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Full text of "The cook and the cupboard"

LIBRARY OWONGRESS. 



-f^V 3 

Chap....;.... Copyright No*. 
Shelf.r.f.5.4^ 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 




ludwIgJp'ANOS- 



ESTEY ORGAN. 



J. H. ROBI 

49 Kayette Street, 



General agent for 



ESTEY & BRUCE, 

1207 Chestnut Street, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



CONSHOHOCKEN, PA. 

In (HESTER, 

DELAWARE uml 
^ MONTGOMERY 

COUNTIES. 



Exchanging, Repairing and Tuning a specialty. 
Catalogues mailed free on application. 



II 
BASTINE'S PURE EXTRACTS. 

For Flavoring Ice-cream, Sauces, Custard Pastry, Blanc 
flange, Jellies, Gravies, Soups, etc. 

Valuable Hints to Housekeepers. Reasons Why Cheap Flavors are the 
Most Expensive to Buy. 

NO housekeeper likes to pay out money and get a poor return ; but a great 
many do so without giving the matter any thought. 
Many persons have the impression that flavoring extracts are pre ty much 
all alike, only that for some reason, which they do not stop to analyze, the grocer 
sells some kinds for 30 cents per bottle, and other kinds for various prices, down to 
10 cents per bottle, and it is a curious thing that many grocers try hardest to sell 
the cheapest flavors ! Why ? Because on cheap flavors they can make a profit of 
100 per cent, (actually sell them for just double what they pay for them), while 
on the best flavoring extracts they can only realize a reasonable profit. 

Flavoring extracts occupy a very important place in the production of very 
many delicacies for the table, and unless the flavor is prepared in a scientific 
manner, so it will always be uniform in strength, and always keep its flavoring 
qualities unimpaired, there is a great liability of spoiling whatever the housewife 
may attempt to flavor. 

Housewives should make a test and convince themselves by taking a bottle of 
Bastine's Extract of Lemon, as that is absolutely pure and the best extract made, 
and use one spoonful to a quart of blanc mange or jelly. Then take some extract 
of lemon which costs 10 or 15 cents and use five spoonsful to a quart, and you 
will find the one spoonful of Bastine's will impart a much stronger, and, also, a far 
superior, flavor. Many will not believe this, until they have tried it, and then 
they will purchase no more cheap flavors. It is the same with all other flavors as with 
lemon, except vanilla, and with that the cheap extract appears to be stronger than 
the genuine Mexican vanilla flavor; and so it is, being mostly made from Tonka 
beans and various other drugs and compounds, and when used gives a strong, rank 
flavor, whereas the genuine vanilla, made from Mexican beans, imparts a delicate 
and delicious taste, which no substitute can equal. An estimate has been made 
placing the amount of cheap and inferior extracts sold at 95 per cent. 

It seems almost incredible that housekeepers should buy such a large amount 
of goods which has but little value, and goes to show how little thought they give 
to a matter of importance. 

Every bottle of Bastine's Flavors are guaranteed to hold full weight, whereas 
most cheap extracts are put up and sold for 2-ounce bottles, when the bottle only 
holds from one to one and a half ounces. 

The leading hotels, caterers, and ice-cream makers throughout the United States 
use Bastine's Flavors and consider them far superior to any others in the market, 
and most all the stewards of hotels and caterers are good judges of flavors. 

Many grocers say their customers ask for a b ttle of lemon or vanilla flavor 
and take any kind given them and makenocomplaint, and of course many grocers 
put out that on which they make the largest profit. If every family would insist 
on the grocer giving them Bastine's Flavors, they would not only save money but 
get full value for it. Bistine's Flavors have been sold for twenty years and have 
never varied in quality, and whpn told by any grocer that others are just as 
cood, do not be deceived, but insist on getting what you want. If housekeepers 
would positively refuse to take any but a first-class flavoring extract, the cheap 
goods would soon disappear from the market. 

Bastine & Co. agree to forfeit $100 if any of their flavors contain the slightest 
adulteration, viz.: Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, Bitter Almond, Cinnamon, Jamaica 
(dinger, Peppermint, Cloves, Wintergreen, Nutmeg, Mace, Rose, Fruit Coloring 
and Celery. 

We advise all housekeepers to ask for their goods and see that Bastine & Co. 
are on the label and blown in the bottle. — From New York Retail Grocers' Advocate. 
Prepared by BASTINE & CO., 41 Warren St., New York. 

Wholesale Agencies in all the Principal Cities. 



Ill 



Cleveland's 
Baking 
Powder, 



Manufactured originally by Cleveland Brothers, Albany, N. Y., 
now by the Cleveland Baking Powder Company, New York. 



has been used by American housewives for twenty-five 
years, and those who have used it longest praise it most. 

It is perfectly pure and wholesome. 

Its composition is stated on every can. 

It is always uniform and reliable. 

It does the most work and the best work. 

It is the strongest of all pure cream of tartar pow- 
ders, as shown by the U. S. and Canadian Govt. Reports. 

All the leading teachers of cookery and writers on 
domestic science use and recommend it, as : — 



Mrs. Sarah T. Rorer, Mrs. Emma P. Ewing, 

Prin. Philadelphia Cooking School. Prin. Chautauqua School of Cookery. 

Mrs. Carrie M. Dearborn, Mrs. D. A. Lincoln, 

Late Prin. Boston Cooking School. Author of " Boston Cook Book." 

Miss Fannie M. Farmer, Miss C. C. Bedford, 

Principal Boston Cooking School. Supt. New York Cooking School 

Marion Harland, Mrs. Eliza R. Parker, 

Author of "Common Sense in the Household." Author of "Economical Housekeeping." 
Miss Kate E. Whitaker, Supt. of Cookery in Pablie schools, San Francisco, (al. 



IV 

Stollwerck's Chocolates (Sweet). 

Princess Triple Vanilla, >£-1d. cakes.. .25 cts. each. 

Bed Cross Vanilla, ^ -lb. cakes 20 " " 

•« «« " X-lb. " 10 " " 

Phoenix «' >£-lb. " 15 M « 

Noted for their exceeding smoothness and fineness of grain, 
and entire freedom from the gritty taste so unpleasant to the teeth 
and so often found in the so-called cheaper grades. 

N. B. — All dealers are instructed by us to take back and refund money 
for any of our goods if not exactly as represented. 

For sale by Mitchell, Fletcher & Co., E. Bradford Clarke Co. 
K. A. Bowker & Co., and most of the leading grocers. 
Also, at Oak I^ane Pharmacy. 

VOLKMANN, 5T0LLWERCK & CO., 
5 Worth Street. 

Philadelphia Agency. T. H. CAMP, 

6 Strawberry Street. Manager. 

Stollwerck's Pure Cocoa (Imported). 

Fragrant. Instantaneous. Unsweetened. 

Easily digested, even by invalids and dyspeptics. Owing to 
its purity and strength, three-fourths of a teaspoonful per cup will 
be found quite sufficient, a larger proportion being liable to Impair 
its delicacy of flavor. Quality, absolutely unsurpassable. Econ- 
omy and cheapness cannot be equalled. Each ^2 -lb. package 
containing sufficient for over 60 cups, and costing but 25 cents, or 
less than >4 cent per cup. 

#-lb. tins 15 cts. each. 

Stollwerck's Heart Cocoa. 

A very dainty preparation (pure, unsweetened), for use in 
afternoon teas and other social affairs. Each package contains 25 
hearts. One heart to each large cup, or two hearts to three me- 
dium-sized cups. 

Price, 25 cents. Or 2-3 to 1 cent per cup. 

Stollwerck's Plain Chocolate 

(Pure, Unsweetened). 

Of extra quality. For baking, drinking, etc. Owing to 
great strength and purity, a smaller amount should be used for a 
given object than is customary with most other chocolates. 
Price, 20 cts. per #-lb. cake. 



V 

Why not always 
have an.... 

"Excelsior-Star" 
Ham^ 

in the larder, ready for any 
unexpected demand that 
may arise? 

For saie By GROCERS and 
-^^BACON CUTTERS, 

And Cured Only By 

J. H. Michener & Co., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., 

Packers of P [ J R R LEAF LARD 

in all styles of packages, 
and dealers in provisions 
generally. 



it 



Excelsior" Lard 



is absolutely pure, and more 
satisfactory than any so- 
called substitute. 



VI 



Swift & Caldwell, 

Employees of the Late 

ANDREW EPPERSHEIMER, 

FINE GROCERS. 

The 
Choicest 




Coffees 

and £ QSiS 



Specials : 

Our Famous Mayflower Flour. 
Pure Cider Vinegar. 
Pure Spices. 



S 



OUR MOTTO : The most reliable dealings. 

A Large and Select Stock to Choose From. 

N. E. Cor. nth & Spring Garden Sts.. 
PHILADELPHIA. 



VII 



C. L. 

Dexter & co., 



■ ■ ■ ■ 



iimiMiii iimir 



Fancy 




Ice Creams 



and 
Fine 



Cakes. 



Qriginators of 



" Dexter's White Mountain Cake," 
Meringues, Charlottes, Jellies, 
Pastries, Frozen Puddings, etc, 



Cor. Walnut and Fifteenth Streets, 
PHILADELPHIA. 



VIII 




THE 

Painter & Ewing Piano 

Absolutely First=class. 

Sold from the Factory Direct at 
Factory Prices. 

Send for Catalogue and full particulars. 



PAINTER & EWING, 

1105-1107 Spring Garden Street. 



IX 




MICHELL'S 



HIGHKST QUALITY 



Flower, Vegetable, and 
Lawn Grass 




and 



Garden 
Implements. 

J$B~A very large stock and assortment. 

PRICES MODERATE. 

Catalogues and price-list mailed free. 

HENRY F. MICHELL, 



Henry F. Michell. 



Fred J. Hichell. 



1018 MARKET STREET, PHILA. 

(One block east of Reading Terminal Station.) 



A. B. barber, Rainter -«- 

^» -Decorator 

S. W. Cor. 11th and Spring Garden Sts. 

At H. A. Barber & Co.'s RETAIL PAINT DEPARTMENT 
There is always on hand a full line of 

White Leads and Linseed Oil, B 

Also, Varnishes, Glass, Putty, 
Brushes of all kinds, 

Oil and Water Stains, Dry Colors. Artists' 

Materials, Whiting, Glue, Plaster Paris, 

Water color Tints, 

Shellac and Turpentine, 
Benzine, Gasoline and 
Sundry Oils, 

Bath Enamels for inside of bnth tubs, and 

Readv Mixed Paints, and Enamels, all 

shades, Bronzes and Gold Leaf, 

Sponges and Chamois Skins. 

AH are invited to call and examine 
our goods. 





Edward Partridge. 



E. Frank PARTRrrx;r.- 



ESTABLISHED 1863. 



ARTRIDGE & SON, 

WELL-KNOWN AND RELIABLE 

Restaurant and 
Lunch Rooms. 

Open from 7 a. m. until 8 p.m. 

Ice Creams, Ices, and Fine Cake Bakery. Our Ice Creams and 
Ices a continued Specialty. Estimates given for Wed- 
dings and Parties, and Competent Waiters furnished. 

15 North Eighth Street. 

9^ We have no connection with or interest in any other 

store or stores. 

' The __ 
;;;flnperiority 



fine f rench Kid 6lows 

are generally considered a luxury — owing 
to the hitherto high prices thereof. Our 
method of importing them — free from the 
middle-man's profits — brings the very 
finest French gloves to you at prices hut 
slightly above those that preva/l in the 
famous Paris stores. 

Our "Empress" Kid Gloves, at $1.00; 

Our » Harccll " Kid Gloves, at $1.25; 

Our "Daubrey" Kid Gloves, at $1.50, 

are all made from the finest French Kid Skins, and their equal 
cannot be found in America, at the. same low prices. They are 
in all colors and styles — Mousquetaire, or with four buttons, two 
and three clasps or Foster's new hooks. The Glove stamped 
"Daubrey," at $1.50, is the same quality that, with the French 
maker's name inside, is selling generally for 82.00. 

Our stamp inside guarantees the Cloves, and assures you of a 
saving of at least 25 per cent on every pair. 

Mail orders promptly and accurately filled. We pay pestage. 
Money refunded if goods are not satisfactory.. 



STRAWBRIDGE& CLOTHIER 



Dry Goods 



Philadelphia 



of the styles and quali- 
ties of the fabrics and 
garments that are dis- 
played on our counters, 
together with the ex- 
ceedingly moderate 
prices that prevail, a-re 
most interesting to 
every buyer of Dry 
Goods. From the least 
expensive articles 1 
the handsomest and 
most expensive goods, 
the assortments are 
complete with the very- 
best the markets of the 
world afford. 

STRAWBRIDGE & 
CLOTHIER. 



THE COOK 

AND 

THE CUPBOARD. 



A CHOICE 

Collection of Recipes 

issued BY 

The Ladies Auxiliary 

OF THE 

Oak Lane Presbyterian Church, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

PRICE ^oc. by Mail. 

Address : Ladies Auxiliary, P. O. Station 24, Philadelphia. 



Copyright 1896, by the Board of Trustees of the Oak Lane Presbyterian Church 



4Y 



PREFACE. 



We feel assured that our many friends will find that "The 
Cook and the Cupboard" contains many excellent recipes and 
suggestions, particularly to the young housekeeper, for the prep- 
aration of the daily meal. 

No recipe has been allowed admittance unless its merits have 
been thoroughly tested by some one of the ladies of the "Ladies' 
Auxiliary." 

Upon the whole we have aimed to include only those that are 
not only excellent but economical. 

Trusting our little book will be received with favor, we thus 
launch it forth. 

Oak Lane, Pa., 1896. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS, 



PAGE. 

Beverages ] 43 

Breakfast Dishes 25 

Cakes 113 

Carving 5 

Catsup and Pickles 135 

Confectionery 149 

Fish and Oysters 45 

For the Sick 155 

Games and Meats 57 

Miscellaneous Receipts 161 

Pies 1 07 

Preserves 1 27 

Puddings and Desserts 93 

Relishes 31 

Salads and Salad Dressings 83 

Sauce for Puddings 101 

Soups and Chowders 37 

Suggestions for Baking, Boiling, Broiling and Frying 1 1 

Vegetables 69 

Weights and Measures 9 

Yeast, Bread, Muffins and Rolls 14 



CARVING. 

Carving at the table is at once a useful art and an elegant 
social accomplishment. A practical knowledge of its processes 
should be a part of the education of all. Somebody has said carv- 
ing should be done in the pantry. But in many families this is 
not possible, even if it were desirable, which it is not. 

The place of the carver at the table should be the honored 
and desired seat. By right of precedence the carver's chair be- 
longs to the head of the house, either pater or mater famillias. 

Only persistent practice and definite knowledge makes carv- 
ing a pleasure. 

Neither illustrations nor diagrams are of much assistance in 
learning this art. 

Children should know how to carve by the time they are 
fifteen years old. In France a boy is required to take his own 
turn in cutting and serving out meats at the table as soon as he 
is strong enough to handle a knife and fork and tall enough to 
readily reach the joint or fowl. Sometimes he stands upon a 
stool made for the purpose, and he is proud when he is success- 
ful, and ashamed when found imperfect. 

In many families the piece de resistance is always carved 
at the table, even when all other dishes are cut up and served 
from the butler's pantry or side. 

Not only must the carver take into account the number of 
persons to be served in order to make a proper distribution, but 
the graceful and judicious distributing of the meat carved, 
which is quite as essential as the carving itself, implying, as it 
does, the proper division and recombination of the best with the 
less desirable parts of the food, sending the choicest bits only 
where they are due by reason of age, delicacy of appetite, or 
because the recipient is "a stranger within the gates." If there 
is but one carving knife, let it be of the best steel. A cheap 
grade of a knife soon becomes useless, and, at best, is a vexa- 
tion. If a person is able to indulge in table luxuries to any ex- 

5 



6 THE COOK AND THE CUPBOARD. 

tent, the carver will find it worth his while to have a group of sharp- 
carving knives, including a bird knife, a sheer, a jointing knife, 
a breakfast carver, a meat carver and a pair of game scissors. If 
one knife must answer for all, it should be nearly one inch and 
a half broad at its widest part, from eight to ten inches long, 
curved on its edge and tapering to a point. A sheer has a wide 
and very long blade, and is round at its lip end. Its width helps 
to hold a large piece of meat while it is being cut thinly by single 
strokes, which method is better than by several slicings when 
there is a large roast, a long saddle of mutton or a ham to be 
carved. A jointing knife is strong and pointed, and is used 
when strength is necessary in separating gristle, joints and liga- 
ments. A bird carver has a short, narrow pointed blade and a 
very long handle, the latter shaped to rest against the wrist, this 
support being a decided assistance when forcing the blade through 
stubborn joints. Game scissors have short, strong blades, edged 
like a section of a sickle, and are used in cutting small bones 
at table. A breakfast carver is, of course, intended for steaks, 
and has a shorter blade and a smaller handle than a meat carver, 
but is like it in every other respect. A meat carver, which 
every housekeeper must have, and which, in skilled hands, can be 
made do all the necessary work at the table, cannot have too fine 
an edge. 

The carving knife should be sharpened before the dinner is 
served. The rasp and click of the sharpening process suggest 
an annoying lack of readiness. A habit more honored in the 
breach than the observance is that of placing a sharpening steel 
on the dining table by the side of the knife and fork. The wiser 
carver prefers to perform his steel solo in the pantry. 

Platters are often too small. They may appear so at first 
when the meat is brought on the table, but cuts laid round their 
narrow borders are likely to hang over it in an untidy and inse- 
cure fashion. Fowls or joints often appear less generous in size 
than they really are when served upon large platters, but such 
an unfair appearance lessens as the carver proceeds to cut up and 
arrange the parts for serving. Better a platter a trifle too large 
than one that incommodes the carver, who, if he follows the 



THE COOK AND THE CUPBOARD. 7 

latest usage and carves off all the meat that is likely to be needed 
before he serves any one, requires broad edges upon which to 
arrange the slices. 

The carving fork, which must have two tines and a secure 
guard, should be firmly grasped by the left hand, the top of the 
extended forefinger being pressed firmly against the base of the 
opened guard. Such an attitude of the left hand adjusts the fork 
for a plunge into the fowl or meat in an oblique direction. Of 
course, the shape of the piece of meat to be carved and the direc- 
tion of the grain will determine the angle required. 

The knife is held in the right hand just as the fork is in the 
left, with the forefinger pressed against the little ring-like pro- 
tection that surrounds the handle where it joins the blade. All 
carving knives that are properly mounted have this ring to pre- 
vent the blade from soiling the table cloth when accidentally laid 
upon it. Carving knife handles should always be heavier than 
the blades. 

The fork is thrust into the meat or game as far as possible, 
so as to hold it firmly while carving. 

A turkey, wild or tame, inspires the maladroit carver with 
dread, partially, perhaps, because it is a favorite bird and he dis- 
likes to do it an injustice. 

When properly prepared, a turkey has its wings drawn close 
to its body and skewered there; its neck is curled under its body 
and fastened, and its legs are crossed over its tail and tied before 
it g^es into the oven to roast. The same preparation is made 
when it is wrapped and pinned in a towel to boil or steam. The 
fastenings are, of course, removed before the bird is brought on 
to the table. 

The appearance is decidedly improved when the legs are 
brought forward and their tips are trimmed with a ruffle of white 
paper. 

A turkey or any other large bird should always be placed on 
the table with its tail toward the right hand of the carver. 

The perfect carver with a well-fattened and properly-cooked 
bird before him, does not remove his fork after he has thrust it 
into the breast until every part is carved. A deft carver first 



8 THE COOK AND THE CUPBOARD. 

thrusts his fork as deep as it will go into the highest part of the 
breast bone of the turkey as it lies on its back, the tines passing 
down astride the ridge bone. The knife is then drawn with a 
deen cut close between the side and the leg next to the carver, 
and the leg is bent over so as to expose its joint, which another 
touch of point of the knife will sever, set free without leaving a 
ragged edge. The leg on the opposite side is removed in the 
same manner. 

The top of the shoulder or wing is then cut into, and first 
one wing and another is disjointed and cut off. If these parts 
must, because of the smallness of the platter, be removed to an- 
other dish before the carving is continued, the wings are lifted 
with the knife and the legs by their ruffles, the fork not being 
drawn from its place. 

Next the breast nearest the carver is cut into very thin slices, 
with the knife slanting slightly toward the wing to secure a bit of 
crisp outside for each piece. As each slice is cut off it is turned 
outward so that each piece falls upon the other in an orderly man- 
ner. When both breasts have been thus entirely sliced off from 
the bone, the knife is drawn between the wish-bone and the 
breast -bone, and with one cut, and without breaking it, this dainty 
piece of white meat is lifted from its place by the blade of the 
knife. 

The bird is turned slightly away from and then toward the 
carver as he removes from each side bone that tid-bit called "the 
oyster." The fork is then removed from the breast-bone and the 
leg at the "second joints." The latter piece is divided length- 
wise into two parts ordinarily, but into three if the bird is a large 
one and there are many persons to be served. Usually only one 
deep slice is taken from this part of the leg and possibly a single 
slice from the drumstick. 

An expert with a suitable knife is able to dismember a tur- 
key even quicker than he could read these directions. 

The skeleton is not usually cut up at the table, although the 
tail is cut off if any ask for it. 

In serving turkey or other birds it is no longer customary 
to ask when there are many guests which part each prefers. To 



THE COOK AXD THE CUPBOARD. 9 

every guest is sent a piece of dark meat, a piece of light and a 
little dressing. If the carver happens to know that anybody at 
the table especially likes a wing, he sometimes inquires if he may 
send her one. 

Gravy is not passed at table, but served upon the dresing; 
not lavishly, because too much may not be agreeable and more 
can be asked for later if required. 

Aged birds should be boiled or steamed. 

Capons and all other large birds are carved in the same man- 
ner as a turkey. 

Small, roasted or boiled fowls do not have their breasts 
sliced. The meat on the breast is cut away in one or two pieces 
at most. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

SUGAR. 

Two heaping teaspoonfuls equal one heaping tablespoonful. 

One heaping tablespoonful of granulated A coffee or best 
brown sugar equals one ounce. 

Two heaping tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar equal one 
ounce. 

Two heaping teacupfuls of A coffee sugar equal one pound. 

Two level teacupfuls of granulated sugar equal one pound. 

Two coffee cupfuls of powdered sugar equal one pound. 

Two and one-half teacupfuls of best brown sugar equal one 
pound. 

Two and three-quarters teacupfuls of powdered sugar equal 
one pound. 

One and one-half coffee cupfuls of granulated sugar equal 
one pound. 

One pint of A coffee sugar equals twelve ounces. 

One heaping pint of granulated sugar equals fourteen 
ounces. 

One quart of powdered sugar equals one pound and seven 
ounces. 

One quart of granulated sugar equals one pound and nine 
ounces. 



10 THE COOK AND THE CUPBOARD. 

One quart of any kind of sugar equals four teacupfuls. 
One teacupful equals eight fluid ounces or two gills. 
One common size tumbler holds one-half of a pint. 

FLOUR. 

Two heaping teaspoonfuls equal one heaping tablespoonful. 
Two heaping tablespoonfuls equal one ounce. 
Five heaping tablespoonfuls equal one teacupful. 
Five teacupfuls of sifted flour equal one pound. 
Three and one-half level teacupfuls of cornmeal equal one 
quart. 

One quart of sifted flour equals one pound. 

BUTTER. 

One tablespoonful of soft butter equals one ounce. 

Butter the size of a medium egg equals two ounces. 

Four heaping tablespoonfuls of soft butter equal one teacup- 



ful. 



Two teacupfuls of packed soft butter equal one pound. 
One pint of well-packed butter equals one pound. 
Eight large or ten medium-sized eggs equal one pound. 

GENERAL MEASURE. 

Sixteen ounces make one pound. 
Four gills make one pint. 
Two pints make one quart. 
Four quarts make one gallon. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR BAKING, BOILING, 
BROILING, ROASTING AND FRYING 



BAKING. 

Beans, eight to ten hours. 

Beef, sirloin, rare, per pound, eight to ten minutes. 

Beef, sirloin, well done, per pound, twelve to fifteen minutes. 

Beef, rolled, rib or rump, per pound, twelve to fifteen min- 
utes. 

Beef, long or short fillet, twenty to thirty minutes. 

Biscuit, ten to twenty minutes. 

Bread, brick loaf, forty to sixty minutes. 

Cake, plain, twenty to forty minutes. 

Cake, sponge, forty-five to sixty minutes. 

Chickens, three to four pounds weight, one to one and a 
naif hours. 

Cookies, ten to fifteen minutes. 

Custards, fifteen to twenty minutes. 

Duck, tame, forty to sixty minutes. 

Fish, six to eight pounds, one hour. 

Gingerbread, twenty to thirty minutes. 

Graham gems, thirty minutes. 

Halibut, four to six pounds, one hour. 

Lamb, well done, per pound, fifteen minutes. 

Meat, braised, three to four hours. 

Mutton, rare, per pound, ten minutes. 

Mutton, well done, per pound, fifteen minutes. 

Pie crust, thirty to forty minutes. 

Pork, well done, per pound, thirty minutes. 

Potatoes, thirty to forty-five minutes. 

Pudding, bread, rice and tapioca, one hour. 

Pudding, plum, two to three hours. 

11 



12 TEE COOK AXD TEE CUPBOARD. 

Rolls, ten to fifteen minutes. 

Turkey, ten pounds, three hours. 

Veal, well done, per pound, twenty minutes. 

BOILING. 

Asparagus, fifteen to twenty minutes. 

Bass, per pound, ten minutes. 

Beans, shell, one to two hours. 

Beans, string, two hours. 

Beef, a la mode, three to four hours. 

Beets, young, forty-five to sixty minutes. 

Blue fish, per pound, ten minutes. 

Brown bread, three hours. 

Cabbage, young, thirty to forty-five minutes. 

Carrots, forty-five to sixty minutes. 

Cauliflower, thirty to forty-five minutes. 

Celery, thirty to forty-five minutes. 

Chickens, forty-five to sixty minutes. 

Clams, three to five minutes. 

Cod, per pound, six minutes. 

Coffee, three to five minutes. 

Corn, green, five to eight minutes. 

Corned beef, four to five hours. 

Eggs, three to five minutes. 

Eggs, hard-boiled, fifteen to twenty minutes. 

Fowls, two to three hours. 

Haddock, per pound, six minutes. 

Halibut, per pound, cubical, fifteen minutes. 

Ham, five hours. 

Hominy, one to two hours. 

Lamb, one hour. 

Macaroni, twenty to thirty minutes. 

Oatmeal, one to two hours. 

Onions, thirty to forty-five minutes. 

Oysters, three minutes. 

Oyster plant, thirty to sixty minutes. 



THE COOK AXD THE CUPBOARD. 

Parsnips, thirty to forty-five minutes. 
Peas, fifteen to twenty minutes. 
Potatoes, twenty to thirty minutes. 
Rice, fifteen to twenty minutes. 
Salmon, per pound, cubical, fifteen minutes. 
Small fish, per pound, six minutes. 
Smoked tongue, three to four hours. 
Spinach, twenty to thirty minutes. 
Squash, twenty to thirty minutes. 
Sweetbreads, twenty to thirty minutes. 
Tomatoes, fifteen to twenty minutes. 
Turkey, two to three hours. 
Turnips, thirty to forty-five minutes. 
Veal, two to three hours. 
Wheat, one to two hours. 
Winter vegetables, one to two hours. 

BROILING. 

Chickens, twenty minutes. 

Chops, eight minutes. 

Fish, small, thin, five to eight minutes. 

Fish, thick, twelve to fifteen minutes. 

Steak, one inch thick, four to six minutes. 

Steak, one and one-half inch thick, six to eight minutes. 

FRYING. 

Bacon, three to five minutes. 
Breaded chops, four to six minutes. 
Croquettes, one minute. 
Doughnuts, three to five minutes. 
Fish balls, one minute. 
Fritters, three to five minutes. 
Muffins, three to five minutes. 
Slices of fish, four to six minutes. 
Small fish, one to three minutes. 
Smelts, one minute. 



YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, ETC. 



YEAST. 

Two white potatoes, grated; pour over them about one quart 
of boiling water, add one tablespoonful of sugar, and one table- 
spoonful of salt. Boil a few minutes; cool until lukewarm, then 
add one cup of yeast; set in a warm place to rise. 

BAKING POWDER, NO. 1. 

One-half pound of rice flour; one-quarter of a pound carbon- 
ate of soda; three ounces of tartaric acid. Mix well together; sift 
through a sieve until free from lumps. Keep in an air-tight ves- 
sel. A. M. W. 

BAKING POWDER, NO. 2. 

Ten ounces of bicarbonate of soda; thirteen ounces of cream 
of tartar; four ounces of tartaric acid; twenty ounces of flour; 
four ounces of salt. Mix thoroughly. Sift until free from lumps. 
Keep in an air-tight vessel. S. K. 

BREAD. 

One quart of lukewarm water; one tablespoonful of salt; 
three-quarters of a cup of yeast, or one-half of a cake of com- 
pressed yeast. Flour to make a stiff sponge. Beat well, and set 
in a warm place to rise. 

TO MAKE BREAD. 

Take one cup of baker's yeast, or one cake of compressed 
yeast. Scald three pints of milk and allow it to get lukewarm. 
Stir in sifted flour to the thickness of cake batter, then add one 
tablespoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of sugar and the same 
quantity of lard. Lastly add the yeast (if compressed yeast, dis- 
solve it in a cup of water before adding it to the sponge). Set 
away in a warm place to rise over night. In the morning add 
enough sifted flour to make a dough as soft as can be handled. 

14 



YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 15 

Knead about twenty minutes. When thoroughly light, make into 
loaves and put into well-greased pans for final rising. When 
light, bake about forty-five minutes. Brush the crust with butter 
to make it tender. Mrs. S. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cupful of rye flour; one cupful of Indian flour; one cup- 
ful of molasses; two cupfuls of wheat flour; one and one-half 
pints of sour milk; one teaspoonful of soda; one egg; one tea- 
spoonful of salt. Mix the dry ingredients together, then dis- 
solve the soda in two tablespoonfuls of boiling water, then add 
it and the milk to the molasses. Stir well and pour in the other 
mixed ingredients. Beat the egg and add it. Mix thoroughly, 
and pour into a well-greased tin pan that holds two quarts. Steam 
four hours, and then put it into the oven and bake thirty min- 
utes. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

To one quart of wheat bread sponge add one tablespoonful 
of sugar. Stiffen with Graham flour, let raise, and bake. 

S. E. P. 
BRAN BREAD. 

To one quart of milk add three well-beaten eggs; half tea- 
spoonful of salt; three cups of unbolted flour; one teaspoonful of 
baking powder. Pour into biscuit moulds and bake in a quick 
oven. 

RAISED BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour; one pint of milk; one heaping teaspoonful 
of butter; one egg; one-half teaspoonful of salt; one teacupful 
of yeast. Heat the milk, then dissolve the butter into it; let 
stand to cool, then stir in the flour, the beaten egg, salt and yeast. 
Work until smooth. Set in a warm place to rise over night. In 
the morning work softly, roll out and cut into biscuits. Let them 
rise partly, then bake. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

One heaping tablespoonful of lard; one quart of flour; three 
teaspoonfuls of Cleveland baking powder; one-half teaspoonful 



16 TEA8T, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 

salt; enough milk or water to make as soft a dough as can be 
used. Roll out about an inch thick; use a small cutter. Set far 
apart in pan, and bake in a very quick oven. 

BISCUIT. 

One and one-half pints of milk; one tablespoonful of butter; 
one tablespoonful of sugar; two eggs; one quart of flour. Rub 
butter into flour. Beat the eggs; then beat eggs and milk to- 
gether and add the flour. Place in gem pans, and bake for thirty 
minutes. 

GEM BISCUIT. 

Three cups of flour; two teaspoonfuls of Cleveland bak- 
ing powder; one teaspoonful salt; one tablespoonful of butter; 
one tablespoonful of sugar; two eggs; one cup of milk. Mix the 
powder with the flour. Add all together to a soft dough. Bake 
in gem pans about twenty minutes. D. W. 

JENNIE'S CORN BREAD. 

One cupful of flour; one cup corn meal; one cupful of milk; 
two tablespoonfuls sugar; a little salt; half cupful of melted lard; 
one zgg; two teaspoonfuls of Cleveland baking powder; a 
small pinch of baking soda. Beat the egg very light, add sugar 
and salt; beat again, add portion of the milk, then the lard, then 
the corn meal, then more milk, then flour, then rest of milk, 
then the baking powder and soda. Bake half hour. 

H. M. W. 
SALLY LUNN. 

Three cups flour; one egg; one cup milk; three tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder; half cup melted butter; one tea- 
spoonful salt. Bake in gem tins about twenty minutes. L. E. 

CINNAMON BUN. 

One pint of milk; one-quarter pound of butter; two eggs; 
two cupfuls of sugar. Melt butter in milk, beat the eggs and stir 
in the milk, then sugar. Put in one cupful of yeast, stir in flour 
enough to make a dough. Raise over night, roll out in morning. 
Spread with butter and cinnamon, and sprinkle with currants. 



YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 17 

DUTCH CAKE. NO. 1. 

Two cupfuls of flour; one-half pound of butter; one-half 
pound of currants; one-half pound of raisins; two cupfuls of 
sugar; two eggs; one pint of milk; three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Flavor with nutmeg. Bake in two pans. A. M. W. 

DUTCH CAKE. NO. 2. 

Stir a sponge at night of one pint of milk; three-quarters cup- 
ful of yeast. Set like bread sponge. In morning take one cupful 
of lard and butter mixed; two and one-half cupfuls of sugar; three 
eggs. Beat the eggs well together. Stir in sponge. Add flour 
enough to make a stiff dough. Add salt, cinnamon, nutmeg to 
taste, and one cup of raisins; one cup currants. Pour in pans to 
rise when light. Bake in moderate oven. 

CINNAMON BUNS AND RUSKS. 

One pint milk, scalded; large tablespoonful of butter melted 
in milk; one-half of a teacupful of granulated sugar. Put in the 
milk. When lukewarm dissolve yeast cake in it. Thicken with 
flour to soft sponge. Leave stand until light. One-half cup- 
ful of granulated sugar. Beat with three eggs. Pour in sponge. 
Mold in flour into loafs. Stand away until light again. When 
light, divide dough in two parts. One part roll on board. Spread 
butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, currants. Roll up and cut in 
two-inch pieces. Set close together in pan and let raise thirty 
minutes. Bake in slow oven. Take remaining half of dough for 
rusks. Mold into biscuit shapes. Set close in pan. When light, 
wash over with milk and sprinkle with granulated sugar. Bake 
in slow oven. R. C. 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

One egg; two tablespoonfuls of sugar; two-thirds of a cup- 
ful of milk; two teaspoonfuls of Cleveland baking powder; but- 
ter the size of an egg; one heaping cupful of flour. Bake in 
gem pans. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

Two cups flour; two cups milk; one cup cornmeal; two 
eggs; two teaspoonfuls melted butter; two tablespoonfuls sugar; 



18 TEA8T, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 

three teaspoonfuls of Cleveland baking powder; one small tea- 
spoonful salt. Bake half hour in gem pans. Mrs. E. H. B. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

One pint of flour; one cup of cold boiled rice; two eggs; a 
little bait; two teaspoonfuls Cleveland baking powder; milk 
enough to make a batter. Bake in gem pans. 

DELAWARE MUFFINS. 

One egg; one tablespoonful of butter; one tablespoonful 
lard; one quart milk (boil the milk) when lukewarm. Set after 
dinner to rise. Then grease a pan; pour in; let rise second time; 
then bake. Mix pretty stiff. A. M. W. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Four quarts of flour, before sifted; one cupful of butter and 
lard mixed; one tablespoonful of sugar; one good teaspoonful of 
fine salt; one scant cupful of yeast, or one-half a cake of com- 
pressed yeast dissolved; one quart of milk. Scald the milk. Add 
the shortening, and when it is melted, let cool until lukewarm, 
then add yeast and the other ingredients and a part of the flour. 
Let rise, then mix in the rest of the flour. Let rise again, then 
make into small rolls. Let rise, then bake about thirty min- 
utes. S. E. P. 
POTATO ROLLS. 

Boil and mash two cups of potatoes; two eggs, beaten 
light; two cups milk. Set sponge in morning, and let it get 
quite light. Then knead a stiff dough. Add butter or lard, size 
of an egg; two teaspoonfuls salt. Roll and cut with bread cutter. 
Do not let them touch each other in pan. K. J. B. 

BUNS. 

Break one egg into a cup and fill it with milk. Mix with it 
one-half of a cupful of yeast; one-half a cupful of butter; one cup- 
ful of sugar, and enough flour to make a soft dough. Flavor 
with nutmeg. Let rise until very light, then mold into biscuit. 
Let rise and bake. When nearly done, glaze with molasses or 
milk. 



YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 19 

POP-OVERS. 

One cupful flour; one saltspoonful salt; one cupful milk; 
one egg yolk, and white beaten separately. Mix the salt with the 
flour. Add part of the milk slowly until a smooth paste is formed. 
Add the remainder of the milk with the beaten egg, and lastly 
the white beaten to a stiff froth. Cook in hot buttered gem pans 
or earthen cups in a quick oven half an hour, or until the puffs 
are brown and well popped over. 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One pint mashed potatoes; one egg, well beaten with the 
potatoes; salt. Add one quart of milk, gradually enough flour 
to make batter consistency of buckwheat cakes; three teaspoon- 
fuls Cleveland baking powder. Bake on hot griddle. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

One quart of flour; two tablespoonfuls of yeast powder; 
one tablespoonful of sugar; a little salt. Mix thoroughly while 
dry. Chop three tablespoonfuls butter in the flour to one large 
cupful of sweet milk. Add one egg, well beaten. Then put 
whole together as quickly and with as little handling as possi- 
ble. Roll into two sheets, each half an inch thick. Bake in jelly 
tins. When done and while yet warm, split them and butter. Add 
thick layer of strawberries crushed with sugar. To be eaten with 
cream and sugar. A. M. W. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One tumbler of sugar; one tumbler of milk and water (half 
of each); two eggs; one tablespoonful of butter; two teaspoonfuls 
of Cleveland baking powder. Nutmeg and salt to taste. Mix 
as soft as you can handle. Fry in hot fat. 

CRUMPETS. 

One quart of wheat bread dough; three eggs, separating 
yolks and whites; whip both to a light froth. Mix with the dough 
and gradually add warm milk or tepid water until the batter is 
the consistency of cake batter. Bake on a hot griddle. 

S. E. P. 



20 YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 

BUTTER CAKES. 

Rub two tablespoonfuls of butter into one quart of flour; add 
a teaspoonful of salt; two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Mix 
well and moisten with one-half cream and one-half milk. Roll 
out into a sheet about one-half an inch thick. Cut with a round 
cutter. Let the batter stand five minutes, and bake slowly on a 
griddle, first on one side then on the other. A. M. W. 



YEAST, BREAD. MUFFINS, Etc. 21 



22 YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, Etc. 



VBAST, BREAD, MUFFINS, FAc. 23 



84 YBA.8T. BREAD, MUFFINS, FAt 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 



OMELET. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs until a light color and thick ; add 
two tablespoonfuls of milk; one saltspoonful of salt, and one- 
quarter of a saltspoonful of pepper. Beat the whites of two eggs 
until stiff and dry, then cut and fold them lightly into the yolks 
until just covered. When the omelet pan is hot, rub around the 
edge and bottom a teaspoonful of butter, and when the butter is 
hot turn in the omelet quickly. Lift the pan from the hottest part 
of the fire and cool until the omelet is slightly browned under- 
neath, then put it on the oven grate to dry (not brown) the top. 
When done, fold and serve on a hot platter. One tablespoonful 
of chopped parsley, or a teaspoonful of fine grated onion, or 
three teaspoonfuls of chopped ham, veal or chicken; stewed to- 
matoes, or raw tomatoes sliced; chopped mushrooms; cooked 
oysters, clams or grated cheese make a variety of omelet. 

POTATO OMELET. 

Three eggs; one-quarter of a teaspoonful of salt; one cup- 
ful of milk; one cupful of cold mashed potatoes; a dash of black 
pepper. Beat the whites and yolks separately. Add to the yolks 
the milk, salt, pepper and potatoes, then stir into this carefully 
the beaten whites of the eggs. Mix very lightly. Butter the fry- 
ing pan, and as soon as hot turn in the mixture gently. When 
the omelet is set, fold the omelet in half and brown. Cold boiled 
rice can be used instead of mashed potatoes. A. M. W. 

EGGS ON TOAST. 

Break each egg into a cup, then drop it into boiling milk. 
Cook until the whites are entirely done. Place slices of toasted 
bread on a platter; put an egg on each piece of toast, and add 
salt, butter and pepper. Moisten each piece of toast with boil- 
ing milk before putting on the poached egg. 

25 



26 BREAKFAST DISHES. 

FULLED BREAD. 

A loaf of baker's bread is put into a pan and covered by an- 
other, or by a tin plate. In a moderate oven it should remain 
twenty minutes, or until heated through. Then with a fork the 
soft parts are torn apart into three ragged pieces — the larger the 
better. Afterward these pieces are spread on a pan and allowed 
to stand in a hot oven until they are crisp and brown. This is 
the bread now ordered for dyspeptics, but it is delicious to re- 
place crackers or cheese fingers. 

STEAMED BREAD. 

Use a steamer having holes all over the bottom. Put a 
small cup in the middle of the steamer. Place the slices of 
bread against the cup so that the steam may pass between. 
Steam from three to five minutes. Don't let it touch the steamer 
anywhere or it will become water-soaked. Spread each slice 
with butter. Cover with a napkin and serve immediately. 

EGG NESTS ON TOAST. 

Have prepared slices of toast, and on each slice put the 
beaten white of an egg in the shape of a bird's nest, and in the 
centre put the yolk, adding butter, pepper and salt. Put in a 
pan and bake until done. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil the eggs hard, and cut them in two. Take out the yolks 

carefully; then mash well. Add chopped parsley, pepper, salt, 

and a little chopped ham, tongue or veal. Stuff the whites with 

this mixture so that each half has the appearance of containing 

a whole volk. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Have saucepan hot, with plenty of melted butter in it; beat 
eggs, adding salt and pepper to taste. Turn into saucepan, stir- 
ring quickly until thickened. 

FRIED BREAD. 

Put slices of bread in salt water; let it stand a minute; dip 
in egg and fry in hot fat. 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 27 

POACHED EGGS. 

Break each egg into a cup, and drop into boiling water; cook 

until the whites are entirely done. Place on a platter and season 

and serve. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Butter a deep plate or platter; break each egg in a cup, put 

on the dish; put pepper, salt and small bits of butter over the 

top. Bake until the whites are firm, or spread the plate with fine 

cracker crumbs, break the eggs carefully in the dish, and cover 

with seasoned and buttered crumbs. Bake till the crumbs are 

brown. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil eggs very hard and remove the shells; take one tea- 
spoonful each of cinnamon, allspice and mace; put in a little 
muslin bag in cold water; boil well, and if it boils away add 
enough to make one-half pint when the spices are taken out; add 
one pint of strong vinegar; pour over the eggs. If you want 
them colored, put in some beet juice. Mrs. O. 



18 11RVAKFABT DISHES. 



BREAKFAST DIFIFiBS. 



.{0 BREAKFAST DISHES. 



RELISHES. 



WELSH RAREBIT. 

To every one-half pound of cheese (American cream cheese) 
take one tablespoonful of butter, two eggs, one-half a cupful of 
cream. Salt and pepper to taste. Put the cheese into a chafing 
dish or spider; when it is melted add the butter, then the eggs 
beaten light without separating; add the cream gradually, stir- 
ring continually. Serve with salted wafers. 

CRANBERRIES. 

Put three pints of washed cranberries in a granite stew-pan. 
On top of them put three cupfuls granulated sugar and three 
gills of water. After they begin to boil cook ten minutes, closely 
covered, and do not stir them. Remove the scum. They will 
jelly when cool, and the skins will be soft and tender. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

One cupful of grated cheese; one-half of a cupful of but- 
ter; one cupful of flower; a very little salt. All ingredients should 
be ice-cold, made and cut quickly. J. R. R. 

STEAMED RHUBARB. 

Wash, peel and cut the rhubarb into inch pieces. Put it into 
a granite double boiler; add one cup of sugar for a pint of fruit, 
and cook until the rhubarb is soft. Do not stir it. When the 
rhubarb is very sour steam it without sugar until the juice flows, 
then add the sugar, then steam again until the sugar is dissolved; 
or pour boiling water over it and let it stand five minutes, then 
drain and steam. D. A. L. 

In cooking rhubarb it can be peeled or not, as desired. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

To one quart of berries add one large or two small, good, 
tart apples. Cook the apples in a pint of water until tender, then 

31 



32 RELISHES. 

add the berries. Boil until the berries burst, then add two cup- 
fuls of sugar, and boil ten minutes. Mash through a colan- 
der or coarse sieve. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

One quart of cranberries; six good-sized apples. Peel the 
apples to core, cut in quarters. Put the cranberries and apples in 
a kettle; stew till soft. Strain through a jelly bag. Add one 
pound of sugar to one pint of juice. Pour into jelly mold and 
cool. 

AMERICAN TOAST. 

To one egg, thoroughly beaten, add one cupful sweet milk 
and a little salt. Slice bread and dip into the mixture, allowing 
each slice to absorb some of the milk. Then brown on a hot but- 
tered griddle. Spread with butter and serve hot. 

SANDWICHES. 

Chop very fine some cooked ham, cold corn beef, or tongue 
with one-quarter part fat. Mix one teaspoonful of dry mustard 
and one-half teaspoonful of salt with cold water to a stiff paste; 
add to it one-quarter cup of butter, creamed. Cut stale bread in 
very thin slices; spread with the mustard and butter paste, then 
with the ham. Put two slices together. 

CRESS SANDWICHES. 

Select a bunch of fresh green cresses. Pick the leaves care- 
fully from the stems and chop very fine. Mix one tablespoonful 
of olive oil, one teaspoonful of vinegar, and dust with salt and pep- 
per. Have ready bread cut in thin slices and nicely buttered. Re- 
move the crusts and cut the slices in halves. Spread the cress 
mixture over the buttered side, then put over a sprinkling of hard- 
boiled eggs, chopped fine. Cover with another slice of buttered 
bread and press gently. Serve at once. A very dainty way of 
serving these is to have them nicely arranged on a napkin in a lit- 
tle handled basket 



RELISHES. 33 

FRENCH TOAST. 

Take stale bread; cut in slices; make a batter; one egg; two 
•cups milk; flour to make a thin batter. Dip the crust of the 
bread in hot water, then in the batter, both sides. Fry brown in 
hot lard. Serve with sugar and cinnamon and butter. Serve hot. 

A. M. W. 

PIC-NIC SANDWICHES. 

Ihree coffee cupfuls chopped ham; one-quarter grated 
onion; a little cayenne pepper; two tablespoonfuls of prepared 
mustard, mixed thoroughly; then spread biscuit. 

NEW SANDWICHES. 

One pint of boiled chestnuts; two good-sized chicken livers. 
Remove the brown skin by pouring boiling water over them 
after they are boiled. Mash the livers and chestnuts to a paste, 
?nd season to taste with salt, lemon juice and pepper. Spread 
on bread. 



34 RELISHES. 



RELISHES. 35 



3* RELISHES. 



SOUPS. 



BOULLLON. 

Cut up and break six pounds of beef and bone, and put it 
into two quarts of water, allowing it to simmer slowly for five 
hours. Strain through a fine sieve, removing all fatty matter; 
season with pepper and salt to taste. A. F. 

BEEF SOUP. 

To every pound of shin bone of beef add one quart of water. 
For five pounds of shin bone use one head of celery, three tur- 
nips, one onion, one bunch of sweet herbs, four carrots, pepper 
and salt to taste. Put the bone into a stew-pan with water, and 
boil slowly four hours, then cool and remove the cake of fat. 
Cut the meat into small cubes, then put it into stew-pan with 
strained gravy and vegetables cut fine. Simmer slowly for five 
hours. Remove herbs and serve hot. K. J. B. 

MOCK BISQUE SOUP. 

To one quart can of tomatoes add three pints of milk; one 
large tablespoonful of flour; butter the size of an ^gg; pepper and 
salt to taste, and a scant teaspoonful of soda. Put the tomatoes 
on to stew and the milk to boil into a double boiler (reserving one- 
half a cupful of milk to mix with the flour). Mix the flour 
smoothly with this cold milk into the boiling milk, and cook for 
ten minutes. To tomatoes add the soda. Stir well and rub 
through a strainer. Add the butter, salt and pepper to the milk, 
and then the tomatoes. Serve immediately. If half of the quan- 
tity is needed, stir the tomatoes well before taking them out of the 
can, as the liquid portion contains more acid. C. M. McF. 

TOMATO SOTJP. 

To one quart can of tomatoes add two heaping tablespoon- 
fuls of flour; one tablespoonful of butter; one teaspoonful of salt; 

37 



38 SOUPS. 

one teaspoonful of sugar; one pint of hot water. Let the toma- 
toes and water come to a boil. Rub the flour, butter and a ta- 
blespoonful of tomatoes together. Stir into the boiling mixture; 
add the seasoning. Boil altogether for fifteen minutes. Rub 
through a sieve, and serve with cubes of toasted bread, prepared 
as follows: Cut the bread into thin slices and butter; then cut 
into cubes and place into a pan, butter side up, and brown in a 
quick oven. C. M. McF. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Take one calf's head and clean it thoroughly, and boil it in 
three quarts of water until tender; then pick the meat off of the 
bones and cut into small pieces. Season with pepper, salt, sum- 
mer savory and sweet marjoram. Add six potatoes, cut into small 
cubes; two hard-boiled eggs; one lemon; one tablespoonful of 
Worcestershire sauce; two tablespoonfuls of butter. Use drop 
dumplings. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

To one can of tomatoes put on to cook, add salt and pepper 
to taste; a very little cayenne pepper, and nutmeg; a teaspoonful 
of sugar; one small onion. Let cook until onion is tender, then 
strain. Add to one pint of milk a large lump of butter, mixed 
with a little flour. Put the milk on to boil, then add butter and 
flour to the milk. When boiled up, add gradually to tomatoes. 

TURKEY BONE SOUP. 

Wash the turkey bones, and put into a boiler of cold water. 
Boil slowly for four hours. Chop one onion; one stalk of cel- 
ery; three potatoes; two carrots; one large spoonful of barley; 
one large tablespoonful of rice; a sprig of parsley. Season to 
taste, then add one tablespoonful of flour and one of butter. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Cut a fowl into quarters, and put it into a soup kettle with 
four quarts of water and one onion to boil. Bring it slowly to a 
boil, and continue until the liquid has reduced to one quart and 
the meat has shrunk from the bones; then take the chicken out 



SOUPS. 39 

and salt it, and set it away with a cupful of broth until the next 
day. Season the remainder of the broth, and put back on the 
fire to boil, and skim. Add one cupful of rice, soaked in water. 
Cook slowly until the rice is tender. Stir two well-beaten eggs 
into a cupful of hot milk, and add to the broth. Let all come to 
a boil ; then add a handful of finely-minced parsley, and serve. 

K. J. B. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Cut a chicken into small pieces, and place it into a deep 
earthen dish ; add one quart of cold water, and cover it and set it 
over a kettle of boiling water, and steam it until the meat of the 
chicken has become very tender. Strain off the broth and let it 
stand over night. In the morning skim off all the fat and pour 
the broth into a bowl, and into the dish in which the broth was 
made. Put one-third of a teacupful of rice into a teacupful of 
cold water, and steam until the rice is soft; then pour it into the 
broth, and steam the whole from one to two hours longer. 

A. F. 
BEAN SOUP. 

Soak one quart of soup beans in cold water over night. In 
the morning pour off the water and add fresh. Then set over the 
fire until the skins will slip off easily. Throw them into cold 
water, rub well and the skins will rise to the top, when they can 
be removed. Boil the beans until they are perfectly soft, allow- 
ing two quarts of water to one quart of beans. Add flour and 
butter rubbed together. Season to taste. Serve with toasted 
bread cubes. K. J. B. 

PEPPER POT. 

Boil four pounds of tripe for six hours the day previous to us- 
ing and save the liquor. Boil a small knuckle of veal in a separate 
vessel, and add the liquor to the tripe liquor with the following: 
Sweet marjoram, an onion and pepper and salt to taste. Make 
dumplings and add. The above will make about one gallon of 

soup. 

MOCK OYSTER SOUP. 

Six tomatoes; one quart of water; one pint of milk; one-half 
teaspoonful of soda; salt, pepper and butter. Peal and stew the 



40 SOUPS. 

tomatoes in the quart of water, then add the milk, seasoning and 
soda, just before serving, throw into the soup whole water or 
small oyster crackers. R. L. W. 

POTATO SOUP. 
Five medium-sized potatoes, pared and cut in dice shape. 
Put on with one quart of water; one onion chopped; little parsley; 
one-quarter pound butter. Let boil until potatoes are tender, 
then add one pint of milk. Let boil up, then add egg dumplings, 
pepper and salt to taste. Serve. 

CLAM SOUP. 

Boil the juice of the clams. Make a little drawn butter, and 
mix with the boiling juice. Stir until it boils. Chop the clams 
and add them to the liquor. Season to taste with pepper, salt 
and lemon juice. Cream or milk and crackers are to be added. 
Boil over a slow fire for thirty minutes. K. J. B. 

GREEN PEA SOUP. 

Cover one quart of green peas with hot water, and boil with 
an onion until they will mash easily. Mash and add a pint of 
stock or water. Cook together two tablespoonfuls of butter and 
one of flour until smooth (not brown). Add this to the peas, and 
then add a cupful of cream and one of milk. Season to taste. 
Let boil up at once. Strain and serve. A cupful of whipped 
cream put in just before serving is an improvement. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Take a good marrow bone and two pounds of lean meat. 
Wash well. Cover with cold water, and simmer a whole day, add- 
ing water as it boils away. Let stand over night and skim off 
some of the fat. Put the stock on the stove, and add one onion ; 
one small carrot; two small potatoes; one turnip; one stalk cel- 
ery (a little celery seed can be used in place of the celery, a scant 
half of a teaspoonful of the seed); one-quarter of a small head 
of cabbage, all chopped fine. Boil three hours one ear of corn, 
one-hall of a cupful of barley. Put to soak in cold water. Stand 
on the back of the stove until ready for use. Add the barley and 
corn half an hour before using, stirring often. 



SOVl'S. 41 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

Boil one quart of asparagus, cut into one-inch lengths, into 
one quart of water until tender, then rub it through a colander, 
and return it to the water in which it was boiled. Meat one pint 
of milk Stir into it one tablespoonful of butter, rubbed with one 
tablespoonful of flour, and cook a few minutes. Season and pour 
into the asparagus. Let it become boiling hot before pouring it 
into the tureen over toasted bread. Cut into < lice. Serve at 
once. A. F. 



42 



80UP8. 



sours. 



43 



44 Nosrts. 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 



FISH AND THEIR SEASON. 

The following list of the months when the different varieties 
of fish are in the best condition for food may be useful for house- 
keepers. 

It is a summary of what may be found in the great fish mar- 
kets of Boston, New York and Philadelphia, as supplied from all 
sections of the country. Many of the varieties may be pur- 
chased at other times, having been preserved in either ice or cold- 
storage, but the fish are not as fine as when they are naturally in 
season : 

Black Bass. — June, July, August, October, November, De- 
cember. 

Channel Bass. — February. 

Sea Bass. — April, May, June, July, August, September, Oc- 
tober. 

Spotted Bass. — October, November. 

Striped Bass. — Every month in the year. 

Black-fish. — May, June, July, September, October, Novem- 
ber, December. 

Bloaters. — May. 

Blue-fish. — April, May, June, July, August, September, Oc- 
tober, November, December. 

Bonito. — August, September. 

Butter-fish. — May, June, July, August, September. 

Carp. — May, June, July, August, September. 

Catfish. — January. February, March, April, August, Septem- 
ber, November. 

Clams. — The year around. 

Cod. — Fresh the year around, but poor quality during May 
and June. 

45 



46 FISH AND OYSTERS. 

Cod Tongue. — February, March, April. 

Hard-shell Crabs. — January, February, April, September, 
October, November, December. 

Soft-shell Crabs. — February, May, June, July, August, Sep- 
tember, October. 

Crayfish. — The year around, excepting January, February, 
March. 

Eels. — The year around. 

Flounders. — The year around, excepting November, Jan- 
uary, February. 

Frogs' Legs. — April, May, June, July, August, September, 
October, November, December. 

Grouper. — January, February, March, September, October, 
November, December. 

Haddock. — The year around, but poor during May and June. 

Hake. — January. 

Halibut. — The year around. 

Chicken Halibut. — March, April, May. 

Herring. — January, February. 

King-fish. — April, May, June, July, August, October. 

Lobster. — The year around, excepting January. 

Fresh Mackerel. — April, May, June, July, August, Septem- 
ber, October, November. 

Spanish Mackerel. — The year around, excepting November, 
December, January. 

Moon-fish. — July, September. 

Mullets. — December, January, February. 

Oysters. — The year around, excepting May, June, July, Au- 
gust. 

Yellow Perch. — February, March, October, November. 

White Perch. — February, April, October, November. 

Pike. — January, February, March, April, September, Octo- 
ber, November, December. 

Pickerel. — The year around, excepting May, June, July, 
August. 

Pompano.— February, March, April, May, June, July, Sep- 
tember, October. 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 47 

Porgies. — May, June, July, August, September. 

Pisions. — The year around, excepting June. 

Salmon. — The year around. 

Scallops. — January, February, March, April, June, July, 
August, September, November, December. 

Shad. — January, February, March, April, May, June (poor), 
November, December. 

Sheephead. — The year around, excepting September, No- 
vember, December. 

Red Snapper. — January, February, March, April, September, 
October, November, December. 

Skates. — The year around, excepting May and October. 

Smelts. — January, February, April, September, October, No- 
vember, December. 

Sturgeon. — March, June. 

Brook Trout. — April, May, July, August. 

Salmon Trout. — February, March, April, May, September, 
October, November, December. 

Tibfish. — September. 

Turbot. — January, December. 

Green Turtle. — The year around, excepting June. 

Weak-fish. — May, June, July, September, October. 

White-fish. — The year around, excepting January, June, 
July, August. 

White Bait. — The year around, excepting March, May, De- 
cember. 

OYSTER PIE. 

For one hundred oysters take four hard-boiled eggs, chopped 
fine; place a rich crust in a dish; then fill up with layers of oys- 
ters and minced eggs. Place lumps of butter over all. Season 
with salt and pepper. Fill up the dish with milk and oyster 
liquor. Cover all with top crust. Bake as quickly as possible. 

ROAST OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

Toast slices of bread. Wash and dry fine large oysters. 
Spread as many as possible on each slice of toast, with a little but- 



4* FJSH AND OYSTERS. 

ter. salt and pepper to taste. Put into the oven until the edges 
curl. Serve at once. M. F. 

LITTLE PIGS-IN-BLANKETS. 

Take large oysters, wash and dry them thoroughly. Cover 
each oyster with a thin piece of bacon, and pin together with a 
wooden toothpick. Broil or roast until the bacon is brown and 
crisp. Serve hot. M. F. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

To the liquor of three hundred oysters add one pint of vine- 
gar; one tablespoonful of mace, allspice and pepper; one ounce 
ci whole cloves. Let the mixture of liquor and vinegar come to 
a boil. Skim; add the spices, and let it come to a boil again and 
add the oysters. Let them cook a few minutes. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Wash the oysters and drain them for ten minutes, then throw 
Ihem into a hissing hot frying pan, and stir until they boil. Add 
salt, pepper and butter to taste. Serve in a hot dish at once. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Mince fine one quart of oysters, and add one cupful of rich, 
drawn butter, based upon milk. Season with black and cayenne 
pepper. Stir the minced oysters into the drawn butter, and cook 
five minutes. Have ready some shapes of pastry baked in pattie 
pans. Fill these with the mixture. Set in oven two minutes to 
heat. Serve at once. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take fine large fat oysters; drain and dry them. Dip them 
into cracker dust, seasoned with salt and pepper; then in beaten 
egg; then again into the cracker dust. Fry in boiling-hot lard. 

STEWED OYSTERS. 

For one hundred oysters take one quart of milk; two table- 
spoonfuls of butter; add one teacupful of water to the liquor 
strained from the oysters, and set it over the fire to heat slowly. 
When it is near boiling skim, season with salt and pepper, then 
add the oysters and let them stew until their edges curl. This 



FISH AND OYSTEBS. 49 

will be in about five minutes. Add the butter with the milk, 
which has been heated in a separate vessel. Stir well for a few 

minutes, and serve. 

CREAMED OYSTEBS. 

Twenty-five oysters; one pint of cream; one tablespoonful of 
butter; one tablespoonful of cornstarch; one blade of mace; salt 
and pepper to taste. Put the oysters on to boil in their own 
liquor; as soon as they come to a boil drain through a colander. 
Put the cream on to boil in a farina boiler. Rub the butter and 
cornstarch together, and add to the cream when boiling; add the 
mace and stir constantly until it thickens; then add the oysters, 
salt and pepper; stir until thoroughly heated, and serve. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Butter a pudding dish; put in a layer of oysters; season with 
pepper and salt and a layer of cracker crumbs; dot with bits of 
butter, and moisten with oyster liquor. Continue till the dish is 
full. Top layer of crumbs. Bake in a quick oven half an hour. 
Heat a cup and a half of milk; thicken with one teaspoonful of 
flour, and pour over the dish just before serving. A. M. W. 

EGG AND OYSTER OMELET. 

Four eggs ; one pint of oysters (chopped) ; two cupf uls sweet 
milk; one tablespoonful flour; one teaspoonful baking powder. 
Bake in a quick oven. Serve on dishes. 

FLANKED SHAD. 

Take a fine large shad; a little red pepper, salt and melted 
butter; split the shad down the back; wipe dry with a soft cloth. 
Fasten to the plank back downward. Sprinkle with salt, and rub 
with melted butter and little red pepper. Stand the plank side- 
ways over a dripping pan before a very clear fire. Watch con- 
stantly, and as it cooks and browns, which should be slowly, baste 
very frequently with melted butter and red pepper sparingly 
put into the melted butter. Planks can be had at any house- 
furnishing store, or an oak or chestnut board may be used, upon 
which nail the fish. Heat and butter the plank as you would a 
pan. M. L. 



50 FISII AND OYSTERS. 

BAKED FISH. 

Make a dressing of bread crumbs; two tablespoonfuls minced 
onion; some chopped parsley; a little butter; one tablespoonful 
chopped suet, pepper, salt and a beaten egg. Stuff the fish and 
sew or tie securely. Place in a pan with some hot water, and 
bake, basting very often. M. F. 

FISH SAUCE. 

One-half pint milk and cream together; two eggs, well 
beaten; salt, pepper and part of the juice of a lemon. Put over the 
fire and stir constantly until it thickens. M. F. 

BAKED HALIBUT. 

Select large slices of halibut; cut the same as for frying. Rub 
well with salt and pepper. Place three or four slices of thin, salt 
pork on the bottom of a dripping pan; lay the slices of fish on 
the pork, and pour milk over it to cover. Baste with milk while 
baking. Let the milk cook away when the fish is nearly done, 
or thicken for gravy if you choose. Allow at least an hour in a 
hot oven. 

BAKED SALMON. 

One can salmon; one egg; one cupful milk; one cupful bread 
crumbs; one chopped onion; one tablespoonful melted butter; 
little red pepper and salt; little sweet marjoram, or summer sa- 
vory. Drain the liquor from the salmon; mix with the fish the 
given ingredients. Bake one-half hour in a moderate oven. Serve 
hot. A. M. W. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

One can of salmon mixed with half the quantity of mashed 
potatoes; one egg; small quantity of milk, and parsley. Fry in 
egg and cracker. O. B. 

CREAM CODFISH. 

One-half pound salt codfish ; one-half or two-thirds cupful of 
cream; butter size of a walnut; one egg; pepper; sometimes a little 
fiour. Soak the fish two hours in warm water. Pour off the water. 
Pick the fish into pieces, then add the given ingredients. Put 
over the fire and stir until hot. E. H. B. 



FISH AND 0T8TERS. 51 

CODFISH BALLS. 

Three pints boiling water; one cupful salt codfish; one pint 
of potatoes; one egg; one teaspoonful butter; pepper. Mince 
very fine, and bone the fish. Pare and quarter the potatoes. Boil 
together until the potatoes are soft. Drain off the water; mash 
and beat until soft and smooth. Add the butter and pepper, and 
when slightly cooled, the egg well beaten, shape into balls with a 
tablespoon. Fry in hot lard. M. F. 

LOBSTER PATES. 

Make puff paste, and spread on very deep pate pans. Bake 
it empty. Having boiled well two or three fine lobsters, ex- 
tract all the meat and mince very small, mixing it with coral 
smoothly mashed, and yolk of hard-boiled egg, grated. Season 
with a little salt, cayenne and powdered mace or nutmeg, adding 
a little yellow lemon rind, grated. Moisten mixture well with 
cream, fresh butter or salad oil. Put it into stew-pan. Add very 
little water; let stew till it just comes to a boil. Take off the fire 
and the pates being baked, remove them from tin pans. Place 
them on large dish, and fill them up to top with the mixture. 
Similar pates may be made of prawns or crabs. 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 

Chop fine the meat of a two-pound lobster; take also two 
tablespoonfuls butter; enough water or cream to make it very 
moist; one egg; salt and pepper to taste, and one-half tablespoon- 
ful flour. Cook butter and flour together until they bubble. 
Add the cream or water (about a scant half cupful), then the lob- 
ster and seasoning, and when hot, the eggs, well beaten. Set 
away to cool. Shape, dip in egg and cracker crumbs, and fry as 
usual. C. M. McF. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

Haddock and striped bass are the best fish for chowder. 
A little red and black pepper; a little chopped onion and crackers. 
Cut the fish in pieces one inch thick and two inches square. Cut 
five or six slices of the best salt pork. Lay them in the bottom of 
an iron pot, and fry until crisp; do not scorch. Take out the pork, 



52 FISH AND OYSTERS. 

leaving the fat. Put into the pot a layer of fish; a layer of split 
crackers, and a little of the pork, chopped fine; seasoning, onion, 
then another layer of split crackers. Repeat this until all the 
fish is used. Cover the whole with water, and stew slowly until 
tender. Take out the fish and thicken the liquor with cracker 
crumbs and catsup, if desired. Let it boil. Add the juice of a 
lemon. Pour the gravy over the fish. M. F. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Four medium-size potatoes, cut in pieces; one onion. Cover 
with hot water, and when a little soft add one-quarter pound 
water crackers, which have had cold water poured over them 
to make them soft. Take twenty-five clams from the liquor 
(which is too salt to use), cut in small pieces. Put a layer of 
clams and then one of crackers in the kettle. Pepper (salt if 
necessary), parsley. Whole cloves and allspice can be added, 
if desired. L. D. B. 



PISH AND OYSTERS 53 



54 FISH AND OYSTERH. 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 55 



J56 FISH AND OYSTERS 



GAME AND MEATS. 



ROAST BEEF. 

Select a sirloin or rib of beef with sufficient fat on it to use 
in roasting, so no water will be needed. Dredge with flour; salt, 
pepper to taste. Roast in a very hot oven. 

BROILED BEEFSTEAK. 

Wash and dry the steak, then trim off all the suet. Grease 
the boiler with some of the fat. Broil over a clean fire. Turn it 
constantly. Allow eight minutes to broil, if the steak is three- 
quarters of an inch thick. Place on a hot platter. Season with 
salt and pepper on both sides. Cut the suet into small cubes and 
fry until the fat is tried out. Put into this one dozen onions, 
sliced. Fry and stir for twenty minutes. Add one teaspoonful 
of salt and pepper; scant one-half cupful of boiling water. Sim- 
mer until the water is evaporated and the onions a nice brown. 
Put them on the steak, and serve. 

BEEFSTEAK A LA MODE. 

Pound the steak until tender; season with salt and pepper. 
In bottom of frying pan put a layer of chopped onions and pars- 
ley. Then place the steak on top, and cover it with onion and 
parsley; also a beaten egg put on top of all. Sprinkle bits of 
butter over this and cook in a quick oven twenty to thirty min- 
utes. L. P. B. 
HAMBURG STEAK. 

One pound of steak from upper side of the round; chop very 
fine; add a tablespoonful of onion juice; half a teaspoonful salt 
and two dashes of black pepper; mix well together. Form two 
tablespoonfuls of this mixture into cakes or steaks. This quan- 
tity will make eight Hamburk steaks. Put two tablespoonfuls of 
butter in frying pan; when hot fry steaks brown. Place in a hot 
dish. Add tablespoonful of flour to the butter in the pan; 



58 GAME AND MEATS. 

£tir till smooth; add half pint boiling water, and stir constantly 
till it boils; add salt and pepper to taste, and pour over the 
steaks. 

BEEF CUTLET. 

Boil one pound of stewing beef or beefsteak until tender. 
Chop very fine and then add one-half of a teaspoonful of salt, a 
dash of cayenne pepper; one-quarter of a teaspoonful of white 
pepper: one teaspoonful of onion juice, and one of chopped pars- 
ley. Prepare the following sauce: One pint of hot cream; two 
even tablespoonfuls of butter; two heaping tablespoonfuls of corn- 
starch; one-half of a tablespoonful of salt; one-half of a table- 
spoonful of white pepper; one-half of a tablespoonful of celery 
salt. Add to this sauce one beaten egg just before taking it from 
the fire. This sauce should be very thick like drop batter. Mix 
with this sauce the chopped beef, shaping them into cutlets as 
soft as can be handled. Dip in bread crumbs, then into beaten 
egg. Repeat. Fry for one minute in very hot fat. Serve with 
tomato sauce. N. M. G. 

SPICED BEEF. 

Four pounds of clear stewing beef, cut in pieces; cover with 
boiling water. Skim carefully as it boils; then simmer till the 
meat falls to pieces, and the liquor is reduced to half a pint. Re- 
move the meat; season the liquor with salt, pepper, thyme and 
sage. Add to the meat and mix with a fork till the meat is thor- 
oughly picked apart. Pack in a brick loaf pan and press. Serve 
cold, cut in thin slices. 

PRESSED CORNED BEEF. 

Select a brisket of beef. Put on to boil in cold water, enough 
to cover it; then simmer until it can be picked apart easily with 
a fork. Pick the meat into small pieces while warm, mixing well 
the lean and fat. Place in a deep pan (a bread pan is best). Cover 
with a thin board, and place a heavy weight on top to press. Cut 
in slices, and serve cold. 

BROILED SHOULDER OF MUTTON. 

Select two small shoulders of mutton, and have the butcher 
tie them together. Put the mutton in a pot; cover with boiling 



GAME AND MEATS. 59 

water. Add one small onion ; one bunch of parsley. After the pot 
boils, set back and let it simmer gently till tender and the liquor is 
reduced to less than a pint. Pour off the fat, leaving about one 
tablespoonful. Mash the parsley and onion remaining in the pot; 
thicken. Add cup of hot water; thicken with one tablespoonful 
of flour, and serve. A. M. W. 

BAKED LAMB CHOPS BREADED. 

Roll the chops first in bread crumbs, then in beaten egg, and 
again in bread crumbs. Place in a roasting pan and bake half 
an hour if you like them well done. Serve with tomato sauce. 

MEAT BALLS. 

Scrape fibres of raw beef. Mix with a well-beaten egg, salt 
and pepper. Broil quickly. A. M. M. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Three and one-half pounds of raw veal, chopped; one-half 

pound of pork can be added if liked; one heaping tablespoonful 

salt; one of pepper; eight tablespoonfuls powdered cracker; three 

tablespoonfuls cream or milk; butter size egg; two eggs; little 

nutmeg. Mold in a loaf. Put in pan with a little water. Sprinkle 

over with bits of butter and cracker crumbs. Bake two hours. 

To be eaten cold. 

C ANN AD ON. 

One pound of uncooked beef, chopped fine; yolk of 
one egg; one tablespoonful of chopped parsley; one table- 
spoonful of butter; two tablespoonfuls of bread crumbs; one tea- 
spoonful of lemon juice; one teaspoonful of salt; three dashes of 
black pepper. Mix all the ingredients together, then form into a 
roll about six inches long and four inches in diameter; wrap in 
greased paper; put in a baking pan, and bake in a quick oven 
thirty minutes, basting twice with melted butter. When done, 
remove the paper, place the roll in the center of a hot dish, and 
serve with mushroom or tomato sauce poured over it. 

JELLIED VEAL. 

One knuckle of veal; twelve whole cloves; two onions; six 
peppercorns ; one blade of mace ; one-half teaspoonful ground all- 



60 GAME AND MEATS. 

spice; one bay leaf; one gill good vinegar; salt and pepper to 
taste. Cut knuckle in pieces, and put in kettle with two quarts 
cold water. Bring slowly to simmering point. Skim and simmer 
slowly two hours. Then add onion, mace, bay leaf, cloves, 
peppercorn and allspice, and simmer one hour longer. Take out 
knuckle, remove bones and put meat in square mold. Boil the 
liquor till reduced to one quart. Strain and add vinegar, salt 
and pepper. Pour over the meat and stand it away over night 
to cool. When cold, turn it carefully out of the mold. Garnish 
it with parsley and lemon. 

STEWED RABBIT. 

Two rabbits; quarter pound of salt pork; one onion; one 
tablespoonful of butter; one cupful of water. Have your rabbits 
jointed and the pork sliced. Cover close and stew one hour, or 
until meat is tender. Thicken with browned flour. Salt and pep- 
per to taste. 

BOAST GOOSE. 

Select a nice young goose. Draw, clean and singe same as 
a chicken. Wash in several waters, then leave it lie in salt and 
water with a little baking soda for thirty minutes. Drain and 
wipe dry inside and out. Prepare a dressing as follows: Two 
cupfuls of mashed potatoes; one onion, chopped fine; one-half of 
a cupful of milk or cream; one tablespoonful each of butter, pep- 
per and salt; two leaves of sage; one tablespoonful of chopped 
parsley; the yolks of two eggs well beaten. Mix and fill the goose 
and skewer up. Put it in a kettle of boiling water with one tea- 
spoonful of baking soda and a little salt. Let boil two hours. 
Then place into a baking pan with two cupfuls of water, and 
roast till well done. Baste well while roasting. 

TO BBAISE A FOWL. 

If the fowl ordered for roasting is found too old for this pur- 
pose, it may be made tender and good by braising. Prepare it 
as for roasting, trussing it into good shape. Cut into dice a 
carrot, turnip, onion and a stalk of celery. Cut them in a pot 
with a few slices of salt pork and on them place the fowl with 



GAME AND MEATS. 61 

a few pieces of salt pork laid over the breast. Add a bouquet of 
parsley, one bay leaf, three cloves, six peppercorns, also a tea- 
spoonful of salt and a pint of hot water. Cover the pot closely 
and let simmer for three hours. If any steam escapes a little 
more water may have to be added. When done, rub a little but- 
ter over the breast, dredge with flour and place in the oven a few 
minutes to brown. Strain the liquor from the braising pot, sea- 
son to taste and serve it as sauce with the chicken. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Take a spring chicken and prepare as for frying; sprinkle 
with salt and pepper, and roll each piece thoroughly in flour. 
Have fat one inch and a half deep in a frying pan and boiling 
hot. Put in the chicken and cover with a lid. Fry chicken till 
brown on one side; when it reaches this point add a tablespoonful 
of boiling water and turn, fry till tender. Pour off all the fat, 
leaving the sediment in frying pan. Add one cup of milk and stir 
thoroughly. If not thick enough, add one teaspoonful of flour to 
part of the milk before putting in the pan. Boil up, pour over 
the chicken and serve. A. M. W. 

PLAIN BAKED CHICKEN. 

Take a spring chicken; clean and split down the back. Lay 
in a dripping pan; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dot with but- 
ter. Place in a very hot oven, and cook till brown, basting often. 
Place chicken on platter. Add one tablespoonful of flour to the 
fat in the pan, and stir until smooth. Add half a pint of milk or 
cream. Let it boil up, season with salt and pepper, and pour 
over the chicken and serve. M. V. 

ROAST CHICKEN OR TURKEY. 

Clean; rub with salt and pepper, and fill. Tie the legs and 
wings close to the body, and pin in a cloth. Put into boiling 
salted water. Allow twenty minutes to the pound. Boil slowly 
till fairly tender. This may be done the day before it is used. 
Remove the cloth, and dredge with salt, pepper and flour, and 
rub well with butter. Place on rack in pan. Place in hot oven, 
and ado a cupful of water. Baste every ten minutes, and dredge 



■62 GAME AND MEATS. 

with salt and flour after each basting. Cook till legs will sep- 
arate from the body and the turkey or chicken is a rich brown. 
Dressing: Two cupfuls of soft bread crumbs; season highly with 
sage; thyme; marjoram; salt, and pepper; moisten the dressing 
with a half a cupful of melted butter, and hot water enough to 
make quite moist. Add one beaten egg. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

One solid pint of finely-chopped cooked chicken; one table- 
spoonful salt; one-half teaspoonful pepper; one cupful cream or 
chicken stock; one tablespoonful flour; four eggs; one teaspoon- 
ful onion juice; one tablespoonful lemon juice; one pint crumbs; 
three tablespoonfuls butter. Put the cream or stock on to boil. 
Mix the flour and butter together and stir into the boiling cream, 
then add the chicken and seasoning. Boil two minutes and add 
two of the eggs, well beaten. Take from the fire immediately and 
set away to cool. When cold, shape and fry. (The other two 
eggs lo be used in frying.) 

Veal, mutton, lamb, beef and turkey can be prepared in the 
same manner as the chicken. C. M. McF. 

SAUSAGE BOLLS. 

Take as many newly-made sausages as you intend to have 
lolls. If sausage meat is used, make into sausage form. Roll 
out the pastry to about one-third inch thick. Cut in pieces 
about five inches long. Cut edges all around. Lay sausage on 
one-half paste, fold the other half over, then press the edges 
together so the gravy cannot ooze out. In cooking, bake one- 
half hour. (Use a shortcake dough for the rolls.) 

A. M. W. 
BAKED HAM. 

Take a ham from eight to ten pounds. Soak twenty-four 
hours in cold water. Change several times. Wipe and scrape 
clean. Remove skin. Make a rather stiff paste of rye flour and 
water. Cover the ham entirely with the paste, and bake in a 
moderate oven six hours. This is very much nicer than when 
boiled. 



GAME AND MEATS. 63 

TERRAPIN. 

Take a calf's head, and boil until it drops off the bones. Cut 
into small pieces tongue, brains and all. Mix one-quarter pound 
of butter or more with flour to make a rich gravy, add one tum- 
bler of sherry wine, red pepper and salt to taste; a teacup of 
cream. Stew all together a few minutes, and serve hot. Eggs 
for the same. Beat the yolks of hard-boiled eggs to a fine powder 
and make into a paste with the yolk of a raw egg', roll into small 
balls and drop in boiling water a minute to harden. Add these 
to the terrapin. 

FRIED TRIPE. 

Prepare the tripe by cleaning thoroughly and putting on in 
cold water to boil for six hours. Cut into pieces suitable for fry- 
ing. Dip into the following batter and fry until brown in deep 
fat: One egg; two cupfuls milk; salt, and sufficient flour to 
make a thin batter. 

BOILED DINNER. 

Four pounds of corned beef; small bunch of beets; small 
head of cabbage; two small yellow turnips; eight potatoes. Put 
on the meal about four hours before dinner. Boil until tender, 
then remove, and either serve cold or put in hot closet till dinner 
time. Skim the fat from the liquor in which the meat has been 
boiled. Boil the beets in a kettle by themselves. Wash all the 
vegetables. Cut the cabbage in quarters. Pare the turnips, and 
cut into slices less than an inch thick, and pare the potatoes. Tie 
each vegetable, except beets, in a square of cheesecloth. Put 
in the turnips, then cabbage, and half an hour before dinner the 
potatoes. Drain each vegetable carefully, and serve. 

POTATO DUMPLINGS FOR MEATS. 

Pare and boil whole potatoes (it is better to boil them the day 
before using, as they grate better) and then grate them. Put one 
spoonful of butter in a frying P an » mto which throw a slice of 
wheat bread cut into small cubes; when a little brown, add the 
cubes to the grated potato. Add to this mixture a little salt 
and one egg. Stir well and add enough flour so that it can be 
rolled easily into small balls. Fill a good-sized pot three-quar- 



64 GAME AND MEATS. 

ters full of boiling water, and into this put a tablespoonful of 
salt. Drop the dumplings into this, putting the cover on the 
pot. When they are done they will float on the top. Take them 
up as needed, and serve very hot. Serve with cold meat, using 
meat gravy. A. M. N. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING FOR ROAST BEEF. 

Beat three eggs very light. Add one scant teaspoonful of 
salt; one pint of milk. Pour half a cupful of this mixture on two- 
thirds of a cupful of flour, and stir to a smooth paste. Add the re- 
mainder of the mixture and beat well. Bake in hot gem pans 
forty -five minutes. Baste with the drippings from the beef. 

BOILED SUET PUDDING FOR BAKED CHICKEN OR 
TURKEY. 

Two cupfuls flour; one cupful suet, chopped fine; one cupful 
stoned raisins; one teaspoonful salt. Mix lightly with cold water. 
Wring cloth out of boiling water; spread over a bowl, and flour. 
Fut in the pudding and tie tightly. Flour the opening. Plunge 
into boiling water, and keep the water boiling during cooking. 
Boil two hours. Serve with turkey as a vegetable, and use tur- 
key gravy. M. L. S. 

SAUCE TARTAR FOR COLD MEATS. 

One-half pint of mayonnaise dressing; two olives; one small 
pickle; two teaspoonfuls of capers. Chop the olives, gherkin and 
capers very fine, and add them to the dressing. 

TOMATO SAUCE FOR CHOPS, FILLET OR STEAK. 

One-half can of tomatoes; one cupful of water; one table- 
spoonful of butter; one tablespoonful of flour; one tablespoonful 
of chopped onion; one bay leaf; two spriks of parsley; one blade 
of mace ; salt and pepper to taste. Put on the tomatoes, water, 
onion, bay leaf, parsley and mace to boil. Melt the butter, add 
and mix till smooth. Press tomatoes through a sieve. Add but- 
ter and flour, and simmer ten minutes. Add salt and pepper and 

serve. 

MINT SAUCE FOR LAMB. 

One cupful chopped mint; one-quarter cupful sugar; one- 
half cupful vinegar. Let it stand an hour before serving. 



OAM E AXD MEATS. 65 



66 GAME AND MEATS. 



GAME AND MEATS. «7 



68 



*GAME AND MEATS. 



VEGETABLES. 



BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Soak one quart of small soup beans in cold water over night. 
The next morning put them into fresh cold water, and simmer 
till soft enough to pierce with a pin, then drain and pour cold 
water over them. Prepare one-quarter pound of mixed fat and 
lean salt pork, cutting the rind in strips. Place the pork in bot- 
tom of the bean pot, cover with the beans, leaving only the rind 
expo-.ed. Mix one teaspoonful salt; one teaspoonful mutsard, 
and one-third cupful molasses with hot water, and pour over the 
beans. Add enough more water to cover them and keep them so 
covered until one hour before serving. Bake from six to eight 
hours in a moderate oven. N. M. G. 

STEWED POTATOES. 

Cut raw potatoes in small pieces; cover with boiling water 
in frying pan; cook until tender; pour off the water; add milk, 
salt, pepper, butter and parsley. L. P. B. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Cut cold-boiled potatoes into cubes measuring one-third of 
an inch, or into thin slices. Put them in a small, shallow pan; 
cover with milk, and cook until the potatoes have absorbed nearly 
all the milk. To one pint of potatoes add one tablespoonful of 
butter, half a teaspoonful of salt; one-half saltspoonful pepper 
and a little chopped parsley. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Select good-sized potatoes; pare them and lay in ice-water 
for one or two hours; slice them with a cutter very thin; drop 
them again into ice-water. Then dry them with a towel and 
drop them a few at a time into boiling lard until they are of a 

69 



70 VEGETABLES. 

light brown. Take them out and sprinkle with salt. One dish 
receipt. 

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES. 

Cut raw potatoes into wedges; dry thoroughly, and cook in 
deep hot fat until brown. Drain in a colander, and salt. The 
above can be covered until they begin to brown, if desired. 

POTATO CROQtIETTES. 

Two cupfuls of cold mashed potatoes, free from lumps; two 
eggs beaten to a froth ; one tablespoonful of butter (melted) ; salt 
and pepper to taste; a little parsley, chopped fine. Mix this all to- 
gether, and then form into cakes or rolls. Roll in beaten egg 
and crackers or bread crumbs, and fry in hot lard a nice brown. 

S. Y. A. 

POTATO PUFFS. 

Take two teacupfuls of cold mashed potatoes; eight teaspoon- 
fuls melted butter, and beat together till very light. Add salt 
to taste and two well-beaten eggs. Beat again, press through a 
colander, put into a buttered baking dish and bake until brown. 

FRIED EGG PLANT. 

Peal and cut the plant into slices, one-half of an inch thick. 
Then lay the slices one on top of the other, sprinkling a little salt 
on each one; leave stand this way from thirty to fifty minutes. 
Then beat up two eggs lightly, adding a little boiling water. Dip 
each slice in the egg and bread crumbs, and fry in a pan of hot 
lard a nice brown (be sure to have the lard deep enough to let the 
slices be covered), then lay on brown paper to drain, and serve on 
a hot plate. S. J. A. 

BAKED EGG PLANT. 

Wash the egg plant, put it into a kettle and cover it with boil- 
ing water. Boil until tender (about a half hour), then take it out, 
cut it in half, and scoop out the soft portion, leaving the skin un- 
broken. Mash the egg plant fine, add to it a large tablespoonful 
of butter, salt and pepper to taste. Mix well, and put back into 
the skin. Sprinkle the top lightly with bread crumbs, and put 
in tlu oven to brown. L. T. R. 



VEGETABLES. 71 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Wash and cut into halves nice smooth tomatoes; place in a 
frying pan with skin side down. Cut some butter into small 
pieces, and place over the tomatoes; dust with salt and pepper, 
and stand over a moderate fire to fry slowly. When the tomatoes 
are nicely browned, turn them over carefully. When that side is 
nicely browned, lift off carefully on to a heated platter. Then 
draw the frying pan over the hot fire, and add two tablespoonfuls 
of flour. Mix until smooth. Add a half pint of milk or cream, 
stir continually until it boils, season with salt and pepper, pour 
over tomatoes and serve. Be careful to brown the flour and but- 
ter a nice light brown, and if the gravy is a little too thick, add 
a little more milk or cream. S. J. A. 

STEWED TOMATOES. 

Pour boiling water over them ; with a sharp knife remove the 
skins and the hard stem ends, and cut them in small pieces. Stew 
in a porcelain-lined or granite saucepan for a half hour. Then 
add to every quart of tomatoes a tablespoonful of butter; a tea- 
spoonful sugar; salt and pepper to taste. Stew fifteen or twentv 
minutes longer, or until they are the desired thickness ; and thick- 
ened with bread crumbs. A slice of onion may be added to the 
tomatoes, when first put on to cook. Mrs. S. J. A. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Place in a baking dish a layer of bread crumbs; then a layer 
of peeled tomatoes, sliced, with bits of butter, a little pepper and 
salt; then bread crumbs, tomatoes, and so on, until the dish is full, 
having the bread crumbs on top. Place in the oven and bake. 

Mrs. S. J. A. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Select six large, smooth tomatoes, cut a slice off the stem 
ends, scoop out the seeds. Mix together a half cupful of finely 
chopped cold-boiled ham; twelve chopped mushrooms; ten heap- 
ing tablespoonfuls of stale bread crumbs; a tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley; a half teaspoonful of salt; a dash of cayenne, 
and a tablespoonful of melted butter. Fill the tomatoes with 



72 VEGETABLES. 

this mixture, heaping it in the center. Sprinkle over the tops 
with bread crumbs. Place the tomatoes in a granite baking pan. 
Baste with melted butter, and bake in a hot oven from forty 
lo fifty minutes, and serve. 

GREEN CORN CAKES. 

Take one pint of grated green corn; three tablespoonfuls 
of milk, and one teaspoonful of flour. Mix with them one-half 
teacupful of melted butter; one egg; one teaspoonful of salt; 
one-haif teaspoonful of pepper. Drop a spoonful into hot but- 
ter and fry eight or ten minutes. These are nice with meat. 

By request, C. J. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Take one dozen ears of green corn, cut each row through on 
the cob, and then scrape off. To this add two eggs, well beaten ; 
one tablespoonful of sugar; one tablespoonful of melted butter; 
with salt and pepper. Then add one-half pint of sweet milk. Put 
it in a buttered dish and bake three-quarters of an hour. This is 
eaten as a vegetable for diner. One dish recipe. 

SCALLOPED ONIONS. 

Take from six to eight medium-sized onions. (The Bermu- 
das are the best) peal and boil until tender (three-quarters of an 
hour will be sufficient). Then put in a baking dish and pour over 
sauce made of one tablespoonful of butter rubbed into one and 
one-half tablespoonfuls flour. Pour over it one pint hot milk, and 
cook until like custard. Bake one-half hour. Cauliflower or as- 
paragus. 

SCALLOPED APPLES. 

Butter a pudding dish, and put a layer of peeled sliced apples 
in the bottom, sprinkled with sugar. A very little flour, and cin- 
namon, and some small bits of butter. Fill the dish in this man- 
ner, and bake one hour, covering the dish to prevent burning 
on the top. Serve cold or hot. C. M. D. 



VEGETABLES. 73 

ASPARAGUS. 

Tie in bunches and boil until tender in plenty of water. Have 
bottom of dish covered with dry toast, lay asparagus on, and pour 
over it a rich drawn butter made of milk. 

CAULIFLOWER WITH BUTTER SAUCE. 

Trim the leaves of some cauliflowers, wash them and put 
them in two quarts of boiling water, add half ounce of butter, 
half ounce of salt, and the juice of a lemon. Let them boil 
quickly until quite soft; drain them, and they are ready. 

By request, C. J. 

CAULIFLOWER EN-GRATIN. 

Bcil the cauliflower as directed in recipe for boiled cauli- 
flower; put one tablespoonful of butter in a frying pan. When 
melted, add a tablespoonful of flour. Mix until smooth. Add a 
half pint of milk. Stir continually until it boils. Add a half tea- 
spoonful of salt and four tablespoonfuls of grated cheese. (Par- 
mesan is best.) Pour this over the cauliflower and serve. 

R. T. S. 
BOILED CAULIFLOWER. 

Pick off the outer leaves and cut off the stem. Then tie it 
in a piece of cheesecloth, to prevent breaking. Stand it in a 
kettle of boiling water, with the stem downward. Add a teaspoon- 
ful of salt. Cover the kettle and boil twenty or thirty minutes, 
until the cauliflower is tender. When done, pour over it cream 
sauce and serve. 

SPINACH, WITH CREAM. 

Wash three quarts of spinach in several waters, then put 
in four quarts of boiling water, adding half ounce of salt. Boil it 
over a very hot fire for ten minutes, then put it in cold water for a 
moment, press the water from it, and chop it extremely fine. Put 
in a saucepan on the fire four ounces of butter; a tablespoonful 
of flour; half teaspoonful of sugar; some salt; nutmeg, and half 
pint of cream. Stir it all well together until it boils, then add the 
spinach. Serve it garnished with pieces of bread fried in butter. 

Mrs. S .Y. A. 



74 VEGETABLES. 

SUCCOTASH. 

Boil one quart of lima beans until tender, cut down the mid- 
die the grains of one dozen ears corn, and scrape. Drain off 
water from beans; add the corn; season with salt and pepper, and 
a good lump of butter, and a half pint of milk or cream. Then 
cook slowly twenty minutes. You may use string beans instead 
of lima. S. J. A. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Remove all the outside leaves. Place in strong salt water for 
an hour to draw out any little insects that may be in it. Put on 
to cook in cold water, when hot put in salt. Boil until tender. 
Place in a dish, and pour over drawn butter. 

BAKED POTATOES. 

Wash thoroughly as many potatoes as needed, leaving the 
skins on. Place in a hot oven on the rack. Bake from a half 
hour to an hour. When they begin to feel soft press with the fin- 
gers gently and break the skins. Serve as soon as possible after 
done. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Take a bunch of asparagus. Cut the tops off nearly to the 
center of the stock. Lay the tops in cold water. Pare the bot- 
tom parts. Put on to boil in cold water. When nearly boiling 
add salt. When tender put in the tops. Boil until they are ten- 
der. Have ready some toasted bread. Dip in the hot water 
wherein asparagus boiled. Lay on a platter. Put the asparagus 
on top of the toast, and pour on drawn butter, made of a table- 
spoonful of butter, rubbed to a cream with two tablespoonfuls of 
flour. Put in a pint of boiling milk. Boil until thick. Pour 
over the asparagus. Salt to taste. Use the same recipe for drawn 
butter lor cauliflower. 

GREEN PEAS. 

Shell the peas and put on to cook in cold water. As soon 
as they come to a boil put in seasoning. Salt, pepper and butter. 
If very young from twenty minutes to half an hour is sufficient 
for cooking. 



YEOETABLES. 76 

BOILED ONIONS. 

Pare the onions. Put on in cold water. Let boil twenty min- 
utes. Pour the water off. Put on more boiling water, with salt 
enough to season them. When tender, pour off the water again. 
Put butter size of a walnut, and a little milk. Boil slowly for a 
lew minutes. 

SWEET POTATOES. 

Pare as many potatoes as are needed, one or two to a person. 
Lay them in cold water as you pare, to keep from getting black. 
Put on to cook in boiling water. Boil until you can put a fork 
through. Take out one at a time as they get done. Place on a 
pan and stand in the oven to dry. When roasting meat sweet 
potatoes are nice. Put in the pan by the side of the meat and 
browned in the fat. They must be boiled first. 

CORN ON THE COB. 

Prepare as many as are needed, by taking off all the husk, 
except one inside layer. Turn that back and pick off all the 
silk. Replace the husk. Be careful not to take the husk in turn- 
ing it back. Boil in salted boiling water about ten minutes. 

CORN. 

Six good-sized ears of corn. Cut off the grains with a sharp 
knife. Do not take the whole grain at one cut, sort of shave it off. 
Do not cut close to the cob. Then with the back of the knife 
scrape out all the juice that is left on the cob. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

Take a dozen large ears of corn. Cut down the center of the 
grains, and scrape well, being careful not to get the hulls off. 
Add two eggs well beaten. Salt and pepper to taste. Three table- 
spoonfuls of flour. Mix well, and fry slowly from twenty min- 
utes to half an hour in just enough fat to fry nicely. 

BAKED BEANS. 

Soak one pint of soup beans over night. Next morning 
put in fresh water, and put on the stove and boil until the beans 
are done. Season with a teaspoonful of sugar and salt. Pour 
u?. a dish and dot with butter. Bake in a slow oven two hours. 



76 VEGETABLES. 

BOILED CABBAGE. 

One small head of cabbage. Cut in small pieces. Boil in 
salt water until tender. Pour off water. Put in a lump of but- 
ter the size of a walnut, and milk. Cook slowly for a few minutes. 

TURNIPS. 

Pare the turnips and slice. Put on to boil in cold water. As 
soon as hot put in salt; a tablespoonful to a quart of water. When 
render, drain all the water off, and mash with a potato masher, 
using a good-sized piece of butter, the size of an egg. 

STEWED CELERY. 

Cut the celery in half-inch pieces. The green part is the 
best, any will do. Wash well. Put on to boil in cold water. Add 
salt as soon as boiling. Cook until tender. Drain all the water 
off. Put on milk and butter the size of a walnut. Let cook 
slowly on the back part of the stove for a short time. 

COLD SLAW. 

Cut one-half head hard cabbage. Put in dish, and salt and 
pepper to taste. Then sprinkle one-quarter teaspoonful of mus- 
tard over the top of the cabbage. Take two eggs, beat lightly. 
Add piece of butter the size of walnut; one-half teaspoonful of 
rugar, and four tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Place over a hot fire, 
stirring all the time until it thickens like custard. Then pour 
this dressing over the cabbage in the dish and let stand until the 
dressing is a little cold. Mix lightly with a fork through the cab- 
bage. Set away in a cool place. S. J. A. 

LIMA BEANS. 

One quart beans. Cover well with cold water. Put on 
to boil. After boiling ten or fifteen minutes, pour off the water. 
Add more hot water, enough to finish cooking them. Season 
with" salt, pepper and butter. Be sure to put in seasoning when 
the last water is put on. 

YELLOW STRING BEANS. 

Cut the beans in small pieces. Cover with cold water, and 
put on to boil. After boiling about half hour, pour off the water. 



VEGETABLES. 77 

Put on fresh hot water. Put in seasoning to taste; butter size of 
an egg to a quarter of a peck of beans. Boil another hour and a 
half slowly. Cook green string beans in the same way. 

HOT BEETS. 

Take one bunch early beets. Wash, cut stems off from one 
to two inches. Boil one hour in slightly salted water. When 
done put them in a little cold water. Rub off the skins quickly. 
Then cut in quarters or eights, and put in covered dish. Pour on 
them a hot mixture of one tablespoonful of melted butter; two of 
vinegar, and a little pepper. Serve very hot. C. M. D. 

DANDELION GREENS. 

Pick over and wash carefully young dandelions. Boil in 
salted water about two hours, or until tender. Drain carefully 
and season with butter and pepper. 

HOT SLAW. 

Cut half head of cabbage fine as for stew. Put in a stew- 
pan with a piece of butter the size of an egg; one small teaspoon- 
fui salt and a little pepper. Add half teacupful water and half cup 
of vinegar. Cover the stew-pan, and cook the cabbage until it is 
tender. Stirring it often while cooking. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Scrape and cut in quarters four good size parsnips. Boil the 
parsnips until tender; then drain and mash fine. Add one egg, 
well beaten, and one tablespoonful of flour, and a little salt and 
pepper to taste. Form in small cakes. Then fry in hot drip- 
pings. Fry brown on one side, then turn and brown the other. 

BOILED PARSNIPS. 

Scrape and cut in quarters or halves. Boil in salt water till 
tender, then drain. Then pour over them a sauce of butter and a 
little flour melted and seasoned with salt and pepper. 



78 VEGETABLES. 

BEET GREENS. 

Take young beets, the leaves and stalks. Scrape the roots 
and wash in several waters. Boil in salted wa'.er till tender. 
Drain, and then add butter, and serve like spinach. 

OKRA. 

Boil young okra until tender. Drain, add cream and but- 
ter. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and serve hot. 

FRIED APPLES. 

Take nice tart apples. Cut in rings. Take out the cores 
carefully. Coat the apples with flour and fry in hot fat (sausage 
fat is best). Drain each slice. Sprinkle with sugar and cinna- 
mon. Brown bread is nice with them. 



VEGETABLES. 79 



80 TEGETABLES. 



VEGETABLES. 81 



82 VEGETABLES. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

Yolks of four eggs; one "large cupful" of salad oil; juice of 
two lemons, or two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; one saltspoonful of 
salt, and half as much cayenne pepper. Keep oil, vinegar and 
eggs on ice until needed. Set a bowl on cracked ice; break the 
yolks carefully into it; beat the yolks carefully and slowly. Mix 
slowly and add lemon juice alternately until the mixture is a 
thick yellow batter, putting the salt and pepper in last. Pour 
into a small pitcher and set away on ice. J. A. M. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Pick the salmon in flakes, and pour over it a French dress- 
ing and let stand until ready for use. Cover with a mayonnaise 
dressing just before serving. 

TOMATO SALAD. NO. 1. 

Arrange salad leaves on a dish, peal and cut tomatoes in 
halves; place a spoonful of mayonnaise on each half and serve. 

TOMATO SALAD. NO. 2. 

Peel ripe tomatoes; slice; lay in salad bowl; season with salt, 
pepper, a little sugar, oil and vinegar. Keep tomatoes on ice 
until actually served. They cannot be too cold. "Very excel- 
lent." 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Steam or parboil one pint of oysters. Drain, cool and serve 
with a mayonnaise dressing. 

SHAD-ROE SALAD. 

Wash one set of shad roes. Put them in a saucepan. Cover 
with boiling water. Add teaspoonful of salt. Simmer gently 
twenty minutes. When done, stand away until cold. When 

83 



84 SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 

ready to serve, remove the skin from the outside of shad roe, 

cut them into thin slices. Put one slice of onion in center of the 

salad dish. Arrange around it crisp salad leaves. Heap the 

shad roe in the center. Pour over it the mayonnaise, and it is 

ready to serve. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Cut the lobster into small pieces. Add the French dressing, 
and pat on ice until ready to use. Before serving cover the top 
with a mayonnaise dressing. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

One lobster; one-half head of salad; yolks of two hard-boiled 
eggs (boiled twenty minutes) ; two large tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter or oil; one-half teaspoonful of pepper; one-half teaspoonful 
of mustard; one-half teaspoonful of sugar; one-quarter teaspoon- 
ful of salt; two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Chop lobster salad and 
white of eggs fine. Rub the yolks of eggs smooth, and add 
mustard, pepper, salt, sugar and melted butter or oil, and 
lastly vinegar. Add to the lobster and mix well. Mrs. S. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Open a can of shrimps some hours before using, and put 
upon ice. Line a salad dish with leaves of lettuce or cress. Lay 
the shrimps on them, and pour mayonnaise dressing over all, 
and serve. J- A. R. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

For one pair of chickens. Yolks of eight hard-boiled eggs, 
mash them to a paste. Add two cupfuls of olive oil ; one teaspoon- 
ful of salt; one-half teaspoonful red pepper; two tablespoonfuls of 
mustard, mixed in a little vinegar; yolks of two raw eggs. Put 
in the ingredients as given in the recipe and mix accordingly; 
more salt or pepper can be added according to taste. 

S. L. M. 
CHICKEN SALAD. 

Take the white meat of two nice large chickens, cut into 
small pieces. To a pint of meat put two-thirds of a quart of 
celery. Arrange on lettuce leaves, and serve with mayonnaise 
dressing. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 85 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Boil the chicken till tender. Skin and chop fine. Have an 
equal quantity of chopped celery. Take four eggs to one pair of 
chickens. Put on the stove one pint of vinegar. Put in it a large 
piece of butter. Beat up the yolks of the eggs, and pour into the 
vinegar and butter a pinch of red pepper and one teaspoonful of 
mustard. Take half cup of cream and the whites of the eggs 
well beaten, and pour over the chicken, which should be pre- 
viously salted and peppered, and the celery also mixed into it. 

A. M. W. 
MOCK TERRAPIN. 

To three cups of fried liver, chopped fine, add two potatoes, 
chopped; two hard-boiled eggs, cut up; butter; pepper, salt to 
taste; add water enough to make gravy; thicken with flour. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

Parboil three sweetbreads for ten minutes in fresh hot water. 
Drain, and put into ice-water to blanch them. When cool, cook 
in boiling water, salted, for fifteen minutes. Take out, wipe, and 
set where they will cool suddenly. This will make them crisp 
and firm. Cut into small pieces. Line a dish with lettuce. Lay 
the sweetbreads on the leaves, and serve with mayonnaise 
dressing. J. A. M. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 

Take equal quantities of sliced cucumbers, tomatoes and let- 
tuce leaves. Serve with the French dressing. 

EGG SALAD. 

Take six eggs. Boil half an hour. Take out the yolks care- 
fully. Chop the whites very fine. Arrange lettuce leaves or cress 
on a dish, making nests of the whites of the eggs, and put one 
yolk in each nest. Sprinkle French dressing over the whole. 

CELERY AND SARDINE SALAD. 

Cut the celery into inch lengths. Season with salt, pepper 
and vinegar. Heap on a dish and lay sardines on the base of the 
pile. Pour a good mavonnaise dressing over all, and serve. 

E. K. 



86 SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 

STRING BEAN SALAD. 

Take a cup of cold boiled string beans. Heap on a flat dish* 
Encircle with a row of cold-boiled beets, sliced. On each of these 
lay a slice of hard-boiled eggs. Garnish with crisp lettuce leaves. 
Serve with mayonnaise dressing. J. A. M. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Cut six large cold potatoes into cubes. Put them into a dish 
and season as follows: Two tablespoonfuls of olive oil; one-half 
tablespconful of mustard; pepper, salt and celery salt. Whip 
them to a smooth paste, and add slowly five teaspoonfuls of vin- 
egar. When mixed, pour on the salad and serve. A little 
chopped onions can be added if desired, and also young lettuce 
leaves cut fine. S. L. M. 

ICED STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Scald and peel six small solid tomatoes. Cut off stem end 
in a slice, and with spoon scoop out the seeds. Stand the toma- 
toes on ice for two hours. When ready to serve, chop one new 
onion, a bunch of cress and a small bit of parsley, rather fine. 
(Do not bruise the cress.) Mix a half teaspoonful of salt; one- 
quarter teaspoonful pepper; three tablespoonfuls of olive oil. 
Beat in one tablespoonful vinegar. Pour this over the mixture. 
Fill in tomatoes. Stand each on lettuce leaf and serve. 

TO PREPARE MUSTARD. 

Take two tablespoonfuls of mustard; one tablespoonful of 
flour. Mix this smooth with a little cold vinegar. Then mix to- 
gether four tablespoonfuls of vinegar; one tablespoonful of olive 
oil; one teaspoonful of sugar; one teaspoonful of salt; one tea- 
spoonful of pepper. Let this "come to a boil. Stir constantly. 
Then when it boils pour it on the mustard. Stir it well, and as 
soon as it is cold it is ready for use. A. M. W. 

BOILED SALAD DRESSING. 

Three eggs; one small cupful of milk; one-half cupful of 
vinegar, one dessertspoonful of flour; one teaspoonful of mustard; 
one-half a teaspoonful of sugar; salt and red pepper to taste. Rub 



SALADS AND DRESS INOS. 87 

Hour, mustard, sugar, salt and pepper together with a little milk. 
Add beaten yolks of eggs, milk and vinegar, and lastly stir in the 
whipped whites of eggs. Stirring continually until quite thick. 
When cold, add two or three tablespoonfuls of oil, or if preferred, 
cook one-half cupful of melted butter with the mixture. 

L. P. B. 

FRENCH DRESSING FOR SALADS. 

One-half of teaspoonful of salt; one-quarter teaspoonful of 
pepper, three tablespoonfuls oil; one-quarter of teaspoonful of 
onion juice; one tablespoonful of vinegar. Mix in the order 
given. It may be used for vegetable, egg, or meat and fish salads. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One egg well beaten; three tablespoonfuls of vinegar; one 
teaspoonful of sugar; one-half teaspoonful of salt; as much ground 
mustard as will lay on the point of a table knife. Boil slowly 
and stir constantly. If too thick add a little cornstarch wet with 
a little milk. S. E. P. 

COLD SLAW DRESSING. 

One egg, well beaten; one teaspoonful of sugar; one-half 
teaspoonful of salt; one-half a cupful of sour cream; four table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar. Boil until smooth like custard. Stir thor- 
oughly while boiling. S. E. P. 



S8 SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 



8ALAD8 AND DRESSINGS. 



90 SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. M. 



92 8ALAD8 AND DRESSINGS. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 



APPLE SNOW. 

Peel and grate one large sour apple. Sprinkle over it a small 
cupful of powdered sugar as you grate it, to keep it from turn- 
ing dark. Break into this the whites of two eggs, and beat it all 
constantly for half an hour. Take care to have it in a large bowl, 
as it beats up very stiff and light. Heap this in a glass dish, 
and pour a fine smooth custard around it and serve. (A very 
delicate dessert.) 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cupful of sugar; three tablespoonfuls melted butter; two 
eggs. Beat this well together. Add one pint of flour; a little 
salt; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar mixed in it; one teaspoon- 
fid soda dissolved in one cup of milk, and a little nutmeg. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

Pare and core five good-sized apples and slice across. Soak 
one-half cupful of sago over night in cold water, or let it simmer, 
and add sugar to taste. Pour this over the apples and bake. 
Flavor with vanilla. L. B. B. 

PUFF PUDDING. 

Three eggs; one and one-half cups sweet milk; pinch of 
salt; two teaspoonfuls baking powder; flour to make as stiff as 
sponge cake. Bake quickly. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

One cup of molasses; one-half cup of butter; one cup of 
milk; four cups of flour; one teaspoonful of cloves: one teaspoon- 
ful of cinnamon; one teaspoonful of saleratus; one-half pound 
chopped raisins; one-half pound currants; a little salt. Boil four 
hours. 

9:; 



94 PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

One-half pound of gelatine. Soak in cold water thirty min- 
utes. Into this put scant one pint of boiling water; the juice of 
three lemons; two cupfuls of sugar. Strain and set away to 
cool. Beat to a stiff froth. Add the whites of three eggs, beaten 
light. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

One quart of milk; four eggs; one-half ounce gelatine. Pour 
one pint of milk over gelatine. Soak one hour. Then add the 
other pint of milk. Stir it over the fire. Beat the yolks of eggs 
with three tablespoonfuls of sugar, and stir them into the milk 
just before boiling. When it boils, stir into it the whites of the 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth, with three tablespoonfuls of pulver- 
ized sugar. Flavor with vanilla. 

DANDY PUDDING. 

One quart of milk; yolks of three eggs; one and one-half 
teaspoonfuls of cornstarch. Sweeten to taste. Let come to a boil, 
and put out to cool. Beat the whites of eggs with sugar, and put 
on top and brown. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

One egg; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of milk; butter the 
size of an egg, beaten alone; one and one-half cupfuls of flour; 
one teaspoonful of baking powder; one-half box or small pint of 
berries. Bake. L. P. B. 

HALF-HOUR PUDDING. 

Put a layer of fruit one inch deep into a pudding pan. Add 
one pint of water and sweeten with sugar to taste. Make a 
dough as follows: One pint of flour; butter the size of a walnut; 
a little salt; one tablespoonful of Cleveland or No. i baking pow- 
der, with enough cold water to make it as soft as biscuit dough. 
Put this over the top of the layer of fruit. Bake in oven. Cher- 
ries or huckleberries can be used. Juicv fruits require less water. 

S. A. K. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 95 

SUET PUDDING. 

One teacupful suet, chopped fine; three cupfuls flour; one 
cupful sour milk; one cupful molasses; two cupfuls raisins; 
cloves and cinnamon to taste; one teaspoonful allspice; one tea- 
spoonful salt; one-half teaspoonful baking soda; two teaspoon- 
i'uls baking 1 powder. Boil three hours in a mold. Serve with sauce 
No. 1. 

RUSSIAN PRUNE PUDDING. 

Stew one pound of prunes in water, until thoroughly 
cooked Then rub through a colander. To this pulp add a 
scant one-half cupful sugar, and when cold add the whites of four 
eggs, which have been beaten to a stiff froth. Bake twenty min- 
utes, and serve immediately with sugar and cream. L. P. B. 

FIG PUDDING. 

( me-quarter pound figs; two ounces suet; two ounces bread 
crumbs (four tablespoonfuls) ; two ounces brown sugar (two 
tablespoonfuls) ; two ounces flour (four tablespoonfuls) ; one egg 
(well beaten); one-half teaspoonful baking powder; one-half 
cupful of milk. Cut the suet into fine pieces. Mix it with the 
flour, bread crumbs, baking powder, sugar and figs (cut into 
dices). Stir well and gradually add the well-beaten egg and milk. 
Put the mixture into a well-greased pan and steam two hours. 

SAILORS' DOUGH. 

One pint flour; two heaping teaspoonfuls baking powder; a 
pinch of salt; two eggs; one-half cupful milk; butter size of an 
egg; fruit as you choose. Work butter through the flour as for 
pie crust. Break eggs into corner of dish, and by degrees add 
the milk and flour together slowly. Add salt when you do the 
baking powder. Add the fruit last. Steam one hour. Serve 
with sauce No. 1. 

STEAMED STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

One egg; one pint milk; one and one-half cups flour; one 
teaspoon baking powder; little salt. Mix together about the con- 
sistency of batter for fritters. Take teacups and grease well. Put 



96 PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 

a tablespoon batter; tablespoon strawberries, preserved fruit will 
answer, then a spoonful batter. Steam twenty minutes in a kettle 
part full water. Serve with sauce No. i. A. M. W. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM PUDDING. 

One pineapple; one pint of milk; three eggs; three-fourths 
of a cupful of sugar; two tablespoonfuls of flour; one-fourth of a 
teaspoonful of salt, and a half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. 
Put the milk on to boil. Beat the eggs and sugar, flour, salt, to- 
gether. Add to the milk. Let boil ten minutes, stirring fre- 
quently. Take from fire. Add the vanilla. Then set away to 
cool. Pare the pineapple, and grate it when the cream is cool. 
Stir the apple into it, and set in refrigerator for an hour or more. 
(Peaches can be served the same way.) 

COFFEE JELLY. 

One-half box of gelatine; one pint of strong coffee; three- 
fourths of a pound of sugar. Pour the coffee over the gelatine. 
When dissolved stir in the sugar. Add one-half pint of boiling 
water. Strain into molds, and serve with whipped cream. 

CHOCOLATE JELLY. 

Soak one box of gelatine in one-half pint of cold water. Heat 
one pint of rich milk. Then to one pint of cold milk add four 
tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate; one cupful sugar. Mix this 
mixture until smooth. Then add it to the hot milk, and when it 
has boiled up once, add the gelatine. Stir briskly until thoroughly 
mixed. Flavor with vanilla, and serve with whipped cream. 

F. E. P. 
LEMON JELLY. 

One box of gelatine. Soak ten minutes in one pint of cold 
water. Add one quart of boiling water. Let the mixture come to 
a boil. Add one cupful of sugar. Take from fire, and let cool a 
little, then add the juice of five lemons, or the juice of two lemons 
and three oranges. S. E. P. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 97 



98 PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 99 



100 PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 



SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 



SAUCE. NO. 1. 

One cupful sugar; one large tablespoonful butter; one table- 
spoonful vinegar; one tablespoonful cornstarch; one-half of a 
nutmeg. Mix together, and then pour over it one cup of boiling 
water. Let it boil. Then beat one egg, and pour your sauce on 
while hot. Beat well. A. M. W. 

SAUCE, NO. 2. 

One-half pint milk; one egg. Add two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar after the milk boils; one teaspoonful vanilla. Thicken with 
flour. L. P. B. 

PLAIN SAUCE. 

One pint of boiling water; a small piece of butter; one egg; 
three tablespoonfuls sugar; one good tablespoonful of flour. Boil 
until it thickens. Flavor with vanilla. 

HARD SAUCE. 

One-quarter cupful butter; one cup powdered sugar; one 
teaspoonful vanilla; whites of two eggs. Beat the butter to a 
cream. Add gradually the sugar, and beat until very light. Add 
the whites, one at a time, and beat all until very light and frothy. 
Then add gradually the flavoring, and beat again. Heap it on a 
small dish. Sprinkle lightly with grated nutmeg and stand away 
on the ice to harden. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 

One-half cup butter; one cup powdered sugar; one-quarter 
cup milk or cream; one teaspoonful vanilla or lemon extract. If 
lemon or vanilla, use four tablespoonfuls cream. Beat the butter 
to a cream. Add the sugar gradually, beating all the while. When 
light and creamy, gradually add the flavoring, and then the cream 

101 



102 SAUCE FOR PUDDIKGS. 

a little at a time. When all is beaten smooth, place the bowl in 
a basin of hot water and stir until the sauce is smooth and creamy. 
No longer. C. M. McF. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

One tablespoonful of butter; one tablespoonful cornstarch; 
one-half cupful sugar; one egg; one pint boiling water. Beat 
cornstarch, sugar, egg, butter together. Pour boiling water on 
cornstarch. Place on fire until thick. Take from fire. Add rind 
and juice of one lemon. S. A. K. 

FROZEN CUSTARD. 

One quart of milk; two eggs; two' tablespoonfuls of corn- 
starch; one-half pound of sugar; one pint of cream. Scald the 
milk and add cornstarch mixed smooth in a little cold water. 
Cook for two minutes. Take from fire, and add beaten yolks 
of eggs and cream, then flavor. When cold add beaten whites, 

and freeze. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

One tablespoonful of gelatine ; one and a half cups cold water ; 
one-half cup boiling water; one cup sugar; four oranges; two 
lemons or one pint of juice. Soak the gelatine in one-half cup- 
ful cold water ten minutes. Add the boiling water. When dis- 
solved add sugar and cup of cold water and orange juice. Strain 

and freeze. 

LEMON SHERBET. 

One tablespoonful gelatine; one quart water; one pint sugar; 
juice o* six lemons. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

One can grated, or one pint fresh fruit; one pint sugar; one 
pint water; one tablespoonful gelatine. 

VANILLA ICE-CREAM. 

Three pints of cream; one quart of milk; one pound of sugar; 
whites of two eggs; one tablespoonful of vanilla. Mix uncooked. 
Stand in freezer until thoroughly chilled; then freeze. Instead 
of the \ anilla use five tablespoonfuls grated chocolate for choco- 
late ice-cream. 



SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 103 

GRAPE WATER-ICE. 

Three' pounds of Concord grapes; one quart of water; one 
pound of sugar. Boil the sugar and water together for five min- 
utes. Pulp the grapes and add the pulps and skins to the syrup. 
Stand aside to cool. When cold press through a fine sieve, being 
careful not to mash the seeds. Turn into the freezer and freeze. 

AMERICAN CREAM. 

One-half box gelatine; one pint cold water. Set on back of 
stove till dissolved. Stir occasionally. Add pint sweet milk, and 
put on to boil. Beat the yolks of four eggs until light. To the 
eggs add one teaspoonful vanilla and six tablespoonfuls sugar. 
Stir this into the milk and gelatine. When, or near boiling, beat 
the whites of eggs with five tablespoonfuls sugar, one tablespoon- 
ful vanilla. As soon as milk begins to boil take it from the stove. 
Add whites of the eggs, and gently stir through it, and set away 
to cool, and put in a mold or large flat dish. A. M. W. 



104 SAOVE FOR PUDDINGS. 



S I / ' '/•; FOR /'/ 1)1)1X08. 105 



106 SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 



PIES. 



PLAIN PIE CRUST. 

Three cups flour; one cup lard; little salt; two-thirds cup 
ice-water. Makes two pies. 

SUMMER MINCE PIE 

One pound of raisins; two cups bread crumbs; one cupful of 
vinegar; three cups water; one cupful molasses; one cup sugar; 
two eggs; one teaspoonful cinnamon; one of ginger; one tea- 
spoonful allspice; one teaspoonful soda; one of pepper. Mix all 
together, and bake between two crusts. A. S. 

LEMON PIE. 

Two lemons; three eggs; one pint of boiling water; two table- 
spoonfuls of cornstarch; one and three-quarters cups sugar; butter 
size of walnut. Mix cornstarch with little cold water. Then pour 
boiling water on. Add the butter and yolks of eggs with the 
sugar and lemons grated. Pour in a crust already baked. Beat 
the whites of the eggs stiff and spread on top of pie. Brown in 
the oven. J. W. 

LEMON PIE. 

One cupful of sugar, one tablespoonful butter, beaten to- 
gether; yolks of two eggs; one cupful of milk; three dessertspoon- 
fuls of flour, wet with the milk; grate rind, and juice of one lemon. 
Last thing before baking beat the whites of the two eggs and add 
with the rest. This makes one pie. S. E. P. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

One-half grated cocoanut; one quart of milk boiled and 
poured over the cocoanut; two tablespoonfuls butter; four eggs; 
nugar to taste. This makes two pies. S. E. P. 

107 



108 PIES. 

EGG CUSTARD. 

Three eggs; three tablespoonfuls sugar. Beat the eggs and 
sugar together till an even spoonful can be taken up. Add one 
and one-half pints boiling milk. Put into a deep plate covered 
with crust, on which nutmeg and bits of butter have been 
sprinkled. m M. L. S. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

Line a pie plate with a rich paste; rub the paste with a little 
flour. Cover the bottom with pitted dates. Wash and cut the 
rhubarb. Then cover it with boiling water and let stand until 
cool. Then fill in the pie. Sweeten to taste. No water needed 
for moisture. Bake with top crust. 

SQUASH PIE. 

One cupful of sifted or canned squash; one egg; one pint of 
milk; three tablespoonfuls of sugar; salt to taste. Bake with one 
crust in a deep plate. E. T. H. 

RHUBARB-RAISIN PIE. 

One cupful of prepared rhubarb; one cupful of seedless rai- 
sins, and one cupful of sugar. Bake with two crusts. 

CREAM PIE. 

One and one-quarter cupfuls of milk; yolks of two eggs; one 
tablespoonful flour; two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Put the milk 
on to boil. Beat the egg and sugar well together. Add to the 
milk. Boil two minutes. Have your crust done. Then put in 
the cream. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, with a little sugar. 
Spread on top. Brown. Flavor with vanilla. J. W. 

RHUBARB CUSTARD. 

Stew the rhubarb till tender. Then mash. When cool, add 
one egg; one tablespoonful of flour; a little lemon to taste and 
sugar, with half cup of water. Bake without top crust. 

MINCE MEAT. 

One beef tongue (fresh); two pounds of suet; four pounds of 
raisins; two of currants; one peck of apples; half dozen oranges; 
one pound of citron; half pound of candied lemon; six pounds of 



PIE*. 10» 

sugar; one ounce cinnamon; one ounce cloves; one ounce of all- 
spice; one ounce of nutmeg. Line pie plate with paste; wet edges* 
Put in mince meat. Cover over. Bake in quick oven. 

PLAIN MINCE PIE. 

Two pounds lean beef, chopped; one pound suet; five pounds 
apples, chopped; two pounds raisins; one pound of chopped rai- 
sins; half pound citron; half pound candied lemon peel, sliced 
thin; two pounds currants; two and half pounds brown sugar; 
two tablespoonfuls cinnamon; one tablespoonful cloves; one 
"ablespoonful allspice; one tablespoonful salt; one nutmeg; one 
quart of cider (or more); one pint of molasses; three oranges. 
Mix and cook till the apples are done. (This will keep all winter.) 
Lake in crust, like apple pie. 



11<J PIES. 



PIES. HI 



112 PIE& 



CAKES. 



CRULLERS. 

One large tablespoonful butter; one cup sugar; three eggs; 
one cup milk; flour to roll, not too stiff; two tablespoonfuls bak- 
ing powder; salt. M. D. 

CUP CAKE. 

Four eggs; three cupfuls flour; two cupfuls sugar; one cup- 
ful butter; one cupful milk; one-half teaspoonful salt; two heap- 
ing teaspoonfuls baking powder. L. D. B. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One cupful New Orleans molasses; one cupful sugar; one- 
half cupful butter and lard mixed; two eggs; one cupful thick 
milk; one even teaspoonful baking soda; one teaspoonful ginger; 
one teaspoonful ground cloves; one pound currants; one pound 
raisins; flour to stiffen. Bake slowly in cool oven. 

Mrs. M. E. B. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound melted butter; one pound sugar; twelve eggs, 
beaten well; two pounds seeded raisins; two pounds currants; 
one-half pound citron; one champagne glassful of wine and 
brandy; one-quarter teaspoonful mace and one teaspoonful of cin- 
namon dissolved in the liquor; one pound of flour. Bake slowly 
four hours in a very moderate oven. Line cake pan with but- 
tered paper. M. E. B. 

DROP CAKES. 

Beat one cupful butter; one and one-half cupfuls sugar to a 
cream. Stir in three well-beaten eggs and one cup milk. Have 
readv three cups sifted flour with a large teaspoonful baking 
powder. Add this gradually. Beat to a smooth batter. Flavor 
lightly with vanilla or lemon. Drop from a spoon three inches 
apart in well-buttered dripping pans. Scatter a few currants on 
top. Bake quickly in hot oven. A "gem" pan is nice in which to 
bake the above. Mrs. L. F. E. 

lis 



114 CAKES. 

SILVER CAKE. 

Eight eggs, the whites only; two cupfuls sugar; two and one- 
half cupfuls flour; one-half cupful butter; one-half cupful milk; 
one-half teaspoonful soda; one-half teaspoonful cream of tartar. 

E. G. F. 
ALMOND CUP CAKE. 

One cupful butter; two cupfuls sugar (light brown); three 
cupfuls flour; five eggs; one-half cupful milk; one and a half tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder; one cupful almonds (blanched and cut 
fine). Flavor with extract of orange. C. R. T. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

Six cupfuls of flour; three cupfuls molasses; one cupful of 
cream; one cupful of lard or butter; two eggs; one teaspoonful of 
saleratus; two teaspoonfuls of ginger. A. S. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

One cupful of butter; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of 
molasses; three eggs; one cupful milk; one teaspoonful soda; 
three and one-half cupfuls of flour; two tablespoonfuls ginger; 
one teaspoonful salt. Miss O. B. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

One cupful molasses; one cupful butter; one cup sugar; two 

eggs; one tablespoonful ginger; one teaspoonful soda; flour 

to roll out thin. Bring the molasses and butter to a boil, then 

add sugar, eggs, ginger, soda and flour. Cut out and bake. 

N. M. G. 
CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

One-half cupful butter; one cupful sugar; one-half cup 
grated chocolate; one-half cup milk (scant); one-half teaspoon- 
ful baking powder; flour to roll out thin. Cream butter. Add 
sugar, milk and chocolate. Add flour and baking powder. Roll 
out thin and bake like snaps. N. M. G. 

COOKIES. 

One cupful butter; two cupfuls sugar; one-half cupful water; 
three cupfuls flour; two eggs; one-half teaspoonful baking pow- 
der; flavor with nutmeg or vanilla. Roll in thin sheets, and cut 
into small cakes. Bake in quick oven. K. L. B. 



CAKES. 115 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

Three cupfuls sugar; one cupful butter; one cupful milk; two 
eggs; one cupful grated cocoanut; two teaspoonfuls baking pow- 
der. Flour enough to make a dough to roll. J. W. P. 

FRENCH CAKE. 

One pound raisins, seeded and chopped; two cupfuls sugar; 
one cupful butter; one cupful sour cream; four eggs; one tea- 
spoonful soda. Add enough flour to make a stiff batter as for 
pound cake. A. M. W. 

PLAIN FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound raisins; one pound currants; one-quarter pound 
citron; one pound flour; three-quarters pound brown sugar; one- 
half pint milk; four eggs; one-half nutmeg; one teaspoonful soda; 
one-half pound butter; wineglass of brandy. Mix sugar, butter 
and yolks of eggs; then add the other ingredients. Mix currants 
and raisins with a little flour, and add them the last thing before 
putting in oven. Bake three hours in moderate oven. 

J. W. B. 

FRUIT LAYER CAKE. 

One cupful sugar; one-half cup butter; one and one-half cups 
flour; one-half cup wine; one cup raisins (seeded); two eggs; one 
teaspoonful baking powder. Dredge the raisins with flour and add 
lastly. 

Frosting. — Whites of two eggs; four tablespoonfuls of pul- 
verized sugar. Make the same as for ice-cream cake. 

C. R. T. 

FRUTE CAKE. 

One pound butter; one pound (brown) sugar; one pound 
flour (scorched); two pounds raisins; two pounds currants; one- 
half pound citron; ten eggs; three nutmegs; two lemons (cut 
fine); one teaspoonful of cinnamon; one teaspoonful allspice; one- 
half teaspoonful cloves ; one-half cupful strong coffee ; one cupful 
mc'asses; one gill of brandy. Bake in a moderate oven four 
hours. A. M. W. 



116 CAKES. 

LADY CAKE. 

Two cupfuls sugar; two cupfuls flour; one cupful sour milk; 
one-half cupful butter; two teaspoonfuls cream of tartar; one-half 
teaspoonful soda; two eggs, or the whites of four eggs. 

J. W. P. 

POOR MAN'S POUND CAKE. 

One-quarter pound butter; one cupful sugar; two and a half 
cupfuls flour; one-half cupful milk (scant); five eggs; one even 
teaspoonful baking powder; one tablespoonful brandy; one tea- 
spoonful nutmeg. C. A. R. 

MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

One pound sugar; seven ounces of butter; five eggs; one cup 
milk; one cup flour; one teaspoonful of cream tartar and baking 
powder. K. L. B. 

TURBIN CAKE. 

One-half pound butter; one pound white sugar; one pound 
flour; four eggs; one teaspoonful soda; two teaspoonfuls cream 
of tartar; one cup milk. E. G. F. 

PLAIN SPONGE. 

Six eggs, and weight of eggs in sugar; half the weight in 
flour; one teaspoonful vanilla. Beat the yolks of three eggs and 
sugar light. Then add whites of three, then rest of eggs and flour. 
Bake in a moderate oven. J. W. B. 

CREAM SPONGE. 

Ten eggs; one pound sugar; one-half pound flour; juice of 
one lemon. Beat yolks, sugar and lemon. Whip the whites stiff. 
Stir in and beat well. Sift the flour and stir in gently. Bake in a 
(|uick oven. When baked in jelly tins this will make six or eight. 
Cream yolks of two eggs; one pint of milk sweetened to taste; 
a pinch of salt. Flavor with vanilla. For icing, the whites of two 
eggs; three tablespoonfuls of pulverized sugar; lemon juice to 
taste. K. L. B. 



CAKES. 117 

HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE. 

One and one-half cupfuls powdered sugar; three eggs; one 
and one-half cupfuls of flour; two small teaspoonfuls baking pow- 
der; six tablespoonfuls boiling water, and a pinch of salt. Cream 
yolks and sugar thoroughly. Then add beaten whites. Then 
Hour. Stir well. Then stir in boiling water. Bake about thirty- 
five minutes in moderate oven, with increasing heat. A. S. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two eggs; one and one-half cupfuls sugar; four tablespoon- 
fuls melted butter; sixteen tablespoonfuls milk (beat yolk of eggs 
with milk); two cups flour; two teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Bake in three layers. 

Filling. — Three-quarters cupful sugar; one-quarter cupful 
milk; two ounces of chocolate. (Boil all together two minutes.) 

M. E. L. 

JUMBLES. 

One cupful of butter; two eggs; one cupful of sugar; pinch of 
mace; one tablespoonful sherry wine. Flour enough to be able 
to drop from a spoon, and smooth with a knife. M. D. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One cupful sugar; one cupful butter; whites three eggs; one- 
half cupful milk; two cupfuls flour; one teaspoonful baking 
powder. Flavor with almond. 

VAN DUESEN'S GOLD LOAF. 

Yolks of eight eggs; one cup granulated sugar; one-half 
cup butter; one-half cup milk; one and one-half cups flour; two 
teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake in tube pan in moderate 
oven. M. B. 

NUT CAKE. 

One cupful sugar; one-half cupful butter; one-half cupful 
milk; two cupfuls flour; two eggs; one coffee cupful of mashed 
shellbarks; one and one-half teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake 
in a moderate oven about thirty minutes. A. S. 



118 CAKES. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar; one-half cupful of butter; one cupful 
milk; one whole egg, and yolks of three; two and one-half cup- 
fuls of flour (sifted); two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake 
in jelly tins. 

Filling. — One pound package cocoanut. To half of this add 
the whites of three eggs, beaten to a froth. Add one cupful of pow- 
dered sugar. Lay this between the layers. Mix with the other 
half of the cocoanut four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, and 
cover thickly the top of the cake. M. E. R. 

SARA TARTS. 

One pound of flour rubbed with one-half pound butter. Add 
one-half pound of granulated sugar. Beat very light four eggs, 
and stir in. Mix all together until smooth, and then roll out on 
board, and cut in diamond shape with sharp knife. Sprinkle a 
little powdered cinnamon in centre of each and bake light brown. 
Do not put them close, so as they will not run together. No bak- 
ing powder or milk is used. R. C. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of nine eggs; one and one-quarter cupfuls of sifted 
granulated sugar; one cupful sifted flour; one-half teaspoonful 
cream tartar; a pinch of salt added to eggs before beating. 
After sifting flour four or five times, measure and set aside one 
cup. Then sift and measure one and one-quarter cups of granu- 
lated sugar. Beat whites of eggs about half, add cream tartar, 
and beat until very stiff. Stir in sugar. Then flour very lightly, 
and flavor to taste. Bake in thirty-five to fifty minutes. 

M. B. 
HERMITS. 

One-half cupful butter; one and one-half cupfuls sugar; four 
tablespoonfuls milk; two eggs; one heaping teaspoonful baking 
powder; one cup chopped raisins; one-half teaspoonful each of 
cloves, grated nutmeg, cinnamon, mace. Flour to roll out. 
Cream the butter. Add sugar, milk and lightly-beaten eggs. 
Add baking powder, with one cup of flour. Add spice and rai- 






OAK MS. 119 

sins, previously stoned and floured. Roll as soft as possible, a 
little ai a time. Cut out and sprinkle with sugar before baking. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Four eggs (beat parts separately); one cupful sugar; on« 
cupful flour; one and one-half teaspoonfuls of Royal baking pow- 
der. Bake in three layers. 

Cream. — One cupful milk; one egg; two teaspoonfuls of 
cornstarch. Boil, and when cool, flavor with vanilla. Ice the top 
with icing, made with white of one egg and one tablespoonful ok 
pulverized sugar. Beat stiff and flavor with vanilla. M. B. 

VARIETY CAKE. 

One and one-half cupful sugar; one cupful butter; one and 
one-half cupfuls milk; two cupfuls flour; five yolks of eggs; whites 
of two; two teaspoonfuls baking powder. To one-third of this 
add one-half teaspoonful cinnamon; one-half teaspoonful cloves; 
one-half cupful raisins (stoned) ; one-half cupful of currants. Bake 
m three layers (using the dark mixture for the middle layer), and 
put together with icing — the whites of three eggs and one cup of 
powdered sugar. Flavor with vanilla. M. E. R. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

For light batter take one-half cupful butter; one cupful white 
sugar; one-half cupful milk; whites of four eggs; two cupfuls 
flour; one-half teaspoonful baking powder. For dark batter take 
one-half cupful butter; one cupful sugar (brown); one-half cupful" 
molasses; two cupfuls flour; one-half cupful milk; yolks of four 
eggs; one teaspoonful baking powder; one teaspoonful cinnamon: 
one teaspoonful cloves; a little mace, and half a nutmeg, grated. 
Butter your mold, and put in the dark and light batter in alternate 
tablespoonfuls. M. E. R. 

FAVORITE CAKE. 

One cup of milk; two cups of sugar; three cups of flour; four 
eggs; one-half cup of butter; one and one-half teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Flavor to suit. Mrs. Driesbach. 



120 GAKE8. 

GINGER CAKES. 

One cup sugar; one cup New Orleans molasses; one cup 
sour milk; one cup lard; one tablespoonful of ginger; one tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon; one tablespoonful of soda, mixed with a 
tablespoonful of hot water. Flour enough to stiffen. Roll thin. 
Bake in quick oven. Mrs. Driesbach. 

LEAP YEAR CAKE. 

One whole egg, and whites of two; one-half or one-quarter 
pound butter; one-half cup milk; one cup sugar; one and one- 
half cups flour; one teaspoonful of baking powder. 

Icing. — Yolks of two eggs; ten tablespoonfuls pulverized 
sugar; one-half teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat yolks and sugar well. 

M. B. 
LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

Two and one-half small cups of flour; three eggs; one cup 
milk; one cup sugar; one heaping teaspoonful baking powder. 
Flavor to taste. 

Filling. — Three eggs; two cups pulverized sugar; small 
piece of butter; juice of two lemons. Beat eggs well. Then add 
butter, sugar and lemon. Put on slow fire, and stir all the time 
until it boils. Let it cool before putting on cake. C. R. T. 

ICE-CREAM CAKE. 

Five eggs (minus four whites); two and one-half cupfuls of 
flour; one cupful sugar; one-quarter pound butter; one-half cup 
milk; one heaping teaspoonful baking powder. Flavor with al- 
mond to suit taste. 

Filling. — Whites of four eggs; six tablespoonfuls of pulver- 
ized sugar. Flavor with vanilla. Beat whites to a stiff froth. 
Gradually add sugar. Then flavor. Spread between the layers 
when cool. C. R. T. 

STUDENT CAKES. 

Eight large tablespoonfuls of flour; one large cup brown 
sugar; two tablespoonfuls of lard; four eggs; two teaspoonfuls 
cinnamon; two teaspoonfuls cloves; one-half teaspoonful baking 
powder. Keep two yolks to put on top of cakes, after which 



CAKES. 121 

place three pieces of almond on top of each cake. (Cut almonds 
in half lengthwise.) Knead all the ingredients together like 
bread. Roll out one-fourth of an inch thick. E. C. Y. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One cup of hot water; one-half cup of butter. Boil butter 
and water together. Stir in a cup of dry flour while boiling. Let 
it get almost cold. Then add three eggs, not beaten. Mix well. 
Drop by a tablespoonful on a buttered pan. Bake twenty-five 
minutes. This quantity makes eight puffs. 

Cream for Puffs. — One cup milk; one-half cup sugar; two 
eggs (beaten); three small tablespoonfuls cornstarch (mixed in a 
little cold milk). Stir it into the milk while boiling. Beat the 
eggs and sugar together. Stir these into the boiling milk. When 
cool, flavor wth vanilla. When the puffs are cold cut a small 
opening and fill with the cream. E. M. B. 

SPANISH BUN. 

Two cupfuls sugar; one-half cupful butter; one cupful milk; 
three eggs; two cupfuls flour; two teaspoonfuls baking powder; 
one cupful currants (dredged with flour). D. C. W. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 

One-half cupful lard, fill up with boiling water; one cupful 
N. O. molasses; one teaspoonful cinnamon; one teaspoonful gin- 
ger; one-quarter teaspoonful ground allspice; pinch salt; one 
teaspoonful soda (mix with boiling water) ; two and one-half cup- 
fuls flour. S. A. K. 
ICE-CREAM CAKE, NO. 2. 

One cup pulverized sugar; one-half cup butter (scant); one- 
half cup sweet milk; one and two-thirds cups flour; one-half tea- 
spoon baking powder; whites of three eggs, beaten stiff, and 
added last. Bake in two layers. 

Filling and Icing. — Beat until very light the yolks of the 
eggs. Then beat in one cup pulverized sugar until smooth and 
creamy. Flavor with vanilla. Place some between layers. Then 
ice top and sides. Place in quick oven to harden quickly, but 
watch it does not brown. Then remove. 



US OAKBH. 



OAKm. 



12>4 CAKES. 



if A KB8. 



125 



123 GAKIM. 



PRESERVES. 



LEMON BUTTER. 

Three lemons, grate the rinds of two and the juice of all 
three; one pound of sugar; five eggs; one-quarter pound of but- 
ter. Let it cook from twenty minutes to one-half an hour. 

E. R. 
LEMON BUTTER. 

One lemon, grated; one cupful sugar; butter size of an egg; 

one cupful water. Mix all together. When it comes to a boil, 

stir in one tablespoonful of flour. Mix in a little water. Boil 

two minutes. Stir continually. A. M. W. 

TOMATO BUTTER. 

Ten pounds of tomatoes ; five pounds of sugar; four lemons, 

sliced fine; one teaspoonful cinnamon. Boil until thick. 

A. M. W. 
CRAB APPLE JELLT. 

One peck apples; two quarts of water. Put on and boil till 
tender. Strain without mashing. One pound of sugar to one pint 
of syrup. Boil twenty minutes. A. M. W. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Lady blush or fall pippins. Cut apples, and barely cover 
with water. Put on in porcelain-lined kettle. Boil slowly until 
apples are tender. Drain through a flannel bag. Do not squeeze 
or the jelly will be cloudy. To one pint juice one pound sugar. 
Boil juice twenty minutes. Sugar heated. Add to juice. Let 
boil up. Then dissolve sugar. Then place in cups. 

A. M. W. 

CRAB APPLE JELLY. 

Put the apples in a kettle with just enough water to cover 
them, and let them boil until very soft. Mash them up and strain 
through a very coarse sieve. Take a pint of juice to a pound 
of sugar. Boil it twenty minutes. After taking off the fire stir 
around a few geranium leaves to flavor. E. R. 

127 



128 PRESERVES. 

CURRANT AND RASPBERRY JELLY. 

Allow two parts of red or black raspberries to one of cur- 
rants, and proceed as with grape jelly. A. M. W. 

GRAPE BUTTER. 

Seven pounds grapes; four pounds apples; one-half pound 
sugar to one pound fruit. Boil grapes till you can put through a 
colander. Add the apples and cook all together till thick and 
smooth. A. M. W. 

RASPBERRY JAM. 

An equal weight of fruit and sugar. Mash the fruit well with 
a wooden or silver spoon. Put it in a preserving kettle, adding 
to it currant juice in the proportion of a pint of juice to two quarts 
of fruit. As soon as the juice boils up well, add the sugar. Then 
cook for twenty minutes. If the sugar is put in too soon the jam 
will be too hard. Adding the currant juice gives great life to 
the jam. E. R. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Five pounds currants; four pounds brown sugar; two table- 
spoons cinnamon; two tablespoons cloves; one pint vinegar. Boil 
gently two hours. This makes five-pint cans. In order to secure 
best results use cherry currants. 

SPICED PEACHES. 

.Seven pounds fruit; three pounds sugar; one pint vinegar; 
one teaspoon cinnamon; one-half teaspoon cloves. Tie in a 
cloth. Boil and pour over the fruit. Let stand till next day. 
Pour off juice. Boil for three successive clays. Then put con- 
tents of above on to boil twenty minutes. Seal in jars. 

A. M. W. 

PEACH PICKLE. 

One-half peck peaches; three pounds granulated sugar; one 
pint vinegar; ten whole cloves. Boil sugar, vinegar and cloves 
together twenty minutes. Put the peaches in boiling vinegar, and 
boil till tender. Place in jars and pour boiling vinegar over the 
peaches. A. C. D. 



PRESERVES. 129 

EUCHRED PEACHES. 

Seven pounds of whole peaches; three pounds of granulated 
sugar; two gills of white wine vinegar. Boil twenty minutes. 
Clingstone peaches preferred. M. S. 

SWEET PICKLE GRAPES. 

One-half pound sugar to one pound fruit; one quart of vine- 
gar; seven and one-half pounds fruit; spice to taste. Put vinegar 
and sugar together. Boil and skim. Then add fruit after suffi- 
cient cooking. Add spices. Grapes should be pulped. Remove 
seeds. C. A. T. 

PICKLED PLUMS. 

One peck plums; seven pounds sugar; one-half pint vinegar. 
Dissolve sugar and vinegar together. Add plums. Boil three 
hours. Take out seeds while boiling. Add two tablespoons 
ground allspice and ground cloves. C. A. T. 

CITRON PRESERVES. 

Prepare rind in any form you desire. Boil hard forty min- 
utes in tolerably strong alum water. Take from alum water and 
put into clear cold water. Allow to stand over night. In morn- 
ing change the water, and put them to boil until quite soft. Then 
make a syrup, allowing one and one-half pounds of white sugar 
to one pound of fruit, which needs but little more cooking. Mace, 
ginger or lemon flavors nicely. K. J. B. 

GREEN TOMATO PRESERVES. 

Eight pounds of green tomatoes, pierce each with a fork; 
seven pounds of sugar; four lemons; one ounce of ginger and 
mace mixed. Heat all together slowly, and boil until the fruit is 
clear. Take it from the kettle with a skimmer, and spread upon 
dishes to cool. Boil the syrup thick. Put the fruit into jars, and 
cover with hot syrup. E. R. 

SUN-COOKED STRAWBERRIES. 

To one and one-half pounds of fruit add one pound of sugar. 
Boil about ten minutes, then spread on platters and stand in the 
sun until the juice has become stiff. Put in cup and seal. Do not 
use water on the fruit when put on to boil. S. E. P. 



150 PRESERVES. 

TO PRESERVE STRAWBERRIES WHOLE. 

Take equal weights of strawberries and sugar. Lay the fruit 
in deep dishes, and sprinkle half the sugar over them in fine pow- 
der. Give a gentle shake to the dish so that the sugar may always 
touch the under part of the fruit. The next day make a syrup 
with the remainder of the sugar and the juice drawn from the 
berries, and boil it until it jellies. Then carefully put in the ber- 
ries, and let them simmer nearly an hour. Then put them with 
care into jars, and fill up with the syrup. Cover the jars with 
brandy paper. E. R. 

PRESERVED GREEN FOX GRAPES. 

Cut the grapes and remove the seeds. To one pound of 
fruit add one pound of sugar and one-half pint of water. Cook 
until jellied. S. E. P. 

PRESERVED PEARS AND QUINCES. 

Take one-third quinces to two-thirds of pears. Cook the 
quinces in a little water until tender, then put in the pears and 
sugar in the proportion of one and one-half pounds of fruit to one 
pound of sugar. Cook until juice jellies. S. E. P. 

PRESERVED CHERRIES. 

To one and one-half pounds of fruit add one pound of sugar. 
Remove the pits from the fruit and use no water in cooking. 

S. E. P. 
TO PRESERVE STRAWBERRIES, 
CHERRIES OR SMALL FRUIT. 

Six pounds of fruit, after it is prepared; four pounds of sugar; 
one teacupful of water. Gradually dissolve and boil the sugar. 
Add the fruit and boil once. Turn into shallow dishes, and 
set in the sun for three days. Then seal in tumblers. 

TO CAN TOMATOES TO FRY. 

Take nice, smooth tomatoes; trim stem end out; cut in two 
pieces in dripping pans, and put in hot oven till thoroughly heated 
through. Then place slices in jars; fill up with boiling water or 
stewed tomatoes. Seal the jars air-tight. When cold, wrap each 
jar in paper, and put them in a dry, cool place. 



PRBSBRVBM. Ill 



132 PRESERVES. 



I'ltKtWIiVKH. M 



134 PMBBMHW**. 



CATSUP AND PICKLES. 



BORDEAUX SAUCE. 

One gallon green tomatoes, cut coarse; one gallon cabbage, 
cut coarse; one-half gallon vinegar; one-half pound sugar; one- 
quarter pound whole mustard seed; one-half ounce turmeric; 
one ounce whole cloves; one ounce allspice; one-half ounce celery 
seed; one-half cup salt. Mix and boil fifteen minutes. 

M. L. B. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Twenty ripe tomatoes, chopped; five peppers, chopped; two 
onions, chopped; one quart vinegar; two tablespoonfuls sugar; 
two tablespoonfuls salt; two tablespoonfuls ground mustard; two 
tablespoonfuls whole cloves; one and one-half tablespoonfuls 
ginger; one and one-half nutmegs, grated. Boil two hours. Bot- 
tle and seal. M. L. B. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

• One-half peck green tomatoes, sliced; six green peppers, 
chopped; six onions, chopped fine; small cup salt. Sprinkle and 
let stand over night. In morning drain. Add one tablespoon 
whole cloves; also one tablespoon mustard seed. Cover with 
vinegar. Boil one-half an hour. A. M. W. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

One hundred cucumbers; six onions. Slice and sprinkle with 
two cups salt. Let stand over night. Drain off as dry as pos- 
sible. Mix the following spices: One-quarter pound ground 
mustard; two ounces mustard seed; one ounce celery seed; two 
tablespoons ground pepper; a layer cucumbers; then spices al- 
ternately till all is used. Cover with cider vinegar. 

A. M. W. 
135 



136 CATSUP AND PICKLES. 

CUCUMBER SWEET PICKLES. 

Take ripe cucumbers; pare, seed and cut in strips length- 
wise. Soak over night in salt and water. Drain and put into 
weak vinegar for twenty-four hours. Drain well and boil until 
clear in a syrup made of equal parts of sugar and vinegar, with 
spices to taste. Mrs. D. M. T. 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 

One large head cauliflower; three bunches of celery; twelve 
small cucumbers; two quarts green tomatoes; one quart button 
onions; three red peppers; one gallon vinegar; one-quarter pound 
ground mustard; two ounces white mustard seed; one ounce 
turmeric; one-half ounce allspice, whole; one-half ounce pep- 
per, whole; one-half ounce cloves, whole; one-half ounce curry, 
whole; two tablespoons flour. Cut the vegetables, and salt them 
over night. Boil the vinegar. Rub the powder, flour, mustard 
and curry to a paste with cold vinegar. Add this to the boiling 
vinegar with the whole spices. Add vegetables and let it boil 
up once. 

PICKLING WHITE ONIONS. 

Select small white onions and one large one. Remove the 
outside skin. Put in the jar. Make a brine sufficient to cover 
them. Strong enough to bear egg. Let them stand three days. 
Throw the brine away. Wash the onions. Then boil the onions 
live minutes in vinegar and water, half of each. Then take from 
the vinegar. Let them stand till next day. Drain and stick the 
large onion full of cloves. Cover the whole with cold vinegar, 
allowing twelve peppercorns to one quart of vinegar. 

A. M. W. 

COLD CATSUP. 

Chop fine one peck ripe tomatoes; two roots horse radish, 
grated; one cup salt; one cup white and black mustard seed; two 
tablespoons black pepper; two tablespoons red pepper; three 
stalks celery, cut fine ; one cup wet nasturtions ; one cup chopped 
onions; one tablespoon powdered cloves; one tablespoon cin- 
namon; one tablespoon mace; one-half cup sugar; one quart vin- 
egar. Mix all together and bottle. A. M. W. 



CATSUP AND PICKLES. 137 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Two gallons strained tomatoes; seven tablespoons salt; three 
tablespoons black pepper; two tablespoons cayenne pepper; four 
tablespoons mustard seed; one and one-half tablespoons allspice. 
Boil three hours. When boiled one hour, strain off the spices 
through a sieve. When done, add one quart of sharp cider vine- 
gar. Bottle well. F. E. P. 

BOILED TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck of ripe tomatoes; one teacupful of fine salt; one- 
half cup of ground black pepper; two tablespoonfuls of ground 
cloves; two tablespoonfuls ground allspice; two large red peppers, 
cut fine; four large onions, chopped fine; one-half cup of celery 
seed; one pound of brown sugar. Peel the tomatoes. Put all in 
together and boil one hour well. Then add the celery seed. Boil 
half an hour more. Before taking from the fire add one quart of 
vinegar. Strain through a sieve. Bottle hot. 

Mrs. Rusling. 

mushroom catsup. 

Take freshly-gathered mushrooms. Examine them carefully 
to see that they are all right. Wash them and drain. Put a layer 
of the mushrooms in the bottom of an earthen dish. Then sprin- 
kle weil with salt. Then another layer of mushrooms. Another 
of salt, and so on alternately. Cover and stand in a very warm 
place for twenty-four hours. Then mash and strain through a 
sieve. To every quart of this liquor add one ounce of pepper- 
corns, and boil slowly in a porcelain-lined kettle for thirty min- 
utes. Then add a quarter ounce of whole allspice; a half ounce of 
sliced ginger-root; one dozen whole cloves, and three blades of 
mace. Boil fifteen minutes longer. Take from the fire to cool. 
When cold, put into small bottles, filling to the very top. Cork 
tightly, and dip in sealing wax. A. M. W. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

One peck green tomatoes; one-quarter peck onions (white 
onions preferable); two dozen green red peppers, leave in a few 
seeds; one ounce whole cloves; one ounce allspice; one ounce 



138 CATSUP AND PICKLES. 

mustard; one-half pound brown sugar; one teaspoonful of 

ground cloves; one teaspoonful cinnamon; one teaspoon ground 

yellow mustard. Cut tomatoes, onions and peppers the night 

before, layer of salt and layer of vegetables. Next morning drain 

water off. Add other ingredients, with vinegar enough to cover. 

CAT 
CHOW-CHOW. 

One-half gallon of vinegar; one quart of corn, cut from cob; 
one quart of lima beans ; one quart of small onions ; one large or 
two small heads of cabbage; one-half pound of soft white sugar; 
one-quarter pound of mustard seeds ; one-half pound of Colman's 
mustard; one-half dozen large green peppers. All cut fine but 
beans. Boil those first in water. Boil the vinegar. Mix the mus- 
tard with a little cold vinegar, and stir into the boiling vinegar. 
Stir in all the ingredients; salt and pepper to taste, and simmer 
for one-half hour in a covered vessel. 



CATSUP AND PICKLES. 139 



140 CATSUP AND PICKLES. 



CATSUP AND PICKLES. 141 



142 CATSUP AND PICKLES. 



BEVERAGES. 



BOILED COFFEE. 

One tablespoonful of coffee to each person, and one for the 
pot. One cup full of boiling water for each person and one for 
the pot. Crush an egg, using- the shell also. Beat well. Add 
two tablespoonfuls of water. To three people use one table- 
spoonful of the mixture (keep the rest on ice until used) with 
one tablespoonful of cold water. Mix with the coffee. Add the 
boiling water. Boil five minutes. Put to the side of the fire, and 
add a very little cold water. 

BOILED COFFEE, WITH COLD WATER. 

One tablespoonful of coffee for each person and one for the 
pot. One cupful of water to each person and one for the pot. 
Let come to a boil, and it is ready for use. Instead of using the 
above quantity, use two teaspoonfuls to a person, and boil as 
above. 

TEA. 

Use one teaspoonful of tea for three persons. Pour on one 
quart of boiling water. Scald the teapot, which should be 
earthen. Use only freshly-boiled water. 

ICED TEA. 

Make ready the above recipe. Strain from grounds and 
keep cool. When served, add cracked ice and lemon and sugar. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Wash the fruit in an earthen bowl, and to every pound of 
fruit add a pint of vinegar. Cover and let it stand two or three 
days. Then press it through a jelly bag, and to every pint add 
half a pound loaf sugar. Let it boil, and skim. Then boil gently 
five minutes. Remove, cool and bottle. 

143 



144 BEVERAGES. 

UNFEBMENTED GRAPE JUICE. 

Put enough water on a kettle of ripe grapes to cover them. 
Boil ten minutes and strain through a flannel cloth. To three 
pints of juice add one pint granulated sugar. Boil ten minutes. 
Bottle hot. Cork and seal. L. P. B. 

GOOD LEMONADE. 

For one quart take the juice of three lemons, using the rind 
of one of them. I am careful to peel the rind very thin, getting 
just the yellow outside; this I cut into pieces and put with the 
juice and powdered sugar, of which I use two ounces to the quart, 
in a jug or jar with a cover. When the water is just at the tea 
point, I pour it over the lemon and sugar, cover at once and let it 
get cold. 

LEMON TEA. 

Add enough tea to a glass of lemonade to suit the taste. 

RUSSIAN TEA. 

Put a slice of lemon in the bottom of each cup, and pour 
over it the boiling tea. 

CHOCOLATE OR COCOA. 

One cup milk; one cup water; one tablespoon grated choc- 
olate. Sweeten to taste. Boil five minutes. This makes two 

cups. 

COCOA. 

For one cup of cocoa use one-half teaspoonful of cocoa and 
one teaspoonful of sugar. Fill the cup with boiling water and 
milk. The above needs no boiling. Make in the cups as wanted. 



BEVERAGES. 145 



146 BEVERAGES. 



BEVERAGES. 147 



148 BEVERAGES. 



CONFECTIONERY. 



BUTTER SCOTCH. 

One and one-half pounds granulated sugar; one cup vinegar 
pound butter. C. A. R. 

WALNUT (NUT) CANDY. 

One pound brown sugar; one cup vinegar; one-quarter 
and water. Boil without stirring one-half hour. Add one quart 
of walnut kernels. A. M. W. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

Six cupfuls granulated sugar; one cupful vinegar; one cupful 
water. Boil all together without stirring about half an hour. 
Then add one teaspoonful saleratus, dissolved in one tablespoon- 
fiil of hot water and one teaspoonful of vanilla. As soon as it 
crisps when dropped in cold water, pour into greased pans. When 
cool enough to handle, pull until white, and cut into sticks. 

"Copied." 
CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One cupful chocolate (grated); one cupful molasses; one- 
half cupful milk; one cupful sugar. Mix all together, and when 
nearly done add a piece of butter the size of a walnut. Boil until 
it hardens in cold water. 

TAFFY. 

Two teacupfuls brown sugar; fourtablespoonfuls of molasses; 
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; two tablespoonfuls of water; lump 
of butter size of an egg. Boil fifteen minutes slowly. Add nuts, 
grated chocolate or cocoanut. R. C. 

STUFFED DATES. 

Stone one pound of dates carefully, so as not to break them 
in two. Shell and skin one quart of roasted peanuts. Salt the 
same as almonds. When brown, one peanut inside each date, 
covering the nut entirelv. Roll in granulated sugar. 

B. M. W. 
149 



150 CONFECTIONERY. 

CHOCOLATE ITALIAN CREAM. 

One and one-half pounds sugar; one cup milk; one-quarter 
pound butter; one-qvtarter pound chocolate. Boil ten minutes, 
stirring constantly. Take from fire. Stir five minutes, and pour 
in greased pan. 

TO CANDY NUTS. 

Three cups sugar; one cup of water. Boil until it hardens 
when dropped in water. Then flavor with lemon. It must not 
boil after the lemon is put in. Put a nut on the end of a fine 
knitting needle. Take out and turn on the needle until it is cool. 
If the candy gets cold, set on the stove for a few minutes. Malaga 
grapes and oranges, quartered, may be candied in the same way. 

"Copied." 
CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

To the white of one tgg add one tablespoonful of water (cold) 
and one tablespoonful of glycerine. Stir in one pound confec- 
tioners' sugar. Flavor with vanilla. Stir until fine and smooth. 
Then knead like bread until stiff enough to mold into balls. After 
molding into small balls, drop them into melted chocolate. To 
melt the chocolate, put it in a small saucepan over a kettle, where 
it will steam. Let the chocolate be melted while the cream is 
being prepared. The cream prepared in this way may be fla- 
vored in various ways. Coffee, chocolate, orange, or any ex- 
tract may be used. Cream dates, almonds, raisins, etc., may be 
made with above. M. C. R. 



CONFECTIONERY. 151 



152 CONFECTIONERY, 



CONFECTIONERY. 153 



154 CONFECTIONERY. 



FOR THE SICK. 



WINE WHEY. 

Put one pint of sweet milk in a suitable basin upon the stove, 
and when it comes to a boil pour into it a gill (about five or six 
tablespoons) of wine, and when it has again boiled about fifteen 
minutes, remove from the fire. Let it stand a few minutes, but do 
not stir it. Then strain or remove the curd and sweeten to taste. 
It is used for very weak and feeble patients. W. G. T. 

BEEF TEA. 

Take one pound lean beef (round steak) and mince it. Put 
it with its juice in an earthen vessel or glass can in a kettle of 
water. One pint cold water poured on the meat. Let it stand for 
an hour on the back of the stove. Strain well, squeezing all the 
juice from the meat. Place on the fire and let it come to a boil, 
stirring briskly all the time. Add salt and pepper. Stir before us- 
ing. M. A. D. 

EGG NOG. 

Two eggs, yolks and sugar beaten together. Add the 
brandy (four teaspoons) to the yolks and sugar. Then add the 
stiffly-beaten whites and two cups of milk. This will make two 
glasses. A. M. M. 

MILK PUNCH. 

A glass of new milk; two or three teaspoonfuls of brandy, 
and a little sugar. Nutmeg may be grated on the top if desired. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Boil a chicken until tender. Take out the broth. Season 
with pepper and salt. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Cook neck piece of mutton in water enough to cover. Sim 
mer, but do not boil, for several hours. When meat is in shreds, 
turn liquor through colander and set away over night. Remove 
grease from jelly. Then heat and season to taste. 

155 



156 FOR THE SICK. 

CORN MEAL GRUEL. 
Two tablespoonfuls meal, wet up with a little cold water. 
Pour over it one pint of boiling water. Boil fifteen or twenty 
minutes, stirring constantly. Salt to taste. 

MEAT JELLY. 

One pound of beef; one pound mutton; one pound veal, all 
very lean. Cut up fine. Pour on one quart cold water. Let it 
stand till water is quite red. Then put on the fire and simmer 
slowly three hours. Remove, strain, salt to taste, and set in cold 
place to jelly. It can be cut in squares and eaten cold or melted as 
it is needed. Dr. J. Van D. 

IRISH MOSS JELLY. 

One-half cupful Irish moss; one lemon; one pint boiling 
water; one-third cupful sugar. Soak the moss in cold water 
until soft. Pick over and wash again. Then put it into the boil- 
ing water, and simmer until it is dissolved. Add the lemon juice 
and sugar. Strain into a mold. Mrs. D. A. L. 

PANADA. 

Two or three tea buns or rusk. Pour a pint of boiling water 
over them, and add a teaspoonful of butter, a tablespoonful of 
sugar and nutmeg to taste. E. R. 

DANDELION TONIC. 

Four quarts yellow flowers of dandelion; four quarts water; 
grated rind of two oranges; grated rind of one lemon. Boil all 
together twenty minutes. Then strain and add four pounds 
sugar. When lukewarm add three-quarters cup yeast, stirring it 
well. Then slice oranges into it, from which the thick rinds and 
seeds nave been removed. Let it stand in an open vessel three 
or four days. Then strain, and bottle and cork tightly. 

CRACKER TOAST. 

Split one dozen Boston crackers. Put small piece of butter 
in center of each piece, and put in the oven to heat thoroughly 
and become crisp. Make a milk gravy of one pint of milk, one- 



FOR THE SICK. 157 

half pint of cream, thickened with two teaspoonfuls of flour; add 
tablespoonfnl of butter just before serving. Add the toasted 
crackers. 

CALF'S FOOT JELLY. 

Four calves' feet; six quarts cold water; juice four lemons; 
two inches stick cinnamon; one pound white sugar; juice two 
oranges; whites and shells two eggs. Clean the feet well in cold 
water. Put them on with cold water to simmer slowly. It should 
be reduced to two quarts. When done, strain the liquor in a 
bowl. Set away till next day, and remove grease from top and 
the sediments from the jelly. Put in a kettle. Add cinnamon 
and sugar, lemon and orange juice, the whites of eggs slightly 
beaten, the shells crushed. Mix all together and boil hard for 
twenty minutes without stirring. Add a gill cold water. Let it 
come to a boil. Then pull it to the side of the range. Keep it 
closely covered for one-half an hour. Dip a flannel jelly bag in 
boiling water, and hang it where a bowl can be placed underneath 
it. Pour the jelly in the bag carefully, and let it drip slowly. On 
no account must you squeeze or touch the bag, as this clouds 
the jelly at once. Turn in mold and put in a cool place. 



158 FOR THE SICK. 



FOR THE SICK. 159 



160 FOR TEE SICK. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 



AN EXCELLENT RECEIPT FOR A COUGH. 

Slice carrots thin. Sprinkle with sugar. Set over range to 
extract the juice. Take as often as needed. 

FOR CHAPPED AND SOFTENING THE HANDS. 

Take five cents' worth of glycerine; also five cents' worth 
benzoin. Mix with a little more than a pint cold water, and wash 
the hands often with it. 

A few drops of tincture of benzoin in a bowl of water is an 
admirable tonic for the face. The benzoin whitens the skin and 
prevents it from wrinkling. 

Milk should be used to cleanse oilcloth. 

A bit of raw onion will remove fly specks from gilding with- 
out injury to the gilding. 

A rough flatiron may be made smooth by rubbing it when 
warm over a teaspoonful of salt. 

A pinch of salt put into starch will prevent its "sticking/' 

One great secret of washing flannels so that they will not 
shrink is to dry them quickly. When nearly dry they should be 
pressed with a not very hot iron. 

To brighten window glass, clean it with a liquid paste of alco- 
hol and whitening. It requires only a little of this mixture to re- 
move specks and to impart a high lustre to the glass. 

Wash bamboo furniture with salt water. This is better than 
soap. 

Coal will last longer, burn more freely, and there wili De 
fewer clinkers if it is sprinkled with salt. 

To remove indelible ink stains, soak the stained spot in 
strong salt water, then wash it in ammonia. 

161 



162 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

Strong alum water, to which a little soap has been added, 
will give silver a high lustre. 

Water carrying a little salt in solution, is an excellent wash 
tor tired and inflamed eyes. 

The only method to clean jewelry without scratching is to 
wash it in hot soapsuds, to which a few drops of ammonia have 
been added. 

Always put glass ware in hot water edgewise, and it will 
never crack. 

A dish of water set in an oven when baking cake will pre- 
vent scorched edges. 

Bran is useful in other ways than in beautifying the com- 
plexion in bran bath bags. Dingy silk cushions and silk cover- 
ings t) furniture may be restored to their pristine freshness by 
being sprinkled with bran and quickly rubbed with a woolen 
cloth until they are clean. 

Contributed by V. C. D. 



M1SCELLANE0VS RECEIPTS. 163 



164 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 



U18CBLLANB0U8 RBCBIPTB. 165 



366 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 



XI 



^wwwMrmwttrmwmwwwwwwwwww£ 



fc The 



Enterprise 



R 



• • 



IS THE 

ONLY GOOD 
SEEDER 



aiSin and_Gr ape 

Seeder 



.Tinned 






^1 Removes every seed without waste. 33 

£1 Simple in design, easily cleaned ~^2 

ZZ and easily adjusted. 13 

^ No. 36, Family size $1.00 ^ 

C- Will seed a pound in five minutes. 

^ No. 38, Hotel and Baker size $2.50 ^ 

^- Will seed a pound in one minute. -^ 

g— Descriptive Catalogue Free. Consult Your Jobber. 

^ The Enterprise M'fg Co. of Pa., 3 

£= Station Q. PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 3 

|jiUliWUiUiUliWUiUitWlWiWUJUi»W»WlUUiUilWlt<IWIIK 



XII 



i&2^**eg 



^XLLUyy^ 




REINER W WILSON CO 

SCOURING SOAP. 



HIGH-GRADE AMMONIA. 



jj 



MADAME PARRILL, 



TREATMENT OF 



All Diseases of the Scalp, 

Premature Baldness and 

Hair Falling Out. 



528 North Eleventh Street. 



HAIR EMPORIUM. 



XIII 



ELMER A. TYSON, Crystal Parlor bils* and Gasoline. 



Mo. ji6 MECHANIC STREET, Germantown, Pa. 



X-am.p Supplies, Oil and G-asollne Stoves. 



Tin Roofer. 



EDWARD V. BUNN, 

HEATERS and RANGES 

Put up and Repaired. 

Roofs Repaired and Painted. 



Manufacturer of Tin and Sheet Iron Ware. 

BATH TUBS III I.INKO. 

No. 527 Roplar Street. 



Ernest E. Belinfante, 

General 
Out-door 

Photographer, 

1003 Fairmount Avenue, Phila. 



Flash Lights, Groups, Interiors, Animals, 
Machinery, and Architecture suc- 
cessfully photographed. 

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS WORK. 



XIV 



Noah S. Sheaf f, £oai 

Delivered 
** grade f ^"^ Parts of 



#m, 



Post 
Office 
Address 
Station 33, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



L 



Miller's Silver Cleaner SssSSES 



isthelatestimproved | 

Polish. One 10c box j 

will do as much as J 

two of any other; warranted not to scratch the finest ; 

Price, article. Used by U. S. Government. Also by the t 

IO cts. best Hospitals. Sold by all dealers and first-class ♦ 

stores generally. I 

Miller's Silver Cleaner, Fairm't Station, Phila. I 



THOMAS HERRIN, 



Dyeing, 
Repairing, 
Cleaning, 
Altering, and 
Pressing. 



Merchant 
Tailor 



530 North Eleventh St. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



XV 

FOR 

HOT WATER 
STEAMHEATING 

W. J. ROBINSON, Heating Contractor, 

641 Phila. Bourse and 6204 Germantown Ave., 

■ PHILADELPHIA. 

Send for little book "Warmth for Winter Homes." 




ESTABLISHED 1850. 



william ruslinq, Paper 

"— — Hang inirs, 

Southwest Corner ° ° 

Residence, Franklin and Poplar Streets, 

Seventh St., south of Oak Lane. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Samples sent and Estimates given for City and Country. 

HOWARD A. STOUT, 

Architect, 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Room 39, Law Building. 

"hardings" 



PHILADELPHIA, 
OAK LANE, 

ASHBOURNE and 
JENKINTOWN 



Express 



PHILADELPHIA OFFICE : ALL GOODS CALLED FOR AND 

20 North Seventh Street. DELIVERED PROnPTLY. 

EL. G. HARDING, 

Telephone No. 5034. Oak Lane, Philadelphia. 

Opposite R. R. Station. 



XVI 

CLEAN STIFF 

Wniiam Penn Laundry, 

1509-11 Stillman Street, 

Near 25th and Jefferson Sts. 
We collect everywhere. Send a postal, we will call. 



WHITE WORK 

r,ght co T mman U o Carpet, Shade and 
■pi* ^Curtain Men. 

John P. Knobeloch, 

UPHOLSTERY, 



send postal card. Franklin and Poplar Sts., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



IF IN LOVE with your SILVER or PLATED WARE 

M ,£L%%* SILVER CLEANER, 

THE MODERN POLISH. 



Will not chafe the hands. I H 1*111 I FP 21st and Brandywln* St»- : 

Try It, you will like It. J « **• ' HL.LCK, Sta.J. PHILADELPHIA. 



XVII 

WE WANT TO LET YOU KNOW THAT WE HANDLE 
THE VERY BEST 

Butter 
1 Fresh Eggs 



Our Special Brands: A Trial Order will Convince Vou. All 

DARLINGTON, ^ Orders by Telephone or Postal 

GOLDEN ROD, "^ Card Wl " Receive Our Prompt 

CELEBRATED B. B. B. and Careful Attention. 

WM. A. BENDER, 

Telephone Connection. 

Reading Terminal Market, 606-611, - - Philadelphia. 



UPPERMAN BROS., ---^^ 

Dea, XFISH, LOBSTERS, GREEN TURTLE, 

SNAPPER, HARD and SOFT SHELL CRABS, Etc. 



I20S Filbert Street, - Rhiladelphiis. 



LONQ-DISTANCE TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 



ANDREW M. BENDER, Bes t ££i& F IOU r. 

Also Buckwheat Plour, Rye Flour, Oraham Flour, White Corn Flour, Yan- 
kee Rye Meal, Yellow Corn Meal, White Corn Meal, Oat Meal, Hom- 
iny, Grits, Beans, Rice, etc. All Selected Goods. 

607-609 Sixth Avenue, READING TERMINAL MARKET, 

lath and Arch Sts., Philadelphia.