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Full text of "Cornucopia 1956"

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To Feed Man 



That Is Our Purpose 



in these few words 
we express the aim 
and intent of our 
agricultural studies 
— to feed man, 
wherever he may 
live, and to help 
create a healthy 
and prospering 
world in these 
our times . . . 




CORNUCOPIA 



nsb 



National Agricultural College 

Doylestoiim 
Bucks County 
Pennsylvania 



EUGENE SANDER 
HOWARD GOPDON 



Co-Editors 



GEORGE CEILS r^ n - 

wfcvrn^E^ vciL^ Co-Business 

RAYMOND BONOWSKI Managers 





George E. Turner 



It is with a deep sense of pride that we dedicate tliis \eaibook to Dr. George E. 
Turner. Dr. Turner is probably best known for his insistence on a job well done. 
His demand for student achievement is accompanied by constant striving to convey 
fundamental concepts to his students in the most meaningful wa\ possible, illustrating 
these concepts with examples of the newest practical techniques in the particular field 
of study. By a well-balanced ration of humor and pure theory. Dr. Turner always 
succeeds in making his lectures palatable to his classes. 

The talents of this man are not limited to the classroom. His abilities as an 
administrator are indicated b\ his tenure as Dean of Agriculture. Off the campus, 
he is active in the Doylestown Chamber of Commerce. 

Dr. Turner is admired bv students and facultv alike for his unfailing fairness. His 
virtues as an educator add inimeasurablv to the academic standing of our college. 



Smoothly Meshing Gears 



Segal Hall, houses the main classrooms, the botany, 
agronomy, and food industry laboratories and also 
seri'es as a meeting place of the college's many 
clubs. 





Lasker Hall, known to ;« all as the "chow hall.'" 
This spacious building houses the college canteen, 
recreation rooms, and the faculty lounge. 



Moving Us Toward . . . 



Our Field of Action: 



Faculty House, contains the offier of President 
Work and the offices of the faculty. 








Dias.nostic Laboratory, serves the 
poultrymen of Bucks County area 
and is also useil as a place of 
instruction. 







E/ion Hall 



a 



To Feed Man- 



Vllman Hall 




,'">*' 




Completed in October. 1955. the 
new dormitory houses sixty students, 
has an apartment, and classroom. 
The dormitory contains all of the 
modern facilities necessary to provide 
comfortable living for the students. 
It is indicative of the school's growth 
and provides a home for students 
away from home. 









^^^^Mnfl^H^^H 


OH^^^^^^^^^H 


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'''^^-^>^& 



-That Is Our Purpose' 




X- 




President James Work, through whose efforts great 
improvements have been wrought. 



ADMm 



Dr. Ehiier S. Reinthaler. Vice 
President of the college. 




t* - ' 'u ;^^\lvi^\vr*\x*w^.^iA \ 



Assistant Dean Oscar Larsson and 
Mr. Donald Meyer, Dean of 
Students. 




rSTRATION 



Top row, from left to right are: Miss Elsie M. 
Belfield. Secretary of the college: Mr. Carl G. 
Roesler. Comptroller: and Mrs. E. F. Rogers, Pur- 
chasing Agent. 



Bottom row: Mr. Daniel Miller, Business Manager; 
and the office staff, sitting: Mrs. Virginia Wor- 
stall, Mrs. Helen Hobensack, and Mrs. Mary Mel- 
cher. Standing: Mr. John Rodgers, Mrs. Marjorie 
Lapp, Mr. Chester Lippencott, and Miss Gaile 
Clarke. 








Technical 



Dr. Clintdn R. Blackman 
I'rofessnr ol Agronomy 



Agriculture 

Technical and scientific prof!;rcss has l)een so rapid 
during the past half century that many fields have felt 
its force. Agriculture in the United States has probably 
felt the force of progress more than any other single 
field. Lammont du Pont once said, "What is funda- 
mental research today is applied research tomorrow." 
In modern agriculture it may well be said that today 
and tomorrow often meet. 



Agronomy 



Every farmer actively engaged in the production of field crops can be considered 
a practical, operating agronomist. Agronomy is that division of agriculture dealing 
with the study of environment, in regard to the basic and applied sciences in the 
skill of field crop production and soil management. The future welfare of the world's 
population is dependent upon an adequate food supply. Agronomy furnishes the 
farmer with the necessary information which enables him to produce not only 
efficiently and economically but permanently. The study of Agronomy prepares men 
to be practical agronomists and in addition offers a foundation for the many other 
careers in this field. 



Seated in the botany laboratory Ben Dillman uses a 
microsi-upe to examine the internal structure of grain 
specimens. 



Ben Dillman teenier) gives unileri lassmen Willis Thompson ilelt) 
and Paul Chechell a jew pointers on judging grain. 




Animal 
Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry deals basicall) with the 
breeding, feeding, and management of livestock. 
Although many graduates in this field are engaged 
in the practical phases of purebred and commercial 
beef cattle, swine, sheep, and horse production a 
great variety of allied fields are also open to the 
graduates of this major. These allied fields may be 
government work in research, extension services, 
marketing, or inspection: in the meat packing or 
commercial feed industries: or in the profession 
of teaching. Whatever the graduate chooses for his 
life's work he is well prepared. He receives his 
theoretical background from courses in the basic 
sciences and applied animal sciences, while he gains 
practical experience from actual work with farm 
animals. 



Dr. TilM.r F,lh 

Prnlrsscr ol 

Animal Hiisbandr 



Harry Hii|ikins 

Inslnivlvr ,n 

Animal Hiisbnmlr 




A ^rou/i ol Animal Hnsbaniht men examine the tin 
points ol a lilark Aniens heiler. 



'rW^. % 




hinih-. l^ .'/ run:,- itn jioi !uiir,-^ Ihn- a ^ruiiii ul senior 
norl, nilh some ol the s/irc/i al F/irm A o. .!. 




Some III ihr si-niiirs iiidf^r ihc i/iialily oj hin , whiih plays 
an iniporUinl piitl in mill, pniduilion. 



Senior Dairy Husbandry majors check on the conditio 
the Holstein heifers in one of the dairy barns. 




Twentieth Century Agricultun 




Arthur Brown 

Associate Professor of 

Dairy Husbandry 



Dairy Husbandry 

A college graduate in the field of Dairy Hus- 
bandry may enter many fields of endeavor related 
to this science. Aside from the fields of commer- 
cial dairy farming, dairy farm management, breed- 
ing purebred dairy cattle, and dairy supervision 
he may enter the professions of teaching, adminis- 
tration, research, and sales. The Dairy Husbandry 
majors at N.A.C. are instructed in the latest com- 
mercial practices, as well as the techniques and 
theories lying behind them. Practical work is com- 
plemented by technical courses and courses in the 
varied sciences. It is this varied program that 
enables graduates in this field to meet the keen 
competition found in the dairy industry today. 



Lahoratory 
on microo. 
compared. 



fe<hni</iie must he mastereil in this jield. Data 
ganisms is shown here being gathered and 




Proper pasteurization is ol great iniporfance in jfrocessing 
market milk. Here senior Food Indiisir} majors examine a 
pasteurization recording chart. 



Demands the Best Techniques 



Food Industry 

The Food Industry is devoted to training its 
students in the practical and technical aspects of 
food processing and preservation. The men may 
either major in Dairy Processing or General Foods. 
Besides courses dealing with specific foods there 
are also manv subjects applicable to the general 
realm of chemistry and microbiology which have 
been found to be of great value. The methods of 
study are such that first the physical and chemical 
aspects of a particular food are discussed thor- 
oughly, and only then are processing procedures 
taught. Stress is placed on laboratory work which 
demonstrates the problems in industry on a small 
scale, and offers corrective procedures. With such 
rapid advance and changes in industrial technology 
and equipment, frequent field trips to modern food 
factories have been found to be very helpful. 



(;e(,rge E. Tiir 
I'roleisnr ol 
Food Industry 



IJyron Frazcr 
Instructor in 
Food Industry 





HorlicuJliire 



l):.vi.l \I. I'unii.ll 
llo,i„iillure 



Jcisluia Fclilstein 
In.sinidor in 
Hiirtirii/lure 



Tlie firlil oi lloilicNiliiic (IimU uilli ihc |ii(i<liic- 
lidii. |ii ciri'ssint;. ami rnai ki-| iiif; iil fruils atid 
vcjii'lalilc^. I lie ^liiilciil;. ri-cfivi' cxIcnsiM' Iraiiiirif; 
ill I liJi 111 iilliiir li\ caiiAiiiji on inili\ iilual i-\|icii- 
mciils ((iniiri Icil uilli llic iiianaj;riiicnl of lriiil> and 
vcfit'lalilcs. Ill Ml ildiiifi llic\ f;allicr iiifdiiiiaticjii 
uliirli uill lie xaliialilf u|i(iii ^laduatidii. Hi)rticul- 
tural f^iailualcs are (|ualifif(l for positions as 
orchard and market garden managers. horlicLil- 
tural |ir(idii(ts inspectors, and representatives of 
ciiinmeicial iiislituti<iiis handling horticultural pro- 
ducts. I'ositioiis uilli Federal and State govern- 
ments are also available to the graduates. The 
campus contains many facilities for the horticul- 
tural major: such as orchards, vineyards, and 
land for the production of vegetables. 



The proper pnininf; oi )ouni> trees is ter\ imporlanl in 
ordianl work. Below, senior Horliculliire majors gel some 
practice on a young peach tree. 




ticcs ;udgi:ig apples in preparation jor a lorlhconiin 
contest. 



Ornamental 
Horticulture 

The OrnaiiuMilal Hditiculture field offers a vast 
horizon to its majors. Graduates are capable of 
ohtaiiiiiif; siieh positions as greenhouse and nursery 
managers, landscape nurserymen, and landscape 
architects: besides positions in the flora divisions 
of the field. In addition to the preceding oppor- 
tunities one can also gain a good knowledge of the 
subjects of cytology, morphology, pathology, physi- 
ology, and taxonomy. On our twenty-seven acres of 
campus the principles of this field may be amply 
seen and practiced. We become capable of observ- 
ing the processes .going on within the flora before 
us each day. and the correlation between the plant 
sciences and landscaping is very close. In order to 
landscape properly one must have a wide knowledge 
of plant material — their characteristics of growth. 
Our training enables us to work for graduate de- 
grees or to begin our own business. 



FrpcJric S. Blau 

Professor ol 

Landscape Desi/;n 




Aliraliam Rellis 
Instructor in 
Floriculture 



Several beds of geranium stock in the greenhouse are 
examined by seniors majoring in Ornamental Horticulture. 
The plan of a proposed athletic field is checked by men 
working on a landscape ■', • , r /, 




C^% ^^^ 




///( i>/(i!t ot a inoiuKsVi! alhlctf lirlil j.s 
u-orking on a landarajH' design project. 




I'rarlical worl, in the lielil is f;aineil throunh s:ii h ai liiilies 
as the one /licliired below, firrr llie mm iire exruniniuf: 
liirds in ifie laying house. 



Above. Ponllr\ Hiisbandr\ majors study the si.elelal slnir- 
lure of a Ion/ in one oi their technical courses. 




Teamed for Greater Productivity - 
Modern "Know-How^' and Ancient Skills 




Freeman S. Jacoby 

Associate Professor of 

Poultry Husbandry 



Poultry Husbandry 

Poultry Husbandry is a science of huge dimen- 
sions. A major in this field must study not only 
different fowls, breeds and varieties in a given 
fowl, eggs and egg production, but. must also be 
well versed in the basic sciences. A graduate may 
engage in research or management work related to 
egg and poultry production in regard to quality 
production and the economics of production. Prac- 
tical work and numerous field trips to modern 
poultry processing plants in conjunction with class- 
room and laboratory work are essentials necessary 
to gain a full understanding of this field. 



Reginald D. Fdrb.s 
Professor ol English 



A teacher ajjecis eternity : lie can never tell 
ivhere his influence stops. H. B. ADAMS 



Liberal Arts 

No one should sjiecialize to the point where he 
knows nothing other than his own field. Over- 
specialization is one of the gerat dangers facing 
students and educators today. A well rounded 
individual must have some knowledge of a variety 
of subjects. These subjects are classified as the 
Liberal Arts and Humanities. Courses falling into 
this classification are designed to enlarge the hori- 
zons of a student and adjust his perspective as 
well as train him in "free thinking." Among the 
Liberal Arts and Humanities offered at N.A.C. 
are English, economics, political science, logic, 
mathematics, art. music, philosophy, psychology, 
and foreign affairs. It is through these studies 
that our personalities are molded; to shape the 
adult we become. 




I'ricr Click. J I. 

.Associate Pro lessor ol 

Poliliral Srienn- 



Elmer S. Reinthal 
Processor of 
Eronomirs 



Charles E. Keys Jr. 

Associate Professor of 

Physical Education 




(;e„r!.e E. Wel^trr 
Pro lessor of 
Agrinilliiral Engineer! n 



llfiny Sthniitdcr 
Professor in 
Plant Science 




s 



ciences 



ScifiRe anil its hasic funilanii'iilals arc taught in 
many of the specific courses williiri a inaj(ir. How- 
ever, in addition to and in eonjuni-tion witii these 
courses. slud\ in liie basic sciences is given to 
everyone; regardless of his major. Among the basic 
sciences taught are bacteriology, microbiology 
botany. zoolo<;\. and chcniislry (inorganic, or 
ganir. and pin siological. This background in tin 
basic sciences and the scientific knowledge garn 
ered in relation to a given field are of great valu( 
to graduates, regardless of whether they turn their 
efforts toward obtaining higher degrees or going 
into private industry. 



.lames I'oplia 
Instnifiin in Che 



Dr. I'aul liuw.T 
I'roiessor of Riolo 



Below, Drs. Srhalz i rig/il) ami Martin check on a research 
experiment. The jormer is Director of Research and Pro- 
fessor of Microbiology: the latter is a research professor. 





KIRKWOOD G. ARNOLD 

121 Second Street 

New Philadelphia, Ohio 

Dairy Husbandry 

Ambitious, dependable, and full of school spirit, 
best describe Kirk to his classmates. In his four years 
at N.A.C. he has been engaged in almost every ac- 
tivity on campus. He has been outstanding in the 
Glee Club, Student Council, and on the A-Day Com- 
mittee, serving as its chairrjian during his senior 
year. Kirk has also been very active in the Dairy 
Club and was head manager of the basketball team. 
His favorite subject was Feeds and Feeding and he 
excelled in most of the animal courses. His favorite 
pastime is music and he is easily identified by his 
pleasing tenor voice. After fulfilling his military ob- 
ligation Kirk expects to go into the wholesale feed 
business with his uncle. We wish him luck and are 
sure he will be a success in anything he may pursue 
in the future. 



A ualion based on af^ricidture 



ROLAND BARGE 

2138 Morris Avenue 

I'nion. New Jersey 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Since Roland entered N.A.C. his activities and in- 
terests have been many. He participated in sports and 
excelled in baseball as a varsity catcher for four 
years. Roland was liked by all for the interest he 
showed in class activities. Always ranking high in 
his class scholastically, Roland has maintained good 
marks during his four years of study. His social life 
circled around "Marian." Everyone knew those letters 
from Union always kept him happy. "Benny's" car 
was also something which he never failed to think 
of. Upon graduation Roland plans to get married and 
settle down. We all know that with the knowledge 
he received here he will be very successful in life. 




KARL M. BARTH 

701 Westfield Avenue 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Animal Husbandry 

Karl's combination of scientific interests and knowl- 
edge of the animal husbandry field promise new dis- 
coveries in the future. His keen interest in learning 
scientific methods has led Karl to work in the college 
research laboratory every spare moment of his time 
during the past four years. An understanding of 
human nature and his eagerness to help and advise 
others are only a few of the qualities responsible for 
his impressive personality. Karl has also participated 
in the Glee Club, Student Council, Animal Husbandry 
Club, and was on the GLEANER Staff. Karl's eager- 
ness to learn has instilled in him the desire to do 
post graduate work. Whatever his undertaking may 
be, with his all-around ability, the path he follows is 
bound to lead to success. 




'MllliitK 




;mm 



Men who study the land 




RICHARD ALAN BLOCK 

4923 Woodcrest Avenue 

Philadelphia 31, Pennsylvania 

Food Industry 

Richard "Ray" Block is known for his diversified 
interests, including algae culture, art, psychology, and 
plastics. Richie has tried to get the "feel" of his 
college courses — the same "feel" that he has for life 
and religion which plays a dominating part in his 
life. His quick wit and keen sense of humor should 
not be taken lightly; he means what he says and says 
all that he means. He has done more than was re- 
quired of him in campus organizations. His participa- 
tion in the GLEANER, Food Industry Club, Con- 
temporary Club, and the Photo Club are proof of this 
fact. In the future Richie wants to help feed the 
starving people of the world by developing new types 
of food from algae. 



RAYMOND D. BONOWSKI 

!!5() East (Cornwall Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

HoTliculture 

Raymond, better known as Ray, is a "Hort" major 
who has compiled a good scholastic record in his 
major and has also actively participated in the Hor- 
ticulture Club for four years. Ray will be remem- 
bered for his ever present spirit on the football field. 
A varsity lelterman in football and an active member 
of the Varsity Club are also included in Ray's fine 
record at N.A.C. In his senior year he was appointed 
as one of the co-business managers of the yearbook. 
A-Day has been of interest to Ray ever since his 
freshman year. Ray rates farm machinery, marketing, 
and produce production courses as his favorites. He 
is known for his quick wit, broad smile, and school 
spirit. As for the future, Ray plans to go into the 
marketing and production of "hort." products. 




Boys who've been trained . . 




JOE BUCHEL 

297 Orient Way 
Rutherford, New Jersey 
Dairy Husbandry 
Over the course of our stay at N.A.C. Joe has been 
active in many clubs. For the past four years the 
Dairy Society has held his interest and he served as 
its president during his junior year. Joe has also 
served as its vice president in his sophomore year 
and was elected president of his class during his 
senior year. As president of his class he served on 
the Student Council and was responsible for its in- 
crease in prestige. Joe has a likeable personality and 
is always ready to give a helping hand where it is 
needed. Some of our more memorable times have 
originated through his leadership. The improvements 
in the student game room are due to Joe's untiring 
efforts. Because of his varied talents, natural leader- 
ship ability, and good nature Joe is sure to realize 
his goal in life. 




HENRY G. CARPENTER 

221 Hilldale Road 

Villanova, Pennsylvania 

HorlicuUure 

Better known as "Carp" to his classmates Henry 
has contributed much to the Class of 1956. Always 
ready and willing to help out with class functions 
Henry has been a class leader since he entered N.A.C. 
Henry participated in intramural sports, playing on 
all three of the class teams .and he always gave them 
his best. Noted for his unrehearsed style of piano 
playing he always put it to good use by keeping 
class parties alive. Henry has achieved a fine scho- 
lastic record during his four years at N.A.C. He also 
contributed much to the success of the CORNU- 
COPIA. Upon graduation Henry hopes to secure a 
job in the field of Horticulture and with the blend 
of good qualities he possesses he is sure to succeed. 



To take the best from Mother Nature's land . . 



PAUL E. CHUBB 

Stonehurst Court Apartments 

Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

"Chubby" has been outstanding in sports and extra- 
curricular activities. In sports he was a member of 
the varsity basketball and baseball teams and the 
class intramural teams. Interest in music has made 
"Chubby" a valuable asset to the College Glee Club 
and Band. His fine collection of records has always 
provided fine listening and a means of relaxation for 
the members of his class. His interest in poultry 
husbandry has led him to participate in the activities 
of the Poultry Club and its functions on A-Day. 
Paul presided as president of the Poultry Club during 
his senior year and he also represented the college at 
the Intercollegiate Poultry Judging contest at Chicago. 
Upon graduation Paul hopes to establish his own 
business in the poultry husbandry field. 





BEN R. DILLMAN 

233 South Second Street 

Frackville, Pennsylvania 

Apronomy 

Ben's well balanced personality is a perfect com- 
bination of ambition, friendliness, and seriousness. 
His inature and helpful attitude won him the respect 
of his classmates who elected him to the Student 
Council for three successive years. His other extra- 
curricular activities include active participation in 
intramural sports, the Poultry and Glee Clubs, and 
the planning of the past All-Sports Nights. Ben has 
always been a good student and he has shown his 
scientific interest by working on a research problem 
in poultry nutrition. For recreation and relaxation 
Ben likes to hunt and trap. His keen interest in the 
theory and practice of agriculture together with a 
fine personality will certainly help him in his chosen 
field. 



We kmnn the job to he done 



REINHART M. EWERTZ 

148 West State Street 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

Animal Husbandry 

Reinhart M. Ewertz entered the National Agricul- 
tural College in 1950 with- the class of '56 and was 
known to his friends as "Chauncy." After completing 
his freshman year he served for two years in the 
United States Navy. In 1953 he entered our class in 
our sophomore year and has been known ever since 
as "Ewertz." Ewertz has been an active member of 
the Dairy Club and the Animal Husbandry Club. In 
his junior year he was elected co-chairman of the 
A-Day committee. He was also a member of the 
judging team which judged at the Eastern States 
Exposition in 1955. As for the future "Ewertz" plans 
to continue work in his chosen field. 




DAVID EZICKSON 

1072 East 14th Street 

Brooklyn 30. New York 

Horticulture 

Whenever one hears classical music being played 
on a phonograph, you think of Dave. He is not only 
a lover of the great musical masters but is also an 
admirer of pictorial art. Besides having these good 
tastes there isn't too much which escapes his eye when 
it involves his fellow brothers. He is always very 
willing to lend a hand to those in need and never 
leaves any one in distress. Dave has been a member 
of the art class for four semesters and during his 
junior year he was a representative of the art class 
in the A-Day show. Dave was also a member of the 
Photo Club. Horticulture Club, and the Contemporary 
Club. As for the future he will surely be doing his 
part to better the relationships between the peoples 
of the world. 




Our job we will do well . 




ROBERT FENYVES 

417 Grape Street 

Vineland, New Jersey 

Food Industry 

"Smiley" is almost always found deep in thought 
regarding school and work that has to be done. 
When you see that big number 38 on Saturday you 
can bet that "Battling Bob" has his mind on winning 
the game. He has played four years of varsity foot- 
ball and won the "Lineman of the Year" trophy in 
his junior year. Bob likes chemistry and engineering 
courses and keeping his work up to date helps him 
stay near the top of his class scholastically. He is a 
loyal supporter of all social and sporting events. Bob 
does not have to be known by name when one seeks 
to find him. All these things will help him in his 
graduate studies and future work in the field he 
has chosen. 



ALBERT M. FROST 

34 Fulton Street 

Bloonifield, New Jersey 

Dairy Husbandry 

■'Jack's" talents are many and varied. He is an 
outstanding student and is very active in extracur- 
ricular activities. His desire to learn about his major 
helped Jack become an active member of the Dairy 
Club. Jack showed dairy cattle at the Farm Show 
at Harrishurg during his senior year. He also i)ar- 
ticipated in the dairy shows on A-Day for the past 
four years. In his senior year he was top man on 
the college dairy judging team which took part in the 
Eastern States Exposition Judging Contest. Jack also 
won awards for his judging ability of Holstein and 
Jersey cattle at the intercollegiate contest held at 
Rutgers University. As for the future, Jack hopes to 
find a job in the field of Dairy Husbandry and 
eventually establish his own dairying enterprise. 




The land will pve forth 




GEORGE GEILS 

54 West Grove Street 

Bogata, New Jersey 

Dairy Husbandry 

During his four years at N.A.C. George has been 
active in many extracurricular activities. He was an 
active member of the Band and Dairy Club for four 
years and served as president of the latter during 
his senior year. As a senior, George joined the 
GLEANER staff and was appointed as one of the 
co-business managers of the yearbook. Always a 
hard and conscientious worker George has made many 
friends during his stay at N.A.C. Somewhere in the 
United States in years to come there will be a dairy 
farm and in the house over the fire place there will 
be a collection of refinished antique rifles. The proud 
owner of this farm will be none other than George. 




^-i 



1 



HOWARD T. GORDON 

1216 College Avenue 

New York. New York 

Food Industry 

Howard, better known to us by the nickname of 
"Waxy." is an outstanding individual. In his quiet, 
businesslike manner he accomplishes many objectives: 
including a high scholastic rating. "Waxy" is very 
active in school affairs. He was a member of the 
GLEANER staff for four years and has also held 
such offices as treasurer of the Varsity Club, secretary 
of the Class, treasurer of the Food Industry Club, 
and co-editor of the yearbook. "Waxy's" love for his 
field will help make him rise to the top. An easy 
going manner, and an excellent ability to judge all 
types of situations will lead Howard to success in 
any field of endeavor he chooses. 



From the best of her ivorth 



LAWRENCE GOTTLIEB 

169 Arthur Kill Road 
Staten Island. New York 
Ornamental Horticulture 

Larry, referred to as the "orchid king." is one of 
the most likeable members of the class. His greatest 
scholastic interest is in the field of Ornamental Hor- 
ticulture and his specialty is orchids. As a member 
of the Horticulture Club, he has presented some out- 
standing exhibits on A-Day and was awarded a 
Grand Champion ribbon in his freshman year. Larry's 
favorite sport is golf, and he is considered one of 
the best golfers on campus. His other interest is cars. 
He is the only senior to have had a different car 
every year he attended school. Larry intends to 
follow in his father's footsteps by becoming a part of 
the orchid business. He also wants to revolutionize 
the orchid industry: and with his ability he is likely 
to do just that. 





CHARLES F. GREENE 

104 Louella Avenue 

Wayne, Pennsylvania 

Dairy Husbandry 

Blessed with humorous wit that everyone enjoys, 
"Charlie" has made many lasting friends at N.A.C. 
He has been active m the Animal Husbandry Club 
and the Dairy Club; for which he served as secretary 
for two years. Charlie also served his class as treas- 
urer for three years. Charlie demonstrated his love 
for animals by .showing and fitting cattle and horses 
at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show at Harrisburg. 
He also participated in local cattle shows and in the 
Dairy Club program on A-Day. In his junior and 
senior years Charlie was on the college dairy judging 
team and won top honors at the annual Eastern States 
Exposition Judging Contest. Charles will long be re- 
membered not only for his good nature but also for 
his excellent ability in his chosen field. 



Well fed people our story will tell 



GEORGE HARTFELDER 

3913 Park Avenue 

Metuchin, New Jersey 

Horticulture 

There are bigger and heavier men on campus but 
when it comes to intramural baseball, football, or 
basketball George is right in there with the best of 
them. The Horticulture Club saw him for four years 
and he sang with the Glee Club for three years. 
George's favorite day is Friday; then you can see 
that old dependable green Ford heading out of the 
main gate in the direction of New Jersey. However, 
while on campus he can always be found in the 
thick of class activities. George is a very logical 
thinker and after a course in philosophy, he may 
even turn out to be another Plato. George's future 
plans include a job with some independent company 
in the field of Horticulture. 




THOMAS HOFMANN 

1 Fitzrandolph Road 
West Orange, New Jersey 
Ornamental Horticidture 

Tom has participated in many activities but has 
remained outside of the limelight. In his major he 
has been outstanding in his knowledge of plant 
material and how plants go together to form beauty. 
Practically, he has applied this knowledge to his out- 
standing displays in the Horticultural show on A-Day. 
In extracurricular activities he has been tops. He has 
taken two grand championship awards for his A-Day 
exhibits and has written many fine articles for the 
GLEANER. In his senior year he served on the A- 
Day committee as secretary and he also served on 
the yearbook staff. Tom hopes to continue working 
in his chosen field upon graduation, and knowing 
his varied skills and untiring efforts he is sure to 
succeed. 




Without hunger pangs they can think how to ring 

freedom's hell 




CHARLES INDEK 

688 Pelton Avenue 
Staten Island, New York 
Ornamental Horticulture 

"Charlie" better known as "The Dek," is a like- 
able guy who has always been a friend to everyone 
in the class. As an outstanding athlete in basketball 
and baseball Charlie has contributed much to the 
success of these teams in the last four years. He was 
captain of the basketball team for two years and 
exhibited outstanding ability every time he took the 
floor. Charlie has always been an active member of 
the Varsity Club as well as the Glee Club. The 
subjects to his liking appear to be in the Ornamental 
Horticulture field. Listening to records and keeping 
well groomed and dressed are Charlies favorite pas- 
times. Upon graduation Charlie hopes to continue his 
work in the field he has chosen. 



EDWARD A. JOHNSON 

Welsh and Veree Roads 

Philadelphia 15, Pennsylvania 

Food Industry 

It was while Ed was attending Lincoln Liiiversity 
that he decided an education in Food Industry was 
what he wanted most. After making this decision Ed 
left Lincoln on Monday night and the next morning 
he entered N.A.C. The above episode shows that Ed 
is a man who believes that time should not be wasted. 
This belief in not wasting time is as characteristic of 
Ed as is his quiet and modest manner. As an under- 
graduate, Ed devoted much of his time to the Food 
Industry Club and working in the biological labora- 
tory. The skills Ed has learned here at N.A.C: his 
personality; and his natural mechanical ability are 
sure to lead him to success in the future. 




When the stomach's full the temper's good . 




WILLIAM LONG 

45 Albright Circle 

Madison. New Jersey 

Horticulture 

Bill is probably known on campus for his pioneer- 
ing instinct. At any hour of the day or night he may 
be seen outfitted and equipped for the wilderness as 
a trapper, hunter, or fisherman. During his four 
years at N.A.C, Bill has shown his athletic ability 
through faithful service on the varsity baseball and 
football squads. He also has exhibited class spirit by 
participating in class intramural football and basket- 
ball. The Glee Club, Horticulture Club, and Band 
also received his services. Regardless of the phase 
of Horticulture Bill enters, his practical ability and 
sincere desire to succeed should make him an out- 
standing member of his community. 




M. EDWIN POUTTU 

Soumi Street 

Paxton, Massachusetts 

Food Industry 

Small in size but big in voice best describes Eddie 
to his classmates. The right hand man to everyone 
on campus he can always be depended on to do 
any job asked of him. During his freshman and 
sophomore years he was an outstanding pitcher on 
the varsity baseball squad. Ability and spirit prompted 
him to perform on the class intramural teams. A-Day 
found him in the show ring showing sheep and horses 
and helping the Food Industry Club set up its exhibits. 
In his senior year he represented the class on the 
Student Council and was a member of the yearbook 
staff. His intelligence and practical know-how will 
carry him far in his field. In the future Eddie can 
be found somewhere in the United States. 



The mind can work if the body has food 



DONALD C. RICHARDSON 

412 Prospect Avenue 
West Orange, New Jersey 
Ornamental Horticulture 

"Willie" is known throughout school for his fine 
abilities in the Ornamental Horticulture field. He is 
a well liked, easy going guy who has added much to 
the class. "Willie" has shown his all-around ability 
by his active part in varsity football for four years. 
Besides being sports-minded "Willie" has participated 
in nearly every activity on campus; among which 
were the Varsity Club, Glee Club, Horticulture Club, 
and A-Day. "Willie's" car has been an outstanding 
element in his college career. His plans for the future 
include keeping his Volkswagon and continuing his 
work in the field of landscape design. 






MORRIS ROSS 

134 Chilton Hall 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Horticulture 

After completing two years of business administra- 
tion at the City College of New York, "Bud" trans- 
ferred to N.A.C. His business-like manner has been 
exemplified in the outstanding management of the 
dining hall during his two years of service as head 
waiter. In his senior year the class elected him treas- 
urer. Bud showed his ability in his chosen field last 
year as a member of the colleges' Horticultural 
Judging team in the Eastern States Intercollegiate 
Judging Contest. He has been a member of class 
intramural baseball, basketball, and football teams. 
Bud also found time to serve on the yearbook staff 
and was an active member of the Horticulture and 
Contemporary Clubs. His ultimate goal is to be an 
orchardman and his combination of business and 
agricultural knowledge should be the key to his 
success. 



If we want the world to live in tranquility 



EUGENE SANDER 

White Street 

Bowmanstown, Pennsylvania 

Food Industry 

"Bronk" is the man behind the scene who is out- 
standing whenever a job has to be done. He is one 
of the most active members of our class. He has 
actively participated in A-Day and was its treasurer 
for the past two years; as well as being vice president 
of the class. The Glee Club, Varsity Club, and the 
GLEANER also took his interest. In his senior year 
he was chosen as one of the co-editors of the year- 
book. We will always remember him as being on 
the ball in all of the activities in which he partici- 
pated. We'll never forget our intramural teams with 
Bronk as one of the regulars. With a background 
such as this he can be nothing but a success in his 
career and any other task he may undertake. 




ALAN SMITH 

240 South Lynwood Avenue 

Glenside. Pennsylvania 

Horticulture 

Sincere, honest, and conscientious are most de- 
scriptive of Alan's character. Since he set foot on 
campus he has been recognized by his friendly smile, 
and friendly gab. Alan's favorite hobby is working 
with dogs and following the dog shows and clubs in 
the vicinity of his home. An active participant in the 
activities of the Horticulture Club and A-Day, Alan 
also supported his class and nearly all of the school's 
social activities. His ambition and earnest desire for 
success are sure to carry him far in his chosen field. 
As for the future he hopes to continue working in 
the field of Horticulture in a business of his own. 




We can't neglect that basic need-food 




RONALD LEROY STAMMEL 

Route 88 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Animal Husbandry 

Ronald is better known to his classmates as "Ron- 
nie." In his four years here he has been more active 
in student activities and sports than anyone else in 
tlie class. In his sophomore year Ronnie was elected 
"Back of the Year" for his great work on the grid- 
iron. He also served as co-captain of the baseball 
team and co-captain of the football team in his 
junior year. Ronnie is the first student to graduate 
from N.A.C. with twelve varsity letters. In student 
activities he has been an active member of several 
clubs; serving as president of the Varsity Club, presi- 
dent of the Student Council, and president of the 
class of '56. He has always been an active partici- 
pant in the animal shows on A-Day. After graduation 
Ronnie plans to manage his father's farm in Hajris- 
burg. 



JUAN M. UMANA 

Calle 76 No. 4-76 
Bogota, Colombia 
Animal Husbandry 

Known to all of us on campus as "South America's 
answer to the student prince," Juan ranks as one 
of the best liked students at N.A.C. Although he gives 
the impression of an easy going, never worrying 
fellow, Juan is actually a top-notch student bent on 
knowing (he answers to any problems that may arise 
in agriculture. His love for sports prompted him to 
organize the soccer team, on which he excelled as a 
forward. As Juan has gained the respect and friend- 
ship of us all by his keen sense of humor and a 
facility for getting along in a strange country, so 
will he accomplish his goal through an unending 
will to defeat the problems at hand by work and 
applied knowledge. 




A well fed body is a fortress 




ALBERTO URIBE 

Carrera 42 No. 49-68 
Medellin, Colombia 
Animal Husbandry 

One of the best liked students on campus (where 
he is better known as "Uribity" ) is the perfect de- 
scription for Alberto. He has been an active member 
of the Animal Husbandry Club for the past four 
years; and while participating in Art many of his 
works were displayed in the annual A-Day Art ex- 
hibition. Alberto also played on the soccer team as 
a center. Alberto's greatest interests beyond the scho- 
lastic field are flying airplanes and motorcycle rac- 
ing. In the past he was often seen coming through 
the main gates on a cold morning, calmly sitting on 
his little red motorcycle. His ambition is to manage 
Uribe Enterprises in South America, and to do this, 
he will take back to his country many of the new 
and modern techniques he has learned at N.A.C. 




LEROY E. VARNER. JR. 

R. D. No. 2 

Collegeville. Pennsylvania 
Animal Husbandry- 
Roy will long be remembered for his outstanding 
work as president of the Dairy Club and for his out- 
standing contributions to the success of A-Day. He 
has also been an active member of the Poultry Club, 
Glee Club, and the Varsity Club. Roy spent his last 
three years at N.A.C. living off-campus, and com- 
muted from his farm in Collegeville to school every 
day. He enjoys farming and definitely intends to 
make a career out of it. We, of the senior class, feel 
sure that his natural ability to farm and his many 
unmeasured characteristics and abilities will make 
him a success in this, his chosen field. 



Against the mind's daily distress 



J. IRVIN WATSON 

Sewell R. F. D. 

Turnersville, New Jersey 

Poultry Husbandry 

Irv, widely known as the "Turnersville Terror," is 
strictly a turkey man from way back. While major- 
ing in Poultry Husbandry throughout college Irv 
found the time to participate in quite a few extra- 
curricular activities; among which were the Glee 
Club and the Poultry Club. Irv is never at a loss 
for words, and is well known all over campus for 
his gift of gab. He also is well known for his 
chocolate sundaes. One of Irv's plans for the future 
is definitely the turkey business. The other, a beauti- 
ful wife, has already been taken care of. 





HARRY B. WEBER 

R. D. No. 1 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

Dairy Husbandry 

Harry's activities were both many and varied. He 
served the class as president during our freshman 
year; he was an active member of the Dairy Club, 
Student Council, and Varsity Club. For several years 
now, Harry has divided his time between scholastic 
work and managing Dr. Lee's Guernsey Farm. After 
graduation, Harry intends to remain at Dr. Lee's 
farm. He has two "firsts" to his credit. Harry was 
the first member of the class to become a father. 
His greater maturity and keen sense of values are 
sure to stand him in good stead in later life. 



Only after there's no more haggle over food 



ARTHUR WEINSTEIN 

186 Evergreen Drive 

Westbury, New York 

Animal Husbandry 

There are few people in whose constitution fun- 
loving and seriousness are so well combined. Art, 
who is always regarded as "one of the boys," has 
shown his serious side often. He has been an active 
member in the Animal Husbandry Club, Dairy Club, 
and has been the business manager of the GLEANER. 
Art's major is Animal Husbandry and his interest 
in. and love for animals is unbounding. His efforts 
to learn as much of the practical side of his chosen 
field as possible, has led him to travel over a great 
deal of the country. His hard work, perseverance, 
and business instinct will undoubtedly lead him to 
success in the future, as it has done here at N.A.C. 




HENRY E. WIRTH 

126 Callender Street 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Food Industry 

"Heinz," as he is known to his fellow classmen, 
joined our ranks in the spring semester of 1953. A 
vital contribution made bv him to the class was 
giving it that "continental" touch. He was an active 
member of the Food Industry Club. Glee Club, and 
Contemporary Club during his four year stay at 
N.A.C. An avid fan of the "Chrysler products" and 
a humorist at heart best describes his everyday char- 
acter. In his senior year "Heinz" tied a major colle- 
giate (N.A.C.) record by carrying an academic load 
of twenty-six credits. Upon graduation "Heinz" hopes 
to contribute to the progress of his chosen field by 
employing the latest technical methods he has learned 
at N.A.C. 




Caiu nations live peaceful and think of worldly ^ood 




EDWIN L. WORSTALL, JR. 

Limekiln Road 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

Poultry Husbandry 

As a member of the N.A.C. Poultry Club, "Ned" 
has aided the club as well as the College immensely. 
His talents in the field of poultry science earned him 
a top position on the poultry judging team. Ned was 
also a member of the Glee Club, and football team; 
and was one of the best all-around guards the Col- 
lege ever had. Ned was formerly a student at the 
Drexel Institute of Technology in Philadelpia, but 
found agriculture more to his liking. Ned's quick 
wit and sincere personality, combined with his driv- 
ing ambition, will certainly carry him far in his 
life's work, regardless of what it may be. 



GLEN G. WRIGLEY 

R. D. No. 1 

Perkasie. Pennsylvania 
Animal Husbandry 

"The Rig." hails from the suhurbs of Perkasie 
Pennsylvania. He is an exceptionally likeable fellow 
and has clone much for the class in the way of sport; 
and education. His sports-mindedness led him to par 
ticipate in varsity football as well as intramural has 
ketball and baseball. "Rig" is seen at just about every 
social function, both on and off campus. He was an 
outstanding member of the Dairy Club and spent 
four years in the Glee Club. "Rig" is also noted for 
the familiar expression "are you kiddin' me?" A 
combination of the many facets that go to make up 
his personality are seldom found in one person. We 
feel sure that this combination will prove unbeatable. 




Nation shall not lift up sword against nation 



Neither shall they learn war any more: 

Food is yearned. 

War is learned. 

If ive fill the stomach sore. 

Who will want to learn on war? 

This we hope is our contribution. 

Its size, in the future well see. 

But we're pledged ivith our hearts 
with our hands, with our heads 

To make this world a better one : 

If not for us, 

for our children to be. 




Memories 

Are Made 

of This 



"Your name, please?" 
"Class of 1956." 
"Address?" 
"Hometown, U.S.A." 

The man looked stern and happy as the horde of 
young, inquisitive men signed the register. This 
was the beginning of four fabulous and memorable 
years in the annals of the National Agricultural 
College. 

The class of '56 assembled on campus that 
September day in 1952 — a group of noisy young 
men; some shy, some forward, all secretly study- 
ing the expressions and actions of the others in an 
effort to gain their bearing in this new world. 
Those early days were hectic — making friends, 
meeting roommates, and for some getting over that 
"lonesome feeling." During the first week meeting 
the faculty, taking tours of the campus, and being 
subjected to tests I Oh, those tests!) headed the 
orientation agenda. By the end of test week every- 
one was thoroughly confused and ready to run 
home — which was exactlv what they did! 

However Monday morning dawned and everyone 
had come back for more. By this time, the upper- 
classmen had returned to the campus and the stage 
was set for classes to begin. But then there were 
more faces to study, especially the class of '55. 
We had learned, via "the grape vine," the terrors 
the sophomores had planned for that extra-curricu- 
lar activity known as "freshman hazing." We soon 
learned that we were to be blessed with another 
duty, namely, waiting on tables. What a sloppy 
mess that turned out to be! 

From the ranks we chose Harry Weber as our 
first leader, and not too long after his inaugura- 
tion he presented us with the rules of hazing with 
which we immediately complied — signs, dinks, 
wearing ties to meals, and using that famous pas- 
sageway to the east, for which Columbus was once 
searching — "ginko lane." 









As our minds filled with the fear of what was 
in store for us on that "night" we were always 
relieved and inspired by the sounds that came from 
the corner room, "Let's organize!" But the "night" 
finally came, cold and dark, and we were led like 
lambs to the slaughter. The cows were awake, the 
"pile" was high, and the pool was deep and slimy. 
Yes, our punishment for being freshmen was to 
clean the dairy by hand. Those ornery cows just 
would not hit the shovels we held for them! Then, 
one by one. the "wise men" were called to the 
summit to answer for their crimes; what a mess! 
"The organizer" said a mouthful! and he paid for 
it by swallowing a mouth full. Two gladiators per- 
formed for the crowd, trying desperately to sink 
each others ship. 

When the first light of day appeared in the east 
the dairy was spic and span and weary freshmen 
plodded back to the dorm. The encounter at the 
dairy humbled our pride until our day for revenge 
came. Eyeing our opponents fiercely from our side 
of the pond we stood taut and ready, manning 
our end of the rope. Having been briefed in this art 
previous to the "big pull" by that wise old pugilist, 



we were confident that victory was within our 
grasp. What a rewarding sight those sophomores 
were as they dripped back to the dorm, and how 
wonderful it felt to no longer squash the ginkos 
under our footsteps. 

Time passed, and exams were upon us. Most of 
us weathered the storm and sailed on to the calmer 
water of the second semester. With one semester 
down and seven to go we felt like veterans and 
took to our tasks of murdering chickens and giving 
haircuts to peach trees. 

In Spring a young man's fancies turn from 
thoughts of school — a party was in the air. This 
shindig turned out to be a tremendous social suc- 
cess but a dismal administrative failure. At this 
time we received the delightful news that we would 
spend our summer at N.A.C. Groans and gripes 
filled the air but after we helped produce a great 
A-Day show (in which the class took many prizes), 
completed our exams, and watched the seniors grad- 
uate, we resigned ourselves to the task of learning 
practical agriculture. 

Fun was had by all that summer. 





Thinned peaches found their mark on another 
"Peaches." Early in the morning, the chickens were 
fed by tired poultrymen. Horse stories flew thick 
and thin; apprentice blacksmiths and construction 
crews built equipment and tools of tomorrow; and 
breakage fees ran high ! Near the end of the sum- 
mer we assumed a more serious attitude and chose 
our majors. At long last our summer vacation began 
and we were mighty glad to depart for home. 

But we had just gotten settled at home when Sep- 
tember rolled around again. No, the place hadn't 
changed much but the situation was the opposite 
of last year's. We were sophomores now and our 
minds were busy dreaming up tortures which we 
could apply to the freshmen. 

After we had registered as sophomores, we 
realized that a few of our members hadn't returned. 
But our spirit was still there. We surveyed the 
incoming class of freshmen and found that they 
greatly outnumbered us, so we had to show our 
strength by enforcing stricter regulations; such as 
exact dimensions of signs and the wearing of dinks 
at all times. When the night came for giving the 
freshmen a rough workout, a couple of the boys 
decided to give spice to the occasion by setting off 
fire crackers. The result of this display was not 
beneficial to our class. 

Acceptance of the freshman challenge found us 



assembled at the pond, dressed in white shirts, 
ready to uphold our previous record. The twenty 
strong men that faced us looked mighty but were 
obviously green in the art of rope pulling. After 
an exhausting stalemate, our superior skill and 
spirit brought them crashing through the mud to- 
ward our stronghold. Our class holds the distinction 
of being the first in the history of the college to 
win both years. Also, our victory extended freshman 
hazing for another two weeks. 

Everyone will remember the extravagant Snow- 
ball Dance at which a beautiful campus queen was 
elected. No one can forget the hard work and spirit 
of cooperation that went into making this dance 
a huge success. 

At the end of the summer of '54 we were at the 
stage of life where we were mature men who had 
gone through many battles and could face the 
everyday problems of the next two years. We were 
more serious in our thinking, and in some ways 
drifting away from the underclassmen, to think of 
the future years ahead of us.' This year was rela- 
tively a sober one compared to the previous years. 

One of the many interests taken up by our class 
was the chess tournament which took place in Elson 
Hall. During this period we also arganized "De- 
Sousa's Boys" and rapidly they gained a reputation 
throughout the school. 




Ahoul the middle of ihal >c;ir we ordered our elass 
rings, wliieli will always remind lis of the good 
times we had at N.A.C. When the haskethall season 
came around there was a little flare-up created by 
the misunderstanding of our student activities card 
which resulted in a pi-tition. This pelition exploded, 
which left eighty students skating on thin ice. The 
Student Council managed to freeze the whole mat- 
ter. When the peaches were in full bloom, the sen- 
iors were bid fare .veil 1)\ their succe-ssors. Who got 
their feet wet that night? The following week was 
consumed by final exams and then finallv off to 
the fields of work for the summer. During this time 
everyone's mind was on the final year and gradua- 
tion, which had been our optimistic goal. 

Anxiously awaiting our return to N.A.C. for our 
big, final year we were disappointed by two won- 
derful letters which told us our vacation had been 
extended. When we finally did return we were 
fascinated by the beautiful new dorm which we saw 
awaiting us. But. brother, when we got inside 1 We 
shoveled our way through sawdust, climbed over 
two by fours, and those poor boys who slept late 
were rudely awakened every morning to the tune 
of hammers and saws. We suffered through it all 
and it was certainly worth it. We graduated from 
hammocks to real beds. 

The class finally got around to taking over the 
campus. Club presidents started club activities in 
motion, yearbook work got under way. and the 
Student Council began the tough job of executing 
the campus law. 

"DeSousa's Boys" rolled through the intranmral 
football league tieing the "Cruds" for first place 
and topping the league by the toss of a coin. Darts 
and TV became the newest fads for the boys and 
everyone had a great time at the third all-college 
weekend. The Sweetheart Dance was the climax 
of the social endeavors of the seniors and a good 
time was had by all. 

As our history goes to press the Class of '56 is 
looking forward to a successful Prom and a com- 
plete roster at Graduation exercises. When the Class 
of '56 steps out into the world we will know that 
with the background we possess we are certain 
to achieve success in every challenge we may meet. 
"Hats off" to the underclassmen; for without their 
constant push, keeping us on our toes, we would 
have surely fallen by the wayside. 

H.S. and E.S. 




»j^ Aji ia.j| ^Jl 







UNDERCLASSES 

The Class of 7 Or ^mJ / 



Class Officers: President, John Toscano; Vice President. Waiter Kendzierski; Secre- 
tary, Walter Bradford; Treasurer, Harold Jefferis. 



First row: Ernesto Castaneda. Duanne Bair, Paul 
Lepard, Gordon Phillips, Walter Bradford, John 
Toscano. Walter Kendzierski, Harold Jefferis, Joe 
Catino. Second row: Tevis Wernicoff, Louis Seid- 
enberg, Mark Rahinowitz. Tom Watson. Harvey 
Wacker, William Romberger. Jack Holzapfel. Rer- 
nie Rerghardt. Third row: Wayne Hoffner, Sven 



Kastor. Richard Hirschorn. Pinya Cohen. Sid Blair, 
John Lesko, William Loesch, Joe Carstens, Enrique 
Cavelier. Fourth row: William McCall, Wayne 
Groff, Larry Fritts, Gil Finkel. Kenneth Downey, 
William Van Keuren, Clem McCarty, Chris Hague, 
Henry Rose, Fred Wolford. 












The Class of 



f956 



Class Officers: President, Richard Dennis; 
Philip Winkle; Treasurer, Alan Carp. 



Vice President, Don Grim; Secretary, 



First row: R. McGrattan, B. Salmon, R. Burke, 
J. McMahon, B. Penning. E. Wallaca, D. Grim, 
R. Dennis, P. Winkle, A. Carp, E. Zablah, R. 
Soriano, A. Cabrales, T. Temme. Second row: R. 
Salisbury, L. Goldentyer, B. Hoick, F. Rosade, J. 
Overdevest, R. Papp. 0. Schaible, D. Martin, H. 
Ashy, C. Klein, T. Dall, A. McKay, H. Rizen. Third 
row: A. Dolinsky. S. Fonseca, W. Coward, R. Mc- 
Loughlin, J. Strain, R. Haas, B. Tomshe, S. Sch- 



lesinger, A. Smith. A. Delitzscher. C. Crouse, R. 
Heinzelmann. Fourth row: K. Smith, J. Sardone, 
A. Binger, J. McCann, A. Walker. A. Heunerman, 
D. Hughes, I. Novak, M. Flint. W. Haller, D. 
Fero. W. Scott. D. Weinberg. Fifth row: R. De- 
quine, R. Schadt, C. Napravnik. F. lannuzzi, N. 
Weisgarber, J. Dolan, Paul Winkie, H. Goetchius, 
F. Wotjowitz, D. Weidner, D. Collingwood, D. 
Prins. 



The Class of 



1959 



Class Officers: President, Barry Price; Vice President, Paul Rohr; Secretary, Leon 
Firth; Treasurer, Charles Phillips. 



First row: E. Baker, V. Standa, Chan Ho Lee, H. 
Kruck, R. Smith, B. Suavely. R. Porter, L. Firth, 
B. Price, C. Phillips. K. Signor. J. Testa, B. Witten- 
berg, J. Shinor, L. Cooper, J. Braubitz. Second 
row: S. Zuckrow, J. Erb. J. Bertz, W .Buckman, 
P. Rohr, S. Goldblatt, T. Brennan. S. Lammin, 
R. Wilkins. D. Jung. S. Wildstein, D. Major. A. 
Bennett, T. Foley, J. Plog. Third row: R. Middle- 
stead, K. Bergman, A. Maszoschi, R. O'Neil, J. 
Metcalf, J. Little, R. Steidinger. J. Criswell, P. 
Deck. R. Crammer. R. Vant. D. Kharrizi, J. Pot- 



ashnik, M. O'Donnell, F. Davis. Fourth row: L. 
Martinelli, C. Hettinger. J. Faline, R. Burns, R. 
Loeber, R. Ligget, R. Emery, A. A. Mahowski, T. 
Rieth, G. Sauer. W. Parkhurst, A. Manrique, R. 
Parvin, B. Glass. Fifth row: W. Galletta, M. Zuber, 
C. Baker, B. Scoworoft, D. Stuly, J. Watson, L. 
Garrett, G. Usaty, A. Oliver, R. Stevens. W. 
Greere, J. Cheslock. Sixth row: J. Jackson, D. 
Hanson, J. Briggs, S. Nadler, B. Walczak. R. 
Bowman, A. Lenkiewicz, J. Schultz. R. Grim, J. 
Merrill, D. Bjornson. 




ACTIVITIES 








TROUGH 





George Geils 



Cornucopia 
Staff 



Every member of the Class of '56 has contributed in one way 
or another to the success of this yearbook; as have certain under- 
classmen. The task of producing a yearbook is by no means a 
small one and a combination of many people, possessing various 
skills is essential. However, our job has been a gratifying one and 
the success of our yearbook is a reward well worth the work. We 
of the CORNUCOPIA staff would like to express our appreciation 
to Gil Finkel and Howard Destler, two of the underclassmen whose 
help has been invaluable. 



Sitting: Karl Barth, Thomas Hofmann. Henry Carpenter, 
Paul Chubb, Bud Ross, Ray Bonowski and George Geils, 
Co-Business Managers; Richard Block. David Ezickson, 



Ronald Stammel, Kirk Arnold. Standing: Howard Gordon 
and Eugene Sander, Co-Editors. 





Gleaner 
Staff 



Seated: L. Segal, H. Gordon, T. Hofmann, J. Toscano, R. Stammel, G. Finkel and Paul 
Lepard, Co-Editors; P. Cohen, R. Block, W. Kendzierski, W. Bomberger. Standing: J. 
Catino, T. Wernicoff, T. Watson, B. Kenning, G. Geils, J. Lesko, H. Jefferis, A. Wein- 
stien, W. McCall, C. Klein, D. Ezickson, D. Salisbury, T. Dall, H. Ashby. 



Student 
Council 



Seated: John Toscano, Ed Wallace, Nehry Rose, Kirk Arnold, M. Edwin Pouttu, Benjamin 
Dillman, Joe Buchcl, Dick Dennis, Harvey Wacker, Tom Watson, President Ronald Stammel 
standing. 




Professional 



DAIRY CLUB 

First row: L. Widdoss, H. Weber, J. 
Frost, C. Greene, President Georgt- 
Geils. Standing: G. Wrigley, H. Ashby, 
T. Cabrales. B. Salmon, D. Grim, B 
Hoick, R. Ewertz, J. Dolan, R. Stam 
mel. R. Prins, R. Salisbury, D. Hughes 
A. Dolinsky, M. Walker, R. M 
Loughlin, D. Steely, A. Weinslein, M 
Arbeter, N. Weisgarber, B. Sturm, R 
Varner. 




Five of the clubs on campus come under the 
above classification. These clubs deal specifically 
with the major subjects taught at N.A.C. and 
hence, hold a leading position among extracurricu- 
lar activities. Each club meets at least twice a 
month and often sponsors field trips or invites 
outside speakers to lecture on a subject pertaining 
to the major field of interest. 



HORTICULTURE CLUB 

First row: President Joe Catino, W 
Kendzierski, B. Ross, H. Carpenter. 
L. Siegal, C. Klein, T. Ball, H. Goet 
chius, D. Weidner. Standing: D 
Ezickson, D. Lucas, A. Delitzscher, B 
Lamb, P. Lepard, T. Hofmann, R 
Hirshorn, D. Fero, G. Hartfelder, F 
Rosade, D. Schadt, R. Bonowski. W 
McCall. 




tilths 




ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 

Front row: B. Stanley, T. Watson, L. 
Cooper, C. Duque, R. Ewertz, H. 
Wacker, J. McHutchinson. Standing: 
C. Greene, J. Briggs, B. Glass, R. 
Varner, A. Weinstein, R. Soriano, R. 
Stammel, J. Schaible, R. Grace, R. 
Heinzclmann. J, Lesko, D. Bjornson, 
E. Castenecla. E. Cavalier, A. Uribe, 
C. Wrigley, K. Barth. J. Dolan. F. 
Wolfred, D. Lucas, W. Van Kueren, 
G. NfcMahon, F. lanuzzi, A. Mackay, 
M. Zulier, D. Gootman. 



rs^!^/: 



FOOD INDUSTRY CLUB 



Front row: Howard Gordon, President 
Bill Bomberger, Richard Block, Ted 
Johnson. Standing: Henry Wirth, Eu- 
gene Sander, Mark Rabinowitz, Pinya 
Cohen, Gil Finkel. 




First row: R. Heinzelman, R. Stam- 
mel, J. Jackson, E. Worstall, A. Maz- 
zochi, M. Flint, D. Steeley, S. Lamnin, 
Chan Ho Lee, R. Wilkins. Standing: 
H. Goetchius, B. Tomshe, L» Novak, 
H. Rose, 1. Watson, President Paul 
Chubb, Professor Freeman Jacoby. 



Hi: 



Contemporary 
Club 



Left to right: David Ezickson, Mark Rabinowitz, Lenny Siegel, Pinya Cohen, 
Gil Finkel, Richard Block, Thomas Hofniann, Paul Lepard, Bud Ross. 



Photography 
Club 



Front row: Gil Finkel, President; Richard Block. Standing: Paul Lepard, 
Joe Catino, Anthony Oscapinski, David Ezickson, Charles Klein, Al Delit- 
zscher, John Toscano. 










Varsity 
Cluh 



Band 



Kneeling: P. Chubb, T. Watson, R. Bonowski, T. McMinn, W. Kendi- 
zierski, J. Holzapfel. L. Widdoos, W. McCall, W. Thompson. B. Fenvyes. 
Standing: E. Sander, B. Bunn, D. Bair. J. Carstens, W. Hoffner. G. Wrigley, 
H. Jefferis, B. Plenge, C. Indek, R. Varner, B. Long, J. Overdevest, H. 
Gordon, J. Lesko, D. Grim, D. Prins, Ronald Stammel, President ; R. 
Penning. 

















*,f»ji*| 






Glee Cluh 



By the winding banks of the Neshaniiny 
Stands our Alma Mater dear. 
We look o'er the fields we love. 
Cherished year by year. 
All hail our colors green and gold. 
As they proudly wave on high. 
Treasured memories fond and true 
In our hearts ivill lie. 




SPOR TS 



Football 

Remember these moments? 





First row: G. McMalioii, Manayti ; B. Bur^harilt, Traiiiir; T. McMiiin, J. Ovcrilovest, B. Bunn, 
D. Grim. W. Thompson, Captain ; R. Fenyves, P. Chechele, W. Plenge, R. Stanimel. H. Jef- 
feris. Manager; Charles Keys, Jr., Head Coach. Second row: John Giusti, Assistant Coach; G. 
Wrigley, R. Burns, W. Hoffner, L. Widdoss, J. Carstens, J. Holzapfel, S. Blair, R. Bonowski, 
W. Scott, R. Rush, W. McCall, D. Bair. Third row: B. Scowcraft. J. Potashnick, R. Porter, 
J. Metcalf, W. Loesch, C. Phillips, A. Lenkiewicz. C. Hettinger. C. Baker. D. Richardson. 
S. Schlesinger. 



In September forty candidates turned out for 
football, hopeful of another successful campaign. 
The squad had fourteen lettermen returning, but 
suffered a severe setback with the loss of Co- 
Captain Wilber Miller, who had to drop out of 
school for personal reasons. The first gaine was 
played at Kutztown State Teachers College in a 
pouring rain. The Teachers got three quick TD's 
in the first half. In the second half the Aggies 
made a comeback which fell short as they lost 21 
to 13. The next week the team traveled to Mont- 
clair State Teachers College, only to lose another 
close one 7 to 6 in another rainstorm. Oti the 
road for the third week the Aggies got their first 
win at the expense of Brooklyn College, which 
dropped football from its athletic activities as 
they were handed their twenty-ninth straight loss. 

Finally at home the team played its fourth straight 
game in the rain, this time against Susquehanna 
University. The homecoming crowd was treated to 
a 32 to victory on three long TD runs by Ron 
Stainmel. Back on the road again the Aggies ab- 



sorbed their third defeat at the hands of Millers- 
ville State Teachers College, 21 to 7. The Aggies 
picked up their third win with a 20 to victory 
over Wilson College on Alumni Field. With the 
squad really hitting its stride thev rolled over 
Gallaudet College by another 20 to score. Co- 
Captain Willis Thompson led the way to victory in 
the final game over Long Island Aggies. 33 to 0. 
This game featured the senior backfield of five 
seniors: Fenyves, Bonowski. Richardson, Stammel. 
and Wrigley who played their final game for N.A.'C. 

19.5.5 SCHEDULE 

N.A.C. 0pp. 

Kutztown S.T.C. Away 13 21 

Montclair S.T.C. Away 6 7 

Brooklyn College Away 13 

Susquehanna LI. Home 32 

Millersville S.T.C. Away 7 21 

Wilson S.T.C. Home 20 

Gallaudet Home 20 

Long Island Aggies Home 33 




Basketball 



Below: Aggie guard Bill Scott gets off a jump 
shot against Susi|uelianna University. 



Above: Captain Charlie Indek lets go with one of 
his famous two-hand drive shots. 




Ace scorer, 
again. 



Dick Prir 



Forward Bill Haller grabs a 
rebound. 





1955-56 BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

New Brunswick Seminary 27 NAC o5 

Ursinus College 63 NAC 55 

Philadelphia College of Phar. 52 NAC 64 

Temple College of Pharmacy 57 NAC 71 

Newark State Teachers College 69 NAC 67 

Haverford College 100 NAC 78 

Philadelphia Textile Institute .... 86 NAC 67 

Kutztown State Teachers Col. ___ 80 NAC 62 

Cheyney State Teachers Cof. 86 NAC 82 

Newark State Teachers Col 82 NAC 76 

Susquehanna University 101 NAC 8!! 

Jersey City State Teachers Col. .... 83 NAC 99 

New Brunswick Seminary 52 NAC 97 

Kutztown State Teachers Col 65 NAC 58 

Temple College of Pharmacy NAC 

Cheyney State Teachers Col. NAC 

Philadelphia College of Phar. . NAC 

Jersey City State Teachers Col. ... NAC 

Philadelphia Textile Institute NAC 





lam J mm 








\ \H^I I ^ l;\.->KKri!ALL TEAM 

Kneeling: D. Bjornson, W. Kentlzierski, B. Scott, C. Indek, Captain; B. McCall, T. Cabrales, 
R. Stammel. Standing: D. Bair and K. Arnold, Managers; D, Prins, D. Grim, J. Merril, J. 
Briggs. B. Haller, Charles Keys, Jr., Coach. 



The 1955-56 season found the Aggies 
playing the toughest schedule that they 
had ever encountered. However, the en- 
tire team returned to action from the 
previous year, in which they compiled 
a nine won and seven lost record. Lead- 
ing the scoring for the second straight 
year was Dick Prins, whose two year 
total reached 7.S() points. Captain Char- 
lie Indek and Ronnie Stammel are the 
only two members of the squad to be 
lost through graduation. 




JUNIOR VAR.S1T\ BA.sKtlBALL TEAM 

Kneeling; B. Grim, J. Merrill, D. Bjornson. Standing; D. Mid- 
dlestead, B. Hoick, R. Liggett. .1. Shinn. Ronald Stammel. Coach. 




Baseball 



The 1955 season was very impressive, with a 

record of five wins and luo defeats. Iliis year's 

^^^^^ iliib had only one change, the right fielder. Five 

"*' |)layers on last year's clul> hatted over 300 and Sid 

0<*'^ -^«..- ^ \^ Blair and Bill Scott turned in fine pitching per- 

, / / forinances. These tested regulars, along with sev- 

/ , • / / eral newcomers promise a season we may well 

V^ _ JA remember even though this hook cannot record it. 

^ '^ ^>siJ ^ VARSITY SCHEDULE 

jpk / April 4— Newark STC Home 

'■^■'' ' April 9 — Susquehanna U. - Away 

April 10-— Kutztown STC Home 

^ April 12— Rutgers U. of S.J. Home 

^ ^ ' April 16 — Phila. Col. of Phar. Away 

April 18 — Glassboro STC Home 

April 20 — Glassboro STC Away 

April 24 — Rutgers U. of S.J. Away 

April 25~Phila. Col. of Phar. Home 

April 27 — Kutztown STC .,_ Away 

May 3— Newark STC -..- Away 

Kneeling: Seniors Roland Barge, Paul Chubb. Ronald Stammel. Bill Long. Standing: Coach 
Charles Keys. John Lesko. Tom Watson, Sid Blair. Bill .Scott, Waller Kendzierski, Dave Weinberg, 
Harold Jefferis. Manager. 





/ coach all three spiirls hi 




Who said the chef can't hah 
I pot em .' 



All 



Sports 
Night 



Since its iiice|)li(in in l').S2 Ail Sports Night 
has hecdiiif an aniuiai affair. It is held in late 
Fehruary or earlv Manh and consists of such 
events as a pie eating contest, a blind boxing 
bout, boxiiig and wrestling matches, and a 
variet\ of humorous entertainment. Exhilii- 
tions of weigiit lifting and jutlo and hand 
wrestling are also on the program. Tlie |jro- 
gram is a happy balance of comedy and seri- 
ous coni|ietition and pro\ ides an enjo\al)le 
nisiht for everyone. 



Music? 



How to pass Chemistry? 





A- 



shfiu'.s ihe sf}rrlat(irs how to 



In tlie latter part cil' \lar(li pcoiili- in tht- northern 
part of the linited States look forward to the com- 
ing of spring. To the students cd' the National 
Agricultural College this time (d the year has a 
much greater significance — A-Day. To them it 
means that the months of planning are now coming 
to realization and that the work is just about to 
begin in earnest. A visitor at the college would 
find students patiently working with animals they 
are going to show on A-I)ay: other students would 
be found working on their designs for a garden 
retreat or naturalistic scene, and as the first Sat- 
urday in May draws closer you would find the 
clubs making their last minute changes and prep- 



arations for A-I)av. Then comes the climax every- 
one has worked for — A-Day is here. Friends, rela- 
tives, and visitors from the surrounding states, 
along with the judges come here to make their 
critical inspection and comparison of each stu- 
dent's exhibit. The Grand Champion awards are 
given by the judges to those students who have 
excelled in their particular field. Although every 
student does not receive an award he feels that 
none of his efforts were wasted, because he has 
gained many things by working with this big team 
of men who in the future will be the core of agri- 
culture in the Lhiited States. 



Henr) If irth ami Karl liarlh ilisplav 
their "wares" during the jiidgitif; of 
the beard groiving contest. 



with the I unteslanls — the judge carejully ins/tei ts ea< h animal. 




Day 



:i 




Contestants, alter months of work, await the jiulges linal derision 







< 






Jinlfies using stop watches to time 
the log sawing contestants. 



mm": 



Contestanis in the milking contest 
attempting to lill their Coke bottles. 




When we entered these gates ive knew that 

we knew. 
And perhaps we knew a lot. 
But since we've been here, new horizons 

appeared. 
And what we knew wasn't half as great as 

we thought. 

In our four years of college 

We've tasted, of the Tree of Knowledge, 

And were driven out of the Eden of our 

Ignorance 
To the world of cold hard fact. 

And now as we leave we must learn how to 

give. 
And use our knowledge to act. 
And use each fact as a tool. 
And use each tool the best we can 
To do the job we've chosen . . . 

To Feed Man. 



Compliment's 
Of 



MR. AND MRS. ABRAM 



GOTTLIEB AND SON LARRY 



Compliments 
of 



F. E. SMITH, INC. 



1616 N. Delaware Ave. 
PHILADEPHIA 25, PA. 



"The 
Best 
At 
Its 
Best" 

ED'S DINER 

Franklin and State Sts. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


SANITONE 

DRY CLEANING 

Keeps Your Smart Clothes 

Looking Smart Longer! 


STRAND 
VALET SERVICE 

65 S. Main St., Doylestown.Pa. 
Phone 3556 


NYCE'S 
SUPPLY YARDS 

Feed, Grain, Seeds, 
Fuel Oil, Coal and 

Poultry Supplies 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 

and 
NEW BRITAIN, PA. 


Phone 511! 

EDWARD M. HAPP 

General Contractor 
Building Construction 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



FRED BARGE & SON 

Butter, Eggs, and Specialties 
UNION. N. J. 


GROFF CANDY CO. 

SOUDERTON, PENNA. 


NOGRADI BROS. 

Body and Fender Works 

Plate Glass for All Purposes 

Autos — Table Tops — Desk Tops 

Clinton and Union Sts. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 4908 


Phone 4679-5057 

GOSS AUTO PARTS 

AUTOMOTIVE REPLACEMENT PARTS 
84-88 W. State St. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


ROCKY KNOLL FARM 

Golden Guernsey Cattle 

Doylestown, Pa. 

WM. Y. LEE, M.D., Owner 
HARRY B. WEBER, Herdsman 


W. K. HESTON 
MILK TRANSPORTATION 

INSULATED TANKERS 

Furlong, Pa. 

Phone 3521 Bucks County 


ALLMAN BROTHERS 

Insurance 

436 Walnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA 6. PA. 

Lombard 3-9138 


DAVE'S SPORTING GOODS 
CENTER 

Complete Hunting and Fishing 
Information 

PHONE 4414 9 W. COURT ST. 



FICKE'S DAIRY BAR 
and LUNCHEONETTE 

Hoagles and Bar-B-Qued Hot Dogs 

29 S. MAIN STREET 

Phone 5271 



DE SOUSA'S CAFE 




t-WHENINTHE| 

I MOOD FOR 
FINE FOOD 



Italian and 
American Foods 

211 S. MAIN ST. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



DOYLESTOWN INN 

At the Crossroads of 
Bucks County 



For an Evening of Fun — 

HUSTLE INN 

Rt. 611, Doylestown, Pa. 

ASK ABOUT OUR "PARTY ROOM'" 

Open Friday and Saturday Nights 



THE FOUNTAIN HOUSE 

Quality Food 
GEORGE SLOTTER, Manager 



Compliments of the 

Agricultural Chapter 

N.A.C. ALUMNI 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



KERSHNER'S PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph.G. 

Fellow of the American College 
of Apothecaries 

Phone 4666 



Phone 4922 

DOYLESTOWN DRUG CO. 



Main and Court Sts. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Your CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH Dealer 

FOSTER MOTORS 

235 S. Main Sf. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 9494-5 


DODGE PLYMOUTH 

THE FORWARD LOOK FOR 1956 

Dodge Job-Rated Trucks 

W. H. WATSON & SON 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Phone 4355 


HAYMAN-RADCLIFF 
MOTOR CO. 

Chevrolet Sales and Service 


Everything for the Farm 

m 

NEW HOLLAND MACHINES 

DOYLESTOWN 
AGRICULTURAL COMPANY 

Phone 9441 Doylestown, Pa. 


^1^ 


/ij'ifiBiif/ 


State and Main Streets 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


DOYLESTOWN TAILORING 
CO. 

Formal Wear 

Tuxedo — Full Dress — White Coat 
Cutav/ay — Stroller 
for All Occasions 

30 E. State St. 

Phone 5261 DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


DOYLESTOWN 
SELF-SERVICE LAUNDRY 

191 S. Clinton St. 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 


ARTS MEN'S SHOP 

5 South Main Street 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 


ROGER KRAUT 

Jeweler 
29-31 West State St. 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



THE COUNTY THEATER 




DOYLESTOWN 
TRUST COMPANY 

MEMBER OF F. D. 1. C. 



HISTAND BROTHERS 

Roofing Contractors 
DOYLESTOWN 4121 



Doylestown 3189 

YOUNG & BOWMAN 

Plumbing and Heating 
Contractors 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Court and W. State St. 



41 E. State St. 




at 

LEATHERMAN & GODSHALL 



Doylestown 3209 

DOYLESTOWN 
CYCLE & SPORT SHOP 

Equipment For All Sports 

RALEIGH & SCHWINN BICYCLES 

Sales and Service 

Bert E. Smith 15 W. Oakland Ave. 



? 



MADDOX 
PHOTO STUDIO 

candid and formal 

wedding portraits 

children's portraits 

51 E. STATE ST., DOYLESTOWN 




Classical 

Popular 

Children's 

RECORDS 



PEARLMAN'S 



34 S. MAIN ST. 



DO-4654 



Complimen+s 
of fhe 

CLASS OF '57 


Compliments 
of fhe 

CLASS OF '58 


Compliments 
of the 

CLASS OF '59 


Compliments 
of the 

POULTRY SOCIETY 


Compliments 

of the 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 


Compliments 
of the 

DAIRY SOCIETY 


Patronize 
The Student Council 

CANTEEN 

Pennants — Sweat Shir+s — T-Shirts 
COMPLETE SUPPLIES 


CHAMPION KNITWEAR 

Rochester, N. Y. 





ROBERT S. HORN, JR. 


Look To 




AMBURGO 


Nurseryman 
R. D. No. 1 


For A Complete Program 


Doylestown, Pa. 


Servicing Feed Manufacturers 






AZALEAS— PIERIS 


VITAMINS— MINERALS 






RHODODENDRONS 


BIOLOGICALS 






Specimen Evergreens, Liners 


THE AMBURGO CO.. INC. 






and Holly 


1315-17 Walnut St. 




PHILADELPHIA 7. PA. 


PHONE DOYLESTOWN 4879 


PROFESSIONAL PATRONS 


WEISBARD'S DRUG STORE 


MILTON RUTHERFORD 


HALIN'S DRUG STORE 


J. FRATER ELECTRIC 


CHARLIES BARBER SHOP 


CREGER MOTOR LINES 


NELSON'S BARBER SHOP 


BAIR'S ESTATE SERVICE 


SANDY RIDGE FLOWER SHOP 


HOLIDAY LIQUORS 


GARDY'S STATIONERY 


MUTUAL COAT CLEANING 


ELY'S CLOTHIERS 


FERRARI SHEARING CO. 


KENNY'S NEWS AGENCY 


PAN AMERICA FUR CO. 


HIRT'S PASTRY SHOP 


GORDON MOTORS 


BARGER'S CHICKEN SHOPPE 


U. S. RABBIT DRESSING CORP. 


THE WOOLEN SHOP 


ACE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 


HELKER'S ESSO SERVICE 


SUN VALLEY POULTRY FARM, INC. 


HOCK'S FOOD MARKET 


BRISTOL FORD, INC. 


STAN BOWERS 


DOYLESTOWN LAUNDRY 


CARR'S FURNITURE STORE 


ABBOTTS DAIRIES, INC. 


HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 


A FRIEND 


DON SANDS SHOE STORE 


A FRIEND 


J. J.CONROY, INC. 





FRIENDS 


FRED H. WEIGLE 


MR. AND MRS. L. E. GORMLY 


BOOKER STERN '08 


MR. AND MRS. H. BYRNE 


BENJAMIN GOLDBERG 'II 


MR. AND MRS. M. SAMLER 


WALTER F. LONG 


MR. AND MRS. J. HERTZ 


ROBERT A. MARKLEY 


MR. AND MRS. D. HERTZ 


DAVID BLUMENFIELD 


"BABY" HERTZ 


MR. & MRS. ARTHUR FOLEY 


THE HILLER FAMILY 


EDWARD B. VANSANT, JR. 


JOHN FISH & SON 


THE N.A.C. BAND 


MISS S. WALLMAN 


THE RESEARCH LABORATORY 


MISS L WALLMAN 


MR. AND MRS. G. J. GEILS 


MISS N. M. BYRNE 


MR. AND MRS. J. T. CARPENTER, SR. 


MISS R. SINGER 


MR. AND MRS. D. ROSS 


MISS M. RICHTER 


MR. AND MRS. F. E. SMITH 


MR. S. G. WALLACE 


MR. AND MRS. A. E. FROST 


THE MONTANAS 


MR. AND MRS. W. GORDON 


MR. M. FRACKVILLE 


MR. AND MRS. W. RICHTER 


MR. T. ZAMBUREK 


MRS. E. B. TRAINER 


MARY M. SHIELDS 


MR. AND MRS. S. J. POTTER 


THEODORE BYRNE 


MR. AND MRS. R. 1. MANN 


ANONYMOUS— RADNOR. PA. 


MR. AND MRS. W. GROSSKURTH 


ANONYMOUS— BALA CYNWYD. PA. 


MR. AND MRS. B. BERNSTEIN 


ANONYMOUS— BRYN MAWR, PA. 


DR. AND MRS. J. T. CARPENTER, JR. 


ANONYMOUS— WYNNEWOOD, PA. 


MR. AND MRS. C. Y. CLEMENT 


ALAN R. SMITH 


MRS. GEORGE B. CLOTHIER 


JEANNIE AND RONNIE 


MR. AND MRS. PERITT 


CAROLE AND WALT 


MR. AND MRS. ZILBUR 


POLLY AND GENE 


MR. AND MRS. ZUCKERBERG 


DAVIDA AND RICHIE 


MR. AND MRS. L. EISEN 


MARIANN AND ROLAND 


MR. AND MRS. J. WALLMAN 


ROBERT BARGE 


MR. AND MRS. D. WALLMAN 






LITHOGRAPHED BY 

LOR PUBLISHING CO. 

DALLAS • TEXAS 
Besi Yearbooks ore TAYLOR-MADE