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Full text of "Cornucopia 1960"

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FOREWORD 
To be a true mirror for the reflection 
of the student life and activity of N.A.C.; 
to be a book of pleasant recollections# 
one of which will be a permanent 
remembrance of the spirit of good 
fellowship pervading our school; io 
remind us of the privilege we 
had to obtain a college education: 
such has been the purpose of the 
staff in publishing the 1960 Cornucopia. 



Co-Editors: Anthony Fritchey, Lorenzo Fon- 

seca M. 

Business Manager: Alvin Silverman. 



presents 



.h 



en . . . 



Nationa 

Agricultura 

College 




I contents 



Foreword 


1 


Contents 


2 


Dedication 


4 


Administration 


6 


Buildings 


8 


Faculty 


10 


Seniors 


18 


Class History 


47 


Underclassmen 


51 


Majors 


54 


Sports 


70 


Activities 


86 


Advertisements 


104 




...and now 



Cornucopia 



■"flPHBf^ ^\ 




This is a bird's-eye view of the main campus and 
center of all activities of the new Delaware Valley 
College of Agriculture and Science. 



Delaware Valley College 



we 



dedicate 



DR. WEBSTER, because you have a constant abiding 
interest in every student and strive selflessly to give him 
what you know is best; Enrich us because of your vast 
experience and abounding knowledge; Inspire countless 
numbers of students because you have pinnacled your 
character; because your teaching is centered around love — 
love for learning, love for fellow humans and love for agricul- 
ture; because you showed indomitable energy in all that you 
do; do everything honestly, fairly and justly. Because while 
you are humble; it is with deep and sincere admiration and 
gratitude that we give you in dedication this book. 





^ 






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sident 



TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1960: 

You have reached the end of an educational process 
that began four years ago when you entered National 
Agricultural College. Throughout these four years your 
education, in every way the word implies, was uppermost 
in the minds of the Administration and Faculty. 

Now that you are to be numbered among our Alumni, 
you will be no less close to us than you were as students. It 
is our sincere hope that success and happiness will follow 
you wherever you go, and that through you the College will 
gain in stature. 

I extend to you my personal congratulations. 

Sincerely yours. 




O*^' 



DONALD M. MEYER 
Dean of Students 



A man whose guidance and perseverance, 
in all matters concerning us, has meant 
increased knowledge and understanding 
for everyone in their stay at N.A.C. 





OSKAR H. LARSSON 
Assistant Dean of Students 



Whether problems were primary or secon- 
dary, Mr. Larsson has always been ready 
with a solution for anyone's troubles; one 
which would be sure to aid us in our 
future trials that lay ahead. 




eans 




Segal Hall, the hall of learning, 
where most lectures and laborato- 
ries originate. 



on 



Junior and Senior Dormitories, where cards, 
sleep, study, and relaxation are the order 
and one can indulge in these as they meet 
his lancy. 



campus 





Horticultural Building, hor- 
ticulture and all its prob- 
lems are solved here. 



Greenhouse Department, 
Ornamental Horticulture 
and its students keep the 
school in flowers. 



Lasker Hall, where three times a day everyone 
sits, talks, and eats in an atmosphere of shouts 
and waiters. 



Faculty House, the buildings of offices for profes- . . 

sors and President and from which all decisions 
comcerning the college are heard. 








I 

1 


1 




1 

1 




« r W: »■ ,,, 


■^- 


4 


'^_^J^ 



Ida M. Block Memorial 
Chapel, the quiet building 
that serves as a place oi 
worship for all at any time. 

New Dormitories, the site 
of much activity as the 
college expands and 
makes ready for more stu- 
dents. 



faculty 




BOWEN, PAUL R. 
A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Proiessor of Biology 



h^M 




BROWN, ARTHUR 

B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of 

Dairy Husbandry 



CAVAN, DREW 
B.S., C.P.A. 
Instructor in Accounting 




CROSBIE, RICHARD I. 
B.S., M.S. 
Instructor of Physics 



BUCHER, JONAS W. 
B.S.. M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Literature 



CARNEY, RICHARD 

B.S. 

Assistant Football Coach 




CHIODI, ROBERT D. 
B.S. 

Head Coach of Football 
Head Coach of Basketball 
Head Coach of Baseball 



CONOVER, CHARLES C. 

B.S. 

Senior Bacteriologist 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry 



1960 






1960 



ELSON, lESSE 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 



3^ •^• 



t\ 




FELDSTEIN, JOSHUA 

B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture 



FORBES, REGINALD D. 
B.A., M.A., US. 
Associate Professor of English 



FERDO, STEVEN 

B.S., M.S. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

(Chairman of Department) 

Asst. Football Coach 



FESSENDEN, EMMA (MISS) 
B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Physics 




FRASER, BYRON W. 
BS. 
Assistant Professor of Food Industry 





FULCOLY, JOSEPH E. 

B.S. 
Assistant Professor of 

Poultry Husbandry 

Asst. Football Coach 

(also Asst. Dean) 




/C 



•\ 




KENDELL, LOUIS 

Lt. Col. ret. 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry 




UNTA, NATHANIEL A. 

B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of 

Health and Physical Education 





% 



A 



CLICK JR., PETER 

B.A.. B.S.. M.Ed. 

Associate Professor of 

Political Sciences 





HOLLORAN, FRANK 

B.S. 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry 



HOPKINS, HARRY 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry 




KNORR, RUSSEU 

B.S. 

Instructor in Agronomy 



LEIBOVITZ. LOUIS 

B.S., V.M.D. 

Professor of Poultry Pathology 



Fa 



culty 



faculty 




MILLER, DANIEL 
Business Manager 



MOONEY, JOHN 
B.S. 
Instructor in Mathematics 



PELLE. TIBOR 
M.S., Dr. Agr. 
Professor of Animal Husbandry 



POPHAM, lAMES H. 
B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 




McGURK, CHARLES F. 

B.S. 

Director of Public Relations 

Asst. Prof, of English 





O'REILLY, JAMES A. 
BJV., B.S., M.A. 
Instructor in Art 



PRUNDEANU, EDITH N. 
Instructor in German 




PRUNDEANU, JUUAN 
M.S., Ph.D. 
Associate Prolesor of Agronomy 



RELLIS, ABRAHAM 
Instructor in Floriculture 




SCHMIEDER, HENRY 
B.S., M.S. 
Proiessor of Chemistry 



RAUGHT, CHESTER 
Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 



REESE, ARTHUR 

B.A., M.Ed. 

Instructor in History 




RANSOM, VICTOR 

B.S. 

Special Instructor in 

Ornamental Horticulture 



ROBINSON, GEORGE W. 
Comptroller - Assistant Treasurer 



I960 










TURNER, GEORGE 
B.S.. M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Food Industry 



WEBSTER, GEORGE E. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of 

Agricultural Engineering 







Mrs. Muriel Allen. Mrs. Esther Snyder and Mrs. Jean 
Carmint keep things buzzing in the Dean's Office. 



V 



OFFICE 




Mrs. E. F. Rogers, Purchasing Agent: Mrs. 
M. Moore. Telephone Operator-Receptionist: 
and Mrs. C. McHugh. Post Mistress. 




Accounting Staff — Miss E. Hellyer, Stenographer; 
George Robinson, Comptroller: Mrs. E. Brucker. and 
Clyde Thomas, Bookkeepers. 



Mrs. Elizabeth Potts, R.N.. College Nurse. 



STAFF 






i 



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The most impressive and stately build- 
ing on campus, Ulman Hall, strikes 
the eye at the moment of arrival, and 
one is often heard to remark about 
the rows of flowering dogwoods and 
surrounding hedge. 




mors 




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s^ n I o r s 





i 




, • >.,*«•? « 




Edward Stickel — President 
William George — Vice President 
Donald Gregg — Treasurer 
Joseph Siakowsld — Secretary 



Thank you. Dr. Webster, for giving so freely 
of your time to direct and advise us in our 
needs. Your understanding and helpfulness 
will alvyays be remembered. 



DAVID T. AEMSWORTH 

Dairy Husbandry 

Haddon Heights, New Jersey 

David Thomas Ainsworth, 211 First Avenue, Had- 
don Heights, New Jersey; (Nickname) Ainsie; Dairy 
Society 1,2,3,4, Secretary 2, President 3,4; Dairy Judging 
Team 2,3; A-Day, Grand Champion Dairy Showman 1; 
A-Day Committee, Co-chairman 3, Chairman 4; Intra- 
mural Sports, Football 2, Volleyball 4. 





1960 




RONALD C. BAUMAN 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Gilbertsville, Pennsylvania 

Ronald Clark Bauman, 1251 E. Philadelphia Avenue, 
Gilbertsville, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Ron; Ornamen- 
tal Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 3,4; Furrow 
1,2,3, Distribution Stafi 2; Gleaner 2,3, Distribution Staff 
3; A-Day, Ornamental Horticultural Grand Champion 2; 
Ornamental Christmas Float Committee 3,4; Class Dance 
Committee 2,3; Cornucopia Staff 1960. 





JOSEPH P. BITTMAN 

Dairy Husbandry 

Nutley, New Jersey 

Joseph Peter Bittman, 85 Glendale Street, Nutley, 
New Jersey; (Nickname) Joe; Dairy Society 1,2,3,4, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer 3, Vice President 4; Dairy Judging Team 
2,3. 




CARL R. BLATT 

Agronomy 

Chatham, New Jersey 

Carl Roger Blatt, 276 Hillside Avenue, Chatham, 
New Jersey; (Nickname) Roj; Agronomy Club 1,2,3,4, 
Sec.-treas. 3, Pres. 4; Band L2,3,4, Sec-treas. 3, Pres. 4; 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4, sec-treas. 3, Pres. 4; A-Day Committee, 
Co-chairman 3, Program Editor 3, Treasurer 4; Baseball 
1,2; Intramural Sports, Football 1,2,3,4, Baseball 3,4, Bas- 
ketball 3,4, Bowling 4; Comocupia, 1960. 



DAVID BOGAISKY 

Agronomy 
Brooklyn, New York 

David Bogaisky, 7901 Bay Parkway, Brooklyn 14, 
New York; (Nickname) Bogie, Agronomy Club 1,2,3,4; 
Contemporary Club 1,2; Animal Husbandry Club 1; 
Gleaner 1, 





1960 




GARY B. CHARLICK 

Food Industry 

Huntingdon Valley, Permsylvania 

Gary Bud Charlick, 2235 Terwood Road, Hunting- 
don Valley, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Bud; Food Indus- 
try Club 1,2,3,4; Contemporary Club 1,2,3,4, President 
3,4; Bond 1,2,3,4, Vice President 4; Gleaner 3,4; Table 
Tennis 3,4; Intramural Sports, Bowling, Volleyball 4; 
Cornucopia, 1960. 




HAROLD DEITRICH 

Animal Husbandry 

Horsham, Pennsylvania 

Harold Deitrich, Easton Road, Horsham, Pennsyl- 
vania; (Nickname) Zeke; Animal Husbandry Club 1,2,3,4; 
Animal Husbandry Judging Team 3,4; Dairy Society 
1,2,3. 






ALBERT G. EDLING 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Albert George Edlmg, 212 Wendover Street, Phila- 
delphia 28, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Al, Ornamental 
Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 1,2,3,4, Presi- 
dent 4; Football 1,2; Intramural Sports, Football 1,2,3,4, 
Softball 1,2,4, Volleyball 4, Bowling 4, Intramural Com- 
mittee; Dance Committee 3,4; A-Day Committee 3,4; 
Class Dance Committee 2; Cornucopia, 19G0. 






ROBERT W. EVERETT 

Dairy Husbandry 
Somerville, New Jersey 

Robert Wesley Everett, 21 Young Street, Somer- 
ville, New Jersey; (Nickname) Ev; Animal Husbandry 
Club 2,3; Horticultural Society 2; Basketball 1; Intramural 
Sports, Football 1,2,3, Baseball 1,2,3, Basketball 2,3. 



sen I ors 




1960 



JOSEPH I. EXLEY 

Animal Husbandry 

Lansdale, Pennsylvania 

Joseph Jean Exley, 718 West 4th Street, Lonsdale, 
Pennsylvania; Animal Husbandry Club 1,2,3,4, Sec-treas. 
3, President 4; Varsity Club 1,2,3,4; Football 1,2,3; Intra- 
mural Sports, Basketball 1,2,3, Baseball 1,2,3; Animal 
Husbandry Judging Team 2,3,4, Student Council 3,4, 
Treasurer 3. 





JOHN T. FEISTHAMEL 
Animal Husbandry 
Sauquoit, New York 

John Thomas Feisthamel, 120 Paris Hill Rood, 
Sauquoit, New York, (Nickname) Tom; Transfer student 
1958; Animal Husbandry Club, 3,4; Animal Husbandry 
Judging Team 4, Band 3, Glee Club 3; Intramural Sports, 
Softball 3,4. 





LORENZO FONSECA M. 
Animal Husbandry 
Bogota, Colombia 

Lorenzo Fonseca Martinez, Carrera 15 # 56-50, 
Bogota, Colombia, S. A.; (Nickname) Lorenz; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1,2,3,4; Animal Husbandry Judging Team 
4; Agronomy Club 2; Contemporary Club 1,2, Secretary 
2; Student Council 1; A-Day Committee 2; Furrow 1,2,3,4, 
Co-editor 3; Gleaner 2,3, Co-editor 3; Cornucopia, 1960, 
Co-editor. 



JAMES E. FOYLE 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Philadelphia, Permsylvania 

James Earnshaw Foyle, 456 Wigard Avenue, 
Philadelphia 28, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Jim, Dairy 
Society 1,2,; Ornamental Horticultural Society 3,4; Intra- 
mural Sports, Football 3,4, Volleyball 4. 




X^^a^r^^i^^^ 





1960 




ANTHONY L. FRITCHEY 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Northampton, Pennsylvania 

Anthony Leo Fritchey, 1825 Main Street, North- 
ampton, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Tony; Ornamental 
Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4; Christmas Float Committee 
3,4; A-Day 1,2, Ornamental Hort. Grand Champion 2; 
Contemporary Club 1,2, Activities Chairman 2; Class 
Dance Committee 2,3; Furrow 1,2,3,4, Make-up Editor 
1,2,4, Co-editor 3; Gleaner 2,3, Co-editor 3; Cornucopia, 
1960. Co-editor. 




WILLIAM L. GEORGE U 

Horticulture 

Beverly. New Jersey 

William Leo George, 502 Laurel Street, Beverly, 
New Jersey; Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 3, 
Secretary-treasurer 4; Varsity Club 3,4; Baseball 2,3,4; 
Intramural Sports, Football 1,2,3, Softball 1; Apple Judg- 
ing Team 3,4; A-Doy Committee 2,3; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 2,3,4. 






ROBERT B. GORDON 

Ornamental Horticulture 
Clilton, New Jersey 

Robert Bruce Gordon, 157 Luddington Ave., Clif- 
ton, New Jersey; (Nickname) Bob; Ornamental Horticul- 
tural Society 1,2,3,4; A-Day 1,2,3,4, Ornamental Horticul- 
tural Grand Champion 2. 






DONALD R. GREGG 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Yorklyn, DeloTvore 

Donald Richard Gregg, Yorklyn, Delaware; (Nick- 
name) Don; Ornamental Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4, 
Vice President 3,4, Christmas Float Committee 3,4; Ani- 
mal Husbandry Club 2; Band 2,3,4, Sec-treas. 4; Class 
Treasurer 2,3,4; Class Dance Committee 2,3,4; Gleaner 
3; Intramural Sports, Football 2,3,4, Volleyball 4; A-Day 
1,2,3, Ornamental Horticultural Grand Championship 2; 
Plant Stand Co-chairman 3; Cornucopia, 1960, Photog- 
raphy Editor. 



sen I ors 




1960 



GEORGE I. HALPERN 

Horticulture 
Jersey City, New Jersey 

George Joseph Halpern, 3352 Boulevard, Jersey 
City, New Jersey; Horticultural Club 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 
1,2,3; Contemporary Club, Secretary 1; Intramural Sports, 
Ornamental Horticulture Grand Champion 2; Gleaner 
A-Day 1,2,3, A-Day Chairman Horticultural Society 3; 
Basketball 4, Softball 4, Badminton 4, Volleyball 4; 
3,4, Typing Editor 4; Furow 2,3,4. 





THOMAS W. HERR 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Devon, Pennsylvania 

Thomas William Herr, 418 Newtown Road, Devon, 
Penna.; (Nickname) Guano; Ornamental Horticultural 
Society 2,3,4; Intramural Sports, Football 1,4; Volleyball 
4; A-Day 2,3. 





LEONARD S. HILSEN 

Food Industry 

Nutley, New Jersey 

Leonard Solomon Hilsen, 4 Corsay Road, Nutley, 
New Jersey; (Nickname) Lenny; Food Industry Club 
1,2,3,4; Animal Husbandry 1; Contemporary Club 1,2,3; 
Glee Club I; Furrow 4; Intramural Sports, Volleyball 4, 
Bowling 4, Football 3, Baseball 2,3, Basketball 2,3,4; 
Member of Metropolitan Dairy Technology Society. 



JOHN L. HOLCOMBE 

Animal Husbandry 

Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania 

John Leroy Holcombe, 1054 Huntingdon Pike, 
Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania, (Nickname) Roy; Ani- 
mal Husbandry Club 1,2,3,4, Contemporary Club 1; 
Gleaner 3,4, Typing Editor 3; Furrow 3,4, Typing Editor 
3,4; A-Day 1,2,3,4. Cornucopia 1960. 





1960 




DAVID L. KANTNER 

Animal Husbandry 

Reading, Pennsylvania 

David Lee Kantner, R.D. #1, Reading, Pennsyl- 
vania; (Nickname) Kinky; Animal Husbandry Club 1,2, 
3,4; Animal Husbandry Judging Team 3,4; Student 
Herdsman 2,3,4; Band 1,2; Glee Club 1; Gleaner 2,3; 
A-Day 1,2,3,4, Animal Husbandry Represeritative 4, 
Champion Sheep-Showman 1,2,3, Reserve Grand Cham- 
pion Livestock-Showman 1,2; Student Store 3,4. 




WILLIAM K. KENNEDY 

Dairy Husbandry 

Elliottsburg, Pennsylvania 

William Karl Kennedy, Elliottsburg, Pennsylvania; 
(Nickname) Bill, Dairy Society 1,2,3,4; Football 2,3; Intra- 
mural Sports Football 4, Volleyball, 4, Bowling 4, Bas- 
ketball 2,3, Softball 1,2,3; A-Day 1,2,3. 






ROBERT H. KERBY 

Horticuture 
Oxon HilL Maryland 

Robert Henry Kerby, 7095 Indian Head Hwy; 
Oxon Hill, Maryland; (Nickname) Rebel; Horticultural 
Club 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 4; Football 3; Manager 2,3,4, 
Baseball 2,3,4, Basketball 4, Football 4; Intramural 
Sports, Football 1,2; Apple Judging Team 3; A-Day 1,2,3. 






JAMES R. KOENIG 
Ornamental Horticulture 
Hockensack New Jersey 

James Ross Koenig, 227 Forest Avenue, Hocken- 
sack, New Jersey; (Nickname) Whitey; Ornamental tior- 
ticultural Society 1,2,3,4; Animal Husbandry Club 1; 
Varsity Club 1,2,3,4; Football 2,4; Intramural Council 4; 
A-Day 1,2,3, 1st Prize Ornamental Horticulture 3. 



sen I ors 




1960 



THOMAS M. KOES 

Animal Husbandry 

Duryea, Pennsylvania 

TJiomas Michael Koes, 617 Hooven Street, Duryea, 
Pennsylvania; (Nickname) T.K,; Animal Husbandry Club 
2,3,4; Dairy Society 1,2; Football 1,2; Intramural Sports, 
Softball 1; Student Council 1; Class President 1; A-Day 
1,2. 





RONALD L. UGGETT 

. .Agronomy 

Florham Park, New Jersey 

Ronald Louis Liggett, 119 Cathedral Avenue, Flor- 
ham Park, New Jersey; (Nickname) Ron, Agronomy Club 
1,2,3,4; Vice President 3; Basketball 1; Intramural Sports, 
Bowling 4, Volleyball 4, Basketball 4; Student Council 4. 






DAVID L. LINDE 

Horticulture 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

David Lars Linde, R.D, =;3, Bethlehem, Pennsyl- 
vania; (Nickname) Dave; Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4; 
Varsity Club 2,3,4, Secretary 3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; 
Intramural Sports, Softball 1,2,3,4; Horticultural Judging 
Team 3. 



JAMES R. LUMA 

Dairy Husbandry 

Quakertown, Pennsylvania 

James Raymond Luma, 32 Front Street, Quaker- 
town, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Jim; Dairy Society 
1.2,3,4. 





1960 




AUGUSTIN J. MAKOWSKI 

Agronomy 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Augustin John Mokov/ski, 2041 East Susquehanna 
Avenue, Philadelphia 25, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) 
Gus; Glee Club 4; Agronomy Club 1,2,3,4; Intramural 
Sports, Football 1,2,3,4, Softball 1,2. 




EMORY I. MARKOVIC 

Food Industry 

Mount Ephraim, New Jersey 

Emory Joseph Markovic, 138 Fourth Avenue, 
Mount Ephrcdm, New Jersey; (Nickname) Em; Food In- 
dustry Club 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 2,3, Vice-President 4; Stu- 
dent Council 3,4; Assistant Intramural Director 4; Varsity 
Club 1,2,3,4, Vice President 3; Football 1,2,3,4, Captain 
4, UP, AP All State Honorable Mention 3; Baseball 1,2, 
3,4, Captain 3,4, Most Valuable Player Award 1,2,4, 
President's Trophy 4, Best Back Award 4; Basketball 3,4; 
Cornucopia 1960. 






FRANKLIN P. McCONNELL 

Animal Husbandry 

Marlton, New Jersey 

Franklin Pearce McConnell, Elmwood Road, Marl- 
ton, New Jersey; (Nickname) Frank; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1,2,3,4; Animal Husbandry Judging Team 4; A-Day 
1,2,3, Animal Husbandry Grand Champion Showman 1,2. 






EVERETT Y. MENKENS 
Ornamental Horticulture 
Doylestovai, Pennsylvania 
Everett Young Menkens, Colonial Trailer Park, 
Doylestown, Pennsylvania, or 1586 Porter Road, Union, 
New Jersey; (Nickname) Ev; Ornamental Horticulture 
Club 1,2,3,4; Animal Husbandry Club 1,2,3; Dairy Qub 
1; Gleaner 4; Football 1; Track 3,4; Intramural Sports, 
Football 2,3; A-Day 1,2,3; Ornamental Horticulture Christ- 
mas Float Committee 3. 



sen I ors 



1960 




RICHARD J. NORTON 

Dairy Husbandry 

Phillipsburg, New Jersey 

Richard John Norton, Hensfoot Road R.D. #1, 
Phillipsburg, New Jersey; (Nickname) Rich; Dairy Club 
1,2,3,4; Intercollegiate Dairy Judging Team 3,4; Band 
1,2,4; Glee Club 1,2,4; A-Day Dairy Club Representative 
3,4; Intramural Sports Volleyball 4, Bowling 4. 





EDWARD D. PLOTKA 

Animal Husbandry 

Utica, New York 

Edward D. Plotka, 1016 Brikerhoff Avenue, Utica, 
York; (Nickname) Smiling Ed; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1,2,3,4; Photography Club 2,3,4, Vice President 3,4; 
Table Tennis 3,4; Band 1,4. 



U 





FRANKLIN M. RADICAN 

Food Industry 

Palisades Park, New Jersey 

Franklin Mark Radican, 59 East Palisades Boule- 
vard, Palisades Park, New Jersey; (Nickname) Frank; 
Food Industry Club 1,2,3,4; Student Council Secretary 4; 
Varsity Club 1,2,3,4; Football 1,2,3,4; Track 3,4, Captain 
4; Intramural Sports, Basketball 1,2,3,4, Softball 1,2,3,4, 
Bowling 4, Intramural Council 4; Class Dance Commit- 
tee 1,2,3; A-Day 1,2,3,4, A-Doy Committee 3, Food Indus- 
try Grand Champion 3; Cornucopia, 1960. 



CHARLES C REMSEN HI 

Food Industry 
New Vernon, New Jersey 

Charles Cornell Remscn 111, Millbrook Road, New 
Vernon, New Jersey; (Nickname) Tony; Food Industry 
Club 1,2,3,4; Contemporary 1,2,3,4, Secretary 3,4; Table 
Tennis 1,2,3,4, Captain 3,4; Intramural Sports, Football 3, 
Bowling 4, Volleyball 4, Basketball 3,4; Cornucopia 1960. 






1960 



BARRY F. RUMBERGER 

Animal Husbandry 
Bethlehem, Peimsylvania 

Barry Ford Rumberger, 1947 Eaton Avenue, Beth- 
lehem, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Bleu; Animal Husban- 
dry Ciub 2,4; Student Council 2. 




WILLIAM E. SHULL 

Dairy Husbandry 

Newtown, Pennsylvania 

William Ernest Shull, Creamery Road, Newtown, 
Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Bill; Dairy Society 1,2,3,4; 
Varsity Club 2,3,4; Baseball 2,3,4; Football 2,3; Intra- 
mural Sports, Softball 1, Football 1,4, Basketball 2,3; 
Class Dance Committee 1,4. 






JOSEPH W. SIATKOWSKI 

Ornamental Horticulture 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Joseph Walter Siatowski, 7418 Rockwell Avenue, 
Philadelphia 11, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) loe. Si; Or- 
namental Horticultural Society 1,2,3,4, President 3,4; 
Class Secretary 1,2,3,4; Baseball 1,2; Football 1,2; Intra- 
mural Sports, Softball 1,2; Football 1.2,3, Volleyball 4; 
A-Doy 1,2,3; Cornucopia 1960 Advertising Layout Editor. 





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ALVIN R. SILVERMAN 

Food Industry 

Merchantville, New Jersey 

Alvin Robert Silverman, 117 Garfield Avenue, 
Merchantville, New Jersey; (Nickname) Al; Food Indus- 
try Club 1,2,3,4, Vice President 3; Student Council 2; 
Varsity Club 2,3,4; Basketball 1; Football 2,3; Class 
Dance Committee 2; Intramural Sports, Football 1, Vol- 
leyball 4, Softball 1,4, Basketball 2,3,4; Cornucopia 1960 
Business Manager. 



sen I ors 




1960 



ANDREW J. SNOPE 

Horticulture 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

Andrewr John Snope, 46 N, Church Street Doyles- 
town, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Jack; Horticultural So- 
ciety 2,3,4; Transfer Student 1957; Furrow 3; Gleaner 3; 
Intramural Sports, Softball 2; Fruit Judging Team 3,4; 
A-Day 2,3; Cornucopia 1960 Literary Editor. 




PHILUP G. STAUDT 

Dairy Husbandry 

Wernersville, Pennsylvania 

Phillip Gehart Staudt, 127 S. Walnut Street, Wer- 
nersville, Pennsylvania; (Nickname) Staudty; Dairy So- 
ciety 1,2,3,4; Student Council 3; Band 1,2,3; Varsity Club 
3,4; Dance Committee 3; Basketball 2,3; Baseball 2,3,4; 
Intramural Sports, Softball 1, Basketball 4; Volleyball 4; 
A-Day 1,2,3. 




EDWARD R. STICKEL U 

Horticulture 

Delanco, New Jersey 

Edward Roger Stickel II, 211 Edgewood Avenue, 
Delanco, New Jersey; (nickname) Stick; Horticultural So- 
ciety 3, 4; Student Council President 4; Class President 
2, 3, 4; Varsity Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3, 4; Football 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Fruit 
Judging Team 3; A-Day 1, 2, 3; A-Day Committee 3; 
Cornucopia 1960. 



HARRY STONER 

Agronomy 

Camp Hill, Pernisylvania 

Harry Herbert Stoner, 1814 High Street, Camp 
Hill, Pennsylvania; (nickname) Hoib; Agronomy dub 
1,2,3,4; Class Vice President 1,2; Student Council 1,2; 
Animal Husbandry Club 1,2,3; Intramural Sports Foot- 
ball 1,2,3,4, Baseball 1,2,3,4, Basketball 1,2,3,4, Volley- 
ball 4, Bowling 4. 



^..^ 1 



%_ * 






1960 



NEIL J. TRACER 

Food Industry 

New York City, New York 

Neil Jay Trager, 625 East 14th Street, New York 9, 
New York; (nickname) The Wheel; Food Industry Club 
1,2,3,4; Treasurer 4; Table Tennis 3,4; Intramural Sports 
Softball 2,3,4, Football 1,3, Basketball 2,4, Volleyball 4, 
Bowling 4; A-Day 2,3,4; Grand Champion Food Industry 
3. 




DAVID A. WISE 
Dairy Husbandry 
Havertown, Pennsylvania 
David A. Wise, 14 Decatur Road, Havertown, 
Pennsylvania; Dairy Society 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; 
Baseball 2,3,4; Intramural Sports Basketball 2,3,4; Foot- 
ball 1,2, Bowling 4, Volleyball 4; A-Day 1,2,3. 





ALMA MATER 



By the winding banks of Neshaminy, 
Stands our Alma Mater dear. 
We look o'er your fields we love. 
Cherished year by year. 
All hail your colors. Green and Gold 
As they proudly wave on high. 
Treasured mem'ries fond and true 
In our hearts will lie. 



With your inspiration great. 
Ever forward we will go. 
Fearless of the tasks ahead. 
Conquering each foe. 
To you our College let us sing. 
Praises of your honored name. 
Curage, strength and unity 
Courage, strength and unity 
Build an endless fame. 




^m- 



■^ 



CLASS HISTORY 



Here we are sitting in front of the Big Green 
Platform, all our friends and relatives are seated 
behind us. We look around us and see our fellow 
classmates gathered together for probably the 
last time. In front of us Dean Meyer is reading off 
the list of graduates and one by one, each man 
"walks forward to receive his diploma, that simple 
sheet of paper for which he has labored four years. 

As we sit here waiting for our name to be called, 
our minds wander and we remember that very 
first day . . . 

It all started on September 18, 1956, most of us 
were freshly out of high school and looking for- 



ward to college life. We arrived on campus, 
glanced around, registered and took our luggage 
to the room that had been assigned to us. How 
small that room looked, but we soon became ex- 
perts at the art of using every available inch of 
space. 

Then that first week, with everyone rising bright 
and early for breakfast (this was to become a 
chore as the years progressed), all those placement 
tests, the trips around campus to acquaint our- 
selves with the college facilities, the talks given 
by the various professors and finally settling down 
and meeting our fellow classmates. 




th 



^^ 



e class o 



f 



When the second week started, somehow we 
sensed something was foul when we saw those 
'ever popular' sophomores. All they wanted to do 
was to help us become acquainted with the rules 
and regulations of the college. We did feel, how- 
ever, that they might have been a little more diplo- 
matic in their ways. Remember those little dinky 
hats . . . the wood pile (20x20 feet by homecoming) 
. . . "whose turn to drive the tractor" . . . "C'mon 
freshman, let's hear you quack" . . "Let's see 
you rip up that sign" . . . the pile . . . and Ginkgo 
Lane where we soon learned that it was indeed 
terrible to step on that helpless Ginkgo Berry. 

Finally the big day came — the annual rope 
pull between the freshmen and the sophomores. 
If we won, hazing would be over . . . however, if 
we lost, we would have to face another week under 
the merciless clutches of the sophomores. Of 
course you know the result, we never did find out 
what caused our side to be muddy and theirs to 
be nice and dry. 

However, hazing soon ended and we settled 
down to a somewhat normal life. Now was the 
time to become acquainted with the upper class- 
men. The bull sessions, with topics ranging from 
sex to politics and religion, going on at all times 



both night and day. 

How our class was organized that first year! 
Tell us, fellows, who really won that beer bottle 
throwing contest? One of life's little lessons. Re- 
member the big water fight in Ullman Hall against 
the sophomores; the water was cascading down 
the stairs like a water fall, I'm sure Mr, G. really 
appreciated our little sessions. Third floor Ullman 
Hall — remember those Ginkgo berries in your 
bed, George? . . . those shaving cream fights . . . 
the night Mr. G. cleared the dorm because of ex- 
cessive noise; what happened that night, Lenny?, 
you should remember it well . . . and of course 
there were those who found sleeping on bed 
springs far more comfortable than mattresses . . . 
Second floor Ullman Hall — We hear this was the 
floor Mr. G. lived on. Was it really quiet down 
there, boys? . . . Tell us, Frank, what did Mr. G. 
say that night of the dust storm . . . then there 
was Gabe B. and his wanderings, speeding good 
will along with other things . . . Mennens shaving 
lotion . . . Remember Marty Uniman, Woody Wood- 
ruff, Al Shreeman, .and those wild parties on Friday 
nite . . . that one blast which ended up with little 
Joe under the bed; how did you ever get him out, 
AP . . . Room 215, headquarters. 



! 



i 




1960 



I'm sure everyone remembers the first College 
weekend because this one ended rather uniquely. 
The weekend started off quietly, but was climaxed 
by the accidental burning of the gym, which two 
hours earlier had held a real Western Hoedown. 
No one was injured, but in less than an hour all 
that remained of the "old" wooden structure was 
twisted pipe and a battered foundation. We were 
the last class to enjoy a college weekend in the 
old gym and the first to appreciate having a col- 
lege weekend in the new gym. Our objective in 
that first college weekend was to put on a talent 
show. I'm sure the part everyone enjoyed was 
the chorus line; the girls, however, didn't quite 
look as feminine as they might have. 

Before we knew it, Christmas vacation was on 
us, and everyone went home to enjoy Mom's 
cooking and take advantage of the festivities. 
Upon returning we were faced with our first finals. 

Second semester started off no greater than the 
first with no excitement except that we ended the 
first semester on Friday and started the second 
semester on Monday. How about the times the 
fellows in the room below you, Barry, thought the 
floor was coming down; you could have told them 
the trouble. Our first attempt at a college dance 



never did materialize because of some trouble with 
the administration, but we gained from experience. 

The biggest event of the year was the annual 
"A" day. Here we showed our parents and friends 
that we had been working during the year. I'm 
sure one of the surprises of the year was Frank 
McConnell being awarded Grand Champion Show- 
man; nice going, Frank. Many others of us also 
received different awards. 

Soon the first year drew to a close. We took 
some more finals and after a week at home, ar- 
rived back to take eight weeks of Practical Agri- 
culture. This was a combination of fun and hard 
work. Remember those parties at night, especially 
that one night, Tony Remsen, when Mr. G. ob- 
jected to the little bingo party. We couldn't help 
if it was two o'clock in the morning. 

We still can't see what good the combined ef- 
fect to end the practice football field did, because 
two weeks after we completed putting it in, foot- 
ball practice began. 

After a very eventful Summer Practice, we went 
home to five weeks of good food and rest. 

Coming back that second year, we were first 
welcomed by the smiling face of Dean Meyers at 
registration. We had lost a few classmates but we 
had a fairly well-united class. This was our year 
to be the "ever popular sophomores and it was 
our duty to see the incoming freshman started off 
on the right foot. Those early morning sessions 
were tiring; 1 don't know who suffered more — 
the freshmen or us. The night before the annual 
rope pull, we took all the freshmen out on a mid- 
nite jaunt, but during this outing one of our class- 
mates, Hal Deitrich, broke a leg. Although we won 
the rope pull and hazing continued another week, 
this put a sour note on the whole thing and we 
were glad when hazing finally ended. 

Sophomore year was quieter than our freshman 
year probably because we had become accus- 
tomed to college life and had adjusted ourselves 
to it. Early in the fall we held our annual dance 
and this time we had better luck than the previous 
year. We held it off campus at the William Penn 
Inn, and all that attended seemed to enjoy it. 
Of course, sophomore year saw frequent trips to 
such places of interest as the Rainbow Inn, Boyles, 
De Sousas, Bristol, Anns — just to mention a few. 

Remember that soils hike we took second semes- 
ter with Dr. Elson; we were looking for various 
soil samples and wandered into the woods. Maybe 
it was a wood chuck that took off Dr. Elson's shoe 




. . . remember, George? 

"A" day 1958 was the first year it was a two- 
day affair. It would have gone over well, but 
weather hindered us with rain. After "A" day and 
finals, most of us went out to find jobs in our 
respective fields. This was a bad year for every- 
one because we were in the recession, people 
were out of work and college students were find- 
ing it difficult obtaining jobs. Most of us did find 
work, however, and after the summers experience 
of trying to coordinate our knowledge with our 
jobs we were back to start our junior year. Aca- 
demically we were carrying harder subjects; any- 
where from Physics to Farm Machinery. 

For the annual Christmas parade in Doylestown, 
the Ornamental Horticulture major built a float 
which brought praises from everyone who saw it. 

Socially we held the Junior Dance in the spring 
of the year. As our funds were low, the dance was 
held in Lasker Hall but everyone who attended 
commented on the decorations and said that they 
had had a good time. 

"A" day was held for two days again, however, 
this year the weather was better. The new gym 
was started and everyone had visions of what it 
was to look like. 

Final exams and summer recess followed, with 
jobs coming easier to us than they had the year 
before. 

After the summer's work we came back to as- 
sume the role as seniors B.M.O.C. (Big Men On 
Campus). Now we could "look down on everyone. 
We had come a long way to get the esteem of 
the upperclassmen. 

The senior dorm became the home for most of 
us, with some living in Ullman Hall as well as 
off campus. A few fellows had chosen to get mar- 
ried and were either living in town or close by. 



This year we saw the able president of our 
class, Ed Stickle, become president of the Student 
Council; it couldn't have happened to a better 
guy. Then we buckled down to finish our courses 
and organize our class activities which would ter- 
minate by Commencement Day in May. The year- 
book editors, Tony Fritchey and Lorenzo Fonseca, 
started organizing different committees to work on 
the yearbook. Don Gregg ran around collecting 
dues and signing checks; he was our money man. 

Our class held the college weekend in the new 
gym and we became the first senior class to give 
a college weekend in the new gym. The dance on 
Saturday night proved interesting because too 
much dance wax had been put on the floor and 
couples were actually sliding around. N. Linta, 
our Athletic Director, come to the rescue and took 
a good deal of it off with a broom. 

Our senior field trips went over great, especially 
the F. I. Boys in a certain 53 Pontiac. I don't think 
your driving made any difference in your mark, 
Neil. 

Socially, those little nightly get-togethers at Al 
Silverman's house were one of the only forms 
until Al's wife got mad at a few boys for one 
particular birthday party. 

That's about how the last year went — wild 
times, studying hard and always that anticipation 
of Graduation Day in May as it kept coming closer 
and closer. 

Now our college days at N.A.C. have ended. 
For some of us it will mean starting graduate 
school, starting a new way of life through mar- 
riage and working, an opportunity to match knowl- 
edge to experience or going into the Armed Serv- 
ices. Whatever we do, wherever we go, we will 
never forget those memories which are imbedded 
in our minds forever. 




^^'^i^Si^0!^€:mhff^^^!^^^:^_ 









■,,*H^« *^V "--^ 




First row, left to right: ]. Sachs, J. Weeks, D. Warren, W. Hunt. 
J. Van VorsI, E.. Woodward, T. Cannan, P. Boutin. W. Mayer, K. 
Johnson. E. Robinson. Second row: R. Piotrowicz. J. Gall, R. De- 
Rosa, A. Schneider. R. Sensenich. G. Stapleton. W. Eeyser. C. 
Bayha. A. Jablonski. ). Diamond. H. Botero. Third row: J. Gontek, 
S. Katz, W. Roberts. F. Malloy, E. Russell. H. Rosinsky, J. Mil- 
tried. ). Warshaw. K. Lipton. E. Schultz. J. Anderson. Fourth row: 
C. Radle. J. Fitzpatrick. J. Holm, R. Stuart. M. Holmberg, W. 
Whitman. C. Gerth. W. Hoogmoed. W. Burns, J. Moors, D. Whit- 
field. Fifth row: G. Shelly. J. Apestegui. S. Borsh. L. Beck, P. 
Smith. J. Larsen, G. Fuess, C. Fitzgerald, E. Mullen, D. Kuehne. 
J. Kapusnak, B. Buechner. W. Merz. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFHCERS 
President. Albert Jablonski 
Vice President, Gary Stapleton 
Secretary. Carl Fitzgerald 
Treasurer. Joseph Gall 







■_^ _j.:^-rt*-i;;i5L-»S^~ ?Pv3:3 






1962 




Left to Right, First Row: R. Johnson, R. Brown, E. Ken- 
nedy, P. Kirsch, J. Berkheiser, D. Di Giantomasso, A. 
Hanset, A. Steiert, G. Matro, H. Johns, R. Cole, A. 
Abrevaya, J. Teller, P. Brown, S. Santangelo. F. Pen- 
rose, D. Charles. Second Row: P. McFarlond. Roth- 
schild, J. Adams, C. Haegle, K. Brown, F. Pipari, H. 
Gray, F. Gibble, F. Rette. W. Wilson, F. Armbruster. 
R. O'Neill, N. Resnick, D. Olmsted. Third Row: J. Sol- 
omon, J. Hamilton, R. Walder, D. Trexler, E. Jordon, 
R. Zimmer, R. Frantz, D. Ondreassen, N. Gabriel, W. 
Crissman, B. Chadwick, R. Strimel, S. Rudolph, A. Radi, 
M. Brand, R. Pitzschler, E. Schneider. Fourth Row: D. 
Haven. D. Baker, C. Miller, J. Murch, P. Johnson, R. 
Cooney. C. Maxwell. H. Agnew, J. Fish, N. McGuigan, 
J. Ulshoefer. W. Gross, D. Cafaro. A. Monostori, C. 
Bennett. Fifth Row: J. DeMaurias, T. Snyder, D. Irons. 
T. Morosky, J. McNally, W. Aman, M. Kopas, C. Wira, 
W. Serwell, W. Peterson H. Harris. R. Swaehhammer. 
W. Hunte. M. Hunte. 



CLASS OFnCERS 
President. William Patchell 
Vice President, James Nuneviller 
Secretary, Peter Hoffman 
Treasurer, Erik Olsen Jr. 
Student Council, T. Scheex 










'iiF—^' 










"'*•■-'"-?■■' J- 







Left to Right. First Row: S. How, L. Furman, B. Gigliotti, 
W. Shannon. P. HoHman. J. Grafi. D. Holland, B. To- 
peka. R. Parsons, G. Caprio K. Johnson, A. Kafrisson, 
I. Bauer, D. Longenecker. W. Hopkins, J. Cann, V. 
Vender. Second Row: P. Thompson, M. Herman, R. 
Sabol, F. Amado, F. Salazar, S. Colbum, H. Roberts, 
B. Nickell. W. Patchell. N. Hedrich. E. Olsen, W. Con- 
rad, J. Sinkinson. W. Flemming, M. Bumbcum. R. Guli- 
ano, J. Nuneviller. J. Schorr. Third Row: T. Day, K. 
Decker, J. Richards. B. Reitmeyer, B. Gebhard, D. Lewis, 
I. Wolf, D. Ruff. D. Edgerton. J. Barnett, B. Crawford, 
R. Coates. D. Bowker. S. Haviland, R. Stein. Fourth 
Row: D. FazloUahi, A. Sauer. C. Meyers, D. Haldaman, 
J. Gerstemeier, J. Nowakowski. M. Gillman, E. Gigliotti, 
R. Goldstein. I. Fee. R. DriscoU, R. Matt, R. Vribe, R. 
Hillman, T. Stepy. J. McDonough. Fifth Row: J. Umo- 
sella, F. Schneiler. K. Stuart, M. Shuke, C. Utberg, G. 
Perry, E. Guardenier, P. Blodgett, R. Benson, P. Schneid- 
er. P. Fritz. D. Spalding, J. Shaler H. Bunin. D. Emery. 
Sixth Row: R. McLucas. G. Leonharl, F. Traino, S. 
White. T. Scheetz. M. Heflich. R. West J. Finn, A. Must- 
in, K. Peterson. D. Richards. B. Miller. A. Prophet, J. 
Bates, I. Lenxox. J. Tomasini. G. Skoda. Seventh Row: 
G. Tomas. R. Horsman. W. Holzmagel, E. Radomski, 
F. Charles, P. Caldwell. Silverman. E. Ashton, P. 
Blatt. J. Rowland, A. Alemi, H. Hazen, H. Panacek, L. 
Supplee, K. Roinos, D. Irons, W. Merlens. 

CLASS OFFICERS 
President, Robert Frantz 
Vice President, Herb lohns 
Treasurer, Kirk Brown 
Secretary. William Serwell 
Student Council, Ernest Jordan 






1963 





Imbiors 







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mbTors 




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First row. left to right: F. Malloy, F. Rette, B. Nickell, H. Stoner. Second row: 
Haldaman, W. Hunt, D. Warren, R. Blatt, K. Brown. Third row: S. Rudolph, F. 
Gibbel, P. Boutin. A. Radi, I. Nuneviller. Fourth row: P. Johnson. J. Murch. D. 
Andreassen. J. Ulshoefer. D. Trexler. Fifth row: J. McNally, L. Beck, H. Hazen, E. 
Woolward. H. Harris. 




Gus holds up the greenhouse, while 
Herb weeds the wheat. 




Herb and Roge make sure the smuts 
are gone for good. 




A big, new baby makes its 
arrival on campus and the 
boys give her the once 
over. 



Agronomy 



The Agronomy Club, although a relatively new club on campus, 
has been fairly active with field trips to Cornell University, Beltsville, 
Maryland, and various farming operations in the surrounding com- 
munities. We have tried to show, through films, the various types and 
phases of agriculture that encompass Agronomy to give the students 
an idea of the opportunities in the field. Speakers from the Soil Con- 
servation Service have enlightened us on their jobs and the opportun- 
ities with the State and Federal Government along these lines. 



I 






The boys listen intently at Richard's fertiliier plant. 



Here's where the big mix is made, men — So everyone 
watch the process. 



AGRONOMY CLUB OFTICERS 
President R. Blatt, Vice President W. Hunt, Secretary K. Brown, 
Treasurer D. Andreassen. 




•«--| 




-^bairy 
Husbandry 



The Dairy Society is a student organization designed to 
further interest in those students interested in Dairy Hus- 
bandry. It is open to students of all majors. The society ac- 
complishes its goal through projects, field trips, speakers and 
movies during meetings. 




Who says we're not an energetic 
group. 



"For the last time, grow upl" Ok, 
Doc. 




DAIRY SOCIETY OFFICERS 
President D. Ainsworth; 
Vice President J. Bittman; 
Secretary Treasurer E. Ken- 
nedy; "A-Day" Representa- 
tive R. Norton. 




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First row, left to right: E. Kennedy. S, How, A. Jablonski, D. Holland, I. Bittman, 
P. Staudt. J. Luma, R. Norton, R. Johnson. Second row: J. Barneti, F. Armbruster, 
F. Malloy, D. Edgerton, E. Guardenier, J. Sinkinson, B. Shull, R. O'Neill, D. Olmsted, 
M. Holmberg. Third row: G. Fuess, D. Ainsworth, J. Adams, R. Benson, I. Solomon, 
A. Monostory, C. Miller, D. Wise, W. Merz, C. Gerth, K. Decker. Fourth row: D. 
Haven, B. Kennedy, D. Richards, J. Sachs, A. Prophet, P. Blodgett, W. Serwell, G. 
Skoda, F. Charles, E. Ashton. W. Merlins. 




DAIRY HUSBANDRY JUDGING TEAM 
Left to right: R. Scheidy, J. Hoover, 
J. Kuyper, C. Klein. 



Well she's dolled up, but she's still 
a Guernsey. 



Uood 



Industry 

The studies in the Food Industry curriculum are designed to help 
meet the demand for men trained in the basic principles of the huge 
food industry from the point of produc.ion and processing lo the point 
of sales and distribution. 

It is the intention of the Food Industry Club to promote interest 
and better understanding of all phases of this gigantic industry. Thic 
is being accomplished through speakers, films, discussions, A-Doy 
projects and visits to industrial conventions and expositions. 





"Honey? This is Emory, You should 
see what Ihe other guys are doing." 



^^ 



FOOD INDUSTRY CLUB OFnCERS 
President G. Mulnick, Vice President E. Markovic. Secretary W. Mayer, Treasurer 
N. Trager. 



First row. left to right: N. Trager, G. Mulnick. F. Pipari, N. Gabriel, P. Thompson, 
H. Gray, S. Katz, W. Keyser, C. Meyer, C. Bayha, S. Colsburn. Second row: Mr. B. 
Frazer. F. Radican, B. Miller, W. Hoogmoed, K. Johnson, B. Charlick. C. Remsen, 
L. Hilsen. J. Apestegui. W. Burns. W. Patterson. A. Silverman. W. Mayer. C. 
Bennett. R. Cooney. E. Markovic. Dr. G. Turner. 






The "Jaspers" discover a new way 
of preserving food. 



Easy does it, Tonyl 




Oh no, not another trip 
in Trager's car! 



Take it easy, Frank, you're reach- 
ing the end point. 








namenta 
Horticulture 



IB 



i[ 




Ok Where the heck is the ignition? 



All right who stole the flowers? 



ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OFFICERS 
President J. Siatkowski; Vice President D. Gregg; Secretary J. 
Fitzpatrick; Treasurer R. Bauman; "A-Day" Representative A. 
Edling. 








' T .' ■ 






>-' 



^^ ^ j'^ :?^ s 





First row, left to right: D. DiGiantomasso, A. Hanser. R. De Rosa, J. Gall, G. 
Caldaro, D. Kern, E. Peia, B. Gigliotti, I. Grali, I. Teller. Second row: F. Penrose, 
I. Schorr, R. Cole, M. Brand, N. Resnick, P. McFarland, W. Wilson, R. Zimmer, 
D. Gregg, E. Menkens, N. Hendrich, M. Herman, W. Shannon, I. Bates, D. Charles. 
Third row: Mr. R. Bateman, J. Richards, J. Fee, R. Hillman, P. DriscoU, W. Crissman, 
R. Walker, H. Roberts. Fourth row: J. Siatkowski, D. Emery, T. Steepy, J. Van Vorst, 
B. Gordon, J. McDonough, E. Guardenier. Fifth row: M. Shuke, I. Fitzpatrick, D. 
Cafaro, A. Edling, E. Robinson, R. Bauma.i, T. Fritchey. Sixth row: H. Panacek, 
L. Supplee, R. Koenig, J. Bates, R. Horsman, P. Smith, M. Kopas, P. Boutin, R. 
Pitzschler. 




Junior Architects Incorporated. 



Santa's workship for the parade. It's got to be finished 
tonight I 



"It ripped, so what! 





ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB OFFICERS 
Seated, left to right: President J. Exley; Vice President 
J. Diamond. Second row: Program-Chairman J. Milfried; 
"A-Day" Representative D. Kantner; Secretary Treasur- 
er K. Lipton. 



Ed posing with our new mascot. 




Animal Husbandry 



i I 










I 







m ■ ■ ^ 



Xi 



.^s^^^'^ 







I'd like to put it in the 
first place, but today il 
must go second. 




ANIMAL HUSBANDRY JUDGING TEAM 
From left to right: H. Detrich, F. McConnell, L. Fon- 
secQ, T. Feisthamel, Dr. Pelle, D. Kantner, J. Exley. 



The Animal Husbandry department performs many functions and 
duties at N.A.C. Its main objective is to bring together men of similar 
interests, into an intimate group in order that the problems each man 
encounters may be effectually onalized. Students are informed on all 
new ideas in the livestock industry through films, reports, field trips, 
and guest speakers. 




First row, left to right: P. Brown, R. Piotrowicz. A. Jablonski, J. Diamond, A. Steierl, 
W. Hopkins, K. lohnson, A. Abrevcya, P. Hoffman, J. Bauer. Second row: K. Lipton! 
I. Weeks, L. Fonseca, J. Exley, M. Birnbaum, J. Milfried, S. Wilson, T. Cannan, 
F. Malloy, D. Lewis. Third row: J. Shafer, M. Heflicm, C. Haegle, F. Schneider, A. 
Sauer, D. Kantner, P. Fritz, S. Hauilend, R. Sabol, R. Goats. Fourth row: F. Mc- 
Connell, J. Moors, R. Schneider, K. Decker, I. Solomon, R. Stuart, D. Whitfield, 
R. Frantz, E. Jordan, A. Alemi, R. Strimel. Fifth row: D. Kuhne, B. Buechner, P. Blatt, 
F. Charles, H. Agnew, J. Fish, N. McGuigan, W. Gross, E. Plotka. Sixth row: ]. 
De Mauriac, T. Finnigan, W. Aman, T. Feisthamel, G. Leonhardt, D. Haven, R. 
Holcombe, C. Wira, W. Whitman, J. Anderson. 




Messy, but lots of instructive fun. It makes me 
feel like a cow-boy. 



Hard and steady work. It's a shame 
it isn't a horse. 




orticulture 




What a gang! — the Hort Boys oi 
Dr. Blumenfield and Mr. Feldstein. 




n 



"**«M. 



o 






(», 







First row, left to right: E. Schultz. W. Helzell, J. Wolf, R. Franti, G. Stapleton, 
E. Rossell, E. Stickel. J. Kapusnak. Second row: R. Stuart, F. Armbruster, M Rubbu 
H. Kerbv, C. Siebert. Third row: F. Traino, W. Roberts, J. Holms, B. George G 
Perry. Fourth row: H. ONeill, R. Swackhammer, R. Hunte, A. Mustin, G. Halpem 

D. Linde, J. Schorr. Fifth row: D. Baker. C. Fitzgerald, Mr. J. Feldstein S. Borsh 

E. Silverman, T. Snyder. 




"Stick" is certainly proud of his 
Tomato plants. Part of Dr. B's photo 
period test. 




You guessed it! Linde is eating 
again. What an appetitel 




Dr. Blumenfield explains the aiiects 
of various photoperiods as the three 
"Hecklers" look on. 



FRUIT JUDGING TEAM 
First row, left to right: D. Linde, B. 
George. Second row: J. Snope, E. 
Stickel, H. Kerby. 




HORTICULTUBAL 

SOCIETY OFFICERS 

President E. Rossell: Vice President 

I. Holms; Secretary Treasurer B. 

George. 




^^Sf^-fiS^^. 




The new gym — compietef*-^t 

used io Its lullest cajxicity as varsiU 



**t ^\*^ ' 



t^^A^^k 







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orts 




-%* 



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In action this is one of Coach Chiodi's favorite ground gainers, the oH 
tackle power play. The ploy depends upon the key block of big. Aggie 
tackle. John Holmes, This was a consistent ground gainer w^hich netted 
much "real estate" against the big Lincoln University line. In this 
action shot, Ed Stickle hits off tackle for short yardage. 



EMORY MARKOVIC 

1959 TEAM CAPTAIN 

A real hustler . . great competitor 

. . . and team leader. Truly one of 

"Aggies" finest boll carriers. 



The 1959-60 Aggie Varsity football squad was under the helm of a com- 
pletely nev/ and improved athletic department directed by Mr. Ned Linta. 
Head coach Chiodi, former Lehigh end coach, took the reigns and guided the 
Aggies to three vnns. Assisting coach Chiodi in his new endeavor were Richard 
Carney, former Lehigh athlete and two former Aggie grid standouts, Steve 
Ferdo and Joseph Fulcoly. 

Although the Aggies lost five of the eight pigskin contests this season 
the statistics v/ere extremely impressive. They outscored their opponents 
93-82 and excelled in defensive play. 

At the successful football banquet on November 24, 1959, coach Chiodi 
effectively summed up the season by saying. The team played well but had 
new coaches. ' Without a doubt it looks as though Aggie football is headed 
for a brioht future. 




g960.) 



Tough Kutztown back nets short yardage against 
"Aggies' defense; in pursuit are Holmes. Hoover, and 
Stickel. This gqme was truly n "blood" game. Final 
score. K.T.C. 7 . N A C. 6, 




^0.^ \''^>:<» 



/■ 








»^ 



'V^ 



> 



*H' 




Coach Chiodi explains baclciield 
maneuvers to three ol the seniors 
on the team. Markovic. Stickel. and 
Radican. 






•^(R^ 




*^ 



Stickel is brought down by the biij 
Lincoln lacklers alter inteicepting 
a Lincoln's lorv^ard pass. 





Leading ground gainer Markovic. 
hits the D.C. Teacher's line ior a big 
gain. 




Emory, Jim, and Ed receive their 
athletic awards as Coach Chiodi 
looks on. The Athletic Banquet was 
held at the beautiful Warrington 
Country Club. 



1959 FOOTBALL TEAM 
Sealed, left to right: P. DriscoU, R. Stein, K. Roinos, H. Hendrick, P. Blodgett 
Second row: J. Milfried, I. Holm, R. Koenig. F. Radican, Captain E. Markovic, E 
Silverman, R. Mesnak, E. Schultz. Third row: W. Wilson, R. Frantt, H. Harris, I. Hoover, M. 
Holmberg, J. Kuyper, N. McGuigan, H. Agnew. Fourth row: K. Stuart, W. Conrad, A. 
Abreveya, D. Leaty. E. Stein, W. Aman, J. Nuneviller, B. Crawford, T. Scheeti. Fifth row: 
P. Smith, S. White, R. Parsons, H. Hazen, A. Steiert, W. Hoogmoed, W. Peterson, W. 
Patchell. Sixth row: R. Helfich, S. Haviland, End Coach Mr. D. Carney, Head Coach Mr. R. 
Chiodi, Coach Mr. N. Linta, Coach Mr. S. Ferdo, Backfield Coach Mr. J. Fulcoly, Manager 
S. Santangelo. 






schedule 




AGGIES 






7 


Montclair State . 


10 


22 


Lincoln University 


. 7 


27 
6 


D. C. Teachers . . 


. 6 


Kutitown S.T.C. 


7 


19 


Gallaudet 


6 


12 


King's College 


14 





MillersviUe S.T.C. 


13 





Trenton S.T.C. 


19 


93 


Won 3 lost 5 


83 




m^^ 




i /" 



V 



Montclair State College tripped up the Aggies 
in the last seconds of the first game of the season and 
came out on the heavy end of a 10-7 score at Mont- 
clair. 

The following game played on home soil proved 
successful for the Aggies gridders as they drove to a 
22-7 win. The game was highlighted by the sharp de- 
fense of the Aggie line as they held their opponent, 
Lincoln University, to a mere total ground gain of 
twenty yards. 

Another win was notched on Alumni Field as 
District of Columbia Teachers College fell to a 27-6 
defeat before the Aggie eleven. Confidence was high 
and offensive play was sharp as the Aggies had no 
trouble in overcoming their opponents. 

The next game proved to be the season's thriller 
as the largest crowd of the year watched Kutztown 
Teachers hand the Aggies an undeserving 7-6 loss. 
Pot Mihlfried's outstanding -fourth quarter playing was 
not quite enough to pull the Aggies over the hump. 



The last home game proved to be a success after 
a doubtful first quarter when Gallaudet College scored 
in the opening minutes of the contest. But touchdowns 
by Frantz, Crawford and Aman sparked the Aggies to 
a decisive 19-6 win. 

The Aggies put forth their best effort of the season 
against highly favored King's College but came out 
on the short end of a 14-12 score. Led by captain 
Markovic, the Aggies never let up their outstanding 
team play as they battled to prove their worth to 
King's fans. 

A sharp Millersville eleven proved to be too great 
a competition for the Aggies in the next game. The 
Aggies did well, however, in a 13-0 losing effort. 

In the season's finale the Aggies, hampered by 
injuries struggled against a strong Trenton State Col- 
lege team but failed to produce a .500 season for their 
new coach Chiodi, in losing 19-0. 








959 Season 




80 R°Y< attempting to block shot in vain. 



Big Joe scoring two big ones. 




Assistant Coach Jim Radclifie, team 
captain Dave Linde, and Coach Bob 
Chiodi. 



Front row, left to right: Lou Furman, Dennis Irons, Captain Dave Linde, 
John Van Vorst, Bob Frantz. Second row: Wheeler Aman, loe Morosky, 
Bill Mertens, Dick Hillman, Ray Benson, Dave Ruii. Third row: Coach 
Chiodi, Manager Henry Kerby, Assistant Coach RadcIiH. 







Bobby, hitting two points for the 
Aggies. 




BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Dec. 5 Eastern Baptist College 

9 Trenton State College 

11 Glassboro State College 

15 Seton Hall University 

18 Kulztown Slate Teachers College 

Ian. 5 Phila. Textile Institute 

8 Phila. Coll. Pharm. and Science 

12 Seton Hall University 
14 Kings College 

16 Rutgers University ol S.N.I. 
26 Eastern Baptist College 

29 Phila. Textile Institute 

Feb. 3 Haveriord College 

6 Newark State College 

9 Rutgers University of S.N.I. 

13 Phila. College of Bible 

16 lersey City Stale College 

18 Lincoln University 

24 Trenton State College 

26 Phila. College Phar. and Science 

Mar. 1 lersey City State College 




il Slaudt, William George, Dave 
se, William Shull, Emory Marlco- 
the nucleus oi the N.A.C. nine, 
an their oiiensive strategy. 




1959 BASEBALL TEAM 
First row, left to right: J. Merille, Co-Capt., W. Shull, 
Capt. E. Markovic, Coach Mr. J. Markas, M. Maldonado, 
R. Mesnak. Second row: E. Stein, W. George, D. Wise, 
P. Slaudt, J. Gontek, E. Peia, Manager H. Kerby. Third 
row: M. Kopas, M. Holmberg, W. Hoegmoed, S. Kotz, 
G. Fuess, I. Anderson, E. Kennedy, S. Santangelo. 




^^^r ^'^^G/r- -i».^Gir 



if 

- vF" V ^.SEC- g^^-' g^AWr 



t, ^ 



^ \ 




Capt. Emory Markovic swings into action 



Philip Staud 




Long stretch by Dave Wise beats 
Rutgers SJ. runner. 



Coach Maskas holds conference with 
his leaders, left to right: W. Shull, 
E. Markovic, Mr. J. Maskas. 



J. 





^ J 




William Shull 



William George 




(. t *'-^ ^%j7l,i^si^r-^ - ---'.^f^ 





Captain of the "Aggie" nine, Emory 
Markovic. 



Co-Captain, Bill Shull waits 
patiently for the right pitch. 





cfiV'ties 




1 
•^ 





Ai!^' 



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1 



aciiV'ties 






"A-DAY" 

"A-Day" is the outstanding annual event of the 
college year. 

Each year the students of the Notional Agricultural 
College set aside a weekend in May as an open house 
to entertain their families, friends, neighbors and others 
interested in Agriculture. 

The students of the various majors spend months 
each year in preparing for the gala event. 

"A-Day" is strictly a student affair. All work in- 
cluding planning, preparation, and financing is done 
by the students themselves. 

The program consists of exhibits and demonstra- 
tions in each of the nine majors offered by the College. 
In addition, there are many special events such as the 
co-ed milking contest, the beard growing contest, and 
the log sawing contest. 

The central theme of "A-Day" is student achieve- 
ment. This affair affords student the opportunity to ac- 
quire practical knowledge which they can not acquire 
in the classroom. It also provides the student the op- 
portunity to demonstrate those academic skills which 
they acquire at N. A. C. 



This is the big tent, the center of the A-Day activities. The place 
where men become holders of prizes, the place which resounds 
with cheers and sometimes laughter, the place which will be 
remembered by young and old alike lor its contests and exhi- 
bitions and the place in which, year after year, you will see 
some happy faces and some very serious ones. 




A-DAY COMMITTEE 
Seated, left to right: J. Kuyper, D. Ainsworth, ]. Diamond. Stand- 
ing: I. Exley, D. Kantner, W. Mayer, C. Wira, L. Hilsen, R. 
Blatt, R. Norton. 

91 



It looks like another winner lor Ed. 
Intermission under the big tent. 

Technical looking, isn't it? 
They look all right to me! 
A prize winner in Agronomy. 



Take it from me lady, it is a Cala- 
diuml 

There is nothing more inviting than 
a garden retreat. 

Come on, straighten out! 







VARSITY CLUB OFFICERS 
President A. Edling; Vice President J. Kapus- 
nak; Secretary D. Linde; Treasurer D. Linde. 



VARSITY CLUB 




A busy advisor for an active club 



First row, left to right: Mr. N. Linta, B. ShuII, B. George, E. Markovic, F. Radican. 
I. Siatkowski, P. Staudt, J. Holm, D. Wise, D. Linde, Second row: A Silverman, 
W. Keyser, E. Stickel, R. Koenig, A. Edling, E. Schultz, J, Milfried, I. Kapusnak, 
H. lohnson, B. Franz, 






Seated, left to right: E. Markovic, J. Exley, F. Radican, W. Merz, 
E. Stickel. Standing: B. Frantz. E. Jordan, J. Milfried, T. Scheetz. 
W. Patchell, A. lablonski. 



STUDENT 
COUNCIL 



STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS 
President E. Stickel; Vice President A. Jablonski; Secre- 
tary F. Radican; Treasurer W. Merz. 




The student council store 




FURROW 




Left to right: W. Whitman. W. Hunt, R. De- 
Rosa, S. Katz, G. Stapleton, G. Mulnick, R. 
Holcombe, G. Halpern, I. Ulshoefer, J. Van 
Vorst, T. Fritchey, L. Fonseca, E. Woodward, 
L. Hilsen, I. Gall, W. Mayer, M. Brand, P. 
Blatt, W. Mertins. C. Meyers. 



FURROW CO-EDITORS 

B. Brand. W. Mayer 




GLEANER 



Seated, left to right: K. Johnson, S 
Katz. D. Martin. L. Cohen. K. Lipton 

D. Warren, G. Caprig, W. Hunt. J 
Van Vorst. G. Stapleton. Standing 
R. Holcombe, B. Charlick, G. Mulnick 
G. Halpern, R. De Rosa. J. Diamond 
I. Gall, W. Mayer, W. Merz. C. Mey 
ers. B. Miller. W. Mertins. P. Blatt 

E. Woodward. 



GLEANER CO-EDITORS 
K. Lipton, D. Warren 






First row, left to right: B. GebhardI, E. Schneider, H. 
Johns, R. Guliano, M. Brand, D. Lewis. Second row: 
I. Fee, R. Goldstein, C. Sachs, E. Stein, T. Day. 



SCIENCE 
CLUB 

POULTRY 
CLUB 



POULTRY JUDGING TEAM 
Left to right: H. Bolero, A. Schneider, 
W. Merz, R. Sensenich, Mr. S. Ferdo. 





First row, left to right: J. Berkheiser, P. Fritz, H. Johns, H. Ros- 
insky, H. Botero. Second row: B. Chadwick, F. Furlong, W. Merz, 
G. Shelly, Mr. S. Ferdo, A. Schneider, R. Sensenich. 




Left to right: B. Charlick, W. Bums, 
P. Boutin. G. Matro. B. Gebhardt, 
G. Mulnick, P. lohnson, T. Remsen. 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB 



PHOTO CLUB 



Seated, left to right: C. Wira, H. Gray, J. 
Ulshoefer, N. Resnick, E. Plotka, W. Bums. 
C. Bennett. P. Boutin, J. Fee. H. Botero. Stand- 
ing: G. Mulnick. S. Haviland. 



±l\is=^ 



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i 







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1 


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1 


'^^^^^^^H^^H^^^^^I 


l..;^i^ 





INTRAMURAL 
COUNCIL 



Left to right: A. Ediing. F. Radican, J. Anderson, Mr. 
N. Linta. E. Markovic, D. Andreassen, R. Swackhammer, 
W. Merz. 



TABLE 

TENNIS 



Left to right: G. Shelly, E. Plotka, 
P. Kirsch, N. Trager, R. Sensenich, 
I. Solomon, T. Remsen, B. Charlick. 





GLEE CLUB 



First row, left to right: Mr. A. Finch, R. Blalt, D. Whit- 
field. Second row: J. Moors, R. Norton, K. .Johnson, B. 
Nickell, D. Claycomb, C. Gerth. Third row: J. Yentis, 
F. Amado, E. Olsen, H. Roberts. Fourth row: F. Salazar, 
A. Makowski, R. Holcombe, J. Fee. Fifth row: E. Ash- 
fon, C. Wira, F. Charles, L. Supplee. 




BAND 



Left to right: R. Strimel, D. Gregg, R. Blatt, I. Solomon, 
J. Fee, W. Mertens, C. Wira, W. Helzell, D. Richards, 
B. Charlick, G. Leonhadt. 



BAND OFHCERS 
President R. Blatt; Vice President B. 
Charlick; Secretary - Treasurer D. 
Gregg. 





CLASS 
DANCES 



SENIOR PROM COMMITTEE 
Left to right: E. Markovic, D. 
Ainsworth, B. Charlick, F. Rad- 
ican, A. Edling. 







Andrew J. Snope 
Literary Editor 



Donald R. Gregg 
Photography Editor 



CORNUCOPIA STAFF 




-V\ 



^~"L^^(Sis 



-li 







Joseph W. Siatkowski 
Advertisement Layout 





Co-Editors 

Lorenzo Fonseca Martinez 

Anthony L. Fritchey 



Seated, left to right: B. Charlick, 

combe, A. Snope, A. Fritchey, L. Fonseca. Second Row: 

Markovic, C. Remsen, F. Radican, E. Stickel, J. Siatkowski, D. 

Gregg. 






^c 



-"^fe 



1 






^^^^K^^^^fll^^^l 


1 


and 










43 Years Serving the Farm Industry with QuaHty Peebles' Products 



For over four decades Western has 
watched the progress of animal hus- 
bandry. As new methods developed and 
revolutionary concepts became accept- 
ed, a new science was born. 

We have seen half-wild, tough- 
muscled cows develop into sleek, high- 
capacity milk producers; disease-ridden 
poultry flocks turn into heavy-thighed, 
deep-chested broilers and egg produc- 
ing machines. Today, the trim, lean hog 
would turn up his delicate snout at his 
fierce, obese ancestors. 

Feeds, too, have changed drastically 
and Western has pioneered the develop- 



ment of new and better milk nutriments 
for poultry and livestock. Peebles' prod- 
ucts are specially formulated and care- 
fully controlled to allow maximum 
efficiency for widely varying require- 
ments. Our research laboratories and 
farm constantly seek new improve- 
ments. Our plants are located across 
the continent to assure a year around 
supply at low cost. 

One thing has not changed. The 
Peebles' brand will always stand for 
unvarying high quality and feeding 
efficiency in our service to the farm 
industrv. 



>VESTERN CONDENSING COMPANY 

APPLETON, WISCONSIN 

World'a Largest Producer of Whey Products 

Division of Foremost Dairies. Inc. 




Compliments of 

DOYLESTOWN 
TRUST COMPANY 



Compliments of 



ELBLE FLOWER SHOP 



. . . S. P. A. B. C 

IS ESSENTIALLY REPUTED AS 

BREEDERS OF BETTER CATTLE 
with 
[Sjervice Designed for you 

As near as your phone 
[PJrevention of Disease 

Through the Use of Tested Sires 
[a] ssurance of Production Being Proven 

with Dairy Herd Improvement Assos. 
[Bjetter Breed Type 

Accomplished through genuine use of 

sires 
[Cjhoice of Sires Is Yours 

At the enonomical S5.00 Service Fee 




SOUTHEASTERN PENNA. 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING 

COOPERATIVE 

P.O. Box 254 Lancaster. Pa. 

Phone: EXpress 2-2191 



CLASS 

OF 

1961 



HISTAND BROTHERS 

ROOFING CONTRACTORS 

SHEET METAL WORK 
South Hamilton Street 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



ROGER W. KRAUT 

JEWELER 
29-3] W. State Street 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



Johnson & Biehn Appliance Store 



Sales and Service 
Quakertowii. Pa. 



KE 6-6363 



FARRELL FORD 

Quakertown, Pa. 
New — Used — Sports Cars 



EDE MOTOR CO. 

Quakertown, Pa. 
KE 6-4525 Ol.Ifiuiobile 



MEYERS RESTAURANT 

Quakertown, Pa. 

KE 6-4422 



DE SOUSA CAFE 



KE 6-7288 



6-7687 




Isabel and Tony De Sousa. Prop. 



SHIVE HARDWARE CO. 

Main & State Streets 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



CLASS 
OF 

1962 



Senator Marvin H. Keller 



RAYMOND C. REED 

ISiilliiiiuidf liisiiranci' 

Aiilo \M\- Fire 

Notary Piihli. I'.iiiis I'iiik. V 



NYCE'S SHOE STORE 




i'-^u ^ 



West & State Streets 
Dovlcslown. Pa. FI 8-3576 



PIT-CATCHER LANES 

Route 202, CHALFONT, PA. 

Joe Astroth - Bobby Shantz 

Van Dvke 2-9363 



Compliments of 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

and 

STUDENT STORE 



CLASS 
OF 

1963 



Mobil Oil - Mobil Heat 
Mobil Kerosene 

MILLER & BETHMAN 

Place Your Fuel Oil Worries with Us 

Route 611, CROSS KEYS 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Compliments of 

NEW BRITAIN INN 
NEW BRITAIN, PA. 



GROFF CANDY CO. 

Lansflale, Pa. 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



EMIL STAHL & SON 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



Commercial — Industrial — Residential 



283 Second Street Pike 
Southampton, Pa. 



Phone: EL 7-4644 
OR 3-1886 



Coniplinients of 



SYLVAN POOLS INC 



DOYLESTOWN. PENNA. 



Herman Silverman "30 



Compliments of 

WEISBARDS DRUG STORE 

Main & State Streets 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



FOR THE TEENAGE CROWD 
HUSTLE INN 

Rt. 611 Doylestown, Pa. 

Open Friday & Saturday from 8 p.m. 

Private Parties Arranged 

FI 8-5774 



SENTINEL GLASS COMPANY 

HATBOKO, PKNNSYLVAMA 

Authorized Dislribulor of 

PYREX BRAM) Cil.ASS •Doubl.-Toujjir 

Pipe & Fittintrs 



DOYLESTOWN FEDERAL 

SAVINGS & LOAN 

ASSOCIATION 

17 W. Court Street 
Dovlestown. Pa. 



LAUCHMEN 
PRINTING COMPANY 

LETTERPRESS & OFFSET 

. . . THE MOST MODERN 
PLANT IN THE 

NORTH PENN VALLEY . . . 

Wood & Courtland Streets 
LANSDALE, PA. 



DAVE'S SPORTING GOODS 

HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL 
SPORTS EQUIPMENT 
Dovlestown, Pa. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 

should buy life insurance 
now because .... 



The sooner you buy the less you will pay each 
year. 

Your health may be impairej later, making it 
impossible to buy life insurance at any price. 

You can complete your premium payments dur- 
ing your earning years and have your insurance 
fully paid up when you reach retirement age. 

Your life insurance can provide cash or col- 
lateral for opportunities or emergencies, bene- 
fits for your dependents, retirement income 
that you cannot outlive. 

Life insurance is the immediate, sure, safe way 
to create and maintain an estate planned to 
provide cash or income — the right amount at 
the right time. 



DREW CAVAN 

115 N. BROAD STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 
FI 8-9430 WI 9-3385 



Pools 



Residential 



EDWARD M. HAPP 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

ASHLAND & WASHINGTON DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

FHlmore 8-5111 - 8-5561 

Straii Steel Dealer Industrial - Commercial 



Compliments of 

N.A.C. BAND and 
GLEE CLUB 



DOYLESTOWN 
PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



278 S. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 



DAIRY CLUB 



SCHNEIDER 
SALES & SERVICE 

Your 

CADILLAC & OLDS DEALER 

350 South Main Street 

Dovlestown. Pa. 



KERSHNER'S PHARMACY 

Joseph H. Kershncr. Ph.G. 

Fellow of the American College 

of Apothecaries 

Doylestown. Pa. 

Fillmore 8-4666 



NEWTO\^ N CO-OPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION INC. 

FARMERS PURCHASING CO-OP 
Newtown, Pa. 



C/U 5 eiatUiers 


Ornamental TT«»ii. Society 


DpuUtt>wn,fk 


Horticultinal Club 


Complinn'tits of 

A FRIEND 


FOSTER'S TOY & CYCLE SHOP 

COMPLETE TOY STORE 

Bike Repairs 
139 S. Main Street 
Doylestown. Pa. 
Fillmore 8-4348 


FOSTER'S 
GOODYEAR STORE 

Tires — Recapping 
Wheel Alignment 

A'oif at: 
70 Green Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 


60 West State Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Fillmore 8-5620 



'THE BEST AT ITS BEST" 



ED'S DINER 

Franklin and State Streets 
DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 



BOOSTERS 



Peter Hoffman 
Normon Karl Hedrick 
William Hopkins 
Ron Guliana 
Bernard Gigliofti 
Kim Johnson 
Peter Blodgett 
James Rothschild 
Walter Gross 
James de Mauriac 
Steve Katz 
Ed Kennedy 
Keith S. Peterson 
Ernest GigliottI 



William Patehell Jr 
J im Sinkim son 
Herm Hozen 
Kenneth Roinos 
Schuyler How 
Charles Wira 
John Ulshoefer 
Martin R. Gitman 
Teddy Heybach 
Clarks 

George Hornberger 
Tom Snyder 
Fred Schneider 
Terry Scheetz 



Joseph Wolf 

Charles E. Radle 

Ron & John Rm 8 

Walter S. & Jerome S. 

Goofs in Room #34 N.D. 

Max & Ina Ray 

Max & Fran 

Ed, Phil, Paul 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Cole 

The Fund 

Charles & Neil 

Ray & Pat 

Waste-Line 

Jerry Skoda 

Jack's Men's Shop 



Thomas Finegan 
Dave Fleming 
Jim Fee 

The Boys from Third Floor 
Pat & John 
Ned Linta 
Augustus & Tex 
Albert Abrevayo 
Allen Prophet 
Emery Donald 
John Can 
Thomas Day 
B. Driscoll 
Jim Bauer 



Jim Fel 
Ira Salomon 
Dick Strimel 
Ernest R. Jordan 
Ken Decker 
Gee Caprio 
Dick Horsman 
James Leonx 
Frank Gibule 
Johns Herb 
Bob Parsons 
Poul Fritz 
Bob Tapeka 
Dave Ruff 





THE 



N.A.C. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

FRANK LA ROSA, President 



AND 



N.F.S. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PHILIP SPEVAK, President 

join in extending the fraternal hand of fellowship to the 

CLASS OF '60 

and welcome participation in their activities 



PATRONS 



BILL'S SHKLL SKHVICK 
Rt. 202, Uoylrstowii. I'a. 

CARRS FURNITURE 
Fhoiif: Doylestown 3797 

BI.ACk ANGUS STEAK HOUSE 
Route 309 

MR. & MRS. BROOKE KERRY 
Oxoii Hill, Ma. 



H. C. NELSON 
Barber Shop 

LANSDALE HEATING SUPPLY CO. 

TRAUGER'S BARBER SHOP 
Doylestown, Pa. 

KENNY'S NEWS AGENCY 
Doylestown, Pa. 







\nslruments 

• Repoirs 
i • le>e vision 



CLASSICAL 
POPULAR 
CHILDREN'S 

RECORDS 

PEARLMAN'S 



34 S. MAIN ST. 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



AGRONOMY CLUB 



FOOD INDUSTRY CLUB 



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'Nw.-^i^ * X^*^^ 



Hove 

a 
Coke 

There's friendliness in the 
simple phrase, "Have a 
Coke". It turns strangers 
into friejids. . . , Coca-Cola 
stands for the pause that 
refreshes — has become the 
high-sign of people of good 



BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE 
COCA-COLA COMPANY BY 

THE PHILADELPHIA COCA-COLA 

BOTTLING COMPANY 

LANSDALE, PA. 





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CORYDON M.«JOHNSON Co IncM New Jersey) 

7675 MAPLE AVE. 
MERCHANTVILLE, N.J 




wde/te-'iyl Qjmkhoot is ^oft c^^tfays" 



*>V<'f/,s/„,/l Sin,r 1»«<) 


CROSS KEYS MOTORS 


F. W. BOLGIANO CO. 


Lincoln - Merciry - Comet 


GARDKy SI I'l'LlKS 


Sales & Service 


411-423 Now York Avenue 




WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 


CROSS KEYS, PENNA. 




Flllnion' 8-266.') 


STAN BOWERS 


STRAND VALET SERVICE 


Formal W ear Rentals 


65-67 S. Main Street 


The Finest in Men's Wear 


DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


19 N. Main Street 


Call: Fillmore 8-3556 


DOYLESTOWxN, PA. 




SMITH'S MOBIL SERVICE 


BUCKS PRODUCTS READY 


Mobilgas — Mobil Oil 


MIX CONCRETE COMPANY 


Tires — Tubes 




Washing — Lubrication 


State Approved Plant 


Route 202 


Phone: Fillmore 8-2644 


DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Call: Fillmore 8-9389 


DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 


Equipment by: 


CHALFONT STUDIOS 


FARMAL — INTERNATIONAL 


Always Happy to Help with 


Mccormick 




BOLEN & JACOBSEN 


Yearbook Photography 


DOYLESTOWN 


Route 202 


AGRICULTURAL COMPANY 


CHALFONT. PENNA. 


DOYLESTOWN, PeNNA. 






115 



DIEKES & CLUST 


GREGG'S BUS SERVICE 


Mfiniifacliiring Jewelers 




17 John St., N. Y. 8, N. Y. 


Chartered Blsses 


Rings Pens 


For All Occasions 


Charms 




Medals Trophies 


Yorklyn, Delaware Phone : CE 9-5340 


GWINNERS 


KENN-CREST FARMS 


Atlantic Service 


K. E. Kennedy, Owner 


Charles Brinker, Oivner 


Home of Pure Bred Holsteins 


Distributor for Atlantic Refining Co. 


Breeding Stock For Sale 


DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


ELLIOTTSBURG, PENNA. 


NYCES PLANING MILL 










jC 



DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 



A. W. & W. M. WATSON CO. 

Established 1872 

Lumber — Woodwork 

Newtown, Bucks County, Penna. 

WOrth 8-3841 



DELAWARE VALLEY 
MACHINERY CO. 

Office & Showroom 
2323 Maplewood Avenue 
WILLOW GROVE, PA. 



THE CLASS OF 
1960 

Would like to thank all those 
who have extended a Helping 
Hand during the past four years 
at NAC. 



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