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Full text of "County of Christian, Kentucky : historical and biographical"

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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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3 1833 01713 6075 



COUNT Y 

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CHRISTIAN, 



TCP^^TTTCKY. 



Historical and Biographical 



EDITED BY WiLLIAI\l HENEY FEEEm . 



ILLUSTRATED. 



F. A. B A T T E Y 1' U B L I S H 1 N G CO., 

CHICAGO ANti LOI'ISVII.LIC. 

1884. 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 

HENRY G. ABERNATIIY was born April 30, 1825, in Bruns- 
wick County, Va. lie is tlic tliinl.of four chililren born to Raleigh 11. 
and Martha, T. Abcrnathy {nee Avery). Amanda, tlie eldest, is the widow 
of Col. Thomas Rowlett, of Petersburg, Va.; John E. died in Ballard 
County, Ky., and William A. is still a resident of the same county. Their 
parents died many years past in Virginia, and in 1842 Henry G. re- 
moved to Tennessee, locating in Montgomery County, near the State line, 
where for four years he engaged in farming. In 184G he again removed, 
this time settling further north, in the southern portion of Cliristian 
County, Ky. Here he devoted himself chiefly to agricultural pursuits, 
with which he combined mercantile business for some time, as well as en- 
gaging for several years in teaching school, in which profession he mani- 
fested especial fitness. He came to Ilopkinsville in 1869, and that year 
erected the first tobacco warehouse built in that city. Since that date he 
has been the pronounced leader in the local tobacco market, and is still 
actively engaged in the tobacco trade. Mr. Abernathy was married in 
Christian County to Miss Ophelia F., daughter of Benjamin and Eliza- 
beth Leavell. Mrs. Abernathy is a native of Christian County, de- 
scending from one of the oldest as well as most honorable families of 
Kentucky. They have but one child — a son, named Henry II. Aber- 
nathy, junior member of the firm of II. G. Abernathy & Son. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. AbcrnatJiy are members of the Baptist Church of Hop- 
kinsville. A portrait of Mr. Abernathy will be found in a group else- 
whore in this volume. JLG9!jL93S 

LAWRENCE G. ALEXANDER, M. D., was born April 28, 1844, 
in the city of Augusta, Ga., to L. G. Alexander and Martha L. (Steele) 
Alexander. When he was si.x years old his fatlier settled in Calhoun, 
McLean Co., Ky., and there enga;.^od in the milling business. His fath- 
er was born in Prince William County, Va., in February, 1815, and ilied 
in 1SG9. His mother was born in the city of Louisville, Ky., in ISIS, 



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340 EIOGRAPIUCM, SKI'.TCHmS. 

and ilied in 1864. They Iiad but two cliililren, viz., Ur. L. G. Alexan- 
der and Annie A., wife of S. J. Boyd, of liopkinsville, Ky. The subject 
of these lines began the study of medicine in 18G3, and in the early part 
of lS(i7 graduated in the medical department of the Louisville Universi- 
ty, lie began practice at Callioun, Ky., where in 1873 he married 
Lizzie Loving, of Warren County, Ky., who died in 1877, leaving one 
son — Norbern Alexander. From Calhoun he removed to the city of 
Atlanta, Ga., where for a time he engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion, and in editing a medical journal. In 1879 he located in Ilopkins- 
ville, Ky., an<l on the 5th of May, 1S80, was married to Miss Bell Lea- 
vell, daugliter of Livingston L. Leavell and Mary Ann Leavelj. To them 
have been born two children — L.. G. Alexander, Jr., and Mary Ann 
Alexander. Dr. Alexander is a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
of the Baptist Church. He is President of the Christian County Medi- 
cal Society, Secretary of the County Board of Health, has a large and 
lucrative practice, and enjoys the confidence of an extensive circle of 
friends. Though but comparatively a young man, he has already 
achieved success in his chosen profession, and enjoys a reputation second 
to none in Ilopkinsville.* 

ROBERT M. ANDERSON'S father, John Anderson, now of Hop- 
kinsville, Ky., was born in 1820, in Christian County, and is a son of 
Josiah Anderson, of whom mention is made in the history of Ilamby 
Precinct. In 1840 he was married to Miss Pernecia Coon, by whom he 
had two children — Mi's. M. D. Meachnra and Robert M. Amlerson. 
Mrs. John Anderson died in this county in 1881. Robert M. was born 
November 23, 1843. He learned the trade of carpenter, which he fol- 
lowed until 1873, with the exception of a short interval of time, during 
which he served as Assistant Postmaster at Ilopkinsville. He was 
married in Shelby County, Ky., in 1866, to Miss Jlelissa A., daughter of 
J. M. Woods. She was born in Shelby County, December 30, 1842. 
Since 1873 Mr. Anderson has been merchandising, and is now conduct- 
ing a nourishing grocery business on Court Street, between A''irginia and 
Main Streets. He is a member of the Masonic Order ; Knights of 
Honor ; Knights of Pythias ; Odd Fellows, and is Grand Patriarch of 
the Grand Encampment of the I. 0. 0. F., State of Kentucky. Mr. 

tliissketcli.andonthe Irtthday (If Miu-ch, 1SS4, Dr. Alcxaodor aicd at his 



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HOl'KINSVlLLi; CITY AND I'RECINCT. 341 

Anderson sustained a severe loss in the conflagration of October, 1882, 
and in 1883 re'ouilt a substantial business house on the site of the for- 
mer, at a cost of ?3,700. Of his four children, the eldest, Ada, is de- 
ceased ; those living are Florence, Daisey and May Anderson. 

CLARENCE ANDERSON, one of the first photographic artists in 
the State of Kentucky, is the second of three children born to the Rev. 
Henry T. Anderson and Jane (Buckner) Anderson. [For sketch of Rev. 
Henry Anderson, see the history of the Hopkinsvillc Christian Church.] 
He was born in Caroline County, Va., in 1835. He received a fair edu- 
cation largely under the care and teaching of his father. He began in 
early life as a druggist's clerk, and in this capacity worked for some years 
in the cities of Louisville and Chicago. In 1860 he established himself 
in the drug business in Harrodsburg, Ky., \Yhere ho continued to conduct 
that line of merchandise until closing out some time after his removal to 
Hopkinsvillc, in 1877. Notwithstanding the fact that he has devoted 
twenty years to tlie drug trade, he has taken rank with the best photog- 
raphers in the State, and is now devoting his attention to that business, 
with marked ability. He was married in 1802, in Harrodsburg, Ky., to 
Miss Mary, daughter of Dr. C. H. Spilman, of that place. She was 
born in Jessamine County, Ky., in 1842. Iioth are honored members of the 
church and highly esteemed by a large circle of friends. Their children, 
six in number, are Charles H., Clarence, Jr., Alyett B., Genevieve, 
Trabue and Mary Stilman Anderson. 

ALEXANDER H. ANDERSON, a native of this county, and son 
of Joseph F. Anderson, was born July 11, 1846. His father, Joseph 
F., was a son of Josiali Anderson, who came to Christian County from 
Logan County, Ky. He settled in the northern part of the county, 
where Joseph F. was born, June 20, 1818. Joseph was reared to the 
pursuit of farming, and carl}- in life learned the trade of carpenter. He 
was for some time Superintendent of the Christian County poor-farm. 
He married Mary Coon, a native of this county, and a daughter of Ben- 
jamin and Polly Coon. This wife died in Christian County, October 10, 
1843, leaving one sun, William H., who has since died. Joseph F. ne.xt 
married Sarah A. Coon, a sister of his former wife, who still survives him 
and who bore him eight ehildien. Alexander H. being the eldest. 
Joseph F. Anderson became a member of the Third Kentucky Regiment, 



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HinGHAl'IlU'AL .SKKTCIIES. 



in wliich he served as a soldier through the late war. lie was present 
and took part in the battles of Shiloh, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain, 
and was in the entire Atlanta campaign; he died October 19, 1869.' 
Alexander II. was reared and educated in Hopkins/ille, and in early life 
learned the trade of house and sign painting, which he followed for about 
seven years. In 1871 he became a partner with J. H. Tunks, in the 
grocery business, which association terminated three years later. He is 
now connected in the same business with John B. Cheaney, and located 
on Virginia Street, between Court and Russellville Streets. Mr. Ander- 
son was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace in 1881, to fill an un- 
expired term, and was re-elected to the full term in August, 1882. He 
is an honored member of the I. 0. 0. F. He was married^in Hopkinsville, 
Ky., February 28, 1866, to Miss Laura Elythe, daughter of Harvey and 
Caroline Blythe {nee Clemens.) Mrs. Anderson was born in 1846, and 
is a native of Christian County. Their children, tv/o in number, are 
Otho and Robbie Anderson. 

HENRY CLAY BALLARD was born November 1.5, 1840, in 
Princeton, Ky., where he remained until seventeen years old, and then came 
to Hopkinsville, where he engaged to learn the trade of tinner, and where 
he has since made his home. He followed his trade here until the break- 
ing out of the Civil war, and on the 16th of December, 1861, joined the 
Third Kentucky Cavalry, Company' A, under Capt. J. W. Breathitt. 
Two weeks after enlistment, while engaged in battle at Sacramento, Ky.. 
he received two severe wounds, and was taken prisoner by the Confeder- 
ate forces. Six months later, having been exchanged, he rejoined l.is 
command, with which he continued until discharged, in December, 1865, 
having participated in the warfare incident to Sherman's famous march' 
to the sea. In 18G6 he opened a mercantile business in Hopkinsville, 
which he is still pursuing. In Hopkinsville he married Miss Mary L.,' 
daughter of David J. Hooser. She was born in Christian County. The 
children born to their union were named Jennie, James, William and Al- 
bert G., the latter of whom is deceased. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ballard are 
members of the xMethodist Episcopal Churcli, and he of the I. 0. 0. F 

REV. JAMES F. BARROW was born in Logan County, Ky., "on 
the 19th of August, 1839, and is the ninth of a family of eleven children, 
born to Charles M. and Prudence F. Barrow. He grew to manhood 



HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND rUKCINfX 343 

and was educated in his native county, and when about twenty- 
two years old became connected with the Baptist Church. He was 
ordained to the ministry in June, 1864, since which time he has been 
coustautly and faithfully engaged in the service of the Master. He pos- 
sesses many rare traits, which characterize him as an able and efficient 
minister. He is concise and pointed in his delineations, forcible as a 
pulpit orator, and in ordinary conversation impresses all with whom he 
comes in contact, that he is not only a genial gentleman, but thnt he 
possesses a cultivated mind. The fidelity of Mr. Barrow to his church is 
better understood when it is remembered that on two occasions he has 
been by convention placed in nomination to represent the county in the 
General Assembly, but has each time declined that honor to devote him- 
self to his church. His father, who was born about 1800, in Casey 
County, Ky., removed in early manhood to Logan County, where he 
married Miss Prudence F., daughter of Lewis and Dorcas Dunn, who 
emigrated to Logan County from North Carolina, where their daughter, 
Mrs. Barrow, was born in February, 1805. She is still a resident of 
Logan County ; her husband, Charles M., died there in January, 1873. 
James F. Barrow, the subject of this sketch, was married in Christian 
County, Ky., on October 7, 1867, to Miss Mary E., daughter of James 
and Minerva Robinson. She was born August 20, 1840. They have 
two daughters, viz.: Lelia Barrow, born February 15, 1872, and Bertha 
Barrow, born February 14, 1874. In addition to pastoral work, Rev. 
James F. Barrow has labored successfully as missionary of Clear Fork 
and Bethel associations. 

DAVID R. BEARD, whose portrait appears in this work, was 
born October 11, 1814, in Ilarrisonburgh, Rockingham Co., Va. 
John M. and Ilettie (Rolston) Beard, the parents of David R., came to 
Christian County, Ky., about 1*^20, and settled in the northeast part of 
the county, where they engaged in agricultural pursuits, and where in 
1827 Mrs. Ilettie Beard died. In 1832 John M. Beard returned to 
Virginia to visit the scenes of his boyhood, and there died. Ho had 
served as a soldier in the war of 1812, and had a family of five children, 
as follows : Charles Beard, who died in Hopkinsvilie, in 1863 ; David 
R. Beard; Sarah, deceased wife of Joseph M. Cheaney ; John M. Beard, 
who died in this county about 1849, and Ilettie, deceased wife of Andrew 









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344 BlOGUAPiUCAL SKKTOllES. 

Briscoe. David R. Beard was reared on the farm, and wlieii seventeen 
. years old came to Hopkinsville, where he adopted the trade of saddler, 
serving his apprenticeship with S. A. Means, with whom he became 
associated in the business in 1847, which connection was terminated in 
1855. From that time until 1880 he was a partner with E. II. Crutch- 
field in the same line. Since retiring from business in 1880, he has been 
superintending the interests of his farm, which lies a short distance south 
"of Hopkinsville, and consists of 242 acres. Mr. Beard has for the past 
twenty years wielded an extensive influence in the city government, in 
which he has held official position ; he has also been a director in the 
Bank of Hopkinsville since January, 1866. He is a member of the I. 0. 
0. F. and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1858 he was mar- 
ried to Mrs. Malinda Beard {nee Holland). She was born in Fluvanna 
County, Va., January 28, 1818. They have one child, Johnnie 
Beard. Mrs. Beard is a member of the Baptist Church. 

SILA''ANUS J. BOYD was born in Muhlenburg County, Ky., 
August 11, 1833, and is a son of Rev. Adlai Boyd who, with hia par- 
ents, moved from the State of North Carolina about 1814 to Christian 
County, Ky., and two years afterward removed to Stewart County, Tenn., 
where in 1817 he united with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and 
in 1822 entered upon the duties of a Minister of the Gospel in Christian 
County, Ky. He married Johanna Cessna of Muhlenburg County, Ky., 
and she died January 3, 1863. He was actively engaged as a minister 
for over fifty-nine years and until his death, which occurred on the last 
day of 1881, having preached his last sermon in Greenville, Ky., six 
days prior to his death. S. J. Boyd was educated in Greenville, Ky., 
where he studied law and was admitted to practice in said place in 
1859, and removed to Calhoun, McLean Co., Ky., in 1866, and in 1876 
removed to Hopkinsville, Ky. While living in Calhoun, and on the 19th 
day of December, 1872, he married Miss Annie A. Alexander of that 
place. She is now the only surviving child of L. G. and Martha L. 
Alexander (deceased), and was born in Jefferson County, Ky., on the 6th 
of September, 1848. Her father was born in Prince William County, 
Va., and died in Calhoun, McLean Co., Ky., on the 29th day of 
December, 1869. He descended from the old Sterling branch of the 
old Alexander family of Scotland, and his wife was a daughter of Rich- 






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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 345 

ard Steele of Louisville, Ky., in which place she was born. Gen. Neville 
was hei- maternal grandfather, and she was a great-granddaughter of 
Gen. Daniel Morgan, who commanded the American forces at the battle of 
the Cov/pens. She died February 11, 1S63. i\Ir. and Mrs. Boyd are 
blessed with three children, namely : Ashton A. Boyd, Nina Steele Boyd 
and Genevia Boyd. 

. JOHN W. BREATHITT is a native of the county, and descends 
from one of the old and noted families of Kentucky. He is the only 
living son of Hon. James Breathitt, and a nephew of Gov. John 
Breathitt, of Kentucky, after whom Breathitt County was named. 
James Breathitt, the father of John W., was born in Virginia. He 
came to Christian County from Logan County about 1814. He was 
here married to Miss Elizabeth S. Short, by whom he had three chil- 
dren — a daughter that died in infancy and two sons, Peyton S. and 
John W. Breathitt. The mother died in Hopkinsville about 182b, 
and during the infancy of John W., who was born January 9, 1825, Pey- 
ton S., the elder brother, grew to manhood and became a physician ; 
after graduating from the Louisville Medical College he practiced in 
Louisville until loss of health compelled him to abandon the practice, 
soon after which he died in Florida. James Breathitt, in 1830, married 
Gabriella A. Harvie, daughter of John Harvie, of Frankfort, Ky. 
Harvie W. Breathitt was the only child born to them ; he was drowned 
in the Illinois River after attaining manhood. The father died near Rus- 
sellville, Logan County, in 1839, and his widow survived him until 
August 26, 1S83, when she died in Frankfort, Ky. Until 1839 John 
W. received the benefits of the Hopkinsville public schools. After the 
death of his fatlier he went to North Bend, Ohio, to live with his uncle, 
John C. Short. Here he attended Gary's Academy, from which he 
entered the preparatory department of the Kenyon College, where he 
completed his studies. He afterward studied law, but was never admitted 
to the bar. For a time he followed farming, later engaged in merchan- 
dising. September 1, 1861, he entered the Federal Army as Captain of 
Company A, Third Kentucky Cavalry. On the 27th of May, 1863, he 
was promoted to Major of the First Battalion, which position he held 
until mustered out at Savannah, Ga., at the close of the war. He took 
active part in many engagements, among which were Pittsburg Land- 



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346 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ing, Stone River, Lookout Mountain and the fighting incident to the 
Atlanta campaign and Sherman's march to the sea. In 1874 he was 
elected to the office of County Clerk of Christian County, which he has 
held continuously since, assisted by his sous Augustine and Harvie W. 
Breathitt. ' He is a Royal Arch Mason and member of the Baptist 
Church. On the 12th of November, 1847, he married Catherine A. 
Webber, daughter of Dr. A. Webber, of whom mention is made else- 
where. Their family consists of Peyton S., Augustine. Harvie W., 
James, John W. Jr., Elizabeth S., Mary C. and Catherine A. Breathitt. 

HON. JAMES BREATHITT is a son of John W. Breathitt, and 
was born in Christian County September 4, 1852. His early education 
was obtained in the Hopkinsville schools. In 1877 he entered the Cum- 
berland University of Lebanon, Tenn., from which he graduated in June, 
1878. In the same year he began the practice of law in Hopkinsville, 
associated with John W. Payne, under the firm name of Breathitt & 
Payne, which partnership terminated in 1881, and during which he was 
three times elected to the office of City Attorney of Hopkinsville. In 
1881 he was elected to represent his county in General Assembly, and 
was again a candidate in 1883, but was defeated by L. T. Brasher on a 
local. issue. He is now associated in practice with Henry J. Stites. He 
is an honored member of the Knights of Pythias as well as of the Bap- 
tist Church. 

JAMES BRONAUGH'S grandfather was William Bronaugh, of 
French descent, a native of Virginia who married Miss Mary Grant, a 
relative of Gen. Grant, ex-President of the United States. He was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. In 1795 he, with his wife and chil- 
dren, except David, his eldest son, emigrated to Kentucky b}' flat-boat 
from Wheeling, and landed near WMshingtou, the old county seat of 
Mason County, where the parents died. His death occurred in 1815. 
Capt. David Bronaugh, who commanded a conijiany in 1805-180G, was 
the eldest son of William and the father of our subject, was a native of 
Virginia, where he was reared and educated, and on the loth of Decem- 
ber, 1787, married Anna Sandidge in Spottsylvania County. They died 
in Virginia— he May 1, 1853, and she June 24, 1853. Of the ten chil- 
dren born to them James was the eigluli child, and is now the only sur- 
viving descendant of the family. He was born in Spottsylvania County, 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 347 

Va., October 18, 1804, and there spent his early life. In 1831 he came 
to Christian County and settled on the farm now owned and occupied by 
Walter Warfield in Casky Precinct. He afterward moved to a farm on 
the Nashville road four miles southeast of Ilopkinsville, where he now ■ 
owns 260 acres. He now resides in Hopkinsville. In Virginia 
he married Miss Isabel Hart, a native of Virginia, born December 29, 
1804, and died in Christian County, Ky., February 9, 1880. Her 
father, Malcolm Hart, was a native of Scotland, born in about 17"j0, and 
emigrated to the United States previous to the Revolutionary war. He 
was the owner of the celebrated horse " Hart's Medley," which he im- 
ported from England in about 1783 or 1784. He had served as Magis- 
trate and High Sheriff. Mr. Bronaugh's marriage was blessed with the 
following .children : Martha M., who married Dr. Shelton, moved to 
Texas and there died, leaving four children ; Malcolm II. died, leaving a 
wife and one child; David B. died, leaving a wife and three children ; 
James B., now a resident of Hopkinsville; William T., of Hopkinsville; 
Judith Ann, deceased, and Jane M. Bronaugh. 

. ENOCH A. BROWN (deceased) was born in the year 1805 in 
Georgia, whence in childhood he removed with his parents to Rowan 
County, N. C. There the fatlicr died, and the mother, Rachel Brown, 
with her three children, Enoch A., John W. and Margaret Brown, came 
to Christian County, Ky., in 1812. At that time the family were in 
very humble circumstances, and the subject of these lines being the eldest 
of the three children was compelled to render assistance in procuring sus- 
tenance for the family. He was thereby largely deprived of the advan- 
tages of schooling, being only permitted to attend school a short time each 
year during the winter months. Being possessed, however, of an indom- 
itable will, coupled with great energy, he determined to secure an educa- 
tion, which he accomplished under extreme difficulties, keeping his book 
before him while he sat upon his shoe-bench, and thus, while shaping the 
vamps of the rude pioneer's shoe he was also storing his young mind with 
knowledge, the inlluence of which was destined to be felt by the future 
generations of Christian County. He soon became competent to fdl the 
position of teacher, which for some years engaged a portion of his time, 
and often after the duties of the schoolroom were ended for the day he 
worked until late in the night preparing the forest land for the plow. He 



348 BIOGRArillCAL SKETCHES. 

united with the Christian Church about 1827, and to his honor it is said 
that he preached more than fifty years in the same house, during which 
time he administered the ordinance of baptism and performed the mar- 
riage ceremony for more persons than any other man in the county, hav- 
ing frequently married f;ithcr and son. He was the choice of the people 
of his county in 1863 to represent them in the State Legislature, where 
he served with credit one term. lie was also a candidate for delegate to the 
State Con.stitutional Convention of 1849, but sustained a defeat in con- 
sequence of his advocacy of a clause providing for the liberation of slaves. 
He was married in Christian County, Ky., in 1830, to Sarah Brasher, 
who was born in 1809 in South Carolina, and who still survives him. 
He died in June, 1882, but the imprint of his molding hand will long 
remain to evidence the fact that he lived for a high aim and acted well his 
part. His venerable mother, Rachel Long, who was mariied twice, and 
whose maiden name was IJachel Phillips, died in Christian County in 
1880 at the age of one hundred and one years. Of ten children born to 
Enoch A. and Sarah Brown five are still living, four of whom are residents 
of this county. The eldest of these is Omar S. Brown, who was born Jan- 
uary 13, 1832, and was educated in the common school and at the Transyl- 
vania College at Lexington, Ky., and for a time taught school ; he is a very 
successful farmer and present Deputy Sheriff of the county ; he also served 
the county three years as Commissioner of Tax. He is at present a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees for the Hopkinsville Public School as well as 
of the South Kentucky College. He was married in 1866 to Kate Davis, 
daughter of Benjamin and Rochie Davis. They have one child, Lizzie 
A. Brown. Cyrus M. Brown, present Sheriff of the county, is the ninth 
of the family of Enoch A. Brown, and was born February 26, 1848. 
He olitained a practical education, and for ten years was a prominent 
teacher of the county, in which he was eminently succes.^ful, and during 
which time he developed a literary talent of no mean order. In 1880 he 
was elected to the oflice of Sheriff, and the ability with which he filled 
that position was shown in his re-election in 1882. He is a Republican 
and a member of the A. F. & A. M. 

THOMAS F. BROWN. Among the old and numerous families of 
Christian County, Ky., is that of Thomas and licbecca Brown, the 
former of whom was born in Rockingham County, Va., where at an ear- 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITV AND PRECINCT. 349 

ly age he was left .an orphan. He learned tlie trade of blacksmith, at 
which he engaged the most of his life. He was in the war of 1812, after 
which he came to Kentucky, and settled in Christian County, nine miles 
east of Ilopkinsville, on the Russellville road. He married Rebecca 
Stuart, daughter of Gravner and Jane (Fields) Stuart, who came in an 
early day from North Carolina, settling in Christian County. To 
Thomas Brown at his home east of Hopkinsville were born fifteen chil- 
dren ; later the family removed further west, in Casky Precinct, where 
Thomas died in 1855, and Rebecca in 18G9. Their children were : An- 
drew J., Nancy S. (widow of Jeremiah Allcox), Absalom, Gravner S., 
Augustus W., Robert S., William, John A. F., Thomas F., Samuel M., 
Sarah S'., Jane, Milton D., James Henry Brown, and an infant which 
diedunnamed. James H. and Jane died in childhood, and the other mem- 
bers lived to be grown, and in 1850 in the fair grounds of Christian 
County were seen ten of these bearded-faced sons mounted upon white 
steeds, arrayed in similar dress, and presenting a scene so rare as to cause 
extensive newspaper comment. Thomas F. is the ninth of this family, 
and was born October 8, 1828. In early life he devoted several years in 
school-teaching, but in 1855 began the mercantile business in Hopkins- 
. ville, where he soon after sustained a loss of his business from fire. In 
1858, however, he again opened a grocery business, which he prosecuted 
for some years with success, associated in the meantime with his brother 
J. A. F. Brown, under the firm name of J. A. F. Brown & Bro. He 
was married in Christian County, March 12, 1868, to Emma Davidge, 
daughter of Judge R. and Martha (Dallam) Davidge. She was born in 
1838. They have but one child, named Robert Henry Brown, born 
February 1, 1869. Mr. Brown is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South, and his wife is a member of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church. His portrait appears in this volume. 

F. J. BROWNELL was born April 15, 1837, in Fulton County, N. 
Y. His parents were Frederick Brownell and Annie Donnelly, the former 
of Scotch and the latter of Irish ancestry. The father was born in New 
York in 1794, served as a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in 1851 in 
the State of Ohio. They had a family of eleven children, viz.: Charles 
Brownell, of Dayton, Ohio; Phoebe, wife of James Vannatter, of New 
York ; Israel, died in infancy ; Samantha, wife of David Smith, of New 






:3 



'■{ =.'!' Y 



350 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHKS. 

York ; Jane, wife of Charles A. Phelps, of New York ; Elijah Brownell, 
a manufacturer, of Dayton, Ohio; Elizabeth, widow of William Zimmer- 
man, of Dayton, Ohio ; Berintha, deceased wife of John A. Tracy ; 
James 11. Rrownell, deceased ; F. J. Brovrnell, whose name heads this 
sketch, and John R. Brownoll, who is an extensive manufacturer of en- 
gines at Dayton, Ohio. F. J. Brownell was reared principally in Ohio, 
in which State his parents settled when he was a small boy. He was 
educated in Buffalo, N. Y., Tiffin, Ohio, and Deiiison University, of Lick- 
ing County, Ohio. lie enlisted in the fall of 18(31 in Company I, Fifty- 
first Indiana Infantry, was appointed Sergeant, and after a service of 
one year was promoted to the position of First Lieutenant, commanding 
his company, with which commission he was mustered out in the spring of 
1865. We are allowed to preserve the following as an incident in the 
military career of Mr. Brownell: On the 3d of May, 1863, at Gadsen, 
Ala., he was made a prisoner of war, and thus held until making his es- 
cape in March, 1865, covering a time of twenty-two months; fifty-two 
weeks or just one year of which was spent in the famous Libby Prison of 
Richmond. At the time of Sherman's march against the Southern 
strongholds, he in company with many others was being removed from 
Columbia, S. C, to Charlotte, N. C, for greater security. While en route 
the engine of the freight train upon which they were carried became de- 
railed, necessitating a delay of several hours. The night was chilly and 
dark ; fires were constructed beside the cars, and guards were stationed at 
either door of the cars, an order prevailing that but two prisoners be al- 
lowed to warm by the fire at the same time, and but one be allowed at 
the same time to visit an adjoining spring for water. The guards within, 
thinking that a sufficient guard was stationed without, went to sleep, 
when Mr. Brownell and Lieut. Newbrant determined upon a desperate 
means of escape. Mr. Brownell, who was dressed in the Confederate 
gray, stole the gun of the sleeping guard, dropped down by the fire where 
he played the role of a faithful guard, and during his vigil was cautioned 
to be extremely watchful, which he readily consented to do. Soon his 
comrade made his appearance, and desiring a drink was guarded to the 
spring by the faithful sentinel, Mr. Brownell. Once free they threw the 
gun away, and made the best of the remaining hours of darkness. Their 
weary march by night and their perils while lying in concealment by day, 






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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT'. 851 

upon one occasion hidden beneath the floor of a cotton-gin while the rebel 
soldiers tramjied with heavy thud over their prostrate forma — all their 
experiences until reaching Sherman's lines would furnish material for a ro- 
mance. Mr. Browiiell removed to Uopkiiisville, Ky., in January, 1868, 
and engaged with John Orr in operating a planing mill. He is now one o 
the proprietors of the " Gre^cent Mills." May 24, 1870, he married Mis 
Sallic, daughter of Rev. Thomas Bottomly, of Hopkinsville. They are 
both faithful members of the church, and he is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity. They havebut one child, viz., Mary J. Brownell. 

ISAAC BURNETT is a son of Isaac and Matha (Garnett) Burnett, 
and was born in Trigg County, Ky., on the 13th of January, 1838, and was 
there reared and received a common school education, supplemented by a 
course at the Cumberland College of Caldwell County, Ky. In early life he 
read law under the preceptorship of his brother, H. C. Burnett, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1859. He immediately entered upon the practice of 
his profession and continued the same until 1861, when he engaged in mer 
chandising and agricultural pursuits, continuing the same until 1883. In 
1882 he came to Hopkinsville, where he is now engaged in the practice 
of his profession. In Christian County, Ky., in 1866, he married Miss 
Ritchie, daughter of Maj. John Poinde.xter, of this county. vSho was 
born here July 2, 1842. Her father was a native of Virginia and a son 
of Rev. John P. Poinde.xter. He married Miss Elizabeth Graves, of 
Virginia. They died in this county after a residence of about sixty yeas. 
They were the parents of eleven children, of whom all are now deceased 
except Mrs. Burnett and May L. Poindexter. Mr. and Mrs. Burnett 
are the parents of the following children : John P., Bessie Garnett and 
Ritchie P. Burnett. Mr. Burnett is an active member ot the order 
Knights of Honoi-, and with his wife unites with the Christian Church. 

CHARLES H. BUSH was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., on the 
28th day of October, 1856. lie is the only child born to Howard B. Bush 
and Panthea B. Bush (netj Ellis). Howard B. Bush was born in Montgomery 
County, Tenn., and his wife was a native of Humphreys County, of the 
same State; she died a few months after the birth of Charles 11., and the 
father died in January of 1862. Charles tl. was thus deprived of the 
kind ministrations of loving parents, but found a warm home in the fam- 
ily of his uncle, G. B. Bush, of Christian County, Ky. Besides the 









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:W r. 



352 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

advantages of tlie private schools of this county, he prosecuted his studies 
for two years in the Bethany College of West Virginia. After leaving 
college he entered upon the study of law under Hon. Henry Eurnett, of 
Paducah, Ky. He was admitted to practice in July, 1878, and until 
September, 1881, practiced in Paducah ; coming to Hopkinsville in 1881, 
he at once obtained a fair practice which has steadily increased. May 5, 
1880, he was married to Jennie Gary, daughter of Robert S. and Mattie 
(Clark) Gary. She was born near Hopkinsville, Ky., November 25, 
1858. They have two children : Howard and Lillian. Mr. Bush is an 
honored member of the Christian Church and his wife of the Baptist 
Church. 

HON. JOHN PEIRCE CAMPBELL, JR., was born on the 8th day 
of December, 1820, in Christian County, Ky., and is the son of John 
Peirce Campbell, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He 
received a thorough education, mainly in the academy of his native county, 
under James D. Rumsey. At the age of eighteen he began the study 
of law in the office of Joseph B. Crockett, and three years subsequently 
entered upon the practice of his profession at Lexington, Fayette Co., 
Mo. After nine years of successful practice in that State he returned to 
Hopkinsville, and has since engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1848 
he was elected to the lower house of the Missouri Legislature ; was 
re-elected in 1850 ; and after returning to Kentucky was elected to 
Congress in 1855, declining re-election at the close of the term. In pol- 
itics he was associated with the Whig party until its dissolution ; and 
since the war has been identified with the Democracy, taking an active 
part in the political contests. He is a member of the Baptist Church, 
and freely gives his means and influence to the works of his church, and 
towards the advancement of every good cause in his community ; and is 
one of the most substantial and valuable men of Christian County. He 
was twice made President of the Henderson & Nashville Railroad, serving 
in that capacity for more than six years. Mr. Campbell was married, in 
1856, to Miss Mary B. Faulkner, daughter of Charles J. Faulkner, of 
Martinsburg, Va. They have but one living child — a son who bears 
his father's name. 

GEORGE V. CAMPBELL, a son of George and Rebecca Camp- 
bell, was born near Hopkinsville, Ky., September 10, 1826. In early 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 353 

life he JearneJ the tailoring business, which he followed for a brief period, 
and in June, 1850, engaged in the grocery trade, in Hopkinsville, which 
line he is still following, being the pioneer grocer of the city. He was 
married in St. Louis, Mo., November 20, 1855, to Miss Lucy A. Coleman, 
daughter of Nathan Coleman and Prances Coleman {nee Dallam). She 
was born in the City of St. Louis, October 8, 1838, was educated in the 
Bethel College of Hopkinsville, Ky., and was a member of the first grad- 
uating class of that institution, in June, 1855. Iler grandparents, James 
0. and Lucy Coleman, came from Pennsylvania to Christian County, in 
the latter part of the eighteenth century. He was by trade a cabinet- 
maker, which he pursued in Hopkinsville for nearly half a century, and 
died in- 1851, the wife surviving him until 1861. They had a numerous 
family, only one of whom, William, a banker of California, is now living. 
Many of their descendants, however, are yet living. The family of G. V. 
and Lucy A. Campbell consisted of seven children, of whom two died in 
infancy. George N., the eldest son, was born in September, 1858 ; Sallie 
M., born in September, 1861 ; Benjamin, born November, 1863 ; Fran- 
ces R., born in March, 1865; and Lucy A. Campbell, born in July, 
1^71. Both Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are members of the Hopkinsville 
Methodist Episcopal Church. George N., in September, 1878, entered 
the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, from which he graduated 
on the 13th of March, 1881. 

DR. ALEXANDER P. CAMPBELL descends from a pioneer fam- 
ily in Christian County. His father, George Campbell, was born in Ire- 
land; came with his parents to the United States in childhood, and settled 
in Virginia, where he grew to manhood, and where he entered the war of 
1812. Nothing is definitely known of his military record, and we only 
know that shortly after the close of the war he came to Christian County, 
Ky., and here married Miss Rebecca Nichols. She was born about 1790, 
in this county, and was a daughter of James Nichols, a farmer and prom- 
inent member of the Methodist Church, who emigrated to this county 
from Georgia in the latter part of the seventeenth century, and died many 
years ago in Elkton, Todd Co., Ky. George Campbell was accidentally 
killed in 1826, while operating a mill near Hopkinsville. His wife was 
afterward married to Andrew O'Neal, who died about 1858. She lived un- 
til December 1, 1862, when she died at the residence of her son, G. V. 






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354 BIOGllArillCAL SKKTCHES. 

Campbell, in Ilopkinsville. George and Rebecca Campbell had a family 
of six children, of whom but three grew to maturity, viz. : George V., 
Ethalinda C, deceased wife of B. T. Underwood, and Alexander P. 
When the latter was twelve years old he went to Elkton, Todd County, 
and with Messrs. Hurt & Jones learned the trade of saddler, and until 
1853 conducted that business in Elklon. He returned to Hopkinsville 
in 1853 and began the study of dentistry with H. A. McDaniels. In 
1857, in connection with R. J. McDaniels, he opened a dental office in 
Hopkinsville, where he is still located and now associated with Dr. G. E. 
Medley, his former partner having died in 1875. He was married, in 
1860, to Miss Fannie M. Ellis, daughter of Ira I. and Martha (Smith) 
Ellis. She was born in this county July 31, 1835. They have had a 
family of seven children, named as follows: John E., Alexander P., Jr., 
Fletcher, Ira F., George F., Frank and Bob Campbell. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Campbell are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he 
of the K. of H. and Royal Arcanum. 

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL was born April 15, 1831, in Mercer 
County, this State, and when about fourteen years of age was removed to 
Independence, Mo., where he resided for many years, being engaged 
extensively in the milling and grocery business. At the time of the war 
he joined the Confederate ranks, but sickness prevented any extended serv- 
ice. He is a son of James and Catharine (Bradshaw) Campbell, natives 
of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. The father was one of the ear- 
liest settlers in Mercer County, Ky. He was fond of the chase, and 
found especial delight in a pack of houmls, but was altogether a man of 
steady habits and great hospitality, and although a carpenter by trade, 
devoted most of his life to the prosecution of his farming interests. He 
reared a large family of children, of whom eight are now living — Whit- 
taker, Jane, Benjamin B., Mary, Catharine, Alexander, Susan and T. C. 
Our subject was first united in marriage, to Miss Ardenia Ilockensmith. 
She died in Independence, Mo. There were two children born of this 
marriage, one of whom survives— Lee W., now engaged in the boot and 
shoe business in St. Louis, Mo. Mr. Campbell's second wife was Miss 
Sallie B. Hill, of Jessamine County, this State. She died at Lexington, 
Mo. To this marriage were born three children, of whom two are living, 
Maggie and T. C, who reside with their father. Mr. Campbell was sub- 






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HOrKINSVILLE CITY ANIi PRECINCT. 355 

sequently married, after coming to Christian County in 1870, to Miss 
Graeme McCarroll, a daughter of Dr. John MuCarroll, an old, settlor 
ill this county. This union has given two children, Alexander and 
Graeme. After locating in this county Mr. Campbell engaged in the 
grain and mercantile business in the tov/n of Casky, and after moving to 
Ilopkinsville shortly afterward, gave his attention to the revenue busi. 
ness and that of tax collector, having served in the capacity of Deputy 
Sheriff for several years. He is a man of social prominence and substan- 
tial worth, and is held in general esteem by his fellow-citizens. He is 
identified with the Democratic party, which has on several occasions 
honored him with the nomination for important official positions. 

HON. EDAVARD P. CAMPBELL was born in Caldwell County, 
Ky., October 21, 1832, to Samuel and Lucy A. (Wilcox) Campbell. The 
father was of Scotch-Irish parentage, and came to Christian County, Ky., 
from Pennsylvania, when about seventeen years old, and during the early 
settlement of southwestern Kentucky. He possessed remarkable decision of 
character, coming to this country entirely alone and wholly dependent 
upon his personal exertion. He located fifteen miles west of Hopkins- 
villc, where he was married to a Miss Johnson, who, after bearing him 
several children, died in this county. Of these children, W. W. Camp- 
bell, of Caldwell County, Ky., is the only one surviving. He then mar- 
ried Miss Lucy A. Wilcox, this union resulting in the birth of four chil- 
dren : E dward P., Samuel H., Salina and Helen. Samuel H. died at 
the age of sixteen. Salina became the wife of A. Greer; Helen mar- 
ried James Crane, and both died in early womanhood. Edward P. was 
reared on the farm and received a liberal education, principally at the 
Cumberland College. In 1855 he began the study of law under Judge 
George B. Cook, of Princeton, and in 1856 was admitted to practice, 
which he commenced in Princeton, Ky. In 1860 he was elected Common- 
wealth Attorney for the Second Judicial District, serving in that capacity 
for eight years. He was elected in 1871 to the State Senate from the 
Sixth Senatorial District, composed of Christian and Muhlenburg Coun- 
ties, but resigned in 1872 to confine himself to the prosecution of his 
legal business; he was married in Princeton, Ky., in 1858, to Miss Caro- 
line E. Taylor, daughter of W. D. S. Taylor, of Jefferson County, Ky., 
of which she is a native. Their family consists of Edward T., Walter 



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v;-i".' ., I" . 's 



356 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Charles, Hugh, Elizabeth and Flavius J. Campbell. Mr. Campbell is a 
member of the Ilopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. k A. j\I. 

POLK CANSLER was born August 11, 1844, and is the eighth of 
a family of ten children bom to John and Matilda (Renshaw) Cansler; 
his father wus born May 3, ISOO, in South Carolina, and in boyhood 
came to Christian County, Ky., with his parents, James and Betsey Can- 
sler; he married Miss Matilda Renshaw, a native of North Carolina, but 
a resident of Christian County from youth. She was born April 27, 
1805, and died December 21, 1881. They were married in Missouri and 
their union was blessed with ten children, viz. : Artemisia Jane, Nancy 
Minerva; Emily Sirena; Joah, who died in inflmcy ; Martin V., deceased ; 
Marcus B., deceased ; Mary M., James K. Polk ; Selina L., deceased ; 
and Butler Cansler. Artemisia J. is the wife of Timothy Keys and 
widow of James Cooksy, Nancy M. is the wife of W. V. Croft, Elmily 
S. is the wife of Dr. A. W. Brasher, and Mary M. is the wife of 0. J. 
Hamby. In October, 18(31, Polk Cansler enlisted as a soldier in the 
Federal Army, becoming a member of Company A, Twenty-fifth Ken- 
tucky Regiment, which was afterward consolidated with the^ Seventeenth 
Regiment ; he was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of 
enlistment in January, 1865. He participated in the battles of Pitts- 
burg Landing, Mission Ridge, JonesI)oro, Ga., and in all of the service 
incident to the Atlanta campaign. In 1875 he was appointed to the of- 
fice of Sherifi" of Christian County, to fill the unexpired term of W. L. 
Garth, and in the election of 1876 was the choice of the people to fill the 
same position, which he did with acceptance for two years ; he has been 
variously connected with the business interests of the city, and is now 
conducting a livery business, and owns a very fine stable, which was 
erected in 1882 after the big fire. This buildihg is fire-proof, two stories 
with basement, and contains a commodious office and ladies' waiting-room. 
Through his spirit of enterprise Mr. Cansler has opened his stable to the 
stock dealers, two days in each month, for the purpose of trading in stock, 
or buying and selling stock either at public auction or private sale. This 
feature, though new, is meeting a felt want, and is no longer an experi- 
ment. He was married, December 20, 1876, to Miss Elvira A., daughter 
of Augustus and Sidney Boales (7iee Roberts). Mrs. Cansler was born in 
Christian County, April 11, 1847. Both Mr. Cansler and his wife are 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 367 

members of the church. They are the parents of four chiklren ; the two 
elder died in infancy, and the living are Maud and Charley Polk Cansler. 

GEORGE A. CHAMPLIN is a native of Chautauqua County, N. 
Y., and was born Septouiber 9, 1832. ^yhen three years old he, with 
his parents, Cyrus M. and Amy Champlin, moved to Indiana, where, in 
Marshall County, he grew to manhood. In 1851 he entered Center Col- 
lege, of Michigan, where he pursued his studies four years, graduating in 
1856. He immediately came to Christian County, Ky., and for two 
years engaged in teaching at Lafayette. He occupied his leisure hours 
in the study of law, which he had previously begun. Later ho entered 
the ofiRce of Phelps & McKee, of Hopkinsvillc, under whose instructions 
he completed his preparatory reading; was admitted to the bar in 1859, 
since which time he has been connected with the Hopkinsvillc bar. In 
1865 he formed a partnership with J. W. McPherson, wliich continued 
until 1877. In 1866 he was elected to the office of County Attorney, 
which he filled with acceptance for a term of four years ; was then elected 
to the office of County Commissioner of Schools, a position he has since 
held, and for which he has shown a marked fitness, and we deem it but 
just to say that no man has done more for the public good than has been 
done by Mr. Champlin in his policy of furthering the cause of public and 
popular education. He is a Deacon in the Southern Presbyterian Church, 
and a member of the Royal Arcanum of Hopkinsvillc ; he was married in 
the city of Hopkinsvillc in February, 1859, to Miss Mary Henry, daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Lucy (Green) Henry. She is a native of the county, 
and descends from one of the pioneer families. To them have been born 
three children, two of whom are deceased; the other, Giecn Henry Cham- 
plin, was born in Ilopkinsville July 20, 1868. 

JOSEPH MILTON CLARK, whose paternal grandfather was one 
of the first settlers of Christian County and one of its early Sherifls, was 
born in the northern part of the county, March 13, 1817. With the 
exception of the time intervening from 1838 to 18-45 (which was spent in 
Missouri) be has spent his entire life in Christian County. In conse- 
quence of his early surroundings his education is entirely solf-acquired, 
and although he has always lived in the retirement of farm life he has 
nevertheless filled some very important offices of trust and honor in this 
county ; he served several years as Deputy Sherift", and was twice elected 



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358 BIOGKAPIIICAL SKETCHES. 

to the office of County Assessor previous to the adoption of the new Con- 
stitution, and twice elected to a similar office under the present Constitu- 
tion. Besides these offices he has served as Constable and Deputy United 
States Marshal. While in Dade County, Mo., he was twice elected to 
the office of Justice of the Peace ; he was a Democrat previous to the 
late war, but through that struggle supported the administration, and was 
the principal enrolling officer for this county. He was married in Polk 
County, Mo., in 1841, to Miss Malinda, daughter of Hilery and Marion 
Barks. She was born in 1818 in the State of Tennessee and died in 
Christian County, Ky., October 14, 1876. She was the mother of eight 
children, four of whom died in infancy. Those reaching maturity are: 
Amanda M., wife of William J. Morris, of Hutchinson, Kan., and 
mother of two children, Charles W. and Z. W. Morris ; and Pcrnecy, 
wife of James D. Brown, of Christian County, and mother of five chil- 
dren ; Maranda E., deceased, wife of F. M. Morris, died in this county 
September 15, 1877, leaving three children, viz. : Mary Ina, Adalissa 
and Clinton M. Morris, who are members of our subject's family; Jo- 
seph L. Clark died at the age of twenty years. 

JOHN H. CLAPiK, a native of Hopkinsville, Ivy., was born March 
28, 1841, and is one of four children, born to Thomas P. and Ann 
(Durrett) Clark, the latter a native of Kentucky and the former of Vir- 
ginia, in which State he grew to manhood, and soon after came to Ken- 
tucky with his father. They settled on a farm eight miles east of Hop- 
kinsville. John H., the subject, received his education in the schools of 
Hopkinsville. He remained at home until attaining his majority, when 
his father gave him the farm of 150 acres upon which he still resides. 
He has been twice married : first, March 10, 1864, to Tabitha Baker, a 
native of Christian County ; she died December 15, 1881, leaving five 
children : Thomas E., William H., Milton, Nannie and Mary F. Two 
daughters, Lillie and Lizzie, died in infancy. Mr. Clark was next mar- 
ried March 15, 1883, to Emma H. Moore, of Christian County. 

GEORGE B. COOMBS was born April 9, 1830, in Nelson County, 
Ky., where he was reared. He has devoted his time until late years to 
the pursuits of the farm, principally in Muhlenburg and Christian 
Counties. In 1849 he removed from his native county to Muhlenburg 
County, where on the 19th of November, 1851, he married Miss Elizabeth, 



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IIOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 359 

dauf^hter of Jacob and Catherine (Yonts) Ilam. She was born and reared 
in Muhlenl)urg County, and died in Christian County, July 5, 1879, leav- 
ing seven children, one of whom has since died. The living are : 
William E., John M., Augustus B., Katie, Ruth and Warner Coombs. Mr. 
Coombs, on the 17th of August, 1882, was married to his present wife, 
Nannie E. Hester, a native of Christian County, born in 1850, and who 
has borne him one child — Annie 11. Coombs. In 1869 Mr. Coombs 
removed to this county and located in the south part, where he now owns 
a farm, and where he remained until he removed to Hopkinsville, in 1882. 
For the past si.x years he has been engaged in the butcher business on an 
extensive scale, supplying all the meats consumed by the Western 
Insane Asylum. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Chuixh and the Knights of Honor. The parents of our subject were 
Edward W. and Mildred Coombs {nee Mason). These parents were 
natives of Nelson County, Ky., where the mother died in 1836. Soon 
after her death the father met with an accident whereby he lost a leg, 
which event of course changed the course of his life. Until 1851 he 
remained in Nelson County, serving several years in official capacity, but 
at the latter date went to Muhlenburg County, Ky., remaining with the 
family of his son George B., and there by appointment he served as 
Assessor of Internal Revenue. He had a family of three children: 
George B., Elizabeth, wife of H. C. Dillman, and Rebecca, wife of J. S. 
Vaught, of Ohio County, Ky. He was the youngest of a family of six- 
teen children, all of whom lived to extreme old age. lie died February 
23, 1884, in his eightieth year, at the residence of Mrs. Dillman, in this 
county. 

JAMES 0. COOPER, son of James and Eliza (Jones) Cooper, was 
born in Christian County, Ky., July 9, 1838. His father was born and grew 
to manhood in the State of Virginia, but in early life came to Kentucky, 
settling ten miles south of the city of Hopkinsville, on the place still known 
as the Cooper farm. He was married in Christian County, to Eliza, daughter 
of James and Leah Jones, who came from the State of Virginia, where 
Eliza was born. James Cooper died at his homestead in this county, in 
August, 1838, leaving two children: Thomas H. and James 0. Cooper, 
the former now a resident of Graves County, Ky. The mother w;is nfter- 
ward married to Thomas Torian, by whom she had eight children, of 



ii/na 1 3 



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360 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCUES. 

whom seven are now living in the county. She died August 5, 1883. 
Jaincs 0. Cooper wa3 educated in the schools of Christian County, and in 
the Cadiz school of Trigg County, Ky. In 1870 he went to Cadiz, and 
there engaged in hotel and livery business until 1876, when ho removed 
to Ilopkinsville, and opened the Cooper House, which burned in 1882. 
In December of 1878 he became proprietor of the Phenix Hotel, which 
he ably managed until retiring in January, 1884, when his son, W. T. 
Cooper, succeeded him. Mr. Cooper was married in this county. May 9, 
1860, to Miss Ilattie Summers, daughter of William and Harriet A. 
(Anthony) Summers. She was born in this (Christian) county, Septem- 
ber 30, 1841. They have had four children, viz.: William T., Ida S., 
Ella B. (deceased) and James E. Cooper. The family are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Cooper is a member of the Ilop- 
kinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M., Oriental Chapter, No. 14, R. A. 
M., Coramandery No. G, and Royal Arcanum, also of the Knights of 
Pythias and Knights of Honor. 

MAJ. SAMUEL R. CRUxMBAUGH. [See sketch in history of 
South Kentucky College.] 

M. C. DAVIS, a native of Christian County, Ky., was born July 3, 
1829, and is the fourth child born to Clement and Henrietta (Wriston) 
Davis, the latter a native of Virginia, and the former of South Carolina, 
from which State he came with his mother when about eight years of age, 
to Kentucky. They settled in Christian County, where he lived until his 
death, December 3, 1845. He first bought a farm in the north part of 
this county, which he owned for several years. In 1S31 he bought the 
farm now owned by his sons. He was twice married, his first wife being 
a Miss Teague, of Virginia, to whom was born one child, William C, 
who died, leaving a family, a few years ago. To his second wife were 
born seven children, five of whom are living. She died February 28, 
1860. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and participated in the bat- 
tle of New Orleans. M. C. Davis, the subject, received a good practical 
education. He remained at home until May 17, 1855, when he married 
Caroline Tinslcy, of Christian County. He then, with two brothers, 
bought the interest of the remaining heirs in the homestead, and divided 
it equally among them. Mr. Davis has added to his share until he now 
has about 220 acres. Mrs. Caroline Davis died April 13, 1882, leaving 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND FIIECINCT. 361 

two children : Lucy A. and Edward C. Mr. Davis was next married, 
January 15, 1884, to Elizabeth A., daughter of John Campbell, of this 
county. 

PROF. CHARLES II. DIETRICH. [See sketch in chapter on 
Hopkinsville public schools.] 

CHARLES W. DUCKER was born in Christian County, Ky., Octo- 
ber 25, 1849. His father, John J., and mother, Caroline E. (Lakin) 
Ducker, were both born in Christian County, and were married in 1848. 
The date of his father's birth was February 8, 1824; that of his mother 
was March 15, 1830. His father died in Pulaski, Tenn., in 1865; his 
mother still lives. His maternal grandfather was born in Boston, Mass., 
and married a lady of Irish extraction named Campbell. After the 
death of his father, Charles W. Ducker settled down in 1865, in Hop- 
kinsville. He was engaged in various businesses until 1869, when he be- 
gan with Poindexter & Baker, the trade of carriage-making. He has 
ever since conducted it successfully, here and in Fairfield, 111., where he 
was joined in business by F. R. Dryer, and again in Hopkinsville, after a 
nine months' stay at Fairfield. On their return here, the partners suc- 
ceeded to the trade of Poindexter & Baker. Their work is exclu- 
sively upon spring vehicles. Mr. C. W. Ducker is a worthy member of 
the I. 0. 0. F., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He was 
married October 20, 1881, in Pittsfield, 111., to Miss Annie E., daughter 
of Orin and Belinda (Sanford) Green. She was born October 19, 1850. 
Mrs. Ducker is a consistent member of the Chri.stian Church. They 
have one son — John Orin Ducker. 

WILLIAM ELLIS was born in Harford County, Maryland, July, 
1810. When a mere boy his parents, John and Jemima Ellis, removed 
to the city of Baltimore, where he grew to manhood. His father was a 
native of Maryland, but of Irish parentage, and his mother, also a na- 
tive of Maryland, descended from Scotch ancestry. To them were born 
six children, subject being the fifth. He in early life decided to learn 
a trade, and chose that of a tailor, at which he worked in various 
cities prior to coming to Hopkinsville, which he did in December of 1840. 
From that time until 1861 he was chiefly employed in the merchant 
tailoring busir;es3, in which he was successful. The time intervening 
from 1861 to 1874 was passed principally in mercantile pursuits, and in 



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362 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

1874 he purcliasetl the half interest in the Hopkinsville Mills owned by 
John T. Edmunds; he is now a member of the firm of F. L. Ellis & Co. 
He was married in Hopkinsville in 1844, to Miss Ann F. Harrison, a 
native of Kentucky. They have a famil}- of four children, viz.: Mary E., 
wife of M. -D. Bowles ; F. L. Ellis, Lee Ellis and Dr. Clifton Ellis, of 
Emporia, Kas. F. L. Ellis, of the firm of Ellis & Co., is a young man 
of excellent business qualities, the second of four children of William 
Ellis, and was born in Hopkinsville, January 29, 1851; he was chiefly 
educated in the South Kentucky College, and in 1872 engaged in the 
hardware business (buying the stock of Thompson & Coleman), which he 
prosecuted with flattering success until 1876, when he sold to Mr. 
Thompson, a former owner, and purchased an interest in the Hopkinsville 
Mills. He was married, in 1878, to Miss Lucy Jagoe, daughter of Ben- 
jamin Jagoe, who while living was a very prominent farmer in Hopkins 
County, Ky., where Mrs. E. was born on the 8th day of October, 1860. 
They have two interesting children — Edna and Lewis Ellis. 

JAMES 0. ELLIS (deceased) was born near Hopkinsville, in Chris- 
tian County, Ky., January 22, 1832, and was the sixth of eight children 
born to Nicholas Ellis and Mary Ellis (nee Gunn). These parents came 
from Virginia, settling in this county in 18-31. Nicholas Ellis died in 
Christian County about 1848, and his widow, who was born in 1800 in 
North Carolina, is still living and a member of the family of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. G. V. Thompson. Of the eight children born to them the fol- 
lowing are now living — Allen W., Mrs. Fannie Gowen, Emily Rice, of 
Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. Ann McCarrol, and Mrs. G. V. Thompson. 
James 0. Ellis grew to manhood in Christian and Trigg Counties, in the 
latter of which he was chiefly educated. In 1853, in Hopkinsville, Ky., 
he was married to Miss Robert Catherine Bradley, who was born in Allen 
County, Kentucky, March 14, 1833. For three years after marriage 
Mr. Ellis resided in Hopkinsville employed in mercantile labor, and in 
1856 removed to Pettis County, Mo., whore he was engaged in farming 
until 1862. In the early history of the war he sustained a total loss of 
his property by raiding soldiers, and soon after returned to Hopkinsville, 
where he obtained a position as book-keeper for the firm of McGowan & 
McReynolds. After two years in their service he was appointed Deputy 
Sheriff" of the county, and for several years had charge of the principal 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITV AND PRECINCT. 363 

business of tliat office ; he was finally elected to the office of Sheriff; then 
to the office of Judge of the Christian County Court, which position he 
filled with credit for four years. In the last years of his life he served 
as Auditor and City Treasurer and Deputy County Clerk. He was an 
honored member of the Masonic fraternity, Knights of Honor and 
Knights of Pythias. He died November 22, 1880, leaving five children, 
viz., Nannie, wife of L. H. McKee: John G. Ellis, Mary Ellis, Richard 
D., of Louisville, Ky., and Jimmie Ellis. John G. is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, and at present engaged in the coal trade, but for 
several years has engaged in mercantile pursuits. Mrs. R. C. Ellis is 
still living, and is an honored member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
ROBERT M. FAIRLEIGH, M. D., was born in Brandenburg, 
Meade Co., Ky., January 17, 1840; his father, William Fairleigh, was 
Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts of that county for thirty-five years, 
nearly up to the time of his death in 186.5, an old-fashioned gentleman of 
great personal popularity and a most efficient and faithful public officer. 
His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Enlow, a woman of sterling 
sense and great strength of character, was his tutor until he entered 
Brandenburg Academy under the direction of Prof. D. C. Cully ; he 
studied medicine with Dr. H. K. Pusey at Garuettsville, Ky., and grad- 
uated in his profession at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in the 
eventful year 1860; he practiced medicine at Brandenburg until the 
autumn of 1861. The State shook with the fierce throes of civil discord, 
and the heart of the youthful physician going forth in all its ardor to the 
old flag he was appointed Assistant Surgeon in the United States Army, 
and assigned to duty with the gallant Col. James S. Jackson's Third Ken- 
tucky Cavalry. In June following he was promoted to the rank of Sur- 
geon, and soon after took charge of the medical department of the brig- 
ade commanded by the boy General, Eli H. Murray, at the present time 
Governor of Utah Territory. This position he held with signal ability 
until the termination of hostilities, when he was appointed Medical 
Director of the Western Department of Kentucky, with headquarters at 
Bowling Green. Although only in his twenty-sixth year, so closely had 
he studied his profession, so diligently had he discharged his official duties, 
and so humanely and generously had he exercised his authority that he 
was so widely popular with both parties, with civilians as well as with the 









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364 BIOGRAnilCAL SKETCHES. 

military, that few surgeons of greater age and experience were so highly 
esteemed ; he was no carpet knight, but toiled incessantly and most suc- 
cessfully, displaying rare talents as an executive oiScer. An ardent and 
uncompromising Unionist, the sunshine of his nature was never over- 
shadowed by the spirit of vengeance ; and to the extent of his power to 
every needy foe he was the good piiysiciah, the generous friend, acting 
faithfully with the motto inscribed on the sword presented to Zachary 
Taylor : " Bis vincit qui se vincit in victoria " — " twice does he conquer 
who conquers himself in the hour of victory." While stationed at" 
Bowling Green he married, May 17, 1865, Miss Anna Slaughter, a lady 
noted for her graces of mind and person, the daughter of W. II. Slaugh- 
ter, of Larue County. In July, 1865, he left the service, and early in 
the fall of that year removed to Hopkinsville, where he has labored ever 
since in his profession with eminent success, winning " golden opinions 
from all sorts of people," and giving his influence zealously at all times 
to improve and elevate the noble calling to which he has devoted his life. 
Nowhere are his talents more heartily recognized than among his profes- 
sional brethren. Although devoted to the practice of his profession, Dr. 
Fairlcigh takes a lively interest in the discussion of all the various social 
questions which necessarily arise in all intelligent communities. In the 
great Masonic order he is a bright and shining light. He was initiated 
into the Entered Apprentice degree in Hopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, in 
1865; he became Junior Warden in 1866, and was chosen Master from 
1867 to 1872. In 1872 he was appointed Grand Junior Deacon of the 
Grand Lodge of Kentucky; in 1873, Grand Marshal; in 1874 he was 
elected Grand Junior Warden of the Grand Lodge; in 1875, Grand 
Senior Warden; in 1876, Deputy Grand Master, and in 1877, Grand 
Master. He has been High Priest of Oriental Chapter, No. 14, Royal 
Arch Masons, and Eminent Commander of Moore Commandery, No. 6, 
Knights Templar, in 1881. During his services as Grand Master in 
1877-78 the Grand Lodge was disturbed by the great debt question of 
the Widows' and Orphans' Home, and it was largely owing to his inde- 
fatigable labors, tact and energy, that the controversy was creditably and 
satisfactorily settled. His views on various Masonic questions, officially 
set forth, are quoted approvingly in the lodges of the country, as their 
author is recognized as a positive philanthropist, who desires that his 



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1G91939 

HOrKINSVILI.K CITY AND PRECINCT. 365 

order shall Lo a powerful motive in the elevation of society. In 1883 he 
was elected Grand High Priest of Royal Arch Masons in Kentucky, 
and at this writing he is their presiding oflicer. From 1869 to 1879 
Dr. Fairleigh was an active member of the Board of Councilmen of 
the city of llopkinsville, and its Chairman for three years. In that 
capacity he advocated the purchase of and embellishment by a skillful land- 
scape engineer the beautiful addition to the city cemetery and the appoint- 
ment of a civil engineer to prepare a good map of the city ; both meas- 
ures are of great advantage, and have met with general approval. The 
most important question which was agitated soon after his retirement from 
the J3oard of Councilmen, and which has since given a powerful impulse 
to the pi-ogress and prosperity of Hopkinsville, was the establishment of 
public graded schools. Of this great work Dr. Fairleigh was among the 
originators and chief promoters. He put all his energies into the hotly- 
contested struggle, for many excellent citizens, unfamiliar ^Yith the prac- 
tical workings of the system, believed that the agitation of the subject 
was ill-timed and injudicious, and that the expense involved in the adop- 
tion of the measure would seriously embarrass the municipal finances. 
During this discussion he worked untiringly with tongue and pen, fully 
assured of the merits of the proposed system, and seeking to persuade 
his fellow-citizens that public schools were the " one thing needful " for 
the beloved city of his adoption ; and that even the success of the colleges 
already established there was to a large degree dependent upon providing 
free primary education for the masses, from whose ranks a large proportion 
of their pupils must be recruited. The measure was carried, a commodi- 
ous and handsome building erected and well furnished, and an efficient 
Principal and corps of teachers provided, and the public schools of Hop- 
kinsville, now in their fourth year, with 632 pupils, rank with the most 
efficient in tlie country. They have contributed largely to the remarkable 
growth of Hopkinsville since their inception. It will be a red letter day 
for the State when every county-seat and every community shall emulate 
the admirable public school system of Hopkinsville, established by the 
labors of Dr. Fairleigh and his coadjutors. Experience has proved that 
far from being a burden they invite a thrifty and intelligent population, 
add largely to tiie municipal revenues, and even pave the way for the 
introduction of extensive manufacturing establishments as in the neigh- 



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366 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

boring city of Henderson. No one wields a larger influence than a pro- 
fessional man who, possessing acknowledged merit in his special sphere, 
is also a citizen at once liberal and positive, courteous and firm, charitable, 
but outspoken on all questions which in his judgment concern the welfare 
of humanity'. Such a man never stops to ask whether his opposition to 
or advocacy of a particular measure will lose him a client, a patient or a 
parishioner. He prefers to do his duty and risk the consequences. It is 
probable that fortune, who favors the bold, is quite as propitious to coura- 
geous spirits eventually as to the over-cautious, who seal their lips for fear " 
of offending old friends. Nothing is sadder than to see a professional 
man imprisoned in the iron cage of his specialty, separated by choice 
from all participation in the social struggles in which his fellows are 
involved ; like the French physician who, after devoting his life to his 
specialty, plaintively asked his friends to write on his tomb: " Born a 
man ; died a physician." How much better, a man as well as a physician. 
Such a specialist is not Dr. Fairleigh, who, still in the prime of robust 
manhood and in the sunshine of a successful practice, throws his whole 
soul actively into every contest in which is involved the welfare of his 
fellow-citizens. There are five living children in the family, seniority in 
age as named: Margaret Fairleigh, Thomas B. Fairleigh, Jr., Fanny 
Slaughter Fairleigh, Letticia Wilson Fairleigh and Robert M. Fairleigh, 
Jr. Two children have died, both young — Anna and Cornelia Wallace. 
A portrait of Dr. Fairleigh will be found on another page. 

HON. JOHN FELAND was born December 23, 1837, in Barren 
County, Ky.; his father was a native of Virginia and of Scotch descent ; 
was long a farmer in Christian County ; for ten years Postmaster at Hop- 
kinsville, and one of the substantial and valuable men of the community. 
The subject of this sketch received a liberal education, completing his 
studies at Center College at Danville. In 1858 he began the study of 
the law with Col. James F. Buckner, now^ of Louisville ; he .had barely 
commenced practice when the war broke out in 1861 ; ho entered the 
army as Quartermaster of the Third Kentucky (Federal) Cavalry, and 
remained with that regiment until the battle of Shiloh ; he was then 
Quartermaster of the Eighth Kentucky Cavalry, with which he served 
until 1863, when he left the army, returned home, and resumed the prac- 
tice of law at Hopkinsville. In the following year he formed a law part- 






■{'. '^no->u 









HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 367 

nership with Gen. Benjamin II. Bristow, which continued until Gen. 
Bristol's removal to Louisville two years later ; he then associated with 
Col. Walter Evans for nine years, and then with S. 0. Graves, and at 
present is associated with Hunter Wood in the law practice. In 1875 
he became a candidate for the Legislature, and was elected over his oppo- 
nent, Hon. James A. McKenzie ; was re-elected in 1877 and in 1879 ; 
he was Presidential Elector for the State at large on the Republican 
ticket in 1876. In the spring of that year he was appointed by the 
State Legislature in connection with Judge Joshua F. Bullitt, of Louis- 
ville, to edit and publish the new code of practice adopted by that body, 
and to take effect January 1, 1877. He is a man of sound practical abil- 
ity, a good speaker, a careful, thrifty and successful lawyer ; a man of 
great independence of character, espousing a cause and maintaining it at 
all hazards ; is a man of fine appearance and agreeable manners, and 
stands deservedly high in the community of which he is an active and 
useful member. Mr. Feland was married February 12, 186-3, to Miss 
Sallie Kennedy, daughter of the late S. W. Kennedy, of Todd County, 
Ky. 

J. S. FORREY'S father, Strickler Forrey, was of German descent and 
a native of Pennsylvania; he died in Chicago, 111.; his wife, and mother 
of our subject, was Mary B. Randolph, a native of Pennsylvania; she died 
in 1834; he next married Mary Sharpless, of Pennsylvania; who bore 
him five children, of whom three are now living. J. S. Forrey was born 
in Fayette County, Penn., February 9, 1833. When he was three years 
of age he was brought to Wayne County, Ind., by his father, and was 
there reared and educated, and learned the carpenter's trade, at which he 
worked in his younger days. In 1855 he moved to Minnesota, and en- 
gaged in farming for five ' years. In 1869 he came to Ilopkinsville from 
Dayton, Ohio, and worked at his trade for Brownell, Miller & Orr, and 
in 1881 succeeded Mr. Brownell in the business. In 1856, in Wayne 
County, Ind., he married Miss Caroline Allbright, a native of Indiana, 
born in 1836. i\Ir. and Mrs. Forrey are members of the First Presby- 
terian Church, and he is an active member of the orders K.of H. and K. 
of P. 

REV. JOSEPH FOULKS, deceased, was born August 30, 1786, in 
Monmouth County, N. J.; his parents were from Wales. When in his 



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3G8 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

seventeenth year he made a profession of religion and joined the Method- 
ist Churcli, in which he was licensed to preach in 1811, soon after which 
he came to Kentucky, and for two years traveled the Henderson and 
Hartford Circuits. On account of loss of health, he located in 1815, set- 
tling a few miles from Russellville in Logan County, where on the 26th 
of September, 1816, he married Miss Sallie Marshall, a woman noted for 
her amiability and piety. They remained in Kentucky until 1820, mov- 
ing then to St. Clair County, 111., v/here until 1825 he labored as a local 
minister, but in the year 1825 joined the Conference and traveled far 
some years, and until his health compelled him to locate. In September, 
1837, he returned to Kentucky and settled in Logan County, where the 
remainder of his life was spent; he died on the 3d of May, 1863, hislaSt 
hours being peculiarly characterized by that peace which he had so long 
and faithfully preached; his widow died in McLean County, Ky., in 
1879. Their family consisted of ten children, of whom six sons grew to 
manhood, viz.: Evan G., Dennis M., Ezra L., Samuel M., Joseph W. 
and James G. Foulks. Ezra L. Foulks was born near Belleville, St. 
Clair Co., 111., January 12, 1823; he was educated chiefly in tlie 
McKendree College, of Lebanon, 111., and in 1852, in Logan County, 
Ky., was married to Miss Sarah A. Erowder, daughter of Rev. Thomas 
and Sarah (Claywell) Browder. She was born March 6, 1826, in Logan 
County. Since 1858 they have resided in Hopkinsville, Ky. They 
have a family of four children : Ellen L., wife of G. B. Underwood ; 
Thomas M. Foulks ; William Ernest, married to Fannie Coleman, and 
father of one son, named Walter E. Foulks ; Sallie B., the wife of W. 
H. Peace, of Hopkinsville — they have one child — Laura U. Mr. 
Foulks, associated with his son, William E., is engaged in the coal trade 
and the sale of pumps, and Frye's combination fence, which they are man- 
ufocturing. Mr. Foulks is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

MOSES FRANKEL is among tlie tried and true men of business 
who have, first and last, been connected with the mercantile interests of 
Hopkinsville. He was born in the year 1819, in the Kingdom of Bava- 
ria, Germany, where he grew to mature years, coming to the United 
States when a young man. Mr. Frankel inherited the principle of 
scrupulous honesty, and remarkable business energy, which are so char- 






' H 



HOI'ICINSVILLE CITV AND PRECINCT. <5b9 

acteristic of his nationality. These distinctive traits of character have 
ever marked the business record of Mr. Frankel, during his long con- 
nection with the people of Ilopkinsville, Christian Co. Ilis first busi- 
ness venture was in the State of Mississippi, where, however, he remained 
onl}' about three years, when he removed to Shclbyville, Ind. From the 
latter place he came to Hopkinsville, Ky., in 18G2, and there established 
the "Old Reliable" business house, which is still conducted by his son 
Joseph M. Frankel. Mr. Frankel removed from Ilopkinsville to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, in 1883, where he now resides with his family, and where, in 
185G, he married Miss Dorothea Aischberg, who is also a native of Bava- 
ria, Germany. Their family consisted of seven children : Henry, now a 
merchant of Princeton, Ky.; Joseph M.; David A., who died in 1883; 
Rosa, Fannie, Samuel and Sadie Frankel. Joseph M. Frankel was 
married, September 7, 1881, to Miss Esther, daughter of Joseph and 
Caroline Slaughter, of Louisville, Ky., where she was born in 1860. 

WILLIAM I. FRASER'S grandfather, John Fraser, came from Vir- 
ginia in 1822, and settled in Stewart County, Tenn., near the State line, 
and there remained to the time of his death; his wife, Martha (Brown) 
Fraser, was a native of Virginia, and a sister to ex-Governor Aaron 
Brown, of Tennessee. They had eleven children, of whom was John W. 
Fraser, the father of our subject. He was born in Virginia in 1818, and 
when he was four years of age was brought to Tennessee by his parents, 
who located, as we have mentioned, in Stewart County. There John W. 
Fraser was reared and educated, and when a young man studied medi- 
cine. In 1842 he graduated from the Louisville Medical College, and 
engaged in the practice of his profession in Tennessee. In 184i he came 
to Christian County, and located in the village of Lafayette, where he 
remained engaged in the practice of his profession to the time of his death, 
which occurred June 13, 1877. In 1843 he married Miss Mary Brig- 
ham, a native of Tennessee, born in 1822. Dr. Fraser was a warm- 
hearted man, and sympathetic in his nature, endearing himself to a vast 
circle of friends; his practice among the poor, without charge, often rid- 
ing many miles without hope of remuneration, other than the conscious- 
ness that he had done his duty, alone made him popular; his nature was 
genial as sunshine, and always humorous, full of jokes, and fond of the 
society of the young; his office was a general resort of his friends. In 



370 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

business he was very successful, and at his death left an estate valued at 
about §00,000; he and his affectionate wife and helpmate were blessed 
with three children, viz.: William I.; Leonora, wife of A. W. Williams, 
and Mary J. Fraser. William I. Fraser was born March 10, 1844, in 
Christian County, and here received his education; he has followed farm- 
inj:;, and is now the owner of a farm in Tennessee. At present he is con- 
nected with Mr. Hancock in the tobacco business. The portrait of John 
W. Fraser appears elsewhere in this work. 

WILLIAM M. FUQUA, M. D., was born January 16, 1838, in 
Charlotte County, Va., and is of Huguenot descent; his father, William 
A. Fuqua, was a distinguished physician of Virginia, and was born in 
Campbell County, as was also his mother, Mary J. Barksdale, who was of 
English anil Welsh origin, and was born in Charlotte County, Va. 
William M. was the second of their family of nine children, and in boy- 
hood had the advantages of the University of Virginia, in which he after- 
ward commenced the study of medicine. In October, 1S58, he entered 
the Medical College, Richmond, Va., from which he graduated in 1859; 
he immediately established a practice in Richmond, but in 1861, at the 
breaking out of the late war, he became a surgeon in the military service. 
Confederate States Army, and was at first assigned to the Libby Prison 
hospital ; his connection with the army was not severed until the close of 
the war, and his reputation as a surgeon has ever since taken rank with 
the first in the State. While he enjoys an extensive general practice, his 
special merit lies in his ability ami skill as a surgeon, and is a successful 
ovariotomist and lithotomist. He came to Christian County, Ky., and 
located in Ilopkinsville in 1868. He is a member of the American 
Medical Association, and has filled the office of President of the McDow- 
ell Medical Association, and the Medical Association of Christian County ; 
ho is now an officer in the State Medical Association, and a liberal con- 
tributor to the various popular medical journals. In 1882 he was a candi- 
date for Congress from the Second District, for which position he was de- 
feated by the Hon. J. H. Clay. He came to Christian County, Ky., and 
located in Ilopkinsville in 1868. In 1861, in Richmond, Va., he was mar- 
ried to Miss Vandalia Davis, daughter of Capt. John Davis, of Norfolk, Va. 
Their family consisted of Brou3.sais, Eunice, Mary, Morton H. (deceased), 
Victor Hugo, Vandalia, Nelson, Louis and Ilortense Fui]ua. In another 
part of this volume will be found a portrait of Dr. Fuqua. 



1' n. (.-';;^cl 



'^,'1 






nOPKINSVILLE CITY AND I'RECINd'. 371 

RICHARD W. GAINES, M. D., one of the oldest and worthiest 
physicians of the city, was born in Charlotte County, Va., July 5, 1815; 
■he is the only child of Richard W. and JSfancy (Morton) Gaines, both of 
wliom were natives of Virginia. His mother died of pulmonary disease 
when he was but a few weeks old, and his father afterward married Miss 
Anna White, who bore him seven children ; the eldest of these was Gen. 
John W. Gaines, who died in Trigg County, Ky., January 13, 1884. 
Richard W. Gaines, died in Virginia iu 1846, and Anna (White) Gaines 
died in 1869, in Trigg County, Ky. Dr. R. W. Gaines was reared on 
the farm under the beneficent influence of pious parents, and was educa- 
ted in the Randolph Macon College of Mecklenburgh County, Va., of which 
his father was an early patron and founder. He graduated in 1833, and 
in 1834 entered the Transylvania Medical College of Lexington, Ky., 
graduating in 1837. From the latter date to 1853 he practiced his pro- 
fession in Charlotte Court House, Va. , during which time he acquired 
an enviable reputation ; he came to Hopkinsville, Ky., in 1853, since 
which time he has had a very successful practice, in which he is still 
actively engaged ; he possesses, to a remarkable degree, the sympathetic 
nature and refined sensibilities so necessary to the true physician, deriv- 
ing vastly more enjoyment in being able to relieve the suffering than in 
receiving their remuneration for his services. He is an ex-Presidont of the 
State Medical Society, is a member of the American Medical Association, 
and also of the Christian County Medical Association ; he is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and of the Southern Assembly of the Presbyte- 
rian Church. He was first married in Virginia to Sarah E., daughter of 
Col. James P. Marshall. She was born in Charlotte County, Va., and 
died in ISGl, leaving no children. He afterward married Mary C, 
daughter of Richard I. Gaines of the same county. She died in Hop- 
kinsville in August, 1880. His present wife, Sallie M. Adkerson, to 
whom he was married June 28, 1883, is a. daughter of John H. Adker- 
son, of Murfreesboro, Tenn., where she was born in 1855. 

JOSEPH K. GANT (deceased) was born in May, 1827, in Christian 
County, where his parents, who were among the early settlers, had resided 
for many years. He received his education^ which was fair, in the schools 
of Hopkinsville, up to the age of fifteen years. When eighteen years old 
he entered into partnership with his father, as merchant. When his 






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372 ^ BIOaRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

father retired from business, which was in about 1848 or 1850, he took 
his place, and for several years carried on business at his father's old 
stand, and did a large and lucrative trade ; he also engaged in farming. 
lie was a man of quick perceptive faculties, urbane and kind in his man- 
ners and disposition, and attracted patronage in whatever business he 
undertook ; he was a man of fine mental and physical endowments, of 
courage and resolute purpose, and of indomitable will and untiring energy. 
Everything he undertook was pushed forward with resolution and upon as 
large a scale as his circumstances would permit ; he did a large business 
as merchant, as farmer, and in later years as warehouseman or commis- 
sion merchant in Hopkinsville ; he was a remarkably good judge of human 
nature, and seldom failed in judging correctly of men's motives. To 
this, as well as to his extensive acquaintance, was he largely indebted for 
the success he met with in' his business enterprises; he was a man of 
strong attachments for his friends, and perhaps no man ever lived who 
had more aft'ection and concern for his family. When he confined him- 
self to his business, witli which he was familiar, few men were as success- 
ful ; when he struck out into new fields, his boldness and confidence were 
apt to carry him too far. For many years he exercised as much influence 
upon the business affairs of the county as any man who ever lived within 
its borders ; he was a leader in everything he undertook, wal public- 
spirited, was in favor of progress and development, and ever ready to sub- 
scribe as liberally as his means would permit, to any enterprise for gen- 
eral improvement, and withal gave to poor and to charities generously. 
The portrait of Mr. Gant is on a page elsewhere. 

DANIEL J. GISH, M. D. " America boasts of her self-made 
men." The career of Garfield from the tow-path to the Presidency, 
from poverty to honor, loses none of its interest in the fact, that it is 
but a brilliant type of what is frequently accomplished in the more limited 
and humble sphere of private life. The subject of this sketch belongs 
emphatically to the class of self-made men, and no citizen of the county, 
perhaps, deserves more creditable mention than he. Born amid humble 
surroundings, and deprived by poverty of even the limited educational 
advantages common, in the days of his youth, but by honesty, industry 
and economy, he has overcome the obstacles in his pathway, and achieved a 
success in life of which he may justly be proud. Of delicate frame, and 



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norivINSVILLE CITY AND PKECINCT. 373 

for many years subject to ill health, yet he has had as large a practice in 
his profession as any physician in the county, and it can be said to his 
credit, that during his busiest years the needs of the poor were never 
forgotten, and his kind ministrations at the bed side were always freely 
given, regardless of the ability of his patient to pay. Dr. Gish, as his 
name indicates, is descended from a German family, inheriting therefrom 
the honesty and rugged independence which is a national, characteristic. 
Ilis grandfather, Christopher Gish, was one of the earliest settlers of 
south Kentucky, coming from Virginia in the latter part of the seven- 
teenth century. His son, Joseph Gish, the father of Dr. Gish, was 
horn while his father lived in Virginia, and grew to manhood in Ken- 
tucky ; he was married to Sarah Sandes, a Virginian by birth, and to 
them were born four children, of whom Daniel J. was the eldest. He 
was born in Muhlenburg County, Ky., July 16, 1816. The early 
death of his father required him as soon as possible to lend his assistance 
to the maintenance of the family, and his early years were spent in the 
hard labor of the farm, depriving him of any educational advantages, a 
loss that he made up by attending night schools and employing every 
leisure hour in scholastic pursuits. When sixteen years old he came to 
Hopkinsville, and for two and a half years served as an apprentice to the 
tailor's trade, in which time he so impaired his health as to necessitate 
his return to farm life. After regaining his health he returned to Hop- 
kinsville and secured a position as bank clerk in the old Bank of Ken- 
tucky, under the presidency of R. R. Rowland, which he filled until again 
compelled to try country life in the open air. Notwithstanding these 
experiences, his native energy and determination to achieve success in life 
induced him to accept a situation as a student under Dr. L. Lindsay, to 
whose memory he often pays tribute for the kindness shown him. He 
graduated from the Medical College of Columbus, Ohio, in 1840, and 
immediately opened a practice in Hopkinsville, meeting with merited suc- 
cess, although opposed by some because of his medical, political and relig- 
ious views, all of which were unpopular in the county at that time. He 
was a Jacksonian Democrat at the time the county was intensely and bit- 
terly Whig in politics. Adopted the Eclectic system of practice only to 
meet the bitter opposition of the entire medical fraternity, and became a 
member of tlie Christian Cliurch, when that denomination was opposed by ail 



374 BlOGIlAriUCAL SKETCIIKS. 

existing religious parties. In this his characteristic independence of thought 
was manifested, no opposition of foes or entreaty of friends could swerve 
him from a course of action when once approved by his conscience. He 
followed the Union sentiment during the war, and has been identified 
with the Republican party since, but always reserved the right to 
" scratch " any name, or disapprove of any action of his party that did 
not harmonize with his ideas of right. After a practice of fourteen years 
he became satisfied of the superiority of the Ilomceopathic system of 
medicine, and in 1852, graduated from the Cleveland Homccopathic 
College, of Ohio. Notwithstanding a change so radical ho succeeded in 
retaining his former patrons to whom he added a number of the best fam- 
ilies of the city. He still does an office practice, the general practice 
being performed by his partner, Dr. James A. Young. In 1844 he was 
married to Miss Eliza C. Garnett. She was born in Christian County, 
and died in Ilopkinsville, in 1850, leaving one child — Eliza C, wife of R. 
R. Donaldson, of Ilopkinsville. His present wife, to whom he was 
married in 1851, was Mrs. Ellen D. Young, widow of Rev. James Abner 
Young, and daughter of Rev. John Kerr, a noted Presbyterian minister 
of Newry, Ireland. She came to the United States at the age of thir- 
teen. They have two children — Cora E., wife of Rev. L. H. Stine, of 
Illinois, and Elizabeth C, wife of Dr. Andrew Seargent, of Ilopkins- 
ville. Dr. Gish is also the head of the firm of Gish & Garner, the lead- 
ing drug firm in the county ; he is an Elder of the Christian Church, and 
has been prominently identified with educational interests in the past. 
No man has the confidence of the community to a greater extent, and his 
career should be an incentive to all young men. Let them imitate his 
example in honesty, industry and economy, adopt his motto learned from 
his mother, " Do unto others as you would be done by," and they may 
reasonably expect equal honor and wealth. 

M. W. GRISSAM'S grandfather, whose name was John "W. Grissam, 
with his wife, Nancy (Chapman) Grissam, came from South Carolina to 
Kentucky in the year 1807, and made a settlement in the northern part 
of Christian County, on land now owned and occupied by Samuel John- 
son, on which is situated Johnson's Mill. They remained on this place 
engaged in firming for a few years only, and removed thence to the State 
of Indiana, locating at Patoka. John W. Grissam took part in the war 



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HOI'KINSVILLK CITY ANU PRECINCT. o75 

of 1812, through its earlier struggles and triumphs, but died before its 
termination at his home at Patoka. His widow was afterward married 
to a Mr. Perry and removed to the State of Tennessee, where she died. 
Jolin W. Grissam had a family of four sons and two daughters: John 
W., Jr., the father of M. W. Grissam ; Jeflerson, Alfred, William, 
Elvira and Caroline Grissam. John AV., Jr., was by trade a cabinet- 
maker, and came to Hopkinsville, Ky., about 1819, but soon after 
removed to the scenes of his earlier childhood in the north part of Chris- 
tian, lie was born near the old battle-field of Guilford Court House, in 
South Carolina, on the 19th day of November, 1797. In Muhlenburg 
County, Ky., in 182-1, he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Micajah and 
Ann Wells. She was born January 12, 1802, in Nash County, N. 
C, and came to Kentucky with her parents in 1804. She is still living, 
and is now a member of the family of her son, an esteemed citizen, M. 
W. Grissam, of Hopkinsville. Mother Grissam enjoys the enviable rep- 
utation of having been a consistent member of the Methodist Church for 
" three score and ten years," and, considering her life-work nearly per- 
formed, is looking in the near future for the reward of a well-spent life. 
She is the second wife of John W. Grissam, he having married in 1818, 
while temporarily located at Port Gibson, Miss., Elizabeth Walker, 
who died in 1819, as did also the one child born to them. Though an 
uneducated man, Mr. John W. Grissam was a comprehensive reader, and 
being for many years an invalid he became a man of fine general infor- 
mation. He was an honored member of the Methodist Episcopal Church ; 
served the county in various official capacities, and died November 9, 
1861. As a result of his second marriage he had fifteen children, twelve 
of whom grew to maturity. Micajah W. is the tenth of this family, and 
was born on the 18th day of August, 1837. His early life was spent on his 
father's farm. In 1866 he removed to Kirkmansvillc, Todd Co., named 
the village, and was its first Postmaster, and engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits, which have been his principal occupation since. In September, 
1878, he removed thence to Hopkinsville, Ky., where he opened a hotel 
business, which he continued but one year, though he still owns tlie val- 
uable hotel property known as the Phoenix Hotel. For several years he 
has engaged in the grocery and provision trade, and is numbered among 
the most reliable dealers in the city. On the 21st of December, 1870, 






• R'i., V.I.' 



376 BIOGRAl'HICAL SKETCHES, 

in Todd County, he was married to Miss Nannie M. Lacy, daughter of 
William and Julia Lacy. She was born March 6, 1851, and both she and 
Mr. G. are Methodists. Their children are: Charles Walter (deceased), 
Lena Octavia, Cano Chapman and Hiberuia Aion Grissam. 

THOMAS R. HANCOCK'S father, Nathan Hancock, ivas born in 
Charlotte County, Va., in 1807, where he now resides, enjoying the 
confidence and esteem of all who know him. Besides being a Justice of 
the Peace for a third of a century, he has been closely identified with the 
railroad, agricultural and mercantile interests of that county, and has 
accumulated a fair property. His wife, Paulina (Rudd) Hancock, was 
born in Charlotte County in 1811, and died in 1847. She was the mother 
of eight children, of whom Thomas R. (subject) was the seventh born. 
He is also a native of Charlotte C-Quiity, and was born in 1842. He was 
reared and educated in his native county, and in early life engaged in 
mercantile pursuits, which he continued until the breaking out of the 
late Civil war, when he entered the Confederate Army as Second Lieuten- 
ant in Brook Neal's Company, of Campbell County, Va., in which he 
served six months, and then became a member of Company A, of the 
Twenty-first Virginia Regiment. He participated at the battle of Gettys- 
burg and all of the battles of the Valley of the Potomac, including 
Frederickstown, Wilderness and Winchester. Of the 137 who were mem- 
bers of this company, he is one of the eighteen known to have survived 
the war. He served till the close of the war and was once wounded. 
In 18G6 he came to Trigg County and engaged in the mercantile business. 
Since 1870 he has been engaged in the tobacco commission business, and 
four years, by appointment, was Inspector of Tobacco on Statcn Island. 
In Christian County, December 26, 1875, he married Miss Rebecca E. 
Ragsdale, a daughter of William J. and Emma J. (Tillotson) Ragsdale. 
Mrs. Hancock was born in this county in 1853, and is the mother of 
four children, viz.: William Martin, James Wallace, Douglas Buckner 
and Thomas Ragsdale. The portrait of Mr. Hancock will be found in 
this volume. 

LAWSON B. HICKMAN, M. D., was born near Athens, in Fay- 
ette County, Ky., June 1, 1818, and there grew to man's estate, mean- 
time receiving the advantages of a liberal education, chiefly obtained in 
the Morrison College in Lexington. Having decided to pursue the study 



HOPKINSVILLE CITV AND PK13C1NCT. 377 

of "materia medica," he entered the Medical Department of the Tran- 
sylvania College, from which he graduated in 1837, going the same year 
near Vicksburg, Miss., where he opened a general practice, remaining 
about four years. He then located in Todd County, Ky., where for 
about thirty years he pursued an extensive and successful practice. Ilis 
practice in Hopkinsville dates from 1870, making altogether an unbroken 
practice of over forty-seven years, and he is still actively engaged. He 
was married in Todd County, in 1843, to George ^nn Baylor, daughter 
of Tucker and Barbara Baylor, of Todd County, members of one of the 
oldest families of Kentucky. Their family consists of Ellen, widow of 
Dr. Bass, of Todd County ; Jammie, wife of J. P. Thompson, of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio ; Lucy B., wife of M. L. Flack, of Hopkiijsville ; William L., 
of St. Louis ; Mary G., wife of William P. Gray, of St. Louis ; Mattie 
Hickman and Baylor Hickman. Dr. Hickman is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order and I. 0. 0. F. 

RICHARD H. HOLLAND was born in Christian County in Feb- 
ruary, 1857. His father, John S. Holland, a well-known farmer, who 
died in Pembroke Precinct in 1867, came to this county from Virginia in 
1834. He was born in Virginia in June, 1830, and grew to manhood in 
this county. In 1855 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Palmer, who 
was born in 1835 in Kentucky. They had two children : Linn McCau- 
ley Holland, born November, 1855, and died in January, 1856; and 
Richard H. Holland. John S. died in 1867, and his wife in 1859. 
Richard H., after the death of his mother, was reared principally in the 
family of Capt. D. R. Beard in the town of Hopkinsville ; he was edu- 
cated in the Bethel Male College of llussellville, Logan County, Ky. ; he 
began his practical business career as a farmer on the old homestead, and 
now owns a farming interest of 600 acres in Pembroke Precinct of this 
county. Since leaving the farm he has shown his enterprise by erecting 
an elegant opera building in Hopkinsville at a cost of §30,000. 

JAMES M. HOWE, son of William Howe and Eliza S. (Dairy) 
Howe, was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., July 24, 1854. The father, Will- 
iam Howe, was born in England in 1809, and his mother was born in 
1812 on the island of Helgoland, in the North Sea, where she was left 
an orphan in early childhood. She was reared by relatives who brought 
her to Canada. She was married to William Howe in Toronto, Canada, 



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378 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

October 2, 18o5. To these parents were born ten children, the youngest 
of wliorn was born in 1858, and all are still living : William Henry, of 
Nashville, Tenn. ; Sallie, wife of Samuel Williams, of Pittsburgh, Penn. ; 
Frederick Augustus, of Huntsville, Ala. ; Jennie, ^vifo of Robert McMil- 
len, of Pittsburgh, Penn. ; Anna L. IJowe; Amelia II., wife of James JM. 
Lindsay, of Pittsburg, Penn. ; Fannie AV., wife of Thomas J. Porter, of 
Pittsburgh, Penn. ; Thomas J. Howe, James M. and Charles Edward 
Howe. James M. Howe, the subject of this sketch, came to IIop- 
kinsville, Ky., in September, 1868, and for eleven years engaged 
in the jewelry business for his bi'other William II., whom he bought 
out in 1879. Subject was married in Hopkinsville, Ky., March 12, 
1878, to Miss MoUie, daughter of E. W. and Carrie (King) Hen- 
derson. . Mrs. Howe was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., March 30, 1859. 
They have two children — Walter Emerson and Jessie Fay. Mr. Howe 
is a member of the Hopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. k A. M., 
Oriental Chapter, No. 14, R. A. M., Moore Commandery, No. 6, Knights 
Templar, and of the Knights of Pythias. Both he and wife are mem- 
bers of the Christian Church. The parents of Mr. Howe are living and 
now residents of Pittsburgh, Penn. It is but just to Mr. Howe to say that 
he is thoroughly acquainted with his business and understands the wants 
of his patrons, which he is amply prepared to supply. He is a true gen- 
tleman, and in every way worthy of the confidence of the people, which he 
so fully possesses. 

JAMES E. JESUP, a native of Fayette County, Kentucky, was 
born December 17, 1820. He is the fourth of a family of eight children 
born to Samuel B. and Catherine Jesup {nee Sidener). The Jesup family 
was first represented in Kentucky by the father of Samuel B., who came 
from Virginia about 1802. Samuel was born in Virginia in 1798 and 
consequently was about four years old when he came to Kentucky. He 
was married in Bourbon County, Ky., to Miss Catherine Sidener, and in 
1830 they settled in Croghan's Grove, since called Jesup's Grove; here 
Samuel B. Jesup died. James E. Jesup was reared on the farm, re- 
ceiving such educational advantages as the country then afforded. In 
1845, in Hopkinsville, he was married to Miss Lucy Long. She was born 
in Christian County and died at Hopkinsville. They had eight children, 
five of whom are now living: Kate, wife of D. A. Tandy of Hopkinsville; 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 370 

Thomas S., of Iowa ; Nellie, wife of W. S. Davidson, of Iowa; James G. 
ami Mamie C. Jesup of lIoi)kinsville. Ilis present wife, to whom he was 
married in Trigg County, May 21, 1S79, was Mary Redd, widow of Sta- 
plcton Redd, and daughter of Moses Thompson of Trigg County, Ky. As 
the result of this union, Mr. Jesup has two daughters: Hattie and Addie 
Jesup. He is a member of the firm of Nelson & Jesup and deals in 
tobacco and grain. Both he and his wife are honored members of the' 
church. The portrait of Mr. Jesup will be found in a group elsewhere. 
JUDGE JOSEPH I. LANDES, was born January 3, 1836, in 
Christian County, Ky. His father, Isaac Landes, was born in Rocking- 
ham County, Va., on the 4th of October, 1796. The parents of Isaac, 
who were of German origin, removed from Virginia about 1805, and 
settled in Muhlenburg County, Ky., where they afterward died and where 
Isaac grew to maturity. About 1822 he came to Christian County, and 
in 1824 was married to Miss Susannah, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Summers) Kelly. This family came from Virginia about 1800 and made 
settlement in Bourbon County, Ky., four years later removing to Christian 
County, where they died. Elizabeth (Summers) Kelly is remembered as 
possessing rare literary ability, though not a scholastic education. Su- 
sannah (Kelly) Landes was born in Bourbon County, Ky.. March 8, 1803. 
She was the mother of five children : Catherine E. (wife of James Ruth- 
erford of Hopkinsville), born in 1828; Susannah (who died in early child- 
hood), born in 1880 ; Benjamin D., now of Logan County, born in 1884; 
the subject of this sketch, and Samuel J., of Atlanta, Ga., born in 1843. 
Joseph I. received his educational training in the schools of Hopkinsville, 
and Ilardinsburg, after which he studied law in the University of Vir- 
ginia at Charlottesville. In 1858 he was licensed to practice by Judges 
Stitesand Duvall, of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, and at once engaged 
in practice at Hopkinsville. He has served the city of Hopkinsville 
four years as Judge and for the same length of time was County Attorney. 
He is a member of the Hopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M., Ori- 
ental Chapter, No. 14, and of the Royal Arcanum ; he is also a Ruling 
Elder in the Presbyterian Church. Judge Landes was married in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, April 27, 1865, to Miss Mary McD. Carter, daughter of Dr. 
F. Carter of that city. Iler mother, Anna (Starling) Carter, was a 
daughter of William and Polly (McDowell) Starling. ,,,_ ,-. ,, ■ i, ,,-., 



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6iH) BIOQRArillCAL .SKETCHES. 

JOHN C. LATHAM, whose portrait appears in this work, was born 
in Russellville, Logan Co., Ky., November 6, 1814. The parents, John 
and Nancy (Morehead) Latham, came to Kentucky from Virginia in early 
life, and were married in Logan County, whence they came to Christian 
County about 1819. They located a short distance from Hopkinsvllle, where 
they died. John C. is the fifth of a family of seven children, but three 
of whom are now living: John G. and two sisters, one the widow of 
Ciiarlos Bradshaw, of Jeflerson County, 111., the other the widow of Maj. 
McGoodwin, of Danville, Ky. The subject of these lines was educated 
in Hopkinsvllle, which has been his home since the days of his boyhood. 
Early in life he became Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of Christian 
County, whose duties he performed for nearly four years. In 1854 he 
was elected to the office of Clerk of the Circuit Court, serving in that 
capacity for eight consecutive years. Besides being a county official he 
has been intimately connected with the city government of Hopkinsville 
for many years, filling all the more responsible positions of trust. Dur- 
ing his incumbency as a county officer he improved his leisure time in 
the study of law, and was admitted to practice, never, however, with a 
view to adopting the law as a profession, but that he might be the better 
qualified for a business career. For sixteen years he was interested in 
mercantile business, and in 1865 was elected President of the Bank of 
Hopkinsville upon the organization of that institution, in which he is one 
of the stockholders, and of which he has since been the executive head. 
Mr. Latham was married June 28, 1842, to Miss Virginia Glass, daugh- 
ter of Dr. David and Rebecca Glass, of Hopkinsville. She was born 
in Virginia, but came with her parents to Christian County, Ky., in 
childhood. Their marriage has been blessed with three children : John 
C. Latham, Jr., a banker of New York City, who married Mary L., 
daughter of Thomas II. Allen, of Memphis, Tenn. ; Mary R. Latham 
and Charles M. Latham, the latter a merchant of Hopkinsville, who 
married Lou T., daughter of Col. Thomas W. White, of Hernando, Miss. 

M. LEWIS was born in Christian County, Ky., on the 30th of No- 
vember, 1821 ; descends from two of the early families of this county — 
the Bryants and the family of Robert Lewis — who came here from Vir- 
ginia in 1819 or 1820. These men, both of whom had served as soldiers 
in the Revolution, settled a few miles from Hopkinsville. Soon after set- 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 381 

tling in this county, Joiin Lewis, son of Robert, married Margaret Bry- 
ant. John TN-as a soldier in the vair of 1812; was born in Virgiaia, July 
2, 1794, and his wife, Margaret, was born August 22, 1804, in Greenbrier 
County of the same State. To John and Margaret Lewis were born five 
children, of whom the eldest is the subject of these lines. The family of 
John Lewis removed to Trigg County, Ky., where the father died several 
years ago, and where the mother is now living. M. Lewis was reared on 
the farm, and in early life followed the profession of teaching, later de- 
voting himself to the pursuits of the farm. In January, 1875, he re- 
moved to Ilopkinaville and opened a grocery store and private boarding- 
house ; he is now proprietor of the Lewis House on the corner of Nash- 
ville and Clay Streets. He was married in this county in 1851, to Cas- 
sandra Ricketts. She was born in Christian County July 2, 1832. They 
are members of the Christian Church ; have had six children: Elizabeth, 
Willie, Ella, M. E., Hezekiah and Robert, all of whom are deceased ex- 
cept Elizabeth, who is the wife of Peter Owen, to whom she was married 
May 12, 1871. Peter Owen was born in Halifax County, Va., Novem- 
ber 2, 1851, and is the youngest of a family of nine children born to 
Thomas T. and Mary A. Owen. Ilis parents removed to Kentucky 
when he was an infant, and settled in Hamby Precinct, of Christian 
County. Peter has been a resideiit of Ilopkinaville since 1875, since 
which time he has served the city four years as Chief of Police and City 
Marshal, and when not thus employed has engaged in mercantile labor. 
Their two children are named Lewis and Nana Owen. 

JUDGE A. A^ LONG. One of the very early settlers of Cliristian 
County, and among those who have long since been gathered to their 
fathers, was Thomas S. Long, the father of Judge A. V. Long, who is 
now a resident of the city of Ilopkinsville ; was born in this county and 
has lived here all his life. Thomas S. was the son of Gabriel Long, the 
head of an old Virginia family, and who fought for American independ- 
ence in the war of the Revolution. Lucy Slaughter, who became the" 
wife of Thomas S. Long, was the daughter of Col. John Slaughter, who 
also served as a Revolutionary soldier from Culpeper County, Va. Mr. 
Long, on first coming to the State of Kentucky in 1803, settled in Lo- 
gan County, where he remained but a few years, and from there he came 
to Christian County probably in 1800. He was a plain, honest farmer, 



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^°" BIOGRAPinCAL SKETCFIES. 

and died near Hopkinsville in the year 1826; his wife, Lucy Long, sur- 
vived him nearly forty years, and died in Hopliinsville in March, 186G. 
They had five children, of whom Judge A. V. Long is the eldest and 
only representative now living in the county; he has never married, but 
during the life of his mother devoted himself to the pleasant task of 
securing to her the comforts of life; he is a man of kind and generous 
impulses, possessed of more than ordinary mind, as well as a remarkable 
memory, which characteristics have rendered him of very great service to 
the writers of this history; his knowledge of this county is second per- 
haps to no one now living in it, he having made it his life-long home, and 
for eight consecutive years served as Judge of the County Court. 

JUDGE JOE McCARROLL is a son of Charles A. and Elvira 
Anne McCarroll, of Christian County ; he is a native of the county, 
born April 6, 1848 ; he was reared to manhood on the farm, and received 
his early education in the private schools of the country, and in the 
schools of Hopkinsville. He was thereby enabled to assume the duties 
of a teacher, which he did in the years 1870 and 1871, improving his 
spare moments meantime in the study of law. In October, 1872, he en- 
. tered the Law Department of the Louisville University, and received his 
license to practice in March, 1873; he immediately began to practice in 
Hopkinsville, associated with Judge W. P. Winfree, under the firm name 
of Winfree & McCarroll. The partnership terminated by the election of 
Winfree to the Judgeship in 1882. In 1878 Mr. McCarroll was elected ' 
to the ofiice of City Judge, which he filled with acceptability and credit 
for four years. He is ardently interested in the cause of. education, and 
for several years has been a member of the Hopkinsville Board of Edu- 
cation, of which he is now the Secretary. He is an honored member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church South, also of the Masonic fraternity 
and Knights of Tythias, in both of which he has filled all of the posi- 
tions of honor. Mr. McCarroll was married in Henderson County, Ky., 
September 23, 1880, to Miss Mary T. Holloway, daughter of John Hol- 
loway, a deceased resident of Henderson County, e.Y-member of the State 
Legislature, and father of Hon. William S. Holloway, present Represent- 
ative. She was born in Henderson County, May 1, 1858. They have 
had t«o children, viz.: Anne, born July 8, 1881, and John Holloway Mc- 
Carroll, born July 14, 1883. Little Anne died Au^'ust 23 1884. 



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HOl'KINSVILl.E CITY AND PRECINCT. 3»a 

RICHARD T. McDANIEL was born in Robertson County, Tenn., 
on the ItJth day of October, 1833, and is descended from Scotch ances- 
tors on the father's side, and Irish parentage on tlie side of tlie mother. 
His father, whose name was Joel S. McDuniel, was born in Georgia in 
the year 1801 ; the mother, Mahala McGuire, a native of same State, 
was born in 1804. They were married in Tennessee in 1824, and until 
1837 made their home in Robertson County, removing thence to Mont- 
gomery County, settling near the city of Clarksville where Joel S. still 
lives, and where his wife died in October, 1880. They reared a family 
of three sons and one daughter, viz.: John W., now of Texas; Alsa, liv- 
ing near Clarksville; R. T. McDaniel, of Ilopkinsville, and Mrs. Mary 
F., wife of Thomas Hoffman, of Montgomery County, Tenn. The sub- 
ject of this sketch camo to the town of Ilopkinsville, Ky., in 1851, and 
engaged as a salesman in a wholesale house until 1860, when he was 
elected to the office of Sheriff of Christian County; he was re-elected to 
the same oiBce in 1862, serving with acceptance to the close of the second 
term. From 1864 until 1881 he was employed in mercantile business, 
and in the last-named year was elected to the office of County Assessor, 
which office he now holds with credit. Mr. McDaniel was married in 
Ilopkinsville February 6, 1855, to Miss Sallie Lakin, daughter of Charles 
and Charlotte (Campbell) Lakin, the former of whom died in 1835, and 
the latter in 1879. They have but two descendants now living: Mrs. 
McDaniel, who was born in October, 1834, and Caroline E., widow of 
John J. Diicker. Mr. and Mrs. McDaniel are blessed with eight children: 
Carrie 0., wife of A. M. Cooper; Charles G., Katie, a teacher in the 
Ilopkinsville public school; Sally, Lucy, Lottie, Robert S. and John C. 
McDaniel. Mr. McDaniel is a member of the Ilopkinsville Lodge, No. 
37, A. F. & A. M. 

JOHN AV. Mcpherson was bom in Fauquier County, Virginia, 
September 18, 1826. His father, John McPherson, and his mother, Sarah 
McDonald, both of whom were of Scotch ancestry, were each born and 
reared in Yirgiuia. John W. is the youngest of a family of eleven chil- 
dren. He attained his majority in his native state, receiving an academic 
education. About 1844 he began the study of law, and two years later 
was admitted to practice, which he commenced in Lewisburg, Green- 
brier Co., W. Va. He continued to practice there until 1859, hav- 






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384 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ing meantime served as County Attorney for eight years. Mr McPher- 
son came to Christian County, Ky., in 1859, and until 1864 was en- 
gaged in merchandising, but in that year resumed the practice of the 
law, in which he has been very successful. From 1865 until 1877 he was 
associated with George A. Champlin, under the firm of McPherson k 
Champlin. He was married in West Virginia in December, 1849, to Miss 
Margret A. Withrow, daughter of James and Letitia (Edgar) Withrow. 
She was boru in West Virginia, September 22, 1828. They have had a 
family of six children, the eldest of whom, William C, died in 1880. Five 
living are: James Edgar, John W., Jr., Joel T>., Herbert Lee, and Mary 
W. McPlierson. The family are members of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church, in which Mr. JlcPherson is an Elder. He is also a member of 
the Masonic order. 

CHARLES M. MEACHAM is the editor oithe South Kentuckian, of: 
which enterprising sheet he assumed the editorial management in the fall 
of 1879, becoming at the same time a part proprietor. He had for some 
time previous filled the position of local editor on the same paper. He 
was born in Belleview, this county, June 14, 1858, and received his early 
education in the country schools and those of Hopkinsville. He is a son 
of the Rev. A. W. Meacham, of whom" a sketch will be found elsewhere 
in this work. In early life he gave his attention to the study of law, read- 
ing under the instructorship of Judge G. A. Champlin, and was admitted 
to the Hopkinsville bar March 15, 1879. Mr. Meacham is a young man 
of undoubted talents, and of high social and intellectual worth. The South 
Kentuckian, under his able supervision, is now issued semi-weekly, and 
teems with matter of a practical and high literary order, and with editorials 
comprehensive in grasp and vigorous in tone, disclosing his special aptitude 
for the work, which insures the paper a long lease of usefulness and pros- 
perity. In 1881 he was appointed a member of the Christian County 
Democratic Executive Committee, and was elected secretary of the same, 
which position he still retains. In February, 1884, the appointment was 
acceptably tendered him as a Commissioner of the Western Kentucky 
Lunatic Asylum for a term of six years. Mr. Meacham was united in 
marriage June 14, 1883, to Miss Lizzie E. Tandy, the youngest daughter 
of Major Charles M. Tandy, deceased, a former resident of Hopkinsville. 
LUCIEN W. MEANS was born September 10, 1854, and is a son of 
William and Susan Means {nee Pursley). His grandfather, whose name 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 385 

was William Means, came from North Carolina to Christian County, Ky., 
about tlio beginning of the present century. He settled about seven miles 
south of the village of Hopkinsville, where in 1818 William Means, Jr., 
was born. lie grew to manhood, following agricultural pursuits. He mar- 
ried Susan Pursley, near Hopkinsville, on the place now owned by Rev. 
Walker, and in 1843 they removed to the adjoining county of Trigg, 
where he served for some years as Deputy Sheriff. Mrs. Susan Means was 
born in 1822 and died of apoplexy of the heart, in 1875. William Means 
died in February, 1878. They had a family of eight children: Sarah A., 
wife of W. H. West of Hopkinsville; Pinkney D., who was killed at Gar- 
rettsburg, while in the Confederate Array; Lucy A., deceased wife of John 
Prince; John H., Josiah M. and James William, all of Washington County, 
Illinois, and Lucien W. Means, whose name heads this sketch. Besides 
these, one son, Samuel A. Means, died in childhood. Lucien W. Means 
was reared to the pursuits of the farm, received the benefits of a common 
school education, and though a young man is one of the leading farmers 
of the county, and takes especial interest in all improved methods of hus- 
bandry, possessing the zeal and enterprise which makes his influence felt 
for good in his community. He was married in this county, December 11, 
1879, to Miss Myra, daughter of M. S. and II. E. Major. She was born 
in Christian County, October 31, 1863. They are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, and he is a Master Mason. Their children, two 
in number, are James Major and Alfred West Means. 

JOSIAH R. MERRITT was born October 7,. 1833, in William- 
son County, Tennessee. His parents were both natives of Tennes- 
see, where they grew to maturity and married. The mother, whose 
maiden name was Mary Shannon, died several years ago, after the 
family had moved to this county. The father, W^illiani T. Merritt, 
was born on the 23d of February, 1802, and became a farmer of con- 
siderable note in this county, to which he removed in the fall of 1853. 
He then settled in Mount Vernon Precinct, of which he was for several 
years magistrate. Mrs. Elizabeth Shcrrell {nee Titterington), became his 
second wife, survives him, and lives on the old homestead. William T. 
Merritt was an influential member in the Baptist Church, and died Octo- 
ber 3, 1882. He had thirteen children, most of whom grew to maturity, 
and of whom three sons — Josiah R., Daniel II., and Burkett II. — now 



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38G BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

reside in the county. Josiah R. was educated in the Triune Academy of 
his native county and at the Harmony Academy of Caldwell County, 
Ky. He came to Ilopkinsville in 1861, and engaged as merchant clerk 
for a few years, a business for which he possessed a peculiar fitness. 
About 1SG9 he formed a partnership in the grocery trade with F. W. 
Dabney, under the firm name of Merritt & Dabney, which terminated 
after an existence of two years. He then engaged in the boot and shoe 
business which he prosecuted for four years, since which time he has been 
retired. 

V. M. METCALFE was born Novembers, 1832, in McMinn County, 
East Tenn. In 1855 he married Miss Ellen Killebrew, of Montgomery 
County, Tenn., and lived for many years near the Christian County line, 
devoting his time to agricultural pursuits. In 1863 he became largely 
interested with his brother in a cotton manufactory in the South. At 
the close of the war he removed to Nashville, Tenn., to look after his cot- 
ton interests, where he lived until removing in 1869, to Ilopkinsville, 
Ky., where his home has since been, and where he has been engaged in 
mercantile business. Mr. Metcalfe's grandfather, John Metcalfe, was the 
eldest of nineteen children. His father was killed in the Revolutionary 
war, leaving him the care of this large family, all of whom lived in Vir- 
ginia. Wishing to better the condition of the family, he, in company 
with Daniel Boone, Mike Stoner and others, set out for the dark and 
bloody ground of Kentucky, fighting their way, and often undergoing 
great hardships. They at last effected a treaty of peace with the In- 
dians, and John Metcalfe settled near Paris, Ky., in 1783. Here Charles, 
the father of V. M. Metcalfe, was Lorn in 1793. In 181-1 Charles mar- 
ried Jane Baylor Chilton, daughter of the Rev. Thomas Chilton, a Bap- 
tist minister of great prominence in his day. About 1832 Thomas Chil- 
ton, Jr., eldest son of Rev. Thomas Chilton, removed to the town of 
Ilopkinsville, where for many years he practiced law, occasionally preach- 
ing for the Baptist people. He was finally induced to devote his entire 
time to the ministry. While in Kentucky he twice represented his Dis- 
trict in Congress, and in his day was regarded as a successful preacher, 
lawyer and politician. He was a very companionable man and hence 
very popular wherever he went. One of his brothers. Dr. Minor Chil- 
ton, died in 1836, at Trenton. Another brother, Dr. Lucius Chilton, 






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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 387 

who (lied in Pembroke, in 1800, was a man of more than ordinary abil- 
ity, having served one term in the Kentucky Legislature, and to him is 
largely due the location of the Southwestern Lunatic Asylum, at Hop- 
kinsville. His first wife was a Miss Tribble, aunt of Mr. Samuel Fox, of 
Ilopkinsvilie, and his second wife was Sarah Killebrew, a sister of Mrs. 
V. M. Metcalfe. While Dr. Chilton was living near Garrettsburg, his 
aged parents from Ilardin County made him a visit. One morning the 
old gentleman and wife, both of whom were quite feeble, started in a 
buggy to see a neighbor, and in crossing a branch which they thought 
not deep, their horse sank in quicksand ; the old gentleman was thrown 
from the buggy, and was drowned. A little slab on the hill near by now 
marks' the grave of Rev. Thomas Chilton, one of the purest and ablest 
men of his time. The grandmother of our subject on his father's side 
was a sister of Gov. Owsley, and his maternal grandmother was a sister 
of Jesse Bladsaw. Thomas Metcalfe, who was his great-uncle, was re- 
garded as one of the best Governors the State of Kentucky has ever had, on 
account of his high sense of honor and unflinching devotion to principle. 
Being a practical stone-mason, he was often called " old Stone-hammer " 
Metcalfe. V. M. Metcalfe was educated at Alabama Military Institute 
and Burrett College. Though his parents gave him a good education, 
desiring to make a professional man of him, his taste ran in another 
direction. His father owning a large cotton factory in east Tennessee, 
he was placed in charge of the establishment, but after a few years, find- 
ing his health required more out-door exercise, he turned his attention to 
farming, at which he engaged until moving to Ilopkinsvilie, since which 
time he has been actively engaged in mercantile business. He has been 
preaching regularly as a minister of the Christian Church. During the 
past five years he has traveled extensively in the Northern and Southern 
States in the interest of a fertilizer, delivering lectures on Agricultural 
Chemistry, lie is blest with five sons and one daughter, the youngest 
about grown. His sons are among the most promising young men of 
the country and are noted for their sobriety and industry. 

JOHN N. MILLS' father, Charles H. Mills, was a native of Vir- 
ginia, born November 9, 1776, where he was reared and educated. In 
1812 he came to Kentucky and settled in Fayette County, and soon after 
to Christian County (now Todd), and there married Miss Tabitha, daugli- 



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385 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ter of William and Valiuda (Simmons) Daniel. He was a farmer, and 
died near Salem, Livingston Co., March 6, 1864. His wife, and mother 
of our subject, was born in Jefferson County, Ky., in 1795 and died about 
1S74. They were the parents of fourteen children, of whom the follow- 
ing grew to maturity, viz : Ann Eliza, deceased wife of James C. Cole- 
man, of Frankfort ; Ellen, deceased wife of Samuel Allen ; Milton H., 
died in Texas ; John N., the subject of this sketch ; Sarah, wife of 
Judge Reuben A. Rives, of the Supreme Bench of Texas ; Charles, who 
was killed in a battle of the late Civil war ; Martha, deceased wife of R. 
West; Roger Q., a prominent lawyer of Texas, the first Representa- 
tive at large elected to represent that State ; is now representing a District 
in the Lower House ; was Colonel of the Tenth Texas Regiment in the 
last war ; was captured at Arkansas Post, carried to Camp Chase, thence 
to Richmond, and there exchanged; at the battle of Atlanta was seri- 
ously wounded and carried off for dead ; Nathaniel J., who studied medi- 
cine under Dr. Hickman, graduated at Philadelphia, and removed to 
Texas, where he is now engaged in the practice of his profession. He 
served four years in the Confederate Army ; Fannie, who married "W. B. 
Yater, of Tennessee, but are now residents of Texas; Cynthia V., 
widow of Dr. John F. Gordon, of Crittenden County, Ky. John N. 
Mills was born in Todd County, Ky., Decembei* 8, 1821, and was reared 
on a farm, and has spent his life in the counties of Christian and Todd. 
On the 8th of May, 1845, he married Eliza J., daughter of Rev. Caleb 
N. and Jane (Browder) Bell. Mrs. Mills died in Todd County, March 6, 
1863, leaving one child, Martha G., who has since died. He next mar- 
ried in August, 1863, Mrs. Mildred E. Lacy, widow of Drury Lacy and 
a daughter of Lemuel Mosely. This union has been blessed with two 
children, viz.: Roger Q., and Johnnie Lou. Mr. Mills is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the Masonic fraternity. 

ROBERT MILLS was born in July, 1830, in County Tyrone, Ire- 
land. His parents, Robert and Margaret Mills {nee Knox), were both 
natives of Ireland, where they spent their entire lives. The subject of 
these lines set sail for the United States in 1846, and after a voyage of 
three months landed in New Orleans, where for six months he engaged 
as a salesman in a mercantile house. From there he went to Cincinn;iti, 
Ohio, where he remained until 1854, and there, during that time, he 






■!;■■ . 



HOrKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 38i1 

served his apprenticeship as a carpenter. Coming to Ilopkinsville in 
1854, he immediately entered upon his useful career as a builder. Since 
that date he has been constantly employed in bis business, and perhaps 
no one man in the State has done a more extensive work in that line 
during that time. Among the many fine structures erected by him can 
be mentioned the two college buildings and public school building of 
Hopkinsville ; the public schoolhouses of Bowling Green, and most of 
the finer business and dwelling-houses iu Ilopkinsville and vicinity. In 
the fall of 1872, after the great Chicago fire, he went to that city, and 
superintended and built the block known as the Kentucky Block. Mr. 
Mills is still actively engaged in contracting, and gives employment to a 
large number of mechanics. He was married in Ilopkinsville in 1857, 
to Miss Ellen C. Dunnavan, daughter of Timothy and Mary Dunnavan. 
She descends from Irish ancestors, and was born in 1840. They have 
six children, viz.: Margaret, wife of G. H. Brandon, of Tennessee; Rob- 
ert Mills, Jr., an architect of Cincinnati, Ohio; Lellie, Nettie May, 
George and John E. Mills. Mr. Mills owns a fine farm of 210 acres 
adjacent to Ilopkinsville, and a desirable city residence on East llussell- 
ville Street. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

JOHN W. MINCK came to Hopkinsville, Ky., in April, 1S64, 
from Wilmington, Del. Ilis parents were Louis Minck, a native of 
France, and Catherine Greiner, who was born in Wurtemberg, Germany. 
These parents came to the United States in early life, and were married 
in the city of Philadelphia. They afterward settled in Wilmington, Del., 
where the father engaged in the butcher business. lie died of yellov.- 
fever, in the city of New Orleans, in 1843, while there on business. His 
widow died at their home in Wilmington, Del., in the year 1854. Their 
family consisted of John W., Louis W. and Rosanna, the latter of whom 
was burned to death at the age of three years. John W. was married 
in Newark, Del., July 30, 1860, to Miss Hannah Catherine, daughter of 
Benjamin and Margaret A. Wilson {nee Caldwell). Mrs. Minck was 
born in Newark, Del., July 29, 1840 ; there her parents still reside in 
advanced age. Since coming to Hopkinsville, Mr. Jlinck has been con- 
stantly engaged in conducting a meat market, with businei;s location on 
Court Street, and family residence on East Russellville Street. He is a 



390 BlOGRAnilCAL SKETCHES. 

member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Episcopal Church, and his 
wife is an honored member of the church. 

MAURICE II. MORRIS was born June 27, 1828, in Bourbon Coun- 
ty, Ky., where he resided until moving to Christian County in 1870. His 
father, John Morris, was born February 10, 1793, acar Paris, Bourbon 
County, where he was three times married. The second wife, mother of 
our subject, was Elizabeth, daughter of David and Winifred Bowles, and 
widow of John Payne. They had two children, of whom Maurice 11. was 
the elder. John Morris died in Robertson County August 20, 1872, and 
his wife Elizabeth died in 1831, at their home near the old Cane Ridge 
Church in Bourbon County. Maurice H. Morris was married November 
18, 1852, near Paris, to Mary, daughter of Joiin M. and Susan (Currant) 
Layson. She was born December 28, 1835, in Bourbon County, and de- 
scends from the famous " Giant Family," so noted for their extreme height 
and weight, as well as for their .sterling worth as citizens. Mr. and Mrs. 
Morris are the parents of ten children : John M., William I., Edwin A., 
Jess H., Perry M., Susan E., Bob T., Emma M., Rodman and Samuel 
G. H. W. Morris. William I. and Susan E. are deceased, the former 
leaving a wife, Mary V. Morris (iiee Hayes), and one son named Claude 
F., now living. In 1870 Mr. Morris settled in Mount Vernon Precinct 
on the dairy farm of P. A. Cushman, but in 1883 removed to his pres- 
ent residence in Hopkinsville Precinct, near the city of Hopkinsville. 
Mr. Morris is an honorable, industrious man, and has served the county 
for some years as a Magistrate. He is chiefly engaged in the dairy busi- 
ness, with which he combines agriculture. 

THOMAS INIORROW, one of the early pioneers of Kentucky, came 
to Christian County from North Carolina in the year 1789, and settled a 
farm now known as Mount Vernon in the Mount Vernon or Yellow 
House Precinct ; lived there until the date of his death about the year 
1834. The place afterward became one of the voting precincts of the 
county, and has remained as such ever since. Thomas Morrow had a fam- 
ily of four children, three sons and one daughter, none of whom are now 
living; but his grandchildren are scattered from New York to Te.xas, with 
several representatives in this county. The eldest son of Thomas Mor- 
row, Dr. T. V. Morrow, studied medicine, and graduated in that profes- 
sion at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he afterward practiced, and where, in 






■( '■•' !■..' /.'(iO ..J ^nuioirr't •.: r.^/.i 



HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PltliClNCT. 391 

connection with Dr. R. S. Newton, he founded the Cincinnati Eclectic 
Medical College, the first of that school of medicine in the United States, 
find one that has been in successful operation since. Dr. T. V. IMorrow 
diisd in Cincinnati about the year 18.50, leaving a widow and several chil- 
dren, one of whom, Wooster Beach Morrow, is a distinguished member of 
the Cincinnati bar. Another son of Thomas Morrow was Col. William 
Morrow, who, after the death of his father, acquired the old Mount Ver- 
non homestead, where he lived until about 1847, meantime building a 
new house, which he painted yellow, and thus arose the name of " Yellow 
House Precinct," which it still bears. Col. William Morrow served for 
some time as Colonel of the Kentucky Militia. He was also elected to the 
lower house of the Kentucky Legislature, and represented Christian 
County in that body for one or more terms. About 1847 he removed 
from Mt. Vernon to Fairview, and there established a store, sold off lots 
to the settlers, and afterward procured the incorporation of the town. In 
1854 he removed to Princeton, Ky., and there died in 1864. Tlis widow 
and four children — three sons and one daughter — are still living. The 
youngest son. Dr. P. A. Morrow, went to New York City twenty- years 
ago, being then but sixteen years old, without means or a single acquaint- 
ance, there began the study of medicine, and has become an eminent prac- 
titioner in said city. With Thomas Morrow, in 1789, came James Vau- 
ghan, and settled on a farm adjoining Mt. Vernon, where he lived to a 
ripe old age. Richard Vaughan, his son, is now engaged in business in 
Fairview, and is regarded as one of the most worthy citizens of the 
county. 

MEMUCAN H. NELSON was born xMarch 14, 1846, in Columbus, 
Hickman (then Ballard) Co., Ky., and is a son of Hugh Nelson, of 
whom mention is elsewhere made. When six years of age he became a 
member of the familj of Dr. .James B. Wallace, his maternal grand- 
father, who was for many years a resident of Christian County. When 
fourteen years old he was placed in school at Caledonia, Tenn.; leaving 
which he enlisted in the Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry and entered the Con- 
federate Array, though at the time only fifteen years old. He served 
through the Rebellion, and was paroled with his regiment at its close. He 
was educated in a sectarian college at Georgetown, D. C, after v,-Iiicli, in 
1867, he came to Hopkinsville, Ky. lie served Christian County as Dep- 



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392 BlOGKArillCAL SKETCHES. 

uty Sheriff for four years, after which he engaged in the coal trade. 
Since 1877 he has been a commission merchant, handling grain and to- 
bacco ; first as a member of the firm of W. G. Wheeler & Co.; later un- 
der tlie firm name of Nelson k Wheeler, and for the past six years as 
Nelson & Jesup. Mr. Nelson was married January 25, 1872, to Miss 
Isabella, daughter of Maj. Boiling Gordon, a leading politician of Ten- 
nessee. She was born in Tennessee in 1849, and is a graduate of the 
Columbia Institute of that State. They are both honored members of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, and have three children, named Boiling 
Gordon, Memucan and Mary Eloise Nelson. 

IIOBERT W. NORWOOD was born in Jackson, Tenn., January 
10, 1817. His parents, Ignatius W. and Elizabeth (Huston) Norwood, 
were each born in Tennessee, and are still living in Jackson. Robert W. 
is the youngest of four children born to these parents, all of whom are 
living, the eldest three living in Jackson, Tenn., viz.: John II., Samuel L. 
and Sarah E., wife of E. C. Johnson. Robert W. was reared in Jack- 
son, and before seventeen years old became a soldier in the Confederate 
Army, serving about one year, or until the close of the war, as a member 
of a Tennessee regiment, participating in the engagements at Columbia, 
Franklin and Nashville, Tenn.,. and Selma, Ala. In 1867 he became 
agent for the Southern Express Company, and has been in their employ 
continuously ever since, and located at Hopkinsville since 1872. On the 
5th of November, 1872, he married Miss Dora, daughter of Hiram C. 
and Mary A. Vaughan. She was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., 
November 4, 184S. They have had four children : Bessie V., Mary L. 
(deceased), Robert W. and Norma Hamlin. Mr. Norwood is an accepta- 
ble member of the Masonic order, Knights of Honor, Knights of Pythias, 
and the Golden Cross. 

JOHN ORR is a native of Allegheny County, Penn., born Septem- 
ber 29, 1830, to Hugh and Virginia (McConnell) Orr, the former of Irish 
descent and the latter of Scotch descent, and tlie parents of the following 
children: Mollie, deceased wife of Arthur White; Isabella, wife of 
Henry Kennedy, Beaver County, Penn.; Eliza, deceased wife of R. H. 
Cooper ; Martha, wife of John Kerr, of Beaver Falls, Penn.; Alvira ; 
William, of Beaver Falls ; James, of Beaver County, Penn., and John, 
the subject of this sketch, who was the seventh child. His early life was 






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HOPKINSVILLK CITY AND I'RKCINCT. 393 

spent in Pennsylvania, wlicre he learned the carpenlci-'s trade. Coming 
to Ilopkiiisville in IS.JO. he engaged at his trade and continued the same 
until 1866, ;vhen he, in company with Martin Miller, erected and estab- 
lished the llopkinsville Planing Mill, which has since been enlarged and 
is now one of the largest enterprises of the city, employing about fifty 
men. In 1856 Mr. Orr married Sarah E., daughter of Drewry and 
Obedience Toryan. Mrs. Orr was born in Christian County, Ky., and is 
the mother of the following children: John, William G., Clara V. and 
Jessie B. Mr. Orr is an active member of the orders K. of 11. and K. of 
P., and with his wife and eldest son unites with the Christian Church. 

OVEllSHINER FAMILY. Gideon and Barbara (Campbell) Over- 
shiner came from Stanton, Rockingham Co., Ya., and settled three miles 
north of llopkinsville. Christian Co., Ky., about 1815. Gideon was a 
soldier in the war of 1812, followed farming in Virginia and for some 
years after coming to Christian County. He then removed to Hopkins- 
ville and opened a wagon-making shop, a trade which he had learned 
early in life. He prosecuted this business for many years, but later in 
life removed again to the farm and died in 1866, in his seventy-fifth 
year. His wife was born in Ireland in 1796, and came to Virginia in 
childhood. The Overshiner family was first represented in the United 
States by the father of Gideon Overshiner, who came from Germany and 
fought for the Americans in the Revolutionary war. Gideon and Barbara 
were pioneer Methodists in this county, and their house was for many 
years the frequent stopping-place for the weary itinerant. Their chil- 
dren were : Albert ; Mary J., deceased, wife of D. J. Hooser ; Alexan- 
der C, John J., Perry, Rebecca and Margaret Overshiner, the last three 
of whom died in childhood. Alexander C. was born in Christian Coun- 
ty, February 13, 1819. He was reared and educated in Hopkinsville, 
and has spent his entire life since in mercantile business. From 1839 to 
1856 he was merchandising in Muhlenburg and Logan Counties; since 
1856 has been in business in Hopkinsville, and is now associated in the 
stove and tin business with D. J. Hooser. He was married in Hopkins- 
ville to Bettie, daughter of Thomas C. and Martha J. White. Mrs. 
Overshiner is also a native of Christian County. They liave been blessed 
with seven children, of whom Alexander C, Jr., Mattie, Thomas C. and 
Lee are still living. Mr. Overshiner is a member of the Masonic order 






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394 BIOGRAI'IIICAL SKETCHKS. 

and I. 0. 0. F. John C. Overshiner, who was born November 2, 1822 ; 
early in life learned the trade of tinner, which he has followed since. He 
married in Christian County, in 1849, Miss Margaret A., daughter of 
David K. and Mary Nichols. She was born April 12, 1832, in Elkton, 
Todd Co., Ivy. Their family consists of five children, viz.: Mary B., 
wife of Richard Quails; Charles D., of California ; James B., Clifton 
J. and Lizzie Overshiner. 

NEWTON PAYNE is a native of this county, and was born January 
14, 1814. He is the fourth child of Dennis and Nancy Payne, who came 
from Bourbon County to this county in 1800. Subject was reared in Chris- 
tian and Todd Counties ; he then studied law and was admitted to prac- 
tice in 1834. After practicing for two or three years he turned bis 
attention to teaching, and afterward to farming and trading. He was 
married in Todd County, Ky., on February 22, 1844, to Miss Mahala 
Clark, a daughter of Thomas Clark, of Todd County. This lady was 
born in Todd County in 1822, and died in 1851. To her were born two 
children : Davie Ella and Leslie Elwood, both deceased. Leslie was edu- 
cated in the profession of law in the Law Department of the University 
of Lexington, Ky., from which institution he graduated in 1871. He 
afterward practiced in Hopkinsville, first with D. 0. Graves, now in 
Louisville, Ky.; later, with the late John P. Ritter. He died February 3, 
1877. Miss Davie E. Payne was the wife of James D. Hooker. This lady 
died in Hopkinsville in August, 1873, leaving one daughter — Miss Bettie 
D. Hooker. Subject married the second time, on July 25, 1853, to Mrs. 
Lauvisa A. Faulkner {7iee Baker). This lady is the daughter of Peter 
and Rhoda Baker, and was born in 1827. This union has resulted in 
the birth of five children : John W., EBie (wife of J. W. Warfield), 
Minnie (wife of Dr. W. M. Trice), Felie B. and Edna E. John VV. 
Payne wa?. educated in the Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tenn., 
from which institution he graduated in 1877. He was admitted the same 
year to practice in the courts of Kentucky, first with Hon. James 
Breathitt. From October, 1880, to January 1, 1884, he was business 
manager and local editor of the New Era. In December, 1883, he was 
elected City Attorney over a prominent Republican, J. W. Downer, and 
is now serving in th,it capacity. He is a member of the Baptist Church, 
as are also his mother and sisters, Mrs. Warfield and Mrs. Trice. The ■ 



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HOrKINtJVlLLE CITY AND PUECINCT. 395 

Payne family have been residents of Christian County since 1844, living 
until 1866 on tlieir farm in Union Schoolhouse Precinct, and since that 
date in Ilopkinsville. 

HIRAM A. PHELPS, the oldest practicing lawyer in Ilopkinsville, 
was born in July, 1S12, in Caldwell County, Ky. When fifteen years 
old he went to Lexington, Ky., and there learned the trade of carriage- 
maker, at which he worked until coining to Hopkinsville, Ky., in 1834. 
At that time his father, John Phelps, was Clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Christian County. Hiram A. obtained the position of Deputy, and during 
bis stay in the oflSce was also engaged in reading law. He afterward 
continued his studies in the office of Ninian E. Gray, with whom he prac- 
ticed for some time after his admission in 1841. He is one of the Trustees of 
the Bethel Female College and a member of Hopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, 
A. F. k A. M., and of the Oriental Chapter, No. 14, R. A. M. He 
was married in Ilopkinsville in November, 1842, to Miss Cornelia F. 
Campbell, daughter of John P. Campbell and Mary A. Buckner. She 
was born in Christian County in 1822. They have ten children living, 
viz.: Augusta (wife of William Cowan), John, Mary (wife of Dr. John 
Q. Thomas), Lucy (wife of John R. Green), James, Fannie, Cornelia, Mat- 
tie, Lillie, Bell Phelps. John Phelps, junior member of the law firm 
of H. A. Phelps & Son, was born in the town of Hopkinsville, February 
9, 1845. He was educated in the Hopkinsville schools, and in 1867 
began the study of law with his father. He was admitted to the bar in 
1868, since which date he has been in constant practice in Hopkinsville, 
and in the early part of his legal career served as City Attorney. He 
was married to Miss Emma, daughter of Robert and Mary McReynolds, 
on the 13th day of November, 1866. She was bora in Ilopkinsville, 
Ky., in 1845, and died August 22, 1871, leaving one son — Hugh Phelps. 

EUGENE A. PIKE was born in Owensboro, Daviess County, Ky., 
in June, 1857. His parents were Samuel and Zarilda A. (Gaugh) Pike, 
both of whom were reared in Spencer County, Ky., near Taylorville. 
They were married in Owensboro, Ky., in the year 1852, where Sam- 
uel Pike engaged at his trade — that of a cabinet-maker — and where both 
he and his wife died, both being consistent members of the Catholic faith. 
To them were born two sons, viz. : Eugene A. and George H. Pike, who, 
at the death of their parents, were still in the tender years of childhood ; 









..•J 



ayb BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

too young, indeed, to appreciate tlieir loss, which was rendered all the 
more sad in consequence of being left with no fortune, save the charac- 
teristics inherited from their parents. They were, however, fostered by 
relatives of their mother; and with the meager estate left them, defrayed 
the expenses of their early education, they in the meantime serving as 
store boys in Owensboro. In 1877, feeling a desire to increase his 
chances for advancement, Eugene left Owensboro, and accejited a posi- 
tion on the clerk staff of the Louisville Hotel, in the city of Louisville, 
which position he filled with acceptance until October, 1870, when he 
removed to Ilopkinsville, where, for a time, he engaged in clerical work. 
By his industry he soon acquired money, which enabled him to engage 
in business for himself. He is now the proprietor of the European Hotel 
on Bridge Street, where his time and money are spent in his efforts to 
dispense comforts and kind attention to his many guests. In October, 
1883, Mr. Pike was united in marriage with Miss Rossie T. MacKenzie, 
of Nashville, Tenn., whose presence adds much to the grace and attrac- 
tions of his house. She was born in November, 1861, in Wilmington, 
Ni C, and is a daughter of James MacKenzie and Fannie J. McGeady ; 
the former born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1827, and the latter in London- 
derry, Ireland, in 1832. George H. Pike, the younger brother of Eugene 
A., has spent several years in the "art preservative of all arts" in the 
States of Kentucky and Illinois — the Muhlcnburg Echo, a sterling 
Democrat organ of the town of Greenville, Ky., and which flourished 
under his management, being his latest effort in this line. On account of 
failing health he abandoned this field of labor and now efficiently presides 
over the office of the European Hotel. 

COL. GEORGE POINDEXTER, whose long and useful career in 
Ilopkinsville has made him extensively and favorably known, was born 
September 24, 1807, in Jessamine County, Ky., where his father, Peter 
Poindexter, settled in 1780, coming from Louisa County, Va. Peter 
Poindexter removed with his family to Logan County, Ky., in 1825, and 
died in 18-13, at the residence of his son in Todd County. The mother 
of our subject was Mrs. Mary Marrs, widow of John Marrs, and daughter 
of a Mr. Lard, who was killed in the battle of King's Mountain, in the 
Revolutionary war. She married Peter Poindexter in Kentucky, and 
died in 1832. Both, having been previously married, had a family of 



•»1 

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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND I'RECINCT. 397 

childien — he five and she four ; their union resulted in the birth of six 
children, making the entire flimily of children number fifteen. Of this 
number George is the only survivor. He learned the trade of carriage- 
making in Jessamine County, and came to Hopkinsville in 1829, for the 
purpose of establishing himself in this business, which he did, continuing 
for more than half a century, and retiring therefrom in 18S1. In 1861 
Col. Poindexter was elected to represent Christian County in the State 
Legislature, and was again elected in 1865, serving two terms with 
acceptance, during which time he was instrumental in securing to Hop- 
kinsville the re-establishing of the Western Kentucky Insane Asylum, 
and also in securing the appointment of Dr. James Rodman as its Super- 
intendent. For many years Col. Poindexter has been a member of its 
Board of Managers, and is now Secretary of that body. He was married 
in this county in 1836, to Miss Bettie, daughter of James McDonald. 
They have had four children, all of whom are deceased. Mrs. P. was 
born in Christian County, Ky., in 1818, and both are pioneer members 
of the Christian Church at Hopkinsville. Col. Poindexter is a member 
of Hopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M., Oriental Chapter, No. 14, 
R. A. M., and Moore Commandery No. 6, K. T. For services rendered 
as presiding officer in these orders, he has been made an honorary life 
member of each of them, without dues. 

PYLE FAJIILY. The parents of John Pyle, of Hamby Precinct, 
Christian County, Ky., were Nicholas and Mary Pyle, of Carolina, 
John being one of a family of nineteen children born to them. His 
paternal grandparents were Nicholas Pyle and Ann Black, both of whom 
were Carolinians. John was born June 18, 1813, and on the 22d of 
January, 1836, married Miss Jane E. Meacham, who was born March 
IG, 1S20. She was a daughter of Wyatt Meacham, who was born in 
1798, the son of Joseph Meacham and Mary West, both natives of En- 
gland. Her mother was Ellen Robinson, a daughter of Abner Robinson, 
of English ancestry, and Nancy Duty, of Irish origin. Ellen was born 
in 1798, and was married to Wyatt Meacham in 1817. He died in 1876, 
and she in 1878. They were the parents of Abner W., Jane E. and 
Joseph A. Meacham. To John and Jane E. (iMeacham) Pyle were born 
ten children, as follows: Arabella M., born December 29, 1836; Abner 
W., born November 22, 1844; James F., born December 10,1846; 



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398 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Sarah N., born December 27, 1848; Byron A., born July 10, 1850; 
Falconer 0., born October 30, 1861; Harvey R., born September 27, 
1854; Almeda E., born November 18, 1856; Albina C, born January 
21, 1859; Jo Emma Pyle, March 25, 1860; all deceased except Abner 
W., James F. and Jo Emma. Abner W. Pyle was born in Christian 
County, Ky., November 22, 1844. Wlien seventeen years old he began 
the trade of cabinet-maker, to which several years of his life have been 
devoted. He began as a furniture dealer in Hopkinsville in 1870, and is 
still engaged in that line on West Main Street. He was married in Hop- 
kinsville September 29, 1870, to Miss Olivia J., daugliter of Henderson 
and Maggie Wade. Mrs. Pyle was born July 10, 1854, in Todd County, 
Ky. They have three daughters, viz.: Lena B., aged eleven years; 
Maggie M., aged nine years, and Mary H., aged four months. Mr. Pyle 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Knights of Honor, and both he 
and wife arc members of the Christian Church. 

JOHN T. RABBETH was born in the city of Louisville, Ky., on 
tlie 4th day of October, 1845. He is descended from English parents; 
his father, Joseph Rabbeth, was born in London, September 3, 1806, and 
his mother, Anne Colder, was born in the city of Folkestone, County of 
Kent. The father grew to manhood and married in the old country ; 
came to Louisville, Ky., in 1831, and there died in 1868; Anne (Colder) 
Rabbeth was born February 21, 1812, and is still living, an honored 
resident of Louisville. John T. is the sixth of their family of nine chil- 
dren, of whom three sisters are deceased. Margaret Rabbeth married 
Prof. Harry Hill, at one time leader of the Italian Opera at London, 
England, and was a pupil of the Royal Academy of Music, and who 
came to the United States as the leading violinist of the famous Jullien's 
Band. Charlotte Rabbeth is now the wife of James C. Oliver, a car- 
riage manufacturer in Jeffersonville, Ind. John T., of Hopkinsville, 
Matthias, Sydney and Joseph of Louisville, constitute the living members 
of the family. John T., whose name heads this sketch, was reared in 
Louisville, Ky., and in youth adopted the profession of telegraphing, at 
which he early acquired proficiency. During the late Civil war he be- 
came Military Operator under the command of Col. Samuel Bruch, 
Military Superintendent, and was by him ordered to Hopkinsville. As 
a matter of necessity during the war, he was ordered from place to place 



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HOPKIXSVILLE CITV AND PRECINCT. 399 

as circumstances required, his last point of military service being Spring- 
field, Tcnn., where he afterward became Train Dispatcher and Express 
Agent. He returned to Hopkinsville, Ky., in 1871, and for three yeais 
had charge of the station for the St. L. & S. E. Railroad Company. In 
1874, on the ground now occupied by the "Crescent Mill," he and 
William Cowan erected the grain establishment known as the Hopkins- 
villa Elevator. In 1877 the Crescent Mill was built by Mr. F. J. 
Browncll and himself He is a member of the Masonic order, I. 0. 0. 
F. and of the Episcopal Church. His wife, Ella K. (McFveynolds) Rab- 
beth, to whom he was married, January 15, 1880, is an honored member 
of the Christian Church. 

CHARLES W. RADFORD, one of the pioneers of Christian Coun- 
ty, and" whose portrait appears in this work, was born May 29, 1813, in 
Green County, Ky. Reuben Radford, his father, was a native of Buck- 
ingham County, Va., as was also his mother, whose maiden name was 
Phoebe Gibson. These parents were reared and married in their native 
county, from where they removed to Kentucky, settling in Green County 
about 1810. Of their eight sons and two daughters, most of whom were 
born in Virginia, but three are now living, viz.: Charles W., Miles G. 
and John M. Radford, each being residents of Christian County. About 
the close of the year 1815, and before Charles W. was three years old, 
the father died ; the mother following him to the unknown in 1821. The 
younger children were taken under the guardianship of the eldest brother, 
who took care that each should become industrious and self sustaining. 
In 1831 Charles W. came to this county, and, being a practical farmer, 
he obtained work on the farm of Pleasant Garrett, as his business man- 
ager, and remained with him one year. On the 14th of November, 1833, 
he was joined in marriage to Miss Amelia G. Tandy, a most estimable 
lady. She was a daughter of Mills Tandy and Amelia Tandy (jiee 
Graves), and was born in Christian County. Her death occurred April 
6, 1878, after a long and useful life, most of which time she was a faith- 
ful member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Radford's life business has been 
that of a farmer, in which he has enjoyed a success far greater than is the 
lot of the average farmer. In January, 1879, he removed to the city of 
Hopkinsville, where he will doubtless spend the remainder of his days. 
He is director and stockholder in the City Bank, and also a stockholder 



i. ':,!:•;-, M'l ,,:.•■„ VI. ' .■: 






400 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCIIKS. 

in the Bank of Hopkinsville. Mr. KadfbrJ is a true gentleman, a valua- 
ble citizen and a Christian man, having been for more than half a century 
a member of the Baptist Church. 

WILBUR F. HANDLE was born in Jeilersou County, 111., June 
2-2, 1838. His father, Peyton Randlo, was born in 1798 in North Caro- 
lina, and principally reared in Montgomery County, Tenn., and was a 
son of Osborn and Mary Randle {nee Davidson). Peyton came in his 
early manhood to Hopkinsville, Ky., and was here married to Miss Mary 
L. Grant, a second cousin to Gen. U. S. Grant. She was a daughter of 
Joshua Grant and Henrietta (McNeil) Grant, and was born in 1808, in 
Christian County, Ky. Peyton Randle was by trade a blacksmith, with 
which trade he combined general farming. In the year 1833, he removed 
to Jefferson County, 111., where he made a residence of about eleven 
years, and in which time W. F. Randle was born. The family, in 184-1, 
removed to Arkansas, settling in Lawrence County, where they remained 
about six years, and where Joshua Grant (then a member of the family) 
died in 1845. From Lawrence County they went to Phillips County, 
where the parents spent the remainder of their lives. The mother, Mary 
■ L., died April 9, 1860, and Peyton Randle on the 13th of March, 1864. 
Wilbur F. was the seventh of a family of eleven children, beside whom 
but three are living, viz.: Angus P., Sarah A. (widow of A. J. Huft"), 
and Mavy C. (widow of C. J. Wilson), all of Hopkinsville. Wilbur F., 
through his boyhood, followed the fortunes of his father's family in Illi- 
nois and Arkansas, and in 1861 entered the Confederate Army, the fort- 
unes of which he shared through the war, with the exception of one year, 
during which time he was disabled. From the close of the war until 
1869, he followed farming in Arkansas on the old homestead ; then re- 
moved to Paducah, Ky.; thence, in 1870, to Hopkinsville, where he en- 
gaged in mercantile business, at which he is still engaged. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Mattie, daughter of Dr. John E. and Rebecca (Hubbard) 
Park. Mrs. Randle was horn in 1843. in Georgia, and for several years 
has had the manngemcnt of the Union Telegraph Office of Hopkinsville. 
Mr. Randle is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and Knights of Honor. 

RERD RENSHAW was born in Knnx County, Tenn., February 7, 
1807, to John and Nancy (Reed) Renshaw. John Renshaw was born 
in Rowan County, N. C, and was there reared, educated and married. 



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HOl'KINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 401 

"lie removed to Knox County, Tenn., and subsequently in IS08, to Cliris- 
tian County, Ky., and settled on Brush Fork, of Tread Water in Hamby 
Precinct. In 1818 removed to Missouri, and while he was here on busi- 
ness in September, 1822, died. lie wixs a f\irmer. His wife, subject's 
mother, was born in Rowan County, N. C, and died in this county in 
1848. They were the parents of eight children of whom Reed, our sub- 
ject is tlie only surviving child. lie was one year old when his parents 
came to the county, and here was reared until his parents removeil to 
Missouri, and there was educated. In 1826, after the death of his father, 
lie returned to Christian County with his mother, and soon after engaged 
in farming on his own account in Ilamby Precinct, and in 1839 removed 
to Bainbridge Precinct, where he remained until 1875, when he came to 
llopkinsville, where he now resides. In 1827 he married Miss Lucetta 
Clark, a native of the county. She died November 28, 1883. She was 
the mother of eleven children, of whom eight are now living, viz.: Finas 
II., Luretha A., Eliza, James C, Saphrona, Amanda C, Adelia E. and 
Joseph R. Mr. Renshaw has been a member of the Universalist Church 
since 1842, is an active njember of the order A. F. & A. M., and is a 
Republican in politics. 

JOHN T. RICKETTS w.as born June 1, 1830, in Christian County, 
Ky., and is a son of the late Hezekiah Ricketts, of this county. Heze- 
kiah was born in Maryland, in 1789, and there grew to manhood and 
was married to Miss Sarah Pool, with whom he emigrated to Christian 
.County, Ky., about 1816. They settled a few miles south of llopkins- 
ville, where they passed their long and useful lives. They were both 
members of the Methodist Church of that pioneer period, when elegant 
church edifices with their cushioned pews, grand furniture, pulpits sup- 
plied with men of pronounced literary ability, were things unknown or 
very uncommon ; when the choir with its organ accompaniment was not 
to be found to entice the multitude to the house of God. But instead, 
these original founders of Christianity performed their service from deeper 
motives, being prompted only by a desire to see the cause of right prevail. 
Hezekiah and Sarah Ricketts lived to see their labors blessed, and the 
influence of their pious examples is still seen and felt. They died at a 
ripe old age : Hezekiah on the 29th of October, 1873, and the llopkins- 
ville Press thus speaks of him: " In the death of Mr. Ricketts, this com- 
as 






Vi..-..:i. .M..t 



402 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

•-munity has been deprived of one of those links which bind us to the 
honor, tlie glories and the cherished memories of the period of the past. 
lie Ciirac from Maryland to this State in 181G, and settled in this county 
where he has since resided, and been widely known and highly esteemed 
for his many excellent traits of character. He served with credit to him- 
self and his country, as an ofliccr in the war of 1812-14, and has since 
devoted himself in a quiet and unobtrusive way to the maintenance of 
himself and family. He was a kind, afl'octionate, and fond father, a gen- 
tle husband and a pleasant neighbor." His wife, who was born July 28, 
1802, died July 14, 1877. These parents had a family of eight children, 
viz.: George W., who died at the age of sixty-one years, in Trigg County ; 
James E., died in Henderson County ; John T.; Casandra, wife of M. 
Lewis; Mollie E., wife of Alexander Wright ; Matilda, deceased wife of 
Parker Wright; Berlinda, wife of William P. Nichols, of Texas ; and B. 
M. Piicketts. Jolin T., the third of this family, spent his entire life in 
the immediate vicinity of his boyhood. In his earlier life he was 
appointed to the office of Deputy Sheriff, serving for four years, ending 
in 1852. He was tnarried February 3, 1857, to Miss Mollie, daughter 
of Elijah Cravens. She was born in this county in 1838, and died on the 
25th of December, '1875, leaving three children : Essie, wife of Scott 
Means; James E. and Elijah llickotts. On the 3d of July, 1S7C>, he 
was maaried to Miss Carrie Means, daughter of Y. J. Means, of tliis 
county. Slie was born in Christian County, August 10, 1849. Tliey 
have two children, viz.: John T., Jr. and Ella Ricketts. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. llicketts are honored nieml)ers of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and he is a member of the Clio^cn Friends. Mr. Ricketts has devoted 
his life to agriculture and stock, combined with general trading, and is 
regarded as one of the most substantial men of Christian Coiinty. He 
was also for ten years engaged in merchandising, during which time he 
held the position of Postmaster. 

JUDGE ALEXANDER D. RODUERS was the son of David Rodgcrs 
and L. (Jackson) Rodgers; he was born in Jackson, Miss., January 30, 
1825; his father, who was a member of the State Senate of Missis- 
sip[ii at the time of his death, left iiis son, the subject of this sketch, 
togotlicr with hi.s wiilowed mother, in straitened circumstances, and they 
removed to Kentucky soon after that event. Here, with a very incom- 



ai.i-' ri..'")!! 



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i .1 ):, 



HOPKINSVILLE CITV AND PRECINCT. 403 

plele education, the boy found himself confronted with tlie problem of 
life. Bright, energetic and determined, he bravely faced the difficulties 
of his position, the hardships of poverty, and went to work at a trade. 
After serving faithfully at his apprenticeship, he found, soon after reach- 
ing his majority, that the introduction of machinery, the establishment of 
factories, had rendered the profits of his trade so scanty and meager, that 
he determined to carve out for himself another career. Before he was 
quite twenty-two years of age, he married Mary E. Underwood, and had 
other responsibilities in addition to his widowed mother to call forth his 
energies ; he first served as Constable, and then, after a most exciting 
contest with an older and popular citizen, which is still well remembered 
in Ilopkinsville by some, he was elected Town Marshal by one majority. 
In the meantime, with the advice and encouragement principally of that 
quiet and unpretending, but generous-hearted gentleman, Hiram A. 
Phelps, who gave him the free use of his library, he studied law. After 
practicing law and being fully prepared for the duties of the position, he 
came before the people of old Christian in 1854 as a candidate for 
County Judge, -and was triumphantly elected. This period probably dates 
his connection with the more public history of our county, and in order to 
correctly estimate his oflicial services, a recurrence to the facts then ex- 
isting is necessary. Our new Constitution had but shortly before gone 
into operation. The first County Judge, William V. Bernard, had been 
elected only for a short term, and Judge Rodgers was his successor. 
The many questions arising from the new Constitution and the laws reg- 
ulating the powers and duties of the County Judge, had not as yet been 
fully and definitely settled by judicial decision. The people were unused 
to the new system. In addition to his duties as Judge of the Quarterly 
Court, his jurisdiction embraced the important subjects of the probate of 
wills, the care and guardianship of the orphan infants of the county as 
far as to require full and proper security for the management of their 
estates, the settlement with executors, administrators and guardians, and 
a control and supervision, in conjunction with the Court of Claims, of all 
county expenditures. The young Judge maintained the dignity and per- 
formed the duties of his responsible office so satisfactorily, that when he 
came before his constituents for re-election in 18.58, only one objection in 
a warm contest was urged against his official action : he had adopted the 



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404 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

maxim, that in county improvements the best was the cheapest, and had 
given all his influence to the erection of the stone bridge on the Madison- 
ville road, in the edge of town. This was attacked as an unwarrantable 
expenditure of the people's money, but Judge Rodgers assumed his full 
responsibility, faced the issue fairly and squarely, and defended his action 
so successfully that he was re-elected with a party majority against him. 
He continued to perform the duties of his office, honorably to himself and 
acceptably to the public, until the end of his term in 1862, when the laws 
being silent amid the din of arms, and the State being under military 
control, he retired to private life. He was preparing to go into business 
to support his family, when he sickened, and died in Hopkinsville on the 
16th of January, 1865. Private eulogy may be considered out of place 
in the history of our county, but the writer, who was intimate with him 
from his early boyhood until the time of his death, maiy be pardoned for 
saying that Judge Rodgers was true as steel to his friends ; and they re- 
ciprocated his fiiithfulness, and even now often experience a feeling of 
sadness at the recollection that he was so untimely cut off, in the full 
pride and vigor of his manhood. 

PROF. J. W. RUST, who is a remarkable exemplification of success 
attained under great difficulties, is one of the most prominent Baptists in 
Kentucky, his native State. Born in Logan County, February 14, 1819, 
he developed in early life a fondness for books, although working on a 
farm until he was fifteen years of age. With a few months' schooling at 
a time, in all thirteen months, in addition to private application, he 
learned to read, write and cypher. Without friends to help or money to 
sustain him, he determined to qualify himself to teach, and such was his 
pwsistency, energy, tact and sagacity that, by the time he had fairly 
reached manhood, he had earned a reputation as a teacher, which was re- 
warded with the unsolicited honor of A. M. h^ two respectable colleges ; 
and for nearly forty-seven years his success as a teacher has been invari- 
ably great and gratifying. From 1864 to 1868 he was President of 
Bethel College at Russellville, and during his administration the college 
attained its greatest patronage. As editor of the Western Recorder, he 
became a power among his brethren. Although not a minister, he has 
done much to encourage the spread of Gospel ; as a Sunday school work- 
er, he has been very useful ; nor has any one done more than he to keep 



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,'0 0,f; ..■,■>■(. "'.".-.-il'LT.! VUtlJl 






HOI'KINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 405 

Baptist interests before the public. For several years he was Secretary 
of the General Association of Kentucky, and is now President of ]>ctliel 
Female College, at Hopkinsville, Ky., which, under his care, is in a 
flourishing condition. He is still exerting a good influence in behalf of 
education and Sunday-schools, being President of the Sunday-school Con- 
vention of the Bethel Association. President Rust is an extraordinary 
man in many respects, and of great versatility of talent, having succeeded 
admirably in every sphere of labor it has been his lot to occupy. lie is 
an excellent educator, and was a superior editor. No man is more uni- 
versally popular in his native State, Kentucky. In 1881 the honorary 
degree of LL. D was conferred on him by the Southwestern Baptist 
University at Jackson, Tenn. A ready writer and fluent, forcible speaker. 
Dr. Rust has made an impression for good wherever he has lived, and his 
life presents many studies of interest and encouragement to the young. 

ANDREW SEARGENT, M. D., is a native of the State of Texas, 
and is the youngest of four living children born to John G. Seargent and 
Susan (Colier) Seargent. John G. was born in 1818, in Buckingham 
County, Va., and in the year 1830, with his fiither, x^ndrew H. Seargent, 
removed to Christian County, Ky. John G. Seargent was the only son 
of Andrew H. Seargent, and had three sisters, viz.: Mrs. M. L. Steger, 
widow of William Steger; Mary, deceased, wife of Joseph Radford, and 
the mother of Mrs. Dr. J. P. Thomas ; Elizabeth, deceased, wife of Uriah 
Major. John G. Seargent continued a resident of this county, living near 
Beverly, until 1850, when with his family he emigrated to Texas, where 
the subject of this sketch was born August 16, 1858. His father and his two 
elder brothers there espoused the cause of the Confederacy and at the close 
of the war removed to Kentucky. Susan Seargent was born in Lincoln 
County, Ky., in 1821, where both she and her husband are now living. 
Tlie early education of Dr. Seargent was obtained in the schools of Stan- 
ford, Ky. He read medicine with Dr. J. P. Thomas of this county, and 
in 1879 entered the Louisville Medical College, from which, in 1881, he 
graduated with the highest honors of his class for general proficiency. 
He was then elected to the position of Resident Physician of the Louis- 
ville City Hospital, where he practiced with credit to himself for one 
year. In 1882 he came to the city of Hopkinsville, Ky., and formed a 
partnership with Dr. W. M. Fuqua, which has since terminated. Though 



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406 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

his residence here has been brief, his ability as a physician is acknowl- 
edged, and he has succeeded in establishing a very desirable practice. 
lie is an active member of the State Medical Association and the order 
of Knights of Pythias, and is a regularly appointed Medical Examiner of 
Pension Claimants. In November, 1883, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Lizzie C, youngest daughter of Dr. D. J. Gish, of Ilopkinsville. 
Both the Doctor and his estimable wife are members of the Hopkinsville 
Christian Church. 

ELIJAH G. SEBPtEE, JR., lawyer, and Attorney for Christian 
County, is a native of Todd County, Ky., where he was born April 30, 
1857. He is a son of Elijah G. Sebrec, a prominent planter of that 
county, and was, therefore, reared under the influence of fai-m life and 
meantime had the advantages of a good private school. When sixteen 
years old he entered Bethany College of West Virginia, from which he 
graduated in 1877. Soon after he engaged in clerical work in the office 
of the Clerk of Henderson County, Ky., in connection with which he pur- 
sued the study of law. He 'entered the Law Department of the Louis- 
ville University, in October, 1878, graduated from that institution and 
was admitted to practice in March, 1879. He immediately began the 
practice of the law in Hopkinsville, and has been successful in establish- 
ing a good practice. In August, 1882, he was elected to the office of 
County Attorney, the responsibility of which he dischai-ges with ability 
and general acceptance. Though a young man, he displays unusual tal- 
ent, wielding a marked influence politically, which is enjoyed by the Re- 
publican party. l\Ir. Sebree was married in Henderson, Henderson 
County, Ky., October 5, 1881, to Miss Marguerite Banks, daughter of 
David Banks of Henderson, where she was born in 1862. They have 
one son named Elijah G. Sebree. 

DR. CHARLES SHACKELFORD was born November 23, 1817, 
in the town of Hopkinsville, where he has spent his entire life, with the 
.exception of'one year. He is the son of Judge Benjamin and Frances P. 
(Dallam) Shackelford, who were among the earliest and most respected 
settlers from Virginia and Maryland. The subject of this sketch was ed- 
ucated in his native village, at the old Christian Academy, under the 
faithful and efficient instruction of James D. Rumsey . In early life he stud- 
ied law under his father, but, becoming dissatisfied, forsook the profession 



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I'VA:' ^ :■[■■: .,) 



IIOl'KIN'SVILLE CITV AND rKECINCi'. 407 

and entered a dry goods store as clerk. From 1840 to 1847 he engaged 
in the business for himself, and while so engaged diligently prosecuted his 
studies as a physician. Abandoning in 1847 the mercantile business, he 
devoted himself exclusively to the study of medicine under Dr. David 
Glass for two years, in the meantime superintending the management of 
his farm near the town. Beginning the practice of medicine in the year 
1851, he was actively engaged therein for a period of over ten years. At 
the breaking out of the war between the sections, he was appointed the 
first Provost Marshal (C. S. A.) of Christian County. He was after- 
ward appointed Assistant Commissary under Maj. Dallam, with whom he 
served until the army left for Fort Donelson in 1862. Upon the advent 
of the Federals into Hopkinsville, he was arrested and sent ofl' to prison, 
where he was held a few weeks and then permitted to return to his family. 
In early life he was a Whig, but later became a Democrat of the most 
pronounced type. In 1843 he was married to Jane C, daughter of Ed- 
ward and Eliza G. (Madison) Worthington. She was born in Mercer 
County, Ky., September 7, 1821, and died in Hopkinsville 1854, leaving 
three children; named respectively Lucy, Edward W. and Eliza M. In 
May, 1855, Dr. Shackelford married his second wife, Laura J. Cook, 
daughter of William Cook, of Virginia. She was born in Bedford County, 
Va., in 1829, and died in Hopkinsville, April, 1861, leaving two chil- 
dren, Laura Otey and Benjamin. The former became the wife of James 
Rives, Jr., and died at the residence of her husband in 1882, and the lat- 
ter died in infancy. In 1872, January 2, he married Henrietta, widow 
of Col. John Cogburn, and daughter of Rev. Dr. Phillip P. Necly, a 
noted minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Shackelford was 
born July 13, 1845, in Columbia, Tenn., and is a member of the Roman 
Catholic Church. The Doctor is a member of the Episcopal Church. 

FIDELIO C. and EVELINA J. SHARP. In the chapter on 
the early bar of Hopkinsville, mention is made of Fidelio C. Sharp, whose 
portrait appears elsewhere in this volume. While we feel that no words 
from our pen can portray even a faint outline of his active and useful life 
or add any luster to the already brilliant picture engraved on the memory 
of friends yet living; still we deem it just that some further mention be 
hciein made, hoping that some may read and emulate his noble example. 
The only definite information we possess regarding the ancestry of 






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*W0 mOGKAI'IlICAL SKETCHES. 

Fidelio C. Sliarp is that he was a son of Thomas Sharp, who emigrated 
from England prior to the Revolutionary war, settling in Virginia. He 
espoused the cause of the Americans in that war, and gallantly fought 
for independence, at the noted battle of King's Mountain. In 1787, in 
company with Cols. Madison and McDowell, he emigrated to Kentucky, 
settling in the then wilds of Logan County. In Virginia he had married 
Jean Maxwell, whose parents were stanch adherents of the " Scottish 
Kirk," and whose separation from the parent land was the result of their 
desire to enjoy, untrammeled, the faith of their fathers. Fidelio C. 
Sharp was one of the family of eight children, including three daughters, 
born to these parents. He was born in Virginia, February 22, 178-1, and 
was consequently but a mere lad when the family removed to Kentucky. 
Born of such sturdy ancestry, and reared under the influences of pioneer 
life, he acquired, naturally, a love of liberty, and spirit which breathed 
forth the inspirations of independence. Of his early education we only 
knoTi- that what he obtained was self-acquired, and while his progress was 
necessarily slow, he was nevertheless laying a foundation deep and wide, 
whereon to build, in future years, a character which should serve as a land- 
mark for the generations to follow. The study of law, to him, was natu- 
ral and easy ; he enjoyed the help of no instructor, save his books, which 
were obtained singly as necessity required, and read, often by the light 
of the midnight fire. lie soon became noted as a land lawyer, a reputa- 
tion he sustained through life ; but it is of his private life we wish more 
fully to speak. He was gentle and kind to all, yet, with an unflinching 
tenacity, adhered to what he deemed to be right — faithful and honest in 
the small as well as the great affairs o( life, and no man could lay the 
charge at his door, that he betrayed a trust or forfeited his word. We 
quote from his published obituary, " He was the friend of order, of peace, 
of morality, and piety." " He admired and loved our political institu- 
tions, and most earnestly and prayerfully hoped for the perpetuity of the 
Union." " Col. Sharp became the friend of literature. His conversation 
was marked by a strong reasoning faculty and close observation. He 
reviewed things around him with no ordinary mind. He conversed with 
equal interest upon the objects of nature, and the actions of men." "In 
domestic life he was the kind husband, the indulgent father and humane 
master. To render the family circle happy was to him a chief object. 



':vd.': i';.)n"u;iO'H,i 801' 






fie');. 



IIOrKINSVILLE CITY AND PHECINCT. 409 

As a neighbor he was kind, free from reproachful remarks, and liberal in 
his charitable distributions." lie became a resident of Christian 
County in 1819, and two years later contracted a marriage with Evelina 
J. Johnson, by whom he reared a family noted for their honor, culture 
and true citizenship. Col. Sharp was for many years a faithful consist- 
ent member of the Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which he trust- 
fully died on the 29th day of September, 1852. Mrs. Evelina J. Sharp 
(nee Johnson), was a remarkable adaptation to a remarkable husband. 
She was born in the year 1800, was highly educated at Frankfort, Ky., 
and removed to Hopkinsville in 1818, and was at the time of her death, 
perhaps, the oldest inhabitant of that city. Not only was she an old 
and honored citizen, but she was in many respects one of the most re- 
markable women in the State of Kentucky. Inheriting the talents of 
her father's family, coupled with a fine education, she was fitted to adorn 
any circle, and would have been recognized as a leader in any commu- 
nity. Her lung association with her distinguished husband, also gave to 
her advantages and enabled her to display capabilities of a very high 
order. In strength of character, resolute and inflexible devotion to princi- 
ple, she stood pre-eminent. Her devotion to her family, to her church, 
to her section, was evidenced by tireless ministrations, and the works of 
her hands and her heart were ever liberally supported by contributions 
from her purse. During the late war she was tireless in her efibrts to 
relieve suffering, ministering to the wants of the sick soldiers, not only 
visiting the hospitals daily, with baskets laden with delicacies, medicine, 
etc., but actually filling her own commodious house with the convalescent. 
For many years she was a zealous member of the Presbyterian Church 
of Hopkinsville, and probably tlie most liberal contributor to its support. 
She made many liberal donations to educational institutions, and was al- 
ways i-eady with her means to sustain those enterprises which received 
the sanction of her ripe judgment. She possessed a large estate, and 
though she had a large family of children and grandchildren, such was 
her executive ability and business sagacity that she yearly increased her 
income. Until near her death she managed her own business, taking a 
lively interest in affairs of a public character. Like the ripened sheaf 
she was cut down in tlie fullness of her day, with a record replete with no- 
ble deeds. She died on the 7th of February, 1881. She went to her 









no L .i' V .^il 



4IU BIOGRAPHICAL SKF.TCHES. 

rest, as go the faithful followers of her Redeemer, her fading eyes alight 
with the dawning beams, and her trusting soul alert for the coming joys, 
• which irradiate and fill the realms of the children of God. The portrait 
of Mrs. Sharp also appears elsewhere. 

WILLIAM M. SHirP, deceased, was born October 25, 1810, in 
Bourbon County, Ky.; he was the son of Laban Shipp, who came to 
Christian County about 1816, where he spent the remainder of his useful 
life, endearing himself to a large circle of friends ; he and his wife, Eliza- 
beth Shipp, were both natives of Virginia, and were among the pioneers 
of Bourbon County, Ky. Willi;im M. was among the younger of a large 
family and was educated under Prof. Rumsey in the old Ilopkinsville 
Academy. In 1833 he married Elizabeth Ilopson, of Christian County, 
who died in 1867, leaving two children, viz.: Mary S., wife of Dr. Will- 
iam Hopson, of Ilopkinsville, and Sallie P., wife of W. J. Withers. His 
second wife, who still survives him, and who resides on the old homestead 
adjoining the city of Ilopkinsville, was Miss Lottie LeMaster. Mr. 
Shipp himself improved the above mentioned farm, consisting of several 
hundred acres of valuable land, where he spent about forty years of liis 
life, and where he died on Saturday, December 31, ISSl. Mrs. Lottie 
(LeMaster) Shipp, is the daughter of John W. and N^ncy Lee LeMas- 
ter (nee Allmond). The father descended from an early Huguenot family 
of South Carolina, and served as a soldier in the war of the Revolution. 
Capt. John W. LeMaster was born in South Carolina, but came from 
thei-e in early life to Tennessee, where he was married to Miss Allraond ; 
he served in the war of 1812. Their union resulted in the birth of sev- 
eral children, of whom five grew to maturity. Mrs. Shipp, the third of 
this number, was born in 1832, in Columbia, Maury Co., Tenn.; was 
educated in her native town, and when about nineteen years old became 
a teacher in the old Columbia Atheni^um, in which relation she continued 
until her marriage with W. M. Shipp, in October, 1868. She has one 
daughter, Elizabeth Jones Ship}), born April 24, 1871. 

GEORGE W. SMITH was born in Virginia, February 2, 1S28. 
He is the fourth of a fiiraily of five children of George W. and Delphi;i 
Smith {nee Wilburn). George W. Smith, Sr., was born in 1705 in Vir- 
ginia; there grew to manhood and was married; his wife was also born 
in Virginia, and there died in 1835. A few years later Mr. Smith mar- 






L. -,.>: 1. .....' .01... -.."■>.) 



HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 411 

ried Miss Jennie Bowen, and in 1844 the family removed to Kentucky, 
settling near the village of Fairview in Christian County, and near whore 
George W. died in 1863; his wife survived him until 1872, and died in 
Montgomery County, Tenn. Of the five children born to them, but one 
is now living, viz., George W. Smith. He was reared to the pursuits of 
the farm, which he followed until 1870, at which time he engaged in livery 
business at New Providence, Tenn.- After remaining there three years 
he came to Ilopkinsville, Ky., which has since been his' home, and where 
he is conducting a livery business located on Bridge Street, west of Main. 
Mr. Smith was married in Christian County, in 1857, to Miss Sarah E. 
Vaughan, daughter of Henry Vaughan. She was born in Christian 
County, Ky., in 1842. Mr. Smith isa member of the Masonic fraternity, 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and both he and Mrs. Smith are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their family, consisting of 
nine children, are as follows : Florence, wife of John Young, of Hopkins- 
villc; George H., Bettie Lee, Mary Ellen, Jennie A., Howard, William, 
Thomas and James Smith. 

JESSE W. I. SMITH'S father, Samuel C. Smith, a seaman, was of 
English descent, born in New Jersey on the 18th of August, 1806, and 
died near Goshen, Ohio, from sunstroke in August, 1877. In New Jersey 
he married Miss Louisa Bronaugh, of German ancestry, born February 
.20, 1807, and died in November, 1866. They were the parents of the 
following children: Dr. John C, a resident of Kansas; Maggie, who mar 
ried Charles Armstrong, of Plainville, Ohio, and died in 1872; Lottie, 
who married AV. II. Ross, now of Dakota ; Emma L., wife of Whitfield 
Armstrong, of Ohio; Clara, wife of Samuel F. Emery of Minneapolis, 
Kas., and Jesse, the subject of this sketch, who was born in Jersey City, 
N. J., August 18, 1832. When he was nine years of age ho was brought 
to Goshen, Ohio, by his parents, and was there reared on a farm until he 
was seventeen years of age, when he entered the Delaware College and 
^praai'ned there for two years ; after which he engaged as a traveling sales- 
man and continued the same for three years. He then moved to Indiana, 
and located in Union County, where he engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness, and continued the same until 1861, when he entered the Federal 
Army as Capt. of Co. G, of the 36th Ind. Vol. Infantry ; was afterward 
promoted to Major of the regiment, and served until he was mustered 



3 1 t (i( till ,(< , .iW 3IJ ir I, mK J 



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1 / 



412 BIOGRAPinCAL SKETCHES. 

out in September, 1864. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Mis- 
sion Ridge, Chickamauga, Atlanta campaign, Stone Riyer, and at Jones- 
boro, and was with Hooker on the top of Lookout Mountain. He was wound- 
ed ai Stone River and Chickamauga. After the war lie located at Connors- 
ville, Ind., in the employ of the Cincinnati & Indiana R. R. In 1872 he 
went to Clinton, 111. ; in 1873 to Springfield, 111. ; in 1876 to Hopkins 
County, Ky., and in 1880 to Hopkinsville, Ky., where he is at present 
located in the position of Agent for the Louisville & Nashville R. R. 
In November, 1854, he married Miss Rosa, daughter of John A. and 
Rosanna (Jlanuel) Smith. Mrs. Smith was born in Dayton, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 3, 1836, and is the mother of the following children: Alfred C, Charles 
G., Annie F., Ida L., Harry C. and Jessie L. R. Mr. Smith and wife, 
with his five eldest children, unite with the M. E. Church, and he is a 
member of the order of A. F. & A. M. His eldest son is the operator at 
Hopkinsville and his second son is in the Western Union Telegraph office 
at Chicago as chief operator. 

THOMAS L. SMITH was born near Lebanon, in Wilson County, 
Tenn., January 4, 1842. His parents were Philip Smith and Elizabeth 
S. Smith {nee Walker), the latter a native of Smith County, Tenn., where 
she was born in 1816; is still living in Muhlcnburg County, Ky. 
Philip Smith was born in Smith County, Tenn., and in 1856 met an acci- 
dental death. While engaged in slaughtering hogs, he was thrown from his 
footing by a frightened hog and received injuries from the effects of which 
he died a short time subsequently. At this time the family of Mr. Smith 
consisted of his wife and two sons, Thomas L. and John E. Smith, the 
latter now living with his mother in Muhlenburg County. Thus early 
in life Thomas L. was thrown upon his own resources and required to con- 
tribute to his own support. On the 1st of March, 1865, he came to Hop- 
kinsville and engaged to drive stage from Hopkinsville to Russellville, which 
he did for about one year, when he became general agent of the route and 
manager of the stables. He continued in this position until the construction 
of railroad connection forever cut off the stage coach travel. He then on 
a limited scale opened a livery stable, which he conducted with success 
and in which he is still engaged. In the general conflagration of October, 
1882, he met with the entire loss of both his stables. This great fire had 
its origin in one of Mr. Smith's stables and spread so rapidly that to save 






ait 



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il.v-^^Ju-n o; i:«;.I 



Y^Jjlirc-t.l 







HOPKTNSVItLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 413 

anylhinn; was impossible. Notwithstanding his reverses, he now has one 
of the finest stables to be found in Kentucky, built substantially of brick 
on the site of the former one on corner of Spring and Virginia Streets, 
with a capacity for about fifty horses. Mr. Smith was married in Octo- 
ber, 1871, to iliss Nannie C, daughter of W. W. Phipps. She was born 
in Kentucky, November 11, 1852. They have two children, William 
Wallace and Harry G. Smith. Their family residence is on llussellville 
Street. 

MICHAEL 0. SMITH is a native of Shelby County, Tonn. He 
was born February 13, 1848, and isthe fourth son of Benjamin V. and Eva- 
line (Mahar) Smith ; his father's family consisted of eight children, six 
of these are now living. Their fatlier was killed by Federal soldiers in 
Arkansas, October 1-, 18G3. Their mother resides in Arkansas and is 
now living in her sixty-eighth year. Mr. Smith, the subject, was edu- 
cated in the Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tenn., and remained 
there six years, graduating in literature in the summer of 1870. He 
united with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1SG8, and entered 
the ministry in 1870. A faithful minister of Christ for five years, phj"-- 
sical disability then compelled him to abandon that field of usefulness. On 
October 1, 1883, he engaged in the grocery trade. June 29, 1880, he 
married Miss Annie E. Casky, daughter of James and Eliza (Wood) 
Casky. She was born in this county October 10, 1854. They have a 
daughter, born in Hopkinsville, May 10, 1881. Mr. Smith's mother was 
born in Florence, Ala., and removed in childhood with her father's family 
to Tennessee ; her father, Michael Mahar, was a pioneer school-teacher, 
and first settled the place where the city of Memphis has since arisen. 

COL. SAMUEL M. STARLING; of Hopkinsville, is a worthy mem- 
ber of the illustrious historical family of McDowells, whose thousands of 
members, scattered throughout the States of Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, 
Illinois, Missouri, Virginia, Kentucky and the entire South, have contrib- 
r uted'so much to the brilliancy and solid fame of this nation. Among the 
most warlike and fiercest of the sept who ranged themselves with the 
Campbells, to whom they were allied by blood and marriage under the 
standard of McCallum More, in the series of struggles which led to the 
expulsion of t!ie right line of the Stuarts from the Eriiish throne, were 
the sons of Dowell, Presbyterians of the strictest sect, and deeply imbued 



414 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

witli tlie love of civil ami religious liberty, which has ever characterized 
the followers of John Knox. One of these was one of the most respect- 
able of the colonists from Scotland and England who settled in the north 
of Ireland during the Protectorate of Cromwell. Among other children 
of this colonist was a son, Ephraim, who, at the age of sixteen, joined in 
the heroic defence of Londonderry in 1688. In this defense young Mc- 
Dowell bore himself with conspicuous gallantry in a band where all were 
heroic as any Greek who fell at Thermopylas. On the 20th of May, 
1729, several families of the McDowells, ten of whom died on the passage 
shipped for America, where they arrived in the following August and set- 
tled in Pennsylvania. This little colony was soon afterward joined by 
Ephraim McDowell, who remained here until the fall of 1737, and then 
with his son John removed to Augusta County, Va. One night they 
were joined by Benjamin Borden. This gentleman had obtained from 
Gov. Gorch, in exchange for a buifalo calf, the papers for 500,000 acres 
of land in the Shenandoah Valley, provided he would settle thereon 100 
families. He offered any one who would conduct him to his grant 1,000 
acres of land, which was promptly accepted by John McDowell. James 
Greenlee, a son-in-law, and the father and sou soon removed their families 
to what has since been known as the " Borden Grant," covering much of 
Augusta and Rockbridge Counties, and in consideration of a liberal share 
of the claim, undertook to assist in carrying out Borden's contract for 
him. Their efforts resulted in soon bringing to this section other Scotch 
and Scotch-Irish families — McClungs, McCues, McCouns, McElroys, 
McCambells, Campbells, McKees, Caruthers, Paxtons, Lyles, Irvins, 
Caldwells, Calhouns, Stuarts — names which have since illustrated every 
page of Southern and Western history. Ephraim McDowell died here 
at an age exceeding one hundred years, just before the Revolution. His 
eldest son, John, received a military commission from Gov. Gorch, and 
was killed with eight of his men in a fight with the Indians on Christmas 
day, 1742. The common grave in which all were buried may still be 
seen enclosed by a brick wall, a short distance from Lexington, Va. The 
widow of John Young {nee Magdalene Wood) subsequently married Bor- 
den, and after his decease, Col. Boyer. She died at the age of one hun- 
dred and four years, leaving two sons and a daughter. Judge Samuel 
McDowell, the eldest son of Capt. John Young and Magdalene Wood, 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 415 

was the progenitor of the Kentucky branch of the family ; he married, 
when little over eighteen years old, Mary McClung, and with his family 
in 178-4 moved to Mercer County, Ky. The third son, Samuel, who had 
been a Revolutionary soldier, came with his fother and was appointed by 
Washington 'Marshal of the State. He married Anna Irvine, a distant 
relative, and reared a large family, living within a few miles of Ilarrods- 
burg, Ky.; his oldest child, Polly, in 1805 married William Starling, who 
had with his father and many sisters and brothers emigrated from Meck- 
lenburg County, Va., in 1797. From this marriage was born Samuel 
McDowell Starling, the subject of tliis sketch. The ancestors of Col. 
Samuel M, Starling on his fither's side, though not so numerous as the 
McDowells, were no less honorable and respectable; his grandfather. Col. 
William Starling, was colonel of a Virginia regiment which was organized 
to repel the attacks of the traitor Arnold; he was High Sheriff of his 
county, and was distinguished as a man of great coolness and undaunted 
courage. Of his grandsons, Col. Lyne Starling was aide to Gen. Critten- 
den througli the war. Col. Edmund Starling was colonel of the Thirty- 
fifth Kentucky; his great-grandsons in the Federal Army were: Lieut. 
Fielding Starling, son of Col. S. M. Starling, died with camp fever; 
Lieut. John nolloway, died also of camp fever ; Lieut. AVilliam Starling, 
son of Col. Lyne Starling; Dr. Starling Loving, of Columbus, Ohio; 
Lieut. Ned. Campbell. Col. S. M. Starling was the second son, and was 
born September 19, 1807, on Wilson's Run, a small tributary of Dick's 
River, a short distance from Danville, Boyle Co., Ky. It has always 
been a matter of pride to Mr. Starling that he is the most thorough Ken- 
tuckian in the State, both of his grandfathers being natives of Virginia, 
both Revolutionary soldiers; his mother a native of Kentucky, born in 
1787, and both he and his mother being born in the center county of the 
State. W^hen a lad of four years, his father moved to Frankfort, Ky., 
and settled on a tract of land containing 1,000 acres, just below the 
mouth' of Benson Creek ; his education at school was begun here, the lad 
walking over to Frankfort, where he enjoyed the instruction of Charles 
O'llara; he was subsequently a student of Kean O'Hara, who taught 
school many years there, and who educated the young men of Frankfort 
from 1810 to 1820. In 1821 his father, William Starling, who had while 
a resident of Frankfort been a merchant and Warden of the penitentiary, 






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^^^ BIOGRAPfllCAL SKETCHES. 

moved to Logan County, Ky., and settled on a farm five miles south of 
Russellvilie. While living here Col. Starling married Elizabeth Lewis, a 
daughter of Gabriel Lewis and Mary Bibb ; he worked as a farmer from 
the time of his marriage in 1831 until 1836, when he moved to Ilopkins- 
ville, wliere he has since resided. From his earliest youth Col. Starling 
was educated in the Washington, Hamilton and John Marshall school of 
politics ; he believed the disintegration of the Union the great danger of 
the Government, and hence had great aversion to the resolutions of 1798 ; 
he distrusted Mr. Jefferson and his school, who seemed to him to be doing 
call in their power to weaken the bonds that unite the interests of the 
whole nation. When the Rebellion of 1861 took place, and during the 
extreme violence of party spirit that preceded the outbreak, he was a°most 
uncompromising and vigorous supporter of the Government; he was con- 
vinced that the institution of slavery had outlived its day, that the age 
was too enlightened to longer tolerate the inflimy, and though the here.li- 
tary possessor of a large number of slaves, hailed the promise and fact 
of emancipation. Entertaining these views, at great personal cost he en- 
tered the Union army in 1862, with a commission as Second Lieutenant 
in the First Kentucky Infantry, and was at once placed on the staff of 
Brig.-Gen. J. S. Jackson as Inspector of Division. There was for a few 
weeks a tremendous effort to concentrate troops and to provhle for the 
protection of Louisville against Bragg. This done, the pursuit of the 
rebel General at once began, and overtaking him at Perryville one of the 
bloodiest battles of the war ensued. The three Generals of the Division 
—Jackson, Webster and Terrill were killed, and Col. Starling rendered 
such efiicient service at this juncture as to receive the highest compliments 
in the official reports for his gillantry. Gen. R. S. Granger, who suc- 
ceeded Gen. Jackson, retained Starling upon his staff in th°e same posi- 
tion ; he was soon afterward appointed by Col. James M. Shackelford, 
Captain in his regiment, and on th? promotion of Shackelford to the posi- 
tion of Brigadier-General, Starling was commissioned as Major of the 
First Battalion in the Eighth Kentucky Calvary ; he commanded his bat- 
talion which was prominent in the pursuit and capture of Gen. Jolin S. 
Morgan when he made his raid through Indiana and Ohio. At the ex- 
piration of his tcrtn of ser^ ice, he was mustered out and made Colonel of 
the State Guard, and in this capacity had several vigorous skirmishes 






>■■■■■■:■. I ..:• -jH' 






HOPKINSVILLE CITV AND PRECINCT. 417 

with guerilla parties who attempted to capture Hopkinsvillo. He is at 
this date, May, 1884, living a quiet, contented life near Ilopkinsville, 
cultivating fruits and flowers, and entertaining his old political principles 
with unabated conviction and earnestness. Col. Starling is a well-in- 
formed and cultivated gentleman, of literary tastes and acquirements, a 
clear, incisive writer, and a cordial, hospitable host, remarkable even in 
this land of overflowing hospitality.- Of the union of Samuel M. Star- 
ling and Elizabeth Lewis were born the following children: Mary, mar- 
ried to William R. Payne, who died soon after his marriage ; no children ; 
she resides with her father. Lewis married Virginia Duflield, of Bran- 
don, Miss.; he died at Pensacola, Fla., leaving one child — William. 
Thomas Starling married Nannie Killebrew, who died in 1870, leaving 
Nannie, Lizzie, Kate, Lewis and Ellis. George Starling is unmarried, and 
superintends the work of the homestead. He served throughout the war 
in the Confederate Array under Gen. Joe Johnston, but is now an uncom- 
promising Union man and Republican. Anna L'vine Starling died un- 
married. 

HON. HENRY J. STITES, son of Abram and Ann Stites, was 
born in Georgetown, Scott Co., Ky., in 1816. Li infancy he was brouglit 
by his parents to Hopkinsville, where he grew up to manhood and con- 
tinued to live until 1862. At an early age he was sent to school to Dr. 
James Buchanan, a distinguished teacher, the father of Dr. Joseph R. 
Buchanan, afterward distinguished as a philosopher and essayist. His 
next and only teacher was James D. Rumsey, who was noted as an 
instructor throughout the Green River County. At the age of fourteen 
young Stites besought his father to permit him to learn some calling 
whereby he could support himself and relieve his father, who was then 
poor and encumbered with a large family. In compliance with his request 
his father bound him to service for a period of four years for his victuals 
and clothes as a merchant's clerk to George Ward, Esq., then a merchant 
of large business in Hopkinsville. During this service, which was most 
faithfully performed, he gave every moment that he could properly spare 
from his duty as clerk to reading and the culture of his mind. At the 
end of his term he was offered a partnership by his master but preferred 
to enter into partnership with a fellow clerk, Loander D. Holman, who 
had a small capital, for whom he entertained a strong attachment that 






;q U!V-3n.-.,i ti' 









"118 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

. continued until Ilolmun's death, which occurred in ISIO. For over four 
ye;ua lie with Holman pursued successfully the mercantile business, until 
the great financial crash of 1837. This firm of young men havin"- but 
limited capital was necessarily compelled to rely upon their credit, and 
was always largely indebted to Eastern merchants. They however main- 
tained their credit and were never sued. But young Stites, always averse 
to debt, then resolved to adopt another calling which would enable him to 
live without debt. He selected the law, and at once began to study 
Blackstone, Kent and other elementary writers, giving all his time he 
could spare from his business to his law books. In 1839 he formed a 
partncr.-^hip as merchant with one of the best men that ever lived, John 
Bryan, of Hopkinsville, Ky., and continued successfully with him until 
1841, all the time, however, pursuing his studies when his business would 
allow. In 1840, and while a merchant, he obtained license as lawyer 
from Judge John Marshal! of Louisville and Judge Shackelford of Cliris- 
ti.TU. In 1841, after winding up his mercantile business, he began as a 
lawyer with Ilirara A. Plielps, then also a young practitioner, but since a 
lawyer of fine repute and high standing. They soon had a fine practice, 
and ilerived great benefit in a business way from the favorable acquaint- 
ance of young Stites with the Eastern merchants with whom he had 
formerly had dealings. After his dissolution with Mr. Phelps, Stites con- 
tinued to pursue his profession until 1851. He was induced then to 
become a candidate for the ofllce of Commonwealth's Attorney, but before 
the election was compelled by tiie overwhelming voice of his friends to 
run for the office of Circuit Judge. He was elected, and before the expi- 
ration of his term of office was reluctantly induced to become a candidate 
foR the office of Appellate Judge as successor of Judge Elijah Ilise, who 
had declined a re-election. In August, 1854, he was elected Judge of 
the Court of Appeals by a majority of nearly 6,000 votes in a district 
which then had a majority of more than 3,000 politically opposed to him, 
and having as an opponent a distinguished lawyer and politician, once a 
Member of Congress and also of the convention which formed the Con- 
stitution. He continued on the Appellate bench until he became Cliief 
Justice of the State and until the summer of 1862, when, because of his 
sentiments as a State Rights Democrat and his opposition to the war, he 
was compelled to leave his home to avoid the oppression of the military 



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HOrk'INSVILLE CITY AND I'UErlNCT, 419 

.on either side, which were then at one time or another alternately in con- 
trol of southern Kentucky. Arrest and imprisonment, an unconstitu- 
tional oath or a departure from his section of the State were the alterna- 
tives presented, and he chose the last and v.-ent to Canada. There he 
remained over three years. After the termination of the war he returned 
to Kentucky. In 1867 he was appointed Juilge of the Jefferson Court 
of Common Pleas, an important civil tribunal in the city of Louisville. 
To this oflice he has been three times elected without opposition, making 
when his present term expires over thirty years of judicial service among 
those who have known hira during his life, his fellow-citizens of Ken- 
tucky. From 1868 to 1873 he held the position of Professor of Law in 
the University of Louisville as an associate of Judges Pirtle and Bullock, 
but was compelled to resign this place because of his judicial labors. In 
1841, soon after Judge Stites began the practice of law, he intermarried 
with Miss Mary Jane Sharp, daughter of Dr. Maxwell Sharp, of Chris- 
tian County, with whom he lived most happily until her death in 1875. 
Afterward he married Mrs. Caroline M. Barker, a sister of his first wife 
and the widow of Richard II. Barker, a lawyer of New Orleans, with 
whom he is now living at his home near Louisville. No better testimonial 
to Judge Stites' worth could be given than the following editorial from the 
Courier-Journal of August 1, ISSO. S{)eaking of Judge Stites' judicial 
service, it says: "The admirers of this eminent judicial officer rejoice 
that he enters upon the race for the Judgeship of the Court of Common 
Pleas without a competitor. It vrould have been a very foolish thing for 
any one to attempt opposition to him. He is so perfectly endeared to the 
hearts and minds of the people ; he is so devoted to the responsible duties 
toiifided to his care ; he is so thoroughly equipped in all the matters that 
pertain to his high office ; he is so upright in every principle of action, so 
courteous and urbane to all with whom lie comes in contact, without 
respect to party or condition, that running against him would have been 
about as bootless a thing as one could have undertaken. We are gratified 
in knowing that for the high position of Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas Louisville is able to command the services of this eminent jurist. 
We have often thought, when watching the exercises of his high vocation, 
the quick, sudden, clear rules by which he governs cases before him, of T. 
Arnold's npprnpriatc limning of the high attributes belonging to such a 



vvi.. 7:s.u --'ia'iori 



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•ii> no. 






420 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

position as that filled, and well filled, by Judge Stites. Arnold says : 
'To accustom a number of persons to the intelligent exercise of attending 
to and comparing and weighing evidence, and to the moral exercise of being 
pLiced in a iiighand responsible situation invested with one of God's own 
attributes, that of judgment, and having to determine with authority 
between truth and falsehood, right and wrong, is to furnish tliem with 
very high means of moral and intellectual culture ; in other words, it is 
providing them with one of the highest kinds of education.' The people 
of Loui.sville are very familiar with the perfect exhibition on the part of 
Judge Stites of those high and ennobling qualities. They rejoice to know 
that in him they have an upright, learned and incorruptible judicial officer, 
in whose hands all the interests committed to him are secure of sound and 
honest legal action. They all, one and all, join in saying to him : 'Well 
done, good and faithful servant of the people.' The ermine could not 
more appropriately fit the person of any one." 

COL. L. A. SYPERT. (For sketch see chapter on the war history 
of Christian County.) 

GEORGE 0. THOMPSON. No proper history of the business 
interests of Ilopkinsville could be written without mention being made of 
the man whose name heads this sketch, and whose portrait appears else- 
where. Beginning at the age of eighteen to learn the trade of cabinet- 
maker, by industry and business sagacity, and notwithstanding many 
reverses (principally by fire), he has risen to the distinction of being one of 
the wealthy men in the city of Ilopkinsville. He was born in Virginia 
December 23, 1805, and though nearly eighty years old, is still in active 
business. In 1811 his parents, Charles and Ann (Graves) Thompson, 
came to Christian County and settled four and a half miles north of Ilop- 
kinsville, where they lived until 1834, when they removed to Hancock 
County, 111., where the father died in 1844, and where the mother also died 
a few years later. But four of the nine children bora to tliem are now 
hVing, viz. : W. G. Thompson, of Bloomington, 111. ; Albert Thomp- 
son, of Carthage, III.; James II. Thompson, of Winterset, Iowa, and 
George 0., of Ilopkinsville. Our subject engaged in the manufiicture 
and sale of furniture in Ilopkinsville in 1835, and has been at the head 
of that line of trade continuously until the present, or about fifty years. 
From 1838 until 1870 he was associated with II. H. Coleman. He was 



IIOPKINSVILLE CITV AND ntECINCT. 421 

married in 1835, to Margaret Phaup, daughter of John and Sarah Phaup. 
She was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., in 1815, and there died in 1846, 
leaving five 'children : James J. Thompson, of Collin County, Tex.; Bettie 
(wife of James McElwain of Todd County, Ky.) ; Ellen (deceased wife 
of W. C. Graves, died May, 1881); Charles Thompson, of Hopkinsville, 
Ky. ; and Maggie (wife of Virgil A. Garnett of Pembroke, Ky.). His 
present wife, Martha J., daughter of Roger Thomson, to whom he was 
married .in 1848, was born in Christian County, Ky., in 1823. Mr. 
Thompson is a member of the Baptist Church and Mrs. Thompson of the 
Southern Presbyterian. 

GEORGE V. THOMPSON, son of James E. and Jane Thompson, 
was born August 20, 1832, in Trigg County, Ky. His paternal grand- 
father, James Thompson, came from Virginia to Logan County, Ky., 
being among the earliest settlers of that county ; tlieiice he moved to the 
town of Cadiz in Trigg County, in which he died. James E. Thompson 
was his second son and was born February 25, 1805. He married Jane 
Hill in October, 1826. She was born March 2, 1805, and died on the 
24th of September, 1841. Their children were: Zebulon, George V., 
Bettie, Cornelia J., and Thomas C. Thompson. The second marriage 
of James E. Thompson was to Miss Elizabeth A. Burbridge, who bore 
him Walter, Sallie and James E. Thompson, Jr. After the death of this 
wife Mr. Thompson then married Mrs. Lovisa Rodgers. He died in 
Trigg County October 5, 1881. He served as Circuit and County Clerk 
of Trigg County, for a period of twenty years ; was twice elected to the 
office of County Judge, and represented that county in the State Legisla- 
ture. He was a ruling member in the Baptist Church, and an honored 
member of the Masonic fraternity. George V. Thompson was reared in 
Trigg County, and in 1853 was married to Miss Elizabeth 0. Ellis, 
daughter of Nicholas and Mary Ellis. Nicholas Ellis was a sun of the 
Rev. Ira Ellis, of whom mention is elsewhere made, and was born Sep- 
tember 1, 1796, in Virginia. He removed to Kentucky in 1829 and 
died in 1849. In 1819 he married Mary Gunn, who was born in 1800 
in North Carolina, and who is now a resident of Hopkinsville. Elizabeth 
0. (Ellis) Thompson was born in Christian County, Ky., August 1, 1834. 
Mr. George V. Thompson has a family of three children : Benjamin, 
Emma (wife of F. H. Bristow), and Olivia Thompson. He came to llnp- 



1 '• A.i't T ,.v 



'•J!T!i(U 






422 BIOGRArillCAL SKCTCIIES. 

kinsville in 1863 anil has since been a resident of the town, and engaged 
in the leaf tobacco commission business. lie is an honored member of 
the A. F. and A. M., and both lie and his wife are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church South. 

ALFRED V. TOWNES T\as born December 24, 18-37, in Madison- 
ville, Hopkins Co., Ky. ; his father, Alfred Townes, born in North Car- 
olina June 8, 1794, descends from an English family on his father's side; 
his maternal ancestry being the Hopkins family, of Irish origin, among 
the descendants of whom was Stephen Hopkins, one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence, and of Avhom the Breckinridge family of 
Kentucky is a bi-anch. The raotlier of our subject, Ann Maclin, is a 
descendant of the family of James Taylor, who came from Carlisle, England, 
in the seventeenth century, settling in Virginia. Ann Maclin was born 
in 1800, March, 18, in Mecklenburg County, Va. She and Alfred 
Townes were married in Virginia, March 31, 1836, and to them were born 
two children — the subject and a .sister, Ann Eliza, a resident of Madison, 
Ky., and wife of Richard McClanahan. Alfred Townes died June 19, 
1872, and his wife March 16, 1864. Alfred V. Townes was educated in 
■ Greenville, Ky., and Danville, of same State, and has devoted his time 
largely to surveying, being a practical civil engineer. In the fall of 1861 
he entered the Federal Army as a private in the Tliird Kentucky Cav- 
alry, but was early commissioned First Lieutenant of Alexander's Bat- 
tery, then to acting Major of the Tenth Kentucky Cavalry. He was 
mustered out in 1864 ; he then enlisted as a private in the Seventeenth 
Kentucky Cavalry, but soon received the appointment of Lieutenant and 
acting Assistant Quartermaster in the Second Division of the Kentucky 
Department, under command of Gen. E. Murray. Mr. Townes was mar- 
ried, February 4, 1874, to Lucy A. Lander, daugliter of William and 
Kate Lander. She was born in Christian County, Ky., December 12, 
1842. They have but three children: Kate Maclin, Willie V., and 
Alfred H. Townes. Mr. Townes is the last surviving member of a Pres- 
byterian Church once formed at Madisonville, Hopkins County. 

JOHN D. TYLER was born December 25, 1826, in Montgomery 
County, Tenn. ; his parents were Richard K. and Lucy Q. (Redd) Tyler. 
The Tyler family is of English origin, and was first represented in the 
Llnitcd States in the colonial days, during which a branch of the family 






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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. A'lS 

settled in Caroline County, Va. Richard K. Tyler, Sr., the grand- 
father of our subject, served as a soldier through the war of 1S12 ; he 
had a family of three sons and one daughter, Ricliard K., Jr., being tlio 
youngest. This family settled in Montgomery County, Tenn., about 
1816, and there the parents died. Philip Redd and wife (nfe Temple), 
were the parents of Lucy Q. Redd, and materual grandparents of subject. 
Philip Redd was also a soldier in tiie war of 1812, and came to Ken- 
tucky from Virginia about 1818, his wife having previously died m Vir- 
ginia, after which he married Lucy Ilackett. He settled near the pres- 
ent site of Cadiz, in Trigg County (then Christian County), where he 
died. Richard K. Tyler, Jr., and Lucy Q. Redd were married in 1822, 
and he settled in Montgomery County, Tenn., where he engaged for some 
years in agricultural pursuits, and where in 1820 his wife died, leaving 
two children : John D., and a sister who became the wife of Ira Ellis, 
both of whom are deceased, leaving but one descendant, a son, who re- 
sides in Trigg County, Ky. Richard K. afterward married Miss Minerva 
R. Waddell, of Trigg County. He died on October 28, 1878, and she in 
December, 1870. John D. Tyler was educated first under his uncle, John 
D. Tyler, and later in the Cumberland College, at Princeton, Ky. He 
qualified for the profession of the law, was ailmitted to practice in 1847, 
but abandoned the law to devote his time to a;;riculture, and is now an 
extensive land-owner in Cliristian and Trigg Counties. He retired from 
the farm in 1881, at which time he removed to Hopkinsville. He was 
first married in 18-17 to Miss Helen M., daughter of Asbury and Mary 
Harpending. She was a native of Caldwell County, Ky., and died in 
1870, in Trigg County. His present wife, to whom he was married June 
3, 1873, is Lizzie M., daughter of Col. \V. S. and Mary P. Moore. 
She was born in October, 1841, in Alabama, but reared from infancy on 
the old " Elk Grove " farm in Christian County. They have two cliil- 
drcn : Mary Moore and Richard K. Tyler. Mr. Tyler is an honored 
meralDer of the Masonic fraternity. 

CAPT. BENJAMIN T. UNDERWOOD, the youngest in afamily of 
fourteen children born to John and Mary (Teague) Underwood, is a native 
of Shelby County, Ky., and was born November 2. 1823. His early life was 
spent at home assisting to till the soil of the home farm, and receiving 
such an education as could be obtained from the common scIjooLs of the 



424 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

period. In 1842 he left his home in Shelby County and settled in Hop- 
kinsville, engaging in mercantile pursuits, a business he carried on for 
thirty years with varied success. In September, 1861, he enlisted in the 
Federal Army, and organized Company A of the Twenty-fifth Kentucky 
Infiintry, and was chosen Captain of his company ; he resigned after the 
battle of Pittsburg Landing in 1862, and returned home. In 1880, he 
was elected to the office of Circuit Clerk of Christian County, which 
oflice he is now filling with credit to himself and the satisfaction of the 
people. He has been twice married : in 1844 to Ethelinda C. Campbell, 
who died in 1867, leaving one son — George B., now a resident of Hop- 
kinsville. In 1869 he married Martha J., widow of Dr. William Ran- 
dolph and a daughter of Capt. C. W. Roach. This union has been 
blessed with one child — Thomas Underwood. 

JOE WEILL was born in 1846 in Bavaria, Germany, to Jacob and 
Barbara Weill. The first eighteen years of his life were spent in Ger- 
many, where he was educated. In 1861 he came to the United States,, 
and located in the city of Louisville, Ky., to wliich place he was fol- 
lowed by his parents in 1866; there his mother died the following year ; 
his father is still a resident of that place. Joe Weill began business in 
Louisville as a clothier, but remained but a short time, when he removed 
to Newnan, Ga. ; there he conducted business until coming to Hopkins- 
ville in 1869. From the latter date until 1878 he was here engaged in 
merchandising. He is now the proprietor of a livery and feed stable on 
Nashville Street. Mr. Weill is a straightforward business man, a member 
of the llopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M., and also of the 
L 0. 0. F. 

WILLIAM GORDON WHEELER, M. D., is a son of Dr. James 
Wheeler, and was born in Talladega County, Ala., on the 28th of Octo- 
ber, 1841. In 1843 he was brought to Christian County by his parents, 
and was here reared. He was educated at the University of Virginia, and 
took a course of lectures at the Medical University of Toronto, Canada, 
and also at the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, graduating from 
the former in 1866, and from the latter in 1867. In 1867 he entered 
upon the practice of his profession in this county, and continued the same 
in connection with farming until 1873, when became to llopkinsville and 
engaged in the tobacco and grain commission business, and since 1878 he 






. . : V-. ■' ,' ..'-1 ,'■: : ■.! (./(?/ 



HOI'KINSVILLE CITY AND PKKCINCT. 425 

has been associated with J. N. Mills. He was a soldier in the late Civil 
war, enlisting October 8, 1861, in the First Kentucky Cavalry, Confeder- 
ate States Army, commanded by Col. Ben Hardin Helm, and served with 
him until October, 1862, when he was comraissioned Captain in the Signal 
Corps, and served with Kirby Smith and John 0. Breckinridge. In the 
winter of 1864, on account of disability, he resigned and returned home. 
He was engaged in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, and Richmond, 
Ky. In Clarksville, Tenn., on the loth of November, 1876, he married 
Miss Anna G. Auchenleck, daughter of Melville Auchenleck, of Scotch 
descent. She vras born in Clarksville, Tenn., July 20, 1853, and is the 
mother of one child — Emily, born August 4, 1ST7. Dr. Wheeler is an 
active member of the order A. F. k A. M., Lodge No. 37, and is a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal Church. 

W. A. WILGUS was born April 12, 1859, in Cadiz, Ky., and is a 
son of T. J. Wilgus and Eliza (Kelly) Wilgus ; the latter was boru 
and reared in Warren County, Ky., but was of an old Virginia family, and 
the former (Mr. Wilgus), was born in Russellville, Ky., and removed to 
'Cadiz several years prior to the late Civil war. W. A. \7ilgus, the sub- 
ject, was educated in the schools of Cadiz, and during his vacations and at 
odd times learned something of the printing business in the office of the 
old Cadiz Democrat. In October, 1877, he came to Hopkinsville, and 
accepted a position with Col. J. M. Dodd, editor of the JTopkinsuille Dem- 
ocrat. After six months he was appointed foreman of the office, and at the 
expiration of fourteen months formed a partnership with W. T. Townes 
and bought out Col. Dodd. They started the South Kentuokian, Janu- 
ary 1, 1879, since which time he, in connection with Charles M. Meacham, 
has continued the same. In another part of this work will be found a 
sketch of the paper. Mr. Wilgus is an enterprising and energetic young 
business man, and deserves well of the people of the city and county. lie 
was married, June 28, 1883, to Miss Sallie P. Cook, only daughter of 
Dr. E. R. Cook. 

DR. M. W. WILLIAMS is a son of Josiah and Cynthia (Vaughan) 
Williams ; he is a native of Tennessee, and she of Alabama. They were 
the parents of twelve children, of whom the following are now living: 
Indiaha, the wife of William Cowan, of Tennessee; Rufus B., a pho- 
tographer of Winchester, Tenn.; Martin L.; Jasper M., a teacher; 






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426 BIOGRAPniCAL SKETCHES. 

Thomas E., a farmer; Jennie, Jerry P., Josiah C. and Cynthia. Dr. 
Williams (subject) is a native of Winchester, Franklin Co., Tenn., born 
Juno 7, 1S55 ; he was educated in the University of the South, at Sewanee, 
. Tenn., and studied dental surgery in Winchester, under the preceptorship 
of Dr. C: P. Baird; entered the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 
1876, and graduated from the institution in March, 1877. He immedi- 
ately entered upon the practice of his profession at Baltimore, and in 1879 
came to Hopkinsville, where he has built up a large and lucrative practice. 
May 2, 188-2, he married Miss Daisy, daughter of Capt. Darwin and Mary 
(Walker) Bell, of Christian County. Mrs. Williams is a native of this 
county, and is the mother of one child, viz.: Marion Walker Williams, 
born October 11, 1883. 

RICHARD H. WILSON was born May 8, 1831, in Lunenburgh 
County, Va.; lie is the son of J. B. and Martha Wilson, of whom mention 
is made elsewhere. (See sketch of Dr. E. A. Wilson, of Garrettsburg 
Precinct.) Richard H. was reared in his native State, and there engaged 
in the pursuit of agriculture until coming to this county in 1869, and 
there, on the 3d of February, 1863, ho married Miss Margaret A., daugh- 
ter of Orlando and Lavinia Smith. In the spring of 1861 Mr. Wilson 
entered the Confederate Army, as a member of the Ninth Virginia Cav- 
alry, in which he served for about two years ; he was "then detailed as a 
recruiting officer and drill-master in his native State, in which capacity, 
with the commission of Lieutenant, he served until about the close of the 
war in 186.5. As above stated, Mr. Wilson came to Christian County, 
Ky., in 1869, and here engaged in farming and stock-raising until re- 
moving to Hopkinsville, in January, 18S3. His enterprise has been 
manifest in his improved methods of farming, and in the erection of build- 
ing-i whicli are not only an ornament, but add value to the surrounding 
community. Besides his magnificent city residence, on the corner of 
South and Campbell Streets, he has finely improved two farms in the 
county. Mrs. Wilson is descended from two of the first families of Vir- 
ginia. Her paternal grandfather was Dr. Anthony Smith and her ma- 
ternal grandfather was Dr. Thomas A. Feikis, both noted physicians of 
Virginia, and both ardently devoted to the Presbyterian Church, in which 
they sustained for many years the relation of Elders. Mis. W. rs the 
oldest of four children born to Orlando Smith and Lavinia Feilds, the 






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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 427 

Other members being, Susan G., wife of William B. Wheeler, of Tennes- 
see ; Wilbcr, who bec:ime a civil engineer, and died while in military ser- 
vice, at the age of nineteen years, and Kate, wife of Mr. Ephraim Barnes, 
of Edwurils County, 111. Mrs. Wdson was born March 27, 1842, and is 
the mother of five children, viz.: Wilber F., born April 22, 1866; Harry, 
born March 6,1870; Maggie S., born May 17, 1873; Edward, born 
September 26, 1879 and Guy Wilson, born May 1, 1881. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. W. are members of the Presbyterian Church, of Ilopkinsville ; 
he is also a member of the Knights of Honor. 

ALFRED L. WILSON, a member of the firm of Wilson & Galbreath, 
Ilopkinsville, Ky., was born in Trigg County, Ky., July 5, 1861, and is a son 
of John F. and Augusta A. Wilson {nee Foard). His father, John F., came 
from Virginia, his native State, to Kentucky, and, 'then a young man, located 
in Christian County where he married. His wife was a daughter of 
James M. and Mary D. Foard. She was a native of Christian County, 
and both she and John F. Wilson died in Ilopkinsville, the former on 
the 10th of June, 1861, and the latter December 13, 1875. They left a 
family of five children : John F., William A., Dee C, James R. and Al- 
fred L. Wilson. The latter was educated in the schools of Hopkinsville 
and Paducah, Ky. He was married on the 28th of May, 1883, to Miss 
Anna Y., daughter of Johnson T. and Virginia (Hooser) Savage. Since 
April 7, 1882, Mr. Wilson has been engaged in his present prosperous 
business on West Main Street, near Nashville Street. Johnson T. Sav- 
age, father of Mrs. Wilson, was born in Iluntingilonshire, England, in 
May, 1838, and came to the United States with his father, George Sav- 
age, in 1843, and that year settled at Evansville, Ind. His mother, Ann 
Savage, died in the old country. Johnson T. grew to manhood in Evans- 
ville, Ind., where he learned the trade of marble cutter, which he has 
followed for many years since coming to Hopkinsville in 1859. He was 
married in Ilopkinsville, Ky., to Miss Virginia Hooser, daughter of David 
llooser, of Ilopkinsville. Besides Mrs. Wilson, they have two children — 
George D. and John F. Savage. 

JUDGE WILLIAM P. WINFREE was born January 28. 1843, in 
Sumner County, Tenn. His father, Shurvin T. Winfree, was born in Pow- 
hatan County, Va., in 1819, and his mother, Elmira B. Atkinson, was a na- 
tive of the same county, and was born in the year 1824, These parents were 



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4LJ» BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

married in Virginia in 1842, and immediately removed to Tennessee, set- 
tling in Sumner County. William P. is the eldest of fourteen children 
6orn to these parents, of whom the greater number are now living, and 
among the prominent families of this county. The family removed from 
Tennfcssee to this county in 1848, and located near Hopkinsville, where 
William P. grew to manhood, meantime attending the common schools, 
and later a high school in Montgomery County, Tenn. At the breaking 
out of the late war he enlisted in Company H, First Kentucky Cavalry, in 
which he served for the term of his enlistment, during which he partici- 
pated in the battles of Perryville, Chickamauga and Winchester, Tenn., 
in the last of which he was wounded. In the .year 1865 he began the 
study of law under the instruction of Hon. H. J. Stites, of Louisville, 
Ky. He was admitted to practice in 1866, and in that year located in 
Hopkinsville, where he has since practiced with the exception of one 
year spent in Pleasanton, Kan. In connection with his law practice, he 
there edited and published a paper known as the Linn County Press. 
Returning to Hopkinsville in the fall of 1870 he here resumed his prac- 
tice, which he prosecuted with fair success until the summer of 1882. 
He was then the choice of the people for County Judge, an office he now 
fills with marked ability, still practicing in the higher courts. In 1869 
he was married to Carrie Bradshaw, daughter of Benjamin and Juliet 
Bradshaw, of Hopkinsville. She was bom in Christian County, Ky., 
March 20, 1846. They have a family of five children, viz. : Lulu L., 
Jennie, Willie, John and Benjamin Winfree. Judge Winfree is a mem- 
ber of the Hopkinsville Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M., and also of the 
Christian Church, in which he sustains the relation of a Deacon. The 
family residence is on Maple Street, Hopkinsville. 

JAMES H. WINFREE, third sou of Shurvin and Elmira Winfree, 
was born in Sumner County, Tenn., February 27, 1846, and was reared 
to manhood in Christian County, Ky., attending the common schools of 
the county, meantime laboring on the farm. His pursuit had been that 
of agriculture, until removing to the city of Hopkinsville in 1881, when 
he became associated with his brother, Judge W. P. Winfree, in the im- 
plement trade. Mr. Winfree was married December 20, 188-3, to Miss 
Katie Bell, daughter of Washington and Ellen Sydnor, of Logan County, 
Ky. She is a native of Kentucky, and was born in 1860. Both Mr. 



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HOPKINSVITXK CITY AND rRECINCT. 429 

anil Mrs. Winfreo are membcra of the Methodist Episcopal Cimrcli, he 
l.oing also a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Chosen 
Friends' 

WILTJAM J. WITHERS' father was Lewis W. Withers. He was 
born in Pittsylvania County, Va., where he grew to manhood, received a 
good education, and was married to Miss Jennetta Smith. She was also a 
native of Virginia, and there died, prior to the removal of the family to 
this county. She loft but one child, whose name heads this sketch. Mr. 
Lewis W. Withers' second marriage was also in Virginia, to Miss Mary 
Ann Richardson, wlio is still living, and who is a sister to the wife of 
Gen. James Lee, of Virginia. As a result of this second union, Mr. 
Withers had several children, of whom but two are now living, viz.: R^ 
B. and John P. Withers, of Mississippi. The family came to this county 
about 1845, and settled near the present village of Pembroke, where for 
many years L. W. Withers engaged in the agricultural pursuits, and 
dealing in stock. He died at Eggs Point on the Mississippi River in 
1872. He was a man of more than ordinary literai-y attainments, and 
was eminently fitted for many positions of honor, but never sought any 
public trusts, clioosing rather the quiet retirement of the farm and his 
books. He was a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and for many years prior 
to his death was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. Will- 
iam J. Withers was born in Virginia, October 2, 1842, and was about 
tliree years old when the fiimily emigrated to this county. Here he was 
reared and educated, and in 1861 entered the Confederate Army as a 
member of the First Kentucky Cavalry. The incidents connected with 
his fraudulent arrest and prosecution as a spy, even after he had retired 
► from the service, would be of thrilling interest, but by request we for- 
bear their mention. Suffice it to say, he followed the fortunes of 
the war until his health was destroyed, and now, like all true men, accepts 
the results of that desperate struggle, a willing subject to the powers 
■which prevail. On the 3d of May, 18G5, he married Miss Sarah Polk, 
daughter of William M. Shipp. She was born in this county, November 
15, 1814. To them have been born three children : William Shipp, Lewis 
W. and Jennie Elizabeth ; the second of whom died when three years 
old. Mr. Witliers and wife are members of the Episcopal Church, while 
he is a member of the Knights of Honor. He owns an extensive farming 



'V;,!ii^H 






4dU BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

interest in the county, including a valuable farm of 200 acres, adjoining 
the city of Ilopkinsvillo. 

DR. BENJAMIN S. WOOD. Perhaps no family in the history of 
Ilopkinsville and Christian County are more extensively known than are 
the immediate descendants of Bartholomew Wood, of whom extensive 
and frequent mention has been made elsewhere in this work. He had a 
large family, among whom was Bartholomew T. Wood, the father of 
Benjamin S. Wood, whose name introduces this sketch. Bartholomew 
T. Wood -was born in North Carolina, and came to the present site of 
Ilopkinsville with his parents in childhood. Hero in the infant village 
he passed his boyhood days, attending the primitive schools, and learning 
the lessons of true manhood and hospitality which so characterized his 
entire life. August 1, 1816, he married Nancy Saft'arrans. Together 
they lived and labored, and in time, by industry and thrift, so manifest 
in the life of each, became possessed of a handsome competence. Bar- 
tholomew T. Wood was an admirer of Henry Clay, originally a Whig, 
later a Democrat, but an ardent supporter of the administration through the 
late war. He was for many years Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of 
this county, and thus came to know almost all who lived in the county. 
In his nature he was jovial and humorous, and his faculty for entertain- 
ing bis friends became a common remark, and he was never happier than 
when thus employed. • He possessed a vigorous constitution, was very 
athletic, and peculiarly fond of horseback-riding, maintaining much of 
his youthful vitality of both body and mind to the close of life. He was 
for many years a member of the Christian Church, to the duties of which 
he was remarkably faithful. He reared eleven children to man and 
womanhood, and died at the old homestead. His wife, Nancy Wood, sur- 
vived him but a few weeks, when she too died, having for several years 
been an invalid. She was born in Martinsburg, Va., and was a daughter 
of John Saft'arrans, a German coppersmith, who came to Hopkinsville 
from Virginia in the early part of the century. Mrs. Wood was a devot- 
ed member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and possessed a warm, 
generous heart, which characteristics secured to her many friends. Two 
of their family of eleven children, Caroline and Catherine, died prior to 
tlie death of the parents, the'fonuor in September, 1850, and the latter 
in 1863. Several of the surviving ones are residents of Christian Coun- 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 431 

ty, including Dr. Benjamin S. Wood, who was born October 26, 1837. 
After his preparatory education, which was obtained in the schools of 
Ilopkinsville, he entered the Western Military Institute of Tyree Springs, 
Toiin. Having decided upon the profession of medicine, he entered the 
Medical College of Nashville, from which he graduated in 1857, after 
which, in 1858, he graduated in the Jefferson Medical College of Phila- 
deljihia, and for two years following was the resident physician in the 
Philadelphia Hospital. In 1861 he was elected to the office of military 
surgeon of a Kentucky regiment of Confederates, and was soon after 
placed upon Gen. Forrest's staff with commission of Major. He was 
captured at Mt. Pleasant, Tenn., by the Federal Army, and for three 
monthsheld as a prisoner of war. He was married in Clarksvillo, Tenn., 
November 22, 1866, to Miss Mary H. Bowling, daughter of II. G. Bow- 
ling. She was born in Christian County, March 28, 1851. Besides 
three children who died in infancy, their family consists of Sallie, Hen- 
ry, Helen and Ewing Wood. Since the late war Dr. Wood has devoted 
l^is time to farming and trading, and now owns nearly 2,500 acres of land. 
The family residence is on the corner of Virginia and Jackson Streets, 
Hopkinsville. A portrait of the pioneer, Bartholomew T. Wood, appears 
in this work. 

DANIEL B. S. WOOD is a descendant of one of the oldest fami- 
lies of Christian County, and is the third child of a family of eleven 
children born to Bartholomew T. and Nancy (Saffarraus) Wood. He was 
born in Hopkinsville April 30, 1820, and was here reared and educated. 
Arriving at his majority he went to Memphis, Tenn., and was there en- 
gaged from 1847 till the breaking out of the late war at various kinds of 
employment. Returning to Hopkinsville, he has since been engaged in 
agricultural pursuits and trading. 

ENOCH P. WOOD'S parents were William and Penina Wood (iice 
Walker). They were both born in the year 1789 in North Carolina, 
whence they came in early life to Kentucky. They were married in 
Christian County about 1810, soon after which they removed to the State 
of Illinois, then a Territory. They remained, however, but a short time, 
the hostility of the Indians compelling them to seek safety elsewhere ; they 
accordingly returned to this county and made a settlement in the northern 
part, near the present village of Crofton, where Enoch P. was born August 






./J 



432 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



23, 181G. In after years they removed near the Cerulean Springs, where 
they died, the mother in November, 1871, and the father in Marcli, 1872. 
Besides three children that died in infancy they had ten who grew to 
maturity, as follows : John Wood, who was born in Illinois ; Elizabeth, 
deceased wife of Lloyd Duley ; Wilebour, deceased wife of Enoch Duley ; 
Enoch P. ; Sibyl, who married Harrison Goodwin and died in early 
Avomanhood ; Mary A., wife of Benjamin Kennedy; Henrietta, widow of 
Felix Kennedy ; William R. Wood, who was assassinated in the time of the 
war ; and Willis Franklin and Orlando G. Wood, both of Christian Coun- 
ty. Enoch P. Wood was reared in this county and has made his home 
here through his entire life. He has devoted his time to the pursuits of 
agriculture, in which he has been very successful. He is the owner of 
two farms, one of 680 acres in Christian and one of 330 acres in Trigg 
County. He retired from the farm in 1882, and located in iropkinsviHe! 
to enjoy the privileges of its public schools for his children. Mr. Wood 
has been twice married and twice called to mourn the loss of a devoted 
companion. In 1839, in this county, he was married to Miss Susanna 
Morress. She was born in Christian County in 1819, and died in 1862. 
Tliey were Messed with eight children, viz. : Wilebour, wife of James B. 
Hardy; Elizabeth, wife of James Wadlington ; William M. Wood; Par- 
melia, wife of James S. Cunningham ; James and Frank Wood ; Mary P.. 
wife of Lewis N. McCargo ; and Martha H., wife of Benjamin F. Leneave! 
In 1867, in Logan County, Mr. Wood married Isabella T., daughter of 
George Herndon. She was born August 2, 1841, and died April 12, 
1S7S. Of the five children born to them, there are living : Frances E., 
Sarah A., George P. and Attie T. Wood. Mr. Wood is a member of long 
standing in the Baptist Church. 

EUGENE WOOD was born December 1, 1852, in Todd County, 
Ky. He is a son of Hardin J. and Georgiana (Cro.ss) AVood. They had 
a family of eight children, five of whom are still living: G. Cross Wood, 
of Todd County; Lewis G. Wood, of Clarksville, Tenn. ; Eugene Wood', 
John H. Wood and Georgia Wood. Hardin J., the father of °his family,' 
is still living, and is a farmer and miller of Todd County. He was borii 
in Christian County, Ky., in 1821, and is a son of Bartholomew Wood. 
Eugene Wood was educated chiefly in the Franklin College, near Nash- 
ville, Tenn., and on the 26th of December, 1877, married Miss Inez, 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRKCINCT. 433 

daughter of Richard and Mary Durrett {7iee Campbell). She was born in 
this county November 26, 1854. They are members of the Christian 
Church, and he of the Knights of Honor and Royal Arcanum. Daisey 
Wood, a member of their family, is a daughter of John H. and Lillie 
Wood. Since 1872 Mr. Wood has had charge of the Eugene Flouring 
Mills of the city of Hopkiiisville. 

HUNTER WOOD is descended from an English family that came to 
America at ;m early period, and settled in Virginia. He was born No- 
vember 2, 184.^, in Albemarle County, and is a son of Dr. Alfred C. 
Wood, an eminent physician of Virginia, and Martha W. (Rogers) AVood, 
a daughter of Dr. James Bird Rogers, also of Virginia. Hunter Wood 
received a liberal education, and became thoroughly proficient in the clas- 
sical as well as the modern branches of learning. After completing his 
primary studies he entered the Virginia Militai-y Institute at Lexington. 
The war was in progress, and while a cadet at this school he served eight 
months in the army. He graduated in 1865, and having chosen the law 
as his profession at once began the study, entering the law department of 
the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, from which he in due time 
graduated, and upon his admission to the bar removed to Hopkinsvillo, 
Ky., and commenced practice. His brilliant talents were soon recognized, 
and he rose rapidly to position as one of the most successful advocates at 
the bar of his district. In 1868 he received the appointment of Master 
Commissioner in Chancery of the Christian Circuit Court, and held the 
position for two terms (eight years). In June, 1870, he was chosen 
County Attorney, which office he held for four years. lie was elected 
Commonwealth's Attorney for the Second Judicial District of Kentucky 
in 1874 for six years ; at the State Democratic Convention of 1884 he 
was chosen one of the delegates to the National Democratic Convention 
at Chicago of July 8. Mr. Wood has gained considerable prominence as 
a politician, and is a zealous adherent of the. Democratic party. He pos- 
sesses great legal ability, and although yet a young man, has attained dis- 
tinction in his profession. He is energetic, earnest and determineil, and 
his labors are well worthy of the high esteem in which they are held. He 
was married, in 1868, to Miss Rosalie N. Green, a daughter of the late 
John R. Green, of Christian County. They have five children : Alfred 
W., Lizzie T., Hunter, Grace and Hugh N. Mr. Wood is a member of 
the Episcopal Church of Hopkinsville. 27 



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434 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

JAMES R. WOOD >yas born June 21, 1851, in Albemarle County, 
Va., and is a son of Dr. Alfred C. AVood. The family was originally 
from England, and settled early in Virginia. James R. received a good 
classical education in Virginia, and came to Hopkinsville in December, 
1869. He commenced the study of law in 1870, taught school for two 
sessions in Christian County; studied law in the office of lion. J. Proc- 
tor Knott in 1872, and was admitted to the bar in Hopkinsville in 1873. 
He practiced law in Hopkinsville until in April, 1881, when he went 
into the newspaper business as editor of the Kentucky Neiv Era. He is 
a man of fine talents, and an editor of more than ordinary ability. His 
paper is one of the brightest and most sparkling in southwestern Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Wood was married January 4, 1882, at Charlottesville, Va., 
to Miss Ella W. Rogers, daughter of Dr. W. G. Rogers. 

DR. JOHN H. WOOSLEY was born in Christian County, Ky,, 
December 23, 1829, and is a sou of Burrel T. Woosley, and grandson of 
Thomas Woosley, a soldier in the Revolution, who settled iu Kentucky 
about the beginning of the present century. Thomas Woosley first set- 
tled in Le.xington, afterward removed to Barren County, Ky., and finally 
to this county about 1814. He then located eight miles northwest of 
Hopkinsville, where he died in 1856. Burrel T., the father of Dr. J. H. 
was the third of five children born to Thomas Woosley, and was born iu 
October, 1796, in Ilalifa.x County, Va. He attained his manhood in this 
county, married Elizabeth Reed, a native of Salisbury, N. C, where she 
was born in October, ISOl. Burrel Woosley died in Johnson County, 
Kas., in October, 1863, and his widow died in Christian County, Ky., in 
1881. To these parents were born seven children, Dr. John H. being the 
fourth ; Martha A., the wife of James L. Daniel; Rigdon T.; Nancy B., 
wife of William T. Rodgers ; Dr. Burrel T.; Alexander J.; and Virginia, 
wife of Jacob Youtsler. John H. at the age of twenty went to Spring- 
field, 111., and studied medicine under Dr. J. W. Jones, during which 
time he became personally acquainted with President Lincoln. Ho after- 
ward graduated from the University of Louisville, and in 1855 began the 
practice of medicine in Edmondson County, Ky., whence in 1857 he 
was elected to the Kentucky State Legislature, serving one term in that 
body. During the war he went South, and was for a time connected with 
the Confederate Army as Assistant in the Commissary Department under 



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HOPKINSVILLE CITY AND PRECINCT. 435 

E. M. Bruce. After the war he settled near Louisville, Jeflerson Co., 
Ky., where he engaged in his practice until coming to this county in 
1870. Returning to Christian County he purchased a farm near where 
he was born, and there commanded an extensive practice. Since 1883 
he has been a resident of Hopkinsvilie, but is still actively engaged in 
the practice of medicine. He has been twice married : first, in 1852 to 
Elvira A., daughter of Samuel Woosley, by whom he had three children : 
Dr. Collins B. AVoosley ; Lavinia E., wife of William Grisham, and 
Josephine I. Woo3ley. His present wife is Jennie A., daughter of 
Joseph Turner, and is a native of Christian County. Dr. Woosley is a 
member of the State and County Medical Associations. 

JAMES W. YANCEY, a native of Campbell County, Ga., and son 
of William Y. and Lucinda (Bryant) Yancey, was born August 16, 1847. 
When he was about three years old his parents removed to Alabama, 
where they remained about si.x years, removing again in 1856 and set- 
tling a few miles west of Hopkinsvilie, where James W. grew to man- 
hood. The parents are both natives of Georgia, and are now living, as 
are also four of their six children, in Lee County, Miss. Their family is 
composed of James W., Sarah Elizabeth, wife of G. T. Hill ; Marian 
Columbus ; Mary, wife of Joseph R. Renshaw ; George W. Yancey, of 
Hopkinsvilie ; and Eliza Mildred, wife of John Johnson. In 1874 James 
W. was elected on the Democratic ticket to the office of County Jailor of 
Christian County, and that year removed from the farm to Hopkinsvilie, 
where he has since lived. In 1876, in connection with Polk Canslcr, he 
engaged in the grocery trade, from which he retired in 1879. In 1880 
he engaged in the coal trade, in connection with which he is doing a liv- 
ery business, and is located on the corner of Adams and Liberty Streets. 
He was married in December, 1870, to Miss Amanda, daughter of Reed 
and Lucetta Renshaw. She was born in Christian County, Ky., July 
27, 1844. Their children are Sophronia Arlena and William Reed Yan- 
cey. Mr. Yancey is an honored member of the Christian Church, and 
his wife of the First Presbyterian Church. 

JAMES A. YOUNG, M. D., is a native of Betliany, Va., where lie 
was born on the IGth day of May, 1846. His father. Rev. James A. 
Young, was by birth a Kentuckiari, and died in Clarksville, Tenii., in 
early manhood. He was a Christian minister, whose labors were cliiefly 



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436 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

confined to the State of Tennessee. He was married to Miss Ellen D. 
Kerr, the present wife of Dr. D. J. Gish, of Ilopkinsville, which union 
resulted in the Lirth of one son, James A. Young, and subject of this 
sketch. The marriage of his mother with Dr. Gish naturally placed him 
under the care of the latter, by whom he was reared and educated, and 
with whom lie is now engaged in an extensive medical practice. Ilisprepar- 
atory education was acquired in the Bethany College of Virginia, and the 
University of Kentucky, at Lexington. In 1867 he entered the Hahne- 
manian Medical College of Philadelphia, graduating the following year. 
Some years after he took a special course in the Ohio Medical College of 
Cincinnati, and in the Pulte College of the same city. He entered upon 
the practice of his profession in 1868, at Hopkinsville, Ky., but the fol- 
lowing year removed to Paducah, Ky., whore he remained for five years. 
Returning to Hopkinsville in 1874, he formed a partnership with Dr. D. 
J. Gish, with whom he is still associated. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Homoeopathy ; honorary member of the Indiana Institute ; 
corresponding member of the St. Louis Ilomoaopathic Society ; Fellow of 
the Ilahnemanian Institute of Philadelphia, and was Adjunct Professor 
of Theory and Practice in the St. Louis College for one session. He is a 
member of the Masonic order, and of the K. of P. He was mai-ried in 
Hopkinsville in 1870, to Miss Kate Long, daughter of Gabe B. Long and 
Martha Long {nee Thompson). Their family is comprised of Mattie, 
Ellen G., James A., and Daniel J. Young. As a physician, Dr. Young 
stands in the front rank, and being young in years and possessed of a 
rare degree of energy of both body and mind, bids fair to become pre- 
eminent in his profession. Tiie- Doctor and wife are members of the 
Christian Church. 






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MOUNT VERNON PRECINCT. 

DR. E. II. COOK is a native of Bedford County, Va., and was lorn 
April 11, 1824. lie is a son of William Cook, ^vlio was a lawyer by 
profession, and who moved early from Franklin County, Va., to Bedford 
County, where he practiced law, and where he died in 1817. He was an 
active and influential Democrat, and his house was ofttimes made the 
rendezvous for great political gatherings. He was a son of Benjamin 
Cook, who was the father of a large family of children. Tlie mother of 
our subject was Sallie Otey, a daughter of Maj. Isaac Otey,.and a sister 
of Bishop James H. Otey, of Tennessee. The pai-ents of Dr. Cook were 
blessed with nine children, six of whom are living: Mai-y, Frances A., 
Mildred E., Sarah E., Edwin R. and James 0. Our subject moved to 
Christian County for good in 1850, having previously paid a visit to 
this section of the country. He resided in Ilopkinsville a short time, 
during which period he built his present residence, situated on the Rus- 
sellville road a few miles east of Hopkinsville; he has since resided here 
with the excepti«»of the four years of the war, during which time lie lived 
in town again and practiced medicine ; of which latter he had commenced 
the study very early, and had subsequently graduated from the Pennsyl- 
vania Medical University, Philadelphia, in 1847, but in late years he hits 
devoted his attention more to Iiis farming interests. lie owns a beautiful 
place of about 500 acres, besides other tracts of land elsewhere. He mar- 
ried Miss Martha U. Campbell, a daughter of John P. and Mary A. 
(Buckncr) Campbell. John P. Campbell was a very large land-owner, 
represented Cliristian County in the State Legislature, and was for many 
years President of the Hopkinsville Bank. Dr. and Mrs. Cook are the 
parents of eleven children, of whom six arc living: Sally P., Walter C, 
Edwin R., Frank P., Robert L. and James 0. Our subject is a Demo- 
crat politically, and is a member of the Hopkinsville Lodge, A. F. & A. 
^I. For many years he was a member of the Board of Managers of tlie 
Western Lunatic Asylum, and has been identified and generously inter- 
ested .in many popular enterprises. 



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438 BIOGRAPHICAL SKKTCIIES. 

JAMES V. FORBES was bora December 27, 1833. His parents, 
Samuel ami Sarab ( Henderson) Forbes, were originally from North Caro- • 
lina. The father was a farmer, came to Christian County in 181'J, and 
located o.n the place where our subject now resides. He was a son of 
Jeremiah Forbes, who was also a North Carolinian. Five of the seven 
children born to the parents of our subject are now living — Mary, 
Malinda, Hannah, James V. and John E. James V. has always made 
Christian County his home, and has engaged principally in farming and 
carpentering. His place consists of 154 acres, and is devoted to farming 
in its various branches. November 8, 1861, he enlisted in the Twenty- 
fifth Kentucky Volunteer Infiintry, which was afterward consolidated 
with the Seventeenth Kentucky. Mr. Forbes was taken sick after the 
engagement at Donelson and returned home, where he lay for several 
months, but finally rejoined his regiment at Russellville, Ky., and served 
with it until the close of the war. He married Mattison J. Forbes, a 
daughter of John M. and Cynthia J. (Bass) Forbes. She passed away 
August 2, 1883, after a long period of illness. Five of their six children 
survive: Elmer H., Gay IL, Guy II., Everett and Clara M. Mr. Forbes 
is a Democrat politically, is an A. F. & A. M., a member of Blue Lodge, 
No. 214, and also of Moore Chapter No. 76, and belongs to the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian Church. 

JOHN E. FORBES is a native of Christian County, and was born 
December 9, 1840 to Samuel and Sarah (Henderson) Forbes. He has 
always given his attention to agriculture, and has a present farm of 
eighty-three acres. Mr. Forbes has been twice married, first to Susan 
M. Rolston, and afterward to Martha E., a sister of the former. Both 
are deceased. Willie T. and Edward W., children by his first wife, and 
Carrie Belle, by his second, are living with their father. Mr. Forbes is 
a Democrat, and a much-respected citizen of the county. 

MICHAEL A. FRITZ is a native of this county, and was born 
June 26, 1829, to Solomon and Annis (McClellan) Fritz, both of whom 
were also born in Christian County. The father was a gunsmith by 
trade, and was well known throughout this country as " Sol Fritz." 
He had farm property to the extent of 500 acres, and generally gave 
some attention to agricultural pursuits. He was a Colonel in the old 
refimcntal musters. Ilis father, John Fritz, was also a blacksmith, and 



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MOUNT VEUNON I'llECINCT. 43!* 

came from Genoaiiy, and with liis wife, Ruth, located near whore IIop- 
kinsville now stands, at a very early date. The parents of our subject 
reared a family of ten children, of whom there are six now living — Eliz- 
abeth J., John G., Michael A., Annis E., Newton J. and Elijah II. 
Our subject has been identified with the Good Templar and Grange or- 
ganizations, and is at present a member of the A. F. & A. M., Blue 
Lodge, No. 214, and also of Moore Chapter, No. 76. He is one of the 
present magistrates for Mt. Vernon Precinct, and belongs to the Demo- 
cratic party, and with his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South. Ilis first marriage was with Miss Mary E. Ducker, a 
daughter of James Ducker, now deceased. By her he had two children, 
one of whom is living — John W. D. Mr. Fritz's second wife was Miss 
Missouri A. Hayes, a daughter of Elial Hayes, an old resident of Chris- 
tian County. This marriage has been blessed with two children — Edward 
S. and Thomas E. — now living. Mr. Fritz is one of the substantial farm- 
ers of Christian County, and has in late years been a very successful to- 
bacco raiser. 

ELIJAH H. FRITZ was born in Christian County September 25, 
1846, and is a son of Solomon Fritz. He has always resided in this 
county, and has given his attention to farming pursuits. His farm prop- 
erty consists of 100 acres, which is devoted to farming in its general 
branches; the raising and dealing in tobacco also claims a large share of 
his attention. He was united in marriage to Octavia Harned, a daughter 
of Isaac Harned. Mrs. Fritz is now deceased. She left two children — 
Cora J. and A. Marion. Mr. Fritz is identified with the Democratic 
party, and is a much-respected citizen of Christian County. 

SAMUEL T. FRUIT was born in this county July 17, 1838, a son 
of Thompson C. and Elizabeth (Underwood) Fruit. The father was also 
born in this county, and is still living here at a good old age. He is a 
son of James, who was a son of John Fruit, who was originally from 
Pennsylvania. The subject of these lines obtained his early schooling 
here, and has always given his attention to farming pursuits. His pres- 
ent home place, which consists of 190 acres, is devoted to fai-ming in its 
general branches. October !■'), 1861, Mr. Fruit enlisted in the Twenty- 
fifth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, which was shortly afterward consoli- 
dated with the Seventeenth Kentucky, which did heavy service at Donel- 



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4-10 BIOGIlArHICAL SKETCHES. 

son, Sliiloh and tliroughout the southern campaign. Mr. Fruit enlisteil 
as a private, but was successively promoted to the positions of Second 
Lieutenant, First Lieutenant, and finally to the Captaincy of Company 
G, in which position he served with distinction until the close of the war. 
lie married Victoria Clark, a daughter of Joab and Mary (Brasher) 
Clark, and the union has been blessed with eight children, seven of whom 
survive: James W., Albert E., Joe F., Nannie E., George E., Samuel 
T., Jr., and Chester H. Mr. Fruit votes the Republican ticket. 

ENOS HARNED was born in this county March 10, 1813, and is 
still a much-respected resident of it. He is one of a family of eleven 
children, born to Benjamin and Hannah (Colvin) Earned. Four of the 
children are still living : Edward, Larkin, Enos and Job. The father of 
our subject was a successful farmer and stock-raiser. He was drafted into 
the war of 1812, but procured a substitute to serve in his place. Enos 
Harned has always devoted his time and energy to farming pursuits. 
His present farm consists of 140 acres of land, and is given to the culti- 
vation of general productions. He married Mary A. Carroll, a daughter 
of John Carroll, an old resident of Christian County. Seven of their 
■large family of children are living : Susan V., Columbia C, John A., 
Lee, Ollie, Benjamin T. and Phidonia. Mr. Harned and his family are 
members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically, he is a 
Democrat. 

ISAAC HARNED is a native of this county, and was born on the 
1st day of April, 1822. He was the eldest child born to William and 
Mary (Meacham) Harned, and the father was the eldest of a family of 
eleven cliildren, born to Benjamin and Hannah (Colvin) Harned. Will- 
iam Harned was first married to Mary Meacham, who bore hiui three 
children, the subject of these lines being the only one now living. His 
second marriage was with Lucinda Rogers, by which union he had 
five children, of whom there arc two living — Enos and Etliy M. Our 
subject has resided in Christian County during his life, with the excep- 
tion of about ten years, during which period he resided in Todd County, 
and he also lived in Indiana and Illinois a short time. He has given his 
attention to farming pursuits, and lias a present farm of si.\ty-five acres. 
He was united in marriage to Nancy A. Lindsay, a daughter of Archi- 
bald and Jane (Meacham) Lindsay. This union has been blessed with 






.1 . ;-f 1 ..>!.. 



MOUNT VEUNUN rUECINCT. 441 

eleven cliildrcu, seven of whom are living: Birdett A., John M., Isaac 
N., Nannie E., Thomas M., Joab and Alexander H. Our subject is a 
Democrat politically, and has been identified with the Grange and Good 
Templar organizations. He and wife are members of the Methodist 
Church South. 

GEORGE W. LACKEY, M. D., was born October 16, 1843, in 
Christian County. His parents, William and Nannie (Stuart) Lackey, 
were from Virginia. The father was a local preacher in the Slethodist 
Church South, and also gave some attention to farming industries. He 
located in Christian County in 1832. He was a son of John Lackey, 
also of Virginia, and a soldier in the war of 1812. The parents of our 
subject had twelve children : Edward A. W., Tirzah E., Lillie, deceased; 
Mary, deceased ; Thomas S., Elizabeth, S. B., L. C, deceased ; John 
W., deceased; Samuel V., deceased; G. W. and H. B. Our subject 
moved to Smithland, Ky., with his parents, v.'hen he was about eight 
years of age, and there received his early schooling, and also commenced 
the study of medicine which he prosecuted still further during his resi- 
dence in Logan County, Ky., where he had moved after residing in 
Marshall County, Ky., for several years. He studied under the direc- 
tion of his two brothers, Drs. Thomas S. and John W. Lackey, anddur- 
ing his residence iu the two latter named counties, engaged also in the 
mercantile business for several years. He attended the Louisville Med- 
ical College, and afterward graduated from the Central University at the 
same place. He returned to Christian County in 1873, and has since 
been engaged in the practice of his profession, and has met with large 
and deserving success. He first married Josephine Brine, a daughter of 
Dr. James Brine, now deceased. One child of this marriage is living — 
William E. His second wife was Annie E. Hollins, a daughter of John 
E. Hollins, of Logan County, Ky. This union has been blessed with 
one child — Walter A. The Doctor is a member of the L 0. 0. F., and 
politically is a Democrat. 

GEORGE V. LACY is a native of Christian County, and was born 
April 6, 1838. He is the youngest of eight children born to Hezekiah 
and Hannah (Johnson) Lacy, but only two of the children are now living : 
Jennette A. H. and George V. The father was a farmer by occupation, 
Was a SOD of Moses Lacy, and came to this county about 1810 from near 



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^"^^ BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Frankfort, Ky. Our subject served an apprenticeship to ti.e brick-laj- 
ing and mason trade, but in late years has devoted his attention more 
to farming. His present farm consists of 190 acres, most of which is 
given to the production of hay. Mr. Lacy married Lucy E. Meacham, a 
daughter .of Ellis and Dovey A. (Holston) Meacham, the latter of whom 
is yet living. Mr. and Mrs. Lacy are members of the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian Church ; in politics Mr, Lacy is Independent. 

M. V. B. LAYTON is a native of Allegheny County, Va., and was 
born January 30, 1840. His parents, Isaac N. and Sarah (Ad'ams) Lay- 
ton, were natives of Virginia also, and the former is still living on the 
old homestead in that State. The subject of this sketch moved ''from Ids 
native county, and after residing a year in Ohio, located in Christian 
County. He rents out his farm property and devotes his time to working 
at the blacksmith trade, which he learned under his father. In 1861, 
Mr. Layton enlisted in Company A, Sixtieth Virginia Volunteer 
Infantry, Col. Summers. He served throughout the Virginia Campaign. 
Mr. Layton is a Democrat in politics, is one of the present magistra'tes 
for Mt. Vernon Precinct, and with his wife is a member of the United 
Eaptist Church. He married Linnie A . Meacham, a daughter of Joseph 
Meacham, and has five children : Ida, Jettie, Vanie, Benjamin F. and 
Minnie. 

DENNIS R. PERRY is a native of Logan County, Ky., and was 
born on the 4th of July, 1844. He is a son of Loudan S. and Elizabeth 
iGillum) Perry. The father is a farmer and yet resides in Logan County, 
Ky. To the parents were born four children: John T., William M.' 
Dennis R and Henry F. Our subject was reared in his native county,' 
and commenced active life in 1862, as a clerk in a store, in which capacity 
he was engaged for several years ; subsequently launching out in business 
for himself. He removed to Fairview, this county, and there engaged in 
the mercantile business, and was for many years also a member Tf the 
firm of Vaughan, Shaw & Perry, acting in the capacity of general buyer 
of tobacco, etc., the firm dealing heavily in that commodity. Mr. Perry 
married Miss Anna B. Vaughan, a daughter of Richard and Mary A. 
(Shaw) Vaughan. This union has been blessed with one child-Richard 
H. His present beautiful farm, which contains 300 acres, he has owned 
since 1871. It is devoted largely to the raising of tobacco. He also 



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MOUNT VEKNON rREGINCT. 443 

buys am] sells this staple article on a considerable scale. To materially 
add to the beauty of the premises as well as to afford himself some pleas- 
ure, Mr. Perry has secured the services of an expert to dig several 
large and beautifully situated ponds, to be devoted to the cultivation of 
several varieties of the Cnny tribe. A delightful and never-failing sup- 
ply of spring water will flow continuously through the ponds, surrounding 
which will be running rows of beautiful flowers. Mr. Perry is a member 
of the A. F. & A. M., Blue Lodge, No. 214. In politics he lends his 
support to the Democratic party. 

WILLIAM H. SIIANKLIN is a native of Todd County, Ky. 
He was born January 29, 1830, to Fielden and Maiy (Tilman) Shanklin, 
the latter of whom is yet living in Todd County. The father of our sub- 
ject was a farmer by occupation, and was a son of Edward Shanklin, who 
was originally from Virginia. In the parents' family there were seven 
children, of whom three are now living — Lucinda S., Sarah C. and the 
subject of these lines. The latter remained in his native county until he 
was twenty-five years of age, at which time he removed to his present 
place, which consists of 156 acres. He has also a tract of land in Todd 
County adjoining. In partnership with Mr. W. II. Griffin he has run a 
eaw-mill for some time, situated in Todd County, and which does some 
custom grinding also. Mr. Shanklin married S. Virginia Rolston, a 
daughter of David and Mary W. (Griffin) Rolston. David Rolston came 
to Christian County very early from Virginia. He was a son of Samuel 
Rolston, and previous to his marriage with Mary W. Griffin, who now sur- 
vives him, he had married Susan Matthews. His second wife bore him 
four children, of whom the wife of our subject is the only one that sur- 
vives. Mr. and Mrs. Shanklin are the parents of five children : Mary 
E., Sarah E., William E., Mattie E. and Ada E. Our subject is a Dem- 
ocrat politically, and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church. He is a member of Blue Lodge, No. 214, A. F. & A. M., and 
was also identified with the Grange organization, when the latter had a 
lodge in this vicinity. 

THOMAS H. SHAW was born April 5, 1829, in Christian County 
and is one of a family of eleven children born to William and Sarah 
(Fritz) Shaw, vis. : John J., Samuel E., William F. (deceased), Mary A., 
James S., Solomon W., Sarah J., Thomas II., Milton A., Malinda A. 



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444 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

and George W. William, the father of our subject, was a son of William 
Shaw, Vrho was of Scotch-Irish descent, and served, as did also several of 
his brothers, in the Eevolutionary war. Thomas H. Shaw has during his 
life given his attention mostly to mercantile pursuits. He commenced in 
1852 as a clerk in the store of Richard Vaughan, and a few years later 
purchased the interest of Mr. Vaughan's partner, A. J. Brown, and has 
since been a member of the firm of Vaughan k Shaw, doing business at 
Fairview, Ky. During their business life they have met with many mis- 
fortunes. A disastrous fire visited them in 1868, and their large and 
fine storehouse and contents were totally destroyed. A large mill, which 
was an ornament to the little village, was erected by Vaughan, Hoy & 
Shaw, in 1867-68, but was also reduced to ashes by the remorseless fire- 
fiend in 1873. Mr. Shaw has a farm of 255 acres, situated in Pembroke 
Precinct, which is devoted to general farming. He married Mary E. 
Clark, a daughter of Thomas J. Clark. This union has been blessed 
with four children, of whom there are three living : Jessie, Mary D. and 
Kosa L. Mr. Shaw is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is the 
present Master of Blue Lodge, No. 214, and is a member also of Moore 
Chapter, No. 70. He was at one time Secretary of the State Lodge, L 
0. G. T. ; was identified with the Grange organization, and has filled the 
position of Police Judge for the village of Fairview. Politically, Mr. 
Shaw is a Democratic. He is a man most highly respected by the com- 
munity, and with his partner, Mr. Vaughan, 'has been identified with 
many enterprises calculated to enhance the material interests of the peo- 
ple at large. 

JAMES D. STEEL is a native of Christian County, was born 
March 12, 1829, and is the eldest son of Hiram and Elizabeth G. (Hayes) 
Steel. The father was a cooper by trade, but in his later years gave his 
attention more to farming pursuits. He came to this county from Ten- 
nessee at eighteen jears of age, and. located where his grandmother had 
long before settled, upon a hill of commanding eminence, and here the 
subject of these lines yet resides. Hiram Steel filled the office of Magis 
trate in this county for many years, and was a man of enterprise and 
prominence. He was a son of William Steel, who served in both the 
Revolutionary war and the war of 1812. The parents of our subject were 
blessed with five children, of whom there are four now living: Mary J., 



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MOUNT VERNON PRECINCT. 445 

James D., Joseph F. and Thomas M. Martha E. G., deceased, married 
G. W. Shaw, of this precinct. Mr. Steel has always lived upon his 
present place, with the exception of two year;, during which period he 
served the county as Sheriff from 18G7-l!0. Ho married Mary A. Car- 
roll, a daughter of John ami Mary A. (Rhodes) Carroll, and by her has 
one child, a bright little girl named Ef^e. Mr. Steel is a member of 
tlie Masonic fraternity, Blue Lodge No. 214, and also of Moore Chapter, 
No. 70. Politically he is a Democrat, and with his wife, a member of 
the Methodist Church South. 






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PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 

REUBEN B. ARMISTEAD vraa born in Appomattox County, Va., 
April 11, 1828, and removed with liis parents to Montgomery County, 
Tenn., in 1835, where he was reared, and in 1854 came to Christian 
County, Ky. His father, George W. Armistead, was born in Cumber- 
land County, Ya., in 1783, and died in Graves County, Ky., in 1859 ; 
he completed his own and also his brother's term of service in the war of 
1812. Subject's grandfather, John Armistead, was for five years a 
soldier in the war of the American revolution. He was a Virginian and 
died in Smith County, Tenn., in 1807. Subject's mother, Mary B., 
daughter of Benjamin Day, of Virginia, was born in 1802, and died in 
Kentucky in 1874. Her children were : John H., Reuben B., Joseph 
A., James M. and Virginia A. (Alcock). Reuben B. was married Oct- 
obei', 1871, to Miss Susan F., daughter of Daniel G. Hutchinson, of 
Christian County, Ky., and to them were born : George D., Reuben B., 
Jr., John D. and Mary E. Mrs. Armistead's grandfather, Benjamin 
Downer, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Mr. Armistead's ad- 
vantages for obtaining an education were limited, but he has improved 
his opportunities, until, by common report, he is regarded as one of the 
best accountants in the community ; he is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and also of the Grange; he is a farmer, having 184_acres of good 
land which he cultivates in wheat, tobacco and corn. In politics he is a 
Democrat. Mrs. Armistead is a Methodist. 

ROBERT ARMSTRONG, M. D., was born June G, 1820, in Mon- 
aghan County, Irelaml, where he was reared until he was fourteen years 
of age, when ho went to Liverpool, England, and in 1888 engaged in the 
mercantile business with an uncle, until 1844, when he came to the 
United States by way of New Orleans, and located near Keysburg, in 
Logan County, Ky. From 184G to 1848 he studied medicine with Dr. 
F. A. Rice, and attended lectures at Cincinnati in 1848 to 1849, after 
which he commenced the practice of his profession in his present location, 



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448 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



the village of Fairview, in both Christian and TodJ Counties, Ky., hav- 
ing sprung up around him since that time. Dr. Armstrong through all 
these years has enjoyed an extensive and remunerative practice, and re- 
_ tains a firm hold on the coufideuce and afleclion of the people in the com- 
munity where he has so long resided. He is descended from a ^vorthy 
line of Scotch ancestors, who have long been resident, in good standing, 
in the green island. His educational advantages in youth were of th°e 
very best, and one would be led to infer that they had not been neglected, 
and after the frosting of sixty-three winters,it is apparent that the" doctor 
is yet a progressive student. He was married in 1844 to Mrs. Dorotha 
Inman, daughter of Mr. Stemmons of Logan County, Ky., and with her 
he lived until 1859, when she died. He was next married in 18G5 to 
Miss Mary A., daughter of Austin Cason, of Christian County, Ky., 
and to them were born seven children, two of whom, Martha J. and 
Robert L., are living. Mrs. Armstrong died in 1882. Dr. Armstrong is 
also engaged in farming to a considerable extent, owning about 800 acres 
of land, most of which is valuable and very productive, and cultivated in 
wheat, corn and tobacco. The doctor is a member of the Royal Arch 
Masons and also of the I. 0. 0. F. In politics he is identified with the 
Democratic party. 

ERNEST G. BARCLAY was born in Christian County, Ky., June 9, 
1861, was reared in Warren County, in this State, and has resided at his 
present home, near Pembroke, Ky., for the past two years. His father, 
Joseph W. Barclay, was born in Barren County, Ky., about 1834, and is 
at present a resident of Bowling Green. He is the son of Philander 
Barclay, who died near Russellville, Ky., about 1841. Subject's mother, 
Sallie, daughter of Richard Tandy, of Christian County, Ky., died in 
1865. Joseph W. Barclay's children are : subject, Anna T., Sallie, 
Agnes C, Roe P. and Waller P. Subject was educated at Ogden Col- 
lege, Bowling Green, Ky., and is a great reader of books and current lit- 
erature. He is by profession a farmer, owning 170 acres of productive 
land, situated near Montgomery's Creek. Mr. Barclay is a member of 
the Bethel Baptist Church. 

^ DARWIN BELL, M. D., was born in 1862, in Christian County, 
Ky., where he has all his life had his residence. His father, John H. 
Bell, of Hopkinsville, was born in this county in 1820, and is engaged 



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PEMBHOKE PRECINCT. 449 

in the business of fai-naing. His grandfather, Dr. Frank Bell, was born 
in Virginia, in 179 i, practiced medicine in Christian County many years 
■and died in 1878. Subject was educated in the common schools of Todd 
County, read medicine with Dr. Chappell, of Longview, attended lec- 
tures and graduated at Vanderbilt University, at Nashville, Tenn., in 1882, 
and settled the same year in Pembroke, Ky., where he is now engaged in 
the practice of his profession. In religion he is a member of the Chris- 
tian Church, and in his political afliliations is associated witii the Demo- 
cratic party. 

HENRY II. BOLLINGER was born in Todd County, Ky., Febru- 
ary 1, 1847, and removed to Cliristian County in 1870, where he at pres- 
ent resides. His father, Henry Bollinger, Sr., was born in Maryland, 
and came to this county in an early day, where he died January 24, ISOl. 
He first settled in that portion at present included in Todd County. Sub- 
ject's mother, Martha Reeves, was born in Todd County, Ky. She was 
the sister of Judge Reeves, an eminent jurist of Texas. She was married 
to subject's father about 1845. To the father were born : Eliza (Massie), 
Katie (Sargcant), Henry H., Reuben R., Jennie A. (Quarles), Madison 
M. and Lute 0. (Hunter). Subject was married in 1868, to Miss Annie 
T., daughter of James Jenkins, of Tiennessee, and to them were born tv\o 
children : Howard M. and Harry R. Subject is a farmer, and is owner 
of 225 acres of very fertile land, on which he has been very successful. 
lie is a member of the order of A. F. & A. M. ; in religion he is a Cum- 
berland Presbyterian, and in his political affiliations a Democrat. 

JOHN P. BRAGG was born in Mecklenburg County, Va., on the 
22d of February, 1848. His father, Joseph P. Bragg, was born in Lu- 
nenburg County, Va., and there reared and educated. He was a carpen- 
ter by trade and worked at the same for twenty years, and subsequently 
engaged in farming in Mecklenburg County, where he died in 1880; he 
married Mary Crenshaw, a native of Mecklenburg County, Va., who died 
in the same county in 1857, leaving four children as the result of their 
union : Eugenia, Marcus J., Laura I. (who died in 1879), and John P., 
our subject. John P. Bragg was reared on a farm and educated in tli'e 
common schools of his native county. He enlisted in Company A, John- 
ston's Heavy Artillery, and remained in the service from 18G4 until iiis 
surrender witli Lee. After the war he returned home and enrra^ed in 






s..:.' 



450 ' BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

farming on his own account, continuing the same until February, 1868, 
when he came to Christian County, Ky. Here he first apprenticed him- 
self to M. V. Hartman, of Garrettsburg, to learn the carpenter's trade, 
and remained with him for five years: In 187?. he came to Pembroke, 
and after three years' hard work at his trade, he had managed to save 
enoufh from his earnings to enable him to engage in the mercantile busi- 
ness, with a small stock. His honesty and fair dealing in trade soon 
secured him a good business; he at once began to prosper, and as bis 
means would permit, he enlarged his stock ; his store is one of the best 
in town and contains a full line of general merchandise. In 1878 he . 
married Miss Fanny B. Poor, a native of Tennessee, who has borne him 
one child— Laura Lee. Mr. Bragg is an active member of the order of 
A. F. & A. M. 

WILLIAM M. BRON.iUGII was born in Christian County, Ky., 
July 20, 1837, where he has resided on the old fomily homestead to the 
present time. His father, William Bronaugh, was born in Louisa County, 
Va., in 1800, and came to Kentucky in 1835, where he died in 1874. 
His grandfather, David A. Bronaugh, was bnrn in Virginia, and was of 
Scotch descent. His mother, Harriet C, daughter of Anderson Tice, 
was born in Louisa County, Va., married in 1816, in that State, and was 
the mother of David A., William M., Mattie E., Virginia E., James F., 
John D., Weis S. and Jeremiah T.; she is yet living. Subject was edu- 
cated in tlie schools of the neighborhood until seventeen years of age, 
when ho attended Bethel College one term. In 1861 he entered Com- 
pany II, First Kentucky Cavalry, as Third Lieutenant, but on account 
of ill-health resigned at the end of eighteen months. This company was 
detailed by Gen. A. S. Johnston for special duty. In 1866 subject was 
married to Miss Maria, daughter of James C. and Mary (Yancy) McEl- 
wain, and to them were born Charles, Lillie M., Hattie D. and SanJige. 
His wife dying June 26, 1874, subject was next married. May 18, 1882, 
to jMiss Jennie P., daughter of Cyrus Marsh, of Louisville, Ky., and to 
her was born Mattie. Subject has always been a farmer, and now owns 
500 acres of valuable land, which has been profitably cultivated. He 
■ also has a lar^e- wheat and tobacco warehouse in Pembroke, and is a suc- 
cessful dealer in those commodities. He is a Democrat in politics, and 
he and his family are members of tlie Bethel Baptist Church. 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 451 

. GEORGE R. BROWDER, M. D.— The grandfather of tliis gen- 
tleman is Col. Robert BrowJcr, a native of Virginia, born in 1S05, who 
tame to Kentucky and settled in Logan County in 1820, where he has 
since' resided. His son, and father of our subject, the Rev. George R. 
Browder, Sr., is a native of Logan County, Ky., born in 1828, where he 
now resides. lie is a Presiding Elder in the Louisville Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church South, and a man who is renowned for his 
oratorical and literary ability. Dr. Browder was born June 17, 1857, in 
Logan County, Ky., and was educated in the Browder College of his na- 
tive county. At twenty years of age he began the study of medicine 
under the preceptorship of Dr. J. R. Bailey, a prominent physician of 
Logan County, and remained with him tliree years ; he entered the Louis- 
ville Medical University, and graduated in ISSl ; he began the practice 
of his profession in Robinson County, Tenn., and in 1882 came to Fair- 
view, where he has built up a large and lucrative practice. Dr. Browder 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, a young man of 
fine ability, of good reputation, well worthy of the high esteem in which 
he is held by the community. 

ADDISON C. CATLETT was born August 3, 1853, in Christian 
County, Ky., which has been his place of residence to the present time. 
He is the son of John A. Catlett, who was born in Virginia in IbOl, and 
died in this county in 1867. The Catletts are an old Virginian family. 
Subject's mother, Allie A., daughter of Peter Senseney, M. D., of Vir- 
ginia, was born in 1815, and died in this county; her children are : Anna 
L. (Lunderman), Cornelia C. (Oliver), Alexander C, John C. and sub- 
ject. Mr. Catlett is a farmer by profession, having 400 acres of good 
land, v/hich he cultivates in wheat, corn, tobacco, and raises stock. This 
is a part of the immense tract of land entered as Seminary Land, near to 
Davis, the pioneer, upon which on the West Fork of Red River are 
to be seen remnants of the old Davis Mill-dam, which was built at a 
period so remote that no one now living can tell the date of its construc- 
tion. Here, also, are the Cedar Bluffs. Mr. Catlett is a member of the 
Salem Baptist Church, and in politics is a Democrat. 

FRANCIS M. CHILTON was born in Christian County, Ky., Octo- 
ber 22, 1S3G, where his residence has always been; his fatlier, John 
Chilton, wa^i born in Pittsylvania County, Va., December 20, 1800, and 



;1T-.C; Z ■ 









452 BIOGIIAI'HICAL SKETCHES. 

in 1833 came to Christian County, Ky., where he died January 27, 1875. 
Subject's grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in this 
county; his mother, Elizabeth H. Epperson, was born in Virginia, where 
her father served in the war of 1812 ; her children were : William, James 
L., Francis M., Robert T., John, Sarah V. (Lackey), and Mary T. 
(Gardner). Subject's school advantages were such as the country af- 
forded in his youth. On July 20, 1865, he was married to Miss 
Sarah A. Sasseen, who was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., July 9, 1839, 
where she attended school ; then at Greenville Academy, and finally 
graduated at Walnut Hill, Fayette County, in 1859; her father was born 
in Garrard County, Ky., in 1805, came to Christian County in 1815, and 
died July 31, 1884. Her grandfather, Lewis Sasseen, was born in Vir- 
ginia in 1773; was in the war of 1812, came to Kentucky in an early day, 
and died in 1867. To subject and wife have been born : William, JIary P., 
John E. B., Frank, Anna and Lewis. Our subject by. profession is a 
farmer, having 215 acres of valuable land, on which he is successfully 
engaged in raising wheat, tobacco and live-stock. He was Assistant 
Commissary in tlie late war; was a member of the Grange and of the 
Order of Chosen Friends. He is a Baptist in religion, and politically, 
a low tariif Democrat, but is not in favor of free trade. 

ROBERT n. DUDLEY was burn in Kentucky in 1829, and 
removed with his parents to Montgomery County, Tenn., where he 
remained until he arrived at manhood. He then settled in Christian 
County, Ky., in 1867, where he is at present located, enjoying the con- 
fidence and esteem of all who know him. His father, William Dudley, 
was a South Carolinian, born in 1794, and died in Montgomery County, 
Tenn., in 1869. He was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church, and 
was also a valiant soldier under Gen. Andrew Jackson. Subject's grand- 
father, Ambrose Dudley, of South Carolina, a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war, settled in Todd County, Ky., in 1805, and died in Carroll County, 
Tenn., in 1840. Subject's mother, Rebecca Farior, of North Carolina, 
died in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1840. To her and husband were 
born : Joseph M,, Needham B., John B., Elizabeth M. (Taylor), Robert 
H. and William G. Subject was married in 1800, to Miss Mildred E., 
daughter of John Jlorrison, of Cliristian County, Ky., and grand-daughter 
of Rev. Mr. Ross, a celebrated Baptist minister of this State. To hus- 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 453 

band and herself were born : Rebecca R., Nannie E.and William A. Our 
subject received a good English education at a select school taught by James 
Ross, Author of " Life and Times of Elder Reuben Ross," and has supplied 
himself with choice books and newspapers, by the perusal of which, though 
modest and unassuming, he has become a man of good information. He 
is a farmer by profession, owning over 400 acres of good land, which he 
cultivates in corn, wheat, tobacco and fruit. In religion he is connected 
with the Primitive Baptist Church, and in politics is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM W. EDDINS was born in Todd County, Ky., May 21, 
1843, where he grew to manhood and resided until 1870, when became to 
Christian County, and finally settled in 1883 on his present place, which 
is known as the Moodie farm. He is the son of Dulany Eddins, who was 
born in Orange County, Va., in 1800', where he married, leaving one 
daughter there, and removed to Todd County, Ky., about 1828, where he 
died in 1864. The family are of old Virginia extraction, and of Scotch 
descent. Subject's motlicr, Sus.in S., ilaughter of Benjniuin and Eliza- 
beth Downer, Sr., of Todd County, was born in 1806, and died in 1S72. 
Her children were : Emily F. (McRae), Mildred A. (Allen), Columbus G., 
Ellen E., Benjamin D. and subject. His maternal grandfather. Slaugh- 
ter, was a Colonel in the Revolutionary War. On March 22, 1882, Will- 
iam W. was married to Mrs. Dora, widow of Benjamin Behymcr, and 
daughter of Joseph H. and Elizabeth J. Dicken, an old Virginia family 
of Pendleton County, Ky. Subject secured a good English education at 
the common schools of the community where he was reared, and is well 
supplied with good books and papers. He is a farmer by profession, hav- 
ing 240 acres of good land which he is successfully cultivating in wheat, 
corn and tobacco. He is a member of Bethel Baptist Church, and in 
politics is a Democrat. 

. REV. SAMUEL P. FORGY was born April 16, 1S26, in Logan 
County, Ky., and at the age of ten years removed with his widowed 
mother to Adams County, 111., where he remained until 1847, wlien lie 
returned to his native State. He is the son of Samuel C. Forgy, who 
was born in North Carolina about 1798, removed with his parents to Logan 
County, Ky., where he died in 1830 ; he was a gallant soldier in tlie war 
of 1812; his father, James Forgy, was born in Ireland, came to America 
at the beginning of the war of the Revolution, entered the service as 



■\rll v.u i MfifjjV!, ;!.-- 



i I ". i-r ■> ^1.- 



454 BIOQKAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Major, under Marion, and served till peace was established. Subject's 
mother, Elizabeth Scott, was born in North Carolina in 1803, and died 
in Illinois, in 1863. Her children were: Hilary, James M., Miles M., 
William A., subject, Eliza J. (Veach), Ezekiel C. and Ann E. Forgy. 
In 1849 subject was licensed as a minister of the Gospel, in the Mission- 
ary Baptist Church, in Butler County, Ky., ordained at Monticello in 
1850, served as Pastor at Glasgow six years, severally at Trenton and 
Allensville, from 1858 to 1877, and became settled in charge of the con- 
gregation at Salem Church, in Christian County, his present field of 
labor, in 1880. He is, by those who know him best, accounted a worthy 
and faithful shepherd of his flock. He was married, January 24, 1850, 
to Miss Elizabeth F., daughter of Deacon George and Mary A. (Edgar) 
Crewdson, of Logan County, Ky., and from this union have sprung Will- 
iam H., February 27, 1851 ; Mary Lizzie, March 21, 1854 ; Luella, 
September 15, 1855: Katie, October 18, 1857; Lillie, December 20, 
1858 ; Minnie, December 12, 1861 ; S. Walton, October 15, 1866 ; and 
Willard E., April 11, 1871. Owing to the orphanage of subject in early 
childhood, his educational advantages-were limited; but by industry and 
studious habits, has accumulated a fine fund of general information, and 
especially in the department of Christian literature has he succeeded to 
an extent that should encourage others situated under like circumstances. 
THE GARNETT FAMILY.— To mark the progress in the history 
of Christian County during the last three-quarters of a century, one need 
only compare tlie condition of the country at the present time, with its 
flourishing villages and growing cities ; its farms with their waving crops, 
their blooming orchards, groves and hedges, and substantial dwellings ; 
its system of schools; its railroads and its net-work of telegraphic wires, 
to its condition over seventy-five years ago, when its soil was unbroken by 
the hand of husbandry, and the stillness of its forests was undisturbed, 
save by the noise of the hunter's tread, and the crack of the Indian's 
rifle. It was at this early day that James Garnett, a native of Virginia 
and of English parentage, a prominent farmer, and at the head of the 
Garnett family, in 1821 came to Kentucky and settled in Pembroke Pre- 
cinct, where, after passing through the diff'erent phases of a pioneer's life, 
he died, leaving a large family. Eldred Brockman Garnett, son of James 
Garnett, was born in Albemarle County, Va., on the 10th of May, 1813. 



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PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 455 

lie came to this county with his parents when he was eight years of age ; 
he spent his early life at home, assisting to till the farm, and receiving 
such an education as could be obtained from the subscription schools of 
the period. Arriving at his uiajuiily, liu embarked on his career in life 
as a farmer, and became one of the most substantial agriculturists of the 
county. Of busy men, he became about tlic busiest, not for a greed of 
gain, but because he had an instinct of activity and a fondness fur busi- 
ness. He was the owner of about 500 acres of laud in the county ; he died 
July 18, 1870 ; was a member of the Baptist Church and bore a name 
and reputation wiiich is an honor to his descendants ; he was married, 
September 28, 1834, to Miss Frances A., daughter of John and Fanny 
J. (Thompson) Pendleton, early settlers of Christian County. Mrs. Gar- 
nett is a native of Orange County, Va., born January 30, 1810; her 
early education was received under the preceptorship of iicr father, but, 
developing an early taste for reading, and having access to a gouil library, 
she acquired a good education. She has led a useful life, and though 
now over seventy years of age, she still retains a vigorous mind, and is as 
constant a reader as in her younger days. She is now residing with her 
son, W. W. Garnett, enjoying tlie fruits of a well-spent life. Siie is the 
mother of the following children : Helen L., wife of Rev. II. W. More- 
head ; Virgil A., William W., John P., ami James 13. Helen L. was 
born in Christian County, Ky., July 31, 1835. She attended first the 
Common schools of the neighborhood, and was a favorite with the teachers 
on account of her easy and rapid progress. When about fifteen years of 
age she attendeil for one or more terms the high school at Ilopkinsville, 
Ky. After this she attended the Female College at Clarksvillo, Tenn., 
where she completed her education. About this time she united with the 
Baptist Church at Bethel. She was fond of reading, and after complet- 
ing her education took a thorough course in general literature. She was 
married to Rev. R. W. Morehead February 5, 18fi3. Thib marriage was 
blessed with five cliildren: Robert W., died in infancy ; Clarence G., 
born May 10, 1865; John P., died in infancy; Charles S., horn June 
Itj, ISG'.t, and Fanny G., born December IS, 1871. She now resiiles in 
Princeton, Cahlwell Co., Ky., wiiere her husband is the pastor of two 
churches — New Bethel and llannony. Prof Virgil A. Garnett was born 
in Christian County, Ky., February 10, 1837. His educational advan- 



■•■"■:■ '.ri'i ■■'.'U. ■;■;.(;<': 






456 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

tages were afforded by the private schools in the neighborhood ; under 
the instruction of Richard Durrett, a prominent teacher of the county 
(who taught in one place for over forty-five years), and Bethel College, 
Russellville, Ky. He entered this institution in 1854 and graduated 
June 17, 1858, with the degree of A. B., and afterward that of A. M. 
On the 8th of October, 18G1, he enlisted in Conapany H, First Kentucky 
Cavalry, under command of Col. Ben Hardin Helm and Capt. H. C. 
Leavell ; he was captured and held a prisoner of war at Louisville for 
three weeks ; he received an honorable discharge from the service in 1863; 
since the war he has spent a portion of his time in teaching school, and 
has been a teacher of the Pembroke schools since January, 1881. He 
has also been engaged in farming, and is the owner of the homestead farm 
of his father, which is located three miles south of Pembroke. He was 
married, October 8, 1872, to Miss Maggie, daughter of George 0. Thomp 
son, of Hopkinsville; he became a member of the order A. F. k A. M., 
Gasper River Lodge, No. 391, in 1861, and of the Pembroke Lodge, 
No. 288, in 1865. He was a member of Royal Arch Chapter, No. 75, 
of Fairview, and of Clarksville Council, No. 4, and is now a member of 
the Moore Commandery, No. 6, Knights Templar of Hopkinsville. In 
religion he is a Baptist and in politics a Democrat. William "Warficld 
Garnctt, a jirominent mcrcliant, of the firm of W. W. k J. V. Garnctt, 
Pembroke, Ky., was born in Christian County, Ky., November 0, 1838. 
He was educated in the common schools of the neighborhood, and at 
Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. At fourteen years of age he engaged 
as a clerk in a store for Faulkner <& Slaughter, of Pembroke, and remained 
tlius engaged, though for different firms, until the spring of 1860, when 
he engaged in the mercantile business on his own account in the firm of 
W. H. Pendleton & Co., which was successfully carried on until the war, 
when it met with heavy losses, and the firm was dissolved. In 1861 he 
enlisted in Company II, First Kentucky Cavalry, under command of Col. 
Helm, and was honorably discharged from the service in 1862. In 1866 he 
resumed business under the present name of the firm, and it has since con- 
tinued to prosper, and is now one of the solid firms of the county and carries 
a large and complete stock of general merchandise. In connection with 
the mercantile business the partners own a farm of 200 acres in Pem- 
broke Precinct, which they carry on. Mr. Garnctt was married. May 3, 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 457 

1870, to Miss Sally Bailey, a native of ToJd County and a dauglitcr of 
Thomas G. and Amanda (Small) Bailey. This union has been blessed 
with one child: Fanny Bailey Garnett, born November 30, 1S71. Mr. 
Garnett and wife are members of the Baptist Cburcli. lie was one of 
the oi'iginal projectors, and assisted in the organization of the City Bank, 
Ilopkinsvillc, Ky., in 1879; he was elected on the first Board of Direct- 
ors, and has been re-elected every year since that time.. John P. Gar- 
nett is a native of Christian County, Ky., and was born January 16, 
1841. He spent his early life at home on the farm, and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools, supplemented by a course at Bethel Col- 
lege; he remained at home engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1866, 
when he engaged in his present business in partnership with his brother. 
He was married, on the 29th of October, 1872, to Miss Rosa, daughter 
of Drurey and Elizabeth (Mosley) Lacey, a native of Christian County. 
They have three children : Mary A., Sally W. and Anna L. Mr. Gar- 
nett is a Democrat in politics, and with his wife unites with the Bethel 
Baptist Church ; he was Postmaster of Pembroke from 1866 until Jan- 
uary 1, 1884, when his increasing business in the store compelled him to 
resign ; he is of a literary turn, and since the age of sixteen has been a 
regular contributor to many of the newspapers and magazines of the 
country, both in prose and verse. James B. Garnett, Commonwealth 
Attorne}', Cadiz, Trigg Co., Ky., was born in Christian County, Ky., 
July 28, 1845 ; his early life was spent on the farm, and he there re- 
ceived the benefit of common schools; he afterward attended the Cum- 
berland University at Lebanon, Tenn., and graduated from the law de- 
partment of that institution in 1867. He then located at Cadiz, Ky., 
and engaged in the practice of his profession, and lias served the pco])le 
in the following ofiiccs: County Attorney for one term; County School 
Commissioner for two years; State Senator, representing the counties of 
Trigg, Calloway and Livingston, and in 1880 was elected Commonwealth 
Attorney of the Sixth Judicial District for a term of six years. He 
married Miss Virginia Hewett, a native of Tuscaloosa, Ala., who died 
with her child one year after her marriage. 

BENJAMIN C. GARNETT (deceased), was a son of James and 
Frances (Chiles) Garnett, the former a native of Louisa County, Va., and 
the latter of Orange County, Va. They were the parents of the followiiig 



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458 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

children: Jane F., Benjamin C, Eldred B., James T., Susan A., Eliza 
C. and Mary E. Benjamin C. Garnett, the subject of this brief sketch, 
was born on the l"2th of August, 1811 ; at tlie age of ten years he emi- 
grated with his parents to Kentucky, and settled in Todd County, and 
the following year came to Christian County, and located on the present 
site of Pembroke village. In early life he had the advantages of a good 
English education, and through a long and studious career he continued 
to improve his opportunities by reading standard works, as well as the 
current literature of the times. On the 12th of September, 1833, he 
married Miss Martha A., daughter of William C. Davis, and grand- 
daughter of James Davis, the first settler of Christian County. This 
union was blessed with the following children : Francis A., Willinm D., 
Mary E., James L. and Gustavus E. Of these children William D. still 
survives, and is a prominent farmer of this county. In 1860 he married 
Miss Mollie A., daughter of James Jones, who has boi-ne him two chil- 
dren, viz.: Benjamin J. and Gustavus. Jas L. Garnett and Annie L. 
Lacy (a grandaughter of Lemuel Mosley) were marricil in December, 
1870. This union was blessed with three children : Mattie A., Lizzie 
and William D. Lizzie died when two years old ; the other cluWren 
still survive. James L. Garnett died October 27, 1881, in Pueblo, Col., 
whither he had gone for his health Benjamin C. Garnett was a farmer 
by occupation, and was one of the most successful business men of the 
county. Ilis death occurred at his residence on tl'e 27tli of February, 
1884, after a brief illness. lie was a man of large mental endowments, 
and possessed many admirable traits of character. He was a devoted 
husband, a loving father and aflectionate brother, a kind neighbor and 
most excellent citizen. lie was an earnest, zealous, Christian, and had 
been a member of the Bethel (Baptist) Church for fifty five years, of 
which time he was for forty years a Deacon. His memory will be cher- 
ished and his good deeds not forgotten. 

ISAAC GAEROTTwas born in Christian County, Ky., June 8, 
1817, and is still a resident. His father, Robert W. Garrott, was a 
native of Christian County, having been born November 2, 1823, and 
has always made this his home. Subject's mother was Sallie. the daugh- 
ter of Robert Y. Pendleton, Sr. ; was born in tlii.s county, June 21, 182^, 
and died in 18*i7. To her and husband were born : Leslie 0., Isaac, 



PEMBROKE rUECINCT. 459 

Nannie (Fives) and Magc^ie E. By vocation subject is a farmer, pos- 
sessing 500 acres of good land, in an excellent state of cultivation. lie 
also owns a fine herd of sliort-liorn cattle and Berkshire hogs, vfliich have 
proved to be very profitable. He was formerly engaged in mercan- 
tile business. ' Subject was married December 5, 1871, to Miss Eddie 
E. Jameson, of Pembroke, and to them were born : Robert J., Nannie P., 
and Thomas L. Subject is a member of the Grange, and also of Pem- 
broke Lodge, No 288, A. F. & A. M., of which he is Master at the 
present time, and has four times previously represented his lodge in the 
Grand Lodge at Louisville. His education was procured in the schools of 
Christian County, and he is an extensive reader of books and newspapers. 
He is an active member of Salem Baptist Church, and politically is asso- 
ciated with the Democratic party. 

THOMAS D. GRAY was born July 27, 184D, on the tract of land where 
he now resides, in Pembroke Precinct, Christian Co., Ky., and whieh has 
always been his home ; his father, Reason D. Gray, was born on this place in 
1819, and also died here, in 1875. His grandfather, John Gray, was born 
•in North Carolina and died here in about 1859, at the advanced age of 
ninety-three years. He was an early pioneer, and in the last century 
entered a large body of land in this section of Christian County. Indians 
were numerous and wild game abundant when he became the first settler 
in this region. Subject's mother, Mary E., daughter of Thomas Thomp- 
son, of Marengo County, Ga., died here in 1880, at the age of fifty-five 
years; her children were: Margaret A. (Combs), John Y., Thomas D., 
William II., Deborah (Anderson), George B., Ellen W. (Rose), Mary E. 
and Reason 1)., Jr. Subject was married, in lS7o, to Miss Martha J., 
daughter of V/illi:un Anderson, of Hardin County, 111. ; his literary 
advantages were good, and he was content with a good business education ; 
he is a farmer by profession, still owning as a patrimony 100 acres of the 
old family domain, which he successfully cultivates in the staple products 
of the country, at a fair profit; he is also a dealer in leaf tobacco, under 
the firm style of Gray k Brother, handling annually about 250 hogs- 
heads of tobacco, at a profit. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and in politics is a Democrat. 

STEPHEN HANNA. Stephen Ilanna, Sr., the lather of the gentle- 
man whose name heads this sketch, was a native of Pennsylvania, a soldier 






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'^^^ BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

of the Revolutionary wor, who died in Mercer County, Ky., in 1814, a-ed 
sixty years; he was of Scotch-Irish descent; his wife, and mother of our 
subject, was Elizabeth (Forman) Ilanna, a native of Virginia, who died in 
Todd County. Ky., in 1840. She was the mother of the following, chil- 
dren : Jol,n, Elizabeth (Taylor), Nancy (Groo.ns), Stephen, Lucy T. 
. (Greenfield) and Forman. Stephen, our subject, was born in Mercer 
County, Ky., August 16, 1700, and was there reared and educated. 
When he was twenty years of age he removed to Logan County, where he 
resided four years, and then moved to Todd County, where he resided 
thirty years, and subsequently to Christian County. On the 1 1 th of De- 
cember, 1841, he married Miss Sarah W., daughter of Tlioinas Ilord, of 
Christian County. This union has been blessed with the following cliil- 
dren : Thomas F., Henry G.. John M. and Stephen D. Ilanna. Mr. 
Hanna has always followed the occupation of farming, and is now the 
owner of 400 acres of land. He is an exemplary member of the Bethel 
Baptist Church, and has been a member for forty-two years. 

REV. S. A. HOLLAND was born in Warren County, Ky., on the 
10th of December, in 1815. At the age of twenty-three he nrofcssed 
faith n. Christ, and on the first Sabbath in August, 1838, was baptized 
by Rev. R. Rutherford, and received into the fellowship of the Salem 
Baptist Church, in Christian County, Ky., of which church he remained a 
member (with the exception of a short time) until his death. His early 
life was devoted to the farm, and without the advantages of a liberal edu- 
cation, entered upon the active duties of lifi, under circumstances marked 
by no great promises of future success. But he found in Miss Almeda 
Brumfield one with whom he was willing to plight his fortune for the 
future, and after their marriage, on the 7th day of September, in the year 
of our Lord 1837, they set out on life's pilgrimage, and never more for- 
tunate was man in the choice of a companion than was our brother in the 
choice of that most faithful and devoted of wives. From that day, side 
by side did they press together up the doubtful hill of fortune to its'sum- 
mit, reaching it but in time to see the sunlight of domestic union send its 
lengthening shadows across its sunny bower, giving only time to exchange 
the last genial counsel, and hear the last adieu for time. In my fir°st 
acquaintance with Brother Holland, in 1841, he had accumulated a suffi- 
cient amount of means to make a first payment of §800 on a tract of land 



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PKMBUOKE PRECINCT. 461 

which he had purchased for §2,400 ; this, with two little servants which his 
wife had received from her father's estate, with some stock and farming 
implements, constituted the estate of our dear brother. His success as a 
farmer was marked from that day forward ; increasing with the years he 
grew in worldly goods. God blessed him in basket and in store, until he 
was not only regarded as a successful but as a prince of farmers. His 
early religious impressions date back to his childhood, though his parents 
in his youth were not pious, nor were the advantages then such as they 
are now enjoyed by the youth in that favored part of our beloved com- 
munity ; but they were sufficient to bring before his mind, at times, his lost 
condition with great force. Tliis state of things continued with its ebb and 
flow until the year 18-38, when, under the exhibition of the gospel of the 
blessed God, he was not only brought to see himself a sinner lost, but to 
behohl Jesus the friend of sinners by faith, and enjoy the peace of recon- 
ciliation tlirough the Lamb that was slain, whom he ever after regarded as 
a living intercessor for him. From that time he became a devoted church 
member, willing to do his duty and bear his part in all the work of the 
church, to the lionor and glory of Christ who had redeemed him. It 
may be as truly said of him as of any one of the present day, that like 
Paul he said, " Lord, what wilt thou have me to do ?" The church seeing in 
him a faithful Christian and church member, he was selected with 
one other to act as Deacon for the church ; they having been ordained 
by a council called by the church, consisting of Elders R. Ross (his 
pastor); Samuel Baker, pastor of Hopkinsville Church; II. Y. Ander- 
son, of Locust Grove; R. W. Nixon, of Spring Creek Church. He 
entered upon his work with great diffidence. I remember about this 
time he attended the meeting of the Bethel Association at Russell- 
ville, and on his retutn he said to a friend, "I think I ought to 
resign as Deacon, for since I have seen and learned something of 
the work done by Brothers G. W. Norton and N. Long, I feel that I am 
unfit for the place." He was told that he should try and do his duty, 
and God would lend all needed aid; and those that were acquainted with 
him as Deacon, will testify to his fidelity to the trust imposed, though often 
by his straightforward course he was brouglit in contact with unfaithful 
members. But the church was not long in discovering that God had 
designed him for a different work ; and in November, 1S45, the Salem 









■ . ',' ,■,:;-. Ill 



^^2 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Church licensed him and his fellow-deacon to exercise their gifts in 
exhorting and ministering the word in the community, that the brethren 
could be the better judges of their gifts in that department of Christian 
labor. He entered upon this work feeling its fearful responsibilities, and 
his impbrfect qualification. Feeling that he had no right to refuse to do 
whatever the church thought his duty, and that he could not preach, he 
would often spend whole nights in weeping and praying in his anxiety 
and doubt about his duty. He and his fellow-laborer spent whole days 
together in prayer; often his mind would take on the most gloomy aspect 
of the future; but encouraged by the other, he pressed on under the con- 
viction that he should do all he could to save sinners, and in that light he 
exhorted at the prayer-meetings, and occasionally would take a tert and 
explain by giving his views. His simplicity of manner and originality 
of thought, with his earnestness, soon convinced the brethren of the church 
that he was eminently endowed with gifts that if cultivated would be of 
inestimable value to the church. Consequently, on the 3rd day of Aug- 
ust, 1847, a presbytery consisting of Reuben Ross, Samuel Baker, Robert 
Williams, R. Y. Anderson, Elisha Vaughan, and R. W. Nixon, at the 
request of the Salem Baptist Church, in Christian County, Ky., ordained 
him and his fellow-laborer to. the work of the gospel ministry, and George 
Kilabrew and William Pendleton as Deacons (I must stop here ; the teara 
roll fast down my cheeks, and I alone am left to tell thee). From this 
time he entered upon the pastoral life, which was marked by great success ; 
first with Concord Church, Christian County, then at Graysville, and last 
with Mount Zion, Todd County, Ky., and South Union, Christian County, 
Ky. The estimation in which he was held by them as pastor may in part 
be learned from the records of affection and respect upon their several 
church books; but never fully until the deep, dark drapery of the heart 
shall be exchanged for the brighter apparel of the celestial guest that may 
attend the marriage supper of the Lamb, and the under-shepherd shall 
say, " These are Thine which Thou hast bought with Thine own blood." 
His efficiency was what distinguished him in every department in life. 
He was a man of great force of character, and whatever he put his hands 
to, he did with all his might. He was inflexible in purpose, tireless, uncon- 
querable, resolute and fearless, both of man, power and opinion, calm, 
self-reliant, and possessed mysterious control over others, a strong, cor- 






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PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 463 

r.ect judgment, with rapidity of thought and sudden impulse. He decided 
quicker, yet better than other men ; his powers were ail practical ; he 
•thought better and could work better than others. His social life was so 
strongly marked by alTection and cheerfulness that he gathered around 
him a large number of bosom friends, who felt that his presence was 
indisjiensable to complete their social circle. The testimony which they 
give him to-day — a monument more lasting than marble — is, that he was 
honest in business, fiiithful in friendship, generous toward society, respect- 
ful toward superiors, courteous toward inferiors, modest among equals, 
kind, benevolent and afiable toward all. His beneficence was marked by 
its versatility and its consistency. It comprehended suffering humanity, 
whether considered temporally or spiritually. The key of his treasury 
hung upon a benevolent heart, and the cry of want found no bars to his 
store' he began and ended his religious life by using his substance for the 
glory of God ; not his substance only, but himself. Said he, "Here, 
Lord, take me." Much of his time was spent in gratuitous missionary 
work, and all the proceeds of his ministerial labor were contributed to the 
destitute or to the aid of the rising ministry. AVhile his churclies con- 
tributci] to him as their pastor, he sent it forth to do its double work. 
Tlie weak churches, the Home Mission, the Domestic Mission, the inter- 
• est of education, both literary and theological, as well as the mission 
abroad, all found in him a friend indeed ; he closed his life-work in giving 
his means to extend the knowledge of salvation to dying men, at home 
and abroad. But what shall I say more? for like the friends of Dorcas, 
we stand beside his dying couch, weeping, showing all the things he did 
for us while he was with us. Before entering the sacred precincts of the 
home circle, I take my slioes from off my feet, feeling it is holy ground. 
I enter not to disturb the repose, nor re-open the fresh-made wounds on 
affectionate hearts, but to ask a remembrance of the consistency of that 
life which has so recently closed, and to ask you the privilege of uniting my 
feeble testimony with others, that a generous brother, a faithful and kind 
father, a constant and affectionate husband, has passed away in the death 
of S. A. Holland. I have come to stand with other loved ones around 
the dying couch of the child of God, and catch the last testimony he 
leaves to weeping loved ones, and ask you to let his last word, "glory," 
bring sweetest cheer to your troubled hearts, and to let bands of mourn- 



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464 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ing drape the LoinesteaJ and_the sacred house of prayer. Let mourning 
folds lie black and heavy on true bosoms everywhere. For beside the 
grave we all realize that there are voices whispering to us out of the 

shadu\Yy silence beyond the river, saying : 
" Never again — no more — 

Coiiiea back to enrth the life that goes 
Hence to the Eden shore ! 

Let him rest ; it is not often 
That his soul hath known repose ; 

Let him rest— they rest but seldom 
Whose success challenges foes. 

lie was weary, worn with wateliing ; 
His life crown of power hath pressed 

Oft oil temples sadly aching; 
Ue was weary, let him rest." 

Your Brother in Clirist, 

F. C. Plasters. 

[The portrait of Eev. Shandy A. Holland and that of his widow, 
Mrs. Alraeda (Brumfield) Holland, will be found elsewhere in this vol- 
ume.] 

WASHINGTON HOLLIS was born in Montgomery County, Tenu., 
May G, 1842, where he resided until May, 1861, when he enlisted in 
Company K, Fourteenth Tennessee Infantry, in which he served until 
Lee's .surrender at Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 18'J5. He 
then came to Christian County, Ky., which has been his home to the 
present time. He is the son of Achilles Hollis, a natural mechanic, who 
was born in Tennessee in 1807, and died in Montgomery County, the 
same State, August 28, 1860, greatly respected and esteemed for his 
brilliant mechanical genius. Our subject's grandfather, L«aac Hollis, is 
thought to have been born in Scotland. His mother, Priscilla (Hodges) 
Hollis, was born in North Carolina in 1805, and died in Tennessee, De- 
cember 16, 1855. Her children were: Charles, Joseph A., Franklin, Olive 
Anjaline, Washington (subject), James P. and Susan (Ferrell) Hollis. Oc- 
tober 16, 1866, subject was married to Miss Sarah E., daughter of Absalom 
and Margaret (Stevens) Davidson, and to them have been born: Mollie, April 
1, 1869; Otis Nathaniel, June 9, 1873, who died August 16, 1876. Sub- 
ject's wife died November 24, 1873, and he was next married. May 27, 
1875, to Miss Fannie C. Beard, of Todd County, Ky. Her father and 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 405 

mother were born in Virginia; her mothej', Rebecca P. (Stone) Beard 
was a daughter of Elijah Stone, who was a soldier and an officer under 
Gen. George Washington throughout the entire Revolutionary war, and 
lived to a rip)e old age, and died in Virginia, his native State, honored 
and highly respected by all who knew him. Isaac Ilollis' cliildrcn were : 
James, a soldier under Jackson at New Orleans in 1815; Jonathan, 
William and Henry. Subject is a natural mechanic, and is engaged in 
the undertaking and milling business, at which he has been fairly success- 
ful. He is one of the prominent men of the community, and is held in 
high esteem by his neighbors. He has never been an aspirant for office, 
but has served three years as Town Trustee of the village of Pembroke. 
He is a member of Pembroke Lodge, No. 288, A. F. & A. M., and is 
identified with the Democratic party, but not connected with any religious 
denomination. 

ROBERT G. HOPKINS was born in 1831 in Cumberland County, 
Ky., and in 1840 removed with his parents to Christian County, which 
has been his home to the present time. In youth he traveled over differ- 
ent States, abiding for some time in Missouri, but always regarded his 
own native State, and especially Christian County, as far surpassing 
them all. His father, Joseph H. Hopkins, was born in Buckingham 
County, Va., in 1798, and died in Christian County, Ky., in 1867. His 
grandfather, Samuel Hopkins, was a Virginian, and died in this county, 
at Oak Grove. He was related to Gen. Hopkins, of Kentucky, and was 
a soldier in the war of 1812. Subject's mother, Elizabeth M. (Garnett) 
was born in Culpeper County, Va., and died in Christian County in 185G. 
To herself and husband were born : Robert G., John W., Samuel G., 
Arney F. and Joseph F. Robert G. Hopkins was married, April 22, 
1855, to Miss Ruth B., daughter of George W. and Martha (Embry) 
Tribble, and to them have been born : Fannie L. (Smith), Mattie E., Lou 
T., Anna J., Robert G., Jr., and Ruth T. Our subject received a good 
business education at the select scliools of the county, and has been a 
constant reader of good books and papers, until he is considered well 
versed in general and current literature. By profession he is a farmer, 
and owns 367 acres of very valuable and productive land, which he man- 
ages with skill, and is successful in raising wheat, tobacco and stock — 
the latter claiming his especial attention, and of which he is a careful 









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4bb BIOGRAnilCAL SKETCHES. 

and prudent manager. He is a member of the Grange, having been the 
sixtli Master elected in the State of Kentucky to that useful and worthy 
order, and was a member of the State Executive Committee of that body 
for two years. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and in politics is a Democrat. His family are members of the 
Christian Church. 

GAPT. DANIEL G. HUTCHISON was born March 4, 1807, in 
Pittsylvania County, Va., and removed to Christian County, Ky., in 
1834, where he has resided to the present time. He is the son of John 
Hutclii.'on, who was boin in Loudoun County, Va., and died in Todd 
County, Ky., in 1840. Subject's mother, Susan Burton, was born in 
Virginia in 1784, and died in 1872. To herself and husband were born : 
Daniel G., Nellie G. (Foster), Susan (Murphy), Louisa J. (Ballard), Jane 
B. (Brown), Sallie and John. November 19, 1839, Capt. Hutchison was 
married to Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Slaughter) 
Downer, and grand-daughter of Col. John S. Slaughter, of the Revolu- 
tionary war, and from this union sprang : Avilla S. (McRae), Susan F. 
(Armistead), and Julia McRae. Mr. Hutchison has always followed the 

, vocation of a farmer, being at the present time the owner of 165 acres 
of fair land, which has yielded liim and family a comfortable support, and 
on which he has successfully grown the products common to this vicinity. 
Capt. Hutchison is a Granger, a Democrat, and a member of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church South. 

ROBERT C. JAMESON was born in 1823, in Christian County, 
Ky., where he has resided all his life. His father, John D. Jameson, was 
a native of Virginia, and removing to llopkinsville, Ky., in an early 
day, established himself as a silversmith. His death occurred in 1837. 

"His wife was Eliza Coleman, of Todd County, who died in 1834. Their 
children were : Robert C, James M., Elizabeth (Williams), Ellen, Sarah 
G. and David. Subject's education was obtained in the common schools 
of the day, but he has improved his opportunities to the best advantage, 
possessing a good library, containing some rare works. In 1844 he was 
married to Miss Susan C. Smith, and to them were born Eddie E. (Gar- 
rott), Bob E. (Reynolds), and David T. Subject's wife died in 1871, and 
in 1873 he married Mrs. Annie E., widow of Walter W. Pendleton, and 
daughter of Philander Barclay, of Russellville, Ky. Her children arc : 



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PEMnROKE I'UECIKCT. 4G7 

Philander B., Carrie K. and Loulie B. Subject is a fanner, has been a 
mercliant, and is a dealer in wlieat and tobacco, in Pembroke, Ky. lie 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity, a Baptist and a Democrat. His 
portrait appears on another page. 

MRS. BEITIE E. KENNER, daughter of Richard and Martha 
(Britt) Crouch, of Todd County, Ky., was born January 13, 1824, and 
was married October 30, 1856, to Abram F. Kenner, who was born at 
the present family seat in 1811, and where he died November 15, 18G3. 
His father, Abram Kenner, Sr., was born in North Carolina in 1770, and 
died here in 1834. Abram, Sr.'s wife was Mary Bollinger. Mrs. Bettie 
E. Kenner's parents were born in Goochland County, Va., and their 
children are : Susan E. (Morehead), William S., Sarah J. (Chastme), 
Catherine L. (Poor), John H., subject, and Richard J. Crouch. To Mrs. 
Kenner and her husband were born : Henry Stites, and Richard B., now 
deceased. Henry S., who was born August 20, 1857, is superintending 
the home farm of 500 acres with success. jNIrs. Kenner is a member of 
the Bethel Baptist Church. 

BENJAMIN D. LACKEY was born November 5, 1835, in Chris- 
tian County, Ky., which has generally been the place of his resi<lence. 
He is the son of George E. Lackey, who was born in Amherst County 
in 1806, and reared in Bedford Couuty, Va.; removed to Logan County, 
Ky., in 1832, and to Christian County in 1833, where he died in 1881. 
Subject's grandfather was a Virginian, served as an officer in the war o 
1812, and died at Clarksville, Tcnn., about 1845. The family had long 
been residents of Virginia and were of Irish descent. Subject's mother, 
Mary S., daughter of Benjamin Downer, was born in Christian County, 
Ky., in 1813, and is still living. She was a descendant of the 
Slaughter family, of Virginia, of Revolutionary fame. Her children 
were: Benjamin D., Americus 0., John N. and Addie M. (Leavell). 
Subject was married in 1866 to Miss Ella A., daughter of John S. Long, 
of Todd County, Ky., to whom was born Benjamin S. Mrs. Lackey 
died on December 7, 1873, and on December 12, 1876, subject married 
Miss Alice H., daughter of Richard and Jennie E. (Summers) Thur- 
mond, of Christian County, to whom one child — Ella Cooper — was born. 
Mr. Lackey is at present a member of the County Court. He is a mem- 
ber of the order of A. F. & A. M., and also a member of the Meth- 



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468 BioGUArniCAL skctciies. 

odist Episcopal Churcli South. In politics he is identified with the 
Democratic party. 

JOHN LUNDERMAN was born in Prince Edward County, Va., in 
17G5, and came to Christian County, Ky., in 1822, where he died in 
1859. His father came from Germany to Virginia. John's wife was 
Miss Mary Jackson, of Virginia, and to them were born : Frances 
(Garton), Martha, Nancy M. (Murphy), Mary E. (McPhail), Jane (Crutch- 
field), Thomas J., John, Henry H. and Chasteen. In 1850 Chasteen 
married Miss Elizabeth Galbrcath, of Christian County, and to them 
were born : John N., Thomas B. and Mary. After the death of Eliza- 
beth, Chasteen was married, in 1865, to Miss Louisa Catlett, to whom 
have been born: AUie M., Jackie, Lulie, Henry C. and Malcolm. 
Chasteen, with whom Henry C. is living, has 700 acres of valuable land, 
a part of the old Davis tract. The educational advantages of these 
brothers were such as the common schools of tlie country afforded, but 
they are readers of standard books and papers. 

LYMAN McCOMB. Among the prominent and successful planters 
of Pembi-okc Precinct, may be classed the gentleman whose name appears 
at the head of this sketch. He is a native of Christian County, Ky., 
where he was born, August 31, 1840. His father, Jesse McComb, of old 
Virginia stock, was born in 1800, and died in this county in 1852 ; his 
grandfather, .John McOomb, was reared and died in Virginia. Subject's 
mother, Susan B. (Jeffries), was born in Kentucky, and died in 1852. To 
herself and husband were born ; William D., John J., Lyman, Walter and 
Susan A. (Richardson). Subject was married January -12, 1864, to 
Miss Linnie, daughter of George B. and Jane IloUoway, of Woodford 
County, Ky., and to them have been born: George IL, Jessie, Linnie, 
Samuel W., Jeffries, Susan A. and Henry B. Subject attended the select 
school of the county, and finally graduated in 1858, at Bethel College, at 
Russellville, Ky. Mr. McComb successfully cultivates his fine 500-acre 
farm in wheat, corn, tobacco, and raises stock, and if appearances and 
common report are to be taken into account, he has certainly not been 
mistaken in choosing his vocation. He is a Granger, and a member of 
the Masonic fraternity. In his religious associations he is connected with 
the Salem Baptist Church, and in politics is a Democrat. 

WILLIS B. MASON was born September 19, 1820, in Buckingham 






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PEMBROKl-; niEClNCT. 4(39 

County, Va., and removed with his parents to his presenthomc, in Christian 
County, Ky., in 1843. llis father, John Mason, was born in Virginia in 
1778 ; raised in Cumberland County in that State, and died on the place 
now occupied by subject, in 1865. He was a soldier in the war uf ]81'3. 
Subject's grandfather, William Mason, was born in England ; his mother, 
Anny B. Smith, was born in Cumberland County, Va., in 1796, and died in 
Christian County, Ky., in 1879. Her father was one of the guards in charge 
of Cornwallis, after his capture at Yorktown. Subject's brothers and sisters 
were : William B., John, James, Nancy (Hooper), Mary (Hardeman), 
Susan (Sanders), Henry, Willis B., Joshua, Martitia E. (Mason), 
Sarah A., L>avid S., Ann J. (Wood), Catherine, Richard and Matilda F. 
(Carroll). Mr. Mason was married February 14, 1850, to America J., 
daughter of William Mason, of Christian County, Ky., and to them was 
born one child — America J., deceased. His wife died April 12, 1851, and 
he has ever since remained unmarried. Subject has followed the vocation 
of carpentering, and is now engaged in farming, having 300 acres of good 
land, which he cultivates in tobacco, wheat, corn, hay and various other 
products ; he also has a considerable apiary. In his religious belief and 
associations he is connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church South, 
and in politics is identified with the Democratic party. 

FREDERIC B. MASSIE was born in 1850, in Christian County, 
Ky., where he has lived all his life. His father, George Massie, was 
born in Virginia, and died in this county in 1863. The family are of 
old Virginia stock. Subject's mother, a daughter of Henry Bollinger, 
was born in. 1817, in Christian County, Ky., and is still living. Her 
children are : Elizabeth A. (Massie), John II., James B., Lewis W., Virgil 
W., Frederic B., Mary C. (Carnahan), Franklin P. and Jefferson D. 
Frederic B. was married, in 187G, to Miss Sarah E., daughter of George 
T. Duerson, and to them was born one son — Eugene. Mrs. Massio's 
grandfather, Thomas Duerson, was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. 
Massie is by profession a farmer, having 150 acres of good laud, which 
he cultivates in wheat, tobacco and corn. In religion he is a member of 
the Christian Church, and in politics a Democrat. 

M. G. MILLER was born in Calloway County, Ky., on the 27th 
of December, 1841, to William and Elizabeth (Hood) Miller. His htiier 
was born in North Carolina in 1795, and when eight yoiirs of age went 






'! . ■rcv.'J 



470 BIOGIUrillCAL SKETCHES. 

with his parents to Montgomery County, Tenn., where he was educated 
in the common schools and brought up on a farm ; at twenty years of 
age he moved to Calloway County, Ky., being one of the first settlers of 
that county. He there engaged in farming on his own account, and con- 
tinued the same to the time of his death, which occurred in December, 
1859. His wife, and subject's mother, was born in about 1800, in Vir 
ginia, but was reared in Sumner County, Tenn. She died in Calloway 
County, Ky., in 1879. They were the parents of fifteen children, of 
whom eight boys and four girls lived to man and womanhood. M. G. 
Miller, our subject, spent his early life at home, assisting to till the home 
farm, and receiving such an education as the common schools afforded. 
On the 20th of July, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, of the Third 
Kentucky Infantry. He was engaged in the battle of Baton Rouge, and 
still carries a rifle-ball in his left breast which he received there. In 
September, 1863, he was discharged, and returned home. In 1S65 he 
engaged in mercantile business at Hico, in his native county, and 
continued in that business for two years at Hico. In 1867 he went to 
Allensville, Todd Co., Ky., and engaged in the grocery business for one 
year. In 1868 he bought a farm, and followed agricultural pursuits for 
about two years. In 1870 he went to Columbia, Tenn., and engaged in 
the sewing machine business, and the fall of the same year came to Pem- 
broke, his present residence, and continued the same business until the 
spring of 1871, when he engaged in the drug business, buying the stock 
of J. L. Walker. He has since continued in trade, having added to his 
stock, until at the present time it contains a largo and full line of drugs, 
dry goods, groceries, hardware, boots, shoes, and agricultural implements. 
His store is the largest in the town, being over one hundred feet long. 
Ho is also engaged in mercantile business at Longview and Garretts- 
burg, having a store at each place. He is the proprietor of the Miller 
House at Pembroke, and though not so large as some others of the coun- 
ty, its accommodations cannot be excelled. Mr. Miller was married, in 
18G7, to Miss Virginia, daughter of Dr. L. P. and Henrietta (Hunter) 
Sale, of Todd County, Ky. They arc the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Leroy P., William II., Melissa B. and Mertie G. Mr. Miller is 
an active member of the order A. F. & A. M., and to his credit it may 
be said that he has done as much, if not more, than any other one man 
for the improvement of the town. 



:(' f ruBOSi o.r.iiij 






i .; ..,.„!1 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 471 

JUDGE THOMAS T. MURPHY, a native of Pittsylvania County, 
Va., was born December 12, 1824, to John and Lucy (Tiffin) Murphy. 
Ilis father was born in Pittsylvania County, Va., in 1800, and was there 
re.ared and educated, lie was a farreier by occupation, and died in Ballard 
County, Ky.', in 1874. His wife, subject's mother, was born in Danville, 
Va., and died in Todd County, Ky., in 1838, leaving two children, of 
whom Thomas T. Murphy, our subject, still survives. He was reared on 
a farm and educated in the common schools. When he was twenty years 
of age, he left his home and embarked on his career in life as a farmer, 
on his own account in Todd County, Ky. In 1845 he removed to Chris- 
tian County, Ky., and in 1856 went to Missouri, where he remained until the 
breaking out of the late Civil war, and then enlisted and served until 18G5, 
rising to rank of FirstLieutenant in Company B, and afterwards to Commis- 
sary on the staff of McDonald. After the war he resumed farming, and in 
1867 came to Pembroke, Christian Co., Ky., and engaged in brick-making 
for five years. In 1869 he engaged in the livery business, and is still en- 
gaged in the same, in connection with the grocery and coal bussincs. Mr. 
Murphy was married on the 14th of October, 1844, to Miss Sarah Ann 
Walsh, a native of Todd County, Ky. She died on March 4, 1883, leaving 
six children, of whom the following are now living: James II., Lucy, Liv- 
ingston L., Elizabeth C, and Ann Eliza. F. J. died in the South of yellow 
fever. Mr Murphy is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church ; 
is an active member of the order A. F. & A. M., and i.s a Democrat in 
politics. ■ He was town Judge for four years, and is now Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of Pembroke. 

REV. EDWARD J. MURPHEY is a native of Stewart County, 
Tenn., and was born October 13, 1838, to lildward and Rachel (Thornberry) 
Murphey. His father was born in North Carolina in 1801, and was there 
reared and educated. When he was twenty-five years of age he moved 
his family to Stewart County, Tenn. He owned a farm, but followed the 
occupation of a pilot of a steamboat on the Cumberland and ^Mississippi 
Rivers. They resided in Tenne.ssee until lSr)-2 when they moved to Illi- 
nois, where lie died in 1858. His widow, mother of our subject, was born 
near Norfolk, Va., in 1813, and died in Lyon County, Ky., in 1875. 
They were the parents of eight children, of whom the following are 
now living: Edward J., the subject of this sketch; Robert F., a ma- 



472 



lilOGKAl'lIICAL SKKTCIIES. 



chinist of Marion, Ky. ; Georgie, wife of William McElroy, a farmer 
of Lyon County, Ky. Edward J. Murphey was reared in Eddyville, 
Ky., and there received the benefit of the common schools. When 
, he was fifteen years of age he embarked upon the rugged pathway of life 
as a mail-carrier for Judge F. II. Skinner, from Eddyville to Dycusburgh 
and from Eddyville to Eenton, and followed the same for two years. He 
then engaged as clerk in a store at Eddyville, Ky., and continued the 
same until the breaking out of the late Civil war, when he began teaching 
lu the common schools, but continued the same for only one year. During 
the years of 1861 and 1862 he attended the Institute at Wallonia, and on 
leaving that institution he entered Eethel College at Russellville, Ky., and 
remained there for four years. In 1866 he engaged in merchandising and 
teaching, and the following year removed to Pembroke, his present resi- 
dence, where he has since been engaged teaching, acting as agent for fire 
insurance, and preaching as supply for various Baptist Churches. He was 
married November 28, 1867, to Miss Anna W. Hord, a native of Chris- 
tian County, and a daughter of David S. and Henningham (Catlett) Hord. 
Mr. and Mrs. Murphey have been blessed with the following children: 
Edward G., David R., Eugene M., Ernest D., Corinne C. and Calmese 
IL Mr. Murphey is an active member of the order of F. & A. M., and 
with his wife unites with the Baptist Church. 

ROBERT Y. PENDLETON, the subject of tliis sketch, was born in 
Christian County, Ky., December 7, 1828, and has continued to be a 
resident of the same to the present time. His father, Robert Y. Pendle- 
ton, Sr., was born in Spottsylvania County, Va., September 23, 1792, 
and came to Christian County, Ky., previous to the war of 1812 ; but 
after one year returned to Virginia and entered the army, then returnL-d 
to this county in 1815, and on December 24, 1816, was married to Miss 
Mary R., daughter of John Rawlins of Christian County, Ky. From 
this union sprang : John II., Sarah A. (Garrett), Eleanor, Robert Y., our 
subject, and Joseph H. Subject's father died May 31, 18G7 ; his mother, 
October 6, 1835. His grandfather, Philip Doderige Pendleton, was a 
noted Baptist minister in Virginia. Subject's vocation is that of a 
farmer, in which he has been successful, being at present the owner of 
700 acres of land, most of which is valuable, and in a fine state of culti- 
vation. On May 15, 18G5, he was married to Miss Helen, dau-hter of 



Tl- 






1)-, . ., . ii'>f:J 



I'EMliKOKE rilECINCT. 473 

A. G. and Maria (Yancy) Slaughter, of Christian County. Armistcad 
G. Slaughter was born in Virginia, and died at Hopkinsville, Ky., in 
May, 1874. To subject and wife were born two children, viz. : Robert 
Y., Jr., March 14, 1866, and John, October 6, 1868. Mr. Pendleton's 
educational advantages were such as the common schools of the country 
aftbrded in his youth, but he has improved his opportunities by reading 
the works of standard authors, and the current literature of the day. He 
is a member of the Pembroke Masonic Lodge, and in politics a Democrat. 

PHILANDER B . PEKDLETON was born July 4, 1852, in Logan 
County, Ky., and was reared in Christian County, Ky., his present resi- 
dence. He is the son of Edward Waller Pendleton, who was born in 
Christian County, Ky., in 1822, and who died here in 1870. Subject's 
mother, Mrs. Anna E. (Barclay) Jameson, was born in 1829, and is still 
living. Subject attended the select schools of the country until his 
eighteenth year, and then attended college at Georgetown, Ky. In 1881 
he was married to Miss Lizzie C, daughter of Col. Henry C. and Mrs. 
Sallie A. (Clardy) Leavelle, of Christian County, Ky. They are both 
members of the Salem Baptist Church. Subject was reared a farmer 
(which is his present vocation), and he now owns 272 acres of valuable 
and very productive land, in a high state of cultivation. He is a member 
of the Grange, also of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics is connected 
with the Democratic party. 

JOSEPH P. PEYTON, M. D., was born on the 4th of May, 18-31, 
in Jessamine County, Ky., where he grew to manhooil, after which he 
commenced the study of medicine with Dr. B. W. Dudley, of Lexington, 
in 1848, remaining five years ; and graduated at the Kentucky School of 
Medicine in 1853, after which he practiced his profession in Mercer County 
two years ; then removed to Longview, where he practicc<l si.x years, after 
which he came to Pembroke Precinct in 1856, and to his present seat, 
Woodside, in 1876. Dr. Peyton is a successful physician, having prac- 
ticed in the families of many of his present patrons for the past twenty- 
three years. His father, Thomas Peyton, was born in ]?arrcn County, 
Ky., in 1805, and died in Jessamine County, this State, in 1866. Ilia 
grandfather, Joseph Peyton, a soldier of the Revolutionary war, was born 
in Culpcper County, \'a., and died in Jessamine County, Ky., in 1840. 
Subject's mother, Rebecca (Kcatly) Peyton, was born in Loudoun County, 






T'l;^ uvj-ii:i:j on.) {vie .^n i;.'' [}-:obi 






^01 



.-..;./> ."!■■•:] 



474 BIOaRAPUICAL SKETCHES. 

Va., in 1806, and died in 1863; her children were: Mary E., 
Joseph P., Sarah F. (Baird), William T. and Edwin C. On the 11th day 
of June, 1856, Joseph P. was married to Miss Susan H., daughter of 
James Campbell, of Mercer County, Ky., and to them were born a son, 
Porter K., and a daughter, Katie R. Dr. Peyton is a member of the 
order of A. F. & A. M.; also a member of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church, and politically is identified with the Democratic party. 

WILLIAM T. RADFORD was born in Christian County, Ky., May 
31, 1836, and is still a resident of his native county. His father, James A . 
Radford, is a son of old Virginia, having been born there in 1805, but in 
early childhood, in 1814, removed to this county, where he still resides, a 
well-preserved specimen of a hearty old gentleman, retaining his faculties 
in a most remarkable manner, for one of so great an age. Subject's grand- 
father, Capt. Benjamin Radford, was born in Virginia.and died in Chris- 
tian County, Ky., in 1844. Subject's mother, Ann, daughter of Mills 
Tandy, of this county, was born in 1808, and is still living. To husband 
and herself were born : Charles J., William T. and Amelia A. (Fort). Sub- 
ject was married, in 1860, to Miss Piety, daughter of Joel Fort, of Rob- 
inson County, Tenn. His second marriage was in 1866, to Miss Marv E., 
daughter of Dr. Henry II. Sugg, of Robinson County, Tenn., and to them 
have been born : Walter A., Cyrus S., James A., Marianna and Willie T. 
Mrs. Radford's grandfather, Gen. Grimes, was a soldier in the war of 
1812. Mr. Radford was early favored with good facilities for obtaining a 
good English education at the common schools of the country, after which 
he attended Bethel College at Russellville, Ky. His profession is that of 
a farmer, being one of the most extensive in that line in Christian County. 
He is at present tlie owner of 1,800 acres of choice and highly cultivated 
lands, producing in great abundance wheat, corn and tobacco, and espe- 
cially wheat, of which he has raised in one year a crop of 12,000 bushels, 
and at another time eighty-one hogsheads of tobacco. In 1862 Mr. R. 
entered the army as Lieutenant, in Capt. Henry LeavcU's Company, 1st 
Kentucky Cavalry, with which he remained one year, after which he 
entered Morgan's command, in which he served until the close of the war. 
In religion he is a member of Salem Baptist Church, and in polities a 
Democrat. 

JAMES RICHARDSON was born March -1, 1816, i„ Caswell 
County, N. C. Ilis father, James Richardson, was born in Halifax 



' . I. H 



■.:d :'::sr ,.. t.CiL bn.' ^'-r .; , :Y 

l.ft.'r., I ;-!f<-.V ,(!--r,,:Ul.'^' I 






.,, ...,r;-.'l 



PEMliJlUKK rKKClNCT. 475 

County, Va., and there reared and educated. He was a farmer and 
merchant. He died in Caswell County, N. C, in June, 1826, and at 
that time was the owner of 1,200 acres of land. His wife and subject's 
mother, was Ann P. Ware, a native of Pittsylvania County, Va. She 
died on a train while en route to visit her children in 1881. After 
the death of Mr. Richardson, she married Stephen Sargeant. She was 
the mother of nine children ; by her first marriage the following : W. W. 
Richardson; Susan P., widow of John Gunn, who resides in Alabama; 
James, our subject ; Col. Edmond, the largest cotton-planter in the United 
States, who resides in New Orleans ; Robert P., a farmer, merchant and 
tobacco manufacturer near Reedsville, N. C. ; Mary A., widow of Louis 
AVithers, residing in New Orleans ; Elizabeth, widow of Joshua Glass, 
residing in Caswell County, N. C; and by her last marriage : Margaret 
D., widow of James A. Lea, residing in Salem, N. C, and Agnes, wife 
of Dr. StanEeld, of Caswell County, N. C. James Richardson, our sub- 
ject, spent his early life in Virginia and there received a limited com- 
mon school education. When he was sixteen years of age he left 
his home and embarked on his career in life as clerk in a store at Dan- 
ville, Va., and continued in the same position for five years, and then 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, following farming on iiis own 
account near Danville until 1844, when he moved to Kentucky and set- 
led on West Fork, in Todd County, where he bought his first land and 
remained there until 1849, when he moved to his present residence, one- 
half mile from Pembroke. His farm contains 400 acres. Since 185.5, 
in connection with his farm he has been engaged in the tobacco and com- 
mission business, and is now connected with the firm of Richardson k 
Jameson, who do a large business. In 1837 Mr. Richardson was mar- 
ried in Pittsylvania County, Va., to Miss Sarah T. Estes, a native of that 
county. She died in Christian County, Ky., in 1855, leaving si.\ chil- 
dren as the result of their union, viz. : Margaret A., Susan P. (who died 
in December, 1878), William B., Robert P., Triplet E. and Caroline T. 
In 1857, in Christian County, he married Martha U. Buckner, who has 
borne him the following children : Frank B., Anna, Mattie, Mary and 
Jennie. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson are members of the Baptist Church ; 
he is an active member of the order A. F. & A. M. and is an ardent Dem- 
ocrat. He was Magistrate in the county for eight year^, and is now 
Deputy County Clerk, having held the ofiicc for fifteen years. 



,;.•:, '-'ar. ^vurr >:«i\l hen .ii\' ,\UwoO 






476 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

WILLIAM G. ROSE. The subject of this sketch was born May 15, 
1832, in Jackson County, Tenn., where he grew to manhood and lived 
until 1873, when he removed to Christian County, Ky., and settled where 
he is at present located, in Pembroke Precinct. His father, Thomas J. 
■Rose, was also born in Jackson County, Tenn., in 1808, and died there 
in 1883. He was the son of David Rose, who was born in Pennsylvania, 
and died in Jackson County, Tenn. Subject's mother, Polly (Scantland) 
Rose, was born in Jackson County, Tenn., and is still living with her son 
at this place. On September 26, 1852, Mr. Rose was married to Miss 
Louisa, daughter of AVashington Hampton, of Jackson County, Tenn., 
and to them have been born : Martha S. (Moss), Thomas \V., James ^L, 
George D. and John II. On July 12, 1867, Martha S. was married to 
Reese V. Moss, the son of William Moss, of Jackson County, Tenn., and 
to them have been born : James P., William H., Johnnie F. and Annie 
M. On October 16, 1888, Thomas AV. was married to Walker E. Gray, 
of Christian County, Ky. On January 11, 1881, James M. was married 
to Mattie Combs, daughter of William Combs, of Todd County, Ky. On 
March 13, 1884, George D. was married to Ollie B. Stamps, the daugliter 
of John 11. Stamps, of Christian County, Ky. John H., the only one 
now single, is living with his father, and is a bright and energetic young 
man. Subject is by profession a farmer, being the owner of over 400 
acres of fair land, which he is successfully cultivating, and on which he 
is prospering. Mr. Rose is regarded as a valuable accession to and a 
useful man in the community where he resides. In religion he is a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church, and in politics a Democrat. 

ROBERT H. SMITH was born in Buckingham County, Va., Octo- 
ber 0, 1817 ; removed with his parents to Georgia in 1824, where lie 
remained until 1831, when he moved to Todd County, Ky.,and settled on 
his present place in Christian County in 1842. His father, William 
Smith, was born in Prince Edward County, Va., in 1701, where iie grew 
to manhood, and was married in 1816 to Miss Nancy W., daughter of 
Thomas Cobb, of Buckingham County, Va., and to them were born : 
Robert H., Mary (Carbon) and John 1'. William was a soldier in the 
war of 1812, and the son of Owen Smith, a Baptist uiinister and mer- 
chant of Old Virginia, who, after having reared seventeen ciiildren to 
manhood and womaidiood, died in his native State about 1S20. His 






(iii'^'l /; ij^: _' ."._•■[• -■;i., j; '•oit umi 



li,u ■oria.i-.ia 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 477 

fatlier, Col. Ricliard Smitli, was a Scotcli-Irishman, and married Kittu- 
rah Brewer, of Scotch descent. Nancy W. Cobb's father entered the 
Continental Army at the age of eigtheeen years, and served to the end of 
tlip war ; and his i'ather, Col. Thomas Cobb, of the Revolutionary war, 
died near Augusta, Ga., about the year 1832, at the advanced age of one 
hundred and twenty-nine years. He was related to the Lamar family. 
Subject was married February '20, 1838, to Miss Octavia M., daughter 
of Leonard L. Wood, of Christian County, Ky., and to them have been 
born : Napoleon B., Dora (Williams), Catherine H. (Snow), Gilbert IL, 
Nancy S. (Sheldon), Robert L., Julia P. (Harrison), Claude L., James A., 
Sterling P. and Lillie Maj. Mrs. Smith was born May 21, 1821, in 
Williaffl.son County, Tenn., and is still living, bright and well preserved. 
Her parents were born in North Carolina, but were of old Maryland 
stock. Subject and wife are memljers of the Christadelphian Church, and 
in politics he is Independent. 

OWEN J. SMITH, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Ware) Smith, 
was born September 27, 18G0, near Victoria, Tex. His father was born 
in Virginia in 1819, and came with his parents to Christian County, Ky., 
when a child, where he remained until 18.59, when he removed to Texas, 
where he lived until 187G; then returned to Christian County, Ky., 
where he stayed until 1S83: then removed to Florida, his present home. 
Subject's mother was born in Port Royal, Tenn., about 1828, residing 
there until 1840 ; she then removed to Memphis, in the same State, thence 
to Graysville, Ky., where she was married to Thomas Smith, and to 
them were born : Helen, Harvey, Nettie and Owen J. Her ancestors 
were related to Lord Fox, of England. Subject, was educated at the 
common schools at Pembroke, and at the age of fourteen years was put 
in charge of the railroad and telegraph office as night operator at Hop- 
kinsville, where he remained nine months, and was then transferred to 
Belleville, 111.: thence to Earlingtou, Ky., where he stayed nearly four 
years ; then to Martin, Tenn.; then to Nashville ; then was employed as 
extra operator for two years ; then operated in Slaughtersville, Ky., two 
years ; then in the general office, L. k N. R. R., at Louisville ; thence 
was transferred to Kansas City, Mo.; thence to Las Vegas, N. M.; tiience 
to Guthrie, Ky., where he remained one year, and then to Pembroke, 
where he is at present in charge of the railroad and telegraph office, and 



ro;-.! 



!'/; i. .8'.;yt ,0'-: ■/iMnc ■ i [oit 'H.'i .n?/ j>-}i.'u-; 



478 BIOORAPIIICAL SKETCIIBS. 

is also Postmaster and express agent. In religion he is a Baptist. His 
earnest friends are the best citizena of the community. 

EDWARD S. STUART, M. D. Among the able practitioners of 
medicine none is more worthy of a prominent mention in the history of 
Christian County than Dr. Edward S. Stuart, whose name heads this 
sketch. His grandfather was born in Ilillsboro, N. C, in 1768, and 
died in Cliristian County in 1835. Samuel Stuart, the father of our 
subject, was born in North Carolina in 1800, and was brought to Chris- 
tian County by his parents in 1806, and here died in 1833. His wife, 
subject's mother, was Elizabeth II., daughter of Edward Shanklin. She 
was born in Newmarket, Shenandoah County, Va., in 1800. She is the 
mother of William C. Stuart, who died in this county in 1866, and Dr. 
Stuart, the subject of this brief biography ; he is a native of Christian 
County, born near Antioch Church, on the 21st of July, 1828 ; his early 
life was spent at home. In 1848 he came to Fairview and began the 
study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. H. W. Darnall, and 
remained until the winter of 1849, when he entered the St. Louis Medi- 
cal College, and there graduated with the degree of M. D. in the spring 
of 1851. Upon leaving college he immediately entered upon the practice 
of his profession near Crofton, Ky., where he remained two years. In 
1853 he removed to Fairview and entered into a partnership with his 
former preceptor. Dr. Darnall, and continued with him until 1858, and 
since that time has practiced alone. On the 1st of December, 1858, he 
married Miss Jane E., daughter of Hiram Vaughan. They had two chil- 
dren : May, born May 1, 1871 ; Willie, born September 13, 1877 ; the 
younger died in infancy. Dr. Stuart' has met with great success in the 
practice of medicine and surgery, and has a splendid reputation as a phy- 
sician and a gentleman. He is a Democrat in politics, never sought 
office, and often has been solicited for different offices, but firmly declined, 
believing it to be more consistent with his interest to stay at home and 
devote his time and attention to the duties of his home and practice. He 
is the owner of about 900 acres of land, which he rents, and which was 
accumulated by his industry and economy. For the past fifteen years he 
has been High Priest of the Moore Chapter, No. 75, R. A. M., of Fairview. 

THOMAS J.' TANDY was born September 20, 1840, in Christian 
County, Ky., which has ever since been the place of his residence. His 






irt : . bl (ti -, ?1,U.C- -r;lj.. 






PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 479 

father, Deacon Richard Tandy, was born in Spottsylvania County, Va., 
August 9, 1811, and removed with his parents, in infancy, to Christian 
County, where he grew to manhood, and died in 1873. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer, and long a member of the Bethel Baptist Cimrch. Sub- 
ject's grandfather. Elder William Tandy, was born in Virginia in 1778, 
and died in Christian County, Ky., in 1838. He was a soldier in the 
war of 1812, and was for nine years pastor of the Bethel Church. Sub- 
ject's motlier, Ann B., daughter of Thomas Hord, of Christian County, 
died in 1845. Her children were: Elizabeth (Morrison), Sallie W. (Bar- 
clay), William, Thomas J., David A., and John 11. The family were 
favored with good literary advantages, and secured good Englisli educa- 
tions at select schools in the community. Subject is a farmer, possessing 
480 acres of good farming land, which he cultivates successfully in wheat, 
tobacco and corn ; lie is unmarried. His brother, John H. Tandy, was 
born December 9, 1843; is also a farmer, owning forty acres, and one- 
half interest in 275 acres of good fai-ming land, and is also unmarried. 
William Tandy was born in Christian County, March 15, 1839, and was 
married, December 14, 1865, to Miss Tommie C, daughter of James C. 
and Martha R. (Mosley) Jones, of Christian County, Ky., and to them 
were born : Augustus W., July 17, 1867, and Sallie, December 16, 1SG9. 
Mrs. Tandy's grandfather, Lemuel Mosley, was a soldier in the war of 
1812. The family are all members of the Bethel Baptist Church. The 
men vote the Democratic ticket. 

JOSEPH POTTS THOMAS, M. D., of Cottage Lawn, near Pem- 
broke, was born September 9, 1830, in Clarksville, Tenn., where, at the 
ago of twelve years, he entered a drug store, in which he continued for a 
period of twelve years, and gaining a high character as a pharmacist. 
His father, Capt. Joseph P. Thomas, Sr., was an architect of Winchester, 
Va., who equipped, at his own expense, and commanded a company 
throughout the war of 1812. He removed to Elkton, Todd County, Ky., 
in 1822, and to Clarksville, Tenn., in 1829, where he died in 1835. His 
wife was Sarah Curran Duvall, of Frederick, Md., a descendant of John 
Philpot Curran, the celebrated Irish barrister. To them were born : 
Eliza A. (Waters), Emily A. (Armistead), Sarah J. (Walter), Dr. 
Adison E., Townsend A., Benjamin F., Edwin R. W., Robert B. 
and Joseph P. Subject's grandfother was a distinguished attorney. 






b:.: .:«r 



.!■' ..,-V 



480 BIOGRArillCAL SKETCHES. 

who lived and died in Winchester, Va. He was also Major in the 
Revolutionary war. Subject was educated at the Clarksvillo Acad- 
emy ; the Shelby Medical College ; the Universities of Nashville 
and Louisville, graduating in 1859, and again in 1868. In 1854 
he was married to Miss Louisa J., daughter of Joseph A. Radford, of 
Christian County, Ky., and to them have been born : Mary C. (Mc- 
Clanahan), Blanche B., Lula M., Sallie H., Bettie, Ange A., Joseph 
E., and Frank P. Dr. Thomas moved to his present residence at Cot- 
tage Lawn in 1857, where he has continued his profession in general 
practice and surgery to the present time. At his extensive and delight- 
ful residence he has successfully treated many chronic cases placed under 
his jcare from a distance, and established a small sanitarium, as it were, for 
the treatment of chronic diseases, at which many successful cures have been 
performed. Ho has added to the wealth of medical science by his con- 
tributions to the literature of that old and worthy profession. Dr. 
Thomas possesse.=i and has exercised the rare and heroic courage to publish, 
in the literature of the medical world, for the benefit of the profession, 
his failures in difficult cases in surgery, and has, in consequence, received 
many letters of commendation and inquiry from men whose reputation 
gives weight to tlieir opinions throughout the civilized world. In addition 
to his practice he is also an extensive farmer, having 1,500 acres of 
good land which he is successfully cultivating in wheat, tobacco, corn and 
live stock. In his religious affiliations he is connected with the Baptist 
Church ; and politically is identified with the Democratic party. His 
portrait appears on another page. 

MRS . SALLIE A. WILLS was born in Christian County, Ky., in 
1836, in which she was reared, and made her home to the present time. 
Her father, Mr. John C. Clardy, was born in North Carolina in ITUS, 
removed to Smith County, Tenn.. and tlicnce to Christian County, Ky., 
about 1830, where he died at Wood Lawn, the old Clardy homestead, 
in 1853. The Clardy family are of old French Huguenot stock, who 
settled in an early day in Florida and emigrated to North Carolina, 
many years ago. Her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth (Cacey) Clardy, was born 
at Cumberland Court House, Virginia, in 1804, and is still living. To 
John C. Clardy and wife were born : William D., Dr. John D., James 
M., Benjamin F., Mrs. Sallie A. (Wills), Dr. Thomas F., Henry H. and 



. ■'. . ',- - ■■ : :.;■" <' .■; :,.;,■■: I... ..?r 



''■'■•1 



PEMBROKE PRECINCT. 481 

Mrs. Fannie M. (Burke). Mrs. Wills was first married in 1855 to Col. 
Henry C Leavell, who was born in Todd County, Ky., in 1824, and 
died in Walker County, Ga., August 26, 1862. The universal testimony 
of the comrades in arms and the acquaintances and neighbors of Col. 
Leavell, is to the effect that he was a brave and gallant soldier, an officer 
of more than ordinary ability, a thorough gentleman and a Christian. 
Ilis early death was greatly lamented, and his memory is still cherished 
in this community with a reverence that is but seldom attained by those 
who have lived long and useful lives. Seldom has the pall of death cast 
so heavy a shadow over a community, as did the death of Col. Leavell, 
over this ; he lived and died in communion with the Salem Baptist 
Church, in Christian County, Ky. To Col. and Mrs. Leavell were born 
a son, Joseph II., who is now, superintending the home farm, with a 
bright future before him ; and Mrs. Lizzie C, wife of Philander B. 
Peiidleton, of this county. Mrs. Leavell was next married in 1866, to 
Mr. George H. Wills, who was born in Christian County, Ky., in 1842, 
and died in 1882 ; he was a good and gentlemanly man, and held in high 
esteem; he, with his wife, was a member of the Baptist Church. To 
thend were born George W. and John C. Wills. 

JOHN C. WILLIS is a native of Christian County, Ky., having 
been born in 1845, and this has been his home all his life. His fother, 
Clarke Willis, was born in 1804 in Orange County, Va., and with his 
parents removed to Grayson County, Ky., at the age of two years, where 
he continued to reside until he arrived at the estate of manhood ; removed 
about 1830 to Christian County, Ky., where he died in 1867. The fam- 
ily are of old Virginia descent, and his grandfather, Lewis Willis, was a 
soldier in the war of 1812. Subject's mother, Louisa A., daughter of 
Richard Holland, was born in Fluvanna County, Va., in 1814, and came 
with her parents to Christian County in 1835 ; she is still living. Her 
father served in the war of 1812 ; her children are: Nancy V. (Ander- 
son), Lewis R. and John C. Willis. On December 1, 1881, Mr. John 
C. Willis was united in marriage to Miss Willie, daughter of Mr. Ruben 
Clark of Memphis, Tenn., and to them one child, Morine, has been born. 
Mr. ^Villi3' vocation has always been that of a farmer, and he now has 
4G0 acres of valual)le and very productive land, which he is successfully 
cultivating in wiieat, tobacco and stock, realizing a handsome remunera- 



:: .-Y/l , ';^;'(;0 lit..'''' «i ai.>.! .;^« .- ■ 









482 . BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

tion for the investment, underjiiilicious management. On his farm may 
be seen some fine specimens of cattle of the short-horn grade ; he also 
has a track for training fast trotting-horses, and some animals now in his 
possession have already attained a speed that, a few years since, was not 
greatly surpassed by the celebrated trotters of the world. Mr. Willis, in 
politics, affiliates with the Democratic party. 

STEPHEN F. WILLIAMS was born in Montgomery County, 
Tenn., August 19, 1843, and at the age of eleven years removed with 
his parents to Todd County, Ky., where he remained until 1872, when 
he came to Christian County, his present residence. His father, John B. 
Williams, was born in Virginia, and died in Todd County, Ky., in 1869. 
His grandfather was a Virginian, who died in Todd County, Ky., in 1864, 
nearly ninety years old. Subject's mother, Elizabeth A., daughter of 
Stephen Fuqua, of Logan County, Ky., was born in 1812, and is still 
living. Subject was married in 1870 to Miss Mary H., daughter of 
Edwin and Emma Turnley of Todd County, Ky., and their children are ; 
Edwin T., Susan and Stephen. In the common schools our subject re" 
ceived a good business education. He is by profession a farmer, having 
250 acres of valuable and productive land, which he successfully culti- 
vates, and which he has found remunerative. He is also possessed of 
those qualities of hospitality manifest in so eminent a degree in this por- 
tion of Kentucky. Subject is a member of the Grange, also a member 
of the Bethel Baptist Church, and in politics is a Democrat. 

MRS. JANE D. WOOD was born on the place where she now 
resides in Pembroke Precinct, Christian County, Ky., June 29, 1822, and 
has never in her life been twenty miles away from her home. Her 
father, Benjamin Bradley, entered this land in 1799, the parchments, now 
in Mrs. Wood's possession, being signed by Christopher Greenup, as 
Governor, and Alfred William Grayson, as Secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Kentucky. Mr. Bradley removed from Virginia to this place 
in the latter part of the last century, and died here in 1824. His wife 
was Mary Austin, who died in 1842. His children are : Benjamin, Lit- 
tleton, John, Sallie (McPhaden), Polly (Crouch), Fanny (Austin), James, 
Martha A. (Wiltshire), David M., George W. and Jane D. (our subject). 
She was married in 1839 to William H. Wood, and to them were born : 
Pauline E. (McRac), Benjamin F., George M. and David D. Mr. Wood 



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PEMDROKE PRECINCT. 483 

was from Alabama, and died in 1853. Mrs. Wood has for twenty-nine 
years been a member of Bethel Baptist Church. She is engaged in 
farming, having 167 acres of the old ancestral home, upon which, by 
industry, she has reared her family. 





.U4 



ms^^ 






LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 

JOHN W. ALLEN, of Elmo, is a native of Christian County, Ky., 
and was born October 22, 1845; he is the son of John Allen, who was 
born in Montgomery County, Tenn., and came to Christian County about 
1838, where he died in 1869. His father, George Allen, was born in 
North Carolina, and died in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1850. Sub- 
ject's mother, Elvira, daughter of Josiah and Mary (Scott) Settle, was 
born in Christian County, and is still living; her father lost an eye in 
the war of 1812, and died in 1868, aged seventy-two years. Subject's 
brothers and sisters are: Fannie S. (Jenkins), Josiah A., George M., 
Rowena A. (Bollinger), Bailey W., Dr. Thomas P., and Ella (Lunder- 
man). Mr. Allen was married February 10, 1875, to Miss Mary J., 
daughter of Irvin S. and Marietta (Scroggins) Ragsdale, of Christian 
County, and to them was born one child — L-vin Thomas, now deceased. 
Mr. Allen has been a merchant at Elmo, Ky., seventeen years, at which 
business he has been successful, at present owning his buildings and 
stock. He is a Mason, a Baptist and a Democrat. 

MAJ. THOMAS M. BARKER is a most respected citizen, and one 
of the most substantial farmers of Christian County; he came to the 
county with his parents in 1849 from Virginia, he having been born in 
Louisa County, that State, January 12, 1842; he is a son of Chiles T. 
and Mary L. Barker, to whom were born the following children : T. M., 
John W., Mary L. Cloud, Sallie W. Logan, Nannie M. Jessup, Barbara 
Williamson, Lizzie L. Moore, Charles E., Peter M., Fannie P. and 
Susie M., the last two being twins. The circumstances surrounding our 
subject's early life granted him superior educational advantages, but his 
school life was cut short by the breaking out of the war, into which he 
entered though young in years; he went into the service as First Lieuten- 
ant of Company H, First Kentucky Calvary, C. S. A., but his commendable 
conduct in the field secured him a subsequent promotion to the rank of 
Major, and as such he served to the close of the war. He has since 



,TJA :r :.ti(H 



486 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

given his attention to farming pursuits; he possesses farm property to the 
extent of 500 acres of improved land, which is in a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and is devoted to farming in the various branches. Mr. Barker is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity, Knights of Honor, and the Grange 
organization; he is a Democrat, has been one of the Magistrates of Long- 
view Precinct for eight years, and is a member of the Baptist Church. 
lie was united in marriage to Miss Mary L. Morris, a daughter of John 
D. and Margaret L. (Meriwether) Morris. This union has been blessed 
with the following children: Chiles T., Fannie M., Thomas M., John 
M., Richard M. and Margaret L. Mr. Barker is a man of enterprise 
and energy and is ever ready to give his encouragement and material 
assistance to enterprises calculated to be of benefit to the general public. 

PETER M. BARKER is a young man of high social and private 
worth, of generous and noble impulses, whose every-day life is a picture of 
enterprise and activity and whose genial and affable manners hold him in 
pleasant acquaintance by all who know him. He was born March 13, 
1859, at " Glenburnie," the residence of his father. Our subject's pres- 
ent home is situated upon historical ground, the immediate place being 
one formerly occupied by an old French settlement. It consists of 670 
acres of highly improved land, and is given to the cultivation of the prin- 
cipal staple crops. Mr. Barker has the beneOts of a fine education, and 
is altogether a young man of great promise. 

JOHN T. BATTS was born on April 27, 1832, in Robertson County, 
Tenn., and is a son of Jeremiah and Mary A. (Burns) Batts. The father 
was born in Edgecombe County, N. C, and was a son of Jeremiah Batts, 
Sr., who was also a native of North Carolina. The latter came to Ten- 
nessee and settled in Robertson County when Jeremiah, Jr., was but an 
infant. In that county the grandfather died, in 1858, at the age of 
eighty-four. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was highly 
respected among the people of that county, where Jeremiah, Jr., is still 
living. The mother was a daughter of James Burns, who was also a 
native of Robertson County. This lady was born in 1810, and died in 
1867. To her were born the following children: Mahala L. (Stultz and 
Dunn), John T.,'Lucinda A. (Long), Martha W. (Cooley), Mary E. 
(Davis), Jeremiah, Emily F. (Anderson), Sallie A. (Carlew), Henry C. 
and Boscorab. John T. Batts remained in his native county until he 



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LONGVIEW PllECINCT. 487 

reached manhood, and then came to this county. lie moved on to his 
present place in 1878, and now owns about 100 acres of highly cultivated 
land. Mr. Batts was married on September 13, 1866, to Miss Virginia 
Draughborn, of Robertson County, Teuu. To her was born one child — 
Joseph W.— and her death occurred in 1870. Our subject married, on 
October 23, 1870, Miss Mary J. Adams, a daughter of George F. Adams, 
who was born in Enuiskillen, Ireland, in 1802, and is now living in 
Montgomery County, Teun. Mrs. Batts was born in Logan County, 
Ky., on December 4, 1845, and is the mother of three children, viz.: 
Alva C, George F. and Mary A. Mr. Batts was a soldier in the late 
war, and fought under Gen. Hood. He is a Mason, also a member of 
the K. of H. fraternity, and is connected with the Bethel Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. He gives his support to the Democratic party. 

CINCINNATUS D. BELL was born on August 16, 1833, at the 
old Davis place in Christian County, Ky.,and was reared to manhood near 
Oak Grove, in the vicinity of which he still resides. He is a son of Dr. 
John F. and Kittie (Bowcock) Bell. The father was born in Orange 
County, Va., on July 15, 1797. He came to Kentucky in 1811, and 
first settled in Shelby County. In 1813 he moved to Trenton, Todd 
County, and in 1818 he came to Hopkinsville. Here he read medicine 
with Drs. Short and Webber until 1822, and then returned to Trenton and 
farmed and practiced until 1836. He then came to Oak Grove and 
practiced until his death, which occurred on May 6, 1878. The mother 
was a daughter of Douglas Bowcock, of Alabama, and to her were born 
the following children: Elizabeth M., John N., Darwin, Evelina M., 
Fannie B., Cincinnatus D. (our subject), and Kittie B. Her death occurred 
in 1837. Our subject was educated in the schools of his native county, and 
afterward attended tlie Georgetown (Ky.) College, from which institution he 
graduated in 1854. Soon after he turned his attention to farming, and 
has made that his occupation for life. He now owns about 385 acres 
of valuable land, which he successfully cultivates in wheat and tobacco. 
He also handles some stock. Mr. Bell was married on October 29, 1857, 
to Miss Annie M. Peay, a daughter of Austin and Maria A. (Pendleton) 
Peay, of this county. To this lady were born four children, viz.: John 
P., Maria P., Douglas B. and Austin. In 1862 Mr. Bell entered 
Woodward's Second Kentucky Cavalry, and served until the close of the 



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488 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

war. Mr. ]5ell is a member of the Masonic and K. of II. fraternities of 
Hopkinsville, and is also a member of Salem Baptist Church. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 

GEORGE BENDALL, the son of Isaac Bcndall, of Old Farm, 
Sussex County, Va., was born in 1806, and married in 1829, to Susan 
Tucker of Dinwiddle County, in the same State. Their children are : 
Anna E. (Avent), James D., Sarah (Vaughn), Joseph M., Richard J., 
Susan R. (Bendall), Benjamin F., Catherine V. (WeltonJ, Francis M. 
and William E. (who were twins). Of these, five were soldiers in the late 
war. Joseph M. was born August 21, 1836, and came to Christian 
County, Ky., in 1883. He was married in 1872, to Miss MoUie E., 
daughter of James Parker, of Sussex County, Va.,and to them were born 
Thomas M., Lottie B., Ida B., Lewis P. and a daughter, a baby yet 
unnamed. William E. Bendall was born in 1846, and was married in 
1881, to Miss Hettie, daughter of P. G. and Elizabeth (Thomas) Aliens- 
worth, of Christian County, Ky. Her lamented death occurred June 9, 
1883. 

WILLIAM I. BOONE is a native of Todd County, Ky., bora Feb- 
ruary 2, 1844. At the age of twelve years he was taken to Missouri, 
returning to this State after living there about three years. He is a son 
of Squire B. Boone, who was born in the year 1825, in Todd County 
also, and who is yet living. Squire is the son of Isaiah Boone, a native of 
upper Kentucky, whose father. Squire Boone, was a nephew of the his- 
torical Daniel Boone. The mother of our subject was Mary M. Foster, 
who is now deceased. She was a native of Todd County, this State, and 
she died in Missouri in 1851. Of the children born to them, W. L, 
Miles D. and Squire R. are living. Our subject has been engaged prin- 
cipally in farming. His farm consists of 245 acres, which are given to 
the raising of the usual crops. He married Miss Martha J. Massie, who 
was born in Todd County. To this union were born the following chil- 
dren : Mary M., Lula E., William M. and Lady H. Mr. Boone is a 
member of the Christian Church, and is a respected and substantial citi- 
zen of the county. 

FRANK W. BUCKNER (deceased) was a native of Virginia, born 
in 1809, and when young came to Kentucky. He was married, in 1S35, 
to Miss Sarah A. Gordon, who still survives, and is the mother of the 



liMv; ...ip-;ir:l/. JiJ lo ■ti:<lm 



:1 cjjsiug 






LONGVIEW I'KECINCa'. 489 

following children: Samuel G., Mrs. Annie Wooldridge, William F., 
Harry C. and Upshaw. Mrs. Buckner is a native of Christian County, 
Ky., born December 2, 1819. Her father, Samuel Gordon, was born in 
Buckingham County, Va., and died in 1852. 

IIEV. JOSIAH CARNEAL. Among the most prominent and use- 
ful men of the southeastern portion of Christian County, Ky., and whose 
influence for good has been great and enduring, may be mentioned the 
venerable patriarch whose name appears at the head of this sketch. He 
was born September 23, 1810, in Caroline County, Va., where he was 
reared, and at the age of eighteen years removed to Christian County, in 
this State, to commence the battle of life, in which he has proved success- 
ful in an eminent degree. His father, James Carueal, was a native of 
Virginia, and a soldier at Norfolk in the -war of 1812. James was the 
son of Patrick Carneal, who was born in Ireland, and died in Virginia about 
1835, at the age of ninety-six years. Subject's mother, Elizabeth Wright, 
of Caroline County, Va., died in 1S13. From the union of her and 
James Carneal, sprang : Thomas, Walker, John, Josiah and Sally (Thack- 
er). In 1831 Josiah was married to Kittie Galbreath, of Christian 
County, Ky., and to them were born : Henry W., John D., Mary (Harris), 
Martha (Graham), twin with Walker, Eliz. (Crutchfield) and Robert P. 
Mr. Carneal's wife dying in 1849, he next married, in 1851, Mrs. Nancy 
Harris, daughter of William Rice. One child — Josiah, now deceased — was 
born to this union. In 1853 Mr. Carneal was married to his present 
wife, who is Miss Lucy J., daughter of Thomas McQuary, of Todd 
County, Ky.. and to them were born: Isaiah T., Victoria R. (Massie), 
Silas, Wesley, Demetrius, Paul and Fannie. In 1827 Mr. Carneal 
became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was licensed to 
exhort in 1850, and became a local preacher in 1856, and has been active 
in his label's from that time to the present. He has been largely instru- 
mental in establishing the society and building Chapel Hill Church. He 
commenced active life as a carpenter and builder, which vocation lie fol- 
lowed for fifteen years, with success, and is at present engaged in farm- 
ing, owning 558 acres cf valuable lands, in a good state of cultivation, 
and having distributed about 600 acres to his children. Mr. Carneal's 
life has been one of markod .success, and he is held in high esteem in the 
community where he lives. 



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490 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

JOHN M. CARTER is one of the most respected citizens and sub- 
stantial farmers of Christian County. He was born October 1, 1815, in 
Culpeper County, Va., whence he removed with his parents to Mont- 
gomery County, Tenn., in the year 1819. Tliere he received a good 
education, and grew to manhood, and finally removed to Christian County 
in 1842, and located on his present place, his residence being known as 
'• Cedar Grove." He is a son of John and Rachel (Klaugh) Carter, both 
of whom were natives of Virginia. The father was born January 31, 
1773, and died June 17, 1842, and the mother was born April 9, 1773, 
and departed this life June 7, 1838. Their union had been blessed with 
the following children : Byrd F., Guilford H., Sarah E. (Slaughter), 
Daniel F., Eliza E. (Rawlins), Amelia P. (Allensworth) and John M. 
(the subject of these lines). Daniel F. Carter was a man of considerable 
prominence. He was for many years a Deacon in the First Presbyterian 
Churcli at Nashville, Tenn., and he died at the age of sixty-five yearsr 
In early life he ran a stage line from Nashville to Louisville, Ky., and in 
after years accumulated a large fortune. He was a man of generous 
impulses, and during his life made many liberal donations to charitable 
societies and institutions. He married Miss Mary J. Buntin, and their 
only surviving daughter, Mrs. Thomas D. Craighead, now resides in 
Nashville, Tenn. John M. Carter, our subject, now devotes his attention 
to agricultural jiursuits. llis farm property consists of 895 acres of land, 
which is in a higli state of cultivation, and is devoted to the raising of the 
staple crops. Mr. Carter is a gentleman of refined literary attainments. 
The standard books and reviews, and works of eminent men, are a special 
attraction to his classical mind, and a delight is found in a comprehensive 
study of the social and political issues of tlie day. He is a Democrat 
politically, and is a citizen who is held in high esteem by all who are 
favored with his acquaintance. Mr. Carter was united in marriage with 
Miss Fannie A. Killebrew, November 7, 1841. She is a daughter of 
Wliitfield and Fannie (Johnson) Killebrew. This union has been blessed 
with the following children : Willie C. (Chilton), Daniel F., Gertrude, 
John W., Fannie R. (Moore), Henry B., Claudius C. and Eddie L. 

DANIEL F. CARTER is a native of this county ; he was born 
May 3, 1846, to John M. and Fannie A. (Killebrew) Carter, a sketch of 
whom will be found above. Our subject was reared in Christian County, 






girl 



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•} •.,;■ 



LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 491 

being educated in its select schools, and his life has been devoted to the 
prosecution of his farming interests. He is a man of substantial worth, 
being held in high respect by his fellow-citizens ; his farm property con- 
sists of an interest in a large tract of land which is in an improved con- 
dition, and possesses fine productive qualities. Mr. Carter possesses high 
literary attainments, and is a man who takes special interest in the mate- 
rial improvement and prosperity of the country. 

JOHN CRITTENDEN CATLETT was born August 11, 1848, at 
his present residence, on the blufts of the West Fork of Red River in 
Christian County, Ky., where he was reared and has resided all his life. 
The place is called " Webala," the Indian name of the river. Near the 
residence arc evidences of the former existence of an aboriginal village, 
or probably the camping-place of large armies, where implements of war 
and for the chase were manufactured. Not less than five acres of ground 
are macadamized with flint spawls, broken and unfinished arrow-points 
and split flint bowlders, which abound in the vicinity. Elmo Village is 
near this place. Subject's father, John A. Catlett, was born in Frederick 
County, Va., in 1801, and died at this place in 1867. He was the son 
of Joseph K. Catlett, who was born in 1779 and died in 1801. Joseph 
K. was the son of John, who was born in 1749 and died in 1825. The 
Catletts are of an old Maryland family, and one of their kinsmen settled 
at the present town of Catlettsburg, Ky., in honor of whom that city was 
named. Subject's mother, Allie A., daughter of Peter and Louisa Sen- 
seney, of Shenandoah County, Va., was born in 1815, and died at this 
place in 1882. As the result of her marriage with John A. the children 
born to them are : Louise A. (Lunderman), Cornelia C. (Oliver), Alexan- 
der C. (slain in the late war), our subject, as above, and Addison C. The 
family are intelligent, upright, well educated, and an honor to their worthy 
progenitors. John C. Catlett is a farmer, having 350 acres of valuable 
land in a good state of cultivation. This place was settled as early as 
1803 by that sturdy old pioneer Joseph Bollinger, and is near the home- 
stead and cave where James Davis, the original pioaeer of Christian 
County, first settled. 

MATHEW CAYCE was born in Christian County, Ky., August 
19, 1861, and here lie grew to manhood and has always had his residence. 
He is the son of Thomas J. Cayce, who was born in 1820 and died in 



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492 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

this county some years since. He was the son of William Cayce, who 
was born in Virginia and died in Kentucky. Subject's mother, Sarah P., 
daughter of Thomas Thomas, of Montgomery County, Tenn., was born 
there in 1826, and is still living at the family residence in Christian 
County, Ky., where she has reared her family of children, consisting 
of: Edgar, Leslie B., Luella (Jones), Harry C, Mathew, Robert L., 
Lucien M. and Delbert D. At the common schools of the country Mr. 
Cayce secured an ordinary business education, and is also a reader of 
books and the newspapers of the day. He was married December 20, 
1881, to Miss Rosannah, daughter of Clayborn and Parraelia (Violette) 
Bradshaw, of Lebanon, Ky., and to this union was born one child — Luella. 
Mrs. Cayce is a member of the Liberty Christian Church. Mr. Cayce 
is by profession a farmer, engaged in the cultivation of tobacco, corn and 
wheat, with fair prospects of success in life before him, as he is energetic 
and devoted to his calling. 

CHARLES B. CHERRY is a native of Todd County, Ky., and was 
born July 29, 1832. In 1855 he removed to Texas, where he remained 
five years, after which in 1860 he returned to Kentucky, and settled in 
Christian County, where he still resides. His father, Garrard Y., the son 
of Charles Cherry, was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1812, 
and died in Texas in 1862. In 1860 Charles B. was married to Miss 
Mary C, daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Garrott) Thomas, of Christian 
County, Ky., and to their union were born : Mary C, Sarah A., Hope 
E., Rosa M., Charles B., Little Siss, Lena E., Martha E. and an infant 
unnamed. In early youth Mr. Cherry possessed good educational 
advantages, of which he availed himself, and is taking an active interest in 
the education of his children. He is a farmer by profession, owning 152 
acres of good land, upon which he cultivates the staple crops of the coun- 
try. He is an honored member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics 
affiliates with the Democratic party. 

JOHN C. CLARDY (deceased) was born in 1798 in Granville 
County, N. C. He removed with his parents to Smith County, Tenn., 
and settled near Dixon's Springs about 180-1, after which he settled in 
Christian County, Ky., in 1831, where he died in 1853. His father, 
Benjamin C, was born in North Carolina, and died in Smith County, 
Tenn., in 1842. He was the son of Benjamin Clardy, Sr., who came 



LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 493 

from France to Florida, and afterward settled in North Carolina. Our 
subject was married January 3, 1822, to Elizabeth, daughter of Flemming 
and Elizabeth (Atkinson) Cayce, of Cumberland County, Va., and from 
this union sprang a large and respectable family, consisting of: Benjamin 
F. (deceased), Elizabeth S., William D., John D., James M., Benjamin 
F., Sallie A. (married Col. Leavell, and also Mr. Wills), Dr. Thomas F., 
Henry II. and Fannie C. (Burke). Mrs. Elizabeth (Cayce) Clardy was 
born September 3, 1804, in Cumberland County, Va., and is now resid- 
ing at the old Clardy homestead in Christian County, Ky., upon which 
she has sojourned for fifty-two years. She possesses a fine estate, consist- 
ing of 372 acres of very valuable and productive land in a high state of 
cultivation. Her son, James M. Clardy, who superintends her farm, was 
married June 4, 1857, to Miss Mary B., daughter of Uriah L. Major, of 
Cedar Hill, Christian Co., Ky., and to them were born : Vivian, James 
B., Sallie A., William A., John H., Parker C, U. L., Thomas F., Annie 
M., Tennie and Willauder. The Clardy family are all members of the 
Baptist Church. 

THOMAS F. CLARDY, M. D., stands prominent among the phy- 
sicians and surgeons of this county. He is a son of John C. and Eliza- 
beth (Cayce) Clardy, and was born in Christian County, Ky., on the 29th 
of June, 1838. He was educated in the select schools of the neighbor- 
hood, supplemented by a course at the Georgetown, Ky., College, where 
he graduated in 1858. When he was eighteen years of age he began the 
study of medicine under the preceptorship of his brother, Dr. J. D. 
Clardy, of this county. He afterward attended lectures at the Pennsyl- 
vania University of Philadelphia, and in the year 1861 graduated from 
that institution with the degree of M. D. The same year he entered the 
late Civil war as Surgeon of the Seventh Kentucky Infantry, and after- 
ward was Surgeon of Buford's Division of Forrest's Cavalry, in which he 
was engaged to the close of the war. In 1865, on the 10th of October, 
he married Miss Lizzie C, daughter of David S. and Sophia (Woodson) 
Lamme, of Boone County, Mo., and to them have been born two children : 
James R. and Mary E. Besides a large and lucrative practice of medi- 
cine, Dr. Clai'dy is engaged in farming, having 350 acres of valuable and 
very productive land, which he successfully cultivates in wheat, corn and 
tobacco. He is a Deacon of the Salem Baptist Cluircli, and is an active 
member of the orders A. F. & A. M. and I. 0. 0. F. 






'6 .11 7Tr .h 



•■- .■■) 



494 BIOGRAPIirCAL SKETCHES. 

ZEBEDEE P. DENNIS was born July 14, 1841, in Montgomery 
County, Tenn., where he was reared, married and resided till 1877, when 
he came to Christian County, Ky., and settled on the farm " Pond Home," 
where he now resides. His father, Marmaduke 0. Dennis, was born in 
Clarksville, Tenn., in 1802, the first white child born in that city, and 
there lived to tlie time of his death, which occurred in 1854. He was a 
son of Zebedee Dennis, a native of North Carolina, a soldier of the Rev- 
olutionary war, and one of the first settlers of Clarksville, Tenn., where 
he died in about 1840. Elizabeth (Bailey) Dennis, the mother of our 
subject, was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., and died therein 1844. 
Zebedee P. Dennis was her only child; he was educated at Brookville, 
Md., and spent three years at the University of Virginia. On the 16th 
of August, 1859, he married Miss Ellen, daughter of Tliomas F. Pettus, 
of Montgomery County, Tenn., to whom have been born Marmaduke, 
John H., Martha E., Zebedee P., Jr., Edward H., Oscar, Ellen and 
Stephen T. 

JOSEPH F. GARNETT, a son of James T. Garnett, was born 
December 16, 1844, in Christian County, Ky. He was educated in the 
select schools of the county, and afterward taught school at Oak Grove 
for eight years. He is now engaged in farming, and is the owner of 500 
acres of good land, upon which he is successful in the cultivation of wheat, 
corn, tobacco and stock. On November 2, 1869, he married Miss Emma, 
daughter of John R. Whitlock, of Christian County. Mrs. Garnett died 
in 1876, leaving two children, viz. : John W. and Thomas W. He next 
married A. "Wilmoth, daughter of Rev. Shandy A. Holland, of this county. 
This union has been blessed with the following children : Holland, born 
December 27, 1879; Mary E., born June 13, 1881, and Faunt LeRoy, 
born August 11, 188.3. Mr. Garnett is one of the active, wide-awake 
business men of the county, and besides the farm spoken of above, he is 
the owner of a considerable amount of real estate in Hopkinsville. He 
is an active member of the Masonic fraternity, of which he has been 
Master, and is an exemplary member of the Baptist Church. 

MARCELLUS A. GARROTT was born January 4, 1832, in 
Christian County, Ky., in which he has continued to reside to the pres- 
ent time. His father, Pleasant Garrott, was a native of Buckingham 
County, Va., was born in 1802, removed with his parents to Montgomery 






; ■If;') 9l! 

,! ..,1 •Ml-'^f 






.T<,.i 



LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 495 

County, Tenn., in 1817, and to this county in 1821, where lie died in 
1875. He was the son of Isaac Garrott, of Virginia, who was a gallant 
soldier in the Revolutionary war, and who died in Tennessee. Subject's 
mother, Martha J., daughter of Capt. Benjamin Radford, of Christian 
County, was born in 1803, and died in 1875. Unto her and her husband 
were born : Julia A. (Buckner), our subject, William W., Alice M. (Rig- 
gins), Inez 0. (Bradshaw), Justine P. (Johnson) and Aurelia L. (Whit- 
field). On December 8, 1859, Marcellus A. Garrott was married to Miss 
Frances M., a daughter of James and Susan S. (Stublefield) Clark, of 
Christian County, Ky., and as the result of this union were born : Susan 
S., August 16, 1860 ; James J., June 3, 1862 ; Martha L., March 16, 
1864; Mary E., March 3, 1866 ; William C, January 12, 1868 ; Walker 
L., June 17, 1870 ; Lucy B., November 5, 1872, and Julia B., October 
28, 1877. Mr. Garrott is a farmer, a Master Mason, a Baptist and a 
Democrat. Mrs. Garrott's father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and 
her grandfather was Col. Stublefield, of the Revolutionary war. A 
remarkable fact in connection with this family is, there was not a death 
among its members from 1833 to 1875. 

E. C. GRIFFIN. The grandfiither of this gentleman, Joseph Griffin, 
was born in Culpeper County, Va., of Irish parents; he moved to Lau- 
rens County, S. C, and when sixteen years old enlisted under Gen. 
Marion. Served with him to the close of the Revolutionary war, and 
died in South Carolina. Joseph B. Griffin, subject's father, was born in 
Laurens County, S. C, November, 1807 ; moved to Franklin County, 
Tenn., in 1822, where he was married to Rebecca Jewell, and to them 
were born the following children : Margret E., Berthier, Ellen W., James 
M., Elijah C, Nancy M., Joseph E., Stephen C, Mary F. and John B. 
Elijah C. was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., December 20, 1839, and 
was there reared; he moved with his father to Stewart County, Tenn., in 
1860, where his father d^d in 1851 ; he next moved to Trigg County,' 
Ky., and subsequently, in 1875, to his present residence in Christian 
County, Ky., where he follows the occupation of wheelwright ; he was 
married April 24, 1877, to Miss Thecla, daughter of Burd B. Mart, of 
Trigg County. Mr. Griffin is a member of the Christian Church, and of 
the order of A. F. & A. M. and K. of II. 

JESSE T. HARRIS was born January 2, 1836, in .Montgomery 
County, Tenn., where he was reared, and remained until 1866, when ho 






i\ f, ( iiif-oi' - ,*•; o:;i1;-.ji. {. •. .1, ;iJ' ■ ; ' Jl).-I (■ 



49b BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

removed to Christian County, Ky., ami settled at " Broad Oaks," his 
present place of residence. His father, William S. Harris, was born in 
1806, in Louisa County, Va., and removed to Montgomery County, Tenn., 
in 1827, where he died in 1857 ; he was the son of Jesse Harris, who 
lived and died in Virginia. Subject's mother, Eliza W., daughter of 
Anthony Jones, of Christian County, Ky., was born in Virginia, in 1815, 
and is still living. To William S. Harris and her were born : William 
A., Jesse T., Martha M. (Mallory), Albert L., Mary E., Joseph J. and 
J. Mercer. Jesse T. was married December 10, 186-3, to Miss Mary E., 
daughter of Rev. Josiah and Catherine (Galbreath) Carneal, of Christian 
County, Ky., and to them were born: Kit);ie W., November 13, 1864; 
William S., February 18, 1868; Martha M., May 27, 1872; Josiah G., 
April 19, 1875; M. Tennie, November 25, 1877; Jessie, August 6, 
1880, and Emma L., March 17, 1883. Mrs. Harris was born June 26, 
1840. Mr. Harris is a farmer possessing 270 acres of valuable land, 
well improved, and in a high state of cultivation. The family are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. 

HENRY C. HERNDON was born in Christian County, Ky., June 
1, 1841. His father, Edmund G. Herndon, was a native of Virginia, 
born in 1802, and at an early date came to Christian County, where he 
died in 1849. His wife, and mother of our subject, was Jane R., daugh- 
ter of Capt. Samuel Hopkins. She was born in Virginia in 1805, and 
died in this county in 1855, and was the mother of the following chil- 
dren : Mary I., Henry C. and Elizabeth. Henry C. Herndon, the sub- 
ject of this biography, was reared on a farm and educated in the schools 
of the county. He is now engaged in farming and trading, and is the 
owner of about 1,000 acres of land. On the 6th of September, 1877, 
he married Miss Susan D., daughter of Archibald D. and Marcia (Bodie) 
Fletcher. They are the parents of four children, viz.: Edmund D., 
William H., Mary M. and Lucien D. Mr. Herndon was a soldier for 
three years in the late Civil war; is a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and is a Democrat. 

MRS. ANNIE E. McKEE was born October 2, 1824, in Hopkins- 
ville, Ky., where she was reared. Her father. Col. Fidelio Sharp, was 
born in Virginia in 1784, removed with his pai-ents to Tennessee in 17S7, 
and died in Hopkinsvillo, Ky., in 1S52. He was a gallant soldier in 



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LONGVIEW PRECINca'. 497 

the war of 1812. His wife, Evelina, daughter of Henry A. Johnson, of 
Virginia, was born in 1800 and died in 1881. Their children are : Mrs. 
Eleanor J. Templeton, Mrs. Annie E. McKee, as above, Mrs. Catherine 
M, Wallace, Solomon A., Mrs. Mary E. McCleilan, Mrs. Carrie M. 
McKee and Henry J. In 184G Annie E., our subject, was married to 
Robert McKee, who was born in 1820, and died in 1863 in Chicago. He 
was a Colonel in the late war, a fine lawyer and an accomplished gentle- 
man. Their cliildren : are Robert S., Sarah H., Samuel M., Mrs. Carrie 
E. Roper, Annie Lizzie and Henry R. The family have 400 acres of 
line farming land, cultivated in the staple products of the country. In 
religious affiliations Mrs. McKee is a Presbyterian, and is a lineal descend- 
ant of Dr. John Sharp, Archbishop of Canterbury. 

WILLIAM W. McKENZIE was born in Iredell County, N. C, June 
8, 1803 ; his father, Andrew McKenzie, was a native of the same county, 
and died in Trigg County, Ky., in 1817, aged forty-five years. The 
grandfather of our subject was Andrew McKenzie, a native of Scotland, 
who immigrated to America prior to the Revolutionary war, and with his 
son William participated in that struggle. He died in Christian County, 
Ky., in 1828, aged ninety-eight years. Elizabeth (Stevenson) McKenzie, 
the mother of our subject, was born in Iredell County, N. C, and died in 
Texas in about 1840. She was the mother of the following children : 
Mrs. Mary E. Bell, Mrs. Elizabeth L. Girand, William W., Harriet A., 
Mrs. Agnes L. McCormick, Mrs. Catherine A. Gunnell, Mrs. Jane 
Stevenson and James L. William \V. McKenzie has been a resident of 
this county since 1814, having come from his native State with his par- 
ents in that year ; his early education was limited to such as the pioneer 
schools of the neighborhood aflbrdcd, but by constant reading, observation 
and experience, he has acquired more than an ordinary education; he was 
married, in October, 1827, to Miss Mary C, daughter of Moses Steven- 
son, of this county, who died in 1838, leaving the following children : 
Milus E., Francis A., Josiah B., Mrs. Elizabeth A. Cooper and Mrs. Mary 
W. Sherrell. In 1839 he married Miss Isabella C. Ewing, of Christian 
County. Mrs. McKenzie died on the 7th of November, 1871, and was 
the mother of Hon. James A., John F., Mrs. Isabella C. Moss, and Sophia 
E. Girand. Mr. McKenzie is one of the most prominent men of Christian 
County; he has been a member of the Presbyterian Church for fifty-five 



.L.,<'v...! ,An:'ev'-r 






498 BIOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

years, of which time he has for fifty years' been a Ruling ElJer. He has 
been a JIagistrate of the county for tliirty-eight years, County Judge one 
term, State Senator two years, filling out the unexpired term of Hon. 
Benjamin H. Bristow, who was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by 
Gen. Grant. 

URIAL L. MAJOR was born in Louisa County, Va., in 1817, and 
removed with his parents to Christian County, Ky., about 1837, where he 
departed this life in 18G1 ; he was the son of Charles Major, of Virginia, 
who died in Christian County, Ky., in 1857, at the age of eighty years. 
The family are of Irish descent. Subject's wife was^Elizabeth, daughter 
of Andrew Sargeant, of this county, and to them were born: Andrew S., 
Mollie B. (Clardy), John F., George H., Thomas II., Annie M. and Car- 
rie E. (Cayce). George H.. Major was born in Cliristian County, Ky., in 
1847, and in 1873 was ra:irried to Miss Virginia E., daughter of Archer 
Campbell, of this county, and to them was born William T. After the 
death of his wife, Mr. Major was married, in 1878, to Miss Mary W., 
daughter of Walker Carneal, from which union sprang James II. Our 
subject is a farmer, owning eighty acres of good land, and is a member of 
the Christian Church. Thomas 11. Major was born on the place where he 
now resides in Christian County, Ky., April 5, 1850; he was married, 
October 10, 1872, to Miss Mary W., daughter of Harris W. Killen, of 
Hopkinsville, Ky., and to them have been born : John K., Lottie A., Lizzie 
L. and Thomas II. The last-named is a Magistrate in Longview District, 
and was formerly Constable; he is a farmer, possessing 212 acres of val- 
uable land, which he is successfully cultivating ; he is also a large dealer 
in tobacco, handling much of that staple raised in this community, and is 
of great benefit in furnishing a home market. 

HOWARD MAJOR was born December 9, 1843, in Christian 
County, Ky., on the place where he now resides, and where ho grew to 
manhood. His father, Howard Major, Sr., was born in Madison County, 
A'a., in 1811, removed with his parents to Christian County, Ky., in 
1826, and here died in 1871. He was the son of Charles Major, who was 
born in Virginia, and died in this county in 1857 at the age of eighty- 
two years. The family are descended from English parents, who came to 
America, married and left a respectable family. Subject's mother, Rachel 
A. dau-hter of James McDonald, of Christian County, Ky., was born 



iv r C;i .[..r :■ I'.-.J >: 



■^y.i. 









LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 499 

in 1814, and is still living. To herself and husband were born : Patrick 
II., Emily B. (married first to Myers, then to Tatum), Adie E. (Hester), 
our subject, Alice (Ward), Leah (Cayce), Maggie E. (Bradshaw), 
Ida (Cayce), Dinnie and Lester. Howard Major was married, October 
25, 1866, to Miss Virginia, daughter of George W. Cayce, of this 
county, and from this union sprang: Erastus, George W., Samuel A., 
Charles and lluth. Mr. Major is a farmer possessing 151 acres of valu- 
able land, which yields abundantly any of the products of this latitude. 
lie is a member of the Christian Church. 

MERIWETHER A. MASON was born March 1, 1853, on the 
Spriiigliill Place, three miles from Hopkinsville, in Christian County, 
Ky. He is the son of William B. Mason, who was born in Todd County, 
Ky., in 1814, and died in this county in 1877. The Masons are an old 
Virginia family of high standing. Subject's mother, Sarah N. (Ander- 
son), of Todd County, Ky., was born in 1817, and is still living. Her 
children are William B., Clinton T. and subject. Mr. Mason was mai-- 
ried, February 28, 1878, to Miss Lulu J., daughter of William W. and 
Mary E. (Watkins) Wills, of Christian County, and to them have been 
born-: Sadie, Meriwether A., Jr., and Lizzie E. Our subject was favored 
with a good business education. By profession he is a farmer, owning 
about 1,300 acres of first-class land, the cultivation of which he superin- 
tends in such a manner as to make the business profitable. He is a relia- 
ble gentleman, and a member of the Locust Grove Baptist Church. 

WILLIAM M. MASSIE, of Barker's Mill, was born in Shelby 
County, Ky., in 1814, and removed with his parents to Todd County, in 
the same State, in 1818, thence to Christian County in 1859. He is the 
son of Hugh Massie, who was born in Virginia, and died in Todd County, 
Ky., in 1843, at the age of sixty-three years, and Mary Royster, of Vir- 
ginia, who died about 1838. Their children are : Elizabeth (Durrett), 
William M., Littleberry, John and Martha (Crouch). In 1842 William 
M. was married to Miss Elizabeth B., daughter of William B. Sims, of 
Todd County, Ky., and from this union have sprung: Mary, William, 
B., Martha (Boone), Henry E., Charles G., Addison E., Ida (Elgin), and 
Eddie S. Massie. Mr. Massie is a farmer, possessing 424 acres of good 
land. He is a member of the Christian Church, and in politics is a 
Democrat. 



■ .' ■-' :.:\,:?''i -'to', A .'r.'i'iU!- Iijo 



Iff.'; '::)!(B-i'3 



500 BIOOUAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

JAMES MEDLEY. The Medley family, as represented by the one 
of this name in Christian County, Ky., is an old Virginia family, of 
English and French origin. They were among the old Colonial settlers 
of Viro-inia ; shared in the struggle for independence, and filled posi- 
tions of honor in the councils of State. It is recorded of Isaac Medley, 
one of the founders of the family in Virginia, that " he was a man of 
extraordinary mental endowments; patriotic and public-spirited; a mem- 
ber of the/ House of Burgesses, and a commissioned officer in the old war.' 
This family has descended, for the last four or five generations, in an un- 
broken succession from three ancestral families, viz. : Medley, Edwards, 
and Cook. The Medley and Edwards forefathers emigrated from Eng- 
land at the same time. The Cooks came from France, and all three fam- 
ilies were among the old Colonial settlers. Isaac Medley, the head of the 
family in Kentucky, was a son of Isaac and Nancy (Cook) Medley, and 
inherited all the sterling characteristics of his ancestors. He was born in 
Halifax County, Va., October 7, 1805, and died at Ilardcastle, Christian 
County, Ky., May 29, 1879. His wife, A. Caroline (Edwards) Medley, was 
a daughter of Stephen and Sarah (Cook) Edwards. She was born in Hali- 
fax County, Va., January 14, 1819, and died at Hardcastle, Christian 
County, May 29, 1870. Their children are : Sallie M. (Dennis), Eliza- 
beth C, Charles E., Virginia C, James, and Granville E. James Med- 
ley, the subject of this sketch, was born in Stewart County, Tenn., 
August 21, 1852. His father, Isaac Medle*y, moved from Virginia in 
the year 1851, and settled in 1855 at Hardcastle, Christian County, the 
present residence of James Medley. This was one of the first settled, 
and is also one of the finest tracts of land in south Christian. Among 
the pioneer settlers of the place was an old bachelor named Coleman, 
who, it is thought from the h.irdness of his own character, as well as that 
of his associates, gave the place its name of Hardcastle. It was after- 
ward owned by Dr. Edward Rumsey ; then by Mr. Edward Green; and 
from him it was purchased by Isaac Medley. 

JAMES M. MONTGOMERY. The grandfather of this gentleman 
was Dr. Francis G. Tvlontgomery, a graduate of the Transylvania Univer- 
sity, an early settler of Christian County, a physician of prominence, and 
at one time Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane near Hop- 
kinsville ; he died in ISfio ; his son, and fatlier of our subject, was 



.U ,,;t . ' 



■IX 
sin'} lo 



LONGVIKW PRECINCT. 501 

Abraham Montgomery, a native of Hopkinsville, who was assistant at the 
asylum with his father ; he died in Hopkinsville in 1870, aged thirty-nine 
years. James M. Montgomery was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., March 
26, 1860, and here he was reared until he was fifteen years of age, and 
then moved to Louisville and lived with his uncle, Judge Henry J. Stites, 
and then attended the high schools. On the 14th of January, 1883, he 
married Miss Lizzie W., daughter of James W. and Sarah F. (Radford) 
Moore; he is the owner of a farm of 164 acres of good land, upon which 
he resides, engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

JAMES AV. MOORE was born in Buckingham County, Va., in 
1806, and in 1816 came to Kentucky with his parents, who settled in 
Christian County on the farm "The Cedars," where he has since resided, 
and followed the occupation of a farmer. Besides having divided a large 
tract of land among his children, he is now the owner of 300 acres. In 
1832 he married Mary Harrison, of Montgomery County, Tenn., who 
died leaving the following children, viz.: Benjamin D., James C, Mrs. 
Mary Montgomery and William H. On the 6th of June, 1850, he mar- 
ried Sarah F. (daughter of Reuben Radford, of this county), who has 
borne him the following children: Robert L., born in 1854; Mrs. 
Elizabeth W. Montgomery, born in 1862, and Frank R.,born in 1864. 
Capt. Benjamin Moore, the father of our subject, was born in Virginia, 
and died in this county in 1831, aged seventy-two years; he served in 
the Revolutionary war; his wife, and mother of our subject, was Sarah 
(Jones) Moore; she died in this county, and was the mother of William, 
Mrs. Nancy Jones, Robert, Mrs. Martha Gordon, John, Henry, Thomas, 
Benjamin, David, Jefferson, James W., Mrs. Lucy Summers and Mrs. 
Mary P. Buckner. 

CHARLES O'NEAL is a native of Montgomery County, Tenn., 
born September 10, 1814. His father, Thomas H. O'Neal, was a native 
of Rockingham County, N. C, born in 1784. He came to Tennessee in 
his youth, served in the home guards against the Indians ; was a pilot 
from Clarksville on the river to New Orleans, La., and walked from New 
Orleans to Tennessee fourteen times. He died near Clarksville in 1875 ; 
he was a son of Peter O'Neal, of Irish descent, who died in Rockingham 
County before 1800. The mother of our subject was Priscilla (Brantley) 
O'Neal, a native of Montgomery County, Tenn. She died in 1871, 






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502 BlOGItAPIIlCAL SKETCHKS. 

aged sevciity-ciglit years, leaving the following children : Peter, Charles, 
William, Mary and John. Charles O'Neal was educated in the common 
schools, and is a farmer by occupation, having accumulated 827 acres of 
land, which he divided among his children. He was married on the 15th 
of October, 1844, to Miss A E. Radford, daughter of Reuben and Sarah 
F. Radford, who died on the 1st of October, 1883, leaving the following 
children: Levette L., Laura, Charles and Walter. Mr. O'Neal was 
reared in Montgomery County, Tenn., and has been a resident of Chris- 
tian County since 1844. 

LEVETTE L. O'NEAL is a son of Charles O'Neal, a sketch of whom 
appears above, and was born in Christian County, Ky., October 1, 1850. 
He was reared on the farm of his father, and was educated in the com- 
mon schools; he is now engaged in farming and is the owner of 168 
acres of good land, which is under a high state of cultivation. In 1873 
he married Miss Mary E., daughter of Grant Smith, and has been blessed 
with two children : Edna and Levette J. 

JAMES S. PARRISH was born near Gallatin, Sumner County, 
Tenn., February 2, 1827, and came to Christian County with his parents 
in 1833. They settled on his present farm where he has since resided. 
He is one of the practical farmers of the precinct, and his farm, " Aspen 
Plains," which contains 462 acres, is one of the best in the county. 
He was married in December, 1848, to Miss Zerilda, daughter of Drury 
West. She died in November, 1854, leaving the following children : Henry 
W., Charles B. and Mrs. Mary P. Ragsdale. In 1856 he married Miss Mar- 
garet Poindexter, who died in 1870. In 1S71 he married Miss Jane 
D. Ward, of Montgomery County, Tenn., who died February 9, 1884. 
The father of our subject, David W. Parrish, was a native of North Car- 
olina, and was reared in Wilson County, Tenn. ; he died in this county, 
in 1877, aged eighty-six. He was a soldier of the war of 1812; his 
wife, and mother of our subject, was Luhlda Hunt, a native of Sumner 
County, Tenn., who died in this county, and was the mother of the fol- 
lowing children : Mrs. Eliza Donaldson, Mrs. Elizabeth Gilmore, Mrs. 
Martha Clarke, Mrs. Mary Roberts, James S., Fannie, Mrs. Lucretia 
Whitlock and Mrs. Amelia C. McKenzie. Mr. Parrish is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, and of the Baptist Church. 

WILLIAM B. RADFORD. The ftither of this gentleman, Will- 
iam Radford, was born in Buckingham County, Va., in 1799, whore he lived 



4 tfiyi'i .;^ ^ni* nni 



.T,'r ^..:;.,V/ iM': ..:,r,,,r-, ,,,;,„. ^ , J 



LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 603 

to the age of fifteen years, and then (IS 14) came with his parents to Chris- 
tian County, Ky., where he died in 1875. His father, William Radford, 
and grandfather of our subject, died in 1837, aged seventy-five years, 
liie ijiolhcr of our subject was Mary, daughter of Euckner and Mary 
Killebrew. She was boru in Montgomery County, Tenu., and died in 
this county in 1872, aged seventy-two years. She was the mottier of 
the following children: Mrs. Sarah E. McGuire. William B., Mrs. 
Eliza J. Steger and James M., now deceased. William B. Radford was 
born at his present residence, "Long View," on the 7th of March, 1824. 
He received a good business education ; is now engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and is the owner of 900 acres of land. He was married on the 
13th of December, 1853, to Miss Sicily A., daughter of Abraham and 
Mary McElroy, of this county, who has borne him the following children : 
Annie, Henry, McElroy, Dr. William, Mollie and Edna. Mr. Radford 
is an active member of the order A. F. k A. M. 

WILLIAM EDWARD RAGSDALE is a son of William J. and 
Emily J. (Tillotson) Ragsdale, both natives of North Carolina, who after 
their marriage removed to Tennessee and settled in Montgomery County, 
on the line between that and Christian County, where they remained but 
a short time and removed to Stewart County, Ky., and finally to Trigg 
County, where he died in 1853 and she in 1868. William J. Ragsdale 
was by trade a wheelwright, though he devoted his time and attention to 
farming and trading ; he bad a family of nine children, two of whom died 
in infancy ; the remaining seven are all residents of this county, viz.: 
Elizabeth F., Lucy A., Mary H., James S., William E., Emily and 
Rebecca E. William E. Ragsdale was born July 31, 1847 ; he coui- 
menced life as a farmer, and now in connection he is extensively engaged 
in trading, and doing one of the largest tobacco broker's businesses in this 
section of the State; he has been a resident of Christian County since 
1867, and though his office and tobacco business are carried on in II op- 
kinsville, he resides at his beautiful farm, " Woodlawn," which contains 
526 acres of good land, located on the Clarksville and Hopkinsville pike. 
On the 20th of November, 1866, he married Miss A. E. Collins, a native 
of Christian County, born in 1849. They have been blessed with five 
children. 

HORACE P. RIVES was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., on 
January 20, 1845, and is a son of Henry A. and Eleanor P. (Tillotson) 



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ii^ir-iw :jii'V/:.'Ii: 






'I 'J- 



504 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Rives. The grandfather was Stephen Rives, and was born in Virginia ; 
be moved to Tennessee in 1829, where he subsequently died. The father 
was born in Virginia in 1816, and came to Tennessee with his father ; 
he is now living in Montgomery County, that State. The mother was 
born in Virginia ; died in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1882. To her 
were born the following children : Mildred E., AV. M., Stephen E. and 
Horace P. (subject). Horace P. attended school in Kentucky, where he 
graduated and afterward followed surveying ; he is now quite an exten- 
sive farmer and tobacco-grower, and owns about 350 acres; he was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary E. Pendleton. Two children blessed this union — 
Willie and May. Mrs. Rives died in 1875, and Mr. Rives was next 
married to Miss Nannie A. Garrott, a daughter of Robert W. Garrott. 
To this union were born two children — Harry A. and Maggie. Mr. 
Rives is a Democrat. 

EDWIN W. STEGER was born February 22, 1841, on his present 
homestead in Christian County, Ky., which has always been his residence. 
His father, William M. Steger, was born in Buckingham County, Va., in 
1817, and removed to this county in 1833, where he died in 1877. He 
was the son of William Steger, who lived and died in Virginia. Subject's 
mother, Maria L., daughter of Andrew Sargeant, of Virginia, is still living 
in Christian County, Ky. Her children are: Mary F. (Gary), William 
A., Jennie A. (AVest), our subject, Idella (Bard), Elvira (Pierce), Maria 
L. and John T. In 1868, subject was married to Miss Sallie E., daughter 
of William and Mary (Gary) Glover, of Trigg County, Ky., and to them 
were born : Ernest W., William A., Edwin T.. James 0. and Mary B. 
Since the death of Mrs. Steger, September 10, 1873, Mr. Steger has 
remained unmarried. He is by profession a farmer, and owns 200 acres 
of very productive land, which he cultivates successfully in tobacco, wheat 
and corn. Mr. Steger is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also of the 
Knights of Honor. In religion he is a Baptist, and in politics a Demo- 
crat. 

JOHN QUARLES THOMAS, M. D., was born January 3, 1842, 
near Garrettsburg, Christian Co., Ky., where he grew to manhood, and 
commenced the study of medicine with Dr. D. W. Quarlcs, with whom 
he remained two years ; then attended the Shelby Medical College, at 
Nashville, Tenn., where he graduated in 1861, after which he entered the 



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LONGVIEW PRECINCT. 505 

Array as Assistant Surgeon, and after having served in that position for 
two years was promoted to the office of Major, in the late war. In 1874 
he commenced the practice of his profession at Garrettsburg, in this county, 
where he remained two years, and then settled on his present location, 
near Longview, where he is engaged in the practice of medicine and sur- 
gery. His father, John J. Thomas, was born in 1813, in Albemarle 
County, Va., came to Christian County, in 1829, which county he sub- 
sequently represented in the Legislature, and now resides in Paducah. 
Subject's mother, Lucy M., daughter of Col. Garrett M. Quarles, 
born in Louisa County, Va., and died in this county in 1848. Her 
father was a Colonel in the war of 1812. To subject's parents were born: 
Lt.-Col; Lewis M., who died during the war; our subject, Pendleton, 
Annie M. (Quigley) and Katie. Dr. Thomas was married, April 29, 
18G9, to Miss Mary, daughter of Hiram A. Phelps, of Hopkinsville, Ky., 
and to them have been born : Lewis M., Hiram P., John and Marion A. 
The Doctor is also a farmer, having 160 acres of good land. He is a Royal 
Arch Mason, and also a member of the Knights of Honor. He owns a 
■ kennel of thorougbred Llewellyn setter dogs, and takes great pleasure in 
shooting. 

CHARLES H. WALDEN was born in Halifax County, Va., Janu- 
ary 2, 1832, and was there reared and educated. In 1852 he came to 
Christian County, Ky., where he remained four years, and then removed 
to Tennessee; in 1857 he returned to this county, where he has since re- 
sided, engaged in farming. On the 4th of July, 1859, he was married to 
Miss Celina, daughter of Llewellyn WilliarnE, of Christian County, to 
whom were born : Harry C. and Laura A. Miss Laura was educated at 
Anchorage, Ky., and is now teaching at Washington, D. C. Mrs. Wal- 
den is in Washington at the head of the flower-seed department. 
Mr. Walden is Deputy County Clerk. His father, Samuel B. Walden, 
was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1802, where he engaged in farming 
to the time of his death, which occurred in 1859. The grandfather of 
our subject was William Walden, a native of King and Queen County, 
Va., but lived the most of his life iu Halifax County, where he was a 
Magistrate for forty-five years, and where he died in 1845, aged seventy- 
eight years; he was a participant in the war of 1812. The mother of 
our subject was Sallie (Flemming) Walden, of Prince Edward County, 



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506 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, » 

Va. Slie died in Halifax County in 18:^2, and was the mother of the 
following children : William B., Mrs. Martha A. Parrish, George A. 
■and Charles II. The father's second marriage was to Miss Nancy Mc- 
Cutchen, who was the mother of Richard M., Mrs. Emiline King and 
Samuel V. Walden. 

BENJAMIN A. WHITLOCK was born in Christian County, Ky., 
September 17, 1843; his father, Capt. Joiin R. Whitlock, a native of 
Buckingham County, Va., was born March 13, 1797. In 1810 he emi- 
grated to Greene County, Ky., and in 1816 he removed lo Cliristian 
County, where he resided a respected and honored citizen to the time of 
his death in 1878. He had been a resident of the county for sixty-two 
years, during which time he was at the head of the militia, and a suc- 
cessful farmer. His first wife died in 1840; she was a daughter of Will- 
iam B. Radford, Sr., of Longview, and mother of the following children: 
William T., John R., Elmira (Beasley), Rufus M., James and Lucy. In 
1842 Capt. Whitlock married Sicily H., youngest daughter of Benjamin 
Radford, of Christian County, but at that time widow of Fielding Bacon, 
of Trigg County, with two children — Ann F. (Clardy, Newstead, Ky.) 
and William J. Bacon. She was born in Virginia in 1807, and is the 
mother also of Benjamin A., Sallie J. and Emma (Garnett) Whitlock. 
Benjamin A. Whitlock was reared and educated in Christian County, 
where he resided till 1867, when he engaged successfully in tobacco spec- 
ulation in Trigg, Caldwell I'.nd Crittenden Counties, and later in banking 
business at Cadiz, Ky. On tlie 5th of September, 1870, he married 
Miss Saidee Barker Faxon, daughter of Lucy A. (Steele) and Charles 
Faxon, of Clarksville, Tenn. They have no children, having lost two 
the first few years after their marriage. He returned to Longview, 
Christian County, in April, 1873, and engaged in cultivating an excellent 
farm which he owns, and on which he still resides. He is a member of 
the I. 0. 0. F., and a Masou; he unites, with Salem Baptist Church; 
his wife is a member of the Episcopal Church. 

S. T. WINFREE was born in Powhatan County, Va., March 7, 
1819, whore he was reared, educated and married. In 1841 he moved 
to Sumner County, Tenn., and subsequently to Christian County in 1845, 
where he has since remained. He is a. farmer and is the owner of 137i 
acres of land. In 1840, in his native county, he married Miss Elmira 



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LONGVIEW PKKCINCT. 



507 



B., daughter of William 13. Atkinson, who has borne him tie followiinr 
children: William P., John VV., James II., George W., Mrs. Jennie V. 
Gray, Mrs. Irene T. Durrett, Mrs. Florence L. Callnon, Mrs. Mary E. 
Gray, Julius R., Thomas S., Mrs. Susan T. Cunningliam, Matthew F., 
Alexander A. and Carrie E. Woodson M. Winfree, the father of our 
subject, was born in Powhatan County, Va., where he died in 1858. He 
was a soldier of the war of 1812, and his father, John Winfree, was in 
the Revolutionary war. Serena (Farley) Winfree was a native of Pow- 
hatan County, and was the mother of the following children: Mrs. Maria 
Farley, Robert M., Shurvin T., William A., Alexander, Nancy, Mrs. 
Susan Sweeney and Matthew. 







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•-i. 



LAFAYETTE PRECINCT. 

SAMUEL BLAIR was born in Lafayette Precinct, thia county, Sep- 
tember 13, 1848, and is a son of Evan B. and Winnifred (Fletcher) 
Blair. Evan B. Blair was. born in Montgomery County, Tenn., a son of 
John and Susanah (Bowles) Blair. John Blair came from Maryland 
when a young man ; raised a large family in Montgomery County ; was 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, and was highly respected in his 
community. The grandfather of Gen. Francis P. Blair and Hon. Mont- 
gomery Blair was his brother. The family originally came from Scot- 
land. Evan B. Blair came to this county in 18-16, where he resided until 
his death, November 8, 1866. He was married to Priscilla Fletcher in 
1834, by whom he had four children, three of whom survived him, viz.: 
Mrs. N. L. Stevens of this county, and Mrs. S. B. Elliott and John T. 
Blair, of Humboldt, Tenn. Mrs. Priscilla (Fletcher) Blair died in the 
early part of the year 1840, and in the latter part of the same year 
Evan B. Blair married her sister, Winnifred Fletcher, by whom he had 
six children, three of whom are now living, viz.: Samuel, James W., at 
Humboldt, Tenn., and Mrs. Priscilla Bumpugs in Obion County, Tenn. 
Mrs. Winnifred Blair died October 21, 1870. Samuel Blair assisted on 
the home farm until about 1870, when he assumed control of it and 
remained there the mostfof the time until 1882, when he came to Bennetts- 
town, and has since been merchandising ; he was married in Bennettstown, 
April 2, 1879, to Miss Virginia R. Bennett, a daughter of Stephen and 
Anne B. (Otterson) Bennett, both natives of Halifax County, Virginia. 
Stephen Bennett was of English-Scotch descent; his ancestors came to 
Halifax County some time prior to the Revolution, and Robert Bennett 
and William Haidwick, his paternal and maternal grandfathers, both 
served in that conflict ; his father, John Bennett, served in the v>-ar of 
1812. They each fought for this country against the British ; served 
their full time, and brought home an honorable discharge. Stephen 
Bennett came to this county in 1841 ; was married to a daughter of 



[ .V_ 11'/ -^ 



510 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

William Otteraon in 1842 ; he was a merchant, tobacconist and farmer, 
a man of great energy and enterprise, of strict integrity, and a member 
of the Baptist Church; he was instrumental in the formation of the vil- 
lage of Bennettstown ; built many of the houses now standing ; he died 
May 18, 1868, in his fifty-second year. Five of his children are now 
living, viz. : Mrs. Blair, Stephen H. Bennett, J. Bunyan Bennett, Drurny 
B. Bennett and Maria E. A. W. Bennett ; all of the five, and their mother 
are now living in Piano, Collin County, Tex. Mrs. Bennett was of 
English-Irish descent ; was born November 7, 1827. The wife of Samuel 
Blair was born in this county December 29, 1845; is the mother of two 
living children — John B. and Francis F. Blair, who were born December 
22, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Blair are members of the Baptist Church, and 
Mr. Blair is a Democrat. 

J. A. BOYD was born in Iredell County, N. 0., on May 14, 1824, 
and is a son of H. \V. and Matilda (Moore) Boyd. The father was of 
Irish descent, and came to this State in November, 1837. He settled in 
the western edge of Trigg County. In 1846 he moved to Ballard County, 
and thence to Paducah in January, 1849. Here he died on August 12th 
following. The mother was of English descent, and died in Ballard 
County, on January 17, 1849. Our subject was the eldest of nine chil- 
dren, three of whom are now living: J. A. (our subject), David L. (in 
Ballard County), and Mrs. Sarah King, in Clarksville, Tenn. J. A.'s 
education was received in the schools of his native State until 1819. He 
then learned the carpenter's trade, at Lafayette, and afterward followed 
this business in different portions of the State. He also opened a cab- 
inet and furniture store in Lafayette in 1856. lie remained there until 
January, 1867, and then came to Bennettstown. Here he worked at 
the carpenter's trade and also ran a furniture store. He remained in 
this business until 1877, when ho was elected to the office of Constable, 
and has since served in this capacity. He also has a small place near 
Bennettstown, and has farming carried on. Mr. Boyd was married on 
January 25, 1849, to Miss Susan H. Brodie, a daughter of Alexander 
and Mary (Oldham) Brodie, of Montgomery County, Tenn. Mrs. Boyd 
was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., on August 7, 1829, and is the 
mother of three living cliildrcn : Mrs. Rebecca Jobe (of Bennettstown), 
Ilattie L. and Pearl S. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are both members of the 



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LAFAYETTE PRECINCT. 511 

Presbyterian Church. Mr. Boyd is a member of Lafayette Lodge, No. 
151, A. V. k A. M., and Mt. Olivet Chapter, No. 124. In politics he is 
identified •nith the Democratic party. 

J. T. COLEMAN was born in this precinct on March 8, 1839, and 
is a son of J. W. and Mary J. (Rives) Coleman. The father was a 
native of Dinwiddie County, Va., and was of English descent. He came 
to this county in 1834, and on March 8, 1838, he married Miss Rives, 
(now Mrs. E. T. Stephens, whose sketch appears elsewhere). Mr. J. W. 
Coleman farmed in this precinct until his death, on March 18, 1862. J. 
T. Coleman is the eldest and the only one living of four children. His 
education was received in the schools of this county. He remained at 
home until eighteen and then began life for himself. He came to his 
present farm, which was then owned by his father, but which he after- 
ward inherited. He now owns about 560 acres of which 350 is in culti- 
vation. Mr. Coleman was married on November 19, 1861, to Miss Jen- 
nie Pollard, a daughter of R. C. and Mildred N. (Hardgrove) "Pollard, 
natives of Virginia. Mrs. Coleman was the mother of eight children, viz.: 
Cardan S., Mary N., .James C, Lula, Earnest W., Alice E., Jennie B. 
and George P., and died on November 8, 1879. Mr. Coleman was next 
married on October 17, 1882, to Miss Mary Hugh Cooper, who was a 
daughter of Capt. H. C. and Elizabeth (McKenzie) Cooper (deceased), 
and was born on January 27, 1861. In June, 1874, Mr. Coleman was 
elected Justice of the Peace of this precinct, and has since served in that 
capacity. He is a member of Church Hill Grange, No. 109, and is iden- 
tified with the Democratic party in politics. 

A. M. COOPER -was born in this precinct and county on July 19, 
1851, and is a sou of H. C. and Bettie (McKenzie) Cooper. The father was 
also a native of this county, was born here on September 2, 1827, and 
was a son of John and Margaret (Harper) Cooper; his parents were 
natives of Harper's Ferry, S. C, and came to this county in a very 
early day, making one of the earliest settlements in the county. 
The grandfather of our subject died on July 3, 1851. The father was 
also a farmer, and resided here until his death on January 17, 1876. 
He was a soldier in the late war, having enlisted in 1861 in Company B 
of the Twenty-fifth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry. At the organization 
of tl'.e regiment he was elected Captain of his company ; he served in 



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.:-.: Oli 



512 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

this capacity for about a year, when his regiment was consolidated with the 
Seventeenth Kentucky Infantry, when he resigned and came home ; he 
was in his lifetime a stanch and consistent member of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church. The mother was also a native of this county, 
having been born here on May 15, 1831. She was a daughter of Squire 
W. W. McKenzie, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. Iler 
death occurred on December 10, 1875. To her were born thirteen chil- 
dren, and of this number nine are now living, viz.: J. W., in Ilopkins- 
ville ; A. M., our subject; J. F., in Elmwood, 111.; JI. J., in Florida; 
Minerva C, wife of W. E. Emery; Bettie W., wife of A. J. Fuqua; 
Mary II., wife of J. T. Coleman; Amanda B. and Ruth L. The schools 
of this county furnished our subject his education. In December, 1872, 
he was elected Constable, and served until December, 1873, and then 
commenced farming ; he now runs the home farm, which consists of 270 
acres; he was married in this county on February 28, 1882, to Miss 
Carrie 0. McDaniel, a daughter of R. T. and Sallic (Lakin) McDaniel, 
of Hopkinsville. Mrs. Cooper was born in this county on January 25, 
1857, and to her has been born one child— Katie May. On January 1, 
1883, Mr. Cooper was appointed Deputy Tax Assessor of the county, 
which ofEce he still holds. He is a member of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian Church, and in politics he gives his support to the Democratic 
party. 

M. D. DAVIE was born in this county and precinct on August 16, 
1827, and is a son of Maj. Ambrose and Elizabeth (Woodson) Davie. 
The father was born in Person County, N. C, on December 29, 1788. 
He was of English descent ; his great-grandfather, William Davie, came 
fi-om England some time before the Revolution. This gentleman, as well 
as his son and grandson, were all soldiers in that war. Maj. Ambrose 
Davie was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was appointed to the rank 
of Major by the Governor of North Carolina. In 1819 he came and 
settled in the south part of this county. He lived on that farm until the 
spring of 1823, and then came to the farm now owned by subject. In 
his time he was one of the largest planters in this county, and was uni- 
versally admired by his neighbors. His death occurred on February 22, 
1S63. He served as Sheritf of this county from 1832 to 1836. Subject 
is the younger of two living children ; he attended school in this county 



LAFAYETTE PRECINCT. 613 

until sixteen, and then went to Yale College ; be remained there only 
One year, however, and then went to Princeton College, where he grad- 
uated in the class of 1848. Returning to this State, he purchased some 
1-irge flouring mills near Clarksville, Tenn.; he also, in connection with 
his brother, Winston J. Davie, embarked in the banking business. Both 
of these operations he carried on extensively until the breaking out of the 
war, when he lost an immense amount of capital. He was compelled to 
come to this county and give his attention to farming ; here he has since 
resided. Mr. Davie was married, on September 12, 1850, to Miss Cor- 
nelia Leavell, a daughter of Lewis Leavell, of Trenton, Todd County. 
Mrs. Davie was born on November 28, 1829. To this union were born 
eleven children, eight of whom are now living, viz.: Lewis L. (in 
Arkansas), Irving, Ambrose M. (in Florida), E. Snced (in Florida), 
Winston J., Cornelia (wife of L P. Davie), Eugenia and Maud. Mr. 
Davie is a member of the Clarksville Commandcry, Knights Templar. In 
1873 he was elected first Master of the State Grange of Kentucky, and 
held that office two terms. During that time he was instrumental in 
organizing Granges throughout the State. In 1855 he was elected a 
member of the Tennessee Legislature, and served in that capacity four 
years. Irving Davie, the second son of our subject, was born on October 
5, 1852. His education was received in the schools of this county, in 
the University at Lexington and at the Evausville Business College. In 
1877 he went West and spent two or three years in travel. He returned 
home in 1870, and has since had charge of the old homestead — a farm of 
some 500 acres. 

MRS. EMILY DOWELL was born in Madison County, Va., on June 
2G, 1825, and is a daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah Jane (Major) Weaver. 
Both of the parents were natives of Virginia, and in 1827 they came to 
this county, settling in Longview Precinct ; there the father died in 1834. 
The mother afterward moved into this precinct, where she died in 1879. 
Mrs. Dowell is the eldest of four children ; her education was received in 
the schools of Ilopkinsville. On August 10, 1841, in this county, she 
was married to John R. Dowell. This gentleman was born in Halifax 
County, Va., on July 3, 1814, and was a son of Richard and Mildred 
(Keen) Dowell. R. Dowell moved to Greene County, Ky., in an early 
day, where he died. The son came to this county in 1838, and turned 






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8 Ri.li <■■ ?,iMrii;i^v)!. 






514 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

his attentiou to farming. In 1855 he began merchandising at Beverly, 
this county. In this business he engaged until his death, which occurred 
on December 14, 1861. Mrs. Doweil, after her husband's death, came 
to this precinct, where she has since resided. Here she has turned her 
attention to 'farming. To her were born seven children, five of whom are 
now living : Mrs. Sarah Fleming, Mrs. Nancy Williamson (in Tennessee), 
Mrs. Mary J. Giles (of Garrettsburgh Precinct), Mittie and Anna at 
home. Mrs. Doweil and her family are members of the Baptist Church. 
A. J. FUQUA was born in Robertson County, Tenu., on November 
7, 1819, and is a son of Maj. James H. and Judith (Forbes) Fuqua. 
The parents were natives of Buckingham County, Va., and were 
descended from French Huguenots, who came to tliis country at an early 
date. The father was a soldier in the war of 1812, being stationed at 
Norfolk, Va., with the rank of Captain. He came to Tennessee about 
1817 ; here he farmed and also carried on a mill ; he was elected Major 
of the State militia, which was at that time organized in difi'erent parts 
of the State, and served as Justice of the Peace for years. In 1837 he 
came to Trigg County on his way to Missouri, but was taken sick, and 
after a long illness died on May 3, 1837. His widow settled down in 
that county, with her family, and resided there until her death, July, 
186S. To her were born nine children, of whom our subject was the 
fifth, and of this number four are now living: A. J., T. J., W. L. (in 
Texas), and W. J. (in Trigg County). A. J. Fuqua commenced life by 
farming near Canton, Trigg County. In 1839 he came to the village of 
Lafayette, Christian County. At this point he turned his attention to 
merchandising, first in the grocery business, in which he engaged for about 
three years; he next embarked in the dry goods business, and has 
engaged in that line of merchandising almost ever since. In 1873he asso- 
ciated with himself his nephew, A. A. Fuqua, and the firm has since 
been doing business under the title of A. A. Fuqua k Co. They now 
carry a stock of about §8,000, and are one of the most successful firms 
in the place. Mr. Fuqua was married in this county on October 4, 1843, 
to Miss Eliza Thacker, a daughter of Capt. Holt and Mahala (Hughes) 
Thacker, natives of Virginia. She was a native of the same county, was 
the mother of four children (all deceased), and her death occurred on 
March 23, 1880. He was next married December 1, 1881, to Mrs. Jen- 






..!■•. .<,;!/: 






LAFAYETTE PRECINCT. MS 

nie Landis [nee Wallace), a daughter of Jesse Wallace. This lady was 
a native of Cadiz, Trigg County, and died at home in Lafayette, Chris- 
tian County, June 23, 1882. Mr. Fuqua's third marriage took place in 
this county, on December 12, 1882, to Miss Bcttie W. Cooper, a daughter 
of Capt. H. C. Cooper. Mr. Fuqua has served as Magistrate of this 
precinct for upward of fifteen years. lie is at present acting as Police 
Judge in the town of Lafayette. In his political affiliations he is a Dem- 
ocrat; he is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Ben- 
nettstown ; he is also member of Lafayette Lodge, No. 151, A. F. k. A. 
M., and Mt. Olivet Chapter, No. 24. 

THOMAS J. FUQUA was born in Robertson County, Tenn., Feb- 
ruary 22, 1822 ; he was the sixth child of James II. and Judith (Forbes) 
Fuqua. At the age of seventeen he began clerking at Cadiz; he remained 
there for about three years, and then came to this county in 1842 ; he 
settled at Lafayette, and merchandized here for about five years ; he then 
turned his atlention to farming, and settled northwest of Lafayette. In 
1862 he came to his present farm, where he has since resided ; he now 
owns about 300 acres, of which there are about 180 acres in cultivation ; 
ho was married, in this county, January 15, 1345, to Miss Susan E. Handle, 
a daughter of Henry L. and Elizabeth M. (Burke) Randle, natives of this 
State. Mrs. Fuqua was born January 1, 1829, and is the mother of 
thirteen children, of whom eleven are now living, viz.: James H., in 
San Juan, Col.; Samuel B., Alexander A., Thomas J., Willie W., Mal- 
com M., Price, Fulton F., all at Lafayette; Robert L., in Clarksvjlle ; 
Eliza II. and Carrie. Mr. Fuqua is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South, Mrs. Fiiqua of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 
He served as Township Constable for about thirteen years; he is now 
acting 03 Notary Public; he is a member of Lafayette Lodge, No. 151, 
and Mount Olivet Chapter, No. 24, A. F. & A. M. In politics he gives 
his support to the Democratic party. 

F. M. GIRAND was born in this precinct on October 13, 1835, and 
is a son of Francis M., Sr., and Elizabeth L. (McKenzie) Girand. Fran- 
cis M., Sr., was a native of Baltimore, Md., and his people were of French 
descent, his father having been a soldier in Napoleon's array. Francis M., 
Sr., came to this county in 1820, and in 1825 he married Miss McKenzie, 
a daughter of An<1rew McKenzie, who came to this county from North 






lUrao'.) r.Ki< 



616 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Carolina in 1815. Andrew McKenzie's father came from Ireland to this 
country at a very early day ; he came to this county with his son, and died 
here in 1820, being over one hundred years old at the time of his death. 
F. JI. Cirand, Sr., settled down in Lafayette Precinct. Here he resided 
until his death in July, 1835. The mother died December 1, 1875. 
Subject is the youngest of five children, of whom three are now living: 
Mrs. Amanda Barkley, in Graves County; F. W., in Young County, 
Texas; and F. M., our subject. He assisted his mother in running the 
home farm until 1855, when he went to Texas ; he remained in that State 
until December, 1866, when he returned to this precinct ; here he has since 
resided. Mr. Girand was married in this county on October 22, 1875, 
to Miss Sophia E. McKenzie, a daughter of \V. W. and Isabella (Ewing) 
McKenzic. The parents were natives of North Carolina, and early set- 
tlers in the county. One cliild, James M., has blessed this union. Mr. 
and Mrs. Girand are members of the Bennettstown Presbyterian Church. 
Mr. Girand was a soldier in the late war; he enlisted in April, 1861, in 
Terry's Regiment, and at the end of a year he re-enlisted in Gibson's 
Battery, serving to the close of the war in this connection. The Dem- 
ocratic party receives his support. 

DR. CLAUDIUS HALL (deceased) was born in Marshall County, 
Tenn., on January 20, 1820, and was a son of Thomas and Emma (Wal- 
lace) Hall. The father was a native of Scotland and came to this coun- 
try in an early day. The mother came from North Carolina. Dr. Hall 
was educated at Jackson College of Columbia, Tenn., from which he 
graduated in 1840. He next attended medical lectures at Louisville, Ky. 
He practiced in Marshall County, Tenn., for some years, and then came 
to this county in 1849. He settled in Lafayette and practiced there 
for some time, probably about twenty-five years. But finally, on account 
of his health, ho was compelled to retire from active practice. He was 
appointed Postmaster at Lafayette for some years, and was a faithful 
officer. His death occurred in this county on June 7, 1874. He was 
married in Maury County, Tenn., on November 20, 1845, to Miss Selina 
Garland. This lady was a daughter of Edward and Nannie Garland. 
The mother was a native of Kentucky, the father of Virginia. Mrs. 
Hall was born on February 22, 1827, and was the mother of eight chil- 
dren. Of this number but three are now living : Lizzie ; Allan, now 






.7 : ■(:iltJC 






LAFAYETTE PllECINCT. 517 

attorney at law, in Columbia, Tenn.; Charles, now at college at Cullcoka, 
Tenn. Mrs. Hall is rearing her grandson, Redford Hall Lacy, who is 
now two years of age. Mrs. Hall and her family are members of the 
Old Soliool Presbyterian Church. 

G. W. McGEE is descended from one of the earliest pioneer families 
of this county. He was born in this precinct on August 9, 1828, and is- 
a son of William and Sarah (Franklin) McGee. The father was boin in 
Sumner County, Tenn.; his father having come from Ireland in 1787, 
and settled in that county. In 180-1 the latter came to this county, and 
settling in this precinct he entered 800 acres. He lived here until about 
1825, and then moved back to Sumner County, Tenn., where he died about 
1840. William continued to make his home in this county. In 1810 he 
was married to Miss Franklin, who was a daughter of Absalom Franklin, 
who came to this county in about 1800. Mr. McGee settled on the farm 
now owned by subject, where he died on April 9, 1835. His wife (our 
subject's mother) was born in Franklin County, Ga., in Au^just, 1789, 
and died in this county on January 22, 1871. To her were born ten 
children, of whom subject is the youngest. Of this number but two are 
living — Mrs. Mary Ann Miles, in Johnson County, 111.; and George W., 
our subject. The latter 's education was but limited, and was received in 
this county. Heassisted on the home farm until he became of age, and 
then took charge of it himself. Here he has since resided. Mr. McGee 
was married on January 15, 1857, to Miss Elizabeth Miles, a daughter of 
John H. and Mary A. (Folks) Miles, natives of Montgomery County, 
Tenn, Eight children have blessed this union, of whom seven are now 
living, viz.: Tandy D., Samuel B., Stonewall J., Margaret J., James L., 
John B. and Joseph J. Mrs. McGee is a member of the Little River 
Baptist Church. Mr. McGee is a Democrat in politics, and is a member 
of Lafayette Lodge, No. 151, A. F. k A. M. 

DR. C. J. NORTHINGTON was born in Roaring Springs Precinct, 
Trigg Co., on March 11, 1828, and is a son of Samuel and Jane (Jouette) 
Northington. The father was a native of Pee Dee County, N. C. The 
mother was a daughter of Judge Charles Jouette, one of the early military 
Governors of Michigan Territory and also a General Indian Agent in this 
portion of the United States. The father was a farmer ; came to tliis 
county when our subject was but two years old, and settled in Union 



V^ K.I 






518 BlOGRArmCAL SKETCHES. 

Schoolhouse rrccinct; he remained in this county until 1847, when he 
emigrated to California ; he lived in that State ten years and then moved 
to Wharton County, Tex. At that point he resided until his death in 
November, 1875. The mother died in this county in* June, 1837, when 
our subject was but a boy, leaving a family of seven children. Of this 
number but three are now living, viz.: B. F., of Rawlins, Wyo. T.; Mrs. 
Jane Stark, of San Antonio, Tex., and C. J. (our subject). The latter 
in 1847 went to Cumberland College, in Princeton County ; he afterward 
taught school for five years, and then turned his attention to the study of 
medicine ; he read with Dr. W. W. Throckmorton, of Princeton, Ky., 
and remained with him two years and then attended lectures at medical 
colleges at Memphis, Tenn., and Macon, Ga., graduating from both insti- 
tutions ; he commenced practice at this point in 1855, and has since had 
an extensive and lucrative practice over this portion of the county. Dr. 
Northington was married in this county on November 12, 1857, to Miss 
Susan J? Hester, a daughter of Capt. W. and Henrietta (Rogers) Hester. 
The parents were natives of Prince Edward County, Va., and came to 
Montgomery County, Tenn., in 181G. They came to Christian County 
in 1846 and settled at Lafayette. Here the father merchandized and 
was also a very extensive farmer and tobacco-grower; he is now living a 
retired life at the advanced age of eighty-four. The mother died in 
May, 1874. Mrs. Northington was born in this county on February 5, 
1853, and is the mother of two children : Mary Ella and Susan J. Dr. 
Northington and his family are members of the Christian Church of La- 
fayette; he is a member of Lafayette Lodge, No. 151, A. F. & A. M., 
and Mt. Olivet Chapter, No. 24 ; he has served as member of the Village 
Board, and in politics he is identified with the Democratic party. 

D. B. OWSLEY was born in Lincoln County, Ky., on July 25, 
1828," and is a son of H. P. and M. E. (Owsley) Owsley. The father of 
subject was also a native of this State, and was born on October 27, 
1796. His father was a native of Virginia, and came to this State in 
1782. n. P. Owsley moved to Shelby County in 1835, and in 1838 he 
came to this county. He settled on the farm now owned by subject, and 
there he resided until his death, on September 6, 1875. In his life-time 
he was a strong and devoted member of the Liberty Christian Church, 
and helped to a great extent in the erection of that house of worship, and 



•■;::^Tj;i^ .lA^.iii-f '.i'ix 



SU. 



iin i:,. )f.ir 






LAFAYETTE PRECINCT. 510 

.also in the building of the South Kentucky College. The mother was 
also born in this State, on March 18, 1811, and her death occurred on 
May 4, 1880. Subject is the only living one of three children. His 
education was received in the common schools of this county, and in e;irly 
life he assisted his father on the home farm. At the age of thirty he 
assumed control of the place, and at present owns about 1,800 acres, of 
which 600 acres are in cultivation. He also pays some attention to stock- 
raising. Mr. Owsley was married in this county on May 17, 1859, to 
Miss Susan A. Ford, a daughter of Robert and Jane W. Ford, natives of 
Virginia. Mrs. Owsley was born in Virginia on February 10, 1835, and 
was the mother of six children, of whom four are now living, viz. : Rob- 
ert, Bryan, Hans P., and John. This lady died on January 30, ISSl. 
Mr. Owsley is a member of the Liberty Christian Church, and is identi- 
fied vrith the Republican party. 

DR. E. C. ROBB (deceased) was born in Sumner County, Tenn., on 
December 11, 1820, and was a son of Joseph and Anna (Motheral) Robb. 
His education was received in the schools of his native county, and after- 
ward at the Nashville University, from which he graduated in 1841. He 
next read medicine for a short time, and then attended lectures at the Uni- 
versity of Medicine at Philadelphia. From this institution he graduated in 
the class of 1846. He commenced practicing in Sumner County, Tenn., 
and afterward came to Lexington, Ky. In 1852 he moved to Clarksville, 
Tenn., and at that point on December 19, 1854, he was married to Miss 
Evie Hester, a daughter of Robert and Minerva (Oldham) Hester. The 
father was a native of Virginia, the mother of Tennessee. Dr. Robb 
came to this county in 1861, and settled on the farm now owned by Mrs. 
Robb. He was able to practice but little, as his health was poor. 
He consequently devoted most of his attention to farming. He resided 
here until his death on November 29, 1873. Mrs. Robb was born March 
17, 1830, and is the raotlicr of two children : Anna (wife of R. J. 
Carothers) and Eva. She is identified with the Christian Church. 

P. E. SHERRILL was born in this county on May 8, 1829, and is 
a son of Jacob and Jane (Stephenson) Sherrill. The parents were 
natives of North Carolina, and came to this county in 1817. The father 
settled on Little Jliver, where he entered about 250 acres ; he resided 
here until his death, which occurred in the fall of 1872. The mother 



■1 .\ii.: :i:-/,. 






iielfi. 



520 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

died when subject was quite young. The latter was the eighth of ten 
children, and of this number but four are now living : P. E. (our sub- 
ject), Mrs. Harriet Boyd (in Graves County), Mrs. Martha Stephenson 
(in Ballard County), and Mrs. Elenora Crews, of Brazoria County, Tex. 
The common schools of this county furnished our subject his education ; 
He assisted on the home farm until twenty-one, and then commenced life 
for himself; he first settled in Ballard County, but lived there only a 
short time ; he next came to his present farm, where he has since resided. 
He now owns about 250 acres, of which 190 acres are in cultivation. 
Mr. Sherrill was married in this county on January 5, 1853, to Miss 
Mary W. McKenzie, a daughter of Squire W. W. McKenzio, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this work. She was the mother of two chil- 
dren — Munson B. and James B., both of whom are now in Texas — and 
died in the fall of 1859. Mr. Sherrill was next married, on January 5, 
1862, to Miss Sue Pierce, a daughter of John and Sarah (Allan) Pierce. 
This lady was a native of this county, and was the mother of four children, 
viz.: Mary P., Kempie, Jacob and Lou. Her death occurred on Octo- 
ber 25, 1874 ; and in Evansville, Ind., on May 15, 1878, our subject 
married Miss Rhoda Walker, a daughter of W. H. and Mary (Philips) 
Walker, of Evansville. The parents were natives of Washington County, 
111. Mrs. Sherrill is also a native of that county, having been born there 
on August 9, 1854. Mr. Sherrill is a member of the Old School Presby- 
terian Church, as was also his father before him. His wife is connected 
with the Methodist Church ; he is identified with the Democratic party 
in politics, ?,nd is a member of Church Hill Grange. 

E. T. STEPHENS was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., on 
February 20, 1841, and is a son of James and Nancy (Forest) Stephens. 
The father was born in North Carolina, came to Tennessee when quite 
young, with his parents, and died in Houston County, Tenn., in July, 
1880. The mother was born in Stewart County, Tenn., and died in 
Montgomery County, on June 6, 1856. Our subject was next to the 
youngest of eleven children, of whom seven are now living, viz.: Mrs. 
Theresa A. Jobe, in Dixon County, Tenn.; Sophrouia J. Grimes, in 
Gnives County, Ky.; John W., in Montgomery County, Tenn.; Francis 
M., in Trigg County, Ky.; James H. Stephens, in this county ; Mrs. 
Amanda A. Brown, in Montgomery County, Tenn., and EldriJge T., our 



Kili'.jro -i .lA'ijU'T/ MO'in 



f ::1liv 1 ./Ol! H-U m:T 












LAFAYETTE PRECINCT. 521 

subject. The schools of his native county furnished the latter his means 
of education. When about fourteen he learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed until 1867. In that year he turned his attention to 
farming and settled on his present place, where he now owns about 300 
acres, of which about 250 acres are in cultivation. Mr. Stephens was 
married in this county on March 28, 1867, to Miss Mary Jane Coleman 
(7iee Reves). This lady is the daughter of Thomas and Mary B. (Col- 
lins) Reves, who were natives of Virginia, and early settlers in the coun- 
ty, and was born on February 9, 1821. Our subject was a soldier in the 
late war, having enlisted in May, 1861, in Company K, Fourteenth Ten- 
nessee Infantry, C. S. A. He was, however, wounded at the second 
battle of Manassas, and was subsequently detailed on light duty during the 
remainder of the war. Mr. and Mrs. Stephens are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Stephens is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, and also of Church Hill Grange, No. 109. He is also 
identified with the Democratic party. 

DR. HENRY D. TUCK (deceased) was born in this precinct on 
December 3, 1835, and was a son of Dr. D. G. and Elizabeth M. (Tout) 
Tuck, natives of Mecklenburg County, Va., and emigrants to this county 
at an early date. Our subject was the fourth of nine children. His 
schooling was obtained in this county and in Montgomery County, Tenn. 
He then read medicine with his father two years, and then went to the 
Louisville Medical College. His health failed hira, however; he attend- 
ed only one session, and then returned to this county. Here he devoted 
his attention mainly to farming. October 6, 1858, he was married in 
this county to Miss Bettie J. Smith, a daughter of Dr. John and Bettie 
(Walton) Smith. Her parents were natives of Granville County, N. C, 
and came to Fayette County, Tenn., in 1833. Mrs. Tuck was born in 
that county on October 11, 1835, and to her were born seven children, 
four of whom are still living : Davis G., Sallie A., Corrinne and Emma. 
Dr. Tuck, when he began life in this county, first settled in the eastern 
edge of the precinct, and in 18G6 he came to the place now owned by 
Mrs. Tuck. Here he resided until his death, which occurred on Septem- 
ber 5, 1881. Ho was a member of the Masonic fraternity, also the 
Grange, and was a stanch member of the Lafayette Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He left a farm of about 1,000 acres, of whicli about 700 acres 












'iULS:-- ■::>) 



1.-:. ■.'.-I.e. \v.i-\vr hi Tuu: 



522 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCITES. 

are in cultivation. Mrs. Tuck is a member of the Old School Presbyterian 
Church, her family of the Methodist. 

T. S. YOUNG was born in Garrettsburg Precinct, this county, on 
April 8, 1840, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth M. (Crenshaw) 
Young. The father was born in Granville County, N. C, on September 
24, 1801. On January 11, 1829, he married Miss Elizabeth Crenshaw, 
who was born in Wade County on April 10, 1811. In 18-30 the twain 
came to this county, and first settled in Garrettsburg Precinct. There 
the father resided until 1858, when he came to the farm now owned by 
subject. Here he died on January 1, 1862 ; the mother on February 
15, 1871. Subject was the fifth of ten children, five of whom are now 
living, viz.: Addie C, T. S., H. A., Sallie B. and Alice W. The schools 
of this county furnished subject his means of education. He has always 
given his attention to farming, and now owns about 250 acres. In this 
county, on January 29, 1S6S, Mr. Young married Miss Sarah E. Wat- 
kins, a daughter of William G. and Emily (Moss) Watkins, natives of 
North Carolina. Mrs. Young was born on July 2, 1845, and is the 
mother of seven children, all of whom arc living, viz.: Ada B., Mary L., 
Rosa L., William T., Augusta, Harry and Frank. Mr. Young enlisted 
in October, 1861, in Woodward's Company, or Oak Grove Rancrers, 
as they were called, and remained in service until the close of the war. He 
served in many hard-fought battles, and was acting as body-guard for Jeff 
Davis when the latter was captured while trying to escape. Mr. Young, 
with moat of his company, eluded capture. In politics he is a Democrat, 
and is a member of the Knights of Honor fraternity and a Granger. 






£S(i 



.l'ji;'i' .xil/. .roi' ■■/ii!;i.:i ni 'yi^< 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 

JAMES M. ADAMS was born January 12, 1839, in Christian 
County, four miles from Hopkinsville, and is a son of Jolin and Elizabeth 
(Cayce) Adams. He was brought up on tlie farm, and upon arriving at 
manhood's estate commenced the business for himself. "When the war 
broke out he concluded to attend school, and did so for a time, but the 
next fall visited Nashville, 111., where he remained several months, and 
then returned home and bought his present place at Church Hill. A 
few years later he and a relative (by marriage) opened a store in partner- 
ship. They commenced on a small scale, and for two years comlucted a 
successful business, when they dissolved partnership, and Mr. Adams as- 
sociated bis brother with him, but in 1875 sold out. In 1880 he again 
embarked in merchandising, forming a partnership with J. E. Evans, 
which still continues. They carry a large stock of goods, and have an 
extensive trade. ^Ir. Adams was married, January 25, 1874, to Mary, 
a daughter of E. H. Siveley. Tliey have four children : John E., 
Emily E., Kosalie and Charles D. Mr. and Mrs. Adams are both strict 
members of the church ; he is a charter member of Church Hill Grange. 

WILLIAM E. ADCOCK was born in Buckingham County, Ya., in 
1846. He is the fourth of eleven children of Anthony and Martha E. 
(Saunders) Adcock. They died within four months of each other, Will- 
iam being then but sixteen years old. He remained at home until the 
age of twenty, securing a common school education. He then went to 
Nashville, Tenn., remaining there till the following spring. He engaged 
and worked in a brick-yard for four months for Mr. Alley, who paid him 
well, and desired him to remain, Having a friend named McCormick in 
Kentucky he came here, arriving without any money. For eight years 
he farmed on rented land, and applied himself strictly to his work. He 
then bought his present homestead of 213f acres, at §15 per acre ; he 
afterward bought 130 acres more, of which he sold 104 acres the same 
day, reserving twenty-six acres. At another time he bought nineteen and 



I ,:J! Y-!S:.::;,1. ri.' I 






,..r:// 



524 BIOORAPIIICAL SKETCHES. 

one-half acres, making in all 250| acres, and on it he erected a handsome 
two-story house in the fall of 1882. Mr. Adcock was married, in Novem- 
ber, 1871, to Miss Emma J., the eldest child of William Barklay and 
Jane (Campbell) Smithson. They have had six children : William An- 
thony, Barbara Alice, Lee Campbell, Delia Jane, George Hansford and 
Lois Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Adcock are members of tlie Methodist 
Church. He is a member of the Church Hill Grange. 

COL. CHARLES B. ALEXANDER is a native of Breckinridge 
County, Ky., and a son of Charles B. and Elizabeth (Wilson) Alexander, 
the former a native of Loudoun County, Va., and the latter from the vicin- 
ity of Wheeling, Va. His father's family were: John, who died at Union- 
town, Ky.; Elizabeth (Mrs. William Hoffman), of Lake County, Cal.; 
Mary (Mrs. John D. Stevens), Yolo County, Cal.; Armstead M., who 
died in Breckinridge County ; Ann, who was drowned in the Sacramento 
River, California; Charles B., the subject; Julia, who died in Breckin- 
ridge County. The family moved to Kentucky and settled in Breckin- 
ridge County in 1818, and to Booneville, Cooper Co., Mo., in 1848. 
Col. Alexander was educated at a Catholic School in Breckinridge 
County; he left school at the age of fourteen years, and escorted 
his three sisters to Cooper County, Mo., where his father had already 
moved. When the j^old fever broke out in 1819, Col. Alexander, 
in company with others, crossed the plains with an ox-team, being four 
and a half months on the road. Their route was very nearly that after- 
ward of the Union Pacific Railroad. He remained in California a little 
more than three years, and in 1853 returned home from San Francisco, 
via the Isthmus of Panama, thence to New York. En route home he 
passed through Cincinnati, and there for the first time in his life lieard 
" Woman's Rights " discussed by Lucy Stone and Mrs. Jenkins. In 
1854 Col. Alexander made another trip to California, and took with him 
a drove of 350 head of cattle, proceeding by the same route of his first 
trip. Arriving in the Sacramento Valley he sold his cattle to the miners 
to good advantage. This was among the earliest ventures in the cattle 
trade of the West, now grown to gigantic proportions. He continued in 
the cattle trade for three years, selling mostly to the miners, and doing a 
largo business. After his return from California the second time, he 
bought a farm in Cooper County, Mo., and under the firm of Majors, 



(,..; ,Tr. 



.II >v n; JO I 



1 :.y.'( ,:■..' 






id Lo^<.i.q 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 525 

Russell & Waddill, took a freight contract during the Mormon difficulties, 
when Albert Sidney Johnston was Governor of Utah, and the Govern- 
ment was sending large amounts of military stores overland to Salt Lake 
City. When the war broke out in 18G1 Col. Alexander joined the Con- 
federate army,' under Gen. Sterling Price. He served as Captain at the 
battles of Booneville and Springfield, Mo., and at Lexington was pro- 
moted to Colonel of a regiment of troops from Cooper, Pettis and Saline 
Counties. He was captured with 600 raw recruits, mostly unarmed, at 
Blackwater, Mo., and kept a prisoner of war at various places ; finally at 
Fort Warren in Boston Harbor, until after the seven days' fighting before 
Richmond, when he was exchanged. He was then sent to the Trans- 
Mississippi Department, where he remained until the close of the war. 
The war left him, like thousands of others, with few earthly posse-ssions, 
but his untiring energy is rapidly bringing him out of the poverty in 
which the war left him. Col. Alexander was married, June 14, 1866, to 
Mrs. Mary F. Jackson, daughter of Mrs. S. B. Lewis, who was a daugh- 
ter of Charles Brent, a merchant of Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky. Mrs. Alex- 
ander's family were among the pioneers of Kentucky ; her grandparents, 
the Lewises, came from Delaware, and settled in the central part of the 
State when it was only a district. Col. Isaac Baker, a cousin of her 
father, was in the Regular Army, and senior Colonel at the battle of New 
Orleans; Judge Joshua Baker, also a cousin, and still living in Louisiana, 
is the oldest living graduate of West Point. 

E. H. ANDERSON was born in Todd County on January 2, 1848, 
the second of eight children of M. W. and Nancy F. Anderson, of Han- 
over County, Va. His father read medicine in Virginia, and graduated 
from the Transylvania University at Lexington, Ky. Marrying in 1845, 
in A'^irginia, he removed to Gallatin, Tenn., one year after moving to Todd 
County. Here he remained two years, and then came on to Christian 
County in the beginning of 1850. He died in St. Louis in 1863; his 
mother died here in 1871. Our subject resides on the old homestead, 
being part owner of the farm, heirs owning the rest. He was married, 
April 28, 1875, to Miss Emma B. Coffee, the sixth of seven children of 
Asa and Sidney Coffee, of Kentucky. There are three children living : 
Henry, Ernest and an infant daughter. 

WILLIAM H. BOYD is the son of Littleton A. and Martha Ann 



.'■ 1/ ,:•'•■ ' to lorr.'' ■"■I' ■-;■■■'; tii 



.vr ,4 ij.-,^.,. a 



■lym 



\K•''^ 



526 BIOGUAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Boyd, and was born November 8, 1844, near Newstead in this county. 
He was brought up on the farm ; his father died in Christian County, 
October 20, 1846 ; his mother is still living in Trigg County. Mr. Boyd 
(the subject), received the benefits of the schools of his neighborhood, and 
at the beginning of the civil war enlisted in the Confederate Army, where 
he served until the spring of 1865. Since then he has been actively en- 
gaged in farming. By hard work and economy he has acquired a com- 
fortable home, comprising 270 acres of land located one mile northeast of 
Newstead. He has been a member of the Church Hill Grange since June, 
1881. He was married, November 1, 1871, to a daughter of James and 
Julia A. Carter, who was born in Christian County March 3, 1853. They 
have had five children, four of whom are living : Charley, Walter, Julia 
and Maggie. Bettie E. was born July 27, 1874, and died September 8, 
1876. Mr. Boyd is a member of the Baptist Church, his wife of the 
Reformed Church. 

JOHN A. BROWNING was born in Todd County, Ky., December 
13, 1840, and is a son of Almond and Mary (Kirkman) Browning, the 
former a native of Logan, and the latter of Todd County. His father's 
family were among the early settlers of the country. Almond Brown- 
ing was a benevolent man, and a kind- hearted and charitable one. 
John A., the subject, located on his present place in November, 
1871 ; the mother died at their old home in Todd County in 1882, 
and he then brought his aged father to live with him, where he died Jan- 
uary 14, 1884. Mr. Browning is a charter member of Church Hill 
Grange; was its Secretary some time, and two years its Master. In 
December, 1883, he was elected Secretary of the State Grange, which 
position he still holds. He was married, December 22, 1870, in Todd 
County, to Miss Sallie E., only child of Thomas and Lucinda Radford. 
They have had three children : Mary L., who died in infancy, Mattie S. 
and James A. Mr. and Mrs. Browning are members of the Methodist 
Church at Hebron. 

FRANK B. CAMPBELL was born in the town of Ilopkinsville June 
17, 1834, and was there reared and educated. He is the fifth of nine 
children born to John P. and Mary A. Campbell (nee Buckner), both of 
whom were natives of Virginia. His father, John P. Campbell, was an 
extensive tobacco dealer, and a man of sterling business qualities. For 



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UNION SCHOLHOUBE PRECINCT. 527 

many years he was an active member of the Baptist Church, and was 
frequently chosen to represent them in the Bethel Annual Association, 
embracing the counties of Christian, Montgomery, Todd, Logan, Simpson 
and others, lie died in 1S67. To those not favored with a personal 
acquaintance with John P. Campbell, no definite pen-picture can be pre- 
sented. He was tall, weighing about 190 pounds, fair complexion, with 
blue eyes, from which beamed forth the love which was so lavishly be- 
stowed upon his family and friends. The Hopkinaville Ecmiblican of 
November 10, 1881, pays him the following tribute: "One of the most 
remarkable men buried in the Hopkinsville Cemetery was Capt. John P. 
Campbell, for many years President of the Bank of Kentucky of this 
place ; the owner and active manager of several large farms, and a large 
number of slaves ; a heavy operator in tobacco, and a successful man of 
affairs ; his tall, erect, well-dressed person was for a long time a conspicu- 
ous figure upon the streets. The inflexibility and immovable character of 
the man is well typified by the shaft of Scotch granite which marks his 
resting place. He was devoted to the Union during the rebellion, and no 
disaster nor misfortune could shake his fidelity to what he believed to be 
his duty." His wife was a remarkable adaptation to a remarkable hus- 
band, and was also devoted to the Baptist Church and to her family. She 
died in the year 1882. Frank B., the subject of these lines, was a soldier 
in the Confederate Army, from which he was honorably discharged on 
July 5, 1862, having been for fifteen months in the service. He was 
discharged bearing the commission of First Lieutenant of Company A, 
First Kentucky Cavalry. Since the war he has devoted his time to 
his agricultural interests. He was married, January 26, 1864, to Lizzie, 
youngest daughter of Thaddeus S. and Harriet Wright, natives of Virginia, 
who removed to Christian County, Ky., about 1840, the former being 
now a resident of the county. The mother is deceased. The union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Campbell has been blessed with six children, all of whom 
were born on the beautiful farm homestead known as Belle Isle. 

CAPT. NED CAMPBELL was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., August 
9, 1840, and is the only son of Benjamin S. and Maria McD. Campbell 
{nee Starling), who were married near Russellviile, Ky. Benjamin Camp- 
bell was born in Mercer County, Ky., in 1811 ; his father was also named 
Benjamin ; his mother was Elizabetli Bradshaw. He was for some time 






!■, , / '.;:;. 'fl/, 



'; , Ji 'l L-'^i ^c ! - ,,...; :•;■ , ,>,'■-' MliiJ 



628 BIOaRAPHIOAL SKETCHEi?. 

a merchant in Ilopkinsville, but since 1852 has pursued fiinning on his 
present place, four and a half miles from the city. Capt. Ned Camp- 
bell, the subject, was educated in the schools of Christian County, and 
was brought up mostly on the farm. In ISGl he enlisted in the Federal 
Army, rose to the rank of Captain, and was honorably discharged in 
Louisville in January, 1865, two days before the burning of the old Gait 
House, from which he b^irely escaped with his life. On the 11th of Sep- 
tember, 1882, he was appointed Collector in the Second Kentucky Dis- 
trict of Revenue, a position he resigned October 31, 1883, and since then 
has devoted his time to farming. He has been for four years Chairman 
of the Christian County Republican Executive Committee, and has taken 
an active part in politics. He has always been a Republican ; his first 
vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. He was married, November 
8, 1866, in Ilopkinsville, to Miss Fannie Long, a daughter of Gabriel B. 
and Martha Long. They have one son — Gabriel L. Capt. Campbell, 
his wife and son, are members of the Christian Church. 

JOHN D. CLARDY, M. D., the fourth of ten children of John C. 
and Elizabeth (Cayce) Clardy, was born August 30, 1828, in Smith 
County, Tcnn. His father was born January 13, 1798, in North Caro- 
lina. In early life the Doctor's paternal grandfather removed to Smith 
■County, middle Tenn., and from there John C. Clardy removed his fami- 
ly in 1832, to Christian County, Ky. He was for many years a member 
of the Baptist Church. He died of apoplexy December 3, 1853, in 
Long View Precinct, Christian County. Dr. Clardy's mother was born 
September, 1804, in Cumberland County, Ya. Removing to middle Tenn- 
essee with her mother's family she was tlicre married to Mr. John C. 
Clardy. She was converted to Christianity in early womanhood, and has 
ever since been a faithful member of the Baptist Church. She is still 
living. Dr. Clardy first attended the schools of the neighborhood, after- 
ward, in 1845, being sent to Georgetown College, Scott County, Ky., 
graduating in 1848 with the degree of Bachelor of Sciences. He studied 
medicine with Dr. N. L. Thomas of Montgomery County, Tenn., attend- 
ing his first course of lectures at the Medical University of Louisville, 
and his last course at the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, 
from which he graduated in the spring of 1851, beginning to practice 
medicine in Long View Precinct, this county, the same year. After 



>:i„„]\ ,v. )r./:Jr.y.: 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 529 

three years' practice he removed to Ballard County, Ky., practiced there 
seven yearj, returning to Christian County in 1862. In July, l8Ga, 
having purchased " Oakland," his present elegant home, he removed 
there with his family. He engaged in the commission business, most- 
ly in tobacco, in the city of New York, during the years 1864-G5. 
Since then he has devoted his time to farming and stock-raising. He 
was married November 21, 1854, in Christian County to Ann, daughter 
of Fielding Bacon, Esq. She was born November 11, 1834, in Trigg 
County, and was educated in Cla'rksville, Tenn. Her father died in 1836, 
in Trigg County. Her mother is still living, and resides in Long View 
Precinct, Christian County. Dr. and Mrs. Clardy have had four children : 
Willie B., who died September 26, 1858 ; John F., born June 10, 1859 ; 
Fleming C, born December 10, 1860, and Fannie M., born December 
8, 1866. Mrs. Clardy is the grand-daughter of <]apt. Edmund Bacon, 
of Trigg County. He was for twenty years the business manager of 
Thomas Jefferson, at Monticello, Va. Thomas Jefferson "struck the 
first peg" and Edmund 'Bacon "struck the second peg " when laying oft" 
the University of Virginia. Dr. Clardy and wife have been active mem- 
bers of the Baptist Church since early in life. 

W. E. COOMBS was born in Muhlenburg County, Ky., February 
2'.K 1852, and is a son of George B. and Elizabeth Coombs. He was 
raised on the farm until sixteen years old, when his parents removed to 
Christian County ; he obtained a good common school education. He 
married, April 26, leTO, Miss Sally Dawes, a daughter of John and 
Melinda (Stephenson) Dawes of Lincoln County, Ky. Her parents re- 
moved to Trigg County, where she was brought up and where she was 
married. They have three children : George D., William H. and 
Hugh P. 

11. C. CRENSHAW was born in Trigg County, Ky., January 16, 
1852, and is the seventh of nine children born to Thomas and Eliza 
Crenshaw {nee Greenwade). His grandfather, Cornelius Crenshaw, was a 
native of Virginia, a soldier of the war of 1812, and removed to Trigg 
County in 1816 ; his maternal grandfather was from North Carolina, 
and was John Greenwade. He came to Kentucky about the close of the 
war of 1812, und in nu early day shipped produce to New Orleans by flat- 
boats, and in return brought back sugar, cofl'ee and molasses. He was 

33 



530 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

also a large stock-dealer, and took large droves of hogs to Alabama and 
Georgia, and thus amassed quite a fortune ; he died in 1867. Mr. 
Crenshaw, the subject, was brought up on his father's farm until twenty- 
oue years of age ; he then engaged in merchandising for six years, after- 
ward he handled tobacco extensively at Roaring Springs and at Cerulean 
Springs in Trigg County. lie was maxTied, October 19, 1875, to Miss 
Eunice Nance, a daughter of Mr. B. B. Nance of this precinct. They 
have one child — Gertrude. Mr. Crenshaw is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, and of the Christian Church, and is also an active temperance 
worker ; his wife is a member of the Baptist Church. 

JAMES H. DILLMAN was born in Muhlenburg County, Ky., Jan- 
uary 24, 1863, and is a son of Henry C. and Elizabeth (Coombs) Dill- 
man. His father held several important positions, among others. 
Collector of Internal Revenue. His father, David Dillman (grandfather 
of subject), represented Muhlenburg County in the Legislature one term, 
and was also Collector of Internal Revenue. James H., the subject, still 
remains at home with his father, and manages the farm, while his father 
is United States Mail Agent. James was married December 2, 1883, to 
Miss Ophelia Hanbery, the oldest daughter of John W. and Eliza Ilan- 
bery. 

CHARLES N. EDWARDS was born in Simpson County, Ky., 
March 4, 1887, and is a son of Henry N. Edwards, a native of North 
Carolina. He received a limited education in the common schools of the 
county, and removed with his parents to Graves County, where he re 
mained until twenty-three years of age. About the close of the war he 
came to this county, where he has since resided. He was married, in 
1864, to Miss Belle Torian. They have four children : Lila B., Charles 
M., Walter 11. and Arthur T., all of whom are at home. Mrs. Edwards 
died in 1880, and May 1, 1882, he married Miss Minnie E. Foard. 
They are members of the Metliodist Church — he is a member of Church 
Hill Grange. 

ALLEN W. ELLIS was born in Christian County, Ky., July 22, 
1836, being the youngest of tlie family of nine children of Nicholas and 
Mary (Gunn) Ellis. His parents were natives of North Carolina, emi- 
grating to Christian County in 1829. Nicholas Ellis, his father, died in 
1847, but his mother is living with her youngest daughter, Mrs. George 



C3o 



T.' .' . jj. hoii 'J-' ; •..nitJw'; 









!/. \.:r:. ' ri ;ri ;,::;i 



UNION SCItOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 531 

V. Thompson, ITopkinsville, Ky. Allen was educated in Ilopkiiisville 
and Cadiz. On being married he went to Missouri ; one child has been 
born to them — Lue. On the death of his wife he entered the Confeder- 
ate. service for a short time, being honorably discharged, when with his 
infant daughter he returned to Kentucky, where he has since continued 
to reside, engaging in farming. On November 21, 1865, he re-married, 
the lady being Miss Owen, daughter of Thomas Torian and Mary A. 
Owen. Her father is a native of Halifax County, Va., and her mother 
of North Carolina. Mrs. Ellis was educated at the Bethel Female Sem- 
inary, Hopkinsville. They have seven children : Ira A., Inez, Thomas 
T., Paul, Guy Roy, Arthur Wilbur and Mary Ellis. Rev. Ira Ellis, 
grandfather of A. W. Ellis, was a noted Methodist preacher of Virginia, 
whose life has been published in the early history of Methodism ; he was 
a member of the First Methodist Conference held in the United States. 
Allen W. and family emigrated in 1874 to Colorado, but as the grass- 
hoppers held a picnic at the expense of their crops, they returned to Mis- 
souri in 1875, but here again their crops were destroyed by grasshoppers, 
when they returned to Kentucky the same year. Mr. Ellis is a Meth- 
odist. 

JESSE E. EVANS was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., January 23, 18G0. 
He is the youngest of two children of Thomas E. and Hally (Adams) 
Evans. His parents were born in Kentucky ; his father died when Jesse 
was an infant ; his trade was that of a tailor iii Hopkinsville. His mother 
afterward re-married, and Jesse received his education in Hopkinsville. 
In 1880 he formed a partnership with his maternal uncle, J. M. Adams, 
at Church Hill, Ky., in the general merchandise business. Oa Novem- 
ber 19, 1883 he married Eva L., the youngest daughter of David and 
Eliza Steger, of Long View Precinct. They reside near the store, and 
are members of the Reformed Church at Church Hill. 

HENRY A. FARNSWORTH was bom near Columbia in Murray 
County, Tenn., on November 21, 1829, and is one of three children by 
the first marriage of Samuel A. and Jane (Coward) Farnsworth, of 
Tennessee. His parents died in Hickman County, Ky. The eldest 
brother of Henry is Andrew II., who is living in Henderson County, 
Tenn, and a sister Mary Jane is now Mrs. Robert Duff, of Limestone 
County, Tex. Henry remained at home with his pai-ents until he was 



.=*rl^ 



.1 i.-ns>:y ■.. hit. 

.;•-.,: s/.; )!■* m.<j 



,,;ii ;; jy ' •?:!•'. g/ti.'d -^'./i? sd) 



532 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

nineteen ; he attended the common schoc/'s in Avinter, and worked on the 
farm in summer. After leaving home he engaged in contracting for, and 
the constmction of railroads, etc., continuing in this for six years. At 
.twentj-six years of age, he married Miss Iitiura H. White, of Tennessee. 
They have iive children, all living : Robert ¥., Joseph 11., Julia, Rich- 
ard C. and Emmie. Mr. Farnsworth had a jivndfather of the same name 
who participated in the war of 1812. 

E. J. FAULKNER is a native of Trigg County, Ky., where he was 
bom in 1834, but has resided in Christian County about thirty years. 
His father's name was Ephraim Faulkner and his grandfather's name 
was John. Mr. Faulkner had seven brothers and sisters. His mother's 
name was Elizabeth, daughter of Mattie and Caldwell P. Poole, who was 
a soldier of the Revolution. Mr. Faulkner's parents came at an early 
day to that part of Christian County which is now Trigg County, and 
improved a farm there. Mr. Faulkner was educated in the common 
schools and worked at homo on the farm till twenty-one years of age. 
Then he managed business for others till he acquired sufficient capital to 
itart farming on his own account, buying a farm in 1862. Afterward he 
;iold that farm and bought the one on which he at present resides. On 
December 9, 1802 ho was married to Miss S. C. Mason, the eighth child 
out of nine of John B. and Belina Mason. Her parents were natives of 
Virginia, who immigrated here in 1830 ; William Mason, her grandfather, 
was a Revolutionary soldier. These children have been born to this 
union : Faulkner, Ida, Robert and Walter. Mrs. Faulkner died in 1868. 
In 1869 Mr. Faulkner married Miss Ann F. Mason, the sister of his first 
wife. He and his son Robert are members of the Church Hill Grange. 
Mrs. Faulkner is a Baptist. 

JOHN W. FOARD was born in Christian County, September 5, 
1846, and is a son of Robert and Jane (Hewell) Foard, the former born 
in North Carolina in 1802, and the latter in Virginia May 12, 1813. 
His father, Francis Foard (subject's grandfather) was a Revolutionary 
soldier, and was wounded while in-the service, from the effects of which 
he suffered until his death in 1833. Robert Foard and family came to 
Kentucky in 1830 and settled in Trigg County, and two years later re- 
moved to Christian County and settled near Beverley, where he died 
March 6, 1870 ; his widow is still living ; he was a member of the 






S«6 



■I .-: . '; ' I'i 



UNION PCHOOUIOUSE PRECINCT. 533 

Methodist Episcopal Church South, Irom 1831 to the timo of his death, 
and his wife has been a member sinco 1-529. He was made a Master 
Mason in 1842, and was a bright and shining light in the ordei. J:)hn 
W. Foard, the subject, received an English education, and grew to man- 
hood on the old homestead at Beverly. lie purchased his present homo 
from his brother in 1872. It was formerly known as the old Ool. Will- 
iam Henry place, but has been christened by Mr. Foard as " HedgoCol'l." 
He raises tobacco principally, but pays some attention to stock and grain ; 
he is a charter member of Church Hill Grange and its present Chaplain ; 
he is a Master Mason, and Treasurer of the lodge at Beverly, and is also 
a member of the Knights of Pythias, and a member of the Christian 
Church. Mr. Foard was married October 20, 1868, to Miss Rosa 
Adams, youngest child of John and Elizabeth (Cayce) Adams. She was 
educated at South Kentucky College in Hopkinsville. They have had 
eight children : Daniel \V., Walter A., C. H., John II., Lilian L., Jessie 
W., Lizzie J. and Maggie; the last three are at home ; Daniel W. and C. 
H. are dead. Mrs. Foard is a consistent member of the Christian Church. 
Mr. Foard is one of the stanch citizens of the county, is public-spirited, 
energetic and au enterprising business man. 

JOHN ANDREW GAKRETT was born in Dubois County, Ind., 
on September 15, 1846, and is the thiril oi live children of James and 
Parmelia Garrett, both of them being natives oi Ireland. Mr. and Mri. 
James Garrett emigrated to Indiana via New York, in 1839. Their fatn 
jly were: James, who married in Missouri, and died there, leaving a wJ/c 
and two children ; Eliza, married and living in Indiana ; Sarah Ann, 
who married, and died shortly afterwanJ; Movy A.nn, married, and living 
in Indiana; and John Andrew (larrett. He remained at home till Lo 
was nineteen, working in the summer and attending school in the wintei. 
At nineteen he enlisted in the Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
under Col. Carr, who was brotlier-in-law to Gov. 0. P. Morton ; he was 
with Gen. Sherman at the surrender of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston near 
Raleigh, N. C, and at Atlanta. After the surrender at Appomattox 
Court House, he was with Sherman's army at the grand review in the 
City of Washington, and was honorably discharged from tlie service at 
Louisville, Ky., and paid off at Indianapolis, Ind. Then he engaged in 
the saw-mill business in Dubois County, Ind., since then removing opjiO- 






.•J *^:(,. jj.** 



; ■■'■V u-;(i(iO i, 






534 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

site Mt. Vernon, In J., in Kentucky, cutting walnut lumber; tlien in 
Illinois, Iowa, Tennessee and Arkansas, and also where he at present re- 
sides, lie was married to Miss Maggie, the fourth of six children of 
Lawson and Almetta Downs, of Trigg County. Mr. Garrett's family 
now consists of three children, Lester, their third child, dying in infancy. 

JOHN CHAMBERS GARY was born in Buckingham County, Va., 
and is the second of eight children of Robert S. and Mary (Chambers) 
Gary. His parents removed to Christian County in the fall of 1836, 
and settled four miles south of Hopkinsville, where they died. John, the 
subject, was educated in the subscription schools of the neighborhood, 
and when grown, married, in December, 1851, Miss Eliza, daughter of 
James and Susan Clark. Her grandfather was a Colonel in the Revolu- 
tionary war, and the family still preserve with much care his silver shoe 
and knee buckles. Mr. Gary purchased his present place about the year 
1853, and has erected an excellent residence, with the best of out-build- 
ings. Mr. and Mrs. Gary have had seven children, five of whom are liv- 
ing, and married. 

ROBERT S. GARY was born in Buckingham County, Va., and was 
one of eight children born to Robert S. and Mary W. (Chambers) Gary, 
both natives of Buckingham. Of the eight children but five now live. 
His parents moved here early in the fall of 1836, purchasing a large farm 
and successfully working it till their death. They were all members of 
the Baptist Church. Robert was but two years old when the family ar- 
rived here; he was educated in Russellville College, leaving it in 1854. 
He began to farm the old family homestead in 1855, since which time he 
has continued to live upon it and has greatly improved it. In 1857 he 
married Mattie L., daughter of James and Susan Clark, natives of Chris- 
tian County, Ky. She was educated in Hopkinsville and Lafayette. 
They have had twelve children, seven of whom are living. He is a mem- 
ber of the Church Hill Grange. 

J. C. GLASS was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., in 1828, the fourth 
child of Zachariah and Mary Jane (Clark) Glass, who were natives of 
Virginia but removed to Kentucky at an early day. His maternal grand- 
mother was a Miss Gaines, a daughter of one of three brothers of that 
name, who came from Switzerland. They were most probably the ances- 
tors of all of that name in America. Mr. Glass had two brothers and five 



.n;':i;^ .--h 



Hi 



h Iv: -;5>V.( 



UNION SCtlOOLIIOUSE TRECINCT. 535 

sistera, both his brothers and one sister having died. The party ot' Vir- 
ginian emigrants with whom his parents came to Kentucky, contained 
200, of whom 175 were slaves. His maternal grandfather was known as 
" Richgrove " John Clark. He settled with his family seven miles south 
from Hopkinsville, and was a large man, weighing 350 pounds, lie was 
one of the best-known and most hospitable men of this section, being vis- 
ited by nearly every one in Christian County. Everything used on his 
farm was manufactured there — rope, cloth, and tobacco hogsheads. Mr. 
Glass' paternal grandfather, Thomas Glass, and family settled first near 
Frankfort, Ky. The Indians, however, drov^e them from their settlement, 
and they buried such things as would not injure by contact with the 
earth ; they returned to Virginia and remained a year. Organizing a 
large party they came again to Kentucky, and remained in spite of Indi- 
ans. Mr. Glass' father successfully followed the business of saddlery, 
merchandise and banking. He finally purchased a large tract of land 
near Hopkinsville. Mr. Glass has a very pleasant homest:ead of 500 
acres of choice land, on which he cultivates corn, wheat and tobacco. 
He is a charter member of Church Hill Grange, and he regards it as 
a good thing for farmers. He is one of ten who stood by and kept it up 
when interest in it flagged ; at its annual stock sales, the Grange has set 
free dinners to all who attended. The first year the attendance on sale 
day was 200, the second year GOO, and last year there were 4,000 people 
present. In 1856 he married Miss M. W. Gant, of Hopkinsville. They 
have two children: Sally (Mrs. J. E. McPherson), and William A., at 
home. Mr. Glass is very fond of the chase, and is one of an old hunt- 
ing party formed forty years ago. They still annually take their hunt in 
the forests of the Southwest. 

JOHN 11. GREEN was born October 19, 1818, in Union School- 
house Precinct, and is one of the enterprising farmers of this county ; he 
is the sixth of twelve children born to John R. and Elizabeth T. (Nelson) 
Green. His grandfather, Thomas Green, was an early settler in the 
county, and improved the place now known as "Broad Castle " farm, 
where John R., Jr., was born, and now resides. John R., Sr., was also 
born in Christian County, where his life was spent. He was a farmer 
and merchant, whose energy and systematic business habits were warmly 
eulogized by all with whom he came in contact. He was a Royal Arch 



:■ ' :,-■-'■.■■'■ U-i'li-M «0!*!a 









5rfb BIOGRAPillCAL SKETCHES. 

Mason. His native humor made his society very desirable to all bis 
friends. He died February 7, 1875 ; his wife was born in Virginia, and 
was a daughter of Dr. Hugh and Mary Ann A'elson, prominent families 
of that State. John R., Jr., received his elementary education at the 
hands of a private tutor. Prof. Otto Barthes, after which he attended the 
Forrest Academy of the city of Louisville, Ky. At the age of nineteen 
he went to Clarksville, Tenn., where he engaged as shipping clerk for a 
tobacco dealer. In 1870 he went to Hopkinsville, and there dealt in 
leaf tobacco until 1875, when, in consequence of the death of his father, 
he returned to the old homestead, where he has since remained actively 
engaged in farming, with which he combines general trading in tobacco 
and stock. In business he has frequently sustained severe loss, but his 
energy and will have overcome all obstacles, and he is now well established 
in a prosperous business. On the 2-lth day of February, 1874, he was 
married to Miss Lucy Phelps, d.iughter of Hiram and Cornelia Phelps, 
of Hopkinsville, where she was born, and where in the Bethel Female 
College she was educated. They have three children : Cornelia, Hunter 
Wood and Lizzie Nelson Green. 

JOHN WILSON GRESHAM was born in Christian County, Ky., 
September 22, 1840, and is the fourth of twelve children born to Archi- 
bald and Sufan (Boyd) Gresham. In 1852 the family removed to Wood- 
ford County, 111. John W. was then twelve years old. His mother died 
in August, 1881, but his father is still living in Illinois. There are nine 
living children. The subject was educated in the public schools of Illi- 
nois. He served his country as a soldier in Company E. One Hundred 
and Eighth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, from August 28, 1862, 
to September, 1865, and was then honorably discharged at Chicago, 111. 
He returned March, 1866, to Kentucky, and in 1874 he purchased his 
present homestead. He married Miss Fannie Gregory, of this county, 
on November 19, 1868. She was born February 4, 1842, and is a 
daughter of Isam and Mary (Hall) Gregory ; she received a common 
school education. They have three children: Wilbur, born April 5, 
1870 ; twins were born May 18, 1872, a boy and girl. The boy died in 
infancy, and the girl, Minnie May, died, at the age of ten years, of white 
swelling, on February 21, 1883. When suffering from disease she was 
visited by a little school-mate. On leaving she said, " I hope next time I 



:a;; :■'') 



.lohwR 'ill •>' 6i!-! -ir-.n)!. o-- 



■'s-U 



I.. ..,.*. 'I . rd-J;:3 0» ;o.A. ,u 






UNION SCHOOLHOUSE TRECINCT. 537 

see you you'll be better, Minnie," to which she replied, " You'll never 
see me better till I go up yonder." Mr. and Mrs. Gresham are members 
of the Baptist Church. He has held the office of Deacon several years. 

JOHN W. HANBERY was born March 14, 1827, in Trigg County, 
Ky., and is a son of Thomas Hanbery, a native of Norfolk County, Va. 
He moved to Kentucky in an early day, and both he and his wife did! in 
Trigg County. John's education was limited and confined to the winter 
months of the common schools of the neighborhood. He hired out when 
but a boy, and thus contributed his mite to the support of his mother's 
family, his father dying and leaving a large and almost helpless family. 
This he continued until he was grown. He was married, November 7, 
1852, to Miss Eliza Wadlington, who has boi'ne him eight children, five 
boys and three girls, three of whom are married. Mr. Hanbery is a live, 
energetic man, and a good farmer. He accumulated considerable prop- 
erty, but became involved by going security for a friend, lost his all and 
was left §1,400 in debt. But undaunted by the misfortune, he went to 
work, commenced again at the bottom of the ladder, to repair his ruined 
fortune. He rented 1,200 acres of land, bought stock upon which he gave 
a mortgage, and with the help of his sons, the eldest two being now- 
young men, put in a large crop of wheat, corn and tobacco. This was 
in the Centennial year (1S76), and it seemed to have been a lucky vent- 
ure, for everything he touched proved prosperous, and his old debts were 
soon all paid. In 18S2 the Courier-Journal mentioned him as probably 
the largest tobacco-grower in the world. Mr. Hanbery is a member of 
the Church Hill Grange and of the Baptist Church. 

COL. GANG HENRY is a native of Scott County, Ky., was born 
February 8, 1820, and is a representative of one of the most prominent 
families ever in this county. A general sketch of the family precedes 
this, and details are needless in this sketch. His parents, Gen. William 
and Cornelia V. (Ganu) Henry, removed to Christian County when he 
was yet an infant. He was educated in the common schools, and at the 
age of twenty-one years was appointed Sheriff of the county, holding the 
position three years. He was married in 1845 to Miss Harriet Mc- 
Gaughey, the youngest daughter of Col. Arthur McGaughey, and Julia 
Hume, Ilia wife. Harriet Henry died in 1852, leaving two children — 
Arthur and Harriet. In May, 1855, he was married to Miss Anna K. 






H<\'. h.' 



; K>»r!M.-i, 



538 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Davis, of Shelby County, a daugliter of Col. Presley and Sarah T. Davis. 
Four children were born to this last marriage : William, Gano, Mary P. 
and Annie E. ; the last three live at home ; William, the eldest, is dead. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry are members of the Baptist Church. In 1854 Mr. 
Henry was ■commissioned Colonel by Gov. Morehead and placed upon his 
staff. In 1858 he was elected Prcsiilont of the Evansville, Henderson 
& Nashville Railroad, and the next year made a trip to Europe in its in- 
terest. He held the oflice until work was stopped on the road by the 
war. He was appointed one of a Commission by the Legislature, at the 
session of 1819-50, to lay off the County of Christian into precincts and 
fix their boundaries. He has always been a busy, public-spirited and en- 
terprising citizen. 

R. W. HENRY, lawyer, Hopkinsville, was born in this county June 
1"2, 1858, and is a descendant of one of the oldest families of Kentucky. 
Gen. AYilliam Henry, his great-grandfather, was born in Charlotte 
County, Va., April 12, 1761. An extended sketch of the Henry family 
immediately precedes this notice. JIaj. R. W. Henry, the father of our 
subject, was born in Christian County, June 4, 1825. Here he married 
Fannie Bell and became a planter of considerable note. lie was a Major 
in the Confederate service. He was captured at Fort Donelson and car- 
ried a prisoner of war to Indianapolis, Ind., where he died in 1862. Mr. 
Henry was reared on the farm and educated in the private schools. In 
1878 he entered the Law Department of the Cumberland University, from 
which he graduated the following year. He was admitted to practice in 
August, 1879, since which time he has been a member of the Hopkinsville 
bar. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and also of the Chris- 
tian Church. 

JOHN N. JOHNSON was born in Louisa County, Va., on Febru- 
ary 22, 1832, being the fifth of nine children born to Thomas and Eliza- 
beth (Seargeant) Johnson. Both parents were born in Virginia; his father 
dying there in 1847, his mother moved the family, including John, to 
Beverly, Christian Co., Ky., in 1849. She bought a farm on which they 
lived three years, but being too small, she sold it, and bought the one on 
which John now resides. John remained with her as the head of the 
family till he was twenty-five years old. He tlien married Martha, third 
child of Pleasant and Sarah (Weathers) Cayce, borrowing the money on 



Oti 



a .1 .-. . 1 

-.!.■: /■;',■ 






UNION SCHOOLIIOUSE PRECINCT. 539 

wliich to start liouse-kecping. He resided 'at home one year longer, and 
then bought a place near Lafayette, and settled upon it. Hero ho re- 
mained thirteen years, till he secured the farm next to his present place, on 
the east. He built his residence in 1883 ; his mother died ten years ago ; 
he was a charter member of the Lafayette Grange, and is now a member 
of the Church Hill Grange. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of the 
Christian Church. Mr. Johnson's maternal grandfather was a soldier of 
the Revolution, and refused to receive any pension. His four grand- 
parents lived to be very old, each nearly reaching one hundred years, and 
all finally died without any trace of disease, and simply from old age. 

JOHN RICHARD KNIGHT is a native of old England, and was 
born in Dudley, Staflordshire, in July, 1843. He is the eldest of five 
children born to Joseph and Mary Ann Knight (nee Hall). Joseph was 
an iron-master, and had been brought up to the business by his f^ither, 
John Knight, who was manager of the iron works at Dudley. He and 
his wife came to America and first stopped in Maryland, where he worked 
some time in the Mount Savage Iron Works, and while there assisted to 
make the first " T " rail made in the United States. He afterward worked 
at Cincinnati, Ettawa, Ga., Cumberland Iron Works, etc. He then 
bought a farm at Indian Mound, Tenn., where the family resided some 
years, his wife liaving died at Ettawa, Ga. After the battle of Fort Don- 
elson he went to St. Louis, and from there to Louisville, and became 
Superintendent of the Louisville Iron Works, which position he held un- 
til his death in 1873. John R., the subject, attended school at Carters- 
villo, Ga., Marysville, Tenn., and Ross Military School near Clarksville, 
Tenn. He entered the iron business at Ettawa, Ga., and went with his 
father to St. Louis and Louisville, and afterward engaged in the same 
business in Lonton, Ohio, Sharon, Penn., and Chattanooga, Tenn. His 
last work in iron was at the Hillman Rolling Mill, Lyon County, Ky. 
He was married, January 28, 1866, to Miss Maggie E. Palmer. They 
settled at Indian Mound, liaving inherited the f;irm from his father, and 
resided there eight years. He then sold out and purchased his present 
farm in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Knight have had seven children born 
to them, six of whom are living. 

GEORGE ENOS KNIGHT was born at Mount Savage, Maryland, 
January 10, 1848. He is the fourth of five children born to Joseph and 






■uls I':. 

i'-i-Ili'.' 

■n -nJ 






540 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Mary (Hall) Knight. They were natives of England, and emigrated to 
Maryland in 1843. His mother died in Ettawa, Ga., to which place the 
family had removed. They then went to Cumberland Iron Works, Ten- 
nessee, and various other places, finally settling in Louisville, where, 
after being Superintendent of the Iron Works for ten years his father 
died. George was educated at the Cumberland Iron Works, Tcnn. In 
1865 he went to the Louisville Iron Works, and remained there under 
his father's direction until 1873. His father's death occurred that year, 
and he received the honors of the Odd-fellows' burial at New Concord, 
Calloway Co., Ky. George remained at Louisville till 1875, when he 
came to his present place in Christian County, which he had just pur- 
chased. He has since engaged in farming and building. On February 
16, 1879, he was married to Miss R. J. Shropshire, the oldest daughter 
of John 0. and A. E. Shropshire. Her parents reside at the Tennessee 
Iron Works, Lyon County, where she was born. They have had one 
child — George, who died in infancy in 1880. Mrs. Knight is a member 
of the Christian Church. 

COL. ARTHUR McGAUGHEY was born in Pennsylvania in 1790. 
During his infancy his father emigrated to Shelby County, Ky., where 
his boyhood was spent, and afterward located in Hart County, Ky. He 
served as a volunteer in the war of 1812, and after the war was commis- 
sioned Colonel of the militia by Gov. Adair. In 1819 he married Miss 
Julia Hume, and in 1826 moved to the southern part oT Christian County, 
where he purchased a large tract of land, and spent his ample means 
building upon and improving an extensive farm. He was a man of a 
high sense of honor, untiring energy, combined with great delicacy and 
refinement of feeling. He died in 1852. Albert Wallace was born in 
Culpeper County, Va., in 1800. In 1832 he emigrated to Crittenden 
County, Ky., and settled on the bank of the Ohio River, where he owned 
a large tract of land. In 1816 he married Miss Elleli Kenton McGaughey, 
of Christian County. In 1856 he moved to the south part of Christian 
County, and in 1856 to Hopkinsville, where he resided until his death in 
1879. He was a man of stern integrity, temperance and purity of life. 
In his intercourse with men he was dignified, reserved and unobtrusive. 
He was the father of eight children, only four survived infancy, viz.: 
Julia II., Alfred IL, Henry D. and Dr. Howerson Wallace. 






h ,.<S !v.-',;rj 






M^i't.f-rio 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 541 

ROBERT II. McGAUGHEY,sonof Col. Arthur and Julia P. (Hume) 
McGau^hey, was born January 26, 1826, at Bacon Creek, Hart County, 
this State, and tlie same year his parents removed to this county, he at 
the time being but three months old. He was educated principally at 
Transylvania University, Lexington, graduating in 1846 with honors. 
He has always followed farming, and owns a good farm in Union School- 
house Precinct, highly improved and in an excellent state of cultivation. 
He is a charter member of Church Hill Grange, and ever since its organ- 
ization he has held the important position of its Treasurer, except for the 
last two years. When he resigned this office the Orange showed its ap- 
preciation of his services by presenting him a gold pen, holder and case, 
which he values highly. He was married, September 9, 1868, to Mrs. 
Mary J. Green, a daughter of Jefferson and Adelaide Grumpier, of David- 
son County, Tenn. He is a member, and has been since 1846, of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

JOHN W. McGAUGHEY, the youngest of six children of Col. 
Arthur and Julia (Hume) McGaughey, was born July 1, 1832, at his 
present home "Steadfast." This fine place is situated one mile southeast 
from Newstead Postoffice. His father was born April 1, 1790, in Bedford 
County, Penn., and his mother, Julia P., was born January 1, 1799, in 
Clark County, Ky. John VV., the subject, has followed the occupation 
of a farmer, being fairly successful. He was married, April 7, 1868, in 
Christian County, Ky., to Miss Hattie P., daughter of Lindsey and Eliza- 
beth Kincade. Hattie P. was boru September 17, 1815, in Christian 
County, and had the advantages of the schools of the vicinity. They 
have had four children, three of whom are living. They are, Henry 
Hume, Arthur Kenton and Robert Howe. Mr. McGaughey was Magis- 
ti-ate for three years, beginning with 1880. He is an Elder in the Old 
School Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a member many years. 
Mrs. McGaughey is a member of the Reformed Church. Mr. McGaughey 
has beautified his home by surrounding it with ornamental trees, in which 
he justly takes great pride. 

JOHN C. MARQUESS was born in Sumner County, Tenn., No- 
vember 12, 1836. He is the fifth of eleven children born to William K. and 
Charlotte (Armstrong) Marque.ss. His parents were natives of Sumner 
County; his mother died in Todd County, Ky., in 1859, but his father is 



'ory; 



a I -A 






lOn-'/T'i $-oot' 



542 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Still alive, and resides in Trigg County. Mr. Marquess has three brothers 
and three sisters. lie remained at home with his father till his thirtieth 
year, thus securing a practical English education. They went into part- 
nership on John's coming of age, and in January, 1867, he began by him- 
self in the wheelwright and blacksmithing business, which he has continued 
ever since. In 1881 he commenced to undertake general merchandising 
in Pee Dee. On January 24, 1867, he was married to Bettie, the fourth of 
eight children of John M. and Mollie (Dyer) Darnell. Mrs. Marquess is a 
member of the Reformed Church. 

DAVID S. MASON was born in Buckingham County, Va., April 
20, 1830. He is a son of John and Annie (Smith) Mason, natives of 
Cumberland County, Va. Subject's grandfather was a Revolutionary 
soldier, who never returned from the war. He was a native of England, 
but espoused the cause of the colonies and sealed his devotion to that 
cause with his life. He left a widow and several children. David, the 
subject, was married, December 22, 1859, to Miss Mary Ann Jones of 
Hopkinsville. Mr. Mason follows forming and milling— he owns the 
Star Mills on Little River, and 240 acres of excellent land adjacent. 
His stalwart sons assist him in both branches of his business. 

EDGAR FARLEY MORRIS was born in Christian County, Ky., 
March 10, 1845, being the eldest child of Augustus and Anne (Johnson) 
Morris. Edgar's father died on July 31, 1846. This family were among 
the earliest settlers of Christian County, Eddin Morris immigrating there 
from Kanawha County, Va., in 1817. Edgar's mother married J. F. 
Dranc, by whom she had five more children. Mr. Morris remained at 
home with his mother till her second marriage, when he removed to his 
grandfather's farm, and upon the decease of that relative he sold 100 
acres of the homestead, reserving 300 acres on which he at present lives. 
Eddin Morris was a captain in the war of 1812. On May 11, 1865, 
Edgar married Bettie, daughter of Madison ami Mary (Pinnor) Northing- 
ton, and they have had born to them four children : Augustus E., Thomas 
W., Alcyon and Augusta. He produces tobacco, corn, wheat, and also 
turns liis attention to the raising of hogs. Mr. Morris is a good and 
public-spirited citizen. 

JOHN L. MOSS' was bora in Montgomery County, Tenn., Novem- 
ber 10, 18:4. He is the fifth child of Stephen Young and Caroline 






li.. "M 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 643 

(Gold) Moss. His father was born in Virginia and his mother in Tenn- 
essee. They were farmers and devoted to their children. John was 
.educated in the common school, and is now a farmer. In 1857 he 
removed to Beverly, Christian Co., Ky., and finally to his present place 
in 1884. On JIarch 5 he married Ella, youngest daughter of Archibald 
and Alice Campbell, late of Todd County. Her parents and four 
brothers and sisters are all dead. She joined the Baptist Church in 1877, 
and is still a member. He is at present farming 360 acres of land, 
devoting his attention to the growing of tobacco, wheat, corn, etc. They 
have two children named respectively Campbell and Frederick. 

BENJAMIN BEDFORD NANCE is a native of this county and of 
this precinct. He was born April 28, 1830, and is a son of Joel and 
Sarah (Sholar) Nance. Joel Nance, the father of subject, was a native 
of Bedford County, Va., and came to Shelby County, Ky., in 1818. He 
had been a soldier in the war of 1812, and fought gallantly for his 
country. He removed to Christian County in 1821, and lived here until 
his death, September 11, 1879. He was a thorough and practical 
farmer, genial, hospitable and loved to have his friends around him. 
Benjamin, the subject, received but a common school education, and when 
only about twenty years of age was married to Miss Jane Giles. Five 
children were the result of this union : Mary A., now Mrs. Ernest White; 
Sarah E., now Mrs. R. C. Crenshaw ; Martha J., who died when a 
child; Emma L., now Mrs. Robert Farnsworth, and John B. Mrs. 
Nance died June 30, 1860, and Mr. Nance afterward married Miss 
America B. Usher, daughter of Dr. James H. Usher. They had one 
child, Robert H., who died. His wife died August 19, 1868, and he 
married a third time, October 22, 1872, Miss Josephine H. Usher, a 
sister of his deceased wife. Four children are the result of thi.s last 
marriage : Lucy, Annie M., Mary T. and Lizzie H. Mr. and Jlrs. 
Nance are members of the South Union Baptist Cluirch. lie is a public- 
spirited citizen, and like his father, is a practical and energetic farmer. 

THOMAS T. OWEN was born in Halifax County, Va., February 
29, 1808. He is the second son of William and Elizabeth Owen (wee 
Torian). They had sixteen children whom they raised, eleven sons and 
five daughters. His parents were natives of Virginia ; seven are living 
of his father's children : the subject of this biography, Joseph L., 



-niisT i; 'i..1J0jii mm I 



■'1' 'I T>i ' ■,'/..,.■ 

I>:-:- ji^' ■it. I 'i. oi 



>■■:.,■ bus flL'HlOld 

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■'9 ft."i 



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544 BIOGUAPIIICAL SKETCHES. 

Obedience and Elizabeth who reside with him, Andrew, James J. and 
Edward. Mrs. William Owen died in Virginia in 1856, Mr. William Owen 
died in Virginia in 1857. Mr. Thomas T. Owen, the subject, married 
Miss Mary Ann Foulks at her father's residence, Halifax County, Va. 
She was the youngest daughter. She was devoted to her family, and a 
life-long member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Owen and sisters are also 
members of that church. Ho removed from Virginia to Christian County, 
Ky., in the fall of 1S52. Here engaging in farming he acquired 700 
acres of land, and commodious buildings, five miles northwest of Hopkins- 
ville on the Princeton road. Eight children blessed his marriage, four 
sons and four daughters, of whom two sons and three daughters are living ; 
all are married. He brought some means from Virginia, including forty 
blacks. He has given a farm to all his children but two; he can provide 
for them all. He put up a steam saw and grist-mill on his place, which 
enables him to miike meal and lumber. He was for years a stanch 
friend of prohibition. He looks on alcohol as a dangerous foe to human 
happiness. 

MARTIN \. OWEN was born in Christian County, Ky., November 
29, lb37. He is the youngest of eight children (four of each sex) of 
William A. and Sarah Elizabeth (Creed) Owen. His mother was born 
near Alexandria. Va., and emigrated with her parents to Hawkins County, 
Tenn. His father was a Tennessean, and died there in 1837. Emigrat- 
ing with her childien to Christian County, Ky., she afterward returned 
to Murfrecsboro, Tenn., where she died of cancer in 1855. Martin 
went to the Baptist College there under President Pendleton. He also 
attended the common schools in Kentucky, working in summer in order 
to attend the schools in winter, and he paid his board in part b}' working 
of a Saturday while at school. His mother had considerable property- 
when she removed to Kentucky, which was unfortunately entrusted to 
others and lost. Mr. Martin Owen being thrown so early upon his own 
resources for an education and means of subsistence, worked one entire 
year for §40, and the last year he worked for §140. In 1856 he traveled 
irt , Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and then returned to 
Christian County, greatly benefited by what he had seen in those States 
of farming generally. He managed farms fur various people from 1857 
to 1864, and in 1865 he commenced farming on his own account, being 



T ^, 



n?. 



"'■jiiilh'iJO 

f ,11 i,,5.b 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 545 

for the next four years profitably engaged with Dr. Clardy in farming 
and the tobacco trade. He bought his present homestead in 1870. In 
1874 he became General Agent and Inspector of tobacco for Bryant & 
Co. of Hopkinsville, afterward becoming General Agent for Buckner & 
Wood, tobacconists. On November 18, 1863, he married Mattie, daugh- 
ter of Capt. Jolui Pierce, a native of North Carolina, and Captain in the 
war of 1812. They have three living children — Lizzie, Frank and Allen. 
The parents and Lizzie are members of the Methodist Church and of the 
Church Hill Grange, Mr. Owen being a charter member and Lizzie ladv 
Assistant Secretary. 

MILES G. RADFORD was born in Buckingham County, Va., Au- 
gust 19, 1808. Ilis father was Reuben, the son of John Radford ; his 
mother's name was Phoibe Gibson, and a daughter of Miles Gibson. 
Reuben Radford, subject's father, was a Captain in the war of 1812, and 
was within a day's march of the battle of New Orleans, but unable to 
reacii the scene of action, and compelled to listen to the roar of the can- 
non without participating in the fight. Miles G., or " Rock " Radford 
as he is known in his neighborhood, was educated in the common schools 
of Kentucky, his parents having removed to Green County, this State, 
when he was but three years old. His father died when he was seven 
years old, and his mother died four years later. lie farmed with his 
brother-in-law until he was twenty, and then followed " oversecim' " until 
he was twenty-seven. He has been married three times; his first wife 
was Elizabeth Poole, to whom he was married in December, 1835. They 
had three children : Sarah Elizabeth, Albert T. and Amelia J., all of 
whom are now dead. His wife died in 1839-40, and some years later he 
married Miss Emily B. Cheatham, with whom he lived some eighteen 
years; she then died, childless. Five years later he married Miss Ann 
G., a daughter of William and Elizabeth Alexander. Mr. Radford was 
arrested during the late war, and taken to Louisville, for his sympathy 
with the rebellion, where he was kept several weeks a prisoner. Finally 
he was tried, with others who were arrested and taken there at the same 
time, and after considerable red tape were all sent home, after taking the 
oath of " allegiance," etc. 

JOHN M. RAMSEY, M. D., was born November 15, 1S51, seven 
miles north of Gallatin, Tena., and is the eldest of seven children born to 



ih 1.1 

}( '.0 .^■■J 



546 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCMES. 

E. A. and S. N. Ramsey, tho former a native of Rockcastle County, 
Ky. His grandfather was a very early settler near Lancaster, in Garrard 
County, Ky. His father removed to Tennessee when grown, where he 
taught school, and afterward engaged in farming. He married Sarah 
McNeill, the eldest of three children of John and Henrietta McNeill. 
Dr. Ramsey worked on the farm until seventeen years of age, attending 
school during the winter, when he was thrown upon his own resources, 
his father not being able to give him any further education. During the 
next seven years he taught and attended school alternately, gaining in 
this way a good preparatory education. He then began reading medi- 
cine, and in the fall of 1877 he entered the medical department of the 
University of Nashville, and Vanderbilt University, from which he grad- 
uated ill March, 1879, obtaining two gold medals. Vanderbilt University 
conferred upon him his diploma as a physician. Returning home to Gal- 
latin he remained there until in August, when he came to Christian 
County, and settled in what is known as the Sinking Fork neighborhood, 
six miles northwest of Hopkinsville. In the State of his adoption, where 
he went among strangers for the purpose of carving out a path in life, he 
soon obtained friends and patronage under adverse circumstances, being 
without money and without even a horse to practice his profession. By 
assiduity and close attention those difficulties were soon overcome, and in 
the winter of 1883-84 he bought a home, where he expects to build him- 
self an elysium. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and Superin- 
tendent of the Pisgah Sunday-school. Faithful to his friends, his pro- 
fession, his God and the cause of education, he has done much to repair 
the Sinking Fork Church, build the Sinking Fork Schoolhouse, furnishing 
nearly a third of the money and superintending the work himself. And 
as trustee of the public school he has endeavored to build up the cause of 
education and moriility in the vicinity. 

RUFUS A. RUSSELL was born in Lafayette, this county, on 
December 12, 1843, and is the fourth of seven children born to J. H. and 
Elizabeth (Beazley) Russell. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, 
who removed to Lafayette, engaging in merchandising there until 1856. 
He both married and buried his wife there. After engaging in business 
in various places he finally settled in McPherson County, Kan., where he 
at present resides. Rufus lived in Lafayette, attending school till four- 



8tg 

I 
) 



:r-i'j.;! 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 547 

teen years old. In 1858 his father removed to Stewart CoiuUy, Tenu., 
when Rufus began tu work on the farm, and continued to do so till the 
spring of 1864, when he again attended school. In November of the 
same year he engaged as clerk in the grocery storo of II. W. Tuck, La- 
fayette, with whom he remained till 1867, marrying in August of that 
year Miss Tillic E. Boyd. In January, 1868, he removed to his father's 
in Stuart County, Tenn., farming and milling with him till 1872, when 
his father removed to Illinois, and then to Kansas, Rufus, however, re- 
maining. He has had two children : -Tohn, who died in infincy ; and 
V/illie, who is now a large boy, born February 18, 1870. His wife died 
in September, 1876. In February, 1878, he married Lewis P., the eldest 
child of W. V. and Lucy W. Rives ; her father is a native of North Caro- 
lina, and her mother of Montgomery County, Tenn. They have had three 
children. In November, 1878, they removed to part of the Henry Young 
farm which he had purchased; again, in January, 1883, removing to the 
Richardson farm, where he now resides. Mr. Russell is a member of 
the Church Ilill Grange, and of tiie Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Russell 
is a member of the Methodist Church. He was trustee of the Lafayette 
Female Institute, to which he contributed liberally. 

GEORGE WALTON SOUTHALL was born near the town of La- 
fayette, in this county, April 18, 1858. His father was William II. 
Southall, a son of Holman Southall of North Carolina ; his mother was 
a daughter of James and Sarah Thacker, and was a native of this county. 
George W.'s parents were married in Stewart County, Tenn., emigrated 
to this county, and settled near Lafayette, where Mr. Southall now 
lives. William H. began life without property, and by diligence and per- 
severance accumulated considerable wealth, much of it in land, which ag- 
gregated 1,300 acres. His wife died in 1871. Of the eight children 
born to them four are now living. George AV., the subject, was married, 
December 22, 1874, to Miss Lucy E. Mosely, of Trigg County, a daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Lucy Mosely. Their children are: Mary E., Willie 
^Nathaniel (who died at the age of two years), Walter H. and Vernor 
Bell. Mrs. Southall is a consistent member of the Baptist Church. 

WILLIAM T. STOWE was born in Halifax County, Va., April 20, 
1818, second of nine children forming the family of William and Obedi- 
ence T. (Cardwell) Stowe, both natives of Virginia, and also their place 






.1 ■ .<\i;: ;,^:!'. li^-.V 



548 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

of death. William remaineJ at homo working on the farm during sum- 
mer and attending school in winter, until November, 1841. He then 
started alone and on horseback for Christian County, where he arrived 
. on the 20th, the journey occupying seventeen days. All he possessed 
was a horse and §42 in cash. The first business he did was for John H. 
Phelps, of Hopkinsvillo, who owned a farm. William engaged to manage 
the farm for his board and $225 per annum. After this he managed the 
farm of C. N. Roach at §150 and board per year. During the next 
seven years be rented a farm which he ran for himself, after which he 
leased the widow Isabel Bennett farm in Trigg County for nine years. 
Having been very saving he was able to purchase his present farm of 
402^ acres in 1865 from B. W. Macrae, paying §21,162.50 cash in hand. 
His ne.xt purchase was the Dr. Prince farm of 267^ acres, on the Canton 
road, for §10,000, for which he paid cash in 1870. He then purchased 
the Isabel Bennett place in Trigg County, having previously leased it, 
and paid for this the sum of §8,000, the acreage of this place being pretty 
extensive. The Robert Dulin place of 311 acres was his next venture, 
the sum of §10,000 changing hands. Since then he has purchased two 
small tracts, for which he paid §1,500. Besides paying for all this land 
he Las been able to accommodate good men with loans. He was married 
December 17, 1846, to Miss M. J. Wood. She was born in Christian 
County, Ky., and is the daughter of John and Lucy (Saunders) Wood. 
Her father was a native of North Carolina, and her mother of Virginia, 
wlio died about thirty-two years ago. They have had ten children, the 
first two of whom died in infancy, the third, John Henry, dying at twen- 
ty-four. The living children are : George Howard, Frederick C. and 
Edward A. (twins), Julia A., William Dudley, Robert Thomas and Mary 
E. The entire family are members of the Baptist Church, on the Cadiz 
road, nine miles west of Hopkinsville. 

WILLIAM D. SUMMERS was born in Christian County, Ky., 
October 25, 1850, and is the youngest of a family of twelve children born 
to William and Harriet A. Summers. His father, who was a native of 
Fairfax County, Va., from whence he removed in 1828, settled in Chris- 
tian County, Ky., on the place known as the Rosedale farm. Here he 
engaged in farming to the close of his life, which terminated in 1875. 
He was one of the most practical and systematic farmers in the county. 



fi;W .(!;*>! -k 



UNION SCIIOOLHOUSE rRECINCT. 549 

His social qualities were of the highest order, kind and hospitable to all, 
and especially to the ministers of the Gospel, who ever found his house 
open to their entertainment. But it was in the privacy of his own family 
that his true character shone brightest, being a most devoted husband and 
father. His wife, Harriet A. Summers, was born in Sumner County, 
Tenn., and still survives him. She is now a member of the family of 
her son, William D., and for the past fifty years has been a devoted 
member of the Methodist Church. William D. Summers was educated 
principally in the Kentucky University of Lexington, and since 1871 
has devoted his time and energy to the pursuits of the farm. In this 
industry of all industries, he has proven himself a master hand. To him 
belongs the credit of introducing hay-presses into the county, thus giving 
an impetus to that department of agriculture which the county hitherto 
had not known. This he did in May, 1881, and in the season of 1883 
he alone produced a crop of 800,000 pounds of hay. He also, by his 
personal influence, carried to successful issue the plan for constructing 
the macadamized road from Hopkinsville to his farm. It is not a selfish 
interest that calls into action the native energy of this sterling man, but 
the result of his enterprise is such as to secure lasting good to the com- 
munity of which he is an honored member. In 1879, chiefly through his 
influence and by his means, a good schoolhouse was erected in his district, 
supplying a want which for several years had been seriously felt by the 
public. Good roads, good schools and churches are the foundation of 
commerce, intelligence and religion. These are the corner-stones of 
progress and prosperity; to foster and encourage them is the duty of all 
mankind, is indeed a sacred trust for the faithful discharge of which every 
citizen is personally responsible. Mr. Summers was married in the city 
of Nashville, Tenn., December 6, 1871 to Miss Amanda Broady, who 
died two years subsequently, leaving one son — Leslie A. Summers. His 
present wife, to whom he was married in 1870, was Miss Julia, youngest 
daughter of A. D. and Sidney Bowles. They have one child, a daughter, 
nf^rned Lady S. Summers. 

MRS. JENNIE E. THURMOND was born at the old homestead, 
five miles from Hopkinsville, and is a daugliter of William A. and Har- 
riet (Antony) Summers. Her father was a native of Virginia and her 
mother of Tennessee ; he moved to Tennessee and there engaged in farm- 









^h- ,;ll 7. :.c!f-l.f>I 



T . / r-.i--;/: r 



550 BIOORAPHICAL SKETCHKS. 

ing and there married. Banks Antony, her grandfather, was a soldier 
in the war of 1812, and one of the few martyrs of the battle of New 
Orleans. Iler father was one of fifteen children, and starting out early 
to seek liis fortune, went to Tennessee, where he acquired a handsome 
fortune. Mrs. Thurmond was educated in the common schools, finishing 
off in the female school of Ilopkinsville, under the superintendence of 
Prof. James Rumsey. She was married October 11, 1854, to R. C. Thur- 
mond, a native of Nashville, Tennessee, and a son of William and Eliza- 
beth Thurmond. They had nine children : Alice, William S., John C, 
Amanda S., Lizzie Lee, Mary E., Susan B., Richard S., and Annie 
Laurie. Mrs. Thurmond is a member of the Methodist Church. 

JOHN CARTER THURMOND was born in Union Schoolhouse 
Precinct, this county, on February 25, 1861. He is the third of nine 
children of Richard C. and Jennie Eliza Thurmond. His grandfather 
emigrated to this country from England, and settled in Tennessee, where 
our subject's father was born. His mother is the daughter of William A. 
Summers. John C. was educated in the county school. He farmed at 
home until within the last three years, since which he has been farming 
on his own account. He cultivates three farms comprising 700 acres, 
500 of which he has in actual cultivation, for attendance to which he em- 
ploys fifteen hands in summer and eight in winter, raising wheat, tobacco, 
clover, corn and oats ; this year he has 2-50 acres in wheat. In 1883 he 
raised 1,200 bushels of wheat ; over 1,200 bushels of corn ; fifty acres of 
tobacco and 11,000 pounds of meat from fifty-three hogs. He has 100 
sheep, fifteen head of cattle and nine head of work-stock. Having made 
such progress, he has had to add a steam thresher to his stock of farming 
implements. On November 1, 1883, he was married to Miss Lela E. 
Wood, at the residence of her father in Christian County, Ky. She is 
the third child of Leo and Mary (Bennett) Wood. She joined the Bap- 
tist Church at the age of fifteen, and was educated in the common schools 
of Kansas, Missouri and Kentucky. She taught subscription school for 
three months at Pisgah. Mr. Thurmond began life with but small 
means, leaving success to follow in the wake of great industry, and the 
good resulting from that steadiness of purpose and common sense of which 
he is possessed, is his present prosperity. 

JACOB TORIAN was born in the southern part of Christian Coun- 






f.).'..'. 



t.ri'. r,:^- 






: -.1 :.i!! 1.-: J: 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 551 

ty, January 9, 1833. He is the fourth of seven cliihlren born to Drury 
and Obedience (Torian) Torian. Drury was the son of George Torian, of 
Virginia, both families being natives of that State, ultimately removing 
to what is now Trigg County, whei-e the parents) of J^acob were married. 
Our subject attended the common school, and worked at liorae till eight- 
een, when he started out for himself, managing the fiirm of his uncle, 
Thomas Torian, five years, making a big success. On May 23, 18S1, he 
married Mrs. Mary E. Brewer, third child and second daughter of 
Thomas and Ann Eliza Torian. She had seven brothers and sisters, 
was born on the fiirm where she now resides, and was educated in the 
subscription schools of the county and in Hopkinsville. On April 14, 
1861, she was married to Robert S. Brewer, and had three children by 
him. Mrs. Torian is a member of the Baptist Church. 

DR. JAMES HENRY USHER was born January 28, 1806, near 
Rocktown, now Harrisonburg, Rockingham Co., Va. He is the sec- 
ond of nine children of David and Rebecca (Irvin) Usher. The family 
emigrated to Christian County in 1802. Mr. Robert Usher, the Doctor's 
grandfather, came here in 1811. They settled three miles southeast of 
Hopkinsville on the Clarksville road, where the grandparents died ; 
David, his father, dying here also, in 1835, followed by his wife at the 
age of seventy-five years, in 1858. The Doctor remained with his 
father's family until he commenced to read medicine with Dr. William D. 
Cope. He married Miss Lucinda Compton December 29, 1831, in 
Washington County, Ky. Dr. Usher's two sons, James H. and Francis 
M., were graduates in medicine at Pennsylvania University in 1857. J. 
H. settled in Milburn, Ballard Co., Ky., and practiced about four years, 
when he died. F. M. settled in Fulton County, near Hickman, and has 
secured a large practice. Dr. Usher had three other sons and seven 
daughters : Sarah T. L. S. Proctor; A. V., married B. B. Nance; Mary 
E.; Ophelia H., married F. J. Northington ; Josephine H., present wife 
of B. B. Nance ; Emma E., married T. G. Gaines ; and Marietta, 
married R. Tl. Scott, of Illinois. Dr. Usher remained in Washington 
County, practicing medicine one year, and then removed to his present 
homestead, and has remainetl there ever since, engaged in farming, ex- 
cepting a period of five'years, during which he practiced medicine hero. 
Mrs. Usher died on June 17, 1875. 



652 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

DR. JAIMES BROWN WALLACE was born in Cu]pci)ei- County, 
Va., on the 2d day of September, 1792. On his father's side he was of 
Scotch extraction, his grandfather, Dr. Michael Wallace, having come 
from Glasgow, Scotland, to Port Tobacco, Md., as a medical student to a 
Scotch physician, Dr. Brown, one of the most eminent men in his pro- 
fession in Maryland. After finishing his studies, and graduating in 
Edinburgh, the young Doctor married the youngest daughter of Dr. 
Brown, and moved across the Potomac, and settled in Culpeper County, 
Va. Nearly all the other daughters of Dr. Brown married Scotch 
Episcopal Parsons, McGruder Lomax, Keyes, Montcures, Daniels, Scott, 
Horner, and whose descendants have multiplied into a legion. Francis 
Scott Key, the author of the "Star Spangled Banner," was a grand- 
son of one of the daughters; Gen. Bankhead McGruder, of Virginia, of 
another. Dr. Michael Wallace left eight sons who fought through the 
Revolutionary war, the youngest of whom, Capt. Thomas Wallace, was 
the father of Dr. James B. Wallace. He left ten children of whom the 
Doctor was the eldest. After leaving school he entered the office of Dr. 
Carmichael, of Fredericksburg, Va., and read medicine with him, and 
graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, and then, like many 
another young professional man of his day in the "Old Dominion," he 
launched out South or AVest to make his fortune, and a home. In a com- 
pany of young companions he started out on horseback over the Blue 
Ridge and Cumberland Mountains through east Tennessee, and arrived 
at Huntsville, Ala., wiiich was a Virginia colony on the confines of civili- 
zation, all the country south of there to Louisiana being in the possession 
of the Indians. Not satisfied there, he pressed on through the Indian 
country to Louisiana. The war of 1812 having closed only a few years 
before, he found business of every kind prostrate, and selling his horse, 
he embarked in one of the three or four steamboats then navigating the 
Mississippi Rivei-, for Louisville, Ky. His description of these steamers 
seems ridiculous when compared with the fleets of the "floating palaces " 
now seen on all the western rivers. The cabin was in the hold, and they 
had to land each night and cut cord wood to run them the next day. 
None were over 300 or 400 tons ; the fare was §300, and they were one 
month making the trip. There were only two or three settlements on the 
river from Natchez to Louisville, which hitter, only contained about 



lidd 



-^•■^ ■;■• i/A: vL V, ,:,, ,.sV 



UNION SCHOOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 553 

1,500, or 2,000 inhabitants settled along on the banks of the Ohio. 
Where the court house now stands was a large lake or pond where the 
young people took boat-rides. He found both friends and relatives in 
Louisville, and remained about two years, practicing his profession, when 
his father dying, he returned to Virginia to wind up the estate and look 
after his brothers and sisters. At this time he formed the acquaintance and 
married Miss Sarah A. E. Clayton, the daughter of Maj. Philip Clayton, 
of Culpeper, and after three children were born to them, he, about 
the year 1825, again started to Kentucky, but this time turned his face 
to Christian County, where his relations, Capt. Green and family, had 
settled, Mrs. Lucy Green being his first cousin. After a long and 
tedious journey in wagons, he arrived, and rented a place below where 
Newstead stands, and entering into partnership with the late Dr. John A. 
Steele, he resumed the practice of his profession. He described all 
South Christian, except along the streams, as a vast prairie. Herds of 
deer could be seen at almost any time and for miles, and in the spring 
of the year, when riding over the country the horse's hoofs Avould be 
dyed red with the wild strawberries wliicli almost carpeted the ground. 
There were only a few farms along the road to Hopkinsville from 
where he rented; the best improved of which he bought after a few years 
from Dr. AVilkins, who moved to Louisiana, which he improved, and 
where he resided until his death. The last buflalo ever seen east of the 
Ohio, was claimed to be killed at a spring on this place about this time 
by " Uncle Billy Means," one of the oldest settlers in the county and his 
near neighbor. Dr. Wallace now virtually abandoned the practice of his 
profession, and gave himself up to improving his home, educating his 
children, and cultivating kindly relations with his neighbors, by all of 
whom he became greatly beloved and respected. He was always a great 
student, and kept himself posted, and up with all progress of the age, 
and was one of the first to introduce improved machinery into agriculture, 
and to educate the farmers. He became a successful planter, and lived a 
happy and useful life, until, after a brief but severe illness, he died on the 
30th of September, 1860, in his sixty-eighth year. His beloved wife sur- 
vived him only a few months, dying the following December, in her fifty- 
sixth year. Dr. AVallace was one of the first to organize the Episcopal 
Church in Hopkinsville, and was one of the first vestrymen, and lived and 



.1 ■ i'.r: rfu[3!» -.U 



554 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

died an honest and devoted Christian. As a man, he was always generous 
courteous, and eminently domestic in all his habits. His was a virtue 
that shone with no ordinary lustre ; that would bear at all times the 
closest scrutiny. As a parent, a husband, a master and a friend, he 
was ever true to the interest of those intrusted to his care. An absence 
of all pretense, a love of truth in word and action were atnong his 
most prominent characteristics. Refinement and culture with him con- 
sisted not in mere efforts at external display. His ideal was correct, and 
in him was exemplified the Christian gentleman. In brief, in the lan- 
guage of Pope, he was 

" An boncst man — the noblest work of God." 
JOHN C. WHITLOCK, M. D., whose portrait appears in this vol- 
ume, is one of the old and prominent citizens of Christian County, and 
is a son of John and Sarah (Ashlin) Whitlock, natives of the Old Do- 
minion. The Whitlock family settled in Louisa County, Va., prior to 
the Revolutionary war, where Dr. Whitlock, his father, John Whitlock, 
and his grandfather, Thomas Whitlock, were all born. Sarah (Ashlin) 
Whitlock v.'as a native of Patrick County, Va. The parents of Dr. 
Whitlock removed to Kentucky in 1830, and resided mostly in Trigg 
County, where Mrs. Whitlock died in 1S45; Mr. Whitlock died in 
Christian County in 1865. Dr. Whitlock was born March 18, 1818, 
and came with his parents to Kentucky in 1830, when twelve years old. 
His education was received in the schools of Christian County, mostly at 
Garrettsburg ; his father being but a plain farmer in moderate circum- 
stances, was unable to give his son a collegiate education. Upon leaving 
scliool young AVhitlock commenced the study of medicine with Dr. John 
A. Steele, a prominent physician of the time, and well known through- 
out the county. He attended two sessions of the medical college at 
Louisville, from which he graduated in 1842, and since that time has 
practiced his profession in this county. While Dr. Whitlock takes a 
lively interest in political affairs, State and National, he has never been 
an active politician nor an office-seeker, his public service having been 
confined to a term in the lower House of the State Legislature, to which 
position he was elected in 1846, and the duties of which he faithfully dis- 
charged. Dr. Whitlock was married, January 13, 1848, to Miss Maria 
F. Withrow, a daughter of James and Letitia Withrow (jiee Edgar), and 






111: ■;.. ■;:;•>.-! ; .i--v. t,;rf,' _, „)^ 



i;:;. iHo'! .r-Jjr, ■, 



DNION SCHOLHOUSE PRECINCT. 555 

who was a native of Greenbrier County, Va. Tliey have had six chil- 
dren, of whom three only are living ; two of these are married.' Dr. 
Whitlock and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church ; he is also 
an Elder in the same. Devoted to his profession, Dr. Whitlock has given 
to its practice and progress his best energies during a long and success- 
ful career, and is deservedly respected by his brethren of the healing 
art for his knowledge of the science, as well as by the whole community, 
for those fine personal traits which make him a valuable and worthy 
citizen. For more than fifty years his face has been familiar to the 
people of the county, and all may point to him, and say with truthful- 
ness, "there is an honest man." 

T. L. YONTS was born in Ohio County, Ky., November 10, 1S47 ; 
his father was Jonathan Yonts ; his mother's maiden name was Abigail 
Sheard. His parents removed to Muhlenburg County when he was quite 
young. He received the benefit of a common school education, and upon 
attaining his majority, bought 196| acres of land in Muhlenburg County 
and farmed for several years. After the railroad was built (it passed 
over his land) he sold out to it for the coal with which his land was un- 
derlaid. He then removed to Christian County, raised one crop and re- 
turned to Muhlenburg, but after two years removed again to Christian, 
where be has since resided. While living in Muhlenburg County the last 
time, he became involved in debt, and lost all his property. But by his 
untiring energy he has paid all claims against him, and has again got his 
head above water. He commenced work, after his failure, with an old 
mare, a mule and a little household furniture, etc. He was married in 
Muhlenburg County to Miss Millie Oilman, a daughter of H. C. and 
Elizabeth Dilmau. They have had six children, five of whom are liv- 
ing, viz.: Ella May, Ida F., H. C, Elizabeth and Minnie M. Mrs. 
Yonts is a member of the Methodist Church. 



HAMBY PRECINCT. 

ELIJAH ARMSTRONG was born in Scates' Mill Precinct, this 
county, on May 23, 1811, and is a son of Benjamin and Jane (Brasher) 
Armstrong. The father was born iu Greenville County, N. C, and his 
parents were of Irish descent ; he grew to manhood in that State, and 
married Miss Brasher, who was of English descent. In 1809 the twain 
came to this county and settled in Scates' Precinct; he resided there until 
March, 1827, when be came to Hamby Precinct, where he resided until 
his death, which occurred on November 17, 1846. In his life-time he was 
a member of the Christian Church. The mother died in this county on 
August 25, 1864. Elijah is the fourth of nine children, and of this num- 
ber but four .are now living, viz.: Mrs. Eliza J. Gilliland, John, David 
and Elijah. The education of the latter was received in the schools of 
the early times; he remained at home until about thirty -four years of age, 
and then commenced farming for himself; he settled on his present farm 
immediately, and has resided here, ever since; he now owns about 415 
acres, of which he has about 200 acres in cultivation. Mr. Armstrong 
was married in this precinct on March 25, 1845, to Miss Cinderella Ilam- 
by, a daughter of Philip and Jane (Croft) Hamby. The fatlier was a 
native of Metcalf County, Ky., and came to this county in 1804 with his 
mother. The fiimily settled in Crofton Precinct, and there Mr. Hamby 
resided until 1844, when he came to this precinct ; he. is still living at the 
advanced age of eighty-seven. Mrs. Armstrong was born in Scates' Mill 
Precinct on August 25, 1825, and was the mother of nine children, 
all living, viz.: Crittenden C, in Texas; Narcissa C, wife of Isaac 
Cook; Melissa, wife of John W. Marcus, of Fruit Hill Precinct ; Letitia 
C, wife of J. T. Owen, in Texas ; Benjamin P.; Margaret A., widow of 
F. Renshaw ; Sarah A. and Elijah H. Mrs. Armstrong died in this 
precinct on August 25, 1864. Mr. Armstrong has served in this town- 
ship as Constable two years, and has been Magistrate four years. Before 
the war he was identified with the Whig party, but has since that time 
given his support to the Democratic party. 



.■mS: 



558 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

YOUNG BOYD was born in this precinct on May 8, 1835, and is a 
son of James and Elizabeth (Long) Boyd. The father was born in Vir- 
ginia and tlie motlier in South Carolina. The father came to this county 
with his parents in 1815. The hitter settled in the western edge of the 
precinct, and' tliere resided until their death. James Boyd grew to man- 
hood in this precinct, and began life on a farm in the eastern edge of it. 
lie finally came to the farm now owned by subject, and resided here until 
his death on July 24, 1872. During his life-time he was a consistent 
member of the Mt. Zore Baptist Church. The mother died in this pre- 
cinct in the spring of 1861. Y''oung Boyd was next to the youngest 
of twelve cliildren, of whom five are now living, viz.: Francis, in Fruit 
Hill Precinct; Drury, in same precinct; George E., W. H., in Jones 
County, Texas ; and Young, our subject. The common school of this 
precinct furnished the latter his education; he remained at homo until 
twenty-three, and then settled down in Fruit Hill Precinct ; he resided 
there four years, and then removed to Stewart. In 1870 he came to tliis 
precinct and settled on his present farm; he now owns about 150 acres, 
of which there are about sixty-five acres in cultivation. Mr. Boyd was 
married in this county on July 9, 1858, to Miss Elizabeth M. Davis, a 
daughter of John and JIary (Long) Davis, natives of South Carolina. 
She was a native of this county, and was the mother of seven children, 
six of whom are now living, viz.: John H., J. W., Lewis, Mildred M-, 
Effic J. and Thomas L. This lady died on November 10, 1877. Mr. 
Boyd T/as next married on January 18, 1878, to Miss Gracie M. Ford, a 
daughter of Elijah and Mary (Armstrong) Ford. This lady is a native 
of this councy. Mr. and Mrs. Bnyd are members of the West Mt. Zore 
Baptist Church. In politics Mr. Boyd is a Democrat. 

JOSEPH EAST was born in this county on July 17, 1843, and is a 
son of William and Mary (Haskins) East. The parents were natives of 
Charlotte County, Ya., and came to this county in 1838. They first 
settled south of Hopkinsville, and afterward moved to Lafayette Precinct, 
where they resided until 1806. In that year they came to this precinct, 
and settled on the farm now owned by subject. The mother died on 
January 13, 1884, but the father is still making his home with his son 
(our subjectj. The latter was the fourth of seven children, of whom Eve 
are now living, viz.: W. R., Joseph, Benn, John T. and Julia. Joseph took 



■nlT 






iftjKt 






HAMBY PRECINCT. 569 

charge of the home farm in 1878, and has since resided there. Ho now 
owns ahout 200 acres of which there are about 80 acres in cultivation. 
He is unmarried, and his brother, William R., is now living on the homo 
farm. He is a member of the West Mount Zore Baptist Church, and of 
the Good Templar fraternity. In politics he is identified with the Re- 
publican party. 

DR. J. R. MOORE was born in New Providence, Montgomery Co., 
Tenn., on November 10, ISIO, and is a son of James M. and Mary 
(Lesembe) Moore. The flither was a native of North Carolina and the 
mother of Tennessee. Both are still living in Montgomery County. Dr. 
Moore is the second of seven children. His education was received in 
the common schools of his native county, and subsequently at Stewart 
College. 0.0 then commenced reading medicine with Dr. W. T. 
McReynolds, of Clarksville, and remained with him three years. He next 
attended the University at Nashville, from which institution he graduated 
in the class of 1805. Taking up his chosen profession he began life, and 
settled in Oakwood, Montgomery County. He remained at that point 
until 1871, when he came to this county and settled at Crofton. At this 
point- he remained about three years, and then came to this precinct. 
Here he has since resided, and now has a very lucrative practice. He is 
now acting as the county physician for the jail and poor-house. Dr. 
Moore was married in Montgomery County on March 31, 1806, to Miss 
Mary Gibbs, a daughter of Stephen and Malinda (Duncan) Gibbs, both 
natives of Tennessee. This union has resulted in seven children, of 
whom six are now living, viz. : John, Anne, Robert, Clay, James and 
Willie. Dr. Moore is a member of the Knights of Honor fraternity, and 
is identified with the Democratic party. 

J. M. RENSHAW was born in this precinct on November 8, 1853, 
and is a son of Enoch and Melinda (McCord) Renshaw. The father is. 
also a native of this county and was born here on August 11, 1811. His 
parents, John and Nancy (Reed) Renshaw, came from Rowan County, 
N. C, in about 1805. They settled in this precinct and resided here 
until their death. Enoch Renshaw grew up to manhood in this precinct 
and on November 1, 1835, he married Miss McCord, who was a daughter 
of Samuel McCord, a native of Tennessee. After his marriage he settled 
in the nortliwest part of tlie precinct. He has farmed here ever since 



r.r,:- 08 iin. 






.1 •,«;-,.:fi;'.) 



560 BIOORAPIIICAL SKETCHES. 

and now owns about 226 acres. In 1846 he commenced merchandising 
and -was engaged in business until January, 1884, when he sold out to 
Mr. Hamby. He is now living a retired life with his son. The mother 
died in this precinct on November 15, 1883. Our subject's education was 
received in the schools of his native precinct, and at Hopkinsville. After 
completing his education he taught school four years, and then in 1873 
he turned his attention to merchandising. He became associated with 
his father and the firm carried on an extensive business until January, 
1884, when Renshaw Senior sold out. The firm is now known as Ren- 
shaw & Hamby, and carries a stock of about §1,600. Besides merchan- 
dising, Mr. Renshaw is also engaged in farming on the old home place. 
He was married in tliis precinct on November 11, 1873, to Miss Sallie 
Ilaml^y, a daughter of L. M. Hamby, of this precinct. Three children 
liave blessed this union, two of whom are now living, viz. : Edgar and 
Carrie. In politics ?tlr. R. is identified with the Democratic party. 










,...,: fi..>. .. .•■ 



FRUIT HILL PRECINCT. 

DAVID L. BARNES is a native of this county, born November 18, 
1829. He has about 1,500 acres of land, which is devoted principally 
to fruit culture, and is one of the substantial citizens of the county. His 
parents, William and Elizabeth (Myers) Barnes, were natives respectively 
of Virginia and Pennsylvania. His grandfather, George Barnes, was 
originally froru Ireland. He had come over to America on business, but 
owing to the war troubles could not return, and finally entered the army 
and served throughout the Revolutionary war. He started for Kentucky 
witli his wife, three sons and three daughters, at a very early date, and 
finally located in Mercer County. Two of his sons were either killed or 
captured upon the way, by the Indians, and William, the father of our 
subject, was saved by falling into the hands of some woman, who after- 
ward restored him to his parents, and about fifteen years afterward 
(in 1797) they removed to this county, then a wilderness, and Will- 
iam Barnes and John Lewis cleared the land on which the Court 
House at Ilopkinsville now stands. The parents of our subject were 
blessed with twelve children, of whom there are seven living : Robert D., 
Maxwell S., David L., Nisan W., Elizabeth A., Udegirt A. and Mary Z. 
Our subject devotes most of his attention to fruit culture, apples and peaches 
being the principal varieties, most of his land being situated upon high 
land and ridges, particularl}' adapted to this branch of agriculture. Ho 
is a member of the Universalist Church, and is a Greenbacker politically. 
For the last five years he has been Secretary of the Universalist State 
Convention, of Kentucky. 

JOHN J. BARNES is a native of Ciiristian County, the date of his 
birth being May 19, 1840 ; he is a son of Melville and Mary E. (John- 
son) Barnes, the father a son of William Barnes. The parents had three 
children: William H., John J. and Elbert M. The subject of these 
lines has always resided in the county, and has engaged in agricultural 
pursuits ; lie has with his brother 500 acres of land, which are devoted to 
general husbandry. Mr. Barnes has filled the position of Magistrate for 



Jim r 



V AvJ 
I .0281 






:i ;. 



562 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Fruit Hill Precinct two terms, is a member of the Universalist Church, 
and gives his support to the Republican party. He was first married to 
^lary J. Meacham, a daughter of James Meachara, of this county. 
This union gave one child — Melissa E. His second marriage was to Miss 
Margaret M. Croft, daughter of Roland and Peggy Croft. There are 
tAYO children by this marriage : Lucian E. and Charlie J. Mr. Barnes 
and his brother are much respected citizens of Christian County, and are 
very enterprising and substantial farmers. 

ARCHIBALD BATES was born in the State of Rhode Island April 
10, 1823 ; he married in his native State, and at twenty-five years of age 
moved to Vermont. For many years he worked in the Eastern cotton 
factories, but in later years has given his attention to farming ; he has a 
farm of 130 acres, and raises farm products generally ; he is a son of 
John and Betsey (Jordan) Bates, both of whom were natives of Rhode 
Island. John Bates worked some at carpentering, and was a son of a 
farmer of the same name. The parents of our subject had six children, 
of whom Eliza, Archibald, Susan and William are living. Our subject 
has lived in Christian County since leaving Vermont, about the close of 
the war, excepting two years, during which period he resided in Arkansas. 
He wedded Armina P. Bliss, a daughter of Joshua Bliss. This union 
has been blessed with three children, two of whom survive : William, who 
married Lucy J. Whittaker, a daughter of Richmond G. and Eliza 
(Courtney) Whittaker, and has four children : Carrie L., William A., 
Ada and Oscar G.; and John, who resides in the East. Mr. Bates is a 
Republican politically, and is a much-respected citizen of the county ; he 
possesses that Yankee energy and practical sense which have always been 
such material factors in the civilization of our country. 

JOHN H. CAVANAH was born in Christian County, March 7, 
1836, to James F. and Nancy (Vaughan) Cavanah, both of whom were 
also natives of this county. The father devoted his energies to forming 
pursuits, was a Captain in an old militia organization, and died when our 
subject was young. His venerable widow is still living in this county. 
She bore him two children : Celina J. (wife of Seth H. Myers), and sub- 
ject. She was married to Elijah Carneal, which union gave one child — 
Susan v., wife of William Wilkins. Our subject's grandfather was 
Charles Cavanah, who, with his brother William, came from North Car- 



FRUIT HILL rRECINCT. 6G3 

olina and located at a very early date in Fruit Hill Precinct. The 
former's residence and home property were burned to the ground several 
times during his residence here, and be was compelled to suffer many 
misfortunes. Our subject married P. E. Fruit, a daughter of T. C. Fruit. 
(See sketch of S. T. Fruit, Mt. Vernon Precinct.) This union has been 
blessed with eleven children, of whom ten survive: William T., James 
F., George T., Mary B., Cora C, Samuel N., John H., Alexander D., 
David, Edward C. and Otho M. James F., twin brother to William T., 
died when three weeks old. William T. was married in Labette County, 
Kan., December 18, 1883, to Vannie Lacy. Mr. Cavanah is a member 
of the Masonic frateinity, L. M. Cox Lodge, No. 327, and is one of the 
Magistrates for Fruit Hill Precinct. He is a member of the Baptist 
Church, and is a Greenbacker in politics. 

T. W. GOOCH is a native of Robinson County, Tenn., and came to 
Christian County in 1844, after residing some time in Muhlenburg Coun- 
ty, this State. He is a son of Gideon Gooch, who removed from Vir- 
ginia and located in Tennessee at an early date. The latter carried on a 
carding factory at the time of his deatli, and had been engaged in the 
same business for many years of his life. To him and his wife were born 
six children, of whom but the subject of these lines survives. John G. 
Gooch, the eldest of the family, died in Texas, where his family yet 
resides. He was a former resident of Muhlenburg County, Ky., and had 
represented it in the Legislature in 1850. James C. Gooch, another of 
the deceased children, was a practicing physician, and Elijah was for 
many years connected with the asylum at Hopkinsville, and Gideon 
Gooch was a Methodist preacher. Mr. T. W. Gooch, the subject of these 
lines, has devoted a considerable share of his life to working at the car- 
riage-maker's trade, and for a period of six years had charge of the County 
Poor-House. His supervision of this charitable institution was attended 
with gratifying results. Many of its parts were remodeled and refitted, 
and the whole institution subjected to a systematic overhauling, and it 
^ was left in a condition which indicates the general ability he possessed 
and exhibited during his administration of its affairs. He now resides 
upon his farm of 223 acres, and gives his attention to farming pursuits. 
He in a member of the A. F. & A. M., I. 0. 0. F., K.of H., the Grange, 
and other orders of note. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and 



riT ;:;...,r.'l '.I 






I- iff hoif> 



564 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

gives his support to the Republican party. He first married Priscilla 
Robinson, who bore him one child, now deceased ; his second marriage 
was with Mii=s Lou Whaling, by whom there ?.vc two children : Margaret 
E. and William Gidon. His present wife was formerly Miss Sarah A. 
Mitchell. This union has given one child — James C. 

ALEX. A. HENDRIX, M. D., came to Christian County in the 
spring of 1865, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion. His medical services have been held in flattering demand by the 
people generally, since the time of his location in their midst, and many 
obstinate cases of disease have succumbed to his practiced skill ; his field 
of operations is large, extending throughout a large section of the country. 
He was born in Williamson County, Tenn., August 5, 1830 ; his parents, 
Isaac and Margaret (Willard) Hendrix, were natives of North Carolina 
and Pennsylvania respectively, and were of Irish descent. The father 
was a son of Thomas Ilendrix, came with him to Tennessee at an early 
date, and engaged during his life in agricultural pursuits. To him and 
his wife were born six children, five of whom lived to maturity, and of 
these William W., Mary, A. A. and John G. were living at last accounts. 
Our subject obtained his early schooling in his native county, and first 
read medicine under Dr. J. T. Cox in the State of Tennessee, and practiced 
there four or five years. In the year 1859 he came to Kentucky, and 
remained one year. At the outbreak of the war he returned to the State 
of Tennessee, and remained there during the war ; at the close he came 
back to Christian, where be has almost ever since been in active 
service. In the year 1874-75 he attended the St. Louis Medical 
College, and in 1876-77 the Jledical Department of the Univer- 
sity of the State of Tennessee, graduating at that time. He was engaged 
in active practice previous to the war, but did but little during the war, 
preferring to remain at home with his parents. The Doctor has at pres- 
ent a farm of 147 acres, and his spare moments are given to his farming 
interests. He was formerly a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in 
political affairs his vote indicates his faith in Greenback doctrines. He 
was united in marriage to Miss L. C. Lewis, a daughter of John A. 
Lewis, now a merchant in Crofton, this county. This union has given 
nine children : John W., Ridley 11., Sallie, Margaret, Ollie, Rettie, 
David I., Carrie and James D. The Doctor possesses a practical 



'Hr>-i -.If ,;> .''! • -urvn.'! 



i I 






FRUIT HILL PRECINCT. 565 

turn of mind, and to this and the cool and thoughtful manner in which 
he deliberated upon or examined into any question or obstinate case 
of disease, is largely due his material success in tlie practice of his pro- 
fession. 

THOMAS J. POWERS was born in Washington County, Va., Feb- 
ruary 26, 1839, to Ewel and Catharine (Miles) Powers, natives of Vir- 
ginia. The father is a harness-maker by trade, but during late years has 
giving his attention to farming pursuits. He is still living in Fruit Hill 
Precinct. Tliere were nine children in the parents' family, of whom 
there are four living : Celia A., Thomas J., Brantley M. and Naomi M. 
Our subject removed with his parents from Virginia, in 1849, and located 
in Christian County, and has since been variously engaged. He has 
served as Constable, Deputy Sheriff, clerked for some time in stores, 
has been purchasing agent for parties engaged in the tobacco trade. He 
is now devoting his attention to farming pursuits, and is the Postmaster 
at Fruit Hill Postoffice ; his sister attends to the business. His farm 
consists of 144 acres. He was married first to America J. Woouburn, 
a daughter of Alexander Woodburn. This union gave six children, two 
of whom are living : James J. and Eddie. His present wife was formerly 
Miss P. V. Ferguson. Mr. Powers is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
L. M. Cox Lodge, No. 327. He is a Greenbacker politically, ami is a 
member of the Universalist Church. 

JAMES W. UNDERWOOD is a son of William and Elizabeth (13ob- 
bitt) Underwood, who were natives respectively of North Carolina and Ken- 
tucky. He was born November 7, 1832, in Christian County, and with the 
exception of a year's residence in Illinois, has always remained in it. 
His parents were blessed witii ten children ; those living are : Henrietta, 
Samuel H., Mary J., James W., Lucinda, Hester and Tibitha. The 
grandfather of our subject was Samuel Underwood, originally from North 
Carolina. James W. Underwood, the subject of this sketch, has always 
given his time and energies to farming pursuits. He is a natural mechanic, 
and although not making a practice of working with tools, generally does 
his own work, and has lately erected himself a new house, which is situated 
upon a hill, which commands a considerable view of the surrounding coun- 
try, and into which he will shortly move. His farm property consists of 
245 acres, which are devoted to general productions. He first wedded 



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56G BIOOKAl'lUCAL SKETCH KS. 

Catharine Meacham, a Jaugliter of James Meacliam. This union gave 
four children, three of whom survive : Henrietta, John T. and Willie B. 
His present wife was formerly Miss Harriett Owings. a daughter of Joshua 
Owings, an old resident of Christian County. By this marriage there 
were three ■ children : Carrie, Eva and Maud. Mr. Underwood is a 
llcpublican, and is a man of generous impulses, and is ever ready 
with his encouragement to all enterprises calculated for the public good. 
In December, 1861, he enlisted in the Third Kentucky Cavalry, Col. 
James S. Jackson. The latter was succeeded by Eli H. Murray. Mr. 
Underwood served three years, the regiment doing eiScient service through- 
out the ^Vestern and Southern campaigns, being finally mustered out at 
Savanpah, Ga., after accompanying Sherman to that point in his famous 
march to the sea. Mr. Underwood sustained but few wounds, occa- 
sioned by accidents during his long service. 

BENJAMIN II. WEST was born March 2, 1848, in Christian 
County, to Philip E. and Eliza A. (Johnson) West, natives of North 
Carolina and this county respectively. The father is still living, and 
engaged in farming pursuits, a resident of Fruit Hill Precinct. Five 
of the seven children born to our subject's parents are living : Henry 
M., Cornelia C, B. H., Sidney E. and Margaret E. Mr. West, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, has always resided in Christian County, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. For several years he has run a general store upon 
his premises. He is a member of the Baptist Church. He married 
Almarinda C. Bourland, a daughter of Felix and Ann M. (RatclifiF) 
Bourland. Mr. and Mrs. West have one adopted child — Nannie S. Mr. 
West is one of the enterprising men of the county, and is ever ready with 
his support to all enterprises of public interest and value. 

CHARLES C. WEST is a native of this county and was born Dec- 
ember 26, 1832. He is a son of William E. and Narcissa [Stroud) West, 
the former a native of North Carolina, and thelatter of Christian County. 
The father was a farmer, and he came to Christian County when he was 
very young, with his father, Charles H. West, who was a son of Thomas 
West. The parents of our subject liad thirteen children, of whom there 
are nine now living: James H., C. C, Thomas M., William W., Mary A., 
Orrin A., Benjamin F., Eliza A. and Narcissa E. Mr. West, the sub- 
ject uf these lines, has always made his residence in Christian County, 



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FRUIT iULh PRECINCT. 567 

and has engaged wholly in farming. He has about 300 acres of land 
upon the home place, and also interest in other tracts. Mr. West was 
first married to Martha H. Allen, a daughter of Moses 11. Allen. This 
union has given two children: William jM. and Charlie C. His present 
wife was Miss Lenora Dulin, a daughter of E. G. Dulin, an old resident 
of Christian County. This union has been blessed by three children : 
William E., Maud and Thomas. Our subject is a member of the A. 
F. & A. M., L. M. Cox Lodge, No. 327. Politically he is a Democrat. 
WILLIAM W. WEST, a son of William E. West, was born and 
reared in Christian County, and has always resided here, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. In 1861 he enlisted in the Third Kentucky Cav- 
alry, Col. Jackson. The regiment served under many of the most 
renowned cavalry leaders, and took active part in some of the principal 
engagements throughout Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi, and 
accompanied Sherman in his memorable march to the sea, the regiment 
being mustered out at Savannah, Ga. Mr. West was united in marriage 
to Miss P. A. Croft, a daughter of Roland Croft. This union has given 
seven children, six of whom are living : Ella A., Salina, Curtis, Lelier, 
Roy and the baby. Mr. West is a Greenbacker politically, and is a 
member of the A. F. & A. M., L. M. Cox Lodge, No. 327. 







.0 'f 






SCATES' MILL PRECINCT. 

C. A. BRASHER, of the firm of Brasher & "West, general mer- 
chauts, was born July 13, 1842, in Christian County. He is a son of Jacob 
C. and Agues (Campbell) Brasher, also natives of Christian Connty. 
His father died in 1874, aged sixty-three years. The subject of this 
sketch was reared on his father's farm. At the breaking out of the war 
he enlisted in Company G, Seventeenth Kentucky Infantry (Federal). He 
served tliree years and was mustered out Second Lieutenant. He returned 
to Christian County, and continued farming. In 1872 he removed 
to Crofton and secured a position as clerk with J. E. Croft, where he 
remained till 1879, when the present partnership was formed, which has 
since continued. He was married in 1875 to Sarah H. Long. She was 
born in Christian County. They have two children, a son and daughter. 

J. R. BROWN was born February 14, 1822, in Scales' Mill rrecinct, 
Christian Co., Ky., and is a son of Timothy and Jane (Armstrong) 
Brown. They were natives of North Carolina, and Timothy Brown was 
one of the early settlers of this county. The subject of this sketch now 
owns and resides on the original tract of land entered by his father, con- 
sisting in part of 400 acres. Upon this farm he has passed his life, and 
is now one of the most extensive farmers of the district. lie was mar- 
ried in 1847 to Miss Martha Misemore, a native of Christian County, 
who died in 1859, leaving three children — two sons and one daughter. 
In 1860 Mr. B. married Eliza Ann Campbell, who was born in Christian 
County. This union has been blessed with five children — two sons and 
three daughters. Mr. Brown has for forty years been a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church South, and for twenty years a member of 
the order of A. F. & A. M. 

J. D. COLLINS was born September 26, 1856, in Christian Coun- 
ty, Ky., and is a son of Dr. Morgan Collins, also a native of this county. 
The latter, about the age of thirty-five, began the practice of medicine, 
and continued the same until his death, which took place in 1873, at tiie 






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.A .0 









570 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

age of fifty-two years. The subject of this sketch, after receiving a com- 
mon school education, supplemented it by a two years' course at the 
Evansville Commercial College, afier which he returned home and taught 
school in the district where he now resides. In 1883 he married Eliza 
Orton, a native of Tennessee. They have one son. 

W. V. CROFT, undertaker, was born May 26, 1826, in Christian 
County, Ky. He is the seventh child of a family of nine children born 
to David and Margaret Croft ; they were both natives of South Carolina 
and were among the earliest settlers of Christian County. The subject 
of this sketch was reared on his father's farm. On the death of his father 
he came into possession of this farm, where he has since continued to 
reside ; it consists of about 350 acres, largely improved. Mr. Croft was 
married in 1852 to Nancy M. Canslor ; she was born in Christian Coun- 
ty. They have one daughter. Mr. Croft is engaged in the undertaking 
business, which be established in 1882. 

A. B. CROFT was born February 8, 1832, in Christian County ; he 
is the second child of a family of six, born to William G. and Elizabeth 
(McKinney) Croft ; the former was a native of South Carolina, the latter 
was born in Illinois and reared in Kentucky. The subject of this sketch 
was reared on his father's farm, and there continued to reside till his 
father's death, which occurred in April, 1872, at the age of 8ixt3'-five. 
Two years later our subject removed to Crofton and settled on his farm of 
150 acres, adjoining the village of Crofton. Mr. Croft owns in Christian 
County in all about 1,000 acres, which is largely improved ; he is also 
proprietor of a meat-market in Crofton. He was married in 187-1 to Mar- 
cella Campbell ; she was born in Christian County. One daughter glad- 
dens their home. 

J. E. CROFT, general merchant, was born in Scates' Mill Precinct, 
Christian County, January 19, 1839. He is a son of William G. and 
Mary E. (McKinney) Croft, tlie former a native of South Carolina, born 
in 1807; the latter a native of Illinois, born in 1814. His grandfather 
immigrated to Christian County, where he carried on the hatter's trade 
(this business he learned in England) and also engaged in farming. The 
subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm, where he remained 
till the age of seventeen; he then attended the Castleberry School three 
years, and afterward taught school for two years, since which time he has 



■eGATKS' ^iXJ. J'JUiCINCT. 571 

been engaged in merchandising in Crofton. Mr. Croft laid out the town, 
and has erected the largest number of dwellings here. Pie also owns the 
flour and saw-mill and two warehouses. The past twenty-five years he 
and his brother have been engaged in the tobacco business ; he has always 
taken a deep interest in educational matters, and at his own expense built 
a public school here ; he is one of the largest stockholders of Crofton 
Academy, a very fine structure, completed in 1883. He has been Deputy 
County Clerk, and for the past ten years a member of the School Board. 
Mr. Croft was married October 2, 18G2, to Miss Elmira E. Bourland, a 
native of Scates' Mill Precinct. This union has been blessed with four 
children — one son and three daughters. A portrait of Mr. Croft will be 
found on another page. 

JOHN M. DULIN, farmer, was born October 15, 1842, in Fruit 
Hill Precinct, Christian County. He is the sixth child of a family of 
nine born to Rice and Catherine (Myers) Dulin. He was reared on his 
father's farm, and there remained until his marriage, which took place 
November 4, 1863, to Mary E., daughter of John E. Rice, of Hopkins 
County, Ky. This union has been blessed with five children — three sons 
and two daughters. 

J. R. FULLER, dealer in general merchandise, and Justice of the 
Peace of Scates' Mill Precinct, was born September 25, 1847, in this 
county, and within four miles of where he now resides. He is the tliird 
in a family of seven children born to William C. and Margaret J. (Boyd) 
Fuller, who are natives of this county. The subject of this sketch was 
reared on his father's farm, and received a liberal education. At the age 
of twenty-one he engaged in farming on his own account, rented a farm, 
and soon after bought one of 200 acres, and has since been engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, as well as merchandising. In 1871 he began the 
mercantile business, at which he still continues, doing a prosperous busi- 
ness, and has recently erected a new storeroom ; he has served in the 
office of Magistrate for the past seven years. He was married, January 
21, 1869, to Miss Rhoda Collins, who was born in this county, and is the 
mother of four children — one son and three daughters. 

D. H. GLOVER was born September 16, 1839, in Robinson County, 
Tenn. He is a son of Henry and Martha (Cliamblcs) Glover ; the 
former a native of Virginia, and the latter of North Carolina. The sub- 



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572 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ject of this sketch spent his early life at home, receiving the benefits of 
the common schools and assisting to till the home farm. At twenty-one 
years of age he left his home, came to this county, where he has since 
resided, engaged in farming, and is the owner of 320 acres of land, of 
which 75 acres. are under a high state of cultivation. In 1864 he enlisted 
in the late Civil war, and served seven months in the Seventeenth Ken- 
tucky Cavalry. He has been Treasurer of the School Board for four years, 
and has served as Deputy Sheriff for one year, and is a member of the 
order A. F. & A. M. On the 4th of December, 1866, he married Miss 
Elizabeth C. Lantrip, a native of Christian County,* who has borne him 
six children — two sons and four daughters. 

PROF. R. H. INGRAM, Principal of Crofton Academy, was born in 
Nottoway, Va., and is a son of S. A. and Mary J. (Hyde) Ingram, also 
natives of Virginia. The subject of this sketch was born and reared on 
his father's plantation. At the age of seventeen, he enlisted in the Third 
Virginia Cavalry, served three years and was honorably discharged at the 
expiration of his enlistment. He then returned to his father's home, and 
soon after took up teaching as a profession, which he has since followed. 
September, 1883, he was appointed to his present position. 

H. CLAY McCORD, general merchant and dealer in agricultural 
implements, was born September 13, 1846, in Christian County. He is 
the fifth child in a family of six, born to David and Levina McCord. 
The former was born in Christian County, the latter in North Carolina. 
The subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm, upon which he 
remained till the age of eighteen. He then engaged in teaciiing school, 
which he continued about five years. In 1871 he embarked in the mer- 
cantile business at Crofton, being the first merchant of the town, where 
he has since continued, and is doing a large and prosperous business. II. 
Clay McCord was in April, 1873, in the act entitled "An Act to incorpo- 
rate the town of Crofton," appointed one of the Trustees for said town ; 
was subsequently elected to said position three times ; afterward serving 
as Treasurer for said town four years. In ] 875 he was elected Justice of 
..the Peace, which position he filled for four years, and in 1876 was 
appointed Examiner for Christian County, which position he has held for 
eight years. On December 3, 1.S77. he was married to Serena C. Bowl- 
ing, a native of Christian County. Two daughters now bless this union. 
Mr. McCord is'a prominent member of the Masonic; fraternity. 



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SCATES' MILL PKECINCT. 573 

JOHN N. MURPHY, of the firm of White & Murphy, general mer- 
chants, of Scates' Mill Precinct, via,s born July 28, 1844, in McMiiui Coun- 
ty, Tenn ; he is the son of Jefferson D. and Susan (Orton) Murphy. The 
former was a native of McMinn, and the latter of Carter County, Tenn. 
The subject of this sketch being left an orphan at the age of six months, 
ho was reared by his step-father, with whom he remained until he was 
twenty-nine years of age. In 1875 he removed to near his present resi- 
dence and opened a general merchandising business, and has increased 
his trade from §500 to §5,000 per year. In the spring of 1863 he 
enlisted in Walker's Battalion, where he served four months. He was 
married on the 11th of July, 1869, to Miss C. A. White. They have 
two children. Mrs. Murphy is a native of McMinn County, Tenn. In 
addition to his mercantile business he is engaged in farming, and is the 
owner of 270 acres of land. 

J. J. NIXON, grocer and liquor dealer, etc., was born August 16, 1855, 
in Kentucky ; he is the fourth child of a family of six born to N. T. and N. 
S. (Hopson) Nixon. N. T. Nixon was born in Tennessee. The subject 
of this sketch was reared on his father's farm. At the age of seventeen 
he went to Illinois, worked on a farm there about thirteen months ; 
he then removed to Kentucky and engaged in farming till 1880; he 
then engaged in merchandising at Fruit Hill. After continuing about 
eighteen months he was burned out, and came at once to Crofton and 
commenced his present business. In 1876 he married Miss Charlie West. 
She was born in Christian County. Two daughters bless this union. 

MARTIN ROBERTS, farmer, was born February 24, 1828, in 
Monroe County, Tenn., and is the fourth child of a family of seven born 
to Basil and Sallie (Ervin) Roberts ; the former was a native of Tennessee. 
The subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm, where he 
remained until the age of twenty-three ; he then lived on a rented farm 
four years, after which he bought a farm of sixty-five acres in Roane 
County, where he remained about eight years, when he returned to Mon- 
roe County ; he there bought a farm of 265 acres, on which he resided 
until the spring of 1864 (except serving three months in the army) ; he then 
returned to Bullitt County, Ky.; engaged there in farming. December, 
1864, he removed to Indiana ; there remained till the fall of 1865, when 
ho returned to his home in Tennessee. In the fall of 1875 he came to 



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574 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Christian County, where he has since resided ; he owns a farm of 235 
acres, about seventy of which are improved ; he was married on January 
], 1852, to Mrs. Susan A. Murphy, a native of Tennessee (Carter Coun- 
ty). Five children blessed their union — two sons and three daughters. 

JOSEPH D. TERRY, farmer, son of John and Margaret F. (Davis) 
Terry, natives of North Carolina and South Carolina respectively, was 
born September 7, 1829, in Crittenden County, Ky.; he was reared on 
his father's farm, where he remained until the age of twenty-three ; he 
then traveled and taught vocal music till his marriage, which took place 
in 1861, to Rebecca C. Brown. She was born in Christian County. 
Their union has been blessed with seven children — four, sons and three 
daughters. Mr. T. enlisted in 1861 in Company A, Twenty-fifth Kentucky 
Infantry, afterward consolidated with the Seventeenth, Company G ; he 
served about nine months, and was discharged on account of physical dis- 
ability ; he is a member of the Christian Church, having preached for this 
denomination more or less for several years. 

W. M. WEST, of the firm of Brasher & West,. general merchants, 
was born January 22, 1854, in Fruit Hill Precinct, Christian County, 
and is a son of C. C. and Martha (Allen) West, also natives of Christian 
County. The subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm, and 
there remained till about the age of nineteen ; he then came to Crofton, 
and was employed as clerk for J. E. Croft five years. In 1879 he, with 
C. A. Brasher, formed their present partnership. This firm is doing a 
business of about §20,000 a year. Mr. West was married in 1875 to Lou 
R. Dulin. She was born in Christian County. Two children bless this 
union — one son and one daughter. 









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GARRETTSBURG PRECINCT. 

MRS. M. E. BACON was born in this precinct and county on April 
6, 1840, and is a daughter of Dr. J. C. and Louisa (Poindextcr) Metcalf, 
who are noticed elsewhere in this work ; her education was finished at 
LaSalle Seminary, Auburndale, Mass. She returned to this county, and 
on February 7, 1859, she was married to Mr. H. E. Bacon. This gen- 
tleman was born in Charlotte County, Va., on May 25, 1819 ; he came 
to this county when about eighteen ; he first clerked for Albert Jones in 
Garretsburg, and then began business for himself, and for upward of 
thirty-five years he continued to be a merchant there — until his death, 
which occurred on January 25, 1879. Mrs. Bacon has since leased the 
house and store to Mr. M. G. Miller, of Pembroke. Mrs. Bacon is now 
making her home near Garrettsburg. She is a member of the Baptist 
Church. 

MATTHEAV A. BARNS is a native of Montgomery County, Teun., 
bom October 26, 1833. His father, Joseph Barns, was born in North 
Carolina in 1809, and died March 25, 1839. From his obituary, written 
by Rev. John C. Mickle, we quote the following: "Mr. Barns was a 
member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church from his youth, and was 
well known to many of the ministers of that body. Too much cannot be 
said in regard to the moral and pious excellence of Brothor Barns. Con- 
stant, unassuming, uniform, modest, and meek in his disposition and 
character, he obtained universal confidence, esteem and respect. He was 
long the subject of affliction, but bore it with patience and fortitude becom- 
ing the Christian." Emily (Adams) Barns, subject's mother, was born in 
Montgomery County, Tenn., and died February 28, 1839, aged about 
twenty-eight years. She was the mother of six children, of whom Jack- 
son H. and our subject are now living. He was reared on a farm, and 
after the death of his parents made his home with his Aunt, Lavina Barns, 
and remained with her uritilhe was sixteen years of age, when he engaged 
in farming on his own account, in his native county. In 1861 he came to 
Christian County, and in 1868 to his present farm, where he has since 



,lr.' l/ 



■1; -h:, 



57G BIOGRAPIIIOAL SKETCHES. 

resided ; he is now the owner of 205 acres, and makes the raising of 
■wheat and tobacco a specialty. On the 6th of April, 1859, he married 
Miss Clarinda F. Lee, a native of Stewart County, Tenn., born October 
14, 1837. Mr. Barns is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 
and his wife of the Methodist Church. 

CAPT. DARWIN BELL. Among the many hospitable and genial 
men of Christian County, there are none to be found more companionable 
than the gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch. He 
was born, January 1, 1828, in the first house reared in Christian County, 
Ky., where James Davis made his pioneer settlement. His father, Dr. 
John F. Bell, was born in Orange County, Va., in 1796 ; removed to 
Christian County, Ky., in 1810, where he died in 1878; he was a prom- 
inent physician of extensive information, and in his life amassed a fine 
property. Dr. John F. Bell was the son of Capt. John Bell, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier of Orange County, Va., who died in 1805, at the age of 
sixty-eight years. Capt. John was the son of William Bell, of Orange 
County, where he died. William was the son of John Bell, who emi-' 
grated from Ireland in an early day. Subject's mother, Catherine B. 
Bocock, daughter of Douglas and Mildred Bocock, of Albemarle 
County, Va., was born in 1805, and died in Christian County, Ky., in 
1838. To her and her husband, Dr. John F. Bell, were born : Eliza- 
beth M., John H., subject, Evelina M. (Quarles), Fannie S. (Henry), 
Cincinnatus D., Catherine B. and Mary A. (Henry). Subject was mar- 
ried, December 28, 1857, to Miss Mary W., daughter of Dr. Charles H. 
Meriwether, of Albemarle County, Va., and to them have been born : 
Catherine D. (Manson), Gilmer M., Margaret (Williams) and John F. 
Capt. Bell's educational advantages were of the best that the county 
aftbrded, and he has continued his habits as a student, having a fine and 
extensive library, until he is regarded by others as one of the best posted 
men in southern Kentucky. At the age of eighteen years, in 1847, Mr. 
Bell enlisted in Company A, Texas Rangers, Chevallier's Battalion, at 
San Antonio, and entered Gen. Taylor's army, and remained in service 
until July, 1848, when he was mustered out at Camargo, Mexico. In 
1861 he entered, as Lieutenant, Company A, 1st Kentucky Cavalry, and 
was soon promoted to the rank of Captain, which position he held until 
the end of the late war. 



GARRETTSCURa PRECINCT. 577 

ROBERT L. BOYD was born in Christian County, Ky., Septem- 
ber 13, 1835. Ilia father, John Wasiiiugton Boyd, was a native of Hal- 
ifax County, Va., born in 1814. When he was four years of age he was 
brought to Cliristian County by his parents, who settled five miles north 
of Hopkinsville. He married in this county, and dui-ing his life followed 
the occupation of a farmer. His death occurred on the 5th of April, 
1865. He was a man of good reputation, a member of the Baptist 
Church, and of the Masonic fraternity. Elizabeth (Anderson) Boyd, his 
wife, and mother of our subject, was born in this county in 1815, and 
died in 1859. She was of Irish descent, and a daughter of Josiah 
Anderson, a native of North Carolina, and an early settler of Christian 
County. She was the mother of seven children, of whom the following 
are now Tiving : John W., James A., Mary E. (widow of John VV. Long), 
George W., Benjamin C. and Robert L. (subject), who was the second 
child born. He remained with his parents until he reached his majority,. 
and since has followed farming. On the 19th of February, 1863, he 
married Miss Bettie White, a native of this county, born December 9,' 
1839. Her father, R. G. White, was born in Louisa County, Va., 
August 31, 1791, and died in this county June 15, 1871. Her mother, 
Elizabeth (Amos) White, was born May 20, 1797, and died November 19, 
1881. They came to Christian County in 1832. Mr. Boyd has four 
children : Mary E., born June 27, 1866 ; Lulu, November 15, 1867 ; 
John R., November 11, 1875 ; and Fannie E., November 16, 1877. Mr. 
and Mrs. Boyd with their two eldest children are members of the Baptist 
Church. He is a member of the Masonic order, and K. of H. 

PAC. GILES. The father of the gentleman whose name heads this 
sketch, Jesse Giles, was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1789, where he 
was reared, educated and married. He served through the war of 1812. 
In 1333 he came to Christian County, and during his life followed farm- 
ing, and became the owner of about 1,000 acres of land. His death 
occurred June 30, 1873. His wife, subject's mother, Dicic (Jones) Giles, 
was born in Halifax County, Va., and died in February, 1874, aged 
eighty-three years. She was the mother of nine children, of whom the 
following are now living : Martha, widow of John C. Furguson ; Dolly, 
widow of L. Nance; Jesse; John; and Paschal, the subject of this 
sketch. He was born near his present residence August 27, 1836, and 



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0- .. -- -.TT .:,oyi 



578 BIOGRAPniCAL SKETCHES. 

was reared on a farm and remained at home with his parents until the 
breaking out of the late Civil war ; he then enlisted in 1861 in Company 
K, Tenth Kentucky Cavalry, and was Orderly Sergeant. He served 
till the close of the war, and participated in the battles of Chickamauga, 
Saltville,, Va., and many minor engagements. In 1865 he was honorably 
discharged and returned home, but soon after began traveling and con- 
tinued the same for about three years. In 1869 he engaged in mercan- 
tile business in Tennessee, and was thus engaged for six years. In 1875 
he removed to his present farm, where he has since resided, engaged in 
farming and trading. He is now the owner of about 800 acres of land. 
In February, 1881, he married Miss Lulu Lyle, a native of Providence, 
Tenn., and a daughter of B. and Allie (Trice) Lyle, both natives of 
Tennessee. Mr. Giles is one of the wide-awake business men of the 
precinct, and is a member of the Masonic order, K. of II. and Grange. 
They have one child — Lillian Anna Bell Giles. 

COllTEZ LEAVELL. The father of this gentleman was Benja- 
min Leavell, a native of Culpepper County, Va., born in 1780, and was 
there reared, educated and married. He emigrated to Tennessee, after- 
ward to Todd County, Ky., and subsequently, in 183-4 or 1835, to this 
county, where he remained engaged in farming to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1850. He was the owner of 1,200 acres of land ; a man 
of even temperament, of moral character, a great admirer of Henry Clay, 
though not an active politician himself. His brother, Lewis Leavell, was 
the first settler in and founder of Trenton, Ky. Elizabeth (Willis) Lea- 
vell, the mother of subject, was born in Louisa County, Va., in 1790, and 
died in Hopkinsville in 1866. She was the mother of twelve children, of 
whom four are now living, viz.: William, Benjamin, Ophelia (wife of H. 
G. Abcrnathy) and Cortez, our subject. He was born in Todd County, 
Ky., September 11, 1831, and was reared on a farm and educated in the 
common schools. At nineteen years of age he began farming at his 
present place, where he owns 310 acres, called " Forest Home." He is 
also the owner of a farm of 140 acres located near Garrettsburg. In 1861 
he married Miss Susan Metcalf, a native of the county, who died in March, 
1877, leaving four children : Louisa, Benjamin (now deceased), Fanny 
and Bessie. In October, 1881, he married Mrs. Anna Grundy, a native 
of Paducah, Ky., who has borne him one child — Carrie Bailey Leavell. 



•>II 






fd 
,71 

!j ffii 



QARRETTSBORG I'RfiCINCT. 679 

.Mr. and Mrs. Leavell are members of the Baptist Church, lie is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity. 

J. J. C. McKNIGIIT was born in Christian County, Ky., on the 9th 
of September, 1832. lie was reared in the northern part of the county, 
and was educated in the subscription schools of the neighborhood. When 
he was twenty-one years of age, he left his home and commenced life as a 
farmer. In 1861 he enlisted in the late Civil war, and served in Company 
A, First Kentucky (Confederate) Cavalry, under command of Col. Ben. 
Hardin Helm, Lieut- Col. Woodward, for twelve months; and served 
through the war aa Third Lieutenant. He participated in the battles of 
Chickamauga, Saltville, Va., Loudon, Stone Mountain, Bull Gap, and 
covered the retreat from Dalton back to Atlanta ; at that time he was 
under Col. Johnson. In 1865 he was honorably discharged, returned 
home and engaged in farming, at which he still continues, and is the owner 
of 650 acres of good land. In 1876 he married Miss Ophie Wills, a 
native ol the county and a daughter of George Wills. She died Septem- 
ber 1, 1879, leaving two children, of whom one is now living, viz.: 
George William, born August 11, 1877. William McKnight, the father 
of our subject, was born in 1803 in South Carolina, and in 1824 with his 
parents came to Hopkinsville, Ky., and the following year bought land 
and settled in Scates' Mill Precinct, where he became the owner of about 
4,000 acres of land. He died in 1878. Charlotte (Ilamby) McKnight, 
his wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Christian County, Ky., 
and died in 1840, aged thirty years. She was the mother of eight ciiil- 
dren, of whom two are now living, viz.: J. J. C. and Thomas T. 

JOHN CALVIN METCALF, M. D., deceased, was born in Win- 
throp, Me., in 1801, where his childhood and youth were spent. When 
about twenty-one years of age, he moved to Charlotte County, Va., where 
he remained eight years, engaged in teaching school and studying medi- 
cine. About 1830 he came from Virginia to this county, and settled at 
Garrettsburg, where he lived to the time of his death, which occurred 
February 3, 1872. For more than thirty years Dr. Metcalf had a large 
and lucrative practice of medicine. He also educated a number of medical 
students. He was for a number of years Elder of the Presbyterian 
Church at Lafayette, and lived tiie life, and died the death, of a Christian. 
In all the walks of life, Dr. Metcalf was honored and beloved by a large 












rl'. .'jO-tiij 


1-. v.! ;i,-J/. 


/:■. •:_.,! f.,1 


|y-, ..or-C! 



580 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCilES. 

circle of friends. He was a graduate of the Pennsylvania University, 
Philadelphia. He first married Martha Louisa, daughter of Nicholas J. 
aiid Pvcbecca (Raglan) Poindej;tor,"of Christin.n County, who died in 1860, 
leaving the following children : Dr. J. N. Metcalf, of Lafayette ; Mary 
Elizabeth, widow of H. E. Bacon; Susan Olive, who married Cortez 
Leavell; and David Johnson Metcalf. On the 9th of April, 1862, he 
was married to Mrs. Victoria Dabney, widow of Dr. Samuel H. Dabney, 
and daughter of Robert G. and Eliza Watson (Michie) Willis, of Chris- 
tian County. Mrs. Metcalf is the mother of one child — John Calvin Met- 
calf, who was born August 7, 1865. Her farm, " Shamrock," contains 
200 acres of land. A portrait of J. C. Metcalf, M. D. (deceased), ap- 
pears on another page in this volume. 

HON. AUSTIN PEAY was born on the 29th day of February, 
1844, in Christian County. His parents, Austin and Maria A. (Pendle- 
ton) Peay, were both natives of Virginia. From that State they removed 
in the year 1835 to this county, coming across the mountains on horse- 
back. The father devoted his life to the prosecution of his farming inter- 
ests, abd was a man of substantial worth to the community, being a man 
of sound judgment and of practical business proclivities, and was univer- 
sally looked upon as one possessing great strength of mind, and his life 
was an active one, commanding the respect of all. He died compara- 
tively young in years, in 1852. His distinguished son, who bears his name, 
possesses much of his father's practical turn of mind and energetic business 
qualities. He received a good education in the schools of Christian 
County, and prepared himself to enter the University of Virginia, but 
the following four years were destined to be spent far differently — upon 
the battle-field of deadly strife. Though very young — seventeen years of 
age — he enlisted at the opening of the war, in the First Kentucky Con- 
federate Cavalry (Col. B. H. Helm), in which he served out the twelve 
months of enlistment. His company and one other went into the mem- 
orable Second Kentucky Cavalry, commanded by Col. Woodward, and 
after his death by Maj. Tom Lewis. In this regiment our subject served 
throughout the war, being successively under the command of Gens. For- 
rest, Wheeler and Hampton. His long service was gallantly rendered, 
and during it he sustained but a slight wound, received in Wheeler's attack 
on Fort Donelson. At the close of the war, Mr. Peay returned home, 



0«5 



■..ilL'or, :;!'■! ■(-■ 



,7 ■.n ,:;[.n:ii-! -[.J :jl'j-.n 



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GARRETTSBURO I-HKCINOJ'. 581 

and gave his attention to farming pursuits. His beautiful farm residence 
is known as "The Oaks," and his farm property consists of 500 acres of 
land in a high state of cultivation. Mr. Peay is a warm adherent to the 
Democratic party ; he has served his party with a love born of a belief in 
its principles. For twelve years he filled the position of Magistrate for 
Garrettsburg Precinct, acceptably to the people, and with credit to him- 
self; his great popularity reduced an opposing Republican majority of 
nearly 1,000 votes to 224 in his race for a seat in the State Legislature 
in 1880, against Breathitt, one of the ablest young men in the county. 
Two years later he received the nomination for the State Senate, and 
accepted the position as the unanimous gift of the people, receiving no 
opposition in a Republican district from either side. His career in this 
responsible capacity has been active and eminently creditable to himself 
and friends ; he is Chairman of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs, 
and, as a member of the Committee on Charitable Institutions, he had in 
charge the late investigations into the charges preferred against the man- 
agement of the Anchorage Asylum, and he performed the duties thereof 
in a manner reflecting great credit on himself, the inquiry under his super- 
vision .being an active, determined and conscientious one ; he has also 
prepai'ed and brought before the Senate many important bills of various 
kinds. How long he will serve in his present or in a higher position 
could be determined, it appears, if the length of his life's lease were 
known, for the people will be loth to part with the service he so satisfac- 
torily renders as a representative of their thoughts and desires. Mr. 
Peay has been twice married, the first time to Miss Cornelia F. Leavell, 
of Hopkinsville, which happy union gave five children, four of whom sur- 
vive : Mary B., Anna P., Austin and Cornelia F. Mrs. Peay died 
December 11, 1880. Mr. P. was subsequently married to Miss Anna B. 
Lewis, a daughter of Judge Walter Lewis, of Guthrie, Ky. Mr. P. is a 
member of the Salem Baptist Church of this county. A portrait of him 
will be found elsewhere in this work. 

J. B. RADFORD was born in Christian County, Ky., October 10, 
1840, to Benjamin and Martha (Quisenbury) Radford. The elder Rad- 
ford was born in Greene County, Ky., January 1, 1811, and was there 
reared and educated. Arriving at his manhood he came to Christian and 
engaged in farming. After renting land for about tlirce years he settled 






■}il ;■>'.■■ (c Ti L- 



582 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHKS. 

on the farm where his son, our subject, now resides, and there remained 
to the time of his death. In 1831 he married Adaline Whitlock, who 
died in 1837, leaving three children, of whom Mary Ann and Lycurgus 
are now living. He subsequently married Miss Quisenbury, subject's 
mother, who is now living with her son on the homestead. She is a 
daughter of James and Catherine (Thralkale) Quisenbury, nntives of 
Culpepper County, Va. He died February 14, 1839, and she died 
March 19,1866. Mrs. Radford is the mother of two children, viz.: Kit- 
tie, deceased, who married H. B. Wood, and J. B. Radford, whose name 
heads this sketch. His early life was spent at home. He was educated 
in the subscription schools of the county. In March, 1868, he married 
Miss Isabella Long, who died in July, 1874, leaving two children, viz.: 
Edgar C. and Viola P., who died October 31, 1880, aged nine years. 
On the 11th of October, 1881, he married Miss Amelia Park. This 
union has been blessed with one child — Mattie May. Mr. Radford is the 
owner of 2G0 acres of land. He is a member of the Baptist Church and 
his wife of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a member of 
the Masonic order. 

MRS. REBECCA A. RIVES. This lady was born in Warren 
County, N. C, on November 22, 1822. She was a daughter of Reves 
and Ruth Lumega (Vaughn) Turner. The father was a native of the 
same county, the mother of Granville County, N. C. When our subject 
was ten years old her parents moved to Sumner County, Tenn. Here 
they resided some time, but afterward moved to Weakley County, where 
they died. Mrs. Rives' schooling was received in Sumner County. In 
Montgomery County, Tenn., while visiting her uncle, on September 22, 
1841, she was married to Mr. James T. Rives. This gentleman was born 
in Warren County, N. C, on March 21, 1816. He was a son of Thomas 
and Mary E. (Collins) Rives. When he was about ten years old his 
parents moved to Christian County, Ivy., and settled in the southern part 
of Garretsburg Precinct. There the father resided until his death in 
1872. Mr. J. T. Rives, after his marriage, first settled in Montgomery 
County, Tenn., and resided there until the spring of 1851, when he came 
to the farm now owned by subject. Here he resided until his death, 
which occurred on April 1-5, 1882. He left a wife and six children, viz.: 
Rufus, James T., Mrs. Addic Wills, Mrs. Maude A. Wills, Mrs. Mattie 



ew 



GARHETTSCUKG PRECINCT. 583 

B. Allen (of Montgomery County, Tenn.) and Thomas, to mourn liis loss. 
The farm, which contains about 700 acres, is now managed by Mrs. Rives 
and her family. Mrs. Rives is a member of the Methodist Church. 

THOMAS J. TERRELL is a son of John W. and Elizabeth (Bagby) 
Terrell, and was born in Halifax County, Va., September 7, 1820 ; his 
father was a native of the same county, a farmer, and a soldier of the war 
of 1812; he died in 1876, aged ninety -seven years. He was a son of 
William Terrell, a native of Buckingham County, Va., of English descent, 
and who served through the Revolutionary war, lived to a ripe old age, 
and died in his chair while smoking his pipe. The mother of our subject 
was born in Prince Edward County, Va., and died in Halifax County, in 
1869, aged seventy-seven years. She was the mother of six children, of 
whom the following are now living : Parthenia, wife of George Perkins ; 
Thomas J.; Mary, wife of Robert Daniel ; Martha, wife of Thomas B. 
Perkins. Thomas J. Terrell, the subject, was reared on the farm, and at 
nineteen years of age left home and lived with his uncle and grandparents. 
In 1843 he came to Christian County and engaged in farming, and is now 
the owner of a farm of 575 acres. Li 1847 he married Maria S. Garrott, 
who died in 1873, leaving two children, viz.: John W., and Eliza, wife 
of Charles Fleming. In 1875 he married Fannie Crowder, who died in 
1877. His present marriage occurred in 1879, to Mrs. Ilattie E. Evans, 
widow of Thomas E. Evans, a native of Christian County. Mrs. Terrell 
is the mother of two children — John T. and Jesse Evans. Mr. and Mrs. 
Terrell are members of the Christian Church, and he is a member of the 
Grange. 

JOHN W. TERRELL was born in Christian County, Ky., June 25, 
1850; his early life was spent at homo assisting to till the soil of his 
•father's farm, and receiving such an education as could be obtained in the 
neighborhood schools. When he was twenty-two years of age he left his 
home and commenced life as a farmer, and continued the same until 1878, 
when he sold his farm and engaged in the mercantile business at Garretts- 
burg for two years, and the latter year added farming in connection. In 
1881 he bought his present farm of 265 acres, and upon which he has 
since resided, engaged in farming. In September, 1875, he married Miss 
Azille H., daughter of John B. and Eliza J. White, of Garrcttsburg. 
They have three children: William Lee, born in June, 1876; Thomas 



684 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Jefferson, born in February, 1878, and James Isaac, born May 1, 1882. 
Mr. Terrell is a member of tbe Grange and K. of II., and he and wife are 
members of the Baptist Church. 

THOMAS H. WALLACE'S father, John W. Wallace, was born in 
Culpeper County, Va., in 1818, where he was reared until he was 
fifteen years of age, and at that age came to Crittenden County, Ky., and 
in 1850 to Christian County and settled near Long View, and afterward 
on the Ragsdale farm. During his life he followed the occupation of 
farming; he died March 25, 1883; he owned 1,000 acres of land in the 
county ; his wife and mother of subject, was Catherine (Sharp) Wallace, 
a native of Hopkinsville born in 1828, and died in 1860. She was a 
daughter of Fidelio Sharp, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
volume. She was the mother of five children of whom the following are 
now living : Thomas H., Fidelio C, Arthur M. and Caroline K. Thomas 
H. was born in September, 1847, and was educated at the Washington 
and Lee University, and graduated from that institution in 1870. Dur- 
ing the years of 1870 and 1871 he was in California. In 1872 he 
returned to this county and has since been engaged in farming, controlling 
1,000 acres, of which he owns 260 acres. 

J. B. WHITE was born in Virginia, October 29, 1814, and is a son 
of Samuel and Elizabeth (Bragg) White, who were natives of Virginia. 
Subject was the oldest of five children, two of whom are now living : 
Mrs. Rosanna Northington, in this precinct, and J. B. (our subject). 
The latter received his education in the schools of his native county, and 
when he was about twenty- one years of age, his father came to this county. 
The latter settled in this precinct, and followed the trade of a blacksmith, 
also farming. He resided here until his death, which occurred in Febru- 
ary, 1872. Our subject learned the blacksmith trade of his father, while 
•residing in Virginia, and after arriving in this county he worked with his 
father until about 1840 ; he then came to the town of Garrettsburg and 
began carrying on the business for himself. He engaged in blacksmith- 
ing until 1865, and then commenced merchandising at the same point. 
Here he has been engaged in business ever since ; he also owns about 
250 acres and has farming carried on. He was married in this county 
on July 23, 1840, to Miss Eliza J. White, a daughter of R. G. and 
Elizabeth (Amous) White. The parents were natives of Louisa County, 






>,i .IV i! . ■ll.j^- 



GARRETTSBURG PRECINCT. 585 

Va., and came to this county in 1830. They settled in the north part of 
the precinct ; here the father died on June 13, 1871, and tlie mother on 
November 19, 1881. Mrs. White was born in Virginia on January 27, 
1824, and is the mother of twelve children, seven of whom are now living, 
viz.: Eudora'T., wife of J. H. Barns; James H., Eoline, wife of N. B. 
Dickson ; Ada B., wife of W. B. Sargeant of Little Rock, Ark.; Azille, 
wife of J. W. Terrell ; M. K. and Aritosa I. Mr. White has served as 
Magistrate of the county ; he was appointed Postmaster in about 1858, 
and has since held that office. Mr. and Mrs. White are both members of 
the Baptist Church. Mr. White is identified with the Democratic party 
in politics. 

EDWARD A. WILSON, M. D., was born in Lunenburg County, 
Va., February 10, 1828. His father, Josiah B. Wilson, was a native of 
the same county, where he was reared, educated and married. In early 
life he followed mercantile pursuits, and in his latter years was a farmer ; 
he was in the war of 1812; his death occurred in 1872, aged eighty 
years; he was a son of Edward Wilson, of Scotch-Irish descent, and a 
native of Virginia ; he served through the Revolutionary war, and was a 
farmer. Martha A. (Moore) Wilson, subject's mother, was born in Lun- 
enburg County, and died in 1849, aged fifty-six years. She was the. 
mother of three children, viz.: Edward A., Josiah B., a farmer of Vir- 
ginia, and Richard H., a farmer and trader of Hopkinsville. Dr. Wilson 
spent his early life at home assisting on the farm, and receiving such an 
education as the schools of Petersburg afforded. When he was eighteen 
years of age he began reading medicine under the preceptorship and in 
the office of Hatchett & Connelley, and remained with them one year. 
The following summer he assisted Dr. John R. Pettus in his practice, and 
in the winters of 1848-49 and 1849-50, attended the Jefferson Medical 
College, Philadelphia, and graduated from the institution in March, 1850. 
He immediately entered upon the practice of his profession in his native 
county, where he remained four years, and removed to Mecklenburg 
County, where he was engaged in his practice until the spring of 18G6, 
when he came to Kentucky and located at Garrettsburg. In 1875 he 
removed to his present farm residence, " Ashwood," where he owns 156 
acres. In Virginia, in 1853, he married Miss Indiana C. Burton, who 
died in 1865. In 1867, on the 3d of December, he married Frances E. 



-;.•', .., i.riv/ .^ii.: .iii^r ,;;r v^difj'.'joVi 






586 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Edwards, a native of Christian County, and a daughter of Nicholas and 
Lucy W. (Boswell) Edwards ; he a native of Halifax County, Va., was 
born in 1797, and came to this county in 18i!8 and died in 1854. She 
was born in Virginia in 1805, was married there in 1825, and is now liv- 
ing, and is the oldest member of the Lafayette Methodist Church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilson have been blessed with the following children : Nannie 
B., Fannie E., Lucy B., Edward A. and Olney M. Dr. Wilson is a 
member of the Baptist Church, of the orders A. F. & A. M. and A. 0. 
U. W., and of the Christian County Medical Association, of which he has 
been President. 












u.. ..-I U 



BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 

HENRY H. BRYANT is one of the leading farmers and stock-raisers 
of this section. His farm of about 400 acres lies mostly in Christian 
County, though his present residence is situated just across the line in 
Trigg. He was born in Christian County February 9, 1843, to Lav^rence 
and Margaret (Harrison) Bryant, natives respectively of Virginia and 
this county, the latter being a daughter of the well-known Major Harri- 
son. The father of our subject was a farmer by occupation, and he came 
to Christian County when only a few years old with his father, Lawrence 
Bryant. He was what might be called a natural lawyer, being a sharp 
thinker and apt debater, and had in early life secured law books and made 
them his study ; but being in poor circumstances, thought himself unable 
to continue his studies in that direction, and he turned his attention to 
farming pursuits. He commenced with nothing but good sense and a 
plentiful supply of energy, and at the time of his death had accumulated 
about 1,600 acres of land ; he had filled the position of Magistrate, but 
cared but little for political office. To him and his wife were born six 
children, of whom there are four now living. Our subject gives special 
attention to stock, having many head of fine horses and cattle, and 
recently sold two fine horses at §1,000 each. In the fall of 1801 Mr. 
Bryant enlisted in the Eighth Kentucky Infantry (Confederate). lie was 
afterward taken sick and was discharged, later joining Morgan's Cavalry, 
and with it serving till the close of the war. He was first married to 
Miss Blanche Farmer, a daughter of Capt. John S. Farmer of Logan 
County, Ky. By her he had seven children, one of whom is living — 
Pearl. His present wife was formerly Miss Mary Guthrie, a daughter of 
John Guthrie, a resident of Nelson County, Ky. This union has given 
one child. Mr. Bryant is a man of much enterprise and activity. He 
subscribed liberally to the proposed new railroad through this section of 
the country, and is interested in all enterprises calculated for the gen- 
eral good. 



•J.; 



"j'/r:ii 



588 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

HOSEA B. CLARK, one of the most substantial citizens of his 
native county — Christian — was born March 16, 1834. His parents, Joab 
and Elizabeth (Brasher) Clark, were born in Christian County also. His 
father was a very prominent man, and was largely identified with the 
history of this section, and receives notice in the historical portion of this 
work. Although devoting part of his life to farming pursuits he was 
engaged principally in preaching the Gospel, having been a minister in 
the Universalist Church for about fifty years. He was a Democrat, and 
although the county was largely Whig in sentiment his great popularity 
reduced the heavy odds against him into a substantial majority the third time 
he ran for the State Legislature ; he was made Assessor by the old County 
Court, and served in that capacity for about eighteen years. He served 
also as Deputy Marshal, Circuit Clerk and Magistrate for many years in 
each position. His father, Jo Clark, came from Virginia to Christian 
County at a very early date. Joab Clark was married three times, his suc- 
cessive wives, Elizabeth, Mary and Nancy, being sisters. The former 
bore him six children: Harriett K., Gustavus G., Volney C, Hosea B., 
Aurelia D. and Sebastian S. (deceased). His second wife bore him also 
six children : Larkin (deceased), Albert H., Victoria, Elizabeth, Ellen 
E. and Josephine (deceased). There were two children by his third wife: 
Joab and Mollie. Our subject has devoted a considerable part of his life 
to the merchandising business, being located both in Hopkinsville and 
Belleview, Ky. He is now engaged in farming pursuits, having farm 
property to the extent of over 200 acres ; he also deals in tobacco and 
engages in general trading, etc.; he is a member of the Universalist 
Church, is a Republican, and is one of the present Magistrates for this 
precinct. He was married first to Mildred Pyle, a daughter of John 
Pyle, and afterward to Miss Elizabeth S. Cox, a daughter of Elijah J. 
Cox. This union has given nine children, eight of whom are living : 
Mary A. (wife of John Q. McGehee), George M., Harry, Claude, Clif- 
ford, Ellen, Ada and Albert. 

WILLIAM F. COX, a native of Christian County, was born March 
5, 184'4, to Elijah J. Cox, an old resident of the county, now deceased. 
Mr. Cox, the subject of these lines, is an enterprising and substantial 
farmer of Bainbridge Precinct, and has always given his attention to 
farming pursuits. Ilis farm of about 200 acres is situated in the southern 









..iil 






BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 589 

portion of the precinct, and is devoted principally to the cultivation of 
wheat, tobacco and the usual farm products. Mr. Cox engages also in 
general trading and speculation, mostly in tobacco and farm commodities. 
He has been twice married. His first wife, Susan Alexander, a daughter 
of Thomas Alexander, bore him three children, one of whom survives — 
Ora. His present wife was formerly Miss Jessie Hunter, a daughter of 
David Hunter. This union has been blessed with three children, of 
whom one, Walter, is now living. Mr. Cox is held in respect by the peo- 
ple, and is a man of worth to the community. 

E. R. CULLOM,M. D., was born near Nashville, Tenn., March 10, 
1844. His parents, Jesse P. and Amanda (Hooper) Cullom were of Irish 
and Scotch descent respectively. The father was a carpenter and general 
mechanic, and with his family had moved to Missouri at an early date, 
and there he and his daughter died. He was a son of Jesse P. Cullom, 
who served under Jackson in the war of 1812. The parents of our sub- 
ject had six children : Abashaba, deceased ; Benjamin L., deceased, was 
killed in the late war, near Franklin, Tenn. ; Augustus B., now a prac- 
ticing physician, residing at Cerulean Springs, Trigg Co., Ky. ; E. R. 
and Jesse P., who is also a physician, residing in the adjoining County 
of Trigg. Our subject served a long time in the Confederate armies. 
He was successively under the command of Gens. Price, Beauregard and 
Forrest. He enlisted in Company B, First Missouri Cavalry, and after- 
ward served in the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and 
later with the Tenth Tennessee Cavalry. In company with others he 
was captured and lay in prison for a period of eighteen months. The 
Doctor first began the study of medicine in Nashville, Tenn., under the 
instruction of Paul Eve, M. D., and he attended his first lectures in the 
Medical Department of Vanderbilt University, and afterward graduated in 
the Kentucky School of Medicine, and the Louisville Medical College. 
His first practice was in the City Hospital, Nashville. He removed to 
Cheatham County, Tenn., where he resided three years, and then came 
to Christian County, where he has since made his residence. The 
demands for his professional services come from every direction, and com- 
prehend a large scope of territory, the people recognizing his great ability 
everywhere. His residence and office are situated in the town of Old 
Bclleview. He was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Mallory, a daugh- 



law .utainn-wn 



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590 BIOQBAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ter of William Mallory, a resident of Nashville, Tenn. This union 
has given seven children, of ■whom six are living: Benjamin P., Egbert 
M., Jessie M., Willie C, Anna and Gertrude. The Doctor is a Dem- 
ocrat politically. 

MARSHALL N. DIUGUID, deceased ; was born in Buckingham 
County, Va., and came to Christian County, with his parents in 1830. 
The latter were George E. and Elizabeth (Diuguid) Diuguid, both of 
whom were also natives of Virginia. The father was a cabinet-maker by 
trade, but in later years gave his attention more to farming pursuits. 
He was a captain in the war of 1812. His father was George Diuguid. 
The parents of our subject had six children, two of whom, Lucy and 
George H., are now living. Our subject was a painter by trade, but the 
latter part of his life was given to farming pursuits. He had received a 
fair education, and was a substantial citizen of the county. He was a 
Democrat in politics. He married Miss Mary M. Connor, who now sur- 
vives him ; she is a daughter of Jolm and Mary C. (Thompson) Connor, 
who were formerly of Virginia. The father of John Connor served in 
the Revolutionary war. Five of the nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Diuguid are living: George M., William A.., Washington J., Lydia E. 
and Joycic W. Mrs. Diuguid has a farm of 143 acres, which is devoted 
to farming in its various branches. 

LEWIS P. GUTHRIE, a native of Christian County, was born 
February 14, 1863, to John J. and Nancy C. (Jones) Guthrie, natives 
respectively of Virginia and Christian County. The father is a wheel- 
wright by trade; he came here very early with his father, Vincent Guth- 
rie, who was in the war of 1812. He now devotes his attention to farm- 
ing pursuits, and resides in this precinct. The parents of subject have 
nine children : Sarah E., Moses A., Charles J., Frances A., Susan J., 
Mary C, L. Mildred, Lewis P. and Lucien W. Our subject was reared 
upon the farm, and taught a writing-school in later years. He is now a 
clerk in the general store of B. F. Hiser, at Sinking Fork, and has been 
in his employ for nearly two years. 

JOSHUA L. and THOMAS M. HARDY. We include both of 
these gentlemen in the same sketch, as one is the counterpart of the other, 
about all the diiferencc in thom being in name. They are the champioH 
twin brothers of the country, having weighed in the same notch for many 



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BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 591 

years, and "each is the other" to such a confusing extent as to nearly 
obliterate their individual identity, and to successfully defy any discrimi- 
■ nation between them on the part of citizens who have known them for 
years. " The only way I can tell them apart," said a neighbor to the 
writer, " is that one usually wears his pants in his boots, while the other 
has his on the outside." They were born in Montgomery County, Tenn., 
on the 20th day of November, 1827, and are sons of Bird and Tiersey 
(Tyre) Hardy, who were natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee, 
and whose wedded union had been blessed with ten children, of whom five 
are now living : Helen, widow of Benjamin Pool and later of J. John- 
son; J. L. and T. M.; Jane, wife of James Witte; and James, living 
elsewhere in this State. The father was a farmer ; was a Captain in the 
war of 1812, and had filled the position of Magistrate in Tennessee. He 
was three times married : to Miss Tiersey Tyre, to Miss Susan McFar- 
land, and to Miss Mary Griffiu. When about ten years of age, our sub- 
jects removed to Trigg County, Ky., where they resided some thirteen 
years, then coming to Christian County, where they have since remained, 
being engaged in farming pursuits. J. L. has a farm of 250 acres, and 
T. M. 240 acres, the farms lying near together. Both are members of 
the Masonic fraternity, and each votes the Democratic ticket. J. L. mar- 
ried Miss Martha S. Sizemore, and his dual or "other self" wedded 
Nancy G., her sister. They are daughters of Anderson and Sarah Size- 
more. Five of the nine children born to J. L. and wife are living : 
Elizabeth V., Mary A., John J., Eliza E. and William L. Our subjects 
are held in high esteem by their fellow-citizens, and are men of substantial 
worth to the community. 

BENJAMIN F. HISER is the present merchant and Postmaster at 
Sinking Fork. He was born February 26, 1832, in Barren County, 
Ky., to Benjamin and Annie (Forbes) Hiser. The father was a farmer by 
occupation, and was a son of John Hiser, who served in the war of 1812, 
and who was originally from Pennsylvania. The parents of our subject died 
but a day apart, the father on September 3, 1863, and the mother the 
day following. To them were born eight children : William M., Perlina, 
Nancy J., B. F., Lewis H., Margaret, Almarinda and Reuben S. Our 
subject came to Christian County in 1869, and has since been engaged in 
teaching school, farming and trading generally. He has two farms which 



in- i .'■■ ii 






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592 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

he now rents. In 1881 he bought out the general stock of W. H. Nolen, 
and has since run a store, carrying a general line of goods. He also 
buys and deals in tobacco, etc. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and also of the Chosen Friends, is a member of the Christian Church, 
and a Democrat in politics. Previous to leaving his native county he had 
been engaged in merchandising for many years. He married Mary F. 
Garrett, a daughter of Granville Garrett, a former resident of Christian 
County. This union has given eight children : Theodore G., Lauis I., 
Lelia A., Laura A., Ida M., Roberta C, Mary R. and Ada. Mr. Hiser 
is one of the enterprising men of the county, and gives his support to 
public enterprises generally. 

GEORGE W. LANDER, a much respected and worthy citizen of 
Christian County, is a son of Stephen S. and Mary (Torian) Lander, 
natives of Kentucky and Virginia respectively, and was born January 24, 
1832. in this county. His father came to this county at an early date, 
was a farmer by occupation, and had filled the position of Magistrate for 
many years, in both this and Trigg County. He was actively interested 
in the construction of pike roads and other public enterprises, being 
especially identified in the proposed Hopkinsville, Cadiz & Canton 
pike. He was a son of William Lander, of Virginia, whose father and 
two brothers came over from EnglR,nd at an early period. The parents 
of our subject were blessed with nine children, of whom there are the fol- 
lowing living : George W., Letitia, wife of R. ^Y. Ware, M. D.; Susan 
E., wife of T. D. Roberts; Stephen S. and Belle, wife of James W. Mc- 
Gehee. With the exception of one year, during which time he was 
engaged in the livery business in Evansville, Ind., Mr. Lander, the subject 
of these lines, has always resided in Christian County. For about five 
years he was engaged in the same business in Hopkinsville, the firm being 
Lander &; McCarty and afterward Lander & Means. He was also in the 
commission business in Hopkinsville, doing business as Lander & Don- 
aldson for about four years, since which he has given his attention more 
to farming pursuits. His farm property consists of 250 acres, which is 
devoted to the raising of the usual crops. He has been a member of the 
A. F. & A. M. since he was of age, also a member of the K. of P., K. of 
11., K. T., and many other like organizations ; is also a Democrat, and 
belongs to the Baptist Church. He was first married to Sallie A. Sum- 



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BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 593 

mers, a daughter of W. A. Summers. This union gave two children : 
Albert W. and Sallie. His present wife — Amanda B. — is a sister of his 
former wife. This marriage has given four children : Ernest, George, 
Lucille and Joshua S. 

WILLIAM N. and CHARLES T. LANDER are sons of the late 
John W. Lander. The latter was born in this county May 5, 1830, a son 
of John S. and Elizabeth (Hoggard) Lander, both of whom were natives of 
Clark County, Ky. John S. was a son of William Lander, formerly of 
Virginia. The former bad nine children by his first wife, above men- 
tioned, four of whom are now living : Martha, Letitia, James A. and Cor- 
nelia. His second wife was Sarah Bryson, who is yet living in Missouri. 
This union gave three children : Nannie, Virginia and Thomas W., the 
latter of whom served throughout the late war, in the Confederate Army. 
The father of our subjects was first married to Miss Mary Bennett, a 
daughter of Walter and Jane (Hughes) Bennett. There was one child 
by this marriage — Alice — now residing in St. Louis, Mo. Ilis second mar- 
riage was with Miss Mary J. Blakeley, a daughter of Josiah and Eliza- 
beth (Goodwin) Blakeley. This union was blessed with six children, of 
whom four are living : William N., Charles T., Elizabeth A. and Laura 
C. The former is now interested in the saw-mill business, and Charles 
T. operates the home farm, which consists of over 600 acres. They are 
substantial citizens of the county, and are held in general esteem. 

PETER P. MASON, a much respected resident of Christian County, 
was born here January 25, 1810, to John B. and Bolina (Davis) Mason, 
who were natives of Virginia. The father devoted his attention during 
life to carpentering and farming. To him and wife were born a family of 
fourteen, of whom four are now living : Ann F., wife of E. J. Faulk- 
ner; P. P. Robert, a farmer of this precinct, and Elijah, a present resi- 
dent of Trigg County. With the exception of about two years' residence 
in Trigg County, our subject has lived in this county always. His life 
has been devoted to agricultural pursuits, and he has a present farm of 
110 acres, besides some timbered land. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. 
F., Ilopkinsville Encampment; is a Democrat politically, and with his 
wife a member of the Methodist Church South. He wedded Miss Mar- 
garet Alexander, a daughter of William and Elizabeth Alexander. Mr. 
, Mason is a man of generous impulses, and gives his encouragement to 






■ i h.M ■ '!;^u>( ) 



,1.. :- .ui.lV 






ii'yj'i ti'.:' 



594 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

enterprises of a public nature, which have at stake the general welfare of 
the community. 

A. W. MEACHAM. The history of the Baptist Church in Chris- 
tian County, or more especially perhaps of that branch of its organization 
which has for years assembled in what is known as the West Union 
Church, situated in the southwestern portion of this precinct, would 
obviously be incomplete without appropriate and adequate mention being 
made of the Rev. A. W. Meacham, who has zealously oflSciated at its 
deliberations for no less than thirty years. Within this time and during 
his pastoral life spent elsewhere in the State, and in Tennessee, he has 
administered the ordinance of baptism to upward of 4,000 persons. Many 
of them, now worthy and substantial citizens of this vicinity, have grown 
to age under his solicitous and fostering care ; the youth has been led to 
forsake his erring and wayward ways, and to accept the one " which 
leadeth to life everlasting," and those who have been brought to the door 
of death have passed sweetly through, accompanied by his tender words 
of faith and hope, and their sorrowing friends sustained by the cheering 
assurance that "Death is but the door through which the righteous pass 
to' life eternal." Brother Meacham was born in Christian County, on 
the 13th day of February, 1818, and is the eldest child born to Wyatt 
and Ellen (Robinson) Meacham, natives of Chatham County, N. C, and 
both of whom came with their respective parents to this county at an 
early date, Joseph Meacham, with his brother, John, coming previous to 
1800, and Abuer Robinson and his brother. Col. James Robinson, at the 
same time, and they all located in the northeastern portion of Christian 
County, in what is now Wilson Precinct, where many of their descendants 
yet reside. Joseph Meacham served in the Revolutionary war ; he mar- 
ried Mollie West, whose father was a Baptist preacher. This union was 
blessed with the following children : Edmund, Willis ; Andrew, a Baptist 
preacher ; Jeremiah, Joseph ; West and Wyatt, twins ; Jonathan, and 
Sinah, who married a man by the name of John Spurlin. Col. James Rob- 
inson served in the war of 1812, being promoted from the rank of 
Captain to that of Colonel. Abner Robinson married Nancy Duty, by 
whom he had six children : Matthew, Ellen, Wylie, Amy, James and 
Harvey. Of these Amy, widow of Samuel V/ithers, yet survives. To 
the parents of our subject were born three children: A. W., Jane and 



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1S5 



.•?}ii:i.:JffiMO -liJ 






BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 595 

Joseph A. The former was reared on the farm, and his early life was 
devoted to ao;ricultural pursuits. He first commenced the study of law, 
which he soon gave up however, upon his making a profession of religion, 
and that being in the year 1839, he was licensed to preach the Gospel, 
having studied theology and the languages under Robert T. Anderson, a 
preacher and select teacher then residing in Logan County, Ky. Since 
1839 Brother Meacham, with the exception of about two years, during 
which time he was in feeble health, has not been without a pastoral charge. 
In 1842 he removed to Paducah, Ky., where he labored zealously for a 
year, worshiping first in the old court house until a church building was 
erected. His pastoral charge of this church was signalized by the baptism 
of seventy-two souls. He then removed to Tennessee, preachinc in 
Shelbyville, Lebanon and various churches throughout the adjacent 
country up to 1851, at which date he returned to Christian County, and 
in 1854 took charge of the West Union Church, of which he has been 
the pastor almost ever since, preaching also to various other congref^ations 
in the neighboring country. Surely, he has grown old in the service of 
the Lord. His sermons are noted for depth of thought, and a pleasant 
earnestness of delivery, and upon his services, the people to whom he has 
administered spiritual food, and been their beloved pastor for so many 
years, assume to have a claim. Brother Meacham has been a member of 
the Masonic fraternity for many years ; has been identified with various 
temperance organizations, giving lectures and preaching temperance ser- 
mons on many occasions, and otherwise laboring for the success of the 
cause. Of late years he has given some attention also to farming pur- 
suits, having a farm of 825 acres, which he usually rents or has worked 
for him. His life has not been without its misfortunes. Amon^ them 
was the total destruction by fire, on December 11, 1872, of his fine resi- 
dence and its contents, the later including a §3,000 library of selected and 
costly books, and works of eminent writers. Brother Meacham married 
Miss Mariura A. Lander, a daughter of James H. and Mary F. (Jones) 
Lander. This union has given six children : Robert T., born October 
23, 1856, and died May 29, 1883, of bronchitis. He was a young man 
of many virtues and noble qualities, and his untimely death was a sad 
blow to his host of friends to whom his pure and upright life had endeared 
him. The remaining children are Charles M., born June 14, ISoS, now 






■ .■• ■ i1 



, : • _; '"l rl 



696 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

editor of the South Kentuckian ; Mollie H., born January 9, 1862, 
now the wife of T. E. Bartley, a resident of Orange County, Va.; James 
P., born May 6, 1863 ; Vic. E., born September 1, 1866, and Lander, 
born December 11, 1876. Mr. Meacham has served the Little River 
Association (the largest in the State,) as Moderator for upwards of twenty 
years. In the neighborhood where he resides, he has preached at all the 
funerals, and officiated at almost every marriage that has taken place. 

JAMES T. MITCHELL was born in Hopkins County, this State, 
February 26, 1851, a son of Thomas J. and Altazary (Dunning) Mitch- 
ell, both natives of Kentucky, and born April 8, 1823, and October 30, 
1817, respectively, and are now residing in this precinct. The father is 
a farmer, but since he became of age he has taught vocal music through- 
out many of the adjoining counties, as well as Christian. In this capac- 
ity he possesses rare ability; he is a son of Cader and Martha (Nichols) 
Mitchell, natives respectively of North Carolina and Kentucky. To them 
were born nine children. Cader was a son of Thomas Mitchell, of North 
Carolina. The parents of our subject have three children : Albert F., a 
farmer in Trigg County; James T. and Martha E. The home farm con- 
sists of 387 acres, and is given to farming in its various branches. Mr. 
Mitchell is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Dick Barnes Lodge, No. 
398. His father is also a member, and also of the Chapter. The family 
are members of the Baptist Church, and are Democrats politically. Our 
subject and his father are substantial citizens of the county, and are held 
in general esteem by the community. 

WILLIAM H. NOLEN, the present merchant and Postmaster at 
Bainbridge, is a native of Trigg County, Ky., and was born April 26, 
1847, being the eldest child of John and Mary (Harber) Nolen, both of 
whom died when AYilliam was young. The father was a farmer, a son of 
Charles Nolen, who spent his life in a like occupation. To the parents of 
our subject were born two children: W. H. and Charles P. Nolen, a res- 
ident of Hopkinsville. Our subject moved over from Trigg County to 
Christian when he was young, and resided here until entering the army. 
He enlisted in the fall of 1864 in the Seventeenth Kentucky Cavalry, 
Col. Samuel F. Johnson, and served until the close of the war. With 
the exception of a short residence in Missouri Mr. Nolen has since lived 
in this county, and has been engaged principally in merchandising; he 



BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 597 

has a store, carrying a considerable general stock, and enjoys the patron- 
age of a large section of the country ; he married Miss Mary E. Stuart, 
a daughter of AVilliam Stuart. This union has given five children, three 
of whom survive: John R., Mary A. and Ollie. Mr. Nolen is a Repub- 
lican politically, and is a man held in high esteem by his fellow-citizens. 
SQUIRE JAMES M. PTOOL is one of the present magistrates 
for Bainbridge Precinct, and has served in that capacity for the past 
eighteen years, such is his hold upon the popular respect and good-will. 
He is one of the most substantial farmers and citizens of Christian 
County ; is a man of great enterprise and activity, very courteous and 
social in manner, and possesses many generous impulses, oifering readily 
his material encouragement and assistance to enterprises calculated for 
the general good of the people. The Pools descend from a family who 
spelled their name Pettypool, the fore part of the word being subse- 
quently dropped, although the present generation retain a "P" before 
Pool, in lieu of the Petty. The vSquire was born in Halifax County, Va., 
October 14, 1819. His parents, Allen P. and Sarah (Pool) Pool, were 
natives also of Virginia. The father followed farming as an occupation. 
He served as First Lieutenant in the war of 1812, and toward the close 
of it was promoted to the rank of Captian. He was a strong Jackson 
Democrat in political sentiment. His father was William P. Pool, a 
native of Virginia, and who was probably of old Scotch descent. Our 
subject removed from Virginia in 1835, with his parents, who located 
in the adjoining county of Trigg, and made a crop, and the fol- 
lowing year came over into Christian County, where the Squire has 
since resided with the exception of a few months' residence in Mis- 
souri. His present home farm consists of over 300 acres, and another 
farm of 300 acres lies partly in Caldwell County. These farms are 
devoted to the raising of tobacco and other staple crops. The Squire 
was Tobacco Inspector at Paducah, Ky., for two years, and also 
served in a like capacity in Hopkinsville. He has for the past twenty 
years been interested in tobacco handling ; buying yearly large quanti- 
ties of the staple article throughout the surrounding country. The 
Squire is a Democrat, politically, and has been a member of the Demo- 
cratic Conventions for about eight years. He is a member of the A. F. t^ 
A. M., Dick Barnes Lodge, No. 398, in which he was W. M. for more 



I' -iil'. \' ■iMyi 



b A 

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1 :1 :;i . ^1V■I^* 



598 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

tlian ten years. He is also a member of the Chapter, Cave Spring 
Lodge, No. 107, and has served in the capacity of H. P. The Squire's 
parents had a large family of children. Eleven grew up, but only two are 
now living: William and our subject. The former is engaged in farming 
in the adjoining county of Caldwell. The Squire was united in marriage 
with Miss Nancy G. Wilson, a daughter of Wylie and Sallie (Mayes) 
Wilson, natives of Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. P'Pool are the parents of five 
children, of whom four are living : William F. P., Wylie A. P., Mat- 
tie C. P. and James L. P. The first-named married Miss Ellen Jackson, 
and resides in Texas ; W. A. P. married Miss Alice B. Goodwin, and 
resides in Hopkinsville, whore he is engaged in the mercantile business ; 
Mattie C. P. married first William Reese, and lastly John AV. Stith ; 
James L. P. married Miss Lydia E. Dunning. This union has given 
three children: Minnie F., James D. and John E. Squire P'Pool is a 
member of the Baptist Church, in which he is a Deacon and also the 
Clerk. He is a man of great worth to the country, and the present his- 
tory is made up principally with delineations of the characters and lives 
of such men and their doings. 

CEORGE A. P'POOL is a native of Halifax County, Va., born 
July 28, 1838, to Peter and Elizabeth (Shotwell) P'Pool. The latter 
were both natives of Virginia also ; moved to North Carolina early, and 
from that State to Christian County, and both died here, at the place 
they first located upon. The father, in his early life, was bound for fif- 
teen years to the blacksmith trade, and he afterward labored in that work, 
but not liking it devoted the remainder of his life to the prosecution of 
his farming interests. He was a substantial farmer, and a; whole-souled, 
home-made man, always wearing clothing of his own make. He had 
served in the war of 1812. To him and his wife was born a large fam- 
ily, eleven of whom grew up, and five are now living : Sallie, Rebecca, 
Zacharias P., John D., and George A. P'. The latter came to Christian 
County with his parents when about seven years old, and has made it his 
place of residence nearly ever since. He has been engaged in farming 
pursuits ; in the grocery and general store business for many years, and 
was interested in the saw and grist-mill business for about eight years. 
He has also done considerable stock trading, and is also interested in the 
tobacco interests. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a man of substan- 



ti ' -r.MJ']- ' 'j 'o :,(';(rj..,i /i 0^'■■ '' 



{ .0 5: 



BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 599 

tial worth. He married Miss Mary L., a daughter of Joseph Turner, 
now deceased. This union has given four children : Joseph P., Elizabeth 
E., Jennie L., and a little one, not named. 

CHARLES E. RA\rLS was born in Robinson County, Tenii., April 
1, 1831. His parents, Benjamin and Nancy (Parker) Rawls, were 
natives of the same county, their respective parents coming from North 
Carolina. The father of Mr. Rawls was a blacksmith by trade, and for 
many years was a minister in the Presbyterian Church. He served in 
the war of 1812. To him and wife were born ten children, only two of 
whom are now living: James T., a farmer in Robinson County, Tenn., 
and Charles E., the subject of these lines. The father was married a 
second time to Miss Rosa Dowlin, which union gave five children : XJsilia 
B., Martha C, Hugh B., Henry S. and lluldah L. Our subject came to 
Christian County in 1870. He taught school in early years, but has 
given his attention mostly to farming pursuits. His present farm con- 
sists of 300 acres, and is devoted to the raising of the usual staple crops. 
Mr. Rawls is a Republican politically, and had been favored with posi- 
tions of trust in his native county. He was first united in marriage with 
Miss Sarah Hinkle, a daughter of Peter llinkle, now living in Robinson 
County, Tenn. This union gave two children : Foster A. and Wylie B. 
He next married Miss Mary J. Keys. Mr. Rawls is an enterprising 
farmer, and is held in high esteem by his fellow-citizens. 

FINIS H. RENSHAW is one of the most substantial farmers of 
this section of the county. His present farm of 232 acres is beautifully 
situated in a valley between a row of hills, and high land on either side. 
Mr. Renshaw was born in Christian County, May 8, 1829, and is the 
eldest child born to Reed and Lucetta (Clark) Renshaw. The father was 
engaged in the butcher trade in early life, but in later years has devoted 
his attention more to farming pursuits. He was a Magistrate for many 
years, and is yet living in Christian County. The parents of our subject 
were blessed with eleven children, of whom eight are now living : F. H., 
Luretha A., wife of James W. Woosley ; James C. and Eliza M., twins — 
the latter married W. H. Woosley, now deceased ; Sophronia E., married 
John W. Jones ; Amanda, wife of James Yancy ; Adelia, wife of W. T. 
Williamson, and Joseph R. Our subject received his early schooling in 
this county, afterward attending the Bethlehem Academy, in Caldwell 



'r.<!;)if!.I1'AJ! 



ri J f ' 1 >!j if J h.« , J oinfftl. tl 
} ! 



600 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

County, and also institutions of learning in Trigg County. At seventeen 
years of age he commenced teaching school, and was thus engaged for 
several years. lie has been active in the temperance cause, having been 
a member of various organizations of that kind. He is a Republican 
politically, and has filled various smaller offices. He married Lavina J. 
Woosley, a daughter of Samuel S. Woosley, an old resident of Christian 
County. This union has given six children, of whom five are now liv- 
ing: Franklin P., Gustavas A., Ella E., married William Diuguid; Her- 
schel G., Samantha L., wife of Washington Diuguid ; and Mahlon M., 
deceased. 

W. J. RENSIIAW is a much respected citizen of the precinct; he 
was born in this county, July 1, 1837, and is the eldest child born to 
Wylie and Elizabeth (Cansler) Renshaw, who were the parents of eleven 
children, seven of whom survive: W. J., Cynthia A., Nancy E., Emily 
C, Virginia, Ransom C. and Wylie R. Mr. Renshaw has always resided 
in Christian County, and his life has been given to the prosecution of his 
farm interests. His present place consists of 100 acres, and is devoted to 
the raising of the principal staple crops. Mr. Renshaw married Miss 
Martha L. Doss, a daughter of Samuel Doss. Their union has been 
blessed with six children : Finis M. (deceased), Wylie W., Frances M., 
Albert J., Fredonia E. and Margaret H. Mr. Renshaw is a Republican 
politically, and with his wife is a member of the Universalist Church. 

JAMES J. SMITH is one of the most enterprising and substantial 
farmers of Christian County. He was born here on March 17, 1827, to 
Charles and Elizabeth (Shryer) Smith, natives respectively of Kentucky 
and Virginia. The fatlier was a blacksmith by trade, but in after years 
he gave his attention more to farming pursuits. To him and his wife, the 
latter a daughter of John Shryer, were born five children, three of whom 
grew to maturity, but James J., the subject of these lines, is the only one 
now living. The latter, at twelve years of age, was removed to the 
adjoining county of Trigg, where he learned the tanner's trade, in which 
he was engaged during his eight years' residence in that county ; he 
removed to Ilopkinsville, Ky., and in partnership with his brother, George 
W. Smith, ran a saddlery and tanning establishment for about three years, 
when our subject moved to a point several miles west of town, and con- 
tinued the tanning business, his brother remaining in Ilopkinsville, 



:.' = -■;•,' ••3 .!f.'>.U'JA«?)Oia 00.') 









BAINBRIDGE PRECINCT. 601 

engaged in the saddlery trade. Since 1858 our subject has devoted his 
attention to agricultural pursuits, having resided upon his present farm 
of 220 acres since 1865. His farm is devoted to the raising of general 
productions, tobacco being the staple crop. Mr. Smith and wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church South, and in political affairs he gives his 
support to the Republican party. He was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah J. Quisenberry, a daughter of E. S. Quisenberry. This union has 
given seven children, six of whom are living : Catharine E., Mary E., Nancy 
F., Charles E., James L. and William H. Mr. Smith is held in high 
esteem by his fellow-citizens, being a man of strict integrity and of sub- 
stantial worth to the community. 

JOHN W. STITJI is a man of substantial worth, and a much 
respected citizen of Christian County. His native county was that of 
Hardin, this State, and he was born August 4, 1849. His parents, 
Archer and Susan (Tarpley) Stith, were natives also of the same county, 
and both died when John was young. The father followed farming as 
his occupation, and was a son of Jackson Stith. He had been twice mar- 
ried. By his first wife, above mentioned, he had four children, of whom 
there^are three now living: Sallie E., John W. and George W. T. — 
Jesse C, the eldest child, being deceased. The father's second mar- 
riage was with Matilda Pawley, a daughter of James Pawley. This 
union gave one child — Henry \V. John W., the subject of these lines, 
remained in his native county, engaged principally in farming and stock- 
trading, until the spring of 1871, at which date he removed to Christian 
County. He has been identified with the merchandise business both in this 
and in the adjoining county of Trigg, having sold goods for many years, 
the firm name being Duncan & Stith, and afterward Pool & Stith. He 
has of late given his time to the prosecution of his farming interests, hav- 
ing a farm of 358 acres, which is devoted to the raising of the usual staple 
crops. He is a Democrat politically. He married Mattie C. (P'Pool) 
Reese, a daughter of Squire J. M. P'Pool, and the widow of William 
Reese, by whom she had one child — Poolie. Mr. and Mrs. Stith have 
bad four children : Robert (deceased), Hattie, Ora and Lottie. 

ROBERT W. VAUGHAN was born in Mecklenburg County, Va., 
March 1, 1840. His parents, Peter G. and Jennie (Vaughan) Vaughan, 
were also natives of the same State. The father was a farmer, and he 



;o :03-i;;rar :. v v- ii.j-';;;^^ J. i,j,t.„-3 



602 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

served in the 1812 war. His wife is yet living in Virginia at an advanced 
age. To the parents were born fourteen children, of whom seven are 
now living: Spencer, Nancy, Mary, Martha, Betsey, R. W. and Andrew. 
Our subject has devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. He removed 
from Virginia to Christian County in 1866. His present farm consists 
of 286|- acres, which is given to the raising of the usual farm products. 
In June, ISol, Mr. Vaughan enlisted in the Thirty-eighth Virginia 
Infantry, which was afterward transferred and included in the Fourteenth 
Virginia Regiment. He served throughout the war, having been in the 
principal battles in the Virginia campaign, without being wounded, or being 
sick a day. He married Miss Elizabeth Griffin, a daughter of Eliaa 
Griffin, a native of Virginia. This union has given six children : Annie, 
Maggie, Robert L., Thomas, Peter and George. Mr. Vaughan is one of 
the substantial farmers of the county, and is interested in enterprises 
which promise benefits to the people generally. 

JOHN \y. WOOD, more commonly known to the citizens as John 
X. Wood, is a man of a jovial and friendly nature, and is one of the 
respected and substantial residents of this precinct. He was born in 
Christian County, April 9, 1854, to William R. and Eliza J. (Kenady) 
Wood, the latter of whom is still living. The father was a general 
mechanic and farmer, and was a member for a long period of the old mili- 
tia companies. The parents had three children, John W., the subject 
of these lines, being the only one living. The latter has ahvays resided 
in Christian County, and has given his attention to farming pursuits ; he 
has seventy-three acres of land, and also works the place known as the 
Kenady farm. Mr. Wood votps the Republican ticket. He married 
Miss Dolly Mayes, a daughter of John and Jane (Elliott) Mayes, who 
were originally from Tennessee. This union has given four children : 
Lillie F., John R., Mary E. and Minnie. Mr. Wood's grandfather was 
William Wood, who was a saddler by trade. He was a native of North 
Carolina. 



CASKY PRECINCT. 

JAMES M. CLARK was born near Ilopkinsville, August 31, 1822, 
and is a son of James and Susan J. (Stubblefield) Clark. James Clark, 
Sr., was a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1795. lie came to Kentucky 
in 1802, with his parents, who settled near Frankfort. At nine years of 
age he was engaged in the Clerk's oiEce of Court of Appeals. He was an 
ofEcer in the war of 1812, served two years under Gen. Harrison, and con- 
veyed the order from Harrison to Gen. Dudley, ordering him to spike his 
guns and retreat, which order Dudley failed to obey and was thus defeat- 
ed. After the war he served as Deputy Marshal for some time, and later 
was Clerk in the old Christian Bank of Hopkinsville. He died in Hop- 
kinsville at the residence of his son (the subject), in September, 1878. 
He was a son of Mathew B. Clark, a native of Pennsylvania, and of 
Scotch descent. The mother of subject was born in Virginia in 1798, 
and died at her son's residence in July, 1855. She was a daughter of 
Beverly Stubblefield, a native of Virginia, a farmer by occupation, a sol- 
dier of the Revolutionary war and an early settler of Kentucky, who 
died near Trenton, Ky., about 1827. James M. Clark is the fourth child 
in a family of fourteen children, of whom thirteen lived to reach their 
majority. He was reared in the county and received a good English edu- 
cation. He came to the farm where he now resides in 1831, and has 
since made it his home, excepting ten years' residence in Hopkinsville, 
though at that time carried on his farm. He is the owner of 504 acres 
of land, called " Springwood," which is located on the Hopkinsville and 
Clarksville pike. In 1856 he married Miss Elizabeth Boulwar, a native 
of Missouri, who died in February, 1870, leaving one son — Ben- 
jamin C. On the 19th of March, 1872, Mr. Clark married Mrs. 
Harriet F. White, daughter of Rev. Samuel Kelley. Mr. Clark is an 
active member of the Casky Grange, and has served as State Treas- 
urer of the order since its organization. He has held the office of Jlagis- 
trate for sixteen years, is a Democrat in politics, but was a strong Aboli- 
tionist during the war. 



hl.-l, , 



M v.-y.- '■ "i-j ao'- (• a i. 






604 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

JAMES T. GARNETT, deceased, a son of James Garnett, a native 
of Virgiuia, of English descent, was born in Albemarle County, Va., on 
the 7th of December, 1816. When he was eight years of age he came to 
Kentucky with his parents, who settled in Christian County. Here he 
spent his boyhood days, assisting to till the soil of the home farm, and 
receiving the benefit of the subscription schools ; he afterward graduated 
at the Princeton College of Kentucky, and began the study of law, but 
never became a practitioner of the profession. He engaged in teaching 
school in this and Montgomery County, Tenn., continuing the same until 
1853, when he engaged in farming on the farm in Casky Precinct, where 
his son, James T. Garnett, Jr., now resides. On the 16th of January, 
1844, he married Mary, daughter of Joseph and Eliza (Bowman) Faunt 
LeRoy, a native of Shenandoah County, Va., born May 26, 1823, who 
died in this county January 6, 1882, leaving seven children as the result of 
their union. Mr. Garnett died after a three years' illness, May 11, 1883. 
lie was a successful man in business, and became the owner of the beau- 
tiful farm " Rich Grove," which comprised a body of 555 acres. Mr. 
Garnett was a Democrat in politics, and was one of the best known and 
most popular men that ever lived in the county. Of an impulsive, warm 
and generous heart, his whole nature was as genial as sunshine ; of blood 
pure and gentle, his companionship was an unmixed pleasure to all his 
large acquaintance, which extended throughout this portion of the State. 
His warm heart went out in sympathy to the afflicted, and his purse-string 
was never tied when the appeal of charity came ; his integrity stood every 
test of life, and was never questioned; brave, chivalric and impulsive, he 
would resent instantaneously any real or fancied reflection upon his own 
or his friend's integrity, but his pure soul never harbored malice, hate or 
revenge a moment, and he was as ready to forgive and forget as he had been 
to feel and resent the wrong. His ideal of moral integrity was placed in the 
highest niche, and yet his whole life was marked by no deviation from the 
high standard he had placed before him when a boy. He was a member 
of the Baptist Church for over half a century. His life was pure and 
cleanly, both morally and socially. He was a loving and affectionate 
husband and father, and when the cruel and irreparable loss came to his 
loved household, with its great and incurable aflliction, the sympathy and 
condolence — sincere and heartfelt — of all his wide circle of friends went out 



^r)iii;i ;■ ;108 Ji 






CASKY PRECINCT. 605 

to them in their hour of severe trial. At the head of his grave the sons 
and daughters of posterity may stand and truly say, the world is brighter 
and bettor that he lived. His memory will be cherished, and his good 
deeds not forgotten. 

WILLIAM \V. GARROTT was born in Christian County, Ky-, 
near Longview, on the 10th of October, 1835, to Pleasant B. and Martha 
J. (Radford) Garrott. He (subject's father) was born in Buckingham 
County, Va., June 5, 1802, where he was reared till he was fifteen years 
of age, and then came to Tennessee with his parents, who located in 
Montgomery County. In 1823 he came to Christian County with his 
brother, who settled near Longview. In 1824 he bought land adjoining 
his brother's farm and engaged in farming on his own account. In 1875, 
after the death of his wife, he removed to Providence, Tenn., and there 
died on the 12th of December, 1875. He was married in 1827, and 
was blessed with eight children, of whom seven were reared. Mr. Gar- 
rott began life a poor man, and by his honesty, industry and economy, he 
succeeded in accumulating a good property. His land in Christian 
County amounted to over 2,000 acres, all of which, excepting 800 acres 
at the old homestead, he divided among his children prior to his death. 
He was a man of limited education, but possessed sound judgment and 
an excellent memory, and was strictly temperate. He joined the Baptist 
Church at forty-five years of age, and not only did he become an exem- 
plary member, but was well versed in the Scriptures. His wife, the 
mother of subject, was born in Louisa County, Va., in April, 1803, and 
was brought to Shelby County, Ky., by her parents in 1815, afterward 
to Todd County, and subsequently to Christian County in 1820, where 
she married, and died August 12, 1875. She was the mother of the fol- 
lowing children : Julia A., Marcellus A., William W., Alice M., Inez 0., 
Justine P., Aurela L. William W. Garrott, the subject, was reared on 
the farm near Longview, and received a common school education. In 
December, 1856, he came to his present farm, and has since been engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. His homestead farm is called "Riverside." 
In January, 1861, he married Miss Mary S., daughter of Dr. S. J. 
Leavell, of Todd County, Ky. They have been blessed with the follow- 
ing children : Pleasant B., John C, Martha P., James R. and Eudora. 
Mr. and Mrs. Garrott, with tliree of their children, are members of the 



606 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Baptist Church ; he is a Deacon of the same, and was Superintendent 
of the Sunday-school for a period of eight years, having a distance of 
six miles to go over a rough country road. 

THOMAS L. GRAHAM is a son of Jolin Graham, who was a native 
of Todd County, Ky. He was early left an orphan, and became a self- 
made man. Early in life he taught school for a short time, and led a 
roving life until about 1840. In 1854 he came to Christian County and 
settled eight miles east from Hopkinsville, on the Russellville road, and 
from that date he followed the occupation of a farmer. He was a man 
of great energy, of a quiet nature, of strong temperance habits, and very 
industrious. He owned 600 acres of land in the county. He died Jan- 
uary 15, 1883, aged seventy-one years. He was an exemplary member 
of the Bethel Baptist Church. He was three times married: first, to 
Miss Mary Garnett, who died leaving one child — Frances M. His second 
marriage was to Mrs. Jennie W. Kimbrol, a daughter of Lemuel Moseley, 
native of Virginia, who died in this county in 1856, leaving three chil- 
dren, of whom two are living, viz. : Thomas L. (our subject) and Walter. 
His third marriage occurred in Virginia, to Miss Susan H. Haskins, who 
after her husband's death returned to that State, where she now resides. 
Thomas L. Graham, the subject of this sketch, was born in Todd County, 
Ky., March 23, 1850. He attended school from his eighth till his nine- 
teenth year, receiving as thorough an education as the schools of the 
county aflbrded. He purchased his present farm, "Lanark," in 1884, and 
moved to it on November 21 of same year. It contains 270 acres of 
good land, which he devotes especially to the raising of stock, and is get- 
ting up a herd of fancy short-horn cattle, of which he now has five reg- 
istered and eleven grades. On the 12th of November, 1873, he married 
Miss Mattie Carneal, a native of the county, and a daughter of Josiah 
and Kittie (Galbraith) Carneal. They have been blessed with two chil- 
dren, viz. : Jennie Katherine and Douglas. Mr. Graham is a member of 
the Bethel Baptist Church, and his wife is a member of the Methodist 
Church at Salubria. He is an active member of the Casky Grange, 
which was organized in 1873, and has been in operation ever since, ex- 
cepting two years of suspension ; it co-operates in buying and selling, 
and has an annual stock and wool sale, at which between seven and eight 
thousand dollars change hands. 



ij.j..i'i>.nooi)i 



o09 






:,. ■•,., ;- ■■, ■..-, -,,,;,,- ,.,' nrh :..', ywA 



CASKY PRECINCT. 607 

THOMAS GREEN'S great-grandfather was Robert Green, the first 
of the family who came to America. He was a son of William Green, an 
Englishman, an officer in the body-guard of "William, Prince of Orange, and 
arrived here about the year 1712, and settled with his uncle, Will- 
iam Duff, in King George County, Va. He was born in the year 
1695. When a young man he married Eleanor Dunn, of Scotland, and 
settled in Culpeper, St. Mark's Parish, near what is now Brandy, a sta- 
tion on the Washington City & Virginia Midland Railroad. He had 
seven sons : William, Robert, Duff, John, Nicholas, James and Moses. 
The grandfather of our subject was Col. John Green, of the Revolution, 
a native of Culpeper County, Va. He married Susanna Blackwell, who 
bore him eight children, viz.: William, John, Robert, Duff, George, 
Moses, Thomas and Elizabeth. Thomas Green, Sr., was born in Cul- 
peper County, Va., June 30, 1775. In 1815 he came to Kentucky, set- 
tled in Louisville, and engaged in merchandising for one year. In 1816 
he removed to Christian County, and engaged in farming, continuing the 
same to the time of his death, which occurred on the 21st of October, 
1821. He was one of the wealthiest men of the county, at the time of 
his death owning about 2,000 acres of land. He served as Captain in 
the war of 1812. He married Lucy Peyton, a native of Stafford Coun- 
ty, Va. — the homestead Stoney Hill. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, viz.: Edward, Ann, Lucy, Mary, John, and Thomas (our subject, 
the only surviving child). He was born in Christian County, Ky., on 
the 20th of September, 1819. His early life was spent in assisting to 
till the home farm and receiving such an education as the common schools 
of the county afforded. Arriving at manhood he commenced his career 
in life as a merchant in the firm of Green, Edmunds & Green of Hop- 
kinsville. In this business he continued for about two years ; then 
moved to his present home, where he has since been engaged in farming, 
making a specialty of tobacco and wheat. His farm, called " Liberty 
Hall," is one of the best of the county, and contains 1,150 acres. Mr. 
Green took an active part in getting the railroad, a project that has done 
more to develop Hopkinsville and Christian County than any other one 
thing. He was married February 24, 1842, to Caroline Venable, daugh- 
ter of Dr. George Venable. She died on the 17th of September, 1857, 
leaving four children, viz.: Mrs. Elizabeth (Bankhead) Dade, Mrs. Lucy 












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608 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

(Randolph) Dade, George V. and John R. In April, 1859, he married 
Mary T. Moore, who has borne him two children : Thomas and James 
M. Mr. and Mrs. Green are members of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church. He is an active member of the Grange ; is a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and has held several high official positions in the county. Mr. Green 
is an active and zealous advocate for all enterprises looking to the progress 
and development of the county, particularly the permanent improvement 
of the public roads. A portrait of Thomas Green will be found else- 
where. 

JOHN ALLEN GUNN, M. D., is a son of Dr. Daniel Burnett 
Gunn, who was boi'n in Caswell County, N. C, in March, 1818. He 
attended the Jefferson Medical College and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania at Philadelphia, and graduated from the former in the winter of 
1848-49. His preceptor was Dr. Allen M. Gunn, of Yanceyville, N. 
C, a physician of great prominence. Soon after receiving his di- 
ploma he removed to Alabama, where he began the practice of his 
profession, and in 1855 removed to Brandon, Miss., where he still 
resides, and has a large practice. In 1839 he was married to Miss 
Eliza Henry Brandon, a native of Caswell County, N. C, born in 1822, 
who has borne him five children, of whom three are now living. John 
Allen Gunn, the subject, is the eldest child, and was born in Person 
County, N. C, July 31, 1840. When he was quite a young man (in 
1859) he began the study of medicine, under the preceptorship of his 
father ; at the same time he was engaged as clerk in a drug store, and 
was thus engaged when the late Civil war broke out. March 20, 1861, 
he enlisted in Company A of the Tenth Mississippi Iiifantry of the Con- 
federate Army, and remained with the regiment until its disbandment at 
Corinth, Miss., one year after. He was captured at Port Hudson, July 
8, 1863, and held a prisoner of war until June 8, 1865, after the armies 
had all surrendered, and was then discharged. After the war he returned 
home and resumed his study of medicine with D. W. Booth, M. D., of 
Vicksburg, Miss., and at the same time he was employed as the prescrip- 
tion druggist of the City Hospital of Vicksburg. In the winter of 1866-67 
he attended the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana at 
New Orleans, and the following winter attended the Ohio Medical College 
at Cincinnati, and graduated from that institution March 2, 1868. He 



I A hi) a j'lu) . La I , fqW^o*^) 

I {- rv riiifj 1 ' i •■ 
1 f Oft I « I n 






CASKY PRECINCT. 609 

then returneil home, and in May of the same year he came to his present 
place, where he has since resided, engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion. In December, 1871, he married Miss Anna, daughter of Dr. R. 
11. .Kelly, deceased. They have been blessed with five children, of -whom 
the following ' four are now living : Carlotta, Florida, Ethel and John 
Daniel. 

CHARLES McKEE is a native of Albemarle County, Va., and 
was born October 3, 1812. His parents, Andrew and Martha (Cannon) 
McKee. were natives of Pennsylvania and West Virginia respectively. 
The father was a hatter by trade, and was for many years engaged in 
that business in Virginia. He served in the war of 1812. In the par- 
ents' family there were two children : Andrew R. and the subject of this 
sketch. The latter learned his father's trade, and worked at it during his 
residence in Virginia. In 1841 he came to Christian County. Previous 
to his departure, he had married Thursy Hilton, a daughter of William 
and Harriett (Burt) Hilton. This union gave six children : Thomas J. 
(deceased), Harriet, Andrew R., William N., Mary M. and Lemuel H. Mr. 
McKee's present wife was Miss Ellen T. White, a daughter of Richard G. 
and Elizabeth White. Two children have blessed this union : Annie E. 
and Elizabeth. Mr. McKee has always, since his residence in Chi-istian 
County, given his attention to farming pursuits. His property consists of 
several farms, aggregating 1,000 acres, and considerable attention is 
devoted to the raising of stock, including finely-bred horses and mules. 
Phaeton, Jr., a finely-bred horse now in Mr. McKee's possession, is a 
colt by Imp. Phaeton, and is a half-brother of the celebrated Ten 
Broeck, and is used for stock purposes. Mr. McKee and wife are mem- 
bers -of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In political affairs he 
gives his support to the Democracy. He is one of the most respected 
citizens, and one of the most substantial farmers of Christian County. 

CHARLES J. RADFORD is a native of Christian County, Ky., 
born in 1833, and is a son of James A. and Ann P. (Tandy) Rad- 
ford, both of whom are now living and residents of this county. His 
father, a native of Buckingham County, Va., was born in 1805, and came 
to Christian County with his parents in 1813. The mother was born in 
Louisa County, Va., in 1809, and is the mother of the following children : 
Charles J., William T. and Mrs. Amelia A. Fort. Charles J. Radford 



>,:1. . L ■;■:;£(:. -J .1'-.' ,-,9d/' iv.a ol iio^« 



610 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

■was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools, supplemented 
by a course at the Stewart College, Clarksville, Tean. He is a farmer 
by occupation, and is the owner of 850 acres of excellent land. In 1858 
he married Miss Ann W. (daughter of Dr. S. J. Leavell, of Todd 
County, Ky.), who has borne him the following children :, James A., 
Baker S., William T., Mollie L., Annie P., Amelia T., Charley A., 
Estella and Joseph. Mr. Radford is a Democrat in politics, an active mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity, and a member of the Salem Baptist Church. 

LUTHER B. RAWLINS, a native of Christian County, Ky., was 
born March 15, 1814. His father, John Rawlins, a farmer, was born in 
Montgomery County, Md., and came to Kentucky in 1812, settled on the 
North Fork of the West Fork of Red River, in Christian County, and 
died there in 1854. He became quite wealthy and owned 1,200 acres of 
land ; his wife, and mother of our subject, was Ann (Ray) Rawlins, born 
in Montgomery County, Md., and died in Christian County, Ky. She 
was the mother of eleven children, five daughters and six sons, of whom 
Luther B. was the tenth child. He was reared on a farm and received 
a common school education ; he remained at home with his parents until 
their death ; he has always followed farming, and is now the owner of 400 
acres of good land. In 1847, on the 7th of February, he married Miss 
Margaret R., daughter of Rev. James Y. and Elizabeth II. (Uslier) 
Barnett, early settlers of Christian County. Mrs. Rawlins was born in 
Christian County January 24, 1831 ; she died March 30, 1884. Mrs. 
Rawlins as, was Mr. Rawlins is, an exemplary member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

ROBERT F. RIVES was born on the line between Kentucky and 
TenHcssee, on the 7th of December, 1837 ; his father, Robert Rives, is a 
native of Warren County, N. C, born December 16, 1803 ; he is a farmer 
and resides in Lafayette Precinct, Christian Co., Ky. ; he is of Scotch 
descent. His wife, subject's mother, Rebecca (Vaughan) Rives, was born 
in Granville County, N. C, and died March 8, 1870, aged sixty-six years. 
She was the mother of six children, of whom four are now living, Rob- 
ert F. being the youngest child. He was reared on a farm and received 
a common school education. At nineteen years of age he engaged as 
manager of his father's farm in Montgomery County, Tenn. In 1861 he 
enlisted in the late Civil war, in Company L, Fourteenth Tennessee Cav- 



■ : :■■,,; :. -t v,r;;- hit,, .)-;■; .■,-,(.■•'; •:;T-,;-i„«i;TjM 









CASKY PRECINCT. 611 

airy, served through the war, and participated in many cavalry fights. 
After Lee's surrender he was captured at Paris, Tenn., but was immedi- 
ately paroled. After the war he resumed farming in Montgomery County, 
and in 1874 removed to his present residence, where he has since remained 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. His farm, " Jordon," contains 600 
acres, upon which he makes the raising of wheat and tobacco a specialty. 
In 1868 he married Isabella V. Pollard, who died October 19, 1875, leav- 
ing four children : Robert Henry, Franklin, Florence Neal and George 
Pollard. On the 25th of October, 1876, he married Sally E. Moore, a 
native of Dixon County, Tenn., a daughter of Jordon and Sarah D. 
(Viser) Moore, be a native of Montgomery County, Tenn., born in 1811, 
a member of the Tennessee Methodist Conference ; and she a native of 
Alabama, born in 1818. By this union there are two children: Mary 
Belle and .lordon Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Rives are members of the Meth- 
odist Church ; he is a member of the Casky Grange, and is a Democrat 
in politics. 

E. J. ROBERTS, deceased, was born in Halifax County, Va., October 
10, 1798, where he was reared and educated; and on arriving at his 
majority he worked at the carpenter's trade, and continued at that occu- 
pation until 1831, when he came' to Kentucky and located on the Mont- 
gomery farm, in Trigg County, which he rented, and remained upon the 
same for one year. In 1835 he bought land in Casky Precinct, Chris- 
tian County, on the East Fork of Little River, and here remained actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits to the time of his death, which occurred 
July 20, 1873. He was a Deacon of the Baptist Church, and a man 
who had by honesty, industry and economy succeeded in accumulating a 
good property. He was twice married; his first wife was Elizabeth 
Williams, who died in this county in 1837, and was the mother of, five 
children, of whom the following are now living : John, Thomas and 
Joseph. John emigrated to Te-^as in 1853, was in the late war, was 
wounded at the battle of Gaines' Mill, losing his right arm. In 1841 
Mr. Roberts married Sarah J. Atwell, a native of Augusta, Staunton 
Co., Va., born September 28, 1810, and a daughter of William and Mary 
(Hall) Atwell ; he a native of Maryland, and .she of Virginia. The result 
of this union was one child — James Roberts — who, witli his step-brother, 
Joseph, manages the home farm of 365 acres, called " Wheatland." 






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IT :uiJ .1 f/. ! ■■)! 



612 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

James served in the late war, enlisting in October, 1862 ; he was captured 
at Farmington, Tenn., October 7, 1863, and was confined in prison at 
Indianapolis until the surrender of Gen. Lee. John Roberts is now a 
resident of Robertson County, Texas. 

W. E. WARFIELD was born in Christian County, Ky., on the 25th 
of September, 1825, and is the only living child of William C. and Rachel 
(Edwards) Warfield. His father, Rev. William Warfield, was born in 
Lexington, Fayette Co., Ky., and was there reared and received the bene- 
fits of the subscription schools, supplemented by a course at the Tran- 
sylvania University. Subsequently he attended the Theological College 
of Princeton, N. J., where he graduated, and was ordained a minister of 
the Baptist Church. From the time of his entering the ministry till his 
death he was an earnest and eloquent and effective advocate of the cause 
of Christ. One of the members of Salem Church, Mrs. E. Clardy, in a 
short sketch of his pastorate, speaks of him as one of the ablest champions 
of Baptist faith and doctrine ; firm in his devotion to his cause ; preach- 
ing from house to house, or under the trees, and making converts to 
religion by his untiring labor. Many other persons yet living testify to 
his faithfulness. His last meeting was held at the Bethel Baptist Church, 
in this county, and while thus engaged at his post of duty he was called 
to his reward ; his death occurred in 1835, at the residence of Elder 
Tandy. Walter Warfield, M. D., the grandfather of our subject, was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war, who rose to the rank of Major. After 
the war he located in Lexington, Ky., where he was a practitioner of 
medicine for many years. He married a daughter of Col. William Chris- 
tian, in honor of whom Christian County, Ky., received its name. Dr. 
Warfield died in Fayette County, Ky. Rachel Edwards, our subject's 
mother, was born in Maryland, in 1800, and died in Christian County, 
Ky., in 1828. She was a daughter o.'" Benjamin Edwards, and the 
youngest of fourteen children ; she was a sister of Hon. Ninian Edwards, 
a sketch of whom appears in the chapter devoted to the general history of 
the county. Mr. AVarfield's sister, Matilda, died at nineteen years of age, 
unmarried. He was reared by his aunt, Matilda Cossitt ; he was edu- 
cated at the Cumberland College, Princeton, Ky., and graduated in 
1842, in the class prior to its removal to Lebanon, Tenn. It is now 
known as " Cumberland University," and is a distinguished institution, 



jA.,;ii',.-; .)o:n 



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CASKY PUECINCT. 613 

especially so in its department of law. In January, 1843, he began 
reading law under Ninian E. Gray, of Hopkins ville, and continued thus 
until December, 1844, when he entered the Transylvania University, 
Lexington, Ky., and graduated in 1845; he then returned to his home 
in llopkinsville, and in 1849, chiefly on account of his health, he gave up 
the practice of his profession and removed to his present residence, where 
he has since remained in agricultural pursuits ; his farm, " Igloe," con- 
tains 720 acres, and is located immediately on the railroad, near Casky. 
Since 1868, excepting four years, he has served the county as Magistrate. 
He was formerly an Odd Fellow. Politically he is a Democrat ; is for 
tariff for revenue only. In 1854 he was married in this county to Caro- 
line V/allace, a native of the county, who died in 1861, leaving three 
children — two daughters and one son. In 1865 he married his second 
wife, Sarah E. Nelson. This union has been blessed with five children — 
tliree eons and two daughters. 

DANIEL M. WIIITAKER was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., on 
the Slst of October, 1840. Daniel Whitaker, Sr., the father of subject, 
was a native of Kentucky, born January 10, 1796. He was taken by 
his parents to Lincoln County, Tenn., when a small boy, and v^as there 
reared and educated. In 1853 he removed to Obion County, Tenn,, 
where he died September 7, 1881. His wife (mother of subject) was 
Nancy (Sebastian) Whitaker, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born 
April 10, 1803. and died in Obion County of that State on the 20th of 
November, 1871. She was the mother of eleven children, of whom five 
daughters and two sons are now living. Daniel M. Whitaker, the sub- 
ject, spent his early life at home receiving the benefit of the common 
schools. When he was thirteen years of age he went with his parents to 
Obion County, and there remained until the breaking out of the late Civil 
war, when, on the 9th day of September, 1861, he enlisted in Company 
D, Thirty-third Tennessee Infantry, and served until June 30, 1864, 
when he was discharged. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Mur- 
freesboro and Chickamauga. He was wounded at Kenesaw Mountain 
Line while with Joe Johnston. On returning iiomc his wounds proved to 
be so severe as to prevent his working until 1867. He then removed to 
his present farm in Christian County, where he has since remained actively 
engaged in farming. His farm contains 322 acres of good land, upon 



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614 BIOORArHICAL SKETCHES. 

which he erected in 1882, by his own design, a large and commodious resi- 
dence. In February, 1867, in Christian County, he married Miss Eliza- 
beth I. Barnett, a native of the county, born February 15, 1844. She 
died April 17, 1879, leaving the following children: Robert B., born 
November 3, 1868, and Maggie E., born August 24, 1872. Mr. Whit- 
aker is an enterprising, public-spirited citizen, an Elder in the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian Church, and an active member of the Masonic order. 




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STEWART PRECINCT. 

JESSE BASS was bom February G, 1847, in Muhlenburg County, 
Ky., but removed with his parents in infancy to Christian County. Ilis 
father, Capt. Jordan Bass, Jr., was bom September 19, 1822, in the 
vicinity of liis present home, and now owns the original family homestead, 
besides large tracts of other lands along Pond River, which he devotes 
largely' to stock-raising. He is the sou of Jordan Bass, Sr., of North 
Carolina, who came to Christian County, Ky., at an early date, and died 
here in 1861. at the age of eighty-one years. Jordan Sr.'s wife, Nancy 
Webb, was born in Xt^^inessee, and died in 1853, aged sixty-five years. 
Their children are: Anna (Mitchell), Scion, Mary (Hale), Joseph C, 
Quinea (Cary), Lurena (Atkinson), Martha (Imbler), Jordan, Jr., Jane 
(Gates) and John N. Jordan, Jr., was married September 15, 1845, to 
Miss Mary A., daughter of Jesse Murphy, of Muhlenburg County, Ky., 
(she was born October 6, 1831,) and from this union have sprung : Jesse, 
our subject; Nancy, who was first married to Mr. Manahan, and after his 
death to Mr. Drake; John W. and Mary A. Subject is largely engaged 
in farming and in raising and dealing in live stock, at which he has been 
fairly successful. Though young in years he has been called to the 
responsible position of Magistrate of his district, and is, in consequence, 
a member of the County Court. In politics he affiliates with the National 
Greenback party. 

JAMES M. CLARK was born July 30, 1340, on the place where 
he now resides. His father, William B. Clark, is a native of Pendleton 
District, S. C, where he was born in 1797, and removed with his parents 
to Christian County, Ky., in 1803, where he is still living, remarkably 
well preserved for one of his advanced age. He is the son of Jonathan 
Clark, who was born in Virginia in 1759, entered the army as Captain at 
the beginning of the Revolutionary war, and was promoted to Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Eighth Virginia Regiment, having served through the 
entire struggle. Ho was a surveyor by profession, and after serving 



w .M f. 



616 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

many years as High Sheriff and Magistrate in Christian County, Ky., 
died in 1851. He was the son of Bollin Clark, an Englishman. Jona- 
than married Jane, daughter of John Rogers, of South Carolina, and 
their children were: John R., Bollin, Simeon B., William B., Sally (wife 
of Hawkins Goode) and Phanuel. William B. married Nancy, daughter 
of William Thompson, of Christian County, Ky., and to them were born : 
Mary J. (Atkinson), Elizabeth A. (Gray) and our subject, who was mar- 
ried February 22, 1865, to Miss Mildred A., daughter of Isham G. Bob- 
bitt, of this county, and from this union sprang: Mollie H., Joseph P., 
John H., George M., Carrie and Maggie. Subject served his country as 
a soldier in Company A, Third Kentucky Cavalry, for more than three 
years in the late war, and was honorably discharged ; he is now engaged 
in farming, at which he is successful ; he is an honored member and 
Master of the Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, and also a 
member in good standing of the Knights of Honor. In religion he is a 
Universalist, and in politics Independent. The place where he lives was 
among the first settled in this portion of Kentucky ; he has in his pos- 
session a fine powder-gourd that his grandfather carried through the Rev- 
olutionary war. 

JOSEPH CORDIER is a native of France, and was born February 
15, 1824 ; came with his parents to the United States in 18.33, and after 
living in Cincinnati two years, removed to Louisville, Ky. In 1845 he 
came to Christian County, and commenced merchandising at a place now 
called Old Petersburg, where he amassed a handsome competency, and is 
now retired from active business. He is the son of Francis Cordier, who 
died in Louisville in 1853, and Sophie (Grashaud) Cordier, who died in 
1833. Their children are Josephine (Williams), Sarah (Hitz), Mary 
(Deible), and subject, who was married in 1847, to Miss Serena, daughter. 
of Aquilla Brasher, of Christian County ; and to them have been born ; 
Josephine (Williams], Francis M., Emma (Beall), Richard R., Lillian 
D., Dr. Albert H., Eugene and Lena M. Mr. Cordier owns 680 acres 
of farming land which he cultivates, and which is located amid the coal 
fields. In religion he is a Catholic, his wife being a Universalist. In 
politics he is a Democrat. His grandfather was a General under Napoleon. 

JESSE H. DENTON was born May 11, 1844, in Hopkins County, 
Ky., where he grew to manhood, and at the age of twenty-two years came 



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STEWART PRECINCT. 617 

to. Christian County, where he has continued to reside to the present time, 
and is regarded as one of the most worthy and intelligent citizens of his 
section. lie is the son of Daniel G. and Orlena A. (Olman) Denton, 
whose children are Malabuvt. Clarinda (Tigue), Thomas, subject, Bettie 
(Tigue), James, Caroline (Laffoon), John W., Bailey and Orlena. Jesse 
11. was married January 19, 1871, to Miss Martha, daughter of Bayless 
E. and Rachel P. (Williams) Parker, of Christian County, Ky., and from 
this union have sprung : Adier F., Leslie E., Orlena A., Eflie R. and 
Georgie L. Mr. Denton is a farmer, owning 110 acres of fine land, 
which is in a good state of cultivation, and shows the hand of a careful 
and thrifty husbandman. An evening's entertainment with himself and 
his worthy family is a source of real enjoyment. He is a reading man 
and an intelligent thinker ; he is a member in good standing of the A. F. 
& A. M., also a member of the Christian Church, and afEliates with the 
Democratic party. 

JOHN W. DENTON is a native of Hopkins County, Ky., and was 
born on the 6th of April, 1848. Thei-e he was reared and after he 
arrived at manhood removed to Christian County, the place of his present 
residence, where he is esteemed as an honored and worthy citizen. He is 
the son of Daniel G.. Denton, who was born about 1816 in Hopkins 
County, where he is now living. Daniel G.'s wife, Orlena A. (Olman), 
died about 1857. Their children are: Malaburt, Clarinda (Tigue), Thom- 
as, Jesse H., subject, Bettie (Tigue), James, Caroline (Laftbon), Bailey 
and Orlena. Subject was married in 1872, to Josephine, daughter of 
Larkin T. Parker, of Christian County, Ky., and to this union was born, 
on April 30, 1875, a son — Rufus. Mr. Denton is a farmer and is the 
owner of eighty-si.x acres of fair land, which he tills very successfully 
with his own hands ; he is also an honored member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity. 

ZACHARY T. DRAKE was born October 10, 1849, in Hopkins 
County, Ky., where he was reared and received a good English educa- 
tion; ho is the first son of Thomas Drake, who was born in Powhatan 
County, Va., June 2, 1806, came to Kentucky about 182^, and is resid- 
ing at Slaughterville, in this State, at the present time. Thomas' wife, 
Antha, daughter of Robert Coleman, of Trenton, Ky., was bora in 1815, 
and is still living. Their children are : Annie (Tinder), Zachary T., Robert 









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618 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

P., Thom!i3 J., Olivia H. and Addie L. Zachary T. is engaged exten- 
sivelj in the manufacture of lumber, large quantities of which he ships to 
different parts of the United States. He is unquestionably a man of 
much enterprise and energy, and is a prominent factor in the community 
where he has cast his lot. In his political afBliations Mr. Drake is iden- 
tified with the Democratic party. 

RICE DULIN. In a beautiful valley nestling among picturesque 
hills, and near the base of the well-known " Cotton Knob," is an old-time 
residence in a good state of preservation, constructed of hewn walnut 
timber, and erected at a period so remote that none now living can 
definitely determine its age, in which could once be found that honored and 
sturdy old pioneer, the subject of this sketch. Rice Dulin was born near 
this place in Christian County, Ky., February 24, 1809, and has always 
resided in this vicinity, the past half century at his present home, which 
was first settled by the Stewart family. He is the son of Lod Dulin, who 
was born in North Carolina in 1765, and removed to Christian County, 
Ky., in 1806, where he died in 1848. He married Mary Garrett (late 
Moor), of Lawrence District, S. C, who was born in 1777, and died here 
in 1853. Their children are: Rice, Edward G., Daniel M., Austin 
M. and Lott W. To subject's father by his first marriage were 
born: James J., Demarias and Sarah. Subject's mother by her 
first husband, A. Austin, had two children : Casander and Pamela. 
Rice Dulin was married December 22, 1829, to Miss Catherine, 
daughter of Henij and Catherine (Negley) Myers, of Christian County, 
and to them have been born : Thomas J., William H., Mary W. 
(Robinson), Robert S., Martin V., John M., Benjamin F., Adelia C. 
(Rice) and Lou R. (West). Mr. Dulin in youth enjoyed such educa- 
tional advantages .as the early pioneer schools afforded, but by long years 
of application and access to standard books and current literature he has 
accumulated a fine fund of general information. In his library may be 
found some valuable works. The old homestead contains 250 acres of 
valuable and fertile land, which he has for many years successfully culti- 
vated in the staple products of the country. He has now retired from 
active life ; resides in Crofton Precinct, and the farming is conducted by 
his sons. 

WILLIAM F. GABARD is a man of unquestioned ability, and one 
destined to influence the community v^here ho resides in a manner that 



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STEWART PRECINCT. 619 

will greatlj' enhance its material prosperity. He is a native of Franklin, 
Tenn., where he was born November 8, 1853, residing there and in 
Manry County until he arrived at manhood. His father, Rev. Nathan 
R. Gabard, was a native of North Carolina, and removed to Tennessee 
about 1848, where he died in 1861. He was long an active and useful 
member of the Tennessee Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church 
South. Subject's mother was Maria, daughter of Noah Scales, of Bed- 
ford County, Tenn., and is still living. To herself and husband were 
born: William F., Rev. Charles S., of the Tennessee Conference; Rev. 
Milton E., of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church ; and Eleanor E., 
married to William J. Stone, of Tennessee. On June 2, 1880, William 
F. was married to Miss Laura Belle, daughter of Samuel H. and Elizabeth 
(Parish) Williams, of Hopkins County, Ky., and to this union, on 
February 8, 1882, a son — William H. — was born. Mr. Gabard was for 
three years Superintendent of the Empire Coal Mines, in Christian 
County, Ky., and is now a stockholder in and Superintendent of the 
Clifton Mines, at Williams, Ky. The company now own 1,200 acres of 
valuable coal lands, with a paid-up capital of §120,000. By perseverance, 
enterprise and industry Mr. Gabard has made a success of life for one so 
young. 

FINUS E. GRACE, M. D., was born in Christian County, Ky., 
November 28, 1847, and is the son of John H. and Susan (Vinson) 
Grace, of this county. The father is a native of Christian County, and 
was born in 1821, and is still living. The mother is also a native of this 
county, and is the daughter of Alexander and Lucy (Gibson) Vinson. 
Their children are : Sarah E. (Hite), Finus E., Ellington M., Octavia A. 
(Haile), Miranda J., George M., Theodosia F., Cordelia, Emelia A. and 
Joseph A. John H. is the son of Joseph Grace, who was born in Ken- 
tucky, and died here in 18.59, aged sixty-three years. Joseph was the 
son of Henry, of North Carolina, who died in. New Orleans, a soldier in 
the war of 1812. Joseph's wife was Martha, daughter of John Wells. 
Their children were John H., Samuel M., Nancy L. (Browning), Lau- 
rana (Browning), Martha M., Unity J., Francis D., James L., William J. 
and Winfield W. Dr. Grace commenced the study of medicine in 1870, 
and after two years began to practice near his home, where he continued 
until 1878, when he attended lectures at the Nashville (Tennessee) Med- 



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620 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

ical College, where he graduated in 1879, receiving also a diploma from 
the Medical and Dental Society. Since his graduation he has been suc- 
cessfully engaged in the practice of his chosen profession in his old neigh- 
borhood, wiiere he stands deservedly high as a physician and a citizen. 
Dr. Grace is a'noble specimen of the self-made man. lie was married 
March 23, 1874, to Mrs. Frances L., widow of William Manahan, and 
daughter of Riley and Mary A. (Grace) Wells, of this county, and to 
them have been born : Diora S., George 11., Aaron (deceased), and 
John n. 

RALEIGH M. JACKSON was born October 26, 1823, in Ruther- 
ford County, Tenn., where he grew to manhood, after which he removed 
to Christian County, Ky., in 1851, and settled on the site of his present 
residence. lie is the son of Thomas Jackson, of Virginia, who died here 
in 1866, at the age of sixty-six years. Thomas married Ruth, daughter 
of Thomas Hendrix, of Overton County, Tenn., who died in 1872, at the 
age of eighty-three years. Their children are : Francis H., Mary (Potts), 
Elizabeth (Ray), Nancy (Arnold), Newton C, Jennetta (IlenJrix), 
Raleigh M., Evergreen A. (Winset) and Thomas H. Raleigh M. was 
married October 5, 1848, to Miss Zada, daughter of Hiram and Rebecca 
(Harrison) Putman, of Williamson County, Tenn., and to them have been 
born : Mary J., James B., Elva (Sisk) and Charles S. Iliram Putraan's 
children are: Zada, Jesse M., Martha L., Elvira J. (Fox), Ann M. 
(Green), William R., Rebecca A. ^Manahan), Nancy C. (Williams), Mary 
T. (Green), Monroe and Sarah M. Mrs. Jackson is an acceptable mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. Mr. Jackson is engaged in the profession of 
farming, owning over 500 acres of good land, well improved, and in a 
high state of cultivation. He is also engaged in the manufacture of lum- 
ber, to which he devotes great energy. In politics he is independent. 

DR. J. W. LONG was born in Christian County, Ky., December 
24, 1835. He is the son of William and Hester (Armstrong) Long. 
The former came with his parents from South Carolina to this county in 
infancy, and here he died in 1836. The latter was born here, and died 
in 1858. Their children arc: Allen, John S., Alfred, Leander W., 
Richard M. and our subject, who was married December 12, 1872, to 
Miss Meilissa B., daughter of Alexander and Margaret (Brown) Brasher, 
of Christian County, and to them have been born : Eula D., born March 



STEWART PRECINCT. 621 

23, 1875 ; RicliarJ W. and Elbridge L. (twins), born February 12, 1877. 
Dr. Long's early educational advantages were limited. In 185G lie com- 
menced the study of medicine with Dr. T. A. Yarrellat Bainbridgo, Ky. 
After studying two years he attended one course of lectures in the Eclec- 
tic Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, after which he practiced in Cedar County, 
Mo., two years, and graduated from the Cincinnati College of Medicine 
and Surgery in 1861. He then returned to Christian County, Ky., and 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Petersburg, where he has 
remained from that time to this, with the exception of five years (from 
1872 until 1877), when he was located at Earlington, Hopkins Co., Ky., 
and was employed by the St. Bernard Coal Company to do tlie practice 
for the miners and laborers in the employment of said company. Dr. 
Long has been a successful practitioner, stands high in his profession, and 
has accumulated considerable property. He owns 350 acres, of farming 
land, the cultivation of which he superintends, raising chiefly corn, wheat, 
hay and stock. He is an intelligent gentleman, and of great v.alue to 
the community in which he lives. 

SQUIRE GEORGE H. MYERS was born on the place where he now 
resides, September 16, 1831. He is the son of George Myers, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, and at the age of eighteen years came to this place, where 
he died in 1859, aged sixty-five years. George made wagons, stocked 
plows, and was the first as well as the champion cradle-stocker of Chris- 
tian County, the latter coming into use after 1820. lie was the son of 
Henry Myers, who died about 1835. George's wife was Nancy, daugh- 
ter of Henry Boysal, of Simpson County, Ky., and their children arc : 
Catherine (Bobbitt), Nancy G. (Faughender), John II., David D., Susan 
H. (Withers), Elizabeth, Benjamin J., Sarah A. (Harkins), Anna P. 
(Eaton), Lucy B. (Brown), and subject, who was married September 3, 
1857, to Miss Salena F., daughter of Presley N. 0. and Mary J. (Clark) 
Thompson of Christian County, and to them have been born : Mary V. 
(married to Joab Clark), Nannie M., Benjamin T. (deceased), and Eddie 
C. Mr. Myers has been called upon to fill responsible positions, having 
been for the past five years a Magistrate in his precinct, and formerly 
acting as Deputy Sherift'. He is a worthy member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, having acted as Master of the lodge. In i-eligion he is a Univer- 
salist and in politics is independent. In the vocation of farming he is 



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622 BIOGRAPUICAL SKETCHES. 

successful, owning 420 acres of fair land, a portion of which he cultivates 
in wheat, tobacco and corn. 

JOHN P. PROUSE was born in Muhlenbarg County, Ky., Decem- 
ber 29, 1841, and there grew to manhood; he came to Christian County 
in 1873, and here engaged in merchandising and dealing in tobacco, at 
which he has been very successful. He is the son of George 0. and Polly 
(Wells) Prouse, the former of North Carolina, who died in Kentucky in 
1862 ; his widow died in 18S1, at the age of seventy-two years. Their 
children are : George 0., Elizabeth (Atkinson), Sarah (Beacham), Jane 
(Atkinson), John P., Frank, Hop., Nancy 0., Lewis, Mark L., Isaac 
and Laurana (Cary). John P. was married, January 13, 1870, to Miss 
Theodosia, daughter of Samuel C. and Theodosia (Bailey) Atkinson, of 
Henderson County, Ky., and to them have been born : Frank, Charlie 
and Nonie. Mr. Prouse is supplied with a library of many excellent and 
valuable books, and, with his excellent and intelligent lady, is well versed 
in the literature of the day. The family are members of the Reformer's 
Church, and in politics Mr. Prouse is a stanch Republican. 

MRS. SARAH E. TANDY, daughter of Amos and Nancy (Ridge- 
dale) Atkinson, was born in Christian County, Ky., April 8, 1822, and 
•was married December 19, 1872, to Mr. Nathaniel Tandy, who was born 
in 1812 and died in 1881. Her father was born in North Carolina in 
1792, and died in this county in 1860. Her mother was born in South 
Carolina and died here in 1S51, aged about sixty-two years. Their chil- 
dren are Samuel C, Sarah E., Pembroke S., Francis M., Elisha F. and 
Albina A. Mrs. Tandy is a well educated lady, with a fine mental cast, 
having accumulated a large fund of general information by studious habits 
and industry. Formerly she was engaged in teaching school, and in the 
aggregate taught seven years. She now occupies her farm of 200 acres, 
the careful cultivation of which she successfully superintends, and with 
the addition of a fine orchard, secures a competency. She is an active 
member of the Baptist Church. Her grandfather, Elisha Atkinson, was 
an efficient soldier in the Revolutionary war, from beginning to end, and 
died in 1844 at the age of ninety-four years. 

BYRON D. WILLIAMS was born in Hopkins County, Ky., 
August 23, 1859. His' father, Samuel H. Williams, was born in 1828, 
on the place of his present residence, which has always been his home ; 






■ .■;-;/- ,' ^,. .;> : -T'i)[l^h 









STEWART PRECINCT. 623 

his wife is Elizabeth M., daughter of George W. Parish, of Bedford 
County, Tcnn. Their children are: George W., Byron D., Laura B. 
(wife of William F. Gabard) and Samuel H. Jr. Byron D. assisted his 
father as clerk in the mercantile business for about six years, then was 
employed on the railroad for three years, and then about two and one-half 
years ago, in connection with Mr. Gabard, commenced merchandising at 
Williams Station, beginning, in fact, at the bottom round of fortune's 
ladder, which he by industry and close attention to business has ascended 
with commendable success, and has attained a comfortable competency, 
and good standing in commercial circles. Samuel Williams, the elder, was 
born in Edgefield County, or District, in South Carolina, February 29, 1783. 
He came to Christian County, Ky., in or about the year 1808, accom- 
panied by his brother, William Williams, who was ten or twelve years his 
senior. William settled twelve or thirteen miles north of Hopkinsville, 
on the Hopkinsville and iladisonville road. Samuel lived with him two 
years, then married Elizabeth, the daughter of William Teague, and set- 
tled March, 1815, five miles north, near the Christian and Hopkins 
County line, upon which the Clifton Coal Company is now operating. 
He (Samuel) died at this place July 17, 1857. Williams Postoffice was 
the first office ever established in the north part of the county, and took 
its name from William, who was appointed Postmaster. The place is 
known to the old settlers as Williams Hill. At that time the mail was 
carried in a leather mail-sack on horseback; there were only one or two 
mails per week. The office was thence moved to Old Petersburg, as now 
called. At that time the mail was carried by a stage coach. After the 
railroad was built through here, the office was moved to New Petersburg, 
one mile north. B. D. Williams is the present Postmaster, and was 
appointed by Timothy 0. Howe, Postmaster-General. The country near 
Crofton and Kelley's Station, in the year 1815, was mostly prairie, it 
being a difficult matter to even get a riding switch, there being only one 
post oak standing anywhere near. It was about one-half mile south of 
Kelley's Station, and is known to this day as the Lonesome Oak. The 
section of country south of Hopkinsville was barren or prairie, almost 
destitute of timber. 



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WILSON PRECINCT. 

GEORGE N. JOHNSON, was born in Christian County, Ky., Sep- 
tember 14, 1831, and is one of r family of eight children — the subject, 
Samuel, Elizabeth (Garnett), William, John, Lucy Robinson and W. P. — 
born to Robinson and Lucy (Nash) Johnson, both natives of North Car- 
olina. The former was born in 1804, and his wife a year later. Our 
subject was married to Miss Frances E., daughter of James Taylor, of 
Rutherford County, Tenn.; seven children : Joab, Charlie, Sanda, Sidney, 
James R., Columbus and Ida E. have been born to them. Mr. Johnson 
is one of the largest and most successful farmers in the north part of the 
county, owning nearly 700 acres of land in a high state of cultivation. 
He is a member of the Universalist Church, and of the Masonic order. 
He has his life insured in the Masonic Insurance Company. In politics 
he is a Greenbacker. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace for 
four terms, and has filled various other civil offices. 

ROBINSON JOHNSON, JR., was born October 28, 1845, in Chris- 
tian County, Ky., where he grew to manhood, and has always had his resi- 
dence. His father, Robinson Johnson, Sr., was born in North Carolina, 
about 1804, and died in Christian County, Ky., in 1850. He was the 
son of Samuel Johnson, of North Carolina, who died in this county in 
1846. Subject's mother, Lucy (Nash) Johnson, died here in 1845. 
Robinson Sr's. children are : George N., Samuel, Lizzie (Garnett), Will- 
iam D., John, Lucy, Robinson, Jr., (subject), and Winfield P. Robin- 
son, Jr., was married December 28, 1865, to Rebecca J., daughter of Jack- 
son and Mary (Hight) Lile, of Christian County, and to them were born : 
Joseph N., John R., Edward W., Nancy J., Alexander, Delia A. and 
Azariah A. The family are readers of books and the current literature of 
the day. Mr. Johnson is by profession a farmer, possessing 500 acres 
of fair land, upon which he raises pork, corn, wheat and tobacco. In 
politics he is a Democi-at. 

PRESLEY 0. MARTIN was born September 22, 1816, in Indiana, 
and removed with his mother to Christian County, Ky., in infancy, where 



h.-i. . o8i M i£vjfne 



626 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

he grew to manhood and has remained to the present time. lie is the 
son of William Martin, who was born in North Carolina, and died in 
Indiana in 1816. William's wife was Cassandra Braralett, of White 
County, 111. Their children are : Leanner (Andrews) and our subject, 
who was married in 1835, to Miss Elizabeth O'Daniel, and to them were 
born : William W., Elizabeth (Sheltou) and Mary J. (Powel). He was 
next married January 5, 1864, to Mrs. Minerva, widow of William 
B. Harrison, and daughter of Benjamin and Ruth (Steel) Lacy, of Chris- 
tian County, Ky., and from this union have sprung : Sandford 0., Susan 
M., Eliza A. and John J. W. D. Subject is a farmer, owning eighty- 
eight acres of fair land, and is also a distiller of apple and peach brandies. 
His early education was limited, but he is a considerable reader, a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church and a Democrat. His father was a cousin of 
Jeflerson Davis. The Lacy family came from North Carolina to Chris- 
tian County, in 1796. Benjamin died in 1862, leaving the following 
children : Elizabeth (Powel), Nancy (Edwards), Benjamin IL, James R., 
Edmond M., Susan (Stinett), Minerva A. and David M. 

CALVIN W. MEACHAM was born October 15, 1836, in Christian 
County, Ky., where he has resided to the present time. His father, 
Edmond Mcacham, was born about 1811, and is still living. Ilis mother, 
Iva, daughter of James Williams, of Christian County, was born about 
1813, and is also living. Their children are : Nancy P. (Fritz), Marion 
D., Calvin AV., Henry C, Louisa E. (Meacham), Leander Q., John M. 
and Albern W. Calvin W. was married in 1866, to Miss Catherine A., 
daughter of Dr. J. C. Lesher, of Mt. Carmel, 111., and to them have been 
born: Sarah E., Joseph W., Jesse F. and Edward B. Mr. Meacham is 
by profession a farmer, owning about 160 acres of medium land. In 
religion he is a Baptist, and in politics a Republican. He served as a 
soldier in the late war in the Seventeenth Kentucky Infantry. 

JOHN MILTON MEACHAM was born March 16, 1848, in Chris- 
tian County, Ky., where he grew to manhood and still has his residence ; 
his father, Edmond, the son of Edmond, Sr., the son of Joseph Meacham, 
died in this county. The family came originally from South Carolina. 
Subject's mother, Iva, daughter of James Williams, of Christian 
County, is still living. John Milton Meacham was first married, 
in 1867, to Miss Josephine Clark, of this county, and to them were 



■4 uai 



: '■■■r.-.'.rufii .''■■i\ i/i'.ii txxiHn.n'" •■>* »"?•'•■ ?•' 

, , , : :.;. ,,--;t KJ;;, ,.,..1': ,;.., _.; ^. 






1 -1 






WILSON PRECINCT. 627 

born Volney M. and Dudley A. Mr. Meacham was next married, in 
1878, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Matthew Robinson, of Christian County, 
and the result of this union has been the birth of one child — Mil ford A. 
Subject is a farmer by profession, owning 138 acres of fair land, the cul- 
tivation of which occupies his care and attention. In religion Mr. 
Meacham is a Universalist, and in politics is identified with the Repub- 
lican party. 

STEPHEN D. PEPPER was born June 22, 1827, in Todd County, 
Ky., and removed with his parents to Christian County, in 1847, where 
he has since made his home. His father, Thomas Pepper, was born in 
Virginia, in 1794; was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in 1858. 
He was the son of Richard Pepper, who was born in Virginia and died in 
Tennessee. ' Thomas married Pamelia, daugliter of Austin Moor. She 
was born in 1801, and died in Christian County, Ky., in 1871. Their 
children are : Austin M., Benjamin F., subject, Francis M., Noel and 
Mary J. (Robinson). Subject was married November 1, 1855, to Miss 
Margaret M., daughter of John and Melinda (Cooper) McFadden, of 
this county, and to them have been born: John T., Isadora, William F., 
AlfredL., Charles L., Bob W., Mary B., James M. and Eddie II. Mr. 
Pepper is a successful farmer, having 300 acres of good land in a fine 
state of cultivation. Though his own early educational advantages were 
limited, he takes an interest in the advancement of his children, procur- 
ing the better class of literature for their instruction. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity ; is connected with the Christian Ciiurch, and in 
politics is a Democrat. 

MRS. ELIZA J. ROBINSON, the daughter of James and Eliza- 
beth (Bell) Taggart, was born in 1825, in Muhlenbui'g Connty, Ky., 
where she was reared, and in 1850 was married to Addison II., son of 
Abner and Nancy (Duty) Robinson, of Christian County, Ky., and 
from this union sprang one daughter — Willie C. Addison li. Robinson 
was born February 12, 1807, and died in 1876. James Taggart was 
born in 1796, and died in 1876 ; Elizabeth Taggart was born, 1792, 
died in 1863. Iler children are: John L., William B., subject, Elmira 
A. (Welborn), James M., Thomas R., Jesse B. and Elizabeth (Dockens). 
Mr. Addison II. v/as first married about 1830, to Elizabeth Meacham, 
and to them were born : Lucy A. (Pepper), and Abner 0. Ho was 






Vr.,lf,.V ,,Ta,< 









628 BioGRArniCAL sketches. 

married the second time, about 1843, to Elizabeth Grant, to whom was born 
Presley B. Mrs. Robinson is engaged in farming, having ninety acres 
of good land. She is a member of the Baptist Cliurch. 

ELBERT M. ROBINSON was born at the place of his present resi- 
dence, November 6, 182G. He is the son of Matthew Robinson, who was 
born in North Carolina about 1796, and died in Christian County, Ky., 
in 1850, leaving his wife, Susana, daughter of David and Jane (Pyle) 
Lacy, who was born in this county, and died here in 1881, at the age of 
seventy-eight years, and his children— Elbert M., David W., John G., 
William N., Henry H., Eliza A. (Meacham), and Octavia E. (Barnes). 
Elbert M. was married, February 12, 1879, to Miss Elizabeth H., daughter 
of Alfred and Harriet (Clark) Younglove, of Christian County, Ky. Her 
father was born in 1805, and died in 1878. Her mother was born in 
1810, and died in this county in 1873. Mr. Robinson is by profession a 
farmer, having 192 acres of good land, which he is successfully cultivating. 
He is a member of the Baptist Church, also of the JLasonic fraternity, and 
is identified with the Democratic party. 

GUSTAVUS A. H. ROBINSON was born on the place where he 
now resides, June 19, 1833. His father, Wiley Robinson, was born March 
27, 1800, and was the second white child born in Christian County. 
Wiley Robinson's father, Abner Robinson, was born in Duplin County, 
N. C, and in 1796 came to Christian County and here died in 1841. 
Abner's father, James Robinson, also a Carolinian, was a Revolutionary 
soldier, and came to Kentucky in 1787; he stopped at the older settle- 
ments of Boonesboro and Harrodsburg until 1788, then came to the Blue 
Lick Ford of the Pond River, erected a cabin in a cane brake, remained 
two years; then went to Carolina for his family, returned in 1796, and 
then went to Port Royal, Tenn., where he died in 1799. Gustavus 
Robinson's mother, Sally (Lacy) Robinson, was born near the Pilot 
Rock, Christian County, in 1803, and died in 1868. To her the 
following children were born: Mary J., Nancy E. (Graddy), Gus- 
tavus A. H., Sarah A. (Tedder), Bob B. and Martha E. Gustavus 
A. H. was married, May 7, 1861, to Miss Mary E., daughter- of 
Joseph W. and Mary (Gohsler) Scatcs, of this county, and from this 
union sprang Minnie L., Walter B., Mattie A., Wiley L., Mary Lou, 
William J., Otho and Maud 0. Mrs. Robinson was born in Hopkins- 



■jAnr: jkri'.ii'ftiimui 



829 



iir^il'A 1 .ii^' ..t(0<J6 .';i!-ij Fjii'jn.ni'.iU Lon'jsm 

:• fii Jr.,.p(Ti -I. 'loe.'l-'irjjl .l."!^ ..'1 Vflis'Jl'I 






?M(/^. :;:.iJ 



WILSON PRECINCT. 629 

ville, May 20, 1838, and is a niece of Hon. Walter B. Scales, late of the 
Supreme Court of Illinois ; her mother was born in France; her grand- 
father was a soldier under Napoleon, and fled his country after the defeat 
at Waterloo. Our subject's early educational advantages were rather 
limited, still he is a student and great reader, and takes pride in furnish- 
ing his family with choice literature. He is a carpenter and builder, and 
also owns 355 acres of medium land, on which he has his residence. In 
the war of 1812, five of his uncles took part, among them Col. James 
Robinson. 

JAMES K. WEST was born June 24, 1833, on the place where he 
now resides, in Christian County, Ky.; his father, Jesse West, was born 
here in 1798, and also died on this place in 1843. He was the son of 
Charles West, who was born in South Carolina, and died in Christian 
County. Subject's mother, Martha, daughter of Jacob Pruitt, was born 
in 1803, in Illinois, and died here in 1880. The children of the family 
consist of Henson R., John M., Amos S., William E., Susan C, Sally R. 
(Cooper), Charles P., Eliza S., Francis M. and James K. (twins), Jesse 
W., Harmon N. and Henry H. James K. West has never married; 
he is a farmer, owning 245 acres of land of a fair quality, on which he 
cultivates wheat, corn, tobacco and clover. The place on which he resides 
was one among the earliest settled in the county. Mr. West is a mem- 
ber of the Blue Lodge, A. F. k A. M., and a member of the Christian 
Church. 

JOHN W. AVICKS was born in Christian County, June 26, 1848, 
and after he grew to manhood entered the service of his country as a sol- 
dier in the Fifty-second Kentucky Mounted Infantry, arid was honorably 
discharged. His grandfather, William Wicks, was born in North Car- 
olina in 1782, and died in 1850. John W. Wicks was married, January 
10, 1866, to Miss Martha J., daughter of William A. Hord, of Christian 
County, and to them have been bora: Eddie H., James H. , Emma, 
Evie E., Eulalic, William R., John M. and Harry B. Mr. Wicks was 
favored with a good education, and engaged in school-teaching for a 
period of eight years. In 1831 he engaged in merchandising, at which 
he has won success, always maintaining a good credit and a reputation 
for prompt payment. He commenced at tlie bottom, and gradually 
secured a comfortable competency. In politics he affiliates with the 
Republican party. 



Qti) 



ff.i' :. sjM .u: 



.1. ijflr. 



I ai ir' >o 

rttw ■'-•■ : '■ 



.;;j.,, .' no; ','v a' ,C:U" i.'Ufi?orp 



. f ■'.> iti ,i:)uii&-: (70! 









630 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

CAPT. JAMES M. WILSON was born in Christian County, Ky., 
January 13, 1821, and here he has always made his home. He is the son 
of Matthew Wilson, who was born and partly reared in North Carolina, but 
who removed to and for some time resided in South Carolina, and then 
with his mother came to Kentucky about the year 1794, and settled in 
what was then Logan County, in that portion from which Christian 
County was afterward formed ; here Matthew Wilson resided until his 
death in 1853, at the age of eighty- three years. His wife was Mary, 
daughter of James Campbell, of Christian County, died in 1843, aged 
about sixty-five years, and was mother of the following children : William, 
Lemuel C, Narcissa M. (Carman), Louisa, Ann E. (Blackford), John B. 
C, Matthew H., Catherine (who first married Murphy and afterward 
Lambert), James M. (our subject) and Hester E. (Withers). Matthew 
Wilson was for many years a surveyor ; for a long time he was a mem- 
ber of County Court, was Sherifi'of this county two terms (or four years), 
and also for several years represented Christian County both in the Lower 
House and the Senate of Kentucky. Our subject, James M. Wilson, was 
■ for twelve years Justice of the Peace in this county, in a large district, 
which, after his terms had expired, was divided into three districts, one of 
which was named in his honor. In 1861 he enlisted in the Twenty-fifth 
Kentucky Infantry, was promoted from the ranks to Second Lieutenant 
of Company E, and participated in the battles of Fort Donelson and Shi- 
loh or Pittsburg Landing. His Captain was wounded at the commence- 
ment of the latter action, the First Lieutenant was absent, and conse- 
quently the command of the company devolved upon Mr. Wilson. Shortly 
ufter the fight at Shiloh the regiment was consolidated with the Seven- 
teenth Kentucky, and our subject, being in ill health, resigned and 
returned to his home ; in 1863 having recovered his strength he recruited 
a company for the Forty-eighth Kentucky, of which he was commissioned 
Captain, and served as such until mustered out at the end of his term. 
In 1876 Capt. Wilson married Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander Wood- 
burn, of Muhlenburg County, Ky., and to this union have been born : 
Stephen A. D., Narcissa L., Lorenzo D., James B. W. and Mary J. 
Capt. Wilson is a Free Mason, and is a member of the Christian 
<Dhurch. In politics he is independent, and at present is engaged in 
firming. 






Iru r<Vii\ii ?>;w y.fli/oO 



,.;.:j.'W 



.J (:.V 



WILSON PIIECINCT.' 631 

FRANCIS M. WITHERS was born September 8, 1831, at the place 
of his present residence — the home of his ancestors. His father, Samuel 
AVithers, a native of Virginia, came to Christian County, Ky., at an early 
date ; served at New Orleans in the war in 1815, and died at his home in 
1852, aged sixty-five years. He was the son of Thomas Withers, a Vir- 
ginian, who died in this county. Samuel's wife was Amelia, daughter of 
Abner Robinson, of Christian County. She was born in 1801, and is 
still living. Her children are: James H., Abner B. and subject, who 
was married February 24, 1854, to Miss Hester E., daughter of Matthew 
and Mary (Campbell) Wilson, of this county, and to them were born : 
Elvisa M. (Wilson), John S., Lucy E., Abner B., James F., Narcissa E., 
Louisa J., Mary A. and Leonard H. Subject is a farmer, possessing 
180 acres of good land in a fine state of cultivation, upon which he raises 
good crops of wheat, corn and tobacco. In religion Mr. Withers is a 
member of the Christian Church, and in politics a Democrat. 







..! oj i.r.f.: ,M 



rV 



Jl 









MEMORANDA 



BIOGRAPHICAL EVENTS 



OCCURRING SUBSEQUENT TO THE PUBLICATION 
OF THIS WORK. 



634 BIOGKArillCAL MEMOKANDA. 



.tf.:JIII"U>!LlClUI 



BIOGRAPHICAL MEMORANDA. 636 



tf 



INDEX. 





.',;; 


I'o™'^'" ""'' "R 


Hark ana liloodj- Ground, The 

Geology iu General 


33 

ISl 






Indian Extermination 


33 

.. 23 






Mounds iu Kentucky 


30 

.... 31 


Natural Uridge 

I'ilot l;ock 




Soil, Etlects of the 

Timber ..........!...!!....! 


....... 20 


CHAPTER II. 

P:aP.LY S.ETTI.EMEXT, PlOSEERS, ETC 


3'J 

5.1 


Census, The 


57 

59 

53 




( '..',. ■ 1 -; ' ST 




5.i 

57 

o-i 




g:"^r:"z::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:: 


41 

4S 

46 


t-eat ut Justice, Locating the 


61 

4.5 



CHAPTER III. 



P.VGE. 

Thou:a.s Chilton ini 

Kol'Crt Colenian y" 

Joseph K. Cruci:e'tt.'.']!!'.."!.'!.'."."".'.'^i!.!.'.i...'.... M 

John W.Crockett 93 

Reziu Davidge 8.". 

Jeflerson Davis IU'* 

James I. Dozier 100 

Joseph Duncan 11"' 

Mnian Edwards S:i 

James W. Ewing luD 

Young Ewing 10*5 

W. W. Fry Ha 

Niiiiau H. Urey 93 

Daniel S. Hays 9,0 

Gustavus A. ilenry 9S 

KotiCrt P. Henry VS 

l:oL..:it McKee 101 

Johu McLaruing 99 

J h u I ' i'ag e "'."■.'.'.'.■.'.'.■.'.'.".'.'.':.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.■.'.' 1 00 

Bi-iii..i"i^ \\ Im:: n 97 

DavH! • !■ '■.•■• 97 

Ed«.i 9i; 

Her.;- , ■ : ''■.'. 87 

Ei.l^i :, 94 

Kolr.l ; .', ■ ; ■■ 99 

'Counv. ; . uu 

Orga.iv. _ r 1 IMrlk'S lUS 

CHAPTER V. 

iNTEKKAt iMrKOVEMESTS 119 

:^|S-l;-':rrv-::;::;;;;:;:;::::::.:;::;::::::::;:i^^ 

Brid^, li;2 

Crop .-: 139 

Hcndi'i' ; rv-ii' ,,'y7;":«i''z;r';';;zz iJo 

llorliiullure 143 

Indian Trails 119 

1,1 ve .-^look 139 

Hills 13ii 

Nci,'ro .■Slavery i:i4 

Uailro.uls 1'.'9 

lioads 120 

Tobacco 138 

Turniukcs 124 

CHAPTER VI. 

Ili;i,UiiOL-s Hlstoky..... 14") 

lOdui.iii M 149 

Iloi.ki:' ■ ...;'Zf.V^^ZZZ/.! 100 

H0[.tii 102 

ilo|ikri !:■- /. • : ■" IW 

Kmiuri.; .\ r i:.-ii, iJie pa 

K,-.,',.c'-.; l:.p„l.li.Mn 100 

K\,Un.-K,j RtjU- 103 



t ^.x i-'ii 



Sihools of the County.. 
Schools aiul .Scho<>Ihous 



CHAPTER VII. 

War Htstoey 

Ca\alry, C. S. A., Eighth Ktal 
Col. h. A.Sypert 



War Between the ; 

Warof 1S12 

War with Mexico. 



HOPKINSVILL 

Banking 

Bartholomew Wood- 
City Government 

Crescent .Mills, The .. 

Early Tradefmen 

Eugene iliUs, The 



. Mauulacturiug ludustries 208 

Merchants 204 

Postoflice, The _ iWS 

ness.Xhe 204 

Settlers, JZarly 192 

Taverns 20'.! 

Western Lunatic Asylum 197 

CHAPTEK IX. 

HOPKINSVILLE CltUKCHES, ETC 217 

Baptist Church 225 

Catholic Church 239 

Cemeteries 210 

Christian Church 2;;2 

Colored Methodist Church 233 

Cumberland Presbyterian Church _ 236 

Episcopal Church 233 

Methodist Church 217-220 

Presbyterian Church 230-232 

Eev. Henry Anderson 23« 

CHAPTER X. 

Educ.<tio>-.il, etc 243 

Benevolent Institutions 2.56 

Bethel Female College 2.i5 



Colored ScIk 

Free Masons 

Hopkin^viilelligh School... 



Odd Fe 

Opera House 

Prof.C. H.Dietrich 

Public Schools 

Samuel K. Crumbaugh.. 



CHAPTEU XI 

Bethel liuplist Church..". 

Casky liruugc. N'o. 3.'> 

Cumberland Presbyterian Ch 

Early Preachers , 

Early Schools and Teachers.. 



273 



w Pkecincts.. 201 



Early Settlers 251 

General Description 201 

Geology, etc 273 

Negroes The 26S 

Pembroke, Town of 273 

Professional Men 273 

Reformed Church 272 

Salubria M. E. Church.. 
Villages 

CHAPTEP. XII. 

Union Scuoolhouse Precinct 

Churciies 

Colored Families 

Concord Church 

Earliest Settlers 

Fevers 

General Descrijition 

Indian Mounds 

Ncwstead Presbyterian Church.. 

Patrons of Husbandry 

Pee Dee M. E. Church' South 

Shiloh Methodi.5t Church 

South Union Baptist Church 

The Unitarians 



Ber 

Church History 

Early Settlers o'f (iarrcttsburg 

First Birth in Flat I-ick 

First Postofflce 

First Settlers of I.al'axotto 

First Wedding in Flat Lick 

Flat Lick 

Garrettsburg 

Garrctl-sburg Schools 

Garrettsburg Village .». 

General Description 

Incorporation of Lafayette 

Lafayette Precinct 

McKenzie Kirk 20: 

Merchants and Professionals 

Pleasant Valley Church 

Ple.isant Valley School 

Terrible Tragedy 

The Baptist (Jlmrch 

The Methodist Churth 

The I'rcsbvterio n Church 

Town of Lafayette 

War Incident 

CHAPTEU XIV. 
MotjNT Vernon, Fruit Hill, Stew.vet ani 

WitsoN Precincts 

Coal Deposits „. 

Early Settlers of Fruit Hill 

Early Settlers of -Mount Vernon 

Early Settlers of Stewart 

Early Settlers of Wilson 

Fairview Methodist Church 

Fruit Hill Precinct 

Natural or Rock Bridge 

Pie.vsaut Hill Baptist Church 

Revolutionary Soldiers 

Rock Bridge Baptist Church 

Schools 

Stewart Precinct 

The Old Baptists 

The Uui\crsalists 

Vaughn's Chapel _ 

Wilson Precinct 

CHAPTER XV. 
Bainbridoe, Hamby and S'jATEb' Mill Pkk 

CINCT3 

An Old Soldier 

Bear ^tory 

Churches 

Consolation Universalist Church 

Croflon 

Crofton Slale and Female Academy 

First Comers to Bainbridge 



645 



General Description 309 

Hamby Precinct 312 

Methodist Ilpiscopal Church South 319-320 

Philip Hamby 312 

Reformers orChristians 319 

Reuuniscenc&< 3H 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Bainbrldge Precinct 587 

Casky Precinct C03 

Fruit Hill Precinct r.Ol 

Garrettsburg Precinct S75 

Hamliy Precinct ■"■"^~ 

HopkiniTillc, City and Precinct :; ■' 

Lafayette Precinct 

Lougvicw Precinct i > 

Mount Vernon Precinct 1 .' 

Pembroke Precinct 117 

Scales' Mill Precinct 5«) 

Stewart Precinct n'< 

Union Sehoolhouse Precinct 523 

Wilson Precinct 623 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Court F0U303 between pages IS and 19 

Hopkinsvillc Public School lUiilding 

between p.ige3 2J2 and 243 

Modern Sehoolhouse between pages 306 and 307 

Priiuitive Sehoolhouse 15-4 

Scene at a Sehoolhouse, Christmas 245 



PORTRAITS. 



Abcrnathy, II. G 
Alexander, L. G., 

Bc.-ird, n. R 

Brown, T. F 

Buckner, S. G 

Crofl, .T. F. 

Fairlei^li.l;. M... 



K^uilonl, C. W ; liindSlI 

Sharp, Fidelio C ' ^'laiid g.? 

Sh;irp, Mrs. Kvclina,!.. land 95 

Thomas, .Joseph P '. ii . :. j. j .- and 25D 

Thompson, George l.etv.ouii p.iK'ts ■■'H' and 211 

Whitlock, J. C between pages 122 and 123 

Wood, Bartholomew T between pages 190 and 191 

MEMORAXDA. 

PAGE. 

Historical .?2I 

Biogr.-iphical 633 




A _ -a^..fe#i 






Biographical Index, 



PAGE. 

Abernathy, H. G 339 

Alexander, L. G 339 

Anderson, R. M 340 

Anderson, C 341 

Anderson, A. TI 341 

Armistead, 11. B -.447 

Armstrong, R 447 

Allen, J. W 485 

Armstrong, E 557 

Adams, J. iM 523 

Adeock, W. E 523 

Alexander, C. B 524 

Anderson, E. H 525 

/Ballard, H. C 342 

Barrow, J. F 34:i 

Beard, D. R 343 

Boyd,'S. J 344 

Breathitt, J. W 345 

Breathitt, J 34G 

Bronaugh, J 346 

Brown, E. A 347 

Brown, T. F 848 

Brownell, F. J 349 

Burnett, 1 351 

Bush, C. H 351 

Barclay, E, G 448 

Bell, D 448 

Bollinger, H. H 449 

Bragg, J. P 449 

Bronaugh, W. M 450 

Browdur. G. R 451 

Barktr, T. M 485 

Baikcr, P. M 480 

Batts, John T, 48(j 



/ 



.: y 1 i. 



i!i'-r/\/-i-ji.;:a 



648 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 

Bell, CD ;^87 

Bencl:ill, Q ^gg 

Booue, W. 1 4gg 

Buckner, F. W ^gg 

Blair, S Z........509 

l^oytl- J- A 510 

Boyd, W. 11 525 



Brovvnins, J. A. 



.526 



B^yd, Y 558 

Barnes, D. L ; \ 5gj 

Barnes, J. J 5gj 

Bates, A .502 

Brasher, C. A 559 

Brown, J. R 5gg 

Bacon, Mrs. i\I. E 575 



Barns, M. A. 
Bell, D 



.575 

.576 



Boyd, R. L. 577 

Bryant, H. IT ggy 

Bass, J ..".".."..615 

Campbell, J. P., Jr 352 

Campbell, G. V 352 

Campbell, A. P 353 

Campbell, A 35^ 

Campbell E.P Z3.'.Z.''.''."."".".''.".".Z".".'!355 

Causler, Polk 35g 

Champlin.G. A 357 

Clark, J. M '.'.'" ............................. ."357 



Clark, J. H. 



.358 



Coombs, G. B 35g 

Cooper, J. 359 

Crumb.-rngb, S. R 3gO 

Cook, E. R..... ...................437 

Catlett, A. C ....!....!!... .451 

Chilton, F. M ..........451 

Carneal, J., Rev 4g9 

Carter, J. M 49q 

Carter, Daniel F 49Q 



Catlett, J. C. 



491 



Cayce.M 49-^ 

Cherry, C. B ........!.... 492 

Clardy, J. C ; ,'_" 493 

Clardy, T. F 493 

Coleman, J. T .........."...511 

Cooper, A. M 512 



(J d 



a 



BIOGRAnilCAL INDEX. 649 

Campbell, F. B 526 

Campbell, Ned 527 

Clardy, J. D 528 

Coombs, W. E 529 

Crenshaw, 11. C 529 

Cavanah, J. 11....! 562 

Collins, J. J) 569 

Cion, W. V 570 

Croft, A. B 570 

Croft, J. E 570 

Clark, n. B 588 

Cox, W. F 588 

CuUom, E. R 589 

Clark, J. M 603 

Clark, J. M 615 

Cordier, J 616 

Pavis, M. C ■. 360 

Dietrich, C. H 361 

Diicker, C.W , 361 

Dudley, R. H 452 

Dennis, Z. P 494 

Da%'ie, M. D 512 

Dowell, Mrs. E 513 

Dillm.in, J. H 530 

Dulin, J. M ; 571 

Diuguid.M.N 590 

Denton, J. H 616 

Denton, J. W 617 

Drake, Z.T 617 

Duliu, R 618 

Ellis, William 361 

Ellis, J. 362 

Eddins,W. "W 453 

Edv.ards, C. N 530 

Ellis, A. W 530 

Evans, J. E 531 

East, J 558 

Fairleigh, R. M ' 363 

Feland, J 366 

Forrey, J. S 367 

Foulkes J 367 

Frankel, M 3G8 

Frrthcr, W. 1 369 

Fuqua, W. M 370 

Forbes, J. V 438 



;. ■'n.sli;,-) 

7; ,;■;, -if) 
.A .'iv.va 



650 BIOGRAPUICAL INDEX. 

Pint. 

Forbes, J. E 438 

Fritz, M. A 438 

Fritz, E. H 439 

Fruit, S. T 439 

Forgy, S. P 453 

Fuqiia, A. J 514 

Fuqua, T. J ..515 

Farnsworth, H. A... .' .'.531 

Fauli<iier, E. J 532 

Foard, J. W 532 

Fuller, J. R 571 

Gaines, R. W 371 

Gant, J. K 371 

Gish, D.J 372 

Grissam, M. ^\' .' 374 

Garnett Family 454. 

Garnett, B. C 457 

Garrett, I 458 

Gray, T. D 459 

Garrett, J. F 494 

Garrott, M. A 494 

Griffin, E. C 495 

Girand, F. M 515 

Garrett, J. A 533 

Gary, J. C 534 

Gary, R. S 534 

Glass, J. C 534 

Green, J. R 535 

Gresham, J. W 536 

Gooch, T. W 563 

GloTcr, D. H 571 

Giles, P 577 

Guthrie, L. P 590 

Garnett, J. T 604 

Garrott, W. W 605 

Graham, T. L 606 

Green, T 607 

Gunn, J. A 608 

Gabard,W. F ' .'618 

Grace, F. E 619 

Hancock, T. K 376 

Hickman, L. B '. 376 

Holland, R. H 377 

Howe, J. M 377 

Harned, E 440 



BlOOKArillCAL INDEX. 651 

Ilarned, 1 440 

Hanna, S 459 

Holland, S. A 4G0 

Mollis, W 4G4 

Hopkins, E. G 4f,5 

Hutchinson, D. G 46G 

Harris, J. T 495 

Herndon, H. C :..: 49G 

Hall, C 516 

Hanbery, J. W 537 

Henry, G 537 

Henry, R. W 538 

Hendrix, A. A.... 564 

Hardy, J. L 590 

Hardy, T. M 59U 

Hiser, B. F 591 

Ingram, R. H 572 

Jesup, J. E 378 

Jameson, 11. C 466 

Johnson, J. N 538 

Jackson, B. M 620 

Johnson, G. N 625 

Johnson, R 625 

Kenner, Mrs. Bettie E 467 

Knight, J. R 539 

Knight, G. E 539 

Landes, J. 1 379 

Latham, J. C 380 

Lewis, M 380 

Long, A. V 381 

Lackey, G. W 441 

Lacy, G. V." 441 

Layton, M. Y. B 442 

Lackey, B. D 467 

Liindcrman J 468 

Loavell, C 578 

Lauder, G. W 592 

Lander, W. N ; 593 

Lander, C. T 593 

Long, J. W 620 

McCarroll, Joe 382 

McDauiel, R. T 383 

McPherson, J. W -. 383 

Meacham, C. M 384 



.T..'.l!i'IA,lWia 



1 ,(. \.hil .1 

'^ U ,i:!f,.K :.! 



652 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 

Means, L. W 384 

MeiTitt, J. R 385 

Metcalfe, V. M 386 

Mills, J. N 387 

Mills, R 388 

Minck, J. W 389 

Morris, M. H 390 

Morrow, T 390 

McComb, L 468 

Mason, W. B 468 

Massie, F. B 469 

Miller, M. G 469 

Murphy, T. T 471 

Murphey, E. J 471 

McKee, Mrs. A. E 496 

McKenzie, W. W 497 

Major, U. L 498 

Major, H 498 

Mason, M. A 499 

Massie, W. M 499 

Medley, J , 500 

Montgomery, J. M 500 

Moore, J. W 501 

McGee, G. W 517 

McGaughey, A 540 

McGaughey, R. PI 541 

McGaughey, J. W 541 

Marquess, J. C 541 

Masou, D. S '. 542 

Morris, E. F 542 

Moss, J. L 542 

Moore, J. R 559 

McCord, H. C 572 

Murphy, J. N 573 

McKnight, J. J. C 579 

Metcalf, J. C 579 

Mason, P. P 593 

Meacham, A. W 594 

Mitchell. Jas. T 596 

McKee, C 609 

Myers, G. H 621 

Martin, P. 625 

Meacham, C. W 626 

Meacham, J. M 626 

Nelson, M. 11 391 



a -T J^.flT^ 



BIOORAPinCAL INDEX. 663 



Norwood, R. W 392 

Northington, C. J 517 

■Nance, B. B 5^3 

Nixon, J.J 573 

Nolen,W. H....- 59C 

Orr, J 392 

Overshiner Famil3- 393 

O'Neal, C : 501 

O'Neal, L.L 502 

Owsley, D. B 518 

Owen.'T. T 543 

Owen, M. V 544 

Payne, N 394 

Phelps, n. A. .r. 395 

Pike, E. A 395 

Poindexter,G 396 

Pyle Family • 397 

Perry, D. R 'i'i- 

Pendleton, R. Y 472 

Pendleton, P. B 473 

Peyton, J. P • 473 

Parrish, J. S 502 

Powers, T. J 565 

Peay, A 580 

P'Pool, J. M 597 

P'Pool, G. A 598 

Prouse,J. P 622 

Pepper, S. I) 627 

Rabbeth, J.J 398 

Radford, C. W 399 

Randle,W. F 400 

Rcnshaw, 11 • 400 

Ricketts. J. T 401 

Rodgers, A. D 402 

Ru3t, J. W 404 

Rudford, W. T 474 

Richardson, J ; : 474 

Rose, W. G 476 

Radford, "\V. B 502 

Ragsdale, W. E 503 

Rives, H. P 503 

Robb, E. C 519 

Radford, M. G 545 

Ramsey, J. M 545 



■i\-.in^Aiii}Q\a 






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654 BIOGRAPHICAL INDKX. 

Kussell, R. A 540 

Renshaw, J. M 559 

Roberts, M 573 

Radford, J. B 581 

Rives, Mrs. R. A 582 

Rawls, C. E 599 

Renshaw, F. II 599 

Rensliaw,W. J 600 

Radford, C. J 609 

Rawlins, L. B 610 

Rives, R.r 610 

Roberts, E. J 611 

Robinson, Mrs. E. J 627 

Robinson, E. M 628 

Robinson, G. A. H 628 

Seargent, A 405 

Sebree, E. G 406 

Shackelford, C 406 

Sharp, F. C. and E. J 407 

Shipp, W. M 410 

Smith, G. W " 410 

Smith, J. W. 1 411 

Smith, T.L 412 

Smitii, M. ' 413 

Starling, S. M 413 

Stites, II. J 417 

Sypert, L. A 420 

Shanklin, W. H 443 

Shaw, T. H 443 

Steel, J. D 444 

Smith, R. H 476 

Smith, 0. J 477 

Staart, E. S 478 

Stcger, E. W 504 

Sherrill, P. E 519 

Stephens, E. T 520 

Southall, G. W r 547 

Stowe, W. T 547 

Snmmers, W. D 548 

Smith, J. J ... 600 

Stith, J. W 601 

Thompson, G. 420 

Thompson, G. V 421 

Townes, A. V 422 

Tylw, J. D 422 



i/.;ji!!'i,i.atx;>ls 






BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 655 

Tandy, T.J : 

Thomas, J. P 

Thomas, J. Q 504 

Tuck, H.P 521 

Thurmoiul, Mrs. J. E 549 

Thurmond, J. C 550 



PIOK. 

..478 
,.479 



Torian, J. 



.550 



Terry, J. D : 574 

Terrell, T.J 583 

Terrell, J. W 583 

Tandy, Mrs. S. E C22 

Underwood, B. T 423 

Usher, J. H 551 

Underwood, J. W 565 

Vaugban, K. W GOl 

Weill, Joe 424 

Wheeler. W. G 424 

Wilgns,W.A 425 

Williams, M. W 42o 

Wilson, 11. H 426 

Wilson, A. L _. 427 

Wiufree, W. P .' 427 

Wiufree, J. H 428 

Withers. W. J 429 

Wood, B. S 430 

Wood, 1). B. S 431 

Wood, E. P 431 

Wood, E 432 

Wood, H 433 

Wood, J. R 434 

Woosley, J. P 434 

Wills, Mrs. S. A 480 

Willis, J. C 431 

Williams, S. F 482 

Wood. Mrs. J. D 482 

Walden, C. II 505 

Whitlock, B. A ; 506 

Winfrce, S. T 5'JG 

Wallace, J. B 552 

Whitlock, J. C 554 

West, B. II 5G6 

West, C. C 5CG 

AVcst, AV. W 567 

West, W. M 574 



656 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 

FAOE. 

Wallace, T. H 584 

White, J. B 584 

Wikon, E. A '. 585 

Wood, J. W 602 

WaiGeld, W.E 612 

Whitaker, 1). M 613 

Williams, B. D 622 

West, J. K 629 

Wicks, J. W 629 

Wilson, J. M 636 

Withers, F. M'. 631 

Yancey, J. W 435 

Young, J. A 435 

Young, T. S 522 

Yonts, T. L 555 






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