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Full text of "Cornucopia 1953"

i ; i 





f-^re Seated bu tin 

SENIOR CLASS 
of the 
NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Farm School Post Office 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania 






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BREATH OF LIFE 

'-.* And the Lord God, formed man of the dust of the 

X" ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of 
life; and man became a living soul. 

In our troubled days it is heartening to recall a 
" human who walked among us and with his creator. 
His humble and difficult youthhood, the dedication of 
"i his life to his fellow humans. 

The faith of his fathers guided his gentle ways, 
, the goal was crystal clear, the obstacles numerous. 
Youth and his problems were dear to him and he con- 
secrated his physical and mental energies, his 
meager material wealth to their well being. 

His breath of life, gave sustenance to a hall of 
learning in a profession he considered "the purest, 
noblest, most blessed calling of all." That is the 
heritage of Farm School and the National Agricul- 
tural College, the soul of Dr. Joseph Krauskopf. 




'Dedicated 



to 



When it came time for the Class to decide to whom this 
Book should be Dedicated, no problem arose. One Name was 
thought of above all others. The Name was that of a philan- 
thropist, a Man who must surely love his Fellow Men. 

Choosing Edwin B. Elson to receive this Honor was an ex- 
cellent choice. The selection of his Name was the only way, 
and the best way, to show Our heartfelt appreciation for the 
wonderful service he rendered the Student Body of this great 
College. 

There is an old phrase used by economists. "Psychic In- 
come" is the phrase, and "Psychic Income" is what Edwin B. 
Elson gave. For his donation of Elson Hall Dormitory adds 
greatly to the living comfort of the Student Body. This New 
and Modern structure will always be remembered by those of 
us who first lived there as a place of Comfort and Convenience. 

And so again, we can only say Thank You. 




Edwin B. Elson 
Friend - Philanthropist - Trustee 



JAMES WORK 

President of 

N. A. C. 





Jh Appreciation 



TTie National Agricultural College is the natural outgrowth of its 
parent institution, the National Farm School. And the School was 
created by Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf. 

Joseph Krauskopf. the son of a lumber dealer, was born in 
Germany in 1858, on the twenty-first of January. He came to this 
country at the age of fourteen, and settled in Massachusetts. 

He soon developed the desire to be a Rabbi, and after receiving 
his B. A. from the University of Cincinnati in 1883, he became a stu- 
dent in the first graduating class of the Hebrew Union College. 

During his lifetime Dr. Krauskopf was a pioneer and worker in 
many religious and civic movements. The school was said to be in 
part both of these. 

Dr. Krauskopf, through his personality, oratory, and travels, 
gained many friends and supporters for the school. This remained, 
during his life, his most important single contribution to the growth 
and welfare of the school. 




Peter Click, Jr 



the fouMtainhead 



\\m\ 



Assistant Dean James Sheaffer (standing). 
Dean Donald M. Meyer (sitting). 




K.iA 



Dr. Paul R. L. Bowen 



Norman Finkler 




Joshua Feldstein, David Purmell 



of knowledge 



Ralno K. Lanson 




David Segal 



Arthur Brown 



Dr. George Webster 



Dr. Elmer S. Relnthaler 



Maximillian Vanka 



friendly aid 



Dr. Albert Schatz 




Dr. George E. Turner 



Henry Schmeider 



aftd guidance 




Dr. Max Trumper 



^ i 




SENIORS 





li[NIOI!!i 



MICHAEL AIELLO 

105 Wildwood Avenue 

Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

Agronomy 

An all 'round student, Mike was the one who 
could be counted on ... . baseball player, writer, 
and an individual of high interests .... gave help 
to those who needed .... and does his work 
cheerfully and well. 

Student Council 1,2,3,4; Baseball 1,2,3,4; 
Gleaner 1,2,3,4 -sports editor and associate 
editor; Secretary and Vice-president of Stu- 
dent Council, Varsity Club; Basketball Manager; 
Agronomy Club; Cornucopia Editor. 




SANDY AKLUFI 
Farm School, Pennsylvania 

Horticulture 

A good student, though sometimes out- 
spoken, Sandy usually had a good answer for the 
tough problem .... which should be a great asset 
to him after graduation .... his interest in sub- 
ject matter and ability to start a good discussion 
will always be remembered. 

Hort Club 1,2,3,4; Gleaner 2,3. 




0[ 19S3 



WILLIAM J. BRANIGAN 

521 Dor emus Avenue 
Glen Rock, New Jersey 

Dairy Husbandry 

"Big Bill," a man who knew howtoget things 
done. . . .good athlete and mainstay of the foot- 
ball team .... and a good dairyman .... active 
in class affairs and intra- mural sports. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Sports; 
Class Dance Committees. 





MARTIN CHERNEK 
Farm School, Pennsylvania 

Horticulture 

Marty is a big, quiet guy, who is interested 
in his work .... probably learned other skills 
while spending four years at his Alma Mater 
.... including window washing .... should make 
a name for himself with Del Monte. 

Hort Club 1,2,3,4; writer for the Gleaner 
3,4. 



!i[NIOIili 



JOSEPH L. CHERNICOFF 

4942 N. Boudinot Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

An individual with much to offer .... Joe 
proved to be an aid to the class .... active in 
many of the class and College activities . . . . 
could be counted on to do practically any job 
that came his way. 

Football 1; Gleaner 1,2,3,4 - associate edi- 
tor and editor-in-chief; "A' Day Committee, 
Co-Chairman; Poultry Club 1,2,3,4, Program 
Chairman 3; Hort Club 1,2; Secretary-treasurer 
National Collegiate Poultry Club; organizer 
and publicity director. Eastern Collegiate 
Poultry Club; Intra-mural Sports; National Col- 
legiate Poultry Judging Contest. 





ARTHUR M. COL LINGS, JR. 

707 Lees Avenue 

CoUingswood, New Jersey 

Animal Husbandry 

"Ot" was a class and campus leader .... 
helpful and willing .... to make every activity a 
success .... and this we'll remember .... his 
"A" Day leadership and his big heart. 

Animal Husbandry Club 1,2,3,4; Dairy Club 
1,2,3,4; Varsity Football 3,4; "A" Day Com- 
mittee-Chairman; Senior Prom Committee; 
Class Dance Committees. 




or I9S3 



ROBERT COPE 

7032 Walker Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Dairy Husbandry 

An interesting and unusual individual .... 
Bob was able to combine agriculture .... with 

radio the founder of WNAC, Bob had the 

dormitories "wired for sound".... a friendly 
and warm-hearted person .... a very fine dairy- 
man .... Bob should make out well in his chosen 
field. 

"A" Day Committee 3,4; Dairy Club; Glee 
Club 1,2,3,4 -Glee Club President; Band 1,2, 
3,4. 






ORION CROMWELL 

7th & Market Streets 

Perkasie, Pennsylvania 

Dairy Husbandry 

"Etoc" was another one of those people who 
accomplish things quietly .... a star pitcher on 
the baseball team, and member of the basket- 
ball squad .... "Doc" was also a good dairyman 
....took part in many of the class activities. 

Baseball Team 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Sports; 
Football 1,2; Dairy Club 1,2,3,4; "A" Day Com- 
mittee 3,4. 






CARL S. DAHLSTROM 

802 W. Somerset Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

An active member of class and College 
affairs, "Chuck" combined athletics and agri- 
culture in a rich mixture .... a big boy who 
could usually get things done .... he took part 
in many activities. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4; Poultry Club 1,2, 
3,4, Poultry Club President; Intra-mural Sports; 
Eastern and National Collegiate Poultry Judging 
Contest. 




BRUCE FAIRWEATHER 
Animal Husbandry 

Another member of the Senior Class who did 
things in a quiet way, Bruce was active in most 
affairs .... though sometimes given to starting 
a 'hot discussion' over class policy .... Bruce 
was another animal husbandryman who should 
make out well. 

"A" Day Committee 2,3,4; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1,2,3,4; Dairy Judging Teams. 




or \m 



DANIEL FRANCHETTI 

475 Chew Road 
Hammonton, New Jersey 

Horticulture 

The "Sweetpotatoe King" of South Jersey, 
Danny was an "all 'round guy".... one of the 
top men in football in this geographical area 
.... Danny is a top farmer .... sometimes car- 
ried away with the spirit of things .... a good 
lad to have in the class. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4 - recipient of Out- 
standing Back award; Hort Club 1,2,3,4; writer 
for Gleaner 3. 







_A._ ^ 





EDWARD J. FLEMING 

Bristol Pike 
Andalusia, Pennsylvania 

Horticulture 

Another fine Horticulturalist and athlete 
.... from the southern end of Bucks County, Ed 
was a friendly guy who enjoyed having a good 
time .... a good student and active in class and 
College affairs .... another good man to have 
around. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4; Basketball Team 
1,2,3,4; Hort Club 1,2,3,4; writer for Gleaner 
3,4. 



li[NIOItli 



DOUGLAS W. FRIES 

1918 Ruth Street 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

One of the nicest members of the class .... 
Doug was a fine floral designer, winning prizes 
at the annual "A" Day competitions with his 
African Violets .... Doug was active in all af- 
fairs .... 

Hort Club 1,2.3,4, President of Hort Club; 
"A" Day Committee; Class Dance Committees. 










JOHN N. GlUSTl 

421 East Ridge Street 

Nanticoke, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

A dynamic type of individual, John was a 
campus leader .... we'll never forget his cour- 
age and excellent play .... in football .... and 
baseball .... and the way he handled the class 
dances .... 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4, Captain 2,3,4, Coach 
3,4; Baseball 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Champion 
Teams 1,2,3,4; President of Class; Vice-presi- 
dent; Student Council 1 ,2; Sports Editor, Gleaner; 
President, Varsity Club; "A" Day Committee; 
Recipient of Outstanding Back, Linesman, Cit- 
izenship and Sportsmanship awards. 







or loss 



NORMAN GOLDSTEIN 
66 Goodwin Avenue 
Newark, New Jersey 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Active in floral and other ornamental affairs 
.... Norm was one of the long-time leaders of 
the Hort Club. . . . always willing to lend a hand 
.... wherever or whenever needed. 

Hort Club 1,2,3,4, President, Secretary; 
Class Dance Committees; "A" Day Committee 
3,4; Glee Club. 





GUY W. GROSS 

R. D. #1 

Ambler, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Another good horticulturalist, Guy will be 
remembered for his exploits on the football 
field .... and for his help with the class dances 
.... an active classmate. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4; Hort Club 1,2,3,4; 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4. 





lilllOllii 



FRANK J. GRUENFELD 

Ayelcth Hashacher 

20 Shm. Levin Street 

Tel Aviv, Israel 

Dairy Husbandry 

Intelligent, quick-witted .... that's the 
"A-rab" .... as Frank was called .... a class- 
mate with an interesting background .... active 
in many campus activities .... should go far 
with his proposed graduate studies. 

Dairy Club 1,2,3,4, President; "A" Day 
Committee 3,4. 




LEO HANDLER 
Oakwood Gardens, D-8 

East 3rd Street 
Lansdale, Pennsylvania 

Agronomy 

An active member in many of our clubs, Leo 
helped the class .... by doing a good job .... 
we'll cdways remember his friendliness and 
helpfulness. 

Agronomy Club; Farm Machinery Club; "A" 
Day Committee. 




or 1953 



ROBERT HASCHERT 

1043 N. 11th Street 
Reading, Pennsylvania 

Agronomy 



Bob is another member of the "quiet but 
sincere" club .... a good addition to the class, 
Bob participated in class activities and did a 
fine job. 

Agronomy Club; "A" Day Committee 3,4; 
Class Dance Committees. 







FRANK HOLLORAN, JR. 

Box 283 

Tufton 

Charlottesville, Virginia 

Animal Husbandry 

"Doc" participated in all campus activities 
.... a good friend to many .... he could be de- 
pended on to help finish the tough job .... 
helped make each event a success. 

Glee Club 1,2,3,4, President 2,3; President 
of Freshman Class; Student Council 1; Student 
Court; Intercollegiate Judging Team; Animal 
Husbandry Club 1,2,3,4; Farm Machinery Club; 
Social Secretary of Animal Husbandry Club; 
"A" Day Committee 3,4. 



li[|IOII!i 



IVAR D. HOLMBERG 

R. D. #1 

Kane, Pennsylvania 

Agronomy 

Big and friendly .... a good description of 
Ivar .... or "Humphrey" as his friends often 
called him .... a good man on the football field 
and in class activities .... caused many 
"anxious moments" throughout his four years 
living in the dorms. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Sports; 
Agronomy Club; "A" Day Committee 3,4; Band 
1.2,3,4. 






CALVIN KIDDER 

1507 Spring Lane 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Animal Husbandry 

Cal is one of those classmates who are 
anxious to make the class a success .... great 
on the baseball diamond .... equally good on 
the basketball courts .... and active in every 
College affair. 

Varsity Baseball 1,2,3,4; Varsity Basketball 
1,2,3,4; Animal Husbandry CLub 1,2,3,4; "A" 
Day Committee 2,3,4; Class Dance Committees. 




or 1953 



PETER KRUSCH 

32 Warren Street 

Hackensack, New Jersey 

Agronomy 

'A big and likeable guy' .... Pete could al- 
ways be depended upon to get things done .... 
in intra-mural sports and in class activities 
.... and editor of the Cornucopia .... Pete 
helped design the book. 

Intra-mural Sports 1,2,3,4; Yearbook Com- 
mittee, Associate Editor; Gleaner 2,3,4, Asso- 
ciate Editor; "A" Day Committee 3,4; Senior 
Prom Committee. 





JAMES LIPARI 

R. F. D. #3 

Easton, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

"Chiz" will always be remembered for his 
fine teachings in chemistry and his agility on 
the Aggie's basketball court .... Chiz had his 
lighter side .... and was one of the mainstays 
of the football team. 

Varsity Football 1,2,3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4 - 
Top scorer for four year period; Hort Club; 
"A" Day Committee; Class Dance Committees. 









SAMUEL J. MALOVE 

6230 Ellsworth Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

Active in many campus activities .... Sam 
always did a good job, particularly in poultry 
activities .... he'll always be remembered .... 
especially for, in a jovial sense . . . wholesale 
vs. retail .... also for his very fine judging. 

Poultry Husbandry Club 2,3,4; "A" Day 
Committee 3,4; Eastern Intercollegiate and 
National Collegiate Poultry Judging Teams. 




ROBERT MARKLEY 

141 Charles Street 
Easton, Pennsylvania 

Dairy Husbandry 

Bob will always be remembered for his 
friendliness and cooperation in the many im- 
portant campus and class activities, espiecially 
in his work for "A" Day. 

Dairy Club 1,2,3,4; "A" Day Committee 2, 
3,4; Intra- mural Sports; Dairy Judging Teams. 




OF 19S3 



SAMUEL P. McCLEARY 

5520 Morris Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

Sam is one of the classmates that are a 
pleasure to have .... always with a smile .... 
Sam did each job with sincerity .... and made 
it interesting .... we'll never forget his "A" 
Day talks. 

Poultry Club 1,2,3,4; "A" Day Committee 3, 
4; Glee Club; Dance Committees; Senior Prom 
Committee. 






ROBERT D. McKENNEY 

P. O. Box 14 

Solebury, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

Another fine poultry husbandryman. Bob was 
not only active on campus but also in many out- 
side activities .... a good artist, he amused 
many of us with his caricatures and interesting 
stories. 

Poultry Club 1,2,3,4; "A" Day Committee 
3,4; Gleaner 1,2,3,4; Art Editor -Gleaner; Year- 
book Committee, Art Editor; Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Judging Teams; National Intercol- 
legiate Judging Teams. 



27 




HERI^liRT MILLSTONE 

1121 S. 54th Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

One of the outstanding campus leaders .... 
Herb always accomplished whatever work was 
needed .... did it conscientiously .... a phil- 
anthrope .... happy at anything from intra- 
murals to duck hunting .... he'll always be 
well remembered. 

Class President; Class Vice-President; Stu- 
dent Council 1.2,3,4; Hort Club 1,2,3,4; Student 
Activities Chairman; Senior Prom Committee; 
Dance Committees; Intra-mural Sports; "A" 
Day Committee. 







HOWARD GESSNER NASH 

York & Bristol Road 

Hartsville, Pennsylvania 

Horticulture 

"Gess" is another busy man on the campus. 
When'^ver anyone needed a good businessman we 
immediately thought of "Gess." The expert on 
tractors, especially "Cleatracs." 

Hort Club; Glee Club; Secretary, Farm 
Machinery Club; Gleaner Circulation and Busi- 
nessman; Football 1,2,3,4; Baseball 3,4; Var- 
sity Club 2,3,4; Photo Club 2; "A" Day Com- 
mittee 3. 




or I9S3 



EDWARD A. NIEZNAY 

R. D. #1 
Pennsburg, Pennsylvania 

Horticulture 

Ed is probably the hardest working fellow in 
our class. He could be found working or down 
at Ambler. Ed carried his hard working habits 
on to the football field, always on the go that 
was Ed all over. Everyone will remember Ed 
as a good hearted guy who could never say no 
to any favor asked of him. 

Varsity Club 2,3,4; Varsity Football 1,2,3,4. 





CLARENCE E. OKERLUND 

Main Street 
Mount Jewett, Pennsylvania 

Dairy Husbandry 

We'll always remember "Buzz" .... pro- 
vided many interesting moments .... particu- 
larly 'round the table' .... took part in many 
activities .... and did a good job when called 
upon. 

Student Council 1,2; Class Dance Commit- 
tees; "A" Day Committee 2,3,4; Dairy Club 1, 
2,3,4. 






WILLIAM PAVLICK 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Quiet, brainy, sincere, that's how we all 
know "Pav" .... wins all verbal duels with se- 
reneness and dignity .... a student but most 
certainly not a grind .... a good man and a 
good friend to all. 

Horticulture Club 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Bas- 
ketball 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Softball 1,2,3,4. 




STANLEY E. PERELMAN 

370 Tree Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Animal Husbandry 

An animal man is Stan, but he likes his 
goldfish too ... . who can forget how he handled 

those horses on "A" Day a good man to have 

around to collect pictures for the yearbook .... 

Animal Husbandry Club, Secretary, 1,2,3,4; 
Yearbook Staff, Photo Ed.; "A" Day Committee. 




or 1953 



DONALD PETERS 
1141 New Holland Road 
Reading, Pennsylvania 

Ornamental Horticulture 

"Iron, fire, copper, wire," and "pompwm" 
. . . .he's known by all these, but we'll remem- 
ber him for his deeds on the gridiron and bas- 
ketball court .... a quick retort and a ready 
smile .... and he gets things done. 

Football 1,2,3,4; Basketball 3,4; Varsity 
Club 3,4; Hon Club 1,2,3,4; Intra-mural Bas- 
ketball 1,2; Intra-mural Softball 1,2,3,4; Treas- 
urer Senior Class; Gleaner 1,2,3,4, Sports Edi- 
tor; Yearbook Staff, Sfxarts Editor. 








LEWIS SHELBY 

Center Grove Road 

Millville, New Jersey 

Poultry 

Participates in all campus activities .... 
star poultry judge .... good athlete .... keeper 
of the student body, always looking out for their 

welfare . when something important comes 

up Lew will get it done one way or another. 

Poultry Club 1,2,3,4; Student Council 2,3,4, 
Treasurer, President; Baseball 1,2,3,4, Captain; 
President of Junior Class; Varsity Club 2,3,4. 




!i[NIOII!i 



JOHN WILLIAM SMITH 

2260 N. Howard Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Agronomy 

We first got to know old "Smitty" as a quiet 
serious fellow, but my how he changed in four 
years. A "champ" pitcher on our Intra-mural 
Softball Team as well as a steady member of 
the "fouling five" .... we wish you lots of luck 
at Seabrooks. 

Vice President of Class 2,3, Intra-mural 
Basketball and Softball 1,2,3,4; Junior and 
Senior Dance Committees 3. 





EDWARD B. VANSANT, JR. 
Hulmville, Pennsylvania 

Agronomy 

"Big Ed" will always be remembered for 
his feats on the basketball court and on the 
Softball diamond .... a man who took part in 
all campus activities .... a true friend to all 
.... invaluable to the production of our year- 
book. 

Band 1,2; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Class Treasu- 
rer 2,3; Class President 4; Student Council 4; 
Varsity Basketball 1,2,3.4; Softball 1,2,3,4. 







Remember . . . 

The green, green grass of the 
campus and its stately trees .... 
piercing gaze of Mr. Daniel Miller 
during that fateful interview .... 
Dr. Krauskopf memorial library.... 
a little chapel in the woods .... 
the promise of new worlds in our 
roommates .... beds in the Gym and 
Alumni House .... football scrim- 
mage .... Segal Hall and the airi- 
ness of the Botany Lab.... Mr. 
Finkler's opening English lecture 
.... dairy, poultry and waiter de- 
tails ... . the friendliness of Dr. 
Bowen .... Friday night football 
rallies and the tremendous bonfires 
.... our first class dance . . . .'crick- 
ets chirping in the cool evening 
stillness. 

And . . . 



HISTORY 










^^ 




pivij 




Hazing .... mutt hats .... the 
smelly ginkos carpeting mutt land 
and the punishing midnight march 
to the dairy .... nametags to be 
worn at all times .... chickens let 
loose in the dorm and gym in the 
wee wee hours .... rooms bedecked 
with "midnight requisitioned" signs 
.... craters on Alumni *Lane and in 
the parking lots .... ready smile 
of Dean Don. Meyers .... Mr. Lan- 
son's preoccupied look,... dirty 
socks and manure caked clothes in 
the halls .... brown envelopes beck- 
oning students to the office .... 
beckoning lights in the library and 
Segal Hall on the eve of a test .... 
summer practicum and the tractors 
losing wheels .... raids on the vege- 
table patch and the peach and apple 
orchards .... Mr. Lanson losing 
the 500 gallon water tank .... Mc- 
Kenney in his birthday suit picking 
peas .... 




-.rtOTi 









Remember ? ? 

Those sleepy 8 A.M. scholars 
. . . . letters from home .... Snuf- 
fy 's "gentle" snoring .... field 
trips .... basketball and football 
games .... "Rah Rah" and his avid 
cheering .... intercollegiate con- 
tests and our prize winning Per- 
cherons. 

The fair-like "A" Day .... the 
busy intense preparations, Hort dis- 
play in the gym, poultry in the mach- 
inery building, livestock on the cam- 
pus grounds .... beard growing, 
log sawing and milking contests 
. . . . holidays and home .... Mr. 
Schmieders' thought provoking dis- 
courses .... blood donations to the 
Red Cross .... classmates drop- 
ping out along the way .... precious 
extra help Chemistry classes given 

by Mr. Elson beer parties 

Nieznay and Weir keeping us in 

stitches piglets and chicks 

nursed in the dorm .... tipsy sing- 
ers in the diner. 




«-*. 





Remember . . . 

Fireworks in the dorm . . . . 
floods on the 3rd floor at UlmanHall 
.... water pistol fights .... all-night 
"Blackjack" sessions .... Josh 
Feldsteins earnestness .... the 
snowy campus and icy walks . . . . 
ice skating on the sidewalks . . . . 
the youthfulness of Mr. Blackmon 
.... square dances and hayrides . . . . 
Dr. Reinthalers outstanding "eco" 
classes .... weight lifting in the gym 
.... coffee trips to "Eddie's" as Mr. 
Schmeider calls it ... . a short talk 
with Mrs. Feisser .... clean sheets 
and room inspections .... 10 A.M. 
scholars .... Mr. Blau's ever pres- 
ent bowtie .... George of the green- 
house down to earth language . . . . 
sunbathing and softball during final 
exams .... Mr. Purmell's thorough 
lectures and tests .... Danny Fran- 
chetti's noisy presence .... blowing 
up of the toilet bowl .... the "superb" 
chow.... Mr. Vanka's continental 
look .... President Work's straight 







Cim HISTORY 



talk .... the fine Gleaners .... 
weekly movies and club meetings 
.... "smoke moochers" . . . . "fre- 
quent" assemblies .... Dr. Turner's 
talk on bacteriophage .... ever pre- 
sent term papers .... the expanding 
canteen .... the unpredictable Mr. 
Segal .... flat tires on Mr. Miller's 
car .... ginkoes and mice in the 
"sacks" .... the junior - senior 
proms in Trenton and Atlantic City 
.... student lounge in Vansant and 
Peters rooms .... pitching pennies 
in the hall .... Mr. Brown otherwise 
a friendly soul breaking up card 
games in the rooms .... new faces 
on the campus .... South America, 
Iran, Israel .... 

















Remember? .... 

The green and the gold .... the 
winding banks of the Neshaminy .... 
the pink flowering dogwoods and 
picturesque walk from the mess- 
hall .... our battered but valiant 
football team after a hard fought 
game .... letters from former 
classmates wishing they were back 
.... vagrant thoughts luring us away 
from the classrooms .... Mr. Click's 
immaculate appearance and crew- 
cut .... all-night poker sessions 
.... checking the mail .... weekly 
trips to the key and county .... job 
placement interviews .... all sports 
night mass exodus on weekends. 









Junior Class Officers 

LI Al Rosner 

M2 Arthur Foley 

R3 Steve Ferdo 

4 Lee Berger 

Sam Boltax 



juiioR cim 



Throughout the three years that the 
Junior Class has been on Campus, \t has 
been outstanding in its campus activities. 

The class contribution of college lead- 
ers is one of its proudest remembrances. 
The class had its lighter side, too. The 
Square Dance, one of the most successful 
ever put on, was the class's crowning 
social achievement. Hard cider, hayrides, 
decorations, and good music all combined 
to make this affair the big success of the 
season. 

The class likes to remember that its 
freshman beer party was distinguished by 
the fact that no members were blinded, 
and that they were all able to navigate back 
to the dorm. 

The class finished the year with the 
Junior-Senior Prom, a beautiful and digni- 
fied affair. Music and romantic surround- 
ings made that evening the perfect ^"'^ to 
a grand year. 




Sam Boltax and Morton Hershman 
looking over a "sick chick.' 



Farm Structures Class on a Field 
Trip with Dr. Webster. 



An interesting conv.ersation 

Mr. Sch.nieder talking to Ray Posey. 



naiE 







mm cun 



AGRONOMY MAJORS 
Berger, Lionel 

4412 Tenth Avenue 

Brooklyn, New York 
Jaggard, LaBarre 

1 West Oak Avenue 

Moorestown, New Jersey 
Mulvey, William 

Mountaintop, Pennsylvania 
Soards, John 

101 Main Road 

Hammonton, New Jersey 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY MAJORS 

Demitroff, George 

1743 N. 31st Street 

Philadelphia 21, Pa. 
Jardel, Edward 

604 Tyson Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Mayer, William 

7031 Forrest Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY MAJORS 

Madill, James Taylor 

R. D. #1 

Green Lane, Pennsylvania 
Sitrin, Herbert 

22 Ferris Street 

Utica, New York 



FOOD INDUSTRY MAJORS 

Bronsweig, Ronald 
7163 Walker Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Rosner, Albert 

2264 Bridge Street 
Philadelphia 37, Pa. 

Tannin, Harold 

1641 Ocean Avenue 
Brooklyn 30, New York 

HORTICULTURE MAJORS 

Gale, Arthur C. 

172-19 144 Road 

Springfield, L. I., New York 
Plummer, Russell 

6000 Washington Avenue 

Pennsauken, New Jersey 

Poley, Arthur 

Easton Road 

Hallowell, Pennsylvania 
Weitzner, David 

1505 Boston Road 

Bronx, New York, N. Y. 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 
MAJORS 

Bornfriend, Carl 

5331 Arlington Street 
Philadelphia 31, Pa. 



Brooks, Martin 

R. D., KintnersviUe, Pa. 

Lorenz, Charles 

240 Wanamaker Avenue 
Essington, Pennsylvania 

Ransom, Victor 

2626 Franklin Avenue 
Broomall, Pennsylvania 

Wisser, Bernard 

Route 3, Shropshire Farm 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY MAJORS 

Birk, Joseph 

R, D. 1, Box 202 

Flemington, New Jersey 
Boltax, Samuel 

272 Rivington Street 

New York, N. Y. 
Ferdo, Stephen 

138 Almond Lane 

Wilkes- Barre, Pa. 
Hershman, Morton 

65-41 Booth Street 

Forest Hills, New York 
Litoff, Bertram 

8 103 -5th Avenue 

North Bergen, New Jersey 
Posey, Raymond 

31 Morse Street 

Camden, New Jersey 
Warta, Francis 

P. O. Box 76 

New Britain, Pa. 



mmm cim 




The Class of 1955, although the smallest 
on campus, has proved to be a very active 
group in all school functions. 

They are known for their ability to put 
on excellent dances, as witnessed by the 
Christmas Dance. They are very active in 
intramural spwrts as well as in the varsity 
sports. 

Their courage was challenged on the 
night that they took a freshman class, three 
times their size, out for the traditional 
walk, and they managed to keep this per- 
fectly under control at all times. However, 
this 'accomplishment' was overshadowed by 
the fact that the freshmen were able to pull 
the sophs through the horse pond, in the an- 
nual tug-of-war, to end the hazing. 



Sophomore class officers, F. Weide- 
marrn, Vice Pres.; J. Weaver, Pres.; 
D. Bradish, Sec; M. Adleman, 
Treas. 




A typical room during study hours. 



Ira Jawetz being burned at stake by 
Irv. Breher. 




W( 



Last year's champion tug-of-war 
class in the annual event. 











Adleman, Marvin 

1911 W. Sparks Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Berkis, Stewart 

1972 Washington Avenue 

Bronx, New York, N. Y. 
Bradish, Richard 

R. D. #1 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Breber, Irvin 

Whittier Avenue 

Andalusia, Pa. 
Conover, Harry J. 

1829 44th Street 

Merchantville, New Jersey 
Diaz Martinez, Jesus 

Ave. Gloria #15, El Basque 

Chacao, Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. 
Fisher, Raymond 

1528 B River Road 

Camden, New Jersey 
Freed, Sherman 

406 S. 30th Street 

Camden, New Jersey 
Haentze, Fred 

307 Bryn Mawr Avenue 

Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 



Harvey, Lee 
Main Street 
Annandale, New Jersey 

Hess, Henry E. 

Fifth & Church Streets 
North Wales, Pa. 

Jawetz, Ira 

22 Brighton 4th Lane 
Brooklyn, New York 

Johnson, Donald 
60 Willow Road 
Colonial Park, Pa. 

Kemmerer, Howard A. Jr. 
125 W. Sylvania Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Knouse, Cloyd A. 
Star Route 
Newport, Pennsylvania 

Kuhta, Joseph 

16 Hudson Street 
Garfield, New Jersey 

Ludwig, Lester F. 
2485 78th Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mumma, J. Russel 
Rt. 88 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Noble, Robt. J. 

435 Windsor Road 

Wood-Ridge, New Jersey 
Tessmer, James 

R. D. 2 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Weidemann, Frank J. 

514 Broadview Road 

Upper Darby, Pa. 
Weigman, Jay 

405 Manning Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Weaver, George 

1102 Bloomfield Street 

Hackensack, New Jersey 
Force, Arthur 

Church Road 

Titusville, New Jersey 
Frank, Paul 

140 Trent Road 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sonneborn, Kurt 

191 Warren Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 




Freshman class officers, H. Weber, 
Pres.; A. Frost, Sec; M. Shirvani, 
St. Coun.; C. Greene, Vice Pres.; 
R. Bonowski, Treas. 



riifSHiiiii cim 



The Class of 1956 contributed to many 
activities on campus. They gave a good 
many good men to the football team and 
other sports. 

The freshmen also had a great many 
singers who contributed their fine voices 
to the College Glee Club. The traditional 
Tug-Of-War between the sophs and frosh 
was won by the lowerclassmen, thus ending 
hazing. 

"A- Day" was one of the best that the 
College has ever seen, and comprised of 
the activities of many of the freshmen. 
Many of the men were prize winners in 
competition with the upperclassmen. 





The sophomore class being pulled 
through the pond by the freshman 
class. 



Two 'freshies" in the process of 
being hazed at the dairy. 



The beginning of the pyre for the 
big football rally. 




Arnold, Kirk 

121 Second Street, S. W. 

New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Austin, Roy 

213 Meetinghouse Road 

Twin Oaks, Pennsylvania 
Backus, Jennings 

2913 Cathedral Avenue, N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 
Barge, Roland 

2138 Morris Ave., Union, N. J. 
Barth, Karl 

2240-80th Street 

Jackson Heights, New York 
Bean, Frederick 

R. D. 3, Doylestown, Pa. 
Bonowski, Raymond 

850 E. Cornwall Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Buchel, Joseph 

247 Orient Way, Rutherford, N.J. 
Caplan, Harry D. 

3 Lawn Place 

Atlantic City, New Jersey 
Caro, Silvio 

1420 S. Bancroft Street 

Philadelphia 46, Pa. 
Carpenter, Henry 

221 Hilldale Road 

VlUanova, Pa. 
Chubb, Paul 

Apt. D432, Stonehurst Court Apts. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Dillman, Benj. 

233 S. 2nd Street 

Frackville, Pa. 
Dunn, Edmund 

6241 N. Camac Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Esgro, Sebastian 

221 Franklin Street 

Glassboro, New Jersey 
Feindt, Robert 

303 Gilham St., Phila., Pa. 
Fenyves, Robert 

417 Grape St., Vineland, N. J. 











r-s 



rii[siiii cinH 



Frankenfield, William 

138 S. 14th St., Allentown, Pa. 
Frost, Albert 

30 Fulton St., Bloomfield, N. J. 
Geils, George 

54 W. Grove St., Bogota, N. J. 
Flanders, Robert C. Jr. 

773 E. Shawmont Ave. 

Philadelphia 28, Pa. 
Gordon, Howard 

1216 College Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 
Gottlieb, Lawrence 

169 Arthur Kill Road 

Staten Island 6, N. Y. 
Greene, Charles 

708 Bethlehem Pike, Ambler, Pa. 
Hartfelder, George 

3913 Park Ave., Metuchen, N. J. 
Hofmann, Thomas 

1 Fitzrandolph Road 

West Orange, New Jersey 
Indek, Charles 

209 Hart Blvd. 

Staten Island 1, New York 
Johnson, Edw. 

Welsh & Verree Roads 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Knee, Lawrence 

4924 Chancellor Street 

Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
Lane, Lucas 

Box 235, Pen Argyl, Pa. 
Long, William 

8 Mountainview Road 

Millburn, New Jersey 



Mahon, William 

18 W. 33rd St., Reiffton 

Reading, Pa. 
Miller, Wilbur 

371 Durand Ave., Trenton, N. J. 
Osborne, Howard 

R. D. 1, Millville, N. J. 
Pouttu, Edwin 

131 Suomi St., Paxton, Mass. 
Printzenhoff, Wayne 

467 Portage St., Emporium, Pa. 
Reich, Hanan 

240 Audubon Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 
Richardson, Donald 

412 Prospect Avenue 

West Orange, New Jersey 
Sander, Eugene 

White St., Bowmanstown, Pa. 
Shirvani, Manouchehr 

Jalleh Ave., Tehran, Iran 
Smith, Alan 

240 S. Lynwood Avenue 

Glenside, Pa. 
Smith, Morgan 

Baltimore St., Ext. 

Hanover, Pa. 
Stammel, Ronald 

Route 88, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Terhune, John 

276 Donaldson Avenue 

Rutherford, New Jersey 
Uribe, Jose A. 

Carrera 42, #49-68 Medellin 

Colombia, South America 



Umana, Juan 

Calle 76 47-6 

Bogota, Colombia 

South America 
Varner, LeRoy 

R. D. 1, Perkasie, Pa. 
Waters, Joseph 

808 Elkins Avenue 

Elkins Park, Pa. 
Carpenter, G. Milton 

6114 Wissahickon Avenue 

Philadelphia 44, Pa. 
Watson, John 

Sewell, R.F.D. #2, N. J. 
Weber, Harry 

6847 Highland Avenue 

Camden 5, New Jersey 
Weinstein, Arthur 

1362 E. 36th Street 

Brooklyn, New York 
Brandt, Ronald 

1421 Stirling St., Phila., Pa. 
Worstall, Edwin L., Jr. 

33 Dudley Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 
Wittenzellner, George 

165 Median Ave, Windsor, Conn. 
Wrigley, Glen 

R. D. 1, Perkasie, Pa. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 
Block, Richard Alan 

4923 Woodcrest Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ezickson, David 

1072 E. 14th Street 

Brooklyn, New York 



I#4 



( 



c 



^ 




The meeting of the minds, from left to right, P. 
Krusch, Managing Ed.; J. Chernicoff, Special Features 
Ed.; G. Nash, Circulation Manager; M. Aiello, Ed.- 
in-Chief; E. Vansant, Business Manager; D. Peters, 
Sports Ed., and seated, S. Perelman, Photo Ed. 



Editor Mike Aiello hard at work on 
the yearbook. 



Staff members P. Krusch, E. Vansant, D. 
Peters hard at work. 



yearbook Committee 




Late in 1952 when our thoughts were 
far from graduation, the Cornucopia Staff 
was chosen. Mike Aiello was chosen Editor, 
Pete Krusch Managing Editor, and Ed Van- 
sant Business Manager. 

These three men joined the nucleus of 
the staff which through much effort and hard 
work produced this year's Cornucopia. 

The senior yearbook is the accumula- 
tion of the events which have occurred 
during our four years here at the college. 

In years to come our yearbook will be 
something to look at and remember the 
happy days spent at college. 

The Senior Class extends its thanks to 
the editor, staff, and everyone connected 
with the yearbook. 




(MR) H. Tanin, E. Vansant, F. Haentze, (Treas.) M. Hershman, (Pres.) 
L. Shelby, (Vice Pres.) M. Aiello, (Sec.) S. Ferdo, (BR) J. Weigman, H. 
Millstone, P. Krusch, (FR) G. Weaver, H. Weber, M. Shirvani. 



Student Council 



In the past few years the Student Council has 
become increasingly important on the campus, 
but this year under the able leadership of Pres- 
ident Lew Sacharnoski the council has come 
into its own. This year practically all extra- 
curricular activities have been sponsored or 
planned by the council. Among the many activi- 
ties handled were the dances, movies, club 
meetings, the student canteen, the student lounge, 
and assembly programs. These are but a few of 
the more important functions. It is the job of a 
good council to form a link between the adminis- 
tration and student body, and this year we have 
realized a strong sense of cooperation between 
these two components of our college. 

Probably one of the more important func- 
tions of the council is the Student Court. TTie 
Student Court is an organ of the Student Council 
made up of members chosen by the Student 
Body to maintain the high quality of citizenship 
on the college campus. 



The Student Court with M. Aiello, judge; E. Vansant, 
prosecutor; and the jury made up of other council 
members. 





Qleancr 



The GLEANER is the official publication of 
the student body of the National Agricultural 
College. This year the GLEANER has combined 
with the Alumni Gleanings to increase its cir- 
culation and size of issue. 

Through the fine cooperation of the Business 
Administration and College Administration, the 
GLEANER has been able to make great strides 
towards its goal of being one of the finest Agri- 
cultural College magazines in the country. 

Under the leadership of its Editor-in-Chief, 
Joseph L. Chernicoff, and Managing Editor, H. 
Gessner Nash, the members of the GLEANER 
staff have been able to learn much about agri- 
cultural journalism and magazine organization 
in the GLEANER(Ag Journalism 1 Credit) Class. 



Below - Editors, H. Conover, P. Krusch, J. 
Chernicoff, G. Nash. Right- Editor-in-Chief, 
Joe Chernicoff shown in his office checking 
over the next Gleaner issue. 



A Gleaner cover of our prize 
Percheron Stallion. 



CjiMM^ 






The entire Hort. Club membership on the steps of the Hort. Building, 
with advisor, Mr. Purmell, second from the left. 



Standing- G. Weaver, C. Bornfriend, R. 
Plummer, S. Wisser, R. Poley, 'Officers of 
the Hort. Club. 




Horticulture Club 



With the enrollment of a large freshman 
class this past semester, the Horticultural 
Society has considerably increased its active 
membership over past years. 

Many interesting programs have been planned 
to make this year in the Horticultural Society 
beneficial educationally, as well as a source of 
entertainment for active members. 

Our first speaker was Miss Tintleman, rep- 
resentative of W. A. Burpee Seed Company. 
Miss Tintleman gave a very interestingly illus- 
trated talk on Bu'-pee's seed production tech- 
nique, and she also showed us many beautiful 
color slides of flower arrangements made 
with Burpee name variety seeds. 

The second speaker was a veterinarian. Dr. 
Louis Leiboritz of the New Britain Animal 
Hospital. The Doctor spoke to us about plants 
toxic to animals. His talk was extremely in- 
formative to those of us who have animals of 
our own. 

Movies were also shown, one of special in- 
terest to Horticulture majors, dealing with 
growing and marketing horticultural products, 
and the other film of tropical plants of the 
Bahamas used by our southern neighbors. 

In the last semester our main efforts will 
be to produce another fine Horticulture Show 
in our Gym for A- Day. 

With our coming field trips to the Phila- 
delphia Flower Show in March and a trip to 
Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve, this year 
is sure to come to a successful close with "a 
good time had by all." 

Two Hort. Club members tieing up tomato 
plants on their special tomato project. 




J. Buchel, C. Okerlund, C. Greene, H. Sltrln, G. Wrigley, F. Welde- 
mann, S. Esgro, A. ColUngs, H. Weber, H. Gordon, J. Terhune, O. 
Cromwell, E. Dunn, R. Markley, R. Varner, R. Fenyvas. In the left 
foreground, Mr. Flckes - right foreground, Frank Gruenf eld, President. 



'Dairy Society 




Dairy and animal husbandry at one of the many live- 
stock shows and sales which they attend during the 
year. In the outer foreground is Dr. Pelle. 



This year again, the Dairy Club succeeded 
to secure itself the same high standing of a 
prominent and efficient Club, as it has been the 
tradition throughout the recent years. 

The Club's aim is to supply scientific and 
practical information with the help of guest- 
speakers, as well as fieldtrips and movies, in 
the field of Dairy Production and its allied 
fields. 

The highlight of this year's activities was a 
visit to the U. S. D. A. research projects, lec- 
tures about the breeding program and the 
methods employed in agricultural research. 
Another event was the life-size demonstration 
of a parlor-milking system, which was attended 
by a great number of dairy farmers in this 
locality. 

The Club's greatest event though is, and 
always has been, "A" Day, originally initiated 
by the Dairy Club, on which the members sum 
up their yearly activities by the showing of 
dairy cattle and other exhibits. 



Aside from the required studies, the college 
student has many extra curricular activities 
which keep him busy. Some of these activities 
may be useful and some of them may be pri- 
marily for pleasure. 

One activity that a student of an agricultural 
college can take part in is the joining of a club 
dealing with his chosen field or profession. 

The Poultry Science Club gives an oppor- 
tunity for its members to come into contact 
with many of the problems of the poultry in- 
dustry. 

Also there is a chance to work on projects 
that vary in scope from raising broilers to 
sanitation and disease problems affecting man 
and bird. 

Our club this year has purchased duck eggs 
which we will incubate, and then the ducklings 
will be reared. Marketing of the ducks will also 
be an educational activity. 

Club members are also afforded the oppor- 
tunity to hear speakers, see movies of interest 
dealing with the industry, and visit places of 
interest such as research stations, and mar- 
keting outlets. 




Chuck Dahlstrom exhibiting Poultry Newsletter written 
by Poultry Club members. 



Poultry Club 



Professor Raino Lanson demonstrating the inter- 
muscular inoculation of a chicken for the pre- 



vention of Newcastles Disease. Holding the bird 
is Steve Ferdo, President of the club. 





The entire Animal Husbandry Club shown with two of 
the show horses. Club advisor Dr. Pelle is at the 
extreme right. 



Animal Husbandry Club 



Harry Hopkins showing the horse's teeth to 
Howard Kemmerer. 







jjgSSr-- 



i 



% 



Several years ago a few members of the 
Dairy Society, who were majors in Animal 
Husbandry, with a primary interest in live- 
stock, organized the N. A.C. Animal Husbandry 
Club. 

The response by the school was immediate, 
and the club has held a position of high mem- 
bership since. 

The purpose of the club is manifold, of 
which the first might be, a stimulation of 
interest in the field of animal science. Another 
important goal is to augment the formal educa- 
tion of the student. This is carried out by having 
speakers, movies, demonstrations, projects, 
field trips and general discussions related to 
both the technical and practical phases of agri- 
culture. 

The two outstanding events of the year are 
the Pennsylvania Farm Show at Harrisburg, and 
"A" Day at the college. 

At the farm show club members exhibit 
animals in state-wide competition. "A" Day is 
the culmination of the year when club members 
proudly show the animals which they have fitted 
up personally. 




Varsity Club 



(B.R.) L. Shelby, E. Fleming, E. Nieznay, E. Jardel, 
D. Franchetti, D. Peters, President J. Giusti, H. 
Conover, H. Tanin. 

(TR) J. Lipari, C. Lorenz, B. Branigan, H. Sitrin, S. 
Ferdo, B. Wisser, E. Vansant, C. Kidder, O. Crom- 
well, M. Aiello, C. Okerlund, I. Holmburg, G. Nash. 



The Varsity Club is the only exclusive club 
on the campus. Membership is gained by winning 
a varsity letter in football, baseball, or basket- 
ball. 

This club is one of the most important as 
well as busiest on campus. Club members 
handle refreshment stands at all sports and 
other special events including A- Day. The 
Varsity Club stand on A-Day is famous for its 
barbecued chicken. 

The first dance of the year is sponsored and 
conducted by the club. 

Probably the most important function of the 
club is the administration of all intramural 
sports at the college. 

To signify membership in the club, fresh- 
man members may receive beer mugs and 
special varsity club jackets. 



The now famous Varsity Club's barbeque pit and 
refreshment stand at last year's "A" Day. 





Paul Frank looking over a prospective subject for his 
entry in the Photography Club's contest. 



The Photography Club is comparatively new 
on our campus. Started three or four years ago 
it has since grown to an active and very im- 
portant club on the campus. 

The club welcomes new members, especially 
freshmen. The new members are taught all 
phases and methods of photography by old club 
members. 

This year under the leadership of President 
Bert Litoff, the club has set up a dark room in 
the basement of the faculty house. Slowly but 
surely they have been gathering equipment, 
until they have gotten a fine dark room set up. 

Each year the club runs a photo contest for 
"A" Day with ribbons and cash prizes being 
given to individual winners. 

The club's advisor, Mr. Segal, has given 
invaluable advice as well as equipment to the 
club. We of the yearbook staff wish to thank the 
members and advisor of the Photography Club 
for the assistance which they have given us. 



Photography Club 



Club members shown in their darkroom. Reading from the left, M. 
Adleman, J. Birk, A. Rosner, H. Tannin, P. Frank, E. Jardel. Seated- 
B. Litoff, President. 



^«**f*SSSI^P^^^ * 



10. 



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1 








. - M / // i 



The combined Glee Clubs of the Ambler School 
and the National Agricultural College being con- 
ducted by Harry Purcell on the night of the 
Holiday Festival. 



(^Ue eiub 



The college Glee Club with President Bob 
Cope in the foreground. 



The N. A. C. Glee Club is a comparatively 
new organization on the campus. 

Started a few years ago several students 
organized an informal singing group. 

This year the club has expanded to a mem- 
bership of between 40-50 men. 

Each week these men on their own time 
meet in the evening, under the leadership of 
Mr. Harry Purcel, to sing together. 

During the school year the club gives con- 
certs in the Bucks County and Philadelphia 
area. 

The highlight of the year is at Christmas 
time, when our Glee Club combines with the 
girls' Glee Club from the Ambler School of 
Horticulture to present the annual Holiday 
Festival. 







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"A" Day Committee 



Left side - kneeling: Robert Markley, Ed 
Jardel, L. "Bub° laggard, Victor Ransom, 
Sam Malove, Joe Chernicoff. Front row - 
sitting: Steve Ferdo, co-chairman; Stew Ber- 
kis; Arthur Ceilings, chairman, Bill Mulvey, 
co-chairman. Standing: Gessner Nash, Char- 
les Green, Cloyd Knouse, Frank Gruenfeld, 
Lee Harvey, Joe Buchel, Pete Krusch, Orion 
Cromwell, Calvin Kidder, Lester Ludwig, 
Herbert Sitrin. 




Herbert Sitrin, Steve Ferdo, Vic Ransom, Ed Jardel, 
Bob Markley, Art CoUings, Stew Berkis. 



Each May the students of N. A. C. produce a 
field day, better known as A-Day. 

A-Day has grown from a good "little idea" 
of the Dairy Society in 1949 to the most im- 
portant student function of the year. 

The administration of this affair is ably 
carried on by the A-Day Committee, which an- 
nually picks up the pieces in September, that 
put together, form the working gears of A-Day. 

The members of the committee are chosen 
from every class, club and organization on the 
campus plus any additional volunteers. 

Under the able leadership of Ott Collings 
the committee is in charge of planning all 
events, entertainment, refreshments and ad- 
vertising concerning A-Day. 

Everyone connected with the college can be 
proud of the fine job done by this committee. 



XCUlT-i 



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^•■. 






FOOTBALL 



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FOOTBALL SQUAD 






Name 


Height 


Weight 


Position 


Jmi 


Franchetti, D. 


5'8" 


155 


H. B. 


./m 


Gross, G. 


5'10" 


180 


F. B. 


^^m^^ 


Fleming, E. 


5'9" 


160 


H. B. 


^^^^ 


Nieznay, E. 


5'7" 


150 


H. B. 




Branigan, W. 


6'1" 


195 


Tackle 




Holmberg, I. 


5'10" 


185 


Tackle 


Dan Franchetti 


Dahlstrom, C. 


6'2" 


195 


Guard 




Glustii J. 


5'9" 


175 


Guard 




Lipari, J. 


6'1" 


170 


Q. B. 




Peters, D. 


5'8" 


165 


Center 




Collings, A. 


6'0" 


1,75 


End 




Mulvey, W. 


5'10" 


160 


H. B. 




Soards, J. 


5'11" 


175 


End 




Berkis, S. 


5'8" 


165 


F. B. 




Huntsinger, G. 


5'6" 


165 


Guard 




Conover, H. 


5'9" 


145 


Q. B. 




Frank, P. 


6'0" 


160 


Guard 




Jardel, E. 


5'5" 


130 


End 




Stammel, R. 


5'10" 


180 


F. B. 


Esgro, S. 


5'9" 


155 


H. B. 


Lane, L. 


5'7" 


145 


H. B. 


JI^^^BlB 4^ 


Frost, A. 


5'6" 


145 


H. B. 


^^^^^H^& ^^^^ 


Varner, R. 


6'0" 


175 


End 


^^^^^^Bk^^^A 


Wrigley, G. 


6*1" 


160 


End 




Miller, W. 


5'10" 


190 


Tackle 


^^j^y m^i m 


Mahon, W. 


5*10" 


165 


H. B. 




Bonowski, R. 


6'1" 


180 


End 




Osborne, H. 


6*0" 


260 


Tackle 




Weber, H. 


5'8" 


165 


Guard 




Shirvani, M. 


5'10" 


170 


Guard 




Richardson, D. 


5'8" 


165 


Guard 




Caplan, H. 


5'9" 


160 


Center 


sKb ^B ^P 


Fenyves, R. 


5'9" 


175 


Tackle 


^■T i' 


Gervasoni, R. 


5'8" 


160 


Guard 




Ferdo, S. 


6'1" 


220 


Center 


^^Ss-^l^ 


Director of Athletics 






Managers 


^^ 


Peter Glick, Jr. 






Nash, G. 
Okerlund, C. 




Coaches 


Colors 




Nickname 


___-^. 


Charles E. Keys, Jr. 


Green 




Aggies 


^^^^^^H'' 


John Giusti 


White 






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Aggie pass blocked by Wilson State 



1952 Football Squad 

Ed Jardel, Bill Mulvey, Ron Stammel, Ed Nieznay, R. Gervasoni, Dave Caplan, Jim 
Lipari, Stu Berkis, Dan Franchetti, Bill Mahon, Ray Bonowski, John Giusti, Harry Con- 
over, Ivar Holmberg, Bill Branigan, Roy Varner, John Soards, Herb Sitrin, Bill Miller, 
Buck Esgro, Ed Fleming, Jack Frost, Manny Shirvani, Art CoUings, Don Richardson, 
Carl Dahlstrom, Harry Weber, Bob Fenyves, Steve Ferdo, Don Peters, Paul Frank, Glen 
Wrigley, Guy Gross, H. Osborn, G. Huntsinger. 




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NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, FARM SCHOOL P.O.. PA. 
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE — 1952 

Sept. 27 — Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa Away 2:00 P.M. 

Oct. 4— N. J. State Teachers College, Montclair, N. I Home 2:00 P.M. 

Oct. 11— Brooklyn College Home 2:00 P.M. 

Oct. 18— State Teachers' College, Trenton, N. I Home 2:00 P.M. 

Oct. 25 — Long Island Agricultural & Technical Institute, 

Farmingdale, N. Y Away 2:00 P.M. 

Nov. 8— Gallaudet College Home 1:30 P.M. 

Nov. 15— Wilson Teachers College Home 1:30 P.M. 

Coach — Charles Keys, Jr. Co-Managers — Clarence Okerlund '53 

Ass't Coach — John Giusti H. Gessner Nash '53 

Director of Athletics — Peter Glick, Jr. 





Mil I gg^iagsgsss-aaa 







Ed Nieznay 



Guy Gross 



Ivar Holmburg 



Chuck Dahlstrom 





Coach 
Charles Keys, Jr. 



Dan Franchettl 



Ed Fleming 



Don Peters 



Jim Lipari 



Bill Branigan 



Art Collings 





Jim Liparl 



BASKETBALL 



With the hanging up of helmets, and with the 
smell of snow in the air, N. A.C.'s athletes 
begin their laps around the gym. Yes, with the 
change in weather comes the beginning of the 
basketball season, the beginning of a new 
season for the Aggies' rooters. 

This year's squad, with the return of many 
lettermen, and the prospects of a few prom- 
ising freshmen, set out, determined to have a 
winning season. However, this was not to be, as 
our opponents had other plans in store for us. 

Rounding out the old pros of Cal Kidder, Ed 
Vansant, and Hal Tannin, was reserve Ed Flem- 
ing, a senior who was part of last year's bench 
strength. Our bench, made up mostly of fresh- 
men, should be of value in future years. Re- 
member the names of Stammel, Chubb, and In- 
dek. 

Cal Kidder returned to his spot of play- 
making guard after sitting out most of last 
season with a broken ankle. Cal surprised no 



one with his running, shooting, and ability to 
keep the ball going around until an opening was 
found. 

Hal Tannin did his usual job along with Kid- 
der, occasionally dropping in some long sets. 
Fleming, with his high-footed push shot, made 
himself a real favorite with quick field goals 
when the chips were down. 

Ed Vansant, who kept the coaches guessing 
for years, was his usual "easy" going self. Al- 
ways dependable off the backboards, Ed had a 
little trouble opening the chords on the basket. 

An inspiring figure on the court at all times 
was Don Peters. Unforgettable to the local 
crowd as well as all those before whom he 
played is Jim "Chiz" Lipari. Team leader in 
every department, Jim was, without a doubt, 
the most colorful player the Aggies could 
boast in the past three seasons. As all good 
things, "Chiz" will be missed more when the 
next season opens. 



N. A. C. Vs. Bloomfield. Number 11, Jim 
Lipari, jumping with one of Bloomfield Five. 




Ed Vansant, Jim Lipari, Cal Kidder, 
Ed Fleming, Ronald Stammel, Harry 
Conover, Charlie Indek, Don Peters, 
(Bill Mulvey, Dave Caplan, Mgrs.) 



Don Peters, Ed Fleming, Ed Van- 
sant, Jim Lipari, Cal Kidder. 





Lipari and Kidder up for ball against Temple 
Pharmacy. 



Aggies in action against Bloomfield 



1953 Basketball Results 






Own 


Opp. 


Opponent 


Score 


Score 


Susquehanna University 


50 


70 


Montclair S. T. C. 


56 


78 


King's College 


68 


70 


Temple Pharmacy 


58 


50 


Bloomfield College 


42 


99 


Goldey Beacon 


63 


66 


Newark S. T. C. 


56 


67 


Cheyney S. T. C. 


70 


54 


Bloomfield College 


72 


96 


Philadelphia Textile 


57 


75 


King's College 


73 


75 


Goldey Beacon 


58 


66 


Cheyney S. T. C. 


81 


112 


Patterson S. T. C. 


78 


109 


Newark S. T. C. 


67 


73 


Temple Pharmacy 


57 


65 


Alumni 


50 


38 





Man at Bat - Harry Conover 



Due to bad weather, the Aggie baseball squad started 
practice in the gym about the first of April. TTie boys 
spent their time getting loosened up and learning the fun- 
damental defensive plays. On occasion, a pitcher would 
become a little wild and 'bean' somebody in the close 
quarters, but the experience was valuable. 

The pitching squad was filled out by two seniors and 
two freshmen. Seniors "Doc" Cromwell and Lew Shelby 
carried the load of the pitching chores while the squad 
found able replacements in "Bronk" Sanders and Eddie 
Pouttu. The other half of the batteries were filled by two 
experienced backstops - Charlie Lorenz and Harry "Luigi" 
Conover. 

John Guisti was the only other senior on the squad, 
holding down second base and occasionally covering right 
field. 

Although the team's record wasn't too impressive, the 
boys played hard and enjoyed the game. Many instances 
shall never be forgotten. One of the greatest being the 
upset of Bloomfield College with a left-handed second 
baseman being our defensive star! 




BASEBALL 



Lew Shelby 



Ed Fleming 



Michael Aiello 



Cal Kidder 





Intramural Softball 



^mm'f 




Softball - John Smith Pitching 



INTRAMURALS 



Scene from Volleyball Game 



Intramural Volleyball 




Senior Volleyball Team 




t*-i-' '^ 



A" DAY 



On "A Day", 1953, we had rain for the first 
time since the event was first scheduled in 1949. 
Despite the inclement weather, a fine crowd 
turned out to see the results of many months' 
hard work on the part of the student body. A 
new twist was added with a radio show over the 
Mutual Network. 

Financially, it was the best "A Day" we 
have had, giving a good backlog for next year's 
staff to get rolling with. Hats off to our chair- 
man. Art Coilings, and his fine committee! They 
leave with a fine tradition to carry on a bigger 
and better "A Day" every year! 




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Six Chester white piglets enjoying their lunch from a 
sleeping mother. 



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In the picture at the left is 
the show ring where four 
heifers are being judged. 
The above picture is of 
Stan Perelman preparing 
his horse for actual judg- 
ing. 








Three of our nubian friends waiting their turn to be shown. 



^WW^-M- 



^ - 1 




Two judges carefully evaluating the merits of our finest sheep. 




A speed contest to fill a coke bottle, between an N.A.C. The pride of the animal husbandry department, four 

student and an Ambler Hort. School girl. beautiful Black Angus. 










X fv. 






The pride of N. A. C Harry Hopkins, driving our 
famous six horse hitch and wagon. This was the 
climax of the "A" Day Show. 1 



"A' DAY 




students pulling, pushing, carrying and generally 
coaxing the sheep out for judging. 




Jack Fenner and his heifer being 
declared winner of their class. 



Members of various high schools 
judging teams, shown judging 
poultry. 



Two of our more hardy 
students engaged In the log- 
sawing contest. 



Lee "Tex" Harvey proudly 
showing his prize winning 
black Angus. 




A very beautiful wild-life exhibit prepared by an or- 
namental horticultural major. 




The prize winning Agronomy display of seeds and 
various crop plants. 

Part of the large crowd, which attended "A" Day, 
viewing the livestock. 




Shown here are a few of the many farm machinery 
and implements on display at "A" Day. 



J 



E-^.;. 




A Day Winners 




In the top picture are shown the winners of the beard 
growing contest. 



Dairy 

Junior Yearlings J. Frost 

Senior Yearlings Ed Dunn 

Four Year Olds Glen Wrigley 

Aged Cows Roy Varner 

Grand Champion Roy Varner 

Reserve Grand Champion Ed Dunn 

Animal Husbandry 

Beef Tex Backus 

Sheep Bill Mayer 

Horses Lee Harvey 

Hogs Lucas Lane 

Grand Champion Lee Harvey 

Reserve Grand Champion Tex Backus 

Horticulture 

Garden Retreat Victor Ransom, [>5uglas Fries 

Fancy Flowers in a 
Natural Setting .... Larry Gottleib, Don Richardson 

Naturalistic Planting Marvin Adelman, 

Tom Hoffman, George Hartfelder 

Educational (Vegetable) Harry Conover, 

George Weaver 

Educational (Chemical) Gessner Nash 

Educational (Miscellaneous) Richard Block, 

Ron Brandt 

Grand Champion Adelman, Hoffman, Hartfelder 

Reserve Grand Champion Gottleib, Richardson 

Special Events 

Beard Growmg Bill Mayer 

Log Sawing Lee Harvey and Don Johnson 



Contestants in the beard growing contest, standing, 
J. Giusti, E. Vansant, A. Collings. Kneeling, P. 
Krusch, M- Aiello. 



A large "Ham" taking its daily nap. 



A display by the Poultry Depart- 
ment on the handling and packaging 
of poultry products. 




In the foreground some of the dairy cattle, in the 
background are some of the larger farm equipment. 




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PATRONS 



Allan H. Blitz 

2168 Diston St. 
Dr. Morris Brenner 

410 S. 56th St. 
Benjamin Bush 

3350 Kensington Ave. 
Boris Caplan 

4234 Wyalusing Ave. 
Hyman Citron 

5418 Lansdowne St. 
Martin M. Cohren 

5836 N. 12th St. 
James J. Coyle 

5564 HiUcreek St. 
Louis Eckstein 

6872 N. Forrest Ave. 
Theodore Fertik 

5224 N. 10th St. 
Herbert Fishbein 

5944 Horrock St. 
Edward Frankel 

1830 Nolan St. 
Benjamin Goldberg 

2223 Longshore Ave. 
Sam Goldfarb 

1704 Erlen Rd. 
Jerome Hartnebaum 

40 Overbrook Pky. 
Harry Klein 

2512 N. 33rd St. 

Samuel Rudley 

50th & Wynnefield Ave. 
Jack Rosenthal 

Benjamin Franklin Hotel 

Flower Shop 
Manuel Petkor 

5670 Diamond St. 
Nathan Moser 

7119 Kindred St. 
Manuel Meyers 

1816 E. Mohican St. 
K. B. Mayer 

5216 Roosevelt Blvd. 
Norbert Mink 

181 City Line Ave., Bala, Pa. 
Herbert ^osca 

32 Rutgers St., Maplewood, N.J. 
Mawrice Novin 

Grenada Apts., 6100 N. 17th St., 

Phila. 26, Pa. 
Philip C. Powell 

3305 Dorithan Rd. 

Baltimore 15, Md. 



Charles Raskin 

109 E. 4th St., Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 
Lawrence Rickert 

30 Highland PI., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Emile Z. Rivkin 

121 N. Park Ave. 

Montebells, Calif. 
John Rizzo 

349 E. Clinton St. 

Lock Haven, Pa. 
Harry E. Rogin 

130-37 244th St. 

Rosedale, L. I., N. Y. 
Leon Rosenzweig 

North Wales, Pa. 
Samuel Rudley 

50th & Wynnefield Ave. 

Phila. 31, Pa. 
Samuel Samuels 

P. O. Box 334, Doylestown, Pa. 
Carl Schiff 

2271 E. 64th St. 

Brooklyn 34, N. Y. 
Paul Schomp 

Witchwood Farm 

North Wales, Rt. #1, Pa. 
David Segal 

National Agricultural College 
Dr. Sol Shapera 

649 West Boston Post Rd. 

Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Leonard Sherman 

50 W. Clinton Ave. 

Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Max Shindell 

105-06 Metropolitan Ave. 

Forrest Hills, L. L, N. Y. 
George Smith 

Supt. 'Lee Shore" 

Byram, Conn. 
Solomon L. Soskin 

Rd. #2, Quakertown, Pa. 
Philip Spevak 

2461 W. 79th Ave. 

Phila. 38, Pa. 
Max Steinberg 

761 S. 4th St., Phila. 47, Pa. 
Albert M. Stoudt 

R. D. Chester Springs, Pa. 
Andrew H. Strang 

1023 S. 54th St., Phila. 43, Pa. 



PATRONS 



Edward Brophy 

723 Aubrey Ave. 

Ardmore, Pa. 
Albert Darpino 

414 Almond St., Vineland, N.J. 
Wallace Heitsmith 

96 Hudson Ave. 

Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
Robert Holland 

149 Hudson Ave. 

Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
Richard Ilsemann 

430 Longfellow Ave. 

Wyncote, Pa. 
Albert Jurcin Konls 

4661 Gerniantown Ave. 

Phila. 44, Pa. 
Oskar Larsson 

Newton Rd., Ithaca, Pa. 
Carl Leutner 

70 Christie St. 

Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
Louis Mostardi 

38 W. Langhorne Ave. 

Havertown, Pa. 
Peter Rolland 

1 Victory Court, Metuchen, N.J. 
Robert Rosenberg 

312 Bunker Ranch Rd. 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 
William Slemmer 

420 3rd Ave. 

Haddon Heights, N. J. 
Sidney Spungen 

1508 Roselyn St., Phila., Pa. 
John H. Toor 

Sandy Ridge Road 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Robert G. Weber 

86 Sealins St., Dover, N. J. 
Irwin B. Friedman 

R. D. #1, Middletown, N. Y. 
Douglas Van Winkle 

69 Great Oak Ave. 

Short Hills, N. J. 
Pierson Orr 

c/o Clark, Lebanon, N. J. 
Stanley Fidell 

3615 Kalsman Drive 

Los Angeles 16, Calif. 
Sol Malinsky 

205 Milton Rd., Warrington Br. 

Pensacola, Fla. 



Gustave Taube 

2102 Wallace Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 
Cecil J. Toor 

Sandy Ridge Rd. 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Rosner Triol 

Line Lexington, Pa. 
Reuben Tunick 

1727 N. 33rd St., Phila. 21, Pa. 
Julius Ullman 

198 Lenox Rd., Atlanta, Ga. 
George Van Dernoot 

R D #1 Box 249A 

New Brunswick, N. J. 
Philip Weber 

Hartsdale Nursery 

Hartsdale, N. Y. 
Fred H. Weigle 

Gwynllan Farm 

Gwynedd Valley, Pa. 

Emanuel Weinsteln 

6746 Upland Terrace 

Phila. 42, Pa. 
Harry Weissman 

U. S. Honor Farm 

R. D. Decatur, Ga. 
Dr. Milton Werrin 

408 S. 20th St., Phila. 26, Pa. 
Dr. Nathaniel Werrin 

520 Haverford Rd. 

Wynnewood, Pa. 
Harry Zack 

Deep River Gardens 

Deep River, Conn. 
Benjamin Zeider 

Newton Rd., Woodbridge, Conn. 
Bernard Zeigler 

190-18 Nero Ave. 

Hollis, L. I., N. Y. 
Mortimer A. Zwaff 

14 Blackwell Ave. 

Hopewell, N. J. 
Norman Auslander 

8413 Eastwick Ave., Phila., Pa. 
Stanley Barber 

2056 Brown St. 

Norristown, Pa. 
Max Berkowitz 

R. D. #1, Lambertville, N. J. 
Edwin Borst 

19 Walk St., Lacey Park 

Hatboro, Pa. 



PATRONS 



Charles Bernstein 

Cornell Farms, Inc. 

Glen Wild, N. Y. 
Samuel Billing 

30 W. 190th St., Bronx, N. Y. 
Sidney Brunwasser 

1319 Fifth Ave. 

Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
William G. Clancey 

224 82nd St., Brooklyn 9, N.Y. 
Harry Dubrow 

30 Sickles St., N. Y. 34, N. Y. 
Leo Edelman 

c/o Speigels Inc. 

1061 W. 35th St., Chicago 9, Ul. 
Sylvan Einstein 

7 South 3rd St., Vineland, N.J. 
Samuel Erde 

219 W. 81st St. 

New York 24, N. Y. 
Joshua Feldstein 

N. A. C. Farm School, Pa. 
Fredric Blau 

N. A. C. Farm School, Pa. 
David Friedland 

New Galena Road 

Chalfont, Pa., R.D. #1 
Joseph Fulcoly 

R.D. #1, Doylestown, Pa. 

New Britain 
Peter Fuller 

Barclay Hotel 

18th & Rittenhouse Square 

Phila. 3, Pa. 
Benjamin Gartner 

Phoenixville R. D. #2, Pa. 
Gustave Gellens 

Jacob's Creek Rd. 

TitusviUe, N. J. 
Louis Gershenson 

6835 Clover Lane 

Upper Darby, Pa. 
Charles Goodman 

6732 N. 18th St., Phila. 26, Pa. 
Carl Green 

170 W. 71st St., N. Y. 24, N.Y. 
Donald A. Barbour 

R. D. 1, Doylestown, Pa. 
Harry Bachman 

3710 Cold Spring Lane 
Baltimore 15, Md. 



Leo Ginsberg 

2297 Bedford Ave. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sydney Goldberg 

61 Elwood St., N. Y. 34, N. Y. 
Louis Goldich 

315 Peachtree Drive 

Atlanta, Ga. 
George Grisdale 

27110 Forest View Ave. 

Euclid 23, Ohio 
Walter Groman 

National Agricultural College 
Edgar Hecsh 

3407 Walnut St., Phila. 4, Pa. 
John Holzheimer 

790 Riverside Drive 

New York 32, N. Y. 
Carl Kahan 

1309 N. Evergreen St. 
Jack Kamison 

507 Bellvue Rd. 

Wilmington, Del. 
Ronald Keiser 

2501 Ailsa Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Myer Kristol 

717 Fairfax Road 

Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Louis Kiesling 

Keys Lynn Farm 

Bordentown, R.D. #1, N. J. 
David Lasday 

1505 Race St., Phila., Pa. 
Aaron Lavln 

Davisville Rd. 

Willow Grove, Pa. 
Arthur S. Levintow 

105 N. Easton Rd. 

Glenside, Pa. 
Kalman Liske 

L & H Feed Co., 99 S. Colony 

Wallingford, Conn. 
Morris Mayer 

219 S. 24th St., Allentown, Pa. 
Daniel Miller 

National Agricultural College 
Samuel Miller 

424 Ritner St., Phila. 48, Pa. 
Ira J. Mills 

Blue Ridge Manor 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Compliments of 



(^m^u/t\ 



'^ 



THE AMBURGO CO., INC. 

1315 Walnut Street 

PHILADELPfflA. PA. 

SAMUEL GOLDEN '22 
President 



CALORIC STOVE 
CORPORATION 

TOPTON, PA. 



ALLMAN BROTHERS 

INSURANCE 

43G Walnut Street 
PHILADELPfflA 6, PA. 



Lombard 3-91 



S and S CORRUGATED PAPER 
MACHINERY CO., Inc. 



160 North 4th Street 
BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



THE 



BEST 



AT 



ITS 



BEST' 



ED'S DINER 

Franklin and State Streets 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

NATIONAL 
ALUMNI 

GOOD LUCK 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

NEW YORK 
CHAPTER 

GOOD LUCK 



GOOD LUCK 
FROM 

SIDNEY 
BRUNWASSER 



HOWARD'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. State Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

"Opposite County Theatre" 


SANDY RIDGE 
FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES - CUT FLOWERS 
PLANTS 

Telephone: Doylestown 4169 


SAM RUDLEY 

'OS- 


CLASS OF 
1954 


COMPLIMENTS 

FRED H. WEIGT.E 
M914' 


COUNTY THEATRE 

Telephone: Doy. 4014 

KEY THEATRE 

Telephone: Doy. 4176 


JOSEPH H. FORD 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH DEALER 

Washmq, Pamtina, Repairing, Reconditioning 

Brake Testing, Brake Lining. Fender Repairs. Body Work 

Factory Approved Service 

Complete Lubrication Service 

Ignition, Starter, Generator, Batteries 

All Electrical Service 

Tires and Tubes. Sales and Service 

225 W. State Street 
DOYLESTOWN 

Phone 9494 


CLASS OF 
1955 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


DOYLESTOWN INN 


DOYLESTOWN 


At the Crossroads of 


TRUST COMPANY 


BUCKS COUNTY 


Member of 
F. D. I. C. 


THE FOUNTAIN 
HOUSE 


FARM BUREAU 
INS. CO. 

WILLIAM H^ BOOZ 


QUALITY FOOD 


Cross Keys 




DOYLESTOWN 


GEORGE BLOTTER, Mgr. 






Phone: Doy, 9534 


COMPLIMENTS 


FRESHMAN 


OF 


CLASS 


CHARLES RUDOLF 


of 


'Class of 30' 


1956 




Repair - Recovering - Reconditioning 
Cessna Dealer - Aircraft Parts 


BITZER 


OLD STAR AIRPORT 


DRY CLEANING 
and 


JOHN A. VANSANT 
Owner and Operator 


DYE WORKS 


LANGHORNE, R.D. 1, PA. 




Telephone: Langhorne 2635 



FIFTEEN YEARS OF CRAFTSMANSHIP 

As Campus observes its fifteenth birthday, 
it can look baclc on 80 million yearbook 
pages, 2000 fine editions and, above all, a 
record of service that will be maintained in 
the years to come. A pioneer in providing 
all inclusive yearbook service in offset, 
letterpress or combinations of the two. 
Campus has many would-be imitators — a 
tribute to Campus effectiveness. 




CAMPUS PUBLISHING 

DIVISION OF THE DORVILLE CORPORATION 
Letterpress ♦ Art ♦ Offset 

1420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 



1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
^"43 




yTOCRAPHi;