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Full text of "Construction of the Spokane River Bridge of the Idaho & Western Railway at Spokane Bridge, Wash."

SPOKANE RIVER BRIDGE 
AT SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 



C, U. SMITH 

ARMOUR INSTITDTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

1911 



624 
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Construction of the Spokane River Bridge 

of the 
Idaho & Western Railway 
at 
Spokane Bridge, Wash. 
A THESIS 
presented by 
C. U. Smith 
to the 
President and Faculty 
of 
Armour Institute of Technology 
for the degree of 
Civil Engineer 




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Ta"ble of Contents 

list of Illustrations 2 

List of Maps, etc. 4 

Object 6 

General Description 6 

Camp 10 

Plant and Equipment 13 
Material:- 

Gravel 17 

Sand 18 

Cement 18 

Reinforcing Bars 21 

Timber, Imnber and Piling 88 

Miscellaneous 24 

labor 26 

Construction :- 

Concrete Sub -structure 29 

Steel Structure 59 
Appendix:- 

Cost Data 66 






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2 



List of Illustrations, ' 

Spokane River Bridge, Idaho & Western Ry. Frontispiece, 

1, Pier, #3 showing temporary timber trestle and mixer, 

2, Pier. #3 near viev/ showing trestle. Page 16 

3, Pile driver working at Pier #2. 

4, Piers #2 and #3, 20 

5, Pile driver at Pier #2 showing work trestle and 

Pier #3 tmder construction, 23 

6, General view showing runways to mixer, 

7, General view showing mixer, 30 

8, Piers #2 and #3, grillage for pier fl being built, 

9, Pier #1 and east abutment, 32 

10, Caisson for Pier #2 floating pile driver working at 

Pier #1, 35 

11, Caisson for Pier #2 floating, 37 

12, West abutment. Piers #2 and #3, 

13* West abutment under construction, 39 



14. General view looking up stream, west abutment under 
construction. 



41 



15, General view down stream, 

16, East abutment under construction, 43 
^'^» General view, log Jam and east abutment site, 

18, Concrete mixer. *^ 

19. West abutment. 47 



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20. Removing "bent of temporary trestle. 

21. Removing "bent of temporary trestle. Page 49 

22. West abutment showing deck slabs in forms. 

25, Pier #1 completed, showing rip rap. 50 

24. Steel in place, riveting gang at work. 

25. View down stream. Old and Hew. (in middle) 

Inland liinpire System bridges. 52 

26. Qeneral view up stream. 54 

27. Detail of abutment construction, 

28. Detail of west abutment. 56 

29. Detail of east abutment. 

30. Reduced progress profile, 57 

31. Detail of west abutment, 

32. General view down stream. 

33. View of temporary timber deck. 61 

34. General view showing shallow girder, 62 

35. East abutment, ^^ 

36. Finished bridge, water over rip rap. 



58 
60 



65 



rn 



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list of Maps, etc. 



General vicinity map 

Local vicinity map 

Bridge site and camp map 

Sample of Daily Force Report 

Cost sheet 

Plans : - 

East Abutment plan and elevation 

East Abutment details 

Caisson for Piers #1 and #2 

Details of Piers #1 and #2 

Details of Pier #3 

West Abutment plan and elevation 

West Abutment details 

West Abutment Reinforcement 

Steel erection diagram 



Page 5 

7 

11 

27 

Appendix I 

II 

III 

IV 

V 

VI 

VII 

VIII 

IZ 

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coirs TRUCTIOII OF THE SPOKAITS RIVER BRIDGE, 
IDAHO & WESTERN RY. 

Object :- To describe the method of construction of 
the Spokane Riyer Bridge at Spokane Bridge, i¥ash. , on the 
Idaho & Western Ry. 

General Descripti on:- The Idaho cb Western Railway 
Co. recently completed a line from Dishman, Wash, to 
Ooeur d'Alene, Idaho, a distance of 25,3 miles. At 
Dishman a connection with the Oregon-Washington Railroad 
& navigation Go. gives access to Spokane on the west, and 
to the main line of the Chicago, MilwatOcee & Puget Souna 
Ry. on the south, via Pliimmer, Idaho. 

The Idaho & Western Ry. is a subsidary company of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Ry, , being more famili- 
arly known as the Coeur d'Alene Branch. To the north 
of the line is the Spokane Valley, well known as pro- 
ductive of fruits and garden truck. To the south are 
the foot hills of the Coeur d'Alene mountains, having 
a good growth of pine and fir. 

The small scale map on page 5 shows the new line 
colored red, the main line of the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
Puget Sound Ry, being shown dotted. 

Immediately after passing the Washington-Idaho 



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state line the railway crosses the Spokane River, 18.5 
miles from Spokane and 12.1 miles from Dlshman. The 
entire structure, including the west approach, is in 
Idaho. 

The Idaho & Western bridge crosses the river 400 
feet up stream from the new crossing of the Inland 
Empire System. The old crossing of the Inland Empire 
System "being about 300 feet down stream from the new, 
and is being considered as a crossing structure for 
the new state road. The town of Spokane Bridge, Wash, 
being within a quarter of a mile of all their structures 
is most appropriately named. 

The Spokane River bridge consists of two reinforc- 
ed concrete arch approaches and three concrete piers. 
Four 80 foot steel girders form the spans. The piers 
are constructed to accommodate a future second track 
to be constructed south of the present line. (See 
map on page 11) The approaches were constructed for 
single track, with the footings only for the future 
second track structure. 

The concrete approaches are reinforced above 
the footings and are decked with reinforced concrete 
slabs, built on the ground and placed after setting. 



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At present the deck on the steel girders is of timber, v 
but this will be replaced by reinforced concrete slabs 
in the near future. 

Under each of the approaches is a private roadway- 
constructed by the railway company for adjacent property 
owners. These roads are gravel filled and have grades 
not exceeding 8 per cent. 

The concrete construction and roadway work was done 
by the Bates & Rogers Construction Company of Chicago and 
Spokane. The following articles of the contract show 
its general nature: 

(1) The contractors agree to furnish all the labor, 
superintendence, and to handle the work of construction, 
the employment of necessary labor and the purchase of 
material ordered by the engineer, is to be in accordance 
with the Chief Engineer's instructions or authority, 
which also covers the rates for labor and the terms and 
prices for purchases. The work is to be done in accord- 
ance with the plans, specifications, instructions and re- 
quirements of the Chief Engineer of the railway. 

(E) Furnish all equipment, plant and tools requir- 
ed for the performance of the work. 

(3) Provide and furnish the camp and to board the 
employes. 



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(4) Commence the work forthwith and to handle it at 
such a rate of progress as will secure completion prior 
to greater difficulty incident to the fall floods and 
unfayorable weather. 

The Railway Company agrees to 
fl) Pay the contractors their pay roll for labor 
and for supervision employed on the work in the actual 
performance of the same. 

(2) Pay the purchase cost of all material entering 
Into the construction of the work, 

(3) Pay the contractors the agreed per cent on items 
(1) and (2) as compensation for their tools, eciuipment, 
their services and their profits. (Freight charges are 
not included in the amounts on which percentage is paid. ) 

The steel work was "built by the railway company and 
erected by company forces. 

Camp ;- Yhe camp site for this work was located on 
the west side of the Spokane river, being within a short 
distance of Spokane Bridge, a station on the Inland Empire 
System, where all supplies and materials were shipped to. 
The topography of the country is very flat and a gradual 
down grade ftom the town to the work, over a good gravel 
road, made easy teaming. 



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Reference to the map on page ii shows the location of 
the camp to good advantage. All the work was done on the 
south, or up stream side of the line. On this side the 
blacksmith shop, tool house, "boiler, raixer and material 
yards were located. To the north of the line were the 
cement storage house, contractors office and commissary, 
oook shack and sleeping tents. 

The camp heing almost entirely off of the railway 
company's right of way, a small rental was paid to the owner 
for the use of the site. Although the land could have heen 
used free, the payment of a small sum released the occupants 
from any damage claims which might have arisen during the 
course of construction. 

As the contract states, the camp was run entirely hy the 
contractors and thsy niads all the profit derived from it. 
A price of 25 cents per meal was charged and deducted from 
the man's time. A commissary furnished the men with tobacco, 
gloves, clothing, etc., credit being given against the time 
checks . 

The buildings for the camp were put up at the expense 
of the contractors, excepting those actually used in the 
performance of the work. Upon the completion of the work 
all buildings v/ere removed and the site left as it originally 
was. The contractors sold the material in their camp build- 



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13 



ings for a Itunp siun, while that for the railway companv's 
buildings was returned to the second hand stock. 

Plant & Equipment : - The contractors plant for this 
work had an estimated value of approximately :i^l5,000 and 
consisted of the following equipment: 

One 1/E yard Smith concrete mixer, boiler and engine 
attached. 

Five "bottom dump stuehner cone buckets. 

Two 6 1/4 X 10 American hoisting engines complete. 

One EO ft. mast guy derrick complete. 

One 30 ft. mast stiff leg derrick complete. 

One 40 E.P. jJagle portable boiler with fittings. 

One 5" Emerson pump. 

One Gould centrifugal pump with engine attached. 
(Used engine only.) 

One 6x4x6 Fairbanks Morse force pump. 

One 6x4x6 laidlow t: Dunn force pump. 

One 5 1/2 X 7 Comstoek upright engine. 

One skid pile driver complete, 30 ft. leads. 

One 2800 lb. pile hammer. 

One 800 lb. pile cap. 

Three concrete cars (One lost In river) complete. 

Two push cars, complete with trucks. 
L. One gravel car, complete with trucks. 



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14 



One 40" circular saw. 

One 36" circular saw. 

One 2 1/2" shaft for saw. 

Pour #2 slip scrapers. 

Sixteen steel tray wheel "barrows, 2 ft, capacity. 

Six cross cut saws. 

Eighteen #2 shovels,D handle, round point. 

Ten #2 shovels, D handle, square point. 

Four long handle roiind point shovels. 

Three spades. 

700 ft, 1" dia. manilla rope. 

600 ft, 1 1/4" dia. manilla rope. 

300 ft. 6/8" dia. manilla rope. 
4610 ft. 1/2" wire hoisting rope. 
1840 ft. 5/8" wire guy rope. 
60 picks with handles. 

Six pike poles. 

Three 8 Ih. mauls. 

Eight 10 Ih, mauls. 

One set hlacksmith tools. 

One forge complete with hlower. 

One grind stone, 2" face. . 

One Barren track jack. 

One 150 Ih. anvil. 



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15 

f.r. ccer 

I ' ■'■> f'VC CF f Cf (Tf I ( ( I 

Five cant hooks. ' 

Four carry hooks. 

Seven axes. 

Four pair of rabber "boots, hip, 

4 

Five double "blocks, wood. 
Four dou'ble "blicks, iron . 
One snatch "block, iron. 
Six ship augers. 
Three tim"ber dollies, 
Tv70 Marshalltown trowels. 
Two vises. 

Five monkey wrenches. 
Three pipe wrenches. 
One pipe cutter. 

One set Armstrong stock and dies. 
One set little Giant stock and dies. 
One 10" X 12" split pulley. 
One £" and one 3" flue roller. 
One small sand screen. 
Six lanterns. 

Crow bars, claw bars, pinch bars, chains, etc. 
Other equipment on the work, but not actually used in 
construction consisted of: 

One Clam shell bucket. 



Vi ( .i(r.i;?IT U ITLHIUI. I 
Y r A C E I J 

• 8ox« a«T»€ 

• 

. noTi .UtoCTd ^I(fxrofi vroif 

•aoYt .sCooXtf iCotaM 4HiO 

•aT»a*a qlA xtt 

••I*vo«t owotlXadiTaa a«T 

•■••It 0^ 

,xBitiso »^t(i eaO 

»m9tb Sua sCooiTa aarxtWRJL tss tad 

•Mis haa :foof tnatr aX^il tM •aO 

.^IZsni ftlza •It X "01 anO 

•leXIoi «0X1: "S •«• Aa« "S aaO 

.CLM^M bajam iLMtm miO 

•Mi«ata«I xtC 

• ot9 ,ailai(» ,a:M(f itoolf .a«i<f mtto .rxatf troiO 

al 5oaxr x^^'^o^^^ ^oa fad .ixov adif so tamntaf fdto 

:\o ftetalaaoo aottaxrctanoo 
. :^?«">f oird Ilexfa .-naXO «aO 



5 -V T- 






'd^-e^^i^^ 



r 1 






'1, 



V 







17 



One orange peel bucket. 

One 50' mast guy derrick complete. 

The camp equipment consisted of fcxir 16 x 18 tents, 
12 02., stores, etc. with a cooking outfit for 150 men. 

The engineers outfit consisted of one 14 x 16 tent, 
one 7x7 tent, drafting tahle, chairs, desk and the 
customary engineering Instruments. All the tents were 
framed, floored and half walled covered with tarred paper. 

Material :- Gravel:- The gravel for this work was a 
good coarse grade, that would mesh 90^ through a 3/4" sieve, 
lying ujider a lava strata, was taken out of a pit on the 
railway company's right of way and washed there, it was 
then dumped into a car and carried down to the work on a 
gravity track and unloaded at the storage pile as indicated 
on the map page 

The gravel was picked up In the pit with slips. It 
was then dumped through a trap and washed with a hose, as 
it went down a 30 degree incline to the storage hopper. 
The car was run under this hopper and filled. The outlet 
of the hopper heing arranged with a trap door operated "by 
a lever. 

When a car was filled it was started down grade to 
the storage pile, where it was dumped and returned to the 
loading hopper with a horse. 



.©JsIu^lOD 'Aot-ifb tJt^a tO«ffl '03 ©XI- 

.aaa 'vi»,X 101 * . iXvOoo a iizl^ .o?9 ,8»to»e ,.20 iiX 

^•ici^t 31 X *X •ao !:o fifttf-ataaoo flUxro 3a»«aljtt» »^ 

rift ,"'n'^ rfa«B ,r;T*-.^rr2 ,«rrffit '^rtl:?^aTft ,:fT.9t 7 t: 7 »ao 

,c i-Xa « jIsxtoxlI;* -a»sa jIvov tMiLt t^^vt^ eeiisoD ^003 

ertf flo tlq 8 ^0 txro vivksA 8«w ,j8;f«tct8 atsI « TftJicu; 3i?"C-C 

£ .^0 xior eift 0.'' ai>oo r)«i-i>i«o fiaa aBO a o;>ri- .5 aoilt 

. \XZr), i\tl.T :tiq erfJ^ Rt (jxr Jioiolq a«w I^re-rs err: 

. aoff a dtiw Jbsifeaw Aos qar* a rT^uoxift ftsqnjxJJ n»i.t aaw 

.'xaqcroif »3J»-'-'^+9 odi^ ot •olXool 99ics8£ OC 3 awoA t'lsw It 

JdX:?i;o e .bsiAn Jioa taciiorl airf* T«fi(Lo cin aaw too exrr 

^jcf fc9t£i9qo tooft qa-xt a rfJtr ':>«3Xiama ^ilecf rsci.ioil sxCJ *o 

.tdvaX a 
ot a^ais awob Aatrsta sav tt A«XXH aaw t«o a asxT. 
orCr^ 0^ imxnistni J&oa Jbdi^rurJi aaw tt sTtuf'.v .aXiq s^aTota exft 

••arod a dttw Teqqoif ^-^^-^i 



18 



^ The force on this work averaged two slip teams with 
drivers, one horse with driver to pull hack empty car, two 
men on car, two men on slips, one washerman and three men 
on the dump. Ahout 100 yards a day were handled with one 
car, E700 yards were hauled, the average haul being 500 
to 550 feet. 

Sand ; - The sand was obtained from a local pit about 
one mile south of the work. It was loaded at the pit in 
1 1/2 yard wagons and dumped on the work at the storage pile. 

The sand was bought at a unit price per yard, engineer's 
measurement, and hauled at a contract price per yard. The 
average delivery per day was nine yard per team, three 
teams working only when the roads were in good condition. 

Mne hundred and fifty-five and one half yards of this 
sand, which was sharp and of a fine grade, were delivered. 

Cement ;- The cement used was the Santa Cruz blue cross 
brand. It was shipped from Seattle via Plumraer, Idaho and 
Spokane over the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound RY. , 
Oregon-Washington Railroad and navigation Co, and Inland 
Empire System to Spokane Bridge, Wash. It was unloaded 
there by the contractors and hauled to the store house, a 
distance of about 350 yards. 



aer: "A-s.-'t ^i'* nsfTfidBmrn sno ,Bs£ll8 ao nar^ ovrt ,t«o no csm 
003 3:il»<f Ijf«(f ra^xvra exft .Aftltreif et^w aMa^ OOVS »««e 

•te»% oaa ot 

j-jiod^fl tJb(X Xfiool a aorA Jbaatattfo m« btut a^ -:Las£ 
cit tlgr ȣft ta AaBaoI aaw tZ .ihcov Aift lo rf^jroa 9lJ^3i ono 
.ol^c; s-p^Biots erCt ta itrow mdt ao Aaqptrfi JSoa waor^erj brax A-^ -^ 

a'iseal ,^iti'Z t»q, Bottq ftiurm t» til^irotf aaw bnan aifT 

arTT .f)i«': taq doiiq toa^taoo a ta Jbalxraxf ioa , taante^iraae t 
99Xdt ,rxa9t leq Ai«^ onla saw z^ 1*5 ^iisTJtleJb ejaiova 
.aotftbaoo J&003 al oidw a^aoi »dt n.9d\' %Za.o ^ai>'aor aaaet 
BM:^ lo a/j^a^ tXad aao ba* 9rtt-'rtttt boji AeiSrurrf aatll 

,bei9rtL9b aiav .•J&ara eatt a lo ban q:iMtiB saw x(olxfir .fioaa 

aaoTO ej x>; o:;r'xO atasS adt saw baair taauiaa •£! ^ttaa aa O 

fias Oiiflltl .tarrrarri BiT aXtcfaaS ao'ft J&aqqlila aaw tl .AasrcT 

, .YE BfuroE tsaxfS. " 99:[jxjpirlt:: , Oj^olriO «iCt tero sa^j'oqS 

5nf'IciI Ana ,0; aoitaair^S bOA AmorltsK not3ni:£aaV:-ao3etO 

As 3« tl .ilaar .aaBt'xI anaiCoqE ot c»ta^ Btticc: 

£ .oaxroil 9-xota aift ot Balsad Aoa a'xo;^9axtaoo ailJ' \<i 9i9dt 

m9f>xsri 035 tirotfa ^0 eoastalfi 



19 



The average labor to unload and store was about four 
teams and two men with driver for each team. There were 
30 sacks to a load and approximately 900 sacks in a car. 
14 cars were received, 

12067 sacks were delivered, 11902 sacks were used in 
the work, 157 sacks were sent away on rush work, 8 sacks 
remained to be returned to stock. The cement was shipped 
in sacks of four to a barrel. 

The cement was sampled in the cars before shipment, 
only two cars being sampled at the work. The following 
are the figures of a test of one sample. 

Tensile Strength 
lbs* per square inch 
1 day 7 days 28 days 
485 790 825 

Time of Setting 



Initial 
Minutes 


Final 
Hours 


110 


4 1/2 




Fineness 


Per cent 


of residue on 


#100 si 


eve #200 sieve 


1,8 


13.2 



luol I'ruoitM asw •to;^! box inoltuj ot iod»l 9^'m'W oifT 
dtevr 910x17 ,m9& rfoM lolt t^rtit dtt'w ami 99i ioM aauitt 
• XBO a al B^'oaa 009 \l%taa±x9rvut Hm AaoX « ot ailoaa OS 

•AaTlaoai titv a^uo >X 
nj; 5eax/ A^aw a^toaa S09XI ,6arBaTtXafi t^m w^om TdOSX 
a^foaa 8 t^io\; xfairx ao vnr« taaa ataw aitaM t3X ..^low erf^r 
Aoqcitiia ajm taacxaa a4T .ioota ot Aanottv •tf ot J5aal«aiai 

•Xarsatf « o# «ro% to a^o«a nl 
.j-aoririJ^riB sTo'tatf aiEJM adt ftl ftaXvoM Mv #saB»a arTT 
3n^woIIo% 9dr! ttttm •dt t« A^XfHM lolatf •«•• owt ^Xno 

••Iv«t as* la ta«t • lo aa««ill odf 9tB 
tffiaa«tB aXlMMf 
ffaal »7«<rpa w •''^~ 



a^sA 8f 


•IA»T 


s 


Bh I 


333 


067 




ad> 




aatttae to affltl 






XisaJtt 
^awoir 


Xatnal 
aatxra^:: 






•\M . 


oxx 





aaaaaai? 
flo •ahlnor to taao val 
•▼^la O OS^ •rata O OX* 
S.5X 3.X 



20 




21 



Per cent of water used 21 
Specific gravity 5,10 
A aand test proportioned 1 to 3 "by weight showed: 

Tensile strength 

in Ihs. per square inch 

7 days 28 days 

387 420 

9,5 per cent of water used. 

Reinforcing Bars:- !I!he reinforcement was square 
corrugated bars l/2" - 3/4" and 1" sizes, varying in 
shipping lengths from 6' to 40'. 

These were shipped from the main line via Plummer 
and Spokane to Spokane Bridge and from there hauled by 
team to the yards. 

In the yards the bars were sorted and cut to the 
various plan lengths. They were then taken to the 
blacksmith shop and bent into the required shape as 
they were needed in the work. 

The following list shows the amount of reinforc- 
ing material used in the work: 

East Abutment 

Size 1/2" 3/4" 1" Total 

lln.ft. SIFT EMi 3^5 1M^^~ 

lbs, 5242 12519 11169 28930 



dt^a9xt» tUtaa*'! 
do&t •'xairpe x»f .Btfl oi 

«»<xairpa •am taumortolal^x •tSf -raraS aale«otal«S 
at ^atrurr .Mila "I Aa« '^»\S - "S\l n»tf Aat^airrcoo 

.•0> 0* 'a oo-rt sxitsntl 3Xt::tA9 
ta.^iml^ air •oil ulBs ^dt aoli ft^q^Jtrfa -*«•* •••iC 
Xd bBZuMd •r^df m-A J5aa •^tsE «acCa«e ot aoantoqe Aoa 

•a&xax *^ o^ nxaat 
9x£t of t0o &a» 59t*Eoa siav axatf orft a^TBi; ailt al 
9df oi a9iUit a»dt BV»m x^sK .eiT^aasX aalq airotiaT 
aa aviada Asi^xTpe? adt otai t(i9(T £na ({oiia xfttoacfoaXtf 

•?C70« axlt ol A«A*«i a<xair ^fadt 
-a-xo^nlai to tntrooa arft avroxia tat£ aolwoXIot axi" 

::<:co« ar(t al Aeau Xeliatacx jal 
taaBitircfl, taa!I 



»» 



cam 3I2SX SWd .bc'Z 



22 



Size 


West Abutment 
1/2 »' 3/4" 


1" 


Total 


Lin. ft. 
Lbs. 


14391 9817 
12232 18780 


10998 
37393 


35206 
68405 



Timber, Lumber and Piling:- The timbers used in the 
work trestle cuid upon various structures as mixer plat- 
form, gravel washer, etc., were old bridge timbers shipped 
to Spokane Bridge from the main line yards and hauled to 
the work by team. 

The contractors used 45956 feet 3.M, of this material, 
not including the timber in the temporary trestle. Of 
this 34660 feet B.M. was recovered upon the completion of 
the work and sent into the old material supply again. 
The remainder was either lost in the river, or cut into 
such lengths as were not acceptable for further use. 

The form lumber and caisson timber was shipped via 
the Inland Empire System to Spokane Bridge from a local 
mill in Coeur d'Alene. That which was left at the end 
of the work was sent into the railway company's old 
material stock. 

Approximately 135000 feet B.M. of small dimensioned 
stock was used for forms, cofferdam, sheds, etc. The 
amount used In the caissons for Piers #1 and #2 was about 



-:i^^_ 



ao^ao EGB7C 08781 3":ssi •adl 



- *©«i; HT^tf.-Tlt •if? "'.•Qa.ill^ bam fdauZ ,t«»rf:TLtT 
-fs^/c r^vlm §« af»txr* oirTi^■ ■uoJimv noqxr bam »Zt»»tt 

,i.,.iiU i.^iiojJ6U 'Jio L.i. -.'i'ai ^a9B Aft.' aj' 

) .. ,-ib7tl »iii at tflOl l«xf*l» ^B«W T»Aut' 
,"r • leiftt;/! tol ftlcfatifooa ton dttw eb •:f;^•<ifi©.L 
j,tdB iii:\. T'j'..^. .._■..: . .uj lacfiax;! aio" --'" 



23 




24 



61900 F.B.M, From these two items approximately 17900 
F.B.M. were returned to old material stock. The form 
Itunher was 2x8 stock, with 3 x 12 planks for flooring, 
runways, etc., and 3x8 M. and D, material for sheeting. 

The piling also came from Coeur d'Alene and was un- 
loaded on the old main line of the Inland Empire System 
opposite the work. From there it was brought to the 
work by team as needed. 

The switching charges by the Inland Empire System 
for the use of the main line were a minimum of $5,00 
for one hour. Unloading theiewas a great saving as 
two cars came in at once and could be unloaded in an 
hour, saving a long team haul and providing a storage yard 
on the Inland Empire System right of way, 

10000 lin.ft. of piling was used. The piles were 
fir and tamarack of 20 - 25 - and 32 foot lengths. At 
the completion of the work the pile cut offs were sent 
into the old material stock to be used for building 
foundations and fuel. 

I Miscellaneous:- Such items as nails, oil, waste, 

small tools, etc., ordered from time to time on the work, 
were shipped from dealers in Spokane via the Inland Empire 
System to Spokane Bridge by local freight or express. 



25 



The following list shows the amount of nails, oil, 
bolts, etc. used during the course of construction: 



Article 



Amount 



Coal from Bellview, B.C. 
Drift bolts 
10 d nails 
60 d nails 
40 d " 
16 d " 
20 d " 
8 d " 
3/8" X 8" boat spikes 
3/8" X 3" track spikes 
Huts and washers 
Tool steel and iron 
Packing 
Mill breoras 
8" files 
Tarred felt 
Waste 

Blacksmith coal 
Oakum 

White lead 
Boiler compound 
#16 Annealed wire 

9 " " 
Coal oil 

lubricating and cj^-linder oil 
Cup grease 



160 


tons 


2100 




20 


kegs 


8 


It 


6 


IT 


17 


Tt 


2 


n 


1 


n 


6 


If 


50 


lbs. 


65 


n 


1450 


n 


33 


If 


1 


doz. 


18 




8 


rolls 


1 


bale 


6 


sacks 


50 


lbs. 


25 


II 


10 


gals. 


12 


rolls 


17 


It 


1 


drum 


50 


gals. 


20 


lbs. 



The above list does not include iron washers and 
bolts ordered on engineer's requisition, or that shown 
on plan bills of material. 

All material was ordered by the contractors at the 
direction of the engineer in charge and bills rendered 
at the end of the month. The only exception to this 



ni~d-?.- 



26 



"being the cement, reinforcing bars and old timber which 
were ordered on requisition of the Division Engineer, 

Lalbor:- The labor on this 'v7ork was furnished by 
the contractors as stated in the contract. A specimen 
of the daily force report on page 27 shows the average 
force on the work. 

These reports were sent to the office of the 
Division Engineer and to the main office of the con- 
tractors upon the completion of each day's work. By 
this method a daily report of the progress of the work 
was always on record and in determining the cost of the 
various parts of the work was absolutely necessary. 

Distributions for all the work done were kept in 
this way being classified for each separate pier or 
abutment and also for general work as gravel, cement 
handling, bridge protection, rip rap, etc. 

The superintendence of the work for the contractors 
was done by a general superintendent who made occasional 
trips to the work, but was not resident there. During 
his absence a general foreman had entire charge, but was 
always subject to the orders of the engineer on the work. 

The wages paid for the various classes of labor is 
shown in the specimen report. These were constant 
throughout, with the exception of the wages for common 



27 



Bates & Rogers Construction Co. 

355 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



DAILY REPORT. 



BRIDGE. .^}pLa)!iJxnei. 

WORK DON E: 



P. O. ADDRESS. .^.S?X..i-T 

DAr£:,-.Q-Q±.-'3Ll-— 19 IQ- 

COST LABOR. 



!o g"t 



Abutment 



EXCAVATION. 



'ier' 



CONCRETING 
FORr»1S 



_CU. YDS. 
_CU. YDS. 



Rigr'* I PI I Fg DRIVEN NO. 

Hau\irTg l—umber 



7" LIN. FT. g.g'^ 



Grove-l . 



FORCE: 

-J FOREMEN 

^ ENGI NEERS 

\ g. rrARPFTNTERS 

■4- LABDREHS 



26 

1 TIMEKEEPERS 

Z.& TFAMs •9- Men 

El 



I 



ini^inf.gr- 




NO. SACKS CEMENT USED. 



50 



ai 


ST 


^3 


e© 


>-4- 


OS 


£3 


S3 


T 


so 
-go 


T 
35 




T5 


ea 


\o 


so 


^e 


oo 


-4 


?<?. 


lo 


oo 


sa 


§° 


3 


SO 


a 


>va 


\& 


so 


a 


oo 


•3 


oo 






^IST 


T5 



-191 



EXPECT TO COMPLETE THIS JOB__ 

REMARKS: \Q uds. of 3£in£i dell Vetr<2.c^ 

90 ^< ^5. of ^r<ave\ hau^e- d, 

Ave^r o^e. pen c-Vr a -Vt on Pier"*! pj^jty-^ \nr.t -^ 



w 



FATHFR; C\ Z,Q*' 



O. H ^.T^ 



28 



laborers, which were cut from 25 cents per hour to 
22 1/2 cents and finally to 20. Ezceptionally good men 
of this class were paid in a like proportion 27 l/2 - 25 
and 22 l/2 cents per hour. 

The largest force on the work at one time consisted 
of the following: 

1 General Foreman 
1 Carpenter " 
1 Pile driver " 
4 Engineers 
10 Carpenters 
4 Carpenter helpers 

1 Blacksmith 

2 Riggers, or pile driver men 
1 Timekeeper 

3 Teams 

1 Single horse and man 
51 laborers 

For a time during the driving of piling for founda- 
tions a pile driver foreman was on the pay roll for 40 
cents per hotir. This was only a temporary expense, as 
the general foreman and carpenter foreman were ample to 
direct the work other than pile driving where supervision 



nr 



29 



must "be constant, 

Cons truc tion -Concrete Sub-structure:- The construc- 
tion work v/ill he discussed in tlie actual order of its 
progress and not for each abutment and pier separately. 
Tliis is done because the work did not proceed in the 
direct order of Piers fl, #2 and #3, but often two or 
more pieces of work were in progress at one time. 

Before the permanent bridge work was commenced, it 
was deemed necessary to construct a temporary timber 
trestle to be used for traffic in the event of the non- 
completion of the permanent bridge at the time track was 
to be laid. This temporary structure was built and 
complete before the bridge contractors were ready to work. 

In order to have an advantageous means of carrying 
on the work, it was deemed advisable to build a temporary 
work trestle to transport concrete on and also for the use 
of the pile driver. This was therefore started at once. 
Twenty-one 3 pile bents were driven and decked with old 
bridge timbers. The piling used were SO x E5 ft, lengths. 

While the temporary trestle was under construction, 
the timbers for the cofferdam for Pier #3 were being 
framed and put in place. This cofferdam was 14' x 45' 
inside of the sheeting. The method of construction was: 



.J"ij8*aaoo erf ^es' < 

Bdf d hfocyiq, ioa htb :'Tor s^t osirrosrf sr.oi Bt etdT! 

zj LTt H3^o tad ,S iOii i; ,j. .lox- !to leiiTO tosiii 

. > lit ©no tr r.sdiiijOTq nt et9\: JiTorr ^o Bsoalvi^ enos: 

-.0. a.rl;? lo tfiSTS Silt cl oi'ilBi:* lol h^nv srf oi" oXteeTj' 

3SY' >'ojRii" ^-T^:'■ ti^ •3'' tad dTtsaam©^ ^iW ^o noi;J'©XrriOO 

Ma ctXiXiC BAW eixrd-orai'B ^^laTio^iiat Btd? .i>i«I ©rf ot 

ot -jAastL 9i©w tttoioatiCLQO o^^ itd exit ©^colbec' ©*©I(j::too 

Qfll'^c'Si?© 1:0 «aa©n •uos^ifiln.fiv'a aa ©rfirf ot t©IiTO ;iT 

:-::j3r:... :.T£J" a ILtad of ©XrfaeivJSa Jb©ia9©£ saw tl .iTor oxii- ao 

'. ©nJ- TO^ osXc £08 ao etcToaoo tioqeriBrc* ot ©Xlseit •'.ion 

,A 1 +/> ',a*frfp «.-r .^sis^t Bsv atif: ,rr9Ti^ ©Xli ©rit ^o 

bLo ^Ji I>6;:o©L LiUB D.9VtlL 91©1» ata©d ©Xi<I C 9:l(h-'^tSL9Vf2 

..sfl SS X OS ©^©w Aaeii 3.itXtq[ ad? .eiarfnlt ©QJblirf 
.notj-Qju'x.taaoo iv&ur aav ©Xtaa^t ^aaYo^m^ Btii ©Xtxn 

yfiiftcT 9U©w S'.. t©!! lol ::jRJ!>rt©^xOO orit to'!: eist^r.i* ©n* 

•«:^ X •4;.X eaw nai;'i©Hoo eixi!? •«oaX(x ct tirtj JSii^ Ji ©reared 

•-^' noltoxrrtar.oo lo J5ox::fa::T ailT •-^aJ^ts>ati£a ©ii* ^o ©iiiaaX 



30 











3V 






t^_^-^*Vt'"-^^^ 



:^f. ;.-*^v. 



5.V 






V r 









5,^^^ '^4„5jE4i^ '<-'5t<:4«* -Jn!i^ 35 i^*>i«^?^''^ 



^' -^^ 




31 



Four 12 X 12 tajn'oers were fastened together in the 
form of a rectangle and floated into the desired position, 
"being held in place "by lines and bracing to temporary work. 
The sheeting, 3x8 I.!. & D. material, was then put in 
place around this v/aling, being held at intervals hy 
small nails. TThen the entire waling was walled up 
with sheeting a similar waling was huilt on the out- 
side, about two feet distant all around on three sides, 
the west side heing in such shallow water that outside 
protection was not necessary, the puddling material "being 
placed up against the sheeting with no backing. 

When this second frame was made it was walled up 
on the inside with 3 x 12 rough lumber. The puddling 
material, local surface dirt, was them dumped in between 
these two walls. The puddling process being completed 
the inside was pumped out and the leaks tajjiped tight. 

The excavation was next started. This was done by 
hand, the material being loaded into bottom dump buckets, 
which were handled by a stiff leg derrick situated at (2] 
near Pier #3 (map page 11 ) the material being deposit- 
ed arouxid the cofferdam. 

The waling and sheeting were driven down by hand 
operated tamps. Then down about six feet a second 
waling was built of the same dimension as the first 



■M.t 0^1- 1 h9tao£l ham •X-^ruitoti « to atot 

■-9t ot aalM^tf hoM ■•all x^ •oaX^ at bt%a •gat^d 

c*- ■'■■'■ Mdt •m ,lMti9tMa . . 8 X e ,3alt»«^ eaT 

.eoile ouiiW- ao htworQ £X« ^oaj-tl* ;f©tl ovt Jxrotf. . 

^ -lett'o tailit a©t«r rcXXsrfe rfoirs nl :v»Jtorf afjiu tr 

?IIsvT eav; ti t>b .-loose e>^:*- .tm:. 

aoev.*©!. 9i;ijj'Ji m^ifj- ear ,J-iX:> PoeixiJe X^ooX ^Ici-z^ttHA 

.7^„Xu i^et^aj^;}- a:lj}oX ^^.2^ ^jaa tiro S)9qpu<^ b»v nAtasU out 
jiiob BMv alxC? •» V:ta efiisr c.oti»reox% Si£? 

DJ-ci'j: i:-i»A a»X nicffc . ^Lbaad •fv dQtdx; 

!:»cf Xcltotarr du't ,f XX ©^eq ciam^ C' ft': tfien 

rjl> n9vXtJ5 «ti»TT 3rtito«rle i5ns ^nJtXav/ exf? 

• t«9l xle tro(f« awoJ5 aoxT ,rtqrmi •>©ftf><"£0 



S3 



and. put in place alaout five feet atove it. This method 
of driving sheeting and excavating was then continued 
until the desired level was obtained in the cofferdam. 

A 5" Emerson pump was used in this cofferdam and 
proved of ample capacity, although the leakage was consid- 
erable at times. This was the only wet excavation on 
the work. 

During the cofferdan work the "boiler was put in place 
as shown on map, the gravel washer built and track laid 
from it to the storage yard, the mixer platform was built 
and the mixer set up, the tool house and blacksmith shop 
were built and excavation started on the west abutment. 

By the time the excavation in the cofferdam was 
completed the work trestle was also finished and the 
pile driver was returned to Pier #3 site ready for driv- 
ing the foundation piling In the cofferdam. This foun- 
dation consisted of 88 - 20 and 25 ft. piles driven every 
2' 3" along the center line of the pier and every 2' 6" 
at right angles to it. 

The piles were driven until they practically stopped, 
or to an average penetration of 10.2 ft. The cofferdam 
was allowed to fill during the pile driving and was 
pumped out after all the piles were driven. They were 



,::;::o. 3iiw 
I uar "i«»IJtod exit aCtton acb-iel'r.oo ^dt antruiC 

la.Ijfild £ac oei/od loot orlJ ,q;jj Jee :cexln and- /mp, 

ac; i^e^.iial:! obI« bat? •X^avid' i'xo\: odi i>eteI^iaoo 

••r-T fifti'. •r?^f- {>,-'+ ^o ©nil lotflco ^ilf t. fa T '" 



34 



-then cut off, by hand, about 1.5 ft. above the ground. 
A small box was made to carry the water around the sides 
of the cofferdam to the pump in one corner and everything 
was in readiness for concrete. 

During the process of pile driving at Pier #3 forms 
were being cut for the nose and back, material delivered 
and the river bed at Pier #2 site raked with an iron 
hook to remove large surface boulders. 

The pile driver was moved to Pier #2 and 93 - 32 ft. 
piles were driven every 2' 6" along the center line and 
every 3 ft. at right angles to it, These were also 
driven to an approximate stand still, to a penetration 
of 18.9 ft. During this pile driving Pier j^S was 
concreted. The concrete being placed with bottom 
dump buckets which were handled by the derrick at (2). 

In the meantime the excavation for the west abut- 
ment was continued and construction started on the 
caisson work for Pier #2, This caisson consisted of 
three tiers of 12 x 12 3. 1. S. timber bolted together, 
making a solid base 14 x 48 x 3 ft. On this the side 
and end walls made of 3 x 12 1.1. & D. material were 
fastened by long hook bolts running from the top sill 
to the base. They were fastened together at the ends 
by bolts so that when they were used at Pier ,f2 



t. ' X 



-•■''"'^' IjoJttc*tati (rfostf £a« •eort 9x£* tol: *ko ^i»c* o-rsr/ 
no'ii a£ iTtiw Jitifli etle S* itti i* A»a aer^s 9di i^oa 
•aiwJMiTOtf eoa^tvfs ft;;^:Ml ero2»T ot r'ooxt 
- ■^'' Bn« S'i toll o* Jbsvcrrt aaw frtib eXtc^ a:!? 

1-917 ©BSifr .tl 0* aalaoui tftlgli *« .rt C -^lov© 
•ri?ci fl ot ,IIl:fB JBflB^a ••♦ ' 

notj-orf litir Jbaoalg aalac' otoTOftoo srl!? .ie^oi-'^.^oo 
' :rolr«r©J& 9:^;^ v' *'■■-' - 

J^ ;9Tr srit 10^ aoittiraoxe '■-rf* e&JtJaaeu erfu al 
uii' CO l»»tTfl;^a noltoirxtanoo fin* ^^ssntfnoo 8*w j^nsi' 
^■•> ''■' "-'.^taaoD aov.Bl&o alxf? ,« iw- . -..■" ■^rro-' ; 

V. •; ,o;r jjatlocf terfmit •& .1 .r SI x SI lo Bitti oi-. 
e^ta srTj- atri* nO ,t?t S x 8^ x 1^1 aaarf J5tXoa a gnj^^m 
oiew liltt^Jfii., , X :t C *c afiarrr all* ? 

XXi:o (iot axft aoTft ji-s ad-Ioi.' " .' ; Jj^aitaal 



56 



.the "bolts were removed and the sides and ends came off ' 
and were floated into place and set up again on the base 
for Pier #1. 

TThile waiting for the forms to be placed for the 
neatwork of Pier #3 the excavation for the main part 
of the West Abutment was finished and the footing con- 
creted. The concrete was deposited by cars running 
on a track from the mixer to the foundation. 

The pile driving at Pier #2 being finished the 
driver was moved to Pier #1 site, which had been 
previously raked for boulders, and 94 - 32 ft, piles 
were driven here. These piles were spaced the same 
as for Pier #2 and were driven tintil the movement 
under last blow of hammer with fall of 20 ft. was 
less than an inch. The average penetration was 
17,8 ft. 

While the pile driver was working at Pier #1 
the forms for the neatwork of the West Abutment were 
being made. Pier #3 was stripped, the rip rap work 
around Pier vfS was started after the cofferdam sheet- 
ing had been pulled, the guy derrick at (1) was set 
up and the engine moved from (2) near Pier #3 to 
operate it and the piling at Pier #2 were cut off. 



•liars '^ 

■ - , . • * 

-•':?■• J59 or ^c, ftt^t.' e?>Ii: .'^tsr: teTtiA -^T^iv; 

■ . *voa ■ . i ■ ' ' , ■ ■ ';„':■ 

I lot: i-jB aai. Tov-iT.5 ftl? ftHidv 



37 



,y'>_^ '-"■.'■■■^^'■.■^^y. ."■■.«*■> 




"tiMMmsmmm 



^'z-m^WM^^ 



mcm^^^^MmmMm 



38 



The piling were cut off under water with a circular' 
saw on a vertical shaft. This shaft was mounted on a 
frame that held the engine and was operated by a belt. 
Skidways were fastened to the temporary trestle and 
guide piling and rails were placed on them to an exact 
level. The saw was set to cut over the highest point 
of rock on the bottom and held in place by a collar 
on the shaft. A steam line was laid from the boiler 
to the saw engine and connection made with steam hose. 

The cutting was started at the up stream end of 
the pier and the frame was skidded back and forth at 
right angles to the center line of the pier being fed 
ahead as each row of piling was cut. The levels of 
the cut offs were frequently checked and the saw re- 
set if necessary. After all the piles were cut a 
variation in level of only ,03 ft, was found. 

When the piles were cut and the skidways and 
saw frame removed, the work trestle was opened and 
the completed caisson was floated into place. It was 
lined in and when In position was secured by bracing 
to the temporary structure and the guide piles. 

During this work the pile driving at Pier #1 was 
completed and the saw was moved to cut the piling there 
in the method previously described. The pile driver 
was then talcen apart and the engine of the pile driver 
used on the stiff leg derrick, which was set up at (2) 



.a ntc 

>j3::o CB ot 1n9.It no b9o .'»w eXiai M« s^ill . 

xl> T«rc two ot *«»e j'Br Tve erf? ,X©r©I 

■ ■: B«V, 

' I OXl:t J. ' UB /'©t 'X:i 



m^^m^m^^^mmmmmm 



40 



The rip rap work at Pier #3 was completed also, tlie 
concreting of the main West Ahutraent and some rip rap 
was placed in front of the main east abutment site. 
The footing pedestals for the west abutment were exca- 
vated and all concreted with the exception of those for 
the future track. 

The concrete was next placed in the caisson at 
Pier #E. It was carried from the mixer in buckets on 
ears and then hoisted by the derrick into the caisson 
where it was distributed evenly to prevent undue 
settling at any one place during the process of sinking. 
The caisson being calked and water tight there was no 
trouble in working the concrete. 

When the caisson was sxink onto the piling, being 
reset for alignment just before it was completely down, 

the footing was allowed to set up before the forms for the 
neatwork were put In place. As much of the form work 
as could be saved from Pier #3 was used as the shafts 
of all three piers were of the same dimension making 
the forms Interchangable, 

During the concreting of Pier 7^2 the forms for 
the columns of the west abutment were placed, the re- 
inforcing bars were cut and bent,- the caisson base for 
Pier #1 was made, and the excavation for the main east 



aotfti^oxt 'idf ditrr b9i''n'zon^r> Its '>n.s J&«:f v 

■)rrif til t9 ■■ i'>r> nasi i ' . i 

, . - .i- . . ^ - " J . :. . '.. 

■ft ^0 .'rn;:sr e .'^ojE.Cq nl trfi eistr y.rr . 










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V >^»--^ 



42 



abutment started. The gravel was also delivered during 
this time and the washer and track taken up. 

The excavation for the east abutment was attended 
with some difficulties. The material was coarse gravel 
and sloughed off considerably, breaking back so far in 
the main abutment site as to endanger fhe temporary 
trestle, which had to be Jacked up and repaired with a 
cribbing tinder it. The excavation for the footing 
pedestals were very deep to prevent slipping on the 
side hill and for this work dry cofferdams had to be 
built to hold back the dirt on the sides of the excavations. 
Interference with the temporary trestle also caused more 
cribbing to be done to maintain that structure. 

The west abutment approach was next concreted. The 
mixture for this work was made very wet amd was thorough- 
ly worked by spades against the face, every effort being 
made to get a good surface and not expose the rods which 
were within two inches of the forms. The work of spading 
In the colTuons was exceedingly difficult as the rods in 
place left very little room for a man to work and it was 
necessary for him to move out whenever a car of concrete 
was dumped. 

The concrete for the west abutment was emptied into 
"buckets at the mixer, which were raised by the derrick at 



» '.si. j«ii«s-^07 Aa« fir A«3L0«4 ^<i o^ ^a^'- ^'C'.i^. .•X^eoit 
r^nitool ftil^ lol xiolt«T«ox* tif? •i^^ tAftiur 3nlcfJt<xo 
frft ao ^fliqcflXa tffftTtTq ot ^t^A it^r oa»w tX-'^:^'^•^ABq 

. Toii-Bv ;ox« •/£;)• ♦o eefile ftuJ bo iztt exf* :Co«tf Llorf oi tltL-tf 

9. .9^910X100 tT»rt B«v. xto«OT(xq« *fl»pr*jj(f« *B«r erf? 
-:[•':: ~Tjr'.t bbt; ftcui tfr ^rr-'V afim but- ^"rOTr 8 f f * fn'* <s«r:'t'r ^''T 

io'i:l« ^{i9T» ,«ojil oniJ iBale-^H 9*baib . zov %L 

i'; ■ Rot sxJJ' ••o.p:» ton baa soattim Booj ^3 ot ab&: 

'"■o rr-Tor *rf? ,e -^0^ - .ft ^n ^^aoat oxrt iitdtt% «t«v 

it z-lic- ati ilaol-iZth 'il^lbQanoa 8«xr taro/Ioo 9£ft n^ 

iTcour o# rum « 10^ tsooi 9lfitL \;rr3V *^«I eoAlq 

■>fTon to t-an « T^vac^'vr +fro •TOm ot :itii .. . ;-i!«»#o«a 

^•li^irie Bam ia^c^fada ta«w ^rf^ toI fttotoaoo dxfZ 



44 



(1) and dtunped on a platform on the temporary trestle. 
From here It was shoveled into a side dump car and 
conveyed to the place where it was to !>• used. For con- 
creting the columns it was shoveled into chutes that ran 
down into the structure. For the side walls and cross 
"beams it was dumped on a platform and shoveled directly 
Into the work. Great care at all times was observed in 
the placing of this concrete not to disturb the rein- 
forcement, 

'iVhen the concreting was completed at Pier #2 the 
derrick and engine were removed to (E) Pier #1 to be 
used on concreting this Pier. It was then decided to 
place the caisson for Pier #1, but before this was done 
the gates of a large dam at Post Falls, Idaho were 
opened and the water rose four feet bringing all manner 
of drift with it. 

So great was the accumulation of drift that both 
the work and temporary trestles were in danger. This 
called for the entire labor force to keep an open channel 
and send the accumulated drift down the river. This 
condition prevailed for 12 days, but at the end of this 
time, although no further inconvenience was caused by 
drift, the water did not go down more than one half foot, 
making it inadvisable to place the Pier #1 caisson as it 



,Ji«Bxr md e-f rarr fi. Bind", ©osla ?tii of bt'^rtio') 
Hsrix.ii ojr. ' ■■■ : - '.".B B«w tt ear.u;Xoo 9dt ^nt^oio 

'•rtlt AftlevoffB Ana rrro^ ,terq a no Aaqmrfi n«w ft BrnBerf 

."ioodo EBTT RO'iild' S.Zsi -a 9TB0 ^asf . odi otat 

'f if-m-futb o:t Jon »t»rroaoo eiifJ to aniDalq; e;I* 

ci ot I ioi - ':%) o* /itvo -^w Brtljj'^B Baa ?toli<XB£ 

•^tfjftf; nr ' ... 00 flo bftfiu 

"lew otIflXI ,flIXBt tBo2 *B cm6 oaiBl « to ;;atit'j srf^ 
■> - '^J. iiro* •^r-'^T tbJb' '•■''♦■ 

.':^i'ib to noltBZu: s oo« oxfd- baw *b8Ts oC 

•i r(f "TAW B9l*Bet* >rui1C0q[B»* J^XU '^r- * '^ 

fii oJ^ eoiot totfBl Qilita9 9:[f rot b^ll&o 

(•IflQvaooiiJ: isflJxi/l on xi^j/Oiij i 
tiBiit atom nvr on Bi:J& TBtBW »/(*• .-f^tfr. 



-: V 45 




46 



, ten > 

might have broken ite morlng^or got something under it, 

due to the ciirrent, that would have prevented it from 

sinking to a level footing. 

The labor force was increased at this time and the 
concrete wprk on the west abutment was completed. The 
footings for the main east abutment were also concreted. 
The concrete for this work was carried across the work 
trestle in push dump cars and emptied directly onto the 
work. The engine at Pier #1 was rigged to help the 
cars up cui Incline at the east end of the work trestle. 

While the concreting of the east abutment was under 
way, track was laid across the temporary structure and 
as daily work trains were In operation it was necessary 
to arrange for a rapid means of clearing the track on 
the bridge. Therefore the platfonn used on the west 
abutment work was airranged to that it was not fastened 
to the structure, but could be lifted off with the derrick, 
to which a long boom was attached to handle the concrete 
for the east abutment. 

All the concrete with the exception of the main 
abutment footings on the east abutment, both plain and 
reinforced, was placed by push cars on the temporary 
trestle, the concrete being deposited in chutes which were 



• • • s 

^, . .(, 

ooa Qciit Bidi fa AtaatidaJt saw aotcA todnZ erf? 
r . •tdXqnoo e«w tnoortirtfa ta*w f»r{:t no z^nqm tt9%oaoo 

.X>c:^^<■;oaoo oaLt diew iaeai'udB tamo atom 9di to% eaaid^-.:^ 
r^TOw ex{* atOToa BeixiBo a«w 3itov> alxit lol; stercoaoo sxK 

i-ItoftTift fttttq r?> /;nfi at"0 (jnarJB ifaxni nl ftltiaTc^f 

. C:; ''\ *rf;^ Ito f>fl« tan* culi t« entXoil OB qp ev o 

^ rittjatrsqLO nt ctaw an tat* ^lov? -^Xi 

r. .ton a«w Jt ;^aiW o* htt^a -xim.—ji atiow taapofrrfB 

.ittTT ^^o ft9i^tL Off firiroi ti;(f ,aTff*3irita '>frt o,t 

ioi.oo yfld- %Sh.u\ti 0? i&a;iOiiJ ' .-^o'd j|aoI « dotx£\. o* 

• taaru^i/da ifnaa erf^ to^ 

i)ac aia-i ilj^o ,Jao;f?«t;ji ;^a«a ©.tt ao aanJttool taenrtrff* 



47 




'^^j: 



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•§^ 









r*"< 









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t--;'^*-*' 



SS* -5^ i 




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48 



Shortened as necessary. The side walls and cross Ijeams 
were concreted from a platform similar to that used on 
the west side. 

Shortly after track was laid the water fell con- 
siderably and it was deemed adyisahle to place the 
caisson for Pier #1, To protect the caisson from any 
small amount of drift that might he a menace to the work, 
a hoom was placed in front of the Pier site after the 
caisson was placed. 

The oonoreting of Pier #1 was handled in a manner 
similar to that used at Pier #2, This work was rapidly 
done, as the bridge crew were waiting to place the steel 
and some time was necessary for the concrete to set be- 
fore it was advisable to put any weight on it. Tht 
erection of the steel will be discussed later. 

])uring the concreting of the east abutment and the 
time forms were being built for Pier #1, the rip rap work 
was going on at Pier #2. This rip rap consisted of sur- 
face boulders picked up on the land surrounding the work, 
by permission of the owner, loaded on teams and hauled to 
the west end of the work trestle, here it was loaded on a 
push car and taken to its destination. This work was 
done whenever the laborers were not needed on concreting 
and during the general clearing up. 



V toetoTj oT .1 'iP-t lo'i flocalijo 

orft "to Jno-xT; nl JC)«0"rq «^eT. raoxf V' 

e nf £»»If)flLrrr paw X^ fti "io a/iJiltJ-xoxioo oxi'v 

-1. auiiixvi ot ^altlaw ftiow w»io ©36I'. ,- 

-0rf to« ot •tftiertoo erfJ *ro^ -^xasMOfta a«T7 e^ittJ^ anoB ra.i 
9;: . tc trfrifltr ^fUB ^Jt'? 0* •Icf«rtrfta saw tt eao!t 

I ciol 

t ' ' 



i>u 




51 



At about this time the future track footings for 
both the east and west abutments were placed, as it was 
desired to use the site for storage of the deck slabs. 

The deck slabs were concreted in forms placed on 
specially constructed platforms to the south of the west 
abutment and between it and the sand pile. These were 
allowed to set for at least ten days and were then moved 
by the derrick Jl) amd piled up close to the west abut- 
ment for the derrick car to pick up readily when placing. 
All the slabs were made with two bars placed in them in 
the form of a U, making a place for hooks to be attached 
in handling. 

When all the concrete had been placed, the work of 
making the roads at the Bast and west abutments was 
begun. This was done with slip teams and hand shovel- 
ing, the material being dumped off of flat cars by a 
lidgeirwood plow. These oars were in use in the track 
surfacing and the gravel was loaded into them by a steam 
shovel in a cut about one half mile from the bridge. 

While the roadways were being made the rip rap work 
was finished and the yard cleaned up. All the material 
to be returned to stock was piled up to the south of the 
west abutment within reach of the guy derrick fl). 
"The contractors equipment was hauled up on the right of way 



•i '^alt etd'^ -iro- 

fj«w it 9B .fiftTlq tttar aJnsrtrti'cTij *Btw btia tea* ©ri# iftotf 

ra4«I<i icnoj: fil J^•J0^ococ si«w B«/?Ii rfo»A »rfT 
j-^'S'v .It ^0 diiuoB exit 0* •sno'ttfiXot BaiJoinifBnoo xJ^Ialoeqe 
^x«w »«dd- .*Hq X>ft«B 9di ^.Off ti n-^nTrtod JbajB fa^mfadtt 

■ '>TOM a«rf* BUBW £ft« B^nA flat tBABl tC TO^ t»B Ot ftBWOXI." 

- '" fft9T '^'ft ot ••oTo 11/ f>9liq AttB .'II iotrtftJB Sift ':d' 

'JX-i uyii\. ixi^^OJ"l i^-u ^3t(; Oj «XBO jtotTlsA *rf* tOl *ii9 i 

1: r.t nl ^aoeXci f. -^fcart '^rtat. ecfi^ro oxft XXA 

•i-^a 9rf o* Q-'ooxf •xo!k 80«X(i « t^nl , to artol •>;{]■ 

. » •• "• •• ' I 

,6©04. ^ . ^nd ote-ioftoo ^.it XXjc liatf: 

:i^ a^ii'Sv i. sftoi* ' " .axraad 

.o^Ltitf ttdt ofoll 8Xt(^ 1;X«.'f aao txro<fa tx;o « ot iBvorla 

rrtirot iu holl 3* 5««iJ7te*3: e 

, . '•»■'■+'' • • ' ■ 



52 




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53 



opposite the town of Spokane Bridge to be stored imtil 
needed again. 

The temporsury work trestle was pulled out "by the 
engine at (1), it being moved for this work over where 
the boiler had been. A block was fastened to a tree on 
the east bank and the cable with a chain on it stretched 
across* One drum of the engine was used to pull the 
elisln out and the other to return it« Beginning at the 
west end by this means all the work trestle was pulled 
ashore and the salvaged material was piled up with the 
other old stock* 

Upon the completion of all the clearing up and 
storing of material a work train was furnished and load- 
ed by means of guy derrick. All the material thus loaded 
was shipped to Dishman and turned into the second hand 
stock. The ground was leveled off with slip teams and 
the site was left In good order with no unsightly rubbish 
lying around to mar the appearance of a very sightly 
structure. ' 

A reference to the oost sheet In the appendix gives 
all the Information In regard to the yardage, mixtures, and 
Tarlous distributions* 

The work was commenced on August 29, 1910 and com- 
pleted on Feb. 6, 1911. Stormy weather interfered with 



Lltsq^ oi Hi. "o tustb ©.. .aeotco* 

eHi ^e 3alneJtf9& ^ft nxsjiti 9t imdio 9dt bos tvo atudc 

; i.;- n/jr eltoAit ^itow •xf* XXe noB^a ttdt ^rf Jbn« *«tir 

•stootB Jblo Ift/ftO 

audt LtitiBimw •dt III •iot' t«Jb Xf^ ^^ e(ut»m ^(f £• 
rtcoei ftrft o^nl Iisntirt fin:? itrnriBlCT 0* ^ecTTtrfa nmr 
■jriizot qila dityt tto ;)»x»vcX luiif fcouoig •xf* 
.{cl(f<fjj-'X ^XtiialBoir oa Aftv fbro £003 d tltX Mw 9itD 9rif 

BerlB xl£aBq[q« •df at ^0bxUi ^bo* Bii^ ot too*it%Bi ▲ 

^wxokivdt'xiBtb BJroXiAT 
-fiioo bciB oxei ,98 #««yUL ao i—attmf m« stvow Bin 

i<«r ^prroire .XXVI •• .dBV no b%t9lq 





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55 



the work on 5 days, a yery small percentage. Concrete 
was actually placed on 56 days. One accident due to the 
oarelessness of a gang foreman in dropping a heary block 
on his foot was the only one of consequence during the 
entire work. 

The present temporary trestle made It impossible to 
run the center line of the track so the line was off set 
and run in front of the piers. The piers were at an 
angle of 60 degrees with the center line and were lined 
In ftom points set on the old Inland l^plre System bridge. 
Vibration and rough usage made it impossible to use the 
temporary trestle for permanent sights, 

Ho forms were used in the bottom footings in any of 
the work. The footings of the piers were placed against 
the caissons and for all the abutment pedestals they 
were put in place in the excavation without form work. 

Upon the completion of the ^'v'ork riill cletails of 
yardage, mixture, materials and all matters of importance 
during the construction and bearing on future work were 
recorded on blue ptints auid sent to the office of the 
Chief Engineer, 

The plans were made in Chicago, under the direction 
of C, P, loweth and the construction was handled imder 
_DlTision Engineer A. G. Holt, in Spokane. The writer 



9 'iUtt ia9blooM •aO •«^a£ dd no b^»Mlq. %ilaMtoe aair 
ol(J rr^—d m ffllqqtTA al iiMWel yu% m lo •••ntMl-'xeo 
ea^ anlurA •Mi»fip««iM 1q sac '(Xao •di mm toot Btd no 

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Ji. fitw Bftq, •JfT .etolq •<(# to tuvA At ntn ham 
h%atl «nr«w ham •■IX *tc5aflo azft dftv seenttA 08 t 

. ;«.%; Anlqcf ia«xai X)i.o •ad' ac ?•■ s^aloq flOll fil 
9di •%u of •Xtflnaoqat tl •b&m %:gamB d^ot ' r<olt«TtflT 

•ttjfgtt #B«r!AnfT<)CT «tot 9Xlae«ct -rrarcoqatt 

10 xcui Hi ■sai^oolb MOttotf •dt at ifou stvw «Brxot Ou 
tonirasa A«o8Xq •!•« ar^tq •dt to •aoitoot •ifT •:<!io« 9dt 

X^dt slat 't^Aft tooHtfftfa arft XXa Tot tea enoRalBO »t(;t 

.:'vov nrrol ?uox&lw aoltaraozo Bdt at •MiXq £U ^ijq ti^w 

lo ?l*#r. 

*?>iJ3^^aoqail ij ttt»**am XXa fios alaJli'x^tftai ,ftTtft?^^ ,«'«Jbxa^ 

X :. ao snlxaetf £aa ii9tfosniaaoo •dt ^olrcj/A 

9d;:^ to »oltto ^dt ot #ao« Jbfu a^aitq 9:sLi! ao A^Jbrcooo^c 

aoiJooilJb dift t<»*iur ,9i«ol^ i.i ttea aiaw aoeXq •ilT 
^•Jbru; Jb«XJbaaif b«w aol^oxTTtaaoo adt Aoa it«wo.' . 
t^tJt?:' -^'r ^^nmfoqiE at ,tXoH •© •! ^••ttlaa:* ixoiaivl" 



ismfi^^mimmmm^ 



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. IftiilhtniiT^ ^ ^ A tenjoj 




IDAHO "WESTERN Ri 
Pn^ress Prcnie 

GoncrE^c WorK 



30 



59 



' was the engineer In charge of the work In the field. > 

For diplomatic reasons It Is not deemed necessary 
to go Into the details of the cost of the work, al- 
though the cost sheet Is shown In the appendix. 

Steel:- The steel work consists of four 80 foot 
girders, 3 of them 9' 6 l/2" deep, made by the railway 
company for this bridge and one 8* 5 1/e" deep made 
originally for a main line bridge, but used on this 
work to economize. 

The shallow girder was originally a right angle 
girder and was dellrered as such. The necessary work 
to change It to a 60 degree skew, being done In the yard 
at the bridge. This girder was placed at the east end. 

The method of erecting the steel will be briefly 
described. The equipment consisted of two 50 ton 
derrick ears, with 50 ft. boom, one compressor car, 
tool cars and the necessary boarding cars for a crew 
Of 30 men, only 12 of these being steel workers. 

Girders were brought out on a temporary trestle, 
on two flat cars with a derrick car on each end. They 
were then lowered to rest on the second track portion 
of the piers and a temporary bent at the abutments. 

The bents of the temporary trestle were then puJbled 
out down to the caps on the piles. The bed plates were 



.'•I>r: it i'to. odf to •3t«rfo al anatJ- 

-ia titiow edt io if^oo !>a't lo aXta^tsA eri;^ o;f 
.xlAriAqqa arft itl a\70x{a aJt teaiia taoo ad^ 
J; •rro'v "ko atatanoo iiow Xe«ta adT •: ^^-^ 

lit ^rf 9£mi ,q«*^* "SXX a *Q cx>At to S .ur^Iitl^ 
sbBir qoaA ""^Xl 9 *3 «co IbOB aabl^tf alfft lol ^cuBqiflO) 
at:it no &aau tud ,^^:)tti aalX nt«m « icot x^X«at3^*:o 

•a'ttawaooa ot iiow 
alsoA ^£lahc a \XX»at3lto aiiw fh%t^ nolLtuUi oAX 
:^.u\ ^ruaaaoaa ax(S .ifoffa a« AatarlXaA M« bna taMtg 
£xA^ ax& al aaoA ^Alatf .waito aa'XfaA Od « ot tt osB^ifo ot 
J. Z9 t':»9 ftdt Ja AaoaXq aaw laAila aixi'' ••aMi'f '■•^t fa 
^L:«>t':o <»d Xltw X9a#a aj& ^aJbtoa^a to Ao;i^t 
r;o^ ^T. owt to JIatal'iaoo taainqixrpd e£{7 •')a<ftn:oa«6 
, lora^Tqiaoo otio ,nioorf .tt 0?. rfttr .Btea jfoiiiw-') 

•■'9-.:o . '1XC9. ^XATAOd ^ruMsaoaa soj ^as: BtDO Xcut 

.r;i9:aow X'i'a^B »iiJt»tf aaarft to ;:X -jXno ,aaa 05 to 
,9ltn»'rt vrcBTocrnat a /lo tiro tif^ffCT^ rrran Rt'jMt" 

.i)n9 xioflo ao lao ^ot fb a i^jl 
noirt^ioj loofla af.f no taax oi ftotswoX norct otarr 

,s;tn?r3^ncTc arft t« tnoef ^aioc[tro* a ftoa at©' 

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64 



^et on sheet lead over the places marted out on the con- 
crete to receive them. The girders were then picked up with 
derrick at each end and swung into place, A temporary 
timher deck was then put on the concrete slahs for the 
steel not being made. This operation was repeated at each 
opening. 

The piling of the temporary trestle was then pulled or 
hroken "by the derricks and the work was completed. 

When all the steel was placed the riveting was done 
and the holes hored In the concrete for the anchor bolts. 
These bolts were slit and driven in on wedges, a neat 
cement being poured aroujid them as a filler. 

The slabs on the approaches were set in a like manner. 
The trestle was pulled out and the slabs which had been 
previously piled within reach of the derrick cars were 
picked up and put in place on a 1" bed of mortor. The 
deck was then replaced and the cracks between slabs 
filled with mortor. The ballast on the slab deck will be 
of crushed rock, being drained through holes provided in 
the slabs. This gives a solid, noiseless floor with little 
maintenance cost as compared to the old type of bridge 
decks. 

The end. 



•a ' • 

■* 

t^'iviz *it{t b9c>aiz ^^^~ X'etc orld- Ciljc no:' 

x« jloi-rt«& .v{t- 1 , ii34i9i ai.Tllv. .^^alt'^ ^8i/olvo*xc[ 

, 1. Csd "X r "10 enfi'"': kI .t;'^ ^^ 

-la edt no *e«II«(f SiT? .rcoJnoa rftlrr 5dXIi'i 

v^ « 

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66 



Appendix-Cost Data ;- The cost of all the work was 
carefully recorde'd and separate distribution made of it 
for material and labor. This was tabulated upon the 
completion of the work and is shovm on the hlue print 
of the cost sheet, A full set of the working plans 
for the sub-structure are included, as printed from 
the tracing on file in the office of the Bridge &: 
Building Department of the railway company. 



Respectfully submitted, 

\\1 - Ui \Q>^ dcL^. 



W^o.-^ 




e. M^ 







to ffotV 



VHi.i^i 




y-JLiti;. 




Idaho "-QS yestern Ry. 
Coeur d Alene Branch 
A G.Holt Div En^r 
SpoUone.. 
Woah. 



Cost Sheet 

OF 

Concrete Work 

ON 

Spokane River Bridge 
Spokane Bridge 

WA5H. 



Bate5 '^ Rogers Const'n Co. 

Controctors 
Work Connmenced August, £3, 1310 
Work Completed February, 6, 1311. 
Compiled by C U, Smith. \nsp 
Spokonc. Wosh Feb 20, 1911. 



Remarks. 


Distribution- — 


Eoat 
Abufmt- 


Pier 
Numtaer 1 


Pier 
Slumber £ 


P 

NufTl 


er V 


/e3T 
t'mnt 


General. 


Totals Totals. 


General Dota: 


/' -. 


Excavation 


1 »3Ta«| 1 


* 281 60 


'236.6b 




•89031 


L 


utMir Un>l Coal 






Piling 




•69930 


*730aG 


311.67 






174193 


Locution 


&A>. ovation 

Vorilti CoMi bar YurJ 


Coleaone (Grllloge) 




28802 


34138 








62940 


Eaat Abutment 455 * .82 
Pier No 3 93(lOO%V«cl) '303 
W.si Abutm.nt 242 ' 98 
Total 790 'l,l3 
Pili.>9 
Locotion. Lin. Ft Driven. Coat per Uiii Ft 
Pier No.l 3168 « .22 
Pier No 2 3232 ' .22)i 
Pier No 3 ie57 < .1 6 
Work Trestle. 1740 * .1 1 
Total 10037 '.19 
Concrete 
Location Footiiiaa Nwtvoik Plain Neotwoih H»ior 
East Abutment. ei2Yd* w.337 116 Yda. II*<0£192Y.1» •* 1 o^ 
Pier No. 1, 78- - |,T4 3I3 . .133 
Pier No.2 73- . * te324 . .I,*0 
Pier No3 llO . .1,16238 . . 76 
West Abutment 300- - l-»* 158 - .1.38333. , t.ott 
Total. 774 ■ 1268 • 585 - 
Gravel 
Location Yordl Cost per Yoid. 
Total a62T *.363 
Rip Rap, 
Location Yorde, Cyal per Yard 
East Abutment 210 « 67 
Pier No.l .580 "104 
Pier No 2. 750 < 1.16 
Pier No.3 240 ' 1,42 
West Abutment ZO ' 81 
Total 1800 ♦l,03 1 
Moterioli Unit Cost^- 
Sond. 
355.5 Yds At pit •<.oe Houling W*.es Totol *l3» • ttott.bo 

Cement 
Costi * a EO per Bbl Frei^ttt ctiar,ges » es per Bbl ^4 3oth» 

Loc Footinys NeotVJorK Plain Nealv^orh HeInt 
E Abut. 2221661.- ISO Bbl.. 275 Bbl;, 
Pier No 1. 74X ■ 355)1 • 
»ierNo.2 821t - 401Jt ■■ 
= ier No3 IZS* • 302 

W.Abut 245 • 18914. . 5S1V. • 
Totals. 750 I398» - 826»v - 
Reintorcing Sara. 
Coot Abutment Weat Abutment Total. 

■ 1 1.6a per 100- 11169 lbs, 37332 lbs 4656 1 • 
*.»IG8 - . 12434 • 18652 - 31086" 
Ifine - 4684 - 10330 - 15614* 
11- '336 - 558 • 1302 - ISfcO* 
Totols 28845 - 68276 - 37121" 

Future Work Cost 
Eost Abutment West Abutment 
« 107000 ♦168500 

Mi>tures- 
E:. Abut. P.er"l. Pur "2 Pier " 3. W Abut 
oolinjs l-2ye-6 l-eti-e l-2)i-6 I-2/I S l-Sl-e-S 
coHTono»l l-2Vi-6 1-2)4.-5 1-2 -5 

- lT,ti,,i»,| l-21i.-6 1-2-S 1-2-S 1-2-5 1-2-5 

- (Copina) 1-2-4- 1-2-4- 1-2-4- 

■ (Reinf) 1-2-4 I-2.-4 

Cost per Yard of Concrete:- * 16 30 

Concreting Commenced: Oct 3, 13IO. 

Concrelinjg Completed- Jon 31, 1911 

Days Concreting: -56 

All concrete mixed with a Smith Mixer, excepting one 
jrure toolifig W Abut Grovel from pit on "X, Souttt 
f Sto 716. Sond from 'Humphreys Pit* about one 
lie 3outtt ot Bridqc. 
i 


Cofferdom. 








16968 






16963 


Puddling. 1 1 1 


7159 






71.59 


Forma. 


ei4S3 


261-49 


29302 


252.09 


1 19393 




262136 


Reinforcing. 


38960 








101 I.S2 




1411,52 


Concrete. 


104038 


S5S02 


570fcO 


36322 


IS03O3 




404625 


BucWtilling. 


6682 








3304 




3385 


Grove). 


32&CI 


22073 


223;..' 


22374 


479115 




147318 


Hauling Lumber. 


4438 


7408 


7500 


85.06 


8350 


*I082 


34344 






Hauling Cenrient. 


6267 


4147 


46b« 


41.40 


S6fiO 




28782 




L 


Rip Rap. 


140.1 


60343 


86902 


33934 


16.31 




196880 


i 




a 



J 


Roadwijtj. 


17361 








162 75 




33636 


Ill 






607.92 


60732 


Fencirjg. 












973 


373 


LoQdtr|g Pilinjg. 












2783 


2733 


Temporory Work Trealle. | ^ | | 






27903 


27303 


s 

L 
d 


IgggQ^QQQJ 












352,71 


3527 1 


iBaHWBWgPHBI^ 


Jon,.) 










44520 


44520 

- 


Cleoring Up 












51566 


51366 


General Roll (3upr tdnce. etc.) 










90,45 


9045 


Liability Insurance 






53405 


53405 


Total a. 


3249.66 


274354 


3150.21 


2 1 1 620 


482788 


287350 


1 836033 


\ 


^ 


Percentage.. (ia>fey.) 


406.20 


34294 


33376 


E6452 


60343 


353.13 


237012 


Totola. 


♦ 3653.8S 


*308648 


'354333 


* 238072 


*543I38 


♦ 323263 


♦21331.11 




» 13857 


'28830 




' 88860 










654610 






Cement. 


1425,05 


94600 


106480 


94050 


2 1 66.75 




B 

L 

' s 


Pilinjg. 




26136 


26664 


161.45 




'14355 


83300 


n^^^M^^S 


inch 1 8764 








62621 




815.85 


^ 


I . 20886 








31336 




522E4 


. *. 1 I021l| 1 - 




23831 




34042 


Lumber. 


17.42 








3484 


265.71 


31737 


Forma. 


311.76 


1 12S8 


1 1 5.06 


121.24 


57661 




1231.15 


Cofferdom 








2S420 






28420 


Coia90n« CGrillo^e.) 1 i 


42583 


42583 








851.66 


Miacelloneoua. 


6364 


144.1 1 


141.07 


3930 


1 1463 


605.I2 


1 1 1387 


(Off.ca. 


.,= ) 










1 1450 


1 14.50 


TotoVs. 


2517.60 


2022 39 


214732 


168626 


4363,31 


1 1 2858 


1 3865.66 F 


1 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^R 


314.73 


2S2B7 


26842 


2I057 


54543 


141 1 1 


1733,13 " 




I Totals 


* 2S32.53 


*a27Si6 


'241 574 


^^^^^^S jj^^^^^Q ^^^^^^^ 


♦ 1 553875 


^ Frei^tit. 


16333 


13250 


14600 


10687 


24931 


II 7221 


137048 


Miscellaneous. 












7192 


7132 


Engineering CSolorie. 


s. etc.) 










123336 


123336 


^ Totals 


'l6o33 


' 13250 


'l4600 


•l06 87 


'243.51 


'247743 


' 327576 


i_ 




Grand Totals 


•6631.77 


•S43424 


•6I0673 


•.i3&342 


•I059Q23 


'638017 


•402O562 



f 



m. 








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Section A- A 



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ii t7r><^ ir7Cr£o 



ir^ 



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•cure a aooc/ /hufii^^Ai>r>. f/ien fhg eyfa/^r? 
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: A-. 4,/.^ ^.^..j,mo. "^ '' ® °f ® 



C.M.&R,S.Ry. 

Bridge AND Buildino 'Department. 



w/.x; wiwr?^wxr;x^s:^'' spokane river bridqe 

.„.„.^,..,-„,»:..V%X;;r.^^^w'^d,y COEUR D'AlENE LINE -.COLUMBIA DmSION 

,,, — ■^^//'^/•'"■f"'? ''"pM ^/■^fc'v 'o su,/ oriMar,, ^^g.p Abutment - Plan & ELtvATioNsHri' 

'Lr/j;i:rL s/t t7ff^..t;r."o7Lr.%i/;%i^^:s^. h,caoo, l^ 15. 19.0 ZZo^^o° ^ 

^/■^^.., /^«/«^_,. *■ orrcct: approved. 



0/ aa//ac«n/ /ooAh^s. ^ , - , 

rhe (?&« /aunc/af'ons h^re sAo^^^ far aon^e faofm^e. ha^e beM 



/ Asst.En 



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1 [ ' ,4 




•i^^or® 



3hoiving (jrran^ernenf O^ bars in coA/^. 
^or /ocaAo^ o/" Jg^/ih^s J*a OrW^ C6389) 



C.M.&RS.Ry. 

Bridge and Building Department 



Spokane River Bridqe 

CoEUR D'ALENt Line Columbia Division 
East Abutment L^thils of Slabs, Cross-beams etc 
Chic»QO. Aus. 15 1910 Drawino N0C6390 

ConRECT". 

'\\ Ass't Cnsr _ *• e'ngb4. SuPT atTB 



approved; 



i_. 



i 




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/brNi//or/£''^3c/.r£'L 




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fyo/s^ ^'//Y £//e7/7y. 



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A 


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£y4i 3o//SS/ 



C.M.&RS.RY. 

RIDGE AND BuiLDING DfPARTM 



Spok/(Ne: River Bridge 

CoeurD'Alene Line Columbia Division 

Caissons for Piers Nos 1*2 



C ic AGO, June 2, J9f0. 


Drawinc No C-6370 


CcRpeecr: 


Approved: » 


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& 



'/es ore r^otz/nee/ ^o st/paar/ 
-^7?, /^tfy '"oy ^^ e/r/iv/f o/ same 



C.M.&RS.Ry. 

Bridge and Building Department. 



Spokane River Bridge 

CoeuR D'Alene Line Columbia Division. 
Details of Piers No's, la- 2 
Chicaqo.June 1910 Drawing No C63 



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Armour Institute of Technology 
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