(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Cooks in clover : reliable recipes"

.-^- 



.\^ >] 




^OflPlLen BY 






Hiwgjgpft 








LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

~:c^rV^ 

' Shelf...£n5 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 







S£SS11^S^S^S^IS^^^^^^^^ 



T\X\V_OR. 



NIETROPOLITAN MARKET. 



»»®e:o^®E E^i^P^A^5,««' 



-DEALER IN- 



£3 V 9t 



al 



PORK, POULTRY, FISH, VEGETABLES, &c. 



SPEEH'S BUILDING, 
Cor. MAIN AVENUE AND WASHINGTON PLACE, 



PASSAIC, N. J. 




SLATE /\ND WOOD M/\jNyZL5, 



^M^ OLD OAK, CHERRY, ASH, WHITE WOOD, &c. 



"z^r^^ 



NEW AND ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS IN 

SLATE MANTELS 



OIPEHSr TILE ^^II?,E] IPL-A-OES, 

TILES FOR FUOORS, HEARTHS, PACINGS, ETC 
(T-T?. A Tj-T'T-Fi jij^TiD ivi:.a.e,:bijE! iwcoivr-cnvtBiisrx's. 

HOWE AVENUE, PASSAIC, N. J. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

Breads GaUe^ Gor\fectior\ery^ 

AND ICE CREAM. 

-^MEALS AT ALL HOURS. :^ 
Cor. 3lain Avenue & Jefferson Street, - Passaic, N. J. 



SHE At^QE^SOH Ll^/VvBEf^ (^0., 



DEALERS IN 



LUMBE1|, LIME, LATH, CEMENT >ND OTHER BUILDING MATERIJIL, 



•-OT^&^S«0<«fc»Sf9i»^ 



]^e:high (^oal a §p6:eialty. 



•''OT'fcs»C*«e:^*®s^.i^- 



MAIN AVENUE, PASSAIC, N. J., 

BENJ. B. AYCRIGG, President. S. T. ZABRISKIE, Sec. & Treas. 



Saddle River Ice Compant, 



WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALERS IN 



l£I, COM, FLOUR, m^U & FEED, B^ILEB ^M, 

STRAW, ETC. 
Cor. HOWE AND MAIN AVES. AND PROSPECT STREET, 

F'ASSAIC, X. J. 

Orders by Telephone ivill 'Receive Vrovipt Attention. Telephone Call, JJo. 25. 



Ti. Ti. B El I?, XD ^^ nsr . 

FURNITURE AND CARPET STORE 

WINDOW SHADES, OIL CLOTH, MATTIM'GS, 
BEBBIKG OF EVERY BESCRIFTIOM, 

Parlor, 'Qi^^iiig Room, ged Room and Kit^^^^i fTurniture, 

Childrens^ Carriages, Refrigerators, Ice Chests. 

(IRON FRONT BUILDING.) 

3 IS PASSAIC STREET, Running Through to Ann St. 

R. R. BKRDAK, Passaic, IT. J. 



" Ladies Like to Talk 



5 5 



and when one has been cured of a troublesome Cough, Cold, Throat or Lung affection it is impossible 
for her to be silent on the subject. In this waj' those who have been restored to health by the use of 

"BULLOCK'S THROAT <So LUNG BALSAM" 

have made its merits known far and near as the 

CDCDL-JC35I— I CDLJFREI-" 



" For weeks I suffered with a hackincr wmgh, difficulty in breathing, sharp pains and tightness across the chest. Neither the usual remedies nor a 
physician's treatment gave me relief. Bullock's Throat and Lung Balsam being so highly recommended I gave it a trial. Less than a bottle healed the 
Inngs and removed all trouble." Mrs. WARREN FILKINS, Passaic, N. J. 

" Never have I used anjihlng equal to Bullocks Throat and Lung Balsam for curing the coughs, colds, and croup, that my children have been pecul- 
iarly suhiect to. We have used it in our family for the past year for throat and lung troubles and have received excellent results. 

Mrs. S. UOYT, Passaic Bridge, N. J. 

•H?l55> 25 AND 50 CENTS PER BOTTLE, i^wf- 

DEPOT: 20 COLLEGE PLACE, NEW YORK. For sale by Druggists and at 

Bullock Bros. Drug Store, Passaic, IT. J. 



]reijI/\ble recipes 



COMPILED BY THE 




^^7^"^ LADIES OF THE NORTH REFORMED CHURCH 



PASSAIC, N. J. 



^, \ 



Copyright, '^o\^ 

1889. T^ 



Thurston &> Barker, Printers, 
Passaic, N. J. 



C omplete, concise, handy and new, 

ur latest effort comes to you ; 

O ffering recipes choice and true, — 

K nown to but a favored few, — 

S ure, successful, through and through. 

1 ndividual offerings here you'll find, 

N o doubt, suited to every mind. 

C onfess its merit to each friend; 

L ead them to buy, but do not lend. 

O rder has been our leading aim; 

V ariety, next, our work became; 

E conomy then our minds employed ; — 

R are things, by all to be enjoyed. 

V. G. C. 



(committee : 

Mrs. J. H. Whitehead, 
Mrs. F. Marsellus, 
Mrs. H. W. Crane, 
Miss S. E. Still. 



Contents. 



SOUPvS. 






{ 








PAGE 


PAGE 


Oyster Soup, II, . . . .4 


Stock Soup, . .1 


Black Bean Soup, 






4 


Hot Bouillon, 






I 


Gumbo Soup, 






5 


Vegetable Soup, . 






I 


Turkey " 






5 


Potato " . 






I 


Julienne " 






5 


Cream of Tomato Soup, 






2 


Consomme Soup . 






5 


Tomato Soup, 






2 


Ox-Tail " . 






6 


Clam Soup, I, 






2 


Brown " . 






6 


Clam " II, . 






2 




Clam " III, . 






3 


FISH. 


Celery " . - 






3 




Mock-Turtle Soup, 






3 


Boiled Fresh Fish, .7 


Clear Soup, 






3 


Broiled White " . . . .7 


Pea, 






4 


Baked Blue " .... 7 


Oyster "I, 






4 


Baked Halibut, . 






7 



Vlll 








CONTENTS. 










PAGE 


PAGE 


Fried Codfish, . . . 7 


Bewitched Veal, . . . 13 


Hot Salmon, 






■ 8i 


Veal Cutlets, 








13 


Little Pigs in Blankets, 








8 


Veal Cheese, 








13 


Scalloped Oysters, 








8 


Roast Pork, 








13 


Creamed Oysters, 








8 


Pork Chops, 








13 


Oysters a la Sturtevant, 








9 


Kidney Stew, 








13 


Oyster Patties, 








9 


Fried Sweetbreads, 








14 


Pickled Oysters, . 








9 


Pickwickian Chops, 








14 


Fish Chowder, I, . 








10 


Mock-Venison, 








14 


Fish Chowder, II, 








10 


Baked Beef, 








IS 


Fish Cakes, 








10 


Beef Croquettes, . 








15 




Meat Chowder, 








15 


MEATS. 


Cold Meats Warmed, 








15 












Hash, 








16 



Beef Steak and Kidney Pie, 

Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding, 

Beef a la Mode, . 

Beef Stew, 

Roast Veal, 



POULTRY AND GAME. 

I Chicken Boiled Without Water, . 
1 Barbecued Chicken, 









CONTENTS. 






IX 




P.-^GE- 


PAGE 


Chicken Pie, .... 


17! 


Chili Sauce, III, . . . .22 


Pressed Chicken, . 






18; 


Spanish Sauce, 






22 


Chicken Pudding, 






18 


Queen of Ode Sauce, 






22 


Boned Chicken, 






iS 


Green Tomato Sauce, 






23 


Roast Turkey, 






'9 


Sauce HoUandaise, 






23 


Oyster Dressing, . 






19 


Sauce Tartare, 






23 


Roast Wild Fowl, 






19 


Giblet Gravy, 






23 


Broiled Quail, 






20 


Roast Meat Gravy, 






24 


Mock Duck, 






20 




Turkey Hash, 






20 


CATSUPS AND PICKLES. 


SAUCES AND GRAVIES. 




Cold Tomato Catsup, . . -25 






Tomato Catsup, I, 






25 


Drawn Butter, .... 


21 


Tomato Catsup, II, 






25 


Egg Sauce for Fish, 






21 


Green Tomato Soy, 






25 


Cranberry Sauce, 






21 


Chow-Chow, I, 






26 


Mint Sauce, 






21 


Chow-Chow, II, . 






26 


Chili Sauce, I, 






21 


Piccalilli, I, 






26 


Chili Sauce, II, . 






22 


Piccalilli, II, 






36 



X 






CONTENTS. 




PAGE 




PAGE 


Home-Made Pickles, . -27 


Potato Salad, I, . 


32 


French Pickles, 






27 


Potato Salad, II, . 


■ 32 


Curry Pickles, 






27 


Cardinal Salad, 


■ 32 


Pickled Onions, . 






28 


Potato and Beet Salad, 


32 


Pickled Cabbage, . 






28 


Salad Dressing, I, 


■ 33 


Pickled Peaches, . 






28 


Salad Dressing, II, 


■ 33 


Sweet Pickled Grapes, 






28 


French Salad Dressing, . 


■ 33 


Pickled Currants, 






29 


Lettuce Dressing, 


■ 34 


Pickled Eggs, 






29 


The Chef's Dressing, 


• 34 


Spiced Peaches, . 






39 


Mayonnaise Dressing, 


• 34 


Spiced Grapes, 






29 






Spiced Currants, . 






29 


VEGETABLES. 


French Mustard, . 






.^0 








Potato Puff, 


• 35 


SALADS. 


Potatoes Creamed, 


■ 35 




Potatoes on Half Shell, . 


■ 35 


Chicken Salad, . . . . 31 


Potato Tymbals, . 


• 35 


Turkey or Chicken Salad, . -31 


Potato Cakes, 


• 36 


Lobster Salad, 






31 


Asparagus, 


. 36 



Carrots With Cream Sauce, 
Green Corn, 

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes, 
Boiled String Beans, 
Preserved String Beans, 
Egg Plant, 
Scalloped Cabbage, 
Cream Cabbage, 
Boiled Greens or Sprouts, 
New England Baked Beans, 
Spaghetti with Italian Sauce, 
Macaroni and Cheese, 
Rice Croquettes, . 
Noodles, . 



EGGS. 



Omelette, I, 
Omelette, II, 







CONTENTS. 










xi 


PAGE 


P.^GE 


. 36 


Omelette, III, . . .41 






36 


Omelette, IV, 










41 






37 


Ham Omelette, 










42 






37 


Marguerites, 










42 






37 


Stuffed Eggs, 










42 






38 


Crumbed Eggs, 










42 






38 


Poached Eggs, 










43 






38 


Scrambled Eggs, 










43 






38 


Baked Eggs, 










43 






39 


Egg Vermicelli, 










43 






39 


Egg Toast, 










44 






39 
40 


Egg Nests, 










44 






40 


BREAD, BISCUIT, &c. 




Wheat Bread, I, . . . . .45 


. 41 


Wheat Bread, II, . . .45 






41 


Graham Bread, I, 










46 



xn 








CONTENTS. 








PAGE 


MUFFINvS, WAFFLES, ETC 


Graham Bread, II, . . .46 




Boston Brown Bread, I, . 






. 46 


PAGE 


Boston Brown Bread, II, 






46 


Muffins, I, . . Ki 


Boston Brown Bread, III, 






47 


Muffins, II, . 




51 


Boston Brown Bread, IV, 






47 


Muffins, III, 




51 


Biscuit, I, . 






47 


Golden Muffins, . 




51 


Biscuit, II, 






47 


Graham Muffins, 




51 


Drop Biscuit, 








47 


Corn Muffins, I, 




51 


Raised Biscuit, I, 








47 


Corn Muffins, II, 




52 


Raised Biscuit, II, 








48 


Waffles, 




52 


Fried Biscuit, 








48 


Raised Waffles, 






52 


Breakfast Rolls, . 








48 


Gems, 






52 


Graham Biscuit, . 








48 


Breakfast Gems, 






52 


Buns, I, 








48 


Graham Gems, 






53 


Buns, II, . 








48 


Butter Cups, 






53 


Johnny Cake, I, . 








49 


Puffs, 






53 


Johnny Cake, II, . 








5° 


Lunch Puffet, 






53 


Johnny Cake, III, 








50 


Buttermilk Pancakes, 






53 


Rusk, 








50 


Green Corn Griddle Cakes, 






53 



CONTENTS. 



Swiss Fondu of Cheese, 
Sally Lunn, 
Cheese Straws, 
Cracker Rare-Bit, . 



PIES. 



Plain Pie Crust, 

Pie Crust, 

Half Puff Paste for Fruit 

Cream Pie, 

Custard Pie, 

Apple Pie, . 

Orange Pie, 

Lemon Meringue Pie, I, 

Lemon Meringue Pie, II, 

Lemon Pie, I, 

Lemon Pie, II, 

Lemon Pie, III, 



Pies, 



PAGE I 

■ S3! 

■ 54\ 

■ 54; 

• 54I 



Pumpkin Pie, 

Pumpkin Pie Without Eggs, 

Raisin Pie, 

Banbury Turnovers, 

Grandma's Mince-Meat, . 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



Plum Pudding, John Bull's Own, 

Plum Pudding, 

Queen of Plum Puddings, 
56 (English Plum Puding, 
56 Eureka Fruit Pudding, 
56 I Christmas Plum Pudding, 
56 1 Taylor Pudding, 

56 i Boiled Apple Pudding, 

57 > Apple Dumpling, 
57 I Cable Pudding, 
57 j Apple Tapioca, 



P.\GE 

• 57 
■ 57 
. 58 

• 58 
58 



59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
61 
61 
61 
62 
62 
62 



XIV 






CONTENTS. 




PAGE 




PAGE 


Orange Pudding, . . . . .62 


Queen of Baked Puddings, 


. 66 


Orange Souffle, 






63 


Bread Pudding, I, 


. 67 


Pine-apple Tapioca, 






63 


Bread Pudding, II, 


. 67 


French Tapioca Pudding, 






63 


Cracker Pudding, 


. 67 


Banana Pudding, . 






63 


Indian Pudding, I, 


. 67 


Fig Pudding, I, 






63 


Indian Pudding, II, 


. 67 


Fig Pudding, II, . 






64 


Snow Pudding, 


68 


Fig Pudding, III, . 






64 


Peggy's Pudding, 


68 


Blackberry Mush, 






64 


Chocolate Pudding, I, 


. 68 


Green Corn Pudding, I, . 






64 


Chocolate Pudding, II, 


69 


Green Corn Pudding, II, . 






64 


Raisin Puffs, 


69 


Rice Pudding Without Eggs, 






6s 


Lemon Sauce, I, 


69 


Cream Rice Pudding, 






6s 


Lemon Sauce, II, . 


69 


St. Nicholas Pudding, 






6S 


Lemom Sauce, III, 


■ 70 


Boiled Flour Pudding, 






65 


Strawberry vSauce, 


70 


Entire Wheat Pudding, 






6S 






Quick Baked Pudding, 






66 


FRITTERS. 


Prune Pudding, 






66 






Cottage Pudding, . 






66 


Cream Fritters, 


. 71 



Apple Fritters, I, . 
Apple Fritters, II, . 
Banana Fritters, 
Corn Fritters, 
Green Corn Fritters, 
Oyster Fritters, 
Clam Fritters, 
Parsnip Fritters 



CAKES. 



Nut Cake, I, 
Nut Cake, II, 
Nut Cake, III, 
Hickory Nut Cake, 
English Walnut Cake, 
Fruit Cake, I, 
Fruit Cake, II, 
Fruit Cake, III. 



CONTENTS. 


XV 


P.4GE 




PAGl- 


. 71 


Fruit Cake, IV, , 


74 


. 71 


Wedding Cake, 


74 


. 71 


White Fruit Cake, 


75 


. 71 


Nut Fruit Cake, 


75 


72 


Pound Cake, 


75 


. 72 


Mock Pound Cake, 


75 


■ 72 


Orange Cake, 




. 72 


Currant Cake, 


76 




Whortleberry Cake. 


76 




Dried Apple Cake, 


76 




Bread Cake, 


76 


■ 73 


Coffee Calce, 


76 


• 73 


Pork Cake, . . 


76 


• 73 


One Egg Cake, 


77 


■ 73 


Cheap Sponge Cake, 


• 77 


■ 73 


Sponge Cake, I, ■ 


- 77 


■ 74 


Sponge Cake, II, . 


• 77 


■ 74 


Martha Washington Cake, 


■ /8 


■ 74 


Geo. Washington Cake, 


• 78 



CONTENTS. 



Washington Cake, 
Union Cake, 
Angel Food, 
Angel Cake, 
Delicate Cake, I, 
Delicate Cake, II, 
Belle Cake, . 
Silver Cake, 
Sunshine Cake, 
Piccolomini Cake, 
Feather Cake, 
Dutchess Cake, 



LAYER CAKES. 



Chocolate Ice Cream Cake, 
Ice Cream Cake, 
Lemon Cake, I, 
Lemon Cake, II, 



PAGE 
78 
78 
78 

79 
79 
79 
79 
79 
80 
80 
80 
80 



80 



j Orange Cake, 

Chocolate Cake, I, . 
/ Chocolate Cake, II, 

Date Cake, 

Walnut Cake, 

Cocoanut Cake, I, 

Cocoanut Cake, II, 

Almond Cake, 

Tutti-Frutti Cake, 

Fred's Favorite, 

Gold Cake, 

Moire Ribbon Cake, 

Ribbon Cake, 

Cream Cake, 

Boston Cream Cake, 

Charlotte Russe Cake, 

Strawberry Short Cake, I, 

Strawberry Short Cake, II 

Pine-apple Short Cake, 



PAGE 

81 
82 
82 
82 
82 
83 
83 
S3 
83 
84 
84 

84 
85 
85 
85 
85 
86 
86 
86 



Charlotte Pol-maise, 
Cream Icing, 
Boiled Icing, 



SMALL (JAKES. 



Jumbles, I, 
Jumbles, II, 
Sugar Jumbles, . 
French Jumbles, . 
Cookies, 
Plain Cookies, 
Rich Sugar Cookies, 
Chocolate Cookies, 
Cream Puffs, I, 
Cream Puffs, II, . 
Cocoanut Drops, . 
Qocoanut Puffs, 



CONTENTS. 


XVll 


PAGE 




PAGE 


. 86 


Betsy's Kisses, 


89 


• ^A 


Lady Fingers, 


. 90 


■ 87 


Crullers, I, 


■ 9° 




Crullers, II, 


• 90 




Crullers, III, 


■ 90 




Doughnuts, 


■ 9° 


«7 
87 


MOLASSES CAKES. 



J Aunt Caddie's Molasses Cake, 
88 } Molasses Cake, 
88 (Soft Molasses Cake, 
88 ( Molasses Ginger Cake, 

88 i Ginger Snaps, I, . 
1 Ginger Snaps, II, 

89 (Ginger Cookies, . 
I Norton Hill Cookies, 

89 (Soft Gingerbread, 



90 
91 
91 
91 
91 
91 
91 
92 
92 



CONTENTS. 



CUvSTARDvS AND CREAMS. 



Floating Island, 
Apple Snow, I, 
Apple Snow, II, 
Painted Apples, 
Apple Souffle, 
Compote of Apple 
Moonshine, 
Snow Balls, 
Tapioca Meringue 
Custard Souffle, 
Rice Pyramids, 
Bohemian Cream 
Spanish Cream, 
Coffee Cream, 
Tapioca Cream, 
Charlotte Russe, 
Ice Cream, 



and Cream 



PAGE 

; White Ice Cream, . . . -97 

PAGE ^ Strawberry Ice Cream, . . . -97 

93 ; Banana Ice Cream, . . . -97 

93 1 Frozen Fruit Custard, . . . .98 

93 

93 1 JELLIES, CANNED FRUITS, ETC. 

94 

94 (Table for Preparing Fruits for Preserving, . 99 
94 Amount of Sugar to a Quart Jar of Fruit, . 99 

94 Tutti Frutti Jelly, I, . . .100 

95 Tutti Frutti Jelly, II, . . ■• . .100 
95 I Lemon Jelly, ..... 100 
95 I Coffee Jelly, ..... 100 

95 Apples in Jelly, . . . . . roi 

96 (Cider Jelly, ..... loi 
96 (Crab Apple Jelly, .... loi 
96 J Quince Jelly, ..... loi 

96 Currant Jelly, . . : . . 102 

97 ) Orange Marmalade, .... 102 



CONTENTS. 



Lemon Marmalade, 

Mixed Marmalade, 

Canned Peaches, . 

Canned Peaches or Pears, 

Canned Pine-apple Without Boilint 

Canned Cherries, . 

Canned Quinces or Plums, 

Canned Tomatoes, 



CANDIES. 



Cream Candy, 
Peanut Candy, 
Peppermint Creams, 
Cream Walniits, . 
Marsh-mallow Drops, 
Chocolate Caramel, I, 
Chocolate Caramel, II, 



PAGE 
I02 S 
I02 / 

i°3 

'03 

1031 

103! 

104 

104 



Molasses Taffy, . 
Molasses Cocoanut, 



THE SICK ROOM. 



i°5 
i°5 
i°S 

105 j 
106 

106 I, 
106 1 



Beef Broth, 
Beef Tea, . 
Oysters on Toast, 
Broiled Oysters, . 
Broiled Sweetbreads, 
Broiled Squabs, 
Stewed Pigeon, . 
Rennet Custard, 
Graham Brewis, . 
Panada, 
Buttermilk, 
Round Cream Toast, 
Toast Water, 
Rice Water, 



PAGE 

. 106 

. 106 



107 
107 
107 
107 
107 
108 
ro8 
108 
loS 
loS 
108 
109 
109 
109 



CONTENTS. 



Raspberry Shrub, 
Cough Remedy, 
Cough Syrup, 
Flaxseed Tea, 
Mustard Plaster, 
Bread Poultice, 
Flaxseed Poultice 



PAGE ) 

109 Charcoal Poultice, 

109 ( 

1 10 i 

1 10 1 Materials, 
1 10 1 Methods, 
1 10 j Miscellaneous, 
no) Memoranda, 



HINTS. 



page 
. 1 10 



1 1 1 

I 12 

114 
"5 



Soups. 



Stock. — All meat and bones for soup must be put 
on in cold water, and allowed to boil slowly several 
hours. Strain the liquor and set it aside until the 
next day, when every particle of fat can be removed 
from the top. 

Send all soups to the table very hot. 

Hot Bouillon. — One pound of round of beef per- 
fectly free from fat, three pints of cold water, 
four whole peppers, two cloves, one onion, half 
of a medium sized carrot, half of a small turnip, 
half a teaspoon of celery seed. Cook all day in 
a porcelain saucepan, adding the vegetables and the 
spice the last half of the time. Strain while hot 
through a piece of cheese cloth. When cold remove 
every particle of fat, and pour off carefully all but the 



; sediment. Color slightly with a little burned sugar. 
I To be heated the last moment and served in cups, 
!with a thin slice of lemon in each cup. Mrs. W. 

Vegetable Soup. — Boil four pounds of lean beef 
in three quarts of water, for three or four hours. 
In another pan boil your vegetables. Chop together 
very finely two carrots, two turnips, half a head of 
cabbage, an onion, and two or three stalks of celery ; 
add half a cup of rice or barley; boil until tender. 
Strain the stock into the pot with the vegetables. 
Boil all together for half an hour and season to taste. 
Mrs. G. E. Dinsmore. 

P Otato Soup. — Boil four large potatoes until nearly 
done, pour off the water and add one quart of hot 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



water. Then boil again until thoroughly dissolved, 
adding fresh boiling water as it boils away. When 
done, run it through the colander, adding three- 
fourths of a cup of hot cream, a large tablespoon 
of finely cut parsley, salt and pepper to taste. Bring | 
it to boiling and serve. Mrs. Fannie Marsellus. 

Cream of Tomato Soup. — To one can of toma- \ 
toes add one pint of boiling water and let it boill 
thoroughly ; thicken with corn starch, strain and ! 
season. Heat one quart of milk in another vessel! 
and add a little soda. When ready to serve, add i 
the milk to the prepared tomatoes. 

Aliss L. M. Garrison. 

Tomato Soup. — Boil the contents of one can of j 
tomatoes in a sauce pan with three pints of boiling 
water and one onion, three-quarters of an hour. 
Rub two ounces of butter into the same quantity j 
of flour. Add one tablespoon of sugar, one of salt. 



one-third of a teaspoon of cayenne pepper; when 
the tomatoes are boiled, strain, and mix with the 
other ingredients, a little at a time, stirring briskly 
until thoroughly mixed and very smooth. Let it 
boil ten minutes. When ready to serve, add half a 
pint of heated milk, and toasted bread cut in small 
dices. Mrs. Jos. Holds-worth. 

Clam Soup, I. — Four strings of clams chopped; 
boil in three pints of water half an hour. Strain 
through a colander, add three pints of milk, boil 
five minutes, add the yelks of three eggs well 
beaten, butter and salt to taste. Chop parsley 
and roll crackers; put in the tureen and pour the 
soup over. Mrs. H. P. Doretnus. 

Clam Soup, II. — Twenty-five clams chopped fine; 
three cjuarts of water; one onion chopped; one pint 
of milk. Boil half an hour, thicken with two table- 
spoons of corn starch and a piece of butter the size 



of an egg. Beat three eggs in the tureen and pour 
the broth boiling hot over them. 

Miss S. E. Brotvn. 

Clam Soup,' III. — Twenty-five clams, two quarts 
of water, two tablespoons of flour, a small lump 
of butter, pepper and salt; boil fifteen minutes. 
When ready to serve, beat the yelks of two eggs with 
half a pint of milk, and add to the soup but do 
not let it boil again, Mrs. R. A. T. 

Celery Soup. — Heat one quart of beef stock, 
and thicken with a little flour mixed with water ; cut 
one bunch of celery in small pieces and boil them 
in the soup half an hour, or until tender; then 
add one cup of cream or milk, salt and pepper to 
taste. Boil up once and serve. 

Mrs. D. C. Cimidrey. 

Mock-Turtle Soup. — Cut in half a calf's head 



with the skin on and clean it well ; then half boil 
it, take all the meat off in square bits, break the 
bones of the head, and boil them in some veal and 
beef broth to add to the richness. Fry some shal- 
lot in butter, and dredge in flour enough to thicken 
the gravy; stir this into the browning, and give it 
one or two boils. Skim it carefully, and then put 
in the head. About ten minutes before you serve, 
put in some basil, tarragon, chives, parsley, cay- 
enne pepper and salt to your taste ; also two spoons 
of mushroom catsup and one of soy. Squeeze the 
juice of a lemon into the tureen, and pour the soup 
upon it. Mrs. J. Duckworth. 

Clear Soup. — Five pounds of beef cut from lower 
part of the round ; five quarts of cold water. Let it 
come to a boil slowly, strain and put away to cool. 
In the morning skim off the fat, and be careful not 
to pour sediment in the soup pot. Add one onion, 
one stock of celery, two sage leaves, two sprigs of 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



parsley, six whole cloves. Boil gently twenty min- i 
utes, and strain ; salt and pepper to taste. For a | 
richer soup, pour the sediment in the soup pot) 
and use the whites of two eggs. Miss Anna Hesse. \ 

\ 

\ 

Pea Soup. — Two cups of split peas, cooked soft \ 
and mashed through a wire sieve ; season with plenty i 
of butter, salt and pepper. Add water to make the 
desired consistency, and serve with cubes of bread 
toasted in the oven. Clifton. 

\ 

Oyster Soup, I. — Two quarts of good mutton 
broth, six dozen oysters, two ounces of butter, a J 
quarter of a pint of cream, one ounce of flour, salt, \ 
cayenne pepper and maize to taste. Scald the oys- 
ters in their own liquor, then add it well strained to \ 
the broth, thicken with the butter and flour, and \ 
simmer for a quarter of an hour. Put in the oysters, \ 
cream and seasoning ; stir well, but do not let it boil 
Serve very hot. Mrs. Wm. Bi/ri^ess. 



Oyster Soup, II. — Put into a saucepan one quart 
of milk, butter, salt and pepper to taste. While the 
milk is coming to a boil, drain the liquor from one 
hundred medium sized oysters into another sauce- 
pan; add a scant pint of water, being sure to skim 
while boiling. Let the liquor boil about five min- 
utes, then drop in the 03'sters ; let all boil a few min- 
utes, until the oysters are plump and of a light color. 
Pour the milk into the saucepan containing the 
oysters, mix well, and turn into a heated tureen. 
Serve immediately. Mrs. J. H. Whitehead. 

Black Bean Soup. — Soak one quart of beans twen- 
ty-four hours. Take the remains of a roast of beef 
as free from fat as possible, or two pounds of beef 
and one of salt pork, — this is better than the ribs; 
boil together in a large pot, in six or eight quarts 
of water, first adding an onion cut up fine. Boil 
beans and all for five hours, mash and strain ; flavor 
with a bunch of herbs, pepper and salt to taste ; add 



half a pint of wine to a tureen of soup. Serve very 
hot, after adding hard boiled eggs chopped, and 
slices of lemon. Mrs. H. 

Gumbo Soup. — Cut up gumbo or okra in cold 
water; boil half an hour. Boil a knuckle of veal 
three hours. Pick out the meat of six crabs ; add 
corn, tomatoes and an onion; then add the gumbo, 
strain the stock of the veal and mix together. Sea- 
son to taste. B. K. — B'dway, N'. Y. 

Turkey Soup. — Put the bones and pieces of a 
cold turkey into about three quarts of water. If 
you have turkey gravy, or the remnants of chicken, 
add them also, and boil two hours or more. Skim 
out the meat and bones, and set the water aside in 
a cool place till the next day. Then take all the 
fat from the top ; take the bones and pieces of skin 
out from the meat and return it to the liquor. If 
some of the dressing has been left, put that in also. 



and boil all together a few minutes. If more sea- 
soning is needed, add it to suit your taste. ***. 

Julienne Soup. — Cover a soup bone with some 
meat on it, with two quarts of water, half an onion 
and a little salt. Let it stand half an hour and then 
bring it slowly to boiling. Simmer several hours, 
strain and set away to cool. There should be about 
one and a half pints when strained. Boiling water 
may be added while cooking, if it boils away. A 
short time before serving remove all fat, put the 
stock on the fire and add half a pint of mixed vege- 
tables, which have been previously cooked in salted 
water, strained, and cut in uniform dice shape. 
Season, boil up and serve. Mrs. A. 

Consomme Soup. — Heat gradually the soup bone 
with three pints of cold water. When it first boils, 
take off every particle of scum, and add a slice of 
onion, a clove, and a little salt and pepper. Sim- 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



mer slowly five or six hours; then strain, cool, and 
take off every bit of grease. Half an hour before 
serving, heat to a boiling point, and add a few sticks 
of macaroni broken in inch lengths, and previously 
boiled tender in salted water. The amount of water 
should be reduced to about one quart. 

Ox-Tail Soup.— Take two tails, divide them at 
the joints, and soak them in warm water. Put them 
into cold water in a gallon pot or stew pan. Skim 
off the froth carefully. When the meat is boiled 



I to shreds, take out the bones and add a chopped 
I onion and carrot. Use spices and sweet herbs, if you 
1 prefer. Thicken with browned flour. Boil three 
1 or four hours. * * *. 

Brown Soup. — Make stock of beef; add carrot, 
turnip, onion, and a small quantity of cinnamon 
and mace. Strain off, add force-meat balls of sau- 
sage and small blocks of pork fried. Thicken with 
flour. B. K. 



Fish. 



Boiled Fresh Fish.— Clean and wash the fish | dripping pan ; sprinkle with salt and pepper inside 
thoroughly, wipe dry and tie in a cloth kept solely and out. Make a dressing of bread crumbs ; season 
for the purpose. Plunge the fish into a pot of boil- with salt, pepper and a piece of butter the size of a 
ing water that has been first salted sufficiently. Re- walnut. A little thyme makes it very nice. Fill 
move carefully from the kettle when done, and serve the fish with the dressing, and bake about half an 
with egg sauce or plain drawn butter. Mrs. F. M. \ hour. Mrs. L. W. 



Broiled White Fish.— Wash quickly in cold water, 
and wipe dry. Rub the bars of a double broiler 
lightly with butter, and place the fish in it. Dredge 
with salt, pepper and flour. Place over a clear but 
not fierce fire, having the inside turned to the fire 
first. Watch carefully ; and turn often to prevent 
burning. Mrs. O. F. 



Baked Halibut. — Lay slices of halibut about an 
inch thick in salt and water for half an hour. Chop 
one large onion very fine and put on the bottom of 
the baking-pan. Lay the fish on the onion, and 
sprinkle pepper and salt over the top; put pieces 
'of butter on the fish, and add half a cup of vinegar. 
Bake until light brown. Mrs. G. E. Dinsmore. 



Baked Blue Fish. —Place the fish in a well-greased Fried Codfish— Sprinkle a slice of fish with salt 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



and pepper, dredge with rolled cracker, and spread 
a beaten egg over it. Put in boiling fat and fry 1 
brown. Mrs. A/. A. Howarfh. 

Hot Salmon. — Heat thoroughly a can of salmon 
in a pot of boiling water; open with a can opener, 
and allow the oil to drip entirely out. Dish, and 
serve with sauce: | 

Butter Sauce:— One cup of milk heated to a boil and i 
thickened with a tablespoon of corn starch pre- 
viously wet with cold water, one large tablespoon of 
best butter, one egg beaten light, juice of half a 
lemon, mace and cayenne pepper to taste. Add the 
egg to the thickened milk and butter, and, just be- 
fore pouring it over the salmon, put in the lemon 
juice. Mrs. J. Hemioii. 



lay each oyster on a slice of bacon, crosswise. 
Fold the bacon over them and pin with wooden 
toothpicks. Put them in a frying pan with a little 
lard, and fry until crisp. Serve hot on toast. ***. 

Scalloped Oysters. — Drain the oysters, place a 
layer of rolled crackers in the bottom of a buttered 
pudding dish, then a layer of oysters; sprinkle with 
pepper and salt, and small bits of butter ; moisten well 
with a little of the liquor mixed with milk, then a 
layer of crackers, then oysters and so on until the 
dish is full, having crackers on top. Beat an egg 
in a little milk and pour over the whole. Sprinkle 
with small bits of butter, cover and bake three-quart- 
ers of an hour ; remove the cover, and brown the 
top before sending to the table. Mrs. S. J. Post. 



Little Pigs in Blankets.— Take twelve large oys- Creamed Oysters.— Make one cup of thick cream 
ters ; wipe dry and roll in rolled cracked crumbs, sauce, season with salt, pepper and celery-salt. 
Have twelve slices of bacon cut as thin as possible; j Wash one pint of oysters and parboil till plump. 



Skim carefully, drain and add them to the sauce. } 
Serve on toast, or with bread crumbs browned in \ 
butter and sprinkled over them. Afrs. H. H. Copeland. \ 

Oysters a la Sturtevant. — Place two dozen large 
oysters in a saucepan with their own liquid ; let them 
come to a boil ; then strain the oysters, saving the J 
liquid; put about one tablespoon of butter and two 
of flour in a saucepan, heat and work smooth; add 
the oyster liquid and let it boil for about five min- \ 
utes, stirring all the while;addthejuiceof one lemon! 
and the yelks of two eggs well beaten, one heaping- 
tablespoon of parsley minced fine, pepper, salt, and 
lastly the oysters. Serve on buttered toast. 

Mrs. Chas. B. Reynolds. 

Oyster Patties. — A heaping teaspoon of butter; a 
large tablespoon of lard; one-fourth of a teaspoon 
of baking powder; three tablespoons of iced water; 
flour enough to roll thin. Line small round, deep 



tins with this crust, cut covers to fit the tops, and 
put on a flat tin, with an opening in the center of 
each, so they will not get out of shape ; bake all to 
a light brown. Boil half a pint of oysters in three 
tablespoons of their licjuid, with a small bit of but- 
ter, a pinch of salt, and a little white and red pep- 
per. Thicken with a heaping teaspoon of flour 
blended in a little water. Put each shell on a hot 
plate, fill with 0}-sters, put on the cover, and serve 
as hot as possible. This quantity will make four 
patties. ***. 

Pickled Oysters. — The liquid from one hundred 
oysters; half that amount of vinegar; one table- 
spoon each of whole black pepper and allspice. 
Boil the juice, vinegar and spices together about 
ten minutes, then drop the oysters in and let them 
boil up; take the oysters out, and allow the liquor 
to cool before pouring it over them. 

Mrs. A. C. Hascy. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Fish Chowder, I. — Two pounds o£ codfish; one- 
half pound of salt pork ; two onions. Cut the pork 
into small pieces, fry it till quite brown, add the 
onions cut small, and fry them till well cooked; 
then add the fish cut in large pieces, and two quarts 
of water ; cook twenty minutes after it boils. Make 
a thickening of two tablespoons of flour, one tea- 
spoon of salt and a little pepper, made into the con- 
sistency of cream with milk. Add to the chowder 
and bail ten minutes, stirring it often to prevent 
burning. Mrs. V. Hussey. 

Fish Chowder, II. — For a fish weighing six 
pounds, take five good sized potatoes and a quarter 
of a pound of salt pork. Fry the pork brown with- 
out scorching, and put it in the bottom of a kettle; 
slice the potatoes, and cut the fish in small pieces; 
put potatoes and fish in alternate layers; dredge 
in a little flour, salt, and pepper; pour over this 



three quarts of cold water, and boil gently half an 
hour; soak six crackers two or three minutes in 
cold water, and put them in the chowder. When it 
has cooked twenty minutes, add about a pint of milk, 
and butter the size of an &%%, about five minutes 
before serving. An onion improves the chowder for 
those who fancy the flavor. 

Mrs. K. C. Atuiood. 

Fish Cakes. — Put in a pot on the back of the 
ssove, two pounds of salt codfish with enough water 
to cover it, and let it soak for at least three or four 
hours ; then remove the fish and pick it up fine. Peel 
two quarts of potatoes, and put them on to cook in 
boiling water ; sprinkle the fish over the potatoes 
and boil for half and hour. When done, take up in 
J a pan, break two eggs over it, and mix and mash 
j thoroughly. Make up in flat cakes, and fry in hot 
{ lard until very brown. Afrs. G. I. Chapman. 



Meats. 



Beef Steak and Kidney Pie. — Two poimds of 
rump steak ; two kidneys ; seasoning to taste of salt 
and pepper ; any nice plain crust. Procure tender 
steak and pound it well. Divide into small pieces, 
and cut each kidney into eigljt pieces. Line a dish 
with pastry, leaving a small piece to overlap the 
edges. Then cover the bottom with a portion of 
the steak and a few pieces of kidney ; season with 
salt and pepper, and sprinkle very lightly with flour; 
then another layer of steak and kidney, and so on 
till the dish is full. Now pour in sufficient water 
to come within two inches of the top of the basin. 
Moisten the edges of the crust, cover the pie over, 
press the two crusts together so the gravy may not 
escape, and turn up the over-hanging paste. 
Wring out a cloth in hot water, flour it, tie up the 



pie, put it into boiling water, and boil for four 
hours. Replenish the water, always keeping the dish 
covered and boiling all the time. When ready, cut 
a round place in the top of the crust to prevent 
bursting. Mrs. A. R. Burgess. 

Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding.— Set a 

piece of beef to roast on a grating laid over a drip- 
ping pan. About half an hour before the meat is 
done, pour the pudding into the pan, and let the 
drippings fall upon the pudding. When both are 
done, cut the pudding into squares and lay around 
the meat when dished. Do not have much fat in 
the dripping pan when you are ready to pour the 
pudding in. 

Pudding: — One pint of milk ; four eggs, yelks and 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



whites beaten separately ; one teaspoon of salt ; two ' 
cups of flour. It should be a yellow brown when 
done. Mrs. O. W. Fouder. 

Beef a la Mode. — Soak six pounds of round beef 
in vinegar or claret wine over night. Prepare and ! 
parboil one turnip and one carrot. Take the beef out ! 
of the vinegar or wine, and tie up tightly with cord. 
Cut deep gashes in both sides ; into each gash insert 
pieces of carrots and turnips, and onions chopped 
fine, also a little bread dressing — as for poultry, well 
seasoned with pepper and salt ; also insert in alter- 
nate gashes a small piece of corned pork. Spice with 
whole cloves, sweet marjoram and thyme. Boil 
slowly and steadily for four hours in a porcelain 
kettle in a quart of water, with a thin slice of corned 
pork and any of the above vegetables that may be 
left over, turning the beef in the pot occasionally. 
Brown as a pot roast. When taken out, make gravy 
of the liquor in the pot. Mrs. A. C. H. 



Beef Stew. — Three or four pounds of good beef 
steak cut from the round, all fat trimmed off, and 
the meat cut in half-inch pieces; cover well with 
water; add salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce 
to suit the taste ; let all simmer slowly. Cut two 
carrots and three stalks of celery into small pieces 
and add to the meat; in an hour and a half add four 
potatoes, cut small. Cook all slowly, covered, un- 
til just before serving; remove meat when ready to 
serve, and thicken gravy with browned flour ; pour 
over the meat and serve. Mrs. L. M. L. 

Roast Veal. — Take a loin of veal, make a dress- 
ing as for roast turkey, fill the flap with dressing 
and secure firmly on the loin. Rub the veal with 
salt, pepper and butter; put in a pan with a little 
water. While roasting, baste frequently and let 
it cook until thoroughly done, allowing two hours 
for a roast weighing from six to eight pounds. 
When done, remove the threads before sending 



13 



to the table ; thicken the gravy with a little flour. 
Mrs. G. I. Chapman. 

Bewitched Veal.^Two pounds of veal cutlets, 
three slices of salt pork, three slices of bread, three 
eggs, seasoning to taste. Chop the veal and pork 
fine, crumb the bread, mix well together, and add 
the eggs. Make the whole quite soft with milk. 
Bake one hour in a buttered dish. Serve cold. 

Miss Louise Webb. 

Veal Cutlets. — Mix bread crumbs with the beaten 
yelks of two eggs ; dip the cutlets into melted but- 
ter, then into the &%%. Fry in hot lard to a light 
brown. Thicken the gravy with butter and 
browned flour. Mrs. J. R. Morris. 

Veal Cheese. —Use equal quantities of sliced boiled 
veal and tongue; pound each separately iu a mortar, 
adding butter as you do so. Mix in a stone jar pressed 



in hard, and pour on 
covered in a dry place, 
tea. 



melted butter. Keep it 
To be sliced for lunch or 
Mrs. A. C. H. 



' Roast Pork. — Take a nice leg of pork, have the 
bone removed and fill the cavity with the following 
I dressing : Boil six good sized onions ; when tender, 
') drain and chop ; add to them an equal quantity of 
'! bread crumbs, a teaspoon of dried and rolled l^not 
\powdcred) sage; all mixed with two eggs. Have the 
J skin of the pork scored, put into a baking pan with- 
; out water, and set in a hot oven. Allow twenty-five 
5 minutes for each pound, basting frequently. Serve 
hot with apple sauce. Brooklyn. 

Pork Chops. — Dip shoulder chops in two well 
beaten eggs; roll in cracker or dried bread crumbs; 
fry until well done, in drippings. U. 

Kidney Stew. — Cut one beef kidney in small 



M 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



pieces and let it stand in salt water for one hour ; then > 
put butter the size of an egg in a saucepan, put the 
kidney in and cook one hour ; then add half a pint of 
water, one small onion, a little chopped parsley and 
thyme ; salt and pepper to taste ; cover again and cook 
half an hour; thicken and serve very hot. 

Mrs. S. A. Johnson. 

Fried Sweetbreads. — Parboil the sweetbreads 
fifteen minutes; split them in half, season with salt, 
pepper and a sprinkle of nutmeg; melt in a frying 
pan three ounces of butter, lay the sweetbreads in 
and fry until they are a light brown ; when done 
thicken the butter with browned flour, add two tea- 
spoons of burnt sugar and a little hot water; 
boil up, pour over the sweetbreads, and serve. 

Mrs. P. 

Pickwickian Chops. — Boil half a can of best 
tomatoes, strain them, add a small tablespoon of 



salt, and a large tablespoon of butter ; pepper well ; 
when boiling, thicken with a tablespoon of corn- 
starch, dissolved in a little water; stir constantly; 
as soon as it boils up, remove to the back of the 
range. Broil quickly one pound of choice rib lamb 
chops, turning often, and drop from the broiler into 
the tomato sauce, which must be kept boiling hot; 
remove to a deep platter; pour the sauce over and 
I around the chops. Serve. *. 

Mock-Venison. — Cut a nice piece of corned beef 
in thin slices, and soak three or four hours in tepid 
water, changing the water often. When sufficiently 
freshened, drain, wipe dry, put on a hot gridiron 
and broil quickly, turning often, only enough to be 
fully heated through. Make a gravy of drawn buttey, 
add a little pepper and salt; chop fine the yelk of a 
hard boiled egg and, if agreeable, a little boiled 
onion, and pour over it; or simply butter, pepper 
and a little salt, as for beefsteak. *. 



IS 



Baked Beef.— Slices of cold roast beef, salt and 
pepper to taste, one sliced onion and one teaspoon 
of minced savory herbs, twelve tablespoons of gravy 
or sauce of any kind, and mashed potatoes. Butter 
the sides of a deep dish, and spread mashed pota- 
toes over the bottom. On this, place layers of beef 
in thin slices well seasoned with pepper and salt 
and a very little onion and herbs, which should be 
previously fried a nice brown; then add another 
layer of mashed potatoes and beef, and other ingre- 
dients as before ; pour in the gravy or sauce, cover 
the whole with another layer of potatoes, and bake 
for half an hour. Mrs. A. R. Burgess. 

Beef Croquettes. — To every pint of chopped 
meat — roasted being preferabie^use a half pint of 
milk or cream, a tablespoon of butter and two of 
flour. Chop the meat as fine as sausage meat and 
season with salt and pepper, a dozen drops of onion 
juice, a little chopped parsley, and a slight sprink- 



ling of nutmeg or mace. Boil the milk, add butter 
and flour, blended to the consistency of paste, and 
stir into the boiling milk, adding a half teaspoon 
of salt. Let this boil until it is quite thiok ; put the 
meat into the mixture, mix thoroughly and set 
aside to get cold. Mould into small rolls, dip into 
&%%, and bread or cracker crumbs. Fry in boiling 



lard, 



Mrs. P. 



Meat Chowder. — Twc pounds of meat ; one large 

onion ; one dozen potatoes. Chop fine, add one can 

of tomatoes, four crackers, salt, pepper and thyme 

to the taste; then add water and boil half an hour. 

I A good way to use cold meats. 

Mrs. Richard ]'reeland. 

Cold Meats Warmed. — Chop up the meat fine, 
and add salt, pepper, a little onion and chopped 
tomato. Fill a pudding dish one-third full; 
cover it over with boiled mashed potatoes ; lay 



i6 



COOKS IN CLOVF.R. 



pieces of butter on the top, and bake half an hour. 

Mrs. H. 

Hash. — Rid cold corned or roast beef of fat, skin 
and gristle, and mince it in a wooden tra)', not 
allowing the pieces to be larger than an eighth of 
an inch square. With two cups of this, mix a cup 
of cold potatoes chopped. Season well with pepper 
and salt, if the beef be fresh; if corned, use the salt 
sparingly. Set a frying-pan on the stove with a 



I cup of beef gravy in it, from which you have 
skimmed all the fat; clear soup or beef drippings 

' will do if you have no gravy. When the gravy be- 
comes thoroughly heated, add a small half-teaspoon 
of made mustard, then put in the meat and potato, 
and stir to prevent sticking. Let this boil rapidly 
for about five minutes or until it thickens, but do not 
let it get stiff. Heap on a hot dish, and eat from hot 
plates. This can be served on toast if desired. 



Poultry and Game. 



Chicken Boiled Without Water. — Having cut 
up a chicken into convenient pieces, season with ( 
pepper and salt, and put it into a pot which can be| 
tightly covered. Let it simmer for about two \ 
hours, (care being taken to heat gradually at first), i 
When done, stir together one tablespoon each of J 
flour and butter, and add half a cup of rich milk;\ 
let it boil up and it will be ready to serve. \ 

Mrs. Guild Copeland. } 



Barbecued Chicken. — Split down the back as for 
broiling and lay breast upward in a baking pan. 
Season with salt and pepper, lay thin slices of fat 
pork over the breast, put a lump of butter and a 
cup of hot water in the pan, and bake in a hot oven. 
Before it is quite done, have some biscuit dough 



rolled to about half an inch in thickness, cut in 
strips, and lay across each way forming bars; bake 
quickly. Take up without breaking the crust. 
Thicken the gravy in the pan, add more butter, 
and sendtothe table with the chicken. Afrs. G. C. 

Chicken Pie. — Joint a fowl, wash and place in 
two quarts of boiling water — no salt. Let it boil 
tender, removing all scum. There should be a quart 
of water when the fowl is done. Cut and scrape all 
meat from the bones, cut the meat in small pieces, put 
it back into the gravy, add salt and pepper, thicken 
with two tablespoons of flour, and butter the size of 
an egg. Let all boil two or three minutes. Put the 
chicken in pastry, pour enough gravy over to moisten 
well, put on top crust and bake in a moderate oven 



COOKS IX CLOVER. 



until golden brown. Heat the remaining gravy and ] 
serve a little over the pie. Af. C. P. 

Pressed Chicken. — Cut a chicken in small pieces, 
lay in a sauce pan and just cover with cold water. 
Cook slowly until very tender, taking off the scum 
as it rises. Remove all the bones and pick — not 
chop — the meat in small pieces. Season with salt, 
pepper, sweet herbs, and if the chicken is not too 
fat, add a tablespoon of butter. Mix with the 
gravy and put into a mould, well buttered. Set in 
a cool place for twelve hours, or until perfectly 
firm. Cut in slices for the table. It is better to 
make it the day before it is wanted for use. 

Mrs. G. F. Smith. 

Chicken Pudding. — The fowl should be young 
and tender, and divided at every joint; s-eason with 
pepper, salt, and a lump of butter the size of an egg, 
to each chicken. Stew slowly half an hour or until 



tender. Take them out on a hot dish, setting aside 
some of the liquor for gravy. Make a batter of one 
quart of milk, three cups of flour, three tablespoons 
of melted butter, one-half teaspoon of soda, one of 
cream-tartar, four well beaten eggs, and a little 
salt. Put a layer of chicken in the bottom of the 
dish and pour some batter over it, then the re- 
mainder of the chicken and the rest of the batter. 
The batter must form the crust. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven. Beat up an e^%^ and stir into the gravy 
that was set aside; thicken with rice or wheat flour. 
Mrs. O. W. Fowler. 

Boned Chicken. — Boil one large chicken, cover- 
ing it entirely with water; boil until the meat falls 
from the bones ; put it on a dish to cool, leaving the 
bones to boil about twenty minutes longer; strain 
the liquid and let it cool. When cold, cut the 
chicken into small pieces, take the fat from the 
jelly, warm the jelly, season to taste with salt and 



POULTRY AND GAME. 



19 



pepper, and add a small tablespoon of gelatine, 
previously dissolved in a teacup of cold water. Stir 
the chicken in the liquid while hot. After wetting 
the mould with cold water, line the sides and bottom 
with slices of two or three hard boiled eggs, and 
sliced lemon; pour in the mixture and set in a cool 
place. When cold, turn out on a flat dish and gar- 
nish with parsley or lettuce. This makes an ex- 
cellent relish, as pleasing to the eye as to the palate. 
Mrs. A. Z. Van Hoiden. 

Roast Turkey. — Singe, dress, and wash the tur- 
key carefully, wiping it with a clean towel; rub in- 
side with salt and pepper, and fill with the follow- 
ing dressing: Wet stale bread with cold water; 
when moist, press out all the water, and add three 
stalks of celery and a slice of onion chopped fine; 
season quite highly with salt and pepper, a very 
little thyme, and two tablespoons of butter; sew up 
carefully, and bind the wings and legs snugly to 



the body with a cord ; rub the outside with salt and 
pepper; dredge with flour, and place bits of butter 
over the top; put in a dripping pan with one cup of 
water; roast in a hot oven two and a half hours, 
basting frequently ; boil and chop the giblets quite 
fine, and use in the gravy, which should be thickened 
with two tablespoons of flour; add enough water to 
make a large bowlful. * * * 

Oyster Dressing. — Half a pint of oysters, half a 
loaf of bread. Break the bread in fine pieces and 
spak in enough water to moisten it ; put in a table- 
spoon of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, a pinch 
of thyme, and, lastly, stir in the raw oysters. *. 

Roast Wild Fowl. — The flavor is best preserved 
without stuffing. Put pepper, salt and a piece of 
butter into each. Wild fowl require much less 
dressing than tame. They should be served of a 
fine color and with a rich brown gravy. To pre- 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



vent the fishy taste which wild fowl sometimes have, 
put an onion, salt and hot water into the dripping 
pan, and baste them for the first ten minutes with 
this; then take away the pan and baste constantly 
with butter. Mrs. R. Montgomery. 

Broiled Quail. — Pull off the skin, split them down 
the back with a sharp knife, pepper the breasts and 
lay the inside first upon the gridiron. Broil them 
slowly at first, skewering a small bit of pork upon 
each one. Turn them after seven or eight minutes. 
Broil them twenty minutes. * » * 

Mock Duck. — Prepare a good dressing, as for 
turkey. Pound a round steak, spread the dressing 



over it, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and add a 
few bits of butter; turn the ends over, roll the steak 
\ up tightly and tie ; spread butter over the steak, 
and wash with a well beaten g%%. Put water in 
a baking pan and lay the meat so as not to touch 
the water, basting often. Bake half an hour in a 
brisk oven. Make a brown gravy, and send to the 
table hot. Mrs. O. W. Fowler. 

Turkey Hash. — Cut the meat of cold roast turkey 
in small pieces, put the gravy with it, adding warm 
water if there is not sufficient gravy, season with 
butter, salt and pepper, and let it come to a boil. 
Add a couple of hard boiled eggs cut in small pieces, 
before serving. Mrs. Garret Terhune. 



Sauces and Gravies. 



Drawn Butter. ^Take a lump of butter the size of 
an egg, and two tablespoons of flour; beat to a 
cream, then pour over this a scant pint of boiling 
water. Set on the fire and let it just come to a boil. 
Serve immediately. * * * 

Egg Sauce for Fish. — Make rich drawn butter 
with milk ; when cooked add onebeateneggwhilehot; 
do not put on the fire again. 

£. K.—B'dway, N. Y. 

Cranberry Sauce. — Pick and wash one quart of | 
cranberries; place them in a porcelain lined sauce- 
pan; pour on just enough water to cover them. 
When the berries begin to break, add one pint of su- 
gar, and stew for twenty minutes. Stir often to pre- 



vent burning. Strain through a colander. When 
cool, this will make a desirable sauce for poultry. 
Mrs. J. H. Whitehead. 

Mint Sauce. — One cup of vinegar, one cup of 
sugar, juice of two lemons and the rind of one pared 
very thin. Two heaping tablespoons of mint, chop- 
ped as fine as possible. The lemon rind to be 
chopped fine too. Mix all together and let stand 
several hours. This may be bottled for future use. 
Mrs. Chas. B. Reynolds. 

Chili Sauce, I. — Eight quarts of tomatoes, three 
pints of vinegar, one pound of brown sugar, one tea- 
cup of salt, one teacup of mustard seed, one tea- 
spoon of black pepper, one teaspoon of ground 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



mustard, two ounces of cloves, two ounces of cinna- 
mon, two ounces of allspice, one quart of onions 
chopped, three peppers chopped, celery seed to taste. 
Cook three hours. Miss Libbie Still. 

Chili Sauce, II. — Thirty tortiatoes, ten onions, 
two green peppers chopped, one quart of vinegar, 
one large cup of sugar, three teaspoons of salt, one j 
of cloves, one of cinnamon, and one of allspice; one] 
nutmeg grated, one tablespoon of celery seed. Boil] 
until quite thick. Mrs. W. N. Kip. 

Chili Sauce, III. — Thirty-five large ripe tomatoes, 
ten bell peppers, eight onions, four tea.spoons of 
cinnamon, four teaspoons of cloves, four teaspoons 
of ginger, four tablespoons of salt, eight tablespoons 
of sugar, eight cups of vinegar. Peel and chop the 
tomatoes very fine ; cut the peppers and take out one- 
third of the seeds ; peel the onions, chop them and the 
peppers together very fine, and put in alargepreserv 



|ing kettle; when they begin to boil, add spices and 
; vinegar. Boil all together two hours, stirring f re- 
Iquently to prevent burning. When cold, put in 
] wide-mouthed bottles and cork tightly. 

Mrs. John Wooley. 

Spanish Sauce. — Half a peck of green tomatoes; 
six onions sliced thin. Sprinkle with salt and let 
them stand over night. In the morning drain very 
dry and add half a pound of brown sugar, two 
ounces of white mustard seed, half an ounce each 
of ground black pepper, ginger , cloves and cinna- 
mon. Mix dry, and alternate the layers of tomatoes 
and mixed spices. Cover with vinegar and boil two 
hours. Mrs. A. C. H. 

Queen of Ode Sauce. — One peck of green to- 
matoes chopped fine, one cup of salt sprinkled 
through them; let them stand over night. In the 
morning, drain the water off and add one cup of 



SAUCES AND GRAVIES. 



23 



sugar, one cup of grated horse-radish, six large pep- 
pers, four large onions chopped fine, one tablespoon 
of ground cinnamon, the same quantity of cloves, 
allspice and mace. Add cider vinegar enough to 
cover, and cook until soft. Mrs. Robert Bill. 

Green Tomato Sauce.— One peck of green to- 
matoes, four onions, six green peppers, all chopped 
fine; add one cup of salt, and let it stand over 
night; then strain very dry and add one cup of 
grated horse-radish, one cup of brown sugar, one 
tablespoon of whole cloves, one tablespoon of whole 
cinnamon, one tablespoon of whole allspice. Cover 
with vinegar, and stew until soft. 

Mrs. M. Tindall. 

Sauce Hollandaise. — Put in a sauce pan an ounce 
of butter, and, as it melts, add one tablespoon of 
fiour; stir this till it is smooth, and add half a pint 
of boiling water or soup- stock. As it boils, stir in 



! the beaten yelks of two eggs. Add the juice of half 
I a lemon and a teaspoon of fresh butter. Serve at 
I once. *• 

Sauce Tartare. — Beat well the yelk of a raw &%%, 
\ add two saltspoons of salt and one of dry mustard, 
\ work well together, pour in slowly about two table- 
/ spoons of salad oil, alternating with a few drops of 
I vinegar or lemon juice, and a light dash of cayenne 
\ pepper. When these are well mixed, add two ta- 
blespoons of capers, a very small onion minced fine, 
a small cucumber pickle cut fine, and a little 
parsley. ***• 

Giblet Gravy. — Chop the giblets fine, and piit on 
the stove with enough cold water to cover them. 
Cover closely, and simmer while the chicken is bak- 
ing ; then strain the liquid into a dripping pan, and 
thicken with a little flour. Stir the giblets into the 
gravy, and serve with the chickens. ***. 



24 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Roast Meat Gravy. — After the meat has been re- ] teaspoon of flour with cold water, enough to make 
moved from the pan, skim the fat from the gravy \ a thin paste. Add this to the boiling gravy, and 
and add half a cup of boiling water, if there is keep stirring until brown. Season with salt and 
about that amount of gravy in the pan. Mix one j pepper. Strain and serve. £. 



Catsups and Pickles. 



Cold Tomato Catsup. — Half a peck of ripe to- 1 
matoes peeled and chopped fine, two roots of grated | 
horse-radish, one teacup of salt, half a teacup of 
ground mustard, two teaspoons of black pepper, 
two red peppers chopped fine, half a teacup of cel- 
ery seed, one cup of chopped onions, one teaspoon 
each of ground cloves and mace, two teaspoons of 
cinnamon, one teacup of brown sugar, and one quart 
of vinegar. Shake well and seal in bottles. 

Mrs. A. M. CoUignon. 

Tomato Catsup, I. — One gallon of tomatoes, 
three tablespoons of salt, three tablespoons of whole 
black pepper, two tablespoons of whole allspice, 
five onions and five green peppers chopped, and 
one pint of vinegar. To be simmered three hours. 



strained, and boiled down to half the quantity. 
Add eight tablespoons of white mustard seed. 

Mrs. H. P. Dorctnus. 

Tomato Catsup, II. — Wash and slice the toma- 
toes and when well cooked, strain them, and to 
every gallon of juice add two tablespoons of salt, 
two tablespoons of cassia, two tablespoons of ground 
mace, one teaspoon of cayenne pepper, and one tea- 
cup of white sugar. Boil down one-third. When 
nearly done, add one pint of cider vinegar to every 
gallon of tomatoes. Mrs. M. A. H. 

Green Tomato Soy.— Two gallons of green 
tomatoes sliced without peeling, twelve good-sized 
onions sliced, two quarts of vinegar, one quart of 



36 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



sugar, two tablespoons eadh of salt, ground mustard, 
and ground black pepper, and one tablespoon each of j 
allspice and cloves. Mix all together and stew un- 
til tender, stirring often to prevent scorching. Put i 
up in small glass jars. Mrs. A. W. Brcmner. 

Chow-Chow, I. — Twenty-five small cucumbers, 
one quart of onions, two cauliflowers, six green pep- 
pers, and two quarts of green tomatoes. Cut as small 
as you like and sprinkle salt over them to make a 
weak brine; cover with water and let stand over 
night. In the morning put over the fire, and bring 
to a scalding heat, but without boiling; then drain 
in a colander. Boil three quarts of vinegar. Mix 
together half a pound of ground mustard, half an 
ounce of turmeric, and one small cup of flour, made 
into a smooth paste, and stir into the boiling vine- 
gar; add four cups of sugar and four teaspoons of 
celery seed. Put the pickles into bottles, pour the 
dressing over them, and cork. Mrs. F. S. Dates. 



Chow-Chow, II. — Half a peck of green tomatoes ; 
one head of cabbage ; ten large onions ; five peppers, 
chopped fine and salted over night ; half an ounce 
of celery seed; one ounce of mustard seed; quarter 
of a pound of brown sugar ; half an ounce of whole 
cloves; one ounce of turmeric, mixed with a little 
vinegar ; enough white vinegar to cover. 

Mrs. G. F. E. 

Piccalilli, I. — vSlice one peck of green tomatoes, add 
one pint of salt, and let it stand overnight. Drain 
oft" the brine, rinse and chop, adding six peppers 
and twelve onions; scald in weak vinegar; strain off 
the liquid, adding one cabbage and one cup of horse- 
radish. Scald one c^uart of vinegar, one pint of 
molasses, two tablespoons of allspice and one of 
cloves, and pour over, hot. Aitnt Clarissa. 

Piccalilli, 11.^ — One gallon of chopped green toma- 
toes, sprinkled with salt; let them stand one day, 



CATSUPS AND PICKLES. 



27 



then drain them well. Chop twelve onions, six 
small green peppers, two quarts of chopped cabbage, 
half a pint of grated horse-radish, half a pint of 
white mustard seed and one tablespoon of black 
pepper. Cover with boiling vinegar. 

Mrs. P. R. Watson. 

Home-Made Pickles. — Take small cucumbers 
and for three mornings pour hot salt and water 
over them, in the proportion of one cup of salt to 
six quarts of water, being careful to have it fresh 
every morning. The fourth morning take some 
weak vinegar with small lumps of alum in it, and 
turn it over the cucumbers, allowing them to remain 
in it till next day; then take them out of the vine 
gar, put them in stone jars, glass cans or bottles ; 
pour over them cold vinegar of good strength, ad 
ding pieces of red peppers, and plenty of white 
mustard seed — an ounce of seed to a gallon of vine 
gar, and a lump of alum the size of a butternut. 



I Seal the jars and they will keep a long time. 

Mrs. A. M. Sproull. 

French Pickles. — Four quarts of green tomatoes, 
one quart each of small onions and small cucumbers, 
one small head of cabbage, and one head of cauli- 
flower. Cut them into small pieces and let them 
stand twenty-four hours in a light brine ; then boil 
ten minutes in the brine, and drain in a colander 
very dry. 

Dressing: — Six teaspoons of ground mustard, one 
tablespoon of turmeric powder, one and a half cups 
of sugar, and one cup of flour. Mix these with 
water enough to form a paste. Bring to a boiling 
heat two and a half quarts of vinegar, and six green 
peppers chopped ; stir in the paste, cook as thick 
as soft custard, put in the pickles and seal them in 
fruit cans. Mrs. Frank Hughes. 

Curry Pickles. — Wash and dry six hundred very 



28 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



small cucumbers, and put them in jars. Boil together 
one gallon of vinegar, eight tablespoons of salt 
and three of black pepper. Mix with cold vinegar 
two tablespoons of curry powder, four tablespoons 
of corn starch, and eight tablespoons of mustard. 
Stir this into the hot vinegar until it thickens, then 
pour over the cucumber. Mrs. S. Bremner. 

Pickled Onions. — Place small white onions in a 
kettle of boiling water, after removing the skins. 
As soon as they look clear take them out, and lay 
them in a towel folded double ; when all are done and 
quite dry, put them in jars only three-fourths full. 
Heat the vinegar, adding one red pepper cut in 
pieces, and one ounce each of whole allspice, whole 
black pepper, and salt, to every quart of vinegar. 

Mrs. E. Clift. 

Pickled Cabbage. — One good sized head of cab- 
bage chopped fine, five red peppers cut in small 



I pieces, without the seeds; mix with these, two 
/tablespoons of salt, and put them in a stone jar. 
Heat one quart of vinegar with two ounces of white 
mustard seed, to boiling, and pour over the cabbage, 
( stirring thoroughly. After standing over night it 
) is ready for use. Mrs. James H. Ackerman. 

Pickled Peaches. — One quart of vinegar; seven 
) pounds of sugar ; whole cinnamon, and cloves to 
1 taste. Boil this down, after boiling the peaches in 
i it, until soft enough to take out with a fork. 

Mrs. IV. N. Kip. 

Sweet Pickled Grapes. — Pulp eight pounds of 
grapes, boil the pulps until the seeds separate from 
them, put through a colander, take out the seeds, 
return to the kettle, and boil with the skins. Add 
one cup of vinegar, four pounds of sugar, one table- 
spoon of cloves, one of cinnamon, and one teaspoon 
of mace. Mrs. Frank Hughes. 



CATSUPS AND PICKLES. 



29 



Pickled Currants. — To five pounds of currants 
put four pounds of sugar, one pint of vinegar, one j 
tablespoon of ground cloves, two tablespoons ofj 
ground cinnamon and one ground nutmeg. Boil one { 
hour, stirring often. Mrs. F. M. 

Pickled Eggs. — Boil them twelve minutes, and 
place them immediately in cold water, which will! 
cause the shell to come off easily. Boil some red 
beets till very soft, peel and mash them fine, and 
put them into cold vinegar enough to cover the ' 
eggs; add salt, pepper, cloves and nutmeg. Put the 
eggs into a jar and pour the mixture over them. *. 

Spiced Peaches. — Ten pounds of peaches, three 
and a half pounds of brown sugar, one quart of vin- 
egar, one quart of water, and two ounces each of 
cinnamon, cloves and allspice. Rub the peaches and 
stick a few cloves in them ; boil them in the vine- 
gar, water and sugar, a few at a time to prevent 



them from breaking. After the peaches are all 
boiled and taken out of the syrup, tie the spices in 
thin muslin bags and boil in the syrup ; then pour 
it over the peaches and let it stand until the next 
day; then reboil the syrup, and pour over the 
peaches. Mrs. D. D. Naugle. 

Spiced Grapes. — Take the pulp from the grapes, 
preserving the skins. Boil the pulp, and rub it 
through a colander to get out the seeds, then add 
the skins to the strained pulp and boil with sugar, 
vinegar and spice. To every seven pounds of 
grapes use four and a half pounds of sugar, and one 
pint of vinegar. Spice highly with one teaspoon of 
cinnamon, half a teaspoon of cloves aud one nutmeg. 
Boil a few minutes. Miss H. M. 

Spiced Currants. — Four quarts of currants, three 
and a half pounds of brown sugar, one pint of vine- 
gar, one tablespoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of 



30 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



ground cloves, and one nutmeg. Boil for one hour. | off the vinegar and add to it a little cayenne pepper, 
Miss Sadie M. Dinsmore. j a little salt, a teaspoon of sugar and enough mustard 
S to thicken; mix and boil, stirring constantly. When 
French Mustard. — Grate an onion and cover cold it is ready for use. 
with vinegar. After it has stood for one hour, pour \ Miss Katie C. Brinlkman. 



Salads. 



Chicken Salad. — Chickens must be boiled whole, 
and only the white meat used for really nice salad. 
Two quarts of chicken require one quart of celery. 
The celery and chicken must be cut small, but not 
chopped ; then mixed together and the dressing 
spread over as well as mixed in. Mrs. John Hcmion. 

Turkey or Chicken Salad.— The meat of cold! 
boiled, or roasted fowl minced fine; three-fourths! 
of the same bulk of celery, cut small. Mix the i 
meat and celery, and set in a cool place. 

Dressing: — Two hard boiled eggs ; one raw e^^, 
well beaten; one tablespoon each of salt, pepper < 
and mustard ; three of salad oil or melted butter; ; 
two of white sugar; a small cup of vinegar. Rubj 
the yelks of the eggs to a fine powder ; add the salt, 



I pepper, mustard and sugar, then the oil, rubbing 
I all together. Beat the raw q%z to a froth and mix 
■ well with the dressing ; add the vinegar, beating 
i again thoroughly. Sprinkle a little salt over the 

meat and celery, pour the dressing over it and mix 
'with a silver fork. Garnish with celery tips. 

Canned chicken can be used. Mrs. Fannie Kelly. 

Lobster Salad. — Be careful to get fresh lobsters, 
and to have the water boiling when you put them 
in ; let them boil until they become red, adding a 
handful of salt. In opening lobsters, care must be 
taken to remove the poisonous part; this lies in the 
head, all of which must be thrown away, as well as 
the vein which passes from it through the body ; 
all the other parts are good. Break the shells with 



32 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



a hammer. Any good salad dressing may be used. 
Lobsters are excellent when taken from the shell, 
and eaten cold with vinegar and mustard. JV. 

Potato Salad, I. — Five good sized potatoes boiled 
and cold; add one onion chopped moderately fine; 
season with salt, celery, mustard and cayenne pep- 
per; over this pour half a cup of vinegar, boiling 
hot, with a tablespoon of butter; lastly half a cup 
of cream. Add two hard boiled eggs, minced and 
mixed thoroughly through it ; garnish with parsley 
or lettuce. Mrs. A Z. Van Hmiten. 

Potato Salad, II. — Boil eight large potatoes with 
their skins on, and without salt. Choose those that 
do not go to pieces in boiling. Let them get nearly 
cold, then pare them and cut in slices. Chop one 
onion very fine, and mix with the potatoes, stir in 
a tumbler of vinegar and water, (two-thirds of vin- 
egar and one of water), then add three tablespoons 



\ of salad oil, and pepper and salt to taste. 

: Mrs. W. R. Payne. 

Cardinal Salad. — Chop the stalks of celery into 
half inch lengths. Take one teaspoon of salad oil, 
two tablespoons of vinegar, and a pinch of salt; 
mix this thoroughly through the celery and lay on 
the salad dish. Pour a Mayonnaise dressing over 
the top, with olives. *. 

Potato and Beet Salad. — Cut well-cooked cold 
potatoes and beets into small dice, and mix well; 
set in a cool place till it has all become a delicate 
pink,-by mixing ; then put it in small piles on lettuce 
leaves, and pour over it the following dressing : 

Boston Cooking School Dressing, Nice for all kinds of 
Salads. — One dessert spoon of salt, one tablespoon 
of sugar, two of melted butter, and a little red 
pepper. Add three well beaten eggs, one teacup 
of vinegar, and, lastly, one cup of cream. Stir over 



33 



the fire till it is as thick as soft custai-d. Lettuce) one cup of cream, whipped. Beat the yelks and 
and water-cresses mixed, — garnished with small) dry ingredients till very thick and hard, adding 
radishes; also lettuce with celery, with this cream the melted butter by degrees; as it thickens, add 
dressing, make a nice variety. Mrs. P. E. Kipp. butter more rapidly; salt to taste, and when it gets 

thick, add a little vinegar. When all of the butter 

Salad Dressing', I. — Two beaten eggs, one cup of j and vinegar has been added, add the lemon juice 
milk, one and a half tablespoons of mustard, one and whipped cream. Put all the dressing in a 
heaping tablespoon of sugar, one teaspoon of salt, ', farina kettle and boil until it thickens, stirring con- 
one quarter teaspoon of pepper. Mix all together '1 stantly ; then let it cool, and just before needing 
in a bowl and stand in a vessel of boiling water j the salad, mix half of the dressing with the chicken 
until hot. Heat boiling hot one teacup of vinegar) and celery, and pour the remaining half over the 
and butter the size of an ^g^; stir this gradually salad. Mrs. J. Hemion. 

into the other mixture, and pour it over the cab- j 

bage, stirring thoroughly. After standing over} French Salad Dressing. — Take six tablespoons 
night, it is ready for use. Mrs. J. H. Ackerman. of oil or melted butter, the same of cream or milk, 

\ one teaspoon of salt, and half a teaspoon each of 

Salad Dressing, II. — The yelks of four raw eggs, i pepper and mustard. With this mix a large cup of 
one teaspoon each of sugar and mustard, half a cup vinegar and boil well; after removing from the fire, 
of melted butter, quarter of a cup of vinegar, the add three well beaten eggs, and stir five min- 
juice of half a lemon, a pinch of cayenne pepper, j utes. Miss H. M. 



34 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Lettuce Dressing. — Half a teaspoon each of mixed eggs; beat well and stir into one cup of hot sweet 
mustard and salt, one tablespoon of butter, a small cream; stir all together over the tea-kettle until it 
half cup of heated vinegar; beat in the white of one I thickens like a custard, take from the fire, and add 
egg. Mrs. A. C. Hascy. ( two tablespoons of vinegar. *. 

The Chefs Dressing. — Mix one dessert spoon of | Mayonnaise Dressing. — With the yelk of onoegg, 
dry mustard, half a teaspoon of salt, quarter of a stir in rapidly salad oil until you can cut with a 
teaspoon of pepper, half a teaspoon of celery salt, knife; add the juice of half a lemon, salt, cayenne 
with one tablespoon of butter; when it is all pepper and mustard to taste. Put on ice. 
thorougly stirred together, add the yelks of twoj B. K. — B'dway, N. V. 



Vegetables. 



Potato Puff. — Take two large cups of cold mashed 
potato, and stir into it two tablespoons of melted 
butter, beating to a white cream before adding any- 
thing else. Put with this two eggs beaten very 
light, and a teacup of cream or milk, salting to 
taste. Beat all well, pour into a deep dish, and 
bake in a quick oven until nicely browned. 

Afiss Elsif B. Oakes. 



\ for a few minutes. vSweet cream is better than milk. 
; Mrs. L. W. 

\ Potatoes on Half Shell. — Bake six perfect good 
sized potatoes until done, then cut carefully length- 
wise, scoop out the contents — preserving the shells 
unbroken, beat in a bright tin with a silver fork, sea- 
son with milk or cream, butter, salt and pepper to 



taste. Add the beaten whites of three eggs, stir, and 



Potatoes Creamed. — Ciit into small square pieces j quickly fill the shells evenly 
six medium sized potatoes; put in a spider, cover j to a golden brown, 
with salted water and boil until quite soft. Pour off 
the water and have ready, in a small saucepan, half 
a pint of milk, slightly thickened with cornstarch, a 
little salt, and a piece of butter; having come to a 
boil, pour it over the potatoes and cook all together 



Bake in a hot oven 
Pratt's Inst. B'hlyii. 



Potato Tyrabals. — Eight large potatoes, one 
tablespoon of salt, two tablespoons of butter, half 
a teaspoon of white pepper, three eggs, one cup of 
hot milk, a third of a cup of dry crumbs. Pare the 



36 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



potatoes and boil them in boiling water thirty'min- 
utes, pour off the water, mash and add seasoning, 
milk and eggs well beaten. Butter the mould and ; 
sprinkle the bread crumbs on the bottom and sides, 
put the potatoes in this, and bake in the oven for j 
half an hour; let it stand for a few minutes and 
turn it out on a flat dish. 

Miss Anna Hesse. 

Potato Cakes. — Peel and cook six medium sized 
potatoes, mash in butter and milk, then beat in one 
or two eggs. Make into cakes, and fry in hot fat. 
Mrs. W. W. Taylor. 

Asparagus. — Pare each stalk with a sharp knife, 
beginning with the thin outer skin at a point about 
an inch below the head, and let the thickness of! 
the peel increase as you pass down, so that every 
particle of the fibrous coat, which, when cooked be- 
comes so tough, shall be removed. Lay in cold 



salted water for a short time. Cook and serve on 
toast in the usual way. Your dish will be somewhat 
smaller in bulk for the paring, but if carefully]done, 
the entire length of the stalk will be as tender and 
delicious as the top. Mrs. T. R. GooJlatte. 

Carrots With Cream Sauce. — Scrape, wash and 
cut into cubes, enough carrots to make a quart, put 
into a stew pan with two quarts of boiling water, 
cook one hour, and pour off all the water except half 
a gill. Add one teaspoon of sugar, and one of salt, 
and boil rapidly until all the water evaporates. 
Add the sauce and serve at once. 

Saaee: — Boil three gills of milk, add two table- 
spoons of butter beaten to a froth with a tablespoon of 
flour, half a teaspoon of salt and a little pepper, 
cook for three minutes before pouring over the 
carrots, ( ) 

Green Corn. — .Strip off the coarser husks, leaving 



VEGKTABLES. 



37 



on the fine ones next the ear, pull these down and pick 
off all the silk ; replace the inner husks and tie at 
the top; then drop the corn into boiling salted wa- 
ter. Cook fifteen minutes and send to the table 
wrapped in a napkin on a flat dish. Do not let it 
stand in the pot after it is cooked. * * * 

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes. — Take ripe, firm to- 
matoes, cut a small piece off the top and remove 
the pulp, leaving enough to make a firm cup to 
hold the stuffing. Chop the pulp with bread 
crumbs and an onion, (one onion to six tomatoes), 
season with pepper and salt, and put into the to- 
matoes, with a small piece of butter on each. Bake 
in a pan until they are lightly browned on top. 
The quantity of bread crumbs depends upon the 
size and juiciness of the tomatoes. 

Mrs. G. D. Anderson. 

Boiled String Beans. — To each half gallon of 



) water, allow one heaping tablespoon of salt and a 
very small pinch of soda. This vegetable should 
( always be eaten young, as, when allowed to grow 
(too long, it tastes stringy and tough when cooked. 
J Cut off the heads and tails, and a thin strip on each 
side of the bean, then divide each bean into four or 
I six pieces according to size, cutting them length- 
') ways in a slanting direction, and, as they are cut 
drop them into cold water with a small quantity of 
i salt dissolved in it. Have ready a saucepan of boil- 
; ing water, with salt and soda in the above propor- 
j tion ; put in the beans and keep them boiling quickly 
( with the lid off. When tender, which may be ascer- 
( tained by their sinking to the bottom of the sauce- 
(pan, take them up, throw them into a colander, and 
I when drained, dish, and serve with plain white 
(sauce. Mrs. A. R. Burt^ess. 

J Preserved String Beans. — Late in August or 
) early in September procure a bushel of fresh young 



38 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



beans. vString carefully and cut in inch lengths, or j Egg Plant. — Peel, cut in dice, boil tender in 
in slender strips the entire length of the bean, — the salted boiling water, and serve in white sauce on 
latter plan will take more time, but will make a toast. This is a palatable novelty. G. H. 

much more attractive looking dish on the mid-winter \ 

table. Have ready a large tub that is sweet and \ Scalloped Cabbage. — Put a layer of the cabbage 
water-tight. A butter tub will answer, though one — well boiled — into a baking dish, then a layer of 
with perpendicular sides is better. Cover the bot- broken crackers, butter, salt and pepper, and alter- 
tom with a thick coat of salt, then put in alternate nate the layers until the dish is filled. Pour over 
layers of beans and salt, and let the top layer be a j this good rich milk or cream, and bake, 
liberal one of salt. Use a wooden cover fitting the) Mrs. Garret Terhune. 

inside of the tub, put a heavy weight upon it, and 

stand the tub in a cool place. You will be surprised Cream Cabbage. — Cut up a small head of cab- 
to find in a few hours that the contents of your well bage as for cold slaw. Boil in salted water until 
filled tub have shrunk at least one-third, and that the \ tender, then drain well, and pour over it half a pint 
beans are covered with brine. When needed for! of milk, add a piece of butter the size of an egg and 
use, soak the beans you intend to cook in fresh j a little salt and pepper. Let it come to a boil, and 
water for at least an hour, and, after they have serve. Mrs. T. R. G. 

boiled a short time, change the water so that they \ 

may not be too salt. Boiled Greens or Sprouts. — To each half gallon 

Mrs. T. R. Goodlatte. \ of water allow one heaping tablespoon of salt and a 



VEGETABLES. 



39 



very small pinch of soda. Pick away all the dead J 
leaves and wash the greens well in cold water, drain > 
them in a colander, and put them into fast boiling 
water with salt and soda in the above proportion. / 
Keep them boiling quickly, with the lid off, until 
tender, and the moment they are done take them 
up or their color will be spoiled. When well 
drained, serve. The great art in cooking greens 
properly and in having them of a good color, is to ', 
put them into plenty of fast boiling water, to let them 
boil very quickly and to take them up the moment 
they become tender. Young greens take ten to 
twelve minutes, sprouts twelve minutes, after the 
water boils. Mrs. A. R. B. 

New England Baked Beans. — One quart of beans \ 
soaked over night in cold water. Drain, and put in 
a covered stone jar with one-quarter of a pound of I 
salt pork, three tablespoons of molasses, erne tea- < 
spoon of ground mustard, half a teaspoon of soda, 



salt and pepper to taste. Cover with luke-warm 
water, and bake twelve hours, adding water from 
time to time as it dries away. Have the oven quite 
hot at first, gradually diminishing the heat. The 
small white bean that does not fall apart in cooking 
is the best to select for this manner of preparing. 
Mrs. M. L. Bullock. 

Spaghetti with Italian Sauce. — Put one pound 
of spaghetti in boiling water with one teaspoon of 
salt; boil twenty minutes, drain in a colander, then 
place in a deep dish and pour over sauce made as 
follows : 

Sauce: — Two small white onions, sliced fine and 
browned nicely in half a cup of butter; simmer one 
quart of tomatoes, mix together and strain fine. 
Sprinkle over one cup of grated cheese. 

Miss Libbie Still. 

Macaroni and Cheese. — Half apound of macaroni 



40 



COOKS IN CLOVER, 



broken in pieces an inch long; cook in boiling wa- 
ter slightly salted, for twenty minutes. Drain, and 
put a layer in the bottom of a well greased baking 
dish ; upon this, spread some grated cheese and 
small bits of butter, then more macaroni, and so on 
until the dish is filled. Have grated cheese on top. 
Wet with a little milk, salt slightly, cover and bake 
half an hour; brown, and serve in the dish. 

Mrs. John Heinion. 

Rice Croquettes. — Two cups of cold boiled rice, 
two tablespoons of melted butter, three well beaten 
eggs, two tablespoons of white sugar, a large pinch 
of finely grated lemon peel, and salt to taste. 
Beat the eggs and sugar together until light, 
and work the butter well into the rice, mix both 



! together, season and make into croquettes of what- 
I ever shape you fancy. Roll in a little flour, then in 
one beaten egg, lastly in half a cup of powdered 
\ cracker, and fry a few at a time, in lard or butter. 
I Miss. S. G. Wallis. 

, Noodles. — Beat four or five eggs very light, add 

J a teaspoon of salt, and stir in flour until stiff; turn 

; out on a cake board, and knead in flour until the 

I mass is hard; cut in pieces, roll out in irregular 

'sheets as thin as wafers, and put them on a clean 

cloth to dry for half an hour. Lay these sheets in 

a pile, sprinkling flour lightly between the layers, 

and cut into shreds with a very sharp knife. Dip 

a few at a time into any kind of broth, and boil all 

twenty minutes. Mrs. H. IV. Crane. 



Eggs. 



Omelette, I. — Six eggs, one chip of milk, one table- j 
spoon of flour, and a pinch of salt. Beat the whites \ 
and yelks separately. Mix the flour, milk and salt ; \ 
add the yelks, and then the beaten whites. Have a! 
buttered spider very hot, and pour in the mixture. 
Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. J. H. Ackerinan. 

Omelette, II. — Six eggs, whites and yelks beaten 
separately; half a pint of milk, six teaspoons of corn 
starch, one teaspoon of baking powder and one tea- 
spoon of salt. Melt a heaping tablespoon of butter 
in a frying pan, and, when the mixture has set, add 
the whites beaten to a stiff froth ; cut in two in the 
center and turn one half over the other before send- 
ing to the table. Mrs. Peter Doremus. 



Omelette, I II. — Beat six eggs very thoroughly, the 
yelks to a cream, and the whites to a stiff froth ; 
add to the beaten yelks one tablespoon of flour or 
corn starch mixed smooth in one ciip of sweet milk, 
salt and pepper, and a piece of butter as large as an 
English walnut; now pour this over the white froth 
and, without stirring at all, pour the whole into a hot 
buttered omelette pan. Cook on the top of the stove, 
over a brisk fire about five minutes. Gently re- 
move it to the hot oven and let it brown. Serve 
hot. 

Miss Ella L. Burt. 

Omelette IV. — Soak a teacup of bread crumbs in a 
cup of sweet milk over night. Beat separately the 
yelks and whites of three eggs, mix the yelks with 



42 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



the bread and milk, stir in the whites, add a little i 
salt and fry brown. Mrs. O. IV. Fowler. 

Ham Omelette. — Three eggs, beaten very thor- 
oughly ; three quarters of a cup of milk ; one table- - 
spoon of corn starch with half a teaspoon of baking i 
powder mixed in, and a little milk to wet it; half! 
a cup of chopped ham, cooked and cold. Grease a] 
frying pan on all sides, have it very hot, and turn | 
in the mixture. The fire should not be too hot. 
Keep cutting away from the sides, and when the ] 
Qgg is set, turn half of it over with a griddle turner. 
Mrs. M. L. Blizard. 

Marguerites. — Six hard boiled eggs, lettuce to 
make the shells, one scant tablespoon of mustard, 
half a teaspoon of salt, three tablespoons of oil, 
one tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice, and 
half a teaspoon of pepper. Cut the whites care- 
fully in two, mash all the yelks together, and grad- 



ally add the seasoning; fill in the whites with the 
prepared yelks, and place each half-egg in two 
leaves of lettuce. Miss A. Hesse. 

Stuffed Eggs. — Boil the eggs very hard ; when 
cold, remove the shells and cut in half, taking out 
the yelks and putting them in a bowl ; stir with 
a spoon, adding olive oil or butter, a little mustard, 
salt, pepper and vinegar to taste, and a little sugar 
if you like. Mix together and place back in the 
white half. A little chopped ham may be added. 

Mrs. J. Hcmion. 

Crumbed Eggs. — Cut six hard boiled eggs into 
I slices, dip them into melted butter, then into fine 
I cracker crumbs, and fry in good drippings; spread 
; triangles of fried bread with anchovy paste, lay 
them in a hot platter and arrange the eggs on these; 
! pour over all a cup of drawn butter, into which a 
! raw egg has been stirred. ( ). 



43 



Poached Eggs. — Into a frying pan pour plenty 
of boiling water, and a teaspoon of salt. Let it boil 
steadily, but not violently. Break an egg into a 
cup and pour it very cautiously and quickly on the 
surface of the water. Do not put more than three 
eggs in the pan at a time. They should be cooked 
in three minutes, taken up with a skimmer, and 
laid on a hot flat dish, in which a teaspoon of but- 
ter has been melted. When all are done, pepper 
and salt lightly, put a bit of butter on each egg, 
and serve very hot. A square piece of toast, dipped 
for half a minute in hot water, may be placed under 
each egg, and is quite an addition. * * *_ 



( eggs and stir them briskly, until you have a soft 
I mass just firm enough not to run over the bottom 
<! of the heated dish on which you turn it out. Make 
'■ it into a neat mound, and garnish the edge of the 
i dish with parsley. * * * 

; Baked Eggs. — Break fresh eggs into a buttered 
I earthen dish and cover with sweet cream, allowing 
J two tablespoons of cream for each egg. Bake in a 
5 hot oven for a few moments. Serve hot with but- 
I ter, pepper and salt. The most dainty way of serv- 
/ ing, is to bake the number required for each person 
j in a separate saucer. Mrs. M. L. Bullock. 



Scrambled Eggs. — Nine eggs, one tablespoon of ;' Egg Vermicelli.— Three eggs boiled twenty 
butter, half a teaspoon of salt, a little pepper, half a'! minutes, four slices of bread toasted and cut in 
teacup of milk. Break the eggs in a bowl with the ) squares and triangles, one cup of milk, one teaspoon 
milk, and beat them until light. Put the butter in \ of butter, and one heaping teaspoon of flour. Melt 
a frying pan and set it on the range ; as it melts \ the butter, and stir in the flour, boil the milk, and 
add pepper and salt. When it hisses, pour in the | mix the butter and flour with it, adding half a tea- 



COOKS IN Cl.OVEU. 



spoon of salt, and one salt spoon of pepper. Chop 
the whites of the eggs, put them in the sauce, and 
pour this over the squares of bread; over this mash 
the yelks through a strainer. Garnish the edges 
with the squares and jiarslcy. 

J/rs. £. C. Gin. 

Egg Toast. — Four hard boiled eggs, boiled twenty 
minutes; one pint of drawn butter; delicate toast 
with all the crust removed. Chop the whites of the 
eggs fine and add to the warm drawn butter; this is 
poured over half a dozen pieces of toast. Then 
through a wire basket sift the yelks of the eggs like 



^gold dust, till it is all thoroughly covered. Edge 
I the dish with parsley. Mrs. P. E. Kipp. 

I Egg Nests. — Six eggs, one tablespoon of butter, 
( one teaspoon of salt, and pepper if desired. Beat 
\ the whites to a stiff froth and put the salt into them. 
I Keep the yelks in the shell, being careful not to 
\ break them; form the whites on the toast, leaving 
a cavity in the center for the yelks ; before slip- 
ping in the yelks, place a little butter, and if wished, 
some chopped ham on the toast. Place in the oven 
and bake two and a half minutes. Serve on but- 
tered toast. Miss Fannie Gray. 



Bread, Biscuit, &c. 



Wheat Bread, I. — Take three pints of lukewarm 
water, and sufficient flour to make a batter not quite 
stiff enough to allow a spoon to stand in it ; add two 
even teaspoons of salt. Dissolve one compressed 
yeast cake in a little warm water; mix thoroughly, 
and set to rise over night ; if the weather is cold, be 
sure to stand it in a warm place. In the morning 
add flour, and knead about twenty minutes; set it at 
one side to rise again for about one hour, and w'hen 
ready, knead fifteen minutes more; mould and put 
into pans ; when risen to the top, place in a moderate 
oven, and bake one hour. This will make three 
loaves. Mix the sponge about nine o'clock in the 
evening. Af. E. 

Wheat Bread, II. — About six o'clock in the even- 



|ing boil two potatoes in half a pint of water; put half 
! a pint of flour in a bowl, pour the potatoes and 
I water through the colander, and mash them ; stir 
\ well, and let it get lukewarm. Dissolve one cake 
I of Baker's safe yeast in a little warm water, stir this 
'into the batter, set in a warm place and cover. 

Place three pints of flour and one pint of water in a 
ibowl, stir well, pour it in the sponge, and set it in 
; a warm place until morning. Then add a little 

lard, a teaspoon of sugar and a tablespoon of salt; 
; stiffen with flour, turn out and knead for half an 

hour. Put it back in the bowl and allow it to rise 
; until twice its size, then knead until it is round, and 
' cut into loaves ; place them in the pans and let them 

rise until twice the size. Bake three quarters of an 
[hour. After removing from the oven, take a small 



46 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



piece of butter and rub it well over the top, then i pans, let it rise about twenty minutes. Bake one 
roll up the loaves and set them aside to cool. j and a half hours in a moderate oven. This will 

Mn. P. jmake three medium sized loaves. Miss Matfie Cliff. 



Graham Bread, I. — Set sponge over night made of 
one quart of water, one teaspoon of salt, and half an 
yeast cake; thicken with white flour, add half a cup 
of molasses, and Graham flour enough to stir quite 
thick with a spoon, but not stiff enough to handle. 
In the morning put into bread tins, let it rise a 
short time, and bake one hour. This makes two 
loaves. Mrs. H. R. Wells. 

Graham Bread, II.— Wet three and a half pounds 
of Graham flour with three pints of luke-warm 
water, adding two heaping tablespoons of salt, and 
one Fleischman's yeast cake; add one teacup of 
molasses, and shortening about the size of an t.%^\ 
mix with a spoon; add sufficient flonr to make 
about the consistency of cake. After putting it in 



Boston Brown Bread, I. — Two and a half cups 
of granulated Indian meal, two and a half cups 
of Graham flour, one cup of Porto Rico molasses, one 
; teaspoon of salt. Mix the meal and salt with boiling 
water, add molasses and lastly the flour. Bake in a 
covered tin very slowly at least eight hours. 

Mrs. F. M. Swan. 

Boston Brown Bread, II.— Three and a half 
cups of corn meal ; one cup of rye or Graham flour ; 
one cup of wheat flour; half a cup of molasses; one 
and a half pints of milk and water; two teaspoons 
of baking powder, and one of salt. Steam or boil 
four hours; then, removing the cover, place the 
bread in a hot oven and bake half an hour. 

Mrs. V. Hussey. 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 



47 



Boston Brown Bread, III. — Two cups of Indian) 
meal, two cups of rye flour, one ci:p of wheat flour, 
two-thirds of a cup of molasses, one and ahalf pints j 
of milk, a little salt, and one large teaspoon of sal- 1 
eratus. Pour this in a long tin pail, put in a pot with 
just enough water to keep it boiling, cover the 
pail closely so that it is water tight, keep boiling 
three hours, and you will have a loaf of bread with- 
out crust. Mrs. J. R. 

Boston Brown Bread, IV. — Half a pint of rye 
flour, a pint of sifted Indian meal, a pint of sour 
milk, half a gill of molasses, a teaspoon of salt and 
a large teaspoon of saleratus. The bread should be 
cooked at least four hours. 

Mrs. M. H. C. 

Biscuit, I. — One quart of flour; one teaspoon of 
salt ; three teaspoons of baking powder ; one table- 
spoon of butter; one pint of sweet milk. Sift to-| 



gether the flour, salt, and powder; rub in the butter, 
add the milk and form into smooth, consistent 
dough. Mrs. L. If. Lutz. 

Biscuit, II.— Allow one tablespoon of lard or but- 
ter to one quart of flour, and two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder; add a little salt, and mix with milk to 
make a soft dough. Roll out, cut into biscuit and 
bake in a very hot oven. Mrs. W. W. Taylor. 

] Drop Biscuit. — One quart of flour; three tea- 
1 spoons of baking powder; one teaspoon of salt ; but- 
ter the size of an egg, rubbed into the flour; one 
I pint of milk. Drop from a spoon in a buttered pan. 
Bake in a quick oven. Miss E. B. O. 

Raised Biscuit, I. — Make a sponge of a pint of 
milk and half an yeast cake. When light, add a 
heaping teaspoon of butter, half a cup of sugar, half 
a teaspoon of soda, and salt. Mrs. A. H. Ackerman. 



48 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Raised Biscuit, II. — One cup of milk warm { in a pan half an hour. Bake twenty minutes 
enough to melt one cup of lard, one cup of fine 
mashed potatoes, one quart of flour, half an yeast 
cake, and a little salt. Let it rise over night ; in the 
morning stir in enough flour to make a soft dough : 
let it rise, make into biscuit, and let them rise again 
a little before baking. ,' 

Mrs. A. M Sproiill. \ 



Graham Biscuit. — Three cups of Graham flour, 
two cups of wheat flour, half a cup of lard, three 
teaspoons of baking powder, one cup of sugar, 
half a teaspoon of salt. Mix lightly and bake in a 
quick oven. Mrs. Peter Doremiis. 



Fried Biscuit. — Work a piece of butter the size 
of an egg into a large pint of light bread dough; 
when it has risen again, roll it very thin, cut into 
circles or squares, and fry for breakfast. * * * 

Breakfast Rolls. — One pint of milk, one teaspoon 
of salt, flour to make a stiff batter, half a com- 
pressed yeast cake ; set it to rise over night. In the 
morning add half a cup of butter, one egg, and flour 
to make a stiff dough. Let it rise again ; when it 
gets very light, shape into rolls, and set them to rise 



; Buns, I. — Half of a compressed yeast cake, one 
I pint of milk, three eggs, quarter of a pound of but- 
|ter, quarter of a pound of sugar. Mix soft. When 
I light bake in a quick oven. Miss H. M. 

Buns, II. — One cup of milk, one cup of sugar, 
four teaspoons of butter, four teaspoons of yeast, 
I half a cup of currants; make a batter at night of the 
!milk, yeast, and one half of the sugar; in the morn- 
I ing add the remainder of the sugar, butter, fruit, 
' and flour to mould ; cut and put in pans to rise, be- 
; fore baking. Mrs. J. Duckworth. 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. ,„ 

Johnny Cake, I. — Take a cup of corn meal, and the meal should be yellow; 
Add a cup of wheat flour, to make the meal mellow; 
Of sugar a cup, white or brown at your pleasure, 
The color is nothing; — the point is the measure. 

Now, after the sugar, the flour, and the meal. 
Comes a cup of sour cream, but, unless you should steal 
From your neighbors, I fear you would never be able 
This item to put upon your cook's table; 
For sure and indeed, in all towns I remember. 
Sour cream is as scarce as June bugs in December. 

Instead of sour cream, then, take one cup of milk ; 

Sweet milk from the dairy,— what a sweet phrase to utter I 
And to make it cream-like, put into the cup 

Just three tablespoons, and heaping, of butter. 
Of cream-tartar and soda, each a teaspoon then add. 
Or else your poor corn cake will go to the bad . 

Two eggs must be broken, without being beat, 

Then a teaspoon of salt your work will complete. 
Twenty minutes of baking are needful to bring 

To the point of perfection, this awful good thing. Bishop Williams. 



5° 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Johnny Cake, II. — Two cups of Indian meal, one baking soda, two eggs, salt to taste, sweet milk to 
cup of flour, one cup of molasses, two eggs, half make the batter. 

a teaspoon of saleratus, one and a half cups of milk, Mrs. Holden. 

half a teaspoon of salt. Bake half an hour in a hot! 

oven. Mrs. Robt. Bell. Rusk. — One pint of milk, three eggs, half a cup 

I of sugar, half a tablespoon each of butter and lard, 

Johnny Cake, III. — Three cups of corn meal, two one yeast cake, salt. Bake in a slow oven, 
cups of flour, one cup of molasses, one teaspoon of) Mrs. R. Inglis. 



Muffins, Waffles, Etc. 



Muffins, I. — Two eggs, [one cup of sweet milk, but- 
ter the size of an egg, two teaspoons of cream-tar- 
tar, one teaspoon of soda, a small pinch of salt. Mix 
as stiff as cake. Beat the eggs well ; next add the 
butter after it has been chopped fine, then the milk, 
next the flour with the cream-tartar; lastly the soda 
dissolved in a little milk. Mrs. T. M. Moore. 

Muffins, II. — One pint of milk; two beaten eggs; 
two tablespoons of melted butter ; two tablespoons of 
sugar; two teaspoons of baking powder; flour to 
make a batter that will drop from the spoon. 

Mrs. Geo. E. Moyer. 

Muffins, III. — Two cups of milk, half a cup ofj 
sugar, two teaspoons of baking powder, salt. Add ! 



flour to make batter about the consistency of cake. 
Must be baked in a quick oven. 

Mrs. H. J. Jaqmth. 

Golden Muffins. — Two teacups of sweet milk, two 
eggs beaten very light, half a teaspoon of salt, one 
tablespoon of butter, one teaspoon of sugar, three 
teacups of flour, two teaspoons of Royal baking pow- 
der. Miss Kate Kennell. 

Graham Muffins.— Two eggs, one pint of milk, 
one cup of Graham flour, one cup of wheat flour, 
one teaspoon of salt. Bake in cups. 

Mrs. R. Inglis. 

Corn Muffins, I. — One and a half small cups of 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



flour, half a small cup of Indian meal, filled with 1 
flour ; one teaspoon of salt, one tablespoon of I 
sugar, nearly a pint of milk added to make a batter 
little thicker than batter cakes. Add two beaten 
eggs, and two full teaspoons of Royal baking pow- 
der. Bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs. S. IV. Waterhouse. 

Corn Muffins, II. — Two cups of Indian meal, 
one cup of wheat flour, half a cup of butter, two eggs, 
one teaspoon of salt, half a cup of sugar, two heap- 
ing teaspoons of baking powder. Stir all with sweet 
milk or water to a soft dough. Put in small pans 
and bake immediately in a hot oven. 

Mn. IV. M. Payne. 

Waffles. — One scant quart of flour, one quart of 
milk, one teaspoon of salt, four tablespoons of melted 
butter, fotir eggs, two heaping teaspoons of baking 
powder. Mix all together and beat until very light. 



Bake in a waffle iron, dust with powdered sugar, 
and serve at once. Mrs. J. H. Whitehead. 

Raised Waffles. — One quart of milk, half a 
pound of butter, four eggs, half a compressed yeast 
cake, a teaspoon of salt, and flour for the consis- 
tency of pancake batter. Set this to rise in the 
morning, and it will be ready to be baked in a 
waffle iron for supper. * * * 

Gems. — Two cups of flour, one cup of sweet 
milk, one or two eggs, one teaspoon of baking pow- 
der, a little salt. Bake in gem pans in a quick 
oven. Miss H. M. 

Breakfast Gems.— One tablespoon of butter, two 
[ tablespoons of sugar, one &%%, two tumblers of flour, 
; two teaspoons of baking powder, one cup of milk. 
iBake in gem pans fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. R. B. Timiall. 



MUFFINS, WAFFLES, ETC 53 

Graham Gems. — Two cups of (iraham flour, two \ of butter, two teaspoons of baking powder. Bake 
cups of wheat flour, one tablespoon of lard, two ta- in a hot oven. A/rs. A. C. Hascy. 

blespoons of sugar or molasses, four teaspoons of 

baking powder, a little salt; add milk or water to! Buttermilk Pancakes.— Three pints of fresh but- 
make stiff batter. Have the gem pans hot when the Uermilk, one teaspoon of baking soda, salt to taste, 
mixture is dropped in them. Afiss S. E. Brawn. f flour sufficient to make a pancake batter. Fry on a 

(well-greased pan. Mrs. W. Holden. 

Butter Cups. — Beat one cup of sugar with a third ! 
of a cup of butter to a cream ; add half a cup of milk, } Green Corn Griddle Cakes.—Grate eight medium 
and one and a half cups of flour, to which has been | sized ears of sweet corn; add half a pint of milk, 
added two scant teaspoons of baking powder; lastly^ one beaten q^Z^ two tablespoons of melted butter, 
the five beaten yelks. Flavor with lemon. Bake (half a teaspoon each of salt and pepper, two tea- 
in gem tins. Mrs. D. C. Cowdrey. spoons of baking powder, and flour enough to make 

I a batter suitable for cooking in thin cakes on a hot 

Puffs. — One pint of flour, one pint of milk, two {griddle. Very nice, served with roast beef or 
eggs, salt. This makes thirteen puffs. Bake forty- j beefsteak. Mrs. M. L. Bullock. 

five minutes in a very hot oven. Mrs. H. Wallis. \ 

Swiss Fondu of Cheese. — Make a batter of a 

Lunch Puffet. — One quart of flour, one pint of (scant pint of fresh milk, one cup of fine dry bread 
milk, half a cup of sugar, two eggs, one tablespoon crumbs, two well beaten eggs, a small tablespoon 



54 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



of melted butter, salt, pepper, and a pinch of soda J 
dissolved in hot water. Cover the bottom of a well 
buttered baking dish with some of the batter, over 
it put a thick layer of dry cheese grated fine, then ^ 
more of the batter, and so on until nearly half a 
pound of cheese, and all of the batter, have been used. \ 
Sprinkle dry bread crumbs over the top, and bake ( 
a light brown. Serve immediately. { 

Mrs. T. R. Goodlatte. \ 
i 
Sally Lunn. — One cup of milk, two and a halfj 
cups of flour, one &%<g, two teaspoons of baking pow- j 
der one tablespoon of butter, one of sugar. Nice 
for breakfast. Mrs. O. W. Fowler. 

Cheese Straws. — Three tablespoons each of; 



grated cheese and flour, a little salt and red pepper ; 
add to these one tablespoon of melted butter, one 
of water, and the yelk of one egg. Roll thin as 
for cookies, and cut in strips five inches long and 
half an inch wide. Bake fifteen minutes. In 
serving, build the straws up like a log cabin, on a 
fringed Doily covering the plate. 



Cracker Rare-Bit. — Cover the bottom of a baking 
pan with crackers, and put a tablespoon of grated 
cheese on each one, with a little salt and pepper. 
Place in a very hot oven ; when the cheese is melted, 
add one cup of milk, and return to the oven until 
the milk is absorbed ; then serve immediately. 

Daisy Crane. 



Pies. 



Plain Pie Crust. — One cup of lard, three of flour, 
half a cup of cold or ice water, a little salt. Do 
not use your hands in mixing. Afrs. J. Hemion. 

Pie Crust. — Sift a quart of flour into a pan, cut 
into it half a pound of lard and a quarter of a pound 
of butter, add a saltspoon of salt, and cold water to 
form a dough; stir it together with a knife, using 
your hands as little as possible; flour the pie-board 
and roll out; dust it with flour, and roll again; re- 
peat this until you have rolled it out four times; 
set it aside for half an hour, roll out again and use 
as required. Use as little flour as possible in 
rolling out. Mrs. H. 

Half Puff Paste for Fruit Pies.— Sift one pound 



) of flour into your paste bowl, cut in it quarter of a 
I pound of lard, add a small pinch of salt, and mix to a 
} dough with cold water, flour your pie board, turn 
I out the paste, roll it out half an inch thick, sprinkle 
j lightly with flour and roll again ; lay on it half a 
I pound of butter, fold the crust over it, roll out as 
'before, dust lightly with flour, fold and roll it again ; 
\ repeat this once more. Set aside in a cool place 
i for half an hour, give it another roll, and it is ready 



for use. 



Mrs. H. 



Cream Pie. — Three pints of milk, two cups of 
sugar, three eggs, nine tablespoons of flour. Scald 
two and a half pints of the milk, stir the flour into 
the remainder, add the beaten eggs and sugar, and 
pour all into the scalding milk; add a little salt and 



56 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



let it boil until it thickens; flavor with nutmeg, and 
bake on a rich paste. Mrs. F. S. Dates. 

Custard Pie. — One quart of milk, five eggs, five 
tablespoons of sugar, a pinch of salt. Mix well, 
flavor, put in a pie dish lined with crust, and bake 
carefully. For cocoanut pie, add half a cocoanut — 
grated, to this mixture. * * *. 

Apple Pie. — Cover a pie plate with a good plain 
crust; peel and slice enough juicy apples to round 
the dish full, sprinkling sugar well through, and 
bits of butter. Add a scant teacup of water, and 
flavor. Cover with a crust, press the edges tightly 
together, and bake. Mrs. /. H. Whitehead. 

Orange Pie. — Three eggs, three fourths of a cup 
of white sugar, two tablespoons of butter, the juice 
and grated rind of half an orange, the juice and 
grated rind of half a lemon, nutmeg to taste. Beat 



)the butter and sugar together well; then beat in the 
yelks of the eggs, and the orange and lemon ; put 
I into pastry without top crust, and bake. When 
I done, spread over them the whites of the eggs 
I beaten stiff with powdered sugar, and return to the 
\ oven for a few minutes to brown. 
) Mrs. /. Duckworth. 

\ Lemon Meringue Pie, I. — The grated rind and 
(juice of three lemons, the yelks of three eggs, three 
\ cups of sugar, one cup of water, one tablespoon of 
\ corn starch and a lump of butter. Cook these to- 
Igether until it thickens, stirring constantly. 
i Cover a pie dish with a rich crust and bake, then 
I fill, and cover with a meringue made of the whites 
I of three eggs, and two tablespoons of powdered 
sugar. Mrs. S. Bremner. 

Lemon Meringue Pie, IL — Two tablespoons of 
(corn starch wet in a little cold water;stir in briskly 



two teacups of boiling water ; add two cups of sugar 
and a small piece of butter. It is best to prepare this 
first, so that it may have time to cool somewhat be- 
fore adding the juice of two lemons, and the yelks S 
of three eggs, leaving the whites for a meringue to ) 
be spread on the pie after it is baked. Then put it 
in the oven long enough to brown the meringue. / 

Mrs. F. M. 

\ 
Lemon Pie, I. — Six lemons, five cups of boiling) 

water, four tablespoons of corn starch, four eggs, { 

and four cups of sugar. Mrs. J. H. B. I 

Lemon Pie, H. — One heaping tablespoon of cornj 
starch, one cup of boiling water, one cup of sugar, I 
one &%,%, one tablespoon of butter, and one lemon. \ 
Moisten the corn starch with a little cold water, 
then add the boiling water ; stir this over the fire ) 
for two or three minutes, allowing it to boil ; add j 
the butter and sugar. Remove from the fire, and, | 



when slightly cooled, add one &%%., and the juice 
and grated rind of one lemon. This is for one pie 
only. Miss Lottie M. Sti/l. 

Lemon Pie, III. — Three lemons, one cup each of 
sugar and molasses, two eggs, two tablespoons of 
corn starch, blended in a little cold v>rater. Squeeze 
the lemons and chop the peel ; put in the oven as soon 
as mixed, to prevent the corn starch from settling. 
Mrs. Geo. W. Royce. 

Pumpkin Pie. — Cut in pieces half a medium sized 
pumpkin, steam, and press through a colander; 
when cold, add two quarts of milk, one pound of 
light brown sugar, five beaten eggs, one tablespoon 
of corn starch smoothed in cold milk, ginger, nut- 
meg and salt. Mrs. J H. 

Pumpkin Pie Without Eggs. — Prepare the 
pumpkin in the same manner as you would when you 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



use eggs, take a tablespoon of flour to a pie, mix it 
with milk, stir in the prepared pumpkin, and bake. 

Mrs. E. C. Gill. 

Raisin Pie. — Boil one pound of raisins in one 
quart of water, adding water so that there will be 
about a quart when done ; mix well together the 
grated rind and juice of one lemon, one cup of 
sugar, three teaspoons of flour, and one e.^^; then 
turn the raisins over this mixture, stirring all the 
time. Mrs. E..M. Cliff. 

Banbury Turnovers. — One cup of seeded raisins 
chopped very fine, one cup of cracker crumbs, one 
cup of sugar, the juice and grated rind of one lemon, 
one &%%. Make a nice puff -paste and cut it in large 
roiinds the size of a saucer, put one tablespoon of 



the filling in each, turning one half of the paste 
I over the mixture, and press the edges closely to- 
\ gether. 

Miss M. N. Dinsviore. 

Grandma's Mince-Meat. — Ten pounds of round 
beef well boiled, three pounds of suet, one peck of 
greening apples, all chopped separately and mixed 
I together, with two tablespoons of salt. Add to this 
three pounds of seeded raisins, three of currants — 
thoroughly washed and dried, three of light brown 
? sugar-dissolved in a gallon of sweet cider, one pint 
) of brandy, four teaspoons of allspice, four of cinna- 
jmon, and two of cloves; three nutmegs. These in- 
gredients must be thoroughly mixed. Lay fine 
slices of citron on each pie before putting on the 
\ upper crust. * * * 



Puddings and Sauces. 



Plum Pudding, John Bull's Own. — One pound 
each of suet, moist brown sugar, currants, raisins, > 
Sultana raisins, mixed candied peel, and bread J 
crumbs ; one quarter of a pound of flour; one tea- 
spoon each of salt and mixed spice ; eight eggs, and 
one quarter of a pint of brandy. Chop finely the 
suet, stone the raisins, remove stalks from the 
Sultanas, thoroughly wash and dry the currants, 
sift the bread crumbs, chop the peel very finely and 
mix all in the following order: Flour, salt, spice, 
sugar, raisins, peel, bread crumbs. Sultanas and 
currants. Beat the eggs well, add the brandy to 
them, and pour over the mass. Stir for twenty 
minutes, till the ingredients are thoroughly mixed. 
Flour a cloth well, in which boil the pudding for 
twelve hours. It may be made any length of time 



before required. Boil ten hours when first made, 
and two hours to heat it by boiling or steaming, the 
latter preferred. Mrs. A. R. Burgess. 

Plum Pudding.- — One cup of beef suet, one cup 
of currants, one cup of seeded raisins, half a pound 
of citron, one dozen figs, half a teacup of blanched 
almonds, all to be chopped fine ; one cup of molasses, 
one cup of sweet milk, three cups of flour, one &%^, 
one teaspoon each of mace, cinnamon, cloves, and 
salt, one tablespoon of baking powder. Mix well, 
and steam two hours. To be served hot with hard 
and liquid sauce, flavored to taste. 

Mrs. H. P. Doretntis. 

Queen of Plum Puddings. — One pound of but- 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



ter and of suet, freed from strings and chopped very 
fine ; one pound of sugar, two and a half pounds of 
flour, two pounds of raisins, seeded, chopped and 
dredged ; two pounds of currants, picked over care- 
fully after they are washed , one and a quarter 
pounds of citron, shredded fine; twelve eggs, the 
whites and yelks beaten separately; one pint of 
milk, one cup of brandy, half an ounce each of 
cloves and mace, two grated nutmegs. Cream the 
butter and sugar, and beat in the yelks whipped 
smooth and light; next put in the milk, then the 
flour, alternately with the beaten whites; then the 
brandy and spice; lastly the fruit, well dredged 
with flour ; mix all thoroughly. Boil in steamer or 
cloth five hours. Mrs. J. IV. Meloney. 

English Plum Pudding. — Two pounds of moist 
sugar, sixteen eggs, two pounds of bread crumbs, 
two pounds of suet, two pounds of raisins, one and 
three-quarter pounds of currants, one pound of Sul- 



tanas, a quarter of a pound of chopped almonds, the 
rind of two lemons, and the juice of three, a quar- 
ter of a pint of brandy, one ounce each of ground 
nutmeg and cinnamon, a quarter of a pound of can- 
died lemon peel, and half a pound of orange peel. 
Chop the raisins and suet, cut the citron, lemon and 
orange peel fine, wash the currants and Sultanas, 
and beat the eggs very light. It is usually necessary 
to add a little milk to make it thin enough. In ty- 
ing, do not allow room to swell, or it will become 



water soaked. 



Mrs. E. A. Spiegle. 



Eureka Fruit Pudding. — Into one teacup of mo- 
lasses, stir one teaspoon of soda until it foams; add 
flour enough to make a very stiff batter, then add 
one pint of berries — floured, and a pinch of salt. 
' Steam two hours. Serve while hot, with liquid 
sauce. 

\ Sauce: — To the white of one egg beaten to a froth, 
\ add half a teacup of sugar, then the yelk well beaten , 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



5i 



serving, 



and flavor to suit the taste. Just before 
add two tablespoons of boiling water. 

Mrs. L. W. F. 



Taylor Pudding. — One cup of molasses, one cup 
of milk, half a cup of butter, two cups of raisins, 
one teaspoon of ginger, half a teaspoon of cinnamon, 
! half a teaspoon of cloves, two and a half cups of 
Christmas Plum Pudding.— vSoak half a small \ flour, one heaping teaspoon of baking powder. 

Steam three hours; serve hot with sauce. 

Mrs. S. Brcrnner. 



loaf of bread in a pint of milk ; when it is thoroughly j 
soaked, add to it half a pound of beef suet chopped j 
very fine, one pound of raisins stoned and chopped, \ 
a pound of currants, a tablespoon of sugar, two well i 
beaten eggs, half a nutmeg grated, a tablespoon of j 
cinnamon, and a small teaspoon of allspice. Mix 
well together, and boil in a well floured bag for three j 
hours. Serve hot. ( 

Sauce: — A third of a cup of butter and one and a J 
half cups of sugar, creamed together. Dissolve a 
tablespoon of corn starch in a little cold milk, and 
cook in a teacup of boiling water; when cooked, 
pour over the creamed butter and sugar, and beat a 
few minutes. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. Geo. E. Moycr. 



Boiled Apple Pudding. — Three pints of sweet 
milk, two eggs, salt to taste, two heaping teaspoons 
of Royal baking powder, flour sufficient to make 
an ordinary batter, three quarts of apples, pared, 
cored and quartered. Butter thoroughly a large, 
tightly covered tin pail, put in the apples, pour the 
batter over them and cover tightly. Set the pail in 
a large pot half filled with boiling water, putting 
something perforated in the bottom of the pot, to 
raise the pail so that the water may boil underneath, 
then cover the pot tightly, and boil steadily for 
three hours. Renew the water from a boiling 



62 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



kettle, to retain the quantity, 
sauce. 



Serve hot, with hard cover all with an icing made of the whites of the 
Mrs. Wm. Holden. \ eggs. Serve with sweet cream. Mrs. D. C. Cmvdrey. 



Apple Dumpling. — Half a pound of kidney suet 
— .skinned and chopped fine, one and a half pints of 
flour, a little salt ; mix as for pie crust. Peel and 
quarter about one dozen apples, roll out the crust, 
place the apples in the center of it, then bring the 
four corners of the crust together and pinch well, 
so as to prevent the juice from boiling out. Tie up 
tightly in a cloth that has been well floured, put in 
boiling water, and boil one and a half hours. Serve! 
with any kind of pudding sauce. Mrs. H. Wallis. 

Cable Pudding. — Mix three tablespoons of but- 
ter, one cup of sugar, the yelks of two eggs, one 
cup of milk, and three scant teaspoons of baking 
powder, in one pint of flour. Bake in two long or 
square shallow pans. When cool, spread one layer 
with apple sauce, place the other layer on top and 



Apple Tapioca. — One cup of tapioca, soaked over 
night in six cups of water; in the morning add 
about six medium sized tart apples, chopped very 
fine, and one cup of white sugar. Bake slowly 
about four hours. To be served either warm or 
cold, with cream. Very delicate for invalids. 

Mrs. R. Montgomery. 

Orange Pudding. — Peel and slice three or four 
large oranges and lay in a dish. Make a custard 
of one pint of milk, the yelks of three eggs, one 
tablespoon of corn starch, and a third of a cup of 
sugar. When cold, pour over the oranges. Beat 
the whites of three eggs and one cup of sugar to a 
stiff froth; spread on the top, and place in the oven 
for a few minutes to brown. 

Mrs. H. C. Jerolemon. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



63 



Orange Souffle. — Make a custard of one quart of 
milk, the )'elks of eight eggs, and the whites of 
four, sweetened to taste. Place in a dish six large 
oranges, peeled and cut in small pieces. When the 
custard is quite cold, pour it over the oranges. 
Beat the whites of four eggs with one and a half 
cups of sugar, and spread over the top. Place the 
dish in a pan of cold water, and set it in the oven 
to brown. Miss M. F. R. 

Pine-apple Tapioca. — One cup of tapioca soaked 
in one quart of water, a few hours ; then boil or 
steam slowly until like gelatine. Add half a cup 
of sugar, remove from the stove, and stir in one 
pine apple already prepared in small pieces. Pour 
in a prettily shaped dish and set away to harden. 
When ready for use turn it out. To be eaten with 
sweetened cream. Mrs. Terhune. 

French Tapioca Pudding. — Soak three table- 



spoons of tapioca over night, in a pint of cold water ; 
stir into this one quart of scalded milk, and boil, 
adding a little salt. Beat the yelks of three eggs 
and four tablespoons of sugar; stir in the milk 
and tapioca, and let it boil. Flavor with lemon or 
vanilla. Beat the whites stiff and stir gently into 
the pudding. Make this in the morning, and put 
ion ice for dinner. Mrs. A. M. Collignon. 

Banana Pudding. — Slice six large bananas in the 
dish on which they are to be served. Cover one- 
third of a box of gelatine with cold water, and when 

\ dissolved, add a pint of boiling water, sweetening 
to taste. When cold, pour the gelatine over the 

j bananas, and put on ice over night. Just before 
serving, whip a pint of cream, sweeten, flavor with 

) vanilla, and turn it over the pudding. Mrs. T. 

\ 

\ Fig Pudding, I. — Half a cup of milk, one cup 

\ each of bread crumbs, and molasses, one teaspoon 



04 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



of soda, cinnamon and allspice to taste, one cup of 
chopped figs, flour enough to make a stiff batter. 
Steam three hours. Miss Edith H. Swan. 

Fig Pudding, II. — Half a pound of figs, and one 
cup of suet, each chopped fine ; one cup of milk ; one 
cup of sugar ; two large cups of bread crumbs ; two 
eggs; spice to taste. Boil three hours, and serve 
with clear sauce. 

Clear Sauce: — Boil a pint of water and a large cup 
of sugar, until clear and a little thick . Flavor with 
wine, or lemon juice. Mrs. F. S. Dates. 

Fig Pudding, III. — One pound each of figs, suet, 
bread crumbs, and brown sugar; six eggs. Chop 
the figs into small pieces, beat the eggs until light, 
mix all together and steam two hours. Serve 
with cream sauce. Aliss F. R. Gray. 

Blackberry Mush.— Mash in a preserving kettle 



J a cjiuart of very ripe blackberries, sweeten themi 
(with white sugar, and cook fifteen minutes. vStir 
iin dry flour enough to make them stick together, 
) keeping them boiling all the time. When very 
thick pour into teacups. Turn out when cold. To 
jbe eaten with cream. Mrs. P. 

\ Green Corn Pudding, I. — Two dozen full grown 
\ ears of corn. Cut each row down the center ; then 
\ cut from the cob, and pound sufficiently to break the 
j corn. Add three pints of milk, three crackers 
( pounded fine, one cup of sugar, one and a half tea- 
( spoons of salt, and five eggs. Bake two hours. 
\ Mrs. V. Hussey. 

\ 

Green Corn Pudding, II. — One quart of milk, 

four eggs, two tablespoons of melted butter, one 
\ tablespoon of white sugar, one dozen large ears of 

corn. Grate the corn from the cob, and beat the 
j whites and yelks of the eggs separately. Put the 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



6S 



corn and yelks together, stir hard, add the butter, ; 
pour in the milk gradually — beating all the while, ; 
next the sugar, and a little salt ; lastly the whites. 
Bake slowly at first, covering the dish for an hour. 
Remove the cover, and brown finely. Miss F. R. G. 

Rice Pudding Without Eggs. — Half a cup of | 
rice, one scant cup of sugar, one cup of raisins, and t 
two quarts of milk. Stir frequently while baking. \ 
Do not let it get too stiiT. Mrs. Geo. T. Chapman. \ 

Cream Rice Pudding. — Two quarts of milk, 
three tablespoons of granulated sugar, a pinch of 
salt, a scant cup of rice. Wash the rice and put it 
in the pudding dish; add the milk, salt, sugar, and 
a little grated nutmeg. Bake slowly. Keep stir- 
ing at intervals, putting the spoon carefully under 
the creamy crust which forms on top. Serve cold 
with a spoon of any sort of jelly on each small dish. 

Mrs. John Hemion. 



St. Nicholas Pudding. — Simmer a small cup of 
rice in a quart of milk, until it is soft ; when cold, 
stir in the beaten yelks of three eggs. Add half a 
cup of sugar and a pinch of salt. Make a meringue 
of the whites of three eggs and two tablespoons of 
powdered sugar; spread over the pudding, and 
brown. Mrs. S. Bremner. 

Boiled Flour Pudding. — One quart of milk ; six 
well beaten eggs; six heaping tablespoons of flour, 
two tablespoons of sugar ; a little salt. Boil one 
hour. To be served with soft sauce. 

Mrs. J. H. IV. 

Entire Wheat Pudding. — With two cups of en- 
tire wheat flour mix half a teaspoon each of soda 
and cream tartar, one cup of milk, half a cup of 
molasses, and one cup of raisins stoned and chopped. 
Steam two and a half hours. 

Sauce: — Half a cup of butter, one cup of powdered 



66 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



sugar, one teaspoon of vanilla, a quarter of a cup of J ing powder, and flour enough to mix a stiff batter, 
boiling water, the white of an egg beaten to a stiff ) Sauce: — Make thin corn starch, add one egg, and 
froth. Stir all together till foamy. Mrs. Allen. flavor with vanilla. Mrs. W. W. Taylor. 



Quick Baked Pudding. — Mix five tablespoons 
of flour, and five of milk, with five well beaten eggs; 
and a little salt ; turn one quart of boiling milk 
upon it. Bake twenty minutes. Serve hot, with 
hard sauce. Miss S. G. IVallis. 

Prune Pudding. — Half a pound of prunes stewed 
until soft; whites of six eggs, beaten to a stiff froth ; 
powdered sugar sufficient to make it a little thinner 
than icing. After cooling and removing the pits, mix 
the prunes with the sugar and eggs. Bake a few 
minutes. Mrs. C. C. Randall. 

Cottage Pudding. — Two tablespoons of butter 
and half a cup of sugar-well beaten together, one 
^gg, half a cup of milk, a heaping teaspoon of bak- 



Queen of Baked Puddings. — One and a half cups 
of white sugar, two of fine dried bread crumbs, five 
egfgs, one tablespoon of butter, vanilla, rose water 
or lemon flavoring ; one quart of fresh rich milk, and 
half a cup of jelly or jam. Rub the butter into a 
cup of sugar, beat the yelks very light, and stir 
these together; the bread crumbs soaked in the milk 
' come next, with the flavoring. Bake this in a large 
buttered pudding dish, two-thirds full, until the 
custard is set ; draw to the door of the oven, spread 
over with jam or other conserve; cover this with a 
meringue made of the whipped whites and half a 
cup of sugar. Shut the oven, and bake until the 
meringue begins to color. Serve cold with cream. 
In strawberry season you may substitute fresh 
fruit. Mrs. J. W. Meloney. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



Bread Pudding, I. — Soak one bowl of broken bread 
in boiling water, beating very fine with a fork ; one 
quart of milk, half a cup of sugar, one egg well 
beaten, one teaspoon of salt, and three teaspoons of 
lemon extract. Mix all together in a pudding dish, 
and grate nutmeg over the top. Bake in a steady 
oven three-quarters of an hour. Afrs. John Woolley. 

Bread Pudding, II. — One pint of stale bread, one 
quart of milk, one teaspoon of salt, three tablespoons 
of sugar, two eggs. Remove the crust from the 
bread, cut the remainder into small dice and soak in 
the milk for two hours, stirring well together. 
Beat the eggs, sugar and salt together, and add to 
the bread and milk ; turn into a pudding dish, and 
bake in a slow oven forty-five minutes. 

Miss Anna Hesse. 

Cracker Pudding. — One quart of milk, one cup 
of powdered cracker, five eggs, two tablespoons of 



( melted butter, half a teaspoon of soda dissolved 
J in boiling water; heat the milk slightly and pour 
I over the cracker ; let it stand fifteen minutes. Stir 
\ into this the beaten yelks ; then the butter and soda ; 
/beat all smooth and add the whipped whites. vServe 
I hot, with pudding sauce. Mrs. E. J. Richmond. 

' Indian Pudding, I. — One small cup of Indian 
1 meal, one cup of molasses, one teaspoon of salt, a 
( little ginger, one quart of boiling milk, one quart 
' of cold milk. Mix the ingredients well together; 
(pour in a deep dish, and place in the oven. Stir it 
\ once in a while for the first hour, to prevent the 
J meal from settling. Allow it to remain another 
I hour without stirring. Mis. G. E. Dinsmore. 

\ Indian Pudding, II. — One quart of milk, two 
; heaping tablespoons of Indian meal, four table- 
/ spoons of sugar, one tablespoon of butter, three 
I" eggs, one teaspoon of salt, half a teaspoon of ginger. 



68 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Boil the milk in a farina kettle, and sprinkle the 
meal in it gradually, stirring constantly for twelve 
minutes. Beat the eggs, salt, sugar and ginger to- 
gether; stir the butter in the milk and meal, add 
the egg mixture, put in a pudding dish and bake 
slowly one hour. Mrs. J. Hemion. 

Snow Pudding. — Soak half a box of Cooper's 
gelatine in one pint of cold water, adding two cups of 
sugar and the juice of two lemons. Pour over this 
one pint of boiling water, strain through a fine 
cloth, and let it stand until it commences to jell. 
Beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, add the 
jelly, a tablespoon at a time, and beat well together. 
Put in a dish and let stand over night in a cold 
place. 

Custard: — Scald one pint of milk, add the yelks of 
four eggs, well beaten, and a large tablespoon of 
sugar, and boil until it commences to thicken. Fla- 
vor with vanilla. Mrs. H. H. Copeland. 



Peggy's Pudding. — Two cups of fine bread 
icrumbs, three cups of chopped apples, one cup of 
sugar, one teaspoon of mace, half a teaspoon of all- 
spice, two teaspoons of butter, one tablespoon of 
salt. Butter a pudding dish, and cover the bottom 
with crumbs. Lay on these a thick layer of minced 
apple, sprinkle lightly with spices and a little salt- 
more heavily with sugar. Stick bits of butter over 
all ; then more crumbs, continuing this order until 
all the ingredients are used up. The top layer 
should be crumbs. Cover closely, and bake half an 
hour. Remove the cover and let it brown. Send 
to the table in the dish in which it is baked. Use 
\ a hard sauce. ( ). 

Chocolate Pudding, I. — One pint of milk, five 
tablespoons of grated chocolate, ten tablespoons of 
grated bread crumbs, four eggs. Beat together the 
yelks of the eggs, one and a half cups of sugar, 
the bread crumbs and chocolate, with a little of the 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



69 



milk ; add this to the rest of the milk that has been 
boiled, and let all boil until it thickens, stirring 
constantly. Pour into a buttered dish, and put in 
the oven for a few minutes. Beat the whites of the 
eggs, add three tablespoons of powdered sugar and 
spread over the top; brown slightly. Eat with cold 
cream. Miss M. F. R. 

Chocolate Pudding', II. — Boil one quart of milk; 
grate one and a half ounces of chocolate, and mix 
with a little cold milk and water. Stir the boiled 
milk into the chocolate, and set it to cool ; stir in the 
beaten yelks of six eggs, and flavor with vanilla. 
Sweeten to taste, and bake until the consistency of 
custard. Beat the whites of the eggs with six table- 
spoons of sugar, spread over pudding, and brown. 
Mrs. C. C. Randall. 

Raisin Puffs. — Two cups of flour, two eggs, one 
cup of sweet milk, a scant half cup of butter, two 



tablespoons of sugar, one cup of seeded raisins, 
three teaspoons of baking powder. Steam in mould 
or cups. 

Sauce: — One pint of sweet milk, one tea- 
spoon of corn starch, two eggs ; sweeten to taste ; 
flavor with lemon extract. Mrs. E. F. T. 

Lemon Sauce, I. — For Steamed Puddings. — Thicken 
one pint of boiling water with flour to the consis- 
tency of cream, strain, return to the fire, and add 
one tablespoon of butter, a little salt, and sugar to 
taste. Just before serving, stir in the rind and juice 

\ of one lemon, or half a glass of wine. 

I Miss Kate Kennell. 

Lemon Sauce, II. — The juice and grated peel of 
one lemon, one cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, a 
third of a cup of boiling water. Mix these in a 
bowl, and stand in a pan of boiling water on the fire, 
until melted. Mrs. J. R. Morris. 



7° 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Lemon Sauce, III. — One cup of sugar, half a cup J Allow it to become very warm, but not boiling, 
of butter, one egg, one lemon — all of the juice and Stir constantly. A/iss Sadie Mate Dimmore. 

one-third of the grated peel, one teaspoon of nut- \ 

meg, three tablespoons of boiling water. Cream \ Strawberry Sauce. — Half a cup of butter, and 
the butter and sugar, add the egg-well beaten, then \ one cup of powdered sugar, rubbed to a cream. 
the lemon and nutmeg. Beat hard for a few min-lAddthe beaten white of an egg, and one cup of 
utes and pour on the boiling water, a spoonful at a strawberries thoroughly mashed, 
time. Put in a sauce pan and place on the fire. ) Mrs. A. M. S. 



Fritters. 

Cream Fritters. — One cup of cream, the whites; Apple Fritters, II.— One pint of flour, one egg, 
of five eggs, two cups of prepared fiour, one salt- J one full teaspoon of baliing powder, ten apples cut 
spoon of nutmeg, and a pinch of salt. Stir the {in rings, and milk to make a soft cake batter, 
whites and flour alternately into the cream, put in I Mrs. J. N. Terhune. 

the nutmeg and salt, and beat all briskly for two , 

minutes ; the batter should be rather thick. Frying Banana Fritters. — Cut three bananas into thin 
plenty of hot lard, a spoonful of batter for each / slices and use in the same manner as for apple 
fritter. Drain, and serve upon a hot dish. Eat > fritters. Mrs. W. 

with jelly sauce. Miss S. G. Wallis. ; 

Corn Fritters. — Half a can of tender sweet corn, 

Apple Fritters, I. — One pint of milk, three eggs, jtwo eggs, one and a half cups of flour, half a tea- 
a little salt, and enough flour to make a moderately / spoon of Royal baking powder, a little salt, and 
thick batter. Chop a dozen apples qtiite fine, and ' milk enough to make a stiff batter. Fry in very 
mix well through the batter. Boil in lard, and dust hot butter and lard. Fritters should be half an 
with powdered sugar before sending to the table. | inch thick when done. This amount will make 

Mrs. A. H. W. \ eight or ten. Mrs. L. J. Phelps. 



7* 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Green Corn Fritters. — To twelve ears of sweet ( 
corn — grated, add one teaspoon of salt, a little pep- 1 
per, one egg, and two tablespoons of flour. Mix in i 
small cakes, and fry in butter and lard. Afiss H. M. i 

Oyster Fritters. — To one pint of milk add two < 
eggs, a little salt, and sufficient flour to make quite ' 
a thick batter. Chop thirty oysters in small pieces, | 
and mix through the batter. Boil in lard, or beef; 
drippings. . 

Clam Fritters. — Mix one cup of milk with one of 
the clam liquor, add two eggs and the soft part of 
about forty clams chopped; stir in sufficient 



flour to make a batter. Have ready in a spider 
boiling lard, and drop into it a tablespoon of the 
mixture, for each fritter. Have enough lard to 
cover the fritters. Fry them to a light brown, 
place on an inverted sieve for a moment, and serve 
on a hot dish. Mrs. W. H. J. 

Parsnip Fritters. — Wash thoroughly two good 
sized parsnips, and cook till soft, in boiling water 
drain off the water, plunge in cold water, and re- 
move the skins; mash, and season to taste with but- 
ter, salt, and pepper. Shape into small cakes with 
flour. Roll in flour, and fry in butter till brown. 



Cakes. 



Nut Cake, I. — Two-thirds of a cup of butter, two 
cups of sugar, one cup of milk, three eggs, three 
cups of flour, three teaspoons of baking powder, 
one cup of nuts, chopped fine. M/ss E. F. Miller. 

Nut Cake, II. — Beat half a cup of butter and two 
cups of sugar until creamy, add the yelks of four 
eggs, and half a teaspoon of soda dissolved in one 
cup of milk, three cups of flour, and one teaspoon 
of cream-tartar ; then beat the whites of the eggs to 
a stiff froth, and stir in quickly one cup of English 
walnuts, broken up fine. Mrs. G. F. Smith. 



\ half a cup of milk, one cup of nut meats. Rub the 
I butter and sugar to a light white cream, add the 
\ eggs beaten a little, then the flour, sifted with the 
{baking powder; mix with the milk and nuts into a 
\ rather firm batter, and bake in a steady oven thirty- 
! five minutes. Mrs. L. H. Lutz. 

'( Hickory Nut Cake. — Three cups of sugar, one 
; scant cup of butter, one cup of milk, five cups of 
j flour, four eggs, one teaspoon of soda, two of cream- 
j tartar, and a large cup of hickory nut meats. 
) Mrs. O. W. Ackcrmaii. 



Nut Cake, III. — Half a cup of butter, one and a) English Walnut Cake. — One cup of sugar, half 
half cups of sugar, three eggs, two and a half cups \ a cup of butter, half a cup of milk, two cups of flour, 
of flour, one and a half teaspoons of baking powder, \ three eggs, one heaping teaspoon of baking powder, 



74 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



one large cup of stoned raisins, and one large cup 
of chopped walnuts. Flour the nuts and raisins be- 
fore putting them into the cake. Mrs. G. D. A. 

Fruit Cake, I. — Five cups of flour, one and a 
half cups each of sugar and butter, half a cup of 
milk, one cup of molasses, one teaspoon of soda, 
two teaspoons each of allspice and cloves, five eggs, 
two teaspoons of cinnamon, two pounds of raisins, 
three pounds of ciirrants, one and a half pounds of 
citron, one nutmeg. This recipe makes five loaves, 
and can be kept as long as wanted. Mrs. J. Clough. 

Fruit Cake, II. — One and a half pounds of 
stoned raisins, one pound of currants, half a pound 
each of citron, butter, and sugar, half a gill of mo- 
lasses, one teaspoon each of allspice and nutmeg, 
three-quarters of a pound of flour, three eggs, and 
two teaspoons of baking powder. This will make 
a six pound cake. Mrs. A. S. 



Fruit Cake, III. — Four pounds of raisins, three of 
currants, one of citron, one of sugar, one of flour, 
one of butter, half a pint of molasses, nine eggs, 
two ounces of mixed spices, one gill of brandy, one 
of wine, and four nutmegs. Afrs. J. Ryerson. 

Fruit Cake, IV. — One pound of butter, one pound 
of sugar, ten eggs, one pound of flour, four pounds 
of raisins, four pounds of currants and one pound of 
citron ; then add a tablespoon each of cloves, cinna- 
mon, allspice, mace and nutmeg; three-quarters of 
a cup of molasses, half a glass of brandy, and half 
a teaspoon of saleratus. Bake about three and a 
half hours. Mrs. S. J. Post. 

Wedding Cake. — One pound each of light brown 
sugar, flour and butter, eight eggs, the whites and 
yelks beaten separately; half an ounce each of 
cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg; one large wineglass 
of wine, and one of brandy ; one cup of molasses 



7S 



four pounds of raisins; one pound of currants; one 
and a half pounds of citron ; one teaspoon of Royal 
baking powder; a little salt. Mix half of the flour 
with the fruit. Bake six hours in a slow oven. 

Mrs. J. W. Mcloney. 

White Fruit Cake. — Half a pint of butter, one 
pint of sugar, one and a half pints of flour, two { 
teaspoons of baking powder, the whites of eight | 
6ggs. Flavor, and stir in one grated cocoanut, one \ 
pound of almonds blanched and cut up fine, and ) 
half a pound of citron cut in small pieces. \ 

Mrs. Guild Copeland. J 

Nut Fruit Cake. — Half a cup of butter, one} 
pound each of raisins, Brazil nuts, and dates, fouri 
eggs, two teaspoons of cinnamon, one cup of strong/ 
coffee, two of brown sugar, one of sour milk, one tea- 
spoon of soda, and half a pound of currants. Every- 
thing chopped fine. Bake two hours. Miss Webb. \ 



Pound Cake. — One pound of butter, one pound 
of sugar, one pound of flour, ten eggs, and one tea- 
I spoon of baking powder. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. H. P. Doreynus. 

Mock Pound Cake. — One cup of corn starch, 
wet with half a cup of milk; one cup of butter; two 
cups of sugar; three cups of flour; four eggs, the 
whites and yelks beaten separately ; two even tea- 
spoons of baking powder. Flavor to taste. 

Miss H. E. Latham. 

Orange Cake. — Two cups of sugar, the yelks of 
five eggs, half a cup of water, the rind and juice of 
one orange, two large cups of flour, with two tea- 
spoons of baking powder ; add the whites of three 
eggs well beaten. 

Icing: — The whites of two eggs, two tablespoons 
of pulverized sugar, and the rind of half an orange. 

Mrs. G. F. E. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Currant Cake. — Two cups of flour, one cup of 
sugar, one cup of butter, the whites of three eggs 
and yelks of four, and half a pound of currants. 

Miss E. B. O. 

Whortleberry Cake. — One quart of flour, one 
quart of berries, one and a half cups of sugar, two 
teaspoons of baking powder, water enough to make 
a batter about as stiff as pound cake, salt to taste. 
Bake in a hot oven. Miss S. M. Gill. 

Dried Apple Cake. — Three cups of dried apples, 
soaked over night in cold water and chopped in the 
morning ; three cups of molasses, stewed with the 
apples. Let this cool, then add one cup of melted 
butter, three eggs, one teaspoon of soda, two tea- 
spoons of cinnamon, one and a half teaspoons of 
cloves, three cups of flour, and one pound of chopped 
raisins. Bake in a moderately hot oven. 

Mrs. F. M. 



Bread Cake. — Two cups of soft sponge, two eggs, 
' one cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, three cups 
\ of flour, four teaspoons of Royal baking powder, 
; two teaspoons of cinnamon, half a teaspoon of cloves, 
J half a nutmeg, and two cups of seeded raisins. Put 
\ the sponge in last. This will make two loaves. 

Mrs. H. R. Wells. 

Coffee Cake. — Two cups of sugar, one cup of but- 
ter, one cup of molasses, one cup of strong coffee, 
four eggs, one teaspoon of soda and two of cream- 
tartar, two teaspoons of cinnamon, two teaspoons 
of cloves, one grated nutmeg, one pound of raisins, 
one pound of currants, and four cups of flour. Bake 
in a moderate oven. Half of the quantity will make 
one nice sized cake. Mrs. R. Bell. 

Pork Cake. — One pound of fat salt pork-chopped 
fine, two pounds of currants, two pounds of raisins, 
one pound of citron, one pound of brown sugar. 



77 



three eggs, two teaspoons of all kinds of spices, two < 
teaspoons of baking soda in a little hot water, one < 
quart of boiling coffee poured over the pork, and | 
one teaspoon of salt. Miss M. A. R. \ 

One Egg Cake. — One and a half cups of sugar, \ 
two-thirds of a cup of butter-beaten to a cream, \ 
one well beaten egg, half a cup of water, a quarter \ 
of a cup of cocoanut, two cups of flour, one teaspoon \ 
of baking powder. Flavor with lemon and a little! 
vanilla. Bake about half an hour. 

Mrs. A. E. Spiegle. 

Cheap Sponge Cake. — Four eggs, beaten separ- 
ately ; one and a half cups of sugar, stirred into the 
yelks; two-thirds of a cup of boiling water; the 
grated peel of one lemon, or one teaspoon of lemon 
essence; a small pinch of salt; two cups of flour- 
sifted, with one heaping teaspoon of baking powder. 
Stir in the whites of the eggs at last. Mrs. J. H. 



Sponge Cake, I. — Four eggs-whites and yelks 
beaten separately, one cup of sugar, one cup of flour, 
one teaspoon of baking powder. When ready to 
put into the oven, add half a cup of boiling water. 

Mrs. R. Inglis. 

Sponge Cake, II. — Six eggs, the w^eight of five 
unbroken eggs in pulverized sugar, the weight of 
three eggs in flour-twice sifted, the juice of half a 
large lemon. Separate the yelks and whites, beat 
the latter stiff, beat the yelks and sugar until per- 
fectly smooth and light, add the lemon juice, and a 
third of the whites : after this, stir in slowly the flour ; 
while stirring with the right hand, drop the flour 
gently with the left, little by little; when a third of 
the flour has been added, stir in another third of 
the whites, and so on until all is mixed. Do not 
beat at all, after commencing to put in the flour. 
Bake immediately, in a moderate oven. 

Philadelphia. 



78 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Martha Washington Cake. — This recipe was used' 
in Gen' I. Washington s family and copied from an old book 
of Mrs. Washington's. — One and a quarter pounds of 
white sugar, half a pound of butter, one and three- 
quarter pounds of flour, six eggs, one pint of sour 
cream, the grated rind of two lemons and juice of 
one, one nutmeg and some mace, one pound of 
raisins, one pound of currants, one and a half 
pounds of citron. Cream the butter and sugar to- 
gether, add the yelks of eggs well beaten, then the 
cream and flour, then the whites beaten to a froth. 
Have the fruit floured, and stir it in last of all. 
Bake about two hours. Miss M. F. R. 

Geo. Washington Cake. — One pound of sugar, 
one poimd of flour, half a pound of butter, one cup 
of milk, four eggs, half a nutmeg, one pound of 
raisins, one pound of currants, half a pound of cit- 
ron, three teaspoons of baking powder. 

Mrs. J. H. B. 



Washington Cake. — One cup of sugar, half a cup 
of sour milk, two eggs, one teaspoon of saleratus, 
one and a half cups of flour, and lemon to taste. 
Alits Katie C. Brinkman. 

Union Cake.— One pound of sugar, one pound of 
flour, one scant half pound of butter, one cup of 
milk, five eggs, two teaspoons of baking powder. 

Mrs. C. E. D. 

Angel Food. — The whites of eleven eggs, one and 
a half tumblers of pulverized sugar, one teaspoon 
of vanilla flavoring, one tumbler of sifted flour, and 
one teaspoon of cream-tartar sifted in the flour. 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth, add the sugar, flour, 
and vanilla, stirring gently. Do not grease the bak- 
ing pan. Bake forty minutes, and turn out on a 
sieve, or something that will allow the air to pass 
under the cake, while cooling. 

Mrs. Chas. E. Denholm 



79 



Angel Cake. — One cup of powdered sugar, one' 
cnp of flour, one teaspoon of cream -tartar, thei 
whites of eleven eggs. Sift the flour and cream- ' 
tartar, beat the eggs to a stiff froth, beat in the' 
sugar, one teaspoon of vanilla, and the flour, j 
Bake slowly forty minutes in an ungreased pan. 
Turn the pan upside down to cool the cake. 

Miss N. M. Blizard. ) 

Delicate Cake, I. — One cup of butter, two cups of; 
sugar, one cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, 
half a cup of com starch, two teaspoons of baking 
powder, and the whites of seven eggs. Flavor to 
taste. Mrs. Wni. R. Powell. 

Delicate Cake, II. — Two cups of white sugar, 
three quarters of a cup of butter, one cup of sweet 
milk, three cups of flour, the whites of four eggs, 
two teaspoons of cream-tartar, and one of soda. 

Mrs. O. IV. Aekirvian. 



Belle Cake. — One cup of sugar, a third of a cup 
of butter, half a cup of milk, one and a half cups of 
flour, the whites of two eggs, two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder, and a little salt. Ice, while hot, with 
the yelks of the eggs and half a cup of powdered 
sugar, also one teaspoon of ground cinnamon. 

Mrs. Robt. Bdl. 

Silver Cake. — Stir to a cream one and a half 

cups of powdered sugar, and half a cup of butter ; 
add the whites of three eggs beaten stiff, one tea- 
spoon of vanilla or rose, one cup of cold water, three 
cups of flour, and two teaspoons of baking powder. 
Bake in a tin pan, eight by twelve inches in size, 
in a moderately hot oven. 

Frosting: — The whites of two eggs, and one pound 
of powdered sugar. After you have frosted the 
cake, mark into squares, and place half of an Eng- 
lish walnut on each. To be cut as marked, when 
cold. Mrs. Peter Doremus, 



8o 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Sunshine Cake.— The yelks of eleven eggs, two 
cups of sugar, one of butter, one of milk, one tea- 
spoon of cream-tartar, half a teaspoon of soda, and 

three cups of flour ; flavor to taste. 

Mrs. M. L. Blizard. \ 

Piccolomini Cake. — One cup of butter, and three \ 
cups of sugar rubbed to a cream ; beat five eggs very \ 
light, and stir them gradually into the butter and ! 
sugar; then add four cups of flour, one cup of sweet' 
milk, one teaspoon of cream-tartar in a little warm < 
w'ater, half a teaspoon of soda, nutmeg, and a wine 
glass of rose water. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. A. E. Deyo. 

Feather Cake. — One cup of sugar, half a cup of 
butter, half a cup of sweet milk, two and a half cups 
of flour, two eggs, two teaspoons of cream- 
tartar, one teaspoon of saleratus ; flavor with lemon 
or vanilla. Mrs. /as. Clough. 



\ Dutchess Cake. — Half a cup of butter, one cup 
{ of sugar, one cup of milk, six eggs, one teaspoon of 
I baking powder, one large pint of flour, and one tea- 
\ spoon of vanilla. Mrs. Wm. R. Payne. 



LAVER CAKES. 

Chocolate Ice Cream Cake. — Half a cup of but- 
ter, one and a half cups of sugar, four eggs, two 
and a half cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking 
powder, and enough melted chocolate to make the 
cake sulhciently dark. Bake in layers. 

Filling: — Two cups of granulated sugar, half a 
cup of boiling water, and the whites of two eggs. 
Boil the sugar and water together until the mixture 
will candy when dropped in cold water; pour the 
boiling syrup into the beaten whites of the eggs, 
and beat to a firm cream. Flavor with vanilla, and 
spread between the layers and over the top. 

Mrs. D. C. Cowirey. 



\ 



Ice Cream Cake. — The whites of eight eggs, one ' 
cup of butter, two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, • 
one cup of corn starch, one cup of milk, and three 
teaspoons of baking powder. 

Filling: — The whites of four eggs, four cups of| 
granulated sugar. Pour half a pint of boiling water \ 
over the sugar, and boil until candied and clear. 
Beat the eggs light, and pour the boiling sugar over 
them, beating to a stiff cream. Add one teaspoon 
of citric acid, and flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. A. M. Collignon. 

Lemon Cake, I. — Two eggs, five tablespoons of 
milk, one cup of sugar, one and a quarter cups of 
flour, two teaspoons of baking powder; three layers. 

Filling:— -Two eggs beaten very light, half a cup 
of sugar, a teaspoon of butter, the grated rind of 
one and the juice of two lemons. Boil until thick, 
and spread between the layers, when cold. 

Mrs. F. M. Swan. 



Lemon Cake, II. — One and a half cups of sugar, 
half a cup of butter, three eggs, half a cup of milk, 
two and a half cups of flour, and one and a half tea- 
spoons of baking powder. 

Filling: — One tablespoon of corn starch, wet with 
a very little water ; one cup of sugar, two eggs, the 
rind and juice of one lemon, a little butter, and a 
pinch of salt, mixed together and added to the corn 
starch. Mrs. A. H. Ackerman. 

Orange Cake. — One pound of flour, one pound 
of sugar, half a pound of butter, half a pint of sweet 
milk, four eggs, and two teaspoons of baking 
powder. Bake in layer tins. 

Filling: — To the whites of two eggs, add the juice 
of two oranges; grate the rind of one, sweeten to 
taste, and use as you would jelly. Mix what re- 
mains with the white of another G^^^g, and the juice 
of another orange ; thicken with powdered sugar 
for frosting. Mrs. J. Ryerson. 



82 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Chocolate Cake, I. — One pint of flour, two tea- 
spoons of baking powder, one cup of sugar, two 
eggs, and butter the size of an egg; mix the butter, 
sugar and yelks of the eggs together, add one cup 
of milk, the flour and beaten whites of the eggs ; 
melt two squares of Baker's chocolate and stir I 
quickly through the batter ; flavor with vanilla, and 
bake in layer tins. 

Filling: — The white of one egg, one tablespoon of' 
water, and powdered sugar. Spread between the| 
layers when cool. Miss Lottie M. Still. 



Date Cake.— One cup of butter, two of sugar 
three and a half of flour, half a cup of sweet milk, 
the whites of seven eggs, and two teaspoons of 
baking powder. Bake in layera 

Filling: — Chop a pound of dates, mix with part of 
icing, and spread between layers. 

Icing: — One and a half cups of sugar, and two 
tablespoons of water; let it boil on back of stove 
until it is waxy or stringy, then add the whites of 
two eggs, and flavor with pine apple. 

Mrs. R. Vrecland. 



Chocolate Cake, II. — One and a half cups of flour, 
one cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, two eggs, 
and one teaspoon of baking powder; flavor with! 
lemon. 

Filling: — Grate one cake of sweet chocolate, add 
one cup of sugar, one cup of milk and one eg 
boil slowly until thick, and stir in one and a half i 
teaspoons of extract of vanilla. Airs. L. H. Lutz. 



Walnut Cake. — Three-quarters of a cup of but- 
ter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, one cup 
of milk, four eggs, and a little salt. 

Filling: — One pound of walniits chopped fine, one 
egg, one tablespoon of sugar, one tablespoon of corn 
starch, and one cup of milk. Boilthemilk, then pour 
in the ingredients and let all come to a boil ; spread 
between layers. Mrs. J!'/.'!. R. Fcwcll. 



Cocoanut Cake, I. — Grate one cocoanut and mix 
with powdered sugar. Mix two teacups of sugar 
with one teacup of butter, and beat until very 
smooth, add four eggs and one teacup of milk, and 
after thoroughly mixing, add sufficient flour to 
make a thin batter, and two teaspoons of baking 
powder. Bake in small layer tins, and place a 
layer of the grated cocoanut over each cake, having 
previously covered each with a thin icing. After 
sufficient layers have been added, cover the top 
with the icing, and sprinkle thickly with grated 
cocoanut. Mrs. Joseph Holds-worth. 

Cocoanut Cake, II. — Twocupsof sugar, half a cup 
of butter, one cup of milk, three cups of flour, and 
two teaspoons of baking soda. Bake in layer tins. 

Filling: — To half a grated cocoanut, add the whites 
of three eggs well beaten, and one cup of pulver- 
ized sugar, and spread this between the layers. 
Mix with the other half of the cocoanut, four table- 



spoons of sugar, an 
cake. 



83 

id strew thickly on the top of the 
Mrs. J .R. 



Almond Cake. — On the beaten whites of ten eggs 
sift one goblet of flour through which has been 
stirred a heaping teaspoon of cream tartar, stir very 
gently and do not beat it. Bake in layer pans. 

Cream Filling: — Half a pint of sweet cream, the 
yelks of three eggs, a tablespoon of pulverized 
sugar, and one of corn starch. Dissolve the starch 
smoothly with a little milk, beat the yelks and 
sugar together with this, boil the cream, and stir 
these ingredients in as for any cream cake filling, 
but a little thicker; blanche and chop fine half a 
pound of almonds, and stir into the cream. Put to- 
gether like jelly cake, and, while the icing is soft, 
stick in half a pound of split almonds. 

Mrs. A. E. Spicgle. 

Tutti-Frutti Cake. — Two cups of granulated su- 



84 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



gar, one cup of milk, the whites of five eggs, three 
cups of flour, and three teaspoons of baking powder. 
Bake in layer tins. 

Filling: — One pint of hot water, two cups of sugar ; 
boil as for candy, and add it to the whites of two 
eggs, beaten to a froth ; dissolve citric acid, the 
size of a pea, in one teaspoon of water; stir all 
well together. Spread this between the layers and 
over the top, placing raisins, blanched almonds 
and citron on the icing. Mrs. G. Terhune. 

Fred's Favorite. — Three eggs, whites and yelks 
beaten separately; one cup of sugar, two cups of 
flour, half a cup of rich milk, (cream is better), half 
a teaspoon of soda dissolved in hot water, one tea- 
spoon of cream-tartar sifted in the flour; flavor with 
bitter almond. Bake in layer tins. 

Filling: — The whites of four eggs whipped until 
stiff", and one heaping cup of powdered sugar. 

Miss S. G. Wallis. 



\ Gold Cake. — One cup of sugar, half a cup of but- 
|ter, two cups of flour, three-quarters of a cup of 

I sweet milk, one and a half teaspoons of baking pow- 

II der, the yelks of eight eggs ; flavor to taste. 
) Cream: — One lemon grated, one ^%'g, three-qiiar- 
) ters of a cup of sugar, three tablespoons of water ; 
jboil until quite thick, and spread between the 
/layers. Mrs. Wm. R. Foicell. 

\ 

\ Moire Ribbon Cake. — Cream together one cup 
j of butter and two cups of sugar, add four eggs, 
beating thoroughly, then one cup of milk, and lastly 
\ three cups of flour prepared with one heaping tea- 
-spoon of Royal baking powder. Divide this mix- 
|ture into three parts. For the middle layer take 
I one of these parts, and add one cup of raisins, one 
I cup of currants, and one teaspoon each of cinna- 
) mon, allspice and cloves. Bake in shallow, oblong 
) tins, and put together with jelly, pressing gently, 
) to unite them firmly. Mrs. J. H. Ackermaii. 



8s 



Ribbon Cake. — Two cups of sugar, one cup of 1 
butter, one cup of milk, three eggs, three full cups< 
of flour, two heaping teaspoons of baking powder, 
salt. Mix butter and sugar together until creamy, 
then add salt, eggs-well beaten, milk, flour, and ' 
baking powder. After mixing all well together, 
divide in three parts. Color one part pink with j 
cochineal, another part with two cakes of sweet choco- 
late, leaving the third as it is, and flavor to taste. 
Bake in deep layer tins. Beat the white of one egg 
with two tablespoons of powdered sugar, and 1 
spread a little between the layers to unite them. 
Add a little more sugar to the rest, for the top. 

Mrs. J. H. JV. 

Cream Cake. — Two scant cups of sugar, three 
eggs, half a cup of cold water, half a teaspoon of 
salt, two and a half cups of flour, and one teaspoon 
of Royal baking powder. Bake in four layers in a 
quick oven. 



Cream: — One large cup of milk, half a cup of su- 
gar, one Qgg, two teaspoons of corn starch, a little 
salt, and one teaspoon of vanilla or lemon. Let the 
milk come to a boil, then add the corn starch, egg 
and sugar, mixing well together. When it thickens 
remove from the fire and cool ; then spread between 
the layers. Mrs. F. Groocock. 

Boston Cream Cake. — One cup of sugar, two 
cups of flour, and two teaspoons of cream-tartar; 
beat six eggs until light, then add half a teaspoon 
of soda in about a tablespoon of hot water. Mix 
' ten minutes, and bake in layer tins. 
; Cream: — One cup of sugar, half a cup of flour, 
; two eggs ; one pint of milk, boiled, and poured over 
; the sugar, flour, and eggs ; then put on and boil up, 
\ stirring all the time. Mrs. E. C. Gill. 

Charlotte Russe Cake. — One coffee cup each of 
sugar and flour, three eggs, half a teaspoon of soda 



86 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



and one of cream-tartar, one tablespoon of water, j 
one pint of cream, whipped and flavored with 
vanilla. To be baked in layers, and put together 
with cream. Mrs. O. W. Ackernian. 

Strawberry Short Cake, I.— One cup of sugar, 
one tablespoon of butter rubbed into the sugar, 
three eggs, one cup of flour, two tablespoons of 
milk, and one and a half teaspoons of Sea Foam. 
Bake in tins as layer cake. Mrs. L. W. Filkins. 

Strawberry Short Cake, II.— Bruise the berries, 
cover with a thick layer of sugar and set aside. 
Take one quart of sifted flour, half a cup of but- 
ter, one egg, and milk enough to make a stiff dough ; 
knead well and roll out about one inch thick. 
When baked, split and let cool, then put the berries 
between. Mrs. R. R. Berdan. 

Pine-apple Short Cake.— Two hours before 



bringing the cake on the table take a very ripe, 
finely flavored pine-apple, peel it, cut as thin as 
wafers, and sprinkle sugar over it liberally, then 
cover it close. For the short cake take sufficient 
flour for one pie dish, butter the size of a small Q.^%, 
2l very little salt, and milk enough to make a very 
soft dough. Do not knead the dough, just barely 
mix it, and press it into the pie plate. The baking 
powder, butter, sugar and salt should be rubbed 
well through the flour, the other ingredients then 
quickly added. When it is time to serve, split the 
cake, spread the prepared pine-apple between the 
layers, and serve with sugar and sweet cream. 

Mrs. R. Montgomery. 

Charlotte Pol-maise. — Boil over a slow fire one 
and a half pints of cream, or rich milk. Have 
ready six yelks, stir them gradually in the boiling 
cream, let this boil until thick, then divide and put 
in two sauce pans ; stir into one pan six ounces of 



SMALL CAKES 



chocolate grated fine, two ounces of loaf sugar, 

a quarter of a pound of macaroons broken fine. 

Put into the other pan four ounces of shelled sweet I 

almonds and a few bitter ones, blanched and Jumbles, I.— One pound of butter, one pound of 

pounded ; one ounce of tfitron cut fine, four ounces sugar, two and a half pounds of flour, three eggs, 

of sugar. Stir well, let it come to aboil, and set to half a teaspoon of saleratus, one tablespoon of 

cool. Put between cake in alternate layers. water. Roll in powdered sugar before baking. 

Garfield. \ Mrs. C. Van Riper. 



Cream Icing. — Two cups of granulated sugar, 
half a cup of hot water; boil five minutes or until 
it becomes like jelly, then place the vessel in cold 
water and beat hard until thick, add the whites of 
two eggs beaten to a light froth, and flavor. 

Miss S. E. Brtmrn. 

Boiled Icing. — The white of one &%%, one coffee 
cup of granulated sugar, and two tablespoons of 
water. Boil until it threads from the spoon, then 
pour on the beaten &g<g and beat till stiff. Mrs. T. 



Jumbles, II. — Two cups of sugar, two eggs, one 
I cup of butter, half a cup of sweet milk, one tea- 
1 spoon of soda in the milk. Mix as soft as you can 
roll it out. Flavor to taste. Mrs. C. Miller. 

Sugar Jumbles. — One cup of sugar, three table- 
spoons of water, two thirds of a cup of butter, two 
eggs, a little salt and nutmeg, two teaspoons of 
baking powder ; roll out, cut into cakes, sprinkle 
granulated sugar on the top, and bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. E. F. Tomer. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



French Jumbles. — Two cups of sugar, half a cupS 
of butter, four cups of flour, three eggs, one tea- j 
spoon of cream-tartar. Roll out, bake, and sprinkle ) 
with sugar. Mrs. R. R. Bcrdan. ) 

I 

Cookies. — Half a cup of milk, one cup of butter, \ 
two cups of sugar, two even teaspoons of baking ;, 
powder, three eggs, flavoring, just enough flour to J 
roll, — the less the better. Mrs. E. D. Dean. '■> 

Plain Cookies. — Two cups of sugar, one cup of | 
butter, one cup of sweet milk, two eggs, five cups 
of flour, four teaspoons of baking powder. Roll 
thin and bake quickly. Miss E. B. O. ' 

Rich Sugar Cookies. — Half a pound each of su- 
gar and butter creamed together, three quarters of j 
pound of flour, two eggs, and a little brandy. They 
should be soft when ready to roll out. Lay each in \ 
sugar before baking. Miss Katie Kcnnell. j 



Chocolate Cookies. — One tablespoon of butter, 
two cups of flour, one cup of sugar, one egg, two 
bars of sweet chocolate — grated, and two heaping 
teaspoons of Royal baking powder. Mix in the 
milk to a stiff dough, roll out, cut into cookies, and 
bake in a very quick oven. 

Mrs. W. W. Taylor. 

Cream Puffs, I. — One cup of water, half a cup of 
butter, three eggs; boil the water and butter to- 
gether, and stir in one cup of dry flour while boil- 
ing; when cool add the eggs — well beaten, and mix 
thoroughly ; drop into well buttered small tins, and 
bake twenty minutes in a hot oven. 

Cream: — One cup of milk, half a cup of sugar, 
three tablespoons of corn starch, one e,%g, sl 
little salt and flavoring. Beat the &%% and 
sugar together; add the flour, and stir into the 
milk while boiling. 

Mrs. iV. R. Payne. 



S9 



Cream Puffs, II. — Half a pound of butter, three! 
quarters of a pound of flour, eight eggs, and one pint i 
of water. Stir the butter into the water, which should ! 
be heated, set it on the fire and bring it to a boil, 
stirring frequently. When it boils, put in the flour, 
boil one minute, stirring constantly, take from the 
fire, and let it cool. When cold, add the eggs which 
should be beaten very light. Drop, in spoonfuls, | 
upon buttered paper, and bake quickly. \ 

Cream: — One quart of milk, four tablespoons of \ 
corn starch, two eggs, two cups of sugar. Wet the ] 
corn starch with enough milk to work it into a| 
smooth paste. Boil the remainder of the milk, 
beat the eggs, add the sugar and corn starch to 
these, and, as soon as the milk boils, pour in the mix- 
ture, stirring constantly until smooth and thick. 
Drop in a small piece of butter, and set the custard • 
aside to cool. Flavor with vanilla. Pass a sharp 
knife around the puffs, split them and fill with 
the mixture. Afiss Sadie M. Dinsmore. 



Cocoanut Drops. — Grate a cocoanut, and weigh 
it; then add half the weight of powdered sugar, and 
the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth; stir 
the ingredients together, then drop the mixture 
with a spoon upon buttered white paj)er or tin 
sheets, and sift sugar over them. Bake in a slow 
oven fifteen minutes. Mrs. M. E. W. 

Cocoanut Puffs. — Beat well together the white of 
one (t%g, half a cup of sugar, and one tablespoon of 
flour; then add a pinch of salt, one teaspoon of 
vanilla, and a cup of cocoanut ; dip out with a tea- 
spoon on buttered paper, and bake in a good oven. 
Miss M. N. Dinsmore. 

Betsy's Kisses. — Beat the whites of nine eggs to 
a stiff froth, then mix with it fifteen tablespoons 
of finest white sugar, and five drops of essence of 
lemon. Drop them on paper with a teaspoon, sift 
sugar over them, and bake in a slow oven. ***. 



9° 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Lady Fingers. — Mix well four ounces of sugar, | Sour milk requires one teaspoon of cream- tartar, 
the yelks of four eggs, three ounces of flour, and a and sweet milk two. Mrs. F. M. Swan. 

little salt. Beat the four whites into the mixture, \ 

gradually. Butter a shallow pan, squirt through Crullers, III.— Two cups of sugar, three eggs, a 
a confectioner's syringe or a little piece of paper good half cup of butter, two cups of sweet milk, 
rolled up ; dust with sugar, and bake in a moderate one heaping teaspoon of soda, and two of cream- 
oven. Mrs. Geo. I. Chapman. tartar. Mrs. A. H. Acker mam. 



Crullers, I. — Two cups of sugar, twocupsof milk, 
four eggs, a small half cup of butter, nine cups of ; 
flour, three large teaspoons of baking powder, and 
half a nutmeg. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, 
next add the eggs after they have been thoroughly 
beaten separately, then the milk, next add the flour] 
after it has been sifted seven times with the baking \ 
powder, and the nutmeg. Mrs. T. M. Moore. 



Doughnuts. — One and a half cups of sugar, two 
eggs, two scant cups of milk, two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder, half a teaspoon of salt, a little grated 
nutmeg, enough flour to make a stiff batter. Drop 
by the dessertspoonful into boiling lard. Let them 
fry until a light brown, and sprinkle with pulver-' 
ized sugar. Mrs. G. E. Dinsmore. 



Crullers, II.— Two cups of sugar, two-thirds of a) MOLASSES CAKES, 

cup of shortening, one pint of milk, four eggs, one) Aunt Caddie's Molasses Cake. — Put a table- 
nutmeg, one teaspoon of soda, and a little salt, spoon of lard or butter in a cup with one even tea- 



91 



spoon of soda, fill the cup with hot water, add one ) gar, one cup of milk, one teaspoon of soda, three 
cup of molasses, one egg, a pinch of salt, spice to j cups of flour, with cinnamon and ginger to taste, 
taste, and two cups of flour. Mrs. P. R. Watson. \ Bake twenty minutes. Mrs. R. B. Tindall. 



Molasses Cake.— One and a half cups of molasses, 
half a cup of butter, three cups of flour, one of milk, 
two eggs, one small teaspoon of soda, ginger and 
other spices to taste. Mix the molasses with the 
butter thoroughly, then stir in the flour, and add 
the milk; next the eggs well beaten, and lastly the 
soda dissolved in a little milk or water. 

Mrs. D. D. Naugle. 

Soft Molasses Cake. — One cup of molasses, half I 
a nutmeg, half a cup of butter, half a cup of sour i 
milk, two eggs, one even teaspoon of saleratus ; mix 
them with flour. Mrs. E. F. T. 

Molasses Ginger Cake. — One cup of molasses, 
two eggs, a third of a cup of butter, one cup of su- 



Ginger Snaps, I. — One and a half cups of molasses, 
\ one cup of butter, one teaspoon of soda, two tea- 
! spoons of ginger, and flour enough to roll. Bake 
I in a quick oven. Miss E. F. Hussey. 

Ginger Snaps, II. — One cup of sugar, one cup of 
molasses, one cup of butter, two and a half tea- 
spoons of ginger, one teaspoon of soda, and flour 
to roll. Mrs. J. H. Bogart. 

Ginger Cookies. — Tvvo cups of molasses, one cup 
of sugar, three eggs, two even dessertspoons of soda 
dissolved in half a cup of boiling water, one tea- 
spoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of ginger, and one 
cup of lard. Mix with flour very soft. 

Mrs. L. J. Phelps. 



92 COOKS IN CLOVER. 

Norton Hill Cookies.— One cup of sugar, two^ Soft Gingerbread.— Half a cup of butter, one 
cups of molasses, one and a half cups of melted ) and a half cups of flour, two- thirds of a cup of 
butter, one tablespoon each of soda, ginger, cloves, ( water, one egg, one teaspoon of soda, one cup of 
and cinnamon. Roll very thin, and cut with a bis- \ molasses, one teaspoon of sugar, ginger to taste, 
cuit cutter. Bake in a quick oven. j Mrs R. Inglis. 

Mrs. G. E. Dinsmore. \ 



Custards and Creams. 



Floating Island. — Into a pint of cream sweet- 
ened with loaf sugar, stir sufficient currant jelly to 
give a rich tint, place this in a glass dish, in the 
center put slices of lady cake, or other delicate cake, 
covered with raspberry jam, laid evenly on each 
other. Flavor another pint of cream with the juice 
of two lemons and beat to a stiff froth ; then pour 
it over the cake. Mrs. J. R. Morris. 

Apple Snow, I. — The pulp of four baked apples, 
the white of one G.<gg, one cup of sugar, beaten to a 
stiff froth. If a " Keystone Beater " is used, this 
can be beaten in five minutes. 

Sauce: — The yelks of three eggs, one pint of milk, 
one teaspoon of corn starch. Cook like soft custard, 
and flavor with vanilla. Mrs. H. \V. Crane. 



Apple Snow, II. — Pare and core some juicy 
I apples, stew in water and sift through a sieve, 
\ sweten to taste with powdered sugar and spread, 
when cold, in a deep dish. To every apple allow 
the white of one &^g and a teaspoon of sugar. Beat 
to a froth and pour over the apples. 

Miss Ella L. Burt. 

Painted Apples. — Steam red skinned apples till 
tender, in boiling water, five or ten minutes, re- 
move the skins and put in a dish to cool. While a 
syrup is cooking — flavored with orange, paint the 
; cheeks of the apples with the red from the inside of 
of the skins, putting it on with a knife. Pour the 
orange sj'rup over them when cool. 

Mrs. P. E. Kipp. 



94 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Apple Souffle. — Peel and cut two pounds of good 
apples; stew them until tender, with four ounces 
of loaf sugar. Make a custard with the yelks of 
six eggs, adding two ounces of powdered sugar and 
one pint of boiling milk. Let this get firm by put- 
ting it in a kettle of boiling water, and steaming 
it. Beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff froth with 
a little powdered sugar. Mix your apples and cus- 
tard, spread the whites over the top, and bake in 
a quick oven. Mrs. A. H. WalHs. 

Compote of Apple and Cream. — Make a syrup 
with one cup of sugar, one cup of water, and a square 
inch of stick cinnamon; boil slowly for ten minutes, 
skimming well ; core and pare eight or ten tart 
apples, and cook until soft in the syrup. Boil the' 
syrup until it ropes. Arrange the apples in a glass ; 
dish and pour over them the syrup. Place on each 
apple, when cool, a teaspoon of currant jelly. Pour ; 
whipped cream lightly over the whole. Mrs. G. \ 



Moonshine. — Having beaten the whites of six 
I eggs to a stiff froth, add six tablespoons of powdered 
(sugar, beating not less than thirty minutes; then 
beat in about one heaping tablespoon of preserved 
peaches, cut in tiny bits, and set on ice until 
\ thoroughly chilled. In serving, pour in each saucer 
i some rich cream sweetened and flavored with va- 
nilla; on this place a liberal portion of the moon- 
shine. This is enough for seven or eight persons. 
Mis. H. H. Copeland. 

Snow Balls. — Make a soft custard of the yelks of 
eight eggs, a quart of milk, a scant cup of sugar, 
and flavor to taste . Beat the whites of the eggs, 
put on half a pint of milk to boil, add a little sugar 
and lemon to the whites, and when the milk boils, 
drop on a spoonful at a time, and let them set 
thoroughly; then remove as fast as they are done, 
and lay them tastefully on the custard. 

Mrs. /, H. B. 



CUSTARDS AND CREAMS. 



95 



Tapioca Meringue. — Soak one cup of tapioca j 
over night, strain, add three eggs, one cup of sug«x, 
three cups of milk, a small piece of butter, and j 
flavor to taste. Bake slowly. When done, take* 
the yelks of three eggs, corn starch, sugar and milk ; | 
make a hard custard, and put it over the puddint 
Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs, spread I 
over the pudding and stand in the oven a few min- 1 
utes. To be served cold. 

B. K.—B'dway, N. Y. 

Custard Souffle. — Two scant tablespoons of but- 
ter, melted; stir in two tablespoons of flour, add' 
one cup of milk gradually, and cook eight minutes, 
stirring often. Add the well beaten yelks of four; 
eggs, and two tablespoons of sugar; then set away 
to cool. Beat the whites to stiff froth, and add them 
very lightly ; pour into a buttered dish, and bake 
half an hour. 

Sauce for Custard: — To half a cup of butter beaten 



to a cream, add gradually one cup of powdered su- 
gar, four tablespoons of wine and one-fourth of a 
cup of cream, stirring smooth. Put into hot water 
to cook, stirring fast till done. If preferred, a cold 
sauce, beaten very creamy^ can be used. 

Mrs. G. F. Sinii/i. 

Rice Pyramids. — Boil a cup of rice in milk until 
it is soft and quite dry, press in egg cups and turn 
out on a flat dish. Make a meringue by beating 
the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth and adding 
two tablespoons of powdered sugar. Cover the 
pyramids, and brown in the oven. Eat with a soft 
custard, the same as for vSnow Pudding. 

Mrs. H. H. Copelaud. 

Bohemian Cream. — Four ounces of any fruit 
you choose, which has been steamed soft and sweet- 
ened. Pass the fruit through a sieve, and add one 
ounce of gelatine, thoroughly dissolved, to half a 



96 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



pint of fruit; mix it well together; then whip a pint 
of rich cream, and add the fruit and gelatine gradu- 
ally to it. Then pour it all into a mould; set it on 
ice or in a cool place, and when hardened or set, dip 
the mould a moment in warm water, and turn it 
out on a dish, ready for the table. *. 

Spanish Cream. — Half a box of Cooper's gelatine, 
one quart of milk, the yelks of three eggs, and one 
small £up of sugar; put these on the fire, stir well 
until warm, add the yelks and sugar, bring to boil- 
ing heat, strain, and, when nearly cold, put in 
moulds. Mrs. A. C. H. 

Coffee Cream. — Boil a calf's foot in water until 
it makes about a pint of jelly, and strain it. Make 
a teacup of very strong coffee, clear it with a bit of 
isinglass till perfectly bright, pour on it the jelly, 
and add a pint of very good cream, and as much 
fine Lisbon sugar as is pleasant ; let it boil up, and 



^ pour it into the dish. It should jelly, but not stiffly. 
j The coffee must be fresh. Mrs. J. Duckworth. 

I Tapioca Cream. — Four tablespoons of tapioca, 

) one quart of milk, one cup of sugar, one tablespoon 

) of the essence of lemon, and four eggs. Soak the 

tapioca all night in water or milk, add the milk and 

(sugar and boil five minutes; then add the yelks of 

J the eggs beaten in a little cold milk, and boil three 

minutes longer. Have the whites beaten to a froth, 

and add six tablespoons of sugar. S^oread this over 

the top, and brown nicely. Mrs. C. Van Riper. 

Charlotte Russe. — One quart of cream, three 
eggs, one cup of sugar, vanilla, two and a half 
sheets of Cooper's isinglass, or half a box of Cox's 
gelatine. Beat the cream to a froth, beat the j^elks 
of the eggs and add these to the sugar ; soak the 
isinglass for an hour or more in cold water, take it 
out, squeeze it tightly, put it in a tin cup with two 



CUSTARDS AND CREAMS. 



97 



tablespoons of milk, and place it on the back of the 
stove until it dissolves; then strain, and pour on 
the beaten yelks and sugar, add the whites of the 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth, last of all stir in the 
beaten cream. Line the dish with slices of sponge 
cake or lady's fingers, pour in the mixture and set 
in a cool place to stiffen. Miss S. E. Brown. < 

Ice Cream. — One quart of cream, one generous ; 
pint of milk, one scant half cup of flour, two eggs, ; 
one cup of sugar, and one tablespoon of flavoring. 
Let the pint of milk come to a boil, beat the sugar, 
eggs, and flour together and stir into the boiling ; 
milk, stirring often in a double boiler for twenty 
minutes; add to this mixture when cool, the quart! 
of cream, and freeze. The "White Mountain"! 
freezer is the best. Miss Anna Hesse. 



of milk, the whites of six eggs beaten with a little 
white sugar; flavor to taste. Let the milk come to 
a boil and put in the corn starch ; boil well for five 
or six minutes, stirring all the while to prevent 
burning ; have the eggs in a dish, and put part of your 
; cream on them, stirring constantly ; mix all together 
well. Put plenty of sugar in it, as it needs to be 
quite sweet when frozen. Mrs. E. C. Nation. 

Strawberry Ice Cream.— Two quarts of good 
rich milk, six eggs, and two cups of sugar. Put 
this mixture in a double boiler, stir constantly, 
and, when it thickens like cream, set it away to 
cool ; when cold, add one quart of cream, one cup of 
sugar, and three pints of fresh strawberries, 
thoroughly crushed. This makes nearly four quarts. 

Mrs. H. R. Wells. 



White Ice Cream. — Three quarts of milk, three \ Banana Ice Cream. — Make this the same as 
tablespoons of corn starch dissolved in half a cup Strawberry Ice Cream, leaving out the berries, and 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



adding three bananas, sliced thin. Mrs. H. R. W. \ ing beaten them to a stiff froth ; let it cook slowly, 

^stirring constantly until the custard thickens; add 
Frozen Fruit Custard. — One quart of milk, one! to this one pint of fresh peaches cut into small 
quart of cream, six eggs, and three cups of sugar, ^pieces. When the custard is perfectly cold, beat in 
Heat the milk to almost boiling, then add gradually the cream, and freeze, 
the beaten yelks and sugar ; stir in the whites, hav- i Mrs. E. C. N. 



Jellies, Canned Fruits, Etc. 



Table for Preparing Fruits for Preserving. 



Amount of Sugar to a Quart Jar of Fruit. 



Boil Cherries moderately, 


5 minutes. ! 


Whortleberries, 


" Whortleberries moderately, - 


5 


Raspberries, 


" Raspberries " 


- 6 


Cherries, 


" Blackberries " 


6 


Blackberries, 


" Ripe Currants 


- 6 


Bartlett Pears, 


" Strawberries " 


8 


Small Sour Pears 


" Peaches, halves, - 


- 8 


Ripe Currants, 


" Peaches, whole, 


IS 


Strawberries, 


" Pkims 


- lO " 


Plums, 


" Wild Grapes 


10 " 


Pine-apples, 


" Rhubarb, sliced, - 


- lO " 


Crab-apples, 


" Pine-apple, sliced. 


IS 


Wild Grapes, 


" Bartlett Pears 


- 20 " 


Quinces, 


" Quinces 


20 


Rhubarb, 



4 ounces. 

4 

6 

6 

6 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

10 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Tutti Frutti Jelly, I. — Cut a number of oranges i 
into small pieces, removing the seeds, and slice i 
several bananas. Place in a dish or mould alter- 1 
nate layers of fruit and sugar. Make a jelly of one ' 
ounce of gelatine and one scant quart of water;' 
pour this over the fruit, and stand in a cold place. 
Mrs. G. IV. Watcrhouse. 

Tutti Frutti Jelly, II. — One pound of white 
grapes, three oranges, three bananas, one pine- 
apple, one pint of strawberries, two dozen English 
walnuts, two ounces of dates, two ounces of figs, 
one package of Cooper's gelatine, five lemons, and 
one pound of sugar. Sherry or Madeira may be 
used in place of the lemons. Soak the gelatine in 
one pint of cold water, or wine ; add one quart of boil- 
ing water, sugar, and the juice of the lemons, if 
the wine is not used; then strain. When the jelly 
is cold, put the jelly first in the dish, then the 
fruit, and so on in layers until the dish is filled, 



having the jelly come on top. This makes a large 
quantity, and may be served with whipped cream. 
Airs. C. B. Reynolds. 

Lemon Jelly. — Squeeze the juice of six or seven 
lemons, add one pint of cold water, one box of gela- 
tine, and one pound of granulated sugar. Let this 
stand five or six hours, then add one and a half 
pints of boiling water, and strain ; then pour into 
moulds. Mrs. J. Ryerson. 

Coffee Jelly. — One pint of sugar, one pint of 
strong coffee, one and a half pints of boiling water, 
half a pint of cold water, and one box of gelatine. 
Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water, then 
pour the boiling water on it and when dissolved, 
add the sugar and coffee ; strain, turn into moulds, 
and set away to harden. Serve with sugar and 
cream, if you choose. 

Mrs. F. M. 



JELLIES, CANNED FRUITS, ETC. 



Apples in Jelly. — Pare and core small apples, 
place them with two lemons in water enough to 
cover, let them boil slowly until tender, and 
remove without breaking. Make a syrup with half 
a pound of sugar to each pound of apples, cut the 
lemons in slices and put these with the apples in 
the syrup, andboil very slowly until the apples are 
clear. Place them in a deep dish ; then add to the 
syrup one ounce of dissolved gelatine, boil two 
minutes, and pour over the apples. 

Mrs. A. S. 

Cider Jelly. — Two pounds of sugar, one pint of 
clear sweet cider, one pint of cold water, one pack- 
age of gelatine, the juice of two lemons, and grated 
peel of one, one quart of boiling water, and a good 
pinch of cinnamon. Soak the gelatine in the cold 
water one hour, add to this the sugar, lemons, and 
cinnamon ; pour over all a quart of boiling water 
and stir until the gelatine is thoroughly dissolved 



put in the wine, strain without squeezing, wet your 
moulds with cold water, and set the jelly away in 
them to cool. 

A/rs. E. C. Nation. 

Crab Apple Jelly. — Pick and wash a peck of crab 
apples, put them in a preserve kettle and cover 
them with water; boil them to the consistency of 
sauce, and strain through a flannel bag; measure 
and boil the juice fifteen minutes, skinning care- 
fully ; having heated the sugar in the oven, — one 
pound for every pint of juice, — add it to the juice, 
dissolving it thoroughly; pour into glasses and set 
away to cool. 

Mrs. J. H. W. 

Quince Jelly. — The broken pieces, peelings and 
cores, left from preparing quinces for preserves, 
may be boiled for jelly, following the recipe for 
crab apple jelly. Mrs. W. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Currant Jelly. — Wash the currants, boil slowly 
twenty minutes without water, then remove from 
the fire and measure in a pint measure, having! 
pressed all the juice from the boiled fruit. Rinse ( 
the kettle, pour the juice in, and boil again twenty 
minutes. Remove the kettle from the fire and stiri 
sugar into the hot juice, — one pound to each pint of ' 
juice, until thoroughly dissolved ; pour while hot 
into glasses. 

Mrs. A. 

Orange Marmalade. — Twelve oranges, three 
lemons. Peel the rind of both as thin as possible, 
and boil until quite tender. Peel off the tough 
white skin, slice the fruit, put three-quarters of a 
pound of sugar to one pound of fruit, and add one 
pint of water; then chop the boiled rinds, and add 
them to the fruit and boil until it begins to set. 
Be sure to take out the pits before boiling. 

Miss Alice E. Redhead. 



Lemon Marmalade. — Slice six lemons, and to 
each pound of fruit put three pints of water; let it 
stand over night ; boil until tender, and set it away 
until the next day. Then weigh the whole, and 
add one and a half pounds of sugar to each pound of 
preserves; boil until clear. 

Mrs. R. 

Mixed Marmalade. — Apples or pears mixed 

with quince make a very pleasant marmalade. 
They should be pared and cut in small pieces; 
just cover them with water, or boil the cores and 
skins first, and use the liquor to boil the fruit 
in ; stew the fruit till it can be mashed with a 
wooden spoon; when well mashed, add three- 
quarters of a pound of sugar for each pound of 
fruit, and let it cook slowly for two or three 
hours ; the longer it cooks, the more solid it will 
be when cold, 

( )• 



JELLIES, CANNED FRUIT, ETS. 



Canned Peaches. — Peel the fruit, and put it in 
the jar. To each one-quart can take eight table- 
spoons of sugar dissolved in enough cold water to 
fill the jar. Place a board into a flat bottom boiler, 
set the jars of fruit on this, placing the glass lids| 
on, and put enough cold water in the boiler to reach 
two-thirds up the can. Allow it to boil twenty 
minutes, remove the jars, and if they are not full ; 
of syrup, fill them with hot water; then put on the! 
rubbers, and screw the lids down tightly. Turn each ! 
can upside down, to be sure to prevent leakage. 
Keep in a dark, cool place. 

Mrs. T. M. Moore. 

Canned Peaches or Pears. — Two pounds of su-! 
gar, six pounds of fruit, and one pint of water. 
Make a syrup of the sugar and water, boil thei 
peaches in it ten minutes, then put them in the jars i 
scalding hot. Pears, if not ripe, may require a 
little more time for boiling. Mrs. M. 



Canned Pine-apple Without Boiling. — Select 
large, fresh pine-apples, pare them with a very 
sharp knife, having a thin blade ;and carefully remove 
the little prickly eyes. Slice the fruit in round 
slices about half an inch thick. ' Weigh a pound and 
a quarter of best granulated sugar to each pound 
of fruit, and put into a glass preserve jar a layer 
of sugar, and then a layer of fruit, till the glass is 
filled. Make the layers of sugar very thick, else 
you will have a quantity left when the fruit is all 
laid in. Cover the jar close and set it in a very 
cold place. This will keep perfectly, and have the 
taste of fresh pine-apples a year afterward. 

Mrs. M. E. W. 

Canned Cherries. — To six pounds of white ox- 
hearts put one quart of water and one pound of 
white sugar; let the water and sugar boil, then put 
in the cherries, and boil a few minutes. 

Mrs. F. M. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Canned Quinces or Plums. — Three pounds of 
fruit, one and a half pounds of sugar, and one and 
a half pints of water. Let the sugar and water < 
boil up, then put in the quinces after peeling, re- 
moving the cores, and cutting them, in either halves, 
or quarters, according to the size of the fruit ; let 
them boil until soft, and pour in the cans scalding' 
hot. If the plums are sour, three-quarters of a pound 



of sugar to a pound of fruit, will improve them, and 
pricking them will in a measure prevent the skins 
from breaking. Mrs. M. 

Canned Tomatoes. — Scald the tomatoes suffi- 
ciently to remove the skins. Let them boil about 
fifteen minutes ; add salt and pepper to taste, and 
put them in the cans scalding hot. Mrs. M. 



Candies. 



Cream Candy. — One pound of granulated sugar, | 
one teaspoon of cream-tartar, half a tumbler of cold ; 
water, one teaspoon of vinegar, and vanilla or other 
flavoring. Boil twenty-five or thirty minutes, or 
until brittle when dropped into cold water; pour 
out on a buttered platter; when cool enough work 
like molasses candy, and cut before it is cold. 

Mrs. F. Hughes. 

Peanut Candy. — Five cups of sugar, six table- 
spoons of water, four tablespoons of vinegar, one 
tablespoon of butter. Boil, without stirring, till it 
crisps in cold water. Line buttered pans with pea- 
nuts and pour the candy over them. When nearly 
cold, mark off into squares. 

Miss Josie Whitehead. 



Peppermint Creams. — Two pounds of confection- 
er's sugar, the whites of two eggs well beaten ; mix 
these well together, add half a teacup of cold water, 
and two teaspoons of peppermint; roll in flat cakes, 
and put in a cool place. Miss Annie Doremus. 

Cream Walnuts. — One pound of confectioner's 
sugar, the white of one egg beaten well, one table- 
spoon of water and one teaspoon of vanilla. Mix 
these together to form a dough. Crack one pound 
of English walnuts carefully, so that the meats will 
come out in halves. Roll a small piece of the dough 
on the hand, and then flatten it, putting half a wal- 
nut on each side. Place them on a buttered plate, 
and let them stand for a while. 

Miss A. IV. Tindall. 



io6 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Marsh-mallow Drops. — Dissolve one pound of; 
clean white gum-arabic in one quart of water, strain, 
add one pound of confectioner's sugar and place | 
over the fire. Stir continually until all is dissolved, 
and the mixture is of the consistency of honey; add 
gradually the beaten whites of eight eggs. Stir the ! 
mixture all the time until it loses its thickness 
and does not adhere to the finger. Flavor with va- 
nilla or rose. Pour into a tin slightly dusted with 
powdered starch, and, when cool, divide into squares; 
with a sharp knife. Miss Ivy Jones. 



Chocolate Caramel, I. — One cup each of finely 
grated chocolate, molasses, and sugar, and a piece 
of butter half the size of an ^'g^\ stir all together, 
and boil twenty minutes. When done, pour into a 
buttered tin, and when almost cold, mark off into 
squares with a knife. A cup of nuts, just before 
pouring in the tin, adds to the flavor. 

Miss E. F. Hiissey. \ water. 



Chocolate Caramel, II.— Twocupsof molasses, one 
and a half cups of sugar, half a cup of butter, half 
a cup of milk, half a pound of chocolate; add three 
teaspoons of milk, when you take it from the fire. 
Boil from twenty-five to thirty minutes. 

Miss Edith H. Swan. 

Molasses Taffy. — Three cups of molasses, one 
cup of sugar, and one cup of butter. Boil twenty 
minutes, and put in one teaspoon of vanilla just be- 
fore removing it from the stove. Pour in pans and 
let it cool. 

Miss A. W. T. 



Molasses Cocoanut. — Three cups of molasses, 
one and a half cups of granulated sugar, butter the 
size of an &%%. When half done, pour in one and a 
half cups of cocoanut grated fine, and flavor to taste 
with vanilla. Boil till it is brittle in a little cold 

Miss A. D. 



The Sick Boom. 



Beef Broth. — Chop finely one pound of lean beef, 
pour over it one quart of cold water, and set it on 
the back part of the stove so that it will not reach 
simmering for over an hour. Cook very slowly for 
at least six hours, shaking the pan frequently. 
When cold remove every particle of fat, and strain 
through a very fine sieve. This will make about a 
pint of liquid. * * * 

Beef Tea. — Cut into small pieces one pound of 
lean beef, pla.ce it in a bowl, cover tightly, and stand 
in a pan of water ; let this simmer slowly until the 
juice is all drawn out. This quantity will make 
about one cup of tea. Add a little salt, and give in 
small quantities. 

Mrs. /. H. IV. 



Oysters on Toast. — One gill of oysters chopped 
fine, salt, pepper, one egg, and two tablespoons of 
cream. Stir briskly and serve on toast. 

M. A'. 

Broiled Oysters. — The oysters must be large and 
plump ; the fire must be hot. Wipe the oysters dry, 
roll in fine cracker crumbs, and broil quickl)^ on a 
buttered gridiron. Butter them daintily before 
\ serving. *. 

Broiled Sweetbreads. — Blanch them in boiling 
water over the fire for five minutes ; then wipe them 
dry, split them in half, and broil over a clear fire. 
Turn on a hot plate with a little butter on them, 
and pepper and salt. Afrs. M. 



io8 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Broiled Squabs. — Split down the back and wash' 
in ice cold water, slightly salted. Wipe dry, and ] 
broil over a bright fire. Butter well before serving. ' 



Stewed Pigeon. — Having prepared and cut into 
pieces a good sized young pigeon, put it into a sauce- 
pan, pouring over it a small cup of water. Simmer 
gently until thoroughly done Into half a cup of 
milk stir a well beaten egg, a small piece of butter 
rubbed smooth with a teaspoon of flour, a pinch of 
pepper, and salt ; put this mixture into the sauce pan 
with the pigeon, and stew slowly for about ten min- 
utes. *. 

Rennet Custard. — Into one quart of milk very 
slightly warmed, stir about one tablespoon of pre- 
pared rennet, and grate nutmeg over the top. Let 
it stand in a cool place for fifteen minutes. Pour 
off the whey, and eat with sugar and cream. 



Graham Brewis. — Heat one cup of milk to boil- 
ing; remove from the fire, beat in half a cup of fine 
Graham bread crumbs quickly and thoroughly- — as 
you would whip cake batter, and serve as soon as it 
can be eaten with comfort. Sift sugar on each 
saucerful, and pour cream or milk over it. 

( )■ 

Panada. — Soda or Boston crackers, as many as 
needed ; — Boston crackers must be split. Cover the 
bottom of the dish, sprinkle with salt and sugar, 
doing the same to each layer. Cover with boiling 
water, and set on the back of the stove in a pan of 
hot water, closely covered. For adults, a little nut- 
meg and butter can be used ; it can also be flavored 
with wine or brandy, and may be served in about 
half an hour. V. G. C. 

Buttermilk. — Good fresh buttermilk, made from 
sweet cream, is a serviceable drink in diabetes. 



THE SICK ROOM. 



109 



Round Cream Toast. — Cut from slices of stale 
white, light bread with a biscuit cutter, as many 
pieces as desired; place on a plate or platter, and 
put in the oven until heated ; then toast them, with- 
out burning, dip quickly in boiling water, butter 
and salt slightly, place in a deep dish and cover 
with scalding— not boiling — milk, into which has 
bean stirred a teaspoon of blended corn starch ; 
cover the dish tightly, and place in a pan of boiling 
water in a hot oven for ten or fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. H. IV. C. 



Rice Water. — Wash half a cup of rice, pour over 
it a quart of cold water, add a large pinch of salt, 
and boil until the rice begins to soften. Strain off 
the water, and, when cold, use as a drink. 



( Raspberry Shrub. — To three quarts of raspberries 
I — mashed, put one quart of vinegar. Let it remain 
('over night, strain, and, to each pint of juice, add 
( one pound of sugar. Boil twenty minutes, and 
( bottle. Afrs. Frank Huzhes. 



Toast Water.— Remove the crust from two thick 
slices of stale, well made bread, and toast to a crisp 
brown, without scorching; lay them in a bowl, 
add boiling water, cover the bowl closely and set 
it away till cold. Strain gently through muslin. 
A little sugar may be added, and, if the case per- 
mits, the bowl may be kept on ice. 



Cough Remedy. — One ounce of sumac berries, 
two ounces of elecampane, two ounces of hoarhound, 
one pound of brown sugar, half a pound of rock 
candy, and one stick of licorice. Put two quarts of 
water on the herbs and boil down to one; strain, 
add the sugar, candy and licorice, and boil until 
dissolved. 

Miss C. M. Still. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



Cough Syrup. — Boil a handful of hops in three 

pints of water until the strength is extracted, stfain, 

and add one and a half cups of best molasses, and 

one cup of sugar, and boil down to about one quart. 

Miss K. C. Biinkman. 

Flaxseed Tea. — Pour a pint of boiling water on ) 
a tablespoon of whole flaxseed and let it stand! 
covered for fifteen minutes on the back of the stove, > 
but do not let it boil. When cold, add lemon juice'' 
and sugar. This is very good in colds with sore) 

throat. Mrs. V. G. C. \ 

i 

Mustard Plaster. — One part mustard, and two 
parts flour, mixed with warm water. It must not be 
thin enough to run. Spread between two pieces of 
cheese cloth, in a very much thinner layer than for 
a poultice. Keep it on from fifteen to twenty min- 
utes, never long enough to blister, as a blister raised 
by mustard is very sore and difficult to heal. G. C. 



] Bread Poultice. — Soak a muslin bag filled with 
[bread crumbs in boiling water for a few minutes, 
I then squeeze gently until it does not drip. As this 
[poultice does not retain heat any length of time, 
I it should be very thick. 

Flaxseed Poultice. — Stir flaxseed meal into 
'boiling water slowly, stirring constantly to prevent 
lumps, until it becomes stiff enough not to run 
freely. It takes about a pound of meal for- a good 
sized poultice. 

Charcoal Poultice. — Mix powdered charcoal 
through either meal or bread poultice, and sprinkle 
its surface freely with the powdered charcoal. This 
is an excellent purifier for old and foul sores. 

When for any reason a poultice cannot be had as 
soon as desired, flannel cloths wrung out in hot 
water, and renewed every few minutes are very 
effective. Grace Crane. 



Hints. 



RIALS. 



Barley. — Pearled barley is excellent in soups. 
It requires soaking for several hours before using. 



Caramel. — Indispensable for coloring Soups, Gravies 
and some Jellies. ]Melt one cup of granulated sugar in 
[ a sauce pan, stirring it imtil a very dark brown ; add 
> very gradually one cup of cold water, stirring con- 
} stantly, and boil these together until a little thick ; 
Bay Leaves. — The leaves on the top of a box of (as soon as it is a little cool, put in a wide-mouthed 
figs are usually bay leaves. Theyhavea very strong j bottle. When cold it should be about the consist- 
flavor, and more than one is never used at a time, {eucy of molasses. It will keep indefinitely. 

Browned Flour. — Sift half a pound of flour into( Crumbs. — Dry slices of bread, otherwise wasted, 
a dripping pan, and set it in a hot oven. Look to (may be saved for crumbs, set on a tin in the oven, 
it occasionally and stir it well. When it is the | and allowed to become very crisp; then rolled, sifted, 
color of coffee which is half milk, take it out, and (and kept perfectly dry. 
put in a tin for use. You will require a third more } 

of this, for thickening, than of raw flour. \ Curry Powder. — India curry powder is the best, 

Molly. -and can be bought in small bottles. 



112 COOKS IN CLOVER. 

Garlic. — This has a flavor like onions, but more | Never allow any meat or fish to lie, if you can 
delicate. A braid of garlic costs but a few cents, ) hang it up. 
and will keep a long time. A 'clove' of garlic is> 

one of the little sections into which the roots divide. All r^;/ meats should be cooked rare, and all 

( 7vJiitc meats should be well done. 

Pepper. — Cayenne pepjDer is more wholesome J 
than black pepper ; it is stimulating while the latter { Stewing is the most economical mode of cooking 
is irritating. \ meats; broiling and roasting, the most healthful. 



Tapioca.— Flake and pearled tapioca have the All vegetables, when cut, may be kept fresh by 
same taste, but the latter is better for thickening (putting the stalks in water, 
soups, and for many kinds of puddings. It must < 
always be soaked before using. 



Be sure the water is at boiling point before put- 
ting into it the vegetables to be cooked. 



T H O D S 



i Sweet potatoes require nealy twice the time of 
To have a bright strong fire, the fire-pot must be Irish potatoes, either to bake or boil, 
kept free from cinders and ashes. | 

) It is important that every form of food into which 
For scraping kettles, a large clam shell is excellent, jstarch enters, should be thoroughly cooked. 



Never grease pie plates ; sprinkle them lightly < 
with flour. i 

Put sugar on the bottom crust of fruit pies, and 
the juice will not run out; be careful not to have 
the oven too hot or the sugar will harden. 

To stone raisins easily, pour boiling water over 
them, and drain off. 

Put a small dish of water in the oven, when bak- 
ing cake, to prevent too rapid browning. 

All cakes in which molasses is used, are more 
apt to burn than others. Watch them weLl. 

Boiled custard frequently becomes curdled from 
over cooking; when it does, it may be returned to 
proper consistency by beating with an egg beater, 
as soon as taken from the stove. 



Weights and Measures. 

Four teaspoons of liquid — one tablespoon. 
Three teaspoons of dry material — one tablespoon. 
Four tablespoons of liquid — one wineglass. 
Eight tablespoons of liquid — one gill. 
Sixteen tablespoons of liquid — one cup. 
Four cups of liquid — one quart. 
, Four cups of flour — one pound or quart. 
Two cups of solid butter — one pound. 
Two cups of granulated sugar — one pound. 
Two and a half cups of powdered sugar — one pound. 
Three cups of meal — one pound. 
One pint of milk or water — one pound. 
One pint of chopped meat, solid, — one pound. 
Nine large, or ten medium eggs — one pound. 
Butter, the size of an egg — a quarter of a cup. 



COOKS IN CLOVER. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Flowers grow particularly well in the kitchen, 
where the heat is even, the air moistened by the 
steam, and the sun seldom shut out. 

If applied immediately, powdered starch will ab- 
sorb most of the fruit stains from table linen. 

A little borax in the water will prevent red and . 
blue bordered table linen and towels from running. < 

A little kerosene on a flannel answers nicely to 
rub tip furniture. 

To take out an old window pane, heat a poker, 
run it slowly along the old putty and soften it loose. 

When lamps cease to give a good light, boil the 
burners half an hour, using a good teaspoon of 
washing soda, rinse and dry. 



* For removing all stains except hot grease from 
j clothing, take four tablespoons of bay rum, one 
I teaspoon of saltpetre, and one quart of rain water. 

I Apply with a sponge or brush. 

) 

I To destroy moth, take one pound of alum, dis- 
solved in one quart of water; apply, while warm, 
\ with a small brush, wherever the moths are. 

Cucumber peelings, laid around the infested places 
over night, is said to be an effective remedy for ex- 
terminating roaches, three or four nights being 
sufficient to remove all traces of them. 

For cleansing carpets, cut very fine one bar of 
white Ivory soap, and boil it in one gallon of soft 
water, untildissolved; then add four ounces of pul: 
verized Fuller's earth, stirring until melted; then 
stir in slowly nine gallons of cold water and half a 
;pint of alcohol. 



••^JMEJMOR/\NDA.^- 



•>-^t^T H K^5^.- 



p til tic lli.lt§iil BiikJ®^^^^^^^ ^vvj^ % \^d^ ^o^^M 



PASSAIC, N. J. 



SllIJPLUS, 



DIRECTORS. 

EDO KIP, PuEs., JOHN A. WILLETT, Vice-Pres., 

A. N. ACKERMAN, CHAS. M. HOAVE, 

M. E. WORTHEN, THOS. M. MOORE, 

D. CARLISLE, FRANK M. SWAN, 

ROBERT U. KENT, Casiiiek. 



ICOMPAN Y. 



$100,000. I 
12,500. ; 



McRsy kmi on Ils;:sii and Isisrsst IWmi 



DIRECTORS. 



)C". M. HOWE, Pres., 

} R. D. KENT, Vice-Pres., 

{EDO KIP, 

JOHN A. WILLETT, 

M. E. WORTHEN, 

PETER REID, 

F. W. SOULE, 



D. CARLISLE, SEc'y., 

F. A. SOULE, Treas., 
JOHN J. BOW^S, 

G. B. WATERHOUSE, 
^. Z. VAN HOUTEN, 
A. N. ACKERMAN, 
FRANK M. SWAN. 



T. M. MOORE, Att'y. 

OKKICE HOURS, 



Daily, 11a. m. to 1 v. m. 



Saturdays, 7 to 9 p. m. 



Wednesdays, 7 to S i'. M. 



OUR NUMBER IS 300 MAIN AVENUE, NEAR DEPOT. 



AND WE HAVE :W0 ARTICLES IN THE 



Line that you need unci cannot live without. Among this number we would mention our 
That are always FRE.SH and PUKE, anJ i^ure to trive entire satisfaction. Yon will lind our 

*^FI.OUH, BUTTKH, CHEESE AKD EGGS^ 

The very test the Market Affords. We have the Ijest ussortment of CANNED GOODS in the City 

FRVJ\TS> ^v^o 3f:rr\^s> 

Kept in their season. This being so I cannot do better than to buy of 



The " COOKS IN CLOVER " have well and ably provided for the comfort of the " inner man," in this choice collection 
of tried and tested recipes. But the " outer man" can only be said to be well taken care of when suitably provided with 
artistic and durable footwear. A well shaped foot in a neat fitting, handsome boot or shoe, "is a thing of beauty"; and no lady 
or gentleman can lie said to Xte well dressed who fails to pay careful attention to this important part of the outer garb. 



KIKVIT ^ HAHTLKT, 



For the past three years we have supplied the people of Passaic and vicinity with FASHIONABLE .uid DURABLE 
FOOTWEAR of EVERY KIND, that has stood the test of time and use. 

We can point with satisfaction and pride to the fact that we have been able to retain all our old customers from the time 
we commenced business up to the present time, and that our large and satisfactory patronage is due to our strictly honest and 
fair way of doing business. 

We never recommend, or sell, an inferior article in our line of goods. Our aim is to give the best fitting and longest 
wearing boots and shoes for the lowest price. Give us a call and judge for yourseh'es. 



^^SOLE + AGENCY > 



vv v^ v\ ^ 3 v\ \ e, ^^ 



^^^^ H ALL'S BAZ/\RDpE55F0p|v1S 

S3.00, S3. BO & Se.BO. 
■'-J»<^iN[() HOME COMPLETE "WITHOITT OX■E.^(pis^. 

227 MAIN AVENUE, PASSAIC, NEW JERSEY. 

-^BOOKS -^ STATIOHERY, lir FAHCY i^ GOODS. ^ 

The most complete line of Domestic Office and School Supplies in the city. Sole Agency tor the Demorest & Butterick Patterns and Publications 

a full stock always on hand. Patterns mailed anywhere on receipt of price. The Demorest Sewing Machine at §19.50 equals the best, excels 

most, and cheap at $50.00. Trial allowed for thirty days, if not satisfactory cash returned. Guaranteed for five years. 

VISITING, WEDDING AND INVITATION CARDS PRINTED OR ENGRAVED. 

NOTE THE ADDRESS, NEW STORE 227 MAIN AVENUE. 





ESTABLISHED 1862. 

AM(n METAL WO^RKE(RS. 

Hot Jir Furnaces, Stoves and Ranges, 

Sinks and Gutters, Leaders and Roofing of all hinds. 

Tin Plated Sheet Iron, Copper Sheet Zinc, Solder, Wire,Sfc. 

TIN AIMD JAPPANNED ^J^ARE. 
241 Main avenue. 



\^. K. e>RP\V^^. 






)«?N VN-^:t) 






iiad©¥^ SKadcs aadl ^IWaiags |f ade 1© Order. 



STOBE: GARFIELD, M. J., Boardman's Block. 



ORDERS LEFT AT A. VAN LEEUWEN'S, STORE, 230 MAIN AVE. 



- kc e: HH cz> 



^L-iDer^, * I^oarding, i gale * and * E;xcl^ange * gtable§,4 



DUNDEE DRIVE 



?Sphon: crii: ^'.^' opposite N . Y. L. E. & W. R. R. Depot. 



Coaches for Weddings, and Funerals a specialty. Horses and carriages by the hour at reasonable 
rates. Particular attention paid to boarding horses. Open day and night. 



JAMES DRISCOL, 

ssiSKEDSMAN & FLORISXl 

254 MAIN AVENUE, PASSAIC. N.J. 

A FULL ASSORTMENT OF 

VEGETABLE, FARM AND FLOWER SEEDS 

KEPT CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

lllusiraied Caialogue of Same Fiiraished Free lo Intending Piirehasers. 

FOR WEDDINGS, FUNKRALS AND ALL PURPOSES AT MODERATE PRICES. 






W^Mm^mMm^M 









LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 489 4819 #