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Full text of "Contact: Hemet 42E-43G"

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Air Corps Training Detachment 

Ryan School of Aeronautics 

Hemet, California 

CLASS 42-E 




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ALCORN, ELI G. 
ALLISON, OTIS E. 
ARNETT, WILL S. 
ARTUSY, RAYMOND L 
BAILEY, FELIX R. 
BAILEY, WALTER H. JR. 
BECK, CLAUDE A. 
BENSON, WALTER S. JR. 
BERRY. BILL 
BERRY. JACK S. 
BIDELSPACH, FRED A. JR. 
BIESEL. WILLIAM H. 
BILLS, RALPH C. 
BISCAYART, JULES D. 
BLAIR, JOHN L JR. 
BOCKHAUS. LLOYD R. 
BO WEN, CLIFFORD R. 
BOYDSTUN, WARD L 
BRADFORD, WINSTON J. 
BREWER, JAMES E. 
BRIDGES, CLAUDE H. JR. 
BRINKMAN, WILLIE E. 
BROOKS, WILLIAM H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD G. 
BUTLER, ELDON W. 
CANNON, CLYDE C. 
CARR, BENSON V. 
CARSON, MYRICK H. 
CARTER, RAYMOND S. 
CAWYER, RAYMOND D. 
CEARNAL, AUZIE E. JR. 
CHAFFIN, HENRY G. 
COKE, WILLIAM B. JR. 
COLE, CHARLES L 
CONLIN. JOHN D. 
COOSE, RICHARD M. 
COULTER, AUSTIN N. 



CROWELL, RICHARD S. 
CUMMINGS, DUKE D. 
DAVIS, ROY A. 
DENTON, HARRIS L 
DOELL, OSCAR T. JR. 
DONHAM, ELBERT R. D. 
DOWDY, ROSS W. 
DRAUGHON, MILLER 
EVANS, HERBERT O. 
FERGUSON, JAMES C. 
FOSTER, ARTHUR L JR. 
FOX, ROY V. 
FRAYSHER, VERNON L 
FROEHNER, REUBEN B. 
FRY, ROBERT A. 
GAMARD, EDWARD W. 
GERICK, HERMAN 
GILILLAND, JAMES V. 
GODDARD. GEO. M. JR. 
GRACE, JAMES D. 
GREEN, DURWOOD S. 
GREEN, TRAVIS C. 
GRGG, JARVIS R. 
GROUNDS, WILLIAM C. 
GUNN, JACK W. 
GWYN, ROBERT L JR. 
HART, WALTER J. JR. 
HENDRICKS, RAYMOND E. 
HETHERINGTON, THOS. F. JR. 
HIERONYMUS, WM. M. JR. 
HOLLIS, WILLIAM N. 
HORTON. HORACE E. 
HOWARD, JACK W. 
HUTTON, JOHN W. 
JENNINGS, THEO B. 
JONES, EMIL B. 
JORDAN. ELI G. 



KEMPER, GEORGE A. JR. 
KERR, JOSEPH N. JR. 
KESTERSON, JEROME D. 
KING, ROBERT E. 
KINGSBURY, TILLMAN A. 
KIRKPATRICK, COLEMAN E. 
KNIGHT, JAMES E. 
KORMAN, JOHN G. 
KUHNS, JAMES B. 
LAXSON, MACK E. 
LEFFLER, GEORGE V. 
LESLIE, GENE J. 
LEWIS, JAMES E. 
LEWTER, HARLETH I. 
LOCKHART, CHARLES L 
LONDON, HUEL G. 
LONG,- ROBERT H. 
MADDOX, WILLIAM DeW. 
MADELEY, ARTHUR C. JR. 
MARSHALL, LEWIS H. 
MARTIN, EVERETT L 
McCARTY, BILLY S; 

mqclintock, robert a. 
McDonald, morris t. 
Mcelroy, perry b. jr. 

McMATH, JACK L 
NAMLE, JOHN P. 
NEW. LEO JR. 
NICHOLSON, MARTIN H. 
ORTIZ, CIRILO O. 
SAMS, WILLIAM W. 
SMITH, BARNEY M. JR. 
SPENCE, ROBERT W. 
STROUD, HARRY A. JR. 
TAYLOR, GEORGE F. 
TERHORST, GEORGE E. 
WHEELER, JESSE P. 




Dedication 



To those former graduates of Ryan Field 
who are risking their lives in active combat 
service to found a world of democratic 
peace and freedom, wherever they might 
be — the Philippines, hiawaii, England or 
Africa — we sincerely dedicate this issue. 
May they be clad with the strength of 
Mars and the wings of Mercury that free- 
dom and a future world of peaceful sanity 
will belong to them as well as those for 
whom they fight. 



PUBLISHED BY 
K\jan ^ckccl cl Qe'icnauiics 

HEMET, CALIF. 

JANUARY 16, 1942 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Fox, R. V Editor 

Berry, J. S Associate 

It. Sather Photography 

Crowell R. S Poetry 

Boydstun, W. L Snapshots 

Bowen, C. R Beauty Contest 

Bradford, W. J. & Brooks, W. hH Cartoonists 

Cooper, R. D Editorial Advisor 



Business Office — In Blackout Cabin 8-A 
Hours — From Taps to Reveille 




A/C R. V. FOX, Editor 



FROM THE EDITOR 



The task of publishing a nnagazine of this yet something as serious as is our job itself, 
type is definitely a responsibility inter- that you might carry on with you through- 
mingled with a joy that comes only from out training, active service and post-war 
dabbling in the proverbial printers' ink. life. To those cheerful assistants, who did 
Foremost in the minds of those who have the work, and to those cadets who furnished 
made this issue possible has been the the material, we give our sincere thanks, 
thought of giving you something humorous. We hope you enjoy it and treasure it. 



CONTACT 



Page Three 




Keep 'Em Flying 



On the morning of November II, 1918, 
Americans cheered their victorious soldiers 
who had fought so valiantly to preserve the 
freedom of this and other democracies and 
who on that eventful morning succeeded in 
conquering German aggressors. That war 
was a war to end wars and for the next two 
decades peace-loving nations the world 
over celebrated Armistice Day, while be- 
hind this curtain of contentment a new 
generation of Germans banned together 
with an Austrian paperhanger to form the 
powerful Nazi party which has come to be 
feared throughout Europe. In hiitler's wave 
of conquest, he was joined by the military 
machines of two other war-minded nations, 
first Italy and then Japan. Soon, these 
countries spread war and hate throughout 
the world, first preying upon small, unpro- 
tected nations, then as opportunities pre- 
sented themselves, expanded their barbar- 



lous tactics to other and larger countries 
until the entire world felt the effects of the 
combat. Like China, England and others, 
these United States finally were brought 
into the conflict, but only after American 
possessions and its own soil were threaten- 
ed. Thus, a nation which had not been in- 
vaded in a century became the scene of 
defense preparations, blackouts and fear 
for the safety of women and children. Life, 
liberty and pursuit of happiness became 
goals which once more must be fought for 
and protected. Again the curtain of the 
theatre of war has been rung up and it 
looks as if its run might be a long one, its 
playhouse being not just Europe but the 
entire globe. In answering the call to col- 
ors, American youth volunteered for those 
branches of service in which they thought 
they could best serve this democracy and 

(Conilnued on page five) 



Page Four 



CONTACT 




LIEUT. HOWELL 



To the Aviation Cadets of Class 42-E and others to follow: 

A challenge worthy of acceptance by free men has been issued by the Axis powers 
In the bombing of Pearl hHarbor. I need not dwell on that act by our present enemies, 
who were professed friends until that time. 

You who are training to become combat pilots of our Army Air Force have heard 
and read of the exploits of service and heroism of the Army pilots already engaged with 
the enemy, although seemingly hopelessly outnumbered, both in men and materials. Now! 
the planes and material. In quantities and quality second to none, will be provided In the 
coming years of 1942 and 1943, as outlined by our President In his address on the state 
of the nation given January 6, 1942. 

It is YOUR job, and yours alone, to man these war planes with the best pilots In the 
skies; and to clear these same skies of all enemy aircraft. This can and will be done. 

ALFRED S. HOWELL, 1st Lieut., Air Corps 



CONTACT 



Page Five 



Ground School Instructors 




Ground school Instructors pictured above are, left to light: J. H. KEESEE L F BRISTOL R E BUTLER 
P. PIERCE, H. RAINE, H. LANDRY and E. M. WEIDINGER. (D. RAINE not in picture). ' ' ' 



Ground school plays an integral part in 
flying and the success of a flyer's career. 
Early in one particular course an instructor 
made the statement: "I don't care whether 
you pass this course or not; it doesn't make 
any difference to me, but if anything I can 
say will sometime or another help save a 
life, then I will be satisfied." 

That, In general, is the purpose of ground 
school instruction. Flight instructors teach 
us to fly; but without a working knowledge 
of flight theory, engines and weather, the ex- 
tent of flying success would be quite limited. 

To some, ground school is play and the 
Instructors are the object of many jokes. 
But regardless of this fact, they are the un- 
heralded heroes of flying and serious 
thought and tribute is at this time directed 
towards them and their work. 



KEEP 'EM FLYING 

(Continued from page three) 

other nations trampled by the war-wrought 
destruction of aggressor countries. In the 
past year and a half, hundreds of young 
men have been graduated from Hemet's 
Ryan Field and are now serving their coun- 
try as pilots, navigators, bombardiers and 
armament officers of the Army Air Corps 
in the fight to save democracies from dic- 
tatorships. We take time out from this 
book's frivolous train of thought to pay 
sincere tribute to these men, now officers, 
who are risking their lives in active service 
and In whose footsteps we are striving to 
follow. Carry on and "Keep 'Em Flying." 

A/C FOX, R. v., 42-E. 



E. G. ALCORN O. E. ALLISON W. S. ARNETT R. L. ARTUSY F. R. BAILEY W. H. BAILEY 




C. A. BECK W. S. BENSON B. BERRY J. S. BERRY F. A. BIDELSPACH W. H. BIESEL 




R. C. BILLS J. D. BISCAYART J. L. BLAIR L. R. BOCKAUS C. R. BOWEN W. L. BOYDSTUN 




W. J. BRADFORD J. E. BREWER C. H. BRIDGES W. E. BRINKMAN W. H. BROOKS E. G. BUTLER 




E. W. BUTLER C. C. CANNON B. V. CARR M. H. CARSON R. S. CARTER R. D. CAWYER 



A. E. CEARNAL H. G. CHAFFIN W. B. COKE C. L COLE J. D. CONLIN R. M. COOSE 




A. N. COULTER R. S. CROWELL D. D. CUMMINGS R. A. DAVIS C. E. DEHLER H. L. DENTON 




O. T. DOELL E. R. DONHAM R. W. DOWDY M. DRAUGHON R. J. DYGERT H. O. EVANS 




J. C. FERGUSON A. L. FOSTER C. C. FOSTER R. V. FOX V. L FRAYSHER R. B, FROEHNER 




R. A. FRY E. W. GAMARD H. GERICK J. V. GILILLAND G. M. GODDARD J. D. GRACE 



D. S. GREEN J. R. GREGG T. C. GREEN W. C. GROUNDS J. W. GUNN R. L. GWYN 




R. E. HENDRICKS T. F. HETHERINGTON W. J. HART W. H. HIERONYMUS W. N. HOLLIS H. E. HORTON 




J. W. HOWARD J. W. HUTTON T. B. JENNINGS E. B. JONES E. G. JORDAN G. A. KEMPER 




J. N. KERR J. D. KESTERSON R. E. KING T. A. KINGSBURY 0. E. KIRKPATRICK J. E. KNIGHT 




J. G. KORMAN J. B. KUHNS M. E. LAXSON G. V. LEFFLER J. E. LEWIS G. J. LESLIE 




H. I. LEWTER C. L. LOCKHART H. G. LONDON R. H. LONG A. C. MADELEY W. D. MADDOX 




L H. MARSHALL E. L. MARTIN B. S. McCARTY R. A. McCLINTOCK M. T. McDONALD P. B. McELROY 




J. L. McMATH J. P. NAMLE L NEW M. H. NICHOLSON C. O. ORTIZ W. W. SAMS 




B. M. SMITH R. W. SPENCE H. A. STROUD G. f. TAYLOR G. E. TERHORST J. P. WHEELER 



Page Ten 



CONTACT 




Percy McElroy certainly forgot about 
that girl in Texas he was going to marry — 
after she married someone else. 

We want to know why that little rhumba 
teacher in Long Beach slapped Morris Mc- 
Donald seventeen times in fifteen minutes 
and then made up for it in four hours. 

Booglie Wooglie Bugle Boy Brewer of 
Company B finds rest and "relaxation" on 
week-ends off buddy-buddying with Band- 
leader Bob Crosby. 

Mr. Walter Hart is a good boy. But we 
haven't found out what he's good for. 

Messrs. Goddard and Bills say that Cadet 
W. H. Brooks can sleep through anything. 
And he doesn't know what he missed. 

Why was Mr. hHendricks' face so red 
when his "woman friend" sat down with 
him and his Texas true love at Earl Carroll's? 

Cadet Grounds is the only man with red- 
haired Texas and California girl friends, 
both true to him. 

We wish Captain Jennings would make 
up his mind whether he Is going to date 
Quida or her mother. 

Kesterson Is the only man here with a 
hundred addresses and not one date. 



What part did Ed Cearnal have in the 
floor show at the "It Room" during the 
holidays? 

Did Evelyn come out here to find out 
what was going on between McCarty and 
Gloria? 

Cadet Crowell goes to Pomona every 
week-end. hlis uncle is dean of a girls' 
school. Poor Mr. C. has to sleep in the 
dormitory. 

Since when does Cadet Leo New have 
to play second choice to lieutenant In the 
matter of a Long Beach girl friend. 

G. F. Taylor plus Old Taylor equals a 
midnight call to his Texas girl friend. But 
she's never home. 

We can't figure out whether Mister 
Wheeler did his recuperating at March 
Field hospital or Riverside's Somerset 
hlouse. 

Is that a platonic interest or otherwise 
that Editor Roy Fox has in Bob Crosby's 
luscious vocalist? She is a sweet number 
though. 

Why can't Gosport Gus find out some- 
thing printable about Jack Berry? 



CONTACT 



Pago Eleven 



Captain Colin Kelly, U.S.A.C. 

You can talk of feats of yore 

And of pilots gone before 

Or of navigating blind in dismal mist; 

But when it comes to flying even tliough it 

means sure dying, 
There's a man who's at the top of every list. 

On Pacific's distant shore 

Uncle Sam'ls great Air Corps 

Kept a rendezvous to guard democracy; 

And when the Japs began to slaughter 

Freedom's birthright to the water, 

His bombers went aroaring out to sea. 

In command of the first flight 

Was a fella full of fight, 

Whose plane had tons of death down in her 

belly; 
Filled with grim determination 
To bring yellow devastation 
Was a man whose name was Capt. Colin 

Kelly. 

He was just an hour out 

When he raised a valiant shout 

As he saw a warship of the Rising Sun. 

With its deck guns blazing fire 

He hauled his plane up higher, 

And knew the fight to death had just begun. 

As the shells around him crashed 

And his wingtip partly smashed. 

He headed on with nerves of coldest steel. 

When his bombsight squarely checked, 

He loosed havoc toward the deck 

Till it tore a living hell from mast to keel. 

On his wings the sun was gleaming. 

And with mighty motors screaming, 

He plummeted straight down from out the 

blue. 
Though his plane was quickly burning. 
He had no thought of turning. 
Before he crashed he knew his job was 

through. 

The Pacific's quiet waves 

Leave no marking for the grave 

Of a man who gave his life for Freedom's 

ring. 
But his country will remember 
To avenge that bleak December; 
Capt. Colin Kelly, tis of thee we sing. 

—William P. Sloan 



A DODO LEARNS AT RYAN 

THAT: 

You should have brought your tennis 
racket, Mister, and where are your skis? 

Texas won the Civil War with the 'aid of 
the South. 

A pop-to Is not a soda also. 

Upperclassmen are very concerned about 
a dodo's spare time. 

Raunchy is an all-descriptive word. 

W. Lee O'Daniel is the father of our 
country. 

You should have studied math in school. 

The Eyes of Texas is our national anthem. 

Reveille oil does not come in cans. 

Five o'clock A.M. is not the middle of the 
night. 

Rat racing is not a rodents' field meet. 

This has been very unusual California 
weather. 

Frogs and Dodos have much in common, 
the shadow of the gig is with them always. 

Five weeks is a mighty long time, but 
would you want to be somewhere else, 

l^is+er? VC STICKLE, W. J., 42-F 




WLoiu Of -;«t U. D. O. ? 



Page Twelve 



CONTACT 



I'VE DONE MY HITCH IN HELL 

I am sitting here just thinking 

Of the things I left behind, 

And I'd hate to be a telling 

Just what's running through my mind. 

I've run in a million "rat races" 
And I've covered miles of ground ; 
A place that's somewhere nearer hell, 
Is waiting to be found. 

But there is one consolation; 
Gather closely while I tell. 
When I die I'm bound for Heaven, 
For I've served my hitch in hell. 

In "popping to" and other tasks, 
I've toiled and sweat with pain; 
And what reward I get, you ask: 
Why, "flying in the rain." 

We double time the whole day through. 
And purr like jungle cats; 
My shoes which once were shining new. 
Look like a pair of spats. 

The number of parades I've stood, 
It's hard for me to tell; 
But there'll be no parades in heaven, 
For I've done my hitch in hell. 

And when on earth my work is done. 
My friends they all will tell 
That I've gone on up to heaven, 
For I've done my hitch in hell. 

The Angels all will welcome me 
And harps will start to play. 
I'll draw a dozen passes 
And spend them all one day. 

And then I'll hear St. Peter 
Call out with one big yell: 
Take the front seat Ryan dodo. 
For you've served your hitch in hell. 

— A/C Leffler, G. V., 42-E 



i{p hem ike Kanks 

A/C MOSER, R. R., 42-E 

It seems only yesterday I was saying fare- 
well to Sgt. Snarl. "I'm not being discharg- 
ed, you know, just being transferred to the 
Army Air Corps," I reminded him. 

"A jerk in the A.A.C." he said, with 
coarse laughter to match his coarse humor. 

I rose above it. "Never mind, Sarg, "if 
things get too tough for the good old out- 
fit, I'll be glad to come back and sacrifice 
my dreams of being a flier." 

"Over my dead body," he screamed. 

"I'll be glad to come back," I grinned, 
fast on the repartee. I'm also fast on my 
feet and it was a good thing. 

It seems only yesterday I was saying 
farewell to Mr. Growl, my flying instructor, 
as he shakily climbed from the ship. "You're 
the raunchiest cadet here," he said. "You're 
not safe to ride with. That's why I'm soloing 
you." 

"You got me mixed up with some jerk in 
the A.A.C." I said jeeringly remembering 
Sgt. Snarl's quip. 

"Get that ship rolling," he said, "and If 
you get It back down safely it will be a 
miracle." 

"I'll be glad to come back and try 
again," I nnumbled through bandages as I 
stood on my crutches at the barred gate 
of Ryan Field. 

"Over my dead body," the captain 
screamed. 

I wasn't so fast on crutches and didn't 
believe In miracles any more, either, so I 
kept my fast repartee to myself this time. 



DEFINITION OF A DODO 

Sir, a sir, dodo sir, is sir, a sir, scum sir, 
of sir, the sir, earth sir, who sir, is sir, for 
sir, upperclassmen sir, to sir, wipe sir, feet 
sir, on sir. 

A/C Sarkisian, D. M., 42-F 



Prepare to Rum-Dunn 

I like an exam, 

I think they are fun. 

I never cram, 

And I never rum-dum. 

(I'm the ground school Instructor.) 

A/C BOYDSTUN. W. L, 42-E 



CONTACT 



Page Thirteen 



TO GROUND LOOP OR— 



By A/C BERRY, J. S., 42-E 



A ground loop, one of the most interest- 
ing maneuvers in modern aviation, can be 
accomplished at any altitude, but it's most 
effective on the gorund, that is if you're 
really interested in tearing a wing up. If 
you're not going to shatter a wing, I can 
see very little use in carrying the maneuver 
to its weary end. 

Now, if you don't think a ground loop 
produces a weary end, ask the man who has 
had one — not a weary end, but a ground 
loop. A ground loop once completed is 
actually only the beginning of a long and 
drawn out procedure. 

First, it is necessary to apologize to the 
ground crew, each and every individual, 
for the added work such a precise maneu- 
ver will require. Since numerous forms and 
records must be made, causing added office 
work, it is mere formality to attempt apol- 
ogy toward each — usually not accepted. 

Naturally enough, the flight commander 
would consider your conversation most in- 
teresting — that is, he would certainly make 
it a point to talk to you. Your instructor 
probably — or rather definitely — would have 
his ideas concerning the incident and it is 
polite to listen to him as though you really 
believed it all to be your fault when all the 
time you know it must have been a defect 
in the plane. 

If you are getting tired, this is only the 
beginning. The serious business has not yet 
begun. Last, but far from least, you must 
go to the Army office. This should prove 
very interesting; not only do you say 
"yes sir" and "no sir" a hundred or more 
times, but you also get to hear some very 
good speakers. Of course, so far as the 
mere ground-looper Is concerned, he had 
rather be In his cabin, but to an outsider I 
Imagine the conversation would prove to 
be a worthy one, with a few good thoughts 
thrown In. Yes, at the Army office you 
get a shave, haircut, hot and cold shower 



s a very 



and also an Army wash ride. It' 
clean occasion. 

Oh, by the way. If your plane should start 
to ground loop, kick a rudder, jerk a stick, 
burst the throttle, hit a brake and let nature 
take its course, or something along that 
line; ask your Instructor, he'll tell you how 
to avoid them. As Confuslous once said, 
"It's better to avoid them than to have to 
live with one." I still don't know whether he 
was talking about women or ground loopS' — 
but it's applicable In either case. (Author's 
note: I wonder why my Instructor refused 
to accept this masterpiece.) 



/?auncA/. TAe/ O/Ze /lole. 

5ay^ /yjc^ Pof' To I Liffit C Vv 

ntntPofTo —SIX 

FEET VHD^Rl'' 



Out of ^/ovr Hol^j 




y, Hart-^II^F.e. 



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Class of 42-F^"Do<los 




CONTACT 



Page Fifteen 



Beautiful, Beautiful Texas 

Texas occupies all the continent of North America, except the small part set aside for 
the United States and Canada. Texas owns the North of the Rio Grande, the only dusty 
river in the world; also the only one, with the possible exception of the Trinity, which is navi- 
gable for mud cats and pedestrians. 

Texas is bounded on the North by twenty-five or thirty states, and on the East by all 
the oceans in the world except the Pacific and on the South by the Gulf of Mexico and South 
America, and on the West by the Pacific Ocean, milky way and the real side of the universe. 

If Texas were chopped from the rest of the United States at the Panhandle it would 
float out into the ocean, as it rests upon a vast subterranean sea of fresh water. 

Texas is so big that the people in Brownsville call the Dallas people Yankees and citizens 
of El Paso sneer at the citizens of Texarkana, Texas, as being snobs from the effected East. 

It is 150 miles further from El Paso, Texas to Texarkana, Texas than it is from Chicago 
to New York City; Fort Worth is nearer to St. Paul, Minn., than it is to Brownsville. 

The chief occupation of the people of Texas is trying to keep from making all the 
money in the world. The chief pursuit of the people of Texas was formerly Mexican bandits. 
Now it is land buyers, steers and Texas crop records. 

The United States with Texas off would look like a three-legged Boston Terrier. 

Texans are so proud of Texas that they cannot sleep at night. If a Texan's head should be 
opened the map of Texas would be found photographed on his brain. This is also true of 
his heart. Unless your front gate is 18 miles from your front door you do not belong to so- 
ciety as constituted in Texas. Mrs. King's gate is 150 miles from her front door and she is 
thinking of moving her house back further so that she will not be annoyed by passing auto- 
mobiles and peddlers. 

Other Texas landlords have whole mountain ranges and rivers on their ranches. One 
Texan has forty miles of navigable land on his farm. If the proportion of cultivated land 
were the same as Illinois the value of Texas crops would equal that of the 47 other states. 

Texas has enough land to supply every man, woman and child in the whole world with 
a tract of five by twenty feet, and have enough left over for the armies of the world to march 
around the border five abreast. 

Texas grows alfalfa, which if baled and built into a stairway, would reach to the pearly 
gates. If all hogs In Texas were one hog he would be able to dig the Panama Canal in 
three roots. 

If all the Texas steers were one steer he could stand with his front feet in the Gulf of 
Mexico, one hind foot in the hludson Bay, the other in the Arctic Ocean, and with his horns 
punch holes in the moon, and with his tail brush off the mist of the Aurora Borealls. If all the 
cotton raised in Texas annually were made into one mattress all the people in the world could 
take a nap at one time. 

Rightly, Texas Is named THE GARDEN OF THE WORLD. 



RYAN CADET 




MISS JO ANN BOWEN, Waco, Texas 



CAN PICK 'EM 




MISS LILLIAN TUDOR, Sweetwater, Texas 





MISS MIRIAM PATTY, Los Angeles 




MISS MARGARET ELLEN HOLT, Waco, Texas 



MISS MAURENE KEY, Austin, Texas 



Page Eighteen 



CONTACT 



Ikcse oeautie^ 



One of the most popular spare+ime pas- 
times at Ryan Field is that of gazing woe- 
fully at a picture of the girl that was left 
behind and writing sweet bits of nothing to 
her. On one particular dreary afternoon a 
bunch of the boys got together and formed 
a display of their gorgeous feminine pul- 
chritude. 

From this exhibit, a committee composed 
of Lt. M. D. McCormick and Misses Barbara 
Deane and HIarriet Fink and Daryl H. Smith, 
Ryan employees, picked a Queen of Cadets 
and an attending court. 

When the votes had been counted, Miss 
Jo Ann Bowen, 20-year-old sister of Cadet 
Bob Bowen was the winner. A blond with 
brains. Miss Bowen attended Baylor Uni- 
versity, likes photographic modeling and 
makes her home in Waco, Texas. 

The others are beautiful too. 

Originally from Texas, Miss Miriam Patty, 
Los Angeles, claims she knows Cadet Perry 
McElroy. This particularly pretty contest 
entry has light brown hair, brown eyes, is 
only nineteen, attended Cumnock and takes 
to flying and photographic modeling. 

Miss Maurene Key, Austin, Texas girl, 
still writes Cadet "Mole" Boydstun, but 
hasn't seen his new haircut. This 2 1 -year- 
old red-haired beauty attended Texas U. 
and has a hobby of writing letters, "I hope," 
quoth the mole. 

Miss Margaret Ellen Holt of Waco, Tex- 
as, puts up with Cadet Jack Sunn, via air 
mail. She attended Baylor University, is 21 
years of age and likes "Boogie Woogie." 

Miss Lillian Tudor, Sweetwater sweet- 
heart of Winston "Rock" Bradford, is a 
20-year-old brunette with blue eyes! Danc- 
ing is second in interest only to "Rock." 
What a gal! 



LETTER FROM BILL 

A/C DICKEY, A. R., 42-F 

Dear Emma: 

I'll bet you wouldn't believe it if I told 
you some of the things you have to learn 
to do here before they'll let you fly. Like 
popping-to, rat-racing, chasing rabbits, and 
wiping it off. Also learning word for word 
funny answers to silly questions and singing 
songs about Texas. My first few days here 
I swear I thought I'd gotten into the Texas 
Rangers by mistake. I wish you'd get a 
map somewhere and see where Texas is, 
honey, we ouqhta send some missionaries 
there. Most of these upper-class men never 
even heard of hHeaven. They think that if 
they live right, when they die they'll go to 
San Antonio. Why Emma, these guys actual- 
ly think Sod is bow-legged, has a ten gallon 
hat, and rides around on a horse. 

Love, 
BIIL 



THE DODO'S LAMENT 

J dodo is a bird, they say, 
JFith whicfs loo short to fly; 
But all the iipperclassmen say 
A dodo's just a raunchy guy. 

It's red light, mister, eyes on a point. 
JFhata ya wanta do, buy the joint. 
It's pop-to mister, and pop-to from there, 
You're the raunchiest dodo I ever sazv, I 
swear. 

Do you know your lozverclass customs 
And your general orders, too. You don't? 
JFell, report a couple of gigs, mister, 
That's zvhat you had better do. 

So even though history tells you 
That a dodo is a bird that cannot fly, 
As long as there are iipperclassmen 
.1 dodo is jus I a raunchy guy. 

A/C Alexander, C. C, 42-F 



Page Twenty 



CONTACT 



A TENNESSEE HILLBILLY WRITES HOME 



Dear Mawm, 

I rekkoned yo' all mite think I am dade 
or sumthin, so I 'speck if I have time to 
finish this here letter, you uns will here 
from me soon like. I'll try to discribe this 
here flyin' school as I go along so that the 
rest of the home folks will know what Cali- 
fornee is like here after the postmun reads 
this here letter to you uns. 

We fellers is called Dodoos by the boys 
that wuz here fore we cum here, and we all 
puts up in cabins. Rekon that aint nuthin 
new to me, but maw, yew can tell paw we 
have this new lektrlkity, and runnin warter 
in em. It sho is mitey haindy not tew have 
tew pomp warter tew be takin my Sunday 
bath, and say paw, we have a little stove 
that all I has to do to make the far is tew 
strike a maitch and turn a little gadget and 
whooof — we have a far. One thing that 
sure do cramp my comfit is that my trends 
— city slikkers — that lives with me wont let 
me chaw my terbakky. 

And maw you can let little Willie have 
my overalls to wear till I cum back cause 
this man they calls Unkle Sam has give me 
some plum new ones and everything to 
wear and the boss man says I caint even 
wear my new meetin house overalls I fetch- 
ed with me. I gotten me doubts if I get to 
meetin fast like as it seems as we is being 
done like we uns was done when Willie 
come down with the measles. We has to 
stay here on our on farm for a right smart 
spell yet. 

Mr. Ryan sure has a big kitchen maw but 
I sho'd be hatin to cutten wood fer them 
tremenjous stoves. Gosh, they is most as 
big as the sheep dippin talnk. He has fer 
usns a man cook who feeds us and some of 
his boys, I guess cause they is mostly red 
heds tote out the vittals from the kitchun. 

Paw, member how scairt you gotten the 
day Unkle Zeke brung over his big red 
engine on weels to do the fall plowin? 



Down hyar they has a contrapshun that gets 
plum often the dirt and leaves sight. My 
man whut Mr. Ryan sent here to lam me to 
fly the critter, lowed I'd be tied in but I 
lowed as how I have to be hog tied afore 
they can tote me to it. I guess it's how you 
sed paw that I'm the dernedest youngun 
of the thirteen and I'll most likely try It once 
fer the fun of it. If'n my hide is still togither 
wen I fetch my dogs on tfie dart out of that 
tin bird I rekin you'll here frum me agin. 

Well maw it is most time I went tew feed- 
in and settled down with laarin good chow 
fore the chikkens hole up so tell Willie tew 
feed my sow well afore she furrows and not 
let the crazy critter maish any of them 
suklin pigs. Paw better work the colts afore 
the spring thaw sets in. 

Yore contry boy bein cittified, 
Bub. 



REFLEX ACTION 

Waiter: What will it be, sir? 

First customer : Give me a bottle of pop. 

Second customer : Pop too. 

The sound of breaking dishes at a nearby 
table where a dodo on S.P.O.P. is eating 
brings the manager. 

Manager: Are you 111, sir? 

Dodo : No, sir, just well trained. 

— A/C Perkey, J. E., 42-F 



^0P~ TO / 



3V.OODY 







\s 






Page Twenty-two 



CONTACT 



BLACKOUT 

(JJ^ritten diir'ntg Christmas Eve blackout) 

'Twas the night before Christmas 
And all through the land, 
Not a light was showing, 
And all guns were manned. 

The blankets were hung 
Over windows with care. 
For fear that the Japanese 
Soon would be there. 

When out of the night 
Came a low-throated whine, 
And everyone wished 
That the moon didn't shine. 

A squadron of planes 
Crossed the low-hanging moon. 
And we all held our breaths 
For we knew 'twould be soon. 

The planes swung in low. 

And we watched in the glare 

Of the searchlights which crisscrossed 

And stabbed through the air. 

At last they were caught 
In the beam of the light. 
And everyone breathed forth 
A sigh of delight. 

For there, not the sign 

Of the "Rising Sun," 

But the emblem of Christmas 

Was on every one. 

They came in and landed, 
And pulled up to the line, 
And all of us cheered 
At the welcome sign. 

For who should step down 
From the leading ship. 
But Santa himself, 
All tired from the trip. 

So now with the help 
Of that jolly old rover, 
We pulled d<jwn our blankets 
The blackout was over. 

A/C Westbrook, J. W., 42-F 



DODO'S FIRST LETTER HOME 

Dec. 13, 1941. 
Dear Folks — 

You will know by hearing from me that 
I arrived here all right and that I am O.K. 
However, if you want me to stay in this 
condition, please air mail me your copy of 
Dale Carnegie's book, "How to Win Friends 
and Influence People." 

Lovingly, Rusty. 
A/C Allen, R. G., 42-F 



Here lies New Aviation Cadet Dripjerk, 
Lemuel G., who in his stay at Ryan field: 

Kicked about the food. 

Kicked about the weather. 

Kicned about the leave. 

Kicked about the guard duty. 

Kicked about upperclassmen. 

Kicked about the inspections 
and 

Kicked about the right rudder of a Ryan 
at 20 feet. 
P.S. Now he has his wings. 

A/C West, R. J., 42-F 



TO DOG-FIGHT OR NOT TO 
DOG-FIGHT 

Here lies the body of JFalter Jay; 
He died demanding the right of way. 
He zvas right, dead riglit, as he fleiv along; 
But he's just as dead, as if he'd been wrong. 

A/C Meyers, A. L., 42-F 




"I was a Ryan guard '+fl the Dodos started guarding." 
"Yes? I was a Cadet but I started over to the canteen 
one night." 



Page Twenty-lour 



CONTACT 



f^ebiime ^toivj Witlt Q lUclal 



Once upon a time there were two little 
upperclassmen. One was nicknamed "Ace" 
while the other went by the prefix "hiot 
Pilot." Their lives at Ryan were easy ones, 
until the new year caught up with them 
before they made their resolutions. January 
2nd was a beautiful day, as beautiful days 
go in California. But ah, if only they could 
have foreseen the heartaches and unhaooi- 
ness that were In store for them as they 
skirted over hill and dale In their fleet Ryans. 

Ace, as he was later to be known, was 
Indulging in the pleasant pastime of herd- 
ing sheep up an adjoining ravine. Up flew 
H. P., dipping his wings in friendly recogni- 
tion. Ah, there were two pilots with but a 
single thought — to join forces. 

Down one valley and up another they 
flew, skinning the hilltops and brushing the 
fences with but inches between their wing- 
tips. Blissfully on they flew, in and out of 
ravines, through trees and over rolling plains. 
Tiring of this child's play, they entered Into 
a furious dog-fight; had one been a Jap, 
many times he would have been accounted 
for. As Ace pulled up sharply to avoid 
hitting an innocent cow, he noticed another 
ship winging sharply towards him. "Aha, 
another enemy." If only he had known how 
much of an enemy. Ignorantly he pursued 
him only to find to his dismay that he was 
following an instructor, who evidently was 
not in a playful mood. Needless to say, 
after that unfortunate Incident, the two 
aerial sheepherders proceeded woefully 
back to the field. 

January 3rd was just as beautiful a day, 
plug for the Southern California Chamber 
of Commerce! But it didn't shine for Ryan's 
two problem children, as they found out 
for certain that their illegal maneuvers had 
been apprehended. The flight commander 
suggested that they call upon the captain 
and tell him of their thrilling experiences of 



the day before. Needless to say, the Cap- 
tain was not particularly impressed by their 
tales, due to the things he asked them to 
do. Ace and hi. P. now have private chairs 
in the ready room, complete with their 
names, but they face cold blank corners. 
Also they are allowed to remain on the post 
at all times and may take leisure walks in 
the area whenever they have a little so-iro 
time. And they lived happily ever after. 
® 



INVICTUS TO A DUSTY ON GUARD 

Out of the night that covers me, 
Dark as a pit from post to post, 

I cuss whatever gods may be 
That I'm not in my hole. 

It matters not hozv zvet the night 
How charged with gigs my scroll 

The draft hoard is the master of my fate 
Mr. Knight the captain of my soul. 
A/C Thompson, R. D., 42-F 



HIi KNOWS HIS SEARGENTS 

A negro sergeant was out drilling some 
negro recruits. 

"Eyes right," ordered the sergeant. 

"Of course you's right," said a rear rank 
private, "you's de sergeant, ain't you?" 
A/C Jones, L. M., 42-E 



NO OBJECTIONS 

Recruiting officer: What branch of the 
service do you prefer? 

Civilian : I prefer to fly. 

Officer: Only officers can fly. 

Civilian: That's all right, sir, I have no 
objections to being an officer. 



BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL TEXAS! 
Dodo's definition of Texas : A place where 
rattlesnalces, Gila monsters and upperclass- 
men come from. 

A/C Davis, H. E., 42-F 



CONTACT 



Page Twenty-five 



HERE'S TO 

Here's to the clivuile, 

.111 Ion hot! 

Here's lo the food — 

Thoiiyh ive yet a lot; 

Here's to the ivovien we never see 

Here's to a raiiuchs Dodo — 

Me. 

Here s to the upper class 
JVith a pop-to, mister; 
Here's lo the photo 
I hope's your sister. 

Here's to the leave 
We ain't got yet; 
Here's to the infantry — 
Our hast bet. 

Here's to the planes 
We never fly; 
Here's to the canteen 
Thai don't cjo dry. 

Here's to the tea area 
So big and white; 
So here's lo the poem 
I tried lo write. 

Here's to the Dodo 
With blistered feel; 
Here's to the area 
irith red hoi heal. 

Here's to the brass 
We have to shine; 
Here's to the freedom 
If'e left behind. 



HEMET COUNTRY CLUB 

New Dodoes arriving every few weeks 
from civilian life to the life of the Army Air 
Corps find their duty begins at dawn and 
ends after dusk at the hiemet County Club. 
Ground school Is not to be taken lightly, 
and the possibility of washing out Is always 
present. Nevertheless, another new member 
of the Army has found his opportunity to 
build a foundation for a pleasant future here 
at the Ryan Shcool of Aeronautics. 

Washing out Is not taken as a disgrace by 
any means. There are other sections of the 
Air Corps such as Armaments, Bombardler- 
Ing and Navigation which may be followed 
to further protect our mighty Air Force. 
Flying Is an art and not everyone has the 
ability to meet the requirements of the Air 
Corps. It Is true that any normal young man 
can learn to fly In time. But with the steadi- 
ly Increasing demands of the Army only 
those men who can adapt themselves readi- 
ly to the training will be used for pilots. 

The Army Air Corps offers opportunities 
that may be received only In the Air Corps. 
Army pilots are the best-trained In every 
detail from flying, ground school and phy- 
sical fitness. 

Every new Dodo hopes to receive a com- 
mission In the Army Air Corps within the 
next few months. It's worth the try. 

"Keep 'em flying!" 



HAVE YOU SOLOED YET? 

Upperclassman : How much time do you 
have now, dodo? 

Dodo: I have twenty hours of guard 
duty and twenty minutes of flying, sir. 



Here's to ihe inspection 
We have to pass; 
Here's to Shell 
With its Aerogas. 

Here's lo the mail 
We never get; 
Here's to drill 
.411 toil and sweat. 



Here's lo the draft 
We should have taken; 
Here's to advice 
JVe thought was taken. 

Here's to the home 
We left behind; 
Here's to the Dodoes, 
We jumped in blind. 



Page Twenty-six 



CONTACT 



THE PENALTY OF DRINK" 

— or — 
"Why Be An Upperclassman, Anyway?" 

An Upperclassman had gone to the hot 
place. (All Upperclassmen go to this place 
sooner or later to answer for their sins.) The 
heat there was exactly five times that of 
Hemet, and our hero was not having such a 
hot time. He was being judged for his many 
transgressions against mankind. (These were, 
for the most part, In the form of inhumane 
acts towards Dodoes.) For every gig that 
he had given a Dodo the Upperclassman 
was condemned to a thousand years of coal 
shoveling, and for every rat race or air raid 
he had to pump 1 ,000,000 gallons of molten 
brimstone with an eyedropper. 

As he was making a futile attempt at car- 
rying out his punishment tasks the many 
times that he had made life miserable for 
Dodoes were weighing heavily upon his 
mind. He saw the many clean rooms he had 
torn up at Inspections; he saw the endless 
marching feet of Dodoes that he had so 
mercilessly ordered on the double time. 
These and many other visions continued to 
come to him. At last they became so un- 
bearable that he thereupon vowed that if 
he were ever permitted to return to earth 
that all Dodoes should be treated like kings. 

At that moment the notes of first call 
floated through the open cabin window 
awakening our hero to another Monday 
morning. Due to the fact that his head felt 
like a barrage balloon and that his dream 
had softened his hard heart, for the day he 
only handed out five gigs. 



THE ANALYSIS OF A KISS 

A kiss is a noun because it is both com- 
mon and proper. It Is a pronoun because 
she stands for It. It Is a verb because It 
can be In any mood. It Is a conjunction 
because it joins and connects. It Is an 
adverb because It describes a feeling. It 
is a preposition because It has an object. 
It Is an Interjection because It shows strong 
feeling. 



BREAK OF DAWN 

Oh hear the bugle sounding 
In the midst of early morn; 
It is reville announcing 
Another day has come. 

Another day of marching — 

You'd think it is the infantry; 

If I'd known they marched in the Air Corps 

I'd have joined the cavalry. 

But they say this outfit Is good 
And we must try with all our might; 
But the only good things we've found 
Is taps as sounded at night. 



Could Be, Could Be 

Cadet, in a crowd in front of a theatre: 
Honey, can't we squeeze in here? 

Honey: Gee, Mister, can't we wait until 
we get home? 

A/C JOY, W. B., 42-F 



And How! 

Dodo — observing mock dog-fight: Wow, 
I would certainly hate to be up there in one 
of those things. 

Upperclassman: Well, I would certainly 
hate to be up there without one of those 
things. 



A Ray of Sunshine 

Some men smile at the moon. 

Some men smile at the sun. 

But the man worth while. 

Is the man who can smile 

When he makes a mistake on Form 1. 

A/C MACEY, P. S., 42-F 



CONTACT 



Page Twenty-seven 



Sounding Off.... 



ALCORN, E. G. — From Menard, Texas. Attended Univ. of 
Cincinnati and left with an L.L.B. degree in 1938. 
Had criminal law practice In Ohio and Texas. 

ALLISON, O. E.— Warren, Texas. Stephen F. Austin State 
Teachers College and Texas A.&M. Worted with 
a sawmill crew. 

ARNETT, W. S. — Madisonville, Texas. Sam Houston State 
Teachers College in Huntsville, Texas. B.S. degree. 
Coached athletics. 

ARTUSY, R. L. — Houston, Texas. Univ. of Texas, Univ. South- 
ern Cal., and others. A.B. and M.S. degrees. Re- 
search Geologist and paleontologist for United 
Gas Corp., Houston, Texas. 

BAILEY, F. R. — Nacodoches, Texas. Stephen F. Austin Col- 
lege. Chemical engineer. 

BAILE, W. H. — Port Arthur, Texas. Univ. of Texas and La- 
mar College. Auto mechanic. Also worked for Texas 
Pub. Service Co. in Austin, Peoples Gas Co. in Por^ 
Arthur. 

BECK, C. A. — Marshall, Texas. College of Marshall. Enlisted 
in Army Air Corps as a private prior to present 
training. 

BENSON, W. S.— Austin, Texas. Univ. of Texas student. 

BERRY, B. — Cisco. Texas. Cisco Jr. College. Assistant Mgr. 
Lake Cisco. 

BERRY. J. S. — Texarkana, Texas. Univ. of Texas. B.B.A. de- 
gree. Field clerk at Lone Star Ordnance Plant. Tex. 

BIDELSPACH. F. A.— Waco, Texas. Baylor Univ. Mgr. of 
College Book Store. 

BIESEL. W. H.— Dallas, Texas. Southern Methodist Univ. and 
North Texas Ag. College. Studied Aero Engineering. 

BILLS, R. C. — Dawson, Texas. Texas A.?'M. Worked in DepT. 
of Agriculture, A. A. A. Bureau, College Station, Tex. 

BISCAYART, J. D.— Glendale. California. Sgt. in the Army 
Air Corps. Mechanic with Lockheed. Attended 
Glendale Jr. College. 

BLAIR, J. R. — Fort Worth, Texas. Texas Christian Univ. and 
North Texas State Teachers College. B.S. degree. 

BOCKHAUS. L. R.— Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Carroll College, 
Waukesha, Wis. In the Army at Brooks Field prior 
to training here. 

BOWEN, C. R.— Waco. Texas. Baylor Univ. A.B. degree in 
Journalism. Youth Personnel Director for National 
Youth Administration. 

BOYDSTUN. W. L— Fort Worth, Texas. Graduate of Univ. 
of Texas with B.S. and Ph.G. Registered Pharmacist. 

BRADFORD, W. J. — Sweetwater, Texas, Texas A.&M. Col- 
lege. Worked for the Railway Express Agency. 

BREWER. J. E.— Victoria, Texas. Daniel Baker College and 
North Texas State Teachers College. B S. degree 
in 1938. Musician and band director. Austin, Tevas. 

BRIDGES. C. H.— Wichita Falls, Texas. Hardin Jr. College. 
Worked in the oil fields. 

BRINKMAN, W. E.— Houston, Texas. Univ. of Houston. Den- 
tal Technician 

BROOKS. W. H. — Denton, Texas. Student in North Texas 
State Teachers College and University of Texas. 

BUTLER. E. G. — Austin. Texas. Univ. of Texas. Studied law. 

BUTLER, E. W.— Comanche, Texas. Student at Howard 
Payne College In Brownwood, Texas. 

CANNON. C. C— Stockdale, Texas. Sam Houston State 
Teachers College. Coach in athletics. 

CARR, B. V. — Monticello, Mississippi. Copiah-Lincoln Jr. 
College. Radio operator. 

CARSON, M. H.— Brady, Texas. Texas A.&M. College. Claim 
adiuster for Bryan Motor Co., Bryan, Texas. 

CARTER, R. S. — Galveston. Texas. Texas A.?.'M. College. 
Worked as a roughneck In the oil fields. 



CAWYER. R. D.— Brownwood, Texas. A student in Daniel 
Baker College. 

CEARNAL, A. E. — Brownwood, Texas. Daniel Baker College 
and Tex. Tech. College. A.B. degree. Civil Engineer. 

CHAFFIN. H. G. — Belton. Texas. Southwest State Teachers 
College and Univ. of Texas. B.S. and M.A. degrees. 
Instructor In high school. 

COKE. W. B. JR.— Dallas, Texas. North Texas Agricultural 
College at Arlington, Texas. 

COLE, C. L. — Harlingen, Texas. Student at North Texas 
State Teachers College. 

CONLIN, J. D. — Brownwood. Texas. Daniel Baker College 
and John Brown Univ.. Siloam Springs. Ark. Worked 
as clerk in Post Exchange. 

COOSE, R. M. — San Antonio, Texas. Univ. of San Antonio. 

COULTER. A. N. — San Angelo. Texas. Student of Daniel 
Baker College. A sheet metal worker and carpen- 
ter's helper. 

CROWELL, R. S.— Austin, Texas. Pennsylvania State College 
and Univ. of Teas. Research chemist, welder, the- 
atre director and artist. 

CUMMINGS. D. D. — Luling. Texas. Texas Lutheran College. 
Seguin. Texas. Studied Drafting. 

DAVIS, R. A. — Albany. Texas. Oklahoma Univ. Was an en- 
listed man in the Air Corps at Goodfellow Field. 
San Angelo, Texas. 

DENTON, H. L.— Quitman, Texas. North Texas State Teach- 
ers College. Science teacher in Quitman High sch. 

DOELL, O. T. JR. — San Angelo. Texas. Univ. of Texas. Com- 
mittee clerk in the Texas Legislature. 

DONHAM, E. R. D. — Cisco, Texas. A. A. degree from Cisco 
Junior College In 1940. He says he's a student in 
Civilian Life. 

DOWDY. R. W.— Amarlllo. Texas. Texas Technological Col- 
lege. B.S. degree in architecture. Worked as Archi- 
tectural draftsman. 

DRAUGHON, M. — Temple, Texas. Univ. of Texas. Employ- 
ed In the signal dept. of the Santa Fe Railroad. 

EVANS, H. O. — Westminster, Texas. East Texas State Teach- 
ers College and Univ. of Arkansas. 

FERGUSON. J. C. — San Angelo. Texas. San Angelo Jr. Col. 

FOSTER, A. L. JR. — San Antonio. Texas. Southwest Texas 
Teachers College. Studied industrial arts. 

FOX, R. V. — Brownwood. Texas. Howard Payne College 
graduate. Was Jr. Engineer Aide in the Civil Serv. 

FRAYSHER, V. L.— El Monte, Calif. San Luis Obispo Jr. 
College. Was an enlisted man in the Air Corps be- 
fore flight training. 

FROEHNER. R. B. — San Antonio, Texas. B.A. degree from 
Southwestern Univ. Taught school in Bay City, Tex. 

FRY, R. A. — Tyler. Texas. Georgia Tech. Professional Bowler. 

GAMARD, E. W. — San Antonio, Texas. Mechanical Engineer- 
ing at Texas A.&M. Worked as accountant for the 
Housing Authority in San Antonio. 

GERICK, H. — Cameron, Texas. John Tarleton A.&.M. Work- 
ed for Texas Construction Company. 

GILILLAND, J. V.— Dallas, Texas. Student in Texas A.S'M. 
College. 

GODDARD, G. M. — Ennis. Texas. Student in North Texas 
State Teachers College. 

GRACE. J. D. — Sweetwater. Texas. Univ. of Texas. B.S. de- 
gree. Superintendent of Recreation. 

GREEN, D. S.— Houston. Texas. Rice Institute from 1931-41 
with B.S. degree. An oil magnate (Shell Oil Co.) 

GREEN, T. C. — Raymondville, Texas. Univ. of Texas. Did 
research work in Genetics. 



Page Twenty-eight 



CONTACT 



GREGG, J. R. — Eustace, Texas. B.S. degree from Sam Hous- 
ton State Teachers College, Assistant director of 
education, Texas State Prison system, 

GROUNDS, W. C— Fort Worth, Texas. North Texas Agricul- 
tural College. Worked for T. & P. Packing Company. 

GUNN, J. W. — Waco, Texas. Baylor Univ. B.A. degree. Ser- 
vice reporting. 

GWYN, R. L. — Temple, Texas. Temple Jr. College. Whole- 
sale Grocer. 

HART, W. J. JR.— Fort Worth, Texas. Texas A.&M, College. 
Worked in west Texas oil fields. 

HENDRICKS, R. E.— Fort Worth, Texas. Kemper Junior Col- 
lege, Texas Univ. and Texas Christian Univ. Meter 
installer. 

HETHERINGTON, T. F. JR.— San Antonio, Texas. Texas A. 
&M. College. Clerk and stenographer. 

HIERONYMOUS, W. M. JR.— Temple, Texas. Texas Tech- 
nological College. Secy, of the Temple Chamb'^r 
of Commerce. 

HOLLIS, W. N.— Abilene, Texas. Texas A.&M. College. 
Studied engineering. Worked as a shipfitter. 

HORTON, H. E.— Eastland, Texas. B.S. degree from North- 
western Univ. Salesman for Sieberling Rubber Co. 

HOWARD, J. W.— Austin, Texas. Student in the University 
of Texas. 

HUTTON, J. W.— Los Angeles, Calif. B.A. degree from 
University of Southern Calif. Commercial artist. 

JENNINGS, T. B.— Garland, Texas. Texas A.&M. College. 
Worked in A.A.A. office. 

JONES, E. B.— Chico, Calif. B.A. degree from Chico State 
College. 

JORDAN, E. G.- — Mason, Texas. B.B.A. degree from Univ. 
of Texas. 

KEMPER, G. A. JR.— Pearsall, Texas. Student In the John 
Tarleton Agricultural College. Worked as air- 
port attendant. 

KERR, J. N. JR.— Sanderson, Texas. St. Mary's Univ. of 
Texas. Worked as a rancher near Sanderson. 

KESTERSON, J. D.— Oroville, Calif. Univ. of Calif. College 
of Agriculture, Davis, Calif. Logging truck driver. 

KING, R. E.— Zanesville, Ohio. Ohio and Ohio State Uni- 
versities. Enlisted man. Was Assistant Crew Chief 
of the line at Luke Field. 

KINGSBURY, T. A.— Merkel, Texas. Texas A.S'M., Abilene 
Christian College, and St. Mary's Univ. Did Oil 
field work. 

KIRKPATRICK, C. E.— Taft, Texas. Student In Abilene Chris- 
tian College. 

KNIGHT, J. E. — Electra, Texas. Petroleum engineering major 
at Texas A.&M., John Tarleton, and Southwest Texas 
State Teachers Colleges. Worked In oil field. 

KORMAN, J. G.— Taylor, Texas, Attended Texas A.&M. 
College. 

KUHNS, J. B.— Ponca City, Oklahoma. Attended Unlversit/ 
of Missouri. 

LAXSON, M. E. — Pearsall, Texas. B.S. from Southwest Texas 
State Teachers College. Coached sports. 

LEFFLER, G. V.— Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. Plattsville Teachers 
College and Univ. of Wise. Instructor In Arma- 
ments at Lowry Field, Denver, Colorado. 



LESLIE, G. J. — Bajley, Texas. Student in Texas A.S.'M. and 
East Texas State Teachers Colleges. 

LEWIS, J. E.— Mllford, Texas. Hillsboro Jr. College and 
Texas A.&M. Engaged in Sheep and cattle raising. 

LEWTER, H. I. — Houston, Texas. Took Civil Engineering at 
Rice Institute, Texas. 

LOCKHART, C. L— Arp, Texas. Attended John Tarleton 
College. 

LONDON, H. G.— Denton, Texas. Attended North Texas 
State Teachers College. 

LONG, R. H. — Abilene, Texas. B.A. degree from McMurry 
College, LL.B. degree from Univ. of Texas. 

MADDOX, W. D.— Wellington, Texas. Texas Tech. and Wea- 
therford College. Worked as Shoe Salesman. 

MADELEY, A. C. — ^Temple, Texas. B.S. degree from North 
Texas State Teachers College. 

MARSHALL, L. H. — Heidenhelmer, Texas. B.S. degree from 
Texas A.&M. College. Soil surveyor for the depart- 
ment of Agriculture and taught Agriculture. 

MARTIN, E. L. — Spur, Texas. Student in New Mexco High- 
lands University. 

McCARTY, B. S.— Dallas, Texas. North Texas State Teachers 
College and Southern Methodist Univ. Pipe cutter 
by trade. 

McCLlNTOCK, R. A.— Port Arthur, Texas. East Texas State 
Teachers College. Worked as Department Clerk for 
The Texas Company. 

McDonald, M. T.— Abilene, Texas. B.B.A. from Univ. of 
Texas. Worked for the Wholesale Grocery Company. 

McELROY, P. B. JR. — Brownwood, Texas. Howard Payne 
College. Salesman for Dublins Inc., Brownwood. 

McMATH, J. L. — Denton, Texas. Student in North Texas 
State Teachers College. 

NAMLE, J. P.— Sacramento, Calif. B.S. from Univ. of Ne- 
vada. Assistant engineer, Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Co. 

NEW, L. JR. — Shreveport, Louisiana. University of Texas. 
Was dispatcher for United Gas Pipeline Co. 

NICHOLSON, M. H.— Houston, Texas. Texas A.&l. Col. 
lege. Was Airplane mechanic In the Army Air Corps. 

ORTIZ, C. O. — Alamosa, Colorado. Attended St. Benedict, 
Atchison, and Holy Cross Univ. Enlisted in the 
Army before flight training. 

SAMS, W. W. — Sallna, Kansas. Student In Kansas State 
College. 

SMITH, B. M. JR. — Beaumont, Texas. Studied law In the 
University of Texas. 

SPENCE, R. W.— Tyler, Texas. B.B.A. from University of 
Texas, Also a law student there. 

STROUD, H. A. JR.— Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Student of 
Central State College in Edmond, Oklahoma. 

TAYLOR, G. P.- McAllen, Texas. Edinburg Jr. College, and 
University of Texas. 

TERHORST, G. E.— Terre Haute, Indiana. University of Cali- 
fornia. Was a railroad employee. 

WHEELER, J. P.— Austin, Texas. Attended West Point and 
Schreiner Inst. B.A. degree from Univ. of Texas. 
Worked for Texas Dep't of Education. 



CONTACT 



Page Twenty-nine 



My Culinary Orders Are: 



1. To take charge of this steak and all 
desserts in view. 

2. To watch my plate in a diligent man- 
ner, keeping always on the alert for any sec- 
onds that come within sight or smell. 

3. To regurgitate all napkins that are ob- 
structing my throat. 

4. To report all peeps from eggs more 
distant from fresh than my own. 

5. To quit my table only when hunger is 
properly relieved. 

6. To receive, smell, and pass on to the 
man who sits next to me all plates of onions, 
cabbage, asparagus and uncooked spuds 



from the kitchen only. 

7. To talk to no one except when through 
eating. 

8. To give the alarm in case of beans or 
custard. 

9. To call the Mess Sergeant in case of 
any chops not covered with gravy. 

10. To salute all ice cream, and all steaks, 
pork chops and chickens not too tough to 
eat. 

M . To be especially watchful of my plate 
and, during the time for reaching, to chal- 
lenge all paws on or near my plate and to 
allow no one to get more dessert than my- 
self. A/C Crowe!!, R. S., 42-E. 



\L/ 




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DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
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EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

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Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
you by the name on your individual bundles of 
Dry Cleaning and Laundry. 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 
300 E. Devonshire Phone 250 



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Headquarters for 

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In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 

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Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 



( 




t 




•-'>» 




Air Corps Training: Detachment 

Ryan School of Aeronautics 

Hemet, California 

CLASS 42-F 



=>#^^ 



»^^ii 



GROHl 



Rest 



e'i 




ass 



^2-7 



ADAMS, WILLIAM C. 
ALBRIGHT, CECIL L, JR. 
ALEXANDER, CHARLES C. 
ALLAIN, MARTIN D. 
ALLEN, RUSSELL G. 
ATKIN, ROBERT J. 
BAILEY, JOEL L, JR. 
BANKSON, MACK W. 
BASSETT, HOWARD D. 
BEHRENS, LEO S. 
BELL, WILLIAM F. 
BENJAMIN, RICHARD L 
BERK, HERBERT B. 
BIBB, EARL J. JR. 
BIGGERS, HAROLD C, JR. 
BILLINGS, JACK T. 
BORIGHT, LAVERN K. 
BOWMAN, CHARLES G. 
BOWMAN, PATRIC 
CALLICOTT, NORFLEET, JR. 
CAPES, LAWRENCE B. 
CARBONELL, HENRI J. 
CARLSON, BURT D. 
CHAMBERLAIN, GORDON C. 
CHANDLER, JACK W. 
CHERRY, ALBERT W. 
CHITTICK, JAMES C. 
CLARK, LAWRENCE D. 
CLEMENS, JOHN M. 
COMMANDER, JACK B. 
DAVIS, HARRY E., JR. 
DAVIS, WALTER E. 
DAY, SCOTT C. 
DICKEY, JOHN R., JR. 
DROOGAS, HARRY C. 
DUNN, LAMAR J. 
ELDRIDGE, HIXON B. 
ELY, THEODORE B. 
EPPERSON, GEORGE B. • 
ERWIN, GEORGE P. 
FELDER, IRVING M. 
FIELDS, JERRY S. 
FITZGERALD, CHARLES K. 



FOWLER, EDGAR C. 
FRANKLIN, ROBERT S., JR. 
GARBER, DALE D. 
GARRISON, LT. EDWIN H. 
GOLSON, CHARLES O., JR. 
HANCOCK, JOSEPH E., JR. 
HARTUEB, JOHN R. 
HIBBETT, CHARLES Y. 
HILL, RAYMOND D., JR. 
HOEFLER, GEORGE E. 
HOWARD, WALTER R. 
JORDAN, EDWARD L 
JOY, WILLARD B. 
KRISTALL, NATHAN 
LANE, EDWARD W. 
LATIMER, JAMES T. 
LEBO, JULIAN I. 
LENTZ, LUCIEN 
LITTLETON, JOE 
LUKE, JOHN D., JR. 
LYONS, FRANCIS S. 
MACEY, PAUL S., JR. 
MAGANI, AUGUSTUS F. 
McCLENDON, JAMES H. 
McGILL, PAUL E. 

McLaughlin, willis j. 
mcmillian, cecil m., jr. 
meyers, albert l 
miller, charles f. 
miller, robert f. 
moore, dan w. 
morrison, dwight l 

NORRED, WILLIAM S. 
OBERG, JOHN A. 
PENN, GEORGE 
PERKEY, JOHN E. 
RAMOS, LAMAR A., JR. 
RAY, DONALD M. 
REYNOLDS, WILLIAM J. 
RICE, REX A. Q. 
ROBERTS, CHARLES B., JR. 
ROLLINS, JOHN W. 
ROSE, JAMES P., JR. 



ROYER, WILLIAM E., JR. 
RUBINSTEIN, DOUGLAS H., JR. 
SARKISIAN, DICKRAN M., JR. 
SCHNATZ, EUGENE P. 
SHULER, LUCIEN B. 
SINEATH, FARLEY R., JR. 
SORDELETT, WINFREE A. 
SORENSON, SHERARD A. 
STEELE, FRED A. 
SUSSDORF, PAUL B. 
SWAGGERTY, STUART B. 
TAYLOR, GLENN W. 
TAYLOR, JAMES L. 
THOMAS, JESSEE C. 
THOMPSON, RODERICK D. 
TIDWELL, SAMUEL A., JR. 
TIMMONS, LAMAR S. 
TINGLEY, JOHN A. 
TOMLINSON, ARCHIE B. 
TRABUE, NELSON T. 
TRUELOVE, AUGUSTUS A., JR. 
TURNER, JOHN B. 
UMSTEAD, WILEY L. 
WALLACE, RALPH G. 
WALLEY, FRED J. 
WARE, CHARLES E., JR. 
WATKINS, CLARENCE A., JR. 
WELLS, PERRY P. 
WENDUNG, GEORGE V. 
WESLEY, BRYANT V. 
WEST, ROBERT J. 
WESTBROOK, JOSEPH W., JR. 
WHEAT, CURTIS E., JR. 
WHITAKER, GORDON 
WHITE, FLOYD 
WHITEHEAD, JULIAN S. 
WHITMORE, ALEXANDER P. 
WILKES, CHARLES E. 
WITHROW, JOE D. 
YOCUM, NOBLE H. 
YOUNG, DAVID E. 
YOUNG, WILLIAM M. 



PUBLISHED BY 

Kufin ^cltool cl Qeionauiics 

HEMET, CALIF. 

FEBRUARY 20, 1942 



i 

! 



I 
i 



SOME STAFF 

Callicotf, N. (None) Jr. (19066916) Editor by mistake 

Benjamin, R. L Associate by necessity 

Atkin, R. J. (Eyes and EARS of the World) Literary Editor 

Chandler, J. C H. T. (Hot Typist) 

Bowman, P Foreign Correspondent 

A Flock of Looies Beauty Contest 

Ludlow, Brashear, Auld, Conlee, etc Cartoonists 

Lt. Graham, J. (with mustache) Editorial Advisor 

Cooper, R Credit Manager 

Lt. Sather Shutter Bug 



1 



1 

I 

-4 



This magazine, known to Its many readers as "Contact," is printed on demand by a group of 
lost souls in all the spare time afforded them here on the spacious grounds of Ryan Country Club, 
Hemet, California. Subscriptions and all correspondence regarding them is purely coincidental and 
besides, this staff is too busy with editorial policies to quibble with such trivial matters. This 
edition is destined, however, to become one of the book-dividends of the Book-of-the-Month Club, 
so be sure you are a member of good standing. 




19066916 

(Which means A/C C 
Norfleet, 



cott. 
None] Jr. Editor) 



CAL SEZ: 

Yes, siree, we've done it again. You 
just can't keep a super, super magazine 
down. We get so many left-over articles 
from everybody here at the country club 
they're bound to find type enough somep- 
lace to print the darn thing. So, I played a 
little politics and assembled this superb staff 
who will present to you in their own inimit- 
able style a brand new Contact. Contact 
sees all, knows all, and prints nothing worth 
while, but if it will help you recall your 
friends and carefree days at dear old Ryan, 
the staff will be more than repaid for its 
efforts. 



w 


^c^ 


i 


1 


bv^^^ir-^ 


f 


i 


^ 


■ 



CAPT. W. S. FORD. 

Take one look af those 
pictured below. Maybe 
Mr. Darwin was right. 



«>*^ if :-'-', '^"-s.'tTijr.Ti;" 




LT. R. D. CAPE 

Wolf, er — I mean Rolf, 
is now rushin' a Rus- 
sian. 




LT. D. D. CONNARC 

Doc, would you mind 
explaining that again? 




^ 



J 



CAPT. M. O. DART 

This won't hurt much — 
Mi Gawd he fainted. 




LT. R. S. DAVID 

He dictates a grade 
slip: Chandelles — beau- 
tiful; Lazy Eights — 
When do we get mar- 
ried; Grade — unsatis- 
factory. 




LT. E. H. GARRISON 

"I don't want to set the 
world on fire. Not 
much." 



jrsrf- -^»^^es<^,y^''ia^Si^>ii^ - 







LT. J. K. GRAHAM 

The guy what ain't go- 
ing to be seen much 
of, after the above pic- 
tured officers read this 
page. 




LT. C. R. MclNTYRE 

I don't care what you 
all say, I'm still going 
to get married — I think. 



LT. A. J. HADWIN 

Maybe I don't under- 
stand this game? 





1st LT. R. L. MERRILL 

Woops! I said cough, 
not jump. 



1st LT. A. S. HOWELL 

Men. the present sit- 
uation calls for every- 
one pitching In. I'll call 
and raise. 



LT. C. E. JENSEN 

Pass the potatoes, but 
don't go out of your 
way. 



LT. M.D.M'CORMACK 

I'm holding my nose 
and shutting my eyes 
so I won't dilute It. 




1st LT. S. J. SATHER 

Yes, dear; Yes, dear; 
Yes. dear — just told the 
wife off. 



CAPT. O. B. STEELY 

Look me in the eye, 
Mister. You don't have 
to get on your knees — - 
or do you? 



MR. R. D. COOPER 

Her kisses were heav- 
enly — I don't care if 
she was a Ubangi. 



PAGE TWO 




Ground school instructors pictured above are, left to right: J. H. KEESEE, L. F. BRISTOL, R. E. BUTLER, 
P. PIERCE, H. RAINE, H. LANDRY and E. M. WEIDINGER. (D. RAINE not pictured). 

Why Ground SchooL. 



or, YOU CAN CHAIN DOWN THE 
BODY BUT NOT THE MIND 

An instructor stands before his class, 
trymg frantically to penetrate the collec- 
tive bone. As he didacts, he cannot help 
thinking: 

"Mm, what a drowsy-looking crew; 
I'll bet I know where they were last night. 
. . . Lucky thing I'm giving out today with 
that fascinating stuff on adiabatic lapse 
rates — that'll keep 'em awake. . . . Wow, 
what an irrelevant question! What was 
the fellow thinking about? . . . And what 
does he expect me to know about the 
expansion and contraction of plumbing 
fixtures, anyway? . . . Ah, I'm gripping 
again! That homespun analogy about 
Luxing their lingerie really got 'em! Now 
to plant the point before those brain- 
cells have a chance to relax. . . . What 
happens in the back of the room? ! ! 
hlold a bull-session in my classroom, will 
they! hHere's where I go into my atten- 
tion-commanding whisper-act. . . Curses, 
it always worked before! . . . Now I'm in 
the soup for sure — running three minutes 
behind time and Cadet Quibble has to 



grab the floor. Quibble, prepare to sub- 
merge! . . . Too late! The worst has hap- 
pened — three sleepers. Boy, are they 
ever in the cockpit — twitching at imag- 
inary controls, like dreaming dogs. Air- 
scoops open, and all. Sleepers, prepare 
to spin in! . . . Now whatever was so 
complicated about that explanation? 
Guess I'll have to shoot the Basic English 
to them for a while. . . . Ah, a gleam of 
interest! Will I ever cultivate you, my 
cherished individualist! . . . The dreamers 
are getting nervous now, but they aren't 
listening. What's up? Oh, yes, period's 
nearly over. They're poised for a race 
to the post office, no doubt. I hope 
they're luckier than I; no letter from Baby 
now for two days. . . . There goes that 
buzzer — they're off. . . . What vitality! 
What eagerness! What alertness! . . . 
My kingdom for the magic words!!! . . ." 
The instructor unscrews his brow at 
length, forces a shrug, takes from his pocket 
a sinister-looking small box, removes from 
it two aspirin tablets, bolts them dry, and 
rushes to the Canteen for a restorative 
Coca-Cola. 



PAGE THREE 



PARODY ON "TREES" 

(With Apologies to Joyce Kilmer) 
I think that I shall never see 
A girl refuse a meal that's free. 
A girl whose hungry eyes aren't laid 
Upon a drink that's being made. 
A girl who doesn't like to wear 
A lot of junk to match her hair. 
Girls like this are loved by me, 
For who in hell would kiss a tree. 



CEILING ZERO 

Hark, all you Dodos, before you start flyin' 
I'll tell you about a cadet named O'Brien. 
Just one little error was made by our hero, 
His ship was O.K. but the ceiling was zero. 

He learned all his dual, and his solo was 

dandy; 
He became quite proficient, with a plane he 

was handy. 
When he did acrobatics, the crowd watched 

agog. 
But his one big mistake was to fly Into a fog. 

The mists closed about him, he lost sight of 

land; 
The throttle and joy stick were tight in his 

hand. 
He flew by his compass, but his fuel was 

depleted. 
He had to do something before this flight 

was completed. 

With a prayer on his lips as he headed her 
down, 

That he'd not hit a mountain but would land 
on the ground; 

The Good Lord was with him; the fog clear- 
ed away, 

And right there beneath him was a field 
filled with hay. 

The moral contained here is plain as can be. 
The one named above had pure luck you can 

see. 
So if you would like to become a great hero. 
Don't try any flying when the celling is zero. 

Banta, E. L. 



RYAN FLYING COFFIN 

Sputter, sputter, little Ryan, 
What on earth keeps you flyin, 
Up above the world so high 
Like a lawn mower in the sky. 

First you quiver, then you shake 
Giving us the belly ache. 
Then you sputter; next you choke 
I hardly know just when you'll croak. 

You drive like a mule and buck like a bronc. 
God only knows the time you'll conk. 
Dive like a rock, spin like a feather; 
Only a prayer will keep you together. 

But as long as Uncle Sam keeps buyin' 
That's plenty good with Mr. Ryan. 
So we'll dig a grave for a Cadet named Ned, 
'Cause that damned Kinner conked out dead. 

Bowman, P. 
Ryan, W. E. 
Thompson, R. D. 




AN "OWED" TO IGNORANCE 
A dodo to Ryan did come. 
Who thought ground school 
More drudgery than fun. 
He started his engine, 
With gow, not attention. 
And blew it to Kingdom Come. 

Deane Raine 



PAGE FOUR 




I. Solid comfort ... 2. Flymg coffins ... 3. Ain't it a shame ... 4. Hi yo. Mole — away! ... 6. Any day men . . . 

7. Preparing for inspection ... 8. Ranch style ... 9. Four of a kind ... 10 The squad car . . . II. Palm Springs play 

thing ... 12. Something new has been added ... 13. You should stay out of those games ... 14. "Keep 'em Flying". . . 
15. Them days are gone forever ... 1 6. An H. P. on parade ... 17. The flying cowboy. 

PAGE FIVE 




Inspecflon Eve. 

Letter to Elsie,,. 

January 18, 1942 
Monday Morning 
Dearest Elsie: 

Well, here I am on a beautiful Southern 
California morning waiting on the Flight 
Line. And, thank Sod, I go up fourth so 
that air will have a chance to gain a few 
calories from the much publicized Califor- 
nia sun. 

hiad a wonderful day yesterday. Slept 
till noon after being tired from the previous 
Saturday night — you know, the life of an 
Aviation Cadet — just fly around all day, 
with Wine, Women and the Dance in the 
evening. I attended the dance for four 
hours on Saturday night. It's strictly formal 
around here — to ask for a dance you must 
say, "Halt, who goes there?" Don't you 
think that's a funny way to ask for a dance. 
One of the lads danced so much that he 
almost got pneumonia. Personally, I think 
he just had a Red Face cause they wouldn't 
let him dance a little longer. 



Well, to get on with my tale — after get- 
ting up at noon yesterday, it left me in a 
fine fettle. Ah, yes, I was really invigorated. 
So, to unburden some of my abounding 
energy, I eased up to the O.D.'s hut and 
got an S.P.O.P. I tore off to Riverside with 
Mr.s Benjamin, Bowman and Carbonell. 
We had a lovely time and went to the 
show. Saw that Warner Brothers epic, 
"They Died With Their Boots On." this 
twenty-eight cent rate is hard to beet, 
even for a Warner Brothers picture. 

V/ell, after the sit In the show, we bounc- 
ed over to the Somerset hlouse — a simply 
delightful spot in the heart of the River- 
side Bright Strip. Meade Lux Lewis, the 
master of the Boogie- Woogie type of jive, 
was on the menu. hHe went on from nine 
till two. hie was really good — we left at S 
to get back to our little bunks. But they 
say he's really good. 

I nad a steak sandwich with French Fried 
spuds and onions. I managed to stab four 
cadets in the ensuing dogfight — one more 



3nd 



have been an Ace. The onion I did 



finally manage to salvage from the horrible 




"I Doubt If Burks Has Sufficient Self-Conlidence." 



PAGE SIX 



wreckage of the debacle kept reminding 
me all night of my terrible miistake, but i 
guess that's the price one must pay for a 
good aim. It was a marvelous piece of work, 
getting that onion, if I say so myself. I out- 
maneuvered four bloodthirsty airmen by 
grasping a knife firmly in my strong right 
hand and catching them off guard with Ihe 
aid of split vision out of my left eye. This 
added anatomical aid enabled your warrior 
to deftly stab with a single prong of a fork 
clutched in his left hand the above mention- 
ed delicacy. 

Then to drown my sorrows from the hor- 
rible sight, I tried to ease my shattered 
mind and relieve the deadening tension 
with a few aids of the great god Bacchus. 
A few didn't work so I had a few more. The 
rest of the lads dropped out of the race 



due to the gastronomic disturbance, it 
looked like I would have to do so myself 
but for an entirely different reason — I was 
suffering from cramps in the left hind pock- 
et. But my nearest competitor, Mr. Charlie 
Bowman, came forth like the true comrade 
that he is and refueled my now almost 
depleted resources. Time marched on. 

Slowly our defeated foes carried us out 
to our awaiting car and zoom we were back 
in hiemet. We were a happy lot, we were. 
Yes, dear, Mr. Boman, P. and C. S. and 
Mr. Benjamin. But Mr. Carbonell wasn't 
too happy. It seems that he had imbibed 
in a little too much second-hand cigarette 
smoke. That is the fatal mistake when one 
tries to be an Aviation Cadet and continue 
his Charles Atlas course at the same time. 

So off we trundled to bed — this happy 

(Continued on page 14) 







PAGE SEVEN 



IN YOUR HOLE, DO DO fr 



Q- 




GUARD DUTY 

A green recruit was on guard for the 
first time. He had just been told exactly 
what to do and the essentials of challeng- 
ing. He was walking his post in a nnilitary 
manner when a Captain approached him. 
The guard said "HALT!" The Captain halt- 
ed and remained so for a few minutes, but 
the guard said nothing. So the Captain 
started advancing again. The guard com- 
manded "HALT!" The Captain halted and 
waited again. Still the guard said nothing. 
The Captain grew tired of waiting and 
said, "What are you going to do now?" 
The guard replied, "Wait until you move 
again and holler halt for the third time — 
then shoot you." 

PURIFOY, L L 



LAST REQUEST 

Cadet Board: Washee, what is your last 
request from us? 

Washee: Sir, I want to meet the mole! 



ADVENTURER 

A group of tourists were on a sight-seeing 
tour in Europe. They were shown a volcano 
and told that it was one of the few remaining 
active volcanos left in the world. Looking 
down into its fiery center, an American in 
the group said, "It looks like Hell, doesn't 
it?" An Englishman hearing the remark 
said, "By God, these Americans have been 
everywhere!" 



A DODO'S FIRST LANDING 

/ circled the field at 500 feet; 

The controls of the "PT" were handling 

sweet. 
I cut the motor, but forgot to glide, 
Before I knew it, I was in a slide. 

I pulled her out, hut then she stalled. 
I'm afraid my instructor saw it all. 
At last I got her on the beam. 
And found my flight had been a dream! 



GUESS WHO? 
/ know how homely I are; 
I know my face ain't no star; 
But still I don't mind it. 
Because I'm behind it; 
It's the guy in front gets the jar. 

Jackson, O. M. 



THEY'LL DO IT EVERYTIME 

Dodo making first trip to mess hall, sit- 
ting, gazing about as though inspecting: 

UPPERCLASSMAN: Dodo, do you want 
to buy the place? 

DODO: Yes, sir. Do you have change for 

a quarter? 

MILLER, C. M. 



PAGE EIGHT 




;^/.W;.«'^yV.ii' 



PAGE NINE 




MY FIRST DAY AT RYAN 

Came into post . . . I'm an Army Pilot. 
. . . Upperclassmen — swell guys! ! Let me 
carry your bags, Mister; do you play ten- 
nis? Did you bring your skis? POP TO! ! ! 

Report a gig! ! ! But, sir, I . Report 

two gigs! ! ! What's your cabin number, 
mister? Got a car? Why not? POP TO! ! ! 
Who's the father of . . . are you laughin', 
Dodo?? Wipe it off; POP TOOOO, Dodo!!! 



Throw it on the ground, pick it up . . . stick 
it . . . Report a gig. Oh hum — mess; get 
some sleep . . . good warm bed . . . happy, 
sleeping, contented. RAT RACE! ! ! You're 
In the control tower, mister, and you're a 
bomber. . . Wipe it off, mister. Report a 
gig, gig, gig, gig. 9 o'clock — finally to 
bed . . . disgusted, disillusioned, mad, grip- 
ped, angry and sore. Would you rather be 
somewhere else, mister? ? hHELL NO! ! ! 

RICE, L. H. 




SOLO! 




"Tell Hon. Cadet me velly slorry. Do not know where 
Ryan Field is." 



PAGE TEN 



DISAPPOINTED PILOTS 

//(';■(' -zvc (ill sit, jiist iviiit'uig about 
Ycarn'incj for some officer to stand up and 

shout. 
Giving us orders that would leave us no 

doubt, 
That ive ivere all leaving, no matter what 

route. 

The Doc's looked us over and tore us apart. 
As pilots, he told us zve'd better not start. 
If? tried putthig together all of the bits. 
But, alas, no avail — we zvore out our wits. 

JJ'c're a pretty good bunch and not prone to 

boast ; 
But ['m sure of one thing, we all zvould like 

most 
If some kindly officer, acting as ho si, 
fVotdd get us off this Gol-darned post. 

One thing we've learned, even though it's 

too late.. 
JJe knew it for sure when we entered the gate. 
That the old army saying we've all come to 

hate. 
Is "Hurry and get there so you'll have 

longer to wait." 

Jackson, O. M. 



SUGGESTED MOTTO FOR AIR CORPS 
IN 1942 

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Japanese! 





A/C Smith, c. F. 
"And when ah says eyes right, ah wants to hear then 
eyeballs click!" 



IN MEMORIAM 

THERE'S A DIFFERENCE 

/ got up just before dawn, 
Jerked on my boots and hit for the ham. 
Fed the horses and milked the cow, 
Geared old "Dobbin" and started the plow. 

I get up here way before dawn. 

Fall out for exercise on the lawn; 

Then it's "Pop-to" and "Back in your ship," 

And fly to formation with my grip. 

JFhen I was young and followed the plow, 
I knew no difference between a Ryan and a 

cow. 
I was quite a whiz at pulling "Bessie's" 

udder, 
But I doubt if I'll learn to use a Ryan's 

rudder. 



Bailey, J. L. 



PAGE ELEVEN 



REVERIES OF 
THE GUARD 



Ouch! Damn that bench! Why don't 
those mechanics put their things away? A 
fellow could break his neck tripping over 
the stuff they throw around. 

Hmm, 2:30. Only an hour and a half to 
go — round and round and up and down 
these dratted airplanes. Why did Mabel 
have to see "I Wanted Wings"? Maybe 
the draft board would have missed me! 
Oh well, too late to beef now. Duration 
plus six months. Wonder if she'll wait? 
Boy, when I get my commission, and those 
bars on my shoulders, I'll sure show . 

Hey! What's that. Oh Lord, here comes 
someone and I have to halt him and go 
through all that. Lord, strike him dead, or 
— or — strike me dead. Do something — 
Ohhh! It's Lieutenant Howell. 

Halt, Lt. Howell! Who goes there? . . . 





To Be Especially V/atchful At Night . . . 



PAGE 



<-n\fc-r 



Now what did I say that should make him 
laugh? Does he think this is funny? I ought 
to — boy, I'm glad he's gone. 

Ouch! There's that damned bench again. 
Those mechanics. . . . Wonder how many 
steps around this post. One, two, three, 
four, . . . seven hundred forty-one, seven 

hundred forty Damn it, I'll throw that 

bench so far — Seven hundred forty-two 
steps at thirty Inches each. That makes 
about, about — well It's quite a walk. Won- 
der how I made out In today's math exam, 
I hate rumdums. 

Wonder if Lieutenant Howell was laugh- 
ing at the way I handled my rifle. Well, I 
did the best I could. I came here to fly, 
not to pack a rifle at all hours of the night. 
It's a good thing he didn't ask for general 
orders. But even at that, I think I know 'em 
— well, some of 'em anyway. 

Wonder if the next shift will be on time. 
It better get here or I'll raise trouble. Those 
guys get to sleep while I'm out here 
walking back and forth, round and round. 
No one would know It if I got hurt or some- 
thing. Why, I could . . . Ouch! Damn 
that bench! ! ! 

FERSCHWEILER, T. A. 
TWELVE 




I. Play "Yogi" play ... 2. Some of the boys ... 3. Just another dusty ... 4. Let 'em hit chucker ... 5. We have 
our pictures taken ... 6. Dodos ... 7. Ah yes, remember? ... 8. Prepare to recreate — recreate ... 9. H. P. (hot 
plane) ... 10. Raunchy war birds ... II. "Dusty" Clark swings out ... 12. Siesta ... 13. I wanted wings . . . 
14. Pop to from there, dodo ... 1 5. The perfect housewife ... 16. Expansion — and we paid for them ... 1 7. Very 
interesting ... 18. Yes sir, Mr. Cooper. 

PAGE THIRTEEN 



LETTER TO ELSIE . . . 

(Continued from page 7) 

lot. Sleeping soundly and smugly dreaming 
of our dashing escapades were rudely awak- 
ened in the middle of the night. The lights 
flashed on and an uncouth warmly-wrapped 
ruffian rolled us out of our bunks with a 
ripping "Get up, you Bums" (imagine!), 
"and get out of bed — you're it!" 

Needless to say what "It" is. Yes, my 
dear, we had to go to the dance. I had 
to chase the wall-flowers around from twelve 
to two. Mr. Benjamin was a little more 
fortunate, drawing the sing shift from two 
till four. As Mr. Bowman, C. S. and I were 
in the same crowd, we sat most of it out 
discussing in low, calm tones just what we 
thought of the army social life and I can 
assure you, my dear, it differed slightly 
from what that awful tripe the Recruiting 
Sergeant tried to make me believe. 

Love, 

Pat. 




Mr. Cooper: "Men, you are the scream — er-cream of 
the crop." 



A DODO'S QUANDARY 

Three times a day Cadets have to eat; 
Because of songs it's half on our feet. 
Procurement of food is quite a job, 
Because lowerclassmen haven't much in their 
knob. 




We stand at attention with eyes on a point, 
And if you fail you'll be walking the joint. 
Glancing around has a limited space; 
Somebody will think you are buying the place. 

Our brass is all polished and shoes are all 

shined. 
For we all meet inspection every day on the 

line. 
Our cabins are spotless and all through the 

night. 
The guards are all watching, so we can sleep 

tight. 

To classes we go every day on time. 

To polish our brainpower under instructors 

fine. 
The mail call follows and I hope each day 
I'll hear from that gal, far, far away. 

Then to the flight line to fly through the air 
Trying to do everything at least pretty fair. 
Our instructors we think like to open their 

yaps. 
But, God help you Pilot, it may kill a Jap! 

Eklund, O. W. 



PAGE FOURTEEN 




Diary of an Aviation Cadet- 
Class 42-F 



Wednesday, January 2 I st — Our Battalion 
Comnnander told us today we would get 
open post this week-end. Look out Holly- 
wood!! 

Friday, January 23rd — Tomorrow is the 
day. We've planned a party at the Pala- 
dium. Tommy Dorsey's there! 

Saturday Morning, 24th — We just found 
out that we will fly this afternoon. We'll 
probably leave for Hollywood about four- 
thirty. 

Saturday Night, 24th — We just found 
out we fly in the morning. We'll probably 
get off Sunday afternoon. 

Sunday Afternoon, 25th — Just saw my 
name on the guard roster. We'll walk guard 
tonight — no probability to it. 

Sunday Night, 25th — We'll probably get 

PAGE FIFTEEN 



open post next week-end. 

Monday Noon, 26th (At Mess) — Orders: 
"Class 42-F is restricted to post for next 
four weeks." 

Tuesday, January 27th — Maybe the war 
won't last forever! 




Why don't we do this more often? 




MISS CLAIRE TOWNSEND— "Wrote" to a guy named 

Beniamin — Yes we all know I'll be ' " Benjie! ! Miss 

Townsend attended the University of Minnesota, a member 
of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. An excellent golfer as well 
as a photographer's dream — well, anyone's dream. 




I 

MISS JANE HERRICK— Mr. Penn claims he corresponds, 
we wonder? Miss tHerrick operates a dress shop and is a 
professional artist. Attended University of Michigan and Is a 
member of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. Enjoys dancing and 
swimming. 



They 11 L 

Ryan Ca 

Well, We Can 1 



i 




MISS MARTIEL BRIDGES— Mr. Franklin, we expected this 
from you so we are not surprised, but when are we leaving 
for Vienna, Georgia? How can a "Dusty" rate like this?? 
Miss Bridges teaches modern dancing and Is bour>d to 
write to her little "Bobble." 



PAGE SIXTEEN 



Waiting 

ts Hope 

am, Can't We? 




MISS ROBERTA PHILLIPS— Engaged to Mr Tingley, and 
he claims her to be a natural blonde. Well, Jack, she's 
okay anyway, and her ability to cook is super, super! What 
are you doing in the Army when San Francisco is so close? 





MISS VIRGINIA CALLICOTT— We should all go home with 
Mr. Callicott. CaTs sister is certainly okay. Cabin 43A praises 
her cuisine. Virginia attended Whittier college and Fullerton 
J. C. Sings and dances; too bad Cal doesn't look like his 
sister. 



MISS RAYE GILBERT— Claimed by Mr. Swaggerty. Miss 
Gilbert is a secretary for a brokerage house; is 20 years of 
age; a proficient rider and swimmer. Lives in Nashville, 
Tennessee. We didn't know Tennessee had such pulchritude. 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 




"This idea of auto factories making planes is fine — it's swell, and I'm for it — but they gotta 

draw the line somewhere!" 



JOE'S LETTER TO PA 

Hemit, California 
January 29, 1942 
Dear Pa: 

I wuz finaly let Into this hear arnny and 
cause I aint got no book learning they done 
sent me out hear to be a plllt and learn to 
fly like a chicken. I Is realy glad they done 
sent nne out hear fur a feller learns how to 
fly In a powerful hurry. As soon as I walks 
In the gate they teached nne how to keep 
both eyes on the point. I Is still looking 
for the point and will tell you about It 
when I done find it. Rite next they give 
nne some cordlnation exercize by being 
teached to put my rite feet In front of my 
left feet when he say one or tree and put 

PAGE 



my left feet In front of my rite feet when 
he say too or fore — this hear must be 
realy important cause I gotta do it all the 
time. An, Pa, the very first day they teach- 
ed me how to fly in the rain and to dive 
bomb. I is realy good cause all the folks 
have done say I is the best dodo bird ever 
been hear. I dont no what it mean but it 
sound good. I think I Is about to graduwate 
fur I been learned practlle everything and 
pretty soon they say they Is going to send 
me to basic whear I gets to be in a reel 
airoplane. 

Well, Pa I gotta go fur it is time to get 
some more cordlnation exercize. 

Love, 
Joe 

RYAN, E. C. 
EIGHTEEN 



Verily, I Say... 

Verily I say unto you, marry not an aviator, 

For the flyer Is a strange being and pos- 
sessed of many evils. 

Yea, he speaketh eternally in parables which 
he calleth his "Flight Plan." _ 

And he wieldeth a big stick which he cal'eih 
a slide rule, and he hath but one Bible; — 
Form I. 

hHe talketh always of banks and turns, end 
without end of aerodynamics. 

He showeth always a serious aspect and 
seemeth not to know how to smile. 

hie picketh his seat In the car by the springs 
thereof and not by the damsel beside him. 

Neither does he know a moonlight night 
except for Its visibility, nor a maid except 
for her thermal efficiency. 

Verily though she expecteth chocolates 
when he calleth, she opens the package 
which discloseth only instruments of navi- 
gation. 

Yea though he holdeth his damsel's hand 
but only to determine the skin friction, 
and he kisseth only to measure the cam- 
ber of her lips. 

For in his eyes shineth a far away look which 




is neither ove nor longing, but a vain 
attempt to remember the atmospheric 
conditions. 

There Is but one key dear to his heart, and 
that Is the "Key Position" on pattern 
eight, and only one love letter for which 
he yearneth — a "B" on stages. 

When to his maiden he writeth of love and 
signeth with X's, mistake not these sym- 
bols for kisses, but for check points along 
his course. 

When but a boy, he pulleth a girl's hair to 
test the elasticity, but as a man he dis- 
covers different devices. 

For he would test her maneuverability and 
he reckoned the strength of her structure. 

For he seeketh ever to pursue the scientific 
Investigation. 

h^e noteth a maiden's leg only to determine 
the streamlining thereof, and Inscribeth 
his passion in a formula. 

hlis marriage Is a simultaneous equation, 
involving two unknowns, and yielding 
diverse answers. penick, J. V. 







"You told me +o take the stick . . . well, here it Is!" 



'I could've sworn you said 'Pair o' shoes'. 



PAGE NINETEEN 





ADAMS, W. C. — A Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, lad who 
went to college at Notre Dame. Worked for six whole 
weeks for Railway Express; likes horseback riding and 
is called "Corky" by friends. 

ALBRIGHT, C. L.. JR. — A "brain"; he passed the entrance 
exam without the aid of college; a full-fashioned 
knitter by trade. Likes sports and is noted for his 
excellent sense of step while marching. 

ALEXANDER. C. C— Hails from Silverton. Texas. Attended 
Altus J.C. in Altus, Okla. Worked in a garage In Tex- 
as — wonder if he could get us any tires? 

ALLAIN. M, D. — Must have come from somewhere, but we 
couldn't read his mind; he finally traveled to South- 
western La. Inst. Give him any kind of sports. 

ALLEN, R. G. — From Birmingham, Alabama, suh; but for 
some reason had to go to V.M.I, to get his learning; 
incidentally, we thought everyone who went there 
would be at least a general; likes golf. 

ATKIN, R. J. — A "Yankee" from Evansville, Indiana, and 
proud of it. Took a business administration course at 
Indiana Univ. Sigma Nu, and known as "Sails"; can- 
ning plant sup't. before A.C. — noted for ability to rest, 

BAILEY, J. L., JR. — He's from Chucky, Tenn., and went to 
Tusculum College- — a member of that great organiza- 
tion — G.D.I. — became a teacher. Likes Basketball. 

BANKSON, M. W. — Ambulance Driver Bankson, who attend- 
ed L.S.U., when asked, said "I Joined the Air Corps 
because the food at home was P. P. (pretty punk) and 
besides there is always room for one of my pro- 
fession in the Air Corpse." 



BASSET, H. D. — Left Saratoga Springs. N. Y. and went io 
school at Seattle Pacific College. After getting a de- 
gree in chemistry he became an Aviation Cadet to be 
a glamour boy — likes athletics and reading. 

BEHRENS, L. S. — When interviewed Behrens said "I went to 
Tulane Univ., because they have a good cheering sec- 
tion. However, unlike most of the football players, I 
got a degree In accounting. Tulane was also close to 
New Orleans and that's home." 

BELL, W. F. — Bell was a dental student and progressing nice- 
ly when the draft board beckoned — so he's an A/C 
now. Originally from Asheville, No. Carolina, Bill Is 
noted for being an excellent "party man." 

BENJAMIN, R. L. — A "gadget" from Los Angeles in sunny 
Calif. Attended the Univ. of Calif, and U.S.C. His 
hobbies are sailing and photography. He plays a 
beastly game of soccer and can ski with the best. 

BERK, H. B.— A gift to Hemet from New York City, where 
he attended N.Y.U. Reputed to be a salesman, and 
enjoys swimming and Ice skating. Herb modestly 
states that he has excellent taste in women. BACK 
IN YOUR HOLE, MOLE! ! ! 

BIBB, E. J.. JR.— From Nashville. Tenn.. and Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. Was a newspaperman [why didn't he get this 
job?) He was first to pass that final army check. Bravo! 

BIGGERS, H. C JR. — From Glasgow, in the commonwealth 
of Kentucky. Harold enjoys basketball from the stands 
and has derived fame from his ability to manipulate 
a slip horn. 





BILLINGS, J. T. — This lad came from Nashville, Tennessee — 
attended University of Tennessee, where he joined 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Jack worked as a 
salesman for a coal company. Mr. Billings, though 
usually mild mannered, manages to do a good job 
of taking over Palm Springs. 

BORIGHT, L K.— Hails from Seattle-land— way up in Wash- 
ington and went to the Unlv, of Wash. LaVern was 
noted for his dead-pan, but has recently shown signs 
of humor. 

BOWMAN. C. G. — Hermosa Beach, California, sent Charles 
to U.S.C. where he affiliated with Sigma Chi. C. G- 
worked for U. S. Steel before the draft board called. 

BOWMAN, P. — Pat was one of the proudest members of 
the L. A. Fire Department (his home town) after he 
had attended U.C.L.A. and Cal. Aggies, hie spends 
his time wanting to go home and see Elsie. 

CALLICOTT, JR.— Balled out of Whittier College In his 
home town just before a terrible draft hit the place. 
"Cal" was editor of the yearbook but gave it up to 
edit this magazine to end all magazines. Was a Lancer 
and appeared In 1942 Who's Who Among College 
and Univ. Students. Hobbles are dancing, dramatics; 
while track and basketball are his sports. 

CAPES, L. B. — Lawrence went to the University of Florida 
from his home In Clearwater, In what the Florida boys 
claim is the land of sunshine. Mr. Capes Is a PI Kappa 
Alpha and likes golf, tennis and swimming. 

CARBON ELL, H. J. — Handsome Henri makes his home in 
San Diego, California, but he attended San Francisco 

J. C. and was in the hotel business in San Francisco. 

CARLSON, B. D. — "Burt" Is one man whose work is In the 
line of his education since he studied aeronautical 
engineering at Auburn. He is from Fruithurst, Ala. 



CHAMBERLAIN, G. C— "Stinky" as he is called for some 
reason (?) is from San Diego, Cal. and went to the 
State College there, where he was taking pre-legal 

subjects. Claims he was a salesman. 

CHANDLER, J. W.— Better known as "Happy," hails from 
Chattanooga — way back In sunny Tennessee. Attend- 
ed University of Chattanooga and was an Engineer- 
ing Aide with the TVA — one of those dam Govern- 
ment projects. Favorite sport is football. 

CHERRY. A. W.— From Dayton. Ohio— he attended the 
University of Dayton. One thing about him, he's not 
a draft dodger because he enlisted in the Field Artil- 
lery before he was accepted as an aviation Cadet. 

CHITTICK. J. C. — Our own "Pinky" Is a fugitive from San 
Diego. Went to San Francisco J.C. to prepare for an 
illustrious career at Consolidated Aircraft in San Diego. 
After his local draft board inspired him, "Pinky" 
joined the Air Corps. 

CLARK, L. D. — "Dusty" owned a filling station in Seattle 
before he became a cadet. Attended University of 
Washington and studied aeronautical engineering. 
Mr. Clark Is quite famous at the "Hemet Country 
Club" for the tonal quality of his bugling. 

CLEMENS, J. M. — Mr. Clemens was a gentleman farmer 
and found how it was done at the University of 
Tennessee. His home is in Knoxvilie, Tennessee, and 
he professes to be a pro-boxer. 

COMMANDER, J. B. — From Atlanta, Georgia, where he 
went to Georgia Tech. He spent most of his time fly- 
ing before he joined the Army. His favorite sports 
are Indoor ones — wine, women and song. 



F''^ istl 






DAVIS, H. E. — Davis is a forestry expert. He is from Albany. 
Ga., and learned about trees at the Univ. of Georgia. 

DAY, S. C. — Scott went to McMaster University and owned 
a service station while a civilian, hie likes dancing, 
cards, hunting and skating. 

DICKEY, J. R. — John transferred (?) from Farm Security 
Administration to the Army Air Corps. We bet he 
wonders why. Left Cleaton, Alabama, to go to Auburn 
where he was an Alpha Gamma Phi. 

DROOGAS, H. C— Mr. Droogas, of 180 Boerum Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Harry went to the College of the 
City of New York, where he took Civil Engineering. 

DUNN, L. J. — Hails from Daviston, Alabama. Lamar goes in 
for riding and hunting, but didn't state what he hunts. 

ELDRIDGE, H. B.— Left Chattanooga, Tenn., via train by 
same name. Says it has more class than "Hemet Fly- 
er." Took book learning at Chattanooga and Tennes- 
see Universities. 

ELY, T. B., JR. — ^A Chi Psi from Cornell, home town at 
Franklin, Penn. F.D.R. was a Chi Psi too, buddy, buddy. 

EPPERSON, G. B. — A machinery dist. before signing with 
Uncle. From propagandized Tampa, Fla., attended 
Georgia Military. Football is his game. 



ERWIN. G. P.— Grad. of Davidson College with A.B.S. in 
Physics. Left home town of Davidson and Electric Co. 
Superintendent for Hemet Country Club. . 

FELDER, I. M. — Coming from Norwich, Conn, and Kappa 
Alpha of Rollins College In Winter Park, Fla. Account- 
ant at Pratt & Whitney before choosing Air Corps. 

FIELDS, J. S. — A student of medicine at Temple Univ.. Phil- 
adelphia. A civilian "sawbones" and chiropodist. A 
bomber radio operator before cadet appointment. 

FITZGERALD, C. K.— A flight Instructor In civilian days 
from Charlotte, N. C, attended Wafford College. 
Flying and dancing are his hobbies. 

FOWLER, E. C.-A gift from Fort Benning to Ryan ? Co.. 
"Flaps" was a G.D.I, from R.P.I. Troy, N. Y. (also 
P.D.Q. and C.O.D.) 

FRANKLIN, R. S. — A refugee from Leesburg, Florida. Geor- 
gia Military College adopted him and P. Kappa Phi 
put a roof over his head. 

GARBER, D. D. — A proved yankee from Ouosso. Mich. At- 
tended Michigan State and came to Mother Ryan 
from the rough 127th Infantry, Camp Livingston. 



/Nsi 









GARRISON, Lt. E. H. — Seeking his "wings" after serving 
17 months with the Field Artillery, received his A.B. 
at Arkansas State College and a member of the Delta 
Omega Sigma and the Scabbard and Blade Fraterni- 
ties. Jonesboro, Arkansas take a bow. 

GOLSON, C. O. — The raunchiest dodo ever enrolled at 
Ryan. The "Goon" is from Rouge, Louisiana. He 
learned his family table manners at Louisiana Tech. 
(He should Rum dum his college.) 

HANCOCK. J. E. — Lives in Montgomery, Ala., and attend- 
ed Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Hit his head while 
working as an Engineering Surveyor and joined the 
Air Corps. 

HARTLIEB. J. B.— Ohio gave us the Wright Brothers and 
now Cincinnati gives us "Dick." He came to the Air 
Corps via the INth Field Artillery. He is a nice fel- 
low even if he was a bus driver before joining the A.C. 

HIBBETT, C. Y. — Never was able to stay put, attended Ten- 
nessee State Teachers College, Tenn. Polytechnic In- 
stitute, and Austin Pedy Normal School. His perma- 
nent home Is Gallatin. Tenn. 

HILL, R. D. — Like all those Florida boys, Jr. likes the wo- 
men. Worked for the Florida East Coast Railway and 
makes his home In St. Augustine. 

HOEFLER, G. E. — California, plus Army orders attracted 
"Tailspin" to Ryan from St. Petersburg, Florida. At- 
tended Georgia Tech., where he was a Sigma Chi and 
played a swell game of golf. 



HOWARD, W. R.— Attended Riverside Military Academy 
and University of North Carolina. He took C.P.T. 
training and now the Army is teaching him the cor- 
rect way to fly. His home Is Sanford, North Carolina. 

JORDAN, E. L. — Another Rebel from Nashville, Tennessee. 
This H. P. was schooled at Palm Beach Jr. College. 
Quit an electrical company to become a bird man. 

JOY, W. B. — Columbus, Georgia Is proud of this "draft 
dodger." Torn between the Pi Kappa Phi and the 
Delta Sigma Pi, W. B. waded through University of 
Alabama. Was a Radio Broadcaster in civilian life. 

KRISTALL, N. — A private pilot from Detroit, Mich., and 
also a "brain" for he was enrolled In Detroit Insti- 
tute of Technology and still had time for football. 
baseball, and A.Z.O. Fraternity. 

LANE, E. W. — When not yelling "at ease" was Sales Man- 
ager for General Motors In Tampa, Florida. "II Duce" 
pines for his days at Univ. of Florida. He claims fame 
as a "ladies man." 

LATIMER. J. T. — Learned to swear playing golf around 
Anderson, So. Carolina. Took his knowledge from 
Davidson College and is a PI Kappa Alpha, 

LEBO, J. 1. — Sings the blues of Memphis, Tenn. Afraid that 
a Draftsman would be drafted, joined the Air Corps. 
He is a Rambling Wreck from Georgia Tech. 

LENTZ, L. — Dodos tremble at the mention of his name. H. P. 
was a reporter for Nashville Banner and although his 
home Is In Tennessee, he was schooled at Univ. of 
North Carolina. A Sigma Chi. 








LITTLETON, J. — From Basin street to Hemet, Louisiana gave 
us the blues and Joe. Leoville is his home town and 
the Army called him from Louisiana State. 

LUKE, J. D. — A Georgia cracker from Nashville. Attended 
North Georgia College where he was a civil engineer. 

LYONS, F. S. — A beach-comber from Tampa, Florida. Was 
attracted to the University of Florida by pretty girls. 
California lets anyone enter its borders. 

MACEY, P. S. — ^Took a crack at Auburn and after his school 
days became a clerk for the U. S. Civil Service. P.S. 
comes from Montgomery, Alabama and he likes 
tennis, swimming, and golf and all of which are prom- 
inent here at the country club. 

MANGANI, A. F. — The most heart-broken man in the place 
since the lowerclass customs have been ruled out. 
He holds an engineering degree from the Pratt Insti- 
tute and claims Jackson Heights, Long Island, New 
York as his home town. 

McCLENDON, J. H. — Another boy from Monroe, Louisiana. 
Someone gave him a slide-rule for Christmas so he 
spent the next few years studying mechanical engineer- 
ing at Louisiana Tech. 

McGILL, P. E. — Yes sir, it's none other than "Cyclone" Mc- 
Sill who blew in from Knoxville, Tennessee. Paul 
studied in the College of Engineering at the Univers- 
ity of Tennessee. He was previously employed by the 
Fulton Syphone Company. 

McLaughlin, W. J.— AII the way from Seattle, Washing- 
ton comes Mr. McLaughlin. Has the old poker habit 
so bad he calls it his hobby. 



McMillan, C. M. jr.— Sho 'nuff, you all is right, another 
southerner from Gaston Wing, Alabama. Went to 
school at the University of Alabama and was a sur- 
veyor by profession. 

MEYERS, A, L. — Florence, South Carolina claims this lad 

who spent three and one-half years of his illustrious 

life In Clemson College. He was a member of the 

R.O.T.C., Clemson Flying Cadets, and swimming 
team. His hobby is dancing. 

MILLER, R. F.— Here Is a boy who just beat the draft. Bob 
checked out of Upsola College after two years to be- 
come a cadet. His home is Elmira, New York. 

MOORE, D. W. — Here is a real party man. Dan halls from 
Monroe. Louisiana and attended school at Louisiana 
State when he studied Agronomy. 

MORRISON, O. L.— Another Southern gentleman (?) from 
Gerard, Georgia. He attended the Middle Georgia 
College. Dwight says his motto is "To see that the 
Rising Sun of Japan has a total eclipse." 

NORRED, W. S. — "Major Hoople" formerly resided in Pine- 
apple, Alabama. He obtained his B.S. degree at Troy 
State Teachers College and coached athletics at 
Luverne, Alabama. 

OBERG, J. A. — Mr. Oberg was sired in Falrhope, Alabama. 
He graduated In Agriculture Science at Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Alabama and was a 
member of Alpha Gamma Rho. 





PENN, G. JR. — George insists that he's from Jacltsonville, 
Florida where he was mighty handy at swimming, 
boxing and football. Some of his pictures prove that 
Rufi really gets across with the women. 

PERKY. J. E. — hHome is Cedar Town, Georgia but worked 
in Florida, Came to California because of its climate 
and also his orders told him to. He was schooled at 
Stetson University. 

RAMOS, L. A. — Received a B.S. degree in Petroleum En- 
gineering at Louisiana State University. He was a Lt. 
in the R.O.T.C. Junior's family is at New Orleans. 

RAY, D. M. — An expert on figures (girls' or otherwise). 
Home town is Wellington, Ohio and was a Sigma 
Delta Psi at Oberlin College. Don was Chief Cost 
Accountant for Molle and Energine Co. 

REYNOLDS, W. J.— Believes that all good flyers go to Texas 
when they die. Raunchy's home is in New Orleans but 
went to St. Edwards University in Texas. 

RICE, R. A. — A traveling salesman and high pressure man 
in the southeastern states for Blair Mills. Rex says his 
home town is Belton, South Carolina and that he was 
a Phi Delta Theta from the University of North Caro- 
lina. Likes to chase tennis balls. 

ROBERTS, C. B.— Introducing "Buck" Roberts of Macon, 
Georgia and a real "Rebel." He is of the University 
of Georgia Kappa Alphas. Was the assistant to the 
superintendent of a textile mill before his cadet ap- 
pointment. 

ROLLINS. J. W. — Here Is one of the overgrown quiz kids. 
He hails from Jacksonville. Florida. Attended the Uni- 
versity of Florida. Yogi was a shipping clerk for Sears, 



Roebuck and I believe his vast knowledge was taken 
from their catalogue which he mailed to all the small 
two-seated libraries in the U.S.A. 

ROYER, W. E.— The bombshell from Dade City. Florida. 
Attended Bob Jones College. A licorice stick footer 
as well as a great lover. Bill constantly upholds the 
Florida Chamber of Commerce much to the chagrin 
of his California friends. 

RUBINSTEIN. D. H. JR.— Another Georgia Peach from At- 
lanta who thinks swimming is the only sport. Couldn't 
make up his mind about schools so started with Texas 
A.&M. and wound up at Temple University. He claims 
his hobby is that of collecting S.P.O.P.'s. 

SARKISIAN. D. M.— Resembles Capt. Bligh of "Mutiny" 
fame. Was a gift to the army from Williams College, 
Williamstown, Mass. He is quite a skier and a mem,- 
ber of Chi Psi Fraternity. He was a stock broker In 
civilian life. 

SCHNATZ, E. P. — Cleans the barracks with a pair of dice. 
Received an A.B. in Chemistry at Wayne University. 
His home town Is Detroit. Michigan. 

SHULER, L. B. — Keeps the postofflce busy with mall from 
the lonely hearts club. Understand he was quite an 
athlete at Young Harris College and before the draft 
lived in Griffin, Georgia. 

SINEATH, F. R. JR.— Joined the club after six months in 
the infantry. Was an old hand at the game of Post 
Office In Hopewell. Virginia and also an athlete. 

SORDELETT, W. A.— Joined the Club after six mos. in In- 
fantry. An old hand at the game of Post Office in 
Hopewell, Va. and an athlete. 



jy'w; 









SORENSON, S. A.— A bow-legged Texan from Ft. Worth, 
but spends most of his tinne in Juarez, Attended 
University of Texas and is famed for his music and 
hunting — blondes. 

STEELE, F. A. — Enjoys the Zenda Ballroom in L.A. Came to 
Ryan without the permission of the Florida C. of C, 
but being a "dusty" they could not see him leave 
Lake Worth. 

SUSSDORF, P. B.— Before A.C. he sold real estate. Plays 
tennis. His chief claim to fame is for stuffing macaroni 
with doughnut holes. Strange people come from New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

SWAGGERTY, S. B.— Attended Vanderbilt University and 
is a Sigma Nu. His home is in Nashville, Tenn. Was 
learning his father's manufacturing business before 
he got the "call." 

TAYLOR, G. W. — Intimately known as "Flash" and is a loyal 
son of Kansas State College where he majored in 
Agronomy (I don't know, either). Worked as a super- 
visor for Agricultural Conservation Association. His 
home is in Lebo, Kansas. No dirty cracks. 

TAYLOR, J. L. — "Something new has been added." "Sold 
American," "They Satisfy." Another tobacco man 
from Mt. Olive, North Carolina. 

THOMAS, J. C— Started at Milligan College but pretty 
girls and greener pastures talked him into Memphis 
State College. His home is in Stanton, Tennessee. 



THOMPSON. R. D.— Was in the money before hearing "the 
call" as a bank teller. He comes from that unmen- 
tionable state (Florida). Does Hemet compare with 
Orlando? 

TIDWELL. S. A. — Often called "Speed", maybe because he 
races motorcycles and midget autos or else it is his 
technique with the pretty girls. Take it slow and easy. 
Sam worked in the steel mills before seeing the light. 

TIMMONS, L. S. — Resides in Monroe, Georgia but mi- 
grated to Northwestern for his three R's. Taught 
school and coached young athletes prior to becoming 
a student of his Uncle Sam. 

TINGLEY, J. A. — A horse Doc. from Cal Aggie. Has what 
it takes to land a beautiful gal who can cook. Ala- 
meda, California should be proud of their protege. 
Good luck, "Ting." 

TOMLINSON, A. B.— Hails from the Tobacco Lands of 
North Wilkesboro, N. C. Blew smoke rings at N. C. 
State and U. of North Carolina. 

TRABUE, N. T.— In "still" life, says "Little Joe," he makes 
Tennessee corn whiskey like a true Beta Theta Pi. 
Shoots "craps" at Vanderbilt University and Ryan C.C. 

TRULOVE, A. A. — Could not stand the adverse weather of 
Madison, Florida so migrated to Tennessee where he 
enrolled In King College. He Is quite a swimmer and 
wrestler. 

TURNER, J. B. — Another Tennessee lad and an Alpha Tau 
Omega from Union University. Worked for DuPont 
before the Air Corps called. John is a candid camera 
man and plays a good game of tennis. 




UMSTEAD. W. L./A gift from Roxboro. N. C, attended 
Hampden Sidney College, Va. Umstead should fly 
big ones with that name. 

WALLACE, R. G. — A Tarheel from Raleigh, North Carolina. 
Studied Aeronautical Engineering at N. C. State. 

WALLEY, F. J. — A "rebel" from Jackson, Mississippi. Walley 
attended Mississippi State College where he played 
a great game of golf, later becoming a pro. 

WARE. C. E. JR. — Comes from Statesville, North Carolina. 
Attended Gailford College at Greensboro. North 
Carolina and was a bookkeeper and paymaster. 

WATKINS, C. A. — Another Georgia cracker from Decatur. 
Attended North Georgia College at Dahlonega, Ga. 
A typical rambling "REX" and a helluva engineer. 

WELLS. P. P.— Princeton, Illinois. Attended Milwaukee School 
of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Formerly elec- 
trical arc welder. Used to own 300.00 Waco. 

WENDLING, G. V. — Comes from Birmingham, Alabama: 
Sigma Chi from Auburn. 

WESLEY. B. v.— From Marshville. Georgia. Attended Middle 
Georgia College, keeps all conscious of the "Peach 
State." 

WEST, R. J. — A Wilmington, North Carolina, civil engineer 
from University of Arizona. 

WESTBROOK. J. W. JR.— Halls from Greensboro. North 
Carolina; Sigma Phi Epsllon was his frat affiliation at 
North Carolina State. 



WHEAT, C. E. JR.— Unfortunately from Pharr, Texas. At- 
tended Texas A.2'M. in Kingsvllle, Texas. 

WHITAKER, G. — The dodo's Simon Legree hailing from 
Goldsboro, North Carolina. Attended Atlantic Chris- 
tian College, Wilson, North Carolina. 

WHITE, F. — From Raleigh. North Carolina, another refugee 
from a nicotine capital, attended University of North 
Carolina. 

WHITEHEAD, J. S.— Lives In Birmingham, attended Birming- 
ham Southern, known affectionately as "Grandma." 

WHITMORE, A. P.— Straight from the Tobacco Capitol, 
Durham, North Carolina — Studied at Dunwoody In- 
dustrial Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

WILKES, CHARLES E.— Nashville. Tennessee is Charlie's 
home town with the University of Tennessee the Alma 
Mater. Quite a lover with a tendency towards blondes. 

WITHROW, J. D.— Halls from Forest City, North Carolina. 
Attended both North Carolina State College and 
Univ. of North Carolina. Salesman and bookkeeper, 

YOCUM, N. H.- — -"Pappy" is a former undertaker from Flor- 
ence, Alabama. Went to State Teachers College. 

YOUNG, D. E. — A country gentleman from Mt. Hope, Ala- 
bama. Learned fine art of agriculture at dear old 
Auburn. Taught Vocational Agriculture. 

YOUNG, W. M. — "The Sphinx" was shipped from Dixon 
Springs, Tennessee. Was dispayed at the University 
of Tennessee where Phi Gamma Delta claimed it. 




"Naw, he ain't goin' to Mars — he makes his first pattern flight today.' 




PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



ODE TO THE MOLE 

JF hen ever the Mole 

Is Old of his hole 

I look at him and just wonder 

Quite what he would say 

If he came to some day 

And found himself, six feet under! 



DODO'S 23RD PSALM 

Mr. Keesee is my iuslrnctor; 

I shall not pass. 

He maketh me a fool before the class; 

He replaceth my self confidence 

fflth other things hence; 

He leadeth me into the paths of the un- 

knozvn, for my sake 
.lud yea, though I study from morn 'till night 
I see no light, 
For it is not with me. 
His rod and his staff, they fall upon me; 
He placeth a test before vie in the presence 

of mine ignorance; 
He anointeth my head with shame; 
My mind runneth on a dame; 
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me 
And I will not dzvell in the house of Hemet 

forever. 



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EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

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Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
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— no— »iu^««{( 




^«c- 







Class 42- G 

QU Gaps liainiHC Uetacltment 

Ryan School of Aeronautics 
Hennet, California 

i 




- 


1 PD" 
J ufl 


\ 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



To our new Commanding Officer, Lt. 

Merril H. Carieton, we wish the best. 

To our retiring C. O., Capt. Ford, 

who has left this post for further duty. 

To our officers, who have taught us 

the Army rules and regulations. 

To our instructors, on the flight line 

and in ground school, who have given 

us advancement. 

To all the employes of the Ryan School 

who make it possible for us to "Keep 

'Em Flyin'." 

To all of these we sincerely dedicate 

this edition. 



PUBLISHED BY 

Kuaw ^cltocl ok (jie'ionauiics 

HEMET, CALIF. 



MARCH 24, 1942 




STAFF 

A/C Callicott, N. Jr Editor 

Lt. Graham, J. K. . Editorial Advisor 
A^C Chandler, S. T. . Photographer 
Lt. Sather, G. J. . Photographic Adv'r. 
Mr. Neri Typist 

FEATURE WRITERS— 

Bill "Doc" Sloan, A^S Shirk, M. L; 
A/S Taylor, M. D.; A/C Northmp, R. 
P.; A/C Crawford, I. M.; A/C Either, 
J. R.; A/C Salsberry, W.; A/C Mosher, 
S. R.; A/C Metz, R.; A/S Andrews, 
C. D.; A/C Pearse, R. M. 



GAL SEZ— 

Well, here it is press time! Once 
again we wade into the type and ink 
constantly looking for that one for- 
mula or combination that will give us 
that magazine — Yes, that one and 
only — "Contact." In this edition we 
: are attempting to bring you something 
old, something new, something borrow- 
ed, and some of them — phew (they 
just made it). I hope that as you scan 
these pages they will recall for you 
those happy? carefree? days you 
spent in the dear old Ryan Country 
Club (more recently named Ryan Ag- 
gies, Kinner Tech, or Rumdum U.). 




PAGE TV/O 




nabbv j^aHcinasl 



Cl nealtij Welcomel 



And it's with a hearty welcome and a 100 per 
cent vote of confidence that we welcome Lt. Merill 
H. Carleton to hHemet as the new commanding offi- 
cer of the detachment. The lieutenant, who arrived 
Friday from San Diego, is well-known among the older 
personnel, the majority of whom served with him at 
the San Diego school before the inception of the 
hHemet post. Expressing unbounded enthusiasm over 
the school's efficient operation. Lieutenant Carleton 
pledged his fullest support and has set his goal at 
making this detachment the Number One primary 
school in the United States. We're with him all the 
way, and with such cooperation, we can't miss. 



It is with a sigh of regret and hearty wishes for happy landings 
that we say adios to Capt. Wallace S. Ford who received transfer 
orders to points unknown last Friday. For over a year Captain Ford 
has guided the destinies of the hiemet Ryan School of Aeronautics 
and because of his capable supervision, Uncle Sam's air force is 
considerably stronger. hHowever, in his next move onward and 
upward, he will again fill an important niche in the corps, and he 
promises to "keep 'em flying" with egual gusto on his new assign- 
ment. 




THE PARABLE OF THE H.P. 



\7 ERILY, VERILY, IT CAME to pass thai 
in the year when a certain innpostof 
ruleth over the land of milk and (Blond) 
Honeys for the third term, there liveth in 
a small village in that land a man and verily 
he hath a son. 

And this son stinketh unto high heaven — 
he graduated from the school Yoo Hoo U. 
and he thinketh himself to be the something 
on a stick. 

For verily, he goeth with the village siren, 
namely Helen Highwater — and, she thinketh 
herself to be something on three sticks — 
Wow! they really soweth many acres of 
wild oats. 

And behold neither hath any virtue and 
they courteth often and yea though they 
walk through the valley of the shadow of 
the sycamores, they fear no park Cops. 
Verily they both thinketh themselves to be 
the hot stuff indeed. 

But it also came to pass that in those 
days there cometh the draft. For there 
was a certain chicken, namely (Word Cen- 
sored) (double censored) Hitler — ■ he 
thinketh himself to be something on nine 
hundred sticks — and verily he Damned near 
proveth it. Behold he raketh the bowels of 
many Countries; he proveth himself to be 
the modern villain. In other words he stink- 
eth like unto seven hundred pole cats. 

Now this young son he pulleth the right 
strings and he entereth the Army Air Corps 
unto a place called Ryan Field — and verily 
he suffereth nine hundred kinds of Hell. 

For the Corporal maketh him popeth-to, 
for behold the Corporal thinketh himself to 
be something on about two dozen sticks. 

And the Sergeant maketh him turn pastel, 
red, white, blue, green and lavender from 
fright because he talketh in ranks and shineth 
not his brass. For behold the Sergeant 
thinketh himself to be the substance that 
maketh three dozen sticks glitter. 

Yea, the Lieutenant and Captain descend 
down upon him like unto fire and brimstone 
— verily they maketh him feel like unto a 
native Californian, he rates not worth a 



Damn. For the Louie and Captain knoweth 
they are the chemical formula which can 
make any stick gleam-. 

So the lad writeth the hot stuff girl friend 
Helen Highwater and sayeth: "Helen, at 
least thou hast not forsaken me — write unto 
me words which maketh the kidneys creep 
and maketh the liver conga eight beats to 
the bar — Deliver me from my enlmles." 

But behold the answer arriveth: "Great 
gobs of too to thou — behold I taketh unto 
myself a husband, thou rival, the Percival 
Piqsnout. Already I knitteth the raiments 
of Infanticipation." 

Oh, and verily, the lad tosseth about the 
bed in great agony and decldeth to com- 
mit unto himself sideways. For behold Woe 
is he. 

Forthwith cometh the dawn he struggle- 
eth with his instructor into the P. T. I 3-B 
and cllmbeth to five thousand feet which is 
unto five G's of altitude. And he diveth 
the plane unto a straight line toward that 
portion of the landing field upon which is 
ashphalt. Verily the plane traveleth like 
the speed of the wild-kitty who sitteth him- 
self upon a cactus. 

And behold the lad closeth his eyes and 
kicketh the rudder and wobbleth the stick 
to all directions which showeth upon the 
Compass. Verily, he longeth for the end. 

(Conflnued on page 18) 



ms^m^ ms^j^^^ 




PAGE FOUR 



THE RAVEN 

Once upon a morning dreary 

When I pondered weak and weary about 
things far, far away. 

While I nodded, nearly napping 

Suddenly there came a tapping as if some- 
one roughly rapping. 

Rapping on the classroom floor. 

"Nuts," I muttered darkly for I could sleep 
no more. 

"Who's so bold to spoil my slumber? 

"Did you see him get his number? 

Suddenly, then, I felt no pain, 

'Cause it was only Mr. Raine. 

Mr. Raine and nothing more. 

Nothing more than Mr. Raine. 

Now, in the midst of every morning. 
While I listened to his droning about the 

merits of a radial. 
While I listened to his jokes, I sit there very 

nearly choking, 
Not because he's so funny, but because it's 

so revoking. 
Mr. Raine, if you should read this — 
Just forget this little thesis. 
I know you are quite forgiving. 
Even though you're not forgetting 
How I rumdummed every week-end. 
On the tests I was asleeping 
When I should have been apeeping. 
But now that I've found out the score, 
I'll never more forget the score, 
Quoth the author, nevermore. 
(Apologies to Poe, E.A.) 

A/C Mitchell, M.L., 42-B 



"You look broken up. What's the mat- 
ter?" 

"I wrote home for money for a study 
lamp." 

"So what?" 

"They sent the lamp." 




FARMER'S LAMENT 

Hemet was a farming town, 
So peaceful and so quiet. 
With all these flying men around 
The place is now a riot. 

My silo Is a pylon, 

My cows they all go dry. 

Have they no place to land upon 

That they must use my stye? 

I have to do the women's work — 
This Is an awful life. 
My daughters, they are never home, 
And sometimes it's my wife. 

hiemet was a farming town. 
Those days I yearn for yet. 
I lived a peaceful farmer's life 
With an absence of cadets. 



PAGE FIVE 



UNDERCLASSMAN'S ORIENTATION 

TEST 

How much do you know about your school? 
Mark one answer correct in each group. 



In recent public testimony this school 
was called: 

1. A place for the mentally disabled. 

2. A concentration camp. 

3. Ryan School of Aeronautics. 

4. A county jail. 

The Commandant of Cadets is: 

1. Fiorella LaGuardia. 

2. Lieut. (Glamour Boy) hHadwin. 

3. Donald Duck. 

4. The little man who wasn't there. 



VI. The name of the School magazine is: 

1 . "Doc Savage" 

2. "Contact" 

3. "The Stanford Quarterly" 

4. "The Illustrated Outhouse Special" 

VII. A "jukebox" is: 

1 . V\/here a lowerclassman pays a 
rumdum fine. 

2. The hope chest of the Jukes family. 

3. A place where they put washouts. 

4. A music machine. 



In order to enter Ryan School of 
Aeronautics you must have: 

1 . A set of golf clubs. 

2. A passport from Moscow. 

3. A strange love for Kinner engines. 

4. Two years of College. 



VIII. The cabins you live in are known as: 

1. An F.hH.A. model house. 

2. Mr. Ryan's gold mine. 

3. A dodo's sanctuary. 

4. A hole completely equipped with 
hot and cold running dodos. 



IV. Lowerclassmen are not allowed to 
smoke because: 

1. They are too young. 

2. Smoking is vicious. 

3. The tobacco people don't need 
the money. 

4. Contact does not carry tobacco 

ads. 



V. If you have just entered the Hemet 
Country Club you are: 

1. A damn fool. 

2. A damn fool. 

3. A damn fool. 

4. A damn fool. 



IX. The food we eat is obtained from: 

1 . Leftovers from the preceding meal. 

2. All game and domestic animals 
killed during forced landings. 

3. Your guess is as good as mine. 

4. City salad wagon number 13. 

X. Ground School is commonly known as: 

1. An agricultural school or Ryan Ag- 
gies. 

2. Kinner Tech. 

3. Rumdum U. 

4. A place to catch up on lost sleep. 

A/C Andrews, CD. 
A/C Callicott, N. 



PAGE SIX 



ONE DAY WITH A FLYING CADET 




THE HOUSE OUR JACK BUILT 

This is tin- house our jack built. 

This is the dodo that sleeps in the house 
our jack built. 

This is the Cadet zvho worries the dodo 
that sleeps in the house our jack built. 

This is the mess that gogs the Cadet who 
worries the dodo that sleeps in the 
house our jack built. 

This is the "Doc" who cares for the men 
that eat the mess that gags the Cadet 
who worries the dodo that sleeps in 
the house our jack built. 

This is the Canteen that gyps the "Doc" 

zvho cares for the men that eat the mess 

that gags the Cadet who worries the 

dodo that sleeps in the house our jack 

built. 

A/C Callicott, N. 





WHY I JOINED THE AIR CORPS 

They told me to join the Air Corps, 

The pay was mighty fine. 
You get a check for seventy-five, 

But they dock you sixty-nine. 
They told me to join the Air Corps, 

That the flying's really great. 
But they walk you ninety miles a day, 

And the C. O. comes at eight. 
They told me to join the Air Corps, 

The uniforms were cute. 
But Fve been here for about six weeks 

In a raunchy union suit. 
They told me to join the Air Corps, 

That there were no Sergeants there 
But every time I turn around, 

Fve got one in my hair. 

A/C Metz, R. 

PAGE EIGHT 




CALIFORNIA WEATHER 

For twenty-one years I've travelled afar, 

And lived in many a state, 
But never before have I seen the likes 

Of this California climate. 
First it rains, and then there's fog, 

Next there's wind with a touch of snow. 
Will someone please explain the clime 

To this bewildered dodo? 
For where is the weather so sunny and clear, 

The Chamber of Commerce predicted 
this year? 
Perhaps it's coming by way of Tibet, 

But sure as shootin' it ain't here yet. 

A/C Northrup, R. P. 

e 

BIG SPUD 

TJe ivalk into the mess hall, 
And stand behind our choir. 

Thirty minutes later, 

Ue're still standing there. 

JFhen at last we start to eat 
And food is passed around, 

JIc look into the spud howl, 
But none are to be found. 

We hold the bowl high in the air, 
And give the waiter a call. 

But by the time he gets there, 
He says, "I'm sorry, that's all." 

That is why you now see here, 

A dodo drawn and thin. 
But when the upperclass graduates, 

He will start to eat again. 



ROMANTIC, AIN'T IT 

Here in a mountain valley 
Beneath the sunny sky. 
They call it paradise valley, 
But it's hell in a dodo's eye. 

Now in this pretty valley, 
Where Alessandro brought his bride. 
Lives a flock of lonely dodos 
Who crawl in their holes to hide. 

Where in the moonlight nights they found, 
The thrill of life complete, 
The dodo with the nights profound 
Can only meet retreat. 

Ramona had her Alessandro, 
The dodo has his Ryan. 
Ramona lost her Alessandro, 
Will the dodo "Keep 'Em Flyin'." 

A/C Crawford, I. M. 



POOR PILOT 

Listen my dodos and you shall hear 
The tale of a pilot, chilled ivith fear. 
All went zvell until one day 
A ground-loop zvashed his fears away. 

It all began ivith a little gust. 
That laid his wind-tip in the dust. 
Then the Army gave the check, 
To zvash him out, and save his neck. 



A/C Taylor, W. D. 



PAGE 



"OUR BAND" 

Band sound off! The Captain says 
And one by one they do. 
And even if the notes aren't true, 
I really think they try — don't you? 

A/C Salsbery, W. 
TEN 



THE RAUNCHY DODO 



DOUBLE-TIME 



Under the glare of grueling eyes 

The raunchy dodo stands. 
The dodo, a wretched man is he, 

With large and clumsy hands. 
And the muscles of his scrauny arms 

Are as strong as rubber bands. 

He goes to ground school once a day 
And sleeps through every class. 

The navigation's really hard, 
The math he cannot pass. 

And still old "knucklehead" is held at bay 
By rumdums that he fails — alas. 

He flies his Ryan everyplace 
And brings it home with glee. 

The gosport tube is giving out 
With give the ship to me. 

And now he's writing on the blackboard 
Beware, I'm blind. I land down T. 

A/C Pearse, R. M. 

A/C Callicott, N. 



A DODO'S PRAYER 

Our iipperclassmen zvJio art above us, 
Lenience to be thy name. 

Th\ commission come, thy zvill be done 
In tlie Army as it is on earth. 

Give us this day some decent bread, 
And forgive us our Rum-Dums 

As we forgive those zvho Rum-Dum -ziith us. 
Lead us not into "gigs" 

But deliver us from "Pop-To' s" 

For yours is the Honor of upperclass- 
men 

irhich lasts only five weeks . . . Thanks it's 
not forever. 

And that ain't no Damn Propaganda. 
— Amen. 



"On the double, Dodo," 

Is what I hear all day, 

And even in my sleep at night 

That's all my dreams can say. 

From barracks to the mess hall. 
From mess hall to the line; 
Then back the other way, I run 
In double, double time. 

Now I don't mind the running 
And I have never been late. 
But when I AM allowed to eat 
All I can see's my plate. 

So there's one thing I'd like to know 
Before I get much sicker: 
If they want us there in such a rush 
Why don't they start us quicker? 

A/C Addison, M.C. 41- 



WHY DON'T WE GROUND LOOP 
MORE OFTEN 

(Tune— Why Don't We Do This More Often) 
Why don't we ground-loop more often? 
Just like we ground-looped last night. 
Gee, but it's hell to take a check ride again, 
Thank gawd it happens only now and then. 
We shouldn't do this so often, 
Don't you agree that Fm right? 
We make these Ryans stall, we make these 

Ryans spin, 
And you never get a good one it seems, 
So why don't we ground-loop more often? 
Just like we ground-looped last night. 

A/C Bither, J. R. 



A/C Wight, R.G., 42-C 



"A DODOD'S BOUQUET" 

Roses are red, 

Jiolets are blue, 

The upper-class -zvill get you, 

If you don't Pop-to. 

A'C Mosher, S. R. 



PAGE ELEVEN 



The Ryan A B C's 



A — stands for airplane, the thing that we fly. 

D — is for Benjamin, the top rankin' guy. 
v.. — is for Contact, the world's greatest mag. 

U — is for "dodo," the raunchiest tag. 

t— Is for engine, the Kinner is bad. 

r- — is for form-one, a mistake makes you sad. 
O — is for ground-loop, the fear of the drome. 
r~l — is for hHadwin, the head of our home. 
I — -is for instructor, the gosport whiz. 

J — is for jerk, who gets all of the quiz. 

K — is for Keesee, who pedals to school. 

L — is for Laundry, who teaches slide rule. 
M — is for mess, so lousy it stinks. 

N — is for next, who buys the drinks. 

f^ is for occasional, as in open post. 

^^ or maybe It's O. D., the job you hate most. 

r — -is for pay-line, where hands grab our dough. 
\f) — is for quiver, as all dodos know. 

K — is for Ryan, who sells us the stuff. 

O — is for Sam, who takes all of his guff. 

I — is for tee, a most changeable thing. 

U — is for undershoot, look out for that wing. 

y — is for vaccination, we're stabbed twice a week. 
W — is for wallet, mine's pretty weak. 

A— is for exercise, that Cooper pours on. 

Y — is for youth, who faded and 



won. 



7 is for zero, a terrible grade, whether in ground 

<;rhrin nr nn v/mir I fifl c+^rfo 



school or on your 180 stage. 
PAGE TWELVE 



From Ranks to Riches... 



or 
A Tour About Is Foul Play 

I became an aviation cadet on October 
I, 1941, and I'm almost through primary 
school now. In fact, my instructor said 
today that if I keep on flying like I have 
been lately, that I will be out of here in no 
time! 

I was in the Cavalry before I became a 
flyer. That's where I got the idea of flying. 
I took short flights nearly every day from 
the back of a horse to the ground. 

I'm an ambitious soldier, and in three 
months I worked my way through the ranks 
to be a sergeant. In fact, my Captain used 
to say I was the rankest man in the organ- 
ization. 

On my first airplane ride here at Ryan 
my instructor took me up for thirty minutes. 
I was all over the sky. Some of it got on the 
plane and he made me wipe it off with a 
bucket and sponge. The next day was bet- 
ter, and he didn't have to tell me to do it. 
I already knew where the bucket was! 

hie asked me if I ever had any previous 
time. I told him no, but that I had a brother 
who did two years at San Quentin. One 
day he said we would shoot landings, so I 
hurried over to my cabin and got my old 
Colt. We never did see any, though. 

I'll never forget my first solo. I did three 
landings- — the first two were honeys. We 
certainly are lucky to have so many available 
parts of airplanes to study in ground school. 

When I first got to this school I astound- 
ed my fellow cadets with the large amounts 
of mall I got each day. Why, I got more 
mail in a day than my roommates got in a 
week! Then I paid my bills, and it dropped 
off to nothing. 

Cadets used to drop in my cabin all the 
time. We would play poker, although it 

PAGE 



was against regulations. I won all of the 
time, except the night the mirrors clouded 
up when my roommate took a Turkish bath. 

It sure Is nice to have hHollywood so close. 
I go there nearly every week-end and hob- 
knob with the movie stars. Last week I was 
hob-knobbing with Betty Grable and Ann 
Sheridan. Then some guy bumped me and 
I dropped my binoculars and broke them. 

We get lots of recreation at Ryan — bas- 
ketball, baseball, volleyball, badminton, 
tennis, ping pong and billiards. Badminton 
Is my game, and I am pretty good at It. 
When I come around they are all afraid to 
play me. They just walk off and give me 
the bird! I used to box some, too. My 
technique was different. They carried me 
both ways! 

One Saturday we all went for a ten mile 
hike just to remind ourselves of how glad 
we were to be In the Air Corps. Most of 
the cadets got pretty tired, but I came out 
fairly fresh. For a while I thought the Lieu- 
tenant saw me as I sneaked back into ranks 
when the boys marched back. 

Well, a few days ago I took my final 
Army check ride. The Lieutenant who rode 
with me was quite a pilot. He did a slow roll 
by the numbers. Then I did a slow roll by the 
numbers. My numbers were rounded off! 

He did a Chandelle, starting 50 feet off 
the ground and gained 200 feet. Then I did 
a Chandelle starting 50 feet off the ground. 
In the second plane we took up I did my 
lazy eights and pylon eights. 

He gave me two forced landings. I hope, 
we go to Randolph for Basic; I understand 
the ground is ail flat around there! I did 
two snap rolls and came out on the point. 
The third one I did at 150 miles an hour. 
Those parachutes sure give a fellow a jolt 
when they open! 

By A/C CARL WILLIAMS, 42-D 
THIRTEEN 






i^ 



LO Cv , 







LJ (X) 



CH 



iJl 



^^'i^.3 



(ji 



Q_0 r- 



o 



OU o 



jO 




Ul 




«QUK%'i^.l 



N»0 



jna3 




"How high can you count, Mr. Peterson?" 

"Two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, 

nine, and ten. Jack, Queen, King and Ace." 



hHostess: "I've met you some place be- 
fore, haven't I?" 

Cadet: "That's right, last summer you 
met me halfway at Long Beach." 



Dodo: "hloney, I'm wild, wicked and ex- 
travagant with my money. Will you marry 
me and reform me?" 

Airport Annie: "Well, I'll marry you!" 



A dodo walked into a tough beer joint 
and was going to buy a bottle of beer. He 
saw the sign, "Billiards, five cents," and or- 
dered five cents worth of billiard beer. The 
bartender decided to fix the dodo up so he 
just added turpentine and coloring and 
served it. The dodo drank it down, smack- 
ed his lips and made a face. He turned to 
the bartender and said, "If I weren't such 
a billiard drinker, I'd swear that was tur- 
pentine." 



"You say your dodo friend won $50,000 
in a lottery? Are you sure you got the right 
dope?" 

"Well, he'll do until another dodo comes 



along. 
• 



Three dodos died and went to heaen. 
One dodo knocked on the door and said 
he was a Cal Aero dodo, another dodo 
knocked and said he was from San Diego 
Ryan Field. St. Peter refused both admit- 
tance and sent them to hell. 

The third dodo knocked and said he was 
from Ryan Field in Hemet. St. Peter said; 
"Come in, you've had enough hell." 

PAGE 



Oh for the life of a dodo; 
'Tis pure, 'tis calm, 'tis sweet; 
He has not a care in the world; 
Why existence is a treat. 

But seriously speaking it is a thrill; 
When all is said and done; 
To realize the right to fight the good fight: 
For the greatest country under the sun. 

Why, this is reville, rum-dum, and inspection : 
Pop-to and red lights galore ; 
There is blisters, headaches and sunburn. 
And marching aft and fore. 

But upon full consideration. 
Not one but would shed a tear; 
Tf upon last contemplation 
Tie had to say, "Cood-bye Old Dears." 
A/C Walker, A. M. 



SIXTEEN 



The Story of Three Dodos 



By A/C JORDAN, E. G., 42-E 

Once upon a time there were three 
Dodos. These Dodos were baby Dodos, 
because nobobdy has even seen a mama or 
a papa Dodo. So nobody knows where 
Dodos come from. 

Some say that Dodos are made out of 
college students, which is logical since col- 
lege students are easily convertible. Any- 
way nobody knows what happens to college 
students after they graduate. 

One day when the three Dodos were on 
the flight line, little Peroxidelocks wandered 
into their cabin. Peroxidelocks was a fa- 
vorite of the fellows who had washed out, 
because she was washed out, too. But the 
fellows weren't washed out because they 
used peroxide. 

Well, anyway, little Peroxidelocks got 
lost when she was out picking dates. She 
couldn't decide between some fat, rich. 



juicy ones, or the regular run at Ryan. 

She was very tired when she wandered 
into the three Dodos' cabin, so she lay down 
on the bed. The bed, being made in a 
military manner ond having the blankets 
drum tight, threw her to the bottom of the 
upper bunk and she was knocked cold. 
When the three Dodos came home from 
their formations and saw the messed up 
bed they presumed that someone had rat- 
raced in it, and so gave it no further thought. 

The Dodos were tired so they crawled 
into the other three bunks and went to sleep. 
Little Peroxidelocks awoke before reveille 
the next morning and ran all the way home, 
because she knew that wasn't her bed, and 
besides, she happened to remember her 
way home. 

The original ending of this story was 
censored because noboby has even seen a 
mama Dodo or a papa Dodo. No one would 
have believed it anyway — of the Dodos. 




PAGE SEVENTEEN 



"OWED" TO A FLYING CADET 

Blessings on thee, Flying Cadet, 

Your silly puss I can't forget; 

With thy head of solid bone, 

Its inner functions stay unknown, 

Dressed up in thy fine attire, 

I wish that clothes could make a flyer! 

And thy over-banked chandelle — 

HHow I wish you were in hell! 

Thy landings leave me black and blue, 

God made you half-kangaroo; 

With thy skidding down wind turn 

I give up! You'll never learn. 

With thy feet on rudder froze. 

What keeps you up? God only knows! 

With thy pylon-eight down wind 

You are in a constant spin; 

With thy ever-dragging wing. 

Please, sweet death — where is thy sting? 

With thy goggles cased in dust. 

If loops don't get you, snap rolls must. 

Blessings on thee. Flying Cadet, 

Stay in and pitch — you'll get there yet. 

I only hope some day you'll be — • 

A flight instructor, same as me! 

— William Sloan, 
Ryan Flight Instructor. 



THE PARABLE OF THE H.P. 

(Continued from page 4) 

Then behold cometh a still small voice in 
the Gossports: "Hot stuff, kid, thou hast 
just passed thy sixty hour test. Unto my 
many ears, never has come one so right- 
eous unto the ways of slow rolls, pylon 
eights, loops, and, eac. Enter thou, my son, 
unto the joys of the Basic School. 

And the lad feeleth like unto one who 
falleth Into the sewer and crawleth out with 
a freshly laundered shirt. As a matter of 
fact he feeleth Damn good; yea, he again 
feeleth like the something on a stick. 

Really, he careth not a great big Damn 
even for the Helen Highwater. 

PAGE 



DODO'S DAFFYNITIONS 

By V\/M. (DOC) SLOAN 

Hangars — Racks to hang clothes on. 

Landing Mat — Article in bathroom floor to 
break falls after slipping. 

Laundry Bag — Sack to put odd shoes, bot- 
tles, powder boxes, etc., in on Saturday 
mornings (also used occasionally as a 
place to deposit dirty clothes). 

Mountain — Part of ring In which gem Is set 
— curvature of horizon. 

Hemet Belle — Give me a cow bell. 

Ground School — A fellow's got to catch up 
on his sleep somewhere. 

Upperclassman— CENSORED. 

Potatoes — Usually rare. 

Jacket — Combination of verb and pronoun, 
"If we have a flat tire, we'll jacket up 
and change it." 

Anonymous — Noted Greek author. 

Rome — Verb meaning "to wander." 

Myth — Female moth. 

Basin — Place where during inspection water 
is supposed to be found not present. 

Hand Towel — Bathroom decoration. 

Ash Tray — Ditto (without bathroom). 

Flying Line — Ferocious animal with wings. 

Pop-To! — Used as "I'm gonna write Mom 
a letter and Pop too." 

Ground Loop — Rope laid in a circle on the 
ground. 

Take-Off— To doff. 

Elevators — Found In tall buildings. 

Rudder — To take one's choice — "I'd rudder 
be a F-^C than a yard bird (I think)." 

Letters — Sows have 'em when they haven't 
been good girls. 

Vertical Fin— A $5 bill. 

Tea Dance — Plural for a certain species of 
ant. 

Anti-Socialist — One who never goes to par- 
ties or social functions. (Dodo.) 

Gelatin — Machine for decapitating French- 
men. 

Dutch Cleanser — Laxative used In Holland. 

Gig — Used to spear frogs. 

Parachute — Article which, if you ain't got 
when you first need it, you won't ever 
need again. 



EIGHTEEN 



Ground Loop 

When a pilot's been aflying for a coupla' years or so, 

And can kick a plane around, and put on quite a show, 

It's a thing he takes no pride in, and unless I have been scooped 

If he's ever done much flyin', he's at different tinnes ground looped. 

When the kaydets get together for a stage at Randolph Field, 

And you're due to draw a ship with a wobbly tail wheel; 

You come in for your landing and you put her down O. K. 

But before you know what's happened, she's headin' for the hay. 

So you pour the gas into her and she bounds up from the ground, 
And you're feelin' mighty thankful for a chance to go around; 
Down the base leg you come roaring, cut the gun and make the turn, 
But you know that they're watching and your ears begin to burn. 

You head in for the runway, note the drift and drop a wing. 
And you feel the ship asettlin' as the wires begin to sing. 
The ground comes up atearin' and you ease back on the stick, 
And you bear down on the rudder and you do it mighty quick. 

But you know your case is hopeless when you feel her start to go. 
And you crack the throttle open, but you know you've been too slow. 
The horizon starts aspinnin' and the plane is swapping ends, 
As the dust begins to shower while the wing-tip slowly bends. 

You can hear the spar asplittin' and fabric tear apart, 
While the terror down inside you takes a death grip on your heart; 
Your hands and feet are paralyzed as the dirt goes flying past. 
And you duck down in the cockpit as the motor coughs its last. 

Then you climb out from the wreckage, and your knees begin to shake. 
And you feel humiliated for the ribbing you must take. 
All the pilots crowd around you and advice begins to flow. 
And they tell you how it happened, just as if you didn't know. 

They criticize and advise you and although they're meanin' well. 

You try to laugh it off and tell 'em all to go to hell — ■ 

Lots of pilots give prescriptions and enjoy to rub it in, 

But there's few that give descriptions of the ground loops they were in. 

BILL SLOAN. 

PAGE TWENTY 



YEA, VERILY! ! 

By A/C BESEDA, J. M. 42-C 

A ND SO IT CAME TO PASS that in 
-^^^ the great valley where clear skies 
dawned eternal and Stearmans roared in a 
manner most unholy, an Untutored one 
came. Yea, though he possessed a sheep- 
skin, his noggin was bare, save the bone. 
And he sayeth unto the Prophet, "O Mighty 
One, teach me the way of the Lords. 
Grant unto me the power to arise alike unto 
the eagle that I may no longer be earth- 
borne. Guide me past the pitfalls of elim- 
ination, and deliver me from the washing 
machine. Lead me to my commission that 
I may have a goodly income, and dazzle 
the babes back home with my glamor." 
And the Great One restrained his anger, 



for lo, this was olde stuff to him. hHardened 
unto ignorance was he, and tolerant of 
asses. So he sayeth unto the knucklehead, 
"O giver of headaches and sleepless nights, 
the way before thee is strewn with thorns 
and groundloops. Before the symbol of 
worth is pinned on thy heaving bosom, ye 
must prove thyself a man. Thy heart must 
be filled with the love of flight, not of 
femmes. Thy yen to be possessed of wings 
must be as a sponge, absorbing always the 
wisdom of the learned ones, for he who pro- 
gresses as a snail shall be forever wingless. 
Thy eyes shall be dedicated to eternal vigi- 
lance, for he who looks, but sees not, soon 
reposes in hHell. Thy body shall be at ease, 
vet responsive, for he who possesses two 
left feet and coordinates cross-legged dis- 

(Continued on page 25) 



-n 




rw T's, G Rf^THK/N S ^ -Ct 

Ne's 8eei\/ hav/^/& a little 

TROUBLE iJJlTH h/S PATTFJ^^' ' * 



PAGE TWENTY-ONE 



Forced Landing... 

By A C TOMS, B.M., 42-D 

66 A LITTLE MORE rudder there. Ease 
^^^ on the ground pressure; don't let 'er 
dive. Start the roll-out — gotta get that 
wing tip through ol' San Jac. That's it. 
Man, am I hot! Wattaneight! Wattaneight! 
H.P.? Sizzling, 'at's me. — Now for the next 
one; bring 'er nose up slow — start the . . . 
Whatsamatter? Where's the motor? WHO 
TURNED OFF THAT MOTOR! SOME- 
BODY CUT THE . . . Oh, forced landing, 
huh? Remind me to tell you what a fine 
gosport voice you have sometime, Mr. 
Dinwiddie. Okay, don't shout! I heard you. 
I'll have her down to a normal glide in a 
minute. Now for a field; how's it on the 
right? Rocky as hell! Left? Same old . . . 
Yessir, I'll keep my glide even. I ought to 
set you down on those goddam rocks. May- 
be it'd cure ya of pullin' this ol' stuff. If 
I don't find a field pretty soon I'll have to. 
Oh, oh; there's nice green one just over 
the hill — a regular airport! Wattabreak! 
Now to get . . . Nossir, i wasn't going to 
land in that orange grove. Damn! Okay, 
Mr. Dinwiddie, I'll take the next one. As 
brown as that is, it can't be an orchard. 
Now for that base leg . . . Wattinell are 
those things movin' around? A guy oughtta 
be shot for puffin' sheep out here! It's a 
serious hazard. What if it was a real forced 
landing? A bottleneck in defense, that's 
what it is. . . . Hope I can stretch this glide 
just a little farther. Maybe I can make the 
next one. Shouldn't allow power lines 
around, either. . . . Okay, okay, I see 'em. 
You'd think as long as he's been flyin' he'd 
have better depth perception. I'll clear 
'em by a good ten feet. . . . Quit jerkin' 
that stick! If you were a white man, you'd 
clear that motor again and give us a little 




push. 



If my mother were here you 



W 



owl 



wouldn't talk to me like that. . 
That field's little. Goddam garden patch! 
Gonna overshoot. Better use flaps. FLAPS! 
FLAPS! Hope he heard me. . . . Boyoboy! 
Weregonna hit 'er okay. Hey, that ain't 
bad! From 3000 feet! Over mountains, 
too! That's really ridin' the beam. . . What's 
that? Smoke? Yeah, I see it. It's blowin' 
from. . . . Omigod, I'm landin' downwind! 
Who changed that wind? SOMEBODY'S 
BEEN FOOLIN' AROUND WITH THE 
WIND! SOMEBOD— Okay, so it was strict- 
ly Navy — ya don't have to rub it in, do 
ya? I'd a made it if there'd been a decent 
field. Pullin' forced landings in this coun- 
try; what'd ya expect? Yeah, I'll head for 
the main airport. Wait'll I find the guy that 
changed that wind!" 



PAGE TWENTY-TWO 




PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



OUR HERO. CHARLIE CADET--AS HE APPEARS . . . 



TO HIS BEST GIRL— 

Ah, be still my heart!! He's coming to see 
me tonight, and I'm counting the seconds 
till the doorbell rings. I'll open the door and 
he'll stand there, resplendent in his uniform, 
smiling his oh-so-handsome smile, with the 
look of an eagle in his deep brown eyes, 
hlow brave he must be daring the elements 
each day as he soars aloft on his golden 
wings. What courage he must have to con- 
stantly flirt with danger as he masters the 
intricate art of flying. And he says, too, 
that the General promised to make him a 
captain soon. I can hardly wait!! Military 
weddings are just too, too . . . 

TO THE LINE MECHANIC 

Oh, Oh!! — Here comes Homicide Hec- 
tor, and I'm stuck to crank his ship. So help 
me, the next time that nit-wit switches the 
gas off when I call for "contact," I'll take 
the crank and bust it over his empty nog- 
gin. Yesterday he darn near blew me naked 
revving the motor up, and my chances of 
living to a ripe old age are the same as the 
proverbial snowball when he taxiis out of 
here. He'll come tearing back in here, over- 
shoot the parking line five feet, and have 



the crust to howl about defective brakes. 
I'm getting flat feet from chasing his form 
One across the airport. When the good 
Lord gave him his choice between brains 
and cake, he must have been awful hun- 
gry. . . . 

TO HIS FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR — 

Well, here we go again!! — God's gift to 
the air corps and I are going to prove once 
more that the law of gravity is so much 
damfoolishness. I wonder what the imper- 
sonation will be today — the cigar store In- 
dian or the contortionist with the hives. 
Here comes Glamor Pants now with his 
scarf dragging and his goggles on upside 
down. Let's see — yep, my insurance is paid 
up this month. Better put some air in my 
chute cushion and have the mechs check 
the shocks on this crate — his drop-in land- 
ings from ten feet are a masterpiece on 
how-not-to-do-it. Boy, if rigor mortis sets 
in again today, I'm gonna run, not walk, to 
the nearest straight jacket. One hundred 
students in this class and I'm stuck with the 
only one with mental paralysis. Oh, well — 
Come on, Lindbergh, let's go. . . . 

— Doc Sloan. 




PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



YEA, VERILY ! ! 

(Continued from page 21) 

appeareth with the first Board Meeting. 
Yea, though the Great White Beard needeth 
pilots, thou are as a friend unto the enemy 
if thou art gutless. 

So go then, ye accident seeking a place 
to happen, and abide by these truths. And 
in those darkest days when thou knowest 
not up from down, let this be thy prayer: 
My Instructor, who are in the front 

cockpit, 
CENSORED be thy name. 
When finals come, I hope its done 
In flight, as it was on the blackboard. 
Give me this day a passing grade. 
And forgive me my raunchy turns. 
As I know not what I do. 
Lead me not unto Bombardiering 
But deliver me to Pursuit 
For Thine is the word that will keep me 
From being a Dodo 
Forever 
Amen. 



-.* 



A Tasty Sandwich 

and 

Your Favorite Soft Drink 



Connplete: 

BREAKFAST 
LUNCH or DINNER 



Malt Shop 



306 E. Florida 



I 
Hemet, Calif. 1 



.._,„_.„_.. — ,_,._,._„,_„_.^ 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Sunday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 25c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 



* — — ■ — «• — 



I 
I 

•4 



Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deiiciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



I 

*"■■ 



1 
1 
I 



.._„ , — ,_„ — . — ._. — ._,, — ,_„._. — „,_.._.^, 



PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



— , — „„_„„_„._.„_„,* 



CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
Trust and Savings Bank 

of Riverside, Calif. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEY 
BOWLING CENTER 



24 N. Carmelita 



Hemet, Calif. 



+.— ..— .. 



EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

?IMIi 

IHiEMEir NiiWS 

Complete 
Local News Coverage 

• 
"AIRVIEWS" By "DOC' SLOAN 



PHONE 10 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 



■* 




Cadet 
Portraits 

MADE 

EXCLUSIVELY 

ON THE POST BY 

AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

Special rates given Ryan Cadets 

Studios Located 

at 
503 "E" Street 3935 Main St. 

Scui Bernardino Riverside | 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 



<{■■ ■■ >■ .. .. uu du u. d. u. « ,. >■ n. u. u„ .u D>|. 



.ameras 



. . . Fil 



ms 




DEVELOPING — PRINTING 
DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 




Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 



<.,_.._.._.,_.._.._.. — ._.._„_.._.„ 



■—"——* 



For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

HEMET VALLEY 

Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 

I 2 th at Vine 
PHONE 2400 RIVERSIDE 



uu^— uu^— n^ 



NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




. — + 



WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail in 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 



C. p. MARTIN 



D. D. MARTIN 



Phone 1940 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 

TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
you by the name on your Individual bundles of 
Dry Cleaning and Laundry. 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 
300 E, Devonshire Phone 250 






PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



♦- 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters For 

UniForms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

m 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 

QUALITY LUGGAGE 

In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 

"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmelita Hemef, Calif. 



— Bi ^— n^^i— *u^— M^— ■■ —BO ^—an ^— m— ■■— 



-M— u— ■■■^ai-— n— 



HCMET NEWS PRINT 




.^'TtU mcms:'- 



Class 42'H 

/ Qii Coips i\almnG Ueiacliment 

J Ryan School of Aeronautics 

* Hemet, California 



PUBLISHED BY 
Kwaw ^ckcol ol Cle'ionauiics 

HEMET, CALIF. 

April 24, 1942 






IVt'AN SCHOOL 
OF AERONAUTICS j 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

R. W. SPARGUR EDITOR 

J. D. WILLIAMS ASST. EDITOR 

G. D. CURRIE ART EDITOR 

E. C.SCHAFER FEATURE WRITER 

A. W. CLARK janitor (don't rate capitals) 

LT. J. K. GRAHAM EDITORIAL ADVISOR 

DEAN RICHARDSON BUSINESS MANAGER 



-* 
I 



• This — shall we say, creation — is submitted by a hurried staff to the Class of 42-H 
and the entire world as a memorial wherein are chiseled the unmistakable footsteps of those 
noble men of 42-H through Primary who now, because it's that time of year anyway, move 
on for bluer skies to conquer. 

•All contributions received are gratefully appreciated and we believe they fell into 
rather neat order. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed assembling it. 

THE STAFF. 




Headquarters 

AIR FORCE TRAINING DETACHMENT 

Hemet, California 

April 18, 1942 



CAPT. M. H. CARLTON 



In assuming my duties at this station I do so with the tirm conviction that anything 
worth doing at all is worth doing right. The spirit and cooperation, as evidenced by all, 
is indeed gratifying and is indicative of assured success in our efforts to do the job well. 

You of 41-H have experienced a complete change in class customs. In doing so, your 
Cadet Officers are deserving of commendation for maintaining splendid discipline. The 
cooperation and results obtained give a true picture of the flexibility required of Air 
Forces personnel. Many of your class have been eliminated from pilot training and are 
already preparing themselves for other duties equally as important. A minute percentage 
have skipped the traces — we can only hope that their "just-due" has made them better 
soldiers in this time of need. 

We of this detachment are proud of 
your record here at Ryan Field. Let your 
experiences here be a guide to the future 
and success is assured. 

MERRILL H. CARLTON, 
Captain, Air Corps, 
Commanding. 



y 




LT. A. J. HADWIN 
Commandant of Cadets 



PAGE TWO 



Ryan Field Officers— 

r p _ ]^ 

1^ 1^ . ^ 



CAPT. M. O. DART 

"What do you make of 
the case. Ferrlll? 



CAPT. A. S. HOWELL 

"Captain's bars are just 
a matter of time [a life 
time) " 



1st LT. D. D. CONNARD 

"You passed." 




1st LT. R. S. DAVID 

"My Kinner, the acme of 
efficiency." 




1st LT. R. D. CAPE 

'Russians are a dull race." 




^^ 



1st LT. M. D. M'CORMACK 

"Woof." 




1st LT. C. R. MclNTYRE 

"Oh, goody, let me sup- 
ervise the drill at 6 p.m." 





1st LT. J. K. GRAHAM 

'Four aces." 




^« 



i^ 



1st LT. C. E. JENSEN 

"Madame, you may have 
your chewing gum back." 



JOHN P. KELLEY 
1st Cadet Capt. 



A. BOLDMAN 
Cadet Sgt. Major 








1st LT. R. L. MERRILL 

'Milk, bartender." 



IRVIN C. HUTCHINSON 
Cadet Adjutant 



G. C. KNIGHT 
Cadet Supply Officer 



PAGE THREE 



A Thought — 



Ground School is largely the result of a definition — the definition of an efficient 
military pilot. The definition doesn't come from the dictionary. It is coming from Bataan, 
from the Burma Road, from India, from Africa, from China, from Australia. Everywhere, 
It is becoming increasingly clear that the effective military pilot is a healthy. Intelligent, 
informed, skillful, courageous, experienced, tactician, technician, fighter, meteorologist, 
navigator, engineer, and soldier. Truly a remarkable individual! 

The Ground School curriculum is an outgrowth of this definition. Knowledge — funda- 
mental, basic knowledge — Is the foundation of many of the elements of this definition. 

Without It, intelligence is un- 
Implemented; skill is impossible; 
courage is foolhardiness; exper- 
ience is unprogressive and use- 
less; flying becomes a public 
menace. 

The value of Ground School 
training can perhaps best be 
realized by visualizing the piti- 
ful anomaly which would result 
without it — ■ the uninformed 
pilot. hHe Is the man who "for- 
got to tell you the switch was 
on when you were cranking his 
prop, hfe's the one who crawls 
out from under the wreckage 
to explain that he put the brakes 
y^ri IfSi -M^^^^^K "'MMMi' on a little too hard. hHe's the 

^^^ ii.'W^ ^^I^Wi^P ^RW. one who lost a wing because 

he didn't know a thunderhead 
was so tough. hHe's the one 
who — but why go on? This men- 
ace never becomes an old pilot. 
When one considers the value 
of this training, either in terms 
of dollars and cents, or from 
the academic point of view, or from the more practical standpoint as Insurance In actual 
combat. It becomes difficult to understand the individual who falls to make the most of 
it, unless one looks for a psychopathic explanation. 




H. RAINE. R. E. BUTLER, D. RAINE, J. H. KEESEE 
H. LANDRY, E. M. WEIDINGER, P. PIERCE, L. F. BRISTOL 



hlere lies a part of Dodo Butts; 

The other parts are scattered. 
\-\e thought that flying was the nuts; 

But Ground School never mattered. 
By hiale Landry 

PAGE FOUR 



F"'" « 







Company A 



Cadet Capf. 
AFTON L. SMITH 





C. H. Stoddard 




W. L. Salisbery, Jr. 



G. M. Adams 



C, B. Jones 




Wm. E. McCool 



C. C. Ne 




D. F. McCarron 




D. D. Sullivan 




W. F. Long 




P. C. Bowen, Jr 




™*».aaS 



M. L Shirk 



W. D. Taylor 



L. R. Ha 





M. C. Jordan 



E. E. Eillis 



L L. Eaton 





S. R. Johnstone 




Y. S. Berntien 




P. Knudson 




W. H. Buchanan 




S. R. Mosher 



R. P. Northrup 



C, S. Ralston 



L. L. Robinson 



W. T. Carroll. Jr. 



LITTLE DODOS 



"BLUES IN THE NIGHT" 



Ten little Dodos 

Came to fly at Rj'an. 

One saw the place in dayliglit 

And tlien there were nine. 

Nine little Dodos 
Got inside the gate. 
One did a "pop to," 
And then there were eight. 

Eight little Dodos 
Calling "seven come eleven." 
One cleaned the Commandant, 
And then there were seven. 

Seven little Dodos 
Doing airplane tricks. 
One wasn't high enough. 
And then there were six. 

Six little Dodos 
Were betting on a dive, 
One dived farthest, 
And then there were five. 

Five little Dodos 

Thought instructors were a bore. 

One refused to listen. 

And then there were four. 

Four little Dodos 

Examining the tee. 

One cut across it. 

And then there were three. 

Three little Dodos 
Wanted something to do, 
One played with power lines 
And then there were two. 

Two little Dodos — 
Round and round they spun, 
One forgot his rudder 
And then there was one. 

One little Dodo — 
No doubt a raunchy one. 
He's an upperclassman now 
The lucky son-of-a-gun. 

A''S Thomas A. Ferschweiler 



There icas a young lady from Trent 
iriio said she kne-zc zvhat it meant 
irhen men asked her to dine, 
Offered cocktails and wine, 
She knezc -zchat it meant — but slie zcent. 

A/S D. W. Heesee 



We yawn and rise before it's light 
And then begin the daylong flight, 
We clean and scrub and buck and shine 
And then rush like mad — out to the line. 
Then rush back in to something called chow 
And maybe a smoke if time will allow. 
Then to the classrooms for the rest of the 

day 
To hear what the Theorists may have to say. 
No, it's not over yet, we still have a thrill 

or two, 
The company falls out for drill for an hour 

or two. 
Then we fall out again for supper, even then 

we are not thru. 
It's fall out again for a practice review. 
Then two hundred Dodos who never wrote 

a line 
Must finish a thesis by lights out at nine. 
It's days like these that makes morale sink. 
But how many of us need be driven to drink. 

Raymond D. Stehle 



"To be or not to be." — Shakespeare. 
"I gotta make good." — Dodo. 

A/C Albert W. Clark 



"YOU'LL NEVER KNOW" 

From Oahii to old Maine 

Jnd from Hicham to the Plains, 

They came in droves to Ryan 

For the chance to "Keep 'em Flyin'." 

The fellozcs from the Islands, 
.hid all corners of the map 
Have made extensive plans 
On a potion for a Jap. 

The elixir may he sticky 

And a nasty medicine too, 

For the hrezv is called AFickey 

Mr. Jap: the zvord, is. Jinn to yon. 

A/C Robert N. Price 



TRYING! FLYING! 

./ great little ship is the Ryan 

Used for Primary flying, 

And behold the guy, 

If^ho cannot fly, 

Bnt does his damnedest trying! 

A/S T. W. Olson 



PAGE SEVEN 



Company B 



Cadet Capt. 
W. M. MARTIN 







J. B. Kair 



K. F. Morton 



B. E. Se 




W. P. McDowell 




Y. B. Do 




C. J. Hawes 





N. R. Wellbacher 




H. Thoronton 





W. E. Roseberry 




R. T. Kitchin 




D. B. Kirby 





D. H. Fugerson 




F. A. Larson 




H. D. Porter 




G. E. Mye 





J. D. Reardon 




D. A. Cr 




J. R. Nix 




W. L Paulson 



C. H. RIgsby 



F. W. Ristau, Jr. 



M. F. Stewart 



J. L Wood 



r 




L^rrERrrt who'j GOT 

THE RnurvCHY DODO 



3. ?ftNP\VOS J 





In'S.Vruc!k)R-. 
No-uj ^Vie -PrrsV +Vnn9 +o 
te-wein^iev — ALWAYS 
Reet> ^P^^ V\EF0 movSno 
and uowr EYES cbeiaj 
\ocfein<p W oWiev shitoS)! " 



L 







TRIMMING 
THE-SHIP! 



PAGE NINE 



.ompany 




Cadet Capt. 
M. LUMSDEN 






L. Andrews 



R. Mills 



J. Sandilos 



O. Kinkade 



R. Butler 




J. E. Butler 



D. Taylor 



H. Lafferty 



R. Brentllnger 



C. Andrews 








D. Anderson 



W. H. Willis 



T. Rege 



W. Johnson 



J. McFarland 








D. Taylor 



J. Murphy 



H. Nelso 



R. Nicholson 



G. L. Martin 







N. Lund 



H. Holik 



J. S. GImblln 



J. Vestal 



THli PERFECT "DODO" 



CADET'S LAMENT 



This story deals with a dodo named Bryan, 
Who landed for training, at Dear Old Ryan, 
He went into town, on a certain week-end 
And he landed in Hemet, just around the 
bend. 

Ele went to the show, and took a seat, 
RifTJit next to a blond, who was really neat, 
W'lien the show was over, he proposed a coke, 
1 h s was all, as he was almost broke. 

She gave him a smile, and said she would. 
He looked her over, and approved, but good. 
While drinking the coke, they had a long 

talk, 
Which was followed by a moonlight walk. 

She looked at the moon and faintly sighed, 
"Let's get my car, and go for a ride." 
After riding a while, it got quite chilly. 
The lassie's name, by the way, was Billie. 

"My folks," said Billie, "are on a trip. 
Let's go out, and have us a nip. 
We'll pull the shades, roll up the rug, 
Have a dance, and pour down a slug." 

Up until now, you will have to agree, 
That Bryan was headed for a damn good 

spree, 
But he left the gal, the car, and the spree. 
Because he was "on the Ball" as you can see. 

You may be wondering, as to the reason, 
That caused his actions, in this lovely season. 
It iiurts me to tell you, as you will agree, 
That few would have left her, not me! 

She was a beautiful gal, and well educated. 
They would have been, a couple well mated. 
But she lived 12 miles from our happy Field, 
So our hero's fate, was in this way — sealed. 

A/C Harold T. Rogers 



WHEN 

When they've got your ten to one, man. 
And your ship is eating lead, 
When you think you're all done in, man. 
And you've nearly lost your head. 

Wiien you're the last one that's left, man. 
And tiiey're closing in to kill. 
If your wings creak like a gate, man 
And they've given you your fill . 



I. el's lake a look at Ryan's FoiinUihi 
From Cokes and Smokes the sales are motinl- 

in'. 
Our hard earned Gold loivard il is flozvin'. 
We zvonder hozv ive keep on gain. 

The sound has grozvn above a sigh an' 
The zvorm must turn, there's no denyin' . 
Jle zvant to knozv, and we ain't lyin , 
'•Jf'hen the hell is Ryan BUYIN'f" 

A/S De Preter, J. L. 



RIVERSIDE GAL 

/ took her to a night cliih, 

I took her to a shozv, 

I took her almost any damn place 

JVhere she might like to go. 

ffe took in all the night spots, 
Sazv all there zvas to see. 
Ulien suddenly I realized 
She zvas taking me. 

T. A. Ferschweiler 



\'isitor to Ryan Field, Hemet — "Mister, 
I would like to see someone with a little 
authority." 

Dodo — "What can I do for you, Sir? I 
have about as little as anyone." 

A/S D. W. Heesee 



THE LAST RIDE 

Listen — Dodos, and you shall hear 
The tale of a Dodo, chilled zvith fear, 
Il all began zvith a gust of zvind 
Thai pill his zving tip into a spin. 
Then the army gave him the check, 
And zcashed him to save his neck. 



FLASH — Train stops with a jerk. Jerk 
gets off. 



The Dodo's conception of the Gosport 
System: An instrument that "Says all and 
means everything it says." 
PAGE ELEVEN 



• CLASS 



Ryan Schc 
Air Corps T 




Kneeling, Left to Right: 

WILLIAM J. LE BRETON 
JAY M. SINK, JR. 
LAURENCE SALTARELLI 
JAMES C. DAKAN 
JOHN G. SHATZ 
JOHN S. WILLEY 
WILLIAM S. GIBBS 
FREDDIE F. CHILDS 
FRANK W. KOWALCHIK 
ROBERT N. PRICE 
GERALD B. McDONALD 
ROBERT M. HANSEN 
FRED B. SWANK 
EDWIN S. WILCZYNSKI 
HORACE B. MONROE 
JIM T. CONNOLLY 
JOHN J. REYNOLDS 
LLOYD I. RIEGEL 
HOWARD E. RICE 
CLIFFORD W. STEVENS 
RAYMOND L. FITZGERALD 
MELVIN R. STARK 
OMEN B. SMILEY 
LeROY J. BRANDT 
ALPHEUS T. BLACKMAN, JR. 
JAMES P. VANZANT 
HARRIS B.YATES, JR. 
VERNON H. ZIMMERMAN 
LLOYD F. HARNER 
RAYMOND M. WAITE 
GEORGE T. DWYRE 
RALPH BURSON 
WILLIAM M. SHIREY 
WALTER A. LINK 



ROBERT S. SHERMAN 
LESLIE V. SLATER 
WILLIAM O. SMITH 
WILLIAM DIAN 
LOUIS T. MARTINDALE 
ARTHUR S. HOSTETTLER 
THOMAS LIOTTA 
BILL P. GAUTIER 
GEORGE D. CURRIE 
GLEN H. ISAKSEN 
WILLIAM J. HEMMEN, JR. 
REX H. GRABLE 
FRANCIS W. GUZAK 
CHARLEY H. JONES 
KENNETH P. JOHNSON 
JOHN L. DE PRETER 
CHARLES F. TYRRELL 
CARROLL A. FRENCH 
CARLF. WHITESELL, JR. 
JAMES T. CLEMENTS 

First row standing, Left to Right: 

WILLIAM L. TITUS 
WILLIAM W. SKINNER 
WARREN F. SCHNEIDER 
HENRY W. BALASH 
NOLAN P. DUCOTE 
JAMES V. McMYNE 
STANLEY G. NETZ 
ROBERT B.WRIGHT 
CLARENCE E. STUBBLEFIELD 
GORDON C. MUTH 
QUINCEY W.TUCKER, JR. 
THOS. A. FERSCHWEILER 
HAROLD K. PULLIAM 
THOMAS J. BUKOVAC 



GEORGE M. LAMB 
EUGENE M. HAYES , 
RON W. BAILEYS 
JACK W. SIPE 
CLIFTON E. WILLIAMS 
ROBERT BRINK 
ALFRED E. BARRETT 
VERNON L MORTON 
WILLIAM J. STEELE 
HARLEYO. SHIRK 
WILLIAM L SOUTH 
BENETO LEAL 
URBAN M. KARPEN 
ROBERT B. KLEIN 
JOSEPH JOHNSON 
ROBIN HANSEN 
BERNARD G. BIALKIN 
LEO D. GODFREY 
JAMES R. HARTUNG 
MARTIN C. ENGQUIST, JR. 
FRANK R. HUTCHISON 
WILLIAM F. KOEHL 
TOMMIE L. POPE 
GEORGE SAIED 
WILLIAM A. PITT 
PAUL TORRETTI 
VERNON A. HENDERSON 
DONALD C. M. WESTHAVER 
HAROLD L. ROGERS 
CHARLES L. CAVE 
STANLEY W. MURPHY 
JULIUS J. WIGGINS 
WILLIAM C. SIMON 
THOMAS H. COZENS 
ROBERT E. COOK 
RAY A. BALLINGER 
FLOREN K. BAKER 



i 



i 



=^ 



ironautics 
Detachment 



42-1 • 



■ ^ ! gf S! y 



. ^- ^ f^ -^ ^ 



T 



**, '- - -- » «^ ^; ^. . 




DON W. FOGGLESONG 
JOHN E. MAXEY 

2nd row standing, left to right: 

JAMES A. PARKER 
GEORGE R. SINGER 
HAROLD B. HELSTROM 
RICHARD W. THOMPSON 
ROBERT B. HUDDLESTON 
HENRY R. HABENICHT 
HOLLIS A. GODFREY 
BENJAMIN A. FOREMAN 
D. H. McFARLAND 
DONALD R. YOUNG 
DUANEV. STRONG 
JAMES R. HARTLEY 
JOHN S. RIPPY 
RALPH SMILEY 
JOHN W. BEAUDOIN 
VAN BUREN CROSS 
KEATON F. McCARTY 
JOHN A. ROBERTS 
CLARENCE E. HULBERT, JR. 
ALBERT O. ROWE 
WALTER R. PURPUS 
WILLIAM L. SWANSON 
CLAUDE V. SWINGLE 
GUY L. SHEPARD 
MARION WAGNER 
MASON E. MITCHELL 
HOWARD GEORGE HALE 
DOUGLAS W. KEESEE 
JAMES D. WILLIAMS 
JAMES A. BURLESON 
HOUSTON L. SHEPHERD 
RAYMOND D. STEHLE 



THOMAS C. MARTIN 
REX E. MONO 
DONALD R. HINSHAW 
JAMES F. BRUNO 
RICHARD G. PARR 
HUGH B. TAGERT 
ERNEST W. FROST 
ALVIN D. HOLDER 
JAMES F. WALLS 
REYNOLDS BOGGIO 
EARL E. FISHER, JR. 
JOHN M. AINLEY 
LEONARD GALLOWAY 
WENDELL O. PALMER 
HAROLD E. SHUCK 
JOHN C. NEARHOOF 
ARTHUR D. SOVEY 
JOHN MIKULA 

3rd row standing, left to right: 

GEORGE T. STANNARD 
JAMES H. HAYES 
JOHN BRADLEY 
WILLIAM H. ARMS 
PAUL W. REINOWSKI 
JOHN A. WYLIE 
HYMIE BORONSTEIN 
RICHARD G. PEAK 
FRED L. MYREN 
BILL R. MEHEW 
DONALD E. YOUNGMAN 
MORGAN G. HICHAM 
CHAS. F. SCHOEFFNER, JR. 
JAMES W. MacMILLEN 
LLOYD E. JARBOE 
SYLVESTER R. KRUPPA 



ALVA M. OFFORD 
RICHARD E. LEBLOND 
ROBERT E. BAIRD 
JAMES L. WEEKS 
ROBERT J. PEALE 
MARION L. JONES 
WILLIAM M. THORSEN 
WILBUR H. PENROD 
C. W. SHAW 
WALTER P. LANGDON 
FRANK C. JACOBS 
ORLO F. DUKER 
EDWIN C. SCHAFER 
ROBERT W. SPARGUR 
RICHARD M. BENTLEY 
ALBERT WESLEY CLARK 
LION H. WENTWORTH 
ROBERT P. COE 
WILLIAM E. WRENN 
CECIL E. DUNCAN 
LeROY WHITTAKER 
GARNETT F. HOLLAND 
VERNON E. BLACK 
JOHN J. RELLES 
HAROLD R. MILLEN 
RICHARD D. ANDERSON 
VON L. CARTWRIGHT 
EDGAR W. ALQUIST 
LA VERN W. OLSON 
GEORGE F. O'NEAL 
ROLAND D. WARNOCK 
HAROLD E. JENSEN 
WILFRED J. TOCZKO 
THOMAS E. DONNELLY 
HERMAN C. GADDIS 
JAMES F. HARDER 
RAY S. MOURER, JR. 



Company D 



Cadet Capf. 









^■L^^v v«w \ 









C. Jaquese 



A. Holman 



F. Achison 






R. Pappert 



C. Hicicman 



K. Durrett 



R. Lehnhausen 



C. Logue 




R. Cummings 



G. Collins 



J. Balteior 



J. Schell 




J. Younger 




W. Welch 



e. Van Viliet 



R. Thompson 



F. Ogler 



R. Nelson 





J. Middaugh 



J. McPhee 



W. R. Maass 



H. Jordon 



F. Hurlbut 








Jesse Johnson 



A. Hersch 



R. L. Taylor 



R. Laird 



E. Warren 





D Company, All Present Sir 







Report a. faucKet -^ t^ 







PROMINENT 



CCHARACTERS'^ 

of 

- CooD p 



THOSE NOT ACCOUNTED FOR 
ONSlOEft YOURSELF LUCK 




/y^y ' 



PAGE FIFTEEN 




Uombanv iZueens 

Inspiration and fortification, 
But too far away for pacification. 
Lovely dreanns for lonely men, 
Waiting, we hope, when our flights end. 



MISS BEHY ANN BARLOW— Co. A. Here, gentlemen, is 
the fair hand that has been addressing those letters to 
"Any Day" Bernzten, and we mean fair. From Gadsden, 
Ala., Miss Barlow is a very good representative. 




MISS JANE VOLK— Co. B. Imagine going to school and 
having Miss Volk for a teacher! Those fortunate pupils of 
Salinas High enjoy the privilege. A Gamma Nu from Salinas 
Junior College, she is engaged to Capt. Martin and plans 
to do some teaching of her own. 




MISS DOROTHY WILLIS— Co. C. Way ahead of her bro- 
ther Bill in this air game, Miss Willis flys the Portland to 
San Francisco run for United Air Lines as a stewardess. You 
can sell me a ticket right now. San Jose, Calif., boasts of 
this young lady. 



PAGE SIXTEEN 



Ike i2.ueen$ oj: 
the Giob 

All the girls at home are the best 
of any crop, these are represen- 
tative in only a few cases. 




MISS TANYA WIDRIN— Post Officers' Queen. One of the 

most photographed models In San Francisco and the answer 
to Lt. Cape's Russian connection. Miss Widrin is a volunteer 
in the 4th Interceptor Command, so all we need is "Wings" 
and a transfer. 




MISS BETTE HUNT— Co. D. Lucky Mr. McDowell— what a 
treat it must be to have Miss Hunt wander around in 
your dreams. A member of Pi Phi sorority of the University 
of Oregon, swimming and dancing, according to "Lucky", 
are her strong suits. 




MISS VIRGINIA LEE THIELER— Queen of the Cadet Bat- 
tallion Staff. A graduate of St. Mary's High School at Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo., she now graces the campus of Loretto 
Heights College at Denver. She has kept Mr. Knight worried 
for the last three years by inflicting the term "bodacious ' 
upon him. She swims and plays tennis and for a hobby 
just argues. 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 






m 




,/ 



e. 









^.rfUl.a. dtfi. 




'/ 






A PILOT'S PRAYER 

Dear God, whose mighty hand did make 

The things I see below, 

Help me guide this ship of mine 

In paths where it should go. 

Give us each day a clear, clear sky. 
True winds to lift the wings, 
Make each flight safe, for those who fly. 
And each, home swiftly bring. 

Make me to know the starry blue 
Is somehow should with thee 
Dear God, I feel so close to you 
Up here where clouds fly free. 

And when at last the great dive comes 
Please let me not forget. 
That thou will take the stick from me 
And be my pilot yet. 



SOME LIFE 

Here's to the dodo whose life is most trying. 
He joined the Army to keep 'em flying, 
The upperclass gigs him for playing or 

talking. 
And on the week end they have him walking. 



THE FIRST RIDE 

// was simply zvonderfii! 
To leave the ground below, 
Aud go soaring peacefully, 
Where one has yearned to go 

It was like a dream come true 
To gaze down at the ground. 
And see our earth as God sees it 
As you eagerly look around. 

Then as your thoughts go straying 
Far out in the blue — 
Someone jerks away the stick 
And says a zvord — or two. 

Then your ears start ringing 
Until you get back down, 
And you wonder why in Hell 
You ever left the ground/ 

A/C J. F. Bruno 

Then to the flight line all tense and tired 
To his good old instructor who's easily ired. 
Only at taps when he lies down to rest, 
Is he ever at his very best. 
"Some Life." 

A/C R. E. Leblond 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 
Phone Hemet 941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat-Sunday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 25c j 

f 



I 

San Jacin+o Theatre 

Phone 50 | 

OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 



Always A 

Hearty Welconne Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 



Deliciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

IMlEMiir CAIFH 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



I 
1 
I 



PAGE TWENTY 



CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
Trust and Savings Bank 

of Riverside, Calif. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



I 



— iin—— n*{i 



.„_.„_„._.._„._„—.._.♦ 



EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

?IMIE 

IHIEMET NliWS 

Complete 
Local News Coverage 

• 
"AIRVIEWS" By 'DOC SLOAN 



PHONE 10 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 



BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 



1 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEY 
BOWLING CENTER 

124 N. Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 

4 




Cadet 
Portraits 

MADE 

EXCLUSIVELY 

ON THE POST BY 

AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

Special rates given Ryan Cadets 
Studios Located 

at 
503 "E" Street 3935 Main St. 

San Bernardino Riverside 



PAGE TV/ENTY-ONE 



,._* 



WHEN YOU'VE "OPEN POST"— TRY 



-„* 




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HOTSPRI 



DANCING ON SAT. NIGHT 

Service Men 55c 7-Piece Orchestra 

— COCKTAILS — 
CAFETERIA DINING ROOM 

Good Food at Popular Prices 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH COUNTER 

GOLF— All Grass Public Course . . . 
RYAN FIELD— 50c At All Times 

TENNIS— Lighted for Night Play 

Hotel Rates — European Plan 
$1.65 to $3.30 Per Day 

Gilman Hot Springs, Calif. 

Phone San Jacinto 8811 



I 



.„ — 4- 



1 Complete line of 



BAKERY GOODS 



Specializing In 
PARTY AND WEDDING CAKES 



VALLEY BAKERY 



211 E. Florida Avenue 



Hemet, Calif. 



Phone 286 I 

I 



■"—""—"+ 



+ . 



We Made Your 
Class Picture 

• 

Wm. Fox Studio 

p. O. Box 1478 
Banning, Calif. 



1 
1 
I 



Additional Copies 
May Be Ordered by Mad 



4.. „,, .„. „„ 



. + 



Compliments of 

International Provision Co. 

1570 Industrial Street 

Los Angeles, California 

Trinity 961 I 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



PAGE TWENTY-TWO 



.ameras 



...Fil 



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DEVELOPING — PRINTING 



DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE I 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 




Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 



For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

HEMET VALLEY 

Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 

12th at Vine 
PHONE 2400 RIVERSIDE 



NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 



1 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail in 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 

C. p. MARTIN D. D. MARTIN 

Phone 1940 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 

TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



«— 



Modem Service for 

% 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



Ed, the Laundryman ... 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
you by the nanne on your Individual bundles of 
Dry Cleaning and Laundry. 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 
300 E, Devonshire Phone 250 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters for 

UniForms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 



H 






The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 

QUALITY LUGGAGE 

In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 

"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 



HEHST NKWa PKIffT 




o 

o 

o 
o 





^-5^^l^^^pi^'' 



r 



\ 



Class 42-1 

Qii Goibs Itaininc UetacUmetit 

Ryan School of Aeronautics 

Hennet, California 

MAY 23, 1942 




CORNTACTERS 

THE CRIER R. W. SPARGUR 

ASSOCIATE CRIER E. C. SCHAFER 

HEAD DOODLER H. R. MILLEN 

OTHER DOODLERS H. X. FORD, R. E. SETTLE 

BLACKMAILER (ADV. MGR.) CURRIE 

SNOOPERS M. G. MAHONEY, J. L. WHITON 

FLUNKEYS L. D. MYERS, J. F. BRUNO 

W. J. SHACKELFORD 

SHUTTER BUGS R. W. SABEL, J. WHITE, R. S. SHERMAN 

BUSINESS MGR DEANE RICHARDSON 

EDITORIAL ADVISOR LT. J. K. GRAHAM 






• Paris has the Eiffel Tower (or did have to the last communique), a tower leans in Pisa, 
Boulder has a dam, the Sphinx remains in Egypt and South Dakota has the Rushmore 
Memorial — all monuments to man's progress and memory. 

• Destined to overshadow all previous works made by other jerks, this issue of 
"CONTACT" is offered to the world at large by a hard working staff as an uncrushable 
monument, an unquenchable torch to those men who falteringly dragged their leaden 
feet through Primary at Ryan Field. 

• If you enjoy reading it any more than we enjoyed assembling It, you'd better stop 

reading now because our constitution won't be abb to stand the mirth, and we're supposed 

to be in good condition. t-, ,^ r-r a ,-r- 

THE STAFF 




Capt. M. H. (Read and Initial) 1st Lt. A. J. (Glamour Boy ) Had- Capt. A. S. (Pappy) Howell— Capt. M. O. (Murder, Inc.) Dart 
Carlton — "Remember me. Ma- win — "No, Dodo. I did not write "Honest. Grace, night ball games "Hmmmm, pulse normal, heart 
dam? I am your husband." 'Mein Kampf." sometimes last till 2 o'clock." normal, dead too." 




1st Lt. J. K. (Rank) Graham— 1st Lt. R.D. (What's Cookin)Cape 1st Lt. R. L. (Quack) Merrill— 1st Lt. D. D. (Air Raid) Conard— 
"And she has the most beautiful — Proud inventor of a new kind of "Hit him again, he's not dead "And then she asked me who my 
set of retreads." syn. rubber. Makes it with sugar, yet." scout master was." 




1st Lt. C. R. (Extended) Mclntire 2nd Lt. W. P. (Profile) Sloan— 2nd Lt. V. H. Murdock— "And 2nd Lt. C .E. (Ceiling Zero) Jen- 

— "Are my orders in yet, or will "No, Madame, this is not a cam- then I very defiantly said .to the sen — "What do you mean little? 

I have to pay my bills?" ouflage. I look like this every Colonel. 'Yes. Sir'." Why. I can see everything on the 

morning." table by just standing up." 

PAGE TWO 




2nd Lt. B. F. (Rosecrans) Hazei- 1st Lf. M. D. (Gulp) McCor- 2nd Lt. Richard (Foo) Young— 1st Lt. F. L (Ailing) Springer- 
ton, III — "Mister, as Ass't. Com- nniclc — "Lips that touch wine shall "You seem to have al the quali- "Listen, I've been siclc." 
mandant I demand that you ad- never touch mine. What am I fications for the job, Miss. Inci- 
dress me as 'Sir' and not 'Snooks'." saying?" dentally, can you type?" 



f. 




,4 !^^.^i4f^ 



STUDENT OFFICERS 



•^#5 Vs V 





REVIEWING OFFICERS 



INSPECTION 




^^^ 



Deane Richardson — Director ot 
the Grunt and Groan Dept. 
hi is type of living would be 
a good example for some of 
the "playboy" officers. 




A. W. CLARK 
Major 



CADET BATTALION STAFF 




G. T. DWYRE 
Capt. & Adjutant 



R. W. SPARGUR 
Supply Lt. 



H. A. GODFREY 
Sgt. Major 



PAGE THREE 



TO THE BOYS OF CLASS 42-1 

Guess you'll go doziii as the best, 
That ever fought a war, 
Not for the love of fighting, 
But loving zvhat it's for. 

Your fathers fought the last one, 
.ind 'twas a rugged fight; 
They threw you a torch from Flanders, 
To light you through the night. 

So remember The Spirit of '76 
'Cause you've a job to do, 
Your fathers gave it to Kaiser Bill 
But .idolph is up to you. 

Shack Shackelford 
Class 42-J 



Chinese loundryman, as he takes the bag 
of laundry, "Washee?" 

Dodo, "Yeh, how the hell did you know?" 



Ground school instructor, "Today we will 
try to solve a most baffling question. Where 
do the Hemet girls go when they grow up?" 



Exasperated Instructor: Sure, Dodo, 
George Washington chopped down a cherry 
tree, too, but not with the wing of a Ryan. 
A/C Joseph Whiton 



He gave me a "Forced Landing." 
I picked out a field that looked the size 
of a handkerchief. 

It was a handkerchief. 






iV 







If 



"Birth 

OF A 

"DODO 
J.F.maWieios 

— X-nslruc\or - 




PAGE FOUR 



Daffynitions... 

AIRFOIL— Ersatz tinfoil. 

ANGL1<: OF ATTACK— Any soft soap to 
a date. 

ARTIFICIAL HORIZON— \Vhat the in- 
structor calls the natural horizon around 
Hemet. 

AUTOMATIC PILOT— Any man who 
gets out of his bunk on second sail, dresses 
and makes reveille at third call still asleep. 

BLADF WIDTH RATIO— A necessary 
evil invention by Mr. Keesee. 

CEILING— Bottom of the floor of the 
room upstairs. 

CHORD — Our band will never know. 

COCKPIT — A wonderful sightseeing spot 

DIVE — You should know, you rum hound. 

DOPE — More commonly known technically 
as "Dodo." 

DRAG— Political pull. 

FIN — Five-spot. 

FLAP — Seldom used portion of the wing. 

GROUND LOOP— X (*) ?! !— blankety- 
blank — (censored) . 

INSTABILITY— (note— see "DIVE") 



LIFT — What a letter from the one and 
only affords. 

MIXTURE CONTROL— Right amount 

of coke at the right time. 

PARACHUTli— Drop stopper. 

RAIN — That stuff which if you're standing 
out in, you get wet from. 

RELATIVE WIND— Bragging uncle. 

RUDDER— Texas colloquialism— "I'd rud- 
der fly den eat." 

SKY — That which if you feel rain on your 
head you know it came out of. 

STABILIZER— Bromo Seltzer. 

STALL — Beatin' around the bush. 

TAIL HEAVY— That Monday morning 
feeling. 

THERMAL CURRENT — Generally 

known as — Current Thermal, that Red Head 

in Riverside. 

THROTTLE— What you'd like to do to 
your instructor. 

WIND TEE — Simple device to show hitch- 
hikers general wind direction. 

YAW — Brilliant answer by a Flying Cadet. 



ARTHUR RYAN TAUGHT ME 
FLYIN IN A HURRY 

Life was so peaceful at Santa Ana, 
Days were never too blue, 
Then came the day, we were sent away 
To a little place called Ryan, 
Where we do all our flying. 

Oh Arthur Ryan taught me flying in a hurry, 
He showed me the ground course, the walk 

around course. 
And told me to take it from there. 

Then Arthur Ryan told me not to worry, 
Fd come out all right and 
To my way of thinkin', I came out stinking 
I don't know a stall from a kite. 

The dodos around me can all fly over hills 
Without touching the trees. 
But any resemblance to flying is just 
Coincidental with me 'cause 

Arthur Ryan taught me flying in a hurry, 
And tho he makes me try. 
To me it resembles the eight hour trembles. 
Still he guarantees, I can fly. 



Things I think that I shall never see: 

Mr. Landry flying into a thunderhead. 

An upperclassman who's never said "Pop 
to!" 

Lana Turner at a U.S.O. dance. 

TOKIO (from the air). 

A poem more lovely than a tree. AMEN. 



UNDERTONES 
Dear Mama : 

Yes, Mama, I've been a good little dodo. 
I eat my vegetables every day, (that's all the 
upperclassmen leave me). I drink plenty of 
water, (just try to get anything else). I 
clean my teeth every day, (those that I could 
pry out of the cockpit cowling). I go to bed 
early every night, (fall into bed, to be more 
exact). I get a haircut once a week, (and a 
trim from Mr. Ryan three times a day). 
What's that, Mama? Oh, sure they kick it 
out of you at least once a day. I take a 
shower once a day. (I've got a special army 
wash scheduled for tomorrow). 
Can I come home now. Mama? 

Your Raunchy Son 
John Dodo. 

A/C John Moist 



PAGE FIVE 











\ 




Model PT-3.2 



(RESTRICTED) 



Exhaustive tests have been conducted for a considerable period, at least the last 
two days, by Dr. Donnelly, H.P., W.P.A., C.C.C, and Dr. Boggie, H.P., A.A.A., B.S., 
S.P.C.A., to determine a refined model of the Ryan PT22 Definite results have been 
obtained, and, through special permission of the Air Corps, War Department, and the 
Society for the Prevention of Calling Sleeping Car Porters "George," we are hereby 
able to release scant Information concerning this bundle of chained lightning (it has to 
be chained or it would fall apart.) 

It is safe to say that the Drs. Donnelly and Boggio have been busier than a one-armed 
paper hanger In fly time, and, through wind tunnel tests of terrific strain, powered by 
the heaving blows of four dodos, and after thirty-two cracked ribs, fallen arches, spots 
before the eyes, and a bad case of baldheadedness from nosing over and scraping along 
the mat, these intrepid experimenters have finally decided that the greatest trouble with 
the last model has been Its inherent tendency to supply a definite loss of aerodynamic 
efficiency to the left wing and a heavy pull of that little known force of gravity on the 
right aileron counterbalance causing what is known as "ground loop." 

Using depth sounding apparatus, they found the major factor concerned was the 
misplacement, in the old model, of the fire extinguisher. Placed on the extreme right side 
of the rear cockpit, the weight of the case added definitely to the falling force. Again, 
this same extinguisher being filled with a fluid known technically as N2 I 2 R3 00, commonly 
known In the vernacular of the day as "stuff," added even more to the weight because 
of the sub 212 on the N component, which is very — very dense. Zero sub zero component 
being Its partial reciprocal. Common fault in construction of this instrument was the lack 
of baffle plates causing "swish" of the "stuff," a consequent shifting of weight, and if 
this "swish" of the "stuff" did not become powerful enough to overbalance the plane It 
did, at times, get the pilot so seasick he didn't care whether he ground looped or not 
after the eighth bounce. 

A brilliant suggestion by Dr. Donnelly was thought at first to have solved the question 
without radical change of design. Dr. Donnelly graphed the absolute humidity in the 
rear cockpit for eight successive days and finally came to the conclusion that by turning 
the altimeter needle to the left, sufficient weight could be added to the left side of the 
plane to counteract the devilish pull of the fire putterouter on the right side. It was 
quickly seen, however, that this would result In the use of arithmetic to determine altitude 
readings and since this new model is to be used by Class 42-J, no such difficult operation 
should be added. 

Another suggestion was the removal of the numerals painted on the right side of the 
plane, since the black paint used In painting such figures as 999 on the side of a plane 
added weight, with consequent lowering of the black to yellow paint ratio — considered for 
years by experts to be exceptionally objectionable. Here again, It was found that the 
removal of the paint counteracted the weight of the case of the extinguisher, but the 
"stuff" still had to be contended with, so the plan was rejected. 

At last — Eureka! — or In United States English — "hHere it is!" or "I spy-" Simple, as 
all great discoveries are. It was finally found that by putting more air In the left tire than 
in the right tire the problem was solved. A little trouble has been experienced by the fact 
that air is heavier in San Diego than at Ryan Field, and should a plane have San Diego air 
In one tire and Ryan Field air in the other, the plane has a tendency to lean toward San 

PAGE EIGHT 



Dieqc — a direct application of Aristotle's I 3th law of physics. However, since the men in 
42-J will not be fair weather pilots, who cares if the plane does fly in a 30° bank. Through 
the collaboration of Brothers Grohs and Sheely, however, all parachutes will be packed on 
an opposite angle to offset this, leaving the pilot sitting straight and level. 

Further application of those water brains of the experimenters have brought about 
the addition of a nose wheel, a wheel at each wing tip, and a distractable tail wheel, either 
36 inches, or 3 feet wide. The different size depending entirely on the total horsepower 
supplied by the KInner K-5 (K in this model stands for koughing.) 

To complete refinement, a gosport condenser has been added to make all instructors' 
conversation come out as milk and honey, (goole, isn't It?) Further, arrangements have been 
made with the Wurlitzer Company to supply a juke box for the front cockpit with push 
button selection by the Instructor for 180° turns, 360° turns, chandelles, etc. Several 
attempts have been made to record the conversation of the instructor after the student 
has spun out of a steep turn, but until a new material has been found the project Is at a 
standstill, since no wax can be found that will hold the voice without melting. Frequent 
complaints on the part of the instructors have been heard of this new attachment, because 
of the fact that all Instructors will be expected to furnish their own nickels for the juke box 
but since Ryan has supplied each of them with a pair of loaded dice, nothing further has 
been heard. 

One mechanical perfection that far outranks anything found on foreign planes to 
date is the addition of the "helluva good" gas saver. This is obtained merely by instructing 
all pilots to get lost, land at March Field, and get a refill. From the 100 cases attempted, 
99 planes have returned to Ryan with almo't the same amount of gasoline with which 
they left, within the range of a few drops plus or minus. 

Since only one hand made model is now available, and mass production will not be 
In full swing until 1956, below Is shown a picture of the new Model PT 3.2 in flight, 
supplied through the courtesy of the Japanese embassy. 

By A^C E. C. SCHAFER. 







RYAN PT 3.2 (camouflaged) 



PAGE NINE 




ANN BEARD — Co. A. The above is what turns Mr. Ainlay 
into a poet this time of year. A University of Nebraska 
senior, where she is majoring in Fine Arts, Miss Beard comes 
from Lincoln, Neb. Incidentally, poetry or no poetry, 
Ainlay must have something to become engaged to such 
a beauty. 



D 



ream rormulas 



Though no scientist can explain 

; What transpires within my brain 

':, When sound asleep; here's proof! 

These photos show that I'm no goof. 




FRANCES H. GRIESINGER— Co. B. Now we know what 
makes Capt. Willey such a successful man. A pleasant 
addition to any landscape. Miss Griesinger makes that 
addition at Independence, Iowa. According to Mr. Willey, 
her long suits are music and dancing. 




THELMA (HAZEL) BRADDOCK— Co. C. Poor Capt. Con- 
nolly, we sympathize with him. leaving Miss Braddock behind. 
Paris, Texas, is fortunate enough to have her within its city 
limits where she graduated from Paris Junior College. 



PAGE TEN 



Quota of Queens 

No land Is ruled by any queen 
As beautiful as can be seen 
Upon these pages, left to right. 

They're left. To us, not right! 




MARION SELF— Co. D. A double shuffle— Mrs. Self is 
the sister of Jim Hayes and the wife of Lt. M. L. Self, a 
Ryan graduate now with the 56th Pursuit Squadron, Harding 
Field, Baton Rouge, La. Texas scores again, this time 
Odessa. She graduated from North Texas State Teachers 
College. 




DORTHEY DANIELS— Battalion Staff. Believe it or not, 
boys, she goes with Spargur. Inside information — right now 
she is attending Lindenwood College, just a hoot and a 
holler from St. Louis, Spargur's stomping grounds. Miss 
Daniels' home is in Chicago; sorry, couldn't get the street 
address. 




MARIAN AAGAARD— Editorial Staff. Such a wonderful 
staff needs wonderful inspiration. No wonder Schafer does 
loops and spins so well, he gets a lot of practice dreaming 
of Miss Aagaard. She's a blonde, so "Schafe" says, and 
Omaha, Nebraska, boasts of her beauty. 



PAGE ELEVEN 



Peepin Thru the Cabanas 



sights that Bess and Burn. . . . 

The faucet boys, Misters Peak, Bentley 
and Skinner, (Drip after Drip) heading for 
the Army office. 

Miss Gloria hlenderson re-adjusting her 
girdle on the steps of the Ryan office much 
to the consternation of Cadet Major Clarke 
who insisted (the ole meany) the boys keep 
their eyes off the point and wouldn't give 
'em eyes right. 

Los Angeles (the 49'/2 mile limit) was really 
inhabited this past week-end. Poor Capt. 
Mehew, in an eight hour blackout, making 
the dreadful mistake of reaching for the 
Ron Rico Rum and grasping his perfume 
bottle by mistake. Whoops . . . hie's been 
spitting Chanel No. 5 ever since, and the 
Dodos love it. 

The pilots judging the wind have discon- 
tinued watching the dust blow up but are 
now concentrating on the powder spray of 
Miss Maxine Savage when she gilds the 
lily. And brother it doesn't cut down on the 
ground loops either. 

Who is the Blonde Bombshell from the 
Ground School office any Cadet wouldn't 
mind staying after school with? 

And who was the poor Dodo in C com- 
pany that broke off with his fiancee and 
demanded back his ring and received the 
pawn ticket via the mails??? 

Johnny Bradley of Boston turning a deep 
crimson when asked was his girl friend one 
of the Bags they threw overboard at the 
Boston Tea Party. 

Orchids to the Floridan Chamber of 
Commerce for issuing a passport to C. Shaw 
to come to California. Now if they'd only 
take off the blinders. 

The hearty eater in the Mess hiall saying, 
"And I used to leave more than this on my 
plate." 

Mr. Bovet, our erstwhile Chef supreme 
and a character out of the Keystone Cops 
footage, it said to have first seen light of 
day in an ice cream parlor. Judging from 
the way he dishes it out in the Mess Hall, 

PAGE 



we can really believe It. 

Did you hear of the Hot Pilot that got 
washed out of playing Spin the Bottle 'cause 
he was holding too much rudder? 

Mr. Highm driving to Riverside with his 
cutie-pie being asked by her, "Since when 
has Mr. Ford started encasing his Gear 
Shifts with Nylon Hose?" 

Lt. Hadwin reports that on the week-ends 
the companies that have closed posts, 
deaths in the family, ailing grandmothers, 
weddings that cannot be postponed and 
visiting relatives, (always from out of town) 
seem to reach a new high. Oh, boys, can't 
you do better than that? 

Add to sounds in the nite . . . 

"And besides getting a hair cut once a 
week, Mr. Ryan trims me three times a 
day." "And he said to report a gig, so I 
wrote my mother, and now I not only ketch 
hell but I get three more besides." "Well, 
darling, you can't blame him for being a 
little wild when he comes to Los Angeles." 
"Six days at Hemet would even make a 
mouse want to bite a lion." 

And fellows, let's get a big turn out on 
these shows the W.P.A. puts on for us out 
here and Keep up their Morale. . . . 

Mr. Richardson, Dean of Physical Tor- 
ture, had better slow up on the making of 
musclemen. Forty per cent of the last class 
got to Basic wound up with Heart Mur- 
murs. Now we are not reporting it was a 
direct result of that hour per day, but 
please, Mr. Richardson, too much is too 
much. 

Doesn't Mr. Stubby Stubblefield look an 
awful lot like Wrong Way Corrlgan. And 
say, what did ever happen to Corrlgan, 
anyway? 

The Chinese Laundryman, receiving Mr. 
Brink's unmentionables with the query, 
"Washee?" And Brink answering, "Yes, 
but how the hell did you know?" 

Mr. Landry trying to stop the Dodos with 
a most baffling question, "Where do the 
Hemet girls go when they grow up?" After 

TWELVE 



musing a few minutes and the laughter sub- 
sided, one dodo piped up with, "Have you 
ever looked in one of your Thunderheads?" 

Things I'm sure we shall never see. . . . 
Lt. Hadwin without his pipe. My altimeter 
steady at 400 feet. The $75 we heard so 
much about. Lana Turner in another sweat- 
er. (Damit). Everybody awake on the Flight 
Line. Ping Pong paddles with handles. Me 
thinks the hungry Dodos must eat 'em off. 
A dodo singing to his instructor, "I DON'T 
WANT TO FLY WITHOUT YOU BABY." 
A supper without at least 3,000 announce- 
ments to be made and always between the 
entree and dessert. An afternoon session 
where the air is bumpier than Gypsy Rose 
Lee doing an encore. 

Mr. Peak, (Boy Scout of Beaver Patrol 
No. I) sporting his armband at the Palla- 
dium, and giving the girl a beautiful line 
about the stripes meaning he takes his flight 
up three times in the morning and twice in 
the afternoon. .■ . . How could you, Mr. 
Peak? For shame. 

Mr. Brink giving the room orderly trouble 
on Saturday M. . by washing his feet in the 
wash basin. "Body-Beautiful Bentley" as he 
is commonly known, and Largo Ricardo 
(Spanish) doing his bust exercises every 
A.M. to the tune of "Skinny Skinner" mus- 
cleman from Vassar, in an effort to put 
Lana Turner to shame. What a case. 

Mr. Rice making a little money on the 
side running a cab service to Hemet with 
the salestalk of, "See, . fellows, I wouldn't 
charge you only I'm broke." And he got 
225 bucks two weeks ago. After him boys. 

Mr. De Preter doing a little fast talking, 
(he's a New Yauker) and missing a few gigs 
for not being in formation with the lone 
lament, "I suffered a temporary blackout." 

Mr. Johnson, the Oakie from Oklahoma, 
sending a pair of S-l shoes home with a 
note, "Pa, they wear their Sunday shoes ail 
week here." 

The girl who fluffed off Mr. Mehew, when 
asked how he kept his teeth so beautiful, 
and what kind of powder he used, with, "I 
thought it was gun powder the way you've 
been shooting your mouth off." 

PAGE 



Mr. Cross at Gilmans tripping, and we 
do mean tripping, the light fantastic with a 
cross between a Balboa Beauty and a L. A. 
Lush. . . . 

Referring to Mr. Boronstien's hair . . . 
He'll have a nice head of skin in another 
six months. 

Mr. Spargur's secret for fun . . . Ryan, 
Women and Song. Typographical error, 
please 'scuse. 

Prize crack of the year came from I 3 B 
when after shall we say a hectic week-end 
at Hemet (yes, it is possible but we want 
50-1 odds) a certain Mr. Skinner when asked 
would a Bromo-Seltzer give him any help, 
replied with, "No thanks, the noise would 
kill me." 

And while we are slamming the Weaker 
Sex (Lord forbid) what's the dirt on Happy 
at the Canteen (the one with the whiskey 
tenor voice) going on a diet??? Seems the 
doctor restricted her to just a cracker and 
salad. The poor Kildare about fainted when 
the retort beautiful from "Happy" was, 
"Before or after each meal, Sir?" 

And if our boy Ralph Burson doesn't hold 
,on to that letter of citation, he'll wear the 
damn thing out showing it to the dodos on 
how he saved the Hawaiian Isle with the 
help of course from the Navy, Army and 
Marines. 

The broad A's of Boston's gift to Ryan, 
one John Bradley, surely give the boys a 
laugh. He sure did a crimson when someone 
asked was his girl friend one of the bags 
they threw overboard at the Boston Tea 
Party. 

And doesn't Body Beautiful Metz (yes, 
girls, he used to be a lifeguard) do a slow 
burn everytime he does his pushups. Imag- 
ine trying to improve that lovely figger. 

The way Mr. Rienowski marches (he used 
to be a Yoeman in the Navy) one would 
think somebody was rocking the boat. 

Wasn't it sweet of the Floridan Chamber 
of Commerce to give Mr. C. Shaw a pass- 
port to California or is he just a Spy, scout- 
ing weather conditions and are they lousey. 

MICKEY MAHONEY 



THIRTEEN 



CADET 
OFFICERS 
CO. "A" 




WESTHAVER, D. C. 
Captain 



RICHARDSON, E. E. 
Platoon Lt. 



DONNELLY, T. E. 
1st Sgt. 



CARTWRIGHT, VON 
Supply Sgt. 



PARR, R. G. 
Platoon Sgt. 



FROST, E. W. 
Corporal 



WHITESELL, C. T. 
Corporal 



WISSENS, J. J. 
Adjutant 



MILLER, H. R. 
Line Sgt. 



BOGGIO, R. 
Platoon Sgt. 



ROGERS, H. L. 
Corporal 




McFARLAND, D. H. 
Platoon Lt. 




WILCZYNSKI, E. S. 
Line Sgt. 




TITUS, W. L. 
Corporal 




SCHAFER, E. C. 
Corporal 



CADET 
OFFICERS 
CO. "B" 



HEMMER, W. J. 
Platoon Lt. 



KLEIN. R. B. 
Line Sgt. 




WILLEYS, J. S. 
Captain 



BALLINGER, R. A. 
1st Sgt. 




HARTLEY, J. R. 
Line Sgt. 




HOLDER, A. D. 
Adjutant 




SINK, J. M. 
Platoon Sgt. 




WILLIAMS, J. D. 
Supply Sgt. 




ENGQUIST, M. C. 
Platoon Lt. 



STRONG, D. B. 

Platoon Sgt. 
(No Picture) 




BUKDVAC, T. J. 
Corporal 




SHIREY, W. M. 
Corporal 



KARPEN, U. M. 
Corporal 



GODFREY, L. D. 
Corporal 



ANDERSON. R. D. 
Corporal 



CADET 
OFFICERS 
CO. "C" 




CURRIE. G. D. 
Supply Sgt. 



CONNOLLY, J. T. 
Captain 





ISAKSEN, G. H. 
Adjutant 




FRENCH, C. A. 
Platoon Sgt. 



REINOWSKI, P. W. 
Corporal 




BRADLEY.^ J. 
Platoon Lt. 




SNOOK, R. R. 


LINK, W. A. 


GRABLE, R. H. 


BURSON, R 


Platoon Lt. 


1st Sgt. 


Line Sgt. 


Line Sgt. 




REYNOLDS, J. J. 
Corporal 




JONES, C. H. 
Corporal 



WILLIAMS, C. E. 
Corporal 



SWANK, F. B. 
Corporal 



LENZ, F. T. 
Corporal 



CADET 
OFFICERS 
CO. "D" 



RIEGEL, L I. 
Platoon Sgt. 




HELSTROM, A. B. 
Corporal 



MEHEW, B. R. 
Captain 



HIGHAN, M. G. 
Adjutant 



WREN, W. E. 
Line Sgt. 



WINKS, W. B. 
Line Sgt 



CLEMENTS,J. T. 
Corporal 



STUBBLEFIELD, C. E. 
Corporal 



JOHNSON, K. P. 
Platoon Sgt. 




SKINNER, W. W. 


FEAK, R. G. 


BENTLEY, R. M. 


DUKER, O. F 


Platoon Sgt 


1st Sgt. 


Platoon Sgt. 


Supply Sgt. 




HUDDLESTON, R. B. 
Corporal 




LANGDON, W. P. 
Corporal 



ODE TO AN UPPERCLASSMAN 

One bright Spring day, going into May, 
Came the dodos to Ryan, out Hemet way. 
Happy and content, and free from care. 
They strolled thru the gates, many in pairs. 

One in particular caught the quick eye 

Of a smart upperclassman, who breathed a 

It was Mr. Brink, Theodotius to you, 
A hard-hearted man, I Simon Legrew. 
(Legree) ? Yes. 

His face was a mess, with wrinkles galore 
From many Pop To's within the Air Corps. 
His manner was bold, and feet quite long. 
His voice was deep, couldn't carry a song. 

Yet this Hickam Hillbilly, out Hawaii way. 
Lived for the moment called Dodo Day. 
He would stand in front and rave and rant. 
Scare poor dodos right out of their pant^. 



His boasts of his prowess in the air 

Was heard from Wahoo to homes in Bel-air, 

His time in the air, his favorite spiel, 

Was only twelve hours on a ferris wheel. 

Good things come to an encl, they say, 
And poor ole Brinky had his, I'm afraid. 
A ten-hour check on poor Mr. Brink 
The result, need say, did surely stink. 

He's back at Hickam, so I hear. 

Raving and sweating while changing his gear 

Of the poor little Dodo he did abuse. 

Back at Ryan, and tho it amuse. 

You next upperclassmen, please take care 

That the dodo you raze, hasn't the flair. 

At Hickam, they say, he's fighting the Japs. 
The raunchy one who forgot he had flaps. 
Lord help this Nation of ours, she'll prob- 
ably sink 
If we depend on the defense of 
Mr. Robert Aloysius Theociocius Brink. 

Mickey Mahoney 



Gas on,! Suj^VcW 
off! TVxtoWe 
^uTn^ed and 

closed'. 



Gas OFF ./ 

SWITCHED 
CLOSED t? 




PAGE NINETEEN 




Kneeling, 

Left to Right: 
MARLYN O. SATROM 
PHILIP E. ATKINSON 
WILLIAM H. CLARK 
WILLIAM BARLOW 
BRUNO J. DUTKIEWICZ 
JOHN R. STYN 
RAY E. GUSTAFSON 
STANLEY E. MALORA 
WILLIAM T. COLLINS 
GEORGE GABLE 
ORVILLE L CROTHERS 
JOHN L. GAWLEY 
W. C. HERZOG 
HOMER T. WENTZ 
WILLIAM C. FOREHAND 
ROBERT W. SABEL 
MARVIN E. TRAVER 
NEIL D. PATTERSON 
JOHN E. MOIST 
KERMIT SHOTTS 
VINCENT TAPPING 
ROBERT A, POLHAMUS 
LAURENCE E. PROBASCO 
HARRY X. FORD 
TARJE M. GRIMSTAD 
DAVID M. BREY 
OVAL H. DAVIS 
EDWARD J. GOETZ 
WILLARD G. DAVIDSON 
ROBERT C. HALL 
WILLIAM L. LANDSBOROUGH 
TROY A. ADAMS 



ROBERT S. KOPP 
LEOPOLD S. PODUSZCZAK 
FRED E. NEAL 
JOHN R. STOKES 
EUGENE L. PETERSON 
JAMES O. NICKELL 
EUGENE F. ANGLIN 
JOHN T. SNOW 
LOUIS M. LENGEL 
GRANVILLE R. LANDIS 
CARL A. MORTENSON 
MARTIN SPORN 
FRANK J. STAVA 
ROBERT L HUTCHINSON 

First Row, Standing 

Left to Right: 
FRED M. PRAHL 
WARREN S. ROWE 
RAY SCHUCK 
JAMES B. PRITCHARD 
BENJAMIN L. PARKER 
NATHANIEL HURT WILLIAMS 
RAY D. SCHOTT 
ROBT. D. STEVENS 
WILFORD F. JOHNSON 
W. E. McCLELLAN 
BERNARD J. LOYER 
WILBUR E. MEYER 
JAMES B. THURIN 
RICHARD E. RADER 
VERNON G. RAFFERTY 
CHARLES LUGER 
WILLIAM MANROD 
JOHN DOE 



NOEL RICHARD BRITTEN 

JAMES W. GRIFFIN 

JOHN J. NEMETH 

WILLIAM J. METZGER 

GROVER D. BOYD, JR. 

CORNELIUS J. STOKES 

VINCENT F. MAHONEY 

MARK M. VECK 

GERARD PETERSON 

GEORGE A. RICHART, JR. 

EDWIN L. COLES 

HAROLD F. WEILAND 

JACK P. TERRY ^=^ 

MILTON H. GREENBLATT 

LAWRENCE HANDELSMAN 

ROBERT E. SETTLE 

DARRELL C. DeBOLT 

WILLIAM C. SCOTT 

JOHN W. WHITE 

JOSEPH A. O'BARA 

ALVIN V. JOURNEY 

MARION C. VAN ARSDELL 

ROBERT B. ANDERSON 

GLENN F. ZIMMERMAN 

JAMES C. NEWBOLD 

WRIGHT SANDERS 

KENNETH W. MITCHELL 

ALBERT JOHN HUHNDORF 

NORMAN GORDON RIGG 

WILLIAM H. WANSTREET 

HARRY E. TRASK, JR. 

JOHN L, SENTESY 

DAVID A. ALLEN 



i 



C! 

Ryan Schoc 

Air Corps lj| 

Heme 

Ma 




l-J 

Aeronautics 
g Detachment 
ifornia 
I, 1942 



Second Row, Standing 
Left to Right: 

DON STORY 

REX S. BROWN 

JAMES J. GILES 

ADDELL A. COTE 

GERALD E. GIBSON 

HOWARD M. ROARK 

ALLAN K. MAC DOUGALL 

ALBERT H. KAFER 

RAYMOND W. PRICE 

FREDERICK R. ROEPER, JR. 

^ FLOYD McKEAND 

MARTIN L. KULLMANN 

ROBERT J. BARRETT 

ARTHUR T. ALTMAN 

RAYMOND WESOLOSKI 

KENNETH D. DUFFY 

WILLIAM H. HEMRICK 

CHARLES S. HUDSON 

ROBERT L. ICE 

JAMES P. GARRELL 

DANIEL R. GOTTSHALL 

CLARENCE J. PALMER 

HERBERT FRIEDMAN 

JEROME GIEGER 

HOWARD J. PERRY 

HAROLD RADENCIC 

PHILIP C. PEACOCK 

CLARENCE W. GOODEN 

WILLIAM J. SHACKELFORD 

CLARENCE E. VAN COTT 

HARRY R. CHISECK 

FRED A. COPPOCK 



LEON D. MYERS 

CHARLES O. DURANT, JR. 

WILLIAM GAUSE 

JAMES B. NESBY 

MICHAEL-DENNIS MAHONEY 

DONALD W. McMAHON 

CECIL V. REED 

FREDERICK R. BARKER 

KENNETH G. LADD 

ROBERT THEIS 

ALBERT PERREN, JR. 

ROBERT B. LONGFELLOW 

DIRCK TEN BROECK HARTMANN 

CHARLES W. NALL 

HERMAN D. STEVENS 

VINTON H. MAYS 

JAMES W. HUDSON 

HOBART L LA MAR 

Third Row, Standing 

Left to Right: 
JOHN E. FOX 
JOHN S. RUSSELL 
JOHN F. SMOOT 
WAYMOND H. KAHL 
GLEN S. MURPHY 
HARRY J. TASK 
JAMES F. LACKEY 
ROBERT J. REYNOLDS 
HAROLD E. AHRENS 
GEORGE W. ROHRER 
LAURENCE T. HOBAN 
KENNETH M. GREEAR 
ROBERT A. KEYES 
PETER MILOTSKY 
JOHN W. BORHMAN, JR. 



MARSHALL E. MUMAW 
CARLTON E. JUSTIS, JR. 
HARRY HEARNE FULLER 
ARTHUR L. DOUBLE 
WARREN H. BELL 
BOYD GALLAHER, JR. 
GLENN C. BACH 
WILLIAM E. PATTERSON, JR. 
FOREST E. ROGERS 
RICHARD SMITH 
BILLY C. HEMMING 
WILLIAM H. LEE 
ROBERT H. BUTLER 
SHERMAN F. SCHRODER 
JOHN RICE WELLBELOVED 
GEORGE A. BROWN 
WILLIAM L. EMERSON 
NORMAN E. STOECKL 
JAMES E. PALMQUIST 
CHARLES R. PRIDE 
ROBERT L. BURLESON 
CARL K. LINDQUIST 
RAYMOND J. COLLINS 
FRED E. STANT 
ROBERT L. RAMSEY 
NORMAN MACLEOD 
RAYMOND J. ZUCKER 
JOE L. WHITON 
JOHN M. EKWALL 
WILLIAM O. LaDOW 
THOMAS EDMUND HATFIELD 
WILLIAM H. McNABB 
EDWARD H. SPRIETSMA 
ROBERT P. DODDS 
FRANK W. CRANZ 



\ 





J. M. AINLAY E. W. ALQUIST W. H. ARMS R. W. BAILEYS R. E. BAIRD 




H. W. BALASH A. E. BARRETT D. F. BETTENCOURT V. E. BLACK A. T. BLACKMAN 




H. BORONSTEIN L. J. BRANDT 



R. BRINK 



J. F. BRUNO J. A. BURLESON 




V. B. CROSS 



J. C. BAKAN J. L DePRETER 



W. DIAN 



A. DRABNIS 



M. P. DUCOTE C. E. DUNCAN R. L FITZGERALD D. W. FOGLESONG B. A. FOREMAN 




H. R. HABENICHT H. G. HALE 



R. HANSEN 



R. M. HANSEN J. F. HARDER 




L. F. HARNER A. S. HOSTETTLER E. M. HAYES 



J. H. HAYES V. A. HENDERSON 




D. HENSHAW G. F. HOLLAND C. F. HULBERT F. R. HUTCHISON D. W. KEESE 



F. C. JACOBS L. E. JARBOE H. E. JENSEN 



J. JOHNSON 



M. L. JONES 




W. F. KOEHL 



F. W. KOWALCHIK 



G. M. LAMB 



B. LEAL R. E. LeBLOND 




W. J. LeBRETON 

--p.. 



T. LIOTTA 



L E. LORENZ T. C. MARTIN L T. MARTINDALE 




J. E. MAXEY K. F. McCARTY W. E. McCOAL G. B. McDONALD J. V. McMYNE 




J. MIKULA M. E. MITCHELL R. E. MONG H. B. MONROE V. L. MORTON 





R. S. MOURER 



S. W. MURPHY 



G. C. MUTH 



J. C. NEARHOOF 



S. G. NETZ 




A. M. OFFORD 



L. W. OLSON 



C. F. O'NEAL 



W. O. PALMER 



R. J. PEALE 




^^p!i 




\ ■■ : ' P"t : 



W. A. PITT 



T. L. POPE 



R. N. PRICE 



H. R. PULLIAN 




A. O. RAINE 



G. SAIED 



L SALTARELLI 



J. G. SCHATZ C. F. SCHOEFFNER 




J. F. SCHMITZ C. W. SHAW G. L SHEPARD H. L SHEPHERD R. S. SHERMAN 





H. O. SHIRK 



H. E. SHUCK W. C. SIMON 



&. R. SINGER 



J. W. SITE 




S. R. KRUPPA H. B. TAGERT R. W. THOMPSON W. M. THORSEN W. J. THOCZKO 





p. TORRETTI p. W. TUCKER C. F. TYRRELL J. P. VANZANT M. WAGNER 




R. M. WAITE 



J. F. WALLS R. D. WARNOCK J. L. WEEKS L. H. WENTWORTH 




L. WHITTAKER R. B. WRIGHT J. A. WYLIE H. B. YATES D. R. YOUNG 




D. E. YOUNGMAN 
Band Sgt. 



V. H. ZIMMERMAN 



•^pomr 




(PO(P-V(pf FS/^^smDO' Cl)&?'S°^-^@&(3') 




CROUMt) SCHOct 



RiSieue'U 




Von L. Cartwrlght 

A/C Von L. Cartwright, the "Gringo" 
of Santa Barbara, California, went to Santa 
Barbara State, where, incidentally, the as- 
sistant Dean of Wonnen is waiting for him 
to come home. Played football and ran 
track. hHe enlisted in the Air Corps in Janu- 
ary, 1942, and his ambitions here lean to- 
ward bigger and better passes. The "Grin- 
go" says he'll be wearing bars and sleeping 
all day in about fifteen years. He collects 
bottles. 
Howard G. Hale 

A^S Howard G. Hale of V/ashburn, Wis- 
consin, was a photographer 'at the time he 
enlisted in the Air Corps in November, 
1940. His ambition is to get an S.P.O.P. 
someday. Likes swimming and still does 
photography as his hobby. He makes no 
comment on women, but claims he'll be a 
man with a larger family fifteen years from 
now. 

Richard G. Parr 

A-^C Richard G. Parr, who says his first 
name should have been "Under," comes 
from Canton, Ohio. He was a Tool and 
Die Maker when he enlisted in the Air Corps 
in June, 1941. Local ambition is to get ice 
cream instead of sherbet at noon mess. 
A footballer, he spends his spare time with 
a $1.00 camera. He likes girls, saying, 
"Girls are nice — I love 'em all." Bearing 
this out he plans to settle on a lake (Veron- 
ica) in Canada after the war. 

PAGE 



D. H. McFarland 

A/S D. H. McFarland hails fiom Ray- 
mondville, Teas, (I'm sorry. Sir-) He was a 
radio technician after he joined the Air 
Corps in January, 1941. Claims his ambi- 
tion while at Ryan is to ride in the front 
seat with Lt. Hadwin in the back wearing 
the gosports. Favorite sport is baseball. 
"Mac" claims too, that he found a gal in 
Hemet over fifteen. 
Wendell O. Palmer 

A^C Wendell O. Palmer took up his 
option on life in Anaconda, Montana, where 
he worked on a smelter in the Anaconda 
Copper after high school. He joined the 
Air Corps in August, 1941, and says his 
ambition here is to get Whitesell to be the 
first one out of bed in the morning some- 
time. Likes volleyball, and hobbies In hunt- 
ing and fishing. Says he's an eligible batch- 
elor, and will be test-hopping the latest 
Ryan PT in about fifteen years. 
Carl F. Whitesell, Jr. 

A/C Carl F. Whitesell, Jr., started In 
Franklin, Pennsylvania, where he went to 
Franklin Commercial College after high 
school. He was a student when he joined 
the Air Corps. Likes baseball, and says his 
hobby is playing the fiddle. "Junior's" am- 
bition locally is to be able to get a pack of 
fags In five minutes, Instead of twenty, In 
the canteen. Swears, women are no good, 
and that fifteen years from now he'll still 
be in Primary because of them. 

THIRTY 




^"^i^^v^sZ^', 








SE.«*<'rie.sv 



L.ONlCt<=^«^Ll.O 



LO^ 



V 



MtU^g.M 



Edwin C. Schafer 

A''C Edwin C. Schafer and Omaha, Ne- 
braska, began things together about 1917 
or 18. (hHe's modest about his age.) hie was 
a publicity man with the Union Pacific at 
the time of his entrance into the Air Corps 
in January, 1942. An ex-baseball sharp, he 
spends his free time collecting old mussed- 
up dollar bills. Wants to leave this place 
a live pilot 'cause she is waiting . . . blonde, 
beautiful, and 6' 5". Fifteen years from 
now "Schafe" plans to be doing smoother 
turns, or he'll be pushing up daisies. 

PAGE 



Reynolds Boggio 

A^C Reynolds Boggio, locally known as 
"Boogie Woogie," got his start in Los An- 
geles. Went to Fullerton J. C. to prepare 
for the Air Corps. "B. W." joined the Air 
Corps in Janary, 1942, and now screams: 
"I gotta make good," at the drop of a hat. 
Girls are his hobby . . . Donna Vrooman 
bearing this out by waiting for him in L. A. 
He also states: "My football and track train- 
ing will be a great help to me when I relieve 
Lt. hHadwin as Commandant of Cadets, 
twenty years from now." 

THIRTY-ONE 




AND PlfASf L^T 30a HOP£ Co/*f€ TO 0<^^ CAfif" ^<^o^/ 



^^ICKSY 'rrAHtNSY 



Harold L. Rogers 

AC Harold L. Rogers, who gives St. 
Paul, Nebraska, as the home town, was an 
A.T.O. at the University of Nebraska, where 
he majored in Architectural Engineering. 
Before joining the Air Corps in March, I 942, 
he was in the retail lumber business. Plans 
to go back to it after the war. After some 
football or baseball he likes to sit down and 
read a novel. Like everyone else, he wants 
to get off the place. "Roge" won't com- 
ment on women since his last three have 
gotten married on him while he's been 
giving his all to Uncle Sam. 



Richard E. LeBlond 

A/C Richard E. LeBlond hails from Holly- 
wood, California, but says he doesn't care 
to act. Preparing for the Air Corps, he 
went to L. A. City College where he ran 
track and played basketball. He joined the 
Air Corps in January, 1942, and now has 
the ambition to take Mr. Keesee's girl away 
from him at Gilman's. Having gotten her 
he will not keep her since, "Any gal who'd 
go with Keesee is looped." "Frenchie" is 
now writing a book, "How to Ground Loop," 
and will conclude the book several years 
from now when he ground looks the B-19. 







PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 




• •• 



CADET " &EOK<SrE" "ROSSELL 

DOES H-{S FA^A005VLYlWGr TAHGEKIKIF'' 
(J^^Ei-iKJGr Off From. Both SiPE-s ^T ©wicr j 



Harold R. Millen 

A'C Harold R. Millen, a native of Cali- 
fornia, calls San Fernando home. After two 
years at Fullerton J. C, he went to Stanford 
University, majoring in Dramatics. Spent 
last summer as technical director and actor 
in a summer stock company. Joined the 
Air Corps in January, 1942. Favorite sport 
is track, while painting, singing and silver 
work are his hobbies. Local ambition is to 
steer clear of the hospital. Concerning 
women, "I'd never be single again, (see Mr. 
Richardson's statement). Fifteen years from 
now he hopes to have his name in lights on 
Broadway. 

PAGE 



Hollls A. Godfrey 

A^S Hollis A. Godfrey, a native of Nash, 
Oklahoma, went to Oklahoma A. and M., 
taking Engineering. Went to work in an oil 
refinery before joining the Air Corps as a 
mechanic in December, 1940. His sports 
are football and baseball, while arts and 
crafts are his hobbies. Only ambition right 
now Is to get to the place where he will 
enjoy. Instead of detest, getting up in the 
morning. His wife, Geraldine, is one of the 
few women instrument mechanics in the 
army — Duncan Field, San Antonio. Godfrey 
Intends making a career of Army flying. 
THIRTY-FIVE 



ILL LOGIC 

A Ryan trainer is to train dodos. 
Some dodos freeze the controles. 
Frozen stuff is ice. 

Ice is diamonds and stuff that robbers steal. 
Steal is what nails are made of. 
If a guy can eat nails, he's got a good con- 
stitution. 
The Constitution was a good ship. 
That's why a Ryan trainer is a good ship. 
OR IS IT? 



I picked up a girl in Riverside. 

A garbage man picks up stuff in Riverside. 

Garbage is food that's fed to pigs if Ryan 

doesn't buy it. 
Pigs are things that footballs are made of. 
F'ootballs are kicked around a lot. 
Well, this girl had been kicked around. 
Stones that are kicked around gather no 

moss. 
A moss is a big deer with horns. 
Horns are musical instruments. 
A musical instrument is something to play 
around with. 
That's my girl ! ! ! 



I 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Simday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 25c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 



Jack W. Sipe 

A^S Jack W. Sipe, a dog-robber from 
Hickam. God's gift to American woman- 
hood. Ryan's only Kanaki. What's a cook? 
Ask Sipe. A California product. 
James V. McMyne 

A^S James V. (Valentine) McMyne "Mac" 
F. A. Schofield Bks. "How to beat an Army 
ride in one easy lesson." Pennsylvania claims 
him. 
Charles E. Me+z 

A-^C Charles E. Metz, the lad from Mary- 
land. Swimming instructor in civilian life. 
W. Va. University product. 
Gordon C. Mu+h 

A^S Gordon C. Muth, Pennsylvania's gift 
to Alaska. They gave him to Ryan. Ryan's 
No. I Eskimo grease ball. 
Robert J. Peale 

A^S Robert J. Peale, bugler tootin lad 
from Foster Field, Texas. Home, not Texas. 
Indiana. 
Paul W. RienowskI 

A/C Paul W. RienowskI, a corn cracker 
gob from Manila, P.I. A yoeman, U.S. Navy. 



Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deliciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

IHiiMiT tA¥E 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



np^— N^ 



PAGE THIRTY-SIX 



.ameras 



...Fil 



ms 




DEVELOPING — PRINTING 
DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 




Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 



For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

HEMET VALLEY 

Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 

12th at Vine 
PHONE 2400 RIVERSIDE 



4.a n ID 






NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail In 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 



C. p. MARTIN 



1 



Phone 1940 



D. D. MARTIN j 
I 

..._.._.._„_._4 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 



TAHpUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

'In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 






CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
Trust and Savings Bank 

of Riverside, Calif. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



I 
I 

•4 



BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEY 
BOWLING CENTER 



124 N. Carmellta 



Hemet, Calif. 



EVERY WEEK IT'S IN 



*— — ■ 



.._.,_.._.._.._.._„_,._.._.._.4. 



i 

i 



TIMIE 
JHliMiT NliWg 

Complete 
Local News Coverage 

• 
"AIRVIEWS" By "DOC SLOAN 



PHONE 10 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 




Cadet 
Portraits 



MADE 

EXCLUSIVELY 

ON THE POST BY 



AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

Special rates given Ryan Cadets 
Studios Located 

at 
503 "E" Street 3935 Main St. 

Seui Bernardino Riverside 



+ — " — .—..—.. 



I 

i 



PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



4«N „„ 

T 



WHEN YOU'VE "OPEN POST"— TRY 







HOT SPRINGS 



DANCING ON SAT. NIGHT 

Service Men 55c 7-Piece Orchestra 

— COCKTAILS — 
CAFETERIA DINING ROOM 

Good Food at Popular Prices 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH COUNTER 

GOLF— All Grass Public Course . . . 
RYAN FIELD— 50c At All Times 

TENNIS— Lighted for Night Play 

Hotel Rates — European Plan 
$1.65 to $3.30 Per Day 

Gilman Hot Springs, Calif. 

Phone San Jacinto 8811 



+ 



Complete line of 

BAKERY GOODS 

Specializing in 
PARTY AND WEDDING CAKES 



""—"—♦ 



VALLEY BAKERY 

2 I I E. Florida Avenue 



Hennet, Calif. 



Phone 286 I 

I 

I 

— ,_, 4 



We Made Your 
Class Picture 

• 

Wm. Fox Studio 

p. O. Box 1478 
Banning, Calif. 



Additional Copies 
May Be Ordered by Mail 



■f 



I 

T 






I 

a 

I 
■4 



-.* 



Compliments of 

International Provision Co. 

1570 Industrial Street 

Los Angeles, California 

Trinity 96 1 I 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
you by the name on your individual bundles of 
Dry Cleaning and Laundry. 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT. Mgr. 
300 E. Devonshire Phone 250 



PAGE FORTY 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters for 

UniForms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

■ 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 

"~~ QUALITY LUGGAGE 

, In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 

"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 



NCUCT NEW* nilHT 



< 



4 






li (Mons?- 



Class 42-J 

QU Cotps liaitiinc Uetacktnent 

Ryan School of Aeronautics 

Hemet, California 

JUNE 20. 1942 




We, the members of Class 42-J, present this edition 
of Contact to those to whom we are indebted for this excel- 
lent opportunity to further ourselves as men, serve our coun- 
try as best we can, and protect those we love. To you, Mr. 
and Mrs. America, we are very deeply grateful. 

THE CONTACT STAFF. 



CONTACT STAFF 



MYERS, L. D. . . . 
ZUCKER, R. J. . . , 
CRANZ, F. W. . . . 
ROARIC, H. M. . . 
GREEAR, K. M. . . 
MILOTSICY, P. A. . 
SHACKLEFORD, W. J. 
WHITON, J. L. . . . 
MAHONEY, M. G. . 
FORD, H. X. . . . 



EDITOR 

. ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER 



ASSOCIATE PHOTOGRAPHERS 



. REPORTERS 
CARTOONIST 







aMV/^[?i?CK 




j//f^^y /,r^^J> 



BOY ! WHAT A TEAM YOU'VE GOT 

Boy! What a team youVe got — 

You've got a Roosevelt, a Marshall and 

Hank Greenberg, too. 
You've got millions of John Does, and they'll 

win for you ; 
You've got Mothers and Fathers cheering 

for your side, 
And helping in your struggle to forever 

turn the tide. 

Boy, what a team you've got — 

All those women buying bonds are helping 

to win your fight. 
That Boy Scout collecting paper, he too, 

can see the light; 
The sailor on the high seas, the pilot in his 

flight, 
And the nurse behind the lines are giving 

all their might. 

Boy, what a team you've got — 

You'll show dictators who encourage hate 

and lies. 
That decency, love, and honor never, ever 

dies; 
You conquered for that in '76 and again 

in '98, 
And you'll show these tyrants very soon an 

even sadder fate. 

Boy, what a team you've got — 

You've got a Hull, a MacArthur, and 
Hollywood's Jimmy Stewart, 

Shipping clerks and Bobby Feller are pitch- 
ing in to do it; 

You've got men making planes; they're part 
of the fray; 

And the girl friend's most important with 
her letters every day. 

Boy, what a team you've got — 
I'm Liberty, Democracy and all that's good 
and true; 
I'm as old as Uncle Sam himself, but son, 
we can fight some. 
And Sam and I will still be here for hun- 
dreds of years to come. 



May I join your team, Miss Liberty? You're 

a precious friend. 
My Father's Father always said you'd pay 
a dividend; 
I thank you. Miss Liberty, for the privilege 

of being free. 
And my neighbors — 130 million — ^join in 

thanking thee. 

A/S Morris Turitz, Co. "D" 



SAD CASE 

Beneath thi'is stone 
Lies Johnny O'Brien. 
He stunted for his girl, 
JVhile flying a Ryan. 

A/S J. B. O'Hagan, Co. A 



Roses are red, 

P'iolets are blue. 

Sugar is sweet. 

But where can you get it? 

Lagomarsino, Robert F., 42-K 



n 




/ SOLOED TOD Ay.* 



PAGE FOUR 





k 




i?iir^^ 





CADET MAJOR R. D. STEVENS 




CADET ADJUTANT and CAPTAIN 
W. H. KAHL 





SUPPLY OFFICER 
F. F. CHILDS 




SERGEANT MAJOR 
R. J. COLLINS 



PAGE SIX 



CADET 
OFFICERS 



V. L. CARTWRIGHT 
Adjutant 



CADET 
OFFICERS 




J. E. MOIST 
Adjutant 




R. W. SCHOTT 
Captain 



C. W. NALL 
Lieutenant 




R. N. BUTLER 
Captain 



G. A. RICKERT 
Lieutenant 

PAGE SEVEN 



CO. 

'A' 



I I A I I 




N. C. RIGS 
Lieutenant 



CO. 
B' 



1 1 n 1 1 




G. R. GABLE 

Lieutenant 



CADET 
OFFICERS 



R. C. HEMMING 
Adjutant 



CADET 
OFFICERS 



W. GAUSE 
Adiutanf 




R. L RAMSEY 
Captain 



F. R. BARKER 

Lieutenant 




A. DRABNIS 
Captain 



H. M. ROARK 
Lieutenant 

PAGE EIGHT 



CO. 

c 



I /-"^ I I 




G. W. ROHRER 
Lieutenant 



CO. 



I I f-N I I 



D 




W. J. MET2GER 
Lieutenant 




PEEPING THROUGH THE CABANAS 

Brother Shack Shackelford, the spy from 
Florida, is really in the groove these days. 
That big smile came when he found out his 
Aunt is doing her bit for National Defense. 
She's Air Raid Warden on a gambling ship. 

Comment by Lt. Cornell on his Company 
D's marching. "Everybody out of step but 
the Sgt." 

Miss Jean hlopple being asked why do 
gentlemen prefer blondes, and the retort 
beautiful, "Blondes know what gentlemen 
prefer." Well do they really, Jean? 

Orchids to our chubby chum, Happy, 
the female Gene Bovet, on her wonderful 
progress in dieting. She's already lost six 
pounds. Chin up hiappy, only 36 pounds 
more to go. 

Add to look alikes . . . Miss Dorothy 
Peters to any Jon Whitcomb drawing. As 
one cadet put it, "If being cute were 
against the law, she'd be a cinch for life 
imprisonment." 

Miss Maxine Savage, the telephonic 
thrush, was the topic of conversation be- 
tween two Dodos the other P.M. The far- 
sighted one said she looked like she had 
been poured into that dress. The near- 
sighted one said, "Buddy, from where I'm 
standing it looks like she had been churned 
into that dress." 

Mr. Pajewski, of the Army office, has 
seriously been thinking of changing his 

PAGE 



name, hie almost exploded when the queen 
of all mispronounciations by a cadet was, 
"I wanta see Mr. Poopdeck papa." 

Under things we can do without said the 
dodos: Upperclassmen, Gigs, Reveille, 
Ground School, taxiing the planes out to the 
ramp, so much free time, Hemet, San Ja- 
cinto, first sergeants, the 49I/2 mile limita- 
tion, and most of all, SANTA ANA. 

For your information, girls, that six foot, 
tall, dark, and an answer to any maiden's 
nitemares is none other than Sgt. O'Brien 
(alias "Stinky"). 

Who was the Cadet who war gargling 
with Susie Seagram on open post, and then 
being a true Texan, he decided to do a 
little horseback riding? After he had played 
Lone Ranger long enough, and was return- 
ing to the stables with this broken-down 
man-of-war a curious thing happened. Gal- 
loping, the horses hoof caught in the stir- 
rup. Our tipsy friend just blinked an eye, 
turned to the horse and said, "Now look, 
buddy, if you're getting on, I'm getting off." 

We would like to set Harry Ford's moth- 
er's mind at ease at this moment. Your son 
hasn't a tape-worm, it's just your cookies 
from home are so good, he has to share 
'em with the boys or else. 

Mary Jo Tate, who graces Nylon Hose 
with finesse, is the answer to where Hemet 
gals go when they grow up. Now, if Hemet 
ould only go on a 24 hour day. 

— A/C MICKEY MAHONEY 
NINE 



THE DODO 

Some ffiiys seurcli for nudists' camps, 
And some guys Buzz the tees, 
But I'm still just a Dodo — 
That stuff's not for me. 

I'm trying hard to do things right, 
But my mind must never work. 
Cause every time I land that Ryan, 
The gosport spouts out "Jerk." 

.Is time goes on, (and I hear it will) 
I think you'll all agree. 
That should a man ever leave this place, 
JVH.IT A PILOT HE WOULD BE. . . 

But I really shouldn't worry — YET! 
Cause Monday is the day, 
It's then I get my final check — 
/ either go or stay. 

If all goes well, I'll leave next month. 
If not, (you know the rest). 
And all I'll say to the guys back there is 
"Boys, I did my best." 




^m0 




KEEP 'EM TRYING 

(An Ode to a Student) 

Among the things that I must learn 
While in my private rank, 
Are things that make an engine turn 
And start without a crank. 

They say there's pistons, pins, and rods; 
Their word I'll never doubt. 
But things I can't get through my head, 
Is why they move about. 

I pity the Looie who's to fly, 
A plane on which I've worked. 
He'll find when parts start flying out, 
My duty I have shirked. 

Then when on the carpet I am called. 
And to me it's just alas, 
I'll think of dear old engines, 
And how I slept in class. 

Ex-mechanic, Corp. Wood 
Now A''S Eugene W. Wood 



"REVIELLE" 



PAGE TEN 



THE WORTH OF IT ALL 

The roar of engines and the smell of oil, 
Oh, what's the use of all this work and toil; 
What's to be in the end to come. 
This reason for functioning and working 
as one? 

There is a story behind it all as you shall see. 
For there is our flag waving so proud and 

so free. 
Can everyone think and speak as he chooses? 
Nay, it is not so, or his head he loses. 

In every land is there equality and justice 

for all; 
How can that be after the Polish and Grecian 

fall? 
Is that why thirty million are so set and 

strong 



To repel and blast forever this great wrong? 

That's right; it isn't the way of men good 

and well 
To blast each other into the depths of Hell. 
It is our duty, then, as men with wings 
To fight and keep with us all these things. 

And we can do it to the last fighting man, 

For there's never been a true blooded Amer- 
ican 

That couildn't whip, and I don't mean 
perhaps, 

A million backstabbing, yellow Japs. 

A/S Marlow T- Miller, Class 42-K 

Co. A 




CO/\/yOY PUTY 



PAGE ELEVEN 




MISS AILEEN McGAUGHRAN. Home town, Memphis, 
Tennessee. Senior, University of Tennessee. Loves to enter- 
tain and is a wonderful dancer. Wliat memories ! have of 
that old Mississippi river! — A/C E. E. Fisher Jr., Co. A. 





MARY ZUCKER, Co. "B" Donation for the sugar shortage. 
Senior at Redlands University, 20 years old, 5 ft. 4 in. 
Home, Riverside. 



HALLIE STINE RAMSEY. Charleston, West Virginia. Uni- 
versity of Georgia. TRI DELTA SORORITY. 



PAGE TWELVE 




MRS. GLORIA C. CRANZ, wife of A/C Frank W. Cranz, 
42-J. Co. D. Resides at 529 Patterson Avenue. Glendale, 
California. Graduated from Glendale High School. She is 
only waiting for her husband's commission. 





VERNELLE CASEY (wow) a Texas contribution, 22 years 
young, photographic model. 



HELEN KAISER— Lets tab a trip to the University of Wis- 
consin. 



PAGE THIRTEEN 




PAGE FIFTEEN 




First Row, kneeling, 
Leff fo right: 

LOUIS M. BAXTER 

WILLIAM J. GREENE 

JOHN F. KING 

FORREST C. TURPIN 

JAMES R. LINDSEY 

PAUL F. SHINSKY 

LARRY M. FITZPATRICK 

FELIX A. KALINSKI 

HENRY S. BARBER III 

FREDERICK M. SMITH 

KEITH G. LINDELL 

WOODROW W. PRATT 

JOE M. WURZER 

MANLEY G. FRANKENBERG 

ROLAND O. LEEMAN 

GERALD W. KEY 

BERNAYS A. ROSENTHAL 

RANDALL E. MURFF 

DOMENICO A. TUSSIO 

GEORGE E. COONS 

MORRIS Y. HOROWITZ 

MARLOW J. MILLER 

EDGAR E. PARKS 

WILLIAM C. MOORE 

HARDING BARBARICK 

KARL L MARUSZAK 

AUGUST R. VACEK 

EDWARD M. YORK 

N. DELLA VALLE 

H. J. DAVIES 



H. A. RADAKOVITZ 
ROBERT W. HAYDEN 
MARVIN F. KENNEDY 
FOREST E. SUMMERVILLE 
CARSON M. HINKLE, JR. 
HERBERT V. SPARDLIN 
DAVID C. LONG 
BENJAMIN F. HALL 
JAMES A. SARGEANT 
GEORGE R. BARNETT 
MARIO P. CHIAROLANZA 
ABE C. LEATHERWOOD 

Second Row, 
Left to right: 

STEPHEN BROWN 
WILLIAM F. MALONE 
DANIEL R. RAASCH 
SHERMAN P. MORRIS 
GEORGE F. NEAL 
GEORGE W. PORTER 
RAYMOND C. ZETTEL 
ELMO E. CLARK 
ELMER E. BROCKMAN 
DON D. MARTIN 
TRUMAN W. WALKER 
VANN A. McCULLOUGH 
OTIS T. NEWLAND 
JOHN W. WHEELER 
JAMES W. SMITH 
VASIL M. MARKOFF 
WARREN L. TAYLOR 
FRANK T. BASS 



HYMAN DICKMAN 
JOHN M. HERM 
ROBERT H. APPEL 
WILLIAM I. DIXON 
JOHN LATVAITIS 
ROBERT E. LANGAN 
JOHNNY A. JOHNSTON 
FLOYD C. HOOVER 
FLOYD O. SCUDDER 
CYLLIS P. KELLY 
WALTER C. HAMILTON 
ROBERT R. BRACKETT 
R. A. PITTS 
DON E. WILSON 
MANUEL AGUIRRE 
PERRY G. PEDERSEN 
MARVIN L. DULL 
EUGENE W. WOOD 
CHARLES W. HICKS 
LAWRENCE G. O'BRIEN 
WILLIAM R. MILLER 
EMANUEL G. STEFFEN 
HOWARD T. WOOCK 
RICHARD I. MASTERSON 
BRADLEY B. SUMMERS 
BENJAMIN E. HAGMANN 
JAMES E. LIGHTFOOT 
MELVIN O. PINK 
LEONARD E. LANDES 
JOHN B. THOMPSON 



'<::; 



::> 



"•^ 



CI 

Ryan Scho< 

Air Corps Tr 

Hemel 

June 



PAGE SIXTEEN 




-Wm. Fox Studio, Banning 



^ 



-^ 



Aeronautics 
% Detachment 
ifornia 

1942 



Third Row, 
Left to right: 

HAROLD L. CONRAD 

ELLIOT R. ZEISS 

WILBUR E. THORSEN 

BILLY M. TERRY 

STANLEY S. SEKULA 

RAYMOND PAXON 

OSCAR E. THEIS 

AUBREY L. PRICE 

JOHNNIE W. SOSNELL 

FRANK O. HENLEY 

JUSTUS O. JACKSON 

PAUL VIRGIL SILLS 

CARL S. SATTERLUND 

H. J. MERCER 

ROBERT F. PUDLEWinS 

JOHN A. HINE, JR. 

FRANK P. BREITENBACH 

DONALD E. SCHMID 

GORDON D. FISHBECK 

RUSSELL F. HAMILTON 

EDWARD L. KEBART 

GILBERT LELAND 

GEORGE P. GIBLIN 

JOHN SCHULZ 

JOHN J. KEMPOWICZ, JR. 

ROBERT F. LAGOMARSINO 

ROBERT D. LONG 

RICHARD J. CZECHANSKI 

RONALD L. GARKIE 

GIL CROTTE 



OLIVER F. MATTEK 
HERSCHEL K. BEANE 
ARTHUR J. VAN ARMAN 
PAUL PEACEFUL 
LAWRENCE J. SCHAFER 
JAMES G. MASTERS 
CHESTER LOWE 
WILLIAM MURPHY, JR. 
LEO GRIKSTAS 
GUY L. BONNER 
CLAIR A. SKEWES 
WILBUR J. KIMM 
EARL WARICHER 
NORMAN A. JOHNSON 
RAYMOND L. WOLFERT 
ROBERT W. COLLETTE 
HOWARD J. MAYS 

Fourth Row, 
Left to right: 

ROBERT E. PIERSON 
VICTOR V. VERBINSKI 
HOWARD W. EILp 
BEN R. HOPKINS 
ROBERT L CARSON 
LEO R. KISAMORE 
CHARLES T. COCKRELL 
LAURENCE F. GAITHER 
VICTOR J. HEPBURN 
HUESTON B. DAVIES 
R. L. DAY, JR. 
RICHARD D. LOUGHMAN 
JOHN H. McCAIN 



JAMES E. ISHMAEL 
JOHN H. CONNELLY 
JARIELD B. FRANCIS 
GARDNER W. KENDALL 
DON F. OWEN 
ROBERT F. HAUGHY 
EDWARD D. LORD 
RICHARD BERRY 
JOSEPH A. POPE 
ROBERT S. SMITH 
ROBERT A. BOONE 
WILLIAM H. WARRING 
WILLIAM L. THOMAS 
CHARLES B. HAZEL 
HAROLD E. MAUDLIN 
GUIDO GIOANA 
LOUIS N. KANE 
ARTHUR D. SMITH 
RICHARD E. HART 
JACK HOHMAN 
EMMERON B. WALLNER 
CHARLES W. RICHARD 
JOHN R. WARE 
JOHN W. BERGSTROM 
HERBERT M. PALMTAG 
CLIFFORD M. CUPPLES 
DONALD A. DETWILER 
JACK L. GRIFFIN 
ELLSWORTH H. KENYON 
EDWARD E. LANE, JR. 
LEON A. HARVIN 
SAM PASTERNAK 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 




ADAMS, T. A. 

"I can ride a bronc, but oh, 
these Ryans." 

ALLEN, D. H. 

"I just love these afternoon 
parades." 

ALTMAN, ARTHUR T., JR. 

"You take the blonde, and 
I'll take the redhead." 



ANDERSON, R. B. 

"I've had enough, but just 
one more." 

BACH, G. C. "Nibs" 

"You can't take It with you." 

BARLOW, W. R. 

"Marriage means nothing to 
me." 



BARRETT, ROBERT J. 



BELL, W. H. 

"Riverside is a lovely town." 

BOYD, G. D. 

"Honest, fellows, I still love 
my wife." 



BRITTEN, N. R. 

"Let's detonate boys." 

BROWN, G. A. "Buster" 
"I don't know. Sir???" 

BROWN, R. S. "Sexy" 

"Rest, gentlemen, rest." 



BURLESON, R. L. 

"Don't blow that bugle. 

CHISECK, HARRY R. "Chis' 
'Now you're cookin'." 

CLARK, WILLIAM H. 

"Who's making a lot of 
noise?" 




COTE, A. A. 

"I guess I'm just lucky." 

CRANZ, F. W. "Curly" 

"I'll fry it. How do you do 
It?" 

CROTHERS. ORVILLE L., JR. 
"We didn't do it that way 
back in the squadron." 



DAVIS, O. H. 

"I'm looking for a soundproof 
gosport." 

DOUBLE, A. L. "Dubbs" 

DURANT. C. O. "Chuck" 

"You're speaking of the wo- 
man I love." 



DULKIEVICZ. B. J. 

"I didn't know they were Red 
Lined at 190." 

FISHER, E. E., JR. 

"Where's Ka Zeeee?" 

FLEMING, G. B. 

"What red flag?" 



FORD, H. X. 

FOREHAND, W. C. 

"I got the ring, where's the 
girl?" 

FOX, J. E. 

"Call me wolf." 



FULLER, HARRY H. 

"What we need is bigger and 
better cigars." 

GABLE, GEORGE R., JR. 

He and Clark have a way 
with the women. 

GALLAHER, B. H. "Boots" 

"I'm a hot pilot. I soloed 
today." 




'■'ff^'-y'^-'^' 




GARRETT, J. P. 

GEIGER, J. H. 

"She's back In my cabin." 

GIBSON, G. E. "Hoot" 

"Oh, Blow me down — slowly.' 



GILES, H. H. "H. H." 

"I'll be a navigator yet." 

GOODEN, C. W. "Marie" 
"I gotta make gooden." 

GREEAR, K. M. "Heck" 

"What the hell's the differ 



GRIMSTAD, TARJE M. 

HALL, R. C. 

"What regulation was that 
under?" 

HARTMAN, D. J. "Dutch" 

"I was really raunchy today." 



HATFIELD, T. E. "Tommy" 

"Did ya ever hear the one 
about the baldheaded man?" 

HUDSON, CHARLES S. 

"Bakersfleld, here I come!" 

HUTCHINSON, R. L. 
"It was just luck." 



JOHNSON, W. F. 

"Take me back to Montana." 

JUSTIS, CARLTON, E., JR. 
"Missed me that time." 

KAFER, A. H. 

"Who said I was no ace?" 



"Six times around 
the hangar." 



LA MAR, HOBART L., JR. 

"I betcha I can hold more 
than you can." 

LANDIS, G. R. 

"Glides like a brickbat." 

LANDSBOROUGH, WM. L. 

"Hoot Mon, I passed my 
thirty." 



LINDQUIST, CARL K. "Slim" 
"Yeah!" 



LONGFELLOW, R. B. 

"Pick up de money, de game 
is over." 

MAYS, V. H. 

"What, no check ride today?" 



MEYER, W. E. 

"Hello, Daisy." 

Ml LOTS KY. P. A. 

MITCHELL, KENNETH W. 

"Somebody put it there, hon- 
est." 



MUMAW, M. E. "Dumy" 

'D' Co., on the double!" 

MYERS, LEON D. 

"I'm a hard man, Dodo." 

NEMETH, J. J. 

"Who slipped me that 'Mick- 
ey'?" 




NICKELL, JAMES O. 
"Are my speeches 
ready yet?" 

PALMER, C. J. 

"I came, I saw, I con- 
quered." 

PATTERSON, T. L. 

"Oh, tor a short beer." 





PERREN, A. C. 



PERRY, H. J. 

"I think It's pattern '7'." 

PETERSON, GERARD 

"Gigs removed — reasonable.' 



PETERSON, E. L 

"Don't cover up my stream- 
liner. 

PRAHL, F. M. 

PRICE, RAYMOND W. 

"I thought a supercharger 
was the P.X." 



PRIDE, C. R. 

"I flew Into a cloud, and 
thought I blacked out." 

PRITCHARD, J. B. 

"I like my women like my 
Ryan— Hot!" 

PROBASCO, LAURENCE E. 



RADER, R. E. 

"My crop dustin' days are 
over." 

RAFFERTY, VERNON G. 

"Hut, two, three. Four r r r." 

REED, CECIL V. "Butch" 
"60 hours or bust." 



RICHARDS, W. T. 

RICHARDSON, C. W. 

"I got a little behind in my 
work." 

ROEPER, F. R. 

"How did the ground get up 
there?" 



ROGERS, F. E. 

"Someone changed that 
wind." 

ROWE, W. S. 

"When in doubt, bail out. 

SABEL, R. W. 

" 'E' Flight— fall out!" 



SATROM, M. O. 

"Let's use my deck." 

SCHROEDER, S. F. "Rick" 
"Judis Preistl" 

SCOTT, W. C. 

"I wish my wife had a car, 
too." 



SHACKLEFORD, W. J. "Shack" 
"Have you heard about Flor- 
ida?" 

SHOTTS, KERMIT E. 

"No, I don't know what hap- 
pened to your socks." 

SMITH, RICHARD "Smitty" 

"You ain't fust a woffing." 



SMOOT, JOHN F. 
STANT, FRED E. 



STOECKL, N. E. 

"I like walking, anyway.' 



STOKES, JOHN R. 

STOREY, D. D. 

"Flag signals are O.K. if I 
could see them." 

SULLIVAN, F. A. 

"Deep in the heart of Texas." 





TAPPING, VINCENT E. 

"Who moved Aguanga?" 

TERRY, JACK P. 



THEIS, R. 

"That check pilot was blind." 



VAN ARSDELL, M. C. 

"Who said you can't land at 
130 mph?" 

VAN COTT, CLARENCE "Mike" 
"They still call me Ground 
Loop." 

VECK, MARK M. "Rabbit" 
"That ain't no dream." 



WANSTREET, J. R. 

"Stand clear, this ain't gun." 

WELLBELOVED, JOHN R. 

"Doc Welby" 
"Cut loose on that jive." 

WANTZ, H. T. "Tuck" 



WILLIAMS, N. H. 
ZIMMERMAN, GLEN f=. 
ZUCKER, RAYMOND J. 




NOT QUITS SO MUCH BRAKE. MR. DODO! 



* ( o/v, y£-/i//y ) 




W£ ^ c 



£ 



zn. 



o 



JJJJJJJJ *J>^JJJ^^ '. ^.,.'^^ — ■ J J J J .. ^ > .. ^ -.J J^,^ 





PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



The Schafer PT-3.2 

While It is generally and unselfishly conceded by all those concerned, namely Drs. 
Donnelly and Boggio, that Dr. Donnelly, hH.P., W.P.A., C.C.C., and Dr. Boggio, hH.P., A.A.A., 
B.S., S.P.C.A., have done a singularly remarkable job in refining Mr. Ryan's original low- 
wing meal ticket, PT-22, to such a point that It will actually fly, It must still be admitted 
that they have stopped much too soon. Like the Ryan Romeo who kissed his girl on the 
first date, they have made a fair start, but have left much undone. They have produced 
only the bare essentials, merely the unadorned plane. While some few things Is this world 
get by very well unadorned (look at Sally Rand) our learned doctors have missed a great 
opportunity to add the little niceties that would make the PT3.2 a really attractive ship. 
Now, our worthy chef, Mr. Bovet, who is an expert at keeping things from going to waste, 
(remember that salad last night, boys?) suggested that the fertile minds of the Sunshine 
Club, (and they are fertile If, like land, they improve with idleness) be put to the problem of 
producing the necessary auxiliary equipment to make the PT3.2 a really super trainer, so 
fool proof that even the boys from West Point could fly It. After all, who should better 
know the mechanical shortcomings of a Ryan than a wash-out, .sure, Sir, I'm positive that 
it was the delayed recoil of the shock absorbers which made me gain three hundred feet 
in that level turn, but wash me if you must.) 

Well, taking the matter into their own hands, these intrepid Sunshine Clubbers, via 
ditch, via hitch, assembled at a secluded rendezvous, just slightly resembling the cocktail 
lounge at the Alessandro. At this secret retreat they put their heads together, .termites 
take notice) and commenced to concentrate on the consequences of putting periscopes 
on the prominent periphery of the fuselage. These worthy sages, by way of an aid to 
concentration, gazed for hours into the thick, white foam floating on top of their lemon- 
ade. Occasionally a member would become concentrated to such a point that it became 
necessary to allow him to recline under the table, air raid fashion, until he recovered, usually 
several days later. 

The first step taken by the masterminds, who had all learned their Math and Physics 
from Mr. Landry, was to find the ratio made by placing the wing loading ratio over the 
number of gigs In a P.P., (a complicated aeronautical unit understood only by Sergeant 
Lee) multiplied by the number of Quail bagged in the vicinity of San Jacinto over the week- 
end. By a careful study of the resultant figure, it was discovered that the plane was just 
slightly overweight, and it was unanimously agreed that the needle of the altimeter In 
the front cockpit must go. One member of the assembly said profoundly, "hiell take out 
the whole front cockpit!" hie was undoubtedly prejudiced. 

A poor unfortunate with his hand still swathed in bandages and splints wanted a built-in 
Instrument of torture which would act on the seat of the Instructor's pants as a measure 
of reprisal every time he pulled a forced landing and mangled a student's hand in the 
throttle. A sore of a hot-foot to the posterior would do the trick. Then too, a very useful 
gadget would be a neon sign that, at the press of a button in the rear cockpit, would 
announce to the instructor, "Take your hands off the damn plane, and let me fly it my way." 
Then to take care of subsequent emergencies, another sign could flash, "For God's sake, 
take over and get me out of this mess." 

PASE TWENTY-SIX 



with his lemonade to offer any useful suggestions, 
with the foann (from the lemonade, of course) 



Bob Ice, who had been too occupied 
finally tore himself from his pleasures and 

still drooling from the left corner of his mouth, shouted, "Go ahead and build your perfect 
plane, but give me just one ground loop and see what is left-" Well, Bob demonstrated a 
ground loop right then and there, completely forgetting a plane. Gallons of lemonade 
were spilled in the confusion, fights were started, eyes were blackened, the cops came, 
the washouts went, the girls screamed, (girls in hiemet? I must be drunk too) and an 
unestlmated number of invaluable revisions and refinements to the PT3.2 remained unborn. 

Such are the ways of Mice and men and wash-outs. May they rest in peace! 

By A/C J. L. Whiton 




MILD CORRECTION 



Of course you heard Mr. Keesee tell of 
the Cadet who, after his first solo, entered 
on form 1-A, Gossport not working!" 



Mr. D. Raine: What is a supercharger? 
Dodo: The Ryan P. X., Sir. 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 
Phone Hemet 941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Siuiday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 25c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Niffhtly — No Matinee 



„,_.._.+ 



I 
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Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deliciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

IMIEMET CAPE 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 




PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



d..— ..- 



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Quality: 

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Company Ltd. 



12th at Vine 



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PHONE 2400 



RIVERSIDE 



NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail in 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 



C. p. MARTIN 



D. D. MARTIN 



Phone 1940 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 

• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 

TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



i 



+•— — 



CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
Trust and Savings Bank 

of Riverside, Calif. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



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— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEy 
BOWLING CENTER 



124 N. Carmellta 



Hemet, Calif. 



I 
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EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

iriHii 

IMiiMiT INiiWS 

Complete 
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• 
"AIRVIEWS" By 'DOC SLOAN 



PHONE 10 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 







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Special rates given Ryan Cadets 

Studios Located 

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Phone San Jacinto 8811 



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21 I E. Florida Avenue 
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p. O. Box 1478 
Banning, Calif. 



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Los Angeles, California 

Trinity 961 I 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
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IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
you by the name on your individual bundles of 
Dry Cleaning and Laundry. 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 
300 E. Devonshire Phone 250 



1 

■4 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters for 

UniForms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

•EDGERTON SHOES 

QUALITY LUGGAGE 

in all the latest styles for your 
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Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 

<■ *« — -M ■■■« ■■■■! m I >■•■■»•■■■««— 'X—W^M-^ii— W ■»■ i» f -i'W IM I M M ■ ■■ ■ II ■■■ MH iiM III ■— ^■^—^■^^i^^— — ^— i^— ^"Mi— <y 



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Class 43'A S 

5th Army Air force flying [raining Detachment 



Ryan School of Aeronautics 
Hemet, California 

PUBLISHED BY THE RYAN SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICS, A CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE, 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE PERSONNEL OF THE 5th A.A.F.F.T.D. 



AUGUST 24, 1942 



'•>,^g^g^ 




DEDICATION 



• To the Mothers, Wives and Sweethearts 
who wait, not knowing, and in not knowing 
suffer the agonies of a thousand deaths, 
we humbly dedicate this edition. 






< 



CONTACT STAFF 

THOMAS E. MULLIGAN, JR EDITOR 

FRANK S. CHAPLICK ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

HARRY L. SMITH - ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

CLYDE E. RHODES, JR HISTORIAN 

DONALD G. RICHARDSON HISTORIAN 

JOHN E. O'GRADY PHOTOGRAPHER 

RICHARD X. CHABALOWSKI ASST. PHOTOGRAPHER 






When duty whispers. Thou must, the youth replies, I can- 



and 



so we went to work, gentlemen, and in three very short days compiled, 
edited, and rushed through 43-A's issue of CONTACT. The staff had to 
work into the wee hours of the morning and miss chow so we could get 
pictures and copy — but now that it's done, we feel none the worse from 
wear and before we let you judge our effort, we add with a grin that if 
the bottle in the dark room labeled DEVELOPER had had developer In 
it, we would have a few more good pictures — even a picture of the staff. 

THE EDITOR 



CONTACT STAFF 



From Hickam Field, Wheeler Field, the 
Aleutians, Alaska, Texas, Massachusetts, 
North, East, South and West come the 
members of Class 43-A. Many wear rib- 
bons on their chests that tell a story of 
heroism and wounds received while under 
murderous Jap fire on December 7th. 

Made up of officers, enlisted men, cadets 
and former members of the RCAF, all are 
here with a common purpose — to become 
combat pilots in the air force that Is to be 
the Nemesis of the Jap and the Nazi. 

Unique because every member of the 
graduating class has had former service In 
some branch of the army. Class 43-A knows 
what It wants and is not flying for the 
"glamour" in it. 



This cross section of America — and the 
American officer and soldier — was, in the 
most part, awarded flight training because 
of some outstanding deed performed under 
the strain of fire. A determination to get 
back at the Japs and even the score will 
carry them through Basic and Advanced — 
and to the coveted pair of silver wings. 
To the man, all are vowed to meet Toto 
again — but this time It will be in the air. 

And now as we leave Ryan Field with 
Its many memories, and with one-third of 
our goal realized, we search the sky of 
tomorrow and pray that God will give us 
the strength, knowledge and wisdom to 
realize our ultimate goal — a world free from 
treachery, tyranny and hate. 



PAGE TWO 




CAPT. M. H. CARLTON 
Commanding 



HAPPY LANDINGS 

To you of Class 43-A I wish to extend 
our sincere good wishes for a brilliant future. 

Individually and collectively It has been 
a pleasure to work with you and we are 
proud of your record. 

Those classes preceding you to Basic 
School have established an enviable record. 
Yours is the duty to maintain and improve 
upon that record in this time of need for 
well trained pilots. 

Just "ADIOS," and hiappy Landings. 

Capt. Merril hi. Carlton 
Commanding 



TO CLASS 43-A 

Yours has been a "tough row to hoe"; 
having been thru "Pearl hiarbor" and now 
having finally won thru the first phase of 
your flight training. I am proud to have 
had the honor of working with you men 
and I am sure that the Basic and Advanced 
Schools will be but stepping stones to 
greater honor and glory for you all. Regard- 
less of how tough the assignment, 43-A 
will be able to master the situation. Good 
Luck and Godspeed 43-A. 

Lt. B. A. Peeters, 

Commandant of Cadets 




LT. B. A. PEETERS 
Commandant of Cadets 



PAGE THREE 




CAPT. D. D. CONARD 1st LT. V. H. MURDOCK 1st LT. J. K. GRAHAM 

"Oh Happy August the sixth!" "Yes Sir, Yes Sir, Yes Sir, I think "Mister, you're washed out — or was 

maybe so. Sir." this a final check?" 



"G. I." 





CAPT M. H. CARLTON 
"Hadn't you better level off, Conard?" 



1st LT. W. P. SLOAN 
'Is my moustache running?" 




1st LT. RICHARD YOUNG 



1st LT. B. F. HAZELTON 



2nd LT. F. L. POLK 



'Where's Hazelton and Polk? We've "Maybe we could add FOUR more "Those guys wavin' the red flags 



got 60 rides today." 



runways. 



fiust be nuts.' 



H. Q. STAFF 




MAJOR A. S. HOWELL 
"So I told the M.P., I ain't no glider 
pilot'." 




CAPT. G. J. SATHER 
"Me and Pajewski and Smith — Boy- 
do we confuse 'em." 




LT. B. B. HUTCHINSON 2nd LT. R. D. COOPER 1st LT. M. J. MUELLER 

"This is the only asylum in the coun- "She must have taken a great big "Hmmmmm — let's see — another dash 

thy that's run by its inmates." breath and held it." of castor oil — hmmmm." 




2nd LT. F. W. EVANS 2nd LT. W. P. MULLEN 1st LT. C. A. FENTON 

"Gimme back that beer! I I am TOO "And then she said, 'This one's on "Sorry, but I'm taking the recon to 

twenty-one." me, Lieutenant'." San Bernardino." 



PAGE FIVE 




PAGE SIX 



QuioG^abk^ 



PAGE SEVEN 




HARRY VAIL CLUSSTON 



LLOYD KENNETH BURRIS 



Though soaring on silent wings 

Still they carry on; 
Two who have made their last 

Earthbound flight 
Will always fly in the hearts 

Of their fellow pilots. 



PAGE EIGHT 



*■, - 





FIW^^ 



^ 



COMPANY A— Top row, left to right: Donald S. Richardson, 
James C. Hanselman, Frank G. Chaplick, William A. Davi'".: 
bottom row: Thomas E. Mulligan, Charles E. Smith, Richard 
X. Chabalowski, John E. O'Grady. 



COMPANY B— Top row, left to right: Charles J. Tharp, 
Glenn L. Johnson, hloward J. Wood, Forrest W. Jewel': 
bottom row: Byron A. Dobbs, Jr., Joe H. Wallace, Frederick 
L. Bower. Joseph E. Young. 




BATTALION STAFF— Robert L. East, Odean 
Walter A. Jackson, Jr., Edward M. Murphy. 



R. Mil 




COMPANY C— Top row. left to right: Walker T. Tedford, 
Kenneth W. Gremore, Elbert E. Young, William H. Wilgus; 
bottom row: Lewis E. Louraine, Clark E. Farrar, Thomas J. 
Writt, Gorman W. Smith. 

PAGE NINE 



COMPANY D— Top row, left to right: Erwin F. Miles, Elman 
F. Lemley, Delbert D. Long; bottom row: Harold D. Single- 
ton, Smith, Ralph W. Hetherington, Clifford A. Palmer. 




RALPH LUTHER ACOSTA 8/1/40 
Newsmurna Beach, Florida 
Mechanic (Corp.) Hickam 

Field, T. H. 
Saw action during Jap Invasion 

on Dec. 7/41. 
DONALD RICHARD ANDREWS 
Glen Ellyn, Illinois 9 16/40 

Coast Artillery, Cpl), Seattle, 

Washington 
ROBERT JOSIAH BASKIN 

Drums, Penn. 8/30/40 

Clerk, Message Center, (Pvt). 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec. 7/41. 
RUSSELL CALVIN BALLINGER 
Waverly, III. 12/13/41 

Crew Chief (Sgt), Wheeler 

Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7/41. 
LEAFORD BEARSKIN 9/18/39 
Wyandotte, Oklahonna 
Crew Chief (Sgt), Elmendorf 

Field, Alaska. 
EDWARD JOE BOSWELL 7/8/40 
De Leon, Texas 
Crew Chief (Sgt), Kelly Field. 

Texas. 

FREDERICK LOUIS BOWER 
Yale, Oklahoma 6/29/40 

Mechanic, Field Artly, (PFC), 

Camp Barkeley, Texas 
ALEXANDER JACK BREWER 
Salt Lake City, Utah 1/6/42 
Student (Tech School), Shep- 

pard Field, Texas 
RICHARD WILLIAM BRYANT 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Radio Operator (Pvt), Camp 

Roberts, Calif. 
KENNETH LLOYD BURRIS 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 7/1/41 

Clerk (Sgt), Enid Army Flying 

School, Enid, Oklahoma 
Killed in the line of duty, 5th 

Army Air F'orce Training 

Detachment, Hemet, Calif. 
GEORGE G. BYRNES (Lt.) 

11/11/37 (Commissioned) 
St. Petersburg, Florida 
Co. Commander 120th Infantry 

Ft. Jackson, South Carolina 
CARL ROBERT CARLSON 

Racine, Wisconsin 10/29/40 

Aircraft Mechanic (PFC), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7/41 
WALTER RICHARD CARPENTER 
South Bend, Indiana M/8'39 
Radio Operator on Combat 

Crew (Corp), Hickam Field, 

T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7/41 
RICHARD XAVIER 
CHABLOWSKI 9/18/40 

Chicago, Illinois 
Aircraft Mechanic (Sgt), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Decorated with Purple Heart 

(Wounded in Action) 
FRANK GEORGE CHAPLICK 
Groveland, Mass. 9/1/39 

Personnel Clerk (Sgt), Hickam 

Field, T.H. 
Decorated with Purple Heart 

(Wounded in Action) 
Most outstanding Ryan Cadet 

(Silver Award) 



MORRIS BENJAMIN COOK 
Seattle, Wash. (Sgt] 5/1/39 
Gunnery Sgt. (Field Artillery) 
Fort Lewis, Wash. 
TOM ANDERSON CROCKETT Jr. 
Winters, Texas (Sqt) 10 27 3? 
Radio Operator, Signal Corps, 
Camp Forest, Tenn. 
WILLIAM CROFT, JR. 7/ 12 41 
Carsicana, Texas (PFC) 

Aircraft Mechanic, Ellington 
Field, Texas 
ANDREW YOUNG DAVIS 

6 7 41 
Grauette, Arkansas (Corp) 

Aircraft Mechanic, Kelly Field, 
Texas 
WILLIAM AUSTIN DAVIS 

Ooltewah, Tenn. (Sgt) 8/1/3? 
Hiclcam Field, T.H. 
Saw action during Japanese 
invasion on Dec. 7 '41 
CARLE JAMES DILLONAIRE 
Racine, Wis. I 1/2^40 

Air Mechanic, (Cpl), Hickam 

Field, T. H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
invasion on Dec. 7/41 
BYRON ALEXIS DOBBS, JR. 

9/20/39 
Birch Run, Mich. (S/Sgt) 

Mennber of 1st Pursuit Group 
(F) Eddie Richenbacker 
outfit) 
Selfridge Field, Mich. 
JOSEPH STEEL DUNBAR 

Oakland, Calif. 5'28/12 

Leading Aircraftsman in R. C. 
A. F. Regina, Saskatchewan, 
Canada. 
Transferred to U.S.A.A.F. 
5/28/42 
ROBERT L. EAST 11/23/40 

Wilmington, Illinois (S'Sgt) 

Control Tower Operator, Hick- 
am Field, T.H. 
Saw action during Japanese 
invasion on Dec. 7/41 
JOHN BILES EASTER 9/9/40 

Nitta Yuma. Miss. (Corp) 

Instructor A.C.T.S. (Aircraft 

Mechanics) 
Barkdale Field, Louisiana 
WILLIAM CALEMAN 

EDWARDS, JR. 9 '20/41 

McComas, West Virginia 
Radio Operator (Corp). Mather 
Field, Calif. 

MURRELI. ABB EGGERS 7 28 40 
Watauga. Tenn. 
Radio Operator, (Cpl). Hickam 

Field. T.H. 
Saw action during Japanese 
invasion on Dec. 7 '41 
HAROLD JEROME ERICKSON 
3 '25 M 
Menomonie. Wis. (Corp) 

Link Trainer Instructor Good 
fellow Field, San Angelo, 
Texas 
CLARK ELBERT FARAR I 28 42 
San Antonio, Texas (Sgt) 

Aircraft Mechanic (Sgt) Enid 
Army School of Flying. Enid. 
Oklahoma 
WILLIAM JESSE FENNER 

2 14/4! 

Anaconda. Montana (R.F.C.) 

Aircraft Mechanic, Chico Army 

Flying School. Chico, Calif. 















CHARLES LUNDRY FOWLER JR. 
Rome, Georgia (Sgt) 8/5/40 
Coast Artillery (AA) Hickam 
Field, T.H. 

LEWIS MAX GILLESPIE 7/3/41 
Detroit, Mich. 

Aircraft Mechanic, March Field, 
Calif. 

KENNETH WARD GREMORE 
Verona, Michigan 10/27/40 

Aircraft Mechanic, Wheeler 

Field, T.H. 
Decorated with Purple Heart 

(Wounded in Action) 

ROBERT CARL GROTH 10/30/40 
Bridgman, Michigan 
Power Turrett Technician (PFC) 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw action during Japanese 

invasion on Dec 7/4! 

DUANE ELMER ZARNEKE 

Doland, South Dakota 5/22/41 
Aircraft Mechanic (Corp), 
Elmendorf Field, Alaska 

JOE FRANCIS HANNAN 

Long Beach, Calif. 12/29/39 
Crew Chief (Sgt), Elmendorf 
Field, Alaska 

JAMES CARROLL HANSELMAN 

San Diego, Calif. 11/27/39 

Radio Operator & Weather 

Observer (S/Sgt) Elmendorf 

Field, Alaska 

CHARLES RAYMOND HARRIS 
3/28/4! 
New Kensington, Penn. 
Air Mechanic (Pvt), Hickam 

Field, T.H. 
Saw action during Japanese 
Invasion Dec 7/41 

HERBERT FRANKLIN HARRIS 
Morganton, N. C. 8/8/41 

Clerk (Pvt), Sheppard Field, 
Texas 

1st LT. ALBERT TAG HAVILAND 
Commissioned 1938 
Orange, New Jersey 
Graduate of Field Artillery 

School, R. Sill, Oklahoma 
Instructor, F.A.S., Ft. Sill, 1942 

ROBERT CHARLES HENRY 
Chicago, III. 12/31/4! 

ACTS Student, (Pvt), Aero I.!.!. 

JACK LOUIS HENSELL 10/23/4! 
Augusta, Maine 
Air Mechanic, (Pvt), Sheppard 
Field, Texas 

RALPH WILLIAM HETHERING- 
TON 10/31/40 

Benton Harbor, Michigan 
Aircraft Mechanic, (Corp), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec. 7/41 

WALTER AUBRA JACKSON, JR. 
Memphis, Tenn. 8/4/39 

Clerk, S-2 & S-3, (S/Sgt), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7/41 

FORREST WENTWORTH JEWELL 
Elmwood, Wisconsin I 1/1/40 
Combat Engineer (Pvt), Hick- 
am Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 



GLENN LEROY JOHNSON 
Carlton, Oregon 9/18/41 

Infantryman (PFC), Schofield 

Barracks, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7 41 

ROGER JOHNSON JONES, JR. 

8 2/40 

Athens, Ohio (1st Lt.) 

S-3, Infantry, Camp Cook, Calif. 

AUGUST GAIL KERN 1/2/42 

Riverside, Iowa 

Aircraft Mechanic, (Pvt), Shep- 
pard Field, Texas 

NORMAN FREDRICK KLEMU- 
SHIN I0''I4/4I 

Erie, Penn. 

Aircraft Mechanic (Pvt), March 
Field, Calif. 

Most outstanding Ryan Cadet; 
Gold Award 

ELMAN FLOYD LEMLEY 5/3I/3V 
Core, W. Va. 
Crew Chief & Aerial Engineer 

(S'Sgt), Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7 '41 

RENE GASTON LAQUEX 
Altadena, Calif. 
Section Chief, Coast Artly, 
(Corp), Ft, Flagler, Wash. 

ROBERT HERBERT LLOYD 

12/11/39 
New Kensington, Penn. 
Aircraft Machinist (Corp), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 

DELBERT DEAN LONG 10/3/39 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Aircraft Mechanic (Sgt) Hick- 
am Field, T.H. 

Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7 '41 

JOSEPH ANCEL LOPEZ 7'I7/4I 
Tulare, Calif. 

Aircraft Mechanic (Sgt), Santa 
Ana, Calif. 

LEWIS EDWARD LOURAINE 
Lexington, Oklahoma 6/25/40 
Radio Operator (Sgt) March 
Field, Calif. 

JULIAN FLOYD LUDWICK 

Morris, Oklahoma 1/27/42 

Aircraft Mechanic (Pvt), March 
Field, Calif. 

IRWIN FERRELL MILES 8/20/40 
San Antonio, Texas 
Aircraft Mechanic (S/Sgt) 
Kelly Field, Texas 

ODEAN RELVEAU MILLMAN 
Amarillo, Texas 9/7/39 

Clerk, Hq. Hawaiian Air Force, 

Fort Shaffer, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 



Invasion on Dec 


7 ''41 


RAYMOND HOMET 


MILLS 


Spokane, Wash. 


7 '17/40 


Infantryman (Sgt) 


Schofield 


Barracks, T.H. 




THOMAS EDMUND 


MULLI- 


GAN, JR. 


9 1 6/42 


Albany, N. Y. 




Leading Aircraftsman, R.C.A.F., 


Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 


Transferred to U.S 


, A.A.F. 


5/30/42 












HARVY JAMES MUNSON 

10/8/41 
Beaumont, Texas (Pvt) 

Armament Specialist, Albuquer- 
que Air Base, Albuquerque, 
N.M. 

EDWARD MARTIN MURPHY 

10/30/39 
Rock Springs, Wyoming 
Aircraft Mechanic and Engineer, 
Kodlalc, Alaska 

JOSEPH MICHAEL McHALE 

7/27/40 
Riverside, Calif. (Sgt) 

Field Communications, 
Elmendorf Field, Alaska 



FRANK McLAIN 1/8/42 

Bryant, South Dakota (Pvt) 
Aircraft Armorer, Lorry Field, 
Colorado 

JAMES MELVIN MERRIH 

1 1725/40 
Lakeland, Florida 

ARISTOLELIS S. NAOUM 5/1/40 
Boston, Mass. (Corp) 

Aircraft Armament Instructor, 
Hickam Field, T.H. 

CARL AMOS NELSON 9/9/40 
Emporia, Kansas (Sgt) 

Aircraft Mechanic, McClellan 
Field, Calif. 

JOHN EDMUND O'GRADY 
Cohoes, N.Y. (PFC) 12/10/40 
Corps of Engineers, Schfiled 
Bks, T.H. Saw action during 
Jap attack Dec. 7, 1941. 

CLIFFORD ANDREW PALMER 

6/1/40 
Blackduck, Minn. 
Mechanic (Sgt), Elmendorf 
Field, Alaska 






LLOYD WILLIS PAULSON 

1/21/42 
Bellingham, Wash. 
Radio Operator, Sheppard 
Field, Texas 

DALE JAMES YOUNGER 12/2/40 
Cameron, Missouri 
(PFC) Headquarters, 130th 
Field Artillery 

PHILIP MELVIN PEDERSEN 

9/16/40 
Bend, Oregon 

Infantryman (Sgt), Fort Lewis, 
Washington 



MARK CHARLES PELLETIER 

5/16/41 
Oakland, Calif. (Sgt) 

Aircraft Mechanic, Mather 
Field, Calif. 

REX PRINCE PRISBREY 3/3/41 

Washington, Utah (PFC) 

Clerk (Engineers) San Luis 
Obispo, Calif. 

CLYDE ESTLE RHODES 5/22/41 

Crew Chief (Aerial Engineer], 

(PFC), Hamilton Field, Calif. 



HOWARD LOUIS RICHARD 
Gardner, Mass. 9/1/39 

Aircraft Mechanic (Sg+), Hick- 
am Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7''4I 
Most outstanding Ryan Cadet; 
Bronze Award 

DONALD GERALD RICHARD- 
SON 12/28/41 
Del Morte, Colorado 
Truck Driver (Pvt), Gowen 
Field, Idaho 

1st LT. CLARENCE JUNIOR 
ROBINSON 9/5/41 

Newton, Kansas 
Asst. Adjutant, Victorville Army 
Flying School, Calif. 

LEE RILEY ROOT 1/2/40 

Dunkirk, N.Y. 
Radio Operator (Pvt), Hickam 

Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec 7/41 

FRANCIS STANLEY RZATKOW- 
SKI 8/24/40 

Wyandotte, Mich. 
Radio Operator and Gunner 
(Corp) Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/4! 
RAYMOND HERBERT SANDLIN 
Kansas City, Kansas 12/27/39 
Aircraft Mechanic (Corp), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 
ROBERT THOMAS SAVAGE 
Salt Lake City, Utah 3/3/41 
Scout Corporal, Artillery, Fort 
Lewis, Washington 
HAROLD DAYTON SINGLETON 
Gem, W. Va. 6/28' 1 

Instructor (S/Sgt), Kelly Field, 
Texas 
CHARLES EMMET SMITH 

Kimmswitch, Missouri 11/15/40 
Crew Chief (Corp), Mines 
Field, Calif. 
GORMAN WILLIAM SMITH 
Ludlow, Illinois 2/11/4! 

Parts Supply Sgt (S/Sgt) 
Stockton, Calif. 
HARRY LEE SMITH 12/12/40 
Greenbay, Wisconsin 
Aircraft Armorer, (Corp), 

Wheeler Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 
HOLTON SMITH 4/28/41 

Stamping Ground, Kentucky 
MARION OLIVER STEPHENS 
St. Charles, Missouri 9/3/40 
Crew Chief (Corp), Wheeler 

Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 
VERNON CLARK STEVENS 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 7/23/40 
Clerk S-4 (Pvt), Hickam Field, 

T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7 41 
JOHN LAWRENCE STILES 

Philadelphia, Penn. 11/28/39 
Aircraft Mechanic (Corp), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 











MISS FRANCIS WOLF 

"Sorry — no relation, MR. Wolf." 



e 



bUHij 



omvan 



a 



ueen^ 



Inspiration and fortification, 
But too far away for pacification. 
Lovely dreams for lonely men, 
Waiting, we hope, when our flights end. 





MISS LILLIAN KERSTEINER 

Mr. Davis, in Company "A" 

Is wondering, now that he's away. 



MISS HARRIET JIMERSON 

She loved, but only for a day — 
She's mourned, alas, by Company "A" 



PAGE SIXTEEN 



ike al^ueens ok 
ike U^op 

All the girls at home are the best 
of any crop, these are represen- 
tative in only a few cases. 




MISS MARGE BURROWS 

Company "D", whose love Is large, 
Is concentrated on a gal named Marge 





MISS GERALDINE LOVETT 

And who wouldn't Lovett. 



MISS EDNA HANNA 

The pride and joy of Louisiana 

Is a lovely Miss by the name of Hanna. 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 




BILLIE FRED STROUD 9/23/40 
Overton, Texas (Sgt) 

Aircraft Mechanic, Ellington 
Field, Texas 

CARL ELMER SUTTON I 1/22/40 
Chicago, III. 

GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR JR. 

3/10/41 
Hattlesburg, Miss. (Pvt) 

Tail Gunner, March Field, Calif. 

WALKER THOMAS TEDFORD 
6/27/41 
North Little Rock, Arkansas 
Rifle Squad Leader, (Corp), 
Fort Richardson, Alaska 

CHARLES JOSEPH THARP 

8/1/39 
St. Louis, Missouri (S/Sgt) 

Control Tower Operator, Hick- 
am Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec. 7/41 

IVAN JACOB THOMAS 12/19/41 
Estoncia, N.M. 

Aircraft Mechanic, Sheppard 
Field, Texas 

DEXTER EUGENE TIEFENTHAL 
10/30/40 
Allegan, Mich. (Corp) 

Aircraft Mechanic, Wheeler 

Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec. 7/41 

ROBERT DAVID TILLEY 2/2/39 
Anacoco, Louisiana 
Radio Operator (Sgt), Hickam 

Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec. 7/41 

JULIUS ULRICH 5/1/40 

Midway, Penn. (PFC) 

Dispatcher (Motor Pool), Ft. 

Shatter, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 

JOHN N. VAN HORN (Sgt) 
Belllnqham, Wash., Hickann 

Field, T.H. 
Infantry Platoon Sgt. 

JOE HARRY WALLACE 8/12/41 
Mission, Texas 

Crew Chief (Corp), Gila Bend 
Gunnery Range, Arizona 

DALLAS DAY WATKINS 1/10/40 
Monrovia, Maryland 
Aerial Gunner (Sgt), Hickam 

Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec. 7/41 

COLBY ARTHUR WAUGH 

Solon, Maine 3/26/40 

Surveyor (Corp), Schofield 

Barracks, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 

WILLIAM HOWARD WILGUS 
Bremerton, Washington 3/8/40 
Aircraft Mechanic (PFC), 

Wheeler Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 

Invasion on Dec. 7/41 

RICHARD VANCE WOLF 

Joy, Oklahoma 11/15/39 

Aircraft Mechanic (Corp), 
Randolph Field, Texas 








HOWARD JAY WOOD I/I0/4I 
Evert, Washington 
Clerk, S-2, S-3, (PFC), Elmen- 
dorf Field, Alaska 

WILLIAM HENRY WOODY 

7/5/40 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

ROBERT HUGH WOTEN 

12/18/41 
Granite, Idaho 

Aircraft Mechanic (Pvt), Shep- 
pard Field, Texas 

THOMAS JEFFERSON WRITT 

10/2/39 
Export, Penn. 
Aircraft Mechanic, Wheeler 

Field, T.H. (S/Sgt) 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec 7/41 
ELBERT EUGENE YOUNG 

11-10-39 
San Fernando, California 
Radio Operator (Corp), Elmen- 
dorf Field, Alaska 
JOSEPH EUGENE YOUNG 

9/11/40 
Atlantic, Iowa 
Aircraft Mechanic (Corp), 

Hickam Field, T.H. 
Saw Action during Japanese 
Invasion on Dec. 7/41 




ON REVIEW 



PAGE NINETEEN 




AIN'T IT THE TRUTH? 



Any Dodo talking to himself while flying as the zero hour comes near: 

"O. K., Mr. Kumler — I suppose that landing heads me for the "wash rack." Like a 
feather — like a feather — 'at's me. Coulda had a crate of eggs along that time. . . . 

"What's 'at, Sir? Yes, sir — my right wing again — dam it! 

("After I get out of here I'm going to start a laundry called "Won Wing Low" — 
and it looks like it won't be long now. I'm overdue — like an unpaid bill. I've kicked around 
too long — fifteen hours nearly — and no solo in sight. Trouble is — Kumler has too many 
students and so he's gonna wash one out an guess who it's gonna be. Right- The others 
have soloed long ago — an' I can fly rings 'round 'em too — Probably fly rings 'round Kumler 
for that matter — trouble is — ) 

"What's 'at sir? Take it up alone. Yes sir . . . WhHAT . . . wha' Do you think 
ready sir? 

("You do — hHe does — hHe does, does he — What does he know about my flying any 



m 



way 



???1 



'No sir, I won't forget the flaps — Yes, sir, look around all the time, sir. 

(O.K. kid, let's taxi 'er down. Let's taxi 'er fast and scare the hell out of Kumler. . . . 
Nope, nope — better take 'er easy — Ready? Hmph! He knows I'm not ready — what's he 
trying to do? Kill me off? Watch it . . . don't head straight on the runway— 45 degrees 
. . . 'at's it. Easy to stall a minute or two while I'm still alive. Well, better get goinq — hiere 
we go! HERE WE GO! . . . OOPS- We're flying! What do I mean, "WE" . . . I'm all alone! 
HEY! I'M ALL ALONE! Sod! I'm already too high . . . better turn — turn — turn. How the 

hell do you turn? Oh, yes, turn. Eight hundred feet. What? Eight hu How'd I get 

up here? Better glide back to five — better — God! How empty that front seat is — Never 
realized what a big man Kumler was. Let's see . . . down wind leg . . . where's the field . . . 
oh, yes . . way down there . . . Gosh, it looks far down there. WHAT! Eight hundred fee+ 
again! Gotta glide again. How do I do it? Oh, yes . . . trim tab. Here we go to land! 
I'll never make it . . . better go up to 3000 and bail out . . . nope . . . nope . . . bad 
idea . . . better try to land 'er. God . . . that ground's coming up fast . . . level off . . . 
level off . . . maybe I won't kill myself afte' ... I DOOD IT! I DOOD IT! Not a bad 
landing at that. I'M A H. P.! ! 

"What's 'at, Mr. Kumler? One wing low? Yes sir . . . yes, sir ... I believe I did 
forget to pump those flaps. . . ." A^C D. G. Hoyt, 43-B 



PAGE TWENTY 




PA6E TWENTY-ONE 



LULABI ARTISTS 




Ground school instructors pictured above are, left to right: J. H. KEESEE, L F. BRISTOL, R. E. BUTLER, 
P. PIERCE, H. RAINE, H. LANDRY and E. M. WEIDINGER 




"NAW, HE AIN'T GOIN' TO MARS— HE'S GONNA FLY THE NEW 2-WAY PAHERN. 




PAGE TWENTY-THREE 




AN AIRPLANE is something that flies 
^^ through the air. The Ryan PT-22 flies 
through the air. Therefore It must be an 
airplane. A brick flies through the air If you 
throw It hard enough. 

On the front end of the PT-22 Is a thing 
called an 'R-55." It Is said to be an engine. 
It Is very useful because If It wasn't there 
the plane would be too light In the nose 
and that would not be good. Also there Is 
one school of thought that says the "R-55" 
Is of considerable assistance In making the 
plane proceed through the air. A second 
school of thought, however, Is of the opin- 
ion that a good tail wind Is more reliable. 

The PT-22 Is held together by nuts and 
bolts. Of grave Importance Is the "nut" 
which holds the stick. 

The principal control Is the "Sosport" 
which Is a tube with a lot of pressure on one 



end and a vacuum on the other. The Gos- 
port activates the nut holding the stick 
which in turn activates control surfaces 
which make the plane do maneuvers that 
are remarkable Indeed! 

One of the easiest maneuvers to learn 
Is the "ground loop." In fact, some students 
have been known to master It the first time. 
This always makes a strong impression on 
the Flight Commander. As a reward to the 
student he takes him for a personal ride. 
And as an additional reward the lucky fel- 
low goes for another free ride in a plane 
whose color scheme Is further enhanced by 
the liberal use of red and is chauffered by 
a genuine Gl pilot. 

Among other attributes, pilots of this 
sterling character are also known for their 
cleanliness. It is common knowledge that 
they wash frequently. 

Lt. S. G. Byrnes 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 




"You told me to take the stick . . . well, here it Is!" 



The Caydet does some darned queer things, 
While trying to win that set of wings. 

When coming out of a dive at two hundred 

per, 
And pulls that stick — makes your stomach 

stir! 

He uses left rudder In a right climbing turn, 
No wonder his instructor is ready to burn. 

He lands so hot on the mat out there, 
You'd think he was flying up in mid-air. 

And if he could fly awake, as he does In 

his sleep, 
hie would have those wings in less than 
a week. 

A/C Bowrlng, S. hH. 
Co. A, Class 43-B 



A CADET'S PRAYER 

That I might cross the pitfalls 
Which stand between my class 
And a little set of silver wings, 
And two small bars of brass. 

A/C Robert Hughes, 43-B 



INSTRUCTOR: After a ten hour check 
with his student: "The only thing that was 
wrong with your check, was that you 
bounced." 

Student, a happy smile roaming over his 
face: "My, what these CHECKS can do." 




"I could've sworn you said 'Pair o' shoes'. 



PA(5E TWENTY-FIV^ 




(^/t'&c/ 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 




o 

u 



LU 

I 

u 

< 

CO 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 




RElf^X/ / 





MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 3941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Sunday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Unifornn and Students 28c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 






Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deliclously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

IHliMEir CAPi 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 £. Florida Avenue 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



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Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
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• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 

12th at Vine 
PHONE 2400 RIVERSIDE 



— M^— llfl 



NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail In 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 

Phone 2771 






For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

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• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 

TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
Trust and Savings 6anl( 

of Riverside, Calif. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




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124 N. Carmelita 



^„_.„_„„_.„_„._,„_.._.„_.. 



Hemet, Calif. 



EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

TIHIi 

IHiEMiT NIEWS 

Complete 
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• 
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PAGE THIRTY 



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PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
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IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
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Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
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Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 

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PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



Cadet and Personnel 
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The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

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"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 



Class 43-B 

5th Army Air Force Flying Training Detachment 

Ryan School of Aeronautics 

Hemet, California 

PUBLISHED BY THE RYAN SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICS, A CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE, 

IN THE INTEREST OF THE PERSONNEL OF THE 5th A.A.F.F.T.D. 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1942 



Farewell to Class 43-A 

Alas! Alas! You're about to leave, 
The place you love so dear? ? ? 
But don't you feel kinda sorry 
For the guys you're leaving here? 
Novv that it's over, you loved it; 
And have nnemories you vv'on't forget. 
But all us poor little dodos 
hHaven't begun our worries yet. 

You soloed without much trouble. 
Passed your ten hour check with ease; 
But, oh! That thirty and sixty. 
Was everything but a breeze. 
We know it's rough and rugged. 
And are prepared for all that's tough. 
Too bad you are not remaining 
To watch us strut our stuff. 

We enjoyed our association with you; 

You fellows were really swell. 

Such men of your type and calibre 

Will give all our enemies hell. 

Our best wishes will always be with you. 

When you fly into the cosmic blue; 

But, to omit all emotional conclusions, 

We'll merely bid you adieu. . . . 

By Gene Morgan A^S 
Company "C" 
Class 43-C 




DEDICATION 



To those men who have fulfilled their 
motto, "From possibility to actuality" — 
to our Instructors. 



FROM THE EDITOR: 

Aircrews and machines must reach the front lines if they are going to be of any value 
in the winning of this war. Don't forget that, Misters. . . . So, in your training, play it safe. 

There is going to be plenty of opportunity later on for you to show your guts and skill, 
opportunity when dash and daring will pay dividends in successful bombing raids and air 
victories. But if you crack-up in training, those opportunities will never be yours. So play 
it safe. Stick to regulations and don't take useless chances. 

A crack-up over here means a double loss over there, the machine and the aircrew is 
lost, and the time and effort required to produce that machine and aircrew might just as 
well have never been. 

Uncle Sam is depending on you. Don't fail him by being a damphool in your training. 



CONTACT STAFF 

EDITOR RIFKIN, G. R. 

PHOTOGRAPHER GRIFFITH, H. L. 

LENS SHADE HOLDER HUMMEL, T. D. 

ART DIRECTOR MASON, C.W. 

ASSOCIATE ED * ROBINSON, J. W. 

ASST. ASSOCIATE ED ROSSELOT, L. C. 

ASST. ASSOCIATE ED WOOD, H. C. 






We laughed, we sang songs, we told jokes, we haunted the patients In the hospital, so now we give you CONTACT. 




You of the Class of 43-B 
that have successfully piloted 
your craft through the turbulent 
air of primary stage, may well 
be proud of your accomplish- 
ment. One needs that feeling 
of accomplishment in these days 
of supreme effort. Without it 
time seems all-consuming, hlow- 
ever, your wings have only be- 
gun to sprout. The rigorous 
training you are about to enter 
into at Basic will require an even 
greater effort. With the part- 
ing word of "hHappy Landings," 
we send you on to your next 
stage of training. 

MERRILL H. CARLTON 
Captain, Air Corps 
Commanding 



To the Class of 43-B: 

Just a final word upon the 
completion of the first and 
toughest phase of your flight 
training. You have shown that 
you've got what it takes to make 
a good pilot and officer. This 
department has striven to in- 
still in you men the value of 
honor among men and self dis- 
cipline. As you go on to Basic, 
Advanced and finally Into vari- 
ous tactical units, you will real- 
ize the importance of these 
ualities and their utmost neces- 
sity in the building and main- 
taining an efficient and well- 
disciplined fighting team. Let's 
show them, 43-B, that you have 
what it takes and more! Good 
luck and Happy Landings. 

B. A. PEETERS 



Editor's Note — Last month the Commandant of Cadets 
left the post on a ten-day leave of absence. When he 
returned, something new had been added. II e wish to 
take this opportunity to extend our congratulations to 
tfie newly-weds, Lt. and Mrs. B. A. Peelers. 




^5i^^-fc 



«v*^ 




2nd U. Polk 
1st Lt. Young 



Capt. Conard 
1st Lt. Murdock 



Capt. Carlton 

CODC /CUADCCN PLEEX 

43-B Retreats to Basic With Severe Losses 

Raunching, Cal., Sept. 28 
Since the renewed activities on this front of five red nosed P. Poor 22's, the hiemet "Vulture 
Squadron" was able to successfully repulse the latest attacks by the Kaydet Dive Bums from East hlang- 
er. Due to increased gossportage, these ships easily overcame their opponents. 

Victoriously led by Capt. Carlton, and closely followed by Capt. Conard, these stalwart defend- 
ers of the Nation have added 96 to their total score. Their associagtes, Lts. Young, Polk, and Murdock 
have also made brilliant showings in their engagements. Lt. Polk feels that his success was slightly re- 
tarded by the absence of Lt. Peeters, while Lt. Murdock states that his paper work is most annoying. 
The citizens of Ryan give three hearty Burps and hope that Lt. Young will get his personal orders and 
flight pay soon. Vv'e regret that Lt. Sloan has not returned from his mission to the far east. (If you 
don't think it's far east, try getting there the Army way.) 



".vMW 




1 «^♦;^gsao^^^^^^^^ 



THE STORY OF THE THREE DODOS 



Once upon a time there were three 
Dodos. These Dodos were baby Dodos, 
because nobody has ever seen a mama or 
a papa Dodo. So nobody knows where 
Dodos come from. 

Some say that Dodos are made out of 
college students which is logical since col- 
lege students are easily convertible. Any- 
way, nobody knows what happens to college 
students after they graduate. 

One day when the three Dodos were on 
the flight line, little Peroxidelocks wandered 
into their cabin. Peroxidelocks was a favor- 
its of the commandos, because she was 
washed out too. 

Well, anyway, little Peroxidelocks got 
lost when she was out picking dates. She 
couldn't decide between some fat, rich, 
juicy ones, or the regular run at Ryan. 

She was very tired when she wandered 



Into the three Dodos' cabin, so she lay down 
on the bed. The bed, being made in a mili- 
tary manner and having blankets drum tight, 
threw her to the bottom of the upper bunk 
and she was knocked cold. When the three 
Dodos came home from ifheir formations 
and saw the mussed up bed they presumed 
that someone had rat-raced in it, and gave 
it no further thought. 

The Dodos were tired so they crawled 
into the other three bunks and went to sleep. 
Little Peroxidelocks awoke before reveille 
the next morning and ran all the way home, 
because she knew that wasn't her bed, and 
besides, she happened to remember the 
way home. 

The original ending of this story was cen- 
sored because nobody has ever seen a mama 
or papa Dodo. No one would have believed 
it anyway — of the Dodos. 



PAGE FIVE 




JOE C. MOSNER 



C. NEIL RODDY 



THEY STOOD RETREAT AS SOLDIERS 







AALAND. R. D. 


ABBOTT, F. E. 


ADAMS, J. M. 


AKERS, J. D. 


Port Orchard, Wash. 


Chino, Gal. 


Bellflower, Cal. 


Websfergroves, Mo. 







ALLEN, C. D. 
Hubbardswood, IlL 



ALLEN, F. W. 
Spencer, Ohio 



ALLISON, R. W. 
Beverly Hills, Cal. 



ARCHIBALD, W. J. 
Seattle, Wash. 



ARNETT, L. W. 
New Straitsville, Oh!< 



ARNOLD, A. A. 
Chicago. III. 



ASBRIDGE, J. B. 

Christopher, III. 



AUSTIN, R. L. 
Linwood, Cal. 






AVERITT, W. T. 
Indianapolis. Ind. 



BACH, J. V. 
WhI+esburg, Ky. 



BANKSTON, H. J. 
Roberta. Ga. 



BARNS, W. F. 
Los Angles, Cal. 











BECH, G. N. 
Sebastapo, Cal. 



BECK, L J. 
Aberdeen, Wash. 



BELL, L. R. 
Emporia, Kan. 



BENFER, A. B. 
Dover, Ohio 




BENJAMIN, M. B. 
Wichita, Kan. 



BENSON, R. E. 
Seattle, Wash. 



BINGHAM, C. C. 
Dequlncy, La. 




BIRD, G. E. 
Springfield, Utah 



BLACKER, J. A. 
Seattle, Wash. 



BLEWFIELD, R. L. 
Rockford, III. 



BOLTE, W. A. 
Beaufort, Mo. 




BOWRING, S. H. 
Webstergroves, Mo. 




BOWSHER, P. T. 
Springfield, Ohio 



WITSCH, J. G. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



BRANSTETTER, W. H. 
Seattle, Wash. 




BRIGGS, H. I. 
Akron, Ohio 




"THIS MUG 
DiDNT 

TURN OUT" 






BRINCK. R. G. 

Ketchikan, Alaska 



BRIXEY, H. S. 
Cassville, Mo. 



BRYAN, W. L 
St. Louis, Mo. 



V, 



BUeNER, L S. 
Andale, Kan. 







BUNTING, B. H. 
Liberal, Kan. 



BURKE, W. F. 
Seattle, Wash. 



BYRNE, B. R. 
Clayton, Mo. 



CALLAHAN, L. E. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



CARLSON, D. P. 
Mitchell, S. D. 



CHAMPLIN, J. 
Toppenlsh, Wash. 



CHESMORE, E. R. 
Seattle, Wash. 



CHIPMAN, D. R. 
Aldsoma, Colo. 






CHRISTOFERO, L. S. 
Seattle, Wash. 



CHRISTY, H. E. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



CLAYTON, H. E. 
Hammond, Ind. 



CLORE, C. M. 
Bargersville, Ind. 




/ "V 





c ^ 



••\ 



A 






CONES, E. R. 
Beaumont, Tex. 



CONKLIN, W. R. 
Wichita, Kan. 



COOPER, R. P. 
Seattle, Wash. 



CORBETT, J. J. 
Magnolia, Ohio 




COX, C. T. 
Dubuque, iowa 



DE YOUNG, A. A. 
Chicago, III. 



Dl BETTA, G. 
Parkersville, W. Va. 




DIRICKSON, M. T. J. 
Silverton, Ore. 



DOLK, C. E. 
Warren, Ohio 



EDGAR, W. A. 
Seattle, Wash. 



EINIG, R. N. 
Richmond Heights, Mo. 



ENGELS, R. A. 

Ghent, Minn. 




FALKOWSKl, C. 
St. Paul. Minn. 



FERGUSON, J. R. 
Bellevernon, Pa. 



FIDLER, P. E. 
Columbus, Ohio 



FIELD, G. G. 
Braintree, Mass. 







€j\^ 




FITCH, E. B. 
Belllngham, Wash. 




FLOURNOY, R. C. 
Wichita, Kan. 




W 'V^ ^ 



FOREMAN, T. L. 
Indiana, Pa. 



FORHAN, J. F. 
Cleveland, Ohio 







FOSTER, J, S. 
San Bernardino, Cal. 



FOWLES, E. J. 
San Jose, Cal. 



FRANKE, T. H. 
Liberal, Kan. 



FRANKLIN, J. W. 
Seattle, Wash. 



FRISCH, E. E. 
Springfield. Mo. 



FURMAN. S. E. 
Fond du Lac, Wis 



FYOCK, J. F. 
Wayne, Ind. 



GANSBERG, R. H. 
Downers Grove, 1611. 






GARDNER, J. L. 
Chatfieid, Minn. 



GATEWOOD, J. W. 
Lyona, Neb. 





GEARRIES, N. F. 
Indianapolis, Ind, 



GOODMAN, A. W. 
Altoona, Pa. 







GRANT, R. H. 
Healdsburg, Cal. 



GRIFFITH, H. L 
Los Angeles, Calif. 




HALLUM, W. D. 
Mansfield, Ohio 



1^ 




HANSBURY, M. 
Seattle, Wash. 




HANSEN, H. C. 
Sanger, Calif. 



HARVEY, T. W. 
Huntington, W. V. 



HECHLER, C. H. 
Bandlia, Mo. 




HEDSTROM, S. E. 
Seattle, Wash. 



HELMLEY, L E. 
Kiowa, Kan. 



HENDERSON, J. T. 
Seiqu, Wash. 



HICKMAN, I. L 
Sharron Springs, Kan. 



HILL, B. F. 
Millsap, Tex. 





HOLMES, R. L. 
Turloclt, Cal. 



t^ 



HOMSTAD, f. F. 
Centralia, Wash. 




HOYT, D. G. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



HUGHES, F. J. 
Seattle, Wash. 






HUGHES, R. L. 
Spokane, Wash. 





HUMMEL, T. D. 
Toledo. Ohio 





V '^'f 



JUDY, J. D. 
Mercer Island, Wash. 




KIMPEL, G. M. 
Hicksville, Ohio 




KING, R. S. 


KINGSBURY, R. 


E. 


KLINE, D. B. 


LASH, J. K. 


Seattle, Wash. 


Chicago, III. 




Seattle, Wash. 


Seattle. Wash. 


MAKI, N. R. 


MANSVELD, W. 


L. 


MASON, C. W. 


McGEE, L. B. 


Ontario. Canada 


Salem, Ore. 




Seattle, Wash. 


Berokhaven, Miss, 







^ 



A 



1 



£ 




McNABB, R. E. 
Chehalis, Wash. 




MILLER, W. J. 
Montello, Wis. 




MULLER, O. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




NEFF, E. K. 
Retreat, Va. 










NESS, H. F. 
Galin, Ohio 



NEWELL, F. W. 
Seattle, Wash. 



O'CONNER, M. V. 
Oak Park, III. 



OLSON, O. M. 
Seattle, Wash. 




PACKWOOD, J. R. 
Chehalls, Wash. 



PARKER, G. N. 
Seattle, Wash. 



RECHTIN, C. G. 
Dayton, Ky. 




RIFKIN, G. R. 
Seattle, Wash. 



ROBINSON, J. P. 
New York City, N. Y. 



ROBINSON, J. W. 
Seattle, Wash. 



ROEHM, J. F. 
Seattle, Wash. 



ROSE, W. 
Synthiana, Ky. 




ROSSOLET, L. C. 
Middletown, Ohio 



SCHMIDT, R. C. 
Thomas, Ky. 



SCHMIDT, R. F. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



SHANGLE, L. 
Spokane, Wash. 










SHELDON, D. B. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



SMITH, J. F. 
Quanah, Tex. 



SMITH, T. W. 
Tulare, Calif. 



SOMA, M. P. 
Seattle, Wash. 







SPAULDING, P. P. 
Baldwlnsville, Mass. 



SPEARMAN, R. R. 
Seattle, Wash. 



SPENCER, D. E. 
Seattle, Wash. 



STANDARD, D. L. 
Dongola, III. 



STEARNS, C. C. 
Zumbrota, Minn. 



STEINBICKER, J. H. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



TUTT, H. W. 
Wichita, Kan. 



TUTTLE, B. J. 
Seattle, Wash. 






VAN FLEET, V. D. 
Des Plains, III. 



WARGO. J. J. 
Cleveland, Ohio 



WARMUTH, A. P. 
Oregon City, Ore. 



WASPE, N. L. 
Cincinnati. Ohio 












J 




li-^^^ry^ 



-,i,Jc c^Jn^r ;^^^ 






yiW Jyj 



/ 



HEADQUARTERS STAFF 

5TH ARMY AIR CORPS 

FLYING TRAINING DET. 

HEMET, CAL 



CAPT. G. J. SATHER 




2nd LT. W. P. MULLEN 




1st LT. C. A. FENTON 



2nd LT. R. D. COOPER 



1st LT. L. J. BREATHOUR and 1st LT. B. B. HUTCHINSON, SGT. H. O'BRIEN 





2nd LT. F. W. EVANS, JR. 



t \ 




BATTALION STAFF: J. V. BACH, H. C. WOOD, J. W. FRANKLIN, M. V. O'CONNER 



PASS IN 

REVIEW 




**S(f;j 



.% 



i* i. 



Co. B BURKE, W. F. 



BLEWFIELD, R. L 



DIRICKSON, M. T. J. 



COMPANY OFFICERS 



ALLEN, C. D. 




TUTT, H. W. 



Co. C. BRANSTEHER, W. H. GOODMAN, A. W. 



BARNS, W. F. 



ADAMS, J. M. 





HANSEN, H. C. 






WHITCOMB, R. E. 
Seattle, Wash. 



WHITE, J. R. 
Seattle, Wash. 



YANKOVICH, S. P. 
Chicago, III. 



WOOD, H. C. 
Seattle, Wash. 




THE CADET 

If he parks his little flivver 
Down beside the moonlit river 
And you feel him all aquivver 
Baby, he's a Cadet. 

If he says you're gorgeous lookin' 
And your dark eyes set him cookin' 
But your eyes ain't where he's lookin' 
Baby, he's a Cadet. 

When he says that you're an eyeful 
But his hands begin to trifle 
And his heart pumps like a rifle, 
Baby, he's a Cadet. 

If, by chance, when you are kissin' 
You can feel his heart a missin' 
And you talk but he won't lissin' 
Baby, he's a Cadet. 

If his arms are strong as sinew 
And he stirs the GYPSY in you 



HE'LL ALWAYS BE A DODO 

He comes late to flight line every day — 
dashes out to his instructor's ship late and 
climbs in putting his foot through a wing. 
Forgets to set brakes while checking mag- 
netos, causing mechanics to scatter. Ground 
loops while taxiing out to runway. Is vio- 
lently startled when given a forced landing 
and trembles as if he had palsy, usually end- 
ing up down wind into the only tree for 
miles. Nods head vigorously when spoken 
to. Jerks stick hastily if he sees another 
plane within two miles. Taxies into gas 
truck upon returning to the line — jumps 
from cockpit with gossports still attached 
and dangles by ears over the side — counts 
three and pulls rip cord. 



And you want him close agin' you, 
Baby, you're a Cadet. 




A. WEIDINGER 



Ground School... 

OUR JOB 

Who will deny that the most vital piece of equipment 
that can be found in an aircraft in flight is the complex 
swivel gadget resting on the top of the pilot's spine? To 
keep it in constant top flight shape, filled with high octane 
information, all bearings well oiled, to forestall loose wiring, 
so that it will serve its high purpose — This Is our job. 




p. PIERCE 



J. KEESEE 



H. RAINE 



L BRISTOL 



H. LANDRY 





"A" FLIGHT (left to right) Lieurance, Schumann, Lake, McGuIre, Rinehart, Gaddis, Fairbanks, Stater, Newton, Wike, Dunker, Kopeinig, 
Lambert. "B" FLIGHT — Gibbons, Mergenthal, Bryan, Dornberger, Barkstrom, Quinn, Akins, Wallace, Moore, Venable. 



Flight... 



Two years ago Ryan Field came into being. 
Li+tie did the small group of instructors realize 
as they posed in their first picture, the future 
of the field as we know it. The stubble field has 
developed into a modern primary school, which 
has earned a reputation as one of the finest 
training schools of its type in the country. We 
wish to extend our congratulations, on this, the 
Second Anniversary of Ryan's progress. 




"C'l FLIGHT (left to right) Scheifele, Bouck, Grady, Hoffman, Mannagh, Hagberg, Musselman, Botosh, Douglas, Lovell Rossi Poole 
Fickinger, Caldwell. "D" FLIGHT— Cooper, Matthews, Hart, Williamson, Wraske, Fitch, Stratton, Miller, Hawn, Daniels, Sturdlvant 
Moore, Hawley, Fredrick, Wetzel. 




I. ? 



▼**■-*/ 



ft 



9 ti 

Ml 



..HANGAR TCCCLE.. 



"MAMA'S BOY" 

You say he can't stand the Army, 
The life is too rough, hlow sad, 
Do you think he's any better 
Than any other mother's lad? 

You brought him up like a baby. 

He doesn't drink or smoke, you brag. 

If all others were like him, 

Well, what would become of our flag? 

You say, let the roughnecks go fighting. 
That they're used to beans and stew. 
But I'm glad I'm classed with the roughnecks, 
Who fight for the red, white and blue. 

You say his girl couldn't bear to send 
hier sweetheart out with the rest. 
Do you think she'll be proud of him 
When she feels a Jap's breath on her breast? 

You can thank God the stars on Old Glory 
Are not blurred with stains such as those. 
Because there are millions of roughnecks 
Who carry real blood In their veins. 

They go out to drill in bad weather 
And come in with a smile on their face 
While your darling sits in the parlor 
And lets a man fight in his place. 

You're right, we do smoke and gamble, 
But we fight as our forefathers did. 
So go warm the milk for his bottle. 
Thank God, we don't need your kid. 



This flying's the stuff and it's lots of fun, 
Yet I dream of the day when they say, "My 

son. 
The war is over, to linger's a sin, 
Here are your papers— YOU'RE A CIVIL- 
IAN AGAIN!" 

A/C David Willock 
Company "A" 
Class 43-C 



MR. BACH: Wouldn't that Rasp you? 

CADET CAPT.: Where's your tie? Re- 
port a Gig. 

DODO: Flying's a cinch. 

MR. LASH : I said, "Column left ! !" 

ROSEY HODGE: I'm sorry, it's after 
7:30. 

MR. CHRISTOFERO: Play the "Taxi 
Strip Polka." 

MR. KEESEE: I see many vacant seats. 

COOK: Pass me that meat stretcher. 

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR: You are all 
potential commandos. 

THE REEVES BOYS: We didn't want 
to be Pilots anyway. 

LT. PEETERS: I saw a Cadet sit down 
today, think up another formation. 

MR. TUTTLE: These Damn Flies 
should wear diapers. 

MR. MERGENTHAL: Who Ground 
looped my motorcycle? 

MR. ROSE: Really, fellows, the chute 
just fell out. 

MR. ROSSELOT: I got a swell idea! 

CAPT. CARLTON : Let's play it again 
and be more careful about the tilt. 

MR. CHESMORE: Her kisses were 
sweet even if she was a UBANGI ! ! 



A QUESTION BY 43-C 

At Hemet Field in commando row 

We see the commandos come and go. 

We all know they tried their best 

To pass the final army test, 

And we regret to see them go 

Cause who will next fill commando rowf 

A/C Ernest L. Kvam 



Hickory, Dickory Dock! 
Two mice ran up a girl's leg, 
Wc tried to say garter, 
But the C. O. was smarter, 
Hickory, Dickory Dock! 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



Before 



2 

Years 

of 

Progress 
? 




After 




WRENCH WENCHES 



The grease monkey has been a character as typical of Airplanes and airdromes as the 
very planes that made them possible. The introduction of War, however, has changed 
their position from one of solid security to almost comic uncertainty. Yes, the grease monkey 
is giving way to the Wrench Wench. Don't get the wrong impression, the skirt Is not 
replacing the coveralls. The rear view will remain the same, but the old spirit will be gone 
forever. 




SITS STALLING 




STARTS FALLING 




GABRIEL CALLING 



LAMENT 

The Cavalry, llic Iiiftinlry, and llic Coast 
Artillery too, 

All are represented in Mister Ryan's 
School. 

The rooms are like the Jf'aldorf (fff) the 
rooms just like the Ritz {???) 
We're here zvith one ambition — to -ivliip 
old Snickelfritz. 

There's no K.P. and no CO. but oh! those 
gigs and tours, 
Ultli week-ends spent upon the ramp in- 
stead of on the moors. 

It's not these things that get us down or take 
up most our time. 
It's sitting in a classroom ivhen we'd 
rather be on the line. 




CHECK "RIDE 



-i^vy/ 



The officer who caught one of the upper- 
classmen at Ryan Field eating out of a 
garbage can, said: "Come in the mess hall 
and eat, you are no better than the other 
fellows." 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 3941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Sunday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 28c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 



,|tH uu ^„ „„ „u „„ „„ „„ „u „„ 









Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deliciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

yEMET CAPE 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



4,._.._.._„_.._.._.._.. 



——.-4 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



_„ . — . — ._.._.,_.._.._.._. — ,._.._.._.+ 



ameras 



...Fil 



ms 




DEVELOPING — PRINTING 
DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



3 
6 
I 



Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 




I 
I 



For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

HEMET VALLEY 

Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 



12th at Vine 



PHONE 2400 



RIVERSIDE 



+ — .- 



4.._.„ , , — „ — , 



NOV/ UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail in 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 



i_„ 



Phone 2771 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 



TAHQUITZ 

CONFECTIONERY 

I 

"In the Center of Hemet" j 

208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE ! 

4 „„_. ., — + 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



I 



1 



CADETS and PERSONNEL I 

We Invi+e 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
{ Trust and Savings Bank 

} of Riverside, Calif. 



I 



Member Federal Deposif Insurance Corporafion 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEY 
BOWLING CENTER 

Hemet, Calif. 



" •"— 4 



1 

I 124 N. Carmellta 

4,,,, — ,. „ ,„ — , 



.._.._.._,._.* 



EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

TIMii 

IHiEMiT INIEWS 

Complete 
Local News Coverage 

• 
"AIRVIEWS" by Harry Hofmann 



PHONE 281 I 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 



I 
■4 



1 




Cadet I 
Portraits | 

I 

MADE I 

EXCLUSIVELY j 

ON THE POST BY \ 

I 



AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

Special rates given Ryan Cadets 
Studios Located 

at 
503 "E" Street 3935 Main St. 

San Bernardino Riverside 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



WHEN YOU'VE "OPEN POST"— TRY 

a 







NGS 



DANCING ON SAT. NIGHT 

Service Men 55c 7-Piece Orchestra 

— COCKTAILS — 
CAFETERIA DINING ROOM 

Good Food at Popular Prices 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH COUNTER 

GOLF — All Grass Public Course . . . 
RYAN FIELD— 50c At All Times 

TENNIS— Lighted for Night Play 

Hotel Rates — European Plan 
$1.65 to $3.30 Per Day 

Gilman Hot Springs, Calif. 

Phone San Jacinto 8811 



Complete line of 

BAKERY GOODS 

Specializing In 
PARTY AND WEDDING CAKES 



-•.4> 



VALLEY BAKERY 

2! I E. Florida Avenue 



I Hemet, Calif. 



Phone 3283 



I 

1 

4..- 



•i H^—n-^ia 



— nn^— DD^— DD^— OD^— Bn^^ii* * *!*< 



We Made Your 
Class Picture 

• 

Wm. Fox Studio 

p. O. Box 1478 
Banning, Calif. 



Additional Copies 
May Be Ordered by Mail 



4*.—- 



Compliments of 

International Provision Co. 

1570 Industrial Street 

Los Angeles, California 

Trinity 9611 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



PAGE THIRTY 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO. WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



Ed, the Laundryman . . . 

Adds a personal greeting and a desire to know 
you by the name on your individual bundles of 
Dry Cleaning and Laundry. 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT. Mgr. 

300 East Devonshire PHONE 2501 



PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters For 

UniForms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 

QUALITY LUGGAGE 

In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 

"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



Ground Loop 

When a pilot's been aflying for a coupla' years or so, 

And can kick a plane around, and put on quite a show, 

It's a thing he takes no pride in, and unless I have been scooped 

If he's ever done much flyin', he's at different times ground looped. 

When the kaydets get together for a stage at Ryan Field, 
And you're due to draw a ship with a wobbly tail wheel; 
You came in for your landing and you put her down O. K. 
But before you know what's happened, she's headin' for the hay. 

So you pour the gas into her and she bounds up from the ground, 
And you're feelin' mighty thankful for a chance to go around; 
Down the base leg you come roaring, cut the gun and make the turn. 
But you know that they're watching and your ears begin to burn. 

You head in for the runway, note the drift and drop a wing. 
And you feel the ship asettlin' as the wires begin to sing. 
The ground comes up atearin' and you ease back on the stick. 
And you bear down on the rudder and you do it mighty quick. 

But you know your case is hopeless when you feel her start to go. 
And you crack the throttle open, but you know you've been too slow. 
The horizon starts aspinnin' and the plane is swapping ends. 
As the dust begin to shower while the wing-tip slowly bends. 

You can hear the spar asplittin' and the fabric tear apart, 
While the terror down inside you takes a death grip on your heart; 
Your hands and feet are paralyzed as the dirt goes flying past. 
And you duck down in the cockpit as the motor coughs its last. 

Then you climb out from the wreckage, and your knees begin to shake, 

And you feel humiliated for the ribbing you must take. 

All the pilots crowd around you and advice begins to flow. 

And they tell you how it happened, just as if you didn't know. 

They criticize and advise you and although they're meanin' well. 

You try to laugh it off and tell 'em to go to hell — 

Lots of pilots give prescriptions and enjoy to rub it in. 

But there's few that give descriptions of the ground loops they were in. 

— 1st LT. W. P. SLOAN. 



HEMET NEWS PBINT 







€N T€ BA/IC 



I Class 43 -C 

\ 5th Army Air Force Flying Training Detachment 

I Ryan School of Aeronautics 

^l Hennet, California 

/ PUBLISHED BY THE RYAN SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICS, A CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE, 

a IN THE INTEREST OF THE PERSONNEL OF THE 5th A.A.F.F.T.D. 

7 OCTOBER 29, 1942 




DEDICATION TO 
MAINTENANCE CREW 



To the ones that did their part to "Keep 'em 
flying" — to the Maintenance Personnel we 
sincerely dedicate this issue of "Contact." 



Editor Sez.... 



Along with us — 43-C — came a lot of "stuff" and most of this "stuff" was "poor stuff." 
Firstly, from this bunch of poor stuff, we brought out some weather. Secondly, was the 
accident rate, which amounted to alot of "poor stuff." Thirdly, was our ground school 
average — "some stuff." Now — we bring you a bunch of "Stuff" we also cooked up — 
"Contact." 

We grabbed a few old moldy bottles of ink, and scratched out a few old stories, 
borrowed or swiped what we could from all previous issues and begged the Dodos for 
the rest. 

Seriously — we hope that when scanning through these pages later on, that maybe 
you will get a kick out of what these pages recall to memory, and fellas that ain't a lot of 
"stuff" — either. 

Editor 
Post Script — Now all together and not too loud. 

—Ed. 



CONTACT STAFF 

W. F. THEISEN : . . . Editor and chief of staff 

D. E. CARLSON Usually found in Canteen 

J. R. GAGNON Photographer 

G. W. BURNUP . • . . A sucker for work 

R. J. BARONET In charge of typewriters 

D. BARNES Who threw that ink? 

R. THOMAS Who wants to know? 





CAPTAIN WILLIAM I. FERNALD 

COMMANDING OFFICER 



TO CLASS 43-C 



To the members of the 
Class of 43-C. You men have 
completed our first phase of 
training. You have become 
acclimated to your new en- 
vironment. You have learned 
the fundamentals. You have 
learned to appreciate the im- 
portance of observing safety 
regulations, of exercising 
qood judgment through plan- 
ning, of practicing good co- 
ordination until it is a part 
of you, and of weighing the 
airplane while in flight in an 
effort to determine proper 
air speed essential to good 
performance. 

Go forth with your knowl- 
edge, add to it more experi- 
ence, and come out with 
those silver wings. I regret 
I have not had the oppor- 
tunity to know each one of 
you personally, but hope we 
may meet again some day. 
Best of Luck, Men. 

WILLIAM I. FERNALD 
Captain, Air Corps 
Commanding 



Congratulations on the successful com- 
pletion of your primary training at this 
station. You have succeeded in passing 
your first phase of training in the greatest 
outfit in the world. Take heed of the lessons 
we have tried to instill in you, and to you 
men who will be navigators, bombardiers, 
and officers in other phases of the Air 
Corps, may I wish you the best of luck. We 
who remain here will follow your careers 
with interest, knowing that upon you rests 
the success of our mission; to all of you — 
may your course be well marked, your mIs" 
sion completed and your return safe. 

B. A. PEETERS, 
1st Lieut, A.C. 
Commandant 




LT. B. A. PEETERS 

Commandant of Cadets 



PAGE THREE 




Hot! Damn! down again — now to fix the 
form I. up. Gripes! when did I take off? 
Oh yaas, t'was, lemme see now, 16:23 to 
aaaaa that makes 49 no — that makes aaaaa 
• — what's that dear? You want the book? 
Oh! you do? Oh! Soofy women — just get 
started — what was that darn time again? 
s'O.K., I got lotsa time. Ah! got the book, 
or what's left of it. hHa! done. Now for a 
cigarette and a drink of water and a stretch. 
Two hours already today; boy that smoke is 
gonna taste good. What'd you say, Joe? 
Wanted at the tube? Well wottin hell??!! 
Ain't even got the lousy parachute off yet. 
Gripes! GADET PLUTZ REPORTING. An- 
other feminine voice — hHere's your slip, Mr. 
Plutz. Get out to your ship and get an hour 
and let's get going right away. I'll give you 
ten minutes to be in the air. Ten Minutes? 
What in hell does that babe think I am 
anyhow, just a lousy machine like the planes 
we got? By Gad, I'm gonna have my smoke 
anyway and besides I gotta go. PLUTZ! 
PLUTZ! Let's get out to that ship. Gripes! 
has she got ten eyes or did she — no 1 don't 
suppose she did. Oh well, guess I better 
go up and when I come down next time I'm 
gonna sneak in behind someone way away 
from the gas truck, run like hell and hide 
and get caught anyhow. 

By Bill Thelsen 



HEMET BUTANE 

(You'll agree zvlien you read il) 

I used to think that I could fly, 
Way up high there in the sky, 
But now I confess I cannot tell, 
Whether I can fly or what the hell. 
'Tis too much for me to comprehend, 
Just where to start and where to end. 
I'm not sd worried now whether I can fly, 
Way up high there in the sky, 
Wliat's really what 1 want to know. 
Is how does a guy ever learn to solo? 

Some guy, 
43-D 




THii ny ve*^ siuteMT, is >f Slou 'Fot.t, • 



PAGE FOUR 





Physical Training... 

Many of you might wonder why we are so insistent that you attend Physical training 
each day, and why it takes an act of Congress, practically, to be excused from class. It must 
be realized by all that Physical Training is an Important phase of your training to become 
a great pilot. 

The importance of Physical Training in the Air Forces can be best explained by quot- 
ing a directive from higher authority: "The complexities of modern military aviation require 
so much technical training that, too often, little time is allotted to physical training. Yet 
the soldier who possesses great skill but is unable to withstand the rigorous life demanded, 
especially under combat conditions. Is of questionable value. Physical Training, therefore, 
must be an integral part of the training program for both officers and men In the Army 
Air Forces. It must be considered equal in value and importance to other phases of the 
training program." 

The major objectives are to develop and maintain the 
health, endurance, strength, and agility of all personnel to a 
degree that they may successfully meet the demands of 
severe combat conditions. The ultimate goal of Physical 
Training, therefore. Is physical efficiency which Is essential to 

military effectiveness. fc^ 

LT. ROY D. COOPER 
Physical Training Officer 
S'Sgt. Deane E. Richardson 
Assistant ^^^^^ry 







Ist LT. V. H. MURDOCK 



1st LT. W. P. SLOAN 



Ist LT. RICHAFtD YOUNG 




CAPTAIN W. I. FERNALD 



'G. I.' PILOT/ 

Brothers of the Upperclass, if you were 
lucky enough during your stay at Ryan 
School of Ackrobat — I mean Aeronautics, 
you too may have ridden in a ship enhanced 
with the colors of Christmas — only they 
don't give it to you — the ship I mean — 
besides I know you would not have the 
damgadget for a ten dollar counterfeit 
confederate note. But they will give you 
something — wouldn't they like to have — 
especially if you hadn't taken a bath recent" 
ly as this is the army wash. If you had a ride 
in one of these glorified kitchen sinks jock- 
eed by a genuine SI pilot and lived to tell 
the tale why don't you go on "We the 
People" — I mean, friend — you bear a 
Charmed Life. 





LT. C. I. MOHLER 



Ist LT. B. F. HAZELTON 



PAGE SIX 




H. 
Q. 

S 
T 
A 
F 
F 





CAPT. G. J. SATHER 




LT. KARL KOENie 



2nd LT. W. P. MULLEN 



LT. M. J. MUELLER 






BATTALION 




CERALOA, N. B. LONG, W. E. 

Company A Company B 
ALLISON, C, G. SMITH, F. W. CARROLL, T. W. 

BATTALION OFFICERS 

HART, F. M. WARREN, R. 

Company C Company D 



McNEIL, R. 




ALLAN, R. F. 
Saugus, Mass. 




ALLISON, C. G. 
Montcldir, New Jersey 




BARNES, D. 
South Bend, Indiana 



A 



BARONET. R. J. 
Rayne, Louisiana 






• ■SttcislStTTraKMB! 




BARTLETT, C. W. 


BEAN, B. L. 


BEBBE, F. C. 


BENSON, R. 


Bethany, Missouri 


Amarlllo, Texas 


Crawfordsville, Indiana 


Brooken, Oklahoma 


BEYER, J. H. 


BROKAW, B. C. 


BROWN, J. B. 


BURNETT, G. W. 


Warsaw, Indiana 


Coffeeville, Kansas 


Los Angeles, California 


Austin, Texas 






CARROLL, T. W. 
North Platte, Nebraska 



CARAOLO, N. B. 
Brooklyn, New York 



CLARK, R. R. 
Prosser, Washington 



COLBY, F. B. 
Worland, Wyoming 






CRANAGE, E. N. 
Ipswich. South Dakota 



DION, E. J. 
Gregory, South Dakota 



DREGER, A. 
Long Beach, California 



ELLIOTT, B. D. 
Huntington Beach, California 




FISHER, D. D. 


FISHER, G. D. 


FOTIS, W. 


FRANKLIN, R. M. 


Seattle, Washington 


Alva, Oklahoma 


Canton, Ohio 


Clatskanie, Oregon 



FREEMAN, T. L. 
Armstead, Montana 



GRUNKE, F. A. 
Belmar, New Jersey 



HANDYSIDE, H. E. 
Webster, New York 



HERREN, B. A. 
Reading, Iowa 




HESTER, C. O. 
Santa Monica, California 



HOLT, H. D. 
San Diego, California 



JOHNSON, R. A. 
Spokane, Washington 




KEISLE. K. G. 
Wyandotte, Michigan 








KENNEDY, C. W. 
Hun+ing+on, Pennsylvania 



KENNEDY, J. S. 
Flint, Michigan 



KERTSOW, W. A. 
Spokane, Wash. 



KOCHEL, A. R. 
Baker, Montana 






KUCICH, R. A. 
San Francisco, California 



LANTZ, R. E. 
Grabll, Indiana 



LENHART, J. K. 
Frederick, Maryland 



LIGHTER, A. C. 
Algona, Iowa 



LOFTIN, R. W. 
Okmulgee, Oklahoma 



LONG, W. E. 
Arvin, California 



McCLUTCHEON, C. W. 
Des Moines, Iowa 




McDONOUSH, T. S. 
Cedar City, Utah 




McKEE, C. E. 
Freeport, Texas 




McKINNEY, T. M. 
Simpsonville. South Carolina 



MAGLEBY. A. M. 
Monroe. Utah 



MICHAELS, R. E. 
Windom, Minnesota 





' \ 



"¥" 



MILLER, A. W. 
Brooiclyn. New York 




MILLER. G. M. 
Bellefone, Pennsylvania 




MINNICK, H. E. 
Muncle, Indiana 



MITCHELL, L P. 
Ringgold, Texas 





MORRIS, H. R. 
Columbus, Ohio 



MORRIS, T. H. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



MURRAY, D. H. 
El Monte, California 



NOTT, K. C. 
Omaha, Nebraska 



NOWLES, Q. G. 
Los Angeles, California 



O'FARRELL, G. M. 
Rosamond, California 



O'NEILL, C. H., Jr. 
Santa Barbara, California 



O'REILLY, J. D. 
Denver, Colorado 




OPPERMAN, C. W. 
St. Louis, Missouri 



ORLICKI, T. T. 
Chicago, Illinois 




ORR, C. B. 
Los Angeles, California 



ORR, M. H. 
Santa Monica, California 








ORR, R. B. 
Greenfield, Indiana 



OSWALT, A. F., Jr. 
Salinas, California 



OXFORD, D. N. 
Dumas, Texas 



PADGETT, J. W., Jr. 
Porfland, Oregon 




PAFFORD, E. E. 

Hollywood, California 



PARKER, W. W. 
Los Angeles, California 




PEDIGO, C. W. 
Little Rock, Arkansas 



PETERSEN, L. C. 
Petaluma, California 



PETERSON, R. 

El Monte, California 



PERSECHINI, M, J. 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 



POLINSKI, L H. 
Smith Field, Texas 



POUTRE, L. 
Concordia, Kansas 




PLETA, A. J. 
Pottsville, Pennsylvania 



PROVOST, C. 
Los Angeles, California 



PUCHRIK, A. A. 
El Segundo, California 



RANDALL, J. L. 
Ventura, California 









RANGER, P. F. 
Ventura. California 



RANSON, C. B. 
Owensbore, Kentucky 



RATHBUN, C. S. 
Poland, New York 



REAVIS, H. C. 
Sierra Madre, California 




REBER, P. D. 
inston Salem. North Carolina 



REICH, D. O. 
Winston Salem, N. C. 



REYNOLDS, W. R. 
Lodi, California 



RICE, E. L. 
Powell, Nebraska 



RICHARDSON, J. W. 
La Porte, Texas 



ROBERGE, W. H. 
Wallingford, Connecticut 



ROBINSON, T. L 
Seymour, Texas 



ROBSON, G. M. 
Crete, Illinois 




RYAN, T. J. 
Chicago, Illinois 



SCHNEIDER, N. A. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



SCHULTZ, J. L 
Greshin, Nebraska 



SCHUNK, A. W. 
Marmaduke, Arkansas 







SCOTT, R. E. 
Roxbury, Massachuseffs 



SLITER, R. E. 
San Jose. California 



SMITH, F. T. 
Chicago, Illinois 



SMITH, O. E. 
Black Rock, Arkansas 





SNYDER, A. R. 
Fullerton, Nebraska 



SPARKS, R., Jr. 
Meron, Indiana 



SPENCE, W. A. 
Orlando, Florida 



SPIELMAN, R. e. 
Dixon, Illinois 



STARBACK, R. N. 
Boyne City, Michigan 



STOFFER, R. L. 
Croydon, Iowa 



STRICKLAND, F. G. 
Buffalo, New York 



THEISEN, W. F. 
Omaha, Nebraska 




THOMAS, R. 

Redlands, California 



TILLOTSON, R. A. 
Santa Rosa, California 



TUCKER, E. H. 
Seminole, Oklahoma 



VAKINER, G. M. 
Gregory, South Dakota 








■ 



I m 






> 



VAN POPERING. E. A. 
Neward, New Jersey 



VENABLE, CALIN H. 
Hemet, California 



VIELLEUX, G. R. 
Fort Benton, Montana 



WALKER, W. C. 
Charleston, Illinois 







WALLEN, R. D. 
Elk Rapids, Michigan 



WARD, E. M., Jr. 
Falls Church, Virginia 



WARREN, R. L. 
Meridian, Idaho 



WATERMAN, B. D. 
Taylorville, Illinois 



WEAVER, H. C. 
Galesburg, Illinois 




WHITON, L. G. 
Bremerton, Washington 



X. 



i 



WEBB, J. H. 
Memphis, Missouri 



WILLITS, C. A., Jr. 
New York, New York 




SMITH, J. M. 
Hansen, Idaho 



WILLIAMS, H. R. 
Larimee, Wyoming 



SMITH, K. E. 
St. Louis, Missouri 




WILLIAMS, L. E. 
Seminole, Oklahoma 




■m 





WILLIAMS. W. L 
Pittsburg, Kansas 



WILLOCK, D. B., Jr. 
Kansas City, Missouri 



WOLFERMAN, J. M. 
Spokane, Washington 



WOODWARD, C. P. 
Saltville, Virginia 




WRIGHT, S. R. 
Odessa, Nebraska 




WRIGHT, R. J. 
Manhattan, Kansas 



YEAGER, C. E. 

Hamlin, West Virginia 



2nd LT. SMITH, U. G., J 



2nd LT. BIDEGANETA, Y. J. 



2nd LT. CATTERLIN, R. R. 



1st LT. FOSTER, E., Jr. 



1st LT. FULLER, J. H. 





?■- v^'^ li 



-v . 





2nd LT. GARICH, E. J. 



2nd LT. McDOWELL, J. P. 



2nd LT. PUTNAM, R. K. 



LT. ROY, J. H. 






i 




^^■^^^L f)i ^^^^^^B 




\ 


W' 


^^Bpi *^ 1 




1 


jpw^ 






TH1< K-DETS LAST HOP 

Out on the Ryan Field Airdrome, 

On a cold September day, 
Beside a cracked up PT 

A dyinjr K-DJ{T lay. 

His comrade stood beside him 
With low and drooping head. 

Listening to the last words 
The dying K-DLT said 

Tell my sweetheart down in Nocotte, 

My time on earth is past, 
Pm going to take another hop, 

And this hop will be my last. 

Pm off for a better field, he said. 
Where everything is bright. 

Where you can get any ship you ask for. 
And you can fly all day and night. 

At this field, they will not ground me, 
And though I haven't tried 'tis true. 



I shall ily their Boeing antl Lockheed, 
And lay off the PT 22. 

'Pliere they have no traffic schedules, 
They don't tell you where to turn, 

i light commanders don't seem to care, 
How much gasoline you burn. 

There you can take off cross winded, 
y'ou can fish tail when you land, 

You can stunt a Blimp or Parachute, 
II you've got the sand. 

If the crew chief says he's ready, 
On the take off Pll Chandelle. 

And tell the O.LC. of Flying 
To send his flying rules to hell. 

Plis eyelids dropped, his head fell back. 

He had sung his last refrain, 
The other K-DL,T swiped his goggles and 
wings 

And took off AGAIN. 



PAGE TWENTY 



Ck -V^ (3blM THt Aft 
YOO TRV IT nitST.. ' 




HOT PILOT FOTSON 

Hot Pilot Fotson was his name, 
r rom deep in Texas was where he came. 
As all Texans he was sure to boast; 
Says he, "I can fly the PT from coast to 
coast." 

Came the day of his cross country run, 
And he set his PT to the sun. 
Then to his mind came his previous boast — 
"I can fly the PT from coast to coast." 

.\s inte would have it he ran out of gas. 
And old Fotson dug up eight feet of grass. 
Now all Hot Pilots heed his boast and 
Don't attempt to fly the PT from coast 
to coast. 



I shot an arrow into the air. 

It fell to earth I know not where. 

I lose more damn arrows that way. 



Hickory dickory dock, 
Tzvo mice ran up the clock, 
The clock struck one 
But the other one got azvay. 



THE BUGLER 

The bugler comes out every night, 
To blow "Retreat" with all his might. 
And even though the notes aren't true, 
I realh' think he tries, don't you. 



PAGE TWENTY-ONE 




A. WEIDINGER 



Ground School... 



When we first started ground school we thought it was 
just a good place to catch a few "cat-naps" — but as we 
got a few more hours flying we realized that the ground 
school was just as essential in our training to be pilots as the 
flying itself. These men are responsible for the development 
of new knowledge that will enable us to perform our duties 
to come in the most intelligent and efficient manner poss'ble, 
thereby creating in us, and those to come, the means to 
dispose of our enemies more efficiently and qu'ckly. We 

wish to express our gratitude 
to each one of these men for 
3verything he has done for us. 




p. PIERCE 



J. KEESEE 



L LANDRY 



H. RAINE 



L BRISTOL 



•/f r 





liiO Ol/tf-nT TO &o GST J* ic»tJ(.^ bf^H 



? 



Friends, if the engine fell out of vour 
PT22 when vou were at two thousand feet 
would you blush and run away or would you 
smile and say, "Look here, buddy, let's talk 
this over." If you were coming in to land and 
your last turn was too low and you spun 
in would you feel personally slighted or 
would you leap to your feet and shout across 
the mat at the flight commander, accuse 
him of being a fifth columnist and a poten- 
tial saboteur? If you suffer these troubles 
Dr. Ryan's Vita'Wash will help you. If such 
chronic disturbances bother you Dr. Ryan's 
Vita-Wash taken lightly with three Gl oilots 
will guarantee to send you through basic 
and in fact may even put you back in Santa 
Ana or Bakersfield, so if you have trouble of 
th's kind don't patronize Dr. Rvan — dash 
over to the dispensary and get a Schneider. 



Mary had a bicycle, 

She learned lo ride il zvell. 

Bui one day she hit a piekel fence 

And broke it all to . . . pieces. 



The shades of night were falling fast 
JFhen for a kiss he asked her. 
She must have answered Yes, because, 
The shades came dozen much faster. 



THE AIR FORCE 

I joined the Army, not to go to war, 
That is the reason I am in the old Air Corps. 
"Every day's a holiday, a picnic every meal," 
That's what the Sergeant said, and it's the 
way I feel. 

We have dessert three times a day and 

everything to eat. 
And nothing on the table but the choicest 

cuts of meats. 
We never do a K.P., never stand a guard. 
We have to drill one hour a year, by Allah, 

that Is hard. 

We never carry a forty-five. It must be a 
fable. 

The only time we see side-arms. Is on the 
breakfast table. 

We ride In silver airplanes, above the moun- 
tain tops. 

We go to town 'most every night, we sleep 
in beds, not cots. 

Now, boys, don't join the Navy, 'cause 

you'll have to go to sea. 
But visit the "Recruiting Sergeant" and let 

the Navy be. 
Join the Army Air Corps, and live a life 

of ease. 
It's not like those Marine outfits that have 

a lot of fleas. 



"I draw the line at kissing," 
She said in accents fine. 
But he was a football hero, 
So she let him cross the line. 




:j;F.Sei^£ 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



"Flight E" 




"Flight F" 




PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



"Flight G 



JJ 




Flight Instructors 



OUR SINCERE APOLOGIES TO 

"Flight H" 

(Our cameraman forgot to load his camera) 



We, the class of 43-C, wish to express our sincere appreciation and gratitude to our 
flight instructors for pushing, cussing, kicking and dragging us through this course — well, 
maybe not all of that but they got us through. There is not much we can say that will 
truly express our feeling for these boys whose temper and patience we tried so we won't 
attempt to write It. 



PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 




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Farewell to Class 43-C 



Congratulations on your successful com- 
pletion of Primary, you have been a swell 
bunch of upper-classmen — best of luck in 
your future training and "hHappy Landings." 

CLASS OF 43-D 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



I've learned to like this army 
Cause it's done a lot for me; 
A sort of education, 
And there's the world to see. 

I've learned to like forced issues 
From the QMC overstock; 
I've learned to like an empty purse 
With all my things in hock. 

I've learned to roll the dimpled cubes, 
The 'twas at great expense. 
I've learned the rating of the cards 
Against my better sense. 

I've learned to keep my hair cut short, 
Since that's the regulation. 
I've learned to button up my lip, 
And that by invitation. 

I've learned that every corporal 

Is ranker than the skipper. 

I've learned a lot of other things 

Too numerous to mention. 

I've learned that early reveille 

Is Satan's own invention. 

I've learned a lot of other things 

Too numerous to mention. 

I've learned that every transport 
Takes a lot of us back home. 
Of Oahu I've had quite enough, 
So that's where I will roam. 



Oh yaas sixteen to — My Gosh, Is it raining? 
Oh, you say the gas squirted, did it? Yas, 
Yas, Yas. Did you get some In the plane, 
dear? Oh, It spilled all over the side of the 
ship, didn't It? Yes It does make the plane 
nice and shiny when you wipe it off. Now 
I spose she'll wipe off the windshield with 
the damn rag. Oh well — No that's all right. 



Jfl' find in parchment scrolls and hooks 
From tablets and from cuneiform, 
That girls from Caesar's time to now 
Have akvays loved a uniform. 



Old Mother Huhhard zvenl to llw cupboard 
To yet her poor daughter a dress. 
When she got there, the cupboard was bare, 
And so was her daughter, I guess. 



Mary had a little watcli. 

She swallowed it one day. 

The doctor gave her castor oil 

To pass the time away. 

The castor oil it did not work, 

The time it did not pass; 

Now you can tell the time of day, 

By looking up Mary's . . . Aunt. 

She's got a wrist watch. 



A draftee from the Amazon 

Put nighties on his gramazon. 

The reason's that 

He was too fat 

To put his own pajamazon. 



Mary had an aeroplane, 

Through the sky she loved to frisk. 

Wasn't she a silly thing. 

Her little * . . . (Asterisk). 

® 



Mary had a little lamb, 

Her father shot it dead. 

Now Mary takes the lamb to school 

Between Izvo hunks of bread. 



Always A 

Hearty Welconne Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deiiciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

yiMET CAFE 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



..—.4 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



I 
CADETS and PERSONNEL j 

We Invite 5 

You to Use the Many I 

Services of This Bank 1 



HEMET BRANCH 1 

! 

Citizens National j 
Trust and Savings Bank | 

of Riverside, Calif. j 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation = 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER | 

U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN j 

, .„_.^ 



,j,._„_,„ — .„_„._., , , — „_„, „._„ — 4. 

BOWL 

— for — 
Recreation and Relaxation 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

I VALLEY 

1 BOWLING CENTER 

I 124 N. Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 
4. ._.+ 



4. . . ,._.„_.. .„_„._.. ^ 

EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

iriMiE 

Complete 
Local News Coverage 

• 
"AIRVIEWS" by Harry Hofmann 



PHONE 2811 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 



"r" "" "" "" 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 3941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.Sunday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 28c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 



♦— 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



+- 

a 

I 



WHEN YOU'VE "OPEN POST"— TRY 







HOT SPRINGS 



DANCING ON SAT. NIGHT 

Service Men 55c 7-Piece Orchestra 

— COCKTAILS — 
CAFETERIA DINING ROOM 

Good Food at Popular Prices 

■ FOUNTAIN LUNCH COUNTER 

GOLF— All Grass Public Course . . . 
RYAN FIELD— 50c At All Times 

TENNIS— Lighted for Night Play 

Hotel Rates — European Plan 
$1.65 to $3.30 Per Day 

Gilman Hot Springs, Calif. 

Phone San Jacinto 88 II 



Complete line of 

BAKERY GOODS 

Specializing in 
PARTY AND WEDDING CAKES 



VALLEY BAKERY 



I 211 E. Florida Avenue 

I Hemet, Calif. Phone 3283 



I 

i 




Cadet 
Portraits 

MADE 

EXCLUSIVELY 

ON THE POST BY 



AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

Special rates given Ryan Cadets 
Studios Located 



at 



503 "E" Street 
San Bernardino 



3935 Main St. 
Riverside 



Compliments of 

international Provision Co. 

1570 Industrial Street 
Los Angeles, California 



-.»|. 



4 



i 



Trinity 961 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



PAGE THIRTY 



. . .+ 






ameras 



...Fil 



ms 




DEVELOPING — PRINTING 
DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



3 
6 



Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 




For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

HEMET VALLEY 

Quality: 

ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 



I 2th at Vine 



PHONE 2400 



RIVERSIDE 



! 
1 

1 

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NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail in 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 

Phone 2771 



I 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 



TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



1 

I 
■■+ 



PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



COMPLETE ONE-STOP 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

In Our Call Office on the Post 

For Better Service 



Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 

300 East Devonshire PHONE 2501 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters For 

UniForms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 



QUALITY LUGGAGE 

In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 



I 



"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmelita Hemet, Calif. 



— 11^— ■■ w— 



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CN T€ CA/IC 



\ Class 43-D 

\ 5th Army Air Force Flying Training Detachment 

iRyan School of Aeronautics 
Hemet, California 

/ PUBLISHED BY THE RYAN SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICS, A CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE, 
ft IN THE INTEREST OF THE PERSONNEL OF THE 5th A.A.F.F.T.D. 

; DECEMBER 3, 1942 



m^^^MM^^^^^^M^^^^^^^^^^^m 




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ne THasie^eb ike 
juvi^ameniaU ok jualtt 




DEDICATION 



To Lt. Roy Cooper, Athletic Officer extraordinary, we dedicate 
43-D's issue of Contact. Physical fitness is sometimes more desired in 
the having than in the acquiring. hHence, Coop deals with reluctant drag- 
ons for the most part, hlis success in leading us through our paces is 
attested to by this singular fact: You may see a fat Dodo but never a 
fat upperclassman. 

If he did no more than keep us fit to fly he'd still have a whale of 
a job, but in addition Coop practically turns out Contact and handles all 
dance, stag party details, and other entertainment features single-handed. 
This Isn't the sort of work that throws out a positive value; you only notice 
the ommisslons. Like your sight or hearing you miss it only when it's 
gone — Coop, we had to make an effort, hence accept this back-handed 
compliment as our "Well done"; It would have been hell without you. 



PAGE TWO 




■^ \, of «^®^' .A vJho, ^®®^:.*.beat a^<^ !,a nation 

terrific J ^^ep tne 

-^^''f ^'^sX^^^^- . .ted. neatly <^°;t,^. 

rolling siao ooordin^*^'': ^ its ^^^tV^A 

i^' ^^ Ced iT«^«^"^^!:iei°«- - 





CAPT. WM. I. FERNALD 



Captain Willliam 1. Fernald looks and walks like 
a welterweight boxer. He speaks in a soft hesitant 
drawl. Would it surprise you to know that this mild- 
mannered, diffident gentleman spent five years 
with pursuit, both in a tactical unit and later as an 
instructor at Kelly; that he is something of a mech- 
anical whiz, spending his spare time designing and 
building various articles in his garage workshop; that 
he was a high school coach in Florida, yet, can't 
throw a ball to save his neck; that he taught Physics, 
Chemistry and Math after graduation from the 
University of Florida? It sort of surprised us, too. 

After five years of army pursuit work Capt. 
Fernald resigned his commission in 1940 and be- 
came a civilian flight instructor. Not the least of 
his feats during this phase of his life lies in having 
taught his wife to fly. No unmarried man can prop- 
erly appreciate this job. 




Army 
Administration 



LT. KARL KOENIG 
Asst. Adjutant 



ARMY ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEES 




CAPT. e. J. SATHER 
Adiutant 



BACK ROW: Mrs. Lloyd, Mrs. Moore, Miss Tate, Mrs. Gomer, Miss Talbot, Mrs. Wallace, Mr. Neeff. Mrs. Barrington, Miss 
Russell. Miss Reed, Miss Larson, and Miss Molitor. FRONT ROW: Miss Williams, Miss Copley, Miss Hougard, Miss Hanson, 
Mrs. Farrell, Miss Adanns, Miss Anderson, Mrs. Swindell, and Mrs. Hawley. 





MEDICAL STAFF 



LT. B. B. HUTCHINSON 




LT. M. J. MUELLER 




LT. L J. BREATHOUR 



Pvt. Stanley Crawford Tech, Sgt. Earvel H. Ellis Pvt. Marvin O. Grage 

Cpl. Frank W. Wayland Pfc. Clarence A. Ryner Pfc. Edgard W. Schrader 







PAGE FIVE 



RUSSELL STILLWAGEN ROGER BRUBAKER 




Ryan 
Administration 



R. DOUGLAS MAW DARYL SMITH 

RYAN OFFICE STAFF 




QHaEsauaEMist 









LEFT TO RIGHT: Margo Stiliha, Maxine Savage, Virginia Johnson, Jean 
Hopple, Victoria Forbes, Bertha Klemens, Faye Shanklin, Lydia Shewalter, 
Alyne V^iltshire, Maxine McKinley. 



PAGE SIX 




What thorns are to the rose — shell to ths nut — curtain to the strip tease; ground school 
is to the flight training. Until you've sat through three hours of lectures when you were so 
tired and nervously exhausted you thought you'd snap, brother believe me, you have no 
idea what hHELL is like. 

So here's a silent prayer to the one who guides our destiny for giving us five cracker 
jack instructors. Raine, Keesee, Pierce, Landry, and Bristol saved the game. They knew their 
stuff — they showed by their presentation that they had given thought as to how to make 
the spinach palatable. We weren't willing and flesh Is weak but somehow they got the 
stuff across. hHence in the last analysis, the whole fine job Is a tribute to Mr. Weldlnger, 
Director of Ground School. 



PAGE SEVEN 





MARTIN WEIDINGER 





'-^ 



Ji^^ 



HARRY RAINES 




L BRISTOL 



HALE LANDRY 



PAUL PIERCE 










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To that poor unfortunate who was never called to the Ryan Office, Army Office or 
attended sick call, never failed to do the last push-up, never shirked on leg shifts or lost 
a step in the Randolph Shuffle, this section of Contact is herewith dedicated. 

This particular part of our training was an escape from the pressure and strain of flight 
line and ground school, a release for steam and chagrin. In actuality, this vitally important 
and necessary division of our schooling is a build-up of reflex to the high pitch demanded 
by flying. 

The following few pages try. In some small measure, to sum up pictorially and prosai- 
cally the stresses, strains, grunts, groans and various exertions we all experienced in win- 
ning our R. 



PAGE NINE 






"^lik 



LT. ROY D. COOPER 
Athletic Director 

"Two men died of athletics 
heart you say?" 



ATHLETIC 
ACTIVITIES 



LAMBS TO THE SLAUGHTER 






Doubletlme and the living 
was easy. 





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LAST LONG MILE 




FOUL ! ! ! 




Your attention has swirled around this vortex since the day you arrived from Santa 
Ana. We have captured the likenesses of those men who, whether you admit It or not, 
were your particular heroes. Those men whose very inflection or tone of voice made or 
ruined a day for you. They personified the ideal that nothing short of right is right. 

We have also collected shots of your part in this phase of training which we hope will 
give you a severe case of nostalgia if you ever glance at this section In later years. It is 
our favorite — we hope there are no apparent ommissions. 



PAGE ELEVEN 





PAUL WILCOX 
Civilian Director of Flying 




WILLIAM EVANS 
Stage Comnnander 



SECTION LEADERS 

Never In the history of Ryan have so many owed so much to so few. 
(With apologies to Winston Churchill.) 



RICHARD HUFFMAN 
Stage Connmander 




ROBERT QUINN 



PAUL BALA JOHN GRADY JACK MATTHEWS 

WILLIAM BOUCK (Missing) 
LOYD VENABLE JOE HART ROY SCHUMAN 








LEO STATER 






HAROLD BOWEN 



r"! 



JOSEPH GADDIS 




MELVIN LAMBERT 




A' FLIGHT 




DEAN LAKE 
Flight Comander 




WILLIAM KOPEINie 




CHARLES FAIRBANKS 



JAMES RINEHART 



STANLEY NEWTON 



CARL DUNKER 



MAURICE McGUIREj 









HAROLD BARKSTROM 



WARREN McLEAN 



/n/ 



't'. 

■^ 




RALPH AKINS 




B' FLIGHT 




LESTER "Smiling Jaci(" MERGENTHAL 
Flight Commander 




CHARLES DORNBERGER 




STEPHEN LEWIS 



JOHN BRYAN 



KENNETH MOORE 



KENNETH SAUPP 



JOHN WALLACE 







BEVERLY DOUGLAS 



ROBERT MANNAGH 



STEPHEN BOTOSH 



/^/ 



C FLIGHT 



WILLIAM LOVELL 
"Missing in Action 





WILLIAM SCHEIFELE 
Flight Commander 



JOHN POOLE I 

Motion picture rights to thi 

striking example of Infra-rec 

portraiture belongs to 

Warner Bros. 




ERIC HAGBERG 



EDWARD MUSSELMAN 



JAMES ROSSI 



PETER HOFFMAN 



THOMAS FLICKENGER 



ERNEST HEAD 









A 



V 




y 






EGBERT STURDIVANT 



JAMES HAWLEY 



ALBERT DANIELS 



EDMUND DIMOCK 



/rN/ 




HAROLD HAWN 




_jj 



D' FLIGHT 



Sorry Fellows, Coop stepped 

out for a quick one and 

didn't get back in 

time. 



LEONARD COOPER 
Flight Commander 




FRANK ALBRIGHT 




JAMES HAWN 



LYLE MOORE 



ARCHIE WRASKE 




DOUGLAS STRATTON 


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1 





JAMES MILLER 



THOMAS FREDRICK 







ABRAMSON, LEONARD W. AGGERS, WILLIAM R. ANDERSON, VINCENT E. BAUGH, DONALD P. 



BELL, PAUL E. 




BJORUM, CARL H. BREWER, ORSE, JR. BRIMAGE, RICHARD L. BROWN, ROBT. D. CAMPEAU, JOSEPH H 



CARBAJAL, BENNIE R. CARNES, HARRY W. CAVALLO, TONY S. DE GRAFFENREID, E. L. 




DE KEYSER, LEON 




DEMERE, LOUIS L. 



DVORAK, EDWARD J. EDMONDSON, CHARLES D. GRONEMEYER, WM. C. HARTWICK, FRANK f 





HAWKINS, LEROY E. 



HIXON, VAN 



JACKS, HORACE H. JACKSON, CHARLES L JARVIS, HARRY E. 




JONES, OSCAR W. 



JONES, WARREN L. JOHNSON, FARMER A., JR. KELAHAN, THOMAS R. KENDRICK, JOHN M. JR. 



KING, JACK C. 



KIRSCHNER, KENNETH D. KLIBBE, FRANK W. 



KOEN, ALBERT T. 



KRAUSE, CYRIL S. 




. DEAUX, DONALD A. LANCASTER, ORVID V. 



LEONG, LAWRENCE 



LORHR, CHARLES F. LOUGHEED, WALTER J. 




MILLS, LAWRENCE H. MASON, CLYDE V. 



OWENS, DELOS 



ODELL, MARION D. FOOTE, WARREN 





ANDERSON, WARD J. COLVIN, JOHN A. JR. DAVIS, RICHARD S. LARSON, GAIL W. LAZENBY, JOHN F, 



MATZENBACHER, RAY McCOY, JOHN B. 



McMANUS, HENRY MENDONCA, ELMER J. MESSENGER, GAYLE 




MICHAEL, EDWARD S. MINECH, JOHN L 



MITCHELL, JOHN F. MONCUR, VERN L MORRIS, WILLIAM h 











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1 




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MORGAN. OTIS D. MORRISSON, ROBT. H. JR. MORRISON. RAYE G. MOWERS. CHARLES H, MULLIGAN. LEE N. 




TJ'\^?^■.■■^-'*^^\'■^- 




MYERS, DONALD C. MYERS, WILLIAM H. NELSON, GLENN NICHOLSON, JOHN A. NICKEL, JACOB 



NICOSON, JAMES W. NISBITT, RALPH E. O'BRIEN, JACK W. OLSON, DONALD E. OVERDORF, RICHARD C. 




"■"!«^ 



PETERS, JACK 




PETRILLO, ROBERT J. 



PFYL FRANK A. 



PIERSON, JOHN P. PICKETT, ROSCOE D. 






PORTER, EDWIN R. 



WATSON, THOMAS E. 



MOODY, FREDERICK G. 



LA BARGE, A. P. 



EVERS, WILLIS F. 



FENSLER, JACK L. FERRIES, WILLIAM J. HARRINGTON, GEORGE D. HIGGINBOTHAM, H. (v 





HOWARD, ROBERT I. 



KING, CREED F. 



KINGSLEY, PAUL E. 



KISTLER, JAY R. 



LOUGHRAN, HAROLD 



MAHER. ERCILL D. MALLETTE, RICHARD, E. MANN, CLIFFORD J. MARCUM, ROBERT S. McCARTHY, R. D. 




IcCLOUD, KENNETH L McCRAY, RICHARD J. McGARRY, JOHN 



McKINNIS, R. A. McLAUSHLIN, G. R. Jr. 



MIDDLETON, A. C. MILLER, CHARLES H. MILLER, WILLIAM M. OWEN, HAROLD N. PRAHL, VINCENT H. 




PRELL, DONALD D. 



RA, JOSEPH RATAJSKI, CHARLES J. ROBEY, ARCHIE N. ROSE, HOWARD B. Jr. 






SHANER, GRANT S. 



SHAW, SIDNEY 



SHEEHAN, ROBT. E. SMITH, MARVIN V. 



STACK, ROBERT L 





STANDEFER, JOHN P. SWEENEY, JOSEPH L TALCOTT, HAROLD R. TAYLOR, RALPH E., Jr. TEDFORD, GLENN E. 



TEIGEN, MILTON H. THOMAS, ROLAND P. TUREK, FLOREN L. TURNER, MARK, Jr. VACCA, GABRIEL F. 






ANDERSON. NEWELL 



BOGLEY, V. M. 



BURT, WILLIAM L. DUDLEY, LAWRENCE M. 



FAIR, GENER 



FILLER, RICHARD F. FLETCHER, ROBERT G. HANSEN, HERSCHEL A. KANE, WILLIAM P. KINSELLA, WM. E. 




KRAUSE, WM. e. MARGISON, ROBT. L. MARTIN, JAMES 



MARTIN, JOHN R. MASSEY, GLENN C. 



MOORE, IRVING 



MOORE, ROBT. E. MURPHY, ROBT. E. PAYNE, HAROLD T. PEARSON, DELBERT S. 




RANSDALL, WM. R. 



REED, JAMES E. 



REID, JULIUS H., Jr. 



RICHARDS, FRANCIS M. RICKELS, GEORGE E. Jr. 






WAMBIER, CHARLES A. 



Cfc 



jjl 



ROPER, ROBERT J. RURUP, LEONARD W. F. RUSHWORTH, WM. E. RUTLEDSE, LEONARD SCHREIBER, HAROLD F. 




SHAFFER, LEWIS, A. SULLIVAN, JOHN F. SHURTZ, WILLIAM E. WAGNER, MELVIN H. . WALLACE, J. W., Jr. 



WARDLE, EARL F. WATSON, CHESTER W. WEAVER, CHARLES M. WELLS, ROBERT L 




WILLIAMS, HERBERT H. WILTSHIRE, BUELL O. WINNINSHAM, H. K. WOLF, JOHN F. WOODWARD, MARLIN 






WORKMAN, JOHN R. 



YOST, RICHARD H 



ZWIRTZ, GORDON C. 



LIM, ROBERTO 



B 



ureau o 



f 



''/iTfc*,";T^-.">"^'-.v.'. -;'V;■fit'•rr>;$!?>.!;•'*^■'^"^■^^^ 




LT. RICHARD YOUNG 




Standard: 




LT. VERN H. MURDOCK 




LT. CHARLES \. MOHLER 



LT. B. F. HAZELTON III 




LT. WM. P. SLOAN 



"Must of been 
easier then." 






"That process by which a number of vari-colored and dis- 
similar objects are blended into a variety of symetrical and beaLitifu! pat- 
terns" — Webster. . . . This is our way of telling you that the following 
section deals with your multitudinous activities since you came here 
dodos and leave — with a thin coating of feathers. 





KALC) nOSCOPE 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 




WALLACE, JAMIE 
Adjutant 



McCUTCHEON, L. J. 
Supply Officer 



MARTIN, J. R. 
Major 



McCRAY, RICHARD J. 
Sergeant Major 



B 
A 

T 
T 
A 
L 



O 
N 




KELAHAN, T. R. 
Flight Lieutenant 



JONES, O. W. 
1st Sergeant 



AGGERS, W. R. 
Adjutant 



MASON, C. V. 
Squadron Comnn. 



BJORUM, C. H. 
Supply Sgt. 



HIXON, VAN 
Flight Lieut. 




RUSHWORTH, W. E. 
Flight Lieut. 

WEAVER, C. M. 
Flight Lieut. 

SHURTZ, W. E. 

Squadron Comm. 

RURUP, L. W. F. 
1st Sergeant 

RICHARDS, F. M. 
Adjutant 



o 

F 
F 



C 
E 
R 
S 




Left to right: OVERDORF, R. C, Flight Lt.; MULLIGAN, L. M., Flight Lt.; NICKEL, J. Adiutant; 
ANDERSON, W. J., Squadron Comm.; LA BARGE, A.P., 1st Sgt.; LARSON, C. W., Supply Sgt. 




TAYLOR, R. E., 


JR. 


TURNER, MARK JR. 


HOWARD, R. 1. 


MILLER, C. H 


Adjutant 




Squadron Comm. 


Flight Sgt. 


Flight Sgt. 





LT. B. A. PEETERS 
Commandant of Cadets 



"S;-arlets" 
W. L. BURT 
J. R. HUGHES 



LT. WALKER P. MULLEN 
Asst. Comm. of Cadets 





fr^ 




T 



\^» > 



■^mm 



ELCT'r Eri: VIE>V CE CYAN 




"Don't Let the Clutch Out" 



QUOTABLE QUOTES 

"I'd rather spend one minute doing what 
I wanted to do than a lifetime doing what 
someone else wanted me to do." — Keesee. 

Ed. — You don't like to eat regularly, do 
you, pal? 

"I've got a thousand-mile cruising radius 
on my bantam" — Pierce. 



Ed. — Just on paper, prof, just on paper. 

"Never stop a dog fight by prying their 
jaws apart with your hands." — Landry. 

Ed. — Boy, you're talking from experience! 

"Notice that radiator protruding from 
under the belly — a dead give away." — Bris- 
tol. 

Ed. — But did you ever see one on the 
Aircraft Identification exam? 




SWffev \c W^ulledtje; "5o Ae»e liuas, already 3 lurns an' fiqWtniV 




B^^i ^ 



»)oi\s9<j Sot* or ^a.Kes Vis Uav>QQn- rlu>Y\Q 
5cviousK<, doea-nH V\e ? 



PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



rLA/n BAcr 



Anderson, Aggers, Baugh, Brimage . . . 
Piling into G.I. trucks in pitch darkness, the 
bumpy ride to the station at Santa Ana. 
The long mosquito infested wait for the 
"cannon ball." Campeau, Carnes, Cavallo, 
De Keyser, Demere . . . Those bulky gas 
masks, the old fashioned chair car — the 
latrine over flowing two cars up. De Sraf- 
fenreid, Edmondson, Evers . . . First sight 
of a PT-22 — exclamations, conjecture, awe. 
Stars in our eyes when we dropped off the 
train into the blinding glare of a noon day 
sun. Cries of "Get those wings off your 
hat until you solo-" Division of the men into 
different groups breaking old ties causing 
the basis of a new friendship in the common 
terror of waiting to fly. Ferries, Fensler, 
Gronemeyer, . . . The dollar ride — Martin 
flashing his hash — boredom of the "previous 
time" men to the whole thing. Mutual am- 
azement that the instructors permit you to 
taxi the thing out to the line. Thrill of fol- 
lowing through on the first take-off. Hor- 
rible hash of the first turn — "surprising how 
little rudder is needed. Isn't it?" The eager 
convoys of those first two weeks. Jealousy 
and pride in all recitals of time "two hours 
and five minutes." "hHow do you fill In this 
log?" "What kind of a motor did you say?" 
HIartwick, hiarrington. Jacks, Jones. . . . 
First spin — stall — the inability to do a climb- 
ing turn without banking 60 degrees. Pre- 
vious time men solo — the shower — "My 
God! will I ever solo, why doesn't he turn 
me loose? I know I could take It around." 
The bliss of that shower — the unaffected ar- 
rogance of the boys who came back to the 
ready room after changing to C.K.C. Klib- 
be, Krause, King, Lancaster, Leong, Mills, 
Moore, . . . Ten hour checks — "I don't 
know how I passed — spun out of a 360 de- 
gree turn, landed down wind — flew a hor- 
rible pattern." "Don't Instructors ever stop 
criticizing — I passed that check didn't I?" 
Remember that solo off the mat? Cliff 
Mann landed cross tee three times. Remem- 



ber when Ransdall and Aggers tried to dog 
fight the Instructors? Did Rutledge ever 
tell you the take-off was a cinch, just like 
working the pedals on a tractor? Were 
you there when Dudley beat an elimination 
ride and thought it was his 30 hour check? 
What hapened to all the eager convoy 
men? hlow do you like flying three hours 
and better each day? Nelson, Nisbitt, O'- 
Brien, Odell, Pace, Patterson, Robey, Rataj- 
ski, . . . The 90 degree stage when they lined 
the boys up like the start of the Pulitzer Cup 
Race and some of them flew their pattern 
just as if It were. The time Jim Reed knocked 
over the checken coop with his wing — boy 
what a day! Then those I80's where the 
last turn was so low you almost scraped a 
wing tip. Stack, Standefer, Talcott, Taylor, 
Tedford, . . . "Who said 30 hour check"? 
"HHope I don't stall out of a chandelle." Re- 
member when Smokey Moore grabbed his 
seat handle on his first loop — thought seat 
and all were going for a while. Fact is, he 
was ready to flip his safety belt. Sweating 
out the Sixty — lots of slow rollers and loop- 
ers in the crowd now — speculation as to 
whether the army requires you to do a snap 
roll. "Say, who gets open post?" Squadron 
II! — Hell, they always have open post, that's 
because the cadet major lives over there — 
the rat!" It surely is a dirty trick to make 
cabin check during revielle. Do you remem- 
ber the boys who came around In the morn- 
ing and lit the gas burners — punishment 
fitted the crime no less. Vacca, Watson, 
Wells, Weaver, . . . Did anyone ever look 
at that army check ship without muttering? 
"But for the grace of ... " Yost, Zwlrtz, — 
Terrible strain — last five hours — that dippy 
ground school exam — Cross wing landings 
• — calesthenlcs — wonder If we'll live through 
It? Used to be "What did you do today" — 
now It's "How high did you climb?" Don't 
forget the boys who have gone. Do you 
think they'll ever do anything about the 
food? — I don't, either. 



PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 



"THE LIEUTENANT'S LAMENT 

./ liciitoidnl is Oil officer, 

Or so soiiif people stiy. 

He wears pink pants and shoulder simps 

And draivs commissioned pay. 

But if yon pause and ponder 

You ivill see thai they are ivrong; 

'Tis sucli a cause for zvonder 

That I've put it into song. 

The colonels live in (juarters. 

The privates live in toits; 

By the post commander's orders 

The lieutenant merely rents. 

The USO gives dances 

For the poor enlisted men; 

The colonels' 'zvives plan parlies 

Where each rooster has his hen. 

The college girls 

Cast their pearls 

Before the crude cadets; 

But the men of Mars 

Jf'ith single Bars, 

'Tis them the zvorld forgets! 

To buy their meals they are allozved 

Just sixty cents per day, 

But they must mess in zvith the crozvd 

.hid ten hits for it pay. 

.hid if a post commander 

Does, perchance, provide them quarters, 

He builds them out of tarpaper 

.hid livinq there is orders. 

What is the rent? 

Oh, it is meant 

To provide such //uarlers free — 

Lieutenants merely do nilhoui 

./ forty dollar fee! 

Oh, lieutenants lliey are officers. 

Or so some may have thought, 

They zcear pink pants and shoulder straps 

But really they are nought. 

They must respect their betters, 

.hid 'tis numerous they are, 

Their bars are really fetters 

To an eagle or a star . . . 

Rank ivithout authority. 

Duty ■zcithoul aiilhorilv. 

Duty icithoiit pozver, 

Service zvithout glory, 



CHECr CICE 

"Sir, I am Avia+ion Student Woodward 
reporting for my 10-hour check, I have 14 
hours and 20 minutes" (hlope this guy does- 
n't expect me to fly like Lindbergh . . . 
wish I had old Jaxon Matthews — don't for- 
get flaps — got that written on my coveralls 
leg. 'II probably crack up taxiing out to the 
line — wish I was back in Fiji in that old ' I 7 — 
Boy, that was a sweet take-off . . . hope he 
noticed I looked back . . . let's see — turn 
right then left — don't forget to line up 
with section line — he's holding up two fin- 
gers, he'll just have to hold it. I can't go 
back now: should have gone before he got 
in the ship . . . Oooh, wants a I 80 to the 
right. Why doesn't he say so. Power on 
stalls? Oh, oh, almost didn't clear myself — 
will this thing ever break — don't catch it 
with ailerons — two turn spin? Boy, watch 
this — Good Lord, these Ryans don't spin 
well with flaps, do they? Gliding turns, flaps, 
flaps. . . . will I ever learn? What road does 
he mean . . . Boy, I rolled out of that one 
nicely — wings level just as I crossed the 
road — must have hit a thermal, couldn't 
possibly have climbed 200 feet in that short 
time. I'm going to miss on this one . . . hope 
he doesn't notice me sneak that altitude 
back. Forced landing — where's the wind? 
— the flaps are stuck — flaps, flaps — could 
he have meant for me to land in this plowed 
field with that wheat stubble right along- 
side? — Take you home? — Those are the 
sweetest words you've ever said. 

"Thank you, sir" — Well, I 'did one thing 
right — I said gas on, switch off, throttle 
pumped and closed — where's my instructor 
— got to get him in there and do some fast 
talking . . . . " 

"Ten-hour check? Just had one, nothing 
to it — believe me-" 

I strive, I strain, I concentrate, 
But I can't do a pylon eight. 

(Apologies to an unknown author) 

Officer, for an hour! 

Lt. Donald E. Super, 
Maxwell Field, Alabama. 

(From Air Force News Magazine) 



PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 



CONTACT STAFF 

JOHN R. MARTIN EDITOR 

WILLIAM L. BURT ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

TONY S. CAVALLO COPY BOY 

WILLIAM L. BURT CARTOONIST 

GERY WILLIAMS . . ARTIST 

LT. R. D. COOPER ADVISOR 






Well, boys, that's all, there isn't any more. 
If you liked the rag we didn't sweat in vain. 
We really drove "Coop" crazy and even 
surprised ourselves during the mad race 
against the deadline. No, thanks, fellows, 
we can't take the dough, just put it into 
our hands instead. 



Special commendation and a superior ef- 
ficiency rating goes to A^S Bill Burke, our 
able-bodied cartoonist, to Miss Williams 
who drew the section covers and finally to 
Tony Cavallo, printers devil extraordinary, 
for his tireless carrying of the beer pail. 

John R. Martin, Editor. 



SOLO 

John Dodo ivas flying with definite ease, 
He found it no trouble his instructor to 

please, 
It zvas about his eighth hour when the going 

got tough. 
Solo time was Hearing, this was no time 

to sluff. 

He recalled his dual hours with his instructor 

so near. 
But now it was different, the front seat ivould 

be clear. 
He hopped into the airplane and took off 

■zvith great care. 
The result of his solo is not told in despair. 

At supper thai night, he stood up on his 

chair, 
Called the Ballalion lo altenlion, and said 

ziith great care, 
"My goggles are perched on the back of my 

head, 
You know what that stands for, I'm glad 

I'm not dead. 
That I could fly, I knew since I was a tot. 
For now, you can see, as a pilot I'm hot." 



..,4. 



Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deliciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

IHIiMiir CA^i 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



4 .. 



PAGE THIRTY-SIX 






.ameras 



...Fil 



ms 




DEVELOPING — PRINTING 
DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



3 
6 
I 



Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 




For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

HEMET VALLEY 

Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

Golden State 
Company Ltd. 

12th at Vine 
PHONE 2400 RIVERSIDE 



*_„ 



NOW UNDER 
NEW MANAGEMENT 




WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite Cocktail In 

The Indian Room 

Hotel Alessandro 

Phone 2771 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

• LUNCHES 
• DINNERS 

TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 



PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 



CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 

Citizens National 
Trust and Savings Banl( 

of Riverside, Calif. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN 



i 



BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




I 



• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEY 
BOWLING CENTER 

Hemet, Calif. 



1 

I 124 N. Carmelite 

4,,._,„_.._.._,._.._.._.._, 



EVERY WEEK IT'S IN . . . 

flMIE 

iHiEMiT INIiWS 

Connplete 
Local News Coverage 

• 
"AIRVIEWS" by Harry Hofmann 



PHONE 2811 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 



_.,♦ 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 3941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Sunday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 28c 



San Jacinto Theatre 

Phone 50 
OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 



♦— "■ 



PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



I 



WHEN YOU'VE "OPEN POST"— TRY 

a 





i 



HOT SPRINGS 



DANCING ON SAT. NIGHT 

Service Men 55c 7-Piece Orchestra 

— COCKTAILS — 
CAFETERIA DINING ROOM 

Good Food at Popular Prices 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH COUNTER 

GOLF — All Grass Public Course . . . 
RYAN FIELD— 50c At All Times 

TENNIS— Lighted for Night Play 

Hotel Rates — European Plan 
$1.65 to $3.30 Per Day 

Gilman Hot Springs, Calif. 

Phone San Jacinto 8811 



Complete line of 

BAKERY GOODS 

Specializing In 
PARTY AND WEDDING CAKES 



VALLEY BAKERY 

21! E. Florida Avenue 
Hemet, Calif. Phone 3283 



I 
I 

4*.- 




Cadet 
Portraits 

MADE 

EXCLUSIVELY 

ON THE POST BY 



AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

I Special rates given Ryan Cadets 

' ALL NEGATIVES ARE KEPT ON FILE INDEFINITELY. 
1 RE-ORDRS WILL BE GIVEN IMMEDIATE ATTENTION 

I — Studios Located at — 

503 "E" Street 3935 Main St. 

I San Bernardino Riverside 



Compliments of 

Snternatlonal Provision Co. 

1570 Industrial Street 

Los Angeles, California 

Trinity 961! 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



Modem Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



COMPLETE ONE-STOP 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

In Our Call Office on the Post 

For Better Service 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT, Mgr. 

I 
300 East Devonshire PHONE 2501 | 



PAGE FORTY 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters for 

UniForms— Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 



• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 

QUALITY LUGGAGE 

In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 



I 



"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmellta Hemet, Calif. 



^r <■ f' ( 







CN T€ BA/IC 





PAUL WILCOX 
Civilian Director of Flying 




WILLIAM EVANS 
Stage Commander 



RICHARD HUFFMAN 
Stage Commander 




PUBLISHED BY 
The Ryan School of Aeronautics, a Civilian Enterprise, in the Interest of the Personnel 

of the 5th A.A.F.F.T.D. 



^ 








l^yi^'^miym:}^:}^:^^^^ 



he Ulasteiec) the 
juHc)ameniaU ok jliakt 




ARMY AIR FORCES 

FLYING TRAINING DETACHMENT 



^^^ 




CAPT. WM. 1. FERNALD 



A final grade slip from the Commanding Officer to you men who 
have completed the course at primary: 

SAFETY — This student is superior in this phase of his training. Looks 
around well for other aircraft. Checks carefully his cockpit 
procedure, etc. 

PLANNING — Above average. Student plans work well and utilizes his 
time to excellent advantage as is demonstrated by his progress. 

COORDINATION— Student demonstrated excellent coordination. No 
slips or skids were felt by check pilot, even on forced landings 
or gliding turn into the field. 

SUSTENTATION — Demonstrated superior sense of sustentation. Ex- 
cellent sense of air speed in all maneuvers and landing approach. 

I sincerely hope your basic instructor will see fit to mimeograph a 
bunch of these slips and write your names at the top. 

Good luck men. It has been a pleasure to have worked with you. 



PAGE THREE 




HEADQU 

ST A 



CAPT. S. J. SATHER 
Adjutant 




LT. B. A. PEETERS 
Commandant of Cadets 





LT. KARL KOENIG 
Assistant Adjutant 



LT. WALKER P. MULLEN 
Asst. Comm. of Cadets 



PAGE FOUR 



ARTERS 
FF 




LT. M. J. MUELLER 




IT. L. J. BREATHOUR 





LT. B. B. HUTCHINSON 



LT. ROY D. COOPER 
Athletic Director 



PAGE FIVE 








LT. CHARLES F. MOHLER 



LT. WM. P. SLOAN 



FLYING 



r -^ •'sr^"S'"'""^"'"7^r -m:^w. 




LT. B. F. HAZELTON 



OFFICERS 



Hi 



'ft*:^ 



f t^ 



i Ml 








LT. VERN H. MURDOCK 



LT. RICHARD YOUNG 



PAGE SIX 



CADET OFFICERS 



BATTALION STAFF 

Battalion Major , Mefford, J. V. 

Battalion Adj Thurman, E. D. 

Battalion Sup. Off Weiss, R. E. 

Battalion Sgt. Maj Loehnert, R, O. 



SQUADRON I 

Capt Forrester, R. 

Adj Weyerbacher 

Lt Schuman, G. 

Lt Truax, S= 



SQUADRON II 

Capt Secor, R. 

Adj Earl, R. 

Lt Smith, F. 

Lt Long 



SQUADRON III 

Capt Hamilton, J. 

Adj Vick, T. 

Lt Furlong 

Lt Sweeney 



SQUADRON IV 

Capt Logan, R. 

Adj Weems, M. 

Lt Sisson, R. 

Lt, Smith, N. 



PAGE SEVEN 



( — ' HE 15, 15 HE ? >-> 

WELL,SE1MD HIM IN/ 1 




GROUND SCHOOL 



A. MARTIN WEIDINGER 

HOME STATE— Montana 

EDUCATION — From a grease monkey to the top via the school 
of experience 

STARTED AT RYAN— Many years ago 

TEACHES — (Anything) Director of Ground School 

HOBBY — An extensive collection of classical records 

PET PEEVE— ? 7 ? 

AMBITION— Technocracy 



-fiUT THEY HAD A HaL OF A 

GOOD time: in new meaico. 

ANYWAX IT WA5 M05T FME)ARRA55INS 



HALE E. LANDRY 

HOME STATE— Montana 

EDUCATION — Navigation teacher since 1918; Attended 7 univ's. 

STARTED AT RYAN— September I, 1941 

TEACHES— Navigation 

HOBBY— Pastel paintings 

PET PEEVE — None; he's a student of psychology 

AMBITION— Traveling 





PAUL PIERCE, JR. 

HOME STATE— Illinois 

EDUCATION— An old Ryan scholar 

STARTED AT RYAN— July I, 1940 

TEACHES— Engines 

HOBBY— His baby bantam 

PET PEEVE — Talking during an exam 

AMBITION — To explore South America by plane 



PASE EIGHT 



INSTRUCTORS 



LEVERETTE F. BRISTOL 

HOME STATE— New Jersey 

EDUCATION — University of North Carolina; Ryan School graduate 

STARTED AT RYAN— In San Diego 

TEACHES — Aircraft Identification and Navigation 

HOBBY— Bridge 

PET PEEVE — Anything thrown on his desk 

AMBITION — College professor 




-WEi^/ILLNOWTAKf 
UP THE HAto 
FITCH FRoreUft? 



^y- 



JAMES H. KEESEE 

HOME STATE— Oklahoma 

EDUCATION— School of Hard Knocks, U.S.A. 

STARTED AT RYAN— July I, 1940 

TEACHES — Theory of flight and practical Maintenance 

HOBBY — Dancing hoe-downs at Gllman's 

PET PEEVE— Draft Boards 

AMBITION— Blondes and brunettes 




have al(eady 
left town — 



HARRY G. RAINES 

HOME STATE— Ohio 

EDUCATION— McGill University, Canada; Antioch College, Ohio 

STARTED AT RYAN— May, 1941 

TEACHES — Weather and engines 

HOBBY — Dancing and reading scientific nnaterial 

AMBITION— Professor 

PET PEEVE— Sleeping In class 




THEY HELD OUT 
FOR A BUCK. 
PRmTE, BUT 
bVGOSH THEY 
WEREN'T 
ABOUT 
7DG£T 
MEfOR 
NOTHIN' , 



PAGE NINE 



FLIGHT 



E' FLIGHT 




BACK ROW — left to right: Floyd Yosl", Spencer Valsey, Lemuel Krlsle, John Kumler, Alex Hyde, 
James Fette, Robert Lindquisf. FRONT ROW — Noel Sharp, Donald Garner, Thomas Lovell. Earl 
KInzel, Wayland Fink. 



F' FLIGHT 



T 



^.7^ 



.:'?S 









BACK ROW— left to right: William Graton, Edmund Nicolas, Robert Bauchet, Harold Clark, 
Tyle Roethel, Wilfred Stearns. FRONT ROW— James Travis, William Diehl, Alfred Chase, Ray Porter, 
Isaac Hayes, Ivan Kinne. 



INSTRUCTORS 



e' FLIGHT 




BACK ROW— left to right: Elmer Haines, Robert Woodridge, Jack Clifford, Edwin Shockley, Robert 
Knowles, James Coughran, Adelbert Hannah, Howard Clifford. FRONT ROW — John Barrett, Fred 
James, Walter Whisenand, Arthur Chase, Roaid Hanson. 



H' FLIGHT 




BACK ROW— left to right: Jack Wilburn. Reed Kinert, Frederick Workman. Barl Porter, James 
Simpson, Hallock Hoffman, Frederick Pierce, Joseph Roble. FRONT ROW — Gordon Helm, William 
Gordon, Warren Stoner, Gerald Nunnaly, Curtis Townsend. 



THE PATTERN POEM 

There was a young man named Dunn 

Taking off on pattern one. 

The engine was cold though the pilot was 

bold; 
Now he's hanging out stars and the sun. 

We know of a lad named Drew 

Who cross Tee'd on pattern two. 

On the right by his side was an army check 

ride; 
And now Mr. Drew is all through. 

And then there was hot pilot Lee, 

Jerked a ship off on pattern three. 

The mat used to be smooth, but now there's 

a groove ; 
A warning all dodos should see. 

Then there's the know-it-all bore 
Who thought he could fly number four. 
He turned to the left instead of the right — 
He's now "sweating out" the tank corps. 

While thinking of Saturday's jive, 
A pilot took a ship off on five. 



His run was too long; He knew he was 

wrong. 
Two ships were "washed out" in his dive. 

A pilot and drinking don't mix. 

As witnessed on pattern six; 

The wheels left the ground; torque pulled it 

around. 
The propeller was cracked into sticks. 

With his thoughts a long way from heaven, 

Smith started on pattern seven, 

He was thinking of Japs instead of his 

flaps — 
That wreckage ivas ship one-eleven. 

Jones thought of his throttle too late 

When landing on pattern eight. 

Though he made it alright, the squeeze was 

too tight; 
And the army board gave him the gate. 

So think it out carefully, lads; 

If you all want to live to be dads. 

Just stay "on the ball"; straight and level; 

don't stall, 
And depend on your eyes, not crash pads. 




■Yas, I'm a Co-Pilot on a P-39!" 



PASE TWELVE 



PULL UP AND JUMP 

Though they told him he could fly 

He knew it was a lie 

'Cause in his throat there grew a great hig 

lump 
When he pulled up in a stall 
And the ship began to fall 
His heart cried out, "Pull up and jump." 

Then when he did a spin 
And the "opposite" rudder was in, 
With all his might he got the ship to dump. 
He gathered speed going down; 
He looked out at the ground. 
And his nerves kept saying, "Pull up and 
jump." 

When he approached the field too high, 
He "cased" it with a sigh 
And full flaps he slowly started to pump. 
As the ground began to rise 
He looked up to the skies 
And said, "I guess Pd better pull up and 
jump." 

Then he started out one day 
With instructor frisk and gay 
And in a loop they just got over the hump. 
When she started in a spin. 
The wing fabric just caved in. 
The instructor cried out loud, "Pull up and 
jump." 



But the lad just sat in tight 

And with all his might 

Tried to get courage to lift his rump; 

But like a key in a groove 

He found he just couldn't move. 

And he died trying to "Pull up and jump.' 



NOTT vs. SHOTT 

A duel was recently fought in Texas by 
Alexander Shott and John S. Nott. Nott 
was shot and Shott was not. In this case it 
is better to be Shott than Nott. There is 
a rumor that Nott was not shot and ,Shot 
avows that he shot Nott, which proves 
either that the shot Shott shot at Nott was 
not shot or that Nott was shot notwithstand- 
ing. Circumstantial evidence Is not always 
goood. It may be made to appear at the 
trial the shot Shott shot shot Nott, or as 
accidents with firearms are frequent, it may 
be possible that the shot Shott shot shot 
Shott himself, when the whole affair would 
resolve itself into Its original elements and 
Shott would be shot and Nott would not. 
We think, however, that the shot Shott 
shot, shot not Shott, but Nott. hlowever, 
it's hard to tell who was shot and who was 
not. 




"This darned ole crank Is just too hard 
for me to turn!" 



PAGE THIRTEEN 




"Looks like that 20 m.m. cannon we mounted on the crankshaft is a 
little too strong for this Ryan!" 




iiMn 



"Oh, you'll get used to it in time — just be 
thankful It's not rain." 



M\.iic/(/ed to fly 

1 oii're first to admit 

l\>id when voii've come through 

^ezv words here will fit. 




PAGE FOURTEEN 




Physical Training 

Here at Ryan, under the vigorous guid- 
ance of Lt. Roy D. Cooper and his able 
assistant S^Sgt. "Monty" Du Barry unto 
each of us has conne the true meaning and 
concept of physical training. 

Physical fitness has been an integral part 
of our training since the very beginning 
when we were inducted into the Air Forces. 
Doubtless at times each of us has regarded 
this program a weary burden and an evil 
to skip over very lightly. And reward for 
our efforts today will undoubtedly assert 
itself now and in the future even though we 
be unaware of it. 

The physical training program was divid- 
ed into two main parts. The first part being 
calisthenics. The exercises used conform 
with the best army tradition of physical 
fitness. To describe them is very difficult, 
however, one Interesting feature Is that 
these exercises are often couched in words 

(Continued on page 26) 







MY 



• Pictured on these pages 
tound at Ryan Field. • \ 
when the bugle sounded a| 
clawing off the blankets in 
beds and hit Reveille forr 
too, that after a hasty bre 

gravel getting back to the cottage so we'd have time to nnop up the 
shack and check over our neglected school notes. • We found that the 

Ground School Instructors knew their stuff and that we couldn't catch I 

a quick snooze during a lecture without getting a slab of chalk bounced 
off our skulls. • We discovered that a hangar floor can be damned 

cold when you're rolling around 
on it in your shorts, and that 
bruises were part of the roun- 
tine on the athletic field. • We 
found that the flight line grows 
into a monotonous routine after 
a month or so, that there are 
never enough parachutes to go 
around, that the instructors are 
the world's best psychologists, 
the dispatchers the busiest, the 
planes are the flyingest, the mat 
the dustiest, and when you per- 
sisted in making the same silly mistake over and over, you carried a 
sign on your back with each individual error printed in bold letters on 
it, or if you didn't pump flaps or look around before making a turn, 






PAGE SIXTEEN 



DAY 



a few examples of whaf we 
discovered promptly, that 
( 5:45 a.m., we had to start 
3r to be up, dress, make our 
on at 5:50. • We found, 
ast we had to really pound 





you wrote a little sentence on the blackboard six or seven hundred 
times. • We found that acrobatics must be practiced at a safe alti- 
tude, that every field or road can be a potential landing field, that 
we must never dive bomb cattle or houses, nor fly over Farmer Brown's 
chicken ranch or the "gobbler" farm, and when we came home at 
1700 and the traffic was thick, 
we found that it was impracti- 
cal to try landing behind a plane 
with a dead motor. • We found 
that Retreat was the last for- 
mation of the day, also the hard- 
est one to march slowly away 
from, and that after supper, you 
either studied or sat around on 
your laurels and waited for the 
faithful old bugle to blow you 
into your sack at 2200. • And 
best of all, we found that after 

eight weeks of marching, flying, studying and griping, we have managed 
to make the grades in all ground school classes and completed our 
primary solo flying, and are now going after higher stakes — BASIC! 





PAGE SEVENTEEN 







ANDERSON, FRED JR. AULT, FRANK G. JR. ATKINS, JOSEPH E. BARNES, NEAL J. BECKER, JOSEPH F. JR. 




BUSKIRK, CLAIR E. BYRD, MARKREL L. CARPENTER, JOSEPH B. CARROLL, HARRY W. 




/n/ 



E' FLIGHT 




CLARK, THOMAS B. 



COLLINS, WILLIE D. 







CROSS, GENE R. DAVIS, CHARLES C. DAVIS, IRA G. DEBUSK, JAMES H. 







DILLMAN, CLIFFORD V/. DOPKO, BARNARD M. DUNN, ROBERT L. RYAN, EDWARD R. SAXTON, ROBERT W. 



PAGE EIGHTEEN 






■'^■^yrj'^y^ ■■ 





SAYRE, ROBERT M. SCHWARTZ. RICHARD M. SERVICE, THOMAS P. SHERMAN, WILLIAM H. SIMPSON, KENNETH 



W. 





SKINNER, WALLACE I. SMITH, FRANCIS L. 








SMITH, HOWARD G. SNIDER, RAYMOND G. SPELLISCY, WILLIAM J. SWARTFAGER, HAROLD W. SWEENEY, PEYTON F. 




TIMBERLAKE, JESSE H. TOWNSEND, CHAS. W. 







TRUAX, SAMUEL M. TURLEY, JAPETH W. UPCHURCH, HARRY L. VALLEY, ROBERT J. VANLOON, LAURENCE A. 



PAGE NINETEEN 








ECKERMAN, CHESTER E. FELTS, CLYDE A. FORRESTER, ROLLAND L. FOSTER, ROBERT R. FOX, JEROME 




FULLER, CARL W. FURLONG, DONALD J. GIBNEY, GREGG D. GLASSCOCK, HOMER L. 




7r/ 



F' FLIGHT 




HAMILTON, J. L.. JR. 



HARPER, WILLIAM M. 







HART, GEORGE M. HENDERSON, JAMES L. HENSLEY, DONALD L HIGH, CECIL R., JR. 




GOURNAY, HAROLD A. JONES, GEORGE H. ROBERTSON, RUSSELL ROBESON, SAMUEL C. ROMIG, DALE V. 



PAGE TWENTY 







ROOT, MERTON B. ROSATI, DOMINIC A., JR. SCHMID, FREDERICK J. SCHRERO, JULIAN Y. SCHRIEBER, KENNETH R. 





SCHULZE, GILBERT E. SCHUMAN, GEORGE W. 








SCOTT, EDWIN F. SHAFFER, RAYMOND E. SHERE, FRED C. VANN, JAMES F. VERTREES, WARREN J. 





VICK, TOM P. WHITCOMB, FRANKLIN F. 







WILDS, DAVID W. WILKINSON, WALTER E. WINDERS, WILLIAM L. WINTER. HERBERT T. WORTHY, MARION J. 



PAGE TWENTY-ONE 





EARL, REID T. KELLEN, WALTER L. LANDIS, AUBREY N. LANG, GOLDEN LA ROCCA, MICHAEL J. 




LEAHY, JOHN LEUKUMA, JOSEPH F. LILLARD, JOHN R. LOEB, JOSEPH K. 




ir^i 



G' FLIGHT 




LOEHNERT, R. O., JR. 



LOGAN, ROBERT B. 




' :^tSSatKg^,'igti^^^^!BVi. 







LUCAS, MAC L. MASTNY, GEORGE G. MEFFORD, JUNE V. MENDELSON, MILTON C. 




w: i^^sgiisj^- 




f 



MILES, ROBERT E. MOORE, WARREN C. MULBERGER, DEAN M. NOLEN, CYRIL L. PASSMORE, MORRIS H. 



PAGE TWENTY-TWO 



PENETON, JAMES W. PERKINS, JACK G. SIEVERS, EDWARD A. SISSON, ROBERT H. SMITH, FOY E. 







SMITH, MAX A. SOCOLOFSKY, ARTHUR A. STAUDTE, RAYMOND W. STENSETH, HJALMER D. 




STRYKER, ROY T. STUMPFF, WILLIAM J. THORTON, ARTHUR E., JR. TOLBERT, GEORGE L. TOMLINSON, FRANK E. 




"'KT -^ -XJlfc "^ ?T«^ 






TOOMEY, DAVID F. TOWNSEND, CHARLES C. TRANTHAM, FRANK M., JR. TROUP, DONALD S. 




TRYON, HOBART WAKELAND, EDWARD W. WALDO, JAMES B. WEBB, JOHN K., JR. WEISS, ROBERT E. 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



BURROW, LARRY S. DARROW, RALPH N. ELDER, ALAN W. HAYS, DEE J. LONG, ORVILLE K. 




MALTBY, GLEN T. MARSHALL, ROBERT K. NELSON, CHARLES L. NELSON, ROY A. 




/I 1/ 



H' FLIGHT 




REED, EVERETT D. 



RENNIE, ALBERT M. 




ROBERTS, ARDICE L. ROBERTSON, WILLIAM J. ROWE,, LEE W. SCHIELD, MARCUS A. 




SECOR, RALPH A. SIMMERMON, WM. A. SLAGLE, LAWRENCE O., JR. SMITH, JOHN E. SMITH, NEWMAN T. 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 





SNYDER, LESTER W. SPAULDING, JESSE E. 



TEN BARGE, JOSEPH C. TENCH, WILLIAM C. 





THURMAN, EUGENE D. WAGNER, JOHN J. WOLTER, CHARLES T. WATSON, JOHN E. 



'SSW' 







WATSON, HARRY E., JR. WEEMS, MONARD D. WELLMAN, IRVING J. WESTBERG, FRANKLIN A. WESTBERG, JOSEPH W. 



-iSISiSSiSS"' 







WEYERBACHER, K. W. WHITESCARVER, JOHN T. WIGHAMAN, ROBT. G., JR. WILSON, KEITH S. 




WINTERBERGER, C. L. WRIGHT, LAWRENCE, JR. YOUNG, BRUCE S. YURCINA, THOMAS ZUMWALT, EDGAR O. 



PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



Student 
Officers 




CAPT. G.E.JOHNSON 

"E" Flight 





LT. P. H. TOMLINSON 
"H" Flight 




LT. C. L. SACKETT LT. L. A. MADDOX 

"G" Flight "E" Flight 

APOLOGIES FOR THE PICTURES MISSING TO: 

ROBERTSON, D. L. NIX, G. W. MORRELL, G. E. 

"H" Flight "H" Flight "G" Flight 



LT. A. J. SARDONI 
"F" Flight 



AKINS, J. E. 
"E" Flight 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(Continued from page 15) 

or phrases aptly descriptive of the exercise. 
One such exercise is the "Randolph Hop", 
this one is a cinch for anyone who has stood 
on a hot stove barefooted, anyone with a 
background In the theatre, particularly 
"Ballet", experiences no difficulty in its ex- 
ecution. One that comes up regularly is the 
"Burpee", the title would seem to insinuate 
a contest in "belching". Cadets, being gen- 
tlemen and disciples of Emily Post, do not 
revel in such gastronomic pleasures there- 
fore that title is a misnomer as can also be 
attested by the fact that following the ex- 
ercises one Is fortunate to have breath for 
breathing let alone for any such superfluous 
antics. One other is the "Killer." This Is a 
throwback from the days of the Inquisition. 
We all look forward to getting the "Iron 
Maiden" In "Basic" to toughen our skin to 
mosquito bites. 

The second part of the period Is devoted 
to sports. Here may be noted a keen com- 



petitive spirit between teams and individ- 
uals in the different sports offered. The 
choice of sports is left to the Individual. 
One may choose softball basketball, volley- 
ball, horse-shoes, badminton and a few in- 
dividual activities. 

The physical stamina of a pilot Is an ele- 
ment that someday may determine the suc- 
cess or failure of his ability to discharge his 
duties or accomplish a mission In accord- 
ance with the high tradition of our Air 
Forces. With this the ultimate goal of the 
Air Forces and ourselves each day we dedi- 
cate a part of our time to the development 
of a strong mind and body. 

We are deeply grateful of the oppor- 
tunity afforded us in this athletic program 
and enthusiastically endorse Its many varied 
activities. We should well be proud of our 
programm and achievement. Let us not re- 
lax, but make a determined resolve that 
habits of keeping fit will not deteriorate, 
but rather, we shall strive to improve that 
which we have already achieved. 

A/Q BOB WEISS. 



PAGE rWENTY-SIX 



CLA// WILL... 



WE, the class of 43-E, do hereby set down words of well-founded wisdom and expect our 
predecessors, the class of 43-F, to profit by them and act accordingly. 



I, (Duster) Lillard, leave three fence posts end 30 feet of barbed wire — memoirs of a 180° 
TOO low approach. 

I, (Zero) Peneton, leave the address of a kind farmer with a fine wheat field for forced 
landings. (Irish stew served on Saturdays.) 

I, (Rebel) Dopko, leave I 17 gigs, with a three-page booklet on how to talk yourself out 
of same. 

I, (Rip-Cord) Loehnert, leave my slow roll together with nine closely trimmed trees and 20 
feet of altitude which I always have left over. 

I, (Two-by-Two) Loeb, leave my knowledge of tech orders — Always, useful in heckling prac- 
tical ground school instructors. 

I, (Pale Face) Lucas, leave a well-used bucket and sponge for- — you know what. 

I, (Rupert Sackster) Weiss, leave my worn mattress, rebuking the old adage, "No rest for 
the wicked." 

I, (Farmer) Rennie, leave my daily chore of slopping in them hogs to the next Oklahoman 
who comes along. 

I, (Snapper) Simmermon, leave four strips of cat gut and a busted beak as a reminder to 
those who try to organize a legitimate football game. 

I, (Crash) Wighaman, leave one demolished Ryan, ample proof of the law of gravity at 
stalling speed. 

I, (Eager Beaver) Mefford, leave my high soprano voice for the benefit of the next battal- 
ion major. 

I, (Flaps) Mulberger, leave one Ryan tire, worn only on the side and a slightly dented wing- 
tip, proof of where I was when the dust cleared. 

I, (Baldy) Tench, leave seven-eighths of the field for the underclass to land in; I never use it! 

I, (H.P.) Secor, leave my iron lungs for the underclass to sound off in class. 

I, (Mabel) Wolter, leave a gorgeous blonde at Oilman's for the rest of the suckers to buy 
expensive presents. 

PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 






CONTACT STAFF 

R. O. LOEHNERT '. . . . EDITOR 

R. E. WEISS ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

LT. P. H. TUMLINSON CARTOONIST 

GARE WILLIAMS ARTIST 

T. RUGATE PHOTOGRAPHER 

LT. R. D. COOPER ADVISOR 






EDITOR SEZ: 

As we lay the blotter on this issue of Contact there are approximately 140 members 
of Class 43-E waiting in line for their tickets to Basic. We hope that every one of that 
number will be in line when the wings are handed out several months hence. We also hope 
each of you will find a spot in your bag for this issue, so that when we meet up in some 
nice warm ready room, waiting for the fog to lift, we can dig it out and recall those days 
at Ryan Field, Gateway to a thousand ambitions. 



We've 'u.-oH in our f'ujhl --jcith the Ryan PT 
And learned hozv to land zvith the "Tee" 
We've contributed our hit to the scrap metal 

drive 
Bx trying to land with the ship in a dive. 

We've been yelled at, knocked dozvn, kicked 

in the face 
Jnd tripped on our tone/ties in a seven-lap 

race; 
We've groveled in hangars and rolled in the 

dirt — 
,/// this for Cooper, a szvell little squirl. 

We've flown for hours at 20 below 

Made down-wind landings in a 30-7nile blow. 

We've doubted our compass on cross coun- 
try flights 

.hid prayed for an airdrome blessed with 
lights. 

We're finished here nozv and ready to go, 
.1 parting message we'd like you to knozv: 
If \our engine conks out and the fog's thick 

as milk — 
//;/ the silk, brother, hit the silk! ! ! 



1 
1 



Always A 

Hearty Welcome Awaits You 

For That 

FAVORITE COCKTAIL 

— or — 

Deliciously Prepared 
Meal 

at the 

IMIiMET CAPE 

FLOYD HUME, Prop. 
229 E. Florida Avenue 



..—4 



PAGE TV/ENTY-EIGHT 



4.._.._.._.._.,_.._,._,._.._.._™_. — .— . .._.._, 



.ameras 



...Fil 



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DEVELOPING — PRINTING 
DOUBLE SIZE NO EXTRA CHARGE 

• 

DRUGS — SUNDRIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS 




Open 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. — Daily & Sundays 



For the 

RYAN SCHOOL & 

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Quality: 

• ICE CREAM 
• BUTTER 

• EVAPORATED MILK 
• CHEESE 

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I 2th at Vine 



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PHONE 2400 



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WHERE A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS THE RYAN CADETS AND PERSONNEL 

SERVING: 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

- and - 

Your Favorite CocHai! in 

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Hotel Alessandro 

Phone 2771 



For Your Enjoyment 

• FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAMS 

(Our Own Make) 
• CANDIES 

• SODAS 

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• DINNERS 

TAHQUITZ 
CONFECTIONERY 

"In the Center of Hemet" 
208 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE 






I 
I 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



CADETS and PERSONNEL 

We Invite 
You to Use the Many 
Services of This Bank 



HEMET BRANCH 1 

! 

Citizens National j 

Trust and Savings Bank { 

of Riverside, Calif. J 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporaflon = 

DEPOSITS IN THIS BANK INSURED UNDER | 

U. S. GOVERNMENT INSURANCE PLAN f 



^ , . . ^ 

I BOWL 

— for— 
Recreation and Relaxation 




• 8 Streamlined Lanes 

• Soda Fountain 

VALLEY 
BOWLING CENTER 



24 N. Carmelita 



Hemet, Calif. 



EVERY V/EEK IT'S IN . . . 

TIMIE 
IHiiMET INIEWS 

Complete 
Local Nev/s Coverage 

• 
"AiRVIEWS" by Harry Hofmann 



PHONE 281 1 
FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 



..* 



-.—.4. 



MARTIN'S HEMET THEATRE 

Phone Hemet 3941 

TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 

7 — 9:30 P.M. Except 

Sat.-Suiiday — 3 P.M. 

Continuous to 12:00 

Men in Uniform and Students 28c 



! San Jacin+o Theatre 

I 

I Phone 50 

I OPEN 3 DAYS A WEEK 

I FRIDAY— SATURDAY— SUNDAY 

I 2 Shows Nightly — No Matinee 

I 

i, — ._. — ,_„_.,_.._.._.._.._.._.._.._..—..—..— 



PAGE THIRTY 



An nil uM 



WHEN YOU'VE "OPEN POST"— TRY 




NGS 



DANCING ON SAT. NIGHT 

Service Men 55c 7-Piece Orchestra 

— COCKTAILS — 
CAFETERIA DINING ROOM 

Good Food at Popular Prices 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH COUNTER 

GOLF — All Grass Public Course . . . 
RYAN FIELD— 50c At All Times 

TENNIS— Lighted for Night Play 

Hotel Rates — European Plan 
$1.65 to $3.30 Per Day 

Gilman Hot Springs, Calif. 

Phone San Jacinto 8811 



Complete line of 

BAKERY GOODS 

Specializing In 
PARTY AND WEDDING CAKES 



VALLEY BAKERY 

21 I E. Florida Avenue 
Hemet, Calif. Phone 3283 



An ^— n n ^— on — n D ^— n II ^— n n 




Cadet 
Portraits 

MADE 

EXCLUSIVELY 

ON THE POST BY 



AUSTIN 

STUDIOS 

Special rates given Ryan Cadets 

ALL NEGATIVES ARE KEPT ON FILE INDEFINITELY. 
RE-ORDRS WILL BE GIVEN IMMEDIATE ATTENTION 

— Studios Located at — ■ 

503 "E" Street 3935 Main St. 

San Bernardino Riverside 



Compliments of 

international Provision Co. 

1570 Industrial Street 

Los Angeles, California 

Trinity 96 1 I 



Purveyors of Fine Meats 
and Provisions 



+"- 



PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



Modern Service for 

MILITARY & CIVILIAN NEEDS 



Did You Know? 

THAT THE FAMOUS LOVE STORY OF RAMONA AND ALES- 
SANDRO, WRITTEN BY HELEN HUNT JACKSON TOOK PLACE 
IN THIS VALLEY OVER WHICH YOU ARE RECEIVING A 
COURSE IN AVIATION THAT YOU MAY BECOME A COM- 
MISSIONED OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES AIR CORPS? 



COMPLETE ONE-STOP 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

In Our Call Office on the Post 

For Better Service 

Valley Laundry 

and DRY CLEANING Co. 

MAURE HURT. Mgr. 

300 East Devonshire PHONE 2501 | 



PAGE THIRTY-TV/O 



1... 



Cadet and Personnel 
Headquarters for 

Uniforms—Civilian Clothes 
and Equipment 

The Popular Nationally Advertised Brands 

• ARROW SHIRTS 

• COOPER'S UNDERWEAR 

• EDGERTON SHOES 

QUALITY LUGGAGE 

In all the latest styles for your 
trip to Randolph or Moffett 

"STORE FOR MEN" 
Florida at Carmeli+a Hemet, Calif. 




CN TC EAXIC 



cmuicl 




FEBRUARY 1943 









O o o o o o 



o o o o o o 



{M^dydi^lA^ff^f 



%imE^$Emim^^mm^m:im:^^ 



While the toast is going round 
To men of F Four Three 
Raise your glasses while I sound 
A praise on bended knee .... 

To Front Seat Riders, hopeful guys 
Who trust the God of skills. 
They "sweat" a dodo as he flies, 
And hope it's time he kills. 

We fagged them out; we made them shake 
We saw their eyeballs pop. 
Downwind we flew; we rode the brakes 
And twirled 'er to a stop. 

When we were bored we left them there 
Their hair we turned to white. 
They watched us floating down the air, 
And couldn't rest at night. 

Four days of bliss; four nights of sleep 
Before Class F Four Three, 
And then again their flesh will creep. 
I groan on bended knee! 



so wi+h apreclation and esteem do we dedicate this 
issue of CONTACT to our flight instructors. 



}i'}^i^!j^:^^i^}?^^^^ 




.^WirS^ii***^ 




•7^4m^eA 



MAJOR WILLIAM I. FERNALD 

POST COMMANDER 

Quiet, sincere, seasoned by five years of pur- 
suit flying. Latest achievement — the golden leaf. 
Congratulations, Major! 




CAPT. VERN A. MURDOCK 




CAPT. B. F. HAZELTON 



Who'd guess it after a gander at the beam- 
ing faces above? Just to mention one of 
these names on the flight line is enough to 
make a Cadet's skin crawl. Explanation: 
among many other duties, these flying of- 
ficers ride the forward cockpit on the last 
of all flights. The Army Check Ride. Ladies 
and gentlemen, may we present the Lords 
of Final Judgment. 



F 
L 
Y 



N 
G 



O 
F 
F 
I 

C 
E 
R 
S 



Hi^ 




CAPT. WILLIAM P. SLOAN 




LT. CHARLES F. MOHLER 




LT. RICHARD YOUNG 




CAPT. G. J. SATHER 
Adjutant 




LIEUT. KARL KOENIG 
Assistant Adjutant 



H 
E 
A 
D 

Q 
'U 

A 

R 

T 

E 

R 

S 

S 
T 
A 
F 
F 




LIEUT. B. A. PEETERS 
Commandant of Cadets 




LIEUT. WALKER P. MULLEN 
Assistant Commandant of Cadets 







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^^^^ 


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■>^» . -*^ 


^HHHb.4^V 



LIEUT. ROY D. COOPER 
Athletic Director 




m-^ 



LIEUT. L J. MUELLER 





They tell us we're the cream of the crop, the 
healthiest of the healthy. Ask the gentle- 
men above someday. Sprains, colds (who 
said hangovers?) and old-fashioned fatigue 
all find their way finally and definitely into 
the Post Infirmary. 



LIEUT. L. J. BREATHOUR 




Ground School 



To these gentlemen goes the less glamorous, though 
utterly essential task of constructing the academic backdrip 
to the dizzy didoes of the budding flier. Their formula for 
making the wheels go round in the noggin of a rowdy, pas- 
sively interested cadet? It's a military secret. 



A. WEIDINSER 




p. PIERCE 



J. KEESEE 



H. RAINE 



L BRISTOL 



H. LANDRY 




^:imsmimdmd^mm:imim:i^^ 



Ljei lliee oeltind Ttie, PalsoH 

"I understand some of you boys are thinking about getting married." 
The scene — retreat. The speaker — Major Fernald. Concern is written 
on his face and he speaks with the deliberation due such grave and 
personal matters. 

"Now, ril agree with you that marriage is a fine thing and I don't 
just want to discourage anybody." The Major studies his shoes; works 
toward the delicate heart of his subject with studied, choice of words. 
"You know, brides have a way of wanting you at home . . ." The other offi- 
cers present have stopped breathing. ". . . especially at night." Audience 
reserve lets go In unbridled guffawing. The Major, slightly embarrassed 
and confused by the wayward trend of his counsel, blushes — chuckles 
behind his hand. Grasping the earlier serious note, he continues. "As 
you know, the real purpose of your being here Is to learn to fly and 
that's why we can't have open post every night. And, of course, being 
here all the time, you can't do your wives any good." Any resemblance 
to the haloed retreat ritual Is now gone and the Major appears on the 
verge of fleeing before a hurricane of his own making. Instead, blushing, 
he carries doggedly on. "Besides that, you can't do a good job of flying 

with your minds on work at home." In a last, desperate attempt 

to retrieve the situation, he pulls himself together, waits 

for quiet. Then, "You boys have your hands full as it is and 

you'd find it pretty tough holding up both ends at once." Chaos 

Is complete and deafening. 

Only those very, very near to the Major could possibly have heard 
his helpless resignation. "Well, you know what I mean. That's all." 



^^>i^^^^Mr:S^^if^ii^^^:^)^^ 




Ljieen Hadules "- Cl l^ament 



Gl's are we and nothing more 
Class "F" of Forty-three 

(Gl in the lingo of the Army Lore 
means straight from the line 

— uncouth 
— a bore) 

And old Gl's are we. 

We know of the dreary dark OD 

of Gl posts and stations 
We know of spit-and-polish fiends 

— of gripes 
—of drill 



And what is more 

We know of 'regulations'. 

Pink bed blankets, Venetian blinds, 
free men who laugh 
and gals who smile so sweetly 

plying wrench or pen. 

The chance to see a bright red tie . . . 

Alas, alas all these and more are left behind. 

Yea, back to the Army we must go 

come future fat or leaner 
And there's a long tough row to hoe 

ere we see pastures greener. 

— BCW. 





Si^Si' 



■''XJ 



SAMMY A. WEST 
Cadet Squadron Captain 




LT. ROBERT L. SCHMIDT 
Tact. Officer Flight 'A' 





ARTHUR R. LEHWALDER 
Cadet Squadron Adjutant 



LT. CHAS. CHURCH 
Tact. Officer Flight 'B' 




FREDRICK C. STEPHEN 
Cadet Lieut. Flight 'A' 



JOHN A. MOLLER 
Cadet Battalion Major 



LEWIS I. VANCE 
Cadet Battalion Supply Officer 





LEWIS MOYER, JR. 
Cadet Lieut. Flight 'B 





OLSON, WENDELL D. 



OPPER, LE ROY C. 



PAHERSON, JOSEPH F. PHILLIPS, WILLIAM T. 




PICOZZI, SALVATORE 



POTTS, WILLIAM A. 



POUNDSTONE, LEO E. 



RHEA, MANFORD T. 



RIVENBARK, HARRY R. ROESSLER, DAVID M. 



ROSS, DONALD D. 



SARGENT, JACK S. 



I] 




SCHMIDT, CHESTER G. SCHWEDA, GEORGE J. 



SHERR, DONALD H. 



SIGGS, WILFRED C. 







SNOW, GEOFFREY H. 



SODERBECK, EARL G. STEPHAN, FREDRICK C. 



TURNER, ROBERT G. 




VICKERS, DONALD B. 



WADE, WILLIAM G. 



WALLER, D. B. 



WALTERMIRE, WILLIAM E. 



WEISMAN, GERALD P. 



WELLS, STANLEY C. 



WESSON, RICHARD S. WETZEL, CHARLES E., JR. 



I] 




WIEHRDT, RALPH W. WILLIAMSON, DONOVAN R. WILSON, FRANCIS M. 



WOOD, WILLIAM G. 








WRINKLE, J. M., JR. YARBROUGH, LEWIS M. 



POTTLE, ROBERT 




DEATON, LLOYD G. 



HOLLAND, DERALD C. HOLMBERG, LE ROY J. 



HORNEY, DALE T. 



JACKSON, JOHN E. 



JONES, ALBERT C. 



b 



KIRBY, JOHN W. 



KLINZMAN, BILL R. 




LE CLAIR, EDWARD R. LOVELESS, HAROLD P. McGOWAN, GARRETT P. MclNTYRE, DAREN A. 






i-r" 



my 




MAJOR, RUSSELL F. MARTIN. WILLIAM H., JR. MATHEWS, EUGENE S. 



-fm 



i 



MEYER, DONALD E. 




MORRILL, STUART L. MURRAY, JOSEPH G. 



PONKE, LEO F. 



RUDIN, COURTNEY T. 



RUNDE, KENNETH P. SCHILLEREFF. RAYMOND E. SHANKS, HOYT A. 



THOMPSON, WALTER R. 



D 




THONI, HAROLD 





^RHki'^ 



TONTI, SULLIVAN N. TORGENRUD, DONALD W. 





TOP ROW— 


left to 


right: 


Leo A. 


Stater, 


Ro 


bert L. 


Quinn 


Joh 


T M. 


Mamuz 


ch. 


Vaughn G. Kearns. 


Middl 


e Row: 


Joseph 


S. 


Gaddis 


Melv 


n t. 


Lamb 


ert. 


Morris 


G. McGuIre 


Stan 


ev L. 


Newton 


James 


C 


. Rineh 


9rt. Bottom 


Row: 


D 


5an 


M. 


Lake. Roy C. 


Schumann, h 


arold L 


Bowen, Carl W. Dunker, 


Char 


es D. 


Fa 


rba 


nks. 



TOP ROW — left to right: Robert C. Mannaugh. Edward C. Musselman, John D. 
Poole, James E. Rossi. Samuel D. Rehwald. Middle Row: Albert T. Elickinger, 
Waldemar E. Hagberg, Ernest M. Head, Peter B. Hoffman, William G. Lovell. 
Bottom Row: William B. Scheifele. William C. Bouck, John C. Grady, Stephen 
J. Botosb, Beverly F. Douglas. 



THEIF 

FROM F 
TO AC 




10TTO: 

isiBIUTY 
ALITY/* 



TOP ROW— leff to right: Donald W. Brookmeyer, Eugene V. Scheely, Edson L. 
Neil, Robert M. Lundgren, Harold J. Zamora. Middle Row: Warren D. McLean, 
Kenneth D. Moore, Kenneth W. Saupp, John S. Wallace, Harold L. Berkstrom. 
Bottom Row: Lester C. Mergenthal, Paul D. Bala, Ralph P. Akins, John J. Bryan. 



TOP ROW— left to right: Lyie Moore, Frank Albright, James C. Hawn, Edmund 
T. Dimock. Middle Row: Douglas H. Stratton, Edward N. Sturdivant, Archie D. 
Wraske, Harold Hawn, James F. Hawley. Bottom Row: Leonard J. Cooper, 
Thomas T. Fredricks, Albert P. Daniels, Jack Matthews, Joseph E. Hart. 





LT. W. H. PEARSON 
Tact. Officer Flight 'C 



tOBERT A. WEGRZYNEK 
Battalion Adjutant 




Jm- 




LT. R W. EVANS, JR. 
Tact. Officer Flight 'D' 



JOHN E. WALSH 
Squadron Cadet Captain 



ROBERT C. JOHNSON 
Squadron Cadet Adjutant 



ROBERT W. TAYLOR 
Cadet Lieut. Flight 'C 




CAROL C. KEY 
Cadet Lieut. Flight 'D' 





u 



BACHSTEIN, ROBERT L. 




ESTEP, EVERETT C. 



JOHNSON, HAL M. JOHNSON, OSBORN W. 




JOHNSON, ROBERT L. JULIAN, MAXWELL M. KEATHLEY, HAROLD L. 



KOENER, RALPH F. 



KULLIN, ARTHUR 



LAURIE, JACK S. 



LAWSON, DELBERT R. LEDBETTER, ALLEN K. 










MAHER, JOHN E. 



McKENDRY, EDWIN E. MARS, LAWRENCE V. MARTIN, CHARLES E. 



MATTHIAS, ADOLPH J., JR. MOORE, SALE J. 



MORRIS, CHARLES 



MUSSELMAN, MERL F. 




OSTGULEN, NORINE O . OWEN, CHARLES E. PARROTT, DWIGHT M. 



SMITH, ROBERT A. 



SNELL, GEORGE W. STAFFORD, HOWARD E. STOCKDALE, GLENN W. TILTON, THORNTON C. 







1 




VARDON, WALTER C. WEYENBERG, WILLIAM D. 



WEST, BURTON F. 




WILLIAMS, BRUCE C. 





WILSTED, LE ROY M. 



WILSON, GUY N. 



WOOD, GEORGE A. WOODRUFF, EDWARD C. 




ASHPOLE, DONALD J. CRITCHETT, JAMES R. 



GILLETT, CLAUDE E. 



GRACIE, GORDON R. 



GROW, JOSEPH A. 



GROW, ARTHUR R. 



HAGGARD, WAYNE L. HALLIGAN, JAMES P. 









HOWELL, HARRY R. 



HULL, DAVID E. 



McSUlNN, DANIEL H. PETSINGER, HARRY M., JR. 




PICCOLO, BIAGIO J. POLLOCK, JOHN C. 



PRICE, LEWIS 



RAHM, EMMETT J. 



RAY, C. B. 



REDDIG, CHARLES R. ROBERTS, MILO H., JR. 



ROOKS, FRANK O. 



U 



I 




RUNNELLS, JOHN R. 





RUSTAND, HANFORD J. RUTHERFORD, ADAM H., JR. SKINNER, NORMAN P. 








SMITH, DAVID J. 



SPURRELL, WILLIAM A. 



SQUIER, JAMES B. 



STUPAK, WALTER L 




WALLACE, CHARLES D. THOMPSON, ROBERT H. THOMAS, GEORGE J. 



THOELE, WILLIAM J. 



WATERS, JAMES H. 



WELLS, GOODWIN S. WEATHERS, PRENTICE C. 



WARD, NORMAN J. 








ARMI, FRANK S. WILCOXON, RODERICK G. 



WILLS, FRED W. 



WITHROW, HAROLD D. 





A A 



;i^: 













DEAR JOE: 

In your last letter you asked me what I meant by 
"Physical Training." Well, Pal, it's like this. Every P.M. 
about 4:30 we hear a series of sour notes on the bugle 
and everyone scrambles into gym suits and sneakers and 
double-times it down to the gym (gym here is just an- 
other word for hHangar number one). Double-time, in 
case you don't know, is a good stiff pace just short of 
a dead run. 

Down at the hangar either Lt. Cooper who is our 
physical director or Sgt. Du Barry, his assistant, takes over 
and gives us a bunch of exercises which the army calls 
calisthentics. Brother, let me tell you, a work-out at these makes our old tennis matches 
seem like a strenuous game of tidly-winks. Say, Joe, do you remember those professional 
wrestlers we used to go to see at the Armory and what a show they used to put on 
with all their moaning and groaning? Well, you ought to hear us as we go through the 
twenty-five minutes of LIGHT exercises. Lt. Cooper told us the first day that he 
wasn't trying to make musclemen out of us — just trying to keep us healthy. No kidding, 
boy, after that very diplomatic statement I don't see how someone like you expects to 
live more than six months. 

Seriously though, things aren't quite as rugged as I might picture them. I hear 
you are planning on signing up for Cadet Training so don't let me scare you out. After 
these dainty calisthentics and a few wind sprints or a cross-country run they very graciously 
let us take off for some kind of sports. By this time I'm usually ready for the hospital so 
settle for a rousing, game of horseshoes. Most of the guys play basketball, baseball, volley 
ball or football. Pretty good selection they have here, eh? Everybody really gets wound 
up In these games and competition is about as keen as It used to be when we played 
on the old High School basketball team. 

Well, Joe, when you get your Cadet appointment don't worry too much about the 
athletics, although you'll no doubt shed that beer belly you've developed in the last 
couple of years. I don't think It looks distinguished on you anyway even though you 
always said it did. Tell all the gang hello for me and try to take a few minutes out of 
busy social calendar for a letter a little oftener. 

Your Pal, 

BILL 



your 



t 



•♦ O 




J7 ,V?^:!^:;<^' tt^ 1^-^^^«-^^«^.^.^.«>.^- 






i,::®v!:V-' 



-Y 




Meet Mr. Evans, ladies and gentlemen, an ex-cow puncher 
from Arizona now riding herd on Cadets, hie knows flying 
from here to there. Of Tuesday nights, he tries to convince 
the boys on the use of old-fashioned horse sense in modern 
flying. Try, that is, without the aid of a sledgehammer. 



WILLIAM EVANS 

Stage Commander 



Tag a fistful of frsky flies sometime then sit down and keep a written 
record of their capers as they buzz around your ears. On top of that, 
persuade them that an hour means ONE hHOUR — no more, no less. That, 
in microscopic form, is the lot of the gentleman and his lady friends 
below— the flight DISPATCHERS. 



JIMMIE PHELPS 
"A" FLIGHT 



GERTRUDE PARKER 
"B" FLIGHT 




HELEN HASLAM 
"D" FLIGHT 



HEAR YE, HEAR YE . . . 

Straight from the "most reliable and au- 
thoritative sources" comes the season's all 
out slap-on-the-back. To wit: Class Forty- 
Three "F" has hung up an all time record 
here at Ryan for low washout rate and ex- 
emplary conduct. 

We haven't found the courage to check 
further in the interim betwixt issuance of 
the above and press time. 

—ED. 



To Albert Herbert — 

A zealous young Kaydet at Ryan 

Became quite bored with his flyin' 

From a slow roll he fell 

Bound directly for Hell 

But his parachute saved him from fryin. 

To Moose Varnum — 

An old golden eagle named Pete 

Was hunting for something to eat. 

Embarrassed he was, 

And simply because 

Our planes are all bone and no meat. 

TO THE MAJOR 

Safe? Why none as safe as us. 
Plan? Our mentors never cuss. 
Coordination? Like Fred Astair. 
Sustentation? You've got me there. 

FOR PARENTS 
A Glossary of Cadet Parlance 

Gadget — Our appelation 
Air Speed — Just sustentation 
Flaps — Things you forget 
Mat — Something quite wet 
Ten-hour Check — Revelation 
Pitot Tube — A pressure fissure 
PX Queen — Conversation disher 
Convoy duty — A crank and a look 
Sixty-hour Check — the end of the book 
Cross Tee — Please, not that 
Ground Loop — Pass the hat 
Gosport — Breeder of thunder 
Downwind — What a blunder. 



A POEM ! ! 

At five-fifteen we hit the floor 

And make a dash for the bathroom door. 

We really hit it on the run; 

If we don't get shaved, It's a "gig" for some. 

At five-twenty-five we're out in front 
To let them know we're out of our bunks. 
We wave our arms and bend a bit, 
And hurry back where the fire Is lit. 

At five-fifty-five we're off to mess, 
And stand at attention till given "Rest". 
Then we stand ten minutes or so 
Waiting for upperclassmen to show. 

At seven-five to class we go, 
To find out just how much we know. 
At eleven o'clock when class Is done, 
We're preparing to take the next rum-dum. 

Then after mess. It's the flying line, 
Where we try to get In a little time. 
Some days are good and some are bad, 
But the air's the thing for us lads. 

When all the flying for the day Is done. 
We're off for the next found on the run. 
Sometimes it's drill, sometimes it's play 
But one of these must be done every day. 

When work is over it's time to eat; 
That's one formation we like to meet. 
Then after supper mess is through, 
We've a couple of hours with nothing to do. 

We may write a few letters and talk awhile, 
And then It's to bed Avith a great big smile. 
Though there's hard work here, we're happy 

you see, 
For some day soon, "Men with Wings'' 

we'll be! 1 



Here lies the remains of Dodo Jones, 
Beneath this sod reposes his hones. 
The pattern ivas seven, he landed three; 
He didn't know lie came dozvn tee. 

Now Dodos, he sure to learn your stuff, 
So your landings you zvon't muff. 
For if a pilot you would he, 
Don't land a seven — if it's a three. 



DON'T LOOK NOW . . . 



If you have found this rag a dead herring, dispense, we beg of, 
with post mortems. Just close the thing and say a prayer for it, for us 
and all concerned. 

Still with us? Thanx. Carry on — the culprits will be found below: 

EDITOR BRUCE C. WILLIAMS 

ASSISTANT EDITOR . . . WM. D. WAYENBERG 
GOOD MAN FRIDAY (All Week) WALTER C. VARDON 

THANKS— 

To Miss Gare Williams of the Administration Office for the art 
layouts. 

To Earl Moore for manny hours of toiling, minus sunlight, on pho- 
tography. 

To Lt. Roy D. Cooper for the steadying hand. 

To Miss A. h4ougard and Sgt. Monty Du Barry for a helping hand 
on many and various occasions. 

To J. E. Walsh for doggerel as noted heretofore. 



Reading from Stogie to right— WCV, WDW, BOW. 




Oh tke Voiieb f.im, iTlktei . . . 



(MM 



"i^.'G 




MARCH + + 1943 




=ai" •i&=--^ai'^ig.r-?4i^ 



CERTIFICATE 



m 



ifii ii to W 

'Certitp.THAT; ". ". " ~; 

/ C i.-L _..j. 1. - 1 

on this day of IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD, NINE- ^ 

TEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY MASTERED (?) THE REQUIRED MAN- ^ 

EUVERS TO OBTAIN GRADUATION FROM PRIMARY TRAINING AND TO % 

PROCEED AT HIS OWN RISK TO BASIC. BE IT KNOWN TO ALL CONCERN- ['j 

ED THAT I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMN FOOL MISTAKES % 

THAT SAID H-P WILL BE BOUND, BY ALL LAWS OF NATURE, TO MAKE. ^ 

W. 

INSTRUCTOR, RYAN FIELD ^ 



gj;^^^^i^^c^^^j»^|^^i^>c^gi^|^c^^t5| 



To Mom: 



"For the long nights you lay awake 
And watched for my unworthy sake: 
For your most comfortable hand 
That led me through the uneven land: 
For all the story-books you read: 
For all the pains you comforted: 
For all you pitied, all you bore, 
In sad and happy days of yore: . . . ." 



ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON. 



;d^;^>r^l^^^^i^r^i^^^<^ld^^rsJd?^ 




ARMY AIR FORCES 

FLYING TRAINING DETACHMENT 





Attention Men I ! I 



The editor allotted me this space in which to introduce 
myself and that I will. 

Joe Cadet is the name and I hail from Anyplace, U.S.A. 
Editors seem to have a peculiar habit of having to pan some- 
body in order to increase circulation and in this publication 
I'm the goat. I don't know what these guys who call them- 
selves publishers would do if they couldn't pick on some 
innocent by-stander and make him the laughing stock of 
the town. 

Anyway, I hope you enjoy the copy. 




MAJOR WILLIAM I. FERNALD 




Congratulations, Class 43-G! Your records 
show that you have learned the four fundannen- 
tals of flight: Safety, Planning, Coordination and 
Sustentation. If you continue your practice of 
these basic principals, each of you will be in 
line graduation day at Advance School. 

Good luck, gentlennen, in your future career 
as pilots. 

WILLIAM I. FERNALD, 
Major, Air Corps, 
Commanding. 




LT. WALKER P. MULLEN 
Commandant of Cadets 



TC CLAff 43-G 

Many adjustments were necessary dur- 
ing your tour at the 5th AAFFTD. It has 
been a great satisfaction to the Command- 
ant to have seen instilled by Class 43-G 
the hHonor Code of the Air Corps, the 
keener sense of Military Courtesy, and the 
esprit d'corps which will be passed on to 
the classes which come after you. It was a 
job well done. We salute you as you pass 
on to the drone of the B-T motors. 

WALKER P. MULLEN 
I st Lt., Air Corps 
Commandant of Cadets. 




LT. KARL KOENie 
Adjutant 



HEADCL ARTEC/ 




LT. ROY D. COOPER 

Athletic Director 




/TArr 



LT. B. A. PEETERS 
Intelligence Officer 



LT. CARL C. REEDY 
Asst. Adjutant 





MEDICAL 

erncER/ 



LT. B. B. HUTCHINSON 




LT. L. J. MUELLER 





LT. L. J. BREATHOUR 



FLYING OFFICERS 









^' 





CAPT. VERN A. MURDOCK 



CAPT. WM. P. SLOAN 




CAPT. B. F. HAZELTON 








LT. CHAS. F. MOHLER 



CAPT. RICHARD YOUNG 




PAUL PIERCE 





mm 


^^H|R|r/ ' 


^^^H 




/'M 


^m. \ 1 


N ^^^^^H 


JPHb^ .a ' i^' 





JAMES KEESEE 



Ground 

School 

nstructors 






L. BRISTOL 




HARRY RAINE 



HALE LANDRY 



STUDENT OFFICERS 





LT. ALONZO E. MOCK 





LT. GEORGE T. TIMBERS 



LT. ANDREW J. GORSKl 




LT. WILLIAM HANCOCK 



LT. WILLIAM A. SMITH 




Physical Training 



Men of history say that, "An army march- 
es on its stomach," but what good will 
your stomach do if your physical condition 
cannot stand the strain of marching, flying, 
fighting and maybe even going without 
food and rest for several days at a time? 
To athletic director Lt. Roy D. Cooper and 
his able assistant, S^Sgt. Monte DuBarry, 
the task of whipping the Cadets of Ryan 
into perfect physical specimens has been 
assigned. The Cadets are required to per- 
form many feats of coordination and speed 
combined and all must be demonstrated, a 
fact that makes an athletic director's iob 



most undesirable, unless the student pays 
strict attention and does the best he can 
when performing the exercise. 

In addition to the calisthenics, there are 
cross-country runs and various games in 
which the Cadet must participate. Base- 
ball, football, volleyball, horseshoes, bad- 
minton, and basketball are all available to 
the trainees. One of the above games is 
always the main attraction during its sea- 
son. Several members of 43-S were form- 
ed into a basketball squad that played 
games with local aggregations and made 
a fine showing by winning many of the con- 
tests against the more experienced teams. 









-*^^^ 











r 



•mammmmm imiftffigmi^m 







'E' FLIGHT 
INSTRUCTORS 










J. C. KUMLER 
Flight Commander 



BOTTOM ROW, left to right— James Fette, Morris Roberts, Dan Garner. Alex Hyde. CENTER 
ROW — Wayland Fink, Thomas Lovell, George Bosley, Frank Hutchins. TOP ROW — Lloyd Yost, 
Maurice Solt. Ervin Ovick, Robert LIndquist, George Peabody. 





ADAMS, WOODROW W. 
Mer Rouge, Louisiana 



ANDERSON, ROY L 
Litchfield, Minnesota 



ARMSTEAD, JOSEPH R. 
San Antonio, Texas 



ASTROFF, EVERETT S. 
Lawrence. Massachusetts 



ASWAD, SALEEM 
Binghampton, New York 



BACHMAN, ROYAL V. 
Santa Ana, Callfornie 



BARRETT, HARRY H. 
New York City, N. Y. 



BECKER, JOHN A. 
Bangor, Wisconsin 



BEEM. HARLEY A. 
Toledo, Iowa 



BODNAR, GEORGE 
Detroit, Michigan 



BRONSON, ROBERT P. 
Mercer Island, Washington 



BUNDE, HERBERT J. 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



BURGESS, JAMES O. 
Muntord, Tennessee 



BUSBOOM, LLOYD C. 
Pocatello, Idaho 



BUTTERFIELD, WM. H. 



BYRNE, ROBERT P., JR. 
Redwood City, California 



CADWALLADER, ROBERT F. 
Rocky Ford, Colorado 



CARDIFF, ALFRED V. 
Framlngham, Massachusetts 



GERBER, GERALD 
Kingston, New York 



HOGABOAM. GEORGE J. 
Culdesac, Idaho 



IRVINE, DELBERT B. 
Connpton, California 



LEVEEN, PAUL D. 
San Antonio, Texas 



MILCH, JOSEPH B. 
Great Falls, Montana 



OLSEN, RALPH A. 
Pasadena, California 



PENSON, HAROLD H. 
Boise, Idaho 



PETERSON, ROLAND E. 
Ironton, Minnesota 



PIBURN, GENE D. 
Huntington Park, Calif. 



REICHMAN, DAVID M. 
Kinder, Louisiana 



ROBBENNOLT, WILFRED C. 
Agar, South Dakota 



SAMUELSON, K. A. 





SCHNEIDER, RUSSELL G. 

Sterling, Illinois 



SCHOBEL, SUMNER 
Cleveland Hgts., Ohio 



SMITH, GEORGE H. 
San Diego, California 



SMITH, JAMES PATRICK 
Oakland, California 



SPARE, JOSEPH G. 
Covington, Kentucky 



SPEANBERG, RENNE B. 
Schnectady, New York 



STEINBACHER, EDGAR L. 
Glendale, California 



SHEPPARD, LEONARD R. 
Detroit, Michigan 



STOCKBOWER, ROBT. D. 
Ridgewood, New Jersey 



TANDY, HERBERT N. 
Gardner, Massachusetts 



UNDERDAL, SELMER O. 
Galata, Montana 



VEITZ, JACK H. 
Chicago, Illinois 



WATSON, JOHN D, 
Hillsboro, Iowa 



WHITAKER, RAY H. 
San Francisco, California 



WILGUS. HERBERT D. 



'P FLIGHT 
INSTRUCTORS 




ALFRED C. CHASE 
Flight Commander 



BOTTOM ROW, left to right— Isaac Hayes, Millard Davis. Wilfred Stearns, William Graton. 
CENTER ROW— Harold Clark, David Beltz, Ray Porter, William Diehl. TOP ROW— William Wil- 
liamson, Donald Anitrum, Edmund Nicolas, Ivan Kinne. 





ALLEN, BERT P. 
Ontario, California 



CASTLE, RICHARD J. 
Chicago, Illinois 



CLAYTON, WILLIAM F. 
h/ladisonville, Kentucky 



COHEN, LEON 
New York, New York 



COOPER, ROBT. FREDRICK 
Charlotte, Michigan 



COULTAS, CLIFFORD W. 

Bluffs, Illinois 



CRAFT, FRED W. 
Detroit, Michigan 



CROSMAN, WILLIAM S. 
Evanston, Illinois 



DOUGLAS, HENRY C, Jr. 
Ehren, Florida 



ELLIOTT, WILLIAM P. 
Santa Barbara, California 



EVERMAN, CHARLES A. 
Rivers, Arizona 



FLAHERTY, FRANCIS R. 
Muncie, Indiana 



GARVEY, JAMES W. 
Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin 



GEST, FREDERICK R. 
Yakima, Washington 



GLENN, WILLIAM M. 



GRAY, DONALD R. 
Rosemead, California 



HAMES, ROBERT L. 
South Pasadena, California 



INGLIS, ROBERT W. 
Stayton, Oregon 



KELLEY, CURTIS C. 
Austin, Texas 



KELLY, JOHN W. 
Bothell. Washington 



KIRK, WALLACE E. 
Amarillo, Texas 



LINDEMULDER, HAROLD R. 
Denver, Colorado 



LUNDE. JOSEPH M. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



LYNCH, ALVIN B. 
Akron, Ohio 



MILLER, ROBERT M. 
Montgomery, Pennsylvania 



NICELEY, LEWIS D. 
Mt. Vernon, Kentucky 



O'DONNELL, CLAUDE G. 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 



PAVEL, LESTER J. 
Solon, Iowa 



PAYNE, BILLY M. 
Johnson City, Tennessee 



PINTO, PROSPER F. 





PRATT. RAYMOND L. 
Denver, Colorado 



PRUITT, SAM S. 
Danville, Virginia 



RICKON, WILLIAM E. 
San Francisco, California 



ROBERTS, WENDELL E., JR. 
Bluefield, West Virginia 



SHINER, BURTON S. 
Butler, New Jersey 



SIMMONS, ALLEN B. 

Natchez, Mississippi 



TAKEN, HUBERT E. 
Chicago, Illinois 



TAYLOR, WESLEY H. 
Oro Grande, California 



THATCHER, ROBERT H. 
Russiaville, Indiana 



TUCKER, RISGS 
Nashville, Tennessee 



VARNUM, GEORGE J. 
Yates Center, Kansas 



VLAHOVICH, VICTOR P. 
Kimberly, Nevada 



WALLACE, ARMAND N. 
Baldwin Park, California 



WALLACE, GUY A. 
Boise, Idaho 



WHITE, FRANK B. 

I riii . n - I * I 



WILLS, WILLIAM H. 
Seattle, Washington 



WILSON, OSCAR R. 
Mesllld Park, New Mexico 



WIROSCO, JAMES A. 
Cleveland Hgts., Ohio 



WITHINGTON, DAVID L 
Honolulu, T. H. 



WOODRUFF, EDWARD C. 
Orange, New Jersey 



WUTHRICH, ERWIN C. 
Portland, Oregon 



WYNN, ANDREW J. 
Tulare, California 



XANTHOS, ALEXANDER 
Brooklyn, New York 



YEOMANS, HARRY F. 
Somerville, Massachusetts 



ZALUSKY, THOMAS P., JR. 
Maryd, Pennsylvania 



ZIEBARTH, DENNIS J. 
Scranton, North Dakota 





CADET ( 




LENHARDT, J. C. 
G. P. Adjutant 




KELLEY, C. C. 
Supply Officer 




WALTER WHISENAND 
Flight Commander 



'G FLIGHT 
INSTRUCTORS 



BOTTOM ROW, left to right— James Coughran. Roald Hanson, Adelbert Hannah, Elmer Haines, 
S. J. Copenhaver. MIDDLE ROW — John Kayser, Robert Fisher, Fred James. Harold Barkstrom, 
Lin Cooper. TOP ROW — Dorman Smith, James Wright, Edwin Shockley, Robert Knowles, John 
Barrett, Davis Walker. 




AGAIN. THOMAS C. 
Joplin, Missouri 



AlBRECHT, ARNOLD M. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



AMATO, ANTHONY M. 
Jersey City, New Jersey 



AMES, VAUD V. 
Havana, Illinois 



AMIDEI, JAMES W. 
Chicago. Illinois 



ARNOLD, JOSEPH R. 
Berkeley, California 



ATKINSON, CLARENCE E. 
Wilmington, Delaware 



BAKER, KAY A. 
Astoria, Oregon 



BARRONS, WILLIAM J. 
Burlingame, California 



BILLO. WILLIAM F. 
Detroit, Michigan 



BONAGURA, MICHAEL J. 
Woodhaven, New York 



BOSWORTH, WALTER C. 
Galveston, Texas 



BURCH, HUGH R. 
White Bluffs, Washington 



FONTANA, RICHARD G. 
Marin County, California 



FOSTMEIER, LAWRENCE 





FRY, ARNOLD A. 
Montesano, Washington 



GALEY, FRANK H. 
Jackson Hole, Wyonning 



GALLAGHER, WM. J. 
Calumet City, Illinois 



GILDNER, WESLEY F. 
Portland, Oregon 



GLADFELDER, GLENN C. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



GREENFIELD, JOHN 
Miami, Florida 



GRIGGS, AUGUSTUS M. 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 



GROSSMAN, HOWARD A. 
Chicago, Illinois 



HAAS, LELAND M. 
Brooklyn, New York 



HALLACY, JAMES 
Pittsburg, Kansas 



HARTMAN, ORVILLE E. 
Newark, Ohio 



HENDERSON, FLOYD W. 
Loup City, Nebraska 



HOLMES, WARD W. 
Vancouver, Washington 



KELLER, ARTHUR A. 
Portland, Oregon 



KRAHN, RAY E. 

Eau Claire. Wisconsin 



MILLER, JAMES H. 
Surgoinsville. Tennessee 



MILLS, THOMAS A. 
Roanoke, Indiana 



MOHER, RICHARD W. 
Manchester, New Hamp. 



MORRISEY, RICHARD J. 
Sausalifo, California 



MORRISON, ETHAN B. 
Kansas City, Kansas 



MORRISON, JOS. H., JR. 
Richmond, Virginia 



MARTIN, LILLARD L. 
Lebanon, Tennessee 



NEW, LLOYD V. 
Russell, Kansas 



NICHOLAS, W. H., JR. 
Waxahachie, Texas 



O'BRIEN, PAUL J. 
Monongahela, Pennsylvania 



O'SULLIVAN, WALTER C. 
William, California 



PARKER, FRANCIS H. 
Burbank, California 



PETERSON, KERMIT 
Sidney, Montana 



PROVANO. HUSO A. 
Atlanta, Georgia 



RORFRTSON RFFCF R 





RUBODIUX, LYNN W. 
Pocatello, Idaho 



ROYCROFT, HORACE M. 
Pittsburg, Kansas 



SAULS, FLETCHER H. 

St. Louis, Illinois 



SCHAEFER. VERNON D. 
Chicago, Illinois 



SHELTON, THOMAS C. 
Arlington, Virginia 



SMITH, HAROLD G. 
Bushwell, Illinois 



SPEAKES, ROY W. 

Hollywood, California 



STARK, PETER R. 
New York, New York 



TAGG, JAMES M. 
Lyn brook. New York 



THOMPSON, RAYMOND D. 
Jeronne, Idaho 



TOBEY, EDWARD ELVIN 
Freeport, Texas 



WALSETH, HENRY V. 
Glendive, Montana 



WARNER, CLARENCE B, 
Alma, West Virginia 



WARNER, HARRY F. 
Buffalo, New York 



WESTERVELT, GILBERT J. 



WISE, JAMES B., JR. 
Elkhart, Kansas 



WOOFTER, JOHN R. 
Los Angeles, California 



ZIENKA, EDWARD J. 
Passaic, New Jersey 






R. E. BLAUVELT 
Flight Commander 



'H' FLIGHT 
INSTRUCTORS 



BOTTOM ROW, left to right — Gerald Nunnaley, Gordon Helm, Hallock Hoffman, Curtis Town- 
send, Joe Robb. CENTER ROW — Albert Lawrence, William Gordon, William Murphy, Warren 
Stoner, Leo Sherry. TOP ROW — James Simpson, Fred Pierce, Fred Workman, Berl Porter, Reed 
Klnert. 




BUTLER, HARRY J. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



BYRNE, CHARLES E., JR. 
Tilden, Texas 



CASSIDY, DUANE A. 
Bly, Oregon 



CHILD, ELDON R. 
Roy, Utah 



CHESIRE, ORVILLE L. 
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 



CONSTANT, RAYMOND L. 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 



CONTROULIS, BERNARD E. 
Decatur, Illinois 



CRAWFORD, C. E. 
Houston. Texas 



DONOHOO. THOMAS W. 
Louisville, Kentucky 



ENDSLEY, HARRY B. 
Omaha, Nebraska 



FITCHETT, LAWRENCE W. 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 



FLINN, JOHN C. 
Wilmington, Delaware 



FRETZ, DeWITT C. 
Houston, Texas 



GAINES, EDWIN F. 
Quincy, Illinois 



GODDARD, IRA T. 





GORDON. SEYMOUR 

Brooklyn, New York 



GOTTLIEB, HAROLD 
Brooklyn, New York 



GREENE, WILLIAM L. 
Farmland, Indiana 



HASKELL, COLVIN B. 
Marblehead, Massachusetts 



HERBOLD, JONATHAN M. 
Anoka, Minnesota 



HIRST, CRAIGE P. 
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 



HUBBELL, JAMES E. 
Normandy, Missouri 



HUNTER, ROBERT A. 

Port Washington, New York 



JOHNSON, GLADSTONE 
Tuolumne, California 



JORDAN, RUSSELL S. 
Albany, California 



KEELING, GERALD G. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



KELTNER, JAMES T. 
Austin, Texas 



KEMNITZER, JACK R. 
Los Angeles, California 



KERNS, CLIFFORD L. 
Wilmington, California 



KLAUDA, CHARLES C. 
Chicago, Illinois 



KRIFKA, EUGENE J. 
Chicago. Illinois 



l-AGIER, RAYMOND O. 
San Francisco, California 



LAWHON, WALLACE M. 
Burkett, Texas 



LENHARDT, JAMES C. 
Detroit, Michigan 



LEONE, FRANK J. 
Sou1h Gate, California 



LIPSKI. ANDREW F. 
Norwich, Connecticut 



LUCIANI, ARTHUR E. 
Hollywood, California 



McNAMARA, RICHARD A. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



MARSH, WILLIAM I. 
Alamosa, Colorado 



MAST, RALPH W. 
Coloma, Michigan 



MENTON, PATRICK J. 
Yonkers, New York 



MILLS, WALTER H. 
Akron, Ohio 



MINER, ROBERT L. 
St. Peter, Minnesota 



MARAK, VICTOR T. 
Allen Park, Michigan 



MULLEN, THOMAS H. 
St. Paul. Minnesota 





NAESETH, JOHN V. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



NELSON, ROY E. 
Fairfax, Minnesota 



NELSON, VERNON P. 
Ottawa, Illinois 



NICHOLSON, JULIUS K. 
Springfield, Illinois 



PARRISH, WILLIAM R. 
Center, Texas 



PATTERSON, DONALD E. 
St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin 



REHERS, VINCENT G. 
Los Angeles, California 



RUMMEL, HARRY A. 
Mt. Ephriam, New Jersey 



SULLIVAN, JOSEPH G. 
Jersey City, New Jersey 



..^^^'' 





THE OFFICERS AND CADETS 

OF THE 

FIFTH ARMY AIR FORCE 
FLYING TRAINING DETACHMENT 

HEMET, CALIFORNIA 
REQUEST THE PLEASURE OF YOUR AHENDANCE 

AT A 

GRADUATION DANCE, HONORING CLASS 43-G 

TO BE GIVEN 

SATURDAY, THE SIXTH OF MARCH 

IN THE MESS HALL 

NINE O'CLOCK 



Let's see, now, who do I wan+a take to the big hop? That blond in the P-X or the curly 
headed cutie on the gas truck? Maybe that pretty little red head I met down at the U.S.O. 
last Sunday. Let me think. Maybe I outa call up my girl friend in L.A., she might like to 
come down, no, the gas rationing will stop that 'cause she don't like busses. Oh, well. No 
use worrying about that, got a whole week yet. 

Gosh that week went fast and no date yet. Better get on the ball or be left out. That 
blond was all dated up and the same story seemed to be true about those other two local 
heartbreakers. Maybe one of the little de-icers that Lt. Cooper invited will be free after 
the dance. 

Boy what a crowd, there's Maj. Fernald and Capt. Sloan all decked out in their Sun- 
day best. Better get in there and start trying to lure one of those jitter-bugs over to my 
corner. No hard liquor they say — some deal I'd say. Ah! maybe some H-P will spike the 
punch and give it some real punch — I hope. There's an idea, maybe I outa be the one to 
add life to the party. Boy! Whata band. Coop did all right there — some of these eye- 

attracters aren't bad, either. Ah! There's the one for me — watch my speed How was 

I to know she was a Louie's wife? — no need for her to be so huffy about it. Now, I gotta 
start from scratch, again. How about that brunett over there? Some chick, I'd say — I'll 
just get in my ground work right now — boy what a sweet number and I think she likes me, 
too. I'll keep working on that — Can you beat that, she's in love with a sailor — What's that 
— Intermission, m-m-mmm, and me without anybody to take to the punch bowl — Boy look 
at those two girls dance — pretty good entertainers, yes sir — Now the dance again and 
for me to grab one of these cuties right away quick — How about that red-head over 
there — Just my luck another cadet's wife — What's that? The last dance? What the — 
I haven't even got me one of these babies yet. Oh, well! Maybe I'll have better luck at Basic. 



CLAXf 



"A" FLIGHT 



43-H 




BOnOM ROW— Maliszewski, T. F., Stevens, H. J., Bester, J. F., Kimzey, P. C, Shabsis, Z. C, Hostett- 
ler, J. E., Raines, M. F., Pullaro, S., Polikoff, L, Giordano, F., Rice, G. J.. Dassat, W. J., Moody, W. S. 
SECOND ROW— Le Pree, M. J., Phillips, L M.. Street, W. H., Sullivan, G. T., Boltz. G. C, Conpenelis, 
R. P., Barnes, H. D., Siegel, T., Schoaff, C. M.. Berg, A., Schrim, A., Strader, L. C, Moshier, F. A., 
Jeffries, J. H. THIRD ROW— Semrad, J. A., McCallen. J. A.. Pinelli, R. A., Pupacko, A., Pezalski, R. H., 
Satter, B., Brouillard, R. V., Hayes, E. G., Hargrove, W. C, Nash, G. R., Pfeiffer, E. G., Simmons, R. M., 
Devine, K. E. FOURTH ROW— Stevenson, C. R., Dunn, J. R.. Holcombe, D. R., Maxwell, G. N., Robert- 
son, K. M., Roosa, F. W., Kipp, V. W., Quiring. O. A., Musumeci, J. A., Larsen, J. R., Scott, J. F., Smits, C. G. 



•B" FLIGHT 




BOTTOM ROW— French, W. E.. Beardslee, C. M., Empey, J. W., Christian, M. A., Coates, D. M., Hinkel, 
H. G., Kelly, L P., Carlisle, R. F., Beles. F. J., Vafiades, W., Totten, R., Zanetti, O. F., Graham, W. A. 
SECOND ROW— Cannon, F. M., Washco, D. C, Witzig, R. B., Versypt, A. S., Ward, R. C. Wittmeir, 
W. S., Carlson, R. J., Weixler, E. J.. Volk, D. J., Aldrich, D. R., Holley, H. D., Cooper, M. W.. Garson, 
S. V. THIRD ROW— Wingfield, K., Burgman, O. V.. Zatollo, A. J., Glynn, T. J.. Totten, W., Zagula. J. M.. 
Lavery, P. J., Atkinson, H., Hutcheson, C. W., Hutchison, J., Harrah, R. M.. Beach, B. FOURTH 
ROW— Chrisman, J. P., Trimber, M. W., Walker, A. J., Mulllns, H. C, Tjaden. T. I., Cheyne, L. L, 
Kesterson. R. V., Terrell, B. R., Szczepaniak, E. F., Van Scor, L. F., Travis, K. H., Van Dorgen, H. R., Tynan, J. A. 



CLAIf 



"C" FLIGHT 



43-H 







BOTTOM ROW— Wagner, R. J., Mathews, W. G., Jr., Venezia, N. G., Rozdil, A. P., Bell, M. T., Vilberg, 
J. W., Temple+on, C. E., Wolchok, S., Zbythiewski, A. J., Ward, V. E., Warden, W. K., Wadham, H. N., 
Loyd, R. J. SECOND ROW— Rogers, T. W., Jr., O'Farrell, K. K., Rows, R. A., Orth, R. M., Taylor, J. G., 
Van Bortel, W. H., Minham. V. S., Sullivan, F. L, Stone, E. B., Leech, H. W., Wallace, P. K,, Zimmerman, H., 
Staranick, N. M., Ackerman, W. H. THIRD ROW— Saveskie, P. N., Settle, H. A., Rauschkolb, F., Strata, 
J. P., Putman, F. E., Lust, Laurn L., Moler, C. G., McMorrow, N. S., Jr., Anderson, R. P., Spegel, Z. J., 
Smith, R. E., Leslie, T. R., Rossman, M. E., Spralc, J. M., Sapp, D. H. FOURTH ROW— Roberts, S. D., 
Van Dyken, H. B., Suchman, S. M., McLaughlin, T. V., Murphree, C. O., Whittaker, D. P., Wakeland, V. E., 
Perdue, L. L., Stepman, A. C, Payne, A. E., Nagle, C. W. 



"D" FLIGHT 




BOTTOM ROW— Stoskus, V, A., Jr., Dickenson, A. H., ' -i :■■•, M iv , r- ■ '^j,. D., Stierwalt, L. T., 
Sicard, E. A., Stelnberger, E. E., Brown, J. W., Howe, W. W., Loard, H. C, Stensland, J. C, Nuba, J. D., 
Reidy, H. J. SECOND ROW— McQueen, R. H., Mulvey, R. F. (flight sgt.), Mazur, P., Joseph, H. R., 
Keating, T. P., Jr., Quinlan, H. E.. Mirena, J., Magduff, J. T., Brodersen, R. J., Leonard. L. V., Murphy, 
J. J., MacLeiland, R. D., Finkle, H. A., Staszak, S. R.THIRD ROW— Fisher, J. H., Krichling, W. P., Ornish, 
C. A., Sherman, H., Levine, S.. Duffin, N. W., Cutshall, J. B., Klrkham, J. A., Ill, Kane, T. F., Jr.. Mat- 
arazzo, J. S., Schumacher, R., Edelstein, B., Scott, J. W., Linthacum, L, R., Humbles, A. T.. Ross. R. R.. 
Brestich, D. P. (1st sgt.), FOURTH ROW— Herron, C. E., Corwin, R. E., Rademaker, J. H., Connolly. T. J.. 
Green. W., Jr., Broderick, H. R., Jr.. Jaeger, E. H., Osborn, J. D.. Anderson, L. V.. Cederlind. E. C. Faix, V. J. 




Wi!'^^i^ 



'•t»?«#R 



■h 4- 

















Top Row, left to right — Mrs. Ernest Rickard. 
Mrs. Carl Thompson, Mrs. Lulu Raymond, Miss 
Myrtle Barry, Mrs. Robert Record, Miss Eliza- 
beth McKelvey. 



Bottom Row, left to right — Miss Edna Fletcher, 
Refreshment Chairman; Mrs. H. R. Buxton, 
Advisory Member; Mrs. Carl McCammon, 
Chairman; Miss Mabel Vaughn, Secretary; 
Mrs. O. P. Ensley. Advisory Member. 




The Hemet U.S.O., under the direction of Mrs. Carl I. McCam- 
mon, has shown us that local organizations can be a home of amusement 
and pleasure. The welcome extended by the Senior and Junior hostesses 
cannot be surpassed by any chapter regardless of size. 

Ping pong tables, card tables and dancing are the feature at- 
tractions for entertainment, but the Cadets always cater to the food 
table for nourishment ere the evening is over. 

The Class of 43-S recommends the U.S.O. to any lonesome 
Cadet of Ryan and guarantees that he will enjoy himself to the fullest 
extent. 




ROCKET OTOOLE 



What with the usual flurry of excitement, hair-pulling, groans and despair that al- 
ways precedes going to press, we almost neglected Colonel O'Toole — would have. In fact, 
except the Colonel had different ideas on the subject. When he realized the extent of our 
discourtesy after his weeks of zealously grooming himself for the occasion — even submit- 
ting to a pedicure — his irritation knew no bounds and he decided to take things into his 
own hands. 

For the Colonel to think is to act; and he straightway made off for our intrepid 
cameraman and, by dint of strenuous pulling on various portions of the poor lad's anato- 
my, maneuvered him Into a position whereby Rocket could pose for a shot of himself. 
It turned out extremely well, as you can see, but the Colonel wanted a write-up to go with 
it and as we are rather easily Intimidated — you should get a close-up of those molars, 
brother — we submitted to the indignity of Colonel O'Toole's utter disregard for the free- 
dom of the press. The following statement is to the Class of 43-S, edited and composed 
by the Colonel himself: 



"I ain't gof much to say, fellers, but I knew you 
guys would be interested In hearing something first-hand 
on a dog's life. 

"Lots of times I hear you guys beefing about one 
thing or another and you seem to think a dog's life Is 
pretty awful. Well, it ain't! 'Course I'M a thoroughbred 
and can trace my ancestors back to the Mayflower and 
have entrance to the best homes In the country but any 
canine with a little personality and who knows his stuff 
can get by doing nothing more than sleeping and waking 
up long enough to gulp down some chow and then go 
back to sleep. 

"Before I came to Ryan to take charge of Lieut. 
Mullen and help him run this field properly I roomed with 
a gent called Lionel Atwell for three years but what with 
the Ration Board getting a little Inquisitive and one thing 
or another I decided to leave the old boy and strike out 



for Ryan whose culinary fame had reached even our iso- 
lated retreat. I wanted to do my bit for the war effort too, 
naturally, so when the Commandant offered me the tem- 
porary commission of Colonel to stay on and help out 
I Jumped at the chance to serve my country. ** 

"That's all I've got to say about myself, fellers, 'cepting 
— we dogs are behind you In this shindig. And remember, 
If you get out somewhere over Tokyo and get a chance at 
some of those guys who've been responsible for curtailing 
my meat diet, don't just 'nip the Nip' . . . bite his damn 
head off!" 

ROCKET OTOOLE, COL, 
Advisor to the Commandant. 

* — Ed. Note: The Colonel took out his first papers two 
years ago. 



LESACy . . . 



Custom has it, that, when a man passes on to better things, he bequeaths his world- 
ly chattel to those whom he loves and reveres. In doing so he hopes his bequest will ease, 
in some small measure, the strife and turmoil of the recipient's battle for existence. 

Knowing the impracticability of such an arrangement, we, after much solemn 
thought and deliberation, offer as a substitute the intangibility of "ADVICE." Whether 
its nature can be termed as beneficial is largely a matter of conjecture and, no doubt, 
open for debate among the illiterate of our Underclassmen. Be that as it may — by rea- 
son of our superior intelligence, physique, rank and artistry in flying, we charge YOU, our 
Underclassmen, to heed these words of wisdom and benefit accordingly: 

"BE IT KNOWN, THEREFORE, that we, the Class of 43-G, being of sound 
mind (what little there is of it) and tremendous will, do bequeath, assign and 
give to the Class of 43-hi various and sundry ideals and morals of indisputable 
value to be used, protected, cherished and adhered to for the remainder of 
their stay at Ryan Field. 

ITEM: The privilege of individuality! Any Cadet wishing to refrain from active 
participation in calesthenics may do so by merely walking into the Cammand- 
ant's office, stating concisely and clearly his belief in the matter, execute a 
snappy salute, about face, and return to his cabin for bunk fatigue. (Ed. 
Note: We advise further that, if the Commandant appears distressed and on 
the verge of apoplexy . . . Ignore It! We have It from an unusually reliable 
source that the h!onorable Commandant Is partial to our balmy weather and 
often spends hours at a time endeavoring to soak up as much of Old Sol as 
his duties will permit. Your concern for the Commandant's health, therefore, 
is laudable; but quite unnecessary.) 

ITEM: The right to reverse positions with your flight instructor when you've 
reached a point of wanting to scream back nasty Insinuations as to the 
legitimacy of his ancestors but can't because of the lack of inter-plane com- 
munication. There will be times when this change-over will appeal tremen- 
dously to you. Let us caution you, however, on one point. This switch should 
NOT be made while in flight. 

ITEM: The right to snooze in class while Ralne drips ubiquitous Information 
of Weather and Its Symbols. . . . 

ITEM: The ability to lengthen the runway of any airdrome by removing 
strips of fence in the process of a down-wind landing. 

ITEM: The opportunity to keep "wrench-wenches" under constant surveil- 
lance so that If one forgets herself momentarily and wanders into a dark 
corner of the hangar the maneuver may be fully appreciated. (Ed. Note: Care 
should be observed inasmuch as we were unlucky enough to attempt to slip 
a lip to a wrench-wench who turned out to be an ex-wrestler. Some members 
of the weaker sex, we find, are tremendously powerful ) 

ITEM: Last, but not least, we give Into your loving care one "Rocket O'- 
Toole." This guardian of our h^onor often avails himself of the close proxi- 
mity of cadet quarters for a night of sweet repose. If, upon arrival, he should 
appropriate your softest bed, we suggest a polite attitude of indifference. 
May we add, also, that not all the floods experienced in this locality were 
caused by cumulonimbus cloud formations. 




HEADQUARTERS 

AIR CORPS TRAINING DETACHMENT 

HEMET, CALIF. 



, ^ _ March 9, 1943 

MEMORANDUM: 

TO: ALL CONCERNED— 

I — For absenting himself from a+hletic formations 13 times to write squibs for CONTACT, 
A^C Hunter, Robert, A., is hereby awarded 35 demerits. 

2— For consistently missing flight meetings to make layouts for CONTACT, A/C Wilson, 
O. R.," is awarded a round dozen demerits and 15 tours for good measure. 

3 — For leaving the flight line without permission of the dispatcher, his instructor and the 
girls on the gasoline truck, to work on CONTACT, A/C Allen, B. P., Is confined to the 
post for the duration plus six months. 

A — For committing most of the above offenses and also skipping as many reveilles as pos- 
sible for CONTACT duties, A^C Gladfelder, Glenn C, is awarded two army check 
rides. 

5 — For aiding and abetting the above cadets, by providing excuses for the misdemeanors 
stated, Miss Sare Williams will assume the duties of "dog walker" for a period of not 
more than one week. 

6 — For being a public nuisance and all around pest due to an unholy penchant for snap- 
ping pictures of unsuspecting victims, usually with their mouths wide open, Pvt. Earl 
Moore is henceforth banished from the P. X. and dark room. 

7 — For being too attractive and making it impossible for me to concentrate on my work, 
Miss Annabel! Hougard Is to take a two-week vacation with full pay. 

W. P. MULLEN, 
1st Lt., Air Corps, 
Commandant of Cadets. 



RSJissseissiHSiKasasasEssiSKiiS 



Flight Instructor 

Bv William P. Sloan, Captain, AC 

I've often heard the thunderous roar 
Of mighty engines, skyward winging 
/■Ind seen the flash as wing guns chant 
Their song of death, and angels singing. 

From the cockpit of a Fortress 
Smiling as my phones respond 
To each command to battle stations 
To each wingman, just beyond. 

I've seen stricken, upturned faces 
Blasted into shapeless flesh, 
Felt the thud of bullets tearing 
IVoven from the ack-ack's mesh 

From Java shores to bleak Attu 

Thru searing heat and piercing cold 

I've flown and fought and died with them 

I've laughed with them, the young grown old. 

The eyes that see these feats aren't mine, 
Nor are the ears that hear; 
Not mine the hand that grips the stick, 
Not mine, the joy and fear. 

For I am but a moving cog 
Whose patience, work, and swearing 
Instilled in them the know, the how, 
They had the guts and daring. 

But when they fly down Tokio's streets 

Or take off for Berlin, 

I'll be there, silent and unseen. 

My men and I, we'll win. 



)^^^^!fr^!K:^^>r:i^:>^^