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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

MAR G 1967 

LIBRARY 






University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago, and London, 1967 



IIINTILUIMHtAirY ilAllilltlCAK I'AINTIKi; AKII KCIILI* I llltK l!H»7 

Introduction by Allen S. Weller 



nth ex/ubition 




College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois, Urbana 



«:«Nli:A\l>«ltilKY AAIKIMCAN PAINTINIp A\» StAlLVTUKK 



DAVID DODDS HENRY 

President of the University 

ALLEN S. WELLER 

Dean, College of Fine and Applied Arts 
Director, Krannert Art Museum 
Ctiairmon, Festivol of Contemporory Arts 

JURY OF SELECTION 

Allen S. Weller, Choirman 
James D. Hogan 
James R. Shipley 

MUSEUM STAFF 

Allen S. Weller, Director 

Muriel B. Ctiristison, Associate Director 

Deborah A. Jones, Assistant Curator 

James O. Sowers, Preporotor 

Jane Powell, Secretary 

Frieda V. Frillmon, Secretary 

H. Dixon Bennett, Assistant 

K. E. Finical, W. E. Boles, Custodians 



) 1967 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois Library of Congress Catalog Cord No. A48-340 



ii:K\o\Yij:iM;A\i:KTS 



le College of Fine and Applied Arts and 
e Krannert Art Museum are grateful to 
ose who have made loans of paintings 
id sculpture to this exhibition and 
:knowledge the cooperation of the fol- 
wing artists, collectors, museums, and 
illeries: 






r. Samuel M. Adier, New York, N.Y. 

nkrum Gollery, Los Angeles, California 

rieigh Gallery, San Francisco, California 

infer Gallery, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

;rkeley Gollery, Son Francisco, California 

)lles Gallery, San Francisco, California 

race Borgenicht Gallery, Inc., New York, 
N.Y. 

fkeri Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

r. Frank A. Campini, Berkeley, California 

:o Castelli Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

r. and Mrs. William Coblentz, San 
Francisco, California 

r. and Mrs. Jordan Cohen, Kansas City, 
Missouri 

Dmara Gallery, Los Angeles, California 

ordier & Ekstrom, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

ayton's Gallery 12, Minneapolis, 

■ Minnesota 

lilexi Gallery, San Francisco, California 

iirry Dintenfass, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

prsky Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

le Downtown Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

wan Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

ndre Emmerich Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

ex Evans Gallery, Los Angeles, California 

■ chard Feigen Gallery, Chicago, Illinois; 
1 New York, N.Y. 

aingarten Galleries, Los Angeles, 
California 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry Feiwell, Larchmont, N.Y. 

Forum Gallery, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago, Illinois 

Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Frank Gallo, Urbana, Illinois 

Gilmon Galleries, Chicago, Illinois 

Gump's Gallery, San Francisco, California 

The Hansen Galleries, Son Francisco, 
California 

Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Philip Johnson, New Canaan, 
Connecticut 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Jones, San Marino, 
California 

Krasner Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Kraushoor Galleries, New York, N.Y. 

Felix Landau Gallery, Los Angeles, 
California 

Landau-Alan Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Main Street Galleries, Chicago, Illinois 

Royal Marks Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, Inc., New 
York, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Mayer, Winnetka, 
Illinois 

Midtown Galleries, New York, N.Y. 

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 
N.Y. 



Tiber de Nagy Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Rolf Nelson Gallery, Los Angeles, California 

Lee Nordness Galleries Exhibition Section, 
Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Oklahoma Art Center, Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma 

The Pace Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Herbert Palmer Gallery, Los Angeles, 
California 

Park Place Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

The Betty Parsons Gallery, New York, N.Y, 

Mr. and Mrs. David Paul, New York, N.Y. 

Roychem Corporation, Redwood Cily, 
California 

Esther-Robles Gallery, Los Angeles, 
California 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shapiro, Beverly Hills, 
California 

Stable Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Staempfli Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L. Stephens, Jr., South 
Gate, California 

Allan Stone Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

David Stuart Gollery, Los Angeles, 
California 

Woddell Gallery, Inc., New York, N.Y. 
Howard Wise Gallery, New York, N.Y. 

Gordon Woodside Gallery, San Francisco, 
California 



i»iiim:hasi^ aivaimik 



1948 

LEONARD BECK 
EUGENE BERMAN 
RAYMOND BREININ 
JOSEPH DE MARTINI 
WILLIAM J. GORDON 
PHILIP GUSTON 
HAZEL JANICKI 
KARL KNATHS 
JULIAN E. LEVI 
LESTER O. SCHWARTZ 

1949 

CLAUDE BENTLEY 

LOUIS BOSA 

FRED CONWAY 

JOHN HEllKER 

CARL HOLTY 

RICO LEBRUN 

ARTHUR OSVER 

FELIX RUVOLO 

YVES TANGUY 

BRADLEY WALKER TOMLIN 



1950 

MAX BECKMANN 
DEAN ELLIS 
FREDERICK S. FRANCK 
ROBERT GWATHMEY 
HANS HOFMANN 
CHARLES RAIN 
ABRAHAM RATTNER 
HEDDA STERNE 
ANTHONY TONEY 

1951 

WILLIAM BAZIOTES 

BYRON BROWNE 

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB 

CLEVE GRAY 

MORRIS KANTOR 

LEO MANSO 

MATTA 

GREGORIO PRESTOPINO 

KURT SEIIGMANN 

JEAN XCERON 

1952 

SAMUEL ADLER 
TOM BENRIMO 
CAROL BLANCHARD 
CARLYLE BROWN 
WILLIAM CONGDON 
WAITER MURCH 
RUFINO TAMAYO 



1953 

ROBERT L. GRIILEY 
YNEZ JOHNSTON 
GYORGY KEPES 
LAWRENCE KUPFERMAN 
THEODORE J. ROSZAK 
BEN SHAHN 
MARGARITA WORTH 

1955 

RALPH S. DU CASSE 
FRANK DUNCAN 
LEONARD EDMONDSON 
MORRIS GRAVES 
MARGO HOFF 
ROGER KUNTZ 
GEORGE RATKAI 
KARL ZERBE 

1957 

DAVID ARONSON 
JACOB EPSTEIN 
ELIAS FRIEDENSOHN 
JOHN HULTBERG 
WOLF KAHN 
CARL MORRIS 
CHARLES UMLAUF 
NICHOLAS VASILIEFF 



1959 

LAWRENCE CALCAGNO 
FRED FARR 
JONAH KINIGSTEIN 
RICO LEBRUN 
ARTHUR OKAMURA 
REUBEN TAM 

1961 

LEONARD BASKIN 
CHARLES BURCHFIELD 
DAVID PARK 
JULIUS SCHMIDT 

1963 

STUART DAVIS 
LOREN MAC IVER 

1965 

JAMES BROOKS 
PAUL JENKINS 
ERLE LORAN 
SAIVATORE SCARPITTA 



saij:s 



Many of the works in this 

exhibition are for sale. Visitors ore 

invited to obtain price information at the 

Museum office. The Krannert Art Museum 

reserves the right of priority in purchases 

mode from the exhibition. 



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CURRENT EVENTS 



An exhibition which includes over one hun- 
dred works produced by as many artists, rang- 
ing in age from their early twenties to their 
early seventies, covers a lot of ground. We are 
looking at the results of a cultural develop- 
ment which has occupied two full generations, 
and there are voices here which are speaking 
in totally different languages. You cannot 
expect to find a common basis for all of these 
works, and you cannot judge them by a com- 
mon standard. To the critic who is inter- 
ested in the evolution of style, some of the 
contrasts and confrontations which are the 
result of chronology are bound to arouse se- 
rious problems of definition, analysis, and 
evaluation. 

The present exhibition includes a far 
greater proportion of work by young artists 
than by old ones. This in itself is symp- 
tomatic of our times and is as it should be. 
Those of us who were responsible for the 
selection of the works were guided by two 
principal considerations. We hoped to include 
examples of as many of the major directions 



in which American artists are travehng today 
as possible, and we tried at all times to be 
guided by a sense of quality: that is, we 
hoped that each work we selected successfully 
accomplished what it set out to do. Of course 
there were disappointments, and there may be 
certain significant directions which are not 
properly represented. The sense of quality is 
a very personal thing, and you as a spectator 
will undoubtedly criticize the critics as you 
make your own evaluations jmd judgments. 

Many years ago the German art critic Wil- 
helm Finder wrote a perceptive though hardly 
definitive little book called Das Problem der 
Generation in which he argued that the pre- 
cise date of one's birth had a profound in- 
fluence on all subsequent developments within 
the individual. This is obvious and of course 
true, but the implications of Finder's general- 
izations have not often been precisely studied 
in relation to specific works of art. Perhaps if 
we look at the 110 works in this exhibition 
chronologically (not by date of execution, but 
by artist's birthdate), we shall be able to un- 



derstand some of the developments we have 
lived through in a way that will give meaning 
to forms which by themselves, isolated and 
unrelated to others, seem at first inexplicable. 
It will also bring us face to face with a cultural 
problem which is not often realized by the 
very young, but is very much an issue with 
many others: the problem of the aging in- 
novator. What happens to the artist who finds 
himself turning into a contemporary old 
master? Once an influence on others, a pace- 
setter, an "original," he suddenly finds his 
younger contemporaries striking out in totally 
different directions, unsympathetic or (worse) 
simply not interested in what he has to say. A 
few creative spirits seem themselves to be age- 
less and to live completely within the terms 
of changing times; a few seem not to be both- 
ered by changing standards and are able to 
work consistently within boundaries they early 
established for themselves. But many others 
are genuinely disturbed when they find that 
they no longer speak a Ijuiguage which is un- 
derstood by their younger contemporaries. 
This is one reason why the whole field of edu- 
cation in the creative arts is in such a difficult 
state at the present moment. Artists can learn 
in a variety of ways, but whether it is any 
longer possible for them to teach remains a 
question. 

The gap between the generations is one of 
many evidences which we see in modem cul- 
ture resulting from the disintegration of a con- 
tinuing sense of tradition. Up until the period 
of World War I a basic and continuous cul- 
tural tradition informed almost every aspect 
of western civilization. Even developments 



which were revolutionary were inevitably " 
linked to what had gone before in specific 
evolutionary ways. In the field of the fine arts, 
an appreciation of craftsmanship provided afl 
basis for development, even when everything 
else changed. But today, we are more and 
more made aware of the fact that the cultural 
values of the past have not been transmitted 
to young people in the same sense. These 
values are probably better known than they ' 
ever were before (through books, reproduc- 
tions, museums), but they remain detached 
and unused. It seems more and more impos- 
sible to build upon the past, to start at the 
point where someone else left off. Many recent 
developments seem rootless. Oskar Kokoschka . 
speaks of young people today as "entering on 
life with empty hands." 

The kind of thinking, seemg, and execution 
which is evident in works created by artists 
who are thirty-five years old or younger is not 
like that of artists bom in the 1920's or earlier. 
While there are, of course, an enormous num- 
ber of different ways of approaching the prob- 
lem of creating a valid expression for our 
times, it is not impossible to see certain recur- 
ring themes and attitudes which reveal them- 
selves in different ways. 

For one thing, there is a mood of detach- 
ment about much recent work. The excite- 
ment of the manipulation of the material for 
its own sake becomes more and more a mark 
of maturity or old age. Precise surfaces and 
the use of mechanistic forms and methods are 
frequent. There is a sense of calculation, an 
avoidance of the attitude that the work almost 
formed itself without the artists knowing what 



was happening — an attitude frequently ex- 
pressed by artists a few years ago. Many of 
these young artists know exactly what they 
intend to do, and follow a precisely deter- 
mined pattern of decisions. There is a substi- 
tution of a new kind of discipline for the 
reliance on intuition and the accidental which 
prevailed until recendy. 

This youthful mood of detachment may 
find its expression in sharply opposing ways. 
On the one hand, it is seen in the intense 
concentration of certain artists upon the most 
minutely observed details of physical reality, 
with apparently entire emphasis on material 
forms which are outside of the artist himself, 
and a deliberate avoidance of "interpreta- 
tion." Often, however, these analytical ob- 
servations are unrelated one to another and 
deliberately avoid adding up to a cumulative 
or unified whole. At the opposite end of the 
scale is the kind of detachment which reveals 
itself in works which have simply avoided 
almost all of the pictorial and spatial problems 
which largely determined the formal structure 
and content of works of art in the past — 
pictures without illusion and without expres- 
sion, works which (in the conventional sense) 
are deliberately empty and undifferentiated, 
lacking individual handwriting. Is this an 
escape from the troubling complexities of 
actual life, or is it a return to great elemental 
basic forms — a sort of visual id? Whatever 
the ultimate significance of these opposing 
kinds of detachment may be, they cannot be 
judged by standards which applied in earlier 
cultural situations. The kind of descriptive 
figural image in these new works cannot be 



measured by norms which were appropriate 
to impressionism any more than can the mys- 
terious emptiness of other works be measured 
by classical standards. 

It is not always easy to see what is cause, 
what is effect. Is the gulf which exists between 
young artists and old artists today the result of 
the loss of tradition, or has this loss, this root- 
lessness, been itself the reason for discarding 
traditional forms and methods? Young artists 
may indeed enter on life with empty hands, 
but their hands do not remain empty long. If 
they no longer grasp the past as the material 
out of which to build the present, they grasp 
other materials. Two things in particular have 
taken the place of tradition in the evolution of 
the art of our times. One of these is the artist's 
own deepest inherent personality, and he has 
sometimes become engrossed in himself as was 
seldom done in the past. He has discovered 
the universe within and has turned away from 
that other universe of which he is himself a 
part. The other new emphasis has come from 
his preoccupation, his involvement, with that 
extension of himself, the man-made products 
of an industrial society. The world of nature 
retreats as the world of man advances. The 
raw material of art today is the hidden inner 
spirit of the individual man on the one side, 
and the mechanized, industrialized environ- 
ment which man has built for himself in the 
later twentieth century on the other. 

Among the qualities of "young" art are the 
following : descriptive realism devoid of judg- 
ment, photographic vision, precisianism, the 
influence of engineering, interest in actual 
physical motion and in actual light, a realiza- 



tjon of the significance of emptiness, emphasis 
on pure geometric form, the big scale of 
simple undifferentiated images, the eradica- 
tion of firm boundaries between different art 
forms, the avoidance of self-expression and 
self-realization, the use of commercial or ad- 
vertising imagery. In one way, this last char- 
acteristic (which led to pop art) links up 
more strongly with some styles of the past, 
because it is marked by a kind of enthusiasm 
and involvement which is often lacking in the 
other qualities which have been enumerated. 
These add up to an attitude and a method 
which differ at almost every point from the 
mature art of the abstract expressionist gener- 
ation, which must now adjust itself to a situa- 
tion in which it has been turned into a con- 
servative older group. 

One important element which separates the 
generations is the attitude toward and the use 
of materials. Painters used to be people who 
brushed oil paints on canvas, or who stained 
paper with water colors, just as sculptors used 
to be people who carved wood or stone, or 
modeled clay to be cast in bronze. Traditional 
materials and time-honored techniques are 
now combined in new ways, or are frequently 
abandoned by young artists, who no longer 
find them adequate for expressing the forms 
and ideas with which they are concerned. 

Materials and techniques which were de- 
veloped primarily for industrial use have been 
redirected into powerful and expressive chan- 
nels. Most of these processes were developed 
in order to speed up mass production, to re- 
duce costs, to do away with laborious long- 
term hand methods, or to satisfy a vast con- 



sumer market which demands goods of 
constantly novel design and of identical 
standardized quality. Are these same demands 
now determining factors in the production of 
works of art? Certainly many young artists 
are impatient, unwilling to undergo the long 
and laborious kind of training of technical 
craftsmanship which was traditionally a signif- 
icant part of their education. Individual ex- 
pression more and more becomes equated 
with swiftness of execution, and it is not only 
the expense of such time-honored techniques 
as bronze casting and stone carving, but akc 
the comparative ease of execution in nevs 
materials, which lead the artist joyously to 
experiment with every new material and 
method offered him. ■ 

Colors produced for industrial purposes dr\ 
rapidly without changing their essential char- 
acter. Plastic paints and acrylic and vinyl 
resins offer many possibilities which were not 
available to the painter of the past, such as 
impastos which do not crack and a choice be-l 
tween mat or glossy surfaces. New plastii 
materials like polyethylene, polyvinyl, poly- 
ester resin, plexiglas, and fiberglas invite all 
sorts of experiments and suggest the increasing 
use of polychromy in sculpture. Sculpture is no 
longer almost entirely a matter of carving or 
modeling or casting: the use of wire screen 
ing, of cutting and fitting, of welding, of 
assembling, of materials like aluminum, mag- 
nesium, and stainless or structural steel, lead 
to new forms and new feelings. 

Is a two-dimensional rectangular object 
made out of metal a piece of sculpture? It 
is certainly not a painting. The fact is that the 



lines of demarcation between art forms be- 
come indistinct. More and more we are un- 
able to distinguish between painting and 
sculpture, just as every print technique may 
now be used in a single plate. Craftsmanship, 
which used to be a manual skill, increasingly 
becomes an appropriate use of industrial ma- 
terials and mechanical methods. 

The immaculate metallic planes of Max 
Finkelstein, with their startling opposition of 
visual surface effects, suggest some of the new 
possibilities, just as the animated mechanical 
beings of Enrique Castro-Cid seem now like 
an inevitable expression of the contemporary 
human condition. Is there such a thing as 
machine art? The flashing lights of Howard 
Jones, controlled by the precision of com- 
puter programming, seem to promise that a 
whole new field of expression is opening up 
for us. Sometimes it is in the form of a precise 
but unidentified functional object, as in the 
careful constructions of such artists as Richard 
Randall, or in the use of utilitarian objects for 
expressive purposes, as in the nail composi- 
tions of Robert Seyle, that we see new direc- 
tions. John Willenbecher's superbly executed 
boxes describe inexplicable activities; they 
open up into astronomical proportions. John 
Freeman's work is more than a triumph of 
cabinet-making: it is also a portent, a prod- 
igy; it has a strangely prophetic character. 
Forms which seem to have been designed for 
the most specific kinds of functional activity 
mysteriously conceal what that function may 
be. The machine becomes an instrument of 
contemplation, of allusion, rather than of use. 

Three-dimensional primary forms, of aus- 



tere geometric design, become increasingly 
prominent. These may be complex, like the 
work of Lillian Floreheim, fashioned of several 
diflfcrent materials, or stripped to boxlike se- 
verity, as is the work of Vasa. Certainly there 
are new possibilties in the field of truly archi- 
tectural design, as Gerald Laing and Craig 
Kauffman show us. The big scale and aggres- 
sive positivism of Richard Van Buren strike 
us as an authoritative proclamation when we 
compare it with the shifting, vagrant, impul- 
sive, tentative statements of some artists of an 
earlier generation, whose works were con- 
structed on the trial-and-error principal. The 
works of many young artists may indeed be in 
error (only time can tell this), but they are 
not trials. 

The tendency toward impersonality reaches 
its climax in the style to which Jules Langs- 
ner gave the name of hard-edge painting. 
Some artists, like John McLaughlin, expressed 
themselves naturally this way many years ago 
(he is one of the older artists in the exhibi- 
tion ) , but such pioneers were for a long time 
largely eclipsed by their contemporaries who 
glorified the impetuosity of highly individual- 
ized performance. Now such a visual lan- 
guage — cool, controlled, direct, avoiding 
suggestion and illusion — seems an inevitable 
and natural characteristic of a generation 
which contains important elements which 
have deliberately detached themselves from 
an outpouring of personal emotion. Geometric 
plans, as in the work of Will Insley and Dean 
Fleming, remain completely systematic and 
are unrelated to the shifting quality of visual 
impressions. On the other hand, that it is not 



impossible to apply such a disciplined manner 
to recognizable material is demonstrated by 
George Mueller, whose architectural themes 
suggest a kind of flat symbolic perspective — 
a new way of implying, rather than of realiz- 
ing, space. The architectural quality of such 
work is obvious and understandable. Some- 
times it is entirely specific, as in Thomas 
Akawie, who develops the actual ground plans 
of Medieval and Renaissance buildings into 
splendid abstract patterns; sometimes it is 
reduced to a kind of engineering drawing, as 
in the work of Arakawa, who seems to pre- 
sent us with directions for the construction of 
monumental structures which conceal their 
character. The bold directness of Edwin Ruda 
and Kenneth Noland go off in one direction; 
the greater surface refinement of Herbert 
Bayer in another; and it is understandable 
that such an ordered and tightly controlled 
style should experiment with startling color 
relationships for visual optical stimulation, as 
with Miriam Schapiro. 

There is a special group of young precision- 
ists, who express themselves with immaculate 
surfaces and a studied avoidance of impulse 
or accident. Everything is calculated, orderly, 
almost untouched and untouchable. Much 
of the purely geometric work is of thb nature, 
as are the vibrating color compositions of the 
op artists, but this mode is found in repre- 
sentational work as well. Peter Dechar con- 
centrates upon the swelling forms of fruits, 
removing them from all sense of environment, 
taking them out of context, and giving them 
an unexpected and startling sense of grand 
scale. Lowell Nesbitt observes the sterile forms 



of nineteenth-century architecture, and ere 
ates disturbingly empty but grandiose images 
of structural power. We have seen the archi- 
tectural motif handled in the past with 
romantic or sociological or purely formal as- 
sociations, but we now see it in a new kind of 
isolation. Much recent representational work 
detaches the objects represented from their ex 
pected surroundings, reduces the overtones wc 
are accustomed to, and stresses a kind of 
stripped purity. Even such a timely militar) 
motif as that seen in the work of Sam Rich- 
ardson is presented impersonally. Barbro 
Ostlihn turns a pattern of geometric cubes 
into a monumental structure of great stability 
and cumulative effect. That such work may 
mark the continuation of long-established tra- 
ditions is shown by the still-life composition.' 
of Paul Cadmus. 

A striking development of the mechanistic 
side of recent art is the greater and greater 
emphasis upon actual physical movement. 
We can no longer think of the work of art ^a- 
static, or as suggesting movement by symbolit 
images or by relying upon the physical move- 
ment of the spectator to bring it to life. Ever 
since the mobiles of Alexander Calder an- . 
nounced exciting possibilities, artists have in-" 
creasingly designed works which actually arc 
in motion as the result of natural forces (air 
currents, gravity, magnetism), or by motoriza- 
tion. A monumental development of the di- 
rection started by Calder is seen in the work 
of Jerome Kirk; the shifting color films of 
Fletcher Benton are completed by continuous 
motion; while magnetic and gravitational re- 
sources are relied upon by Alberto Collie and 



i 



Ronald Mallory. Actual light rather than sym- 
bolic light, too, becomes an element in recent 
design. The flashing compositions of Howard 
Jones and Gregorio Vardanega, with seem- 
ingly infinite possible combinations, and the 
moving color areas of Palatnik are engrossing 
ways of handling such materials. The end- 
lessly fascinating movement of matter, never 
repeating itself, is a prime element; All of 
these experiments suggest that a new concept 
of realism is now prevalent. We now realize 
that cdl so-called realism in the past was sym- 
bol, was illusion: many contemporary artists 
are unwilling to deal with such intangibles, 
and find that they must handle the actual stuff 
of physical existence. 

The desire to present a complete and self- 
contained experience in the individual work 
of art has led to a new kind of unity in many 
recent works. This is seen in one way by the 
exclusion of illusions and associations, and in 
another by a very conscious breaking down of 
the barriers which separate the various art 
forms. Many young artists obviously do not 
think of themselves as painters or as sculptors, 
but as designers in a total sense. Two- and 
three-dimensional design merge. For the first 
time since the neoclassic style placed a pall of 
whiteness upon pure marble surfaces, and 
color variations were excluded from metal 
forms, the designer and constructor of three- 
dimensional forms thinks naturally in terms 
of color. Canvas is no longer a flat plane 
clinging to the wall, but it projects into space, 
proclaiming the new tangibility of actual ex- 
perience. Whether the shaped canvas remains 
colorless, as in the work of Herbert George, or 



is as fully developed in color as was the tra- 
ditional picture plane, as in the geometric 
compositions of Charles Hinman, it forces the 
spectator into a new kind of relationship with 
itself. Actual space relationships, as in recent 
works by James Jarvaise, take the place of 
the kind of perspective which used to mean 
space to us. It is interesting to see such a com- 
pletely painter-like artist as Samuel Adler re- 
sponding to new impulses, and reexpressing 
his personal style in a form of construction 
which is as much sculpture as it is painting. 
Combinations of metal, wood, and paint bring 
surface and shape into new and exciting rela- 
tionships, as in the work of Arlo Acton. 

Our mechanistic world has affected our 
vision profoundly. We no longer see our sur- 
roundings, for instance, as our ancestors saw 
them before the invention of photography and 
the development of all kinds of cheap and 
swift methods of reproduction bombarded us 
with pictorial images which are quite differ- 
ent from those which reach us directly 
through our own built-in physical equipment. 
While it is not impossible for us to recapture, 
to cultivate, the kind of actual vision which 
was behind many of the great artistic styles of 
the past, it often requires a conscious effort 
to do so. The organic perspective vision of the 
Renaissance, for instance, is no longer able 
to cope with the physical apprehension or the 
mental concept of space today, just as it is not 
easy or natural for us to see elements of nature 
with the kind of vision which the romantic 
period possessed. The influence of mechaniza- 
tion on art is not simply the result of the in- 
vention and the use of new materials, or the 



discovery of new worlds of subject matter, but 
it has ako affected the artist within himself 
in ways which are both physical and psycho- 
logical. 

An obvious evidence of this is the way in 
which many young artists today use the photo- 
graph with an honesty and a directness which 
has led to certain remarkable results. From 
its very origin the photograph had a profound 
influence on the so-called "fine arts," but 
for a long time it was an influence which was 
not really admitted by the artist — it was 
something hidden, a secret. After an initial 
phase in which certain nineteenth-century 
artists attempted to turn themselves into ma- 
chines and to rival the camera on its own 
terms, the tendency was to use the photograph 
as a sort of automatic sketchbook, recording 
motifs and materials which the artist then 
reworked in his own manner. He generally 
attempted (perhaps unconsciously) to dis- 
guise this dependence and to preserve a kind 
of fiction that nothing had come between him 
and the world of nature from which he was 
drawing his themes. 

But today a great deal has come between 
the artist and the world of nature. He sees 
this world in terms which are highly self- 
conscious, but at the same time he is acutely 
aware of a total society. In many cases, he 
sees it at second hand rather than as a direct 
experience. This is why we see an increasing 
number of young artists who present us with 
realistic compositions which are obviously 
founded on the mechanical vision of the snap- 
shot, with its precison of silhouette, its frequent 
blurring of interior detail, its arbitrary cutting 



off of essential forms at the picture's edge, its 
reliance upon tone and value rather than on 
color for its quality. The photograph becomes 
not something to provide raw material for the 
artist, not an aide-memoire, but a dominant 
form, a kind of primary vision, which com- 
pletely controls the final result. 

One characteristic of the photographi( 
image, particularly of the product of the new> 
photographer or the snapshot of the amateur, 
is its sense of arrested motion — the figure in 
violent action which has been suddenly frozen. 
This is quite a different kind of visual move- 
ment from that which impressionism created, 
with its merging of form and atmosphere, or 
from that which the expressionists developed, 
with an almost physical impulse within the 
material form of the work itself. It does not 
allow the spectator to experience the kind of 
empathy which many earlier forms suggested. 
But it is the sort of motion-image with which 
we are familiar in newspapers and other pop- 
ular publications, and has become the stock- 
in-trade of much advertising art. Some inter- 
esting things have happened to it in the hands 
of artists who are exploiting it for larger 
purposes than those prevalent in mass com- 
munications media. 

The petrified snapshot image of movement 
can be curiously ambiguous and deceptive. 
The combination of precise description and 
enigmatic meaning is something which seems 
to offer distinct possibilities to younger artists 
today. A figure in shadow may be presented 
with great exactness, and yet leave us with the 
mysterious quality of the silhouette, which 
does not tell us whether we are looking at the 



front or the back of the basic form. The pho- 
tographer generally takes more than one shot 
of a single subject, and this accords well with 
the tendency so many artists have now of 
working in sets, of reexpressing the same 
image again and again with certain variations. 
It relates, too, to the use of the multiple image 
in a single work: not the multiple image in 
superimposed evolutionary movement, as it 
was long ago seen in futurism, but rather the 
successive frames of a motion picture which 
has been arrested. No painter has more inter- 
estingly exploited the photographic possibil- 
ities of contemporary vision than has Robert 
Harvey. In design, in composition, in color, 
his work is an exacting realization of man 
and nature seen through the mechanical lens, 
rather than through the eye and mind of the 
artist. 

A notable characteristic of the kind of 
photographic vision which is now encountered 
so frequently in American painting is the com- 
bination of extremely active forms, which may 
even approach violence, with an almost com- 
pletely impersonal handling of the medium 
itself. The disengagement of the artist is con- 
tinually encountered. Where once he ex- 
pressed himself, achieved the ultimate in 
identification with the creative act by com- 
plete involvement with the medium, active 
or violent representational themes are now 
couched in terms which studiously avoid the 
personal handwriting of the artist: surfaces 
are smooth and undifferentiated, the brush- 
stroke invisible. Photographic vision, which 
records coldly and mechanically the most in- 
tensely active and personal acts, has a strong 



appeal to many artists today. Kendall Shaw's 
silhouetted athletes (probably derived from 
news photos from the sports pages) are ex- 
amples. The fluent outline undulates with 
sensitive movement, but the blank surfaces 
and completely impersonal handling studi- 
ously avoid all expression of a personal in- 
volvement of the artist with the theme. One 
almost has to go back to certain types of nine- 
teenth-century academic painting for parallels, 
though the utter avoidance of sentimentality 
or romanticism completely separates the two 
styles. 

Wayne Thiebaud's figures pose stiffly and 
self-consciously against an absolutely neutral 
background. Direct reliance on the photo- 
graph is interestingly handled in Noel Ma- 
haffey's painting, in which the actual photos 
become an element of collage in the final 
work. The painter has not worked from the 
living models, but obviously and frankly from 
a series of photographs which become them- 
selves part of the completed work. He allows 
us in this case to see what his process of selec- 
tion has been, as he takes an attitude or ges- 
ture from one exposure, and combines this 
with others from still other films. Is there 
some significance in the fact that the creator 
of this timely painting is the youngest artist in 
the exhibition? 

Another notable characteristic of the snap- 
shot (particularly when produced by amateur 
photographers) is the way in which forms are 
suddenly and often unexpectedly cut off by 
the edge, sliced through in exactly those areas 
which the conventional academic artist of the 
past would have taken care to center or to 



surround with a "proper" amount of space. 
Philip Pearlstein's figures, their heads or 
shoulders abruptly and unexpectedly termi- 
nated by the frame, are examples. This artist 
illustrates still another aspect of photographic 
vision: the striking differences in scale be- 
tween those parts of the body which are closest 
to the lens and those which are farthest 
away. Such disparities were generally mini- 
mized in conventional figure construction in 
the past. Intense observation of detail and 
indifference to or actual avoidance of a sense 
of total unity are characteristics of many con- 
temporary works — and not oiJy in the world 
of art. 

There are other, and increasing, uses of the 
multiple image: the same figure or form in 
successive stages of movement, or from alter- 
nate points of view. The former is exempli- 
fied by Gerald Gooch, the latter by Andy 
Warhol. The superimposition of one image 
upon another is avoided; instead, we read a 
sequence in successive stages. Has not the 
comic strip kind of narrative contributed to 
this kind of presentation? Gooch shows the 
active figure in a sequence of movement, and 
cleverly divides one image from another by 
actual physical separation. Warhol, in his 
"made-to-order" pictures, assembles standard 
images with certain individual variations. 
Both artists avoid intruding themselves into 
the fabrication of their work. 

Joe Raffaele's paintings are in many ways 
extraordinarily complete expressions of some 
of the major qualities and characteristics of 
the new kinds of vision. There is intense and 
probing observation of fragments: figures are 



seen only in imexplained parts rather than a> 
wholes. There seems to be no logical relation- 
ship between these penetratingly observed de- 
tails; not only are they unrelated to each 
other in theme and in scale, but they are 
placed against a completely neutral back- 
ground which denies to them any under- 
standable or fixed place in the world of spac( 
and time. There is a tense emphasis on phys- 
ical pain which often makes the spectator 
cringe; there is a strong undercurrent of sexu- 
ality in actions and images. There is a perfectly 
frank utilization of the kind of mechanized 
vision with which the photograph has made 
us completely famiUar, and which has ver)' 
largely taken the place of direct observation 
of nature. There is seemingly little desire for 
"self-expression," which for so long was con- 
sidered an essential element of artistic cre- 
ation. There is a desire to startle and perhaps 
to shock the spectator in an immediate and 
personal way, but at the same time the artist 
conceals himself behind a sort of mechanical 
and impersonal glibness. 

These are all characteristics which are 
painfully evident in the events which are daily 
presented to us in the newspaper, the radio, 
the TV, and which are particularly evident 
in advertising art. We know an enormous 
amount about detailed events, and remain 
woefully ignorant of the significance behind 
them. We feel isolated in the midst of con- 
stantly increasing physical contacts. People 
become things; pure sensation takes the place 
of contemplation or judgment. Of course the 
artist is sensitive to these currents in our cul- 
ture, and it is inevitable that he should seek 



expressive ways of embodying them. There 
are qualities in our present situation which 
demand a new vocabulary for their expression. 

One category of "young" art which has 
been most difficult for an older generation to 
understand (let alone to accept) is the kind 
of work which excludes almost everything 
which has been most precious in the past — 
not only the exclusion of subject and content, 
but also the exclusion of form in its classical 
sense of compositions made up of parts one 
related to another, as well as apparendy the 
exclusion of self-expression in any individual 
sense. For at least ten years there has been a 
group of artists who have turned away from 
the sort of work which we have ordinarily 
thought of as self-expression — that is, if we 
equate this term with highly individualistic 
ways of handling the media, much of it devel- 
oped along intuitive lines, utilizing the often 
exciting effects of the "happy accident." This 
has been an alternative to the abstract expres- 
sionism which seemed adequately to express 
the mood of artists in the period immediately 
following World War II. We have seen, in- 
stead of the briUiant, loose handling and 
almost unconscious symbolism of the abstract 
expressionists, the suppression of modeling, the 
elimination of textural variation, the limita- 
tion of color contrasts. This is a tendency 
which has steadily increased and has drawn 
more and more artists into its orbit. It is now 
a major element in the art of our times. 

We encounter more and more works in 
which the entire work is a unit, rather than 
an organization of separate units each with its 
own character and individuality. Forms ex- 



tend throughout the entire composition, often 
with the suggestion that they continue on into 
surrounding space. Works which involve 
only a single form or a single undifferentiated 
color are seen increasingly. Some of them are 
not without a strange kind of emotional im- 
pact, but it becomes increasingly difficult to 
define what precise emotion is stimulated. 
Whereas abstract expressionist art frequently 
seemed obscure because of the highly personal 
kind of imagery or symbolism which the artist 
used, the obscurity of this more recent devel- 
opment is frequently combined with the most 
exacting clarity of form. Sharpness of mate- 
rial definition and clarity of meaning (or con- 
tent) are not necessarily related. 

One result of this attitude is that we see an 
increasing emphasis on the work of art for 
itself, rather than on the artist as a unique 
human being. The excitement of process be- 
gins to pall; the dictum that art is "becoming" 
rather than "being" sudderdy seems a little 
old-fashioned. The possibility that art may be 
a mirror of the absolute rather than a kind of 
therapeutic activity on the part of certain 
highly charged individuals is something to be 
seriously considered. 

What does such art mean? The meaning 
lies in the very presence of the work of art, 
not in what it suggests or what it symbolizes. 
Such catch words as "primary forms," "sys- 
temic painting," "minimal art," emerge in 
an attempt to establish some kind of category 
for such works as have turned away from 
the violence, the intensity, the life-within- 
the-medium of what may be the final phase 
of abstract expressionism. Some critics have 



seen in this a return to classicism, though a 
classicism which is certainly devoid of historic 
overtones. 

Two kinds of adverse criticism are fre- 
quently launched against such work. It is an 
art of "nothingness," we are sometimes told, 
and it is an art which denies the kind of 
personal and aesthetic self-expression which 
for a long time has been considered one of the 
great values of art. 

There are certainly works being produced 
today which seem to many of us devoid of 
meaning and which also seem to tell us very 
little about their creators. But the hangers-on 
of every historic style in times past produced 
works which in any true or significant sense 
seem to us meaningless, and there were artists 
in the past who expressed, not themselves, but 
lessons learned by rote from more potent 
sources. We must judge every movement by 
its successes, not by its failures. And it is by 
no means impossible that we are at this stage 
seeing the emergence of a kind of aesthetic 
thinking which is not only in tune with the 
unique conditions of our moment in history, 
but also capable of expressions of significance 
and truth. I think we must accept the fact 
that singleness of purpose and the unity of 
imagery (even to the extent of undifferen- 
tiated forms, colors, or textures) are not neces- 
sarily and always a negation of meaning, an 
acceptance of nothingness. The infinite exists 
within the single unit as well as within com- 
plex proliferations of multiple units. 

There is a stripping away of everything 
which might be considered extraneous. Such 
young painters as Brice Marden and Donald 



Kaufman present us with works which in one 
sense are devoid of illusion or suggestion, 
which every trace of "illustration" has beet 
rejected. We see these very much as we se 
isolated objects of the natural world. They 
negate shape, subject, and form. Sometime 
the pure field of color is handled with greater 
surface variation, as in the paintings of Jules 
Olitski and Vic Smith, but remains a singu- 
larly concentrated expression. 

The traditionalist, whether he be creator or 
spectator, will of course ask how far it is pos- 
sible to carry an aesthetic philosophy which 
rejects more and more contacts with the ex- 
ternal world at the same time that it avoids 
the kind of self-realization which for at least a 
century has been basic to modem art. When 
we encounter works which present us with the 
frames of elaborate medieval triptychs con- 
taining panels painted in absolutely undifTer- 
entiated flat colors, or when we see the work 
of artists who are now showing completely 
empty frames, we are forced to wonder 
whether we are witnessing the end of art as it 
has been known in the past. It is quite pos- 
sible for works which contain no trace of 
obvious symbolism to be themselves symbols, 
and it may be that the austere avoidance of 
involvement which such works suggest is aii 
inevitable expression of some of the character- 
istic qualities of our times. The paradox lies 
in the fact that while we accept the fact that 
we begin once again to concentrate on the 
work of art as such, instead of on the imique 
personality of the artist as a specific human 
being, the work may lose exactly those quali- 



ties which have, in the past, made the study of 
works of art a life-enhancing occupation. 

Where does this leave the kind of painting 
which is generally called abstract expression- 
ism or action painting? For twenty years this 
has been a powerful and pervasive movement 
in American art. It has had a profound influ- 
ence on art education, and it is possible that it 
will find its final fortress in the schools, which 
do not easily give up a point of view which has 
been basic to educational philosophy for a 
generation. The leading artists who pioneered 
this effort are now men and women in their 
late forties and fifties or early sixties; this is 
a style which has reached full maturity and 
which is now seen as a generally conservative 
element. Not many artists in their thirties, 
and till fewer in their twenties, find the ab- 
stract expressionist idiom congenial — or at 
any rate, they seem unable to use this lan- 
guage with the energy and inventiveness of 
their older contemporaries. Such artists as 
Kenzo Okada, Willem de Kooning, Philip 
Guston, William Kienbusch, and Friedel Dzu- 
bas are now seen as having a kind of old 
masterish aura which sits a bit uneasily on 
their shoulders. 

But many artists refuse to see man as a 
machine, and are unwilling to resign from 
humanistic contacts. They continue to be in- 
volved with man as a complex physical form 
and as the great enduring motif for the ex- 
pression of the individual personal problem. 
Such painters as Morris Broderson and Ben 
Kamahira are, at first glance, deceptively old- 
fashioned, with their scrupulous regard for the 
external realities of material experience, but 



their art turns out to be surprisingly symbolic, 
full of ambiguous undefined references, almost 
demanding that the individual work be placed 
in an actual sequence, opposed to the now 
popular policy of complete independence of 
the individual work of art. Broderson's paint- 
ing is one of a lengthy and ambitious series 
which explores and expresses a significant 
theme from many difTerent points of view; 
in a sense, it is literary, just as was much of 
the great church art of the past. Other 
humanist artists see the great image in more 
fluent terms : the rich illusionism of Jack Le- 
vine, the powerful emergence of the figure 
from within the medium of Nathan OUveira. 
A joyful, healthy, rich mingling of figures and 
enveloping nature characterizes the paintings 
of Morton Kaisch, and it is reassuring to see 
the refinement and control of Isabel Bishop in 
a work of singular charm, or the fine simplic- 
ity of Fairfield Porter. The expressionistic 
tradition, in which the figure is intensified 
and enriched but without losing contact with 
the motif outside of the artist's own mind, is 
powerfully handled by Abraham Rattner and 
with boisterous vigor by Lee Savage. John 
Paul Jones romantically merges the figure 
with a consuming landscape, while Robert 
Bechtle hides it in precise shadowy space. 
That it is still possible to deal with the theme 
with old-time bravura and brilliance is seen 
in the recent work of Paul Georges, an aston- 
ishing recrudescence. 

Surely it is significant that the motif of the 
human figure missing from an environment 
which implies that it is present emerges in a 
time like ours. This is encountered in the most 



direct and dramatic way in the work of John 
Battenberg, whose extraordinar)' compositions 
of military uniforms in poses of vehement ac- 
tivity astonish us by their actual emptiness. 
Here are garments which are molded into 
movement in a highly personal way, but the 
individual is not there. More and more we 
seem to concentrate upon disembodied action, 
rather than upon individual initiative and 
realization, or rather than upon personal con- 
frontation. Nor it is lacking in significance 
that Battenberg's uniforms belong to the 
period of World War I and not to the pres- 
ent; a haunting and a haunted quality has 
brought these remnants of a violent past into 
a ghostly kind of energetic but impersonal life. 
Harold Tovish also deals with man as a miss- 
ing element — a negative form, an impression 
of a reality which has vanished. 

One result of the space age has been, in 
many works, the abandonment of the tradi- 
tional sense of gravity as the controlling and 
determining factor of composition. The art 
of the past was based on the idea that all 
forms in space were related in a gravitational 
sense to the earth's surface, and proportions 
and relationships were developed instinctively 
by the artist on this premise. Today we are 
no longer earth-bound, and the traditional 
pull toward that part of the material universe 
we happen to inhabit no longer strikes us as 
the only or the inevitable way of ordering the 
shapes and the relationships with which the 
artist deals. The reaUty of man moving 
weightlessly in the infinite space of a universe 
which is not only vastly larger than that con- 
ceived by mankind in ancient times, but into 



which he has himself actually penetrated, h 
not been without effect on the artist, 
may be an obvious theme in itself, as we see i 
Sam Richardson's astronaut lifting off, but ij 
will also reveal itself in the figural images 
George Cohen, which move in large diagon 
directions in opposition to the picture fram( 
and to any implication of a stationary horizon, 
The motif of the falling man has been develi 
oped with symbolic power by Ernest Trovai 
often this repeated image moves in circular 
arrangements which make it impossible for us 
to say that the work has a top or a bottom. 
The isolation of realistically descriptive details 
torn out of context and floating in a kind of 
negative blankness in Joe RafTaele's work are 
further examples of a space sense which has 
abandoned all traces of formal perspective as 
a control. The violently foreshortened figures 
of Richard Lytle destroy any sense of the pic- 
ture plane. John Hultberg's dramatic dis- 
tances sweep into deep but still architectural 
space, but seem to detach themselves from a 
stable frame. 

Not unrelated to this feeling of forms freed 
from the controls of classical space and the re- 
straints this imposes is the increasing tendency 
to avoid the pure rectangle as the almost in- 
evitable and invariable shape for a work of 
two-dimensional art, or else to swing it around 
so that it is seen on a diagonal axis. Diamond 
shapes or lozenges acquire a new potency, just 
as it no longer seems possible to avoid actual^ 
physical space relationships in many com^ 
positions. 

The kind of involvement with the smashing 
visual images of commerce and advertising 



d 

I 



and mass appeal which, a few years ago, led 
to the development of pop art, is no longer as 
widespread as it was. The pop artists opened 
our eyes to expressive and sjinbolic possibil- 
ities in terms whose banality and obviousness 
was a part of their power; though, on the 
whole, this movement seems to have lost the 
forward impulse it once had. But there is still 
work coming out of this aspect of the raw 
material of art which impresses us with its 
authority. Robert Indiana's work has now 
reached a stage of almost classic distinction; 
no one else has been able to glorify the sign, 
the signal, the stencil, to the extent that he 
has. The vast billboard details of James 
Rosenquist, often frighteningly unrelated one 
to another, continue to overwhelm us. Andy 
Warhol's mechanical reproductions of familiar 
images beat a kind of cumulative tattoo on 
our sensibilities and make an effect through 
sheer repetition. Here it is the sensibility of 
the spectator, not of the creator, which is 
brought into play. Such popular images as 
fashion models, children's toys, comic strip 
figures, appear as sources in works by Ronald 
Kitaj, Robert Nelson, and Larry Rivers. 
There is a hearty, good-natured, mindless 
enthusiasm in the work of Roy Schnackenberg 
which makes one feel good. A strange min- 
gling of the ordinary and the exotic, the near 
and the far, removes the work of Frank Gallo 
from any of the obvious categories in which 
we are inclined to place it. 

Another groups of artists, instead of delving 
within their own individual personalities, or 
measuring the infinite in one way or another, 
or submitting themselves to the restraints of 
formal systems, seems to probe into the phys- 



ical reality of matter. There is something 
organic, even visceral, about some recent 
imagery. It penetrates beneath surface ap- 
pearances, and reveals a kind of life which is 
intense, even though it does not involve the 
specific individuality of either the artist or 
some animate being separate from him. Some- 
times, as in the sculpture of Roger Bolomey, 
it is raw nature, unshaped in any overt way, 
with which we seem to come to grips — there 
is something geological, pre-human, about this 
artist's work. Daniel Shapiro creates forms 
which are turgid, expanded or inflated by 
some organic impulse which works from with- 
in out to the surface. Deborah Remington's 
precise abstract paintings delicately define 
structural, almost evolutionary, kinds of rela- 
tionships, while patterns of growth are traced 
in the proliferating plastic forms of William 
Dubin. Sometimes the eternal renewal of 
organic life is suggested by the world-egg 
which Louis Schanker confines within archi- 
tectural boundaries; sometimes it is expressed 
in recognizable anatomical form, as in the 
strange figures of Richard Boyce, which com- 
bine monumental proportions with intense in- 
ternal activity and a curious floating lightness. 
What will happen next? The thing that 
never ceases to interest us is that we do not 
really know. The creation of works of art is 
not part of a predetermined plan. It develops 
through the unique confrontation of a specific 
individual and a particular combination of 
events and situations. It is often a surprise. 
Whether there are seminal works by young 
artists in the present exhibition which may 
direct the course of the future only time can 
tell. Allen S. Weller 



CATALOOIIB 



page 136 


1 


ARLO ACTON 

Circle in the Sun 


page 144 


2 


SAMUEL M. ADLER 

Construction with 5 Figures 


page 84 


3 


THOMAS F. AKAWiE 

Santa Maria del Fiore 


page 98 


4 


ARAKAWA 

Bottomless 


page 66 


5 


ROBERT BARNES 

Untitled 


page 40 


6 


JOHN N. BATTENBERG 

Johnny's First Trip 


page 142 


7 


HERBERT BAYER 

Suspended 


page 68 


8 


ROBERT ALAN BECHTLE 

French Door 


page 162 


9 


FLETCHER BENTON 

Synchronetic C-11 


page 75 


10 


ISABEL BISHOP 

Study for Undressing on the Bed 


page 64 


11 


ROGER BOLOMEY 

Hoboken*12 


page 110 


12 


RICHARD BOYCE 



Proteus Changing I 



page 164 


13 


MORRIS BRODERSON 

T.izzie Borden Standing 


page 134 


14 


LOUIS BUNCE 

Two Figuration 


page 55 


15 


PAUL CADMUS 

Family Group 


page 76 


16 


ENRIQUE CASTRO-CiD 

Anthropomorphicals I and II 


page 178 


17 


GEORGE COHEN 

Untitled 


page 167 


18 


ALBERTO COLLIE 

Spatial Absolute *3 


page 183 


19 


JOSEPH CORNELL 

Apollinaris 


page 156 


20 


PETER DECHAR 

Pears 


page 177 


21 


WILLEM DE KOONING 

Big Blonde 


page 79 


22 


WILLIAM DOLE 

Mandate 


page 86 


23 


WILLIAM DUBIN 

Tertiumquid 


page 159 


24 


FRIEDEL DZUBAS 

Mountainside 



page 122 


25 


MAX FINKELSTEIN 

Square Plus 200 


page 118 


26 


DEAN FLEMING 

Laser's Edge 


page 107 


27 


LILLIAN FLORSHEIM 

Squares on Diagonal with Rods 


page 82 


28 


PETER FORAKIS 

Magic Box I 


page 163 


29 


HELEN FRANKENTHALER 

Santorini 


page 123 


30 


JOHN FREEMAN 

3 Star 


page 128 


31 


FRANK GALLO 

Love Object 


page 160 


32 


HERBERT GEORGE 

Dance Like A Coiruna 


page 44 


33 


PAUL GEORGES 



page 54 



page 181 



34 



page 62 35 



36 



Self-portrait with Model 

GERALD GOOCH 

Counter-clockwise 

JAMES GRANT 

Black-White & Blue 

PHILIP GUSTON 

Heir 



page 111 37 



page 106 



page 50 



38 



39 



GRACE HARTIGAN 

Mistral 

ROBERT HARVEY 

French Opera Barbershop 
(Walker Evans Series) 

DUAYNE HATCHETT 

Summer Solstice 



page 155 


40 


JOHN HELIKER 

Still Life with Sugar Bowl 


page 119 


41 


CHARLES HiNMAN 

Red/Black 


page 57 


42 


JOHN HULTBERG 

Great Glass Roof 


page 46 


43 


ROBERT INDIANA 

Louisiana 


page 90 


44 


WILL INSLEY 

Untitled 


page 114 


45 


JAMES JARVAISE 

LL*8 


page 124 


46 


PAUL JENKINS 

Phenomena Distant Reverberation 


page 91 


47 


HOWARD JONES 

Area Two 


page 115 


48 


JOHN PAUL JONES 

Sentinel 



page 172 


49 


MORTON KAISH 

The Women 


page 51 


50 


BEN KAMIHIRA 

Nude 


page 130 


51 


CRAIG KAUFFMAN 

Chartreuse-Red 


page 174 


52 


DONALD KAUFMAN 

Thatcher and Grand 


page 74 


53 


WILLIAM KIENBUSCH 

Winter 


page 112 


54 


JEROME F. KIRK 

Big Lotus 


page 83 


55 


MASATOYO KISHI 

Opus 66-C-12 


page 87 


56 


R. B. KITAJ 

The Nice Old Man and the Pretty Girl 
(with Huskies) 


page 63 


57 


GERALD LAING 

Slot 


page 78 


58 


JOSEF LEVI 

VinumS 


page 60 


59 


JACK LEVINE 

The Age of Steel 


page 170 


60 


ALEXANDER LIBERMAN 

Colloquy 



page 132 


61 


RICHARD LYTLE « 

The Slide 


page 100 


62 


NOEL MAHAFFEY 

My Brother with Janis 


page 180 


63 


RONALD MALLORY 

Untitled 


page 138 


64 


BRICE MARDEN 

Nebraska 


page 102 


65 


JOHN MCLAUGHLIN 

*9-1965 


page 94 


66 


JOAN MITCHELL 

Untitled 


page 139 


67 


JAMES MONTE 

Series Ell 


page 152 


68 


ROBERT MOTHERWELL 

Untitled 


page 120 


69 


GEORGE MUELLER 

Octagonal Porch 


page 72 


70 


ROBERT A. NELSON 

Andrew Jackson with Ray Gun 


page 151 


71 


LOWELL NESBITT 

Belle Grove Plantation 


page 43 


72 


KENNETH NOLAND 

Opt 



page 135 


73 


KENZO OKADA 

Open 


page 103 


74 


JULES OLITSKI 

Iron and Powder 


page 182 


75 


NATHAN OLIVEIRA 

Standing Man and Window 


page 148 


76 


BARBRO OSTLIHN 

Erik's House 


page 52 


77 


ABRAHAM PALATNIK 

Sequencia Visual P-53 


page 80 


78 


PHILIP PEARLSTEIN 

Model Reclining on Couch 


page 176 


79 


CLAYTON PINKERTON 

Hollywood Party 


page 154 


80 


FAIRFIELD PORTER 

Elizabeth 


page 99 


81 


HARVEY QUAYTMAN 

Mainechance 


page 48 


82 


JOE RAFFAELE 

Heads, Bird 


page 179 


83 


RICHARD K. RANDELL 

Big Zero 


page 92 


84 


ABRAHAM RATTNER 



The Red Carpet 



page 166 85 DEBORAH REMINGTON 

Canyon 

page 126 86 SAM RICHARDSON 

Straight Up 

page 147 87 LARRY RIVERS 

Don't FaU 

page 168 88 JAMES ROSENQUIST 

Painting for the American Negro 

page 71 89 EDWIN RUDA 

Blake's Eye II 

page 150 90 W. LEE SAVAGE 

Automobile 

page 171 91 LOUIS SCHANKER 

Variation on a Theme 

page 59 92 MIRIAM SCHAPIRO 

Untitled (Empire) 

page 116 93 JULIUS SCHMIDT 

Untitled 

page 104 94 ROY SCHNACKENBERG 

Green Bird on Red Background 

page 127 95 ROBERT HARLEY SEYLE 

Nail Relief VI 

page 95 96 DANIEL SHAPIRO 

Peaceful Triptych 



page 158 


97 


KENDALL SHAW 

Youth Diving 


page 175 


98 


VIC SMITH 

Albatross II 


page 70 


99 


V. DOUGLAS SNOW 

Plateau 


page 67 


100 


SUNG WOO CHUN 

Mandala Tradition *2 


page 140 


101 


WAYNE THIEBAUD 

Two Sitting Figures 


page 146 


102 


HAROLD TOVISH 

Passage 


page 88 


103 


ERNEST T. TROVA 

Study, Falling Man: 24" Wal 


page 108 


104 


RICHARD VAN BUREN 

Zamir 


page 47 


105 


GREGORIO VARDANEGA 

Relief Electronique 


page 58 


106 


VASA (VELIZAR MIHICH) 

Contact 


page 96 


107 


ANDY WARHOL 

Jackie 


page 42 


108 


JOHN WILLENBECHER 

Daynight *2 



page 131 109 



page 143 110 



JACK YOUNGERMAN 

Springs 

NORMAN ZAMMITT 

^3807-2 



All dimensions are given in inches, height first, width second, 
depth third. 

Tlic dates in parentheses, following the name of the artist's 
gallery, indicate years of previous University of Illinois ex- 
hibitions of Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture 
in which the artist's work has been included. The location of 
such exhibitions presented before 1961 is designated as Uni- 
versity of Illinois, Urbana; of those presented since 1961, as 
Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign. 

The biographical data for the artists represented in this exhibi- 
tion has been prepared by Deborah A. Jones, Assistant 
Curator, Krannert Art Museum. 



1 



40 




^■^v.f;pi. 



BATTENBERG/41 

6 



JOHN N. BATTENBKRG, Johnny's First Trip, 
1966. Cast aluminum, 9f) x 77 x 58. Esther- 
Robles Gallery, Los Angeles. 

John Battenbcrg was born in Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, in 1931. He has studied at the University 
of AVisconsin, Madison, 1949-50; Saint Cloud 
State College, Minnesota, where he received his 
B.A. degree in 1955; Ruskin School of Drawing 
and of Fine Art, Oxford, 1956-57; Michigan 
State University, East Lansing, where he received 
his M..A.. degree in 1960; and the California Col- 
lege of .Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 1963-64. As a 
student Mr. Battenberg was the recipient of teach- 
ing assistantships from Michigan .State Univer- 
sity and the California College of Arts and 
Crafts. He has taught at New Mexico Western 
College, Silver City, 1962-63; Contra Costa Col- 
lege, San Pablo, California, 1964-66, and is 
presently teaching at San Jose State College. He 
lives in Castro \'alley, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Battenberg's work 
have been held at the Wustum Museum of Fine 
.Arts, Racine, Wisconsin, 1955; Saint Cloud State 
College, Minnesota, 1955; Michigan State Uni- 
versity, East Lansing, 1960; Temple Gallery, 
London, 1961; Contemporaries, Sante Fe, 1963; 
Richmond Art Center, California, 1964; Comara 
Gallery, Los Angeles, 1965; The Hansen Gal- 
leries, San Francisco, 1965. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the RB.A. Galleries, London, 1956; Brad- 
ford City Art Gallery, England, 1957; Joslyn Art 
Museum, Omaha, 1958; GAGA Galleries, Boston, 
1959; Michigan State University, Kresge Art 
Center, East" Lansing, I960; Walker Galleries, 
Woodstock Galleries," London, 1960; Milwaukee 
Art Center, 1960; The Pennsylvania .Academy of 
the Fine .Arts, Philadelphia, 1960; Oklahoma Art 
Center, Oklahoma City, 1962; St. Paul's Church, 
Peoria, Illinois, 1962; Western Washington State 
College, Bellingham, 1964; Kaiser Center, Oak- 
land, 1964; Richmond .Art Center, California, 
1964, 1966; California State Fair & Exposition 
Art Show, Sacramento, 1964-65; San Francisco 
Art Institute, 1964; Pacific Northwest Arts and 
Crafts Association, Bellevue, Washington, 1965; 
Museum West, San Francisco, 1965; Pavilion 
Gallery, Newport Beach, California, 1966; San 
Fernando State College, Northridge, California, 
1966; E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, Sacramento, 
1966; The Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego, 1966; 
The Hansen Galleries and Western Association 
of Art Museums, San Francisco, 1966; Santa .Ana 
College, California, 1966; Gordon \Voodside Gal- 
lery, Seattle, 1966. 

Mr. Battenberg's work is in many collections 
in the United States and abroad including those 
of Michigan State University, East Lansing; 
Leistershire County Council, Leistershire, En- 
gland; Saint Cloud State College, Minnesota; 
New Mexico Western College, Silver City. 



42/wiLLENBECHER 



JOHN WILLENBECHER, Daynight #2, Spring 
1966. Wood and glass construction, 28x28x5. 
Richard Feigen Gallery, New York & Chicago. 

John AVillenbecher was born in Macungie, 
Pennsylvania, in 1936. He studied at The Mer- 
cersburg Academy, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, 
1950-54; Brown University, Providence, Rhode 
Island, where he received a B.A. degree, 1958; 
and New York University, New York, 1958-61. 
He lives in New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Willenbccher's work 
have been held at the Feigen-Herbert Gallery, 
New York, 1963; Richard Feigen Gallery, Chi- 
cago, 1964; Feigen/Palmer Gallerv, Los Angeles, 
1964; Richard Feigen Galler>', New York, 1965, 
1966. His work has been included in group exhi- 
bitions at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 
1963; Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles, 1963; Univer- 



sity of New Mexico, .Albuquerque, 1964; The 
Betty Parsons Gallery, New York, 1964; Whitney 
Museum of .American .Art, New York, 1964, 1965; 
Rhode Lsland School of Design, Providence, 1964; 
Ravinia Park, Highland Park, Illinois, 1965; The 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 1965; The Byron 
Gallery, Leo Castelli Gallery, The Kornblee Gal- 
lery, Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1965; 
Larry Aldrich Foundation ^Iuseum, Ridgefield, 
Connecticut, 1965; Institute of Contemporary 
•Art, Rigelhaupt Gallery, Boston, 1966; Harvard 
University, Cambridge, 1966; Stedelijk van 
.Abbe-Museum, Eindhoven, Holland, 1966; The 
Museum of Fine .Arts, Houston, 1966; Occidental 
College, Los Angeles, 1966; Finch College, God- 
dard-Riverside Community Center, Grippi & 
Waddell, Whitney Museum of .American .Art. 
New York, 1966; Larry .Aldrich Foundation Mu- 
seum, Ridgefield, Connecticut, 1966. 




KENNETH NOLAND, Ojit, 1966. Acrylic on 
canvas, 108x60. .\iidic Emmerich Gallery, New 
Yorlc. (1965) 

Kenneth Nolaud was born in .\shcvillo. North 
Carolina, in 1924. He studied at Black Mountain 
College, North Carolina, and at the Ossip Zad- 
kine School of Sculpture, Paris, 1948-49. He has 
taught at the Institute of Contemporary .Arts and 
at Catholic Uni\ersity, AVashinglon. DC. He 
lives in .South .Shaftshury, N'ermont. 

Mr. Nolaud has received awards from the In- 
stitute Torcuato di Telia, liuenos Aires, 1961, 
and Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachu- 
setts, 196.5. Special exhibitions of his work have 
been held at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New- 
York, 1956-38; French & Companv, Inc., New 
York, 1959; Galcria deir.Arietc, Milan, 1960; 
Bennington College, X'erniont, 1961; .Andre Em- 
merich' Gallery, New York, 1961, 1962, 1963, 
1965, 1966; Galerie Lawrence, Pari.s, 1961, 1963; 
Galerie Neuf\'ille, Paris, 1961; Galerie Schmela, 
Dusseldorf, 19()2, 19t)4; Galerie Charles Lienhard, 
Zurich, 1962; Kasniin Gallery, Ltd., London, 
1963, 1965; The Jewish Museum, New York, 
1965; David Mirvish (iallery, Toronto, 1965. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Samuel M. Kootz Gallery, Inc., 
New' York, 1954; Whitney Museum of .American 
Art, New York, 1957, 1963; The Corcoran Gal- 
lery of Art, Washington, DC, 1958, 1963; The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museuin, New York, 
1961; The Jewish Museum, New York, 1962; 
World's Fair, Seattle, 1962; Brandeis L'niversity, 
Waltham. Mas,sachusetts, 1962; The Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago, 1963; Instituto Torcuato di 
Telia, Buenos .Aires, 1964; Kunsthalle, Basel, 
Switzerland, 1965; Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, 1965; J. L. Hud.son Art Gallery, Detroit, 
1965; The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 
1965; Rockford .Art .Association, Illinois, 1965; 
San Francisco Museum of Art, 1965; The Cleve- 
land Museum of .Art, 1966; Larry Aldrich Foun- 
dation Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut, 1966; 
The New Brunswick Museum of Art, .Saint John, 
1966; David Mirvish CJallery, Toronto, 1966; The 
Washington Gallcrv of Modern Art, Washington, 
D.C., 1966. 

Mr. Noland's work is in the collections of the 
Instituto Torcuato di Telia, Buenos .Aires; .Al- 
bright-Knox .Art Gallen-, Buffalo; Harvard L"ni- 
versity, Cambridge; The Detroit Institute of .Arts; 
Michigan State L'nivcrsity, East Lansing; Israel 
Museum, Jerusalem; Tate Gallery, London; 
Whitney Museum of .American Art, New York; 
Brandeis University, \Valtham, Massachusetts; 
The Washington Gallery of Modern Art. 



noland/ 



43 




44 




GlORGiSJ^S 



PAUL GEORGES, Selj-portrait with Model 
1965. Oil on canvas, 72x51. Allan Fiumkin 
Gallery, New \o\k. 

Paul Georges was born in Portland, Oregon, in 
1923. He studied at the University of Oregon, 
Eugene, and with Fernand Leger in France from 
1949-52 and later with Hans Hoffman. In 1964 
he taught at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New 
Hampshire, and lectured at Yale University, New 
Haven, Connecticut. He lives in .Sagaponack, 
Long Island, New York. 

Mr. Georges has received awards from Hall- 
mark Cards, Inc., Kansas City, 1961, and The 
Pennsylvania .Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadel- 
phia, 1964. Special exhibitions of his work have 
been held at Reed College, Portland, Oregon, 
1948, 1956, 1961; the University of Oregon, 
Eugene, 1956; Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 
1956; Zabriskic Gallerv, New York, 1959; Great 
Jones Galleiy, New Vork, 1960, 1961; Allan 
Frumkin Gallerv, Chicago, 1962, 1964; Allan 
Frumkin Gallery, New York, 1962, 1964, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The .'\rt Institute of Chicago, 1962; Whit- 
ney Museum of American Art, New York, 1962, 
1964, 1966; Boston University, 1964; The Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 
1964; New School for Social Research, New- 
York, 1965; University of Texas, .Austin, 1966. 

Mr. Gcorges's work is in the collections of the 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; Hall- 
mark Cards, Inc., Kansas City; The Museum of 
Modern .Art, New York University, \Vhitney 
Museum of .American Art, New York; Reed Col- 
lege, Portland, Oregon. 



46 



/INDIANA 




ROBERT INDIANA, Louisiana, 1966. Oil on 
canvas, 70x60. Dayton's Gallery 12, Minne- 
apolis. (1965) 

Robert Indiana was bom in New Castle, Indi- 
ana, in 1928. He attended The John Herron Art 
Institute, Indianapolis, 1945-46; School of Art, 
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, 1947- 
48; The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, 
1949-53; Skowhegan School of Painting and 
Sculpture, Maine, 1953; and The Edinburgh Col- 
lege of Art, Scotland, 1953-54. Mr. Indiana lives 
in New York, New York. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Stable Gallery, New York, 1962, 1964, 
1966; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, 
1963-64; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 1963; 
Rolf Nelson Gallery, Los Angeles, 1965; Galerie 
Schmcla, Dusseldorf, 1966; Stedelijk van Abbe- 
Museum, Eindhoven, Holland, 1966; Museum 
Haus Lange, Krefeld, Germany, 1966; Dayton's 
Gallery 12, Minneapolis, 1966; Wurttemberg- 
ischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart, 1966. 

Mr. Indiana's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Martha Jackson Gallery, New 
York, 1960; Dallas Museum of Contemporary- 
Arts, 1961; The Museum of Modern Art, New 
York, 1961-63, 1965; San Francisco Mu.seum of 
Art, 1961; The Pace Gallery, Boston, 1962; Ga- 
lerie Saqqarah, Gstaad, Switzerland, 1962; Dwan 
Gallery, Los Angeles, 1962; Sidney Janis Caller)-, 
New York, 1962; The Art Institute of Chicago, 
1963; The Contemporary Arts Center, Cincin- 
nati, 1963; Des Moines Art Center, 1963; Beaver- 
brook Art Gallery, Fredericton, New Brunswick, 
1963; Tate Gallery, London, 1963, 1964; Graham 
Gallery, Samuel M. Kootz Gallery, Inc., New 
York, 1963; Centre Culturel Americain, Paris, 
1963; Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachu- 
setts, 1963; The Washington Gallery of Modern 
Art, Washington, D.C.," 1963; Woburn Abbey, 
Woburn, Bedfordshire, England, 1963; Haags 
Gcmeentemuseum, The Hague, 1964; Whitney 
Museum of American Art, New York, 1964, 1965; 
World's Fair, New York, 1964; Krannert Art Mu- 
seum, LIniversity of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 1965; Milwaukee 
.'\rt Center, 1965; Finch College, New York, 1965; 
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New 
\'ork, 1965; The Corco"ian Gallei7 of Art, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1965; The White House, Washing- 
ton, D.C., 1965; Worcester Art Museum, Mas- 
sachusetts, 1965; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 
1966; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, 
1966; Stedelijk van Abbe-Museum, Eindhoven, 
Holland, 1966; Herron Museum of Art, Indi- 
anapolis, 1966; The Pennsylvania Academy of 
the Fine Arts, Phildclphia, 1966; University of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1966. 

Mr. Indiana's work is in the collections of the 
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor; The Baltimore Museum 
of Art"; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, BufTalo; The 
Detroit Institute of Arts; Stedelijk van Abbe- 
Museum, Eindhoven, Holland; Kaiser Wilhelm 
Museum, Krefeld, Germany; University of Ne- 
braska, Lincoln; Los Angeles County ^4oseum 
of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Finch 
College, The Museum of Modern Art, Whitney 
Museum of American Art, New York; Larry 
Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Con- 
necticut; The Art Gallery of Toronto; Brandeis 
University, Waltham, Massachusetts. 



VARDANEGA/47 



73 f^ 



i^jisr^i 



GREGORIO N'ARDANEGA, Relie] Electro- 
niquc, 1964-65. Electronic, 23'/3 x 26'/4. Howard 
AVise Gallery, New York. 

Gregorio Vardanega was born in Venice, Italy, 
in 1923. He studied at the Acadcmia .'\rgcntina 
dc Bellas Artes, Buenos .Aires. Mr. \'ardancga 
lives in Paris, France. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Salon de I'Ameriquc Latine a Paris, 
1948-49; Galerie Colette Allcndy, Salon Pcuscr, 
Paris, 1950; Galerie Kraft, Galerie Kravd, Paris, 
1953; Galerie Gath & Chaves, Paris, 1954; CJa- 
Icrie Galatea, Paris, 1955, 1957; Galerie Muller, 
Paris, 1955; Galerie Estimulo de Bellas .'\rtcs, 
Buenos Aires, 1956, 1958; Galerie Van Riel, 
Paris, 1956; Jardin Botanique de Buenos Aires, 
1957; Museu dc .\rte Moderna de Sao Paulo, 
Brazil, 1957; \V'orld"s Fair, Brussels, 1958; Galerie 
H, Buenos .Aires, 1958; in Paris, 1959; at the Ga- 



lerie Denise Rene, Paris, 1961, 1963, 1965; Musce 
de Rennes, France, 1961; Galerie d'Art Modernc 
de Basel, .Switzerland, 1962; Stadtishes Museum, 
Leverkusen, Germany, 1962; Galerie Creuze, 
Paris, 1962; Musec dWrte Modcrne, Paris, 1962, 
1963, 1964; Galerie Hyblcr, Copenhagen, 1963; 
in Dusseldorf, Germany, 1963, 1965; at the Ga- 
lerie Cadario, Milan, 1963; in Venice, Italy, 1963; 
at the Moderna Galerija, Zagreb, Yugoslavia, 
1963; Gimpel & Hanover Galerie, Zurich, 1964; 
Staatliche Kunsthalle, Baden-Baden, Germany, 
1965; in Berne, Switzerland, 1965; Brussels, Bel- 
gium, 1965; at the .Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 
Buffalo, 1965; The Museum of Modern Art, New 
York, 1965; Salon d'.Automne, Grand Palais, 
Paris, 1965; Galerie Blcue, Stockholm, 1965; 
Maison de la Culture de Caen, France, 1966. 

Mr. N'ardanega's work is represented in numer- 
ous public and private collections. 




48 RAfFAELE 



iui 



mix 



JOE RAFFAELE, Heads, Bird, 1966. Oil on 
canvas, 76x50. Stable Gallery, New York. 

"My work is primarily about the things pic- 
tured in it. Their description is objective and 
their presence detached. They are homeless, yet 
independent and self-contained. Before anything 
else, they are what they are. If nostalgia is 
stirred within the viewer, it will have more to do 
with the viewer than with the images them- 
selves." (Courtesy of Art in America, Vol. LIV, 
No. 4, 1966, p. 34.) 

Joe Raffaele was born in Brooklyn, New York, 
in 1933. He attended The Cooper Union School 
of Art and Architecture, New York, 1951-54, and 
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, where 
he received liis B.F.A. degree in 1955. Mr. 
RafTacle was awarded a scholarship to the Yale 
Summer School of Music and Art, Norfolk, Con- 
necticut, 1954; a Fulbright Fellowship to study 
in Florence and Rome, 1958; and a Louis Com- 
fort Tiffany Foundation scholarship, 1961. He 
lives in New York, New York. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Raffaele's work have 
been held at the Kanegis Gallery, Boston, 1958; 
Galleria Numero, Florence, 1959; D'Arcy Gal- 
lery, New York, 1963; and the Stable Gallery, 
New York, 1965, 1966. His work has been in- 
cluded in group exhibitions at The Art Listitute 
of Chicago, 1965; Agricultural and Technical 
College of North Carolina, Greensboro, 1966; 
Yale L'niversity, New Haven, Connecticut, 1966; 
The Museum of Modern Art, The Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1966; Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1966; Larry 
Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Con- 
necticut, 1966; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, 
Washington, D.C., 1966. 



49 






50 HATCHETT 

7^ c<d J>'V- 



DUAYNE HATCHETT, Summer Solstice, 1966. 
Aluminum, 58'/i x 30 x 1 12. Royal Marks Gal- 
lery, New York. 

"My concern in sculpture has been to control 
idea and mass in a form involving the observer 
as a participant by reflecting man's idea devel- 
opments. Areas of the unknown today are fron- 
tiers symbolized by programmed machines and 
orbiting hardware. 

"The artist in our past could reflect his time 
in a more objective manner with emphasis on 
the strength of the individual. Today sculpture 
is very time and environment conscious with 
masses which not only displace a given area of 
space, but involve the observer with his own 
emotions." 

Duayne Hatchett was born in Shawnee, Okla- 
homa, in 1925. He studied at the University of 
Missouri, Columbia, 1944-45, and at the Univer- 
sitv of Oklahoma, Norman, where re received his 
B.F.A. degree, 1950, and his M.F.A. degree, 1952. 
He has taught at the University of Oklahoma, 
Norman, 1949-50; Oklahoma City Universitv, 
1951-54; University of Tulsa, 1954-64; The Ohio 
State University, Columbus, 1964-65. Mr. Hat- 
chett lives in Columbus, Ohio. 

In 1963 and 1964 special exhibitions of Mr. 



Hatchett's work were held at the Bryson Gallery, 
Columbus, Ohio; Calhoun Galleries, Dallas; Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma, Norman; Oklahoma Art 
Center, Oklahoma City; Oklahoma State Univer- 
sity, Stillwater; Philbrook Art Center, Tulsa; and 
at the Royal Marks Gallery, New York, 1966. 
From 1963 to 1965 Mr. Hatchett's work has been 
included in group exhibitions at the Phillips 
Academy of .American Art, Andover, Massachu- 
setts; Dallas Museum of Contemporary .Xrts; 
Dallas Museum of Fine Arts; The .Arkansas .Arts 
Center, Little Rock; Royal Marks Gallery, and 
the World's Fair, New York. 

Mr. Hatchett's work is in the collections of the 
Phillips Academy of American Art, .Andover, 
Massachu.setts; Dallas Museum of Contemporary 
.Arts; University of Oklahoma, Norman; Okla- 
homa Art Center, Oklahoma Fair Board, Okla- 
homa City; Larry Aldrich Foundation Museum, 
Ridgefield, Connecticut. His architectural com- 
missions include works for Northeastern State 
College Library, Alva, Oklahoma; Trader's Na- 
tional Bank, Kansas City, Missouri; Mr. Truitt 
Coston, Oklahoma City; Dr. Yale Andlcman, 
Boston .Avenue Methodist Church, Couch Pre- 
scription Shop, First National Bank, Mr. Charles 
Goodall, Mr. Murray McCune, Tulsa Fire De- 
partment Headquarters, Tulsa. 




KAMIHI 



RAJ 



51 



BEN KAMIHIRA, Nude, 1966. Oil on ranvas, 
42 X 42. Forum Gallery, Inc., New York. 

Ben Kaniihira was born in Yakima, Washing- 
ton, in 1925. He studied at the .Art Institute of 
Pittsburgh and at The Pennsylvania ."Vcademy of 
the Fine Arts, Philadelphia. Mr. Kamihira was 
the recipient of a Cresson Traveling Fellowship, 
1951; J. Henry Scheidt Traveling Scholarship, 
1952; and a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation 
scholarship. He has taught at Pennsylvania State 
University, 1954; the Philadelphia Museum of 
Art; and The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts from 1953 to the present. He lives in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Kamihira has received awards from the 
National .Academy of Design, New York, 1952, 
1958, 1962; The Pennsylvania Academv of the 
Fine Art.s, Philadelphia, 1958; Wilkie-Buick Re- 
gional Exhibition, 1960; Silverminc Guild of 
Artists, New Canaan, Connecticut, 1961; The 
C'.orcoran Gallery of .Art. \\'ashington, D.C., 1961: 



Chautauqua Exhibition, Chautauqua, New York, 
1962; The Art Institute of Chicago, 1964; Na- 
tional Institute of .Arts and Letters, New York, 
1965. Special exhibitions of his work have been 
held at The Philadelphia Art Alliance, 1954; The 
Pennsylvania .Academy of the Fine Arts, Phila- 
delphia, 1956, 1965; Janet Ne.ssler Gallcrv, New 
York, 1962; Durlacher Brothers, New York, 19(i4; 
Forum Gallery, Inc., New York, 1966. 

Mr. Kamihiras work has been included in 
group exhibitions at The Art Institute of Cihicago; 
The Museum of Modern .Art, National .Academy 
of Design, Whitney Museum of .American .Art, 
New York; The Pennsylvania Academy of the 
Fine Arts, Philadelphia; Museum of .Art, Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh; Butler Institute of American 
-Art, Youngstown. His work is in the collections 
of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center; Dallas 
Museum of Fine .Arts; AVhitney Museum of 
.American Art, New A'ork; The Pennsylvania 
.Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; John 
and Mabie Riiigling Museum of .Art, Sarasota. 




52 



/PALATNIK 



ABRAHAM PALATNIK, Sequenda Vinial P- 
53, 1965. Lightbox, sequence 7'15", 44x29. 
Howard Wise Galler)', New York. 

Abraham Palatnik was born in Natal, Brazil, 
in 1928. He studied art in Israel and Brazil. He 
has also spent a considerable amount of time 
designing industrial machinery and control sys- 
tems. Mr. Palatnik lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

For his first "cinechromatic" work Mr. Palat- 
nik received an award from the Museu de Arte 
Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil. Since 1960 six 
special exhibitions of his work have been held, 
and his work has been in many group exhibitions 
including those at the Galerie IDenise Rene, Paris, 
1964; Studio F, Ulm, Germany, 1964; Venice 
Biennale d'arte, 1964; Institute of Contemporary 
Art, Boston, 1965; Royal College of Art, London, 
1965; Salon Comparison, Paris, 1965; Museo 
de I'Arte Moderna, Buenos .-Mres, 1966^ Con- 
temporary Arts Association, Houston, 1966. 

His work is in the collection of the Museum of 
Image and Sound, Rio de Janeiro. 




53 





54 



/gooch 



GERALD GOOCH, Counter-clockwise, 1966. 
Lithograph and oil on plexiglas, 31 x 43. Arleigh 
Gallery, San Francisco. 

"There is no one answer to my work, for I 
work consciously and unconsciously with dif- 
ferent ends in mind. For me to discuss what is 
happening in my work would destroy my goal 
as an artist. Each person should be able to find 
something in the work for himself. Hopefully 
each viewer will see a story or an entire new 
thing by projecting his imagination into the 
work." 

Gerald Gooch was born in West Virginia in 
1932. He studied at the California College of 
Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 1962-66. He lives in 
Oakland, California. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Derby Street Gallery, Berkeley, 1965; Uni- 
versity of Colorado, Colorado Springs, 1965; 
.•\rleigh Gallery, San Francisco, 1966. His work 
has been included in group exhibitions at The 
Pasadena Art Museum, 1964; Richmond Art 
Center, California, 1966; E. B. Crocker Art Gal- 
lery, Sacramento, 1966; San Francisco Art Insti- 
tute, 1966; San Francisco Museum of Art, 1966. 

Mr. Gooch"s work is in the collections of Mrs. 
Edgar Sinton, Hills Borough, California; Time, 
Inc., New York; The Pasadena .'Vrt Museum; Mr. 
John Carmack, San Francisco. 




CADMUSJ 55 

J n -h 



PAUL CADMUS, Fa/niVy Group, 1964. Tempera 
on paper, 14% x 19%. Midtown Galleries, New 
York. (1950) 

Paul Cadmus was born in New York, New 
York, in 1904. He studied at the National 
.■\rademy of Design, New York, with William 
.■\uerbach-Le\ y and later at the Art Students 
League of New York with Joseph Pennell and 
C. W. Locke. In 1961 Mr. Cadmus was the re- 
cipient of a grant from the American Academy 
of Arts and Letters. He lives in New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Cadmus has received many awards, and 
a number of special exhibitions of his work have 
been held. His work has been represented in 
group exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of 
American Art, New York, 1934, 1936, 1937, 
1938, 1940, 1941, 1945; The Brooklyn Mu.seum, 
1935; The .Art Institute of Chicago, 1935; Society 
of .American Graphic Artists, Inc., New York, 
1938; The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 



Arts, Philadelphia, 1941; The Museum of 
Modern Art, New York, 1942, 1943, 1944; Mu- 
seum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1944, 
1945; and many others. 

Paul Cadmus' work is in many public collec- 
tions including the Addison Gallery of Ameri- 
can Art, Andover, Massachusetts; Cranbrook 
Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; The 
Art Institute of Chicago; Wadsworth Atheneum, 
Hartford; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Mil- 
waukee Art Center; The Brooklyn Museum, The 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York 
Public Library, Whitney Museum of American 
Art, New York; American Embassy, Ottawa; 
Four Arts Club, Palm Beach; Seattle Art Mu- 
seum; Sweet Briar College, Virginia; The Shel- 
don Swope Art Gallery, Terre Haute, Indiana; 
Library of Congress, \Vashington, D.C.; Williams 
College, Williamstown, Massachusetts; and in 
many private collections. 




56 




hultberg/ 



57 



JOHN HULTBERG, Great Glass Roof, 1965. 
Oil on canvas, 36 x 48. Martha Jackson Gallery, 
New York. (1957, 1959, 1961) 

". . . Why do v\e strive to communicate by 
searching for the bizarre and trivial, instead of 
aiming for the center, for the melodies which are 
waiting for us to invent? AVe look at art as we 
look at science, noising about each extravagance 
as progress toward a desired though unknown 
goal; yet these novelties never quench our ennui. 

"If my painting appears repetitive, lacking in 
inventive variations or wide connotations, perhaps 
this is because I want some kind of icon-like sta- 
bility instead. As the plague of despair and dis- 
honor spreads I find it necessaiy to retrench 
instead of seeking new escapes. Standing in the 
midst of this sickness I hold on to painting. It's 
too late to expect solace from the conceits of the 
surrealists or the laboratory work of the abstrac- 
tionists. In this grim time of transition, when we 
are balanced between destruction and hope, we 
deserve that which can comfort and warm us, 
make us whole again. I want to gather together 
those scattered insights that modern art has un- 
covered and burn them in an eclectic bonfire in 
this frozen desert. In these somber embers per- 
haps I may be allowed to glimpse once more the 
poetry- and romance I felt as a child. Now that 
the values of the outside world have become 
meaningless for me I rejoice that I find in paint- 
ing a way to create my own earth." 

John Hultberg was born in Berkeley, California, 
in 1922. He attended Fresno State College, where 
he received his B.A. degree in 1943, and the Art 
Students League of New York, 1949-51. He was 
the recipient of an Albert Bender Fellowship, 
1949, and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial 
Foundation fellowship, 1956. He has taught at 
the Art Students League of New York; University 
of Portland, Oregon; San Francisco Art Institute; 
and he presently is teaching at the LIniversity of 
Hawaii, Honolulu. He lives in Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Mr. Hultberg has been awarded the San Fran- 
cisco Annual Watercolor Prize, 1947; an Honor- 
able Mention in the Los .Angeles Centennial 
Exhibition, 1949; First Prize in the Corcoran 
Biennial, 1955; and the Norman Harris Medal 
from The .Xrt Institute of Chicago, 1962. Special 
exhibitions of his work have been held at the 



Contemporary Gallery, Sausalito, 1949; Korman 
Gallery, New York, 1953; Martha Jackson Gal- 
lery, New York, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1960; I.C.A. 
Gallery, London, 1956; The Swetzoff Gallery, 
Boston, 1957; Galerie du Dragon, Paris, 1957, 
1959; Galerie Rive Droite, Paris, 1957; Phoenix 
Art Museum, 1957, 1960; Gallcria Numero, 
Florence, 1958; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, 
Washington, D.C., 1958; Main Street Galleries, 
Chicago, 1959; Galleria deU'Arictc, Milan, 1959; 
Fairweather-Hardin Gallery, Chicago, 1960; The 
Philadelphia Art Alliance, 1960; Piccadilly Gal- 
lery, London, 1961, 1965; Malmo Museum, 
Sweden, 1962; The Pasadena .Art Museum, 1962; 
Esther Bear Gallery, Santa Barbara, 1962; 
Franklin Siden Gallery, Detroit, 1964; Esther- 
Robles Gallery, Los Angeles, 1964; La Galerie 
.Alice Pauli, Lausanne, 1965. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at Phillips Academy of American .Art, 
Andover, Massachusetts, 1947-48; Reed College, 
Portland, Oregon, 1947-48; California Palace of 
the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 1947-48; 
Museum of Modern Art Penthouse, New York, 
1952; Galerie Rive Droite, Paris, 1954; The 
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1955; 
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 
1955, 1965; Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, 
Pittsburgh, 1955; Venice Biennale d'arte, 1956; 
The Museum of Modem Art, New York, 1959; 
International Festival of Art, Turin, 1959; New 
School for Social Research, New York, 1961, 
1966; The Art Institute of Chicago, 1962; Martha 
Jackson Gallery, New York, 196.3; Salon de Mai, 
Paris, 1964; Museo Civico, Bologna, 1965; Finch 
College, New York, 1965; Harpur College, Bing- 
hamton, New York, 1966; The Arkansas Arts 
Center, Little Rock, 1966. 

Mr. Hultberg's work is in the collections of the 
Atlanta Art Association; The Baltimore Museum 
of Art; Mr. J. B. Urvater, Brussels; Albright-Knox 
.Art Gallery, Buffalo; The Hon. Claire Booth 
Luce, Dr. and Mrs. Milton Mendelwitz, The 
Metropolitan Museum of .Art, The Museum of 
Modern .Art, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Neuberger, The 
Hon. Nelson A. Rockefeller, New ^■ork; Chrysler 
Art Museum of Provincetown; Mr. F. H. Lirhten- 
stein, San .Antonio; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; 
Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Rankine, Washington, D.C. 



58/vASA 




VASA, Contact, 1966. Acrylic lacquer on wood, 
42x22x9'/2. Herbert Palmer Gallery, Los An- 
geles. 

"For me painting and sculpture are combined. 
Shades and shadows are not important. I am 
achieving plasticity and illusion of form by 
painting. 

"I am working with mechanically applied in- 
dustrial finishes, because no classical medium can 
give me the fine surface. Through this process I 
am eliminating the presence of the artist in his 
work, leaving only the idea and the concept to 
be experienced by the observer without other 
distractions." (Courtesy of Art in America, Vol. 
LIV, No. 4, 1966, p. 61.) 

"Beginning with the flat two-dimensional sur- 
face of the conventional hard-edge painting, I 
extended and projected the forms, as delineated 
by the colors, into three-dimensional construc- 
tions. At first these constructions were pure box 
forms. Later they became more complex. In 
contrast to ordinary sculpture however, shade 
and shadows were not important. In these three- 
dimensional works I succeeded in achieving the 
illusion of several pieces in one by painting and 
contrasting forms on the surfaces. 

"I am now seeking to liberate the various in- 
dividual sections of color from the common flat 
surface of the painting and the surfaces of my 
three-dimensional constructions. Lifting these 
colors into space and exposing them to the light 
in different angles introduces a new dimension in 
my work. Projected thus into space and freed 
from their unchanging environmental limitations, 
these colors acquire new values which suggest, if 
not dictate, the angles and the dimensions of the 
basic forms which carry them. The forms, in 
turn, vary the values and intensities of the colors." 

Vasa (Velizar Mihich) was born in Yugoslavia 
in 1933. From 1947 to 1951 he studied" at the 
LIniversity of Belgrade; and from 1951 to 1954 
at the School of Applied Arts, Belgrade. He has 
taught at the University of Belgrade, 1955-60. 
He lives in Los Angeles, California. 

.Special exhibitions of Mr. Vasa's work have 
been held at the Salon of Graphic Arts, Belgrade, 
1956, 1959; and at the Feigen/Palmer Gallery, 
Los Angeles, 1966. His work has been included 
in group exibitions at La Jolla Museum of Art, 
1966; San Francisco Museum of Art, 1966; and 
the University of Arizona, Tucson, 1967. 

Mr. Vasa's work is in the collections of Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter A. Netsch, Jr., Chicago; Mrs. 
Dolly Bright Capen, Mr. and Mrs. Terry De- 
Lapp, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff^rey Hayden, Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin J. Hirsh, Los Angeles; The Pasa- 
dena Art Museum, Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. 
Rowan, Pasadena; Larry Aldrich Foundation 
Museum, Ridgeficid, Connecticut. 



MIRIAM SCHAPIRO, Untitled (Empire), 
1965. Oil on canvas, 81 x 90. Andre Emmerich 
Galler>', New York. (1961, 1965) 

Miriam Schapiro was born in Toronto, Can- 
ada, in 1929. She attended Hunter College, New 
^■o^k, from 1942 to 1944, and The University of 
Iowa, Iowa City, where she received B.A., M.A., 
and M.F.A. degrees, 1944-49. In 1964 Miss 
Schapiro was awarded a Tamarind Fellowship. 
She lives in New York, New York. 

.Special exhibitions of Miss Schapiro's work 
have been held at the University of Missouri, 
Columbia, 1950; Illinois VVcsleyan University, 
Bloomington, 1951; .'\ndre Emmerich Gallery, 
New York, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1963; Franklin 
Siden Gallery, Detroit, 1966. 

Her work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The Brooklyn Museum, 1947; Indiana 
University, Bloomington, 1948; The Denver .Art 
Museum, 1948; City Art Museum of St. Louis, 
1950; San Francisco An Association, 1950; 
Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri, 1951; the 
Stable Gallery^ New York, 1952, 1953, 1954, 
1955; Tanager Gallery, New York, 1952, 1953, 
1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1962; Flint Institute of 
Arts, Michigan, 1954, 1966; University of Florida, 
Gainesville, 1955; The Museum of Slodern .Art, 
New York, 1955, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965; Poin- 
dexter Gallery, New York, 1956; The University 
of Iowa, Iowa City, 1957; Nottingham Univcrsitv, 
England, 1958; Museum of .Art, Carnegie Insti- 
tute, Pittsburgh, 1958; Whitney Museum of 
.American .Art, New York, 1959; in Tokyo, Japan, 
1959; at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, 
New York, 1959; Brooks Memorial .Art Gallery, 
Memphis, 1960; University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign-Urbana, 1961, 1965; The .Art Institute of 
Chicago, 1961, 1962; Contemporary^ Arts .Associa- 
tion, Houston, 1963; The Jewish Museum, New 
York, 1963; The Pennsylvania .Academy of the 
Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1963, 1964; Brandeis Uni- 
versity, Waltham, Ma.ssachusetts, 1964; Cran- 
brook .Academy of .Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michi- 
gan, 1966. 

Miss Schapiro's work is in the collections of 
.Albion College, .Albion, Michigan; Illinois Wes- 
leyan University, Bloomington; Mr. and Mrs. 
William Easton, Chicago; Stephens College, 
Columbia, Missouri; Dr. and Mrs. Fred Olson, 
Guilford, Connecticut; Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Bradley, Milwaukee; Dr. and Mrs. Leon .Altman, 
Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Brodsky, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leo Castelli, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur .A. Cohen, 
Mme. Lily Dache, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Glusker, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Hunter, Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Kafka, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Kahn, Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Kornblee, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kulicke, Mr. and Mrs. 
.Albert List, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Motherwell, 
The Museum of Modern .Art, New York Univer- 
sity, Mrs. Sphy Regensburg, Mr. and Mrs. David 
Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shulof, Mr. 
and Mrs. Howard Sloan, Mr. Ben Starkie, Mr. 
and Mrs. Allan Stone, Mrs. Barbara Sulzberger, 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Thaw, Mrs. Chauncey 
Waddell, Mr. and Mrs. Guy A. Weill, Mrs. Bertha 
Weiss, New York; City .Art Museum of St. Louis; 
Tougallo Southern Christian College, Tougallo, 
Mississippi; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, 
Washington, D.C. 



SCHAPIRO/59 

d 7SV, 7 s 



rm 






60 




levine/ 



61 



JACK LEVINE, The Age of Steel, 1966. Oil on 
canvas, 72 x 63. Landau-Alan GaIIcr>', New York. 
(1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1955, 1957, 1961, 
1963) 

Jack Levine was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
in 1915. He studied privately with Dcnman Ross 
of Harvard University and with Harold Zim- 
merman. He received a John Simon Guggen- 
heim Memorial Foundation fellowship, 1946-47; 
a grant from the American Academy of .■Xrts and 
Letters, New York, 1946; a Fulbright Fellowship, 
1950; and an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts de- 
gree, awarded by Colby College, Waterville, 
Maine, 1956. He has taught privately at The 
School of The Art Institute of Chicago and at 
the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculp- 
ture, Maine. Since 1942 he has lived in New- 
York City. 

Mr. Levine has received awards from Museum 
of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1946; The 
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1947, 
1959; The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts, Philadephia, 1948. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Levine's work have 
been held at The Downtown Gallery, New York, 
1938, 1939, 1951; Institute of Contemporary Art, 
Boston, 1953; The Alan Gallery, New York, 
1953, 1957, 1960, 1965; Whitney Mu.seum of 
American Art, New York, 1955; Palacio de 
Bellas Artes, Mexico City, 1960. 

His work has been included in many grouj) 
exhibitions and is found in the collections of the 
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, 
Massachusetts; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; 
Harvard University, Cambridge; The Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago; University of Kansas, Lawrence; 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Walker Art 
Center, Minneapolis; The Brooklyn Museum, 
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum 
of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American 
Art, New ^'ork; University of Oklahoma, Nor- 
man; Portland Art Museum, Oregon; S. C. 
Johnson & Son Collection, Racine; University of 
Arizona, Tuscon; Munson-Willianis-Proctor In.sti- 
tute, Utica; The Phillips Collection, Washington, 
D.C.; and in man\' other collections. 



62 



/grant 




JAMES GIL/VNT, Black-White & Blue, 1966. 
Polyvin) 1 resin, 56 x 56. Lent by Mr. and Mrs. 
William Coblentz, San Francisco. The Hansen 
Galleries, San Francisco. 

"This painting is one of a series that developed 
during the course of several years from a more 
traditional use of collage. Though most collage 
material is now overpainted, certain attitudes in- 
herent in its use remain : emphasis on the physi- 
cal presence of the material and an identity of 
particular areas characterized by consistent color 
or te.xture and the reinforcing of outline. Con- 
ditioned by these attitudes, sections of the paint- 
ing are attached physically to one another much 
as though they were sculptural forms." 

James Grant was born in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, in 1924. He received his B.E. degree from 
the University of Southern California in 1945 and 
his M.F.A. from the Jepson Art Institute, Los 
Angeles, in 1949. From 1950 to 1959 Mr. Grant 
taught at Pomona College, Claremont, California. 
He lives in San Francisco, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Grant's work have 
been held at The Pasadena Art Museum, 1952; 



Humboldt State College, Areata, California 
1958; University of Cahfornia, Riverside, 1958 
Pomona College, Claremont, California, 1959: 
Grand Central Moderns, New York, 1961, 1963 
Galleria Pogliani, Rome, 1962; M. H. de Young 
Memorial Museum, San Francisco, 1963; The 
Hansen Galleries, San Francisco, 1965. 

Mr. Grant's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at Stephens College, Columbia, Mis- 
souri; De Tering Gallery-, Dallas; Mary Washing- 
ton College, Fredericksburg, Virginia; Cornell 
University, Ithaca; La Jolla Museum of Art; 
Nebraska Art .-Association, University of Ne- 
braska, Lincoln; Los Angeles County Museum 
of Art; M. Knoedler & Company, Inc., The 
Museum of Modern Art, Bertha Schaefer, New 
York; The Pasadena An Museum; Idaho State 
University, Pocatello; California State Fair & 
Exposition .Art Show, Sacramento; .San Fran- 
cisco Art Institute; San Francisco Museum of .Art. 

His work is in the collections of Dr. and Mrs. 
Peter Selz, Berkeley; Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Slive, 
Cambridge; Pomona College, Claremont, Cali- 
fornia; Mary Washington College, Fredricks- 
burg, Virginia; The Pasadena Art Museum. 



LAINg/63 

I 



GERALD LAING, Slot, 1965. Baked enamel on 
aluminum, chrome and brass, 63 x 42' J x 22. Lent 
by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mayer, VVinnetka, Illi- 
nois. Richard Feigen Gallery, New York & 
Chicago. 

Gerald Laing was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
England, in 1936. He attended the Royal Mili- 
tary .Academy, Sandhurst, 1954-56, and St. Mar- 
tin's School of .-^rt, London, 1956-60. In the 
summer of 1966 he was the artist-in-residence 
at the Institute of Humanistic Studies, Aspen. 
He lives in New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Laing's work have 
been held at the Institute of Contemporary Art, 
London, 1964; Feigen/Palmer Gallery, Los .Ange- 
les, 1964; Richard Feigen Gallery, New York, 

1964, 1965; Richard Feisjen Gallery, Chicago, 

1965, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Young Contemporaries, London, 
1963, 1964; Musee d'.Art Moderne, Paris, 1963; 
The Pace Gallery, Boston, 1964; Albright-Knox 
Art Gallery, Buffalo, 1964; .Arts Council of Great 
Britain, Institute of Contemporary .Arts, London, 
1964; Richard Feigen Gallery, The Pace Gallery, 
New York, 1964; Museum of Contemporary .Art, 
Nagaoka, Japan, 1965; San Francisco Museum of 
Art, 1965; Stedelijk Museum, .Amsterdam, 1966; 
Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago, 1966; The 
Ohio State University, Columbus, 1966; New 
Paltz State College, New Paltz, New York, 1966; 
The .American Federation of .Arts, Finch College, 
The Jewish Museum, New York University, New 
York, 1966; Larry Aldrich Foundation Museum, 
Ridgefield, Connecticut, 1966. 




6^/BOLOA1fy 



ROGER BOLOMEY, Hoboken #12, 1964-65. 
Polyurcthane, 84x132. Royal Marks Gallery, 
New York. 

"My work usually pertains to natural element.s, 
to moments and happenings as they take place 
in nature, to a kind of life process. The material 
I use is to some extent self-creating; after giving 
basic form to the work, I watch the surface flow 
and allow it to set as if arrested in its own crea- 
tion. This combination of creating form and 
activating a sort of life process over it is mean- 
ingful to me, and I hope it results in works that 
are meaningful to others." 

Roger Bolomey was born in Torrington, Con- 
necticut, in 1918. He studied in Switzerland for 
four years; then at the Accademia di Belle Ani, 
Florence; and at the California College of Arts 
and Crafts, Oakland. He lives in Wingdale, N.Y. 

Mr. Bolomey has recei\ed awards from the 
California State Fair & Exposition .\rt Show, 
Sacramento, 1961; San Jose State College, 1962; 
AValnut Creek Pageant of .'\rts, California, 1962; 
Bundy Art Gallery, Waitsfield, Vermont, 1963; 
Art in America magazine. New York, 1966. Spe- 
cial exhibitions of his work have been held at the 
E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, Sacramento, 1950; 
San Francisco Museum of Art, 1950; Gallery 
Passedoit, New York, 1951; Santa Barlsara Mu- 
seum of Art, 1953; M. H. de Young Memorial 



Museum, San Francisco, 1954; California Palace 
of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 1958; 
Royal Marks Gallery, New York, 1964, 1965. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the San Francisco Art Association, 1950, 
1960; San Francisco Museum of Art, 1952, 1962, 
1963; The Contemporaries, New York, 1960; 
BoUes Gallery, Eric Locke Gallery, San Fran- 
cisco, 1960; California State Fair & Exposition 
Art Show, Sacramento, 1961; San Francisco Art 
Instiute, 1961, 1962; The Art Institute of Chi- 
cago, 1963; Royal Marks Gallery, New York, 

1963, 1964, 1965; Salon de Mai, Paris, 1963; 
Industrial Exhibition of Plastics Industries, St. 
Louis, 1963; New School for Social Research, 
New York, 1964; Whitnev Museum of American 
.Art, New York, 1964, 1965; Museum of Art, Car- 
negie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1964; Larry Aldrich 
Foundation Aluseum, Ridgefield, Connecticut, 

1964, 1965; The .American Federation of Arts, 
New York, 1965-66; World's Fair, New York, 
1965; Swiss Tri Annual, Bienne, Switzerland, 
1966. 

Mr. Bolomey 's work is in the collections of the 
Los .Angeles County Museum of .Art; Chase Man- 
hattan Bank, Lipman Foundation, The Mu.seum 
of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American 
Art, New York; Larry Aldrich Foundation Mu- 
seum, Ridgefield, Connecticut; Bundy Art (Gal- 
lery, \Vaitsfield, \'ermont; and many others. 



65 




66 1 BARNES 

— I 



ROBERT BARNES, Untitled, 1966. Latex on 
canvas, 72 x 84. Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Co- 
hen, Kansas City. Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago. 

Robert Barnes was born in Washington, D.C., 
in 1934. He studied at The School of The Art 
Institute of Chicago, 1952-56, and at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1952. He received a two-year 
scholarship to The School of The Art Institute 
of Chicago and a Fulbright Fellowship to En- 
gland, 1961-63. Mr. Barnes has taught at the 
Kansas City Art Institute and School of Design, 
Missouri, and since 1960 at Indiana University, 
Blooinington. He lives in Bloomington, Indiana. 

Mr. Barnes's work was represented in "New- 
Talent," Art in America magazine. New York, 
1962, and special exhibitions of his work have 
been held at Rockford College, Illinois, 1956; 
Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago, 1960, 1961, 
1964, 1965, 1966; Indiana University, Bloom- 
ington, 1965; Reed College, Portland, 1966. 



Mr. Barnes's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Lhiiversity of Chicago, 1956; 
The University of Iowa, Iowa City, 1960; Indi- 
ana University, Bloomington, 1961; University of 
Colorado, Boulder, 1961; The Art Institute of 
Chicago, 1961, 1963, 1964; Kansas City Art 
Institute and School of Design, Missouri, 1962- 
63; Whitney Museum of American Art, New 
York, 1962, 1965; Galerie du Dragon, Paris, 1962; 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1963; 
San Francisco Museum of Art, 1963; Museo 
Civico, Bologna, 1965; Salon de Jcune Peintres, 
Paris, 1965; Rhode Island School of Design, 
Providence, 1965, 1966; The Pennsylvania .'Acad- 
emy of the Fine .Arts, Philadelphia, 1966; The 
Virginia Museum of Fine .Arts, Richmond, 1966. 
Mr. Barnes's work is in the collections of The 
Art Institute of Chicago; The Museum of Mod- 
ern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, New 
York; The Pasadena Art Museum. 




SUNG AVOO CHUN, Mandala Tradition #1', 
1964. Oil on canvas, 59 x 44. Bollcs Gallery, San 
Francisco. (1961, 1963) 

"During the last few years, the Mandala be- 
came the most frequent subject for my paintings. 

"The Mandala is the pictorial bible of the 
ancient Buddhism, and it also represents the 
eternal Universe. But most of all, it symbolizes 
the state of mind of an individual: the state of 
mind where one could achieve the ab.solute and 
the eternal tranquility. 

"It is my belief that, while paintings are de- 
veloped, it produces a personalized atmosphere, 
a reality which exists primarily in the mind of 
the painter, and for this reason, I deeply believe 
in the significance of the Mandala. 

".\nd it is my belief that Mandala could best 
be expressed through the way of Nature, since 
to synthesize the state of mind is the root of 
creativity, and as a result, the painting would 
have simplicity of forms, and also a complex 
meaning. 

"Symbolically, the nature simplifies in order 
to express the complex meaning and expressions." 

Sung \Voo Chun was born in Seoul, Korea, in 
1935. He studied at the Seoul National Univer- 
sity; San Francisco State College; San Francisco 
Art Institute, where he obtained a B.F.A. degree; 
Mills College, Oakland, where he received his 
M.F.-A. degree: and Ohio State University, Co- 
lumbus, where he received his Ph.D. degree. He 
lives in Seoul, Korea. 

Sung ^^'oo Chun has won awards from the 
Seoul National Museum and the San Francisco 
Museum of Art. Special exhibitions of his work 
have been held at the Dong Wha Gallery, Seoul, 
1943; Minakai Gallery, Seoul, 1948; Lucien La- 
baudt Galler\", San Francisco, 1957; Mi Chou 
Galler\-, New York, 1959; Bolles Gallerv, San 
Francisco, 1960, 1962; Bolles Gallery, New York, 
1962; Richmond .-\rt Center, Richmond, Cali- 
fornia, 1964. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the University of Illinois, Champaign- 
Urbana; Mi Chou Gallery-, \Vhitncy Museum of 
American .\xX, New York; Provincetown .'\rts Fes- 
tival; San Francisco Museum of Art; Butler Insti- 
tute of .American .Art, Youngstown. Sung ^Voo 
j Chun's work is in the collections of Sarah Law- 
rence College, Bronxville, New York; Chase Man- 
hattan Bank, Whitney Museum of .American .Art, 
I New York; Mr. John Bolles, San Francisco Mu- 
I seum of Art, San Francisco; Seoul National Mu- 
seum; Dr. Richard Gorton; Marsteller Collection. 



sung/ 



67 




68 




bechtle/ 



69 



ROBERT ALAN BECHTLE, French Door, 

1965. Oil on canvas, 72 x 72. Berkeley Gallery, 
San Francisco. 

Robert Bechtle was born in San Francisco, 
California, in 1932. He studied at the California 
College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, where he 
received his B..\.A. degree, 1954, and ^LF.A. 
degree, 1958; and at the L'niversity of California, 
Berkeley, 1960-61. He has lectured at the Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley, and taught at the 
California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 
since 1957. Mr. Bechtle lives in Oakland, Cali- 
fornia. 

Mr. Bechtle has won awards from the San 
Francisco Art Festival, 1954; Oakland .'\rt Mu- 
seum, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961; Museum of 
1958; Jack London Square Art 
1958; Richmond Art Center, 
1961, 1964, 1965; James D. 
Phelan award fund, San Francisco, 1959; San 
Francisco Museum of Art, 1959, 1965; California 
College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 1960; 
Monte \'ista Invitational, Danville, California, 

1966. .Special exhibitions of his work have been 
held at the San Francisco Museum of Art, 1959, 



Fine Arts, Boston, 
Festival, Oakland, 
California, 1958, 



1964; Lawrence Drake Gallery, 1960; LIniversity 
of California, Berkeley, 1965; Richmond Art 
Center, California, 1965; E. B. Crocker Art (!al- 
lery, Sacramento, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The Brooklyn Museum, 1960, 1964, 1966; 
Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts, San 
Franci-sco, 1960; California Palace of the Legion 
of Honor, San Francisco, 1960, 1961, 1964, 1965; 
United States Information Agency, \Va.shington, 
D.C., 1960-62, 1965-66; Wit'te Memorial "Mu- 
seum, San Antonio, 1965; San Francisco Art 
Institute, 1965, 1966; California State College at 
Havward, 1966; University of Arizona, Tucson, 
1966. 

Mr. Bechtle's work is in the public collections 
of Starr King School for the Ministry, Berkeley; 
Diablo \'alley College, Concord, California; 
Monte \'ista High School, Danville, California; 
Chase Manhattan Bank, New York; Mills Col- 
lege, Oakland; Concordia Teachers College, 
Ri\er Forest, Illinois; Achenbach Foundation for 
Graphic Arts, San FrancLsco Art Commission, 
San Francisco; San Jose State College; Library 
of Congress, United States Information Agency, 
Washington, D.C.; and many private collections. 



70 



/snow 



V. DOUGLAS SNOW, Plateau, 1966. Oil on 
canvas, 44 x 68. Feingarten Galleries, Los Angeles. 

"I try to be honest and get at the essence of my 
deepest response toward nature." 

V. Douglas Snow was born in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, in 1927. He studied at the University of 
Utah, Salt Lake City, 1943-46, and at the Cran- 
brook Academy of .Art, Bloomfield Hills, Mich- 
igan, 1947-50. Mr. Snow was the recipient of a 
Fulbright Fellowship to Rome, 1950-51. He 
has taught at the Flint Institute of Arts, 1950; 
Stanford University, Palo Alto, summer 1952; 
Wayne State University, Detroit, 1952-54; and the 
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, from 1954 to 
the present. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Snows work have 
been held at the Paul Kantor Gallery, Los 
Angeles, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1957; Santa Barbara 
Museum of .'\rt, 1952; M. H. de Young Memorial 
Museum, .San Francisco, 1952; Feingarten Gal- 



leries, New York, 1961; Feingarten Galleries, Los 
Angeles, 1962, 1964; Salt Lake Art Center, 1963. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the California Palace of the Legion of 
Honor, San Francisco, 1952; University of Ne- 
braska, Lincoln, 1953; The Pennsylvania Academy 
of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1954; Munson- 
Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, 1955; The 
Denver Art Museum, 1956, 1957; The Museum of 
Modern Art, New York, 1956; Colorado Springs 
Fine Arts Center, 1957; Stanford University, Palo 
Alto, 1958; Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
D.C., 1958. 

Mr. Snow's work is in the the collections of the 
Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, 
Michigan; Ford Motor Company, Detroit; Miles 
Laboratory, Elkart, Indiana; Bank of Las Vegas; 
Salt Lake City Junior League, Salt Lake City 
Public Library, Utah State Institute of Fine Arts, 
Salt Lake City; Mr. Wright Ludington, Santa 
Barbara; Mr. Gifford Phillips, Santa Monica. 




ruda/ji 




ED\VIN RUDA, Blake's Eye IJ, 1966. Acrylic 
on canvas, 84 x 73. Park Place Gallery, New 
York. 

"The curtain hasn't fallen on twentieth-century 
art. It's just that the backdrop is different. Some- 
where along the line the sunset disappeared and 
all I could make out was a set of gleaming teeth 
and a bakcd-cnamel Chrysler ten times the hu- 
man scale. 

"It's not .so much a question of which side 
you're on. When radio waves jump through your 
head and you're zooming down the freeway, 
choosing sides is pretty irrelevant. 

"Though I sometimes wonder if things really 
have changed much since the days of Li Po. 
Perhaps it's only that nature looks different now, 
like molecules instead of leaves. 

"If you can see through the air pollution and 
traffic, chances are you will find a few diehards 
hanging on as always, thinking about art all the 
time and making it the best way they know how." 

Edwin Ruda was born in New York, New York, 
in 1922. He received his B.S. degree from Cornell 
University, Ithaca, in 1947; his M..'\. degree from 
Columbia University, New York, in 1949; and 
his M.F.A. degree from the University of Illinois, 



Urbana, in 1956. From 1949 to 1951 Mr. Ruda 
studied at the Escuela de Pintura y Escultura, 
Institute National de Bellas Artes, Mexico City. 
While attending the University of Illinois he was 
granted a teaching assistantship. Mr. Ruda has 
also taught at Texas Western University, El Paso, 
1953; University of Texas, Austin, 1956-59; and 
Pratt Institute, New York, 1961-66. He lives in 
New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Ruda's work have 
been held at the Globe Gallery, New York, 1961; 
Feiner Gallery, New York, 1963; Park Place Gal- 
lery', New York, 1966. His work has been in- 
cluded in group exhibitions at the Great Jones 
Gallerv, New York, 1961; Camino Gallery, New 
York, '1962; Park Place Gallerv, New York, 1963, 
19(i4, 1965, 1966; John Daniels Gallery, Gol- 
dowsky Gallery, New York, 1964; World's Fair, 
New York, 1965; The Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Museum, New York, 1966. 

Mr. Ruda's work is in the collections of the 
.MIentown .Art Museum, Pennsylvania; The Lan- 
non Foundation, Chicago; Dallas Museum of Fine 
.\rts, Mr. D. D. Feldman, Dallas; N'irginia Dwan, 
Mrs. .Mbert List, New York; Lakeview Center for 
the .Arts and Sciences, Peoria. 



72 




nelson/73 

d -75 ¥■ '^ ? 
N 



ROBERT A. NELSON, Andrew Jackson with 
Ray Gun, 1966. Oil, collage, and construction on 
canvas, 64 x 50. Banfer Gallery, Inc., New York. 

"My work is given over to compositions and 
portraits which are essentially federal icons. Fig- 
ures from the broad .American past, but most 
specifically the nineteenth centur\', become the 
trigger mechanisms which dictate my oil and con- 
struction art forms. The nostalgia and the heroics 
which cloak both good and evil figures found in 
the wash of early Americana form the climate 
from which my work evolves. The images of 
Washington and Lincoln, .-Xnnie Oakley and 
George .'\rmstrong Custer, Billy the Kid and Sam 
Bass, Grant and Lee, or Lindbergh and Dillinger 
are the foundations for shape, color, and organi- 
zation. The elements of space and collage, plexi- 
glas and voice bubble, line and color, and the 
monumentality of physical dimensions are de- 
vices which shape a suitable stage upon which the 
figures of history, both real and legendary, per- 
form. In some ways my work is most probably 
out of context with the grand modern movements 
of the middle twentieth century: it may be shot 
through with the last dying vestiges of sur- 
realism, cheap illustration, and the qualities of 
calendar and tobacco can advertisement; it may 
be limited to old-fashioned glaze techniques and 
hard-line drawing; yet, it becomes a method of 
speaking which allows me to resurrect in solid 
form the multi-purposed ghosts and shades from 
the main halls and side cubicles of .American his- 
torical time. I am a visual mercenar\- in the pay 
of the Cheyenne chieftains, of the Civ'il ^Var foot 
soldiers, of the aviators who fought for the skies 
in the France of 1916-18, and of the great march 
of political leaders from the eve of the American 
Revolution to the middle years of prohibition. I 
am satisfied with my imaginative documentary 
position — I would trade it for no other." 

Robert A. Nelson was born in Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, in 1925. He studied at The School of 
The Art Institute of Chicago, where he received 
his B.A.E. degree in 1950 and the M..'\.E. degree 
in 1951; New York University, 1962-63; The John 
Herron .'\rt Institute, Indianapolis, summers 
1963, 1964. He was the recipient of the Bryant- 
Lathrop Traveling Fellowship, 1951-52; Mac- 
cauley Lithographic Grant, Winnipeg, 1954; Fac- 
ulty Research Grants from the University of 
Manitoba, ^Vinnipeg, 1955, and from the Lnivcr- 
sity of North DakoYa, Grand Forks, 1958, 1960, 
1966; Danforth Teachers Fellowship, 1962-63; 



Tamarind Lithographic Fellowship, summers, 
1963, 1964. Mr. Nelson has taught at The School 
of The An Institute of Chicago, 1952-53; Univer- 
sity of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 1953-56; and at the 
University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, 1956 
to the present. He lives in Grand Fork.s, North 
Dakota. 

In 1951 Mr. Nelson received the Cezanne 
Medal awarded by the French government. Spe- 
cial exhibitions of his work have been held at the 
Gallery of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1948; 
Sapi Gallery, Palma dc Mallorca, Spain, 1952; 
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 1953, 1954, 
1955; Roko Galler>-, New York, 1954; Univer- 
sitv of North Dakota, Grand Forks, 1956, 1957, 
1959, 1960, 1964, 1965; in Valley City, North 
Dakota, 1957; Bismarck, North Dakota, 1959; at 
Concordia College, Moorhcad, 1959; Rourke Gal- 
lery, Moorhead," 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 
1964; in Denver, Colorado, 1960; at Banfer Gal- 
lery, Inc., New York, 1963, 1964, 1966; Montana 
State University, Missoula, 1964; Joslyn .'\rt Mu- 
seum, Omaha, 1964; University of Omaha, 1964. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The .Art Institute of Chicago, 1947, 1948, 
1949, 1950; Milwaukee Art Center, 1948, 1949, 
1950; Walker .Art Center, Minneapolis, 1960, 
1961, 1962, 1963, 1964; The Denver Art Museum, 
1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965; The Museum of 
Modern .Art, New York, 1962; Universitv of \Vis- 
consin, Madison, 1962, 1964, 1965; Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Center, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966; 
Ball .State Teachers College, Muncie, Indiana, 

1963, 1964, 1965; Butler Institute of .American 
Art, Youngstown, Ohio, 1963, 1964, 1966; The 
Brooklyn Museum, 1964; Pratt Institute, New 
York, 1964, 1965; Joslvn .Art Museum, Omaha, 

1964, 1965; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1964; The Baltimore Museum of 
.Art, 1966; Bucknell L'niversity, Lewisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, 1966; The Virginia Museum of Fine 
.Arts, Richmond, 1966. 

His work is in the collections of the .Allentown 
.Art Museum, Pennsylvania; The .Art Institute of 
Chicago; University of North Dakota, Grand 
Forks; Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania; The Minneapolis Institute of .Arts, Walker 
.Art Center, Minneapolis; Ball State Teachers 
College, Muncie, Indiana; Hilton Hotel, Rocke- 
feller Center, New A'ork; Carleton College, North- 
field, Minnesota; Burbee Galler\- of .Art, Rockford, 
Illinois; Saint Paul .Art Center; L'.S. Judge's Col- 
lection of Washington, D.C., Municipal Court; 
Butler Institute of .American .Art, Youngstown. 



74/kIENBUSCH 



WILLIAM KIENBUSCH, Winter, 1966. Casein 
on board, 29 x 43%. Kraushaar Galleries, New 
York. (1965) 

"My picture, JVinter, is just that, a personal 
evocation of winter in downcast Maine. In fact, 
it was not only winter, it was a blizzard. It took 
me an hour and more to walk a half mile to the 
post office and back to my friends' house, and I 
shall never forget the total whiteness, the freez- 
ing cold, and the cutting cruelty of the snow. In 
recent years I find myself, more and more, sacri- 
ficing everything to a lyric equivalent of the 
mood." 

William Kienbusch was born in New York, 
New York, in 1914. He majored in Fine Arts at 
Princeton University and graduated in 1936 with 
a Phi Beta Kappa award. He attended the Art 
Students League of New York, 1936-37. He 
studied with Henry Varnum Poor at the Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Center; at Colarossi's and with 
Abraham Rattner in Paris; with Anton Refrcgier 
and Stuart Davis in New York. Mr. Kienbusch 
received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial 
Foundation fellowship in 1958. Presently he is 
an instructor at The Brooklyn Museum Art 
School and lives in New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Kienbusch has won awards from The 
Brooklyn Museum, 1952; The Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, New York, 1952; Columbia Museum 
of Art, South Carolina, 1957; New York State 
Fair, Syracuse, 1958; Provincetown Arts Festival, 
1958; Summer Art Festival, Portland, Maine, 
1960; Boston .^rts Festival, 1961; Ford Founda- 
tion, 1961. Special exhibitions of his work have 
been held at the University of Maine, Orono, 
1956; Cornell University, Ithaca, 1958; Art Mu- 
seum, Princeton University, 1962. 

Mr. Kienbusch's work has been in many group 
exhibitions including those at the Museum of 
Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1954; Whitney 



Museum of American Art, New York, 1955; 
World's Fair, Brussels, 1958; Fort Worth Art 
Center, 1964; Krannert Art Museum, University 
of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; Albright-Knox Art 
Gallery, Buflfalo; The Art Institute of Chicago; 
Des Moines Art Center; Walker Art Center, 
Minneapolis; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The 
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. 

His work is in the collections of the University 
of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Atlanta University; 
Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts, Boston; Bowdoin College, 
Brunswick, Maine; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 
Buffalo; Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center; 
Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina; Des 
Moines Art Center; The Detroit Institute of Arts; 
University of Delaware, Dover; Fort Worth Art 
Center; Dartmouth College Museum, Hanover; 
Wadsworth Athcncum, Hartford; The Museum of 
Fine Arts, Houston; Nelson Gallery-Atkins Mu- 
seum, Kansas City, Missouri; University of 
Nebraska, Lincoln; The Currier Gallery of Art, 
Manchester, New Hampshire; University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis; Montclair Art Museum, 
New Jersey; The Newark Museum; New Britain 
Museum of American Art, Connecticut; The 
Brooklyn Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, The Museum of Modern Art, Sara Roby 
Foundation, Whitney Museum of American Art, 
New York; University of Maine, Orono; The 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Phila- 
delphia; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Museum 
of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Portland 
Museum of Art, Maine; Chrysler Art Museum 
of Provincetown; The Virginia Museum of Fine 
Arts, Richmond; Rochester Memorial Art Gal- 
lery; The Toledo Museum of Art; The Art Gal- 
lery of Toronto; Munson-Williams-Proctor Insti- 
tute, Utica; Wichita Art Museum; Williams 
College, Williamstown, Massachusetts. 



"5, 







BISHOp/75 

l3 f-'/-^ 




■^ 



4|f 




''^^^ 




ISABEL BISHOP, Study for Undressing on the 
Bed, 1961. Oil on canvas, 19x38. Midtown 
Galleries, New York. (1950, 1963, 1965) 

"Within the essential problem of figuration vs. 
ground, I hope to make the ground yield up, as it 
were, a moving figure." 

Isabel Bishop (Mrs. Isabel Bishop Wolff) was 
born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1902. She studied in 
Detroit, at the .\rt Students League of New York, 
and in Europe. Miss Bishop received a grant 
from the .American Academy of Arts and Letters, 
New York. She has taught at Yale University 
Art School, New Haven; the .Art Students League 
of New York; and at the Skowhegan School of 
Painting and Sculpture, Maine. She lives in New 
York, N.Y. 

Miss Bishop has won awards from the .Art .As- 
sociation of Newport; .American Artists Group, 
Society of .American Etchers, National Institute 
of .Arts and Letters, National .Academy of Design, 
New A'ork; The Pennsylvania Academy of the 
Fine .Arts, Philadelphia; The Corcoran Gallery of 
Art, Washington, D.C.; Butler Institute of Amer- 



ican Art, Youngstown. 

Miss Bishop's work has been shown in many 
special and group exhibitions and is represented 
in the collections of .Atlanta University; Cran- 
brook .Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Mich- 
igan; Museum of Fine .Arts, Boston; Florida Gulf 
Coast Art Center, Clearwater; Colorado Springs 
Fine Arts Center; The Columbus Gallery of Fine 
.Arts, Ohio; Des Moines .Art Center; Herron Mu- 
seum of .Art. Indianapolis; Nelson Gallery-.Atkins 
Museum, Kansas City, Missouri; Nebraska .Art 
-Association, Lincoln; The Newark Museum; New- 
Britain Museum of .American .Art, Connecticut; 
The Brooklyn Museum, The Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of .Art, \Vhitney Museum of .American .Art, 
New York; The Pennsylvania .Academy of the 
Fine .Arts, Philadelphia; The N'irginia Museum 
of Fine .Arts, Richmond; Museum of Fine .Arts, 
Springfield, Massachusetts; City .Art Museum of 
St. Louis; Munson-\Villiams-Proctor Institute, 
Utica; The Corcoran Gallery of .Art, The Phillips 
Collection, Washington, D.G.; Butler Institute of 
American Art, Youngstown. 



76 




ENRIQUE CASTRO-CID, Anthropomorphicah 
I and II, 1964. Plexiglas and aluminum, 65 x 
20x24. Richard Feigen Gallery, New York & 
Chicago. 

Enrique Castro-Cid was born in Santiago, 
Chile, in 1937. He attended the Escuela de 
Bellas Artes, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, 
from 1957 to 1959. In 1962 he received a 
scholarship from the Organization of American 
States, and in 1964 a fellowship from the John 
Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Mr. 
Castro-Cid has taught at the Escuela de Bellas 
Artes, Universidad dc Chile, Santiago. He lives 
in New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Castro-Cid's work 
has been held at La Livertad Galeria, Santiago, 
1960; Feigen/Palmer Gallery, Los Angeles, 1963; 
Richard Feigen Gallery, New York, 1963, 1965, 
1966; Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago, 1964. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the International Gallery, Tokyo, 1959; 
Galeria de Arte Contemporaneo, Caracas, 1960; 
Pan American Union, Washington, D.C., 1961; 
in Mexico, 1963; at The Byron Gallery, New 
York, 1964, 1965; Museum of Art, Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh, 1964; Institute of Contem- 
porary Arts, Washington, D.C., 1964; Krannert 
Art Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign, 
1965; Ravinia Park, Highland Park, Illinois, 
1965; The Kornblee Gallery, New York, 196.5; 
The American Federation of Arts, Sidney Janis 
Gallery, The Jewish Museum, New York, 1966; 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 1966. 



castro-cid/ 



77 



•^ •-) 



3 ■■ J/' '■ 



78 



/levi 




JOSEF LEVI, Vinum 8, 1966. Liquitex, per- 
forated metal, and fluorescent light, 36'/2 x 39'/2 
X 8. Stable Gallery, New York. 

"Impermanence of visual experience is the 
only constant reality. I wish to emphasize this 
mutability under varying conditions of light and 
color." (Courtesy of Art in Artierica, \'ol. LIV, 
No. 4, 1966, p. 49.) 

Josef Levi was born in New York, New York, 
in 1938. He studied at the L^niversity of Con- 
necticut, Storrs, where he received his B.A. de- 
gree in 1959, and at Columbia L'niversity, New 
York, 1960. He lives in New York, New York. 

A special exhibition of Mr. Levi's work was 
held at the Stable Gallery, New York, 1966. His 
work has been included in group exhibitions at 
the Des Moines Art Center, 1966; Flint Institute 
of Arts, Michigan, 1966; Contemporar\- .\rts 
Association, Houston, 1966; Nelson Gallery- 
Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, 1966; 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1966; 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1966; 
Larry Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, 
Connecticut, 1966. 

Mr. Levi's work is in the collections of the 
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; The Mu- 
seum of Modern Art, New York; Larry Aldrich 
Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut. 



dole/ 



79 



WILLIAM DOLE, Mandaic, 1966. Collage on 
niasonitc, 22 x 28. Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
M. Jones, San Marino, California. Rex Evans 
Gallery, Los Angeles. ( 1965) 

"My pictures are constructed from fragments, 
some found, some prepared. They derive from, 
or reflect, a complex visual environment which 
includes increasingly the documents, records, 
forms, indices, etc. that circumscribe contempo- 
rary life. I intend, without embarrassment, the 
images I create to be beautiful things. The image 
of chaos need not itself be chaotic." 

^Villiam Dole was born in .Angola, Indiana, in 
1917. He studied with Moholy-Nagy and Gyorgy 
Kepes in Chicago; and with Kuniyoshi at Mills 
College, Oakland. He received his B./\. degree 
from Olivet College, Michigan, and his M.A. 
degree from the L'niversity of California, Berke- 
ley, in 1947. Mr. Dole has taught at the Llniver- 
sity of California, Berkeley, and presently is 
Chairman of the .\xx. Department at the Univer- 
sity of California, Santa Barbara. He lives in 
Santa Barbara. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Doles work have 
been held at the Galerie Springer, Berlin, 1956; 
Eric Locke Gallery, San Francisco, 1956; Gallcria 



Sagittarius, Rome, 1957; Graham Gallery, New 
YoVk, 1958, 1960; Santa Barbara Museum of 
Art, 1958; Bertha Lewinson Gallery, Los Angeles, 
1959; Art Center in La Jolla, 1960; California 
Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 
I960; Galeria Antonio Souza, Mexico City, 1961. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Esther Bear Gallery, Santa Barbara, 
1960, 1961, 1963, 1964; Rex Evans Gallery, Los 
Angeles, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966; Pasadena 
Art Museum, 1962; California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 1962; Santa 
Barbara Museum of .^rt, 1962; Krannert Art 
Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; 
LJniversity of California, Santa Barbara, 1965; 
McRoberts & Tunnard Gallery, London, 1966. 

William Dole's work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. Lenis Cabot, Boston; Mrs. Dwight 
Harken, Cambridge; Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Brody, 
Miss Naomi Hirshhorn, Mr. and Mrs. Billy 
Wilder, Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minne- 
apolis; Mr. George Frelinghuysen, Palm Springs; 
Mr. Richard Ames, Mr. Wright Ludington, Miss 
Margaret Mallory, Santa Barbara; Santa Barbara 
Museum of Art; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, 
\Vashington, D.C. 




80 



/PEARLSTEIN 



PHILIP PEARLSTEIN, Model Reclining on 
Couch, 1966. Oil on canvas, 54x7P/i. Allan 
Frumkin Galleiy, New York. ( 1965 ) 

Philip Pearlstein was born in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1924. He studied at the Carnegie 
Institute of Technology where he received a 
B.F.A. degree, and at Nevs' York University where 
he received an M.A. degree. In 1958 he was a 
recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to Italy. Mr. 
Pearlstein has taught'at the Pratt Institute, Brook- 
lyn; Yale Universky, New Haven; and is presently 
teaching at Brooklyn College. He lives in New 
York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Pearlstein's work 
have been held at the Tanager Gallery, New 
York, 1955; Peridot Gallery, New York, 1956, 
1957, 1959; Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York, 
1963, 1964, 1966; Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chi- 
cago, 1965; Ceeje Gallery, Los Angeles, 1965; 
Reed College, Portland, Oregon, 1965; Swarth- 
more College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, 1965. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pitts- 
burgh, 1955, 1964; Nebraska Art .Association, 
Lincoln, 1956, 1957, 1958; Whitney Museum of 
American Art, New York, 1956, 1958, 1962, 1965; 
The Art Institute of Chicago, 1959, 1962, 1964; 
University of Colorado, Boulder, 1962; San Fran- 
cisco Museum of Art, 1963; Krannert Art Mu- 
seum, University of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; 
University of Texas, Austin, 1966. 

Mr. Pearlstein's work is in the collections of the 
AUentown Art Museum, Pennsylvania; University 
of Nebraska, Lincoln; The American Federation 
of Arts, Mr. Richard Brown Baker, Mr. Edgar 
Kaufmann, Jr., New York University, Whitney 
Museum of American Art, New York; Reed Col- 
lege, Portland, Oregon; Syracuse University. 



81 




■V^ <ti.->- 



82 



/forakis 




PETER FORAKIS, Magic Box I, 1966. Stain- 
less steel polished, 18 x 12 x 12. Park Place Gal- 
lery, New York. 

". . . Right now the line is everything. . . .' 
". . . Each morning every day is different. . . ." 
Peter Forakis was born in Hanna, Wyoming, in 
1927. He studied at the San Francisco Art Insti- 
tute where he received his B.F..A. degree in 1957. 
He has taught at the San Francisco Art Institute, 
1958; The Brooklyn Museum Art School, 1961, 
1962, 1963; Pennsylvania State University, Uni- 
versity Park, 1965; Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology, Pittsburgh, 1965; University of Rhode 
Island, Kingston, 1966. He lives in New 
York, N.Y. 

Mr. Forakis was a recipient of an award from 
the Marina Sculpture Center, California, 1958. 
Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
the Gallery 6, San Francisco, 1955, 1956, 1957, 
1958; David Anderson Gallery, New York, 1961; 



Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1962, 1963; 
Park Place Gallery, New York, 1966. His work 
has been included in group exhibitions at the 
Ueno Museum, Tokyo, 1953; San Francisco .\rt 
.'\ssociation, 1955, 1958; San Francisco Museum 
of Art, 1956, 1957, 1958; Cornell University, 
Ithaca, 1960; Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 
1960, 1961; Cincinnati Art Museum, 1964; Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, Lincoln, 1964; Riverside 
Museum, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
New York, 1964; World House Galleries, New- 
York, 1965; The Jewish Museum, New York, 
1966. 

Mr. Forakis' work is in the collections of Mr. 
John G. Powers, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey; 
Virginia Dwan, Mr. Dan Graham, Mrs. Martha 
Jackson, Mrs. Jill Kornblec, Mrs. .Albert List, 
New York; Mr. J. Patrick Lannon, Palm Beach 
and New York; Larry Aldrich Foundation Mu- 
seum, Ridgefield, Connecticut. 



KISHi/ 



83 



MASATOVO KISHI, Opus 66-C-I2, 1966. 
Oil on canvas, 70 x 70. Lent by Raychcm Cor- 
poration, Redwood City, California. Arleigh Gal- 
lery, San Francisco. (1963, 1965) 

Masatoyo Kishi was born in Sakai, Japan, in 
1924. He was graduated from llie Sakai Middle 
School in 1941 and completed his studies in the 
science course at the Tokyo Physical College in 
1945. He organized the Tekkeikai CJroup in 1958. 
In 1959 he became associated with the Yamada 
Gallery in Kyoto and came to the United States 
in 1960. He taught at Holy Names College, Oak- 
land, 1965-66, and is presently teaching at 
Dominican College, San Rafael. Mr. Kishi lives 
in San Francisco, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Kishi's work have 
been held at Sogo Art Gallery, Osaka, 1956; 
Hakuho Gallery, Osaka, 1957, I960; Maruzen 
Gallery, Tokyo, 1957; Takasnimaya Art GalleiT, 
Osaka, 1958; K.C.C. Hall, Kobe, 1959; Nichi- 
futsu Gallery, O.saka, 1960; Thibaut Gallery, New 
York, 1961; Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, 
Pittsburgh, 1961; Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, 
1962; Hanamura Gallery, Detroit, 1963; Lanyon 



Gallery, Palo Alto, 1964; Nicholas Wilder Gal- 
lery, Los Angeles, 1965; Arleigh Gallery, San 
Francisco, 1966. 

His paintings have been included in group ex- 
hibitions in Osaka, 1957, 1958, 1959; Nishino- 
miya, 1958; at the City Art Museum, Koyto, 
1959, 1960; Ginza Gallery, Tokyo, 1960; Mu- 
.seum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1961; 
Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, 1961; San Fran- 
cisco Museum of Art, 1961, 1964; Hanamura Gal- 
lery, Detroit, 1962; California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 1962, 1964; 
Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois, 
C;hampaign, 1963, 1965; Lanyon Gallery, Palo 
.•\lto, 1963; M. H. de ^■oung Memorial Museum, 
San Francisco, 1963; Tucson Arts Center, 1965; 
The Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego, 1966. 

Masatoyo Kishi's work is in the collections of 
Mr. Joseph Cohen, Oakland; Mr. Richard Brody, 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Gregory, Palo Alto; Ray- 
chem Corporation, Redwood City, California; 
Mr. and Mrs. Dex Boring, Mr. and Mrs. Moses 
Lasky, Mr. Harry Weinstein, San Francisco; Mr. 
Allen S. Weller, Urbana; Mr. O. K. Mawardi. 




84 AK AW IE 



THOMAS F. AKAWIE, Santa Maria del Fiore, 
1966. Acrylic on masonite, 72x48. Berkeley 
Gallery, San Francisco, and David Stuart Gal- 
leries, Los Angeles. ( 1965 ) 

"I would like to attempt to make a statement 
about my current work even though I am rather 
unskilled verbally. Perhaps some background 
would help. My first four years of university 
training were spent studying art history. During 
this period I planned to teach in the field, .^fter 
graduation, my wife and I went to Europe, 
orienting our trip around traveling to and view- 
ing the great architectural monuments of Western 
Europe. At that time, floor plans seemed a 
necessary evil toward the understanding of the 
spatial relationships and organization of churches. 
It did not occur to me then that they would 
some day be used as material for paintings. Some 
seven years later, after enjoying painting in many 
styles, I now find my European experience, my 
art history, coming into the painting that I am 
doing. 

"I try to transcend the blunt matter-of-fact 
quality of the original church diagram. My ap- 
proach is romantic. 1 have simultaneous desires 
for mystery and order. For me these paintings 
are multi-valued. The choice of the church is 
important. Either I have been to the church and 
have had some rich experience therein, or I have 
a fantasy of wanting to go there. Some of my 
paintings are trips to these places; some have a 
memoir quality. Most often I feel it necessary 
to change the formal relationships of the church 
parts. I think of the spray technique as a means 
of enlarging the space of the church, adding 
light, even filling the chapels with neon gases or 
artificial aromas. Some of the paintings are 
mental landscapes or urban landscapes. Some 
have erotic connotations. They always appear 
anthropomorphic to me. Some are just my idea 
of how a particular church is. Some may be 
machines, women, hospitals, or formal gardens. 
It is unnecessary for the viewer to know the 
original church or plan as that is a different sort 
of art history-." 



Thomas F. .\kawie was born in New York, 
New York, in 1935. He attended Los .'\ngeles 
City College and the University of California, 
Berkeley, where he was graduated with honors in 
1959 and received an M..\. degree in 1963. Mr. 
.\kawie has taught at the L'niversitv of California, 
Berkeley, 1963-65; at California State College, 
Los .\ngeles, 1965-66; and presently is teaching 
at the San Francisco An Institute. He lives in 
Berkeley, California. 

Mr. Akawie has received several awards, and 
special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
the Contemporar^' Arts Gallerv, Berkelev, 1957, 
1965, 1966; Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, 1963; 
Comara Gallery, Los .■\ngeles, 1965; Long Beach 
.Art Museum, 1966. His work has been included 
in group exhibitions at the Coronet Lou\Te 
Gallery, Los Angeles, 1956; Los Angeles County 
Museum of Art, 1956; Contemporary .-Xrts 
Gallery, Berkelev, 1957; Jackson Gallery, 
Berkeley, 1960; The Denver Art Mu=eiun, 1962; 
Richmond Art Center, California, 1962, 1963, 
1964, 1965; California State Fair & Exposition 
Art Show, Sacramento, 1962; Western ^Vashing- 
ton State College, Bellingham, 1963; David 
Stuart Galleries, Los Angeles, 1963; Bolles Gal- 
lery, Brooks Hall, San Francisco, 1963; Quay Gal- 
lery, Tiburon, California, 1963; San Francisco Art 
Institute, 1964; San Francisco Museum of .Art, 

1964, 1965; AValnut Creek Pageant of Arts, 
California, 1964; University of California, Berke- 
ley, 1965; Berkeley Gallery, San Francisco, 
1965; Krannert Art Museum, University of Illi- 
nois, Champaign, 1965; La Jolla Museum of Art, 
1965; California .Art Museum, Newport Beach, 

1965, 1966; \Vorld's Fair, New York, 1965; 
Downey Museum of Art, Downey, California, 
1966; \V'itte Memorial Museum, San Antonio, 
1966; The Fine .Arts Gallery of San Diego, 1966. 

Mr. Akawie's work is in the collections of Mr. 
Robert Hartman, Berkeley; Downey Museum of 
.Art, Downey, California; Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Comara, Mr. Robert F. Taylor, Los .Angeles; 
Miss Virginia R. Rosen, New York; Mr. Henry 
J. Lowenstein, San Francisco. 



85 







'♦ 



•♦ 



Di 



K 



86/DUBIN 




WILLIAM DUBIN, Tertiumquid, 1966. Exotic 
hardwoods, 37x25x18. Dilexi Gallery, San 
Francisco. 

^Villiam Dubin was born in Los .Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, in 1937. He studied at San Francisco 
State College, 1961-64; San Francisco Art Insti- 
tute, 1965; and the California College of Arts 
and Crafts, Oakland, 1965-66. He lives in Oak- 
land, California. 

A special exhibition of his work was held at 
the Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco, 1966. His work 
has been included in group exhibitions at Pomona 
College, Claremont, California, 1960; San Fran- 
cisco Art Institute, 1960; San Francisco Museum 
of Art, 1960, 1964, 1966; and the .American Ex- 
press Company Pavilion, \Vorld's Fair, New York, 
1965. 

Mr. Dubin"s work is represented in the Asher 
Family Collection, Los Angeles; and in the col- 
lections of Mr. Sterling Holloway, South Laguna; 
and Mr. Jon Nicholas Streep, New York. 



KITAj/87 




R. B. KITAJ, The Nice Old Man and the 
Pretty Girl (with Huskies), 1964. Oil on canvas, 
48 X 48. Marlborough-Gerson Galierv, Inc., New 
York. 

R. B. Kitaj was born in Ohio in 1932. He 
studied at The Cooper Union School of Art and 
.Architecture, New York, with Sydney Delevante, 
R. B. Dowden, Paul Zucker, and John Ferrcn, 
1950; at the Akademie der Bildcnden Kunste, 
Vienna, 1952-53; Ruskin .School of Drawing and 
of Fine Art, Oxford; and at the Royal College 
of Art, London, 1958-61. He has taught at the 
Ealing School of Art and the Cambenvell School 
of Art, London, 1961-62. Periodically from 1949 



to 1953 Mr. Kitaj traveled as a seaman to such 
countries as Algeria, Tunisia, Spain, Venezuela, 
and Columbia. He lives in London, England. 

Mr. Kitaj has received awards from the 
Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, in 1961 and 1963. 
Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Marlborough New London Gallery, Lon- 
don, 1963; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 
1965; Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, Inc., New 
York, 1965. His work is in the collections of 
Haags Gemeentemuseum, The Hague; Walker 
Art Gallery, Liverpool; Tate Gallery, Victoria 
and Albert Museum, London; The Museum of 
Modern Art, New York. 



88 



/trova 



ERNEST T. TROVA, Study, Falling Man: 24" 
Walking Man, 1966. Bronze, 24" high. Lent by 
Mr. and Mrs. David Paul, New York. The Pace 
Galler)', New York. 

Ernest Trova was born in St. Louis, Missouri, 
in 1927, and presently resides in that city. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Image Gallen,-, St. Louis, 1959, 1960, 1961; 
The Pace Gallery, Boston, 1963; The Pace Gal- 
lery, New York, 1963, 1965; H. Balaban Carp 
Gallery, St. Louis, 1963; Hanover Gallery, Lon- 
don, 1964, 1966; City .Art Museum of St. Louis, 
1964; The Pace Gallery, Columbus, Ohio, 1966. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the City Art Museum of St. Louis, 1947, 1948, 
1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 
1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961; De Cordova and 
Dana Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts, 1963; 
The Pasadena .Art Museum, 1963; The Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago, 1964; The Solomon R. Guggen- 
heim Museum, New York, 1964, 1965-66; Vassar 
College, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1964; Dallas 
Museum of Fine Arts, 1965; The Byron Gallery, 
The Pace Gallery, New York, 1965; Larry Al- 



drich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Connecti- 
cut, 1965; \\'orcester Art Museum, Massachusetts, 
1965; University of Colorado, Boulder, 1966; 
J. L. Hudson Art Gallery, Detroit, 1966; Han- 
over Galler)-, London, 1966; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of Art, 1966. 

Mr. Trova's work is in the collections of Mr. 
Richard H. Solomon, Boston; Container Cor- 
poration of .-\merica. Inc., Chicago; Mr. R. Mark 
Glazebrook, Mr. E. J. Power, Tate Gallery, Lon- 
don; Mr. Frederick \\'eisman, Los Angeles; 
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; .Abrams Fam- 
ily Collection, Mr. Richard Brown Baker, Mr. 
and Mrs. .Arthur .\. Goldberg, The Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Museum, Mr. Philip Johnson, Mr. 
How-ard Lipman, Mr. and Mrs. .Albert List, The 
Museum of Modern .Art, Mr. I. M. Pei, Mr. John 
G. Powers, Mr. Robert Scull, Mr. and Mrs. 
Burton Tremaine, Whitney Museum of .American 
.Art, New York; Larry .Aldrich Foundation Mu- 
seum, Ridgefield, Connecticut; City .Art Museum 
of St. Louis, Mr. Morton D. May, Mr. Joseph 
Pulitzer, St. Louis; Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Aron, 
Scarsdale, New York. 



89 





90 



/iNSLEY 




WILL INSLEY, Untitled, 1964-65. Liquitex on 
masonite, 80 x 80. Stable Gallen-, New York. 

Will Insley was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, 
in 1929. He studied at The John Herron Art 
Institute, Indianapolis; at Amherst College, 
Massachusetts, where he received his B.F.A. de- 
gree in 1951; and at Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, where he received his Bachelor of Archi- 
tecture degree in 1955. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Stable Gallery, New York, 1965, 1966. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1965; 
Whitnev Museum of American Art, New York, 
1965-66; Rigelhaupt Gallery, Boston, 1966; Finch 
College, Riverside Museum, The Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1966. His work 
is in the collection of Brandeis University, 
Waltham, Massachusetts. 



JONEs/ 



91 



HOWARD JONES, Area Two, 1966. Light con- 
struction, 60x98Vixl20. Royal Marks Gallery, 
New York. 

"I would say this only if there is a difference 
between the two: Let's explore the uncertain 
nature of life itself and forget about art." 
(Courtesy of Art in America, Vol. LIV, No. 4, 
1966, p. 30.) 

Howard Jones was born in Illion, New York, 
in 1922. On a four-year scholarship he studied 
painting at Syracuse University, and has also 
studied at Columbia University, New York; Uni- 
versity of Toledo; and Cranbrook Academy of 
Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Mr. Jones was 
the recipient of a grant from the Graham Founda- 
tion for .\dvanced Studies in the Fine .Arts, 1966. 
He has taught at The Tulane University of 
Louisiana, New Orleans; Florida State Univer- 
sity, Tallahassee; and he presently is teaching at 
Washington University, St. Louis. He lives in St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Mr. Jones has received recognition in "Elected 
New Talent" by Art in America magazine, 1966. 



Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
the Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, 
Missouri, 1965, and at the Royal Marks Gallery, 
New York, 1966. In 1964-6.') his work was in- 
cluded in group exhibitions at the Dallas Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts; University of Florida, Gaines- 
ville; The Byron Gallery, New 'Nork; H. Balaban 
Carp Gallery, City Art Museum of St. Louis, 
St. Louis University, Martin Schweig Gallery, St. 
Louis; The Ohio State Universitv, Columbus, 
1966; Royal Marks Gallery, New' York, 1966; 
Larry Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, 
Connecticut, 1966; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, 
Washington, D.C., 1966. 

Howard Jones's work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph T. Coe, Cleveland; the Nel- 
son Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; Mr. Peter Tunnard, London; Mrs. Betty 
Parsons, New York; Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Adams, Princeton, New Jersey; Larry Aldrich 
Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut; 
Mr. and Mrs. William Eisendrath, Jr., Mr. 
Morton D. May, Washington University, St. 
Louis; Florida State University, Tallahas.see. 




92 




rattner/ 



93 



ABRAHAM RATTNER, The Red Carpet, 1964. 
Oil on canvas, 45 x 57',1'. The Downtown Gallery, 
New York. (1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 
1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1965) 

Abraham Rattner was born in Poughkeepsie, 
New York, in 1895. He studied at George Wash- 
ington University, Washington, D.C.; The Penn- 
sylvania .Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 
and in Paris at the Academic Julian, Ecole des 
Beaux Arts, Academic de la Grande Chaumiere, 
and at the .■\cademie Ranson. He received a 
Cresson Traveling Fellowship from The Penn- 
sylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 
in 1945. Mr. Rattner has taught at the New- 
School for Social Research, New York, 1947-55; 
The Brooklyn Museum Art School, 1950-51; 
American Academy in Rome, 1951; Yale Uni- 
versity, New Haven, Connecticut, 1952-53; Art 
Students League of New York, 1954; The Penn- 
sylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 
1954; University of Illinois, Urbana, 1954-55; 
Columbia University, New Y'ork, 1955-56; Mich- 
igan State University, East Lansing, 1956-58; 
University of Chicago, 1957; and at the Skow- 
hegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine. 
He lives in New \'ork. New York. 

Mr. Rattner has received awards from The 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1945, 
1958, 'i960; The Philadelphia Art Alliance, 1945; 
Pepsi-Cola Company, New York, 1946; Museum 
of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1946, 1949; 
University of Illinois, Urbana, 1950; The Cor- 
coran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1953; 
Temple University, Philadelphia, 1954; Chicago 
Book Clinic, 1956; Michigan State University, 
East Lansing, 1956; American Academy of Arts 
and Letters, New York, 1958; New School for 
Social Research, New York, 1960. 

Special exhibitions of his woi'k have been held 
at the Bonjean Galleries, Paris, 1935; Julien Lew 
Gallery, New York, 1936-41; The Arts Club of 
Chicago, 1940; Con Courvoisier, San Francisco, 
1940; Paul Rosenberg & Company, New York, 



1942-56; Santa Barbara Museum of .Art, 1943; 
University of Illinois, Urbana, 1952; The Renais- 
sance Society, University of Chicago, 1957; The 
Downtown Gallery, New York, 1957, 1958, i960, 
1964, 1966; North Shore Temple, Glencoe, Illi- 
nois, 1958; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1958; The American Federation of 
Arts, 1960-61; Galerie Coard, Paris, 1965; West- 
chester .Art Association, White Plains, 1966; 
Stendahl Gallery, Los Angeles; New Orleans Arts 
& Crafts Club. 

Mr. Rattner's work is in the collections of The 
Baltimore Museum of .Art; Albright-Knox Art 
Gallery, Buffalo; Krannert .Art Museum, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Champaign; The Mint Museum 
of Art, Charlotte, North "Carolina; The Art In- 
stitute of Chicago, Container Corporation of 
America, Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc., Chicago; 
Florida Gulf Coast Art Center, Clearwater; Des 
Moines Art Center; Michigan State University, 
East Lansing; Fort Worth Art Center; Dartmouth 
College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Wadsworth 
Atheneum, Hartford; Bezalel Museum, Jerusalem; 
Johnson State College, Johnson, Vermont; Ne- 
braska .Art .Association, Lincoln; Marquette Uni- 
versity, Milwaukee; Walker Art Center, Minne- 
apolis; Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, 
Indiana; The Newark Museum; Yale University, 
New Haven, Connecticut; The Jewish Museum, 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, The 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New School for 
Social Research, Whitney Museum of .American 
Art, New York; University of Oklahoma, Nor- 
man; Musce du Jeu de Paume, Paris; The Penn- 
sylvania .Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia 
Museum of Art, Philadelphia; Vassar College, 
Poughkeepsie, New York; Washington Lhiiversity, 
St. Louis; Wittc Memorial Museum, San Antonio; 
Santa Barbara Museum of Art; Arizona .State 
L'niversity, Tempe; Brandeis University, Wal- 
thani, Massachusetts; The Phillips Collection, 
Washington, D.C.; Williams College, Williams- 
town, Massachusetts; Butler Institute of American 
Art, Youngstown. 



94 



/MITCHELL 




JOAN MITCHELL, Untitled, 1964. Oil on 
canvas, 96 x 78. Stable Gallery, New York. 

Joan Mitchell was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
in 1926. She studied at Smith College, North- 
hampton, Massachusetts, 1942-44; The School of 
The Art Institute of Chicago, where she received 
her B.F.A. in 1947; Columbia L'niversity, New 
\'ork; and New York University, New York, 
where she received her M.F.A. in 1950. Miss 
Mitchell was the recipient of a fellowship from 
The Art Institute of Chicago for study in Europe. 
She lives in Paris, France. 

Special exhibitions of her work have been held 
at the New Gallery, New York, 1951; Stable 
Gallery, New York, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 
1961, 1965; Galleria dell'Ariete, Milan, 1960; 
Galerie Neufville, Paris, 1960; Southern Illinois 
University, Carbondale, 1961; B. C. Holland Gal- 
lery, Chicago, 1961; Dwan Gallery, Los .Angeles, 
1961; Klipstein und Kornfeld, Berne, 1962; 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge, 1962; Galerie Jacques Dubourg, Galerie 
Lawrence, Paris, 1962. 

Her work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The .Art Institute of Chicago, 1950, 1957, 
1958, 1962; Whitney Museum of American Art, 
New York, 1950, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1965, 1966; 
University of Illinois, Urbana, 1950; Walker Art 
Center, Minneapolis, 1955; The Museum of 
Modern Art, New York, 1956, 1962; The Arts 
Club of Chicago, 1957; The Minneapolis Insti- 
tute of .Arts, 1957; Japanese International Ex- 
hibition, Tokyo, 1957; The Corcoran Gallery of 
Art, Washington, D.C., 1957, 1959; The Balti- 
more Museum of .Art, 1958; Dallas Museum of 
Fine Arts, 1958; in Kessel, Germany, 1958; Osaka, 
Japan, 1958; at the Museum of Art, Carnegie In- 
stitute, Pittsburgh, 1958; Rome-New York Art 
Foundation, Rome, 1958; Washington University, 
St. Louis, 1958; in Spoleto, Italy, 1958; at The 
American Federation of Arts, New York, 1959-60; 
Museu de Arte Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
1959; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1961; 
Birmingham Museum of Art, Michigan, 1961; 
Dayton Art Institute, 1961; Yale University, New 
Haven, Connecticut, 1961; The Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1961; World's 
Fair, Seattle, 1962; The Pennsylvania Academy 
of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1965-66; Flint 
Institute of Arts, Michigan, 1966; Drexel Insti- 
tute of Technology, Philadelphia, 1966; The 
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, 1966. 

Miss Mitchell's work is in the collections of 
the Geigy Chemical Corporation, .Ardsley, New 
York; Kunsthalle, Basel, Switzerland; Albright- 
Knox Art Galler>', Buffalo; The .Art Institute of 
Chicago; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Chase 
Manhattan Bank, The Museum of Modern Art, 
Rockefeller University, The Singer Manufactur- 
ing Company, Union Carbide Corporation, Whit- 
ney Museum of .American Art, New York; James 
A. Michener Foundation, Pipersville, Pennsyl- 
vania; The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.; 
Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts. 



SHAPIRO/95 



DANIEL SHAPIRO, Peaceful Triptych, 1966. 
Acr>lic on canvas, 49 x 33. Arleigh Gallery, .San 
Francisco. 

"These recent acrylic paintings are expressions 
of persistent symbols derived from organic forms, 
and particularly from human anatomy. My con- 
scious concerns are with myth, mystery, and 
magic. These concerns stimulate the shapes; 
chance and the unconscious determine their posi- 
tions and movements." 

Daniel Shapiro was born in New York, New 
York, in 1920. He studied at The Cooper Union 
School of Art and .Architecture, New York, 1941, 
and at Columbia University, New York, 1944-46. 
Mr. Shapiro was the recipient of research grants 
from the University of California, Davis, 1961-66, 
and a fellowship from the McDowell Colony, 
1963. In 1965 he was appointed a Fellow in the 
Institute of Creative Arts, University of Cali- 
fornia. He has taught and lectured at Benning- 
ton College, \'ermont, 1947-57; Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, 1957-59; and New York Uni- 
versity, New York, 1959. Since 1959 he has 
taught at the University of California, Davis, and 
lived in San Francisco, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Shapiro's work have 
been held at the Rose Rabow Gallery, San Fran- 
c isco, 1962; University of California, San Fran- 
cisco, 1963; Cellini Gallery, San Francisco, 1964, 
1965; Arleigh Gallery, San Francisco, 1966. His 
work has been included in group exhibitions at 
the San Francisco Art Institute, 1962, 1963, 1964, 
1965; San Francisco Museum of Art, 1962; Okla- 
homa Art Center, Oklahoma City, 1963. 

Mr. Shapiro's work is in the collections of Ohio 
University, Athens; Olivet College, Michigan; 
San Francisco .Art Institute. 




96/ WARHOL 

n 1^1/ 7 ? 



ANDY WARHOL, Jackie, 1964. Acrylic and 
silkscreen enamel on canvas; nine panels, each 
20 X 16. Leo Castelli Gallery, New York. 

Andy Warhol was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1930. He studied at the Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh. Since 1952 
Mr. Warhol has lived in New York, New York. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, 1962, 1963; 
Stable Gallery, New York, 1962, 1964; Leo 
Castelli Galler>-, New York, 1964, 1966; Galerie 
Ileana Sonnabend, Paris, 1964, 1965; Galleria 
Rubbers, Buenos Aires, 1965; Galerie Buren, 
Stockholm, 1965; Jerrold Morris International 
Gallery, Toronto, 1965; Gian Enzo Sperone Arte 
Moderna, Turin, 1965. 

Mr. Warhol's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Dwan Gallery', Los .'\ngeles, 
1962; Sidney Janis Gallery-, New York, 1962, 
1963, 1964, 1965; Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, 
Kansas City, Missouri, 1963; I.C.A. Gallery, 
London, 1963; Oakland Art Museum, 1963; 
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New 
York, 1963, 1966; Galerie Ileana Sonnabend, 
Paris, 1963; The Washington Gallery of Modern 
Art, Washington, D.C., 1963; University of New 
Mexico, .\lbuquerque, 1964; Stedelijk Museum, 
Amsterdam, 1964; Louisiana Kunstmuseum, 
Louisiana, Denmark, 1964; U.S. Plywood Cor- 
poration, New York, 1964; Salon de Mai, Paris, 
1964; Portland ."^rt Museum, Oregon, 1964; Uni- 
versity of Rochester, New York, 1964; Moderna 
Museet, Stockholm, 1964; Jerrold Morris Inter- 
national Gallery, Toronto, 1964; Brandeis Uni- 
versity, Waltham, Massachusetts, 1964; Institute 
of Contemporary .Art, Boston, 1965; Palais des 
Beaux-.'\rts de Bruxelles, 1965; Hamburger Kunst- 
kabinett, Hamburg, Germany, 1965; Dwan Gal- 
lery, Los Angeles, 1965; .American Embassy, 
Paris, 1965; Worchester .Art Museum, Massachu- 
setts, 1965; Lhiiversity of Texas, .Austin, 1966; 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 1966. 
His work is represented in many public and 
private collections. 



97 




98 ARAKAWA 




iWMV'" ! '-^mi 



ARAKAWA, Bottomless, 1965. Ink, oil, and 
cellophane on canvas, 76 x 40. Dwan Galler>-, 
New York. (1965) 

"If you take Nature solely as a series of con- 
nections, it falls naturally into a diagrammatic 
form. 

"In order to begin, make a sketch of Nature 
by translating it into a 'language.' From these 
words, make a diagram of the visible world. This 
is part (A). 

"Part (B) consists of a working diagram of the 
invisible world. 

"Part (C) is a diagram to determine the many 
and varied connections between (A) and (B). 

"The last and most important connection is 
that of equalitv ( = ). 

"Then, I hope: (A) + (B) = (C)." 

Arakawa was born in Nagoya, Japan, in 1936. 
He studied at Musashino College of Fine Arts, 
Tokyo. Since 1959 he has lived in New York, 
N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Arakawa's work have 
been held at the Museum of Modern Art, Tokvo, 
1958; Mundo Galler\-, Tokyo, 1961; Galerie Al- 
fred .Schmela, Dusseldorf, 1963, 1965; Palais des 
Beaux-.\rts de Bruxelles, 1964; Dwan Gallery, Los 
Angeles, 1964; Galleria dell'Ariete, Milan, 1965; 
\Vurttembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart, 1965; 
Minami Gallery, Tokyo, 1965; Dwan Galler)', 
New York, 1966. 

.Arakawa's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Gordon Gallery, New York, 
1961; The National Museum of Art, Tokyo, 1961; 
Dwan Galler)', Los Angeles, 1963; Sidney Janis 
Gallery, New York, 1964; Minami Gallery, 
Tokyo, 1964; Krannert Art Museum, University 
of Illinois, Champaign, 1965. His work is in the 
collections of Mrs. Virginia D. Kondratief, Mrs. 
Joyce Schiller, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Weisman, 
Los Angeles; Mr. Leon Kraushar, New York. 




•J 1 •> 



QUAYTMAN/99 




HARVEY QUAYTMAN, Mainechance, 1965. 
Oil on canvas, 84 x 48. Royal Marks Galler)', 
New York. 

Harvey Quaytman was born in Far Rockaway, 
New York, in 1937. He studied at .Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1955-57; at The School of the Museum 
of Fine .Arts, Boston, where he was granted a 
diploma with distinction, 1960; and at Tufts Uni- 
versity, Boston, where he received his B.F.A. 
degree, 1960. Mr. Quaytman was the recipient 
of a scholarship from the New York State Board 
of Regents, 1955-57; a tuition scholarship from 
the Skowhegan -School of Painting and Sculpture, 
Maine, 1957; a tuition scholarship and graduate 
assistantship from The School of the Mu.seum 
of Fine Arts, Boston, 1960; and the James 
William Paige Traveling Fellowship, 1960-61. He 
has also studied in Europe, mainly London, 
where he experimented with mezzotint at the 
Royal College of Art, London, 1961-62. He has 
taught at Tufts University Alumni Center, Bos- 



ton, 1959; The School of the Museum of Fine 
Arts, Boston, 1960, 1962-63; Middlebury College, 
Vermont, 1961; Newton Creative .Arts Center, 
Massachusetts, summers 1961, 1963, 1964; Rox- 
bury Latin School, Boston, 1962-63; North East 
Essex College of .Art, Essex, England, 1962; .Adult 
Education Program, Brookline, Massachusetts, 
1963, 1964; Lowell and Winthrop Houses, Har- 
vard University, Cambridge, 1963, 1964, 1965; 
Commonwealth School. Boston, 1964-65. Mr. 
Quaytman lives in New York, New York. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Quaytmans work 
have been held at the Ward-Nasse Gallery, Bos- 
ton, 1964, 1965; and at the Royal Marks Galler)-, 
New York, 1966. His work has been included 
in group exhibitions at the .A.I..A. Gallery, Red- 
fern Gallery, London, 1962; Museum of I'^ine 
Arts, Northeastern University, Stanhope Gal- 
lery, Boston, 1963; University of Massachu.sctts, 
Amherst, 1963; De Cordova and Dana Museum, 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, 1964. 



100 



/mahaffey 



NOEL MAHAFFEY, My Brother with Janis, 
1966. Oil on canvas, 66 x 66. Oklahoma .\rt 
Center, Oklahoma City. 

Noel Mahafley was born in .St. .Augustine, 
Florida, in 1944. He studied at the Dallas Mu- 
seum of Fine .'\rts School on a scholarship and 
at the Atelier Chapman Kelley, Dallas, 1959-62. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The Pennsylvania ."Academy of the Fine 
.Arts, Philadelphia, 1962, 1966, and is represented 
in the permanent collection of the Oklahoma Art 
Center, Oklahoma City. 



101 




102 



/Mclaughlin 



JOHN McLaughlin, »9-1965, 1965. Oil on 
canvas, 48 x 60. Felix Landau Gallery, Los 
Angeles. 

"My position is based on the assumption that 
extended perception arises from response to the 
relatedness of experience. 

"The stark, voidal simplicity of these composi- 
tions is designed to create a climate of uncom- 
promised freedoin, beyond the insistence of the 
particular. Thus, the neutral structure, devoid 
of the objectivism of the self-cxpressionistic de- 
vice, indicates that cognition of the interdepen- 
dence of experience is essential to its meaning. 

"We must agree that the parts constitute the 
whole. Aesthetic wholeness, within the context 
of epistemology, is intuitive grasp of the signifi- 
cance of total experience." 

John McLaughlin was born in Sharon, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1898. As an artist he is self-taught 
and since 1946 has devoted his time to painting. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Felix Landau Gallery, Los Angeles, 1953, 
1958, 1962, 1963, 1966; The Downtown Gallery, 



New York, 1955; The Pasadena Art Museum, 
1956, 1963. His work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Art, 
1955, 1956; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1955; Cincinnati .'\rt Museum, 1956; 
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 1956; The 
Virginia Museum of Fine .Arts, Richmond, 1958; 
Queens College, Belfast, 1959-60; Institute of 
Contemporary Art, London, 1959-60; Los Angeles 
County Museum, 1959-60; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of An, 1959-60; The American Federation 
of .Arts, New York, 1960-61; Amon Carter Mu- 
seum of \Vestern Art, Fort Worth, 1962; Whitney 
Museum of American Art, New York, 1962; The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1966; Mead 
Corporation, San Francisco, 1966. 

Mr. McLaughlin's work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. Taft .Schreiber, Beverly Hills; 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Los .Angeles 
Times; Mr. Walter Hopps, The Pasadena Art 
Museum, Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Rowan, Pasa- 
dena; Mr. and Mrs. Gifford Phillips, Santa 
Monica, California. 




OLIT5Kl/w3 




JULES OLITSKI, Iron and Powder, 1966. 
Acniic on canvas, 92 x TiM. Lent by Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Feiwell, Larchmont, New York. 
Andre Emmerich Galler>', New York. 

Jules Olitski was born in Gomel, Russia, in 
1922. He studied at the National Academy of 
Design, New York; Ossip Zadkine School of 
Sculpture and the Academic de la Grande 
Chaumiere, Paris; and at New Y'ork University 
where he received his B.A. and M.A. degrees. 
He has taught at C. ^V. Post College of Long 
Island University, 1956-6.3, and is presently teach- 
ing at Bennington College. He lives in Bennington. 

Mr. Olitski has received awards from the Mu- 
seum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1961, 
and the Ford Foundation, 1964. Special exhibi- 
tions of his work have been held at the Gallery 8, 
Paris, 1950; French & Company, Inc., New York, 
1959, 1960; Poindexter Gallery, New York, 1961, 
1962, 1963, 1964, 1965; Galleria Santa Croce, 
Florence, 1963; Toninelli Arte Moderna, Milan, 



1963; Richard Grey Gallery, Chicago, 1964; 
Kasmin Gallery, London, 1964, 1965, 1966; 
Galerie Lawrence, Paris, 1964; David Mirvish 
Gallery, Toronto, 1964, 1965. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Museum of .■Xrt, Carnegie Institute, 
Pittsburgh, 1961; Norman Mackenzie Memorial 
Gallery, Regina, Canada, 1963; San Francisco 
Museum of Art, 1963; Brandeis University, Wal- 
tham, Massachusetts, 1963; The \Vashington Gal- 
lery of Modern .^rt, Washington, D.C., 1963; 
Contemporary .'\rts A.ssociation, Houston, 1964; 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1964-65; 
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New- 
York, 1964; Art Gallery of Toronto, 1964-65; 
Kunsthalle, Basel, Switzerland, 1965; Harvard 
University, Cambridge, 1965; The Pasadena Art 
Museum, 1965; Venice Biennale d'arte, 1966. 

Mr. Olitski's work is in the collections of The 
Art Institute of Chicago; The Museum of Modern 
Art, New York; Chrysler Art Museum of Prov- 
incetown, University of Saskatchewan, Regina. 



104 




i 



schnackenberg/ 



105 



ROY SCHNACKENBERG, Green Bird on Red 
Background, 1966. Oil with plexiglas cast figure, 
76 X 64 X 4. Main Street Galleries, Chicago. 
(1965) 

"When the demands of food and shelter are no 
longer a pressing need, and the static of Everyday 
is cleared, Man is left with himself. Faced with 
the oppressive reality of his own fallibility, his 
own mortality, and the absolute isolation in which 
he must endure them, he can flee into dogma, 
habit, insanity, or physical suicide; or he may 
choose to live his life in defiance of fate. 

"To live that life of defiance and to bridge that 
terrible isolation by giving form and dimension to 
the universality of Man's experience is the part of 
the artist. He must express, in whatever medium 
he is most skilled, what it is to be a human being. 
The hope is that others might be enriched by this 
common bond just as he was by the work of 
those artists who preceded him. 

"I make pictures. These pictures, when success- 
ful, contain a sense of order, of independence — 
and some highly arbitrary reflections of this par- 
ticular point in history. I feel that the method by 
which I make these pictures is of little impor- 
tance; that the picture, once finished, must speak 
for itself." 

Roy Schnackenberg was born in Chicago, Illi- 
nois, in 1934. He attended Miami University, 
Oxford, Ohio, where he received a B.F..'\. degree 
in 1956. He taught at the Oxbow Summer School, 
Saugatuck, Michigan, in 1966. Mr. Schnacken- 
berg lives in Chicago, Illinois. 

Mr. Schnackenberg was the recipient of an 
award from The Art Institute of Chicago, 1964. 
Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
the Joachim Gallery, Chicago, 1962, and the 
Main Street Galleries, Chicago, 1963, 1964. His 
work has been included in group exhibitions at 
The Art Institute of Chicago, 1961, 1962, 1964, 
1965; Art Dealers Association of America, Inc., 
New York, 1964; Krannert Art Museum, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; and the Walker 
Art Center, Minneapolis, 1966. Mr. Schnacken- 
berg's work is in the collection of Mr. Robert 
Mayer, Winnetka, Illinois. 



■r7^ 



d 



106 



/harvey 



ROBERT HARVEY, French Opera Barbershop 
(Walker Evans series), 1966. Oil on canvas, 
48 X 48. Gump's Gallery, San Francisco. 

Robert Harvey was born in Lexington, North 
Carolina, in 1924. He studied at the Ringling 
School of Art, Sarasota; Art Students League of 
New York; San Francisco .Art Institute; and with 
Louis Ribak, Taos, New Mexico. He lives in San 
Francisco, California. 

Mr. Harvey has received awards from the 
California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San 
Francisco, 1960; Marin Society of Artists, Inc., 
Ross, California, 1961, 1962; The Corcoran Gal- 
lery of .Art, Washington, D.C., 1962; Western 
Washington State College, Bellingham, 1963; San 
Francisco Art Festival, 1963; Jack London Square 
Art Festival, Oakland, 1964; The North Carolina 
Museum of .\rt, Raleigh, 1964; M. Knoedler & 
Company, Inc., New York, 1965. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Harvey's work have 
been held at the Saidenberg Gallery, Inc., New 
York, 1954; Gump's Gallerv, San Francisco, 1959, 
1961, 1963, 1966; Bay Window Caller)-, Mendo- 
cino, California, 1961; Eleanor Bedell, Santa Fe, 
1961, 1962; La Galeria Escondida, Taos, 1962; 
Terrv Dintenfass, Inc., New York, 1963; Jefferson 
Gallery, La Jolla, 1964; David Stuart Callers-, Los 
Angeles, 1964; Phoenix Art Museum, 1964; 
E. B. Crocker .\rt Galler)', Sacramento, 1965; 
Wichita Art .Association, Inc., 1965. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Oakland Art Museum, 1960, 1961, 
1963, 1964; California Palace of the Legion of 
Honor, San Francisco, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 



1965; Marin Society of Artists, Inc., Ross, Cali- 
fornia, 1961; San Francisco Museum of Art, 1961, 
1965; The Denver Art Museum, 1962; Nelson 
Gallery-.-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, 
1962; The North Carolina Museum of Art, Ra- 
leigh, 1962, 1963, 1965; Santa Barbara Museum 
of .Art, 1962; Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, 
1962; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, 
D.C., 1962; \Vestern Washington State College, 
Bellingham, 1963, 1965; Phoenix Art Museum, 
1963; M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, San 
Francisco, 1963; San Francisco Art Festival, 
1963; Jack London Square .Art Festival, Oakland, 
1964, 1965; San Francisco Art Institute, 1964; 
Laguna Beach .-\rt .Association, 1965; M. Knoed- 
ler & Company, Inc., New York, 1965; The Vir- 
ginia Museum of Fine .Arts, Richmond, 1966. 

Mr. Harvey's work is in the collections of Baron 
Leon Lambert, Bnissels; Mr. and Mrs. Stuart 
Rowe, Davis, California; Mr. James Trittipo, 
Hollywood; Mr. and Mrs. JefTrey Hayden, Lytton 
Savings and Loan Association, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sanford Simmons, Los .Angeles; Storm King Art 
Center, Mountainville, New- York; Mrs. Mary 
Roebling, New Jersey; Mr. Farley Granger, Miss 
Signe Hasso, New York; M. Marcel Marceau, 
Paris; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Campbell, Crown 
Zellerbach, Miss Helen Heninger, Mrs. Louis 
Honig, Mr. and Mrs. \'ictor Honig, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bruce Walkup, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. 
Phillip S. Hack, Scottsdale; Prince and Princess 
Doan de Champassak, Tangier; The Corcoran 
Gallery of .Art, \Vashington, D.C.; Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Dunne, \Vichita; ^V'ichita .Art Museum. 




LILLIAN FLORSHEIM, Squares on Diagonal 
with Rods, 1966. Plexiglas, 16x24x16. Main 
Street Galleries, Chicago. 

"Does the artist paint a picture of the chaos 
in the world around him or docs he herald the 
possible destruction of the world to come or does 
he express his own innermost self? Probably all 
three. But ni)' world, though it may be wishful, 
is an orderly world and while the inventions of 
the twentieth century inay have brought about 
destruction and chaos, they have also made pos- 
sible the use of machinery and the development 
of synthetic materials. 

"These materials have a fascination for me and 
because their nature demands the use of geo- 
metric forms they satisfy my own need for order 
and serenity. Whether this is blindness or proph- 
ecy, only a distant future can tell." 

Lillian Florsheim was born in New Orleans, 
Louisiana. She studied painting with Henry 
Hensche, Provincetown, 1946-47; Rudolph 
W'eisenborn, Chicago, 1948-50; and with George 
Buehr, Chicago, 1948-54. In 1951 she studied 
sculpture at the Institute of Design, Illinois In- 
stitute of Technology, Chicago. Miss Florsheim 
lives in Chicago, Illinois. 

A special exhibition of Miss Florsheim's work 
was held at the Main Street Galleries, Chicago, 
1966. Her work has been included in group ex- 
hibitions at the Denisc Rene Gallery, Paris, 1965, 
and in Tel .\viv, Israel, 1965. Miss Florsheim's 
work is in the collections of Mrs. Robert Mandel, 
Beverly Hills; Mr. and Mrs. Alan Steinert, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts; Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Block, 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin Hokin, Chicago; Isaac Delgado Museum 
of Art, Mrs. Edgar B. Stern, New Orleans. 



FLORSHEIM 107 




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VAN BUREN/ 109 



RICHARD VAN BUREN, 7.amir, 1966. Fiber 
glass, 40'/2x91 x88. Bykert Gallery, New York. 

"Keep your hamburger red. Support black 
power." 

Richard Van Buren was born in Syracuse, New 
York, in 1937. He studied at San Francisco State 
College, The University of Mexico, and Mexico 
City College. He teaches at the School of Visual 
Arts, New York, and New York University. Mr. 
Van Buren lives in New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the San Francisco Museum of Art, 1962; and 
the Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco, 1964. His 
work has been included in group exhibitions at 
the San Francisco Museum of Art, 1964; World 
House Galleries, New York, 1965; Musee Can- 
tonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland, 
1966; The Jewish Museum and Park Place Gal- 
lery, New York, 1966. 



no 



/boyce 




RICHARD BOVCE, Proteus Changing I, 1965. 
Unique Bronze, 14". Felix Landau Gallery, Los 
Angeles. (1955, 1965) 

'"I am obsessed with the struggle both for and 
against time, and so am concerned with the en- 
during quality of certain formal ideas and the 
permanence of the most traditional sculptural 
media. Not paradoxically, the same concern has 
invoK'ed my work with the body of m)th which 
deals with the changing of form and with the 
form of myth which changes according to the 
needs of the culture in which it finds itself 
recognized." 

Richard Boyce was born in New York, New 
York, in 1920. He studied painting at The School 
of the Museum of Fine .Arts, Boston, and at the 
Art Students League of New York. He received 
the James William Paige Fellowship for painting 
and the Bartlett Grant for Sculpture. He has 
taught at The School of the Museum of Fine 
Arts, Boston; Wellesley College, Massachusetts; 
Boston University; University of California, Los 
Angeles. He lives in Los Angeles, California. 



Special exhibitions of Richard Boyce's work 
have been held at the Boris Mirski Gallery, Bos- 
ton, 1952; The Swetzoff Gallen', Boston,' 1956, 
1959, 1961, 1962; Zabriskie Gallery, New York, 
1961, 1962; The Alan Gallery, New York, 1963, 
1965. His work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign-Urbana, 1955, 1965; The Art Institute of 
Chicago, 1960; Whitney Museum of American 
Art, New York, 1963; The Pennsylvania Acad- 
emy of the Fine .'^rts, Philadelphia, 1964. 

His work is in the collections of the Addison 
Gallery of .American Art, Andover, Massachu- 
setts; Mr. Patrick B. McGinnin, Boston; Harvard 
LJniversity, Cambridge; Mr. Stanley Marcus, 
Dallas; De Cordova and Dana Museum, Lincoln, 
Massachusetts; Mr. and Mrs. Victor Carter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Eric Lidow, Los -Angeles; Mr. Yincent 
.Astor, Mr. Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., Mr. Lincoln 
Kirstein, Whitney Museum of .'\merican Art, 
New York; Rhode Island School of Design, Provi- 
dence; The Hon. William Benton, Southport, 
Connecticut; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, 
Washington, D.C.; Wellesley College. 



HARTIGAN III 



r' 



GRACE HARTIGAN, Mistral. 1964. Oil on 
canvas, 60 x 68, Martha Jackson Gallciv, New 
York. (1963) 

"I have become increasingly aware of what 1 
must do. Gide said an artist should want only 
one thing and want it constantly. I want an art 
that is not 'abstract' and not 'realistic' I cannot 
describe the look of this art, but I think I will 
know it when I see it. 

"I have found my 'subject'; it concerns that 
which is vulgar and vital in American modern 
life, and the possibilities of its transcendence into 
the beautiful. I do not wish to describe my 
subject matter or to reflect upon it. I want to 
distill it until I have its essence, then the rawness 
must be resolved into form and unity; without 
the 'rage for order' how can there be art?" 

Grace Hartigan was born in Newark, New 
Jersey, in 1922. She studied in New York with 
Isaac Lane Muse, and has traveled in Europe 
and Mexico. She has taught a seminar at the 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. She lives 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Special exhibitions of Miss Hartigan's work 
have been held at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery, 
New York, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957; 
Chatham College, Pittsburgh, 1960; Grcs Gal- 
lery, \Vashington, D.C., 1960; Museum of Art, 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1961; Martha 
Jackson Gallery, New York, 1962, 1964; Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1963; Franklin 
Siden Gallery, Detroit, 1964. Her work has been 
included in group exhibitions at the University 
of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1955, 1961, 1963; 
TTie Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1955- 
56; Museu de Arte Moderna de Sao Paulo, 



Brazil, 1957; World's Fair, Brussels, 1958; in 
Kassel, Germany, 1959; at the Coliseum, New 
York, 1959; The Columbus Gallery of Fine 
Arts, Ohio, 1960; Walker Art Center, Minne- 
apolis, 1960; University of Michigan, .Xnn .Arbor, 
1961; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museimi, 
New York, 1961; Mary Washington College, 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, 1963; Instituto de Cul- 
tura Hispanica de Madrid, 1963; Whitney Mu- 
seum of American Art, New York, 1963; The 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadel- 
phia, 1963; Dayton Art Institute, 1964; Flint In- 
stitute of Arts, Michigan, 1964; Musee des Beaux- 
Arts, Ghent, 1964; in Essex County, New Jersey, 
1964; The American Federation of .Arts, New 
York, 1964, 1965; World's Fair, New York, 1964; 
Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroit, 1965; Finch 
College, New York, 1965; S. C. Johnson & Son 
Collection, Racine, 1965. 

Miss Hartigan's work is in the collections of 
The Baltimore Museum of Art; .Mbright-Kiiox 
Art Gallery, Buffalo; The Art Institute of Chi- 
cago; Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas 
City, Missouri; The Minneapolis Institute of 
Arts, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; New Paltz 
Museum, New Paltz, New York; The Brooklyn 
Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The 
Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of 
.Atnerican Ait, New York; Museum of Art, 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Vassar College, 
Poughkeepsie, New ^'ork; Rhode Island School 
of Design, Providence; The North Carolina Mu- 
seum of Art, Raleigh; \Vashington University, 
St. Louis; Brandeis University, Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts; The Washington Gallery of Modern 
Art, Washington, D.C. 



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112 KIRK 




JEROME F. KIRK, Big Lotus. August, 1966. 
Aluminum and stainless steel, 62 x 80 x 80. Fein- 
garten Galleries, Los Angeles. 

Jerome F. Kirk was born in Detroit, Michigan, 
in 1923. He studied at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, Cambridge, where he re- 
ceived his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering 
and the Humanities, 1951. He lives on the Palos 
Verdcs Estates, California. 

Mr. Kirk has received awards from The Detroit 
Institute of .Arts, 1954; Kirk-in-the-Hills Show, 
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, 1955; Birmingham 
Art Center, Michigan, 1963; Hollywood Bowl 
Festival of Arts, Los Angeles, 1966. Special ex- 
hibitions of his work have been held at the Little 
Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, 1954, and the 
Feingarten Galleries, Los Angeles, 1965, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Detroit Artists' Market, 1952, 1953, 
1954; The Detroit Institute of Arts, 1954, 1955, 
1957; Bon Bazar Gallery, New York, 1954; F. B. 
Arthur, Incorporated, New York, 1954; Kirk-in- 
the-Hills Show, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, 1955; 
Anna \Verbe Gallery, Detroit, 1955; Whitney 
Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, 1956; Hanamura 
Gallery, Detroit, 1961, 1962; Birmingham Art 
Center, 1963; Orange Coast College, Costa Mesa, 
California, 1965; Palos \'erdcs Art Gallery, Palos 
Verdes Estates, 1965; Hollywood Bowl Festival 
of Arts, Los Angeles, 1966; Laguna Beach Art 
Association, 1966; Pavilion Gallery, Newport 
Beach, California, 1966. 

Jerome Kirk's work is represented in over one 
hundred private collections. 



113 






JAMES JARVAISE, LL #8, 1966. Oil on 
aluminum, 28x41. Felix Landau Gallery, Los 
Angeles. (1953, 1957) 

James Jarvaise was born in Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana, in 1925. He studied at the LTniversity of 
Southern California, Los Angeles, where he re- 
ceived both his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees, 
1947-52. From 1953 to 1955 he studied and 
traveled throughout Europe, and in 1963, Spain. 
He has taught at the University of Southern 
California, Los Angeles, 1955-62, and at Occi- 
dental College, Los Angeles, 1966. He lives in 
Los Angeles, California. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Felix Landau Gallerv, Los Angeles, 1952, 
1955, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964; and at the 
Thibaut Gallery, New York, 1961. His work has 
been included in group exhibitions at the Oak- 



land An Museum, 1950, 1957; Santa Barbara 
Museum of Art, 1951, 1957; Seattle Art Museum, 
1951; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1952, 
1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 
1961; The Denver Art Museum, 1953, 1954, 
1958; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York, 1953; San Francisco Museum of Art, 1953; 
University of Illinois, Urbana, 1953, 1957; The 
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1953; 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1959; 
Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 
1959, 1964. 

Mr. Jarvaise's work is in the collections of the 
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, 
Massachusetts; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buf- 
falo; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of 
Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Butler In- 
stitute of American Art, Youngstown. 



JONEs/ 115 

C 7 



JOHN PAUL JONES, Sentinel, 1965. Oil on 
canvas, 36 x 72. Felix Landau Gallery, Los 
Angeles. (1963) 

John Paul Jones was born in Indianola, Iowa, 
in 1924. He received his B.F.-A. degree in 1949 
and his M.F.-A. degree in 19.'J1 from the Univer- 
sity of Iowa. He was the recipient of a scholar- 
ship from the Louis Comfort TifTany Foundation, 
1931, and a fellowship from the John Simon 
Guggenheiin Memorial Foundation, 1960. He 
has taught at the University of Oklahoma, 1951- 
52; University of Iowa, 1952-53; and the Univer- 
sity of California, Los .Angeles, from 1954 to the 
present. He lives in Los .Angeles, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Jones's work have 
been held at the Des Moines Art Center, 1951; 
Blanden Memorial .Art Gallery, Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, 1951; Iowa \Vesleyan College, Mt. Pleas- 
ant, 1951; ^V'itte Memorial Museuin, San .Antonio, 
1951; University of Oklahoma, Norman, 1952; 
Los .Angeles County Museum of .Art, 1954, 1965; 
The Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Michigan, 1955; 
Felix Landau Gallcr\', Los .Angeles, 1956, 1958, 

1962, 1964; Oakland'Art Museum, 1956; Laguna 
Blanca School, Santa Barbara, 1958; Santa 
Barbara Museum of Art, 1958; The Pasadena Art 
Museum, 1959; Taft College, Taft, California, 
1959; Galleria Cadario. Milan, 1961; .Arizona 
State University, Tempe, 1962; The Brooklyn 
Museum, 1963; University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 
1963; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
1963; Terry Dintenfass Galler), Inc., New York, 

1963, 1965; Container Corporation of .America, 



Chicago, 1965; The Brook Street Gallery, Lon- 
don, 1965. 

Mr. Jones's work has been included in nu- 
merous group exhibitions in the Lhiited States and 
abroad. Examples of his work arc in the Krannert 
.Art Museinn, University of Illinois, Champaign; 
Dallas Museum of Fine Arts; Des Moines Art 
Center; Michigan State University, East Lansing; 
Texas Western College, El Paso; Blanden Me- 
morial .Art Gallery, Fort Dodge, Iowa; The Uni- 
versity of Iowa, Iowa City; The Kalamazoo In- 
stitute of .Arts, Michigan; Nelson Gallery-.Atkins 
Museum, Kansas City, Missouri; University of 
Nebraska, Lincoln; Victoria and .Albert Museum, 
London; Fred Gmnwald Collection, Los .Angeles 
County Museum, Otis .Art Institute, University of 
California, Los Angeles; Kansas City College, 
Manhattan; Kansas State University of .Agricul- 
ture and Applied Science, Manhattan; ^Valker 
Art Center, Minneapolis; Iowa Wcsleyan College, 
Mt. Pleasant; Ball State Teachers College, 
Muncie, Indiana; The Tulane University of 
Louisiana, New Orleans; The Brooklyn Mu.seum, 
The Musciun of Modern .Art, The New York 
Public Library, New \'ork; Oakland Art Museum, 
California; Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha; Bibli- 
otheque Nationale, Paris; The Pasadena Art Mu- 
seum; San Diego Museum; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of Art; Santa Barbara Museum of .Art; 
Seattle Art Museum; Munson-VVilliams-Proctor 
Institute, Utica; Library of Congress, Joseph H. 
Hirshhorn Collection, National Gallery of .Art, 
Washington, D.C.; Youngstown University, Ohio. 




116 




Schmidt/ 



117 



JULIUS SCHMIDT, Unlitlrd, 196(5. Bronze, 
34 inches hich. Marlboroiia;h-Gerson Gallcn, 
Inc., New York. (1959, 1961,' 1963, 196.t) 

Julius Schmidt was born in Stamford, Con- 
necticut, in 1923. He studied at Oklahoma .Xgri- 
cultural and Mechanical College, .Stillwater, 1950- 
51; at Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield 
Hills, Michigan, where he received a B.F.A. de- 
gree in 1952 and an M.F.A. degree in 1955; with 
Ossip Zadkine, Paris, 1953; and at the .Xccadetnia 
di Belle Arti, Florence, 1954. In 1964, Mr. 
Schmidt was the recipient of a John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship. 
He has taught at the Cranbrook Acadetny of Art, 
Bloomfield' Hills, Michigan, 1952-53, and 1962- 
64; Silverniine Guild School of Art, New Canaan, 
Connecticut, summers, 1953, 1954; Kansas City 
Art Institute, 1954-59; Cleveland Institute of Art, 
.summer, 1957; Rhode Island School of Design, 
Providence, 1959-60; Universitv of California, 
Berkeley, 1961-62. He lives in Bloomfield Hills, 
Michigan. 

Mr. Schmidt has received awards from the 
Cranbrook .Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, 
Michigan, in 1957 and 1958. Special exhibitions 
of his work have been held at the Silverniine 
Guild of .Artists, New Canaan, Connecticut, 1953; 
Kansas City .Art Institute and .School of Design, 
1956, 1960-66; Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum. 
Kansas City, Missouri, 1956; Otto Gerson Gal- 
lery, New York, 1961, 1963; Santa Barbara Mu- 
seum of .Art, 1961; University of California, 
Berkeley, 1964; Franklin Siden Gallery, Detroit, 
1964; Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroit, 1965; The 
Arkansas .Arts Center, Little Rock, 1966; Marl- 
borough-Gerson Gallery, Inc., New York, 1966; 



Talladega College, Talladega, Alabama, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The Arts Club of Chicago, 1958; The 
Detroit Institute of Arts, 1958; Milwaukee Art 
Center, 1958; Dudley Peter Allen Memorial .Art 
Museum, Oberlin, Ohio, 1958; The Pennsylvania 
.Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1958; 
Universitv of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 1959, 
1961, 1963, 1965; The Art Institute of Chicago, 
1960; The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 
1960; Whitney Museum of American Art, New- 
York, 1960-63; Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris, 
1960; Rhode Island .School of Design, Provi- 
dence, 1960; Boston .Arts Festival, 1961; Dayton 
Art Institute, 1961; New School for Social Re- 
search, New York, 1961; Otto Gerson Gallery, 
New York, 1961-62; Museum of Art, Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh, 1961; Bolles Galler)-, San 
Francisco, 1961; Michigan State University, East 
Lansing, 1962; The Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Museum, New York, 1962; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of Art, 1962; Battersea Park, London, 1963; 
Museu de .Arte Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
1963; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 1964; 
University of Texas, .Austin, 1966; New School 
for Social Research, New York, 1966. 

Mr. Schmidt's work is in the collections of the 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Krannert 
.Art Musuem, L'niversity of Illinois, Champaign; 
The Art Institute of Chicago; The Detroit In- 
stitute of .Arts; Nelson Gallcr)'-Atkins Museum, 
Kan.sas City, Missouri; University of Nebraska, 
Lincoln; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The 
Museum of Modern .Art, Whitney Museum of 
American .Art, New York; Washington Univer- 
sity, St. Louis, Missouri. 



118 



/FLEMING 



DEAN FLEMING, Laser's Edge, 1965. Acrylic 
on canvas, 99 x 66. Park Place Gallery, New 
York. 

"FOR CHAMPAGNE 

SIGHT! 

A NIGHT'S SIGH 

INTO PRISMS 
INFINITIES EXCHANGE 

CRYSTALLINE PRIMITIVE 

PRIMAL SPLENDOR'S 
CEASELESS RENDING 
SENDING MESSAGES TO THE HEAD 

THAT WHICH 

IS 
IN YOU 

SPLITS 
RESISTANCE DIMINISHES 
LUCID OB.SERVATION 
BECOMES POSSIBLE 
SIGHT!" 

Dean Fleming \va.s born in Santa Monica, Cali- 
fornia, in 1933. He attended the San Francisco 
Art Institute where he received his B.F.A. de- 
gree, 1958, and M.F.A. degree, 1959. Mr. Flem- 
ing has taught at the San Francisco Art Insti- 



tute, 1959; State University College at Fredonia, 
New York, 1961-62; and at the Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology, Pittsburgh, 1963-64. He lives 
in New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Fleming was the recipient of the I. N. 
Walters Award for Sculpture, 1958, and the 
Richmond Annual Sculpture Prize, 1960. Spe- 
cial exhibitions of his work have been held at the 
Gallery 6, San Francisco, 1957; Russian Hill Gal- 
lery, San Francisco, 1958; Batman Gallery, San 
Francisco, 1961; Mu.seum of Art, Carnegie Insti- 
tute, Pittsburgh, 1964. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions presented by the Oakland Art Museum, 
1960; San Francisco Art Association, 1961; Park 
Place Gallery, New York, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966; 
John Daniels Gallery, New York, 1964, 1965; 
Jacksonville Art Museum, Florida, 1966; The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 
1966; Mr. J. Patrick Lannon, Palm Beach, 1966; 
Larry Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, 
Connecticut, 1966. 

Mr. Fleming's work is in the collections of the 
Allentown Art Museum, Pennsylvania; University 
of Texas, Austin; Virginia Dwan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert List, New York University, New York; 
Mr. J. Patrick Lannon, Palm Beach; Larry 
Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Con- 
necticut; and a number of others. 




HINfAAN/ 119 

d.76y//J 




CHARLES HINMAN, Red/Black. 1964. Acry- 
lic on shaped canvas, 67 x 60 x 9. Richard Feigen 
Galler}-, New York & Chicago. 

"Part of the goal is to reduce expression to the 
most essential terms. The further the reduction, 
the fewer the decisions, the more important each 
one is relative to the other. 

".Another part of the goal is that style be broad 
enough to include all of one's artistic interests. 

"My painting begins with an idea of how the 
object may be constructed and the notion that 
the structure can be beautiful in itself. 

"Particularly important is the taut membrane- 
like quality of the stretched canvas, and that the 
can\as partially hides the structure. The screen 
of the convoluted surface of the painting suggests 
a special relationship not easily defined in terms 
of geometr\'." (Courtesy of Art in America, Vol. 
LIV, No. 4, 1966, p. 36.) 

Charles Hinman was born in Syracuse, New 
York, in 1932. He studied at Syracuse University 
where he received his B.F.A. degree, and at the 
Art Students League of New York, 1955-56. He 
was the recipient of the .'\ugusta Hazard Fellow- 
ship for Painting from Syracuse University, 1955- 
56. Mr. Hinman has taught at the Staten Island 
Academy, 1960-62, and at Woodmere .Academy, 
1962-64.' He lives in New York, N.Y. 



Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago, 1964, 
1965, 1966; Feigen/Palmer Gallcns Los Angeles, 
1964; Richard Feigen Gallery, New York, 1964, 
1966; Tokyo Gallery, Japan, 1966. 

Mr. Hinnian's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 
1964; Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1964; The 
Art Institute of Chicago, 1965, 1966; Museum of 
Contemporary Art, Nagaoka, Japan, 1965; The 
Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of 
American .Art, New York, 1965; Oberlin College, 
Oberlin, Ohio, 1965; New York State University 
College, Plattsburgh, New York, 1965; San Fran- 
cisco Museum of Art, 1965; Up.sala College, East 
Orange, New Jersey, 1966; Long Island Univer- 
sity, New York, 1966; The Pasadena Art Museum, 
1966; Larry Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridge- 
field, Connecticut, 1966. 

Mr. Hinman's work is in the collections of the 
Boise-Cascade Corporation, Boise; .Albright-Knox 
.Art Gallery, Buffalo; .American Republic Insur- 
ance Company, Des Moines; The Detroit Insti- 
tute of Arts; Los .Angeles County Museum of .Art: 
Museum of Contemporary Art, Nagaoka; Chase 
Manhattan Bank. The Museum of Modern .Art, 
Whitney Museum of .American .Art, New York. 



120 



I MUELLER 



GEORGE MUELLER, Octagonal Porch, 1964. 
Acrylic on canvas, 114x114. Waddell Gallery, 
Inc., New York. (1955) 

George Mueller was born in Newark, New 
Jersey, in 1929. He studied at the Newark School 
of Fine and Industrial Art and at The Cooper 
Union School of Art and .Architecture, 1948-50. 
Mr. Mueller was the recipient of a John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship in 
1956. He lives in Long Valley, New Jersey. 

Mr. Mueller has received awards from the 
Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, 1957, and Brandeis 
University, ^Valtham, Massachusetts, 1961. Spe- 
cial exhibitions of his work have been held at 
the Artists Gallery, New York, 1952; Grace 
Borgenicht Gallery,' Inc., New York, 1955, 1960; 
Fairleigh Dickinson LTniversitv, Madison, New 
Jersey,'^1963; Grippi & Waddell', New York. 1964. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
New York, 1955; University of Illinois. Urbana, 
1955; ^Vhitnev Museum of .American .Art, New 
York, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1964; Dallas 
Museum of Fine .Arts, 1957; Museum of .Art, 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1957; Rome-New 
York Art Foundation, Rome, 1958; \'enice Bi- 
ennale d'arte, 1958; Worcester .Art Museum, 
Massachusetts, 1958; World's Fair, Brussels, 
1959; The Detroit Institute of .Arts, 1959; The 
Pennsylvania .Academy of the Fine .Arts. Phila- 
delphia, 1960; Brandeis L'niversity, Waltham, 
Massachusetts, 1961, 1964; The .American Federa- 
tion of .Arts, New York. 196:^; The .Art Institute 
of Chicago, 1964; World's Fair, New York, 1964; 
Larry .Aldrich Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, 
Connecticut, 1964. 

Mr. Mueller's work is in the collections of the 
.Allentown .Art Museum, Pennsylvania; The .Art 
Institute of Chicago; Dallas Museum of Fine 
.Arts; .American Republic Insurance Company, 
Des Moines; The Newark Museum; The Solomon 
R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of 
American .Art, New York; New Jersey State 
Museum, Trenton. 



121 




122 



/finkelstein 




MAX FINKELSTEIN, Square Plus 200, 1966. 
Aluminum construction, 34'/4 x 36 x 2. Herbert 
Palmer Gallery, Los Angeles. 

"The esthetics of precision is part of my way. 
I like to take 'cold' metals like aluminum and 
make a thing of warmth and beauty. My forms 
are part of the times. The computer, sophisti- 
cated machinery, automation, etc., suggest the 
work. I prefer sculpture to painting because, for 
me, it is closer to modem technolog)' and more 
enduring. 

"I have worked with metals for many years, 
mostly as a machinist from blue prints. The idea 
of working with metal, unrestricted and indepen- 
dently as an artist, is the basis of my art interest. 

"I am looking for an essential pure image that 
is obviously derived from modern materials and 
applications. 

"To me aluminum has almost all the proper- 
ties that epitomize our times; it has the poetry 
of space, the computer, the new industr)- and 
mass product. My work is not a multiple pro- 
duction, though it has many similar parts. It is 
not mass-produced, though it is mass-derived. It 
is intuitive development of unitized images. 

"I use a module in common « ith industry — 
squares, rectangles, hexagons, and circles, and 
the negative remaining space. 

"Each unit of construction is carefully ma- 
chined with a surface of my own design. The 
rea.sons for this, aside from fascinating textur- 
ologies, are that these machined surfaces refract 
light, 'project' colors and add a dynamic dimen- 
sion. Also machining the surfaces of the com- 
ponent units gives me an infinite number of 
combinations and possibilities that would not be 
attainable with simply cut reflective areas." 
(Courtesy of Art in America, Vol. LIV, No. 4, 
1966, p. 69.) 

Max Finkelstein was born in New York, New 
York, in 1915. He studied at the Sculpture Cen- 
ter, New York; California .School of Art, Los 
Angeles; Kahn Art Institute, Los Angeles; Uni- 
versity of California, Los .Angeles; and at Los 
.■\ngeles City College. Since l964 he has taught 
at the L'niversity of Judaism, Los .Angeles. He 
li\es in Los Angeles, California. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the .Xdele Bednarz Galleries, Los Angeles, 1965; 
and at the Herbert Palmer Caller)', Los Angeles, 
1966. His work has been included in group ex- 
hibitions at The Jewish Museum, New York, 
1958, 1961; Los .Angeles County Museum of Art, 
1961; The American Federation of Arts, New 
York, 1961-62; Municipal Art Gallery, Los 
-Angeles, 1965; San Francisco Museum of Art, 
1965, 1966; La Jolla Museum of Art, 1966. 

Mr. Finkelsteins work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harr) Lackritz, Chicago; Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Ahmanson, Los Angeles; Mr. S. I. 
Newhouse, Jr., New York; Mr. and Mrs. Mason 
Phelps, Pasadena, California. 



JOHN FREEMAN, 3 Star, 1966. Laminated and 
inlaid wood, 27 x 15 x 15. Royal Marks Gallery, 
New York. 

John Freeman was born in Walla Walla, \\'asli- 
ington, in 1922. He studied at Washington State 
University, Pullman, where he received the 
B.F.A. and M.F.-A. degrees, and at Pratt Insti- 
tute, New York, 1950-51. He tearhes at The Ohio 
State University and lives in CU)lumbus, Ohio. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Akron .Art Institute; The Columbus (Jal- 
lery of Fine .Arts, The Ohio State University, 
Columbus; Deni.son University, Granville, Ohio; 
Royal Marks Gallery, Ruth White Gallery, New- 
York; Otterbcin College, Westerville, Ohio; 
.\ntioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio. 

Mr. Freeman's work is in the collections of the 
Columbia Museum of .Art and Science, South 
Carolina; The Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, 
Ohio; The Murchison Collection, Dallas; Otter- 
bein College, ^Vesterville, Ohio; and others. 



freeman/ 



123 



A 




124 



/ JENKINS 



PAUL JENKINS, Phenomena Distant Reverber- 
ation. 1966. Oil on canvas, 36x50. Martha 
Jackson Gallery, New York. (1959, 1961, 1965) 

"Candle lisht, sunlight, these shaped the direc- 
tion in which the accustomed eye saw its reality 
and created an illusion of sculptural dimension. 
And now. We see and perceive differently, even 
though we may continue to be accustomed in 
our mind's eye to see as they saw. Our light 
world is caught in refraction, interpcnetration. 
.Sometimes wc really wonder if we are seeing 
what we are. We perceive the .swift familiar 
shifting and changing before our eyes in the 
motion of our time and this is our inscrutable. 
We do not see all there is to see rather what we 
can perceive. We also move through tempera- 
ture zones that contrast as violently and subtly as 
the areas of unnatural light, with their own 
silences, their own sounds which bathe us as we 
are caught in llieir multiple reflections. We are 
caught up in ambiguity — the adventure being 
to distinguish the real universe of ourselves from 
the other one we reel through; the chasms of 
light outside ourselv-es which catch our own inner 
light projecting from us in forms unseen, pres- 
ences, radiations, invisible but felt gestures. 
Goethe, with all his awareness, as he said it, 
when speaking about the unfathomable before 
which he too resigns himself is yet revealed to 
him in the world of phenomena, not the absolute 
itself, but the mirrored reflection of its majestic 
remoteness." (Extract from /( h, New York, 
autumn, 1958.) 

Paul Jenkins was born in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, in 1923. He attended the Kansas City Art 
Institute and School of Design in 1940, and the 
Art Students League of New York from 1948 to 
1951. He lives in^New York, N. Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Jenkins' work have 
been held at the Zimmergaleric Franck, Frank- 
furt am Main, 1954; Studio Paul Facchetti, Paris, 
1954; Zoe Dusanne Gallery, Seattle, 1955; 
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1956, 1958, 
1960, 1961, 1964, 1966; Galerie Stadler, Paris, 
1957, 1959; Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1960, 
1963; in Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1960; at Galerie 



Karl Flinker, Paris, 1961, 1962; Galerie Toni- 
ncUi, Milan, 1962; Thibaut Gallery, New^ York, 
1962; Charles Lienhard Gallery, Zurich, 1962. 

Mr. Jenkins' work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Arnaud Galerie, Paris, 1954; 
Galerie Rive Droite, Paris, 1955, 1956, 1957; 
Petit Palais, Paris, 1955; Spazio Gallery, Rome, 
1955; Saarlandmuseum, Saarbrucken, 1955; by 
the Arts Council of Great Britain, London, 1956; 
at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 
1956; Galerie Stadler, Paris, 1956, 1957; Sala 
Caspar, Barcelona and Madrid, 1957; Arthur 
Tooth & Sons, London, 1957, 1958; \V'hitney 
Museum of American Art, New York, 1957, 

1958, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965; Museum of Art, 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1958, 1961; The 
Corcoran Gallery of Art, AVashington, D.C., 
1958; University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 

1959, 1961, 1965; Kunsthalia, Cologne, 1959: 
Osaka, Japan, 1959; in Tokyo, Japan, 1959; 
Turia, Rumania, 1959; at the Esther-Robles Gal- 
lery, Los Angeles, 1960; University of Minnesota, 
Minneapolis, 1961; Grand Palais, Paris, 1962; 
Musee National du Louvre, Paris, 1962; The Art 
Institute of Chicago, 1963; The Brooklyn Mu- 
seum, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
New York, 1963. 

His work is in the collections of the Stedelijk 
Museum, .Amsterdam; Mr. Donald Benker, Mr. 
Gordon Smith, Buffalo; Busch-Reisinger Mu- 
seum of Germanic Culture, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts; Krannert Art Museum, University of 
Illinois, Champaign; Mr. and Mrs. David Ander- 
son, Frenchtown, New Jerse)-; Mr. Marion 
Schuster, Lausanne; Mrs. Norman Laski, London; 
Mrs. H. J. Mankiewicz, Los .'\ngeles; Walker Art 
Center, Minneapolis; Mr. Kurt Berger, The 
Brooklyn Museum, Mr. Peter Dixon, Mr. David 
Ellis, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
Mr. and Mrs. David Kluger, Mr. and Mrs. B. B. 
Kreisler, The Museum of Modern Art, Mr. \\'\\- 
liam Tucker, Whitney Museum of .American Art, 
New York; Mr. Da\id Anderson, Paris; Mr. Ed- 
ward Cauduro, Portland, Oregon; Chrysler Art 
Museum of Provincetown; Miss Peggy Guggen- 
heim, 'Venice, Italy; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Col- 
lection, Mrs. George Wheeling, Washington, D.C. 



125 




126/ RICHARDSON 

■ 75'^ 7:- 



/< 







1 



SAM RICHARDSON, ^^ra^^yA? t'/;, 1966. Can- 
vas, oil, plexiglas, and wood, 68x95x18. The 
Hansen Galleries, San Francisco. 

Sam Richardson was born in Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, in 1934. He attended the California Col- 
lege of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, where he 
received his B.A. and M.F-.A. degrees. He has 
taught at the California College of Arts and 
Cra'fts, Oakland, 1959-60; Oakland City College, 
1959-60; and at San Jose State College'. 1963-66. 
Mr. Richardson lives in Oakland, California. 

Special exhibitions of his work were held at 
The Hansen Galleries, San Francisco, in 1962 and 
1966. His work has been included in group ex- 
hibitions at the Oakland .-^rt Museum, 1962; 
Richmond .Art Center, California, 1966; E. B. 
Crocker .Art Gallery, Sacramento, 1966; and the 
San Francisco Art Institute, 1966. 

Mr. Richardson's work is represented in many 
private collections in the United States. 



ROBERT HARLFA' SEYLE, Nail Relief VI, 
1966. Nail on wood, 30 x 48 x 2. Lent by Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph I.. .Stephens, Jr., South Gate, 
California. .Ankruni Gallery, Los /Xngeles. 

"My unusual use of nails and wood is not the 
result of any particular effort to be different or 
unique. It is rather the natural outgrowth of my 
previous experience in the carpentry trade, where 
I gained facility in handling the materials. I 
also learned to respect these humble materials for 
their honest, simple, yet powerful qualities. I 
feel that as an artist I should use these materials 
in a way that will enhance their qualities. 

"I am not trying to communicate any precon- 
ceived thought or feeling. I want my work to 
reveal in itself certain basic principles of honesty 
and integrity — to me the foundation of all 
fine art." 

Robert Seyle was born in National City, Cali- 
fornia, in 1938. He studied at the Monterey Bay 
.'\cadeniy, California; La Sierra College, .Arling- 
ton, California; and at the Otis Art Institute of 
Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, where he re- 
ceived his B.F.A. and M.F.A degrees. Mr. Seyle 
has been the recipient of a Ford Foundation 
grant. He lives in Los Angeles, California. 

Mr. Seyle's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the California Museum of Science 
and Industry, Los .Angeles, 1964; .Ankrum Cal- 
ler)', Otis An Institute of Los .Angeles County, 
Los .Angeles, 1966. His work is in the collections 
of Mr. and Mrs. Mar\'in Eisenstein, Highland 
Park, Illinois; Mr. David J. Moss, Mr. and Mrs. 
Willard Oppenheim, Otis Art Institute of Los 
.Angeles County, Los Angeles; Mr. Peter Piening, 
New York; San Pedro and Peninsula YMCA, 
San Pedro, California; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L. 
.Stephens, Jr., South Gate, California. 



seyle/ 12: 




128 



/gallo 



FRANK GALLO, Love Object, 1966. Epoxy 
resin reinforced with fiber glass and wood, 57 x 28. 
Lent by Mr. Frank Gallo, Urbana, Illinois. Gil- 
man Galleries, Chicago. (1965) 

"I don't believe in art; I am not even 
interested in art. I keep my work free of esthetic 
judgments. For me, postures of the human figure 
are potentially expressive. There is so much 
concerning the figure that is heretofore unex- 
amined, unfelt, and unimagined. Perhaps it 
seems mundane to most artists, but to me, a 
celebration of the ordinary, a passion for the 
commonplace or subtleties of the incidental are 
grave concerns. There arc no noble subjects. If 
I were to do a figure of Jesus, I would probably 
see him as Nikos Kazantzakis did, first as a timid 
epileptic. 

'T recognize that art is residual, noncultural 
and nonvital. If art is ever to be vital again, it 
will have to be as a diflferent form with a dif- 
ferent name, unknown to the artists." (Courtesy 
of Art in America. Vol. LIV, No. 4, 1966, p. 26.) 

Frank Gallo was born in Toledo, Ohio, in 
1933. He studied at The Toledo Museum .School 
of Design where he received a B.F..\. degree in 
1954; the Cranbrook Academy of .'\rt, Bloomfield 
Hills, Michigan, in 1955; ancl The L^niversity of 
Iowa, Iowa City, where he received an M.F.A. 
degree in 1959. Mr. Gallo was the recipient of 
a John .Simon Guggenheim Memorial Founda- 
tion fellowship, 1966-67. He has taught at the 
Lhiiversity of Illinois and lives in Urbana, Illinois. 

Mr. Gallo has received awards from the Des 
Moines Art Center, 1958, 1959, and from The 
Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, 1961. 
Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
The Toledo Museum of .Art, 1955; Gilman Gal- 
leries, Chicago, 1963, 1964, 1965; and at the 
Sherry-Netherland Hotel, New York, 1964. His 
work has been included in group exhibitions at 
the Des Moines Art Center, 1953, 1959; The 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1958, 
I960; Cincinnati An Museum, 1961; Krannert 
Art Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign, 

1963, 1964, 1965; Louisiana State University, 
Baton Rouge, 1964; The .Art Institute of Chicago, 
1964; Ravinia Park, Highland Park, Illinois, 1964; 
Whitney Museum of .American .Art, New York, 

1964, 1965; Larry .Aldrich Foundation Museum, 
Ridgefield, Connecticut, 1965-66; Butler Insti- 
tute of .American Art, Youngstown, 1965; The 
.Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, 1966; Na- 
tional Institute of Arts and Letters, New York, 
1966. 

Mr. Gallo's work is in the collections of The 
Baltimore Museum of .Art; Mr. and Mrs. Reed 
Armstrong, The .Art Institute of Chicago, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gordon Fletcher, Mr. Marvin Glass, 
Mr. Frank Miller, Chicago; The Cleveland Mu- 
seum of .Art; The University of Iowa, Iowa City; 
Professor Joseph B. Dallett, Ithaca, New A'ork; 
Mr. and Mrs. Abel Fagan, Lake Forest, Illinois; 
Mr. Rex Harrison, London; Los .Angeles County 
Museum of Art; L'niversity of Wisconsin, Madi- 
son; Mr. Jaccjues Kaplan, Mr. .Albert List, The 
Museum of Modern .Art, AVhitney Museum of 
.American Art, New A'ork; Mr. 'Wright Ludington, 
Santa Barbara; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. Robert E. Benjamin. 



129 




130 



/kauffman 




CRAIG KAUFFMAN, Chartreuse-Red, 1965. 
Acn'lic on plexiglas, 90 x 46'/2. Lent by Mr. 
Philip Johnson, New Canaan, Connecticut. The 
Pace Gallery, New York. 

Craig Kauffman was born in Los Angeles, 
California, in 1932. He studied at the University 
of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1950-52, and 
at the University of California, Los Angeles, 
where he received an M.A. degree in 1956. He 
studied and traveled in Europe and from 1960 to 
1962 li\ed in Paris. Presently he lives in Venice, 
California. 

.Special exhibitions of Mr. KaufFman's work 
have been held at the Felix Landau Galleiy, Los 
.\ngeles, 1953; Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, 1958, 
1963, 1965; Dilexi Gallery, ,San Francisco, 1958, 
1960. His work has been included in group ex- 
hibitions at the San Francisco Museum of .•\rt, 
1952, 1954, 1959, 1960, 1961; The Museum of 
Modern .\rt. New York, 1953; in Los Angeles, 
1955; L'uiversity of California, Los .\ngeles, 1959, 
1960; L'niversitv of Illinois, Urbana, 1961; The 
Pace Gallery, New York, 1965. 

Mr. Kauffman's work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. Donn Chappellet, Los Angeles; Mr. 
Philip Johnson, New Canaan, Connecticut; Mr. 
J. Patrick Lannon, The Museum of Modern Art, 
Mr. Frank Stella, New York; Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Hopps, Pasadena; Larr)' Aldrich Founda- 
tion Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut. 



YOUNGERMAn/ 131 



JACK YOUNGERMAN, Springs, 1965. Plastic 
paint on canvas, 83 x 74. The Betty Parsons 
Gallery, New York. (1965) 

Jack Youngerman was born in Louisville, 
Kentucky, in 1926. He studied at the University 
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1944-46; the 
University of Missouri, Columbia, where he re- 
ceived his A.B. degree, 1947; and the ficole des 
Beaux Arts, Paris, 1947-48. He lives in New 
York, New York. 

Mt. Youngerman received the "New Talent 
.Xward" from Art in America magazine. New 
York, 1959. Special exhibitions of his work have 
been held at the Galerie .\rnaud, Paris, 1951; 
The Bettv Parsons Gallerv, New York, 1958, 
1960, 1961, 1964; The Museum of Modern Art, 
New York, 1959; Galerie Lawrence, Pari.s, 1962; 
Everett Ellin Gallery, Los Angeles, 1963; Gal- 
leria dell'Ariete. Milan, 1963. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Galerie Maeght, Paris, 1950; Galerie 
Denise Rene, Paris, 1952; Gres Gallery, Wash- 



ington, D.C., 1957; Museum of .Art, Carnegie In- 
stitute, Pittsburgh, 1958, 1961; The Corcoran 
Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1959; Kimura 
Gallery, Tokyo, 1960; the Art Institute of Chi- 
cago, 1961; The Museum of Modern An, New 
York, 1961; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Mu- 
.seum. New York, 1961, 1964, 1966; Brandeis 
University, Waltham, Massachusetts, 1962; in 
Tokyo, Japan, 1963; at the Kranncrt Art Mu- 
seum, Lfniversity of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; 
\Vhitncy Museum of American Art, New York, 
1965; the Bettv Par.sons Gallery, New York, 
1966. 

Mr. Youngerman's work is in the collections of 
.Mbright-Knox Gallery, Mr. Albert L. Arcnberg, 
Buffalo; The Art Institute of Chicago; Chase 
Manhattan Bank, Equitable Life Assurance Build- 
ing, The Museum of Modern /\rt. The Hon. 
Nelson A. Rockefeller, New York; James A. 
Michener Foundation, Pipersville, Pennsylvania; 
S. C. Johnson & Son Collection, Racine; The 
Reynolds Metals Company, Richmond, Virginia; 
\V'orcester .'\rt Museum, Massachusetts. 




132 



r.-^r'}^. . ~.:-^: 




lytle/ 



133 



RICHARD LVri.l'., Thr Slid,. IDlili. Oil mi 
canvas, 72x66. Grace Borgcnii lit (Jallciy, Inc., 
New York. 

Richard Lytic was born in Albany, New York, 
in 1935. He has studied at Yale University Sum- 
mer School of Music and .'\rt, Norfolk, Connecti- 
cut, 1954, on .scholarship; The Cooper Union 
School of Art and Architecture, New York, 1955; 
Cummington School of Fine Arts, 1956, on schol- 
arship; and at Yale University, New Haven, 
Connecticut, where he was teaching assistant to 
Josef Albers and received his B.r..'\. and M.F..\. 
degrees. Mr. Lytle was the recipient of a John 
Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellow- 
ship to Italy, 1958-59. He teaches at Yale Uni- 
versity and lives in New Haven, Connecticut. 

Mr. Lytle has received awards from the New 
Haven Art Festival, 1958, and Art in America 
magazine. New York, 1959. Special exhibitions 
of his work have been held at the Grace Borgen- 
icht Gallery, New York, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1966; 
and at the Silvermine Guild of Artists, New 
Canaan, Connecticut, 1964. His work has been 
included in group exhibitions at The Brooklyn 
Museum, 1956; Silvermine Guild of .'\rtists, New 
Canaan, Connecticut, 1956: The .Xmerican Feder- 
ation of Arts, New York, 1956; Kancgis Gallery, 
Boston, 1957, 1959; The Museum of Modern Art, 
New York, 1959; Galleria Schneider, Rome, 1959; 
The Art Institute of Chicago, 1960, 1961; De- 
Cordova and Dana Museum, Lincoln, Massachu- 
setts, 1960, 1963; The Museum of Fine Arts, 
Houston, 1961; Birmingham Museum of Art, 
Alabama, 1962; The Pennsylvania .•\cademy of 
the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1962, 1963, 1964; 
World's Fair, Seattle, 19f)2; Whitney Museum of 
American Art, New York, 1963. 

Mr. Lytle's work is in the collections of Mrs. 
Patrick McGinnis, Boston; DcCordova and Dana 
Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts; Yale University, 
New Haven, Connecticut; Mr. Lawrence Bloedel, 
Columbia University, Mr. .'Xrmand G. Erpf, Mr. 
and Mrs. Frederick Gash, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
N. Gast, The Museum of Modern .\rt. The Hon. 
Nelson .\. Rockefeller, New York; Mr. J. Patrick 
Lannon, Palm Beach and New York; S. C. John- 
son & Son Collection, Racine. 



134 



/bunce 




LOUIS BUNCE, Two Figuration, 1966. Oil on 
canvas, 48 x 60. Gordon Woodside Gallery, San 
Francisco. 

"Two Figuration talks about my interest in 
girlie pictures, both the two-bit peep show variety 
as seen in amusement emporiums and the kind 
that I dig in paintings such as Courbet, Picasso, 
etc. The planes running in opposition to the 
canvas rectangle give it a movie screen effect as 
do the colors employed. I enjoyed making this 
painting and now enjoy looking at it." 

Louis Bunce was born in Lander, Wyoming, 
in 1907. He studied at the Museum Art School, 
Portland Art Museum, Oregon, 1925-26; and at 
the Art Students League of New York, 1929-30. 
In I96I he received a Ford Foundation grant to 
the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, Inc., Los 
Angeles. Mr. Bunce has taught at the Salem Art 
Center, Salem, Oregon, 1937-38; University of 
California, Berkeley, 1960; University of British 



Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 1960; Univer- 
sity of Washington, Seattle, 1965; and periodi- 
cally since 1946 at the Museum Art School, 
Portland Art Museum, Oregon. He is Visiting 
Professor of Art at the University of Illinois 
during the spring semester of 1967. His perma 
nent residence is in Portland, Oregon. 

Mr. Bunce has received awards from th( 
Seattle Art Museum, 1936, 1955, 1962, 1964; 
World's Fair, New York, 1939-40; World's Fair, 
San Francisco, 1939; LTniversity of Washington, 
Seattle, 1950; Portland ."Xrt Museum, Oregon, 
1955; Portland International Airport, Oregon, 
1958; San Francisco Mu.seum of Art, 1961. Spe 
cial exhibitions of his work have been held ai 
the Seattle Art Museum, 1936, 1953; Portland 
Art Museum, 1945, 1947, 1955, 1961; Reed Col- 
lege, Portland, Oregon, 1947, 1951; University ol 
Washington, Seattle, 1947; Willamette Univer- 
sity, Salem, Oregon, 1948; The Museum ol 
Modern Art, New" York, 1950, 1951; Cincinnati 
Art Museum, 1952; Doris Meltzer Gallery, New 
York, 1956; University of California, Berkeley. 
1960; The Fountain Gallery of Art, Portland. 
Oregon, 1962, 1964, 1966; Portland State Col- 
lege, Oregon, 1963; Comara Gallery, Los Angeles. 
1964; Gordon Woodside Gallery, Seattle, 1964, 
1966; Gordon Woodside Gallery, San Francisco, 
1966; Cheney Cowles Memorial Museum, Spo- 
kane, Washington, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at The Art Institute of Chicago, 1947; 
Worcester .Art Museum, 1949; The Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, New York, 1950; Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Center, 1951, 1953, 1956, 1959, 
1963; Whitney Museum of American Art, New 
York, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1959, 1960; University j 
of Colorado, Boulder, 1953; Los Angeles County 
Art As.sociation, 1953; The Corcoran Gallery of 
Art, Washington, D.C., 1953; Dallas Museum of 
Fine Arts, 1954; Des Moines Art Center, 1954; 
Nebraska Art Association, Lincoln, 1954; The 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Phila- 
delphia, 1954, 1958; The Denver Art Museum, 
1955, 1956, 1959, 1963; Museum of Art, Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh, 1955; Mu.seu de Arte 
Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1955, 1956; Santa 
Barbara Museum of Art, 1957; Stanford Univer- 
sity, Palo Alto, 1958; M. H. de Young Memorial 
Museum, San Francisco, 1958; Grand Rapids Art 
Museum, Michigan, 1961; Tamarind Lithogra- 
phy Workshop, Inc., Los Angeles, 1962; Print 
Council of America, New York, 1962-63; World's 
Fair, Seattle, 1962; University of Arizona, Tuc- 
son, 1966-67; University of Oregon, Eugene, 
1966-67. 

Mr. Bunce's work is in the collections of the 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Center; University of Oregon, 
Eugene; The Newark Museum; American Acad- 
emy of Arts and Letters, The Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, 
New York; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Port- 
land Art Museum, Reed College, Portland, 
Oregon; San Francisco Museum of Art; Seattle 
Art Museum, University of Washington, Seattle; 
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica; Art 
Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria, Canada; 
American Embassy, Vienna; Library of Congress, 
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; 
Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown. 






OKADa/ 135 

p 7 



KENZO OKADA, Open, 1963. Oil on canvas, 
84x61'/:>. The Bettv Parsons Gallcrv, New York. 
(1963) 

Kenzo Okada was born in Yokohama, Japan, 
in 1902. He studied at the Meijigakuin Middle 
School, Japan; Tokyo Fine .Arts University; and 
in Paris from 1924-27. In 1939 he received a 
Ford Foundation grant. He has taught at Nippon 
Universitv, Japan, 1940-42; Musashino College of 
Fine .Arts. Tokyo, 1947-50; and Tama Fine Arts 
College, Tokyo, 1949-50. He lives in Rensselaer- 
ville. New York. 

Mr. Okada has received awards from Nikakai 
in Japan, 1936; .Showa Shorei, 1938; Yomiiiri 
Press, 1947; The Art Institute of Chicago, 1954. 
1957; Museum of .Art, Carnegie Institute, Pitts- 
burgh, 1955; Columbia Museum of Art and Sci- 
ence, South Carolina, 1957; Venice Bicnniale 
d'arte, 1958. Special exhibitions of his work have 
been held at Nichido Gallery, Tokvo, 1929; The 
Bettv Parsons Gallery, New York, 1953, 1955, 
1956, 1959, 1963, 1964; The Corcoran Gallery of 
.\rt, Washington, D.C., 1955; Fairweather-Hardin 
Gallery, Chicago, 1956; Ferus Gallery, Los 
.Angeles, 1959; Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nologv, Cambridge, 1963; .Albright-Knox Art 
Gallery. Buffalo. 1965. 

Mr. Okada's work has been included in many 
major exhibitions and is in The Baltimore Mu- 
seum of .Art; Museum of Fine .Arts, Boston; Uni- 
versity of Colorado, Boulder; .Albright-Knox .Art 
Gallery, Buffalo; The .Art Institute of Chicago; 
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut; The 
Brooklyn Museum, Chase Manhattan Bank, The 
Metropolitan Museum of .Art, The Museum of 
Modern .Art, Rockefeller University, The .Sol- 
omon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Mu- 
seum of .American .Art, New York; Museum of 
Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Reynolds 
Metals Company, Richmond, \'irginia; San 
Francisco Museum of .Art; Santa Barbara Mu- 
seum of .Art; Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, 
Utica; The Phillips Collection, \V'ashington, D.C.; 
and manv other collections. 




136 



/acton 



ARLO ACTON, Circle in the Sun, 1964. Wood 
and painted metals, 85 x 73 x 84. The Hansen 
Galleries, San Francisco. 

"The cords of all link back, strandcntwining 
cable of all flesh. That is why mystic monks. 
Will you be as gods? Gaze in your omphalos. 
Hello. Kinch here. Put me on to Edenville. 
Aleph, alpha: nought, nought, one. 

"Spouse and helpmate of Adam Kadmon: 
Heva, naked Eve. She had no navel. Gaze. Belly 
without blemish, bulging big, a buckler of taut 
vellum, no, whiteheaped corn, orient and im- 
mortal, standing from everlasting to everlasting." 
(James Joyce, Ulysses [The Bodley Head Ltd., 
London, 1954], pp.' 34-35.) 

Arlo Acton was born in Knoxville, Iowa, in 
1933. He studied at Washington State Univer- 
sity, Pullman, where he received a B.A. degree 
in 1958, and at the San Francisco Art Institute, 
where he received an M.F.A. degree in 1959. 
During the spring semester of 1963 Mr. Acton 
taught at the L'niversity of California, Berkeley. 
He lives in San Francisco, California. 



Mr. Acton has received awards from the Rich- 
mond Art Center, California, 1961; and the San 
Francisco Art Institute, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965. 
.Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, 1962; 
Lanyon Gallery, Palo Alto, 1965. His work has 
been included in group exhibitions at the Oak- 
land Art Museum, 1960-61; Richmond Art Cen- 
ter, California, I960, 1961, 1962; San Francisco 
Museum of Art, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 
1965; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1961; 
Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, Fort 
Worth, 1962; Stanford University, Palo Alto, 
1962; AVhitnev Museum of American Art, New 
York, 1963; ' Kaiser Center, Oakland, 1963; 
Musee d'Art Moderne de la V'illc de Paris, 1963; 
The Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, 1966. 

Mr. Acton's work is in the collections of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Bolles, San Francisco Art Insti- 
tute, San Francisco Museum of Art, San Fran- 
cisco; Mr. Charles Cowells; Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Heisler; Mrs. Sally Hellyer; Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanton Sobel; Mr. and Mrs. .Alfred Wastlhuber. 




757 




138 



/marden 




BRICE MARDEN, Nebraska, 1966. Oil and 
wax on canvas, 58'/2 x 72. Bykert Gallery, New 
York. 

Brice Marden was born in Bronxville, New 
York, in 1938. He studied at Boston University 
from 1957 to 1961; Yale University Summer 
School of Music and Art, Norfolk, Connecticut, 
1961; and at Yale University, New Haven, from 
1961 to 1963. He lives in New York, N.Y. 

A special exhibition of his work was held at 
Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, 

1964. His work has been included in group ex- 
hibitions at The Lyman Allyn Museum, New 
London, Connecticut, 1960; Leo Castelli Gallery, 

1965, Park Place Gallery, 1966, New York. 



MONTE/i39 



JAMES MONTE, Series E II, 1965. Acrylic and 
oil on canvas, 84 x 60. Arleigh Gallery, San 
Francisco. 

James Monte was born in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, in 1937. He studied with Louis Siegricst 
and Thomas Leighton at the .■\rt League of Cali- 
fornia, San Francisco, 1949-50; at the California 
College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 1955; 
Academie de la Grande Chaumierc, Paris, 1956, 
1957; College of Marin, Kentfield, California, 
1958, 1959; and at the San Francisco Art Insti- 
tute, 1960. He has lectured at Lincoln Llniver- 
sity, San Francisco, 1964, and Dominican College, 
San Rafael, 1965. At the present time Mr. Monte 
lives in San Francisco, California. 



In 1964 Mr. Monte was the recipient of the 
James D. Phclan award, San Francisco. Special 
exhibitions of his work have been held at the 
T. Taylor VVishart Gallery, San Francisco, 1961; 
and at the .Arleigh Gallery, San Francisco, 1965. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, 1961; Quay 
Gallery, Tiburon, California, 1964; .Xrleigh Gal- 
lery, San Francisco, 1965, 1966; Horizon Gallery, 
Sau.salito, 1965. 

Mr. Monte's work is in the collections of Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Matson, Boston; Mr. and Mrs. 
John Irwin, Columbus, Ohio; Miss Judy Gero- 
witz, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lieder, Los Angeles; 
Miss Elaine Mayes, San Francisco. 




140 



/thiebaud 



WAYNE THIEBAUD, Two Sitting Figures, 1965. 
Oil on canvas, 60 x 72. Allan Stone Gallcrv, New 
York. (1965) 

Wavne Thiebaud was born in Mesa, Arizona, 
in 1920. He studied at Sacramento State College, 
California, where he received the B..^. and M..^. 
degrees. Mr. Thiebaud has been the recipient of 
several awards, grants, and fellowships. He 
taught at Sacramento City College in 1951, and 
at the San Francisco Art Institute in 1958. He 
teaches now at the University of California, Davis, 
and lives in Sacramento, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Thicbauds work 
have been held at the E. B. Crocker .^rt Gallery, 
Sacramento, 1952; Gump's Gallery, San Fran- 
cisco, 1953; San Jose State College, California, 
1955; Sacramento City College, 1957; Allan 
Stone Gallery, New York, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965; 
M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Fran- 
cisco, 1962; Galleria Schwarz. Milan, 1963; Stan- 
ford University, Palo .Alto, 1965. 

Mr. Thiebauds work has been in numerous 
group exhibitions including those at the Nelson 
Gallery-.-\tkins Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, 
1963; Institute of Contemporary .Arts, London, 
1963; Los Angeles County Museum of .Art, 1963; 
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New 
York, 1963; Akademie der Kunste, Berlin, 1964; 



The .Art Institute of Chicago, 1964; Haags 
Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, 1964; Wadsworth 
Atheneum, Hartford, 1964; Vancouver .Art Gal- 
lery, 1964; Museum des 20 Jahrhunderts, \'icnna, 
1964; Brandeis L^niversity, \\'altham, Massachu- 
setts, 1964; Krannert .Art Museum, University of 
Illinois, Champaign, 1965. 

His work is in the collections of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Paine, Boston; .Albright-Knox .Art Gal- 
lery, Buffalo; Mr. .Arnold Maremont, Chicago; 
Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford; The Newark 
Museum; Mr. Larry .Aldrich, Mr. Richard Brown 
Baker, Mr. Phillip Bruno, Mr. and Mrs. \Villiani 
Copley, Mr. Philip Johnson, Mr. Leon Kraushar, 
The Museum of Alodern .Art, Mr. .A. Sobel, Mr. 
James Thrall Soby, Whitney Museum of .Amer- 
ican .Art, Mrs. Albert Wise, Woodward Founda- 
tion, Mr. Hanford A'ang, New York; Brandeis 
University, Waltham, Massachusetts; Joseph H. 
Hirshhorn Collection, Library of Congress, The 
^Vashington Gallery of Modern Art, Washington, 
D.C.; Mr. Robert Mayer, Winnetka; Mr. Harry 
F. Abrams; Mrs. Bagleywright; Mr. John Bran- 
stein; Mr. Carter Burden: Miss Leslie Caron: 
Mr. Ben Case; Mr. John Chamberlain; Mr. John 
Coplans, Mr. Boris Goldow.sky: Mr. J. Gollin; 
Mr. W. Goodhue; Mr. Louis Kane; Mr. Max 
Kozloff; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Robb; Dr. 
William Rubin; Mr. Samuel Sacks. 



141 





142 



/bayer 



HERBERT BAYER, Suspended, 1965. Oil on 
canvas, 60 x 60. Esther-Robles Gallery, Los 
Angeles. 

Herbert Bayer was born in Haag, Austria, in 
1900. In 1919 he served as an apprentice in the 
Schmidthammer design studio in Linz, Austria; 
in 1920 he worked with the architect, Emanuel 
Margold, in Darmstadt, Germany; from 1921 to 
1923 he studied typography, and also wall paint- 
ing with Kandinsky, at the Bauhaus in Weimar, 
Germany. He taught typography and visual com- 
munication at the Bauhaus in Dessau from 1925 
to 1928; and he worked as a graphic designer, 
painter, and art director in Berlin from 1928 to 
1938, and in New York from 1938 to 1946. Since 
that time he has served as a designer, editor, and 
author. He lives in Aspen, Colorado. 

Thirty-four special exhibitions of Mr. Bayer's 
work have been presented here and abroad. His 
work has been included in many group exhibi- 
tions, and it is represented in the collections of 
fifteen museums in Europe and over fifteen uni- 
versities and museums in the United States. 




NORMAN ZAMMITT, #3807-2, 1963. Baked 
ciianiels, acrylic and phenolic plastic, 19xl8x 
11 '4. Felix Landau (iailcry, Los Angeles. 

Norman Zamniitt was born in Toronto, 
Canada, in 1931. He studied at Pasadena City 
College and at the Otis .'\rt Institute, Los 
.Angeles, where he received his M.F.A. degree. 
He has taught at the University of New Mexico, 
.Mbuquerque, I9t)3-t)4, and at Orange Coast Col- 
lege, Costa Mesa, California, 1964-66. Mr. Zam- 
niitt lives in C'alifornia. 

.Special exhibitions of Mr. Zamniitt's work 
have been held at the Felix Landau Gallery, Los 
.■\ngcles, 1962, 1966; and at the Robert Schoel- 
kopf Gallery, New ^'ork, 1963. His work has 
been included in group exhibitions at The Mu- 
seum of Fine .Arts, Houston; .St. Thomas L'niver- 
sity, Houston; Robert F"raser Gallery, London; 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Mu- 
seum of Modern .Art, World's Fair, New York, 
1965; The Pasadena .Art Museum. 

Mr. Zamniitt's work is in the collections of Dr. 
and Mrs. Leonard .Asher, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Ducommun, Dr. and Mis. Omar Farced, Dr. 
Louis Heyn, Los Angeles; Mr. Robert Q. Lewis, 
Mr. Jerome Zipkin, New York; Larry Aldrich 
Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut; 
Mr. Sterling Holloway, South Laguna, California. 



ZAMMITT / 143 

z z^":^ 




lU 




adler/m5 



SAMUEL M. ADLER, Construction with 5 
Figures, 1966. Wood and oil, 40 x 78 x 4%. Lent 
by Mr. Samuel M. Adler, New York. (1950, 
1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, 
1965) 

"For years I had loyed with the idea of try- 
ing my hand at sculpture, but my involvement 
with paintings and collage made it difficult for 
me to tear myself away for a new and untried 
venture — lack of courage, too, may have played 
a part. 

"After my last collage show, however, the idea 
really took hold — it seemed a logical step for- 
ward, and I took the plunge. 

"It proved a difficult and completely fasci- 
nating challenge and I set about perfecting the 
necessary technique. 

"My piece Construction with 5 Figures is but 
one of a number now ready for exhibition and I 
can only hope that I have added somewhat to 
the general dimension of my former work." 

Samuel Adler was born in New York, New 
York, in 1898. He was admitted to the National 
Academy of Design by special dispensation at 
the age of fourteen. He devoted his early years 
to both music and painting, supporting himself 
as a violinist until 1927 when he turned to paint- 
ing as a full-time profession. Mr. Adler taught 
drawing and painting privately from 1936 to 
1950. He was Visiting Professor of Art at the 
University of Illinois, Urbana, 1959-60; and 
Visiting Professor of Art and Associate Member 
of the Center for Advanced Study, University of 
Illinois, Urbana, 1964. In 1965 as the Artist 
in Residence at the University of Notre Dame, 
Indiana, he received a Ford Foundation grant. 
Since 1948 he has taught at New York Univer- 
sity. He has been guest lecturer at the University 
of Michigan, Ann .Arbor; Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, Bloomington; The Museum of Modern 
Art, New '^'ork University, New York; Washing- 
ton L^niversity, St. Louis; and at Syracuse Uni- 
versity. He lives in New York, New York. 

Mr. Adler has received special awards from 
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 
Philadelphia, 1951; Whitney Museum of .Ameri- 
can Art, New York, 1952; University of Illinois, 
Urbana, 1952; Audubon Artist.s, Inc., New York, 
1956, 1957, 1959, 1960; Staten Island Institute 
of Arts and Sciences, New York, 1962. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Joseph Luyber Galleries, New York, 1948; 
Indiana University, Bloomington, 1950; Louis- 
ville .-\rt Center, 1950; The Mint Museum of Art, 
Charlotte, North Carolina, 1951; Grace Bor- 
genicht Gallery, Inc., New "i'ork, 1952, 1954; The 



Philadelphia Art .Alliance, 1954; University of 
Illinois, Champaign-Lhbana, 1960, 1964; Grand 
Central Moderns, New ^■ork, 1960; Babcoek Gal- 
leries, New York, 1962; Rose Fried Gallery, New 
York, 1965; University of Notre Dame, Indiana, 
1965; The University of Iowa, Iowa City, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Birmingham Museum of Art, Ala- 
bama; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Palais des 
Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles; University of Illinois, 
Champaign-LTrbana; The .Art Institute of Chi- 
cago; Cincinnati Art Museum; Columbia Mu- 
seum of Art and Science, South Carolina; The 
Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Ohio; Dallas 
Museum of Fine Arts; Davenport Municipal Art 
Gallery, Iowa; Dayton Art Institute; The Denver 
Art Museum; Des Moines Art Center; Michigan 
State University, East Lansing; Grand Rapids 
Art Museum, Michigan; Art Galleiy of Hamil- 
ton, Canada; Palais des Beaux-Arts, Lille, 
France; DeCordova and Dana Museum, Lincoln, 
Massachusetts; Nebraska Art Association, Lin- 
coln; Royal Academy of Art, London; Los 
Angeles County Museum of Art, Lhiiversity of 
California, Los Angeles; The J. B. Speed Art 
Museum, Louisville; The Currier Gallery of Art, 
Manchester, New Hampshire; American Acad- 
emy of Arts and Letters, Audubon Artists, Inc., 
Hunter College, The Jewish Museum, The 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Uni- 
versity, Whitney Museum of American Art, New 
\'ork; Stanford University, Palo Alto; Musee 
d'Art Moderne de la Ville, Musee Galliera, Paris; 
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia; 
Phoenix Art Museum; Rhode Island School of 
Design, Providence; The Virginia Museum of 
Fine Arts, Richmond; Palazzo \'enezia, Rome; 
City Art Museum of St. Louis; California Palace 
of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco Museum 
of Art; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; Uni- 
versity of W'ashington, Seattle; Syracuse Univer- 
sity; The Art Galleiy of Toronto; The Corcoran 
Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Butler Insti- 
tute of American Art, Youngstown. 

Mr. Adier's work is in many collections includ- 
ing that of the Krannert Art Museum, University 
of Illinois, Champaign; Florida Gulf Coast Art 
Center, Clearwater; New York University, Staten 
Island Institute of Arts and Sciences, Whitney 
Museum of American Art, New York; Norfolk 
Museum of Arts and Sciences; University of 
Notre Dame, Indiana; S. C. Johnson & Son Col- 
lection, Racine; Glicenstcin Museum, Safad, 
Israel; Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, LItica; 
Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, Wa.shington, 
D.C.; Butler Institute of American Art, Ohio. 



146 TOVISH 



HAROLD TOVISH, Passage, 1964. Bronze, 
40x35x16. Terry Dintenfass, Inc., New York. 
(1959, 1961) 

Harold Tovish was born in New York, New 
York, in 1921. He studied at Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, 1940-43; Ossip Zadkine 
School of Sculpture, Paris, 1949-50; and at the 
Academic de la Grande Chaumiere, Paris, 1950- 
51. He has taught at the New York State Col- 
lege of Ceramics, 1947-49; University of Minne- 
sota, 1951-54; and at The School of the Museum 
of Fine Arts, Boston, 1957-65. In 1965 Mr. 
Tovish was elected as Sculptor in Residence at 
the American Academy in Rome. He now lives 
in Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Tovish has received awards from the 
Village Art Center, New York, 1946; ^Valker Art 
Center, Minneapolis, 1951; The Minneapolis In- 
stitute of Arts, 1952, 1954; Boston Arts Festival, 
1957, 1959, 1964; Portland Art Museum, Oregon, 
1957, 1958; Institute of Contemporar)- Art, Bos- 
ton, 1959; American Academy of Arts and 
Letters, New York, 1960. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Walker An Center, Minneapolis, 1953; 
The Swetzoff Gallery, Boston, 1957, 1960; Fair- 
weather-Hardin Gallery', Chicago, 1960; Terry 
Dintenfass, Inc., New York, 1965. His work has 
been included in group exhibitions at The Metro- 



politan Museum of Art, New York, 1942; Village 
Art Center, New York, 1946; The Toledo Mu- 
seum of Art, 1947; \Vichita Art Association, Inc., 
1948; Walker .Art Center, Minneapolis, 1951; 
The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 1952, 1954; 
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 
1952, 1954, 1957, 1960, 1964; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of Art, 1952; The Denver Art Museum, 
1955; Boston Arts Festival, 1957, 1958, 1959, 
1963, 1964; Portland Art Museum, Oregon, 1957; 
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New 
York, 1958, 1960; Museum of Art, Carnegie In- 
stitute, Pittsburgh, 1958; University of Illinois, 
Champaign-Urbana, 1959, 1961; The Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago, 1959, 1960; The Museum of 
Modern An, New York, 1959; Museum of Fine 
.•\rts, Boston, 1964; DeCordova and Dana Mu- 
seum, Lincoln, Massachusetts, 1964; The .Amer- 
ican Federation of Arts, New York, 1964. 

Mr. Tovish's work is in the collections of the 
Addison Gallery of .American Art, Andovcr, 
Massachusetts; Mr. and Mrs. Lester Dana, Mu- 
seum of Fine .Arts, Boston; The .Art Institute of 
Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. John Cowles, The Minne- 
apolis Institute of .Arts, Walker Art Center, Min- 
neapolis; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Stone, Whitney Museum of 
American Art, New York; Joseph H. Hirshhorn 
Collection, Washington, D.C.; Mr. and Mrs. 
Heyward Cutting; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gardner. 




I 



rivers/m? 



LARRY RI\ER.S, Don't Fall, 1966. Oil, plastic, 
ind metal with neon light, mounted on wood 
1 onstriiction, 92x62. Marlborough-Gerson Gal- 
lery, Inc., New York. ( 1959, 1963) 

Larr)' Rivers was born in New York, New 
York, in 1923. He studied at the Julliard School 
of Music, New York, 1944-45; New York Univer- 
sity, New York, 1947-48; and spent two years 
studying with Hans Hofman in New York. He 
lives in New York, New Y'ork. 

Mr. Rivers received special awards in exhibi- 
tions at The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washing- 
ton, D.C., 1954, and in .Arts Festivals at Newport, 
Rhode Island, and Spoleto, Italy, in 1958. 

.Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Jane Street Gallerv, New York, 1949; 
Tibor de Nag>- Gallerv, New Y'ork, 1951, 1952, 
1953, 1954, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962; Stable Gal- 
lery, New York, 1954; Dwan Gallery, Los 
.\ngeles, 1960, 1965; Martha Jackson Gallery, 
New York, 1960; Gimpel Fils Gallery, London, 
1962; Rive Droite Gallery, Paris, 1962; The 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 1965-66; The 
Jewish Museum, New York. 1965-66; The Pasa- 
dena Art Museum, 1965-1966; Brandeis Uni- 
\ersity, VValtham, Massachusetts, 1965-66. 

Mr. Rivers' work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the Whitnev Museum of .American 
Art, New York, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 
1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966; The Museum 
of Modern .Art, New York, 1956; Museu de .Arte 
Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1957; Museum of 
.Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1958, 1961; 
in Mexico, 1960; at the World's Fair, Seattle, 
1962; The Pennsylvania .Academy of the Fine 
.Arts, Philadelphia, 1963; Univ'ersity of Texas, 
.Austin, 1966; Herron Museum of Art, Indian- 
apolis, 1966; L'niversity of \Vestern Ontario, Lon- 
don, Canada, 1966; .San Francisco Museum of 
Art, 1966. 

Mr. Rivers' work is in the collections of The 
.\rt Institute of Chicago; Kansas City .Art Insti- 
tute and School of Design, Missouri; Tate Gal- 
ler>-, London; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts; 
The Metropolitan Museum of .Art, The Museum 
of Modern .Art, Parrish .Art Museum, New York; 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; The 
North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; Mun- 
son-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica; The Cor- 
coran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 




148 OSTLIHN 



BARBRO OSTLIHN, Erik's House, 1965. Oil 
on canvas, 89 x 57. Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New 
York. 

Barbro Ostlihn was born in Stockholm, 
Sweden, in 1930. From 1954 to 1959 he studied 
at the Royal .Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm. 
Mr. Ostlihn was the recipient of a study grant 
from the Foundation of King Gustaf Adolf of 
Sweden in 1961. He now lives in New York, 
New York. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Ostlihn's work have 
been held at Cordier & Eckstrom, Inc., New 
York, 1963; Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 
1966. His work has been included in several 
group exhibitions in Stockhohn, and at The 
Westmoreland County Museum of Art, Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania, 1966. 

Mr. Ostlihn's work is in the collections of Mr. 
Frederick Ossorio, Mr. Robert Rauschenberg, 
New York; and the Moderna Museet, Stockholm. 



149 




W^ffmmimrr'?^^^^ 



I 







150 



/savage 



W. LEE SAVAGE, Automobile, 1966. Oil on can- 
vas, 60 X 60. Krasner Gallery, New York. 

"Most of the time during the past seven years 
I have labored fairly happily in the soap pits of 
Madison Avenue to pay for the privacy of my 
picture making. In that seven years I was able 
to isolate in my paintings some of the inklings 
that were inside me and to make explicit to 
myself (and to some others) what my entrails 
were capable of. I had freed myself somewhat 
from an external authority and was able to 
grapple with some of the responsible internal 
absurdities that make painting worthwhile. 
Whether the paintings themselves are in fashion 
or out of fashion, I found out, is completely 
beside the point. I found out also that the 
critical authority is a happy bunch of flies kick- 
ing around in an aesthetic marmalade and that 
posterity can sometimes be a liar. I realized that 
what once had been in me an enormous responsi- 
bility to -BE A PAINTER" had changed in that 
seven years to an inward responsibility to simply 
paint my own pictures. The pictures improved; 
the absurdities were my own. I had found at 
least some of my responsibilities. 

"I paint for the same reason I splash in the 
bathtub. Like splashing you don't have to do it 
if you don't want to; nobody asked you to paint. 
You just do, knowing that the only thing that 
is important is that which is inherent in the 
painting itself. The artist has the moral cre- 
ative responsibility to make the painting that he 
is presently working on be the greatest picture 
that has ever been painted. The struggle is in- 
ternal. Grappling creatively with externals is 
commercial art (or bad art). Commercial art 
is only the choice of solution; the solving of a 



given external problem. Fine art is the choice 
of problem AND the choice of solution. The 
artist must isolate the problem from an infinity 
of problems and then solve it from an infinity 
of solutions. The problem he isolates is his re- 
sponsibility (and his style) and the solution of 
that problem is his art. The absurdity of art is 
that it is worthless, i.e., priceless. I am committed 
to my responsibilities and involved with its ab- 
surdities. . . ." 

Lee Savage was born in Charleston, West Vir- 
ginia, in 1928. He studied at West Virginia 
University, Morgantown, 1946-48; the Pratt Insti- 
tute, New York, 1948-50; and the Art Students 
League of New York. Mr, Savage is the recipient 
of a fellowship from the John .Simon Guggenheim 
Memorial Foundation. He has taught at the 
School of \'isual Arts, New York. He lives in 
New York, New York. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Savage's work have 
been held at the Krasner Gallery, New York, 
1961, 1962, 1964, 1966. His work has been rep- 
resented in group exhibitions at the University 
of Colorado, Boulder; Silvermine Guild of Artists, 
New Canaan, Connecticut; The Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American 
.\rt. New York; The Pennsylvania Academy of 
the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; Butler Institute of 
.American Art, Youngstown. 

Mr. Savage's work is in the collections of the 
Container Corporation of America, Inc., Chicago; 
Columbia Museum of .Art and Science, South 
Carolina; The Lyman Allyn Museum, New Lon- 
don, Connecticut; New York University, Whitney 
Museum of American An, New York; Chrysler 
.-Art Museum of Provincetown; Joseph H. Hirsh- 
horn Collection, Washington, D.C.; Butler Insti- 
tute of .'\merican Art, Youngstown. 




NESBITT/ 151 



LOWELL NESBITT, BMc Grove Plantation, 
1966. Oil on canvas, 65x85. Rolf Nelson Cal- 
ler)', Los Angeles. 

"Sunday afternoons, first by myself, later with 
Lilo Raymond, a photographer friend, I explored 
the empty streets of South Broadway from 14th 
Street to the Battery. I was very moved by the 
mysterious beauty and sense of presence that these 
1870-90's loft buildings have. This led to a photo- 
graphic essay as 'sketches" for an architectural 
series of paintings. 

"The frontality and symmetry of the images, 
and the fact that they are pressed so close to the 
picture plane, give the paintings an iconic quality. 
This explains to a great extent their stability, 
poise, and presence. 

"Like bas-relief sculpture or like certain Ren- 
aissance sculpture designed to be seen in niches, 
my images imply depth but remain strongly two- 
dimensional. One feels that true depth exists 
behind these paintings — possibly in front — bul 
if these forms were viewed from the side they 
would evaporate. Any .sense of spaciousness must 



certainly be derived from the image itself." 
(Courtesv of Art in Amrrica, Vol. LIV, No. 4, 
1966, p. 47.) 

Lowell Nesbitt was born in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, in 1933. He studied at the Tyler School 
of Fine .Arts of Temple University, Philadelphia, 
and at the Royal College of Art, London. From 
1961 to 1963 he taught at The Baltimore Museum 
of Art. He lives in New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Nesbitt's work have 
been held at The Baltimore Museum of Art, 
1958; Franz Bader Gallery, Washington, D.C., 
1963; The Corcoran Gallery of An, Washington, 
D.C., 1964; The Rolf Nelson Gallery, Los 
Angeles, 1965-66; Howard Wise Gallery, New 
York, 1965; The Henri Gallery, Washington, 
D.C., 1965; Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroit, 
1966. 

Mr. Nesbitt's work is in the collections of The 
Baltimore Museum of .Art; The Museum of 
Modern Art, New York; The Corcoran Gallery of 
.Art, Library of Congress, The Phillips Collection, 
Washington, D.C. 




152 



/MOTHERWELL 



ROBERT MOTHERWELL, Untitled, 1966. 
Acrylic on canvas, 66 x 50. Marlborough-Gerson 
Gallery, Inc., New York. (1949, 1950, 1951, 
1952, 1953, 1955, 1965) 

Robert Motherwell was born in Aberdeen, 
Washington, in 1915. He studied at Stanford 
University, Palo Alto, where he received an A.B. 
degree in 1937; at Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge; at the University of Grenoble, France; 
and at Columbia University, New York. Mr. 
Motherwell has taught at Hunter College, New 
York; the University of Pennsylvania, Phila- 
delphia; and is presently the visiting critic at 
Columbia University. He lives and works in New 
York and in Provincetown, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Motherwell was the recipient of an award 
from The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
New York, 1964. Special exhibitions of his work 
have been held at the Art of This Century Gal- 
lery, New York, 1944; Chicago Arts Club, 1946; 
Samuel M. Koontz Gallery, Inc., New York, 1946, 
1947, 1949, 1952; San Francisco Museum of Art, 
1946; Oberlin College, Ohio, 1953; Sidnev Janis 
Gallery, New York, 'l957, 1959, 1961, 1962; Ben- 
nington College, Vermont, 1959; Galerie Berg- 
gruen, Paris, 1961; Museu de Arte Moderna de 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1961; Galerie der Spiegel, 
Cologne, 1962; The Pasadena Art Museum, 1962; 
Galleria Ody,ssia, Rome, 1962; Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 1963; Smith 
College, Northampton, Massachusetts, 1963; The 
Museum of Modern An, New York, 1965-66; The 
Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., 1965. 



Mr. Mothenvell's work has been shown in 
many group exhibitions including those at the 
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 1949, 
1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1965; Museu de 
.%te Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1951, 1953; 
in Kassel, Germany, 1959, 1964; at the Museum 
of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1961, 1964; 
Tate Gallery, London, 1964; The Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1964; Whitney 
Museum of American Art, New York, 1965; San 
Francisco Museum of Art, 1966. 

His work is in the collections of the Addison 
Gallery of American .'^rt, Andover, Massachusetts; 
The Baltimore Museum of Art; Bennington Col- 
lege, Vermont; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buf- 
falo; Harvard University, Cambridge; Kranncrt 
Art Museum, LTniversity of Illinois, Champaign; 
The Cleveland Museum of Art; Blandon Memo- 
rial Art Gallery, Fort Dodge, Iowa; The Museum 
of Fine Arts, Houston; University of Nebraska, 
Lincoln; Lfniv-ersity of Minnesota, Minneapolis; 
Yale LIniversity, New Haven, Connecticut; The 
Brooklyn Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York 
University, Whitney Museum of American Art, 
New York; Smith College, Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts; Brown University, Providence, Rhode 
Island; The North Carolina Museum of Art, 
Raleigh; Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de 
Janeiro; Washington University, St. Louis; Tel 
Aviv Art Museum, Israel; The Art Gallery of 
Toronto; Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice; 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Nor- 
ton Gallery and School of Art, West Palm Beach. 



153 




154 



/porter 




FAIRFIELD PORTER, Elizabeth, 1965. Oil on 
canvas, 48 x 24. Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New 
York. 

Fairfield Porter was born in Winnetka, Illinois, 
in 1906. He studied at Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, and at the Art Students League of New 
York with Bordman Robinson and Thomas Hart 
Benton. He lives in .Southampton, Long Island, 
New York. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Tibor de Nagy Galien,', New York, 1953, 
1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 
1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966; Rhode Island 
.School of Design, Providence, 1959; Southern 
Illinois University, Carbondale, 1964; University 
of .-Xlabama, Tuscaloosa, 1964; The Cleveland 
Museum of Art, 1966. 

Many group exhibitions of his work have been 
held including those at the Dayton .Vrt Institute. 
1961; Yale L'niversity, New Haven, Connecticut, 
1961-62; The Museum of Modern .Art, New 
York, 1961; Whitney Museum of American Art, 
New York, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964; National Insti- 
tute of .Arts and Letters, New York, 1962; The 
Pennsylvania .Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadel- 
phia, 1962; University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 
1963; Colby College, VVaterville, Maine, 1963. 

Mr. Porter's work is in the collections of the 
^Vads^^orth .Atheneum, Hartford; Mr. Lawrence 
Bloedel, Mr. .Arthur Buliowa, Chase Manhattan 
Bank, Mrs. .Austin List. The Museum of Modern 
.\rt. Mr. David Rockefeller, Mr. Paul Roebling, 
\\liitney Musciun of .American .Art, Mr. David 
Workman, New ^'ork; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Col- 
lection, ^Vashington, D.C. 



HELIKER/l5i 



JOHN HELIKER, Slill Life icith Sunar Howl, 
1965. Oil on canvas, 4014 x 40. Kraushaar Gal- 
leries, New York. (1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1955, 
1961) 

John Heliker was born in Vonkers, New York, 
in 1909. He studied for two years at the Art 
Students League of New York with Boardman 
Robinson, Kenneth Hayes Miller, and Kinion 
Nicholaides. In 1948 he received a Prix de Rome; 
in 1951, a fellowship from the John Simon 
Ciuggcnheim Memorial Foundation; and in 1966, 
an honorary degree from Colby Oollege, Water- 
ville, Maine. He has taught at the Colorado 
Springs Fine Arts Center and presently is teach- 
ing at Columbia University. He lives in New 
York, N.Y. 

Mr. Heliker has received awards from The 
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1941 
National Academy of Design, New ^'ork, 1948 
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New 
York, 1957; Ford Foundation, New York, 1960, 
1961; New York State Exposition, 1963. 

Numerous special exhibitions of Mr. Heliker's 
work have been held and his work has been in- 
cluded in group exhibitions at the L'niversitv of 
Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 1948, 1949, 1950, 
1953, 1955, 1961; The Arts Club of Chicago, 
1954; \Vhitnev Museum of .American Art, New- 
York, 1955, 1964, 1966; World's Fair, Brussels, 
1958; Cincinnati Art Museum, 1966; The Vir- 
ginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, 1966; 
and at The Art Institute of Chicago; The Metro- 



politan Museum of Art, New ^■ork; The Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 
Museum of .Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Helikers work is in the collections of 
Atlanta University; Illinois Wcslyan University, 
Bloomington; Harvard University, Cambridge; 
Kranncrt Art Museum, University of Illinois, 
Champaign; The Art Institute of Chicago; Flor- 
ida Gulf Coast Art Center, CHcarwater; The 
Cleveland Museum of Art; Colorado Springs 
Fine Arts Center; University of Miami, Coral 
Gables; Dcs Moines Art Center; Arizona .State 
College, Flagstaff; Wadsworth Athcneum, Hart- 
ford; Commerce Trust Company, Nelson Gallery- 
Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Mis.souri; Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, Lincoln; The Currier Gallery 
of .Art, Manchester, New Hampshire; AValker 
.•\rt Center, Minneapolis; Storm King .Art Center, 
Mountainville, New York; New Britain Museum 
of American Art, Connecticut; The Brooklyn 
Museum, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., The 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York 
Hospital, \\hitney Museum of American .\rt. 
New York; University of Notre Dame, Notre 
Dame, Indiana; the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 
The PennsyKania .\cademy of the Fine .Arts, 
Philadelphia; Rhode Island School of Design, 
Providence; S. C. Johnson & Son Collection, 
Racine; San Francisco Museum of Art; Telfair 
.Academy of Arts and .Sciences, Savannah; Mun- 
son-Williams Proctor Institute, Utica; The Cor- 
coran Gallery of Art, ^Voodward Foundation, 
Washington, D.C.; Wichita Art Museum. 




156 




dechar/ 



157 






PETER DECHAR, Pears, 1966. Oil on canvas, 
54 X 72. Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, 
New York, Larry Aldrich Foundation Fund. Cor- 
dier & Eclistrom, Inc., New York. 

Peter Dechar was born in New York, New 
^'ork, in 1942 and presently resides in that city. 
His work is in the collections of Mr. Arne 
Ekstrom, New York; the Chrysler Art Museum of 
Provincetown; and Mr. Zachary Scott. 



158 



/sHAW 



KENDALL SHAW, Youth Diving, 1965. Liqui- 
tex on canvas, 71 x 30. Tibor de Nagy Gallery, 
New York. 

Kendall Shaw was born in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, in 1924. He studied at The Tulane 
University of Louisiana, New Orleans, where he 
received a B.S. degree in Chemistry, 1945, and 
an M.F.A. degree in Painting, 1959; at the New 
School for Social Research, with Louis Guglielmi, 
Ralston Crawford, and Stuart Davis, New York; 
and at The Brooklyn Museum Art School. He 
has taught at The Tulane University of Louisi- 
ana, New Orleans, and at Columbia University, 
New York. He lives in New York, New York. 

Mr. Shaw has received awards from the New 
School for Social Research, New York, 1952; 
Isaac Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans, 
1958; State of Louisiana .Art Commission, Baton 
Rouge, 1960. Special exhibitions of his work 
have been held at the Orleans Gallery, New 
Orleaas, 1960, 1961, 1963; Columbia University, 
New York, 1962, 1965; and at the Tibor de 
Nagy Gallery, New York, 1964, 1965. His work 
has been included in group exhibitions at the 
Atlanta Art Association Galleries, 1958; Isaac 
Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans, 1958; 
State of Louisiana Art Commission, Baton Rouge, 
1960; in Hong Kong, 1960; Honolulu, Hawaii, 
1960; at the Orleans Gallery, New Orleans, I960, 
1961; in Tokyo, Japan, 1960, 1962; at the Morti- 
mer Brandt Gallery, New York, 1962; Brandeis 
LIniversity, Waltham, Massachusetts, 1963; Her- 
ron Museum of Art, Indianapolis, 1964; Marian 
Koogler McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, 1964; 
The .Art Institute of Chicago, 1965; Museum of 
Contemporary Art, Nagaoka, Japan, 1965; New 
York University, New York, l965. 

Mr. .Shaw's work is in the collections of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Korach, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. 
John Bernard, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Davis, New 
Orleans; Mr. Hanlin Becker, Mr. and Mrs. David 
Cowles, Mrs. O. Louis Guglielmi, Mrs. E. P. 
Jones, New York L^niversity, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Perry, New York; Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Juster, Scarsdale, New York; Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert Mayer, Winnetka, Illinois. 



FRIEDEL DZUBAS, Mountainside, 1966. 
Acnlic on canvas, 37 x 102. .^ndre Emmerich 
Gallery, New York. 

Friedel Dzubas was born in Berlin, Germany, 
in 1915. He studied at the Prussian .Academy of 
Fine .Arts and at the Bauhaus, Dusseldorf, with 
Paul Klee. He has taught at Dartmouth College, 
Hanover, New Hampshire, 1962. In 1966 he was 
the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Me- 
morial Foundation fellowship. Mr. Dzubas lives 
in New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Dzubas has received awards from The Art 
Institute of Chicago, 1942, 1943, 1944; and The 
Metropolitan Museum of .Art, New York, 1950. 
Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
the Samuel M. Kootz Gallerv, Inc., New York, 
1950; Tibor de Nagy Caller)'', New York, 1952; 
Leo Castelli Caller)', New York, 1958; French & 
Company, Inc., New York, 1959; Dwan Gallery, 



Los Angeles, 1960; Robert Elkon Gallery, New 
York, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965; Kasmin Caller)-, 
Ltd., London, 1964, 1965; .Andre Emmerich 
Caller)', New York, 1966. His work has been 
included in group exhibitions at the Stable Cal- 
ler)', New York, 1957; The Solomon R. Guggen- 
heim Museum, New York, 1961; Museum Wald- 
see, Berlin, 1963; Dayton Art Institute, 1963; 
\Vhitney Museum of American Art, New York, 
1963; Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pitts- 
burgh, 1963; The Corcoran Gallery of .Art, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1963; Los Angeles County Museum 
of .Art, 1964; The Jewish Museum, New York, 
1964. 

His work is in the collections of The Baltimore 
Museum of .Art; Yale L^niversity, New Haven, 
Connecticut; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Mu- 
seum, Whitney Museum of .American Art, New 
York; The Phillips Collection, Washington, B.C. 



160 



/george 



HERBERT GEORGE, Dance Like a Comma, 
1966. Canvas and wood, 34x68x52. Stable 
Gallery, Neu York. 

Herbert George was born in the state of \Vash- 
ington in 1939. He studied at the University of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, where he received an 
M.F.A. degree in 1966. Mr. George is currently 
in England on a Fulbright Fellowship. 

.\ special exhibition of his work was held at 
the Stable Gallery, New York, 1966. His work 
has been in group exhibitions at a number of 
institutions including The Museum of Modern 
Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, New 
York; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 



161 




162 



/benton 



FLETCHER BENTON, Synchronetic C-11. 
1966. Plexiglas and aluminum, 16'': x 20x4. 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shapiro, Beverly 
Hills. Esther-Robles Gallery, Los Angeles. 

"Any statement about my work at this time 
would be in the nature of a non-statement. I am 
more e.xcited about kinetics than anything Lve 
done. I feel that we are at the beginning of 
something that is going to be tremendous. Where 
it will go I don"t know, but I do know that as I 
make more discoveries of relationships between 
form, motion and color my excitement intensifies. 
Right now I have plans for doing a kinetic wall 
to be activated and viewed from both sides." 
(Courtesv of Art in America, Vol. LIV, No. 4, 
1966, p. 68.) 

Fletcher Benton was born in Jackson, Ohio, in 
1931. He studied at Miami University, Oxford, 
Ohio. He has taught at the California College 
of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, and at the San 
Francisco An Institute. He lives in San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Benton's work have 



been held at Gump's Gallery, San Francisco, 
1960, 1961; California Palace of the Legion of 
Honor, San Francisco, 1964; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of Art, 1965; Esther-Robles Gallery, Los 
.•\ngeles, 1966. His work has been included in 
group exhibitions at the California College of 
Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 1960; California Palace 
of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 1961, 
1962, 1963, 1964; Esther-Robles Gallerv, Los 
.A.ngeles, 1962, 1965, 1966; Santa Barbara Mu- 
seum of .4rt, 1962, 1965, 1966; San Francisco 
.•\rt Institute, 1964, 1965; La Jolla Museum of 
.\rt, 1965; \Vorld's Fair, New York, 1965; Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley, 1966; San Fran- 
cisco Museum of Art, 1966. 

Mr. Benton's work is in the collections of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Janss, Beverly Hills; Mr. Leo 
Guthman, Dr. Theodore Zeckman, Chicago; Mr. 
and Mrs. .Mien Guiberson, Dallas; Mr. and Mrs. 
Melvin J. Hirsh, Los Angeles; Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Lipman, New York; Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Wolgin, Philadelphia; Larry- .-Mdrich Foundation 
Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut. 




HELEN FRANKENTHALER, Santorini, 1966. 
Acr>'lic on canvas, 106x69. .Andre Emmerich 
Gallery, New York. (1959, 1963, 1965) 

Helen Frankenthaler was born in New York, 
New York, in 1928. She studied at Bennington 
College, \'ermont, where she received a B.A. de- 
gree. She has ta\ight at New York University, 
New York. She lives in New York, New York. 

Miss Frankenthaler was the recipient of an 
award from the I Biennale de Paris, 1959. Special 
exhibitions of her work have been held at the 
Tibor dc Nagv Gallery, New York, 1951, 1952, 
1953, 1954, ■"'1955, 1956, 1957, 1958; Andre 
Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1959, 1960, 1961, 

1962, 1963, 1965, 1966; The Jewish Museum, 
New York, 1960; Everett Ellin Gallery, Los 
.'\ngeles, 1961; Galerie Lawrence, Paris, 1961, 
1963; Bennington College, Vermont, 1962; Gal- 
Icria dell'Ariete, Milan, 1962; Kasmin Gallery, 
Ltd., London, 1964. 

Her work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, 
Pittsburgh, 1955, 1958, 1961, 1964; Whitney Mu- 
seum of American Art, New York, 1958, 1963; 
University of Illinois, Champaign-L'rbana, 1959, 

1963, 1965; in Kassel, Germany, 1959; Paris, 
France, 1959; Tokyo, Japan, 1959; at The Colum- 
bus Gallery of Fine Arts, Ohio, 1960; The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 
1961; World's Fair, Seattle, 1962; The Art In- 
stitute of CUiicago, 1963; The Pennsylvania Acad- 
emy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1963; San 
Francisco Museum of Art, 1963; The Washington 
Gallery of Modern .Art, Washington, D.C., 1963; 
LInivcrsity of Texas, Austin, 1964; Tate Gallery, 
London, 1964; Los .-Xngeles County Museum of 
.\rt, 1964; The .American Federation of Arts, 
World's Fair, New York, 1964; Brandeis LInivcr- 
sity, Waltham, Massachusetts, 1964; The Detroit 
Institute of Arts, 1965; The Maryland Institute, 
Baltimore, 1966; Southern Methodist University, 
Dallas, 1966; Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sci- 
ences, 1966; The New Brunswick Museum of Art, 
Saint John, 1966; \'enice Biennale darte, 1966; 
National Collection of Fine Arts, .Smithsonian In- 
stitution, The \Vashington Gallery- of Modern Art, 
^Vashington, D.C., 1966. 

Miss Frankcnthaler's work is in the collections 
of the Ulster Museum, Belfast; Albright-Knox 
.Art Gallery, Buffalo; The Detroit Institute of 
Arts; Wad.sworth .Atheneum, Hartford; Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, Lincoln; Milwaukee .Art Center; 
The Newark Museum; Yale University, New- 
Haven, Connecticut; The Brooklyn Museum, The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York University, 
Whitney Museum of .American Art, New York; 
Museum of .Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; 
The Washington Gallery of Modern .Art. 



frankenthaler/ 163 




164 BRODERSON 



MORRIS BRODERSON, Lizzie Borden Stand- 
ino, 1966. Pastel and gouache on heavy paper, 
35V.. x27'/2. Lent by Mr. Frank A. Campini, 
Berkeley, California. The Downtown Gallery, 
New York (1963, 1965) 

Morris Broderson was born in Los Angeles, 
California, in 1928. He studied at The Pasadena 
Art Museum, and the Jepson Art Institute and 
the University of Southern California, Los 
Angeles. He lives in Los Angeles. 

Mr. Broderson has received awards from the 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 19.58, I960; 
Art in America magazine, 1959; Whitney Museum 
of American Art, New York, 1960; Art Directors 
Club of Philadelphia, 1963. Special exhibitions 
of his work have been held at .Stanford L'niver- 
sity, Palo Alto, 1957; Santa Barbara Museum of 
Art, 1958; Bertha Lewinson Gallery, Los Angeles, 
1959, 1960; University of California, Riverside, 
1959; Ankrum Gallery, Los Angeles, 1961, 1962, 
1964, 1965; M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, 
San Francisco, 1961; The Downtown Gallery, 
New York, 1963; Phoenix Art Museum, 1964. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Los Angeles Countv Museum of ,\rt, 
1958, 1 96 1; Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1958; 
The Pennsylvania .\cadcmy of the Fine Arts, 
Philadelphia, 1959; Butler Institute of .American 
An, Youngstown, 1959, 1960; L'niversity of Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles, 1960; Whitney Museum of 
American An, New York, 1960, 1962, 1963; The 
John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sara- 
sota, 1960; Museum of An, Carnegie Institute, 
Pittsburgh, 1961, 1964; California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor, San Francisco, I96I; Anion 
Carter Museum of Western Art, Fort Worth, 
1962, 1963; Krannert Art Museum, University of 
Illinois, Champaign, 1963, 1965; World's Fair, 
New York, 1964; Leicester's Gallery, London, 
1965; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Wa.shington, 
D.C., 1965. 

Mr. Broderson's work is in the collections of 
Container Corporation of America, Inc., Chicago; 
The Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Michigan; 
Home Savings and Loan, Los Angeles County 
Museum of An, Los Angeles; Sumner Founda- 
tion, Whitney Museum of American Art, New 
York; Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha; Stanford Uni- 
versity, Palo Alto; Phoenix Art Museum; James 
A. Michener Foundation, Pipersville, Pennsyl- 
vania; M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, San 
Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco; Dr. 
Mackinley Helm, Mr. Wright Ludington, .Santa 
Barbara Museum of Art, .Santa Barbara; Joseph 
H. Hirshhorn Collection, Washington, D.C. 



765 




**'/: .-.VH 




166 



/remington 



DEBORAH REMINGTON, Canyon, 1964. Oil 
on canvas, 49 x 44',2. Bykert Gallery, New York. 

"I do not approach my work with any com- 
plete structural preconceptions, but believe in 
allowing each painting to develop and adjust as 
I work. Still, I find the forms I invent con- 
tinually reflected in the external world, and must 
believe that the opposition and attraction im- 
plicit between them mirror something which per- 
vades all life, artistic, biological, and intellectual. 
It is the tension between male and female, be- 
tween order and chance, between dissonance and 
harmony."" 

Deborah Remington was born in Haddonfield, 
New Jersey, in 1930. She studied at the San 
Francisco .Art Institute from 1949 to 1952, re- 
ceiving her B.F..'\. degree in 1955. From 1955 to 
1958 Miss Remington traveled and studied in 
.Asia. She taught at the San Francisco Art Insti- 



tute, 1958-65; at the University of California, 
Davis, 1962; at San Francisco State College, 
1965; and was guest lecturer at the San Fran- 
cisco .Art Institute in 1966. She lives in New 
York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of Miss Remingtons work 
have been held at the Dilexi Gallery, San Fran- 
cisco, 1962, 1963, 1965. Her work has been in- 
cluded in group exhibitions at the .San Francisco 
Museum of .Art, 1964; Whitney Museum of 
.American Art, New York, 1965, 1966; AVorld's 
Fair, New York, 1965; Musee Cantonal des 
Beaux-.Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland, 1966. 

Miss Remington"s work is represented in nu- 
merous private and public collections including 
the \Vhitney Museum of .American .Art, New 
York; Miss Dorothea .Speyer, Paris; Crown Zel- 
lerbach Corporation, San Francisco Museum of 
.Art, San Francisco, California. 




ALBERTO C:OLLIE. Spatial Absolute «3. 1965. 
Aluminum on plexiglas base, 18 diameter. Lee 
Nordne.ss Galleries Exhibition Section, Inc., New 
York. 

.Mberto Collie was born in Caracas, Venezuela, 
in \9?)9. He studied with .-\rmando Barrios and 
Eduardo de Gregorio in Caracas. He also has 
attended Boston L'niversity, where he received 
his B.-A., 1964; Harvard University; and the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge. He was the recipient of a John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, 
1966. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Collie's work have 
been held at the Atelier Chapman Kelley, Dallas, 
1963; Nordness Gallery, New York, 1964; and at 
the Venezuelan Embassy, Washington, D.C., 1964. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the Chrysler Art Museum of Provincetown 
and at the World's Fair, New York, 1964-65. Mr. 
Collie's work is represented in the collections of 
the Dallas Museum of Fine .'\rts, .Xtelier Chap- 
man Kelley, Dallas; Chrysler Art Museum of 
Provincetown; and the S. C. Johnson & Son Col- 
lection. Racine, Wisconsin. 



collie/ 



167 




168 



/rosenquist 



JAMES ROSENQUIST, Paimino for the Amer- 
ican Negro, 1962-63. Oil on canvas, 80x210. 
Leo Castclli Gallery, New York. 

James Rosenquist was born in Grand Forks, 
North Dakota, in 1933. He studied at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and at the 
Art Students League of New York. He lives in 
New York, New ^'ork. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Rosenquist's work 
have been held at the Green Gallery, New York, 
1962, 1963, 1964; Dwan Gallery, Los .\neeles, 
1964; Leo Castclli Gallery, New York, 196.'i, 
1966; Galeric Ileana Sonnabend, Paris, 196.'j; 
Galleria d'Arte Moderna, Turin, Italy, 1965; Ste- 
delijk Museum, .Amsterdam, 1966; Staatliche 
Kunsthalle, Baden-Baden, Germany, 1966; Kuns- 
thalle, Berne, 1966; Louisiana Kunstmuseum, 
Louisiana, Denmark, 1966; Moderna Museet, 
Stockholm, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Dwan Gallery, Los .Angeles, 1962; 
Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1962; Institute 
of Contemporary .Arts, London, 1963; The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 
1963; Oakland /\rt Museum, 1963; Centre Cul- 
turcl Americain, Cinema Ranalagh, Galerie 
Ileana Sonnabend, Paris, 1963; The Washington 
Gallery of Modern Art, Washington, D.C., 1963; 
Amherst College, Massachusetts, 1964; Stedelijk 
Museum, .Amsterdam, 1964; Tate Gallery, Lon- 
don, 1964; Louisiana Kuntsmuseum, Louisiana, 
Denmark, 1964; Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville 
de Paris, 1964; Portland .Art Museum, Oregon, 
1964; Moderna Museet, Stockholm, 1964; Palais 
des Beaux-.Arts de Bruxelles, 1965; Institute 
Torcuato di Telia, Buenos Aires, 1965; Ham- 
burger Kunstkabinett, Hamburg, Germany, 1965; 
The Four Seasons, Sidney Janis Gallery, New 
York, 1965; American Embassy, Paris, 1965; The 
Art Institute of Chicago, 1966; Flint Institute of 
Arts, Michigan, 1966; Nelson Gallers-.Atkins Mu- 
seum, Kansas City, Missouri, 1966; Galleria Gian 
Enzo, Milan, 1966; Cordier & Eckstrom, Inc., The 
Jewish Museum, The Museum of Modern Art, 
New York, 1966. 

Mr. Rosenquist's work is represented in many 
public and private collections. 



769 




170 



/liberman 




ALEXANDER LIBERMAN, Colloquy, 1966. 
Plastic paint on canvas, 77 x 50. The Betty 
Parsons Galler)-, New York. ( 1965) 

Alexander Liberman was born in Kiev, Russia, 
in 1912. He studied painting with Andre Lhote, 
Paris, from 1929 to 1931 and architecture with 
.\ugust Perret at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, 
from 1930 to 1932. From 1933 to 1937 he was 
.■\rt Editor of ]'U magazine, and he became Art 
Director of Vogue magazine in 1943. His work 
was selected for representation in the "Art in 
America Exhibition," New York, 1961. He lives 
in New York, Ne\v York. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Liberman's work 
have been presented at The Museum of Modern 
.\rt. New York, 1959; The Bcttv Parsons Gallery, 
New York, 1960, 1962, 1963, '1964; Bennington 
College, \'crmont, 1964; Robert Eraser Caller)', 
London, 1964. 

Mr. Liberman's work has been included in 
group exhibitions at The Solomon R. Guggen- 
heim Museum, New York, 1954, 1964; Milwau- 
kee .Art Center, 1956; in Zurich, 1959; at The Art 
Institute of Chicago, 1961, 1962; .Arthur Tooth 
& Sons, London, 1961; David Herbert Gallery, 
New York. 1961; .Albright-Knox .Art Caller)-, 
Buffalo, 1962; World's Fair, Helsinki, 1962; The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1962, 1964, 
1965, 1966-67; ^Vhitnev Museum of .American 
Art, New York, 1962, 1963, 1965; Tokyo Bien- 
nale, 1962; DcCordova and Dana Museum, Lin- 
coln, Massachusetts, 1963; Galerie Claude Bernard 
Paris, 1963; The Roswell Museum and .Art Cen- 
ter, New Mexico, 1963; The Corcoran GallriT of 
Art, Washington. D.C., 1963, 1964; The \Vash- 
ington Gallery of Modern Art, AVashington, D.C., 
1963; \Vadsworth .Athcncum, Hartford, 1964; Los 
.Angeles County Museum of Art, 1964; World's 
Fair, New York, 1964; Galerie Denise Rene, 
Paris, 1964; Kranncrt Art Museum, University 
of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; The .American 
Federation of .Arts, New York, 1965; The Penn- 
.sylvania .Academy of the Fine .Arts, University of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1965. 

Mr. Liberman's work is in the collections of 
the .Addison Gallery of American .Art, .Andover, 
Massachusetts; .Albright-Knox .Art Gallery, Buf- 
falo; The .Art Institute of Chicago; Tate Gallery, 
London; Yale L'niversity, New Haven, Connecti- 
cut; Chase Manhattan Bank, Museum of Modern 
Art, Whitney Museum of .American .Art, AVood- 
ward Foundation, New York; Smith College, 
Northampton, Massachusetts; Rhode Island 
School of Design, Providence; The Washington 
Gallery of Modern Art, Washington, D.C. 



schanker/ 



171 




%, 






•rH 




LOUIS SCHANKER, I'ariation on a Theme, 
1965. Black walnut on mahogany base, 79 x 10 
x3. Dorsky Gallcns New York. (1950, 1955, 
1957) 

Louis Schanker was born in New York, New 
York, in 1903. He studied at The Cooper Union 
School of Art and Architecture, New York, 1920- 
24; Art Students League of New York, 1925; and 
at the Educational Alliance Art School, New 
York. From 1931 to 1933 he traveled and studied 
in France and .Spain. He has taught at the New 
School for Social Research, New York, and at 
Bard College, .Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. 

More than fifty special exhibitions of his work 
have been held including those at the Lhiiversity 
of Michigan, Ann .Arbor; The Art Institute of 
Chicago; The Brooklyn Museum, Dorsky Gallery^ 
Grace Borgenicht Gallery, Inc., New School for 
Social Research, The Willard Gallery, New York. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the University of Michigan, .Ann Arbor; The 
Brooklyn Museum, The Museum of Modern .Art, 
New School for Social Research, Whitney Mu- 
seum of American Art, New York; The Phila- 
delphia .Art .Alliance; San Francisco Museum of 
Art; University of Illinois, Urbana; Munson- 
Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica. 

Mr. Schanker's work is in many collections 
including those of the University of Michigan, 
Ann .Arbor; University of Colorado, Boulder; 
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, BufTalo; The .Art 
Institute of Chicago; Cincinnati Art Museum; 
The Cleveland Museum of Art; The Detroit 
Institute of Arts; Lessing J. Rosenwald Collec- 
tion, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; LInivcrsity of 
Nebraska, Lincoln; Wesleyan College, Macon, 
Georgia; University of Wisconsin, Madison; The 
Brooklyn Museum, The Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, The New York Public Library, Whitney 
Museum of .American Art, New York; Philadel- 
phia Museum of .Art; The Toledo Museum of 
Art; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, The Phil- 
lips Collection, Washington, D.C. 



172 




KAISHJ 173 



MORTON KAISH, The Women, 1960. Oil on 
canvas, 50 x 60. Staempfli Gallery, New York. 

(1965) 

Morton Kaish was born in Newark, New 
Jersey, in 1927. He studied at Syracuse Univer- 
sity, where he received a B.F.A. degree; the 
Academic de la Grande Chaumierc, Paris; and 
the Instituto d'Arte, Florence. While attending 
Syracuse University he received a Harriet T. 
Leavenworth Award, 1949. In 1949 Mr. Kaish 
taught at The Everson Museum of Art, Syracu.se. 
He lives in New York, New York. 

Mr. Kaish was the recipient of awards from 
The Everson Museum of .\\i, Syracuse, 1950, and 
Syracuse University, 1962. Special exhibitions of 
his work have been held at the Rochester Me- 
morial .Art Gallery, and the Staempfli Gallery, 
New York, 1964. His work has been included in 
group exhibitions at The Museum of Modern 
Art, New York, 1953; Manhattanville College of 
the Sacred Heart, New York, 1955; Instituto 
Calcografio and Gallerie II Torcoliere, Rome, 
between 1956-58; Barone Gallery, New York, 
1959; The .Art Institute of Chicago, 1964; Ne- 
braska Art Association, Lincoln, 1964; Sheldon 
Memorial .Art Gallery, University of Nebraska, 
Lincoln, 1964; Krannert .Art Museum, L'nivcrsity 
of Illinois, Champaign, 1965; Herron Museum 
of Art, Indianapolis, 1965; Guild Hall, East- 
hampton, Long Island, New York, 1966; Amer- 
ican Academy of .Arts and Letters, Whitney Mu- 
seum of American .Art, New York, 1966. 



DONALD KAUFMAN, Thatcher and Grand, 
summer, 1966. Liquitex on canvas, 27 x 78. 
Richard Feigen Gallery, New York & Chicago. 

"The work may be produced out of anything; 
then it needs to be attended to." 

Donald Kaufman was born in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, in 1933. He studied at the LTniversity 
of Wisconsin, Madison, where he received a B.S. 
degree, 1958, and an M.S. degree, 1961. He lives 
in New York, New York. 

Special exhibitions of Mr. Kaufmans work 
have been held at the Richard Feigen Gallery, 
Chicago, 1966, and at the Richard Feigen Gal- 
lery, New York, 1966. His work has been included 
in group exhibitions at the Auslander Gallery, 
New York, and at The Corcoran Gallery of Art, 
Washington, D.C., 1967. 



smith/ 



175 



NIC SMITH, Albiitro.u II, 1966. Acrylic aiitl oil 
pastel on canvas, 68x65',.'. Comara Ciallcry, Los 
.\ngelcs. 

"If the paintings of my youth can fairly be said 
to reveal an awareness of becoming, then it may 
be no less fair to note that it now seems necessary 
to express an awareness of being. 

"Like a gyroscope, twentieth-century art has 
increasingly turned upon itself. And, like a 
gyroscope, inward momentum may produce an 
appearance of arrest. Vet the exclusively visual 
problems of "pure painting," 'art as art,' or the 
attempt to determine 'the irreducible essence of 
pictorial art' seem ultimately academic. Even the 
gyroscope undergoes friction and eventual col- 
lapse. .'\rt conceived as an expression of art 
will in the long run severely limit art as an ex- 
prcssiiHi (if human consciousness. 

"Rilke, in the Duino Elegies, spoke of his angels 
as 'being, nothing but being, a superabundance 
of being.' But the danger is always one of getting 
trapped into making pictures in which there are 
no mo\'ing ]5arts to go v\rong — the danger of 
getting seduced too easily and too quickly by the 
beckoning silence of a transcendental dead end. 
To avoid this trap the mind must, in a way, cease 
to create, and the self-conscious 'T must quietly 
disappear. Thus the act of painting is not so 
nmch a voyage as a meditation, an attempt to 
slow the mind down in order to watch it work. 

"Baudelaire was moved by the spaciousness of 
the .sea to write: 'What a delight to drown one's 
gaze in the immensity of the sky and sea ... all 
those things think through me, or I think through 
them, for in the vastness of revery, the I quickly 
loses itself.' Perhaps at this stage there is no 



real dichotomy between the still timelcs-sness of 
being and the daily conllicts of becoming. Here 
the artist no longer creates but is created, and 
artist and canvas are one. 

"Nevertheless, I must finally agree with Susan 
.Sontag when she .said recently, 'interpretation is 
the revenge of the intellect upon art. . . . Even 
more it is the revenge of the intellc( t upon the 
world. To interpret is to impoverish, to deplete 
the world — in order to set up a shadow world of 
tneaninn,' " 

Vie Smith was born in Grand Island, Nebraska, 
in 1929. He studied at Long Beach State College, 
California, where he received an M..'\. degree in 
1951. He has taught at Long Beach State Col- 
lege, California, 1955-62, and at California State 
College at Fullerton, 1962-66. He lives in West- 
minster, C'alifornia. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Exodus Gallery, Los Angeles, 1958; Long 
Beach Museum of .-Nrt, 1959; Comara Gallery, 
Los Angeles, 1960, 1962, 1966; Santa Barbara 
Museum of Art, 1962; The Pasadena An Mu- 
seum, 1963. His work has been in many group 
exhibitions including those at the Los .Angeles 
Countv Museum of .Art, 1957, 1959; La Jolla Mu- 
seum of Art, 1960, 1961, 1962; in Osaka, Japan, 
1960; at the San Francisco Museum of Art, 1960, 
1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966; The Museum 
of Fine Arts, Houston, 1962; Galleria d'Arte 
Modcrna, Turin, Italy, 1962; in Italv and West 
Germany, 1964, 1965. 

Mr. .Smith's work is represented in numerous 
collections including the Downey Museum of .Art, 
Downey, California; La Jolla Museum of .Art; 
Long Beach Museum of .Art; International Center 
of Esthetic Research, Turin, Italy. 




176 



/PINKERTON 



CLAYTON PINKERTON, Hollywood Party, 
1966. Acrylic on canvas, 69x72. Arleigh Gal- 
lery, San Francisco. 

"I am intrigued by the relationship of man to 
himself; his environment; and his fellow man. It 
seems at times rather messed up." 

Clayton Pinkerton was born in San Francisco, 
California, in 1931. He studied at the University 
of New Mexico, Albuquerque, and at the Cali- 
fornia College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 
where he received his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees. 
Mr. Pinkerton was the recipient of a Fulbright 
Fellowship to France, 1957-58. He has taught at 
the Richmond .-Xrt Center, California, 1952-62; 
and at the California College of Arts and Crafts, 
Oakland, from 1960 to the present. He lives in 
Richmond, California. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at the Everett Ellin Gallery, Esther-Robles Gal- 
lery, Los ."Xngeles; Arleigh Gallery, California 
Palace of the Legion of Honor, Lucien Labaudt 
Gallery, M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, 
San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco. 
His work has been included in group exhibitions 
at the University of California, Los Angeles; The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of 
Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; The Virginia 
Museum of Fine .-Xrts, Richmond. 

Mr. Pinkerton's work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Hopper, Los Angeles; Mrs. 
Charlotte Mack, M. H. de Young Memorial Mu- 
seum, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Gifford 
Phillips, Santa Monica, California. 




Df KOONING 177 



VVILLEM DE KOONING, Big Blonde, 1964-65. 
Oil and collage on paper, 29x30. Allan Stone 
(iallery, New York. (1952) 

Willeni de Kooning was born in Rotterdam. 
Holland, in 1904. He studied at the .\radeniie 
voor Beeldende Kunsten ed Technische Weten- 
sehappen, .Xmsterdam, 1916-24. He taught at 
Black Mountain College, North Carolina, 1948, 
and at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 
1950-51. He lives in Springs, Long Island, New 
York. 

Mr. de Kooning has received awards from The 
.\rt Institute of Chicago; The .Academy of Plas- 
tics and the State Academy, Rotterdam. Special 
exhibitions of his work have been held at the 
Charles Egan Gallery, New York, 1948, 1951; 
The .^rts Club of Chicago, 1951; The School of 
the Mu.seum of Fine .\rts, Boston, 1953; Sidney 
Janis Gallery, New York, 1953, 1956, 1959, 1962; 
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1955; Paul 
Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles, 1961; The Good- 
man Gallery, Buffalo, 1964; Allan Stone Gallery, 
New York, 1964, 1965. 

His work has been in numerous group exhibi- 
tions including those at The Museum of Modern 



Art, New York, 1936, 1951; Whitney Museum of 
.'\merican .Xrt, New York, 1948, 1950, 1954-55, 
1958; The \'irginia Museum of Fine .Arts, Rich- 
mond, 1950; Wnice Biennale d'arte, 1950, 1954, 
1956; The Art Institute of Chicago, 1951, 19.54; 
Museu de .'\rte Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
1951, 1953; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 
1952; Mu.seum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pitts- 
burgh, 1952, 1955; The Baltimore Mu.seum of 
Art, 1953; World's Fair, Brussel.s, 1958. 

Mr. de Kooning's work is in the collections of 
Mr. and Mrs. .Albert M. Greenfield, Chestnut 
Hill, Pennsylvania; The Art Institute of Chicago; 
XeLson Gallery-.*\tkins Museum, Kansas City, 
Missouri; Mr. John Becker, Mr. .Alexander Bing, 
Dr. and Mrs. John A. Cook, Mr. Edw in Denby, 
Mr. Max Margulis, The Museum of Modern .Art, 
Mr. Fairfield Porter, The Hon. Nelson .A. Rocke- 
feller, The Solomon R. Guggenheini Museum, 
Mr. Saul Steinberg, Whitney Museum of Amer- 
ican Art, New York; Museum of .Art, Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh; Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collec- 
tion, Washington, D.C.; Mr. AValter .Auerbach, 
Mr. Daniel Brustlein, Mr. Rudolph Burkhardt, 
Mrs. Robert Leonhardt, Mr. Frank O'llara, and 
in the Helena Rubenstein Collection. 




178 COHEN 



GEORGE COHEN, Untitled, 1965. Acrylic and 
mirrors on canvas, 63 x 84. Richard Feigen Gal- 
lery, New York & Chicago. (1965) 

George Cohen was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 
1919. He studied at The School of The Art 
Institute of Chicago where he received a B.F.A. 
degree in 1946; at Drake University, Des Moines, 
1946; the University of Chicago where he com- 
pleted the residence requirements for graduate 
degrees in the history of art, 1946-48. He was 
the recipient of scholarships from The School of 
The Art Institute of Chicago, 1938-39 and 1939- 
40. Mr. Cohen has taught at Northwestern Uni- 
versity, Evanston, Illinois, since 1948. He has 
held teaching appointments at the Contemporary 
.\rt Workshop, the Institute of Design, Illinois 
Institute of Technology, Chicago; the Evanston 
Art Center, Illinois; the Institute of Related Arts, 
Wilmette, Illinois. He lives in Evanston, Illinois. 

Mr. Cohen received awards from the North 
Shore .'\rt League, Winnetka, Illinois, 1953; The 
.■\rt Institute of Chicago, 1956; and the William 
and Noma Copley Foundation, Chicago, 1956. 



Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
Bordelon Gallery, Chicago, 1950; Contemporary 
Arts, Chicago, 1951; Baldwin-Kingery, Chicago, 
1953; The "Alan Gallery, New York, 1958-59; 
Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago, 1960-64; 
Feigen/Palmer Gallery, Los .'\ngeles, 1963; Rich- 
ard Feigen Gallery, New York, 1963-64, 1966. 

His work has been included in group exhibi- 
tions at the Krannert Art Museum, University 
of Illinois, Champaign; The Art Institute of 
Chicago; The Cleveland Museum of Art; The 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts; The Museum of 
Modern Art, New York; Museum of Art, Car- 
negie Institute, Pittsburgh; San Francisco Mu- 
seum of Art. 

Mr. Cohen's work is in the collections of The 
Hon. and Mrs. Nelson A. Rockefeller, .\lbany; 
Mr. and Mrs. William Copley, Mr. Sam Hunter, 
Howard W. Lipman Foundation. Mr. Bert Stern, 
New York; Mme. Lily Dache, La Baronne A. dc 
Gunzburg, Paris; Joseph H, Hirshhorn Collection, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mayer, 
Winnetka, Illinois. 




randell/ 



179 



RICHARD K. RANDELL, Big Zero, 1965. 
Wood, niasoiiitc, fabric, and dope, 40 x 60 x 52. 
Royal Marks Gallcn', New York. 

■"Coupled with the sculptors suspicion that 
society regards him either as a menace or an 
idiot is the artists growing understanding that 
M)ciety in fact regards him as a "natural enemy' 
whose pursuit of values, whicli appear to be 
individual rather than collective, places him out- 
side the social entity, and therefore he is not 
eligible for its reward of serious concern. Recip- 
procally, the sculptor recognizes his estrangement 
and burrows deeper into his work; it becomes 
more depersonalized, more calculated, more dif- 
ficult, more covertly critical, and more unmindful 
of earlier art. .And, the alienation of the artist 
becomes more explicit. 

'".Actually, many of us prefer it that way!" 
fCourtesv of Arl in America, Vol. LI\', No. 4, 
1966, p. 52.) 

Richard Randell was born in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, in 1929. From 1954 to 1957 he was 



an assistant to the sculptor, John Rucid, in Min- 
neapolis. He has taught at llamline L niversity, 
Saint Paul .Seminary, and Macalaster College, 
St. Paul, 1954-61; and at the University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, 1961-65. Presently he 
teaches at Sacramento .State College and li\es in 
Sacramento, ("alifornia. 

A special exhibition of his work was held at 
the Royal Marks Gallery, New ^'ork, I96G. His 
work has been included in group exhibitions at 
The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 1956, 1957, 
1959, 1961, 1963, 1964; Walker Art Center, Min- 
neapoli.s, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 
1964; The Detroit Institute of .Arts, 1959; 
Joselyn Art Mu.seum, Omaha, I960; The Art 
Institute of Chicago, 1961; St. Paul Gallery and 
School of .Art, 1961, 1964; San Francisco Museum 
of -Art, 1961; Museum of Contemporarv Crafts, 
New York, 1963; World's Fair, New "^'ork, 1965; 
The American Federation of Arts, Royal Marks 
Gallery, World House Galleries, New York, 1965; 
Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota, 1965. 




180 



/mallory 





Xfl^ 





RONALD MALLORY, Untitled, 1965. Con- 
tained mercury, 28% x 28% x 3. Stable Gallery, 
New York. 

Ronald Mallory was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, in 1935. He studied at the Univer- 
sity of Colorado, Boulder, 1951; University of 
Florida, Gainesville, where he received the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Architecture, 1952; Escola 
Nacional de Belas Artes, Rio de Janeiro, with 
Roberto Burle Marx, 1956; and at the Academic 
Julian, Paris, 1958. He lives in New York, N.Y. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at Galerie Claude Volsey, Paris, 1960; Mirell 
Gallery, Miami, 1961; and the Stable Gallery, 
New York, 1966. Mr. Mallory's work was in- 
cluded in group exhibitions at The Byron Galler>', 
P. V. L GalleiT, New York, 1964;' Institute of 
Contemporary .'\rt, Boston, 1965; Palais des 
Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles, 1965; Contemporary 
Arts Association, Houston, 1966; The Museum of 
Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, 
New York, 1966; University of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, 1966; Larry Aldrich Foundation 
Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut, 1966; San 
Francisco Museum of .Art, 1966. 

Mr. Mallory "s work is in the collections of the 
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; The Mu- 
seum of Modern .•\rt. New York; Larry Aldrich 
Foundation Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut. 



I'HILII' GLSTOX, Heir, 1964. Oil on canvas, 
69 X 76. Marlborough-Gcrson Gallery, Inc., New 
York. (1948, 1949, 1965) 

Philip Guston was born in Montreal, Canada, 
in 1913. He studied at the Otis An Institute of 
Los Angeles County, Los Angeles. Mr. Guston 
was the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim 
Memorial Foundation fellowship in 1948; a grant 
from the .\merican Academy of .\rts and Letters. 
New York, in 1948; a Prix de Rome in 1948; and 
a grant from the Ford Foundation in 1958. He 
has taught at The L'niversity of Iowa, Iowa City, 
from 1941 to 1945; \Vashington L'niversity, St. 
Louis, from 1945 to 1947; New York University 
from 1951 to 1959; and the Pratt Institute, New 
York, from 1953 to 1957. He lives in New York, 
New York. 

Mr. Guston received an award from the Mu- 
seum of .^rt, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1945. 
.Special exhibitions of his work have been held at 
The L'niversity of Iowa, Iowa City, 1944; Mid- 
town Galleries, New York, 1945; The School of 
the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1947; Munson- 
\Villiams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York. 
1947; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1950; 
Peridot Gallery, New York, 1952; Egan Gallery. 
New York, 1953; Sidney Janis Gallery, New 
York, 1956, 1958, 1960, 'l961; Museu de .^rte 
Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1959; Dwan Gal- 
lery, Los .Angeles, 1961; Stedelijk Museum, Am- 
sterdam, 1962; The Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Museum, New York, 1962; Palais des Beaux-.'\rts 
de Bruxelles, 1963; Whitechapel Galler>-, London, 
1963; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1963. 



GUSTON 181 

Mr. CJuston's work has been included in group 
exhibitions at the University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign-Urbana, 1948, 1949, 1965; University of 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1951; The Ballimore 
Museum of Art, 1953; The Museum of Modern 
Art, New York, 1956, 1958; Museu de .'\rte 
Moderna de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1957; Musco 
Nacional de Arte Moderno, Palacio de Bellas 
.Artes, Mexico City, 1958; in Kassel, Germany, 
1959; at the Whitney Museum of .'\merican .'\rt. 
New York, 1959, 1964; Ycnicc Biennalc d'arte, 
I960; United States Information .'Vgency, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1961-62; \Vorld's Fair, Seattle, 
1962; The An Institute of Chicago; The Pennsyl- 
vania .Academy of the Fine .Arts, Philadelphia; 
Museum of An, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; 
San Francisco Museum of Art; The Corcoran 
Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 

Mr. Guston's work is in the collections of The 
Baltimore Museum of .Art; Albright-Knox .Art 
Gallery, Buffalo; State College of Iowa, Cedar 
Falls; Krannert .Art Museum, University of Illi- 
nois, Champaign; The .Art Institute of Chicago; 
The Cleveland Museum of .Art; Tate Caller)', 
London; The Minneapolis Institute of .Arts; The 
Metropolitan Museum of .Art, The Museum of 
Modern .Art, The Solomon R. Ciuggcnheim Mu- 
seum, Whitney Museum of .American .Art, New 
York; James .A. Michener Foundation, Pipersville, 
Pennsylvania; City .Art Museum of St. Louis, 
Washington University, .St. Louis; Munson- 
Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica; The Phillips 
Collection, ^\'ashington, D.C; \Vorccster .Art Mu- 
seum, Massachusetts. 






182 OLIVEIRA 



NATHAN OLIVEIRA, Standing Man and Win- 
dow, 1965. Oil on canvas, 66x60. Landau-Alan 
Gallen-, New York. (1957, 1961, 1963) 

Nathan Oliveira was born in Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, in 1928. He studied at Mills College. 
Oakland, and received his M.F.A. degree from 
the California College of Arts and Crafts, Oak- 
land, in 1952. He was awarded a Louis Comfort 
Tiffany Foundation scholarship in 1956, a John 
Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellow- 
ship in 1958, and a Norman Wait Harris Bronze 
Medal and Prize, The Art Institute of Chicago, 

1959. Mr. Oliveira has taught at the California 
School of Fine Arts, San Francisco; California 
College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland; and the 
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. He 
now is teaching at Stanford University, Palo 
Alto, and he lives in Palo Alto, California. 

Special exhibitions of his work have been held 
at The Alan Gallen', New York, 1958, 1959, 

1960, 1961, 1965; Paul Kantor Gallery, Los An- 
geles, 1960, 1961; University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign-Urbana, 1961. His work has been included 



in group exhibitions at the University of Illinois, 
Champaign-Urbana, 1957, 1961, 1963; Whitney 
Museum of American .^rt, New York, 1958, 1959, 
1960, 1961; Bienal Interamericana, Mexico City, 
1958; International Exhibition, Tokvo, 1958; The 
Art Institute of Chicago, 1959, 1960, 1961; The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1959; The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 
1961: Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pitts- 
burgh, 1961; World's Fair, Seattle, 1962; and at 
other institutions. 

Mr. Oliveira's work is in many collections in- 
cluding those of the University of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor; Kranncrt Art Museum, University of 
Illinois, Champaign; The Art Institute of Chi- 
cago; Dallas Museum of Fine Arts; University of 
California, Los Angeles; \Valker .Art Center, 
Minneapolis; Mr. Larry Aldrich, Mr. Richard 
Brown Baker, The Museum of Modern Art, Mr. 
Roy R. Neuberger, Whitne\- Museum of Amer- 
ican .■\rt, New York; Mr. Joseph Pulitzer, St. 
Louis; San Francisco Museum of Art; Joseph 
H. Hirshhorn Collection, Washington, D.C.; 
Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown. 




CORNCLl/i83 



JOSEPH CORNELL, ApoUinarh, 1952. Con- 
struction, 9-V4 X 15%. Allan Stone Gallery, New- 
York. 

Joseph Cornell \sas born in Nyack, New York, 
in 1903. He attended Phillips Academy of Amer- 
ican .\\X., .Andover, Massachusetts. As an artist, 
however, he is largely self-taught. He lives in 
Flushing, New York. 

Mr. Cornell has received awards from the 
William and Noma Copley Foundation, Chicago, 
1954, and The Art Institute of Chicago, 1959. 
Special exhi1)itions of his work have been held 
at the Julicn Lew Gallery, New York, 1932, 1939, 
1940; Hugo Gallery, New- York, 1946; Copley 
Galleries, Los Angeles, 1948; Charles Egan Gal- 
lery, New York, 1949, 1950, 1953; Allan Frum- 
kin Gallery, Chicago, 1953; Walker Art Center, 
Minneapolis, 1953; the Stable Gallery, New 
York, 1955, 1957; Bennington College, Vermont, 
1959; Ferus Gallery, Los\'\ngeles, 1962; Robert 
Schoelkopf Gallery, New York, 1966; The Pasa- 
dena Art Museum, 1966. 

Mr. Cornell's work has been included in nu- 
merous group exhibitions and is in the collections 
of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Mr. \Vil- 
liam Copley, Los Angeles; Mrs. Albert List, The 
Museum of Modern Art, Mr. Allan Stone, 
Whitney Museum of American .Xrt, New York; 
The Pasadena Art Museum; Mr. Edgar Bergman, 
Mr. Lawrence .\. Fleischman, Mr. and Mrs. John 
de Menil, and Mr. Steve Paine. 




i>HOTOi;itAi>HY i:kkiiitk 



In this listing, names of the photographers appear in alphabetical order, 
followed by page numbers on which their work is reproduced. 



ELLEN AUERBACH- 149, 154 
BRENWASSER-75 

RUDOLPH BURCKHARDT-97, 131, 135 

GEOFFREY CLEMENTS - 42, 43, 47, 52, 53, 59, 60, 63, 71, 72, 74, 76, 82, 92, 
103, 108, 138, 150, 155, 156, 159, 163, 165, 166, 167, 174, 178, 182 
ED DULL PHOTOGRAPHY- 134 
THOMAS FEIST- 121 
RICHARD K. KOCH- 129 
WILLIAM LaRUE-40 

O. E. NELSON - 55, 57, 111, 116, 147, 153, 181 
ERIC POLLITZER-46, 98, 99, 119, 169 
NATHAN RABIN -44, 81, 170 
LILO RAYMOND- 151 
WALTER ROSENBLUM-'il, 146, 171 
W. C. RUNDER PHOTO COMPANY, INC. - 89 
WALTER RUSSELL- 144 

JOHN D. SCHIFF-49, 78, 90, 94, 118, 125, 161, 172, 180 
JACK STOCK STUDIO- 132 



KOTKS 



\oti<:k 



, 



iKiii<:x 



ACTON, Arlo 1 36 DECHAR, Peter 



ADIER, Samuel M 1 44 



AKAWIE, Thomas F 84 



ARAKAWA 



.98 



BARNES, Robert 66 

BATTENBERG, John N 40 

BAYER, Herbert 142 

BECHTLE, Robert Alan 68 

BENTON, Fletcher 162 

BISHOP, Isabel 75 

BOLOMEY, Roger 64 

BOYCE, Richard 110 

BRODERSON, Morris 164 

BUNCE, Louis 1 34 

CADMUS, Paul 55 

CASTRO-CID, Enrique 76 

COHEN, George 178 

COLLIE, Alberto 167 

CORNELL, Joseph 1 83 



.156 



DE KOONING, Willem 177 

DOLE, William 79 

DUBIN, William 86 

DZUBAS, Friedel 159 

FINKELSTEIN, Max 122 

FLEMING, Dean 118 

FLORSHEIM, Lillian 107 

FORAKIS, Peter 82 

FRANKENTHALER, Helen 163 

FREEMAN, John 123 

GALLO, Fronk 128 

GEORGE, Herbert 1 60 

GEORGES, Paul 44 

GOOCH, Gerald 54 

GRANT, James 62 

GUSTON, Philip 181 

HARTIGAN, Grace Ill 

HARVEY, Robert 106 



HATCHETT, Duayne 50 

HELIKER, John 155 

HINMAN, Charles 119 

HULTBERG, John 57 

INDIANA, Robert 46 

INSLEY, Will 90 

JARVAISE, James 114 

JENKINS, Paul 124 

JONES, Howard 91 

JONES, John Paul 115 

KAISH, Morton 1 72 

KAMIHIRA, Ben 51 

KAUFFMAN, Craig 1 30 

KAUFMAN, Donald 174 

KIENBU5CH, William 74 

KIRK, Jerome F 112 

KISHI, Mosatoyo 83 

KITAJ, R. B 87 

LAING, Gerald 63 



LEVI, Josef 78 

LEVINE, Jack 60 

LIBERMAN, Alexander 170 

LYTLE, Richard 132 

MAHAFFEY, Noel 100 

MALLORY, Ronald 1 80 

MARDEN, Brice 138 

MC LAUGHLIN, John 102 

MITCHELL, Joan 94 

MONTE, Jomes 139 

MOTHERWELL, Robert 152 

MUELLER, George 120 

NELSON, Robert A 72 

NESBITT, Lowell 151 

NOLAND, Kenneth 43 

OKADA, Kenzo 135 

OlITSKI, Jules 103 

OLIVEIRA, Nathan 1 82 

OSTLIHN, Barbro 148 



PALATNIK, Abraham 52 

PEARISTEIN, Philip -SO 

PINKERTON, Clayton 176 

PORTER, Fairfield 1 54 

QUAYTMAN, Harvey " 

RAFFAELE, Joe 48 

RANDELL, Richard K 1 79 

RATTNER, Abraham 92 

REMINGTON, Deborah 1 66 

RICHARDSON, Sam 126 

RIVERS, Lorry 147 

ROSENQUIST, James 168 

RUDA, Edwin 71 

SAVAGE, W. Lee 150 

SCHANKER, Louis 171 

SCHAPIRO, Miriam 59 

SCHMIDT, Julius 116 



SCHNACKENBERG, Roy 104 

SEYLE, Robert Horley 1 27 

SHAPIRO, Daniel '5 

SHAW, Kendall 158 

SMITH, Vic 1 75 

SNOW, V. Douglas 70 

SUNG WOO CHUN 67 

THIEBAUD, Wayne 140 

TOVISH, Harold 146 

TROVA, Ernest T 88 

VAN BUREN, Richard 108 

VARDANEGA, Gregorio 47 

VASA (Velizar Mihich) 58 

WARHOL, Andy '6 

WILLENBECHER, John 42 

YOUNGERMAN, Jack 131 

ZAMMITT, Norman 1 43 



:1W 



9-83^