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Full text of "Consolidator"

iElHIffliniDl 




WORLD'S LARGEST AMPHIBIAN, MODEL 28-5A, FLIES "FROM ANYWHERE TO ANYWHERE" 



JANUARY '1940 



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GUN CLUB X's 

By H. M. Prior, Secretary-Treasurer 

1940 looks like a banner year for the 
Conwlidatcd Aircraft Gun Club. The ex- 
ecutive committee has worked out a pro- 
gram which we believe will create a 
keener sense of competition and a more 
fraternal spirit throughout the whole or- 
ganization. 

Starting with the month of February, 
the Club is going to present medals to the 
high scorers of each month for pistol and 
rifle shooters. In order to prevent two or 
three men from winning all of the medals 
each month, we have adopted a plan where- 
by every shooter has an equal chance to 
win a medal. We take the names of all 
shooters who have competed at least three 
nights in one month and divide them in 
three classes according to their aggregate 
score. The high man in each class receives 
a medal. By reclassifying these groups every 
month every man has a chance to win by 
improving his shooting. 

As an added inducement to improve his 
marksmanship, every member who shoots 
a rifle score equal to 8 5''^^ of a possible 
300 points from three positions will win 
a Club Emblem. The same award applies 
to pistol shooters who attain a score of 
9i)'/c on a standard 75 ft. pistol target. 

The Gun Club feels that with these in- 
centives to spur us on we will develop a 
Club that will be second to none in this 
part of the country. So come on all you 
shooters — let's go places in 1940. 



X NEWS 

Bruce Miles and Len Stabenan have just 
been awarded new badges as per rumor. 
It is known that the award was made by 
the Navy for work performed on XPB2Y-1 
over a three-year period. Coming at this 
time it will make a splendid Christmas 
present. 

FINISH NEWS 

By Al Griffith 

I see Mr. Wilson is the honorable painter 
who painted our Xmas tree — good job too! 

Among the number of boys coming 
back to work I see Pete Engbright. How 
are the turkeys, Pete? 

Mr. Lythe is sure getting pleasantly 
plump. What certain sprayer went home 
one nite pretending to be a little tipsy and 
put on the act so well that his wife kicked 
him out? He went and stayed with a 
friend for two days, but was finally ad- 
mitted home. 

From the San Diego "Rotator" we have 

this one: 

Date Expense Report Ami. 

9-1 Advertising for Girl Stenographer S .SO 

9-2 Violets — New Steno .65 

9-S Week's Salary for Stenographer 20.00 

9-9 Roses for Stenographer 3.00 

9-11 Candy for wife .75 

9-13 Lunch with Stenographer 6.25 

9-15 Week's Salary for Stenographer 25.00 

9-17 Picture Show tickets — self and wife. .80 

9-18 Theatre tickets — self and steno 7.50 

9-19 Candy for wife .75 

9-20 LILLIAN'S SALARY 3 5.00 

9-21 Theatre and dinner with LILLIAN- 21.75 

9-22 Fur coat for 'Wife 600.00 

9-23 Advertising for man stenographer — .50 



32nd and University 
30th and El Cajon 



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CONSOLIDfiTOR 



Volume 5 



January, 1940 



Number 1 



Just as -we are going to press w^ith this issue, the local press breaks 
the news that the Navy Department has awarded a new $20,016,699.00 
contract for airplanes to Consolidated. No official details were released 
as to the number or type of aircraft involved. The press' announcement 
placed us "securely in the forefront of American aviation's headliners." 



TURKEY, TRIMMIN'S, AND A 
HAPPY NEW YEAR! 

On Friday, December 22d, each 
and every member of Consolidated, 
irrespective of length of employ- 
ment, received a $5.00 Christmas 
check to cover the purchase of a 
turkey and the trimmings or its 
equivalent. 

"The occasion of the Yuletide 
Season cannot be allowed to pass 
without an expression of apprecia- 
tion for your co-operation thruout 
the year, and to extend to everyone 
a Merry Christmas and a Happy 
New Year," was the message Major 
Fleet extended to all Consolidated 
employees. 



The Consolidafor Editor received a very 
appropriate Christmas and New Years 
card from Carl Liebig, formerly of the 
Machine shop, extending Christmas Greet- 
ings to the "gang" at Consolidated . . . 
Thanks a lot, Carl. 

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON . . . 

We have it on straight authority that 
young Henry Liegel, son of "Hank" Liegel 
of Sheet Metal, is quite the football player. 
Young Hank got a real write-up in the 
local press recently. He's been a star player 
on the Point Loma High School team, and 
this team has held the Metropolitan cham- 
pionship for four years . . . 

Like father, like son, however . . . When 
Dad Liegel met with an accident and in- 
jured his hand recently, young Liegel 
played a little too vigorous a game and 
proceeded to break his arm. On December 
6th the team staged a stag affair for 
fathers and sons at the San Diego Club. 
You can bet "Hank" and young Hank 
were there! 



"Aviation as a Factor in National De- 
fense," was the title of an address delivered 
by Major Fleet before the California State 
Chamber of Commerce Convention Nov- 
ember 30th. The Convention met this 
year in San Francisco. In his address. Major 
Fleet pointed out the usages and importance 
of aircraft in times of national emergency 
and the benefits of the present aviation 
activity to all of California. Major Fleet is 
a director of the California State Chamber 
of Commerce. 

COLOR PHOTO ARTIST 

Russ Kern, it is learned, is quite the 
maestro in the art of color photography. 
Having taken some of his masterpieces in 
British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, 
the San Francisco Fair, in Borego, and 
about San Diego, his group of slides have 
become much in demand for local show- 
ings. Recently he delighted audiences at 
the Helping Hand Home, Rest Haven and 
the Vauclain Home. Russ, it is reported, 
is quite a hand with the lecturing that 
goes along with the showing of the slides. 
He kept one audience an hour past the 
prescribed time, and they were so en- 
tranced it was not until the show was 
over that the extra time was noticed! 



Thru an inadvertent slip in the 
rush of preparing the pages of last 
month's Consolidator for the press, 
credit for the cover photograph was 
omitted from the magazine. By all 
means this should not have been 
omitted, and apology is hereby made 
for this error. 

Full credit for the cover photo 
should go to Consolidator Al Lam- 
bert of the Tool Room who submit- 
ted this excellent piece of work. 



BASKETBALL STANDINGS 

December 14th: 

Engineering 47, Maintenance 22. 

Final Assembly 3 3, Wood Shop 22. 

Production, won by forfeit; Experi- 
mental, forfeited. 

Purchasing 11, Tank 59. 

Sheet Metal, no team; Hull played 
church team. 

Welding 15, Wing 17. 

Total points won: Engineering 81, 
Wing 29, Welding 15, Hull 56, Final 
Assembly 56, Production 21, Purchasing 
19, Maintenance 39, Wood Shop 30, Tank 
59. Experimental forfeited. 

"Consair" Night teams, basketball 
scores. (Dec. 11, 12) : 

Wing 15, Sheet Metal 24 

Machine 3 8, Final Assembly 23. 

Hull 43, Production 25. 

Total points won: Production 74, Hull 
73, Sheet Metal 54, Machine 53, Final 
Assembly 47, Wing 32. 

SUCCESS 

A man is successful when he refuses to 
slander even his enemies; when he does not 
expect to get paid for everything he does; 
when he does not wait until tomorrow to 
do the things he might do today; when 
he is loyal to his employer and to his as- 
sociates; when he intelligently cooperates 
with others and is tolerant in thought and 
deed; when he studies constantly to pre- 
pare himself for a higher position finan- 
cially and in the estimation of his fellows. 
— Junior Citizen. 

RING OUT THE OLD, RING IN THE NEWr 
Good-bye old nineteen thirty-nine . . . 

You weren't as bad as some we've seen. 
You started out a toddling elf, 

And now how old and wise you seem! 

You hit some rough spots on the road 

It wasn't downhill all the way. 
You came so full of joy and hope 

And now you're old — and wise — and gray. 

Too bad you have to go, "Old Friend," 

The trail you blazed, others will follow, 

Perhaps it ever will be so . . . 

The new succeeds the old and mellow. 

We counted every day you gave us. 

Be eager, glad, be gay and sporty. 

The old has gone, the new has come . . . 
Let's give three cheers for 1940! 

— O. T. Berger, No. 974. 



All communications should be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint in whole or in part, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., Son Diego, California. 



Consolidator 




Photographed in the patio on Major General Arnold's "flying visit," left to right: Col. D. N. W. Grant; I. M. Laddon, Vice-Pres. and Chief Engr.; Maj. Gen. 
H. H. Arnold; Major E. R. McReynolds, San Diego Air Corps Representative; C A. Van Dusen, Vice-Pres. and Works Manager; Col. J. H. Burns; Col. F. L. 
Pratt; E. N. Gott, Vice-Pres.; Major R. M. Webster and Capt, E. H. Beebe. 



VISITORS ... 

of late we have been honored with 
quite a number of distinguished guests here 
at the plant: Above is pictured Maj. Gen. 
H. H. Arnold and his group who paid us 
a flying visit. On November 28th members 
of the Senate and House Military Affairs 
Committees also paid us a visit, but cir- 
cumstances did not permit securing their 
picture. Members who paid us the honor 
included: Senator Elmer Thomas of Okla- 
homa, Senator Sherman Minton of In- 
diana, Senator Harry S. Truman of Mis- 
souri, Senator Dennis Chavez of New 
Mexico, Representative John Martin Cos- 
tello of California, Representative Overton 
Brooks of Louisiana, Representative Charles 
Russell Clason of Massachusetts, Repre- 
sentative Paul W. Shafer of Michigan, 
Representative John J. Sparkman of Ala- 
bama, Representative William Devereux 
Byron of Maryland, and Representative 
Thomas Ellsworth Martin of Iowa. 



Home and Lot Bargains 

in 
(riendly 

Bird Rock 

distinctive 

La Jolla Hermosa 

Adequate Scenic Homesites in 
sensiljly restricted districts at 
prices lower per front foot than 
tfiose asl<ed in far less favored 
districts. 40, 60,75 and 80 foot lots 
from $500 to $1000; on paved 
streets, all bonds paid. Others 
as low as $250. For full informa- 
tion, see 

Robert G. Robeson 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

By "Brad" Bradshaw 

HERE it is folks 1940, a brand new 
year but about the same old "stuff" 
to read. We had hoped to get out of the 
fog by now. So we will wish everyone a 
glorious and eventful year. That is one 
advantage of writing a column — you can 
save the cost of cards and postage — sure 
missed the invitations to the doings of 
the Butterfields, Mucks, Browns, Mulroys, 
Benders, Hartmayers, Golems, and others 
over the holidays. — They seem to be get- 
ting wise and "ain't a talkin" to no mag- 
azine reporters. — We are not mad the 
because it was probably pretty bad "re- 
freshments" they served anyway. — With 
the "sourpuss" look on the faces of Paul 
Hock, Roy Coykendall, Lloyd Bender, 
Bob Mussen, and Paul Gaughn, their wives 
must have bought themselves some rather 
expensive gifts FROM "hubby." 

Mr. Claus who has the lowdown on 
the boys and girls around Consolidated 
gave out a few confidential statements 
on his one night out: — Jim Eisman, ac- 
cording to Santa, had a white tree with 
not a speck of "green" in the place. Says 
it is due to some mania brought on by 
handling so many "rush tags." — Ben 
"Kish" Kiegle, high mogul of Pacific Beach 
Chamber of Commerce, wanted some 
"good poison." Said it was to carry out 
his before election promises: — Art 
"Gracie" Stone asked for a pair of sus- 
penders and an invitation to eat "rabbit 
stew" with the Coykendall family: — Jake 
Dietzer sent Santa a set of PBY BM's and 
asked for the raw material to fill require- 
ments: — Paul Willoughby, married the 
week before, asked for several toys — opti- 
mistic about the future we presume: — Bob 
Mussen got a pair of "cheaters" which is 
saving a lot of "bark" from being knocked 



from his shins going thru the narrow pas- 
sages between the planning desks. 

After being called some few choice 
names from the rather large vocabulary 
of Lou Miller, the Elsie Maxwell of Plan- 
ning, and branding my recent article as 
grounds for libel, I was invited to "open 
house" with the usual gang of "mystics" 
who prove the "hand quicker than the 
eye." Needing the coin for Christmas and 
realizing I was in for a trimming, I de- 
clined. Jack Mulroy, Dan Clemson, Ben 
Leonard, Bill Wiley, Tom Butterfield, 
and Ted Anderson attended and here is 
how I heard the story from one of the 
gang. "We played in the parlor but had 
to take off our shoes, two bottles of beer 
were equally distributed, and later we 
were fed "salted peanuts" and the water 
turned off. This insured our leaving early 
enough for Lou to get the place cleaned 
before the wife returned. He mumbled 
something about improvements not being 
complete in "Cactus Gulch." 

Happenings during the month: Ed Stew- 
art took over the tool warehouse and Kel 
Aiken was named Asst. Chief Storekeeper. 
Ed has since eaten off three finger nails 
and waxed his head to save the last nine 
hairs. — Hotchkiss claims to have a pow- 
erful basketball aggregation but says there 
will be no 1 5 to 1 money this season. — 
Production No. 1 lost to Purchasing with 
Trotman keeping score and Mulroy and 
Stone "heckling" which proves Frank 



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Classes forming for Children and Adults in 
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SCHOOL OF THE DANCE 

1039 7th Ave. F. 5750 
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January, 1940 



O'Conner still has the technique of put- 
ting the "evil eye" on all opponents. — 
Ray Tuit knows the feeling of being 
"King for a Day" when he distributes the 
pay checks. — Ed Kellogg claims that the 
star halfback playing for Tulane is his 
"Pop." — Roy Coykendall is trying to 
learn what kind of hunting is "shooting 
in the bush." — Bud Buflat, of inspection, 
cannot find the romance in mountain 
climbing that is pictured by the number 
one "mountain goat" Russ Kern. Sore feet, 
scratches, and aching muscles don't seem 
to compensate "Bud" even if the girl is 
beautiful. — Ernie Johnson says Larry Boe- 
ing, living in E.S.D., still makes a trip to 
La Jolla each evening — must be a story 
there. — Freddie Brady is not selling paper 
in the shop. — That bag is for carrying 
blue prints. — Some newly married fellows 
are going to be mighty disappointed to 
find their sleeping quarters to be mostly 
in the shop if the work keeps piling up. — 
Joe Maloney has a real band of hustlers 
in the blue print and records department 
with Dick Cromwell, Geo. Craig, Chas. 
Biehl, Jim Kendricks, Frank Cross, Freddy 
Brady, and Les Stockton. — Keep up the 
good work fellows and don't forget where 
to dish out the best service. — Owen Stock- 
ton, overworked correcting the writer's 
mistakes in the shop, has been given an 
assistant, Frank "Frenchy" McHugh. 

According to "papa" Al Ballard, the 
new addition to the family, a husky of 
three weeks, will be ready for the "bull 
gang" in time for the building expansion. 
With the added expense Al is planning on 
opening a clothing store featuring a nov- 
elty "sweater creation" for unfortunates 
during the cold winter months. 

Perry Ogden proves that the eyes are 
still good as well as recognizing talent 
with two "keyboard pounders" he turned 
over to Gracie Koenig that are shoving 
the orders out so fast they have Dietzer, 
Rasmussen, and Allison burning the mid- 
night oil. So fellows meet Miss Lois Camp- 
bell and Miss Cedelia Roberts, who have 
stolen quite a bit of the spotlight from 
"Admiral" Art Stone. 

The writer went hip swinging, shin 
kicking, and elbow bending with the En- 
gineering staff at their yearly "blowout" 
at Hotel del Coronado. It was a swell 
dance and the way those boys were decked 
out reminded me of the homecoming dance 
at "Slippery Rock." Wells, Kennedy, 
Pf ankuch, Kallis, McCabe, Lockheed, Gro- 
wald, Dayton, Famme, and practically the 
entire gang were moving around like a 
bunch of rodeo ponies. Jeff Bouley did not 
show up and missed some swell "column 
stuff." Jeff said that he didn't like those 



semi-formal affairs where you had to wear 
a shirt and tie. Most of the unmarried fel- 
lows maneuvered around and managed to 
miss the ferry for that delightful ride 
homeward around the "Silver Strand." 

If "Major" McManus is playing "War 
games" he is surely making them realistic 
enough with the "barbwire" cuts and 
"scrapnel wounds" that so frequently adorn 
his features. More mystery develops when 
"Chancellor" Craig Clark of the night 
crew shows up with a "bayonet wound" 
across his head. Could it be something on 
the order of two dictators feeling each 
other out to see if the night or day crew 
holds the power? 

Realizing what U.S.C. did with that 
hefty line this year. Chief Mulroy has 
added a little weight to his forward wall 
in the persons of "Buck" Gott, Ed Freak- 
ley, Carl Sjoblom, and Bob O'Donnel, and 
is probably anticipating some tough going 
against the shop team. These lads should 
help shake Anderson, Wiley, Generas, 
Hassler, and the other nimble-footed lads 
loose with enough parts to keep Jack 
happy. 

Paul Gaughn, football prognosticator, 
has closed his season's contest with Bill 
"Lucky" Wiley taking in the "jackpot." 
Paul must have run it honest as he finished 
up next to the writer, last place. Bill 
claimed to have some good "inside info" 
on the games which we have since learned 
came from inside a school for the "feeble 
minded," that a relative is coaching. Any- 
thing can happen in the pigskin game as 
was proven when Bob Morse's alma mater 
won a game without Chicago U. on the 
schedule. 

Barrmg a last-minute physical collapse, 
we assume that Bill Liddle took advantage 
of the holiday bargains and got himself 
"hitched." Frank Fields let him in on a 
swell "cut rate parson" without going 
"South of the Border." A last-minute re- 
prieve failed when "papa" gave his con- 
sent. So now all of those rust-laden wed- 
ding gifts purchased for Bill in the past 
can be used. Lucky for me that I saved 
those dishes I have been getting each 
Tuesday night at my favorite East San 
Diego theatre. 

Paul Willoughby, Hull dispatcher, was 



NEW GIFT DEPARTMENT 

. . . just opened/ 

Unusual Gifts to beau- 
tiFy your home. Prices 
are popular on them all 

DRYERIS 

a STANDARD 

Furniture Co. 

i. e. DRYER. Fuel 2368 Kcttner at Kalmia 




another victim of cupid's deadly aim two 
weeks before. Paul passed out some pretty 
good cigars but we always feel guilty 
when smoking one, thinking of how much 
"meat and potatoes" could have been 
bought later on. Anyway the boys saved 
buying a Christmas gift for what more 
could two swell girls want than Paul and 
Bill hanging on a tree, or just hanging. 

SILVER WEDDING 

Mr. Ted Bodenhagen and his wife, Rose, 
will celebrate the 2 5 th anniversary of their 
marriage on December 31, New Year's 
Eve. Many happy returns of the day, and 
may you both live to celebrate your golden 
wedding day. Mr. Bodenhagen is with the 
Maintenance Dept. — Mrs. Barnes. 

Bill Gilchrist wishes to thank all those 
who made it possible for Santa to visit 
the Rest Haven Girl dormitory, with a 
doll for each child Christmas morning. 




f PER LESSON 

You, like hundreds of others, 
can learn to (ly this easy, low 
cost, practical way without 
neglecting your present work. 



fiy/NG fffJWCF 

Barnett Avenue al ihe causeway 
ACROSS FROM MARINE BASE 

Telephone Bayview 5222 • San Diego 



Consolidator 



KATHLLLN 
'<^^^1 SCHINLIDLI^ 



OUR Christmas Party was a success 
from the time we parked our feet 
under the dinner table until hours later 
when we trudged our weary way home- 
ward. The dinner table was beautifully 
decorated with miniature green trees, ice 
ponds, ski jumpers, skating shoes and other 
wintry scenes. Our dinner tasted as good 
as the table looked — which was the best 
would be a hard decision to make. There 
were thirty-three girls present and each 
received gifts from under a gay Christ- 
mas tree. After the gifts were distributed, 
"oh's" and "ah's" and other forms of ad- 
miration were prevalent, and comical me- 
chanical toys were performing all over 
the room. 

As the evening progressed, the male 
species began to make their appearance, 
and along came an orchestra to make our 
evening complete. Drinks and good dance 
partners were plentiful, everyone was con- 
genial, and the orchestra was fine — 'nuf 
said. 

We saw: Ann Howard and Avis Clarke, 
the Scarlett O'Haras of the evening, in 
their backless black dresses — Bea Jackson, 
the plutocrat, with an orchid in her hair — 
Lucille Fisher as "The Lady in Red" — 
Grace Koenig in honey-colored taffeta, 
quite the glamour girl when the jacket 
was removed — Lois Campbell exercising 
her tonsils and warbling with the orchestra 



Aircraft Accessories 
Corp. Capital Stock 

BOUGHT SOLD 
QUOTED 



R. E. Patton 



D. S. Dorn 



Searl-Merrick 
Company 

Members Los Angeles Stock Exchange 

508 San Diego Trust «&. 
Savings Building 
San Diego 
F-7626 



— Mary Eleanor Meredith giving a dem- 
onstration of putting on and taking off 
her novel "Roman" sandals for several 
gentlemen — Irma Robbins, Lucille Fisher, 
and Mary Nugent playing Santa and dis- 
tributing gifts from under the Xmas tree 
— Louise Girodon in a pretty green and 
silver gown — ^June Dunn pinning little 
ski jumpers on her dress — Evelyn Kells 
bobbing in and out the door — Fran War- 
ner and Grayce Holm with intriguing 
zippers on their dresses — Leta Davis wish- 
ing her shoes would stop hurting — Blanche 
Davis floating in 7-Up instead of being 
preserved in alcohol — ^Jerry Buel bragging 
about her dress "did something for her" — 
Lorine Mounce, who was going to leave at 
10:00 still having a good time at a quarter 
of three — Mary Nugent dancing every 
number — the orchestra being bribed to 
play another half-hour — Mamie Kipple 
asking everyone if they were having a 
good time — several "old standbys" con- 
spicuous by their absence — Juanita Smith 
attacking her salad with gusto — Marcella 
Holzman tired but having a good time — 
Eva Wiseman looking under the table for 
her husband — Lee Johnson lending dignity 
to the atmosphere — Florence Cannon in 
cerise and blue taffeta — other interesting 
incidents too numerous to mention — was 
our party a success? Definitely. 

And orchids to Irma Robbins and Lucille 
Fisher for their work in handling the party 
this year. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wussow are the 
proud parents of a son born Saturday, 
November 18th. The new addition to the 
Wussow family will be known to his play- 
mates as Jeoffrey Lance Wussow, 1st — 
Irma Robbins' imitation of Hitler recently 
was a good one, 'tho the adhesive tape was 
a necessity and not for clowning pur- 
poses — The popular song of the month — 
instead of "Who Threw the Overalls in 



LINDBERGH FIELD CAFE 

Administration Buiiding 
Lindbergh Fieid 



"The Home of Aviation" 
BREAKFAST SERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 



Mrs. Mulligan's Chowder" — is "Who 
Threw that Something Thru Mr. Lear- 
man's Window" — Deep sympathy is ex- 
pressed for the poor fellow who has to pay 
his laundry bill with his Christmas bonus 
— there just ain't no justice — and then 
there's the Ccmwlidator whose Christmas 
check went to the laundry in his shirt 
and came back looking like a dissipated 
soda cracker — Betty Jane Melcher started 
out for a dance one evening not long ago 
and ended up having her appendix re- 
moved. So Betty will spend her Christmas 
holidays recuperating and will put her 
jitterbugging days on the shelf 'til able 
to rhumba minus her appendix — Sorry to 
hear of Grace Swearingen's illness and hope 
her stay in the hospital will be a short one 
— Dolores Elliott was another one who 
had to miss the party because of "appen- 
dicitis trouble." What is it, girls, an epi- 
demic? 

The lure of last-minute Christmas shop- 
ping is too great to resist, so instead of 
racking my cranium, I'm off to wreck my 
feet. 

Happy New Year! 

vg, 

THINGS THAT COME OUT 
AT NIGHT 

By Craig 

THOSE time clock bulletins reminding 
one that news for the Consolidator 
is due again are wearing me down. Maybe 
it's because of the scarcity of news this 
month. Everyone seems to have been too 
busy with Christmas and New Year's plans 
to give much attention to anything else. 

Gordon Burns and Ed Chapman of 
Wing were properly decorated for Christ- 
mas. Those brilliant red, blue, green, etc. 
colored shirts they have been wearing com- 
pared favorably with the lights on the 
tree in the patio. If they didn't move 
around so much one might expect to see 
them surrounded with gifts. 

Johnny Petit gets help from Mineah and 
wishes "Min" would come in nights more 
often. The other night John lost a bar 
of candy to "Min" who did a tough job 
for Johnny. After thinking it over Mineah 
wonders whether he won or lost. 

Rex Cord of Finished Parts Stock has 
a "stop and go" memoni'. The other night 
he forgot his badge and drove all the way 
to Chula Vista and back between 3:30 
and 4:00. A few nights later Rex remem- 
bered the location of some parts he had 
stored six months ago. Kel Aiken still 
can't believe it. 

Gordon Richards, one of the newer ad- 
ditions to the Win? night crew, is well 



January, 1940 



known by Consolidators. "Gordie" is the 
cheerful little fellow, who when he was 
secretary at the Coliseum, supplied us with 
passes to the fights and wrestling matches. 
Let's make him feel at home! 

"Hustlin' Henry" Zilz, sheet leadman, 
whose motto is, "If you like our service 
tell others, and if you don't tell us" has 
a variety of interests. Henry has his own 
little ranch, raises mushrooms, chickens, 
pigs, etc., and finds time to install an oc- 
casional sprinkling system. 

During the storm of last month Con- 
solidated was without lights for a couple 
of hours. Imagine a dispatcher's plight in 
a case like this. Gordon Browne, however, 
was determined to "get his parts." It was 
only after he had badly bruised a per- 
fectly good face that he decided the parts 
could wait. 

An inspector has finally found some use 
for a dispatcher. Hank Niemeyer, paint 
inspector, wants Shelby Best to do his fight- 
ing for him. Hank will also trade for any- 
thing, any time. We are lucky to get out 
with our shirt sometimes. Why don't you 
trade Ross out of a few feet of waistline, 
Hank? 

Ross Dilling is getting suspicious of 
"Doc" Walker. Doc sent to paint shop 
for a can of gasoline the other night. Ross 
wonders if Doc is using the gasoline to 
make liniment. 

The night basketball league is a success. 
Six teams have been organized and play 
has been under way for three weeks. Just 
before Christmas the Hull Dept. led with 
Production, Sheet and Machine Shop in 
the runner-up position. The teams have 
improved rapidly and now play a good 
brand of basketball. 

Bill Fleming of anodize had better trade 
in that straw hat or one of our "ranchers" 
will be taking him home for a scarecrow. 

When the Hull Dept. does something it's 
in a big way. At the recent pig roast in 
El Monte Park the lads decided to stage 
their own "bowl" game. It was dubbed 
the "Greased Pig Bowl." I hear the Hotch- 
kiss' won, but everyone was so sore they 
didn't care. Why don't you guys grow up? 

Tommy Geararnotti of Wing Dept. has 
had a little streak of bad luck lately. 
Tommy blames it on the fact that the 
track is so narrow the horses can't run 
by each other. 

Verne Melin of Wing is rushing the 
New Year just a little. A few nights ago, 
on the way home from Escondido, Verne 
misplaced his car. It must have followed 
him part way home for it showed up on 
Pacific Blvd. next day much the worse for 
wear. Verne, is trying to figure out some 
way it can put him in bed after this. 



The stockchasers in Wing and Hull are 
finding it more difficult to locate lead men 
and foremen every day. The "forest" of 
fixtures in these departments is really a 
problem. We suggest that all lead men be 
given red caps, or a bell to wear around 
the neck to facilitate locating them. 

There must be a Santa Claus and assum- 
ing this we put in an order for Christmas 
for: a pair of arch supports for Johnny 
Strachan, a new razor for Dante Selvaggi, 
a piece of metal that can be pounded thin 
enough to see through for Bob Potter, a 
chord line for Gordon Richards, a Ten- 
nessee victory over U.S.C. for Troy Lans- 
ing, a week in Seattle for John Petit, a new 
whistle for Johnny Glen and a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year for 
all "Coiisolidafors." 

WING KEYHOLE 

By Browne 

BILL CHATHAM is arriving at work 
on time lately. We learn Bill has a 
very charming wife to awaken him every 
morning. Congratulations and loads of 
happiness to Mr. and Mrs. Chatham. 

Leo Klingenmeier has purchased his 
wife a saddle for Christmas so she can 
bring the horses in for him. Better luck 
next year, Leo. 

We wonder who won the argument be- 
tween Herb Ezard and his wife during 
a recent window-shopping tour. Someone 
said they compromised and Mn. Ezard 
came out with what she wanted. 

Al Ballard's head has enlarged consid- 
erably due to the recent addition to his 
family. Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Al Ballard for their new baby boy. 

Harry Birse, how about an introduction 
to those two pretty gals you take home 
every night. The gang would be very 
pleased. 

We see Elmer Gahlbeck has kept his 
New Year's resolution all year. Mrs. Gahl- 
beck hasn't cut his hair quite as often. 

Mentioning resolutions, here are a few 
new ones for 1940: 

Joe Saunders — no more teeth pulled be- 
cause someone else does. 

Vic Atkinson — better snapshots for the 
new year. 

Harry Birse — to lower all benches in the 
shop. 

Stephen Powell — to try a few new fast 
steps to speed production. 

Bob Morse — more parts for Herbie 
Ezard. 

Gil Lance — bigger and better goats. 

Army Armstrong doesn't have any to 
break. 

Frank Heidemann — to buy another pipe 
and a new can of tobacco, for his wife? 



Charlie Wallman and Bill Sierra, former 
Wing Dept. employees, are back from 
North Island. Bill and Charlie are now 
members of Wing Inspection. Welcome 
home fellows, and keep up the good work. 

Craig Clark, editor and chief night dis- 
patcher has a very worried look of late. 
In a few weeks the Clarks are expecting a 
new arrival in their family. Craig is hop- 
ing for a boy. That's the old spirit, Craig. 

He doesn't fly, but an airplane won't fly 
without him. He doesn't have a natty 
uniform; but a Pilot with all his uniforms 
would be useless without him. He has 
nothing to do with War Department ma- 
neuvers. But the Air Corps would be use- 
less without him. Years ago some lily- 
fingered wag dubbed this grease-covered 
being "greaseball." Today efficient Air- 
craft operations would be a miserable fail- 
ure without him. But what of it? He 
achieves no fame though he is the real 
hero. But without him all the money in 
the United States treasury wouldn't keep 
a fleet of modern aircraft flying. His 
grimy fingers can flick new life into an 
engine through a magic only he has con- 
trol over. But no one has time to do him 
honor. HE is the mechanic . . . "Grease- 
ball" . . . Highstone, X 8082. 



J 



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ll»3S 



SRN DIEGO 
rnXI CRBS 
HRVE ROLLED 
MILLIONS 
r OFMIL€S 

xclusivelvr"" 



WE GIVE 

'S6H GREEN STAMPS 
" DOUBLE STAMPS 
_ ON SUNDAYS f 




IMjiJMill 



Consolidator 



TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Maguirre 

Greetings to you all, dear readers and 
a Happy New Year. 

We would like to take this opportunity 
to thank the members of the Engineering 
Department for a very pleasant evening 
at the Hotel Del Coronado on December 
15th. Familiar Tool Design faces were 
scarce, but among those present were: Mar- 
cella Holzman, looking very charming, 
Glenn Webster, our new typist, and yours 
truly. 

But to get into the Tidbits and hap- 
penings of this department, we are sorry 
to report at this writing that Mr. Van 
Doren, Tool Design's Chess Champion is 
ill. We hope he recovers soon. 

Mr. T. P. Shaw has trouble in Tia Juana. 
Mr. Shaw: you can learn Spanish in ten 
easy lessons. George Denton, is now one 
of those things that come out at night. We 
hope that Roy Smeltzer doesn't get any 
cigars for Christmas. That happy smile on 
Mr. Bennett's face doesn't mean that he 
is a millionaire; his wife is back from a 
trip to the East Coast. Perry, quit brag- 
ging about your daughter, however, we 
can't blame you. Le Maire, "our hunter", 
shot up three boxes of shells in Mexico. 
Results — sore arm. How was the air meet, 
Davidson? Bob Hyder has been spending 
some time whittling quail calls at noon. 
Ed Gurling says he wonders what Hank 
Morgan's sudden interest at Borego Val- 
ley is. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



BENCH NEWS 

Henry Doerr is now cornered between 
a floor furnace and a distillate heater. 
Somebody come to the rescue and help him 
decide. 2930. 

Carl Scherer has been bit by the Love 
Bug for the 2 5 th time, but this time he is 
going through with it if it kills him. That's 
what he said before but he's still making 
feminine hearts flutter. 2929. 

The old skipper, Bert Kemp has given 
up sailing the high seas and is back work- 
ing in the Bench Department. 

Teddy (Begonia) Edwards' chickens 
don't produce very much towards the feed 
bill, so he has started to raise gold fish for 
his new hobby. 

Due to the higher tax rate this year 
Teddy Edwards thinks it would be better 
to give Pacific Beach back to the Indians. 

Bill Rasp moved into his new home just 
finished in Rolando Village. 

We wonder if Geo. Eggleston is going 
to take on a partner? He's remodeling his 
house. 

Owen Harder drives right up to the 
new Police Station to get his ticket for a 
traffic violation! 

Bill Bellows is overhauling his boat. He 
will have her in first-class shape for the 
coming fishing season? 

The Boys of the Metal Bench Dept. who 
have worked here a considerable length 
of time and who will receive their 15 -year 
pins will miss the familiar face of Bill 
Milton who, until a few months ago, was 
one of the old timers. All the old timers 
are wishing Bill the best of luck in his new 
position at North Island. No. 293 8. 




Open a 

BUDGET 
ACCOUNT 

120 Days to Pay 

Credit Dept. 
Sixth Ave. 
Mezzanine 



/^ Smart girls 

^ get the 

^ "WHITNEY HABIT' 

Consdirettes and Consair wives can save 
a lot of money, time and steps by trying 
Whitney's First! 53 departments brim- 
ming full. "Sale prices" on everything 
every day in the year — that's Whitney's 
unusual money-saving policy! 



PARK FREE 



at Crystal Palace Garage, Sixth and E 
with a $1 purchase, or Free Delivery 



jjyyyiUjjHiii^^ 



We cash your 
payroll checks 



Eit«bliih«d 1904 




"Join the Navy, 
See the World " 

Join the Navy and see the world! . . . 
especially, it might be added, if you're 
fortunate enough to hook up with a bunch 
of PBYs ! ! ! Here are some snapshots 
received by our Vice-Pres. C. A. Van 
Dusen, from his son, C. A. Van Dusen, III, 
from "somewhere in the Pacific." Upper 
is a picture of N. A. P. Kelly, one of the 
pilots . . . and that's the inside of a PBY, 
or it wasn't built by Coinolidated! The 
information is added that, "Kelly is red- 
headed, in case you're interested." The 
middle view is of Kalakau Corner, Waikiki; 
crossroads of the Pacific. The third sign 
from the bottom on the right of the pole 
(if we have any influence with the 
Chamber of Commerce) is henceforth go- 
ing to read, "16 hours, 17 minutes, via 
PBY . . . SAN DIEGO." Lower is C. A. 
Van Dusen, III, "somewhere in the Pa- 
cific making friends with a Gooney bird. 
Planes are on the water in the background. 



January, 1940 



DRIFTING THRU DRAFTING 

By Jeff Bouley 

We can regard Chuck Freel with mien so sedate, 
Mid the giggles and squeals of his worshipping 

date; 
But when suddenly into his tricks he delves, 
It keeps us in stitches in spite of ourselves. 

APPARENTLY Chuck Freel is going in 
t for a bit of comedy of the slipstick 
variety or, should we say, mixing his slip- 
stick and lipstick these days. One of our 
demon operatives chanced to pass a down- 
town dine and dance establishment and 
spied our hero seated inside with a beautiful 
young creature who gazed soulfuUy at 
him in mute admiration as he deftly ma- 
nipulated, of all things, a slide rule! It now 
develops that among the amazing feats of 
magic that Chuck performs on said article 
to the delight of his feminine friends is the 
reading of a gal's horoscope. Yowsah! The 
field is practically unlimited for the clever 
young engineer of today. 

The holiday season apparently keeps 
everyone too busy to get married, or pos- 
sibly those astute young men chose to keep 
the gals out of their folding money until 
after the spending season. At any rate, 
our Ties and Cries department did not 
record a single knot this month, and those 
babies who have arrived at such an un- 
fortunate time to get a birthday and 
Christmas present all in one are the little 
gals of Herb Sharp and Tommy Hemphill. 

We have fought to repress it for two 
months, but the truth will out. The Citi- 
zens' League has insisted that we record 
the fact that Frank Fink arrived thirty 
minutes early at a recent banquet and 
rushed to a seat in the middle of the front 
row. He then steadfastly refused to yield 
his seat or even turn around to eat until 
after the entertainment had ended. 

Things would bs pretty dull around 
Ocean Beach sometimes if it weren't for 
some of the happenings to Larry Bayliss, 
the strong, silent sentinel of the stress 
gang. Several months ago he and Howard 
Macdonald spotted several good fire logs 
along the beach about a mile from their 
houses. They proceeded to make a raft of 
same and soon they cast off and were on 
their way, well outside the breakers. As 
they passed Sunset Cliffs, a crowd began 
to assemble along the beach and soon sirens 
screamed, ambulances arrived, and the two 
mariners were "sensationally rescued" 
much against their will. They tied their 
raft up and gave up in disgust for the day. 
But then came the storm and the next 
day their raft was headed for the land of 
lanterns and kimonos. 

Now more recently we hear Bayliss being 
dubbed "Galento." When we inquired into 
the causes we found that there was a story 



behind it. Larry is a robust guy of the type 
that makes the Chamber of Commerce 
proud. He likes to take a swim in the ocean 
every day, summer or winter, but because 
of the daylight problem he cuts down to 
Saturdays and Sundays in the winter sea- 
son. He was following this practice one 
Saturday off Sunset Cliffs and he was 
peacefully floating on his back when he 
heard the whine of a bullet as it sailed 
past his head and ploughed into a swell. 
He galvanized into action and swam for 
shore. When he arrived on the beach he 
found a shivering youth who explained to 
Larry that it was all a mistake — he had 
thought he was shooting at "an old beer 
barrel." Perish the thought that we should 
ever venture a pun, but we think if we 
were Larry, we would have given the guy 
a good stiff polka two. 

This very unusual weather that we have 
in California sometimes brings out very 
unusual incidents. When the thunderstorm 
hit last month Graham McVicker noticed 
a small leak in the roof of his garage. 
Fearing the rain might damage the goods 
stored inside, he ventured forth to repair 
the leak. It may have been the darkness 
or it may have been the wet roof; at any 
rate something happened quite suddenly. 
When the action halted, Mac's legs were 
dangling, one on each side of a rafter. 
The shingles, unaccustomed to 230 pounds 
of concentrated shock load, had yielded, 
to put it mildly, and two gaping holes 
emitted light from within. The ensuing 
chain of events is not known but we un- 
derstand that Mac gave up and made a 
trough. 

WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

By J. Hodgson 

WELL, well! Our old friend Bob 
Brabban has retired from the sea, 
has in fact burned (or sold) his boat, and 
bought a jalopy. Yes sir. Bob is going to 
live the life of a rancher out La Mesa 
way (after working hours). His ground 
is mostly occupied by lime trees so we 
feel he ought to be good for at least one 
"rickey" when you pay him a visit. 

Bob recently bot himself a new DeSoto 
so he truly has two cars in his garage, even 
if one is a '29 Ford. 



It was Mac McGiffin who bought Bob- 
bie's boat. I guess the new "Skipper" is 
pretty well known among the "rod and 
reelers", however, on the q.t., he asked 
us to let it be known that he is going into 
the fish business. O.K. Mac you may go 
in the finny (not funny) type of fishy 
business, but please leave the smell at 
home. I could have made a pun here about 
having "smelt" but I'll let it pass. 

It may be the Christmas spirit, but buy- 
ing cars will soon reach the epidemic stage, 
if it is not curbed. Art Wiffenback, our 
hair-trigger inspector has swapped off his 
old "Buick" for a later model Chrysler. 
Atta boy. Art, just keep rollin' along. 

Frank Mische, another pattern maker in 
our fraternity also got himself a new car. 
When he did not show up for work the 
other day, we were worried, as Frank 
doesn't lose any time, usually. We know 
the car is all right, Frank, but who is the 
little lady in Los Angeles who caused you 
to stall there? Folks, he won't talk! 

They tell me there was a cute young 
saleslady around here recently, trying to 
sell, of all things, 6 inch scales. We have 
not seen these particular rulers, but they 
do say that you had to have a book of in- 
structions to be able to read them (the 
scales). Maybe you "guys" should have 
gone to night school. 

We are near the end of another year, in 
San Diego. It has afforded me a great deal 
of pleasure to scribble our article each 
month, and if space will permit I would 
like to thank all the boys in the Wood 
Shop for their help and cooperation in 
providing the stuff that goes into our 
little corner. 

Each of us, wishes each and every other 
one of us, A Very Merry Christmas and 
a Happy Prosperous New Year. 



"ALL AMERICAN HOMES" 

W. W. WELLPOT 

BUILDER 

Complete Building Service 

1305 I AVENUE • NATIONAL CITY 
Phone National 453 



SI 


ID 

Radios 


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Refrigerators 


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Lamps 






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Washin 

TERMS 


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Sales 
1025 S 


• Service • Rentals 


»eventh Ave. 


4991 Newport Ave. 


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Ocean Beach 


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r. 5397 


Bay. 491 3 



Consolidator 




plete with oleo shock struts, retract into 
wells in the side of the hull. The nose wheel 
in the bow is completely closed over in the 
retracted position by automatically oper- 
ated hatches so that no resistance to plan- 
ing is encountered. All three wheels are 
operated by a central hydraulic power 
drive, and the operations are carried out 
in sequence automatically. A single lever 
controls both the extension and the re- 
traction of the landing gear. Hydraulic 
pump power is derived from the main 
power plant or from an auxilliary engine, 
and may be operated by hand if necessary. 

Flight characteristics of the Model 28 
flying boat so highly perfected in the 
original design, have been unaffected by 
the incorporation of the landing gear, and 
several handling advantages have become 
apparent. Flight testing with the gear in 
all positions, and in combination with the 
retractable wing tip floats, failed to dis- 
close any adverse effects. The same stable 
flying characteristics of the PBY are main- 
tained, and there was found no loss of 
speed with the landing gear in the re- 
tracted position. 

The advantages of the landing gear, 
aside from greatly extending the scope of 
utility for the Model 28, are many: "For 
taxiing the extended gear serves as a sea 
anchor and greatly assists in control on 
rough open water, and in making an ap- 
proach for mooring or ramp with an ad- 
verse wind. More engine power may be ap- 
plied for short turns without undue ac- 
celeration. Turns on the water are achieved 
with far less skidding, and the danger of 
scraping the keel on the ramp is eliminated. 
There is no necessity' for a beaching crew. 



WORLD'S LARGEST 



On December 7th there went out to the 
world at large the following release, telling 
the world of our amphibian. Stated briefly, 
it gives all the dope that is releasable at this 
time, and so is printed here in full. One 
other interesting fact is worthy of note: 
The XPBY-5A is the heaviest airplane ever 
to operate from Lindbergh Field up until 
this date, so far as is known. 

World's Largest Amphibian 
Makes Its Debut . . . 

The Consolidated Aircraft Corporation's 
newest contribution to aeronautical pro- 
gress, the Model 28-5A Amphibian, desig- 
nated by the U. S. Navy for whom it was 
constructed as the XPBY-5A; has under- 
gone its flight testing to become as a re- 
sult, the largest amphibian plane in the 
world. 



Basically the new Consolidated Am- 
phibian is the Model 28 twin-engined fly- 
ing boat which the Navy knows as the 
PBY. This design of boat has already ac- 
cumulated a remarkable total of massed 
flight records and reputation for sustained 
performance, and now there has been in- 
corporated in the structure, the amphibian 
feature. The inherent advantages of the 
Model 28 boat have been retained, and the 
great advantage of land plane operation 
added. Thus the amphibian can operate 
from either land or sea, to land or water 
bases in remote localities, opening a vast 
new realm of utility. 

The landing gear is of the tricycle type, 
with a single wheel forward and two aft, 
all of which are fully retractable. The side 
wheel and supporting mechanism, com- 



as the ship can chmb a ramp or beach 
under its own power, or descend in the 
same manner, completely controlled by the 
brakes. It may also operate from remote 
sand beaches without benefit of special 
ramps or facilities for handling. 

The side wheels are above water when 
the ship rises on the step in making a 
take-off, and automatic means have been 
provided to eject all water in the closed 
bow wheel hatch before the plane is in the 
air. Thus the flying trim is unaffected. 

Repairs or routine servicing to the 
landing gear can be accomplished with a 
minimum of trouble. Normally, with a 
landplane of comparable size, the sup- 
porting of the plane's weight for repairs 
to the landing gear is an acute problem. In 
the Consolidated amphibian, the custom- 



January, 1940 



ary beaching gear lugs incorporated in 
all Model 28s are retained. All that is re- 
quired for servicing of the landing gear 
is to attach a standard beaching gear and 
run the plane out of the water. The beach- 
ing gear lifts the landing gear clear of the 
ground where any servicing may be carried 
out. No special equipment is necessary, 
and since the beaching gear was designed 
for quick attachment and removal, the 
operation consumes a minimum of time. 

In action the huge amphibian alights 
with a smooth absorption of its descend- 
ing velocity, exhibiting no tendency to 
bounce or porpoise. When alighting on 
land, the ship's tendency in a side land- 
ing is to straighten out; and the brakes 
may be applied to the utmost with- 
out adverse effect. This technique simply 
increases the load on the nose wheel. No 
special procedure is needed for take-oflf or 
landing. The wheels may be locked, ele- 
vators pulled full back, and both engines 
given full take-off throttle without the 
possibility of the nose wheel rising from 
the ground. During recent testing, a land- 
ing was made in which a bump happened 
to be struck on the instant of contact with 
the brakes on. The accelerometer showed 
a very high reading, yet no trouble either 
structural or in handling, was encountered. 
With the familiar Model 28 wing tip floats 
extended, the drag is increased and the 
angle of glide is steepened. 

Incorporation of the amphibian gear, 
as an integral part of the famous twin- 
engined flying boat, without disturbing 
its basic flying qualities, makes the field of 
operations of the world's largest am- 
phibian, the Consolidated Model 2 8- 5 A, 
virtually from anywhere to anywhere on 
the face of the globe. 

As this goes to press, the "World's larg- 
est amphibian" has spanned the continent 
and aboard her along with the Navy crew, 
is our own fellow worker, Gene R. Tibbs, 
who accompanied the ship east as company 
representative. 

Annoiincetnent — from Drawbench De- 
partment: Winfield Cliff Scott, Jr., 8 lbs., 
3 oz., born December 6th; Mercy Hospital. 
Congratulations! 



HULLABALOO 

By Al Leonard 

THE pig barbecue attended by a large 
group of Hull folks at El Monte Oak 
Park was a huge success. Plenty of food 
and beer put every one in a very good 
humor. The feature attraction was the 
football game between the Beer Guzzlers 
and the Pantywaists. George Galley in- 
tercepted a pass and ran for the only score 
of the ball game. The touchdown didn't 
do Galley much good though, because he 
was so worked out from the run that he 
had to retire and missed out on the feed. 

Two rookies were given the works re- 
cently by some of their more experienced 
co-workers. Jimmy O'Rourk scoured the 
entire plant looking for some dehydro-oil 
(dehydral). Norm (Ears) Heckeroth was 
sent to bring a hole closer. When told to 
get a pork chop drill some time later. Norm 
refused to go, saying that there couldn't 
be a pork chop drill any more than there 
was a hole closer. 

The manager and all the boys on the 
Hull basketball team wish to thank the 
boys in the bulkhead department for buy- 
ing the new basketball for the team. The 
boys promise to play some classy games 
throughout the season and would like to 
have all the Hull Dept. turn out for all 
the games. 

Elliot tells this sad one. While coming 
to work one foggy morning Elliot was 
blinded by a sudden beam of sunlight 
which penetrated the fog. As he leaned 
forward to lower his sun visor he was 
startled to hear a crash and a bump. Elliot 
got out of his car to see what the trouble 
was and was horrified to find out he had 
run into a police motorcycle. Before he 
could get into his car to drive it out of 
the middle of the road another fog-bound 
motorist crashed into the rear of his car. 
Elliot says he didn't mind paying for all 
the damage as much as he did facing his 
wife when he got home, because the last 
thing she said before he went to work 
was "Elliot be careful." 

"Red" Chaplin claims that he lost his 
hard fought golf match because he was the 
victim of a practical joker. Freddy Grossher 
somehow got around the thirteenth hole 



AASE (ACE) BROS. 



"BRINGING YOU THE BEST IN LUNCHES, SAND- 
WICHES, COLD DRINKS AND TOBACCO— JUST 
INSIDE THE NORTH AND SOUTH GATES"— 
wish you a very 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 




9 



and finally took Chaplin on the 19th hole. 
George Wire borrowed Chaplin's clubs one 
day and soon the rumor got around that 
he had traded Chaplin's clubs in for a new 
set for himself. Chaplin was so upset about 
this that he was a nervous wreck by the 
time he played Freddie, although he had 
gotten his own clubs back. Chaplin ad- 
mits that he was on a special diet the 
week of the match. He says he cut out 
all meats and had nothing but liquids so 
he would be in good shape. 
Happy New Year everybody. 

Wherewith we pause to repeat another 

cute jingle: 

There was an aircraft worker named Straus 
Who went on a terrible sauss 

He had the right key 

In the keyhole, you see 
But the keyhole was in the wrong hauss. 

The city fellow's ancient chariot was 
misbehaving away out on a little-traveled 
lane, and he was discouraged. As he tink- 
ered with the so-called mechanism, a farm 
boy watched the proceedings, open- 
mouthed, and finally in exasperation the 
motorist barked, "Is this the first auto- 
mobile you ever saw?" "No," replied the 
country boy, ruminatingly, "but it looks 
a lot like it." 




Make 
this your 
New Year's 
Resolution! 



I m driving a 

FORD in FORTY" 

FORD V-8 
MERCURY V-8 
LINCOLN-ZEPHyR V-12 

BROWN 

MOTOR CO. 

India at B St. 

also CORONADO 
LA JOLLA 
MISSION HILLS 

Lincoln Division«Columbia at B St. 



10 



Consolidator 



HERBERT SCHIFF MEMORIAL 
TROPHY 

THE Herbert Schiff Memorial Trophy 
awarded annually to the naval avia- 
tion squadron or unit with the best record 
for safety in flying during a year was 
won by Patrol Squadron Eleven, attached 
to Patrol Wing One, San Diego area. It 
had a total of 4,903 hours flying time, July 
1, 1938-June 30, 1939. This squadron was 
designated as Patrol Squadron Seven until 
July 1, 1939, when it became Patrol 
Squadron Eleven. 

The Herbert Schiff Memorial Trophy 
was presented to the Navy Department in 
192 5 by Mr. ^5^illiam Schiff, brother of 
Lieutenant (jg) Herbert Schiff, U. S. 
Naval Reserve aviator who was killed in 
line of duty at the Naval Air Station, 
Norfolk, Virginia, on July 11, 1924. The 
expressed purpose of the donor of the 
award was to stimulate interest in naval 
flying and at the same time to reduce avia- 
tion accidents. Until 1929, the award was 
made to individuals, but in that year the 
rules covering the contest were revised and 
the trophy awarded to the squadron or 
unit which made the best record for safety 
in flying during the fiscal year. 

Lieutenant Commander Silas B. Moore, 
U. S. Navy, was commander of Patrol 
Squadron Eleven from March 2, 193 8 un- 
til June 1, 1939, when he was transferred 
to the Staff of the Commander Patrol 
Wing Two, Pearl Harbor Area. (Home, 
Glendale, Calif.) 

Lieutenant Commander Frank Tren- 
with Ward, Jr., U. S. Navy, is now com- 
mander of the squadron. He was its ex- 
ecutive oflScer during the past competition 
year. (Home, Raleigh, N. C.) 

Patrol Squadron Eleven was awarded the 
Schiff Memorial Trophy for 1937 and is 
the only patrol squadron to have been 
awarded it a second time. This squadron 
received no penalties in the computation 
of its score, having had no accidents of 
any kind during the past year. Twenty- 




Above: V.P.-II (old V.P.-7) Winner of the Herbert Schiff Memorial Trophy, lined up at the award 
ceremonies at North Island. Dec. 16th for the presentation. One of the V.P.-ll planes (our PBYs) is 
immediately behind them. 

Below: The presentation of the Schiff Trophy to Lieut. Comdr. Silas B. Moore, U. S. Navy, Com- 
manding V.P.-7. by Captain C. P. Mason and Staff. 

Left: Captain Charles P. Mason. Commanding Patrol Wing One holding the replica which was given 
Lieut. Comdr. Moore for his permanent possession. Right: Lieut. Comdr. Silas B. Moore, Commanding 
Officer V.P.-ll, winner of the Schiff Memorial Trophy. 



four squadrons and units were in compe- 
tition for the trophy. 

Lieutenant Commander Moore was born 
at Compton, California, October 18, 1899, 
and was appointed to the Naval Academy 
from Iowa in 1917. He was designated a 
naval aviator August 1, 1924, and had 
duty with Observation Squadron Two, in 
the U.S.S. California and at the Naval Air 
Station, Pensacola, until 1927. After com- 
pleting the post graduate course in ord- 
nance, he served in the Asiatic Fleet, with 
Torpedo Squadron Five, in the U.S.S. 
Houston and in the U.S.S. Augusta. He 
was attached to the Naval Torpedo Sta- 
tion, Newport, Rhode Island, from August, 
1934, until June, 1937, when he joined 
Patrol Squadron Seven, and was in com- 
mand from March 2, 1938, until June 1, 
1939. 




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He has been tactical officer on the staff 
of Commander Patrol Wing Two since 
late in June, 1939. 

He has received the Victory Medal — 
Atlantic Fleet Clasp, and Yangtze Cam- 
paign Medal for participation in Shanghai 
Incident, 193 2, while attached to U.S.S. 
Houston. 

Lieutenant Commander Ward was born 
in Raleigh, North Carolina, December 25, 
1901, and was appointed to the Naval 
Academy from North Carolina in 1919. 
He was designated naval aviator, April 
24, 1926, and served with Torpedo 
Squadron Two, in the U.S.S. Saratoga and 
at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, until 
October, 1930, when he reported for duty 
in the Bureau of Aeronautics. From June, 
1932, until June, 1934, he served as flag 
lieutenant and aide to the Commander, 
Aircraft Scouting Force, and later to Com- 
mander Aircraft, Battle Force, and joined 
Fighting Squadron Five, June, 1934. He 
was attached to Squadron \'T>J8D5, at 
Naval Academy, Annapolis, from June, 



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January, 1940 



11 



193 5, until June, 1938, when he was 
transferred to Patrol Squadron Seven, and 
assumed command June 1, 1939 (Patrol 
Squadron Seven) changed to Patrol Squad- 
ron Eleven, July 1, 1939. 

MACHINE SHOP 

NEWS AND VIEWS 

By Matt Wielopolski 

ALTHOUGH I am pressed for time 
and space, my friends of the Machine 
Shop and Consolidated, I want to take 
this opportune moment to wish you all 
this New Year wish: 
"May every hour of every day of the 

Coming Year, 
Bring you the blessings of Happiness, Con- 
tentment and Good Cheer." 

With the Thanksgiving holidays, and a 
heavy Christmas rush put asunder, we 
are now confronted with the spirit of the 
nineteen hundred and fortieth year. That's 
quite a long time when you stop and think 
about it. But why stop, says I, when there's 
so much to do. Then there is the day, and 
that's only eight hours short. 

This brings me back a few (Consoli- 
dator) issues, when I commented on Ray 
(Pop) Felton's doing so well at his age 
and all due to his School of Opportunity 
and Hard Knocks. Well! I have since found 
out that the majority are opposed to the 
"School of Experience" due to the lack of 
holidays and vacations. 

Here's a bit of news which will bring 
to some Mothers envy and blues. Our 
young machine apprentice, Al Wang, has 
his mother living with him during these 
Happy (Holy) Days. In a few weeks Al 
will take his mother to San Bernardino for 
a visit with her mother, Mrs. Ed Marsh, 
whom she has seen only once in fifteen 
years. This is a three-fold visit for Mrs. 
A. Wang, (1) Living with her son, Al, 
(2) Seeing her own mother, and (3) 
Visiting our California. 

Al proves to us that every day should 
be Mother's Day instead of but once, in 
May. All the boys at the Machine Shop 
envy you, Al! 

Now we extend another treat. Mrs. 
Anita Loveridge left Newton, Iowa, by 
way of the Santa Fe. She arrived in our 
fine city on the "Scout" December 17. 
During her stay here, Mrs. Loveridge will 
be escorted in and about California by an- 
other lowan, Mr. "Sir" Edmond Passmore, 
L.T.D. and H.M.S. Anita, er — er, Mrs. 
Loveridge intends to see and hear from 
her son, who is now in the U.S.N. 

This first column of the New Year 
should be dedicated to the Ladies. Why 
not? What with Leap Year and I with- 



out fear — so far, yet so near — shucks, there 
goes that gear, — something's wrong! 
Fear — 

Remember when Long Beach was taken 
over by the lowans? Then when Iowa 
University licked Notre Dame? Now 
they're here, well, that's corn buskers for 
you. Hard to beat. Even I owe a bill or 
two. 

More visitors: 

Mrs. Sel Christensen and three children 
with husband, Selmer. 

Mrs. Chas. Wharton with hubby, 
Charlie. 

Mrs. Leo Inhoff with mate, Leonard. 

Mrs. Ralph Sellers and family on the 
way to the West. 

The Machine Shop Basket Ball Team 
wishes to extend hearty Thanks to all who 
have supported them financially. To date, 
we have won two games and lost two 
games. Now, if the night shift, men and 
boys, wives and girls, relatives and friends, 
support them, we may bring fame and 
glory to the dear Ol' Machine Shop. 

Last but not least — 

"May you have — 

The gladness of the New Year, 

Which is Hope; 

The spirit of the New Year, 

Which is Peace; 

The heart of the New Year, 

Which is Love." 

Pure Reasoning 

Some fellows think they can borrow 
more money than they earn and still come 
out even. Their system of making things 
balance is like the two kids at school who 
were talking in the classroom: 

"Say, Jack," said one, "how many legs 
has a horse got?" 

After some thought, the second student 
said: "Why, eight, of course." 

"How do you figure that out?" said 
the puzzled inquirer. 

"Simple! Two in front, two behind, and 
two on each side." — Navy News. 

There is much in the psychological ap- 
proach: Tomatoes were once regarded as 
poisonous . . . now their juice is nature's 
vitamin filled nectar. If only more people 
would discard the psychological approach 
to aviation that it is a poison . . . take 
it coolly, with a little salt . . . what a 
stimulating vista would be unfolded. 

Forged aircraft cylinders often have % 
of their material removed in machining. 

"It is better to wear out than to rust 
out." 



The Inspector 

Tough jobs, don't have a thing on me 

For misery bends me double 
My life is sad as a life can be 

For my everyday name is "Trouble". 
I'm the target fair for the whole damned shop 

I'm the regular grouch collector 
I'm a sort of bag for the boys to punch 

For I'm a poor Inspector. 

The fellows say I'm a hawk-eyed Grump 

With an ingrown disposition. 
The Boss — he says, I'm a careless Chump 

Whose sight is in poor condition. 
From Pattern Shop to Shipping Room 

From Water Boy to Erector 
The whole gang adds to the murky gloom 

In the life of a poor Inspector. 

The foreman surely has woes enough 

The "Supe" has a few to hold him 
The Manager's job is sometimes tough 

When worries and cares enfold him. 
But mine is the worst of the lot because 

I'm a kind of a shop detector 
Who's cussed for finding or missing flaws 

A widely abused Inspector. 

Well — The fellows bark — but they never bite 

And it's all in the job — you've said it. 
So I'll try to see that the work is right 

And certain to do us credit. 
For a bum job never was useful yet 

And being the flaw detector 
I reckon I'll do my best, you bet 

In the style of a real Inspector. 

PERMANENT POSITION 

The following notice was inserted in a farm 
weekly: 

"Anyone found near my chicken house at night 
will be found there the next morning." 



VISIT 

DEPARTMENT STORE FOR 
MOTORISTS 

TODAY 

Tires 

Batteries 

Spark Plugs 

Life Protector Tubes 

Motor Tune Up Department 

Brake and Wheel Alignment Dept. 

Home and Auto Radio Service 

Four Leading Brands of Gasoline 

Auto Accessories 

Home and Auto Radios — Six Leading 

Makes to Choose From, 
Ranges and Woshers 
Refrigerators 
Juvenile Wheel Goods 
Bicycles for Boys ond Girls 
Children's Toys 

Ask about our Xmas Loyaway 
Club Plan. 

Terms as low as 25c per week. 

Pay checks cashed between 
8 A.M. and 6 P.M. 

ITS SO MUCH EASIER TO PARK 
AND SHOP AT 

Broadway, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 



12 



Consolidator 




WHY AVIATORS LEAVE 



IN the October issue of the Consolidator 
there appeared a brief article on the 
flight of the XPB2Y-1 four-engined 
Consolidated Flying Boat under command 
of Commander Andrew Crinkley, U.S.N. 
On that flight, it will be recalled, the Sand 
Point Naval Air Station at Seattle, Admiral 
A. B. Cook, commanding the Aircraft 
Squadron of the Aircraft Scouting Force, 
by dispatch, hauled down his flag on the 
U.S.S. Memphis and hoisted it aboard the 
XPB2Y-1 Flagplane, thereby establishing 
a precedent in Naval History. Never be- 
fore had such a flag been officially hoisted 
on a plane. The huge plane, by formal pro- 
cedure, thus became the first Flagplane 
ever to fly for the United States Navy . . . 
a signal honor. 

In the area of Sitka, Alaska, the 
XPB2Y-rs crew and party encountered 
exceptionally beautiful weather, and fortu- 
nately a photographer took full advantage 



of the occasion. Some of the views taken 
on that occasion are reproduced here to 
show "Why aviators leave home." Lest 
other aviators and individuals get foot- 
loose, it should be pointed out that not 
always is such perfect weather enjoyed. 
The weather was exceptional. The views 
Nos. 1 thru 13 are as follows: 

1. The snow-covered mountain range 
behind Sitka, Alaska. 

2. The XPB2Y-1 flying over water and 
islands, coming in toward Sitka from the 
north. Note that the islands and land to 
the water's edge are covered with trees. 

3. A group of islands in Sitka Harbor, 
with the rugged and towering mountains 
in the background. 

4. The U.S.S. Memphis at anchor in 
Sitka Harbor. Mount Arrowhead is in the 
background. 

5. The Memphis (Flagship of the Air- 
craft Squadron Scouting Force) steaming 



in the North Pacific, plowing through 
heavy seas between Sitka and Kodiak. 

6. Sitka, and environs, as it appears 
from the air. A patrol squadron of PBYs, 
and the Memphis are at anchor. Likewise 
the XPB2Y-1 (nearest of the airplanes) 
can be seen riding at anchor. Sitka is sit- 
uated on the upper left. The large island 
to the right is Japonski. On this is located 
the U. S. Naval Air Station of Sitka, 
Alaska. 

7. The Consolidated XPB2Y-l's (Flag- 
plane of the Aircraft Scouting Force) an- 
chored at Sitka. Atop the XPB2Y-l's hull 
are seated Admiral Cook, Congressman 
Scrugham, and Commander Crinkley. 

8. Another view of the XPB2Y-1. The 
trees are on Japonski island in the back- 
ground. 

9. A view of a bit of man-made fairy- 
land: The San Francisco Exposition. The 
XPB2Y-1 stopped at the Pan American 



January, 1940 



13 




DME... 



base on Treasure Island on the return flight 
from Sitka to disembark Congressman 
Scrugham. 

10. Another view that could hardly be 
missed at San Francisco. The Bay bridge 
from San Francisco to Oakland. 

11. On the dock at the Naval Air Sta- 
tion at Sitka. Left to right are: Com- 
mander Andrew Crinkley, Congressman 
Scrugham, Commander George R. Fair- 
lamb, Jr., and Lieut. R. S. Purvis. 

12. Looking across the bay at Sitka. Re- 
mains of the old Russian Blockhouse in 
Totem Pole Park may be seen to the left. 
Jamestown Bay is on the right and Cross 
Mountain in the background. 

13. Another of those breath-taking fly- 
ing views of the snow-covered range back 
of Sitka. Notice Clear Lake nestled in the 
crags to the left. This scene was taken 
flying from Chatham Strait to Sitka. 



THE HULL TRUTH 

By "Chuck" Farrell 

T OHN GLENN refuses to tell us how 
" he came by that name of "Bubbles." 
After kicking over a lot of damp rocks 
we have a story. Won't let it out until 
we have all the facts. If not from "Bub- 
bles" we will have to get it from his 
friends ( ? ) . 

Bob Patter's vacant stare and double 
talk had the night force worried. No one 
seemed to know just what had happened 
to the lad. When one night in answer to 
George Wire's question, Bob answered, 
"Yes, Lambie," we all knew. The boy is 
in love. The "Love Bug'' not only bit him 
it chewed him a bit. And a tweak on the 
ear did it all. She is a swell gal, Bob, and 
it happens to the best of men. 

This loud shirt business is really ex- 
panding. Latest addict is "Smokey" Stover. 
He wears a creation that looks like a house 
painter's night-mare. 

Frank Popp would like to swap his 
watch for a sun-dial or an hourglass. He 
needs something a little more accurate 
than the time-piece he now carries. 



Some Christmas suggestions you may 
want to second — 

A bag of gum drops for Louie Fischer's 
sweet tooth. 

A pair of boots to go with Jack Bryant's 
cowboy shirt. 

Boxing gloves for Tiger Jim Hawkins. 

A pair of strong glasses for Joe Drozdz. 

A motor scooter for "Gibby" Gibson, — 
a slow one. 

A dime's worth of bubble gum for John 
Glenn and John Macey. 

The Hull Basketball Team captained by 
Bob Patter is in first place in the night 
league. Seems they are the boys to beat. 
Several new members have been added 
since they started playing and the outfit 
gets better with every game. Will have a 
complete list of players and scores of past 
games later. In the meantime we wish you 
all the best of luck in the coming year. 

We understand that Ted Laven of the 
Bulkhead Dept. is taking the fatal jump 
sometime this month with Miss C. Empke. 
Best of luck, Ted! 

— H. Hershey, No. 4021. 



14 



Consolidator 



ON PRESSURE CARBURETORS .... 



By G. H. Gill, Engr. Dept. 

OPENING an engine from 200 to 
2,000 horsepower in a few seconds, 
flying upside down at several hundred 
miles an hour, expecting an engine to run 
the same at 10,000 as at 10 feet altitude, 
feeding an engine with 230 gallons of 
gasoline an hour at take-off, or only 50 
gallons for long range cruising, makes 
tough going for that old standby, the 
float type carburetor; in fact, so tough 
that it is beginning to drop back in the 
race. 

The modern carburetor has to supply the 
correct fuel mixture to an engine on the 
ground, at any altitude, right side up or 
upside down, pulling out of a dive, at 
high power or low power. It has to be as 
simple as possible, be foolproof, it cannot 
encourage vapor lock, which is the boiling 
of gasoline in the fuel system, and above 
all, it must not collect ice. The difficulty 
of meeting these demands with the float- 
type carburetor has led to the develop- 
ment of the pressure-type carburetor. In 
this type, the fuel is always under pres- 
sure from the time it leaves the fuel pump 
until it is sprayed into the intake pas- 
sage of the engine. Keeping the fuel un- 
der pressure serves two purposes: first, 
it lessens the chance of vapor lock, and 
second, it provides pressure atomization 
of the fuel as it mixes with the air enter- 
ing the engine. 

By locating the spray nozzle in the 
carburetor adapter, or actually in the en- 
gine intake to the supercharger, enough 
heat is transmitted to the mixture through 
the walls of the passage to prevent the 
formation of ice on the metallic surfaces. 

There is no really simple mechanism for 
giving the proper fuel flow to the engine 
under all conditions of operation. The 
principle of operation of the float type 
carburetor is simple, but by the time 
the carburetor is made practical, it is 
complicated. On the other hand, the pres- 
sure carburetor starts with a complicated 



SIMPLIFIED DIAGRAM-- PRESSURE OR. 
INJECTION CARBURETOR. 




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idea, but the final mechanism is relatively 
simple. 

Basically, the pressure carburetor is di- 
vided into three units: the throttle section, 
the fuel metering assembly, and the in- 
jection nozzle. 

The throttle unit is similar to an or- 
dinary float type carburetor with butter- 
fly throttle valves, throat Venturis, and 
an altitude compensator. There are in ad- 
dition, however, small Venturis held above 
the centers of the large ones. These are 
the "Boost Venturis", which control the 
flow of fuel. 

The fuel metering assembly is the heart 
of the carburetor. Its operation depends 
on the balancing of the pressures exerted 
by the flow of air and fuel through the 
carburetor. The air pressure generated by 
the impact of the entering air on the 
small impact tubes around the top of the 
carburetor is transmitted to the chamber 
A in the body of the carburetor. Chamber 
B, which is connected through another 
air passage to the throats of the boost 
Venturis, is separated from chamber A by 
the flexible diaphragm E, called the air 
diaphragm. The pressure in A and the 
vacuum in B force the diaphragm out- 
ward, opening the fuel poppet valve H in 
the fuel section of the regulator. Fuel 
thereupon flows through the valve, 
through the metering orifices, and into 
the injection nozzle. The flow through 
the metering orifices causes a certain pres- 
sure drop across the openings; this pres- 
sure is applied across another diaphragm. 



the "fuel diaphragm," in such a manner 
as to oppose the force exerted by the air 
diaphragm. Then, as the fuel flow in- 
creases, the pressure drop across the orifices 
increases, and the fuel diaphragm forces 
the valve to close slightly, this movement 
of course cutting down the fuel flow 
slightly. The control unit finally comes 
to a position where the two forces are 
balanced. In this position, the fuel is 
properly metered so as to give the cor- 
rect fuel-air ratio to the mixture going 
to the engine. If the amount of air flow- 
ing through the carburetor is changed, 
say by closing the throttle valve, the air 
force on the diaphragm decreases, the fuel 
force closes the poppet valve until the fuel 
pressure equals the air pressure, and again 
the proper mixture ratio is established. 

So far so good, but such a simple car- 
buretor would never work on an airplane. 
First, there is the matter of altitude. This 
simple carburetor would get richer and 
richer as the airplane climbed because the 
pressure from the impact tubes and the 
suction from the venturi would change 
with the density of the air. To correct this, 
an altitude compensating device is used. 
This is a gas-filled syphon bellows which 
operates a metering rod in the air passage 
between the impact tubes and the air 
chamber in the carburetor body. As the air- 
plane climbs, the pressure becomes less out- 
side of the bellows, and the gas expands. 
The expansion moves the metering rod to 
increase the restriction in the air passage, 
decreasing the air pressure on the air 



January, 1940 



15 



metering diaphragm, and so preventing its 
opening the fuel poppet valve to give an 
enrichment of the mixture at altitude. 

Moreover, the fuel air ratio is not the 
same for all engine output powers and 
operating conditions. For full power in 
take-off and high speed, it is necessary to 
have a very rich mixture. For normal op- 
eration on cruising a medium value is 
used, while for long range cruising, a 
mixture as lean as the engine can take 
without overheating or loss of power, is 
desired. In order to get the different 
ratios, the carburetor uses several fuel 
metering jets of different sizes. The pres- 
sure drop of the fuel flowing through the 
jet is the controlling factor in the fuel 
metering. This pressure drop is dependent 
on the flow and on the jet area. The smaller 
the jet, the smaller the fuel flow to give a 
certain pressure drop. 

The smallest fuel flow in the carburetor 
occurs when the engine is idling; accord- 
ingly, the idling jet is the smallest. This 
jet is the restriction in the passage F 
formed by the sloping side of the rod 
G. The fuel flows down the passage, 
through the master take-off jet in F, the 
idling jet and the cruise jet. The take-off 
and cruise jets are so large relative to 
the idle jet that there is no appreciable 
pressure drop across them at this small 
fuel flow, and the idle jet is said to "hold 
control." Now the air flow at idling is so 
small that it is insufficient to open the 
valve H, it therefore being necessary to 
use the idle spring K to hold the valve 
open. In this case, the mixture is deter- 
mined by this spring and not by the air 
pressure on the air section of the regu- 
lator. As the throttle is opened for in- 
creased power, a cam on the throttle shaft 
pulls out the idle rod, removing the re- 
striction in the passage. The cruise jet now 
becomes the smallest area in the flow and 
assumes control. This jet is much larger 
than the idle jet, so a much larger fuel 
flow through it is necessary to produce the 
pressure to operate the fuel diaphragm. At 
the same time, the increase of air flow to 
the engine has increased the pressure on 
the air diaphragm, which is reflected in 
a greater fuel flow to obtain balance. The 
regime under which the carburetor is 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

"^o optometrist t.^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



now operating is called the "Automatic 
Rich Cruising Condition." This is the 
richest cruising condition, and the fuel 
air ratio is held constant for any altitude 
by the automatic altitude control. If it is 
desired to have a leaner mixture, the 
manual mixture control is moved to 
"Automatic Lean", which inserts the pin 
L into the cruise jet, cutting down its 
area. Whatever mixture is set by the 
manual control is held automatically by 
the altitude control. 

If the normal mixture control is moved 
to the extreme lean position, the collar 
on the pin L completely closes the jet 
and the full flow is entirely shut off. This 
position is known as the "Cut off" posi- 
tion, and is used to stop the engine. Stop- 
ping an engine by cutting off the fuel 
supply insures that the engine will stop. 
It sometimes happens that if only the 
ignition is turned off, some glowing point, 
like a piece of carbon or a spark plug 
point will be able to ignite the charge 
in the cylinder. 

As the throttle is opened beyond the 
cruising condition, a third spring loaded 
diaphragm, not shown on the diagram, 
begins to open the economizer needle M. 
This action provides for the increased fuel 
flow necessary at the higher powers. In 
addition to the normal increase of fuel, 
the economizer needle enriches the mix- 
ture considerably. The fuel flow increases 
at a rate dependent on the strength of 
the spring behind the control diaphragm 
and on the taper of the needle. The maxi- 
mum fuel flow is finally limited by the 
take-off jet in the passage F. 

The metered fuel passes from the car- 
buretor proper to the spray nozzle in the 
adapter unit. The nozzle is adjusted so 
that it opens only when the fuel pressure 
is greater than 4 pounds. There are two 
reasons for this adjustment: first, this is 
the only point in the carburetor where 
the fuel is automatically shut off when the 
engine is not operating, and second, the 
fuel, being sprayed into the intake passage 



under pressure, is completely atomized. 
It is from this pressure spraying action that 
the carburetor gets its name. The spray 
has definite advantages because there is 
plenty of power available for the spray- 
ing, the pressure being derived from the 
fuel pump and not from the relatively 
small amount of power available from a 
venturi, which produces the spray in the 
ordinary carburetor. 

In addition to the major items men- 
tioned, there are a number of smaller items 
that go to make up a successful carburetor, 
one of these being the accelerator pump. 
In the pressure carburetor, this pump 
is located in the adapter casting. It con- 
sists of a chamber divided into two parts 
by a flexible diaphragm. One side of the 
chamber is connected to the air in-take 
passage below the throttle valve and has 
a spring which resists the suction from 
the intake. When the throttle is closed the 
suction is strong enough to overcome the 
spring, and the other side of the chamber, 
which is connected to the fuel pipe near 
the injection nozzle, fills with gasoline. 
(Continued on page 18) 



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16 



Consolidator 




SLAM! 



By Larry Boeing 

ACTIVITIES on the various war fronts 
Lmay be a matter of polite operations 
but activities in the Drop Hammer De- 
partment at Consolidated are anything but 
polite in manner ... or sound! 

It is in this newest of Consolidated's 
departments that metal is really "slapped" 
around into its proper place and shape. 

The department is equipt with eight 
Drop Hammers of various sizes, and this 
is a bit of an article to acquaint Consoli- 
dator readers briefly with the operations 
that cause all the noise . . . and the men 
who control the "slapping around" op- 
erations. 

First of all you must realize that sheet 
metal is pliable to an extent, compressible, 
able to stand pulling, tugging, beating, 
pounding and stretching. Like human 
muscle, it will get harder and tougher as 
you work or exercise it. But metal does 
one thing more: it becomes brittle, and 
it cracks when over-worked. Therefore 
no fighter ever entered a ring with more 
concern being exercised over his condi- 
tion than that shown for the piece of 
flat metal which goes through the drop 
hammer forming process. 

Airplanes are built up of various ma- 
terials and the choice of a particular ma- 
terial for a particular part depends upon 
the service it will be expected to perform, 
or the medium in which it will operate. 
This means that a variety of materials are 
used, each having a set of somewhat dif- 
fering characteristics which must be con- 



Plaster modeling becomes a fine art when 
it is applied in making up patterns for drop ham- 
mer dies. Many of the modelers boast of years of 
experience in diversified fields. Some are Holly- 
wood set builders, others have handled trim work 
in luxurious buildings, theaters and churches. Their 
working knowledge and their ability to handle the 
fast hardening material, cause a steady stream of 
finished patterns to be turned over to the foundry 
unit for casting. In the left background are Jake 
Mintz, Johnny Woodhead and Howard Nelson, 
checking a partially completed plaster pattern for 
correct profile. In the right rear is George Abdo 
checking a completed pattern. In the foreground 
are A. Batoletti and Johnny Gilloni working a 
pattern down to size. 

WHAM! 



sidered. Like a fighter, the hammer op- 
erator must understand these character- 
istics, and plan his "attack" accordingly. 
In the case of aluminum alloys, most 
of which are Alclad or 24ST Dural sheets 
coated with a thin layer of pure aluminum, 
the material can be worked as received, in 
the annealed condition. As it is given a 
"going over" by the hammers, it becomes 
toughened and must be annealed. This is 
accomplished by dipping the work-hard- 
ened area into a pot of molten lead, or by 



William Raymond Robbins ramming special 
moulding sand around a plaster pattern. Equipment 
is pneumatically operated as is vibration type sifter 
in background. This department is completely 
equipt with overhead handling equipment that op- 
erates over entire floor area. 

Gene Harrison, Department Foreman observing 
Don Dawson and Lon Carona pour molten "Kirk- 
site", a zinc alloy into sand mould. 



but the last few years have found more 
and more industries utilizing this process 
to advantage in their own production 
problems. Along with such usage, metal- 
lurgists have developed special steels or 
other materials best suited to this type 
of forming. 

With the development of the all-metal 
airplanes came a new technique in drop 
hammering. The high tensile aluminium 
alloys did not perform like the ferrous or 
iron base metals. Many new problems 
were encountered . . . and solved. 

This brings us to the point of consid- 
ering just how the process is utilized and 
who make the patterns and build up and 
finish the dies so that the hammer men 
can "knock out" the required items. 

First we must remember our good 
friend "Father" Coughlin and his boys 
who loft the profile templates and others 



BANG! 



giving it a heat treatment through the 
regular channels, to bring it back to the 
annealed state. In other words to bring 
the material to a uniform hardness 
throughout and remove the variances of 
hardness which might cause cracks to 
develop. 

Drop hammering is not a new process. 



which the patternmakers follow when 
making up plaster patterns. The wood- 
shop also helps with frames and large 
models of complete airplane units. These 
are delivered to John Woodhead, an old 
master at pattern-making in all its 
branches, who plans his jobs, taking into 
consideration previous determined pro- 



January, 1940 



17 



cedure that has been discussed with G. V. 
Harrison who is in charge of all drop 
hammer operations, and Al Ambrose, 
Tank department foreman; the Drop 
Hammer department being a unit of the 
Tank department. 

D. D. Dawson oversees and assists in 
the fabrication of the hard base die made 
by pouring molten "Kirksite" into the 
cavity of a sand mold. The cavity con- 
toi:rs following the shape of the previous- 
ly mentioned plaster cast or model. 

W. Sweethorn and his boys make the 
lead punches by pouring molten lead into 
a form built about the hard Kirksite, or 
zinc alloy die. The surface of the die is 
given a protective coating, and this pre- 
vents any adhesion between the punch 
and die. 

R. Jamison and his helpers finish the 
cast punches and dies to correct size by 
working them to templates furnished by 
the Loft department. 

C. F. Pjerrou is in charge of all actual 
hammering processes and is direct assistant 
to supervisor G. V. Harrison. Both of 
these men have had years of hammer ex- 
perience. Gene Harrison has spent much 
time with drop hammers, having worked 
at several aircraft factories, and he is well 
acquainted with modern aircraft con- 
struction. 

This department with its elaborate 
equipment, all massive in size, owes a 
great deal of its smoothness of operation 
to the carefully laid plans and installa- 
tions of equipment. Much time and effort 
were expended and problems were dis- 
cussed with leaders in the construction en- 
gineering field to determine the correct 
type of base needed to absorb the shock 




when dies weighing as much as six tons 
are "rammed" together. 

All this force is required to mold, press 
or hammer the piece of material into its 
required shape. Yes, aircraft materials are 
tough, and nothing less than a Dempsey 
or Louis wallop can make it stay put. 

Three types of hammers are in use: 
Pneumatic, hydraulic and a rope con- 
trolled unit. Their operation control is so 
sensitive that seasoned operators can ex- 
ert any degree of "Wallop" they desire, 
from light speedy "jabs" to "knockout 
wallops." 

Drop hammering necessitates prelim- 
inary design study, and its advantage is 
the elimination of parts by combining 
into one detail all the separate details 
usually found in riveted aircraft con- 
structions. The savings in time and man- 
ufacturing costs make the use of drop 
hammer parts a practical necessity. 

True, this department is noisy, and the 



1. Powerful and cflicicnt handling equipment 
marks the Drop Hammer Department as an ex- 
ample of modern manufacturing efficiency. 

In this picture Joe Havelick and Jack Scott arc 
grinding a large die block while Lou Carona op- 
erates the pneumatic overhead hoist. At the con- 
trols of the Lift Pipe Platform truck is Cloyd 
Coates. The truck with a capacity of 30,000 lbs., 
is practically indispensable. The platform can be 
elevated to correspond with the level of the Ham- 
mer Bed. By an arrangement of sheaves and 
pulleys the truck's power unit can be utilized to 
skid the dies into place without manual effort. 

2. Dies are bolted or clamped into position and 
Lloyd Barkuloo is giving the setup a final checkup 
before the sheet material is inserted between the 
halves of the dies. This photo shows, besides the 
sturdiness of construction of the Hammer itself, 
the control mechanism and air exhaust muffler. 
The die shown is making both halves of a unit in 
one operation. 

bank of hammers are usually referred to 
as "Thunder Row", but all the noise seems 
necessary because a good fight is going 
on. A stubborn sheet of material doesn't 
want to be somebody, so the drop hammer 
man just takes it and changes its mind 
. . . Slam WHAM! BANG!! 



CROSSWORD PUZZLE 

Engineer W. E. Eldred engineered this 
neat bit of crossword puzzle into existence 
... so, go to it, you puzzle fans . . . 
but just remember that taking clews and 
solving for the mystery is an easy task, 
alongside of composing a mystery! Note 
that the "theme" of this crossword stickler 
is a formation flight of PBYs, with a few 
scattered clouds. It'll be nice flying if you 
can sail thru this in an hour . . . and don't 
question the definitions. We did, and Mr. 
Webster is still chuckling over our ignor- 
ance. 



VERTICAL 

1 . Agreement. 

2. Preposition. 

J. Compass Point. 

4. Conjunction. 

5. Behold. 

6. Dictator Nation. 

7. Accomplish. 

8. A measure of area. 

9. And (FR.) 



10. Prosecuting Officer 

(Abbr.) 
14. Pastry Makers. 
16. Preceding in Time. 

18. A Resinous Sub- 
stance. 

19. Across. 

21. Ore Refinery. 

26. A Dupe. 

27. Relate. 



1 


2 


3 




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£ 


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lo. 


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13 




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73 




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2 9. Bird. 

30. Selected Menus. 
34. Especially (Abbr.) 

3 6. Frequently. 

3 9. Carriage for Hand- 
ling Airplane on 
Ground. 

40. Perfect Golf. 



42. Layout Dept. of 

Aircraft Plant. 
4S. Preposition. 

47. Musical Note. 

48. Type of Electrical 
Current. 

5 0. To Be. 



HORIZONTAL 

I.San Diego Concern. 

11. Unit. 

12. Lifting Part of Auto 
Gyro. 

13. Auxiliary Control 
Surface. 

1 ^ . Decade. 

17. Metallic Mixture. 
20. Request. 

22. Sun Deity. 

23. Always. 

24. Personal Pronoun. 

2 5. Region Covered by 
Wilkins in Guba 
No. I. 

2 8. Airplane Control 

Surface. 



31. Aid to Solution. 

32. Lubricants. 

33. Rudder Control 
(Naut.) 

3y. Desire. 

37. Measurement of 

Length (Pi.) 
3 8. Honored by Feast. 

40. A Lever. 

41. Flier. 

43. Sign at Full Theatre. 

44. Edge. 
46. Carrion. 
49. Friend. 

5 1 . Government Sanc- 
tion of Commercial 
Plane or Engine. 

5 2. Pronoun. 



"I see they have barred Camels from 
the streets of Jerusalem because of the 
hazard to traffic. " 

"Well, maybe they know their business, 
but over here we could use some traffic 
that could go seven days without a drink." 



18 



Consolidator 



PRESSURE CARBURETORS 

(Continued from page 151 
When the throttle is opened, the vacuum 
is broken and the spring, pressing against 
the diaphragm, forces the charge of gaso- 
hne through the connecting tube to the 
nozzle and out into the intake. In this 
way, when the throttle is opened, the 
extra quantity of fuel necessary for accel- 
eration is injected into the engine. Another 
item, which guards against vapor lock, is 
a small float and valve in the passage 
where the gasoline enters the carburetor. 
Any air or vapor entrapped in the fuel 
is liberated and rises to the top of the 
chamber and when enough has accumu- 
lated, the float opens the valve and allows 
the gas to escape. 

So, though the carburetor may begin 
simply enough, by the time it does this, 
and has to take care of that, it begins to 
get complicated. It represents years of 
experience in practical operation, months 
of skilled engineering to meet its prob- 
lems, and many hours of machining to 
make the precision parts of which it is 
made. 



BEHIND THESE DOORS 

SERVrCE AND ECONOMY 




SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINT HEADQUARTERS 

^9C 



PRinT - UJRLLPnPER 

BroadLuav a^ Tenth 



AERONAUTICAL I. Q. 

1. What country holds the landplane 
maximum altitude record? 

2. How does the United States rank 
with other countries regarding Interna- 
tional Aircraft records as given in latest 
FAT'' reports? 

3. Name the country ranking first in 
official aircraft records. 

4. The first military "aeroplane" in 
the world made by Wright Brothers is 
located in what country and where? 

5. How many aircraft manufacturers 
are there in the United States? 

6. Air transport lines in the U. S. are 
now operating how many airplanes on 
domestic and foreign routes? 

7. The first airmail route established 
by the Post Office Department was be- 
tween what two cities? 

8. Federal Airways within the United 
States cover how many miles? 

9. How many pilots hold certificates 
in ths U. S. at present? 

10. The only flying boat that ever 
flew around the world and at the world's 
greatest diameter was built by what man- 
ufacturer? 

'■Federation Aeronaucique Internationale. 

(Answers Page 24) 

TID BITS 

By Bill GHchrht 

You wouldn't give much for a man's 
word if he won't keep it . . . and no one 
else will take it. 

Life is full of ups and downs . . . 
keeping expenses down and appearances 
up! 

Just about the time you get a youngster 
taught to talk, you insist on his keeping 
quiet. 

What do you suppose makes the western 
prairies so flat? The sun sets on them every 
night. 




Personal Supervision of the Owners Assures Careful Consideration of 

Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Always Reasonable 

Conveniently Located— Ample Free Parking 



JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and A(h St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 61ifl 



"THINGS WORTH WHILE" 

He rang in a little sooner 

Than the fellows in the shop . . . 
And stayed a little longer 

When the whistle ordered "stop" . . - 
He worked a little harder 

And he talked a little less 
And he seemed but little hurried 

And he showed but little stress. 
For every little moment 

His efficiency expressed , . . 
Thus his envelope grew just 

A little thicker than the rest . . . 
He saved a little money 

In a hundred little ways . . . 
He banked a little extra 

When he got a little raise 
A little "working model" 

Took his little leisure time 
He wrought each little part of it 

With patience sublime . . . 

Now it's very little wonder 

That he murmurs with a smile . . . 
As he clips his little coupons . . . 

"Aren't the little things worth while?" 

— Selected — Bill Gilchrist. 

The Curtiss Propeller division of 
Curtiss-Wright Corp. has announced the 
development with the cooperation of the 
U. S. Army Air Corps, of the first four- 
bladed controlable propeller. To absorb the 
horsepower being developed in some of the 
new engines with the now conventional 
three-bladed propellers, it would be nec- 
essary to increase the diameter to such an 
extent that a larger and heavier landing 
gear would be necessary. With the shorter 
four-bladed propellers the engines can be 
spaced closer together with a saving in 
wing structure weight. 

Flight Analyzer Barograph 
Checks Altitudes 

One transcontinental airline recently 
made installation of "flight analyzers," 
automatic recording instruments which 
continuously chart altitudes maintained 
by planes during flight, rates of climb and 
descent, and other pertinent flight infor- 
mation. 

Before every flight, a sealed barograph 
is installed in the rear of the plane. In the 
device is a fresh chart of the division, 
scaled to time and altitude. Self-inking 
pens, one actuated by a barograph and the 
other electrically, record the elevation of 
the plane as it climbs, maintains cruising 
level and descends, and also the periods 
during which the automatic pilot controls 
the flight and when the ship's radio trans- 
mitter is in use. At the completion of the 
flight, the sealed instrument is removed. 
Its chart is analyzed to check the altitudes 
maintained during ever\' minute of the 
flight, as well as other features of the trip. 

Thus the flight analyzer provides a 
positive check on the maintenance of the 
prescribed flight altitudes on every di- 
vision of the airline svstem. 



January, 1940 



19 




The Consolidated built American Export Airlines' twin-engined survey ship caught as she tlcw out of 
New York on one of her trans-Atlantic flights. Note the Statue of Liberty. 

AMERICAN EXPORT AIRLINES FLIGHTS 
(Crews of 6— Model 28) 











Buoy 


to Buoy 








Miles 


T 


me 


Date 


From 


To 


Statute 


(Hrs. 


Min.) 


6/30/39-7/1/39 


New York Horta, Fayal, Azores 


2,384 


16 


58 


7/2/39 


Horta 


Lisbon, Portugal 


1,053 


8 


01 


7/3/39 


Lisbon 


Biscarrosse, France 
(via Cape Finisterre) 


718 


6 


01 


7/4/39 


Biscarrosse 


Marseilles, France 
(via Garonne Valley) 


356 


3 


01 


7/6/39 


Marseilles 


Biscarrosse, Lisbon 


1,074 


8 


55 


7/7/39 


Lisbon 


Horta (survey San Miguel 
and Pico) 


1,100 


10 


24 


7/8/39-7/9/39 


Horta 


New York 


2,384 


22 


48 


7/14/39 


New York Botwood, Nfld. 


1,070 


7 


11 


7/14/39-7/15/39 


Botwood 


Foynes, Ireland 


1,995 


14 


10 


7/16/39 


Foynes 


Biscarrosse, Marseilles 


730 


8 


56 


7/17/39 


Marseilles 


Marseilles, Biscarrosse, Foynes 


730 


8 


39 


7/19/39-7/20/39 


Foynes 


Halifax, N. S. 


2,502 


23 


01 


7/20/39 


Halifax 


New York 


589 


4 


40 


7/28/39 


New York Botwood 


1,070 


7 


51 


7/28/39-7/29/39 


Botwood 


Biscarrosse 


2,528 


18 


27 


8/1/39 


Biscarrosse 


St. Nazaire, France, Biscarrosse 


450 


4 


01 


8/2/39 


Biscarrosse 


Lisbon (via Cape Finisterre) 


718 


5 


50 


8/3/39 


Lisbon 


Horta (survey of Terceira, 
Graciosa) 


1,100 


8 


53 


8/3/39-8/4/39 


Horta 


New York 


2,384 


19 


45 



Total 24,93 5 St. Miles 



OPTOMETRISTS 

" -a^A N D I eg^ 

• EYES EXAMINED TERMS 

. GLASSES FITTED 

. GLASSES REPAIRED M. 3203 

506 Bank of America Building Fifth Floor 



^939 FIFTH AVE. J 



' 'S&H" 

STAMPS 
GIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES 

£__ K^FN America's Most Famous 



Union-made Shoes 



^5 



One day Mark Twain arrived in a 
Canadian hotel and, glancing over the 
register, took note of the signature of the 
last arrival. 

"Baron and valet." 

Twain signed and the clerk looked at 
the register and found: 

"Mark Twain and Valise." — Curtiss Fly 
Leaf. 

•41 

Hotel Clerk: "Why don't you wipe the 
mud off your shoes when you come in?" 
Hillbilly: "What shoes?" 

•« 

An eastern Dude came out west and 
bought a small ranch. He then found that 
he had an even $100 left with which to 
stock it, and also found that he could buy 
calves for $10 each, lambs for $3 each, 
.ind rabbits for 50c each. He decided he 
wanted some of all these animals on his 
ranch, and being of a mathematical turn 
of mind, he figured out how he could buy 
an even 100 animals with his $100. How 
many of each did he buy? 

(Answer Page 21 ) 

BEAUTIFUL AND DUMB 

Both beautiful and dumb 

Must my true love be. 
Beautiful, so I'll love her. 

And dumb, so she'll love me. 



GOODRICH 

HAS MOVED 

905 B STREET 



Convenient Credit Ex- 
tended to all Consoli- 
dated Employees 



Goodrich 

Silvertown Stores 



905 B Street Phone F. 6258 



20 



Consolidator 



MOUNT WHITNEY CLIMB... 



By D. R. Kern 



THE Consolidated mountain goats, a 
dozen in number set out one Friday 
night last month for Lone Pine and 
Whitney Portal to conquer Mount Whit- 
ney the ultimate goal of all mountain 
lovers. The group or "herd" of goats 
consisting of George Landy, Cora Hotch- 
kiss, Walter Beyer, Mrs. Beyer, Arnold 
Kaiser, Joe Williamson, Henry Mandolf, 
Dean Carlson, Pauline McEwen, Tom 
Gascoyne, Jones and Russ Kern, left the 
Portal (8371') about 6 a.m., after a few 
hours rest in the clear, cold mountain air 
above Owens Valley. 

The scenic trail starts its long thirteen 
mile zig-zag about fourteen miles west 
of Lone Pine at beautiful Hunters Flat, 
between mighty granite walls. Lone Pine 
creek is followed for several miles and is a 
sight long to be remembered with its turb- 
ulent waters cascading over many beautiful 
waterfalls. Lone Pine lake was passed at 
9,975' just before coming to the 
meadows of Ibex Park at Mt. Whitney 
Outpost camp (10,300') where "sissy" 
mountain climbers usually park for the 
night before their attack of majestic 




• VALUE • 

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THE 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

—J or — 

BUILDING-MATERIALS 

YOU GET REAL VALUE FOR EVERY DOLLAR SPENT 



EVERVThlNC ■•"^-BtlUllNe- 

I I II ^1 I I 1 II ^ J^ > \msmm^^mt—9- 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

V 41!8Univerilty • Oceanlldc -ElCenlro > 



Whitney. Here we had breakfast and a 
half hour's rest under stately pines before 
launching out into thinner air. At about 
11,500' just above mirror lake and under 
the last stunted wind-torn pine and cedar 
trees of the timber line four of our party 
had to retire due to lack of what it takes. 
A few miles further on we entered a 
world of mighty walls and boulder strewn 
basins with beautiful Consultation lake 
to our left. In this wilderness of stone, 
some of the loveliest of high country 
wild flowers grow. Here beside rushing 
Lone Pine creek with its cold snow-water 
we camped for an hour eating our lunch 
and napping in the sunshine at about 
12,000'. Here also, unable to get up due 
to tightening muscles, we left another 
member of our party. The seven remain- 
mg goats pushed onward and upward 
thru fields of everlasting snow zig-zagging 
up the steepest slope which forms the 
great divide of the mighty Sierras. We 
had an experience many mountain climb- 
ers do not get when nearin? the divide. 
Four workers were blasting out a new 
easier trail high above us and it was 
thrilling to watch the tons of rock come 
tumbling down thundering thousands of 
feet below and plunging into snow fields. 
We reached the Whitney Pass (13,380') 
about 4:30 and stopped to rest brieflv on 
the backbone of the Sierras just inside of 
Sequoia National Park. To the west lav 
the vast wilderness of the D^rk. many small 
lakes with their crv"^tal clear waters, the 
Kern river canyon and over the great 
western divide the haze of the San Toaauin 
valley. To the east the Owens vallev with 
the Inyo mountains and Death Valley be- 
yond. 

A short distance bevond the pass the 
trail drops to the base of Muir Peak, a wild 
crag over 14,000' high named in honor 
of the well known John Muir. naturalist, 
author and first president of the Sierra 
Club, then continues unward, clinging to 
the steeo west side of the mountain, from 
time to time crossing the bottoms of 
giant notches in the main ridge, enabling 
us to get startling glimpses of the Owens 
va'Iev and mounta-ns bevond. 

As darkness came upon us we were 
slowly making our way over the gentle 
granite strewn west face or top of Mt. 
Whitney itself, reaching the old stone 
shelter (built by the Smithsonian Institute 
for cosmic ray research work in 1909), 
about seven o'clock. We were so tired out 
we could barely prepare our evening meal 
and so cold it took quite an effort to move 




any part of our bodies. We made a fire 
but the smoke drove us out the shelter. So 
we just ""collapsed" on the ground floor 
of the hut wrapping ourselves in blankets 
until morning. 

During the long, long hours of the 
night the peak was attacked by three 
severe snow storms and everything was 
white next morning. It was so cold our 
food all froze during the night so it was 
quite a task eating breakfast. 

A plaque listing the names of our party 
was cemented to a huge granite block 
N.W. of the six-foot rock cairn which 
stands on the very eastern edge of the 
summit 14,496'. 

Looking straight down, over 2,000' be- 



A 
FRIENDLY 



f^m 



H'^fHiev 



SERVICE , 




''inimti 



January, 1940 



21 



low the eastern edge one sees a beautiful 
little lake, the highest in America, with a 
large mass of emerald green ice in the 
center. Far in the valley below "hair line" 
roads were seen shining in the sun as it 
had been raining all night. Vast 
panoramas could be seen thru open- 
ings in the clouds. And what a sight to 
behold. There we were actually looking 
down upon the tops of mountains more 
than 13,000 and 14,000 feet high. To 
the southeast we could see the location of 
Death Valley and the lowest point in the 
United States 14,776' feet below us. 

We all signed the "Who's Who" in the 
Sierra Club register box before departing 
at seven a.m. after exactly twelve hours 
on the summit — all feeling fine and in 
high spirits to think we were the highest 
citizens in the U.S.A. for the night — in- 
cluding those traveling over any airline too 
as we were nearly three miles above sea 
level. 

BUOYS WILL BE SERVED 

Consolidated has two buoys for moor- 
ing the flying boats in the bay. There is 
but one anchorage between them, how- 
ever. This enables one buoy to be serviced 
ashore while the other does duty, and they 
require servicing every now and then as 
time affords. The buoys are plenty stout, 
heavy, and until recently, quite awk- 
ward to handle, since in addition to the 
buoys it is necessary to hang onto about 
30 feet of IVg-inch stud link chain, 
which is attached to a large block of con- 
crete resting in the mud in the bottom of 
the bay. 

If you've ever tried to handle a heavy 
and bulky object over the side or stern 
of a skiff, you'll appreciate why a special 
servicing float was rigged up, utilizing a 
number of full-sized paint drums for 
buoyancy, to which is attached a work 
platform with a tripod arranged in the 
center over a large hole in the platform. 
The tripod arrangement allows a sling or 
hoist to be rigged directly over the moor- 
ing buoy when it is necessary to carry out 
the servicing operation. The pull is then 
directly over the center of buoyancy and 
not off center as it would be with a boat. 
The new servicing float also serves ad- 
mirably alongside any of the flying boats, 
should servicing be required from outside 
as they ride at their moorings. 

A solid cloud depth of 22,000 feet was 
recently observed. 

Answer: 5 calves, 1 lamb, and 94 
rabbits. 




Top: New species of deer. Center: The usual 
species of deer. Below: Glenn Hotchkiss set his 
camera, ran and got in the picture (using a tim- 
ing device). 

"DANIEL BOONE" MacEWAN 

Four years ago this fall, Harry Mac- 
Ewan, while deer hunting on Thomas 
Mountain, spotted a swell looking deer 
which was so far away he could not de- 
termine whether it had horns or not. He 
maneuvered around by crawling and 
sneaking through the brush for nearly an 
hour, so that he could get close enough to 
make a sure thing of it. With his gun to 
his shoulder he cautiously raised up to 
look at a beautiful, brown-eyed Jackass. 
It being too good to keep, he told us of 
his misfortune, but at the same time vowed 
there'd be a day. 



On Friday, Oct. 13, 1939, Mike Koll- 
man. Hap Forsythe, Glenn Hotchkiss and 
our "Hero" set out for the Aguanga 
Mountains and at daybreak were all sit- 
uated on nice lookouts near the peak. 
About 7:30 A.M. Harry turned his head 
to see a beautiful buck standing not thirty 
feet away. After a slight touch of "buck 
fever," and scattering two random shots, 
he connected with a beautiful shot. Harry 
immediately sat down to recover before 
giving the deer a close inspection. As he 
sat there, dreaming of venison steak and 
other things good, a nice three point buck 
made the fatal mistake of clipping a 
branch with its horn. Again Harry cut 
loose, but this time with his second shot 
caught him in mid-air with a perfect neck 
shot, just to make good that vow. 

After considerable explaining, photo- 
graphing and demonstrative shooting by 
Harry, we started winding our way down 
the mountain realizing how true it is that 
a man can be down but not out. Instead 
of "Jackass" MacEwan, he is now known 
as "Daniel Boone" MacEwan. 




S. J. WINES COFFEE CO. 
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BOWLING NEWS 

By H. K. Clay 

WITH the coming of the New Year 
and the Consair bowling leagues 
nearing the midway point of their com- 
petition, statisticians of the Sunshine Alleys 
are busy gathering data on the various 
teams and individuals. Four teams are set- 
ting a wicked pace for the pilot's seat of 
the fourteen team league whereas two 
quints are making the strongest bids for 
top honors of the Engineers circuit. 

The Production No. 1 team with Har- 
vey Muck at the helm has the advantage 
with 3 3 points won and 1 1 lost while the 
Finish team made up of M. Speed, Ed 
Drews, Ed Banks, Larry Granstedt and 
Roy Combs is hot on their trail with 3 1 
won and 13 lost. Third position is held 
jointly by the No. 2 team from Produc- 
tion and the Engineering quintet, each 
team having cornered 30 points and lost 14. 

Of the Engineers' league The Arma- 
ment group is in the driver's seat with 27 
won and 13 lost, and the Flap team is 
matching scores with 26 wins and 14 
losses. 

Three teams have won top honors to 
date for perfect attendance. The Pur- 
chasing team made up of Frank Meer, 
Eddie Jones, Frank Fields, Paul Hoch and 
Frank Gary have yet to take a penalty for 
an absent player. A similar record is en- 
joyed by the Engineering team composed 
of M. C. Weber, A. H. Kimble, Carl 
Heim, Irving Craig and Tom J. Coughlin. 
The league leaders. Production No. 1 with 
W. N. Liddle, Jim Wilkinson, Lloyd 
Bender, Harvey Muck and Arnold Springer 
on its roster have likewise had a perfect 
showup record. 



In going over the records it was de- 
cided that "Whitey" Dake of the Tank 
team proved himself to be the most valu- 
able player in the league, with second 
honors in this connection going to Roy 
Coykendall of Production No. 2. "Whitey" 
has rolled in every match since the start 
of the league and failed to bowl his start- 
ing average but once. Roy Coykendall 
fell below his average twice but his superb 
shooting in the past six weeks gives him 
second honors. 

The highest average of the league is 
accredited to Hal Leppart of Production 
No. 2 who has amassed a total of 65 31 
pins during the 36 games for an average 
of 1 8 1 surpassing the mark of Mike Brooks 
of Hull No. 1 who has a grand total of 
6369 pins with an average of 176. 

The highest three game series to date 
was turned in by Hal Leppart who 
burned up the Sunshine lanes with a siz- 
zling 639. Roy Combs of the Finish team 
polled a 62 5 for second honors while third 
spot of this division goes to Mike Brooks 
with a 607. 

A further survey of the Sunshine records 
show that in addition to the foregoing 
scorers high team series were registered as 
follows: Eddie Lang, Experimental, 602; 
W. G. Erickson, Maintenance, 5 89; Louis 
Peters, Machine Shop, 58 5; T. J. Coughlin, 
Engineering, 581; Frank Gary, Purchas- 
ing, 573; W. N. Liddle, Production No. 1, 
547; "Whitey" Dake, Tank, 542; Stephen 
Gardner, Hull No. 2, 532; Louis Miller, 
Raw Material, 531; Bert Freakley, Sheet 
Metal, 502, and R. Knapp, Final Assembly, 
492. 

Of the Engineers' league Tom Coughlin 
topped the Loft No. 1 by copping a 594 
series, Irving Craig showed the way to 
the Loft No. 2 team with 540, Louis Loyka 
paced the Loft No. 3 team with 488, and 
Ken Whitney starred for the Fixed Equip- 
ment gang with top score of 505. A. C. 
Holden has a 5 50 series to his credit and 
leads the Hull team while Walter George 



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SAFEl/ITAY 



is pacing the Armament crew with 505. 
Harlan Fowler has a clinch on the Flap 
department keglers with 5 1 5 and A. Abels 
paved the way for General by pegging a 
522 series. 

Two quints are off to a bad start and 
will certainly be compelled to do some- 
thing better in the future unless they ex- 
pect to remain in the doghouse. The Raw 
Material and Final Assembly teams have 
only obtained a morsel or two in the 
league pin-biflfing contests and their out- 
look seems anything but optimistic. They 
have had so many changes in their team 
personnel that consistent shooting to them 
has been an utter impossibility. In a handi- 
cap league they should be making a much 
better showing and perhaps they will snap 
out of it after the first of the year. 

Irving Craig of the Engineers has com- 
plained that the shadows on the alleys in- 
terfere with his kegling. Last week he 
turned in games of 193-212 and 156 for 
a 561 total. If the lighting system at the 
Sunshine were altered to appease the wrath 
of the irrepressible Irving the rest of the 
teams might not have a chance. And per- 
haps there may be more truth than poetry 
in this quip. 

What are we going to do with W. G. 
Erickson, lead-off man for Maintenance 
who tours the layout for 589 in the Pur- 
chasing-Maintenance match? Erick started 
out with 200 then tallied 169 and trotted 
home with a mere 220. That is the kind 
of kegling that warms the heart of the 
most frigid team captain. 

Roy Combs of the Finish team has 
finally let his light out of the bushel 
basket. On December 15 th, Roy accumu- 
lated a 625 series, getting games of 168, 
242 and 215 in so doing. For the benefit 
of the public we might add that Combs, 
despite his apparent naivete is one of the 
city's most experienced tournament 
players. We recall his being on several 
title holding teams in the distant past and 
remember that he was usually regarded as 
the spark plug of the team. 

The league standings at press time fol- 
low: 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



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23 



CONSAIR LEAGUE 

Won Lost 

Production No. 1 33 11 

Finish 31 13 

Production No. 2 30 14 

Engineering 30 14 

Purchasing 28 16 

Hull No. 1 28 16 

Experimental 2 5 19 

Maintenance 24 20 

Machine Shop 23 21 

Hull No. 2 16 28 

Tank 14 30 

Final Assembly 8 36 

Raw Material 6 38 

ENGINEERS' LEAGUE 

Armament 27 13 

Flap 26 14 

Loft No. 2 23 17 

Loft No. 1 21 19 

Hull 18 22 

Loft No. 3 19 21 

General 17 23 

Fixed Equipment 11 29 
»^ 

UJINGS AGAINST THE SKY 

Have you ever thought of the aero- 
plane? 

Of the fragments of dreams, wooed 
and wrought through hours of computa- 
tions and calculations, until they become 
blue prints? 

Of the minds and machines and hands 
of men? 

Of the experience and craftsmanship 
from past generations? Of the product 
woven until there is no more to be added, 
no more to be taken away? 

Of the beauty and symmetry of the 
finished plane as your eyes follow its flight 
through the sky? 

This miracle that has happened because 
of the dreams that were, and the eager- 
ness of minds and hands of men to do? 

It is as if every hand that had an in- 
finitesimal part in its fabrication were 
moulded into one miraculous hand that 
sculptured this flawless thing out of 
nature. 

These dreams, these calculations, these 
hours spent, the many hands, find their 
reward as the eye follows the grace and 
beauty of — Wings Against the Sky! 

— Odin L. Thaanum. 

A Russian parachute jumper, Y. M. 
Solodovnik, recently made a parachute 
jump from 32,808 feet . . . said to be the 
first from the region of the stratosphere. 
He wore a special suit . . . got down in 
22 minutes, drifted 10 miles. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



CHAMBER STORY 

It's going the rounds, this story which 
is supposed to have taken place in a 
California Chamber of Commerce: It 
seems that one of the local farmers had 
brought in an exceptionally large water- 
melon, and it was on display at the Cham- 
ber. A very loyal Chamber of Commerce 
man was guarding it from harm. In walked 
a stranger, and placing his hand on the 
watermelon inquired, "What is this, an 
alligator pear?" 

The indignant guard of the prize was 
aghast. "Alligator pear? Say, where are you 
from anyway?" 

"Why, I'm from Florida." 

"That's what I thought," retorted the 
guard. "Get your dirty hands off that 
olive!" 

The stakes were piling up mighty high. 
Finally Rastus says, "Ah call yo. What 
has yo got?" 

"Brother, Ah is got fo' aces! What is 
yo' got?" 

"Ah is got fo' kings . . . and a razor." 

"Rastus, yo' always was lucky." 



THAT'S RIGHT. 

YOU'RE WRONG! 

How do you pronounce the word 
A-L-T-I-M-E-T-E-R ? Most persons 
pronounce this word, common to aircraft 
usage, with the accent on the first syllable: 
Al'timeter. That's wrong, according to 
the dictionary. The correct pronouncia- 
tion places the accent on the second sylla- 
ble, thus: AI tim'eter! What's the reason? 
Units of measure, such as centimeter and 
decimeter have the accent placed on the 
first syllable, whereas measuring devices 
(thermometer, barometer and speedo- 
meter) have the accent on the second 
syllable. Therefore al TIM'eter! 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



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Consolidator 



San Diego Flying Club News 

By Frank C. Buzzelli 

ON December 17, 1903, two young 
men, Orville and Wilbur Wright 
made the first heavier-than-air flight at 
Kitty Hawk, N. C. 

In commemoration of this historical 
date, the Alpha Eta Rho and San Diego 
Flying Clubs held their second competitive 
air meet at Linda Vista Airport. A huge 
crowd gathered to watch members of these 
clubs test their skill as pilots and bombers, 
in a contest, consisting of bomb dropping, 
balloon bursting, paper cutting and spot 
landing. 

The judges were Lt. (jg) Richard Burns, 
U.S.N., Lt. (jg) Preston, U.S.N., Ensign 
Engle, U.S.N. , Jean Tappan of the Alpha 
Eta Rho Club, Don Frome of the Experi- 
mental Dept. also members of Alpha Eta 
Rho, and Carl Hunnaman, Treasurer of 
the San Diego Flying Club. 

Deane Raine of Ryan Aeronautics was 
at the microphone all day and did a mighty 
fine job. Deane has a private license. 

A unique and simple method of scoring 
was used. Miss Alberta Jones was the score- 
keeper, a beautiful co-ed from State Col- 
lege. 

In the balloon bursting contest, each 
contestant released two balloons at 1500 
feet; there was a 100-second time limit in 



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which to burst the balloon from the time 
it was released, scoring one point for each 
second. The best score for this event was 
made by Jack Berg of the San Diego Flying 
Club. His average was 13.5 seconds. 

In paper cutting the scoring was the 
same as in the balloon bursting, but each 
contestant cut the ribbon twice and his 
time counted from the time of his first 
cut to the second. John Menefee of Alpha 
Eta Rho won this event with and aver- 
age of 12 seconds. 

The bomb dropping was done from an 
altitude of 500 feet. Measuring from the 
center of the target to the spot where 
bomb hit, one point was given for each 
foot away from center. This contest was 
won by our own President Butterfield, 
and Bill Travis. Their average was 30 for 
the two bombs. 

In the spot landing competition the 
throttle was cut over the spot and a 
normal 180° or 360° turn executed. The 
landing was to be made between two 
lines 100 feet apart. If the landing 
was made before the first line or be- 
yond the second line the contestant re- 
ceived 100 points for that landing. The 
measurement was made from the first line 
to the point where the tail skid remained 
on the ground. This eliminated bouncing 
the tail skid in an effort to get a good 
score. 

Frank Graham of Alpha Eta Rho won 
this event with an average of 53.9. Frank 
passed the preliminary phase of Navy 
training at Long Beach last summer and 
expects to go to Pensacola later this month. 
He has a hmited commercial license. 

All in all it was a nice meet and every- 
thing went off smoothly. It was pretty 
obvious that the Alpha Eta Rho Club 
practiced consistently since our last air 
meet in the spring. They were determined 
not to let us win 2 cups straight and 
showed it by displaying some mighty fine 
precision flying in their turns, spit S's 
and wing overs. 

It was a close battle for possession of 
the trophy emblematic of superiority, but 
the Alpha Eta Rho Club won it and we 
congratulate them. They have a fine bunch 
of boys, and are real sportsmen. 

Henry Lebofle of the San Diego Flying 



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Club and C. R. Page of Alpha Eta Rho 
headed the committee of each club in 
making preparations. 

Bill Travis and Bud Seltenreich have 
been checked out for their first solo hop 
recently. Two of the members also received 
their solo hcense. Jack Hospers and Bob 
Johnston. 

It would be nice for any of the fellows 
that have a few minutes to spare, to visit 
Clifford Peel, a fellow member. Cliff just 
had an appendix operation. Stop in and 
wish him well. 

Our brand new Continental engine ar- 
rived from the factory last Friday and 
under the supervision of our flight in- 
structor, several of the boys worked 'till 
2 A.M. Saturday changing the engines in 
the Cub. The old engine had 1600 hours 
on it. 

AIN'T IT ODD? 

Glenn Hotchkiss tells this one: The 
other morning as he came to work he ran 
out of gas. He was lucky and coasted into 
a gas station. It was late, he was in a 
hurry to get to the plant, and all he had 
was a $20.00 bill. The proprietor had 
difficulty in making the change. Hotch- 
kiss said, "Well, if you'll trust me I'll 
come in this noon and pay you. I'm in an 
awful hurry." 

"No, Sir," came back the reply. "We 
had a fellow do that once and he never 
came back!" The proprietor rounded up 
$15.00 and gave it to Glenn, then said 
he'd have to go clear up to the house to 
get the balance. 

Glenn said, "Say, listen, will you trust 
me to come back for my change?" 

The fellow said, "Yes." 

ANSWERS 

1. Italy (56,046'). 

2. Fifth (let's get going). 

3. Germany. 

4. U. S. Smithsonian. 

5. Thirty. 

6. 346. 

7. Washington and New York. 

8. 2 5,000 miles. 

9. 26,144. 

10. Coitsolidafcd. 



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HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

By "Willie" Winchell 

T T 7E welcome back Harlan Dye who 

» V has been sojourning up North. 
Harlan says all the rumors about his be- 
ing married are just that. He claims to 
be sane, yet! 

We understand that Clyde Walker has 
made application to change his name since 
a certain incident which happened at the 
County Hospital. Clyde still says, he's not 
a papa — but can there be two C. E. 
Walkers on the same street in the same 
block? 

Johnnie Goodall stole a march on the 
boys and got himself married to cute little 
Rachel Kvondal of National City. Seems 
like they all fall sooner or later. Best 
wishes for future happiness, Johnny. Don't 
forget those cigars. 

Frank Kastelic has invested considerable 
money for his Christmas present this year. 
He has gone, hook, line and sinker for 
electric train sets and has a complete out- 
fit — remote control, switches, reverse, etc. 
Frank still claims he bought it for his 
young son but little junior is only two 
years old so we still say they make a swell 
gift for a son to give his father. 

Al Milley knows by now that a nibbling 
machine can't be used to trim finger nails. 
Seems hke Al tried to do just that and 
forgot the nail was part of his finger. Oh 
well, what's one hunk of finger more 
or less? 

Somebody ought to tell Goodbody that 
if and when you eat fish you're not sup- 
posed to eat the bones too. He got one 
caught in his throat and couldn't swallow 
anything but soup for a week. 

We wonder what Al Gatchell was doing 
down in Walker's Toy Dept. one Saturday 
during the Christmas rush? Santa Claus 
very seldom makes mistakes, Al. 

Gus Fougeron, that well known eques- 
trian from Bay Park has at last secured his 
store teeth but what we want to know is 
what good are they if he keeps 'em in his 
pocket? Gus, says he can eat those peanuts 
now, Jimmy. 

Don James, our estimable clerk had the 
misfortune of trying to loop the loop in 
his car the other day. Don knows now it 
can't be done. 

The Welding Dept. basketball team, 
consisting of, Harlan Dye, Bert Bailey, 
Roy Williams, Jule Aquire, and Al Miley, 
has started the season with a terrific bang 
— a loss by a scant margin but they say 
watch out hereafter. 

It's a good thing the stores give us paper 
sacks. They do make swell work hats after 
a fashion, but the guys who need them 
never wear them — we wonder why. 



The new Pratt and Whitney "Double 
Wasp" of 18 cylinders, is rated at 1,600 
H.P. above 20,000 feet. This power out- 
put of 1,600 above 20,000 feet is the 
equivalent of 3,000 H.P. at sea level. It is 
believed that airplane speeds in excess of 
400 miles per hour, above 20,000 feet, can 
readily be obtained with this engine. 

"Every man must have a cemetery of 
his own ... to bury the faults of his 
friends!" J. W. Kelly, No. 1750. 

A doctor's income is not necessarily an 
ill-gotten gain. 

It is far better to have grass growing 
under your feet tlian over your head. 

A liberal education, to the modern col- 
lege student, means one with plenty of 
spending money from the old folks at 
home. 

"WRECKERS" 

I watched them tearing a building down, 
A gang of men in a busy town. 
With a ho-heave-ho and a lusty yell 
They swung a beam and the side wall fell. 
I asked the Foreman, "Are these men skilled 
As the men you'd hire if you had to build?" 
He gave a laugh and said, "No indeed!" 
"Just common labor is all I need. 
I can easily wreck in a day or two 
What builders have taken years to do." 
I thought to myself as I went away 
Which of these roles have I tried to play? 
Am I a builder who works with care, 
Measuring life by the rule or square? 
Am I shaping my deeds to a well laid plan. 
Patiently doing the best I can? 
Or am I a wrecker who walks the town 
Content with the labor of tearing down. 

—Selected, Bill Gilchrist, 808. 

The best thing to do about a mistake 
... is to admit it. 

Politicians alone cling to the musty 
notion that an admission of error is a 
confession of weakness. — Bruce Barton. 




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Volume 5 



February, 1940 



Number 2 



COMPLIMENT . . . 

In Forrest Warren's 'Half Minute In- 
terviews' which appear in the local press, 
dated Jan. 7th, an interview with Mrs. 
F. T. Scripps is given as follows: 

"The people of San Diego and its vis- 
itors certainly owe a thank-you to Con- 
solidated Aircraft for the beautiful and 
perfect Christmas tree with its hundreds 
of jeweled lights, making it the most 
glorious tree ever seen here. As I was driv- 
ing by with my four-year-old grand- 
daughter, she said: "It is the most beautiful 
Christmas tree in the world; grandmother, 
please drive slow so I can see it for a 
long time.' It is something to remember, 
and we both say, 'Thank you,' to Consol- 
idated." 

Thank you, Mr. Warren and Mrs. 
Scripps. 

ENGINEERS . . . 

Engineers who design aircraft have 
their troubles, too, but they also can look 
at the funny side of their problems. Re- 
cently an engineer at the Aeronca factory 
in Cincinnati came up with the following 
masterpiece on the trials and tribulations 
of an airplane designer: 

"Design a plane," the head men say. 
It must be built in such a way 
That the dumbest mug can fly hands off, 
Make the hardest landings still feel soft, 
Make up for brains the pilot lacks, 
Make the seats lean forward and still lean back. 
Supply and demand will be the thing; 
Forget the span and chord of wing. 
The spar must just be six feet long. 
For scraps of spruce cost but a song. 
The fuselage can be tied with string 
Or by a similar method hung to the wing. 
It must be safe and, in the main, 
Be able to withstand a hurricane. 
It must be fast and not land-hot. 
(What a helluva job the designer's got!) 
Fast and light and comfortable, too. 
With a cruising range to Timbuktu. 
Of course, this is no common hack, 
For it must carry the load of a ten-ton Mack. 
It must climb straight up and land straight down, 
But the pilot must scarcely feel the ground. 
Yes, flaps and brakes and retractable gear. 
Hell's bells! They must think the millennium's 

here. 
And one last word the head men say: 
"It's got to be finished by yesterday!" 
On second thought, there's one thing more: 
They'll have to sell at the ten-cent store. 

•a 



BOUND VOLUMES 

We have a few 1938 volumes of the CONSOLIDATORS available. 
These are bound in black cloth with an artificial leather grain with 
"Consolidator" volume and year imprinted in gold. They contain all 
twelve issues including the special 100 page 15th Anniversary issue. 
This is an opportunity to secure the entire set conveniently bound 
together ... on excellent gift to yourself and family for future refer- 
ence. They will be sold at cost ($1.35 each) as long as they last. No 
more will be available as certain issues in the set are now exhausted. 
Apply Consolidator office. 



MUSICIANS! ! ! 

A call for musicians interested in re- 
hearsing with a symphony orchestra under 
auspices of San Diego nite school has been 
sent in to Consair. 

It is felt there must be a number of 
musicians in the plant who would like to 
avail themselves of the opportunity to 
practice evenings with this orchestra, un- 
der the able direction of Leo Scheer. 

All orchestral instruments are needed. 

Rehearsals are held twice weekly on 
Tuesday and Friday evenings, beginning 
at 7 p.m. at the orchestra hall (directly 
behind Russ auditorium) San Diego High 
School. 

The only charge for this activity is a 
fee of one dollar for the semester. 

Further information may be obtained 
from Bill Gilchrist or call Mr. Scheer at 
J. 23 81 — or better yet bring your instru- 
ments to orchestra hall Tuesday or Friday. 

LET'S COOPERATE . . . 

Attention has been called to the fact 
that quite a number of employees eat their 
lunches in their cars across the street in the 
parking lot. In so doing some few persons 
throw away their waste paper and occa- 
sionally bottles. The littered waste material 
gives the outsiders the wrong impression 
about the quality of workmen we are and 
the bottles get broken and are a hazard 
to auto tires. Let's all cooperate and see to 
it that waste material goes into the cans 
provided. It's a little thing . . . let's co- 
operate! 



DISTRESS SIGNAL 

A navy plane flying back and forth 
across the bow of a surface ship means an- 
other plane of its squadron is in distress, 
mariners are advised by a hydrographic 
bulletin. The procedure when a plane of 
the squadron has been forced down is as 
follows: 

A plane flies several times across the bow 
of the nearest surface vessel, opening and 
closing the throttle, and then flies in the 
direction of the plane in distress. This sig- 
nal is repeated^ until the surface vessel has 
acknowledged by following the plane. If 
possible, the plane remains in sight of the 
ship until the latter sights the plane in dis- 
tress. All planes resort to the use of avail- 
able pyrotechnics as necessary to attract 
the attention of surface vessels. 

If you see Jim Eldredge (Air Corps 
Secretary) putting on more weight, it 
will be because Chef Bob Summers (Tank) 
has been serving up more wicked goulashes 
for Eldredge and messmates Geo. Righter 
(Experimental) and Felix "Kentucky" 
Mattingly (Tank) at their new apartment 
at 3241-3rd Avenue. 

B. J. ELDREDGE, Air Corps Office. 

"A lecturer tells us prehistoric man was 
never bow-legged or round-shouldered. We 
can only suppose the tax burden was dif- 
ferent in those days." — The Cleveland 

News. 

*•» 

GOLF TOURNEY 

The Engineers' Golf Tournament will 
be held Feb. 1 1, at Chula Vista. 



All communications should be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, Californio. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in part, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., Son Diego, California. 



Consolidator 



PERSONAL INCOME TAXES 
FOR 1939 

Who Must File Retwrns: 

Every married person whose annual 
income is in excess of $2 500 and every 
single person whose annual income is in 
excess of $1000 must file income tax re- 
turns with the Federal Government be- 
fore March 15, 1940, and with the State 
of California before April 15, 1940. Fed- 
eral income tax returns must be submitted 
in duplicate. 

Income: 

Income subject to tax includes salaries, 
wages, interest, dividends, rents, and pro- 
fits from the sale of securities and other 
property. The income of minor children is 
considered to be the income of the parent 
for tax purposes. Gifts or inheritances, 
health and accident insurance payments, 
and amounts received in settlement of 
claims for injuries and damages are exempt 
from income tax and should not be re- 
ported on the returns filed. 

Deductions: 

Allowable deductions include interest 
paid, uncollectible debts, losses on invest- 
ments, taxes on real and personal property, 
automobile registration and license fees, 
tax on admissions, losses resulting from fire 
and theft, California unemployment insur- 
ance tax, and contributions to religious, 
charitable, fraternal, and veterans' organi- 
zations. 

California income tax which was actu- 
ally paid during 1939 is deductible for 
Federal income tax purposes, but not for 
State income tax purposes. 

Sales tax, California gasoline tax, ali- 
mony, and Federal old age benefits tax are 
not allowable deductions. 



JL eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

FOURTH .tEim 



Persottal Exemptions and Credits: 

Personal exemptions and credits for de- 
pendents are $1000 for a single person, 
$2 500 for a married person living with his 
wife, $2 500 for the head of a family, and 
$400 for each dependent other than hus- 
band or wife. A head of a family is a 
person who actually supports one or more 
relatives in one household. A dependent 
must be under 18 years of age or be incap- 
able of self-support. Personal exemptions 
and credits for dependents must be pro- 
rated on the basis of the marital and pa- 
rental status which existed during the 
year. Credits for dependents must be de- 
ducted by the head of the family. 

In addition to the items enumerated 
above, the Federal Government allows each 
taxpayer an earned income credit of lO'yc 
of his net income. 
Tax Payments: 

Federal and state income taxes are pay- 
able in full when the returns are filed, or 
in installments of 2 5*^^ each in the case of 
the Federal tax and 3 3 1-3% each in the 
case of the State tax. 
Filing Returns: 

Representatives of the Federal and state 
tax authorities will be at this plant during 
the week commencing February 12, 1940, 
to assist the employees with their income 
tax returns for the year 1939. 

The days assigned to each department 
will be announced later. 

Each employee is required to fill in as 
much of his or her income tax return as 
possible before submitting it to the Gov- 
ernmental representatives for review. 

Question of State: — 

Would a Dutch Uncle come under the 
classification of "Foreign Relations"? 

Master Gary Joe Apple, made his ap- 
pearance in the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Apple on January 11th. The time 
was exactly 2:34 p.m. Gary Joe, needless 
to say, is now the apple of the eye of the 
Joseph Apple family! Congratulations. 
Little Joe Apple weighed in at 7 pounds 
and 10 oz. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME 

SENSIBLE PRICES 

and on 

CREDIT TERMS 

DRYER'S 

Standard 
Furniture Co. 

J. e oRVER. Pull 2368 Kettner at Kalmia 




New Books on Aviation Now 

Available at the San Diego 

Public Library 

Eddy, Myron F. — ^Aeronautic radio: a 
manual for operators, pilots, radio me- 
chanics. 1939. 

The first eleven chapters should prepare 
the average person to pass the theoretical 
part of the examination for an aviation 
radio operator's license. 
Brimm, Daniel J. & Boggess, H. Edward — 
Aircraft engine maintenance. 1939. 
For the beginner in the field with refer- 
ence material of value to the expert also 
included. 

Diehl, Walter Stuart — Engineering aero- 
dynamics, rev. ed. 1939. 
Essentially a new book. Concise practi- 
cal information on the dynamics of aero- 
plane design for the advanced student or 
designer. Contains an excellent chapter on 
the new field of hydraulics in aeroplane 
design. 

Mackenzie, L. B. — Welding encyclopedia: 
a practical book on metalhc arc, carbon 
arc, oxyacetylene, electric spot, butt, 
flash and resistance welding, thermit 
welding and metal spraying. 9th ed. 
1938. 
Harcourt, Robert H. — Working and heat- 
treating of steel. 1959. 
Prepared for use in technical schools 
and colleges. Some chapters on drawing 
out, bending and twisting steel, also on 
hammer work and tool forging. 
Niles, A. S. — Airplane structures. 2 vols. 

1938. 
Simmons, Virgil — Air piloting. 1939. 
Baugham, Harold E. — ^Aviation dictionary, 

reference guide. 1939. 
Adams, D. R. — Practical aircraft stress 

analysis. 1939. 
Day, K. S. — Instrument and radio flying. 

1939. 
Duncan, Richard — The aircraft flight in- 
structor. 1939. 
Note: If you do not find these books on 
the shelf, ask the librarian for them as 
many of these books are kept on the X 
shelf. The X shelf is maintained for books 
of special value to prevent them from 
being stolen or damaged. 

When our R. Biddle's wood shop was 
set up temporarily out in the paved yard 
recently, he simply stated, "As you can 
well see, I have the only open shop in the 

plant!" 

Farmer's Daughter: "Here comes them 
city folks from Wichita . . . Hurn.- up and 
warm the milk up. You know they want 
it fresh from the cow." 



February, 1 940 




LOOK ALIKE . . . 

Otto Menge is too durned good a pho- 
tographer. He's the only fellow who could 
shoot these two fellows side by each, and 
make the above difference. Actually when 
you see these Cansolidafors in action (or 
hear them talk) you think you're seeing 
(and hearing) double. It's 'Sparky' Ernest 
on the left and "Red' Ernest on the right, 
unless this print was made with the nega- 
tive reversed. They're from 'way down 
South, and their southern drawl just rolls 
out and bounces all over the floor when 
they talk. Both of them work in Hulls, 
but occasionally you find one of them (or 
the other one) in experimental. You 
guessed it all right. They're twins. Lately 
they been feuding with some of the boys. 
It seems that one of them made a bet he 
could turn out a particular job in a short 
time. It was quite an accomplishment. 
It was either "Red' or 'Sparky' who made 
the bet. Both of 'em are plenty red headed 
and dress just alike. The person who made 
the bet with them claims that both the 
boys were working on the one job, and 
therefore the bet was no go. However, 
"Sparky,' or maybe it was 'Red,' claims 
he was working so fast it looked like two 
of him. They're still feudin.' 

The saying that opportunity knocks 
only once is wrong. It knocks twice, the 
second rap being its constant companion, 
work. 

To C. E. Reynolds and Mrs. Reynolds 
of the Wing Department, January 3d: A 
boy; weight 7 pounds and 13 oz. There- 
fore Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds are proudly 
introducing young Mr. Wilford Emerson. 



HULLABALOO 

By Al Leonard 
T OHNNY HOPMAN has entered into 
" the select circle of black cat haters be- 
cause of an unfortunate accident. While 
driving up Market Street some time ago, a 
black cat ran in front of his car. Pooh- 
poohing the idea of anything superstitious, 
Johnny drove merrily on his way. A couple 
of blocks farther along Johnny was startled 
to see a car cross from the other side of 
the road straight for his car. He tried to 
get out of the way, but it was too late. 
The driver of the other car was slightly 
Inebriated. Now Johnny is a firm member 
of the Friday the 13 th club, and as for 
black cats — ??? 

Nick Karpinski, Hull dept. inspector, 
has slowly ripened into the No. 1 rooter 
for the Hull basketball team. He has even 
missed Bank Nite to attend games. Nick 
was allowed to take care of the first aid 
kit one night, and was so pleased that he 
wanted to know why the team didn't play 
every night, instead of only five games 
in a row! 

Dutch Klien, who is rather economical 
and doesn't like to run up a large water 
bill by watering his lawn, prayed for a 
rain a few weeks ago, and really got it. 
The day it rained so hard Dutch came out 
of the plant after a hard day's work (?) 



Good Board — Packed Lunch 
Comfortable Home— Transpor- 
tation to Consolidated. 

REASONABLE RATES 

4040 Hillcrest Drive 



and tried to start his car. It wouldn't start, 
so while it was pouring so hard he got out 
and wiped off the wires. He disconnected 
all the wires from the distributor and for- 
got how to put them back again. After 
two hours in the drenching rain he got his 
car started. He says he is all thru with 
this liquid sunshine! 

Harry MacEwan is keeping up on his 
current events and magazine reading in 
a most economical way. He now spends 
his evenings at the corner drug store gently 
perusing the latest magazines. In order not 
to appear too conspicuous, Harry once 
bought a package of gum and at another 
time a three-cent stamp. 

The boys in the Hull dept. are sure sorry 
to see Gene Pasek leave for his new job in 
the employment office. We all know Gene 
will be successful at his new post and he 
can be sure all the boys of Hull wish him 
lots of luck. «^ 

You have a dollar, We have a dollar. 
We swap. Now you have our dollar, we 
have yours and we are no better off. 

You have an idea. We have an idea. 
We swap. Now you have two ideas and 
we have two ideas, and that is the differ- 
ence. 

There is another difference: A dollar does 
only so much. It buys so many potatoes 
and no more. An ""Idea" that fits your pur- 
pose may keep you in potatoes all your 
life, and it may incidentally build you a 
place to eat them in. gji, cjichrist. 

Consolidated Aircraft's Secretary, Mr. 
R. A. Stanberry is boasting a bit to the 
world these days. The reason: Master 
Robert Mitchell Stanberry, who weighed 
into this world at just 6 pounds and 13 
oz., on January 11th. Congratulations. 



SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

offers 

The MASTER RADIO COURSE pre- 
paring you for commercial radio op- 
erator's license, telegraph or telephone; 
fitting you for ship, shore, aircraft, 
airway, amateur or broadcast station 
operation, installation and servicing. 

6 months $250 

NAVIGATION 

AIRCRAFT ADVANCED DEAD RECKONING COURSE 
5 w66ks S50 

AIRCRAFT CELESTIAL NAVIGATION COURSE 

5 weeks $50 

MARINE NAVIGATION, Complete 2 months $100 
Day courses available to men on night 
shift. 

Evening courses available to men on 
day shift. 

Calljor additional information 

Radio and Navigotion Books, Maps and 

Charts, Instruments 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
Lindbergh Field Jackson 7400 



Consolidator 




PEEKING thru the desk furniture be- 
ing moved from here to there, I've 
sighted several new faces out Planning De- 
partment way. These new faces belong to 
Genevieve Holm and Hazel Brink. Mr. 
Learman has a change of scenery, too. His 
new secretary answers to the name of 
Estelle Smith. 

Oh, oh! We've just discovered Cedelia 
Roberts is wearing a bright new diamond 
on just the right finger. Looks interesting. 
This calls for digging up such other in- 
formation as names, dates, etc. Will the 
young lady give us the young man's name 
willingly, or must we drag the guilty 
culprit to light ourselves? 

New Arrival Department: The line 



forms to the right to congratulate Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Babb (Marjorie Snyder), 
who are the parents of Dixie Deane Babb, 
born January 7th. 

On her birthday recently, Louise Gi- 
rodon received an almost unanimous array 
of perfume, soap, and other sweet-scented 
articles. Louise is still trying to decide 
whether this was a gag or a coincidence. 
Or, says she, is it a gentle hint? 

Don't let those cellophane packages 
crossing the street in rainy weather fool 
you. Upon closer observation you'll note 
they are some of the gals from the plant 
going to work wrapped in cellophane, and 
not fugitives from a Christmas tree. 



WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

By J. E. Hodgson 

THE Woodshop family is augmented 
by the arrival January 11th of Jerry 
Joe Apple, weight 7 pounds and 10 oz. 
Joe sends reports that mother and son 
are fine, so all is right with the world. 

We are gratified to learn that J. Cair- 
eracas and F. Mitasoflf are on the road to 
recovery, both of whom have been ser- 
iously ill. 

Al Younger went east to Sheldon, Iowa, 
to visit his folks over the Yuletide, but 
was he not glad to get back to San Diego! 



He says he knows what it's like in Finland 
these days, as it was 22 below zero in Iowa 
when he left there. 

Charlie Pogerel is making a serious study 
of living conditions in San Diego. He has 
contacted most of the older men in the 
shop regarding the above, and by now 
must have compiled a considerable amount 
of data on this subject. Oh, no! Charlie's 
not thinking of writing a book about it. 
He's studying the pros and cons, as he 
expects to get married around the end 
of March. 

Ralph Berg and family have given up 
(Continued on page 7) 




# 



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Credit Dcpt. 
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get the 

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Consairettes and Consair wives can save 
a lot of money, time and steps by trying 
Whitney's First! 53 departments brim- 
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every day in the year — that's Whitney's 
unusual money-saving policy! 



PARK FDPF ^' Crystal Palace Garage, Sixth and E 



with a $1 purchase, or Free Delivery 



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bliihtd 190} 



ARCHBOLD EXPEDITION 
IN RETROSPECT 

THE Christian Science Monitor pub- 
lished on August 10th, the following 
article covering the activities of Mr. Rich- 
ard Archbold's expedition to Netherland 
New Guinea, and is hereby reproduced 
thru their courtesy: 

Sydney, New South Wales — Discoveries 
claimed to equal those of Darwin and 
Wallace in importance have been reported 
by the Archbold expedition, which re- 
cently returned to New York after con- 
ducting an extensive survey of Nether- 
land New Guinea. 

In an interview here before embarking 
for home on the expedition's flying boat 
Guba, Richard Archbold, leader of the 
expedition and an associate of the Amer- 
ican Museum of Natural History, described 
some of the important "finds", including 
dancing birds that build hurdles to jump 
through, and tree rats four feet long. An- 
imals, birds, insects, and plants — 20 per 
cent of them new to researchers — were 
found in New Guinea by the expedition, 
he declared. 

"The results of the expedition are the 
greatest in my experience in various parts 
of the world, and perhaps will never be 
equalled again," Mr. Archbold said. "The 
use of a modern flying boat, which made 
168 flights from the coast to the interior 
and carried 568,000 pounds of food and 
equipment over jungle impassable on foot, 
helped us a great deal. 

Radio Connection Invaluable 

"The erection of radio stations at our 
three bases permitted the flying-boat crew 
to keep in communication and receive the 
latest weather reports, but great skill was 
required for the heavily-laden take-offs 
and landings in jungle rivers and on a 
lake 11,000 feet above sea level. We saw 
territory never before seen by a white 
man. In one large valley — we call it the 
Grand Valley — we estimated the native 
population to be from 70,000 to 80,000. 
One previously unknown river, the Baliem, 
was a large stream. 

"Our expedition has made the most im- 
portant and extensive discoveries since Dar- 
win and Wallace. We have 20 new animal 
species, among which is a kind of giant 
arboreal rat. It is a thick, squat creature, 
four feet long from nose to end of tail. 



LINDBERGH FIELD CAFE 

Administration Building 
Lindbergh Field 



"The Home of Aviation" 
BREAKFAST SERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 



February/ 1940 



and a foot high. It has rows of long sharp 
teeth, and Hves on green shoots. We also 
discovered a new bird which lives on flies 
in barren, rocky country 1 5,000 feet above 
sea level. It is blue-black, with a bright red 
spot on the breast and stands about nine 
inches high. 

"We obtained many new plants and col- 
lected more than 40 rare varieties of 
orchids. The expedition made new geo- 
graphical discoveries. It obtained movies 
of birds of paradise in action on their 
dance-grounds. The birds indulge in amaz- 
ing dances on small velodromes or race- 
tracks, which they build out of moss. 
Sometimes they build hurdles and hoops, 
over and through which they jump." 

Mr. Archbold has been flying since 
1932, and the expedition now terminated 
was his third to New Guinea. He used a 
flying boat on his second expedition, but it 
was wrecked in a windstorm known by 
the natives as a "guba"; hence the name 
of his present craft. 

Night Flight Over Equator 

Capt. Lewis Yancey, navigator of the 
Guba, recalled one highlight of the ex- 
pedition, a night flight over the equator. 
"We saw some pretty heavy stuff — clouds 
and rain — just ahead of us," he said. "So 
we went on up to climb over it. Pretty 
soon we ran right into it — sleet and rain 
and snow. Remember, we were 17,500 
feet up. And was it cold! We wore fur- 
lined flying suits, and we were still frozen. 
It was snowing so hard that the wind- 
shield of the cockpit was coated thick. I 
had an after-hatch open, and I gathered 
up a snow ball, just to be able to say that 
I had handled snow over the equator." 

Describing the hazards of establishing 
the initial inland base in New Guinea, af- 
ter landing at Hollandia, on the north 
coast of Netherland New Guinea, Cap- 
tain Yancey said: "Our first trip revealed 
hundreds of native villages on the banks 
of a big river. There must have been 60,000 
or 70,000 natives all told. They had never 
seen white people before. There was not 
one thing to show that they even knew of 
the existence of the outside world. We 
flew low over the river, and watched them 
run. They were scared by the Guba. Later 
we learned that every one of them was a 
head-hunter." 

Mr. Archbold has spent almost all of 
the last year in hitherto unexplored terri- 
tory in Netherland New Guinea on this 
elaborate and intensive research expedi- 
tion, with the cooperation of the Nether- 
land East Indies Government. The expe- 
dition cost £2 50,000, of which Mr. Arch- 
bold provided £100,000. He said that he 
had found the country so interesting that 
he proposed to make another visit next 
year, using another flying boat. 

Making a psychic bid in bridge is pre- 
cisely the same as ordering hash in a 
strange cafe. 




FAMILY REUNION . . . 

Recently Chief Test Pilot "Bill" 
Wheatley tipped us off to an odd coinci- 
dence; on a certain day it appeared that 
there would be some five "generations" of 
Coinolidatcd Aircraft within the plant 
yard. "Bill" and Otto Menge therefore 
arranged to be in the air on that day and 
took several shots of the "family re- 
union." In the photo above you will notice 
at the upper left, the Model 31, our latest 
boat and the plane that boasts the two 
most powerful radial air-cooled engines 
ever to be installed in an aircraft. To the 
upper right is the four-engined XPB2Y-1, 
the plane which has hopped across the 
continent and back covering the entire 
distance over land and without benefit 
of gear for descent upon land. It also was 
recently made the first official Flagplane of 
the U. S. Navy, a signal distinction. In the 
center is one of the old timers, a P2Y, one 
of the type which, in a formation of six 
planes, made the first massed flight from 
San Francisco to Honolulu (2,414 miles — 
Jan., 1934). At the bottom, left is a PBY 
being fitted for special work and to the 
right the world's largest Amphibian, the 
XPBY-5A, recently flown to Washing- 
ton. The PBY and the amphibian might 
be said to be of the same generation. The 
fifth is the factory's "Fleetster" from 
which the photos were taken, with 
Wheatley at the Controls and Otto Menge 
doing the shooting. 



ANTHONY H. G. FOKKER 

Anthony H. G. Fokker, pioneer airplane 
designer and manufacturer passed away 
after a month's illness on December 23 in a 
New York City hospital. 

He took up flying in 1911 and gained 
world-wide attention when he designed 
planes during the World War for the Ger- 
man High Command. His designs had been 
previously turned down by various allied 
governments. 

He was born in Java on his parents' 
coffee plantation and at an early age 
showed signs of mechanical ingenuity 
which marked his whole later life. He 
taught himself to fly in a monoplane of 
his own design and construction. He later 
became the first man to loop a plane in 
Germany. 

Many Consolidators, have worked at 
either his New Jersey manufacturing units 
or the later expanded General Aviation 
Corporation plant at Fairmount, West 
Virginia. 

Later, in Holland, he maintained his 
factory, the Nederlandsche Vliegtuigen- 
fabrik, N. V. He pioneered the 9,000 mile 
airline between Amsterdam and the Dutch 
East Indies. In this factory he continued 
to build his own designed planes and at 
one time he was a sales representative for 
Comolidated Model 28's. 

All of us in Aviation deeply mourn this 
early pioneer's passing. 

Larry Boeing. 







A. 


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TOOL BITS 

By Lett Hultcii 

C. M. Speed of our tool room was mar- 
ried Saturday, January 13th. Congratula- 
tions. Joe Williamson went to Baltimore 
on vacation and brought back a new 
Pontiac. Plymouth saw Deters coming and 
stuck him for a new Plymouth. 

Art Woltring has been transferred to 
Tool Design, from Tool Room. Al Rinker 
has been made a leadman. 

One of the new men said to me the 
other day, "This job is only 1-32 off, 
and I have to make a new one. They sure 
work to a cat's whisker around here, 
don't they?" *® 

WOOD SHOP 

There are those who take their recrea- 
tion in fishing, boating, hunting, and all 
sorts of indoor sports; but let's give a 
thought to the fellow who takes his fun 
two nights a week with a gun and a uni- 
form — the National Guardsman. 

In the employ of Consair there are ap- 
proximately fifty of these men, among 
them are our own Bill Harwick, Barton, 
Kauffman and Bruce Robbins. These men 
not only are getting their recreation 
(week-end hikes, summer camps, etc.) 
with the fellows that they know and like, 
but are receiving training that may some- 
day prove very useful. In return for this 
they are giving the good old U. S. A. that 
helping hand, their oath to make this 
country just a little bit stronger each day. 

These boys will be among the first to 
jump to your protection and mine. So 
let's give a little hand to the men who are 
doing two jobs and liking it; the National 
Guardsmen. 




GOT A MATCH? 

ON Friday, December 22nd, Vice- 
President and Works Manager C. A. 
Van Dusen, received a beautiful gift, the 
handiwork of some of the boys in the 
shop, plus a goodly supply of a much 
needed auxiliary necessity. He received 
an artfully fashioned, full grown and 
really man-sized smoking pipe, some three 
feet long. The pipe was equipt with a 
boiler room, convenient drain outlet, Mr. 
Van Dusen's name in script, etc. Also there 
was a supply of matches . . . plenty of 
matches. 

It seems that Van Dusen's pipe is as 
famous throughout the plant, and wherever 
he goes, as that belonging to Charles G. 



YOU, TOO, CAN 



\£Ai?yvi^m/ 




Same instructors, ships 
and training as CAA stu- 
dents are now receiving 
at Speer's under Govern- 
ment supervision. 



Widely diversified flying line — 
including Piper Cubs, Piper 
Coupe (equipped with instru- 
ments for blind flying instruc- 
tion), Kinners, Fleet, Curtiss- 
Wright Travel Air. 



Dawes. Van's pipe is of the straight, strong 
and out-sticking type . . . with an ungodly 
capacity for matches. Invariably when 
Van Dusen slips into high gear in a con- 
ference, or on some knotty problem, he 
takes a draw on his pipe and asks, "Got a 
match?" The pipe gets lit, the matches 
automatically go into his pocket, and the 
pipe goes out . . . almost in one single 
motion. This oft repeated act has in the 
past caused untold havoc with many of 
the personal match supplies throughout 
the plant. 

To help stem the outward flow of 
matches via Mr. Van Dusen's consumer, 
the boys contributed toward the purchase 
of a supply estimated to be ample . . . for 
a while. Not a book of matches, not a 
box or a carton . . . but a whole case of 
book matches was secured and presented. 
In short, the tribute to the maw of Van 
Dusen's pipe, was an even 50,000 lights. 
When Mr. Van Dusen unwrapped his gift, 
silently inspecting all its sterling features, 
and had fondly fingered his new match 
bonanza, he remarked, thoughtfully, 
"Thanks, boys, this is the first pipe I've 
ever had that holds as much as I've often 
thought a pipe should hold . . . Got a 
match?" 



3arnett Avenue at the Causeway 
ACROSS FROM THE MARINE BASE • 
Telephone Bayvicw 5222 • San Diego 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

~Vj Optometrist ^^^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



February, 1940 



PRIVATE FLYING 

... A NEW CLUB 

PRIVATE flying is now booming right 
along with more and more enthusiasts 
joining in the sport and art. Out on Bar- 
nett Avenue at Speer Flying Service it was 
estimated that between 90 and 100 em- 
ployees of Consolidated are taking flying 
lessons or are adding to their flying time. 
In a brief check it was found that among 
those from Consolidated who are flying 
from this one port, are included: Jim 
Fling, Chuck Lane, Ed Borgens, M. F. 
Blaine, Ray Bybee, Em Otle, Bill Cronk, 
Paul Dale, Howard Gibson, Malcom Ros- 
soll. Jack McDonald, B. V. Milles, Don 
Southwick, Paul Madson, Bill Cowthray, 
Ed Dudrow, Bruce Craig, W. A. Walker, 
Earl Merlan and Wes H. Evans. Time did 
not permit checking thru all the names. 

News comes too, of a new flying club 
organization who call themselves the 
"Southern California Flyers." The club 
appears to have gone over with a bang 
from the very start and in a surprisingly 
short time they had a club of twenty 
members. Just the week before Christmas 
they took delivery of a very good-looking 
Cub plane, all yellow, trimmed with black 
and sporting wheel pants. Al Griffith of 
Finish Dept. who was instrumental in 
forming the club writes as follows: 

"Our first member was Bill Van Winkle, 
who has a service station, Tex Hills, of 
the D. H. dept. was next. Tex was glad 
for this opportunity to fly and also to get 
the experience that goes with the game of 
keeping the ship in an air worthy condi- 
tion at all times. Ray Dinsen and his pal, 
Joe Havlik also of the D. H. dept. fol- 
lowed close by. All three of these boys 
have gone through Aero I. T. I. in Los 
Angeles. Fred Robertson, who is with a 
local electric company decided he wanted 
to fly and is proving it with some six 
hours instruction already. Tommy Saun- 
ders, of the D. B. dept., who not only 
is an air-minded lad, but has entertained 
our group with his piano playing. Pat 
Dowling and Bill Sutton of Produc- 
tion Dept., are also putting in a lot 
of time and doing nicely too. Isa- 
belle McCrae, our only woman pilot at 
present, is a nurse in a local doctor's office. 
She is a sister of Don Garrett in the 
Wing Dept. who is a very good pilot and 
has some 150 hours to his credit. Joe 
Hollenbeck, of North Island says this 
is the way to fly. Ken Smith of F. A. dept., 
and his pal Billy Luffe, who works at a 
local hotel are among the solo members 
of our group. Ben Danforth, is a Fish and 
Game Warden and has made his first at- 
tempt at flying and thinks it's the best 



WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

iContinued from page 4) 
their Gypsy life and moved from the tent 
into his newly completed home, out La 
Mesa way. I'll bet he will find it strange 
when he can't smell the aroma of stray 
skunk or hear the coyote serenade at 
night! 

S. A. Dodd, another night man, has 
moved from trailer to his recently pur- 
chased home. He has so much space now 
he doesn't know what to do with it. I'll 
tell you, S. A. — just move the living-room 
furniture into the kitchen so that your 
little lady falls over you every time she 
moves to do her chores . . . then you'll 
feel quite at home again. 

Harry Walter built a lovely model 
motor boat some time back. He has just 
completed a gas engine to install in the 

sport in the world. Bob McGregor of 
Lemon Grove and Bob Sprague of D. H. 
dept. are doing a nice job of flying. Jim 
Killeany, of the Hull dept.. Bob Baily who 
works at a local bank, say they never 
realized what they have missed until now. 
Tommy Emerton works at the County 
Hospital, also a member of the National 
Guards says he will soon give "them there" 
shock cords a work out. Bill Durflinger 
who was our last member works in the 
Production dept. will be out to fly soon." 

At an election of officers recently, Al 
Griffith (who is the organizer, club man- 
ager and instructor of this group) was 
elected president, Tommy Saunders, was 
elected vice-president. Isabelle McCrae, 
secretary. Bill Van Winkle, treasurer, Joe 
Havlik, social director. 

Ray Dinsen was appointed Mainten- 
ance manager. 

"Southern California Flyers" are plan- 
ning soon, to take on a second ship such 
as a Kinner Sport wing, Fairchild 24, 
Waco F2, Cessna or some ship in that 
class. See photo No. 3, page 20. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



boat. The engine, a two-cylinder, two- 
cycle one, has just been given a prelim- 
inary test, and works fine. Harry tells me 
it works better as a diesel, however, for 
when he shot in some oil, the oil started 
firing in great shape and the engine ran 
like a clock. Maybe you've got something 
there, Harry. With a set-up like that all 
you need do, instead of draining the 
crankcase, is just burn up the old oil, es- 
pecially these days when there is so much 
talk of wasting the country's resources. 

The Woodshop basketball team is evi- 
dently coming to life under the manage- 
ment of Bob Harshaw and the captaincy 
of Ken Miscon. Out of seven starts they 
lost the first four and won the last three 
in a row. O K boys, go in and fight for 
dear old Wood Shop, but don't let it go 
to your heads. 

Figures don't lie . . . but Oh, how 



ars can hgure 



M 



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Nothing succeeds like success. 



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Any amount * 
opens your "San 
Diego Federal 

Sav- 
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Tox-exempt 
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Insured SAFETY 
Through lOfh of 
each month, divi- 
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ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL' 




PUAUTE^lUTEHfeEB 

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Consolidator 



SERVICE PIN AWARDS . . . 



The annual celebration and festivities 
for those who have earned their five, ten, 
and fifteen year service pins during the 
year just past, was held this year at the 
Mission Beach Ballroom, on the night of 
December 30th. It was also the Annual 
Consolidated Employees' Dance, with the 
dance following the awarding of the serv- 
ice pins. The evening came quite cool, and 
as many will recall, fog blanketed large 
portions of San Diego, preventing quite a 
number from getting to the event on time. 

At 8:00 P. M. and the start of things, 
the ballroom's loges were filled with Con- 
solidafors, their wives, children and im- 
mediate family members. The ladies were 
all decked out beautifully, and the chil- 
dren displayed much eagerness for the big 
event. Proud they were of their Dads, 
and rightly so! 

Award men were called to the center 
of the dance floor by Don Frye, where 
chairs had been arranged to seat the honor 
group. Here Major Fleet entered into a 
bout of joke tossing, while Mrs. Mounce, 
Don Frye and Ed. Gott made the final 
arrangements on the stage. 

With everything in readiness. Major 
Fleet ascended the platform and prefaced 
the awards with a brief message for all 




BROWNIE SAYS 

"Say 
Consairs 
Have you 
driven the 
new Ford Yet? 

Its FORD 
For FORTY! 

FORD V-8 
MERCURY V-8 
LINCOLN-ZEPHYR V-12 

BROWN 

MOTOR CO. 

India at B St. 

also CORONADO 
LA JOLLA 
MISSION HILLS 

Lincoln Division>Columbia at B St. 



present. Briefly, his intimate talk was 
highlighted with remarks approximately 
as follows: 

"How fortunate we are to be living 
in a country that is not at war . . . the air- 
plane will be an instrumentality of peace 
... so powerful, it will terminate wars 
some day ... its mere possession in suf- 
ficient strength will serve to prevent war 
... I believe that this is what we are com- 
ing to. 

"In the last 20 years we in aviation have 
made remarkable progress . . . planes 
carrying 100 passengers with ease are not 
fantastic . . . 

". . . In consummating the recent 
$20,016,699.00 contract — the largest air- 
craft contract ever made by the U. S. Gov- 
ernment, it was necessary to provide ad- 
ditional facilities . . . We became, as a re- 
sult, the first aircraft plant in the U. S. to 
enter into agreement with the Treasury 
Department, so that the necessary addi- 
tional facilities could be amortized thru 
financial arrangement with the Treasury. 

"We have in the present work on hand 
alone, two years of work ahead of us, and 
it has become necessary to farm out some 
of this. Brewster Aeronautical will make 
outer wing panels — Northrop Aircraft 
will construct the tail assemblies, to make 
room for our own work here . . . You know 
also that we turned out (and you all are 
to be congratulated for your splendid ef- 
forts), our latest big plane in just one 
day short of 9 months. 

"Now, with at least two solid years of 
work ahead of us, we have security of em- 
ployment for all of us who will work . . . 

"It has been a pleasure — an absolute 
pleasure — to work with you, and it 



Home and Lot Bargains 

in 
Friendly 

Bird Rock 

distinctive 

La Jolla Hermosa 

Adequate Scenic Homesites in 
sensibly restricted districts at 
prices lower per Front Foot than 
those asked in Far less Favored 
districts. 40, 60,75 and 80 Foot lots 
From $500 to $1000; on paved 
streets, all bonds paid. Others 
as low as $250. For Full inForma- 
tion, see 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



will be a pleasure to continue our joint 
work. I congratulate all of you on having 
achieved the status this year which en- 
titles you to your respective service pins." 
Miss Jane Dunn, who has passed her 
15 -year service mark this year, was the 
first to receive her pin from the hands of 
Major Fleet. Major Fleet then spoke a per- 
sonal word of appreciation to each of 
some 65 award men. Those who had earned 
their pins in the respective service groups 
of 15, 10 and 5 years were: 

FIFTEEN-YEAR AWARD 
Edwards, H. T. Koch, W. E. 

Wilkinson, D. E. Young, George H. 
Newman, George Perry, V. N. 
Bourdon, L. R. Rasp, E. P. 

Thompson, J. C. Carson, R. S. 

Mulroy, J. J. 

TEN-YEAR PINS 
Galvin, T. J. Combe, Robert 

Hotchkiss, Glenn Jones, E. H. 
Smith, Steve Popadowski, F. J. 

Haegele, A. W. MacLean, George 

Learman, F. A. Tuevsky, N. A. 

Phillips, C. A. Mussen, R. L. 

Seely, W. F. DeMarce, D. R. 

Mineah, Lawrence E. Golem, H. G. 
Penfield, John Roeckel, E. H. 

Raymond, Edward L. 

FIVE-YEAR PINS 
Kucewicz, Walter J. Jones, Daniel A. 
Berger, C. F. Wright, R. M. 

Borden, J. C. Syren, J. P. 

Caster, F. W. May, Stanley, Jr. 

Miller, F. W. Formella, S. F. 

Kraus, H. E. Seaderquist, Conrad 

Harger, F. S. D'Amico, Edward 

Avery, S. H. Generas, E. C. 

Larson, J. W. Ogden, P. V. 

Maving, R. C. McLaughlin, F. H. 

Cederwall, L. O. Cossar, J. J. 
Reddien, C. H. Wainwright, J. L. 

Jones, T. C. Liddle, W. N. 

Wronick, W. J. Webster, F. S. 

Leonard, J. L. Van Dusen, C. A. 

Sec photo No. 2, page 20. 

Counsel (to the police witness) : "But 
if a man is on his hands and knees in the 
middle of the street, that does not prove 
he is drunk!" 

Policeman: "No, sir, it does not. But 
this one was trying to roll up the white 
line!" 



Good Food at 
Moderate Pricea 



Open Sundayi 
and Holidayf 



Morgan's Cafeteria 

1047-1049 Sixtk Ave. 

Between Broadn^ay and C St., San Diego 



February, 1940 




MOVING . . . 

Here are some interesting photos taken by Stan Marcyan. They were taken between 12 M. and 
5 A.M. while the Wood Mill building was being moved from its former location in the "L" of the 
Experimental building, to make room for the expansion program now getting underway. The upper left 
photo shows the building being headed out onto Pacific boulevard and was taken from the parking lot 
across the street. Super XX film was used. This exposure was F6.3 for 3 min. The white streaks across 
the picture were caused by autos passing. 

Upper right, Plant Engineer Bill Maloney and Machine Shop Foreman Hank Golem watch the pro- 
ceedings. These men were advised of the picture taking and stood still for the 2 5 seconds required 
for the exposure (F3.2). The "Ghosts" are those of George Tompkins and Bert Woodward, who moved 
before the time was up. 

Lower left. As the building goes out the gate, Bert Woodward stands by. (F3.2 and 25 sec.) 

Lower right, The Building heads north. It is destined to ride the full length of the main plant on 
the boulevard, go out around the buildings at their north end and down the field to the south end of 
the yard, the new location of the building. (F6.3, 3 min.) Note that the exposures have brought out 
some of the detail in the dark interior of the building. This was not visible to the naked eye from the 
camera position. 



NIGHT MAINTENANCE 

By Stan Marcyaii 

Elmer C. Hornan chased off to Yuma 
after work at 3:00 a. m. Saturday the 13th 
to change the name of Miss Ruth E. Rodig 
to Mrs. E. E. Hornan. 

Every time I hear of a fellow getting 
married I think of the two gentlemen 
meeting on the street, one married, the 
other single; each says to the other: "Gee, 
you're lucky." Those were good cigars, 
Elmer. 

Nick La Gamma says, "With this extra 
five cents working nights, I can afford 
to drive my new Packard." 

FINISH DEPT. NOTE 

Bert Naseef, Chief Anodizer, is build- 
ing a new home. He plans to move in in 
about a month. He's building on the 
mainland for fear that a big wave might 
wash Mission Beach away! 



THE HULL TRUTH 

By "Chuck" Faru'll 

The Hull night basketball 1 team, com- 
posed of Bob Patter, capt.; A. Rock, 
center; Bodien and Havlik, forwards; Ken- 
ner and Pjerrow, guards; Zanni, Lubecki, 
Plone and Taylor, wound up in the lead 
in the first round of the shop league. Only 
two games were lost. One to Sheet Metal 
and one to Production. The boys show a 
lot of flash and speed and are odds-on fav- 
orites to finish the season in first place. 



WHERE TO LIVE? 




ASK 


E. 


FRIEDRICK 


NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 


MAIN 


1014 234 C ST. 


"WE 


COVER THE CITY" 



Ray Kendall is singing the blues to the 
tune of, "Give Me My Boots and Saddle." 
Someone broke into his garage and took a 
fine pair of riding boots. Ray has a burglar 
alarm system in operation now. Sort of 
like locking the barn after the horse is 
stolen. 

Fire Chief Al Flemming cuts a heroic 
figure when he swings into action during 
practice alarms. Pity the poor blaze that 
has to face "Fearless Al." 

More of the old timers on the Owl 
Shift: Bob Wilcox, Sam Jenkins, "Killer" 
Manning and his brother "Chet." Several 
new men have been added to our shift 
and all seem to be doing very well keeping 
awake so late. The first few nights were 
tough on them. 

Frank Popp did get a new watch, but 
he is afraid of breaking it if he wears it, 
so he is still guessing time by the old 
turnip. 

Jones: "My wife is always asking for 
money. It's two dollars yesterday and five 
dollars today and three dollars tomorow — 
always money, money, money." 

Sam Rich: "What does she do with it 
all?" 

Jones: "I don't know — I've never given 
her any yet." 



IZ 



inea^ 1935 



SRN DIEGO 
TRXICRBS 
HRVE ROLLED 
/MILLIONS 
r OFMIL€S 




10 



Consolidat-or 




FLYING TANK MODELS . . . 



By Ernest G. Stonf, Engineering Depf. 

FOR many years "Consolidated" has 
been building tank models to deter- 
mine the hydrodynamic characteristics of 
flying boats much in the same way that a 
wind tunnel model predicts the aerody- 
namic performance. The principal dif- 
ference in the two methods of testing is 
the manner in which a relative velocity 
between the model and the testing medium 
is obtained. 

In the wind tunnel the model is sup- 
ported rigidly by the balances that record 
the forces, and the air is driven past the 
model. As the model is completely im- 
mersed in a testing medium of very low 
density, and extremely high velocities are 
desired, this becomes the most practical 
method. However, in tank testing the 
medium is water which is roughly 800 
times the density of air. As the velocities 
required are relatively much lower it be- 
comes more practical to keep the testing 
medium stationary and propel the model. 
In the past, scale models of laminated 
mahogany were built for both the wind 
tunnel and the tank. As the wind tunnel 
model is mounted rigidly and only the 
characteristics due to geometric form are 
measured, (i.e. drag, lift, and static mo- 
ments) this type of construction is suit- 
able. However, in the tank it soon became 
apparent that the motions or dynamics, 
of the model were more important than 
the mere measurement of resistance due 
to geometric shape. This immediately 
brought up the necessity of having dy- 
namic as well as geometric similarity. The 



result was the flying or dynamic tank 
model. 

The use of dynamic tank models was 
first investigated by the English. By an ex- 
tension and refinement of the English 
method and equipment, "Consolidated" 
has developed a method whereby the 
hydrodynamic stability of a proposed de- 
sign may be determined rapidly and ac- 
curately by use of a dynamically similar 
model. The dynamic model has the fol- 
lowing characteristics in common with 
the full scale airplane which make attain- 
able not only the geometric but the dy- 
namic properties as well: 

1. The hull, particularly below the 
chine, is reproduced accurately to scale. 

2. The air structure is reproduced ac- 
curately in planform and section. 

3. The total gross weight is to scale. 

4. The center of gravity position is geo- 
metrically to scale. 

5. The pitching moment of inertia (i.e. 
mass distribution) is to scale. In other 
words, all of the geometric and dynamic 
properties of the airplane that have any 
bearing on the hydrodynamic character- 
istics are reproduced to scale. The model 
becomes truly an exact, flying, scale dupli- 
cate of the full-sized airplane. It will not 
only reproduce the full scale resistance 
but all oscillations and motions which are 
essential in determining the hydrodynamic 
stability, or as more commonly known, 
porpoising characteristics. 

It has been customary in the past to 
test a geometric reproduction of only the 
hull of the airplane in a towing tank and 
to represent the lift due to the wing by 



either a hydrovane running in the water 
or a system of counterbalance weights. 
This force being applied to the center of 
gravity of the airplane by means of a pulley 
or linkage mechanism. In practically every 
case the weight of the model and towing 
gate has greatly exceeded the scale gross 
weight of the airplane being tested, re- 
quiring the counterweights to be much 
heavier than required for mere representa- 
tion of lift. As the lift derived depended 
only upon forward velocity the effect of 
change in lift due to change in angle of 
attack of the model was neglected. 

This condition of dissimilarity coupled 
with the absence of aerodynamic moments 
and damping of the wing and tail made the 
model unreliable as a source of informa- 
tion on full scale behavior. For example, 
it was possible to determine the best center 
of gravity position for minimum resist- 
ance in the water but there was no assur- 
ance that such a center of gravity was the 
optimum for the airplane from a stability 
standpoint. Very often the latter criterion 
is extremely critical in the full scale air- 
plane and frequently necessitates a shift 
that is detrimental to the resistance or 
flying qualities. For this reason, when 
hydrodynamic stability is unknown, it is 
necessary to use models upon which the air 
structure is truly represented as well as 
being similar as to weight and mass dis- 
tribution. By eliminating the mechanisms 
required to simulate lift the model can be 
made a self-contained unit from which 
the stability characteristics may be ob- 
tained in any calm body of water by 
merely furnishing a means of propulsion. 



February, 1940 



11 



This is provided by the towing carriage 
when tested in the tank or by a speed boat 
in open water. The wing, tail, and other 
appendages may then be removed and 
water resistance obtained in the usual tank 
manner. 

While it is comparatively simple to ob- 
tain the correct model weight and balance, 
the correct lift and mass distribution pre- 
sents a more difficult problem. Due to 
Reynold's Number eflfect the geometrically 
reproduced wing will not give scale lift. 
This is allowed for by correcting the span 
of the flaps to make up the difference. 
The additional flap area will compensate 
for the loss due to Reynold's Number effect 
and bring the stalling and getaway speeds 
to scale without affecting the downwash 
over the tail surfaces. The pitching mo- 
ment of inertia (Mk"), or mass distri- 
bution, varies as the scale to the fifth 
power and can only be obtained by shift- 
ing mass in the model. In order to obtain 
the correct value it is usually necessary 
for at least one-half the total weight of 
the model to be lead ballast. The pitching 
moment of inertia is determined by swing- 
ing the model as a compound pendulum 
and timing at least fifty oscillations. With 
the inertia of the full scale airplane known 
the required period for the model may be 
computed. It then becomes necessary to 
shift the ballast and swing the model until 
that period is obtained. When the model 
is correctly balanced and ballasted it will 
reproduce the motions of the full-size air- 
plane. 

As half the total weight of the model 
is lead ballast the structure must be ex- 
tremely strong and light weight. In order 
to meet these requirements a large amount 
of balsa monocoque construction is used. 
The wings are of full cantilever, stressed 
skin construction consisting of three-ply, 
^-inch, pine ribs, mahogany leading and 
trailing edges, and Is -inch square spruce 
stringers. The entire structure is planked 
with 1/16-inch balsa which gives an ex- 
tremely strong and rigid wing for ap- 
proximately one-half pound per square 
foot of area. 

The hull is built in a similar manner us- 
ing three-ply pine bulkheads planked with 
balsa. In order to get a high gloss finish 
and seal the extremely porous balsa wood 
the entire model is covered with Japanese 
rice tissue paper which is attached to the 
planking with shellac and rubbed out 
smooth. The model is then sprayed with 
three light coats of pigmented varnish and 
rubbed to a high gloss. This type of con- 
struction and finish gives an extremely 
strong model of low weight which is im- 
pervious to water. The illustration shows 



a dynamic model and towing equipment 
mounted on a speed boat"' ready for test- 
ing. 

As the value of a dynamic model de- 
pends upon its ability to reproduce the 
motions of the full scale airplane, it is 
necessary to transmit thrust to the model 
in such a manner that the freedom of mo- 
tion is not impaired. Yaw during takeoff 
is of relative unimportance therefore the 
model is restrained about that axis. The 
towing gear shown in the illustration was 
designed to fulfill these requirements. 

A square roller cage consisting of twelve 
ball bearings was located at the end of 
the towing boom. The ball bearings bore on 
the machined surfaces of the square tow- 
ing staff and allowed freedom in rise, yet 
restrained the model in yaw without bind- 
ing. The other end of the towing staff 
was pivoted in the model at the center of 
gravity which allowed freedom in pitch. 
The center of gravity fitting was mounted 
in the hull on a longitudinal axis which 
allowed freedom in roll for float investi- 
gations, otherwise it could be locked which 
restrained the model in roll. The center of 
gravity fitting allowed the staff to be 
pivoted at a wide range of center of grav- 
ity locations which is necessary for a 
thorough investigation of stabihty. A 
hoisting pulley was placed on the boom 
which allowed the model to be pulled out 
of the water at the end of the test run. 

All tests are recorded by a moving pic- 
ture camera mounted in the speed boat. 
By analyzing the film in a shadow box, a 
frame at a time, the trim and rise, period 
and amplitude of oscillation, and accelera- 
tions in pitch and rise may be determined. 
The horizon is used in all cases as the hori- 
zontal reference line. The shadow box is a 
black box with a ground glass screen at 
one end and a Leica projector at the other. 
A strip of vellum moves across the glass 



"The United States Coast Guard is to be thanked 
for their helpful cooperation in furnishing the 
speed boat used in these tests. 



screen upon which the necessary reference 
lines are traced from the projected image. 
From the tests being made with flying 
tank models, data is obtained which is ever 
increasing the safety, utility and dependa- 
bility of our flying boats. 

GLIDER NEWS 

Anticipating the heavy rains to be over 
in February, leaving in their wake the 
brisk west winds and generally unstable 
conditions that prevail thru the Spring, the 
Annual Glider Meet has been definitely set 
for the first week-end in March — the 2nd 
and 3rd. This should greatly improve 
chances for soaring of all types of ships, 
not just the high performance sailplanes 
(which are now burnishing the ridge 
alone) . 

The Torrey Pines Glider Port, justly 
famous for its excellent location and 
soaring possibilities has lately played host 
to several visiting ships from Los Angeles. 
From the enthusiastic owners we under- 
stand that our Los Angeles friends are 
also looking forward to this Glider Meet. 
A total of 10-12 sailplanes are expected 
to participate. Of these at least three will 
be 2-place, which will make it possible 
for a few of our friends to try soaring 
firsthand. For the entertainment of spec- 
tators there will be formation flights, pre- 
cision flying, and landing contests, and a 
broadcast from the Club's 2-place sail- 
plane. See photo No. 1, page 20. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 




^^WfF 



Union at "C 




# 



Personal Supervision of the Owners Assures Careful Consideration of 

Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Always Reasonable 

Convenientli/ Located— Ample Free Parking 



JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and Ath St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Mdin 6168 



12 



Consolidafor 




Stretching curved sections is a 
difficult problem, but is easily- 
handled on flat table top with aid of 
curved bar being driven against in- 
side of formed angle by pneumatic 
pressure. E. W. Hall and L. E. Whit- 
comb perform this operation working 
the bottom angle leg to set it during 
the stretching operation. This ma- 
chine is readily adjustable for change 
in radius or section. 



Each section being made up must 
have its own set of rolls. Red Robbins 
handles these requirements and 
draws on his many years of experi- 
ence in designing these items. He is 
conferring with Millard Web, Draw 
Bench machinist, on the finishing 
touches to be added to the roll you 
see in the lathe. The finished roll will 
be part of a series to produce a "Zee" 
section similar to that which Robbins 
is holding in his hand. 



All work performed in the Draw 
Bench is not for direct production 
purposes. Many jobs ore intricately 
formed structural iron sections which 
will be used as tools, machine guards, 
and jigs or fixture details. On this 
heavy roll machine large size struc- 
tural sections are easily handled. Joe 
Friel is adjusting the top roll and W. 
Scott is handling the control box and 
feeding into the rolls a section of 
V4"x2'x2" angle iron. 



ROLLING THRU THE I 



By Larry Boeing 

THE person who dubbed Chris Engle- 
hart's department with the title of 
"Draw Bench" sure took an easy way out 
of explaining one of the most difficult set 
of operations performed in our manu- 
facturing divisions. 

It is in this department that materials 




Pictured here is the large Draw 
Bench capable of drawing the heav- 
iest gauges used in the plant. Chris 
Englehart is checking the operation 
and roll setting on the first piece of a 
run of a section of 24 ST Alclad sheet 
.128 inch thick. Bill Fink and Al 
Weigle have set up the job and will 
handle the production run. This draw 
bench can handle lengths in excess of 
50'. It is powered with a 50 H.P. motor. 



are recorded in thousands of feet of par- 
ticular sections, instead of the usual tens 
or hundreds. It is truly the volume pro- 
ducing unit of our organization. 

The large amount of material required 
necessitates a considerable movement of 
raw materials into the department, and 
finished sections or parts to stock, or 
further processing. Only thru careful ad- 
vance planning and organization can de- 
livery schedules be met. But in between 
these movements are sandwiched a myriad 
of operations the nature of which is so 
specialized in most cases, that it becomes 
necessary to construct the required pro- 
cessing equipment in the Draw Bench 
department itself. 

Most of the equipment with the excep- 
tion of a few large machine tools has been 
developed jointly by the heads of this de- 
partment cooperating closely with our Tool 
Design and Tool Room. 

Forming sheet metal by drawing it thru 
a series of rolls is not a new achievement 
by any means. Adopting this processing 
arrangement to form materials used in air- 
craft construction did however, present 
an entirely new set of problems. 

Alclad sheet, the most generally used 
draw bench material, is a composite of a 
heat treatable aluminum alloy core cov- 
ered on both sides with a thin protective 
coating of pure aluminum. This outside 



coating must not be injured in any man- 
ner that might affect its serviceability. This 
makes the watchword "Be careful" the 
paramount concern of all members of the 
department. 

Raw material to be formed is sheared 
to developed widths and delivered to this 
department in coils. Sections with simple 
right angle bends to multiple curves such 
as heavy "hat sections" are manufactured 
here. Many have short return bends at the 
edges to increase the section's inherent 
strength. This complicates the rolling 
process considerably, but adds to the 
plane's strength and carrying capacity. 

These completed sections must conform 
to strict dimensional requirements. Bend 
radii must be accurately maintained and 
finished material must not show any ap- 
preciable loss of section thickness. 

All these operations are accomplished 
by passing the strips of metal thru an 
arrangement of rolls. Each set of rolls 
in the series causes the ribbon of metal 
to take a new shape and the final sef 
brings the section to its correct form and 
dimensional requirements. Powerful elec- 
tric motors drive the equipment. 

The sections once drawn to shape are 
now ready for heat-treatment, straighten- 
ing, pulling and are then checked for cor- 
rect hardness by means of a Rockwell 
Hardness Tester. 



February, 1940 



13 




Stretching of aluminum alloy hard- 
ens it and increases its tensile 
strength about ten percent. Here Louis 
Kolts and Chet Sheppard are stretch- 
ing long stringer sections after heat 
treatment. Rack in the background 
contains warped section (caused by 
heat treatment) awaiting pulling op- 
eration. The machine is pneumatical- 
ly operated. 



Pictured above is Bob Gates op- 
erating one of the smaller rolling ma- 
chines, several of which are in con- 
stant use during three shifts daily. 
Here one can readily see the coiled 
material, passing thru the adjustable 
guides and into the series of form- 
ing rolls. These small rolling ma- 
chines turn out thousands of feet of 
light sections used as stringers and 
reinforcements thruout the airplane. 
Stock being rolled is .072" thick. Also 



RAW BENCH 



The pulling or stretching operation 
work hardens the material and increases 
its tensile strength giving added strength 
without additional weight. 

AH completed sections are marked with 
a roll stamp along their entire length for 
identification purposes. They are then 
ready to be cut into lengths and formed 
to desired shapes as required. 

The shaping process consists of taking 
these sections and fitting them into form 
blocks which are replicas of sections of 
the airplane itself. Some parts can be 
worked easily with a block and rawhide 
mallet, some are passed thru rolls and 
others are completed only after combining 
the above two methods. 

Rolling the completed sections to attain 
forms which later give the completed air- 
plane those sleek graceful lines is a job 
where work stops and art begins. 

Red Robbins and Chris Englehart use 
up plenty of energy working out these 
roll problems. Sometimes the removal of 
only a few thousandths of an inch from a 
face of a roll is all that is needed to clear 
up a difficult drawbench production prob- 
lem. Not only production work problems 
confront the men in this department, but 
often they are called upon to form large 
structural sections which will eventually be 
details of large jigs or assembly fixtures. 
It is very interesting to watch these highly 



specialized jobs being completed and much 
credit must be given to Chris and Red for 
the fine job they are turning in. 

Writing about this department is a lot 
easier than rolling out miles of sections 
every day as these boys do and I want to 
suggest to anyone who might think his 
own work is difficult to watch the Draw 
Bench boys awhile. The ribs and formers 
under an airplane's skin are the cause of 
all its outside beauty. All the members 
of this department deserve a big hand for 
disproving the theory that beauty is only 
skin deep. 



note various roll sets on the table. 
These motor driven machines are 
handled by remote control by oper- 
ator who has operating switch close 
to point where he can observe work. 

Much time and effort is saved 
with the adjustable bench pictured 
above. Blocks are fastened to slides 
in the table top itself. These blocks 
themselves are adjustable for height 
and angle. A sample is drawn from 
Tool Storage and the blocks are fas- 
tened down so that they form a con- 
tinual set of mountings not unlike a 
single form block matching the con- 
tour of the sample. Drawn section 
stock is then hammered or rolled to 
its proper shape, and checked against 
the block setting. The table is usually 
set up in a manner that will permit 
working both right and left hands at 
the same time. Fred Lightner and Joe 
Zerr are at work on details that will 
eventually be part of a Hull Belt 
Frame former assembly. 

Below — This picture shows internal 
view looking aft of Richard Arch- 
bold's "World Record Breaking" 
Guba. Formed angles which give the 
ship its sleek lines can be seen held 
together with longitudinal stringers to 
which the skin is riveted. 




14 



Consolidator 



WILLIE WRITES OF 
AIRCRAFT WORK . . . 

Dear Ma & Pa: 

Just a few lines to let you know I'm 
on the new job at Cousolidated. They 
wouldn't let me test hop the new plane 
because they couldn't spare me from the 
special work I'm doing here. 

When I reached the land of Sunshine 
and Showers I met a smart boy from down 
West Virginia way who was every inch a 
slicker. As I was broke anyway, I didn't 
worry about taking up with strangers. 
Since then I've found them lots of fun 
even though I am still broke. 

I asked this "mountain boy" what he 
done at the "aircraft" and he said he was 
a stock chaser. Well, Ma, as much as I 
hate to admit it, I was slightly fooled. 
I chased stock for you and Pa over the 
south forty since I don't remember when, 
so I thought I might as well start in on a 
job I had some experience on. I should 
have known something was wrong when 
the hiring man looked so funny at me 
when I told him I not only chased stock 




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but was a fair hand at 'hog calling." He 
called me "Mortimer Snurd" and I just 
didn't get it. 

They turned me over to a man who said 
this job is easy. I asked where the stock 
was. He said, he'd help me round it up, 
and sometimes I feel so sorry for that man. 
How he could use a horse! He told me 
they were going to furnish us scooters but 
when they tried them out the results were 
bad. One stock chaser made a fast turn 
and went over the handle bars and into a 
quenching tank. Somebody from the 
Squirrel cage said, "Too bad his aim was 
so poor. One tank more and he'd of made 
the 'Salt Bath'." 

This job was easy at first but now it's 
getting tough. You don't chase stock, just 
colored tags. You see they have a different 
color tag for every order they have. 
Honest, Ma, they must be really busy. 
First they have Pink tags for an Army 
order and Gray tags for another Army 
order and Green tags for still another. 
Wow! Then they have orange tags for 
this kind of spare part. "They use Yellow 
tags for an order for boats and Blue tags 
for spare Navy parts. But the rub came 
when they got new orders. Colors were 
getting scarce. They added white ones 
for commercial jobs. Then they got fancy. 
One morning my boss said we'll use Buff 
tags on the new Navy order. He said the 
Aqua colored ones and a delightful shade 
of Heliotrope were being reserved for fu- 
ture orders. Well Ma, that was all right, 
until one day I had to look for some parts 
in the Squirrel cage. There is something 
funny about that place. Even the fellows 
working in there act funny and look 
funny. They have funny blue lights beat- 
ing down on them. One of the men in 
there keeps pixies or something, another 
eats raw meat. Boy is that a wild place! 
They keep all the men locked in a cage. 
Well, when I started to look for my colored 
tags a man with a green face laughed at 
mc and threw me out. As I was "moving 



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out" I noticed a lot of new colored tags — 
Brown, Purple, Lemon, Orchid, and Rose. 
When I asked my boss what jobs they 
were for he just said, "that's what those 
lights do to colors!" 

So Ma, if I want blue I ask for purple, 
and if I want red I reach for brown. Ma, 
it's really terrible. 

Well I met two boys who are night in- 
spectors and they are in the Dog House. 
New Year's Eve they left the plant and 
on the way home the tall one said, let's 
get some "chuckle water," and the short 
one said "o. k." So the big one said, "My 
wife makes swell Tom and Jerry batter. 
She'll have some in the icebox." So they 
picked up their bottles of cheer and 
headed home. They had a few jolts and 
then went into the house. Softly they 
made for the icebox and then got a pair 
of cups and some hot water and carefully 
measured out the batter and the water, 
and kquor. 

Well, they softly spoke of the year just 
finishing and their plans for the year to 
come and in between times mixed more 
batter, etc. until things were even all 
around. 

In the morning the tall one was awak- 
ened by his wife, who was furious. "Fine 
man, what happened to that bowl of 
waffle batter I had in the ice-box?" she 
asked. 

"Ah me!" the tall one groaned as he 
turned over with visions of a drop ham- 
mer coming down on his head. "Happy 
New Year, darling! Oh!" 

Well Ma, time's a-wasting. More soon. 
Love to you all, 

WILLIE. 

Prof. Wright: "I hate to tell you this, 
sir, but your son is a moron." 

Father: "Wait until he gets home. I'll 
teach him to join one of those fraternities 



with 



out my consent! 

The disturbed old lady (at the Western 
Union Office) finally said: "Well, if you're 
so clever that you can send money and 
flowers by wire, I cannot see why you 
can't telegraph this umbrella for me." 



A 

FRIENDLY 

.SERVICE 



Ffiff^/ 



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''tnmi 




February, 1940 



15 



It'? Raining, It's Pouring 
The Old Man Is SOARING— 

By Jerry Littel 

THE rains have come and, with the 
„ rains the wind. So who worries about 
a riin cloud when it brings wind, free 
power for hours of saiUng in the sky? 
Besides, the cloud itself gives lift. If it can 
hold tons of water up there it certainly 
can hold a sailplane too. By rising high 
enough on the deflected winds a good 
soarer will try to reach a cloud's field of 
attraction to get still more altitude, spi- 
ralling like a hawk till he reaches the cloud 
base. Now he is not restricted to the ridge 
lift any more, his highly streamlined craft 
will take him from the lift of one cloud 
to that of another. His slight loss of alti- 
tude between clouds is quickly regained 
under them. 

The thrill of sailing hghtly around in 
the sky, defying nature's law of gravity, 
not by expenditure of throbbing, roaring 
power, but by using his own skill and 
knowledge of the nature of unstable air — 
balancing its energy with the force of 
gravity — that thrill is reserved for the 
soaring pilot alone. 

That sense of achievement is worth all 
the hours of work spent constructing and 
grooming his ship, and the waiting for 
wind. And if the air turns stable and lets 
him down, his high gliding angle gives 
him a wide choice of landing fields, in- 
cluding his own. Does he worry about a 
"dead stick landing" in a small field? No, 
he just approaches from the most conven- 
ient angle, — the dreaded down-wind turn 
at low altitude is familiar to him, so is the 
tail or side wind landing long practiced in 
slope-soaring — and he alights on the spot. 

" — But if he had a motor he wouldn't 
have to come down, and he conld go 
places." 

And where would be that wonderful 
sense of achievement? Soaring is flying for 
sport, not for transport. That is primarily 
the purpose of the airplane. The transition 
from sailplane to airplane, if desired, is 
easy and the future transport pilot will 
have that fundamental understanding of 
his element which only comes from riding 
the winds. 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
"The Blind Man" 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

102.3 University Avenue 



PAINFUL COMEBACK 

By Bud Spragiic 

THE more or less friendly rivalry be- 
tween those of us who spend our 
spare time enjoying the pleasures of flying 
a power ship, and that strange group of 
mental cases who haul ghders all over the 
country in hopes that they might chance 
upon a stray breeze, give rise to many in- 
teresting private wars. 

In contradiction to an article by Jerry 
Litell appearing in the December issue of 
the Consolidator, in which he told how 
Jim Conniry, erstwhile glider enthusiast, 
took a hop in my Curtiss Jr., which Jerry 
referred to as "nearly an aeroplane", I give 
you these few lines. 

It seems that Jim had intended to go 
for a ride in one of those motorless rigs 
that are so nice for children and old ladies, 
but the wind was not right. After a quick 
look at the weather map and several tries 
of wetting his finger and holding it up 
without results, he found that on this day 
as on numerous others he wouldn't be able 
to glide because the necessary breeze was 
conspicuous by its absence. 

An hour later found him at the La Mesa 
Airport, assuring everyone present that 
the only reason he would stoop low enough 
to take a hop in a power ship, was that this 
seemed to be a necessary second choice. 

Anyway, he went up in the Curtiss Jr. 
with the result that even though he doesn't 
talk about it around his glider Pals, he 
has forsaken the glider for the power ship. 

Jim immediately started taking lessons 
in the Curtiss and a week before Christ- 
mas, "Won his Wings." 



It is quite evident that like many others 
who have taken the "ten-minute cure," 
Jim tired of waiting around on barren 
hilltops for or Man Weather to bring him 
a breeze, and has come to the conclusion 
that it's not such a bad idea to have a wind 
machine right along with you. 

Moral — A power ship, or to quote Jerry, 
"Nearly an aeroplane," is a great deal bet- 
ter than "nothing!" 

To Mr. and Mrs. C. Slankard of the 
Wing Department on December 26th, a 
boy: Robert Calvert Slankard. Young Mr. 
Slankard checked into the world at just 
7 pounds and 3 Yi oz. Congratulations. Mr. 
Slankard is in the Wing Department. 



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51 12 Imperial Ave., corner of Euclid. 
E. A. SUTTON, Owner and Builder. 



16 



Consolidotor 



DRIFTING THRU DRAFTING 

By Jeff Boiiley 

HO Hum! What with overtime and 
all manner of piledriving and other 
construction operations going on at the 
plant, the fellows seem too occupied to 
make news this month. In fact, we have 
heard it breathed around that with so 
many post holes in the plant yard, one has 
to keep his wits about him all the time. 

Added to the difficulty of writing this 
month's column is our attempt to be semi- 
formal by wearing a tie while writing, in 
indignant answer to the chiding handed 
us by Brad Bradshaw in his last month's 
comments on the Engineers' Coronado 
dance. From all accounts, Brad had an en- 
joyable time hobbing around with the 
engineers at the dance, but we cannot 
understand why he got so exclusive on the 
way home and insisted on taking his prom- 
enade on the ferry deck along the outside 
of the railing. 

We note in the San Diego papers that 
the volume of mail handled last year by 
the local postoflice exceeded all previous 



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records. This news comes as no particular 
surprise to us when we consider that most 
of the reasons for it might occur right 
in our own plant. Henry Mandolf in his 
frenzied Christmas activity dashed off 
greeting cards right and left and even 
mailed one to himself. And then there was 
the extra truck put on to take care of the 
Gene Davidson mail, which was the result 
of a vigorous coupon-clipping orgy. Then 
added to this, of course, were the hundred 
copies of the aviation magazine with Ben 
Livers' picture in it. The newsstands were 
sold out the day after the copy appeared 
so that we can only conclude that they all 
found their way to relatives and his old 
college profs. 

The account of one writer of the re- 
cent S.A.E. meeting in Los Angeles was 
quite amusing from the Cottsolidated 
standpoint. The meeting was described as 
a "gathering of serious-faced, pipe-smok- 
ing engineers, etc.," and yet our delegates 
Bernie Sheahan, Ben Livers and Emeric 
Bergere are all steadfast in the belief that 
the sole function of a pipe is to conduct 
hydraulic fluid about. 

The old adage "like father, like son" 
was reversed recently by Bill Maloney's 
dad. Bill was in an accident some time ago 
and messed up his tibia or fibula or maybe 
both, and he still experiences difficulty in 
navigation. Last week Bill's father was 
trying out a demonstration model of a 
power-driven scooter for the new plant 
transportation problem. He was getting 
along pretty well and was just learning 
to do neat figure-of-eights when his mount 
tricked him. He has now taken over the 
operation of the Maloney family crutches. 

Speaking of the hobbling element in our 
department, we don't know whether it is 
due to the parking problem or not, but 
several of the boys are really limping these 
days in their travels up and down stairs. 
Besides Dick Robbins and Gale Thompson, 
Med Sherwood came to work during one 
week with a bandaged foot allegedly in- 



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jured while he was playing basketball. 
Med was the recipient of a baby girl for 
a Christmas present and we really suspect 
that he was tired of walking the floor at 
night and that he cleverly devised this 
scheme to get caught up on his sleep. Or 
again, he might actually have bumped the 
foot during one of his nocturnal vigils 
and been a little sheepish about reporting 
the true cause of the injury. Erv Watts, 
the little giant of the stress group, whose 
kind, it is rumored, made the filming of 
Gulliver's Travels possible is also provid- 
ing shelter for an infant daughter pre- 
sented by Mrs. Watts during the holiday 
season. 

What do the huntsmen and fishermen 
do in the off season? We have pondered 
over this question many times, but one 
recent evening we learned the answer. 
After a strenuous season of deep-sea fishing 
and bird hunting. Buck Growald and 
Etienne Dormoy, those famous chasseurs 
of the denizens of the sea and air, were 
seen in off-season action down at Tony's 
Place. One would fire the electric-eye gun 
at the travelling ducks while the other 
would keep score on his fingers. Quite a 
crowd had gathered in front of the place 
to peer through the windows at the men 
in action. But we were a bit embarrassed 
and we stole silently away feeling somehow 
that this year will be a great one for the 
duck. 

"X" NEWS 

Well, our first item today is something 
that is really choice. Dispatcher No. 44 
got an urgent telephone call the other day. 
The call was for a baby scale. One never 
knows what the dispatching system will 
be called on next to produce. 

It seems as if Jim Morris never runs 
out of "puns." One day last week Jim 
asked Bruce if he had heard about the 
empty house on the hill. Bruce, very ser- 
iously said he hadn't heard anything, and 
Jim, just as seriously comes out with, 
"Why, there's nothing in it, of course." 
That's o. k. Bruce, you are not the only 
one who has fallen for Jim's jokes. 

Our bowling team, last year's champs, 
is going right up the ladder again. In the 
CoHsair League they are tied for third 
place — while in the Wednesday nite 
league they are in first place. Keep it up, 
boys, you're doing swell. 

On January 11, 1940, Mrs. Reed, wife 
of Lonnie Reed, passed away. You have 
the sympathy of all of us, Lonnie. 

A poor workman can do little with fine 
tools, a craftsman, wonders with poor 
tools. 



February, 1 940 



17 



fAiii-^HT-To-rnvj-iimo 

/ PUT- THAT- FIST- FULL- OF- NEBB'sl 

Tomn ' PILLS • IN • ny • scooter's 
Vgas-tank // 




YOU' SHOULDN'T -MAKE -SUCH 
HARD-tt/ORK OF-IT- ML. JUST 
TAKE • IT • EASY - LIKE • THIS /A 




PLANT ENGINEER INJURED 
IN SPECTACULAR CRASH 

There was a terrific burst of speed, a 
couple of bumps and then a resounding 
crash (according to eye witnesses). Out 
of the debris limped our Plant Engineer, 
'Bill' Maloney, with a game leg. 

It seems the physical act of transporting 
one's self about the factory and yard is 
assuming major proportions along with 
the expanding plant. So to cut down the 
'walking time,' the idea of using small 
powered scooters was being tried out by 
'Bill' Maloney and Jim Kelley, plant super- 
intendent. The little busses proved fascin- 
ating runabouts. Jim Kelley managed to 
master the art in one lesson and ma- 
neuvered about the yard without mishap. 
'Bill,' however, encountered some rough 
going and came in for a one point landing, 
injuring his leg in so doing. "Bill' says as 
a result of the experience he's completely 
sold on the tricycle landing gear as used 
on the amphibian and will pay particular 
attention during the expansion to the 
smoothness that goes into the yard paving. 
Only temporarily slowed down, due to the 
use of crutches, 'Bill' will probably be 
'on both feet' by the time this issue comes 
out. 

It's a fine thing to be a gentleman, but 
it's an awful handicap in a good argument. 



FINISH NEWS 

By Al Griff if h 

CONGRATULATIONS go to Bill 
Baker on his marriage, also cooking 
his own breakfast. 

Hubbard planted his lawn the other 
day now he is looking for a lawn-mower. 

Bill Picken is digging up an old lawn 
which will soon be finished. 

Have you ever noticed that engineering 
look on Claud Galehouse's face lately? 
That is from playing with his electric train. 
He found it under the Xmas tree. 

I hear Bob Jurgenson is now running a 
fruit market. 

The honorable Frank Finn says he was 
so busy that he didn't hear the whistle, and 
he missed seeing the army job take off. 



Art Crossley is putting in a lawn at 
his house. Maybe you can borrow Hub- 
bard's lawn-mower. 

We are pleased to hear that Mrs. Bob 
Bibbs has returned from Colorado after 
a six weeks illness. Bob reports that she is 
doing fine. 

Congratulations to Red Shade; the win- 
ner of a scholarship to U.S.C. through 
his swimming. Says he is going to be a 
journalist. 

We sympathize with OUie Stewart be- 
cause of the recent death of his sister. 

Dale had a race with another motorist; 
it went over with a bang, the race was 
a tie. 

Alexandra wants to know the formula 
of Stewarts Sat. nite refreshments. 

Walter Lawr and Roy Combs are both 
figuring on building new homes. 

We wish to welcome back to the de- 
partment Wally Miles, Ray Damon, Ray 
McGriffin, Vern Tyler and Carl Johnson. 
Wally has had an addition to his family: 
little 14-months-old Miss Valaree Miles. 
Damon was busy re-enforcing his home 
against the doings of three husky sons, 



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SAFEl/ITAY 



18 



Consolidator 



who have attained the ages of 3 to 6 yrs. 
McGuffin got married during his leave 
and along with other minor details be- 
came the stepfather of three children. 
Tyler went to Alaska to find his pot of 
gold and came back after a year and a half 
with fond memories of mining camps, 
construction work, and good fishing. Carl 
Johnson took advantage of the times, 
working with a building contractor. A 
beautiful young girl took advantage of 
him and became Mrs. Johnson, and by the 
time this goes to press, according to the 
latest telegram, the stork will have taken 
advantage of both of them. Congratula- 
tions. 

Note: Little Miss Judith Irene, weight 7 lbs., 
12 oz., was born on Jan. 19th. Carl Johnson is now 
the youngtst Dad in Anodic Dept. 

Our red-headed Herbert Austin Max- 
well Henderson just took two weeks off 
to go with the National Guards on its war 
games. Harry Coyle and Russ Haynes 
have switched jobs on the switchboard. 
Curly Thoman and Van Nyhuis take turns 
keeping the tools in order. 



BEHIND THESE DOORS 

SERVICE AND ECONOMY 




SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINT HEADQUARTERS 

pninT - lUQLLPnPER 
Broadoia^ a-t Tenth 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

By Braihhaiv 

WE were feeling mighty sorry for 
Bill Liddle so recently married to 
one of a set of beautiful twins. Seeing his 
bride so seldom he was having difficulty 
distinguishing her from the sister, but 
after we saw the two together we wonder 
why he tried. Ray Hartmayer saw his kid 
for the first time in so long that the 
youngster asked "who is that strange man 
mama?" Roy Coykendall is looking for- 
ward to see Monroe Ave. hard surfaced or 
at least the mud dried up when he gets 
home. Don Rasmusscn still doesn't believe 
he can stay away from home so long and 
still be married. Bert Gimber, and Jake 
Deitzer, don't seem to mind as it gives a 
good excuse for Elizabeth and Virginia to 
live with mamma and cut expenses. But 
most of the fellows seem happy for more 
work, means more money and more girls, 
the latest female additions being Misses 
Hazel Brink, "Checker upper" and Gene- 
vieve Holm, "card replacer." 

During the month — Ray Hartmayer 
had a birthday and either became of 
"teething age" or got his "uppers" and 
"lowers" on the wrong gums which caused 
him a great deal of trouble. A "Horseshoe 
pitching contest" was the final event of 
the celebration and Ray, after learning the 
object was to ring the stake asked, "what 
stake"? He must have lost the "prize" or 
recuperated rapidly from its effects for 
he was fit as a fiddle the next day. . . . 
Hal Leppart, one of the best bowlers in 
the city came through with his usual good 
games to keep his team near the top. . . . 
Glenn Hotchkiss and his Hull basketball 
team under the leadership of that "cagy" 
cage artist, Fred Grosher and sparked by 
the clever "sharpshooter" Tommy John- 
son treated the fans to some thrilling 
games. . . Amos and Andy have nothing 
on the Production phone system, Mr. "G" 
buzz me. . . . More "new deals" have 




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DENNSTED, 



376 1 FIFTH (2 blocks south of University) 
Telephone JACKSON 5176 




been given out in Production than Presi- 
dent Roosevelt could produce with a 
stacked deck. . . . Paul Gaughen is the 
latest addition to the "Process line" and 
like "ye olde time" "Crown Prince" Russ 
inherits the throne a> "King of Spares," 
and menace to the little Kingdom of Larry 
Boeing, still safe within his "chicken wire" 
fortress and givmg 'em "both barrels." 
This will give Paul a chance to smoke up 
those "El Stinko," manila hemp cigars 
he has collected from the marriages and 
births during the past year. . . . John Hop- 
man, is still trying to convince Glenn 
Hotchkiss that he should have an hour in 
order to dress properly for lunch. . . "The 
trouble with this plant is there's no cul- 
ture" groans John. . . . Gracie Koenig 
doesn't like to have her quintet of girls 
referred to as the "hungry five" . . . Bud 
Waterbury, who has the job of placing 
the "hired help" about the shop has ignored 
my suggestion that the Planning now has 
room for two each of blondes and bru- 
nettes. . . . Ernie Johnson's house-warming 
did not pan out so good for the host as 
the guests brought far too small quan- 
tities to stock his cabinet and "stuck" 
him for the round of drinks at the cafe 
while he was trying to "out smart" the 
pin ball machine. . . . The Chief worry 
of Falbaum, Stuck and McVickers of 
Engineering is that too many "Swedes" 
don't go to Finland to ruin the Minne- 
sota Gophers football team. . . . Out 
Niagara street in Ocean Beach Ted Ander- 
son takes up his abode in his new home, 
but Craig Clark still holds the edge in 
"voting power" of the block with the 
addition to the family of Clark number 
"three" while Ted and Kay do not even 
have a fence running around the house. . . 
Not on top of the heap in the basketball 
league, but giving the teams a run for 
their money is the Production hoopsters, 
Matusek, R. Gaughen, P. Gaughen, Carter, 
Welsh, Peters, and Phillips who would like 
to see a few more production fans out be- 
sides their wives and sweethearts, who 
have no place else to go. . . The night 
team we find leading the way in their 
league and top favorites to win. . . Good 
work fellows. . . That gala event at 
Sunnyside was made possible by those 
"Sky hawks" Anderson, Leboffe, Good- 
year, McDonald and Buttcrfield who can 
make a "three point" landing with any 
kind of "load." The worst casualty was 
the loss of Harvey Muck's glasses which 
next to a fallen arch, ingrown toenail and 
bunion is the toughest luck that can be- 
fall a dispatcher. . . But Harvey claims 
he had already seen all there was to see 
(Continued on page 2-4 1 



February, 1940 



19 



HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

By Willie Wiiichcll Hartmati 

IT seems like the romance of aviation 
has caught up with our Frank Hughes. 
He recently joined the "Phantom Pilot 
Club of the Air," a radio serial for boys 
and girls. We also understand that our 
Yodeler Frank Kastelic has been made 
sergeant in the Gene Autry boys' club. 

Tommy McAleer just couldn't stand the 
excitement up in L. A., so he had to come 
back just as we expected. Funny how the 
oldsters are finally seeing the light. 

And speaking of the boys who went 
back home, Pete Cinquegrani left six 
inches of snow in Baltimore. He says no 
more for him. Funny how this San Diego 
climate gets under a guy's skin — just can't 
stay away, or is it those Mission Beach 
Belles, Pete? 

Vic (15-year) Perry couldn't m.ake the 
New Year's Dance, but he did make the 
Rose Parade, and says he had a swell time 
as did Ben Kiegle, Harlan Dye and a few 
others. Incidentally, Vic secured quite a 
few very excellent snapshots of the Pa- 
rade which are a credit to any photog- 
rapher. 

Little (Joe from Chicago) timekeeper, 
is now a member in good standing of the 
Welding Dept. black hand department. 
That black grease is sure tough to get off. 
At least Geo. Spencer thinks so now? 

Roy Williams, soon a papa to be, was 
seen in a certain department store at the 
baby counter buying those square, or 
three- cornered pants they all wear . . . 
Rock-a-bye, baby . . . 

Art the Bommer is contemplating a 
trip to Yuma for the business of getting 
married . . . Just so long as he only thinks 
about it he'll be o. k. 

We all know you can't braze anything 
with graphite or asbestos, but we wonder 
if Hendricks knows it yet, because that's 
what he was using to braze cast iron — tch, 
tch, 'stough, Henry! 

The George Drapers are inf anticipating. 
George is hoping for a girl and his wife 
looks for a boy so George no doubt will 
like another boy! 

Good old Gus Fougeron sure can take 
it. After all his tough luck and bad 



CLEANERS 
and DYERS 

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breaks, Gus dropped his cigarettes in his 
pail of water on the same day he found 
his youngest had put a toy balloon in his 
thermos full of coffee! 

A little sea gull told us that Dick 
Davis, that dapper Dan from down Chula 
Vista way, is just about ready to take the 
final leap into the marital war-like sea 
of matrimony, with the beautiful Vera 
Smith from Coron.ido. The ceremony 
takes place near the end of January, a^ 
Vera's birthday is in February . . . Huh, 
some gift to give a gal, says us. 

The Welding basketball team, consisting 
of Harlan Dye, Roy Williams, Don Feeney, 
Don James, Al Miley, Jules Aguire, Bert 



Bailey and Cecil Flowers, wish to thank 
all those who shared in securing the nec- 
essary equipment, especially Leo Bourdon, 
who so generously donated the very nec- 
essary shorts. O. K., boys, now let's sec 
you get in there and win! 



OPTOMETRISTS 

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20 



Consolidafor 















FROM THE ALBUM . . . 

1. Left to right: Steve Kecskcs, Jerry I.itell 
and Harry Comer assembling Jerry's newest . . . 
"Whitcap." 

2. At the celebration for the giving of the 
service Pin Awards: Left to right: Major Fleet, 
Miss Jane Dunn, Leo Bourdon, Ed Gott, Jack 
Thompson, George Young, Jack Mulroy, Walter 
Koch, H. T. Edwards and Dave Wilkinson. Photo 
by E. Backhaus. 

3. Picture of members of "Southern California 
Flyers." Front row, left to right, Bob McGrcagor, 
Al Griffith, Fred Robertson. Rear row, left to 
right, Pat Dowling, Rod McCrae, Joe Hollenbeck. 
Ray Dinsen, Tommy Saunders, Bill Sutton, Tex 
Hills, Joe Havlik, Isabelle McCrae, Bill Van 





Radios 

Refrigerators 

Lamps 

Appliances 

Washing Machines 

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Rentals 



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San Diego Ocean Beach 

Fr. 5397 Bay. 4913 



Winkle, Jim Killeany, Billy Luffe, Ken Smith, Bill 
Durflinger. 

4. These bachelors run a bachelor house called 
"Club Montecito." Left to right, standing: Jim 
Magee, Mr. Wold and Bill Wold. Mr. Wold is 
Bill's father, and his culinary art is rapidly adding 
to the waist lines of the group. Kneeling, left to 
right, are: Mel Harter, Frank Ranahan and Walt 
George. 

5. On September 3rd last Mike MacNally be- 
came a married man. Here he is just outside the 
photographer's with the former Miss Margaret 
Teresa Brown, who is now Mrs. MacNally. 

6. Eighteen ducks and one goose. The hunters 
are, G. Spaulding, Knute "Ducky" Knudson and 
Bob Dunn. The place of the hunt was the Salton 
Sea. Photos submitted by D. T. Berger of Main- 



tenance who adds, "We would like very much to 
have you fellows over for a duck dinner some- 
time ... be sure to pluck the ducks as we are 
allergic to duck feathers!" 

7. Turned in by D. B. Suggs of Engineering, 
who writes, "This picture is for the benefit of Mr. 
Poggi of Engineering who took the day off at the 
opening of last quail season and came home empty 
handed. He would like to know just what quail 
look like ... so here they are! 

8. Snapshot by Drowne of Experimental, of 
probably one of the oddest airplane accidents on 
record. Lucky Carl Thomasson lit the plane he 
was flying, in a group of wire carrying 12.000 
volts. He climbed out and down the pole without 
being injured. The plane burned and here a fire- 
man atop the pole has just finished extinguishing 
the fire that left the plane a mere skeleton. 



FOUNDRY 

Tiny Chadwick is the little man in the 
foundry (only 230 lbs. of brawn); when 
he and three other men were lifting some 
large flasks Tiny lifted his end and was 
ready to go, while the other three men 
just tried to lift the other end and grunted. 

Earl Merlau, No. 4117 of the Wing 
Dept., has just purchased an airplane. 
This plane (Travelair model 3000, powered 
by a Wright E4 190 H.P. engine) was 
used in the filming of the movie "Men 
With Wings." Earl says it is open for rent 
or hire. 

Announcement! Mr. and Mrs. M. J. 
Fulkerson are the proud parents of a new 
baby boy born at Mercy Hospital, Decem- 
ber 19, 1939. He weighed 6 lbs., 5-oz 
and was named Dennis Wm. Fulkerson. 



BRING yOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 



BENCH NEWS 

Bill Bellows has a cat that works in the 
reverse. Instead of getting rid of the mice 
in the house he brings them in alive and 
turns them free in the parlor, and it keeps 
Bill busy baiting the traps to recapture 
them. So Bill's new hobby is trapping mice. 

No. 2930. 

An optimist is one who makes oppor- 
tunities of his difficulties; a pessimist 
makes difficulties of his opportunities. 

"Teddy Edwards must be slipping," 
said Teddy Brooks when he saw Teddy Ed- 
ward's rubbers protruding from beneath 
Teddy Edward's bench. 

DROP HAMMER 

Mrs. Bob Sayles presented Bob of the 
Drop Hammer Dept. with a 6 lb., 14-oz. 
baby girl January' 11th. 

PLASTER SPLASHES 

We are all looking forward to a cigar 
from Joe Miller. How much longer must 
we wait before you-al! say "A do"? 

No. 3715. 



3050 University Ave. 



1144 Third Avenue "A precedent embalms a principle." 



February, 1940 



21 



MACHINE SHOP 
VIEWS & NEWS 

By Al Pfeiffer 

THE seeming chaotic commotion in 
the Mach. Shop, if you must know, 
is the processing of a new system. Its aim 
is the methodical coordination of machine 
work with productive planning. With the 
combined increase in the number of men 
and machines, the old way gradually out- 
grew its short pants. Much can be said 
about the ready cooperation of those who 
have foreseen this move. For example: 
Didn't the amiable Fred Hudson offer 
to stand on his head just to get job ma- 
terial from stock? 

May we say adieu to Art Murphy, a 
swell fellow and an efficient worker. Fam- 
ily affairs demand his moving to Los An- 
geles. Good luck. Art. 

Notes from the quenching oil — The post 
of "most bashful" has been vacated by 
the marriage of "Dagwood" Bowling, the 
day tool clerk. Our guess is that leap year 
precipitated the jump. In his place, we 
offer that West Virginia Adonis, Owen 
Gandee. Owen can change colors faster 
than any chameleon. And speaking of 
colors that crimson countenance of Bill 
Wiley or "Lil Abner" as he is famiharly 
known, marks a tempestuous nature. High 
blood pressure beware! 

To you who didn't know, dental re- 
verberations put that immovable "chaw" 
in Walt Herchold's right jaw. Paradox- 
ically enough the rotund figure of the jolly 
Jimmy Patton has been in numerous cor- 
ners of the world. Give out with some of 
the lurid details, Jim! A man perturbed 
was Fred Otto when, late in January, he 
suddenly became aware of the necessity of 
licensing his two motorcycles and that 
Auburn speedster. According to Matt Wie- 
lopolski, our night correspondent, Jake 
Frichtel must have pulled a boner on the 
night of January 17th. Leaving work at 
11:30 p. M. he pulled out of his parking 
space, approached the signal and was 
promptly served with notice of violation 
of Ordinance 17. Don't worry, Jake, 
there will be no double feature in court on 
the 22nd. You can still get to work in 
time. Disposition? $17.00. John Howard, 



debonair drill press leadman still remains 
the shop's most eligible bachelor. But wait 
till Spring rolls around and those love bugs 
fill the air. Handsome Jack Ware just 
missed an appointment to West Point on 
two counts (1) his wife Helen and (2) 
his daughter, Joyce. R. C. Miller, the 
smallest machinist, still hums the old 
song, "Little Man Who Wasn't There" 
with the new vocalization of "The Man 
Who Comes Around." We found out that 
Bill Love would rather be a clerk anyway. 
Those little red tags are a nuisance and be- 
sides you can't drill and think at the same 
time. Versatility is certainly personified 
in the form of the Machine Shop basket- 
ball team (Nite Shift). Picnicing, Jan. 
21st on a fine lunch (packed by the girls 
of course) at Warner's Hot Springs, they 
then drove 10 miles up Palomar. Warm 
water to snow in no time — that's versatil- 
ity. Things to do in idle moments — Lend 
a little cheer to Charlie Sellers, our mill- 
man who has been confined to a Los An- 
geles hospital. Stop in at the Golem house- 
hold and view some excellent movie and 
"still" shots of the Pasadena Parade of 
Roses. 

By the time this reaches print, we hope 
Bob Carson, the Tool Crib caretaker, will 
be back with us. 



DANCING CLASSES 

New Semester in AM 

TYPES OF DANCING 

ACADEMICTUTORING 
START Feb. 1,1940 



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Phone f 1197 jor injortnation 




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Adios — and orchids to Matt (Kelly) 
Wielopolski. 

By the way, who is our purveyor of 
osculatory remembrances? 

Basketball League Scores 
For Night Teams 

Jan. 15 and 16 — 

Hull 22 vs. Production _ ..42 

Wing 29 vs. Sheet Metal 25 

Machine 21 vs. Final Assembly ..11 

STANDINGS 

Voint% 
Won Lost Won 

Production 6 1 301 

Hull 5 2 203 

Machine 4 3 174 

Sheet Metal 4 3 155 

Final Assembly 1 6 155 

Wing 1 6 154 

W. C. Gilchrist. 



DON'T READ THIS: t:t;.J.Z 

If you really want clear, brilliant prints, finished 
by experts, send us your next order. 

MAIL AND SAVE 

25c for 6 or 8 exposure roll 

Reprints 3c; Bantams 2c 
Free mailing envelope on request 

THRIFTY FOTO SERVICE 

727 Madison Ave. 

Woodcrcst 5732 San Diego, Calif. 



GOODRICH 

HAS MOVED 

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Silvertown Stores 



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22 



Consolidator 



BOWLING NEWS 

By H. K. Clay 

THE race for the Consair bowling 
championship continues to rage at the 
Sunshine Alleys with unabated fury. The 
Production No. 1 team is leading the van- 
guard of keglers in the colorful contest 
by the narrowest of margins, having won 
43 points and lost 21. The number 2 team 
from Production has garnered 42 points 
and lost 22 and the crack Engineering 
team has 41 points accredited to them. 
Experimental is in 4th place with an ag- 
gregate of 40 points while the Finish, Hull 
No. 1 and Purchasing teams are next on 
the ladder of standings with 39, 38 and 36 
wins on the credit sides of their ledgers. 

The Engineers league is paced by the 
Flap team with 36 points won out of a 
possible 56. The Loft No. 1 quintet is a 
single point behind the leaders with 3 J, 
and the Armament aggregation is in 3rd 
place with 32 points won and 24 lost. 

Carl Heim topped the field of Consair 
keglers on Friday, January 12th by turn- 
ing in a total of 543 pins for the three 
games. Tom Coughlin, his teammate, won 
the honor the following week by register- 
ing games of 202-188 and 189 for a total 
of 579. 



"ALL AMERICAN HOMES" 

W. W. WELLPOT 

BUILDER 

Complete Building Service 

1305 I AVENUE • NATIONAL CITY 
Phone National 453 



The prize offered by the Worth Clothing 
Co. for high series above average was won 
by Owen Gandee of the Final Assembly 
quint. Owen pegged games of 144-154 
and 189 for a 487 total or 11 5 pins above 
par. 

Al Ballard has returned to the game 
again and is to be seen in action with 
his first love, the Sheet Metal team. In his 
initial series since his layoff Al turned 
in games of 146-233 and 160 for a 539 
total. Not only was he instrumental in 
helping the Sheet Metal take the single 
point from Production No. 2 but Al tied 
with Gimber of the latter team for the 
pair of shoes offered by Kirby & Co. for 
high series above average. He had 107 
pins toward the prize. 

Gimber had games of 176-133 and 194 
for a 503 total which is plenty good 
shooting for a 132 average kegler. Gimber 
and Ballard will decide between themselves 
as to who gets the shoes. Gimber may 
capitulate as he is aware of Al's having 
another arrival in his family and of course 
the baby always needs a pair of brogans. 

The Purchasing team composed of Paul 
Hoch, Frank Field, Eddie Jones, Frank 
Meer and Frank Gary took the measure of 
all teams recently by turning in an ag- 
gregate team series of 2611. They tallied 
8 52 in the first, 887 in the second time at 
bat and cantered home with an 866. In 
spite of their superb shooting they dropped 
a point to the Engineers who had 871 in 
their first game. 

Several Consair keglers are unwittingly 
working a hardship on the pin boys at the 
Sunshine. Coming in late they throw three 
or four balls down the alleys at the expense 



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of the pinaroos who vigorously object to 
setting pins for charity. Such a practice 
makes it difficult on the part of the man- 
agement to maintain a high standard of 
pin setters. They frequently give up their 
jobs in protest of the practice and it re- 
quires a Solomon to keep peace in their 
ranks. 

Jim Wilkinson of the Production No. 1 
team has been shifted to the number 4 
position and has won his spurs in the new 
arrangement. Jim clicked off games of 
199-170 and 164 in the match against the 
Tank team recently and obtained a total 
of 53 3 which contributed materially to 
the 3-1 victory taken by Production. 

Another nice series was pegged by Ed 
Banks of the Finish team in the match 
against Hull No. 2. Ed started out with 
168, burned up the alleys in the second to 
the tune of 212 and coasted home with a 
171, making a total of 5 51. 

McKinley Clutinger of Maintenance 
whose average is 137 likewise showed the 
veterans a thing or two about the game 
when he turned in a 512 series in the 
Match against Experimental. Mac regis- 
tered games of 195-159 and 1 5 8 in getting 
his formidable score. 

Every once in a while Ward Levere goes 
on a rampage and brings the Experimental 
team out of a slump. Two weeks ago Ward 
got hotter than usual and garnered games 
of 169-195 and 169 for a 538 total. Thru 
his excellent shooting Experimental took 
three points from Maintenance. 
League Standings: 
Consairs Won Lost 

Production No. 1 43 21 

Production No. 2 42 22 

Engineering 41 23 

Experimental 40 24 

Finish 39 2S 

Hull No. 1 38 26 

Purchasing 36 28 

Machine Shop 3 J 29 

Maintenance 33 31 

Hull No. 2 31 33 

Tank 24 40 

Final Assembly 18 48 

Sheet Metal IS 49 

Raw Material 14 50 

Consair Engineers 

Flap 36 20 

Loft No. 1 35 21 

Armament 32 24 

Loft No. 2 29 27 

General 27 29 

Hull 27 29 

Loft No. 3 25 31 

Fixed Equipment 13 43 



^939 FIFTH AVE.v/ 



' -'S&H" 

STAMPS 
GIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES ^rj 

for MEN iJ::;'.;Vd.^ToL°'"°'" O 



February, 1940 



23 



SPORT HIGHLIGHTS 

Br Matt Wielopolski 

The ever increasing number of sports 
within our Consolidated walls has forced 
me to relinquish my monthly Machine 
Shop article to the new reporter, Al 
Pfeifler, a grand fellow, a swell guy, and 
a fine sport. 

At this time of the season, America 
plays Basketball, the only major sport 
which is purely American. Today, this 
game has been changed a great deal to 
eliminate possible injury to players, sec- 
tional differences, better rules, method of 
play, as well as satisfaction to customers. 
It is a well-known fact that this game 
was created by Dr. Jas. Naismith in 1888, 
at Springfield, Mass., with the aid of a 
soccer ball and two peach baskets. During 
the first few years, a mere three to four 
hundred engaged in basketball. Now, it is 
played in all countries of the world by 
more people (25,000,000) than in any 
other sport and draws more paid admis- 
sions (95,000,000 annually). Believe it 
or not, it outdraws football, baseball, and 
even golf (not fishing, tho) . 

Take this game at Consolidated for in- 
stance. Savaggi brings his basketball to 
the playground where he'll find Johnson, 
Van Dyke, Gillmore, Smith, Clark, Rock, 
Heckeroth, Gaughen, Liddle, Scott and 
Kunkle. They'll choose sides, with one of 
them as referee and the other as scorer 
and time-keeper. 

At the end of the first quarter, due to 
Liddle's close refereeing, the score is 5-2 
in one team's favor. Here we see Mrs. Wm. 
Liddle coming over to remind hubby of an 
engagement they have to keep just then. 
"But why in heck must it be at this mom- 
ent, honey?" asks Bill L. So he leaves, 
and Craig Clark gives up time- and score- 
keeping for refereeing. The first half ends 
with a tie score of 13-13. Now another 
interruption, this time's Rock's mother 
calls him to go to the grocery store. "Why 
doesn't Sis go this time; just this once, 
Mom?" With these words. Rock, the 
Nite Hull Nucleus, leaves the game. 

In the third quarter, Clark's fine team- 
work (for a change) helped Johnson's 
high scoring. This put them ahead of 
Heckeroth's team, score before the fourth 
quarter being 27-19. But, as usual, out- 
side (girl) friends drag Gillmore, Gaughen 
and Van Dyke away from the game. At 
the end of the game, with three men to a 
team, the score was 3 8-3 3 in Savaggi's 
favor, thanks to Scott's hot angle shots 
and the leaving of "them Good Guards," 
Gaughen and Gillmore. 

After this good work-out the boys are 
taking a good shower, getting ready for 



tonight, (this being Saturday), except 
Savaggi and Smith, you see two fellows 
can play an interesting game with a basket- 
ball, the hoop of a barrel and a wall. 
Now we find Savaggi leaving to help Mom 
dry the dishes, but Glenn Smith doesn't 
mind, because his wife is with the in-laws. 
So he has a lot of fun, dribbling, pivot- 
ing, and trying various angle shots. 

TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Maguire 

A word to the wise is useless, so again 
"Tidbits" come tidbitting along. 

I heard the other day that dust is mud 
with the juice squeezed out, according to 
"Guillermo" Ekdahl, which has nothing to 
do with Bob Hyder's report that football 
is a clever subterfuge for carrying on prize 
fights under the guise of a reputable game. 

Shaw tells us that quail means to shrink 
— a characteristic of the bird, when or- 
dered in a restaurant, but it will grow as 
large as an eagle, when being discussed 
after the hunt. 

We think T. D. boasts the Mutt & Jeff 
of Consolidated, in the guise of Ted Hersh 
& Ray Peters. The latter is 6' 8" and 
weighs 320 lbs. Ted is almost 5' and 
weighs 115 pounds. 

Ed Gurling tells us that a miss is as 
good as her smile, and that there are a lot 
of new smiles in Planning. According to 
Earl Biddle, an accident is a condition of 
affairs in which presence of mind is good, 
but absence of body is a lot better. 

More new faces in the department. 
Someone should say welcome, so — Hello! 



We enjoyed Larry Boeing's article in the 
last issue of the "Consolidator" and hope 
no one missed it. 

Don't ask John Liefeld how hard it is 
to find a parking spot, nor Jouett how 
many miles of smiles he walks each day — 
Mr. Johnson wants to know "how many." 

It seems everybody in the dept. was 
going either to L. A., or somewhere distant 
over the week-end when "Dave" came 
around with tickets to a Flying Club 
dance. Better luck next time, Dave, but 
we are quite truthful about leaving town. 

About 90 to 95 percent of "bad 
weather" is cleared when flying at 20,000 
^»et. 



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Selling 

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A MECHANIC IS NO BETTER THAN HIS TOOLS 



TO WHAT DO YOU OWE YOUR SUCCESS, 

MR. BLOTZ?" 




Blotz has had so many promo- 
tions that it makes news. And 
he says, "I owe my success to 
my tools." That may be stretch- 
ing the point but it illustrates 
this: To get on with your job an 
ample supply of the right tools 
is important. Take stock today 
and fill in with Garrett nation- 
ally advertised brands. See 
Whitey Dake at the employees' 
tool store. 



GARRETT SUPPLY COMPANY 



1126 SANTA FE AVENUE 



LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 




24 



Consolidator 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

(Continued from page 18) 
"Say no more Joe" for the odds and ends 
for the month. 

Bob Mussen is again stumbling through 
the Planning desks after sitting on his 
new "specs" left in his car seat to "look" 
after things. Luckily he escaped less serious 
injury than the fellow who came to rest 
on George Young's teeth some time back 
and has been treated for "hydrophobia" 
ever since. But for this latter accident, I 
would have purchased a set of "store 
choppers" myself instead of the overhaul 
job I am having done at present. These 
dentists should get a cut from the "soup" 
manufacturers for the business they do. 



So many "Bank Nights", "Pot-O-Gold", 
"Sweepstakes" and "Turkey Raffles," con- 
fused George Wire so that he became a 
"ticket kleptomaniac" and assumed that 
the fellow in uniform was giving him a 
ticket each day that would be good for a 
prize. But to his utter dismay George 
finally found out that they were "over 
parking" tickets and the judge hit the 
"jackpot" seven times. 

Mrs. "Benny" Leonard, very graciously 
allowed "her husband" to have "the boys" 
over to "sit a few rounds" in her swell 
new home. It was tough on Ben, the per- 
fect host, to see Dan Clemson walk o£F 
with that "first payment" he expected 
and "lousy" of me to write this after he 



If you have any thought of making any change in your 
present insurance, or allowing any part of your protection 
to lapse, first give these three points your most careful 
consideration. 



DO I NEED IT? When you purchased your insurance, you did 
so because you felt it was necessary for your protection. Isn't that 
need as great or even greater today? In times when ready cash is 
difficult to obtain, the sudden onslaught of an accident, a fire, 
a damage suit for personal injuries, a burglary or other loss Is all 
the more difficult to withstand. Surely you need your insurance 
today more than you ever did. 

CAN I AFFORD IT? Many of the things you buy can be classed 
as luxuries. They can, if necessary, be dispensed with, but like food, 
shelter and clothing, insurance is a necessity. You depend on insur- 
ance to safeguard your business, your dependents, your earning 
power, your property from financial loss. Can you afford to assume 
the risk of a large loss as compared to the small cost of the premium 
charged for your insurance? The cost of insurance is only a very 
small fraction of the loss that you might have to stand at any time. 

CAN I BUY CHEAPER INSURANCE? Saving money by 
buying cheaper insurance is the most expensive "thrift plan" ever 
devised. An insurance policy in a reliable, financially dependable, 
time-tested company is worth every cent that is paid for it. You 
may be able to buy cheaper insurance, but will it give you the 
assured protection that you need? Never was sound, dependable 
insurance more necessary than it is today. 



SALMONS 8.W0LC0TT CO. 



316 San Diego Trust & Savings Building 

Franklin 5141 SAN DIEGO 

"Coast to Coast Protection and Service" 



had borrowed the "extra bottle of beer" 
from Lou as a little bribe for a favorable 
report. But that beer cost me "three 
bucks" so I'm not very happy. Others 
enjoying the Leonard hospitality were Jack 
Mulroy, Al Ambrose, Bill Wiley. Lou 
Miller and Tom Butterfield, and all "ohed 
and ahed" at the beautiful home except 
Tom who never won a hand all evening 
and referred to it as a "dump." 

That "propaganda" spread around by 
"Mac" McGuiness alias "McCoy" about 
the Tennessee football team using only 
seven pair of shoes, because of the four 
W. Va. "hillbillies" playing, was un- 
founded, as I saw the Rose Bowl game. 
Although I will admit if the field had been 
on a hill or at least "plowed up" with a 
few trees standing they would have made 
a better showing. I saw all the game this 
time, by steering clear of Ben Kiegle, Jim 
Wilkinson and Bob Robertson and choos- 
ing to attend it with Craig Clark, "Norm" 
Johnson and Don Cornell, who are at 
least "semi-teetotalers." 

"You are suffering from indigestion. 
Drink a cupful of hot water every morn- 
ing." 

Patient: "I've been doing that for some 
time, doctor, only the wife calls it coffee." 



VISIT 

DEPARTMENT STORE FOR 
MOTORISTS 
TODAY 

Tires 

Batteries 

Spark Plugs 

Life Protector Tubes 

Motor Tune Up Department 

Brake and Wheel Alignment Dept. 

Home and Auto Radio Service 

Four Leading Brands of Gasoline 

Auto Accessories 

Home and Auto Radios — Six Leading 

Mokes to Choose From. 
Ranges and Washers 
Refrigerators 
Juvenile Wheel Goods 
Bicycles for Boys and Girls 
Children's Toys 

TERMS AS LOW AS 25c PER WEEK 

PAY CHECKS CASHED BETWEEN 
8 A.M. AND 6 P.M. 

IT'S SO MUCH EASIER TO PARK 
AND SHOP AT 

Ttrestotte 

Broadway, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 



The tender-hearted young lady on her 
first fishing expedition watched her escort 
pull a luscious trout out of the babbling 
brook. "But isn't it cruel?" she asked. 
"Naw," replied the Waltonian scornfully, 
"He likes it. Look at him wagging his 
tail." 



The railroad engineer on his day off 
went out to the golf course and practiced 
assiduously on his follow-through, to such 
good effect that next day he drove the 
train 400 yards past the station. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



FULLER pninTS 






TXtfy leL5i 


• • • 

PHIHTS 

UHRniSHES 

IHCqUERS 

UIHllPHPER 

CIHSS 

HIIRRORS 








UI. p. FUILER & 


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Seuenth Hue. ond F St. 


. main D1B1 




2311 Uniuersity Hue. . 


HHIcreit 3110 




WHY NOT? 

BUILD a home around a new, modern, 
up-to-date bath room installed by the 

WHITING-MEAD CO. 



ALL material to build your home can 
be supplied from the 5-acre plant 

At 14th and K Sts. 

LOANS to fit your needs. Appointment 
after hours if desired. 







EVERVTHIMC-^ '^---BtllDINC- 

l X » ■ 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

41 n Univcrilty ■ Oeeanlide • El Centre 



(jd^ct'D; 



'(svfeV 




»'"S^»* 



When 50,000 motorists vote "Stondord Leads" — that IS o Round-Up! 
A huge independent survey of Western motorists showed Standard rotes first 
in not one — but SIX great motoring values: In inviting stations, courtesy, all- 
around service, clean rest rooms, uniform quality gasoline, and gasoline per- 
formance! 50,000 MOTORISTS CAN'T BE WRONG — PROVE IT FOR 
YOURSELF! 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 



STANDARD 





'OUR XB-24 ... A SPEED OF OVER 300 MILES PER HOUR ... SEE PAGE 3' 



MARCH • 1940 



When you *Tuel Up" 

Your Pantry 

try Safe\^ay Foods 



SAFEWAY 




USED CAR CONDITIONING: 

Consider the manner in which a Dealer reconditions his Used Cars 
in deciding where to buy. 

LARGE SELECTION: 

Also, look for a complete stock from which to make a choice. 
Many high grade late model used cars are being traded upon the 
exceptionally popular 1940 Buick. As a result we con offer a choice 
from a large number of used cars of many mokes and models. 

COMPLETE FACILITIES: 

These Used Cars have been reconditioned in our own modern shops 
by expert factory trained mechanics. Your inspection of the man- 
ner in which our used cars are reconditioned, and also our facilities 
for doing the work, is invited. 

YOUR PRESENT CAR: 

More motoring satisfaction and longer length of service may be 
secured from the automobile you now drive if you will hove it 
Reconditioned in our shops. Inspection of car and estimates of cost 
of Reconditioning cheerfully given, without obligation. Terms, if 
desired: 

ROBERT D. MAXWELL CO. 

San Diego 
Telephone: Main 501 1 402 W. Broadway 

The only authorized Buick Service Station in San Diego. 




ARE YOU JUST 
HOPING TO LAND 
IN A GOOD JOB? 

Hope without foundation doesn't 
go far in this competitive age. 
But hope j3lus training is a 
winn'ng combination! 

Today, in all kinds of profes- 
sions and trades, men are earn- 
ing more money — getting promo- 
tions — because of serious, sys- 
tematic study of International 
Correspondence Schools Courses. 

I. C. S. Courses are prepared by 
outstanding authorities. Instruc- 
tion is a personal relationship be- 
tween student and instructor. Mail 
coupon for full information. 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



BOX 5845. SCRANTON. PE\>A. 

Blxplain fully about your course marked X: 

TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL COURSES 
n Agriculture Q Air Brake □ Manufacture of Pulp 
D Air Conditioning and Paper 

P Architectural Drafting Q Mechanical Draftine 

D -Ajchitecture Q Boilermaking Q ^Iechanical Engineerine 
Q Auto Engine Tune-up Q Xavigation □ Pharmacy 

G -iuto Technician Q Aviation Q Patternmaking Q Plumbiag 
D Bridge Engineering Q Poultry Farming 

D Building Estimating G Practical Telephony 

n Chemistry Q Coal Mining Q Public Works Engineeiins 
D Civil Engineering Q Radio Operating 

□ Concrete Engineering D Radio Servicing 

n Contracting and Building Q R. R. Section ForemftO 



D R. R. Signalmen's 
D Reading Bluepiinta 
D Refrigeration 
D Sheet Metal Work 
n Steam Electric 



D Cotton Manufacturing 

□ Diesel Engines 
n Electrical Engineering 
n Electric Lighting 
D Foundry Practice _ 
n Fruit Growing Q Heating D Steam Engines 
D Heat Treatment of Metals D Structural Drafting 

□ Highway Engineering □ Structural Engineering 
D House Planning Q Machinist Q Surveying and Mapping 
n Locomotive Engineer G Telegraph Engineering 
n Management of Inventions G Textile Designing 

D Managing Men at Work □ Welding. Electric and Gas 

G Marine Engines Q Woo'en Manufacturing 

BUSINESS COURSES 
G Advertising □ Bookkeeping Q First Year College 
Q Business Correspondence Q French D Grade School 

G Business Management Q High School G Illustrating 

G Cartooning G Civil Service Q Lettering Show- Cards 



G Railwaj- Postal Cierk 
Q Salesmanship Q Secretarial 
Q Service Station Salesm'p 
G Sign Lettering Q Spatush 



lakioc 



G C. P. Accounting 
G College Preparatory 
P Commercial 
n Cost Accounting 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE COURSES 

G Advanced Dressmaking Q Professional Dreissi 

D Foods and Cookery aoi^ Designing 

D Home Dressmaking O Tea Room and Cafeteria 

Management, Catering 

Name Apf 

Address 

Oitv State 

Present Position 



^^fC P^^fiHl 



H. R. SIDNEY • 926 BROADWAY 

Phone Office M-1619 Res. Phone M-3247 

FREE VOCATIONAL ANALYSIS 



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CONSOLIDRTOR 



Volume 5 



March, 1940 



Number 3 



NEW ASSOCIATION 

At a meeting of sixteen employees of 
Consolidated last week, an organization 
was formed for the purpose of creating a 
fund to aid athletes who suffer injuries 
and loss of work while engaged in various 
forms of sport. 

The name of "Consair Athletic Associa- 
tion" was adopted, and Fred Grossher 
elected its first president, with plans imme- 
diately getting under way for the pro- 
motion of a series of programs for raising 
funds. 

The need for an organization of this 
kind has been keenly sensed in the past 
with hundreds of employees taking part 
in basketball, softball, badminton, golf, 
bowling, shooting and other forms of com- 
petitive sports, with no insurance against 
injuries that might handicap them physi- 
cally and financially. The association feels 
that with this added protection, many 
more of the employees will enter into com- 
pany athletics — which are vital to their 
health and happiness. 

Every employee of the plant will be 
eligible for membership. A drive will begin 
shortly to bring as many as possible into 
the organization. With the eligible thou- 
sands to draw from, the association, its 
founders believe, should easily become one 
of the largest organizations in the city, 
able to sponsor any type of worthwhile 
programs. Several propositions, such as 
boxing, shows and dances are now being 
considered by the group for the near 
future. 

Other officers who were installed at the 
group's initial meeting were "Brad" Brad- 
shaw, vice-president; Dan Miller, secre- 
tary, and Lon Lyko, treasurer, with Tod 
Carter, "Russ" Kern, and "Army" Arm- 
strong named as Board of Trustees. 

The following representatives of the 
various departments attending the meet- 
ing and listed as charter members were, in 
addition to the above-mentioned officials, 
Al Pheiffer, L. Stabeneau, Jim Wilkinson, 
Ray Weist, Bud Parsons, Bill Baker, 
Burris McDonald, Craig Clark and Bill 
Gilchrist. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

According to Bill Gilchrist, welfare di- 
rector, about 10'; of all his calls are to 
wrong addresses. Employees have moved 
without taking the time to notify the 
personnel office of the change. It is vitally 
important to you as an individual to see 
to it that the personnel office knows your 
latest address and your new telephone 
number. If you are in need of help or aid, 
a wrong number is a great hindrance in 
getting to you. Further, if it so happens 
that you may never need aid, suppose an 
important message comes and you can't 
be reached in time, simply because you 
haven't kept the personnel office informed. 
Don't delay . . . act now for your own 
benefit . . . bring your address and phone 
number up to date! 

*-» 

Consolidated Strongmen 

By Ray Damon 
On Saturday, February 23, at Los An- 
geles, Walter Marcyan, of Final Assembly, 
and John La Lanne, of Experimental, were 
scheduled to lift as members of a five- 
man team representing Los Angeles and 
vicinity. (The event took place as this 
issue of the Consolidafor went to press — 
so ask either of the boys how it came out.) 
Walter and John are two of the many 
men at Consolidated who are very much 
interested in weight-lifting. Walter is the 
Pacific coast 181 lb. champion. 

PARACHUTES OFFERED 

Due to change in type of parachutes 
used by our flight test crew, the company 
has available one form-fitting-back type 
parachute and two of the conventional 
seat type parachutes in good condition and 
for a very reasonable price. For further 
information ask Bill Wheatley, our Chief 
Test Pilot. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Wheat proudly an- 
nounce the birth of a son, Michael Allen 
Wheat, who was born Feb. 16. Michael 
tips the scales at seven pounds, eleven and 
three-quarters ounces, and has an overall, 
tip-to-toe length, of nineteen and one-half 
inches. 



TIMELY COMMENTS . . . 

MR. IRVING TAYLOR, Export 
Manager of the Aeronautical Cham- 
ber of Commerce, paying a visit to the 
Consolidated and San Diego aircraft plants 
just as this issue of the Consolidator was 
being prepared, kindly paused to point out 
a few of the highly interesting items about 
the aviation activity in this country from 
the angle on which he is particularly well 
versed and qualified to speak. Commenting 
upon the export phase of the industry he 
observed that, "Above 90% of approach- 
ing export business is military equipment. 
Under normal conditions, such as those 
existing up to three years ago, non-military 
craft accounted for substantially the 
greater portion of the export business. 

"It is to be expected that for the in- 
definite period of this emergency, military 
export will comprise practically all ex- 
port. However, American aircraft build- 
ers are not losing sight of the fact that 
they have a moral obligation to design 
and build improved non-military equip- 
ment which will take care of foreign air- 
line clients and private flyers who have 
shown a definite preference for U. S. 
craft." 

Another phase of the aviation activity 
he commented upon was the civilian train- 
ing program . . . "The civilian training 
program is developing an "after market' 
of private buyers" he observed, "and this 
is a very important by-product of the 
C.A.A. training program." 

Also he stated that, "Despite the em- 
phasis placed at this time on the military 
phase of aviation, the fact should not be 
lost sight of that at no time in the history 
of the industry has so much attention been 
given to the development of the purely 
civil aircraft. This least spectacular phase 
is truly paralleling the military, and it 
should be especially emphasized in the 
industry because it is imperative to build 
now the equipment that will be the prin- 
cipal demand when the present emergency 

is past." 

Km 

"The day is always his who works in 
it with serenity and great aims." 



All communications should be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in part, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publicotion provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., San Diego, California. 



Consolidator 




^SSfe. 



Don't look now, but ever since Christ- 
mas Dolores Elliott of the Employment 
Office has been wearing a very attractive 
diamond on her left hand. Is he as nice as 
the ring, Dolores? 

Here's a welcome to the new members 
of our Rhett Butler Fan Club (in other 
words, the feminine population here at 
the plant): Edna Willwerth, Margaret 
Grando, Alice Birse, Brenda Fottrell, and 
Gladys Crawford. We have never issued a 
formal "hello" to Ruth Hubbard of the 
Army Office — so here 'tis. 

You can't blend red and maroon nohow 
so Grace Koenig will have to leave her red 
hat home when she takes the family's new 
maroon Oldsmobile for a spin. Bet Gracie 
talked Papa Koenig into getting a wine- 
colored car so she could buy a new outfit 
to match. How's about a bonnet with a 
blue ribbon on it for a beginning? 

We're all sorry to hear of the illness of 
Evelyn Kells' mother and hope she is now 
well on the road to recovery. 

Side Tracks: Bertha Kusche is learning 
some jitterbug steps and when she has 
mastered the art well enough, we'll roll 
back the desks and ask for a demonstra- 
tion. Those new "Confucius say" jokes 
are giving that old gentleman such pub- 
licity as he's never had before. Definitely! 
Bea Jackson is a damsel in distress. For 
several weeks she's been searching for a 
lost button and if you have a similar one, 
beware of the Jackson gal. She's really 
serious about finding said button. Marcella 



Lent. 



FOR 
REAL MEXICAN FOOD 

COME TO 

CAFE HIDALGO 

LUCY ELLER, Proprietor 

Genuine Mexican chefs prepare 
delicious Enchiladas, Tortillas, 
Tacos and other fine dishes in 
our spotless kitchens. • Finest 
Mixed Drinks made from best 
liquors. You'll find a welcome at 

317 E St. 

KNICKERBOCKER HOTEL BLDG. 



Holzman gave up cigarettes for 
(Note: Effective one day only.) 

We femmes often wonder if you fel- 
lows wear such loud socks to keep your 
feet awake. That's the only reason we can 
think of. 

Breathes there a man with soul so dead 
Who has never turned around and said, 

"Hmmmm, not bad!" 

Dad criticized the sermon. Mother 
thought the organist made too many mis- 
takes. Sister didn't like the way the choir 
sang. But they all shut up when little 
brother chimed in with the remark that 
he thought it was a pretty good show for 
a nickel. 

Proud Father: "My son John has got 
his mind made up that he will become a 
chauffeur when he gets a little older." 

Friend: "Well, after he gets to driving 
a car around, I certainly wouldn't stand 
in his way." 

And then there's the Dumb Dora who 
still thinks a mirage is the place where the 
little man who wasn't there keeps his car. 

BENCH NEWS 

Frank Bailey says he would like to catch 
a doodle bug to use in his hunt for gold. 

Carl Sherrer says he will have to hurry 
and get married so he won't have to pay 
any more income tax. Don't forget to 
pay your tax this year, George Eggleston. 

We wonder why Charlie Lay always has 
his fingers tied up. 

Bud Edward's razor must be on a vaca- 
tion — or else Bud's getting ready for a 
whisker contest. 

Benny Keagle, assistant to Leo Bourdon, 
has gone in for Cub Scouting. He wasn't 
able to handle the Boy Scouts because they 
don't want to fly kites, so now he can 
be seen teaching the Cubs the master art 
of kite-flying at Brown's campus grounds 
on Saturday and Sunday. Benny says it 
has some connection with airplanes. 



WING KEYHOLE 

By Broivne 

IT'S a good thing Stephen Powell is not 
superstitious. On January 13 th the Di- 
vision of Motor Vehicles issued license 
plates IZUOO to Steve. 

Tod Carter, Wing dispatcher, has been 
transferred to the night shift and will 
assume full responsibility of the Wings as 
far as Production department is concerned. 
Tod is a very capable man and we know 
he can handle his job well. 

We wonder if Army Armstrong will 
muff his deer hunting trip this year as 
badly as he did last year's? There will be 
no excuse this year as deer season is eight 
months away and Army will have plenty 
of time to practice. 

Summer is coming again and soon 
George Maclean's face will look like a 
red tomato. We discussed buying George 
some anti-sunburn lotion, but on second 
thought he likes fishing and outdoor sports 
so well it would take a small fortune to 
keep him supplied. We might be able to 
promote a little gun grease from our gun 
club for the cause, George. 

Herb Ezard has certainly been turning 
out the wings. They are piling up fast in 
the shop. It takes lots of cooperation and 
planning for Herb to turn this work out. 
This we know is done and very capably 
too or things would not go so smoothly 
as they do. If you think it's easy, sit down 
sometime and figure how long it is from 
the time the spars are set in the jig until 
the completed wing goes to the Finish 
department. 

Confucius say: Wing she grunt and 
wing she groan, but she gettum hull into 
ozone. 

We wish to correct at this time the 
error in last month's issue regarding the 
Earnest twins. Red and Sparky are Wing 
department men. Ask Herb Ezard; he has a 
deuce of a time telling them apart. 

The Wing Dept. feels deeply the loss 
of one of its employees, William "Bill" 
Savage. "Bill" had many friends and was 
well liked by everyone. He was ill only a 
short time before passing away. 

Mention the Consolidator ... it identi- 
fies you. 



Let's Be Friends 

As well as 

Neighbors.' 

• • • 

Make Yourself 

At Home In This 

Big Friendly Stcrel! 




Your Credit DRYER'S STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Is Good J. E. Dryer, President • 2368 Kettner Bhd. 



March, 1940 



"MODEL 32 . . ." 

The first official information pertaining 
to our Consolidated Model 32 four-en- 
gined bomber (Army designation XB 24) 
was released by the United States Army 
Air Corps Feb. 12, and is printed here in 
full: 

"The U. S. Army Air Corps' new bom- 
bardment airplane, technically known as 
the XB-24, recently made its initial flight 
at Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Built by the Consolidated Aircraft Cor- 
poration, it is a 4-motored bomber of high 
wing, all-metal construction. The wing 
is a full cantilever type of high aspect 
ratio with four tractor engine nacelles 
mounted flush to the upper surface of the 
center section. Fowler type flaps extend in- 
board of ailerons. 

Power is furnished by four Pratt & 
Whitney 18-cyiinder twin-row radial air- 
cooled engines rated at 1200 hp. each. 
The propellers are Hamilton Standard 3- 
bladed hydromatic constant speed types, 
12 ft. in diameter. 

The appropriate gross weight of the 
airplane is 40,000 lbs.; wing span, 110 ft.; 
length of fuselage, 64 ft.; and over-all 
height, 19 ft. Tactical requirements are 
for a crew of from 6 to 9 persons, de- 
pending upon the mission to be performed. 

Control surfaces are fabric-covered and 
fully counterweighted. A full cantilever 
horizontal stablizer has twin fins and rud- 
ders mounted at the tips. The all-metal 
stressed skin fuselage is equipped with 
hatches and windows in the nose, tail, 
turtledeck, back, and bottom. The land- 
ing gear is of tricycle type with single 
wheel forward. This retracts into the 
fuselage. The rear or main landing wheels 
retract into wing wells. 

This airplane, from preliminary exami- 
nations, gives evidence of living up to the 
advancements in aerodynamic and per- 
formance characteristics predicted. These 
include a speed of over 300 miles per hour, 
a range of approximately 3,000 miles, and 
a bomb carrying capacity of approximately 
4 tons." 

If the Golden Rule were universally 
practiced, lawyers would starve to death. 



Learn to Dance Well 

Special Private Lesson Rotes 
in Ballroom Dancing 

/c PRIVATE «c nn 

° LESSONS *->•"" 

Consair Club Class Lessons, including one 
hour lesson ond 1 '2 hour Practice Dancing 
only 50c. Wed., 8 to 10:30 P.M. 
Classes forming for Children and Adults in 
All Types of Dancing. Rates in Reach of All 

HEMPHILL'S 
SCHOOL OF THE DANCE 

1039 7th Ave. F. 5750 & 1740 Upas. J. 9458 



DRAW BENCH BENDS 

By W. Fink 

On behalf of the Draw Bench Depart- 
ment, I wish to take this opportunity to 
thank Larry Boeing and Mr. Menge for 
their swell pictures and write-up of our 
department in last month's Consolidator. 

The Tool section of this department has 
been very noticeable lately because of the 
absence of William Freeman. Bill is con- 
fined to bed because of illness. We all wish 
him a speedy recovery and look forward 
to his return. 

Joe Friel invites all you boys out to see 
his new home at 4083 Cherokee Street. 
Did I hear you say something about a 
beer party? Or were you talking to your- 
self, Joe? 

The D. B. promises to have a swell ball 
club this year. We would like practice 
games with other shop teams. 

After a couple of months of leisure and 
idle wanderings, Charles Gardner has re- 
turned to D. B. Since Charley returned we 
again hear "much ado about nothing" 
from his neck of the woods. I wonder 
where he picked up those additional words 
of profanity which he has added to his 
already complete collection? 

Both Ryland Groves and Steve Steven- 
son have had disastrous encounters with 
circular saws. We hope that their injuries 
heal rapidly, for there is work to be done. 

Neu's Flash: The Postmaster announced 
a sudden increase in postal receipts. Could 
it be because Frank "Confucius Says" 
Webb has a new lady friend in Frisco? 
Could be! 

Patronize Our Adiertisers! 



ARCHERY CLUB 

Many requests have been made to or- 
ganize an archery club at Consolidated. 
With renewed interest in this fascinating 
sport, the "Oldtimers" will have a meet 
Saturday morning, March 9, at Balboa 
Park, Sixth Avenue and Laurel, to consider 
the feasibility of forming a club. 

Anyone who would like to learn the 
art or who already has the ability to hit 
the target once in a while is invited to 
make an appearance. 

Our own Jess Schriner, well-known 
archer of San Diego, has promised to be 
with us as instructor. 

Equipment will be available for every- 
one at this first meet, so come and give 
archery a try as a hobby. 



mijijj.ijjuiii 




Any amount * 
opens your "San 
Diego Federal 

Sav- 

ac- 
count 



Tox-exempt 
features 
nsured SAFETY 
Through 10th of 
each month, divi- 
dends from the 1st 



i»iS 




Since 
1885 
never 
a loss in 
yield or 
principal. 

• 

1027 
Sixth 
Ave. 



ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL' 




onsult Jessop*s 

for ideas for gifts For 
important occasions 




• Diamonds 

• Watches and 
Clocks 

• Sterling Silver 

• Jewelry Manu- 

Facturins 

• Plated Silver 

• Watch Repair- 
ing 



• Leather 

• Perfume 

• Stationery and 
Social Engrav- 
ing 

• Opticaland In- 
strumentDept. 

• Jewelry and 

Novelties 




The Courtesy oF Credit is Extended 

"Jewsleri since 1871" 



j.j( 



Qko^ 



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t04l.-FIfTH i9VE. I FRtJNKLIN 4l44 



Consolidator 




GROWING PAINS 

By Wm. A. Maloney, Plant Engineer 

The photograph printed with this article 
gives a graphic idea of the extent of Con- 
solidated's plant when the additions now 
under way are completed. 

All of the proposed buildings illustrated 
with the exception of the Paint Shop Ad- 
dition have been contracted for and work 
is proceeding as rapidly as possible to com- 
plete them. To expedite the completion of 
the program contracts for the structural 
steel were placed on a tonnage price basis, 
during the month of December. On De- 
cember 20th, the contract was placed 
for steel pile foundations for the addition 
to the Experimental Building, the Final 
Assembly Building and the Final Finish 
Building. The piles for the Final Finish 
Building have already been driven, the 
concrete pile caps and footing ties have 
been poured and the erection of structural 



steel for this building will start about 
February 27th. 

The Wood Mill, which was formerly lo- 
cated on the site to be occupied by the 
Experimental Building Addition, has al- 
ready been moved to its new location, has 
been increased to 120 feet in length and 
will be reoccupied and in operation on 
Monday, February 26th. Temporarily, 
pending the moving and enlarging opera- 
tions, the Wood Mill machinery has been 
housed in a tent structure adjacent to the 
southwest corner of the Experimental 
Building. 

Pile driving for the Final Assembly 
Building, the Paint Shop and the Final 
Finish Building will be started on Mon- 
day, February 19th, and will be completed 
in about fifteen days after that date. It 
was necessary to delay this work for a 
period of two weeks as the test borings 
indicated that the soil conditions were en- 
tirely different from those at the site of 



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DORMANS 

41 St and El Cajon Boulevard 
Washington at Falcon Street 



8th 

and 

"C" 



the Experimental Building where all our 
previous pile-driving data had been ob- 
tained. This necessitated the driving of 
two test piles and testing them under load 
conditions to determine the exact number 
and lengths of piles required. 

On Tuesday, February 13 th, the bids 
were opened on the General Contract cov- 
ering such items as concrete work, sheet 
metal work, carpenter work, interior fin- 
ish, etc., and the contract for this work 
aggregating $209,000 was awarded to 
B. O. Larson of this city. 

Prices are now being received on steel 
sash and glass, and this contract, which 
will be somewhere in the neighborhood 
of $5 5,000, will be placed before this 
article is printed. 

The electrical plans and specifications are 
now in the hands of the bidders and bids 
will be received on February 27th and the 
contract placed immediately. Plumbing 
and heating plans and specifications will 
be released to the bidders on or before 
Wednesday, February 21, and bids will be 
called for on Tuesday, March 5 th. 

On Tuesday, February 20th, the plans 
and specifications for monorail cranes and 
other special handling equipment will be 
put out for bids and we hope to place the 
order for this equipment on or before 
March 1st. Shortly after calling for bids 
on the special handling equipment, tenders 
will be asked for stockroom bins and allied 
equipment and the necessary elevator 
equipment to serve them. 

The entire project is planned for com- 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection oF Pipes in San Diego, 
including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 



March, 1940 



FIUAL ASfEUDLV &UILDIIJQ Tentative coupletiou factocy adoitiows to 

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pletion on or before July 15 th. The Ex- 
perimental Building Addition is expected 
to be ready for occupancy by May 1 1 th. 
This will be the first building completed 
and the last building to be finished, the 
new Final Assembly Building, is expected 
to be ready for occupancy on July 13 th. 
The tentative completion schedule for the 
latter building is published with this 
article. 

As bids on the various parts of the 
work are received and contracts awarded, 
it will be possible to coordinate the work 
of the various contractors toward the end 
of shortening these completion schedules 
wherever possible and every effort will be 
made to advance the dates of occupancy. 

Some idea of the magnitude of this ex- 
pansion can be gained from the tabulation 
given below: 

FLOOR AREAS OF EXPANSION 
PROGRAM 
Experimental Building 

S^. Ff. Sq. Ft. 

Ground Floor 12,500 

1st Mezzanine 12,500 

2nd Mezzanine 12,500 

Vault Inter-Floor 500 

Total 38,000 



Union at ''C 



Final Assembly Building 

Ground Floor 259,200 

Finished Parts, 

1st Mezzanine 7,200 

Finished Parts, 

2nd Mezzanine 7,200 

Bonded Stockroom 

Mezzanine 8,000 

Total 281,600 

Office Building 10,120 

Final Finish Building 

Ground Floor 28,800 

Fan Rooms 1,948 

Total 30,748 



PENTER COMPANY, m. 


724 BROADWAY 


MAIN 4392 


CREDIT CLOTHIERS 


For Men 


For Women 


Suits 


Coats 


Topcoats 


Dresses 


Hats 


Shoes 


Shoes 


Lingerie 


Furnishings 


Skirts and 


Neckwear 


Blouses 


NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 


Pay as Little 


as 50g Weekly 



Addition to Paint Shop 

Ground Floor 10,000 

Fan Room 944 

Total 10,944 

Boiler House 5,000 

Storage Shed 30,000 

Mezzanine in Final Assembly 6,875 
Addition to Cover 

Department Mezzanine 2,770 
Hull and Wing 

Department Mezzanine 3,750 

Total 419,807 

Up to the present time, while consider- 
able work of a concealed nature has been' 
done in connection with the building pro- 
gram, it has not had any appreciable effect 
upon production operations throughout the 
plant but within the next 60 days as vari- 
ous units are completed and operations 
are transferred from their present loca- 
tions to their new home and arrangement 
for the new facilities are started, we will 
again experience the growing pains that 
we suffered so violently from in 1936 
when we constructed the additions neces- 
sary to carry through the completion of 
the PBY-2-3 and 4 contracts. Careful co- 
ordination and cooperation between the 
production, construction and maintenance 
forces will be the watchword if confusion 
and delays are to be avoided. 




What Happened? 

(See page 25!) 



Consolidator 



HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

Br Willii' "WinchcU" Hartimvi 

ONE of the newer hands asked 
Brownie why we had to use heat in 
welding. Wanted to know why they 
couldn't use a metal glue of some sort. 
Another "youngster" wanted to know 
where all the saw was coming from on the 
band saw. But the all-star was the one 
who was sent to the tool crib to get a 
letter "B" drill, and asked ""what size B 
drill shall I get?" Out of the mouths of 
babes . . . 

One day not so long ago there arose 
from the vicinity of the electric welding 
booth a terrific odor. Now this particular 
odor wasn't an obnoxious affair, but rather 
it left one with a dull sense of nothing- 
ness, if vou get what we mean. Several of 



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Radios 
Refrigerators 
• Lamps 
Appliances 
Washing Machines 
TERMS 



Sal 



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1025 Seventh Ave. 4991 Newport Ave, 



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Fr. 5397 



Ocean Beach 
Bay. 491 3 



our better-known sleuths tracked said 
smell to its lair and finally discovered it 
emanated from, of all things, Red Feeny's 
shirt where lo and behold some fancy frail 
had literally dumped a whole bottle of 
essence of lilac toilet water. Now then, 
what we want to know is why, where, 
when and what for — oh the shame of it 
all, what with Red being such a big six- 
foot husky, and blushes quite easily like a 
new bride. Well, we have our doubts, but 
we do know, don't we Bert? 

Lo and behold, us guys in the Welding 
department are in for a supply of cigars, 
what with all these marriages, and new 
Cotnolidators being born. First there's 
George Draper, whose wife gave him a 
6'/2 lb. baby girl; Roy Williams fell heir 
to an 8 lb. boy, both as Mercy Hospital, 
and mothers and babies are doing very 
nicely. Then there's Carl Moore and Dick 
Davis, newly-weds, and a couple more on 
the Q.T. which we were asked not to 
mention. O.K. by us, but don't forget 
them smokes, youse guys. 

Homer "Long-Eared" Higbee lost out 
on some of the most important news in 
the department and now he can't live it 
down. Well, Tommy McAller has prom- 



Easter • March 24 

Remember to send Flowers 
—from — 



EXCLUSIVE 

SIXTH ,Md B STREETS 
FRANKLIN B 233 



Let's have a party... 
and let's have it at 
San Diego's Finest hotel 
. . . the U. S. GRANT / 



-j^ BALL ROOMS 

^ DINNER DANCES 



■^ BANQUETS 
■^ BRIDGE TEAS 



Luxurious appointments. Excellent cuisine 
Reasonable rates Free Parking 




ised to keep Homer posted so it will all 
come out in the wash. 

Ray Wade was politely asked to show 
his driver's license one night, at a certain 
beer-hall. Seems like Ray doesn't show his 
age, and him the father of a three-year-old. 
My, oh, my it's nice to keep your youth, 
but gosh when it keeps a guy from getting 
a glass of beer, well — that's too much. 

We always knew that Clyde Walker 
looked like something else, but Miley re- 
ports his girl friend mistook Clyde for a 
horse at Caliente. Seems like Miley was 
telling his girl friend about Walker, and 
she said "Oh, yes — I put two dollars on 
that Walker, and he was just that — he's a 
walker." 

Did you ever know a handsomer bunch 
of boys than our clerical staff. What with 
James graduated to the bouncing bunion 
derby, "dispatching," we have now — ^Wil- 
son, Pierson, Stone, and "little man" 
Thompson, all nice girls — whoops, we 
mean boys. And they sure turn out a mean 
batch of clerking. 

Red Feeney has finally got himself mar- 
ried or at least he's taken on the duties 
of a wife. He and two other boys have 
taken an apartment, with ""Red" doing 
the cooking, washing and other house- 
hold duties, Isn't that cute? Well, Red 
has to pass up ball practice to get home to 
cook the supper. Well, one excuse is good 
as another. 

"Windy" Rohr spent several months 
building a rubber band model airplane, 
only to have a bad crack-up on the first 
flight — tch, tch — tough luck. Windy. 
Better stick to welded joints, they last 
much longer. 

Bert Bailey recently moved to Pacific 
Beach where — so he says — the street cars 
kept him awake the first few nights. What 
Bert didn't know is that the street cars 
quit running out there a long time ago. 
He finally realized that it was the mighty 
Pacific's roar. Ho, hum, some guys is 
dumb. 

We're going to have two teams in the 
Softball league this year, so watch our 
smoke. Manager Wilson promised us he 
would have a champion team out to play 
every game, with over 22 men available at 
all times. 



INVESTORS SYNDICATE 




Lon Casselman Bank oF America BIdg. 
Manager Franklin 7876 



March, 1940 



SPORTS LINE-UP 

With interest in company athletics in- 
creasing daily, and new departmental 
teams constantly forming throughout the 
plant, the need has arisen for some kind 
of a classified "directory" to aid those in- 
terested in contacting the right people 
in connection with their sport. This in- 
formation is given below, where you will 
find the names of various team captains, 
managers and organizers listed, together 
with their departments. 

BASKETBALL 

Team captains: Tank, Jim Safteg; 
Center Section, Savin; Lofting, Craig; 
Welding, G. Harlan Dye; Hull, T. John- 
son; Woodshop, K. Mixon; Final Assembly, 
H. Moy; Wing, Wilber Gish; Purchasing, 
Bob Passenheim; Maintenance, Pete Gri- 
jalva; Engineers, Sherwood; and Produc- 
tion, Russ Gaughen. Contact one of these 
men if you are interested in basketball. 

ENGINEERS' BOWLING LEAGUE 

Loft 1, T. J. Coughlin; Loft 2, 1. Craig; 
Loft 3, C. Heim; Flap, Fowler; Hull, C. 
McCable; Armament, G. Clayton; Gen- 
eral, A. Abels; Equipment, P. Carlson. 
ENGINEERS' GOLF TOURNAMENT 

Those interested contact T. J. Cough- 
lin. 
CONSOLIDATED BOWLING LEAGUE 

Team captains: Sheet Metal, W. Leeser; 
Engineering, Coughlin; Hull 1, Brooks; 
Hull 2, Clark; Tank, Dake; Final As- 
sembly, Kline; Experimental, Peterhanse; 
Purchasing, F. Meer; Maintenance, Erick- 
son; Machine Shop, Miller; Production 1, 
Muck; Production 2, Coykendall; Finish- 
ing, E. Banks; Raw Material, Marks. 

Under the present schedule, these teams 
meet every Friday night at Sunshine 
Bowling alleys. 

ROD AND REEL CLUB 

The Rod and Reel club, organized by 
members of Hull, has been extended to 
men in all departments. Call Hotchkiss 
for further information. 

GUN CLUB 

Call Howard Golem. 

SWIMMING 

Notices have been posted for the for- 
mation of a swimming meet, to be spon- 
sored by the Pacific Beach Chamber of 
Commerce. See Bob Harshaw or John 



LINDBERGH FIELD CAFE 

Administration Building 
Lindbergh Field 



"The Home of Aviation" 
BREAKFASTSERVED AT6:15 A.M. 



Woodhead, Sr., in Wood Shop, for fur- 
ther information. 

BADMINTON 

Now playing each Friday from 6 to 10 
p.m. in south end of Municipal gym. See 
bulletin boards for announcement of 
tournament, which begins March 1. The 
committee in charge includes: Terry, Loft; 
Billings, Engineering; James, Welding; 
Henninger, Accounting; Lockwood, Pro- 
duction; and Gilchrist, Employment. 
TENNIS 

A tournament is now in play, weather 
permitting. See Gilchrist, Employment. 
SOFTBALL 

About 20 or 30 teams in both day and 
night crews will be formed soon. See W. C. 
Gilchrist, Employment. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

Various other activities are in process 
of organization, or under way, but cannot 
be strictly classified as athletics. They 
include: 

BOY SCOUT TROOP 

Men of experience who are willing to 
devote some time toward organizing a 
troop to be called "Consolidators" are re- 
quested to contact Gilchrist in Employ- 
ment about this project. 



PLASTER SPLASHES 

By Boyle 

We are glad to welcome two new help- 
ers, D. Kiinger and D. Robinson. It won't 
be long before they are splashing plaster 
as Johnny Debs does (all over the place). 

J. Debs is going to pin the Dutchman's 
ears back if he doesn't stop feeding him 
clay wrapped up like caramel candy. (Oh, 
boy — did he bite!) 

Something seems to be missing. We 
can hear the bang of the hammers, the 
whirl of die-finishing motors, but not 
the rattle of the iron riveters and the solos 
of Alphio. (It's peaceful now.) 

When Buying, Mention The Consolida/or. 



Bo'wlers Attention 

4th and Cedar Recreation 

(Formerly Elki Club Alleys) 

announce the opening of Four new 

alleys, bringing the total to 

TEN PINE-CENTER ALLEYS 



now ava 



ilabk 



SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

ojffers 

The MASTER RADIO COURSE pre- 
paring you for commercial radio op- 
erator's license, telegraph or telephone; 
fitting you for ship, shore, aircraft, 
airway, amateur or broadcast station 
operation, installation and servicing. 

6 months $250 

NAVIGATION 

AIRCRAFT ADVANCED DEAD RECKONING COURSE 
5 weeks $50 

AIRCRAFT CELESTIAL NAVIGATION COURSE 

5 WGCks S50 

MARINE NAVIGATION, Complete 2 months $100 
Day courses available to men on night 
shift. 

Evening courses available to men on 
day shift. 

Call Jor additional information 

Radio and Navigation Books, Maps and 

Charts, Instruments 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

Lindbergh Field Jackson 7400 



NEW Budget Plan 



As low OS 



For 



CONSOLIDATORS 



$125 



Jown 



On 



New Pontiac "Torpedo" 

INVESTIGATE This New 
Plan 

EL GORTEZ PONTIAG GO. 



1541 Broadway 



F 6656 



Pontiac "Torpedo" 6 

PRICE COMPARISON 

WITH 

CHEVROLET, FORD, PLYMOUTH 

Pontiac Torpedo Six and Chevrolet 

Torpedo Chevrolet 

6 Special DeLuxe Difference 

Sedan $1050 $996 $54 

Tudor $1004 $955 $49 

Coupe $ 957 $914 $43 

Pontiac Torpedo Six and Ford 

Torpedo Ford 

6 De Luxe Difference 

Sedan $1050 $962 $88 

Tudor $1004 $916 $88 

Coupe $ 957 $895 $62 

Pontiac Torpedo Six ond Plymouth 

Torpedo Plymouth 

6 De Luxe Difference 

Sedan $1050 $999 $51 

Tudor $1004 $969 $35 

Coupe $957 $919 $38 

When you take into consideration the increased 

re-:ale value of a Pontiac car over the three 

lowest priced cars 

Pontiac Actually Costs Less to Buy and to 
Operate. 



8 



Consolidator 



GLIDER MEET 

By Jerry Lifcll 

Saturday and Sunday, March 2nd and 
3rd, will witness the largest gathering of 
sailplanes on the West Coast. The place 
is Torrey Pines glider port, between the 
cliffs north of La Jolla and Highway 101. 

For two days there will be uninterrupted 
activities of gliding and soaring, and this 
will afford many who still think of a 
glider as a mass of struts and wires an 
opportunity to see some really beautiful 
aircraft performing. Besides 6 planes, of 
which 3 are new from San Diego, there 
will be about 1 ships from Los Angeles, 
among them the Bowlus Super-Albatross 
which is radically new in design and yet 
about the ultimate of streamlined beauty. 

Major Fleet has demonstrated his keen 
interest in this fascinating sport by do- 
nating the three first prizes. 

There is ample space for parking, and 
refreshments will be available, so come 
up and look around. 

MODEL AIRPLANE CLUB 
Harold Strawn will give information on 
this club. 

BEHIND THESE DOORS 

SERVICE AND ECONOMY 




SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINT HEADQUARTERS 

PnitlT- LURLLPRPER 

Broaduuaiif ai Tenth 




Top left: Five-place Waco used on the trip. Upper 
right: San Gorgonio covered with snow. Elevation 
11,484 ft. Lower left: Palm Springs as seen from 



the air. Lower right: Al Higgins , pilot; Anc^ 
Clemmen s, Art Lawson, Joe Williamson and Carl 
Heim. 



BY PLANE TO PALM SPRINGS 

By Joe Williamson 

Last month a group of Consolidators 
went to Palm Springs by plane. They were: 
Carl Heim and Andy Clemmens, Loft; Art 
Lawson, Wing; Al Higgins, Tool Room. 
Taking off at 8:30 on a clear Sunday 
morning, we left San Diego rapidly be- 
hind and began a long climb, reaching an 
elevation of 9500 feet. This elevation was 
necessary in order to safely negotiate the 
pass south of San Jacinto peak (elevation 
10,805). 

The scenery was beautiful, and the 
snow-covered mountains were a sight not 
soon to be forgotten. Our course took us 
over the Palomar observatory, and it looked 
like some child's toy in a Christmas garden. 

We glided into a perfect three-pointer 
at the airport in Palm Springs, and, after 
shedding our coats and jackets, walked the 
short distance into town. There we hired 
motor glides and toured the town in grand 
style. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



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We had quite a bit of trouble with Carl, 
as he couldn't get over the number of 
pretty girls to be seen. In fact, it was his 
idea to hire the motor glides because he 
could see more girls in less time. Between 
speeding, and turning his head at odd 
moments, he really created quite a traffic 
hazard. After a leisurely lunch we re- 
turned to the airport. 

On taking off we headed due north up 
the valley between San Jacinto and San 
Gorgonio, turning off southwest at the 
head of the valley to make a bee-line for 
San Diego. 

It was a wonderful trip, and a good time 
was had by all. More trips are planned in 
the near future, and anyone interested can 
get in touch with Al Higgins. 

TOOL ROOM GOSSIP 

Ke Soccer 

Do you know that the father of 
"Doug" Buchanan in the Tool Room 
was one of the finest fullbacks that Soccer 
has had in the last 30 years? 

Migrating from Rothesay, Scotland, to 
Los Angeles he played for Los Angeles 
Athletic Club and was their real standby 
until a broken ankle put him out of active 
play. 

Ask Doug about him. 



CLEANERS 
and DYERS 

We call /or 
and delU'er 



m^ 



Phone F. 5932 



•0^ 



NDIA ST. 
at KALMIA 



3977 
GOLDFINCH 



March, 1940 



THINGS THAT COME OUT 
AT NIGHT 

By Craig 

THE Tail gang had a party the other 
night. It was directed and presided 
over by "Pancho" Petit. After work the 
boys, 1 5 strong, went to the Loma Inn, 
where they feasted on Spaghetti and drank 
wine. During the dinner the nickelodeon 
played "South of the Border" so much they 
got into the spirit of the thing and de- 
cided to go to Tijuana for a few souvenirs. 
Everyone had a swell time, and if they all 
saw double it was just the Ernest twins. 

"Casey" Jones, of paint shop, is learn- 
ing how to smoke and Merle Sage is look- 
ing for the guy that gave "Casey" the 
idea. Casey rides with Merle to and from 
work, and the strain of worrying about 
the upholstery in that new Buick is too 
much for Merle. 

The holiday season was tough on a lot 
of the boys. Red. Johnson, of win, and 
"Lex" Durkee, of Tail, each showed up 
at work with a skinned nose, and strangely 
they both got hurt running into a door! 
Joe Havlik, Drop Hammer Dept., and 
Lou Bigson, Hull, wore patches over one 
eye for a few days. They were hurt sliding 
into a door. Benson, of Machine, had a cut 
over one eye and you guessed it — some one 
slammed a door in his face. 

The "lumberjack" shirts that Jack 
Bryant wears are getting him a reputation. 
Several fellows would like to challenge him 
to a log-rolling contest. H. Roese is man- 
aging Jack. 

Tommy Jubert, of Raw Materials, is 
quite a songbird. Tommy sings week-ends 
at the Streamliner on El Cajon Ave., and 
warms up during the week on those un- 
fortunates who must cash raw-stock 
requisitions. 

Tony Andolino, of Wing, has bought 
himself a new fly swatter. Tony finds 
bugs of odd shapes and sizes in his lunch 
box and tools too frequently, and is getting 
sick and tired of jumping back and forth 
over the spar tables to evade the beasts. 

The night crew misses Dick Moore, who 
transferred to day shift to take charge of 
PBY center sections. 

Marvin Speed, of Tool Room, and Miss 
Polly Long, were wed at Yuma on Jan- 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
"The Blind Man" 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

102.? University Avenue 



uary 12. Mrs. Speed is from Georgia and 
a real southern belle. Mr. Speed is learning 
his household duties rapidly at the last 
report. 

Yuma is the place to go it seems. Dave 
Arnett, of Sheet, was married to attrac- 
tive and popular Miss Helen Hudson at 
Yuma on December 24. You can discon- 
tinue those 8:30 phone calls now, Dave. 
Good luck to you both. 

Red Johnson, Final Assembly Insp., is 
a good guy to have around, and the 
fellows should do something nice for Red's 
wife. Red always has some delicacy on 
hand to pass around, such as cookies, 
candies, etc., and it's all homemade. The 
peanut butter sure made a hit with Dick 
Emrick. Better bring some more. Red, we 
can't quite remember how it tasted. 

The fire drill of last week was quite 
a surprise. It took a minute for the boys 
to get collected and then those volunteer 
firemen really showed some classy foot- 
work. It took Ross Dilling quite a while 
to get started, but once under way he 
showed a lot of the boys a neat pair of 
heels. 

We finally actually know some one who 
knows some one who won something in a 
radio program. Shelby Beats' mother won 
a brand new Willys on the "Turns" pro- 
gram last week. Congratulations, Mrs. 
Beats. 

The new filing cabinet arrangement in 
the planning office looks like the begin- 
ning of a new "Maginot Line". Bill Wil- 
son, Joe Kraemer, Jack Zinns and Art 
iContinued on poge 10) 



Mission 


Hills Beauty and 




Barber Shop 


A ^ 


Personal Service for 


K — J 


the entire family « « 




GIVE US A TRIAL 


J-9576 


812 W. Washington 



# 






TODD*S 






THE COMPLETE MEN'S STORE 






"Presents" 

THE NEWEST AND 

LASTEST IN NEW 

SPRING SUITS 

and TOP COATS 

$20.00 to $35.00 Values 

NOW 

51500 iJ^ISso 
$2250 

SAN DIEGO'S FINEST VALUES 






HOME OF 

ADAM HATS 






B. V. D. 
UNDERWEAR 






MANHATTAN SHIRTS 






FORTUNE 
SHOES 






SPORT COATS $7.95 






TODD*S 






THE COMPLETE MEN'S STORE 






Corner 5th Ave. and E St. 
"WHERE SMART MEN SHOP" 





# 



Personal Supervision of the Owners Assures Careful Consideration of 

Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Always Reasonable 

Conveniently Located — Ample Free Parking 

JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and Ash St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 6168 



10 



Consolidator 



^IT 



'GC 



B«ffe> 



J 



®\ 



"7 /-^ h\ zX \ 

"Lots and lots of people for- 
get to turn out lights and then 
punish themselves — too se- 
verely — with feelings of 
waste and regret Of course 
it's wrong to waste anything, 
including electricity because 
there are so many delightful 
ways to use it that are not 
wasteful. But just one light 
burning all night couldn't 
possiblv cost over a cent or 
two and that small amount of 
waste is only worth a teeny, 
weeny self-reprimand and a 
promise never to do it again. 
To get a real idea how little 
I work for, just look at the 
chart below. 



FOR ONLY ONE PENNY | 


1 will operate your 


electric light for 


the following length 


s of time: 


Size ot Lamp 


Hours Minutes 


25 Watts 


12 7 


40 Watts 


7 35 


50 Watts 


6 4 


60 Watts 


5 2 


100 Watts 


3 2 


200 Watts 


1 31 


300 Watts 


1 1 


SAN DIEGO CONSOLIDATED 


GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 



Stone man the pillboxes to repel the 
charges of clerks, dispatchers and others 
interested in advancing on process cards 
and blueprints. 

Joe Merk, Sheet lead man, is leaving 
Consair to become an instructor in the 
Vocational School. Joe was well liked by 
all who knew him, and will be missed by 
many friends. Everyone wishes you the 
best of luck, Joe. 

Levy Ely, of Wing, is the newest addi- 
tion to the growing list of home owners. 
Levy is building in Austin Heights, Na- 
tional City, and is very enthusiastic about 
his new home. Levy has a schedule figured 
out that gives him two more working 




BROWNIE 
SAYS: 

For driving pleasure 

It's FORD 
For FORTYI 

FORD V-8 
MERCURY V-8 

or Lincoln-ZEPHYR V-12 

BROWN 

MOTOR CO. 

India at B St. 

abo CORONADO 
LA JOLLA 
MISSION HILLS 

Lincoln Dlvlsion*Columbia at B St. 



hours during the day. We know he'll need 
them. 

Ralph Berg, of Wood Shop, has finally 
transferred his interests from the hills of 
Majestown to the mountains of California. 
Ralph has a new home on Mt. Helix, 
where he grows avocados. 

The story the Finish Dept. boys are 
telling about a rooster chasing a grown 
man down the street pecking him in the 
back of the neck may be true, but if it 
is I would like to know how much the 
"stuff" costs per quart. 

Comolidator's families have been en- 
larging rapidly. Roger Heinrich, Materials, 
Russ Mounts, Final Assembly, Wayne Wil- 
liams, Draw Bench, and Gordon Burns, 
of Wing, are among the proud dads. 

George Wire has a new dispatcher, but 
cafe society has lost a patron in Danny 
Clemson. Dan thinks if Bender could get 
a blonde the new shift would be fine. With 
a brunette and a red head, the office traffic 
is increasing too rapidly, according to 
Lloyd. *^ 

NIGHT MAINTENANCE 

By Stan Marcyan 

O. Darling (Otto) had some red safety 
lanterns to place on some 14-foot high 
test piling on the grounds of the future 
north extension. It looked so far away 
that he hopped in his car and drove to 
the piling. We're wondering if he drove 
to save steps or his circumference. 

All maintenance men are anxiously 
waiting for the establishment of an intra- 
plant taxi service to easily reach the far 
corners of Consolidated. 

Roy A. Schultz followed Elmer Ho- 
man's example by escorting his bride-elect, 
Dorothy E. Loveless, to Yuma on Satur- 
day the tenth. 

All the rest of us, but Archie Bauer, 
who is waiting for Sadie Hawkin's day, 
are whistling: 

"O, when I was single 
My pockets did jingle, 
I wish I were single again." 




Keep PLENTY of 
FRESH 

QUALITEE 

always on hand 



It far exceeds the standards set by law 



Tune in on "Lowe Highlights" — KGB-Tues. and Fri., 8 p. tn. 



March, 1940 



11 



ANODIC ANECDOTES 

By Bert Nascef 

CONGRATS are due Harry Boyle, for 
his promotion to leader of our third 
shift. He and his doughty crew looked 
red-eyed the first week, but as Russ Haynes 
put it, "we're used to it now." 

Rumor has it that three anodizers went 
south of the border one week-end to study 
night life in Tijuana. One of the boys, 
after sampling considerable native liquid, 
saw a puppy for sale for $2.50. He bought 
it, carrying it with him until running out 
of funds. A council of war was held by 
the trio, as by now they were broke, and 
the car out of gas, resulting in a decision 
to sell the pup. After disastrous discounts 
had been made, the price went down to 
fifty cents, still no takers. The man who 
originally sold it to him offered him 
twenty-five cents, which was flatly refused 
by the justly indignant lad, who in a 
moment of disgust put the pup over a 
fence and let it go. 

He suddenly realized that even though 
the pup was gone, it had left behind a 
vigorous population of fleas. Result: $2.50 
for a batch of fleas, also a hitch-hike at 
7 a.m. Sunday, north of the border. 
Moral — buy gas before pups, and leave out 
the fleas. 

We are justly proud of our ex-anodizer, 



Fritz von Meeden, who left our ranks to 
become one of Jack Thompson's group of 
efficient inspectors. Congratulations, Fritz, 
from us all. 

We would like to welcome back in our 
group Ted Lohman and Gaston Gonzales. 

We have formed an anodic Softball 
team, and hope to be given the rest of 
the teams in and out of Consolidated some 
competition when the season opens. 

Ted Lohman was elected its manager, 
and captain, and wishes other team cap- 
tains to contact him regarding dates for 
practice games. The players, so far, are: 
Wally Miles (Sonny Boy) ; Lester Our- 
hart (Gabby) ; Carl Johnson (Arizona 
Kid) ; Gaston Gonzales (Lefty) ; Jack Orr 
(Two Gun); Ted Lohman (Slugger); 
Emery Thoman (Curley) ; Russell Haynes 
(Boogy) ; Herbert Austin Maxwell Hen- 
derson (Red), and Harry Coyle (Irish). 

The writer wants to thank Al Ballard 



WHERE TO LIVE? 




ASK 


E. 


FRIEDRICK 


NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 


MAIN 


1014 234 C ST. 


"WE 


COVER THE CITY" 



and Gaston Gonzales for their kindness in 
helping him move into his new home on 
1076 Oliver St., Pacific Beach, and also 
other Consolidators who have wished him 
well. 

MALE CHORUS 
A movement is now under way to re- 
organize a male chorus or glee club. See 
Mr. Gilchrist. 




It's SO 
Satisfying 

That big bottle 

5^ 



•o r 



oj^ 



BEVERAGE 
COMPANY 

Main () I 8 I 




CRAFTSMAN TOOLS for Every Purpose, On Every Job Where Precision and 

Reliability are Demanded! Yet Sears Prices Are 1/3 or More Less than Other 

Tools Approaching Their Quality! 



ELECTRIC DRILL 




15.95 

Va Jacob's chuck. 
Double reduction 
gears, ivro sets 
S. K, F. bearings, 
universal motor, 
convenient pistol 
grip and svritch. 



FLEXIBLE SHAFT 




4.95 

Tho tool of a thou- 
sand uses! Buffs, 
polishes, grinds, 
etc. Ball bearing 
motor coupling. 
Quiet, smooth run- 
ning. 



6-FOOT STEEL RULE 
59c 




Craftsman Garage Vise 
4.30 



Worth V2 more! 
Flexible steel. 1/2" 
wide; 6-ft. long. 
Metal case. 




Cold Rolled steel 

slide bar, handle, 
screw, Roplace- 
able heat treated 
jaws. 3V'2-inch. 



MECHANIC'S TOOL BOX 
7.98 




Diagonal Cutting Pliers 
1.39 



Wood frame, steel 
covered. Eight felt 
lined drawers. Re- 
inforced corners. 




"Craftsman." 
Tough, clean cut- 
ting edges! Full 
polished. Blued 
handles. 6-inches. 



BUY ANYTHING TOTALING $10.00 or 
MORE ON SEARS EASY PAYMENT PLAN 

SEARS, ROEBUCK and CO. 



Sixth Ave. and "C" Street 



Franklin 6571 




Leo Danner and ^'. P. Moore point out the all- 
important sign, while Harry Bailey takes a quick 
look at the camera. 



WEIGHT CONTROL 



THE sign pictured above appears in 
the Wing, Tail, Hull and Final As- 
sembly departments and is familiar to 
many. Some, whose task it has been to 
follow its admonition and advise the En- 
gineering Weight Group (Ext. 284) con- 
cerning some minor assembly or part 
about to be installed, have doubtless won- 
dered why so much care is taken in secur- 
ing detail weights. At the time of the 
weighing of a major assembly such as a 
wing or hull, or on the occasion of a com- 
pleted airplane weighing, some of these 
same men have asked questions concerning 
the overweight or underweight and the 
method used in attempting to meet the 
estimated or guaranteed weight. 

The purpose of this article is to point 
out the importance of weight control in 
the manufacture of an airplane and to 
outline briefly the general method em- 
ployed during the design and construction 
stages in limiting the weight. 

One of the most important factors 
making for optimum airplane perform- 
ance is low weight. High rate of climb, 
so important to the military pilot; mini- 
mum take-off time, of importance where 
limited length of airport is available; and 
low landing speed, necessary for a maxi- 
mum degree of safety, are only some of the 
elements of performance affected fav- 
orably by low weight. 

Since performance is so closely related 
to weight, one of the first steps in the de- 
sign of the airplane of today is the pre- 
paration of a careful weight estimate, 
which then forms a basis for the perform- 
ance estimate. This estimated weight (or 
a slightly greater weight, representing an 



arbitrary increase to provide for future 
contingencies) is also employed in the 
strength determination or "stress analysis" 
of the airplane. 

Since the performance estimate and 
stress analysis are based upon an estimated 
weight, it is evident that the actual weight 
of the completed- airplane should not ex- 
ceed this estimated weight; otherwise the 
actual performance may be impaired, and 
the structure be of inadequate strength. 

Such an overweight, if appreciable, 
would necessitate a reduction of fuel, and 
armament (payload in the case of com- 
mercial airplanes), or both. Reduction of 
fuel would, of course, result in a decrease 
in range or distance the airplane could 
fly. A reduction in military armament 
would mean elimination of certain equip- 
ment essential for fighting or protection; 
whereas a decrease in the commercial air- 
plane's payload (passengers, cargo, bag- 
gage, etc.) might mean a serious loss of 
revenue to the operator. 

A classic example of overweight is found 
in the design built by a certain transport 
manufacturer a decade or so ago. After 
many months spent in preliminary design, 
detail design, and construction, this man- 
ufacturer's new airplane was finally ready 
for weighing. Little attention had been 
paid to the subject of "weight" during 
the design and construction of the air- 
plane. However, much effort had been ex- 
pended on the matter of securing "aero- 
dynamic cleanness of design" and the suc- 
cess of the venture was confidently 
awaited. When the weighing was com- 
pleted it was found that the airplane was 
some five or six thousand pounds over- 



Consolidator 

weight! As a result, instead of carrying 
a payload of thirty passengers as antici- 
pated, it was impossible to secure a license 
for a a payload of even one passenger. This 
airplane was the last built by that manu- 
facturer. 

In order that the airplane builder may 
turn out a completed airplane whose actual 
weight does not exceed that used as a 
basis for the performance estimate and the 
stress analysis, a rigid system of weight 
control must be established. Such a pro- 
cedure is essential to the interest of the 
manufacturer. It is, furthermore, a rigid 
requirement of the Government which, on 
some contracts, pays the manufacturer a 
bonus based on the amount of under- 
weight, or exacts from him a penalty 
based upon the degree of overweight. 

By S. H. AVERY 
■ ■ ■ Engineering Department 

Before outlining the general method 
employed in accomplishing this control of 
weight on a new design, it might be help- 
ful to define a few terms commonly used: 

"Weight Empty" — As the term implies, 
this represents the weight of the 
empty airplane, that is, the combined 
weight of the structure, power plant, 
and fixed equipment (instruments, 
surface controls, furnishings, elec- 
trical equipment, etc.) 

"Useful Load" — In the case of a mili- 
tary airplane, this term represents 
substantially the combined weight of 
crew, fuel, oil, armament and dis- 
posable equipment. 

"Armament" includes guns, ammuni- 
tion, bombs, torpedoes, and pyro- 
technics. 

"Disposable equipment" includes a list 
of items specified by the particular 
branch of the Service contracting for 
the airplane. 

In the case of a commercial airplane 
this term represents the combined 
weight of the crew, fuel, oil, pas- 
sengers, baggage, mail, express, etc. 

"Gross Weight" — This represents the 
sum of the weight empty and useful 
load, in other words — the weight of 
the airplane fully loaded for flight. 

"Estimated Weight" — Any weight fig- 
ure based solely upon preliminary de- 
sign data. 

"Calculated Weight" — Any weight fig- 
ure based upon the physical dimen- 
sions and specific gravity of the de- 
tail parts. 

From the above definition of useful load, 
it will be seen that its weight is fixed and, 
therefore, not capable of being controlled. 



March, 1940 



13 



Since the greater part of the weight empty 
is dependent upon detail design, it is here 
that a system of weight control is neces- 
sary. Such a system consists broadly of 
the following: 

1. A breakdown or division of the weight 
empty estimate into a large number of 
small units, the resulting detail weight 
summary serving as a sort of "budget" 
and being known as a "bogie." 

2. The calculation of the weights of these 
units as they are designed and a com- 
parison with the corresponding "bogie" 
weights to determine that the calculated 
weights do not exceed the "bogie" 
weights. 

3. An attempt, where the calculated 
weight exceeds the "bogie" weight, to 
redesign the unit before allowing it to 
be released to the shop for construction. 

4. Maintenance of a complete running sum- 
mary of calculated weights so that any 
net overweight in the items already re- 
leased may be compensated for by an 
equivalent reduction in the "bogie" 

. weights of units not already released to 
the shop. 

5. Determination in the shop of the actual 
weights of the fabricated units and a 
comparison with the corresponding cal- 
culated weights. 

6. Maintenance of a complete running sum- 
mary of actual weights so that any net 
overweight may be offset, where pos- 
sible, by a further reduction in the 
"bogie" weights of units not already 
released to the shop. 

7. Recording of all weight changes after 
weighing and prior to delivery (the 
(flight test period) with an earnest ef- 
fort to limit the extent of revisions af- 
fecting overweight. 

Of the above items, the most important 
is the first, for obviously if the detail 
breakdown of the estimate is not reason- 
able, there is little logic in expecting the 
calculated unit weights to closely ap- 
proach the "bogie" weights. The original 
Weight Empty estimate, although detailed 
in part, consists mainly of estimated 
weights of major assemblies such as wing, 
ailerons, flaps, stabilizer, fins, rudders, ele- 
vators, etc., which estimates have been 
derived from a consideration of such 
factors as area, span, load factor, gross 
weight, geometric shape, etc. A detailed 
breakdown of these particular assemblies 
into such detail items as front spar, rear 
spar, fittings, ribs, bulkheads, plating, 
stringers, trailing edge, leading edge, etc., 
is accomplished by preliminary stress 
analysis, the use of unit weight to as- 
sembly weight ratios obtained from actual 
designs of the same type of construction. 



the application of empirical formulas, or 
by the judgment of the weight engineer. 

Since the number of detail items into 
which the weight empty estimate is di- 
vided amounts to several hundred, and 
since the number of drawings representing 
these items runs into many thousands, it is 
clear that an efficient bookkeeping system 
is essential to properly coordinate the cal- 
culated and actual drawing weights with 
the "bogie" figures. Without such a sys- 
tem, no true weight control system can 
function. 

In addition to a system of weight con- 
trol outlined briefly above, an equally 
effective system of balance control dur- 
ing the design and construction stages 
is necessary in order that the balance of 
the completed airplane may closely ap- 
proximate that used during certain wind 
tunnel tests. This begins at the time of 
the preparation of the original weight esti- 
mate when an estimate of the fore and aft 
location of the center of gravity is made 
for various specified loading conditions by 
the application of fundamental principles 
of mechanics. During the detail design and 
construction stages a running check is 
maintained of change in center of gravity 
location caused by variation of calculated 
and actual detail weights from "bogie" 
weights, or by the change in location of 
equipment. In case an appreciable change 
in balance is indicated, it may then be nec- 
essary to relocate certain equipment or 
redesign items remote from the airplane's 
center of gravity. 

In conclusion, it should be noted that 
the application of a perfect system of 
weight and balance control will not pro- 
duce an actual weight empty and balance 
approximating that used in the perform- 
ance estimate, stress analysis, and wind 

Med Sherwood of the weight group and Ed L. 
Brendza of Wings check up on the actual weight 
of a wing rib. It looks like a good job of estimating 
and a good rib job! 




tunnel tests unless the original weight and 
balance estimate is reasonable. Since cer- 
tain empirical formulas used in the esti- 
mation of the weight of the structure 
(which comprises some 50'/, or more of 
the weight empty) are derived from actual 
weight records of a relatively few existing 
designs, it follows that the accuracy of 
the weight estimate should increase as 
actual weight records are available for 
an increased number of designs covering 
a widening range of gross weights. This 
then constitutes an additional reason for 
the determination of actual weights in 
the shop and for the shop warning "Weigh 
All Parts Before Installing, Phone Exten- 
sion 284." t^ 

THE HULL TRUTH 

By Chuck Farrell 

THE night shift in Hulls have or- 
ganized a bowling team to compete 
in the shop league. Louie Fisher is acting 
as captain and manager. Other members 
are Stevens, Panhorst, Mayberry and Fal- 
rell. 

The reason "Killer" Manning has been 
breathing flame lately is that he mistook 
a bottle of that Mexican hot-stuff for 
catsup. 

Ed Koehler has been treating the boys 
to handfuls of Pine-nuts he brought back 
from his mining property in Baja Cali- 
fornia, Mexico. Just at present the mine 
is flooded with sixty feet of water, but 
Ed hopes to get bailed out "sometime." 

"Vic" Mainhart has been telling every- 
one what fine cakes the "little woman" 
bakes. Last week he proved it with a gen- 
erous slice of walnut cake. Many thanks, 
Mrs. Mainhart. 

Flash! Walt Evans, of Hull, and Betty 
Plesant, of the Aircraft Cafe, were mar- 
ried February 3rd in Los Angeles. The best 
of luck to them both. Walt is a deputy 
in San Bernardino county sheriff's office, 
and a member of Redland's Mounted Po- 
lice. In fact, he rode with the mounted 
group Saturday, February 1 8 th. Cigars 
coming up? 

Frank Popp greased his car, but did not 
stop that annoying squeak. It is no fault 
of the car. It comes from that ancient 
time-piece he carries. 

What lead-man had an accident with 
his car and, after expensive repairs at a 
downtown garage, started home only to 
wrinkle up a fender on the way, and all 
without benefit of insurance? 

Shelby Best, our high-speed stock man, 
is a very efficient amateur camera man. He 
has some excellent snapshots of PBY's, 
B-24, and 3 IX jobs. However, like the 
true artist, he is very modest and insists 
he can do better. 



14 



Consolidotor 



HULLABALOO 

By Al Leonard 

GEORGE "'Scavenger" GALLEY had 
to make a personal appearance at the 
police station a short time ago, and as his 
car was laid up for repairs he borrowed 
Norm Wire's car to go downtown in. 
When his business was finished he came 
out and tried to start the car, but the key 
would not turn in the ignition lock. 
George tried for some time and even en- 



X. eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

^onliamBnjllim 

*7hou^hiktt Se.'orux. '' 
FOURTH it Cim 



^ 



X 




WHY NOT? 

BUILD a home around a new, modern, 
up-to-date both room installed by the 

WHITING-MEAD CO. 



ALL material to build your home can 
be supplied from the 5-acre plant 

At 14th and K Sts. 

LOANS to fit your needs. Appointment 
after hours if desired. 



EVEI!VTHINC-^'"^BtlU)INO~ 

I I ^i^— .^»ilM^ II I I 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

41 !8 Univeriltv ' Ocsatiild* • El C*n(ro 



listed the help of a passerby, but still he 
could not turn the key. While he was 
working away with no results, a police 
detective came out of the station and 
asked Galley what he was trying to do. 
George, who was pretty angry by this 
time, replied that all he was trying to do 
was to start the car. It didn't take the 
detective very long to tell Galley that he 
was in a police car. George tumbled out 
in a hurry, and was his face red when he 
saw his car parked right behind the de- 
tective's car that he was trying to start! 

"Dutch" Klien is the only man in the 
country who has a legal right to be in 
the dog-house. Mrs. Klien just bought a 
dog license for their dog, and its number 
was 5015. "Dutch's" clock number is 
5015. 

"Brute" Mcjoiner, who struts around 
all day long, showing people his muscles, 
is on a milk diet. Sore tummy. 

Now that the Hull Golf Tournament 
is started again the early morning Klock 
Kibitzers are at it again. Everybody is 
bemoaning their handicaps and they all 
swear they're being robbed. Gordon Shoop 
is negotiating for a new set of clubs and 
insists he will not hock them after this 
tournament is over. "Red" Chaplin had 
his dad come all the way out here from 
Buffalo to caddy for him. Chaplin has al- 
ready cautioned his dad to be sure to 
count all his opponents' strokes. Johnny 
"Yap Yap" Hopman has made arrange- 
ments with the golf course officials to 
start playing at 2:30 in the morning, with 
the aid of lanterns so he can finish by 
supper time. 

'Tis rumored that George Wire is sec- 
retly training his night Hull basketball 
team for a game with the day Hull team. 
It's a queer coincidence that the day he 





PLADT PGLic-e-no. i . . . \ 

"OL€ Bia eom€s ti4aoug(+"^ 

\ \ *■ 41825 -S-M.)* 

picks for practice is the day the ladies' 
gym class meets. 

Russ Kern says since the balcony has 
been built over his desk several new men 
have come to him for files and drills think- 
ing he is connected with the tool crib. 
Famihar sayings: 

Night Crew: "The day gang did it." 
Day Crew: "The night gang did it." 
The Hull Department will hire two 
Boy Scouts experienced in the art of Sig- 
naling with flags to transmit messages from 
North Hull Dept. to South Hull Dept. 

HEARD ABOUT THE HULL 

By Bill Petfif, Hull 

"You see," said Tom Eakles, to the 
puzzled clerk, "I want six pieces of ply- 
wood, then have the wood shop cut these 
in half and I have eight. Get it?" 

"Maybe I'm kind of dumb," said the 
clerk, "but I don't!" 

"You know, it's kind of dangerous to 
walk under that ladder," reprimanded 
Glenn Hotchkiss, hull foreman. "Don't 
you believe in superstition?" Imagine 
Glenn's surprise when a minute later he 
glanced upward and saw a huge steel 
girder swinging to and fro about three feet 
from his face! Need it be said that Glenn 
rapidly vacated the premises? 



BEVERAGE 
COMPANY 

Main 9181 



IRVIN AIRCRAFT SCHOOL 

cAnnounces its '^-opening 

• SPECIALIZED • 

Aircraft Riveting, Blue Print Read- 
ing, Sheet Metal and Assembly 
New Equipment • Factory Instructors 
LOW TUITION • DAY- NIGHT 

1616 W. LEWIS ST. 



March, 1940 



15 



MACHINE "OIL" 

By Al Pfeiffer 

W 7E learned that the satirical wit 

V V and exquisite parlance of Brad 
Bradshaw is inspired by his dreams. Many 
a time and oft, Brad rises at 2 a.m. to 
record his nocturnal literary findings. 
Tried the same thing but N.G. — even that 
last bottle of beer was gone from the ice 
box at that ungodly hour. So we proceed 
to slip you the dope in the ordinary way. 
It seems that some fellows have all the 
luck! Bad luck in the case of "Dagwood" 
Bowling. Married exactly a month, he fell 
heir to an attack of acute appendicitis. 
Period of hospitalization is now over and 
from all reports, Junior Bowling is doing 
splendidly. To complicate matters Bowl- 
ing, Sr. was disabled about the same time. 
As he returned home after work the car 
in which he was riding, careened over a 
10 foot embankment. Result was a severe 
fracture of one of the carpal bones in his 
right hand. We repeat, some fellows have 
all the luck. 

Tracing the origin of leap year, we've 
been wondering if it isn't the outgrowth 
of the Garos doctrine of India. Theirs is 
the happy custom of a woman requesting 
the hand of the man in marriage. More- 
over any man daring to submit a proposal 
to the young lady of his choice is prompt- 
ly fined. 

Maybe this latter tenet could have fore- 
stalled a like movement on the part of 
Pagliuso and Valente. The former's ex- 
ecution is slated for the first week in April. 
Valente demands Maybells. When charged 
for a reason Valente replied, "It's all in 
your attitude of things, besides I've had 
experience." Pagliuso on the other hand is 
a triple threat man. 

A common occurrence is to pick up the 
phone and hear someone ask for "Jello." 
The name, if you please is John Emerson 
Woodward Ware or if you prefer, "Where 
is Ware?" 

And while we are on the subject of 
names, it recently came to light that the 
"M." in M. Roy Larceval, stands for 
Marcus. Don't be daunted Roy, think of 
all those other handsome Romans who 
blithely sallied thru life with just such a 
monicker. 



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A. H. Roberts, 6' 4" of real masculinity 
is in a quandary. Just this — where shall he 
rest his lanky frame? At the 270 acre 
ranch at Barrett or the smaller establish- 
ment at Spring Valley? Need a hand pal? 
Interest in sports and activities has 
reached an all-high peak. We've heard it 
rumored that a Consair boxing team is in 
the making. To which Art Scodes offers his 
services as trainer. Prospects for pugilistic 
fame are encouraged to speak to Art. With 
similar movements at Douglas and other 
plants. Consolidated is not to be found 
wanting. 

Quoting Art Woods on marital enter- 
prise, "I'd sure enough like to try it, if 
I could only save the money for the license 
and a trip to Yuma." 

The Frichtel brothers (Joe, Jake and 
Ted) are entertaining visitors these days, 
their mother and a niece from St. Louis. 
Show them all of sunny California boys, 
and Missouri will lose two more taxpayers. 

Life is just one picnic after another for 
the night shift basketball teams. This 
time at Lake Henshaw, Sunday, Feb. 10. 
Climaxed by a party at the Ruzich house- 
hold, they celebrated the close of the 
1939-1940 campaign. The group wishes 
to announce that applications for the soft- 
ball team are now in order. Especially 
since one teammate Roy Schultz is fac- 
ing interment. It seems Roy eloped to 
Yuma with Dorothy Loveless to tie a 
lover's knot. C'est la guerre! 

With all this marrying there's sure to 
be a need of legal advice. Did you know 
that Elmer Buschbaum possesses extensive 
knowledge along these lines with degrees 
of L. L. B. and L. L. M. (This plug should 
call for a share in the fees, Erwin.) 

Love note — Bill Love hereby requests 
that all future messages written to him, 



FOR A "BETTER" DEAL 



s 



ARON 

OONER 



DIAMONDS 
WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE 
RADIOS 

SHROn* CREDIT JEWELER 

3820 FIFTH AVE. Near University 

"CLOSE TO YOUR HOME" 



reverse the order of words or insert the 
word please: To read, "Note Love! or Love 
please note." 

The scarcity of information for these 
columns moves the writer to again advise 
you that contributions are mighty wel- 
come. Further, that the management will 
not invoke any article of the espionage act 
for disclosing such knowledge. Come on 
Fellows, Let's Give? 



Leading Aircraft 
Issues 

Bought — Sold — Quoted 

S)ta.tLitLca.l S/nnotmcLtlon 
Upon /xe<^ueit 

SEARL-MERRICK 
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(Members Los Angeles Stocl< Exchange) 

R. E. PATTON D. S. DORN 

508 San Diego Trust and Savings BIdg. 
F 7626 San Diego 



VISIT 

DEPARTMENT STORE FOR 
MOTORISTS 
TODAY 

Tires 

Batteries 

Spark Plugs 

Life Protector Tubes 

Motor Tune Up Department 

Broke and Wheel Alignment Dept. 

Home and Auto Radio Service 

Four Leoding Brands of Gasoline 

Auto Accessories 

Home and Auto Radios — Six Leading 

Mokes to Choose From. 
Ranges and Washers 
Refrigerators 
Juvenile Wheel Goods 
Bicycles for Boys and Girls 
Children's Toys 

TERMS AS LOW AS 25c PER WEEK 

PAY CHECKS CASHED BETWEEN 
8 A.M. AND 6 P.M. 

IT'S SO MUCH EASIER TO PARK 
AND SHOP AT 

fjre$tone 

Broadway, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 



16 



Consolidator 



WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

B\ /. E. Hoiigsoii 

WOOD carving is probably the old- 
est known handicraft and as such 
calls for a very high degree of both art- 
istry and skill. In Europe, while a con- 
siderable amount of hand carving is still 
being done, here in America, due to our 
high speed technology, it is almost un- 
known, except as a hobby or on articles 
designed to individual taste or require- 
ment. 

The carved plaque, here pictured, is the 
work of Everett E. Jacobson, of the wood 
shop. Mr. Jacobson is the fourth genera- 
tion of wood carvers in his family. His 
great grandfather, a master carver in 
Gothenberg, Sweden, on his death left his 
business to his son, who came to the 
United States to judge the carvings, both 
wood and plaster, in the Chicago World's 
Fair of 1893. He was then employed as a 



Good Food at 
Moderate Pricei 



Open Sundayf 
and Holidayf 



Morgan's Cafeteria 

1047-1049 Sixtk Ave. 

Between Broadway and C St.. San Diego 




He MADE it! 

(BUT, see page 25!) 




O'DEI, 



carver and designer for the Pullman Car 
Company. 

In 1927 Mr. Jacobson, the 3rd, won 
first prize, awarded at the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, in competition with 1100 
eligible contenders from all over the world. 

Our present Everett, carved designs to 
be reproduced in the Chrysler Building, 
New York City; the City Hall, Denver, 
Colo., and between the years of 1931 and 
1933 made replicas of the bibliographical 
objects discovered in the famous tomb of 
King Tut-Ank-Amen for Mr. Richman, 
who sponsored the archeological enter- 
prise. 

We asked J. L. Sievert how he was com- 
ing with his "Cine Kodak." He informed 
us that he is still in the experimental stage, 
though he has some fair pictures of Balboa 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

^Vj Optometrist t^^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



Park, San Diego bay, and some taken in 
Riverside, Calif. 

Bud Hadley, together with Bob Hall, 
will put on a floor show at the U. S. Grant 
Hotel during a "Delta Sigma" fraternity 
party March 16. Bud and his lady friend 
will present an "expose" of dancing with 
"Adagio in Swing." These partners are 
several time winners in dance contests. 

Harry Connely, you know the guy — he 
works in "Mike" MuUicans' gang — went 
and got himself married on February 2d. 

All swimmers interested are invited to 
join the Consair Swim Club, the object 
being to train for a series of distance con- 
tests to be held in Mission Bay under spon- 
sorship of the Pacific Beach Chamber of 
Commerce. A second group will be formed 
of strictly novices, who have never com- 
peted in AAU swims. In addition to regu- 
lar prizes, bronze medals will be given to 
all swimmers who go the distance. Bob 
Harshaw and John Woodhead, Sr., will 
be pleased to coach any inquiring novices. 
See them and start training right now. 
They meet at Silver Spray plunge every 
Tuesday night for practice and coaching 
and — by the way — the coaching service 
is free. 



TRADE MARK 




REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

TOOLS AND HACKSAWS 
are recognized leaders in tlie Aircraft Industry 

SPECIFY STARRETT FOR BEST RESULTS 



March, 1940 



17 



SOME SPORT SLANTS 

By Matt WielopolskJ 

OVER-CONFIDENCE in their ability 
to retain the city and A.A.U. cham- 
pionship for 1940 caused the Coinolidatcd 
Hull team to lose two close games and 
thereby lose a chance for another title. 
However, we have assurance that Fred 
Grossher's boys will end up in the play- 
offs, especially if "sharpshooter" Tommy 
Johnson gets hot. To date. Tommy is 
leading high scorer in the city basketball 
leagues, and that's barring none. 

Incidentally, the night shift league 
leaders are also the Hull team, led by an- 
other high point man, Rock. 

The Machine Shop basketball team ended 
their season in third place. With a few 
more men (thirteen) to their roster, their 
manager, Vic Racko, held first Softball 
practice on February 13. Up to press time, 
their secret practice sessions show surpris- 
ing superiority. No doubt Mr. H. Golem's 
boys are out for titles. 

Today, March 1, at 7 p.m. in the Muni 
Gym, Balboa Park, we begin our Consoli- 
dated Badminton Tournament. All 
matches and flights for men's singles, 
doubles and mixed doubles were drawn 
upon under Mr. William (Bill) Gilchrist's 
guidance, and "Johnny" Lockwood and 
committee's supervision. 

A similar tourney is to be held for our 
night shift employees and close friends at 
10 a.m. in care of Craig Clark, and there 
is no admission fee to this exciting, thrill- 
ing, humorous and interesting new sport. 

Art Scudes will coach, instruct and 
train any young man in the "art of self- 
defense." He would like those boys who 
are interested enough in boxing to try 
competitively for a Consair Boxing team. 
Golden Gloves preparation or professional 
or semi-pro aspirations. What do you say. 
Bob Hyder and Bob Passenheim? Why 
don't you boys bob up and start the gloves 
flying? In case you folks don't know it, 
back in 1929 or thereabouts one of Art's 
boys lost in the semi-finals boxing match 
to Joe Louis in New York. Art, himself, 
was quite a fighter in his day, and he can 
still prove it, teaching. 

Night shift bowling league at the Elks 



simply proved the sad but true saying of 

most of us: 

"For years I've bowled — but even so 
My average score is mighty low. 
My arm is strong enough, but still 
Those cursed pins I cannot spill. 

"But oh how well we duffers know 
That once a dub — we're always so, 
A flash of form — and then, alack, 
We're soon back in the same old track." 

Despite the splits, misses, slips, gut- 
terballs and few strikes and spares, the 
night-owls managed to get out of bed at 
8 a.m., eat at 9 a. m. and bowl at 10 a.m. 
And bowl, they did — with never a dull 
moment! . q, 

BASKETBALL 

Red Sails Inn and Tank Team 

1. Saftig, Captain Center 

2. Consaul Guard 

3. Mendez Forward 

4. Morgan Guard 

5 . Krell Forward 

6. Allen Guard 

7. Summers Center 

8 . Parks Guard 

9. Silverthorne Forward 

10. Emeslie Guard 

Manager Tank, Sid Riches. 

Manager Red Sails Inn, W. L. McCan. 

The Red Sails Inn team is now on top 
of the heap in the Commercial League. 
The same team as the Tank Team, is tied 
for first place in the second round at Con- 
solidated. The team is hitting its stride 
and intends to end up at the top of the 
list in both leagues. 

Mendez, flashy forward for the Tank, 
is one of the six highest scorers in the 
city. 

The team suffered a set back when Sil- 
verthorne, first string forward for the 
Tank, fractured his arm in the Green Spot 
game January 31, 1940. Mendez has been 
shifted to Silverthorne's position and Parks 



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excellent shape. 

C. H. Choate, Tank. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Clemens 
January 2 5th at 1:01 a.m. a daughter, 
Kathleen O. Clemens, who weighed just 
6 lbs. 2 oz. According to reports all are 
domg nicely, including the father. 



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Free parking at Jones Service Station across the street 



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18 



Consolidator 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

As we go to press we get a flash that 
. the most dependable member of the 
airways, except the PBY's, the single 
motored amphibian "Stork" has been 
forced down for a complete overhaul job 
due to the excessive flying hours for the 
craft to meet February deliveries. Re- 
cipients of cargoes in the form of "bounc- 
ing baby boys" were the Jimmy Syrens, 
Craig Clarks, and Eddie Generas, the 




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latter getting the "jackpot" with an 8- 
pounder. Calculations were a little off 
from the "income tax standpoint" and 
Uncle Sam says their intentions were O.K. 
but January 31st is the deadline for "de- 
pendent deductions." Don't worry fel- 
lows as there may be more for the next 
year. 

Besides babies during the month, we find 
the less fortunates — not completely 
counted out. Roy Coykendall rolled a 268 
game which made him prouder than 
"Father Dionne". Lloyd Bender, Paul 
Gaughen, Don Rasmussen and Louis Pur- 
cell, newcomers, are working the night shift 
which their wives claim is a little incon- 
venient but at least gives them the knowl- 
edge of where "hubbies" are (for their 
benefit the shift is over at 12:30). Kel 
Aiken reports that Barney Chambers, al- 
though new to Consolidated, is surely 
making his mark in the plant, and for evi- 
dence you can find his footprints in the 
new concrete by the stockroom. The lad 
probably thought he was at the "Grau- 
man's Chinese". Freddie Rosso, who always 
manages to make "headlines" (although 
the last time it cost him 43 bucks) is sec- 
retly planning on copping the title of 
"Ferdinand No. 1" with that "exotic" 
sweet-smelling and gorgeous flower 
garden. Dropped in on Bill Liddle the 
other night and was treated to a sparkling 
bottle of ice cold beer. Better get the ad- 
dress and drop out fellows for the novelty 
of that kind of hospitality may not long 
endure. It is true that Bert Gimber put a 
nickel in the music box at the Aircraft 
Cafe but he was playing for the "jack- 
pot" and thought he might get the records 
for Elizabeth. "Lil Abner" Gandee re- 
ports that "Pappy Yokum" Holcomb has 
things going as smooth in the Machine 
Shop as "Dogpatch" itself after they got 



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SERVICE; 



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rid of the Skunk Hollow Agitators. 
"Lonesome Polecat" Golem claims Hol- 
comb is an expert at locating the various 
colored travelers as he can look through 
or over his glasses with equal precision. 
George Young is trying to do the city out 
of an obsolete traffic signal with "Stop" 
and "Go" to inform Wilkinson, Seeley, 
Doer, Waite, and Edwards the status of a 
job from his desk. We have read several 
statistics of athletic feats in 1939 but 
have not yet seen Ed Kellogg's famous 
slide across Broadway on the records. 
Perry Ogden is having the same trouble 
as F.D.R. in balancing his "order budget." 
About the only fact he can get is Hart- 
mayer's report that "on a good day we 
should have the box filled by noon." Ted 
Anderson entertained those "city slicker 
card sharks" Mulroy, Miller, Butterfield, 
Clemson, Wiley and Ambrose at his new 
home and from the worried look on his 
"pan" one of the fellows must have the 
"mortgage on the old homestead." Jimmy 
Wainwright informs me that they are go- 
ing to put a leading edge on the PBY's 
after all. We were a little worried that 
slashing the budget appropriation may have 
knocked Herb Ezard out of this work. 
The best part of Dan Miller's new work 
in Purchasing, he claims, is to be able to 
chew the fat with Golem and Nelson non- 
chalantly talking in the million figures. 
Those Comolidaton who have not joined 
the N.A.A. are missing some real treats, 
the last one being Commander Rosendahl 
who with Commander Mayer, head of the 
Navy Inspection Department of the plant, 
are two of the world's most able authorities 
on "lighter than air" crafts. Go down next 
time, knock three times, and say that 
"Brad" sent you. 

Latest reports from the "Planning bat- 
tlefront" was that Tool Design under the 
strategic Von Doren, had moved up on 
all fronts but "Sergeant" Bob Jones and 
his Plant Engineers were holding ground 
with a series of counter-attacks from the 
north. Completely disorganized "Captain" 
Bill Ring and his Production Engineers 
were fleeing in disorder toward the safety 
of the "X" building. The Production 
forces of "General" Perry Ogden and 
"First Lieutenant" Lloyd Bender were sev- 



A. J. Edwards says "Drive a car with 

a built-in tall wind" 

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UNIVERSITY MOTORS 



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March, 1940 



19 



ered and like the Russians in Finland were 
wandering aimlessly over "Planning no- 
man's land" trying to figure out the loca- 
tion of their strongholds. In the "north- 
west corridor" "Dictator" Paul Hoch and 
his aide Bill Holman have gathered their 
troops behind barricades of files for a last 
stand. "Commander" MacDougal without 
an army is cornered in the southwest un- 
able to advance or retreat. 

Lucky for Ed Generas that he is already 
practically "hairless" as he adds to his 
troubles day by day. Last month a new 
baby boy and now he takes over the duties 
and "grief" of Bill Liddle's job. (Bill 
(Little Daniel) is being tossed into the 
"den" of Bill Rennison and Bob Mussen, 
with those three "femmes" the only con- 
solation) Generas says that he is now in 
the worst fix since he got married. 

Lloyd Bender presented me with some 
swell fresh water fish a short time ago and 
after I learned the story of the hardships 
that this super-fisherman along with Geo. 
Newman and Roy Smeltzer endured for 
the catch I should have preserved them 
for trophies. The man at the boat house, 
Roy knew, had a day off so no boat, but 
this did not stop the "perfect host" who 
used the "touch system" down to his last 
"buck" to get the craft and further con- 
vincing the attendants that the biggest 
"fish" are on the shore. The "ripples" of 
the lake also played havoc with that old 
mariner Bender, who seems to have lost his 
"sea legs," misplacing his stomach, and 
the only remedy handy being those "slimy 
mud suckers" which didn't help. The catch 
was good but most of the "brain food" 
to adorn the Bender table in the future 
will probably come from the corner "fish 
market." 

Out La Jolla way I stopped in to see 
Prof. "Chuck" Hibert and found Ernie 
Johnson also visiting, but if there was a 
drop in the house "Chuck" can surely 
keep a secret, as Ernie and I stopped for 
a soda after leaving. "Chuck" showed me 
his "Den" or what was before the children 
took over. The visit was cut short due to 
the "fuss" because Mrs. Hibert refused to 
let "hubby" go to play the pinball machine, 
which according to "Chuck" is such good 



^.939 FIFTH AVE,>> 



■•S&H" 

STAMPS 
GIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES 

for MEN ^zt':':,'^i^Ver'''' 



^5 



fun when the big "American flag" lights 
up. "Oh Goody!!!" 

Consolidated Rod and Reel Club award- 
ed the prizes for the "Catches" during the 
season and again that "master fisherman" 
Roy Coykendall came through with most 
of the "booty". Thurber. Landsburger, 
Hopman, Al Johnson and Lou Miller were 
other winners, Lou with that "Three sea- 
son old" Croaker that he weighed accord- 
ing to a reliable source, with the sandbag 
sinkers. 

TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Magu/re 

March Winds are blowing, so I guess it's 
time for "Tid-bits." 

We're sorry to report that Marcella 
Holzman has been ill for a week and hope 
that she's back before this goes to press. 
We miss her cheery "Good Morning." 

Bob Van Doren, son of J. W. Van 
Doren, last week passed out chocolate 
cigars at school. The reason may be found 
on page 20. Mr. Van Doren says, "Wanted 
— name for pinto colt, about two weeks 
old. Free Marble game for best name sub- 
mitted." Wes Kline please note. 

Le Maire ("Lem") we're sorry we ever 
said anything about your sore arm, after 
seeing the picture you brought in of your 
"kill" in Mexico. A swell brace of birds. 
See picture page 20. 

Roy Smeltzer now has a phone. If you 
don't believe, it ask George Gerstmeier. 

Bert Rowan is no longer "Hull", he's 
now "T.D." Glad to have you, Bert. 

C. Smith, our San Diego to Los Angeles 
Commuter wants to "do" Tia Juana — 
But you'd better take Bob Hyder with you. 

The Department is moving — again! 



FOR 




GRACIOUS 
in San Diego 



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Apartments from S5.00 daily 

DINING ROOM 
open to public 

LUNCHEONS — DINNERS 

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SPECIAL EVENTS 

Facilities for all types of 

parties, catering, dancing. 

Phone Main 0161 

Ash Street at 7th 

THE El CORTEZ 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



GUN CLUB X'S 

By H. M. Prior, Sccrctary-Trcasiircr 

During the first month of 1940, we of 
the Consolidated Aircraft Gun Club have 
welcomed into our ranks as new members 
Elden E. Carpenter, G. C. Hammet, C. T. 
and E. A. Earnest, who are giving our old 
"Dead Eye Schnaubelt" a run for his 
money among the night crew shooters. 

In the regular day crew contingent, we 
welcome J. E. Schreiner, who is also a 
mean shot with a bow and arrow, Fred 
Evans and Mr. and Mrs. Chet Sheppherd. 
Incidentally, Mrs. Sheppherd is plenty 
good in anyone's league. 

The honor of being the first to win one 
of our new club emblems is divided be- 
tween Chet Sheppherd and Felix Kallis. 
From the score to date, for the month 
of February, the battle for the gold medals 
in both rifle and pistol shooting is going 
to be a tough one, and the results will not 
be known until the last shot has been 
fired on February 28. 

To any new men at Consolidated we 
extend a welcome to join our club, and 
attend our weekly shoots held every Wed- 
nesday night at 7 at the Stanley Andrews 
Co. Sporting Goods store on Third Ave., 
between B and C. 

See Our Ads and Save! 




hom'e ownership 



be 

thi 

is 



sure 
! title 
INSURED 



The small, single premium 
for a Union Title Insur- 
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to pay for the protection 
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enjoy from the countless 
hazards that may threaten 
your citle to land. 

@^ Trust Compflj 



SECOND AVENUE |i;J|ij,| JAMES D FORWARD 
AT BROADWAY 



SAN I £ e O 



C A L r F O R ^ 



20 



Consolidator 




NE'W'S & VIEVC'S AMONG CONSOLIDATORS 
1. First-Haif Champions: The Hull Team: Stand- 
ing, left to right, V. Gilmore, S. Shepard, E, 
Bell and J. Kinkle. Bottom: R. White, T. John- 
son, N. Heckeroth. J. Look was absent when 
the photo was taken. Backhaus photo. 



m 



tnce^ 



1935 



SRN DIEGO 
TPXI CnBS 
HRVE ROLLED 
MILLIONS 
r OFMIL£S 



WE GIVE 

SftH GREEN STAMPS 
" DOUBLE STAMPS 
_ 0« SUN DAYS f 



. -YOU TOO ^ 

' CAN HBVE 

TfiXITREHDS 




2. Action shots of some of the boys putting up a 
tough fight on the basketball court. 

3. Tank Basketballers; Standing, left to right: S. 
Riches, Mgr.; W. Consaul, J. Saftig, Capt.; 
McCann, J. Emslie, M. Mendez. Left to right, 
kneeling: F. Morgan, W. Silverthorne and Krell. 
Photo by Backhaus of Tank. 

4. A word about L. V. Lemaire and the 30 quail 
Lemaire shot in Mexico recently will be found 
in Tool Design Tidbits by Maguire. 

5. Melvin "Knute" Knutson of the Carpenter Shop, 
snapped out at the San Diego Flying Club. For 
a word about "Knute" see Flying Club News. 

6. J. W. Van Doren, Tool Design head, has a 
"Rancho" in Chula Vista. Young Bob Van 

"Always the creator of a work is better 
acquainted than anyone else with its hidden 
defects, with its weak points." 



i 




• EYES EXAMINED TERMS 

• GLASSES FITTED ■ 

• GLASSES REPAIRED M. 3203 
506 Bank of America Building Fifth Floor 



Doren is here proudly showing off the ranch's 
latest addition. To hear Van boasting the way he 
has been you'd almost think mama Mare had 
nothing to do with the bringing of the young 
one into existence! 
7. At the San Diego Flying Club: Left to right, 
standing: Bud S. Selenreich, Harry Culver, 
Tommy Paulsulich, Howard MacDonald and 
DeMahy. Kneeling: Left to right: Charlie Cul- 
ver, W. H. Anderson. 

BADMINTON 

Cofisolidafed's Second Annual Badmin- 
ton Tournament will take off in a "two- 
flight" formation on Friday evening, 
March 1st, in the Municipal Gym at Bal- 
boa Park. Those "birds" whose motors 
fail to triumph in the first flight will 
spin into the "B" formation. The events 
being played this year are Men's Singles, 
Men's Doubles, and Mixed Doubles. Many 
new players are entering, providing that 
ever present possibility of "upsets". Ru- 
mors (or propaganda) are spreading to 
the effect that Mendez (Tank Dept.) and 
Aiken (Finished Stock) will be responsi- 
ble for some of the aforementioned up- 
sets. 



BRING YOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 



3050 University Ave. 



1144 Third Avenue 



March, 1940 



21 



SAN DIEGO FLYING CLUB 

Activities at the San Diego Flying 
Club's field known as Grande Vista Air- 
port, have been unusually good consid- 
ering the time of year. 

The club boasts of three new mem- 
bers: Bud S. Seltenreich, of Ryan Aero- 
nautical Co. Inspection Dept., Herbert 
Ruiz, of Sheet Metal Dept., and your 
humble scribe A. H. Davidson of T. D. 

The following members have made their 
first solo recently, M. Kugel, W. H. An- 
derson, Bud Seltenreich, Bill Travis, and 
A. H. Davidson. 

Bud Seltenreich now has 2 5 hours solo 
to his credit since first of December. He 
is from Alaska, where he flew with Star 
Airlines as flight mechanic. 

Bob Goodyear of Engineering who has a 
private license, has soloed the Rearwin, 
and expects to go up for his 2s rating soon. 
H. R. MacDonald also of Engineering will 
be getting his private license soon in the 
2s Rearwin. 

Mr. John J. Hospers, Representative of 
Vought-Sikorsky, at North Island, for 
the past ten years is expecting to take his 
examination for private pilot's license the 
last of this month. Mr. Hospers holds 
Airplane and Engine Mechanics licenses 
and along with Bud Seltenreich has been 
instrumental in keeping the club ships in 
A-1 condition. 

All the ships have recently been re- 
licensed. 

The club is contemplating purchasing 
a new 50 h.p. Piper Cub. The Cub is a 
very popular ship among the members of 
the club and they have decided that there 
is a need for another ship of this type. 

Miss Nita Day's Taylorcraft, and Bob 
Jacquot's Waco are being kept at the field 
now. Jacquot operates his Waco in charter 
service to Lower California. 

Now that the hunting is over Mr. Mel- 
vin Knutson of the Carpenter shop is 
around the field more. "Knute" has his Is 
and 2s ratings (private and flies Rearwin 
a good deal. 

The accompanying photograph shows 
Knutson in his flying togs, ready for ac- 
tion. It is rumored that Knutson, Charlie 
Culver, and B have been very- 

active in providing the members of the 



A TRIAL MEMBERSHIP 


Full privileges for one month 


including Gym and Pool 


all for ^1.50 


Y. M. C. A. 8th and C 



fair sex, who visit the field on week-ends, 
with aerial transportation. Harry Culver, 
club instructor, and Bud Seltenreich have 
been doing their parts in escorting the 
ladies to the ships. 

EXPERIMENTAL NEWS 

Clock 13 34: 

The boys of X department have been 
wondering what happened to that red 
check shirt that Carl Vollmuth used to 
wear. What's the matter, Carl — too much 
kidding? 

The next time there is a nurses' dance, 
we wish Ted Barnes and Fred Brennecke 
would tell the rest of us, rather than go 
alone and have all the fun. 

Clock 8071: 

According to Elmo "Arkansas" Ulmer, 
of the X department, has completely re- 
adjusted himself to city and factory ways. 
He is no longer frightened at factory 
whistles, nor does he look up intending to 
see a stray cow at the sound of a bell. 
Elmo even smiles contentedly at his shoes, 
which he is fully accustomed to by now, 
though he admits his kinfolks had to 
chase him five miles down the pasture 
to catch him when he "test hopped" his 
first pair four months ago. 



DID YOU KNOW . . . 

THAT CONSOLIDATED'S 
XPBY-5A IS THE WORLD'S LARG- 
EST AMPHIBIAN? 



THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF AN 
A-17's RIVET IS 25,000 LBS. TO 
THE SQ. INCH? 



FORD HOTEL 




SHOWER BATHS 
Rates S4 up perW'k 

Close to Consolidated, 

Business/ Shopping and 

Theatrical Districts 

W. B. BASSLER, Prop. 
FR. 2207 • 1135 THIRD AVE. 




Mobilgas 



The Flying Red Horse 

Leads the Field 

Mobilgas 

America's Favorite Gasoline 



GENERAL PETROLEUM 
CORPORATION 



FuiiER pninis 


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2911 Uniuersity Rue. . HillcrBst 3110 



22 



Consolidator 



BOWLING NEWS 

By H. K. Clay 

Three quintets of keglers have the ad- 
vantage in the race for the Consair cham- 
pionship which is now entering the home 
stretch at the Sunshine Alleys. The crack 
Experimental team with Eddie Lang, 
Ward Levere, Russ Wright, Otto Peter- 
hansel and Walt Sherwood in the major 
roles are leading the vanguard with 54 
points won and 26 lost. Second spot is 
held by the Engineers who have a total of 
53 wins and 27 losses while the well-oiled 
Production No. 2 aggregation is in for 
third money with 52 points won and 28 
lost. 

Roy Coykendall, lead-off man for the 



DANCING CLASSES 

New Semester in All 

TYPES OF DANCING 

ACADEMICTUTORING 
START Feb. 1,1940 

RATI IFF ^^"°'°s 

nH I LI I I 1106 Broadway 



Phone F 1197 Jor injormation 




San Diego's BEST 

Place to . . . 

DANCE 

• Grand Music I every wed., fri., 

• Largest Floor I sat.&sun.nites 

RATLIFF'S 

Broadway at 11th 



Production No. 2 quint recently turned in 
a scintillating game of 268 at the Sun- 
shine. Roy started out with eight straight 
strikes and the crowd of fans who saw a 
possible perfect game in the making clam- 
ored for four more and a perfect score. 
The ninth ball hit the pocket for what 
seemed a perfect hit but the ten pin only 
wiggled and failed to fall. This is the high- 
est league game registered at the Sunshine 
in a three-year period and Coykendall 
was presented with a memento by the 
management in recognition of his feat. 

George Clayton of the Engineer's league 
likewise covered himself with glory Feb- 
ruary 6th by turning in an unusual game 
made up entirely of spares. Clayton reg- 
istered his all-spare game the night of 
February 6th. 

An open challenge to the cock-eyed 
world has been hurled by Hal Leppart, 
crack kegler of the Production No. 1 
team and Michael Brooks of the Hull 
No. 1 quintet. These two pin-biffers be- 
lieve that they can take the measure of 
any pair of bona fide keglers registered 
by any industrial concern in the region. 
Not only are they perfectly right in their 
assumption that they are a tough pair of 
keggling artists but it is doubtful if ever 
the challenge is met. We know of only 
one pair capable of giving them some real 
competition and they are with the Ryan 
Aircraft. If Harry Miller and Bill Helmer 
decide to call the Brooks-Leppart ulti- 
matum a huge crowd will be on hand to 
watch the strikes recorded. 

A new name to conjure with has been 



to LEARN TO FLY 

with rp££i9 

TAKE your lessons from our seasoned, licensed 
Instructors as often or as seldom as convenient — 
before or after work or on holidays. Pay 
by the lesson. Free Ground School. 
Southern California's most com- 
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Barnctt Avenue at the Causeway 
ACROSS FROM THE MARINE BASE 
Telephone Bayview 5222 • San Diego 



discovered in the Consair league. Walt 
Sherwood of Experimental has been burn- 
ing up the drives of late and is one of the 
main factors of the leading position occu- 
pied by the Experimental team. When Ed 
Hanzlik went on the night shift Sherwood 
took over his berth and he has more than 
earned his spurs. Starting out with a mean 
of 162 he has built his average up to 171, 
turning in several brilliant series in so 
doing. A couple of weeks ago he came 
through with three games totalling 643 
and he has had two more slightly under 
that mark. 

The National Shirt Shop prize offered 
to the Consair keglers who would bowl 
exactly 30 pins over their average in a 
single game on February 16 resulted in a 
five-way tie with no one hitting the nail 
on the head. Al Ballard, Wallace Tibbs, 
Owen Gandee, Tom Joubert and Tom J. 
Coughlin each missed by one pin. The five 
players are slated to compete further to 
decide the winner. 

The shooting of the Raw Material team 
has been a bit ragged so when Tom 
Joubert turned in a 219 game on the 
night of the 16th of February, Bob Marks 
and other members of the team howled 
with glee. Not only did they accuse 
Joubert of laying down in the past but 
declared the aforesaid player had better 
strut his stuff to the same tune in the 
future. In any event Joubert had a 515 
series which marks a turn on the Joubert 
barometer. 

The Purchasing team went on a scoring 
spree the night of February 2 in their 
match against Production No. 2. They 
took all four points from the latter outfit 
and set up what purports to be a record 
for Consair. Paul Hoch tallied a 526, 
Frank Field registered three games for a 
488 total, Eddie Jones amassed 514 pins 
while Frank Meer had 62 5. Frank Cary, 
the Purchasing anchor-man toured the 
layout for a 598 total giving his team 
games of 922-974 and 865 for a grand 
total of 2761. 

The leading Experimental team likewise 
have posted unusual series in their quest 
for the Consair gonfalon. On January 2 5 
the hard-hitting quint had a team series 
of 2679 pins with every player on the 



# Bowl for Fun 
and Health 

SUNSHINE BOWLING ALLEYS 

624 Broadway 



March, 1940 



23 



team breaking the 500 mark. Lang had a 
5 52, Levere 506, Peterhansel 520, Sher- 
wood 575 and Wright 526. This is the 
first time that five players on a team have 
each cracked 500 the same night. 

Tom Coughhn of the Engineering de- 
partment has been publicly acclaimed for 
his activities in the bowling game and the 
good that the game has received as a re- 
sult of his organization of the Engineers' 
league which has operated at the Sunshine 
for the past three years. A local sport 
paper praised Coughlin unstintingly and 
placed him high on a Hst of seven local 
sportsmen to whom are given credit for 
the local boom in bowling. 

League Standings 

Woti LosI 

Experimental 54 26 

Engineering 53 27 

Production No. 2 52 28 

Production No. 1 49 31 

Finish 48 32 

Hull No. 1 48 32 

Purchasing 44 36 

Hull No. 2 42 38 

Machine Shop 39 41 

Maintenance 37 43 

Tank 30 50 

Final Assembly 23 57 

Raw Material 22 58 

Sheet Metal 18 62 

Engineers' League 

Won Lost 

Loft No. 1 47 25 

Flap 40 32 

Loft No. 2 40 32 

Hull 39 33 

Armament 36 36 

Loft No. 3 36 36 

General 32 40 

Fixed Equipment 18 54 



Home and Lot Bargains 

in 
friendly 

Bird Rock 

distinctive 

La Jolla Hermosa 

Adequate Scenic Homesites in 
sensibly restricted districts at 
prices lower per front foot tlian 
those asked In far less favored 
dlstricts.40, 60,75 and 80 foot lots 
from S500 to $1000; on paved 
streets, all bonds paid. Otfiers 
as low as $250. For full informa- 
tion, see 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



The Pride of Achievement 

The pride of achievement is one of the best 
From the first engineer through all the rest. 
The creative feeling that all of us feel. 
Knowing we too help turn the great wheel. 

Each rivet, each tap helps toward our goal 
As the fire of ambition wc heap on the coal. 
Surely each workman will feel his heart throb 
As he watches the take-off of the newest "X" job. 

And though some work hard, and others work less 
Down in our hearts we really confess 
That if we must work, and it seems that we must, 
While building our ships, we'll build good ones 
or bust! — Aiwiiymoia. 

(Editor's Note: Why be bashful? We'd like to 

know the author of tliis commendable little 

poem.) 



ADVERTISERS IN THE 

CONSOLIDATOR 

DESERVE YOUR SUPPORT, FOR 

THEY HELP SUPPORT YOUR 

MAGAZINE. 




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Phone M-7178 



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OPEN A 
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120 days to pay 

• 

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Sixth Avenue Mezzanine 



We cash your 
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EttabliiKtd 190} 



24 



Consolidator 



So. California Flyers News 

Br Al Griff it b 

After a little over two months of oper- 
ations, flying every night after work and 
Saturday and Sunday all day we have 
flown about eighty hours. 

Joe Havlik of DH Dept. has about 
twenty hours solo time. Ken Smith of FA 
Dept. also puts in his time in the after- 
noons. Pat Dowling of PR Dept. made his 




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first solo hop February 15 th. You should 
have seen his face! One big smile from 
ear to ear. A few minutes later Fred Rob- 
ertson made his also with the same big 
smile when he taxied up to the line. 

In our group we have several more 
nearly ready to solo. Some of them no 
doubt will have soloed by the time this 
goes to press. Among whom are Bill Sutton 
of PR Dept., Tommy Saunders of DB 
Dept., and Bob McGreagor of Lemon 
Grove. Ray Dinson, Isabelle McCrae, Joe 
Hollenbeck and Bill Luffe are pilling up 
their solo time. Bill Durflinger of PR 
Dept., who was our last member, is going 
to catch up as he is doing quite a little 
flying now. 

We had our first ground school last 
week with the repair of a broken crank- 
shaft. Our good friend Roily Tyce of TR 
Dept., also owner of the Tyce School of 
Aviation in Chula Vista, stepped right up 
to our rescue and put the motor right up 
in first-class condition again. 

Each merchant or business represented 
in the Comolidator has placed in his ad- 
vertisement a message of personal value to 
you! A way to save ... a special service 
... an opportunity. Read these messages. 
Then mention the Consolidator. 



A note appended to the following poem 
reads: "To the editor of the Consolidator, 
Dear Sir: As the wife of No. 708 5, may I 
donate this piece of poetry for our mag- 
azine Consolidator?" . . . And the answer 
is, ""You certainly may, Mrs. Robert 
Kelso!" 

READY FOR PROMOTION 

There's going to be a vacancy above you later on, 
Someday you'll find the foreman or the superin- 
tendent gone, 

And are you growing big enough, when this shall 
be the case, 

To quit the post you're holding now and step into 
his place? 

You do the work you have to do with ease from 

day to day. 
But are you getting ready to deserve the larger pay? 
If there should come a vacancy with bigger tasks 

to do. 

Could you step in and fill the place if it were 
offered you? 

Tomorrow's not so far away, nor is the goal you 

seek, 
Today you should be training for the work you'll 

do next week. 
The bigger job is just ahead, each day new changes 

bring — 
Suppose that post were vacant now, could you 

take charge of things? 
It's not enough to know enough to hold your 

place today. 
It's not enough to do enough to earn your weekly 

pay. 

Someday there'll be a vacancy with greater tasks 

to do 
Will you be ready for the place when it shall 

fall to you? 



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WITH 

CHEVROLET, FORD, PLYMOUTH 

Pontiac Torpedo Six and Chevrolet 

Torpedo Chevrolet 

6 Special DeLuxe Difference 

Sedan SI 050 $996 £54 

Tudor $1004 $955 $49 

Coupe $957 $914 $43 

Pontiac Torpedo Six and Ford 

Torpedo Ford 

6 De Luxe Difference 

Sedan $1050 $962 $88 

Tudor $1004 $916 $88 

Coupe $ 957 $895 $62 

Pontiac Torpedo Six and Plymouth 

Torpedo Plymouth 

6 De Luxe Difference 

Sedon $1050 $999 $51 

Tudor $1004 $969 $35 

Coupe $ 957 $919 $38 

When you take into consideration the increased 

re-sole value of a Pontiac cor over the three 

lowest priced cars 

Pontiac Actually Costs Less to Buy and to 
Operate. 



d 




X marks the spot 



— where Blitzkreig Bill decided to buy auto- 
mobile insurance. He spends plenty on that 
1940 super-deluxe double-down-draft job, but 
he never figured he could spare a few sheckels 
for liability insurance. He changed his mind 
fast enough, after that close coll ! The prospect 
of having to turn over one-third of his wages 
for the next fifteen years, to pay a damage 
su't, settled that! Now, as Blitzkreig Bill tools 
along in overdrive, you can bet your buttons 
he's insured. 



SALMONS 8.W0LGaTTm 



information without obligation, 
on all types of insurance. 

OPEN until 5 P.M. Saturday until 12 noon. Evenings by appointment. 



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FRIENDLY 
SERVICE 




Cash Your 
Check Here 

We make arrange- 
ments to offer you 
this convenient 
service without 
obligation. 

Our easy budget terms made 
available to you with only 
your "white slip" as identifi- 
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5 OCEAN RAFTS 



THAT BENSON LUMBER CO. 
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SAN DIEGO'S "Heaven-on-Earth" Climate 



of logs moored in San Diego Harbor, con- 
taining 30 million board feet of lumber to be 
manufactured at our Mill. Width, 52 feet; Length, 1000 feet; Contents, 
6 million feet; Binding chains, 200 tons; Depth below water, 24 feet; 
Height above water, 12 feet; Towed 1000 miles from Oregon. 

. . . owns and operates here the only 
sawmill in Southern California? 

of $250,000.00 is spent right 
here in San Diego, and that our 
annual taxes of $120,000.00 are a great benefit to the City of San Diego? 

. is IDEAL for 
air-drying lumber, 
conceded by government authorities to be the best method? 

. . . from termites by 
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produced in San Diego only by Benson Lumber Co.? 

... is available through the loan and escrow 
department of this 33-year-old company? 



SAN DIEGO HOMES ARE PROTECTED 



FINANCING SERVICE 



BENSON LUMBER C0.*= 

% The Pick of The Trees 








CONSOLIDATED MODEL 32 FOUR-ENGINED BOMBER. (U. S. ARMY XB-24) 



APRIL • 1940 








\-^*Sf-^l 



When 50,000 motorists vote "Standard Leads" — that IS a Round-Upl 
A huge independent survey ot Western motorists showed Standard rates first 
in not one — but SIX great motoring values: In inviting stotions, courtesy, all- 
oround service, clean rest rooms, uniform quality gasoline, and gasoline per- 
formance! 50,000 MOTORISTS CAN'T BE WRONG — PROVE IT FOR 
YOURSELF! 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 



Sr)f<^ /q ^0, " 



STANDARD 



CO N 5 1 1 DP T O R 



Volume 5 



April, 1940 



Number 4 



RESIGNATION 

Released March 1, 1940: 

Coinolidatcd Aircraft Corporation an- 
nounces the resignation of H. E. Weih- 
miller as of February 29, 1940. Mr. Weih- 
miller, who was elected a vice-president 
in December, 1937, was formerly in 
charge of Consolidated'^ Washington office 
as its eastern representative. 

LIKE SON. LIKE FATHER . . . 

Reversing the old saying to read, "Like 
son, like father" we have the news that 
Chief Test Pilot "Bill" Wheatley's father. 
Prof. William A. Wheatley has broken 
into the realm of aviation: On March 1 
he became Director of Schools and College 
Relations for United Air Lines. His em- 
ployment is in line with United's program 
of developing an understanding and favor- 
able acceptance of air transportation in 
the younger generation. 

Said "Bill" Wheatley, Sr., "Air trans- 
portation, economically, civically and 
vocationally is expanding so rapidly it is 
fast taking its place as one of the nation's 
most vital industries. Air transportation 
represents the tempo of the times. It has 
been said that the current decade will be 
known as the "Flying Forties.' This is 
unquestionably true. We live in a fast- 
moving world; it is up to us to move fast 
with it." We welcome Prof. William A. 
Wheatley to the ranks of aviation. 

MUSCLE MEN FUN FEST 

By Stan Marcyan 

The Hillcrest Barbell Club had its spring 
picnic at El Monte Park, Sunday, March 
17. Eight or nine members are our own 
Consolidated boys: Wally Marcyan, 
Johnny LaFanne, Ward Hutton, Ray 
Damon, Bob Gates, Don DeMarcy, Joe 
Fox, Paul Guerin and a few others are on 
the list. Ice cream, ham sandwiches and 
. . . milk were served by their charming 
hostesses. These huskies downed ten gal- 
lons of milk and cried for more. They all 
seemed to eat like birds . . . dainty little 
vultures! 



TROUBLE 

Located throughout the plant, and well 
known to all are the signs which begin 
with the statement, "It is not our policy 
to discharge any person for making an 
occasional mistake . . ." These signs, as 
all employees know, apply to work within 
the plant. These signs are posted to let 
you know that a spirit of fairness will be 
employed at all times. Mistakes do hap- 
pen occasionally in the best of families. 
Sometimes they can't be avoided. 

Less known, however, is the fact that 
this same spirit of fairness will be used and 
applied to mistakes or accidents which 
occur outside of work and may affect your 
work here. For instance: With several 
thousand persons on the payroll, it stands 
to reason that a few of us will occasion- 
ally make a mistake and tangle with the 
law. When such a mistake is made, it quite 
often happens that posting of bail is nec- 
essary, or you spend time in jail. If you 
find yourself in such a predicament, don't 
try to cover it up . . . and don't pay just 
any kind of a bail rate in the belief that it 
is necessary to "cover up" your trouble 
to save your job. Such a procedure may 
saddle an unnecessary burden on you for 
a number of paydays . . . play safe . . . 
phone the personnel office and explain . . . 
people have been in your spot before . . . 
ask the personnel office for advice. It's a 
ten to one bet that the personnel depart- 
ment can help you and probably save you 
both money and worry. Accidents do 
happen ... It is not our policy to dis- 
charge any person for an occasional mis- 
take . . . and you can reach the personnel 
office by phone 24 hours a day. And you 
can think better and do better work 
if you get the load off your chest. 

To the Workers of the Dratv Bench Depf.: 
I wish to thank all the fellow-workers 
of my late husband, for their many acts 
of kindness during his illness, and for the 
beautiful floral offering sent to the services. 
Signed, Mrs. W. F. Freeman. 

Airplane Chicken . . . All wings and 
m.ichinery . . . and no meat. 



ALUMINUM ENGINEER 

San Diego and Consolidated Aircraft 
were honored on March 7th by a visit 
from Dr. E. H. Dix, chief metallurgist of 
the Aluminum Co. of America. On tour 
of the aviation plants, Dr. Dix devoted a 
considerable portion of his day here, dis- 
cussing with plant personnel the problems 
affecting the working and heat treating 
of the aluminum alloys, giving first hand 
information of his intimate knowledge 
on the specialized subject to which he 
has devoted a goodly portion of his 
life. In the evening Dr. Dix was 
guest of honor at a dinner held at 
the San Diego Hotel, attended by 
leading local aircraft officials. At 7:00 p.m. 
Dr. Dix, before a capacity audience of se- 
lected Consolidated, Solar and Ryan men, 
gave a comprehensive illustrated lecture 
on the aluminum alloys, their properties, 
heat treatment, corrosion resistance, the 
effect of cold working, etc. Dr. Dix was 
introduced to the audience by our pro- 
duction manager, D. M. Carpenter. 

Accompanying Dr. Dix on his brief visit 
here were Frederick C. Pyne, Sales Engineer 
of Pittsburgh; W. C. Lynch, Los Angeles 
manager; James Moffatt, district repre- 
sentative, all of the Aluminum Co. of 
America. 

TRAVELIN . . . 

Did you ever stop to think what an air- 
plane is called upon to do? Take one of 
our twin-engined Model 28s for instance: 

Its range, which is the distance it can 
fly without alighting to take on more 
fuel, is more than 4,000 miles. Now com- 
pare this with the performance of your 
car. Just consider what this would mean 
if you applied the same figures to a non- 
stop drive of your automobile. If you could 
average 20 miles to the gallon, this would 
mean that your car's gas tank would have 
to hold 200 gallons instead of around ten. 
In other words, besides carrying its crew, 
the model 28 Is designed to pick up and 
carry along with it, about 20 times as 
much fuel, in proportion, as you require 
your car to carry! 



All communications shou'd be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in part, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., San Diego, California. 



Consolidator 



1939 ANNUAL REPORT 

A portion of Mjjor Fleet's message con- 
tained in the 1939 Annual Report to the 
Stockholders of Consolidated Aircraft Cor- 
poration, is reprinted here because of its 
interest to all Consolidators: 

"... In an unprecedentedly short period 
the company designed, constructed, and 
tested a prototype (XB-24) of a new 
four-engine long-range bomber of unex- 
celled performance for the United States 
Army, and obtained orders for more than 
$12,000,000 of these airplanes, thus mark- 
ing the company's re-entry into the land- 
plane field and resumption of contractual 
relations with a most valued customer. 
As a private venture, the company com- 
pleted and tested a new twin-engine flying 
boat (Model 31) adaptable for operation 
either as a long-range patrol bomber or 
as a 2 8 -passenger transoceanic commercial 
airliner. This flying boat has two decks 
with a large flight control room and eight 
other compartments, and uses the same 
wing and general type of construction as 
the Army bomber. It is equipped with two 
2000-horsepower engines mounting 16- 
foot full-feathering propellers. The en- 
gines and propellers are the largest ever 
manufactured in this country. Another 
product developed by the company during 
the year is a retractable tricycle landing 
gear for the PBY flying boat. This de- 
velopment permits operation of the PBY 
as an amphibian without materially af- 
fecting its excellent performance, and in- 
creases the utility and sales appeal of this 
airplane (Model 28-5A). 

During the past few months, the com- 



pany received contracts from foreign cus- 
tomers for a released version of the PBY. 

At this date, our back-log of business 
is about $49,000,000 which will keep 
us busy until 1941 midsummer; our em- 
ployees number approximately 4,300, we 
are adding about 100 men a week, and are 
operating three shifts. Our products are 
giving excellent satisfaction and our new 
designs are receiving the careful consider- 
ation of our customers. Since organization 
in 1923, we have constructed more than 
three times as many airplanes with a wing 
span of 100 feet or over, as all other Amer- 
ican airplane manufacturers combined, 
and are the largest builders of flying boats 
in the world. 

We announce with regret the resigna- 
tion of Director J. M. Gwinn, Jr., who has 
entered the employ of another airplane 
manufacturing company. 

We record with extreme sorrow the 
death of our friend and esteemed Director, 
George M. Pynchon, Jr." 
Respectfully, 

R. H. Fleet, President. 
San Diego, California 
6 March 1940 

PLASTER SPLASHES 

We are going to miss the Dutchman, 
with his "Hi diddle diddle Sonny Boy." 
Johnny Debs will miss him more than any 
of us. He won't get any more candy. 

We are glad to welcome some new men 
to the shop — Charles Miller, from Lock- 
heed; Emory Seward, from La Junta, 
Colorado, and Glenn Burns, who was 
transferred from Wing. 



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Sixth Ave. Mezzanine 



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pay checks 



Eitiblithid 1909 



SO. CALIFORNIA 
FLYERS NEWS 

By Al Griffith 

We are happy to announce some new 
solo pilots this month: They are Isabelle 
McCrae, Ray Dinsen, of the D. H. depart- 
ment; Tommy Saunders of the D. B. 
department, Bob Sprague of the D. H. de- 
partment. Also some new members have 
been added: Chuck Green of T. B. depart- 
ment. Sid Murphy of Ryan Co. Art La 
Barre of P. R. department. Jack Evans of 
the San Diego Trust and Savings Bank, 
and Kae Griffith. 

Pat Dowling of P. R. and Fred Robert- 
son are checked out now on cross winds 
and Ray Dinsen is also checked out and 
flying regular. 

We have moved our ship to Picks Air- 
port where we do our flight training. Any- 
one is welcome to come out and see what 
we are doing. Among our field activities 
we held a spotlanding contest, flying to 
about 600 feet cutting the gun making a 
180° turn in for a landing over the first 
and before the last marker. Bob Sprague, 
one of our newest solo pilots, was the 
winner of this contest. (Bob Bailey said 
he was robbed.) 

The proceeds from the pool in the con- 
test were used for a party at Al Griffith's 
home. Of course, Kae had a little to say 
about that. 

We now have a swell new radio that 
will be installed in the ship soon, which 
was built by none other than our own Ken 
Smith and his buddy, Billy Luffe, who 
presented it to the club. A word of thanks 
goes to Chuck Taylor also for his con- 
tribution of technical advice. 

The club has a few memberships open 
to men and women who want to learn 
to fly or build up their time inexpensively. 
We plan on night flying and blind flying 
in the near future. For information con- 
tact any member on the field on Saturday 
or Sunday. 

First Pilot: "It makes me cross to be 
told I haven't enough altitude." 

Second Pilot: "It makes me soar, too." — 
Bee-Hive. 



Learn to Dance Well 

Special Private Lesson Rates 
in Ballroom Dancing 
6 PRIVATE «5 00 
^ LESSONS 4)3-"" 

Consair Club Class Lessons, including one 
hour lesson ond I Vl hour Practice Dancing 
only 50c. Wed., 8 to 10:30 P.M. 
Classes forming for Children ond Adults in 
All Types of Dancing. Rates in Reach of All 

HEMPHILL'S 

SCHOOL OF THE DANCE 

1039 7th Ave. F. 5750 & 1740 Upas. J. 9458 



April, 1940 




AND still they come. Latest feminine 
.additions: Maxine Bennett, Glada 
Wright, Margaret Stafford, Evelyn Par- 
kins, and Ruth Sears. 

Having a new nephew arrive when the 
Consoliilafor news is due is hard on the 
column. Try scouting around for news 
when you're debating whether a new 
member of the family looks like Clark 
Gable (without his mustache) or Mickey 
Rooney. Said nephew tipped the scales at 
6 lbs. 4 oz. He answers to the name of 
Michael Leroy Harbert and made his ap- 
pearance on March 12. 

By this time, Lucille Fisher and Lorine 
Mounce will be streamhned. They didn't 
worry themselves thin, it's their nine-day 
diet that did the trick (guaranteed to take 
off ten pounds in nine days). Lucille has 
her eye on Ann Howard's red velvet 
dress, size 12, and Lorine is seriously look- 
ing over Mary Nugent's wardrobe. 

Evelyn Kells took a plane ride the other 
noon and her stomach is still looping the 
loops. Looking at the ocean upside down 
would make anything loop. 

Hope that by the time this is read 
Marcella will again be contributing to the 
lunchroom conversation. We surely miss 
her. Brenda Fottrell is another one on 
our sick list, and she'll have an appendicitis 
operation to discuss when she returns. 

Life is just one darned thing after an- 
other; love is just two darned fools after 
each other. 

And there's the Dumb Dora who thinks 
a man's untold wealth is that which he 
doesn't reveal to the income tax collector. 

We now find that the little man who 
wasn't there eats "ghost toasties" for 
breakfast and has the hole in the doughnut 
for dessert. 

What did the little toe say to the big 
toe? "Don't look now, but I think there's 
a heel following us." 



OPTOMETRISTS 

i EYES EXAMINED TERMS 

i GLASSES FITTED ■ 

. GLASSES REPAIRED M. 3203 



What did one eye say to the other? "I 
think there's something between us that 
smells." 

What did one hat on the shelf say to the 
other? "You stay here. I'm going on 
ahead." 

What did the ceiling say to the wall? 
"I'll meet you at the corner." 

Confucius say: Puppy love is the start 
of a dog's life. 

Aunt Kathleen. 

MUSIC MAKERS 

"IN THE GROOVE . . ." 

Confucius say: "Man play music, make 
everybody happy." 

More than two dozen Comolidated em- 
ployees believe this wise old Chinese say- 
ing, so you can be expecting anything 
from Beethoven to Irving Berlin some of 
these days. Yes, sir — and can they swing 
it, too? AND HOW! 

The gang has been rehearsing at Thearle 
Music company, and reports are coming 
in that the boys are really "in the groove." 
Of course the expression "the more the 
merrier" holds true even with such a fine 
ensemble as our orchestra, so why don't 
all of you who play any instrument, 
whether violin, drums, accordion, or any- 
thing else call the Personnel Office and line 
up with a really worth-while and enjoy- 
able group? 

E. G. Borgens. 



SMND RADIO GO. 

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Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Bussey, 
at just 12:30 a.m. on February 21st, little 
Miss Elizabeth Ann Bussy . . . weighing 
6 pounds, 1 1 oz. Congratulations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lon F. Tubbs, Jr., proud- 
ly announce the birth of a boy, weight 
8 lbs. 6 oz., at 7 a.m. on March 15. Con- 
gratulations. 




RUG SALE 

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BROADLOOM REMNANTS 

O TO 6 5 OFF ' 

9x12 Imported Rugs $16.95 

Ddvidson 



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Ford, Mercury, Lincoln-Zephyr Dealer 
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HORSE-PLAY .... 

"Horse-play" is defined as rude bois- 
terous play. The results are accidents, loss 
of efficiency, pain and loss of income for 
the worker. 

Recognizing the importance of the pre- 
vention of horse-play on the job, the 
compensation laws of the State of Cali- 
fornia fix a penalty on the results of horse- 
play. The penalty is that an injury occur- 
ring as a result of this kind of accident is 
outside the scope of employment and is 
therefore non-compensable. 

Industry recognizes the seriousness of 
this form of sport in that the fellow who 
habitually practices horse-play is rated as 
a poor employee, a problem, and a hazard 
to the job. In fact, he is an undesirable; 
and he will find that as time goes on, if 
he persists in this type of fun, he will 
have no place in the present-day industrial 
picture. It would seem that this is a heavy 
price to pay to gratify the desire to get 
the laugh on a fellow employee, to get his 
""goat", or to see him suffer in silence, or, 
as sometimes happens, to see him blow up 
and, in all probability, injure a fellow em- 
ployee not connected with the horse-play. 

SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



32nd and University 
30th and El Cajon 




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San Diego. May we help you? 



EVERYTHING '" BtllBINO- 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

41 !8 Unlveriily ■ Oceaniidc • El Ceniro 



BENCH NEWS . . . 

Jack Fleck and Cap are two big shots 
now . . . They grab their rifles on week- 
ends for target practice. 

Chester Dudzinski has been doing a lot 
of worrying over a certain pink paper a 
man on a motorcycle gave him the other 
night. No. 2930. 

Hobbies? Some of the boys and their 
hobbies: Dave Wilkinson, Bicycle repair- 
ing; Benny Kiegle, kite flying; Teddy Ed- 
wards, staying home; Owen Harder, de- 
bates with the police; Albert Hagel, wine 
inspection; Al Opolski, repairing the ticks. 

Sh-sh! This is a secret: Carl Sherrer has 
set the date for his trip to the altar. 
Cigars and beer soon, boys. 

Albert Hagel and Herman Dietzel are 
getting the wine barrels ready for the 
coming grape harvest. 

Frank Bailey has quit prospecting due 
to the fact he has not been able to catch 
that Doodle bug. 

SHEET NEWS 

Swede Nelson has opened a malt shop 
at Mission Beach. Lots of luck. . . . The 
boys will be glad to hear that Harold 
Ferguson has bought a set of tools. . . . 
Why does Walt Borg have that satisfied 
look. Maybe it's has new hide-away? . . . 
Tex Hatch is planning on selling his Ford 
to the Navy for laying down smoke 
screens. ... It looks like wedding bells 
for Bill Sherriff. . . . the real thing this 
time. . . . Red Kimble and William 
Wrigley have signed Dizzy Dean, thanks 
to Spearmint. 

News Flash: It's a boy at the John 
Sevenson's. How about cigars, John? Con- 
gratulations. . . . (Hand in your Sheet 
Dept. news to Mike Allianneh or yours 
truly, H. B. Millman.) 



/ 



■ LV Over the Highways 
On a 1940 

HnRLEV-DnUIDSOn 




W. J. RUHLE 

929 India Street San Diego 

Write for Catalog 
Open to 8 p. m. Terms 



April, 1940 



WING KEYHOLE 

By Broil' lie 

We hear Frank Heidemann is coming 
on nights to take charge of Army Flats. 
Frank is a very capable man and has been 
climbing towards the top ever since he 
entered Caiisair in 1936. 

Gil Lance is sporting a new Oldsmobile. 
We hear the price of goat's milk has gone 
up. Has this any bearing on the purchase 
of the new car, Gil? 

If Jack Maier, Wing Inspection, doesn't 
stop bumping his head on Wing center 
sections, we will have to raise them higher 
off the floor, so that Jack can pass under 
with ease. 

We are sorry to learn Ed Brendza was 
rushed to Mercy Hospital for an appen- 
dicitis operation. 

Scotty and Vic, Wing Inspection, are 
certainly stepping around these days, lin- 
ing their inspectors to go over the top 
when the big rush comes. Good work, 
gentlemen. 

Joe Saunders is back on the Leading 
Edge gang again after spending several 
months chasing tools. Welcome back. 

Limey is still in love with the horses. 
Honey Chile recently paid Limey 41 to 2. 
Sounds like a good bet. 

Steve Smyczyosky, Jr., has finally re- 
ceived his new set of Bar Bells from Phila- 
delphia. He worked out for four hours 
the first night and practically exhausted 
himself for the next two days. 

Steve Smith, when told a Confucius 
saying recently remarked, "You know 
what Mohammed say: Confucius talk too 
damn much." 



FLOWERS . . . 

Next time you take an auto trip to the 
mountains and see a forlorn person sitting 
by the road with his head in his hands, be 
prepared for a car-sick young man who 
couldn't take the winding turns in the 
road. On a recent visit to Palomar Mount- 
ains, Johnny Flowers had Jack Gott stop 
the car four times on the way up and as 
many times coming back. During said 
stops Johnny found time to restore his 
sudden green complexion back to its 
natural color. No. 649. 

We are sorry to note here the passing 
of our friend Wm. F. Freeman of the 
Draw Bench Dept. who died on Feb. 2 5 th. 



Mmm / 

Try the most 
delicious, juicy 

Roast Beef 

in town 

3DjZ' 



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oiaan 5 



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San Diego, CaliFornia 



luuER pninTS 






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Seuenth Hue. and F St. . 


main 0181 




2911 UniUBrsitv Hue. . Hillcrest 3110 




with Bud Landis 



They say there's nothing new under 
the sun — except maybe a couple of 

freckles. 

• • • 

But yet the stork keeps on flying 
the regular routes with a strong 
wind to his back. 




That famous old birth bird has just 
delivered a pair of twins to brighten 

our lives. 

• • • 

The new arrivals are really a couple 
of gasolines which, even at such a 
tender age, are turning out to be 
child prodigies. 

• • • 

One's named Super- Shell — a chip 
off the old block with modern im- 
provements. 

• • • 

The other's called Shell Premium. 

• • • 

Shell Premium contains Alkylate — 
which has nothing to do with the 
stuff that was so prevalent during 
the 18th Amusement. 

• • • 
Alkylation is the most startling de- 
velopment in refining history. It 
made possible super-octane gaso- 
lines. 




Your neighborhood Shell Dealer 
will gladly introduce you to the 
new and lusty youngsters. 

• • • 
You'll find them two good gasolines 
made even better — and the extra 
performance costs you no more. 



Consolidator 



NOW/ 

Every NOW and then something MUST BE 
DONE to move out from under a load — NOW 
is the time with HILTON MOTOR CO.— NOW 
is the time for YOU to cash in. In every ad 
in the paper you find a reason for a bargain 
and we assume they are — HOWEVER WE can 
make this statement without fear of contra- 
diction: NONE have been more carefully 
checked and reconditioned — ALL of our re- 
conditioned cars MUST PASS 58 inspections 
before we offer them for sale — So NOW we 
find we have many models on hand of the 
latest makes that we MUST dispose of — to do 
this, one thing we are sure of — PRICE WILL 
MOVE THEM— So NOW we offer you both 
price and condition. 

Below are listed a few of our many bargains 
that MUST BE SOLD: 

NOW 

39 Zephyr Sedan— Radio $1195.00 

39 Ford Deluxe Sedan— Radio $695.00 

38 Ford Deluxe Sedan— Radio $595.00 

37 Ford Deluxe Sedan— Radio S449.00 

36 Ford Deluxe Sedan— Radio $390.00 

39 Ford Deluxe Coupe— Radio $679.00 

39 Ford 85 Coupe $597.00 

39 Ford 60 Coupe— 6,000 miles $599.00 

38 Ford Deluxe Coupe— Radio $539.00 

37 Ford Deluxe Coupe— Radio $439.00 

36 Ford Deluxe Coupe— Radio $329.00 

35 Ford Deluxe Coupe $225.00 

39 Ford 85 Tudor— Radio $595.00 

38 Ford Deluxe Tudor— Radio $549.00 

37 Ford Deluxe Tudor— Trunk $419.00 

38 Ford 60 Tudor— Radio $497.00 

37 Ford 60 Tudor $347.00 

36 Ford Tudor (New Paint) $297.00 

35 Ford Tudor (New Paint) $199.00 

HOUSE CARS 

40 Ford Cabriolet 40 Ford 85 Bus. Coupe. 

40 Mercury Sedan 40 Ford Deluxe Sedan. 

At Big Discount. 

OTHER MAKES 

39 Plymouth Deluxe Coupe $597.00 

37 Plymouth Deluxe Coupe $449.00 

38 Plymouth Sedan $539.00 

35 Packard Sedan $375.00 

38 Pontiac 6 Coupe $597.00 

37 La Salle Sedan $645.00 

37 La Salle Coupe $567.00 

38 Chevrolet Deluxe Sedan $579.00 

36 Chevrolet Deluxe Tudor $337.00 

35 Chevrolet Coupe $217.00 

STATION WAGONS 

39 Ford Deluxe, t-wo to choose from, 

Radio $895.00 

38 Ford Deluxe, two $695.00 

37 Ford Deluxe $545.00 

36 Ford Deluxe $425.00 

MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM 

HILTON 

MOTOR CO. 

Authorized Ford-Mercury-Zephyr Dealer 

1202 BROADWAY 

FR. 5121 



SOARING AND GLIDING 

By Jerry LitcU 

At the annual meet of the Associated 
Glider Clubs, the public saw soaring the 
first day. The wind was the usual light 
westerly, and gliding the second day, 
when the wind was "conspicuous by its 
absence." Reports indicate, however, that 
the blase San Diegans who have become 
accustomed to the sight of the same two 
or three sailplanes cruising back and forth 
in apparent monotony, enjoyed watching 
the many take-oflfs and landings and the 
opportunity of inspecting the latest types 
of American sailplanes at close range. 

Highlights of the meet: The amazing 
performance of Hank Stieglemayer, who 
soared a Baby Albatross for an extra fif- 
teen minutes, mostly below the airport 
and, unable to land on the field, ducked 
into a canyon, slid up the side of it and 
lit like a bird in the sagebrush near the 
top without scratching the ship! 

On hand were beautifully finished 
Woolcott secondary glider with sailplane 
performance, the new taper wing Briegleb 
(showing what Steve Kesches will be fly- 
ing in a few months) — the Bowlus two- 
place, (made by simply inserting an ex- 
tra section in the middle of a Baby Alba- 
tross nacelle to accommodate the second 
seat and control) and the high perform- 
ance craft, the gull winged "Lanonia" 
owned by John Robinson which drew 
much attention, though it has been seen 
soaring here in San Diego for the last 
eight months. George Palmer, formerly of 
Comolidatcd, showed his newly finished 




Top: A few of the spectators at the Glider- 
Soaring meet. Center: At the foot of the clitfs a 
few of the motorless planes landed safely, which 
is an alternative when the wind "lets you down." 
Below: Dick Essery and Harvey Stephens. Essery is 
president of the local club; Stephens prominent in 
the air of sailplaning, and a motion picture actor. 
Pictures by Victor Korski, Hull Dept. 

2-place sailplane which created much com- 
ment by its smooth Ys" plywood cover- 
ing for both its highly tapered wings and 
sharp-nosed fuselage. And then there was 
the Super-Albatross from San Fernando, 



uout5 ^ot tne diking 

*** IRGE PLHn BOOK *** 

18 PICTURES AND FLOOR PLANS 

Of Five and Six Rooms 

SELECTED FOR STYLE AND CONVENIENCE 

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Drive out El Cajon Blvd. to Rolando Blvd. (65th St. ) 

While there Inspect this Newest and Fastest Growing Community 

Your Friendly Neighbor May Be a Consolidator 

Homesites as Low OS $400.00. * Terms if Desired. 




6525 El Cajon Boulevard 



Talbot 2171 



April, 1940 



seen for the first time in San Diego, an 
ultra streamlined, perfectly symmetrical 
midwing job with the characteristic boom 
sail also lowered. Woody Brown is to fly 
it at the Arvin meet. 

Of visitors, we mention: 

Major Fleet, who spoke over the P.A. 
system — "I think that soaring is the most 
wonderful sport, and I cannot under- 
stand why, with the facilities at hand, 
more young people do not take active 
part . . . will be up here myself someday 
and get an hour of soaring." Leo Bourdon, 
Welding Dept. chief, enjoyed a short 
soaring flight the first day of the meet. 
Mr. Fowler, inventor of high lift devices 
for airplanes, showed interest in the 
"spoilers," low lift gadgets for sailplanes. 
Phil Koenig, Tool Dept. head, took a 
"movie" from the rear seat of the Asso- 
ciation's "Grunau." And there was test 
pilot Bill Wheatley, and lots of others. It 
looked like a Cwisolidafed picnic. 

So, the meet was a success. An estimated 
2000 saw 15 modern American sailplanes 
perform. Our guests from Los Angeles 
enjoyed our facilities and the meet started 
our own soaring season off with a bang. 
Writing here in the clubhouse, I can see 
five planes out at the ridge, and already 
more than a hundred spectators are lining 
the field. Come out and enjoy a Sunday 
afternoon at our glider port. You'll like it! 



ROD AND REEL CLUB 

New officers for 1940 were elected by 
the Coinolidafcd Rod and Reel Club at 
their last meeting: Ronnie Miller, Pres.; 
Roy Coykendall, V.-P.; Johnny Hopman, 
Treas.; Milton Hangen, Sec, and L. Mc- 
Giffen, Sgt. 

Russ Kern and Brad Bradshaw were 
named to handle publicity. Every em- 
ployee of Consolidated is eligible. Com- 
plete data concerning the organization can 
be had from Connie Seaderquist, Bert 
Naseef, Henry Galem, Army Armstrong, 
Chris Englehart, Bert Freakley, Walter 
Beyer, Otto Peterhansel, Glenn Hotchkiss, 



Jimmy Wilkinson, Jack Thompson, Carl 
Gilchrist and Charles Hibert. 

Confucius' brother say Confucius talk too 
damn much. — Bee-Hive. 



LINDBERGH FIELD CAFE 

Administration Building 
Lindbergh Field 



"The Home of Jlviation" 
BREAKFASTSERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 




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Conveniently Located— Ample Free Parking 



JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and Aih St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 6168 




•yj; 



Buy'Vbur Spring 
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Choose your new suit from com- 
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packed with every new style idea . . . 
features you expect to find only in 
higher-priced clothes. Compare and 
Save $10. 

Charge It! Pay 1/3 each month 



(H^*^ 



SAH DIEGO, 5th & BROADWAY 




8 



Consolidator 



THE HULL TRUTH 

Br "Chuck" Farrell 

MR. and Mrs. M. \V. (Tiny) Lan- 
thorne wish to announce the ar- 
rival, on March Sth at Mercy Hospital, of 
a baby girl, Florence Elizabeth. Weight, 
8 lbs. 14 oz. Mother and daughter are now 
at home and doing very nicely. "Tiny" 
is bearing up very well under the strain 
of back-slapping and handshaking. 

"Dapper Dan" Clemson, of Production, 
has filed his income tax report. Accord- 
ing to his figures, Uncle Sam owes him 
$94.12. He offers, very generously, 10*^^ 
to any one who can do the collecting. 

A recent magazine article states some 
glaciers move only a few feet a year. If 
you ever hear of a match race between 
Shelby Best and a glacier, put your 
money on the glacier. 

Bill Hedgpeth, Night Inspection, has 



FOR' RENT 

Brand New Bungalow Court. 
$29.^0 Just completed. One bed- 
room. Elect. Refrigerator, Inner- 
spring. Located near County Hos- 
pital: Go north on Front to hospital, 
turn right to 110 Dickinson St. 

W. L. SHANKS 



KIRBY'S 

make a special effort to meet the 
needs of Aircraft Workers . . . 
Goodyear Welt, Gro-Cord, or 
Crepe Sole Oxfords, ^^ p^_ 
Black or Brown .... ^Z^»yD 
Goodyear Welts 



K 



Shoes for the Family 
X-Ray Fitted 

IRBY' 

Good Shoes 



S 



SEVENTH AND BROADWAY 

Open Saturday Nites until Nine 



joined the ranks of tennis fans. Bill 
plays a right nice game too — a fact he 
proved to our satisfaction very recently 
on Municipal courts. Efforts are under 
way to start a novice tournament among 
the Night Hull gang. Lou Fischer will 
give you all the details. Lou is also acting 
as coach to those who wish help with 
their backhand. (Who doesn't?) 

Don Davis is all broken out with new 
car rash. He purchased a car Saturday 
p.m., and by Sunday noon had 250 miles 
on the speedometer. Don swears he did 
not even take time out to eat. When the 
boy finds something interesting enough 
to take his mind off of eating, it must be 
good — at least that is the opinion of 
Davis, Sr., of Lofting. (He should know.) 

Bill Box is bowling with Hull No. 2 
team. And he's really good, too, running 
a 3 game average of 146 for his first time 
in competition. That accounts for the 
bright smile on the face of Jim Stevens — 
that, and the fact that his team is way 
out front in the Night league. 

Our newlyweds, Mr. and Mrs. Walt 
Evans, are at home at 3115 Thorn St. 
Walt was ill for a week, but now invites 
his friends to "just drop in any time." 

That hair cut of Al Leonard's was an 
accident. It seems Al went to sleep on 
his front lawn. When his neighbor came 
over to get the lawn mower Al borrowed 
last summer — well, he took advantage of 
a golden opportunity, that's all. At least 
that is the story as "Scavenger" Galley tells 
it. And then, Al has the hair cut to back 
up the story. 

The question is: Was Professor Roese 
giving an imitation of Whistler the artist, 
or the Green Hornet, radio hero? His 
painting of the floor, walls and roof, not 
to mention several tool kits and lunch 
boxes, was very good, but his make-up as 
Green Hornet was perfect. Roese was 
working on a paint-mixing device when 
something went wrong, and a quart or 
two of green primer was sprayed over 
several square yards of Hull department 
and Roese. When the quitting bell rang, 
he was getting a gasoline shampoo and 
rub-down. 



BRING yOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 



BOWLING NEWS 

By H. K. Clay 

The Loft No. 1 quint of keglers emerged 
victorious of the Consair Engineers' bowl- 
ing league which wound up at the Sun- 
shine Alleys recently. The league began 
activities last October and proved to be 
one of the best industrial circuits ever seen 
in action at the Sunshine. The champion- 
ship team is made up of Tom Coughlin, 
Capt., Herb Sharp, Frank Learman, Bill 
Summers and Phil Taber. 

Experimentalists have a sure-fire assort- 
ment of pin-biffers in Eddie Lang, Ward 
Levere, Otto Peterhansel, Walt Sherwood 
and Russ Wright. 

The race between several leading Con- 
sair keglers as to top honors in the March 
1st average list ended with Hal Leppart 
leading the field by the slimmest of mar- 
gins. Hal, who hails from South Dakota 
where he enjoyed first hand instruction 
under the tutelage of none other than the 
famous Jimmy Smith, is anchor-man for 
the Production No. 2 team. He had a 
total of 11,963 pins whereas Mike Brooks 
of Hull No. 1 came in under the wire for 
a photo finish with an average of 180 
having a total of 11,941 pins for the 66 
games. Other leading lights of Consair 
keglers are George Galley 170, Henry 
Myers 177, Frank Gary 172, Walt Sher- 
wood 172, Irving Craig 170 and T. J. 
Coughlin 175. 

Bill Liddle who has a berth on Produc- 
tion No. 1 team set up an all-time Con- 
sair league record for high individual game 
at the Sunshine. In the match between his 
team and the Sheet Metal aggregation 
March 1 5, Liddle found the grooves to the 
lullaby of 275. He had four strikes, then 
a spare and six more strikes in a row. Roy 
Coykendall who bowls with Production 
No. 2 enjoyed the high record this season 
prior to the Liddle feat by tallying a 
sizzling alley-burner of 266. The high 
series mark is held by Bob Zimmerlee, a 
former Consair kegler who pegged three 
games for a total of 75 8. 

"My days of puny scores are through; 
I'll show those birds a thing or two. 
I'll leave 'em trailing in my dust, 
I'll leave the bottom place — or bust." 



3050 University Ave. 



1 1 44 Third Avenue 



Bowl for Fun 
and Health 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

624 Broadway 



April, 1940 



SPORT SHORTS 

By Matt Wiclopohki 

Lack of sustained interest on the part 
of the night shift employees, coupled 
with the fact that the basketball champ- 
ionship was still in pursuit by George 
Wire's Hull and Craig Clark's Production 
teams, caused abandoning the idea of hav- 
ing a night badminton tourney. 

However, the day shift boys have made 
up for what the night fellows lacked. The 
enthusiasm they have shown, the plays 
they have displayed, plus the sportsman- 
ship shown brought the best players to the 
finals. With Johnny Lockwood vs. Mendez 
and Billings vs. Henninger, there will be 
plenty of action. Due to the fact that 
Mendez is the favorite, Lockwood will 
have to fight from the under dog's handi- 
cap to retain the single's championship 
for another year. While interest is looked 
on these boys, we have our money on 
Terry, Billings, Henninger, and a few 
other fine players in the dark horse di- 
vision. 

George Wire's Howling Hull Hawks 
out-basket-balled Craig Clark's Prim 
Point Producers (Production) in two 
previous games. Then in unbelievable 
fashion, the baskets were upset and the 
highest points ended in Production's favor 
on two following occasions. On the 13 th 
of March, Craig led his boys onto the 
court for the fifth and final tussle for the 
so-called championship of the night league 
against George's Gladiators. Although 
the Hull team led at the end of each 
quarter, it took plucky Speed's accurate 
eye, shifty pivoting, fine pass work and 
noticeable team work to end on top of 
the scoring spree for both the team and 
game. 

According to Mr. (Bill) Gilchrist, there 
will be a play-off between the day and 
night shift league leaders (Hull and Pro- 
duction teams respectively) for the All- 
Consolidated championship either March 
30 or April 6. 

The Machine Shop quintet set a new 
record by rolling a total of 2,519 pins 
against Lloyd Bender's Production No. 1 
team. The Bender bowled consistently of 
155 and Rasmussen hit his stride for a 214 
fame. Shelby Best fell down a bit, causing 



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Manager Franklin 7876 



Paul Gaughn to go on with the wind into 
the gutter. 

Thanks to Matt Wielopolski's streak of 
daffy luck when he totaled 5 34 from games 
of 230, 165 and 159; Al Wang helped 
with his constant consistence of 177, 178 
and 180; Vic Racko averaged 141 to do 
his bit, and "Lefty" Glover helping with 
444 pins. But it took Captain Miller's 
grand total of 572 to help Machine Shop 
team with games of 809, 844 and 866. 
Here's a warning to other teams. Two of 
Miller's money men were absent due to 
illness. 

George Wire led the high singles bowlers 
with a 23 5 one week. Closely following 
were Miller, 232; Wielopolski, 23 0; Goss, 



226; Rasmussen, 214; Miller (again), 212, 
and Kent, 210. 

We believe that anyone who is healthy 
and happy, with luck and patience, can 
bowl that exclusive and elusive 3 00 (per- 
fect bowling score.) 



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Officers, San Diego Flying Club. Left to right, seated: Mrs. H. R. MacDonald, Mrs. T. B. Butter- 
field. Standing: H. R. MacDonald, Sec'y-! F- Young, Dinner Comm.; C. W. Hunnaman; Corp. Treas.; 
A. O. Anderson, Social Director; T. P. Butterfield, Pres.; T. Truman, Operations Treas.; H. Culver, 
Flight Instructor; W. Travis, Operations Mgr.; R. Goodyear, Vice-Pres.; and H. LebofFe, Advisory 
Board Member. 



S. D. FLYING CLUB 

By A. H. Davidson 

The San Diego Flying Club celebrated 
its fourth anniversary by having a dinner 
dance in the Sun Room of the San Diego 
Hotel on Saturday, March 16. 

President Butterfield introduced Mr. 
Bert Naseef, former club instructor and 
original organizer, who commented on the 
rapid growth and its fine record of safety 
through four years of operation. 

Mr. Carl Hunnaman, Corporate Treas- 
urer, gave a brief history of the club's 
activities. The club began activities with 
20 members and one Taylor Cub airplane, 
operating from Linda Vista Airport on 
Camp Kearny Mesa. Later, the club 
moved its base of operations to Lindbergh 
Field. About this time, the members pur- 
chased a Porterfield. In order to do this, 
20 more memberships were sold, swelling 
the club to 40 members. After operating 
from Lindbergh Field for about a year, 
the club moved to its present location at 
Grande Vista Airport, located 3 miles 
south of Chula Vista on U. S. Highway 
101. Here the club operated its own field, 
having 3 planes, hangars, and house. 



President Butterfield announced that 
the deal had been closed for the purchase 
of a new Piper "Cub" powered by a 50 
H. P. Continental motor, equipped with 
hydraulic brakes, and dual ignition. "De- 
livery is expected in 3 weeks." 

Two new members were next voted into 
the club. Mr. Jenkins, and Mr. Higdon. 

Then five members of North Parks' Boys 
band rendered three musical numbers, and 
they really could "give out." 

Mr. Harry Culver, Club flying instruc- 
tor, introduced Mr. Archie Atherton who 
gave a talk on parachutes, and opened a 
'chute and explained parts and types of 
'chutes. Movies were then shown describ- 
ing various types of 'chutes, methods of 
using, and testing. 



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April, 1940 



11 



The meeting adjourned then for danc- 
ing. "Wild Bill" Travis, oldest member 
of the club, really knows his dancing, and 
doesn't do bad at yodeling. Harry Culver, 
Carl Hunnaman, Bud Seltenreich, Tommy 
Butterfield, etc., were on hand to help 
closeup in the "wee small hours." 

Tommy Palsulich soloed on March 9, 
and Jack Hoopers has his private Pilot's 
License now, having taken his tests the 
first of the month. He is the last member 
of the club who will take his test for 
private in the 40 h.p. Cub, as all future 
tests will be taken in the 50 h.p. Cub. 
Jack soloed in the 2S Rearwin also. 

And so the distracted dispatcher said, 
"You don't have to be crazy in this busi- 
ness, but it helps like . . .!" 

Mention the Consolidator ... it identi- 
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HULLABALOO 

By Al Leonard 

THE Hull department is proud of its 
championship basketball team. The 
team has just completed a record break- 
ing season in the Consolidated Shop league 
by going through the entire season with- 
out a defeat. To make the record more 
impressive, Hull has won the Shop league 
three years in a row. The players on the 
Hull team are Tommy Johnson, John 
Kunkle, Sam Shepard, Bob White, Norm 
Heckeroth, Ellis Bell, Speed Gilmore, 
Scotty Rutherford and "last but not 
least," Loob. The team was managed by 
Freddie Grossher. 

The "Sudden Death" Hull Golf tourna- 
ments are in full swing again. Jack San- 
tone burned up the course to win a few 
weeks ago and the last tournament turned 
out a couple of co-winners when Jimmy 
Le Clare and Mike Brooks tied to take the 
honors. "Scotty" Doig, the demon handi- 
capper, has all the boys scared to death 
of winning the tournament because of the 
way he cuts the new champ's handicap. 

The only casualty of the last match was 
"Iron Man" Landy, who got himself wet 
under one of the sprinkling systems and 
was laid up for a week. 

Ray Horton, lead man of the South 
Hull "Balcony Boys" has a reputation for 
being very particular about edge distance. 
One of his boys a short while ago drilled 
a hole in his finger. Ray, who was nearby, 
came over to the unfortunate young man 
and asked, "What did you do, drill a hole 
in your finger?" 

"Yes," snapped the victim, "but don't 
worry about it. I've got the proper edge 
distance!" 

George "Scavenger" Galley was highly 
embarrassed the other day. After brag- 
ging for three days about his new car he 
finally got a group of men to go over and 
look at it and admire its powerful motor. 
Was George's face red when he couldn't 
get the car started! 

The boys in Hull were puzzled last week 
when Norm Wire wore his "church goin' " 
clothes to work. The mystery was cleared 
up however when all the boys were sent 
out to have their pictures taken. 



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Professor "Yap Yap" Hopman amused 
a group of Hull folks at a party recently 
by giving a wonderful exhibition of fish- 
swallowing. He insisted that the fish were 
anchovies but any Rod and Reel Club 
member could tell at a glance that the 
fish were recently bsheaded yellowtail 
bait. One of Johnny's favorite tricks is 
lying on his side and clapping his hands 
while catching fish in his mouth from a 
distance of twenty-five feet. 



DANCING CLASSES 

New Semester in All 

TYPES OF DANCING 

ACADEMICTUTORING 
START Feb. 1,1940 

RATI IFF STUDIOS 

nft I Llri 1106 Broadway 



Phone F 1297 Jor injormation 




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GOODRIC 

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905 B STREET 



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dated Employees 



Ooodrich 

Silvertown Stores 



905 B Street Phone F. 6258 



1. Sitb-assemblies of every nature are as- 
sembled in the Bench department. It is in this 
department that trained mechanics are called 
upon to draiL- from their vast store of experi- 
ence and training to assemble the necessary- 
units that are aftern-ards used in the final 
assembly of the airplane itself. Pictured above. 
Bill Waite, Leadman in charge of Riveted as- 
semblies, is checking a Tail Rib assembly sim- 
ilar to the one that E. F. Miller and F. A. 
Scrivani are riveting and drilling. 



2. -The Operations Headquarters for the 
Bench Department centers around the people 
you see pictured above. At the left are Tommy 
Jones and Ted Anderson of Planning. It is 
their duty to see that enough detail parts are 
on hand so that production schedules are met. 
Next in line in the picture is Leadman Teddy 
Edivards who is discussing an assembly -with 
Bench Foreman George Young. At the right 
are Bruce Pohl and Al Rodriguez, department 
clerks. So close are reqttirement and comple- 
tion dates follotved that seldom are they even 
considered outside the department. The Parts 
are just completed on time. 



3. Extreme accuracy of assemblies is nec- 
essary to guarantee inter changeability of units 
at final assembly of the airplane. One of the 
major assembly jobs of the Bench Department 
is the fabricating of the various details which 
make up the Control Column and other units 
of the control system. John Bailey has just 
completed inspection of an assembly he has 
completed while Leadman Henry Doerr checks 
the operation. Both men are veterans of many 
years in aircraft constrjiction and have 
worked on parts of every airplane Consoli- 
dated has built to date. 



BEHIND THE 



EVERY man to his own last" works 
out in fine shape as far as most 
manufacturing units at Consolidated are 
concerned, but in the case of the Metal 
Bench department, it is of importance 
that a large number of men are organized 
into a group which can handle many, and 
in some cases all the "lasts" in the book. 

It is in this busy department, headed 
by George Young, that some of the most 
intricate of assemblies are completed. 
Here one sees sheet metal details, machined 
items, welded units, and riveted sub-as- 
semblies brought together and worked up 
into large assemblies that make up the fur- 
nishings, handling equipment, armament, 
or operating devices which will control 
the flight of the airplane itself. 

The broad scope of work performed 
necessitates a trained personnel that is able 
to rapidly interpret Blue Prints, be able 
to accurately handle hand and machine 
tools, and possess a degree of skill that will 
be reflected in the smooth, and accurate 
finish of the work being produced. 

Today's record-breaking aircraft depend 
on an unbelievable amount of equipment 
that not only is incorporated in the as- 
sembled airplane to permit its control in 
flight or operating purposes, but also that 
used to handle the plane on the ground or, 
if necessity demands, permit the repair and 
adjustment of the craft itself when it 
might be far from its home base. 

In the case of a military craft armament 
is of utmost importance and the old mil- 



itary axiom which states that the winner 
is the one that reaches the objective "first- 
est with the mostest" holds true in the 
air, as well as on the ground. Modern air- 
planes are able to protect themselves with 
the equipment they carry and increased 
speeds attainable with present design 
coupled with new efficient power units 
remove most of the handicaps of slower 
speed. The plane's capacity to gain an ob- 
jective depends upon its ability to carry 
an exceedingly large load of "persuasion," 
and many details of this phase of plane 
building are the work of the "Bench." 

Seats for the pilots and observers pre- 
sent another large amount of work in the 
department. They are designed to be ad- 
justable for several positions and must be 
in shape to permit easy adjustment during 
flight. 

Getting large flying boats in or out of 
the water looks like an easy task but it is 
made to look easy because of the cleverly 
designed and constructed beaching gear 
equipment that permits the rapid change. 
A good many "Bench Hands" are occupied 
at assembling the large units which go into 
their making. 

The formed sheet metal details that 
make up the light-weight, compact welded 
parts are made in the department and 
turned over to the Weld Department for 
weld assembly, then returned to the Bench 
for straightening and further machine or 
hand finishing operations. 

The swagging of control cable terminals 



is another large order handed to the Bench. 
This method of assembly of these Stainless- 
Steel details presented many manufactur- 
ing problems that were new to our in- 
dustry but which were soon worked out. 
Now their assembly along with the special 
processing applied to the cable itself is so 
uniform in operation that their completion 
time never varies. 

The Bench is often called upon to per- 
form overflow work when some other de- 
partment's production demands exceed its 
capacity to meet schedules, or requirements 
are such that work distribution will in- 
crease production efficiency. One such case 
that has become a regular Bench function 
is the matter of producing the assembled 
Trailing Edge Ribs and other sub-assem- 
blies used in the construction of the wings 
themselves. 

To increase efficiency. Machine Tools 
have been added where required. The De- 
partment boasts of its own metal cutting 
shears, punch presses, band saw, arbor 
presses and drilling machines of various 
capacities. This permits the completion of 
many jobs within the department itself 
and eliminates much handling of material. 

To operate an organization of this size, 
which alone is larger than most local busi- 
nesses, requires men with years of experi- 
ence to plan work and see it carried thru 
to completion. 

In the Bench Department group can be 
found many veteran Coiisolidafors who can 
boast of twelve and even fifteen years of 



OLD BENCH 
PICTURE . 



No ivritten words, regardless of detail, 
could tell the story of Consolidated' s growth 
like a few moments observation of the picture 
below furnished to us by Ted Edwards. This 
is the Bench Department of fifteen years ago. 
Some of the men pictured have gone on to the 
grander life but their efforts to move things 
along and their contribution to the company's 
growth will never be forgotten. Many of the 
men are still ivith the company in various ca- 
pacities. The remarkable angle hard to realize 
is that the Bench Department at that time did 
a major share of the hand-work necessary for 
the completion of the airplanes being built 
including Sheet Metal, Tooling, Electrical ac- 
cessories, Welded details. Cable Splicing, Tank 
assembly and practically any other required 
hand-work. And tvhen the boys completed 




these "simple chores" they moved over to the 
Final Assembly floor and assisted ivith the 
final Assembly operations. The Bench Depart- 
ment at that time ivas almost the entire shop. 
Now it has been divided up into several de- 



partments, each specializing in some branch 
of Aircraft construction. From this small 
group of Bench hands Consolidated has grotvn 
until today more than 3 5 00 men are employed 
doing what ^vere once "Bench" operations. 



BENCH 



Su JIcLttu SoQina 



service. Not a few have worked on every 
type of plane built by this company since 
its inception. George Young, Department 
Foreman, has years of mechanical experi- 
ence to draw from. Starting in the auto- 
mobile business he soon moved over to 
the Sterling Engine Co. who were pro- 
ducing aircraft engines. At this time he 
was inspecting their products for the U. S. 
Navy. He soon became connected with the 
Curtiss Airplane and Motor Co. where so 
many early aircraft mechanics got their 
first experience. He spent five years with 
that company before moving over to the 
newly formed Consolidated Aircraft Cor- 
poration. Starting as a bench hand his ad- 



vance to his present position was inevitable 
as present results readily prove. 

He is assisted by Jimmy Wilkinson and 
Warren Seely, who both have envious re- 
cords in the industry. Leading various 
groups are Ted Edwards, Henry Doerr, 
Bill Waite, Paul Schrenk, Harry Roche- 
ville and Gtis Johnson. These men are all 
carrying a considerable responsibility, be- 
cause, during these periods of expansion 
it becomes necessary for them to not only 
see that production flows freely, but they 
must also train new men to produce de- 
tails that meet the strict inspection de- 
mands. 

Any story of the Bench Department 



would not be complete without some men- 
tion of some of the early Coitsolidators 
who can be found working in the depart- 
ment. Among these boys you will find 
Ed Rasp, Otto Dudzinski, Albert Hagele, 
George Egleston, Otto Fink, George 
Keener, Dave Wilkinson, Otto Voss and 
Ernie Reekie. 

But also very necessary are the hundreds 
of men who have come into the industry 
during the last few years and are working 
along doing an important job and becom- 
ing part of an important unit of what is 
to us the most important Aircraft produc- 
ing plant in the world, the home of the 
world-famous Consolidated "R e c o r d 
Breakers." 



6. Thousands of rivets are set in each work- 
ing shift in the Bench Department. This 
method of fabrication is fast and the re- 
sults very satisfactory. The important factor 
is trained personnel and proper equipment. 
Consolidated has both and more. The close-up 
pictured beloiv is the basic operation that all 
aircraft construction centers about, the actual 
riveting of an assembly. Joe Smith and M. H. 
Watt are assernbling the adjusting guides of 
-what will eventually be a pilot's seat. 



4. Certain details of the airplane proper are 
better handled as sub-assemblies. This simpli- 
fies construction and increases production ef- 
ficiency. Warren Seely, Bench Department 
Sub-Foreman, discusses a matter of assembly 
procedure with headman Paul Schrenk. H. D. 
Rocheville who has just completed the item 
shown will afterwards direct his assistants 
according to the decision. In the background 
John Castle is operating a Drill Press, one of 
many small machines found in convenient 
locations about the department. 



2. Jimmy Wilkinson, Bench Department 
Sub-Foreman, Ed Rasp and Inspector Frank 
Morse are shoivn above checking the detail as- 
sembly and operation of a Gear Box assembly. 
Items of this particular character require skill 
and patience with their assembly. Alignment of 
gears and bearings are held to tolerances that 
match anything being manufactured in any 
industry today. It is in the Bench Department 
that the majority of Consolidated's veteran 
employees are found. 



14 



Consolidotor 



ANODIC ANECDOTES 

By Bit/ Nasccf 

From time to time items are turned into 
this column by anodizers who after all 
create the news interest in it. Quote: 

"Our anodic soft ball team is making a 
high bid for top honors in the Consair 
league. We have had three practice games, 
winning them all. Slugger Lohman has 
been pitching good ball, and promises to 
hit his stride when the league gets under 
way." Wally Miles. 

"Practice games have been held at 
Horace Mann Field, on February 24 we 
played Tool Room and were ahead with a 
score of 10 to 3; on March 2, Drop Ham- 
mers lost a game to us with a score of 
14 to 6; on March 9 we barely escaped a 
tie with Wood Shops, ending with a score 
of 1 1 to 1 in our favor. I would like to 
announce that all future practice games 



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will be played on Wednesday afternoons, 
while league games will be played on 
Saturdays. Let's have better turn outs." 
Ted Lohman, Manager. 

"Ted Lohman has been a proud papa 
since last March 11; by the way, Ted, 
what do you indulge in before pitching 
us to victory every Saturday?" 

"There's a certain Romeo that has really 
fallen for Juliet; it looks like wedding 
bells soon; how's about it, Dave?" 

Carl F. Johnson, Jr. 

Our friend Ray McGuffin, in charge 
of the inspection side of the anodic de- 
partment, not knowing that (ex-spray 
man) Lyle is now a new company in- 
spector, put him to work shooting parts 
through on the other side. (Nice going, 
Mac.) Lyle, our new inspector, is no 
egotist, he will even reject his own spray 
work. "It's got to be good." Arkie. 

The three flying clubs: "San Diego Fly- 
ing Club," "Southern California Flyers' 
Club" and "Consair Flyers' Club" alone, 
represent an active membership of over 
100 pilots and students. Their elapsed 
time of flying combined, since 1936, 
would total to upwards of 2 5,000 flying 
hours, reaching over 300 participants who 
are no longer in. Consolidators should all 
feel proud of this fact, and realize that 
opportunity to fly and learn how at the 
lowest rates this country has ever known, 
is right here in Consolidated. Here's happy 
landings to you all! 

(Bert Naseef was founder and instructor 
of the first flying club — and has taken a 
keen interest in all three. Much credit 
is due Bert for inaugurating this plan 
here. Ed. ) 

BE WRONG JUST ONCE 

By Craighead Weir 
Because we are all human, we will of 
course make some mistakes. A man who 
never makes a mistake is just too perfect 
to live. But the man who makes NEW 
mistakes is far more valuable than the 
fellow who makes the same mistake over 
and over again. Wasn't it Horace Greeley 
who said: "You are bound to make mis- 
takes, let them be new ones, not the same 
old ones?" 



WHERE TO LIVE? 




ASK 


E. 


FRIEDRICK 


NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 


MAIN 


1014 234 C ST. 


"WE 


COVER THE CITY" 



TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Maguire 

Ed Curling and Lou Shirley are looking 
for soft ball material. Step up boys; you 
might make the team. 

Ray Peters is building a stepladder. 
Could it be for R. J. Knight, so he can 
check on Ray's table ? 

Marcella, when are you coming back? 
We all miss you. 

After five years at Consolidated as Tool 
Designer, Mr. J. W. Van Doren is leaving 
for a new position up north. We're all 
sorry to see you go, and wish you the very 
best of everything in your new venture. 

Milt Hangen is working harder to catch 
members for the Rod & Reel Club than 
he would to catch fish. Jerry Kick, "Say 
you saw it in the Consolidator." Roy 
Smeltzer, our vegetable vendor, is now 
smoking good cigars. Have you ever seen 
"Guillermo" Ekdahl eat an ice cream cone? 
It's an art. 

Bob Hyder wants to buy a green eye- 
shade. Where could he get one cheap? I 
almost forgot, we moved — again! 

Have Jim "Steal a Parking Space" Wil- 
liams park your car for you. He never 
fails! 

Keep your head up and your overhead 
down. — The Houghton Line. 



HERTZ 



RENT A CAR 
OR TRUCK 

DRIVE YOURSELF 



Real Insurance Protection 

1145 2nd Ave. Main 8520 

Stations — San Diego to Vancouver 



It's FUN to be thirsty 




o u drink 



/ 



ij^^J^ 



CREAM 
ROOT BEER 

• 

GRAPE 
PUNCH 



5 



April, 1940 



15 



THINGS THAT COME OUT 
AT NIGHT 

By Craig 

Spring is now officially here and things 
are again in full bloom. One of the most 
luxurious of the new spring growths is 
the beard on Martin George's face. Some 
crop, eh "Comrade?" 

"Popeye" Petit has answered the call of 
the sea and is building himself a nice fast 
boat. He is assisted by "Salt Whiskers" 
Durlee. The job is supervised by "Bar- 
nacle" Joe Ryan. 

Lou Gibson of Hull is a super athlete. 
"Gibby" is not only a good golfer, but 
also quite a bowler. Those bad balls he 
throws are just to dust out the gutters. 

"Major Hoople" Heideman, proprietor 
of a Crown Point hostelry, is now a mem- 
ber of the wing Night crew. When asked 
how he liked night work, Frank said, 




MUSIC 

Accordions 
529.50 10 81000 

Wuriitzer 
Accordiana 
Excelsior 
Radiciona 
Hohner 
Brendisi 

Band Instruments 

Buescher • Selmar • Elkhart • Martin 

and Washburn Guitars 

Prh-afe Lessons by Projessionals 

Terms as low as ^1.25 week 



^o-uiheln Caliiannia 

MU^ic ca 



ITUAIIT G >IHIH8iR6. PIJEl HtMPYV. HABPII. I[C.T«EAI. 
D 



"TREASURE 
HUNT" 

The GAME for all! A 
new and exciting pastime. 
Just the thing for Parties 
or family evenings at home. 

01- 



STHTIOnERS 

coRPORnTion 

1040 6th Ave. 



"Fine. It gives me more time at home 
during the day." 

The Wing department is still trying to 
figure out which one of the Earnest twins 
was off sick last week. 

Dick "C. S. Howard" Emrick has ac- 
quired a race horse and a winning one, 
too. Dick's horse has gone to the post 
twice and has garnered a win and a place. 
If this keeps up "Grico" will threaten 
"Seabiscuit's" record. 

Don Garrett of the Wing department 
and Miss Mae Duley were married at Yuma 
on Saturday, March 2. Don has started 
off right by going home from work nights. 

Ed Reynolds and Roy Musico of Paint 
can tell time by the electric lights. Gate- 
house No. 2 says they can, in case anyone 
doubts the story. 

Roy Weyman of Finish, better known 
as "Crooner," entertained at a dance at 
Kenyon's the other night. Roy can hardly 
believe it. 

The night basketball championship was 
won by the Production department. The 
team won 1 3 league games and lost one. 
In the playoff they beat Hull 2 times out 
3. The Production team scored 62 5 points 
in league competition. Dick Scott was 
high point man with nearly 200 points. 
Other members of the team were Speed, 
Selvaggi, Kraemer, Wilson, Carter, Clark, 
Gaughen, Seeley and Emslie. 

Joe Drodz, Hull, built himself a boat. 
After looking over the completed article, 
Joe went down town and bought a wash 
board. 

Henry Zilz, of Cutting, celebrated St. 
Pat's day with a new green work suit. 
Jack Smith, of Planning, wonders why 
it's always raining in Paint Shop. Carter, 
Bender and Browne of Production make 
quite a trio; how come Art Stone finally 
broke down and bought a thermos bottle? 
Inspector Martin, of Tail, once flew for 
Howard Hughes in the picture, "Hell's 
Angels." If a plebescite were held in 
Sheet Metal, the Scotch would take over 
"hands down," with Scotty Birse, Jr., and 
Scotty McCartney. "Bel" Starr, of Stock, 
has taken up golf. It gets his feet in shape 
for jitterbug dancing; Joe Havlik, Drop 
Hammers, has bowled four "300" games; 



EXCLUSIVE 

SIXTH and B STREETS 
FRANKLIN 5 233 . 



Chuck Pjerroa, of Drop Hammers, has 
picked out the rings and set the date; 
Fred Kipple, of Wing, was recently made 
Inspector; Johnny Hester, of Finish, 
bought himself a new house; for Mrs. 
"Red" Johnson a correction — it was 
peanut brittle, not peanut butter; Ross 
Dilling doesn't regret one glass of that 
stomach; Bill Wilson now holds down 
Planning department third shift; Phil 
Lima of Finish is a proud dad. His little 
boy made the front page of the "Union" 
two weeks ago. 

•^ 

The governor picked up a phone and 
called for long distance. "I want to speak 
to Killer Demoff at the state prison," he 
said excitedly. 

"Sorry," a voice answered, "your party 
just hung up." — Bee-Hive. 




Complete 
BUILDING 
SERVICE 

from selection 
oF homesite 
to completed 
iiome beautiful 



Rl AND Jj ^^^ 3144 
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DCIINST€DTAve. 



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* BUILDIN(]4178 



SEND FLOWERS 
and watch your 
ROMANCE BLOOM! 



''Let's Get 
Associated" 

YOUR 
SMILING 
ASSOCIATED 
DEALER 

Selling 

Aviation Ethyl, "Flying A" 
Gasolines 

Cycol and Veedol 
Motor Oils 

LUBRICATION 

Factory Specified 




16 



Consolidator 



WHAT A COOK, 

WHAT A DINNER! 

After three years of hearing Al Leonard 
tell how to cook beef steak and onions, I 
at last had the chance to taste this 
master's famous dish. And much to my 
surprise it was the best I have consumed 
since I left old Virginia. But as Chef 
Leonard would allow no one in the kitchen 
but his wife, I have a hunch the little 
woman should get the credit. 

E. Mcjoyner, Hull. 



*inee^ 



I93S 



SQN DIEGO 
TnXICRBS 
HRVE ROLLED 
MILLIONS 
r OFMIL£S 

Lyrlij<;velyON 



WE GIVE 
'S6H GREEN STAMPS 
* DOUBL€ STAMPS 
_ ON SUNDAYS/ 



,, YOU TOO . 

CAN H»VE 

THXITREHDS 




llM3Mil| 



Delicious 

Refreshing 

Satisfying 



5 



afS^ 



BIG BOTTLE 



BEVERAGE 
COMPANY 

Main g I 6 I 




MACHINE "OIL" 

By Al Pfeiffer 

Borne on the Eastertide comes a new 
bundle of joy to the Kerr household. Bob, 
the slight figure along Turret Lathe Row, 
boasts a lusty boy of 7;/> lbs. Congratula- 
tions Mr. and Mrs. Kerr. Best wishes are 
also in order for the Burdette Stearmans 
who celebrated their second wedding an- 
niversary on March 12. 

Lights — Music — Camera. Here's the 
picture: 

Recently it came to light that Bob 
Williams has determined on a musical 
career for his youthful daughter. Knowing 
Bob as we do, it piques our curiosity to 
ascertain why he should choose the violin 
when he has a definite leaning toward a 
harp. 

Any day we expect to hear the strains 
of some familiar aria like Mendelssohn's 
Spring Song emerge from Fred Hudson's 
Drill Press Kindergarten. It appears that 
musical talent fairly abounds in the per- 
sons of Larry Theis, Ben Beseda and Emil 
Studnicki. Larry brags of 13 years of 
saxophobia and proudly points to numer- 
ous radio engagements in the east; "Swing" 
Beseda beats out a mean set of drums; 
while "Jive" Studnicki is both arranger 
and instrumentalist. 

This past month has marked the shift 
changeover of the various leadmen. Their 
melody strangely remains the same but 
the lyrics change with the clock. We 
eagerly await the time when the nite crew 
will inadvertently blame the nite crew. 

Habitues of the dust track are in for a 
treat; Sam Hill's midget racing car is re- 
putedly the fastest thing on wheels in its 
class. Challenging its supremacy is the 
dark horse entry of the second shift crib 
caretaker, Jim Hull. Line forms to the 
right, lay your bets. 

The latest procedure that of posting 
rejection reports, has quite a few of the 
lads hiding their badges. Shame, shame, 
everybody knows your names! 

Spring has brought a lot of queer things 
in its wake this year, among them is Jake 
Brugger's work cap — an honest to good- 
ness French beret. 

As soon as Walt Koenig's radio trans- 



mitter is completed some of us may be 
able to speak to our mothers and friends 
back east. 

RADIO CLUB 

A Consair radio club is being formed, 
open to both licensed and unlicensed mem- 
bers. An automatic tape machine for group 
instruction has been made available for 
those who wish to learn code. Announce- 
ment of full details will be made later. 
Among the many members already lined 
up are operators: Tom Hemphill, Frank 
Machado, Chuck Taylor, Cliff Thompson, 
Robert White, Frank Seaquist, Roily Tyce, 
Harold Savage, Frank Kemper, Charlie 
Booher, Hap Hopkins, Don Burger, Tom 
Eckles, Charlie Sands, Leonard Holmes. 
Among the other members who are show- 
ing keen interest are: D. Greene, Les John- 
son, Al Griffith, Sam Seligman, Ken Smith, 
Jack Wright, Owen Dillon, Bob Mussen, 
Harry French, Don Southwick, J. C. 
Hoover, Al Fabri, Reno Wheatcraft, 
Walter Koenig, and G. L. Ealy. 

Congratulations are in order for "Dad" 
Sheppard, our six-gun sheriff from East 
San Diego. It has been stated that his 
daughter is engaged to a young man from 
North Island. Happy landings! 



nij.iij.ijjj,ijiH 




Any amount * 
opens your "Son 
Diego Federal 

Say- 

ac- 
count 

• 






Tax-exempt 

features 

nsured SAFETY 

Through 10th of 

each month, divi- 

dends from the 1 st 




Since 
1885 
never 
a loss in 
yield or 
principal. 

1027 
Sixth 
Ave. 



ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL' 




A. J. Edwards says "Drive a car with 

a built-in tail wind" 

Ford • Mercury • Lincoln-Zephyr 

Guaranteed Used Cars 

UNIVERSITY MOTORS 



Office J. 3141 



1276 University 



Home J. 9340 



April, 1940 



17 




OH, HE FLOATS THROUGH 
THE AIR . . . 

WHEN Art Sowell, of Wing, floats 
through the air with the greatest 
of ease, he does so without the aid of a 
flying trapeze. Instead, Art, who already 
has close to 300 jumps to his credit, takes 
to a parachute and a bat-wing rig for his 
aerial thrills. 

The experience of "piloting" one's self 




Complete Line of Airplane Models 



through the air on a bat-wing rig, ex- 
plains Art, is similar to actually piloting 
a plane. One can bank, turn, nosedive, or 
tailspin on a bat-wing, just as one may 
perform similar maneuvers in a plane. But 
the bat-wing soarer must know something 
about birds and their method of flight, 
according to Art, for the wing and tail 
pieces of the rig must be controlled much 
as a bird controls its wing and tail feathers. 

Art recalls two particularly hair-raising 
experiences, both of which were nearly 
fatal. On one occasion, during a barn- 
storming tour in the midwest. Art jumped 
from a plane and, on his way down, was 
performing various mid-air tricks with 
his bat-wing. Part of one wing ripped into 
shreds due to the terrific strain caused by 
his rapid descent, and threw him into a 
spin. Before he could right himself he had 
fallen to within 300 feet of the ground. 
(That's pretty close when you're falling 
between 30 to 60 feet a second!) Needless 
to say, he managed to jerk open his chute 
in the nick of time. Had he attempted to 
pull the rip-cord while in a spin, the 
shroud lines would probably have wound 
around his body — and we'd have ... no 
story here! 

On another occasion Art leaped over 
the water, floated down in his chute, then 
— close to the water — unhooked the chute, 
and jumped. He was a little too high 
when he leaped, so that when he smashed 
broadside into the water he crushed in a 
set of ribs, and a lung with 'em. Walking 
out of the hospital onto the flying field 
sometime later. Art met a friend about 
to take-off. The friend asked him to give 
his plane's prop a crank. Art obliged — 



A MECHANIC IS NO BETTER THAN HIS TOOLS 



WHY ARE SOME GUYS ALWAYS PICKED FOR 

THE BETTER JOBS? 

We don't know all the answers 
but, we do know that the right 
assortment of good tools plus 
knowing how to make best use 
of them goes a long way toward 
corning that better job. How 
is your tool supply? You should 
look over the Garrett line of 
best nationally advertised brands 
and stock up. See Whitey Dake 
at the employees' tool store. 

GARRETT SUPPLY COMPANY 

1 126 SANTA FE AVENUE LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 








and the prop kicked him and broke his 
arm! After hundreds of chute jumps, 
Art broke his arm while grounded! 

Art has practiced his perilous hobby 
for eight years, and may continue it in 
his spare time when he completes a new 
rig he's developing now. Art's married 
and has four children. 

According to Art, the normal rate of 
descent, without the bat-wing, is about 
118 miles an hour. The rig, he claims, 
slows down his rate of fall to between 
60 and 70 miles per hour — just a mere 



A\ 



»« 



SWIMMERS ATTENTION 

John Woodhead, Sr., wants all swim- 
mers to get into the newly-formed swim 
club, as it will soon be time to practice 
in Mission Bay. Johnny and Bob Harshaw 
are prepared to give free coaching to any- 
one who desires it; they have about 10 
men now. 



CLEANERS 
and DYERS 

We call Jo r 
and deliver 



m^ 



Phone F. 5932 



)0iA 



INDIA ST. 
at KALMIA 



3977 
GOLDFINCH 



TODD^S 



THE COMPLETE MEN'S STORE 



"Presents" 

THE NEWEST AND 

LASTEST IN NEW 

SPRING 1&2 PANTS SUITS 

$20.00 to $35.00 Values 

NOW 

$1500 $2250 $1850 

SAN DIEGO'S FINEST VALUES 



HOME OF 

ADAM HATS 



SPORT COATS $7.95 



PANTS $2.95 



TOPP*S 

I THE COMPLETE MEN'S STORE | 

Corner 5th Ave. and E St. 
Budget Plan for Your Convenience 



18 



Consolidator 



FORD HOTEL 




SHOWER BATHS 
Rates $4 up perWk 

Close to Consolidated, 

Business, Shopping and 

Theotrical Districts 

W. B. BASSLER, Prop. 

FR. 2207 • 1135 THJRD AVE. 



Leading Aircraft 
Issues 

Bought — Sold — Quoted 

StdtliticdL S/nnotmation 
Upon /xei^ueit 

SEARL-MERRICK 
• COMPANY 

(Members Los Angeles Stock Exchange) 

R. E. PATTON D. S. DORN 

508 San Diego Trust and Savings BIdg. 
F 7626 San Diego 



FINAL ASSEMBLY GOSSIP 

Br G. W. Sfingl 

SOME one wanted to know whether 
the Final Assembly Department has 
folded up, because they have not been 
represented in the last few Consolidators. 
The final assembly gang is strung all over 
the plant, so it makes is very difficult to 
get in touch with them, but some are still 
around the yard. 

Our lead man is "Art" Brennan, with a 
very sunny disposition. Art sure blushes 
easy when he gets into the sun for a short 
time. He was talking about buying a hat 
the other day — "does anybody know 
why?" 

Charley Fleickner was down on Broad- 
way the other night and saw a telescope 
with the sign "5c to see the moon." You 
know how those small town boys are, 
when they come to the city, they fall for 



FRIENDLY I 
SERVICEi 



f<'^«i 




anything. Charley paid and started to look 
through the telescope. All at once he 
scratched his head and asked the astrono- 
mer what color the moon was. He was 
told it was white, and Charley said it was 
red. Come to find out, he was looking at 
a large Neon light on top of the San Diego 
Hotel. That's one time you saw the light, 
Charley, "better looks next time." 

The smiling crew chief of the X-31 is 
"Harry" Earl from the Marines, and his 
brilliant helper is high-flying "Vick," just 
a mere boy from Los Angeles. 

Our good-looking man "Dale" belongs 
to the ex-Marine class. Every time some- 
thing goes wrong, he starts looking for 
the house boy; he still thinks he is in 
China. 

Battling "Nelson" from our Navy is 
still wondering and pitching, and can't 
get over it, him working on land instead 
of a ship. 

vgl 

A man who finds time to tear down 
what some fellow workman has tried to 
build toward success, has but little time 
left for success himself. Never knock or 
try to pick the other fellow's job to 
pieces . . . spend more time trying to 
improve yourself. 

H. Roese No. 5 13 J. 








^^ 



v^^ 



o^ 




Five Ocean Rafts of logs moored in Sku Uiego Hailior. containing 30 Alillion board 
feet of lumber to be manufactured at our Mill in San Diego. Width, 52 feet; Length, 
1000 feet; Contents, 6 million feet; Binding chains, 200 tons; Depth below water, 24 
feet; Height above water, 12 feet; Towed 1000 miles from Oregon. 

• That Benson Lumber Company owns and operates the only saw- 

mill in Southern California? 

• That Our annual payroll of $250,000.00 is spent right here in San 

Diego, and that our annual taxes of $120,000.00 are a great 
benefit to the City of San Diego ? 

• That San Diego's "Heaven on Earth" climate is IDEAL for air- 

drying lumber, conceded by government authorities to be the 
best method of drying lumber? 

• That San Diego homes are protected from termites by pressure 

treated lumber produced locally only by our company? 

• That Financing service is available through the loan and escrow de- 

partment of this 33 year old company? 

• That visitors are welcome to see the lumber mill in action? 



The Pick of The Trees 



BENSON LUMBER CO 



April, 1940 



19 



TUBE BENDING 

By Hart 

It's a good thing that Danny Whorton's 
wife is coming home before very long, or 
he would be a walking skeleton. Must 
not be eating right. 

We hear that Norman Freakley has 
given up his abode at Mission Beach and 
moved to the city (La Jolla.) 

No wonder they call Cooper "The Bull" 
after the way he handles boxes of %" 
tubing. 

Who is the fellow who was called to the 
North Gate to have his picture taken and 
discovered he had left his false teeth at 
home? Was his face red? 

It won't be long now before Bert 
Freakley starts to polish up his fishing 
poles. The weather is getting kinda warm. 

Traffic sign in Pa. "Slow, no hospital." 




Union at "C 







A UNION TITLE 

policy will 

insure 

that YOU do. 

fl© TnsumTtot 



SECOND AVENUE O^ 
AT GROAOWAY ^^M 

^ A N 1 t G o ia^^ 


JAMES D. FORWARD 
CALIFOBNtA 





THE CONSOLHOBBY 
CORNER 

By Lloyd L. Lee, Jr., Eng. 

Believing it to be true that, next to 
working at his hobby, the real hobbyist 
would rather talk about it, than do most 
anything else, this writer is inclined to 
experiment with a new feature, for which 
the editor of the Coinolidator has given 
gracious permission. This will be the Con- 
solhobby Corner. 

To make this experiment a success re- 
quires only the co-operation of the many 
hobby riders in this big Consolidated fam- 
ily. For instance, we do not know if 
Frank Fink knows that Dick Robbins 
and Dick McCreight also collect stamps. 
Perhaps it would be to their mutual ad- 
vantage and pleasure, to have a common 
meeting ground in the Consolidafor. It 
has been found that Dick Robbins and 
Frank Fink, who are numismatics, and 
Tom Hemphill, a radio "Ham." Lauren 
Bonnell builds scale model airplanes, Felix 
Kallis goes in for collecting knives and 
guns . . . claims to have a real head-chopper 
offer with some 40 nicks in the handle. 
Dick McCreight goes in for stamps. 
Berger of Hull takes to photography and 
Everett Jacobson follows wood carving 
. . . just to mention a few and in Bob 
Mussen we have a hobby show manager 
of the first water. 

Let's get things rolling in Consolhobby 
Corner . . . lobby for your hobby . . . 
turn in a word about what you do for 
your hobby, or maybe snitch on your fel- 
low worker and what he does. Let's have 
all the news. Perhaps a hobby show can 
be held at some time in the future. What 
are your hobby ideas? Let's hear from 
you! 



San Diego Hardware Co. 

TOOLS 

Quality machinist, carpenter 
and metal workers tools are a 
guarantee of satisfaction. Nation- 
ally known makes: — 

• L. S. Slarrett Co. 

• Plomb MFg. Co. 

• Kennedy Steel Tool Kits 

• Crescent Tools 

B Klenk's Aviation Snips 
LOW PRICES — BUDGET TERMS 

SAN DIEGO 
HARDWARE COMPANY 

840-850 FIFTH AVENUE 




ARE YOU JUST 
HOPING TO LAND 
IN A GOOD JOB? 

Hope without foundation doesn't 
go far in this competitive age. 
But hope plus training is a 
winning combination ! 

Today, in all kinds of profes- 
sions and trades, men are earn- 
ing more money — getting promo- 
tions — because of serious, sys- 
tematic study of International 
Correspondence Schools Courses. 

I. C. S. Courses are prepared by 
outstanding authorities. Instruc- 
tion is a personal relationship be- 
tween student and instructor. Mail 
coupon for full information. 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



BOX 1477-C, SCRANTON, PENNA. 

Explain fully about your course marked X: 

TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL COURSES 
D Agriculture Q Air Brake D Manufacture of PuId 
D Air Conditioning and Paper 

D Architectural Drafting D Mechanical Drafting 

a Architecture Q Boilermaking Q Mechanical Engineering 
n Auto Engine Tune-up G Navigation D Pharmacy 

□ Auto Technician D Aviation Q Patternmaking Q Plumbing 
D Bridge Engineering D Poultry Farming 

D Building Estimating D Practical Telephony 

D Chemistry D Coal Mining Q Public Works Engineerine 
D Civil Engineering Q Radio Operating 

D Concrete Engineering D Radio Servicing 

D Contracting and Building Q R. R. Section Foreman 



a R. R. Signalir 

G Reading Blueprinta 

D Refrigeration 

G Sheet Meta! Work 

G Steam Electric 



G Cotton Manufacturing 

G Diesel Engines 

n Electrical Engineering 

G Electric Lighting 

Q Foundry Practice _ 

G Fruit Growing Q Heating Q Steam Engines 

G Heat Treatment of Metals G Structural Drafting 

G Highway Engineering G Structural Engineering 

G House Planning G Machinist G Surveying and Mapping 

G Locomotive Engineer Q Telegraph Engineering 

n Management of Inventions G Textile Designing 

G Managing -Men at Work Q Welding. Electric and Gaa 

G Marine Engines □ Woolen Manufacturing 

BUSINESS COURSES 
G Advertising D Bookkeeping Q First Year College 
D Business Correspondence □ French D Grade School 

Q Business Management G High School □ Illustrating 

G Cartooning Q Civil Service Q Lettering Show Cards 
G C. P. Accounting G Railway Postal Clerk 

G College Preparatory Q Salesmanship Q Secretarial 

D Commercial D Service Station Salesm'p 

G Cost Accounting Q Sign Lettering G Spanish 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE COURSES 
D Advanced Dressmaking Q Professional Dreosmaking 

G Foods and Cookery ,^ a^^ Designing 

G Tea Room and Cafctrrin 
Management. Citrrine 



Q Home Dressmaking 



Name 

Addreaa.. 

City State.. 

Present Position 



VOCATIONAL 
H. R. SIDNEY 
926 Broadwoy 
Phone: M-1619 

SAN 



ADVISORS: 

I. L. LEAVY 
2635 Univ. Ave. 
Phone: J-8267 
DIEGO, CALIF. 



20 



Consolidotor 



DRIFTING THRU DRAFTING 

By Jeff Baiilcy 

AFTER .1 long period of expectancy 
. the boys in the Structures group 
really got hot the other day, but hardly 
in the manner one would anticipate. It 
was actually more on the order of house- 
warming. At any rate some sparks from the 
construction going on outside the window 
ignited Abe Kligman's handsome canvas 
drapes and immediately the boys galvanized 
into action. Abe and Spike McKinney both 
rushed for the fire extinguisher and col- 
lided en route. Ken Jackman rushed for 
his stop watch, movie camera, optical 
pyrometer and maybe some other instru- 



Bowl with Consair 

at 

FOURTH and CEDAR 
RECREATION 

San Diego's Only Pine-Center Alleys 

Ample Free Parking 

CHARLES THOMAS, Proprietor 



YOUR NEXT CAR FINANCED 

AT A 

SUBSTANTIAL 
SAVING 

Call me before you purchase a 
NEW or USED car. I will 
arrange your finance and insur- 
ance at a much lower cost. 

PHONE p ^'721 

(before 5 p.m.) T ' / / ^ L 

askforRAYDeMAHY 




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ments which measure in millidecibels or 
hectares. Little Giant Watts showed that 
he is a true Toastmaster by leaping into 
the breach and marshalling his forces with 
a series of staccato barks. Clarence Gerber 
hurriedly thrust an unlighted cigar be- 
tween his teeth so that he could establish 
a perfect alibi. As he gathered in the re- 
maining canvas preparatory to erecting a 
first aid tent, Norm Robbins was heard 
muttering something about it being a 
shame that his M.LT. fireman's coat — the 
white duck one with the brass buttons — 
was home in the closet. The fire was finally 
extinguished and Dick McCreight the Sil- 
ent Sage of the Ozarks, looked up wearily 
from his work and broke his long period 
of quietude to remark, "I guess it's out 
now." The only person who preserved his 
equanimity during the whole incident was 
Herb Hinckley who did not even look 
up from his work, believing all the hubbub 
was caused by Henry Mandolf preparatory 
to signing a drawing. 

During this day and age of sophistica- 
tion and things commonplace, it is indeed 
refreshing to witness the remarkable ef- 
fects of kindled emotion within the manly 
bosoms of two of our brethren. Johnny 
Valuch, with the ubiquity of a Fuller 
Brush man and the perseverance of an 
insurance agent, finally broke down sales 
resistance and obtained a promise of mar- 
riage from one of San Diego's fair young 
damsels. From that moment on things be- 
gan to happen to John. Usually a very 
well-regulated individual, John rushed 
madly home, threw open the windows, beat 
on his chest, inhaled deeply, and hopped 
into bed. Whether he remembered to re- 
move his shoes and vest, we were unable to 
learn. At any rate he forgot to wind and 
set his alarm clock, misplaced his car keys, 
etc., with the result that he was barely able 
to make it to work the next day in time 
for lunch. Lee Nelson made the fatal 
mistake of courting a gal away over in 
La Jolla whereas he lives in East San Diego. 



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Next he made the mistake of trying to 
get in good by taking her dog out for an 
airing. Then he made the mistake of losing 
it somehow. Then he made the mistake of 
returning to her house, whereby he did 
receive a most caustic verbal panning. And 
so began a one-man search thru the dark- 
ened streets of La Jolla for the missing 
pooch. The night wore on and with the 
gray streaks of dawn and the collaboration 
of several milkmen the dog was duly re- 
covered and returned to its owner, who 
was now indignant for being awakened so 
early. Then to cap the climax the pride and 
joy of the Nelson motorized equipment 
began to falter and finally failed before 
half of the homeward journey was com- 
pleted. All this without a whimper at the 
feet of love. If Nelson keeps up, he'll make 
Raleigh and Galahad look like a couple of 
pikers, and Beau Ideal and Beau Geste will 
be read by beginners only. 



Quality Hand Tools 

Starrett, Plomb, Crescent, Wiss, 
Klenk. Gerstner & Kennedy Tool 
Chests. Home Shop Equipment. 

motor Hordiuore & 
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Main 0115. 



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Visit the Finest Used Car Dept. 
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April, 1940 



21 



WOODSHOP CHIPS 

By /. E. Hodgson 

Danny Cupid completed another job 
Saturday, March 15, with the marriage of 
Miss Geneva BoeUing, of Carlyle, 111., and 
Charlie Pagerelle, of the Wood Shop. From 
current reports, Mrs. P. is a wonderful 
cook. Lucky man! 



ALLEN'S 


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Retail Home 


Delivery 


GRADE "A" 




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PRODUCTS 


Telephone 


J 6152 



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724 BROADWAY MAIN 4392 


CREDIT CLOTHIERS 


For Men 

Suits 

Topcoats 

Hats 

Shoes 

Furnishings 

Neckwear 


For Women 

Coats 

Dresses 

Shoes 

Lingerie 

Skirts and 

Blouses 


NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 

Pay as Little as 50c Weekly 



Campbell Murray is checking blocks on 
the wood assembly fixtures week days. He 
is an enthusiastic Lawn Bowler, and may 
be seen any week-end afternoon on the 
Bowling Greens at Balboa Park. 

Joe Shuter should have been an Irish- 
man; Mrs. Joe presented him with a fine 
son at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, March 17, the 
day of all days to the children of Erin. 

Tommy Bell emphatically denies that he 
is contemplating re-marriage, despite all 
rumors. 

T'other week-end Bob Brabban invited 
some of the boys out to his new place in 
La Mesa, with tools. He then put them to 
work fencing in his lot. However, he 
supplied plenty of refreshments, and a 
good time was had by all, and a fence by 
Bob. 

Bill Clark and Carl Brown are back to 
day shift work. Bill says he wishes to 
attend evening classes, otherwise he liked 
the night work. 

Josh Littleford, with his saw filing 
equipment, has been moved from the 
Wood Shop mezzanine to the new build- 
ing in the southwest corner; his new 
home. Maybe you can stay put for a 
while now. Josh. 

Carl Shumaker attended the Orange 
Show in San Bernardino. He tells us that 
San Diego had a fine showing, part of 
which were moving pictures taken over 
the city, giving a remarkably good view of 
our Consair plant. 

Fred Purdy, our genial template locater, 
has been under the weather. We all hope 
to see you back by the time this is 
printed, Freddy. 

We are all getting ready for the baseball 



^ thinking of parties? 
then think of F 
the grant/ 

Complete facilities for Dances, 
Banquets, Luncheons and Teas 

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season again. According to manager Bob 
Harshaw the Wood Shop team ought to 
make a pretty good showing, having 
among its members Pitchers Harry Whit- 
taker and Floyd Delners, Bud Owens and 
Red Butler catchers, and Charlie Pager- 
elle, a better than good all-around player. 
Others are Bud Hadley, Mixon Bros. 
Boyd Robinson, Harold Hudson, H. Jen- 
sen, J. Olsen, Jim Cook, Carl Klicher, 
Curly Jone and Glen Phillips. 



L eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

Phone Main 5114 
FOURTH at Cim 



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DOWN 



$2241 a month 

Taxes and Insurance Extra 

TWO BEDROOM 
IDEAL HOME' & LOT 

Think of it ... an "Ideol Home" 
designed especially for YOU! See 
the "Ideal Model Home" at 38th 
and El Cajon TODAY! See for your- 
self the tile both and kitchen . . . 
the overhead garage doors! "Ideal 
Homes" ore complete . . . even 
to window shades and garage drive- 
way. 

Also see the "Blue Ribbon Ideal 
Home" in Boy Park Village, 2919 
Chicago Street. 
Our Aim — Satisfied Customers. 

Phil 
LIDOUGHTYPJ 

Ibuilding service^ 

3823 El Cajon Blvd. M 

iTalbol 3593 M 





22 



Consolidator 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection of Pipes in San Diego, 
including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 



MISSION 

DRY 
CLEANERS 



MISSION DRY CLEANING 

IS LIKE CONSOLIDATED 

AIRPLANES ... IT FLIES 

ABOVE ALL 



Phone J-4139 

ADDRESS 105 WASH. 



when Buying, Mention The Consolidator. 



noui SHOuimc 





RT OUR STORE 



Sherwin-Williams Paints 



(OT^J BROADWAY AT TENTH 
2861 UNIVERSITY 



HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

Br Willie Winchell Hart man 

~\\ T'HAT well known youngster got 
V > pinched for driving without an 
operator's Hcense and fined $16 — wow! 
You ought to know you can't get away 
with that forever, Danny. Our police 
force just loves guys like that. 

Red "Hero" Wilson is a great little fire 
putter-outer. Our recent conflagration 
caused him no end of worry, what with 
trying to run with a fire extinguisher and 
operate it at the same time. Poor Tex, and 
little Paul Ferrara got themselves a bath. 

Does anybody want to adopt a bright 
baby boy? Clyde Walker is trying to get 
himself adopted and the only taker seems 
to be Al Miley. The fact that AI has two 
beauteous blondes on his hands has nothing 
to do with it, of course. 

Pete Cinquegrana, our well known 
Baltimoron, knows now when a S. D. cop 
says something he means it, even if said 
cop has to put it in writing. Don't worry, 
Pete, our jail is a swell place — to stay away 
from! 

Al Miley, the dancing gigolo from 
Frisco bay, is trying to make a deal 
whereby he will exchange dancing lessons 
for instructions on how not to get his 
fingers caught in the nibbling machine. 
Al says he's an expert in dancing the 
"Rumbar." 

E. Lafayette Bailey just got on board 
the ferry when he ran out of gas. Not 
only did he hold up the traffic, but he 
had to leave his car on the ferry for four 
trips while he chased all over Coronado 
trying to get some gas. 

Our basketball team, consisting of B. 
Baily, H. Dye, the Aquire boys. Flowers, 
Williams, Langdon, Maxfield, Feeney and 
James, has finally come through with the 
championship of the second league. Being 
beaten by a superior team is nothing to be 
ashamed of and so we are still proud of 
our team's showing. 




Stan Marcyan, who seems always to have a 
camera loaded with film and all set to shoot 24 
hours a day, snapped this picture. He titled it, "Big 
dog — little dog — say hello.'* 

Jules Aquire is the proud papa of an 
8 y2 lb. baby boy and, of course, cigars 
are in order. Jules says he's only sorry it 
wasn't twins, but what's the Mrs. say, 
pal? Anyhow, best wishes for the baby 
and mama. 

What Welder from Baltimore recently 
bought a Tiajuana jalopy and didn't know 
it was a Mexican car until it came time 
to register it? Poor Pete had a heck of a 
time trying to prove his citizenship. Well, 
you know those Mexican bargains by now, 
or at least you ought to. 



V939 FIFTH AVE J 



r "S&H" 

STAMPS 
CIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES $r3 

for MEN iJn^oT^.l'de^^Ur"" O 




UALITEE 

BROWN LABEL 

Whips! 

It's economical, too. 



Tune in on "Lowe Highlights" — KGB, Tues. and Fri., 8 p. m. 



April, 1940 



23 



CONSAIR FLYERS 

By Barney Farley 

CONSAIR Flyers, newest flying club 
to take its place in San Diego, is be- 
ing formed. It has been founded along the 
same lines as various other flying clubs, in- 
corporating all their finer features and add- 
ing a few of its own where needed. 

The Flyers' first ship will be a new Cub- 
50 or 6 5, which will be used as a primary 
trainer for students and will also accom- 
modate the needs of the pilots. A three- 
passenger Cub Cruiser is the second ship 
planned by the club. This latter ship is a 
75 horsepower job, with a top speed of 
110 m.p.h. and a landing speed of 40 
m.p.h. The Cruiser is also in the 2 S class. 

The club, however, believes one of its 
finest advertisements to be the members 
who have already joined and who, perhaps 
now, are interesting prospective ""Flyers." 

To begin with Orville Hubbard had 
the idea. It seems Orv wanted to resume 
his flying, preferably in a club. Undecided 
on whether to join the San Diego Flying 
Club, an excellent organization, or the 
Southern California Flyers, founded and 
managed by the very capable Al Griffith, 
he resolved to take it upon himself to start 
a new one. The result was the Consair 
Flyers. 

Having been past vice-president and op- 
erations manager of the San Diego Flying 
Club, Orv gained much experience and 
became very efficient in both flight and 
ground operations. He will assume similar 
duties as operations manager of the Con- 
sair Flyers. 

Next comes Arthur Becker (club presi- 
dent), former Pensacola student and priv- 
ate flying enthusiast. Becker has been in- 
strumental in organizing the Consair Flyers 



Own Your Home/ 

Use your rent money to 
pay for a home. The small 
down payment starts you 
toward Financial stability. 
Plan now for the years to 
come. Excellent homes in 
Bird Rock, South La Jolla 
and Pacific Beach. . . Fast 
hishway and bus service 
to Consolidated. 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



and is its first charter member. According 
to all reports from North Island, where 
Becker is stationed, the fellows there are 
hearing plenty about the club. 

Then comes Miles Blaine (club treas- 
urer), a pilot with a goodly number of 
hours to his credit. Miles, one of our most 
enthusiastic members, is one of those fel- 
lows who would rather fly than eat. 

Another member is Steve Brown (club 
secretary) , solo pilot. Apart from his duties 
as secretary, Steve is also acting chairman 
of the membership committee. 

Tony Lis Settie has also decided to join 
our ranks. Tony soloed a few years ago 
and after a considerable absence from fly- 
ing, has decided to start anew via the 
Consair Flyers. 

Club instructor will be Louis L. Loyko, 
graduate U. S. Naval Air School, Pensacola, 
Fla., with four years of Naval flight ex- 
perience. Taking a discharge in 193 3, Mr. 
Loyko bought a ship and barnstormed 
around central California. In off seasons he 
did student work for the Duck Air Services 
of Oakland, Calif. An employee of Con- 
soliiiafeci since 1936, Mr. Loyko's flying in 
San Diego area has been strictly student 
work. To have an instructor of Mr. 
Loyko's caliber, is a definite asset to the 
club. 

Operations are planned off Tyce Field, 
Chula Vista, where arrangements have been 
made to take care of the club's necessities. 
Meetings will be held in Room 5 30, S. D. 
Trust & Savings building first and third 
Saturdays each month at 7:00 p.m. Those 
interested are invited to attend. 



Pun of the week: George Wire: '"After 
the bowling my team has to hurry to make 
a plane." 

Bowling Manager: "Flying far?" 
George Wire: '"No. We're on the night 
shift at Consolidated." 



Mission 


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D'NING ROOM 
open to public 

Famed El Cortez Cuisine 

SPECIAL FACILITIES 

For large and small parties, 

banguets, catering and dancing 

Phone Main 0161 

Ash Street at 7th 

^ THE El fORTEZ ^ 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



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Washington at Falcon Street 



8th 

and 

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24 



Consolidator 



VISIT 

ftre^totte 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

FOR MOTORISTS 




FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

Tires and Tubes 
Batteries 
Spark Plugs 
Life Protector Tubes 
Motor Tune-up Dept. 
Brake Department 
Auto Radio and Service 
Four Brands of Gasoline 
Auto Accessories 
Seat Covers 

FOR THE HOME 

Electric Refrigerators 

Ranges 

Washers 

Radios 

Electrical Appliances 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

Bicycles 
Velocipedes 
Scooters 
Wagons 

Terms as Low as 25c Weekly 

WE GASH PAY CHECKS 



It's Easy to Pork 
and Shop at 

Broadway, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

By "Brad" Bradshaw 

WITH that quantity order budget 
keeping my nose to the grindstone, 
ear to the floor and eye peeled for the 
boss, I feel like a contortionist (no cracks 
Gimber, about my nose needing the grind- 
ing) so I was "the little man who wasn't 
there" for much news this month. Al- 
though I did visit, (they called it "snoop- 
ing") the Ted Andersons, and his new 
home and Craig Clark and his new "heir." 
Ted has the front all cleaned off ready for 
the grass and was looking forward to 
"payday" and the seed. Craig, Jr., is some 
boy and "papa" and "mama" have a right 
to be mighty proud. It's easy to see that 
Craig has lost a great deal of prestige since 
the new arrival. His picture that adorned 
the front mantel is now nailed up in the 
garage and for some reason he has a mighty 
bad case of "laundry tub hands." Babies 
will be babies. Harvey Muck, Henry Doer 
and their "mamas" arrived while I was 
there and the ladies were given a chance 
to try their hand to see how much of the 
skill was preserved from that age-old 
science the "three point change." 

Almost forgot about stopping to see 
Mac McGuiness laid up with a strained 
back, at least that was his story, and if he 
has been going in for some of that "McCoy 
mountain industry", it's highly probable, 
as traveling these canyons on the run is 
mighty hard on the "torso." "Mac" be- 
gan groaning about his "indigestion" after 
I rang the bell but later admitted it was 
an "act" as he thought I came after a 
"handout." Not until hunger drove me 
out for a sandwich did I realize how clever- 
ly that fellow had "manuevered" me out 
of a feed. 

Perry Ogden informs me that Com- 
mander Carpenter's objectives in wanting 
that quota of orders is for the industrial, 
technical and social welfare of the em- 
ployees. More orders, more shop produc- 
tion, and less time for Messrs. Koenig, 
Brink, Campbell and Roberts to "overdo" 
their face and hair. It also keeps Ras- 
mussen, Allison, Dietzer, Gimber and 
Pitts, all married men, away from the 
girls' desks, thereby decreasing the chances 



of those "marital perturbances" that tend 
to disrupt the social happiness in the home. 
Being a bachelor, my objective must be 
to keep from getting "canned," or to 
get more work from these "night speed 
demons" Gaughn and Percell. 

Roy Coykendall, to prove his versatility 
in other than outdoor sports, has gone in 
for the "finer arts" as well. At present he 
has mastered the first three lines of "South 
of the Border" with only two months of 
rehearsals, with a magnificent blend of 
tonsil, adenoid and catarrh, producing a 
"nasal melody" that touches the soul of 
Eddie Generas. 

Glad to see Jack Mulroy back and going 
in high gear again. 

Jeff Bouley has never told us that 
"Farny" Farnsworth was a "child prod- 
igy", getting his engineering "sheepskin" 
in his teens, which accounts for the "Ful- 
lers dream" on his upper lip. 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

~v> optometrist t-^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



Fishing Tackle 
Headquarters 

* 

LEU HARDWARE 
& PAINT GO. 

15th and Market 

* 

Quality Tackle at Lowest Prices 



Listen to Radio XEMO, 7:15 to 7:30 a.m. 
for Report of Fish Caught Daily on: 
H & M Sportfishing Co., Sportfisher, 
Aztec and Star & Crescent. 



Let's Be Friends 

As well as 

Neighbors.' 

• • • 

Mal(e Yourself 

At Home In This 

Big Friendly Store \ 




YourCredit DRYER'S STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Is Good J. E. Dryer, President • 236S Kettner Bhd. 



Dear Diary: — 

"Sandy" Falbaum's case of sleeping sick- 
ness is not the "sneezing" kind but "hit 
the hay and snooze" for "Sandy". Rose, 
the wife, although a graduate in pharmacy, 
has yet to hit on the formula (after the 
victuals are gone) that will cure the 
malady. 

As for athletics, Lloyd Bender must 
show more proof of being a "hockey play- 
er" than receipts from that business where 
the "three gilt balls" hang over the door- 
way. "Archie" Stone and "Trotsky" Trot- 
man say their speed is due to being "fleet 
men," get it? But Production Manager 
Carpenter is still "Commander" and that 
shouldn't slow 'em up. George McCaUister, 
who has been hibernating in "Alaskan" 
igloos for some time, is back, and getting 
"thawed out." Process cards that were lost 
several years ago, when he was a "planner," 
have been found lately proving to him that 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
" The Blind Man " 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

102.) University Avenue 



like those "mounties," "we always gets our 
cards." What chance has a fellow to cover 
up a "planning muff" when Holman and 
Johnson of Purchasing always vote against 
me? There's no justice to this majority 
business. We felt that with the able assist- 
ance of "Flash" O'Donnell, Ed Stewart 
would be relieved of many of his "worries" 
and take it easy but we noticed that while 
waiting for Ogden to terminate a confer- 
ence he paced a "Chula Vista block" and 
flipped his cigarette down to a very small 
"butt" in three minutes. Ray Hartmayer 
reports that his cigarette budget shows a 
profit since Bill Liddle took over his new 
duties. 

Famous last words of dispatchers, "I 
can't find the parts, Mulroy, sign this 
A.V.O. for new ones." We hear Johnny 
Penfield has been feeding "Pinion nuts" to 
Ben Leonard to keep him busy while he 
steals "hulls" from the paint shop. Joe 
Maloney has a bell to summon Miss Ben- 
nett and Miss Wright for blueprint service 
but some of the shop lads still yell "yoo 
hoo" at the girls. Just a California custom. 
Bob Morse and "Min" Mineah never seem 
to decide who wins those "verbal battles" 
over parts. Bob can't answer all the ques- 
tions "right off the bat" but with a little 
preparation he does right well. 

Sam Seligman, electrical expert for the 



Bowling operations, says that Jack Bearse 
wrote to Major Bowes for that "armature" 
he asked him to get. Bill Fleet and Jim 
Kendrick didn't like "Gone With the 
Wind." We can stand for Sherman's March 
to the Sea, carpet baggers and Reconstruc- 
tion but "them dern Yankees did not 
whup the south", says these southern gen- 
tlemen. You take the south, suh, and give 
me "Scarlett." 



SAN DiEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

ojffers 

The MASTER RADIO COURSE pre- 
paring you for commercial radio op- 
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fitting you for ship, shore, aircraft, 
airway, amateur or broadcast station 
operation, installation and servicing. 

6 months $250 

NAVIGATION 

AIRCRAFT ADVANCED DEAD RECKONING COURSE 
5 weeks $50 

AIRCRAFT CELESTIAL NAVIGATION COURSE 

5 W66ks S50 

MARINE NAVIGATION, Complete 2 months $100 
Day courses available to men on night 
shift. 

Evening courses available to men on 
day shift. 

Call for additional injormation 

Radio and Navigation Books, Maps ond 

Cliarts, Instruments 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

Lindbergh Field Jackson 7400 




v^^ I 



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ON 



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LAND OR SEA... This Watch Survives 
Every Test of Strength and Accuracy 



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IT'S WATERPROOF Wash.shower.^''^^ 

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IT'S SHOCKPROOF . Drop it, lar 
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OS accurately as ever 

IT'S DIRTPROOF and DUSTPROOF 

. . .Yet with oil Its Inbuilt features, it 
is slim, graceful, smart in style . . . 



The model shown aboi>>e has 17-jewel water- 
prooj-shockprooj movement, special water- 
proof strap, at $37.50. . . Other models Jor men 
and women now displayed at Baranoi''s. 

NO DOWN PAYMENT 

Lowest CREDIT Terms at ... . 



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Fifth Avenue^lf at Broadway 




quESTion 



What is ''Coast to Coast" 
automobile insurance? 



nnsuiER 



SUPPOSE you are driving in a neighboring 
state, and become involved in an accident. 
According to many state laws, you lose the 
right to drive until you have been able to 
establish financial responsibility! Here's the 
rub: many "bargain price" insurance com- 
panies are not recognized by state authorities. 
Here's the moral: when you drive, carry in- 
surance which will really protect you — in 
any state. 



Open until 5 p.m. 
Saturday, 
until 12 noon, 
evenings by 
appointment 




SALMONS &WOLCOTT CO 



Phone Franklin 5141 



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OUR BIG FOUR ENGINED MODEL 32, (U.S. ARMY XB-24) TAKES A LOOK AT THE OCEAN 



MAY '1940 




IN MEMORIAM: 



DONALD MARSHALL CARPENTER 

Late Co-ordinator, Production Manager, 

and a Director of Consolidated Aircraft 

Corporation; known to all as "Doc" Carpenter . . . 



March 1894 . . . AprQ 1940 



CONSOLIDRTOR 



Volume 5 



MAY, 1940 



Number 5 



S. A. E. MEETING . . . 

A highly successful dinner meeting was 
held under the auspices of the So. Calif. 
Section of the Society of Automotive En- 
gineers at the San Diego Club on the 
evening of Friday, April 19th. The meet- 
ing was attended by over 300 persons, in- 
cluding some 7 J representatives from Los 
Angeles Aircraft factories. Leaders in San 
Diego's aviation activities were present, 
and an added guest of prominence was 
Reid A. Railton, designer of John Cob's 
famous 360 m.p.h. car. 

Principal speakers were: Walter Hite, 
Chief Engineer of Timm Aircraft Corp., 
who presented a paper on plastic materials 
applied to aircraft structures; Ken R. 
Jackman, Chief Structural Test Engineer 
of our own engineering department, whose 
prepared paper was on the subject: 
"Modern Aircraft Materials and their 
Testing," and Mr. J. C. Lyons, West Coast 
Representative of the Budd Corp., who 
presented a paper for Dr. Michael Watters 
on stainless steel construction. A short talk 
was also given by E. A. Ross of State Col- 
lege, who was identified with the build- 
ing of the early N. C. boats and the con- 
struction of the first wind tunnel at 
Landley Field. Some highly interesting mo- 
tion pictures taken for the engineering 
department by our photographer, Otto 
Menge, were also shown. 

A good bit of the success of the meet- 
ing should be given to Don Waller of our 
engineering department, acting technical 
chairman for Chief Engineer L M. Laddon, 
who was east on Company business on this 
date. 

XNEWS 

A little too late for inclusion in this 
issue was an excellent snapshot of John P. 
LaLanne of Experimental, and Miss Mig- 
non M. Largent. Attached to the snapshot 
was a clipping from the local paper under 
the heading of Marriage Licenses Applied 
for April 16, also mentioning LaLanne 
and Miss Largent all in one line. Congratu- 
lations! 



NOTICE 

A meeting of the San Diego Aero Club 
will be held on Mon., May 13 th in the Sun 
Room of the San Diego Hotel, beginning 
at 6:30 p. m. The guest of honor will be 
Mr. Richard Archbold, Research Associate 
of the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, who will be presented with a trophy 
in commendation for his Round-the-World 
flight and scientific exploration work in 
Netherlands New Guinea. Other guests of 
honor include Major Reuben H. Fleet and 
Mr. Russell Rogers, who will comment 
upon the motion pictures taken during the 
flight around the world. 

All officers and employees of Comoli- 
datcd are invited, whether or not they are 
members of N. A. A. 

SAN DIEGO AERONEERS . . . 

The Efiie trophy was awarded on April 
14th to Harold Strawn of the Loft Dept. 
Although Harold was able to fly only two 
months of the three for which the trophy 
was awarded, he amassed enough total time 
to win this award. 

Contest flights for the Stanley Andrews 
trophy started on April 14 and will run 
for a six months' period, and will be 
awarded on high points. Contests are held 
on the last Sunday of each month at the 
San Diego Aeroneers' field on Camp 
Kearny Mesa. Anyone may enter, but 
only club members are eligible for points 
on the trophies. 

PET NOTE 

Due to the short notice of posting the 
request for pet pictures, insufficient prints 
were secured for inclusion in this issue. 
However, this feature will run for sure in 
the next issue, so don't delay. Be sure to 
send in glossy snapshot prints of your 
pets as early as possible. Don't delay. Hand 
them in to the news gatherer in your de- 
partment, or send them to the Consolidator 
thru the mall. Be sure to mark on the 
back of each snapshot, your name and 
clock number and department, as well as 
the name or names of your pets, and any 
other notes about them you wish. 



AVIATION DANCE 

Members of the San Diego Flying Club, 
Inc., Coijsair Flyers and Southern Cali- 
fornia Flyers Club invite all to attend 
a novel Aviation Dance at the Broadway 
pier on Saturday, May 4, starting at 8:30 
P. M. 

A unique and admirable feature of the 
affair is that though unitlve in purpose, 
these three flying clubs are in competition 
with each other in the course of their fly- 
ing and operating activities. 

Laurie Higgins, well known maestro, 
and his 11 -piece orchestra will furnish the 
rythm. Dancing from 8:30 P. M. to ? 

Operators of local flight schools have 
been invited to display posters advertising 
their operations in the ballroom. 

Good fellowship is to be the reigning 
spirit of the evening. Flyers, non-flyers, 
those interested in aviation, those not in- 
terested (we'll probably make you inter- 
ested before you leave) — one and all, are 
invited to come down, do a little dancing, 
a little whining if you prefer, turn a few 
handsprings or plan a high dive off the end 
of the pier — but come on down and join 
the fun! Barney Farley. 

TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

Due to the success of last year's tourna- 
ment and to renewed popular demand, a 
men's singles tennis tournament is to be 
started May 18, 1940, playoffs taking place 
on subsequent Saturday afternoons. 

Players desiring to compete are requested 
to submit name, department, and clock 
number to any committee member by May 
10. Official entry blanks are available 
from committee members or on the tennis 
bulletin board at the south gate. 

Be sure to watch the south gate bulletin 
board for last minute announcements. 

The committee: Hudson (Acctg.) , Ver- 
non (Acctg.), Bill Miller (Wing), Peter- 
son (Loft), Lockwood (Prod.), and Gil- 
christ (Empl.) 

About 450 years ago Leonardo da Vinci 
attempted the first flying machine. His 
assistant Astro, was the first test pilot. 



All communications should be oddressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in port, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S, A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., San Diego, California. 



4P/^' 



^c 



c^ ^ 



(f/ui._ ,/^ r "■^--^^c^" 



Consolidator 



ROD AND REELERS 

By "Brad" Bradshaw 

Membership in the Consair Rod & Reel 
Club is nearing the two hundred mark as 
the result of their recent drive, according 
to Milt Hangen, secretary of the organiza- 
tion. 

Sporting activity, especially fresh water 
and ocean fishing, is getting underway 
rapidly and several fine prospective prize 
winning specimens have been landed al- 
ready. Two groups of deep sea anglers, 
one from Engineering and one from Pro- 
duction have been out to the Coronado 
Islands on chartered trips for a fling at the 
Yellowtail. Roy Coykendall, Glenn Hotch- 
kiss, John Hopman, Leo Bourdon and 
Eddie Lang, dangerous rivals for the An- 
nual prizes, were among the group of 
early birds. 

Roy Smeltzer and Lloyd Bender have 
been stimulating interest in lake fishing 
with several trips to Henshaw. Bill Bel- 
lows is getting his boat ready for regular 
runs and everything points to a banner 
year for hooking the fighting "brain 
food" table decoration. 

Oil up that reel, fellows, and let's get 
going — see you at the "ole swimming 
hole." 




RENT one of our modern 
planes at our low rates. If 
you're not a licensed pilot, 
one of our seasoned instruc- 
tors will take you up. Then 
you take the stick under his 
instruction. Try it today! 



3 



SO PER 

LESSON 




fiy/NG /Efn//ce 



Barnett Avenue at the causeway 
ACROSS FROM MARINE BASE 

Telephone Bayview 5222 • San Diejo 



UNSOLICITED 

when a fellow finds a good thing I be- 
lieve he ought to pass it along, especially 
when by so doing he is not only helping his 
pals but himself. 

And fellows, Flo (?), that's my girl 
friend, pal and wife all in one, and I have 
sure found something good. We've learned 
how to live better for less. 

About a year ago we made a move that 
we now know to be the best we've ever 
made. We've got our own little cottage on 
our own little acre. Here we grow our 
own fruit, our own flowers and our own 
vegetables. It isn't so much the value of 
the things we grow, although we now see 
where this can be made into a material 
saving, but it's the fun of doing these 
things. 

We're close to, but back from, the main 
highway. We're away from the noise and 
traffic hazards and yet we're within 20 
minutes of Consair. 

My spare hours are spent in a manner 
which gives me an entire beneficial change 
from my work at the plant. I know I'm 
a better man at my daily job because of 
this new way of living we've found. Flo 
and I are so busy building up and adding 
to our very own little place and are find- 
ing so much happiness in doing it that, 
— well, we just wanted to pass the idea 
along to you. 

There's plenty of room for many of you 
to do as well or better. 

James R. Lay, 
"Mayor of Mt. Helix." 

YOUR MAINTENANCE GANG 

WHILE the men in the mainten- 
ance division are not on the pro- 
duction line, never let it be said they don't 
produce. 

We are the fellows for whom you call 
when your ability to operate ceases. 
Your call is heard, and there we are, 
whether it be electrical, plumbing or any 
other branch of maintaining operation. 

Let it be known that we feel as much 
a part of production, as wing, hull or 
ailerons of any ship you produce. 

We are "the men behind the guns." 
Your Maintenance Gang, 

R. L. Thomas. 

Scotty McCartney has tired of the fast 
city life, while Hank Liegel yearns for the 
bright lights of the city. Scotty has 
moved to National City and Hank's beau- 
tiful new home is at Mission Beach. 



SAN DIEGO FLYING 
CLUB NEWS 

By A H. Davidson 

(Note: See note elsewhere about the 
Aviation Dance.) 

The grading operations at the Club field, 
Grande Vista Airport, at Otay, Calif., 
have been completed and Tommy Butter- 
field, Melvin "Knute" Knutsen, William 
"Wild Bill" Travis, Charlie Culver and 
Stan Petrol, are to be complimented upon 
the fine job they have done. 

The new Cub "50" is to be delivered on 
Sunday, April 21, 1940, and will be wel- 
comed. Flying activities have been quite 
brisk lately, and this new ship will take 
quite a load off of the Cub "40." The 
Rearwin has just had new bushings in the 
gear case and is in "top" condition. 

Fred Young passed his examinations be- 
fore C. A. A. Inspector on Wednesday, 
April 17, and is now proud owner of a 
private Pilot's License for 2 S. Immedi- 
ately following his license, he took off for 
Yuma, Ariz., with his bride to be. Miss 
Ruth Quiggens. The happy couple were 
married in Yuma and returned that eve- 
ning. This was Mrs. Young's first airplane 
ride. 

On the same day that Fred Young 
passed his tests in the Rearwin, Bud Sel- 
tenreich passed his examinations before 
a C. A. A. Inspector for his Private Pilot's 
License for 1 S, in the Taylor Cub "40." 
Three weeks previously Bud also received 
his Airplane Mech. License, at satisfactory 
completion of examinations given by C. 
A. A. (Civil Aeronautics Authority) . Bud 
is leaving for his old stamping grounds, 
Alaska, and will be missed at the Club as 
he has made many friends in his stay here. 



2905 Pacific Blvd. Next to South Parking Lot 

CONVENIENT 
Lowest Prices on GASOLINE — OiL — LUBRICATION 

THE AIRPLANE STATION 

HOLLEMAN and CROOKS 

Ford Specialists Complete Auto Repair 



Pay Checks Cashed for CustomcTS 



May, 1940 



WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

/. E. Hodgson 

The Wood Shop added to its benedicts 
by the marriage of T. E. Donnelly, April 
13 to Miss Mary Louise Tesseda of San 
Diego, Yuma, Arizona being the place 
where the nuptials were performed '■" "' '' 

After seeing that the right jobs done in 
the department were sent to the proper 
places, Joe Apple after about two years of 
this work, donned an apron and is now 
working on the bench with the pattern 
makers '■' '■' 

Congratulations and good wishes are in 
order to James Carreras on being back on 
the job after a serious spell of pneu- 
monia '' ''' ''' 

Bob Rutan and Gerald Bradbury are 
living at Joe Apple's place. It appears 
that the other night the house was dis- 
turbed by some prowler trying to gain 
entrance illegally. Bob and Joe arose and 
evidently scared away the intruder, but 
"Brad" slept on " '" " 

Herman Drasin is to be congratulated 
on his marriage, April 1 3, to the good look- 
ing and charming lady, Mrs. Ethel Zim- 
merman. Mrs. Drasin has experienced life 
in ways that not many of us do, or desire 
to. Born in Russia, she was forced to flee 
during the revolution. Landing in Shang- 
hai, China, she spent the next 20 years 
there, and just got away from there when 
the Japs started their invasion. Let us hope 
that her marriage begins an era of tran- 
quility, to last the rest of her life ''' '■" "' 

The Wood Shop Baseball team has been 
rather disorganized, due to the fact that 
part of the players have been working on 
the graveyard shift. We have a couple 
of first class pitchers in Harry Whittaker 
and Lloyd Del Nero. However, when the 



'^neui Guinea 
EKpeditian"- $3.50 

A Book For the Air-Minded 

— by Richard Archbold 
and A. L. Rand. 

• A fascinating story, 
with many pictures, of 
Arctibold's expedition 
into New Guinea by 
amphibian plane. New 
insight into the lives of 
head-hunters and canni- 
bals . . . Don't miss this 
book-event! 

STHTIOnERS 

coRPORnrion 

1040 SIXTH AVENUE 



season opens we expect to be right in there 
playing ball. The players are hoping that 
spiked shoes will be allowed, as a safeguard 
again accident due to slipping ''" ''' * 

A new arrival is announced in the per- 
son of Lloyd Ronnie Del Nero, Seven 
pounds, 1% ounces, on April 15. His 
Papa is the ball pitcher and his Mama is 
just that, his Mom, "and ain't that 
sumpin'," Mrs. D. N. Best wishes ''' '•' '■' 

Bill Clark, wearing a pair of bell 
bottomed overalls, was grubbing out 
some willow shoots out of his garden. Sud- 
denly he started a combination Indian war 
dance and Irish jig. During his gyrations 
something shot out of his pants leg; it 
turned out to be a lizard about six inches 
long, in search of adventure prob- 
ably '■' '■' '■■ 

The Consair Swimming Club especially 
invites lady swimmers to join its ranks and 
take part m the many swim contests and 
other activities that will ensue during the 
coming summer months. This invitation 
includes both lady employees of Con- 
iol'idatcd or the lady relatives of other 
workers in the plant. Contact John Wood- 
head, Sr., for further particulars '' ''" "' 

According to Chf Berger we don't have 
to worry about being slaves in the U. S. A. 
at least not while the kids at the gates are 
seOing "Liberty" for a nickel '■' "' '' 

We are hoping to see Lymn Baker back 
on the job again soon. Don't forget old 
boy, we are all pulling for you, so hurry 
and get well. '■' '•' '•' 

Don't you believe it: 
"Little dabs of powder, 
Little drops of paint. 
Always make a girl 
Look like what she aint." 

Fellow at lunch counter: "Will you 
change that Swiss Cheese sandwich I or- 
dered to American Cheese?" 

Waitress (to cook) : "Naturalize that 
cheese sandwich!" 

An ignorant man is often our own in- 
ability to understand his method of 
explaining or reasoning. 



LINDBERGH FIELD CAFE 

Administration Building 
Lindbergh Field 



"The Home of Aviation." 
BREAKFAST SERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 




succeeds in the 

AVIATION 
WORLD? 

THE TRAINED MAN SUC- 
CEEDS ! The untrained man is 
doomed to failure — unless he 
GETS practical knowledge. 

Look at the men who hold 
responsible positions through- 
out the aviation industry. With- 
out exception, they are 
TRAINED MEN — and their 
training raises them above the 
"common level" of the industry ! 

Since 1891, nearly 5,000,000 
men have enrolled with the 
I. C. S. More than 2000 progres- 
sive concerns have employee- 
training agreements with these 
world-wide schools. I. C. S. 
graduates hold high positions 
in EVERY industrial field. 

We believe there is food for 
thought— for EMPLOYER and 
EMPLOYEE — in these facts! 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



BOX 1477-C, SCRANTON, PENNA. 

Send me full particulars about the course 
before which I have marked X: 
n AVIATION 

□ Accounting 

□ Auto Electric Technician 

□ Auto Technician 

□ Business Management 
\^ Diesel Engines 

n High School 

□ Mechanical Engineering 
n Traffic Management 



..Age.. 



Name 

Address - 

City State 

Present Position 

VOCATIONAL ADVISORS: 
H. R. SIDNEY I. L. LEAVY 



926 Broadway 
Phone: M-1619 

SAN DIEGO, 



2635 Univ. Ave. 
Phone: J-8267 
CALIF. 



Consolidator 




WELL, the news deadline has caught 
up with me again, and if I only 
had the descriptive ability of Bradshaw, 
the "seeing eye" of Production column, 
I could really make some use of the girls' 
column. However, maybe fifteen scraps 
of paper, scribbled notes, and pencil 
scrawlings will find their way into a 
column. Hope so. 

There is something new under the sun: 
Florence Cannon has an attractive new 
hair-do; Juanita Smith has a new affliction, 
"occupational neurosis" in her left arm 
(your guess is as good as mine) a newly- 
acquired niece sent Lois Campbell dashing 
to Los Angeles recently. Lois reports that 
being an aunt for the first time is a darned 
unique experience; Norma Haugard is the 
new addition to the switchboard; Louise 
Girodon has a new shade of lipstick. 

Comes spring and the heat of noon 
sends four weary working girls up hills 
and around canyons to munch in Balboa's 
shade and greenth. Brendan Fottrell, 
Louise Girodon, Mary Eleanor Meredith 
and yours truly, hop nimbly aboard 
Nijinsky, the Leaping Ford, and away we 
go! 

Consolidated now has 54 feminine em- 
ployees. 



Since Grace Koenig has been working 
nights, we don't get a chance to converse 
with her. So from all the rest of us — 
"Hello, Gracie!" 

Girl: "I know a man who has been 
married ten years and he still stays home 
every evening." 

Boy: "That's what I call love!" 
Girl: "The doctor calls it paralysis." 
Any man who sits in the electric chair 
gets amps in his pants. 

Mary Eleanor (to current boy friend): 
"What did the ocean say to the airplanes 
going by?" "Nothing, it just rolled over 
and waved." 

Brendan contributes the following: 
A recent Satevepost article "Bombers 
by the Pound" whipped up in an idle hour 
(we don't have them here!) by an em- 
ployee in the Production Department of 
an aircraft factory gives the newcomer 
to this exciting business an insight into the 
whys and wherefores of the game. Writ- 
ten in a conversational manner, it is easily 
read and digested. 

We all respect Carl Griebner, who comes 
to work nice and early so we may share 
his Los Angeles Times before starting the 
toil of the day. Yes, indeed, he is allowed 
to read it at lunch time! 




lylitlnctlon.., 

St u una... 

Are Reflected 




JESSOP'S BETROTHAL SETS 

Prices range from $19.75 to $1445.00... Credit, of course! 

Dependable jewelers since 1870 

J Jessop 0V, Ooi\s 

104|-fIfTH <1VE. I FRdNKLIN 



HULLABALOO 

Ey Al Leonard 

The Hull Championship basketball 
team had their pictures taken for this issue 
of the Consolidator. All the boys but 
Kunkel look as though they were four 
points behind with but one minute to 
play. Kunkel has that happy (slap) 
smile on his face since he injured his head 
in an auto accident. The picture would 
have had better light reflection if Freddie 
Grossher and "Scotty" Rutherford were 
at each end. 

Tommy Johnson says he has a chance 
to be a jockey at Caliente if he can lose ten 
pounds. How Tommy could lose ten 
pounds without losing a leg or getting a 
short haircut is beyond comprehension. 
Tommy has discovered that it is far better 
to be on a horse yourself, than to put your 
money on him. 

Walt Hassler, King of the Hull 
dispatchers, claims that his newest floor- 
walker, Andy Lyman, is the best looking 
man in the plant and is ready to start a 
beauty contest to settle any argument. 
"Scavenger" Galley says he saw Andy first 
and warns everyone away from him. 

Nick Tuevesky's little Russian colony 
is thriving nicely under their little glass 
cages. 

Glenn Hotchkiss and his Hull Rod and 
Reelers staged a "bleitzkreig" off the shore 
of Coronado Islands recently and scuttled 
a flock of large yellowtail. Glen was 
high man with ten hooked. There would 
have been more fish caught if "Yap- Yap" 
Hopman, the Anchovie King, hadn't put 
all the bait in his sack. 

It seems that the Hull Sudden Death 
Golf Tournaments are becoming too 
tough for one man to win by himself. The 
last two tournaments ended up in ties. 
Mike Brooks and Freddie Grossher won the 
last one by a narrow margin. Mike has 
been the winner the last two times. Page 
the handicapper! 

There is no grief! 

Disappointments that come our way 
Are only testing scales 

That weigh our human clay. 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

^w. optometrist ^^^ 
Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



May, 1940 



DRIFTING THRU DRAFTING 

By Jeff Bouley 

FOR years Ron Crandall has nursed a 
desire to do something really nautical. 
When he reached the age at which boys 
run away to sea, a thrilling Tarzan serial 
was on at his neighborhood theater so he 
passed up the chance. But all this talk 
one hears now of naval expansion was just 
too much for Ron, and he finally went up 
to Long Beach and purchased a small 
cabin cruiser. On the following week-end 
Skipper Crandall and his crew (Hank 
Wheeler) went up to sail the boat home. 

All went well on the voyage until they 
were passing the Scripps pier at La JoUa, 
where they spied their wives watching 
their progress. Heaving to, they tried to 
converse with the gals but their seafaring 
voices were as yet undeveloped and lacked 
that foghorn quality, rendering conversa- 
tion well nigh impossible over the pound- 
ing of the surf. Unable to understand 
even the gestures of the wives, Ron finally 
bellowed "Send us a post card!" and steered 
out to sea. The girls hurried dutifully to 
obey the orders as they understood them. 
When they reached the nearest phone they 
called the Coast Guard. 

A short time later a cutter steamed up 
to Skipper Ron's boat and a two-inch 
towing hawser was heaved aboard. And 
this, friends, was the beginning of a beauti- 
ful friendship which lasted until 3 A. M. 
when the Coast Guard boys awakened 
Skipper Ron and crew to inform them that 
they and the boat were safely home. 

"The fat is on the fire" is an old adage 
which seems to fit the situation every once 
in a while. Perhaps a bit envious because 
of the amazing pyrotechnics display on 
by the stress gang in their recent fire drill. 



RENTER COMPANY, mc. 


724 BROADWAY 


I4IAIN 4392 


CREDIT CLOTHIERS 


For Men 


For Women 


Suits 


Coats 


Topcoats 


Dresses 


Hats 


Shoes 


Shoes 


Lingerie 


Furnishings 


Skirts and 


Neckwear 


Blouses 


NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 


Pay as Little 


as 50c Weekly 



Lauren Bonnell contributed a very fine 
individual performance for the benefit of 
the boys in the loft. Lauren, who is en- 
dearingly known to his intimates as "The 
Crisco Kid," was crouched on a loft board 
explaining it to someone. As he slid down 
off the board he suddenly went into a very 
lively jig punctuated by a series of glides 
and dips. It developed that during the 
descent from the table the matches in his 
hip pocket were ignited and the pocket 
containing the burning matches and some 
hot money were the motive power for his 
antics. At least accounts, Dick Cella and 
Frank Ranahan, a bit abashed at not being 
booked on Broadway for their parts in the 
Junior League Follies, were starting a local 
Conwlidafed dancing school and were seek- 
ing Bunny for a star pupil in the rhumba. 
It has been brought to our attention 
that Graham McVicker was really the one 
who carried the extinguisher to Abe Klig- 
man's fire last month. For this inaccuracy 
we apologize, but with so many little 
squirts running around the drafting room 
these days our mistaken identity can read- 
ily be understood. Some other things that 
should bear a little further investigation, 
by the way, are Ken Whitney's lavishness 
on those gal friends, wedding bells for 
Johnny Valuch and George Harnack, 
Howard Macdonald's tattered wing tips, 
Chuck McCabe tossing 50-cent pieces in 
gaboons, George Clayton having six nails 
on one foot, Prince Louie Minella's evi- 
dent color-blindness. Jack Treat's gunshot 
wound from his boy's toy cannon, and 
One-Reel Freel's amazing movies. 

SEEING IS BELIEVING 

Magistrate: So your only defense is that 
you were drunk when you kissed this lady. 
How can you prove that? 

Defendant: Well, just take a good look 
at her yourself, Judge. 

An expert is a fellow who'll tell you 
"it won't work." A genius is the fellow 
who removes the "won't", substitutes, 
"Let's" . . . and makes it work. 

Never say die . . . say D , and 

start again. 



On Mother^s Day 

tell her with flowers! 



EXCLUSIVE 

SIXTH .ind B STREETS 
FRANKLIN B 233 




with Bud Landis 



In the autumn, many Great Open 
Spaces close for the season. 

• • • 

The mountain Fastness slows down 
for the winter. 

• • • 

The Wildwood grows tame, curls 
up under 6 ft. of soft, white climate. 

• • • 

Then along comes this time of year 
and Nature starts to tidy up the 
landscape for guests. 




The Call of the Open Road resounds 
across fertile valleys and is relayed 
into teeming towns. 

• • • 

Right now, as eyes turn to far hori- 
zons, it's well for you to time your 
trip and chart your course. 

• • • 

Before you take to the throttle for 
a summer tour, here's a helpful tip : 
Drive into your Shell Dealer's 
Station and unfold your plans. 

• • • 

He'll get you full facts on wind, 
weather, or the cost per person. 




If you have no plans, he'll unfold 

some for you. 

• • • 

He'll send into Shell Touring Serv- 
ice. They'll lay a special route, up 
and down, east and west, or over 

and above. 

• • • 

It's all as free as that zestful air 
you're going to breathe when you 
get 'way out yonder on the big 
vacation trip. 



Consolidator 



BOWLING NEWS 

By H. K. Clay 

THE curtain was lowered on the 1939- 
1940 bowling season at the San Diego 
Club when some 150 keglers and their 
friends joined forces with Consair officials 
at a huge banquet in compliment to the 
victorious quint — the Experimental ag- 
gregation of pin-biffers. 

Arranged by Dan Miller and Harvey 
Muck, the banquet was acclaimed the most 
successful of any similar affair ever staged 
in the region. The motif throughout the 
decorations and menu was kegling and 
Messrs. Miller and Muck supplied many 
novel ideas which won the plaudits of 
the guests. 

In addition to the feted team which is 
composed of Ward Levere, Otto Peter- 
hansel, Eddie Lang, Walter Sherwood and 
Russell Wright, a dozen or so local cele- 
brities were present as honor guests. Head- 
ing the list were Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Fleet, of Coitsolidafed; Mrs. and Mrs. I. M. 
Laddon, Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Leigh, and Mr. 
and Mrs. J. L. Kelley, and Preston Lock- 
wood, of Consolidated; Mrs. Regina W. 
Coker of Sunshine Alleys, and Col. and 
Mrs. Clark. 

Over a thousand dollars in prize money 
was distributed to the various teams by 



MISSION 

DRY 
CLEANERS 



MISSION DRY CLEANING 

IS LIKE CONSOLIDATED 

AIRPLANES ... IT FLIES 

ABOVE ALL 



Phone J-4139 
ADDRESS 105 WASH. 




Bowling alley wizards . . . Top row are the winners of the Engineers' League, the Loft No. 1 
team. Left to right: Frank Learman, Phil Taber, Bill Summers, Tom Coughlin and Herb Sharp. Second 
row are the winners of the I4-team league, the Experimental team: Ed Lang (Navy office), Otto Peter- 
hansel, Walter Sherwood, Ward Levere, and Russell Wright. Bottom, some of the outstanding stars. 
High 3-game series during the league, Frank Fields (Purchasing) 647. Second Mike Brooks (Hull No. 1) 
64S. Mike also took second highest average kegler with 180. Third from left is Hal Leppart highest 
average kegler with 182, and W. N. Liddle (Production No. 1) who startled the boys by wiping off a 
neat 275. 



Major Fleet. Experimental, by virtue of 
winning top honors, came in for the Lion's 
share of the melon, romping off with ap- 
proximately one hundred simoleons. 

As in the case of the first banquet, the 
inimitable Irish wit, Tom Coughlin of the 
Engineers, presided as toastmaster and his 
quips kept the feast mongers in jovial 
mood. 

After dinner the guests wound up the 
evening by tripping the light fantastic 
while those whose feet refused to behave 
found solace in the vestibules watching 
the galloping dominoes. 

Following is the apportionment of the 
prize money for the fourteen team bowling 
league as announced at the banquet: 

Experimental $102.00 

Hull No. 1 88.00 

Engineering 81.50 

Production No. 2 81.50 

Finish 72.00 

Production No. 1 69.00 

Purchasing 69.00 



Hull No. 2 64.00 

Maintenance 61.00 

Machine Shop 57.00 

Tank 48.00 

Final Assembly 41.00 

Raw Material 38.00 

Sheet Metal _:„_„_:_„■- 36.00 

Top individual honors for the season 
insofar as average is concerned go to 
Hal Leppart who emerged with an 182. 
Mike Brooks was close on Leppart's heels 
with 180 while Henry Myers occupied 
third spot with 178. Tom Coughlin carved 



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Leading Aircraft 
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May, 1940 



an immortal niche in the bowlers' hall of 
fame with his 175 while Frank Gary of 
the Purchasing aggregation was next on 
the list with 172. Irving Craig had 171, 
Wait Sherwood 170 while Eddie Lang 
of Experimental had 169. Bob Wahl was 
ninth on the list with 168 and Harold 
Hauptmann was number ten with 167. 

The Engineers wound up their five man 
season last month with the quint from 
Loft No. 1 taking top honors. Phil Taber, 
Herb Sharp, Bill Summers, Tom Coughlin 
and Frank Learman made up the per- 
sonnel of the winning club which went 
through the season winning 54 points and 
losing 30. The team from Hull copped 
second honors with 48 wins and the Flap 
came in for third place with 47 wins. 

Engineers League — Final Standing: 

W. L. 

Loft No. 1 54-30 

Hull - -48-36 

Flap 47-37 

Loft No. 2 — 46-3 8 

Loft No. 3 41-43 

Armament 40-44 

General 36-48 

Fixed Equipment 24-60 

Several Consair keglers have signed up 
for the various Summer leagues and will 
thus keep in trim for the 1940 season. 
A team from the Engineers will participate 



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in the 830 league at the Sunshine and Ben 
Duffy is organizing a team to take part in 
one of the minor leagues. 

Another Engineers' league consisting 
of three players to a team with the club 
limited to eight entries is competing at 
the Sunshine Alleys. The novel Trio league 
will not stop shooting until August when 
many of them will enter the Sun's annual 
singles championship tournament. 

Ted Schwarz, who bowls on the Gity 
Dye Works team of the Novice league is 
another kegler to win a shirt offered by 
the National Shirt Shop. Ted missed his 
mark by two pins in foretelling a series 
one night last month. Russell Wright of 
Experimental is another shirt winner. Russ 
won his prize in the Consair circuit just 
before the league curfew sounded. 

The Sunshine management wishes to ex- 
press its deep appreciation to the Consah 
keglers for their patronage and excellent 
sportsmanship during the past season. All 
Sunshine officials are in accord with Mrs. 
Goker that Consair produces a fine bunch 
of bowlers and they will be missed pending 
the opening of the fall season. 

I would like to sign off for this season 
with a prophecy that this fall will see the 
biggest industrial league ever assembled on 
the West Goast. With five thousand men 
employed at Consolidated and with bowl- 
ing going over the top in popularity there 
is a probability that this fall will see a 
fifth or sixth team league take over the 
Sunshine Alleys on three or four nights. 
Major Fleet appreciates the morale build- 
ing value of bowling and is heartily in 
accord with kegling as one of the im- 
portant athletic functions of the com- 
pany. With Bill Gilchrist on the job there 
are going to be some records smashed this 
fall. Until then — adios! 

U. S. private airplanes in 1938 flew over 
100,000,000 miles. 

A gentleman is a fellow who steps on 
his cigarette so it won't burn the carpet. 

There will someday be a substitute for 
writing ... it is far too bunglesome. 



HERTZ 



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Stations — San Diego to Vancouver 



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30th and El Cajon 



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FOR MOTORISTS 




FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

Tires and Tubes 
Batteries 
Spark Plugs 
Life Protector Tubes 
Motor Tune-up Dept. 
Brake Department 
Auto Radio and Service 
Four Brands of Gasoline 
Auto Accessories 
Seat Covers 

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WING KEYHOLE 

By Browne 

W. H. Armstrong will have to do his 
hunting in the daytime due to the fact 
he is coming on nights. Wonder if Army 
will pay off all those bets he made regard- 
ing night shift? 

Jack Campbell says he was walking past 
the Center section nacelle jig and noticed 
a new addition to the fixture. Upon closer 
investigation he discovered Bob Elo was 
badly entangled and hanging by his belt. 

Flash! John Petit is to teach at Voca- 
tional School. Tough luck John, it's not 
co-educational! 

"Limey" Bartlett lost one of his daugh- 
ters recently. Binnie slipped out and was 
married. "Limey" still has one daughter 
left. 

Johnny "Popeye" Petit and "Barnicle" 
Joe Ryan, unexperienced seamen, at- 
tempted to sail Johnny's boat from Pacific 
Beach to Mission Beach. Before reaching 
their destination they became marooned on 
a sandbar which was a larger percent 
mud. If you weren't there you missed a 
good show. Popeye, Barnicle and boat, 
were mud from stem to stern! 

TANK HIGHLIGHTS 

By Herthel Chappell 

Ernie Backhaus has been very ill with 
lock-jaw, but is now on the road to recov- 
ery. We hope he'll be back with us soon. 
Good luck, Ernie, we're pulling for you. 

News from Dan Cupid: Fred Margan, 
who has evaded the bonds of matrimony 
for some time, has finally been caught by 
Cupid. The wedding will take place in 
July. The bride-to-be is Miss Marian Heck. 
Good luck to both. 

Why did Sid Riches change his wedding 
date from June to the middle of August? 
Getting jittery, Sid? 

Don't be surprised if a Ford roars by you 
as though you were backing up. It may be 
Ted Schwarz in that hopped up V-8 he 
has been working on for the past three 
months. Watch out for the black and 
white motorcycles, Ted! 

Good advice: The mind that borrows 
nonsense will never lend wisdom. Atten- 
tive listening is the main ingredient to 
being well informed. 



SEE THE 1940 
INDIANS 

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE SALES CO. 

GUY UROUHART 
1041 Columbia St. San Diego 

Open Evenings • Terms 



SOARING MEET . . . 

A group of employees of Consolidated 
were permitted to enjoy a week of gliding 
and soaring at the Third Annual Arvin 
Glider meet. Friday, April 12th, groups 
of these men left for their "Soaring Fest" 
held at Arvin, Calif., April 13 to 21. As 
this copy goes to press, each has made some 
showing as to his ability in the handling of 
ships, mostly of their own design and con- 
struction. 

Sunday the 14th, Ray Parker of the 
Model Shop was fortunate in hooking a 
group of thermals, riding these for 28 
miles to the Kern County Airport just be- 
yond Bakersfield. He spent the next day 
soaring in cloudy and overcast conditions 
for four hours. It was a rough ride. 

Jerry Litell of Inspection, spent most of 
his time working on his ship to satisfy the 
C. A. A. The rest of the time he was 
making trips over the pinnacle to the val- 
ley, then hauling his ship back to the 
field. Harry Comer of Tool Room, and 
Victor Korski of Hulls, took turns acting 
as navigator and co-pilot in Dick Essery's 
two place sailplane. Harry flew to Lebec 
which is 3 5 miles to the south of Arvin. 
They collected $3 5 for a goal prize. Victor 
Korski hopped the clouds with Dick to 
McFarland, 5 miles short of their goal and 
$25. 



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May, 1940 



THINGS THAT COME 

OUT AT NIGHT 

By Craig 

THEY say that Spring does things to 
a young man, but we didn't know 
until recently how suddenly this could 
happen. It seems that Ivan Minnech of 
Bench was taking his girl friend home 
after a short visit in San Diego. Ivan had 
started for Pasadena, and was all the way 
to Old Town when "Spring" got in its 
"licks." The result was Ivan wound up 
in Yuma with a wife. It's a good thing 
Don Cornell didn't go with him although 
maybe Don could use a wife. 

The people who saw a man on skates 
racing down the main aisle one week 
couldn't all have been wrong. It hap- 
pened that they weren't. They were look- 
ing at a young man with new ideas. Need- 
less to say the idea rated a "red ticket" 
in a hurry. 

Ray Kendall of Hull asks, "Why do 
these things happen to me?" Ray was out 
in the back yard practicing casting with 
a brand new $3 silk line when a neighbor 
called him to help move a trunk. While 
Ray was gone his wife tried to "hook" 
the neighbor's cat and finally landed the 
washing. Ray spent 3 hours trying to 
untangle the line and then had to cut it 
in two. 




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When Eddie Hanzlik and a crew from 
Experimental worked the third shift for 
a week the fellows decided not to shave. 
The rest of the boys had something to 
show for it, but Eddie says he didn't shave 
either. 

Al Blair of Spotweld had a lot of ex- 
plaining to do to friend wife when she 
found that strange piece of jewelry in Al's 
car. He finally convinced her, when the 
lady in question claimed the jewelry. It 
was Jack Bryant's little girl, Patty, who 
put Al on the spot. 

Nick Tuevesky of Hull needed another 
helper. George Wire agreed. Said George, 
"Nick, I'll get you another taxidermist." 
I don't want a taxidermist," shouted 
Nick, "I want an American or nothing!" 

Grico, that sterling thoroughbred, 
owned by Consolidafed's "Mr. Howard" 
had trouble at the barrier one week. For 
a few moments it was a question whether 
the horse was going to ride the jockey, or 
the jockey the horse. When finally un- 
tangled it was too late for Grico to do 
any running. Mr. Howard doesn't feel 
so bad, however, as Grico redeemed him- 
self a week later. 

Joe Kraemer and Tod Carter of Pro- 
duction, and Bob Jones of Hull are the 
proud "dads" this month. Tod has that 
special look which means a boy, but Joe 
and Bob are just as proud of their baby 
girls. Hope you guys can do a washing. 

"Roll out the barrel" Busby, is so 
excited about his new home in Rolando 
Village that he has invited the whole Wing 
Dept. out for a Beer Bust. If the invita- 
tion includes "Poncho" Petit and his tail 
gang you really have an order to "R. O. 
T. B." 

Tod Carter and Don Rasmussen wanted 
to play last Friday night, so when a glass 
of beer fell out of Tod's hand and landed 
all over Don, the game had only started. 
Came time to go home and Tod found 
the steering wheel covered with glue and 
the floor of the car covered with pepper. 
Any one interested in other diabolical 
schemes may see Rasmussen. 

Steve Lenovitch of Paint, had to shake 
the fruit off of his fruit trees in order to 
let the leaves grow. Steve just bought 



the ranch. George Wire of Hull wonders 
why he had two flat tires on the way to 
work when the tires only had 37,000 miles 
on them "Enough" Light is new third 
Shift paint inspector. Lloyd "first with 
the latest" Bender again has dazzled the 
boy with his new spring outfit. Even the 
shoes are pretty. Browne has moved to the 
beach, by the way, and now wears his 
good clothes to work. Morris "Phooster" 
Neason of Bench, spilled a gallon of primer 
the other night and then to top things 
off, spilled a thermos of coffee all over 
himself. In the bench, the name "Phooster" 
is synonymous with fluster. 

As early as 1915 a Sperry "Stabilizer", 
the real ancestor of the automatic pilot as 
we know it today, was tried out in a 
Curtis boat. 



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Consair Club Class Lessons, including one 
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Classes forming for Children and Adults in 
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MACHINE "OIL" 

By Al Pfeiffer 

The passing of Pop Camp leaves the 
drill press with a space that is hard to fill. 
Unusually adept at minute drilling opera- 
tions he worked with the finesse of a 
watchmaker which is exactly the trade he 
pursued as a young man in Switzerland. 
His tools show the well worn usage of 60 
years. Infected with his stoicism we can 
only say: "Happy Landings, Pop!" 

The Stork Transport Service worried 
Crist Gonzales for some time but finally 
consented to deliver a 10 lb. package of 
masculinity. What kind of a team employs 
12 players, Crist? The Bert Calverts re- 
port no cause for complaint in rates for a 
six pounder. 

That tremor emanating from the San 
Diego Club a few Saturdays ago contrary 



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Silvertown Stores 



905 B Street Phone F. 6258 



to all reports was not the prophesied earth- 
quake, but Owen Gandee's debut into 
society. Tail down and nose up Owen. 

Evey Davis, the Machine Shop's claim- 
ant to pugilistic fame now realizes the full 
significance of the term "blackout." A 
brown bomber passing overhead put out 
the lights. Cosmic ray punch? 

While it may not be news, Roy Larceval 
is now "producing" for Production. Keep 
up the good work Roy! 

Terpsichorean artist of no mean abihty 
is Dick Frauenfelder. Ace man on the stag 
line, he will insidiously worm his way into 
the affections of your best girl. 

Bill Hughes' enforced vacation isn't 
really as bad as we had imagined. To be 
regaled by a bevy of beautiful nurses in 
an atmosphere not altogether unsoothing 
calls for a bit of sympathy for all of us 
who must toil the weary hours. 
•^ 

We feel it only fair to warn the boys in 
the drill press that John Howard is a past 
master in the science of Criminology. 
Studies at Northwestern and in the school 
of behavioristic psychology make him a 
potential "G" man. You cannot evade this 
man. 

Our friend Haddon is actually keeping 
his nose to the grindstone these days. 
Everyone we know tries to make him smile 
without success; fact of the matter is, he 
will not even say, "Chevrolet." 

Hiss the villain, Jesse James Barnes, who 
takes fiendish delight in snapping his un- 
suspecting victims in awkward poses. 
Plague take the varmint. 



Passmore's formula for keeping cool is 
a tin hat and rolled-up trouser legs. Don't 
worry if you can't see the connection. 
Who knows what goes on in the minds of 
mice and men? 

It rarely happens that such mistakes are 
made, but we must admit that those Navi- 
gators' Table Light Shades do resemble 
funnels. Which brings to mind the fact 
that plans are now being formulated for 
the Machine Shop outing. Please refer your 
suggestions to the committee in charge. 



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11 



HEARD ABOUT THE HULL 

By Bill Pe/tit 

IT seems that Johnny Hopman, that all 
around sportsman in the Hull Dept., 
was in the "pink of condition" a few 
weeks ago. Taking an active part in one 
of the Hull's well known golf tourna- 
ments, found Johnny calmly hating the 
weather; his clubs; the general public; 
and himself for living. To make the day 



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perfect, he wound up and with perfect 
form drove his best pipe over the fence. 
P. S. He missed the ball! 

The big sporting event of the year 
came off when the Hull Softball Team 
played Al Ballard's boys from Cutting. 
All was going well when a high fly was 
hit to the infield. Running like mad, 
George Galley, who was on first at the 
time, galloped clear to the home plate 
when he realized that there was only one 
out. George made it two! 

"Say," said Al Clark to an attentive 
clerk, "did you hear what one train said 
to the other?" "No, I don't believe I 
did." "Woo! Woo!" smirked Al. 

When April Fools day rolled around, 
some of the boys thought they might 
pull a fast one on Russ Kern, Hull In- 
spector. Nearing his desk they saw a 
nickel lying on the steps and many a 
splinter was acquired before they realized 
it was mailed down. 

Did Russ have anything to do with 
that? The boys think so. 

It looks like the fishing season has hit 
its stride in full in the Hull. Johnny Hop- 
man claims that the best food in the world 
are those Ensenada anchovies. While Red 
Chaplin claims that the only thing you 
get in Ensenada is stuck in the mud! 

Well, anyway, one thing should be 
settled this year. Do the fish or the Hull 
gang have more fun on these fishing trips! 

Withdrawing from the last Hull De- 
partment golf tournament at the final 
moment, Sammy Gallaso, called the Dap- 
per Dan of the Greens, caused quite a bit 
of confusion in the ranks, but was forgiven 
when he explained he had to make an 
emergency visit to Escondido. Imagine 
his surprise and chagrin when he encount- 
ered a few of the contestants who had 
stayed over to play that afternoon. And 
who did he have with him but that lovely 
"Trip to Escondido." 



"This is hard to take," cried the burg- 
lar, as he staggered out with the piano. 



rlV Over the Highways 
On a 1940 

HRRLEV-DnUIDSOn 




W. J. RUHLE 

929 India Street San Diego 

Write for Catalog 
Open to 8 p. m. Terms 




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JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



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Phone, Main 6168 



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Consolidator 

ing their operations. For instance, it is 
vitally concerned with the forecast and 
weather data given out on the massed 
flights of the PBYs to Hawaii and else- 
where. It function is to prepare forecasts 
of the conditions which will be encount- 
ered enroute; when rain will be met, what 
the cloud conditions are, what ceiling may 
be expected, how strong the wind and 
from what directions it will be blowing; 
all this, during a trip lasting fifteen to 
twenty hours and covering 2500 to 3000 
miles. Synoptic weather maps are pored 
over in the "ready room" just before take- 
off, and in addition changes in weather 
conditions, determined from surface ships 
along the line, are broadcast to the planes 
in flight as a guide as to what to expect, 
or to avoid, as the weather conditions 
change. Thru the courtesy of this office 
the following sample is reproduced: 

FORECAST SAN DIEGO TO HONOLULU: 
SAN DIEGO PARTLY CLOUDY CEILING 
4S00 FEET TO UNLIMITED VISIBILITY 
GOOD SURFACE WINDS LIGHT NORTH- 
WEST X SAN DIEGO TO LONG 12! PARTLY 
CLOUDY CLOUD BASE 5 000 FEET TOPS 7000 
WIND WEST NORTHWEST 18 KNOTS VISI- 
BILITY 10 MILES X LONG 125 TO 13! 
BROKEN CLOUDINESS TWO LEVELS BASE 
3000 TOPS 4000 BASE 6000 TOPS 8000 
SCATTERED SHOWERS VISIBILITY 10 
MILES WINDS VEERING TO NORTH 18 
TO 22 KNOTS X LONG 135 TO 145 BROKEN 
CLOUDINESS TWO LEVELS BASE 1500 TOPS 
3 500 BASE 6000 TOPS 8000 VISIBILITY 12 
MILES WINDS VEERING TO NORTHEAST 
18 KNOTS X LONG 145 TO li! PARTLY 
CLOUDY SCATTERED CLOUDS AT LOW 
AND INTERMEDIATE LEVELS CEILING 
MOSTLY UNLIMITED VISIBILITY 15 MILES 
WINDS VEERING TO EAST NORTHEAST 20 
KNOTS X PEARL HARBOR PARTLY CLOUDY 
TO CLOUDY WITH SHOWERS CEILING 2000 
FEET CUMULUS TOPS TO 12000 VISIBILITY 
12 MILES EXCEPT IN SHOWERS X FLIGHT 
CONDITIONS AVERAGE TO GOOD X 
FLIGHT TIME 18 HOURS X 



THE young lady who wrote, "Gentle- 
men Prefer Blondes" may just have 
wanted to start an argument, but that 
Aerographers prefer blondes, can be 
proven. As a matter of fact, for the eleven 
years that the Aerographer at North Island 
has been making the daily flights to alti- 
tudes of between 15,000 and 16,000 feet 
(weather permitting) he has invariably 
carried aloft a lock of blonde hair. 

How come that this startling fact about 
the preference of aerographers being defi- 
nitely on the blonde side was discovered? 
Over at North Island the other day to 
get a bit of information on the Alaska 
flight of the XPB2Y-1, it was learned 
that the worst weather on the whole 
flight was right here in San Diego. That 



AEROGRAPHERS 



didn't seem fair to the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and likewise it suddenly dawned, 
that one of the most important things 
affecting the intense flying activities at 
the field, was simply the weather. There- 
fore, the Aerographer's office would be a 
good place to go to get some dope on the 
all important weather. 

The first discovery on the road to find- 
ing that Aerographers prefer blondes was 
that there are two "weather stations" in 
operation on North Island. One belongs 
to the Aircraft Scouting Force and deals 
most intimately with the weather affect- 



"Cloud effects courtesy of plant photographer Otto Menge and 
Dame Mother Nature." 



This station, complete in itself, belongs 
to the Scouting Force, and can pack up 
bag and baggage and move with the Force 
should a change in the seat of operations 
be made. 

Thus it does not interfere with the es- 
tablished North Island Naval Air Station 
Aerological Office. This office provides the 
weather data for all the station planes. 
Aircraft Battle Force planes, and the 
Marines. From this office, for the past 
eleven years, daily flights to between 
15,000 and 16,000 feet have been made, 
to catch a bird'seye view of the weather 
aloft, and a written record of the condi- 
tions encountered, thanks in part, to the 
preference aerographers have for blondes. 



May. 1940 



13 



Lieut. W. E. Oberholtzer, Jr., U.S.N., 
Naval Air Station Aerological Officer, in 
charge of the operations, very graciously 
detailed an officer to explain the workings 
of the instruments which enable the men 
to make their forecasts and to gain a pic- 
ture of what may be expected of the 
weather in advance. 

Each morning along about 5:00 a.m. 
the Chief Aerographer has to roll out of 
a comfortable bed and make ready for 
his flight which will last about an hour. 
At a little before six, he fastens his Aero- 
graph on the plane and takes off. Then he 
heads upward at a rate as near 300 feet 
per minute as is possible. He is in 
radio voice communication with his 
ground office and as he circles upward he 
reports the condition of the atmosphere 
as to clouds, haze, visibility, height of 
ceiling, thickness of clouds, etc. Meantime 
he notes his altimeter and takes readings 
from his strut thermometer. The Aero- 
graph, by clockwork is meanwhile plot- 
ting a complete and continuous record of 
altitude readings, temperature changes and 
moisture variation. These three factors in 
the measurement of the atmospheric condi- 
tions have an inter-related influence on 
each other, and certain corrections must 
be made from these records in order 
to gain the true picture. The strut 
thermometer and the altimeter readings are 
simply an additional check. 

In some localities, "Radio Meteoro- 
graphs" are employed for this work. These 
are small free balloons which carry aloft 
a small radio which transmits moisture, 
altitude and temperature measurements 
as the radio meteorograph ascends, and 
these are intercepted from the ground. The 



ilar to an altimeter, except that it meas- 
ures directly in millibars, or units of pres- 
sure, which are more convenient for the 
work than inches of mercury or feet of 
altitude, (neither of which is direct meas- 
ure of pressure). 

The third recording instrument accounts 
for the moisture variation. It is here that 
the blondes come in, for the instrument 
depends, for its operation, on the changes 
in length that take place when human 
hair comes in contact with more or less 
moisture. It seems that blonde hair is far 
more susceptible to such variations, and 
much more uniformly so, probably due 
to the lack of pigment. So, should you 
hear a blonde say that the moisture in the 
air makes her hair "unmanageable," agree 
with her most heartily. The aerographer 
will back you up. If a brunette makes the 
same kind of a remark, agree with her 
also, and keep what you know about the 
aerographer's preference . . . completely 
to yourself. 

Due to the peculiar atmospheric condi- 
tions that exist at San Diego the aero- 
graphers at North Island had to do a bit 
of altering to the standard Aerographs. 
It seems that the upper air encountered 
often runs into an "Inversion" or reversal 
of temperatures, and this, combined with 
very dry air aloft would sometimes make 
two of the three instrument arms with 
their recording pens, get hooked together. 
Under normal conditions encountered with 
aerographs elsewhere in the world, the 
three pens would work more or less in the 
same direction across the face of the rotat- 
ing drum and its recording chart, and 
keep a good distance apart. Here, however, 
it was found necessary to reverse the ac- 



tion of the moisture recorder in order to 
keep the arms from locking with each 
other. 

The inversion is encountered on an over- 
cast day, or a day with a so-called "high 
fog." Going steadily upward, the tempera- 
ture decreases and the moisture increases 
until maximum moisture content and a 
low temperature is reached at the ceiling. 
Immediately above the clouds the air be- 
comes very warm and the moisture con- 
tent drops considerably. Then as the meas- 
urements are made on up it is generally 
found that the temperature gradually de- 
creases with height. Normal temperature 
inversions encountered run from 6 to 12 
degrees Centigrade, though on rare occa- 
sions as much as 20° difference is en- 
countered on going thru these clouds. 

No longer does weather forecasting 
have to do with the immediate vicinity of 
the aerological office: modern flying (wit- 
ness the flights of the PBYs and the 
XPB2Y-1) takes in thousands of miles. 
The North Island Naval Air Aerological 
office, with its flights 7 days a week and 
constant 24-hour duty for checking on 
the weather, has a tough job. It is par- 
ticularly tough because there is little in- 
formation coming from off the ocean 
upon which to base a forecast. It's ex- 
plained by the Chief Aerographer as be- 
ing a job of sorting: like having a whole 
mess of all sorts of potatoes coming down 
a chute at you. You haven't much to go 
by as to what to expect, while your fel- 
low-aerographers at inland stations have 
pretty well had the potatoes sorted out 
for them. They at least know about where 
storms are, how fast they are traveling, 
and in what direction. 



PREFER BLONDES 



Radio Meteorographs go to much higher 
altitudes than the Aerographs are carried 
aloft by the aerographer, and hence give 
a greater range of data, but they are sub- 
ject to instrumental errors which are not 
so easily checked and corrected. The flight 
aloft with the Aerograph has the advantage 
of an observer along with the instrument 
to check by observation, and to add in the 
valuable notes of visibility, etc., which 
cannot be ascertained from the instruments 
alone. 

Contained in the Aerograph which is 
carried aloft is a bi-metaUic thermometer 
which registers a continuous record of the 
temperature changes. Another measuring 
instrument also recording continuously, 
is the pressure recorder. This is quite sim- 



t 





14 



Consolidator 



PLASTER SPLASHES 

Johnny Debs knows now that a little 
Willys Overland won't go through a big 
tough bus. He tried it. Poor Willys! 

We are all hoping to see Geo. Abdo back 
soon. Good luck and a speedy recovery 
pal. 

Lou Barkuloo takes his fishing too 
seriously. When that enormous half 
pounder flipped off the hook, he dove in 
after it. Poor Lou is now in a cast with a 
broken neck. Good luck, and a speedy re- 
cover>'. By Boyle No. 3713. 

Since Red Boyle bought that new 
"Chevy," a certain little blue-eyed blonde 
out in East San Diego seems to be getting 
quite a rush. His new theme song is "Be- 
tween Madison and Adams ... on 3 2d. St.! 
By "Shinola" Burns. 




I Complete 
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• Klenk's Aviation Snips 
LOW PRICES — BUDGET TERMS 

SAN DIEGO 

HARDWARE COMPANY 

840-850 FIFTH AVENUE 




Basketball champs for the 1939-40 season, the Hull team. Kncehng left to right: Norm Heckeroth 
(F), Tommy Johnson (F), Ellis Bell (F), Bob White (G). Standing: Freddy Grossher, Mgr., Scotty 
Rutherford, trainer; Jim Loob (G), Sam Shepard (C), Vincent Gilmore (C), John Kunkle (G) and 
Glenn Hotchkiss, Foreman. 



BASKETBALL WINNERS 

By "Brad" Bradsbaw 

The Hull Department hoopsters re- 
cently terminated a 46 game schedule of 
sensational basketball climaxed by a 59 
to 29 playoff victory over the Night Pro- 
duction team to again emerge champions 
of the Comolidated League for the third 
consecutive year. 

The team coached by Fred Grossher, 
popular sportsman and leadman of the de- 
partment, made a very impressive record 
in competition with the top notch teams 
of the City League, Shop League, Army 
and Navy Service Quintets and a seven 
game schedule in the A. U. U. In Shop 
League play the Hull lads were unbeaten 
and only the Tank team offered serious 
competition. 

Sparked by the brilliant play of their 
diminutive forward and all around athlete. 
Tommy Johnson, they boasted a roster of 
such ex-high school and college stars as 
John Kunkle, Sam Shepard, Bob White, 
Norm Heckeroth, Ellis Bell, Vince Gil- 
more, Scotty Rutherford and Jim Loob. 
Mid-season injuries to Johnson and Kunkle 
as well as the heavy schedule undertaken 
played a large part in keeping the lads 
from winding up on top of the A. U. U. 
League, according to their followers. 

In appreciation of their fine play and 



good sportsmanship each member was 
awarded a gold basketball contributed by 
the plant management. A large and faith- 
ful following of ardent fans were on hand 
for each encounter and were always treated 
to four quarters of exciting and hard 
fought basketball, win or lose. 

Consolidators should feel justly proud 
of these stalwart athletes and the splendid 
record they have made in face of the 
toughest opposition. 



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SPECIFY STARRETT FOR BEST RESULTS 



May, 1940 



15 



CONSAIR SPORT VIEWS 

By Matt Wielopolski 
The night Machine shop team is trying 
very hard to win the bowhng league still 
under way at the Elk's, but so are the 
other five teams. Larry Yeoman, Lou 
Miller, George Wire, and Joe Havlik, 
bowling for different teams, are still after 
the title of "High Average Bowler." 

Vic Racko, machine shop manager, and 
"Red" Basil, leader of final assembly, have 
put their heads together for their softball 
team's welfare. Prior to, and in con- 
junction with the opening game of the 
Consair Night Softball League, the players 
are taking wives and girl friends to El 
Monte County Park on May 5th. You 
guessed it. The ladies are bringing the 
food for this basket picnic, but the boys 
are bringing the ale. (Hail, hail, the 
gang'll be there!) Incidentally boys, is the 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection oF Pipes in San Diego, 
including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 




Home Building Simplified 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING 
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Saving Suggestions 
Suitable Materials 
Selecting Bargains 
Servicing Your Job 

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14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

41 is University ■ Oczanddc • El Centre 



ball game to take place before or after the 
fill? Well, may the best team win! 

In the spring a man's fancy turns to 
"Love." Fifteen-love . . . Thirty-love, 
and the next two points give him a love 
game. So, in his favor with one-love in 
games, he competes in Consolidated' s 
Fourth Annual Tennis Tournament. 
Watch the bulletin boards for further de- 
tails, happenings and results. 

DRAW BENCH BENDS 

By W. Fink 

Chester Sheppherd, who has had a minor 
operation, is reported to be recovering 
favorably, and will soon be back to work. 

We are glad to have Ed. Aubuchon 
with us again. Ed. received a broken leg 
when hit by a automobile. 

Wm. Ladd, who returned to the Draw 
Bench after an absence of about a year, 
is warmly welcomed by his fellow work- 
men. After a week in the department, 
Willie got the urge and trotted down to 
Yuma for the usual ceremonies. Con- 
gratulations, Willie. 

Red Robbins, assistant foreman, has 
been transferred to the night shift tem- 
porarily. His absence is greatly noticed 
on the day shift, and we hope that it will 
not be long before we see his cheerful 
smile and hear his hearty laugh on the 
day shift once more. 

The Draw Bench Dept. baseball team 
under the capable management of Ernie 
Krienkie is reported to be well on its way 
to a successful season. With such out- 
standing players as Joe Friel, Ralph Way 
and Ryland Graves, we expect to give all 
teams in the shop league a good run for 
their money. In 20 practice games the 
team has lost but one and we consider 
this a fine start for the season. 



Has your present job a future? 
Does it offer opportunities for travel? 
Is it interesting? 

SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

offers its 
MASTER RADIO COURSE 

preparing for commercial radio operators 
licenses/ as the answer to the above questions 
RADIO, OS a vocotion, affords jobs in the 
airways as ground station operator 
on shipboard as radio operator 
broodcost station work . installa- 

tion and repair . servicing. 

Our employment service assists in placing 
the licensed operator. 
JOBS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
Both day and evening courses 
NAVIGATION COURSES 
also available. 
Prepare NOW while you ore employed 

SAN DIEGO AEROMARINE 

RADIO AND NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Administration Building Lindbergh Field 

Telephone Jackson 7400 



The Best 
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IN MANY DAYS 



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16 



Consolidator 



ANODIC ANECDOTES 

By Bert Nasccf 

Two Gun Jack Orr was elected the new 
Softball captain, and has a choice of the 
following players: Bill Baker, Ted Leh- 
man, Geo. Smith, Carl Johnson, Don Kes- 
ler. Red Ramsey, Wally Miles, Roy Grider, 
Harry Coyle and Bob Warner. Under 
Jack's leadership they should go places 
this season. 

Anyone interested in capturing that 
"youthful figure" should pay a visit to 
the "Anodic Turkish Bath" . . . O. F. Sted- 
ley. Prop. 

Harry Coyle decided to give up the 
Owl's shift, and go to work for a living 
in the days. Russ Haynes, successor to 
the job, was asked one evening by his lady 
friend, "Why don't you sleep nights?" . . . 
Harn,' Coyle. 

We are glad to welcome back to the 
Anodic Department, Harry Parker, who 
has been away for two years. Harry is 
the proud father of an 18 months' old baby 
boy . . . Wally Miles. 

Ted Lohman and Wally Miles worked 
overtime one Saturday, and came to work 
on Monday with a new car each. It's a 
good thing they didn't work Sunday, or 
they probably would have brought home 
the "China Clipper"! . . . David Mann. 




BROWNIE 
SAYS: 

"3 facts about 
used cars" 



1. You save here because 

of CUT PRICES. 

2. We make WHOP- 
PING BIG TRADES. 

3.SENSATIONAL 
TERMS to responsible 
buyers. 

They all add up to "Come to Brown's!" 

BROWN 

MOTOR CO. 

Ford, Mercury, Lincoln-Zephyr Dealer 

COLUMBIA at "C" ST. 
UNIVERSITY at 7tli AVE. 




This photo clearly indicates that the Easter Bunny apparently likes to treat everybody in proportion 
to size when he makes his calls. Since this appears to be true, Consolidated Aircraft would call for an 
extra special splurge in the way of an extra big Easter egg job. And here it is. At least, this is what was 
found near the finished parts stores on the Monday following Easter Sunday. The boys from the plaster 
shop, accustomed to turning out a really polished job, couldn't resist sort of smoothing up on what the 
Easter Bunny had left, and so that's how they came to be in the photo. Shown working on these colossal 
"eggs" are: John Debs, "Red" Boyle and Dave Klinger. The "eggs" are really special plaster forms for 
making sand molds, which are used in the making of drop hammer dies. 



WEDNESDAY NITE 
MERRYMAKERS 

WANTED: More and merrier mem- 
bers to join our Wednesday Nite 
Dancing Club. 

We have the organization well on its 
merry way under the able guidance of 
our President Maestro, Wilbur McKinney, 
and his body of funmakers, Tom Stromie, 
Vice President; Maxine Bennett, Record- 
ing Secretary, and Lois Campbell, Treas. 

Our education along the rhythmical 
lines includes the Waltz, Fox Trot, Tango 
and Rhumba. Dues for the evening are 
reasonable and gosh, fellas and gals, who 
knows, you might even turn out to be 
competition for Ginger Rogers and Fred 
Astaire. Just think of that! 

You may bring a guest along, other 
than Consolidated, so let's all make a date 
to meet at Hemphill's Studio next Wednes- 
day night and bring your dancing feet. 



Say You Saw It In The Ca?jsolidator! 



1. eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

Phone Main 5114 

PonttamMm 

Ittortuatr^ 

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FOURTH It Eim 



BRING YOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 

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1144 Third Avenue 



May, 1940 



17 



TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Magnirc 

Early summer is here, and week-end 
trips to the back country are in order. 
Yours truly made one last week, through 
Ramona and on to "Inspiration Point." 
On a clear day, one can see across the 
valley to the Salton Sea, and beyond. The 
point rises over a thousand feet above the 
desert floor, and without waxing poetical, 
the point is well named. There are several 
nice places to eat along the road, or a picnic 
lunch in one of the nearby canyons makes 
a swell outing. 

Lew Shirley passed cigars around, and 
was duly congratulated on his marriage to 
Miss Ruthanna Hellman of Topeka, Kan. 
They were married in Yuma, and are now 
living at 4983 Del Monte Avenue. 

Our Saturday morning fashion show, 
led by M. "Gazamo" Ekdahl in an 
ensemble of aquamarine (without ruffles) 
is drawing the attention of "sportsmen" 
all over the plant. Close behind M. 
Ekdahl are such notables as Messrs. Roy 
Smeltzer, in (I'll call it Red), Le Maire 
in two-tone blue, Ed Gurling in blue and 
green (or something) and Ray Peters, 
Grant "D. A." Cline, Jerry Kick, E. L. 
Minch and Charley (Coyote) Wills, arc 
all done up in the latest pastel shades. 
Very nice, boys, but don't let it rain. If 
it does, you'll look like a misplaced rain- 
bow. 

Glad that Marcella Holzman is back, 
and in good spirit, and sorry to say Bob 
Hyder and Ed Gurling have gone out to 
the T. R., but wish them luck. 

Goethe said, "Let everybody sweep in 
front of his own door and the whole 
world will be clean." 



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COUGHLIN'S COUGHINS 

The Engineers' Bowling Banquet was 
held at Emerald Hills on Sat., April 20th, 
and a good time was had by all. Speakers 
were made by all captains present; a 
beautiful floor show and dancing lasted 
until the wee hours of the morning, so 
all in all everybody had a good time. 

The Engineers are having a summer 
bowling league of three men on a team, 
and eight teams in the league; this league 
will continue for 14 weeks and the win- 
ners of same will receive trophies. 

"I'm fed up on that," remarked the 
baby as he pointed to his high chair. 



"When a woman is in a hurry," says 
Highstone of Experimental, "the best 
thing to do is to get out of her way." Who 
also adds that he can't be a successful 
columnist because he has to dip his pen 
too often! 



Bowl for Fun 
and Health 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

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18 



Consolidotor 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

"Brad" Brawshaw 

RECORDING the highlights of the 
month from an upright position has 
convinced me that I am not only a "ten- 
derfoot" at riding the range but can apply 
it to a "broader meaning," after that 
Sunday jaunt over the "Camp Kearny 
trails" with the "Consolidated Boy 
Rangers. 

It was great fun but that "rocking 
chair" under Bob Passenheim looked 
mighty good after the first hour. Bob 
would have saved the stables money by 
leaving the "nag" at the dump heap as 
it will never get out that far again under 
its own power. Les Matusek was singing 
"Blood in the Saddle" as it was never sung 
before — It was his blood. Tom Pitts had a 
little edge on the fellows, being larger 
than the horse, and Lloyd Bender slowed 



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up the trip by unmounting so often to 
"rest his feet" — claimed the stirrups were 
too long and he even had one of those 
"sissy" English saddles — which further 
proves he's educated. The "Lone Ranger" 
in the crowd was Delmar Drake, who held 
no choice in the matter if old "Dyna- 
mite" wanted to do a little exploring. 
We had a "Cain" along also, but he was 
very timid and seemed plenty glad to be 
"Able" to hang onto the leather. Willard 
Luppke, Ted Anderson and Marte were 
others who were "creaking" through the 
shop Monday and wondering how a horse 
can be so hard after eating all that soft 
hay. 

Joe Maloney must have had a happy 
married life or he would put his boys 
wise. George Craig tied the knot the hard 
way and took Myrtle Sechrist on a long- 
term Contract — as if we didn't have 
enough wars going on now. And on top of 
this when the "Fullers Nightmare" on his 
upper lip turned out such a dismal failure, 
Joe Kraemer was finally able to shout 
"Today I yam a man" as "Sandra Jean" 
eight pounds of joy, became a member of 
the household. 

This is a fish story that really happened 
as "I was there Charley," and it will prove 
that "brawn will win over brain" when 
you learn that Bert Gimber won the 
"jackpot" with the largest yellowtail. It 
is also the reason for the "cat convention" 
back of Glenn Hotchkiss's home — wait- 
ing for the old boy to toss out another fish 
head from the eight he brought in. The 
convoy that met and conquered about 
fifty yellowtail on their own "school 
grounds" consisted of Bourdon, Coyken- 
dall, Hartmayer, Lang, Biehl, Kendrick, 
Hotchkiss, Gimber, Drake, Dormay, Am- 
brose, Paul and Fred Brady, Drissell, Hop- 
man and Grauffreteau, each bringing in a 
fish as well as a good portion of their 
stomachs, although a little out of adjust- 
ments. All the fellows were Consolidated 
employees except Pierre Gauffreteau, a 
representative of the French Government 
who decided you did not have to sail all 
the way across for excitement. John Hop- 
man was not satisfied with his catch so 
took home a bucket of "bait" for "sar- 
dine sandwiches." Coykendall and Hart- 



mayer commented that Leo Bourdon was a 
"changed man" after he wound himself 
into a net when his reel came off bringing 
in a big one and then did not throw rod, 
reel and Leo overboard, as he would have 
in days gone by. 

During the month, our "Boy Scouts," 
Bob Mussen, Henry Golem and Bill Liddle, 
went week-end camping and slew a rattler 
in heroic fashion. Golem ran over it with 
his "station wagon," Mussen shot it full 
of holes with his "squirrel gun," and Lid- 
dle retrieved it after sundown and its "tail 
stopped wriggling." Oh a "second class" 
badge and jackknife for each of these 
young pioneers. Those Gandee boys from 
the "snake state" would have caught its 
head between their toes and taken it home 
for a pet. — Kel Aiken hauls passengers to 
work and keeps 'em waiting a half hour 
after quitting time and gets by with it. 
Right — they work for him — what would 




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May, 1940 



19 



you do? — TTie greatest miracle I en- 
countered during the month was LaVerne 
May playing ball and "sweating" without 
a single "cold one" in the ice box. — "Sandy 
Foulbaum" tells me the hardest mathe- 
matical problem he has tackled was try- 
ing to divide a yellowtail among sixteen 
hungry engineers. 

Speaking of babies, Eddie Generas is 
still offering enough sales resistance to keep 
from buying that "dilapidated perambu- 



FORD HOTEL 




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lator" from Roy Coykendall. A few more 
weeks, Ed, and the baby will be walking 
and remember what that "meat chopper" 
he sold me (without a peddlers license) did 
to my face. — I failed to convince Jack 
Mulroy that a good ocean fishing trip is 
just what he needed to get his stomach in 
condition. — We learned that a "tub" and 
"lawn mower" were used to get that "Baby 
Dumpling" haircut effect that "Tiny" 
Peters of Tool Design is sporting. — Misses 
Campbell, Brink and Roberts became very 
interested in the "dimpling" operation on 
a process card and were all for tying on a 
"traveler" to see if it would really work. — 
Ben Keigle is mapping his campaign for 
President of Pacific Beach C. of C, but 
Jim Eisman contends he is better fitted for 
"Fire Chief" or "Kite Flying Supervisor." 
Jim's "moocher special" cigarettes would 
be good vote getters. — Lou Loyko says it 
took 2 and Yz cars to teach his wife to 
drive. — Owen Stockton thought "Mar- 
gie" had jilted him when he heard she 
saw a physician about "getting a wart off 
her hand." — Amsley Phillips did not get 
married and those pots and pans were not 
a "shower," but plane equipment. — Larry 
Boeing has gone in for water sports and 
is using ice cubes in his highballs. — Lou 
Miller's latest economic idea is "scaring" 
his wife for reducing purposes. — Charley 
Hibert finished his boat two meals ahead 
of the termites. "Chuck" says it can al- 
ways be converted into a "bait container." 
With all the fish being caught by Ccm- 
solidafors that theory about "brain food" 
must be a lot of "hooey."— Milt Hangen is 
doing a swell job boosting the roster of 
the Rod and Reel club. — The foreign 
powers have competition in their desire for 
supremacy of the airways by Bob Rob- 
ertson's and Bert Freakley's "Eagle" mem- 
bership drive feud. — Jim Mussen, when 
asked why all the "hustle and bustle" late- 
ly, replied, "I'm subconscious about my 
work when Bert is away." — I was humil- 
iated at Dave Arnett's home recently when 



his wife offered me a glass of water. I 
was "thirsty" not "dirty." — I hear that 
when "Scotties" Doig and McCartney were 
"a'courtin' " they economized by using the 
"love light in their eyes for illumination. — 
Tom Jones has checked everything except 
the "bags" under his eyes and left for 
Buffalo. Good luck Tom, we will be seeing 
you next "long underwear season." — Sev- 
eral of the fellows who attended that 
famous "Stag" tell me they tried to 
cover up everything" to keep within the 
law. — If you happen to stumble into Dick 
and Ed Hager roaming around at night 



SWIM IN 55,000-GALLON 

FILTERED SWIMMING 

POOL 


Try 
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KIRBY'S 

make a special effort to meet the 
needs of Aircraft Workers . . . 
Goodyear Welt, Gro-Cord, or 
Crepe Sole Oxfords, ^'j r-vr 
Black or Brown .... ^^Z^'y-) 
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It's economical, too. 



Tune in on "Lowe Highlights" — KGB, Tues. and Fri., 8 p. m. 



20 



Consolidator 



1 



J/i 



ince^ 1935 



SRN DIEGO 
TRXI CRBS 
HHVE ROLLED 
MILLIONS 
r OFMILtS 

xclusfveh 




WE GIVE 

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You Will Find 

Quality 

and 

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at 

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Yard and Mill 

Foot Columbia St. 
F-6305 



BRANCH YARDS 

La Jolla Lumber Co. 

Ocean Beach Lumber Co. 
Coronado Lumber Co. 

Pacific Beach Lumber Co. 
Chula Vista Lumber Co. 



just remember the wives have gone East, 
which leaves the homeplace mighty lone- 
some and barren. — Don Drissell has been 
called "drizzle puss" many times but 
never has it fit him so well as on that 
ocean fishing trip. — "Pappy Yokum" 
Holcomb sez, "I'm gettin' dern tired bath- 
ing in the wash basin of the men's room, 
so am going to insist on "two barrels" of 
water for "Suncrest" each week. — Hal 
Leppart, Eddie Jones and Frank Meer were 
other Consolidated bowlers who "done 
their stuff" in the city tourney. They 
claim it's been much easier to keep out of 
the "gutter" since they stopped bowling 
in the basements of the Buffalo saloons. 

The "releases," "Mag" St. Clair and 
George Friend, have affected in the past 
few months, make Houdini an amateur. — 
Steve Powell, by getting his work orders 
mixed, has developed a "miracle wing," 
but we suppose Jim Wainwright will get 
credit for the design. — I should for "muff- 
ing" the orders. 

BOWLING 'EM OVER 

By "Brad" Bradshaiv 

Purchasing Department's five man 
bowling team copped second place in the 
799 Division of the City A. B. C. tourney 
held recently at the Bowling Academy, 
to again bring Consolidated into the sport- 
ing limelight. 

The team composed of Paul Hoch, 
Frank Fields, Ed Jones, Frank Meer and 
Frank Carey rolled a score of 2814. Hoch 
covered himself with more glory by taking 
fourteenth place in the singles with a 622 
score and teamed with Roy Coykendall 
to land the second place doubles title with 
a combined 1201 gross. Coykendall gained 
a tie for the fourteenth singles spot and 
Carey finished nineteenth with a 609. 
Fields and Jones tallied 1192 for seventh 
in the doubles event. 

Not satisfied with these awards Hoch 
and Coykendall's 1201 score was good for 
a special prize for being the closest to 
1200. This affair was the most important 
bowling tourney of the year and the Pur- 
chasing team achievements were scored 
against the best bowlers in the city. Cash 
prizes and medals were awarded the bowl- 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
" The Blind Man " 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

102.3 University Avenue 



The man who says he can't is always 
right. 

Whether life grinds a man down or 
polishes him up depends upon what he's 
made of. 

A wife with good horse sense never 
becomes a nag. 

Compliments are like perfume — they 
should be inhaled and not swallowed. 

The greatest wealth any man possesses is 
a good name. 

Grant's Almanac. 

No wonder there are so many marriages 
in the Engineering department. There's a 
large book there plainly marked "Pro- 
posals!" 



OPTOMETRISTS 

' -S.A_N_D_I E GO, 

• EYES EXAMINED TERMS 

. GLASSES FITTED 

. GLASSES REPAIRED M. 3203 

506 Bank of America Bldg. 



FRI.*SUN. 
WALTZ NITE 

JAY WARDE 

HUTTON'S BAND 

"King of Waltzes" 

San Diego's Coolest 

Hall; Big Ceiling Fans; 

200 Windows 

DANCE 

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list at "A" 




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to 11 p.m. daily inc. *^ 
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San Diego's best music & 
largest old time dance 
Wed. 25e Sat. 35c 

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Coolest Hall, Best Floor, 
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BUCKNER'S 

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May, 1940 



21 




Mission 


Hills Beauty and 


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Badminton Stars; Left to right are: Louie Grant o£ Loft who won the Class B singles from Bergman 
in the finals. Jim Williams of Tool Design and E. C. Terry of Loft who won the Class B doubles from 
Sterringer and Holsten are in the center, and J. D. Santone on the left, who teamed with Martin Mendez, 
won the Class A doubles from J. Lockwood and James. Santone's Partner Mendez was the winner of 
the show, but cither because he was too bashful, or likes his sleep better (he is on the night shift) he 
didn't show up for the group picture. Mendez won from Byrne Billing in the final game, and thus became 
the outstanding Badminton star of the tourney. 



BADMINTON .... 

The Consolidated Badminton Club's 
second annual tournament has just been 
completed. Martin Mendez of Drop Ham- 
mer stole the show by winning the Class 
A singles from Byrne Billing of Engineer- 
ing in the final match. Mendez teamed 
with Santone to win the Class A doubles 
from Lockwood and James in a very ex- 
citing series of three games. Grant of 
Loft won the Class B singles from Berg- 
man in the finals. Terry of Loft and 
Williams of Tool Design won the Class B 
doubles from Sterringer and Holsten in 
the final events. The trophies and medals 
were all donated by Wilbur Folsom and 
his cooperation is greatly appreciated by 
all. " '' '' All players are encouraged to 
come up and play with our crowd each 
Friday night. Your complete cooperation 



is necessary for our holding reserved courts 
for you and your party "' '•' '' 

We are looking for a good turnout of 
enthusiastic players from which we shall 
choose our teams for the City League. We 
finished third and fifth respectively with 
our No. 1 and No. 2 teams last year with 
13 teams competing for the championship. 
We hope to make an even better showing 
this year with the new talent and the 
splendid strides our more experienced play- 
ers are showing. All employees and friends 
are invited to play with us every Friday 
night at the Municipal Gym, from 6 to 
1 1 o'clock. 

The committee: Terry, Loft; Lockwood, 
Production; Billing, Engineering; James, 
Welding; Henninger, Accounting; Gil- 
christ, Employment. 



^939 FIFTH AVE.i 



r"S&H" 

STUMPS 
GIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES 

f^m K4PM America's Most Famous 
or IMtIN Union-madc Shoes 



^5 



Own Your Home/ 

Use your rent money to 
pay for a home. The small 
down payment starts you 
toward financial stability. 
Plan now for the years to 
come. Excellent homes in 
Bird Rock, South La Jolla 
and Pacific Beach. . . Fast 
highway and bus service 
to Consolidated. 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



First Boaster: I started in life without 
a penny in my pocket. 

Second Boaster: And I started in life 
without even a pocket. 

"Your husband must have absolute 
quiet," instructed the physician. "Here is 
a sleeping powder." 

"When do I give it to him?" asked the 
patient's wife. 

"You don't give it to him; you take it 
yourself." 



iUhitneii'si 



1 



every, time for Better Values! 



ROBERT'S 

-FOR- 

* PANTS • 

Largest assortment of Trousers 
in the City. Any style-any size. 



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• It's a fact.... you can 
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• Balancing the budget is 
just a breeze when you try 
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OPEN WHITNEY BUDGET ACCOUNT 

Credit Department — 6th Avenue Mezzanine 



We cash your 
pay checks 




iblithtd 190} 



22 



Consolidator 



DESERT TREK 

By Dan Driese 

In Claude Bissell's station wagon, on 
the morning of Sunday, March 10, six 
intrepid wing department adventurers at 
6:30 left San Diego for an all-day trip to 
the desert. The personnel of this venture 
consisted of Bissell, C. Hutchinson, G. W. 
Bunn, W. C. Gish, G. O. Plunkett, and 
of course, the one and only, A. R. McGhee. 

It was at Julian that the back-to-nature 



Any amount * 
opens your "Son 
Diego Federal 

Sov- 

ac- 
count 




Tax-exempt 
features 
nsured SAFETY 
Through 10th of 
each month, divi- 
dends from the 1st 



Since 
1885 
never 
a loss in 
yield or 
principal. 

* 

1027 
Sixth 
Ave. 



movement came to an abrupt halt. Until 
their arrival all the group had been loud 
in their praises of fresh air, sunshine and 
exercise; but the icy wind which rushed 
thru the mountain village sent all the 
"nature lovers" rushing into a smoky 
hamburger joint. For the next half hour 
the only sound was that of hot coffee 
being guzzled. 

Leaving Julian the freezing pioneers 
went to Banner and from there to the 
old stage coach station at Vallecitos. 

At the Vallecitos station is the grave 
of an old-time gambler and it was around 
this grave that the hardy Consolidated 
men stood, all shedding silent tears for the 
long-departed gambler who had developed 
a fast card draw but neglected the equally 
important fast draw with a six gun. 

From Vallecitos, the pioneers (all of 
whom had sworn-off gambling) drove to 
Carrizo where, as another object lesson, 



Claude Bissell pointed out the grave of a 
horse thief who died from that common 
Western disease — lead poisoning. After 
paying silent tribute the now slightly 
weary pilgrims went to see the pertiiied 
trees and beds of fossilized sea shells near 
Carrizo. 

By noon the entire crew had joined in 
a plaintive chant for food. 

After lunch, the gang hiked for a 
couple of hours. See page 3. The march- 
ing order was interesting. Leading the 
group were the four "strong men" — Mc- 
Ghee, Plunkett, Bunn and Bissell; next, 
was the second group (Gish) ; and then, 
so far behind that all he could do was take 
pictures of the leaders was the almost ex- 
hausted "Hungry" Hutchison. (It might 
be interesting to note that McGhee was 
with the first group only because Plunkett 
and Bunn all but carried him.) 

It was a silent group of hikers who re- 



ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL" 




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• • • 

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Is Good /. E. Dryer, President • 2368 Kettner BUd. 




After 30 years of being 
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Dependable, attroctively styled MILOS 
Wrisf Watches for men and women 
Watches that moke ideal 
gifts for graduates. You save $8.00 
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$ 



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54-Pc. Sets 

POTTERY 

Glasses and 

Flatware 



20 pieces of pastel shade pot- 
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four glass strows and 18 pieces 
of colored bone handle, chrome 
plated flatware. 

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Exceptional savings on Diamond Bridal Ring Sets. 
. . . Fine Watches . . . Sterling Silverware 
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5 




Fifth Avenue^lfat Broadway 



Moy, 1940 



23 



turned to the car and on the return to 
San Diego, the silence of the exhausted 
pioneers was indeed impressive. Reaching 
home about 8 o'clock that evening all 
agreed that the trip was a great success 
and the group began to lay plans for their 
next trip into the desert. 

GUN CLUB X'S 

During the month of February we had 
19 shooters competing for medals in the 
pistol division of our Club. The medals 
were won as follows: Class A — H. J. 
Schnaubelt; Class B — H. M. Prior; Class 
C — ^J. E. Schreiner. 

We had 14 competitors for rifle honors. 
Due to a strange coincidence the same men 
took the rifle honors as did the pistol 
honors, in the same order. The month of 
March showed quite a decline in attend- 
ance but the competition was just as keen. 
The medals for pistols were awarded as 
follows: Class A — H. Von Meeden; Class 
B — Chet Sheppherd; Class C — Mrs. C. C. 
Sheppherd. The rifle medals were issued 
to: Class A — Henry Myers; Class B — J. E. 
Schreiner; Class C — C. A. Phelan. 

At this time we would like to again in- 
vite any newcomers to Consolidated who 
are interested in shooting to attend our 
regular shoots held every Wednesday night 
at the Stanley Andrews Co. Range. The 
night crew shooters hold their weekly 
shoot on Wednesday morning at 11 A. M. 
at the same range under the capable leader- 
ship of our Vice-President H. J. Schnau- 
belt. Any night crew men who are in- 
terested may contact "Lightning" in the 
Wing Dept. Day crew men may contact 
Chet Sheppherd (Draw Bench) H. M. 



Prior of tool room (located in PBY Hull 
Dept.) J. E. Schreiner of tool room (lo- 
cated in Hull Dept. No. 1), Johnny Ros- 
mond in Tail dept., or Henry Myers in the 
Tool room. 

H. M. Prior, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

TYPOGRAPHERS MUST 

HAVE THEIR FUN 

Two lovers walk upon the street, 
Theywalklikethisforloveissweet 

Now, wed, they walk the self-same street, 
She's here He's here. 

It's 3 feet. 



"It is a fact that flying modern air- 
planes in accordance with C. A. A. 
regulations as taught by competent in- 
structors, is safer than average motoring." 
From Private Fliers Association Bulletin. 



INVESTORS SYNDICATE 




Lon Casselman Bank of America BIdg. 
Manager Franklin 7876 



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Washington at Falcon Street 



8th 



and 



"C" 



CONSAIR FLYERS CLUB 

By Barney Farley 

Events have been piling up throughout 
the month. Most important of all, to us, is 
the fact that we have ordered our first 
airplane a new Piper Cub 50 h.p. trainer. 
All there remains for us now is to wait 
until it arrives — then commence opera- 
tions. 

To one, outside of those directly con- 
nected with aviation, flying clubs may 
seem inconvenient. Some wonder how one 
can pile 20 members on one ship and ex- 
pect an individual to get any flying time. 
We can say from proven facts that there 
is plenty of time for all. Each member 
is guaranteed one hour a week. Sometimes 
his quota amounts to several hours. 

The aim of Consair Flyers is to turn 
out good pilots — fellows who aren't just 
fair weather pilots, but the type who will 
be able to fly under all conditions. Under 
the able guidance of our instructor, Lou 
Loyko, we hope to attain such a goal. 



24 



Consolidator 



SHEET METAL NEWS . . . 

By H. B. Millman 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Gustav Nelson are 
proud parents of a baby girl born April 1. 
Weight 7 pounds, 5 ozs. 
vgi 

John Kelley should have some very im- 
portant news next month. 



DANCING CLASSES 

New Semester in All 

types of dancing 
academic"tutoring 

START Feb. 1,1940 



RATLIFF 



STUDIOS 

1106 Broadway 



Phone F 1197 Jor information 




San Diego's BEST 

Place to . . . 

DANCE 

• Grand Music I every wed., fri., 

• Largest Floor I sat.&sun.nites 

RATLIFF'S 

Broadway at 11th 



It's been reported Eddie Raymond is 
using a new brand of hair tonic which 
gives him that sheik appearance. 

'■' '' It seems Roy Bramblett has a 
new hobby, baking pies. The boys report 
they are just hke mother used to bake, 
vgl 

The boys that ride with Al Hutter 
have been getting plenty of exercise every 
night lately . . . pushing the car up the 

hills. 

Ed. Birt, Roy Weber and Mergy Hatch 
all stepped off the plank in the past month 
and got married, and E. S. Joseph will 
have made leap year before this goes to 
press. All the boys from the cutting de- 
partment wish them good luck, 
vgl 

We hope Johnny Kessler's wife comes 
back from her eastern vacation soon. 
Probably it will eliminate that far away 
look of his. He is also getting tired fix- 
ing his own meals (doughnuts and coffee) . 

Jimmy Carr is back with us again as 
clerk for Eddie Raymond. Glad to see his 
smiling face after his long absence. 




,r<^ 



FOR GRACIOUS LIVING 
in San Diego 

Rooms from S3. 00 daily 
Apartments from $5.00 daily 

DINING ROOM 
open to public 

Famed El Cortez Cuisine 

SPECIAL FACILITIES 

For large and small parties, 

banquets, catering and dancing 

Phone Main 0161 

Ash Street at 7th 



IL THE El CORTEZ J 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIR 



Geo. Jurard has signed the pledge. 
Things will be much quieter from now 
on over in Coronado. 

R. Hibbs is eating Wheaties every 
morning now for breakfast for pep and 
energy. Taylor reports a big improve- 
ment. 








A^ 



V^^ 



0»»> 







Five Ocean Rafts of logs moored in San Diego Harbor, containing 30 Million board 
feet of lumber to be manufactured at our Mill in San Diego. Width, 52 feet; Length, 
1000 feet ; Contents, 6 million feet ; Binding chains, 200 tons ; Depth below water, 24 
feet; Height above water, 12 feet; Towed 1000 miles from Oregon. 

• That Benson Lumber Company owns and operates the only saw- 

mill in Southern California? 

• That Our annual payroll of $250,000.00 is spent right here in San 

Diego, and that our annual taxes of $120,000.00 are a great 
benefit to the City of San Diego ? 

• That San Diego's "Heaven on Earth" climate is IDEAL for air- 

drying lumber, conceded by government authorities to be the 
best method of drying lumber? 

• That San Diego homes are protected from termites by pressure 

treated lumber produced loca'ly only by our company? 

• That Financing service is available through the loan and escrow de- 

partment of this 33 year old company ? 

• That visitors are welcome to see the lumber mill in action? 



The Pick of The Trees 



BENSON LUMBER CO. 



Sears' "Crafty" 
Rotary Electric Tool 



Nothing like it at this price, or any 
other price, in all America. The "Crafty" 
rotary tool has 50% more power than 
comparable units and hundreds of uses! 
Complete with 34 accessories. It's a 
whole workshop in itself. 



1760 



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Come In and Ask for our "CRAFTSMAN" 
Machinist and Mechanics Hand-Tool Catalog 





'KLEEN-AIR" PAINT SPRAYER 



Complete with Vi H.P. Motor ... 8 times faster than 
hand brushing! Sprays paints, enamels, varnishes, etc. 
Buy it on Sears Easy Payment Plan. 



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Sixth Ave. and "C" Street 



Franklin 6571 



TUBE BENDING 

By G. A. H. 

Maybe the "Boss" can get some work 
out of Slim Franklin now that he has the 
rest of his family in San Diego with 
him. '•' "' '' 

What happened to the system of one of 
the boys who was playing the races at 
Caliente? We hear he lost. ''' '■" '' 

It was heard, by the "Grapevine Route" 
that the "Fire Dept." turned out very 
strongly to greet Norman Freakley at the 
end of the "Bowling Tournament." It 
was hinted that a couple of Police Officers 
greeted him also. ''' '' '' 

Ham Molleur wound up the "Bowling 
Tournament" in good shape the 29th of 
March, a httle ahead of time, but we 
understand that he really made a good time 
of it, along with Capt. Lesser and Al 
Ballard. " '' " 

The boys in Tube Bending passed the 
word around that it was cigar time on 
the "Boss" again, in fact things seemed all 
O. K. to the gang when Bert Freakley even 
stayed home all day one Tuesday, but the 
light dawned when it was announced that 
the great event made Bert a "Grandpa." — 
Grandpa Bert and no cigars. Bert reports 
Mother and son doing fine, also grand- 
parents. ■•■ '"' '•■ 



METAL BENCH 

All the boys of the Metal Bench send 
their best wishes to their foreman, George 
Young, for a speedy recovery from his 
illness. k^ 

A sure sign of spring: Rocheville has 
removed his sweater. 

Teddy (Begonia) Edwards seems quite 
interested in motorcycles. He spends his 
noon hour among them. 

Old Man winter drove Charlie Trippi 
out of Buffalo. He is back working and 
enjoying the California sunshine. 



Tiine doesn't mean a thing to Al. 
Opolski. He can fix it regardless what 
shape it's in. 

When Buying, Mention The Consolidator. 




Buy the "Hull" of Your Foods 

at 

SAFEWAY 

and Give Your Food Budget 

^ ^Glider'' Performance 









*^^evWe c' ^° s/op ;^'^. offer th '"^^ Afreet' 

^' ^ou/cyr°^°^ep,e;^°°'''nsu.l'^°^^y^ lift 
_ ,*g=S^ """once/ 










CO-ORDINATED POWER . . . THE CONSOLIDATED MODEL 32 . . . U. S. ARMY XB-24 



JUNE • 1940 



CLEANERS 
and DYERS 

IVe catljor 
and delU'er 



m^* 



Phone F. 5932 



)^ 



INDIA ST. 
at KALMIA 



3977 
GOLDFINCH 



Drink 




tops in taste/ 

^ for a 

Big Bottle 




Six (or a 

QUARTER 

in Home Carton 



HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

By Willie Winchell Hartman 

Almost missed the deadline. Thought 
we'd forget about the column, but so 
many of the boys wanted to know why 
no column last month, . . . decided to try 
again, so . . . 

Harlan Dye, Courtney Thompson and 
Ray Wade have entered the tennis tourney 
and are now out to beat the antspay off 
of all comers. 

Little Paul Ferrerra better take his 
kiddie kar to L. A. the next time. Poor 
Paul got tangled up in the midst of L. A. 
traffic and had to bring his car home in 
pieces . . .it's tough, Paul. 

Will someone please bring Ray Wil- 
liams no. 210 paper bags — his hat needs 
renewing. And poor old Art Bommer sure 
suffers with the heat these days. 

Asked Red Feeney how he was making 
out in his laundry work on Saturdays 
and he tells us, "Just swimmingly!," and 
speaking of swimming, we have one cer- 
tain welder who went down to the beach 
'tether day, and almost lost a foot — he 
got sunburned. 

Pete Cinqugrani says he's going to get 
a job as a steeplejack when he gets thru 
the job he's now on. Poor Pete has to 



climb up and down all day long — too bad 
he's so small. 

Our baseball team finally found out 
how to win a game (by having it for- 
feited to 'em) . 

Charlie Brown wishes to extend his 
heartfelt thanks to all his fellow workers 
who were so kind to him and his family 
during his recent illness and accident. 



MUSIC 

Accordions 

829.5" to SI 000 

Wurlitzer 
Accord ian a 
Excelsior 
Radiciona 
Hohner 
Brendisi 

Band Instruments 

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In a few more weeks we'll present one of the most "otfroetively 
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CONSOLIDRTOR 



Volume 5 



June, 1940 



Number 6 



Vice-President Marries . . . 

On May second, the society columns 
of leading newspapers in Washington, 
D. C, San Diego and Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia, and the aeronautical publishing 
offices and other spots no end, buzzed 
with the news of a wedding. Announce- 
ment was made by Mrs. William H. 
Koenig of the marriage of her daughter, 
Madie Koenig, to our Vice-President and 
Public Relations Director, Edgar N. Gott. 

With fitting ceremonies the wedding 
was solemnized at noon in the home of 
Col. and Mrs. John H. Jouett with about 
30 persons attending. Major Gen. Henry 
H. Arnold, Chief of the Air Corps, was 
best man, and Mr. Gott's daughter, Steph- 
anie, maid of honor. 

The former Madie Koenig was born in 
Omaha, attended school in America, then 
in Dresden, Germany, later to graduate 
from Vassar in 1922. She returned to 
Europe and had her residence in Vienna 
until 193 8, was president for eight years 
of the American Women's Club of Vienna, 
and vice-president of the American Wo- 
men's Club Overseas. She recently lec- 
tured extensively on the Pacific coast, 
teUing of her experiences in leaving Vi- 
enna after the annexation of Austria. 
More recently she returned from an ex- 
tensive tour of South America with her 
mother. 

Our Vice-President Mr. Gott, is a 
graduate of the University of Michigan, a 
Chi Psi fraternity member, and of course 
as we all know has been prominent in 
pioneer aeronautical circles for many 
years. Mr. Gott, or "Ed," as many know 
him, joined Consolidated in 1936 when, 
after a try at retiring and the life of a 
rancher, the aviation "bug" just wouldn't 
leave him alone. 

Fellow Consolidafors: An ice cold pop 
tastes right good on these hot days, but 
working up an appetite for one over a 
flat tire is no fun. Let's keep our bottles 
off the parking lots. No. 9409. 



ATTENTION ICE-SKATERS 

An attempt is being made to organize 
a Coinolidated Ice Hockey Team. Mr. 
Ward Levere, on the big press in Sheet 
Metal, has kindly consented to donate his 
services as Coach and adviser. A nucleus 
has already been formed, and it is hoped 
that all those interested will either con- 
tact Mr. Levere or Ed. Kellog of the Pro- 
duction department as soon as possible. 

Charles English 

P. R. 4214 

GUN CLUB X's 

"The time has come," the Walrus said, 
"to talk of many things, of shoes and ships 
and sealing wax and cabbages and kings." 
I don't know just what category this will 
fall under, but here's some more shooting 
news: 

During the month of April we had 
twelve pistol shooters vying for top hon- 
ors, which were divided as follows: 1st, 
Harry Von Meeden; 2d, H. J. Schnaubelt; 
3rd, John Rosmond. The rest of the boys 
were right up in there but not up quite 
enough. 

The rifle division has been more or less 
overcome by a larger number of pistol 
shooters, but we still have some fairly 
respectable scores among the eight men 
competing. First place goes to "Annie 
Oakley" Schnaubelt, 2d to John Rosmond 
and third to H. M. Prior. 

We still have a lot of room for improve- 
ment and everybody is working for higher 
scores. We still shoot at Stanley Andrews' 
on Wednesday nite, so come on, fellows, 
let's get in on soine good clean fun and 
enjoyment. 

H. M. Prior, Sec.-Treas. 

NEVER SAY FAIL . . . 

"Never give up. Never give in. Hold on 
to the end. Persevere, with courage un- 
daunted, vision high. Know that you can. 
There is more in you than you ever used, 
than you ever dreamed. Call upon that 
'more'. It will see you through." 

Signed: A Consair Employee. 



TUBE BENDING . . . 

By Hart 

Earl Van Denburgh reports he has just 
purchased a new home out 30th Street 
way. Nice going, Van! 

A fishing excursion to Ensenada, for the 
boys in the Tube Bending Department, 
sometime in the near future is now in the 
formative stage. Curtis Franklin will be 
in charge of all tackle and fishing gear. 
Norm Freakley, bait, etc. . . . also stomach 
sedatives. While Herman Deischl will be 
in charge of glassware and kegs. Herman 
also insists on serving as shore committee 
to welcome the boys back from the sea. 
He figures someone has to be on their feet 
at a time like that. At any rate, no boats 
for Herman! 

Antonie Vionne Kallis, born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Felix Kallis, Eng. Dept., April 22, 
1940, 6:49 p. m. Weight, 9 pounds, 2 oz. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Stahlschmidt 
on March 2 2d, young David Henry Stahl- 
schmidt, who weighed in at just 7 pounds 
and 6 oz. Congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stahlschmidt. 

A minister preaching a sermon on 
safety suggested a list of hymns that a 
driver might appropriately sing. While 
driving at 25 miles an hour he suggests 
that the motorist sing "I'm But a Stranger 
Here Heaven Is My Home," at 45 miles, 
"Nearer My God To Thee," at 5 5 miles 
"I'm Nearing the Port and Will Soon Be 
at Home," at 6 5 miles "When the Roll is 
Called up Yonder I'll be There," at 75 
miles, "Lord, I'm Coming Home." 

— Toledo Democrat. 

It is estimated that there is more flying 
in San Diego than in any other city in 
the United States. 

"The efficient man is always careful." 

"A scratch may cause infection — play 
safe — use your first aid kit." 



All communications should be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in part, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A, by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave,, San Diego, California. 



Consolidator 




BRIGHTEST smile in the plant be- 
longs to Betty Melchor. Does any- 
body know the answer? The answer is 
love! 

A postcard from Fran Warner indicates 
the East is still a good place to have a lot 
of fun and renew old acquaintances. 
Hope to see her back sometime renewing 
friendships she made in San Diego. 

By the way, Bea Jackson, I still don't 
think you earned that box of candy, re- 
member? Or are you holding out on us? 

Edna Willwerth is in the market for 
new coin or match tricks. She recently 



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gave a demonstration (a very well re- 
hearsed one) only to find that her "quick- 
er-than-the-eye- antics were familiar to 
everyone. 

White shoes among the femme per- 
sonnel are becoming more common each 
day. This is a sure sign of summer. And 
those newly-acquired sunburns and tans 
being sported by the outdoor Consoli-debs 
aren't exactly signs of winter. (There 
seems to be every other kind of "deb" 
mentioned in the newspapers now, so we 
may as well be in the swim too) . 

Lucille Fisher, who had a wager at 
stake, called her Purchasing clan together 
to find the correct spelling of "picnick- 
ing." She got such answers as "picnic- 
ing," "picknicking," and "picniking." 
The correct spelling, "picnicking," was 
found in the dictionary and the Pur- 
chasing Department girls are hanging 
their heads in shame — me included. 

College is like a washing machine you 
get out of it just what you put in — but 
you'd never recognize it. — The Houghton 
Line. 

Successful men profit by the errors of 
others as well as by their own. — The 
Houghton Line. 



CONSAIR FLYERS CLUB 

Of late Orville Hubbard has been seen 
rushing hither and yon carrying dull- 
looking volumes together with queer- 
shaped instruments under his arms. Upon 
investigating, it has been found that Orv 
is studying for his commercial license and 
instructor's rating as well — a task which 
anyone will agree rates the use of every- 
thing that will make the job easier. 

Among our very active membership 
there are a couple of fellows who deserve 
much credit for the smiling, amiable way 
they accepted the none too likeable job 
of collecting tickets at the "Aviation 
Dance." Al Drayman and H. W. Dvorak 
courteously greeted merrymakers the en- 
tire evening, regardless of the fact that 
relief never arrived. This is typical of the 
fine spirit shown within the club. 

Seen at the dance were: 

Arthur Becker (club president) and 
Maxine Hubbard doing a sort-of-a (?) 
jitterbug polka. So 'elp me. President 
Becker cracked nary a smile as he swung 
his partner merrily along! Must take his 
dancing like flying — seriously. Secretary 
Steve Brown and wife dancing very cap- 
ably to the swingy rhythms. Orv Hub- 
bard and Harvey Martin (Los Angeles 
airplane dealer) having a powwow in the 
cloak room. Miles Blaine, hurrying here 
and there, and really getting nowhere. 
Burrwell Marshall bragged throughout the 
afternoon of bringing a queen to the dance. 
He proved his point that evening. Brought 
to sudden halt was Ed Bruha when he 
thought he was safely navigating a pre- 
carious way to the refreshment room. 



FUiLER pninis 

ihetf lcL6t . . . 

PHinTS 

UHRniSHES 

mCQUERS 

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CLRSS 

miRRORS 



p. FUllER & [0. 

Seuenth Hue. and F St. . IRain 01B1 
2911 Uniuersity Rue. . Hillcrest 3110 



June, 1940 



San Diego Flying Club News 

On Sunday, April 21st there was an 
unusually large turnout of club members 
at the field, all anxiously awaiting the ar- 
rival of the new Cub "50." At about 
11:00 a. m. a yellow cub was seen ap- 
proaching from the north, which finally 
turned out to be one of the Cubs oper- 
ating from the Municipal Airport at 
Chula Vista, much to the disappointment 
of all. But the suspense continued until 
1:00 o'clock, when the ship finally did 
arrive. The plane was flown from Long 
Beach by Tommy Butterfield, club presi- 
dent, accompanied by Carl Hunnaman, 
treasurer. After being inspected and ad- 
mired by club members, the ship was 
serviced, and the rest of the afternoon 
was spent in giving the members demon- 
stration hops. 

The following Tuesday evening some 
of the club members were on hand at the 
airport to alter the paint scheme, which 
consisted of black checks on tail surfaces 
and bottom of fuselage and the club in- 
signia on each side of the fuselage. 

Two members who have made their 
first solo flight recently are George Ruiz 
of Final Assembly and Jenkins of 
Naval Air Station. At the aviation dance 
held by the three flying clubs: San Diego 
Flying Club, Southern California Flyers 
and the Coiisair Flyers, on May 4th at 
the Broadway Pier, a good time was en- 
joyed by all. 

A cross-country flight was made to 
Mount Palomar on May 5 th by Charlie 
Culver, accompanied by A. H. David- 
son, in the "50" Cub. The route was via 
Lakeside, Ramona to Mount Palomar over 
the Observatory and return via Rincon 
and Lake Hodges. A fog on the coast kept 
the ceiling at two thousand feet, which 
began to break up east of Lakeside. Climb- 
ing through the holes in the fog, the 
visibility was unlimited and the air was 
smooth as glass. 



The former operations manager. Spike 
McCannon, is back from Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, where he has been on duty for the 
company. On the way back he stopped 
in Colorado and purchased a Ryan 
Brougham B-1, which he is now keeping 
at the club field. 

Charlie Culver has had his license re- 
newed, and Harry CuH^er, club instructor, 
has been authorized by the C.A.A. to 
take his instructor's re-rating course at 
Speer's. Two members have recently 
joined the club, Mr. Tracy and Mr. 
Haught. 



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— with Bud Landis 



When attending old-time movies 
you took along a nickel and your 

imagination. 

• • • 

Screens flickered like a lightning 
bug with a short circuit and actors 

walked like Liza crossing the ice. 

• • • 

But projection has gone far since 
the Nickelodeon. Nowadays, any 
resemblance between the cast and 
anybody living is more than coin- 
cidental. 




Actors are on speaking terms with 
the audience and color has come to 

brighten their lines. 

• • • 

Soon third dimension will permit a 
star to shake hands with fans. 

• • • 

And now there is talk of an "odor 
track" which will waft orange blos- 
som fragrance out over the audience 
for the finish fade-out. 

• • • 

The more human senses appealed 
to, the clearer the impression. Shell 
is working along these lines with a 
new motor oil demonstration. 




Your Shell service station Dealer 
has a fine Swiss watch actually lu- 
bricated with Golden Shell. All the 
fine mechanisms — like those in your 
car's engine — are kept in smooth 
operation by this popular product. 

• • • 
By means of his watch, your Dealer 
appeals to three of your senses : He 
tells the Golden Shell story (sound), 
he hands you the watch (feel), and 
he gives you a chance to look in 
through the dials and see Golden 
Shell doing its work (sight). 



Consolidator 



PLASTER SPLASHES 

The surprise Stag party for Joe Miller 
really was a blowout. We wonder what 
the neighbors thought of Johnny's horn 
and the vocal discord? From all indica- 
tions, it seems as though little Dan Cupid's 
arrow had pierced the heart of one Doug. 
Robinson. 

Even before the party a certain red- 
head couldn't find Joe Miller's house, and 
where was Tyler the night of the stag? 



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Ha\'e you pro^'ided Jor 

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Commander R. G. Mayer, stepping out of the position of Inspector of Naval Aircraft for San 
Diego into the position of Production Manager and Co-ordinator for Consolidated; points out to Lieut. 
Commander Rhea S. Taylor, who now assumes Mayer's former duties, how he (Taylor) should jump 
down the Consolidated Production Manager's (Mayer's own) throat, if production schedules are not met. 
In other words, Mayer instructs Taylor how to hang Mayer, if Mayer doesn't hop into his new job 
with alacrity. 



STEPPING UP . . . 

On a scale more vast than any of us 
would have anticipated a few years ago, 
production in our plant is now swinging 
into accelerated action. And with this 
acceleration getting under way, the death 
of our late Donald Marshall Carpenter 
came not only as a deep personal loss 
to everyone, but a distinct shock to our 
production developments as well. The 
filling of "Doc' Carpenter's position will 
be a difficult one, but Conwlidated is 
fortunate in securing Commander Roland 
G. Mayer from the Navy office for Com- 
mander Carpenter's former post. Com- 
mander Mayer, as Chief Inspector of Naval 
Aircraft for San Diego, which brought 



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Administration Building 
Lindbergh Field 



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him in close contact with the problems 
confronting Carpenter, is fully aware of 
the difficulties associated with his new 
job, and qualified by his experience to 
cope with them. 

Commander Mayer's part in aviation 
has been one of long association and 
achievement. He graduated from the 
University of Washington in 1916, and 
started with the then embryo Boeing 
plant in 1917; has been with aviation 
ever since. He joined the Navy in 1918, 
holds licenses as both a pilot of heavier- 
than-air and lighter-than-air craft, hav- 
ing perhaps more hours in lighter-than-air 
craft than any other American pilot. He 
saw duty on the U. S. Naval Airships 
Shenandoah, Akron, Macon and Los An- 
geles and survived the crash of the Shen- 
andoah. Commander Mayer is on leave 
from the Navy at present. His retire- 
ment will become official July 1st. 

Entering the Navy office to fill the 
wake left by Mayer is Lieut. Commander 
Rhea S. Taylor, Chief Inspector of Naval 
Aircraft for San Diego. Commander Tay- 
lor is one of those rare individuals ... a 



Let's Be Friends 

As well as 

Neighbors.' 

• • • 

Make Yourseit 

At Home in Tills 

Big Friendly Store \ 




Your Credit DRYER'S STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Is Good ./. E. Dryer, President • 236S Kettner Bhd. 



June, 1940 



California native son, for he was born in 
Oakland on Jan. 30, 1891. He attended 
the University of California. Enlisted 
during the war, and attended the Ground 
School Aviation Course at M. I. T., fol- 
lowing this with preliminary flight train- 
ing at Key West and Miami in July of 
1918, and advanced training at Pensa- 
cola, receiving his commission in the 
Naval Reserve Oct. 23, 1918. 

From 1918 to 1919 he instructed in 
the handling of big airboats, later moving 
to Langley Field where he served with the 
first shipboard operations on battleships. 
This was pioneering work that preceded 
the introduction of catapulting. A 60- 
foot runway was built atop the turrets 
and this was all the run the planes had 
before they took off. Small French war 
planes were used in the experiments. The 
planes were forced to land on the beach 
when they came down. (Incidentally 
Commander Mayer was responsible for 
the overhaul and reconditioning prior to 
test with these planes.) Commander Tay- 
lor also served with the first Battleship 
Squadron on the West coast under Capt. 
Marc A. Mitscher, now Assistant Chief 
of the Bureau of Aeronautics. 

From 1922 to 193 5 Lieut. Commander 
Taylor served successively with observa- 
tion, fighter, patrol boats, cruiser scouts 
and carrier scouts at San Diego and Pearl 
Harbor. From 1935 to 1938 he acted as 
Inspector of Naval Aircraft at Pratt- 
Whitney and Hamilton Standard Propeller 
divisions of United Aircraft at East Hart- 
ford. During the past two years he has 
been attached to the Aircraft Carrier U. 
S.S. Ranger located at Norfolk. 

It was early in 1926 that Commander 
Taylor qualified for landings aboard car- 
riers. Due perhaps to the fact that his 
early pioneering with launching of planes 
from battleships prohibited returning to 
the ship once the plane was launched, he 
now holds a strong liking for shipboard 
landings. He states he'd rather land aboard 
a carrier anyday, than on a landing field. 
Well, if other pilots had started out with 
experimenting with a choice of a success- 
ful take-off in 60 feet (or a splash in the 
big drink) they too, probably would con- 



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Consair Club Class Lessons, including one 
hour lesson and 1 '/2 hour Practice Dancing 
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Classes forming for Children and Adults in 
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sider the deck of one of our carriers as 
about the size of the state of California — 
but they still look small to most civilian 
pilots, despite Commander Taylor's pref- 
erence! 

■ ,-ai 

MACHINE OIL 

By A I Pfeiffer 

Without walls we just can't have any 
keyholes. Furthermore our ace reporter 
states that every time he managed to get 
comfortably located in favorable position 
behind a lathe, someone whisks it away. 
The net result is no gossip and very little 
news. 

Our heartfelt sympathies are extended 
to Bill Chadwick whose father died during 
the month. 

Instead of Old Dobbin and the Shay, 
Valente has a sporty new Plymouth to 
spark his gal. The prospective Mrs. is well 
on the road to recovery hence the jaunty 
step and cheery smile. 

Pappy Yokum says it's too late now to 
stop the boys from cu:sin' but we hear 
that he's teaching Sunday school manners 
to the future generation of machinists. 

va 

"Multiplication is vexation. Division is 

bad. 
The rule of Three it puzzles me, and 

Practice drives me mad." 



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We've been wondering if the new "li- 
brarians" in the Blue Print Dept. have 
anything to do with the apparent willing- 
ness of the boys to run for prints. Prime 
mover in that direction is Eddie Carmen — 
Need a pair of high heels, Ed? 



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Rates $4 up perWk 

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Business, Shopping and 

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W. B. BASSLER, Prop. 
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TRAVEL 



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any other form of first class 
transportation. 

To the next town, or across 
the country, let your friendly 
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trip. You'll like it! 

tow Fores Everywhere 

LOS ANGELES $ 1.80 

SAN FRANCISCO 6.70 

FRESNO 4.60 

MERCED 5.05 

PHOENIX 5.00 

KANSAS CITY 27.00 

CHICAGO 33.50 

BUS DEPOTS 

700 W. Broadwoy 

Main 8287 
137 E. Broadway 

Main 7271 

Member, Nalional Trailways 
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ROUTE OF THE AIRCOmTIOHlVUiim 



Consolidator 



Emm)' Roy's usual Monday morning 
hair-do puts him out of the running. Who 
or what gets into that tawny thatch, 
Emerson? 

Parrj' man deluxe is Paul Madsen. This 
month's feature is an imitation of No. 7 
train pulling out of the Chicago freight 
yards. (Whistles 'n every thin'). 

"Stub" Goude has good reason to be- 




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lieve in ghosts for the last seance brought 
some startling revelations out of the past. 
Next time corner one and ask him if my 
Uncle Clem needs gloves to fire that 
boiler, Clas. 

Like the boy who cried wolf too often 
Lou Peters' stories are given no credence. 
"It's because I look so strong and husky," 
says Lou. 

What second shift leadman sports a '40 
Dodge and a Gable mustache? 

Gus Granstedt can't help it if his bite 
is worse than his bark. Demonstrating his 
prowess with the new ivories the other day, 
he actually chawed a piece off one of those 
big castings. Was it rejected, Gus? 

The roamin' fever has left Otto Evans 
and he is almost ready to sell or trade 
that little trailer for a what-have-you. 

Sure the day shift softball team took a 
shellacking — but it took the Wood shop 
to do it. 

Those years in Iowa brought Charlie 
Wharton a yen for the briny deep. His 
longing is about to be realized for he re- 
cently acquired a 3 5 -foot schooner called 
The Palomar. When are we going fishing, 
fellows? 

Hughie Stockton must have thought 
that jig needed re-tooling. Most fellows 
throw a fit when one goes wrong. 

A hobby is a good pastime, especially 
photography, but will Wurzler's pictures 
stand inspection? Ay, that's the question. 

Johnny Worobec has trouble with those 
street cars. Did such a good job of banging 
one with his car that he thought he'd try 
it by hand the other night. 

Those new drill presses are so neatly 
compact they look like sewing machines. 
In fact several of the boys were caught 
trying to hemstitch a hankie. Guess Who? 




PRODUCTION MINUTES 

By "Brad" Bradshaw 

HERE it is press time and like the 
"bigamist" I make the same mistake 
twice by waiting until the "deadline" to 
compose this "headache." 

Joe Maloney's business has shown the 
greatest increase from the "customer 
angle" and is doing more for the ad- 
vancement of "blue print reading" than 
Boeing, Shaw, Ehlert, Gibson, and all the 
"vocational school experts" can ever hope 
to accomplish. Of course, Ogden and 
Bender as usual did a bit of "Planning" 
there too, in getting an assortment of 
blondes, brunettes and a red-head so that 
we should all be happy. The "femmes," 
Misses Griebner, Holmes, Wright, Ben- 
nett, Paschen and Graham are doing a 
swell job. 

"Doc" McDonald is the one fellow who 
believes in the proverb "All good things 
come to him who waits" and either by 
accident or — ? Marie Graham pinched a 
finger in the file cabinet and Joe per- 
suaded Keith Hatter, probably by prom- 
ising him a raise, to leave his work and 
escort Marie to "first aid." As the story 
was told to me — Keith came back alone, 
and "Doc" supervised the safe return of 
Marie (with the proper medical attention) . 
It took "Doc" three days to get the "nail 
polish" off and give out the good news 
there would be no "amputation." If you 
find those file cabinets are tampered with 
in the future Joe, it will not take an F.B.I, 
man to find the culprit. 

A new "Lochinvar" has ridden into our 
midst in the person of dashing "Buck" 
Gott who is causing quite a flutter among 
the female hearts hereabouts. 

"Hotfoot" McCall, that stock-getter 
for the Bench, has a new "breakdown" 
and reports plenty to do for some time. 
He claims to have spent two weeks chasing 
parts for the last one to discover the 
assembly had been pulled before he got 
started. "That," says McCall, "is when 
the old Rocking Chair Gets Me." 

Russ Osgood, county amateur golf 
champion has been employed by Purchas- 
ing with duties in the AN Stores. Osgood, 
who is plenty good, gives Meer and his 



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June, 1940 



crew of "golf bugs" some added power 
on the links. 

Doug McDougal, before getting ac- 
climated, was a victim of that strange 
malady and missed being a June bride- 
groom by a few days — just no will-power. 
Mac married Jane Hughes and spent a 
three-day honeymoon at Rosarito Beach 
which was terminated by Jim Mussen and 
Sam Seligman's "metal smashers" and 
"short circuit" men running into Final 
Assembly trouble. 

Eddie Kellogg will probably hesitate 
before doing much boasting in the future 
about the "he men" of the west and their 
"capacity" in "making the rounds." Ed 
started out, so I am told, to entertain a 
pretty visitor from the East along with 
Bill Liddle, and Dan Miller, and their 
wives and ended up furnishing the enter- 
tainment. Ed's alibi "I would have been 
right in there pitching with 'cm if that 
smart bartender had not slipped me that 
'Mickey Fin'!!!" Russ Gaughen advises a 
few "conditioning sessions" at the "Hide- 
away" and don't forget to "set 'em up" 
if I come in. 

Frank Cross has taken over the duties 
of "bond and traveler blood hound" that 
"Frenchy" left after proving himself a 
"second Sherlock" — a few of Mulroy's 
"arch abusers" have been thinking of Ed 
Generas's name in reverse, or as "generous 
Ed" and asking him to order parts for 
shortages but have finally concluded there's 
nothing in a name. — Lou Miller has been 
talking lately about turning the garden 
hose on Butterfield, Mulroy, and Ambrose, 
but is referring to the trees that have been 
purchased with "donations" left by these 
congenial fellows at "Friday night ses- 
sions" and bear the name of the donors. — 



KIRBY'S 

make a special effort to meet the 
needs of Aircraft Workers . . . 
Goodyear Welt, Gro-Cord, or 
Crepe Sole Oxfords, ^^ ^_. 
Black or Brown .... ^L,yD 
Goodyear Welts 



K 



Shoes for the Family 
X-Ray Fitted 

IRBY' 

Good Shoes 



S 



SEVENTH AND BROADWAY 

Open Saturday Nites until Nine 



Trotman is thinking of bringing in one of 
the wife's aprons to wear during lunch 
hour and protect him from the mustard 
and gravy that finds a landing field on his 
"blue serge." — Kel Aiken informs us that 
his force is doing their part in keeping up 
the birth rate and that Bill Miller and 
Kenny Phillips each report the arrival of 
a baby boy. I cannot verify these reports 
without the usual cigar. — Marks and 
Wicnberg, two new dispatchers, never 
realized that carrying so much "meat" so 
far would make the feet so tired. And 
they have the "plant expansion" to look 
forward to. — Dan Clemson says that he 
left his former dispatching job with only 
five shortages, fuselage, wings, engines, 
tanks and landing gear. It's "five" add 
'cm up. 

Red Kimball has added to his athletic 
accomplishments with the mastery of 
the "ostrich crawl" which was performed 
by the "swivel hipped" wonder at "The 
Barn" recently, according to Owen Stock- 
ton. "Rosy" Roese accompanied with vocal 
"strains" over the loud speaker. 

Les Matusek and his Production soft- 
ball crew are in action. He has had a full 
team out so far but still checks up in the 
red when it comes to paying the ump. 
Les, says he can pitch, catch and play out- 
field in case of a shortage. Gaughen, Price, 
Coykendall, Luppke, Browning, Johnson, 
Speed, Miller, Leppart and Aubuchan are 
on the roster. They gave the Anodic De- 
partment a 15 to 4 "treatment" the first 
game. 

P. S. — If Kathleen Schneider who writes 
about the "Femmes" only knew how this 
"brainstorm" came about she would surely 
retract those nice remarks made last 
month. 

They copied all they could copy, 
But they couldn't copy my mind. 

So I left them sweating and stealing, 
A year and a half behind — R. Kipling. 

Airplane engines, due to the fact that 
the art is advancing so rapidly, are to a 
large extent built to order for the cus- 
tomer. 



WHERE TO LIVE? 




ASK 


E. 


FRIEDRICK 


NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 


MAIN 


1014 234 C ST. 


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Saving Suggestions 
Suitable Materials 
Selecting Bargains 
Servicing Your Job 

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we have been supplying all the ma- 
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WHEN YOU 

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ot lenil iMMH 
on pioperti 

derwriters.) 



miTMsi Company 



SECOND AVENUE 
AT BROADWAY 



JAMES D FORWARD 
CALlFOPNl* 



Consolidator 



HEARD ABOUT THE HULL 

Attention was drawn this month to the 
fine showing of Leadman Al Clark as he 
came through in the latest Hull Depart- 
ment golf tournament to cop first prize. 
It seems that Al got a little tired of taking 
the razzing the boys were dishing out, so 
he turned the tables and gave them a real 



SEE THE 1940 
INDIANS 

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE SALES CO. 

GUY UROUHART 
1041 Columbia St. San Diego 

Open Evenings • Terms 



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^^^ SUBSTANTIAL 
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New cars financed at 4 iilO% 

Used 4 8110% 

Insurance lowest in San Diego 

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(before 5 p. m.) JT " / / .) 1 

ask for RAY DcMAHY 

or bring this adv. to 1340 Sixth Ave. 




trouncing. The boys now call him "King 
of the divot-diggers." Nice going, Al. 

Starting the newly formed third shift 
off with a bang are; Foreman, Frank 
Popp, Assistant Foreman, Harry Mc- 
Ewan. Latest reports: "Everything rolling 
smooth." 

Since the "great expansion" in the Hull 
department, some of the fellows have been 
kind of hard to find. Here are a few help- 
ful hints — 

If you see a guy with one hand in his 
pocket and he looks at you with a know- 
ing look, (one eye partially closed) — that's 
Bob Hayman. 

If you see a guy with a clerk or two, 
an inspector, and several stock-chasers 
following him, that's Walter Hassler, 
Chief Dispatcher of the Hull. If Walter 
can't stop and talk to you, it's because 
he's trying to catch the man ahead of 
him. The man ahead of him is Glenn 
Hotchkiss. 

If you see a gentleman come in the 
plant about three o'clock with eyes spar- 
kling, and full of life, jumping from here 
to there, that's George Wire, Night Fore- 
man and if someone watches him with awe 
and admiration in his eyes, and is heard to 
ask "How in the world does he do it?" 
that someone is Tommy Johnson. 

If you see a guy with a satisfied smile 
on his face and a look of "good things to 
come" that's Mike Brooks, first class 
manager of a first class baseball club. 
Good luck, boys. 

Bill Pettit, Hull Clerk. 

The English air passenger demands 4 
things: comfort, tobacco, drink and food. 



HOMES AND HOMESITES ON EASY TERMS 




6525 EL CAJON BLVD. 



T. 2171 



WING KEYHOLE 

By Browne 

Special: Tod Carter "our amateur war 
correspondent" received some second-hand 
information regarding the European sit- 
uation. The information smelled so badly, 
the boys throughout the shop were highly 
disillusioned the following day. Moral: 
Refer to your daily papers. 

Henry Zilz of Sheet Cutting had a real 
battle with a fire extinguisher the other 
night. Hank in moving some angles ac- 
cidentally loosened an extinguisher from 
the wall; every time he made a move the 
hose was one jump ahead and waiting for 
him. Result, one very thoroughly drenched 
Zilz. 

Flash: Frank Heidemann broke two 
poker games in less than two minutes at 
one of the boys' houses recently. P. S. We 
think it's that extra deck Frankie carries 
up his sleeve. 

Craig Clark has been laboring on a bar- 
becue pit the last few weeks. Some of the 
fellows have viewed it from all angles 
and claim it looks like a real job. We an- 
ticipate an open invitation to all who 
bring their own beef, etc. 

Congratulations to Bob Morse on his 
latest achievements. Bob is to be Jim 
Kelley's assistant. Mr. Morse has the mak- 
ing and we wish him all the success possi- 
ble. P S. John Buchan has taken over 
Bob's post in the Wing Department. Little 
John can keep things moving and under 
control. We are proud of you, Johnny. 

Steve Powell, night foreman of Wings, 
really takes off nights owing to the fact 
the aisles are not so crowded as days. You 
should see him travel. 




Buy in 
the 



LOW RENT 
DISTRICT 



Rug and Linoleum 

SALE 

INLAID LINOLEUM, sq. yd. . . 79C 
9-ft. BROADLOOM, sq. yd. . . $2.55 
9x12 AXMINSTER .... $21.95 
9x12 WILTON $39.95 

Ddvidson 



FURNITURE 



SEVENTH at G St. 



Free Parking al West's Assoclaled Service Across lite SIreel 



June, 1940 



TANK HIGHLIGHTS 

By Hcrthcl Chappcll 

Good news from Ernie Bachaus. He 
Is home from the hospital, and we hope 
it won't be long until he's back in Tank. 

Johnny Humes is seeing a lot of a cer- 
tain dressmaker. Now you don't wear 
dresses, do you Johnny? 

What kept Piper and McCann home 
Monday, May 6th? Could it be the little 
man with a hammer? 

Wonder who was hiding in the shrub- 
bery at the Muncipal Plunge Sunday, May 
5th? One might ask John Wiley. Come on, 
Wiley, show the boys your pictures of the 
dazzling bathing beauties. Photography 
must be a swell hobby, fellows! 

The man of speed, Jim Saftig, will by 
now be burning up the bay. He was 
scheduled to launch his new speedboat 
before this. 

See if you can beat this fish story: 
Felix Mattingly, a newcomer from Ken- 
tucky, a greenhorn at deep-sea fishing, 
tops them all by hooking a 15-pound 
sheephead. The rest of the fellows had 
their lines out long before Felix got his 
tackle untangled. A few minutes more of 
deep concentration and he had his line 
out. He was wondering what to do if a 
big one hit his line, when wham! — some- 
thing almost jerked him out of the boat. 



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AAA 

$5 to 750 

MOST STYLES 

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Main 3531 



Screaming for help while holding on to 
his tackle with both hands, he waited for 
assistance, but the boys were doubled up 
with laughter and unable to help him. To 
make matters worse the reel came off his 
rod, leaving poor Felix with the rod in 
one hand, and the reel in the other. Finally 
Johnnie Hume came to the rescue, hauled 
it in hand over hand, landing the biggest 
catch of the day. On the eventful fishing 
trip with Mattingly were Jim Eldridge, 
Bill Consaul, Johnnie Hume, Dick Light- 
hizer, Bob Summers and Jimmy North. 

Flash: A new way to fish! The idea 
is to lie on the bottom of the boat, and 
hang your head over the side and fish, or 
should we say "feed the fish?" For fur- 
ther details, see Duffy and Eddie who went 
fishing with Charlie Hibert. 

Softball news: It seems all the Tank 
Department needs to win a ball game is 
three men, Jim Allen, Frank Serio and 
Clifton — and the help of a few grammar 
school kids. They played against Drop 
Hammer and won by a large margin. 
Come on, fellows, let's turn out and chuck 
for that trophy this season. The players 
on the day shift team are: Craig, cf., 
Saftig, If., Russell, 2d., Allen, rf., Serio, 
1st, Morgan, p., Consaul, c. Sides, 3rd, 
Turosky, ss. and Lundberg, sub. The above 
team played their first game against Hull 
No. 2 and the score was 1 5 to 8 for Tank. 

The following players are on the night 
shift's team: Emslie, 1st, Burdine, 2d., 
Wright, ss., Federoski, 3rd, H. Smith, rf., 
Anderton, cf., Strunk, If., Kugel, p., Wil- 
liams, Oleyar and Marshall, subs. This 
team played their first game against Hull 
No. 2, losing 20 to 8. 

Sam was hired on a railway gang. At 
the close of the first shift he was all tired 
out and sought the boss. 

"Mister, are you sure you got my right 
name down on the payroll?" 

"Sure," said the boss, "here's your name 
— Sam Simpson. That right?" 

"Yes, sir," replied Sam. "I just thought 
you might have got me down as Sampson." 

Everyone makes mistakes . . . that's 
why the cra:crs on pencils. 




A. J. Edwards says 

"Drive a car 
with, a built 
-in tail wind" 



UniUERSITV 
mOTORS 

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Beginning off uiarh 

• 

EITHER means the need 
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For the best 

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see 

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Drive in where you see the 

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GENERAL PETROLEUM 
CORPORATION 



10 



Consolidator 



nBETIER SIGHT- 

with 

Light 
Conditioning 




JUST A FEW 
PENNieS WILL 
STPeAMLINE 
YOUR 
LIGHTING 
FIXTURES /" 



You'll get a kick out of 
adapting the simple 
Light - Conditioners to 
your old fixtures ... in 
addition to the pride 
you'll have in knowing 
that you remolded your 
home with up-to-the- 
minute lighting your- 
self ! Your friends, too, 
will notice a big differ- 
ence with this "Better 
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lighting. 

SEE YOUR 

LAMP DEALER 



Or Phone F-4I2I for 
Free Home Demonstration 

Sao Diego Consolidated 
Mas I Electric Co.—* 



THE SPORT SPOTLIGHT 

By Uatt Wklopolski 

THE time, 10:30 a.m. every week 
day. The place. University Heights 
Softball diamond at Idaho and Lincoln. 
That's where we should watch the night- 
shift teams play for the Consair Softball 
Trophy. Thus far, in two weeks of play- 
ing, some of the boys and teams have 
played wild, loose and erratic games. Yet 
they have proved to us that they can play 
in a sportsmanlike manner. However, a 
little more support from their department 
will bring more fight and lift to the 
players, as well as the game. 

The production outfit had to execute a 
sizzling triple play to stop the wing team's 
rally. Craig Clark's boys' spectacle hap- 
pened in the sixth when a long hit to right 
fielder Tipon caught and pegged a hot 



Come to 

3^tr0t Prpsbgtpnan (filiurrli 

Third, Fourth and Date Streets 

Morning Worship at 11:00 
Sunday School at 9:30 

(If you ■want real fello'wship, ask for John Goodwin 's C^ass) 



The entire family 

enjoys a meal 
at Morgans — 

iV 'cause each one 

can select his own 
fai^orite dish. 



M 



otaan i 



^a-kat^tia 



1047 Sixth Avenue 
San Diego, California 



one to second base. Hall, who relayed to 
third baseman R. Larceval. 

The most valuable player of the month 
was Tony Bernardini. Playing left field 
for sheet metal, Tony, single-handed, beat 
the machine shop out of a game when he 
caught the near impossible hits. Very good, 
unusual and spectacular playing, Tony! 

Hull No. 2 team had three or four 
double plays to make in winning their 
second game, while Hull No. 1, won and 
lost one game. 

They tell me that Al Pfelffer, pitching 
for Day Machine Shop, allowed 20 hits in 
the first inning. Well! You can take it 
from me, when the boys are good, 
they're very very good, and when they're 
bad and off they're . . . well, it's just an 
off day! 

Famous saying from Vic Racko, Mgr. 
of the Machine Shop team, "Look at the 
Yanks! They're at the bottom!" 

From the golf links, where lies never lie 
on the course, comes word that Hank 
Golem shot an even 99 at Rancho Santa 
Fe. Right? 

Bill Liddle finally out-golfed Dan Miller 
at the same golf grounds, a mere two 
strokes margin. "Red" Chaplin occasion- 
ally breaks an 88, but Owen Gandee 
burns up the course in 78, the Snead 
style. 

Evening in and evening out and every 
week-end our tennis Tom, Dick and 
Harrys are practicing their game. "This 
will be the best Tennis Tournament of any 
which Consolidated has ever had" says 
Bill Gilchrist. 

After press-time, the Machine Shop 
bowling team will have their last chance 
to knock the 1st place Draw Bench, off the 
lead. It'll take a stronger team to win four 
games from the league leaders. Which 
means that the bowlers will attempt to 
beat Geo. Wire's high game, 237-?-s. 
three game total, 609, and Machine Shop's 
high series of 2 561. 

A varying wavelength (by motor- 
driven variable condenser) is the heart of 
the radio "Clearance" altimeter . . . 
Flight. 



BRING YOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 



3050 University Ave. 



1 1 44 Third Avenue 



June, 1940 



11 




Consolidator Takes Tops 

A group of San Diego Aeroneers jour- 
neyed to Pomona Sunday, May 5 th, with 
their gas model airplanes to compete in the 
second annual contest sponsored by the 
Disabled Veterans. 

Harold Strawn of Engineering, with a 
Comet Mercury, Ohlsson 23 powered, won 
first place and the $50 cash award. Har- 
old's ship circled and dipped over the field 
for 17 minutes and 7 seconds, landing 
within one quarter of a mile from the 
point of take-off. 

Other Aeroneer members who attended 
the meet were: R. O. Spacey, Chas. Hart, 
E. J. Brown and Bob Hogan. 

WOOD SHOP CHIPS . . . 

By J. E. Hodgson 

WE are pleased to note that George 
Anderson is back on the job after 
having his appendix removed. Pretty soon 
someone will be starting a club so that 
surgical victims may discuss operations to- 
gether. I bet it would be better than some 
of the fish stories that travel around. 

Rumors are rife that Bud Hadley and 
Miss Clydene Blackburn of Ocean Beach, 
are serious. The date is not yet definite, 
depending on when the builder can com- 
plete their new home. More anon. 

In a gas powered model meet of the 
"Aeroneers" held recently at Pomona, 
our own Al Young seems to have had the 
hardest of luck. While his plane remained 
in the air for forty-five minutes, it was dis- 
qualified because the engine ran two sec- 
onds over the allotted time, before cutting 
out. 

A group of the boys with their families 
and friends held an outing and picnic 
Sunday, May 5 th, at Mt. Palomar. Those 
present were: Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs Mercer, 



Does she put you in a spin? 

Send Flowers! 



EXCLUSIVE 



Art Younghusband and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bill Clark, Frank Mische, Geo. Hol- 
zinger and their lady friends, Mr. and 
Mrs. Boyd Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Seiver, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Pogorel. Miss 
Judith Jensen had her first outing with 
Pa and Ma Henry Jensen as she only ar- 
rived lately. The party went out by way 
of Lake Henshaw, returning through Es- 
condido. They had such a good time, that 
plans are in progress for a similar trip 
shortly, probably to Warner Hot Springs. 

The Wood Shop family is growing so 
large that they have organized two soft- 
ball teams. No. 1 under Bob Harshaw, 
plays Thursdays and won their first game 
of the season. In his line-up is a new man, 
George James, fielder, who plays both soft- 
ball and baseball. He played 4 years in the 
Navy, and may join the San Diego Padres 
before the season's end. Team No. 2 under 
Boyd Robinson plays Tuesdays, and al- 
though they lost their first two games, 
promise to give a very good account of 
themselves ere the season ends. 

We offer sincere sympathy and condol- 
ences to Ralph Berg and family on the 
passing of Mr. Berg, senior, recently, also 
to Earl Bashore whose mother died May 
6th. 

The hard luck laurels ought to go to 
Lynn Baker. Last issue we congratulated 
him on returning to work after an illness. 
Now we are informed he has been injured 
in an automobile accident. The extent of 
his injuries, however, has not yet been 
ascertained by us. Let's hope they are not 
serious. 

Traffic problems in Pennsylvania are be- 
ing unsnarled from a flying plane employ- 
ing a two-way radio. 



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Summer Schedule in All 

TYPES OF DANCING ana 

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START JUNE 17th 

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SIXTH .,„d B STREETS 
FRANKLIN B 2 33 



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DANCE 

• Grand Music I every wed., fri., 

• Largest Floor I sat.&sun.nites 

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VISIT 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
FOR MOTORISTS 




FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

Tires and Tubes 
Batteries 
Spark Plugs 
Life Protector Tubes 
Motor Tune-up Dept. 
Brake Department 
Auto Radio and Service 
Four Brands of Gasoline 
Auto Accessories 
Seat Covers 

FOR THE HOME 

Electric Refrigerators 

Ranges 

Washers 

Radios 

Electrical Appliances 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

Bicycles 
Velocipedes 
Scooters 
Wagons 



Terms as Low as 25c Weekly 



WE GASH PAY CHECKS 



It's Easy to Park 
and Shop at 

Broodwoy, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 



12 



Consolidator 



Let's consider the tanks we use in the 
planes we build and look over the men 
who build them. Tlie tanks are of sizes 
and shapes too numerous to mention. The 
materials used are Aluminum Alloy, Stain- 
less Steel, and Aluminum Sheet. They are 
held together by rivets, solder, screws and 
bolts. Many are welded. Tliey range from 
the size of the can your favorite coffee 
comes in, to the dimensions of your pet 
piano. 

Rigid restrictions prohibit a detailed 
description of their construction details 
but service tests of the most severe nature 
prove their worthiness and correct design 
principles. 



have been added to protect their surfaces. 
All are interchangeable. The parts arc 
fastened into the proper places in the small 
jigs and the sub-assemblies arc soon on the 
way to completion before the larger 
skin details are fastened. This occurs in 
the final assembly jig. Baffle assemblies arc 
added, outer panels are placed in position 
and held fast. Mounting pads are added, 
and the tanks acquire next their carefully 
placed inlet, drain and sump details. All 
are then riveted together to make an as- 
sembly that everyone concerned with its 
manufacture, or purpose, can be proud of. 
The completed tanks have defied the 
most rigid of laboratory tests, and the more 



TANKS FOR 



THE PLANES 



By Larry Boeing 



And here we want to refer, for the 
moment, to the Engineering group which 
is responsible for the Oil Tanks of riveted 
construction that perform such meri- 
torious service in our Record Breaker 
Model 2 8's. Bud Moerschel and his boys 
working with him deserve much praise 
for their efforts. 

The design having been decided upon, it 
becomes the task of Al Ambrose, one of 
the coolest and most composed looking 
individuals in the organization, to see to 
their fabrication thru completion. This 
duty is no small task, nor could it be suc- 
cessfully executed without the aid of many 
willing hands who draw from years of 
broad experience. 

First, close cooperation with the Tool 
Design department is necessary to settle 
the question of proper tools and assembly 
fixtures. Here the experience of many 
heads proves its worth and many a ques- 
tion settled over the drawing board saves 
time and frayed nerves later on. Close in- 
spection of the actual tank tool building 
is always an order, and the results arc 
most gratifying. 

While this work is being completed a 
large group of men is busily engaged mak- 
ing details of the various sub-assemblies. 
Large formed parts are delivered from the 
Drop Hammers; while angles and trimmed 
sections come from the Cutting and Sheet 
department. Rolled formers are sent in 
from the Draw Bench. Stampings are 
sent in from the Punch Presses. Machined 
parts are delivered from the Machine 
department. These details have all been 
previously inspected and proper finishes 



severe test of years of service in one of the 
Record Breakers. 

Al Ambrose, Tank Department Fore- 
man, handles his most diversified lot of 
duties, as only a veteran seasoned by many 
years of hard and trying experience can. 
Al is truly a product of Cmisolidatcd, 
having started as a helper in the Tank and 
Cowling department in 1925. He has con- 
tinually advanced thru many phases of 
production work. 

All these duties that befall Al Ambrose's 
Tank department add up to a total that is 
beyond the scope of any one man's ability 
to oversee without the aid of competent 
assistants. These he has in the capable men 
who have grouped around him and who 
direct and aid the various functions of 
the department. Assistant foreman of the 
department is Eric Sprenger, and Gene 
Harrison, a comparative newcomer to 
Conwlidafed, is in full charge of all drop 
hammer operations. 

Under Sprenger is a group of leadmen 
who are in turn responsible for various 
detail construction requirements. B. J. 
Duffy is in charge of all engine cowl 
work handled by this department. He is 
assisted by F. P. Morgan. 

Floats and Braces are handled by J. W. 
Wiley with M. J. Couniham and B. A. 
Shourdes acting as Group Leaders. E. D. 
Wilhclm is Leadman in charge of Final 
Tank completion. 

J. L. Theuws and E. Bachaus are 
Leadmen over groups adding sumps and 
doing general Layout and Tank assembly 
work. L. H. Chappell also leads an as- 




June, 1940 



13 



scmbly group. H. K. Parsons is in charge 
of .ill riveting operations in the depart- 
ment. John Woodhead leads the Plaster 
Pattern shop. 

The night shift is in charge of A. G. 
Hartman and he is ably assisted by G. H. 
Wilson and R. Culver who act as Leadmen. 

Continuous production in this depart- 
ment assures a satisfactory backlog of 
completed Tanks in stock to keep pace 
with the fast moving assembly lines whose 
requirements are most demanding. 

Al and the Tank boys are proud of the 
results of their efforts and we can all say 
truthfully we are a little proud of them 
ourselves. We can all join in and add, 
"Thanks for the Tanks, boys." 



All completed tanks are subjected to the 
tell-tale water test which readily shows any 
signs of possible leaks in the assembly. The 
openings of the tank are securely sealed and 
air pressure is directed into the interior of 
the tank. It is then submerged under "water. 
This final check against any possible defect 
insures the completed product. In the picture 
from left to right are Loeb and Parsons check- 
ing along riveted joints of tank, while De- 
partment Foreman Ambrose and Inspector 
Oolin observe operations. 

All tanks receive thorough inspection be- 
fore being assembled into the complete air- 
plane. This operation starts with the man do- 
ing the work. It is followed by a check by the 
Leadman or Asst. Foreman and finally by the 
Company Inspector assigned to the depart- 
ment. The completed items are then presented 
to the customer representative w^ho in turn 
examines them. 

This somewhat elaborate inspection proced- 
ure assures a long lasting article w^hich 
matches other units of the airplane for de- 
pandability, thru long years of severe service 
demands. In the picture, reading from left 
to right are, Chappell, Asst. Foreman Springer 
and Department Inspector Brow^ne. 

A tank department group doing rivet as- 
sembly w^ork on a float brace strut. To the left 
and below^ are Doesch and Sides w^orking as a 
rivet team, ^vhile in the center foreground 
are McCann and Saftek, and at the lower 
right, Cunningham and Tulanius. Rivet Boss 
Parsons is observing operations. 

Here again w^ell designed jigs and conveni- 
ent electrical outlets permit easy assembly 
procedure. Accuracy and interchangeability 
in assembly are positive demands and extreme 
care is exercised in all the operations to attain 
this condition. 

Large flying boats require wing floats 
to assist them during maneuvers on the sur- 
face of the w^ater. And the Tank Depart- 
ment is again called upon to handle a difficult 
oparation. The assembly of these carefully de- 
signed units requires experienced men due to 
the intricacy of internal bracing and the con- 
stantly changing lines of the external surfaces. 

Pictured about the assembly jig are Clifton, 
Woodsby, Wiley and Schourdes w^hile under- 
neath w^ith only one knee sho"(ving is Kepw^ith. 

Here again the necessity of having w^ater- 
tight joints is imperative and only w^orkman- 
ship of the highest caliber is acceptable. 




Pictured at top is a tank assembly being 
drilled in a large drill jig. All tanks are in- 
terchangeable for any airplane of a particular 
design. Locating mounting holes and fastening 
holes for accessories and faring is simplified 
thru the use of correctly designed and ac- 
curately built jigs. In the picture reading 
from left to right are Strieker, Darr and Ssrio, 
drilling holes at front and top of tank assem- 
bly. Short is working above on holes required 
on the side of the tank. 

Tanks are produced by progressive assembly 
of detail units and production methods are 
comparable to the most modern procedure 
found anyw^here. 

Smooth lines of the completed airplane are 
achieved by adding cleverly designed fairing 
w^hich fastens to the Nacelles containing the 
power units. In turn the Nacelles are fastened 
to the surfaces of the Tving itself. This pro- 
cedure and design increases speed by cutting 
down resistance. 

In the picture Morgan is fitting an Inspec- 
tion door while Summers is checking rivets 
and Leadman Duffy oversees the operations. 
Jigs designed for easy access during assembly 
operations greatly increase production and 
are easier for the men to w^ork about. 

Compressing air warms it. Therefore 
supercharging a cabin tends to warm the 
air somewhat. Normally at supercharging 
altitudes, however, the air is quite cold. 



The Best 
news 



IN MANY DAYS 



While other manufac- 
turers are raising prices on 
their new cars, Ford Motor 
Co. has reduced. 



The Big 



-H.P. 



Coupe 



fully equipped and 

delivered in SanDiego 

for only 



$799 



00 



See and Drive It 
Today 



HILTOn 

motor [0. 

1202 Bronduiav 




DOG GONE!! 



The appeal for Pet Pictures for the Consoli- 
dator seems to have "gone to the dogs." At 
least so one would judge from the above 
group, for never a single picture of a cat, 
canary, or rabbit showed up among the whole 
lot. . . . But it also goes without saying that 
they're a "dog-gone" good lot of pets!!! 
There's about every kind and breed repre- 
sented from thoroughbred mongrels to pedi- 
greed fleascratchers, all of whom rate ace 
number one with their masters. Here they are: 

1. "King" owned by C. Galehouse, No. 
14073 of Paint. 

2. E. E. Hanzlik's male and female Boston 
Terriers and German Shepherd. Hanzlik works 
in Experimental. 

3. "Fooee" and "Muffet" belonging to Shaw 
of Tool Design. 

4. G. J. Tompkins' "King White," posing 
with Mrs. Tompkins. "King" is 5 years old and 
weighs 92 pounds. 

5. James Madsen's Scotty, "Sandi MacDuff" 
from Ardmore Kennels of Detroit, Mich. Mad- 
sen says she's Air-minded as she spends most 
of her time watching for planes. 



6. "Pit-a-pat." Toy Boston Terrier belong- 
ing to S. H. Avery of Engineering. 

7. F. F. Cole»s pet "Pat" half German Police 
and half Cocker Spaniel ... a natural water 
dog. 

8. Pets of A. B. Beck of the Tool Room, On 
the left is "Mitsee" and on the right her son 
"Jip." Mitsee is Pekinese and (?) and they 
both do anything their master tells them to. 

9. Stan Marcyan's pets . . . his daughter 
and his dog. 

10. Meet "Schnauppsy" who is hot on the 
trail of a gopher. He is the pet of Harold 
Hahn of sheet metal and is believed to be a 
mixture of Dachshund and Wire Haired Ter- 
rier . . . w^hat's your guess? 

1 1. "Fooze". ow^ned by Oscar Wehmanen 
of Engineering. 

12. "Bingo" pet of L. F. Airhart of Finish 
Department. Quite a bit of fluff! 

13. "Fooee" and "Mufltet" belonging to 
Shaw of Tool Design, Shaw says his third dog 
appeared in Stan Marcyan's picture "Little 
dog meets big dog." (April Consolidator.) 

14. "Jeep" pet dog of Jim Neisw^onger of 
Sheet Metal Bench. 



15. "Jeep" pet dog of Jim Neiswonger of 
Metal Bench. 

16. "Pal" belonging to E. W. Cowell of 
Experimental. 

17. This is "Red" pet of Troy A. Sansing, 
No. 14092 of Paint Dept. 

18. Here's Ed Kaluza's dog "Duke." Kaluza 
w^orks in Experimental and says of "Duke" 
that he's an excellent sled dog and has webbed 
feet. He plans to bring him to San Diego soon. 

19. Here's Bub Butfat's "Smoky Ken," born 
Nov. 2 0th, 1934, and registered with Amer- 
ican Kennel Club, Son of "Triple Threat 
Tad'* and "Hi Jinks Queen," outstanding Wire 
Terrier champions. 

2 0. "Pit-a-pat," Toy Boston Terrier belong- 
ing to S. H. Avery of Engineering. 

21. S. D. Whitaker of Enginering w^rites of 
his dog "Rappsy in Blue", that he is a pedigree 
Bedlington Terrier, 7 months old. The breed 
originated in England and is still compara- 
tively rare. In some poses he resembles a sheep. 
His fur is blue-gray, very soft, and never 
sheds. Excellent watch dog. Fast, gentle, and 
courageous fighter if attacked. 

2 2. "Buster" Bob Biddle's pet, and also the 
pet of his son Dexter. "Buster" is fearless and 
afraid of nothing. Has had several encounters 
with Police dogs, and alw^ays came out second 
best. 



June, 1940 



15 



PLAY SAFE 

IN this period of expansion, when many 
men are being added to the payroll, it 
becomes increasingly necessary to pay 
careful attention to safety rules. Safe 
working conditions within our plant de- 
pend largely on good housekeeping and 
good judgment on the part of our em- 
ployees. Recent statistics show, by a large 
percentage, that new employees are more 
likely to be injured than those who have 
had more experience under factory work- 
ing conditions. 

The following rules and suggestions are 
set forth briefly, both to warn new em- 
ployees, and as a caution to the older and 
more experienced employees to be on 
guard against unsafe working practices. 
Remember! 90'^'( of all accidents are 
preventable! 



1. eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

Phone Main 5114 
FOURTH at Eim 



Has your present job a future? 
Does it offer opportunities for travel? 
Is it interesting? 

SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

offers its 
MASTER RADIO COURSE 
preparing For commercial radio operators 
licenses, as the answer to the above questions 
RADIO, as a vocation, affords jobs in the 
airways as ground station operator 
on shipboard as radio operator 
broadcast station work . installa- 

tion and repair . servicing. 

Our employment service assists in placing 
the licensed operotor. 
JOBS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
Both day and evening courses 
NAVIGATION COURSES 
also available. 
Prepare NOW while you ore employed 

SAhl DIEGO AEROMARINE 

RADIO AND NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Administration Building Lindbergh Field 

Telephone Jackson 7400 



1. GOGGLES AND FACE SHIELDS 
have been provided for employees 
engaged in cutting, grinding and 
drilling operations, and are avail- 
able at the nearest tool crib. Take 
no chances — use them. 

2. RESPIRATORS are provided for 
the use of persons engaged in the 
Paint Shop, Foundry and Sand 
Blast Departments. Their use is 
mandatory. 

3. LOOSE CLOTHING (ties, long- 
sleeved shirts and coats, etc.) and 
FINGER RINGS, should never be 
worn by machine operators . . . 
play safe. 

4. HAND TOOLS, such as hammers, 
wrenches, hacksaws, punches, etc., 
should be inspected frequently for 
burrs, wear and looseness, and re- 
paired or replaced immediately. 

5. When it is necessary to LIFT 
HEAVY OBJECTS, use the proper 
hoisting equipment, or secure the 
services of additional help. 

6. Use extreme care in HANDLING 
AIR HOSES. Clothing should not 
be cleaned with the air hose. If 
air hoses are used for cleaning off 
benches, tables or machines, the 
pressure should be cut down to a 
minimum, to avoid flying particles 
which might cause eye injuries to 
yourself, or other persons nearby. 

7. Acquaint yourself with the FIRE 
ALARM STATIONS and FIRE 
FIGHTING EQUIPMENT near 
your work. 

(Continued on page 21) 

Say You Saw It In The Ccmsolidator! 



HOME APPLIANCES 

• CROSLEY REFRIGERATORS • 

Radios 
Ranges 
Washers 
Ironers 

• 
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Terms 

• 

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ALSO 916 UNION AT E ST. 



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Everyone is Talking About 

THE NEW WAY 

to buy a 

USED CAR 



Your Satisfaction Guaranteed 

THE NEW WAY 

Visit the Finest Used Car Dept. 
in San Diego 

Tufford Motor Co. 

B at Front Street 
For a Better Deal 



lUliifnetfs 



1 



every, time for Better Values! 



After the bride, the budget/ 

Want that handsome husband to 
praise you for your financial genius? 
He'll be happier and so will you, if 
you stay within that budget! It's no 
trouble at all, vv^hen you can shop and 
save on every family and household 
need at WHITNEY'S! More than 53 
complete departments to serve you! 

Special credit extended 

to Consair families. 



■& '""., 
- %. 





Open Whitney 
Budget Account 

Credit Department 
6 th Avenue Mezzanine 



Wc cash your 
pay checks 



EiUbliihtd 190} 



16 



Consolidator 



"Windmills In The Clouds" 

THIS business of building airplanes 
seems to be catching and in many in- 
stances carries over into worker's hobbies 
as well. Alphonse Gomez, who is a tool 
maker in the Tool Making Dcpt., has 
found this true. His special interest is 
experimenting and working with "wind- 
mill," or rotating-wing flying models. 
Alphonse has done quite a bit along this 
line, and some of his ideas have brought 
interesting results. 

One of his latest "brain children" is a 
surprisingly simple hinge arrangement on 
a three-bladed rotor (he's applied for a 
patent . . . just in case you have certain 
ideas). His hinge arrangement changes 
the angle of incidence, striking an auto- 



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TOOLS 

Quality machinist, carpenter 
and metal workers tools are a 
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• L. S. Slarrett Co. 

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• Crescent Tools 

• Klenk's Aviation Snips 
LOW PRICES — BUDGET TERMS 

SAN DIEGO 
HARDWARE COMPANY 

840-850 FIFTH AVENUE 




Pictured at the right is Alphonse Gomez explaining the action of his autogyro type flying model to 
George Lawson, Tool Room inspector. While details of the hinge placement, which decreases the incidence 
of the blades as the rotor dishes up, are not visible, they are quite simple. 



matic balance and adjusting the com- 
plications resulting from gravity, cen- 
trifugal force, lift and drag, and other 
considerations which must be taken into 
account in designing a rotor. 

While the whole idea may sound simple 
at first, and the design of these rotators 
looks like so much "duck soup," it's actu- 
ally far from being child's play. The 
simplest explanation of why an autogyro's 
blades revolve of their own accord, why 
they produce lift and how they balance 
a whole set of forces might easily make 
the best engineering heads swim. If you've 



Mail Senrlnqil Check these i^alues! 



ever tried to wade through an explanation 
of the whys and wherefores of an auto- 
gyro, you'll appreciate the significance of a 
simple hinge which purports to balance 
the whole complicated equation. It's a 
sort of mechanical solution for an in- 
volved mathematical problem, with a flock 
of variable factors thrown in for good 
measure — in case you don't believe it, 
try figuring it out on your sliderule some 
week-end. 

Gomez's idea apparently works, because 
his gas-powered model, equipped with the 
hinge described above, has made some test 
flights which have created quite a stir 
among the spectators. But Gomez has 




Big, husky 4-ply genuine U. S. high grade 
Safe Tires with flatter tread of U. S."temp- 
ered" Rubber for extra mileage. 





List 


You 


You 


Size 


Price 


Save 


Pay 


4.50-21 


$ 8.55 


$2.86 


$5.69 


4.75-T9 


8.70 


2.91 


5.79 


5.25-18 


10.15 


3.38 


6.77 


5.50-17 


10.65 


3.56 


7.09 


6.00-16 


11.60 


3.87 


7.73 


6.50-16 


14.10 


4.71 


9.39 



(WITH YOUR OLD TIRES) 



Buy now on our Modern Easy Pay 
"Bonus" Plan . . it's convenient! 



Telephone F. 77 5 5 •) 

DORMANS 

8th Ave. and C/ Street 

41st and El Cajon Boulevard 
Washington at Falcon Street 



Own Your Home/ 

Use your rent money to 
pay (or a home. The small 
down payment starts you 
toward Financial stability. 
Plan now for the years to 
come. Excellent homes in 
Bird Rock, South La Jolla 
and Pacific Beach. . . Fast 
highway and bus service 
to Consolidated. 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



June, 1940 



17 



found that, in experimenting with rotor 
models, the fatahty rate is rather high, 
with damage to the plane being the rule 
rather than the exception. So Alphonse, 
undaunted, improvised a "wind tunnel" on 
wheels — his car! To simulate the action of 
a wind tunnel, Gomez fastens a set of rotor 
blades on the front of his auto, fixes them 
securely, and off he goes for a trial "flight." 
If his theories appear to work out on his 
"wind tunnel test flight," he hooks up the 
new blades onto his model autogyro 
fuselage for an actual trial. 

One of the features of the Gomez model, 
in addition to the rotor blades with special 
hinge movement, is found in the construc- 
tion of the tail surfaces. The one central 
rudder is more or less conventional. But 
the two stabilizer fins, mounted on the 
outer ends of the stabilizer, have been 
"toed in" considerably at the bottom and 
rear. This feature, Gomez explains, causes 
the air from the slipstream to converge 
aft of the tail surfaces, much as a jet in 
action. Likewise, the very high dihedral 
angle which exists between these two fins, 
probably has a stabilizing effect. Or so it 
would appear on the model. 

No newcomer to aviation, Gomez was 
already a licensed pilot in 1927, and had 
at that time designed and constructed a 
two-place low powered, low-wing mono- 
plane. This was quite an accomplishment, 
and the plane was a good example of the 
streamlining just then coming into being. 
Among other features, this plane was 
equipped with flaps of Gomez' own design 
— and flaps were rather rare 13 years ago. 

Gomez has done quite a bit of flying, 
with but one crack-up. At one time he 
went in for sky-writing. On one job he 
publicized M. J. B. Coffee over the city 




• Blended to suit 
San Diego water! 

S. J. WINES COFFEE CO. 



of San Francisco. Alphonse has a picture 
of this job, which proves that he not only 
knows how to write (and spell), but 
that M. J. B. Coffee was probably better 
known to inhabitants of the Golden Gate 
city as a result of his efforts. The picture, 
which shows M. J. B. Coffee in sky- 
writing, proves Gomez' prowess in making 
a striking likeness of the company's trade- 
mark. 

As his name indicates, Gomez is of 
Spanish descent. Born in San Francisco, 
he is an American citizen. Perhaps his 
experimentation with rotating-wing flying 
craft, and his general interest in aviation, 
is due to inspiration derived from the great 
pioneering work done by one of his coun- 
trymen, Juan de La Cierva, whose genius 
brought the autogyro into existence. At 
least this theory sounds more readily un- 
derstandable than those surrounding the 
principles of the auto-rotating wing! 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
" The Blind Man " 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

102.1 University Avenue 




Enjoy the home-like comfort, 
the large outside rooms, and 
the friendly service of the 
Maryland. Conveniently 
located right down town. 
Close to your work. Cafe. 

MONTHLY RATES 

$22^° 

with half bath 

$2750 

with bath 



Comfortable 



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MARYLANQhotel 



6th To 7th On "F' St. 
SAN DIEGO 



A 

FRIENDLY 
SERVICE 




Cash Your 
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We make arrange- 
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this convenient 
service without 
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Our easy budget terms made 
available to you with only 
your "white slip" as identifi- 
cation. 




[AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES 



32nd and University 
30th and El Cajon 



18 



Consolidotor 



HULLabaloo 

By AI Leonard 

The Hull golf tournament ended up in 

a triple surprise when three new champs 

were crowned. As usual it took two men 

to win the top flight. This time it was 




Complete Line of Airplane Models 



George Landy and Gordon Shoop. Shoop, 
who never sleeps on Friday nights and does 
his sleeping while playing golf on Satur- 
day mornings, had to be awakened on the 
18 th and informed that he was co-champ. 
Landy, who so far has gotten nothing but 
headaches, feels very happy about the 
whole affair. 

In the second flight the winner was Al 
Clark. Al has been in all the tournaments 
so far and has never had a chance. Now 
he admits that he is ready to die happy. 

The Hull baseball boys are out in full 
force again. There are two teams, each 
entered in a different league. Both claim 
to be tops in their league so it looks like 



Where Customers Send Their Friends 

for QUALITY USED CARS 




PRICE WITHOUT QUALITY 

IS SELDOM A GOOD INVESTMENT 

QUALITY WITH CORRECT PRICE 

MEANS YOUR LASTING SATISFACTION 

A Complete Assortment 

Of All Makes and Models and sold with 
A Finance Charge as Low as the Lowest 

NOTE SAMPLE OFFERINGS BELOW 

the best of condition. New tires, 
radio and extras, $785. 

38 Pontiac 8 — Business Coupe 
for power, comfort and economy. 
See this neat coupe. Full price 
$565. 

37 Buick 46c — Convertible 
Coupe. Just reconditioned in our 
modern shop. New tires, radio 
and extras. Full price $685. 



1939 Buick 41 — 4-Door Tour- 
ing Sedan — This car like many 
Buicks in our stock, was pur- 
chased new from us. We have 
serviced it and have done all 
needed to offer the greatest 
value possible. New U. S. tires 
$845. 

37 Cadillac 8— Model 75 Tour- 
ing Sedan. A high grade car in 



Robert D. Maxwell Co. 



Main 5011 



Buick Distributor 

SAN DIEGO Broadway at State 



the boys will be playing off for the cham- 
pionship one of these days ? ? ? 

Johnny Penfield was seen offering a 
piece of candy to Russ Kern after they 
had a 'little trouble' on one of the ships. 
Johnny insists he was just trying to make 
up, but Kern says he was trying to poison 
him, and anyway, the piece was too small. 

"Mai" Malcuit, who has had very little 
to say lately, is finally himself again. For 
all those wondering, he wasn't talking 
until he got his new 'store clappers.' 

The reason for all the cigar-smoking 
lately is because a flock of new daddies 
have been born. The proud daddies are: 
Cliff Lessing, Arnid Solhue and Bill Kush- 
man. All are first offenders. 

The boys on the day shift miss Harry 
MacEwan and 'Yap Yap' Hopman. 'Tis 
rumored that Hopman had himself put on 
the night shift so he could track down the 
elusive anchovy in the daytime. The latest 
report is that his supply is very low. 

SHEET METAL NEWS 

By H. B. Millman 

ROBERT BAIL GOWDY, the sage of 
Pine Valley, has been appointed to the 
Safety Commission. We all wish him lots 
of luck in his new position. 

Jimmy Carr has been rushing the sea- 
son by getting a beautiful sunburn. Jimmy 
says, "Look all you want to but don't 
touch!" 

Who is it? He is the older of two 
brothers in the Sheet Department . . . has 
such an insatiable desire for blondes that 
he recently gave his Chevrolet a peroxide 
rinse. Ask Connie. 

Ward Levere on the Hydro press seems 
to be quite proud of his new filing cabi- 
net. See that you keep it locked. Ward. 



FOR A "BETTER" DEAL 



s 



ARON 

OONER 



DIAMONDS 
WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE 
RADIOS 

SHROn* CREDIT JEWELER 

3820 FIFTH AVE. Near University 

"CLOSE TO YOUR HOME" 



June, 1940 



19 



Some of the boys in sheet metal would 
like to know why Bud Mason didn't pass 
around his "all day suckers". It seems 
very strange, because he received a whole 
box full. 

It seems that Tony Lissette is slipping 
lately. He can't poosh-cm-up as many 
times as he used to. Can it be that some- 
body slipped him a steel block rather than 
dural? 

Congratulations are being extended to 
Little Joe Accethura (Punch press) who 
was married April 27th to Miss Florence 
Dean of Los Angeles. Joe Sepulveda (cut- 
ting) and Miss Rita Harris accompanied 
the bride and groom acting as witnesses. 

After three weeks' absence Jim Hall, 
came back only to leave for Los Angeles 
to have his eyes treated by a specialist. Lots 
of luck, Jim, and a speedy recovery. 

John M. Mayer, sheet inspector, left 
for Honolulu, T. H., April 29th. He has 
been appointed as Senior Sheet Metal man 
in the Army Air Corps. Bon Voyage, 
John! 

In regards to John Kelley's important 
news this month we would like to make a 
correction. It's not until September. 

Walt Borg is planning on buying a new 
Austin. What are you planning to do with 
your feet, Walt? 

Ludlow Britten is quite a fisherman. 



^939 FIFTH AVE.i 



STAMPS 
GIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES 

fr\r K.4PKJ America's Most Famous 
or l\ICM Union-made Shoes 



^5 



rlrV Over the Highways 
On a 1940 

HHRLEV-DnUIDSOn 




W. J. RUHLE 

929 India Street San Diego 

Write for Catalog 
Open to 8 p. m. Terms 



He has a secret stream that he goes to 
every week-end. What does he do with the 
fish? We haven't seen any! 

Buzz Perry has been a busy man even- 
ings cleaning house. His wife will soon be 
home from a trip east. 

Dean Hammond is leaving soon for Mis- 
souri to marry his one and only dream 
girl. 

Eddie Raymond takes his golf seriously. 
It's been reported after a round of golf, 
that Eddie had to be carried from the 
links! 

TAKE TIME TO LIVE 

Take time to work — it is the price oi 

success. 
Take time to think — it is the source of 

power. 
Take time to play — it is the secret of 

perennial youth. 
Take time to read — it is the fountain of 

wisdom. 
Take time to worship — it is the highway 

to reverence. 
Take time to be friendly — it is the road to 

happiness. 
Take time to dream — it is hitching your 

wagon to a star. 
Take time to love and be loved — it is the 

privilege of the gods. 
Take time to look around — it is too short 

a day to be selfish. 
Take time to laugh — it is the music of the 

soul. 
Take time to play with children — it is the 

joy of joys. 
Take time to be courteous — it is the mark 

of a gentleman. Ex. 



Special Note to South Gate: 

Please put your waste paper in the cans 
provided. Don't let the North Gate get 
ahead of you for keeping the plant yard 
tidy! 



ITHURS.-FRI.'SUN.B 
r,) WALTZ NITE 

JAY WARDE 
MUTTON'S BAND 
"King of Woltzes" 

San Diego's Coolest 

Hall; Big Ceiling Fans; 

200 Windows 

DANCE 

LADIES FREE TIL 8:30 25c After Gents 3 5c 

BUCKISJER'S 

list at "A" 




ea/utio 




In 6 
Priy. 

LESSONS ^__^ 

Studios Open 12 a.m. ^ ^ 
to 1 1 p.m. daily inc. •^X 
Sunday. ^^ 

949 4th, Opp. Plaza, M. 6966 
J^st ot A M. 7868 

BUCKNER'S 

OLD TIME 

WED. AND SAT. 

Son Diego's best music & 
largest old time dance 





Wed. 25c 



Sot. 35c 



DANCE 

Coolest Hall, Best Floor, 
200 Windows, Big Ceiling Fans 

BUCKNER'S 

FIRST AT "A' 



A MECHANIC IS NO BETTER THAN HIS TOOLS 



1126 



WHY ARE SOME GUYS ALWAYS PICKED FOR 

THE BETTER JOBS? 



We don't know all the answers 
but, we do know that the right 
assortment of good tools plus 
knowing how to make best use 
of them goes a long way toward 
corning that better job. How 
is your tool supply? You should 
look over the Garrett line of 
best nationally advertised brands 
and stock up. See Whitey Dake 
at the employees' tool store. 

GARRETT SUPPLY COMPANY 

SANTA FE AVENUE LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 





20 



Consolidator 



"Today is the tomorrow we worried 
about yesterday, and it never happened." 
•^ 

At very low temperatures the action in 
a "dry" cell battery ceases entirely. 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

^vj Optoinetrist <^^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



No Money Down 

■ Equip your 
car now 
f o r s a f e 
SUMMER 
DRIVING 

No Red Tape 

No Delay 
Quick Service 



Ooodrich 

Silvertown Stores 



905 B Street Phone F. 6258 



BOWLERS SCORE 
HIGH IN MEET 

Consolidated turned out two teams to 
enter the Carnival of Bowling Tour, at the 
Sunset Bowling Center in Hollywood, the 
Cuiisa/r Blues and the Consair Greens, and 
the Greens succeeded in rolling into 2d 
place on May 11th and 12th with 2902 
as this goes to press. With more than 100 
teams yet to bowl it is not likely that 
this position will be held, but our boys 
made a good try. L. Bender and T. Cough- 
lin did their share by contributing 620 
and 643 respectively. The Consair Blues 
tried hard but couldn't click although 
Frank Cary rolled a nice 610 series. 

In the doubles H. Muck and T. Cough- 
lin collected 1222 pins for 2d place which 
may bring them some remuneration for 
their efforts. Muck rolled 647 and Cough- 
lin counted 575 which is good bowling 
in any league. 

J. Craig was high for the boys from 
Consair in the singles with an even 600, 
with Paul Hoch next with 594. 

Roy Coykendall holds some kind of a 
record for collecting 7 splits in one game. 
Stay on the head pin, Roy! 

The boys wish to thank the manage- 
ment for the shirts supplied to both 
teams. The shirts may have thrown them 
off a bit, not being used to looking like 
real bowlers — but a good time was had 
by all and the boys are looking forward to 
another year. 

Blues Greens 

P. Hoch 55 5 1. Craig 5 53 

F. Fields 549 H. Muck 5 53 

E. Jones - 5 57 L. Bender 602 

F. Meer 501 R. Coykendall 553 

F. Cary 601 T. Cough'.in -- 643 

Total - - 2772 Total - 2902 



SAY YOU SAW IT IN 
THE CONSOLIDATOR 



# 




# 



Personal Supervision of the Owners Assures Careful Consideration of 

Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Alv/ays Reasonable 

Conveniently Located— Ample Free Parking 

JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Doubles 

Jones 551 

Fields 544 

1095 

Meer 543 

Cary 561 

1104 
Hoch -- - 479 

Coykendall - 634 

1113 

Muck- 647 

Coughlin 575 

1222 

Craig 

Bender . - 



Singles 
509 



513 
584 



5 94 

487 



570 



600 
519 



Any amount * 
opens your "San 
Diego Federal 

Sav- 

* 




ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL" 



It's FUN to be thirsty 




en you drink 



GENUINE 



/ 



'a^*^^ 



CREAM 

root beer 
gra'pe 

PUNCH 

ask for it 
by name 

and GET II.' 



Fourth Ave. and Ash St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 6168 



June, 1940 



21 



PLAY SAFE . . . 

(Continued from page 15) 

8. HORSE PLAY is not to be toler- 
ated during working hours, for your 
own protection, and for the pro- 
tection of your fellow workmen. 

9. There is a FIRST AID KIT in each 
department. Use it for every in- 
jury. 

10. Remember GOOD HOUSEKEEP- 
ING is a counterpart of safe work- 
ing conditions. Keep your work 
place clean and keep yourself clean, 
personally. 

n.HEED THE SAFETY NOTICES 
which appear regularly on the bulle- 
tin boards. 

12. REPORT UNSAFE WORKING 
CONDITIONS to your foreman 
immediately. 

Plant Safety Committee, 

Consolidated Aircraft Corporation. 

By Donald Frye, Chairman. 

"A little nonsense now and then, is 
relished by the wisest men." 

"You may lead an ass to knowledge, but 
you cannot make him think." 

"Nothing is more profitable than ideas." 
— Henry Ford. 




UALITEE 

BROWN LABEL 

Whips! 

It's economical, too. 



Tune in on "Lowe Highlights" — KGB, Tues. and Fri., 8 p. to. 



When Your Food 
Budget ^^Soars'' 
Ground it at 



SAFEWAY 








/ 





Five Ocean Rafts of logs moored in San Diego Harbor, containing 30 Million board 
feet of lumber to be manufactured at our Mill in San Diego. Width, 52 feet ; Length, 
1000 feet; Contents, 6 million feet; Binding chains, 200 tons; Depth below water, 24 
feet; Height above water, 12 feet; Towed 1000 miles from Oregon. 

• That Benson Lumber Company owns and operates the only saw- 

mill in Southern California? 

• That Our annual payroll of $250,000.00 is spent right here in San 

Diego, and that our annual taxes of $120,000.00 are a great 
benefit to the City of San Diego? 

• That San Diego's "Heaven on Earth" climate is IDEAL for air- 

drying lumber, conceded by government authorities to be the 
best method of drying lumber ? 

• That San Diego homes are protected from termites by pressure 

treated lumber produced locally only by our compan)' ? 

• That Financing service is available through the loan and escrow de- 

partment of this 2i2> year old company ? 

• That visitors are welcome to see the lumber mill in action ? 



The Pick of The Trees 



BENSON iUMBER CO 



Consolidator 



ATTENTION, LOCAL MERCHANTS; 



We have been approached many times by various merchants in San Diego for a list of our 
over 5600 employees, now growing at the rate of about 30 per work day. There are many 
obvious reasons why we can not grant these requests. We think, however, that the merchants 
should consider the mathematics of using such a list if it were available. 

It would cost about 5c to mail a circular to each employee, or a cost for one coverage of over 
$280. Our advertising rate for one-half page display in the "CONSOLIDATOR" is only $58.50 
for one insertion; the rate is reduced if more insertions are desired, as shown on the follow- 
ing page. 

It should be borne in mind that the employees of Consolidated receive the highest rate of wage 
paid in this area for comparable work. They receive over twice the average monthly pay of 
the enlisted personnel of the Services. Also, they do not buy from commissaries. According to 
our production schedule, by December 1st, we will be employing about 9,000 men. The mag- 
azine is given to aU employees and as a great deal of the material in it is very interesting to 
them, it is generaUy kept and read by members of the famUy and friends, so that in effect, it 
has a great deal more circulation than is indicated by the number of copies issued, whereas a 
circular would soon find its way to the waste basket and would probably be read only 
once, if at all. 

This year we are going to inaugurate an annual Christmas number of the "CONSOLIDATOR" 
limited to 100 pages, to take the place of the regular December issue. It is planned to make 
this number particularly attractive with photographs of all current Consolidated planes, ad- 
ditions to the plant, new manufacturing facilities, additions to Lindbergh Field and San Diego 
as an aviation center generally, together with information concerning personnel. Over 20,000 
of this issue will be circulated. 

The rates will be found on the following page. While they are much higher than the present 
rates due to the additional circulation and increased size, copy of monthly advertisers wUl be 
carried at the regular rates. 



The "CONSOLIDATOR' 



June, 1940 



23 



REGULAR MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES 

Contract Contract Contract Contract 

12 Times 6 Times 3 Times *lTime 

Fourth Cover $127.50 $135.00 $142.50 $150.00 

Third Cover 108.40 114.75 121.15 127.50 

Second Cover 108.40 114.75 121.15 127.50 

One Page 95.85 101.25 106.90 1 12.50 

Two-thirds page 86.30 70.20 74.10 78.00 

One-half page 49.75 52.65 55.60 58.50 

One-third page 34.45 36.45 38.50 40.50 

One-quarter page 25.50 27.00 28.50 30.00 

One sixth page 17.85 18.90 19.95 21.00 

One-ninth page 1 1.50 12.15 12.85 13.50 

One-eighteenth page 6.40 6.75 7.15 7.50 

Bleed page— SIO.OO additional. 

Color charge — $40.00 for each additional color. ._ 

One lime rates do not apply to Annual Christmas 

Cuts or art work, when furnished by publisher, at cost. Number. 

Discount: 

(a) Cash discount— 2% 10 days from date of billing; 30 days net. (b) advertising agency commission— 15%. 



ANNUAL CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



Advertising Rates 

'Fourth Cover $250.00 

'Third Cover 200.00 

'Second Cover 200.00 

One Page 150.00 

Two-thirds Page 1 10.00 

One-half Page 85.00 



One-third Page $57.00 

One-quarter Page 43.00 

One-sixth Page 30.00 

One-ninth Page 20.00 

One-eighteenth Page 10.00 



Bleed Page — SIO.OO additional. 

Color charge — S25.00 for each additional color. 



Cuts or art work, when furnished by publisher, at cost. 
'Cover rates include two colors. 



Discount: 

(a) Cash discount— 2% 10 days from date of billing; 30 days net (billing date is dale of issue); (b) advertising agency 
commission — 15 % . 



24 



Consolidator 



DRAW BENCH BENDS 

By \r. Fink 

After five years of bowling the Draw 
Bench has finally won first place in shop 
competition. Our bowling team is com- 
posed of all night men, some from each 
night shift. We feel proud to announce 
this success by our fellow workers. 

Ernie Krienkie, manager of our base- 
ball team has been confined to home be- 
cause of illness. Despite the absence of his 
leadership the team is still carrying on 
successfully. We all hope that Ernie will be 
back soon. 

W. Gramse and C. Spann will have 



to keep their noses to the grindstone 
again, for their wives have just returned 
from a prolonged visit East. We all won- 
der why Spann didn't show up at work 
the day before their wives return? 

Al Wiegal is now a taxpayer and 
property owner. He recently bought a 
house down Palm City way. He invites 
all the boys to drop in and see him. By 
the way, his house is very convenient 
to us for it's located on the road that 
leads from Tijuana. "Stagger in some 
time, boys" is Al's latest slogan. 

Wm. Dacy has also bought a home. 
When any of you boys are out Rolando 






OF 



^H[ 



y"»^/. 






ever 






f/f/fl 






pro 



> hi 



heJ^' Oil 



'^e Z'^'^h-sJ^'f^'Ur^ 



esc ^r^P^edrr, 



ned 
orsf 



UPM 

m^frcmoiL 



^nd 



rial 




h9Ta quart 



way, drop in and see Bill and the Misses. 

Ralph Smith has been walking around 
with a vacant stare in his eyes lately. 
Smitty's expecting a new arrival in his 
family any day. Don't forget the cigars, 
Smitty. 

Cliff Moore is really in love. Every 
weekend, rain or shine, he travels to L. A. 
He says that he is homesick, and goes 
north to visit his folks. He always forgets 
to mention the girl next door. 



Quality Hand Tools 

Starrelt, Plomb, Crescent, Wiss, 
Klenk. Gersiner & Kennedy Tool 
Chests. Home Shop Equipment. 

motor Hordiuore & 
Eqoipment Co. 

1125-47 Columbia Street. 
Main 0115. 



RENTER COMPANY, i.c, 

724 BROADWAY MAIN 4392 



CREDIT CLOTHIERS 



For Men 

Suits 

Topcoats 

Hats 

Shoes 

Furnishings 

Neckwear 



For IVomen 

Coats 

Dresses 

Shoes 

Lingerie 

Skirts and 

Blouses 



NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 

Pay as Little as 50c Weekly 



OVER-ALL LAUNDRYSCLEANERS 

R. F. TOOLEY, Prop. 

Any kind of work garments dry cleaned, 
laundered and repaired 

Truck located in gas station across the street 

from north gate every morning and 

afternoon 

Your patronage solicited and appreciated 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection of Pipes in San Diego, 
including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 



TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Magiiire 

The march of events in Tool Design 
have, for the past month, kept the De- 
partment in a whirl. We have, of course, 
moved again. Sorry to bring that up, but 
it's easier brought up on paper than to 
pick up a table. Mr. Phil Koenig has a 
new office with a very appropriate sign 
over the door. Mr. Larry Boeing says the 
men in Tool Design are better dressed now. 
He blames it all on the Blue Print Dept. 
That's taking unfair advantage of us, 
Larry. 

Le Maire, those are lovely roses you're 
handing out. Someone should thank you 
for them. 

Sorry to say Charlie Mathewson is leav- 
ing us. Needed — one new booking agent: 
Page Roy Smeltzer! 

Charlie Smith is now known as the 
Cough Drop King. His second is Bert 
Rowan. For further details see Van Meter. 

Carl Ludeman must have been crossed 
with a bloodhound. He has a mania for 
finding things. 

Marcella left yesterday with a large 
smile — or a large smile left with her. Hi! 
Ho! It must be spring. 

Wes Kline is looking for a perfect 18 
or 30 sixes. 



Marcella has another broken arm in her 
family — what is it, a habit? 

Reward — For the return of Shaw's 
Garrett supply girls. 

The tricycle landing gears are coming 
into favor with airplane designers and 
pilots. The original Wright landing gear 
was a skid. 



now SHOuiinc 




BROADWAY AT TENTH 
2861 UNIVERSITY 



@[^i\SSS*S 



MISSION 

DRY 
CLEANERS 



MISSION DRY CLEANING 

IS LIKE CONSOLIDATED 

AIRPLANES ... IT FLIES 

ABOVE ALL 



Phone J-4139 
ADDRESS 105 WASH. 



SEARS 




Paint Sprayer 

Includes Gun and Hose 



975 



2.50 
DOWN 
Easy Terms 



Small lightvreight (only 8-lbs) . . . 
easy to handle! Developed lor every- 
day use lor jobs around home, garage 
or shop. For 110 volt. 



Smart Mechanics Know That Sears Is Headquarters 
for Dependable Tools at Money Saving Prices!!! 




Comb. Square 
98c 

Adjustable head 
complete with level 
and scriber. 



Hack Saw 
1.29 

Extra rigid frame 
for all around shop 
use. 





Tool Box 
1.19 

spill proof tool box 
with cantilever tray. 



Swivel Vise 
2.29 

Vise with 3-inch 
steel jaws, swivel 




Screwdriver 
1.29 

Automatic screw- 
driver complete with 
bit. 




Tin Snips 
79c 

Heavy quality tin 
snips for years of 




Chisel Set 
L19 

Five piece set, 
Craftsman quality, 
guaranteed. 




Wrench Set 
1.29 

5 "Craftsman" 
wrenches, open 
end. Guaranteed. 



SEARS, ROEBUCK and CO. 



Sixth Ave. and "C" Street 



Franklin 6571 




This 



ones 



about 
the 



farmer's soa— 




Way back in the days of "Jenny's" and "Hisso" motors an engineer we 
know was whistling down a country road in his shiny new 1928 Dodge. What 
did he do but smack into a wagon full of school kids. There was a lot of 
yelling but not much actual damage. One farm boy was sort of banged 
up but it didn't look too serious. 

Last month that farm kid, now turned 21, sued this engineer for $10,000 — 
"permanent injury" he claims he suffered back there in '28. Charley (the 
engineer's name is Charley) is on the spot. The cut-rate company he was 
insured with has long since passed on, taking his protection with it. 

MORAL: Insure with a first-rate company — you know it'll be around for 
a while! 



316 S. D. Trust & Savings BIdg. 
Telephone Franklin 5141 




SALMONS &WOLCOTT CO 



Open till 5 p.m., Saturday till noon. 
Any evening by Appointment. 



iDinieiDiHiiDipniDii 




CONSOLIDATED . . . LARGEST INTEGRATED AIRCRAFT PLANT IN AMERICA . . . (See Page 12) 



JULY '1940 



REWARD! 



Calm yourself, friend — this is no man-hunt. It's just our 
subtle way of hinting that we can save you some dough. 
If you don't like dough, okey — forget it. But if you do — 
well, pull up a choir. Here's the picture: You weren't 
born yesterday — so, you believe in liability and property 
damage insurance when you drive. Now . . . Think you 
can pilot that buggy of yours the next twelve months with- 
out smacking something — and collecting a claim? It'll 
cost us money! But what's money — we'll rebate you a 
check of 15% of your premium, and smile! A nice 

check you can spend. 

That's our story in a nut-shell, friend. Hove we mode a sale? 



SALMONS liWOLCOTT CO. 



Open until 5 p.m. Saturday until noon. Evenings by appointment. 
316 S. D. Trust & Savings BIdg. Telephone Franklin 5141 



^P^C- fc, f 



CONSOLIDRTOR 



Volume 5 



July, 1940 



Number 7 



CONSOLIDATED GOLFERS FIFTH COLUMN ACTIVITIES 



At the Twelfth Annual Invitational 
Golf Meet held at Catalina June 2nd thru 
June 5 th, Consolidated golfers seem to 
have stolen the show against a field of 
around 80 players. Co)isolidafed golfers 
were representing San Diego in the meet, 
and aided materially in bringing back 7 
prizes for San Diego County. 

Among those from Consolidated repre- 
senting San Diego county were: Mrs. C. 
A. Van Dusen, Mrs. E. R. McReynoIds, 
Mrs. J. L. Kelley, Mrs. F. W. Devlin and 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Miller. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Miller in the mixed 
foursome two-ball match, won the event 
with a very low net of 50, whereas par for 
the course is 66. Mrs. C. A. Van Dusen tied 
for second low net in class "C",then played 
off and won the second match with a 134 
net for the two days. Mrs. F. W. Devlin 
in class "B" tied for 4th place, but lost the 
following day, although her score was 
only 139 net. 

Roy Miller, it may be noted, has just 
been elected President of the San Diego 
Country Club, and Ray Schwarz has been 
appointed handicap chairman. 

ARCHERS 

By R. R. Hoover, No. 1456 

Consolidated Archers and friends are 
cordially invited to attend the Western 
Field Archery Tournaments scheduled for 
July 6 and 7, 10 a. m., at the "Old Mis- 
sion Field Archers" official Rovers range 
in the "Gold Gulch," Balboa Park. 

Archers from nine states will compete 
in the event under the guidance of the 
Western Archery Association, of which 
Lt. Col. F. E. Pierce, U.S.M.C. Reserve, 
is president, and the local clubs, the San 
Diego Archery Club and the Old Mis- 
sion Field Archers. 

Guests will include Howard Hill, Ken 
and Walt Wilhelm, Larry Hughes, and 
many other well-known archers. 

"Gold Gulch" is located just south and 
west of the intersection of Park Boule- 
vard and Laurel Street in the canyon be- 
low Pepper Grove and the Girl Scout 
Headquarters. Don't miss this great arch- 
ery event! 



We have, as yet, had no indications of 
subversive, or "fifth column" activity 
within our plant. And we do not want 
any such activity. The best protection is 
prevention. Our fellow workers have been 
selected carefully, are proud of our coun- 
try, our work and our American citizen- 
ship. Likewise our plant police and the 
F. B. L can certainly be classed as ex- 
tremely alert to any signs of subversive 
activities. These men are all experienced 
in sifting clews, know the indications, and 
how to deal with them effectively. 

With as many employees as we now 
have, and who may come in contact with 
additional thousands outside working 
hours; discussing matters as freely as they 
like (as is our own privilege under Amer- 
ican law), it is possible that a few mis- 
guided persons might be discovered here 
and there who might lean toward subver- 
sive or "fifth column" activities. These 
indications should be reported as quickly 
as possible, for the best treatment of this 
disease is to get at the root of it early, 
and do the job thoroughly. 

There should be no hysteria, or getting 
excited about these cases, but it is the 
rigid duty of every employee, as a safe- 
guard to his job, the work we are doing, 
and for the protection of our country, to 
report instantly any suspicious activity or 
overheard utterance on the part of anyone. 
This can be done quietly, with the assur- 
ance that the identity of the advisor will 
not be disclosed, which is important, in the 
event that the investigation reveals that 
there has been a mistake, so that no harm 
or injustice will befall innocent people. 

Reports should in all instances be turned 
in to George J. Tompkins, chief of plant 
police, in person. 

Some of the folks who went to Florida 
for the winter sure found it there. — The 
Houghton Line. 

If all the men who sleep in church were 
laid end to end they would be more com- 
fortable. — The Houghton Line. 



STATE CHAMBER OFFICIALS 
INSPECT PLANT . . . 

State Chamber of Commerce directors 
and officials convened at a morning meet- 
ing on May 24th at the San Diego Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Their arrival here from 
the northern cities was largely by air- 
plane, as was their departure at the close 
of the day. They were greeted here by 
Major Fleet and Hal Hotchkiss of the 
board; Major T. C. Macaulay, executive 
manager of the local chamber, and other 
chamber officials. After the morning meet- 
ing they were the guests of Major Fleet 
at luncheon and then inspected the plant. 

Among those attending the meeting 
were: R. K. Davies, San Francisco; C. C. 
Teague, Santa Paula; Col. Wm M. Garland, 
Los Angeles; Harrison S. Robinson, Oak- 
land; Joseph R. Knowland, Oakland; 
Preston Hotchkiss, Los Angeles; A. C. 
Mattel, San Francisco; D. P. Booth, Mo- 
desto; W. C. Mullendore, Los Angeles; 
A. E. Roth, San Francisco; Harry Chand- 
ler, Los Angeles; R. B. Hale, San Fran- 
cisco; A. T. Spencer, Gerber; M. B. Sil- 
berg, Los Angeles; Parker Frisselle, Kear- 
ney Park; A. J. McFadden, Santa Ana; 
James Mussatti, San Francisco and E. W. 
Murphy, Los Angeles. 

MUSICIANS . . . PLEASE NOTE 

Heigh-ho! Everybody. The Consolidated 
band is in full "swing" — meeting regu- 
larly once a week and doing some really 
fine compositions. It has been announced 
by Mr. E. G. Borgens, Band Director, 
that the band has been invited to play 
some appropriate numbers at the dedica- 
tion ceremony of the new factory addi- 
tion, with a private concert for factory 
men and officials previously. There are 
still a few places open for musicians inter- 
ested in taking part. 

va 

Anyone who enjoys singing as a hobby 
can now join the Chopin Choral Club. It's 
not necessary that you be able to read 
music well, as a portion of the rehearsals 
are devoted to this. 

Meetings are every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Polish Cottage, Balboa Park. 



All communications should be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, Son Diego, Californio. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in port, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., San Diego, Colifornio. 



Consolidator 




LEE JOHNSON has deserted us for a 
J vacation in Buffalo with her parents. 

Grace Koenig is a staunch believer in 
the slogan, "Movies Are Your Best En- 
tertainment," and backs up her belief with 
her own movies. Especially interesting is 
the colored reel on the Rose Parade, but 
least appreciated by the feminine onlookers 
are the scenes of the swarming beehives 
and the tarantula spider. 

A recent letter from Catherine (Phipps) 
Gebing extends a greeting to her Cotisoli- 
dated friends. 

Marcella should become a member of 
the Tall Tales Club. She recently dreamt 
Jane Dunn had one of our PBY's in her 
apartment. It needed assembling but the 
engineers called in could not put it to- 
gether. Along came Lucille Fisher and 
Marcella, who assembled the airplane like 
veterans at the game. Not content with 
merely showing up the engineers, these 
two geniuses climbed aboard the plane and 



IrpFLY 

'this easy 
practical| 
way . . . 



YOU don't have to sign 
up for on expensive fly- 
ing course at SPEER'S. 
Take one lesson or as 
many as you want, as 
often as you lil<e, ond 
PAY BY THE LESSON. 
Speer's famous low rotes 
include dual instruction, 
under licensed, re-rated 
instructors . . . advant- 
ages of a private uncon- 
gested field . . . and a 
choice of modern, in- 
spected ships — Piper 
Cubs, Kinncr low-wings. 
Fleet biplane, C W Travel 
Air. 



:?s»siis.... 



took off out the window! We don't know 
what midnight snack prompted this dream, 
but it could have been pickles and ice 
cream. 

A certain company took out an insur- 
ance policy. The head of the firm told the 
insurance agent to insure everything in the 
place against theft but the clock. "The 
employees watch that" was the brief ex- 
planation. 

Juanita tells one about a Scotchman who 
fried his bacon in Lux to keep it from 
shrinking. 

Husband: "I suppose you dropped 
mustard on this waffle by mistake?" 

Wife: "That's a fine way to talk 
about my lemon pie!" 

The kind expressions of sympathy 
shown by my friends at Consolidated dur- 
ing my recent bereavement, are deeply 
appreciated. — Evelyn Kells. 

New books on aviation subjects now 
available at the San Diego Public Library 
include: 

Teichmann, Frederick K. Airplane de- 
sign manual. 1939. 

Riggs, Norman C and Frocht, Max M. 
Strength of materials. 1939. 

Talbot-Booth, E. C. Aircraft of the 
world. 193 8. 



ELCORTEZ 

Sparkling 
with new 
improvement's 
and 
hospil-ality! 

-¥■ 
NEW 
SKY ROOM 

Open 10 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. 

"Drinking in 
the sky" 




Aih Street at 7th 



NEW SKY ROOM 

DINING ROOM 

DRIVE-IN GARAGE 

Rooms from $3.00 



SHEET METAL NEWS 

By H. B. Millman 

The Sheet Cutting has a couple of very 
proud anglers in Al Ballard and Hank 
Ondler. It seems their bait was too large 
for their finny friends. They both agree 
it's a good thing we have fish markets. 

When a certain little lady can keep 
Connie Seaderquist out until three in the 
morning on a week day she must have 
been very interesting. 

Hank Leigal can be seen on the beach 
taking in the sights these days. Scotty Mc- 
Cartney is getting a beautiful tan work- 
ing on his farm every day. Eddie Dennison 
has just been promoted to inspector for 
the Sheet Department . . . we hope he 
won't be too tough on us. 

Bill Shirreff now has charge of the bur- 
ring gang . . . watch the shavings fly now! 
C. B. King, jr., is waiting for the golden 
nail to be driven in his new house so he 
can move in at Mission Beach. 

Harold Ferguson is a very busy man 
nowadays trying to do a good deed every 
day. He is now a Scout Master. 

Something should be done about Tex 
Hatch's poor memory. He started for 
Yuma recently after work at 12:30 a. m., 
and got half way there before he remem- 
bered he had to be at work in the morning. 
He arrived just before the last whistle. 

Eddie Raymond's golf is improving . . . 
if he could use only a putter he might 
get around in par! 

The Sheet Cutting's softball team un- 
der the leadership of their fiery manager, 
Al Ballard, has really gone places this sea- 
son. Tied with the Wood Shop for the 
championship, they easily won by a score 
of 5 to 1, giving them a clean record of 
six games won and no losses. Frankie Era- 
mo, Johnny Galves and Clyde Cowhick 
starred for the team. 

A post card was received last week in 
the Sheet Metal Department from R. J. 
Sherwood, a former employee who is now 
recuperating at the San Diego County 
Hospital. His card was one of appreciation 
and acknowledgment for the wonderful 
way the cutting room boys extended 
a helping hand. His address, in case some 
of you fellows want to see him, is Ward 
40 J, County Hospital. 



GOVE8NMEN7APMOVEO SCHOOL 
SPEtH F1ELD-An»» Irn MAIUNE BASE 
SAN DIEGO. CALIFOHNIA 



overlooking SA^i.DIEGO BAY 



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July, 1940 



GLIDING AND SOARING 

By Jerry Lit/el 

SAN DIEGO glider pilots, who this 
year for the third time took top 
places at the Western Contest, near Arvin, 
California, are also repeating their per- 
formances at the southwestern meet in 
Wichita Falls, Texas. Most prominent in 
the news reports is the former Cmtsoli- 
dafed man, Dick Essery. Vic Korski of 
Hull dept., who took a month off to serve 
as ground crew, is basking in reflected 
glory, for the press informs us that Vic is 
— not ground crew, nor ballast, but co- 
pilot! Dick's plane is a dual-controlled, 
high-wing sailplane which bears an un- 
mistakable resemblance to the Consolidated 
Model 31. As we suspected, Ernest Stout 
of Aerodynamics dept. served as con- 
sultant for his club-mate Essery, during 
the design of this sensational sailplane 
which is rapidly earning its cost in prize 
money. 

Ernie has just returned from another 
three month's of research at Langley Field 
for Consolidated. Just as soon as he gets 
settled in that new home of his out Ken- 
sington way, the boys hope to draw on his 
experience for other super-soarers. 

Meanwhile, soaring has continued regu- 
larly out at Torrey Pines. Each Sunday aft- 
ernoon sees from two to six graceful 
planes sailing above the 300-foot ridge 
that deflects the prevailing west wind up- 
ward to support them. The Association's 
2-pIace instruction ship has attracted 
many new members and shown them the 
thrill and beauty of motorless flight, but 
these new members have more thrills com- 
ing, for when the moderate westerly 
winds, so dependable in spring and early 
summer weaken, we turn to San Diego's 
back country for advanced soaring. The 
intense heat back there produces columns 
of warm rising air — 'Bumps,' or in soar- 
ing parlance, "Thermals." The trick is to 
find these and spiral to remain within them 
as they rise until they condense into clouds. 
Then you leave the thermal, gliding in the 
direction of your goal, until you find an- 
other one and repeat the performance. It 
sounds simple, but more often than not 



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you find a down draft instead. This used 
to be known as an "air-pocket." Every- 
things becomes quiet — suddenly the air- 
speed goes way down and your controls 
are sloppy. Quick, dive out of it! ... Then 
a terrific updraft will hit one wing, trying 
to upset/you. Don't yield . . . turn on it 
and charge it like a wild beast! The air- 
speed jumps to twice your cruising speed 
. . . haul the stick back and feel the 
climb. Twenty feet per second . . . that's 
fine. You've caught the thermal . . . just 
spiral to hold it, watching your rate of 
climb to determine its core. Thermal soar- 
ing requires both skill and knowledge and 
develops airmanship as no other flying can. 
It requires a strong ship too, for the sail- 
plane may change from a 30 ft/sec sink 
to a 30 ft/sec climb in one second. 

After 130 hours of soaring, the club 
ship is going to get a thorough overhaul 
by Harry Connor and Rae Parker, before 
our first trip to the desert this year. 

A TIP-OVER . . . 

It looks as though the motor scooters 
finally selected for use about the plant 
are to be equipped with side-cars. This may 
or may not be to keep them from tipping 
over. Both plant engineer "Bill" Maloney 
and Factory superintendent "Jim" Kelley 
have been seen operating them with no 
trouble whatsoever, but if one of these 
scooters ever turns up with a heavy piece 
of drop hammer die inside of it, and either 
of the two mentioned gentlemen suspects 
that the other was using this to prevent 
tipping over . . . there's going to be plenty 
of kidding. 

AERONAUTICAL I. Q. 

1. What is the name of cylindrical 
tube with open end pointing upstream, 
used in measuring impact pressure? 

2. The identification marking for 
A-17's rivets is what? 

3. Give the tensile strength of an 
A-17's rivet. 

Answers at bottom of last column. 

Texas highway sign: "This is God's 
country. Don't drive like hell. 

Which recalls for no particular reason 
the old yarn about the superintendent who 
gave one of his men a ten-dollar bill and 
sent him to the store for a bottle of pop. 
"Get something for yourself," he yelled 
as the lad was leaving. So the messenger 
bought himself a pair of shoes. 



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only 50c. Wed., 8 to 10:30 P.M. 
Classes forming for Children and Adults in 
All Types of Dancing. Rates in Reach of All 

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DO YOU REMEMBER 

when a directory of the garages along 
your route was an absolute necessity on 
every out-of-town trip? 

When one manufacturer created a sen- 
sation by placing the steering wheel on 
the left side in his 1911 models? 

When the closed car was called a "show 
case on wheels" and people who drove 
them were called sissies? 

When rival speedometer manufacturers 
advertised: "the only speedometer that 
tells the truth?" 

When car registrations and licenses were 
handled by such departments as The State 
Board of Boiler Inspectors? 

1. Pitot tube. 

2. A dimple in the center of the head. 

3. 25,000 lbs. to the sq. in. 



Consolidator 



SAN DIEGO FLYING CLUB 
NEWS 

By A. H. Davidson 

In the last month, several ships have 
arrived at the club field from distant 
points, — some staying over night. 

The members voted to purchase a new 
Learadio Receiver for use in Club ships. 
Tommy Hemphill of Engineering is in 
charge of Radio installation and main- 
tenance. Several weeks ago, he tested out 
one of his short wave Transievers in the 
Cub "50". One of his friends had another 
Transiever on the ground and the recep- 
tion was very good in the plane and on 
the ground, without any shielding of any 
kind. 

Jack Berg, youngest member in the Club 
received his private Pilot's hcense last 
week and is very proud of his accomplish- 
ment. . . . Charhe Culver is busy adding 
up the hours for his commercial license. 
The Club members are marking the field 
with Markers and the work is progressing 
rapidly. 

There is one radio for nearly every 
third person in the U. S. . . . There is only 
one private airplane for every 9,692 per- 
sons in the U. S. 



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Hollywood Co-operation 

Although over a hundred miles from 
Hollywood, Consolidated has been able to 
co-operate with Hollywood producers of 
motion pictures. First there was the picture 
"Wings of the Navy" in which Model 
28's figured quite prominently. Then fol- 
lowed "The Magnificent Fraud," and now 
it's "Mystery Sea-Raider" soon to be re- 
leased by Paramount. Carole Landis and 



Henry Wilcoxon starring in this new pic- 
ture, utilize a life raft borrowed from 
Consolidated, as shown above. Consoli- 
dated, however, has given Hollywood a 
bit of competition already . . . produc- 
ing the 5 5 minute sound film, "Building 
the PBY Record Breakers" which has been 
telling how the Model 28's are built to a 
wide audience. This picture was filmed 
during the early peak in Model 28 pro- 
duction. 



Dutch Klein (To John Kunkel on his 
first day of riveting) : Kunkel why are 
you throwing away about half of these 
rivets? 

John Kunkel: Those rivets are no 
good. The heads are on the wrong end. 

Dutch Klein: You numbskull! The 
heads are not on the wrong end of those 
rivets, those rivets are for the other side 
of the ship. — H. S. Cooper, Jr. 



LOW RENT 
DISTRICT 




TAPESTRY !p1 /§ "0 

RUGS I^T 

INLAID LINOLEUM, sq. yd. . . . 79C 
FLOOR COVERING (felt base) sq. yd. 29C 
9x12 WILTON RUG . . . $39.95 
BROADLOOM REMNANTS, 30 to 60% off 

Ddvidson 



FURNITURE 



SEVENTH at G Si. 



Frsa Parking at West's tssoclaled Service Across tlie Street 



PLASTER SPLASHES 

By Red Boyle 

We are still waiting for those cigars 
from Joe Miller and Emery Seward. They 
both had additions to the family; Joe a 
wife and Emery a six-pound boy. 

Congratulations to J. Woodhead who is 
upped in position with us . . . also to M. 
Neale on becoming a lead man. 

Joe Tessary is back with us again. He's 
getting along fairly well with J. Debs. 
This is most strange. 

J. Debs had another crack-up. That 
little Willys surely is taking a beating. 
Johnny must drive his car like he slings 
plaster ... all over the place. 

"You have a nice collection of books, 
but you should have more shelves." 

"I know, but nobody seems to lend me 
shelves." — Vesta Vamp. 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
"The Blind Man" 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

102.) University Avenue 



July, 1940 



ANODIC ANECDOTES 

By Bert Naseef 

When making my inquiries of the boys 
regarding contributions to this column, 
my only answer was "no news" from each 
and every one, but by pressing the mat- 
ter, it developed that they had all been too 
busy to write. 

Ted Lohman said his spare time was 
taken up by pitching ball for the Drop 
Hammer team and sitting up nights wait- 
ing for his daughter to get home with her 
boy friend. 

Wally Miles not only plays for Drop 
Hammer in his spare time, but also uses 
up the rest of it by being an Eagle booster 
and using his wiles in the real estate game. 

Harry Parker left for Oklahoma to 
round up his wife, who has been absent for 
six weeks — he'll be back next month. 

Airhart is busy at home, making a dark- 
room and developing and printing pic- 
tures. He has taken some dandies. 

McGiffin bought a home and is now do- 
ing some truck-gardening. Gerber attends 
Bible classes and is getting prepared to 
pass the lessons along to his nine-months- 
old daughter. 

Sidley's, Gonzales' and Warner's doings 
have been a deep secret, although my sus- 
picions are that Warner, who claims he 
takes his "sister" around a lot may have a 
well-developed sense of humor — anyhow 
she's somebody's sister, and darned pretty, 
too! 

The entire Anodic Department wishes 
to congratulate Alexander, Griffith and 
Jones on their promotions to assistant fore- 
men. "Nice going, boys." 

We all welcome the new-comers to this 
department. They are Williams, Larceval, 
Valley, Pennepacker and Fernvaldi. Wil- 
liams is an ex-cowpuncher and hunter, 
Larceval is a good ball player and Penne- 
packer is one of Hoover High School's 
champion football players. 

Well, after hearing all this, I wondered 
what the gang considered news; were they 
waiting for a good murder, or perhaps they 
were waiting for a stock-chaser that was 
not in a hurry or for just one little part 
without a rush tag on it — that WOULD 
be news. 



P. S. — Latest news is that Thoman, our 
spring tightener, has decided to build a 
home where he will raise his families, and 
bees too. 

Our checker-in-er, Dave Mann, says 
he's gotten a lot of new ideas from his girl 
friend, who has kept him busy nights, and 
he is going to try them out soon. What 
they are or on whom or what he is going 
to experiment with, he will not tell, but 
it is still leap year and maybe his lady- 
friend is trying out some new ones on him 
— anyhow, good luck, Dave, you'll need it. 

That is all 'till next month. 

Faint heart never won a pint of peanuts, 
nor two days an airplane built. 

"Do you know where little boys go 
who smoke?", and Junior answered 
promptly, "Sure, out behind the garage!" 



You Will Find 

Quality 

and 

Service 

at 

WESTERN LUMBER CO. 

Yard and Mill 

Foot Columbia St. 
F-6305 



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La Jolla Lumber Co. 

Ocean Beach Lumber Co. 
Coronado Lumber Co. 

Pacific Beach Lumber Co. 
Chula Vista Lumber Co. 







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H M.«>«..i»* A. J. Edwards says 

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^■j J. 3141 1276 University Home J. 9340 




— with Bud Landis 



Once upon a time, and shortly there- 
after, self-preservation was the first 
law of nature. 

• • • 

A person looked out for his own 
neck with considerable pride of 
ownership. 

• • • 

He would go out of his way to keep 
his framework from being overrun 
by passing motor chassis. 




But at present .there are strong in- 
dications that nature's original stat- 
ute has been somewhat repealed. 

• • • 

You will notice this in the conduct 
of some pedestrians. Like the one 
who walks across with his foot 
asleep up over his ears. 

• • • 

And the defiant type who wends his 
way through form -fitting traffic, 
making more faces than progress. 

• • • 

Also the quick-change artist. He 
looks neither right nor left but sets 
out for the far curb like Liza cross- 
ing the ice. 




If foohsh footmen would do their 
daily dozin' at home, it would tend 
to keep them in an excellent state 
of preservation and at the same time 
cut costly congestion by ten percent. 

• • • 
Drive into your Shell Dealer's 
Service Station and get a Share-the- 
Road Club emblem. That'll tell the 
world you are wiUing to follow rules 
afoot as well as awheel. 



Consolidator 



Vacation 
Reading 

A good book is one of the 
things that make summer 
fun! For instance, you're 
sure to hke one of these: 

A Smattering of Ignorance 

2.00 Oscar Levant 

Mr. Skeffington 

2.50 Elizabeth 

Americans All Over 

3.00 Jerome Beatty 

STHTIOnERS 
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SAN DIEGO 



HEARD ABOUT THE HULL 

By Bill Peffit 

MANY were the questioning looks 
and dubious glances that were cast 
Al Leonard's way a few weeks ago. Al, 
who is noted for his quick wit and tongue- 
tripping tirades came to work moaning 
and muttering to himself, going from 
place to place gnashing his teeth and was 
heard to say, "What to do? What to do?" 

Finally some of Al's fellow-workmen 
managed to get his tale of woe from him. 

It seems that Al's wife was so inspired 
by the new car bought by her devoted 
spouse, that she firmly resolved to learn 
to drive. All went well until she under- 
took the task of entering the garage. 

With only the usual amount of gear- 
grinding and tire-spinning antics, Al's 
pride and joy (the car) slid gracefully to a 
stop, inside the garage. But, alas, imagine 
Mrs. Leonard's dismay to find she had for- 
gotten to open the doors! To make the 
situation more complicated for our be- 
wildered leadman, a helpful neighbor 
nailed the doors back good and tight, then 
suddenly remembered the car, with its 
new-found scratches was still in the 
garage! 

"What a life," quipped Al, "the minute 
I turn my back, my past catches up with 
me!" 



KIRBY'S 

make a special effort to meet the 
needs of Aircraft Workers . . . 
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SEVENTH AND BROADWAY 



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Open Saturday Nites until Nine 



Right under the noses of the men in the 
Hull Department, geniuses are being born. 
Bob Murray's model airplane collection is 
really a work of art, and to look at Tom 
Eckles one would never suspect that Tom, 
though quiet and modest at the shop, be- 
comes a whirling, raging madman on the 
ice rink. It is rumored that Mr. Eckles 
may be in Sonja's new picture, "A Star 
Fell Down!" 

Unable to stand the strain of the con- 
stant hustle and bustle of the Hull desk, 
Russ Keins took his inspectors off by 
themselves, way down by Hull No. 2. 
How's it feel to be away from it all, Russ? 

The "Consair Rod and Reel" had quite 
a jamboree recently. Needless to say, now 
that Johnny Hopman is on the night 
shift, Mr. Bender and Mr. Bradshaw 
walked off with the largest part of the 
pickled herring. It is also needless to say 
that there was free beer, and sandwiches. 
Plenty of sandwiches left over! 

Unanimous vote concedes the hard luck 
victim of the month to be none other than 
our new found friend of the fishes. Bill 
Bates, Hull Inspector. 

Bill decided to really have some fun over 
the week end, so he joined Glenn Hotch- 
kiss, George Wire, Ray Kendall, and a 
few of the Hull gang on a fishing trip 
down Mexico way. 

Their trip down consisted of tire 
trouble, and plenty of it, engine trouble 
and almost all other things that can hap- 
pen to an automobile. Despite all the ob- 
stacles in their path the fellows finally 
reached camp safe and sound! 

Becoming more and more enthused with 
every cast of his line, Bill put all he had 
into one magnificent cast, but much to 
his horror, his rod and reel flew from his 
hands and sank to the bottom of the lake. 
Up bright and early next morning Glenn 
and Bill dragged the lake in vain for his 
rod. Finally in exasperation, Glenn had to 
jump in after the pole before it was finally 
brought up. After recovering his pole. 
Bill set about to fish in earnest and was 
doing quite well when all of a sudden a 
splash was heard and there was Mr. Bates 
up to his neck in water! 



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July, 1940 



HULLABALOO 

By Al Leonard 

NICK KARPINSKY, who formerly 
played second fiddle to the Czar and 
is now a Hull Department inspector is 
becoming a golf fiend. He is learning all 
about the game from "Scotty" Doig, 
Freddie Grossher, Mike Brooks, and "Red" 
Chaplin. Nick follows this foursome every 
Saturday in order to pick up the finer 
points of the game (?). Karpinsky sings 
a pretty fair bass and does so no matter 
who is driving off or putting. "Scotty" 
Doig got the longest drive of the day 
when he teed off just as Nick hit a high 
note while singing "Dark Eyes." 

Lawrence Bailey has gone the way of 
all flesh and has taken unto himself a 
bride. "Long" John Kimkle is approach- 
ing the zero hour. His Waterloo will be 
in August. A secret marriage that really 
was a secret came to light last week when 
Eddie Wallant admitted that he was mar- 
ried seven months ago. How can a man 
be married seven months and not show it? 

"What sort of blackmail does "Scav- 
enger" Galley have over Harry Smith to 
force him to bring him an extra lunch 
every day? 

How come "Brute" Mcjoyner has an 
accident with a Ford and ends up with a 
Packard? 

The Hull Department was well repre- 
sented at the Tug-of-War tournament at 
the Balboa Stadium The Hull musclemen 
were Augie Yorges, Bob Vick, Tommy 
Vaughn and Hank Yogerst. The boys won 
nothing but strained muscles — but a good 
time was had by all. 

The North Hull is rapidly developing 
into a veritable jungle of bucks, posts and 





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Washing Machines 

TERMS 



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San Diego Ocean Beach 

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balconies and the new men are having a 
terrible time finding their way around. 
"Yap Yap" Hapman has started a drive 
for guides and a telephone system to help 
any of the new men out when they get 
lost. While wandering around the bucks 
one night Hapman found a new man in a 
semi-conscious condition. Hapman quickly 
brought the man around with some an- 
chovies he carries for emergencies and 
listened to a tale of horror. The poor fel- 
low was lost without food for six days 
before Johnnie found him! 

How Is Your Thinking? 
Asks No. 1823 

1. Does tonnage in a naval vessel, a 
commercial vessel, and an aeroplane have 
the same meaning? 

Answer Page 15. 



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KIcnk. Gerstner & Kennedy Tool 
Chests. Home Shop Equipment. 

motor Hordiuare & 
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Main 0115. 



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4th & BVay 



SAN DIEGO 



Consolidator 



FORD HOTEL 




SHOWER BATHS 
Rates $4 up perWk 

Close to Consolidated, 

Buslncsi, Shopping and 

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W. B. BASSLER, Prop. 
FR. 2207 • 1135 THIRD AVE. 




How mucli money has ■j^.^s- 
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hands In the past 1 years? \(i^j)J) 
S^^ How much will you have In "^s^^ 
the next 10 to 15 years? 

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EVtRYTHINC •"^BUIlBINfr- 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

4128 University ■ Oceanside • El Centre 




WOOD CARVINGS 

The wood carvings pictured here are the work of L. S. Jones of the Wood Shop. Jones 
started carving wood as a hobby some years ago and has developed a fine technique in an art 
that none of his family, as far as he knows, has shown any aptitude. 

For some time Jones taught wood carving in a hobby school in Glendale, and later in 
Hollywood, selling numerous masks to Los Angeles department stores. 

Most of the designs are original, and the pieces sold by the Los Angeles department stores 
attracted considerable attention, especially among the ladies. Except for the finger rings, the 
articles are carved out of wood, and are exquisitely finished. The rings are carved out of a 
plastic material and are quite novel. 



TUBE BENDING 

By Hart 

James Neese and Robt. Bertram have 
just moved their families out here to the 
coast. I sure hope they find San Diego to 
their liking. How come Norm Freakley 
missed the train? 

Who was the expert rifle shot who 
couldn't even hit an electric percolator . . ? 
Curtis Franklin might know something 
about taking a pot shot at a carton . . . 
which contained a brand new electric per- 
colator and two electric light bulbs. None 
were scratched! 

XNEWS 

A! Waid of Cardiff by the Sea and 
Nelhe Thompson were married in Yuma, 
Arizona June 1st. Their trip home was 
dulled by considerable tire trouble. 

Feminine complexions are so called be- 
cause they're so complex. — The Hough- 
ton Line. 



"They told him it couldn't be done." 
"So what?" "So he did it!" "Then what?" 
"They said, T told you someone would 
do it'!" 



YOU NEED NO CASH 
FOR YOUR CLOTHES 

Your Credit is good at 

RUBIN'S 

BETTER CLOTHES 

Jor Men and Women 

ON CREDIT 

713 BROADWAY 

No Red Tape — No Carrying Charges 

For Men 

Suits . . . $19.50, up 
Sport Coats . $12.50 

up 
Slaclis . . . $7.50, up 
Shoes .... 5.50 " 
Furnishings ■ 

• • * 

NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 

TERMS TO .SUIT YOUR CONVENIENCE 



For Women 




Dresses 


. . $6.75, 


up 


Coats . 


. . 11.50 


" 


Suits . 


. . 11.50 


n 


Hats . . 


. . 1.95 


n 


Robes, 


etc. 





Let's Be Friends 
As well as 
Neighbors.' 

• • • 
Make Yourself 
At Home In This 

Big Friendly Store | 

• • • 
Your Credit 

Is Good 




DRYER'S STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

/. E. Dryer, President • 2368 Kettner Bhd. 



July, 1940 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
FLYERS NEWS 

By Joe Havlik 

DURING the past two months the 
Southern CaHfornia Flyers member- 
ship has been increasing with great suc- 
cess. Many new members have signed on 
the dotted line so that they may enjoy 
the thrills of that so-called term of "Fly- 
ing thru the ozone." They now enjoy the 
fun of flying in our spot landing contests, 
which are held every Sunday afternoon, 
and then being entertained at a party in 
the evening. The social events include 
beach parties, hay rides, dances, ice cream 
socials, and various trips to points of in- 
terest throughout southern California. 

Due to the rapid growth of the club we 
are at the point of purchasing a second 
ship such as a 12 5-horse-power Fleet or 
Kinner or such a ship as desired by the 
members of the club. President and In- 
structor Albert L. Griffith now taking a 
C.A.A. refresher course, will be giving the 
solo students a thorough and advanced 
training in this ship. Also the training 
system will be outlined as by the C.A.A. 
course now being given at the leading 
flying schools throughout United States. 

The roll call to date is as follows: Bob 
Bailey, Bill Burflinger, Tommy Munn, 
Pat Dowling (better known as "breeze 'em 
in Dowling"), Ray Dinsen (known as 
"Grease 'em in Dinsen"), Gene Engle- 
horn, Tommy Emerton, Jack Evans, Mau- 
rice Gilstrap, Joe Havlik (Commonly 



Exclusive Representatives for 



A NEW SPINET 



>|% DOWN $U 



MONTH 



SO. CALMUSIC CO. "7^ S.D. 
630-C ST.— r ^fione A^.3'||4( 



known as "Test Pilot Havlik"), Tex 
Hills (The Flying Texan), Mrs. Ina Har- 
ris, Joe HoUenbeck, Billy Luffy (the one 
and only "Rumba Bill"), Leo Leonard 
(our latest solo product). Art Le Barre, 
Isabelle McCrae (our "First Lady"), Bob 
McGregor (adds the industrious era of 
"Lazy McGregor"), Fredrick "Ace" Rob- 
ertson (is noted around the field as "Hop 
along" Robertson), Fred Saari, Tommy 
Saunders ("Tune 'em up Tommy"), Bob 
Sprague ("Wing Ding" Sprague), Ken- 
neth Smith ("Motor Glide" Smith), Bill 
Sutton ("Wee Willie" Sutton), La Vaugn 
White, Victor Urias, Ray French, Carl 
Johnson, Charles Green, and last but not 
least we have Kae "Mom" Griffith. 

Friends and visitors are always welcome 
to see our spot landings contests any Sun- 
day afternoon at Peiks Airport just off of 
Highway 101 North, near the radio beam 
towers. 

"Knowledge comes, but wisdom 
lingers." — Tennyson. 



Has your present job a future? 
Does it offer opportunities for travel? 
Is it interesting? 

SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

offers its 
MASTER RADIO COURSE 

preparing for commercial radio operators 
licenses, as the answer to the above questions 
RADIO, as a vocation, affords jobs in the 
airways as ground stotion operator 
on shipboard as radio operator 
broadcast station work . installa- 

tion and repair . servicing. 

Our employment service assists in placing 
the licensed operator. 
JOBS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
Both day and evening courses 
NAVIGATION COURSES 
also available. 
Prepare NOW while you ore employed 

SAN DIEGO AEROMARINE 

RADIO AND NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Administrotion Building Lindbergh Field 

Telephone Jackson 7400 



# 




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Personal Supervision oF the Owners Assures Careful Consideration of 

Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Always Reasonable 

Conveniently Located — Ample Free Parking 



A 

FRIENDLY 
SERVICE 




Cash Your 
Check Here 

We make arrange- 

ments to offer you 

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service without 

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Our easy budget terms made 
available to you with only 
your "white slip" as identifi- 
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JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and Ath St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 6168 




:automotive servicks 



32nd and University 
30th and El Cajon 



10 



Consolidator 



LEADERS IN SPORTS 

By Matt. Wiclopohki 

William (Bill) Gilchrist, our welfare 
director, told us the other day that "Pa- 
tience pays dividends." Ever since Coii- 
solidated Aircraft came to San Diego, their 
sports activities have produced the clean- 
est, keenest, and finest in sports. 

Last month, diminutive Tommy Mendez 
beat an array of fine badminton players to 
annex Comolidated's second badminton 
tournament. However, Tom had to really 
show his best plays, tricks, and shots to 
take the 1940 trophy from the 1939 cham- 
pion, Johnny Lockwood. Not long ago, 
Mendez played in the well-known Holly- 




FOR WALLS 

Bedrooms, bathrooms, 
kitchen — in these rooms 
especially, you'll enjoy the 
soft, pastel tints of Fuller- 
glo — the West's most pop- 
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and woodwork. 



W, p. FULLER 8 CO. 

803 Seventh Ave. M. 0181 
2911 University J. 2332 



wood Badminton Play-offs. After it was 
all over, Tom won six successive matches 
to win the Class "C" title. 

Recently Homer Shaylor, top entrant in 
Consolidated'^ fourth tennis tourney, won 
successive matches over Don McClarren 
and "Lefty" MacGowan to become the 
1940 Tennis Champion, thus succeeding 
Lloyd Lyoko, last year's leader in tennis. 
In the semi-final match, McClarren al- 
most upset Shaylor by winning the first 
set at 7-5. Shaylor then pulled the second 
set out of the fire at 10-8. Coming into 
the third and final set, McClarren went 
ahead in games at 4-2. After playing nip 
and tuck and eye for an eye type of game. 
Homer Shaylor loosened his grip and began 
playing a spectacular and superior game of 
tennis. The following four games ended 
the set and match at 6-4 in Shaylor's favor 
over the "hard man to beat," McClarren. 
Most significant happening of the tourn- 
ey was "Lefty" MacGowan's playing in 
the finals match against Shaylor. Despite 
his experience, excellence in shots and 
clever playing, "Lefty" just couldn't hold 
off Shaylor's court strategy and super- 
iority, losing 6-3 and 8-6. Thus, for the 
second successive year, MacGowan became 
runner-up for the Class "A" title. One 
often hears it remarked that "third time 
is a charm" — better luck next year, 
"Lefty." 

Bennett won over Peterson to take over 
Class "B" honors by 6-2, 6-1 scores. 



In Softball, Speed pitched his Tool 
Room team to victory in four out of 
six games. The Production gang re- 
ceived but one hit, yet they managed to 
steal two runs, to win the finest game of 
the season. Production 2, Tool Room 1. 



The night shift Machine Shop team has 
won their five last games. Having lost 
one outside game by a score of 10-9, 
Broadway Beauties were the lucky ones. To 
date, the Sheet Metal team leads the league 
on the strength of their win over a strong 
Hull team. 

Roy Gillmore wins the orchid for this 
month's superb ball-playing. 

Watch out for the Maintenance team in 
the day league! 

DRIFTING THRU DRAFTING 

SINCE the Engineering department has 
adopted the popular expansion move- 
ment in vogue today and is moving to the 
far corners of the new drafting room, the 
engineers travel faster than the news 
(shop opinions notwithstanding) to the 
detriment of your correspondent. Indeed, 
it now requires nearly a day by fast yak 
train to hear from the last outpost. But it 
is hoped that the shifting of locations of 
the various groups will enable some of the 
boys to find out how the other groups do 
things. For instance, Andy Minella could 
have saved himself both mental and physi- 
cal anguish if he had not learned by the 
hard way that ailerons have ribs. An ex- 
perimental test panel had been made for 
the control surface group and having 
served its usefulness several of the boys one 
noon decided to subject it to a sort of 
fistic blitzkrieg. Both Jack Stuck and 
Sandy Falbaum smacked their brawny 
paws through both layers of the taut fab- 
ric covering and even Vaughn de Kirby 
succeeded in making some tiny knuckle 
imprints on the top layer. This was too 
much for Minella who had been watching 
the proceedings from afar. He approached 



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431 BROADWAY 

Main 3531 




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GO. 



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Phone 

^ FINANC(N<a j. 
^ B U I L D 1 H a 4178 



July, 1940 



11 



with the tense eagerness of a Kansas farm- 
er as he spies the swing-the-sledge and 
ring-the-gong contraption at the county 
fair. He squared away before the panel, 
wound up and let fly with a prodigious 
wallop that landed smack on the new type 
invisible rib which was spirited away from 
the old time corset and placed in tail sur- 
faces instead. It being a solid web rib 
Mister Minella's mortification knew no 
bounds, but it's an ill wind that blows 
no good for Bill Maloney is planning to 
use Andy until the new drop hammer ar- 
rives. 

The Fixed Equipment group was any- 
thing but that recently at a remarkable 
trading mart which took place during a 
lunch period. Barry Jewell, who is fast 
earning the title of "The Professor" be- 
cause of his choice of loud suits and his 
absent-minded antics, laid a fifty-cent 
piece on his desk for some obscure reason. 
Chuck Freel, who is always desperate as a 
result of his splendid poker playing, 
snapped it up in a flash. Barry then 
grabbed Freel's beam compass and sold it 
to Jimmy Walker for a dollar. Walker 
traded the beam compass for a bow com- 
pass, and then began a series of lightning 
trades that would make David Harum 
look like an amateur by comparison. The 
exchanging finally bogged down when 
someone tried to trade Pete Carlson's golf- 
ing nonchalance to Ken Whitney for a 
book of matches. 

Ad quidnunc: 

While Gordon Waite was at home ill, 
his good wife could not understand why 
persons kept calling him from the plant 
about the "Finnish spec" when that coun- 
try was no longer buying airplanes. 

Ted Hall was not able to see the film, 




AT OUR STORE 




[HJ^ I BROADWAY AT TENTH 
2861 UNIVERSITY 



"My Son, My Son" at a recent downtown 
showing. The reason was the arrival of his 
third daughter. Sons and daughters have 
been arriving in about equal numbers to 
the other boys around the drafting room. 
Ralph Reid, "Tom" Collins, "Pop" Eden- 
field, Eddie Rohn, Brad Powers, Jim Bre- 
see and Felix Kallis are among those who 
have conspired against the census taker 
since he made the rounds. 

The new adornment on Med Sher- 
wood's upper lip is quite a handy thing. 
He maintains that it enabled him to keep 
perfect balance while rolling over a 12 5- 
foot embankment recently. Judging by a 
few of the local softball scores there are 
some pitchers who could use a thing like 
that. 

The only figure that Clarence "Gour- 
mand" Gerber cares about is a mathemati- 
cal one. He so dearly loves to eat that we 
are told he will even sit at the table in a 
high chair and wear a bib, if the steak is 
well done. Tsk! Tsk! And with the Santa 
Barbara "most perfect man" ballot com- 
ing up soon. 

"If you'll lend me five dollars I'll be 
everlastingly indebted to you." "Yeah," 
replied the prospective creditor, "That's 
the trouble." 



HERTZ 



RENT A CAR 
OR TRUCK 

DRIVE YOURSELF 

Real Insurance Protection 
1140 2nd Ave. Main 8520 

Stations — San Diego to Vancouver 



2905 Pacific Blvd. Next to South Parking Lot 

CONVENIENT 
Lowest Prices on GASOLINE — OIL — LUBRICATION 

M AIRPLANE STATION 

HOLLEMAN and CROOKS 

Ford Specialists Complete Auto Repair 



Pay Checks Cashed for Customers 



VISIT 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
FOR MOTORISTS 




FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

Tires and Tubes 
Batteries 
Spark Plugs 
Life Protector Tubes 
Motor Tune-up Dept. 
Brake Department 
Auto Radio and Service 
Four Brands of Gasoline 
Auto Accessories 
Seat Covers 

FOR THE HOME 

Electric Refrigerators 

Ranges 

Washers 

Radios 

Electrical Appliances 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

Bicycles 
Velocipedes 
Scooters 
Wagons 

Terms as Low as 25c Weekly 

WE CASH PAY CHECKS 

• 

It's Easy to Park 
and Shop at 

Broadway, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 






LARGEST AIRCRAFT PLANT UN 



CONSOLIDATED Aircraft Corpora- 
tion's present expansion program, now 
being rushed to completion with full 
manufacturing facilities estimated as com- 
pleted by August first, brings this plant 
into full alignment with the President's 
recently announced emergency defense 
program for building a vastly expanded 
number of aircraft. When completed, this 
will be the largest integrated aircraft plant 
in America, with 1,910,000 square feet 
of covered and uncovered manufacturing 
space and 9 54,440 sq. ft. of contiguous 
airport land under option for further ex- 
pansion if necessary. Ramp, airport and 
rail sidings are not included in these fig- 
ures. 

Comolidated Aircraft Corporation is 
unique in its possession of most favorable 
conditions surrounding its ascendency as 
the largest aircraft plant in America: 

The greater preponderance of the back- 
log, now noted at over $70,000,000, con- 
sists of United States Government work, 
with a smaller proportion of contracts for 
foreign deliveries, leaving the company 



On May 29th, Major Reuben H. Fleet, Founder, President and Manager 
of Consolidated, summed up Consolidated's position and outlook in the fol- 
lowing brief message to all: 

"This is our 17th Birthday. It finds us with (1) $70,000,000 
w^orth of w^ork and outstanding quotations w^hich, if accepted w^ithin 
the next month or two, would bring our backlog to over $100,000,- 
000; (2) the factory being doubled, comprises 1,910,000 sq. feet 
of covered and uncovered manufacturing space, making it the larg- 
est integrated aircraft plant in America; (3) an option on adjacent 
land, equal to 50% of the above area, w^ith plans nearly completed 
for its possible improvement; and (4) a good organization — equal to 
any in the industry — the best in our history. 

"So in counting our blessings let us consider that w^e have a 
factory of our ow^n, tailored for our business, in the city of our 
choice, with plenty of work on hand and in sight, and no mortgage 
on our premises or our future. In one sense I regret that w^e are too 
busy to celebrate." 

R. H. Fleet, Manager. 



relatively free from any contingencies 
which might arise over the turn of events 
abroad. 

In undertaking present plant expansion 
to meet this volume of business, a closing 
agreement was entered into between Con- 
solidated and the United States Treasury 
Department. This agreement provides that 



the cost of certain addition excess produc- 
tion facilities, less depreciation, required 
to meet deliveries may be charged to the 
cost of performing contracts received by 
the company, in effect amortizing much 
of the expansion. 

And, the naturally equable climate of 
San Diego, permits fully 30 percent of 





\MERICA . . . 



the manufacturing operations in building 
the airplanes to be conducted out-of- 
doors. Provision has been made for this 
by paving the entire plant yard area and 
providing suitable outlets for power- 
lines, etc. 

Figure 1 shows painter at work on the 
lower mezzanine floor of the finished parts 
stockroom, within the Final Assembly 
building. Aluminum paint is being applied 
to the structural steel work. 

Figure 2 is a view of the interior of the 
Final Assembly building under construc- 
tion, from the Pacific Highway side. Note 
that half of the tremendous amount of 
overhead steel trusswork has been painted 
and reflects a high percentage of light, 
while the remainder, which has been given 
a dark "shop coat" of primer, has still to 
receive the "field coat" of aluminum. 
Workmen in foreground are stripping 
forms from the foundation wall which 
will be the base for the long row of 
windows on the east side of the building. 

Figure 3 is another view taken from 
inside the Final Assembly building. Some 



conception of the size and free height 
within this single structure can be gained 
from the finished parts stockroom in the 
foreground. It doesn't touch the ceiling, 
and yet it is comparable in size to many 
a small three-story office building down- 
town . . . and a not too small office build- 
ing at that! 

Figure 4 shows cranes at work hoisting 
.1 pre-fabricated section of the truss be- 
tween the Final Assembly and Final Finish 
building which will support the outside 
monorail between the two. Main factory. 
Final Assembly and Final Finish build- 
ings are now connected by outside over- 
head monorail system. 

Figure 5 caught a steel worker using a 
transit during the erection of steel on the 
west side of the Final Assembly building. 
Huge doors will provide 120-foot open- 
ings on this side. 

Figure 6. Entire enclosed yard is being 
paved with asphaltic concrete to take ad- 
vantage of near perfect "assembly weath- 
er" provided by San Diego for out-of-doors 
airplane work. The steelwork of the Final 
Assembly building extends southward in 
this view. Present main building may be 
seen beyond. 

Figure 7. Windows in the sawtooth roof 
far over head will provide excellent north 
lighting. Workers are shown installing 
sash overhead in Final Assembly building. 

Figure 8. Steelworker uses a truss for 
a catwalk. Under his arm he has a bundle 
of tie rods for roof purlins. First time up 
at such a height from the ground gives 
the novice a queer feeling . . . the steel- 
workers drape heavy wrenches, etc. in 
their belts and tote a heavy load of bolts 
or the like along the narrow steel trusses 
with utmost ease, and little concern. 

Figure 9. Painting as the steel goes up 
protects it, aids in securing good lighting 
later. 

Figure 10. Small concrete form being 
assembled about the foot of one of the 
support columns. 

Figure 11. A team of fine horses handles 
some of the lighter work left by the pow- 
erful hoists and bulldozers ... or in other 
words, "All available horsepower" is be- 
ing employed to complete the job! 

The new additions including the 360x 
700 foot Final Assembly building, con- 
necting Office building. Final Finish 
building. Boiler House, outside monorail, 
storage shed and Experimental building 
addition, employ some 3,06 5 tons of 
structural steel. The Final Assombly 
building alone accounts for some 2.129 
tons . . . most of it overhead. 








V 



rz::::;^^;-» jk^\> ?. 



:=i.» ^'Wf*: 



i^->ar-*-'- rr.- 



'-'^. 




14 



Consolidator 



A man walked into a restaurant the 
other day and ordered bean soup. Finding 
no beans in it, he immediately protested. 
The waitress retorted: 

"Well, we got cabinet pudding, too, 
but you won't find any cabinet member 
in It. 




More important 
than^PAINT 
MORTAR 
LUMBER 

The joys and benefits of a 
home of your own may be 
lost if the title to your 
property is attached and 
has not been INSURED 
against title flaws. 




SAN DIEGO 



CALIFORNIA 



DROP HAMMER 

By A. E. Herman 

"Oh Romeo, Romeo, where art thou?" 
asks one of the lead men on the second or 
third shift — the lead men know. When 
Carl Reid, third shift lead man, stepped 
off to Yuma on June 27 with a Brea girl. 
Miss Beverly Smith, the boys all knew 
what that dazed look in his eye had been 
during the past month. 

Charlie Pjirron, second shift lead man, 
also has been "gotten." My, he's a meek 
man in her company. Charlie is to be 
"chained" in the latter part of July to a 
Los Angeles girl, Margaret Khun. It took 
her four years to get him, but she finally 
succeeded. 

Charlie Kauffman seemed to catch the 
idea, too. The ring and what-not went on 
a lucky San Diego girl on June 15 th. 

All the fellows wish these boys luck 
and know that there are going to be three 
lucky girls in town. 

Now that Lew Barkuloo is back after 
recovery from his neck injury, things 
seem the same in the shop. 

The boys are running out of Confucius 
says — so now it's Mohammed murmers. 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection of Pipes in San Diego, 
including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 




C. L. "Chet" Dorman 

I myites You 

... to drive in and become 
acquainted with the com- 
plete Automotive Service 
facilities offered by DOR- 
MAN'S three conveniently 
located stations. Ask your 
friends about DORMAN'S 
"Master" RETREADS and 
"Master" VITACAPS cre- 
ated with U. S. tempered 
tread rubber . . .world fam- 
ous for wear. 



Use DORMAN'S 
EASY PAY 
"fioAia/'PLAN 

It's different! The 
convenient way to 
buy and pay as you 



Telephone F. 775 5 «| 

DOIMANS 

8th Ave. and O Street 




HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

By Wee Willie Winchell Hart man 

Al Jerauld pulled a fast one on the boys 
last week-end by getting himself married 
to Maxine McCany of National City. The 
happy couple will be at home to any and 
all friends at their home in National City. 
— Good, say we all. 

Heartfelt sympathy is extended to Al 
Gatehell whose father-in-law was killed 
recently. 

Kurt Kruger, who had his "throat cut" 
at Paradise Sanitarium recently, is back 
full of vim, vigor, and what have you. 
Kurt wishes to thank all his friends who 
were so kind to him during his conval- 
escence. 

"Hard-luck" Bommer is at it again — 
had another wreck, only this time it 
wasn't his car. Some guys will never learn. 

What is this we hear about Clyde Walk- 
er winning the first prize down at the 
Creole Palace for jitterbugging. Teh, Teh, 
. . . you're too old for that truckin' stuff, 
Clyde me bye. 

Miley bought himself a washing machine 
recently — only trouble is he doesn't give 
his shirts time enough to dry thoroughly 
and he has to wear 'em wet. 

Little Chris Moore, Lin Platner's wrestl- 
ing protege, sure knows how to win a 
bout ... he just slugs them cold. Well, 
that's one way at least. Maybe that's the 
best way. 

Woody Rogers, our champion ball 
player, recently made softball history by 
fanning seventeen men in a row after al- 
lowing the first hit. Woody got mad and 
really bore down. 

Paul Ferrara, our mighty midget, can't 
hold the distinction of being the smallest 
man in the shop anymore — he found an- 
other guy who's a half inch shorter 
and is he proud now that he is a midget 
giant! 

Who was that fellow by the name of 
Ernie Constantino, seen recently at Mis- 
sion Beach trying to shoot the spots off 
all the targets at the rifle range? He didn't 
leave much for anyone else to shoot at. 

Homer "Bee-Keeper" Higbee says he 
lost one of his queen bees last week. Now 



Branches: 41st and El Cojon Boulevard — Washington at Falcon Street 



WHERE TO LIVE? 

Apartments, Courts, Duplexes, Houses 
$20 - We Cover the City - $200 

NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 

CAPT. E, FRIEDRICK, U.S.N. Retd. 
Main 1014 234 C Street 

SALES • RENTALS • BUILDING 



July, 1940 



15 



Homer is looking for her. Try a Consoli- 
dator ad, Homer, they bring results. 

Now we know how Chuck Keenan gets 
so many curls in his hair . . . we saw him 
hauling a load of leaf mold the other day. 
Pretty good, Chuck. 

All these ball players are going to need 
new uniforms pretty quick if they don't 
stop wearing them to work. Those silk 
caps are just too ducky. Our baseball 
team is going strong. If they can only 
keep it up, we will have a winner. Of 
course the Maintenance Department is a 
little ahead of us, but we still have them 
to play and with Al Wilson and Ben Kiegle 
managing the team, how can we lose? 

And speaking of hats, did ya ever notice 
that one of Cecil Flowers? Looks like a 
"Blondie Bumstead" super creation or 
something. 

Those sandwiches Ray Craft brings for 
lunch are getting bigger and bigger — he's 
even out-""Dagwooding" Dagwood with 
his gigantic conglomerations. 
% ^ 

WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

By J. E. Hodgson 

THE Wood Shop motorcade had an- 
other outing Sunday, June 9, to 
Warner Hot Springs, where many enjoyed 
the bathing, but not the drinking. Base- 
ball and other forms of play and amuse- 
ment took the rest of the time. Wrong- 
Way "Red" Hirlbeck left San Diego at 
7:30 a.m. and did not reach the Springs 
until 2 p.m. Maybe he was looking for 
Palm Springs. Anyhow, those who were 
there are already set for another such ex- 
cursion. 

Bob Harshaw's ball team suffered their 
first defeat at the hands of "Cutting," the 
score being 5 to 1. Two wood shop players 



FOR A "BETTER" DEAL 



s 



ARON 

OONER 



DIAMONDS 
WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE 
RADIOS 

SHROn* CREDIT JEWELER 



3820 FIFTH AVE. 



Near University 



"CLOSE TO YOUR HOME" 



in their eagerness to retrieve a "fly" ball 
collided and were slightly injured. 

Miss Helen Rogers of Pacific Beach and 
our Jim J. Paschman are really serious, and 
are going to do something about it in the 
near future. 

We announced the wedding of Harry 
Connelly several months ago. It seems that 
Mrs. Connelly treats him so well that he 
is out-growing his clothes, in fact, accord- 
ing to young Piper, if Harry does not get 
new trousers each Saturday he has to find 
scraps of masking tape on Monday to 
hold him together. I don't believe it! 

The Senior Prom of the San Diego High 
School was adorned by the presence of our 
Bill Gertds, on his girl friend's invitation. 
Maybe this was his reason for omitting 
to come to work the next day. "The 
morning after" so to speak. 

Johnny Cossar is saving his pennies to 
buy a portable cuspidor for Al Rhodes. If 
you would like to know why, ask either 
of these gentlemen — there is a reason. 

"The Album" (see page 16 shows a 
trio of Rod and Reelers from Wood Shop 
with their catch of thirteen prime barra- 
cuda. They are, left to right, "Mac" Mc- 
Giffin, Bob Harshaw, and Frank Mische. 
"Mac" told us they had to reach over and 
kick the fish in their respective faces to 
prevent them from climbing into the boat. 
We believe you "Mac," but there are 
thousands who wouldn't. 

Answer 

L Tonnage does not have the same 
meaning in a naval vessel, a commercial 
vessel, or an aeroplane. The tonnage of a 
naval vessel is weight of the water dis- 
placed by the hull of the ship. Tonnage 
in a commercial vessel pertains to the 
amount of cargo the ship will hold. This 
is taken from the old English word TUN 
meaning a large type of hogshead. The 
tonnage of an aeroplane is the actual 
weight of the ship. 



When you see an aircraft worker and 
his wife walking swiftly down the street 
single file on Saturday night, it's the one 
in front that's mad. 



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Consolidator 




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THE ALBUM 

1. We claim this is a scoop out-scooping Walter Winchell — Young Mr. Charles Curry Aiken, 
photographed just one and one half hours after the big event. Charles entered the world 
at just 7 pounds, 1 3 '/^ ounces on June 11th, and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kelman R. Aiken. 
"Kel" Aiken is assistant chief, finish parts stores. "Kel," Mrs. Aiken, "Kel" junior (aged 3) 
and Master Charles Curry are all reported as "doing nicely," thank you. 

2. Harry Culver, instructor of the San Diego Flying Club is shown beside the club's new 
Cub "5 0," and 

3. Bill Travis, operations manager of the club, is sho'wn at the controls of one of the club's 
other planes. 

4. "Mac" McGifHn, Bob Harshaw, and Frank Mische of the Wood Shop are proudly sho^ng 
off their catch of barracuda. 

3. T. B. "Mac" Maclntyre, night doorman at the main ojfice, spends a good bit of his spare 
time at his hobby — cactus gro'wing. 

6. Herb Allison, planning department No. 3 844, is proud of his daughter and of his handi- 
work. Young Miss Allison is shown here holding a scrap-book made by Herb. The decoration 
is hand-carved, and Mrs. Allison painted the background in oil colors — sort of a family 
affair. 

7. Miss Margie Berger, eight-year-old daughter of Cliff Berger of the Wood Shop, has al- 
ready won fame singing over K F S D. 

8. The Experimental Department ne^vly-weds — John P. LaLanne, No. 8046, and the former 
Miss Mignon M. Largent. April 2 8 ^vas the big day. 

9. Milton "Top Rail" Hangen doing a bit of deep-sea fishing on a recent expedition to the 
blue water. Hangen is secretary of the Rod and Reel Club. 

1 0. This is to prove that Felix Mattingly, Tank Department, really caught a fifteen-pound 
sheephead on his first deep-sea fishing expedition. (See June Consolidator) . 

11. Galehouse, Finish; Offerman, Welding; and Topper, Sheet Metal, are proving that you 
don't have to be wealthy to own a "yacht." This picture, taken at the Coronado Yacht Club, 
shows them with their boats — standard fifteen-foot paddle boards fitted with twelve-foot 
masts, rudder, center board, and all that goes with them for good sailing. 

12. Scotty McCarney, night Sheet Metal, is proving the trite saying that "you can take 
the boy from the country, but you can't take the country from the boy." Scotty is shown at 
his first love — ^his garden. 



"He could distinguish, and divide A 
hair 'twixt south and a south-west side." 

Surely everybody knows by this time 
that wordage which doesn't bear fruit 
should be pruned. 



Mrs. New Driver: "They say that I 
have a short circuit. Can you lengthen it 
while I wait, please?" 

A company is known by the men it 
keeps. — The Houghton Line. 



July, 1940 



17 



THINGS THAT 
COME OUT AT NIGHT 

By Craig 

WITH SO much being said about 
hill-billies at present and such a 
large representation in Production De- 
partment, Roy Larceval decided to try 
this "barefoot business" for himself and 
showed up for a ball game minus his 
shoes. Roy played seven innings thus. 
Bradshaw and Clemson would claim he 
didn't get the proper reaction, because he 
kept his socks on. 

Bill Wold tried to answer one of Jack 
Merrill's questions as follows: "A com- 
mittee having met and considered the 
proposition laid before it, has decided that 
in view of impending European events and 
the generally prevalent turbulent world 
situation, there is but one conclusion that 
any well-organized, clear-thinking assem- 
bly of diligent, conscientious, and progres- 
sive engineering and inspection personnel 
could possibly arrive at, namely, to drop 
the whole thing and go have a beer." Like 
a change order after long and careful 
consideration. Jack was able to figure it 
out. 

Gordon Browne, but recently house- 
keeping for himself, decided he wanted to 
have some friends in for a nice dinner. 
Gordon bought a roast, got all the di- 



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The entire family 

enjoys a meal 
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can select his own 
favorite dish. 



Ati 



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1047 Sixth Avenue 
San Dieso, California 



rections on how to prepare it from Art 
Stone, and then at the last minute, got 
cold feet and took it over to his mother's 
to have her prepare it. We hear that 
"Browne" didn't even blush at the com- 
pliments on his cooking. 

When Oscar Aukley appeared the other 
night with his shirt torn to shreds we 
wondered if an over-excitable lead man 
had lost control of himself to such an ex- 
tent. Upon investigation it was discovered 
that Oscar had acquired the tatters getting 
out of a gas tank. 

Jim Wilkinson, rotund foreman in the 
Metal Bench, is glad for a brief respite 
from good beach weather. Jim used to go 
to the beach every day and lay on the sand. 
He was about to give it up as his stomach 
would become so sunburned he couldn't 
keep a belt around it. 

Henry Zilz, Cutting, really tangled 
with a varmint the other evening. Henry 
accidentally knocked a fire extinguisher 
off the hook and before he could pin it 
down he was wet to the skin, choked and 
blinded by the stream of chemicals. 

In the field of sports the Draw Bench 
bowling team, composed of Dick Scott, 
Lou Miller, Wayne Williams, Roy Nas- 
sauer and Lynn Bybee came out on top of 
the bowling league. The boys won 37 and 
lost 19 for a very good record. The team 
must have been a favorite right along be- 
cause we heard Dick Scott's wife spent 
the prize money three weeks before the 
season ended. 

Gene Laird, Hull, has a fine baby boy 
that weighed in at 7 and 3-4 pounds. 
Gene, who is Scotch, has the boy's applica- 
tion in with Wire already. He figures that 
he has to pay for all those cigars somehow. 
George Wire, Frank Popp, Ray Kendall, 
Johnny Hopman, S. Sterns and S. Coulter 
have found their spot. It's a place called 
Hansen's Lake, and according to reports 
the fish and game are anxious to give up. 
Geo. Wire says sometime he wants to find 
out; the last trip most of his time was 
spent repairing his car. 

Don Rasmussen of the requisition crew 
was worse off the other night than a dis- 
patcher with a broken leg. Don cut his 
writing hand so bad that he had to watch 



for two nights. Jake Dietzer swears he 
didn't even know Don was out of action. 
The Machine Shop sof tball team, led by 
that sterling coach. Matt Weilopolski, 
finally won a ball game, but not without 
some fast thinking by Coach Matt. It 
seems Matt was able to talk three of the 
opponents, who showed up a little early, 
into going home on the ground that the 
(Continued on page 21 ) 



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Summer Schedule In All 

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ACADEMIC TUTORING 

START JUNE 17th 

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• Grand Music I every wed., fri., 

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Broadway at 11th 



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Tools (or every kind of 
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18 



Consolidotor 



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ADDRESS 105 WASH. 



TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Maguire 

We were all grieved to hear of the un- 
fortunate accident to Phil Koenig's 
daughter, Phillis, on June 3rd. We all hope 
for a speedy recovery, Phillis. 

One of the heroes of the month is Carl 
Ludeman who on three occasions last 
month went to Los Angeles and acted as 
blood donor for his sister. We are happy 
to report that she is improving. Nice go- 
ing, Carl. 

Bill Ekdahl will be the major contestant 
in the next beauty contest. He will submit 
as evidence his pass photo even in the face 
of stiff competition from Curly Knight. 
The pictures really do flatter them. 

Don't be alarmed by the smoke screen 
in Tool Design. It is only the result of 
the new air-cooled pipe fad. We might 
add Mr. Chas. Smith is responsible for 
that, too. 

From time to time certain enjoyable 
Radio Programs leave the air rather mys- 
teriously. So it was with Baron Mun- 
chausen and his, "Was you there, Char- 
ley?" We all wondered what became of 
him. According to indications he has 
turned up in our own Tool Design Dept. 
in the form of R. Van Meter. If you don't 
believe me ask "Charley" Smith. In fact 
we think Van is just a little better than 
the Baron. 

We now have a new member in Kline's 
group. Shirley is the latest addition. Wel- 
come and good luck. 

A "TWO REELER" ABOUT 
THE ROD AND REELERS 

By "Brad" Bradshaw 
With summer definitely here for the 
present, the members of the Rod and Reel 
Club have been showing signs of activity 
with numerous reports of good fishing ex- 
peditions and successful catches. 

On the records of Secretary Milt 
Hangen are several entries for awards 
which show an 18'/2 pound yellowtail 
landed by Ed Lang, a I6I/2 inch rainbow 
trout by Hank Neimeyer, a 10 pound 
halibut by James Hawkins and a 3 pound 
1 3 Vz ounce big mouth bass reeled in by 
P. E. Searay. "Stan" Saville has not 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

"Vj optometrist .-^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



weighed his "home grown" bass as yet. 

Several fishing trips were reported dur- 
ing the month and leading the list was the 
journey of Glenn Hotchkiss, John Hop- 
man, Ray Kendall, George Wire, Sam 
Strains, George Landy, Frank Popp, Bill 
Nixon and Bill Bates deep into old Mexico 
for some angling in the Laguna Hansen 
Lake. The catches were fair, the trip ter- 
rible, and the amusing incidents plenty, ac- 
cording to Hotchkiss, who remarks "Give 
me the lake and you take Mexico." 

Milt Hangen, Larry Le Maire, Harry 
Gillen, and Mel Dowse report a trip to the 
Islands with a catch of thirteen yellow- 
tail (and the big tuna as usual got away). 
This catch was divided among three of the 
fellows as Hangen was not in a fishing 
mood, it is reported. Lloyd Bender, Ray 
Kendall, Del Drake, and Ed Lang also re- 
ported a trip for yellowtail. Lank won 
the "jack pot" with his catch. 

•at 

Rastus and Liza were married but a 
short time when he came home with a big 
washtub, a washboard and a three-foot 
mirror. 

Liza: "Whut's all de truck you brung?" 

Rastus: "Not all, but yo' kin take yo' 

pick. Yo' kin take de tub an' washboard 

an' go to work, or yo' kin take de mirror 

an' set down and watch you'se'f starve." 




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or bring this adv. to 1340 Sixth Ave. 




July, 1940 



19 



CONSAIR FLYING NEWS . . . 

Biggest and best news of the month 
is the fact that our airplane is here. The 
new 50 h.p. Cub was flown here from Los 
Angeles by the club's operations manager, 
Orv Hubbard, and secretary, Steve Brown. 
The trim little ship had barely arrived 
before operations began. 

Among those who checked out and who 
are now flying solo are: Brown, Peterson, 
Blaine and Becker. 

Instructor Lou Loyko is reported to be 
doing an excellent job. Lou recently re- 
turned from Oakland where he took the 
new C.A.A. refresher course for instruct- 
ors. Members are advised to be on their 
toes — Loyko lets few things get by un- 
noticed. 

Orv did full justice to his talents by 
painting our club insignia on the fuselage 
of the ship. The colors, incidentally, red, 
white and blue, particularly suit the time. 

Miles Blaine made news this month by 
passing tests for a private pilot's license. 
All members congratulate him on his 
success. This is number one from Consair 
Flyers. More will follow. 

Becker and Al Draimen have certainly 
done their bit to make this club a success 
so far. These fellows work unceasingly for 



the club — promoting Chamber of Com- 
merce publicity, helping grade new run- 
ways on the flying field, installing doors 
on the hangars, etc. 

Almost the entire membership was on 
hand to help move ship and equipment 
into our permanent quarters on Tyce 
field, where we have an individual hangar. 
Also to help grade the new runway. 
Among the noticeable things of this latter 
procedure was the handy way Peterson 
swung the axe during the felling of a tree. 
Can't be that he's been flying all his life! 

All members who haven't already done 
so are urged to come to the field and look 
over their possession. 



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"Joy," answered the lad. 
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A temporary span over a small creek, 
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WHY SKIERS LEAVE HOME 

5y Philip Faiilconer {Loft) 

CONSOLIDATED men are devoted to 
the mild, and, sometimes, even sunny, 
weather of Southern California, yet there 
are some of us who spend half the year 
hunting for snow. For ten successive 
weeks this winter and spring, two night- 
shift Consolidators leapt for their autos 
and skis each Friday night and drove 
through the darkness and dawn to snow, 
usually three hours, but on other occa- 
sions 500 miles and eight or ten hours 
distant. 

On the longer trips our objective was 
Mammoth Lakes, Yosemite or the Mount 
Whitney region; the shorter trips usually 
meant visiting one of the ski huts (really 
JO-man lodges), which the Ski Mount- 
aineers Section of the Sierra Club of Cali- 
fornia has built on Mt. Baldy and Keller 
Peak, near Pomona and San Bernardino. 
When we visited a high peak or pass, the 
nights were spent on the snow, snug in 
down sleeping bags and little Alpine tents. 

Consolidated personnel includes many 
skiers: Frank Holdener, Jack Duthy, Henry 
Mandolf and Charles McCabe (Engineer- 
ing) ; Harold Stark (Tool Room); the 
author (Loft); Russ Kern (Hull), who, 
though not a skier, is a Sierra Club moun- 
taineer; Al Bailey (Spotweld) ; and George 
Seiler (Tool Room) . The first six are Sierra 
Club men, Holdener, Mandolf, Stark and 
Faulconer in the Ski Mountaineers Sec- 
tion. 

George Seiler has the distinction of hav- 
ing climbed the Matterhorn, Switzerland's 
most difficult peak, before he left his 
homeland for the U.S.A. Although he 
made many Alpine cHmbs, George just 
won't take on our 14,000-foot "American 
Alps." Maybe we can get him out yet! 
Many of you probably saw the recent 
motion picture "The Challenge," featur- 
ing an authentic ascent of the Matter- 
horn, which gives an idea of what George 
has done. 

We would specially like to see Al Bailey 
and George Seiler in our Club, and Russ 
Kern on skis. 

This season, Toolmaker Art Wullich, a 



BRING YOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 

jTAHL^lEWf 




upper, This picture shows one of last 
winter's ski camps in the High Sierras. 

Lower, Four skiers at Kearsage Pass, near 
Lone Pine. 

— Photographs by Walter Hennies. 

former Consolidator, also a Ski Mount- 
aineer, gained several high awards in this 
state and in Sun Valley, for his excellent 
skiing. Another member of the San Diego 
Ski Club, to which most of these men be- 
long, won a number of first and second 
places in this season's state-wide meets. 

The growing group of San Diego skiers 
is always made welcome on the ski slopes 
from Los Angeles north, and the more 
Consolidators interested in this sport, the 
lower will be the cost per individual on 
trips to the snow. This year's longest trip 
(in mileage) cost only $6.00 per person 
for 1040 miles by automobile, all living 
expenses on the trip, and at least ten hours 
skiing, at altitudes ranging from 6,000 
to 11,000 feet above sea level. 

Whether you are a skier or not, come 
out this summer to the straw-covered 



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July, 1940 



21 



practice hill; do a little practice skiing or 
just look on. Drive out to Mission Valley, 
about two miles east of Old Town (be- 
tween Texas St. and Sixth Ave.) and you 
will spot the straw slope where skiers 
develop their technic and keep their knees 
and other parts in trim for next winter's 
snow. (It's just like snow 'till you fall!) 
Let's go, fellows! Next season should 
see a lot of Consolidators off for the snow 
when the last whistle blows each Friday. 

Things That Come Out at 
Night . . . (Cont.) 

schedule was mixed up and that the other 
team (Paint) was scheduled on some other 
diamond. If any other manager wants to 
use this idea, remember who it belongs to. 
However, Matt was sincere. 

J. "Popeye" Petit of Tail Dept. entered 
a sailboat race at Mission Bay Yacht Club 
one week. There were 1 6 boats in the race, 
and when Johnny was nosed out of 16th 
place by a mass of driftwood, he decided 
to give up the sport. Popeye says there 
were "spirits" in the water around the 5 th 
buoy and he just couldn't make the turn. 
From what we hear it might have been 
the "spirits" in the clubhouse that caused 
the difficulty, because it's pretty hard to 
go around a buoy that you can't see. 

It appears that Yuma is still the place 
to go. During the past month Paul Ab- 
bott, Wing, and Bernice Leitel of L. A.; 
Joe Margole, Bench, and Evelyn Stevens 
of San Diego, and Bill Flenniken, Pro- 
duction, and Gertrude Frost of Ocean 
Beach made the trip and came back in the 
usual condition after the trip, as "Mr. and 
Mrs." Paul feels he started off right by 
getting married at 7 minutes to 11. 




Gets the 

STRnui 

UOTE for 

gnod taste ! 



5 



^ BIG 
BOTTLE 




Ralph Smith of Draw Bench is a proud 
daddy. It's a baby girl. Jack Bryant's wife 
showed him how to hunt rabbits. Jack 
went looking, Margaret sat and waited. 
Jack got none, Margaret got four. Gale- 
house and his little men really pour the 
work out of the paint shop. What could 
Army's friend "Pistol Pete" be practicing 
for? Joe Bettencourt never gets in the 
"dog house." With Joe it's the "lath 
house." Geo. Kreiger, who has been ill for 
three weeks, is back at work. Our best 
news gatherer, H. Roese sprained a wrist 
a short time ago. We're glad it wasn't his 
face, or what would we do for news? Ed 
Freakley had his tonsils cut and his shoes 
resoled. He's really a new man. It can 
happen and it did — Bob Scott got a ticket 
for jaywalking. You sure make it tough 
on us drivers. Bob. 

AERONAUTICAL I.Q. 

1. What is the width of a civil airway? 

2. What naval plane is now called the 
world's largest amphibian? 

3. The U. S. Government operates 
how many radio range stations on the 
Federal Airways? 

4. Name New York city's latest and 
greatest airport. 

5. Aircraft sales in the U. S. for 1939, 
which were highest in the industry's his- 
tory, were estimated at what figure? 

6. What new air base has been named 
Westover Field after the late Major Gen- 
eral Oscar Westover? 

7. Name the term used that designates 
the breakdown of streamline flow about a 
body. 

Answer Page 24. 



"I haven't any money" used to quiet a 
high-pressure salesman, but today it just 
amuses him because all he wants is your 
signature to a promise to pay in twenty- 
five monthly installments. 

— "Bagology." 



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yield or 

principal. 

• 

1027 
Sixth 
E-i"-^~' Ave. 

ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL" 



lUlliifneu^ 



1 



every time for Better Values! 



"Our Consair Check goes 

farther at Whitney's!" 

. . . and so will yours because it's the 
policy in this big, convenient store, to save 
your money, time and steps on every pur- 
chase. Save on everything from rugs, 
refrigerators and cameras to fishing reels 
and silk stockings. Make WHITNEY'S 
your family shopping center. 

Special credit extended to Consair families. 





Open Whitney 
Budget Account 

Credit Department 
6 th Avenue Mezzanine 



We cash your 
pay chcelct 



22 



PRODUCTION MINUTES . . . 



By "Brad" Bradshau' 

DUE TO another "blitzkrieg" in the 
planning office that saw the capitu- 
lation of Maloney and Jones Plant engin- 
eering forces and their retreat "across the 
channel" has kept me confined to that area 
for fear of losing what little territory 
I have left. But brother Jos Maloney has 
lost his "blonde" so it just seems the whole 
darn world is in a taking mood. Marie 
has been transferred to "Accounting," 
which may be "accounted" for by the 
fact the paycheck comes from that de- 
partment. So the question "Which do gen- 



LiBERGHF[LDCAFE 


Administration Building 
Lindbergh Field 

"The Home of Mviation" 


BREAKFAST SERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 



RENTER COMPANY, u. 

724 BROADWAY MAIN 4392 



CREDIT CLOTHIERS 



For Men 

Suits 

Topcoats 

Hats 

Shoes 

Furnishings 

Neckwear 



For Women 

Coats 

Dresses 

Shoes 

Lingerie 

Skirts and 

Blouses 



NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 

Pay as Little as 50c Weekly 



tlemen prefer most, "Blondes" or pay- 
checks?" 

Fishing occupied the chief diversion for 
many of the Cotnolidated lads during the 
month. But several of the smarter fellows 
like Kellogg, Shonberg, Stockton, Arnett, 
and myself preferred the cool and comfort 
of the "hideaway" and such places where 
you can fish for "two bits" with a beer 
chaser. Coykendall, Bender, Drake and Ed 
Lang were out after yellowtail and had 
some luck, but as usual the "big one" 
that Coykendall had on the hook got away 
after towing the boat some yards. Roy can 
tell you how much he weighed but I still 
don't believe there is such a fish. Maybe 
he hooked onto a U-boat by mistake. 

Glad to hear Joe Maloney 's wife is re- 
cuperating from an operation. Joe says 
"thanks to the Blue Print employees for 
the nice flowers." 

Lloyd Bender finally heeded the plea of 
some of the night crew and put them back 
to work during daylight hours. Gracie 
Koenig says there just 'ain't' no romance 
in the afternoon and is glad to get back 
on her former schedule. After being ac- 
customed to the night work she sat down 
where the chair should have been on one 
occasion — said Gracie, "That's the third 
time that's happened in my career." Louie 
Purcell, recently married, said he had a 
hard time convincing the wife that it was 
"secret Government work" he was doing 
nights to keep her from "going to mama." 
Bert Gimber claims he didn't mind the 
nights so much as he was planning on 
raising "goats" in his canyon during the 
day. Zolezzi was to give him a start with 
those "perfumery thoroughbreds" of his. 

Glenn Hotchkiss reports that the fishing 
trip to Mexico cost George Landy the end 
of a finger when he was scaring little 
girls with tin cans. George Wire knocked a 
hole in the oil pan of his car which is now 



Q U A L I T E E hours fresher 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

[s sure to please. 

Makes cool, nourishing 
main course salads! 




Consolidotor 

plugged with a rag. Bill Bates cast his 
reel in the lake and then himself. So the 
moral is — that fish are easier to get around 
the corner even if they be "dried herring." 

Del Brake, by not knowing his "bean 
patch," is being held responsible for the 
cost of an hour's ride by five Consolidated 
"buckaroos," Morty, Drissell, McHugh, 
Brady and Muck, who claim that they left 
it to "Lone Ranger" Drake to find the 
trail that he had marked with "bean 
patches." After being lost for hours Del 
msisted that the "patches" must have been 
moved due to the war situation or else the 
crows had et 'em. 

Those golf rules about "silence" don't 
mean much to Roy Coykendall after years 
of "talking it up" on the ball field and 
bowling alleys. So Roy "beats his gums" 
when the fellows tee off and boasts he is 
keeping the game pepped up. Liddle claims 
Roy's chatter cost him the beers as he 
trailed Lloyd Bender, Ray Hartmayer and 
Roy in after a recent afternoon's session. 

To give you a little of the month's hap- 
penings in what Butterfield would call 
"hillbilly" style we present the title of 
number one "Headline Crasher" to Kel 
Aiken, with his "perfect timing" or "dumb 
luck" when he appeared at press time with 
an "El Stinko" cigar and says "It's a boy. 
Did I make the Comolidator?" Wife and 
baby doing fine with Kel gradually get- 
ting accustomed to his new "Aiken." 
George Young is back again and has the 
Bench Dept. humming. Sends flowers to a 
couple of doctors that tried to keep him 
in bed after he heard Leo Bourden's Weld- 
ing Dept. was topping his production 
schedule — Dispatcher Macy hooked a tuna 
for a lady on the "Sportsfisher" and then 
"hooked" her for the 18 -buck jackpot. 



Tune in on "Lowe Highlights" — KGB, Tues. and Fri., 8 p.m. 




ASK FOR 

GENUINE 

^ CREAM 
ROOT BEER 



BOTTLE 



July, 1940 



23 



Be careful, girls, this guy might snatch 
your pocketbook — Bob Morse begged for 
parts so long that he cannot get accus- 
tomed to his new authority and keeps 
asking the foreman to do something, then 
yells, "Hey, I'm supposed to be telling you, 
not asking you." Jim Eisman still insists 
that Ben Keigle bought me off to keep 
from publishing a picture and story of that 
new home being built around the Keigle 
homestead. Ben claims the place is still 
attractive enough for Jim to pass up all 
the restaurants to arrive at his place at 
feeding time. Several of the younger 
"dandies" around the shop wonder why 
Alice Birse cannot serve the "Blue Print 
Wolves." Joe says there's a reason and un- 
less she adds a few inches or gets stilts she 
is useless around those high files, even if 
she did enjoy that "today I yam a big girl" 
birthday recently. McCall thought Mulroy 
wanted him to join the union when he 
said "Mac, get organized." "Supersales- 
man" Coykendall after finding that Tom 
Pitts could only get half his foot into 
those bowling shoes still insists that Tom's 
infant son will like to bowl when he grows 
up. We hear that Dispatcher Marks has 
been giving out "Boy Scout merit badges" 
to the foremen for good deeds in getting 
his parts out. Mulroy will probably be a 
"tenderfoot" before many moons. Bill 
Wiley claims that spreading his feet with 
so much dispatching and dancing is the 
cause of his stepping into so many "ga- 
boons." Says Bill, "The farthest I missed 
a "gaboon" lately was at the Grant during 
the fraternity convention. We have been 
wondering about the interpretation of 
"Smoothie" Dick Minnadue's remark 
about each new girl friend being "right on 
the beam." Sometimes a landing might be 



Own Your Home; 

Use your rent money to 
pay for a home. The small 
down payment starts you 
toward financial stability. 
Plan now for the years to 
come. Excellent homes in 
Bird Rocl<, South La Jolla 
and Pacific Beach. . . Fast 
hishway and bus service 
to Consolidated. 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



on the jaw. "It's the little things in life 
that tell," said Dan Clemson as he dragged 
the kid brother out from underneath the 
sofa. "Mac" McDougal was overheard at 
Nelson's Aircraft cafe, "I thought I saw 
soup on the menu." Waitress: "There was 
some but I wiped it off." Les Matusek 
leaves his girl friend's house when father 
tactfully strolls by carrying a box of 
breakfast food. Ed Generas turns down all 
Saturday engagements because, states Ed, 
"That's washday, and there sure are a lot 
of things to be cleaned up." Don Ras- 
mussen has been named night "contact 
man." Here's hoping he sticks to business 
for with those good-looking "femmes" 
around he might try and make something 



out of that title. No report on Al Bal- 
lards. Sheet Metal ball hawks encounter 
with the other undefeated team. Wood- 
shop, but we are certain they haven't 
"talked" Al out of the game. If the F.B.I. 
is looking for talent we suggest that Ed 
(Continued on next page) 

Phone F. 5932 



CLEANERS 
and DYERS 

We c ail /or 
and delii>er 



m^ 



j0lui 



INDIA ST. 
at KALMIA 



3977 
GOLDFINCH 



Where Customers Send Their Friends 

for QUALITY USED CARS 




PRICE WITHOUT QUALITY— QUALITY WITH CORRECT PRICE 

IS SELDOM A GOOD INVESTMENT MEANS YOUR LASTING SATISFACTION 

A Complete Assortment 

of all makes and models and sold with a finance charge as low as the lowest 

NOTE SAMPLE OFFERINGS BELOW 

39 Buick 46-C. Special series convertible 5- equipment; has just been refinished and interior 

passenger club coupe. Full de luxe equipment, is of spotless mohair; entire car has been thor- 

custom push button radio, clock, etc. Interior oughly checked for safety and complete cus- 

finished throughout in rich blue leather chrome tomer satisfaction $495 

trim and beading; original royal blue finish also 39 Buick 41, Special Series 4-door Touring 
trimmed in chrome. All new white side-wall first Sedan. This beautiful car is finished in Wash- 
line tires. Here is the king of all sport auto- jngton blue with chrome; equipped with all new 

mobiles at only $895 tires and has been thoroughly road-tested to 

37 Packard 120 de luxe 4-door touring sodon, guarantee complete satisfaction. Really a 

refinished a sparkling gunmetal with ivory beautiful car $825 

trim, all new Firestone tires; spotless interior 36 Oldsmobile 6 De Luxe Coupe. Here is just 

and has been thoroughly reconditioned to per- the cor for a salesman; has been refinished a 

fection by skilled mechanics in our own shops. beautiful golden brown; has all first line tires 

A real value $635 and in excellent mechanical condition. Spot- 

35 Oldsmobile 6 de luxe 4-door touring sedan. less interior $445 

To save space we will say this car has every- 36 Hupmobile 6 De Luxe 4-Door Touring Sedan, 

thing, radio, clock, heater, etc. Refinished a This is the model Hupp that made motoring 

rich golden brown, all new, first line tires and history; streamlined with a beautiful battleship 

upholstery positively cannot be told from new. grey finish and is in excellent mechanical con- 

For a modern car at low cost see this at. $395 dition $495 

37 Buick 81 Roadmaster Series. Refinished a 1939 Buick 41, 4-Door Touring Sedan — This 

beautiful opalescent blue with chrome trim. cor like many Buicks in our stock, was pur- 

This fine cor has the big 141-h.p. motor and chased new from us. We have serviced it and 

the long wheel base. Radio and full line of de have done all needed to offer the greatest 

luxe equipment, plus all new tires, makes this value possible. New U. S. tires $845 

cor a real value $695 37 Cadillac 8 — Model 75 Touring Sedan. A high 

37 Plymouth De Luxe Coupe. This is an excel- grade car in the best of condition. New tires, 

lent little car for anyone. Has been refinished a radio and extras $785 

sparkling royal blue; equipped with de luxe 38 Pontioc 8 — Business Coupe for power, corn- 
radio, foglite, etc. All first line tires and spot- fort and economy. See this neat coupe. Full 

less mohair upholstery $475 price $565 

37 Chevrolet Master De Luxe Sport Sedan. This 37 Buick 46C — Convertible Coupe. Just recon- 

is the 4-door trunk model with knee action, ditioned in our modern shop. New tires, radio 

turret top, hydraulic brakes and full de luxe and extras. Full price $685 

SEE THESE AND 75 OTHERS 

Robert D. Maxwell Co. 

BUICK DISTRIBUTOR 
Main 5011 SAN DIEGO Broadway at State 



24 



Consolidotor 



Hager and Russ Gaughen should inform 
them of Evelyn "Hawkshaw" Parkins 
work in tracking down those "fifth col- 
umnists" process cards. 

Owen Stockton who is sharing quar- 
ters with Frank McHugh is accusing the 
latter of "photographing" the ham on 
his sandwiches. 




• Richer, stronger blend 
— more cups in every 
pound! 

S. J. WINES COFFEE CO. 



SEE THE 1940 
INDIANS 

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE SALES GO. 

GUY UROUHART 
1041 Columbia St. San Diego 

Open Eveningt • Termt 



Bender, Sanville and Hibert evidently 
had a little explaining to do when they got 
home after the Rod and Reel club meeting 
and their "pickled smelt throwing act" 
which was in competition with Russ Kerns' 
entertaining pictures of "where he's been 
that I know darn well I'll never get." 

Rowan, Gerstmier and Perry of Tool 
Design say they don't mind helping Cline 
and Smeltzer along for a few days as their 
wives may go on a vacation, and the fav- 
ors can be repaid. 

The monicker J. C. Thompson which 
is attached to a Wing dispatcher, could be 
used to good advantage in getting parts 
through inspection provided "Chief Jack" 
didn't get wise. 

When I join the "mystic nights of the 
sea" I will notify Wiley, Willoughby, Seel- 
ey and Pasek that they will be "bounced" 
from our dances just as I was after "crash- 
ing" theirs. 

"Tell what you know about nitrates." 
"I don't know much about them, but 
they are cheaper than day rates." 

*-^ 

ANSWERS 

1. 20 miles. 

2. Consolidated'^ XPBY-5A 

3. 286. 

4. North Beach. 

5. $200,000,000. 

6. Northeast Air Base, Holyoke, Mass. 

7. Burble. 

Tess: "You can't believe everything 
you hear." 

Bess: "No; but you can repeat it." 



RETREAD TIRE SPECIAL 



FOR 



EXCH. 

ANY Passenger 
CAR SIZE 

Retreads or Recaps 



BUDGET 

IF YOU 
WISH 



QUALITY TIRE SALES CO< 



918 1st Ave., at E 



M.5654 



AASE (ACE) BROS. 

bring you the best in LUNCHES, SANDWICHES, COLD 
DRINKS and TOBACCO 

• 
3 LOCATIONS— Inside North and South Gates and in Back Center Yard 



TANK HIGHLIGHTS 

By Herthel Chappell 

California newcomers. Bob Summers, 
Don Short and James Darr came to work 
after Memorial Day with their lily-white 
skins dyed lobster red, due to over-ex- 
posure. It is excusable for newcomers, but 
imagine Bud Parson, veteran of the beach, 
being burned to a cinder. Will you never 
learn. Bud? 

Flash ! ! Did you know there is one 
amongst us who doesn't read the Consoli- 
dator? The reason, so he says, is because 
he can't find his name in it. Well, here it 
is, Tony Barone, will you become a regular 
reader now? 

More sleep or different hours is required 
by Benny Shourds. His girl friend works 
at night, and our sleepy boy has to wait 
until the wee hours of the morning before 
he can see her. She doesn't get off until 2 
a. m., and Benny has to take her home. 
A solution to your problem, Benny: go see 
the man who ties the knot. 

Jim Saftig has been seeing a lot of a 
certain young lady, and it is rumored that 
they might honeymoon at Catalina Island, 
providing his speed boat will carry them 
that far. By the way, fellows, do you know 
that Jim, our strapping, big athlete, has a 
new name? Mighty sweet, too. His one 
and only calls him "Baby." 

Can you believe it? A man who isn't 
interested in women or so he said. The 
man is Dante Rossello of the night shift. 
It could have been something in your eye, 
Rossello, but the fellows who were with 
you claim it was the girl crossing the 
street that caused you to smash into the 
back of another car, knocking the bump- 
ers off. Chip in fellows, let's buy Dante 
some blinders before he gets into trouble. 



FIV Over th 
On 

HHRIEV- 


e Highways 
a 1940 

DHUIDSOn 


M 


fe 


^^ 


^^ 


W. J. 

929 India Street 


RUHLE 

San Diego 


Write for Catalog 
Open to 8 p. m. Termi 



Announcing — the arrival of Mary Ann 
on May 16th, weighing 5 pounds, 7 
ounces. Proud parents are Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Backhaus. You're late with the cigars, 
Ernie. 

Do you know: That Dante Rossello, 
Williams, Hoover and Sparks are seen in 
Tijuana every Friday and Saturday night? 
Maybe that is why they are sleepy and 
broke every Monday morning . . . That 
Ted Schwarz, Duke Counnahan, Jule and 
Ziggy Turoski were out celebrating until 
five o'clock in the morning? The big oc- 
casion — the Turoski brothers finally kicked 
loose and bought themselves a car. Can 



CONVENIENT 
WAY 



TODD'S 

Complete Men's Store 

Give Liberal Credit to 
Workers in the "Consolidated" 



SEE THESE VALUES* $10 SAVINGS 

Guaranteed 



$12.50 Value Sport [oats 7.95 
Pants and Slacks \ 2.95 

< and 

4.95 



$6.95 Value 



Choice Selection of 

2 -Punt Suits 
22.50 18.50 and M5 



. Home oj ADAM HATS 



lODD'S 

Complete Clothing Bldg. 

Cor. 5th & E St. 



you beat it? . . . That Bud Parsons, you 
know, the killer diller of Mission Beach 
ballroom, was seen wandering around the 
beach Sunday, June 2nd, all by his lone- 
some? What's the matter. Bud, have you 
joined the "Lonely Hearts Club?" . . . That 
Jimmy Allen and the Mrs. were out strol- 
ling around Mission Beach — Jim was 
dressed a la Hollywood. Wow! What a 
pretty suit! . . . That Bob Summers was 
spotted at Mission Beach with five girls 
clustered about him? What does Bob have 
that we lack? 

vgi 

Pilots of the western division of T.W.A., 
Los Angeles to Albuquerque, became the 
most experienced group of pilots in the 
world recently. They reached the 20,- 
000, 000-mile mark and were honored by 
company officials on the final day of Air 
Progress Week. 

The three top men in flying experience 
were Eddie Bellande with 2,3 52,000 miles; 
Jack Walsh, 2,170,000; and H. H. Hollo- 
way, 2,240,000. 

The airline has been flying between the 
east and Los Angeles since May, 1929, 
and most of the men received all of their 
flying time on this route in the last 10 
years. 

Elsie: "What kind of husband would 
you advise me to get, Grandma?" 

Grandma: "You just leave husbands 
alone and get you a single man." 

Ironically, Juan de la Cierva, inventor 
of the Autogyro, was killed in a crash of 
a conventional plane. . . . 



Jl eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

Phone Main 5114 

^onlidDiBtollim 

'JJtou^htlut Snnct" 
FOURTH It CLtn 



The Best 
news 



IN MANY DAYS 



While other manufac- 
turers are raising prices on 
their new cars, Ford Motor 
Co. has reduced. 

The Big 
85-H. P. 
[Dupe 

fully equipped and 

delivered in San Diego 

for only 



$799 



00 



See and Drive It 
Today 



HILTOn 

motor Co. 

12D2 Broaduiav 



SEARS 




Paint Sprayer 

Includes Gun and Hose 



975 



2.50 
DOWN 
Easy Terms 



Small lightweight (only 8-lbs) . . . 
easy to handle! Developed lor every- 
day use for jobs around home, garage 
or shop. For HO volt. 



Smart Mechanics Know That Sears Is Headquarters 
for Dependable Tools at Money Saving Prices!!! 




Comb. Square 
98c 

Adjustable head 
complete with level 
and scriber. 



Hack Saw 
1.29 

Extra rigid frame 
for all around shop 
use. 




Tool Box 
1.19 

Spill proof tool box 
with cantilever tray. 



Swivel Vise 
2.29 



Vise w^ith 
steel jaws, 
base. 



3-inch 
swivel 




Screwdriver 
1.29 

Automatic screw- 
driver complete with 
bit. 




Tin Snips 
79c 

Heavy quality tin 
snips for years of 
service. 




Chisel Set 
1.19 

Five piece set, 
Craftsman quality, 
guaranteed. 




Wrench Set 
1.29 

5 "C raftsman" 
wrenches, open 
end. Guaranteed. 



SEARS, ROEBUCK and CO. 



Sixth Ave. and "C" Street 



Franklin 6571 






















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ou^ 





Five Ocean Rafts of logs moored in San Diego Harbor, containing 30 Million board 
feet of lumber to be manufactured at our Mill in San Diego. Width, 52 feet; Length, 
1000 feet; Contents, 6 million feet; Binding chains, 200 tons; Depth below water, 24 
feet; Height above water, 12 feet; Towed 1000 miles from Oregon. 

• That Benson Lumber Company owns and operates the only saw- 

mill in Southern California? 

• That Our aniiual payroll of |250,00O.0O is spent right here in San 

Diego, and that our annual taxes of $120,000.00 are a great 
benefit to the City of San Diego ? 

• That San Diego's "Heaven on Earth" climate is IDEAL for air- 

drying lumber, conceded by government authorities to be the 
best method of drying lumber ? 

• That San Diego homes are protected from termites by pressure 

treated lumber produced locally only by our company? 

• That Financing service is available through the loan and escrow de- 

partment of this 33 year old company ? 

• That visitors are welcome to see the lumber mill in action ? 



The Pick of The Trees 



BENSON LUMBER CO. 








GUBA SCORES AGAIN . . . (see inside fronf cover) 



AUGUST '1940 



GUBA SCORES AGAIN 

RICHARD ARCHBOLD'S twin en- 
gined Consolidated Model 28, the 
"Guba," has scored again in a non-stop, 
transcontinental hop from San Diego to 
New York. Taking off at 1:55 p. m. on 
July 10, the world-girdling and record- 
breaking flying boat made the non-stop 
flight in 1 5 hours and 3 5 minutes, clip- 
ping a half hour from the time held for 
this same distance by the first Guba. 

Aboard as members of her crew were: 
Russell Rogers, chief pilot; Douglas Kel- 
ley, co-pilot; Stephen Barrinka, flight en- 
gineer; Harold Ramm, radioman, and 
Hector Nicholson, assistant flight engi- 
neer. 

Carried aboard the Guba on its dash 
across the continent, was a message of 
greeting from Mayor P J. Benbough to 
Mayor Fiorella LaGuardia of New York, 
which read: 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

It gives me great happiness to take 
this occasion to send greetings to you, 
the mayor of the world's greatest city, 
from the city which encompasses the 
largest naval base on the Pacific coast. 
The records held by the "Guba," 
and the remarkable flights made by 
the navy long-range patrol boats, of 
which the "Guba" is a counterpart. 



not only testify to the splendid ships 
flown by the navy but demonstrate 
how these "flying battleships" could 
span a great continent in a few hours 
to confound an enemy on either coast 
should the need arise. 

It is my hope that this flight of 
Richard Archbold's famous ship will 
do its share to convince Americans 
that many more such flying boats, as 
well as additional military and naval 
equipment provide the safest way to 
preserve our democracy. 

(Signed) P. J. Benbough. 

The Guba, by way of recalling some of 
its achievements, was the first airplane to 



be flown around the world at its greatest 
diameter. First flying boat ever to fly 
around the world, holder of the longest 
flying boat over-ocean, non-stop flight 
record (from Dakar, Africa, to St. 
Thomas, Virgin Islands). First airplane 
to cross the Indian Ocean (the last re- 
maining ocean to be conquered by air) , 
and the first flying boat to cross Africa. 

Another good thing about telling the 
truth is that you don't have to remember 
what you said. 

If you brood over your troubles, you'll 
have a perfect hatch. 



^^Taxi^^ over to 

SAFEWAY and fill up 
your " Galley ^^ with 

Better Foods 

for Less 



MADE FOR PUNISHMENT/ 




QUESTION "What do you mean, 'RPM' 
is made for punishment?" 

ANSWER The blistering temperatures 
that modern motors whip up are so ter- 
rific—that "weak-sister" oils can't "take 
it." They just don't last— and they de- 
posit the carbon, sludge and varnish that 




play mischief with a motor's delicately 
adjusted "insides." But "RPM" keeps 
your motor free from these harmful de- 
posits. And you can't beat it for mileage ! 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 



AMERICA'S PREMIER MOTOR OIL • 250 A QUART 



CONSOIID 




OR 



Volume 5 



August, 1940 



Number 8 



MUSIC NOTES BY THE MAESTRO 

AND A GOOD TIME WAS HAD BY 
ALL— 

On Tuesday evening, July 9, the Con- 
solidated Orchestra was honored by an 
informal visit at rehearsal by the follow- 
ing executives, their families and friends: 
Major and Mrs. Fleet, Mr. and Mrs. Gott 
and daughter Stephanie, Charles Leigh, 
Mr. and Mrs. James Kelley and daughters 
Jacqueline and Susanne, Mr. and Mrs. 
"William Shanahan, Mr. and Mrs. Ingold, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morse and many 
friends, wives and sweethearts of the mu- 
sicians. 

With apologies to the movie magnates, 
"stupendous," "colossal," "magnanimous," 
were mild terms compared to the com- 
ments made by all those attending — in 
fact, Major Fleet asked for several repeats 
of "Stars and Stripes Forever" and "An- 
chors Aweigh." 

There will be another occasion very 
soon for the boys to show what they can 
do, for the benefit of all factory em- 
ployees. A notice of the definite date will 
be posted on the clocks. 

The following men comprise this Con- 
solidated orchestra, those wishing to join 
may contact any member. 



Famme, J. H. 
Minella, A. 
Abels, R. M. 
Tall. Nathan 
Brown, J. R. 
Williams, R. 
DeRimcr, Wm. 
Ernst, John 
Warren, F. 
Sweet, A. E. 
Bonderson, A. 
Newell, D. 
Hamlin, J. 



Williams, C. 
Wells, M. J. 
Woerner, A. 
North, J. D. 
Solomon, S. 
Creason, J. L 
Foley, J. 
Boerste, A. 
King, L. C. 
Lazzelle, H. 
Harnack, G 
Dawson, Bil 
Peery, Bill 



H. 



Culver, W. R. 
Copsey, K. B. 
Hunter, C. E. 
Bunker, W. E. 
Carson, Otis 
Moody, Don 
Paschall, S. 
Pease, R. C. 
Davis, T. S. 
Choate, A. K. 
Nobel, B. W, 



E. G. Borgens, Director. 



Cupid's efforts will culminate August 
3rd when Lena Wagoner and John J. 
Melega became united. Congratulations 
and best wishes. 



V9i 



A wise man discovers where he is wrong 
— a fool proves he is right. 



SAVINGS PLAN 

WE have arranged with the main of- 
fice of the Bank of America, 615 
Broadway, San Diego, Cahfornia, to open 
what is known as Industrial Allotment 
Accounts which are in reality savings ac- 
counts for employees. 

Each employee can make a weekly or 
semi-monthly allotment of his wages and 
the company will deposit the amount al- 
lotted to the credit of his account with 
the bank. 

Statements showing the amounts on de- 
posit will be sent to each employee as of 
July 31 and January 31. Interest will be 
credited semi-annually at prevailing in- 
terest rate. 

Withdrawals from these Industrial Al- 
lotment Accounts can be made in the 
same manner as you would withdraw 
funds from a regular savings account. If 
more than one withdrawal is made during 
any interest period, the employee forfeits 
the interest for that period. 

Applications to open Industrial Allot- 
ment Accounts can be obtained from the 
cashier in the accounting office after work- 
ing hours. 

These Industrial Allotment Accounts 
should not be confused with Christmas 
Savings Funds. 

Deposits can be discontinued at any 
time the employee wishes. 

We arranged this plan in order to pro- 
vide some means for the employees to save 
the extra compensation they are now re- 
ceiving for overtime work. 

Benny Kell, Hull leadman, was also 
pretty excited last month, for the stork 
stopped by the Kell household and left a 
baby girl. "It looks exactly like our first 
little girl," said Mrs. Kell with a smile. 
"Yeah," said Benny, "one a year for five 
years and I'll have Cantor beat." 

Our barber looked at a young man's 
sleek hair and asked if he wanted it cut, 
or just the oil changed. 



I wish to take this opportunity of wel- 
coming into and introducing to the Con- 
wlidator family my new assistant, Ralph 
A. Smith. Being a star athlete and inter- 
ested in clean, wholesome sports himself, 
we will now be able to promote enough of 
different events to keep everyone inter- 
ested. If you have a sport you would like 
to enter, please send your request, name 
and clock number to the Welfare Depart- 
ment and we will endeavor to supply the 
amusement you ask for. 

Your suggestion may promote some- 
thing good help us help you. 

W. C. Gilchrist, Welfare Director. 

Born to Mrs. and Mr. Willard Fink of 
Draw Bench, a son, Wayne Henry Fink. 
Young Wayne Fink checked in at 8 
pounds 2 ounces on Saturday, July 13, 
and all are reported doing nicely. Master 
Wayne Henry Fink is also the grandson 
of Henry Fink, plant electrical mainte- 
nance foreman, mentioned elsewhere in 
this issue. 

FASTEST IN THE WORLD 

There may have been some argument 
as to which one of the powered scooters 
used to get around the plant is the fast- 
est, but George Newman's certainly trav- 
eled the distance from the south fence to 
the north in the shortest time. This was 
an elapsed time of about six seconds! 
Which is about the time it takes to dial 
an interoffice phone! 

Believe it or not, this is a fact recorded 
by several witnesses. The scooter was 
stowed aboard the XB-24 for possible use 
at the terminus of one of the plane's 
flights and, according to the official Army 
statement the XB-24 includes " a speed 
of over 300 miles per hour" and our 
plant is approximately one-half mile long. 
This probably has set an all-time record 
for scooter speed over the plant yard. 

Weighing in at 6Vz pounds, James 
Robert Chess, 2nd, entered this ring to 
delight the hearts of his parents June 1 5 th. 



All communications should be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in port, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Materiel may not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., San Diego, Califomio 



Consolidator 



FACTS ABOUT THE FEMMES 

HAZEL BRINK of the Production 
Department and Fred Robertson of 
the Paint Shop were married in Yuma on 
Thursday, July 4th. Their picture is on 
page 18. They were accompanied by Lois 
Campbell, Frank Buzzelli and Mr. and Mrs. 
Al Griflith. Congratulations! Mary Elea- 
nor is once again a beach resident, having 
rented a cottage in Old Mission Beach 
with several friends. At present she is 
sunburned beyond repair. Marcella is 
another femme seen frequently at the 
beach and she looks plenty nice in her 
Hawaiian playsuit. Ruth Sears is also a 
beach addict and proves it by living there 
the year 'round. Alice Birse lives near the 
beach and spends her week-ends in the 
mountains. Avis Clarke talks often with 
her brother in Waco, Texas, via radio. 
Her brother has a short wave radio set and 
he contacts local short wave owners who 
phone Avis to come over and join in the 
conversation. This sounds like a pleasant 
way to spend an evening and no enor- 
mous telephone bill to worry about. Bea 
Jackson's "old faithful" Nylon hose final- 
ly went the way of all silk stockings. But 
they lasted through eight weeks of daily 
wear — washed every night, of course — 
and that is a record for silk hose. The 
girls all send regards to Eva Wiseman and 
hope she will be back soon. We've de- 
cided one of the best arguments against 
working on Saturdays is that it is "just 
another day to think of something to 
wear." And then there's the old one about 
the little calf who walked up to the silo 
and said, "Is my fodder in there?" 






Any amount * 
opens your "San 
Diego Federal 

Sav- 

* 




ROD AND REEL NEWS 

By "Brad" BraJshaic- 

THE Rod and Reel Club not only 
"rolled out the barrel", but finished 
up several of them, and coupled it up with 
some fancy "shindigging", eating and 
singing at their annual dance. There was 
free beer and eats so they lost money on 
"Dutch" Kline, Al Leonard, Louie Pur- 
cell and others, but the absence of Jack 
Mulroy and Harvey Muck helped to "bal- 
ance the budget." Had a little "dirt" on 
Frank Popp but the gal he was "spooning" 
turned out to be his wife of 20 years. 
Glenn Hotchkiss always thinking of work, 
hung a few "O.K. to rivet" and "re- 
jected" tags on some deserving guests. 
Tom Couglin produced the "chatter" and 
did a swell job. The only guys who got out 
of line were Ralph Way and Tom But- 
terfield who were caught "red handed" 
dancing with their oii'» wives. Roy Coy- 
kendall, Ronnie Miller, and Walter Byer 
were very prominent in "supervising and 
processing" things while they were able 
and Mrs. "C." did a good job as "matron." 
The most inactive man off the dance floor 
was Lloyd Bender who had charge of the 
"soda pop" distribution but made up for 
some of it by "cutting a rug" to the music 



of that "ivory pounder" Bill Hartford and 
his band. Del Drake, after finishing off 
his fourth bottle of "Ne Hi" boasted that 
next year "He yam a man" and will de- 
mand a corresponding drink. Mr. "G." 
Bert Gimber to you less familiar people, 
had his pants fastened with rubber bands 
which was not a bad idea with his need 
for expansion. 



■ liV Over the Highways 
On a 1940 

HHRLEV-DnUIDSOn 




W. J. RUHLE 

929 India Street San Diego 

Write For Catalog 
Open to 8 p. m. Terms 



ROY HEGG, President 



INVEST WITH "SAN DIEGO FEDERAL 




Give HER the thrill of owning a truly fine betrothal 
set from Jessop's. Sets come in white, natural 
and coral gold and p'atinum and range in price from 



$ 



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75 



up. 



The convenience of special credit terms is extended 
to "Consolidators." 



August, 1940 



"MACHINE OIL" 

By Al Pfeiffcr 

PRIZE of the month goes to Johnny 
Worobec for his splendid drill tem- 
plate. It was so good that the boys made 
a medal of it and presented it to him with 
due ceremony. 

Did anyone ever see a more beautiful 
colored optic than Crenshaw sported for 
a couple of weeks? Confidentially, he ad- 
mits that he talked when he should have 
been listening. 

If you've been to Ocean Beach lately 
and seen the girls grouped in circles lalk- 
ing earnestly on some topic unknown to 
you, here's the lowdown: It's that 4 pass. 
Packard convertible coupe in deep maroon 
with leadman John Howard at the wheel. 
My what a pick-up! 

Survivals and late arrivals practically 
describes Owen Gandee's situation a few 
Saturdays ago. Those "angels" in the 
Sky (room) might have at least dropped 
him to earth early enough for work. Par- 
ticularly when it's overtime you are being 
paid for. 

At the local Goodwill establishment, 
what big little man earned for himself 
the sobriquet of "Pop"? 

Story of the month: It seems that one of 
our boys decided that a motorcycle would 
solve his problem of transportation. After 



FORD HOTEL 




^^ SHOWER BATHS 
1^^^ Rates S4 up perWIc 


A^B 


mm I 


! Close to Consolidated, 
"^ Business, Shopping and 
« Theatrical Districts 




iH^BKcS^ W. B. BASSLER, Prop. 


~^ "-"' J fn. 2207 -1135 THIRD AVE. 



BEHIND THESE DOORS 

SERVICE AND ECONOMY 




SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINT HEADQUARTERS 

PRiriT- lunLLPnPER 
BroadLuay et Tenth 



taking possession of aforesaid vehicle, came 
the question of getting it home. His wife 
readily agreed to drive the car so that left 
the cycle for our hero. For several miles 
he sped along with the ease and daring of 
a veteran. Then suddenly without warning 
he came a cropper and his beautiful wife 
just about ran over him. That sure put him 
in stitches, but it is not as ludicrous as it 
appears, take it from Howard Cooper. 

Ivan, the terrible, of the grim grimace 
is caricatured by Fred Hudson since he 
grew that new mustache. Says Fred: "It 
adds dignity and may even scare some of 
the new hands into drilling holes cor- 
rectly. 

Note to the boys on the third shift: If 
at any time you should fail to attract the 
attention of a certain leadman and if you 
don't like the name Paul Peter, just call 
for "Pappy." Results are guaranteed. 

Norm Kissel is aptly described as the 
little man with the mustache, felt hat and 
brown overcoat. When asked how he 
stands all the heat in his regalia. Norm 
politely replied that — the thought of all 
those poor orphans over in Europe makes 
him cold all over and he added: "It feels 
so good when I take them off." 

Every shop has at least one, but Bob 
Williams' brigade includes not one, but 
two, Wielopolskis. Only time will tell 
whether we are blessed or not. 

The ordinary person wouldn't believe it 
but Charlie St. John is really attached to 
that small Brown & Sharpe turret lathe. 
Can't be separated from it in fact. 

Fish can't abound like the fish stories 
we've heard lately in the Machine Shop. 
Dick Schwartz's arms are getting so long 
from telling those yarns and patting him- 
self on the back that something will have 
to be done about it. It would be terrible 
to have him report to first aid and say 
that he stepped on his hand. 

Going to the other extreme, can anyone 
imagine a handsome fellow like M. Bur- 
dette Thompson refusing to dance with a 
beautiful girl just because he didn't wear 
his Sunday suit. 

Crist Gonzales will make no more trips 
southward. His last visit south of the 
border almost resulted in a permanent set- 
tlement. 



WHERE TO LIVE? 

Apartments, Court,<i, Duplexes, Houses 
$20 - We Coi'er the City - $200 

NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 

C APT. E, FRIEDRICK, U.S.N. Retd. 
Main 1014 234 C Street 

SALES • RENTALS • BUILDING 




c?A£/&«A&cfSTVL€S 

on Yx^nneit^- 




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Your employment with Consoli- 
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on our preferred customer list. 
Choose the clothes you need 
and just say "Charge it." Enjoy 
Bennett's values. 

Save 

25% 

on FUR 

COATS 

and Jackets 
Pay $250 Weekly 

Now, during our ANNUAL 

AUGUST FUR SALE. 

Advance styles In popular Furs. 
Every Fur Coat or Jacket fully 
guaranteed for One Year. No 
Interest or extras. 

No Down Payment 
Most Liberal Credit 
Terms in San Diego 




425 BROADWAY 



Consolidotor 



FURMBILT 



A DEPENDABLE STORE 

You'll like these clothes 
— and the values, too! 




«o 



^dUlLS All One Price 



O'coats & Tuxedos, too! 



SEE OUR 
SPORTS COATS & SLACKS! 



COMPLETE FURNISHINGS 
SHOE & HAT DEPTS. 



Use Our Budget Plan 

Here's a plan to weor as you 
poy; for the man who thinks 
about what he gets tor his money 
. . . not just how long can I 
have ... to pay. We'll give 
you 30, 60 or 90 days and 
Cosh-Value clothes. 



FURMBILT 



A COMPLETE STORE FOR MEN 



.4th & BVay. 

SAN DIEGO 




H 



STEPPING AHEAD . . . 

Effective July 16th, on the resignation 
of Don Frye, J. H. Waterbury became 
Personnel Director of Catnolidated Air- 
craft Corporation. 

"Bud" Waterbury, as he is known to 
his many friends in and out of the plant, 
was born in Buffalo where he attended the 
city schools and a prep school. He fol- 
lowed this phase of his education with some 
additional training in the University of 
Buffalo evening session. 

On December 9, 1929, Waterbury 
started to work for Consolidated as a 
Timekeeper and Clerk for Mr. J. L. Kelley, 
who was then Factory Superintendent. 
During the next two years he attended 
evening classes in ground school instruc- 
tion, and the construction, operation, and 
maintenance of aircraft. Shortly after 
"Bud" moved to San Diego with Consoli- 
dated, he was made assistant to Mr. 
Kelley, who was then made Factory 
Manager, and he worked in that capacity 
until November, 1939, when he was trans- 
fered to the Personnel Department to be- 
come Assistant Personnel Director. 

At present, in addition to his duties as 
Personnel Director, Bud is an active mem- 
ber of the Aero Club of San Diego, and 
Treasurer of the San Diego Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce. His chief diversions are 
sailing and shooting. 



DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

~Vj optometrist »^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

By Ernie Hodgson 

ARRY WALTER is back, full of 
"vim and vigor" after his vacation 
during which he visited the redwood for- 
ests and two huge saw-mills. His itinerary 
also covered a visit to the Howard racing 
stables at Willets, the home of the fam- 
ous "Seabiscuit." 

At Kearny Mesa June 30, our Al Young 
placed sixth in the gas model plane meet 
of the "Aeroneers." 

When some of the boys went fishing the 
other week-end, Frank Mische took along 
his new camera. He apparently took a 
fine bunch of pictures — except that he 
never noticed the shutter was set for time 
exposure, result nil. 

Tommy Bell and Art Younghusband 
sped home Friday, July 12. Apparently 
the wood surrounding their homes was 
afire. Fortunately, the wind veered enough 
to prevent the destruction of "Suncrest." 
Younghusband, who by the way, was 
recently elected mayor of the village, stated 
that the fire was too close for comfort. 

The Wood Shop No. 1 softball team has 
high hopes of winning the pennant this 
season. Up 'till now they have won 10 
and lost 1. You should hear what they 
say about Frank Mische as an umpire. 
NIGHTS 

After a long silence, the gang on nights 
in the Wood Shop has decided to let the 
world know of their existence. It is evi- 
dent that wars and rumors of wars are 
only of secondary importance to these 
lads, cars and more cars being the first 
subject of interest. 

The new and used car dealers seem to 
have cornered the boys soon after the 48- 
hour week was announced, for we hear of 
the wonders of the following: 

Milt Stuart sports a new Chewy, Jones 
an Oldsmobile, Mr. Pitts (leadman, 3rd 
shift) a new Chrysler. As usual, however, 
Ford heads the list. Bill Thomas has a 
Mercury and one of those new Super-de- 
luxe trailer homes to follow it around. Ed 
Lindblad, Carl Vogt and Amel Tideman 
all followed suit. 

Miss Martha Louise Seigler took Lee 



Mission 


Hills Beauty and 




Barber Shop 


^ 


Personal Service for 


V - J 


the entire family « « 




GIVE US A TRIAL 


J-9576 


812 W. Washington 



August 1940 



Eggers for better or worse on April 19. 
Our wishes say better and better. 

Betty Jane Kemp and Chalmers Bay- 
less also traded single blessedness for 
matrimonial bliss on June 29 . . . may 
it be endless. 

Quite a few of the boys from Wood 
Shop, including Bill Hardwick of night 
shift, will leave for camp with the Na- 
tional Guard August 4 to 24. 

TOOL ROOM. SECOND SHIFT 

By V. Hill 

When the Tool Room and Machine 
Shop tangled in a Softball game the fur 
flew — and a little skin along with it. In 
their last game there was a number of 
casualties, in fact few of the players 
escaped without some bruises. The catch- 
ers had a very bad day. Duncan of Ma- 
chine Shop suffered a dislocated adam's 
apple and Saulfield of Tool Room a broken 
nose and badly bruised face; neither 
catcher had a mask. A collection was 
taken up in the Tool Room to buy a 
catcher's mask and help pay the doctor 
bill of their catcher and in no time at all 
about $9.00 was raised. Everyone gave, 
thanks to Howard Daw, the "collector- 
upper." Saulfield says thanks a million 
to all who gave and he is very proud of 
his new catcher's mask. 

The second shift Tool Room won their 
first game of the second half softball sched- 
ule from an improved Tank team. Speed, 
our pitcher, allowed only two hits. The 
other teams in the league were warned to 
watch out for the Tool Room as we have 
strengthened considerably and Howard 
Paw is retiring from active playing duty 
and devoting all his time to managing the 
team. The Tool Room has a few loyal 
rooters who come out to every game and 
pull for them, win, lose or draw, and it 
helps the team a lot. Let's have more 
Tool Room men and their families out to 
these games. The games are all on Tues- 
day this last half and it doesn't cost a 
thing to get in. The team will be look- 
ing for you at the games, so come on out. 




LEAVING ... 

It was with a feeling of deep regret 
that Don Frye's many friends received 
word of his resignation effective July 15, 
1940. On the eve of his fifth anniversary 
with the Consolidated Aircraft Corpora- 
tion, Don has announced his intent to en- 
ter the aircraft manufacturing business 
for himself. 

This country has satisfied its need for 
a good 5 c cigar, but there is still a strong 
need for a good low priced airplane, so 
Don feels, and it is in this direction that 
he plans to direct his efforts. He intends 
to build and fly his first ship in Kansas 
City; definite plans of his manufacturing 
program being withheld until later in the 
year. 

Don has had a varied career in aircraft, 
beginning as he did at the age of fifteen 
years as one of the youngest licensed pilots 
of that time, barnstorming with a flying 
circus, air mail pilot, and later in various 
positions with Douglas Aircraft and Con- 
solidated Aircraft Corporations. 

Our best wishes go with you Don, and 
our sincere hopes that all your troubles 
will be small ones. 

Vision — the driving force that impels 
every great organization. 




UniUERSITV 
mOTORS 

Ford* Mercury • Lincoln-Zephyr 

Guaranteed Used Cars 
J.3141 1276 University HlimeJ.9340 



A. J. Edwards says 

"Give a man 
a car he can 
DRIVE!" 



FHA Loans 

To Build a New Home — For Repairs or 
Modernization 

Call Jackson 5171 for Information 

Klicka Lumber Co. 

30th St., just north of Univ. J-5171 



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Contolidotor 




SMOOTH 'EM OUT 

FLY • THE ■ C0N5AIR • CLUB ■ WAY 

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San Diego, California 



CONSAIR FLYERS CLUB, INC., 
NEWS . . . 

By Barney Farley 

AFTER scarcely two months of oper- 
. ations, Consair Flyers Club is be- 
ginning to show definite results as mem- 
bers are obtaining their C.A.A. ratings. 
Orv Hubbard recently became the proud 
possessor of a commercial pilot license, 
Miles Blaine passed tests for a private 
license, and Elwood David and Steve 
Brown are progressing towards that first 
goal. 

A news item which should be of much 
interest is our recent incorporation. This 
item makes Consair Flyers not only an 
excellent club to obtain flight training, 
but lets one know that its prospects have 
been looked into and sanctioned by the 
State of California. This should ease the 



EXCLUSIVE 



SIXTH, M^B STREETS 
FRANKLIN 523 3 



Give sweet romance f 
A real good chance • 

SEND FLOWERS 



MAKE SAVING A HABIT 

• ALL of us have heard the statement 
that one of the hardest things in life 
is to save the first one hundred dollars. 
Records of the FIRST NATIONAL reveal 
many savings accounts that were opened 
with only a few dollars and have since 
grown far beyond that first difficult goal. 
There is a great satisfaction in saving 
money systematically. As the account 
grows, so does your enthusiasm for saving. 
Why not open an account today? 



First National 

Savings KailK. 



minds of those who might be a bit jittery 
about "those flying clubs." The work of 
Maxine Hubbard in taking care of the 
legal details of this matter is appreciated 
by all members. 

A member who is reported to be burn- 
ing up the air is Elwood David who is 
very determined to obtain his rating. 

Due to an increased demand for low 
cost flying, we have decided to expand 
our organization, adding a larger and 
speedier ship to our fleet. This ship will 
be a new three-place Cub Cruiser, believed 
by all to be the last word in light air- 
craft (has a 2S rating, by the way) . Its 
fast cruising speed matches it against 
much heavier ships. 

GLIDING AND SOARING 

By Vic Korski 

On the second Friday in July the San 
Diego group of the Associated Glider Clubs 
of Southern California held their regular 
monthly meeting. In the business of the 
meeting there was an open discussion on 
the possibilities of obtaining a single-place 
ship for solo pilot training. There are now 
enough students and pilots, such as Harry 
Comer (tool room), who are qualified to 
accept the advancement. Josh Wilbur 
(lofting) and Ray Parker (model shop) 
tried to convince treasurer Jerry Littrell 
(Inspection) the necessity of such a sail- 
plane. 

The latter part of the meeting was de- 
voted to the narration of experiences flying 
in the Southwestern Gliding and Soaring 
Meet. Dick Essery displayed and explained 
the group of barograph tracings that he 
collected. Probably the most interesting 
of these was the trip of 123 air miles from 
Wichita Falls to Dallas Texas, on which 
I had the good fortune to be along. The 
greatest altitude reached was approxi- 
mately 3000 feet and there were times 
when the ship was within 600 feet of the 
ground. A haze hung about four thousand 
feet with the sun breaking through occa- 
sionally creating weak thermal action. It 
was by fighting tooth and nail that goal 
was made. 



ESTABLISHED 

IN SAN OrEGO 

18 8 3 



^BruncheH at 30lh and Univ* 

Fuirmutinl and Dnivernily - (-oronado - La Mesa'A' 



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H0USES~$135 

Down, $23 Mo., 2 bedrooms, spic 
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C. K. JOHNSON & SON 

James Hervey Johnson, Mgr. 

927 . 9th F. 7365 

Open Evenings, S unday 

Pacific Beach Branch and Above Model Home 

1025 Garnet Ave., Pacific Beach - (Open Sun.) 



August, 1940 



DANCING CLASSES 

Summer Schedule In All 

TYPES OF DANCING »n<i 

ACADEMIC TUTORING 

START JUNE 17th 

ENROLL NOWl 

DATI ICC STUDIOS 

llM I LIrr HOe Broadway 
Phone F 1197 /or information 




San Diego's B EST 

Place to . . . 

DANCE 

• Grand Music I every wed., fri., 

• Largest Floor I sat.&sun.nites 

RATLIFPS 

Broadway at 11th 



JL eople who receive 
moderate salaries will 
find BonhamBrothers 
"Economy Service" 
completely satisfying. 

Phone Main 5114 

'^Jlou^Mlfut Svufic*" 
FOURTH at Cim 



FOR A "BETTER" DEAL 



s 



ARON 

OONER 



DIAMONDS 
WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE 
RADIOS 

SHROn* CREDIT JEWELER 

3820 FIFTH AVE. Near University 

"CLOSE TO YOUR HOME" 



TOOL ROOM 

By Vat Faxton 

Charlie Tailer, tool room foreman, has 
now moved into his recently completed 
home in the La Mesa Heights District. 

Robbie Robinson and Elmer Boslick 
have quite a time rescuing Herman 
Laesher's fish pole as Herman continually 
deserts his line to head for the galley to 
"take on" food. We understand Plympton 
and Harry Dillen were doing some fancy 
fishing from the sundeck. 

Frank Delaney finally had to break 
down and buy a new badge. 

There is a story about Nuvak's check- 
ered pants but we can't get the low down 
as yet. 

Bob Atchinson has been transferred into 
tool design . . . congrats and best wishes 
in your new job, Bob. 

Herb Daley chisled on fellow clerk Vin- 
sel while he was gone but all is now well. 
Herb just made up with his old girl friend 
— he hopes. 

Karsten asked Fisher to remove his shop 
coat on account of the heat, but Fisher 
said "nothing doing" until Bob Lamont 
takes off his sweater. 

Travis H. Allen, San Diego, was mar- 
ried to Lana Fife, Corona, California, cli- 
maxing a six months' engagement. The 
ceremony was performed at the home of 
the bride's parents in Corona. Good luck, 
Travis and Lana! 

This is the first Tool Room news in 
quite a time, so we hope this first effort 
will start the ball rolling toward a regu- 
lar Tool Room column. 

"There are two things in life which no 
one can take away from you, which no 
reverse of fortune can destroy: That which 
a man puts into his brain — knowledge, 
and into his hand — skill." Whoever wrote 
that many years ago certainly must have 
had visions about the airplane industry, 
and of course our metal bench depart- 
ment. To this might be added something 
about the wonderful cooperation the old- 
timers have shown us newcomers. I know 
I speak with the fullest consent of the 
rest of the new men when I say, "Thanks 
for showing us the ropes." — A. A. Reich. 



CLEANERS 
and DYERS 

We call for 
and deliver 



m"^ 



Phone F. 5932 



10^ 



INDIA ST. 
at KALMIA 



3977 
GOLDFINCH 




WALKER 

Yes, charge account privileges at 
Walkers' are "streamlined" for the 
convenience of people in every walk 
of life. There's a plan to suit any 
practical purpose .... to suit each 
individual. Consolidated employees 
are Invited to take full advantage of 
any of these plans. 

30 Day Open Accounts 

For Any Responsible Person 

Thirty-day charge privileges are ob- 
tainable upon application. No long, 
drawn out "red tape" for responsible 
people. 

90-Day-Pay-Wa y 

No Down Payment! No Interest! 

On purchases of $ lO or more, in any 
one or more departments. Pay in small, 
equal installments over a period of 90 
days. 

Up (o 2 -Years (o Pay 

For Major Purchases for Homes 

Refrigerators, kitchen ranges, washers, 
radios, etc. may be paid for over a 
long period of time. Open to all re- 
sponsible people. Smallcarrying charge. 

D&pt. of Accounts, 8th Floor 

r "Can't-Bust-'em'' ^ 
I V/ork Clothes for | 

I Aircrofters __^^^,^_ | 

Ask the n,an ^'""Jl,,^ clothes. ^ 

ond weor. „otchin9 

shirts, "•" °"^-7he Aircrafter needs. 
• • • "!" ,o hes Bosement Store. 
V/ork clothes, 



WAJ_KER'S 

BROADWAY 



i 



8 



Consolidator 



The Best 
neuis 



IN MANY DAYS 



While other manufac- 
turers are raising prices on 
their new cars, Ford Motor 
Co. has reduced. 

The Big 
85-H. P. 
loupe 

fully equipped and 

delivered in SanDiego 

for only 



$799 



00 



See and Drive It 
Today 



HIlTOn 

niolar to. 

1202 Broaduiay 



ANODIC ANECDOTES 

By Bert Naseef 

AFTER the gang read last month's 
column, they one and all decided to 
write their own news, so the resulting 
turn-in of items leaves nothing to be de- 
sired, and all I've got to do from now 
on is to collect them. 

We are all glad to have Harry Parker 
back from Oklahoma and also hope that 
Fritz will not mind the night shift too 
much. — Mac McGuffin. 

What is this we hear about body build- 
ing and weight lifting. For instructions, 
see Gerber. If you prefer bowling, see 
Warner. — Bob Larceval. 

Gaston "Black Beauty" Gonzales, the 
anodic adonis, has been saving his money 
for months to buy himself a car; now it 
is rumored that he has changed his mind 
in favor of getting married to a dark- 
eyed fascinator named Martha Romero. — 
Paul Duffy. 

Why, after receiving free transporta- 
tion, did our ex-football champ cancel 
his week-end trip to Catalina? — L. F. 
Airhart. 

"Golden Boy" Warner has been show- 
ing us a picture of his sister (?) and ask- 
ing us how we would like to date her. Of 
course we would if we could but believe 
the little beauty was his sister. Our war 
correspondent, Paul Duffy, is a splendid 
European news analyst. Fresh out of col- 
lege, he has been trying to educate our 
friend "Dopey" Gerber. — G. J. Gonzales. 
Ted Lohman and the missus jumped out 
of bed the other night and deliriously 
chased the entire San Diego Fire Depart- 
ment. "Sounds like a three alarm," cried 
Ted, excitedly stepping on the gas. What 
they found on arriving, was three squad- 
rons helping an old lady get her kitty out 
of a tree. — David Mann. 

If you want to see a weight-lifting 
contest, come to the San Diego County 
meet at the City Y.M.C.A. August 3rd 
at 7:30 p.m. and watch anodizer Wally 
Miles lift the three continental weights. 
He is expected to make a good showing 
even though he weighs but 12 5 pounds. — 
Don Gerber. 

Mac McGuffin, anodic clean-up chief, 
had four flat tires in one day. Mac scut- 
tled his '28 Buick for a '28 Dodge with 
better rubber; It won't be long before 
that 1945 model he is waiting for will 
be out. — Harry Parker. 

The most interesting job I've had is 
anodizing. Among the many things to 
watch here, I've learned, is that it is best 
to watch the filling of the nitric acid tank 
through goggles. Otherwise, one may get 



too much of an "eye-full." — M. E. Wil- 
liams. 



HERTZ 



RENT A CAR 
OR TRUCK 

DRIVE YOURSELF 

Real Insurance Protection 

1140 2nd Ave. Main 8520 

Stations — San Diego to Vancouver 





GiLMORE S 


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TERMS k 


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Complete Line of Airplane Models 






LOW RENT 
DISTRICT 



TAPESTRY iPT i\ "0 

RUGS It 

INLAID LINOLEUM, sq. yd. . . . 79C 
FLOOR COVERING (felt base) sq. yd. 290 
9x12 WILTON RUG . . . $39.95 
BROADLOOM REMNANTS, 30 to 60% off 

Ddv7dson 



FURNITURE 



SEVENTH at G St. 



Free Parking al West's Associated Service Across llie Street 




. EYES EXAMINED TERMS 

• GLASSES FITTED • 

• GLASSES REPAIRED M. 3203 

506 Bank of America Bldg. 



HOME APPLIANCES 

• CROSLEY REFRIGERATORS • 
Radios 
Ranges 
Washers 
Ironers 

• 
Friendly 
Budget 
Terms 



San.SiEQO 

ULutcr 

ElEC-tric 



SECOND AND BROADWAY OPEN EVENINQS M-7W8 

ALSO 916 UNION AT E ST. 



August, 1940 



Just out . . . 

^ The New Magazine 

CINE-KODAK EIGHT 

Come in and let 

* L 

us show It to you 



Eastman Kodak Stores, inc. 



419 Broadway 



San Diego 



Learn to Dance Well 

Special Private Lesson Rates in Ballroom Dancing 
6 PRIVATE $5 00 
° LESSONS H>:>'"W 

Consair Club Closs Lessons, including one 
hour lesson and 1 1/2 hour Practice Dancing 
only 50c. Wed., 8 to 10:30 P.M. 
Classes forming for Children end Adults in 
All Types of Dancing. Rates in Reach of All 

HEMPHILL'S 
SCHOOL OF THE DANCE 

1039 7th Ave. F. 5750 & 1740 Upos. J. 9458 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
" The Blind Man " 

NATIONAL 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

University Window Shade Co. 

1023 University Avenue 



Consollda tors 

- - Bowl with 
Your Leagues 



SUNSHINE BOWLING ALLEVS 

624 Broadway 



TANK HIGHLIGHTS 

By Herthel Chappcll 

HERE'S one for the book! Can you 
picture Mac McCann, that high-fa- 
lootin' ladies' man, the ex-manager of the 
basketball team, hitchhiking to Mission 
Beach? He was spotted standing on a 
corner with swimming trunks and towel 
in one hand, and thumbing a ride with 
the other. Believe it or not! By the way, 
fellows, Mac's girl friend calls him "Len- 
ny" (of Mice and Men). We wonder 
why. 

Ted Schwarz, who has been looking for 
the girl of his dreams for some time, says 
his wish has been fulfilled. Her last name 
is Passion — see if you can beat that for 
a name. 

"Little Lulu" is going to town! The 
owner of this speedboat is Jerry Wilson of 
night shift, and a very proud owner, as 
"Little Lulu" is one of the fastest boats 
on the bay. Jerry says he is going to hop 
it up, and top all records. Take the 
turns easy, boy. 

As August approaches, Sid Riches, the 
blushing bridegroom-to-be, looks worried. 
Maybe it's the sleepless nights, and won- 
dering if two can live as cheaply as one. 

Do you know: 

That John Wiley has a 1940 Plymouth 
coupe? Some class there, fellow, and 
what's this we hear about a new home? 
We'll be there when you have open house, 
Wiley. That Bill Strunk of night shift 
is thinking of splurging and buying a 
new home? More power to you, Bill. 
That Joe Thomas was seen tripping the 
light fantastic at Mission Beach with a 
pretty brunette? Nice going, Joe. That 
Jack Theuws and wife went to Yellow- 
stone National Park on their vacation? 
That Felix Mattingly, the fellow who is 
known as the barefoot boy of Kentucky, 
is taking dancing lessons? That Bob 
Summers knows how to make his land- 
lady come down on his rent? In case 
you're interested in details, consult Bob 
"Free Rent" Summers. That Johnnie 
"Jockey" Humes is continually picking 
the wrong horse lately? Come on, John- 
nie, you'd better use a little hoss sense and 
lay off. That Bill Consaul and wife 
spend every week-end at Mission Beach 
working? Bill is dishing out the drinks 
and the Missus works in a booth. 

And that's "30" for this month, gang. 
To think is labor twice distilled. 




with Bud Landis 



Here's a surprising statistic : A thou- 
sand years were wasted in 1939! 

• • • 
That's quite a bit of elapsed time. 
If laid end to end, those ten cen- 
turies would protrude back into the 
past twice as far as the date when 
Columbus docked in America. 




The squandered eon is the result of 
avoidable starting, stalling, and 
stopping endured by 30 million 
motorists in the U. S. 

• • • 

Figures show that 25% of the need- 
less leisure is in the hands of the 
Screwdriver — that whimsical wheel 
wabbler who seems always to be 
trying to steer in four directions at 

once. 

• • • 

Another 10% can be laid at the feet 
of the Screwjay — the pedestrian 
who wanders across busy streets 
with heavy head and feet awhirl. 

• • • 

These two members of the bureau 
of waits and delays run our nervous 
systems down and driving costs up. 

• • • 

You're naturally against this an- 
noying extravagance. So see your 
Shell Service Station Dealer. 



He'll make you a member of the 
Share-the-Road Club, which is out 
to laugh Screwdrivers and Screw- 
jays off the streets. 

• • • 

He'll also fill your tank with Super- 
Shell — a gasoline specially made 
to save on Stop -and -Go driving. 



10 



Consolidator 




SnUG VOUR 
COSH FOR 
UnCHTIOR 

^ Let Miller Service 
Prepare Your Car 
for the Vacation 
Trip . . . pay when 
you return. 

* No matter what the 
car needs . . . tires, 
a battery, brake re- 
line, or motor repair 
. . . just drive to 
MILLER SERVICE, 
where you can get 
convenient credit 
without red tape. 

^^Consolidators" 

Altvays 

Welcomed 




. AUTOMOTIVE SERVICBS 



32nd & University J 4101 
30th&EICajon R 1667 
32nd & Adams T3414 



RECREATION NOTES 

By Ralph Smith 

EVERY Tuesday is Consolidated night 
at the Ice Skatnig Rink from 6:00 
until 7:30 p.m. All skating ends at 11:00 
p.m. All you ice hockey players had better 
be thinking about fiUng those skates and 
limbering your hockey sticks because in 
early fall we expect to form a plant 
league with the possibility of having the 
best team represent the plant for outside 
competition. This is a good time to start 
taking advantage of the special offer on 
Tuesday nights. 

There is a riding club which meets for 
the night crew at 10:00 a.m and the day 
crew at 7:30 p.m. every Wednesday at 
the Balboa Park Riding Academy. Every 
one interested in learning to ride is wel- 
come to join in the fun. We understand 
these clubs are going in for trick and 
pyramid riding later. 

The City Recreation Department, as- 
sisted by W. P. A. leaders, offers an as- 
sorted group of activities for employees' 
wives and mothers in the way of craft and 
volley tennis groups. These craft classes 
are entertaining as well as instructive and 
we are sure all the ladies would enjoy 
visiting if not joining in the activities 
which are free. Some of them are: 

MONDAY: 

Craft Class, Davis Gym., Ocean Beach, 9:00 

a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
Craft Class, National City Park, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, La Jolla, 9:30-11:00 a.m. 
Craft Class, Washington School, 9:30-11:30 

a.m., 1:30-3:30 p.m. 
Volley Tennis, Davis Gym., Ocean Beach, 8:00- 

10:00 p.m. (adult mixed group). 
TUESDAY: 

Craft Class, Grant School, 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 
Craft Class, Florence School, 12:00-S:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, National City Park, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, La Jolla, 1 :30-3:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, Golden Hill, 9:30-11:30 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, McKinley School, 9:00-11:30 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, Washington School, 10-12 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, North Park (Municipal Pool), 

9:30-12:00 a.m. 
WEDNESDAY: 

Craft Class, Mission Beach School, 1 :00-5 :00 p.m. 
Craft Class, National City Park, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Rug Weaving, Davis Gym., Ocean Beach, 1:00- 

4:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, Washington School, 9:30-11:30 a.m., 

1:30-3:30 p.m. 
Volley Tennis, Mt. View Playground, 9:00- 

11:00 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, North Park (Municipal Pool), 

9:30-12:00 a.m. 



YOUR NEXT CAR FINANCED 
^' ^SUBSTANTIAL 
SAVING 

New cars financed at 4 3/109^ 

Used " " " 4 8/10% 

Insurance towett in San Diego 

Call me before you purchase a 
NEW or USED car. I will 
arrange your finance and insur- 
ance at a much lower cost. 

PHONE p TT^I 

(before 5 p.m.) T - / / J L 

ask for RAY DcMAHY 

or bring this adv. to 1340 Sixth Ave. 



yf,"i/fiBiiBaa3^4i!!!|i,'.a'l ' 



$100 

Allowance for Your Old Car 

Regardless of Make, Shape 

or Condition on any *36or'37 

Ford Tudor In Stock, 



Your choice oj SOjine recon- 
ditioned and guaranteed 
Fords. 

1938 FORDS $379 
1937 FORDS $489 

-- THIS IS NOT A CATCH AD -- 

It Means Exactly What It Says. 

Simply drive your old car down 

here and we will positively allow 
you $100 for your old car. 

Best terms in town. 



UNIVERSITY MOTORS 

Authorized Dealer Ford, Mercury 
& Lincoln-Zephyr 

1276 UNIVERSITY J-3141 

Buy From a New Car Dealer 



BRING YOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 



3050 University Ave., 



1 1 44 Third Avenue 



August, 1940 



11 



John Adams School, 9:00 a.m.- 



p.m. 
9:00- 



:00- 



THURSDAY: 

Craft Class 

4:30 p.m. 
Craft Class, Hamilton School, 12:00-5 :00 p.m. 
Craft Class, Florence School, 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, McKinley School, 1:00-10:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, De la Cruz Park, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, National City Park, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, La Jolla, 9:30-1 1 :00 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, Hamilton School, 9:30-11:30 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, Golden Hill, 10:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 
FRIDAY: 

Craft Class, Pacific Beach School, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, De la Cruz Park, 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 
Craft Class, National City Park, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, La Jolla, 1 :30-3:00 p.m. 
Craft Class, Washington School, 9:30-11:30 a.m. 

l:30-3:30p.m. 
Volley Tennis, McKinley School, 9 a.m.- 
VoUey Tennis, Mt. View Playground, 

12:00 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, Davis Gym., Ocean Beach, 

10:00 p.m. (adult mixed group). 
Volley Tennis, University Hgts., 9:15-10:30 a.m. 
Volley Tennis, Washington School, 10:00- 

12:00 a.m. 

Late in August there is going to be a 
three-day craft and hobby show in the 
Municipal Gymnasium. The Recreation 
Department has offered Consolidated a 
space for our exhibit. All those having a 
hobby or craft that they wish to display 
should leave a note with name, clock num- 
ber and type of exhibit at the north gate 
for Ralph Smith. Let's all help to make 
the Consolidated exhibit the best in the 
show! 

Bowling enthusiasts should start lim- 
bering the fingers and getting a line on 
your various teams because it won't be 
long now! 

North American Aviation issued a chal- 
lenge to the Consolidated tennis team, 
which was readily accepted and played at 
North Park, with the Consolidated team 
entertaining afterwards. The players were: 

For North American, 1st singles, Rob- 
ert Miller; 2d singles, George Shull; 3rd 
singles, Francis Schmidt; 4th singles, Oak- 
ly Drulines; 1st doubles, Earl Foote, and 
Harold Jackson; and 2nd doubles, Dean 
Phillips and Ed Brewster. For Consolidated, 
1st singles, Homer Shayles; 2nd singles, 
Dan McClaren; 3rd singles, Joe McKeller; 
4th singles, Carl Shellback; 1st doubles, 
Karl Sjoblom and Ed Requa; 2nd doubles, 
Frank Boyle and Cecil McGowan; and 
Alternates, Hamilton May, John Lock- 
wood and Harold Hudson. 

There are photography clubs being held 
every Wednesday night at Balboa school. 



LINDBERGH FIELD CAFE 

Administration Building 
LIndbergli Field 



"The Home of Aviation" 
BREAKFAST SERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 



FREE ATTENTION AIRCRAFT WORKERS FREE 
FREE FOR MONTH OF AUGUST ONLY FREE 



FREE - An Extra Pair Uniform Pants with 
Each Uniform Purchased at 

t ^M Q C Your Name and 

^C Company Name 

*^ Sewed on FREE 

BETTER GRHDE UIIIIORmS 



Remember - This Free OFfer Good for Month of August Only 

H. L DRUIDSOn 



BETWEEN iNDIA AND 
KETTNER 



FREE 



niEnS' UlEHR 
B12 WEST BROnDUinV 

NO CASH NEEDED 

CONVENIENT CREDIT TERMS 



Open Evenlngi till 9 
Sundays IS to 6 



FREE 



liUliitneus 



1 



every time for Better Values! 



Cast your ballot 

for Whitney VALUES! 

Whether you're a Deal-er or a GOP-er, makes 
no difference in this election! . . . there's only 
one candidate to consider. Platform? Why 
sure! "First, you'll save money; second, you'll 
save time; third, you'll save steps." In fact, let's 
just shorten it to: "You'll SAVE!" 

Open Whitney Budget Credit Account 
6th Avenue Mezzanine 




We cash your 
pay checks 



# 




# 



Personal Supervision of the Owners Assures Careful Consideration of 

Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Always Reasonable 

Conveniently Located— Ample Free Parking 



JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and Aih St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 6168 



12 



Consolidator 



HERE at Consolidated department af- 
ter department performs operations 
of complicated and elaborate nature. To 
keep them operating requires the assist- 
ance of a large group of experienced 
technicians. This little known group of 
men are all specialists in their own lines. 
They are the boys who keep things mov- 
ing . . . regardless of their motivating 
power. They are the boys who furnish the 
air and electricity to points where they 
are needed. They build benches and tables 
and stock racks. Sometimes they build a 
whole stockroom. They move equipment 
and then keep it in repair. They fight 
corrosion and deterioration with barrels of 
paint. They keep the roof from leaking. 
They string lights, keep the phone system 
in order, act as firemen and maintain the 
signal system. They rewind and repair all 
the electrical devices used in the entire 





^k 


am I W"^ '^^m. 


1 


^g^^ / s^ ■ 


^^^^' 


^1 


fej^ 








J^ 


^Kisi^^^^^^^^H 






1. 



The maintenance leaders meet in a "round-table" discussion with the plant engineers: 
Left to right: J. B. Giovanoli, Assistant Plant Engineer; Wm. A. Maloney, Plant Engineer; 
Robert R. Biddle, Foreman, Maintenance Carpenter Shop; Robert F. Jones (upper) Assistant 
to Mr. Maloney; Henry A. Fink, Foreman, Electrical Maintenance; and Robert Combe, Foreman, 
Mechanical Maintenance. 



AIRCRAFT PLANT MAINTENANCE 



plant. They operate the power house and 
the huge air compressors and they main- 
tain the refrigeration system. In other 
words they are a busy group of men who 
have little chance to talk about their 
work and problems, simply because they 
have so many of them. 

To do all this requires planning, super- 
vision and a highly trained personnel. It 
must be near perfect in all phases of its 
duties because its responsibilities are be- 
yond the ready conceptions of most peo- 
ple not acquainted with manufacturing 
problems on a scale as large as Consol- 
idafed's. 

The man in charge of the entire Main- 
tenance and Construction Division of 
Consolidated is "Bill" Maloney who is one 
of the few men in the country with back- 
ground, training and experience to over- 
see this Herculean task always ahead of 
him. Always surrounded by blue prints 
of proposed additions, equipment cata- 
logues, building codes and a million re- 
quests for much needed rearrangements, 
installations, adjustments and repairs, he 
must depend a great deal on his three 
highly specialized assistants: Messrs. Fink, 
Biddle and Combe. They are in direct 
charge of Electrical, Carpentry and Me- 
chanical Maintenance and every Consol- 
idator depends on the results of their ef- 
forts to perform his own part in pro- 
ducing units for our added National de- 
fense. 

Assisting Bill Maloney in the capacity 
of assistant plant engineer is Joe Giovanoli, 



who is in direct charge of all maintenance 
and installation groups. He supervises gen- 
eral plant layout and oversees plant oper- 
ations and mechanical equipment installa- 
tions. 

"Hank" Fink oversees a range of oper- 
ations the thought of which would scare 
most people. It is as varied as only the 
most vivid imagination could dream of. 
For instance he repairs and maintains all 
electric motors in the plant. They range 
from 1/20 H.P. to 295 H.P. They might 
power a hand drill that drills a hole of 
a few thousandths to a lathe which bores 
a diameter measured in several feet! 

L. C. McEntee is his direct assistant in 
charge of all Electrical Maintenance. C. L. 
Hostetler is leadman over all groups do- 
ing new construction, moves and emer- 
gencies on the day shift. 

On the second shift A. Cord handles 
maintenance work while C. Saum carries 
on with new construction and moves 
from where Hostetler's group leaves off. 

C. Cummings handles maintenance and 
emergencies on the 3rd shift. 

The large amount of portable equip- 
ment in use requires careful maintenance, 
repairs and adjustment and Chuck Reddien 
is in charge of this work. 

The extensive refrigeration system of 
the plant requires constant attention and 
the number of units located about the 
plant require the services of a large group 
or refrigeration experts. This group is 
headed by E. Thompson. 

The fire alarm system at Consolidated is 



By LARRY BOEING 

more elaborate and has more call boxes 
than could be found in most small cities. 
Various members of the Electrical Main- 
tenance group act as fire squad leaders and 
regardless of where an alarm might be 
turned in a Fire Captain is on the scene 
with his crew in a few seconds. 

The electric time clocks about the plant 
get a lot of pushing around several times 
a day when one considers that close to 
10,000 people move in and out of the 
plant in a day. They also require con- 
stant maintenance inspection and periodi- 
cal overhaul. 

Accurate recording and control of tem- 
perature of Heat Treating furnaces and 
solutions is absolutely necessary in air- 
craft production. The Recording and Con- 
troling Pyrometers are also serviced by 
the Electrical Maintenance group. 

The second group of maintenance men 
is headed by Bob Biddle. This group is 
called upon to make anything from wood 
that might be required. In this depart- 
ment fine cabinet work for executive 
offices is turned out as well as concrete 
forms. A complete "Mockup" of a huge 
bomber is just a breeze for these boys. 

Ted Stark assists Bob Biddle and is 
kept busy at all times. 

Melvin Knutson has charge of all out- 
side carpenter construction and this is no 
small job. This includes building of huge 
frameworks for static testing large sur- 
faces. 

John Hunter is in charge of all night 



August, 1940 



13 




HENRY A. FINK was born in Buffalo, New 
York, in January of 1893. Trained for electrical 
work, he has spent 25 years of his life in this line, 
specializing in the installation and maintenance of 
factory electrical equipment. During this time he 
has worked with the Bethlehem Steel Company, 
Wick-Wire Steel Company, Buffalo Electrical Con- 
tracting Company, the Bison and the Burroughs 
Electric Companies and has acquired a valuable 
store of information in the electrical field. Mr. 
Fink started with the Consolidated Aircraft Cor- 
poration March, 1933, as an electrician on the night 
shift and soon after became foreman in charge of 
the electrical division of our Maintenance Depart- 
ment, the position he now holds. 



wood working and painting operations. 

Ed Wood has charge of the mill while 
Art Hubbard has charge of bench work 
and acts as cabinet work leadman. C. 
Morton handles the paint work and this 
job is figured not in barrels of paint ap- 
plied but in tons. It is a fact that it takes 
over three tons of aluminum paint for a 
single application to Consolidated'i build- 
ing exteriors. 

At present this group is painting the 
huge sign on the roof of the new west 
building. The sign is 1000 feet long and 
the letters are 2 5 feet high! When com- 
pleted this sign will greet all incoming 
planes. 

This department also conditions about 
500 band and circular saws a week. To 
give you just a little finer insight on the 
amount of work turned out may we re- 
mark that the mill eats up about 10,000 
board feet of lumber a week! 

Mechanical maintenance is handled by 
Bob Combe who is assisted by "Mac" 
Clutinger acting as assistant foreman. 

The Mechanical Maintenance Depart- 
ment consists of three main divisions; the 
Millwrights and Riggers, Pipefitters, and 
Laborers. 

In the Millwright division, new con- 
struction is supervised by leadman Harry 
Pierce and this group produces new factory 
equipment and machinery designed by 
plant engineering. New Monorail is erected 
and changes are made in the present Mono- 
rail system by millwrights under assist- 



ant foreman "Mac" Clutinger. This latter 
group also erects rigging for lifting and 
moving wings and fuselages throughout 
the plant. Leadman D. G. Nesbit's crew 
of millwrights repairs all machinery in 
the tool room, machine shop and through- 
out the plant. Licensed steam engineer 
L. M. Ulery is in charge of boiler and air 
compressor maintenance in the plant. Also 
included in the millwright division are the 
men in the Maintenance blacksmith shop 
who repair anodic and drop hammer equip- 
ment, etc. Sheetmetal work, such as fab- 
rication and installation of stacks and 
vents for lead pots and other equipment, 
is done by this division of Mechanical 
Maintenance. 




ROBERT R. BIDDLE was born in Cape May, 
N. J., in January of 1898. Graduated Buffalo pub- 
lic schools. West Seneca High, New York Institute 
of Photography. Served apprenticeship became Ship 
Jointer, Buffalo Dry Dock, Assistant camera man. 
White Studios and Universal Pictures. Became fore- 
man of semi-finish stockroom Curtis Airplane Co. 
during the World War. Started with Consolidated 
in February of 1934 and soon became foreman of 
Wood mill which also includes supervision of main- 
tenance carpentering and painting, the position he 
now holds. Likes swimming, fishing, photography 
for diversion. Lively, energetic, Robert R. "Bob" 
Biddle's rise came quickly from his start in '34. 



Pipefitters under leadman Frank Web- 
ster, install all necessary steam, water, gas 
and air lines throughout the factory. Air 
and water lines to service the ships in the 
yard are also laid out by this group. 

Laborers form the third division, under 
leadman E. D. "Swede" Burnett, "Tony" 
Buijnorouski and "Bulldog" Johnson. 
These men move all heavy material within 
the plant, unload machinery and new 
equipment, excavate and do cement work 
for machinery foundations and keep the 
factory grounds and yard clean and free 
of refuse. 

"Al" Fink and his crew in the main- 
tenance crib repair paint spray equipment 
and portable pneumatic tools for the 
plant, and the man with the worried look 
in his eye consulting the tide table is 



Walter Winkler in charge of "You know 
what" maintenance. 

Leadman Otto Darling has charge of 
night maintenance throughout the plant. 

Oiling of all machinery, air hoists and 
other factory equipment is another job 
handled by Mechanical Maintenance. 

These three busy groups contribute 
greatly to the success of our manufactur- 
ing operations and probably never get all 
the credit they deserve but without them 
the rest of us couldn't get very far with 
our own little jobs. 

One of the maintenance men with a 
flair for poetry wrote the following which 
just about describes the spirit of the boys: 
And now our story is ended 
We trust we have befriended, 
Our chief aim is intended 
To keep your troubles mended. 




ROBERT COMBE was born of Scottish descent 
at New Castle on Tyne in 1898. He attended ele- 
mentary school in Queenstown, Canada, and later 
went through high school by attending night classes 
in Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

For three years he was a final assembly mechanic 
in the automobile industry, with the National 
Carbon Company one year, and four years as 
assistant foreman of the Dental Department of the 
Carborundum Company. During the War Mr. 
Combe spent over two years with the Canadian 
Engineers. He has also acted as a machine operator 
for the U. S. Battery Company and assistant main- 
tenance foreman two years for the Maximite Dry 
Cell Battery Company. 

In October, 1929, he started with the Consoli- 
dated Aircraft Company as a maintenance me- 
chanic and by the dint of hard work has secured 
for himself the position of foreman in charge of 
mechanical work of our Maintenance Department. 
Bob Combe leads his group of men in an unobtru- 
sive manner in the no small task of keeping the 
mechanical equipment of the plant in proper con- 
dition. For relaxation he prefers Softball. 

"Did you ever do any public speaking?" 
asked the man in the largest rocker. 

"Well," replied the chap on the three- 
legged stool, "I proposed to a girl in the 
country over a party line." 

"Is there something in your eye?" en- 
quired the sympathetic helper and the 
victim grunted, "Heck, no, I'm just trying 
to look through my thumb." 



14 



Consolidator 



PRODUCTION MINUTES 

"Thar's fuedin' goin' on between the 
Boeings and Stewarts agin." It all came 
about when Boeing moved his "motorized 
inspection horde" across the international 
boundary- and took over 6 foot of Ed 




FOR WALLS 

Bedrooms, bafhrooms, 
kitchen — in these rooms 
especially, you'll enjoy the 
soft, pastel tints of Fuller- 
gfo — the West's most pop- 
ular interior paint for walls 
and woodwork. 



W. p. FULLER & CO. 

803 Seventh Ave. M. 0181 
291 1 University J. 2332 



Stewart's storeroom space. After Ed's 
"capitulation" he claimed that the extra 
weight Larry has put on made it "Impos- 
sible to hold the line," and contends that 
the space is very necessary for his "front 
e.xpansion." 

Besides hot weather, added personnel, 
plant expansion, E.O.'s, B.O.'s and "muffs" 
our under-cover agent reported activities 
in July as follows: Since Chris Englehart 
has been working Saturdays and the Mrs. 
taking care of the lawn, it has been cut 
in straight hnes and the flowers left stand- 
ing — the "good humor man" is Bob Abels 
with the paychecks, but "Yohoudie" is 
still a mystery — Kathleen Schneider, an- 
other "scandal slinger" whose "dirt" is 
found on other pages of this magazine, is 
a twin and was monikered "Tiny" in the 
past — Ben Keigle claims Jim Eisman makes 
so many "breaches of etiquette" that he 
has a special apology form printed to 
check and give his host. Wonder if that 
boat owner and those three longshoremen 
have located Coykendall since the chart- 
ered fishing trip was cancelled due to 48- 
hour week? — What does Glenn Hotch- 
kiss, Ed Jones, and Tom Galvin mean 
with that "double talk" about "missing 
the boat" and "getting off at the mezza- 
nine"? — Owen Stockton, fashion expert 
and Esquire critic, thinks a "full dress" 
is a garment made to cover a "bustle." 
Joe Maloney reports increase in print 
returns since installing "library card" 
system. — Afraid of being socked that 2c 
overdue fine. — ^Jim Mussen is much con- 
cerned over brother Bob "going to the 
dogs" after learning about him smok- 
ing those "cubebs." He had never tried 
anything stronger than "corn silks" be- 
fore. 

"Pappy Yokum" Holcomb the Daniel 
Boone of Suncrest took Lloyd Bender fish- 
ing, and according to the latter, he really 
knows the spots. As to his ability in row- 
ing a boat, we learn that he keeps in trim 
by rowing out past the three mile limit 
every week to get his cigarettes off the 
boats and save the tax. From that saving 
we owe, perhaps, those "glamour pants" 
he has been sporting recently. 

Latest to follow the European trend 
from "Democracy and Freedom" to "Die- 



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August, 1940 



15 



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Ballroom FIRST at "A" M. 7868 




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BUCKNER'S 

FIRST AT "A" 



tatorship and Bondage" was Hazel Brink 
and Fred Robertson, and Tommy Joubert 
and Marion Rauschart after a "treaty and 
redistribution of powers and wealth" in 
Yuma. Old "Dan" found the target 
through an open ventilator during the 
"unusual weather." Fred is a Finish em- 
ployee which should give Hazel a fast 
"make up" job to beat the whistle. Tommy 
and Marion are both singers, and can go 
to high "C" if the argument demands it. 
Owen Stockton wants to prove that 
"springtime" is not influencing him, and 
will wait until fall and cooler weather be- 
fore giving up his own cooking for Mar- 
gie's. Frank McHugh, Owen's former 
"cell mate" claims that "Stock's" cooking 
is reason enough to get married. Says 
"Frenchie" I couldn't stand it, and I only 
have half a stomach." 

Bill Liddle, Bob Mussen, and Bill Hol- 
man have solved a part of the national 
defense program with that "CromemoUy 
tubing cannon" they manufactured for 
the 4th. — If the wives ever get together 
and check on all those lodge, club and 
volunteer fire department "business meet- 
ings" on the night of the "Caliente Stag" 
there may be a shortage of tool designers 
and engineers. — Perry Ogden after loaning 
that pipe with the "preheater exhaust 
collector and bowl cooling" features to 
"Bud" Mouschel for "design data" plans 
on returning it for credit. Claims it "ex- 
hausts" when it should be "intaking". — 
Milt Hangen did some swell "forest fire 
fighting" during his vacation which ac- 
counts for the lovely tan. Or is it red? — 
Paul Gaughen has to show his birth certi- 
ficate to get a drink of beer. A few more 
months at his job and he'll look old 
enough. — Paul Hoch suggests hiring an 
interpreter for each PBY to use instead 
or nameplates, and has the figures to prove 
it a saving. 

That was a false report about Eastin, 
Tool Room, subbing for Galento during 
the "battle of bums." What really hap- 
pened was a "soda pop" exploded in his 
face. So there is a good point in favor of 
the "stronger stuff" as you can prove to 
the wife the dangers involved in sipping 
the explosive liquid. 




Let's Be Friends 

As well as 

Nelglibors.'' 

• • • 

Make Yourself 

At Home In This 

Big Friendly Store _____„ 

YourCredit DRYER'S STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Is Good /. E. Dryer, President • 236S Kettner Bhd. 



VISIT 

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DEPARTMENT STORE 
FOR MOTORISTS 




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Tires and Tubes 
Batteries 
Spark Plugs 
Life Protector Tubes 
Motor Tune-up Dept. 
Brake Department 
Auto Radio and Service 
Four Brands of Gasoline 
Auto Accessories 
Seat Covers 

FOR THE HOME 

Electric Refrigerators 

Ranges 

Washers 

Radios 

Electrical Appliances 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

Bicycles 
Velocipedes 
Scooters 
Wagons 

Terms as Low as 25c Weekly 

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16 




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HULL-abaloo 

By Al Leonard 

BILL PETIT, the "Little Caesar" of 
the Hull Department clerks (jitter- 
bug style) signs Glenn Hotchkiss' name 
so many times a day that it became a habit 
with him. The other day Bill went to the 
bank to cash his check and unconsciously 
signed Glenn's name when he endorsed it. 
The bank teller evidently did not believe 
that "the pen was mightier than the 
sword" and wanted to know, how come? 
Bill had a few bad moments explaining 
his way out of his predicament. 

It seems that Harry McEwan's wife 
went down to the Y.W.C.A. recently and 
told Harry to call for her at a certain time. 
Harry showed up at the right time all 
right, but at the Y.M.C.A. After waiting 
for one hour, Mrs. McEwan saw the light 
and dashed over to the Y.M.C.A. There 
was Harry waiting like a patient old St. 
Bernard (without the brandy tied around 
his neck). Harry says 'taint right that 
one letter in the alphabet should make so 
much difference in a man's life. 

"Dutch" Kling had an old trailer in his 
yard that he couldn't use because he did 
not have a license for it. Russ Kern, head 
Hull Inspector, was building a love shack 
in the mountains and wanted to borrow 
"Dutch's" trailer ... he is known to be 
a very thrifty (tight) gentleman, so he 
told Russ he could use the trailer if Russ 
bought the license for it. Russ bought the 
license and immediately all "Dutch's" 
friends started borrowing the trailer. It 
got so bad that if the friends didn't have 
a trailer hitch on their car they would 
borrow the car also. This was too much 
for Dutch, so he sold the trailer and now 
Russ is moaning for the three dollars he 
paid for the license. 



Consolidator 

All Consolidators wish to extend their 
condolences to Ray Parker in the recent 
loss of his father. 

"If you refuse me," he swore, "I shall 
die." 

She refused him. Sixty years later he 
died. 



Monkey 

Business! 

• "Inside stories" about San 
Diego's huge gorillas and other 
residents of our world -famed 
zoo. A fascinating book by 
their fascinating friend, Belle 
Benchley. Order before publi- 
cation August 8th, and get a 
first- edition, autographed by 
Mrs. Benchley. Free delivery 
anywhere. 
"My Life in a Man - Made 
Jungle" by Belle Benchley $3.00 

STHTIOnERS 
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August, 1940 



17 



ROBERT'S 


-FOR- 


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Largest assortment oj Trousers 


in the City. Any style-any size. 


903 FIFTH AVE. WATTS BLDG. 



KIRBY'S 

make a special effort to meet the 
needs of Aircraft Workers . . . 
Goodyear Welt, Gro-Cord, or 
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Black or Brown .... -^/.^'yD 
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HRVE ROLLED 
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'HEARD ABOUT THE HULL' 

By Bill Pettit 

NEVER let it be said that Hull men 
lead a slow and quiet life. Things 
move too swiftly for dull moments. 

Speaking of dull moments. Hank Yo- 
gerst, quiet looking chap in Hull No. 2, 
spends most of his time swinging to and 
fro from the girders while quietly tend- 
ing to his business of moving ships from 
one end of the factory to the other. 

Perhaps the most exciting affair of the 
month was Jack Bennett's little tussle 
with a couple of holdup men. Jack, who 
does a bit of clerking in the Hull Depart- 
ment in his spare time, was coming home 
late one night when two men stopped him 
and demanded that he give them his 
jacket. "I'm sorry, but I can't do that," 
said Jack. "Oh, no," snarled one tough, 
"and why not?" "Well, you see," replied 
Jack, "it belongs to my brother." When 
Jack woke up a half hour later, his face 
was all bashed in and his brother's jacket 
was gone. 

When questioned by the police, Jack 
couldn't describe the men very well, but 
ventured to say they were amateurs, for 
they had left his wallet with $8.00 in his 
pocket! 

Speaking of excitement, those who 
would like thrills galore, join one of the 
Hull groups fishing parties, but come pre- 
pared — for anything can happen. 

Trying his best to keep from being ex- 
cited, we find Dutch Klein explaining to 
one of his men that "Manual Labor" is not 
a Mexican war general but was a riveter 
on the third shift. 



A fool refuses the counsel of a wise 
man, but the wise man often discovers 
truth in the speech of a fool. 

Time scratches every itch. 




BEFORE you come to the 
Golden Gate International 
Exposition, safeguard your 
money with Bank of America 
Travelers Cheques. They are 
obtainable at your local branch 
where the manager will also 
gladly give you a letter of in- 
troduction to the manager of 
the Bank of America Exposi- 
tion Branch-Treasure Island's 
only bank. 

ISattk of KttttxxtVL 

NATIONAL iSvWos ASSOCIATION 

membfh federal deposit insurance corporation 



• SITTING PRETTY • 

THE 171 FAMILIES WHO DURING THE PAST SIXTEEN 

MONTHS HAVE ACQUIRED INDIVIDUALLY DESIGNED 

HOMES IN SAN DIEGO'S FASTEST GROWING NEW 

DISTRICT .... ^ „ 

ROLANDO VILLAGE 

THEY KNOW AS DO MANY FOLKS CLAMORING FOR 
HOMES TODAY IN THIS TOP LOCATION, IN THE HEART 
OF THE SUNSHINE BELT, THAT AS PRICES RISE THEY 
WON'T BE ONE OF THOSE WHO WISHED THEY HAD 
BOUGHT WHEN PRICES WERE LOW. 

YOU TOO - CAN SAVE MONEY AND PROTECT YOUR 
FUTURE WHILE ENJOYING LIFE TO ITS FULLEST BY ACT- 
ING NOW. - BUY THAT HOME OR HOMESITE AND BUILD 
WHILE YOU MAY STILL GET AN 'FHA' LOAN. 

Come and see Jor yourself . 

ROLANDO VILLAGE 

6525 EL CAJON BLVD. T. 2171 



18 



Consolidator 




1. Presenting Baby Larry Vern Sharp at 
14 days! Mr. and Mrs. Vern Sharp became 
the happy parents of Baby Larry on June 2 5. 



2905 Pacific Blvd. Next to South Parking Lot 

CONVENIENT 

Lowest Prices on GASOLINE — OIL — LUBRICATION 

THE AIRPLANE SIAIN 

HOLLEMAN and CROOKS 

Ford Specialists Complete Auto Repair 



Pay Chicks Cashed for Customers 



Own Your Home/ 

Use your rent money to 
pay for a home. The small 
down payment starts you 
toward financial stability. 
Plan now for the years to 
come. Excellent homes in 
Bird Rock, South La Jolla 
and Pacific Beach. . . Fast 
hishway and bus service 
to Consolidated. 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 



Little Larry tipped the scales at 7 pounds 
8 ounces. Mrs. Sharp is doing fine and — oh, 
yes, Vern took it like a man. The picture 
was taken by Stan Marcyan. 

2. Sheppard vs. Payne . "Dad" Sheppard, 
resplendent in his Sunday best but minus his 
large Stetson, slowly walked up the middle 
aisle of the Ashbury Methodist Church on July 
7th and deposited the last of his five charm- 
ing daughters into the waiting arms of John 
R. Payne, who had asked and received per- 
mission to take over Lavina Jean as his very 
ow^n. 

Dr. Martin tied the knot, a single hitch, 
w^hile the organ played "I Love You.*' About 
three hundred friends and relatives, mostly 
Consolidators, w^ere on hand to w^itness the 
beautiful ceremony and attend the reception 
afterwards. 

The bride was attended by her sister, Mrs. 
Zora Peck, Miss Betty Yates and Miss Shirly 
Wallenbach, w^hile Don Diesel and Ralph 
Golden seconded the groom. 

The newlyweds plan on making their home 
in San Diego as soon as they return from a 
short trip to northern California. 

3. Grunion Running! So off w^ent the sec- 
ond shift maintenance gang. One a. m. found 
our party at Ocean Beach, enough barn for 
a fire, and all the requisites for a grunion 
catch. Dodie Rodig, Mrs. Roy Schultz, Mrs. 
Elmer Roman, Mrs. Stan Marcyan, **Red" 
Bauer and Elmer Roman ("posing" w^ith bot- 
tles), Roy Schultz, George Mueller, Ray Ro- 
man and Jack Kernick added to the party to 
make it just large enough to take care of the 
"wine, w^ieners and song." Flash photo by 
Stan Marcyan. 

4. Alphonso Gomez's PBY takes to the 
w^ater. This gas-pow^ered model of Consoli- 
dated's famous flying boat has a six-foot span. 

5. "Just as good as ne"w, and tw^ice as 
handsome." That's how Chief Test Pilot 
"Bill" Wheatley phrased a description of our 
sturdy FLEETSTER NC700V, since it has 
been given renewed outw^ard appearance by 
the striping and treatment of the vertical fin. 
Pressed for some information on this ship, that 



quality Hand Tools 

StArrett, Plomb, Crescent, Wiss, 
KIcnk. Gerstner S Kennedy Tool 
Chests. Home Shop Equipment. 

motor Horduiore & 
Equipment Co. 

1125-47 Columbia Street. 
Mdin 0115. 



probably has been seen by everyone of the 
plant personnel (since it generally resides 
within the yard when not called upon to 
jaunt some of the officials about the country, 
or sw^ing alongside one of our models in the 
air so that Otto Menge can shoot some aerial 
pictures). Bill gave forth the follow^ing in- 
formation relative to this sturdy ship: 

This plane has Pratt & Whitney Rornet 
1690 C engine, Hamilton-Standard adjustable 
metal propeller, Goodyear 3 5x16.6 air w^heels 
and brakes, tail wheel, Electric Inertia starter, 
generator, battery, landing and navigation 
lights, instrument and cabin lights. Its gross 
w^eight is 5 600 pounds and it is an eight- 
place plane w^Jthout radio or seven-place w^ith 
the LEARADIO now installed. The radio 
equipment consists of Transmitter, multi-band 
receiver, and AUTOMATIC radio direction 
finding compass. It has full "blind" flying 
instrument equipment, including: Directional 
Gyro, Sensitive Altimeter, Bank and Turn in- 
dicator, rate of climb indicator, suction gauge, 
air-speed indicator, sweep-second hand clock, 
compass, airspeed, full set of engine instru- 
ments. The plane has had less than 1,000 
hours of flying, and the engine about 200 
hours since purchase from P. & W. A. Co. 
We have just gone all over the plane since 
I got back from flight in June to Washington 
and Dayton, and it has been put in "new" 
condition. 



Has your present job a future? 

Does it offer opportunities for travel? 
Is it interesting? 

SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

offers its 
MASTER RADIO COURSE 

preparing for commercial radio operotorf 
licenses, as the answer to the above questions 
RADIO, as a vocation, offords jobs in the 
airways as ground station operator . . 
on shipboard as radio operator 
broadcast station work . instolla- 

tion and repair . servicing. 

Our employment service assists in placing 
the licensed operator. 
JOBS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
Both day ond evening courses 
NAVIGATION COURSES 
also available. 
Prepare NOW while you are employed 

SAN DIEGO AEROMARINE 

RADIO AND NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Administration Building Lindbergh Field 

Telephone Jackson 7400 



August, 1940 



19 



6. Another wedding! (See "Facts about 
the Femmes.") The former Miss Hazel Brink 
of Production and Fred Robertson of the 
Paint Shop w^ere married in Yuma on July 4. 

7. Consolidated^ s own Swami, "Hindu du" 
Jack Kernick (Night Maintenance) is gazing 
into his crystal in preparation to prognosti- 
cating the future or revealing the past about 
'most anything. 

8. "My, what big feet you have," Frenchy 
McHugh (Planning Department) — also, what 
long legs! 

9. This is to prove that fishing is good at 
Laguna Hanson, Lower California. Roger 
Heinrich (Purchasing) and G. B. Roth (Plant 
Police) hope that this fine string of small- 
mouthed black bass doesn't start too big a 
rush to this mile high lake. This picture was 
taken early in July. 

PLASTER SPLASHES 

By Biirncs 

Everything is back to normal in the 
Plaster Shop now. Red Boyle is back with 
us after a short vacation in St. Louis. He 
still maintains St. Louis beer is the best. 

We welcome George Obdo back after 
his long siege in the hospital. 

Dave Klinger seems rather busy these 
days. He spends all his free hours house 
hunting. What's behind all this, Dave? 

Yep folks, Ralph Mead says it's the 
real thing this time. He spends all his 
evenings with his new "gal" friend, so I 
guess we will have to believe him. 

"Chris" W. E. Christoffersen wants to 
be sure of a job playing Santa Claus this 
coming Christmas, so he is starting to 
grow the beard now. 

Emory Seward says being the proud 
papa has its points, but he is getting plenty 
tired of getting his own breakfast every 
morning. 

Charlie Shoupe seems to be quite the 
fisherman, but he is really quite modest 
about it. He never tells about the big ones. 
Maybe he's just too honest! 



YOU NEED NO CASH 
FOR YOUR CLOTHES 

Your Credit is good at 

RUBIN'S 

BETTER CLOTHES 

for Jlen and Women 

ON CREDIT 

713 BROADWAY 

No Red Tape — No Carrying Charges 

For Men 

Suits. . . $19.50, up 
Sport Coats . $12.50 

up 
Slacks . . . $7.50, up 
Shoes .... 5.50 " 

Furnishings . . . Robes, etc. 

• • • 

NO DOWN PAYMENT NECESSARY 

TERMS TO SUIT YOUR CONVENIENCE 



For U 


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Dresses . . 


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up 


Coats . . . 


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SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
FLYERS NEWS 

By Joe Hai'lik 
TULY 4 brings Wedding Bells into the 
" club this month. Seems that little Dan 
Cupid has taken a pot shot at our indis- 
pensible Fredrick "Ace" Robertson. That 
little dart of Dan's must have a powerful 
sting, and left Freddie walking around 
in a daze for two weeks before the ef- 
fects had worn off. The lucky bride is 
none other than Cansolidated's office em- 
ploye Hazel Brink, now quoted as Mrs. 
"Ace" Robertson. 

This month also finds the Southern 
California Flyers with a membership roll 



topping 40 members, and very shortly 
Piek's Airport will be sporting the club's 
2S ship. Introducing our new air-minded 
members who have joined the legion of 
"Ozone Addicts" we have: Ben Prayble, 
John Artukovich, Everett Triplett, Mil- 



SEE THE 1940 
INDIANS 

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE SALES GO. 

GUY UROUHART 
1041 Columbia St. San Diego 

Open Eveningt • Termi 



Robert D. Maxwell Co, 



Main 5011 



SAN DIEGO 



Broadway at State 




TF you're buying a new car this year, there 
is one automobile you ought look at first. 

It's modern enough to pace the ^vhole 
range of 1940 values- -and low-priced enough 
to be in any man's reach. 

^^ You'll have no real way of ^/''^^ 
knowing what your 1940 money ought to buy 
until you've got your hands on a Buick and 
seen w^hat a really modern automobile 
is like. 

Whether you buy on price, size, 

3f style, comfort or performance ^ 

doesn't make much difference. 



" Se6t buu 5 Sulck! 



WF 



20 



Consolidator 



INSTRUCTION IN AIRCRAFT LOFTING 

The IRVIN AIRCRAFT SCHOOL announces 
the opening of a special course of training in 
AIRCRAFT LOFTING. 

Classes will begin August the 5th. Instruction 
■will be given by experienced Engineers, now 
employeii in the industry. 

Day and Night Classes. 

For Information 

See Mr. Iirin. at the Irvin Aircraft School 

1616 W. Lewis St. 

Phone Woodcrest 1440 San Diego, Calif. 



MISSION 

DRY 
CLEANERS 



MISSION DRY CLEANING 

IS LIKE CONSOLIDATED 

AIRPLANES ... IT FLIES 

ABOVE ALL 



Phone J-4139 
ADDRESS 105 WASH. 



ton Olman, Roy Martinson, Leo Ferris, 
Albert Gaudrault, Dean Yost, Carl John- 
son, L. M. Gibson. 

The rapid growth of our club shows 
signs of keen interest taken by many of 
those who would not as much as look at 
a plane a year ago; this increasing inter- 
est will soon find the Southern California 
Flyers adding to their list another and 
maybe larger ship. 

MORE SPORTS . . . 

^y \r. C. Gilchrist 

Now that the first round of softball is 
over, two teams have come through with- 
out losing a game. We have the equipment 
for another round of play, so get busy and 
see how far your department will go! We 
will try to form four leagues of six teams. 
The play off will bring basket ball into 
season without loss of sporting events in 
your department. 

In order to organize basket ball teams 
or other sporting events, it will be neces- 
sary to have each man recorded before 
play begins. Let us know what sport you 
are interested in. This helps us to arrange 
entertainment for you in your spare time. 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection oF Pipes in San Diego, 
Including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 




It Costs So Little More to Be Safe! 

. . . and all the features you demand of 
new Tires YOU WILL GET in . . . . 



n 



San Diego County 

Distributors 
... Since 1925 ... 



Use DORMAN'S 

EASY PAY 

"Bonus" PLAN 

It's different! The 
convenient way to 
buy and pay as you 
earn. Investigate! 



DORMAN'S ^'Master 

RETREADING 

Streamlined beauty . . . long wear assured by thick 
non-skid Tread of U. S. "tempered" tread rubber; 
world-Famous For wear. SaFety resulting From superior 
workmanship and the use oF selected carcasses. 
Every Retread meets the exacting speciFications oF 
National Institute of Retread Standards and is iden- 
tified by the medallion. 

Telephone F. 775 5 «) 

DORMMS 

8th Ave. and O Street 

QDAKJ^LJCC ^'^^ ""'' ^' ^^i"" Boulevard 
DK/\rNV.r1tD: Washington at Falcon Street 



MUSIC 

Accordions 
S29.5'>fo«1000 

Wurlitzer 
Accord ian a 
Excelsior 
Radiciona 
Hohner 
Brendisi 

Band Instruments 

Buescher • Selmar • Elkhart • Martin 

and Washburn Guitars 

Prii'ate Lessons by Professionals 

Terms as low as ^1.25 week 



fo-utheln Cclikoflnia 

MU^IC CO. 



ITUAm 6. A5HMIH6, PR[1. 





Pi 



2p5 



"\ 



, you up . . . 

I but let's you Sleep 

Here's mellow-blended 
coffee that's had sleep- 
killing acids AGED 
OUT. Try it. You'll 
like it! 



f 


BUY A TIN TODAY 


s. 


J. WINES 


COFFEE , A 

COMPANY |„'s"i,ui12° 



^ 



J 



"Let's Get 
Associated*' 

YOUR 
SMILING 
ASSOCIATED 
DEALER 

Selling 

Aviation Ethyl, "Flying A" 
Gasolines 

Cycol and Veedol 
Motor Oils 

LUBRICATION 

Factory Specified 




August, 1940 



21 




the 

finest 

reconditioned 



USED CARS 

Discover for yourself why Tufford is of- 
ficially acclaimed the FINEST USED CAR 
LOT OF ANY DE SOTO DEALER IN THE 
ENTIRE UNITED STATESt See for your- 
self the amazing lower pricesi Discover 
the sensational Tufford terms . . . and 
higher trade-in allowances! Don't woit — 1| 
or hesitate — come in TODAYI 




"B" AT FRONT ST. 
"FOR A BETTER DEAL" 
MAIN 3188 



"X" NEWS 

By Drowne 

Jack May seems to be doing things up 
right by throwing away his razor and 
buying a horse at the same time. We won- 
der just what the connection is. 

The other night Bernie Swartz was 
fishing at Mission Bay with his father and 
brother. ... A large mullet jumped out 
of the water hitting Bernie's spear, and 
falling into the boat. Bernie swears by his 
story! 

Twenty-one days of field training for 
the California National Guard at Seattle, 
Washington, will draw heavily upon the 
Experimental Department. A considerable 
number from this department are detailed 
to go, starting August 4th. 

Wedding bells rang again in the Ex- 
perimental Department, this time for Bill 
Gibson and Dorothy Jones. They were 
married June 29th at Yuma, Arizona. We 
all wish them the best of luck and may 
the trail of married life be strewn with 
happiness! 

Final Assembly's gain is Experimental's 
loss as Art Collins was recently transferred. 
All the gang wish Art the best of luck 
and speedy advancement in his new job. 

Receipt for having friends — be one! 



You can buy a beautiful 
TWO bedroom "IDEAL 
HOME" including lot for 



150 



DOWN 



$22.41 PER MONTH 

TAXES AND INSURANCE EXTRA 



OWN YOUR OWN HOME 




SEE ONE OF THESE 
MODEL HOMES TODAY 

Located at 2304 Chicago 
St., MORENA PARK (just 
past Bay Park Village)... 
and on El Cajon Boule- 
vard at ThirtvEighth St. 



"Ideal Homes" are 
complete In everv. 
way. Beautiful, con- 
venient ... the kind 
you'll be proud of. 



*Our Aim — Satisfied Customerji^' 



PhO DOUGHTY 

BUILDING SERVICE 

3823 EL CAJON - TALBOT 3593 



You KNOW the Price is RIGHT... and the Quality 
Satisfactory... when you buy Jewelry at BARANOV S 

^top In ana. aet act;,ualntea. 




22 



Consolidator 



Said the boss, "I'm a man of few words. 
When I point my finger at you I want 
you to come." Says the new man. "I too, 
am a man of few words. If I shake my 
head I ain't comin'." — A. A. Reich. 
Wi 

Common sense is verv uncommon. 




FENDERS - BODY 

RADIATORS - TOPS 
UPHOLSTERY and 
PAINTING 

Peterson Bros. 

Docs ifoin- car COLUMBIA and E STS. 
look trearif? Fr. 2i64 



CONVENIENT 
WAY 



TODD'S 

Complete Men's Store 

Give Liberal Credit to 
Workers in the "Consolidated" 



SEE THESE VALUES* $10 SAVINGS 

Guaranteed 

S12.50 Value Sport CoDts 7.95 
Pants and Slacks \ 2.95 

■' and 
$6.95 Value / 4 95 

Choice Selection of 

2 -Pant Suits 
22.50 10.50 and $15 



Home of ADAM HATS 



TODD'S 

Complete Clothing Bldg. 

Cor. 5th & E St. 



TOOL DESIGN TIDBITS 

By Magitire 

AMUSING incidents this month: Ray 
. Peters' "Clothesline" or baby shower. 
This event was the day after he announced 
the birth of Miss Page Brooke Peters (7i/2 
lbs.). The boys in the department strung 
a line across Ray's desk and really con- 
tributed generously: baby blankets, 
dresses, shoes, etc. Was Ray's face red 
when the watchman on the front door 
requested a look at the package he was 
taking from the plant. 

Van Meter went sailing and after 
spending two hours on the bottom of his 
upturned boat sending out SOS he has 
taken up amateur photography. 

E. L. Minch can't get to work with- 
out a flat tire. Paul Welty is buying two 
more alarm clocks. Why? 

Tisdale, Kick and Wills are so far away 
that T. P. Shaw is the only one in the 
department who can muster enough lung 
power to attract their attention. 

Happy to report that Miss Phillis Koe- 
nig, daughter of Phil Koenig, has re- 
turned home from the hospital and is 
rapidly recovering. 

Roy Smeltzer's new pipe is large enough 
to hold one full can of Bill Ekdahl's to- 
bacco. 

New in the department this month: 
Henry Knippenberg and W. H. Barling. 
Our greetings. 

Some of the boys were overdressing a 
little, so Wes Kline has taken a hand to 
show them just how it should be done. 

Charles (Romeo) Smith says it's too 
warm — that's all. 

TUBE BENDING 

By Hart 

The Tube Bending Department was 
well represented in the tennis tournament. 
Although James Nuse didn't quite reach 
the finals, he gave a good account of him- 
self. 

Seven fellows in the department are 
planning real vacations this year. They 



are: H. Deische, Dane Pearce, E. Van 
Denburgh, E. Rasys, G. C. Hammett, D. 
Wharton and Curtis Franklin. Hope they 
all have a good time fishing, or loafing, or 
what? 

L. Grabbit never wants to see another 
horse after two hours of steady riding. 





How much money has 

"passed" through your 

hands In the past 10 years? 

i^SS<^ How much will you have In 
the next 10 to 15 years? 



Have you proiuded Jor 

LIVING PROTECTION? 

INVESTORS SYNDICATE 

Established 1894 

SAN DIEGO OFFICE 

209 Bank o( America Bldg. 

Telephone Franklin 7876 

See 

E. G. "Brad" BRADSHAW 
3427 Van Dyke Ave., Phone R. 7034 

Offices In 250 Principal Cities In U. S. A. 



It's FUN to be thirsty 



Item 



Ask for 
and get 

GENUINE 

^ GRAPE 
PUNCH 



uvt^tNfi. 



5^ 



RETREAD TIRE SPECIAL 




EXCH. 

ANY Passenger 
CAR SIZE 

Retreads or Recaps 

QUALITY TIRE SALES CO. 



918 1st Are., at E 



M.S6S4 



August, 1940 



23 



FINISH DEPARTMENT NEWS 

By Bud Dale 

WITH the Fourth of July safely 
passed, and no casualties, the Paint 
Shop is in the groove, with paint flying 
thick and fast. 

Some new faces are seen around the 
shop; also many old hands have returned. 



TOOLS 

Tools for every kind of 
work are stocked here; Tools 
for machinists, carpenters, 
metal workers, etc. Select from 
GUARANTEED nationally known 
tools such as . . . 

• L. S. Starrett Co. 

• Plomb MFg. Co. 

• Kennedy Steel Tool Kits 

• Crescent Tools 

• Klenk's Aviation Snips 
BUDGET TERMS GIVEN 

SAN DIEGO HARDWARE 

840-850 FIFTH AVENUE 



It's still a mystery concerning Wally 
Brown's glasses. At least some of the 
boys are worried about it. Maybe Pop 
Shepperd, the sheriff of Rattlesnake Gulch, 
could solve it. 

Orve Hubbard returned from his vaca- 
tion, spent among the man-made birds of 
Lindbergh Field. Like the postman hik- 
ing on his day off He was well pleased, 
though, and said he really enjoyed it. 

Roy Coombs of the Covering Depart- 
ment put in his bid for a cross country 
record Sunday, July 7. He "flew" his 
Chevrolet four-wheel cabin job to Bakers- 
field and back, leaving at 1 p. m. and re- 
turning that night. Emergency case, 
though, not a pleasure trip. Poor Roy! 

"Parson" Ollie Stewart, that "gentle- 
man from the South yards," left for ol' 
Frisco July 1 3 on a vacation. Ollie took 
in the Fair, relatives and Yosemite Na- 
tional Park. What a shock for relatives. 
Don't forget some photos, Ollie. 

"Arkie" Morey had better be on his 
toes now. Competition in form of brother 
Carl on the night shift is the reason. A 
promising young man with book "larnin'." 

Mrs. John Gzda — "How can I get a 
wart off my hand?" 



A MECHANIC IS NO BETTER THAN HIS TOOLS 



BETTER TOOLS MAKE YOUR JOB EASY 

Even if our hero does exaggerate the point, you can't get away 
from the fact that your job can be made easier with better tools. 
Why make things hard for yourself with tools not so good as Garrett 
nationally advertised brands? Better see"Whitey" 
Dake in the employee's tool store and see what he 
candoby way of making your job easier. Do it today! 

GARRETT 

SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

3844 Santa Fe Ave. 
Los Angeles 



.v''''^-. 





AASE (ACE) BROS. 

bring you the best in LUNCHES, SANDWICHES, COLD 
DRINKS and TOBACCO 

* 
3 LOCATIONS-Inside North and South Gates and in Back Center Yard 



Doctor — "I would advise you to shoot 
him." 

Ernie Olmstead has decided to enter a 
new field in employment. He is leaving 
Consolidated Aircraft for Consolidated 
Gas and Electric. 



^939 FIFTH AVE. i 



r ■s&H" 

STAMPS 
GIVEN 



CROSBY SQUARES 

ffs.m K/PKJ America's Most Famous 
or IVIQIN Union-made Shoes 



^5 




Hours Faster 




to NEW YORK 

For your convenience in travel, your 
comfort aloft, TWA presents the 
Stratoliners . . . first 4-engine, 
supercharged cabin airplanes in the 
United States. With spacious ac- 
commodations for 33 passengers, 
TWA Stratoliners bring new speed, 
new reliability, new luxury to the 
nation's skyways. Leave Los An- 
geles at 6: CO p.m. ... be in 
New York at 10:40 a.m. the next 
morning . . . only 13 hours, 40 
minutes coast-to-coast! 

Reservations: Call Your Travel 
Agent or 

FRANKLIN 6 5 8 1 

3 56 C Street 
S.in Diego California 




24 



Consolidator 




Home Building Simplified 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING 
Satisfactory Loans 
Saving Suggestions 
Suitable Materials 
Selecting Bargains 
Servicing Your Job 

For 28 Years 

we have been supplying all the ma- 
terial to build thousands of homes in 
San Diego. May we help you? 



\ 



tVERYThlNC " BtlUIINC^ 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

4128 University ' Oceansldc ■ El Ceniro 



SHEET METAL NEWS 

By H. B. Millman 

IT is a good thing Tommie Wathen can 
swim — he had the misfortune to fall 
off the Coronado Ferry about 3 a.m. one 
Sunday morning lately. He claimed some- 
one pushed him. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Alianelli have moved 
into their new home at 473 5 Boundary. 
Every one is welcome. 

Walt Borg misplaced his car the other 
night and had to take a taxi home. The 
car was locaetd the next day still waiting 
for him. 

Aloysius Sugg, one of our inspectors, 
had to give up chewing Beech Nut — his 
girl refused to kiss him good night. 

Gordon L. Grant was seriously injured 
in a car accident recently — here is hoping 
for a speedy recovery. 




No Money Down 

■ Equip your 
car now 
for safe 
SUMMER 
DRIVING 

No Red Tape 

No Delay 
Quick Service 



Ooodrich 

Silvertown Stores 



905 B Street Phone F. 6258 




FORD 
Mercury 
Lincoln- 
Zephyr 



"HOW'S THIS, CONSAIRS? 

230 U3ec( (2at6 Sold 
^a5t Montk! IVou^/ 



That means there are plenty 
of Red-Hot Barsains here!' 



Columbia at C and 
University at Seventh 

OPEN EVENINGS and SUNDAYS 



ICE COLD 

LEMONADE 



5^ 



Made by JOHN, age 11 



ICE COLD 

LEMONADE 




% JURAT'S YOURS, MISTER? 

Have a shot of Joe's? It looks the same. Ei^en tastes the 
same. And people do buy It- -they like to save a couple of cents, 
don't we all. But they come back to Johnny. Why? Well, they 
seem, to lose interest in that 2-cent saving, when they learn that 
Ethel — Ethel is Joe's cat — that Ethel fell in Joe's lemonade. 



DON'T look now, but aren't there 
traces of cat in that low-priced 
car insurance they've been trying 
to sell you? Must be, or it wouldn't 
be that low priced. Couldn't be. If 
you want insurance that insures, 



go up a couple of cents. (Jokers 
belong in card games -- right?) 



SALMONS &WOLCOTT CO. 



316 S. D. Trust & Savings Bldg. - F. 5141 



Open until 5 p.m. daily, Saturday until noon, Evenings by appointment 



CRAFTSMAN TOOLS used for ah Aircraft Work 
and for Every Purpose where Precision and Reliability are Demanded . . . 



"CRAFTSMAN" 
Ball Pein Hammers 

Correct design and balance to make 
every blow count. High quality forged 
steel, properly tempered. Full polished 
heads. Hickory handles. 

2-4-6 and 8 oz. size 65c 

12 Ounce Size 69c 

1 6 and 20 Ounce Size 89c 

24 Ounce Size 98c 

32 Ounce Size 1.25 

6-Oz. RAWHIDE MALLET. . .98c 

Buy Anything Totaling $10 or More 
on Sears EASY PAYMENT PLAN. 





Pliers of the best materials and work- 
manship in all the popular patterns to 
handle your job better and speedier. 

Craftsman Battery Pliers .... 89c 
Craftsman Water Pump Pliers, 1.00 
Craftsman Long Nose Pliers. .1.19 
6-in. Diagonal Cutting Pliers, 1.49 

Side Cutting Pliers 1.45 

8-in. Combination Pliers .... 1 .35 



Daily use on all kinds of Aircraft jobs 
have definitely proven Craftsman Amer- 
ica's finest tools. Expert craftsmen 
everywhere depend on them. 



Hack Saw 
pistol grip; 
tra strong 



1.19 



Tin Snips . . . 

Special analysis 

steel. 12-inch. 

1.35 

Set 



Punch & Chisel Screwdriver 

Set Vanadium Vanadium 

steel. 5-pc. blades. 4-pc. 

1.29 1.39 



for your convenience . . . CASH YOUR 
CONSOLIDATED CHECKS at Sears with 
no fuss or bother. 



SEARS, ROEBUCK and CO. 



Sixth Ave. and "C" Street 



Franklin 6571 




\BoV 






Five Ocean Rafts of logs moored in San Diego Harbor, containing 30 Million board 
feet of lumber to be manufactured at our Mill in San Diego. Width, 52 feet ; Length, 
1000 feet; Contents, 6 million feet; Binding chains, 200 tons; Depth below water, 24 
feet; Height above water, 12 feet; Towed 1000 miles from Oregon. 

• That Benson Lumber Company owns and operates the only saw- 

mill in Southern California? 

• That Our annual payroll of |250,000.00 is spent right here in San 

Diego, and that our annual taxes of $120,000.00 are a great 
benefit to the City of San Diego? 

• That San Diego's "Heaven on Earth" climate is IDEAL for air- 

drying lumber, conceded by government authorities to be the 
best method of drying lumber ? 

• That San Diego homes are protected from termites by pressure 

treated lumber produced locally only by our company? 

• That Financing service is available through the loan and escrow de- 

partment of this 33 year old company? 

• That visitors are welcome to see the lumber mill in action ? 



The Pick ofThe Trees 



BENSON LUMBER GO. 





THE ARMY'S XB-24 (Consolidated Model 32) STARTS TO WARM UP FOR A FLIGHT. 



SEPTEMBER •1940 



Out of state, 
out of luck? 



Ever hear the one about the engineer and the blonde? Seems the 
engineer was on an auto trip up near Yellowstone. The straight 8 
he drove was a hooper-dooper — every gadget you could think of, 
and several extra. His insurance however lacked a couple gadgets, 
as he found out when some blonde piled into him at an intersec- 
tion. The blonde attached his car first thing, and it turned out 
his insurance company had no ready facilities for issuing Re- 
lease of Attachment Bond. So? So Joe (his name was Joe) had 
to wire home for the extra time and extra money it took to 
lift that attachment. 

Text for today: a good insurance company would have had 
an agent in that distant place, who would have lifted that 
attachment like (snap) that. And Joe (his name was Joe) 
would have been on his way. 



snimons & uiouott co 

312 S. D. Trust & Savings BIdg. F. 5141 
Open until 5 p. m., Saturdays until 12 
noon, and any evening by appointment. 




N 






Volume 5 



September, 1940 



Number 9 



MATERIAL FOR 

THE CONSOLIDATOR 

The Consolidator needs good news about 
fellow employees and can use about all 
that is received, provided it meets certain 
requirements. To avoid offending anyone 
who submits material however, certain 
facts must be pointed out: 

1. All material: Stories, news items and 
pictures, etc., must be completely identi- 
fied with the clock number, department 
and name of the person turning in the 
material. This is important, because if any 
question arises as to spelling of names or 
just what is meant, the author can be 
reached quickly for checking. 

2. When submitting pictures along 
with a story, remember that these must 
be Glossy Prints. Dull prints won't re- 
produce satisfactorily, and negatives can't 
be used. 

3. Get your news in as early as pos- 
sible. There is generally a deluge of ma- 
terial at just the moment when the print- 
er's deadline must be met, which means 
that there is little or no time allowable 
for checking or reaching you to tell you 
what is wrong or lacking in the material 
you turn in, and therefore your material 
may not make the current issue. 

4. Don't let a thing like not getting 
your first contribution printed stop you 
from turning in more items or pictures 
. . . keep on shooting in your material and 
ideas, but be very careful to comply with 
the above requirements. The magazine is 
yours, so let's hear from you!! 

*-^ 

EXHIBIT . . . 

Dioramas showing Consolidated paint 
shop and the final finish are now on ex- 
hibit in the windows of W. P. Fuller and 
Co., at 803 Seventh Avenue and 2911 
University. These dioramas represent a 
portion of the display the Fuller com- 
pany had at the San Francisco Exposi- 
tion featuring aircraft paints and finish- 
ing materials. They are complete, down 
to PBY models under assembly in the 
yard. 



CONSOLIDATED NATIONAL 
GUARD 

That Consolidated Aircraft employees 
are fully cognizant of preparedness and 
contributing toward it, may be seen from 
the fact that a large group of men at- 
tended the Coast Guard summer training 
at Chehalis this year. With the deadline 
for this issue coming at the wrong time, 
full particulars of the participation and 
the training were not as yet available, as 
we went to press, but the following list 
of names of Consolidated employees in the 
National Guard will give some idea of 
the number of men who attended: 

Adair, Theodore, Abel, John M., Adam- 
son, Nevin O. 

Bandy, Ralph D., Battles, Wm. R., Bell, 
Wm. C, Bilick, Chris N., Bogan, Geo. O., 
Bos, Joseph H., Bragdon, Roy M., Bryan, 
Donald H., Byrum, Geo. L. 

Canada, Hubert L., Cardenas, Robert L., 
Carnett, Wm. A., Chastain, Wm. B., 
Collins, Thomas W. 

Daenitz, Mortimer, Donnelly, Thomas 
E. 

Farrar, Robert. 

Garcia, Herman, Gilbert, Marvin M., 
Gilstrap, Maurice F. 

Harer, Robert A., Harwick, Wm. J., 
Hayes, Paul J., Henderson, H. M., Hobbs, 
Harry A., Horton, Leonard M. 

Isaacson, Edgar R. 

Jones, Byron M. 

Kauffman, Barton, Kline, Vincent B. 

Layne, Jr., Newton M., Leaf, Wm. R., 
Luck, Jr., James B. 

McColl, Winston L., McGehee, Wayne 
P., McLaren, Arthur, Maher, John A., 
Melching, Wagner F., Mariott, Wm. H., 
Morgan, Glenn R., Morgan, Keith C, 
Morrison, Walter R., Muse, Jessie B. 

Odle, Kenneth R., O'Farrell, Jack. 

Painter, Fields G., Papineau, Milton D. 

Ramsey, Wilbert L., Renkke, Carl, Rix, 
Robert N., Root, Harmon B., Roundtree, 
Oscar, Jr., Rudeen, Roy E., Rush, Louis D. 

Sammis, Herbert F., Scribner, John., 



Sherman, Claude B., Sleeth, Sterling S., 
Smith, Robert H. 

Thickston, Wm. D., Tickner, Chas. A. 

Wagner, Everett L., Watson, Albert 
O., Webber, Roy F., Wery, Emil, Wester- 
field, Robert H., Wyman, Roy. 

York, Jack C. 

DEDICATION . . . 

AT the very last minute as this goes to 
^ press, plans for a fitting celebration 
of the completion of our new buildings 
in the form of dedication ceremonies are 
rapidly formulating, but as yet the details 
and definite schedule can not be obtained. 
As this issue reaches your hands the cere- 
mony will have just passed and be fresh 
in your mind. What can be said of it in 
advance is that it will be a fitting occa- 
sion with a large number of distinguished 
persons lending their prestige to this event 
in Consolidatcd's history, and a large group 
of friends of Consolidated employees will 
be in attendance. The number of guests 
of individual Consolidators only being held 
down in number due to the necessity for 
restraining the size of the crowd to the 
number of persons it was felt possible to 
accommodate. Highlights of the event 
have now become of course, the speeches 
by Major Fleet and others, and the playing 
of Consolidatcd's newly formed orchestra. 
Thus is marked another milestone in the 
growth of Consolidated from its inception 
in 1923 . . . and in the words of the 
radio and the screen, "Time marches on!!" 
to which we parallel, "Consolidated forges 
ahead!" 

HONORED ... 

Bert Freakley, foreman of the tube- 
bending department, was honored by the 
San Diego Aerie Fraternal Order of Eagles 
at dance given August 24th for his fra- 
ternal work since transferring from the 
Buffalo Aerie. In addition, the new class 
of members, initiated August 27th, was 
designated as the "Bert Freakley Class." 
Congratulations, Bert. 



All communications shou'd be addressed to the CONSOLIDATOR, c/o CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, Lindbergh Field, Son Diego, California. 
Permission to reprint, in whole or in part, any of the subject matter herein, is gladly granted any established publication provided proper credit is given the 
CONSOLIDATOR. Material moy not be used for advertising. Printed monthly in the U. S. A. by Frye & Smith, 850 Third Ave., San Diego, California. 



Consoiidator 



;^ ' .,;f;;^^t^ii^^gpjvlj*%I;4^^ 




THAT new emerald on Ruth Sears' 
finger is more than just a ring, it 
signifies a wedding on the 26 th of October. 
. . . After a strenuous lunch of orange 
juice, Lucille Fisher came back to find 
a tempting piece of lemon pie on her 
desk, but she didn't yield . . . Anyone 
with a patent on dent-proof fenders 
please see Evelyn Kells, she's having a lit- 
tle trouble along that line . . . Why 
doesn't Bob Combe give us a ride on the 
yard scooter as he did Mary Eleanor Mere- 
dith, we're envious . . . Maxine Bennett 
is getting very streamline and it's very 
becoming . . . Martha Coons has been 
transferred from Personnel to Purchasing, 
welcome! . . . Who's the handsome 
stranger escorting Edna Willwerth to 
lunch these days? . . . The gals in Per- 
sonnel are now established in their new 
headquarters . . . Juanita "Miss Blue" 
Smith isn't taking another trip home 'til 
she can resist that Iowa fried chicken . . . 



At this writing Grace Path is enjoying 
an airplane trip to New York City, and 
the World's Fair is just one of many in- 
teresting sights she will see . . . Norma 
Haugard creates a sensation when she 
applies lipstick with her miniature paint 
brush . . . Jane Dunn is all smiles since 
the arrival of her sisters from Buffalo . . . 
Florence Cannon finally got a permanent 
after keeping us in suspense for weeks. 
. . . Clipped from the Union's Northeast 
Corner is this clever verse: 
"Go to Father" she said 
When I asked her to wed. 
Now she knew that I knew 
That her father was dead, 
And she knew that I knew 
What a life he had led. 
So she knew that I knew 
What she meant when she said 
"Go to father." 

— Chemistry and You. 



MODEL BUILDER . . . 

John Kara of Metal Bench in 1939 
completed a beautiful model of the Con- 
sohdated Aircraft plant as it was at that 
time. This model was displayed for a 
time in the main lobby, and later was 
sent to San Francisco to be exhibited there 
as a part of San Diego's exhibit. 

This year in his spare hours, Kara con- 
structed a new model of the plant, com- 
plete with all details. Since the lobby has 
become a bit small to hold the new model 



and all those who would pause to in- 
spect it, the model was displayed in a 
5 th Ave. window of Walker's Depart- 
ment store for a week, attracting con- 
siderable crowds and comment. Now the 
Chamber of Commerce is exhibiting this 
piece of Mr. Kara's craftmanship for all 
who wish to see it, at the Chamber of 
Commerce Building. Mr. Kara is to be 
congratulated on this fine piece of work 
which he built in about 3 months of 
his spare time. 



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FROM THE JIG BUILDERS 

By Pat Paxton 

We are the gang you have not heard 
much about (Bob Watt's jig builders) 
but don't worry, you will ... we are 
growing in number and in prominence. 

For instance, there is Jack (Jim Far- 
ley) Chudleigh . . . who of you has mis- 
sed him? 

And now since Del Mar has opened up, 
Don Wilkerson is in training. He travels 
eight furlongs, four times per day and, 
he says, if there is a new consignment 
of bicycles, he will enter the next six 
day race. 

Speaking about conscription, there is 
Tennessee Lejou — he has been oiling and 
polishing up his old squirrel rifle and he 
has been doing a bit of sniping around 
Pacific Beach. 

Frank Broussee's gout is getting along 
fine. He will be chasing the fox up Rey- 
nard Hill almost anytime now. 

Did you ever hear of Ken Cushinau, 
the golfer? Bring on your challenges, 
boys. 

Joe Hickman is the proud father of a 
6 pound 2 ounce boy that made its ap- 
pearance Monday, August 12. 

Herman Loescher resents the crack 
made at him last month about spending 
all his time eating while on a fishing trip. 
He says Robby Robinson and Elmer Bas- 
teck were just jealous because they were 
too seasick for food. 

At this writing Les Ekberg was plan- 
ning to merge into matrimony about 
August 24. 

Tom Bignell was presented with an 8 
pound heir, Thursday August 8. 

Chas. H. Easley, Inspector, was joined 
by his wife and two children and a 
nephew who arrived from Mt. Vernon, 
111., on August 10. Their new home is in 
Chula Vista. 
NOTE: 

Pat Paxton, the clever fellow who 
writes our Tool Room news (From the 
Jig Builders) is too bashful to mention 
his marriage to Wanda Thompson on 
August 16. The best luck to them both! 

Jim Hoeger 



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September, 1940 



JOE GWINN . . . 

ONE of the business clubs has a 
custom of introducing new members 
to its body by winding up its introduc- 
tions in an informal manner something 
like this: "... and so fellows, now that 
I've told you something about our new 
member, who he is, and you now all know 
him by sight, just call him 'Jim'." To this 
the whole club responds in unison, "Hy, 
ya, Jim!" and the introduction is com- 
plete. 

It is in the same spirit that we wish to 
introduce J. M. Gwinn, Jr. Most of those 
who know him call him Joe already. 

"Joe" Gwinn, who joined Consolidated 
August first, really re-joined Consolidated 
for he was assistant Chief Engineer in the 
old Gallaudet Corporation when Major 
Fleet was its Vice-President and General 
Manager. Thus, when Consolidated Air- 
craft Corporation was formed in 1923, 
Joe Gwinn came into the new corporation 
as Assistant Chief Engineer. Col. V. E. 
Clark at the time held the position of 
Chief Engineer of our company. 

When Col. Clark left, and I. M. Lad- 
don, our Vice-President and Chief En- 
gineer joined; Joe Gwinn was engineer in 
charge of Unit No. 1. The corporation as 
then set up, operated in units, with each 
unit devoting its efforts to the production 
of a particular type of plane design. Num- 
ber one unit produced training planes, so 
that when Unit number three was formed 
to build the Fleet planes, Joe Gwinn took 
over the engineering phase as these air- 
planes were closely allied with the trainers. 

Later Consolidated's trend swung to the 
manufacture of our larger craft and the 
units including the engineering staffs 
coalesced into our present single unit. At 
this juncture Joe Gwinn branched out 
for himself, forming the Gwinn Aircar 
Company. The product was the well 
known Gwinn Aircar which he designed 
and built, and which subsequently received 
an A.T.C. This was the first A.T.C. is- 
sued for a stall proof, spin proof airplane. 
Misfortune, however, struck the strug- 
gling concern. Captain Frank Hawks tak- 
ing the plane out of an airport, struck 
wires, crashed, and was killed. 

Brewster Aeronautical Company pur- 
chased the design and manufacturing 
rights on Consolidated's small planes at 
about this time and Joe made himself 
available to Brewster as he was most fa- 
miliar with these planes. He spent several 
months on the preparation of their bids 
for the training plane competition. Last 
fall he joined Bell Aircraft, builders of 




the Airacuda and Airacobra airplanes, as 
chief project engineer, rounding our a 
wide range of engineering experience. And 
now once again he has joined Consolidated, 
taking a position here as Production En- 
gineer, and is rapidly becoming acquainted 
with our vastly expanded personnel. 

It is interesting to note for those not 
familiar with his career, that Gwinn 
started his work with a B.E. from Tulane 
University in Mechanical and Electrical 
Engineering, joined up with the Army in 
1917 right out of college, and was a 
pilot during the war with the 27th Aero 
Squadron, seeing some active duty at the 
front. Joe likes California and its "cli- 
mate", stating that the only difference is 
that in California we have unusual weather 
whenever there are visitors, and in Buffalo 
it is unusual all the time. 

"X" NEWS 

By Droivne 

There just is no such thing as pleasing 
Stabenau for no matter what kind of 
hours a day or how many days a week 
he works, he says he can't get enough 
time for his flowers. His theme song 
should be "I'm So Sorry for Myself." 

Otto is calling for all first-class bowlers 
for the coming season. Everybody will be 
given a chance for the 1940 team in "X" 
Department. 



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MUSIC NOTES 



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By the "Maestro" 

Elsewhere in this ever growing pub- 
lication you will find the names and 
photos of "new arrivals" and "hopefuls" 
— but none will ever reach the popularity 
nor be any more desired than Consoli- 
dated's "New Baby" — the Consolidated 
Glee Club. 

Our "child" is really precocious and 
being a "wonder baby," wrote up its 
own announcement as follows: 

Arrived: 7:30 P.M., Aug. 1, 1940. 

Place: IS 16 Sheridan Ave. 

Doctor: Richard Holtzclaw. 

Note: — The following "details" make 
up the "assembly" at present, but more 
are needed to complete the job, so why 
don't a bunch of you "Barber Shop Har- 
monizers" join up and make this a 
"howling" success. 

Kel Aiken, John Bleifuss, Jim McCoy, 
Joe Ouellette, Tommy Joubert, C. D. 
Maguire, Robert Mussen, Charles S. Mor- 
gan, Leonard Wisniew, Olan Sandin, Owen 
Stockton, Gene Price, Dick Holtzclaw, 
Glee Club Director. 



METAL BENCH NEWS 

By Rodriguez 

Congratulations to Ted Brooks are in 
order — he became the proud father of a 
baby boy the other day. Thanks for the 
cigars, Ted. 

Chester Duozinski came to work one 
Monday looking like boiled lobster. Was 
the sun hot? 

Bill Waite and Bill Rasp just returned 
from their vacations. Bill Waite took a 
trip to Salt Lake City, by way of Mojave 
Desert, Grand Canyon, Zion and Bryce 
National Parks. Bill's only complaint is 
that he ran into heat — 120° of it — in 
the desert. Bill Rasp took in the Fair in 
San Francisco. From there he visited the 
Sequoia National Park and the Yosemite 
National Park. 

Frank Bailey had a nice vacation at 
Warner Springs. 

That guy Joe England is a poor ball 
player. But the fellows say he talks a 
good game. 

Larry Hamilton has a heart interest in 
Laguna Beach. He claims it may develop 
into something. 

Joe Bickel squandered a down payment 
on a slick 1936 Zephyr. 

Ivan Minnich has one pair of pants 
that are newly primed. Yes sir, pants, 



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badge, shoes, and all — that is, all from 
the waist down. Just ask Ivan, he'll tell 
you how it feels to have a can of prime 
dumped in your lap. 

Our friend Al Kemp has quit taking 
the fishing boats out on weekends. We are 
wondering if his interest in the boats lag- 
ged or if they were stopped by Saturday 
night's over-time. 

IN THE WRONG LOCATION 

By Kel Aiken 

IF you have anything else to do don't 
stop to read this column, for this is my 
first literary contribution to the Consoli- 
dator. It would be best to wait until I 
get better at this stuff — (that is real 
optimism) . Anyway, I'll probably spell 
your name wrong, then you'll be sore and 
there is no need of getting anyone sore 
in times like these. 

The big event of the month around the 
stockroom was the beach party held Sun- 
day August 11 at La Jolla Shores. Many 
of the stockroom personnel attended with 
their families and friends. John Ruzich 
(Radish to you) proved himself to be in 
the cast-iron stomach class by drinking 
eleven bottles of strawberry soda pop. 
After roasting weinies, marshmallows, etc., 
the bunch gathered 'round the fire for some 
singing and story telling. The story tell- 
ing was being nicely handled by Art 
Warner until Mrs. A. W. realized what 
the story was and nipped it in the bud 
as not being the type for mixed groups. 
Billy Hill had a trying experience by 
leaving his car keys in his pants pocket 
and his pants in a friend's car for safe 
keeping. Said friend left early with pants 
and keys. Billy worked three-quarters of an 
hour before getting his car opened, only 
to have his pants returned five minutes 
later. It is things like that that keep 
asylums full. Paul Wiler would have left 
early only he couldn't get enough fellows 
together to push his car halfway to La 
Jolla to get it started. John "Red" Parker 
was there with his wife. There is a nice 
harmonizing couple. Red says that he and 
his wife never argue, if Mrs. Parker says 
a thing is black, John agrees with her, if 
he says a thing is white — well, a fellow 
can be wrong! 

Speaking of marriages, we wish to ex- 
tend our best wishes to that ex-store- 
keeper, Norman Chudleigh, who, on 
August 17, said "I do" to that "fatal" 
question, "Do you promise to love, honor 
and obey, etc., etc." The new Mrs. Chud- 
leigh is the former Miss Irene Elizabeth 
McAlexander of National City. 

Ed Kellogg seems to have a sinister plot 
afoot against the Production Dispatchers. 



September, 1940 



He has recently added to his staff the 
crystal ball gazers "Swami" Lovez from 
the storeroom, to supplement the work 
done by "Yogi" Zallizzi in ferreting our 
spare parts when lost, strayed or stolen 
by the Production boys. 

Getting off the beam a second, I'd like 
to remind you that Consolidated has a 
new Male Chorus started and has been 
doing some swell work under able direc- 
tion. But more voices are needed if you 
are interested, contact any of the fellows 
who are listed elsewhere in this month's 
Consolidator. 

Bob Kemper reports himself out of quar- 
antine now after a neighbor's boy came 
down with a contagious disease and the 
whole neighborhood put under orders of 
the Health Department. Bob says his boy 
is sure growing up — says he only hits the 
kid in self-defense now. 

Insomnia trouble is claimed by Floyd 
Cowan . . . says it's so bad he can't even 
sleep when it's time to get up. 

Well, I guess that's all the gab I can 
cook up this time, and knowing that this 
effort is infinitesimal compared with those 
eminent contemporary writers, Bradshaw, 
Boeing, and that "Thing That Comes Out 
at Night," Craig Clark. I'll wind this 
thing up by ending right here at this 
period. %^ 

LINES FROM THE LOFT 

By Jimmie Spnrgeon 

ON Saturday, August 17, Carl Hiem, 
of bowling fame, took "for better 
or worse" Miss Unice Smith of this city. 
We recall the jovial mood of our Andy 
Clement before his "leap" this past June. 
Since then, Andy has developed on odd 
complex caused by getting only a short 
beer and a cheap cigar out of each pay 
check. Beware Mr. Hiem else you end up 
without even the beer. 

We welcome several new men to this 
department but we also regret to lose sev- 
eral men. The greater number of the men 
leaving are returning to school to com- 
plete their education. 

It is amusing to watch the long line 
of men waiting to spend their nickle in the 
new coke dispensing machines. What, 
with these new electric fountains "selling 
out" two and three times a day, you can 
see we have no dry men in these parts. 

We had a man in the loft who en- 
visioned for himself a small, tropical is- 
land out in the blue Pacific, where one 
only had to wander about, enjoying life 
and "living off the fat of the land." That 
man was Montie Manning and since his 
departure, we wonder if he really has in- 
tentions of following up this dream of 



paradise he often spoke about. Anyway, 
it's a nice way to remember Montie, as- 
sociating his name with the thought of 
great palms gently bowing to a soft, 
warm breeze on some South Sea hideaway. 
Mr. Summers of the Loft, known to 
many as Blitzkrieg Bill, is experimenting 
with smoke screens for this department. 
His new equipment consists of a queer- 
shaped briar that appears to be a cross 
between a stogie and a ripe cucumber. 
(Now you can throw it away, Willie.) 

We extend our sincere condolences to 
Mr. Irvin H. Owens, on the passing of 
Mrs. Lola Owens July 30th. 



PLASTER SPLASHES 

By Red Boyle 

D. Klinger is back from his honeymoon. 
He seems to be okeh except that he has 
acquired one badly blood-shot eye and I 
can't tell what is the matter with the 
other one. 

A. Mierlot has been spending a lot of 
time in Mission Beach lately. He will prob- 
ably be the next to say "I do." He seems 
to be a little afraid of her. I wonder why? 

We are hoping that everything will turn 
out okeh for G. Woodworth, who cracked 
up his car recently. 

We want to thank E. Seward for those 
cigars . . . that we didn't get. 




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PRODUCTION MINUTES 

By "Brad" Bradsbaw 

7UST returned from a vacation, and 
" after walking around "Treasure Island" 
with shoes on for a week, now I really 
need a rest. Spent several hours writing 
cards to friends which were just received. 
I wish the trash cans and mail boxes in 
Frisco did not look so much alike. Had 
trouble getting a date in the town as the 
reputation of Lou Miller, Louie Purcell, 
Matt Wielopolski, Howie Bell and other 
Consolidators had preceded me. Old Hor- 
atius would have had a busy day holding 
that "Golden Gate Bridge" as it is quite 
a stretch of concrete. It's a good thing 
they have "emergency stations" along it 
in case there is an "emergency" — took a 
peek into "Sally Rand's Nude Ranch" 
just to see how a girl looked wearing a 
"holster" — they wore nice "smiles" too. 
That's enough about the Fair, as I don't 
want to cut the attendance, go and have a 
look. 

Old tired Father Stork has turned 
European and borrowed an idea from the 
Dictators as he turned loose a "blitzkrieg" 
with "dive bombers" on Mercy Hospital 
recently, Jake Dietzer, Raymond Frindt, 
Don Benson, Al Lehman, Jim Kite and 
Stanley Saville were the "hits scored" 
with the "bundles of joy" — funny that 
Winchell gets that news days ahead of 
me. Remember Jake, that Roy Coykendall 
is still in the "preambulator business." 

From Joe Maloney's "Flower Garden" 
we are always able to "smell out" some 
choice tidbits that are ear soothing. The 
"changes" and P. V. O.'s lately have seen 
Jim Kendrick, the "Dixie Kid" make the 
fastest advancement to the "top" — Jim 
transferred to Loft — Kieth Hatter, one 
of the very few men to migrate from Iowa 
to California, is now assistant to Owen 
Stockton — you will have to ask Owen 
what he does, and La Verne Holcomb, 
has left Bill Wiley to suffer alone in Ma- 
chine Shop, to mingle among the blue 
print femmes — must be pull to make that 
job. New releases to reach Joe are "Phil" 
Phillips, lucky stiff, Alice Vincent (single) 
and Beverley Kipple (married) "Dad Gum 



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It." It's not all "rosy" in the garden as 
Mary Jane Upton will tell you after those 
bruises forced her home — funny it hap- 
pened the day after the legionnaires' dance 
— but get her version of the story. Maxine 
was at the dance too, but evidently that 
"Jiu Jitsu" Bob Marks has taught her 
came in handy as she returned in much 
better condition. The mystery of what 
happened to Beverley Kipple's eye is as 
dark as the optic itself. She claims it was 
done on a "put-put scooter" but that's 
no way to "putter" around. If Randy was 
responsible, he must have "slugged" her 
on the run as he works the night shift. 

As usual, we find the first to turn from 
"passing the buck" to hunting him were 
Roy Coykendall, Glenn Hotchkiss and 
Bob Sebold who surrounded one old fel- 
low, whose antlers had withered away to a 
couple of bumps, and gave him the works, 
Hitler style. There were so many holes 
that they brought home "venison ham- 
burger." Roy says it was so hot and they 
shed so many clothes, it almost turned 
into a "bare" hunt. 

The "frolicking females" of Produc- 
tion have organized a bowling team. One 
team of the "delicate delicious sisters" is 
captained by Maxine "Tuffy" Bennett 
with "Roughhouse" Lois Campbell head- 
ing the other. Members are Evelyn 
"Hawkshaw" Parkins, Gracie "Butch" 
Koenig, Mary Jane "Spike" Upton, and 
Veronica "Snipe" Paschen. Lois tried to 
bring her team the first victory with so 
much "Chin" support she dislocated a 
tonsil which required an extraction, and 
since has been showing her operation so 
often she is threatened with "lockjaw." 

Happenings during the month, which 
are more authentic than European war 
news, as told to me. Since the openings 
between the tool design desks have been 
narrowed Bill Rennison and Roy Smeltzer 
squeeze thru only because they "strike 
below the belt." A few more avocados 
and Roy will walk around — "Mai" Mal- 
cuit offers a solution by having the teeth 
pulled and "gumming the food" for a 
while to slenderize. — Don "Puss" Drissell, 
after looking for days trying to locate 
those "Q" access holes, beads and 
"dimples", claims to be having better 
success with the latter since Miss Kligman 
has been smiling so sweetly at him on the 
journey out Adams Avenue — Wonder 
why Tom Butterfield and Benny Leonard 
have changed their minds about becom- 
ing Boy Scout leaders? — Dan Slemson and 
Bill Wiley, the "Damon and Pythias" or 
"Caesar and Cleo" as you prefer, took a 
trip to Catalina recently, and we are in 
the dark as to "who took who and who 



September, 1940 



paid?" — Jim Eisman, bemoans the fact 
that Ben Kiegle snitched an idea from the 
Britons and has camouflaged his house try- 
ing a "starvation blockade" on him. — Al 
Ballard has an employee who wanted to 
fight a guy for trying to tell him that 
one-half of a 32nd was a 64th when he 
knew darn well that it took two 32's to 
make 64 — you can't fool these California 
Graduates. — All this "Papa love Mama" 
and "Da Da" business has gotten the best 
of Les Matusek and Owen Stockton who 
plan on "squaring off" this month. — Jack 
Mulroy reports that his dispatching force 
is going great, and hold only "five" short- 
ages, Wing, Tail, Fuselage, Engines and 
Tanks — when do we get the mezzanine on 
the parking lots? 

WOOD SHOP CHIPS 

By /. E. Hodgson 

THIS month of August shows a dis- 
tinct rise in re-production in the 
Wood Shop, the stork having paid five 
visits already and only half the month 
gone. We wish, therefore, to offer con- 
gratulations to the parents of the follow- 
ing newcomers: 

Gary Wayne, 7 pounds 8 ounces, born 
August 2 to Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Thomas. 

Donald, 7 pounds 8 ounces, born Au- 
gust 3 to Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ward. 

Donald Lee, 7 pounds 7 ounces, born 
August 4 to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hartz. 

David Arthur, 8 pounds 2 ounces, born 
August 10 to Mr. and Mrs. Jack Benckner. 

The newest arrival, who is just in time 
to be mentioned in this issue, is Miss Paula 
Younger, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Merlin Younger. 

We may state here that all the above are 
getting along fine — especially the papa's. 

A group of nimrods (fishermen to you) 
chartered a boat and while we were just 
turning over for the second half of our 
beauty sleep 2 a.m. Sunday, August 4, set 
out to catch fish, or sumpin. While other 
departments were well represented, the 
Wood Shop contingent were Mike Mulli- 
can, Larry Ireland, 'Mac' McGriffin, Frank 
Mische and Walt Gray. They took along 
some bottled 'oomph' and all had a good 
time. Larry Ireland won the "jack pot,' 
whatever that is. 

We are pleased to see Johnny Howell 
back on the job again after a sick spell 
lasting several weeks, and hope he is here 
to stay. 

Our veteran swimming 'champ' is very 
much here again ... at Balboa, California, 
on Sunday, August 1 1 , John Woodhead, 
senior, was presented with a certificate for 
finishing in the 2'/^ mile Donald Novis 



The ladies must be slipping this month 
as we have only one marriage to report . . . 
Harry Whittaker is the lucky man and the 
lady's name is Connie, though my in- 
formant did not know the rest of it. Con- 
gratulations, folks. 

HULLabaloo 

By Al Leonard 

WEE WILLY" Pettit, the httle 
boy who answers the phone in 
the Hull Department showed up at work 
a couple of weeks ago adorned in a pair 
of dark glasses. After much persuasion. 
Bill removed them and disclosed a beautiful 
pair of black eyes. It seems that Bill, who 
is fresh out of school and still remembers 
reading Scott's Ivanhoe, challenged a cer- 
tain knave to a joust of fisticuffs because 
he had made an uncomplimentary remark 
about one of Bill's latest flames. Bill 
rushed to the attack and was instantly 
set back on his rumble seat with a pair of 
shiners. Bill tried it again and this time 
received a bopp on the nose. As Bill was 
carried away he was heard to mutter "you 
shoulda' seen the other guy." 

The Hull Department was slightly rep- 
resented at the last meeting of the Rod 
and Reel Club. Due to the lack of mem- 
bers attending, those present had a very 
hard time absorbing the barrel of beer and 
the mess of hot dogs. After the refresh- 
ments Mr. Learman of the Loft Depart- 
ment entertained with his excellent mo- 
tion pictures. It seems as though the club 
will have to organize a ladies' auxiliary 
so the boys that tell their wives they are 
going to the meeting will really have to 
show up. 

The love bug is quietly doing its work 
to some of the boys in the Hull Depart- 
ment. Johnny Glenn, the gentle little 
lamb of the PBY bottoms, is on his 
last legs and is slated to go on the block 
by Labor Day. Elwood David, a member 
of the Consair Flying Club is keeping the 
Hull Assembly section in the running and 
should be Yuma-ized by the time you read 
this. Art Writson, hull clerk, is now on 
the engaged list and is slowly working up 
his courage with the help of Dan Cupid. 




DR. HARRIS T. FAGAN 

">-» Optotnetrist o^ 

Since 1913 

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted 

Phone Main 9240 

522 F Street 



WALKER 

,,,, « & WAY 

Yes, charge account privileges at 
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On purchases of $ lO or more, in any 
one or more departments. Pay in small, 
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days. 

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For Major Purchases for Homes 

Refrigerators, kitchen ranges, washers, 
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sponsible people. Smallcarrying charge. 

Dept. of Accounts, 8th Floor 



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Suits . . . $19.50, up Dresses . . $6.75, up 
Sport Coats . $12.50 Coats ... 1 1.50 " 
Slacks.. .$7.50, up Suits ... 11.50 " 
Shoes .... 5.50 " Hats. . . . 1.95 " 
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then lets you SLLLP! 



S- J. WINES 



COFFEE 

COMPANY 



A 
San Diego 
Institution 



The entire family 

enjoys a meal 
at Morgans — 

-U 'cause each one 

can select his own 
favorite dish. 



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1047 Sixth Avenue 
San Diego, CaliFornia 



HOT SHOTS FROM WELDING 

By "Willie Wiiichcll" Hartman 

SEEMS like all the fellows in the Weld- 
ing Department like to read our little 
effort each month and when a month is 
missed, oh how they groan and moan, but 
yet when a guy goes on his vacation, no 
one else takes it on himself to write up a 
column — so what — so this — the next time 
let 'em all take a crack at it and see if it 
is a cinch. 

So much for getting that little speech 
oft' our chest. Al Wilson seems to have a 
harder time finding bowlers than he did 
ball players. Well, if he can't get any 
more than 14 pitchers on his ball team, 
how can he expect to get a 5 -man bowling 
team? 

If anyone, especially Pete Cinquegrani, 
needs any badminton equipment at all, we 
recommend Frank Kastelic. He says he 
can get it for you wholesale . . . where 
have we heard that before? 

The Aquire boys, Jules and Felix, sure 
missed their calling. They should have 
been lawyers . . . why? Just start a con- 
versation on any topic at all and it winds 
up with an argument. 

Quite a few of the boys are taking trips 
to Yuma for the business of getting hog- 
tied. I can't name them all, so we will just 
say congratulations to all concerned. 

If anybody loses anything we advise 
them to see Ernie Constantino. He can find 
the darndest things in the funniest places. 

Vince Caldwell's chickens have kind of 
gone back on him. He hasn't had an egg 
from them now in 3 weeks. Times a 
wastin', Vince, off with their heads. 

When the cat's away, the mice will 
play . . . ask Vic Perry or F. Kastelic, 
they know why and how. 

Maybe George Draper can give us 
pointers on getting deer, but it takes 
Homer Higbee to show us where the 
honey is and it takes Art Endres to tell 



us where to get rid of our money, but 
then maybe he shouldn't try to pick 'em 
all at Caliente. 

Little Sir Echo Rimmer is a famous 
Balboa Park Artist. We mean a real artist 
with brush, palette, easel, et al. — he really 
turns out some very nice canvas. 

Wonder how come so many of the boys 
are having tooth trouble. At least four of 
our boys have had trips to the dentist . . . 
Umm, looks bad, Roy. 

We wish Dan Mellisch, our Magnaflux 
operator, would buy another hat — the one 
he's wearing looks like a Nebraska night- 
mare . . . one of those accidents going 
some where to happen. 

Dick Stone is beginning to worry about 
his grey hairs . . . tch, tch and such . . . 
a young man, too. Well, you know, burn 
the candle at both ends brings bad re- 
sults or something. 

Tiny Campbell feels as though he can 
breathe now that we have expanded. He 
says he couldn't get room to stretch be- 
fore. Well, with that cute Uttle mustache 
you have you'll need more room, Paul. 

Little Paul Ferrara has taken to writ- 
ing love notes to the day crew . . . also, 
you better lay off Paul or you are going 
to be sorry. 

Our baseball team wanted to be re- 
membered in this column. After that last 
game, there just "ain't no comment." 

During the recent Legion convention 
Bill Wolfe was seen driving round and 
round the Plaza. Once he almost didn't 
make it and came pretty near driving into 
the fountain. Yeah, it's mighty powerful 
stuff this year, Bill. 

What group of Pacific Beach residents 
went for a wild week-end to L. A. and 
are now in the well-known doghouse? 

We knew that "Windy" Roher would 
have the police on his neck sooner or later. 
Windy is quite the model airplane builder 
— in fact he's so good at it that one of 



# 




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Each Individual Service • Our Charges Are Always Reasonable 

Conveniently Located — Ample Free Parking 



JOHNSON-SAUM COMPANY 



Fourth Ave. and Ath St. 



MORTUARY 



Phone, Main 6168 



September, 1940 



his models landed in a tree and a neighbor 
lady called the police and told them para- 
chute troops were landing, plane and all. 
When the police arrived, Windy sure had 
to talk fast and long to get himself out 
of it. They — the police — told Windy when 
he wants to shoot those things around 
he's to go away . . . far away. 

SAN DIEGO FLYING CLUB 
NEWS 

By "Spike" 

FOLKS, you really missed something 
if you weren't at the Club's Get-to- 
gether Sunday, August 4th. For that's 
just what it was — a get-together. The 
afternoon was high-lighted by a spot- 
landing contest while the spaghetti din- 
ner took the evening's headlines. We have 
no record of just how many pilots com- 
peted in the contest but two Consair En- 
gineers, Bruce Craig and Tom Hemphill, 
tied for first honors after some mighty 
nice flying. 

In spite of the fact that the three gal- 
lons of "appetizer" ran out a little early, 
the sixty odd members and friends who 
stayed for dinner did due justice to the 
spaghetti, vegetables, and water melon. 
Other amusements consisted of ping-pong, 
hangar-flying, horseshoes, more hangar- 
flying, penny-ante, (who said dimes), 
Chinese checkers, pin-ball machine. Coca 
Cola, and, oh yes, hangar-flying. 

The credit for the whole affair goes to 
Social Director Fred Young and his 
"Women's Auxiliary". The Mrs. Travis, 
Peel, Butterfield, Young, MacDonald, and 
Goodyear "rolled out" the spaghetti and 
Bob Goodyear gets a BIG hand for wash- 
ing the dishes. 

Johnnie Testa and Bill Bunsen each ac- 
quired the coveted private ticket July 17 
and Aug. 2, respectively. Johnnie has 
since purchased a Warner Travel Air. 
More "revs" to you Johnnie. Walter 



Kostew soloed recently and soon after 
had his tonsils blitzkrieged. 'Smatter, 
Walt, did your head get so big that there 
was no room for tonsils? 

New members include Gene Allara, E. 
C. Denyer, M. A. Meyenberg, and Johnnie 
Mayak. Glad to have you with us boys, 
happy landings. And to you readers, we're 
located at Grande Vista Airport, 4 miles 
south of Chula Vista, on the hill. "Come 
up and see us sometime." Unquote. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
FLYERS NEWS 

By Joe Hai'lik 

SEEMS that old Professor Knowledge 
is beginning to rap on the skulls of a 
few of our older members who are about 
due for their private license. The typical 
greeting of one member to another is, 
"What factors would you consider in se- 
lecting your altitude for a cross country 
flight?" instead of the usual "Hello." 

One sometimes wonders if Ken Smith 
ever plots out his course before he takes 
off on his motor glide, and if Pat Dowling 
and Bob Sprague are studying their rules 
and regulations so that they can keep track 
of Kenny. 

Sunday, August 11th, found a group 
of the members out at Duke's Stables 
piloting the ponies over hills and dales. 
Among the group were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Fredrick Robertson, Mrs. Robertson's sis- 
ter, here visiting. Bill Luffy, Ray Dinsen, 
Pat Dowling and their lady friends, and 
the writer. 

August 18 was a big day for the mem- 
bers of the club due to the fact that the 
club's Waco INF was brought down from 
Seattle by instructor Al Griffith. Al took 
the trip to Seattle on the Airliner and 
flew our ship back to the field where the 
ship is hangared for the club's use. The 
Club will have a party inaugurating our 
new plane into the club. 



Just 
GOOD FOODS 



Thafs All — at 



SAFEIVAY 




with Bud Landis 



The thing that makes baseball what 
it is to date is that to score, a man 
must touch all bases. 

• • • 

A batter may fill the sky with clouts. 
Yet if he can't get away quick, he 
might as well be in the dugout. 

• • • 

A runner may go around so fast 
they have to bank the turns, but if 
he doesn't touch second he can just 
as well head for the showers. 




Diamond cutting is an idle gesture 
in our national pastime. A player 
needs must leave home hastily, 
make the rounds without errors or 
omissions, and get back in safe. 

• • • 

In a way it's the same with gasoline. 
It doesn't count if a fuel can pick- 
up and run but can't make the 

distance. 

• • • 

It isn't enough if a gas has some 
spectacular features at the sacrifice 
of other features. 




Super -Shell is a performer that 
touches all bases. It has the highest 
Road Performance Rating in all 

Shell's history. 

• • • 

Drive into your neighborhood Shell 
Dealer's service station. He'll fill the 
tank with a product that gets away 
fast, covers every point, and comes 
back with all haste and no waste. 



10 



Consolidator 



CONSAIR FLYERS CLUB. 
INC., NEWS 

By Barney Farley 

EVERYWHERE one reads of the in- 
creasing flying activities throughout 
the country. Consair Flyers, comparative- 




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W. P, FULLER 8 CO. 

803 Seventh Ave. M. 0181 
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ly speaking, has certainly been well up 
on the list of those who are the most 
active. On week ends the club's ship is 
on the go from dawn to dusk. Members 
are piling up time. Ours is what you might 
term a "flying outfit" — everyone flies. 

Events of the month begin with El- 
wood David, who, in the record-breaking 
time of a little less than three months from 
learning to fly, has obtained his private 
pilot's license. All flying was done in the 
club. When this is printed Miles Blaine, 
also, should be the proud possessor of a 
private, with Steve Brown next. 

By the way, David made a statement 
which has only one meaning. He wants 
to take a cross-country hop to Yuma with 
his girl friend! David will find himself 
with a private license, a marriage license 
and a bride, incidentally. This should be 
enough to keep one man happy. 

Orv Hubbard is busy with the C.A.A. 
refresher course given to commercial pilots 
who wish to obtain the new instructor's 
rating. Orv reports the set-up to be excel- 
lent and encourages all who can, to do 
likewise. 

The club also has its late solo members. 
DeVorak and Brothoway made the grade 
by soloing out this month. Reports and 
flying activities prove that these fellows 
will soon be among those who go up for 
their license. 

Arthur Becker, club president, has Irft 
with his ship on a cruise for an undeter- 
mined duration of time. Since he left we 
have received letters from him postmarked 
from various far-o£F places. These letters 
state that everything is going well. Becker 
reveals that he would like very much to 
be back flying with the club, but also states 
that he doesn't know when. He cannot say 
where he is — strictest type of Naval regu- 
lations, you know. 

Peterson has purchased a 'Model A' to 
get him to and from the field and else- 
where. Pete is very much in earnest about 
obtaining his commercial rating, and can 
be seen at the field early and late practis- 
ing. Ask Pete what he would like to do 
more than flying, and he will tell you 
more flying — in the daytime. 

Jones has been down to fly again. He 



is one of the fellows who returned from a 
cruise. 

A number of inquiries have reached us 
regarding our club. We still have a num- 
ber of memberships open. If you really 
want to fly, drop down to the field, see the 
ship, and meet the fellows, no obligation. 

PAINT SHOP NEWS 

By Bud Dale 

ANY one interested in salesmanship 
L might try selling the Brooklyn 
Bridge, or anyone's tools, to Carl Johnson 
or Kent Dudbridge. We guarantee a sale. 

Frank Finn has left our midst for an 
advancement. He is now at Ryan's doing 
well as an inspector. 

Our sincere sympathies for George 
Hunt who succumbed from injuries re- 
ceived in an auto accident Sunday August 
1 1th. A. N. Hall was seriously injured but 
is recovering at the County Hospital. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
MacGillivray. A daughter, Miss Dona 
Jean, was born July 29th at Paradise Val- 
ley Sanitarium. Mother and daughter are 
doing fine . . . also, proud papa. 

Al Griflith, one of the paint shop's bids 
for air supremacy, went to Seattle August 
16th via U. A. L. to ferry back a 3-place 
Waco for service in the Southern Cali- 
fornia Flying Club. 



■"liV Over the Highways 
On a 1940 

HHRlEV-DHUIDSOn 




W. J. RUHLE 

929 India Street San Dieso 

Write (or Catalog 
Open to 8 p. m. Terms 




J. E. Dryer 
President 



DRYER'S STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Your Credit Is Good • 236S Kettner BLd. 



September, 1 940 



11 



DISCIPLES OF IKE 
WALTON . . . 

WE'VE heard of fishing trips, and 
their fabulous catches. Some of 
these are undoubtedly bona fide. But oc- 
casionally such exploits need investigating 
and elucidating just to keep them from 
getting out of hand. The tales that come 
back sometimes are a bit too tall for tak- 
ing, even with a considerable quantity of 
salt. To forestall any such tales, we dis- 
patched one of our undercover men to 
get the real 'McCoy' on certain fishing 
trips involving members of our personnel 
and their friends and associates. The par- 
ticular fishing exploits referred to involve 
the following persons: Jack Thompson, 
Frank Learman, Henry Growald, Jack 
Larson, Frank Fink, Bruce Aitken; A. R. 
Blair and F. A. Firth of the British office; 
C.A.A. Representative W. M. Cline, Bud 
Snyder from Dayton and Reg. Fleet who 
came all the way from Atlanta, Ga. 

Undoubtedly a lot could be said about 
the size of the fish caught, the struggles 
these men put up to land their catches, 
and even though we're ardent boosters 
along with the Chamber of Commerce 
about our fishing waters, and would like to 
let these things appear in our columns, still 
there has been some exaggeration. There- 
fore, in lieu of just plain words that might 
be misconstrued, we submit the photo- 
graphic evidence shown. It becomes ob- 
vious that the 'catch' (over which Frank 
Learman is quite evidently pleased) has 
put up a terrific struggle b;fore quailing 
before the masterful manhandling used in 
bringing it to gaff. 

The other photograph is typical, so we 
are informed, and shows our stalwart nim- 
rod Jack Thompson in one of his fighting 
fishing stances. Soon after discovering the 
photographer taking this shot, Thompson 
in a magnanimous gesture characterized 
with hand and thumb waving in the vicin- 
ity of the nose, cautioned the photographer 
that the taking of such pictures was 
fraught with personal dislike for publicity 
over his prowess as a disciple of Ike Walton. 
The gesture was caught by our photog- 
rapher, however, and we'd be glad to show 
it to anyone interested. 




There's just one other point that might 
be mentioned to completely debunk this 
fishing foray: The seagulls must have been 
following the boat for some reason. The 
catch (they would immediately recognize) 
is hardly worthy of waiting for. It is 
therefore assumed that not only was this 
group rather weak as fishermen, but also 
rather frail as regards their stamina per- 
taining to seamanship. 

GLIDING AND SOARING 

By Vic Korskj 

BY the time the Consolidator reaches 
you the Associated Glider Club of 
Southern California will be boasting of 
two club-owned sailplanes. At the regular 
meeting on Friday, August 9 the club 
gave final approval for the purchase of a 
single place "Baby Albatross" for solo 
training. Ernie Stout (Engineering) and 
Scott Royce (Engineering) with Jerry 
Littell (Inspection) running a close third, 
were responsible for the club taking ac- 
tion. It was in this ship, known as "Thun- 
der Bird," Woody Brown set the national 
distance record of 263 air miles. 

Things are brightening around the field 
since Harry Comer (Tool Room), brush 
in hand, splattered a lot of green paint on 
the hangar. Also, the red and cream two- 
place Grunau has just come from the 
workshop. Ray Parker (Model Shop) had 
the ship in town for an overhaul and now 
he has one of the flashiest crates in town. 






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12 



Consolidator 



NITE WOODSHOP NEWS 

WELL , boys, here we are back again 
with news from the night — natur- 
ally more things happen to us because of 
the extra hours spent in semi-slumber . . . 
at least that's where Walt Spooner seemed 
to be the second night of 10 hour shifts, 
for he was caught pulling hair from his 
arm at 1:05 a. m. prior to a trip to the 




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Birnett Avenue at the causeway 

ACROSS FROM MARINE BASE 

Telephone Bayview 3155 • San Diego 



band saw. Just a safety-first measure to 
make sure he was still awake. 

Secor has added an Oldsmobile to his 
list of weapons used in pursuit of cupid 
and from what we hear, he may be nearing 
success at last . . . 

Not to be outdone by others, Davis has 
at last laid aside the old crate we used to 
dodge — and now sports a . . , Dodge, boys! 

Going ritzy on us, those gay men about 
town, Eddie, Larry, Red and Walt S., have 
rented a house by the bay for one month — 
price? Well, you guess. 

We had hoped to run a picture in this 
edition of the increase in a certain young 
man's family — but it seems upon investi- 
gating the rumor we find — not a child — 
but a mother-in-law come to visit, so 
your reporter beat a hasty retreat ... I 
have one, too. 

To all the fellows involved in making 
our blushing grooms — Melega and Bailess 
— speechless by presenting them each with 
coffee makers. The boys want to express 
their thanks. And an invite to coffee and 
doughnuts some a.m. after work may soon 
be forthcoming. 

Bill Thomas' wife has left the little home 
on wheels we told you about last month 
and is visiting in Chicago. Which leaves 
him to harmonize with sundry other gents 
whose wives are taking the family vaca- 
tion this year while papa earns the 
"means." 

By the time this is off the press, that 




SECOND AVENUE 
AT BROADWAY 



JAMES D. FORWARD 



AASE (ACE) BROS. 

bring you the best in LUNCHES, SANDWICHES, COLD 
DRINKS and TOBACCO 

* 

3 LOCATIONS—Inside North and South Gates and in Back Center Yard 



lively little engineer-to-be-Peterson — will 
have joined the ranks of "skull pounders" 
at "Cal." Good luck, Pete, and may you 
always have as ready an answer for the 
prof as you have had here. 

Have you noticed the cowed look on 
Woody's face? It happened in this way — 
a widdie biddie mouse came out to play 
which frightened certain people present. 
Our hero rushed to the rescue bent upon 
sudden destruction of said mouse. Was 
the mouse pulling a britzkrieg or was 
Woody's pants leg the nearest hole in 
sight? Minutes later we find Woody in the 
garage just returning his trousers to their 
proper place — and now you know. 

We may presume Lou lost some of the 
smugness over the good deal he got in a 
Studebaker when he arrived home with 
it, for from the looks of that Uttle man's 
family, a bus would have been more suit- 
able. 

Sudden and vicious action is threatened 
by a certain young man should the news 
be printed that he approached the shaper 
man with a job requiring a 10J^^° closed 
angle. "I want a 10J^° shut angle" and 
he didn't care whether the shaper was set 
at 100/2° or 79^2°. 

And then there is the case of young 
Johnny starting blithely out upon his 
search through the plant for a square 
router bit to be used in cleaning out square 
corners in dural blocks. 

We understand, by the way, that a law 
is now being enacted compelling people 
to stay m.arried for at least two years, so 
that the furniture stores will get their 
money. 

FISHING . . . 

By T. J. Woolaid 

ON Sunday, August 4, about thirty 
employees from various departments 
of the plant enjoyed a fishing trip to the 
Coronado Islands aboard the charter boat 
Golden West. 

We got underway at 2:30 a.m. and 
after picking up live bait at the live bait 
floats, reached the islands about 5:30. 

Yellowtail proved to be pretty scarce 
but barracuda were everywhere and soon 
every one was busy hauling the "snakes" 
aboard. 

Irving Craig, the champion bait caster 
of the Loft Department, says that the fel- 
lows near him conspired to take his cham- 
pionship away from him — each time he 
would make a cast some one would pull 
his line in. The fellows just could not keep 
their lines out of his way. 

Bill Plympton of Tool Room picked a 



September, 1 940 



13 



spot near the bow to do his fishing and 
showed the result of his selection by mak- 
ing a nice catch of barracuda and bass. 

Mike Mullican began fishing before 
leaving the harbor and swears he had a big 
strike near the live bait floats. Most of 
the fellows say he snagged a piece of kelp, 
but it probably was a big sardine that 
escaped from the bait tank. 

Larry Vreland of Wood Shop and Ed- 
ward Lang of Navy Inspection shared the 
honors in catching yellowtail with one 
each. Vreland won the jack pot for hav- 
ing the largest fish. The fellows say that 
Vreland passed the deck-hand who gave 
out the colored buttons used for fishing 
positions three times and secured a but- 
ton of each color as he fished from the 
stern all day. 

Milt (horizontal fisherman) Hanger of 
Tool Design was able to do his fishing 
from a vertical position on this trip. 

Due to the effort of casting such heavy 
bait, the boys required constant doses of 
A. B.C. Supreme and similar medicines and 
were soon showing decided improvement. 

The particular brand of medicine used 
by Walt Gray of the Wood Shop made 
Walt insist on the deck hand gaffing his 
fish — one eight-inch sardine — the effort of 
bringing the bait to gaff proved to be too 
much for Walt so he went to sleep. 

Harry Gillen, George Gearhouser and 
Lew Pfeil of Tool Room started to sing 
with disasterous results. The sound was an 
exact duplicate of the mating call of the 
bull seals and soon the water was full of 
"lady" seals looking for mates. When the 
seals came, the fish left, so we decided to 
move — after several moves without im- 
provement of fishing conditions, we de- 
cided to call it a day and head for home. 
Most of the fellows had enough fish and 



^ 



taiif- 




,T L\KES YOU 



were ready to go. Nice catches of barra- 
cuda, bass, bonita, sheepshead, and two 
yellowtail were aboard. 

The fellows nearly wore out the two 
yellowtail by posing for pictures with a 
yellowtail in each hand. If you readers 
should see one of these pictures, remem- 
ber that only Lang and Vreland caught 
yellowtail on this trip so don't take the 
fish story about catching two yellowtail 
too seriously. 

DRAW BENCH BENDS 

By W. Fink 

AL WIEGAL is now the proud father 
of a 9 pound 9 ounce baby boy. Of 
course the young man will be called Alvin 
Wiegal, Jr. Both parents and baby are do- 
ing fine. 

Bob Seebold, the mighty hunter, reports 
that on a recent deer hunt, his party was 
successful in bagging one deer. Glen 
Hotchkiss and Roy Coykendall were the 
other two members of the party. Inci- 
dentally, Roy seemed to have a little dif- 
ficulty in climbing fifty feet uphill. Bob 
said "it took him two hours," how about 
it? 

We are sorry to announce that Chester 
Sheppard is confined to home because of 
illness. We all wish Chester a speedy re- 
covery and hope to see him back here soon. 

William Gramse once again is walking 
around with a worried look in his eyes. 
How long before the stork visits your 
house again, Bill? 

Ed Isacson, has spent the last three 
weeks with the National Guard up in 
Washington. 



Both Art Randall and Bubbles Shepard 
returned from their vacations looking 
more tired than ever. But now, after a 
week of labor they both look fine and fit. 

Curley Colton has been having a bit 
of hard luck lately. First he was confined 
home with a troublesome leg, and now it's 
his teeth. 



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14 



Consolidator 





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YOUR NEXT CAR FINANCED 
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Used 4 8/10% 

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or bring this adv. to 1340 Sixth Ave. 



,F-7731 




DRIFTING THRU DRAFTING 

By R. R. Hoover 

SOMEHOW the trite old "How're 
they goin'," ""What's new" and other 
Bromidic greetings fail to draw out the 
interesting and ofttimes amusing experi- 
ences and "misfortunes" of our fellow 
draftsmen, and we have to resort to 
""Drifting" to keep ourselves acquainted 
with the more human side of our depart- 
ment personnel. So don't hesitate to bring 
that good joke on So-and-so, or that 
honor earned by Such-and-such, to our 
attention for possible entry in our column! 
A great many things have happened 
since our last issue, not the least import- 
ant being the admission of Henry Gro- 
wald into the Coastguard "Ice Patrol" 
as Reserve Officer following his comple- 
tion of certain "ground work" at the 
Glacier Gardens. It is our understanding 
that Henry received certain "decorations" 
which prove beyond question that he 
must have gained an intimate knowledge 
of this subject! 

Then our Calexico correspondent sends 
word that during a recent chat with a 
friend in that city, Wendell Eldred was 
heard to ask whether a certain peculiar 
sound he had been hearing was related 
to one of their frequent tremors. The 



Native replied that the sound was new to 
him and the subsequent investigation into 
the source produced the startling dis- 
covery that Wendell's green trousers were 
being devoured by a small host of ban- 
queting grasshoppers! In the interests of 
economy Wendell recommends that vis- 
itors to Calexico wear raiment of a less 
inviting and appetizing color! 

The Fixed Equipment Group has been 
awarded the prize of the month for "Ex- 
tra-Curricular" activities due to the stag- 
ing of two weddings: Herman von Good- 
at's and Harry Steele's, and the arrival of 
a son and daughter respectively to the 
two Joes, Hampson and Smole. This 
should explain the pall of smoke fre- 
quently seen hanging over the F. E. Group 
during the past weeks. 

We have heard of "born" RepubHcans 
and "hide-bound" Democrats but it didn't 
seem possible for these terms to cover 
such extremes as are described in the fol- 
lowing graphic example: 

Picture if you will a man disrobing for 
the express purpose of going to bed. Note 
that he carefully removes the Wilkie-Mc- 
Nary button from his coat and pins it to 
his shirt front. Then observe how in due 
course of time this button is removed 
from the shirt and carefully placed on 




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For a tree home demonstration call the SAN DIEGO 

CONSOLIDATED GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

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YOUR LAMP DEALER 




Before Light Conditioning 



September, 1940 



15 



the dresser where it is accidentally cov- 
ered by a carelessly tossed billfold. Allow 
a short lapse of time and picture this 
same man tossing restlessly in bed obvious- 
ly laboring under some intense mental 
strain. Another violent toss and he jumps 
from the bed and rushes to the dresser 
where he frantically gropes about. A short 
period of this searching and he is seen to 
turn from the dresser with a smile of re- 
lief to return to his recently deserted bed. 
Shortly happy sigh followed by the even 
breathing of beatific slumber! What a 
startling metamorphosis! Tell us Sid 
Avery, could that glint of light on his 
chest, be the reflection of the street light 
on a Wilkie-McNary button? 

It has been said that there is nothing 
new under the sun: that everything sup- 
posed to be new is just a modification of 
something which already has been. It 
seems the proverb is borne out in even the 
ultra-modern Power Plant Group for 
though Felix Kallis has designed an en- 
gine test stand which is right up-to-the- 
minute, yet he has provided it with a 
control cage which smacks loudly of 
Chic Sales and an intimate yesterday! 

However, the wheels do lend a modern 
touch suggesting a conveniently mobile 
and homey appendage for attachment to 



Has your present job a fiiluref 
Does it offer opportunities for travel? 
Is it interesting? 

SAN DIEGO AERO MARINE 
RADIO & NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

offers its 

MASTER RADIO COURSE 

preparing for commercial radio operators 

licenses/ as the answer to the above questions 

RADIO, OS a vocation, affords jobs in the 
airways as ground station operator 
on shipboard as rodio operator 
broadcast station work . installa> 

tion and repair . servicing. 

Our employment service assists in placing 
the licensed operator. 

JOBS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
Both day and evening courses 

NAVIGATION COURSES 
also ovailable. 

ENROLL NOW 
For Either Day or Nite 

Radio Class 
Beginning October 1st 

Prepare NOW while you ore employed 

SAN DIEGO AEROMARINE 

RADIO AND NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Administration Building Lindbergh Field 

Telephone Jackson 7400 



a house trailer and then perhaps the con- 
trol cage merely expresses an enviable 
versatility of design on Felix's part? 

Modesty is admirable, but it seems to 
us that John Brahtz of Structures Group 
should receive the credit due him for 
winning the La Jolla entrants First Prize 
in the recent rough water swim held at 
La Jolla. In this same event, Larry Bayliss 
of Power Plant gave John a good race 
all the way to finish second by a scant 
margin. Now this is very interesting 
news, but the thoughtful observer might 
detect a hidden significance in this Bayliss- 
just-behind-Brahtz performance. You see 
history reveals that John Brahtz entered 
this same swim event last year and was 
doing fine until an unexplained happen- 
stance sprained one of his big toes, forcing 
him to leave the race! Now since his toes 
are so important to John's best efforts, 
isn't it possible that Larry might have 
trailed him just to guard against a repe- 
tition of last year's misfortune? What 
do you think? 

TOOL DESIGN TID-BITS 

By Maguire 

FOR a few days this month, news 
from outside the Department was al- 
most as important as news inside. Yes Sir! 
The Legion was here and how! It was Hi! 
Buddy, have one on me, etc., etc., for a 
few days. We had a few Tool Designers 
there on the welcoming Committee, too. 
Such as Wes Kline, C. H. Smith, C. L. 
Bennett, R. J. Knight and F. W. Car- 
mody. 

Cline, Dept. "D. A." seems to be loos- 
ing his grip. He hasn't had a case in a 
month, and to make matters worse, he's 
moved up close to Eng. 

Giesselman's board looks like a "Duck" 
Pond. 

See picture section of this issue for rea- 
son Perry rushes home — Cute, Huh? 

It has been reported that Ted (Light- 
ning) Hersh has two assistants, one to yell 
"there he comes" the other to yell "there 
he goes." 

Bennett, Welty, Peters and maybe a few 
others had Bennett's birthday celebration 
down in the Grant last week. You don't 
look a year older, Ben. 

Minch has a new pair of pants — did I 
hear I'll say I did! 

Due to heat, trips up north, sail boats, 
singers, etc., no one has done anything 
that Dave will okey — So — . 

New in the Dept. this month: W. Cobb, 
J. Smith, R. Atchison (Trans, from T. R.) 
H. Daily (Ditto) G. S. Ludeman (Trans, 
from Purchasing) and R. Loftus. 



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NEWMAN'S JEWELERS 

2 Stores 
£08 West Broadway at India . 648 Fifth Ave. 

Notice: Open evenings until 8:00 p.m. for your 
convenience. Saturdays 'till 10:00 p.m. 




driving a jalopy! 



Look 



Listen 



at real cars! 



to swell deals! 

Used Cars 

BROWN 

MOTOR CO. 

Ford, Mercury, Lincoln-Zephyr Dealer 

COLUMBIA. SEVENTH at 
at C St. UNIVERSITY 



16 



Consolidotor 




HYDRAULICS 



AT CONSOLIDATED 



LESS than two years ago it was decided 
J that there must be something to be 
gained by using hydrauhc controls on cer- 
tain mechanisms requiring more power 
than is easily produced by man. Previ- 
ously Ccmsolidatcd made use of electric 
power where this kind of service was re- 
quired. The electric powered systems have 
been good and have indeed been a credit 
to our products, however, cost and weight 
both tend to encourage the study of other 
means of doing the heavy work necessary 
around large planes such as we have been 
building. It was natural that we make 
a study of hydraulics because so many 
other companies, both in this country and 
in Europe, have been notably successful 
with hydraulically operated mechanisms. 

Our first serious effort to take advan- 
tage of the benefits offered by this source 
of power was made on the Model No. 31. 
As most of us know, this airplane has a 
retractable beaching gear, which is car- 
ried with the airplane at all times. It 
also has retractable floats and Comolidated- 
Fowler type wing flaps. Because of the 
fact that during normal flight the hy- 
draulic system is not used to operate the 
beaching gear, floats or flaps, it is put to 
the useful task of furnishing power for the 
Sperry automatic pilot. The central or 
pumping system consists of the following 
units: The reservoir, located just aft and 
below the front wing spar in the hull, 
contains approximately seven gallons of 
mineral oil. Suction lines go from the 
reservoir to each of three pumps. One 



gear pump driven by the port engine, an- 
other gear pump driven by the auxiliary 
power plant near the rear entrance hatch 
and the hand pump located on the port 
side next to the beaching gear well. All 
pumps are connected to a common pres- 
sure line, which goes to an unloading valve 
located near the reservoir. The unloading 
valve is a device which relieves the pumps 
of their load when no work is being done. 
In addition to the one inlet, the unload- 
ing valve has two outlets. One goes back 
to the reservoir and the other to the ac- 
cumulator. The operation is such that a 
pressure of approximately 800 to 1000 
lbs. per sq. in. is maintained within the ac- 
cumulator. As soon as the pressure drops 
below 800 lbs. per sq. in. the unloading 
valve "cuts in" and the fluid which was 
being returned to the reservoir is forced 
into the accumulator. Flow will continue 
in this manner until the accumulator pres- 
sure reaches 1000 lbs. per sq. in., at which 
time the unloading valve will "cut out." 
It then allows the fluid, which is con- 
stantly being pumped, to flow, under very 
little pressure, back to the reservoir, and 
at the same time holding the high pressure 
oil in the accumulator. The accumulator 
is a spherical vessel used for storing oil 
under pressure. In order to store any ap- 
preciable quantity of oil, which is incom- 
pressible, a compressible or elastic medium 
must be introduced. This is done by 
making the accumulator in two hemis- 
pherical halves, which are separated by a 
synthetic rubber diaphram. The lower 



By BEN LIVERS 

half is filled with compressed air under 
a pressure of approximately 600 lbs. per 
sq. in. before any oil is allowed to enter 
the upper half. When oil is forced into 
the upper half, the air is compressed 
further in making room for the oil. The 
air and oil are always under the same 
pressure and are separated by the dia- 
phram. It can be seen that in raising the 
pressure of the air from 600 lbs. per sq. 
in. to 1000 lbs. per sq. in. the pressure 
is nearly doubled and the volume nearly 
cut in half. This reduction in volume is 
the amount of oil in the accumulator. 
High pressure oil is piped from the ac- 
cumulator to the five selector valves used 
to operate the various mechanisms. All 
return fluid passes through these valves 
and is brought into one line and returned 
to the reservoir. Motion for the flap is 
furnished by a single large cylinder con- 
nected to the two panels on opposite sides 
of the airplane by means of a system of 
cables and push-pull rods. Originally the 
airplane was not equipped with an accu- 
mulator and special metering restrictors 
were installed for the purpose of slowing 
down the action of the flaps. It was 
thought that the type used would cause 
considerable change in trim and if operated 
too rapidly would make the airplane diffi- 
cult to control. At first the metering re- 
strictors were adjusted so that the flaps 
operated in 20 to 2 J seconds. After a 
few flights it was decided that more speed 
would not be objectionable. They were 
adjusted for more speed and again tried. 



September, 1940 



17 



and again more speed was requested. After 
adjusting the metering restrictors to the 
limit of their adjustment and finally saw- 
ing off the metering pins the speed was 
increased to approximately 10 seconds. 
Since this represented the maximum speed 
possible with the system as then set up, 
the next request for more speed called for 
a basic change in the system. In order to 
provide for the transfer of fluid at a rate 
more rapid than the pumps could pump it, 
the accumulator was installed. A larger 
selector valve and larger lines were put 
in to replace the original ones to reduce 
losses due to fluid friction. This change 
brought the operating time down to six 
seconds and is now considered satisfactory. 



ages, etc., are the selector valve, the dou- 
ble acting down lock cylinder, the double 
acting retracting cylinder, the single act- 
ing up latch cylinder, the double acting 
door cylinder and several sequence valves. 
To trace through one cycle of operation 
let us suppose the selector valve handle 
is moved to the "wheel up" position. 
High pressure fluid is now allowed to enter 
the up line from the valve, and fluid 
which is in the down line has an open 
passage back to the reservoir. The high 
pressure fluid in the up line goes without 
restriction to the lower connection of the 
down lock cylinder and at the same time 
to a connection on the sequence valve lo- 
cated just above the down lock cylinder. 



MODEL *3!--^^ 

NOSE- WHEEL 
SCHEMATIC PIAGRAM 




It will be noted that there is almost no 
change in the airplane's trim throughout 
the entire range of flap motion and there- 
fore the speeding up of the flap operation 
was possible. 

The main beaching gear and float con- 
trols are rather simple and conventional, 
whereas the nose wheel is more interesting 
because of its greater complexity. In re- 
tracting the nose wheel the following op- 
erations must be performed in sequence: 
First, the nose wheel down lock must be 
released; second, the nose wheel must be 
raised third, the nose wheel must be locked 
in the up position, and fourth, the nose 
wheel doors must be closed. These opera- 
tions are done automatically in proper 
sequence from one control valve. The 
valve is reversible so that the reverse op- 
erations in reverse sequence are performed 
in lowering the nose wheel. A brief de- 
scription and reference to the accompany- 
ing sketch should show how this is done. 
It can be seen that the main hydraulic 
units, not including beaching gear, link- 



TO RAISE: 

1. Control lever moved aft. 

2. Fluid goes out (A). 

3. Fluid is stopped at (B). 

4. Fluid enters (C) and raises do^vn lock 
piston. 

3. Piston opens sequence valve (B). 

6. Fluid goes out (D) and enters (£). 

7. Main retracting cylinder extends rais- 
ing nose 'wheel. 

8. Spring latch (F) holds -wheel up. 

9. At same time sequence valve (G) is 
opened. 

10. Fluid goes out (H) and enters door 
closing cylinder (J). 

11. Door closing cylinder extends and 
closes doors. 

As long as the down lock piston is in the 
down position the sequence valve is closed 
and fluid cannot pass through it. The full 
pressure is therefore acting on the lower 
surface of the down lock piston, with the 
result that it moves upward to the limit 
of its travel, unlocking the nose wheel 
and at the same time tripping the sequence 
valve so that the fluid can pass through it. 
The fluid which gets through this valve 
is then piped to the lower end of the main 
retracting cylinder so that the cylinder 



extends and retracts the nose wheel. As 
the wheel reaches the retracted position 
two things happen nearly simultaneously; 
the spring loaded up latch snaps under the 
supporting lug provided on the wheel 
strut and a second sequence valve is opened 
as the piston reaches the upper end of its 
travel. This sequence valve is built in- 
tegrally with the upper end of the main 
retracting cylinder and is actuated by the 
cam action of the piston itself within the 
cylinder. The opening of this sequence 
valve allows fluid to go to the door clos- 
ing cylinder. As the door closing cylin- 
der is extended the doors are closed. In 
lowering the nose wheel the selector valve 
is turned in the opposite direction and high 
pressure fluid is admitted into the line 
which was formerly the return line. Fluid 
is led through this line directly to the 
door cylinder so that the cylinder is com- 
pressed and the doors opened. As the pis- 
ton reaches the end of its stroke it operates 
a sequence valve built integrally with the 
cylinder. The opening of this valve allows 
fluid to go to the small single acting up 
latch cylinder, which is used to unlatch the 
up latch. Pressure sufficient to operate 
this cylinder is built up by the use of a 
device known as a restrictor. A restrictor 
is a valve composed of a relief valve and 
a check valve so that fluid will flow 
through it one way with very little re- 
striction, whereas in the other direction 
fluid will not pass except at pressures 
higher than the setting of the relief valve. 
The pressure setting, which is adjustable, 
is made sufficiently light so that the un- 
latching cylinder positively operates be- 
fore fluid can get through the restrictor. 
When the fluid does get through to the 
upper end of the main retracting cylinder 
the up latch is already released and the 
nose wheel is free to be lowered. As the 
nose wheel reaches the down position a 
portion of the actuating crank on the 
torque shaft of the gear engages the 
plunger of a separately mounted sequence 
valve. The opening of this sequence valve 
sends fluid to the top side of the down 
lock cylinder so that the down lock 
plunger is driven down into the lug pro- 
vided on the strut of the nose wheel. All 
the sequence valves are made with lightly 
spring loaded balls so that the return fluid 
can easily unseat the balls without build- 
ing up serious back pressure in the return 
system. After studying this mechanism 
it might seem to one who is unfamiliar 
with it that the operation would be jerky 
and slow. Actually the operation is ex- 
ceedingly smooth and free from shock. 
It takes from three to four seconds to com- 
pletely retract the nose wheel. 



18 



Consolidator 



CONSAIR ATHLETIC ASSN. 

By Bradshau 

THE newly organized Consair Athletic 
Association started their series of 
sponsored attractions in July using as a 
successful premier the midget auto races, 
staged as "Consolidated Night" with sev- 



LNDBERGHFELOCAFE 


Administration Buiiding 
Lindbergh Fieid 

"The Home of JIuiation" 


BREAKFAST SERVED AT 6:15 A.M. 



Satliffa 

ACADEMIC TRAINING 

FOR CHILDREN 

T 

Regularly prescrioea course ror 

Pre-Primary tnrougn Junior Hign. 

Accredited Teachers 

For information concerning curriculum 

rates, etc.. a^p}y at 

OFFICE 
1106 Broadway • Franklin 1197 



Our Fall Term Starts Sept. 3rd 

Enrollment should be made at once. 

Limited classes so that each pupil ^vill receive 
individual attention 




Kathleen Schneider and the winner: "Temper- 
amental" Tommy Elliott 



eral hundred of the plant race fans in 
attendance. 

Fred Grossher, Hull Department, presi- 
dent of the organization, reports that a 
sizable profit from the ticket sales was 
deposited to the credit of the association, 
which was founded for the purpose of 
building a fund to render aid to athletes 
injured in the various plant sport activities. 

Lovely Kathleen Schneider of the Pur- 
chasing Department presented the prize to 
the winner of the "Trophy Dash." All the 
events were exciting and furnished a very 
enjoyable evening for the customers. 

The Association, through Ralph Smith 
of Personnel has carded some good at- 
tractions to be held in the next few weeks. 
Probably the next event will be a dance 



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Telephone t. 77 5 5 •) 

DORMANS 

Oth Ave. and C_/ Street 

41st and El Cajon Boulevard 
Washington at Falcon Street 



at Mission Beach Ball Room with a class 
"A" orchestra rendering the music. Tickets 
will be sold by the members and a part of 
the proceeds will go into the coffers of 
the organization. 

Plans are also under way for a city 
championship Softball game between a 
Consolidated all star aggregation and the 
city league winners. The Coliseum Ath- 
letic Club will also be used for the stag- 
ing of amateur boxing programs as soon 
as the season gets under way, sometime 
in September. Ice Skating and many other 
attractions are lined up for the future. 

Present officers of the association in- 
clude Fred Grossher, president; ""Brad" 
Bradshaw, vice-president; and Dan Miller, 
secretary. They urge your support in put- 
ting across the programs as all money 
raised will be disbursed to benefit the in- 
jured athletes without profit to the or- 
ganization heads. 

Jim Kite's flying high these days, since 
the arrival of little Miss Mary Hertha Kite 
on August 2d. Miss Mary Hertha Kite put 
in her first appearance weighing just 7 
pounds and 10 ounces. 




BEFORE you come to the 
Golden Gate International 
Exposition, safeguard your 
money with Bank of America 
Travelers Cheques. They are 
obtainable at your local branch 
where the manager will also 
gladly give you a letter of in- 
troduction to the manager of 
the Bank of America Exposi- 
tion Branch-Treasure Island's 
only bank. 

^»nk of Atitetira 

NATIONAL iAVi^^cs ASSOCIATION 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPOHATION 



September, 1940 



19 



TANK HIGHLIGHTS 

By Herthel Chappell 

A HEARTY welcome is extended to 
Witkowski, who is assisting E. 
Sprenger in the supervision of the Tank 
Department. 

Al Ambrose, busy foreman of tank and 
drop hammer, manages to take care of 
both departments efficiently with the aid 
of his put-put, which enables him to dash 
from one department to the other. Be- 
ware, fellows, don't let our speed-demon 
run you down. 

Many Consolidafors enjoyed a barbecue 
dinner given by Mr. and Mrs. E. Backhaus. 
Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. 
Leo Bourdon, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Theuws, 
and yours truly and wife. 

Our rivet boss on day shift, Mr. Harold 
Kent Parsons, Bud to you, is back from 
his vacation at Yellowstone. His report 
is, quote "There are no yellow stones at 
Yellowstone Park," unquote. 

Matrimony has claimed several of our 
sworn bachelors during July and August. 
Milton Waite, Dick Lighthiger, Fred Mor- 
gan and Sid Riches. So far, the boys have 
not complained about indigestion, but 
time will tell. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Culver, who are the proud parents of a 



You Will Find 

Quality 

and 

Service 

at 

WESTERN LUMBER GO. 

Yard and Mill 

Foot Columbia St. 
F-6305 



BRANCH YARDS 

La Joila Lumber Co. 

Ocean Beach Lumber Co. 
Coronado Lumber Co. 

Pacific Beach Lumber Co. 
Chula Vista Lumber Co. 



baby boy, James Robert Culver, who 
weighed in at 8 pounds 4 ounces. The 
happy event occurred August 8th. 

Do you know that: 

Woodbury is doing all right by himself? 
He is sporting a 1940 Convertible V8, 
and now he seems to be having trouble 
keeping the girls away. 

Frank Serio is thinking of getting mar- 
ried. If you don't believe it, just take a 
look at our tall, dark, and handsome tennis 
player. His girl has come all the way from 
New Orleans just to see him, and now he 
is wondering whether he should send her 
back for another year or marry her now. 
It's all up to you, Frank! 

George Price and Kenneth Prather were 
spotted on the causeway burning up the 
tracks in the midget auto racers. Careful, 
fellows, that's a very dangerous sport. 

Dante Rossello is still badly in need of 
blinders. They tell me that he smacked 
into the back of another car while trying 
to drive and watch airplanes at the same 
time. 

George Price has been spending most of 
his spare time trying to locate a job for 
his girl friend. He says he has to get her 
a job so they can begin the long walk 
toward matrimony. 

Arnold Sprenger is having a hard time 
trying to figure out whether to eat his 
lunch in peace and then make the half 
mile dash to his clock, or to eat on the way. 
Try thumbing a ride on the motor scooters. 

Our beloved Kentucky boy, Felix Mat- 
tingly, insulted one of Tia Juana's best 
Taco cooks by demanding a 'possum sand- 
wich. Better go back to the hills, or else 
become civilized, Kentucky. 



George Kummerow is spending most of 
his time picking himself out of people's 
yards, and off of the highway. We only 
hope he breaks that gallopin' motor cycle 
of his before it breaks him. 

Jule Turoski spends every evening writ- 
ing letters of love to his one and only. 



WHERE TO LIVE? 

Apartments, Courts, Duplexes, Houses 
$20 - We Cover the City - $200 

NAVY RENTAL BUREAU 

CAPT.E.FRIEDRICK, U.S.N. Retd. 
Main 1014 234 C Street 

SALES • RENTALS • BUILDING 



SMND RAD GO. 


Radios 
Refrigerators 
• Lamps 
Appliances 
Washing Machines 


TERMS 


Sales • Service • Rentals 


1025 Seventh Ave. 4991 Newport Ave. 

San Diego Ocean Beach 
Fr. 5397 Bay. 4913 



IREE ATTENTION AIRCRAFT WORKERS |REE 
FREE OFFER EXTENDED FOR MONTH OF SEPTEMBER 



FREE. 


• An Extra Pair Uniform Pants with 




Each Uniform Purchased 




C |n g E Your Name and 
_J Company Name 
■■ Sewed on FREE 



Nationally Adi'ertised Brands 
GRAYCO SHIRTS AND TIES • HICKOK BELTS AND SUSPENDERS 

SPORT COATS • PANTS • SUITS 
SHOES - DRESS - SPORT - WORK 

H. l. DHUIDiOn 



mEnS lUEHR 



B12 UIE5T BROHDiunv °zJ:::TZ' 

NO CASH NEEDED • CONVENIENT CREDIT TERMS 



BETWEEN INDIA AND 
KETTNER 



20 



Consolidator 



VISIT 

Tlre^totte 

FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

Tires and Tubes 
Batteries 
Spark Plugs 
Life Protector Tubes 
Motor Tune-up Dept. 
Brake Department 
Auto Radio and Service 
Four Brands of Gasoline 
Auto Accessories 
Seat Covers 

FOR THE HOME 

Electric Refrigerators 

Ranges 

Washers 

Radios 

Electrical Appliances 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

Bicycles 
Velocipedes 
Scooters 
Wagons 



Terms as Low as 25c Weekly 

CASH YOUR 
PAY CHECK 

For Your Convenience Our 

Cashier Will Be On Duty 

Until 7 p. m. Every 

PRIDAY EVENING 



It's Easy to Park 
and Shop at 

Tire^totte 

Broadway, Front to Union Streets 
F. 7121 



SPORT SPOTLIGHT 

By Matt. Wiclopohki 

Due to the present upheaving diplo- 
matic trends of the modern era, our soft- 
ball championship schedule was cancelled 
for the time being. This is one time, when 
we can prove of what we are really made. 
Sacrificing our social and sport activities 
for our country's preparedness is a tribute 
of the finest and highest. 

Here it is, the night-owl dope about the 
Tool Room pitcher. Speed, who was the 
threat to all batters. However, Selvaggi, 
was the man who pitched the strong Sheet 
Metal team to victory and an inevitable 
championship. But, the contending Hull 
team won over Vic Racko's Machine Shop 
boys to get into the play-off. And, so it 
was, Joe Drozo and the Hull gang won 
the championship over the supposedly great 
Sheet Metal team by a score of 13-12. 

Captain Homer Shalor led a strong 
Consair tennis team against a tough team 
from the North American Aircraft. As a 
result, the Consolidated tennis champ, 
Shaylor, was upset by number one player, 
Baker. Our number three player, Mc- 
Kellan, also had an off day. As the last 
tennis ball of the afternoon hit the net, 
four young men shook hands to the plaud- 
its of the onlookers. Two of the players 
were Ed Requa and Carl Sjoblom, who 
teamed up together and won the final 
match of the day with the final score of 
4-2 for N. A. 

On August 11, the Consair doubles 
tourney went under way. Discounting the 
lone upset of the first round, when Mc- 
Clannen and Witmer lost to Lockwood 
and Boyle, every other match came out 
as_expected in the seedings. 

Magnificent tennis was played by the 
following teams: Buggs-McKellan, Serio- 
Wheeler, Lockwood-Boyle, Requa-Shell- 
bach, Browning-Syren, and the seeded 
Shaylor-Sjoblom combination. Those who 
won by default have yet to prove their 
tennis technique. September 1 was selected 
for the finals. 

Anytime a husband gets the last word 
in a debate with his wife, this is usually 
it: "All right then, go ahead and buy it." 



Consollda tors 

- - Bowl with 
Your Leagues 



SUNSHINE BOWLING ALLEYS 

624 Broadway 



MISSION 

DRY 
CLEANERS 



MISSION DRY CLEANING 

IS LIKE CONSOLIDATED 

AIRPLANES ... IT FLIES 

ABOVE ALL 



Phone J-4139 
ADDRESS 105 WASH. 



•'S^way from h all..!' CORONADO 
Take advantage of LOW RENTALS 

* ^35 "/ HOUSES... APARTMENTS... ^35 «/ « 

TELEPHONE MR. LAMSON — CORONADO 1400 

STRAND REALTY COMPANY 



September, 1940 



21 



TOOLS 

Tools For every kind of 
work are stocked here; Tools 
(or machinists, carpenters, 
metal workers, etc. Select From 
GUARANTEED nationally known 
tools such as . . . 

• L. S. Starrctt Co. 

• Plomb Mfg. Co. 

• Kennedy Steel Tool Kits 

• Crescent Tools 

• Klenk's Aviation Snips 
BUDGET TERMS GIVEN 

SAN DIEGO HARDWARE 

840-850 FIFTH AVENUE 




the 

finest 

reconditioned 



USED CARS 

Discover for yourself why Tufford is of- 
ficially acclaimed the FINEST USED CAR 
LOT OF ANY DE SOTO DEALER IN THE 
ENTIRE UNITED STATES! See for your- 
self the amazing lower prices! Discover 
the sensational Tufford terms . . . and 
higher trade-in allowances! Don't wait — 
or hesitate — come in TODAY! 




"B" AT FRONT ST. 
"FOR A BETTER DEAL" 
MAIN 3188 



THE CLEAN SWEEP 

By G. "Broom" Browne 

WHY is it we never see Herb Ezard 
on a scooter any more? 

John Petit recently purchased a new 
pipe. On the way to work, John ht said 
pipe put the match in his mouth and 
threw the new pipe out the window. Was 
that the same night you came to work with 
your shirt on backwards, John? 

Mr. and Mrs. John Preston proudly 
say, it's a baby girl, Elizabeth 754 lbs. 
Congratulations from us one and all. 

Gone but not forgotten is the "Pro- 
duction Beer Bust" at El Monte park. We 
noticed there was not much mention in 
the last issue of the Consolidafor regard- 
ing our picnic. Following are a few high 
lights: 

Ed Kellogg, high, on the limb of a 
tree . . . Lloyd Bender trying his best to 
bicycle . . . Tod Carter with a death grip 
on the beer barrel tap . . . Craig Clark 
and Joe Kramer out cold after a collision 
on the ball park . . . Did anyone notice 
Joe's shiner after the incident? Art Stone 
bringing enough lunch for an army . . . 
Harvey Muck doing a nice job of um- 
piring . . . The Wilson, Miller, Kramer 
trio. Ohhh! Mrs. Mussen keeping a watch- 
ful eye on Jim Tipton from Finished 
parts, missing a corner with his car on 
the way home and ending up in a corn 
field. 

It seems Jim Mussen and Jim Wilkin- 
son have very attractive names for each 
other. Jim to Wilkinson is "Musselhead", 
while Jim to Mussen is "Droop Snoot". 
It's a good thing these boys didn't com- 
pete in the name suggestion contest for 
the different model ships we are building. 

Among the new faces in the Wing 
Dept. we see Russell and Kenny Dukette 
both boys are noted for their fine horse- 
manship. Russell recently took second 
place at the Monroe Field Rodeo. Yes, 
Daddy Dukette is here also and does not 
take a back seat by any means when it 
comes to riding. 



BRING YOUR CONSAIR IDENTIFICATION CARD AND COME TO: 

STANL^REWf 






V 



m 



* 



We are always 

happy to cash 

your 

pay checks 

90-DAY 

CHARGE 
PLAN 



PAY PAY 

„'S '= «r» 



PAY 



NO INTEREST 
NO EXTRAS 



BROOKS 

in SAN DIEGO 

416-18 BROADWAY 

OPEN SAT. NIGHTS 



3050 University Ave., 



1 144 Third Avenue 



22 



Consolidator 



The obvious is the last thing we think, 
see or do. 

An optimist is one who sees light where 
there is none. A pessimist is one who blows 
it out. 



FORD HOTEL 




SHOWER BATHS 
Rates $4 up pcrWk 

Close to Consolidated, 

Business/ Shopping and 

Theatrical Districts 

W. B. BASSLER, Prop. 
FR. 2207 • 1135 THIRD AVE. 



PLANT POLICE NOTES 

By Frank Thcrmas 

Chief Tompkins calls the 5:30 "traffic 
Blitz" a Dunkerque without water — John 
Ton licked the pneumonia bugs and is up 
to fighting weight again (240 lbs.) — 
William Graves, a staunch Democrat, fol- 
lowed in the footsteps of Wilkie during 
his vacation — William Bean is the Tomato 
Juice King (100 ounces a night) — Mussen 
and Fink should take heed on the straight- 
away; Chief Tompkins, Capt's. Shattuck, 
Roth, and Casey are Special City Police 
Officers and City tickets "stick" these 
days — Leo "the gate," heaviest man in the 
plant, is reducing, below 290 lbs. now. 











Todd's Gomp ete Men's store 

glides most liberal || n t U 1 1 
to the workmen in the .... 

[onsolidated 

Official Uniforms 

Shirt and ^^ Q c 
Trousers ^^ 

r D r r Extra Pants Free. Lettering and Insignia 
' '" ^ ^ on shirt Free with purchase of uniform. 






See These Guaranteed Savings! 
12.95 Sport Coats . . . now 7,95 
7 JO Pants & Slacks 2.95-4,95 
Men's 1.65 Shirts now ^1 

Nationally Ad<.'erti.ted 

men's 1- and 2 -Pant Suits 
22.50 . . . 18.5D ... and $15 

rAMTODD^S 

HATS 1 COMPLETE CLOTHING BUILDING 

. ■ Cor. 5th & E St. 




! 1 ■ 







HELP ELIMINATE THE PARKING 
LOT HOG— REPORT ALL VIOLA- 
TIONS TO PLANT POLICE AT 
NORTH GATE— Rodney Pease, Cham- 
pion Pistol Shot, and the F. B. I. will soon 
instruct our personnel — Byers will let you 
in on his "ice worms" — The Smiths and 
the Browns double up on the second shift 
— Capt. Roth uses a camera to bring back 
those "big ones" that got away — Tom 
Bunch spent his vacation "Where the Turf 
meets the Surf" — Jim Marsh spent 3 go- 
ing, 1 visiting and 3 coming back — Cross 
is keeping the New car dealers on edge — 
Bell will answer the bell at his new home 
at 68 th and El Cajon — Johnson regrets 
giving up his vest for a uniform — Plant 
Police average 5 years' experience as Peace 
Officers — Mitchell has car trouble punch- 
ing out from the "NE Gate" — Daggett 
would make a good stand-in for the Lieut. 
Gov. (makes lots of changes when the 
Captain is away) — Maddux wishes he 
could exercise some of his horses down 
here instead of his dogs — Charles Irving 
had a "timeclock" wedding — Aug. 7th — 
rang out 9 AM., streamlined to Los An- 
geles where he married Miss Dorothy 
Rees of Riverside and rang in August 9 
at 10:30 P.M 

HEARD ABOUT THE HULL 

By Bill Peftif 

IT seems that now-a-days, a man has a 
tough time in this old world, unless he 
has a good sense of humor and a dash of 
wit. Maybe that's why Al "Paddy O'Day" 
Leonard, busy little Hull leadman, gets 
on so well. He has a sense of humor! 

Going from the sub-conscious to the 
sublime, we find that Steve Gardner, gen- 
eral handy man in the PBY division, took 
oath to love, honor, and obey till death 
do him part, one August 9th. A good time 
and cigars were had by all! 

Ah, and now at last the rivet gang in 
the Hull have acquired a man with enough 
good looks to uphold their tradition with 
the weaker sex. "Dutch" Klein's new 
riveter, Mike "Mitch" Williams, has es- 
tablished a record that almost belittles that 
of Homer Slack, sometimes called the 
"Casanova of the Hull", when he was 
in his prime. But you can relax girls, for 
it is strongly rumored that "Mitch" will 
soon be off to Oklahoma where he will em- 
bark on the quiet sea of matrimony. 

Spending the week-end on a hunting 
trip, seems to be Glenn Hotchkiss' idea 
of a swell way to live. Spending a quiet 
week-end in the city seems to be our four- 
footed friend's idea of a good way to live. 
(Especially when Hotchkiss and his cronies 
p.re combing the woodland for them.) 



September, 1940 



23 



COUGHLIN'S COUGHINS 

By T. }. Coughlin 

The Engineer's annual Match Play qual- 
ifying round of golf was held on August 
10 at the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Course 
and the pairings follows: 

FIRST FLIGHT 
Sheaham vs. McGuiness 
Freel vs. Sebold 
Ekrem vs. Robbins 
Meer vs. Craig 
R. Miller vs. Sutton 
Layko vs. D. Waller 
Purcell vs. Schwarz 
Coughlin vs. Smith. 

SECOND FLIGHT 

Kelley vs. Bowling 
Yater vs. Kany 
Raymond vs. Luppke 
Lutz vs. Ranahan 
D. Miller vs. Redwine 
Robinson vs. Faelsch 
Edenfield vs. May 
Cary vs. Des Plantes 

THIRD FLIGHT 



Green vs. Bauer 
Kirk vs. Wahler 
Moe vs. Golem 
Watt vs. Weber 



Bradley vs. Hinckley 
Leigh vs. Ambrose 
L. Nelson vs. Gerber 
C. Nelson vs. Bender 




Mobilgas 



A SIGN OF QUALITY 

Drive in where you see the 

shield with the Flying 

Red Horse for 

Mobilgas 

America's Favorite Gasoline 

GENERAL PETROLEUM 
CORPORATION 



FOURTH FLIGHT 

Carlson vs. McCabe 
Kellogg vs. C. Larsen 
Lee vs. Whitaker 
Eldred, Jr. vs. Growald 
Seick vs. Walsh 
Maunce vs. Rohn 
Micklund vs. Cheynoweth 
Marrow vs. Whitney 
Bauer vs. Kirk 

FIFTH FLIGHT 

Beyer vs. Clement 
Darnoy vs. Hess 
A. W. Kellogg vs. Eldred, Sr. 
Gorman vs. Halsey 



The standings of the Engineering Bowl- 
ing League as of August 13 is: 

1. PBY-3 47-21 5. PBY-5 32-40 

2. PB2Y-2 45-23 6. B24-A 31-37 

3. PBY-2 37-31 7. B24 30-42 

4. PBY-1 36-36 8. PBY-4 24-48 



FHA Loans 

To Build a New Home — For Repairs or 
Modernization 

Call Jackson 5171 for Information 

Klicka Lumber Co. 

30th St., just north of Univ. J-5171 



Robert D. Maxwell Co. 



Main 5011 



SAN DIEGO 



Broadway at State 




TF you're buying a new car this year, there 
is one automobile you ought look at first. 

It's modern enough to pace the \vhole 
range of 1940 values- -and low-priced enough 
to be in any man's reach. 

^^ You'll have no real way of ^^r"^^ 
know^ing what your 1940 money ought to buy 
until you've got your hands on a Buick and 
seen what a really modern automobile 
is like. 

Whether you buy on price, size, 

Jf style, comfort or performance ^ 

doesn't make much difference. 



"£e5i Ifuu 5 Sulclci 



WW 



24 



Consolidator 



Learn to Dance Well 

Special Private Lesson Rates in Ballroom Dancing 
6 PRIVATE 55 00 
° LESSONS *'•"" 

Consair Club Class Lessons, including one 
hour lesson and 1 V2 hour Practice Dancing 
only 50c. Wed., 8 to 10:30 P.M. 
Classes forming for Children and Adults in 
All Types of Dancing. Rates in Reach of All 

HEMPHILL'S 
SCHOOL OF THE DANCE 

1039 7th Ave. F. 5750 & 1740 Upoi. J. 9458 



Just out . . . 

^ The New Magazine 

CINE-KODAK EIGHT 

Come in and let 

* L ■ 

us show It to you 

T 

Eastman Kodak Stores, inc. 

419 Broadway • San Diego 



J^ 


FENDERS • BODY 


^^^"^^ 


RADIITORS - TOPS 


^T""^ QL 


UPHOLSTERY and 


x^-^ 


PAINTING 

Peterson Bros. 


"C-Aj^SBr- 


Does your car 


COLUMBIJk and E STS. 


look wearijt 


Fr. 2164 



SEE THE 1940 
INDIANS 

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE SALES CO. 

GUY UROUHART 
1041 Columbia St. San Diego 

Open Eveningg • Term* 




This July fourth the Sierra Club Rock 
Climbing section made ascents of several peaks 
in the Palisades group of Central California. 
The photographs are representative of the 
scenery that surrounds California's principal 
glacier, and some of her higher peaks. On this 
trip Phil Faulconer, loft, climbed Temple 
Crag, 13,016 feet and Mount Sill, 14,150 feet. 

On Labor Day Sierra Club members will 



climb Mount Humphreys, another Sierra giant. 
If you -would like to go on this trip, see 
Faulconer. 

Engineering now harbors another fugitive 
from a mountain peak. Bill Leovy. Who else 
in the factory likes to pack and climb in the 
mountains? You only need a week-end to climb 
psaks ranging to 14,000 feet above sea level. 



LOFT LINES 

By T. J. Coiighlin 
For a long, long time we've had a celeb- 
rity; a famous personality; a man of 
nation-wide reputation working in our 
midst. A man whose modesty so equals in 
magnitude his accomplishments that un- 
til very recently we were entirely unaware 
of his fame. Of course, closely associated 
with him as we've been for the past year 
or more, we could not help but know of 
his outstanding ability as a bowler, golfer, 
marksman, bail player, hunter and all- 



round athlete, but all that fades to in- 
significance in the light of our present 
knowledge of the man. My friends, with 
pleasure I introduce to you our own Irving 
Craig — who a few years ago attained such 
a reputation as a tree-sitter (remember 
the era of tree and flag-pole sitters? ship- 
wreck Kelly, etc.) that even to this day 
the papers occasionally make reference to 
his thirty-day record. And to think that 
a man of such renown would hide his 
fame from his friends. Irving — will you 
say a few words to the boys? 



BUY $1,000 

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on 



en up $4^2 a week to buy 
GrtVL $231 a week to buy 



$1,000 
$ 500 



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Checking Account 

No minimum balance required. No 
charge other than for checks used. 



\ 



FHA LOANS 

on Easy Payments 

4V2% 



loans up to 90 percent 
term - 5 to 25 years 



SAN DIEGO 



TRUST & 
SAVINGS 



BANK 



COR. BROADWAY AT SIXTH 



HELP YOUR CONSOLIDATOR— Mention this adv. at the Bank. 



September, 1940 



25 



WING TIPS 

By Carter 

1. The house that Joe built has finally 
reached a conclusion. Sooo Joe invites all 
the boys to bring their "Dog Houses" out 
to spend the nite with him. 

They say a "chuck key" is needed to 
open the front door of the Gliebe domicile. 

2. Steve Powell's former loyalty to 
Buffalo was baked out of him at Santa 
Catalina. Steve says, "I am now a "native 
son." Maybe the "mere" maids had some- 
thing to do with it. 

3. The "Beer Barrel Polka" will no 
longer ring forth at the Kyle's Rendezvous 




Home Building Simplified 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING 
Satisfactory Loans 
Saving Suggestions 
Suitable Materials 
Selecting Bargains 
Servicing Your Job 

For 28 Years 

we have been supplying all the ma- 
terial to build thousands of homes in 
San Diego. May we help you? 

WHITING-M&U)e 

EVtRVTHINC-^ — '" — BUIUINO- 

14th and K Streets . Main 7191 

41 n Unlv«rilty • Oc«anilda • El Canire 



as they sell no beer after 2 a.m. and we 
now work until 4:30. The Lazari, Ras- 
putin, Broome, and Toodles quartet will 
now sing sorrowfully and soulfully in the 
shower (alone). 

4. "Sea biscuit" Guaranotta is still on 
the wrong horse, so he has taken up shoe 
repairing as a side line. 

5. The Wing's two blind men (Um- 
pires to you who haven't seen 'em in ac- 
tion) Kipple and Campbell, are looking 
for a Seeing Eye Dog. 

6. J. Petit, the Thomas Lipton of 
Mission Bay, missed last place in last 
month's Yacht Derby by scant inches. A 
few more years says Johnny and "I'll be 
right up there among them." 

7. Frank Heidenman the "Mayor of 
Crown Point" has finally found a "Sucker" 
and so Johnny Mello, the Spar Maestro, has 
built a lovely home in Crown Point where 
the fog and the water meet. 

8. Bob Elo and "Kip the Kippering" 
Kipple can not seem to decide as to who 
eats no pork and who eats no fish on 
Friday. A suggestion from bored listeners 
to their continual yammering has sug- 
gested that they both turn "Yogi" and eat 
neither fish, flesh nor fowl. 

9. "Matt" Barthel and "Limey" Bart- 
lett of the Del Mar division of the Wing 
Department claim that they are not lost 
but just forgotten. It seems that the ex- 
treme North end of the new building is 
really a long way off from anywhere. It 
has been told that when Frank Heidenman 
got home the first morning after the ten 
hour shift, his wife wouldn't let him in 
the house. It seems she thought that it was 
something that couldn't find its way home 
from the grave yard before dayhght. 

10. Dear sweet Willie "Parson" Flen- 
niken of the nite Machine Shop stock 
chase, is trying to raise a hirsute adorn- 
ment. After two weeks of struggle and 
fertilizer, the aforementioned thing 
"Miked" close to .0001374 at the long- 



est point. It looks like he will have to 
develop another technique if he expects to 
"ace" any more of the gals down at the 
Ice Skating rink. 




THE 

STANDARD 

FOR 

AVIATION 



QUALITY TOOLS 

FULLY GUARANTEED 

• 

The Same High Standards of Quality 
The Same Guarantee 

NOW! 

As 30 Years Ago 



■LOS ANGELES- 



K 



IRBY' 

Good Shoes 

SEVENTH AND BROADWAY 



S 



Aircraft Workers 



You'll Find 
the Right 
Shoe Here 




Vul Cork — Gro Cord or Crepe Soles 
SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 




DRINK 

COCA-COLA . . . m Bottles 






WHAT A FAMILY ! ! ! 

Boy, Oh, BOY (and Girls, too) how 
this Comolidated Family has grown and 
is growing! Some time ago an appeal was 
put up on the bulletin boards for baby 
pictures and the response was instan- 
taneous. Now that more than a year has 
elapsed, another appeal for pictures of the 
young members of Consolidated famihes, 
and this appeal scarcely was on the boards 
than it had to come down for other an- 
nouncements, yet some 33 snapshots in the 
very limited time allowed, were turned in 
and we present with pride the junior fac- 
tion of Cottsolida/ed's big family. 

Due to the very short posting of the 
notice, and the short time allowed for the 
taking of new pictures, we will run an- 
other group next month to bring the 
album of young folks up to completion. 
So get out your cameras and take some 
snapshots and turn them in early. Prints 
must be snapshot size and glossy. Don't 
put it off! 

1. Edward Eugene Hatz at 1 year and 7 
mos. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hatz of 
wood shop. 

2. David Kemper at the age of 3 years 
shows off what the well dressed cyclist is 
wearing this year. Bob Kemper of finish parts 
store room is his dad. 



3. Rose Marie Quill, 6 month's daughter of 
Fred R. Quill of the wing department. 

4. Miss Phylis Crosthwaite whose dad works 
in the experimental department. Miss Crosth- 
waite is just 11 (months). 

5. Miss Helen Ann Carter, 18 months, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Carter, who 
seems to be starting out early getting ac- 
quainted with the beach. 

6. Shirley Joan Leisenring and Gary S., 
daughter and son of V. F. Leisenring of 
wood shop. 

7. "Teddie" Borgens at 18 months, whose 
father is E. S. Borgens, orchestra director. 

8. This young chap apparently will read 
Tarzan stories at a very early age. He is 
Harry Roy Lessing, Jr. Mr. Lessing, Sr., is in 
the hull dept. 

9. Gerald (Jerry) Muzzy and his mother. 
"Jerry" is 9 14 months old, and his dad works 
in the wing dept, 

10. Carol Jean Apple, 2 years, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Joe E. Apple. 

11. Gary Joe Apple, son of Joe and Mrs. 
Apple. He is just 6 months old. 

12. Carolyn Perry, 2 years old on the back 
step with a cake ... no wonder the tickled 
look! Daughter of R. F. Perry of tool design. 

13. Miss Mary Ann Backhaus, it appears, is 
completing a very military and jaunty salute. 
Miss Ann was born May 16th and is the 
daughter of E. Backhaus. 

14. Baby Melba Kay Cooper at 1 1 weeks. 
Daughter of O. E. Cooper of the hull dept. 

15. Calvin Rayborn, Jr., who was born 
Feb. 1 9th. Hull department. 

16. Sherrilyn Ann Spear, who was, or will 
be one month old Aug. 6th. Daughter of 
Charles and Eileen Spear. 



17. Here is a young fellow Mr. and Mrs. 
Eddie Generas of planning are proud of: 
Mr. David E. Generas. Mrs. Ruth Generas is 
holding young David. 

18. This is "Ginger", or Laura Lee Bybee, 
4 months old. The picture was taken on 
Easter Sunday. "Ginger" is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Bybee of final assembly. 

19. Master Walter Thorpe at age 16 mos. 

20. Mary Ann (left) and Denny Rae 
(right) of the H. R. Gallant family. Mary 
Ann is 9 and Denny Rae 6. 

21. This picture on the reverse side bears 
the inscription, "Skeets" Smith . . . age 16 
mos. Mr. Fred Smith of hull is the dad. 

22. "C. B." Powers. 1 year Remark on 
back says, "Presidential Timber" belonging to 
Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Powers. It looks like 
Roosevelt and Willkie ^vill have some strong 
competition. 

2 3. Master Gaylord Eastman Eckles. 21 
months. Son of Dean Eckles of superstructures. 

24. Arleen Marie McGuffin, 19 months old 
daughter of Ramond D. McGuffin. 

2 5. This is Paul Otten's son Eric in Detroit. 
The note on the back of this says "Never 
again!" Apparently this is a reference to 
the "Detroit sand" all around. 

2 6. Barbara Craig. Just one year old. 

27. "Whazzat? One o' the Consolidated 
planes Dad works on?" Miss Catherine Ann 
Lessing who -was born May 7 th and "who now 
takes an interest in her father's work. C. J. 
Lessing is in the hull department. 

2 8. Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Smith's most recent 
arrival; Miss Jennette Sonja Smith at just 6 
months. 



September, 1940 



27 



29. Here are David (age 3) and Patricia 
Ann Smith (1,^2) son and daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. B. Smith of ^vood shop. 

3 0. Diane Marlene Welter, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs, W. Welter. Age 14 months. 

31. Miss Norma Deischl, age 3 years. 

3 2. Joan Craig ... 5 years old. 

3 3 . "Junior's morning bath" arranged for 
Al Polus, Jr. . . . probably by Mrs. A. Polus 
while Al Polus is at work in hulls. 



DAD-- 

Where will you buy 
your baby's bed? 

A complete line of furniture 
for your baby . . . 

Baby scales for rent . . . 

Buy your baby's furniture 
on terms . . . 



CENESKNNER 



2525 University Ave. 

JACKSON 2411 




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the pouring lip oj 

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QUALfTEE 

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SHEET METAL NEWS 

By H. B. Millman 

WALT ALECKNER promises to 
never leave his badge at home 
again; he had a terrible time finding some 
one to identify him. 

Tex Hatch is in the market for a 
bicycle, any condition, highest prices paid. 

Tommy Wathen found out what made 
his legs ache . . . the doctor told him he 
was muscle bound. 

Bill Sherriff is planning on exploring 
the Grand Canyon during his vacation. 

Al Hunter says "don't miss Sally 
Rand's show at the San Francisco Fair." 

Eddie Raymond really has the golf bug. 
He practices every spare minute he has. 

Buzz Perry is sporting around in a new 
car, a late 193 Model "A". He reports 
over 3 miles to the gallon of oil. 

The sheet department lost one of its 
most capable men this month in Al Bal- 
lard. We wish him lots of luck and suc- 
cess in his new work. 

We finally found out why Eddie Ray- 
mond has that hungry look of late — the 
Missus has been away. She is coming home 
shortly, Eddie reports. 

The Sheet cutting softball team won 
the championship of the day shift by a 
score of 12 to 1, Hank Ondler getting 
more than his share of hits. 

H. L. Davis, 8093, now has two de- 
pendents according to reports — his wife 
and himself. 

Carl Mounts does things in a big way. 
He is building a beautiful home at Ro- 
lando Heights. He could use plenty of 
help putting in his lawn — a big job for 
a little man. 

Dail Gowdy says he should have the 
rank of sergeant in the army . . . ask him. 




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Terms if desired 

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Trip . . . pay when 
you return. 

* No matter what the 
car needs . . . tires, 
a battery, brake re- 
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MILLER SERVICE, 
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without red tape. 

"Consolidators" 

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• 
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data "^ 

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Own Your Home/ 

Use your rent money to 
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down payment starts you 
toward financial stability. 
Plan now (or the years to 
come. Excellent homes in 
Bird Rock, South La Jolla 
and Pacific Beach. . . Fast 
highway and bus service 
to Consolidated. 

Robert G. Robeson 

REALTOR 

5545 La Jolla Blvd. Phone La Jolla 2414 




The bigger 
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One of our very closest friends has 
been married so long that every time he 
passes a mailbox he feels in all his pockets. 



Quality Hand Tools 

Starrctt, Plomb, Crescent, Wiss, 
KIcnk. Gerstner & Kennedy Tool 
Chests. Home Shop Equipment. 

mntor Horduiare & 
Equipment Co. 

1125-47 Columbia Street. 
Main 0115. 



Champion "Wally" F. Miles of Anodic Department winning this year's county championship in 
weight lifting in the 123 pound class. 

Here we present medals won by champion "Wally" F. Miles, Anodic Department, over a period of 
ten years. He was also awarded a 14,000 mile trip visiting every state in the Union and Canada, by the 
Union and Tribune-Sun. 

1. County Junior Olympic Championship for the 
broad-jump. 2. County Junior Olympic Cham- 
pionship for chinning. 3. Most improved athlete 
in San Diego County for 1934. 4. Fifth place in 
the National Junior Olympics. 5. First place in 
the Huntington Beach 880 yard relay. 6. County 
championship for basketball toss. 7. First place 
for county running broad-jump. 8. Various Y. M. 
C. A. track meets won. 9. First place, 75 yard 
dash in the County Junior Olympics. 10. First 
place in the County Junior Olympics standing 
broad-jump. 11. Playground championship for all 
five events in the County Junior Olympics. 12. 
First place, De Molay 5 yard dash. 13. First 
place in all five events in County Junior Olympics. 
14. First place in 7J yard dash in County Junior 
Olympics. IS. First place in Y. M. C. A. Track 
Meet in San Diego. 16. Southern California 
championship for all five events. 17. First place in 
De Molay running broad-jump. 18. County 
Championship for weight-lifting in 123 pound 
class. 19. First place in chinning in the County 
Junior Olympics. 20. First place for goal throw 
in the County Junior Olympics. 21. First place 
in De Molay 880 yard relay. 22. First place in 
chinning at the County Junior Olympics. 23. 
First place in the standing broad-jump at the 
County Junior Olympics. 24. First place in the 
75 yard dash in the County Junior Olympics. 2S. 
First place in the 75 yard dash at the National 
Junior Olympics. 26. First place in the 75 yard 
dash at the County Junior Olympics. 27. Second 
place in potato race, 88 pound class, in the Y. M. 
C. A. track meet. 28. Ribbon won in the broad- 
jump at the Coast League Dual Meet held in Santa 
Ana. 29. Third place in the target throw, Y. M. 
C. A. Track Meet. 30, 31, and 32. Ribbons for 
220 yard relay and the SO yard dash in the 17th 
Annual Stadium Meet in San Diego. 3 3. Ribbons 
won at the Coast League Dual Meet between San 
Diego and Long Beach. 34. First place in the 
broad-jump in the County Junior Olympics. 



And if you really think the world owes 
you a living, go get it — don't send some 
other guy to collect. 



RENTER COMPANY, i.c. 

724 BROADWAY MAIN 4392 



CREDIT CLOTHIERS 



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September, 1940 



29 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe Sylvester (Joe is the 
nite leadman with all the hair that hangs 
out in the PBY wing center section) held 
a gigantic three-way celebration Sunday, 
August fourth, in honor of the birth of 
a daughter, Carole, their first wedding an- 
niversary and the opening of their new 
home at 4885 West Mountain View Dr. 

P. S. Joe. What do you mean by the 
sixth son of a sixth son having a daughter? 
I guess you're not the man your fore- 
fathers were. — Jim Manderville. 



Phone Jackson 201 1 Chick Runyon 
" The Blind Man " 

NATIONAL 

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University Window Shade Co. 

102.? University Avenue 



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or RECAPS 

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other sizes proportionately low-priced 



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50c per week 



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918rirstAve. atE M. 5654 



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and DYERS 

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vi^ 



ANODIC ANECDOTES 

By "Bert" Nasecf 

We all would like to know why Bob 
Warner made such a sudden change from 
a blonde to a brunette, and a song leader 
as well. Was it the voice, Bob? 

We also welcome back Gonzales after 
his stay at the hospital; even though he 
won't admit it, we understand that his 
"sweetie" turned sour when she found 
him adding on weight so rapidly. Conse- 
quently, he went about reducing said 
avoirdupois too enthusiastically ending by 
being an unwilling guest at the hospital 
to recuperate. We all hope "sweetie" ap- 
preciates his efforts. 

Robert Larceval. 

Will the "owl" gang kindly put all 
left-over sandwiches in our re-run box? 
Our hungry pal "Duffy" will gladly oblige 
with thanks. Ray McGuffin. 

The other day all of us on the Anodic 
bench received the biggest laugh in weeks. 
It came about when Gonzales, the Anodic 
Adonis, noticed how lead man Bert Naseef 
relished his chewing tobacco. Bert looked 
so satisfied that Gonzales, after sampling 
a chew, ended up over the wash basin, 
choking and gasping, wondering how peo- 
ple can stand the darned stuff. 

P. S. — Words could never describe the 
expression on Gonzales' face 

Bob Warner. 

A rumor has been going around the 
Anodic bench that Bob Larceval has been 
approached by movie scouts to play the 
part of Tonto in the new Lone Ranger 
picture soon to go into production. Ac- 
cording to the report, he is just the type 
they have been looking for. 

Gaston Gonzales. 

And a "pome" by M. E. Williams: 

Some are wise and some are wiser 

A pretty good bunch in the Anodizer 

Just give us the stuff, we'll put it through 

In right good shape, I'll promise you. 

Bert Naseef, it's my belief, hangs 

Around like an Indian Chief. 

Mac, Paul and Bob are on the job, 

Doing their stuff without much grief; 

And then hats off to Ted 

He does pretty swell if he gets a good start. 

Dave and Don and Harry, too, 

Do their part to make up the crew. 

Brother, you may be wise 

But you'll be lots wiser 

If you pay us a visit 

In the Anodizer. 



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3820 FIFTH AVE. Near University 


"CLOSE TO YOUR HOME" 



RECREATION NEWS 

By R. C. Smith 

First, let's congratulate the Cutting De- 
partment and the Hull Department for 
their stellar play in winning their res- 
pective leagues. The Cutting Department 
day shift champs are: Al Ballard, man- 
ager; Ed Birt, Hank Ondler, Joe Helm, 
Clyde Cowhick, Frank Eramo, John 
Galvas, Art Miller, Joe Accetura, Clyde 
Bashore, Les Cassie and L. M. Shirley. They 
played splendid ball all season, as their 
record shows. Ed Birt and Hank Ondler 
took care of the mound duties with Joe 
Helm on the receiving end. The heavy 
sticks were Al Ballard, Ed Birt, Hank 
Ondler and Joe Helm. The Hull Depart- 
ment night shift champs had nearly as 
good a record, losing only one or two 
games and they had to beat an all star 
aggregation in the Production Department 
to take the championship. This team con- 
sisted of: F. Furman, B. Leehman, E. 
Bertoncini, C. Calomia, Al Hernandez, F. 
Melzer, G. Hanson, E. Laird, T. Wolf, 
T. Marcella, H. Bartenfelder, M. Doerr, 
C. Walters, J. Drozdz, F. Sullivan, F. 
Wills, and G. Hopman, assistant coach; 
H. McEwan, assistant coach, and G. Wire, 
head coach. 

The plant championship was held Sun- 
day, August 18, at Monroe Field, the win- 
ners received the gold Softball trophies 
for being the best there is, and the run- 
ners-up received the silver softball trophy. 

While we are on the subject of soft- 
ball, there are two fellows who gave a 
lot of their time and energy to make this 
Softball season the success it was. A hand 
for Howard Bell and Craig Clark. The 
players thank you for your efforts. Don't 
let us forget the forgotten men — those 
fellows that take all the abuse — the umps: 
A. Brennan, E. Raymond, J. Leo, A. 
Leonard, H. Hauptman, H. Bell, H. An- 
derson, T. Butterfield, H. Muck, L. Air- 
hart, W. Shattuck, W. Liddle, Wire, Senn, 
Campbell, Kipple and Guarnotta. Thanks 
for your help in arbitrating the games. 
Your interest in the game and fairness 
was shown on many occasions. Thanks 
again for helping. 

When this goes to press, we will have 
lost one of the most interested supporters 
of sports activities at the plant. It is with 
regret we say goodbye to Al Ballard, but 
we wish him luck and success in his new 
position. 

We have a man by the name of Byers 
on the plant police who challenges any 
man in the plant or outside to a horse- 
shoe contest, and nearly guarantees to 
beat them. He held the Minnesota State 
Championship at the age of 1 5 years. 



Bowling is getting under way with a 
bang! At the first meeting, officers were 
elected. Bill Gilchrist officiated until Tom 
(Father) Coughlin was elected president, 
Frank Meer, vice president; and Harvy 
Muck, secretary-treasurer. This group of 
officers are handling all bowling for the 
day shift. If anyone has any questions, get 
in touch with them. 

The tennis doubles tournament is com- 
ing along in great style with Hudson and 
Vernon officiating. There were 44 men 
or 22 teams in this event. They played 
at North Park. 

Consolidated Golf Team took on North 
American at Rancho Santa Fe August 18 
in a contest that has been under fire for 
some time. We are going to have more of 
these inter-company matches in the near 
future. Doig in the Hull Department was 
the man that arranged this contest, and 
we thank him for his help. 

Having trimmed us 4 matches to 2, 
in the first meeting. Consolidated played 
a return match with North American 
August 2 5 at Los Angeles. 

Anything you do that the majority do 
not do is "queer" queer, isn't it? 

Trifles make perfection, but perfection 
is no trifle. 



No Money Down 



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VOUR CHECKS 

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No Delay 
Quick Service 



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Silver town Stores 



905 B Street Phone F. 6258 



September, 1 940 



31 



THINGS THAT COME OUT 
AT NIGHT 

By Craig 

TO the few who can remember the 
"old days", the new night shift is 
quite a sight. In just a few months this 
shift has grown from practically a "one 
man shop" to a force of nearly 3000 men. 
By "one man shop" we mean Mr. R. 
Emrick, who not so long ago was not 
only Night Superintendent, but also, me- 
chanic, plater, painter, inspector and dis- 
patcher. 

During the "great migration" of the 
past couple of weeks, the yard was a bee- 
hive of activity. Jimmy Mussen, like 
Moses, led his Final Assembly crew into 
the "promised land" of the new building. 
The parade of PBY's, B-24 and PB2Y-2's 
across the yard was quite a sight. Jim led 
the exodus, but unlike Moses, he lived to 
see the new home. 

Speaking of moving, it is certainly hard 
on the dispatching group these days. It 
is practically impossible to keep track of 
a department from day to day, to say 
nothing of a few small parts. We hear 
from good authority that the Tank Dept. 
has been lost for days. 

Geo. Wire and "Army" Armstrong 
have returned from their vacations and 
really have things humming. George went 



Tobacco Patch 

The House of Pipes 

Largest selection of Pipes in San Diego, 
including Meerschaum, Calabash and 
Kaywoodie. 

PIPE RACKS . SUNDRIES 

1101 BROADWAY 



BEHIND THESE DOORS 

SERVICE AND ECONOMY 




SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINT HEADQUARTERS 

PninT - lUHLLPPPER 
BroadLuav oi Tenth 



to Catalina and had a swell time. His only 
regret was that he did not have time to 
go boar hunting. "Army" spent his week 
in Yosemite and got a real rest while fig- 
uring out which center section was PBY-5 
and which 28-5. 

The nightly "Round-table" discussions 
in the Production office are informative 
and interesting. Anyone having a spare 
lunch hour should drop in. Geo. Moore 
discusses the coming presidential cam- 
paign; "Colonel" Jerry Allen expounds 
the merits of compulsory service and Tod 
Carter and Ken Phillips are preparing talks 
on "My Career in the Theatre." 

Henry Dooer, Metal Bench, started off 
the new ten-hour shift in great style. 
Henry came home the first morning at 
5 a.m., got a couple of hours sleep and 
then got up to clean the front room Ve- 
netian blinds. In pulling the slats out, 
Henry became a little too vigorous and 
pulled them right thru the glass front 
door. By the time the glass and slats had 
been replaced it was time to go to work 
and Henry is still trying to catch up on 
that sleep. 

Jack Bryant, Hull, is still trying to 
make C. Farrell believe that he won on 
that bet. The next time "Doc" Walker 
removes a sliver for H. Reese, he is going 
to give him an anaesthetic. Then it won't 
hurt. 

We are told that being small and agile, 
Ernie Johnson, Navy Inspector, is now 
the expert on the gas tanks. 

R. Christofferson, dispatcher, is in for 
some very special consideration from the 
Inspection. It happened that Mr. and Mrs. 
John Kratovil became the parents of a 
baby girl August 2. Mrs. Kratovil needed 
some blood; so of the many who offered, 
"Chris" was chosen to give the blood. 
Mrs. Kratovil is doing nicely and Mr. 
Kratovil is a proud and happy Dad. 

The paint shop men will miss C. Gale- 
house, who left for a position at North 
Island. Bill Wold is quite a sleight of hand 
artist, but won't get an opportunity to 
show us after work now. T. Guarnotta 
has his arm out of the sling now that soft- 
ball season is over. We think it was a gag 
to protect him when he missed one. It 
really was warm during that recent hot 
spell. So warm, that R. Emrick finally 
had to peel off his coat. Believe us, that is 
really hot. Roger Heinrich and G. Roth 
brought home some of the big ones that 
didn't get away, from Lake Hanson. They 
enjoyed the trip more than G. Wire did his 
last one. C. Pjerrou, Drop Hammer, fin- 
ally got up the courage to say, "I do." 
Now he is learning to say, "Yes ma'am." 
Congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Pjerrou. 



FURMBILT 



A DEPENDABLE STORE 

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A COMPLETE STORE FOR MEN 



.4th & BVay. 



SAN DIEGO 



32 



Consolidator 



The Best 
news 



IN MANY DAYS 



While other tnanufac' 
turers are raising prices on 
their new cars, Ford Motor 
Co. has reduced. 

The Big 
85-H. P. 
loupe 

fully equipped and 

delivered in SanDiego 

for only 



$799 



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See and Drive It 
Today 



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motor [o. 

1202 Broadijuav 



MACHINE OIL 

By Al Pfeiffer 

Stork delivery service has also been 
working overtime. Latest deliveries in- 
clude: 

At the Don Benson's it's a delightful 
bundle of femininity named Wanda Lee. 

Wenthe progeny is a boy. Name? James 
William. 

Taking top honors in the eight pound 
class, Ray Frindt proudly presents Rich- 
ard Albert. 

It's funny what names will do. Martin 
Montgomery certainly brings a deep scar- 
let to Van Dyke's face. "Rock" Ryerse 
is more formally known as Lyle Coe. 
"Jack" Palmer's real name is Ralph but 
he hears it so seldom that he fails to 
answer it. 

By the time this reaches print, Valente 
that peer of Italian chefs will have been 
married. The charming lady finally ar- 
rived from Memphis and they were Yuma 
bound. Best of luck Manlio! 

That tall handsome young fellow who 
handles the blue print situation so well 
in the machine shop on Days is Doctor 
Overmiller. Or at least he is well on his 
way to becoming a promising medico, ex- 
pects to return to the Univ. of Nebraska 
very shortly. 

Art Scodes' new monnicker is "Angel". 
He himself chose the name after seeing 
a picture of a wrestler with the handle. 
The fact that a pretty girl accompanied 
the grunt and groan artist had nothing 
to do with the selection however. 

Nickel nursing has become a favorite 
pastime since the installation of that 
"Coke" Machine. It's a question now of 
the machine keeping the machinists run- 
ning. Nothing like a cool bracer for that 
2 o'clock let-down. 

The ink had hardly dried on Erwin 
Buschbaum's transfer to Hull when he 
found himself allergic to dural poisoning 
or was it the night air in the yard? How- 
ever we're glad to have him back again 
in the machine shop. 

Numbered among Planning's contri- 
butions to the machine shop is Eddie 
Owens. Formerly with the 'round the 
country circuit of Major Bowes, Ed is 
quite an entertainer. He assures that his 
last exhibition at the Paris Inn was entire- 
ly unrehearsed. 

Joe Hurwitz, time keeper, is a good 
natured fellow but the mere mention of 
those daily letters from Los Angeles up- 
sets him very easily. We wonder if it has 
anything to do with Bear Mountain epi- 
sode and capsizing a sail boat. 



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BUILDING SERVICE 

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TUBE BENDING 

By Hart 

IF anyone wants to know a short cut to 
Yosemite Valley, just ask Eddie Rasp. 
Instead of the usual 468 miles, he only 
traveled 518. 

It must be getting near the bowling 
season again 'cause we hear Bert and 
Norman Freakley, the stars of the tube 
bending department, talking with Ham 
Molleuer, our anchor man, about it. 

Eldon Lewellen, one of the newer mem- 
bers of the tube bending department is 
quite well known as a cat-skinner, in fact 
is supposed to be one of the best, but we 
hear that the other day he tried riding 
some kid's bicycle and found himself 
quite unable to handle the situation, even 
to the extent of landing in the middle 
of the street. 

Bert Freakley 's daughter suggests that 
Eldon come up the hill and she will teach 
him how to go around corners on bicycles. 
If not, she knows where there is a good 
tricycle for sale cheap. 

Gerald Cooper is expecting his wife and 
children home from a two months vacation 
to the east coast. Gerry said it is just like 
getting out of the army on retirement and 
then being called back to duty again. 



m 



tmsm 



'laail 



SnN DIEGO 
TflXI CnBS 
HRVE ROLLED 
MILLIONS 
r OFMIL€S 



WE GIVE 
S&H GREEN STAMPS 
* OOUBL£ STAMPS 
_ OW SUNDAYSf 




CRAFTSMAN TOOLS used for A11 Aircraft Work 
and for Every Purpose where Precision and Reliability are Demanded . . . 



"CRAFTSMAN" 
Ball Pein Hammers 

Correct design and balance to make 
every blow count. High quality torged 
steel, properly tempered. Full polished 
heads. Hickory handles. 

2-4-6 and ^ _ 

8 oz. size ODC 

1 2 Ounce Size 69c 

16 and 20 Ounce Size 89c 

24 Ounce Size 98e 

32 Ounce Size 1.25 

6-Oz. RAWHIDE MALLET. . .98c 

Buy Anything Totaling $10 or More 
on Sears EASY PAYMENT PLAN. 



tor your convenience . . . CASH YOUR 
CONSOLIDATED CHECKS at Sears with 
no tuss or bother. 




Pliers of the best materials and work- 
manship in all the popular patterns to 
handle your job better ond speedier. 

Craftsman Baftery Pliers .... 89c 
Craftsman Wafer Pump Pliers, 1.00 
Craftsman Long Nose Pliers. .1.19 
6-in. Diagonal Cuffing Pliers, 1.49 

Side Cuffing Pliers 1 .45 

8-in. Combinafion Pliers. ... 1 .35 




Daily use on all kinds of Aircraft jobs 
have definitely proven Craftsman Amer- 
ica's finest tools. Expert croftsmen 
everywhere depend on them. 

Hock Saw . . . Tin Snips . . . 

pisfol grip; ex- Special analysis 

fra strong steel. 12-inch. 

1.19 1.35 

Punch & Chisel Screwdriver Sef 

Set Vanadium Vanadium 

sfeel. 5-pc. blades. 4-pc. 

1.29 1.39 



SEARS, ROEBUCK and CO. 



Sixth Ave. and "C" Street 



Franklin 6571 



It is More Satisfactory to Patronize a Jewelry Store 
with an Established Reputation for Quality and Value 

'(^^ICifWVA PflRRDE OF JEUIELRV VALUES 




Celebrating 30 Years of Service to San Diego 





New Diamond 
Bridal Set 

$QO50 



39 



Matched in design. Dia- 
monds set in 18k white 
gold hearts in 14k yel- 
low gold. 



When you select DIAMONDS, Watches, 
Jewelry, Silverware or Electrical Appliances at 
Baranov's you are assured smart style, depend- 
able quality and value unsurpassed. Take ad- 
vantage of our 30th Anniversary Sale savings 
now . . . it's an event that demonstrates our 
appreciation of San Diego's generous patron- 
age over a period of 30 years. 



—Bargains in Lug- 
gage Sets for men 
and women. 

-Men's Waterproof 
Wrist Watches spe- 
cial, $19.75. 

-24-pc. Sterling Sil- 
ver Sets for $33.95. 




No Down Payment 
A«^«4' CREDIT 72tm5 



Smart 5-Diainond 
Engagement' Rings 

y^orv $49.50 

Fashionable 14K natural gold 
mounting with Diamonds set in 
18K white gold. 



Men's Massive Natu- 
ral Gold Rings with 
black onyx top and 
Diamond. Regular 
$24.50 value. 




$17.95 



Regular $75 CROTAN 
Diamond Wrist Watches 



Streamlined Charm in Diamond en- 
gagement Rings of 
distinction, now. . 



Men's $7.50 value 
Sterling Silver Rings 
set with synthetic 
stones in various colors 



$150.00 



$4.95 



Ladies' $17.50 Black Onyx Top 
Rings set with a ClI OC 

Diamond, now 4) I 1.7 J 



Men's Modern Style 
Initial Rings $19.50 
values reduced to 



$12.95 



10 or 12 Diamonds 

A thrilling Anniversary 
bargain! Lovely modern 
white and yellow 14K 
solid gold case, 1 7 jewel 
wrist watches for ladies 
... OS illustrated. On 
"Friendly" Credit! 



, . . 17 Jewels 

AnnU'ersary 
Special 



$ 



49 



50 



"The Store that Confidence Built" 




FIFTH AVENUE AT BROADWAY 



100%