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Full text of "Concord, the city beautiful; its attractions and advantages"



"The City Beautiful" 



CONCORD 

THE CAPITAL OF 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 




City Hall 



THE IDEAL HOME CITY OF 

NEW ENGLAND 

ITS ATTRACTIONS AND ADVANTAGES 

Issued by the Concord Commercial Club 
Concord. N. H.. 1909 






ii 

v 'I' 'I' 



INSURE "WITH 

THE 

CAPITAL PIKE INSURANCE 

COMPANY 

CASH ASSETS, - $900,000.00 



HOME OFFICE 

AcQuiLLA Building 

Cor. Main and Pleasant Streets 

CONCORD, N. H. 



OFFICERS 



LYMAN .TACKMAN, Pres., CHARLES L. .TACKMAN. Vice-Pres. 

RUFUS N. ELWELL, Secretary. 

JOSIAH E FERNALD, Treas., FRED W. CHENKY, Asst. Sec. 



CONCORD 

THE CITY BEAUTIFUL 

ITS ATTRACTIONS AND 
ADVANTAGES 



ISSUED BY THE 

Concord Commercial Club 

" CONCORD, N. H.. 1909 



^^^ 



^ ^ 






PRINTED BY 

RuMFORD Press 

CONCORD, N. H. 



0. OF 0. 



While there is no city in the state more favorably located 
than Concord, N. H., as a seat of industrial activity, if there 
is one thing above all others upon which its people may justly 
pride themselves it is not simply the political prominence of 




The Old State House 



their city, as the capital of the state, but the advantages 
which it offers as a place of residence for the intelligent and 
aspiring home-seeker. Portsmouth may surpass it in historic 
associations, Manchester in the magnitude and Nashua in 
the variety of its industries; but when it comes to the com- 
bination of facts and cii'cumstances rendering a city attractive 



Concord, tiik City Beautiful. 




N. H. StJkte Library 

as an abiding place for the man and woman who have a 
family of children to rear and educate amid the best asso- 
ciations and under the most favoraable conditions, or who 
seek the most desirable location in which to enjoy the well- 
earned leisure following years of fruitful activity. Concord 




Merrimack County Court House 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



5: 



may properly be ranked in advance of all other New Hamp- 
shire cities, comparing favorably, on the whole, with Hart- 
ford, Conn., Springfield, Mass., or Burlington, Vt. 

LOCATION. 

In the first place it may be said that the city is peculiarly 
fortunate in the matter of its location, from a physical or 
geographical point of view. Situated in the beautiful valley 
of the Merrimack, whose waters separate its more than sixty 
square miles of territory into two nearly equal sections, it 
embraces within its limits a wide variety of soil and surface 
— broad and rich intervales, wide-stretching plains, rolling 
uplands and rugged hillsides, with the accessories of lake 




U. S. Government Building' 



and forest to complete the picture; while the fine variety of 
scenery within the city limits is supplemented by much that 
is attractive, within ready access in the surrounding towns. 
But two hours' ride by rail from Boston, the great New Eng- 
land metropolis; five hours to the heart of the White Moun- 
tains, and three or four to any given point on the Atlantic 
beach from Salisbury to Old Orchard; while a single hour 
carries one to Winnepesaukee — "The Smile of the Great 
Spirit" — at the north, or to beautiful Lake Sunapee at the 
west, the advantages of the location are readily discerned. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 




Looking' Down Main Street from Opera House 

whether from a business or health and pleasure-seeking point 
of view. 

The compact portion of the city is mainly located upon the 
plain and adjacent hillside, in the central southern section, 
overlooking the river, extending some two miles from north 
to south and of varying width. Main Street, for half a mile 
on either side of its central section, is lined with substantial 
brick blocks, in which the bulk of the city's business is 
transacted, and compares favorably in appearance with any 
business street in any city of similar size in the country. A 
notable group of public buildings, to the west of Main Street, 




Looking' Up Main Street from Pleasant 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 7 

in the central section, so placed' as to be visible from a 
single point, includes the state house, state library, United 
States government building and the city hall; while an ele- 
gant new granite, brick and marble building, to be occupied 
by the New Hampshire Historical Society, now in process of 
construction, which is expected to cost about $200,000, oc- 
cupies a commanding position in the group, which also in- 
cludes the Unitarian Church, Central Grammar School and 
the large and imposing Christian Science Church, the costli- 
est in the state. In no other city of its size in the Union can 




Central Grammar (Parker) School 

SO imposing a display of public buildings be found. Indeed, 
within a thirty-rod radius of the postoffice are found buildings, 
which, when all are complete, will have cost not less than two 
millions of dollars. 



STATE HOUSE. 

The state house, which was built in the early part of the 
century and remodeled at the expense of the people of Con- 
cord about fifty years later, when a strong attempt to remove 
the capital to Manchester was defeated, although by no 
means as large or expensive as many state capitols, has al- 
ways been regarded as a handsome building, its stately pil- 
lared front portico giving it a fine architectural appearance. 
But it has been practically outgi'own by the state, and, at the 
last session of the legislature, when another attempt was 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 




Concord High School 



made to remove the seat of government to Manchester, an 
appropriation of $400,000 was made to remodel the interior of 
the building and erect a large addition in the rear for offices 
and committee rooms, work upon which is in progress and 
will be completed before the close of 1910. The state house 
occupies an entire square on the west side of Main Street, 
fronting the Eagle Hotel, the ample surrounding grounds, 
adorned by statues of Stark, Webster and Hale, forming a 
delightful park, which is appreciated alike by visitor and 
resident. 




Railway Passenger Station 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 

STATE LIBRARY. 

The state library building, which also contains the Supreme 
Court chamber and accessory rooms, as well as quarters for 
the state board of agriculture and the superintendent of pub- 
lic instruction, located at the northeast corner of Park and 
State streets, on a fine lot provided by the city, was erected 
some eighteen years ago at an expense of about $350,000, 
Concord and Conway granite being used in combination in its 
construction. Massiveness and strength are the leading ideas 
conveyed in its architectural appearance, and it makes a safe 




Looking' Up Pleasant Street 

repository for the 110,000 bound volumes and vast accumula- 
tion of pamphlets and papers stored within its walls. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT BUILDING. 

The United States government building, which occupies a 
full square directly west of the state house, between State 
and Green streets, also donated by the city, is of graceful de- 
sign, constructed entirely of selected Concord granite, and 
completed about twenty-five years ago, at a total cost of 
nearly a quarter of a million dollars. There are, of course, 
many much larger federal buildings scattered through the 
country, but men who have traveled extensively and observed 



10 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



carefully declare this to be one of the handsomest buildings 
owned by the government. In addition to the postoffice it 
contains quarters for the United States Pension Agency for 
the district of New Hampshire and Vermont, also for the 
United States District and Circuit courts, which hold sev- 
eral terms per annum in the city. 




Christian Science Church 
South Cong'reg'ational Church 



Curtis Memorial F. B. Church 
First Methodist Church 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



11 



CITY HALL, 

The new city hall building, completed eight years ago, at 
an expense, for land and construction, of about $150,000, is 
located just across Green Street, to the west of the govern- 
ment building. It consists, practically, of two buildings in 
connection, that in front being utilized for office purposes and 
the meetings of the city government, the aldermanic and 
council chambers being separated by a steel curtain, which 
can be raised, throwing the two rooms into one whenever the 
two bodies meet in joint convention. The office rooms are 
spacious, finely furnished and conveniently arranged. All the 
city officials, except those connected with the municipal 




Baker Memori&l M. E. Church 



North Cong'reg'&tional Church 



court, are here accommodated. The latter have their quarters 
in the police station building, erected some twenty years 
ago, on Warren Street, at an expense of $20,000 or more. 
In connection with, and in the rear of the office building, is 
what is known as the "auditorium," designed for the accom- 
modation of public gatherings, with seats for about twelve 
hundred people and so arranged as to be highly eligible for 
theatrical purposes. Indeed, it is at present leased to a 
theatrical manager for such purpose, with the reservation to 
the city of its use for lecture courses and other public pur- 
poses. 



12 



Concord, the City Beautifui* 
COURT HOUSE. 



At the time when the erection of the new city hall was de- 
termined upon the city's interest in the building on North 
Main Street, about a quarter of a mile above the state house, 
generally known as the "court house," and owned jointly by 
the city and the county of Merrimack, was disposed of to the 
latter, and during the year 1906 the building was thoroughly 
reconstructed, everything being torn down but the walls, and 
rebuilt in the most substantial and convenient manner, fur- 
nishing ample and pleasant quarters for the Superior and 




St. Paul's Episcop&l Church 



Pleasant St. Baptist Church 



Probate courts and the various county offices. The expense 
of reconstruction, including furnishing, has been about $45,000, 
and it is safe to say that it is the finest, handsomest, most 
convenient and most substantial county court house to be 
found in the state — both a credit to the county and an orna- 
ment to the city, which, by the way, constitutes about one 
half of the county, as regards both wealth and population. 



SCHOOLS. 

The schools of Concord have long been noted for their ex- 
cellence, the grade of teachers, the quality of work done, and 



CONCOED, THE CiTY BEAUTIFUL. 



13 



the compensation given, being far superior to that in most 
cities of its rank throughout New England, and its equipment 
of school buildings is also unsurpassed. 

Several spacious and substantial modern buildings for gram- 
mar and lower grades have been erected within a compar- 
atively recent period, while after the destruction by fire of the 
former high school building some twenty years ago, an ele- 
gant new structure was erected on its site at a cost of nearly 
$100,000, which is by far the handsomest school building in 
the state, but which, unfortunately, or fortunately, as may 




Unit&rian Church 



ultimately prove to be the case, was practically outgrown in 
the first half dozen years, through the unexpectedly rapid 
increase in high school attendance, so that it was greatly 
overcrowded for several years, until at the annual school 
meeting in March, 1904, of Union District, which embraces 
the compact portion of the city and the villages of East and 
West Concord, it was voted to erect a new high school build- 
ing, and a committee was appointed to carry out such purpose, 
the sum of $90,000 being appropriated for the work. At the 
same time $30,000 was voted for the erection of a new eight- 
room building at West Concord, the amount to be raised by 
the issue and sale of long-time bonds of the district. 

It was determined by the committee that a building should 
be constructed which, while thoroughly modern and first class 



14 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



in its arrangement and appointments, should be of sufficient 
capacity to meet the wants of the district, and such outside 
pupils as may be attracted, for many years to come. To this 
end it was decided to avoid unnecessary expenditure for a 
site, and to indulge in no expense for mere ornamentation. 
A site on North Spring Street, near Pleasant, and thus in 
ready access by the electric car line, which included the old 
manual training school lot, was secured, and a plain, but 




St. John's Catholic Church 



substantial and commodious granite-trimmed brick building, 
of three stories and basement, erected thereon and the same 
completely equipped in every department, including a large 
room for the commercial course, which is now a prominent 
feature in the high school work. The building is designed to 
accommodate from 500 to 600 pupils, and has a fine assembly 
hall in which they can be gathered. 

Upon the occupancy of the new building by the high school 
the former high school building was taken for a central 
grammar school, all the grammar or ninth grade pupils in 
the compact portion of the city here attending. This is now 
the largest grammar school in the state, and is regarded by 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



15 




Universalist Church 



First Baptist Church 



competent educators as unsurpassed in New England for the 
thoroughness of its instruction. 

With the construction of the two buildings just referred 
to, and a new manual training school provided for in 1906, 
at an expense of $30,000, the same being located near the high 
school building so that it is heated by the same plant, there 
has been expended within about twenty years an amount not 
much less than $400,000 in the construction and equipment of 
new schoolhouses, putting the city far in advance of most 
places of its size in the matter of school accommodations. At 
the same time the quality of the instruction furnished, m all 
departments and grades, as well as of the supervision, is fully 
commensurate with the material equipment, so that no bet- 
ter place for the public education of the young can be found 
in the entire country, except it be some town where a state 
university supplements the ordinary public school system. 

Aside from the public schools of the city, it should be 
stated, there are the parochial schools, connected with both 
the St John's, or Irish-American, and the French Catholic 
churches of the city, the accommodations of the former hav- 
ing been largely increased during recent years, and the at- 
tendance upon all reaching some six or seven hundi-ed. A 
fine boarding school for girls (St. Mary's), under Episco- 
palian auspices, has been in successful operation m the city 
for several years; while St. Paul's, the most noted private 
fitting school for boys in the country, established halt a 
century ago at MillviUe, two miles to the west of the cit> 
proper; but within the corporate limits, is attended regularly 
by hundreds of young men from all parts of the country. 



CONCOKI). THE ("ITY BEAVTIFI'I. 




IVIar£'aret Pillsbury General Hospital 

Here there has been expended more than a million dollars 
in buildings and equipment, and the architectural display 
alone which the buildings present is sufficient to attract hun- 
dreds of visitors yearly. To the high character of the in- 
struction given, the wide fame and wonderful success of the 
school furnish ample testimony. 

CHURCHES. 

The excellence of the Concord schools is fully paralleled by 
the superior character of its church privileges. The pioneers 



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uiUUQ^mjL 


t^^^^~' .aUlllfc-W«^ 




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Odd Fellows Home 



CONCOKD, THE CiTY BEAUTIFUL. 



17 



in the settlement of the place established Sunday worship 
upon their coming, and the same has been continued from 
that time to the present. All the leading denominations of 
Protestant Christianity, as well as the Roman Catholics, are 





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^ _ _ J"*?**^^^^^ 


..3m 


■■HL 


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State Hospital Building's 



well represented, convened in spacious and well-built houses 
of worship and ministered to by some of the ablest clergymen 
of their respective denominations. There are in the central 
portion of the city one Advent, two Baptist, two Catholic (one 
French), two Congregational, three Episcopalian, two Free 
Baptist, two Methodist, one Swedish Lutheran, one Unitarian 



18 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



and one Universalist church. Most of the edifices are finely- 
located and of attractive architectural appearance. Several 
have fine vestries or chapels in connection, while St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church has a substantial, commodious and finely- 
equipped parish or guild house adjacent. The Christian Sci- 
entists have here the handsomest and most expensive church 
edifice in the state, located at the corner of School and State 
streets, in close proximity to the principal public buildings, 
erected five years ago at a cost of about $200,000, mainly the 
gift of Mary Baker G. Eddy, whom they revere as the dis- 
coverer and founder of their faith, and whose home was at 




Concord Y. M. C. A. Building 



"Pleasant View," near St. Paul's School, for many years pre- 
vious to 1907. 

There are Congregational churches, also, at East and West 
Concord and Penacook, also Baptist, Catholic and Methodist, 
and an Episcopalian mission at the latter place, and a similar 
mission at East Concord. Supplementing the work of the 
Protestant evangelical denominations, so called, there is a 
large and prosperous branch of the Young Men's Christian 
Association in the city, which recently erected, at a cost 
of some $35,000, a handsome and commodious building, which 
is finely equipped and occupied for its purposes. Another 
branch of the Y. M. C. A. organized in connection with the 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



19 



railway service has also erected a fine brick building for its 
uses, in the vicinity of the railroad station. 

HOSPITALS. 

A spacious, substantial, well-arranged and well-furnished 
general hospital, located at the south end of the city, erected 




N. H. Saving's Bank Building' 



a few years since through the liberality of the late Hon. 
George A. Pillsbury of Minneapolis, of the great flour manu- 
facturing firm of that city, formerly a prominent resident and 



20 



Concord, the Citv Beautiful. 



mayor of Concord, and named the Margaret Pillsbury Hos- 
pital in honor of the donors' wife, with the best physicians 
and surgeons of the city included in its operating staff and 
board of management, is an institution in which citizens gen- 
erally take due pride, and which materially enhances the 
eligibility of the city from a residential point of view. The 




First National Bank Building' 



New Hampshire Memorial Hospital for Women and Children, 
which was established here some ten years ago by an asso- 
ciation organized largely through the efforts of the late Dr. 
Julia Wallace-Russell, who was the physician in charge up lo 
the time of her death, four years since, is also a most use- 
ful and valuable institution. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



21 



HOME FOR THE AGED. 

The Centennial Home for the Aged, more generally known 
as the "Old Ladies' Home," from the fact that, up to the pres- 
ent time, most of the inmates have been women, occupies 




Centennial Home for the Aged 

now a large and imposing brick structure, of fine archi- 
tectural anpearance, on Pleasant Street, the building having 
been materially enlarged— its capacity practically doubled— 




Penacook Liwke— City's Water Supply 



22 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



within the last few years. It is controlled by an association, 
organized in 1876 through the efforts of various philanthrop- 
ically-disposed citizens of the state, among whom Mrs. Ar- 
menia S. White of this city has been prominent from the 




National State Capital and Lo&n Ct Trust Saving's Banks 



start. It has furnished a comfortable home for many worthy 
and some comparatively needy elderly people, upon the pay- 
ment of a small sum each, by themselves or their friends, 
and is regarded throughout the state as an institution worthy 
to be remembered by men and women of means seeking 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



23 



proper objects upon which to bestow their benefactions. It 
has a very handsome fund already, whose income contributes 
materially to its support; but which, of course, may be in- 




Mechauicks* National and Merrimack County Savings B«vnk 

creased to advantage. Another worthy institution here lo- 
cated is the New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, located 
upon the fine grounds just outside the compact portion of the 



24 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



bity to the west, which belonged to the late ex-President 
Franklin Pierce, and upon which he once planned the erec- 
tion of a fine residence. 

STATE PRISON AND STATE HOSPITAL. 

The location within the city limits of the New Hampshire 
State Prison and the New Hampshire Hospital for the In- 
sane, while adding nothing to the attractions of the city as 
a place of residence, detracts nothing therefrom, while meas- 
urably increasing its importance from the public point of 
view. The former, located midway between the city proper 





^^H|^K|HE^»yt jkmmMmjM 




_: -m 



Entr&nce to Rollins P&rk 



and West Concord, is a model institution of its kind; while 
the latter, whose extensive grounds, embracing nearly one 
hundred acres, border the compact portion of the city on the 
southwest, is one of the largest, best equipped and best man- 
aged hospitals for the insane in the country. Many fine build- 
ings have been added from time to time to the original plant, 
as the requirements of the institution demanded; and the re- 
cently established policy of the state involving the care of 
all the dependent insane at this point has necessitated very 
large additional accommodations, several hundred thousand 
dollars having been expended in the last five years in this 
direction. 

The asylum grounds, being open to the public under proper 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



25 




Entrance to White P&rk 

restrictions, practically constitute a splendid park, and their 
well-kept appearance adds largely to the attractiveness of 
that section of the city. 

PARKS. 

The city has two large improved parks adjacent to the com- 
pact section, both possessed of fine natural attractions, one 
at the south, known as Rollins Park, and one in the northwest 
section, known as White Park, the land for the former having 




Concord Electric Co.'s Power Station, Sewall's Falls 



26 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



been given by the late Hon. E. H. Rollins, and that for the 
latter by the late Nathaniel White, two public-spirited cit- 
izens whose names will be held in perpetual remembrance. 
The former was a natural pine grove, with a splendid growth 
of that beautiful timber, and is largely preserved in its nat- 
ural state, the ground adjacent to the highway only having 
been transformed into a handsome lawn, adorned with plants 
and shrubbery, rendering it particularly attractive in the sum- 
mer season. The center of the grove is cleared of all under- 
growth and is extensively utilized by picnic parties and as a 
general summer afternoon resort for children and others in 
that section of the city. A speaking stand has been pro- 




Wonolancet Club 



vided, and, during Sunday afternoons in midsummer religious 
services have been holden here under the auspices of the 
Concord Young Men's Christian Association. White Park, 
which is larger than Rollins, including some twenty-five or 
thirty acres, is of uneven surface and was largely covered 
with hard wood growth, some of which has been removed and 
the ground tastefully laid out and improved, while an original 
bog has been transformed into a beautiful artificial lake. 
The larger portion, however, still remains wooded, and this, 
like Rollins Park, is a very pleasant and much frequented 
resort during the summer season. Being larger, and pre- 
senting more varied scenic attractions, it is even more ex- 
tensively visited. 

With these two fine parks, which are being still further im- 
proved and beautified from year to year, several smaller ones 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 27 

in different locations, and another large one, known as Pena- 
cooK Park, on the shore of Penacook Lake, near West Con- 
cord, which is capable of being made, and in the course of 
time doubtless will be, one of the finest in New England, the 
city is certainly well provided with summer "breathing 
places" for its population. Aside from these, however, the 
Concord Street Railway, which is now operated by the Bos- 
ton & Maine, has a splendid resort on the Contoocook River, 
about one mile west of Penacook, and seven miles from the 
center of the city proper, which has been fitted up with a 




The Country Club 

dancing pavilion, summer theater, band stand, restaurants, 
seats, swings, and everything requisite to make a resort of 
this kind attractive. Steamers and smaller boats also ply 
on the river, and during ten or twelve weeks of midsummer, 
generally known as the vacation period, the park is thronged 
by people nearly every day, including numerous picnic and 
excursion parties from points outside the city. The fact that 
the street railway's car lines runs directly into the park ren- 
ders it particularly accessible and attractive. It should be 
mentioned, also, that the electrics likewise run alongside both 
White and Rollins parks. 



28 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



STREETS. 

The entire highway system of Concord, coursing through 
its sixty square miles of territory, embraces about 180 miles 




Phenix Hall Block 

of street and roadway, nearly half of which is included in the 
compact portion of the city. These streets are mostly well 
graded, many miles macadamized, and those in quite a section 
near the center concreted. Good concrete sidewalks are also 
provided through the main portion of the city, and nearly 
all the streets are beautifully lined with maple, elm and other 
shade trees; so that the city is specially noted for its at- 
tractiveness in this regard. The Merrimack River "boule- 
vard," or state highway, being one of the three highways 
from Massachusetts line to the mountain region, provided for 
in the $1,000,000 appropriation by the legislature of 1909, 
passes through Concord. 



WATER SUPPLY. 

The city's water supply is unsurpassed, both as to quality 
and abundance. Its source is Penacook Lake, a beautiful 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



29 



body of the purest water, whose outlet is near West Concord. 
It is fed by an abundance of cold springs, and has never yet 
failed to meet all requirements, even in seasons of the great- 
est drought. The lake lies at a good elevation above Main 
Street; but in order to insure a perfect delivery in the higher 
points, a high-pressure service has been introduced to sup- 
plement the main delivery, a reservoir of 2,000,000 gallons' ca- 
pacity having been established upon an elevation 180 feet 
above the Main Street level. Through this service alone 600,- 
000 gallons per day are delivered. The city owns and con- 
trols its water works, the management thereof being in the 
hands of a special commission. 

LIGHTING. 

The street lighting is mainly by electricity, though gas is 
used to some extent. The electric lighting is furnished by the 






P( r^. f^ 



n a 



«-*B»— 1« 



I 1 I i 




Eagle Hotel 



Concord Electric Company, which has one of the finest plants 
in New England, established at Sewall's Falls, some three 
miles up the Merrimack, where a large amount of money 
has been expended. This company, in addition to public and 
private lighting, is prepared to furnish power for manufactur- 
ing and mechanical purposes to an unlimited extent, mak- 
ing this an admirable location for all lines of light manu- 
^3,ct,iiriii£ 

The long-established Concord Gas Light Company, whose 
business is now conducted by the Concord Light and Power 
Company, maintains a fine lighting and heating service, thor- 



30 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



oiighly covering the city, with a constantly increasing pat- 
ronage. Between the two services there is no occasion for 
any man to "dwell in darkness" in the Capital City. 

RAILROADS. 

The railway facilities enjoyed by the city are equal to the 
best. The entire system of railroad lines centering here, 
including the old Concord, Northern, Boston, Concord & Mon- 
treal, Concord & Claremont and Peterborough & Hillsborough, 
has been for the last twenty years operated by the Boston 
& Maine, the service given being eminently satisfactory, and 
improved from year to year as conditions permit. With over 




Kam 







White's Opera House 

a dozen passenger trains each way between the city and Bos- 
ton, half a dozen to the north over the old Boston, Concord & 
Montreal; five each way over the Northern, or present Con- 
cord Division, three each way over the Claremont and two 
over the Peterborough branch, at all seasons, and an in- 
creased service during the period of summer travel, no rea- 
sonable person can complain of lack of facility for reaching 
the outside world at any time, so far as the matter of rail- 
way transportation is concerned. The equipment and operat- 
ing force is also excellent, as a rule; and the man who com- 
plains of any branch of the passenger service may safely be 
set down as a chronic fault-finder. The freight service, al- 
though perhaps not perfect as yet, has been wonderfully im- 
proved; the yards and side-trackage increased many fold, and 
the facilities for delivery and transfer greatly increased. 



CJONCOED, THE CiTY BEAUTIFUL. 



31 




32 



CoNcoui), THE City Beautiful. 



The passenger station at this point is one of the largest and 
finest in New England outside of Boston. It was erected by 
the old Concord Railroad Company before its property became 
a part of the Boston & Maine system, at a time when the cor- 
poration had a large surplus which would have reverted to 
the state had it not been expended in improvements. On ac- 
count of this condition Concord was favored by the erection 
of this splendid station, in which all the people take much 
pride, and which will be adequate to all the wants of the 




The Rumford Press Building' 



public and of the operating corporation, in this line, for some 
generations to come. 

It should be noted in this connection that the Concord & 
Portsmouth Railroad Company, subsidiary to the Concord & 
Montreal, has just voted to relay the rails between Suncook 
and Candia, taken up some forty years ago, which, when 
effected, will reduce the distance between Concord and the 
scalmarrt about a dozen miles and shorten the running time 
for passenger trains not less than half an hour, while the 
coal freighting business will be immensely advantaged. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



3;j 




34 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



STREET RAILWAY. 

As has been heretofore noted, the street railway of the city 
is also operated by the Boston & Maine, having passed into 
its hands three or four years since. This service has also 
been much improved, and the system, which includes lines 
running from lower South Main Street, below the Margaret 
Pillsbury Hospital, to Penacook and Contoocook River Park, 
down South Street and Broadway, to Rollins Park, a loop 
line through the western section, known as the "West End," 




Huntwood Terrace, Home of Woodbury C Hunt Co. 



and a branch to the Concord fair grounds, in all over a dozen 
miles of railway, is equipped with fine new cars, and a fifteen- 
minute service is furnished. Work has already been com- 
menced on another loop extension, covering the northwestern 
part of the city, which will soon be pushed to completion 
and which will bring the service within reach of every section 
of the city, except East Concord, which remains to be pro- 
vided for. 

An electric line, constructed and operated by the Boston & 
Maine, also furnishes an hourly service, each way, between 
the city and Manchester from early morning till late even- 
ing, and half hourly in the summer season, when the line is 
largely patronized on account of the fine view of the beauti- 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 35 

ful Merrimack Valley which is afforded along the route, and 
the otherwise charming scenery that is commanded. With 
the completion of the line from Goffs Falls to Hudson, recently 
effected, there is now continuous electric service between 
Concord and Boston — a situation that is appreciated by many 
people of leisure during the warm season, at least. To leave 
one's door in the city and go to Boston, or to any point along 
the line of North Atlantic beaches from that city to Portland, 
as can now be done by the Concord resident, is certainly 
something worth while for one who seeks a breath of fresh 
air in the sweltering summer time. 

INDUSTRIES. 

Since the railroad interests here were consolidated under 
the Boston & Maine management extensive new repair and 




John Swenson's Grzinite Works 

construction shops have been established at this point and 
the work done vastly increased, so that this has come to be 
by far the most important industry in the city, giving em- 
ployment to more than 600 men upon the average, and the 
total monthly wages paid to all the railway employees resi- 
dent in Concord amounts to over $75,000. 

Among the many substantial industries of the city the Wil- 
liam B. Durgin silverware manufactory takes high rank. It 
is a long-established concern, of world-wide reputation for 
the excellence of its product — solid silverware of the highest 
grade — and is quartered in an extensive, substantial and 
thoroughly equipped plant, recently constructed. About 200 
high grade workmen are employed. 



3(5 



CoxroKi), TiiK City Bkai tifll. 



The Page Belting Company is another industrial concern 
of international note, whose production is used the world 
over. It is also finely housed and equipped, and gives employ- 
ment to some 250 hands. The James R. Hill Co., who manu- 
facture the celebrated Concord harness, has been taken over 
by this concern. 

The Abbot-Downing Company, whose famous "Concord 
wagons" were used all over the country three quarters of a 
century ago, is still in business at the old stand, employing 
from 150 to 175 men in various lines of carriage production. 

The only piano manufactory in the state, that of the Pres- 
cott Piano Company, is here located, and is sending out pianos 
that compare favorably with the best standard instruments 
in quality of tone and construction. 

Another important industrial enterprise is the Rumford 




New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Central Station 



Press, the most complete, extensive and fully equipped print- 
ing establishment in New England, outside of Boston, which 
is engaged in printing books, magazines and periodicals of 
all kinds, law work, and commercial printing of every de- 
scription. It has a fine half-tone engraving plant and ex- 
tensive bindery in connection, and is able to produce the 
finest illustrated volume complete without sending out any 
part of the work. 

Quite an important industry that has been developed within 
the last few years, and attained such proportions that it has. 
erected a substantial three-story brick block on South Main 
Street for its own use, is that of the Woodbury E. Hunt Com- 
pany, fine art' publishers, who produce pictures, art calen- 



COXCORD, THE CiTY BEAUTIFUL. 



37 



dars, text cards, mottoes, valentines, Easter cards, etc., em- 
ploying fifty to sixty young women in their work. 

A distinctive Concord industry, and one in which more 
men are engaged by far than any other in the city, except 
the railroad shops, is the granite business, for which Con- 
cord has been noted throughout the country for years. Inex- 
haustible amounts of the finest granite in the country are 
stored in "Rattlesnake Hill," some two or three miles out 
from the city proper, near the line of the Concord & Clare- 
mont Railroad, and from these quarries have been cut the 
stone for some of the finest buildings in the country, includ- 
ing the Congressional Library at Washington. The leading 
firms engaged in the business are the New England Granite 




Hathaway Club House 

Company and John Swenson. The former is now cutting 
the stone for the New Hampshire Historical Society's new 
building, while the latter is getting out that for the state 
house extension. Mr. Swenson has erected a complete new 
modern plant within the last few years, equipped with the 
most improved appliances for the work, and has a constantly 
growing business. 



MERCANTILE AFFAIRS. 

The mercantile life of the city covers, fully, all retail lines, 
and quite an extensive wholesale business is conducted by 
several firms in flour, grain, feed groceries, iron, lime, 
cement, hardware, etc. Many of the retail stores on Main 
Street are model establishments, and two, at least, of the 



38 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



dry goods stores are equal to any to be found in New Eng- 
land north of Boston. It is said, to the special credit of Con- 
cord merchants, as a rule, that they carry a better class of 
goods than are usually found in cities of corresponding size. 

BANKS. 

The banking establishments here found rank with the best 
in the state or in New England, and naturally do an extensive 
business. The three national banks have an aggregate cap- 
ital stock of $500,000; had, at the time of the last published 
statement, aggregate surplus and undivided profits amount- 
ing to $601,026.52; and deposits aggregating $2,841,921.24. 
The four savings banks here located have deposits, alto- 
gether, exceeding $16,000,000. 



- 








mKK/FT^ 


m 


m ^ 


iA Jm 


^^^^^^^^^^^^Er 




k-_^.- 




^■-^•ii'i^ 


%^,m:. _ 


1 ^'_^^^ 


' -'MB' 


u- ■ 


...J^^ 







Residence of Ex-Gov. Frank W. Rollins 



TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE. 

The city's telegraph and telephone service is complete and 
efficient, both the Western Union and Postal Telegraph com- 
panies having stations here, while Concord is an important 
point in the New England Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany's system. The Concord exchange is quartered in a sub- 
stantial new brick building, erected by the company about 
five years ago, at the Corner of School and Green streets. 
Ihere are about 2,000 local subscribers, and about 2,500 in 
the entire Concord district, which includes also Pittsfield, 
Chichester and Northwood Center. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



39 



HOTELS. 

No city in the state has a better hotel, or one furnishing 
a more satisfactory service, than the Eagle Hotel in Concord, 
with which the Phenix was united as an annex some years 
since, malting it also the most capacious of all the year-round 
hotels in the state, so far as accommodations are concerned. 
There are, also, several smaller hotels in the city. 




Residence of Dr. George M. Kimball 

In professional as well as business life. Concord ranks at 
the very front. Not only are her church pastorates ably filled, 
but her lawyers include many of the brightest and most suc- 
cessful in the state, while the medical profession is repre- 
sented here by a large body of faithful and intelligent prac- 
titioners, some of whom have wide reputation for skill in 
different lines of practice. 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Two long-established daily and weekly newspapers— the 
Monitor and Independent Statesman, representing the Repub- 
lican party, and the daily and weekly Patriot, the Democratic, 
are here published, as is also the Granite Monthly, the state 
historical magazine. The National Grange Official Bulletin 
the national official organ of the Patrons of Husbandry with 
a weekly circulation of 25,000 copies, is now also published m 
Concord. 



40 CoxcoRn, THE City Beaxtiful. 

I 

LIBRARIES. 

The city lias a well arranged public library, containing 
about 30,000 volumes, which is open day and evening for the 
use of the public; which, along with the 110,000 volumes of 
the state library, also open for the use of residents, and the 
extensive and valuable collection of the New Hampshire His- 
torical Society, soon to be housed in its elegant new quarters, 
in close proximity to the other libraries, present advantages 
seldom equaled for those who seek instruction from the re- 
corded thoughts of the master minds of all ages. 

LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS. 

Another prime factor in the educational field is a per- 
manent free lecture course, made available a few years since 
through an accumulated fund, the basis of wliich was be- 
queathed for the purpose by the late Timothy and Abigail 
Walker. Other courses of lectures are also provided during 
the season, under the auspices of different organizations, en- 
gaging some of the best talent in the entire lecture field. 

First-class theatrical entertainment is furnished two or 
three evenings per week, or oftener, during the season, at 
the Auditorium Theater, while at White's Opera House, 
formerly occupied for such entertainment, high-class moving 
pictures have been constantly presented, afternoon and even- 
ing, for the last two years. Concerts, lectures and local en- 
tertainments of various kinds are of frequent occurrence, 
for which various halls are occupied, the largest and most at- 
tractive being Phenix Hall on Main Street, where are held, 
also, the state conventions of the two great political parties, 
and the musical festivals of the Concord Oratorio Society. It 
may be added that the city is generally regarded as the mus- 
ical center of the state, a large number of talented musicians 
residing here, including many teachers, both vocal and in- 
strumental. 

CLUBS. 

The social life of the city is enlivened and improved by 
various clubs and organizations, prominent among which are 
the Wonolancet Club, which has a large membership, mainly 
composed of active business and professional men, and the 
Concord Woman's Club, embracing a large number of the 
representative women of the city. The former, whose ob- 
jects are mainly social, has a fine clubhouse of its own, at 
the corner of North State and Pleasant streets; while the 
Woman's Club, which combines the educational with the so- 
cial feature, holds its weekly meetings, from October to May, 
in the Episcopal Parish House Hall. This club, which was or- 
ganized in 1893, has now 300 members, of whom 250 are ac- 
tive. It stands for civic improvements, philanthropy, better 
education and kindred causes. It has engaged the best tal- 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



41 



ent in the country for its entertainments, some of whicli are 
open to the public. 

Other men's clubs with houses of their own are the Passa- 
conaway and Snowshoe, while out of thirty or more addi- 
tional women's clubs, of which there are ten different Shakes- 
peare clubs, there are three outing clubs, occupying houses 
of their own — the first, organized in 1896, building a house 
three miles out, known as "Camp Wetamoo," understood to 
be the first of the kind in the country. The "Hathaway," 
organized in 1904, which is noted for its hospitality, opened a 




Residence of Gen. Wm. F. Thayer 

cottage on the left bank of the Contoocook in May of that 
year; while the "Country Club," formed in 1897, has a fine 
cottage on the right bank of the same river, the second of 
the kind erected by Concord women. 



ORDERS AND SOCIETIES. 

The various fraternal organizations are well represented, 
and the Masons and Odd Fellows, particularly strong in the 
city, both the latter being housed in spacious and elegant 
quarters. Many grand bodies of different organizations meet 
in the city during the year; and these gatherings, with the 
biennial sessions of the legislature, the numerous terms of 
court, federal, state and county, the annual meetings of the 
New Hampshire Medical Society, all combine to make Con- 
cord the great meeting place of men of thought, character and 



42 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



purpose, fi'om all sections of the state, and at the same time 
enhance its eligibility as a permanent abiding place for 
those who seek the largest measure of advantage for body, 
mind and soul. 

POSTOFFICE BUSINESS. 

The importance of the Capital City in a business point 
of view is illustrated by the magnitude of its postoffice busi- 




The " Coffin Elm "—Residence of M. D. Cummings 



ness, which is in excess of that of any other city in the state, 
this office being a depository for fourth class offices, receiv- 
ing deposits, indeed, from all of the ten counties of the state. 
During the year 1909 the Concord postoffice received from 
sales of stamps $80,040.19; in deposits from other postoffices, 
$60,991.57; United States treasury warrants, $13.5,000. It dis- 
bursed in salaries $257,880.85, and deposited with the United 
States treasury $18,156.22. In its money-order business it 



CONCOED, THE CiTT BEAUTirUL. 48 

issued and paid orders to the amount of $306,076.52, and re- 
ceived in deposits from other offices $474,939.78, making a to- 
tal of $781,016.30, which, with the total receipts and disburse- 
ments from the postal business, makes an aggregate of 
$1,333,090.24 as the total of its financial transactions for the 
year. The people of Concord patronize the postoffice in the 
purchase of stamps to the extent of more than $3.50 per cap- 
ita, on the average. The office has on its pay roll 321 postal 
employees, of w^hich number ninety are connected with the 
local office, and the remainder are rural carriers and postal 
clerks in the state, 

NEW CITY CHARTER. 

At a special election last May the people of Concord, by a 
decided majority, adopted a new charter, which had been 
carefully drawn by a non-partisan commission and endorsed 
by the legislature, with certain amendments. This charter 
provides for a government with a single branch, consisting of 
a mayor and board of fifteen aldermen, of whom six are 
elected at large, and one from each of the nine wards. The 
mayor and aldermen at large constitute a board of public 
works, having supervision of all the executive affairs of the 
city. A permanent board of assessors, consisting of three 
members, is also established. Party nominations are abol- 
ished and no party designations are to appear on the munici- 
pal ballot, the election being also separated from the general 
and state election, occurring in the alternate years. Great 
improvement in the conduct of municipal affairs is antici- 
pated from this change, which is in line with the progressive 
tendency of the times. 

With all its material, educational, social and religious ad- 
vantages. Concord is essentially a city of homes. Among 
these homes are no palatial establishments of multi-million- 
aires, and few haunts of poverty and misery. There are 
some poor people among its inhabitants, and some very 
"well-to-do," as the expression goes, but the majority are 
found in the great middle class of industrious and intelligent 
citizenship. Peace and order prevail in the midst, and the 
fact that it is a "no-license" city makes it even more desir- 
able for those seeking a new place of residence, any and all 
of whom, if law-abiding, order-loving men and women, seek- 
ing the best for themselves, and ready to aid in promoting 
the welfare of others, will ever be heartily welcomed. 



NOTE 

THE FOLLOWING 

PAGES 



Concord, the City Beavtifi'l. 45 



Concord 
Commercial Club 

Organized Sei'tember 18, 1889 



To Promote the Peace, Prosperity and Happi- 
ness of all Our People " 



President : 
DAVID E. MURPHY 

Vice-Presidents : 

GRANVILLE P. CONX JOHN C. TIIORXE 

GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT 

Directors : 

Samuel C. Eistman 

Amos I>lancharcl 

Frank Gressy 

Ilinmau C. Bailey 

Charles T. Page 

William J. Aliern 

Allen Hollis 

Henry E. Cliam1»erlin 

Dr. George Cook 

Secretary, HENRY H. METCALF 
Treasurer, J OSI AH E. FERNALD 



Meetings on the Third Thursday of each month, from 
September to April, inclusive, at 26 Oi.era House Bh^ck. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



Incorporated 1830 






.mm: 



Oi/. 



Deposits - - $9,450,000.00 
Guaranty Fund 500,000.00 



SAMUEL C. EASTMAN, riesident HENRY McFAKLAND, Vice Pres. 

WILLIAM r. FISKE, Treasurer 



JJanking lloonis directly opposite the State House 
CONCORD, N. H. 



Merrimack County Savings Bank 

JOHN KIMBALL, President. LELAND A. SMITH, Yiee-Pres. 

FKANK P. ANDREWS, Treasurer. 



Assets, 12,883,343.9"; 



Interest 4 per cent. 



Deposits, 12,588. ISn. 19 



Trustees : John Kimliall, Leland A. Smith, John C. Pearson. Henry AY. 
Stevens, Frank P. Andrews, Willis D. Thompson, Benjamin W. Couch, 
Joseph S. Matthews, Paul R. Holden, Harry H. Dudley, Wm. S. 
Huntington. 

Nlechaoiclvs National Banl^ 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Capital, ••=!150,000.00 Surplus and Profits, .|8."),000.00 



B. A. KIMB.\LL. President H. H. DUDLEY, Cashier 

HENRY \Y. STEYENS, Yiee-President 

John Kimball, John F. Webster, F. A. Stillinfjjs, James Minot, George M. 

Kimball, Charles 1'. Bancroft, William K. McFarland, Edson J. Hill. 

Transact a general banking business. Accounts solicited. Securities 
and Foreign Exchange bought and sold. Safe dei)osit boxes for rent 

Corner Main and School Streets 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



State Charter National Charter 

, 1853 1865 

The National State Capital Bank 

OF CONCORD, N. H. 



Capital, $200,000 Surplus and Profits, |'340,000 

Transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts Solicited 

J. E. FERNALD, President ISAAC HILL, Cashier 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank 

A Mutiial Savings Bank, Chartered 18T2 

CONCOKD, N. H. 



JOHN M. MITCHELL, President JOSIAH E. FERXALD, Vice-Pres. 

FRED N. LADD, Treasurer 

Assistants : GEORGE R. CONNELL, CHARLES C. JONES 

Trustees: John M. Mitchell, Howard A.Dodge, James C. Norris, Josiah E. 
Fernald, Charles H. Sanders, John F. Webster. Henry C. Brown, Fred 
N. Ladd, Edward N. Pearson, Henry C. Davis, Walter H. Tripp 

Resources - - 13,661,459.24 



The First National Bank of 
Concord, N. H. 

United States Depository 
Capital 1150.000.00 Surplus and Undivided Profits 1369,125.33 

WILLIAM F. THAYER, Pres. CHARLES (i. REMICK, Cashier. 

WILLIAM A. STONE, Jr., Assistant Cashier. 



Union Guaranty Savings Bank 

Office with the First National Bank, Concord, N. H. 



Deposits draw interest at 4 per cent, per annum subject to rules 
and regulations 

Deposits may be made bv mail, in post office orders, bank checks, 
or cash in registered letters, or by express, and bank books will be 
returned by mail to such depositors in registered packages. 

Solon A. Carter, Pres. William F. Thayer, Treas. 



48 


V oxcdiii). TiiK City PiEAiTiFrL. 




G 


AS COOKIN 


G 


A 




A 


S 


Concord 


s 


L 


Light and Power 


. J 


I 


Company 




G 


FOR 


G 


— 


Concord 


H 


T 


Gas Light Company 


T 


I 


90 NORTH MAIN STREET 


I 


N 




N 


G 


AS - EAT V 


G 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 



49 



New Hampshire's Leading 
DRY GOODS 

Department Store 

76-78-80-82 NORTH MAIN STREET 
CONCORD, N. H. 




Glove Department, Corset Department, Ready-to-Wear Sections, Muslin 

Underwear and infants' Department, Enlarged Dress 

Goods and Silk Departments 



Ladies' Reception Parlor and Writing Tables for Ladies 



Largest Stock, Best Goods, Lowest Prices Visitors Heartily Welcomed 

DAVID E. MURPHY 



50 Concord, the City Beautii-il. 
_j 

There's More to this Business 
Than Making Money 

First We feel an interest in our customers beyond the dollars they 

spend — they are friends of ours — friends who make possible this insti- 
tution and who through all the many years since its establishment have 
helped to make it a store of quality. 

Second Our ambition is to build this business — and to build so 

well that your children and ours may point to it as a monument of com- 
mercial integrity. 

Third To boost concord— as a city of homes — as a city of indus- 
trial activity and as a merchandising center. 

We are large distributors of good home furnishings 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co. 

Opp. ST.\TE HOUSE 



MAUKIOE BARNAKD, JOHN W. AVOODWOKTH, CHARLES P. AVOODAVORTH, 
President. Treasurer. Secretaty. 



WOODWORTH & CO. 

Railroad Square, CONCORD, N. H. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 

IN 

Flour, Groceries, Provisions, Fish, Tobacco, Cigars, 
Grass Seeds, Lime and Cement 



Cox CORD. THE CiTY BEAUTIFUL. 51 



HARRY G. EMMONS 

A Store of Quality 

lu all the newness and beauty of the splendid stocks here it 
is well to remember that True Quality is a characteristic that 
people have come to rely on, just as they rely on the soundness 
of the money tliey spend. 

The true economies in buying here come not only because the 
prices are lowest — as they often are — but because the things 
bought may be depended upon for extra service and satisfactori- 
uess; often wearing half as long again becaiise of their good work- 
manship. 

There never was a better time to test these things for your- 
self. And the facts are worth your knowing. 

HARRY a. EMMONS 

The Home of Fine Outerwear 



EDSON C. EASTMAN 

Publisher and Bookseller 

The Old Reliable 

Concord Book: Store 

120 NORTH MAIN STREET 

The Kimball Studio 

Portraits Landscapes Commercial Work 

In all branches unexcelled 17 medals 

Entirely new amateur developing department. Cameras and 
amateur supplies 
AGENT EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Chase Block Telephone 413-11 



52 



CoxcoKU, THE City BeautH'-l'l. 



FOR NEARLY 100 YEARS 



Builders' Hardware, Cutlery, 

Woodenware, 
Aluminum Kitchen Utensils, 

Acovn Stoves and Ranges, Lowe brothers' " Iligli Standard 
Paint," Agricultural Luplements. 



WsiMsff Lo Jeelks <& €< 




at the National School of Business. Every graduate has a posi- 
tion. Catalogue Free. Enter any time. 

E. L. GLIOK, Proprietor, Concord, N. H. 



The Granite Monthly 

The New Hampshire Magazine of Hi.story and Biography 



Henry H. Metcalf, Editor and Manager 
Concord, N. H. 



Terms 



$1.00 Per Annum in Advance 



Co>:coRD, THE City Beautiful. 53 



New England 

Telephone and Telegraph 

Company 



Ceotral Station: 

Corner Green and School 
Streets 



54 CoNccui). Tilt: CiTV I!i:ai tuti.. 

> 

JOHN J. BAHTI.KTT, (iKO. X. WO( IDWAIU), K. G. Die K Kl{ M A X, 

President. Ti emu i er. Sect etai y. 

DiCKERMAN & Co. 

(iNCOlil'OKATED.) 
DEAI.KKS IX 

TEA, COFFEE AND MOLASSES, PROVI- 
SIONS, LIME AND CEMENT 

Specialties— Boss Crackers, Clicquot Club Ginger Ale, 

Concord Gem Tobacco, Worcester Salt, Bartlett 

Cigars and Fancy Cheese 

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSES, BRIDGE STREET 

concord, n. h. 

pianos pianos 
Prkscott Piano Co. 

MAXUFAC'TUKEKS OF 

HIGH GRADE UPRIGHT PIANOS 

In Four Elegant New Styles 




NONE BETTER AT ANY PRICE 

Where not represented by dealer we sell direct 
from the Factory 

Our new catalogue tells the rest Send for one 

PRESCOTT PIANO CO. 

Factory, 181 North Main St. W'arerooms. '12 North .Wain St. 

CONCORD, N. H. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 55 

RuFus H. Baker I. Etgexe Keeler 

Bakkr & Kekler 

All Lines of 

3n5urance 

53 North :\[ain Street - CONCORD, N. H. 

Thompson & Hoague Company 

CONCORD, N. H. 



Agricultural Implements 

SPORTING GOODS 



^^^^''^Agfnts for Adriauce Farm Machinery 

(S. W. BARKER, General Agent) 
Established 1884 

F. E. COLBURN 
Restaurant 

Confectioner, Baker and Caterer 

32 North Main Street - Concord, N. H. 



56 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 




E.©SII 



SHOKS 

The best shoe in the world for 

women. 

All leathers f;3.50 and $4.00 

The W. A. Thompson 
Shoe House 

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



TTHK BKST 

Dtargin's Silver 

at DERBYS 

CONCORD, - - . - NEW HAMPSHIRE 



BROWN & BATCHELDER 

CONCORD'S 
BEST CLOTHING HOUSE 



L. S. BEAN 
Nkedle Crakt Shop 

Souvenirs and Hand Painted Novelties 



<S4 Noinii ■Main St., Coxcokd, N. II. 
Branch Store, York Beach, Me. Open June 20 to September 15 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 57 



H. C. BAILEY 

TeIlT REAL ESTATE 

You can save a dollar by seeing his list before you invest. 



53 North Main Street - - CONCORD, N. H. 

CASCI & ANDREWS 

CONCORD'S 

LEADING MUSIC HOUSE 

5 South Main Street, Concord, N. 11. 



Fine Pianos Victor Talking Machines 



A. B. Batciieldek Establisher 18GG 



BATCHELDER & CO. 



Staple and Fancy Groceries 



14 North Main Street - - - Concord, N. H. 



58 Concord, the City Beautiful. 



CHARLES H. BARRETT 
FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR WEDDINGS, PARTIES AND FUNERALS 

28 Pleasant Street, CONCORD, N. H. 



There is but one progressive daily news- 
paper in Concord, the — 



Concoitr (!!ocniug ittonitor 

— fills the bill, newsy and up-to-date 
Subscribe now 



Raiidlett & Griffin 

ARCHITKCTS 

72 North Main Street, CONCORD, N. H. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 59 



THORNE'S SHOE STORE ESTABLISHED 1835 

John C. Thornk 
RETAILER IN FINE FOOTWEAR 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Exchange Block .. .. 94 North Main Street 
Oldest and Finest Shoe Store in the State. We invite your trade 



LYSTER BROTHERS 



DEALERS IN 



Meats, Provisions and Fresh Fish 

Poultry, Game. Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Canned Goods, 
Salt Fish, Beans, Fancy Pickles in Bulk or Bottles 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES RECEIVED DAILY 

153 and 155 North Main St. 



Cressy & Company 

WHOLESALE DEALEKS IN 

Flotir, Grain and Feed 

state Capital Bank Building, CONCORD, N. H. 

Member New England Grain Dealers' Association and 
Boston Chamber of Commerce 



BROWN & BURPEE 

optometrists and Presc. Opticians 

54 North JMain Street 
Coocorc3, New Hairipshire 

Agents for the EASTMAN KODAK CO. 



60 ("oxcoitD. Tin: City ItKAiTii-i l. 
_» 

Walter S. Dole 

DEALER IN 

FLOOE. FEEP« HAY 

Grain and Poultry Supplies 

Rear New Phenix Block, - Concord, N. H. 
A. PERLEV FITCH 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACIST 

Wholesale and Retail Druggist 

24 North Main Street - Concord, N. H. 

C. H. SWAIN & CO. 

Contractors and Builders 



ANI> DEALF.HS IN 



Lumber, Shingles, Flooring and 
Metal Ceilings 



Sli<)|) ami Yard : 

68 1-2 in Rear of Xortli :Main St., CONCORD, N. II. 

Teleplioue Couiu'ction 



Co^x'OED, THE City Beautiful. 61 



C. H. MARTIN CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1853 



Wholesale and Retail Druggists 

Selliiig Agents for Eureka Headache Powders 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes and Painters' Supplies 

11 North Maix Street - - - Concord, X. H. 



Pure Cream of Tartar 18c. ilb., 33c. lb. Pure Epsom 
Salts 6c. lb., 5 lbs. 25c. Pure Sulphur 6c. lb., 5 lbs. 25c. 
Pure Crystal Saltpeter 15c. lb. Pure Posin 6c. lb., 5 lbs. 
25c. Pure Soda 6c. lb., 5 lbs. 25c. Sunflo\yer Seed 3 lbs. 
25c. Pure Alum 14c. lb. Moth Balls 7c. lb. 



CHARLES C. SCHOOLCRAFT 

Optima Building 



r^etp ^ampsljm Supply Co. 

SIMEON SHARAF 

Three stores iinder one roof. Everything for the whole family 
We solicit your patronage 



13 TO 19 North Maik Street, Concord, N. II 



ESTABLISHED 1872 

N. C. NELSON & CO. 

(O. H. Sinclair) 

JEWELERS 

25 North Maix Street - Concord, N. H. 



62 Concord, the City Beautiful, 




Dexter Optical Parlors 

49 North Maix SritKKT 
CONCORD, N. H. 

Manufacturing, Prescription and Refracting 
Opticians 

Duplicate Lenses grouur] wliileyou wait. Oculists' Prescriptions 
a specialty. No charge for exaniinatiou 

Phone ("onnection 

JOHN SWENSON 

0pp. 370 North State Street 
Concord, N. H. 



(C®ffiic®ffdl ©ffasnat 



FOR ALL PURPOSES 



CEMETKRV IVIEMORIALS 

IN ANY GRANITE 

B. H. OKU (t. H. KOLFE 

Orr & Rolfe 

F'li_^imbers and. Steam Fritters 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION A SPECIALTY FIRST-CLASS 
WORK GUARANTEED PRICES REASONABLE 

Office, Stickney's Block .. .. 150 North Main Street 

CONCORD, N. H. 



Concord, the City Beautiful. 63 



TUb© 



ONE OF 



C©S]ic©ffd'g ©Mei4 UssduH^feie^ 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



EsiSiigegp Stoves s\siid Sissfe 



The Dartmouth line of ranges, acknowledged to be 
the best working range on the market, is a product of 
this foundry ; also the famous Sterling Heater. 



FOR SALE AT THE 
WAREROOMS 

H^S M®ir41h Mmsh Sfee®4 

at Foundry Prices — a saving of from five 
to twenty dollars. 

CALL AMP E^AMSME TMEM 



64 Concord, the City Beautiful. 



W. S. BAKER 

rmm TAihomm 

Phenix Hall Chamheks 
40 XoRTii MAm Street, Concord, N. IT. 

Telephone 566-12 

CUMMINGS BROTHERS 



DEALERS IN 



Monumental Work. Granite and Marble 

Maiu Office and Show Room, 23 So. Main St., Coucord, N. H. 
Kranch Houses, Franklin and I'ittstield, N. H. 

W. C GIBSON 

Books, Stationery and Periodicals 

lOG North Main Street, Eagle Hotel Block 
CONCORD, N. H. 

Patronize our Circulating Library 



** ClhadllbouHffiiii® Btwdm 

High Grade Photographs and Portraits 



98 North Main Street - - Nearly opposite State House 
Telephone Con. CONCORD, N. H. 



The 
Concord Electric Co. 

NOT ONLY 

Supplies Electricity for Light and Power 

BUT CARRIES 

The largest and most attractive line of 
Fixtures and Appliances in New Hamp- 
shire at prices lower than city prices for 
the same class of goods. 

Estimates for Light, Power and Home Wiring 
cheerfully furnished free of charge. 

Electricity is a necessity for those who desire the 
largest measure of comfort obtainable for the home. 

Electricity is clean and sure. 
Electricity is cheap and safe. 
Electricity helps to make life worth living. 



Visit our Display Rooms at 

15 Capitol St., Concord, N. H. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




^^^ 



.c n c ss 

Cof\ 3 



LIBHAHY UH CUNGHbSS 



014 013 577 A