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Full text of "Cook book"

UNIVERSITY OF 

ILLINOIS LIBRARY 
ATURBANACHAMPAIOM 

OAK STREET 
LiBRAPY FACILITY 



CORNER BOOK SHOP 

102 FOURTH AVENUE 
HEW YORK 3, N. Y. 



COOK BOOK 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE OSSOLI CLUB 




A Little Home— 
A Little Family— 
A Little LOVE— 
A Few Friends — 
— and a 

Woods ELlectric 

Gee! What more can a 
man or ^voman want? 



The Car With the Solid Tires 



WOODS MOTOR VEHICLE tO 



2521 CALUMET AVENUE 
SALESKOOMS: 1408 Michigan Boulevard 



OUR OWN GARAGES 

HIGHLAND PARK EVANSTON 



INDEX. 

PAGE 

Kelishes 3 

Soups - 4 

Fish \ 13 

Meats and meat sauce 20 

Fowl 32 

Vegetables 37 

Bieads, muffins, waffles, etc 45 

Salads and salad dressings ,. . . . 58 

- Pies 67 

Puddings and pudding sauces 70 

Small cakes and cookies 90 

Doughnuts 98 

Cakes, f rostings and fillings 100 

Ices 117 

Preserves and pickles 121 

Sandwiches and cheese dishes. 133 

Eggs 136 

Chafing Dishes 138 

Candies " 139 

Household hints 142 

Beverages 142 

Weights and measures 145 



RELISHES. 

FRUIT RELISH. 

Grape fruit pulp, bananas, sliced and quartered, mixed 
with shredded pineapple, using half as much pineapple 
as either grape fruit or bananas, strawberries cut in 
halves. Altogether 2 cups of fruit. Pour over fruit ^ 
cup of sherry, 3 tablespoons of apricot brandy, ^ cup of 
sugar and a few grains of salt. Chill thoroughly, and 
serve in sherbet cups as tirst course at luncheon. 

CAVIARE MEDALLIONS. 

Cut cold, boiled potatoes into slices i an inch thick. 
From these stamp out rounds the size of a silver dollar, 
and marinate in oil and vinegar. Wipe the oil from an- 
chovies put up in oil, then divide each into 3 strips. Set 
these on the edge of the potato rounds, and till the cen- 
ter with pickled beet-root chopped fine. Above the beet- 
root set a half teaspoon of caviare. Finish with a tiny 
figure cut from cooked white of egg. Set these in a cir- 
cle on serving dish. Make other medallions, using round 
of beet-root as the foundation and chopped white of egg 
in place of the beet-root. Finish the same as the first 
medallions. Dispose these in the center of the dish. 
Make other medallions with beet or potato as the founda- 
tion and sifted yolk of egg (cooked) in the center, and 
dispose on the plate. Garnish the plate with stutfed 
olives and parsley. Have these passed as the first course 
iit luncheon or at a chafing-dish supper. 

OYSTER COCKTAILS. 

2 dozen small oysters, 1 tablespoon horseradish, | tea- 
s[K)on tobasco sauce, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 1 tablespoon 
Worcestershire sauce, 1 tablespoon tomato catsup, ^ tea- 
s{)oon salt. Mix the sauce well and place on ice an hour 
before serving. Have oysters ice cold. Put 3 or 4 oys- 
ters in a punch glass, and add 1 or 2 tablespoons of sauce 
to each glass. 



HOT CHICKEN SANDWICH, INDIENNE. 

Remove the flesh from the bones of cold stewed or roast 
chicken and chop the meat, not too fine (use bowl and 
knife). Have ready rounds of toasted white bread. 
Spread these with butter and then generously with 
chicken and press together in pairs. When ready to 
serve pour over very hot chicken gravy. Serve with cab- 
bage or celery salad or stewed cranberries. In making 
the sauce use | a teaspoonful of curry powder with each 
2 tablespoonfuls of flour. The better the chicken broth 
for the sauce the better the dish will be. Baking pow- 
der biscuit, split and toasted or English muffins may re- 
place the bread. 

OYSTER COCKTAIL. 
(Mrs. H. B. Robert.) 

Serve oysters in cocktail glasses or cases made from 
green peppers placed on bed of crushed ice. 1 table- 
spoon Blue Point catsup, ^ tablespoon vinegar or lemon 
juice, 2 drops tobasco, salt, |- teaspoon Worcestershire 
sauce, 1 teaspoon finely chopped celery. Mix ingredients. 
Chill thoroughly and serve. 



SOUPS. 

CLARIFY STOCK. 

Ingredients — Whites of two eggs, -J pint of water, 2 
quarts of stock. Take the whites of two eggs, carefully 
separated from their yolks, whisk them well together 
with the water and still whisking add them gradually to 
the stock, which must be first warmed, place the soup on 
the fire and when boiling and well skimmed, whisk it 
well, draw to the side of the fire and let it settle until 
the whites of the eggs become separated. Pass through 
a fine cloth and the soup should be clear. 

CLEAR SOUP OR BOUILLON. 

Cut up the lean of coarse beef into small pieces; 1 
good-sized onion, 1 good sized carrot, 1 good-sized tur- 
nip; peel and cut up before using. Salt, nutmeg and 



cayenne pepper to taste. 4 whole cloves. Fry with 1 
tablespoon of butter in soup-kettle. When it begins to 
look whitish, pour over it the stock from one chicken. 
Boil the chicken in 1 gallon of water in early morning, 
and make stock in afternoon. Boil 1 hour, strain and 
put away till next day for aspic or bouillon. For bouil- 
lon, beat an egg and let it come to a boil in the bouillon, 
and strain before serving. 

SOUP STOCK. 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) * . 

Beef bone, mutton bone, veal bone, carrots, onions and 
celerv\ Cook all afternoon. For tomato soup add to- 
mato and tablespoon of all spice; boil for hour. Strain 
and serve. 

BOUILLON. 
(Mrs. L. W. Henry.) 

4 pounds beef, 5 pounds veal, 4 pounds chicken. Sea- 
son highly with cayenne pepper and celery seed. Add 
6 quarts of water and cook slowly 5 hours. Remove 
chicken when tender. Keep the stock in a cool place, and 
heat it wlien required, after removing grease from the 
top. 

WHITE STOCK TO BE USED FOE WHITE SOUPS. 

Ingredients. — 4 pounds of knuckle of veal, any poul- 
try trimmings, 4 slices of lean ham, 3 carrots, 2 onions, 
1 head of celery, 2 ounces of salt, 1 blade of mace, 1 
bunch of herbs, I ounce of butter, 4 quarts of water, 
pepper. Mode — Cut up the veal, put it with bones and 
trimmings of poultry and ham into a stew-pan which 
has been rubbed with bits of butter, moisten with half 
pint of water, and simmer until the gravy begins to 
flow. Then add 4 quarts of water and the remainder of 
ingredients, simmer for 5 hours, after skimming and 
straining carefully through a hair sieve it will be ready 
for use. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

3 bunches of asparagus, 1 quart of rich cream or milk, 
1 tablespoon of butter, ^ tablespoon of flour. Boil the 
asparagus in 1 quart salt water till tender. Drain water 



off. then add cream. Rub butter and flour together and 
add before taking from the stove. Add salt and pepper 
to taste. Serve with toasted bread or crackers. 

CREAM OF BEETS. 
(Florence ]\r. Schauffler.) 

2 tablespoons butter, 3 tablespoons flour, 3 pints 
milk, 1^ of tender beets which have been put through a 
potato ricer. Cream together butter and flour and add 
milk. Season with salt and pepper and a few carroway 
seeds may be added after the German fashion, if de- 
sired. Turn into the mashed beets and allow to work 
up. On serving throw in a few capers. 

BLACK BEAN S.OUP. 

15 cent soup bone. Cook day before. To half of the 
stock take one pint of black beans which have soaked 
over night. (;Ook them with stock one hour. Strain and 
add a little thickening and serve with slices of lemon. 

BEAN SOUP. 
(Mrs. Slade.) 

2 quarts of navy beans, H pound salt pork or bacon, 
1 can of tomatoes, 2 large onions, 1 clove of garlic, 2 
carrots, 1 stalk of celery, 1 turnip, white, 5 cloves, 1 bay 
leaf, 1 sweet pepper, J teaspoon of thyme, J teaspoon of 
soda. Soak the beans over night, drain, cover with water 
again, add the soda and let boil for five minutes. Drain 
again, then cover with water and add all the foregoing 
ingredients except the soda. Boil gently until the beans 
are soft. Press through the colander. As this makes 
a large quantity take only what is needed for one meal, 
return to the stove, thin with milk or cream, salt to taste 
and when hot it is ready to pour through a puree sieve 
and serve. 

CORN SOUP. 

1 can of com, 1 quart of boiling milk. Butter, salt 
and pepper to taste. Press the corn through a colander 
and add to the quart of boiling milk, and season to taste. 
Serve hot with toast in squares. 



COEN SOUP. 

Ingredients — 1 can com, 1 pint of water; 1 quart milk, 
\ cup butter, 1 tablespoon chopped onion, \ cup flour, 2 
tablespoonsful salt, ^ teaspoon of white pepper, yolks of 
two eggs. Mode — Cook the com with the cold water for 
20 minutes. Cook the onion in the melted butter until 
light brown. Add flour, seasoning, and the milk gradu- 
ally, then the com; strain and re-heat, beat the yolks 
of eggs, put them into the soupturine, pour the soup 
slowly over them, mix well, serve in cups with spoonful 
of whipped cream in each cup. 

CALF'S HEAD SOUP. 
(Mrs. T. E. Wyles.) 

Have the butcher remove the eyes, jawbone and teeth 
from the calf's head and crush the bones. Cover with 
water, in which place an onion stuck with six cloves, and 
add a few (3) allspice berries and the tongue. Boil un- 
til the meat drops from the bones. Blanch the brains 
and parboil in the stock. Cut the tongue and brains into 
small dice. Mash the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs 
smooth with two tablespoons of flour and one tablespoon 
of butter; cut the whites of the two eggs into small dice. 
Boil down the stock to one-half the original quantity. 
Just before serving, add the meat, tongue, brains, whites 
of eggs and yolks thickening; season highly, and add a 
wineglass of sherry. 

CPtEAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

1 quart of chicken soup, 1 dessertspoonful of butter, 1 
dessertspoonful of corn starch, 3 heads of celery, 1 quart 
of milk or cream. Take the white part of the celery 
and chop it as fine as possible. Put it to boil with the 
milk, and let it cook until it can be rubbed through a 
sieve. If too thick after it has been rubbed through, add 
a little more milk. Return it to the pot and add the 
chicken soup. Wlien it has boiled about 10 minutes rub 
the butter and corn starch together and stir until it 
thickens; then season to taste with salt and white pepper. 



8 

CHERRY SOUP. 

1 quart of sour cherries. Remove the stones, add 1 
quart of water and boil until the cherries are tender. 
Press through sieve (there should be almost nothing left 
in the sieve), add ^; a cup of sugar and return to the fire. 
When boiling hot add 1 tablespoonful of arrowroot or 
cornstarch (rubbed smooth in enough cold water to 
pour) and let boil until clear. Take from fire and cool; 
add juice of one lemon. Serve with shaved ice. Delic- 
ious for the first course of a summer luncheon served in 
bouillon cups. 

GUMBO SOUP. 

1 chicken, 2 pints okra, 1 pint tomatoes, 1 tablespoon 
butter. Fry the chicken and pour over ^ gallon of boil- 
ing water and cook till the meat drops from the bones. 
Remove bones. Prepare the vegetables and add to the 
soup and boil. Then add thickening and season to taste. 
Before pouring off add the butter. Add hot water as it 
boils down. Serve hot, with rice boiled drv. 



CREOLE GUMBO SOUP. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

1 large chicken (5-6 pounds) or veal, 1 medium onion, 
1 large tablespoon lard, 1 tablespoon flour, 4 quarts 
water, 1 can of tomatoes, 3 green peppers, 2 quarts sliced 
okra, 1 tablespoon salt. Cut and joint the chicken as for 
frying, dredge with flour. Put into an iron skillet the 
lard; when hot stir in the flour; brown, being careful not 
to burn; add the onion, minced fine, and then the 
chicken; fry the whole for eight or ten minutes, till the 
chicken is well browned; add the tomatoes, and let cook 
three or four minutes longer. Throw into the soup pot 
and cover with the water; season with the peppers 
chopped fine and the salt. Let the whole boil rapidly 
for a few minutes, then remove to the back of the stove 
and simmer for 4 or five hours. One hour before serv- 
ing stir in the okra. Serve with boiled rice. 



9 

OKEA GUMBO. 
(Mrs. H. L. Taylor.) 

A Creole Southern Soup. 

In a porcelain-lined sauce-pan put a tablespoonful of 
lard ; when hot put in a sliced onion, then a scant table- 
spoonful of flour and cook until a golden brown. Put in 
a can of shrimp and cook 4 or 5 minutes; add a minced 
sweet pepper and two large tablespoonfuls of canned 
tomatoes. Then add a can of okra or three teacupfuls 
of fresh sliced okra. Let this simmer 10 minutes — or 
20 minutes if the fresh okra is used — stirring constant- 
ly. Then add one quart of water very gradually (one 
cup at a time). Season with salt and pepper. Cook 
slowly one hour and serve with boiled rice. Chicken, 
crab meat, or ham and veal can be used instead of the 
shrimp. 

MITSHEOOM CREAM SOUP. 

1 quart of chicken stock, quart milk, 1 can of mush- 
rooms. Drain ofp the liquor, cook and chop and add to 
stock. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

Take 1 quart of rich milk or cream and boil. Draw 
oif 1 quart of oysters and boil and skim. Add it and the 
oysters to boiling milk and cook 5 minutes. Powder 1 
dozen crackers, and with them put J cup of butter in 
soup tureen and pour over and serve* hot. Pepper and 
salt to taste. 

OYSTER SOUP WITHOUT MILK. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

From one quart of oysters drain the juice and put on 
stove. To it add one-half pint of water, one large 
cracker rolled very fine, pepper, salt and bit of butter. 
When juice is scalded, drop in oysters and cook until 
the lips curl, and they are done. 

OYSTER GUMBO. 

1 large chicken, 1 can of oysters, ^ pound of boiled 
ham, 2 quarts of boiling water, 1 bunch of summer sav- 
ory, 1 bunch of parsley, 1 tablespoon of filee powder. 



10 

Salt, black and cayenne pepper to taste. Divide the 
chicken, skin and flour each piece well; cut the ham in 
dice, and, with a cooking spoonful of butter, fry until 
brown. Then pour on it 2 quarts of boiling water, the 
bunches of summer savory and parsley tied together, 
salt and cayenne pepper. Let this boil slowly for 4 
hours. Take out the summer savory and parsley, pull 
the chicken to pieces, return it to the pot, and about 15 
minutes before serving heat the oysters and their liquor, 
and add to the soup. While they are simmering very 
slowly take out a teacupful of the soup and mix with the 
filee powder. When perfectly smooth put it in the soup ; 
let it boil up once and it will be done. Pour into a heated 
tureen and serve with some nicely boiled rice in another 
dish. 

PEA SOUP. 

1 can peas, 1 quart boiling milk, 1 tablespoon butter. 
Press the peas through a colander and add to a quart of 
boiling milk. Add to this 1 tablespoon butter, and salt 
and pepper to taste. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Boil potatoes very soft and rub through a sieve. To 
this add cream or milk and generous bit of butter. Sea- 
son with grated onion, pepper and salt and stir in enough 
thickening to make it the desired consistency. 

CREAM OF POTATO SOUP. 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

3 potatoes cooled and mashed, 1 quart milk, teaspoon 
of chopped onion, stalk of celery, i teaspoonful celery 
salt, ^ teaspoonful white pepper, tablespoonful flour, ta- 
blespoonful butter. 

MARCELLUS'S POTATO SOUP. 

3 large sized potatoes, butter, 1 cup of cream, salt and 
pepper to taste. Cut the potatoes up in fine pieces and 
boil 2 hours in 2 quarts of water. Add seasoning and 
piece of butter size of an egg and 1 cup of cream. Serve 
hot. 



11 

CREAM OF SALMON. 

(Florence M. Schauffler.) 

2 tablespoons of butter, 3 tablespoons of flour, 3 pints 
boiling milk, 1 can salmon or ^ pound cooked salmon. 
Cream butter and flour together and stir in a saucepan 
until smooth. Add milk a half cup at a time. Turn it 
over salmon which should be previously warmed and 
rubbed through a sieve. Season with pepper, salt and 
pinch of nutmeg. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

1 quart of peeled fresh tomatoes or canned. Let them 
stew till thoroughly cooked and add half a teaspoon of 
soda. Have ^ gallon of fresh milk boiling. Stir into the 
tomatoes 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 of flour, and red pep- 
per and salt to taste. Pour tomatoes into milk and let 
it boil 15 minutes. Serve hot. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

(Marion Carr.) 

1 quart soup stock, 1 can tomatoes, 3 sprigs thyme, 1 
small bay leaf, 3 cloves, | teaspoon pepper corns, 4 ta- 
blespoons butter, 1-3 cup flour (short) ; carrot, onion, 
celery, J cup each, cut in small pieces. Salt and pepper. 
Cook carrot, onion, celer^^ in the butter 5 minutes, add 
thyme, bay leaf, cloves, pepper corns and flour. Cook 
another five minutes, add tomatoes, cover closely. Cook 
one hour slowly. Strain, add heated stock, season with 
salt and pepper to taste. 

TOMATO BISQUE SOUP. 

(Mrs. E. Calvin Dobson.) 

1 quart can of tomatoes, 3 pints milk, 1 large table- 
spoonful of flour, one of butter; pepper, salt and soda. 
Put the tomato on to stew, adding a teaspoonful of soda. 
Boil milk in double boiler except enough to mix with the 
flour. Add the cold thickened milk to boiling milk and 
cook ten minutes. Add butter, pepper and salt and then 
the tomato (strained). 



12 

TOMATO SOUP. 

2 cans tomatoes, 1 tea spoonful of soda, 3 pints of 
milk, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 pinch of red pepper. Let 
tomatoes come to a boil, strain hot then add soda. Let 
the milk come to the scalding point and add tomatoes 
just before serving, 

PUREE OF CHICKEN. 

1 large chicken, 1 small knuckle of veal, 3 quarts of 
water, I pound of rice, 1 bunch of parsley, 1 blade of 
mace, J teaspoonful of celery seed, 1 cotfeecupful of boil- 
ing cream. Salt and pepper to taste. Put the chicken 
and veal on with three quarts of water, together with the 
rice, parsley, mace and the celery seed tied in a muslin 
bag. Boil gently until the chicken is thoroughly done, 
taking care to skim well all the time it is boiling. Take 
out the veal bone, cut and pound the chicken in a mortar ; 
moisten it with a little of the stock, and pass it through 
the colander. Strain the stock, pressing the rice through 
the sieve. Return the chicken to the stock, season and 
just before serving, pour in the cream. Heat thoroughly, 
but don't boil. 

TURKEY CHOWDER. 
(Mrs. Henry Carver.) 

To use left over turkey — Cook bones and bits of tur- 
key, strain and add 1 cup lean ham cut in dice, 1 cup 
oysters, 1 cup corn, 1 cup okra. Salt and pepper. Make 
balls of dressing and drop in chowder at serving time. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Take a 10-cent soup-bone and put it in 1^ gallons water 
and let it boil slowly for 5 hours. When cool, add 4 po- 
tatoes cut in small pieces, 4 tomatoes, 4 ears of corn and 
2 onions. Season with salt and pepper to taste and let 
it cook slowly for 3 hours. Then thicken with 2 table- 
spoons flour. Serve hot. 

CORN SOUP. 
(Florence M. Schauffler.) 

1 can corn, 3 pints milk, 3 tablespoons butter, 2 table- 



13 

spoons flour, 1 tablespoon minced onion, 1 teaspoon salt, 
I teaspoon white pepper, yolks of 2 eggs. Chop corn 
to make it fine as possible. Cook with one quart of milk 
15 minutes in double boiler. Put butter and onion in fry- 
ing pan and cook slowly ten minutes. Add flour and 
work until frothy, being careful not to burn. Stir into 
corn and milk. Add salt and pepper and work ten min- 
utes. Put through a strainer and return to fire. Beat 
the yolks of the eggs well. Add to the rest of the milk 
cold and pour into soup. Let it cool one minute, stirring 
constantly. 

FISH. 

FdSH TIMBALE. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

Put I cup of milk in sauce-pan, add 2 tablespoons of 
fine stale bread crumbs, I teaspoon of salt, 1 teaspoon of 
lemon juice, 1 teaspoon minced parsley, a dash of cay- 
enne pepper, a few drops of onion juice. When hot, add 
1 cup of cold white fish. When this boils, pour over the 
well beaten yolks of 2 eggs. Mix thoroughly; and add 
the well beaten whites. Bake in oven in individual dishes 
a few minutes. 

SALMON LOAF. 
(Mrs. Traxel.) "^ 

One can of salmon, 2 large spoonfuls of butter, f of a 
cup of bread crumbs, ^ cup of milk. Season with salt, 
pepper and lemon juice. Add last 3 well beaten eggs. 
Place in a well buttered quart mold, cover and' steam 1 
hour. Serve with some good fish sauce. 

FINNAN HADDIE A LA DELMONICO. 

(Miss E. S. Rumsey.) 

One pound finnan haddie picked up tine, 2 large table- 
spoons butter, 2 cups heav}^ cream sauce, yolks of 2 eggs 
well beaten. When thoroughly heated, add 3 hard boiled 
eggs cut up fine, and 1 tablespoon of grated Edam cheese. 
Season with red pepper. Serve on toast. 



14 

BAKED FISH. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Clean, wipe and dry fish, rub over with salt, pepper 
and a little flour. Split fish open and stuff. Put narrow 
strips of fat salt pork in bottom of pan, place fish on top 
and bake in hot oven, without water; baste frequently. 

STUFFING FOR FISH. 

Moisten one cup of soft bread crumbs with -?r cup of 
melted butter, season highly with salt and pepper. Serve 
with a cream sauce with a finely chopped hard-boiled 
egg added. 

COURTOUILLON. 
(Mrs. H. L. Taylor.) 

A Southern Creole dish. Choose a redsnapper or a 
red fish weighing 3 pounds. In a large skillet put a good 
tablespoonful of lard; when hot add a large sliced onion. 
Cook until soft, then put in a tablespoonful of flour ; fry 
until brown. (This is called a *^roux'' by the Creole 
cooks.) Add 2 tablespoonfuls of canned tomatoes. Cook 
10 minutes, stirring all the time; then pour in 2 cups of 
hot water, 1 sweet pepper sliced, 1 bay leaf, a little pars- 
ley, salt and pepper. Put in the fish and cook slowly 
about an hour, adding water if necessary. Serve with 
slices of lemon. 

SARDINES EN ASPIC. 
(Mrs. Benjamin A. Fessenden.) 

Dissolve gelatine in quantity needed (box or half-box). 
When thoroughly dissolved add tablespoon of lemon 
juice and tablespoon of any clear consomme stock; al- 
low ingredients to become very hot, then add salt and 
pepper (for proper seasoning). Lay good sized (im- 
ported) sardines on large flat plates (or platters) in rows, 
leaving little space (inch) between. Pour the aspic over 
the sardines, set away to become cold. When ready to 
serve, cut out each ciihe (holding a sardine) carefully. 
Serve on a plate garnished with parsley and a bit of 
lemon; also a small brown {Boston) bread and butter 
sandwich. 



15 



CHAFING DISH. 

FINNAN HADDIE A LA DELMONICO. 
(Grace I. Pardridge.) 

One-half pound of finnan liaddie picked up and braised 
in 1 ounce of butter ; 1 cup of cream ; 1 hard boiled egg 
cut into small squares, the yolk of 1 raw egg and 1 tea- 
spoonful of grated Edam cheese. Thicken with cream 
sauce, season to taste and cook seven or eight minutes. 
Serve with small pieces of dry toast. 

CODFISH BALLS. 
(Mrs. William Millerd.) 

One quart of potatoes, cut in small pieces ; one pint of 
fish picked up fkie ; cover with water and boil until ten- 
der. Drain and place on back of stove until very dry. 
Then mash fine and add butter the size of an egg, i salt- 
spoon of pepper and 2 well beaten eggs. Whip all to- 
gether very light with egg beater. In the morning take 
by spoonful and drop in boiling lard. 

CODFISH BALLS. 
(For four people.) 

(Mrs. Hussey.) 

H cups uncooked potato cut in dice; J cup fish picked 
fine. Boil until potato is soft, then mash both together 
until smooth ; add pepper and butter size of walnut, also 
I of 1 beaten egg. Use the other half to dip them in 
before rolling in crumbs. Fry in hot lard — light brown. 



CEOQUETTES. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

1 can salmon, 2 eggs, ^ cup of butter, 1 cup fine bread 
crumbs, I teaspoon baking powder in bread crumbs, i cup 
cream, ^ teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Salt to taste. Mix 
all together and make in pear shape. Eoll in egg cracker 
dust and fry light brown. 



16 

SALMON CROQrETTES. 
(Kate F. Floyd.) 

1^ cup cold salmon flaked, 1 cup thick white sauce. Sea- 
son with salt, pepper and the juice of 1 lemon. Spread 
on a i3late to cool. Add 1 tablespoon parsley, chopped 
fine or part of a green pepper. Form into croquettes; 
roll in crumbs, then egg, and again in crumbs. Fry in 
deep lard. Serve garnished with parsley and then slices 
of lemon. 

STEAMED SALMON. 
(Mrs. John Y, Norcross.) 

1 can salmon ])icked up fine, 2 eggs beaten, 3 table- 
spoons bread crumbs, salt and pepper. Work together 
with hands ; put in pan or mold and steam 1 hour. Serve 
hot with white sauce; garnish with slices of hard boiled 

SALMON LOAF. 

1 can salmon, rub fine ; 3 eggs well beaten, ^ cup bread 
crumbs, 2 tablespoons melted butter, salt and pepper to 
taste: sauce; 1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon cornstarch. Boil 
1 minute, add juice from salmon can, 1 egg well beaten. 
Salt, pepi)er and lemon juice. 

MOLDED SAL^^rON. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — I pound cold salmon, 2 eggs, 2 table- 
spoonfuls of butter, melted but not hot, 1 tablespoonful 
of fine bread crumbs, seasoning of salt and pepper and 
minced parsley. Mode, — Chop the fish fine, then rub it in 
a bowl with back of silver spoon, adding butter until it is 
a smooth paste, sprinkle the bread crumbs into the eggs 
and season before working all together, put it into a 
buttered mold and steam or boil for half an hour. 

SAUCE FOR THE ABOVE. 

Mode. — 1 cup of milk heated to a boil and thickened 
with a tablespoonful of cornstarch, 1 large spoonful of 
butter, 1 raw egg, 1 tea spoonful ancho\ae, mushroom, 
or tomato catsup, a small pinch of mace and one of cay- 
»'«nne. Put the egg in last and boil 1 minute to cook it. 
When the pudding is turned out of the mold pour the 



17 

sauce over it and serve. N. B. — Canned salmon may be 
used for it if liked and the liquor added to the sauce. 

SALMON LOAF AND SAUCE. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

1 can salmon, 1 cup bread crumbs, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 
1 tablespoon melted butter. Drain the fish, pick fine, mix 
with butter; beat the eggs, and mix bread crumbs with 
them. Season, and bake 1 hour in long narrow but- 
tered tin, or bread tin. Turn loaf out on platter, and 
pour over it a cream sauce. 

LOBSTEE OE SALMON CHOPS. 

Boil in salt water for 20 to 25 minutes. Chop as fine 
as possible, l pint sweet cream, butter size of an egg. 
Peel and chop 1 onion into cream. Add 1 tablespoon of 
cornstarch wet with the cold cream. Boil and stir in the 
lobster or salmon, season with cayenne and a little 
Worcestershire sauce. AVlien cold form into chop shape, 
dip in the beaten yolk of an egg, then in the bread or 
cracker crumbs and fry in hot lard as you would oysters. 
If canned lobster or salmon is used omit the boiling. One 
can makes a good dish. 

LOBSTEE CUTLETS. 

2 cups chopped lobster meat, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 
-J teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon finely chopped parsley, yolk 
of 1 egg with 2 tablespoons cold water, 1 cup thick white 
sauce, small quantity of grated nutmeg and cayenne 
pepper. Mix ingredients in order given, cool and form in 
cutlets; dip in beaten egg, crumb and fry in deep fat. 
Serve with tomato sauce. 

CEEAMED LOBSTEE. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — Meat of 3 lobsters, 1 pint of cream, juice 
of 1 lemon, 1 grated nutmeg, 1 teaspoonful of Worcester- 
shire sauce, cayenne pepper and salt. Mode. — Chop lob- 
ster rather fine, then add lemon juice, nutmeg, salt and 
cayenne pepper. 



18 



WHITE SAUCE. 

Mix I cupful of butter and 1 tablespoonful of flour, add 
this .to the pint of cream, mix well with the lobster, and 
put in shells or ramikins, sprinkle with crumbs and 
brown. 

OYSTERS. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Drain large, plump oysters and free them from small 
pieces of shells. Lay them on a cloth to dry. Season 
with milk, salt and pepper and dip in beaten egg and roll 
in cracker dust. Fry a light brown in hot lard and serve 
at once. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Boil 1 quart of cream and thicken with ^ dozen of 
crackers. Season with 1 dessertspoon of butter, salt and 
pepper to taste. "When boiling pour in 1 quart of select 
oysters, and when the ends curl, remove from stove and 
serve hot with crackers. 

OYSTER LOAF. 

1 loaf of bread, 1 quart of oysters fried, ^ teacup of 
tomato catsup, -^ dozen small pickles or 1 dozen olives. 
Cut oif one end of loaf and remove the soft inside, leav- 
ing a shell, which thoroughly butter, and place in oven 
to toast. Fill with a layer of hot fried oysters, a little 
catsup, and pickles or olives, another layer of oysters, till 
shell is finished. Fasten the top on, cut in slices and 
serve very hot. A nice supper dish after theater. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Cover the bottom of baking dish with cracker crumbs 
and put in a layer of oysters. Sprinkle with salt and 
pepper and bits of butter. Cover with cracker crumbs 
and oysters till dish is full. Let the cracker dust lie on 
top in a thick layer. Pour over this the oyster liquor, 1 
cup milk, 1 beaten egg and cook till oysters are well done. 



19 

CUERIED OYSTERS. 
(A. L. M. S.) 

Ingredients, — 2 dozen oysters, 1 onion, 1 tablespoonful 
of curry powder. 1 dessertspoonful of flour, 2 ounces 
butter, juice of 1 lemon. Mode. — Chop the onion quite 
flne, mix the curry powder, flour and butter together, put 
all these ingredients in a stew pan and simmer until a 
light brown, stirring all the time. Add the liquor of the 
oysters and the lemon juice, and boil together for 5 min- 
utes. Put in the oysters, boil up once and serve with a 
dish of rice. 

OYSTER CROQUETTES. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

4 pint oysters, ^ pint cooked veal or sweetbreads, X 
heaping tablespoon butter, 3 tablespoons cracker crumbs, 
yolk of 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful lemon juice. Chop the oys- 
ters and veal. Soak the crackers in oyster liquor and 
shape into croquettes. Dip in egg, roll in crumbs and 
when cold, fiy. Have the lard deep enough to cover cro- 
quettes and hot. 

OYSTERS A COQUELLE. 

1 pint oysters, 1 gill of water, 2 tablespoonfuls butter, 
2^ tablespoonfuls flour, 2 eggs. Put the oysters in a stew- 
pan, with their liquor and the gill of water. Let come to 
a boil. Take otf the fire and strain through a colander. 
In a sauce-pan put the butter and flour and stir over the 
fire until the butter melts ; then put in half the liquor and 
stir quickly until it thickens. Take from the fire and 
break into it the eggs, stirring quickly. Add one table- 
spoonful of parsley, salt and pepper to taste. Add oys- 
ters, put over the fire and boil 1 minute. Sprinkle with 
bread crumbs after placing in baking dish and brown. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

1 pint small oysters or large ones chopped. Make a 
stiff batter with 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of yeast powder, and 
a little milk. Add oysters and flour to thicken. Salt to 
taste. Drop in spoonfuls in hot fat and fry a light brown. 



20 

FRIED FEOG'S LEGS. 

j3oil in salt water for 3 minutes. Beat 2 eggs, 1 cup 
of milk and salt and pepper, and dip first in egg and tlien 
in cracker dust. Put in frying basket. Dip in skillet 
of boiling lard and fry rich brown and serve at once. 



MEATS AND MEAT SAUCES. 

ROAST HAM. 
(Mabel D. Curry.) 

Boil a 12-pound bam 3 hours. Take from the stove 
and skin and take off necessary fat. Use whole cloves 
in a pattern on top of the ham. Into 1 quart of stock 
in which ham was boiled put 1 pint of vinegar and 1 cup 
of brown sugar. Put this mixture with the ham in a 
covered roasting pan, and roast about an hour or until 
ham is tender; 30 minutes before taking ham from the 
oven uncover the ham; sprinkle over it fine cracker 
crumbs, leave uncovered and bake until a crisp brown. 

BRUNSWICK STEW. 
(Mrs. Frank P. Hawkins.) 

This dish is a good medium for the use of the remains 
of a roast mutton ; about two pounds of meat aside from 
the bones being required. The other articles needed are 
a pint of lima beans, one quart of pared and sliced pota- 
toes, half a pint each of turnips and carrots cut into 
dice, one pint of tomatoes cut fine ; one parsnip, cut fine ; 
two quarts of fine shredded cabbage, two quarts of 
water, two tablespoons flour, two tablespoons butter, 
two tablespoons salt, one level teaspoon pepper. All 
vegetables uncooked; when corn is in season, 1^ pints 
may be used. Cut meat into slice, freed from bone and 
fat. Put bones in stew pan, cover with water and cook 
gently two hours. Mix flour with ^ cup water taken 
from the 2 quarts and stir mixture into the water in 
sauce pan, add salt and pepper ; cook 20 minutes. Place 
meat and vegetables in layers in a large stew pan, and 
strain the broth over them. Put the butter on top, cover 



21 

stew pan closely, and cook gently for 2 hours. Serve 
very hot. 

BOILED LEG OF MUTTON. 
(Mrs. John Glass.) 

Put in water even with top of meat. Add 1 large 
onion, 2 bay leaves, I can tomatoes, 1 tablespoonful Wor- 
cestershire Sauce, 1 tablespoonful walnut catsup, 1. table- 
spoonful mushroom catsup, 1 tablespoonful salt, ^ table- 
spoonful of pepper. Boil three hours (if large roast) set 
aside one hour, then put on fire again, add wine glass of 
sherry wine, cook another hour. Strain liquor and make 
gravy, adding capers. 

BAKED HAM. (Small dish.) 
(Miss A. M. Everett.) 

Take a slice of ham two inches thick, leaving the fat. 
Eub both sides well with sugar. Put in deep pan and 
cover with milk. Bake an hour or more turning ham 
once. Use milk for gravy. 

CREOLE HAM. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

A slice of ham two inches thick ; place in a baking pan. 
Slice over top of ham one onion. Cut one onion, one 
green pepper, then cover all with a can of tomatoes. 
Bake in a hot oven for an hour. 

DELICIOUS POT ROAST. 
(Mrs. C. C. Hughes.) 

Wash the roast, then sear it to a rich brown in a 
spider. A rib roast is the better, but a cheaper cut will 
do. For a 5-pound roast, put into the pot 3 pints of 
boiling water, 2 tablespoons of brown sugar, 2 table- 
spoons of sherry, 1 bay leaf, 1 whole onion (medium 
sized), 5 whole cloves. Boil gently for four hours, add 
salt during last hour of cooking. If a rib roast is used, 
leave rib in. When done, remove from liquor, and add 
some flour that has been mixed with water for gravy. 
If more water is necessary, use boiling water only. A 



22 

pot roast requires close attention to keep from sticking 
to the pot. 

VEAL AND HAM PIE. 
(Elinor B. F\-ffy.) 

1 large knuckle of veal; 2 pounds of sliced veal; 2 
pounds of sliced ham, 3 hard boiled eggs. Make a thick 
stock of the veal bone, season with bay leaves, 2 onions, 
salt and pepper. Cut the sliced veal and ham in strips 
about half an inch wide. Put first a layer of veal, then 
of ham, criss cross, leaving a space between, then a 
layer of egg sliced. Use salt, pepper, nutmeg, alspice, 
and cloves to season. Keep on with alternate slices of 
meat till the dish is full. If the stock has not jelled use 
a little gelatine. Fill the dish with the stock, cover with 
a rich pie crust, cutting a hole the size of a quarter in 
the middle. Bake two hours. Then fill the pie with 
stock and put away to cool. The pie should be jellied 
and served cold. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Three cupfuls na\^ beans; one-half pound salt pork; 
one-half pound fresh pork; three tablespoonfuls New 
Orleans molasses. Put beans into a stewpan and ix)ur 
boiling water over them sufficient to cover them, adding 
a teaspoonful of soda. Parboil them a half hour or until 
they shrivel. Then pour off the water. Again cover 
them with boiling water and simmer until tender, but 
not soft; then add the molasses, and salt to taste. Place 
the pork in a beanpot, shake black pepper plentifully 
over it, then add the beans and cover. Bake at least six 
hours in a slow oven, adding water when dry. They 
should be reddish brown in color when ready to serve. 

BAKED PORK AND BEANS. 
(Mrs. Holmes; used by Edna Sampsell.) 

Two and one half cups of "beans, put on in plenty of 
cold water, and cook slowly for one hour. Drain the 
beans. Put in the bottom of a pan. One pound of fresh 
pork, salt it and pour your beans over it. Dissolve in 



23 

water 2 teaspoons of mustard, 2 teaspoons of brown 
sugar, and pour over the beans. Keep the ])eans moist 
while cooking, but at the last instead of moistening them 
with more water pour on a little milk. 

BAKED HASH. 

Run any kind of cold cooked meat through the grinder. 
Equal parts of mashed Irish potatoes. Salt and pepper 
to taste. Butter and milk enough to keep it from being 
too stiff. Put in a baking-dish and pour over 2 table- 
spoons of tomato catsup. Sprinkle well with bread- 
crumbs and brown. Serve hot. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 

Two pounds of lean meat, 2 teaspoons of salt, 1 tea- 
spoon of pepper, 1 tablespoon of onion juice. Run the 
meat through a meat chopper twice and add the season- 
ing and shape like a steak and broil. Serve hot with 
butter. To get onion juice. Peel an onion and cut in 
pieces and squeeze through lemon squeezer. 

DEVILED KIDNEYS. 
(A. L. M. S.) 

Broil the kidneys in the usual way and when half 
cooked score them with a knife and put in the cuts a 
little mustard, cayenne and salt; finish broiling them. 
Put them on small squares of toast, hot and buttered; 
put a small lump of butter mixed with chopped parsley 
into the center of each. Stir the gravy that has run from 
the kidneys over the fire, with a squeeze of lemon juice, 
pour over the kidneys and serve hot. Excellent break- 
fast dish. 

MEAT LOAF. 

For one loaf, 

(Mrs. A. A. Putnam.) 

One and one-half pounds of beef put through meat 
chopper as for hamburger steak. J pound of salt pork, 
prepared the same, 1 cup of bread soaked in water, 1 
egg, salt and pepper to season, onion, if desired. Mold 



24 

in loaf and bake about an hour or three-quarters. Nice 
cold or hot. 

JAMBALAYA. 
A Creole Spanish Dish. 

(Mrs. H. L. Taylor.) 

In a saucepan heat a tablespoonful of lard (scant), 
add a small sliced onion and a teaspoonful of flour. 
Cook until a golden brown, then put in half a pound of 
ham sliced and fry thoroughly, stirring briskly, add 
three cups of hot water and when boiling drop in gradu- 
ally one cup of rice. Season with salt and pepper, add- 
ing a small sweet pepper if desired. Let this cook with 
covered lid until all the water is absorbed. Then un- 
cover, set the pan in a double boiler and cook until the 
rice becomes dry. A Jambalaya can be made with 
oysters or shrimps, or chicken instead of the ham. 

FRIED PIGS' FEET. 

Mix well beaten eggs with salt and pepper and dip 
the pigs ' feet in it, then in the bread crumbs, and let the 
egg dry. Fry in skillet of hot lard till a rich brown. 

FEIED SWEETBEEADS WITH PEAS. 

Stew the breads, but do not cut them up. Make a bat- 
ter and dip the breads in and fry in hot lard. Cook the 
peas in salt water and serve with the breads. 

SWEETBEEADS WITH PEAS. 

Take the skin and fat off the breads and let them 
stand in salt water for a few minutes. Cut into pieces 
and boil till done. Boil the peas in salted water and put 
with the breads. Take the liquor from the peas and 
thicken with flour and season highly with pepper, salt 
and butter. Cook a few minutes and pour over the dish. 

CEEAMED SWEETBEEADS. 

Take blanched sweetbreads and cut them in small pieces 
and put in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon of butter rolled 
in 1 tablespoon of flour, slowly adding 1 pint of cream, 



25 

and salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot. If preferred 
mushrooms are a nice addition. 

ASPIC SWEETBREAD. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Blanch the sweetbreads by soaking in cold water until 
white. Then simmer gently in boiling water, adding a 
pod of red pepper (small), a teaspoon of salt, a bit of 
mace, a bay leaf, for each three pieces of sweetbreads. 
When well done, pick out all the pipes, leaving the meat 
white and clean. Dry in a cloth and cut into small 
shces. Measure and allow half as much celery scraped 
and cut tine as there is meat. Have ready a pint of 
mayonnaise, and a tablespoon of gelatine well dissolved 
and strained, stir the aspic into the meat and celery. Fill 
small mould (after rinsing in cold water) about an inch 
deep, until slightly set, then pour in more. Serve on 
lettuce leaf with mayonnaise. 

SWEETBREADS AND ASPARAGUS. 

2 pair, or 1 pound sweetbreads, 1 bunch boiled aspara- 
gus, 2 tablespoons cream, 4 teaspoons asparagus water, 
butter size of large egg, yolks of 2 hard boiled eggs, heap- 
ing coffee spoon of corn starch, cream together yolks of 
eggs, butter and corn starch. Heat and add cream and 
water of asparagus. When smooth put in sweetbreads, 
previously parboiled, and broken in pieces, stew from 
six to eight minutes. Serve in pattie shells. 

LIVER A LA BEGUE. 

Neiv Orleans. 

(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Secure a fine bit of calf liver, fresh and good color. 
Skin well. Have quantity of lard in frying pan, well 
heated. Slice liver in thick slices. Place in lard and let 
cook slowly after seasoning with pepper and salt. Let 
lard cover liver. Simmer on slow fire, and when cooked 
drain off grease. Serve on hot plate. 



26 

. SUET PUDDING. 
(F. M. Doty.) 

Suet pudding to serve with roast beef. 1 cup suet 
chopped fine, 2 cups of flour, 1 teaspoon of salt, ^ tea- 
spoon of pepper. Rub together and add water cold, to 
make a stiff dough. Roll about an inch thick and turn 
over like jelly roll, tie in a cloth, allowing plenty of room 
for swelling and boil 3 hours. Have the water boiling 
and keep it so. 

PORK TENDERLOIN EU CASSEROLE. 
(Jessie J. Ullrich.) 

Take two strips of tenderloin, split, stuff with bread 
dressing, seasoned with ^ small onion, browned in but- 
ter, salt, pepper, and sausage or bacon drippings, then 
tie the dressing securely between the strips with cord 
and salt, pepper, and flour thoroughly. Place this in 
covered baking dish, and surround with one can toma- 
toes, two large, green sweet peppers, six medium sized 
onions, about ten little sausages. Salt, pepper and 
small quantity of papricka. Bake under cover for about 
one hour until vegetables are done. Potatoes may be 
added if desired. Original. 

MEAT PATTIES. 
(Mrs. Hirschberg.) 

1^ pounds of lean meat, from round steak. Take out 
all fat, chop very fine by hand. Chop 5 onions fine and 
cover barely with water and boil until well softened. To 
this add the lean meat, pepper and salt, and cook for 
twenty minutes. Make pie crust dough with ice water, 
and I of pound of butter. The meat should be well 
moistened, but not too much juice or gravy. Any gravy 
left may be kept to pour on the patties when served. 
Cut your dough round, and put meat on half of the 
circle, folding the other half over and pinching edges to- 
gether. Cook in deep hot lard. Size of patties may de- 
pend upon the number you wish to serve. 



27 

SAUCES. 

Chestnut Stuffing for Ttirkey. 

1 teacup of mashed sweet potatoes, 1 teacup of maslied 
and boiled chestnuts, 1 dessertspoon of butter, 1 wine- 
glass of cream, salt and black pepper to taste. Mix po- 
tatoes, chestnuts, cream and season. Put stuffing in 
when turkey is half roasted. Baste often. 

DAUBS. 
A Creole Southern Dish. 

(Mrs. H. L. Taylor.) 

Get 4 pounds best cut of round of beef, ^ can of toma- 
toes or three fresh ones; 1 onion, minced, one small red 
pepper, 2 cloves, 3 peppercorns, 1 tablespoonful of lard, 
1 tablespoonful flour, salt and pepper. Melt the lard 
and fry the onion, then a tablespoonful of flour. Cook 
until a golden brown, then add the tomatoes and cook 
about ten minutes or less, stirring all the time. Add 1 
cup of water Fry the meat first on one side then on the 
other, add the gravy, the seasonings (a sweet pepper 
niinced is an improvement) and cook on a slow fire for 
about one hour. This is equally good when cold. More 
hot water is added if the gravy dries in cooking. 

CROQUETTES. 
(Mrs. C. E. Schuffler.) 

1^ pounds boiled veal, J pound sliced raw ham, 1 pint 
boiled bread and milk, piece of butter the size of an egg. 
the rind and juice of a lemon, ^ nutmeg grated, a tea- 
spoonful made mustard, } of an onion, 1 egg, 1 table- 
spoonful chopped parsley. Roll some crackers very 
fine; after mincing the whole, roll them in cracker 
crumbs, then form in a wineglass. Fry in boiling lard. 

1 pint of chopped meat, -J pint of milk, heated (not 
boiled), 1 large tablespoonful of butter, 2 large table- 
spoonfuls of flour, ^ teaspoonful of salt. Beat flour, but- 
ter and salt until thoroughly mixed, add to milk and stir 
over the fire until it thickens, then add 1 tablespoonful 
minced parsley, yolk of 1 egg (two if wanted very rich), 
a grating of nutmeg, 1 teaspoonful of salt, chicken or 



28 

other meat, a little black pepper, a very little red pep- 
per, and thirty drops of onion juice. Mix well and stand 
on ice until thoroughly cold. Make croquettes one-inch 
thick; take white of one egg, roll in bread crumbs and 

2 cups boiled meat (any kind), 1 cup of boiled rice, 2 
eggs, ^ teaspoonful ground sage, ^ teaspoonful black 
pepper, a little salt. Mix well, put in ice box until cold. 
Fry in boiling lard. 

DEU'S STUFFING FOR DUCKS. 
(Mrs. Frank R. McMullin.) 

Take small tart apples, peel them and mix with 
raisins, an a few currants, and fill the ducks as full as 
possible, using no other seasoning. The flavor imparted 
to the meat is delicious. 

PORK CHOPS WITH SAUCE ROBERT. 
(Good Housekeeper, used by Edna Sampsell.) 

Take 8 or 9 nice rib chops. Have ready some finely 
chopped onions and parsley, sprinkle each chop on 
both sides with this, also salt and pepper and paddle 
them to make them adhere. Dip each into slightly 
beaten eggj then roll in fine bread crumbs. Broil for 
five or seven minutes over a clear fire, or until cooked 
through. 

SAUCE. 

Chop fine 2 large onions, place in a stew pan with 1 
tablespoon of butter, and cook until well colored, add 1 
tablespoon of flour and stir and brown again, add 1^ 
cups of stock and 2 tablespoons of vinegar. When 
smooth and thick add 1 teaspoon of mixed mustard and 
salt, and pepper to taste, pour this around the chops. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE. 
(Mrs. John Glass.) 

i gallon vinegar, ^ pound mustard, 1 pound raisins, 15 
large ripe tomatoes, 12 chili peppers, 2 pounds brown 
sugar, i pound ginger, 6 large onions, 12 tart apples, 1 
ounce garlic. Boil all together a long time, from 1 to 2 



29 

hours. Do not peel anything except the onions, but take 
out apple cores. 

TAETAE SAUCE. 
(J. E. B. Haskin.) 

2 tablespoonfuls olive oil, 4 teaspoonfuls vinegar, 1 
teaspoonful mustard, ^ teaspoonful salt, ^ teaspoonful 
pepper, J teaspoonful onion juice | teaspoonful minced 
capers, | teaspoonful minced pickle, yolk of 1 egg. 

CEEAM SAUCE. 

1 cup of milk, 1 tablespoon of flour, 2 tablespoons of 
tomato catsup ; butter, size of an egg ; a little juice from 
salmon, salt and pepper. Cook until thick. Just before 
serving, whip in 1 egg. 

CUCUMBER SAUCE. 

1 dozen fresh green cucumbers, 1 dozen white onions, 
1 quart good cider vinegar. Peel and grate the cucum- 
bers and onions and place in a sieve to drain. Place the 
pulp in a bowl and add black and cayenne pepper and salt 
to taste and a quart or more of good vinegar. 

FISH SAUCE. 

(No. 1.) 

1 pint of boiled milk, 2 tablespoons of butter, 1 table- 
spoon of flour, 1 tablespoon of wine, 1 tablespoon of 
capers, 1 egg, salt and cayenne pepper to taste. Put the 
milk in a saucepan, and when it comes to a boil stir in 
a well-beaten egg, salt and pepper. Cream the flour and 
butter till perfectly smooth, and stir in the milk until it 
thickens. Have the capers in the sauce dish and pour 
the sauce over them. Serve hot. 

SAUCE FOR CROQUETTES. 

Make a thick cream gravy of 1 teacup of tomato catsup 
and 1 tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce. Serve hot 
with croquettes. 



30 

TOMATO SAUCE. 
(For Steaks and Chops.) 

1 pint of tomatoes, 1 small carrot, 2 whole cloves, 3 
small pieces of mace, 1 onion, salt and pepper to taste. 
Put the tomatoes, carrots and onions in a saucepan, and 
stew till the carrots and onions are tender. Then put 
them through a sieve, and return to the saucepan, and 
thicken with a teaspoon of flour and dessertspoon of but- 
ter worked together. Serve hot. 

TOMATO SAUCE FOR RICE CROQUETTES. 

Half a can of tomatoes, put in a saucepan and add a 
small onion cut up, salt and cayenne pepper, a bay leaf 
and a pinch of celery seed. After boiling a few minutes, 
long enough for the tomato to soften and for the juice to 
absorb the seasoning strain, add a dessertspoon of brown 
sugar and the same of butter with two dessertspoons of 
flour worked into it. Set back on the stove, and cook till 
about like cream. Serve hot. 

FISH SAUCE. 
(No. 2.) 

Make mayonaise of yolks of 2 eggs and oil. Add 1 tea- 
spoon of Worcestershire sauce, 1 grated onion, salt and 
jjepper and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, chopped pars- 
ley and pincli of cayenne pepper. 



SAUCES. 

OYSTER SAUCE FOR TURKEY. 

1 quart oysters, 1 pint of cream or rich milk, 1 des- 
sertspoon of flour; salt and i)epper to taste. Strain the 
liquor and put in a sauce-pan to boil. Add the cream, 
then the flour, moisteninig with a little cold water. Let 
this boil till thick, then season and drop the oysters in. 
When they curl take them off and serve in sauce-boat. If 
milk is used, put in extra teaspoon of flour and a large 
spoon of butter. 



31 

SHIRLEY SAUCE. 

2 dozen large ripe tomatoes, 2 dozen onions, 4 red pep- 
pers, without seeds; chop with onion very fine; 4 table- 
spoons sugar, 4 cups vinegar; salt to taste; mix all to- 
gether. Boil 1 hour. 

HALLONDAISE SAUCE FOR FISH. 
(Mrs. E. y. Peirce.) 

Take | cup butter and cream it. Add the beaten yolks 
of 2 eggs, one at a time ; lemon juice and salt and pepper 
(cayenne), a pinch of each. Set aside until ready to serve. 
Then add | cup of boiling water, stirring rapidly until it 
looks like custard. It is best to set the bowl over the tea- 
kettle or the lower half of the double boiler when adding 
the hot water. Pour around the fish or serve in sauce- 
boat. 

WHITE SAUCE. 
(Mrs. Frank L. Wran.) 

2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, 1 cup milk 
(part cream), ^ teaspoon salt, few grains pepper. Heat 
milk and stir in other ingredients (after they have been 
well rubbed together) slowly. Stir constantly. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

^ can of tomatoes, sprig of thyme, 1 stock of celery, 1 
slice of onion, bit of haj leaf, 1 cup of white sauce (thin), 
J teaspoon of salt and a little cayenne pepper, ^ teaspoon 
of soda. Cook tomato and seasonings for twenty min- 
utes, rub through a strainer, add soda and then white 
sauce. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE. 
(Mrs. John Glass.) 

To 1 cupful of melted butter add ^ tablespoon of flour, 
cook smooth, let cool. Then add yolks of 4 eggs and | 
pint cream. Mix all together in double boiler, cook until 
thick. Add juice of 1 lemon before serving. 



32 



FOWL. 

CHICKEN AND SPAGHETTI. 
(Kate F. Floyd.) 

Boil spaghetti in salt water for 30 minutes, throw into 
cold water to bleach, drain thoroughly, make a sauce as 
follows : 1 large tablespoon butter blended with a round- 
ing tablespoon of flour, add ^ cup milk, i cup chicken 
stock, or any other meat stock, put over the fire and let 
come to a boil, stirring constantly. Cut chicken in small 
pieces, line baking dish with cream, then layer of spa- 
ghetti, then chicken, then a sprinkling of finely cut green 
peppers, repeat; have the last layer spaghetti topped 
with the sauce; cover with bread crumbs well sprinkled 
with butter or with grated cheese. Bake until thoroughly 
heated through and browned ; serve hot. 

CHICKEN TIMBALE. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

1 pound of uncooked w^hite meat of chicken, breast 
of two good sized hens required, one pint of white soft 
bread crumbs, one cup of Pure Milk Company's sweet 
milk, two level teaspoons of salt, two salt spoons of pep- 
per — white pepper preferred — whites of ten eggs. Put 
the meat twice through the meat chopper, then rub it un- 
til perfectly smooth. Put the bread and milk into a sauce 
pan and stir over the fire until they form a smooth, soft 
paste. Take from fire and when cold add gradually to, 
the meat. Press the whole through a sieve, add salt and 
pepper, then gradually the well-beaten whites of eggs. 
Fill into greased timbale molds (or deep muffin rings) 
and stand in a baking pan partly tilled with boiling wa- 
ter. Bake in a moderately quick oven thirty minutes. 
It is always wise to line the bottom of molds with a piece 
of oiled paper. The sides can be loosened with a knife, 
but if the bottom sticks the appearance of timbales are 
spoiled. While these are cooking, make a plain white 
sauce, add a few mushrooms to it. Pour sauce over tim- 
bales and garnish with parsley. This same mixture may 
be cooked in a large mold if preferred. This quantity is 
sufficient to serve 12 persons. 



33 

CHICKEN HOLLAND AISE. 
(Florence M. Schauffler.) 

2 cups chopped chicken, 2 cups chicken broth, ^ cup 
butter, 1^ teaspoons corn starch, yolks of 2 eggs, i cup 
chopped celery, 1 teaspoon chopped parsley, 1 teaspoon 
chopped onion, juice of J lemon. Melt butter and corn 
starch previously rubbed together. Add slowly hot broth 
until it begins to thicken. Add lemon juice, vegetables, 
beaten yolks and seasoning. Put in chicken and stir well 
until heated thoroughly. Serve on graham toast. 

PRESSED CHICKEN, 

Boil a chicken in as little water as possible till the 
bones slip out and grissly portions are soft. Remove 
skin. Pick meat apart. Mix dark and white meat. Re- 
move all fat and season the liquor highly with salt and 
pepper also with slice of lemon. Boil juice down to one 
cup and mix with meat. Butter a mold and decorate the 
bottom and sides with slices of hard-boiled eggs and ham 
cut in fancy shapes. Pack the meat in and set away to 
cool. When ready to serve dip the mold in warm water 
and turn out carefully. 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 
(Mrs. W. J. Strong.) 

Boil one large chicken till very tender. Save two cups 
of water in which chicken is boiled. Cut chicken in small 
dice and when ready to serve put in sauce pan with 
broth and cook a few minutes. Then add a cup of milk 
and 2 hard-boiled eggs cut in small pieces. Thicken with 
flour and butter, salt to taste, and just before serving 
pour in a half cup of sherry or Madeira wine. Serve on 
toast. 

CHICKEN IN ASPIC. 
(Mrs. Slade.) 

1 chicken, | can of tomatoes, 1 onion, 1 clove of gar- 
lic, 1 carrot, large; 1 stalk of celery, 1 turnip, white; 5 
cloves, 1 bay leaf, J teaspoon of thyme, whites of 2 eggs, 
I box of gelatine ; salt to taste. Cover all the ingredients 
except the gelatine and the whites of the eggs with water, 
and let boil slowly until the chicken is ready to leave 



34 

the bones easily. Eemove from the fire. Take the 
chicken out of the stock and allow both to cool. Strain 
and measure the stock. There should be about three 
pints. If not, add water to make that amount. Separate 
the chicken into small pieces. Dissolve the gelatine ac- 
cording to the rules upon the package. Put the stock on 
the fire and while still cold add the slightly beaten whites 
of the eggs. Allow this to boil 2 minutes, add the gela- 
tine, boil 1 minute, then strain through muslin into a 
mould. In a half an hour add the chicken. Set in a cold 
place to harden. Serve with mayonaise. 

CUREIED CHICKEN. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

1 chicken, 6 large onions, 1 can of tomatoes, 1 quart of 
milk, 2 teaspoons curry powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 pound 
of fresh pork, 1 cup of flour. Fry chicken lightly in a 
little butter. Cut pork in dice and fry until nearly 
melted. Add onions, finely chopped, and cook until 
melted, but not browned. Stir in flour, add milk, and put 
all ingredients together in a saucepan and cook 5 hours 
slowly. Do not cover, but stir frequently. 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 

Cut a cold boiled chicken and liver in small pieces. Re- 
move skin, fat and gristle. Put in a pan with | pint 
cream, ^ pound of butter rolled in 1 tablespoon of flour. 
Salt to taste. Chop up 3 hard-boiled eggs. Add eggs 
and when it comes to a boil stir in a wine glass of sherry. 

ENTREES. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

One chicken, 3 sets of sweetbreads, 1 teacup of cream, 
1 onion, a little parsley^ salt and pepper to taste, 1 table- 
spoon butter. Boil the chicken until tender, also the 
sweetbreads. When cold, grind through the meat 
grinder. Boil the onion in the cream and season with 
parsley, salt and pepper. Thicken with a little flour 
rubbed in the butter. When it begins to thicken, strani 



35 

and mix with chicken and sweetbreads. Mould with aspic 
jelly. This makes two moulds. 

CROQUETTES. 

1 iDOund of cooked turkey or chicken, 3 teaspoons of 
chopped parsley, 1 pint of cream, 1 large onion, i pound 
of butter, J pound of bread crumbs, salt, pepper and 
cayenne pepper to taste. Sprinkle the parsley over the 
meat and run through grinder twice. Boil the onion with 
the cream and strain onion out and when cool pour cream 
over bread crumbs, add the butter, and make a stiff mix- 
ture, then add salt, etc. Knead in the meat and mix all 
together. If too stiff, add a little cream and make as 
soft as can be handled. Put on ice to get stiff. Then 
roll and shape. Dip in egg, roll in bread crumbs and fry 
in hot lard. 

SCRAPPLE. 

Take any bits of cold fowl or any other cold meat or 
2 or 3 kinds of meat, chop fine and put in a frying pan 
with water to cover, season well. When it boils thicken 
with corn meal or with corn meal and buckwheat flour 
stirred in carefully like mush. Cook until thick and pour 
into a mold to cool ; slice and fry. 

TURKEY WITH SHREDDED WHEAT BISCUIT 

DRESSING. 
(Mrs. C. C. Hughes.) 

A young turkey, 8 to 10 pounds, should roast 3 hours 
in a moderate oven. Wash and thoroughly dry the bird, 
then salt it well inside. For the dressing boil the jiblets 
in 1 quart of water. Put into a bowl 10 crushed shred- 
ded wheat biscuits, 1 small onion, chopped fine, 1 tea- 
spoon powdered sage, 1 dash of red pepper, 1 tablespoon 
melted butter, 1 teaspoon salt and the liver finely 
chopped. Moisten this well with the hot stock from jib- 
lets. Put into turkey and sew up securely ; lay strips of 
bacon across back of turkey secured by tooth picks. Place 
in a roaster that can be covered, breast down. Baste fre- 
quently, adding salt the last hour. Shredded wheat bis- 
cuit dressing is more delicate and digestible than bread 
dressing. 



36 

BOAST DUCK. 

Sprinkle well with salt and pepper, and fill the duck 
with a dressing made of bread crumbs, butter, salt and 
pepper, and a little onion. Place 2 slices of pork across 
breast and put in roaster. Add hot water and bast ^ 
freely. Serve with gravy and currant jelly. 

TURKEY DRESSING. 
(Mrs. K. J. Beatty.) 

Have the bread dry or toasted. Cut in very fine pieces, 
add salt, pepper, sage and 4 onions chopped fine. Season 
with butter or with the turkey fat well cut up. Put in 
turkey dry. 

MEATS. 

CROQUETTES. - - 
(Mrs. H. N. Boyd.) 

Chop very fine sufficient cold lamb or chicken to fill 
2 cups, into which has been chopped a little parsley or a 
tiny bit of onion and season with a pinch of salt and pep- 
per. Place in a sauce pan on the fire 2 tablespoons of 
butter, 2 heaping tablespoons of flour ; stir these together 
until perfectly smooth with a Swedish whip instead of 
spoon ; add gradually a scant cup of milk and when it be- 
comes quite thick more like a batter, remove from the 
fire, stir into it the chopped meat, already prepared. 
When mixed spread on a plate and place on the ice to 
become thick or stiff; when needed roll them into shape, 
first bread crumbs, then into egg and back again into 
bread crumbs; fry in boiling lard. 

QUAIL BAKED IN SWEET POTATOES. 
(Mrs. Ayers.) 

Peel and hollow out as many sweet potatoes as needed. 
Place quail inside after seasoning and buttering it out- 
side thoroughly. Tie with twine. Bake 1^ hours in mod- 
erate oven, in covered pan ; keep enough water in bottom 
of baking pan to keep from sticking. Place potato flat to 
keep juice of quail inside. When ready to serve replace 
twine with tooth x^icks. 



37 



VEGETABLES, 

CREOLE EICE. 
(Mrs. Frank P. Hawkins.) 

Wash I cup rice and cook in double boiler until tender. 
Lay 2 good sized pieces of bacon into a liot frying pan 
and cook to a crisp, but do not burn. Add to these drip- 
pings ^ an onion sliced fine and browned, then add ^ 
cup of tomatoes and the rice; season with cayenne pep- 
per and salt, and stew together until it has all blended. 

SAVEET POTATOES WITH WHITE OF EGG. 
(Mrs. A. A. Putnam.) 

Choose good sized potatoes ; bake as usual ; when done 
cut lengthwise and remove potatoes ; mash thoroughly 
with salt and butter and return to shell of potato and 
put in oven until hot. Then beat white of egg stiff with 
a little sugar added and put on top of potato and return 
to oven until a light brown ; very nice. 

DELICIOUS WAY TO COOK RICE. 

i cup rice, 2 quarts of boiling water, 2 teaspoons of 
salt. Wash the rice through two waters. Put the ric(3 
in the boiling water gradually, so as not to stop the boil- 
ing, and let it boil 20 minutes without stirring. Then 
drain through colander, rinse with cold water and shake 
free from water. Put back in sauce pan and let it stand 
on back of stove for 5 minutes. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

1^ pints boiled rice, 3 eggs, butter size of IJ eggs, 3 
tablespoons cream, -I teaspoon scraped onion, salt and 
cayenne pepper to taste, a small pinch of mace. Reserve 
2 whites of the eggs to roll the croquettes in. Mix the 
ingredients and cook in a double boiler till quite thick. 
Allow to cool. Form into croquettes and fry in deep 
fat, after rolling in the whites of eggs and bread crumbs. 
The seasoning can be varied by omitting the mace and 
adding a half a teacup of chopped chicken or brains. 
They should always be served with tomato sauce. 



38 

EICE CROQUETTES. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

Steam one scant cup of rice in one pint of boiling water 
until very soft ; salt ; add while hot one dessert spoon of 
butter, two tablespoons of sugar, and well beaten yolk 
of one egg. If the mixture needs more moisture, add a 
little hot milk. When cool, shape in oval cakes, roll in 
crumbs, dip in egg and fry in deep fat. 

BOILED OKEA. 

Boil the okra in salt water for half an hour. Season 
with salt, pepper and butter and serve hot. 

FRIED EGG PLANT. 

After peeling the plant cut in slices and lay in salt 
water. Steam till tender. Make a batter of 2 eggs 
beaten separately, 1 teacup of sour cream, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 teaspoon soda, flour enough to thicken. Dip the 
egg plant in the batter and fry a rich brown. 

BAKED EGG PLANT. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Boil one large egg plant (after soaking in salted wa 
ter, peeled) ; mash fine, butter your baking dish, put ori(i 
layer of fruit in, after beating into it two eggs, then a 
layer of chopped green pepper, butter and season with 
salt and then another layer of egg plant, sprinkle bread 
crumbs on layer of peppers, pour milk over all and bako 
30 minutes or till a nice brown. 

BAKED EGG PLANT. 
(Mrs. F. C. Nickels.) 

1 egg plant cut in half, cut out the inside, leaving th(; 
shells ; boil the pulp till tender in water with a little 
salt; cut in chopping bowl 2 hard boiled eggs, some onion, 
parsley, pepper, salt, celery (or celery salt), butter, and 
mix with the boiled egg plant. Mix bread crumbs with 
all this until pretty stiff, and fill the shells. Butter the 
top and bake about 4 hour. 



39 

CABBAGE WITH CHEESE. 
(Mrs. Crandall.) 

1 head cabbage chopped fine, 1 tablespoon salt; cover 
with boiling water and boil till tender; drain; 2 table- 
spoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour; melt; add 2 cups of 
milk and season; add 4 tablespoons grated cheese. Put 
in a pan a layer of cabbage, then one of sauce until the 
pan is filled. Sprinkle the top with bread crumbs. Bake 
15 minutes. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Peel and slice the tomatoes. Grate bread crumbs on 
them and season highly with sugar, butter, cayenne pep- 
per and salt. Alternate the layers of tomatoes and bread 
crumbs and bake in a dish for 2 hours. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Cut fresh tomatoes in thin slices. Fry | hour in little 
butter and take out of frying pan. Stir into what is left 
in frying pan 1 teaspoon of flour moistened in milk. Add 
a little milk. Wlien consistency of cream sauce pour 
over tomatoes. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Peel the tomatoes and make a hole in the center of 
each and fill with bread crumbs, salt, pepper, butter and 
a little sugar. Put in dish and bake 2 hours. 

POTATO RIBBONS. 

Take some large potatoes, peel them smoothly as pos- 
sible. Take each potato and pare it round and round as 
you would an apple, an eighth of an inch thick, taking- 
care not to break spiral parings. Keep covered with a 
napkin till all are cut, then lay them in frying basket and 
fry in hot fat until a light brown ; sprinkle with salt. 

GREEN CORN CUSTARD WITH BROILED 

TOMATOES. 

1 cupful of corn, freshly cut from the ears of young 
corn; 4 eggs, beaten slightly; 1 teaspoon of salt, a little 
paprika, a few drops of onion juice, 1^ cups of milk. Bake 



40 . , 

in buttered moulds in hot water. When firm, turn out 
and place on a dish with broiled tomatoes around. Serve 
with cream sauce made as follows : 1 tablespoon butter, 
1 tablespoon of flour, 1 cup of milk ; cook till thick. 

ESCALLOPED COEN. 

Empty 1 can of corn into a baking dish; add 1 egg, | 
cup of milk, salt and pepper to taste and 1 tablespoon 
grated cheese. Place cracker crumbs and bits of butter 
over top ; place in moderate oven and cook until cracker 
crumbs are browned. 

BLUE GRASS CORN PUDDING. 

8 ears of corn, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 teacup of milk, 1 
teaspoon of flour, salt and pepper to taste, 3 eggs. Grate 
the corn and scrape cob with a knife. Beat the eggs 
light and stir in cream, butter and flour, and mix with the 
milk and add the corn. Season and bake J of an hour. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

Beat 2 eggs without separating, 1 cup milk, 1 pint 
canned corn, little salt, sugar, and enough flour for thick 
batter; add 1 teaspoonful of baking powder to flour, 1 
tablespoon butter ; fry in hot lard. 

OKRA AND CORN. 

1 pint of sliced okra, 1 pint of cut corn, | cup of milk, 

1 teaspoon of flour, 1 slice of pickled pork ; salt and pep- 
per to the taste. Fry the pork and remove, leaving the 
grease in the pan. Fry the okra 10 minutes; then add 
corn and fry thoroughly. Mix the flour and milk and 
pour over okra and corn, and fry for five minutes. Sea- 
son and serve. A teacup of chopped fried tomatoes with 
the above instead of milk is an improvement. 

CORN PUDDING. 
(Mrs. H. N. Boyd.) 

1 dozen ears of corn or a can of corn, ^ teacup of milk, 

2 eggs, a tablespoon of butter, 1 teaspoon of sugar, pep- 
per and salt to taste; sprinkle with flour and bake. 



41 

CORN OYSTERS. 
(Mrs. Thomas C. Williams.) 

2 eggs to 1 pint of grated corn or canned corn mashed 
through colander, i cup milk, cracker crumbs enough to 
make stitf as batter, salt and pepper to taste. Pry in 
butter and lard. 

ATTRACTIViE TURNIPS. 
(Used by Edna Sampsell.) 

Boil whole turnips, scoop out the center, fill with green 
peas highly seasoned with butter, salt and pepper. 

FRIED ONIONS. 
(Mrs. J. P. Smith.) 

Slice very thin, 3 Spanish onions ; soak in milk for a 
half hour ; dip in flour and fry in deep lard, very hot. 

CREAMED CABBAGE. 

Par boil cabbage, when tender chop. Place in butter 
baking dish a layer of cracker crumbs, cabbage and hard 
boiled eggs. Repeat until cracker crumbs are on top. 
Add 1 cup cream and some butter. Bake about 20 min- 
utes. 

BROILED MUSHROOMS. 

Take fresh mushrooms and after peeling them lay them 
in salted water for a few minutes. Wipe dry and season 
with salt and pepper and dip in butter and broil over a 
hot fire. Serve with crisp toast. 

STEWED MUSHROOMS. 

Peel fresh mushroms; put butter in saucepan and let 
it get hot. Put mushrooms in and stir till they become 
tender. Season with salt and pepper and add 1 cup of 
cream and a spoonful of flour. Let it simmer. Serve in 
a dish or on toast. 

CREAMED SPINACH. 

Put in boiling water and boil till tender. Drain and 
chop fine and season highly with butter, salt and pepper. 
Serve on toast. 



# 



42 

SPINACH WITH CEEAM. 
(Mrs. C. B. Pierce.) 

Pick and wash 3 pounds of spinach, put in a large 
sauce pan more than half full of boiling water, with a 
little salt; cook 12 minutes; put spinach in cold water; 
squeeze out all water by passing through sieve; when this 
is done put spinach into a sauce pan, with 2 ounces of 
butter, pepper and salt to taste; let it cook 
slowly, stirring occasionally, for ^ of an hour; add 3 
tablespoonf uls of cream, mix well ; pile in center of dish, 
surrounded with fried croutons of bread. 

STUFFED PEPPEKS. 
(Mrs. Frank P. Hawkins.) 

Split four green sweet bell peppers in half lengthwise 
and take out seeds and ribs; prepare a force meat by 
mixing two coffee cups of finely broken, stale bread with 
1 small onion grated; one tablespoon minced parsley; 
salt and pepper to taste; and enough of the liquid and 
soft pulp of fresh or canned tomatoes to moisten thor- 
oughly; mix lightly and fill into the halved peppers; 
put a small lump of butter on each and bake half to 
three-quarters of an hour in a hot oven, with a little 
water in the pan. 

MACARONI. 

1 pound macaroni; J pound butter; i pound grated 
cheese. Boil the macaroni till tender, and then put in 
a deep dish and spread over it pieces of butter and 
scatter the grated cheese. Put in another layer of ma- 
caroni and so on. Put bits of butter on top with salt 
and pepper and bake well. 

ITALIAN SPAGHETTI. 

(Celia Hopkins Arnold.) 

Try out | cup of small cubes of salt pork ; add ^ can of 
Italian tomato sauce, and the thick part of 1 can of to- 
matoes; 1 cup of boiling water. Allow to boil down on 
back of stove J an hour, any time while boiling add 
1 tablespoon of chopped parsley; J teaspoon red pepper 
and salt. Chopped red or green peppers may be added. 



43 

Pour over spaghetti, which has been boiled tender and 
spring! e with grated Parmesan cheese. 

CAEROT TIMBALS'. 
(Mrs. J. G. Mott.) 

Boil carefully in unsalted water, 3 fair sized carrots; 
when tender grate the carrots and add to them | a cnj) 
full of cream; 4 eggs beaten until light; 1 teaspoon of 
salt, and a dash of pepper. Fill small cups, stand in 
a pan of boiling water and bake in a moderate oven for 
30 minutes. 

FRIED APPLES. 
(Mrs. Henry Carver.) 

Take out core, fill halves with bacon, which has been 
sliced thin and rolled ; fold on piece of bacon, lay in bottom 
of ramkin, put apple on this and bake. Put ramkins 
in pan with water in bottom to keep from drying — 
Greenings are best. 

MURPHY POTATOES. 
(Used by Edna Sampsell.) 

Fry small cubes of raw potatoes with a little onion and 
butter ; when done before taking from the fire, ^dd chop- 
ped green pepper. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Chop 1 cup pecans or walnuts; add 1 pint mashed 
potatoes; then the yokes of 2 eggs, slightly beaten; 1 
teaspoon salt ; 1 teaspoon onion juice ; 1 tablespoon chop- 
ped parsley; 1 tablespoon pepper; J nutmeg grated. 
Mix these well together and mold into cylinder shaped 
croquettes; beat tlie whites of eggs, with 2 tablespoons 
water, till well mixed. Roll croquettes in this and fry 
in hot fat. Serve with well seasoned peas. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Take large potatoes, bake until soft ; cut a round piece 
otf the top of each; scrape out the inside very carefully 
so as not to break the skin, and set aside the empty 
cases; mash the inside very smoothly, working into it 



44 

wliile hot some butter and cream, about a teaspoon of each 
for every potato; season with salt and pepper, with a 
good pinch of cheese grated for each; work it very soft 
with cream and put into saucepan to heat, stirring hard 
to prevent burning, when scalding hot, stir in 1 well- 
beaten egg for six large potatoes; boil up once; fill the 
skins with the mixture and return them to the oven for 
3 minutes ; arrange in a pretty napkin with caps upper- 
most; cover with a fold of napkin; stand them up in 
something while heating. 

TUEKISH PILLAX. 
(Florence M. Schauffler.) 

1 pint rice, mashed 3 times; 1 pint soup stock; 1 pint 
water; ^ pint tomato juice; i lb. butter. Bring liquids 
to boiling point; add seasoning and butter; when butter 
is melted add rice ; allow to cook rapidly for 20 minutes 
covered; then more slowly for 25 more uncovered. It 
is best cooked in a heavy iron spider. Should never be 
stirred but lifted from the bottom with a large cooling 
fork if inclined to stick. When done should be dry and 
separate with liquid cooked out. Serve with meats having 
rich brown gravy. 

SPAGHETTI AND CHEESE. 
(Mrs. Kate Floyd.) 

1 ^ye cent package spaghetti, broken in small pieces ; 
throw into boiling water that has been salted, and boil 
constantly for 30 minutes; drain and bleach in 
cold water; make a cream of one large table- 
spoon of butter melted, and one of flour, blended 
with the butter; pour into this a cup of sweet milk and 
stir until it comes to a boil; butter a baking dish; put 
in a layer of the cream, then a layer of the spaghetti, 
and then a thick layer of grated cheese. Eepeat this and 
bake. 

TOMATO STUFFED WITH EICE FOECEMEAT. 
(Used by Edna Sampsell.) 

Scoop out centers of 6 tomatoes ; season with salt and 
pepper; cook for 10 minutes; 6 tablespoons of rice; 



45 

drain ; 1 green pepper chopped fine ; 1 onion chopped fine ; 
IJ ounces of butter ; cook for 5 minutes ; add 6 chopped 
mushrooms ; 3 tablespoons of the tomato, which has been 
scooped out ; 1 tablespoon of salt ; ^ tablespoon of pepper; 
add rice; cook 6 minutes. Fill the tomatoes with the 
forcemeat — put on top a lump of butter and bake for 
20 minutes. Delicious. 



BREADS, MUFFINS, W^AFFLES, ETC. 

BRAN BISCUIT. 
(Mrs. W. K. Sidley.) 

1 egg, 3 tablespoonfuls of molasses, ^ teaspoonful of 
baking soda. | teaspoonful baking powder, 1 cup of flour, 
2 cups of bran, 1 cup of milk, currants if you wish. 

NUT WAFERS. 
(Mrs. W. K. Sidley.) 

2 eggs, well beaten; ^ pound brown sugar, | cup of 
Pecan nuts, 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of flour, 1 teaspoonful 
baking powder. Drop ^ teaspoonful on greased tins. 

BROWN BREAD. 

1 cup of sour milk, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of corn 
meal, 1 cup of Graham flour, 1 cup of white flour, 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda, salt, steam 3 hours, and dry in oven 
15 minutes. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 
(Miss A. M. Everett.) 

1 cup of corn meal (scalded with boiling water), 1 cup 
of rye flour, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of sour milk, 2 tea- 
spoons of soda (dissolved in sour milk), 1 cup of sweet 
milk, a little salt, 1 eg;g, 1 tablespoon melted butter, f cup 
of stoned raisins, 2 cups of white flour. Steam several 
hours. 

BROWN BREAD. 

2 cups Graham flour, 1 cup corn meal, 2 cups of milk, 
1 teaspoonful soda, 1 teaspoonful baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoonful salt. Steam one hour. 



46 

BOSTON BROWN BHEAD. 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

J Clip of molasses, put in 1 teaspoonful of soda till light, 
add 1 cup rye meal, 1 cup Graham meal, 1 cup corn meal, 
2 cups sour milk, or hot water; pinch of salt, raisins, if 
desired, put in baking powder cans; fill cans # full. Steam 
three hours. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 
(Mrs. Henry Thayer.) 

f cup of molasses, 2 cups of Graliam flour, ^ cup of 
white flour, 4 cup of corn meal, 1 teaspoonful soda„,littlo 
salt, 1 pint of milk. Put in 3 one-pound baking powder 
tins. Steam 3 liours. Grease tins well. Dry off a few 
minutes in oven before serving. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 
(Mrs. Hussey.) 

2 cups of Graham flour, 1 cup of corn meal, 1 cup of 
molasses, 1 cup of sour milk, 1 teaspoon of soda dissolved 
in little hot water, i] teaspoon salt. Steam 3 hours in 
mould. 

STEAM PONE. 

1 teacup New Orleans molasses, 5 teacups corn meal, 
2 teacups brown flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 quart butter- 
milk, 2 teaspoons soda. Mix thoroughly and place in an 
air-tight bucket. Set in kettle of boiling water and boil 
for six hours. Then take from bucket, put in pan and 
bake slowly for 2 hours, till a rich brown. 

CORN BREAD. 

(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients, — 1 cup corn meal, 1 cup flour, ^ cup but- 
ter, 2 eggs, -J cup sugar, milk, 2 tea spoonfuls baking pow- 
der. Mode, — Mix J of flour and corn meal with baking 
powder. Mix butter, eggs and sugar, then other half of 
flour and corn meal, and finally the flour and corn meal 
in which the baking powder has been mixed. Pour over 
milk enough to make a batter which will run. Bake in a 
hot oven. 



47 

CORN BREAD. 
(Mrs. Hussey.) 

^ cup corn meal, J cup sifted flour, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 heaping tablespoon 
butter, ^ cup milk, | teaspoon salt. Bake 20 minutes. 

CORN BREAD. 
(Granville Mott.) 

2^ cups of milk, 1 cup of corn meal, 3 eggs, 2 table- 
spoons melted butter, 2 tablespoons of sugar, 2 tea- 
spoons of baking powder, 1 tablespoon of flour. Heat 
milk to boiling point, then stir in butter and meal very 
slowly, while still over the fire, and beat until smooth. 
Then let mixture cool. When cool, add eggs unbeaten, 
sugar, flour and baking powder. 

CORN BREAD. 
(Mrs. E. M. Watkins.) 

1 cup milk, 2 eggs, ^ cup butter, 1 cup corn meal, 1 cup 
white flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Bake 20 minutes. 

CORN MEAL BREAD. 
(For Two.) 

(Mrs. Howard Wrenn.) 

1 eggj i- cup sugar, 1 tablespoon lard (not melted), 1 
cu]> sweet milk, ^ cup flour, 1|- cup corn meal, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder salt. 

CORN BREAD. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

} cup of sugar, -J- cup of butter, f cup of sweet milk, 1 
cup of white flour, ^ cup of corn meal, 1 egg, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder (even). Bake about 15 minutes. 

SPOON CORN BREAD. 

3 eggs, nearly a quart of buttermilk, 1 teacup of sweet 
milk, a light teaspoon of soda, lard the size of a walnut, 
4 or 5 large spoonfuls of corn meal (after it is sifted). 
Bake in an earthen dish an hour. Serve with a spoon. 



48 

SPOON COEN BEEAD. 

] pint sweet milk, 1 small teacup of sifted meal, 4 eggs, 
^ teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 even tablespoon but- 
ter. Put milk on to boil. Add meal slowly and let it boil 
for a few minutes. Take it otf, add salt, sugar and but- 
ter. When this is almost cool beat the eggs separately. 
Add the yolks just before baking. Beat the whites to a 
stiff froth. Bake 30 minutes. 

CORN MEAL CAKES. 

1^ cups milk, 2 eggs, well beaten, pinch salt, 1 teaspoon- 
ful butter, melted, } cup white flour, sifted, enough corn 
meal to make a good batter, 1 heaping teaspoonful bak- 
ing powder. 

CORN BREAD, 
airs. C. W. Buckley.) 

1 cup of either sweet or sour milk, 1 cup corn meal, 1 
cup white flour, 2 large table spoonfuls of melted butter, 1 
teaspoonful salt, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 2 eggs, 
whites and yolks, beaten separately, I cup sugar, | tea- 
spoonful of soda if sour milk is used. • 

KENTUCKY CORN DODGERS. 

Sift the best meal made from the white corn, any quan- 
tity desired. Salt to taste. Mix with cold water into 
stiif dough and form into round, long dodgers with the 
hands. Take the soft dough and form into shape by roll- 
ing between the hands, making the dodgers ibout 4 or 5 
inches long and 1-| inches in diameter. Have a griddle 
hot, grease a little with lard, and put the dodgers on as 
you roll them. Put in oven and bake thoroughly, when 
they will be crisp and a rich brown. This bread does not 
rise. 

JOHNNIE CAKE. 

1 quart meal, 1 pint warm water, 1 teaspoon salt. Sift 
meal in a pan and add wat^r and salt. Stir it until it is 
light, and then place on a new, clean board and place 
nearly upright before tlie tire. When brown, cut in 
squares, butter nicely and serve hot. 



49 

FRUTT LOAF. 
(Mrs. Troxel.) 

1 pint of bread sponge, 1 cup of brown sugar, 1 cup of 
molasses, 1 cup of butter, ^ cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of 
raisins, 1 of currants, a little lemon and citron peel, 1 
tablespoonful of cinnamon, 1 teaspoon of cloves, 1 of all- 
spice, 2 or 3 eggs. Beat eggs, butter and sugar, add all 
together with flour enough to stiffen as an ordinary loaf. 

NUT BREAD. 

(Mrs. Daniel Cobb.) 

1 egg, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 cup Eng- 
lish walnuts (cut, not chopped), 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons 
baking powder, a little salt. Beat egg and sugar together, 
then add milk, nuts and flour. Mix with spoon, grease 
pan and let stand 20 minutes before baking ; then bake in 
slow oven nearly an hour. 

NUT BREAD. 

4 cups of flour, 4 teaspoons of baking powder ^ cup of 
sugar (scant), ^ teaspoon of salt, {^ pound of chopped 
walnuts. Mix all together and add two eggs, well beaten, 
and 2 cups of milk. I^our into well buttered bread pans, 
rise 20 minutes a^id bake from 30 to 40 minutes in a slow 
oven. This makes two loaves. 

NUT BREAD. 
(For Two.) 

(Mrs. Howard A. Wrenn.) 

1 egg. 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour 
(whole wheat), 2 teaspoons baking powder, salt, 1 cup 
walnut meats. Let raise ^ hour. Bake 45 minutes. 

NUT BREAD. 
(K. F.) 

^ cup sugar, J teaspoon salt, 1 egg, beaten, 1 full cup 
of milk. 1 cup sliced walnut meats, 3 cups flour, 3 tea- 
spoons baking powder. Mix all together. Let rise 25 
minutes, then put in oven and have 45 minutes. 



50 

OATMEAL CAKES. 
(Mary Deane.) 

2 cups of oatmeal, 1 cup of flour, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 
teaspoon soda. Mix with hot water and the proper 
amount of salt. 

WHEAT CAKES. 
(Mrs. Luther.) 

Yolks of two eggs beaten with teaspoon sugar and tea- 
spoon salt, 1 pint sweet milk, flour to make batter, 1 tea- 
spoonful baking powder in flour. Add beaten whites last. 

MUFFINS. 

•i eggs, 1 quart sweet milk, 1 quart flour, 1 tablespoon 
melted butter, a little salt. Beat the eggs separately. 
Add milk and butter to yolks and then the flour. Add 
whites last and bake in hot-muffin irons. 

PUFF MUFFINS. 

3 eggs beaten separtely, lard the size of a walnut, 2 
pints of milk, 2 pints of flour well sifted. Beat yolks 
well, then add lard and salt. Then a little flour, then 
milk, then more flour and more milk until all is added. 
Add slowly the well beaten whites. Bake in muffin molds. 
They have to bake slowly to give them plenty of time to 
rise. 

BRAN MUFFINS. 

2 cups sweet milk, 2 cups of bran, 2 eggs, 1 cup whole 
wheat, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 tablespoon mo- 
lasses. Bake in muffin tin in quick oven. 

QUEEN'S MUFFINS. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

Cream { cup of butter. Add 1 egg, 1-3 cup of sugar, 
beaten together; H cups of flour, 1 cup of milk, 2 heaping 
teaspoons of baking powder, 1-3 teaspoon of salt. Bake 
in gem pans. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

1 tablespoon of butter, 1 tablespoon of lard, 1 table- 
spoon of sugar, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 cups graham flour, 
1 cup white flour, 2 tablespoons of baking powder. 



51 

MUFFINS. 

(Miss Freda Heintz.) 

1 eggj 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon but- 
ter melted. Flour to make a thin batter like griddle 
cakes. To every cup of flour take 1 teaspoon baking 
powder. Pinch salt. 

QUEEN OF MUFFINS. 

I cup butter, creamed; add 1-3 cup sugar and 1 egg 
well beaten; sift 1-| cups flour with 2| teaspoons baking 
powder and add to mixture with | cup (scant) milk. 
Bake in the gem pans 25 minutes. 

MARCELLUS'S CORN MUFFINS. 

1 pint buttermilk, 4- pint corn meal, 1 teaspoon soda, 
J teaspoon salt, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon melted lard. Beat 
the egg, add soda to buttermilk and 1 tablespoon melted 
lard and mix together. Have muffin-rings hot and well 
greased and fill half full and cook brown. 

BLUE BERRY MUFFINS. 

I- cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 1 cup sour milk, 1 
cup molasses, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 3 
cups flour, 1 cup blueberries. 

FRENCH CORN MUFFINS. 

(Mrs. H. B. Roberts.) 

To I cup sugar and | cup soft butter add 2 beaten 
eggs, i cup sweet milk, 1 cup Indian meal, 1 cup wheat 
flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder. Bake in a moderate 
oven from 20 to 30 minutes. This makes 12 delicious 
muffins. 

BRAN MUFFINS. 
(Mrs. George E. Moore.) 

2 cups Pillsbury bran, 1 cup flour, 1 cup sour milk, ^ 
teaspoon soda, ^ teaspoon baking powder, 2 tablespoons 
sugar or molasses. Bake in muffin tin or loaf. 



52 

ENGLISH PANCAKES. 
(Mrs. Troxel.) 

Make a batter of two cups of flour, four eggs and one 
quart of milk. Add as a great improvement one table- 
spoonful of brandy with a little nutmeg scraped in. 
Make this size of frying pan. Sprinkle a little gTanu- 
lated sugar over this pancake, roll it up and send to the 
table hot. 

EICE CAKES. 

Cook one cup of rice, and add to it ^ cup of cream, 1 
teaspoon baking-powder, 2 tablespoons flour, 2 eggs, well 
beaten. Fry in lard or butter just enough to grease 
skillet. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

For breakfast cakes the batter must be made and put 
to rise the night before in a warm place. 1 quart buck- 
wheat flour, 4 tablespoons yeast, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 table- 
spoon molasses, warm water enough to make a thin bat- 
ter. If the batter should be sour when ready for use, add 
a little soda. Serve with syrup or honey. 

COEN MEAL PUFFS. 

1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon butter, ^ teaspoon salt, 
2 eggs, ^ cup sugar, ^ cup flour, ^ cup corn meal (scant), 
2 teaspoons baking power. Scald milk, add butter and 
salt and stir in the corn meal (granulated yellow pre- 
ferred), stir and let thicken a few minutes, then cool; 
add eggs beaten without separating, add sugar, flour and 
baking powder sifted together. Turn into a hot, buttered 
muffin pan and bake 15 to 20 minutes in a hot oven. 
Make 1 dozen delicious cakes. 

POPOVERS. 

Beat 2 eggs very stiff and add 1 cup of milk, 1 cup of 
flour and a pinch of salt. Have small tins very hot and 
well buttered. Fill half full with the mixture, bake in a 
quick oven 20 minutes and eat at once. 

TIMBLE shells: 

1 cup flour, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs, 1 small teaspoon salt. 
Beat all well together to consistency of cake batter. Have 



53 

timble iron very hot before dipping in butter. Fry in 
deep fat. 

POPOVERS. 

2 cups milk, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs ; salt to season ; small 
piece of butter, melted and added last. Bake in a hot 
oven. 

SALLY LUNN WITH YEAST. 
(E. L. Wolcott.) 

Make a stiff batter with 1 pint of scalded milk, add salt, 
1 tablespoon each of sugar and lard, 2 well beaten eggs, 1 
cake of compressed yeast. When risen to double its bulk 
add enough flour to knead a little and roll to 1 inch thick- 
ness. Grease pie tins well and fit a layer in bottom, then 
turn over, place a second layer on top. This rule will 
make three tins. When light enough to bake, cover top 
with thick syrup of granulated sugar filled with chopped 
English walnuts or pecans. Reheat before serving. 

SALLY LUNN. 

1^ pints flour, 3 eggs, 1 tablespoon white sugar, ^ cup 
melted I utter, 1 teacup yeast, 1 pint milk. Make into 
a stiff batter, having beaten ingredients well together. 
Let it rise for 5 hours. Then add ^ teaspoon of soda in 
a little warm water and pour the batter in a well greased 
cake mould. Bake 40 minutes and serve hot with butter. 

PtUSK OR SWEET BREAD. 

1 pint flour, 1 pint white sugar, 1 teacup melted lard, 
1^ pints of water, 2 kitchen spoons of yeast. Make into 
a batter at night, set in a warm place to rise. The next 
morning work into this sponge 2 beaten eggs, 3 pints of 
flour. Set in a warm place to rise again. When light, 
bake. Spread on the rolls when warm white of an egg 
and sifted cinnamon. The dough should be as soft as 
you can make it to work well. 

SHORT BREAD. 

Ingredients. — 1 pound flour, ^ i)ound butter, ^ pound 
sifted sugar. Mode. — Put the flour into a basin with the 
butter and mix, and then mix in sugar. Bake on paper 
in moderate oven. 



54 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE. 

^ (Mrs. William Millard.) 

1 egg, -J cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, butter size of wal- 
nut, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, ^ teaspoon salt, IJ 
cups flour. Cinnamon and sugar on top. Very nice for 
breakfast or lunch. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Beat 2 eggs well and beat into this 2 cups cream, then 
add 1 cup sugar. Mix and sift IJ cups flour with 1 tea- 
spoon of cream of tartar and 1 teaspoon of salt. Stir 
this into mixture and add ^ teaspoon soda dissolved in 
1 tablespoon hot water and ^ teaspoon vanilla. Bake in 
large square jelly cake tins, cut with diamond-shaped cut- 
ler and put in pairs with the following fillings : Make a 
smooth paste of 2 tablespoons corn starch, a little water. 
Mix with a cupful of clear cotfee and boil 10 minutes, then 
add J teaspoon salt and the beaten yolks of 2 eggs, slow- 
ly. Cook until mixture thickens, then fill the cakes and 
cover with icing made by mixing the juice of 2 oranges 
and 1 lemon and stirring in confectioners' sugar until 
stiff enough to frost. Before icing dries sprinkle with 
finely chopped nuts. 

COFFEE CAKE. • 

(Mrs. Norcross.) 

1 cup brown sugar, ^- cup butter, ^ cup molasses, -| cup 
cold water or cotfee with 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in 
it, 2 eggs, -J teaspoon cinnamon, ^ each of cloves and all- 
spice, 2 cups flour, raisins. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

(Mrs. Ten Broeck.) 

1 cup sugar, 1 large tablespoon butter, 2 eggs, 1 scant 
cup milk, Ih cup flour, IJ teaspoon baking powder. Put 
in 2 large tins and over them h cup sugar, 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon, I cup almonds (chopped). Bake in quick oven. 



55 

BISCUIT (For 2.) 
(Mrs. H. B. Koberts.) 

1 cup flour, I teaspoon salt, 2 level teaspoons baking 
powder, 1 tablespoon butter little more than level, 6 table- 
spoons sweet milk (more or less). 

SHORT CAKE (For 2). 
(Mrs. H. B. Roberts.) 

1 cup flour, J teaspoon salt, 2 level tablespoons sugar, 
2 level ta spoons baking pwoder, 2 tablespoons butter, 6 
tablespoons milk (more or less). 

POPCORN BISCUIT. • 
(Mrs. R. J. Beatty.) 

Into 1 quart of flour put 2 teaspoons of Royal baking 
powder and 2 tablespoons of salt. Mix thoroughly with 
cold water pat out into a cake on the board, cut out with a 
small cutter and place separately in the pan. Bake very 
well. 

CURRANT BISCUITS. 

Ingredients: 1 lb. bread dough; ^ lb. currants; ^ lb. 
pulverized sugar ; 2 eggs ; 1 tablespoonful butter. Mode : 
Beat sugar and eggs together; mix other ingredients 
together, and add to them the eggs and sugar; make 
into small buns, i)ut them to raise, and bake 20 minutes 
in moderate oven. 

WHITE ROLLS. 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

1 pint sweet milk ; piece of butter size of egg ; tablespoon- 
ful of sugar; pinch of salt; heat up in double boiler, 
when cool add ^ yeast cake; mix in flour enough to 
make a dough ; chop with chopping knife 20 minutes ; let 
rise in a warm place ; chop again for 10 minutes ; let rise 
till light; make in small cakes; turn in with butter be- 
tween ; bake 20 minutes. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS. 

1 quart sifted flour; 1 teaspoonful salt; 1 teaspoon- 
ful baking jDowder, sift both with flour; 1 large table- 



56 

spoonful lard; mix all well; handle as little as possible; 
roll and cut; cook in very hot, quick oven. 

BEATEN BISCUITS. 
(Mrs. E. B. Pierce.) 

Fill a quart sifter full of flour ; add a teaspoon of salt ; 
after sifting, rub in a large kitchen spoon of lard through 
the flour ; mix a ^ pint of sweet milk with ^ ice pint of water ; 
add gradually to flour to make a stiff dough, be careful 
and don't use too much liquid, some flour takes more 
than others, and the stitfer the dough the better you can 
work it and the more worked the better they will be. 
If you haven't. a regular biscuit worker, beat with rolling 
pin until the dough shortens ; roll out about ^ an inch 
thick, cut out and stick with fork; bake in a moderate 
oven for J hour. 

BROWN BISCUITS. 
(Mrs. E. A. Bourinque.) 

1 quart of new flour, unbolted or Graham flour; 2 
tablespoons lard or butter ; 1 cup of buttermilk, with one 
teaspoon soda ; ^ teaspoon salt ; 2 teasj)Oons brown sugar ; 
make this into soft dough, work little, roll out, and cut 
into biscuits and bake in a quick oven. 

MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

(VanNortwick.) 

1 quart of flour; 1 pint of milk; 1 teaspoon salt; 2 
teaspoons baking powder; 1 tablespoon lard; 1 egg; sift 
the flour, salt and baking powder together ; mix in lard ; 
stir in milk to a thin batter; add the beaten egg; drop 
in the pan with a roast; bake twenty minutes. 

^'BELLES C ALAS. TOUT CHAUD!'' 
(Mrs. H. L. Taylor.) 

Under this cry is sold by the old negro Creole women 
in the French portion of New Orleans every morning, 
this tasty dish: Boil soft one pound rice; when cold 



57 

add three or four eggs; a large cup sugar; one package 
self-rising flour; soak a piece of bread in water, drain 
and take off the crust; mix it well with the rice; add a 
little grated nutmeg; and cook by dropping a spoon- 
ful at a time, in boiling lard. This dish is served for 
breakfast with hot coffee. 

WAFFLES. (Delicious.) 

(Mrs. H. B. Eoberta.) 

2 eggs; 1 pint flour; 2 teaspoons baking powder; 2 
CU13S sweet milk; 1 large tablespoon soft butter; 1 large 
tablespoon soft lard; and a little salt. 

WAFFLES. 

(Mrs. Traxel.) 

1 quart of sweet milk ; 4 eggs ; 2/3 of a cup of butter ; 
I a teaspoonf ul of salt ; 3 teaspoons of baking powder ; 
flour enough to make a nice batter. 

WAFFLES'. 

(H. 0. Schumacher.) 

1 pint milk; 3 eggs, beaten separately; | sup melted 
lard and butter; 2 teaspoons baking powder; flour enough 
to make batter as stiff as pancake batter; add baking- 
powder and whites of eggs, last minute before cooking. 

WAFFLES. 

1 pint sour cream; 1 pint flour; 3 eggs; ^ teaspoon 
soda ; beat well and fill hot waffle-irons, which have been 
well buttered; cook till a rich crisp brown and serve hot 
with melted butter ; be sure to have irons hot. 

WAFFLES. 
(Mrs. Chas. H. Warren.) 

2 eggs ; 1 pint milk ; butter size of an egg ; 2 teaspoons 
baking powder; 1 teaspoon sugar; 1 pint of flour; beat 
the eggs separately adding whites last thing; bake in 
hot waffle irons. 



58 

AVAPFLES. 
(Mrs. Hnssey.) 

1 pint milk; pinch of salt; | cup of melted butter; 
3 eggs, beaten separately; 2 teaspoons baking powder; 
beat in sifted flour to make rather thin batter. 

WAFFLES. 
(Mrs. George E. Moored) 

4 eggs beaten separately; IJ pints sour milk; ^ cup 
butter; 1 teaspoon soda, dissolved in milk; IJ teaspoons 
baking powder; flour to make right stiffness. This is 
large recipe. Use half for small family. 

WAFFLES. 
(For three people.) 

(Mrs. Slade.) 

1 cup of milk ; 1 cup of flour ; 1 eggy beaten separately ; 
1 tablespoon of melted butter; 1 teaspoon heaping of 
baking powder ; 1 pinch of salt ; mix the milk, flour, yoke 
of eggy butter and salt; add the well beaten white of an 
egg; just before baking add the baking powder. 

BKEAKFAST MUFFINS. 

(Mrs. Luther.) 

I cup of butter ; ^ cup of sugar ; 2 eggs ; 2 cups flour ; 
3 teaspoons baking powder; f cijp of milk; salt. 



SAIiADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS. 

GEAPE FEUIT IN JELLY. 

(Mrs. L. Smith.) 

In ^ a cup of cold water, soak 2/3 of a box of gelatine 
for 2 hours ; to this add the juice of 3 grape fruit ; 1 cup 
of hot water; 1 cup of sugar; juice of 3 or 4 lemons; 
strain; lay pieces of grape fruit in jelly, and mold in 
cup molds; or garnish with the pieces of grai3e fruit, 
instead of putting them in the jelly and serve on lettuce 
with Mayonnaise. 



5!) 

(;i:aiu^] feuit and English walnut salad. 

Take out the sections, being careful to remove all the 
white bitter skins; to 1 quart of grape-fruit, after it is 
prepared, add 1 pint of English walnuts. Serve with 
bleached lettuce and a French dressing made of lemon in 
the proportion of 3 tablespoons of oil to 1 of lemon juice. 

FEUIT SALAD.. 

Equal parts of fruit, Malaga grapes, celery, oranges 
and nuts ; dressing of sugar, lemon juice, oil and vinegar. 
Just before using, mix with whipped cream. 

APPLE AND GEAPE FEUIT SALAD. 
(Clara E. Smith.) 

Eemove center leaves from 1 large head lettuce ^ fill with 
apple and grape-fruit cut in small pieces and mixed with 
Mayonnaise dressing; on top, garnish with apple balls, 
dipped in red vegetable color. Around edge of plate put 
slices of grape-fruit and apple, leaving the red skin on 
apple; one piece of apple to three grape-fruit. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Take 12 large ripe tomatoes, remove skin and cut the 
center from each; fill the hole with a dressing of 1 cup 
cold ham, which has been run through a meat-grinder; 
1 tablespoon chopped onion; salt and pepper to taste; 1 
teaspoon celery seed; ^ cup bread crumbs; 1 tablespoon 
olive oil. Put on ice and serve with a rich Mayonnaise. 

POTATO S'ALAD. 

1 quart cold potatoes ; ^ pint cold peas, which have been 
cooked till tender ; 2 or 3 good-sized firm tomatoes, not too 
ripe; 2 stalks of celery; 1 onion chopped fine. Cut the 
potatoes, tomatoes and celery into small pieces, add the 
onion and season with salt and pepper. Serve on lettuce 
leaves with a rich Mayonnaise. 

STUFFED TOMATO SALAD. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Peel tomatoes, chill, remove seeds and pulp ; put 1 tea- 



60 

spoon French dressing in each and stand in ice box until 
ready to serve, then fill with equal parts of finely chopped 
celery and nuts. Serve on lettuce with Mayonnaise. 

COLD SLAW. 

Take off the outer leaves and split the head off of a cab- 
bage on a slaw-cutter or with a sharp knife into fine 
shreds and put on ice. Serve with French dressing or 
Mayonnaise. 

CELERY SALAD. 

Cut crisp celery into short lengths and put on ice; 
irhen ready to serve, mix through it either Mayonnaise 
or French dressing made of 2 tablespoons olive oil and 
1 of vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. 

NUT SALAD. 

Take equal parts of celery and nuts and serve with a 
French dressing. 

EGG SALAD. 

/^^ Take any number of hard boiled eggs and remove the 
shells and cut in half; remove carefully the yellows and 
make a dressing of them with chopped ham, pepper and 
salt, made mustard, butter and a little cream; mix well 
and fill the whites. Put on ice till ready to serve. Serve 
on lettuce leaves with French dressing or Mayonnaise. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

1 good sized cabbage chopped fine. Dressing: 1 tea- 
spoonful mustard; 1 teaspoonful pepper; 2 or 3 teaspoon- 
fuls salt; 1 dessertspoonful sugar; 1 gill vinegar; 1 gill 
of either sweet or sour cream ; take yolk of 3 eggs (hard 
boiled) and mash to fine powder; add sugar, pepper 
mustard and salt; then cream and last vinegar. Strain 
onto chopped cabbage. 

BEET SALAD. 

To 1 pint chopped beets, f of a pint celery, and J of a 
pint chopped pecans or walnut meats; mix highly sea- 
soned salad dressing. More salt and pepper usually re- 
quired. 



y 



61 

TOMATO JELLY SALAD. 

Add i of a box of gelatine to a pint of well seasoned 
strained tomatoes; when dissolved strain, mold in small 
cups or wine glasses, turn out on lettuce leaves and 
serve with a spoonful of Mayonnaise on the side. 

TOMATO JELLY. 

J box KJQOx gelatine ; | cup cold water ; 1 can tomatoes ; 
^ onion; a stalk of celery; 2 tablespoons Tarragon vine- 
gar; a bay leaf; 2 cloves; a few grains cayenne. Soften 
the gelatine 5 minutes in the cold water; cook together 
the other ingredients, except the vinegar 10 minutes ; add 
the vinegar and softened gelatine and stir until dissolved 
then strain. Pour into a mold and set in a cool place or on 
ice to form. When cold turn from the mold, garnish 
with lettuce leaves and pour Mayonnaise dressing over 
the whole. 

CEEAM OF CHICKEN SALAD. 

(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

White meat of 1 chicken; 12 almonds; 1 teaspoonful 
salt ; J teaspoonful onion juice ; 2 tablespoons lemon juice ; 
1 gill of aspic ; 1 gill of cream ; 1 pint cut-up celery ; 1 pint 
Mavonnaise. Take the white from 1 boiled chicken, 
chop very fine, then rub to a powder. As the meat is put 
through the chopping machine chop also 12 blanched and 
dried almonds; add to this the salt, onion juice and 4 
tablespoonfuls thick Mayonnaise ; mix; add 2 teaspoonfuls 
of lemon juice and the aspic ; mix again, and stand aside 
until the mixture begins to congeal; then stir in hastily 
the cream that has been whipped to a stiff froth; turn 
this again into a border mold and stand away for 2 hours 
to harden; when ready to serve cut sufficient celery to 
make a pint, mix into plain Mayonnaise dressing, and 
heap into the center of the mold. Put ^ a pint of Mayon- 
naise into a pastry bag and with a star tube garnish the 
top with cream jelly and serve at once. Knox^s gelatine 
may be used in place of the aspic. 



(V2 

SHRIMP SALAD. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Boil chicken and beef and take stock ; season with salt ; 
pepper and lemon juice, then add 4 box gelatine, and let 
dissolve. Place shrimps in molds; mince 2 hard boiled 
eggs over them; cover with seasoned stock; let jell 
Turn molds out on lettuce leaf and serve with Mayonnaise. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

1 can of lobster ; equal part of celery ; chop the lobster 
and cut the celery. Serve on lettuce leaves with a rich 
Mayonnaise. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Remove the skin and bones and pick into small pieces ; 
yolks of 6 hard boiled eggs ; 1 cup of butter ; mash eggs 
and butter and add salmon with pepper and salt and 1 
tablespoon made mustard. Serve on lettuce leaves. 

POND LILY SALAD. 
(Mrs. Frank R. McMullin.) 

Chill 6 hard boiled eggs and cut in halves, crossways ; 
the yokes are removed without breaking and the whites are 
then cut into strips and arranged on lettuce leaves to re- 
semble lily petals, with the half yokes in the center of 
each, making a perfect semblance of pond lilies. A French 
dressing is poured over them. This is a very attractive 
looking salad. 

JAPANESE SALAD. 
(Mrs. Frank R. McMullin.) 

Take tender cooked beets, hollowed out to make a cup ; 
fill this with a mixture of boiled rice, chopped apple, celery 
and pecan meats, and on top put a tiny ball of cream 
cheese; pour over a French dressing. Serve on a crisp 
lettuce leaf. One such for each person. 

SHIMAS NOVELTY SALAD. 
(Mrs. Frank R. McMullin.) 

Fine white canned pears, cut in two, lengthwise ; a half 
served in each individual salad, on crisp heart of lettuce 
leaves with a fringe of water cress. The cavity in the 



63 

center of the pear is filled with grape fruit pulp and 
Malaga grapes. AYhen ready to serve, pour over a dress- 
ing made in the proportion of 1 tablespoonful of olive 
oil; a teaspoonful of pure white honey; salt; paprika; 
the white of 1 egg; 2 teaspoonfuls of lemon juice; the 
whole being whipped creamy. This makes a delicious 
salad. 

SALMON SALAD. 
(Kate Moore.) 

(Used by Edna Sampsell.) 

1 can salmon, pull apart and remove bones; ^ head of 
cabbage chopped fine ; 2 large pickles ; 6 hard boiled eggs ; 
1 bunch of celery. Serve with boiled dressing. 

^ POINSETTA SALAD. 

Materials : Large firm red tomatoes, celery, hard-boil- 
ed eggs, salad dressing, and either white lettuce or endive. 
Way of preparing: Eemove the peel from tomatoes by 
dipiDing them into boiling water ; set on ice to chill ; when 
ready to serve cut them into irregular leaves from flower 
end, to stem end, and leave them attached to stem end; 
remove the seeds ; set each tomato on a bed of lettuce or 
endive and fill the center with chopped celery and boiled 
egg mixed with rather a stiff salad dressing. 

PINEAPPLE AND CELERY SALAD. 

Pare and eye a small pineapple ; cut in slices almost an 
inch thick than in dice. Wash and cut fine an equal amount 
of celery; to 1 cup of Mayonnaise add ^ cup of whipped 
cream, and mix together; stir a little more than half of 
this with pineapple and celery and season with a little 
salt. Garnish with pecans. 

VEGETABLE AND NUT SALAD. 

1 cup of peas; 1 cup celery cut in dice; 1 cup orange 
cut in dice ; 3 tablespoons Mayonnaise mixed with 1 table- 
spoon of whipped cream; 1 cup of English walnuts. 
Serve in hearts of lettuce. 



64 

PINEAPPLE AND MARS'HMALLOW SALAD. 

1 cup marshmallows (cut in quarters) ; 1 cup pine- 
apple cut in dice ; 1 cup of celery cut in dice ; 3 tablespoons 
of Mayonnaise; 1 tablespoon whipped cream. Salt to 
taste and a little paprika. 

EAST INDIAN SALAD. 
(Used by Edna Sampsell.) 

Cut a head of lettuce into strips — cutting across the 
head. Make a nest on each plate and place on the lettuce 
two thick slices of tomato. On one tomato spread chopped 
celery and onion, on the other slice of tomato chopped 
water cress ; pour on all a highly seasoned French dress- 
ing. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

4 tablespoons olive oil; 1 tablespoon vinegar; season 
to taste with pepper, salt and a little garlic. The bowl 
in which the dressing is to be made rubbed with garlic 
will give sufficient flavor. 

MAYONNAISE WITH TOMATO CATSUP. 
(Mrs. Howard A. Wrenn.) 

For all vegetable salads, mix the regular Mayonnaise 
dressing with tomato catsup to taste. 

MAYONNAISE. 

Yolk of 1 egg ; i teaspoon salt ; dash of cayenne pepper ; 
1 cupful of salad oil; ^ teaspoonful of lemon juice. Let 
the oil and egg be very cold before using; also the plate 
must be on ice; let the yolk be entirely free from any 
white; add salt and pepper to egg and mix well, then 
add oil drop by drop. The success depends on adding the oil 
slowly at first. Spend half of the time in incorporating 
the first 2 spoonfuls of oil, after that it can be added a 
little faster. After it is thick alternate a few drops of 
vinegar with the oil. If mustard is liked add i teaspoon- 
ful of dry mustard with the salt at the beginning. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 
Yolk of 1 egg ; dessert spoonful vinegar ; dessert spoon- 



65 

ful lemon; salt and pepper to season; beat well together; 
add oil slowly at first, but not drop by drop. 

MES. JACKSON'S SALAD DRESSING. 

1 teaspoon dry mustard; 1 teaspoon of salt (scant meas- 
ure) ; 1 tablespoon of vinegar ; beat with the yolks of 
2 raw eggs ; add | scant cup of butter or oil, a few drops 
at a time ; the beaten whites of the eggs ; ^ cup of vinegar 
or lemon juice, beating well all the time ; cook over boiling 
water imtil it thickens. 

FRUIT SALAD DRESSING. 
(M. B.) 

1 cup of milk, warmed^ into which put a tablespoon- 
ful of melted butter ; 1 tablespoon of flour ; a pinch of salt, 
red pepper and a little sugar; cook until thick and let 
cool; heat ^ pint of cream; add dressing and beat well. 
Mix with all kinds of fruit. Place whipped cream on 
top for garniture. 

SALAD DRESSING. 
(Mrs. H. W. Boyd.) 

Salad dressing without oil — to use on lettuce, potato 
salad and slaw: 2 eggs, well beaten, with 3 tablespoons 
of sugar; add to this scant ^ cup of vinegar; a good 
I cup of milk, and 1 tablespoon of butter; salt, pepper 
and mustard to taste. Cook in double boiler until 
thickens, stirring constantly; add milk, or better, cream, 
after mixture cools. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

2 eggs ; i teaspoon of mustard ; 1 teaspoon salt ; 2 table- 
spoons of sugar ; 1 tablespoon of flour ; butter the size of 
an egg; pinch of cayenne pepper; beat well together; 
add pint of milk; put on fire, stirring constantly till it 
boils; take off and thin with vinegar. For fruit salad, 
add whipped cream and sugar. . 

BOILED SAI,AD DRESSNG. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

1 tablespoon butter; 1 teaspoon flour (heaping) ; | cup 



66 

* 

of vinegar (half water) ; 1 egg. Let the butter boil and 
add to it the flour; to this add vinegar also boiling; 
cook the mixture a few minutes; have the yolk of the 
egg well beaten and into it pour the boiling mixture; 
beat the whole then thoroughly. Season to taste when 
cold. 

SALADS. 

BOILED S'ALAD DEESSING. 

Ingredients : 4 eggs ; 1 cup vinegar ; IJ cups of water ; 
4 tablespoonfuls of sugar ; piece of butter size of an Eng- 
lish walnut. Mode : Beat eggs till quite light ; add vine- 
gar and water; sugar and butter and boil till thick as 
custard; take off and season with dry mustard, salt and 
pepper to taste. Keep in cool place. 

FEUIT SALAD DEESSING. 
(Mrs. H. B. Clarke.) 

Yolk of 4 eggs, beaten to a cream ; 1 tablespoon sugar ; 
1 level teaspoon dry mustard; 1 level teaspoon butter; 
1 tablespoon lemon juice; 4 tablespoons vinegar; J tea- 
spoon salt; ^ teaspoon j)aprika. Add all these to beaten 
eggs, excepting salt; cook in double boiler until thick 
enough to coat spoon; when cold mix with ^ pint of 
whipped cream ; add salt after cooling, just before adding 
cream; add teaspoon sherry wine to the fruit used and 
let stand in refrigerator for an hour or two. 

VINAGRET SAUCE. 
(Mrs. Hussey.} 

i cup of Tarragon vinegar; 2 tablespoons olive oil; 8 
olives ; 8 midget pickles ; 1 teaspoon pearl onions ; 1 tea- 
spoon capers. Make pink with paprica; salt to taste; 
mince olives and pickles. 

VINEAGRETTE SALAD DRESSING. 

(Used by- Edna Sampsell.) 

4 tablespoons of oil; 2 tablespoons of vinegar (Tar- 
ragon) ; 2 tablespoons minced pickles and olives, a little 
onion (pickled preferred); 1 saltspoon of salt; 2 salt- 
spoon of mustard ; i spoon of white pepper. 



67 



PIES. 

CORNSTAECH PUFFS. 
(Mrs. H. B. Roberta.) 

Small J cuj) butter — creamed; 1 cup sifted pulverized 
sugar; 1 cup cornstarch; 3 teaspoons baking powder; 
4 eggs, beaten separately; yolks with sugar, butter and 
flour. Whites folded in last. Flavoring. 

MINCE MEAT. 

2 lbs. beef (round); 1 lb. beef suet; 2 lbs. raisins; 2 
lbs. currants; 1 lb. sultannas; 1 lb. citron; 5 lbs. apples; 
1 tablespoon cloves; 1 tablespoon allspice; 2 tablespoons 
cinnamon; 2 tablespoons mace; 1 tablespoon salt; 1 tea- 
spoon nutmeg; 2^ lbs. brown sugar; 1 quart sherry; 1 
pint brandv. 

CREAM PIE. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

4 eggs ; 1 cup sugar ; 2 cups pure milk — company's sweet 
milk ; 1 heaping tablespoonful cornstarch ; separate eggs, 
into the yokes beat the sugar, then the cornstarch, mixed 
in a little milk; stir this into the two cups of milk; cook 
in double boiler ; flavor ; turn into crust ; bake until custard 
sets. Add meringue made of the whites of the eggs, re- 
turn to oven and brown. 

PRUNE TARTS. 

Mode : Scald some prunes, remove stones, take out the 
kernels, and put the latter into a little cranberry juice 
with the prunes and sugar; simmer and when cold make 
it into tarts with what paste you like. x\ll stone fruits 
can be done thus. 

CREAMED TARTLETS. 

Mode : Make a short paste as follows : 1 white and 3 
yolks of eggs; 1 ounce each of butter and sugar; small 
quantity of salt and flour to the required consistency;' 
work it very lightly indeed; roll it i inch thick; line 
tartlet tins with it filling them with rice so that they keep 
their shape. Bake them carefully in a moderate oven. 



68 

Fill the tartlet with jam, placing a spoonful of whipped 
cream on the top. 

SQUASH PIE. (Economical.) 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

2 cups sifted squash; 1 cup sugar; 1 tablespoon corn 
starch with squash ; pinch of salt ; 1 quart milk and 2 eggs ; 
ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg; the squash in warm milk; put 
in pie and bake. 

EHUBARB PIE. 
(Mrs. G. N. Lyman.) 

1 pint bowl of rhubarb, cut fine ; 1 cup sugar ; yolks of 
3 eggs; 1 teaspoon flour. Mix sugar and flour together; 
add yolks; then stir in rhubarb,- bake in under crust. 
Make a meringue for top of the whites of eggs. 

RAISIN PIE. 

(From the Carruabbee Shop, No. 6 Madison street.) 

2 cups sugar ; 1 package raisins ; butter size of walnut ; 
cook in sufficient water for 30 minutes ; 2 heaping table- 
spoonfuls of rice flour dissolved in cold water; pinch of 
salt ; bake in 2 crusts 20 minutes ; have the crust rich and 
flaky. 

RAISIN AND RHUBARB PIE. 

f cup raisins; 2 cups rhubarb; 1 cup sugar; ^ lemon, 
grated rind only; 2 eggs, yolks only; stone raisins and 
chop fine; chop rhubarb; add sugar and lemon rind and 
cook. Just as you take from fire add yolks and stir well, 
let cool thoroughly before putting into baked shell. 
Add meringue and brown. 

CRANBERRY AND RAISIN PIE. 
(Mrs. John A. Putnam.) 

1 cup raisins; 1 cup cranberries; 1 cup sugar; 1 cup 
water. Boil until well done, then add a teaspoon vanilla 
and 1 small tablespoon flour, rubbed in a little water. 
Make a tart crust. 



69 

LEMON PIE. 
(Mrs. Henry Thayer.) 

1 lemon, rind and juice; 1^ cups water; 3 eggs, keep 
whites of 2 for frosting; cook in double boiler; have 
pie crust cooked and then pour in. 

LEMON CEEAM PIE. 
(From Marion Harland.) 

(Kate F. Floyd.) 

1 teacup powdered sugar; 1 tablespoon butter; 1 egg; 
1 lemon (large) grated rind and juice, remove seed care- 
fully; 1 teacup boiling water; 1 tablespoon cornstarch, 
dissolved in cold water ; stir cornstarch into water ; cream, 
butter and sugar, and pour over this the hot starch. 
When quite cool add lemon and well beaten egg; mince 
inner rind and add ; bake in open shell and add meringue. 

LEMON PIE. 
(Mrs. H. B. Eoberta.) 

1 cup sugar; 1 cup water; 2 eggs (saving the whites 
for frosting pie) ; juice of 1 lemon; 2 tablespoons flour; 
1 tablespoon butter; cook in double boiler till thick; fill 
pastry shell and brown in oven. 

MOTHER'S CRANBERRY JELLY (fine). 

Bring berries just to boiling point with pinch of soda ; 
drain-wash; cover with hot water and plenty of sugar; 
cook slowly till juice jellies. Each berry is plump and 
sweet. 

LEMON PIE. 
(Mrs. George E. Moore.) 

5 eggs; 1^ cups of sugar; 1 cup water; 2 tablespoons 
cornstarch ; 1 tablespoon butter ; 3 small lemons ; beat all 
yolks and 1 white till very smooth; add the grated peel 
of 1 lemon and the sugar ; beat well, stir in the cornstarch ; 
add the lemon juice, butter and lastly the water; cook, 
stirring constantly. Line 2 pie tins with rich paste and 
bake ; when done fill with above mixture ; cover with the 
beaten whites and set in the oven to brown slightly. 



70 

LEMON PIE FILLING. 
(Mrs. Luther.) 

Bind and juice of 2 lemons; 2 small cups of sugar; 1 
whole egg and the yolks of 2 ; small tablespoon of flour 
and 1 of cornstarch; 1^ cups of cold water; cook until 
thick ; stir while cooking ; use 2 remaining whites for top. 

STIRKED LEMON PIE. 
(Mrs. Frank Lincoln Wean.) 

6 eggs separated; f cup of sugar; 2 lemons, juice and 
a little of the grated rind ; beat yolks and sugar until 
light; add lemon juice and grated rind; cook in double 
boiler until thick and when warm add the beaten whites; 
put in a baked crust and place in oven to brown slightly. 

PIE CEUST. 
(Mrs. J. G. Mott.) 

3 cups sifted flour ; 1^ cups of butter ; ^ cup lard ; both 
very cold; 1 cup ice water and pinch of salt; put flour 
into a chopping bowl, drop in the butter and lard with a 
knife and chop thoroughly through; pour in water slow- 
ly, stirring with the knife round and round until made 
into a ball. Cut enough dough for each separate roll, 
handle rapidly and as little as possible. Will keep on ice, 
is better after a few days. 

PUDDINGS AND PUDDING SAUCES. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 
(Mrs. Thomas C. Williams.) 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup chopped raisins, 
1 tablespoon melted butter 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon soda in a very little hot water, J grated nutmeg, 
scant half teaspoon salt, IJ cups graham flour. Beat 
well and put into cake mold. Steam for 3 hours. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — 1^ cups of graham flour, 1 cup of mo- 
iasses, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of chopped raisins, 1 



71 

tablespoon of melted butter, 1 teaspoon of soda dissolved 
in hot water, 1 egg. Nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves to 
taste. Mode. — Mix all dry ingredients thorou^ly to- 
gether first, then the rest may be added. Steam for two 
hours. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

(Mrs. J. V. Norcross.) 

4 cup sugar, -J cup molasses, ^ cup butter, 1 egg, 1 cup 
sour milk, 1 even teaspoon soda, pinch salt, 1 cup raisins, 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, { teaspoon cloves, 2 small cups gra- 
ham flour. Steam 2 hours. 

SAUCE. 

^ cup sugar, -} cup butter, 1 cup hot water boiled to- 
gether, add 1 tablespoon jelly, thicken with 2 even table- 
spoons cornstarch made smooth with water, then add 1 
tablespoon brandy. 

GRAHAM PLUM PUDDING. 
(Clara G. Geer.) 

2 cups graham flour, 2 cups raisins, 1 cup milk (sweet), 
1 cup molasses, 2 cups currants, 2 even teaspoons soda, 
1 even teaspoon cinnamon, ^ teaspoon cloves, ^ teaspoon 
salt, ^ nutmeg, citron if desired. Steam 3^ hours. Serve 
with egg, foamy, or whatever sauce preferred. 

WASHINGTON PIE. 

^ cup butter, 1 cup sugar, IJ cup flour, 2 eggs, ^ cup 
milk, 2^ teaspoons baking powder. Cream butter, add 
sugar gradually, and eggs well beaten. Mix and sift 
flour and baking powder and add alternately with milk 
to first mixture. Bake in layer cake pans. Raspberry 
jam or jelly of any kind put between the layers. Sprinkle 
top with powdered sugar. Bake in three layers and eat 
while fresh baked. An old-fashioned New England re- 
ceipt. 

STEAMED PUDDING— '^JOHNNIE ^S DELIGHT. '^ 

2 1 cups chopped bread crumbs, | cup suet (butter is 
better), -J cup raisins, ^ cup milk, | cup New Orleans mo- 
lasses, ^ teaspoonful soda in milk, 1 egg, ^ teaspoonful 
cloves, I teaspoonful cinnamon. Steam 3 hours. 



72, 

EICE PUDDING. 
(F. M. Doty.) 

2 tablespoons rice, 2 tablespoons sugar, | teaspoon salt 
nutmeg, 1 quart milk. Bake 2 hours in slow oven. 

EICE PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS. 
(Mrs. W. R. Jacoby.) 

Put 1 quart of milk in a buttered baking dish, add 2 
tablespoons of washed rice, 2 tablespoons of sugar, one- 
half saltspoon of salt, vanilla to taste. Place in oven. 
AVhen browned on top stir down. Repeat twice and when 
stirred down the last time add ^ cup of seeded raisins and 
allow to brown again. 

SWEDISH RICE PUDDING. 
(Clara G. Geer.) 

1 sm.all cup of rice cooked in milk till soft, 1 cup (small) 
of sugar poured over the rice as soon as taken off the 
fire (the heat will melt it). When cold flavor with vanil- 
la, ^ of a box of gelatine dissolved, stir into the rice. 
Lastly add 1 pint of whipped cream and pour into a 
mold to harden. 

SAUCE FOR SAME. 

Melt 1 glass of currant jelly in a little water. Add 
Swedish punch or sherry to taste. This should be thin 
enough to pour. 

JERUSALEM PUDDING. 

Put -h pint rice flakes in double boiler with I pint milk 
and cook 5 minutes. Cover j box gelatine with | cup cold 
water, soak 10 minutes, add to hot rice, add J caps sugar, 
1 teaspoon vanilla. Take from fire, 2 figs, 12 dates 
chopped fine, set in bowl to cool. When it begins to 
harden stir in 1 pint whipped cream. Mold and serve 
with whipped cream. 

FROZEN RICE PUDDING. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

^ a cup of rice put to boil in quart of cold water. Let 
it come to the boiling point, then strain the water off and 
add 1 quart of hot milk and the grated rind of 3 oranges. 



73 

Boil in double boiler 1 hour, then add 2 scant cups of 
sugar, -^ spoon of salt, and boil one-half hour longer, or 
until tender. Set away to cool. Whip 1 pint of cream, 
add to the cold rice with the juice of 3 oranges and freeze. 

VELVET JELLY. 

higredients. — f cup sherry, | cup sugar, f pint cream 
J box Cox gelatine, juice of half of lemon, rind of 1 lemon. 
Mode. — Soak gelatine in cold water, heat gelatine, wine 
lemon and sugar thorough. Do not let the mixture boil, 
then take off fire and let stand till cool. Add cream, beat 
and put into molds. 

BISCUIT GLACE. 

1 quart cream (very rich), yolks of 6 eggs, J pound 
(scant) sugar, powdered, 2 tablespoons of vanilla, 2 dozen 
macaroons. Beat eggs, sugar and vanilla together until 
very light. Then whip the cream till very stiff and add 
macaroons rolled very fine. Mix the eggs and sugar with 
the cream. Do not stir them in or the cream will not re- 
main stiff — but take a knife and turn the mixture in. Have 
ready a bucket, fill it and pack immediately in ice and 
salt. Have the ice all ready before whipping the cream, 
as it must not stand. Use a quantity of salt, as it needs 
to freeze quite hard, and there is not the body to it, there 
is to ice cream. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Ingredients. — 1 pint of milk, 3 ounces of bread crumbs, 
grated rind of 1 lemon, yolks of 3 eggs, 2 ounces of but- 
ter, sugar to taste. Mode. — Cover the bottom of the dish 
with any kind of preserves, pour the mixture over it and 
bake an hour, beat the whites of eggs and a little sifted 
sugar into a stiff froth. Just before taking it out of the 
oven and pour over. Put it into the oven a few minutes 
to brown. This pudding is best cold. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 
(Mrs. Frank P. Hawkins.) 

Soak 2 dozen marshmallows 4 hours in cream flavored 
with a cup of caramelized sugar. Cut an angel cake in 
half cross ways. Spread a portion of the marshmallow 



74 

preparation on tlie lower half of the cake, put on the 
upper half and cover it with the rest of the marshmal- 
lows. Cover the whole of the cake, or heap on the top 
only, sweetened and seasoned whipped cream. A little 
elaboration in the way of candied cherries, violets may 
be used as a finish, 

PLUM PUDDING— (SIMPLE). 

John Bull's Own. » 

Ingredients.: — 1 pound of stale bread crumbs, 1 pound 
of beef suet, 1 pound of currants, 1 pound of raisins, ^ 
pound of citron, 6 ounces mixed candied fruit, few 
chopped almonds, 1 wineglassful brandy, 1 wineglassful 
sherry, 1 of noyan, a little salt, 5 eggs, a little nutmeg. 
Mode. — Chop the suet very fine, add bread crumbs, 
stone the raisins, wash and dry the currants, slice the 
fruit, mix all dry ingredients together, then thoroughly 
beat eggs, add them and lastly the wine, etc. Make into 
three puddings and boil in molds or basin for 6 hours. 
Serve with brandy sauce. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

I pound butter, ^ pound suet, ^ pound sugar, 3 
cups of flour, 1 pound raisins, 1 pound currants, J pound 
of citron, 2 eggs beaten separately, | pint of milk, 1 glass 
of brandy, 1 tablespoon of cloves and mace, 1 grated nut- 
meg. Boil in a cloth 3 hours. 

GRANDMOTHER'S PLUM PUDDING. 
(Isabel L. Clark.) 

1 cup beef suet chopped fine, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup milk, 
3 cups flour, 2 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon allspice, 
I teaspoon salt, 1 cup each of raisins, currants and citron 
cut fine. Steam 2 hours and serve with brandy sauce. 

JOHN'S DELIGHT. 
(Grace D. Pardridge.) 

2 cups chopped bread, ^ cup chopped suet, 1 egg, ^ cup 
molasses, 1 cup stoned raisins, 1 cup sweet milk with J 
teaspoon soda dissolved in it, | teaspoon cloves or nut" 



75 

meg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon and a pinch of salt. Boil 2 or 
3 hours. If bread is dry use a little more milk and some- 
times add a little flour if it seems very soft. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 
(Mrs. C. Granville Hammond.) 

1 pound bread crumbs, 1 pint milk (sweet milk), 1 
pound raisins, 1 pound currants, I pound citron, J pound 
beef suet, 1 teaspoon salt, 6 eggs, 1 heaping coffee cup 
sugar, 1 nutmeg ground, J teaspoon allspice, 1 teaspoon 
mace, 1| teaspoons cinnamon. Soak bread crumbs in 
the milk, add yolks of eggs and other ingredients, the 
fruit well flavored, the last thing the whites of eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth. Steam 5 hours. To be eaten with liquid 
sauce. 

COEN MEAL PUDDING. 
(Mabel D. Carey.) 

Stir into 1 pint of boiling milk 1 tablespoon of yellow 
corn meal and a little salt. Cool slowly 10 minutes. Stir 
in 2 tablespoons of sugar and 1 tablespoon of melted but- 
ter. Bake like a custard. Serve warm, with hard sauce 
or vanilla sauce. 

DANISH PUDDING. 

(Amanda S. Tillman.') 

8 eggs, beaten light with 8 tablespoonsful of white 
sugar, 1 quart (half cream, half milk) poured over the 
eggs when boiling. Flavor with vanilla, then return to 
double boiler, stirring constantly till brown sugar is cara- 
melled. Put about 1 pound brown sugar in frying pan 
and stir till melted to a syrup, then pour it into a baking 
pan, which must be greased and set in a pan of boiling 
water. Pour the custard at once into the baking pan 
(over the caramel) and bake as any custard. Serve next 
day with sweetened whipped cream covering the pud- 



ding 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 



GINGERBREAD PUDDINGS. 

4 cup molasses ; ^ cup sour cream ; i cup brown sugar ; 
2 tablespoons butter ; 2 cups flour ; 1 egg and 1 teaspoon 



76 

each soda, ground ginger, cinnamon. Beat butter and 
sugar to a cream ; add egg well beaten. Dissolve soda in 
warm water and mix with molasses before adding; then 
sift in flour and spices. Steam 2 hours. 

DELMONICO CUSTAED. 

Melt 18 to 24 Imnps of sugar and pour in well greased 
tin ; boil 1 quart milk and pour on to 6 well beaten eggs ; 
sweeten and flavor with vanilla ; pour the custard in pan 
with melted sugar ; bake in pan with water around it. Be 
careful not to bake it too long. Turn upside down on to 
a pudding dish and the melted sugar will be the sauce. 

BAKED CUSTAED. 

1 pint milk ; whites of 3 eggs ; 3 teaspoons sugar ; ounce 
of salt. Bake in cups in hot water, when cold grate maple 
sugar or chocolate over, surround with whipped cream. 

OEANGE FLOAT. 

6 oranges, sliced; 2 lemons, juice and rind; 3 eggs, 
whites only; 3 tablespoonfuls cornstarch; 3 cups sugar. 
Dissolve cornstarch in a little cold water; add 1 pint of 
boiling water ; the rind and juice of lemons ; 2 cups sugar 
and boil for few minutes. Slice the oranges into a glass 
dish with ^ cup sugar. Add mixture when cold. Beat 
whites of eggs with J cup sugar and cover. Serve with 
cream. 

SWISS CEEAM. 

Whites of 5 eggs beaten to a froth; 1 quart cream, 
sweeten to taste. Season with lemon and nutmeg, scald 
cream and turn onto froth of eggs. 

SCHAUM TOETE. 

AMiites of 6 eggs; 2 cups granulated sugar, beat 15 
minutes; 1 tablespoon vinegar, beat 10 minutes; 1 tea- 
spoon vanilla, beat 5 minutes. Butter 2 cake tins, sprinkle 
with flour, put in mixture and bake in slow oven 40 minutes 
or until a golden brown. Filling : Ice cream or whipped 
cream with blanched almonds. On top sliced peaches 
(when in season) or thin spreading of any jam. Most 
excellent. 



77 

CUSTAKD SOUFFLE. 

2 tablespoons butter ; 2 tablespoons flour ; 2 tablespoons 
sugar ; 1 cup milk ; 4 eggs. Let cup of milk come to boil. 
Put flour and butter together, add gradually to boiling 
milk. Beat yolks and sugar, add to cooked mixture and 
set away to cool. Beat whites stit¥ and add to cooled 
mixture. Bake in buttered pudding dish and serve with 
the following sauce: ^ cup partly melted butter; 1 cup 
powdered sugar ; | cup milk ; flavoring to taste. Put bowl 
containing mixture into pan of hot water for 2 or 3 min- 
utes. Serve with souffle. 

STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

Beat 1 egg and ^ teaspoon salt ; add gradually one cup 
of milk ; sift into this 2 cups of flour in which 3 teaspoons 
baking powder has been sifted; then add 1 tablespoon 
melted butter ; 2 squares of melted chocolate, and ^ cup 
of sugar. Turn into well buttered melon mold and steam 
for 2J hours. Serve with vanilla sauce. 

MAESHMALLOW CREAM. 
(Mrs. Adams.) 

To a pint of cream whipped stiff, add ^ lb. chopped 
marshmallows chopped in rather large pieces ; add ^ cup 
almonds or mixed nuts chopped fine. Prepare several 
hours before wanted and serve very cold. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 
(Mrs. Hastings.) 

3 eggs; 2 teaspoonfuls of powdered gelatine; 1 cup 
milk; j cup sugar; 1 pint cream; vanilla flavoring. Dis- 
sole gelatine in milk; bring to a boil in double boiler; 
add yolks of eggs, well beaten, with sugar ; and boil 2 or 
3 minutes. Remove and cool. Then add cream and whites 
of eggs, well beaten. Pour into moulds and eat with 
whipped cream. 

SLICED BANANAS. 

3 bananas sliced; juice of 1 orange; J cup sugar. Set 
in cold place two hours, cover with whipped cream and 
serve. 



78 

STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
(Mrs. L. G. Yoe.) 

1 egg, i cup sugar, -J cup milk, 1 cup flour, 1 lieaping 
teaspoon baking powder, H square Baker's chocolate, 2 
tablespoons butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Mix egg and 
sugar, add chocolate and butter which have been melted 
together — then milk, vanilla and flour. Steam in melon 
mould 2 hours. Serve hot with sweetened whipped 
cream. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
(Mrs. J. V. Brown.) 

1 pint boiled milk, ^ cup bread crumbs, 1 tablespoon 
melted butter, | cup sugar, 3 tablespoons chocolate, 2 
eggs, little salt, bake and serve with hard sauce. 

STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

3 tablespoons butter, f cup sugar, 2J cup flour, 4J 
teaspoons baking powder, ^ teaspoon salt, 2^ squares 
Baker's chocolate, powdered and melted, 1 cup of milk, 
1 egg, cream together the butter and sugar, add the egg, 
well beaten then the milk. Sift the flour, to which the 
baking powder and salt has been added, three times. 
Mix gently with the butter, sugar, egg and milk, adding 
the melted chocolate last. Turn into a buttered mold 
that may be covered tightly and steam for 2 hours. 
Serve with cream sauce. 

PINEHUEST CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
(Bessie S. Bullard.) 

10 tablespoons grated bread, 6 tablespoons grated 
chocolate, 1 pint milk, boil until thick; when cool add 1 
pint granulated sugar, 6 egg yolks, 2 egg whites beaten 
together. Bake in moderate oven, about 45 minutes. 
Make a meringue of the other 4 whites. Place on top and 
brown. To be eaten cold with cream. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
(Mrs. T. E. Wyles.) 

Scald 1 quart of milk. Into this stir 3 tablespoons of 
grated chocolate. When cold add 5 eggs, (reserving the 



79 

whites of 2 eggs), 5 tablespoons of sugar, 1 tablespoon 
of cornstarch dissolved in a little cold milk. Flavor. 
Bake i hour. Serve cold, covering with the whites of 
2 eggs, beaten with ^ cup brown sugar, or whipped 
cream if desired. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 
(Mrs. Ives.) 

Break 3 eggs into a bowl, beat well and add J cup 
sugar. When that is mixed well put in 1 pint of milk 
and ^ teaspoon vanilla. Then pour on the following 
caramel, 1 cup granulated sugar, melt slowly, taking 
care not to burn, add gradually ^ cup hot water, stir till 
free from lumps. Pour this into 9 greased cups and 
over it pour the custard. Place them in a baking pan 
containing water and bake in a hot oven about 25 min- 
utes or until a knife can be put in and drawn out with- 
out the custard sticking to it. Serve cold with cream. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

1 teacup raisins, 1 teacup suet, 1 teacup molasses, 1 
teacup milk, 3 apples cut fine, ^ teaspoon soda, scalded. 
Stir in flour as thick as cake batter. Boil three hours 
and serve with lemon sauce. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

1 cup of sugar, the yolks of 2 eggs well beaten, 1 cup 
of sweet milk, 3 tablespoons of melted butter, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 1 pint of flour, the grated rind 
of 1 lemon. Mix well and bake for half an hour. S'auce 
for pudding, the whites of 2 eggs beaten, with 1 cup of 
sugar and the juice of 1 lemon. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

1 pint of bread crumbs, 1 teacupful of sugar, 1 quart 
of milk, 2 eggs, flavoring or raisins. 1 pint of crumbs 
as fine as can be broken or chipped with a knife. To a 
quart of milk, 1 teacupful of sugar, 2 eggs and flavoring 
or raisins. Cover the top after baking with jelly or any 
other stewed fruit. Beat the white of the eggs and~ 



80 

spread over. Eeturn to the oven a few minutes until 
a light brown and the pudding rises to the height of 
elegance. 

EOLEY FOLEY. 

3 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder and a little 
salt sifted together. Mix with ^ cup lard and butter, 
then moisten with milk till quite soft. Eoll out quickly, 
spread thickly with any desired Jam and roll it up, fold- 
ing over the ends. Put into a well buttered, rather nar- 
row tin and steam 2 hours. Serve with hard or liquid 
sauce. 

HAED TIME PUDDING. 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup hot water, 1 cup chopped suet 
fine, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup currants, 1 cup citron chopped 
fine, 1 teaspoonful soda. Dissolve in a little vinegar. 
Flavor enough to make a thick batter. Steam 4 hours in 
one large can in 3 small ones, hard or soft sauce. 

FEITTEES. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, 2 cups of flour, 3 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, sifted with the flour. Pry in deep fat; and 
serve warm with maple syrup. 

EAISINS AND APPLES. 

2 cups raisins, 6 apples cored and peeled, cover raisins 
with boiling water and put on back of stove for 1 hour. 
Steam apples, add ^ cup sugar to raisins, boil 15 min- 
utes, pour raisins and syrup over the apples while hot. 
Serve cold. 

COCOANUT TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak 5 teaspoons tapioca in water over night. Put 
tapioca in 3 pints of boiling milk; boil ^- hour. It is 
best to use a double boiler. Beat yolks of three eggs 
and one whole egg with one cup of sugar. Add three 
or four tablespoons grated cocoanut, fresh cocoanut is 
preferable. Stir into milk and boil 10 minutes. Put in 
pudding dish. Beat whites of three eggs and stir in 



81 

three tablespoons of powdered sugar. Sprinkle with 
cocoanut and brown in oven. 

COFFEE TAPIOCA. 
(Mrs. J. V. Norcross.) 

1 cup coffee, J cup tapioca, i cup sugar, cook in double 
boiler until thick. Serve cold with cream. 

DUCHESS CREAM. 
(Mrs. Frank P. Hawkins.) 

1 cup pearl tapioca soaked over night, add water 
enough to cover and ^ cup sugar and cook until clear, 
add juice of 1 lemon, -J can pineapple with some of the 
juice ; when cold fold in beaten whites of two eggs and 
serve with whipped cream. 

CHOCOLATE TAPIOCA. 

(Van Nortw'k.) 

1 large tablespoon tapioca, 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 
pint milk, ^ square chocolate (melted first), 1 teaspoon 
vanilla. Heat milk, then add tapioca. If '^minute'' 
tapioca, boil in milk at least half an hour. Then add 
sugar and chocolate; when these are well cooked to- 
gether, take off the stove and add vanilla. Serve cold, 
with whipped cream. 

CHERRY TAPIOCA. 
(Mrs. E:- M. Watkins.) 

Put 4 tablespoons of fapioca in a pint of water to soak 
over night. In the morning pit a pint of cherries, add 
the juice of cherries to a pint of water and the tapioca, 
and let simmer for 20 minutes ; add sugar to make quite 
sweet and lastly add cherries, cook a while longer then 
set away on ice to cool ; and serve with whipped cream. 

LEMON SPONGE. 
(A, L. M. S.) 

Ingredients.— 1 ounce of gelatine, 1 pint cold water, 
rind of two lemons, } pound of loaf sugar, juice of three 
lemons, whites of 2 eggs. Mode. — Add water to gelatine 
and let it stand for 20 minutes. Then dissolve over the 



82 

fire. Add the rind of the lemons thinly pared, sugar 
and lemon juice, beat all for 2 minutes, strain and let it 
stand till nearly cold. Add the whites of 2 eggs well 
beaten and swish until it becomes of the consistency of 
sponge. Put lightly into a glass dish and make it look 
as rough as possible on the top. 

LEMON PUDDINa. 
(Mrs. T. E. Wyles.) 

3 heaping tablespoons cornstarch, made thin in cold 
water. Add 3 cups boiling water. Cook until thick, stir- 
ring all the time. Add 2 cups of sugar, grated rind 2, 
juice of 2 large lemons, and last 2 eggs beaten together. 
Bake 20 minutes in buttered dish. Serve ice cold with 
cream. 

GOOSEBERRY FOOL. 
(A. L. M. S.) 

Ingredients. — 1 quart of ripe gooseberries, 1 table- 
spoonful of butter, 1 teacupful of sugar, 3 eggs, 3 table- 
spoonfuls of white sugar. Mode. — Stew the gooseber- 
ries in just enough water to cover them. When soft and 
broken rub them through a sieve to remove the skins. 
While still hot, beat in the butter, sugar and yolks of the 
eggs. Pile in a glass dish and heap upon the top a 
merangue of the whipped whites and white sugar. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

1 quart flour, 1 pint New Orkians molasses, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 1 quart huckleberries. Mi^ ^ molasses and soda 
well before adding. 

MOCK BANANA. 

Apple sauce cooked in usual way, sweetened and flav- 
ored with banana flavoring. Add beaten white of an egg. 
(Delicious). 

JAM PUDDING. 

Whites of 4 eggs, ^ cup powdered sugar, ^ cup straw- 
berry jam. Beat eggs very stiff, add sugar and jam and 
continue beating. Bake in slow oven 45 minutes, stand 
in pan of water when baking. Make a custard of yolks 
of eggs, put around pudding and add whipped cream in 
center. This must be baked in tin with funnel center. 



83 

PEUNE SOUFFLE. 

Whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff, 3 dessertspoonfuls 
sugar, 15 prunes, mashed fine. Butter double boiler 
thoroughly, steam pudding one hour. Serve with whipped 
cream. (Excellent and does not fall.) 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

1 cup suet, 1 cup brown sugar, J cup citron, 1 cup 
molasses, 4 eggs, 3 cups flour, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup cur- 
rants. Spices to taste (1 part cloves and 2 parts cinna- 
mon) ; 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

DATE PUDDING (EXCELLENT). 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

1 heaping cup of seeded dates (cut fine), 1 cup Eng- 
lish walnuts, 1 cup sugar, whites of 7 eggs, 4 tablespoon- 
fuls bread crumbs, 1 teaspoonful Dr. Price's Cream Bak- 
mg Powder. Bake ^ hour in slow oven in bread pan. 
To beaten eggs (whites) add first sugar, crumbs and 
baking powder, then fruits and nuts. Serve cold whipped 
cream. 

^^GETABLE PUDDING. 

1 cup grated carrot, 1 cup grated potato, 1 cup raisins, 
1 cup currants, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup suet, 2 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon soda, spices to taste. Steam 3 hours 
and serve vnth any dark rich sauce. 

APPLIB PUDDING. " " " 

(Mrs. E. M. Watkins.) 

Slice 6 apples, put in dish with a little sugar and 
little water, and let them slightly cook. Make a biscuit 
dough of 1^ cups flour, about | cup butter, a little salt. 
Beat 1 egg with 1 cup milk, mix with flour and 3 tea- 
spoons baking powder (in flour). Serve with hard sauce. 

PEACH AMBROSIA. 
(Mrs. Lyman.) 

2 eggs, ^ cup sugar, J cup hot water, ^ cup flour. Beat 
volks stiff, add sugar, then hot water, then flour. Do 
not heat much ; 1 level teaspoon baking powder. Fold in 



84 

whites of eggs, beateu stiff. Bake. Spread with peaches 
and serve with whipped cream. 

OKANGE AND BANANA PUDDING. 
(Mrs. E. M. S.) 

1 cup sugar, 2 oranges, 2 bananas, sliced in a dish; 
more than half the sugar on the fruit. 1^ cups milk just 
come to a boil, 1 heaping teaspoonful corn starch with 
rest of sugar, yolks of 2 eggs beaten with the starch and 
a little milk; stir in with the milk and when it comes to 
a boil pour over the fruit. Eaten when cold. 

COMPOTE OF APPLES. 

Ingredients. — 1^ cups of sugar, 1 pint of water, 2 
pounds of apples, 1 large lemon. Mode. — Boil sugar and 
water together till you get thick syrup ; pare and quarter 
apples, put them in the syrup with rind of lemon, boil 
all together until mixture is thick enough to pour into 
a mould. When cold, turn out and cover with custard. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 
(Mrs. T. E. Wyles.) 

Make a good pastry, roll out thin and wrap each apple 
separately ; apples having been cored and the hole filled 
with sugar and a little x)owdered cinnamon; while doing 
this have boiling on the range a syrup of 1^ cups of 
sugar and as much water, and several sticks of cinna- 
mon. Put the dumplings in the syrup and bake at least 
^ hour. Serve with hard sauce. 

PINEAPPLE SPONGE. 
(Mrs. J. V. Norcross.) 

Dissolve i box gelatine in ^ cup water. Put a small 
cup of sugar in one can of chopped pineapple and let 
simmer a few minutes. Remove from fire and let cool, 
then stir in the gelatine. When it begins to harden stir 
in J pint whipped cream and lastly the beaten whites of 
4 eggs. 



85 

WHIPPED CEEAM DESSERT. 
(Mrs. Hussey.) 

1 quart cream, beaten whites of 3 eggs, ^ cup of hot 
milk, 2 tablespoons Knox gelatine dissolved in hot milk. 
Add 4 cup powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons sherry, 1 table- 
spoon brandy, -J teaspoon vanilla. Add beaten whites of 
eggs and quart of cream beaten stiff. Arrange lady 
fingers around dish or mold with cherries on top. 

CARAMEL BAVARIAN CREAM. 
(Mrs. Luther.) 

^l cup granulated sugar (caramel), f cup scalded milk, 
yolks 2 eggs, | cup sugar. Make custard of above in- 
gredients and pour over beaten whites. Dissolve small 
tablespoon granulated gelatine in ^ cup water. Add to 
custard and stir in ice water till it thickens. Whip 2 
cups cream. Fold in mixture and mold. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
(Mrs. John A. Putnam.) 

1 pint milk, X2 tablespoons grated bread, 4 tablespoons 
grated chocolate, ^ cup sugar, 3 eggs. Put the milk on 
in double boiler. Stir in bread crumbs, which have been 
previously mixed with chocolate and sugar. Stir until 
thickens, then take it off the stove. Stir in 3 yolks and 
beaten whites of 2 eggs. Set away to cool. One-half 
hour before serving put into oven, then put on meringue 
of 1 beaten white of egg and sugar. Serve with hard 
sauce. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

Ingredients. — 4 box of Cox gelatine, 1 quart of milk, 4 
oggs, 7 tablespoons of sugar, 1 tablespoon vanilla, 1 
dozen macaroons, 1 glass sherry. Mode. — Dissolve gela- 
tine in the milk, pour it over the well beaten yolks of 4 
eggs that have had 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar beaten into 
them. Let it boil till it wheys slightly. Take off the fire 
and pour the mixture into the whipped whites of 4 eggs 
that have had 3 tablespoons of sugar beaten into them. 
Add the vanilla and macaroons that have been broken 
up into a cup of sherry. Pour into molds that have been 
rinsed with cold water. 



86 

APPLE CUSTARDS. 
(Mrs. Frank E. McMillin.) 

Take six medium sized apples, peel and core, and cook 
slowly in slightly sweetened water. When tender, drain, 
and place each apple in a large custard cup ; fill the cen- 
ter with chopped almonds, then fill up the cups with a 
custard made of 1 pint of milk, three eggs, four heaping 
tablespoons of sugar, one level tablespoon of flour, one 
teaspoon of lemon extract. Set the cups in a pan of water 
and bake in a slow oven until the custard is set. Serve 
cold with plenty of whipped cream. This is a nice des- 
sert, especially for children. 

DESSERTS. 
(Mrs. John A. Putnam.) 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 

Stew 1 pound of prunes, stone them, rub through a sieve 
and measure: 4 cups prunes, ^ cup sugar, 1 teaspoon 
cream tartar, 4 eggs. Add yolks first, and last the whites. 
Bake 20 minutes in a pan of hot water. Serve with 
cream. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 
(Mrs. J. G. Mott.) . 

Soak 20 prunes over night, then cook. Take off out- 
side skin and remove the stones and rub through a col- 
ander. Beat the whites of 4 large or 5 small eggs very 
stiff, then add 6 tablespoons of granulated sugar and 
beat well together. Then add the prunes and flavor with 
vanilla. Put mixture in double boiler and boil 1 hour. 
Serve with whipped cream. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 
(H. 0. Schumacher.) 

8 large apples — peel, core and quarter; 2 tablespoons 
butter, juice of 1 lemon, 1 cup white granulated sugar, 
little nutmeg, whites of 3 eggs, ^ cup powdered sugar. 
Heat butter, granulated sugar, lemon juice and nutmeg 
in double boiler. In this cook the quartered apples until 
tender. Put in glass dish and cover with meringue made 



87 

of whites of eggs and powdered sugar. Serve the syrup 
separately. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 
(Mrs. Carleton Mosely.) 

1 stale brick loaf of bakers' bread grated, 10 eggs, J 
pound sugar, 1 pound suet chopped fine, 1 cup molasses, 
2 pounds seeded raisins chopped fine, and 10 ounces 
citron, 1 pound currants, 1 teaspoon ground cloves, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, 1 nutmeg, 1 winglass brandy, 1 winglass- 
sherry. Steam 6 hours. 

SAUCE FOR THE ABOVE. 

Cream 1 cup powdered sugar and ^ cup butter. Add 
gradually, beating all the time, two tablespoons sherry 
wine and a little nutmeg. Set on the stove in a pan of 
boiling water for about 10 minutes before using, beating 
all the time. Remove from stove as soon as it becomes 
foamv. 

FIG WHIP. 

5 cooked figs, 4 whites of eggs, ^ cup of sugar, -} tea- 
spoon of salt, boiled custard made of 1 pint milk, 4 
yolks of eggs, 1-3 cup of sugar, ^ teaspoon of salt. Cut 
the figs in tiny bits, beat the whites dry; gradually beat 
in the sugar and salt, then fold in the figs. Turn in a 
buttered and sugared dish. Bake on many folds of paper 
surrounded with boiling water. The water should not 
boil during the cooking. The whip is done when firm in 
the center. Serve hot with boiled custard, or with cream 
and sugar. 

SLICED FIGS IN SHERRY WINE JELLY. 

1 tablespoon granulated gelatin, i cup of cold water, f 
cup of boiling water, } cup sugar, ^ cup sherry wine, 
juice of 4: lemon, 5 or 6 figs, whipped cream. Soften the 
gelatin in the cold water, dissolve in the boiling water; 
add the sugar occasionally until cold. Add the wine and 
lemon juice. Let a mold holding a scant pint become 
chilled in cold or ice water. A fluted mold is good for 
this dish. Cut the figs in slices, dip some of these in the 
jelly mixture and use them to decorate the mold. Then 
fill the mold alternately with slices of figs and the mix- 



88 

ture, letting the jelly set partially each time before add- 
ing the slices of figs. Garnish with whipped cream. Or- 
ange or lemon juice may be used in place of the sherry 
wine. 

FIG PUDDING. 
(Mrs. H. B. Clarke.) 

6 cups grated bread crumbs, ^ pound figs chopped fine, 
1 cup suet chopped fine, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup milk. 
Mix bread and suet, then figs and sugar, — 2 eggs well 
•beaten, a little lemon juice, then mix | pound almonds, 
i cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking i30wder, salt. Steam 4 
hours. 

FIG PUDDING. 
(Miss Kate F. Floyd.) 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 cups beef suet 
chopped fine, 1 cup figs chopped fine, 2 eggs, ^ teaspoon 
salt, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water, 1 teaspoon 
each of cinnamon, cloves, and one nutmeg. Mix well. 
Butter a pan thoroughly and tie over it, loosely, a cloth, 
also well buttered. Steam two hours. Serve in form, 
with either hard butter sauce or foamy sauce. 

STEAMED FIG PUDDING. 

1 pound of figs, I cup of nuts, -^ pound of suet, 2 cups 
of bread crumbs, 2 cups of milk, | cup sugar, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon mace, 1-3 tea- 
spoon cloves, yolks 4 eggs, whites 4 eggs. Chop the figs, 
nuts and suet together, mix the sugar, salt and spices 
and add to the beaten yolks; mix the bread crumbs 
through the fig-suet mixture, then mix in the yolks and 
sugar, lastly add the whites, beaten dry. Steam in a 
well buttered mold 4 hours. Serve with hard or liquid 
sauce. 

FIG PUDDING. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients — 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of chopped suet, 
1 cup of milk, 8^ cups of flour, two eggs, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, 1 of cinnamon, ^ of teaspoonful of nutmeg, 1 pint 
of figs. Mix together molasses, suet, spice and the figs 
chopped fine. Dissolve soda with one teaspoonful of hot 
water and mix with the milk and add to other ingredi- 



89 

ents: then beat eggs very light and stir into this mix- 
ture. Add flour and beat thoroughly. 

FIG PUDDING. 
(M. F. Doty.) 

6 ounces suet chopped fine, 6 ounces bread crumbs, 6 
ounces sugar, ^ pound figs chopped fine, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
milk, 1 nutmeg, ^ glass brandy, ^ teaspoon soda, 1 tea- 
spoon cream of tartar. Steam 3 hours. 

SAUCE. 

^ cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, juice and rind 
of one lemon. Beat to a cream and when ready to serve 
add one pint of boiling water. 

SAUCE. 

2 eggs, f cup sugar, J cup butter. Cream butter and 
sugar together, add beaten yolks, heat very hot, water 
till thin, stir in well beaten whites, flavor with vanilla. 

SAUCE. 

^ cup sugar, 1 teaspoon cornstarch, 1 tablespoon but- 
ter and preserved ginger, chopped ; juice 1 orange. Add 
orange juice to sugar and fill cups up with water. Boil 
clear before adding ginger. 

WINE SAUCE FOR PLUM PUDDING. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Yolks of 4 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, ^ cup butter, 1 pint of 
sherry wine. Beat eggs very light; add sugar and melted 
butter, and stir until very light. When ready to serve 
the pudding, bring the wine to a boil and pour over eggs 
and sugar. Stir well and serve. 

HARD SAUCE. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

^ a cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, ^ cup of cream, 4 
tablespoons of wine. Beat butter until smooth, add 
sugar and gradually the cream, then the wine, a spoon- 
ful at a time. When light and creamy put the bowl over 



90 

a vessel of hot water, and beat very hard for a few 
minutes until the sauce is foamy. Set away to get cold. 

FOAMING PUDDING SAUCE. 

(Mrs. T. E. Wyles.) 

1 cup of powdered sugar, 1-3 cup of butter. Cream 
these together and add 4 tablespoons of sweet milk and 3 
tablespoons of wine. Then put away until dinner time. 
Wlien ready to use, set the bowl containing the mixture 
into a pan of boiling water. Stir 3 or 4 minutes, until 
it is creamy. Pour out, add a little nutmeg, and serve 
at once. 

SAUCE LIQUID. 

(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

1 egg, ] cup sugar, 2-3 cup boiling milk. Cook in 
double boiler 15 minutes. Add flavoring desired. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

(Mrs. C. C. Hugbes.) 

I cup of butter, 1 cup of powdered sugar, 1 cup of 
heavy cream, -J teaspoon vanilla. Cream together the 
butter and sugar. Add the vanilla and gradually the 
cream. Beat until stiff. 

SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 

(Mrs. R. Calvin Dobson.) 

1 J cup sugar, J cup butter, 2 tablespoons flour, 2 cups 
boiling water. Let come to a boil and flavor to taste. 

SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES. 

ITALIAN BUNS. 

(Mrs. Fred M. Steele.) 

Whip 4 eggs to a froth. Add half a pound of sifted 
sugar, the grated rind of half a lemon and half a pound 
of flour. Mix and beat well. Roll into round balls, put 
on a buttered tin and bake in a moderate oven. (Historic 
cakes given me abroad.) 



91 

KISSES. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

The whites of 3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Add 1 
cup of granulated sugar and beat very thoroughly. Put 
this mixture over boiling water and heat till well set, 
which will be about 10 minutes. Then add 2 cups grated 
cocoanut, 1 tablespoon cornstarch. Drop on buttered pa- 
per and bake 15 minutes. 

COCOANUT MUFFS. 
(Mrs. Troxel.) 

The whites of 3 eggs, 1 cup of ground sugar, 1 teaspoon 
of the extract of vanilla, 1 tablespoonful of cornstarch, 
2 cups of dessicated cocoanut. Beat the whites well, then 
add the sugar and beat over steam until a crust forms on 
the bottom and sides of the dish. Take it off the steam, 
add the other ingredients and drop on buttered tins. 
Bake rather quickly to a light brown. 

COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, brown or granulated, 2 eggs, 1 cup sour 
cream, ^ cup butter, | teaspoon salt. Flavor with nut- 
meg or lemon. Stir in flour as long as you can, then 
work in more on the board until it can be cut into cookies. 

COOKIES. 

3 eggs, heaping cup sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 teaspoon soda 
dissolved in 2 teaspoons milk, 2 teaspoons cream of tar- 
tar. ]\tix soft, bake in quick oven. 

: COOKIES. 

(Mrs. Hastings.) 

2 cups of ^'C" sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 nutmeg, 
1 teaspoon soda, 4 tablespoons milk. Roll thin and bake 
in quick oven. 

IMPERIAL COOKIES. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — ^ cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, 2 eggs, 
tablespoonful of milk, 2^ cujds of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, 1 teaspoonful of extract of vanilla, all 



92 

level measurements. Cream, sugar and butter, mix bak- 
ing powder in half the quantity of flour, add to the rest, 
add to the sugar, butter and other ingTedients. This 
may require a little more flour to roll out easily. Use 
common bread flour. 

COOKIES. 
(Mrs. E. J. Beatty.) 

Mix thoroughly ^ cup lard, 2 cups C sugar, 2 well 
beaten eggs, 2 tablespoons salt, ^ cup cold water in which 
^ heaping teaspoon of soda has been dissolved. Add flour 
to make batter stiff enough to roll out and cut. Spread 
with granulated sugar and bake. 

SODA COOKIES. 

1^ cups sugar, ^ cup butter, ^ cup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 1 
teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, - 

TAYLOR CAKES. 

1 cup New Orleans molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup 
butter, 2 eggs, 3J cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda scalded in 
boiling water. Drop on well buttered tins in very mod- 
erate oven. 

GINGER COOKIES. . 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

2 cups of molasses, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of butter, 4 
eggs, 1 tablespoon of ginger, 3 even teaspoons of soda dis- 
solved in J cup of hot water. Enough flour to roll out. 
Cut thick and bake. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup molasses, ^ cup butter, 1 tea- 
spoon (level) soda, 2 teaspoons (level), ginger, 2 tea- 
spoons (level), cloves, 2 teaspoons (level), cinnamon. 
Rub sugar to flour in the shortening. Flour enough to 
make a stiif dough. Roll very thin and bake in a quick 
oven. These are to be recommended. 

DATE WAFERS. 
(Mrs. D. Cobb.) 

4 cups oatmeal, 2 cups flour, 1 cup lard and butter 




93 

mixed, I cup sour milk with one teaspoon of soda dis- 
solved in it, 1 cup sugar, a little salt. Fillmg — 1 cup su- 
gar^ 1 cup water, 1 pound dates or figs. Stone dates and 
boil with sugar and water until smooth. Let cool. Put 
oatmeal flour, sugar and salt in bowl and work in lard 
and butter same as -in pie crust. Moisten with milk and 
soda. Roll very thin. Spread ^ of it with date pulp. 
Fold other half over. Cut in squares and bake on pan 
turned upside down. 

BOSTON COOKIES. 
(Mary F. Clark.) 

1 cup butter, 1^ cups sugar, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in 1.^ teaspoon of hot water, 3^ cups flour, J tea- 
spoon salt, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup chopped nuts, ^ 
cup each of raisins and currants. Cream, butter and su- 
gar. x\dd eggs and warm water. Sift dry ingredients 
and add nuts and fruit last. This makes a very stiff 
batter, which should be dropped with a teaspoon on but- 
tered pans. Bake in quick oven. 

GINGER SNAPS. 
(Mrs. J. V. Norcross.) 

Boil 1 cup molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 heaping tea- 
spoons ginger until quite thick. Remove from fire and 
cool. Take ^ cup butter and 2 teaspoons soda and fill the 
rest of the cup with boiling water. Stir and add to 
cooked mixture. Add as little flour as possible in order 
to roll very thin. 

SCRAP CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

1 cup light brown sugar, J cup butter, melted after 
•measuring, 1 egg, ^ cup sweet milk, ^ teaspoon soda in 
milk, li cups flour, 1^ to 2 squares chocolate melted. 
Choi3ped nuts. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

2 squares Baker's chocolate, 1 cup sugar, ^ cup but- 
ter, 1 egg, J cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, ^ cup chopped 
raisins, 1 cup chopped nuts, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2^ cups 
flour. 



V 



94 

MAEGUEKITES. 
(Mrs. Hastings.) 

To 1 cup sugar add 4 tablespoonfuls of water. Boil 
until it threads, as for frosting. Tlien add white of 1 
egg well beaten and 1 cup chopped nuts. Spread in waf- 
ers and brown in oven. 

CUEEANT COOKIES. 

1 cup butter, i cup sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup currants, 
I cup hot water, 2 eggs, 1 level teaspoon soda, ^ teaspoon 
nutmeg. 

FEUIT COOKIES. 
(Mrs. T. E. Wyles.) 

1^ cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, ^ cup milk, 1 egg, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 3 table- 
spoons currants or raisins chopped. Mix soft and roll 
out, using just enough flour to stiffen. Cut out, wet tops 
with milk and sprinkle with sugar. Bake on buttered tins 
in quick oven. 

FEUIT COOKIES (SOFT). 
(Mrs. Howard A. Wrenn.) 

1 cup sugar (brown), 1 cup shortening (lard), 1 cup 
molasses, ^ cup hot water, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons soda, 1 
teaspoon cinnamon, ^ teaspoon cloves, 1 cup chopped 
raisins, 1 cup walnut meats, salt, 4 cups flour (about). 
Cream, sugar and lard. Add eggs well beaten. Put mo- 
lasses into large dish. Dissolve soda in a little water. 
Beat into molasses until foaming. Add balance of in- 
gredients. Drop teaspoon full into buttered tins. Bake 
in moderate oven. 

DELICIOUS EAISIN COOKIES. 

1 cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 eggs, 1 10-cent pack- 
age of raisins floured. Add enough flour to make dough 
stiff enough to roll. Flavor with Bee brand vanilla. If 
you like, add 1 cup of nuts. Eoll very thin with sugar 
instead of flour on board and cut in round shapes. Use 
about 1 cup of sugar in rolling them out so they will be 
sugary. 



95 

DROP NUT COOKIES. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup currants, 
1 cup chopped nuts, 1 cup sour milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 1 teaspoon baking powder in flour and fruit, 1 tea- 
spoon cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon allspice, 4 
cups flour. 

HERMITS. 

1| cups brown sugar, 1 cup shortening, 5 tablespoons 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 saltspoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, J teaspoon nutmeg, ^ teaspoon cloves, 2 eggs, 
1 cup raisins, ^ cup chopped walnuts, 3 cups flour. 

HICKORY NUT WAFERS. 

1 cup sugar, f cup butter, ^ cup sour milk, 1 egg, 1 tea- 
cup hickory nuts chopped. Roll thin as a wafer. Bake, 
sprinkle with sugar. Fine to serve with chocolate or cof- 
fee. 

HERMITS. 

(Mrs. R. Calvin Dobson.) 

2 eggs, 2-3 cup butter, 1^ cups sugar, 1 cup chopped 
raisins, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg, 
4 tablespoons sweet milk, 1 small teaspoon of soda. 

HERMITS. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

J cup butter, 1 cup granulated sugar creamed together, 
I cup chopped raisins with 2 tablespoons sifted flour, ^ 
teaspoon each cinnamon, mace and nutmeg, | cup milk, 2 
teaspoons in flour enough to make soft batter. 

BROWNIES. 

Ingredients. — 1 cup of sugar, | cup of flour, J cup of 
butter, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, | cup of chopped 
walnuts, 2 sticks of chocolate. Mode. — Cream butter, 
add sugar, flour, walnuts and chocolate which has been 
melted. Add well beaten eggs, test and drop mixtures 
into very small muffin pans and bake in moderate oven 
for 20 minutes. 



96 

BROAVNIES— COMPANY CAKES. 
(Mrs. Henry Thayer.) 

1 cup sugar, ^ cup butter, 2 eggs, ^ cup flour, 2 squares 
of chocolate, 1 cup walnuts, little salt, vanilla. Make as 
you would a cake. Spread on a buttered tin. Cut into 
squares before taking from pan. 

SCOTCH COOKIES. 
(Mrs. G. A. Mason.) 

1 cup of shortening, half butter and half lard, 1^ cups 
of sugar, 3 eggs, 10 tablespoons of sour milk, 1 teaspoon 
baking powder, 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 3 cups of oatmeal, 
2 cups of flour and a little salt, 1 cup of currants, 1 cup of 
raisins, chopped. Drop from spoon on buttered tins to 
bake. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, cream together, 2 eggs, 1 cup 
raisins chopped fine, 1 teaspoon soda scalded, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, 5 tablespoons milk, 2 cups flour, 2 cups oatmeal. 
Should be eaten as soon as they are made. 

OAT MEAL COOKIES. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

^ cup butter, 1 cup lard, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 5 table- 
spoonfuls sour milk, 1 small teaspoonful soda, 1 large 
teaspoonful Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder, 2 cups 
oatmeal (dry), 2 cups flour, ^ cup raisins cut up and 
floured. Flavor with Bee brand nutmeg and cinnamon 
or vanilla. If the batter is dropped from teaspoon upon 
greased paper and baked it is called rocks. If rolled and 
cut with biscuit or cookie cutter it is called cookies. 

OATMEAL MACAROONS. 
(Miss F. Papps.) 

5 cup of sugar, 3 cups of oatmeal (Quaker oats), 3 ta- 
blespoons of butter, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, 
1 teaspoon of vanilla, ^ teaspoon of salt. Mix the oat- 
meal, baking powder, salt and sugar. Melt the butter 
after it is measured, and mix well into the oatmeal. Beat 
the egg and add with the vanilla. Mold in a teaspoon and 



97 

drop on a butter tin. . Bake till a light brown in a mod- 
erate oven. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

1 cup butter and lard mixed, 1^ cups sugar, 6 table- 
spoons sour milk, J teaspoon soda, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 2 cups dry 
rolled oats, 2-J cups flour, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup 
chopped walnuts. Sift salt, soda, baking powder and 
spices with flour. Drop batter from teaspoon on to 
greased pan and bake. 

OAT MEAL DEOP CAKES. 

(Mrs. D. M. Er shine.) 

2 cups brown sugar, ^ cup butter, 1 egg, little salt, 5 
tablespoons sour cream and pinch of soda, 2 cups rolled 
oats, 1 cup flour and 1 teaspoon baking powder ^ pound 
or more of pecan nuts, rolled. Drop on buttered tins and 
bake in moderate oven. 

COOKIES. 
(Mrs. Ten Broeck.) 

1 pound brown sugar, 3 eggs, 2 cups flour, ^ teaspoon 
ground ginger, | teaspoon ground cinnamon, ^ teaspoon 
ground cloves, 2 ounces chopped citron 2 ounces chopped 
almonds, a handful almonds cut lengthwise. Butter 
pans, spread with dough, bake until brown, then cut. 

OLD ENGLISH JAM BALLS. 
(Mrs. Fred M. Steele.) 

(Very fine, if directions are followed closely.) 

Take 1 pound of powdered sugar and 1 pound of fine 

flour dried in the oven and make it to a paste with the 

whites of 3 eggs well beaten with 2 gills of cream and ^ 

pound of butter, melted and beaten together, then add 

1 pound of blanched sweet almonds pounded to a paste. 
Knead these all together with the hands and last work in 

2 tablespoons of rose water. Cut the cakes in fancy 
figures. Bake in a moderate oven. Served at both lunch- 
eon or tea. Always put in a good pinch of salt. 



98 

/ FANCY GINGER CAKES. 

(Mrs. Frank Pardridge.) 

Cream 1 cup of butter with 2 of brown sugar, add 1 cup 
currants, add 1 cup chopped walnuts, 2 teaspoons cin- 
namon, 1 teaspoon ground cloves, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 
teaspoon ginger, pinch of salt, 3 eggs well beaten, ^ cup 
cooking molasses, 2 teaspoons baking soda dissolved in 
cup of hot water. Mix all the ingredients together, also 
the cup of water which contains the baking soda. Just 
enough flour to make a nice batter. A teaspoonful of but- 
ter dropped on a greased pan for each little cake. Place 
a raisin on top of each cake. Bake in a hot oven. Spread 
on a cloth to cool. 

ALMOND WAFEES. 
(Mrs. Frank R. Pardridge.) 

Cream I cup butter, add gradually ^ cup powdered 
sugar and I cup milk drop by drop ; then add ^ cup bread 
flour and | teaspoon of vanilla. Spread very thinly with 
a broad, long-bladed knife on a buttered inverted drip- 
ping pan. Sprinkle with almonds, blanched and chopped, 
crease in 3-inch squares and bake in a slow oven until 
delicately browned. Place pan on back of range. Cut 
squares apart with a sharp knife and roll while warm in 
tubular or cornucopia shape. If squares become too brit- 
tle to roll place in oven to soften. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

2 cups flour, ^ cup sugar, ^ teaspoon salt, i to ^ cup 
milk, 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful melted butter, 4 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder. Mix in the order given. Add ^ cup of 
milk to the agg, and add this mixture to the dry ingredi- 
ents. Then add as much of the milk as will make the 
dough just soft enough to handle. Fry in deep fat and 
when done drain on paper. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

(Mrs. Wm. Millard.) 

2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 4 tablespoons melted lard, 1 tum- 
bler sweet milk, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 3J cups 
flour. Salt and nutmeg. 



99 

DOUdHNUTS. 
(Mrs. Chas. H. Warren.) 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons melted 
butter, scant 3 pints flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder; 
roll as soft as possible and fry in deep, hot lard. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon melted 
butter, 1 quart unsifted flour, 1 large teaspoon baking 
powder, 1 even teaspoon soda. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
(Mrs. Howard A. Wrenn.) 

1 egg, i cup sugar, ^ cup stveet milk, 2 tablespoons 
melted lard, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder ; salt 
and nutmeg to taste. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
(Mrs. Howard A. Wrenn.) 

1 cup sugar, 1 egg, ^j cup sour cream, into wbicli stir 
4 spoon of soda, 2 cups flour ; salt and nutmeg to taste. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
(Mrs. Hussey.) 

2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, J cup sweet milk, 1^ teaspoonful 
baking powder, 1 tablespoon butter, melted ; little nutmeg, 
pinch of salt. Flour to mix soft. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
(Mrs. D. M. Erskin.) 

1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, beaten together, 1 pinch salt, 3 
teaspoons melted lard, 1 cup milk, a little less than a quart 
of flour, and 2 rounding teaspoons baking powder. Have 
dough about like cookies, and cut and fry in deep fat 
which smokes a little. 

VANITIES. 
(Mrs. Mihills.) 

Beat 2 eggs very light, add half teaspoon of salt and 
flour to roll. Take a piece of dough as large as a hickory 



100 

nut, roll as thin as paper, cut and fry in hot lard. They 
will be done in a few seconds. Sprinkle with powdered 
sugar. They can be rewarmed the second day in a hot 
oven in a moment. They are crisp and light. 

JUMBLES. 
(Mrs. McMeekin, Chicago.) 

1 cup of granulated sugar, J cup of butter, 2 eggs, ^ 
cup of milk, 2 cups of flour, 2 level teaspoons baking- 
powder, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, | cup currants. Cream 
butter and sugar together, then drop in eggs without 
beating and beat till very light, then flour and milk alter- 
nately, with baking powder and cinnamon in flour. Bake 
in flat tins and cut in squares. 

CRULLEES. 

i cup butter (scant), 1 cup sugar (scant), 1 cup milk, 
3 eggs, 1 glass brandy, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Flour 
enough to roll out. 



CAKES, FROSTINGS AND FILLINGS. 

ALMOND CAKES. 
(Mrs. Daniel Cobb.) 

I' pound powdered sugar, whites of 3 eggs well beaten, 
juice of I lemon; stir for 30 minutes. . Mix with ^ pound 
almonds that have been blanched, and also add rind of 4 
lemon grated. Bake in moderate oven and cut in length- 
wise strips. Delicious to serve with afternoon tea. 

blijeberry cake. 

(Mrs. C. B. Richards.) 

1 small cup sugar, ^ cup butter, yolks of 2 eggs beaten 
to a cream, H cups of sweet milk, flour enough for cake 
batter. 3 teaspoons baking powder. Add whites of 2 eggs, 
beaten stiff. Dredge 1 quart of blueberries and stir into 
mixture just before baking. Bake quickly. 



101 

BROWN CAKE. 
(Mrs. H. B. Clarke.) 

1 cup sugar, -} cup butter, 2 cups flour, ^ cup milk, 2 
eggs, 1^ teaspoons baking powder. Custard part. — 2 
squares Baker's chocolate, yolk 1 egg, 2 tablespoons su- 
gar, J cup milk. Boil until thick, allow to cool and stir 
into cake part. Bake in 2 layers. Filling. — ^ cup but- 
ter, 1 cup confectioner's sugar, cream together and 
flavor with small glass Jamaica rum. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

(E. M. S.) 

J cuj) sugar, ^ cup chocolate, yolk 1 egg, just a little 
water ; cook to a jelly. 1 cup sugar, ^ cup butter, 2 eggs, 
^ cup milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, -| of a cake of chocolate 
grated, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoonful of vanilla ; then add the 
flrst part of cooked chocolate. Be sure and have it cold. 
This is a good sized loaf cake. 

CUP CAKE. 
(Mrs. H. W. Boyd.) 

1 cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 4 eggs, 1 cup of milk, vanilla or 
lemon. Sift the baking powder in the flour. Flavor. 

BLACK CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

-J cup butter, 1 cup sugar, ^ cup milk, 2 cups sifted flour, 
3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda. Shave | cake chocolate and 
mix with ^ cup milk and 1 cup sugar. Boil until smooth. 
Flavor with vanilla, cool, mix and bake in a slow oven. 

DELICATE CAKE. 
(J. E. B. Haskin.) 

2 cups powdered sugar, | cup butter, | cup milk, 1 tea- 
spoon cream tartar, | teaspoon soda, whites of 5 eggs, 
2 cups flour, 1 cup cornstarch. Put soda in the milk and 
cream tartar in the flour. 



102 

DEIED APPLE CAKE. 
(Mrs. Frank Lincoln Wean.) 

2 cups dried apples, soak all night and in the morning 
boil slowly in 1 cup dark molasses for 2 hours. Add 
1 cup sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sour milk, 4 cups of well 
sifted flour, 2 cups of raisins chopped fine, 1 cup of Eng- 
lish walnuts chopped, 14 cups citron, candied oranges, and 
lemon peel mixed and chopped ; 1 teaspoon of cloves, all- 
spice and cinnamon, -J teaspoon nutmeg, 2 teaspoons soda, 

1 teaspoon baking powder. Keep as a fruit cake. 

ELECTION CAKE. 
(YanNortw'k.) 

2 cups of sugar, 1| cups of butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup of milk, 

2 tablespoons baking pwder, 3 or 4 cups of flour, 2 cups 
of raisins, 2 cups of currants, 1 cup of citron chopped, 1 
cup of lemon peel chopped, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1 
teaspoon almond extract ; ^ cup of chopped almonds may 
be added. Bake slowly, in two loaves, an hour and a 
half. Will keep a month or two, if desired. 

FPtUIT CAKE. 
(Mrs. Chas. H. Warren.) 

10 eggs, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound butter, 1| pounds 
flour, 1 pound raisins, 1 pound currants, ^ pound citron, 
-I pound orange peel or lemon peel, J ounce cinnamon, 
I ounce cloves, J ounce mace, |- ounce nutmeg, 4 table- 
spoons brandy or grape juice, 1 teaspoon baking powder. 
Makes one large loaf. Bake 3 or 4 hours in slow, steady 
oven. 

FEDERAL CAKE. 
(Mrs. John Fitch Curtis.) 

2 cups light brown sugar, -J cup butter, 1 cup sour milk, 

3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda in sour milk, 2 cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder in flour milk, 1 cup raisins 
chopped, 1 cup English walnuts chopped, 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon allspice. Vanilla 
to flavor. 



103 

**AUNT HAUNDLES' FRUIT CAKE.'' 
(Mrs. Pan! Smith.) 

1 cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, -J cup molasses, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 1 cup flour, 4 eggs, ^ tea spoonful cream of 
tartar, 1 teaspoonfal soda, 2 pounds raisins chopped 
fine. 1 nutmeg and a little brandy. 

EGGLESS FEUIT CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, ^ cup butter, 1 cup sour milk with 
1 teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ^ tea- 
spoon cloves, 1 cup raisins, seeded and chopped. Bake 
slow for 1 hour. Put the spices in some milk so as to 
turn it dark. 

ENGLISH FRUIT CAKE. 
(Mrs. Benjamin A. Fessenden.) 

1^ pounds raisins, H pounds currants, ^ pound citron, 
I pound each of orange candied and lemon peel, ^ pound 
butter, 4 pound brown sugar, 2 nutmegs, 1 cup molasses, 
I cup brandy, 8 eggs. Wash the raisins and currants 
thoroughly, and have them made perfectly dry; add the 
chopped citron and candied orange and lemon peel and the 
brown sugar, grated nutmeg, the molasses; the butter 
partially melted, the eggs well beaten, the brandy; and 
then just enough carefully sifted flour to make the 
thinnest possible batter of the mixture. Put into pans 
and bake in a good, even, moderate oven 4 hours. 

^OIITE FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup butter (scant), 2 cups sugar, 2^ cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, whites of 6 eggs, f cup milk, 1 
pound almonds, blanched and sliced thin, ^ pound citron, 
I pound seeded raisins. 

SUMMER FRUIT CAKE. 

4 cups brown sugar, ^ cup butter, 2 cups buttermilk 
or sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda scalded, 4 cups flour, | 
pound currants, ^ pound raisins, 1 teaspoon molasses, 4 
teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ginger. Small bit of all- 
spice and small bit of cloves. Bake slowly. 



104 

FRUIT CAKPl 

1 good cup of brown sugar, 1 good cup of butter, 3 
eggs, f cup sweet milk, 5 cup molasses, 1 cup chopped 
raisins, 1 teaspoon soda. Spices to taste. Mix soft. 

SOUR MILK FRUIT CAKE. 

(Mrs. 0. B. Farwell, Cliicago.) • 

1 cup of sour milk, 1 cup of granulated sugar, f cup of 
butter, 2 cups- of flour, | cup of raisins, ^ cup of cur- 
rants, I cup of chopped figs, I cup of chopped dates, J 
cup of English walnuts chopped, 1 egg, | teaspoon cloves, 
J teaspoon ginger, 1 level teaspoon soda dissolved in a 
tablespoon of the sour milk. Bake 1 hour in moderate 
oven. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

(G. C. D.) 

1 pound flour, 1 pound brown sugar, f pound butter, 
3 pounds seeded raisins, 1 pound currants, 1 pound cit- 
ron, 1 pound almonds blanched and chopped fine, 1 nut- 
meg, 1 wine glass brandy, 10 eggs, separated. Butter and 
sugar mixed, then puc in whites of 10 eggs and yolks of 
S eggs, beaten separately and very light. Then add flour 
and fruit well mixed; then at the end, add a large glass 
of jelly. Bake slowly 2 hours. 

AVHITE* FRUIT CAKE. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients.— 1 pound of sugar, 1 pound of butter, 1 
pound of flour, 2 pounds of almonds blanched and 
chopped, 2 pounds of citron, 1 pound of seedless raisins, 

1 teacupful of good brandy, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

2 teaspoons vanilla, 1 of cinnamon, 3 fresh cocoanuts 
grated, 14 whites of eggs, the yolks of 6 eggs. Mode. — 
Cream butter and sugar, add yolks of eggs, the fruit and 
spice, sift baking powder with \ the flour, mix the other 
half with fruit, next add brandy. Line pans with three 
thicknesses of manila paper, bake 2 hours in slow oven, 
as the cocoanut burns easily. Half this recipe makes two 
mediumt sized loaves. 



105 

FRUIT G'TXGEE BREAD. 
(Mrs. Hussey.) 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup molasses, f cup butter and 
lard, 1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon, I teaspoon salt. 1 heaping teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in hot water, 3 cups sifted flour, 2 eggs, 1 cup 
raisins, 1 cup currants, 1 cup nuts. Bake in slow oven. 

SOFT GINGER CxlKE. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

J cup each of sugar, molasses and butter, 1 cup sour 
milk, 2 cups flour, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon each ginger and soda. 
Dissolve soda in tablespoon hot water and stir into mo- 
lasses, slightly melt butter, add sugar, egg and milk, and 
lastly flour and ginger. Stir well. Bake in moderate 
oven. 

SOFT GINGER CAKE. 
(Mrs. Howard Wrenn.) 

^ cup sugar, -i cup molasses, ^ cup lard, ^ cup boiling 
water, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, 1 egg, 1 cup chopped raisins. Salt, flour. Eat 
while warm. 

SOUR MILK GINGERBREAD. 

1 egg, I cup molasses, J cup sour milk, butter size of an 
egg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 cup flour, 

1 teaspoon soda, J cup sugar. 

GINGER BREAD. 
(Mrs. W. J. Strong.) 

1 cuj) dark New Orleans molasses, ^ cup brown sugar, 

2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup boiling water, 1 teaspoon each 
of ginger, cinnamon and cloves, 2^ cups flour, 1 heaping, 
or 2 level, teaspoons soda, 2 eggs, well beaten, added last. 
Bake in slow oven 40 to 45 minutes. 

GINGER BREAD. 

. 1^ cups molasses, 2 cups brown sugar, ^ cup butter, 2 
eggs, 2^ teaspoons soda, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons 
ginger, 1 cup boiling water, 2^ cups flour. Pour boiling 
water in cup with soda to dissolve. 



106 

GINGER BREAD. 
(Mrs. Henry Thayer.) 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 2 eggs, 
2 even teaspoons soda, 2 even teaspoons ginger, 1 .table- 
spoon lard, little salt. Mix as carefully as a cake, lastly 
adding sifted flour, until the consistency of cake. Cook in 
moderate oven about 40 minutes. None better. 

GINGER BREAD. 
(Mrs. R. Calvin Dobson.) 

2 eggs, ^ cup butter, J cup sugar, | cup molasses, 1-| 
cup flour, 1 teaspoon each of ginger and cinnamon, 1 cup 
boiling water, 1 teaspoon soda. 

HASTY CAKE. 

(Schall.) 

1 cup of sour cream, 1 cup of sugar, 1 Ggg, 1 scant tea- 
spoon soda, a little baking powder, flour enough to make 
a soft batter, i. e., a little m.ore than a cup. This cake 
may be improved, to taste, by adding spices and raisins. 

MARTHA WASHINGTON CAKE. 

This was copied from Martha Washington's own hand- 
written receipt book, and is baked and served at the 
D. A. R. luncheons. This recipe was donated by the 
Almeda, California, Chapter. 2 cups butter, 3 cups gran- 
ulated sugar, 5 eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, 4 cups flour, 3 
teaspoons baking powder (cream of tartar and soda 
were originally used), ^ pound currants, | pound seeded 
raisins chopped, handful of citron, cut fine, cinnamon 
and nutmeg to taste. Mix as usual, stirring in at the last 
the fruits well dredged with flour. Bake in a loaf and 
when cold cover with white icing. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 

1 cup butter or lard, or half of each, 1 cup molasses. 
Let come to boil. 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons soda, 2 tablespoons 
cold water, spices to taste. Make as soft as possible. 



107 

JEIiSEY LILY CREAM CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, | cup butter, beaten to a cream, whites 
of 4 eggs, beaten stiff, | cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon va- 
nilla, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 cups flour. Have 
ready 1 cup chopped raisins or dates, ^ cup chopped wal- 
nuts. Put ^ of batter in pan, then layer of raisins and 
nuts and cover with remainder of batter. Use plain 
white frosting. 

AUNT JENNETTE CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. A. B.) 

1 cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup cream, 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 tablespoon allspice, 1 teaspoon 
cloves, 1 gill wine, 1 pound currants, 1 pound raisins, ^ 
pound citron, 3 heaping cups flour. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 

(M. F. C.) 

1 cup sugar, rounding tablespoon butter, 1 egg beaten 
light, 1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1| cups of Swans- 
down Flour, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder. Icing. 
— I cup cream or milk, yolk of egg. Mix all together; 
melt square of chocolate with 1 teaspoonful of butter; 
add together. x\dd XXXX sugar to thickness of frosting. 

POUND CAKE. 
(L. E. B. Haskin.) 

1 pound of butter, 1 pound powdered sugar, 1 pound 
flour, weigh after sifting, 10 eggs, 1 wine glass brandy, 
1 wine glass sherry wine, 1 wine glass good rose water, 1 
teaspoonful ground mace, } of a nutmeg, grated; cream 
butter and sugar until like a froth. Beat eggs separately. 
The whites of the eggs, beat on a flat platter, very stiff, 
and add last. Bake an hour without opening the oven 
door. Heat in the oven must be steady and not too hot. 

POUND CAKE. 

1 cup powdered sugar, 1 cup butter, 1|- cups flour, 5 
eggs. 



108 

PLAIN CAKE. 

1| cups sugar, i cup butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2J cups 
liour, 2 teaspooDs baking poxrder, 1 tea spoonful of va- 
nilla. Add spice or raisins well floured. 

POKK CAKE. 
(Mrs. J. C. L.) 

1 pound of fat pork, entirely free from lean or rind, \ 
chopped so fine to be almost like lard ; pour 1 pint boiling 
water upon it. 1 pound raisins, seeded and chopped fine, 
i pound citron, shredded, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup molasses, 
1 teaspoon soda, rubbed into the molasses. Mix these 
together and stir in sifted flour enough to make a stiif- 
ness, then add 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 2 of cloves and a 
little nutmeg. Bake in a slow oven until by putting a 
straw into the cake nothing adheres. The quantity of 
fruit and spices may be reduced without injury to the 
cake. 

QUEEN'S CAKE. 
(Mrs. L. R. Allen.) 

1 pound sugar, f pound butter, 8 eggs, beaten separ- 
ately, 2 lemons, juice and grated rind, 2 nutmegs grated, 
i gill milk. -} gill brandy, 1 pound flour sifted with one 
<}ven teaspoon soda, 1 pound raisins (stoned, ^ pound 
currants, } pound citron (cut in small pieces). Flour 
the fruit well, in addition to the pound* called for. 

REGECCA'S NUT CAKE. 

( VanNortwick. ) 

^ cup of butter. 1 cup of sugar, 4 cup of milk, whites 
of 4 eggs, H cups of flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 
cup of nuts chopped (hickory preferred). 

E.ySED CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. A. B.) 

8 cups of flour, 2 cupsj<)f sugar, 4 cups of milk, i cake 
yeast. Dissolve the yeast in cup of milk. Mix all in bat 
ter and set to raise over night. In the morning, when 
light, add 2 cups more of sugar and butter well creamed, 5 
eggs, leaving whites of 2 eggs for frosting, or 4 eggs 
without frosting; 1 small teaspoonful of soda dissolve<i 



109 ^ 

in water ; 1 pound of raisins, 1 pound of currants, 1 nut- 
meg. Put in pans and let raise f of an hour. Bake in a 
slow oven. 

STRIPED CAKE. 
(Mrs. H. H. C.) 

2 cups white sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 
3 eggs, 3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, salt, 
vanilla. Put | of the above in 2 square tins. To the re- 
mainder add i cup raisins, chopped fine, a little citron, 1 
tablespoon molasses, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, cloves and 
allspice. 1 tablespoon flour; just a tiny bit of soda dis- 
solved in water. Bake in same size pan as the other half 
— put together with jelly. 

SPICE CAKE. 

1| cups sugar, f cup butter, 2 eggs, pinch salt, ^ cup 
molasses, 1 cup sour milk, | teaspoon soda dissolved in 
boiling water, 1 teaspoon cloves^ 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 
^ nutmeg, 3 cups flour, 1 cup raisins, J cup chopped cit- 
ron, l pound walnut meats. 

SPICE CAKE. 

^ cup butter, 1 cup sugar, J cup milk, 1-J cup flour, 1 
teaspoonfal cinnamon, ^ <" scant) teaspoonful cloves, 4 
cup raisins, 1 } teaspoon baking powder, 2 eggs. 

SOUR CREAM CAKES. 
(F. M. Doty.) 

1 cup of sour cream, 1 egg, 1 small cup sugar, J tea- 
spoon soda, 2 small cups flour, vanilla. Bake in muffin 
rings. 

VELVET CAKE. 

Whites of 5 eggs, | cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup 
of cornstarch, J cup of flour, 1 teaspoon of baking pow- 
der. Put whites of eggs in last. Flavor with bitter al- 
mond. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 
(E. W.) 

4 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 3 cups flour, 4 
teaspoons bp.king powder, whites 4 eggs, vanilla. Bake 20 
minutes. 



110 

WHITE CAKE. 
rMrs. C. W. Buckley.) 

1| cups sugar, ^ cup butter, | cup milk, ^ cup flour, 1 
teaspoonful of baking powder, wbites of 4 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoonful of vanilla. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE. 

(C. B. Willit.) 

(Ser\ed bot with ice cream.) 1^ cups sugar, ^ cup 
butter, 3 eggs, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
1 cup milk, 1 box blueberries (floured). Bake in shallow 
pan. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Whites and yolks of 8 eggs, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 
1 cup milk, 3 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's Cream 
Baking Powder. ^ teaspoonful rose water; cream, but- 
ter and sugar; add beaten yolks, flour and milk, flavor- 
ing, baking powder, and lastly stifly beaten whites. 

STRAWBERRY" JAM CAKE. 
(Mabel D. Cary.) 

1 cup of sugar, J cup of butter, H cups of flour, 3 eggs, 
3 tablespoons of sour cream, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 cup 
of strawberry jam. Mix all together and bake in loaf 
or layers with boiled white frosting. 

FROSTINGS AND FILLINGS. 

BUTTER FROSTING. 
(Mrs. Ten Broeck.) 

^ cup butter, 2 cups XXX powdered sugar ; cream until 
very light; add 1 square chocolate melted. 

BOILED CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

3 squares of chocolate, 1| cups milk, J cup granulated 
sugar, ^ tablespoon cornstarch, 1 pinch of salt, ^ teaspoon 
vanilla. Melt chocolate over hot water, blend with the 
warmed milk. When hot stir in sugar thoroughly mixed 
with the cornstarch and the pinch of salt. Cook in dou- 



r. 



Ill 

ble cooker Tintil thick as custard (does not run from 
spoon, but drops off quickly). Add \ teaspoon vanilla. 
Cool and spread between layers of cake. 

CAEAMEL FROSTING. 
(G. C. D.) 

3 cups blown sugar, cream enough to corn, stir until 
smooth. Place on stove and continue to stir ; when nearly 
cooked, add a butter ball size of walnut. Test by trying 
a little, well beaten in a saucer and cooled on ice for a few 
minutes. When right consistency, flavor with vanilla. If 
cooled too much, a little cold cream can be worked in. 

CAEAMEL. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup sour cream. Boil slowly until it 
thickens. Whip until almost cold. Spread on cake. 

LEMON FILLING. 

2 small lemon rinds, grated, and the juice, 1 cup sugar, 
\ cup water. Heat to alm.ost boiling, then add 1 ^^^^ well 
beaten, and let boil. Add 2 tablespoons cornstarch rubbed 
smooth with \ cup water. 

LEMON FILLING FOE LAYEE CAKES.. 

2 lemons — juice and rind — 3 eggs, 2 cups of sugar, but- 
ter size of an ^g%. Stir over a slow fire until boiling. 

FILLING FOE MAESH^MALLOW CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

2 cups sugar, \ cup water. Cook until it balls in cold 
water. Add 1 dozen melted marshmallows, 1 teaspoonful 
Bee brand vanilla, and pour onto 2 well beaten whites of 
eggs. Beat until thick, then spread on cake and put 
marshmallows on top. 

LAYEE CAKE. 

DEVIL'S FOOD. 
• (Mary F. Clark.) 

J cup butter, If cups sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2^ cups 
flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 



112 

squares bitter chocolate (Baker's), pinch salt. Cream, 
butter and half the sugar, cream, yolks of eggs and other 
half sugar. Combine these mixtures, then add milk 
slowly, beating constantly. Then add flour, sifted with 
other dry ingredients, next add vanilla and melted choco- 
late and lastly the whites of eggs, beaten very stiff. This 
makes a large three-layer cake and should be frosted 
with white boiled icing. 

LIZZIE HAEEIS' CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

6 squares of Baker's chocolate, broken and stirred into 
f of a cup of milk. Add 1 cup of sugar and the yolk of 
1 egg. Cook in a double lx)iler until smooth, then let cool. 
Cake: 1 cup sugar, | cup butter, ^ cup milk, 3 eggs, 2 
teaspoonsful of baking powder, 2 cups flour. Stir all to- 
gether and add the above chocolate mixture, flavor with 
vanilla. This makes 4 thin layers. Put together with 
white frosting. Frosting: 2 cups sugar, 8 tablespoons 
boiling water. Cook until it strings, then pour on the 
beaten whites of 2 eggs, beating all the time, until the 
mixture cools. Use only 4 eggs for cake and frosting. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 5 eggs, leaving out 2 
whites, bake in long tins, 2 sheets. Icing: Beat whites 
of 2 eggs left out, add 1 cup powdered sugar, 6 table- 
spoons grated chocolate; stir together and put in double 
boiler; heat until well dissolved and spread on cakes 
while a little warm. 

CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. A. Bournique.) 

3 eggs, 1 cup milk, ^ cup butter, 2^ cups flour, 1 cup 
sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Filling : 1 cup sugar, 
^ cup milk, butter size walnut, 2^ squares chocolate ; boil 
20 minutes. 



113 

LAYER CAI^E. 

(Jessie J. Ulrich.) 

Cream 1^ cups sugar and | cup butter, add yolks of 2 
eggs, 1 white only, add 1 cup cold water, then 2^ cups 
flour and 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
stir well before adding baking powder. Filling : 2 cups 
granulated sugar, ^ cup cold water, cook until hairs, add 
white of egg left from cake, beaten stiff. White or brown 
sugar may be used; grated fresh cocoanut or nuts make 
this filling very nice. This recipe is inexpensive. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. M. Watkins.) 

1 cup butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3^ cups flour, 1 cup sweet 
milk, whites of 6 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoon almond extract, cream butter and sugar, add flour 
and milk and baking powder, then egg whites stiffly 
beaten. Filling: 1 cup of sugar, ^ cup boiling water; 
boil until it spins a thread ; stir in stiff egg whites, add 
1 cup raisins, chopped, 1 cup nuts, 5 figs, cut in strips. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites 12 eggs, beaten stiff, 10 yolks beaten with 2 
tablespoons of the stiff whites. Add 1 teaspoon of cream 
of tartar to the stiff whites, add H cups sugar (which 
has been sifted 5 times into the whites, fold in yolks, then 
add 1 cup of flour (sifted 5 times). Bake in slow oven 
40 or 50 minutes. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 
(Mrs. E, B. Peirce.) 

Whites of 7 small eggs, yolks of 5 eggs, 1 cup granu- 
lated sugar, f cup Swandown (pastry) flour, ^ teaspoon- 
ful cream of tartar, pinch of salt. Sift flour and sugar 5 
times. Measure and set aside as for angel cake. Beat 
yolks well. Beat whites about half, add cream of tartar 
and beat stiff. Stir in sugar lightly, then beat in yolks 
well. Add flour and flavoring. Bake in tube pan 35 to 50 
minutes. 



114 ' 

ANGEL FOOD. 

(Mrs. Luther.) 

IJ cups granulated sugar, sifted 5 times, whites of 11 
eggs, 1 teaspoon flavoring, ^ teaspoonful cream of tartar, 
1 cup flour measured after sifting 5 times. Add cream 
of tartar to flour. Fold beaten whites in last and bake 
35 or 40 minutes. 

ANGEL FOOD. 

(Mrs. Thomas C. Williams.) 

IJ teacups granulated sugar, sifted 3 times, 1 teacup 
flour with 1 small teaspoon cream of tartar in it, sifted 
3 times, 12 whites of eggs. Have eggs and bowl very 
cold, beat until dry (very stiif), add sugar, then flour 
with cream of tartar, with an upward beat of the egg-, 
whip, letting the flour fall through it instead of beating- 
it in. Last, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Bake in slow oven for 
40 minutes. Bake in pan, not greased, and turn upside 
down on pan feet until cooled. Frosting for angel food: 
1^ cup granulated sugar, with just enough boiling water 
to wet it. Let boil without stirring until it thickens like 
taify in cold water. Then pour into whites of 2 eggs, 
beaten stiff. Beat with spoon until cool enough to put 
on cake. Scant teaspoon vanilla for flavor. 

ANGEL FOOD CAKE. 

(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Whites of 11 eggs, 1^ cups of granulated sugar, 1 cup 
of flour, ^ teaspoonful cream of tartar; sift flour and 
measure, then sift 5 times ; sift sugar and measure ; beat 
eggs very stiff, add cream of tartar when half beaten; 
fold in flour and sugar, flavor with vanilla, pour in an un- 
greased pan and bake 45 or 50 minutes. When done 
turn pan upside down till cold. Bake in very slow oven. 
The above recipe makes fine strawberry shortcake; cut 
the loaf into 3 pieces, using crushed berries sweetened, 
and whipped cream as filling between layers; put 
whipped cream and whole berries on top. 



115 

ANGEL FOOD. 
(F. M. Doty.) 

I cup flour, 14 cup sugar, granulated, sifted 5 times, 1 
cup egg whites, beaten stiff, 1 teaspoon cream of tartar, 

1 teaspoon vanilla ; bake 45 minutes. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE. 
(Mrs. E. M. Watkins.) 

Beat 6 eggs 2 minutes (whites and yolks together), add 
3 cups of sugar, beat 5 minutes, 2 cups of flour, and 1 
teaspoon cream tartar, beat 2 minutes; add 1 cup cold 
water with -J teaspoon soda dissolved in it; beat 1 min- 
ute; add grated rind of 1^ juice of a lemon, a little salt, 

2 more cups of flour, beating 1 more minute, observing 
time exactly. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 
(Mrs. Henry Thayer.) 

Sift 1 even glass flour 4 times, add 1 heaping teaspoon 
of cream tartar, sift twice more; beat whites of 7 eggs, 
also yolks separately; sift H glasses sugar, add each por- 
tion slowly, beating all the time ; put in pan without 
greasing ; cook 40 to 60 minutes. 

MOLASSES SPONGE CAKE. 

5 eggs, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups molasses, 2 
cups buttermilk, 5 cups flour, 1 tablespoon soda, 1 tea- 
spoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Put the whites of 
eggs in last and have them very light. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

6 eggs, beaten separately, 1 cup of sugar. Beat yolks 
and sugar, add ^ teaspoon salt. Fold in whites, then add 
1 cup of well sifted flour, grated. rind of lemon, juice of 
I lemon. Bake in long flat tin. 

GOOD SPONGE CAKE. 

(Mrs. Thorn.) 

II whites of eggs, 5 yolks, 1^ cups (scant) granulated 
sugar, sifted 5 or 6 times, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 1 cup 
of flour, measured after 1 sifting, 1 teaspoon cream tar- 



IK) 

tar, sift flour and cream tartar together 4 times. To 
stiff beaten whites add sugar and beat. Add flavoring 
and yolks; and mix in flour lightly and quickly. Line 
bottom and funnel of pan with paper not greased. Bake 
40 minutes, slowlv. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Whites of 4 eggs, beaten stiff, add yolks gently, one at 
a time; add 1 cup sugar gently {\ at a time), add 1 cup 
flour (fold in gently). Bake in very slow oven 45 min- 
utes. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
(Mrs. H. B.) 

6 eggs, 1 pinch of salt, scant ^ teaspoon of cream of 
tartar, 1\ cups of sugar, 1 cup of sifted flour. Beat 
whites, add salt and cream of tartar, sugar and the yolks 
beaten. Fold in rhe flour and flavor with vanilla. Start 
in a cold oven and bake about 40 minutes. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
(Mrs- c: jy.) 

3 eggs, beaten separately, 1 cup sugar, scant, 1 cup 
flour sifted, 1 scant dessertspoon of baking powder. Put 
together in this order yolks, sugar, flour, baking powder, 
water. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
(Mrs. L. G. Yoe.) 

The weight of 6 eggs in sugar, ^ the weight of eggs in 
flour. Stir the yolks and sugai, add rind and juice of 1 
lemon, then half the flour, then half the whites of eggs 
well beaten, then the rest of flour, and last the rest of the 
whites of Qgg"^. Bake 40 minutes. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — ^^^hites of 11 eggs, yolks of 6, 1| tum- 
blers of granulated sugar, 1 tumbler flour, 1 teaspoon 
cream of tartar. Mode. — Beat whites of eggs to stiff 
froth, add cream of tartar and sugar, sifting 3 times, 
gradually add sugar to the whites of eggs, not beating. 



117 

Next add the yolks of eggs, well beaten, lastly the flour, 
stirring carefully, bake 50 minutes in moderate oven. 
When baked turn upside down in tin. 



ICES. 

MAPLE MOUS. 
(Mrs. Luther.) 

To a cup of rich maple syrup add beaten yolks of 4 
eggs. While stirring cook in granite dish until it boils. 
Strain through tine sieve, then cool. Beat 1 pint of cream 
till stitf, add to it stiffly beaten whites of eggs. Whip 
syrup till light. Mix all together and freeze. 

CAEAMEL MOUSSE. 
(Mrs. C. W. Buckly.) 

Let 1 cup of maple syrup come to the boiling point, 
then stir in the well beaten yolks of 4 eggs. Stir contin- 
ually while cooling. When cooled stir in 1 pint of whipped 
cream. Put in molds and freeze. 

MAPLE MOUSSE. 
(Mrs. Chas. Beckurts.) 

1 full cup maple syrup, yolks of 4 eggs, 1 pint cream. 
Beat yolks until light, then cook with syrup in double 
boiler for 15 minutes, stirring constantly. Beat until 
cold and mix with the cream whipped. Beat again. 
Freeze; enough for 4 people. 

CAEAMEL ICE CEEAM. 
(Mrs. M. A. Ives.) 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 quart cream, 1 tablespoon corn 
starch in ^ cup^milk, 1 small teaspoon vanilla, pinch salt. 
Melt brown sugar thoroughly, stiring all the time. Add 
cream and stir till mixed. Add milk with corn starch 
and then boil till it thickens. Take from fire, add flavor- 
ing and when cold, freeze. 



118 

FEOZEN EICE PUDDING. 

Wash ^ cupful of rice, then put it into a saucepan 
with 2 cupf uls of water and''boil slowly for ^ hour, drain / 
and put into double boiler with a cupful of milk. Cook 
until the rice has absorbed the milk and is soft, press 
the wine through a sieve and return to the kettle. Add 
3 yolks of eggs beaten with a cupful of sugar. Cook, 
stirring all the time till it begins to thicken. Remove 
from fire and add 2 teaspoonfuls of extract of vanilla and 
set away to cool. When cold add 2 cupfuls of whipped 
cream and freeze as in cream. 

LEMON ICE. 

Juice of 4 lemons, 1 quart milk, 1 pint sugar. Dissolve 
lemon in sugar, add milk gradually. 

GRAPE NUT ICE CREAM. 

1 quart cream, sweetened and flavored to taste, | cup 
of grape nuts. Freeze as you would any ice cream. 

DESSERT ORANGE FLUFF. 
(Mrs. G. H. Campbell.) 

Juice of 6 oranges and 2 lemons, with 1 pint of sugar ; 
whip 1 pint of sweet cream stitf, put cream in mold, pour 
juice into cream, put in pail and cover with ice and salt 
for 4 or 5 hours; serve with a white cake; flavor cream 
with sugar and vanilla. 

MAPLE MOUSSE. 
(Mrs. E, B. Peirce.) 

1 cup maple syrup, 1 pint pure cream, 4 eggs. Boil 
syrup about 10 minutes and when about half cool add the 
yolks well beaten, and when cold add whites, well beaten, 
and whipped cream. Place in mold with ice and salt. 
Let stand 4 hours. 

FRUIT ICE CREAM. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

3 pints pure cream (whipped stiff), 3 cups pecans 
(chopped rather fine), juice or pulp of 3 oranges, 1 can 



119 

pineapple (grated), ^ pound candied cherries, 1 pint 
sherry wine; whipped cream and flavor to suit taste with 
sherry wine and sugar; freeze; when nearly hard take 
out the dasher and add the nuts and fruits, the cherries 
previously having been cut up and soaked an hour in 
sherry wine. Do not use wine cherries soak in. Pack 
well for 3 or 4 hours. When ready to serve turn out of 
mold onto a cold platter and slice as you would cake. 
This will serve 30 small cups. 

APPLE SHERBET. 

(Alma Koepke.) 

4 apples, 2 cups sugar, juice 1 lemon cooked well and 
strained; freeze and serve with pork roast. 

FROZEN PUDDING: 

(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — 1 pint of milk, 2 cups of sugar, half cup 
of flour, 2 eggs, 1 pound of candied fruit, \ cup of chopped 
almonds, \ cup of sherry, 1 quart of cream. Mode. — Boil 
the milk with the flour, 1 cup of sugar and the eggs to- 
gether. Add to the milk and cook 20 minutes, then set 
aside to cool. When cool, add wine and the other cup of 
sugar and the whipped cream. Freeze until it begins to 
stiffen, then add chopped fruits, nuts and finish freezing. 

FROZEN WHIPPED CREAM. (Easily Made.) 

(Mrs. Daniel Cobb.) 

1 pint cream and whites of 4 eggs whipped together, \ 
cup pulverized sugar, ^ cup either port or sherry wine. 
Nuts and fruit can be added if desired. Place in mold 
and pack in ice and salt 3 or 4 hours before needed. 

MAPLE PARFAIT. 

(Mrs. Howard A. Wrenn.) 

1 pint cream, 4 eggs, 1 cup maple syrup. Cook the 
beaten e^g yolks and syrup to a boiling point, stirring" 
constantly. When cold add the cream, whipped, and the 
Qgg whites beaten very stiff; put in a mold and pack in 
ice 4 hours. 



120 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

1 quart grated pineapple, juice 4 lemons, 1 quart water, 
1 quart sugar. Whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff, add when 
partly frozen. Put in pineapple last. 

COUPES VENUS. 

Put a generous spoonful of vanilla ice cream in a sau- 
cer champagne dish. Make a shallow depression in the 
cream, and into it set whole peaches, cooked in syrup 
flavored with vanilla, set a maraschino cherry above the 
peach and around the same pipe whipped cream. Serve 
at once. 

ALMOND ICE CREAM. 

4 gallon of cream, 1 cup of grated almonds, 3 or 4 bit- 
ter almonds, 7 oranges; sweeten the cream and freeze. 
When nearly stiff enough beat the almonds and juice in 
and freeze well. 

FROZEN DESSERT. 
(C. B. Willits.) 

1 cup sugar and J cup water boiled 5 minutes to make 
syrup, in which put yolks of 5 eggs well beaten and J tea- 
spoon almond extract. Put in double boiler and stir till 
slightly thickened, then add ^ cup dried and crushed mac- 
aroons, 2 tablespoons chopped almonds, 4 tablespoons can- 
died cherries chopped fitie and soaked in 4 tablespoons of 
sherry wine. Fold in 1 quart whipped cream, put in 
mold, pack in fine ice and freeze 3 hours. Serves 14. 

STRAWBERRY PUNCH. 
(Mrs. J. W. Prindiville.) 

1 quart freshly made Ceylon tea, 1 pint strawberries 
(mashed), 1 bunch mint, juice of 5 lemons, juice of 3 
oranges, 1 quart apollinaris, 1 pint ginger ale. Make 
syrup of sugar and water and add to fruit and fruit 
juices ; cool ; mix with tea and mint. AVhen ready to serve 
dilute, sweeten if necessary and add apollinaris and gin- 
ger ale at moment of serving. 



121 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 
(Martha Holmes.) 

Dissolve i package of Knox gelatine in ^ cup cold wa- 
ter, add ^ cup of boiling water to the gelatine ; dissolve 
1 cup sugar in ^ cup boiling water and add 1 cup canned 
pineapple juice and juice of 1 lemon; let gelatine cool 
and add slowly l pint of stiffly whipped cream. Line a 
mold with large slices of pineapple and pour in cream 
and gelatine. Place in ice box until ready to serve. 



PRESERVES AND PICKXES. 

PEACH MANGOES. 
(Mrs. Ives.) 

Pare peaches ; cut in half. Pill each side with cabbage 
cut very small, and white mustard seed in the cabbage. 
Have plenty of the mustard seed in cabbage. Then tie 
the halves together with strips of muslin ^ inch in width. 
Tie tight, as peaches shrink. Pack them, after wiping 
off carefully, into a stone jar. Then make a sweet pickle 
syrup and pour over them hot, each day for six or seven 
days. For syrup, — 1 quart vinegar, 4 or 5 pounds sugar, 
according to peaches. Flavor with stick cinnamon. 

SWEET PICKLE PEACHES. 

Peel peaches and stick 2 or 3 cloves into each one. Make 
a syrup of 3^ pounds of sugar, 3 pints of vinegar and 
some stick cinnamon. Put your peaches in a stone jar 
and pour boiling syrup over them. This amount will 
cover 7 pounds of peaches. Next morning drain off the 
juice and boil again and pour over the peaches. The 
next morning put peaches and syrup into preserving ket- 
tle and boil until you can stick a straw into the peaches. 
Put in jars and cover tight. 

DAMSON PICia.ES. 

10 pounds of fruit, 6 pounds of sugar, 1 quart of vine- 
gar, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, allspice and cinnamon. 
Wash damsons and put in jars. Scald your vinegar, su- 
gar and spices and pour over damsons. Repeat this for 



122 

five mornings, and on the fifth morning boil all together 
^ hour. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

(Mrs. Mihilk.) 

18 ripe tomatoes, 6 red peppers, 6 large onions, 10 ta- 
blespoonfuls of white sugar, 3 of salt, 5 cups of vinegar. 
Boil H hours. 

CHILI SAUCE. 
(Mrs. R. Calvin Dobson.) 

1 peck ripe tomatoes, scalded and peeled, sliced thin; 
16 green peppers (remove seeds), 8 medium sized onions, 
3 stalks of celery. Grind all, put in kettle with 2 table- 
spoons of salt, 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon black pepper, 1 tablespoon ground allspice, 6 table- 
spoons sugar. Boil 1 hour, add 4 cups of cider vinegar. 
Boil until thick, stir very frequently. 

VIRGINIA CHOW-CHOW. 

2 heads of cabbage, -J peck ripe tomatoes, ^ jDeck green 
tomatoes, 1^ dozen large onions, 9 green and red peppers, 
2 pounds of brown sugar, 1 pint of grated horse radish, 
1 teaspoon black mustard seed, 1 teaspoon ground mus- 
tard, 1 ounce of celery seed, 1 ounce of tumeric. Chop all 
fine and sprinkle in layers with one pint of salt over night. 
Put in colander and drain thoroughly. Put in kettle with 
sugar and spices mixed thoroughly through, add vine- 
gar enough to cover and let boil. Put in airtight jars. 

PICALLILL 

(M. J. V. C.) 

1 peck green tomatoes, 4 peppers, 1 large head cabbage, 
6 onions, 2 stalks celery, all chopped fine. Put in salt 
and water 1 night, using 1 cup salt, drain in the morning, 
cook in vinegar and part water ; when tender drain well. 
Put 5 cents worth of mixed spice in a bag, 2 pounds brown 
sugar, with enough vinegar to cover well the chopped 
pickle. Boil the vinegar, sugar and spices together, and 
pour over the pickle. 



123 

SPANISH PICKLE. 
(Mrs. Luther.) 

2 dozen ripe cucumbers cut in large pieces (green, cu- 
cumbers may be used), chop fine 2 head's cabbage, 3 dozen 
small onions, 8 green peppers, 6 stalks celery. Let stand 
in salt water 24 hours, drain and place in kettle, 1 ounce 
white mustard seed, 1 ounce celery seed. 

FRENCH TO:\LVTO PICKLE. 
(Mrs. Troxel.) 

1 peck green tomatoes, 6 onions, nicely sliced ; sprinkle 

1 teacup of salt over and stand all night, then drain well 
and scald in weak vinegar 10 or 15 minutes, drain again 
and scald with 2 quarts strong vinegar. 1 pound sugar, 

2 tablespoons curry powder, 2 tablespoons tumeric, 2 
teaspoons cinnamon, 2 teaspoons cloves, 2 teaspoons all- 
spice, 2 teaspoons mustard. Simmer all together slowly 
a few minutes. This is a beautiful rich pickle. 

CHOPPED TOMATO PICKLE. 

1 peck green tomatoes, | dozen onions, 1 small head 
cabbage, 3 green peppers, 1 large bunch celery. Chop all 
fine and stir in 1 cup salt, 1 tablespoon ground mustard, 
:| teas])oon cayenne pepper, 3 tablespoons ground cin- 
namon, 1 tablespoon ground cloves. Stir well and cook 
slowly for 2 hours. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 
(Mrs. 0. H. Campbell.) 

1 peck green tomatoes sliced over night, sprinkle with 
salt; in morning dram in colander, slice 1 c^uart onions, 
1 quart green beans, 1 pound brown sugar; cover with 
vinegar, put in a porcelain kettle, add tablespoon of cel- 
ery salt, celery seed, mustard seed, and tumeric powder 
enough to make the vinegar yellow, handful of whole all- 
spice. Cook all afternoon. 

COLD VINEGAR PICKLES. 

(Edna Sampsell.) 

Scrub small cucumbers. Make brine strong enough to 
hold up an egg. Let cucumbers stand in this brine 24 



124 

hours. Spice pure cider vinegar with dill and pepper, 
cloves, horseradish, hlack pepyjer. Heat to the boiling 
point. Let cool and cover the pickles. Put in each jar a 
little of each spice. 

OIL PICKLES. 
(Mrs. H. B. Clarke.) 

100 small sliced cucumbers, 1| cuj^s salt, 2 pints small 
white onions sliced. Put layer of cucumbers, onions and 
salt in colander and let stand over night. Wash and 
drain them; add 3 ounces white mustard seed, 1 ounce 
celery seed, 2 cups best olive oil. Put in a jar and cover 
with vinegar. A little sugar improves and hardens them. 

PICKLED GIRKINS. 
(Mrs. Byron L. Smith.) 

Soak 300 small girkins in brine over night. 1 handful 
of small green peppers, 1 quart small onions, 3 table- 
spoons white mustard seed, 3 tablespoons black mustard 
seed, 3 tablespoons celery seed, 7 small handful s of juni- 
per berries, 2 pounds brown sugar, J gallon cider vinegar. 
Put the mixture on the stove and let it come to a scald, 
not boil. Scald until thoroughly seasoned. When ready 
to bottle, add to this 1 quart bottle of Cross & Black- 
wells Chow-Chow, to which add | pound of ground white 
mustard, mixed with a little cold vinegar. 

ONION AND CUCUMBER PICKLE. 
(Mrs. John Glass.) 

3 dozen small cucumbers, 3 quarts small onions. Slice 
and sprinkle with salt and let stand over night. Rinse 
and drain well in cold water. Make a dressing of : 1 quart 
vinegar, -J cup sugar, J cup flour, 2 level tablespoons mus- 
tard, 1 level tablespoon celery seed, 1 teaspoon tumeric, 
a little cayenne. Cook until thick. Then add cucumbers 
and onions and cook h hour. Put in bottles and seal. 

FRENCH PICKLES. 

200 cucumbers, sliced and sprinkled with salt, stand 
over night. In morning cover with vinegar, 4 cups brown 
sugar, 10c white mustard seed, 10c celery seed, 5c tumeric 



125 

powder, 6 green peppers, 1 dozen onions, sliced with cu- 
eiimbers. Cook until it turns yellow. 

CUCUMBEE PICKLES AND SPICED VINEGAR. 

(Mrs. Hirschberg.) 

Secure smallest cucumbers ; wash, and measure enough 
water to cover well. Add to water salt until brine will 
bear an egg. Scald, skim, and pour over pickles. Cover 
and let stand one week. Every other day take out pickles, 
wash, wipe dry with rough towel and return to brine. 
At end of week, take same amount vinegar as you had 
brine. To 1 gallon vinegar add 1 quart brown sugar and 
boil. Fill quart jars with the pickles and to each quart 
add 1 small red pepper pod, 4 dozen black pepper ber- 
ries, 2 teaspoons garlic, chopped fine, ^ dozen allspice, 2 
cloves, 2 teaspoons white mustard seed, 3 teaspoons cel- 
ery seed. Pour the hot vinegar over them, and seal. The 
vinegar spiced by this recipe makes the best of seasoning 
later for French salad dressing. 

SLICED CUCUMBEE PICKLES. 
(Mrs. E. F. Gorton.) 

3 dozen large cucumbers (green), 1 dozen medium on- 
ions. Peel and slice both — slices to he between a sixteenth 
and a quarter of an inch in thickness. Put into salt over 
night. A large layer of cucumbers, then sprinkle thick 
with salt ; a layer of onions, salt, etc., until jar is filled. 
In the morning drain and cook in weak vinegar until ten- 
der ; then drain again. Take 3 pints good vinegar, 2 cups 
granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon (ground), 1 tea- 
spoon celery seel, 2 teaspoons chopped red pepper, 1 ta- 
blespoon mustard seed. A very little black pepper. Heat 
pickles thorouglily in this. Put in jars and pour over 
them the heated vinegar. 

SWEET PICKLE. 
Water Melon or Etpe Cucumbers. 

(Mrs. E. F. Gorton.) 

6 pounds of fruit, 3 pounds granulated sugar, 1 quart 
(scant) of good vinegar, a bag of whole spices. If melon 
is used, cut off rind and scrape off soft inside. Cut in 



126 

pieces a little larger than for table use. (They shrink.) 
If cucumbers are used, take large yellow ripe ones, peel, 
cut out soft inside, and cut parts remaining into any 
shape you like. Weigh fruit before boiling, then put in 
kettles and cover with cold water. iVllow same to boil 
until pieces begin to look transparent (not soft). Re- 
move, drain and plunge into ice water till perfectly cold. 
Drain and lay on soft cloth and press as dry as possible. 
Bring vinegar, sugar and spices to a hard boil; put in 
fruit, and boil until tender (but not too soft.) Remove 
fruit, and boil syrup down until quite thick — for half an 
hour, or till rich. Put fruit into stone jars with spice 
bags and pour boiling syrup over them. 

CHOPPED CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
(Mrs. Ives.) 

3 dozen cucumbers, 18 onions, 1^ teacups salt, 1 teacup 
mustard seed, | teacup ground pepper, 2 tablespoons cel- 
ery seed. Chop cucumbers and onions fine. Mix with 
salt and let drain over night. The next morning mix with 
the other ingredients and cover with good cider vinegar. 
Do not cook. 

OIL PICKLES. 

1 peck medium sized cucumbers, 2 large onions chopped 
fine, 1 ounce black mustard seed, 1 ounce white mustard 
seed, 1 ounce celery seed, ^ pint olive oil, vinegar enough 
to cover. Slice the cucumbers, let stand in salt water, 
then drain. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

12 large ripe tomatoes, 4 ripe or 3 green peppers, 2 
onions, 2 tablespoons salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 table- 
spoon cinnamon, 3 cups vinegar. Peel tomatoes and on- 
ions, chop all fine and boil 1^ hours. Bottle and it will 
keep. 

OIL CUCUMBER PICKLE. 
(Mrs. Ives.) 

2 dozen cucumbers, size suitable for table. Peel and 
slice them. Sprinkle with 1 cup salt. Let stand 3 hours, 
then thoroughly drain in colander for 2 hours. Sliced 
onions, 1 cup, 1 large red pepper, sliced, j cup white mus- 
tard seed, ^ cup black mustard seed, 1 teaspoon powdered 



u 



127 

alum, 1 quart white wine vinegar, li cups olive oil. Mix 
well and put into Mason jars without cooking or heating. 

MUSTAED PICKLES. 
(Marion Carr.) 

1 quart of small cucumbers, 1 quart of large ones, cut 
up, 1 quart button onions, 2 large cauliflower, cut in 
pieces, 2 quarts celery, diced, 4 red peppers, cut in strips. 
Make a brine of 1 cup salt to 1 gallon water. Soak in this 
brine 24 hours. Scald in same brine until everything is 
tender. Drain thoroughly. Make a paste. 12 table- 
spoons French mustard, 2 cups flour, moistened with vin- 
egar, 4 quarts vinegar, brown sugar to taste. Stir over 
tire until smooth. Add pickles and can. 

CANNING BLUEBERRIES. 
(Grace D. Pardridge.) 

Make a syrup by boiling 6 cups of sugar and 1 of water 
for 15 minutes, then add 9 cups of berries. Keep them 
under the boiling point for 15 minutes, then fill hot jars 
with them and screw the covers tight. 

• DELICIOUS CONSERVE. 
(Mrs. George E. Moore.) 

Cook 5 j)ounds peaches and 5 pounds sugar 30 minutes. 
Add 1 pineapple cut in pieces, 3 eggs, 2 ounces ginger root 
and cook down. 

CONSERVE. 
(Mrs. Frank L. Wean.) 

3 pints stewed grape pulp, boil pulp in juice and put 
through colander 8 cups sugar \ pound raisins, juice of 
one orange and one lemon, 1 pint of water, 1 cup coarsely 
chopped walnut meats. Boil slowly for 20 minutes. 

PEACH CONSERVE. 
(Mrs. J. P. Smith.) 

5 pounds of sugar, 5 pounds of peaches, 1 pineapple, 
a little green ginger root. Boil sugar and peaches a half 
hour and add pineapple cut fine and the ginger root cut 
in small pieces. Boil all until ginger is soft. 



128 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 

2 quarts blue grapes, cook and strain, add 5 cups su- 
gar, boil until begins to jell. Add 1 pint nuts broken 
fine, 1 pound seeded and chopped raisins. Boil a few 
minutes. Put into jelly glasses. Fine with meats. 

CHERRY COXSERA^. 
(Mrs. John Glass.) 

3 pounds stoned cherries, 2 pounds stoned raisins, 4 
large oranges, 4 pounds sugar. Chop oranges fine. Steam 
raisins 20 minutes. Chop coarse. Add cherries and su- 
gar, oranges. Boil 20 minutes, then put in tumblers like 

CURRANT AND RASPBERRl^ JAM. 

2f currants, ^ raspberries, enough water to keep from 
sticking. Boil from ^ to } of an hour. Allow 1 pound of 
sugar to 4 pounds of fruit. Add sugar after fruit has 
boiled i hour, then boil until sugar is dissolved. 

RHUBARB JAM. 

4 pounds rhubarb, 3 pounds sugar, juice and rind 
^grated) of 1 lemon, juice of 1 orange, rind cut into small 
strips with scissors. Boil slowly for 1 hour. Add nuts 
according to taste. 

JIM JAM. 
(Mrs. E. F. Gorton.) 

1 quart of currant juice, 1 quart of raspberry juice, 2 
oranges, 1 pound raisins, stone and halved, 5 pounds 
sugar. Six pints of raspberries will yield 1 quart of 
juice, and 4 quarts of currants. Cut rind of oranges into 
tiny dice, and remove seeds and partitions. Cook the 
mixture at least three-quarters of an hour. 

GINGER PEARS. 
(Mrs. J. P. Smith.) 

8 pounds of green pears, 8 pounds of granulated sugar, 
I pound green ginger root, 2 lemons. Scrape ginger root 
and cut in small pieces. Cut lemons, peel all in small 
dice. Cook these together until tender and add to pears 
and sugar. Cook altogether until like marmalade. 



129 

GINGER PEARS. 
(H. 0. Schumacher.) 

7 pounds of pears not very ripe, 5 pounds sugar, | 
pound ginger root broken in small pieces, juice of 4 
lemons with a little of the rind grated. Mix and cook 
slowly 2 or 3 hours. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 
(Mrs. L. G. Yoe.) 

12 oranges, 6 grape fruit, 3 lemons. Wash and peel 
and put peeling through meat grinder. Slice the pulp, 
take out the seeds. Put all together and pour over it 3 
quarts water. Let stand 24 hours. Then cook 2 hours. 
Then put in 1 quart sugar to each pint of fruit. Boil all 
together for 1 hour. Stir frequently when boiling to pre- 
vent scorching. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 
(Mrs. E. A. B.) 

Slice 4 oranges and 1 lemon. Cover with H pints of 
cold water and let stand over night. Boil till tender next 
day. Pour back in bowl and let stand over night. To 
each pound of fruit add 1^ pounds of sugar. Cook slowly 
1 to 2 hours. 

GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE. 
(Mrs. H. B. Clarke.) 

Peel fruit and remove all fleshy or leathery part from 
the skin or peeling. Cut into very thin slivers. Cook 
until tender in 3 or 4 waters. Remove all inner white 
skin from fruit and cut fruit into small pieces. Put into 
collander, allowing juice to strain through. Allow 1 
pound sugar to each grape fruit. Make syrup without 
stirring until it threads. Then add juice to syrup. When 
heated thoroughly add fruit and peel. Cook until proper 
thickness. 

GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE. 
(H. 0. Schumacher.) 

3 lemons, 6 grape fruit, 1 orange. Cut fruit into quar- 
ters, then slice into thinnest possible slices, discarding 



130 

seeds and white core. Cover with 4 quarts cold water 
and let stand over ni^ht. Cook 2 hours in uncovered ket- 
tle, then add lOj pounds sugar and cook till mixture is 
thick enough to hold up the peel. Makes 24 jam jars 
full. 

EAST INDIA PKESEEVE. 
(Mrs. G. 0. Clinch.) 

8 pounds of hard g:reen pears, 6 pounds sugar, ^ pounds 
green ginger root, juice and yellow rind of 3 lemons, 1 
pint of water. Peel and slice the pears very thin. Peel 
and snip the ginger very fine. Wash and slice the yellow 
rind of the lemons. Boil together for 3 hours. 

PEACH PRESERVES. 
(Mrs. Ayres.) 

5 pounds peaches sliced, 5 pounds granulated sugar, 
juice of 3 oranges, peeling of 1 orange. Cover whole 
with water. Cook ^ hour after it starts to boil. Remove 
orange peel before putting into jars. 

TOMATO PRESERVE. 
(Mrs. H. B. Lensch.) 

3^ pounds of ripe, red tomatoes, scald and peel. If too 
much juice let stand and pour away a little. 2 pounds 
sugar, ^ teaspoon ginger, ground, 1 teaspoon ground cin- 
namon, 1 oily skinned lemon. Cook until thick. Stir 
often. Grate yellow skin of the lemon. Throw away the 
white part, slice the rest. Takes a long time to cook. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. 
(Mrs. Henry Thayer.) 

1 pound fruit, 1 pound sugar. Make a syrup, cook un- 
til it drops from spoon stringy, then put in a few berries 
at a time, cooking slowly for 20 minutes. Lift berries 
out very carefuly, filling jars when all berries are cooked. 
Then cook syrup 10 or 15 minutes more. Fill jars and 
seal hot. Very good. 

CHERRY PRESERVES. 
(Mrs. Frank Lincoln Wean.) 

Pit cherries and weigh. Put in stone jar and cover 



131 

with vinegar and let stand 24 hours. Drain off vinegar 
and stir in carefully pound of sugar for pound of cher- 
ries as first weighed. Let stand for 2 or 3 days or until 
sugar is entirely dissolved, stirring each night and morn- 
ing. Can. 

SPICED CURRANTS OR GOOSEBERRIES. 

(Mrs. Van Nortwick.) 

5 pounds of fruit, 4 pounds sugar, 2 tablespoons cloves 
and cinnamon (each), 1 pint of vinegar. Boil until thick, 
not less than 2 hours. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

(M. W. C.) 

5 pounds of currants, 4 pounds of sugar, 2 teaspoons 
of cinnamon, 1| cloves, 1 allspice, | pint of vinegar. Cook 
currants 1 hour. Add spices and boil 20 minutes, then 
add sugar and vinegar and boil 10 minutes. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

7 pounds grapes, 3 pounds of sugar, 1 pint vinegar, 1 
tablespoonful cloves, same of cinnamon. Boil the grapes 
until very soft. Add the other ingredients and boil until 
it jellies. 

SPICED GOOSEBERRIES. 

(Mrs. Ives.) 

3 quarts gooseberries, 4 pints sugar, 1 pint vinegar, 1 
tablespoonful cinnamon, 1 tablespoonful cloves, 1 table- 
spoonful nutmeg. Cook 1^ hours. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

(Mrs. Carleton Morely.) 

7 pounds grapes, 3^- pounds sugar, 1 pint vinegar, J 
ounce ground cloves, | ounce ground cinnamon. Squeeze 
the pulp from skins and boil until soft. Put through a 
colander. Add skins and other ingredients. Boil 1 hour. 



132 

CUKRANT JELLY. 
(Miss Gregory.) 

In preparing the currants, leave them on the stem. 
After washing, drain thoroughly, place in a stone jar, and 
stand jar in a kettle of water on the stove. Cook until 
thoroughly done — something like 3 hours after the water 
in the kettle begins to boil. Strain the juice over night 
through double cheese-cloth. Let the juice come slowly 
to a boil. Boil 20 minutes, skimming carefully; then re- 
move from the stove, and add the su.s:ar orradually, stir- 
ring until entirely dissolved. Place again on the stove 
and boil hard for 5 minutes, skimming carefully Allow 

1 pound of sugar to every pint of juice, and heat the sugar 
before using. 

MINT JELLY. 

(Mrs. Crandall.) 

2 bunches mint, soak J hour in 1 pint boiling water, 
strain. Dissolve ^ box gelatine in ^ cup cold water. Add 
to this the juice of 2 lemons, 1 cup sugar and a little leaf 
green coloring. Add all to the strained mint. Heat in 
double boiler, then pour into molds wet with water. 

GOOSEBEEEY JELLY. 
(Mrs. Ayres.) 

2 quarts gooseberries, 2 quarts raspberries, -t oranges, 

2 cups raisins, 4 pounds sugar. Peel orange and chop 
fine. Boil the peel a little and pour off water, then boil 
all together until it jells. 

CONCORD GRAPE JELLY. 
(Mrs. Ayres.) 

To 1 basket of Concord grapes add apples cut small. 
Cover with water. Cook until grapes and apples are well 
done. Strain through colander, then through cheese cloth 
bag. To 1 cup grape juice add 1 cup granulated sugar. 
Boil 25 minutes from time it begins to boil. The adding 
of apples removes the strono: taste so often found un- 
pleasant to grape jelly and gives it body for turning out 
from molds. 



133 

YELLOW TOMATO PRESERVES. 
(Marion Carr.) 

Wash and pick over medium- sized tomatoes, 1 pound 
tomatoes, 1 pound sugar. Make syrup of sugar. Pour 
over tomatoes. Let stand until following morning. Heat 
syrup again and pour over tomatoes. Third morning 
same. Fourth morning add to heated syrup sliced lemon 
and a few pieces of ginger root (about 2 lemons to 3 
pounds of tomatoes). When syrup is boiling put in the 
tomatoes. Cook slowly until clear as amber. Remove 
tomatoes one by one and put on plates to cool. When 
perfectly cold put in glasses, fill about two-thirds of the 
glass. Then heat syrup boiling hot and pour over toma- 
toes. When cold cover with paraffine. 



SANDWICHES AND CHEESE DISHES. 

OLIVE SAXDWICHES". 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

1 pint of olives ; 1 pound of nuts ; Mayonnaise dressing. 
Pound the kernels until soft and fine. Cut the meat from 
the olives and chop very fine. Mix together and use 
sufficient Mayonnaise to make a smooth paste. Spread 
on buttered bread cut in triangles. 

CHEESE AND NUT SANDWICHES. 
(Kate Floyd.) 

• Cream cheese, soften with cream. Mix with chopped 
pecans and spread on brown or white bread. 

PIMENTO SANDWICHES. 
(Kate Floyd.) 

Pimentoes chopped fine and drain thoroughly. Mix 
with Mayonnaise dressing and spread on white bread. 

HARD BOILED EGGS AND CHICKEN. 

(Kate Floyd.) 

Hard boiled eggs and chicken minced. Mix with- cream 
sauce, highly seasoned or Mayonnaise dressing. 



134 

^t:ctoeia sandwiches. 

(Jessie J. Ullrich, Sheridan Road.) 

2 eggs; i cup sugar; ^ cup butter; flour. Beat the 
butter to a cream; stir in the sugar and. eggs, which 
should be beaten separately. Add flour to make a cake 
batter (about J of a cup). Pour into jelly cake pans, 
and bake 15 minutes in a moderate oven. Put the cakes 
together with orange mannalade. 

CUCUMBER SPREADS. 
(Mrs. Daniel Cobb.) 

Cut 8 slices of bread thin and butter them, cut off 
crusts ; put 2 young cucumbers of medimn size — the kind 
with small seeds, and slice them. Have readv a small 
cup of finely chopped ham; spread slices of cucumber 
over 4 slices of the bread and put a thin layer of ham over 
the cucumber; squeeze lemon juice over the ham; add a 
very thin spread of Mayonnaise. Put the other 4 slices 
of bread over the spread slices and cut into halves 
or quarters. Serve with slices of lemon. 

AUDITORIUM CHEESE. 
(Mrs. T. R. Wyles.) 

1 lb. Roquefort cheese; 2 teaspoons English mustard; 
^ lb. butter; some garlic and onions grated; 2 table- 
spoons paprika; a little salt; 2 wineglasses of sherry, or 
1 glass of brandy. Mix all this well and put in refrig- 
erator. 

CHEESE BALLS. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

1^ cups of grated cheese ; ^ teaspoonf ul of salt ; J tea- 
spoonfid paprika; whites of 3 eggs. Mix together the 
cheese, salt and paprika, then add whites of 3 eggs beaten 
stiff. Shape in small balls, roll in sifted cracker crumbs 
and fry in deep fat to a delicate brown; drain on soft 
paper. Serve hot with a green vegetable salad. 

CHEESE BALLS FOR SALAD. 
(Mrs. Hussey.) 

1 cup grated cheese American; whites of 2 eggs, well 
beaten; pinch of cayenne pepper. Roll the size of wal- 



135 

nuts and dip in cracker crumbs, rolled very fine. Put on 
ice for an hour before frying in hot lard. Dry on brown 
paper and serve at once. 

CHEESE FINGEES. 

Ingredients : 3 oz. grated cheese ; 3 oz. flour ; 2 oz. but- 
ter; ^ teaspoonful baking powder; salt and cayenne to 
taste. Mode : Mix these ingredients to a stiff paste with 
a very little milk, roll out and cut into strips about 3 
inches long, roll round and bake in a tin in a brisk oven 
for 5 minutes to a very light brown. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 
(Mary F. Clark.) 

1 tablespoon of lard ; ^ teaspoon salt ; 1 cup flour ; 1 lb. 
rich cheese; dash red pepper. Sift salt, pepper and 
flour; rub in the lard, then the grated cheese. Roll the 
mixture to ^ inch thickness, cut in narrow strips and bake 
till a delicate brown. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 
(Mrs. Daniel Cobb.) 

1 tablespoonful lard; i teaspoonful salt; dash of red 
pepper; 1 cup flour; 1 lb. American cheese, rubbed 
through a sieve; work all together like pie crust; roll 
out and cut in strips J inch wide ; lay in pan and bake to 
a delicate brown. 

CHEESE FONDU. 
(Claia G. Geer.) 

1 cup of bread crumbs, 2 cups of grated cheese (old), 
3 eggs, i teaspoon of soda, 1 tablespoon of butter, 2 cups 
of milk, pinch of salt. Soak the bread crumbs in the 
milk, add the eggs, cheese and butter (melted). Lastly 
the soda dissolved in a little hot water. Pour into a but- 
tered baking dish. Bake 20 minutes till a golden brown. 

SERVE WITH SOUP OR SALAD. 
(Mrs. E. A. Bournique.) 

Grate American cheese; add sweet cream until cheese 
is thin enough to spread; season with a little cayenne 



136 

aud salt ; cut perfectly fresh bread in thin slices ; spread 
these with cheese mixture and roll and fasten with tooth 
pick. Place in oven to brown. 



EGGS. 

FEICASSEED EGGS. 

Ingredients. — 6 liard boiled eggs, sliced, 1 cup good 
broth, well seasoned with pepper and salt, parsley and 
suspicion of onion, rounds of stake bread fried to a light 
brown in butter or nice dripping. Mode. — Put the broth 
on the fire in a saucepan with the seasoning and let it 
come to a boil. Eub the slices of eggs with melted but- 
ter, then roll them into flour. Lay them gently into the 
gravy, let this become very hot without boiling lest the 
eggs should break. They should lie thus in the gravj 
for 5 minutes. Have ready ujDon a flat dish the fried 
bread. Lay the sliced egg evenly upon this. Pour the 
gravy over all and serve hot. 

SCALLOPED EGGS. 

1 egg for each person, salt and pepper. For 1 dozen 
eggs, 1 cup of bread crumbs, 1 pint of milk. Boil the 
eggs hard and slice and place in a buttered dish, first a 
layer of eggs and then a layer of crumbs, with pieces of 
butter throughout and salt and pepper to taste. Cover 
the top with crumbs, pour over the pint of milk, and bake 
till brown. 

OMELET, SPANISH STYLE. 

Fiy a little garlic in sweet oil, in a tin or porcelain 
pan, having previously chopped it very fine; when the 
garlic is done add some sliced tomatoes, sliced mush- 
rooms, and smoked beef tongue; season well. Make a 
plain omelet ; fry it in sweet oil and put the garlic, toma- 
toes, mushrooms and tongue inside ; cool and serve with a 
little tomato sauce. 



137 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil and peel and cut into halves. Eemove the yolks 
and cream them and add 1 tablespoon bntter, 2 table- 
spoons old ham, nicely minced. Season highly with salt, 
IDcpper, and mustard, and a little chopped onion. Fill the 
eggs and arrange on a dish or platter. 

EGG CROQUETTES. 

For 6 croquetteSj take 6 eggs, 1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon 
butter, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon chopped parsley, 
10 drops onion juice, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper. 
Boil eggs hard and drop in cold water, and, after re- 
moving shells, squeeze through potato-masher. Boil the 
milk, and add the flour and butter, which have been well 
mixed, then add other ingredients. Turn in a platter to 
cool. Let the mixture stand 3 hours. Shape and drop 
in eggs and bread crumbs and fry in boiling fat. 

EGGS A LA' ELIZABETH. 
(Mrs. 1. P. Veazey.) 

Boil 12 eggs for 15 minutes. Then throw them in cold 
water. Eemove shells, chop fine, season, add enough 
cream sauce to moisten. Put in a buttered baking dish. 
Sprinkle the top with fine bread crumbs and bake in the 
oven for 10 minutes, or until a delicate brown. 

EGGS POACHED WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Ingredients. — 6 eggs, 1 teacupful of cold chicken or 
other fowl minced fine, 2 table spoonfuls of butter, 1 cup 
of good gravy (veal or poultry), 2 dozen mushrooms 
sliced, some rounds of fried bread, 1 raw egg beaten 
light. Mode. — Mince the cold meat very fine and work 
into it the butter with the beaten egg. Season with salt 
and pepper and stir over the fire in a saucepan until it 
is smoking hot. Poach the eggs and trim off the ragged 
edges. The fried bread must be arranged upon a hot 
flat dish, the mince of chicken on this and the eggs upon 
tlie chicken. Have ready in another saucepan the sliced 
mushrooms and gravy. If using the canned mushrooms 
they should have simmered in the gravy 15 minutes; if' 
fresh ones they should be parboiled 15 minutes before 



138 

they are sliced into the gravy and stewed 10 minutes in it. 
The gravy must be savory, rich and rather highly sea- 
soned. Pour it very hot upon the eggs. 



CHAFING DISHES. 

CHICKEN HASH. 

(Grace D. Pardridge.) 

Boil thoroughly, a fat, selected chicken. Take out when 
done. Place pot back on fire and make a good strong- 
broth. While this is being done strip the meat off the 
chicken in as large pieces as possible; cut these into small 
squares with a sharp carving knife. Put into the pan 
with a liberal piece of butter, and the least bit of onion, 
chopped very fine. Cook thoroughly, then add the chicken 
together with J of quantity of boiled potatoes cut in the 
same manner as the chicken. Add 2 hard boiled eggs 
chopped fine, seasoned with salt, pepper and a little Mex- 
ican pimento pepper, over this pour an equal quantity 
of the broth, previously prepared and into which while 
boiling there has been put cream equal to the quantity of 
broth. Cook slowly again and stir constantly until the 
proper consistency for serving as hash. Just before 
serving stir in the yolks of 3 raw eggs, to give it a rich 
color. This is a most delicious dish and may be served 
at luncheon, dinner or a late supper. 

ENTEEES. 

SWEETBREADS AND ASPARAGUS. 
(Mrs. Thorn.) 

Ingredients. — Top of a good sized bunch of cold boiled 
asparagus, the same amount of canned asparagus, yolks 
of 2 hard boiled eggs, butter the size of large egg, 4 table- 
spoonfus rich milk, 1 small teaspoonful cornstarch, salt, 
white pepper, celery salt to taste. Mode. — Parboil sweet- 
breads and plunge into ice water. Cream together but- 
ter, eggs and cornstarch, put into chafing dish and when 
heated add gradually the milk (or cream) ; 3 tablespoon- 
fuls of the water the asparagus is boiled in. When this 



139 

mixture is quite smooth, add the sweetbreads, asparagus, 
salt and pepper and stew about 10 minutes. 



CANDIES. 

(Mrs. E. A. Bournique.) 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

4 cux^s light brown sugar, 1 cup butter, ^ cup cold 
water. Put all to boil. Cook until brittle when dropped 
in cold water. Just before pouring in buttered pans add 
juice of ^ lemon. When partly cooled mark oif in 
squares. 

OCEAN FOAM CANDY. 
(Mrs. G. N. Lyman.) 

2 cups sugar, ^ cup corn syrup, i cup water. Boil till 
brittle. Stir this into the beaten whites of 2 eggs. Add 
1 pound walnuts (broken) and spread out. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 
(E. G.) 

2^ pounds of coifee A sugar, 1^ cups of water, 1 even 
teaspoon cream of tartar. Place over a hot fire and boil 
hard without stirring, until when tried in cold water a 
soft ball may be made. Place in a dripping pan and let 
it cool, until it wrinkles on top when the pan is tipped. 
Pour in 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Take a pancake turner 
and paddle the candy from one side of the pan to the 
other, being careful not to stir it. It will begin to get 
creamy, and, if cooked properly, will thicken into a white 
creamy mass. Roll into small balls and when cool dip 
in melted chocolate. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 
(E. G.) 

1 quart of molasses, 1 pint of granulated sugar, | pound 
butter. Boil without stirring until stiff when tried in 
water. Just before taking off the stove put in a pinch 
of soda. Cool and pull. 



140 

DATE CONFECTIONS. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

Stone any desired number of dates, soak in brandy 
an hour. Blanch an equal number of almonds. Put half 
an almond in center of each date. Roll in granulated 
sugar. 

WHITE CREAM CANDY. 

(E. G.) 

4 cups of granulated sugar, 1^ cups of cold water, 1^ 
teaspons cream of tartar. Boil until stitf when tried in 
water. Cool and pull. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
(E. G.) 

2 pounds granulated sugar, ^ pound of glucose, 2 
ounces best parafine, 2 ounces butter, 1 pint of cream, i 
teaspoon cream of tartar, 4 squares Baker's chocolate, 1 
teaspoon vanilla. Let it boil until it becomes quite hard 
when tried in cold water. Put in shallow jDans and cut in 
squares when cold. 

HARD NUT CANDY. 
(E. G.) 

2^ pounds of granulated sugar, 1^ cups of cold water, 
1 even teaspoon of cream of tartar. Boil until a dark 
amber color and it becomes very brittle when dropped in 
water. Place a layer of nut meats in shallow pan, and 
over them pour enough syrup to cover. When cold and 
hard, break up in pieces. 

CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 
(M. D. B.) 

Cover peel with cold water, bring to boil, and cook until 
soft. Drain, remove white portion with spoon and cut 
yellow portion into thin strips with scissors. Boil ^ cup 
of water and 1 cup sugar until it threads when dropped 
from spoon. Cook strips in syrup 5 minutes, drain and 
dip in fine granulated sugar. 



141 

DIVINITY FUDGE. 
(Mrs. W. H. Baldwin.) 

1 cup Karo corn syrup, J cup water, 3 cups sugar, pinch 
of salt, yjinch of cream of tartar. Boil as for fudge. 
Gradually beat in whites of two eggs. Add flavoring and 
cup of nuts and fruit. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE. 
(Mrs. F. B. C.) 

4 cups of granulated sugar, moistened with a cup of 
milk. When boiling, add a piece of butter the size of a 
walnut, and 4 squares of chocolate grated. Stir con- 
stantly. When the mixture begins to sugar around the 
edge of the pan, put in a teaspoon of vanilla and take 
from the stove. Beat until quite thick, then pour into 
buttered pans, and mark into squares just before quite 
cool. 

PANUCHE. 
(Mrs. C. B. Richards.) 

2 quarts of brown sugar, 1 pint of fresh milk. Boil 
hard, stirring all the time. When it will form a soft ball 
in water, add 1 tablespoon of vanilla, 1 quart of English 
walnuts. Stir in quickly and pour into buttered plates. 
If it turns to sugar after it is cold it will show that it has 
been cooked too long. 

CREAM MINTS. 
(Mrs. Daniel Cobb.) 

1 pound confectioner's sugar, white of 1 egg well 
beaten, 2 teaspoonfuls ice water, 25 drops of oil of pep- 
permint. Mix well together, roll on a bread board, and 
cut with a cutter about the size of a quarter. 

TURKISH DELIGHT. 

(Mrs. C. C. Hughes.) 

1 box Nelson's gelatine soaked in 1 cup of cold water. 
Add I cup of hot water and 1 quart of granulated sugar. 
Let this reach boiling point, then add the juice and grated 
rinds of 2 lemons and 1 orange, and ^ pound of citron cut 
into small bits. Boil this for ten minutes. Turn into 
pans (the confection should be about ^ inch thick), let 



142 

stand over night, or until firm'. Cut into oblong pieces 
and roll in powdered sugar. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

(Mrs. F. S. S.) 

Common salt is a good exterminator for moths. Sprinkle 
it about dry and the moths will disappear. 

CLEANING CAEPET RECIPE. 

2^ bars Ivory soap, laundry size ; ^ lb. powdered borax ; 
-J oz. glycerine ; shave the soap fine ; add 2 gallons water ; 
heat until soap is dissolved ; add 3 gallons of cold water. 
Let stand until thick. 

WASHING CURTAINS. 

1| bars Ivory soap, dissolved in 3 quarts of water; 3 
tablespoons of kerosene, put in 3 pails of water; when 
boiling put in curtains, boil for 20 minutes. Recipe for 
2 pair curtains. 

WASHING BLANKETS'. 

J bar of soap, thoroughly dissolved in about 3 quarts 
of water; 2 tablespoons ammonia; 1 tablespoon borax. 
Put this mixture in a tub of warm water, enough water 
to cover 1 pair of blankets in which 1 tablespoon of 
borax has been dissolved ; let the blankets remain 1 hour, 
occasionally stirring, then rinse through warm waters 
till clear. Hang up without wringing. Listed for over 
30 years. 

BEVERAGES. 

CHOCOLATE. 

2 ounces chocolate, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 cup boil- 
ing water, 3 cups scalded milk. Break the chocolate into 
pieces and melt over hot water. Add sugar and the boil- 
ing water and stir until smooth and glossy ; let cook five 
or six minutes; add part of the milk, and when well 



143 • 

mixed pour into the rest of the milk; let stand over the 
fire 5 or 6 minutes, beating meanwhile with a whisk or 
eggbeater, to make frothy and prevent a skin from form- 
ing on the surface. 

FEUIT FRAPPE. 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

2 cans grated pineapple, 1 can lemon cling peaches cut 
fine, 1 dozen lemons scooped out, sugar to the taste, and 
enough hot water to make 1 gallon. Freeze. After put- 
ting in the glasses add 3 tea spoonfuls of Jamaica rum, 
to each glass, and several cherries. 

LEMONADE. 
(Miss A. M. Everett.) 

1 pint lemon juice, ^ pint orange juice, J pint jar pre- 
served pineapple, 1 banana, 1 scant pound of sugar, 2 
quarts water, cherries to taste. Boil sugar and 1 quart 
of water together, then add the other quart of boiling 
water or use in place of this 1 quart Apollinarus. 

LEMON SYEUP. 

Ingredients. — 4 pounds loaf sugar, 2^ ounces tartaric 
acid, 2 drams of essence of lemon, 1 quart of water, boil- 
ing. Mode. — Put the sugar into a basin and pour the 
boiling water over it ; when dissolved and quite cool, add 
the essence of lemon and tartaric acid and bottle for use. 
1 tablespoonful to a tumbler of water makes excellent 
lemonade. , 

EASPBERRY VINEGAR. ' 

(J. E. B. Haskin.) 

4 quarts of berries, cover with vinegar. Let stand 24 
hours ; scald and strain ; add 1 pound of white sugar to 
each pint of juice. Boil 20 minutes. Bottle and seal. 

GINGER CORDIAL. 

(Mrs. John Glass.) 
1 gallon alcohol, ^ gallon water, 1 peck basket Concord 
grapes, 6 ounces white ginger root, 3 lemons, peel and 
all, tablespoonful dmond extract. Put in stone crock for 



144 

9 days. Mash with wooden potato masher each day. 
After which strain and add 4 pounds (scant) of granu- 
lated sugar, and almond extract. Let stand 24 hours; 
strain through muslin cloth and bottle. This is better 
the longer it is kept. 

CHERRY BOUNCE. 

(Old English.) 

Stone and put ir a jar the cherries, place this jar into 
a pot containing water, set it on a fire and let water boil 
around the cherries until the juice is extracted, then 
strain the juice, and to a gallon put 4 pounds of sugar, 
put into a kettle and let it boil until all scum has been 
taken off. While boiling add | tea spoonful of allspice 
and few blades of mace. Just before bottling put to each 
gallon of liquor 1 quart of brandy and 1 quart of rum. 

GRAPE JUICE. 
(Mrs. John Glass.) 

Pick over grapes, using only sound ones, and strip them 
from stems. Put into preserving kettle and barely cover 
with water. Cook slowly, crushing grapes until all are 
broken. Strain through bag. To 1 quart of juice add 
J cup of sugar. Boil 4 minutes. Bottle and seal. 

(Grape Juice.) 

8 baskets of New York Concords, pick and wash, mash 
well, cook thoroughly, strain through collander, then 
pass through cheese cloth bags. Put on the back of the 
stove. When thoroughly hot add a cup of sugar to each 
basket of fruit used. Boil about 20 minutes. Bottle and 
tightly seal. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

(Lillian Prescott Kingsbury, used by Edna Sampsell.) 

6 lemons, 3 oranges, 1 can pineapple, 2 cups of sugar. 
Make this a few hours before serving and stand away 
on ice. When ready for punch bowl pour into the juice 
ginger ale, allowing 1 bottle of ginger ale to 2 cups of 
juice. If too strong dilute with water to taste. Place a 
large square of ice in the center of the bowl; decorate 
with cherries, grapes, pineapple, etc. 



145 

EGG NOGG. 

(Receipt from Baltimore, used by Edna Sampsell.) 

1 dozen eggs, beaten separately ; 1 tablespoon of sugar 
to each egg. Pour into the yolks in smallest possible 
stream; 8 wine glasses of brandy, 2 or more glasses of 
rum, beating continually. Add rich milk until it is de- 
sired strength. Beat in J of the beaten whites, ^ of the 
beaten place on the top, sprinkle with nutmeg. 

F. F. V. EGG NOG. (Excellent.) 
(Mrs. E. B. Peirce.) 

2 quarts of whisky, 1 pint of brandy, I pint of rum, 3 
quarts milk — no cream — 15 eggs, 2^ pounds granulated 
supar. Separate the yolks from the whites and beat the 
yolks thoroughly ; mix sugar and yolks and beat until bub- 
bles appear. (The longer this mixture is beaten, the bet- 
ter.) Turn 1^ quarts of whisky into the mixture slowly, 
stirring rapidly all the time, then the 1 pint of brandy. 
Pour the milk slowly in, stirring all the time, about 2^ 
quarts, add the ^ pint of rum to flavor. Use the remain- 
der of the whisky, and the remainder of the milk, or 
more if desired, according to taste. When serving whip 
the whites of the egggs into a stitf floater and place on 
top of mixture, grating a little nutmeg on top of this if 
desired. This eggnog is improved by being allowed to 
stand at least 3 days before serving. This quantity will 
make 1^ gallons of eggnog. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

COOK^S TIME TABLE. 

FRYING. 

Muffins, fritters, doughnuts, 3 to 5 minutes ; croquettes 
and fish balls, 1 minute; potatoes, raw, 4 to 8 minutes; 
breaded chops, 5 to 8 minutes ; fillets of fish, 4 to 6 min- 
utes ; smelt, trout, other small fish, 3 to 5 minutes. Note 
— Length of time for cooking fish and meat does not de- 
pend so much on number of pounds to be cooked as the 
extent of surface exposed to the heat. 



146 



BAKING. 

Baked beans, 6 to 8 liours; beef sirloin or rib, rare, 5 
pounds, 1 hour 5 minutes; beef sirloin or rib, rare, 10 
pounds, 1 hour 30 minutes ; beef sirloin or rib, well done, 
5 pounds, 1 hour 20 minutes ; beef sirloin or rib, well done, 
10 pounds, 1 hour 50 minutes; beef (fillet), 20 to 30 min- 
utes; mutton (saddle), 1^ to H hours; lamb (leg), 1^ to 
IJ hours; lamb (fore quarter), 1 to 1| hours; veal (leg), 
si to 4 hours ; veal (loin), 2 to 3 hours ; pork (spare ribs), 
3 to 3 J hours ; chicken, 3 to 4 pounds, 1 to 1^ hours ; tur- 
key, 9 pounds, 2^ to 3 hours; goose, 9 pounds, 
2 liours; duck (domestic), 1 to 1^ hours; duck 
(wild), 20 to 30 minutes; grouse, 25 to 30 min- 
utes; partridge, 45 to 50 minutes; fish, thick, 3 to 4 
pounds, 45 to 60 minutes; fish, small, 20 to 30 minutes; 
bread (white bread), 45 to 60 minutes; bread (graham 
loaf), 35 to 45 minutes; bread sticks, 10 to 15 minutes; 
biscuits or rolls (raised), 12 to 20 minutes; biscuits, bak- 
ing powder), 12 to 15 minutes; gems, 25 to 30 minutes; 
muffins (raised), 30 minutes; muffins (baking powder), 
20 to 25 minutes; corn cake (thin), 15 to 20 minutes; corn 
cake (thick), 30 to 35 minutes ; ginger bread, 20 to 30 min- 
utes ; cookies, 6 to 10 minutes ; sponge cake, 45 to 60 min- 
utes; cake (layer), 20 to 30 minutes; cake (loaf), 40 to 
60 minutes; cake (xiound) 1^ to 1^ hours; cake (fruit), 1^ 
to 2 hours; cake (wedding), 3 hours; baked batter pud- 
dings, 35 to 45 minutes; bread pudding, 1 hour; tapioca 
or rice pudding, 1 hour; custard, 30 to 45 minutes; pies, 
30 to 50 minutes. 

BOILING. 

Cabbage, 35 to 60 minutes ; oyster plant, 45 to 60 min- 
utes ; turnips, 30 to 45 minutes ; onions, 45 to 60 minutes ; 
parsnips, 30 to 45 minutes; spinach, 25 to 30 minutes; 
green corn, 12 to 20 minutes; cauliflower, 20 to 25 min- 
utes; brussels sprouts, 15 to 20 minutes; tomatoes, 
stewed, 15 to 20 minutes ; rice, 20 to 25 minutes ; macaroni, 
20 to 30 minutes. 

BROILING. 

Steaks, 1 inch thick, 4 to '6 minutes ; steaks, 1^ inches 
thick, 8 to 10 minutes; lamb or mutton chops, 6 to 8 min 
utes; lamb or mutton chops in paper cases, 10 minutes; 
quail or squab, 8 minutes ; quail or squab in paper cases, 



147 

10 to 12 minutes; chicken, 20 minutes; shad, bluefish, 
whitefish, 15 to 20 minutes; slices of halibut, salmon 
swordfish, 12 to 15 minutes; small thin fish, 5 to 8 min- 
utes; liver and tripe, 4 to 5 minutes. 

BOILING. 

Coffee, 1 to 3 minutes; eggs (soft cooked), 6 to 8 min- 
utes; eggs (hard cooked), 35 to 45 minutes; mutton (leg), 
2 to 3 hours; ham, 12 to 14 pounds, 4 to 5 hours; corn- 
beef or tongTie, 3 to 4 hours; turkey, 9 pounds, 2 to 3 
hours; fowl, 4 to 5 pounds, 2 to 3 hours; chicken, 3 
pounds, 1 to H hours ; lobster, 25 to 30 minutes ; cod and 
haddock. 3 to 5 pounds, 20 to 30 minutes ; halibut, 2 to 3 
pounds, 30 minutes ; bluefish and bass, 4 to 5 pounds, 40 
to 45 minutes; salmon, 2 to 3 pounds, 30 to 35 minutes; 
small fish, 6 to 10 minutes ; potatoes (white), 20 to 30 min- 
utes; potatoes (sweet), 15 to 25 minutes; asparagus, 20 
to 30 minutes ; peas, 20 to 60 minutes ; string beans, 1 to 
2i hours; lima or other shell beans, 1 to 1^ hours; beets 
(young), 45 minutes; beets (old), 3 to 4 hours. 

MEASUEEMENTS. 

2 cups butter packed solidly equals 1 pound; 4 cups 
pastry flour equals 1 pound; 2 cups granulated sugar 
equals 1 pound ; 2f cups powdered sugar equals 1 pound ; 
3i- cups confectioners' sugar equal 1 pound; 2f cups 
brown sugar equals 1 pound; 4-J cups coffee equals 1 
pound; 2 cups finely chopped meat equals 1 pound; 9 
large eggs equals 1 pound; 1 square Baker's chocolate 
equals 1 ounce; ^ cup blanched and chopped almonds 
1 ounce ; 3 teaspoons equals 1 tablespoon ; 16 tablespoons 
equals 1 cup; 2 tablespoons butter equals 1 ounce; 4 table- 
spoons flour equals 1 ounce. 



Bill says 



The best receipe for making happiness is to 
trade at 

War r ens 

4-6-8-10 West Central Avenue 
HIGHLAND PARK, - ILLINOIS 



A GOOD ROAST must be well seasoned 

and well done. If you wish Watch, Clock and Jewelry well done, take it to 

LEVIN, The Jeweler, 

If not satisfactory I am willing to stand the roast. I have everything in 
season including Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Phonographs and the famous 
Permanent Jewel Needle for disc Phonographs, no changing, no sharpening 
ever ready and everlasting. 

SAMUEL LEVIN 
120 East Central Avenue. 

A, E. NORRLEN 

Express, Moving and Storage 

upholstering and Cabinet work. Furniture packed 

and Shipped. 

Office & Warehouse: 9 and 11 West Central Ave. 

Telephone 414 

Highland Park, 111. 



If all the ladies of this Club Kne^vr ho-w^ 

nice -we launder household laundry and 

^vearing apparel and ho-w -w^ell -we do all 

kinds of dry cleaning, such as fancy dresses, 

suits, gloves, silK and fancy lace ^w^aists and 

skirts -we are sure they ^vould all send us all 

their 'work. So don't hesitate. We are re- 

sponsible. 

Yours expectantly, 

THE. RELIABLE, LAUNDRY. 
618 N. First St; Tel. Highland Park 107 



.»KFiqE 79 GOODS HANDLED WITH GREATEST CARE 

. SIDENCE 259 PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN ALL ORDERS 

JAMES H. DUFFY 

CITY EXPRESS, BAGGAGE 
AND FREIGHT TRANSFER 

OFFICE 

124 East Central Avenue 

ilAGGAGE AND FREIGHT STORAGE 
i<()OM, COMMUTATION RAILROAD 
IICKETS BETWEEN HIGHLAND - - TTtrtVilcinH Pc»«-lr Til 

PARK AND CHICAGO riigiiianu x^arK, m. 

If you will give us a CHANCE— We will 

convince you — We can save you 

MONEY on your 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

WATCH FOR OUR 

SPEICIAL SALES 

"The Pure Food Purveyors" JOHNSON 6 CO. 



TELEPHONE 567 



ALBERT LARSON 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES, HIGH GRADE 

CORRESPONDENCE STATIONERY IN 

ALL UP TO DATE STYLES 

No. 7 St. Johns Ave. 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 



TELEPHONE 723 — J— 




Flowers and Plants 

R. J. SOUTHERTON 



4^ 



PAUL GIESER 

''No meal complete 
Without some Meat, 

If you want the Best, 
Come over West,'* 



MORAINE ROAD 



Telephones 42 and 43 

Highland Park, !U. 



PHONE 764L-796W PACKING AND STORAGE 

T. E. PIERSON 

(THE ANTIQUE SHOP) 

UPHOLSTERING 
& SHADE WORK 

g!g*'5rHl,GTN°y^^|Sy^ 128 E. CENTRAL AVE. 

WE GIVE SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE FILLING OF YOUR PRESCIPTIONS 



FAMILY DRUGGIST 



IF YOU WANT A PURE VANILLA EXTRACT BUY SCHUMACHER'S 
HOME MADE. OUR CHOCOLATE VANILLA CREAMS ARE 
FLAVORED WITH THIS EXTRACT 



TELEPHONES 144-363 
HIGHLAND PARK ILLINOIS 

R. J. TILLMAN 

PURE JERSEY MILK AND CREAM 

HIGHLAND PARK 



PEER OF TABLE WATERS 

SPARKLING SPRING MINERAL 
WATER CO. 



BOTTLED AT THE SPRINGS AND DELIVERED TO YOUR RESIDENCE THE 

SAME DAY, IN LAKE FOREST, HIGHLAND PARK, GLENCOE, 

WINNETKA AND EVANSTON 



WILLIAM TILLMAN, 

MANAGER 



TELEPHONE 37 



HIGHLAND PARK, ILLINOIS 



You are cordially invited to open 
an Account with the 



Erskine Bank 

HIGHLAND PARK 

3 PER CENT 
Paid on Savings 

Safety Deposit and Storage 
Vaults 

Real Estate and Insurance 



PHONE 264 



LAKE SHORE 
CREAMERY 

F. A. TUCKER, Mgr. 

Gilt-Edge 
Butter 

615 Oakwood Ave. 



Mail and telephone 

orders properly HIGHLAND 

attended to PARK 



HIGHLAND PARK 

Tel. 265 214 E- Central Ave. 



4 

Cleaners and Dyers 

PARISIAN DYE HOUSE 

Dyers and Cleaners 



EVANSTON 
Tel. 727 Rood Bldg. 



ALLAN M. CLEMENT [ARTHUR F. LINDLEY 

JOHN F. L. CURTIS ARTHUR C. GROVES 



CLEMENT, CURTIS & CO 

STOCKS=BONDS=GRAIN 
COTTON=COFFEE=PRO VISIONS 

219 LA SALLE STREET 
(THE ROOKERY) 



MEMBERS 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE NEW YORK COFFEE EXCHANGE 

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE CHICAGO STOCK EXCHANGE 

GRAIN DEALERS NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 



We have special facilities for obtaining information in all markets. Our 
financial circulars have foreshadowed every important turn in values. Our 
crop reporting service is the most complete in the country, and has ap- 
proximated government estimates in this country and Canada more 
closely than any other service. Our cotton service is unequaled, -and 
our reports the past season were almost exactly duplicated -by the govern- 
ment. Our Argentine reports have been uniformly accurate. Condition 
and prospects of all corporations in the security market at the service of 
our clients. 



TELEPHONES 
454 
455 
456 



GEORGE A. BOCK 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 
Fruits and Vegetables 



DISTRIBUTER OF 

Curtice Bros. Canned 
Vegetables and Fruits 



14-16 Central Ave, 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 



FRED S. DOLE 

CATERER 

317 East Laurel Av. Phone 53 

Sandwiches, Salads, Frappes, Loaf and Layer Cakes and 
Frozen Dainties are our Specialties. 

We have for hire Linen, China, Punch Bowl and Glasses, 
Silverware and Tables. 

We* solicit your patronage for Luncheons and 

Dinner Parties. 



FRED SCHAEFER 

PLUMBING 
23 N. Sheridan Road - - - - Telephone 632 

Highland Park, Illinois. 

FRANK SILJESTROM 

ICE, COAU COKE AND WOOD 

Elm Place and First Street 

Telephone 65 

HIGHLAND PARK, - - - ILLINOIS 



JESSE SOBEY 



FANCY MEATS AND POULTRY 



We make a specialty in filling phone orders, and 
guarantee quality and service. 

We invite your patronage. 

Tel. Highland Park 431. 



H. P. Jeppesen 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 

Erskine Bank Building 
Telephones . - . 475 and 476 



C. G. ROSEN OW 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Flour 

and Feed 

Telephone 221-223 Highland Park, 111. 



PHONE NO. 104 

HIGHLAND PARE DAIRY 

THEO. SUELKE 

DEALER IN 

PRUE MILK AND CREAM 

436 WEST CENTRAL AVE. 



TELEPHONE 31 

MORAINE HOTEL STABLES 

MARTIN RINGDAHL, Proprietor 
11 ST. JOHNS AVENUE 

HIGHLAND PARK ILLINOIS 



Market Phones 467 and 468 Residence Phone 843J 

JAMES BOWDEN 

FRESH, SALT AND 
SMOKED MEATS 

ST. JOHNS AVENUE 

HIGHUND PARK ILLINOIS 



TIME AND MONEY SAVED BY USING 



For Floors arid 

Woodwork 

For Pianos and 
Farmture 

Ask for free 

Sample 



TRADEMARK 1 R EC. U.S.PAT. OfK 



A perfect cleatung and 
polishing liqmd — 
A superior Aato-Body 
Polish 

Money refunded if 
not satisfactory 



D. C. PURDY & SONS, Inc. Highland Park, 111. 



HIGHLAND PARK ICE CO. 

Lakes of Wisconsin Ice 
237 N. ST. JOHNS AVE. 

Phone 34 Highland Park^ Illinois 



FASTIDIOUS FOLK 

ENJOY 

WHITMAN'S 

CHOCOLATES AND CONFECTIONS 



EARL W. GSELL 

Agent Telephone 3 



Herman A. Drieske 

FLOWE.RS, SHRUBS 
AND PE,RENNIALS 

RAVINIA 

Tel. Highland Park 663. 



LYDIA M. ROWAN 

Scalp and Facial Treatment 

Hair Dressing and Manicuring 

Toilet Articles and 

Hair Goods 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 



The Ladies' TTT" • 1 1 • ^..^^ A ^ J American 

"Xt\irr"^ William Anderson ^-^^y,^ 

DRY GOODS & NOTIONS 



THE ECONOMICAL SHOPPING HEADQUARTERS 

FOR THE REFINED IN TELEPHONE ORDERS 

TASTE AND THE CARE- TELEPHONE 45 RECEIVE PROMPT AND 
FUL IN PURSE - - - CAREFUL ATTENTION 

11 St. John's Ave. Highland Park, 111. 

Highland Park Fuel Company 

JUST COAL, BUILDING MATERIAL AND ALL 
KINDS OF CORD WOOD 

WE HANDLE THE CELEBRATED CROSS CREEK LEHIGH COAL 
EXCLUSIVELY 

OUR MOTTO 

2,000 Pounds to every ton Guaranteed 

LEAVE YOUR ORDER NOW FOR NEXT WINTER'S SUPPLY AND 
GET THE BENEFIT OF THE SPRING PRICES 

CLARENCE F. EDINGER, 

General Mgr. 

LAKE FOREST FUEL CO. WILMETTE FUEL CO. 

HIGHLAND PARK FUEL CO. 

Telephone 494 

CLEANING, PRESSING AND 
REPAIRING 

FIRST CLASS WORK 113 CENTRAL AV. 



Greene's News Co. 

(not incorporated) 

MAGAZINES, PERIODICALS, CONFECTIONERY 
CIGARS, Tobaccos and stationery 

Highland Park Illinois 



MASTERS IN THE ART OF 
WEAVING AND RENOVATING 

ORIENTAL FcUGS 



'BARSUMIjiJsl 'BROS. 



CHICAGO EVANSTON HIGHLAND PARK 

Telephone Telephone Telephone 

Graceland 7027 991-992 764 L 

BRANCHES IN ALL THE NORTH SHORE SUBURBS 



Carries full Line of 

Trunks, Traveling Bags & Suit Cases 

Prices to Suit 
No. 7 St. Johns Ave. Telephone 493 

Highland Park, 111. 




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HOME. DAIRY 

BOTTLED MILK A SPECIALTY 

PURE MILK AND CREAM 

Agency for Arcady Farm Certified 



FRANK G. ZAHNLE 

Phone Highland Park 9 
121 VINE AVENUE 



# 



TELEPHONE 624 

WILLIAM WITTEN 

Contractor for Painting, Decorating, 
Wood Finishing 

New and Old Floors our Specialty 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED 
480 Central Ave. HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

State Licensed Plumber Steam and Hot Water Heating Expert 

1883 1911 
Over a Quarter of a Century of Experience 

Our Motto, "HONEST DEALINGS" 

They say that experience is the greatest teacher. If this is true, coupled with 
the fact that we have been a success, it means much to those that intrust their 
work to us. 

A business man's best medium of advertising is through those tbat he has had 
business dealings with. Ask any of our clients or manufacturers of plumbing and 
heating supplies as to our standing. 

J. J. CAHILL, 

Plumbing and Heating Contractor. 

Highland Park. 111., Glenco, 111., Evanston, 111., 

118 E. Central Av. Fletcher Av. 830 Hamlin St. 

Phone 118 Phone 52 Phone 82 



UNIVERStTY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 011 2 083354685