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Full text of "Cornucopia 1951"



/: 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/cornucopia1951nati 




1896* 



L^iu5d of ^51 

presents . . . 








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/ ublisnecl bu the S^enlof K^ladd 

9 

OF THE 

5 

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

FARM SCHOOL PENNSYLVANIA J 




DR. ELMER S. REINTHALER 



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T is a great honor for the Class of 1951 to dedicate this year- 
sLMbook to Dr. Elmer S. Reintholer. He has been as one of us 
through our four years of college life. 

Dr. Reintholer will be remembered as a most capable instructor 
in the fields of Economics and Accounting, also Music Appreciation; 
but he will never be forgotten for his wonderful personal warmth 
and interest with which, as our class advisor, he aided and encour- 
aged us in both personal and class endeavors. 

In honoring Dr. Reintholer we shall always be indebted to his 
ceaseless work to enlarge the scope of the college and maintain its 
high standards. 



NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
FARM SCHOOL, PENNSYLVANIA 



JAMES WORK 

PRESIDENT 



May 20, 1951 
To the Members of the Class of 1951: 



As you are about to lea,ve us to go joxit several ways, 
and to engage in careers toward which you have been pointing 
for many years, we come to a realization of the fact that the 
time spent with us has been only too short. 

We shall miss you. 

^'ou are inspired, I 'know, by the ambition to attain 
certain goals. I honestly believe nothing is unattainable in 
this life if v/e are willing to sacrifice certain things for those 
things which we must accomplish to attain our goal, if we are 
willing to really dedicate our lives to the achievement of our 
purpose. We cannot have everything. 

As the years pass, you will learn that so much time 
is wasted in our lives on non-essentials, that it is a wonder 
that any of us really reach the places abo\it which we dream in 
our youth. 

My message to yoi; is to make the best use of that 
time, to deal with yourselves and your fellowmen with only 
absolute integrit.v, and to never lose, as the years pass by, 
the ideals which are in your hearts in your youth. 




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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



LEON MERZ Chairman 

LOUIS A. HIRSCH Vice Chairman 

MANFRED R. KRAUSKOPF Vice Chairman 



William M. Adler 

Sidney K. Allman, Jr. 

Gustave C. Ballenberg 

Isidore Baylson 

Leon L. Berkowitz 

J. Griffith Boardman 

David Burpee 

Harry Burstein 

Samuel Cooke 

Sylvan D. Einstein 

Edwin B. Elson 

Mrs. Samuel Gerstley 

Benjamin Goldberg 

Samuel M. Golden 

Lester M. Goldsmith 

Albert M. Greenfield 

Lester Hano 

Roy A. Heymonn 

Julian A. Hillman 

Stanley H. Hinlein 

Louis A. Hirsch 

Rudolph M. Hirschwald 

Maurice Jacobs 

Mrs. M. J. Korpeles 

A. Spencer Kaufman, M.D. 

Julius Klein 

Charles Kline 

Dr. Bertram W. Korn 

Mrs. Joseph Krouskopf 

Manfred R. Krouskopf 

Al Paul Lefton 



Mrs. Irvin F. Lehman 

David Levin 

Leon Merz 

Louis Nusboum 

David H. Pleet 

Julian G. Pollock 

William A. Reiter 

Theodore G. Rich 

Lee I. Robinson 

Mrs. Lee I. Robinson 

Leon Rosenboum 

Fred L. Rosenbloom 

Edward Rosewater 

Samuel S. Rudley 

Matthew B. Rudofker 

Max Semel 

Sol Shopiro, V.M.D. 

Hon. Harry Shapiro 

Edwin H. Silverman 

Nathan J. Snellenberg 

Philip Sterling 

Isaac Stern 

James L. Stern 

Hon. Israel Stiefel 

Maurice L. Strauss 

Cecil J. Toor 

Max Trumper, Com. (MSC) U.S.N.R. 

Fred H. Weigle 

Emanuel W. Wirkman 

James Work 

Wm. H. Yerkes, Jr. 




PRESIDENT JAMES WORK 




Corl G. RosscUr 
Chief Accountant 



Elii^ M Berf.cid 




Jesse Elson. M.S. 
Professor ©♦ Chemistry 




L 




Henry Schmied«r, M.S. 
Professor of Cfiemiitry 



ClmTon R. Blackmon, M.S. 
ssociatc Professor of Agronomy 





Chories E. Keys, Jr , B^. 
Insfructor tn Phrsicol Educotion 




HERBERT AKERS 

"Heib" 

Highview Avenue 
Woodcliff Lake, N.J. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Football 1; Basketball 1; Poultry Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club 1, 2; Animal 
Husbandry Club, President 2, 3, 4; 
"A" Day Committee 3; Class Vice- 
President 3. 



DONALD A. BARBOUR 

"Smokey" 

651 Fargo Street 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Basketball 1, 4; Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Glee Club 3, 4; Animal Husbandry 
Clu'^ 3, 4; Gleaner 4; Class Vice- 
President 4. 




ROBERT BARG 
"Bob" 

642 15th Street 
Miami Beach, Fla. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 

3, 4; Agricultural Engineering Club, 

Treasurer 3, 4. 





ALVIN C. BLEFELD 
"Al" 

2220 Washington Lane 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Poultry Club 1, 2, 4; Horticulture Club 
1, 2; Animal Husbandry Club 1 , 2, 4; 
Football 1, 2; Dairy Manufacturing 
Society 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
"A" Day Committee 3. 



ABRAHAM J. BLOOM 

"Jack" 

Jedlea Hereford Farms 
Newtown R.D. No. 2, Pa. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 





DAVID P. BORSOI 

"Dave" 

1561 Elm Street 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 2, 3, 4. 




DAVID BROOKS 

"Booker" 
Texas 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Poultry Club 1; Horticulture Club 1; 
Dairy Club 1, Secretary 2, 3, 4; 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, Secretary 
2, 3, 4; Farm Mechanics Club 4. 



STANLEY BROOKS 
"Stan" 

43-09 43 rd Street 
Long Island City, N. Y. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Band 1 , 2, 3; Kennel Club 1, 2; Poultry 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Food Industry Club 2; 

Gleaner 4. 





JOSEPH BROTMAN 

"Joe" 

2 Oakland Place 
Great Neck, N. Y. 

AGRONOMY 

Cheerleader 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2; 

Poultry Club 2; Horticulture Club 3, 4; 

Animal Husbandry Club 3, 4; Gleaner 

Staff 3, 4. 



FRANCIS J. CLANCEY 

"Frank" 

224 82nd Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Basketball 2; Baseball 2; Varsity Club 
2, 3, 4; Dairy Club 2, 3, 4; Dance 
Committee 2; Junior Prom Committee 
3; "A" Day Committee 3; Student 
Council 3, Vice President 4; Animal 
Husbandry Club 4; Senior Ball Com- 
mittee 4. 




ALBERT CLARK 

"Al" 

2764 Jenkintown Road 
Ardsley, Pa. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Animal Husbandry Club 2, 3; Dairy 
Club 1, 2. 





JAMES J. COYLE 

"Jim." 

142 Pleasant Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

Student Council 1, Treasurer 2, Court 
Recorder 3, Judge 4; Dance Com- 
mittee 1, 2, 3, 4; Class President 2, 
3, 4; Flower Show Committee 3, 4; 
Cornucopia 4. 



LEONARD CROOKE 
"Es" 

76 Amherst Street 
East Orange, N. J. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 





DAVIS DEMING 

"Jack" 

38 Hampshire Road 
Great Neck, N. Y. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Band 1; Horticulture Club 1; Dairy 

Club 1; Kennel Club 2; Animal 

Husbandry Club 3. 




JOSEPH EAGLE 

"Joe" 

1031 Hopkinson Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HORTICULTURE 

Band 1; Horticulture Club 2, 3, 4. 



IRWIN B. FRIEDMAN 
"hv" 

281 E. 205th Street 
Bronx, N.Y. 

POULTRY 

Gleaner Staff 1 , 2, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 

4; Baseball Manager 2, 3; Poultry 

Club 2, 3, 4. 





BERNARD A. GALLAGHER 

"Barney" 

9 Providence Road 
Chester, Pa. 

HORTICULTURE 

Horticulture Club 3; Student Council 4. 



FRANK A. GERACI 

"Frank" 

1231 Washington Street 
Easton, Pa. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Goat Club 1; Dairy Club 1; Animal 
HusbandryClub 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 2, 3; "A" Day Committee 2; 
Pennsylvania Farm Show 3; Livestock 
Judging Team 4. 




SAUL GOLDFARB 
"Goldie" 

1092 Willmore Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Kennel Club 1, 2; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Baseball 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; 

Dairy Club 3, 4. 





ERWIN GOLDSTEIN 

"Goldie" 

646 Hawthorne Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

POULTRY 

Poultry Club 1, 3, Secretary 2, Presi- 
dent 4; Goat Club 1; Horticulture Club 
2, 3; Poultry Judging Team 2, 4; 
Gleaner 2, Assistant Editor 3, 4; Base- 
ball Manager 3, 4; Student Activities 
Board 4. 



ANTHONY P. GRIFO 

"Mac" 

1343 Washington Street 
Easton, Pa. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Animal Husbandry Club 2, 3, 4; 

Pennsylvania Farm Show 3; Football 

3, 4; Cornucopia Staff 4; Animal 

Husbandry Judging Team 4. 





JOHN C. HOLZHEIMER 

"Punchy" 

790 Riverside Drive 
New York, N. Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club 1, 
3, 4; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 
Varsity Club 3. 




RICHARD H. HORNE 

"Dick" 

W. Broad Street 
Quakertown, Pa. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Football 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2; Food 
Industry Club 1 , 2; Cornucopia Staff 4. 



HENRY HUDSON 

"Shattuck" 

R.D. No. 1 
Fulton, N.Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, President 4; "A" 

Day Chairman 4, "A" Day Committee 

2, 3; Class Vice-President 2; Animal 

Husbandry Club 3, 4. 





WILLIAM JUDD 
"Biir 

5808 N. 4th Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

Horticulture Club 1 , 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1 ; 
Kennel Club 2, 3; Senior Ball Com- 
mittee 4; Chairman Student Activities 
4; Flower Show Committee 3, 4. 



PATRICK KELLY 

"Pat" 

905 Oriental Avenue 
Collingswood, N. J. 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

Horticulture Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 
Co-Chairmon 1, 2, 3, Mgr. 4; Band 1, 
2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
"A" Day Committee 3; Cornucopia 
Staff, Editor 4. 




SHELDON KOLTOFF 

"Harry" 

329 N. 56th Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

POULTRY 

Goat Club 1, 2; Gleaner Staff 1, 2, 3, 

4; "A" Day Committee 3, 4; Kennel 

Club 1, 2, 3; Cornucopia Staff 4. 





HENRY A. KUEHN, JR. 
"Hank" 

12 Birch Hill Rood 
Great Neck, N. Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Football 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 4 
Baseball 1, 2, 4; Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
Junior Prom Committee 3; Farm Me 
chanics Club 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4 
Gleaner Staff 4. 



WILLIAM H. LARDER 

'■Bill" 

19 E. Newell Avenue 
Rutherford, N. J. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy Club 1 , 2, 3, Vice-President 4; 
Basketball 1 , 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 
3, 4; Varsity Club 1 2, 3, President 4; 
Poultry Club 1; Farm Mechanics Club 
4: Class Treasurer 3, 4. 





MORRIS LOWENTHAL 

"Senafor" 

1 359 Findlay Avenue 
Bronx 56, N. Y. 



DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Horticulture Club 1, 2, Poultry Club 1, 
Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Gleaner 2, Associate Editor 3, Editor 4; 
Student Council 2, 3, 4; Dairy Manu- 
facturing Society 3, 




PAUL LUBIN 

"Paul" 

5740 Woodbine Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa, 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Dairy Manufacturing Society 3; Food 
Industry Club 2, 3. 



JAMES S. McCLATCHY 

"Shannon" 

547 Lafayette Road 
Merion, Pa. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Horticulture 

Club 1, 2; Animal Husbandry Club 3, 

4: Farm Mechanics Club 3, 4. 





DAVID MORTON 

"Shifty" 

509 W. Taylor Street 
Taylor, Pa. 

AGRONOMY 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Farm Mechanics 
Club 3, 4. 



IRA MOUMGIS 

"Iia" 

56 No. Oxford Walk 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Baseball 1; Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Animal Husbandry Club 2, 3, 4; 

Livestock Judging Team 4. 




PIERSON ORR 

"Pete" 

Mt. Paul Farm 
Gladstone, N. J. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Student Council 4. 





VICTOR E. PESSANO, JR. 
"Vic" 

3949 Bennington Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Photography Club, Secretary 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Football 1, 2, 4; Gleaner 4; Food 

Industry Club, Secretary-Treasurer 2; 

Cornucopia Business Manager. 



EUGENE C. PREVOST 

"Tex" 

Hulmeville Road 
Fallsington, Pa. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Bond 2; Kennel Club 2; Gleaner 3, 4; 

Animal Husbandry Club 3, 4; Dairy 

Club 4; Photography Club 4; Livestock 

Judging Team 4. 





HERBERT E. REBACK 

"Herb" 

S. Delsea Drive 
Vinelond, N. J. 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

Photography Club 1 , 2, 3, 4; Football 

Manager 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball Manager 

1, 2, 3; Horticulture Club 2, 3, 4; 

Flower Show Committee 3, 4. 




JOHN MACK RINE 

"Mack" 

R.D. No. 1 
Danville, Pa. 

AGRONOMY 

Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Farm Mechanics 
Club, President 4. 



FRANKLIN SCHEIRER 

"Frank" 

Township Line Road 
R.D. No. 3, Norristown, Pa. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Band 1, 2; Goat Club 1; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club, Vice-President 2, 4, 
Treasurer 3; Animal Husbandry Judg- 
ing Team, 4; Cornucopia Staff 4. 





PAUL SCHOMP 

"Paul" 

Witchwood Farm 
North Wales, Pa. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Football 1, 2; Basketball 1; Dairy Club 

1, President 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry 

Club 2, 3; Student Council 2, 3. 



STANLEY SESSLER 

"Stan" 

3 Melwax Street 
Belleville, N.J. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Doiry Club 2, 3; Animol Husbandry 
Club 2, 3. 




MELVIN SILVERMAN 

"Squirrel" 

312 E. 59th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POULTRY 

Gleaner Staff 1, Art Editor 2, 3, 
Assistant Editor 4; Poultry Club 1, 2, 3, 
Vice-President 4; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1, 2; Poultry Judging Team 3, 4. 





GEORGE SLOTHOWER 

"George" 

35 Glenwood Avenue 
Alden, Pa. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Goat Club 1; Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Glee Club 2, 4; Animal Husbandry 

Club 3, 4. 



BRUCE M. SMITH 

"Smitty" 

28 Lyman Street 
Beverly, Mass. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Animal Husbandry Club 3, 4. 





PAUL M. STEIN 

"Tiny" 

149 Essex Street 
Beverly, Mass. 

FOOD INDUSTRY 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball Manager 
2; Photography Club 1, 2, 3, President 
4; "A" Day Committee 2, 3, 4; Food 
Industry Club 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; 
Student Activities Board 3, 4; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Gleaner Staff 4; 
Cornucopia Staff 4. 




JAMES E. SUTCLIFFE 
"Suds" 

9123 80th Street 
Woodhaven, N. Y. 

HORTICULTURE 

Horticulture Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GURSTON TURNER 
"Gus" 

1 749 Grand Concourse 
New York, N.Y. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Photography 

Club 1; Band 1; Animal Husbandry 

Club 3, 4. 





MORTON H. WEINGARTEN 

"Winey" 

1 530 Sheridan Avenue 
Bronx, N. Y. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Photography Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy 
Club 1; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Dairy 
Manufacturing Society 3; Gleaner Staff 
3, 4; "A" Day Committee 3; Farm 
Mechanics Club 4. 



JOHN T. WOODS 

"The Fox" 

Chestnut Ridge Road 
Montvcle, N. J. 

AGRONOMY 

Horticulture Club 1; Baseball 1; Junior 

Prom Committee 3; Ag. Engineering 

Club 4, 




MICHAEL YAWORSKI 

"Mike" 

1 034 Washington Street 
Easton, Pa. 

AGRONOMY 

Football 1, 2; Agronomy Club 3; Dairy 
Club 4; Farm Mechanics Club 4. 




LAWRENCE BILLERBECK 

"Larry" 

New Oxford 
Pennsylvania 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Animal Husbandry Club 4. 




e 



ll\>ecall . . . 



Y^k ALENDAR days have been marked off for five months. The dormitory has the aspect of a math class — 
r^M one hundred doys, ninety days, ten days, and finally zero days left until graduation, The days of marking 

are over and the time of parting has come. So many of us hove anticipated this day and yet we have that 
heavy feeling in our hearts. 

Yes, we have experienced this feeling before and we shall again and again. This period of our life incites 
the feeling of leaving friends, acquaintances and surroundings we have cherished for four years. In years to come, 
we shall meet again but some of the cherished friendliness will have faded with the passage of time. 

Those reunions will bring bock the memory of the stone that rolls onto N.A.C.'s campus in '47 and picked 
up moss and more moss; then rolled out again in caps and gowns in 1951. 

This geological specimen was small in '47 but particles of good times, thrills of a student life, sod moments, 
ond oil the rest of college days made it a good size morsel with ample moss adhering to it. 

You, the profs, the buildings and the books added the material to the stone. In those freshman days of 
long ago when we were christened into college life with the bonfire and the blozing '51, this wos the beginning. 

Those hard moments in college chemistry, the laughs in intromurol sports, and the misery of wearing a 
mutt cap were only a foreword to all the merriment and seriousness of years to come. 

Ah, the merriment! Can you remember those dances given by the clubs and classes. Country Club affairs, 
Trenton State Foir commandos, the Glassboro Invasion and some of the other antics in which we were partakers. 
All these offoirs will be stored in our memory chest. 

The worries over marks, quizzes and exams gave us the experience of student seriousness. Well, we don't 
worry about little things as that any more. 

In passing in review on the graduation stoge, we will hove left many precedents for others to follow. We 
hove initioted some of the students' greatest activities in sports and in farm shows, judging trips, flower shows 
and olso "A" Doy. 

We were a dynamic class. Never were we stagnant very long. We are proud as members of the class 
of '51 ond we shell be proud of our future as we were of our post. 

In some future yeors we will come together. Memories will be lived through again. New memories will 
be added. 

Until we meet for a reunion, farewell, live happily, good luck and remember the merry boys of '51. 

— James J. Coyle 




Ulnclerclc 



added 




(^iad3 Of- 

'52 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President Gerard Marini 

Vice-President Oskar Larsson 

Secretary Robert Holland 

Treasurer Douglas Van Winkle 



(^iCLdd oDlrectoru 



JOSE ALFARO Avenida Roosevelt No. 39, San Salvador, El Salvador 

NORMAN AUSLANDER 8413 Eastwick Avenue, Philadelphia, Penna. 

STANLEY BARBER 205 East Brown Street, Norristown, Pennsylvania 

MAX BERKOWITZ R.D. #1, Lambertvllle, New Jersey 

SELIG BERNSTEIN 217 Delsea Drive, Clayton, New Jersey 

GEORGE BLEIBTREU 4 Oxford Boulevard, Great Neck, New York 

EDWIN C. BORST .... 19 Walk Street, Lacey Park, Hatboro, Pennsylvania 

EDWARD BROPHY 147 Sheldon Lane, Ardmore, Pennsylvania 

FRANK A. BROWN Bartram Avenue, Mt. Holly, New Jersey 

STANLEY CAPLAN 1016 50th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

ALBERT DARPINO 414 Almond Street, Vineland, New Jersey 

MARSHAL K. FISHBEIN 84 Greenwood Drive, Milburn, New Jersey 

ALFRED FURIE c o Ted Moyer, Chalfont, Pennsylvania 

NORMAN K. GOLDSTEIN 66 Goodwin Avenue, Newark, New Jersey 

WALLACE HEITSMITH ... 96 Hudson Avenue, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey 

ROBERT HOLLAND 149 Hudson Avenue, Ridgefield, New Jersey 

RICHARD D. ILSEMANN . . 430 Longfellow Avenue, Wyncote, Pennsylvania 
ALBERT JURCIUKONIS . . 4661 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Penna. 

HENRY J. KALTENTHALER 1315 Hillside Road, Wynnewood, Penna. 

ALLAN KINNUNEN Suomi Street, Paxton, Massachusetts 

FRANK LaROSA 1723 73rd Street, Brooklyn, New York 

OSKAR H. LARSSON, JR Newton Road, Villanovo, Pennsylvania 

CARL F. LEUTNER 70 Christie Street, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey 

GERARD MARIN I 1151 65th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

LOUIS J. MOSTARDI .... 2 Grier Street, Lacey Park, Hatboro, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT PEARSON 1920 Robinson Avenue, Havertown, Pennsylvania 

IRWIN RECHT 225 East 58th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

PETER ROLLAND 1 Victory Court, Metuchen, New Jersey 

ROBERT J. ROSENBERG Box 4, Lumberville, Pennsylvania 

WALTER RUBEN 2039 Cruger Avenue, New York 60, New York 

NORMAN SHAYER 7030 Limekiln Pike, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

RICHARD SOWIERALSKi RD#3, Erie, Pennsylvania 

JOHN H. TOOR Sandy Ridge Road, Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

DOUGLAS VAN WINKLE .... 69 Great Oak Drive, Short Hills, New Jersey 

CARMEN VARE Montgomeryville, Pennsylvania 

O. M. VICARS, JR Wise, Virginia 

ROBERT G. WEBER 86 Searing Street, Dover, New Jersey 

JOHN WISLOTSKI 1012 Cross Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

WILLIAM SLEMMER 420 Third Avenue, Haddon Heights, New Jersey 

JOHN STAEBLE .... Belmont Avenue and New Road, Southampton, Penna. 




'53 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President Herbert Millstone 

Vice-President William Smith 

Secretary-Treasurer Edward Van Sant 



(^laAA oDirect 



Xrecioru 



MICHAEL AIELLO 1 05 Wildwood Avenue, Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

SANDY AKLUFI Edison, Pennsylvania 

SAMUEL BOLTAX 272 Rivington Street, New York, New York 

WILLIAM J. BRANIGAN. . . .521 Doremus Avenue, Glen Rock, New Jersey 

PAUL L. CHECHELE 618 Luzerne Avenue, West Pittston, Pennsylvania 

MARTIN CHERNEK 821 E. Ridge Street, Lansford, Pennsylvania 

JOSEPH CHERNICOFF 4942 N. Boudinot Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

ROBERT L. COPE 7032 Walker Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT E. COTTER Southampton, Pennsylvania 

ORION T. CROMWELL R. D. No. 3, Perkasie, Pennsylvania 

CARL S. DAHLSTROM 802 W. Somerset Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

KENNETH C. EHRLICH. . . .439 Page Terrace, South Orange, New Jersey 
GEORGE B. FAIRWEATHER. . . 1459 St. George Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey 

EDWARD J. FLEMING Bristol Pike, Andalusia, Pennsylvania 

DANIEL FRANCHETTI 475 Chew Road, Hammonton, New Jersey 

DOUGLAS W. FRIES 1932 Grove Avenue, Allentown, Pennsylvania 

JOHN N. GIUSTI 421 East Ridge Street, Nanticoke, Pennsylvania 

FRANK J. GRUENFELD 20 Shm. Levin Street, Tel Aviv, Israel 

LEO HANDLER Fountainville, Pennsylvania 

FRANK M. HOLLORAN . .Merriewold Farms, R. D. No. 2, Monroe, New York 

IVAR D. HOLMBERG Kane R. D. No. 1 , Pennsylvania 

CALVIN KIDDER 1507 Spring Lane, Wilmington, Delaware 

PETER KRUSCH 32 Warren Street, Hackensack, New Jersey 

JAMES LIPARI F^- D. No. 3, Easton, Pennsylvania 

EDWIN MARTIN Box 263, Midland Park, New Jersey 

SAMUEL McCLEARY 5520 Morris Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT McKENNEY P.O. Box 14, Solebury, Pennsylvania 

HERBERT MILLSTONE 1 121 S. 54th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

HOWARD G. NASH York Road, Hartsville, Pennsylvania 

EDWARD A. NIEZNAY R. D. No. 1, Pennsburg, Pennsylvania 

CLARENCE E. OKERLUND Main Street, Mt. Jewett, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM G. PAVLIK 3224 Harcums Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

STANLEY E. PERELMAN 370 Tree Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L PETERS 1141 New Holland Road, Reading, Pennsylvania 

RUSSEL PLUMMER 6000 Washington Avenue, Pennsauken, New Jersey 

ROBERT T. REYNOLDS 312 St. George Street, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM M. ROSS Osage Lane, Moylan, Penna. 

LEWIS S. SACHARNOSKl . . Center Grove Rd., Box 416, Millville, New Jersey 

JOHN W. SMITH 2260 N. Howard Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

HENRY K. STRAWN Box 136, Warrington, Pennsylvania 

EDWARD B. VANSANT 413 Main Street, Hulmeville, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM J. VOGEL, JR R. D. No. 1, Quakertown, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM T. WEIR.' Mantua Road, Mt. Royal, New Jersey 

JOHN M. WILSON 4812 46th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 




(^laJd of 

'54 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President Frank Warta 

Vice-President Stephen Ferdo 

Secretary Taylor Madill 

Treosurer Harold Tannin 



EUGENE ALFONSIN 1 654 W. Second Street, Brooklyn, New York 

VINCENT ALTIERI 63 Reynolds Street, Pittston, Pennsylvania 

DONALD BEIDEMAN Berlin Road, Hoddonfield, New Jersey 

JOEL BELL Pauls Cross Roads, Virginia 

LIONEL BERGER 4412 Tenth Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

JOHN BERNSEE 639 Line Street, Camden, New Jersey 

NORMAN BETZER 376 May Avenue, Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

JOSEPH BIRK 356 E. Seventh Avenue, Roselle, New Jersey 

CARL BORNFRIEND 5331 Arlington Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

RONALD BRONSWEIG. . . .7163 Walker Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

MARTIN BROOKS R. D., Kitnersville, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT DAVIS 405 Devon Terrace, Shillington, Pennsylvania 

GEORGE DEMITROFF 1743 N. 31st Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

THOMAS S. ELLIOTT Gulph Mills, Conshohocken, Pennsylvania 

REINHART EWRTZ 53 Albert Avenue, Alden, Pennsylvania 

MICHAEL FLEISIG 41 W. 42nd Street, New York, New York 

STEPHEN FERDO 138 Almond Lane, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

HENRY GEFFKEN New Britain, Pennsylvania 

RICHARD GLEICHENHAUS 77 Oxford Blvd., Great Neck, New York 

HARRY GREENBAUM Box 464, Cox Cro Road, Toms River, New Jersey 

GUY W. GROSS R. D. No. 1, Ambler, Pennsylvania 

WALTER GUTHRIE 350 Bala Avenue, Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 

MORTON HERSHMAN 65-41 Booth Street, Forrest Hills, New York 

LoBARRE JAGGARD 1 West Oak Avenue, Moorestown, New Jersey 

EDWARD JARDEL 604 Tyson Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

DAVID KING Schwenksville, Pennsylvania 

RICHARD KRATZ. 1220 W. Airy Street, Norristown, Pennsylvania 

MORTON LEVINSON 68 Brunswick Street, Boston 21, Massachusetts 

BERTRAM LITOFF 8103 Fifth Avenue, North Bergen, New Jersey 

CHARLES LORENZ 240 Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pennsylvania 

JAMES T. MADILL Green Lane R. D. No. 1, Pennsylvania 

SAMUEL MALOVE 6230 Ellisworth Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM MAYER 7031 Forrest Avenue, Philadelphia 38, Penna. 

GALE PHILLIPS 41 1 Douglas Street, Reading, Pennsylvania 

ARTHUR POLEY c/o M. Hanken, Holloway, Pennsylvania 

RAYMOND POSEY 31 Morse Street, Camden, New Jersey 

ALBERT ROSNER 2264 Bridge Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT RUBIN 601 Metropolitan Ave., Staten Island, New York 

GEORGE RUNGE 58 Parker Road, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

WILLIAM SHEETS 2520 Hirst Terrace, Havertown, Pennsylvania 

HERBERT SITRIN 124 West Grove Street, Oneida, New York 

ELLIOTT SILVER 853 Evans Street, Pottstown, Pennsylvania 

WILLISON SMITH Frog Hollow Road, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 

JOHN SOARDS 101 Main Road, Hammonton, New Jersey 

MITCHELL SOCKELL 5147 Penway Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

MOHAMMED SOLTANI Roosevelt Avenue, Teheran, Iran 

ROBERT STUFFER 5627 Broad Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

HAROLD TANNIN 1641 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

FRANCIS WARTA 495 Boyden Avenue, Maplewood, New Jersey 

DAVID WEITZNER 1505 Boston Road, New York, New York 

BERNARD WISSER R. D. No. 3, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 



f atrond 



Herman Reback 

V. Elwood Pessano 

Lee Geraci 

Dr. C. H. Rolland 

Ben Brotman 

Dora Koltoff 

Albert Fishbein 

Walter E. Deming 

Francis J. Clancey, Jr. 

Henry J. Kaltenthaler 

Lillian Lubin 

Adam Sowieralski 

George A. Slothower 

Richard D. Grifo 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Larder 

The Helkers 

Louis Pearlman 

Mrs. Nettie Barbour 

Frater's Electric Service 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Home 

Irving Weingarten 

L. L. Trauger 
Doylestown, Po. 

Warren Nelson 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Johnny's Luncheonette 
Cross Keys, Pa. 

Doylestown Laundry 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Mojonnier Brothers 
Chicago, Illinois 

Dieges & Clust 
New York, N. Y. 

Benjamin Goldberg 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Compliments of 
Cold Winter Farm 

Arctic Food Center 
Cross Keys, Pa. 

J.J. Conroy, Inc. 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Compliments of 
The Office Staff 

Compliments of 
The Junior Class 

Compliments of 
The Sophomore Class 

Compliments of 
The Freshman Class 

Bucks County Inn, Inc. 
Doylestown, Pa. 




^c 



tiuitied 



• • • 




i^ornucopiu S^tafP 



"THE editors of the 1950 CORNUCOPIA hove established a 
I high standard which we of the 1951 CORNUCOPIA must 
follow. We have tried to uphold this standard and feel that in 
the production of this book we have accomplished our goal. 

In publishing this book it has been our aim to try to include 
things which will be of interest to us in future years, perhaps a 
chuckle or a sigh. If we have done this then we have succeeded 
in our aims. 

We of the staff have learned a great deal and gained a 
great deal of valuable information in the construction of this 
book. We know our shortcomings and believe that future year- 
book editors may benefit from them. 



student L^ounclt 



RIGHTFULLY holding the dignified position as the prime 
legislative and judicial status of all student activities and 
transgressions, the Student Council has become the number one 
link between the administration and the students themselves. 

This year has seen the Student Council come forward in 
stature. We know now that student government is in strong 
hands. They will go forward to bring better understanding between 
the students and their administration. 





^J^orticultural ^c 



ocieL 



^ 



ONE of the older clubs in the college, the HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY has been a very influential organization. It has 
given its members plenty of opportunities to become more 
informed on outstanding subjects in the fields of Horticulture 
and Ornamental Horticulture. Timely motion pictures and 
lectures have given its members a wealth of information. 

Through the many field trips to such points of interest as 
the Teagle Estate, New York Botanical Gardens, and Boyce- 
Thompson Institute, members have been able to see first hand 
modern practices and methods. 

This year's feature trip was to the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture 
Experiment Station at Beltsville, Md. Students were encouraged 
to ask questions and take the U.S.D.A. pamphlets which are of 
interest to them in their chosen fields. 



f oultru Science L^iub 



FOR the past five years the Poultry Club has functioned as one 
of the more outstanding organizations of the college. It is, 
without a doubt, probably the most active. The club has always 
striven to give its members a practical as well as scientific 
approach to the maintenance of the Poultry Industry. 

Each year this club has made a project of raising and 
marketing a type of poultry. All members of the club are 
expected to participate in the care of these birds. With the money 
gained from their sale the club has a party and saves enough 
money to start the next year's project. In the raising of the 
poultry in this manner the club members gain valuable infor- 
mation which they con apply to their own poultry plants when 
they go out into the field. 





oDuiru ^c 



¥ 



yocieL 



^ 



ANOTHER of the older student organizations of the college 
is the Dairy Society which has, under continually efficient 
leadership, afforded its members much useful information. 
Movies, exhibits, field trips and speeches by outstanding men in 
the field have brought the club members more knowledge of the 
current as well as the older standard practices of dairying and its 
allied fields. 

The Dairy Society will be remembered for its being the 
initiators of the first "A" Day three years ago. This year the club 
has again contributed its share to a very successful "A" Day. 

Entries in the Harrisburg Farm Show and a trip to Beltsville, 
Md., were two of the oustanding activities of this year. 



A 



nima 



I ^J^uAbandru i^lub 



THE Animal Husbandry Club is probably the proudest organi- 
zation on the campus this year. They have sent members of 
their club to the Harrisburg Farm Show and have brought back 
to the school a grand champion ribbon and a reserve grand 
champion ribbon, two of the top awards of the show for horses. 
The club has also set up a project to raise hogs this year. Club 
members take turns in caring for the animals. In this way they 
have secured a great deal of practical knowledge that will be 
useful when they have the care and responsibility of their own 
animals in the future. 





^he K-Jleanef S^taff- 



THE GLEANER is the official publication of the students of 
the college. The primary objectives of the magazine are 
to afford all interested students an opportunity to express them- 
selves in print; and to familiarize the staff members with certain 
fundamentals of journalism. 

The GLEANER is an organization composed of men from 
every class and major who collaborate to put out a finished 
product. The magazine features articles of interest to the students 
in various phases of agriculture as well as other news about the 
campus. All of the stories are written by the staff, and all 
photography and layout work is also done by them. 



Uufdltu (^lub 



^ 



THIS exclusive club is made up of the N.A.C. lettermen in 
football, basketball, and baseball, the three intercollegiate 
sports in the college. 

The members of the Varsity Club act as umpires for intra- 
mural sports, the most famous of which are the softball games. 
They also give an occasional dance and run the refreshment 
concession at football games. 

The money gained from sales of refreshments and member- 
ship dues is used for a club party each year. 





arm 



5< 

Week 



anicA 



The Farm Mechanics Club is the newest group on the campus; however, 
it has gained many members for itself during its single year of existence. 
It is the purpose of the club to bring together those students on the campus 
who have in common the desire to know more about the mechanics of farm 
implements. 

The group spent much of this year organizing but they had time to 
bring to their members some speakers on farm equipment from the various 
dealers in the vicinity. 



pu 



oaraphu 



i^lLib 




One of the most recent clubs in the school, the Photography Club, has, 
nevertheless, gained many new members this year and now ranks as a very 
prominent group. The club has tried to give its members a chance to 
improve their techniques both in photographing end darkroom work. The club 
and its members hove been a great help to the GLEANER and have supplied 
many photographs for the CORNUCOPIA. 







Under very able leadership the Glee Club has, during its short time of 
existence, gained acclaim for itself as well as the college. 

The club founded and continues to sponsor the annual Holiday Festival, 
its members have given numerous performances in the Bucks County area as 
well as in Philadelphia. Broadcasts from the Doylestown station and appear- 
ances at local functions are also on their yearly agenda. 




..Activities 
(l5ocird 



The Student Activities Board, composed of all class presidents, club 
presidents, and two student council representatives, was formed to plan, 
regulate, and supervise extra-curricula activities. 

The Board has endeavored to have a dance planned for each month of 
the school year. It has also formulated a calendar of events for each month. 




-^ oDau K^ommittee 



^ 



THE "A" Day Committee is composed of representatives of 
each chartered club at the college under the head of a 
chairman, together with sub-committees such as the program 
committee and the publicity committee. It is the function of 
the group to organize the preparation and efficient running of 
the annuel field day held in the spring. Since this field day has 
become the outstanding event of the school year, the committee 
must work doubly hard to make sure of all details. 

In producing the annual "A" Day it is the aim of the 
Committee to increase the practical knowledge of those partici- 
pating. The Committee also hopes to reach the local farmers 
with some of the more modern methods now being introduced 
into agriculture. 




s. 



JOfid 




^OotoCLlt 



1950 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


30 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


14 


Oct. 


21 


Oct. 


28 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


18 



Montclair State Teachers College (Montclair, N.J.) Home 

Long Island Agri. & Tech. Inst. (Farmingdale, L. I.) Away 

(Open) 

King's College (Wilkes-Barre, Pa.) Home 

New Haven State Teachers College (New Haven, Conn.). . . Away 

Glossboro State Teachers College (Glassboro, N.J.) Home 

Panzer College (East Orange, N.J.) Home 

Lycoming College (Williamsport, Pa.) Away 

Coaches: Manager: 

Peter Click, Jr. Herbert Reback 

Charles E. Keyes, Jr. 



THE 1951 football team, under the able direc- 
tion of "Pete" Click, turned in a seasonal 
record of one win, one tie, and five defeats. 
However, we cannot judge the team from these 
statistics since our gridders encountered a tough 
schedule. It must also be considered that the 
squad was minus many veterans lost through 
graduation as well as a few men who were caught 
in the armed forces draft. 

Beginning the season with Montclair S.T. C, 
we met top-notch competition all the way through 
the schedule. Injuries throughout the season were 
constantly a detrimental factor. Every first-string 
man at some time or other, 
before or during the season, 
was injured to the extent of 
disability. 

Assistant Coach Keyes did a 
tremendous job in producing 
such outstanding linemen as 
Punchy Holzheimer, Saul Gold- 
farb, Paul Stein, Jerry Marini, 
John Guisti, Paul Chechele, 
Branigon, Holland, Heitsmith, 
Soards, Fleisig and Lipari. 

Stalwarts for the backfield 
were Dan Franchetti, Ed 
Brophy, Palmer Hoffman, Red 
Gallagher and Gene Alfonsin. 




Montclair Teachers College 6, N.A.C. 

In the first game of the season the Aggies 
were outplayed by a favored Montclair 
eleven. Although the Aggies managed to 
get inside the 20-yard marker five times, 
the backfield men could not reach pay- 
dirt. The score of the day came about 
when four Teachers went into the end 
zone — one man was left unguarded; but 
that was all it took. 



N. A. C. 6 — New York Aggies 6 

Our pass defense was still weak and the 
first score of the day was by a N.Y. Aggies 
pass. In spite of nice running by backfield 
men Ed Brophy, Don Franchetti and Ed 
Nieznoy, it took a tackle, one "Cannon- 
ball" Chechele, to steal the ball and 
scamper 52 yards into their pay-off area. 
Gallagher and Morini also shore our first 
touchdown honors because of their timely 
blocking. 

Kings College 32 — N.A.C. 

After a brilliant defense of seven points 
which the Kingmen were able to acquire 
in the first half, the Aggies fell apart 
under a barrage of running and passing. 
The Royalmen completely outclassed and 
outscored the Bulldogs. 




New Haven Teachers 47 — N.A.C. 

In the shade of the Yale Bowl, the Aggies 
were able to preserve their dignity by not 
quitting till the last gun went off. We 
started out with Bill Brannigon, our 
center, fracturing his knee, next some- 
body bounced his shoe-covered foot off of 
Gene Alfonsin's head, and lastly Pauly 
Chechele couldn't move because of a hip 
injury. The nucleus of our team was 
shattered in a matter of 60 minutes. The 
forty-seven points was by no means a gift, 
because there were also a few of the 
Teachers carried off the field. 

Glassboro Teachers 40 — N.A.C. 19 

Playing superior boll from beginning to 
end, the Teachers were able to withstand 
any of the scoring that the Aggies were 
capable of producing. Glassboro's Todaro 
was having a field day — scoring two — 
and throwing four touchdown passes. The 
Aggies scoring was carried out through 
the courtesy of Don Franchetti, Ed 
Nieznoy, Palmer Hoffman and "Punchy" 
Holzheimer's conversion. 

N.A.C. 32 — Panzer 6 

Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1950, sow Dan 
Franchetti open up a war instead of cele- 
brating a day of peace. Danny scored the 
first six points on on 82-yard runback 
from the kickoff. The blocking was tre- 
mendous. Dan also hod two more scores; 
one a 20-yard run, the other 15 yards. 
When Co-coptoin Guisti tackled a Panzer 
bock, the ball fumbled into Jack Soords' 
arms and Jock went five to the end zone 
for a six-pointer. Holzheimer converted 
twice to make on impressive total of 
thirty-two points. 

Lycoming 41 — N. A. C. 6 

Up to the final quarter the Aggies were 
still in the ball game with a score of 19-6. 
When the Warriors were finished whoop- 
ing it up, the score board showed the 
result of on impressive upset, 41-6. 
Seniors Paul Stein, Saul Goldforb and 
John Holzheimer had terminated their 
four-year sojourn of N.A.C. football. 




d^cLskeWcLll 



CLOSING the 1951 Season with a record of 5 wins and 9 losses would not appear at first 
a commendable result, but, we must recall the combined difficulties which the team 
met. Considering the number of freshmen players and the extremely tough schedule 
these boys faced, the record gains a more impressive position. 

Coach Charles Keyes, new at the college, and thus new to the players themselves, 
brought these boys into a fine high fighting trim. He 
had on his team four men from lost year. Bill Larder, 
senior and team captain; Ed Vansant, junior; Jim 
Lipari and Cal Kidder, both sophomores, together 
with freshman Hal Tannin, made up a whiz of a first 
team. They were ably supported with good second 
string men like Bernstein, Auslonder, Caplon, Fleming 
and Fleisig. 

Probably the most thrilling game of the basketball 
season was the second gome with Goldey College at 
Wilmington, Delaware. After defeating the Dela- 
warians 47-42 on our home court, the Aggies went to 
Wilmington for a return match. 

The game went nip and tuck from beginning to end 
with a tie score forcing the gome into two overtime 
periods. Goldey finally nosed out the N.A.C. team 
69-66. But, we were proud! The boys had showed 
Goldey and all of Wilmington that they were not 
going down without their blaze of glory. 

We salute a fine Team who did a swell job under 
a tops Coach! 





(I5a6ebail 



1951 SCHEDULE 



April 10 — Fort Jay Av^ay 

April 21 — Glassboro State Teachers' College Away 

April 27 — State Teachers' College, Trenton, N. J Away 

May 2 — Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science Home 

May 8 — Fort Jay Home 

May 9 — Glassboro State Teachers' College Home 

May 1 1 — Montclair State Teachers' College Home 

May 12 — Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science Away 

Coach Manager 

Ray Wodock Erwin Goldstein 



1951 BASEBALL PREVIEW 

AT the time of this writing, one scheduled 
game has been played against Fort Jay. 
The outcome was sad news, a 6-1 loss. But 
don't let the score deceive you. The team showed 
plenty of promise, especially in the fielding de- 
partment. Only two errors were committed, a 
great improvement over lost year's defense. Get- 
ting to the details of the game, the only two hits 
were by Larder and Sacharnoski. The Fort Jay 
pitcher seemed to have our number as he struck 
out sixteen men. Our pitcher, Paul Chechele, who 
was very effective last year, was plagued by fits 
of wildness and didn't seem to hove his fast ball 
"zinging." The one bright spot in the game was 
a spectacular double play. With a man on third, 
a fly boll was hit to Jerry Marini in left field. 
Jerry grabbed the fly and, with a rifle-like throw, 
"doubled-up" the runner at home. The infield 
also came up with a smart double play. 

Looking over the positions, we *" 

find freshman Lorenz behind the 
bat, a hustling catcher with a good 
arm. At first base we have Goldfarb, 
a capable veteran. Around the key- 
stone sack two men are fighting for 
a starting berth. Frank LaRosa and ^ 

Lou Sacharnoski, two peppery, solid a^ 

hitters. Sacharnoski can also play in , t 

the outfield. Veteran Cal Kidder is 
back at shortstop, covering the posi- ' 

tion in his usual smooth style. The 
hot corner is manned by Dave King, 
a freshman from whom a lot is ex- 
pected. The flychasers are Marini, 
Larder and Guisti. Marini is the pos- 
sessor of the best arm on the team, 1 
while Larder is a good flyhawk and 
hitter. Guisti is our all- 
around team-man. 

The pitching staff is 
made up of experienced 
veterans and untried 
freshmen. Chechele, Slem- 
mer and Cromwell all saw 
service last year, with 
Chechele turning in many 
sterling performances. 
Beideman and Davis are 
the freshmen who should 
prove valuable additions 
to the hurling staff. On 
the bench, where the 
strength of any team lies, 
we find good men in Cap- 
Ian, Holzheimer, Heit- 
smith, Bell, Levenson and 
Bronsweig. 





Dke Eeil at Jb Eed 



ED'S DINER 



Franklin and State Streets 



Doylestown, Pa. 




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formal y^iothes 
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NEUBAUER'S Inc. 



Established over 75 years 

1 107 Walnut Street, Philadelphia 

PEnnypacker 5-5533 



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Your Business Appreciated 

DOYLESTOWN NATIONAL BANK 
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PORTRAITS AND WEDDINGS OF SUPERB QUALITY 



YOUNG AND BOWMAN 

Westinghouse Appliances 
Timken Oil Heat 

STATE AND COURT STREET 
Doylestown, Pa. Phone: 5097 



For Quality Poultry Equipment . . 
Check KEENCO 

Automatic Feeders 
Electric Egg Washers 
Electric Egg Graders 
Nests — Feeders — Fountains 

Manufactured by Keen Mfg. Corp. 
Vineland, N.J. 



y^onifjlitnenlj of 

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Agricultural Department 

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