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Full text of "[Course catalog]"

i-or Keterence 



Not to be taken from this room 





Catalogs of 

College of Liberal Arts 

College of Business Administration 

College of Engineering 

School of Law 

School of Business 

Evening Courses 
of the College of Liberal Arts 

* 
Lincoln Technical Institute 
Lincoln Preparatory School 

• 
Huntington School for Boys 



Qifts and Bequests 

Northeastern University will welcome gifts 
and bequests for the following purposes: 

(a) For its building program. 

(b) For general endowment. 

(c) For specific purposes which may 
especially appeal to the donor. 

It is suggested that, when possible, those 
contemplating gifts or bequests confer with 
the President of the University regarding the 
University's needs before legal papers are 
drawn. 

Gifts and bequests should be made in the 
University's legal name, which is "North- 
eastern University." 




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NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



DAY COLLEGES 

General Information 



19464947 




(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 



BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

DECEMBER, 1945 



Outline of 
POSTWAR CURRICULA 

Five-Year Co-operative Plan 

Beginning in September, 1946, Northeastern will resume 
its co-operative plan of education and will offer curricula 
leading to Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science de- 
grees as outlined in this catalogue. The University is 
wholeheartedly committed to co-operative education and 
its programs of instruction are basically organized on that 
plan. Accordingly, the five-year curricula in which stu- 
dents alternate between classroom study and work ex- 
perience at ten- week intervals are strongly recommended. 
Co-operative curricula in all three colleges comprise 130 
weeks of classroom instruction and 98 weeks of co-opera- 
tive work in engineering, business, or industry. The fresh- 
man year comprises three consecutive ten-week periods, 
and each of the upperclass years comprises 25 weeks of 
academic work (one five-week and two ten-week terms), 
26 weeks of co-operative work, and one week of vacation. 
The five- week periods are summer terms, each a part of 
the succeeding upperclass year. While at co-operative work, 
students are paid on the same basis as other employees of 
the company to which they are assigned. 

Four-Year Plan 

For those who desire the customary full-time college pro- 
grams, because of circumstances growing out of the war, 
there is available a four-year option in all curricula. This 
plan provides for continuous instruction from early fall to 
spring with the usual long summer vacation. In all re- 
spects except for attendance on the alternating ten-week 
co-operative basis, these four-year curricula are identical 
with those offered on the five-year co-operative plan. 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

"Day Colleges 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

CONDUCTED ON THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

^ahle of Contents 

Pages 
I. Northeastern University 

1. Academic Calendar for the College Year 1946-1947. . . 4 

2. The University Corporation 5 

3. Faculty and Staff 8 

4. Northeastern University — General Statement 19 

5. Buildings and Facilities 22 

6. Student Activities 32 

7. Co-operative Plan of Education 39 

8. General Information About the Day Colleges 44 

II. College of Liberal Arts 59 

III. College of Business Administration 125 

IV. College of Engineering 159 

V. Courses of Instruction 205 

VI. Index 221 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Freshman cAcademic Qalendar 

September, 1946 to September, 1947 



1946 
September 



October 12 
November 11 
November 14 



November 18 
November 20 
November 21 
December 24 
December 25 

1947 
January 1 

January 27 

February 22 

April 5 

April 7 



April 19 

May 30 

June 14 



July 
August 



4 
4 



September 4 



Thursday: Registration and opening of college year for 
the Division A Freshman class (1951). Students failing 
to register promptly on this date' will be charged a late 
registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). 

Saturday: Columbus Day. (College exercises omitted.) 

Monday: Armistice Day. (College exercises omitted.) 

Thursday: Registration and opening of college year for 
the Division B Freshman class (1951). Students failing 
to register promptly on this date will be charged a late 
registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). 

Monday: Second term begins for Div. A freshmen (1951). 

Wednesday: College exercises omitted after 1:00 p.m. 

Thursday: Thanksgiving. (College exercises omitted.) 

Tuesday: College exercises omitted after 1:00 p.m. 

Wednesday: Christmas. (College exercises omitted.) 

Wednesday: New Year's Day. (College exercises omitted.) 

Monday: Third term begins for Div. A freshmen (1951). 
Second term begins for Div. B freshmen (1951). 

Saturday: Washington's Birthday. (College exercises 
omitted.) 

Saturday: College year ends for Div. A freshmen (1951). 

IsAonday: Five-week summer term or vacation begins for 
Div. A freshmen (1951). Summer term may be taken 
at this time or beginning August 4. 
Third term begins for Div. B freshmen (1951). 

Saturday: Patriots' Day. (College exercises omitted.) 

Friday: Memorial Day. (College exercises omitted.) 

Saturday: College year ends for Div. B freshmen (1951). 
Seven- week vacation period begins for Div. B freshmen 
(1951). 

Friday: Independence Day. (College exercises omitted.) 

Monday: Five-week summer term begins for Div. B fresh- 
men (1951). 

Thursday: Registration and opening of college year for 
the Div. A Freshman class (1952). Students failing 
to register promptly on this date will be charged a late 
registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). 



DAY COLLEGES 



^he V^grtheastern University Corporation 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 

Frank Lincoln Richardson, Vice-Chairman 

Carl Stephens Ell, President of the University 

Henry Nathaniel Andrews, Treasurer 

Everett Avery Churchill, Secretary 



Joseph Florence Abbott 

Charles Francis Adams 

WiLMAN Edward Adams 

Roger Amory 

O. Kelley Anderson 

Arthur Atwood Ballantine 

George Louis Barnes 

Thomas Prince Beal 

F. Gregg Bemis 

S. Bruce Black 

Henry Goddard Bradlee 

George Augustus Burnham 

Godfrey Lowell Cabot 

Paul Codman Cabot 

Walter Channing 

William Converse Chick 

Paul Foster Clark 

William H. Collins 

Sears B. Condit 

Amory Coolidge 

Albert Morton Creighton 

Marshall Bertrand Dalton 

Edward Dana 

Edward Dane 

Justin Whitlock Dart 

William James Davidson 

Bernard W. Doyle 

Paul Augustus Draper 

David Frank Edwards 

William Partridge Ellison 

Joseph Buell Ely 

Robert Greenough Emerson 

John Wells Farley 

Joseph F. Ford 

Ernest Bigelow Freeman 

Franklin Wile Ganse 

Harvey Dow Gibson 

David Greer 

Merrill Griswold 

George Hansen 

Henry Ingraham Harrtman 

Carroll Sherlock Harvey 

Harold Daniel Hodgkinson 

Harvey P. Hood 

Chandler Hovey 

Weston Howland 

Howard Munson Hubbard 

Maynard Hutchinson 

Raymond Winfield James 

Arthur Stoddard Johnson 

Charles Berkley Johnson 



Jacob Joseph Kaplan 
Harry Hamilton Kerr 
Frank Howard Lahey 
Halhjan Lee 
Galen David Light 
J. Franklin McElwain 
Hugh Dean McLellan 
Edward Abbott MacMaster 
John Russell Macomber 
Albert Edward Marshall 
Harold Francis Mason 
Irvin Likely Moore 
Fred Lester Morgan 
Ira Mosher 

Irving Edwin Moultrop 
Samuel Norwich 
George Olmsted, Jr. 
Olaf Olsen 

AuGUSTiN Hamilton Parker, Jr. 
George Edwin Pierce 
Matthew Porosky 
Frederick Sanford Pratt 
Roger Preston 
Sidney Rabinovitz 
Stuart Craig Rand 
William McNear Rand 
James Lorin Richards 
James C. Richdale 
Harold Bours Richmond 
Charles Forest Rittenhouse 
John James Robinson 
Robert Billings Rugg 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Russell Maryland Sanders 
Andrew Sebastian Seiler 
Joseph P. Spang, Jr. 
Frank Palmer Speare 
F. R. Carnegie Steele 
Charles Stetson 
Earl Place Stevenson 
Robert T. P. Storer 
Frank Horace Stuart 
Edward Watson Supple 
Ralph Emerson Thompson 
James Vincent Toner 
Eliot Wadsworth 
Samuel Wakeman 
EusTis Walcott 
Edwin Sibley Webster 
Sinclair Weeks 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Qeneral University Committees 

Executive Council 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 
Everett Avery Churchill Milton John Schlagenhauf 

Albert Ellsworth Everett William Crombie White 

University Cabinet 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 
William Thurlow Alexander Winthrop Eliot Nightingale 

Everett Avery Churchill Rudolf Oscar Oberg 

Albert Ellsworth Everett Edward Snow Parsons 

Roger Stanton Hamilton John Butler Pugsley 

Charles William Havice Milton John Schlagenhauf 

Wilfred Stanley Lake J. Kenneth Stevenson 

Donald Hershey MacKenzie William Crombie White 

Harold Wesley Melvin William G. Wilkinson 

Stuart Mead Wright 

Library Committee 

Everett Avery Churchill, Chairman 
William Thurlow Alexander Wilfred Stanley Lake 

Albert Ellsworth Everett Myra White 

Roger Stanton Hamilton William Crombie White 



DAY COLLEGES 



faculty Committees 



General 

William C. White, Chairman 

William T. Alexander Harold W. Melvin 

George R. Fennell Winthrop E. Nightingale 

Roger S. Hamilton Edward S. Parsons 

Wilfred S. Lake ' John B. Pugsley 

Milton J. Schlagenhauf 



Executive 

Harold W. Melvin, Chairman 

William T. Alexander Winthrop E. Nightingale 

Roger S. Hamilton F. Elizabeth Oelschlegel 

Wilfred S. Lake Edward S. Parsons 

John B. Pugsley 



Day College Council 

William C. White, Chairman 
George R. Fennell, Secretary 

William T. Alexander Stanley D. Miroyiannis 

Chester P. Baker Rudolph M. Morris 

Charles F. Barnason Winthrop E. Nightingale 

Robert Bruce Edward S. Parsons 

Emil a. Gramstorff Roland G. Porter 

Roger S. Hamilton John B. Pugsley 

Charles W. Havice Milton J. Schlagenhauf 

Frederick W. Holmes Joseph Spear 

Reginald G. Lacount Eliot F. Tozer 

Wilfred S. Lake Arthur A. Vernon 

Harold W. Melvin Joseph W. Zeller 



Student Activities 

Edward S. Parsons, Chairman 
Roger S. Hamilton Joseph Spear 

F. Elizabeth Oelschlegel Eliot F. Tozer 



Graduate Study 

Arthur A. Vernon, Chairman 
Reginald G. Lacount Wilfred S. Lake 

Stanley D. Miroyiannis 



Pre-Medical 

Stanley D. Miroyiannis, Chairman 
Wilfred S. Lake Carl F. Muckenhoupt 

Arthur A. Vernon 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Officers of the IDay Colleges 



Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., Sc.D. 
Office 186 Richards Hall 

Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D. 
Office 138 Richards Hall 

William Crombie White, S.B., Ed.M. 
Office 152 Richards Hall 



Milton John Schlagenhauf, A.B., B.D. 
Office 150 Richards Hall 



M.A. 



William Thurlow Alexander, S.B., M.A. 
Office 152 Richards Hall 



President of the University 
Res. 21 Beaumont Ave., Newtonville 

Vice-President of the University 
Res. 50 FoUen St., Cambridge 

Director of Day Colleges 
Res. 30 Summit Rd., Wellesley 

Director of Admissions 

Res. 96 Blakely Rd., Medford 

Telephone: Mystic 6148-M 

Dean of the College of Engineering 
Res. 14 Nelson Rd., Melrose 



Roger Stanton Hamilton, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of the College of Business Administration 
Office 153 Richards Hall Res. 1367 Walnut St., Newton Highlands 



Wilfred Stanley Lake, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Oj^ce 154 Richards Hall 

George Raymond Fennell, S.B., M.B.A. 
Office 155 Richards Hall 

Charles William Havice, A.B., M.A., S.T.B., Ph.D. 
Oj^ce 357 Richards Hall 

Harold Wesley Melvin, A.B., M.A. 
Office 256 Richards Hall 



Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
Res. 59 Hinckley Rd., Waban 

Secretary of the Faculty 
Res. 42 Fremont Ave., Everett 

Dean of Chapel 
Res. 178 Goden St., Belmont 

Dean of Students 
Res. 44 Houston Ave., Milton 



Rudolph Magnus Morris, S.B., Ed.M. 
Office 139 Richards Hall 



Counsellor for Veterans 
Res. 99 KnoUwood Rd., Squantum 



Winthrop Eliot Nightingale, A.B., S.B., Ed.M. Director of Co-operative Work 

Office 253 Richards Hall Res. 136 Dickerman Rd., Newton Highlands 



Edward Snow Parsons, S.B., Ed.M. 
Office 355 Richards Hall 

John Butler Pugsley, A.B. 
Office 254 Richards Hall 



Director of Student Activities 
Res. 19 Hardy Ave., Watertown 

Registrar 
Res. 23 Hardy Ave., Watertown 



DAY COLLEGES 



(S\dministratwe S^ciff 



Ruth Charlotte Bodemer 
Library, East Building 

William Thomas Cloney, Jr., A.B. 
Ojfice 352 Richards Hall 

A. Riama Crawford 

Library, East Building 

Daisy Milne Everett 

Office 115 Richards Hall 

Mart B. Poor 

O^ce 41 Richards Hall 

George William Hankinson, A.B., S.B. 
Office 150 Richards Hall 

Dr. Henry Arthur Kontoff 

Office 483 Beacon St., Boston 

Dr. George M. Lane 

Office 416 Marlborough St., Boston 

Nathan Levenson, LL.B. 
Office 352 Richards Hall 

Prudie Rae Moore, S.B., M.A. 
O^ce 150 Richards Hall 

Rudolf Oscar Oberg, S.B., Ed.M. 
Office 252 Richards Hall 

F. Elizabeth Oelschlegel, S.B. 
Oj^ce 256 Richards Hall 

Jean Simonds 

Library, East Building 

J. Kenneth Stevenson, B.C.S. 
O^ce 136 Richards Hall 

George Wesley Towle, S.B. 
Office 253 Richards Hall 

Myra White 

Library, East Building 



Assistant Librarian 
Res. 94 Wendell St., Cambridge 

Director of Press Bureau 
Res. 30 Lantern Lane, Milton 

Assistant Librarian 
Res. 112 Bancroft Ave., Reading 

Bursar 
Res. 1111 Highland Ave., Needham Heights 

Manager of Bookstore 
Res. 32 Milton Rd., Brooklinc 

Assistant to the Director of Admissions 
Res. Ill Windsor Ave., Watertown 

College Physician 
Res. Overlook Park, Newton Centre 

Associate College Physician 
Res. 21 Alton Court, Brookline 

Associate Director of Press Bureau 
Res. 5 Nazing Court, Roxbury 

Assistant to the Director of Admissions 
Res. 137 Park Drive, Boston 

Direaor of Alumni Relations 
Res. 37 Walker St., Atlantic 

Adviser to Women Students 
Res. 505 Beacon St., Boston 

Assistant Librarian 
Res. 22 Evans Way, Boston 

Assistant to the Vice-President 
Res. 101 Goden St., Belmont 

Co'ordinator of Co-operative Work 
Res. 12 Forest St., Lexington 

Librarian 
Res. 118 Hemenway St., Boston 



10 NORTHEASTERN UTSIIVERSITY 



HDay College faculty 



Professors 

William Thurlow Alexander, S.B., M.A. 

Professor of Industrial Engineering and Chairman of the Department 
Office 152 Richards Hall Res. 14 Nelson Rd., Melrose 

Chester Packard Baker, S.B., M.A. 

Professor of Chemical Engineering and Chairman of the Department 

Office 1 New Building Res. 31 Bow Rd., Newton Centre 

Charles Frederick Barnason, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Modern Languages and Chairman of the Department 

Office 452 East Building Res. 122 Downer Ave., Hingham 

Robert Bruce, B.C.S., M.C.S. Professor of Accounting 

Office 352 East Building ' Res. 12 Elliott St., Winthrop 

Joseph Arthur Coolidge, S.B., M.A. Professor of Physics 

Office 246 Richards Hall Res. 20 Martin St., Cambridge 

Alfred D'Alessandro, B.C.S., LL.B., C.P.A., M.B.A. Professor of Accounting 

Office 155 Richards Hall Res. 46 Radcliffe Rd., Belmont 

*Stanley Goddard Estes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology and Chairman of the Department 
Alfred John Ferretti, S.B., M.S. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Office 75 Richards Hall Res. 29 Coolidge Rd., Lynn 

Emil Anton Gramstorff, S.B., M.S. 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Chairman of the Department 
Office 101 South Building Res. 19 Hilltop Ave., Lexington 

Roger Stanton Hamilton, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics and Chairman of the Department 
Office 153 Richards Hall Res. 1367 Walnut St., Newton Highlands 

Charles William Havice, A.B., M.A., S.T.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology and Chairman of the Department 
Office 357 Richards Hall Res. 178 Goden St., Belmont 

Frederick William Holmes, A.B., M.A. 

Professor of English and Chairman of the Department 
Office 453 East Building Res. 43 Lincoln St., Dedham 

Wilfred Stanley Lake, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Economics 

Office 154 Richards Hall Res. 59 Hinckley Rd., Waban 

Harold Wesley Melvin, A.B., M.A. Professor of English 

Office 256 Richards Hall Res. 44 Houston Ave., Milton 

Stanley Demetrius Miroyiannis, S.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology and Chairman of the Department 
Office 424 New Building Res. 8 Cumberland St., Boston 

*Carl Frederick Muckenhoupt, A.B., S.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics and Chairman of the Department 

Winthrop Eliot Nightingale, A.B., S.B., Ed.M. 

Professor of Co-ordination and Chairman of the Department 
Office 253 Richards Hall Res. 136 Dickerman Rd., Newton Highlands 

Edward Snow Parsons, S.B., Ed.M. 

Professor of Physical Education and Chairman of the Department 
Office 355 Richards Hall Res. 19 Hardy Ave., Watertown 

Roland Guyer Porter, B.E.E., M.S. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering and Chairman of the Department 
Office 12 South Building Res. 19 Woodbury St., Beverly 

*On Leave of Absence for War Service. 



1 



DAY COLLEGES 



11 



John Butler Pugsley, A.B. 

Office 15^ Richards Hall 
William Lincoln Smith, S.B. 

Office 11 South Building 
Joseph Spear, A.B., M.A. 

Office 325 Richards Hall 
Eliot Franklin Tozer, S.B. 

Office 451 Richards Hall 
Arthur Andrew Vernon, S 

Office 425 Richards Hall 

Joseph William Zeller, S.B., 
Professor 
Office 75 Richards Hall 



Professor of Geology 

Res. 23 Hardy Ave., Watertown 

, Eng.D. Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Res. 4 Academy Lane, Concord 
Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of the Department 

Res. 31 Matchett St., Brighton 

Professor of Draujing and Chairman of the Department 

Res. 22 Devon Ave., Beverly 

.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Chairman of the Department 
Res. 14 Standish St., Newton Highlands 

M.E. 

of Mechanical Engineering and Chairman of the Department 
Res. 282 Concord St., Framingham 



Associate Professors 



Charles Oscar Baird, Jr., S.B., M.S. 
Office 101 South Building 

Laurence Fuller Cleveland, S.B., M.S. 
Office 13 South Building 

George Raymond Fennell, S.B., M.B.A. 
Oj^ce 155 Richards Hall 

Frederick Robert Henderson, S.B., M.S. 

Office 100 South Building 
John A. Hogan 

Office 155 Richards Hall 
Carl David Johnson, A.B., M.A. 

Office 100 South Building 



Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

Res. 17 Manning Rd., Lynn 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Res. 24 Fairfield St., Newton villa 

Associate Professor of Business Management 

Res. 42 Fremont Ave., Everett 

Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering 

Res. 33 Mayo Rd., Wellesley 

Associate Professor of Industrial Relations 

Res. 103 Forest St., Medford 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Res. 24 Lunt St., Norfolk Downs 



Reginald Gage Lacount, S.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Physics and Acting Head of the Department 



Office 246 Richards Hall 
James Wallace Lees, M.A. 

Office 453 East Building 
William Fay Luder, A.B., Ph.D. 

Office 425 Richards Hall 
Waldemar Stanwood McGuire, S.B., M.A. 

Office 425 Richards Hall 
Everett Carter Marston, A.B., M.A. 

Office 355 Richards Hall Res. 

George Harris Meserve, Jr., S.B., Ed.M. 

Oj^ce 253R Richards Hall 
Antonio Libero Mezzacappa, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 



Res. 11 Cleveland Rd., Wellesley 

Associate Professor of English 

Res. 133 Bradford St., Needham 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Res. 27 Kirkland Circle, Wellesley 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Res. 33 Samoset Ave., Quincy 

Associate Professor of English 

40 Hereward Rd., Newton Centre 

Associate Professor of Drawing 
Res. 64 Magoun Ave., Medford 



Associate Professor of Modem Languages 

Res. 100 Wildwood St., Winchester 

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Res. 24 Walker St., Newtonville 

Associate Professor of Education 

Res. 99 KnoUwood Rd., Squantum 

Ph.D. Associate Professor of Sociology 

Res. 97 Francis St., Brookline 

., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of History and Government and Acting Chairman of the Department 

*Henry Edward Richards, S.B., M.S. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

*On Leave of Absence for War Service. 



Office 452 East Building 

John Christie Morgan, S.B., M.B.A. 
Oj^ce 1 New Building 

Rudolph Magnus Morris, S.B., Ed.M. 

Office 139 Richards Hall 
William John Pinard, A.B., M.A., Ed.M., 

O^ce 253 Richards Hall 

*NoRRis Whitheld Potter, Jr., A.B., M.A 



12 



NORTHEASTERN VNIVERSITY 



Frederick Arlington Stearns, S.B., M.S. 

Office 75 Richards Hall 
Gerald Russell Tatton, S.B., M.B.A. 

Associate Professor of 

Office 355 Richards Hall 
George Wesley Towle, S.B. 

Office 253 Richards Hall 

*Albert Edward Whittaker, S.B., Ed.M. 

Saverio Zuffanti, S.B., M.A. 
Office 425 Richards Hall 



Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Res. 66 Florence Ave., Melrose 

Physical Education and Head Coach of Track 
Res. 52 Oakland St., Medford 

Associate Professor of Co-ordination 
Res. 12 Forest St., Lexington 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Res. 29 Newbury Ave., Quincy 



Assistant Professors 



Ph.D 



*Wayland Solon Bailey, S.B., M.S. 
James Thomas Barrs, A.B., M.A., Ph.D 

Office 453 East Building 
William Thomas Cloney, Jr., A.B. 

Oj^ce 352 Richards Hall 
Wilfred James Combellack, A.B., M.A, 

Oj^ce 325 Richards Hall 
Otis French Cushman, S.B., M.S. 

Office 451 Richards Hall 
Elmer Henry Cutts, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Office 253 Richards Hall 
Blanche Brine Daly, A.B., M.Sc, M.A., Ph.D 

Oj^ce 424 New Building 
John James Devine, S.B., Sc.M. 

Office 451 Richards Hall 
Robert Alton Johnston, A.B., M.B.A. 

Office 155 Richards Hall 
George Everett Pihl, S.B., M.S. 

Office 14 South Building 
*Charles McKinley Ramsay, A.B., M.A 
Albert Edward Sanderson, Jr., S.B. 

Office 451 Richards Hall 
Ernest Lincoln Spencer, S.B., M.S. 

Oj^ce 101 South Building 
*Thomas Homkowycz Wallace, S.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
George Baker Welch, S.B., Ph.D. 



Office 246 Richards Hall 

Chester Henry Wolowicz, S.B. 

Office 75 Richards Hall 



M.S. 



Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Assistant Professor of English 

Res. 20 Newcomb Rd., Melrose 

Assistant Professor of English 

Res. 30 Lantern Lane, Milton 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Res. 108 Jersey St., Boston 

Assistant Professor of Drawing 
Res. 11 Gushing St., Amesbury 

Assistant Professor of History and Government 

Res. 387 Harvard St., Cambridge 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Res. 73 Frost St., Cambridge 

Assistant Professor of Drawing 

Res. 29 Jeanette Ave., Belmont 

Assistant Professor of Marketing 

Res. 457 High St., South Hanson 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Res. 40 Bournedale Rd., Jamaica Plain 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Drawing 

Cochituate Road, Wayland 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

Res. 58 South St., Medfield 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Res. 876 Watertown St., West Newton 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Res. 210 Beacon St., Boston 



Instructors 



HoLLis Semple Baird 

Oj^ce 225 Richards Hall 

Fletcher S. Boig, S.B., M.S., Ed.M. 
Office 425 Richards Hall 

Earl Kenneth Bowen, S.B., M.A. 
Office 325 Richards Hall 

Reginald Lawrence Capon, S.B., M.A. 
Oj^ce 453 East Building 

*On Leave of Absence for War Service. 



Instructor in Physics 

Res. Ill Wilson Ave., Wollaston 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Res. Ill Quincy Shore Drive, Quincy 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Res. 246 Union St., Norwood 

Instructor in English 

Res. 58 Channing Rd., Newton Centre 



DAY COLLEGES 



13 



Sa VERIO Cerullo, S.B., M.B.A. 
Office 155 Richards Hall 

Edward Marks Cook, A.B. 

Office 325 Richards Hall 
Louis Cooperstein, A.B., M.A. 

Office 452 East Building 
Warren Clifton Dean, A.B., M.A. 

0;^ce 325 Richards Hall 



Instructor in Accounting 
Res. 17 Shapley Ave., Medford 

Instructor in Mathematics 
Res. 66 Highland Ave., Arlington 

Instructor in Modem Languages 

Res. 31 Howland St., Roxbury 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Res. 213 Jackson St., Newton Centre 



*James William Dunn, A.B. 

Instructor in Physical Education and Head Coach of Football and Basketball 

*Martin White Essigmann, S.B. Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

Edmund Winthrop Fenn, A.B., M.A. Instructor in History and Government 

Office 363 East Building Res. 279 Clifton St., Maiden 

Herbert Wendell Gallagher, S.B. 

Instructor in Business Management, Coach of Hockey and Baseball 



Office 155 Richards Hall 
Warren Lincoln Ganong, S.B. 

Office 75 Richards Hall 
*Joseph Manuel Golemme, S.B., M.A. 
William Carl Hultgren 

Office, Gymnasium, East Building 
Lyman Albert Keith, S.B., M.A. 

Office 352 East Building 
Franklin Norvish, S.B., M.A. 

O^ce 453 East Building 
F. Elizabeth Oelschlegel, S.B. 

Office 256 Richards Hall 
Eugene George Pare, S.B., Ed.M. 

Office 451 Richards Hall 
Gustav Rook, S.B. 

0;^ce 451 Richards Hall 
*DuNCAN Wight Seavey, S.B., M.S. 



Res. 167 Hunnewell Ave., Newton 

Instructor in Industrial Engineering 

Res. 15 Kingsbury St., Needham 

Instructor in Accounting 

Instructor in Physical Education 
Res. 80 Woodside Rd., Winchester 

Instructor in Business Management 

Res. 300 Lakeside Drive, Bridgewater 

Instructor in English 

Res. 73 Upland Rd., Brockton 

Instructor in Physics 

Res. 505 Beacon St., Boston 

Instructor in Drawing 

Res. 12 Hunt St., Reading 

Instructor in Drawing 

Res. 67 Lonsdale St., Dorchester 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 



*Eben O. Smith, S.B. 



Instructor in Economics and Co-ordinator of Co-operative Work 



Stuart Brov/n Sommerville, A.B. 

Office 325 Richards Hall 
Harold Hamilton Wade, A.B. 

Oj^ce 453 East Building 

Edward Seccomb Wallace, A.B., M.A. 
O^ce 363 East Building 

William Wallace, S.B. 

Office 325 Richards Hall 

F. Allen Burt, A.B., Ed.M. 

Office 155 Richards Hall 
Thomas Cooper, Jr. 

O^ce 138 Richards Hall 



Instructor in Mathematics 

Res. 118-A Holden Green, Cambridge 

Instructor in English 

Res. 10 High St., Natick 

Instructor in History and Government 

Res. 86 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Instructor in Mathematics 

_ Res. 30 Oak St., Needham 

Lecturer in Advertising 

Res. 105 Stedman St., Brookline 

Lecturer in Conference Leadership 

Res. 22 Winthrop St., West Newton 



Assistant Instructors 



Egilda DeAmicis. S.B. 

O^ce 425 Richards Hall 
Mrs. Phyllis A. Brauner 

Office 425 Richards Hall 

Mrs. Dorothy Elliot Pratt, S.B. 
O^ce 425 Richards Hall 

•On Leave of Absence for War Service. 



Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 
Res. 505 Beacon St., Boston 
Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 
Res. 36 Yale Ave.. Wakefield 
Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 
Res. 3 Potter Park, Cambridge 



14 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Ruth Claire Roth, S.B. Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Office 425 Richards Hall Res. 52 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 

Laboratory Assistants 

ROCCHITELLA M. CaSALE 

O^ce 425 Richards Hall Res. 12 Cambria St., Somerville 

Dorothy Hartigan 

Office 246 Richards Hall Res. 15 Albright St., West Roxbury 

Joan Motley 

Office 14 South Building Res. 65 Main St., Concord 

SuMiKO Yatsuhashi, S.B. 

Office 425 Richards Hall Res. 66 Beals St., Brookline 



DAY COLLEGES 



15 



Ojfice and Secretarial S^ajf 

Mabel Ellen Bean 61 Quint Ave., Allston 

Secretary to the Assistant to the Vice-President — 136R 
Mary Rose Boltnder 57 Greenleaf St., Maiden 

Secretary to the Dean of the College of Business Administration and the Dean of the College 

ofLiberalArts—153R 
Phyllis Ann Cotton 15 Park Vale, Brookline 

Secretary, Admissions Office — 150R 
Harriet A. Crosby 44 Marathon St., Arlington 

Secretary, Development Office — 184R 
Barbara Felker 38 Rosemont St., Dorchester 

Secretary, Office of the Registrar — 254R 
Eleanor F. Gale 391 Beacon St., Boston 

Cashier arul Information Clerk, Central Offices of the University 
Mildred Curtis Garfield 87 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Financial Secretary to the Director of Day Colleges — J52R 
Edna Jane Garrabrant 19 Forest St., Cambridge 

Secretary to the Director of Co-operative Work — 253R 

Frieda May Graves 

Bookkeeper, Registrar's Office — 254R 

Elizabeth Harriett Howard 

Statistical Clerk, Central Offices of the University 

Elizabeth Ann Jackson 

Recorder, Registrar's Office — 25 4R 

Marjorie Dorritt King 

Secretary, O^ce of the Director of Alumni Relations 

LoRA Louise Leverone 

Clerk, Admissions Office — 156R 

Mary Boutelle Lowe 

Recorder, Office of the Registrar — 254R 

Rosamond Luscombe 

Secretary, Admissions Office — 150R 

Elizabeth Anne MacDonald 

Secretary to the Director of Admissions — 150R 

Amy F. Meserve 

Secretary to the Dean of Engineering — 152R 

Ruth Everett Newell 

Purchasing Clerk, Bursar's Office 

Dorothy L. Peppard 

Secretary to the Director of Student Activities — 355R 

Elin Victoria Peterson 

Secretary to the Vice-President — 1 38R 

Caroline Frances Pettingell 1654 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 

Assistant Bursar — 115R 

Margaret Mary Phillips 

Secretary, Direaor of Alumni Relations — 252R 

Marjorie Graffte Prol't 

Secretary to the President — 184R 

Madelyn Edythe Ralph 

Secretary to the Director of Day Colleges — 152R 

Edna Reed 

Clerk, Admissions Office — I56R 



370 Longwood Ave., Boston 

50 Tyler St., North Quincy 

231 Blue Hill Ave., Milton 

182 Newport St., Arlington 

83 Worcester St., Boston 

124a Sutherland Rd., Brookline 

32 Fenway, Boston 

183 Strathmore Rd., Brighton 

56 Wyman Ter., Arlington 

76 Sanderson Ave., Dedham 

7 Gray Circle, Arlington 

86 Callender St., Dorchester 



114 Huntington Ave., Boston 

1179 Boylston St., Boston 

42 Sylvan Circle, Lynnfield 

15 Barrows St., Allston 



16 XC.%7:-:£-A5TE3?N UNTVER^TY 

Eva LiLtiAN Rc55 145 Ti- 5:.. Aubumiale 

?7C5o:-- i - 416 S. Main Sc, Mar.i£eld 

Rl-Tt- - : r -^ ' 24 Curtis Ave., Vest Somer\-ille 

r ; 7 :i E. Tour t.l - -7 34 E. ^7011111% Ave., Melrose 

Cr" ;~ : ~ ::_- " ■ *^" 42 Pilgrim Ri., Belmont 

r 26 Hemenviray Sc, Boston 

I- -::_:.;- 112 Tonple St., West Roxbuiy 



DAY COLLEGES 17 



Convocation Lecturers 

WILUAXl G. AVXRETT 

Education Editor, New York Herald TrOntne 

"Education and the Kevs" 

JOSEPH W. BARKER 

Special Assasuua a Ae Secraary ofAetlamj 

"Today and Tomonov" 

PAUL E. BURBANK 
Deudapment Manager, United Air Limes 

"The Age of Flight" 

?:~z"~- ~miAM cc»nN 



T. ANTON DE HAAS 
Professor c' 7" ::— : : - : ' ~ " -r.jratupi. Harvard Utanerstj 
7 r I:-; for 1^5" 

c-E?- rz :-: irorLL 

!>.-_. -^ - r : : ' - -■ Rne Alts 



•■War a-; ; tics" "" 

JOSHUA LOTH LIEB\L-\N 

Rflfcbi, Temp'^ Is-^l 

"Faith in die rurjre" 

ALEXANDER LOLT>EX 
Nedierloruis Ambassador 
'Tue Kingdom of the Nether'.-rii at ^= 

STOKE^. : Z~~ 

•TTie Right T>r: - r. 7 ; : ~ i ' 

G. BROMLEY OXXAM 

fifsMi. Methodist Cfnodi 

"A Date with the World" 

OLANXING POLLOCK 

Pli^-uTight, AiAor 
"Is the Fault in Our Starrf" 

EDVARD A. WEEKS 

Editor, The Adanoc MonAly 

"Literature in the War" 

WnJJAM E. WICKENDEN 

Preadem, Case School of Applied Science 

"The Second Mile" 

YANG YUNG43nNG 

Presidaic, Soochov Uninnsit^ 

"China Today and Tomooow** 



18 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Chapel Preachers 

DR. CHARLES N. ARBUCKLE 
Minister, First Baptist Church, Newton 

REVEREND LEE D. BERGSMAN 
Associate Minister, Old South Church, Boston 

REVEREND DR. EDWIN P. BOOTH 
Head of Department of New Testament, Boston University 

REVEREND GEORGE A. BUTTERS 
Minister, Immanuel Methodist Church, Waltham 

RABBI BERYL D. COHON 
Rabbi, Temple Sinai, Boston 

REVEREND DR. FRANK E. DUDDY 
Minister, North Cambridge Congregational Church, Cambridge 

DR. CARL S. ELL 
President, Northeastern University, Boston 

DR. THEODORE P. FERRIS 
Rector, Trinity Church, Boston 

REVEREND HENRY P. FISHER, C.S.P. 

Rector, St. Ann's Church, Boston 

REVEREND HAMILTON M. GIFFORD 

Minister, Newtonville Methodist Church, Newtonville 

REVEREND DANA M. GREELEY 

Minister, Arlington Street Church, Boston 

REVEREND DR. LEWIS O. HARTMAN 

Bishop of the Methodist Church, Resident in the Boston Area 

DR. CHARLES W. HAVICE 
Dean of Chapel, Northeastern University, Boston 

REVEREND CARL H. KOPF 
Minister, Mt. Vernon Church, Boston 

REVEREND FREDERIC C. LAWRENCE 
Rector, St. PauVs Episcopal Church, Brookline 

REVEREND DR. ASHLEY D. LEAVITT 
Minister, Harvard Congregational Church, Brookline 

DR. ELMER A. LESLIE 

Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature, Boston University 

REVEREND WILLIAM R. LESLIE 

Minister, St. Mark's Methodist Church, Brookline 

REVEREND DR. JOSEPH L. McCORISON, JR. 

Former President of Yankton College 

Regional Director of National Conference of Christians and Jews 

REVEREND SAMUEL H. MILLER 

Minister, Old Cambridge Baptist Church, Cambridge 

REVEREND PRENTISS L. PEMBERTON 

Minister to Baptist Students in Greater Boston 

REVEREND DR. PALFREY PERKINS 

Minister, King's Chapel, Boston 

PROFESSOR WARREN T. POWELL 

Direaor of Student Counseling and Religious Activities, Boston University 

REVEREND EDMUND A. STEIMLE 

Minister, The University Lutheran Church, Cambridge 

REVEREND CHARLES L. TAYLOR, JR. 

Dean, Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge 

REVEREND EDWIN J. VanETTEN 

Dean, St. Paul's Cathedral, Boston 



DAY COLLEGES 19 



Northeastern University 

Qeneral 5t<^t^^enp~ 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY is incorporated as a philan- 
thropic institution under the General Laws of Massachusetts. 
The State Legislature, by special enactment, has given the Uni- 
versity general degree granting powers. 

The Corporation of Northeastern University consists of men who 
occupy responsible positions in business and the professions. This Cor- 
poration elects from its membership a Board of Trustees in whom the 
control of the institution is vested. The Board of Trustees has four stand- 
ing committees: (a) an Executive Committee which serves as an Ad 
Interim Committee between the regular meetings of the Board of Trustees 
and has general supervision of the financial and educational policies of 
the University; (b) a Committee on Buildings which has general super- 
vision over the building needs of the University; (c) a Committee on 
Funds and Investments which has the responsibility of administering 
the funds of the University; (d) a Committee on Development which is 
concerned with furthering the development plans of the University. 

Founded in 1898, Northeastern University, from the outset, has as its 
dominant purpose the discovery of human and social needs and the 
meeting of these needs in distinctive and highly serviceable ways. While 
subscribing to the most progressive educational thought and practice, the 
University has not duplicated the programs of other institutions but has 
sought "to bring education more directly into the service of human 
needs." 

With respect to program. Northeastern has limited itself: 

— To offering, in its several schools, basic curricula from which non- 
essentials have been eliminated; 

— To effective teaching; 

— To advising and guiding students; 

— To giving students the chance to build well-rounded personalities 
through a balanced program of extracurricular activities. 

The Northeastern Plan of Education is especially designed for the 
student who must earn while he learns. In the main, it consists of two 
definite types of education: 

— Co-operative Education by Day, 

— Adult Education by Night. 

The plan has been developed in such a way that experience in jobs 
with pay is utilized to help students of limited financial resources secure 
an education and at the same time gain the maximum educational bene- 
fit from their practical experience. So far as the New England States are 
concerned, Northeastern University is the only institution whose day 
colleges, other than the School of Law, are conducted under the Co- 
operative Plan. 



20 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

The several schools and programs of the University are conducted 
either under the name "Northeastern University" or by its affiliated 
schools — the Lincoln Schools and The Huntington Day School for 
Boys. The following is a brief outline of the principal types of educational 
opportunities offered. 

In the field of Co-operative Education there are three day colleges — 
the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Engineering, and the College 
of Business Administration. The College of Liberal Arts offers majors in 
the usual fields of the arts and the sciences leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. The College of Engineering, 
one of the largest engineering colleges in the United States, has curricula 
in Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical, and Industrial Engineering. 
The College of Business Administration has curricula in Accounting, 
Industrial Relations, Marketing and Advertising, Finance and Insurance, 
and Business Management. The College of Engineering and the College 
of Business Administration confer the degree of Bachelor of Science 
with specification indicating the field of specialization. The Co-opera- 
tive Plan, under which all of these day colleges operate, enables the stu- 
dent to alternate regular periods of classroom instruction with super- 
vised employment in an industrial or commercial position, thus com- 
bining theory and practice in an exceedingly effective manner. Apart 
from the educational advantages of the Co-operative Plan is the oppor- 
tunity for self-support while the student is pursuing his studies at North- 
eastern University. During the co-operative periods, students not only 
gain experience but are also paid for their services. Approximately three 
hundred business and industrial concerns co-operate with Northeastern 
University in making this program effective. 

The School of Law conducts both a day and an evening undergradu- 
ate program which prepares for admission to the bar and for the practice 
of the law and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

The Adult Education Program has been developed in the evening 
work of the School of Law as indicated above, in the School of Business, 
and in the evening courses of the College of Liberal Arts. The School of 
Business has curricula in Management, Accounting, and Engineering 
and Business. This School awards the Bachelor of Business Administra- 
tion degree with specification. The University also operates a division of 
the School of Business in Springfield. The College of Liberal Arts offers 
certain of its courses during evening hours constituting a program, three 
years in length, equivalent in hours to one-half the requirements for the 
A.B. or S.B. degree, and providing a general education and preparation 
for admission to the School of Law. The degree of Associate in Arts is 
conferred upon those who complete this program. 

The Adult Education Program has also been developed through the 
Lincoln Schools, which are affiliated with and conducted by North- 
eastern University. The classes in these schools are held at convenient 
evening hours. The Lincoln Technical Institute offers curricula upon a 
college level in various phases of engineering leading to the degree of 
Associate in Engineering; whereas the Lincoln Preparatory School, 
accredited by the New England College Admissions Board, prepares 



DAY COLLEGES 21 



students for admission to college and offers other standard high school 
programs. 

TheUniversity also operates a Bureau of Business and Industrial Serv- 
ice which provides training at the college level through intensive, prac- 
tical courses in highly specialized areas which are especially designed for 
business and industry. These courses are conducted either in the in- 
dustrial plant or at the University. 

The Huntington Day School for Boys, also affiliated with and con- 
ducted by Northeastern University, is the outgrowth of a demand in the 
city of Boston for an urban preparatory school with high educational 
standards which would furnish thorough preparation for admission to 
the leading colleges and universities. While easily accessible to the vari- 
ous sections of Boston and to the suburbs, it has the facilities of a country 
day school and offers a country day school program. This School is one 
of the leading preparatory schools of the country. 



22 hlORTHEASTEKN UNB^ERSITY 

buildings and facilities 

Boston — cA Qreat Educational Center 

The fact that Northeastern University is in Boston broadens the edu- 
cational and cultural opportunities of its students. Few other cities in the 
country are so rich in the finest elements of American life. Many of its 
historic buildings, such as the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, and the 
Old North Church, have become museums for the preservation of old 
documents, paintings, and other collections representative of early 
colonial life. The Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, 
both within a few blocks of the University Buildings, are widely noted 
for their treasures of literature and art. Even nearer to the University is 
Symphony Hall, home of the world-famous Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
And the many churches within Greater Boston not only afford the op- 
portunity of hearing distinguished preachers but through their student 
clubs and young people's societies make possible for students a fine type 
of social and intellectual life. 

University buildings 

Location 

Northeastern University, except for the Law School, is housed in four 
buildings located on Huntington Avenue, Boston, at the entrance to 
the Huntington Avenue Subway and opposite the historic Boston Opera 
House. The main administrative ofiices of the University are located in 
Richards Hall, a four-story brick structure added to the physical plant 
of Northeastern in 1938. 

The chief railroad centers of Boston are the North and South Stations. 
To reach the University from the North Station, board a car going to 
Park Street, at which junction transfer to any Huntington Avenue car. 
To reach the University from the South Station, board a Cambridge 
subway train for Park Street Under. There go up one flight of stairs and 
board any Huntington Avenue car. 

Beacon Hill Building 

The building housing the Law School at 47 Mt. Vernon Street is a 
three-story structure completely equipped with administrative ofiices, 
faculty offices, classrooms, library and student recreational rooms. 

East Building 

The East Building houses the University Library, the Business Ad- 
ministration Laboratory, and several department offices. Jacob P. Bates 
Hall is also in this building. The latter is used for University band and 
orchestra rehearsals, glee club rehearsals, and entertainments, as well as 
dramatic club work. 



DAY COLLEGES 23 



New Building 

The New Building is the second unit of the new Northeastern plant. 
It has a basement and four stories housing laboratories, classrooms and 
a recreation area, the University Commons. Chemical engineering labora- 
tories and classrooms take up the entire basement. The second floor 
contains a large lecture hall and classrooms. The Advertising Labora- 
tory and classrooms take up the entire third floor. The fourth floor is 
given over almost entirely to the biological laboratories and biology 
lecture room. 

Richards Hall 

Richards Hall was the first unit of the new Northeastern plant. Its 
100,000 square feet of floor area provide ample space for administrative 
offices, the Bookstore, reading rooms, lounges. Chapel, special veterans' 
service areas, and many other facilities. 

The major portion of the building is given over to laboratories and 
classroom areas. Laboratory space is provided for the following: Me- 
chanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, General and Advanced 
Physics, Inorganic, Organic, Analytical, and Physical Chemistry, to- 
gether with several special research laboratories. 

Outstanding among the classroom areas are a large chemistry lecture 
hall and two general lecture halls seating 300 and 200 students respec- 
tively. On the fourth floor are located three large, light and well-equipped 
drawing rooms, together with an art room for carrying on designing and 
drafting which form so important a part of technical work. The pent- 
house contains a radio laboratory, astronomy laboratory, and a blue- 
print room. 

South Building 

The South Building, located directly behind the East Building, houses 
the following laboratories: Advanced Industrial Electronics, Electrical 
Measurements, Dynamo, High Tension, Electronics and Communica- 
tions, Ultra High Frequency, Hydraulics and Sanitary Engineering, and 
Concrete and Highway. In addition, it provides space for department 
offices, classrooms, conference rooms and one large drafting room. 

Laboratories 

The laboratories of the University fall into three categories. The first 
group includes those for experimental work in the pure sciences of biol- 
ogy, chemistry, and physics. The second includes those for the study of 
engineering in its major branches (civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, 
and industrial). The third comprises the business and statistical labora- 
tory. 

In addition to these laboratory facilities which are described in the 
following pages, motion pictures and lantern slides are frequently used 
to supplement classroom instruction. For this purpose, there are avail- 
able motion picture projectors for both sound and silent film as well as 
several lantern slide projectors. 



24 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Biology 

The Department of Biology occupies the fourth floor of the New 
Building, which contains, in addition to the Zoological, Anatomical and 
Botanical Laboratories, its offices, research areas, and lecture hall. The 
laboratories are fully equipped for general and special work, with ex- 
tensive collections of museum preparations, models, and specimen col- 
lections displaying thousands of specimens illustrating the various fields 
of biological study. 

Chemistry 

The Chemical Laboratories located on the fourth floor of Richards 
Hall were given to the University by the Charles Hayden Foundation. 
They are splendidly equipped for work in general and inorganic chem- 
istry, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and organic and physical 
chemistry. In addition, several service rooms and space for a limited 
amount of research are provided. 

General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — ^This laboratory is fully 
equipped with water, gas, electricity, steam, and fume hoods. A hydro- 
gen-sulphide room, a balance room, and a conference room are also a 
part of this unit. 

Organic Chemistry — This laboratory provides about six feet of working 
space for each student. The facilities are similar to those in the general 
chemistry laboratory and, in addition, there is provided a large evaporat- 
ing unit and an organic combustion furnace. 

Quantitative Analysis and Physical Chemistry — The tables and fume hoods 
and other equipment in this room are similar to those in the Organic 
Laboratory. In addition, a large drying oven, special balances, electrical 
instruments, temperature measuring devices, and other specialized ap- 
paratus are provided. 

A small laboratory for technical analysis of such materials as coal, 
vegetable oils, petroleum, textiles, and rubber adjoins the main labora- 
tory, and a special laboratory is also available for electrolytic work. 

Research — Three small laboratories are equipped for advanced research. 
These are available for graduate thesis investigations. 

Physics 

The Physics Laboratories located on the second floor of Richards Hall 
are fully equipped for elementary and advanced study as well as research. 
In addition, an astronomy laboratory and an amateur radio transmitting 
station are located in the penthouse on Richards Hall. 

General — This laboratory, designed for elementary instruction, is pro- 
vided with gas, water, and electricity. A spectrometer room, a photo- 
graphic room, and a photometer room are directly connected with this 
laboratory. 



DAY COLLEGES 25 



A second smaller laboratory is equipped for more specialized experi- 
ments, and has facilities for glass blowing and high vacuum work. A 
flexible electrical system here permits use of all the supplies available to 
the Advanced Laboratory. 

Advanced — This laboratory is designed with a view to both precision and 
flexibility. A special switchboard provides single phase and polyphase 
alternating current and a variety of direct current potentials. A work- 
shop with lathe, drill press, grinder, and other tools as well as two sepa- 
rate research rooms complement the laboratory. 

Optics — This laboratory used for advanced work in both physical and 
geometrical optics is especially equipped for the former. Direct electrical 
connection to the special switchboard in the Advanced Laboratory is 
provided for use with the various light sources. 

Radio — This laboratory has a complete set of apparatus for conducting 
experiments in Radio and Electronic Circuits. Apparatus includes crys- 
tal oscillators, audio and radio frequency amplifiers, audio and radio 
frequency oscillators, cathode ray oscilloscopes, frequency modulation 
and industrial electronic equipment, complete radio transmitters and 
receivers. 

The amateur radio transmitting station is in a completely shielded 
room and operates on both radiotelephone and radiotelegraph. Facilities 
are also available for research. 

Astronomy — The astronomy laboratory is provided with equipment for 
grinding mirrors and constructing telescopes, and a platform on the roof 
provides a very good unobstructed view for making observations. 

Civil Engineering 

Most of the laboratory work in civil engineering is, of course, actual 
field work in surveying. A considerable amount of demonstration equip- 
ment including many models is available for use in the study of struc- 
tures, hydraulics, sanitary engineering, highways, concrete and soil 
mechanics. 

Surveying — The Department of Civil Engineering is provided with a 
variety of excellent and up-to-date equipment for field work. The in- 
struments have been chosen to make possible the working out of ad- 
vanced as well as elementary field problems, and to acquaint the students 
with the principal makes and types of instruments in general use. 

Hydraulics and Sanitary Engineering — This laboratory located on the first 
floor of the South Building is equipped with demonstration measuring 
devices for use in connection with the courses in hydraulics. 

Complete equipment is also provided for water and sewage analysis, 
and research students can be accommodated in this field. 



26 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Concrete and Highway Engineering — Located on the second floor of the 
South Building, this laboratory is equipped for conducting all the routine 
tests on cement and aggregate. The 300,000 lb. Riehle testing machine in 
the Mechanical Engineering Department is available for compression 
tests on concrete cylinders. 

Equipment is also available for conducting a major portion of the 
accepted tests on bituminous materials as used in highway work. Soil 
Mechanics equipment consists of a general soil sampler, consolidometer, 
wet-mechanical gram-size analysis and a quicksand demonstration tank. 

Aerial Photogrammetry — The apparatus in this laboratory may be used to 
instruct the students in the basic principles of photogrammetry, or may 
be used to instruct the students in the more technical phases of photo- 
grammetry such as horizontal control, vertical control, stereoscopic plot- 
ting, mechanical triangulation, and the tri-metrogon method of plotting. 

Mechanical Engineering 

The Mechanical Engineering Department has a well-equipped labora- 
tory containing a wide variety of modern machines and occupying over 
10,000 square feet of floor space in Richards Hall. A canal located in the 
laboratory, having a capacity of about 18,000 gallons of water, is used 
for hydraulic experiments. Special areas are available for oil testing, 
mechanics, research and similar purposes. Auxiliary equipment is used 
for making the usual tests and measurements. 

Steam Power — The apparatus operated by steam includes a wide variety 
of steam engines, turbines, pumps, condensers, heat exchangers, and 
measuring instruments. 

Hydraulic Equipment — Water pumps are available for testing and include 
piston pumps, centrifugal pumps, power and rotary pumps, as well as a 
pulsometer and steam injector. Different types of weirs with hook gages, 
and other flow measuring devices including pilot tube, venturi tube, 
orifice and water meters are used for flow of fluids experiments. 

Fans and Air Compressors — A steam driven air compressor and a centrif- 
ugal fan are arranged for testing purposes. 

Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning — Heating equipment includes 
a steam boiler, a hot air furnace and a unit steam heater. Air condition- 
ing apparatus is available for heating, cooling, humidifying and de- 
humidifying. There is in addition a constant temperature room which 
may be used for either heating or cooling purposes. 

Metallography and Heat Treatment — A metallograph capable of magnify- 
ing up to 2500 diameters is available for photographing crystalline struc- 
tures of metals and alloys. Sanding and polishing equipment, and metal- 
lurgical microscopes are used in the preparation and examination of the 
specimens. 



DAY COLLEGES 27 



For the study of heat treatment, several electric furnaces and a gas- 
fired furnace are available for use. 

Internal Combustion Equipment — Included under this heading are several 
gasoline and oil engines, automobile engines and Diesel engines. Some 
of these are set up for running experimental tests, but several are avail- 
able for dismantling and demonstration purposes. 

Testing Materials — Universal testing machines of 10,000, 50,000 and 
300,000 lb. capacities are used for most of the tests. In addition, there 
are three types of hardness testers, 10,000 in. lb. torsion, 220 ft. lb. im- 
pact, endurance and bend units as well as equipment for non-destruction 
tests, such as photoelasticity. Suitable strain gages and other instruments 
for conducting the undergraduate tests are available. 

Aeronautics — The laboratory is provided with a 3-foot hexagonal throat 
wind tunnel for model testing up to speeds of 150 miles per hour. A num- 
ber of types of airplane engines are available for inspection and disman- 
tling purposes. Demonstration apparatus for streamline flow is also in- 
cluded. 

Metal Processing — The laboratory for metal processing consists of lathes, 
planes, boring mill, drill presses, milling machine, and small tools. The 
laboratory also has numerous heat treatment furnaces, oxyacetylene 
welding and cutting tools, electric resistance welding and other equip- 
ment to adequately carry on the work in production processes. 

Miscellaneous Equipment — In addition to the apparatus previously men- 
tioned, the laboratory has available testers for calibrating gages, oil test- 
ing equipment, fuel calorimeters, steam calorimeters, and friction testers, 
as well as instruments for measuring speed, temperatures, pressures and 
flow of fluids. 

Electrical Engineering 

The ground floor and part of the first floor of the South Building is 
occupied by the electrical laboratories. These cover an area of approxi- 
mately 9000 square feet and include the dynamo, measurements, high 
tension, electronics and communications, ultra high frequency, and ad- 
vanced industrial electronics laboratories. 

Dynamo — This laboratory is provided with both 60 cycle 3 phase 230 
volt alternating current and 115-230 volt three-wire direct current power 
services. The equipment includes more than sixty motors and genera- 
tors, both AC and DC, of different types, together with the necessary 
auxiliary equipment to operate and test them. In addition, there are 
numerous transformers and other static equipment including a steel 
tank mercury arc rectifier unit. The motors and generators have been 
selected to reduce as much as possible the risk from high voltage and 
yet be typical of the range of commercial apparatus. 



28 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Electrical Measurements — The equipment here is of two distinct types: 
first, that planned primarily for teaching principles of measurement and, 
secondly, that which is used in teaching advanced standardizing methods 
as well as for calibrating instruments in other laboratories of the Uni- 
versity. Briefly, this laboratory is equipped for practically any work in 
electrical measurements except for the absolute determinations carried 
on in national standardizing laboratories. 

High Tension — This laboratory is equipped with the necessary trans- 
formers and auxiliary equipment to provide 4 Kva. at 50,000 volts po- 
tential. A special room has been equipped for cable and insulation test- 
ing, and impulse testing of insulation is made possible by a surge gen- 
erator capable of producing waves having crest values up to 300,000 
volts. A 4,000 ampere low voltage transformer is also available for the 
study of the effects of heavy currents in conductors, switches, and 
contacts. 

Electronics and Communications — This laboratory is equipped with appara- 
tus for about forty experiments in the field of electronics and radio- 
engineering. The apparatus includes several radio frequency signal gen- 
erators, vacuum tube voltmeters, cathode-ray oscilloscopes, audio oscil- 
lators and a primary frequency standard. 

Ultra High Frequency — The equipment in this laboratory consists of 
several ultra-high-frequency generators, cylindrical and rectangular wave 
guides, antenna arrays and reflectors, frequency measuring equipment, 
and power measuring devices. 

Advanced Industrial Electronics — In this laboratory equipment is available 
to demonstrate and test power apparatus controlled by electronic means. 
The following pieces of equipment are among those found in this labora- 
tory: Induction and Dielectric heating, Industrial X-Ray, Controlled 
Welding, Ignitron Inverter and Rectifier, Motor speed control. Genera- 
tor voltage control. Electrostatic air cleaning. Photoelectric control, and 
Automatic Synchronizing apparatus. Characteristics of individual power 
electron tubes are also investigated, including high vacuum rectifiers, 
ignitrons and thyratrons. 

Chemical Engineering 

The Department is now located on the ground floor of the New Build- 
ing. A total of 8,218 square feet has been allotted for its exclusive use. 

Unit Operations Laboratory — This laboratory is primarily devoted to the 
study of flow of fluids, filtration, heat transfer, distillation, evaporation, 
absorption, and drying; but houses in addition equipment for carrying 
out such unit processes as nitration, reduction, and sulphonation. 

Approximately 1,000 square feet of this laboratory consists of a double 
floor area serviced by a traveling crane for installing and repairing semi- 
plant scale equipment. 



DAY COLLEGES 29 



Crushing, Grinding and Separation Laboratory — A separate laboratory 
equipped with a ventilating fan houses equipment for crushing, pulver- 
izing, and separating solids. All equipment is operated by individual 
electric motors with speed control frequently taken advantage of to get 
experimental data. 

Machine Shop — A small, well-equipped shop is available for the con- 
struction and repair of equipment. 

Research Space — In addition to the Research Laboratory, the mezzanine 
floor of the Unit Operations Laboratory is available for investigating 
new processes. 

Industrial Chemical Laboratory — This laboratory is equipped with modern 
laboratory benches and is located next to the stock room. The determina- 
tion of the optimum conditions for carrying out unit processes on a 
small scale is accomplished in this laboratory. 

Industrial Engineering 

Students in the Department of Industrial Engineering share in the use 
of the Mechanical Engineering Laboratories and the Business Labora- 
tory. 

Industrial Engineering Laboratory — This laboratory which is located in 
Richards Hall is completely equipped with the latest facilities and tools 
used by methods engineers. Besides the general equipment consisting of 
benches, tables, lathe, jigs, fixtures, and racks, the laboratory has an 
ample supply of time study boards, stop watches and timers for time 
study work. There is also available complete motion picture equipment 
and microchronometers for micromotion work. 

Business and Statistical Laboratory 

The Business and Statistical Laboratory is equipped with the com- 
monly used office machines, as well as a number of business charts and 
maps. It is available for laboratory work in accounting and statistics and 
is in charge of a graduate assistant whose duty it is to maintain the 
machines in excellent order, and to give instruction in their uses. Prin- 
cipal pieces of equipment include typewriters, hand and electric calcula- 
tors, and hand and electric adding machines. 



design and IDraftmg "^oms 

The University possesses large, light, and well-equipped drawing 
rooms for the carrying on of the designing and drafting which form so 
important a part of engineering work. These rooms are supplied with 
lockers containing the drawing supplies, files containing blueprints, and 



30 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

photographs of machines and structures that represent the best practice. 
Drafting room blackboards are equipped with traveling straightedge 
devices which facilitate speed and accuracy in blackboard demon- 
strations. 



Libraries 

The general University library is located on the first floor of the East 
Building. The reading room seats about 300 students at one time, and 
the stack capacity approximates 25,000 volumes. Here are available all 
of the general reference books, most of the professional and scientific 
volumes, and most of the periodicals to which the University subscribes. 

Library hours are as follows: 

8:45 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. Mondays through Fridays 
8:45 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. Saturdays 
Closed on Sundays and Holidays 

The library is under the direction of a librarian and several competent 
assistants all of whom have had special training for the work. 

A general reading room and library is maintained by the Northeastern 
Student Union in Room 356, Richards Hall. The books located here are 
chiefly nontechnical works dealing with contemporary affairs, religious 
problems, international relations, travel, etc., among which students 
may browse during periods of relaxation. A few of the literary and re- 
ligious periodicals are also available in this room. 

* 

Boston Public Library 

All members of the University, whether resident or nonresident 
students, have the privilege of taking books from the Boston Public 
Library and of using the library for general reference and study. Inas- 
much as this is one of the best in the country, it presents unusual op- 
portunities to the students. Within a few minutes' walk from the Uni- 
versity, it enables students to have unlimited reference at any time to 
books and periodicals bearing upon their studies. 



Lecture cAssemhly ^alls 

Through special arrangement, Jordan Hall, Symphony Hall, and the 
Boston Opera House are made available for assembly purposes. These 
halls provide ample space for student activity assemblies and for special 
lectures by noted men, which are given sometimes under the direction 
of the student body and other times under the direction of the faculty. 
The special lectures are devoted to those elements of life which count 
most in the development of a man's viewpoint and his character. 



DAY COLLEGES 31 



Squipment for Thysical Training 

Northeastern has exceptional facilities for all-round physical training. 
The gymnasium is one of the most complete in New England. Adjoining 
Richards Hall is a large field equipped for athletics. Here are two tennis 
courts, a rifle range, a baseball cage, an outdoor gymnasium with a soft- 
ball diamond, and other athletic facilities. 

Natatorium and Gymnasium 

The Natatorium is located in the East Building between the assembly 
hall and gymnasium. It is 75 feet long and 25 feet wide and is generally 
regarded as one of the finest of its kind in this area. 

The Gymnasium is known as the Samuel Johnson Memorial Gym- 
nasium and provides the following facilities: three gymnasiums, a twelve- 
lap running track, boxing and wrestling rooms, handball and squash 
courts, bowling alleys, showers, steam baths, massage rooms, electric 
cabinet baths, and locker rooms. 

Huntington Field 

Huntington Field, the University athletic field, is located on Kent 
Street in Brookline and provides ample facilities for track, baseball, foot- 
ball and other outdoor sports. The University maintains bus service 
between its Huntington Avenue plant and the Huntington Field, making 
it possible for students to get back and forth with a minimum loss of 
time. The field is equipped with a commodious field house as well as ten 
sections of stadium seats for spectators. 



32 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Student cActivities 



Northeastern University regards student activities as an integral part 
of its educational program. One of the main departments of the Uni- 
versity, it is charged with the responsibility of co-ordinating the various 
types of activities and of administering the social, musical, literary, and 
athletic organizations in such a way as to enable each to contribute in a 
wholesome, worthwhile manner to student life at Northeastern. Every 
student is encouraged to participate in such activities as may appeal to 
him, although a standard of scholarship which is incompatible with 
excessive devotion to such pursuits is required of all students. 

Members of the faculty also are interested in the informal aspects of 
the college program. Teaching loads are kept sufficiently low so that the 
instructional staff may have ample opportunity to mingle with students 
outside of the classroom in social activities and on the athletic field. In 
fact, some member of the faculty is appointed to serve as adviser for each 
student activity. His function is not to dictate how the organization shall 
be run, but to encourage the students in their extracurricular endeavors 
and to give them the benefit of his mature point of view in solving the 
problems that inevitably arise. 

One of the outstanding contributions of the Co-operative Plan in the 
field of higher education has been its capacity to develop in students 
those powers of social understanding that are so essential to success in 
professional life. At Northeastern the program of student activities is 
made to contribute to this end in a very real way. It is a conscious aim of 
the student activities advisers to develop among their advisees those 
qualities of personality and character which will enhance their useful- 
ness as future professional men and citizens. Students have splendid 
opportunities to develop administrative and executive ability as leaders 
of undergraduate organizations. No academic credit is awarded for any 
student activity. This has been no deterrent, however, to student par- 
ticipation in extracurricular activities, for a recent survey of the under- 
graduate body showed that over ninety per cent of the enrollment were 
engaged in one or more forms of student activity. 

Athletic Association 

All students in the Day Colleges are members of the Northeastern 
University Athletic Association. Policies of the association are passed 
upon by a Faculty Committee on Student Activities. This committee 
decides what students are eligible to participate in athletics, what the 
various sports schedules shall be, and what students may be excused 
from classes to represent the University on athletic trips. 

The actual administration of the athletic program is in the hands of a 
second committee, known as the General Athletic Committee, which 
consists of the Director of Student Activities, the captains and managers 
of all varsity teams, and the coaches as ex officio members. 

The University maintains both varsity and freshman teams in base- 
ball, basketball, cross-country, football, hockey, and track. Intercol- 



DAY COLLEGES 33 



legiate games and meets are arranged with the leading colleges in the 
East. In addition to intercollegiate athletics the athletic association con- 
ducts an intramural program in various sports. 

Honor Societies 
Three honorary societies are chartered by the University in its Day 
Colleges: 

Tau Beta Pi, in the College of Engineering (for men only). 
The Sigma Society, in the College of Business Administration. 
The Academy, in the College of Liberal Arts. 

Election to the college honorary societies is founded primarily upon 
scholarship, but before a man or woman is privileged to wear the honor- 
ary society insignia there must be evidence of an integrity of character 
and an interest in the extracurricular life of the University as well as an 
acceptable personality. The Societies have memberships consisting of 
the outstanding men and women in the Day Colleges. Election to the 
honorary society is the highest honor that can be conferred upon an 
undergraduate. 

Publications 

"TKe News^^ — A college newspaper, the Northeastern News, is published 
each week throughout the college year by a staff selected from the student 
body. The copy is prepared, edited, and published by the students them- 
selves with the counsel of a faculty adviser. Opportunity is afforded for 
the students to express their opinions on subjects relating to study, co- 
operative work, social events, or topics of the day. Positions on the 
News staff and promotions are attained by competitive work. The paper 
is in part supported by advertising, both national and local, and in part 
by a portion of the student activities fee. The Northeastern News is a 
member of the Eastern Intercollegiate Newspaper Association, and sends 
one of its editors to the annual convention of this association each year. 
Copies of the News are mailed to upperclassmen when they are at co- 
operative work and to freshmen after the close of their college year. 

"TKe Cauldron" — The combined senior class publishes annually a col- 
lege year book, The Cauldron. It is ready for distribution in the latter 
part of the second semester and contains a complete review of the col- 
lege year with class histories, pictures of all seniors, of the faculty, and of 
undergraduate groups, as well as a miscellany of snapshots and drawings 
contributed by students. 

Student Council 
Student government of the Day Colleges at Northeastern University 
is vested in the Student Council, composed of elected representatives 
from the various classes. The Council is the authority on all matters 
relating to student policies not definitely connected with classroom pro- 
cedure. It has jurisdiction, subject to faculty approval, over all such 



34 -NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

matters as customs, privileges, and campus regulations. The Dean of 
Students serves as faculty adviser to the Student Council. 

Student Union 

The purpose of the Northeastern Student Union is to carry out the 
work of a Christian association within the University. It endeavors to 
deepen the spiritual lives of Northeastern men and women through the 
building of Christian character, to create and promote a strong and 
effective Northeastern University spirit in and through a unified student 
body, to promote sociability, and to emphasize certain ethical, social, 
civic, intellectual and avocational values. 

All students are encouraged to participate in the activities of the 
Union, no matter what their religious faith, as the work of the Union is 
entirely nonsectarian. A good moral character is the only requirement 
for eligibility to membership. It is hoped that as many students as can 
will participate in this ideal extracurricular work. 

The Union conducts a weekly Chapel Service in the little chapel in 
Richards Hall, to which all faculty members and students are invited. 
The service, which is nonsectarian and voluntary, is held on Thursday 
mornings from 8:40 to 8:55 o'clock. Many eminent preachers of Greater 
Boston are engaged to deliver brief addresses. 

Professional Societies and Clubs 
To assist in the promotion of social, cultural, and intellectual ad- 
vancement through informal channels, a number of professional so- 
cieties and clubs are sponsored. 

Camera Club — The Camera Club welcomes all men and women inter- 
ested in photography. Weekly discussions and special evening lectures 
by guest artists are part of the yearly program. Field trips, monthly photo 
contests and a general exhibition add to the interest and progressive 
work of this organization. 

Chess Club — ^The Chess Club gives both beginners and experts an op- 
portunity to enjoy the game. Yearly tournaments are held among the 
members and, in past years, the best among the members have engaged 
in intercollegiate competition. 

Debating Society— The purpose of the Debating Society, formed in 1936, 
is "to foster and promote an interest and facility in formal argumenta- 
tion; to develop an impartial, unbiased, and intellectual consideration 
of questions and issues of current interest; and to sponsor intercollegiate 
relationships and competition in the debating field." Membership is 
open to all students of the Day Colleges. 

Dramatic Club — The Dramatic Club affords an opportunity for those 
students interested in dramatics to participate in the production of 
several pieces in the course of the college year. Qualification for the cast 



DAY COLLEGES 35 



and for positions on the business staff is through competition under the 
direction of the faculty adviser. 

Engineering Societies, hlational — Students in the several professional cur- 
ricula of the College of Engineering operate Northeastern University 
Sections of the appropriate national professional societies. Chief among 
these are the following: 

American Society of Civil Engineers 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers 
Society for the Advancement of Management 
American Chemical Society 

Members of the engineering faculty who hold membership in the 
parent organizations serve as advisers to these student groups. Meetings 
are held regularly, usually at night so that students from both divisions 
may attend, and practicing engineers are invited to address the sections. 
Occasionally appropriate motion pictures are shown, or the group visits 
some current engineering project in the vicinity of Boston. The College 
of Engineering encourages these student sections of the technical societies 
in the belief that they provide a wholesome medium for social inter- 
course as well as a worthwhile introduction to professional life. 

Membership in the student sections of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers and Boston Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, or the American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers also includes membership and privileges of the Engineering So- 
cieties of New England. This organization is an affiliation of all the major 
technical societies of Boston and vicinity and provides valuable lectures, 
smokers, and informal meetings with the outstanding men engaged in 
engineering work in Boston and vicinity. 

Finance and Insurance Club — The purpose of the Finance and Insurance 
Club is to increase among its members the knowledge of the theory and 
practice of finance and insurance. Any student of Northeastern Univer- 
sity while enrolled in any of the finance and insurance courses of the 
College of Business Administration is eligible to active membership in 
this club. Meetings are held each ten-week period at \yhich executives 
from Greater Boston are invited to discuss current issues in the field. 

Industrial Relations Club — Membership in the Industrial Relations Club 
is open to all students of Northeastern University who may be enrolled 
in any of the industrial relations courses of the College of Business 
Administration. The purpose of this club is to increase among its mem- 
bership the knowledge of the theory and practice of industrial relations. 
Prominent executives from the Greater Boston area discuss current 
issues in this field at the meetings which are held in each ten-week period. 



36 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

International Relations Club — The International Relations Club was 
founded in 1932 for the purpose of studying and discussing those current 
national and international events and issues which vitally concern our 
American life and institutions. 

It is the intention of the club to deal with all questions in an impartial 
and broadminded manner, and to take an intelligent and effective part 
in promoting international understanding and harmony. The club 
maintains contacts with similar organizations in other colleges. 

Membership is not open to freshmen, and only to those upperclass- 
men who maintain good scholarship. 

Law and Accounting Club — All students interested in accounting and 
law are invited to join this stimulating club. Problems and cases involv- 
ing the interrelations of accounting and law are presented and discussed 
at club meetings. Although upperclassmen usually present problems 
arising out of thesis or co-operative work, speakers from the professional 
world come to the meetings to present papers and lead the student dis- 
cussion. 

Marketing and Advertising Club — The purpose of the Marketing and Ad- 
vertising Club is to increase among its members the knowledge of the 
theory and practice of marketing and advertising. Any student of North- 
eastern University while enrolled in any of the marketing and advertis- 
ing courses of the College of Business Administration is eligible to 
active membership in this club. Meetings are held each ten-week period 
at which executives from Greater Boston are invited to discuss current 
issues in the field. 

Mathematics Society — The Mathematics Society encourages the study of 
topics of mathematical interest which are either outside or beyond the 
scope of the regular mathematics courses. Membership is restricted to 
those men and women who have completed one- and one-half years of 
study in mathematics and have an average grade of not less than "C" 
in mathematics courses up through differential calculus. The club meets 
once every five weeks in the evening. Although membership is limited 
to upperclassmen, any student is always welcome to any meeting, and 
freshmen especially interested in mathematics are always welcome. 

The final program of the year is devoted to a dinner meeting for which 
some prominent outside speaker is procured. 

Musical Clubs — The Department of Student Activities sponsors musical 
clubs, such as the following: a concert orchestra, a band, a glee club, a 
banjo club, and a dance orchestra, for which all students with musical 
ability are eligible. Membership in the various musical clubs is attained 
by competitive effort. 

Each organization has a faculty adviser and each elects a representa- 
tive to the Musical Clubs Council. The purpose of this council is to co- 
ordinate the various musical activities of the Day Colleges. At the an- 
nual Musical Clubs Banquet, held early in the spring, charms are awarded 



DAY COLLEGES 37 



to the leaders and managers of the several clubs and to members who 
have played over a period of three full years. 

Omega Sigma Society — This club was organized in 1943 for all women 
students enrolled in the Day Colleges, to derive social, moral and in- 
tellectual benefits for both themselves and the University. 

Radio Club — One of the most popular undergraduate activities is the 
Radio Club. Members are provided opportunity for code practice and 
are encouraged to obtain their amateur licenses. The club owns and 
operates station WIKBN, a short wave transmitter, located in the Radio 
Laboratory in the penthouse of Richards Hall. Meetings are held about 
once a month for the discussion of technical matters. Practicing radio 
engineers are frequently invited to address the club at evening meetings, 
when students in both divisions may attend. 

Rifle Club — Organized a number of years ago, the Rifle Club was so 
successful that in 1933 riflery was recognized as a minor sport. Members 
of the club are given instruction in the art of rifle shooting. Those stu- 
dents who excel in intramural competition are selected for the team 
representing the University in intercollegiate contests. Practice sessions 
are held twice a week in the University rifle range. Membership is open 
to all students. Northeastern is a member of the New England Inter- 
collegiate Rifle League and the National Rifle Association. 

Science Club — Membership in the Science Club is open to students 
who maintain satisfactory scholastic standing. The club has access to 
machine shops for the construction of telescopes and other instruments. 
It also has quarters in the penthouse on the fifth floor of Richards Hall. 

Yacht Club — Only recently formed, the Yacht Club is a member of the 
Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Association. The club participates in re- 
gattas held in the Charles River Basin and also in regattas held at other 
colleges. 

Class Organizdtion and Activity 

Each of the classes in the Day Colleges elects its officers and carries on 
activities as a class. Dances are sponsored by the classes at regular periods 
throughout the year. One of the high lights of the social program is the 
Junior Promenade, held each spring at one of the Boston hotels. 

Seniors plan a number of activities just prior to Commencement. 

Convocations 

The hour from 12:00 to 1:00 on Wednesdays throughout the year is 
set aside for convocations. Attendance is complusory. Arrangements are 
made to bring before the student body some of the ablest and foremost 
thinkers of the day. A list of speakers for the year wUl be found on page 
17 of this catalog. When the convocation hour is not occupied by a 
University lecturer, class meetings, concerts, or athletic rallies are held 



38 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

instead. Such gatherings are under the direction of the Department of 
Student Activities. 

Fraternities 

There are at present nine local Greek letter fraternities chartered by 
Northeastern University. Each fraternity is provided with a faculty ad- 
viser who is responsible for the proper administration of the fraternity 
house under the rules and regulations established by the faculty. The 
list of fraternities in the order of their establishment is as follows: 

1. Beta Gamma Epsilon 5. Phi Beta Alpha 

2. Alpha Kappa Sigma 6. Phi Gamma Pi 

3. Nu Epsilon Zeta 7. Sigma Phi Alpha 

4. Sigma Kappa Psi 8. Kappa Zeta Phi 

9. Gamma Phi Kappa 

Elected representatives from each fraternity make up an Inter-Prater- 
nity Council, a body which has preliminary jurisdiction over fraternity j 
regulations. Its rulings are subject to the approval of the Faculty Com- ' 
mittee on Student Activities. 



i 



DAY COLLEGES 39 



^he Co-operative Tlan 

What It Is 

The Co-operative Plan of Education is founded on the educational 
philosophy that supervised employment in the occupational field for 
which a student is training enhances comprehensive learning and voca- 
tional adaptation. It utilizes, in addition to the usual classroom and 
laboratory exercises, the practical values of the work-a-day-world en- 
vironment, thereby enabling the student not only to become acquainted 
with certain job skills and operations concurrently with his academic 
training but also to develop his confidence and capacity to arrive at in- 
telligent conclusions based upon a knowledge of practice as well as of 
theory. 

How It Works 

The Co-operative Plan works in the following manner. Upperclass- 
men, including both men and women, are divided into two nearly equal 
groups, one of which is called Division A and the other Division B. Each 
student is assigned a job with some business or industrial concern. The 
Division A students start the college year with a term of classroom work, 
while the Division B students start the year with a term at co-operative 
work. At the end of that term, the Division A students go out to work 
with a co-operating firm, while their places in the classrooms are then 
taken by their alternates, the corresponding Division B students. When 
the next term has passed the Division A students return to college and 
the Division B students return to the co-operative job. The alternation 
of work and classroom study continues throughout the year so that an 
upperclassman has usually two terms of ten weeks and one of five weeks 
at college, two terms — one of ten weeks and one of fifteen weeks — at 
co-operative work, and a brief vacation. 

Faculty Co-ordinators 

Each student is assigned to a co-ordinator who is responsible for all 
phases of the co-operative work program for his group of students. He 
interviews them during the freshman year and discusses with them vari- 
ous vocational objectives and answers such questions as the students 
may have in regard to the many activities of business and industry. He 
studies them in the light of their physical condition, scholastic attain- 
ment, interests, aptitudes, and other factors bearing upon their qualifica- 
tions for vocational assignment. These interviews culminate in an agree- 
ment between the students and their co-ordinators regarding the field of 
co-operative work in which the students are placed. During each of the 
terms at college immediately succeeding a term at co-operative work, the 
co-ordinator confers with the student concerning the job experiences 
acquired and other matters relating to vocational adjustment or personal 
problems while on the job. The reports of the employer on the achieve- 
ments and performance of the student are discussed and interpreted in 



40 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

the interest of further co-ordination and more effective learning. In this 
way the progress of all students is observed and co-ordinated with their 
college work to the end that maximum values are obtained from their 
training at Northeastern. 

Placement 

The co-ordinator visits co-operating firms and arranges with them for 
the employment of students under his charge. The range of opportuni- 
ties available to Northeastern students is wide, including practically all 
phases of industrial life. In general, the first year of co-operative work 
can be expected to be of a routine nature through which students may 
prove their fitness for more responsible work. A job assignment directly 
related to the student's field of study and vocational training is the prime 
objective of the co-ordinator. The jobs upon which Northeastern 
students are employed are in no sense protected opportunities. They are 
regular jobs under actual business conditions and are held in competition 
with other sources of supply. The only special privilege accorded North- 
eastern students is that of attending college on the Co-operative Plan 
and the opportunity to merit by superior performance progressive ad- 
vancement on the job. 

Supervision and Guidance 

While the University does not adopt a paternal attitude toward co- 
operative work, it nevertheless assumes certain responsibilities toward 
students and co-operating firms. Co-ordinators visit each job in order 
that the employer may report upon the student's achievement and that 
necessary adjustments may be made. Co-ordinators supervise the assign- 
ment of students to various jobs and in conjunction with employers 
arrange for promotions and progressive training schedules. Problems 
that arise on co-operative work are adjusted by common agreement of 
co-ordinator, student, and employer. In the event of special difficulties 
or dissatisfaction, the case may be adjusted by the Committee on Co- 
operative Work, which comprises several members of the faculty. 

Through a series of co-operative work reports prepared during their 
working periods, students are led to analyze their jobs and to develop a 
thoughtful and investigative attitude toward their working environ- 
ment. A most important phase of co-operative work is the opportunity 
afforded for guidance by the frank discussion of actual problems en- 
countered on the job. The intimate contact between co-ordinator and 
student is of great worth in helping the student to get the most value from 
the co-operative work assignment. While the University endeavors to 
provide every possible opportunity for its students, it expects them at 
the same time to take the initiative and to assume the responsibility in- 
volved in their individual development. To every student are available 
the counsel and guidance of the faculty, and every resource at its dis- 
posal. But the faculty does not coerce students who are uninterested or 
unwilling to think for themselves. 

The Co-operative Plan is thus designed specifically to provide actual 
working opportunities which afford the students practical experience, 



DAY COLLEGES 41 



give meaning to their program of study, and train them in reliability, 
efficiency, and teamwork. 

Correlation of Theory and Practice 

Co-operating companies employ the students, both men and women, 
in the various departments of their establishments. The training is 
thorough. To derive the greatest value from co-operative work the stu- 
dent is advised to continue in the employ of the co-operating firm for at 
least one year after graduation, since certain types of work which would 
afford valuable experience cannot be made available during the alter- 
nating period of work and study. Statistics compiled over a period of 
many years show that an average of from thirty-five to fifty per cent of 
each graduating class remains with co-operating employers after gradu- 
ation. 

Co-Operative Work Reports 

The values to be derived from practical experience are further en- 
hanced by required report writing. These co-operative work reports are 
written during the working periods by all co-operative students. A com- 
plete job analysis is required as the first report written on any new co- 
operative work assignment. Subjects of other reports are selected by the 
student after conference with the Co-ordinator of Co-operative Work, 
by whom they must be approved. The reports are designed to encourage 
observation and investigation on the part of the students and to help 
them to appreciate more fully the extent and value of their experience. 
These reports are carefully read by the co-ordinator and are discussed 
with the student during the following college period. Exceptionally valu- 
able results are obtained from these reports. The value derived must 
necessarily be directly proportional to the conscientious and intelligent 
concentration of effort by the student upon this phase of the work. 

Co-operative Work Records 

Complete and detailed records are kept of the co-operative work of 
each student. They are based upon reports made by the employer at the 
end of each working period; upon occasional personal conferences be- 
tween the employer and the co-ordinator; and upon various evidences of 
the student's attitude toward all the phases of his co-operative work. It 
is not possible for the student to secure a degree unless this part of the 
curriculum is completed satisfactorily. These records of practical ex- 
perience serve as a valuable reference for future Alumni Placement. 

Positions Available 
Because of uncertainties of business conditions, as well as other rea- 
sons beyond its control, the University cannot and does not guarantee 
to place students. However, past experience has demonstrated that stu- 
dents who are willing and capable of adapting themselves to existing 
conditions are almost never without employment except in periods of 
severe industrial depression. 



42 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Earnings 

It should be understood that the primary purpose of the Co-operative 
Plan is training. The rates of pay for students tend to be lower than might 
reasonably be expected on full-time productive types of jobs such as 
would ordinarily be available to youth of corresponding age and train- 
ing, because students are given the privilege of attending college on the 
Co-operative Plan and because the purpose is to provide the student 
with the opportunity of advancing on the job concurrently with his 
academic progress. Frequently this involves transfer, at reasonable in- 
tervals, from one department to another of the co-operating company. 

Location of Work 

It is the policy of the University to assign students to co-operative 
work within commuting distance of their homes. This is not always 
possible, however, and at times it may be necessary for students to live 
away from home in order to obtain satisfactory and desirable co-opera- 
tive work assignments. 

Types of Co-operative Work 

In so far as possible students are placed at co-operative work in that 
general field for which they express preference, provided that aptitude, 
physical ability, temperament, and other personal qualities appear to 
fit them for this field. Usually students are placed first in those jobs of an 
organization where they may learn the fundamental requirements of the 
business. 

For example, the first year of training in a manufacturing establish- 
ment might be as an operator of machines in two or more production 
departments of the plant. This provides the opportunity to acquire inti- 
mate knowledge of the equipment, methods, and operations of some of 
the processing departments of raw materials and products in process of 
manufacture. The second year might be as an expeditor or on assign- 
ments with the maintenance and installation department. Such work 
would require contact with all of the several production and operating 
departments of the plant and would provide the opportunity for a com- 
prehensive and correlated study of all operations, plant layout, routing 
of rav/, semi-processed, and finished materials — in other words, a per- 
spective view of the interrelationship of departments. By this time, the 
student will have progressed to the academic stage where "application" 
courses will be included in the program and the next year of co-operative 
work might be devoted to testing, inspecting, methods analysis or the 
like. The last year would be devoted to initial training in that depart- 
ment for which the student was aiming to ultimately qualify. Thus, in 
the course of a period of four years of co-operative training, the student 
would have the opportunity to acquire a substantial background in at 
least some of the functions of the factory administration. This progres- 
sive type of training is ordinarily obtained in the employ of one com- 
pany. A change of company each year usually provides more a change 
of environment than a progression of experiences. 



DAY COLLEGES 43 



Engineering firms, manufacturing companies, public utilities, banks, 
insurance companies, railroads and many other types of enterprises em- 
ploy Northeastern co-operative students. Definite training schedules 
have been established with several of the co-operating companies. The 
ultimate objective of such schedules is absorption of the graduates into 
the permanent employ of the company, although such absorption is 
based on merit rather than guarantee. 

Types of Co-operative Training Schedules 

These schedules are arranged with the basic idea of giving the student 
a comprehensive training through the several different departments, but 
must of necessity be varied in accordance with the needs of those de- 
partments. 

BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 

The schedule of the Boston Edison Company is divided into the following general 
classifications. Very few co-operative students obtain experience in all branches, but 
students progress from year to year in the respective branches as conditions permit. 

Standardizing 

(a) Testing and standardizing of electrical instruments 
(fc») Miscellaneous standardization 

(c) Repairs on electrical instruments 

(d) Laboratory high voltage tests 

Steam Praaice 

(a) Turbine, engine and boiler tests 
{b) Instrument tests and repairs 
(c) Miscellaneous tests 

Electrical Testing 

(a) Testing and repairing of electrical instruments in power stations and sub- 

stations 

(b) Cable tests 

(c) High voltage tests on apparatus and in the field 

(d) Checking up construction work 

(e) Miscellaneous electrical tests 

Chemical Engineering 

(a) Fuel analysis 

(b) Miscellaneous tests and analysis of oils, water, paints, and other materials 

Photography 

Office Work 

HUNT-SPILLER MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 
One Year General laboratory and plant work, including preparation of samples 
Pyrometry 

Use and care of metallurgical apparatus 
One Year Complete analysis of coal, coke, limestone, sand, iron, soil, etc. 
One Year Keeping of general metallurgical records, filing, and making of reports 
One Year Analysis for combined, graphitic, and total carbon with a complete knowl- 
edge of a carbon combustion apparatus 

PEPPERELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
One Year Stock Records 
One Year Production Analysis 
One Year Inventory Control 



44 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Qeneral ^formation 

Qollege Sxpenses 

Tuition and Fees 

Freshmen — The total charge for tuition and fees for the freshman year 
on either the four- or the five-year program is $350. This includes the 
Student Activities fee of $15. 

Vpperclassmen — The total charge for tuition and fees annually for 
upperclassmen on the co-operative plan is $315. This includes the Stu- 
dent Activities fee of $15. 

Upperclassmen on the four-year plan pay tuition annually in accord- 
ance with the schedule shown below. 

Schedule of Tuition and Fee Payments, 1946-1947 
For Freshmen (Both Four- and Five- Year Plans) 

DIVISION A DIVISION B 

Tuition Tuition 

and Fees and Fees 

September 5,1946 $150. November 14, 1946 $150. 

November 18, 1946 100. January 27,1947 100. 

January 27,1947 100. April 7.1947 100. 

For Upperclassmen (Co-operative Plan) 

DIVISION A DIVISION B 

Tuition Tuition 

and Fees and Fees 

September 9,1946 $135. November 18, 1946 $135. 

January 27,1947 120. April 7,1947 120. 

August 4,1947 60. June 16,1947 60. 

For Upperclassmen (Four- Year Full-Time Plan) 

*Tuition 

and Fees 

September 9,1946 $135. 

November 18, 1946 120. 

January 27,1947 120. 

*These payments cover three terms of instruction. Students who elect to continue for 
a fourth term pay an additional $100. on April 7, 1947. 

Student Activities Fee 

All students are charged a Student Activities fee of fifteen dollars 
($15) a college year. 

This fee supports in part certain student activities and includes mem- 
bership in the Northeastern Athletic Association and subscription to 
the 'Northeastern News, the college paper. 

The services of a physician for emergency attention and general 
medical advice are also available for all students under this fee. Minor 



DAY COLLEGES 45 



ailments are treated by the college health officers without additional 
charge. Any student who shows signs of more serious illness is imme- 
diately advised to consult a specialist or return home in order to receive 
further treatment. 

The Student Activities fee is payable by all students regardless of the 
curriculum in which they are enrolled. 

Chemical Laboratory Deposit 

(Applied only to students taking chemistry and chemical 
engineering laboratory work.) 

Freshmen taking chemistry make a Chemical Laboratory deposit of 
ten dollars ($10.) at the beginning of the year from which deductions 
are made for breakage, chemicals, and destruction of apparatus in the 
laboratory. 

All upperclassmen taking chemistry or chemical engineering labora- 
tory work are required to make a deposit of ten dollars ($10.) at the 
beginning of the first term and ten dollars ($10.) again at the beginning 
of the second term in any upperclass year. 

Any unused portion of this deposit will be returned to the student at 
the end of the college year. If the charge for such breakage, chemicals, or 
destruction of apparatus is more than the sum deposited, the student 
will be charged the additional amount. 

Deferred Payment Fee 

There will be a $2.00 deferred payment fee added to all bills which are 
not paid by the Saturday following the date on which payments fall due. 
When further extensions of time are given on payments which have 
been previously deferred, an additional $2.00 fee may be charged for each 
extension. 

Failure to make the required payments on time, or to arrange for such 
payments, is considered sufficient cause to bar the student from classes 
or suspend him from co-operative work until the matter has been ad- 
justed with the Registrar. 

Late Registration Fee 

A fee of $5.00 will be charged for failure to register in accordance with 
prescribed regulations on the dates specified in the college registration 
bulletins. 

Graduation Fee 

A fee of ten dollars ($10) covering graduation is required by the Uni- 
versity of all candidates for a degree. This fee must be paid before the end 
of the seventh week of the second term in the senior year. 

Payments 

All payments should be made at the comptroller's office which is 
located on the first floor of Richards Hall. Checks should be made pay- 
able to Northeastern University. 



46 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Refunds 

The University provides all instruction and accommodations on an 
academic term basis; therefore, no refunds are granted except in cases where 
students are compelled to withdraw on account of personal illness or to enter 
the armed forces of the nation. 

Expenses 

The following tables, compiled from expense returns submitted by 
the student body, give an idea of freshman expenditures under ordinary 
conditions. 

Estimated College Expenses for a Freshman 

Application Fee $ 5.00 

Tuition and Fees 350.00 

Chemical Laboratory Deposit 10.00 

Books and Supplies 40.00 

$405.00 
(Engineering students should add approximately $30 for drawing instru- 
ments and equipment.) 

Estimated Living Expenses Per Week for a Freshman 

Residing Away from Home 

Room Rent $ 4.00-6.00 

Board 7.00-9.00 

Laundry 1.00 

Incidentals 2.00 

$14.00-18.00 

The figures given above are approximate and may not exactly apply 
to any one student; however, they will be found to represent fairly well 
the expense of a freshman who lives comfortably but without extrava- 
gance. 

Policy on Changes of Program 

The University reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the 
courses offered or to change the order or content of courses in any cur- 
riculum. 

The University further reserves the right to change the requirements 
for graduation, tuition and fees charged, and other regulations. How- 
ever, no change in tuition and fees at any time shall become effective 
until the school year following that in which it is announced. 

Any changes which may be made from time to time pursuant to the 
above policy shall be applicable to all students in the school, college, or 
department concerned, including former students who may re-enroll. 



DAY COLLEGES 47 



Textbooks and Supplies 

The Northeastern University Bookstore, located in the basement of 
Richards. Hall, is a department of the University and is operated for the 
convenience of the student body. All books and supplies which are re- 
quired by the students for their work in the University may be purchased 
at the Bookstore. 

All students may purchase Day College textbooks which are for their 
own use at a ten per cent discount. The ten per cent discount will not 
apply on equipment, supplies, or novelties. It is the policy of the Book- 
store, however, to stock these materials and to sell them at the lowest 
possible prices. 

Fart'Time Work 

Students who find it necessary to accept part-time jobs while attending 
college may obtain such work through the Director of Co-operative 
Work. 

Students are not justified in assuming that the University will take 
care of their expenses or guarantee to supply them with work sufficient 
to meet all their needs. 

A student should have available a reserve fund adequate to provide 
for immediate needs and unexpected contingencies. This should ordi- 
narily amount to at least the first year's tuition plus books and supplies, 
room rent, and board for several weeks or a total of about $600. 



Qrades and Sxaminadons 

Examinations 

Examinations covering the work of the term are usually held at the 
close of each term. Exceptions may be made in certain courses where, in 
the opinion of the instructor, examinations are not necessary. 

Condition Examinations 

Condition examinations are usually given on the Saturday preceding 
the registration day of each term in which a course starts. The charge is 
three dollars ($3.00) for each condition examination. No student may 
take more than two condition examinations on any one day. 

A student must petition to take a condition examination at least two 
weeks in advance of the date the examination is to be given. 

The responsibility for the removal of a condition rests with the stu- 
dent, who is required to ascertain when and how the condition can be 
removed. 

Senior Condition Examinations 

Condition examinations in first term senior courses will be offered dur- 
ing the second term senior examination period. No student will be 
allowed more than one such condition examination. 



48 NORTHEASTERN UMVERSITY 

No condition examinations in second term senior courses are offered 
at the end of the second term. This means that a failure in a second term 
senior course cannot be made up before Commencement. 

Grades 

A student's grade is officially recorded by letters, as follows: 

A superior attainment 

B above average attainment 

C average attainment 

D lowest passing grade, poor attainment (the faculty will accept 
only a limited amount of grade D work toward the Bachelor's 
degree) 

F failure, removable by condition examination 

FF complete failure, course must be repeated in class 

I incomplete, used for intermediate grades only to signify that the 
student has not had time to make up work lost through excuS' 
able enforced absence from class 

L used in all cases of the removal of a failure by condition ex- 
amination or by attendance at summer term. 

A student who does not remove a condition before that course is again 
scheduled, a year later, must repeat the course. A condition in more than 
one subject may involve the loss of assignment to co-operative work. 

The responsibility for the removal of a condition rests with the stu- 
dent who is required to ascertain when and how the condition can be 
removed. 

Dean^s List 

A Dean's List, issued at the end of each term, contains the names of 
upperclass students who have an honor grade average in all subjects 
during the preceding period. Freshmen who achieve high scholastic 
standing are included on a Freshman Honor List, which is published 
at the end of each grading period. No student under disciplinary re- 
strictions is eligible for either of the honor lists. 

Reports on Scholastic Standing 

Freshman reports are issued at the end of each grading period; upper- 
class reports, at the end of each term. Questions relative to grades are to 
be discussed with the student's faculty adviser. 

Students are constantly encouraged to maintain an acceptable quality 
of college work. Parents and students are always welcomed by the college 
officers and faculty advisers for conference upon such matters. 

Parents or guardians will be notified whenever students are advised or 
required to withdraw from the University. 



DAY COLLEGES 49 



Qeneral Qonduct 

Conduct 

It is assumed that students come to the University for a serious pur- 
pose and that they will cheerfully conform to such regulations as may 
from time to time be made. In case of injury to any building or to any 
of the furniture, apparatus, or other property of the University, the 
damage will be charged to the student or students known to be imme- 
diately concerned; but if the persons who caused the damage are un- 
known, the cost for repairs may be assessed equally upon all the students 
of the University. 

Students are expected to observe the accepted rules of decorum, to 
obey the regulations of the University, and to pay due respect to its 
officers. Conduct inconsistent with the general good order of the Uni- 
versity or persistent neglect of work may be followed by dismissal; if the 
offense be a less serious one, the student may be placed upon probation. 
The student so placed upon probation may be dismissed if guilty of any 
further offense. 

It is desired to administer the discipline of the University so as to 
maintain a high standard of integrity and a scrupulous regard for truth. 
The attempt of any student to present any work which he or she has not 
performed, or to pass any examination by improper means, is regarded 
as a most serious offense and renders the offender liable to immediate 
expulsion. The aiding and abetting of a student in any dishonesty is also 
held to be a grave breach of discipline. 

Scholastic Year for Seniors ' 

Seniors of either division who are candidates for a degree in the cur- 
rent year must have completed all academic work, class assignments, 
theses, regular and special examinations, before twelve o'clock noon of 
the Saturday next following the close of recitations for seniors. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend all exercises in the subjects they are 
studying unless excused in advance. Exercises are held and students are 
expected to devote themselves to the work of the University between 
9:00 A.M. and 5:00 p.m., except for a lunch period, on every weekday and 
from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. for those Freshman classes which may be 
held on Saturday. 

No cuts are allowed. A careful record of each student's attendance 
upon class exercises is kept. Absence from regularly scheduled exercises 
in any subject will seriously affect the standing of the student. It may 
cause the removal of the subject or subjects from a schedule. 

Laboratory work can be made up only when it is possible to do so 
during hours of regularly scheduled instruction. 

Absences from exercises immediately preceding or following a recess 
are especially serious and entail severe penalties. 



50 hlORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Attendance at all mass meetings of the student body is compulsory. 
Exceptions to this rule are made only when the student has received per- 
mission from the Director of Student Activities previous to the meeting 
from which absence is desired. 

Student ^^ousing 

Housing Regulations 

The University endeavors to exercise due consideration and care for 
the student's welfare while he or she is in residence. This necessitates 
the adoption of the rules and regulations presented herewith. 

1. Assignments will be made when the student registers. 

2. Students may inspect rooms before accepting an assignment; after 
reaching a decision students must notify the office of the Registrar, 254R. 

3. Students who accept room assignments must retain them for the 
period of their residence, unless given permission by the Registrar to 
change. 

4. Students are not permitted to live in unsupervised quarters. Under 
no conditions are groups of students permitted to lease apartments. 

5. Students are not permitted to engage rooms without the prior 
approval of the University. Those violating this rule will be required to 
give up such rooms immediately and will be assigned by the University 
to approved quarters. 

6. Violation of any of the above rules is considered a breach of dis- 
cipline and will be dealt with accordingly. 

Dormitories 

At present the University does not maintain dormitories and cannot 
guarantee housing accommodations to students who live away from 
home. Provision, however, is made to help students secure rooms in the 
vicinity. Many freshmen prefer to take room and board at the fraternity 
houses, which are all supervised by the University through faculty 
advisers. For information relative to such housing write the Director 
of Admissions. 

Rooms in the dormitory of the Huntington Avenue Branch of the 
Boston Y.M.C.A. may be secured only through the Housing Depart- 
ment of the Y.M.C.A. The applicant must present himself in person to 
a representative of the Department before assignment will be made. 

Applicants desiring to room in the Association dormitory are advised 
to write the Housing Department of the Huntington Avenue Branch, 
316 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Ueterans at V^rtheastern University 

Northeastern University is offering full co-operation in the educa- | 
tional program for veterans and all its resources have been made avail- 
able for this purpose. Veterans who attend Northeastern are not segre- 



J 



DAY COLLEGES 51 



gated from the rest of the student body nor in any way treated as a 
special group. This applies equally to veterans whose college expenses 
are being met by the Government with the natural exception that ad- 
ministrative details vary for this group. 

All veterans are given every possible consideration in the readjust- 
ments they are experiencing in their return to normal civilian life. Re- 
turning veterans are welcome as individuals and their programs deter- 
mined on the basis of previous educational background, experience, and 
employment objective. All University programs are open to qualified 
veterans. Returning servicemen are also urged to take part in all sports, 
class and extracurricular activities in order that they may participate in 
the full range of a normal well-rounded university life. 

The Department of Admissions determines each applicant's poten- 
tialities for profiting from higher education. Once a veteran has been 
admitted to the University his progress is watched and aided by the 
regular University advisory system. In addition, the University has 
established a Veterans' Counseling Center which handles all relations 
between matriculated veterans and the Veterans Administration. The 
Center is also prepared to supplement the regular advisory system by 
providing for extra counseling service for all veterans who wish to avail 
themselves of it. Through testing and guidance, the Center helps veter- 
ans to uncover and develop their aptitudes and interests both educa- 
tional and vocational* 



52 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

freshman Counseling 

Freshman Orientation Period 

In order that freshmen may be ready to pursue their academic work 
with greater composure and be somewhat acclimated before the begin- 
ning of scholastic work, three or four days prior to the first term are 
devoted to a freshman orientation period. During this time freshmen are 
advised as to choice of program, and assisted in every way possible in 
order that they may be prepared to begin serious study and work on the 
first day of the college term. All freshmen are required to attend all 
exercises at the University scheduled during the orientation period. 

An optional feature of the orientation program is the freshman 
camp conducted under the auspices of the Student Union. The camp is 
planned particularly for out-of-town students, although commuters are 
welcomed. It aims at providing a stimulating and wholesome environ- 
ment under vacation conditions in which the new men may become 
acquainted with one another and with members of the faculty. The camp 
site on Lake Massapoag, in the northern part of Massachusetts, is ad- 
mirably equipped for this purpose, having ample facilities for baseball, 
basketball, tennis, boating and swimming. The cost of the two days at 
camp is nominal, and most freshmen avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity for recreation prior to the beginning of the college year. 

Physical Examination 

All freshmen receive a thorough physical examination at the Uni- 
versity during the orientation period. All students are expected to report 
promptly at the appointed time for examination. Those who fail to 
appear at the appointed time will be charged a special examination fee 
of two dollars ($2.00). 

Freshman Counselors 

At the time of matriculation each freshman is assigned to a personal 
adviser, a member of the faculty, who serves as an interested and friend- 
ly counselor during the perplexing period of transition from school to 
college. A personal record card is prepared for each student, containing 
certain pertinent data from the preparatory school record, the report of 
the physical examination at Northeastern, scores on pyschological tests, 
the results of placement examinations, and any special notes which 
may be of significance in counseling work. The aim of the freshman 
advisory system is primarily to assist students in making an effective 
start upon their programs and secondarily to acquire for the later use of 
guidance officers a fund of significant information relative to every 
freshman. Counseling is under the direction of the Dean of Students, 
assisted by a clinical psychologist, who handles the diagnosis and reme- 
dial treatment of difficult problem cases. Direct counseling of women 
students is under the supervision of a woman member of the staff with 
the title, Adviser for Women Students. 



DAY COLLEGES 53 



Individual Attention to Freshmen 

Not only is attention given to the scholastic problems of the student, 
but also to personal problems in which advice is needed and desired. 
The aim is to guide the student to the fullest possible personal develop- 
ment. 

The college records of all students are carefully analyzed in the light 
of what may reasonably be expected from them in view of their previous 
school record, their scores on psychological tests, and all other factors 
in their situations. If they are not doing their best work, investigations 
are made to determine and eliminate the causes. If they are doing as well 
as could be expected, or better, they are encouraged to continue their 
efforts. In other words, each student is held to the best work possible, 
through advice, encouragement, and assistance. 



54 NORTHEASTERN UNA^'ERSITY 

Scholarships, Trizes and cAwards 

Trustee Scholarships 

Established in 1928 by the Board of Trustees of Northeastern Uni- 
versity. Each year the University grants in the three Day Colleges twenty- 
five full tuition scholarships to entering freshmen who have demon- 
strated throughout their preparatory or high school course superior 
scholastic attainment. For additional information relative to these 
scholarships communicate with the Director of Admissions. 

Charles Hayden Memorial Scholarships at 

ISIortheastern University 

Established in 1939 through the generosity of the Charles Hayden 
Foundation and subject to annual renewal. The Foundation, created by 
the will of the late Charles Hayden, an alumnus of the Boston English 
High School, offers annually a sum of money to be distributed as memo- 
rial scholarships at Northeastern University. The scholarships are 
awarded to "deserving boys" whose parents are unable to finance the 
entire cost of their education. To be eligible for consideration a student 
must have graduated from the English High School or from one of the 
following high schools in Boston and its metropolitan area: Arlington, 
Belmont, Boston (Brighton, Charlestown, Commerce, Dorchester, East 
Boston, English, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Mechanic Arts, Public Latin, 
Roslindale, Roxbury Memorial, South Boston), Braintree, Brookline, 
Cambridge (High and Latin, Rindge Technical), Canton, Chelsea, Ded- 
ham, Everett, Lexington, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Milton, Need- 
ham, Newton, North Quincy, Quincy, Revere, Somerville, Stoneham, 
Wakefield, Waltham, Watertown, Wellesley, Weston, Weymouth, 
Winchester, Winthrop. While the scholarships are designed primarily 
to assist students through their freshman year in college, the Foundation 
has set up a supplementary loan fund to make available limited assist- 
ance to meet exigencies which may arise in the upperclass years. Each 
recipient of a Charles Hayden Memorial Scholarship is presented a 
properly endorsed certificate and is eligible for membership in the 
Charles Hayden Scholars Club of the University. Full particulars con- 
cerning these awards may be obtained from the Director of Admissions 
of Northeastern University. 



Dearths List Scholarships 

Established in 1929. Annually at the Dean's List Dinner three scholar- 
ships of one hundred dollars each, known as the Dean's List Scholar- 
ships, are presented to the students with the outstanding records in the 
sophomore, middler, and junior classes. These scholarships are applica- 
ble to the recipients' tuition the first term of the following year. 



DAY COLLEGES 55 



President's Letter 

Established in 1929. At the time of the award of the Dean's List 
Scholarships a President's Letter is presented to the senior student who 
leads the seniors in the Day Colleges in scholastic achievement. The 
letter is a congratulatory one from the President of the University and 
is a coveted prize. 

Sears B, Condit Honor Awards 

Established in 1940 through the generosity of Sears B. Condit. In 
the fall of the year at a University convocation Sears B. Condit Honor 
Awards, not less than ten in number, are awarded to outstanding stu- 
dents in the upper three classes of the College of Liberal Arts, the Col- 
lege of Business Administration, and the College of Engineering. Stu- 
dents who have received the Dean's List Scholarships are not eligible 
for one of these Honor Awards. Each award carries a stipend of not less 
than fifty dollars as well as a certificate of achievement. 

Boston Society of Civil Engineers Scholarship in Memory of 

Desmond FitzGerald 

Established in 1931 by the Boston Society of Civil Engineers in mem- 
ory of Desmond FitzGerald, a former president of the Society and an 
eminent hydraulic engineer with a distinguished record of service. The 
scholarship is subject to annual renewal. It has been awarded annually 
since 1931 to an outstanding Northeastern University senior or junior 
student in the Department of Civil Engineering of the College of En- 
gineering. The presentation is made by the President of the Boston 
Society of Civil Engineers at a College of Engineering convocation in 
the spring of the year. 

Tau Beta Pi Award 

Massachusetts Epsilon Chapter of Tau Beta Pi Association, national 
honorary society in engineering, offers annually a scholarship of one 
hundred dollars to the freshman in the college who has, during the 
previous year, made the highest scholastic record. 

The Sigma Society Award 
Established in 1930. The Sigma Society, the honor society of the Col- 
lege of Business Administration, offers annually a scholarship of one 
hundred dollars to the freshman in the college who has, during the 
previous year, made the highest scholastic record. 

The Academy Award 

Established in 1938. The Academy, the honor society of the College 
of Liberal Arts, offers annually a scholarship of one hundred dollars to 
the freshman in the college who has, during the previous year, made the 
highest scholastic record. 



5£ NORTHEASTERN U1>]IVERSITY 

Omega Sigma Award 

Established in 1944. The Omega Sigma Society, composed of women 
students at Northeastern University, offers annually a scholarship of 
one hundred dollars to the woman student who, by high scholastic 
attainment and by demonstration of the quality of leadership, has 
proven herself the outstanding woman student of the year. 

Henry B. Alvord Memorial Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Established in 1940 in memory of the late Henry B. Alvord, Professor 
of Civil Engineering and Chairman of the Department for eighteen 
years. The award is made annually to a student graduating from an 
accredited secondary school who has demonstrated superic" academic 
ability and gives promise of succeeding in civil engineering. The grant 
of two hundred and fifty dollars is made only to an entering freshman 
who is qualified for and plans to study civil engineering. 

William J. Alcott Memorial Award 

Established in 1934 by members of the faculty and other friends to 
perpetuate the memory of William Jefferson Alcott, Jr., a brillia' t mem- 
ber of the Department of Mathematics in Northeastern University from 
1924 until his death in 1933. The award is offered annually in the form 
of a prize purchased with the income of the fund for outstanding scho- 
lastic achievement during the preceding year, either in a particular field 
of interest or for a superior academic record. 

Public Speaking Contest 

Established in 1922. Each spring the University conducts a Public 
Speaking Contest for which all students in the Day Colleges are eligible. 
Prizes of forty, thirty, twenty, and ten dollars respectively are awarded 
to the four winning speakers in a contest before the upperclass student 
body assembled in a general mass meeting. Speeches are original in 
nature and about ten minutes in length. The judges base their decision 
on appropriateness of subject, content, and delivery. Preliminary con- 
tests are held during the winter in each division. 



J 



DAY COLLEGES 



57 



^he (Alumni cAssociation 

The Alumni of the Day Colleges are organized to promote the wel- 
fare of Northeastern University, to establish a mutually beneficial re- 
lationship between the University and its alumni, and to perpetuate the 
spirit of fellowship among members of the Alumni Association. 

The work of the General Alumni Association is supplemented by the 
activities of regional alumni clubs located throughout the East and 
Middle West. The local clubs meet periodically in their respective cen- 
ters to discuss matters pertaining to the University and its alumni. 
Meetings are also held in conjunction with the visits of Northeastern's 
athletic teams to the various club centers. 

The Association sponsors the Alumni Fund, through which the Uni- 
versity receives an annual gift to assist in the development of the Uni- 
versity. A number of committees of the Alumni Association perform 
valuable services to the University such as assisting in the work of the 
Placement, Admissions, and Student Activities departments. 

Two large social functions are sponsored each year, the Fall Home- 
coming Day, and the Annual Alumni Day held in conjunction with the 
June Commencement. Reunions of various classes are also conducted in 
June. 



The Alumni Council 



President 

Raymond W. James, '32 
Secretary 

Carl M. Weaver, '34 



Vice-President 

George C. Thompson, '30 
Treasurer 

John E. Vadala, '31 



Executive Committee 



Richard B. Brown, '22 
Douglass F. Tulloch, '24 
Horace C. Houghton, '26 



John W. LaBelle, '32 
Howard C. Cookingham, '34 
Frederic S. Bacon, Jr., '36 



Director of Alumni Relations 
Rudolf O. Oberg, '26 

Class Representatives 



1917 — Perry F. Zwisler 
1919 — James A. Knowlton 
1920 — Bernard H. Capen 

1921 — J. Martin Brown 

1922 — Frank L. Flood 

1923 — Alton L. Douglas 

1924 — H. Raymond Benson 

1925 — C. Frederic Hedlund 

1926 — Anton T. Haendler 

1927 — Warner C. Danforth 

1928 — Howard F. Knowles 

1929 — Thomas A. Pinkham 

1930 — Robert F. Walker 

1931 — Harry Gill 

1932 — Leonard F. Colpitts 



1934 — John A. Williams 

1935 — Edward V. Kirkland 

1936 — A. Dent Caton 

1937 — Harry O. Baker, Jr. 

1938 — Ivan G. Easton 

1939 — GusTAv Rook 

1940 — John R. Byrne 

1941 — Charles W. Barbour 

1942 — George Crowdis 

1943 — Richard M. Hatch, Jr. 

1944 — Calvin A. King 

1945 — Sidney Austin 

1946 — Roderic W. Sommers 

1947 — Richard W. Greenwood 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



COLLEGE OF 



LIBERAL ARTS 

(^Admission Requirements and Courses of Study 

1946-1947 




(CO'EDUCATIONAL) 



BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

DECEMBER, 1943 



I 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 61 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



c5Ai 



ims 

IN PROVIDING the means to a modern liberal education the College 
of Liberal Arts of Northeastern University has a threefold objective: 
first, the development of intellectual capability; second, the develop- 
ment of a well-rounded personality; and third, preparation for a voca- 
tion. 

Intellectual capability rests upon the foundation of a sound general 
education. Through the required and elective courses of all curricula, 
students are guided toward a mastery of the leading ideas, significant 
facts, and the habits of thought and methods of work in the areas of 
language, natural science, social science, and the humanities. With this 
training the student will better understand the world and society in 
which he lives, appreciate more fully the basic values upon which civil- 
ization and culture rest, and perceive and accept his responsibilities as 
an active participant in social groups — the family, the community, the 
nation and the world. At the same time the student is aided in the devel- 
opment of a resourceful and independent mind, the ability to use as 
well as to accumulate knowledge, and the awareness of his mental 
strengths and weaknesses. 

The College of Liberal Arts endeavors to aid each student in attaining 
the goal of an emotionally balanced, well-rounded personality. Through 
its academic, extracurricular, and co-operative work programs, students 
are provided experiences which will be conducive to the development 
of strength of character and a sense of personal responsibility — includ- 
ing such personal qualities as self-reliance, integrity, perseverance, and 
the ability to work with others. 

Since liberal arts colleges were originally established for the purpose 
of training for certain professions, the College of Liberal Arts holds that 
there is no inconsistency between a truly liberal education and prepara- 
tion for a vocation. Today it is widely accepted that a liberal education 
must prepare both for the art of living and the obtaining of a living. 
Through its academic program coupled with co-operative work ex- 
perience the College of Liberal Arts aims at providing young men and 
women with a sound training either for further graduate study or for 
immediate entrance upon graduation into some vocation. 



62 hlORTHEASTEKN UNIVERSITY 



(fJtdethodi 



To enable each student to plan a college program in keeping with his 
own interests and aptitudes, a wide range of electives is offered. This 
does not mean that students are free to elect courses indiscriminately, 
for if they are to obtain a liberal education they must have training in 
several basic fields. Therefore, a definite series of basic courses in each 
curriculum is required by the faculty. These required courses are largely 
concentrated in the first two years of the curriculum. 

Through a comprehensive guidance program students are directed in 
their selection of courses so that they obtain the proper preparation for 
their intended vocations. Specialization in a major field is emphasized 
during the latter part of the curriculum and is facilitated by the oppor* 
tunity for electing certain courses in the College of Engineering and the 
College of Business Administration. 

Through the Northeastern plan of co-operative education for upper- 
classmen, the student makes early contact with actual working condi- 
tions and profits by the wholesome experience of earning at least part of 
the money to defray college expenses. Viewed as a whole, then, the col- 
lege years surround the student not with an artificial atmosphere of 
cloistered scholarship but with an environment very close to that which 
he or she will enter after graduation, and thus tend to make for more 
ready employment, an essential element of vocational competence. 

Evening Courses 

In order to provide employed men and women with opportunities in 
liberal arts education, a number of the regular courses are offered during 
the evening. These courses are designed for three groups of young men 
and women who are secondary school graduates and qualified for en- 
trance to the college: (1) those who wish to prepare for admission to the 
School of Law, (2) those who wish to pursue a cultural program leading 
to the title of Associate in Arts, (3) those who do not wish to follow a 
specific program but desire to take courses to improve their cultural 
background. 

The evening courses are arranged in a three-year program which 
meets one-half the semester hour requirement for the A.B. or S.B. de- 
gree and leads to the degree of Associate in Arts. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 63 

Preparation for a Career 

The curricula in the College of Liberal Arts afford i^ot only a broad 
cultural training but also the necessary foundation for a wide range of 
vocations for both young men and young women. Some of the career 
opportunities open to thegraduatesof the College of Liberal Arts together 
with the academic programs needed are indicated below and in the pages 
which follow. 

Business — The value of a liberal arts preparation for a business career is 
clearly shown by the fact that a very large proportion of all graduates of 
liberal arts colleges enter business. Within recent years there has arisen 
an increasing demand for liberal arts graduates by the largest and most 
progressive corporations in the country. For their training programs in 
manufacturing, merchandising, selling, and other fields many companies 
are seeking adaptable young men and women with the breadth of back- 
ground of a liberal arts education. 

Students planning either to go to a graduate school of business ad- 
ministration or to enter business directly upon graduation should major 
in economics and should elect courses in English, government and psy- 
chology. A limited number of specialized courses in the College of Busi- 
ness Administration such as advertising, business law, finance, indus- 
trial management, insurance, investments, marketing, and merchandis- 
ing may be taken by students who have had the necessary prerequisites. 

Biological Sciences — Students who major in biology can arrange pro- 
grams which will lay the foundation for the following careers: teaching, 
dentistry, medicine (see pre-medical curriculum), veterinary medicine, 
public health, sanitation and laboratory methods; research in biology 
with universities, private research institutions, and governmental agen- 
cies under state and federal control; agriculture; and professional work 
in zoology and its applied fields such as fisheries, animal husbandry, and 
biological survey, etc. Graduate study is essential for most of these 
careers. 

Chemistry — Chemistry is rapidly approaching the status of a profession 
as shown by the recent action of the American Chemical Society in lay- 
ing down specifications for approved undergraduate training in chemis- 
try. Students who choose a chemistry major at Northeastern, a program 
accredited by the American Chemical Society, will be prepared upon 
graduation to become junior chemists in industrial, commercial, or gov- 
ernmental chemistry laboratories. The same program provides a thor- 
ough foundation for graduate study in chemistry. 

Dentistry — The minimum requirement for admission to dental schools is 
two years of preliminary study in an approved college. Since the require- 
ments of individual dental schools vary, students should familiarize 
themselves with the specific requirements of the schools in which they 



64 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

are interested. For most dental schools a candidate for admission must 
offer at least one year of work in English, physics, and biology, and one 
and one-half years of work in chemistry including organic chemistry. 

Pre-dental students at Northeastern will be able to meet these require- 
ments by taking the two-year pre-dental program. 

Government Service — Government service is a very comprehensive term 
since the numerous activities of modern government require all types of 
trained workers. For more and more of these positions a college educa- 
tion is essential as shown by the fact that only college graduates are 
eligible to take many civil service examinations today. Recently the 
United States Civil Service Commission has inaugurated examinations 
for graduating seniors as Junior Professional Assistants in such fields as 
biology, business analysis, economics, editing, examinations (for majors 
in psychology), fiscal analysis, mathematics, physics, social work, and 
statistics. 

The distinctive governmental career field is that of public administra- 
tion since the need for college trained personnel in administrative gov- 
ernmental posts of all types, political or nonpolitical, is being increasing- 
ly recognized. While graduate training is desirable, an undergraduate 
program with a major in history-government and a minor in economics 
will provide the necessary foundation for a career in government service 
at home or abroad. 

Journalism — Many of the nation's leading editors now advise students 
preparing for a career in journalism to obtain a broad liberal arts educa- 
tion rather than to concentrate on specific training in the routines of 
journalism in their undergraduate programs. It should be observed that 
opportunities in journalism today are not restricted to the urban or rural 
newspaper fields. Publishing houses, trade journals, house organs, ad- 
vertising departments and agencies, and the various types of public re- 
lations work need college graduates with the same basic training. 

Students who desire to enter journalism should choose the English- 
journalism major with a minor in economics, history, or government. 
They may elect courses in advertising in the College of Business Ad- 
ministration. 

Law — Effective September 1, 1938, by a ruling of the Supreme Judicial 
Court of Massachusetts, in order to be eligible for admission to the bar 
an applicant must have completed certain general educational require- 
ments before beginning a legal education. Briefly, this general education 
must comprise graduation from a four-year high school and the com- 
pletion of not less than half of the work accepted for the Bachelor's 
degree in a college approved by the Board of Bar Examiners. 

The College of Liberal Arts offers two programs of pre-legal study 
designed to meet the above requirements. One of these programs is 
specifically adapted to the needs of full-time day students. This program 
enables the student to meet one-half the requirements for the Bachelor's 
degree in two years of full-time study. It provides the basic background 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 65 

in English, economics, government, and history recommended for the 
prospective student of law. 

The other pre-legal program is designed to meet the needs of employed 
men and. women. It is provided by offering a number of the regular 
courses during the evening and requires three years for completion. 

Law — Liberal Arts (Combined Program) — The combined curriculum in 
the College of Liberal Arts and the School of Law enables students to 
reduce by one year the time ordinarily required for obtaining the A.B. 
or S.B. and the LL.B. degree. Students who have completed before enter- 
ing the School of Law a total of 168 credit hours of academic work of 
which at least 112 must have been earned in the Northeastern Univer- 
sity College of Liberal Arts, and who have fulfilled all other graduation 
requirements, will receive the A.B. or S.B. degree upon the satisfactory 
completion of the full first year program in the Day Division of the 
School of Law. Students who enter the Evening Division of the School 
of Law will be eligible for the first degree upon satisfactory completion 
of the full equivalent of the first year of the day Law School program. 

In both instances the first degree will be conferred at the next Com- 
mencement following determination of eligibility for the first degree. 

Library Work — Professional training for library work now demands at 
least one year of graduate study in a library school following a broad 
undergraduate foundation in liberal arts. While a major in English is 
usually advised, many opportunities are available for those who have 
concentrated in other fields. 

Medicine — In order to be eligible for admission to a medical school ac- 
cording to the Committee on Education of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, a candidate must have attended an approved college and have 
included certain specific work in his program. The minimum course re- 
quirements include year courses in each of the following fields: English, 
inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and a foreign language. 
Since some medical schools impose additional requirements, pre-medical 
students should obtain full information from the medical school of their 
choice about the courses which must be offered for admission. 

The pre-medical curriculum listed on page 76 will enable students to 
meet all the above standard requirements. The electives make it possible 
to obtain any particular additional courses required by some medical 
schools. 

Students are cautioned that the successful completion of the required 
pre-medical program by no means ensures admission to a medical school. 
Since most medical schools have far more applicants than they can 
admit, standards of selection are most rigorous and take into considera- 
tion not only the quality of the applicant's academic record and in- 
structor's recommendations but also his or her medical-aptitude test 
score and the results of a personal interview. 

Ministry — Preparation for the ministry today requires a theological 
school training following graduation from an approved college of liberal 



66 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

arts. The American Association of Theological Schools states that the 
appropriate foundation for a minister's later professional studies lies in 
a broad and comprehensive college education and that the normal place 
for a minister's professional study is the theological school. Recom- 
mended fields of study include: English, economics, education, govern- 
ment, history, foreign languages, one of the natural sciences, philosophy, 
psychology, and sociology. 

While students who major in English, economics, psychology, or 
sociology will be able to arrange programs meeting the above recommen- 
dations, it is urged that pre-ministerial students obtain counsel from the 
dean of the theological school of their choice since some schools have 
further specific requirements. 

Physics — As a result of the rapid developments in physics in recent years, 
there are increasing opportunities in applied physics on the technical 
staffs and in the research laboratories of the electrical, radio, optical, 
and other industries for the liberal arts graduate who has majored in 
physics. Graduate study is necessary for those who plan on research in 
pure physics. 

Psychology — There is an increasing demand for persons trained in psy- 
chology in a wide range of occupational fields. In the field of education 
the demand is expanding for school psychologists at the grade school 
level and for guidance workers and vocational counselors at the junior 
and senior high school level. 

In the field of business and industry increasing numbers of psycholo- 
gists are being employed in marketing research, in advertising, and in 
personnel departments. In state and federal governmental agencies 
clinical psychologists are employed in hospitals for the mentally ill, in 
child guidance clinics, in employment offices, and as research workers 
on problems relating to cultural relations with other countries, to prop- 
aganda, and to education. 

A large number of these positions require that the applicant have at 
least one year of graduate work and not a few require that he or she have 
a Ph.D. degree. For many others, however, college graduates with a 
major in psychology begin an internship with the firm or agency which 
employs them and then continue after this internship in a regular full- 
time position. 

Social Service — Students who major in sociology lay the undergraduate 
foundation for numerous phases of work with either private or public 
agencies in the social service field, such as social case work, family wel- 
fare, child welfare, probation and parole, juvenile court, and settlement 
work, and relief administration. At least one year of graduate study in 
a school of social work is essential for those who desire full professional 
status. 

Statistical Work — The growing emphasis upon statistics in business, edu- 
cation, social service, and government has opened a new career field for 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 67 

the student who majors in mathematics and obtains preparation in 
statistics. Similar training is necessary for students who wish to enter 
the actuarial field. 

Teaching (Secondary School) — While a major in education is not offered 
in the College of Liberal Arts, a minor in this field is available which 
meets the recommended preparation of the Department of Education of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for teachers in secondary schools. 
Students from other states should familiarize themselves with the re- 
quirements of their own state as these requirements are constantly being 
increased. 

Most small secondary schools, in which the graduate must begin, 
expect teachers to be able to teach at least two, and often three, subjects. 
Consequently programs should provide for the common combinations 
of related subjects. A major should be selected from the following fields: 
biology, chemistry, English, history-government, modern languages, or 
mathematics-physics. 

Students who desire to become teacher-coaches may minor in physical 
education, provided they elect the required courses in education. 

Teaching (College) — Students who plan to enter the college teaching pro- 
fession will find that each of the major programs affords an excellent 
preparation for graduate study in the leading universities of the country. 
Since graduate schools usually require a reading knowledge of French or 
German, frequently both, students should elect adequate work in these 
languages. Seminar courses and thesis work are strongly recommended 
for their training in research techniques. 



68 TsIORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



(Admission '^quirements 

Applicants for admission to the freshman class must qualify by one of 
the following methods: 

1. Graduation from an approved course of study in an accredited 
secondary school, including prescribed subjects listed below. 

2. Completion of fifteen acceptable secondary school units with a 
degree of proficiency satisfactory to the Department of Admissions. 

3. Examinations. 

(Certificate of entrance examinations passed for admission to 
recognized colleges and technical schools may be accepted.) 

Prescribed Subjects for Admission 

College of Liberal Arts 

Fifteen units are required for admission and must include three units 
(four years) in English and at least six units in foreign languages, mathe- 
matics, natural science, or social studies except that students planning 
to major in mathematics or science must present three units in mathe- 
matics. The remaining units are elective from other secondary school 
subjects which are acceptable to the Committee on Admissions. 

A unit is a credit given to an acceptable secondary school course 
which meets at least four times a week for periods of not less than forty 
minutes each throughout the school year. 

Entrance examinations are not required of students whose transcripts 
of record are acceptable, but the Department of Admissions reserves the 
right to require a candidate to be present for an examination in any 
subjects that it may deem necessary because of some weakness in the 
secondary school record. 

Other Requirements 

These formal requirements are necessary and desirable in that they 
tend to provide all entering students with a common ground upon which 
the first year of the college curriculum can be based. But academic credits 
alone are not an adequate indication of a student's ability to profit by a 
college education. Consequently, the Department of Admissions takes 
into consideration, along with the formal requirements, other factors 
regarding candidates for the freshman class. A student's interests and 
aptitudes in so far as they can be determined, capacity for hard work, 
attitude toward classmates and teachers in high school, physical stamina, 
and most important of all — character are considered. In this way the 
University seeks to select for its student body those who not only meet 
the academic admission requirements but who also give promise of 
acquitting themselves creditably in the rigorous program of training 
afforded by the Co-operative Plan and of being useful members of 
society. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 69 

Personal Interview 

A personal interview is always preferred to correspondence, and par- 
ents are urged to accompany the applicant whenever this is possible. 
Effective guidance depends in large measure upon a complete knowledge 
of a student's background and problems. Parents invariably are able to 
contribute information that aids the admissions officer in arriving at a 
decision. 

Candidates should visit the office of Admissions for personal inter- 
view if it is possible for them to do so before submitting their applica- 
tions. Office hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily; Saturdays to 
12:00 M. The Department of Admissions will interview applicants on 
Wednesday evenings but by appointment only. 

Application for Admission 

Each applicant for admission is required to fill out an application 
blank stating previous education, as well as the names of persons to 
whom reference may be made. 

A fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required when the application is filed. 
This fee is nonreturnable. 

The last page of this catalog is in the form of an application blank. It 
should be filled out in ink and forwarded with the required five-dollar 
fee to Director of Admissions, Northeastern University, Boston 15, 
Massachusetts. Checks should be made out to Northeastern University. 

Upon receipt of the application, properly filled out, the University 
secures the references and secondary school record. As soon as possible 
after the Committee on Admissions has reviewed the completed appli- 
cation, a report of the status with respect to admission will be sent to 
each candidate. 

Early filing of applications is recommended. 

The University reserves the right to place any entering student upon 
an indefinite trial period. Reclassification would be determined upon the 
academic success of the student. 

Registration 

Eligibility for admission does not constitute registration. Freshmen 
will register at the University on September 5, 1946, and November 14, 
1946. Students are not considered to have met the requirements for ad- 
mission until they have successfully passed the required physical ex- 
amination. 

Advanced Standing 

Students transferring from approved colleges will be admitted to ad- 
vanced standing provided their records warrant it. Whenever a person 
enters with advanced standing and later proves to have had inadequate 
preparation in any prerequisite subjects, the faculty reserves the right to 
require the student to make up such deficiencies. 

Applicants seeking advanced standing should arrange to have tran- 
scripts of their previous college records forwarded with their initial 



70 hlORTHEASTEKN UNIVERSITY 

inquiry. Students admitted to advanced standing are not eligible for 
placement at co-operative work until they have completed a full year of 
academic work at the University. 

Entrance Examinations 

Candidates who are lacking in required units for admission may re- 
move these deficiencies by examination. Such examinations are held at 
the University unless special arrangements are made with the Depart- 
ment of Admissions to administer them elsewhere. Students are advised 
to take such examinations on the earliest possible date in order that any 
deficiencies which they fail to clear may be made up in time to permit 
registration with the desired class and division. 

Examinations will be given approximately three weeks before each 
registration date from ten to twelve o'clock and from one to three o'clock 
on days to be announced. 

Outline of Freshman Courses 

The first year is a period of full-time study during which the student 
must demonstrate fitness for the program which has been elected. Stu- 
dents who are unsuccessful in the basic courses of the freshman year 
will not be permitted to continue with their advanced program, but will 
be advised to change their goal and type of training. In some instances 
this will mean change to another curriculum at Northeastern; in others, 
transfer to another institution. The freshman courses are so arranged as to 
permit change of objective during or at the end of the first year with a minimum 
loss of time. 

"^quirements for Qraduation 

Degrees 

The College of Liberal Arts awards the Bachelor of Arts degree to 
qualified candidates who have majored in economics, English, history 
and government, modern languages, psychology, or sociology. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to qualified candidates 
who have majored in biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics, or 
have taken the pre-medical curriculum. 

Quantity Requirements 

Candidates for either degree must have completed a minimum of 208 
credit hours of work including 48 credit hours of work in a major field 
and 24 credit hours of work in a related minor field. Students who under- 
take co-operative work assignments must meet the requirements of the 
Department of Co-operative Work before they become eligible for their 
degrees. 

No student transferring from another college or university is eligible 
to receive a degree until at least one year of academic work immediately 
preceding graduation has been completed at Northeastern. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 71 

Quality Requirement 

Of the 208 credit hours required for a degree at least 135 credit hours 
must have been completed with a grade of C or better. 

Specific Course Requirements 
In addition to the prescribed courses in the candidate's major field as 
listed on pages 73 to 84, all students must have completed in required 
and elective courses a minimum of: 

1. Fifteen credit hours in English. 

2. Eighteen credit hours in modern language. The elementary course 
in a language will not be accepted in fulfillment of this requirement 
unless followed by a second year in the same language. 

3. Ten credit hours in a natural science. 

4. Eighteen credit hours in the social sciences. 

Graduation with Honor 

Candidates who have achieved distinctly superior attainment in their 
academic work will be graduated with honor. Upon special vote of the 
faculty a limited number of this group may be graduated with high 
honor or with highest honor. Students must have been in attendance 
at the University at least three years before they may become eligible for 
honors at graduation. 



Qraduate S^^dy 



Graduate work in biology, chemistry and physics is offered to properly 
qualified students desiring to undertake advanced study leading to the 
degree of Master of Science. Candidates for admission to this program 
must be high ranking students who have completed, or will have com- 
pleted prior to admission to the graduate program, the requirements for 
the Bachelor of Science degree with major in biology, chemistry, or 
physics at an institution of recognized standing. At the present time the 
program is limited to teaching fellows at Northeastern University. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in biology, chemistry, 
or physics must have completed satisfactorily 48 credit hours of study 
beyond that required for the Bachelor's degree. Of these, 32 credit hours 
(including thesis) must be graduate courses in the major field of biology, 
chemistry, or physics; the remaining 16 credits may be earned in a minor 
field. 

The graduate courses are listed under the departments giving graduate 
work. The minor credits may be selected from graduate courses or from 
certain advanced undergraduate courses called "B" courses. (Graduate 
students must obtain a grade of B or better to receive credit for "B" 
courses.) 



72 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Candidates are also required to complete a satisfactory thesis as a 
partial requirement for the Master's degree. Theses must be completed 
in the field of major study and will be credited toward the major require- 
ment. Theses must be completed at least four weeks in advance of the 
date on which the degree is to be awarded. 

Finally, candidates are required to pass satisfactorily a comprehensive 
examination which may be written or oral at the discretion of the de- 
partment concerned. 

Individual programs of study must have the approval of the Director 
of Graduate Study who also acts as registration officer for graduate 
students. 

Curricular "^quirements 

The following fields of study are approved as major fields in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts: biology, chemistry, economics, English, English- 
Journalism, history and government, modern languages, mathematics 
and physics, psychology, and sociology. In addition, two-year programs 
are approved for pre-dental and pre-legal students. 

Students may elect their minor fields after consultation with their 
faculty advisers. In addition to the major fields listed above, the follow- 
ing subjects are available as minors: education, French, German, phi- 
losophy, physical education, and Spanish. 

The required courses in each curriculum are indicated on the follow- 
ing pages. Upon petition to the faculty, substitutions may be permitted 
in exceptional cases when required by the specific vocational objective 
of the student. 

During the last year students in all curricula are required to attend a 
series of meetings designed to prepare them for placement in specific 
positions in their chosen vocational field. Under expert guidance each 
student prepares a complete personnel record, studies himself or herself 
and the opportunities that are open, and works out a complete campaign 
for obtaining after-graduation employment. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



73 



FIRST YEAR 






Curriculum in Biology {10] 


) 






Term 
"No. Course 
30-01 English 
11-01 Gen. Chem. 
14-21 Basic Math. 
10-01 Gen. Zool. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

Cl.Lab.Pr. 
3 6 
3 3 6 
3 6 

2 3 4 

3 6 
1 2 
2 


Cr. 
3 
4 
3 
3 

3 
1 


Term 2 
hlo. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
11-02 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 4 
14-22 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
10-02 Gen. Zool. 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Ci. 
30-03 English 3 6 3 
11-03 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 4 
14-23 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
10-03 Gen. Bot. 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 




15 


8 30 17 


15 


8 


30 17 


14 


8 28 


16 


SECOND YEAR 




















Term 4* 

10-04 Gen. Bot. 3 

11-04 Gen. Chem. 3 

15-11 Gen. Phys. 6 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 


3 6 
3 6 

12 

6 


2 
2 
3 

IK 


Term 5 

10-55 Vert. Zool. 2 

25-01 Int. Psych. 4 

15-12 Gen. Phys. 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 


6 

3 




4 4 

8 4 

9 5 

8 4 


Term 6 

10-56 Vert. Zool. 2 

25-02 Gen. Psych. 4 

15-13 Gen. Phys. 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 


6 4 
8 
3 9 

8 


4 
4 
5 

4 




15 


6 30 


8K 


13 


9 


29 17 


13 


9 29 


17 


THIRD YEAR 




















Term 
Elective 
Elective 


7* 
8 
8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 8 

10-57 Inv. Zool. 2 

10-40 Anim. Phys. 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


6 






4 4 
8 4 
8 4 
8 4 


Term 9 

10-58 Inv. Zool. 2 

10-41 Anim. Phys. 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


6 4 
8 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 




16 


32 


8 


14 


6 28 16 


14 


6 28 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 




















Term 
■ Elective 
* Elective 

1 


10* 
8 
8 


16 
16 


4 

4 


Term 11 

10-59 An. Histol. 2 

10-61 Vert.Emhry. 2 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


6 
6 




4 4 
4 4 
8 4 
8 4 


Term 12 

10-60 An. Histol. 2 

10-62 Vert. Embry. 2 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


6 4 
6 4 

8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


1 


16 


32 


8 


12 


12 24 16 


12 


12 24 


16 


FIFTH YEAR 




















Term 
Elective 
Elective 


13* 
8 
8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 14 
10-63 Gen. Para. 2 
10-65 or Genetics 4 
10-20Gen.Bact.or 2 
10-67 Mam. Anat. 1 
Elective 4 
Elective 4 


6 

6 
8 




4 4 
8 4 
4 4 
3 4 
8 4 
8 4 


Term 15 
10-64 Gen. Para. 2 
10-66 or Genetics 4 
10-21 Gen. Bact. or 2 
10-68 Mam. Anat. 1 
Elective 4 
Elective 4 


6 4 
8 
6 4 
8 3 
8 
8 


4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 




16 


32 


8 


12 
or 13 


12 24 16 
8 27 


12 
or 13 


12 24 
8 27 


16 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



74 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



FIRST YEAR 

Term 1 

No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 

30-01 English 3 6 3 

11-01 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 4 

14-01 Coll. Alg. 5 7 4 

15-01 Physics 3 6 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 

16-01 Hygiene 10 2 1 

16-10 Phys.Tr, 2 



Curriculum in Chemistry (11) 



Term 
No. Course 
30-02 English 
11-02 Gen. Chem 
14-02 Trig. 
15-02 Physics 

Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
16-02 Hygiene 
16-11 Phys.Tr. 



ClLab.Pr.Cr. 




3 





2 



6 
6 

7 
6 

6 

2 




3 
4 
4 
3 

3 
1 



18 5 33 18 



18 5 33 18 



SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 

11-04 Gen. Chem. 3 

14-04 Int. to Calc. 5 

15-04 Physics 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 



Term 5 

2 11-11 QuaL AnaL 3 10 5 6 

2}4 14-05 Diff. Calc. 4 8 4 

l}4 15-05 Physics 3 3 6 4 

Mod. Lang. 

3 6 IK Elective 4 8 4 



3 6 
10 
6 



Term 
No. Course 
30-03 English 
11-03 Gen. Chem. 
14-03 Anal. Geom 
15-03 Physics 

Mod. Lang. 
Elective 



C!.Lab.Pr.Cr. 



3 
3 
5 
3 



6 

6 

10 

6 



3 6 



16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 

17 5 34 18 



Term 6 

ll-12Quant. AnaL 4 6 8 

14-06 Int. Calc. 4 8 

15-06 Physics 3 3 6 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 8 



14 3 28 7>^ 



14 13 27 18 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 
Elective 
Elective 



7* 
8 
8 



Term 8 

16 4 11-13 Quant. AnaL 3 9 6 6 

16 4 11-41 Chem. Lit. 10 2 1 

14-07 Diff. Eq. 3 6 3 

20-11 Economics 3 6 3 

Elective 4 8 4 



16 32 8 

FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
Elective 8 16 4 

Elective 8 16 4 



16 32 8 



14 9 28 17 



Term 11 

11-20 Org. Chem. 3 6 6 5 

11-31 Phys. Chem. 4 475 

15-14 Adv. Phys. 2 2 5 3 

26-01 Prin. See. 4 8 4 

13 12 26 17 



15 9 30 18 



11-30 Phys. Chem. 4 3 8 

11-15 Inst. Anal. 2 6 4 

20-12 Economics 3 6 

Elective 4 8 



13 9 26 16 



Term 12 

11-21 Org. Chem. 3 6 6 

11-32 Phys. Chem. 4 4 7 

15-15 Adv. Phys. 2 2 5 

26-02 Prin. Sec. 4 8 

13 12 26 17 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 



Elective 
Elective 



8 16 
8 16 



Term 14 
4 11-09 Ad. Inorg. 

4 Chem. 3 6 3 

11-22 Org. Chem. 3 6 3 
11-23 Org. AnaL 

Lab. 9 3 

30-09 Rept. Writ. 3 6 3 

Elective 4 8 4 



16 32 8 



13 9 26 16 



Term 15 

11-24 Org. Chem. 3 6 6 

11-40 Coll. Ch. 3 3 6 

30-07 Eff. Spkg. 3 6 

Elective 4 8 



13 9 26 16 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



75 



HRST YEAR 




Curriculum in Mathematics-Phys] 


■cs (12) 








Term 
No. Course 
30-01 English 
11-01 Gen. Chem 
14-01 Coll. Alg. 
15-01 Physics 

Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
116-01 Hygiene 
116-10 Phys. Train 


1 

Cl.Lab.Pr. 
3 6 
3 3 6 
5 7 
3 6 

3 6 

1 2 
2 


Cr. 
3 
4 
4 
3 

3 

1 


Term 2 
No. Course Cl.Lab.Pr. Cr. 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
11-02 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 4 
14-02 Trig. 5 7 4 
15-02 Physics 3 6 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Train. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course 
30-03 English 
11-03 Gen. Chem. 
14-03 Anal. Geom 
15-03 Physics 

Mod. Lang. 
Elective 

16-12 Phys. Train. 


CI.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 3 6 4 

.5 10 5 
3 6 3 

3 6 3 

2 




18 


5 


33 


18 


18 


5 33 


18 




17 


5 34 


18 


SECOND YEAR 
























Term 4* 

11-04 Gen. Chem. 3 

14-04 Int. to Calc. 5 

15-04 Physics 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 


3 






6 

10 
6 

6 


Term 5 
2 30-33 Engl. Lit. 4 
2K 14-05 Diff. Calc. 4 
IH 15-05 Physics 3 

Mod. Lang. 
1 }4 Elective 4 


8 
8 
3 6 

8 


4 
4 
4 

4 


Term 6 

30-34 Engl. Lit. 4 

14-06 Int. Calc. 4 

15-06 Physics 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 


8 
8 
3 6 

8 


4 
4 
4 

4 




14 


3 


28 


7y2 


15 


3 30 16 




15 


3 30 


16 


THIRD YEAR 
























Term 
Elective 
Elective 


7* 
8 
8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 8 

14-07 Diff. Eq. 3 

15-20 Optics 3 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


6 
2 7 
8 
8 


3 
4 
4 
4 


Term 9 

14-18 Theo. Eq. 4 

15-21 Optics 3 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


8 
2 7 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 




16 


32 


8 


14 


2 29 


15 




15 


2 31 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 
























Term 
Elective 
Elective 


10* 
8 
8 






16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 11 

14-15 Adv. Calc. 4 

15-24 Electronics 3 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


8 
2 7 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


Term 
14-16 Adv. Calc. 
15-25 Electronics 
Elective 
Elective 


12 
4 
3 
4 
4 


8 
2 7 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 




16 





32 


8 


15 


2 31 


16 




15 


2 31 


16 


FIMH YEAR 
























Term 
Elective 

Elective 


13* 

8 

8 







16 
16 


4 

4 


Term 14 
14-17 Inf. Series 4 

15-26 Mod. Phys. 3 
Elective 4 
Elective 4 


8 

2 7 
8 
8 


4 

4 
4 
4 


Term 15 
14-20 Spec. Topics 

in Math. 4 

15-27 Mod. Phys. 3 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


8 
2 7 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 




16 


32 


8 


15 


2 31 


16 




15 


2 31 


16 



•Summer term — 5 weeks. 



76 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



FIRST YEAR 








Pre-Medical Curriculum (14) 








Term 
No. Course 
30-01 EngUsh 
11-01 Gen. Chem 
14-21 Basic Math. 
10-01 Gen. ZooL 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

CI.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 3 6 4 
3 6 3 

2 3 4 3 

3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
11-02 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 4 
14-22 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
10-02 Gen. ZooL 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 
No. Course 
30-03 English 
11-03 Gen. Chem 
14-23 Basic Math. 
10-03 Gen. Bot. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 


3 

ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 3 6 4 
3 6 3 

2 3 4 3 

3 6 3 
2 




15 


8 


30 


17 


15 


8 


30 17 




14 


8 28 


16 


SECOND YEAR 
























Term 4* 

10-04 Gen. Bot. 3 

11-04 Gen. Chem. 3 

15-11 Gen. Phys. 6 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 


3 
3 





6 
6 

12 

6 


2 
2 
3 


Term 5 

10-55 Vert. ZooL 2 

25-01 Int. Psych. 4 

15-12 Gen. Phys. 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 


6 


3 




4 4 

8 4 

9 5 

8 4 


Term 
10-56 Vert. Zool. 
25-02 Gen. Psy. 
15-13 Gen. Phys. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 


6 
2 
4 
3 

4 


6 4 
8 
3 9 

8 


4 
4 

5 

4 




15 


6 30 


8y2 


13 


9 


29 17 




13 


9 29 


17 


THIRD YEAR 
























Term 7* 
Elective 8 
Elective 8 






16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 8 

10-57 Inv. Zool. 2 

11-11 Qual. Anal. 3 

20-11 Economics 3 

Elective 4 


6 

10 




4 4 

5 6 

6 3 
8 4 


Term 9 

10-58 Inv. Zool. 2 

11-12 Quant. Anal. 4 

20-12 Economics 3 

Elective 4 


6 4 
6 8 
6 
8 


4 
6 
3 
4 




16 


32 


8 


12 


16 23 17 




13 


12 26 17 


FOURTH YEAR 
























Term 
Elective 
Elective 


10* 
8 
8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 11 
10-40 Anim. Phys. 4 
11-26 Org. Chem. 5 
Elective 4 



6 




8 4 

10 7 

8 4 


Term 
10-41 Anim. Phys 
12-27 Org. Chem. 
Elective 


12 
4 
5 
4 


8 
6 10 
8 


4 
7 
4 




16 





32 


8 


13 


6 26 15 




13 


6 26 


15 


FIFTH YEAR 














- 










Term 
Elective 
Elective 


13* 
8 
8 






16 
16 


4 

4 


Term 14 

10-63 Gen. Parasit. 2 

10-65 or Genetics 4 

10-67 Mam. Anat. 1 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


6 


8 




4 4 
8 4 
3 4 
8 4 
8 4 


Term 
10-64 Gen. Parasit 
10-66 or Genetics 
10-68 Mam. Anat 
Elective 
Elective 


15 

. 2 
4 
1 
4 
4 


6 4 
8 
8 3 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 




16 


32 


8 


15 

or 15 


14 23 16 

8 27 


or 


15 
15 


14 23 
8 27 


16 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



77 



Curriculum in Economics (20) 



FIRST YEAR 

Term 
No. Course 
30-01 English! 
23-01 Hist. Civ. 
22-01 Am. Gov. or 
14-21 Basic Math. 
15-07 Surv. Sci. or 
10-01 Gen. Zool. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 



1 

Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
6 3 








3 



2 



15 

or 16 



6 
6 
6 
6 
4 

6 
2 





2 30 16 
5 32 



No. 



Term 2 
Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 



30-02 English I 3 
23-02 Hist. Civ. 3 
22-02 Am. Gov. or 3 
14-22 Basic Math. 3 
15-08 Surv. Sci. or 3 
10-02 Gen. Zool. 2 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 3 
16-02 Hygiene 1 

16-11 Phys. Tr. 

15 
or 16 








3 



2 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 

6 

2 




3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
1 



2 30 16 
5 32 



Term 
No. Course 
30-03 English I 
23-03 Hist. Civ. 
22-03 Am. Gov. or 
14-23 Basic Math. 
15-09 Surv. Sci. or 
10-03 Gen. Bot. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 



Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 




3 



16-12 Phys. Tr. 



8 
6 
6 
6 
4 



3 6 3 



2 



15 
or 16 



2 30 16 
5 32 



SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 

15-10 Surv. Sci. or 4 

10-04 Gen. Bot. 3 

23-04 Hist. Civ. 4 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 



Term 5 

8 2 20-05 Econ. Geog. 4 8 4 

3 6 2 25-01 Int. Psych. 4 8 4 

8 2 26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 8 4 

Mod. Lang. 

3 6 1>^ Elective 4 8 4 



30-04 English 



5 \0 IVi 



16 
or 15 



32 
3 30 



8 



16 32 16 



Term 6 
20-13 Econ. Prin. 
25-02 Gen. Psych. 
26-01 Prin. Soc. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 









8 



4 
4 
4 



4 8 4 



16 32 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 7* 
Elective 8 16 4 

Elective 8 16 4 



16 32 8 



Term 8 

20-14 Econ. Prob. 4 8 4 

20-16 Acct. Prin. 3 2 7 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

15 2 31 16 



Term 9 
20-15 Econ. Prob. 
20-17 Acct. Prin. 

Elective 

Elective 



4 8 4 

3 2 7 4 

4 8 4 
4 8 4 



15 2 31 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
Elective 8 16 4 

Elective 8 16 4 



16 32 8 



Term 11 

20-20 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

20-18 Am. Ec. Hist.4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

15 2 31 16 



Term 12 

20-21 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

20-26 Labor Econ. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

15 2 31 16 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
Elective 8 16 4 

Elective 8 16 4 



16 32 8 



Term 14 

20-24 Mon. &l Bk. 4 8 4 

20-31 Ad.Ec.Theo. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

16 32 16 



Term 15 

20-25 Bus. Cycles 4 8 4 

20-32 Ad. Ec. Theo. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

16 32 16 



•Summer term — 5 weeks. 



78 



NORTHEASTERhl UNIVERSITY 



FIRST YEAR 



Curriculum in English and English-Journalism (21) 



No. 

30-01 

23-01 

22-01 

14-21 

15-07 

10-01 



16-01 
16-10 



Term 1 
Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 



English I 3 6 
Hist. Civ. 3 6 
Am. Gov. or 3 6 
Basic Math. 3 6 
Surv. Sci. or 3 6 
GenZool. 2 3 4 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 
Hygiene 
Phys. Tr. 



3 
1 
2 



6 
2 




3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
1 



No. 

30-02 

23-02 

22-02 

14-22 

15-08 

10-02 



16-02 
16-11 



15 
or 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 



2 30 16 
5 32 



Term 2 
Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 

English! 3 6 3 

Hist, Civ. 3 6 3 

Am. Gov. or 3 6 3 

Basic Math. 3 6 3 

Surv. Sci. or 3 6 3 

Gen. Zool. 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 

Hygiene 10 2 1 

Phys. Tr. 2 

15 2 30 16 

or 16 5 32 



Term 
No. Course 
30-03 English I 
23-03 Hist Civ. 
22-03 Am. Gov. or 
14-23 Basic Math. 
15-09 Surv. Sci. or 
10-03 Gen. Bot. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 



15-10 Surv. Sci. 
10-04 or Gen, Bot. 
23-04 Hist. Civ. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
30-04 English 




3 




6 
8 



3 6 IJi 



Term 5 

20-05 Econ, Geog. 4 

23-17 U.S. to 1865 4 

30-33 Engl. Lit. 4 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 



8 
8 
8 



4 
4 
4 



5 10 2}4 



16 32 8 
or 15 3 30 



4 8 4 



16 32 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 7* Term 8 

Elective 8 16 4 30-21 Adv. Comp. 4 8 4 

Elective 8 16 4 26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 



16 32 8 



FOURTH YEAR 



Term 


10* 




Elective 


8 16 


4 


Elective 


8 16 


4 



16 32 16 



Term 11 
30-29 Found. Engl. 

Lang, or 4 8 4 

30-51 Int. Jour. 4 8 4 

30-35 Am. Lit. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 



Elective 



16 32 8 



4 8 4 
16 32 16 



FIFTH YEAR 
Term 
Elective 
Elective 



13* 
8 
8 



16 
16 



4 
4 



*Summer term 



16 32 
5 weeks. 



Term 14 

30-43 19th Ct. Pr. 4 8 4 
30-53 or Tech. of 

Jour. 4 8 4 

30-61 Shakespeare 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

16 32 16 



CI.Lab.Pr.i 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 

3 6 






6 





8 





6 





6 





6 


3 


4 



16-12 Phys. Tr. 



2 



15 
or 16 



2 30 16 
5 32 



Term 6 

20-13 Econ. Prin. 4 

23-18 U.S.since 18654 

30-34 Engl. Lit. 4 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 









8 
8 
8 



8 



16 32 16 



Term 9 

30-22 Adv. Comp. 4 

26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 



8 4 

8 4 

8 4 

8 4 



16 32 16 



Term 12 
30-30 Found. Engl. 

Lang, or 4 8 

30-52 Int. Jour. 4 8 

30-36 Am. Lit. 4 8 

Elective 4 8 



Elective 



4 8 4 
16 32 16 



Term 15 

30-44 19th Ct. Pr. 4 8 
30-54 or Tech. of 

Jour. 4 8 

30-62 Shakespeare 4 8 

Elective 4 8 

Elective 4 8 

16 32 16 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



79 







Curriculum in History-Government (22) 








FIRST YEAR 




















Term 


1 






Term 2 




Term 3 






No. Course 


Cl.Lab.PT.Cr. 


No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 


No. Course 


ClLab.Pr.Cr. 


30-01 English 1 


3 


6 


3 


30-02 English I 3 


6 3 


30-03 English I 


3 


6 


3 


23-01 Hist. Civ. 


3 


6 


3 


23-02 Hist. Civ. 3 


6 3 


23-03 Hist. Civ. 


4 


8 


4 


22-01 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 


3 


22-02 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 3 


22-03 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 


3 


14-21 Basic Math. 


3 


6 


3 


14-22 Basic Math. 3 


6 3 


14-23 Basic Math. 


3 


6 


3 


15-07 Surv. Sci. or 


3 


6 


3 


15-08 Surv. Sci. or 3 


6 3 


15-09 Surv. Sci. or 


3 


6 


3 


10-01 Gen. Zool. 


2 


3 4 


3 


10-02 Gen. Zool. 2 


3 4 3 


10-03 Gen. Bot. 


2 


3 4 


3 


Mod. Lang. 








Mod. Lang. 




Mod. Lang. 








Elective 


3 


6 


3 


Elective 3 


6 3 


Elective 


3 


6 


3 


16-01 Hygiene 


1 


2 


1 


16-02 Hygiene 1 


2 1 










16-10 Phys. Tr. 





2 




16-11 Phys. Tr. 


2 


16-12 Phys. Tr. 





2 






15 


2 30 


16 


15 


2 30 16 




15 


2 30 


16 


or 


16 


5 32 




or 16 


5 32 


or 


16 


5 32 




SECOND YEAR 




















Term 4* 






Term 5 




Term 


6 






15-10 Surv. Sci. or 


4 


8 


2 


20-05 Econ. Geog. 4 


8 4 


20-13 Econ. Prin. 


4 


8 


4 


10-04 Gen. Bot. 


3 


3 6 


2 


23-17 U.S. Hist. 4 


8 4 


23-18 U.S. Hist. 


4 


8 


4 


23-04 Hist. Civ. 


4 


8 


2 


30-33 Engl. Lit. 4 


8 4 


30-34 Engl. Lit. 


4 


8 


4 


Mod. Lang. 








Mod. Lang. 




Mod. Lang. 








Elective 


3 


6 


I'A 


Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 


30-04 English 


5 


10 


2y. 
















16 


32 


8 


16 


32 16 




16 


32 


16 


or 


15 


3 30 
















THIRD YEAR 




















Term 


7* 






Term 8 




Term 9 






Elective 


8 


16 


4 


22-11 Comp. Gov. 4 


8 4 


22-12 Comp. Gov 


. 4 


8 


4 


Elective 


8 


16 


4 


23-11 Eur. Hist. 4 


8 4 


23-12 Eur. Hist. 


4 


8 


4 










Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 










Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 




16 


32 


8 


16 


32 16 




16 


32 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 




















Term 


10* 






Term 11 




Term 


12 






Elective 


8 


16 


4 


22-13 PoL Theory 4 


8 4 


22-14 Pol. Theory 


4 


8 


4 


Elective 


8 


16 


4 


23-13 Engl. Hist. 4 


8 4 


23-14 Engl. Hist. 


4 


8 


4 










Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 










Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 




16 


32 


8 


16 


32 16 




16 


32 


16 


FIFIH YEAR 




















Term 


13* 






Term 14 




Term 


15 






Elective 


8 


16 


4 


22-20 Pub. Adm. 4 


8 4 


22-21 Pub. Adm. 


4 


8 


4 


Elective 


8 


16 


4 


23-19 Lt. Am. His. 4 


8 4 


23-10 Lt. Am. His 


. 4 


8 


4 










Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 










Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 


4 


8 


4 




16 


32 


8 


16 


32 16 




16 


32 


16 


*Summer term — 


5 weeks. 

















80 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 







Curriculum in Modern Langu 


ages (23) 






FIRST YEAR 
























Term 


1 








Term 2 








Term 3 






No. Course 


ClLab.Pr.Cr. 


No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 


No. Course Ci.Lab.Pr.Cr.j, 


30-01 English I 


3 





6 


3 


30-02 English I 3 





6 


3 


30-03 English I 3 


6 


3 


23-01 Hist. Civ. 


3 





6 


3 


23-02 Hist. Civ. 3 





6 


3 


23-03 Hist. Civ. 4 


8 


4 


22-01 Am. Gov. or 3 





6 


3 


22-02 Am. Gov. or 3 





6 


3 


22-03 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 


3 


14-21 Basic Math. 


3 





6 


3 


14-22 Basic Math. 3 





6 


3 


14-23 Basic Math. 3 


6 


3 


15-07 Surv. Sci. oi 


■ 3 





6 


3 


15-08 Surv. Sci. or 3 





6 


3 


15-09 Surv. Sci. or 3 


6 


3 


10-01 Gen. Zool. 


2 


3 


4 


3 


10-02 Gen. Zool. 2 


3 


4 


3 


10-03 Gen. Bot. 2 


3 4 


3 


Mod. Lang. 










Mod. Lang. 








Mod. Lang. 






Elective 


3 





6 


3 


Elective 3 





6 


3 


Elective 3 


6 


3 


16-01 Hygiene 


1 





2 


1 


16-02 Hygiene 1 





2 


1 








16-10 Phys. Tr. 





2 







16-11 Phys. Tr. 


2 







16-12 Phys. Tr. 


2 






15 


2 


30 


16 


15 


2 


30 


16 


15 


2 30 


16 


or 


16 


5 


32 




or 16 


5 


32 




or 16 


5 32 




SECOND YEAR 
























Term 4* 








Term 5 








Term 6 






15-10 Surv. Sci. or 


4 





8 


2 


20-05 Econ. Geog. 4 





8 


4 


20-13 Econ. Prin. 4 


8 


4 


10-04 Gen. Bot. 


3 


3 


6 


2 


23-17 U.S. Hist. 4 





8 


4 


23-18 U.S. Hist. 4 


8 


4 


23-04 Hist. Civ. 


4 





8 


2 


30-33 Engl. Lit. 4 





8 


4 


30-34 Engl. Lit. 4 


8 


4 


Mod. Lang. 










Mod. Lang. 








Mod. Lang. 






Elective 


3 





6 


IH 


Elective 4 





8 


4 


Elective 4 


8 


4 


30-04 English 


5 





10 


2y2 


















16 


32 


8 


16 


32 


16 


16 


32 


16 


CM- 


15 


3 


30 


















THIRD YEAR 
























Term 


7* 








Term 8t 








Term 9t 






Elective 


8 





16 


4 


31-21 Mod. Fr. Lit. 4 





8 


4 


31-22 Mod. Fr. Lit. 4 


8 


4 


Elective 


8 





16 


4 


32-21 Mod.Ger.Lit.4 





8 


4 


32-22 Mod. Ger. Lit.4 


8 


4 












33-21 Span. Lit. 4 





8 


4 


33-22 Span. Lit. 4 


8 


4 












Elective 4 





8 


4 


Elective 4 


8 


4 












Elective 4 





8 


4 


Elective 4 


8 


4 




16 


32 


8 


16 


32 


16 


16 


32 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 
























Term 


10* 








Term lit 








Term 12 1 






Elective 


8 





16 


4 


31-23 Fr. Class'm. 4 





8 


4 


31-24 Fr. Class'm. 4 


8 


4 


Elective 


8 





16 


4 


32-23 CI. Ger. Lit. 4 

33-23 Mod. Sp.Lt. 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 


32-24 CI. Ger. Lit. 4 
33-24 Mod. Span. 


8 


4 1 

i 
1 












Elective 4 





8 


4 


Lit. 4 
Elective 4 
Elective 4 


8 
8 
8 


4 

4 ! 
4 




16 





32 


8 


16 


32 


16 


16 


32 


16 


FIF 1 H YEAR 
























Term 


13* 








Term 14 








Term 15 






Elective 


8 





16 


4 


31,32, Ad. Cmp. 








31,32, Ad. Cmp. 






Elective 


8 





16 


4 


33-31 &L Conv. 4 





8 


4 


33-32 &L Conv. 4 


8 


41 












31-25 Fr. Rom. or 4 





8 


4 


31-26 Fr. Rom. or 4 


8 


4 












32-25 19th Cent. 








32-26 19th Cent. 
















Ger. Lit. 4 





8 


4 


Ger. Lit. 4 


8 


4 












33-25 or Span. Am. 








33-26 or Span. Am. 
















Lit. 4 





8 


4 


Lit. 4 


8 


4 












Elective 4 





8 


4 


Elective 4 


8 


4 












Elective 4 





8 


4 


Elective 4 


8 


4-' 




16 32 
5 weeks. 


8 


16 


32 


16 


16 


32 


16 


*Summer term — 





tTwo language courses to be taken depending upon field of concentration. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



81 



Curriculum in Psychology {25) 



'IRST YEAR 

Term 
^o. Course 
10-01 English ' 
.1-01 Gen. Chem. 
4-21 Basic Math. 
.0-01 Gen. Zool. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
.6-01 Hygiene 
.6-10 Phys. Tr. 



1 

CI. Lab. Pr. Or. 



3 
3 
3 

2 

3 
1 






3 

3 



2 



6 
6 
6 
4 

6 

2 




3 
4 
3 
3 

3 
1 



Term 
No. Course 
30-02 English 
11-02 Gen. Chem. 
14-22 Basic Math. 
10-02 Gen. Zool. 
Mod, Lang. 
Elective 
16-02 Hygiene 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 



ClLab.Pr.Cr. 




3 

3 



2 



6 
6 
6 
4 

6 

2 




3 
4 
3 
3 

3 
1 



No. 

30-03 

11-03 

14-23 

10-03 



16-12 



Term 3 
Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 



English 
Gen. Chem. 
Basic Math. 
Gen. Hot. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 




3 

3 



6 
6 
6 
4 



3 
4 
3 
3 



3 6 3 



15 8 30 17 



15 8 30 17 



Phys. Tr. 2 

14 8 28 16 



5ECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 

0-04 Gen. Bot. 3 3 6 2 

11-04 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 2 

5-11 Gen. Phys. 6 12 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 



3 6 13^ 
15 6 30 8)4 



Term 5 
10-55 Vert. Zool. 2 
15-12 Gen. Phys. 3 
25-01 Int. Psych. 4 
Mod. Lang 
Elective 



FHIRD YEAR 
Term 
Elective 
Elective 



8 
8 



16 
16 



4 
4 



16 32 8 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
Elective 8 16 

Elective 8 16 



4 
4 



16 32 8 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
Elective 8 16 

Elective 8 16 



4 
4 



16 32 8 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



6 
3 





4 
9 
8 



4 
5 
4 



4 8 4 
13 9 29 17 



Term 8 

26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 8 4 

25-11 Meas. inPsy.3 3 6 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

15 3 30 16 



Term 11 

25-15 Ed. Psych. 4 8 4 

25-17 Ab. Psych. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 



16 32 16 



Term 14 

25-19 Psy. of Pers. 4 8 4 

25-31 Adv. Psych. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

16 32 16 



Term 6 

10-56 Vert. Zool. 2 6 4 4 

15-13 Gen. Phys. 3 3 9 5 

25-02 Gen. Psych. 4 8 4 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 8 4 

13 9 29 17 



26-02 Prin. Soc. 4 8 4 

25-12 Exp. Psych. 3 3 6 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

15 3 30 16 



Term 12 

25-16 Ed. Psych. 4 8 4 

25-18 Ab. Psych. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

16 32 16 



Term 15 

25-20 Psy. of. Pers. 4 8 4 

25-32 Adv. Psy. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

16 32 16 



82 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 







Cmriculum in Sociology (26) 










FIRSr YEAR 
























Term 1 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
30-01 English I 3 6 3 
23-01 Hist. Civ. 3 6 3 
22-01 Am. Gov. or 3 6 3 
14-21 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
15-07 Surv. Sci. or 3 6 3 
10-01 Gen. Zool. 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 
16-01 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 2 
No. Course CX.Lah.Pr.Cr. 
30-02 English I 3 6 3 
23-02 Hist. Civ. 3 6 3 
22-02 Am. Gov. or 3 6 3 
14-22 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
15-08 Surv. Sci. or 3 6 3 
10-02 Gen. ZooL 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
30-03 English I 3 6 3 
23-03 Hist. Civ. 4 8 4; 
22-03 Am. Gov. or 3 6 3 
14-23 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
15-09 Surv. Sci. or 3 6 3 
10-03 Gen. Bot. 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 j 


15 
or 16 


2 30 
5 32 


16 


15 
or 16 


2 
5 


30 
32 


16 


15 
or 16 


2 
5 


30 
32 


16 


SECOND YEAR 
























Term 4* 
15-10 Surv. Sci. or 4 
10-04 Gen. Bot. 3 
23-04 Hist. Civ. 4 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 3 
30-04 English 5 


8 
3 6 
8 

6 
10 


2 
2 
2 


Term 5 

20-05 Econ. Geog. 4 

25-01 Int. Psych. 4 

26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 









8 
8 
8 

8 


4 
4 
4 

4 


Term 6 

20-13 Econ. Prin. 4 

25-02 Gen. Psych. 4 

26-02 Prin. Soc. 4 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 









8 
8 
8 

8 


4 

4 
4 

4 


16 
or 15 


32 
3 30 


8 


16 


32 


16 




16 


32 


16 


THIRD YEAR 
























Term 7* 
Elective 8 
Elective 8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 8 

20-14 Econ. Prob. 4 

26-11 Soc. Prob. 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


Term 9 

20-15 Econ. Prob. 4 

26-12 Soc. Prob. 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


16 


32 


8 


16 


32 


16 




16 


32 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 
























Term 10* 
Elective 8 
Elective 8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 11 

26-13 Soc. Eth. 4 

26-15 The Family 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 

8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


Term 12 

26-14 Soc. Eth. 4 

26-16 Criminology 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


16 


32 


8 


16 


32 


16 




16 


32 


16 


FIFTH YEAR 
























Term 13* 
Elective 8 
Elective 8 


16 
16 


4 
4 


Term 14 

26-17 Urban Soc. 4 

26-19 Soc. Theory 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 
8 

8 


4 
4 
4 
4 


Term 15 

26-18 Soc. Prog. 4 

26-22 Prin. Soc. Wk 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 








8 
8 
8 
8 


4 

4 
4 
4 


16 


32 


8 


16 


32 


16 




16 


32 


16 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



83 







Two-Year Pre-Dental Curriculum (13) 










IRST YEAR 
























Term 
'Jo. Course 
■0-01 English ' 
1-01 Gen. Chem. 
4-21 Basic Math. 
.0-01 Gen. Zool. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 
.6-01 Hygiene 
.6-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 3 6 4 
3 6 3 

2 3 4 3 

3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 
No. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
11-02 Gen. Chem. 3 3 6 4 
14-22 Basic Math. 3 6 3 
10-02 Gen. Zool. 2 3 4 3 
Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 
No. Course 
30-03 English 
11-03 Gen. Chem 
14-23 Basic Math. 
10-03 Gen. Bot. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 


3 

Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 3 6 4 
3 6 3 

2 3 4 3 

3 6 3 
2 




15 


8 


30 


17 


15 


8 30 17 




14 


8 


28 


16 


5ECOND YEAR 
























Term 4* 

:0-04 Gen. Bot. 3 

'.1-04 Gen. Chem. 3 

15-11 Gen. Phys. 6 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 3 


3 
3 






6 

6 

12 

6 


2 
2 
3 

IK 


Term 5 

10-55 Vert. ZooL 2 

25-01 Int. Psych. 4 

15-12 Gen. Phys. 3 

Mod. Lang. 

Elective 4 


6 4 4 
8 4 
3 9 5 

8 4 


Term 
10-56 Vert. Zool. 
25-02 Gen. Psych. 
15-13 Gen. Phys. 
Mod. Lang. 
Elective 


6 
2 
4 
3 

4 


6 

3 




4 
8 
9 

8 


4 
4 
5 

4 




15 


6 30 


8>^ 


13 


9 29 17 




13 


9 


29 


17 












Term 5-A 

1040 Anim. Phys. 4 

11-26 Org. Chem. 5 

Lib. Elect. 4 


8 4 
6 10 7 
8 4 













13 6 26 15 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



84 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 





Two- 


Year Pre-Legal Curriculum {24) 






FIRST YEAR 
















Term 1 






Term 2 




Term 3 






No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 


No. Course Cl.Lah.Fr.Cr. 


No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 


30-01 English I 3 


6 


3 


30-02 English I 3 


6 3 


30-03 English I 3 


6 


3 


23-01 Hist. Civ. 3 


6 


3 


23-02 Hist. Civ. 3 


6 3 


23-03 Hist. Civ. 4 


8 


4 


22-01 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 


3 


22-02 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 3 


22-03 Am. Gov. or 3 


6 


3 


14-21 Basic Math. 3 


6 


3 


14-22 Basic Math. 3 


6 3 


14-23 Basic Math. 3 


6 


3 


15-07 Surv. Sci. or 3 


6 


3 


15-08Surv. Sci. or 3 


6 3 


15-09 Surv. Sci. or 3 


6 


3 


10-01 Gen. Zool. 2 


3 4 


3 


10-02 Gen. Zool. 2 


3 4 3 


10-03 Gen. Bot. 2 


3 4 


3 


Mod. Lang. 






Mod. Lang. 




Mod. Lang. 






Elective 3 


6 


3 


Elective 3 


6 3 


Elective 3 


6 


3 


16-01 Hygiene 1 


2 


1 


16-02 Hygiene 1 


2 1 








16-10 Phys. Tr. 


2 




16-11 Phys. Tr. 


2 


16-12 Phys. Tr. 


2 




15 


2 30 16 


15 


2 30 16 


15 


2 30 


16 


or 16 


5 32 




or 16 


5 32 


or 16 


5 32 




SECOND YEAR 
















Term 4* 






Term 5 




Term 6 






15-10 Surv. Sci. or 4 


8 


2 


20-05 Econ. Geog. 4 


8 4 


20-13 Econ. Prin. 4 


8 


4 


10-04 Gen. Bot. 3 


3 6 


2 


23-17 U.S. Hist. 4 


8 4 


23-18 U.S. Hist. 4 


8 


4 


23-04 Hist. Civ. 4 


8 


2 


30-33 Engl. Lit. 4 


8 4 


30-34 EngL Lit. 4 


8 


4 


Mod. Lang. 






Mod. Lang. 




Mod. Lang. 






Elective 3 


6 


ly 


2 Elective 4 


8 4 


Elective 4 


8 


4 


30-04 English 5 


10 


ly^ 










16 


32 


8 


16 


32 16 


16 


32 


16 


oris 


3 30 




Term 5-A 

22-11 Comp. Gov. 4 

23-13 Engl. Hist. 4 

Elective 4 

Elective 4 


8 4 
8 4 

8 4 
8 4 









16 32 16 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 85 

Synopses of Courses of instruction 

On the pages which follow are given the synopses of courses offered in 
the several curricula of the College of Liberal Arts. Curricula in each of 
the three colleges on either the co-operative or full-time plan comprise 
130 weeks of classroom instruction: namely, three ten-week periods in 
the freshman year and 100 weeks of upperclass work. On the co-op- 
erative plan, the upperclass courses are evenly distributed over four 
years so that each division of co-operative students has 25 weeks of 
college work, 26 weeks of co-operative work, and one week of vacation 
annually. 

A complete list of the courses of instruction offered in each of the 
Day Colleges is included in a special section of the catalogue beginning 
on page 205. This section lists the prerequisite and preparation require- 
ments, class and laboratory hours per week, the number of hours nor- 
mally required for study preparation hours, and the number of credits 
which have been assigned to each course. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the 
courses offered or to change the order or content of courses in any 
curriculum. 

Biology 

(Courses designated with (g) may be taken for graduate credit) 

Botany 

10-03 General Botany — An introductory course with emphasis upon the 
structure, function, classification, life histories, heredity and distribution 
of the chief groups of plants. 

10-04 General Botany — A continuation of 10-03. 

10-07 Morphology of Thallophytes (g) — The structure, life histories, and 
taxonomy of the algae and fungi. 

10-08 Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes (g) — The structure, life 
histories, and taxonomy of the liverworts, mosses, ferns and their allies. 

10-09 Morphology of Spermatophytes (g) — The structure, life histories, and 
taxonomy of the gymnosperms and angiosperms. 

1[Bacteriology 

10-20 General Bacteriology — A study of the fundamental principles of 
bacteriology and their applications. The preparation of culture media, 
methods of sterilization, differential staining, isolation and handling of 
pure cultures, taxonomy of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, 
their structure and physiology. 

fCourses in Bacteriology will be offered in 1947. 



86 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

10-21 General Bacteriology — Continues 10-20. 

10-22 Advanced Bacteriology (g) — This course is designed to give more 
detailed information and training in the newer aspects of bacteriology 
and immunity. 

10-23 Advanced Bacteriology (g) — ^A continuation of 10-22. 

Physiology 

10-40 Animal Physiology — The principles of physiology and their appli- 
cation to life processes in animals. The lectures deal with the physiology 
of muscle, nerve, organs of special sense, circulation and respiration. 
Demonstrations and recitations. 

10-41 Animal Physiology — A continuation of 10-40. In this part of the 
course the lectures deal with digestion, metabolism, secretion, excretion 
and reproduction. Demonstrations and recitations. 

10-42 Advanced Physiology (g) — An advanced course of lectures. The sub- 
ject matter will vary from year to year. 

10-43 Advanced Physiology (g) — A continuation of 10-42. 

Nutrition 

10-44 Nutrition — The principles of human nutrition including digestion 
and metabolism of the foodstuffs, food requirements of the body (cal- 
ories, proteins, minerals, and vitamins). 

10-45 Nutrition — A continuation of 10-44. Essentials of an adequate 
diet; calculation of prescribed diets; weight control; food habits; com- 
position of foods. 

10-46 Advanced Nutrition (g) — Nutritional needs of family groups; family 
food budgets; child and infant nutrition. 

10-47 Advanced Nutrition (g) — A continuation of 10-46. Diet in diseases; 
dietetic treatment of impaired digestive or metabolic conditions. 

Zoology 

10-01 General Zoology — An introductory course dealing with the basic 
principles of animal life. A survey of the main types of animals; their 
classification, structure, life histories, distribution and economic im- 
portance are considered. In this part of the course, the lectures deal with 
the following phyla: Protozoa, Porifera, Coelenterata, Ctenophora, 
Platyhelminthes, Nemathelminthes, Rotifera, and Bryozoa. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 87 

10-02 General Zoology — A continuation of 10-01. In this part of the course 
the lectures deal with the following phyla: Brachiopoda, Phoronidea, 
Chaetognatha, Annelida, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Arthropoda, and 
Chordata. 

J 0-55 Vertebrate Zoology — This course deals with the comparative anat- 
omy of the integuments, the skeletal, muscular, digestive and respiratory 
systems of the principal classes of vertebrates. 

J 0-56 Vertebrate Zoology— A continuation of 10-55. In this part of the 
course, the lectures deal with the comparative anatomy of the vascular, 
excretory, reproductive and nervous systems together with the organs 
of special sense of the principal classes of vertebrates. 

10-57 Invertebrate Zoology— This course deals with the comparative 
development and structure of the organic systems of invertebrate ani- 
mals as represented by the following phyla: Protozoa, Porifera, Coelen- 
terata, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemathelminthes, Trochelmin- 
thes, and Molluscoidea; and their biological and ecological relationships. 

10-58 Invertebrate Zoology — A continuation of 10-57. In this part of 
the course, the lectures deal with the comparative development and 
structure of the various organ systems of invertebrate animals as rep- 
resented by the following phyla: Coelhelminthes, Mollusca, Arthropoda, 
and Echinodermata; and their biological and ecological relationships. 

10-59 Animal Histology — The lectures deal with the normal microscopic 
anatomy of the cell, cell division, spermatogenesis, oogenesis, fertiliza- 
tion, histogenesis, and a systematic consideration of the histology of the 
fundamental tissues of the animal body. 

10-60 Animal Histology— A continuation of 10-59. In this part of the 
course the lectures deal with the normal microscopic anatomy of the 
organ systems of the animal body. 

J 0-61 Vertebrate Embryology — The lectures deal with the early and late 
stages of development of the Amphioxus, the Teleost, and the frog. 

10-62 Vertebrate Embryology — A continuation of 10-61. In this part of 
the course the lectures deal with the early and late stages of develop- 
ment of the chick and pig. 

10-63 General Parasitology — This course deals with the more important 
species of parasites and their relation to disease in man and the do- 
mestic animals. In this part of the course the parasitic protozoa and flat 
worms are considered. 

10-64 General Parasitology— A continuation of 10-63. In this part of the 
course the parasitic round worms and arthropods are considered. 



88 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY ' 

10-65 Principles of Genetics — This course deals with the laws of variation 
and inheritance; their application to man and to domestic animals and 
plants. 

10-66 Principles of Genetics — A continuation of 10-65. 

10-67 Mammalian Anatomy (g) — An advanced laboratory course in the 
dissection of a mammal. In this part of the course, the skeletal, muscular, 
digestive, and respiratory systems are considered. 

10-68 Mammalian Anatomy (g)— A continuation of 10-67. In this part 
of the course, the urogenital, circulatory, and nervous systems are con- 
sidered together with the organs of special sense. 

10-69 Histological Technique (g)— This course is designed to present the 
fundamentals of histological technique. The lectures deal with the vari- 
ous methods of fixation, clearing, hardening, embedding, section cutting, 
and staining of vertebrate and invertebrate tissues. 

10-70 Histological Technique (g)— A continuation of 10-69. 

10-71 History of Biology (g)— A course treating the development of bio- 
logical sciences from the earliest times to the present, and tracing the 
history of biological investigations. 

10-72 History of Biology (g)— A continuation of 10-71. 

10-73 General Entomology (g) — This course deals with the structure, clas- 
sification, habits, life histories, and distribution of insects. 

10-74 Economic Entomology (g)— Lectures, conferences, and laboratory 
work. This course deals with the life histories and habits of injurious in- 
sects and of means for their control. 

10-75 Seminar in Zoology-— Assigned readings and reports on selected 
topics. May be selected with the consent of the department by qualified 
seniors majoring in biology. Credit to be arranged. 

10-76 Seminar in Zoology— A continuation of 10-75. Credit to be ar- 
ranged. 

Graduate Courses in Zoology 
10-106 Parasitic Proto;;oa— This course deals with the structure, phylo- 
geny, taxonomy, of unicellular parasites of man and animals. 

10-107 HelmintKology— This course deals with the parasitic worms in 
man and animals. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 89 

10-108 Sanitary Entomology — This course deals with the disease carrying 
insects and of means for their control. Entomological problems of munic- 
ipal, industrial, household, and army camp sanitation. Particular em- 
phasis is laid upon control of flies, mosquitoes, lice, fleas, and blood- 
sucking insects. 

10-109 Advanced Histology — Lectures and intensive laboratory work. 

10-110 Advanced Histology— A continuation of 10-109. 

10-111 Research in Zoology — Open to a limited number of students who 
have given evidence of ability to do independent investigation. A read- 
ing knowledge of French and German is essential. Credit to be arranged. 

10-112 Research in Zoology — A continuation of 10-111. Credit to be ar- 
ranged. 

10-113 Thesis — Credit to be arranged. 

10-114 Thesis — A continuation of 10-113. Credit to be arranged. 

10-115 Reading and Conference — ^Credit to be arranged. 

10-116 Reading and Conference — Credit to be arranged. 

Chemistry 

11-01 General Chemistry — The fundamental ideas of matter and energy; 
the properties of gases; liquids and solids; atomic and molecular weight; 
equations; properties of solutions; classification of elements. 

11-02 General Chemistry — Atomic structure and radioactivity; electrons 
and valence; ionic reactions; acids and bases. 

11-03 General Chemistry — Chemistry of nonmetals; chemistry of metals; 
electrochemistry; industrial inorganic chemistry. 

11-04 General Chemistry — Elements of organic chemistry; industrial or- 
ganic chemistry. 

11-09 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry — Valence; atomic structure; nature 
of crystal bonds; properties of elements. 

11-11 Qualitative Analysis — Mass action law; ionic equilibria; solubility 
product; hydrolysis; principles of semi-micro technique; laboratory work 
is devoted to semi-micro method for analysis of anions and cations. 

11-12 Quantitative Analysis — Theory and practice of volumetric analysis; 
weighing; titration; ignition; combustion. 



90 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

11-13 Quantitative Analysis — Theory and practice of gravimetric analysis; 
mineral procedures; common technical methods. 

J 1-15 Instrumental Analysis — Analysis by use of instruments; microscope; 
spectrograph; photelometer; p H measurements; gas analysis. 

11-20 Organic Chemistry — Reactions and properties of aliphatic com- 
pounds; class relationships; structural formulas; reaction mechanisms. 

11-21 Organic Chemistry — Reactions and properties of aromatic com- 
pounds; importance and preparation of industrial aromatics. 

11-22 Organic Chemistry — Reactions and properties of alicyclic and het- 
erocyclic compounds; unit processes in organic chemistry; halogenation; 
oxidation; reduction; nitration; sulfonation; amination; and diazotiza- 
tion, 

11-23 Organic Analysis Laboratory — Chemical and physical tests used in 
qualitative organic analysis; classification reactions; preparation of de- 
rivatives. 

11-24 Organic Chemistry — Electronic interpretations of organic chemical 
reactions; discussions of current experimental literature from the view- 
point of the electronic theory; plastics; theory, preparation, and uses. 

11-26 Organic Chemistry — Reaction and properties of aliphatic com- 
pounds; clan relationships; structural formulas; introduction to study 
of aromatic compounds. 

11-27 Organic Chemistry — Reactions and properties of aromatic com- 
pounds; nitration; sulfonation; elementary study of heterocyclic com- 
pounds. 

11-28 Biological Chemistry — Properties of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, 
enzymes, vitamins, drugs; tests for carbohydrates, fats, proteins. 

11-29 Biological Chemistry — Chemistry of food and nutrition, digestion; 
chemical analysis of blood, lymph, milk, tissue, wine, foods, drugs, vita- 
mins. 

11-30 Physical Chemistry — Structure of matter: the three states of matter, 
solutions, colloidal dispersions, molecular and atomic structure. 

11-31 Physical Chemistry — Thermodynamics: the first law, thermochem- 
istry, the second law and entropy, free energy, equilibrium, the phase 
rule, chemical kinetics. 

11-32 Physical Chemistry — Solutions of electrolytes: electrical conduct- 
ance, electrolytic equilibrium, electromotive force, electrolysis and polar- 
ization. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 91 



11-35 Thermodynamics — First and second laws; deviation of real gases; 
entropy; thermochemistry; equilibrium; activity; third law. 

11-40 Colloid Chemistry — Particle size; adoption; physical properties of 
colloids; preparation; emulsions; gels. 

11-41 Chemical Literature — Types of chemical journals; library procedure; 
problems in obtaining information. 

11-42 History of Chemistry — Development of scientific theories; contri' 
bution of scientific investigators. 

11-43 Thesis — Experimental work under direction of staff members. 

11-44 Thesis — Experimental work under direction of staff members. 

Graduate Courses 

11-100 Advanced Physical Chemistry — Study of advanced topics in physi- 
cal chemistry. 

11-101 Advanced Physical Chemistry — Continuation of 11-100. 

11-102 Advanced Physical Chemistry — Continuation of 11-101. 

11-103 Advanced Organic Chemistry — Study of advanced topics of or- 
ganic chemistry. 

11-104 Advanced Organic Chemistry — Continuation of 11-103. 

11-105 Advanced Organic Chemistry — Continuation of 11-104. 

11-106 Advanced Organic Chemistry — Continuation of 11-105. 

11-107 Thesis — Experimental problem. Hours per week not specified. 

11-108 Thesis— Continuation of 11-107. 

11-109 Thesis— Continuation of 11-108. 

11-1 10 TKesis— Continuation of 11-109. 

11-111 TKesis — Continuation of 11-110. 

Economics 

20-05 Economic Geography — In order to provide an adequate background 
for the study of economics this course analyzes the economic resources 
of our country and the part played by these resources in the develop- 
ment of our modern industrial society. Emphasis is placed upon promot- 



92 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

ing the comprehension of basic concepts rather than upon acquiring an 
encyclopedic knowledge of a mass of details. 

20-11 Economics — After an analysis of the main characteristics of our 
modern economic order, attention is turned to the fundamental eco- 
nomic laws and principles governing the production of economic goods, 
the organization of business enterprise, money, banking, the business 
cycle, control of the price level, and international trade. 

20-12 Economics — A continuation of 20-11. The first part of the course 
deals with the principles of price determination under competitive and 
monopolistic conditions, and the principles underlying the distribution 
of wealth and income into wages, interest, and profits. Consideration is 
then given to the major aspects of the economic problems of agriculture, 
public utility regulation, labor, consumption, public finance, and eco- 
nomic reform. 

20-13 Economic Principles — A thorough grounding in the fundamental 
principles and laws of economics is the aim of this course. The main 
topics include the nature and organization of production, the nature and 
importance of wants, the relation of money and prices, the process of 
exchange, the nature of international trade, the determination of price 
under conditions of competition and monopoly, the distribution of 
wealth and income in the form of wages, economic rent, interest, and 
profits. 

20-14 Economic Problems— In this course the application of economic 
principles to some of the major economic problems of modern society is 
emphasized. The problems studied include consumption, protective 
tariifs and subsidies, labor problems such as unemployment and labor 
unions, and the business cycle. 

20-15 Economic Problems — A continuation of 20-14. Among the prob- 
lems considered are the following: price stabilization, the agricultural 
problem, the relation of government to business, including control of 
monopolies and public utilities, insurance, public finance, and proposals 
for the remodeling and improving of the economic system. 

20-16 Principles of Accounting — A survey of accounting principles with 
emphasis upon the nature, interpretation, and utilization of accounting 
data, and the preparation of financial statements. 

20-17 Principles of Accounting — A continuation of 20-16 with attention 
to the problems of corporate accounting, the theories of cost and income 
and the interpretation of financial statements. 

20-18 American Economic History — The economic development of the 
United States is traced from the colonial period to the present with 
special emphasis upon the period since the Civil War. Stress is laid upon 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 93 

the importance of economic factors and changes in our history in the 
development of manufacturing, agriculture, domestic and foreign com- 
merce, finance and banking, transportation, and labor organizations. 
Consideration is given to European developments which have been 
closely related to those of the United States. 

20-20 Statistics — This course is intended to give the student an under- 
standing of statistical principles and methods and their practical applica- 
tion in the social sciences. A study is made of the nature, sources, collec- 
tion, and organization of statistical facts; the presentation of such facts 
in tabular or graphic form, the various averages, measures of dispersion, 
and the construction and use of index numbers. 

20-21 Statistics — The major portion of this continuation of 20-20 con- 
cerns the analysis of time series, and includes the methods of obtaining 
trends, seasonal indexes, and the measurement of cyclical variation. 
The application of correlation analysis in the field of social science is 
given extended attention. 

20-24 Money and Banking — This course considers the problems of mone- 
tary and banking control with particular emphasis upon the policies of 
the Federal Reserve System. Current developments are carefully con- 
sidered. 

20-25 Business Cycles — After a study of the conditions which underlie 
cyclical fluctuations in prices, volume of trade, physical production, and 
employment, a careful analysis is made of the more significant theories 
of the business cycle. The possibilities of controlling such fluctuations 
and of initiating recovery receive extended attention. Throughout the 
course emphasis is placed upon the current phase of the business cycle 
and its peculiar problems. 

20-26 Labor Economics — After an intensive study of the application of 
economic principles to the labor markets and of the development of col- 
lective bargaining in the United States, the course will be devoted to an 
analysis of organization of unions, rights and responsibilities under the 
law, the bargaining process as reflected in the labor contract, and griev- 
ances and grievance procedures. 

20-27 International Economic Relations — A careful examination of the im- 
portant principles of international trade and finance precedes a critical 
survey of the international commercial policies of modern nations, with 
special reference to the United States. Such broader problems as the 
international control of raw materials, exchange restrictions, interna- 
tional cartels and the economic activities of the League of Nations and 
other international organizations are considered. 

20-28 Economic Systems — After developing criteria for evaluating the dif- 
ferent economic systems, the course proceeds to a comparative analysis 



94 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

of capitalism, co-operation, socialism, communism, and fascism. The 
problems of economic planning receive particular attention. 

20-31 Advanced Economic Theory — A critical review of the origin and de- 
velopment of economic thought. After a brief account of the contribu- 
tions of Plato and Aristotle, the early Christian fathers, and the writers 
of the Middle Ages, each of the main schools of economic thought is 
taken up in turn: the Mercantilists, the Physiocrats, the Classical School, 
the Socialists, the Historical School, the Austrian School, and the Neo- 
classical School. 

20-32 Advanced Economic Theory — The course introduces the student to 
the more complex aspects of economic theory. Particular consideration 
is given to the major modern theoretical problems. 

20-61 Seminar — Assigned readings and written reports on selected topics. 
May be elected with the consent of the department by qualified seniors 
majoring in economics. 

20-62 Seminar — A continuation of 20-61. 

The following courses offered in the College of Business Administra- 
tion may be elected by majors in economics who have the necessary 
preparation: 

43-01 Principles of Marketing 

43-02 Principles of Advertising 

44-01 Principles of Banking 

44-02 Principles of Insurance 

44-11 Business Finance 

44-12 Business Finance 

44-22 Investments 

45-01 Industrial Management 

45-02 Industrial Management 

46-01 Business Law — Contracts 

Education 

Note: In addition to the courses listed, 26-15 and 26-16 Educational Psychology may 
be counted as courses in Education. 

2J-0I History of Education — Education is considered as the means by 
which nations have attempted to realize their social and spiritual ideals. 
This course traces the history of education from ancient times through 
the Greek and Roman periods, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and 
Reformation, down to John Locke and the Enlightenment. The course 
is concerned with the development of points of view as well as with the 
details of organization and practice. 

21-02 History of Education — Beginning with the emotional reaction 
against formalism in life as exemplified by Rousseau, this course takes up 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 95 

the immediate background of modern education and traces the develop- 
ment of national systems. The influence of such men as Pestalozzi, Her- 
bart, Froebel, Spencer, Mann, Barnard, Dewey, and others is studied in 
detail. The course closes with a consideration of present tendencies in 
education. 

21-03 Educational Measurements — The course concerns itself with current 
problems in the field of educational tests and measurements. Most of 
the lectures are given over to a discussion of the construction and use 
of new type objective tests, with particular reference to the field of 
secondary education. The relative merits of the essay and the objective 
examination are considered in connection with the problem of grades 
and grading systems. Enough elementary statistics are included to en- 
able students to use intelligently the results of testing. Emphasis is placed 
upon the importance of an accurate interpretation of test data and upon 
the futility of indiscriminate testing. 

21-04 Educational Organization and Administration — A study of the prin- 
ciples underlying the organization, administration, and supervision of 
secondary schools in the U.S.A. The course is illustrated with suitable 
problems taken from actual practice. It should be of special interest to 
students who contemplate teaching as a vocation. 

21-05 Comparative Education — A discussion of the educational back- 
ground and current theories and practices of England, France, and Ger- 
many. Emphasis is laid upon the bearing of European education on 
American practice. Much of the assigned reading is in current periodical 
literature, although a basic text is also used. Lectures, special reports, 
and class discussions comprise the media by which the course is con- 
ducted. 

21-06 Educational Sociology — The course considers the relationship be- 
tween education and sociology. Educational objectives are set up from 
the findings of sociological research and the traditional curriculum is 
examined in the light of these objectives with a view towards its recon- 
struction. A critical attitude is maintained toward philosophical impli- 
cations which will inevitably arise in the course. 

21-07 Educational Philosophy — A study of the relationship between the 
science of education and the philosophy of education is followed by a 
consideration of philosophies of education in the light of basic theses of 
the history of philosophy. Such topics as evolutionism, behaviorism, 
pragmatism, instrumentalism, and progressive education are viewed in 
the perspective of the history of philosophy. 

21-08 Principles of Secondary Education — A critical study of the aims, ob- 
jectives and functions of secondary schools. Relations of the junior high 
school, the senior high school, and the junior college to American life 
are discussed. 



96 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

21-09 Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools — A fundamental course 
in methods of teaching. Such topics as motivation, socialization, drill, 
specific techniques, attention and fatigue, use of books and laboratories 
are discussed. 

English 

30-01 English I — A review of basic sentence structure and the grammat- 
ical functions of clauses and phrases, followed by a study of effective 
sentence writing, paragraph development, and reading techniques. 
Theme assignments are planned to develop practical skill in each of the 
phases studied. 

30-02 English I — A study of the structure and organization of written 
compositions: outlining, development of compositions by phases, and 
the analysis of expository writings. Experimental work in each phase is 
carried out by means of theme assignments and readings. 

30-03 English I — A study of the problems peculiar to each of the four 
main types of discourse: exposition, description, narrative, and argu- 
ment. Theme work includes, in addition to these basic types, some 
assignments in the framing of reports and the writing of business letters. 

30-04 Introduction to Literature — A study of the aims and techniques of 
various common types of literature: the play, the short story, lyrical and 
narrative poetry, and the literary essay. Instructional methods include 
assigned reading and the writing of short critical reports. 

30-07 Effective Speaking — A study of the report as a means of oral and 
written presentation of technical data. Reports of various types are 
planned and written. Considerable class time is devoted to the presenta- 
tion of oral reports and oral summaries of written reports. 

30-09 Report Writing — A course on gathering, organizing, and arranging 
in standard form the material on technical reports. 

30-21 Advanced Composition— A study of the craft of writing as applied 
to the shorter literary forms. Each student will be given considerable 
latitude in working in the field of his individual interest. Student manu- 
scripts will be read in class. 

30-22 Advanced Composition — A continuation of 30-21. 

30-23 Creative Writing — For advanced students definitely interested in 
imaginative writing who have already proved their ability in 30-21 and 
30-22 and who wish to continue their writing under supervision. Class 
instruction will be supplemented by individual conferences with the 
instructor. 

30-24 Creative Writing — A continuation of 30-23. 



COLLEGE OF UBERAL ARTS 97 

30-29 Foundations of the English Language — A study of the complex origin 
of the English language, tracing historically the influences which have 
modified the Saxon base. The course includes a detailed examination of 
the grammatical characteristics of Greek, Latin, and Saxon, with a study 
of the roots and affixes which those languages have chiefly contributed 
to the formation of English words. 

30-30 Foundations of the English Language — A continuation of 30-29. A 
study of the ways in which elements of the source languages have been 
modified toward the forms they have assumed in modern English. 

30-31 Western World Literature — A survey of the principal writers of the 
ancient and medieval period. Assigned readings are supplemented by 
lectures on historical background and literary trends. 

30-32 Western World Literature — A continuation of 30-31. This course is 
concerned with writers from the late sixteenth century to the present. 

30-33 Survey of English Literature — A survey of English literature to 1800. 
After a brief study of the social and political background of each literary 
period, the writing of the period is considered, and the more important 
writers are studied and read in detail. The purpose of the course is to give 
the student an appreciation of English literature as a whole, and an 
intimate knowledge of its major figures. 

30-34 Survey of English Literature — A survey of English literature from 
1800 to the present century. The outstanding writers are read, studied, 
and related to the general background of nineteenth century England. 
The purpose of the course is to give the student an understanding of the 
writers who contributed most to the formation and development of 
modern literature in England. 

30-35 American Literature to 1860 — A survey of American literature from 
colonial times to the triumph of the transcendental movement in New 
England. The work of Bryant, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, 
Lowell, Holmes, Longfellow, and Melville will be emphasized. 

30-36 American Literature After 1860 — Continuing 30-35, the course will 
consider the rise of realism after the Civil War, the development of 
American humor, the appearance of local color writers, and modern 
trends since 1900. 

30-37 Saxon and Anglo-Norman Literature — A survey of the literary pro- 
duction of England from about 600 A.D. to 1200. All the selections are 
read in modern English translations, but attention is given to the lan- 
guage characteristics of early and late West Saxon and Anglo-Norman 
writings. 



98 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

30-38 English Literature from 1200 to 1600 — A reading course to acquaint 
the student with the dominant types of literature during the Middle 
English and early modern period: lyrical, narrative, and satirical poetry; 
mystery and miracle plays, ballards; and prose romances. 

30-39 The Seventeenth Century in England — An historical survey of the 
literary developments during the first half of the seventeenth century. 
Assigned readings in drama, lyrical poetry, and criticism are supple- 
mented by lectures on general trends and minor authors not represented 
in the readings. 

30-40 The Seventeenth Century in England — A continuation of 30-39 with 
special attention to the later works of Milton, the poetry of Dryden, and 
the theater of the Restoration. 

30-41 The Eighteenth Century in England — An historical survey of the 
literary developments during the first half of the eighteenth century: the 
rise of popular journalism; the sentimental comedy; satire and realistic 
narrative; the beginnings of the novel. 

30-42 The Eighteenth Century in England — A continuation of 30-41: the 
age of Johnson; late eighteenth century poets, novelists, and dramatists. 

30-43 Nineteenth Century Prose — An examination of significant nine- 
teenth century writers and their relation to the social, political, and 
literary currents of the time. The first semester will include consideration 
of such background workers as Paine and Godwin, the establishment of 
the great quarterlies, and the Romantic essayists, Lamb, Hazlitt, and 
DeQuincey. 

30-44 Nineteenth Century Prose— A continuation of 30-43. Writers to be 
studied include Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Arnold, Morris, Huxley, 
Pater, and Stevenson. 

30-45 Nineteenth Century Poetry — A study of Romanticism, its origins, its 
conflict with classicism, and its contributions to contemporary and later 
culture. The poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and 
Keats will be examined appreciatively and critically. 

30-46 Nineteenth Century Poetry — A study of the Victorian era with em- 
phasis on Browning and Tennyson as artists and as interpreters of life. 
Lesser poets to be considered include Arnold, Clough, and the Pre- 
Raphaelites. 

30-47 The Modern Novel— A survey of the modem and contemporary 
English and American novel, with emphasis on trends and changes in 
content and technique. Representative novels are read, and a few 
novelists are studied in detail. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 99 

30-48 The Modem Drama — A survey of English and American drama 
since 1900, considering representative plays and major dramatists and 
tracing the relationship between drama and history in the twentieth 
century. 

30-49 Modern Poetry — A survey of the principal developments in the 
prosody, substance, and theory of poetry in England and America since 
1912. The chief emphasis of the course will be on the work of the major 
poets of the period. 

30-51 Introduction to Journalism — This course treats the functions of the 
editorial department and the general tasks of an "inside" man. The stu- 
dent is given extensive practice in the re-writing of news stories. 

30-52 Introduction to Journalism — The problems of reporting and news- 
writing, with written assignments in all types of spot news reporting. 

30-53 Techniques of Journalism — Editing the news. The writing of edito* 
rials, feature articles, and columns. 

30-54 Techniques of Journalism — A general practice course in newspaper 
writing, the covering of special assignments, and editorial problems. 

30-61 Shakespeare — The Elizabethan period, sixteenth century London, 
the Shakespearean stage and audience, and the actors' companies will 
be discussed. Shakespeare's life and his development as a dramatist will 
be carefully considered. Five plays will be intensively studied. 

30-62 Shakespeare — Lectures will be given on Shakespeare's language, 
the text of the plays, Shakespearean criticism, editors' problems, etc. 
Four plays will be intensively studied. The sonnets will be read and 
discussed. 

30-63 Chaucer — A study of the Canterbury Tales, with careful training 
in Middle English vocaJDulary and the rhythms and devices of Chaucer's 
poetry. 

30-64 Chaucer — A continuation of 30-63, principally concerned with 
Troilus and Criseyde, The House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and 
some parts of Boece, 

30-71 Seminar — Independent investigation of a selected topic together 
with intermediate research reports. May be elected with the consent of 
the department by qualified seniors majoring in English. 

30-72 Seminar— A continuation of 30-71. A final report is required 
which summarizes the research of the year. 



100 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Geology 

13-01 General Geology — A study of earth movements and various terres- 
trial applications of solar energy. Lectures on fundamental general facts 
as to origin and movements of the earth, weathering, work of winds, 
underground and surface waters, glaciers and the glacial period, lakes 
and swamps, and vulcanism. 

13-02 General Geology — Course 13-01 is continued with such topics as 
mountain formation, oceans, oceanic life, atmosphere touching upon 
meteorology. A considerable portion of time is given to the study of 
igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, supplemented by labora- 
tory and field work. 

13-03 Historical Geology — A review of the beginning of the earth, its de- 
velopment and historical significance of rock characters. This is followed 
by a study of the pre-Cambrian Paleozoic and the early Paleozoic sub-era. 

13-04 Historical Geology — Continuation of 13-03 taking in the late Pale- 
ozoic sub-era, and the Mesozoic and Cenozoic periods, and continuing 
through the geologic history of man. 

Government 

22-01 American Government and Politics — The study of our National Gov- 
ernment with respect to its organization, functions, constitutional pow- 
ers, and limitations. 

22-02 American Government and Politics — A continuation of 22-01. Par- 
ticular attention is paid to the legislative, administrative, and judicial 
machinery under the party system of government. The problems of 
bureaucracy are analyzed. 

22-03 American Government and Politics — A study of the relationships of 
our federal, state and municipal governments. Consideration is given to 
the various types of state and municipal governments with respect to 
the state and local agencies for carrying out the executive, legislative, 
and judicial functions of government in a democratic country. 

22-1 1 Comparative Government — The older governments of Europe, those 
principally of Great Britain and France, but also of Switzerland and the 
Scandinavian countries, are described and analyzed in this course. In- 
stitutions are compared in these various states with reference to America 
and the newer governments of Europe. 

22-12 Comparative Government — A study of the newer governments of 
Europe, as found in Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union. Democracy 
and dictatorship are analyzed as different modes of life and rule. These 
states are compared to each other, to the older governments of Europe, 
and to the United States. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 101 

22-13 Origins of Political Theory — A survey of political philosophy from 
Plato and Aristotle to Bentham. The nature, origin, forms, and ends of 
the state and government are covered. 

22-14 Modern Political Theory — A critical study is made of the major de- 
velopments in political theory since Bentham, with special reference to 
the influence of these developments upon American politics and politi- 
cal institutions. Attention is paid to the modern conflict between the 
democratic and the totalitarian conceptions of the state. 

22-15 American Constitutional Law — After a careful study of the in- 
fluences affecting the framing of the Constitution, attention is turned to 
the leading constitutional principles of the American government as 
developed through judicial interpretation. 

22-16 American Constitutional Law — A continuation of 22-15. Primary 
emphasis is placed upon the relation of constitutional law to present-day 
problems, with particular reference to such items as "due process of 
law" and "interstate commerce." 

22-17 International Law — A study of the essentials of public law govern- 
ing the relations between sovereign states. 

22-28 International Relationships — A consideration of selected interna- 
tional problems arising from the conflict of national policies and in- 
terests. The role of international organization receives special attention. 

22-20 Public Administration — An introduction to the general principles 
of public administration in modern government with emphasis upon the 
organization and operation of administrative agencies in the United 
States. 

22-21 Public Administration — A continuation of 22-20. Emphasis is 
placed upon the policy-making aspects of public administration with 
particular reference to such problems as personnel management, budget- 
ing and accounting, purchasing, and planning. 

History 

23-01 History of Civilization — This is primarily a background course. In- 
troductory lectures deal with primitive society, the development of lan- 
guage and writing, and the early contributions of Egypt and Asia. More 
detail is given to the structure of Greek and Roman society and the rise 
of the Christian Church. 

23-02 History of Civilization — A continuation of 23-01. This course con- 
siders the decline of the Roman Empire, the barbarian invasions of the 
Empire, the growth of Islam, life in the early Middle Ages, the growth of 
monarchies in Europe, and the medieval church. 



102 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

23-03 History of Civilizcition — ^The Renaissance and the Reformation re- 
ceive extended attention in this course. Stress is placed upon the art and 
literature of the era as well as the social, economic, and political develop- 
ments. 

23-04 History of CivilizcLtion — A continuation of 23-03. The chief topics 
of the course include the economic revolution, the Age of Reason in 
France and England, the Old Regime and the Revolution in France, and 
the growth of science and industrialism. 

23-11 Europe, 1789-1870 — This course aims at describing and interpreting 
the development of European states from the French Revolution to 
1870. Major topics include the Metternich system, the emergence of 
French Republicanism, and the unification of Italy and Germany. Non- 
political factors receive much attention throughout the course. 

23-12 Europe, 1870-1920 — The international relationships which pre- 
cipitated the tragedy of 1914 are considered. The rise of militarism and 
nationalism, secret diplomacy, propaganda and the press, the "inci- 
dents" which led to the World War, the conduct of the war, and the 
peace treaties, are discussed in this course. 

23-13 England to 1688 — This course surveys the political, social, religious, 
and economic development of England to the Revolution of 1688. Polit- 
ical history receives the major emphasis, but stress is placed upon the 
rise of the English institutions which represented England's outstanding 
contribution to civilization. 

23-14 England Since 1688 — A continuation of 23-13. A study is made of 
Queen Anne's England, the policies of Walpole, England's part in Euro- 
pean politics, the age of the first Reform Bill, English imperialism, and 
Victorian society. 

23-15 English Constitutional History — This course is devoted to a consider- 
ation of the English constitution and of the common law; local govern- 
ment vs. central government; the origin and growth of Parliament; the 
development of the British cabinet system; and a comprehensive study 
of statutes and documents. 

23-16 American Constitutional History — In this course a study is made of 
the historical development of the United States Constitution with par- 
ticular emphasis on its progressive adaption to a changing social and 
economic order. 

23-17 The United States to 1865 — This course is an interpretation of the 
events which shaped the American nation to the Civil War. Social cus- 
toms, economic influences, racial contributions, and humanitarian 
movements are not neglected, though the political history is stressed. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 103 

23-18 The United States Since 1865 — Major attention is given to the so- 
cial, economic, and political foundations of recent history in this survey 
of the transition of America from an agricultural to an urban indus- 
trialized society since the Civil War. Consideration is given to the prob- 
lems arising with the emergence of America as a world power. 

23-19 Latin American History — This course deals with the European back- 
ground of Spanish and Portuguese colonization in the New World, the 
exploits of the conquistadores, the Indian civilizations, colonial institu- 
tions, and the forces which gave rise to the revolutions in the early 
nineteenth century. 

23-20 Latin American History — This course continues 23-19, and describes 
the Wars of Independence and the rise of the republics. A study is made 
of the international relations of the Latin American countries, the Mon- 
roe Doctrine, and the Pan-American conferences. 

23-21 Far Eastern International Relations, 1840 — 1900— Between 1840 and 
1900 the United States and the European powers developed their several 
foreign policies towards China and Japan. Japan succeeded in develop- 
ing a policy toward China and the West. The Chinese Empire failed to 
develop a consistent policy and was nearly dismembered. This course 
concerns the above developments. 

23-22 Far Eastern International Relations Since 1900 — Since 1900 Japan 
emerged as a world power and embarked upon a career of imperialism. 
China at last developed a foreign policy. With the close of the first World 
War, European imperialism waned. The United States tried to act as 
umpire. War resulted. This course concerns these developments. 

23-23 Recent European History — A consideration of the problems of 
Europe arising out of the first World War and of the background of the 
second World War. 

Mathematics 

14-01 College Algebra — The study of algebra is scheduled to begin with 
the solution of the quadratic equation, simultaneous quadratics, and 
equations in quadratic form. However, a rapid but thorough review of 
the fundamentals of algebra precedes this. The solution of the quadratic 
is followed by a detailed study of the theory of exponents. Then follow 
radicals, series, variation, inequalities, and the elementary principles of 
the theory of equations. Considerable time is given to plotting and the 
use of graphs in the solution of equations. The elementary theory of 
complex numbers is also covered. 

14-02 Trigonometry — This is a complete course in trigonometry and 
should enable the student to use all branches of elementary trigonometry 
in the solution of triangles as well as in the more advanced courses 
where the knowledge of trigonometry is essential. Some of the topics 



104 hlORTHEASTEKN VNIVERSITY 

covered are the trigonometric ratios; inverse functions; goniometry; 
logarithms; circular measure; laws of sines, cosines, tangents, half angles; 
solution of oblique and right triangles; transformation and solution of 
trigonometric and logarithmic equations. Considerable practice in calcu- 
lation of practical problems enables the student to apply his trigonome- 
try to problems arising in practice at an early stage. Additional work, 
graphical and algebraic, is done with the complex number, introducing 
De-Moivre's theorem and the exponential form of the complex number. 

14-03 Analytic Geometry — This being a basic course in preparation for any 
further study of mathematics, it requires a thorough knowledge of the 
fundamentals of algebra. The course covers cartesian and polar co-or- 
dinates; graphs; the equations of simpler curves derived from their ge- 
ometric properties; thorough study of straight lines, circles, and conic 
sections; intersections and curves; transformation of axes; plotting and 
solution of algebraic equations of higher order and of exponential 
trigonometric and logarithmic equations; loci problems. The general 
equation of the second degree is thoroughly analyzed in the study of 
conic sections. 

14-04 Introduction to Calculus — Explicit and implicit functions, depend- 
ent and independent variables, some theory of limits, continuity and 
discontinuity are given special attention from both the algebraic and the 
geometric points of view. Some theorems on the infinitesimal are intro- 
duced, and a study is made of infinity and zero as limits. Relative rates 
of change, both average and instantaneous, and the meaning of the 
slope of a curve follow. The differential and the derivative as applied to 
algebraic functions with the geometric interpretation are then studied. 
Tangents to curves of the second degree follow here. Simple applica- 
tions with interesting practical problems help to develop the interest 
here and lay a solid foundation for the study of the calculus. The intro- 
duction of the differential at the same time with the derivative helps 
considerably to bridge the large gap which usually exists when the stu- 
dent passes from the study of the elementary analytic geometry to the 
infinitesimal of calculus. 

14-05 Differential Calculus — The differential is introduced and defined at 
the outset of the course together with the derivative; geometric and 
practical illustrations are given of both; and both are carried along 
throughout the course. The work in the course consists of differentiation 
of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, 
both explicit and implicit; slopes of curves, maxima and minima with 
applied problems; partial differentiation; derivatives of higher order; 
curvature; points of inflection; related rates; velocities, acceleration; ex- 
pansion of functions; series. Although the subject matter deals with 
considerable theory, constant sight is kept of the practical application 
of the theory. The geometric interpretation of every new subject is care- 
fully defined and problems are continually solved dealing in practical 
applications of the theory in geometry, physics, and mechanics. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 105 

14-06 Integral Calculus — This is a continuation of Calculus 14-05, and 
deals with integration as the inverse of differentiation as well as the 
limit of summation. The topics covered are methods of integration; use 
of integral tables; definite integrals; double and triple integrals; areas in 
rectangular and polar co-ordinates; center of gravity; moment of in- 
ertia; length of curves; volumes of solids; areas of surfaces of revolution; 
volumes by triple integration; practical problems in work, pressure, etc., 
depending on the differential and integral calculus for solution; solution 
of simpler differential equations. 

14-07 Differential Equations I — The elementary theory and solution of 
ordinary differential equations is offered here as a general course in 
mathematics. Although principally a problem course in solving differ- 
ential equations, properties of equations and of their solutions are de- 
duced, and applications to the various fields of science are analyzed. 

14-08 Differential Equations 11 — Special cases of first order equations are 
considered, and a fuller treatment of first order equations of higher de- 
gree leads to a consideration of envelopes, special loci, and particular 
curves. The general second order linear equation is studied, and the 
several well-known methods of attack are presented. Solution in series 
form of equations whose primitives are not made up of classified func- 
tions is studied. Elementary partial differential equations of the first and 
second orders, leading to a presentation of Fourier's series, conclude 
the course. 

14-10 Analytic Mechanics — Fundamental concepts and methods of clas- 
sical mechanics. Composition and resolution of force systems; centroid 
and moment of inertia; equilibrium; relative velocity and acceleration; 
energy, impulse, momentum, and work. 

If time permits, some study is made of Lagrange equations and Ham- 
ilton's principles. 

14-11 Curve Analysis — The topics covered are analysis of empirical data, 
curve fitting, least squares, nomographic charts and general analysis of 
equations of curves. 

14-12 Modem Geometry — The course offers a brief outline of the history 
of geometry, especially in the nineteenth century, analysis of geometry of 
the triangle and circle; systems of co-ordinates; linear dependence; trans- 
formations; principle of duality; poles and polars; harmonic division; 
cross ratios; and conical projection. Special theorems include those of 
Desargues, Pascal, and Brianchon. 

14-13 Spherical Trigonometry — This is a complete course in the study of 
spherical trigonometry, solving right and isosceles triangles; Napier's 
rules; laws of sines; cosines, half-angles, and half-side formulas; Napier's 
analogies. A detailed solution of oblique spherical triangles including 
areas follows. Considerable time is spent on the celestial sphere and the 



106 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

astronomical triangle and on navigation, calculation of latitude and 
longitude, bearing, and time. 

14-14 History of Mathematics — In this course a survey is made of the de- 
velopment of the various branches of mathematics, and attention is 
given to the lives of men who have made outstanding contributions to 
mathematical science. 

14-15 Advanced Calculus — The course is essential for all students who 
expect to study more advanced work in the field of mathematics. The 
various topics include special methods of integration, change of vari- 
able, hyperbolic functions, continuity and related theorems, theory and 
application of the infinitesimal, Taylor's series, infinite series in two 
variables, Fourier series, applications of partial differentiation enve- 
lopes, evolutes. 

14-16 Advanced Calculus — This is a continuation of 14-15. The types of 
topics covered are maxima and minima in three dimensions, Jacobians, 
curvilinear co-ordinates, special definite and improper integrals, differ- 
entiation of integrals. Beta Function, Gamma Function, Bessel's Func- 
tion, line integrals, surface integrals, complex variable, and elliptic in- 
tegrals and functions. 

14-17 Infinite Series — Study of limits; infinite series; tests of various types 
of convergence and divergence; algebraic operations with series; inte- 
gration and differentiation of series; applications and use of special 
series, as power and Fourier series. Some solution of differential equa- 
tions as done by infinite series. 

14-18 Theory of Equations — This course is devoted more to the theory 
and analysis of equations and roots than to actual solutions. The prop- 
erties of polynomials and continuity are studied. The complex number 
in algebraic, geometric, and exponential form is reviewed. The solutions 
of equations of higher degree are discussed, discriminants analyzed, and 
various theorems on roots studied. Proof is given of the fundamental 
theorem of algebra. A complete analysis of n equations in m unknowns 
is made, including the theory and use of determinants. The relations of 
roots and coefficients and some symmetric functions are included. 

14-20 Special Topics — Here the student practices the application of his 
mathematics to special applied problems in the various fields of science. 
The course may require considerable reference work in special topics 
chosen so as to be of particular interest to the individual student. (For 
seniors only.) 

14-21 Basic Mathematics I— A course in algebra review in preparation 
for work in trigonometry and analytic geometry. Many topics covered in 
high school are reviewed, and further work is done in the more ad- 
vanced topics. The reasoning underlying the processes of algebra is 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 107 

emphasized so that the student will find the work in algebra is not 
memory work but is a process of simple, logical reasoning. 

14-22 Basic Mathematics II — A course in plane trigonometry, including 
logarithms, covering the usual work through the solution of triangles 
and applications. 

14-23 Basic Mathematics III — This course continues on with more special 
topics from the two preceding basic mathematics courses. It also intro- 
duces the subject of analytic geometry with considerable emphasis on 
the plotting of graphs and the analysis of the equations covered in the 
two preceding courses. 

14-25 Mathematics of Finance — This course starts with the algebra and 
logarithms necessary for the understanding and use of the formulas 
developed in business mathematics. Then the subjects covered are in- 
terest, discount, annuities, sinking funds, depreciation, amortization, 
valuation of bonds, the use of graphs, the interpretation of statistical 
data, and insurance. 

14-28 Mathematical Statistics — The course is designed to develop the 
statistical quantities used for the description of data, together with data 
analysis made possible by the use of these statistical quantities. The 
nature of the course is such that it will have applications in those fields 
where working information is obtained by the collection and analysis 
of data. Included topics are averages, moments, measures of dispersion, 
curve fitting, correlation theory and the normal error function. 

14-29 Mathematical Statistics and Probability — This is a continuation of 
14-28. Here are developed the basic principles underlying the applica- 
tions of mathematical statistics to many practical problems of impor- 
tance in the fields of applied science, research, and industry. Included 
topics are elements of probability, binomial distribution, Poisson ex- 
ponential function, normal probability function, sampling theory, tests 
of statistical hypotheses. 

Modern Lang^ages 
French 

31-01 Elementary French — A beginner's course stressing the essentials of 
grammar, practice in pronunciation, and progressive acquisition of basic 
vocabulary and current idiomatic expressions. 

31-02 Elementary French — A continuation of 31-01 with emphasis on the 
more difficult points of French grammar. Reading of simple texts. 

31-03 Elementary French — A continuation of 31-02. Reading of texts of 
progressively increasing difficulty, with oral and written exercises on the 
material read. Some of the texts are assigned for outside reading. 



108 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

31-04 Elementary French — A continuation of 31-03. Practice in conver- 
sation dealing with the various aspects of everyday life. 

31-11 Introduction to French Literature — This course aims to provide a 
linguistic and cultural background for the study of French literature, 
besides acquainting the student with representative works of some of 
the more important French authors. The work of the first term consists 
of a thorough review of grammar, phonetic drill, and oral practice based 
on suitable texts. 

31-12 Introduction to French Literature — A continuation of 31-11. Most of 
the time is devoted to the study of literary selections dealing with French 
customs, institutions, geography, and history, with oral practice based 
on the material read. Vocabulary building, study of idioms, and outside 
reading. 

31-13 Introduction to French Literature — A continuation of 31-12. Selected 
readings from representative modern authors. Oral practice and memo- 
rizing of selected passages. Outside reading. 

31-14 Introduction to French Literature — A continuation of 31-13. Conver- 
sational practice. The subject matter will deal with the ordinary activi- 
ties of everyday life and contemporary problems. 

31-15 Intermediate French — In this course several texts of average difficul- 
ty are read and studied. The work includes a thorough review of gram- 
mar, oral practice based on the reading matter, memorizing of selected 
passages, dictation, study of idioms, vocabulary building and outside 
reading. 

31-16 Intermediate French — A continuation of 31-15, with an increasing 
amount of both class and outside reading. 



*o" 



31-21 Modem French Literature — A study of the chief trends in French 
literature since 1850. Significant works of representatives of the various 
literary movements are read and analyzed. The course is concerned 
mainly with the short story and the novel. Collateral reading and 
reports. 

31-22 Modern French Literature — A continuation of 31-21. The major 
part of the course is devoted to the study of the drama, with the re- 
mainder given to French verse of the period. Collateral reading and 
reports. 

31-23 French Classicism — This course is designed to furnish a compre- 
hensive survey of the background and development of French literature 
of the seventeenth century and to aid the student in a critical interpre- 
tation of the most significant works of the period. The reading is mainly 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 109 

from the works of Malherbe, Descartes, Pascal, La Fontaine, and 
Boileau. Collateral reading and reports. 

31-24 French Classicism — A continuation of 31-23. The dramatic works 
of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine receive the major attention. 

31-25 French Romanticism — A study of the origins and development of 
the Romantic movement in French literature. The readings include sig- 
nificant selections from the novels of the principal writers of the Ro- 
mantic school, as well as some of the more important Romantic dramas. 

31-26 French Romanticism — Continuing 31-25, the course pursues further 
the study of the Romantic drama. The latter part of the term is devoted 
to the reading of selections of poetry from the works of Lamartine, 
Hugo, Musset, and others. 

31-31 Advanced Composition and Conversation — ^The work of this course 
will include, besides written and oral composition, a systematic review 
of the most important and the more difficult points of French grammar, 
a brief historical survey of the development of the French language, and 
a practical study of French phonetics and pronunciation. Current 
events and other matters of contemporary interest will furnish the topics 
for discussion and conversation. 

31-32 Advanced Composition and Conversation — A continuation of 31-31. 

German 

32-01 Elementary German — A beginner's course stressing the essentials 
of grammar, practice in pronunciation, and progressive acquisition of 
basic vocabulary and current idiomatic expressions. 

32-02 Elementary German — A continuation of 32-01 with emphasis on 
the more difficult points of German grammar. Reading of simple texts. 

32-03 Elementary German — A continuation of 32-02. Reading of texts of 
progressively increasing difficulty, with oral and written exercises on the 
material read. Some of the texts are assigned for outside reading. 

32-04 Elementary German — A continuation of 32-03. Practice in conver- 
sation dealing with the various aspects of everyday life. 

32-1 J Introduction to German Literature — This course aims to provide a 
linguistic and cultural background for the study of German literature, 
besides acquainting the student with representative works of some of 
the more important German authors. The work of the first term consists 
of a thorough review of grammar, phonetic drill, and oral practice 
based on suitable texts. 



no NORTHEASTERN UMVERSITY 

32-12 Introduction to German Literature — A continuation of 32-11. Most 
of the time is devoted to the study of literary selections dealing with 
German customs, institutions, geography, and history, with oral prac- 
tice based on the material read. Vocabulary building, study of idioms, 
and outside reading. 

32-13 Introduction to German Literature — A continuation of 32-12. Se- 
lected readings from representative modern authors. Oral practice and 
memorizing of selected passages. Outside reading. 

32-14 Introduction to German Literature — A continuation of 32-13. Con- 
versational practice. The subject matter will deal with the ordinary activ- 
ities of everyday life and contemporary problems. 

32-15 Intermediate German — In this course several texts of average diffi- 
culty are read and studied. The work includes a thorough review of 
grammar, oral practice based on the reading matter, memorizing of se- 
lected passages, dictation, study of idioms, vocabulary building, and 
outside reading. 

32-16 Intermediate German — A continuation of 32-15, with an increasing 
amount of both class and outside reading. 

32-21 Modern German Literature — A survey of the main currents of Ger- 
man literature since 1880. Representative works of the leading authors 
of the period are read and interpreted. The course deals chiefly with the 
short story and the novel. Collateral reading and reports. 

32-22 Modern German Literature — A continuation of 32-21. The drama 
and poetry receive the main emphasis. Collateral reading and reports. 

32-23 The Classical Period of German Literature — This course aims to trace 
the development of German literature during the second half of the 
eighteenth century beginning with the Storm and Stress period. The 
works of Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller will receive the major emphasis. 

32-24 The Classical Period of German Literature — A continuation of 32- 
23. The readings will consist mainly of the later works of Goethe and 
Schiller. 

32-25 German Literature of the Nineteenth Century — This course will con- 
sider the chief tendencies in German literature from the beginning of 
Romanticism to the coming of Naturalism. Representative works of the 
principal writers of the period will be read and analyzed. 

32-26 German Literature of the Nineteenth Century — A continuation of 32- 
25. Among the works to be read will be some of the outstanding dramas 
of the latter half of the century. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 111 

32-31 Advanced Composition and Conversation — The work of this course 
will include, besides written and oral composition, a systematic review 
of the most important and the more difficult points of German gram- 
mar, a brief historical survey of the development of the German lan- 
guage, and a practical study of German phonetics and pronunciation. 
Current events and other matters of contemporary interest will furnish 
the topics for discussion and conversation. 

32-32 Advanced Composition and Conversation — A continuation of 32-31. 

Spanish 

33-01 Elementary Spanish — A beginner's course stressing the essentials of 
grammar, practice in pronunciation, and progressive acquisition of basic 
vocabulary and current idiomatic expressions. 

33-02 Elementary Spanish — A continuation of 33-01, with emphasis on 
the more difficult points of Spanish grammar. Reading of simple texts. 

33-03 Elementary Spanish — A continuation of 33-02. Reading of texts of 
progressively increasing difficulty, with oral and written exercises on the 
material read. Some of the texts are assigned for outside reading. 

33-04 Elementary Spanish — A continuation of 33-03. Practice in conver- 
sation dealing with the various aspects of everyday life. 

33-11 Introduction to Spanish Literature — This course aims to provide a 
linguistic and cultural background for the study of Spanish literature, 
besides acquainting the student with representative works of some of 
the more important Spanish authors. The work of the first term con- 
sists of a thorough review of grammar, phonetic drill, and oral practice 
based on suitable texts. 

33-12 Introduction to Spanish Literature — A continuation of 33-11. Most 
of the time is devoted to the study of literary selections dealing with 
Spanish customs, institutions, geography, and history, with oral prac- 
tice based on the material read. Vocabulary building, study of idioms, 
and outside reading. 

33-13 Introduction to Spanish Literature — A continuation of 33-12. Se- 
lected readings from representative modern authors. Oral practice and 
memorizing of selected passages. Outside reading. 

33-14 Introduction to Spanish Literature — A continuation of 33-13. Con- 
versational practice. The subject matter will deal with the ordinary activ- 
ities of everyday life and contemporary problems. 

33-15 Intermediate Spanish — In this course several texts of average diffi- 
culty are read and studied. The work includes a thorough review of 



U2 TsIORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

grammar, oral practice based on the reading matter, memorizing of se- 
lected passages, dictation, study of idioms, vocabulary building, and 
outside reading. 

33-16 Intermediate Spanish — A continuation of 33-15, with an increasing 
amount of both class and outside reading. 

33-21 Spanish Literature of the Golden Age — This course deals with the 
Spanish prose of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, particularly 
the Don Quixote and the Novelas Ejemplares. Lectures, translation, and 
collateral reading. 

33-22 Spanish Literature of the Golden Age — A continuation of 33-21, 
with emphasis on the drama of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and 
Calderon. Lectures, translation, and collateral reading. 

33-23 Modern Spanish Literature — This course aims to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the literature of Spain during the last quarter of the eighteenth 
century and the first half of the nineteenth. The chief emphasis is placed 
on the romantic poetry and drama. Lectures, translation, and collateral 
reading. 

33-24 Modem Spanish Literature — A continuation of 33-23, this course is 
devoted to Spanish literature of the second half of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, with emphasis on the realistic novel. Lectures, translation, and 
collateral reading. 

33-25 Modern Spanish American Literature — The purpose of this course is 
to acquaint the student with the general trends of Spanish American 
literature. Plays, essays, and novels that reflect the economic and social 
problems of our neighbors to the south will receive the chief attention. 
Lectures, translation, and collateral reading. 

33-26 Modern Spanish American Literature — A continuation of 33-25, this 
course is devoted to the literature of Mexico and Central America, and 
particularly the works of Ruben Dario. 

33-31 Advanced Composition and Conversation — ^Tlie work of this course 
will include, besides written and oral composition, a systematic review 
of the most important and the more difficult points of Spanish grammar, 
a brief historical survey of the development of the Spanish language, 
and a practical study of Spanish phonetics and pronunciation. Current 
events and other matters of contemporary interest will furnish the topics 
for discussion and conversation. 

33-32 Advanced Composition and Conversation — A continuation of 33-31. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 113 



Philosophy 

Note: In addition to the courses listed, 26-13 and 26-14 Social Ethics may be counted 
as courses in Philosophy. 

24-01 Introduction to Philosophy— This introductory course combines the 
historical and systematic approaches to the subject. The historical treat- 
ment includes a survey of the chief philosophers and the development of 
basic philosophical ideas. The systematic treatment presents the several 
types of philosophy, such as realism, materialism, idealism, and plural- 
ism. The place of philosophy is considered in its relation to ethics, re- 
ligion, and natural sciences. The course both acquaints the student with 
facts about philosophy and trains him to think philosophically. 

24-02 Problems of Philosophy— The. chief systems of thought are applied to 
what may be termed the persistent problems of philosophy. The prob- 
lems are to be found in the fields of epistemology, teleology, and meta- 
physics. The following topics suggest representative problems which will 
be studied: the relation between mind and body, the nature and extent 
of freedom of the will, the validity of knowledge, and the bearing which 
the more recent views in physics and psychology have upon related 
philosophical problems. 

24-03 History of PKi [osopK}'— Beginning with the early Greek age period, 
the course traces the development of philosophical thought through the 
patristic and scholastic periods. A study is made of the transition from 
medieval to modern philosophy. 

24-04 History of Philosophy —The first half of the course is a study of the 
period from Bacon to Kant; the second half begins with the time of Kaiit 
and ends with a consideration of present-day philosophers and their 
systems of thought. 

24-05 Philosophy of Religion— Fundamental questions of religious belief 
are examined in the light of philosophy. Modern religions are compared 
with respect to their views on the nature of the Deity, the meaning of 
life, and the relationship between man and God. Further topics for 
study include the question of the validity of mysticism and intuitive 
knowledge of religious truth, the immortality of the soul, the meaning of 
the supernatural, the presence of natural evil, and the relation of moral- 
ity to religion. 

24-06 Logic— Formal logic is subordinated in this course to the more 
practical consideration of the methods of critical and reflective thought. 
Common fallacies in logic are indicated, and the student is given fre- 
quent exercises in correct reasoning. Attention is given to the principles 
of induction, deduction, verification, syllogism, and assumption. To 
assist the student to think clearly and correcdy is the essential purpose 
of this modified course in logic. 



m NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Physical Education 

16-01 Hygiene — This course aims to provide the student with funda- 
mental information which will be useful in developing and maintaining 
good health and in the practice of personal hygiene. The course includes 
enough of the fundamentals of physiology and anatomy to enable the 
student to understand such parts of the work as require some knowledge 
of these subjects. 

16-02 Hygiene — A continuation of 16-01 , completing a study of the func- 
tion and care of the several systems of the body. 

16-10 Physical Training — All first year men students are required to take 
Physical Training. Health, strength, and vitality do not come by chance 
but by constant attention to those factors involved in their develop- 
ment. It is very essential for the student to acquire good habits of living. 

The work in the course includes a formal calisthenic program, special 
exercise classes for the correction of postural defects, participation in the 
regular athletic program, including baseball, basketball, football, hockey, 
track, and many types of informal games. All members of the class are 
also required to learn to swim. 

Students wishing to be excused from Physical Training because of 
physical defects are required to present a petition to the faculty supported 
by a physician's certificate. 

16-11 Physical Training — A continuation of 16-10. 

16-12 Physical Training — A continuation of 16-11. 

J 6-2 1 Principles of Physical Education — ^The course considers the place of 
physical education in the educational program in the United States. The 
development of physical education programs based on the changes in 
society from primitive to modern times is discussed, careful attention 
being given to the needs of the individual, as well as to the needs of the 
group. Relationship between medical service and the physical education 
department is considered, and methods of co-ordination between these 
two important departments are investigated. The history of physical 
education, in so far as it affects the modern program, is included in the 
course. Factors such as economic, social and political influences which 
have an important effect on the conduct of the program are also con- 
sidered. School health programs are discussed, with particular emphasis 
upon the medical and physical examinations and tests and the proce- 
dures which follow. Diagnostic and remedial techniques, classroom hy- 
giene, and principles of preventive and corrective exercise are discussed. 
The course also includes a consideration of the proper place occupied 
by interschool and intercollegiate athletics in the physical education 
program. 

Required of all students electing Physical Education as a minor field. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 115 

16-22 Play and Recreation — The purpose of this course is to prepare stu- 
dents for leadership of leisure-time activities. It considers the biological 
and sociological aspects of play and its increasing importance in modern 
life. From a practical point of view the course deals with the problems 
faced by the director o{ leisure-time activities in the community, in the 
school, or on the playground. The course should be of special interest to 
students who contemplate entering social work or teaching. 

16-23 History of Physical Education — To provide a valuable background 
for students in this field, this course traces the whole history of physical 
education from the days of the Greeks and the Romans up to the present. 
Attention is given to a number of special systems of training which have 
been developed in Europe. 

The course is required of all students electing Physical Education as a 
minor field. 

16-24 Administration of Physical Education — This course is designed to ac- 
quaint students in the field of physical education with many of the ad- 
ministrative problems which are likely to arise in connection with their 
work. The subject matter includes a consideration of the objectives of 
the physical education program, personnel required, and various allied 
subjects, such as gymnasia, athletic fields, and the construction and 
maintenance of these units. The conduct of the athletic program in- 
cluding requirements for equipment, arrangements of schedules, coach- 
ing, meets, etc., is also included. 

Required of all students electing Physical Education as a minor field. 

16-25 Football — This course is designed to furnish the student interested 
in football coaching with a thorough knowledge of the sport. Careful 
consideration is given to the fundamentals in discussing the plays of each 
position in the line and backfield. Various well-known offensive and de- 
fensive systems are discussed for the purpose of considering their gen- 
eral merits, as well as adaptations to particular situations. Training and 
conditioning, rules and interpretation, and officiating are given proper 
attention. 

16-26 Track and Field Events — The course considers the care and training 
of track athletes. Practice schedules, selection of material, conduct of 
meets, etc., are discussed. The viewpoint from which the topics are 
treated is that of the student of coaching technique. In connection with 
this course, action pictures taken from actual performances by world 
champions, together with moving pictures, are of great value in dem- 
onstrating the style and technique of track and field events. 

16-27 Basketball and Baseball — Various systems in use throughout the 
country are compared and contrasted. Team play, offense, defense, signal 
systems, training and conditioning, rules, and officiating are among the 
topics studied. The student in this course should acquire a thorough 
knowledge of all phases of the sports. 



116 NORTHEASTERN UNrVERSITY 

Physics 

15-01 Physics — A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics. The 
topics treated are kinematics, dynamics, and statics. 

15-02 Physics — This course completes the study of mechanics, and starts 
the subject of electricity and magnetism. Energy, power, machines, vi- 
bratory motion, elasticity, fluids, magnetism and electrostatics are 
studied. 

15-03 Physics — Continues the subject of electricity. The topics covered 
are resistivity, circuits, electromagnetism, magnetic circuits and con- 
densers. 

15-04 Physics — Completes the study of electricity. Basic principles of 
alternating current generation and series circuits, thermoelectric, photo- 
electric, and thermionic effects, and electromagnetic radiation are the 
topics studied. 

15-05 Physics — A first course in the study of light, covering all the details 
within the scope of standard college texts on the subject. Lectures, dem- 
onstrations, and laboratory experiments on selected topics in mechanics 
and light. 

15-06 Physics — A study of wave motion, sound and heat. Lectures, 
demonstrations, and laboratory experiments, the latter covering topics 
in sound, heat, and electricity. 

15-07 Survey of Physical Sciences — This sequence of courses is designed 
to give students who are majoring in nonscience fields an understand- 
ing of the contributions and place of the physical sciences in contempo- 
rary civilization. In this course attention is directed to the fundamental 
phases of physics. The class work will be supplemented by demonstra- 
tions and motion pictures. 

15-OS Survey of Physical Sciences — A continuation of 15-07, emphasizing 
the various phases of physics. Everyday applications of physics in the 
household are stressed. 

15-09 Survey of Physical Sciences — In this course consideration is given to 
the basic processes of chemistry and their significance. The latter part 
of the term is devoted to topics in astronomy. 

15-10 Survey of Physical Sciences — The contribution of geology to an un- 
derstanding of our physical world is the subject of this course. Certain 
aspects of meteorology receive attention. 

15-11 General Physics — A study of the fundamental principles of me- 
chanics. Lectures and demonstrations only. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 117 

15-12 General Physics — The topics covered are heat, wave motion, sound 
and light. In addition to lectures and demonstrations the student per- 
forms experiments in the laboratory illustrating the above topics and 
those covered in 15-11. 

15-13 General Physics — A thorough study of the basic principles of elec- 
tricity and magnetism. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory ex- 
periments. 

15-14 Advanced Physics — Selected topics in electricity, magnetism, and 
basic electronics. For chemistry majors only. 

15-15 Advanced Pfi^sics— Selected topics in optics. For chemistry majors 
only. 

15-20 Optics — This is a course in the more advanced forms of geo- 
metrical optics and the study of physical optics. 

15-21 Optics— Continuing 15-20, a detailed study is made of physical 
optics with some time spent on modern spectroscopic theory. 

15-22 Acoustics — A complete mathematical study of the modes of vibra- 
tion of strings, pipes, membranes, and a consideration of vibrating sys- 
tems in general. 

15-23 Acoustics — A course in the application of the principles of 15-22 
to the problems of speech, audition, sound, filters, musical instruments, 
and the acoustics of auditoriums. 

15-24 Electronics — This course is designed to make the student familiar 
with the principles, operation and application of electronic devices. 
Direct current circuits, alternating current circuits, measuring devices, 
thermionic tubes, and electronic principles are studied. 

15-25 Electronics — Continuing the work of the first term, audio amplifiers 
and oscillators, high frequency amplifiers and oscillators, frequency 
measurements, photo cells, detectors, radio, and some special applica- 
tions are studied. 

15-26 Modern Physics — Consideration is given to molecular relations, 
and then to atomic structure, quantum mechanics, and allied subjects. 

15-27 Modern Physics — Radioactivity, artificial transmutation, nuclear 
structure, and the devices for studying these phenomena are here pre- 
sented. Some time is also given to the Stark, Zeeman, and Raman effects, 
and to X radiation and cosmic rays. 

15-65 Thesis — See statement on Theses, page 123. 



118 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

15-66 Thesis — A continuation of 15-65. 

15-101 Theoretical Physics — Vector analysis, dynamics, hydrodynamics, 
thermodynamics, statistical mechanics. 
(For graduate students only.) 

15-102 Theoretical Physics — Kinetic theory of gases, electrical theory, 
magnetic theory, optics, spectra. 
(For graduate students only.) 

15-103 Quantum Mechanics — Quantum phenomena, Schrodinger equa- 
tion, potential barriers, classical atomic dynamics, linear harmonic oscil- 
lator, rigid rotator. 

(For graduate students only.) 

15-104 Quantum Mechanics — The hydrogen atom. Van der Waal's forces, 
perturbation theory, the helium atom, the hydrogen molecule, valence 
bonds, radiation. 

(For graduate students only.) 

15-105 Applied Mathematics — Elliptical integrals, matrices, algebraic and 
trigonometric series, line and surface integrals, some differential equa- 
tions of physics. 

(For graduate students only.) 

15-107 Graduate Thesis — Thesis work for graduate students. 

15-108 Graduate Thesis — Thesis work for graduate students. 

15-109 Graduate Thesis — Thesis work for graduate students. 

15-110 Graduate Thesis — Thesis work for graduate students. 

Psychology 

25-01 Introductory Psychology — An elementary study of the structure, func- 
tions, and laws of mental life. The course considers the special relation 
of psychology to the social sciences; the scientific approach to a study of 
mental processes; the dynamics of animal and human behavior; the re- 
lationship between the individual's environment, his response mechan- 
isms, and his personality; the biological and social sources of drives, 
desires, wishes, and incentives and their relation to interest, effort, ad- 
justment, and maladjustment. 

25-02 General Psychology — The course makes a systematic study of the 
psychological mechanisms underlying human behavior and it presents 
the more important theories of thought and action. It deals with the 
neurophysiological and psychological mechanisms involved in learn- 
ing, memory, thought, imagination, motivation, emotion, sensation. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 119 

and perception; the nature and extent of individual differences; aptitudes 
and aptitude testing. It emphasizes the practical application of pyscholog- 
ical principles to mental and social adjustment. It presents the main 
problems in psychology and gives the points of view of the different 
schools of thought. 

25-11 Measurements in Psychology — The course aims to give the student 
an understanding of the statistical procedures by which mental tests are 
constructed, standardized and evaluated. It deals with the following 
topics: collection, reduction and tabulation of data; tabular and graphi- 
cal methods of presentation; methods of central tendency and disper- 
sion; comparison of groups in terms of differences between means, me- 
dians and modes; methods of correlation. 

Special emphasis is given to the measurement of psychometric vari- 
ables and the practical application of aptitude and ability tests to in- 
dustrial and vocational psychology. 

25-12 Experimental Psychology I — An introduction to the methods and 
techniques used by the psychologist in his experimental studies of hu- 
man nature. Detailed study of the materials, procedures and scoring 
devices appropriate to investigations in such fields as threshold measure- 
ments, learning and memory, work and fatigue, emotional expression. 
Sources of error and their control. Systematic written reports required. 

25-13 Experimental Psychology II — A systematic study of the methodology 
and instrumentation of experimental psychology. The course is designed 
to enable the student to acquire techniques for the measurement of ac- 
tion potentials, muscle tension and electrical resistance of the body 
during various kinds of mental and emotional activity; for conducting 
interviews and recording and evaluating the material obtained; for 
measuring public reactions; for testing behavior and development hy- 
potheses. Individual research projects for each student required. 

25-14 Social Psychology — A study of the psychological factors underlying 
human relations with emphasis upon social motivation, nature and de- 
velopment of groups, social movements and institutions, antisocial 
behavior, social controls, leadership, co-operation, war, propaganda, 
racial prejudice. 

In addition, the course seeks to elucidate the methods and the tech- 
niques which yield trustworthy data regarding social phenomena. 

25-15 Educational Psychology — The subject matter of the course is the 
application of psychological principles and data to general educational 
practices. It deals with the problems of native endowment and its modi- 
fication through an effective use of the laws of learning; mental growth 
and decline; development of personality; disabilities in speech and lan- 
guage; methods of teaching; the use of objective ability and achieve- 
ment tests; and the techniques of experimentation. 



120 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

25-16 Educational Psychology — A critical consideration of the psycholog- 
ical aspects of various problems of education. Problems of the class- 
room, the curriculum, school administration, influence of the home and 
the community, the ideals of democracy, freedom of the individual, 
social values, adult education, education of leisure, educational aims, 
issues in educational practice, progressive education, health and hy- 
giene, ethics and character, trends toward educational reform. 

25-17 Abnormal Psychology I — A detailed account of the minor person- 
ality disturbances and social maladjustments. A review of the principal 
conceptions of personality development and disintegration. An evalua- 
tion of the typical objective measures of normal and abnormal person- 
alities. The causation and structure of the psychoneuroses. The causes, 
diagnosis, treatment and prevention of various types of mental disorders. 

25-18 Abnormal Psychology 11 — The development of the subject from the 
minor manifestations of the hypnogogic state, through dreams, hypno- 
tism, hysteria and multiple personality to the more widely divergent con- 
ditions appearing in some forms of insanity. The symptomatology of 
mental disorders; ancient and modern ideas of causation; a critical eval- 
uation of the psychological conceptions underlying diagnosis, therapy, 
and custodial care. Mental hygiene. Supplementary lectures on amentia, 
religious and mystical experiences, extrasensory perception, occult phe- 
nomena. 

25-19 Psychology of Personality I — A historical and critical survey of the 
evidence for and against the existence of personality types. Considera- 
tion of the place of the single case in psychological science. A study of 
the various psychological components which enter into the structure of 
personality testing. 

25-20 Psychology of Personality 11 — An analysis and appraisal of the litera- 
ture dealing with the emerging organismic viewpoint in psychology. The 
dependence of personality structure upon the cultural situation as de- 
fined in psychiatric, anthropological and sociological contributions. 
Theories of personality organization. Methods and techniques for the 
study of personality. 

25-21 Child Psychology — A survey of the growth and development of 
children. The course studies the biological, organic, cultural, and psy- 
chological determinants of personality structure and development; the 
child's conception of the world; the problems of adolescence; the mental 
and physical characteristics of exceptional children; and the causes of 
malbehavior. 

Special attention is given to the treatment of problem children through 
a change or modification of the environment, institutional care, and the 
application of psychological techniques. 

25-22 Child Psychology — A continuation of 25-21. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 111 

25-23 Industrial Psychology — A study of the principles and techniques of 
psychology in their relation to the problems which affect industrial effi- 
ciency. The course includes such topics as training and transfer, fatigue, 
monotony, motivation, accident prevention, conditions and methods of 
work, vocational fitness, adjustment, and the techniques of human 
control. 

Special consideration is given to the motives controlling owner and 
manager of industry and that of the employees; to the conflicts of desire 
which result; to the emotional appeals which are used to resolve these 
conflicts; and to the unconscious impulses which are rationalized in 
idealistic and philosophical formulations. 

25-24 Industrial Psychology — A continuation of 25-23. 

25-31 Advanced Psychology I — ^The historical background of modern psy- 
chology in the light of philosophical, biological, and general scientific 
antecedents. A critical survey of the experimental and theoretical litera- 
ture under the heading of learning and memory, thinking and reasoning, 
work and fatigue, physiological and genetic psychology, feeling and 
emotion. Psychophysiological techniques for the study of processes in- 
volved in sensory and perceptual experiences. Comparative psychology. 
Biopsychology. Psychometric techniques. 

25-32 Advanced Psychology U — A critical survey of the various schools, 
systems, or points of view in modern psychology. A study and critical 
evaluation of developments in contemporary psychological theory and 
of articles in current psychological periodicals. 

25-61 Seminar — Assigned readings and reports in theoretical and his- 
torical problems. May be elected with the consent of the department by 
qualified seniors majoring in psychology. 

25-62 Seminar — A continuation of 25-61. 

Sociology 

26-01 Principles of Sociology — In presenting a survey of the origins and 
sources of human society, this study provides orientation for the courses 
in principles and problems which follow. The several theories of organic 
evolution are discussed. The antiquity of man and basic anthropological 
data are considered. The racial and ethnic groupings of man are then 
studied in the light of biological, geographical, and cultural factors. 

26-02 Principles of Sociology — Facts and principles basic to a general 
knowledge of the field of sociology are presented. The origins, forms, and 
forces of human associations are discussed. Consideration is given the 
several leading schools of sociological thought. The course is designed 
to meet the needs of the student who desires only an elementary survey 
of the subject as well as the student who plans to take advanced courses 
in social science. 



122 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

26-1 1 Social Problems — Attention is given the nature, complex causation, 
and interrelatedness of social problems in general. Cultural change, 
with its attendant lags, as well as other social forces and conflicts are 
studied. While sociological theory is occasionally introduced to clarify 
the problem at hand, the course is essentially practical in character. 
Such problems as poverty and unemployment, race antagonisms, popu- 
lation pressures, and the broken home are considered. Optional field 
trips to various institutions give concreteness to the problems studied. 

26-12 Social Problems — Similar to 26-11 in background and approach, 
this course deals with the maladjustments and ills of human society. 
Emphasis is given those pathological conditions which exist in relations 
between the individual and the group. Typical subjects presented include 
mental defectiveness and disease, alcoholism and drug addiction, suicide, 
delinquency and crime, and pathologies of domestic relations. The field 
trips arranged for this course add to the practical knowledge of the social 
ills which are studied. 

26-13 Social Ethics — ^To clarify the meaning of morality in social rela- 
tions is the aim of this study. Right and wrong conduct is analyzed in 
the light of the highest values for human society. Moral laws are dis- 
cussed, and the various systems of ethics are evaluated. Scientific atti- 
tudes are encouraged in order that one's moral judgments may be com- 
patible with one's best reflective thought. 

26-14 Social Ethics — Problems arising from differences in moral standards 
found in the various social groups will be examined. The question of 
ethical relativism and determinism will be considered. A selected number 
of specific problems in social ethics will be discussed. 

26-15 The Family — ^The historical development of the family is first 
traced, after which the course focuses upon the modern family. The 
monogamic family is contrasted with other types, and such unconven- 
tional forms as companionate and trial marriages are evaluated. Then 
follows an intensive study of family problems. A constructive program 
is presented for strengthening the family as a basic unit in society. 

26-16 Criminology — Delinquency and crime are defined and classified, 
and their causal factors indicated. The various theories as to what makes 
criminals are dealt with, and a brief history of crime is sketched. Legal 
and economic aspects of crime are summarized, but the study is mainly 
sociological. Attention is paid to the prevention and correction of crim- 
inal behavior and to dealing with offenders. Local institutions are visited. 

26'17 Urban Sociology — Upon studying the complex human society 
found in the various cities of the world, this course then turns to an 
analysis of the modern American city. Its types, social values, and path- 
ological elements are discussed. Methods of city planning are considered. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 123 

The belief on the part of some sociologists that democracy is doomed 
by its cities is examined in the light of typical problems of urban society. 

26-18 Social Progress — The historical development of the theory of prog- 
ress, contemporary concepts of social progress, the agents of progress, 
and the phenomenon of regression are several of the subjects for study. 

26-19 Sociological Theory — With emphasis upon modern authorities, this 
course surveys the chief systems of sociological thought and the person- 
alities who have made outstanding contributions to the field. Such lead- 
ing thinkers as Sumner, Ward, Gumplowicz, Durkheim, and Pareto are 
studied. The relation of sociological theory to contemporary world 
movements is stressed. 

26-20 American Social Thought — Beginning with such early social philos- 
ophers as Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine, this course deals with 
the significant contributions to the stream of our national culture. The 
sociological concepts, forces, and institutions — which have produced 
what is commonly designated as the American way of life — are analyzed 
and evaluated. 

26-21 Sociology of Religion — Religious beliefs, practices, and institutions 
are examined and evaluated in relation to their effects upon society at 
large. The great religions of the world are compared in the light of their 
contributions to the well-being and progress of mankind. The social 
creeds of the several leading denominations in America are discussed 
with respect to their attitudes towards race, industry, war, and other 
social problems. The influences of organized religion upon politics and 
educational institutions are given attention. 

26-22 Principles of Social Work — This course is designed to prepare the 
student for part-time or full-time participation, either on a voluntary or 
professional basis, in any of the major social service agencies. Methods 
and techniques are studied, and the practical problems are discussed. 
Several representatives from the various agencies will give occasional 
lectures. Field trips are offered. 

26-61 Seminar — Assigned readings and reports on selected topics. May 
be elected with the consent of the department by qualified seniors major- 
ing in sociology. 

26-62 Seminar — A continuation of 26-61. 

Theses 

A thesis in the College of Liberal Arts is considered to be an essay 
involving the statement, analysis, and solution of some problem in a 
special field. Its purpose is to demonstrate a satisfactory degree of initia- 
tive and power of original thought and work on the part of the candi- 



124 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

date. A mere resume of existing knowledge in some subject is not accept- 
able. This, it is true, must usually be made, but in addition thereto the 
student must show an ability to deal constructively with the data which 
have been collected and the power to draw significant and reliable con- 
clusions from the investigations. The completed thesis will be examined 
for acceptance or rejection from the technical viewpoint by the major 
departments interested and then forwarded to the Secretary of the 
Faculty. Final approval of the thesis rests with the Dean. When it is 
accepted, the thesis becomes the property of the college and is not to be 
printed, published, nor in any other way made public except in such 
manner as the major department and the Dean shall jointly approve. 

Frequently thesis subjects may be chosen on problems arising where 
the student is employed at co-operative work. Employers are usually glad 
to consult with the student in the selection of the subject and the sub- 
sequent development of the thesis. 

When theses are conducted in this manner, it is understood that the 
employer is not expected by the University to assume any expense of the 
thesis nor to furnish any supplies or equipment to be used in the develop- 
ment of the thesis other than those which he may consider it advisable 
and desirable to place at the disposal of the students. The regulations 
governing the use of laboratories and buildings of the co-operating firms 
will vary in practically all cases and each student must naturally be gov- 
erned definitely by the regulations existing at the plant where the thesis 
is to be conducted. 

It is understood that the thesis work must not in any way interfere 
with the regular required co-operative work and must be done during 
hours distinctly outside of regular co-operative work hours unless spe- 
cial request is made by the co-operating firm for some other arrangement. 

Theses conducted in conjunction with co-operating firms must be sub- 
mitted in duplicate, one copy to be presented by the Dean to the co- 
operating employer. 

Theses are not required of seniors in the College of Liberal Arts. To 
certain students who wish to do so, however, the privilege of writing a 
thesis may be granted by the Faculty Committee on Theses in accord- 
ance with the following regulations: 

1. To be eligible to write a thesis a student must have attained a 
scholastic average of at least 2.0 or better through the middler year and 
the first half of the junior year. 

2. Students who have met this minimum requirement may petition 
for the privilege of substituting a thesis for formal classroom work. 

3. In this petition the student must state the subject which is to be 
investigated and give a brief statement of the purpose and scope of the 
proposed thesis. 

4. Petitions for the privilege of writing theses must be submitted in 
writing to the head of the student's major department not later than the 
middle of the second term of the junior year. 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



COLLEGE OF 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



cAdmission Requirements and Courses of Study 



me-mi 




(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 



BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

DECEMBER, 1945 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADM /NZSTR AT/ON 127 

THE COLLEGE OF 
• BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

business and Education 

TODAY as never before "Business" is co-operating with educational 
institutions in the training of young men and women who are 
looking forward to positions in business at the administrative 
level. The need for professionalization in the major fields of business 
administration became apparent in the "New Deal" thirties and has 
been strengthened by the requirements of conversion and reconversion. 
Accountancy has established itself as a profession, and the day is coming 
when the administrative positions in industrial relations, advertising, 
marketing, finance, insurance, and general management will offer the 
prestige of professionalization. The College of Business Administration 
offers accredited programs of study to meet the educational needs of the 
young men and women who hope to fill these positions. 

Although it is true that collegiate training for business is relatively 
new in the field of higher education, it is also evident that collegiate 
business schools are beyond the stage of early experimentation and have 
emerged on a level with other college courses recognized as higher edu- 
cation. There is a certain advantage in newness in that the mere youth 
of the college keeps it up to date in its outlook and scope of activity. In 
addition, it is not bound by the traditional but obsolete practices some- 
times found in older branches of education. 

We hear a good deal today about the increasing need for specialists in 
business. It is asserted that modern business institutions have become so 
large that no one individual can administer the many matters of routine 
involving executive judgment. The need for specialists is self-evident, 
but the training best suited for preparing the individual to take over 
specialized executive authority is not so evident. There are many schools 
offering a short course of training in preparation for these specialized 
positions. Such training cannot give the individual the breadth of vision 
needed to go beyond minor managerial jobs demanding attention to the 
exhausting details of daily routine. 

To pass beyond this on the way to responsibility of truly executive na- 
ture a background of general business and related knowledge is essential. 
This background should precede the specialized study into a particular 
branch of business, enabling one to see the whole business and industrial 
picture and not merely one branch of it. Executive administration can- 
not be taught with any adequacy by attacking one subject, no matter 
how carefully planned the approach and how thorough the course of 
study. For instance, accounting is not the only means of arriving at a 
production budget based on sales estimates; it is but one of the tools. A 
knowledge of marketing, finance, statistics, and management technique 
is also needed. 



128 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

For this reason the academic content of the different curricula in the 
College of Business Administration is divided roughly as follows: one- 
eighth in English (writing and speaking), one-third in the social sci- 
ences, one-quarter in a special branch of business, and one-quarter in 
related business subjects. This subject matter content is equivalent to 
that offered in the traditional four-year undergraduate business curricula. 
Since, however, periods of probation and apprenticeship are inherent 
in the nature of positions at the administrative level, the Northeastern 
programs based upon the co-operative plan are especially significant. 

Aims of the College 

In keeping with current trends in collegiate business education, the 
educational policy of the college is directed toward the achievement of 
the following purposes: 

First: To offer that type of education for business which will enable 
men and women to select most advisedly the field of business best suited 
to their aptitudes. The Co-operative Plan is particularly effective in this 
respect. 

Second: To build for breadth of perspective in preference to over- 
specialization with its narrowing effects. To eliminate haphazard selec- 
tion of courses, through concentration upon balanced, carefully co- 
ordinated curricula, in order to provide an adequate background for 
specialization and yet not overlook professional needs and requirements. 

Third: To provide a thorough knowledge of fundamental economic 
laws and an understanding of their applications in business. 

Fourth: To develop the habits of accurate thinking that are essential 
to sound judgment. 

Fifth: To develop attitudes and ideals that are ethically sound and 
socially desirable. 

Methods 

In order that these aims may be realized as fully as possible, the col- 
lege makes use of the problem and the case methods of instruction in 
addition to the lecture and recitation system. Textbook reading alone 
is almost valueless; students tend to accept without question what the 
textbook presents. Instead, they should learn to analyze every proposi- 
tion, to challenge unsupported assertions, to think independently, and 
to support their thinking with logic and facts. 

Hence, concrete problems and cases which executives have faced in 
accounting, marketing, organizing, and the like constitute the bulk of 
class work. Students analyze problems, break them into their constituent 
parts, discover and list the factors for and against possible solutions, and 
work out a logical conclusion. In class they discuss their work with their 
instructors in the light of the latter's broader knowledge. 

Such a method tends to develop an executive attitude. No lecture or 
mere reading of textbooks can do so. Students gain skill and facility in 
solving problems by actually solving many hundreds of them, thereby 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMIMSTRATIOhl 129 

accumulating a ripe experience seldom open to the employee buried in 
routine and mechanical detail. What counts in business, as elsewhere, 
is not solely whether one possesses much knowledge, but whether 
through his knowledge one can logically and effectively solve the prob- 
lems he confronts, or possibly prevent problems from arising. Experience 
in solving typical problems provides a background for anticipating and 
forestalling similar ones as well as for solving others that may arise. 

The methods of Northeastern for accomplishing its aims are not 
limited to the work of the classroom. Northeastern places great emphasis 
upon the power of co-operative work. During the co-op work periods 
students obtain the basic experience and the practical know-how that 
gives them some standing in the field of their choice. Also as a part of 
its methods, Northeastern offers a broad program of student activities, 
and every student is encouraged to participate. The personal growth 
that comes from participation in athletics, musical clubs, class affairs, 
professional societies, etc., is an asset to every student who aspires to 
business leadership. 

Equipment 

Visual Education Equipment — Classroom instruction is made more effec- 
tive by the use of motion pictures and lantern slides. For this purpose 
there are available projectors for 16 mm. and 35 mm. films. Complete 
sound motion picture apparatus is also available. New and powerful 
Delineascopes project the lantern slides. Stationary as well as portable 
daylight screens enable students to take notes while viewing the pictures. 

Business Laboratory — Students have available for laboratory work in 
accounting and statistical methods all of the commonly used office ma- 
chines. These are available in a special room together with necessary 
library services, including Moody's Manuals, Poor's Manuals, and vari- 
ous charts and maps. 

The laboratory is in charge of a graduate assistant whose work is to 
maintain the equipment in excellent condition and to give instruction 
in the use of the various office machines. 

Principal pieces of equipment in the laboratory include duplicators, 
typewriters, hand and electric calculators, and both hand and electric 
adding machines. 



130 hlORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



cAdmission '^quirements 

Applicants for admission to the freshman class without restrictions 
must qualify by one of the following methods; 

1. Graduation from an approved course of study in an accredited 
secondary school, including prescribed subjects listed below. 

2. Completion of fifteen acceptable secondary school units with a 
degree of proficiency satisfactory to the Department of Admissions. 

3. Examinations. 

(Certificate of entrance examinations passed for admission to 
recognized colleges and technical schools may be accepted.) 

Prescribed Subjects for Admission 

College of Business Administration 

Mathematics (Algebra recommended) 1 unit 

Natural Science 1 unit 

History, Social Studies, Mathematics and /or foreign 

language 6 units 

English 3 units 

*Electives 4 units 

Total 15 units 



*Not less than four of the "electives" must be in one or more of the following aca- 
demic branches: Languages, Natural Science, Mathematics, Social Sciences, History. 

A unit is a credit given to an acceptable secondary school course 
which meets at least four times a week for periods of not less than forty 
minutes each throughout the school year. 

Entrance examinations are not required of students whose transcripts 
of record are acceptable, but the Committee on Admissions reserves the 
right to require a candidate to be present for an examination in any 
subjects that it may deem necessary because of some weakness in the 
secondary school record. 

Other Requirements 

These formal requirements are necessary and desirable in that they 
tend to provide all entering students with a common ground upon which 
the first year of the college curriculum can be based. But academic credits 
alone are not an adequate indication of a student's ability to profit by a 
college education. Consequently, the Department of Admissions takes 
into consideration, along with the formal requirements stated above, 
other factors regarding candidates for the freshman class. A student's 
interests and aptitudes in so far as these can be determined, capacity for 
hard work, attitude toward classmates and teachers in high school, 
physical stamina, and most important of all — character are considered. 
In this way the University seeks to select for its student body those who 
not only meet the academic admission requirements but who also give 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMZMSTRAT/ON 131 

promise of acquitting themselves creditably in the rigorous program of 
training afforded by the Co-operative Plan and of being useful members 
of society. 

Personal Interview 

A personal interview is always preferred to correspondence, and par- 
ents are urged to accompany the applicant whenever this is possible. 
Effective guidance depends in large measure upon a complete knowledge 
of a student's background and problems. Parents invariably are able to 
contribute information that aids the admissions officer in arriving at a 
decision. 

Candidates should visit the Office of Admissions for personal inter- 
view if it is possible for them to do so before submitting their applica- 
tions. Office hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily; Saturdays to 
12:00 M. The Department of Admissions will interview applicants on 
Wednesday evenings but by appointment only. 

Application for Admission 

Each applicant for admission is required to fill out an application 
blank stating previous education, as well as the names of persons to 
whom reference may be made. 

A fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required when the application is filed. 
This fee is nonreturnable. 

The last page of this catalog is in the form of an application blank. It 
should be filled out in ink and forwarded with the required five-dollar 
fee to the Director of Admissions, Northeastern University, Boston 15, 
Massachusetts. 

Checks should be made out to Northeastern University. 

Upon receipt of the application, properly filled out, the University 
secures the references and secondary school record. As soon as possible 
after the Committee on Admissions has reviewed the completed appli- 
cation, a report of the status with respect to admission will be sent to 
each candidate. 

Early filing of applications is recommended. 

The University reserves the right to place any entering student upon 
an indefinite trial period. Reclassification will be determined upon the 
academic success of the student. 

Registration 

Eligibility for admission does not constitute registration. Freshmen 
will register at the University on September 5, 1946, and November 14, 
1946. Students are not considered to have met the requirements for ad- 
mission until they have successfully passed the required physical exam- 
ination. 

Advanced Standing 

Students transferring from approved colleges will be admitted to ad- 
vanced standing provided their records warrant it. Whenever a person 
enters with advanced standing and later proves to have had inadequate 



132 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

preparation in any prerequisite subjects, the faculty reserves the right 
to require the student to make up such deficiencies. 

Applicants seeking advanced standing should arrange to have tran- 
scripts of their previous college records forwarded with their initial 
inquiry. Students admitted to advanced standing are not eligible for 
placement for co-operative work until they have completed a full year 
of academic work at the University. 

Entrance Examinations 

Candidates who are lacking in required units for admission may re- 
move these deficiencies by examination. Such examinations are held at 
the University unless special arrangements are made with the Depart- 
ment of Admissions to administer them elsewhere. 

Students are advised to take such examinations on the earliest possible 
date in order that any deficiencies which they fail to clear may be made 
up in time to permit registration with the desired class and division. 

Examinations will be given approximately three weeks before each 
registration date from ten to twelve and from one to three on days to 
be announced. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMIhUSTRATlOhl 133 



'^quirements for Qraduation 

Students may qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration in one of the following options: Accounting, Industrial 
Relations, Marketing and Advertising, Finance and Insurance, and 
Business Management. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete all of 
the prescribed work of the curriculum in which they seek to qualify with 
a degree of proficiency acceptable to the faculty. Students who undertake 
co-operative work assignments must also meet the requirements of the 
Department of Co-operative Work before they become eligible for their 
degrees. 

Students transferring from another college or university are not eligible 
to receive the B.S. degree until they have completed at least one aca- 
demic year at Northeastern immediately preceding their graduation. 

Scholarship Requirements 

Students who fail to show satisfactory standards of general efficiency 
in their professional fields may be required to demonstrate their quali- 
fications for the degree by taking such additional work as the faculty 
may prescribe. Those who are clearly unable to meet the accepted stand- 
ard of attainment may be required to withdraw from the University. 
The degree conferred not only represents the formal completion of the 
subjects in the selected course of study but also indicates professional 
competence in the designated field of business administration. 

Graduation with Honor 

Candidates who have achieved distinctly superior attainment in their 
academic work will be graduated with honor. Upon special vote of the 
faculty a limited number of this group may be graduated with high 
honor or with highest honor. Students must have been in attendance at 
the University at least three years before they may become eligible for 
honors at graduation. 

Thesis Option 

Theses are not required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration. Students who show special aptitude 
for thesis work, however, may be permitted to substitute an appropriate 
thesis for equivalent work in class. Such permission must be obtained 
by the candidate from the Dean of the college. 



134 'NORTHEASTERhl UNIVERSITY 

^he Programs of Study 

First Year 

A full year of thirty weeks is devoted to a survey of the economic, 
political, and social institutions that underlie the conduct of business. 

The basic tool of business, the keeping of accounts, is introduced 
during the first year to provide a practical check upon the interest and 
capacity of each student in the College of Business Administration. 

English is given an important place and other courses fill the personal 
needs of the student and prepare him for the more advanced work. 
Throughout the year each student has the friendly counsel and guidance 
of a faculty adviser whose aim is to help bridge the gap between high 
school and college. 

Upperclass Years 

For those who elect the five-year co-operative plan, training on the 
job starts with the second year. 

At the end of the second year, at the close of term 6, students elect 
their curricular options in accordance with their major fields of interest 
and natural aptitudes. 

In each of terms 11, 12, 14, and 15 each student will elect a 4-credits 
course from a group of selected courses. A student may, for instance, 
elect to take a series of courses in a language or to take advanced courses 
in economics, history, government, sociology, psychology, or to take 
particular courses in other fields of study. The list of elective subjects for 
each term will be somewhat limited by schedule conflicts with the pre- 
scribed program of study but as wide a selection as practicable will be 
offered. 

During the last year all students attend a series of meetings designed 
to prepare them for entrance into the business world. Under expert 
guidance each student prepares a complete personnel record, studies 
himself and the opportunities that are open to him, and generally 
establishes himself for his "commencement." 

The Professional Options 

All students are required to take common courses which are deemed 
necessary for a well-rounded training. These are pursued jointly with the 
professional work which has been selected, with a view to meeting the 
changing and expanding needs of present-day business conduct, while at 
the same time meeting the vocational needs of the students by way of 
earning a living. A brief statement of the vocational opportunities in the 
fields of work represented by each of the professional options follows: 

I. Accounting — Many successful careers are open to the professional 
accountants. Their services are demanded by business, commerce and 
industry. Public and private enterprises seek adequately trained men 
and women. Better known among the wide variety of titles descriptive 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 135 

of their work are public and private accountant, cost accountant, resi- 
dent and traveling auditor, credit manager, statistician, investigator, ad- 
juster, and financial accountant. 

II. Industrial Relations — The day is past when "anyone" can direct labor- 
management relations. A host of opportunities exist, therefore, in this 
newer field, the human side of conducting a business. Both unions and 
management offer a wide selection of positions in personnel, bargaining, 
wage administration and public relations. The government, too, has 
many openings for men and women who have taken this program of 
studies. 

III. Marketing and Advertising — Business and industry must sell their 
services and products to each other and to the general public. Successful 
selling means more than being a salesman. It demands knowledge of 
distribution channels, markets and buying habits, as well as sales re- 
sistance. It means also knowing how to buy in order to sell and then 
how to organize, promote, and carry out a sales campaign. 

The following list is representative of the vast array of marketing and 
advertising occupations: sales manager, supervisor, analyst and corre- 
spondent, advertising manager, promotion manager, copy supervisor, 
space buyer, and publicity director; market, product and sales analyst, 
industrial salesman, sales personnel supervisor, field representative, 
missionary salesman, manufacturer's agent, merchandise manager, and 
retail store operator. 

IV. Finance and Insurance — Financial institutions serving present-day 
business and industry are its life stream. Any list of these organizations 
which are indispensable in the conduct of business must include banks, 
insurance companies, investment houses, credit concerns, financial 
exchanges, business forecasting organizations, financial service institu- 
tions, mortgage companies, national and local real estate brokerage 
firms, and appraisers. 

Specific courses offered in Northeastern University's College of Busi- 
ness Administration open the door to a host of careers in these institu- 
tions as well as the many governmental regulatory agencies controlling 
their operations. 

V. Business Management — This curriculum might be called the basic pro- 
gram of the College of Business Administration. Graduates in Business 
Management find posts in small business, big business, and public 
service. 

Here is the field of training for the person whose ambition is to start 
a business of his own. 

Here is the field of training for the person who is thinking in terms of 
production control, planning, methods analysis, purchasing, traffic con- 
trol, or other supervisory and executive work. 

Here is the field of training for the person who is keenly aware of the 
possibilities in public administration. Increased use of city-management 



136 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

plans and increased number and prestige of civil service careers present 
a wide group of opportunities to graduates of this program. 

Pre-Legal Curriculum 

Effective September 1, 1938, by a ruling of the Supreme Judicial Court 
of Massachusetts, in order to be eligible for examination for admission 
to the bar, an applicant must have completed certain general educational 
requirements before beginning his legal education. Briefly, this general 
education must comprise graduation from a four-year high school and 
the completion of not less than half of the work accepted for the Bache- 
lor's degree in a college approved by the Board of Bar Examiners. 

Recognizing that business training furnishes an excellent background 
for pre-legal training, the College of Business Administration offers a 
pre-legal curriculum. This consists of taking an amount of work in the 
college equivalent to that required for admission to specific law schools 
in the Commonwealth, and usually requires residence in school for 
sixty-five weeks of instruction. 

Comhined Program 
Business Administration and Law 

The combined curriculum in the College of Business Administration 
and the School of Law enables students to reduce by one year the time 
ordinarily required for obtaining the B.S. in Business Administration 
and the LL.B. degrees. Students who have completed before entering the 
School of Law at least 175 Northeastern credits of academic work of 
which at least 120 must have been earned in the Northeastern Univer- 
sity College of Business Administration, and who have fulfilled all other 
graduation requirements, will receive the B.S. degree in Business Admin- 
istration upon the satisfactory completion of the full first year program in 
the Day Division of the School of Law. Students who enter the Evening 
Division of the School of Law will be eligible for the first degree upon 
satisfactory completion of the full equivalent of the first year of the day 
Law School program. 

In both instances the first degree will be conferred at the next Com- 
mencement following determination of eligibility for the first degree. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



137 



Curriculum in Accounting {41 ) 



FIRST YEAR 

Term 1 
h/o. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 

3(W)1 English 3 6 3 

20-01 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 

22-01 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 

41-01 Int. to Acct. 2 2 8 4 

23-01 Hist. Civil. 3 6 3 

16-01 Hygiene 10 2 1 

16-10 Phys. Tr. 2 



No. 



Term 2 
Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 



15 4 34 17 



30-02 English 3 6 3 

20-02 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 

22-02 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 

41-02 Prin. of Acct.2 2 8 4 

23-02 Hist. CiviL 3 6 3 

16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 

16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 

15 4 34 17 



SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 
30-04 English 5 

12-05 Graph. Pres. 3 
23-04 Hist. Civil. 4 



10 
6 9 
8 



Term 5 

2}4 43-01 Prin. Mktg. 3 

3 44-01 Prin. Bkg. 3 

2 30-05 Public Spkg. 4 

41-04 Inter. Acctg. 2 2 

25-01 Intro. Psych. 4 



6 
6 
5 



12 6 27 7}4 



16 2 33 17 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 7* Term 8 

20-13 Prin. Econ. 8 16 4 20-14 Econ. Probs. 4 8 

46-01 Bus. Law I 8 13 3K 44-11 Bus. Fin. 4 8 

(Contracts) 45-01 In. Mgt. 4 8 

41-11 Cost Acctg. 3 3 9 



4 
4 
4 
5 



16 29 T/i 



15 3 33 17 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
46-02 Bus. Law II 9 

(Neg. Instr.) 
41-21 Prob. in Ac. 5 



Term 11 

15 4 20-20 Statistics 3 

20-18 Am.Ec.Hist. 4 

5 11 3}4 45-03 Bus. Mach. 

41-15 Trust Acctg. 2 

Elective 4 



2 

3 
4 




7 
8 

6 
8 



4 
4 
1 
4 
4 



14 5 26 1J4 



13 9 29 17 



FIFTH YEAR 

I Term 13* 

30-08 Bus. Comm. 5 4 9 3 

20-27 Int. Ec. ReL 3 6 l^^ 

41-23 Acctg. Prob. 9 9 3 



Term 14 
45-31 Bus. &. Gov. 4 
46-11 Bus. Law III 3 
(Per. Prop. 
&. Sales) 
41-24 C.P.A. Prob. 2 
46-21 Inc.Tax Law 2 
Elective 4 








2 
2 




8 
6 



5 
5 
8 



4 
3 



3 
3 
4 



8 13 24 T/i 



15 4 32 17 



hlo. 



Term 3 
Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 



30-03 English 3 6 3 

20-03 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 

22-03 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 

41-03Prin. of Acct. 2 2 8 4 

23-03 Hist. Civil. 4 8 4 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 

15 4 34 17 



Term 6 

43-02 Prin. Advt. 3 6 3 

44-02 Prin. Ins. 3 6 3 

30-06 Public Spkg. 4 5 3 

41-05 Inter. Acctg. 2 2 8 4 

25-02 Gen'L Psych. 4 8 4 



16 2 33 17 



20-15 Econ. Probs. 4 8 4 

44-12 Bus. Fin. 4 8 4 

45-02 Ind. Mgt. 4 8 4 

41-12 Cost Acctg. 3 3 9 5 

15 3 33 17 



Term 12 

20-21 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

20-26 Labor Econ.II 4 8 4 

45-04 Bus. Mach. 3 1 

41-22 Acctg. Prob. 2 4 6 4 

Elective 4 8 4 



13 9 29 17 



Term 15 

45-32 Bus. Pol. 4 8 4 

46-12 Bus. Law IV 3 6 3 
(Agency) 

41-25 C.P.A. Prob. 2 2 5 3 

41-26 Auditing 2 2 5 3 

Elective 4 8 4 

15 4 32 17 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



138 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 







Curriculum in Industrial Relations {42) 








FIRST YEAR 






















Term 
No. Course 
30-01 English 
20-01 Econ. Geog. 
22-01 Am. Govt. 
41-01 Int. to Acct. 
23-01 Hist. Civil. 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

Cl.Ub.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 

2 2 8 4 

3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
20-02 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 
22-02 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 
41-02Prinof Acct. 2 2 8 4 
23-02 Hist. Civil. 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.d 
30-03 English 3 6 
20-03 Econ. Geog. 3 6 
22-03 Am. Govt. 3 6 
41-03 Prin. of Acct. 2 2 8 
23-03 Hist. Civil. 4 8 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 




15 


4 34 


17 


15 


4 34 


17 




15 


4 34 1 


SECOND YEAR 






















Term 
30-04 English 
12-05 Graph. Pres 
23-04 Hist. Civil. 


4* 
5 
3 
4 


10 
6 9 
8 


Term 5 

IVi 43-01 Prin. Mktg. 3 

3 44-01 Prin. Bkg. 3 

2 30-05 Public Spkg. 4 

41-04 Inter. Acctg. 2 

25-01 Intro. Psych. 4 


6 
6 

5 
2 8 
8 


3 
3 
3 
4 
4 


Term 6 
43-02 Prin. Advt. 3 
44-02 Prin. Ins. 3 
30-06 Public Spkg. 4 
41-05 Inter. Acctg. 2 
25-02 Gen'l. Psych. 4 





2 



6 
6 
5 
8 
8 




12 


6 27 


~V/2 


16 


2 33 


17 




16 


2 


33 1 


THIRD YEAR 






















Term 7* 
20-13 Prin. Econ. 8 
46-01 Bus. Law I 8 


16 
13 


Term 8 

4 20-14 Econ. Prob. 4 

2,}i 26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 

45-01 In. Mgt. 4 

41-11 Cost Acctg. 3 


8 
8 
8 
3 9 


4 
4 
4 

5 


Term 9 
20-15 Econ. Prob. 
26-02 Prin. Soc. 
45-02 In. Mgt. 
41-12 Cost Acctg. 


4 
4 
4 
3 





3 


8 
8 

8 • 

9 , 



16 29 7K 



15 3 33 17 



15 3 33 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
46-02 Bus. Law II 9 
42-16 Testing 5 



Term 11 



15 4 20-20 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

5 11 3>^ 20-18 Am.Ec.Hist. 4 8 4 

45-03 Bus. Mach. 3 1 

42-11 Pers.Adm. 4 8 4 

Elective 4 8 4 



Term 12 
20-21 Statistics 3 

20-26 Labor Econ. 4 
45-04 Bus. Mach. 
42-12 Pers. Admin. 4 
Elective 4 



7 
8 


8 
8 



14 5 26 7>^ 



15 5 31 17 



15 5 31 r 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
30-08 Bus. Comm. 5 4 9 
20-27 Int. Ec. Rel. 3 6 
42-20 Prod. Proc. 6 12 



Term 14 

3 45-31 Bus. & Gov. 4 

IH 25-23 Ind. Psych. 3 

3 42-13 Wage Adm. 2 

42-22 I.R. Seminar 2 









Term 15 









8 


4 


45-32 Bus. Pol. 4 





8 





6 


3 


25-24 Ind. Psych. 3 





6 


2 


5 


3 


42-14 Wage Adm. 2 


2 


5 


2 


5 


3 


42-23 I.R. Seminar 2 


2 


5 



Elective 



14 4 27 7}4 



4 8 4 
15 4 32 17 



Elective 



4 8 
15 4 32 



*Summer term 



wee 



ks. 



COLLEGE OF BUSlhlESS ADMINISTRATION 



139 



Curriculum in Marketing and Advertising (43) 



RST YEAR 

Term 1 

io. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 

)-01 English 3 6 3 

)-01 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 

:-01 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 

-01 Int. to Acct. 2 2 8 4 

l-OI Hist. Civil. 3 6 3 

>01 Hygiene 10 2 1 

>10Phys. Tr. 2 

15 4 34 17 



Term 
No. Course 
30-02 English 
20-02 Econ. Geog. 
22-02 Am. Govt. 
41-02 Prin.of Acct. 
23-02 Hist. Civil. 
16-02 Hygiene 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 



ClLab.Pr.Cr. 







2 


2 



6 
6 

6 
8 
6 

2 




3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
1 



15 4 34 17 



£COND YEAR 

0-04 English 5 10 

11-05 Graph. Pres. 3 6 9 

1 5-04 Hist. Civil. 4 8 



Term 5 

lyi 43-01 Prin. Mktg. 3 6 3 

3 44-01 Prin. Bkg. 3 6 3 

2 30-05 Pub. Spkg. 4 5 3 

41-04 Inter. Acct. 2 2 8 4 

25-01 Intro. Psych. 4 8 4 



Term 3 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 

30-03 English 3 6 3 

20-03 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 

22-03 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 

41-03 Prin. of Acct. 2 2 8 4 

23-03 Hist. Civil. 4 8 4 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 

15 4 34 17 



Term 6 

43-02 Prin. Advt. 3 6 3 

44-02 Prin. Ins. 3 6 3 

30-06 Pub. Spkg. 4 5 3 

41-05 Inter. Acct. 2 2 8 4 

25-02 Gen'l. Psych. 4 8 4 



12 6 27 TA 



16 2 33 17 



HIRD YEAR 

Term 
)-13 Prin. Econ. 
3-01 Bus. Law I 



7* 
8 
8 



Term 8 

16 4 20-14 Econ. Prob. 4 8 4 

13 3K 26-01 Prin. Soc. 4 8 4 

45-01 Ind. Mgt. 4 8 4 

43-11 Sales Mgt. 3 3 9 5 



16 29 7^ 



15 3 33 17 



OURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
5-02 Bus. Law II 9 
3-10 Conf.Ldrship 5 



Term 11 

15 4 20-20 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

5 11 3>^ 20-18 Am.Ec.Hist. 4 8 4 

45-03 Bus. Mach. 3 1 
43-13 Probs.Advt. 

Mkt. 6 6 4 

Elective 4 8 4 



16 2 33 17 



Term 
20-15 Econ. Prob. 
26-02 Prin. Soc. 
45-02 Ind. Mgt. 
43-12 Sales Mgt. 



4 
4 
4 
3 






3 



8 
8 
8 
9 



4 
4 
4 
5 



15 3 33 17 



14 5 26 7>^ 



11 11 29 17 



Term 12 

20-21 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

20-26 Labor Econ. 4 8 4 

45-03 Bus. Mach. 3 1 
43-14 Probs. Advt. 

Mkt. 6 6 4 

Elective 4 8 4 

11 11 29 17 



IFTH YEAR 






















Term 13* 






Term 14 








Term 15 








3-08 Bus. Comm. 5 


4 9 


3 


45-31 Bus. &L Gov. 4 





8 


4 


45-32 Bus. Pol. 4 





8 


4 


3-27 Int. Ec. Rel. 3 


6 


IK 


46-11 Bus. Law III 3 





6 


3 


43-22 Mdsg. 4 


4 


10 


6 


3-15 Adv. Prob. 






43-21 Mdsg. 2 


2 


5 


3 


43-24 Mkt. Rsch. 3 





6 


3 


Mkt.,Advt.O 


9 9 


3 


43-23 Store Mgt. 2 
Elective 4 


2 



5 
8 


3 
4 


Elective 4 





8 


4 



8 13 24 7)4 



15 4 32 17 



15 4 32 17 



Summer term — 5 weeks. 



140 




NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 






Curriculum in Finance and Insurance (44) 




FIRST YEAR 








Term 
No. Course 
30-01 English 
20-01 Econ. Geog. 
22-01 Am. Govt. 
41-01 Int. to Acct. 
23-01 Hist. Civil. 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 

2 2 8 4 

3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 Term 3 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr 
30-02 English 3 6 3 30-03 English 3 6: 
20-02 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 20-03 Econ. Geog. 3 6: 
22-02 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 22-03 Am. Govt. 3 6: 
41-02Prin.ofAc. 2 2 8 4 41-03 Prin. of Acct. 2 2 8 'i 
23-02 Hist. Civil. 3 6 3 23-03 Hist. Civil. 4 8^ 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 




15 4 34 17 


15 4 34 17 15 


4 34 17. 
J 



SECOND YEAR 

30-04 English 5 

12-05 Graph. Pres. 3 

23-04 Hist. Civil. 4 



Term 5 

10 2}^ 43-01 Prin. Mktg. 3 6 3 

6 9 3 44-01 Prin. Bkg. 3 6 3 

8 2 30-05 Public Spkg. 4 5 3 

41-04 Inter. Acct. 2 2 8 4 

25-01 Intro.Psych. 4 8 4 



12 6 27 73^ 



16 2 33 17 



Term 6 

43-02 Prin. Advt. 3 

44-02 Prin. Ins. 3 

30-06 Pub. Spkg. 4 

41-05 Inter. Acct. 2 2 

25-02 Gen'l. Psych. 4 

16 2 



■ 


6 3 

6 3 
5 3 
8 4 

8 4 


33 17 



THIRD YEAR 

1 FR Vf / 

20-13 Prin. Econ. 8 16 
46-01 Bus. Law I 8 13 



16 29 

FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
46-02 Bus. Law II 9 15 
43-10 Conf.Ldrship 5 5 11 



Term 8 

4 20-14 Econ. Prob. 4 

3}^ 44-11 Bus. Fin. 4 

45-01 In. Mgt. 4 

41-11 Cost Acctg. 3 





3 


8 
8 
8 
9 


4 
4 
4 

5 


Term 9 
20-15 Econ. Prob. 4 
44-12 Bus. Fin. 4 
45-02 Ind. Mgt. 4 
41-12 Cost Acctg. 3 






3 


8 
8 
8 
9 


4 
4 
4 
5 


7J4 15 


3 33 


17 


15 


3 33 


17 


Term 11 

4 20-20 Statistics 3 

3}i 20-18 Am.EcHist. 4 

45-03 Bus. Mach. 

41-15 Trust Acctg. 4 

Elective 4 


2 

3 




7 
8 

8 
6 


4 
4 

1 
4 
4 


Term 12 
20-21 Statistics 3 
20-26 Labor Econ. 4 
45-04 Bus. Mach. 
14-25 Math, of Fin. 4 
Elective 4 


2 

3 




7 
8 

8 
8 


4 
4 
1 
4 
4 



14 5 26 7}^ 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
30-08 Bus. Comm. 5 4 9 
20-27 Int. Ec. Rel. 3 6 
44-21 Real Estate 6 12 



3 

3 



15 5 29 17 



Term 14 
45-31 Bus. &. Gov. 4 
46-11 Bus. Law III 3 
44-22 Investments 2 
46-21 In. Tax Law 2 
Elective 4 



14 4 27 7H 





2 
2 




8 
6 
5 
5 
8 



15 4 32 17 



15 5 31 17 



Term 15 

45-32 Bus. PoL 4 8 

46-12 Bus. Law IV 3 6 

44-23 Investments 2 2 5 

44-24 Pbs. Fin. Ins. 2 2 5 

Elective 4 8 



4 
3 
3 

3 
4 



15 4 32 17 



*Suramer term — 5 weeks. 







COLLEGE OF BUSIhlESS ADMrNlSTRATION 




141 


•IRST YEAR 

Term 
. <]o. Course 
10-01 English 
.0-01 Econ. Geog. 
:2-01 Am. Govt. 
H-01 Int. to Acct. 
,:3.01 Hist. Civil. 
.6-01 Hygiene 
.6-10 Phys. Tr. 


Curricu 

1 

Cl.Lah.Pr.Cr. 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 

2 2 8 4 

3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


lum in Business Management (45) 

Term 2 Term 3 
hlo. Course CLLab.Pr.Cr. No. Course Cl.Lah.Pr.Cr. 
30-02 English 3 6 3 30-03 English 3 6 3 
20-02 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 20-03 Econ. Geog. 3 6 3 
22-02 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 22-03 Am. Govt. 3 6 3 
41-02 Int. to Acct. 2 2 8 4 41-03 Int. to Acct. 2 2 8 4 
23-02 Hist. CivU, 3 6 3 23-03 Hist. Civil. 4 8 4 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 



15 4 34 17 



15 4 34 17 



SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 

50-04 English 5 10 

12-05 Graph. Pres. 3 6 9 

13-04 Hist. Civil. 4 8 



Term 5 

2J^ 43-01 Prin. Mktg. 3 6 3 

3 44-01 Prin. Bkg. 3 6 3 

2 30-05 Public Spkg. 4 5 3 

41-04 Inter. Acct. 2 2 8 4 

25-01 Intro. Psych. 4 8 4 



12 6 27 IJ^ 



16 2 33 17 



15 4 34 17 



Term 6 

43-02 Prin. Advt. 3 6 3 

44-02 Prin. Ins. 3 6 3 

30-06 Public Spkg. 4 5 3 

41-05 Inter. Acct. 2 2 8 4 

25-02 Gen'l. Psych. 4 8 4 

16 2 33 17 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 7* 
20-13 Prin. Econ. 8 
46-01 Bus. Law I 8 



Term 8 

16 4 20-14 Econ. Prob. 4 8 4 

13 3yi 44-11 Bus. Fin. 4 8 4 

45-01 In. Mgt. 4 8 4 

41-11 Cost Acct. 3 3 9 5 



Term 
20-15 Econ. Prob. 
44-12 Bus. Fin. 
45-02 Ind. Mgt. 
41-12 Cost Acct. 



4 
4 
4 
3 



8 4 

8 4 

8 4 

3 9 5 



16 29 lyi 



15 3 33 17 



15 3 33 17 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
46-02 Bus. Law II 9 
43-10Conf.Ldrship5 



Term 11 

15 4 20-20 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

5 11 3M 20-18 Am.Ec.Hist. 4 8 4 

45-03 Bus. Mach. 3 1 



Term 12 

20-21 Statistics 3 2 7 4 

20-26 Labor Econ. 4 8 4 

45-04 Bus. Mach. 3 1 

42-11 Pers.Adm. 4 8 4 42-12 Pers. Admin. 4 8 4 



Elective 



14 5 26 7}4 



4 8 4 
15 5 31 17 



Elective 



4 8 4 
15 5 31 17 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
30-08 Bus. Comm. 5 



20-27 Int. Ec. Rel. 
42-20 Prod. Proc. 



3 
6 



1 ERVf I 4 

4 9 3 45-31 Bus.&lGov. 4 8 4 

6 IK 46-11 Bus. Law III 3 6 3 

12 3 45-21 Pub. Adm. 4 8 4 

45-23 Traffic Mgt. 2 2 5 3 

Elective 3 6 3 



Term 
45-32 Bus. Pol. 
46-12 Bus. Law IV 
45-22 Pub. Admin, 
45-24 Adv. Mgt. 
Elective 



15 



4 
3 
4 
2 
3 







2 




8 
6 

8 
5 
6 



4 
3 
4 
3 
3 



14 4 27 7K 



16 2 33 17 



16 2 33 17 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



142 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Synopses of Courses of instruction 

On the pages which follow are given the synopses of courses offered 
in the several curricula of the College of Business Administration. Cur- 
ricula of the three colleges on either the co-operative or full-time plan 
comprise 130 weeks of classroom instruction: namely, three ten- 
week periods in the freshman year and 100 weeks of upperclass work. 
On the Co-operative Plan, the upperclass courses are evenly distributed 
over four years so that each division of co-operative students has 25 
weeks of college work, 26 weeks of co-operative work, and one week of 
vacation annually. 

A complete list of the courses of instruction offered in each of the Day 
Colleges is included in a special section of the catalogue beginning on 
page 205. This section lists the prerequisite and preparation requirements, 
class and laboratory hours per week, the number of hours normally re- 
quired for study preparation hours, and the number of credits which 
have been assigned to each course. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the 
courses offered or to change the order or content of courses in any 
curriculum. 

Accounting 

41-01 Introduction to Accounting — This course presents the fundamental 
principles of accounting theory and practice in a manner designed to 
meet the needs of students who intend to specialize in accounting as well 
as those who require a knowledge of accounting as a preparation for the 
study of industrial relations, banking and finance, production manage- 
ment, and marketing. Beginning with a consideration of the need for 
and the purpose served by accounting, a study of the balance sheet and 
operating statement is presented so that the ultimate goal and purpose of 
accounting is understood before the mechanical methods of recording 
business transactions are presented. The basic arithmetic operations will 
be reviewed and proficiency established in the handling of numbers. 

41-02 Principles of Accounting — The course takes up specific balance sheet 
accounts; the law of debit and credit; the theory of nominal accounts; 
construction and interpretation of accounts; the recording process; the 
trial balance; construction of financial statements; the need for adjust- 
ments at the end of the period; depreciation; deferred and accrued items. 

41-03 Principles of Accounting — This course continues the work of the 
first semester with increased emphasis placed on accounting and inter- 
pretation of accounts. The main topics covered are closing of books, 
starting the new period, comparative statements, control accounts, and 
the operation of petty cash systems. 

41-04 Intermediate Accounting — This course is a continuation of the fun- 
damental principles of accounting. Greater emphasis is placed, however, 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINZSTRATZON 143 

on the accounting aspect of management. Special books, departmental 
accounts and statements, and accounting for manufacturing are spe- 
cifically introduced. One of the main features of this course is the intro- 
duction of the analytical aspect of accounting. 

41-05 Intermediate Accounting — The approach of 41-04 is continued with 
greater stress on the accounting rather than bookkeeping aspects. Con- 
tinuity is aimed at throughout. Accounting for business organizations 
occupies the major part of the course. Formation and operation of part- 
nerships and corporations are thoroughly covered. Special emphasis is 
placed on the valuation of partnership and corporation accounts. Prob- 
lems dealing with branch accounting, installment sales, and bonds will 
also be studied in this course. 

41-11 Cost Accounting — The structure of factory costs from the execu- 
tive's viewpoint is studied in this course. The subject is approached 
chiefly from the management point of view. Problems are presented in a 
summarized form in order to stress the fundamental aspects of costs. 
Managerial control through the use of accounts is emphasized at the 
beginning of the course. Some of the specific topics covered are accu- 
mulation and distribution of cost data, process cost, job cost, historical 
cost, estimated cost, standard "cost, and spoilage cost. 

41-12 Cost Accounting — This course is designed to develop in the student 
the managerial ability to control production, operating, and distribution 
costs through the use of cost accounting and the budget. Methods of 
costing and controlling materials, labor, and expenses are considered in 
detail. Cost variations are analyzed. Joint cost and by-product cost are 
introduced. 

41-15 Trust Accounting — Based on the requirements of the Probate Court 
of Massachusetts this course will treat with the rules which govern the 
management of trust estates and the relationship existing between the 
trustee and the beneficiency, the legal and equitable estate in every 
trust, and the accounting principles and methods adapted to meet the 
requirements of periodical settlement of accounts and the reports to the 
probate court. The powers and duties of the trustee, the management of 
trust funds and the problems of principal and income are analyzed and 
studied in detail. 

41-21 Problems in Accounting — This might be called a seminar in Account- 
ing for it is a course which will vary from year to year at the discretion of 
the Head of the Department of Accounting. Its purpose is to make sure 
that the accounting background of all accounting majors is complete. 

41-22 Accounting Problems — The aim of this course is to develop the broad 
viewpoint, analytical power, and constructive and critical ability neces- 
sary to apply properly a knowledge of accounting principles to specific 
problems and situations. Consistency in the application of principles is 



144 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

stressed. Specific topics deal with bonds, annuities, sinking fund, re- 
serves, investment accounting, application of funds, consignment sales, 
correction of statements, venture accounts, receivers accounts and in- 
surance. 

41-23 Accounting Problems — ^The method of approach in this course is 
like that followed in 41-22. The major portion of the course is devoted 
to the study of specific problems dealing with capital and revenue ex- 
penditures; depreciation, appraisals and reserves; branch accounting; 
and analysis of statements. 

41-24 C.P.A. Problems — ^The purpose of this course is to provide for the 
application of the knowledge of accounting principles and practice 
gained in the preceding courses to the analysis and solution of complex 
problems involving a recognition of the economic, legal, and social 
aspects of various forms of business organization. The course content 
consists chiefly of problems given in C.P.A. examinations. All phases of 
partnership, corporation, bond, depletion, cost accounting, consolida- 
tion, municipal accounting, bank accounting, adjustments of complex 
statements and reports, actuarial problems, and institutional accounting 
will be covered. 

41-25 C.P.A. Problems — This is a continuation of 41-24. 

41-26 Auditing — The course contemplates the application of accounting 
knowledge to the analysis and interpretation of accounting records. 
Case material is used to outline the type of procedure best adapted to 
an intelligent examination of accounting records, and the compilation 
of reports on which the business manager can base plans for future 
operations. Specifically, balance sheet audits, detailed audits, and special 
investigations for credit and other purposes receive attention. 



Business Law 

46-01 Business Law I — Contracts — This course covers the law of contracts 
as it affects the businessman. Under the law of contracts such subjects 
are considered as agreements, competent parties, consideration legality, 
assignment, discharge of contracts, enforcement of contracts, and dam- 
ages for breach. 

46-02 Business Law U — Negotiable Instruments — The widespread use of 
credit instruments in commercial transactions demands a knowledge of 
the law of bills and notes. After a discussion of the various types of 
instruments, detailed analysis will be made of requirements for negoti- 
ability , negotiation by endorsements of various kinds, the rights of holders 
in due course, the rights and liabilities of other parties, the requisites for 
charging other parties, and methods of discharge. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMlMSTRATIOhl 145 

46-11 Business Law III — Personal Property and Sales — After an analysis of 
the law of personal property, emphasis will be placed upon the law of 
sales with detailed consideration for passing of title to goods, conditions 
and warranties, the Statute of Frauds, and rights and remedies of buyers 
and sellers. 

46-12 Business Law IV — Agency — This course will treat in detail the law 
of agency with careful attention to agency relationships, rights and duties 
of the principal and the agent, rights of third parties, and termination of 
agency. 

46-21 Income Tax Law — This course is designed to give the student prac- 
tice in the reading and application of specific laws as they relate to the 
conduct of a business. It makes use of the knowledge of Accounting and 
Business Law already obtained and introduces the student to the detailed 
requirements of tax forms. 

Business l^anagement 

45-01 Industrial Management — The course in industrial management 
places emphasis on the administrative and profit-making phases of fac- 
tory and plant operation. A textbook is used to present elementary prin- 
ciples and problem material which are supplemented by lectures. 

The first part of the course presents a brief historical background of 
U.S. industry; this is followed by a treatment of the location of the 
plant; plant services and material handling; plant design, structure, and 
layout; standardization, simplification, and specialization. 

45-02 Industrial Management — This course is a continuation of Industrial 
Management 45-01. It deals with the control of plant operations. Each 
department of a modern industrial concern is considered, emphasis 
being placed on the organization and management problems confronted 
and how they may be handled, with the intention that the student shall 
become familiar with the activities and general working of each de- 
partment and the relationship which the departments hold to one an- 
other and to the business as a whole. In detail are considered budgeting, 
standards of performance (time and motion study, wage systems), organ- 
ization, routing, scheduling, dispatching, inventory control, quality con- 
trol, and visual controls such as the organization chart, planning board, 
and departmental report. 

45-03 Business Machines — This is a laboratory course to introduce the 
basic machines used in most business offices and to develop some pro- 
ficiency in the operation of them. 

45-04 Business Machines — This is a continuation of 45-03. 

45-21 Public Administration — This is a study of career service of local, 
state, and national government with emphasis upon positions with the 



146 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

various administration agencies. Some attention will be accorded the 
philosophy of the administration agency itself. It analyzes public ad- 
ministration in terms of the subject matter and principles of industrial 
management. 

45-22 Public Administration — This course presents a study of the public 
relations, fiscal control, and policy-making aspects of public administra- 
tion, stressing the importance of co-operation among government bu- 
reaus, legislative bodies, and the public; and presents to the student an 
appreciation of the importance of versatility of ability for a successful 
public career. 

45-23 Traffic Management — The organization and functions of the traffic 
department comprise the point of departure for this course. Major at- 
tention is paid external problems of agency, packing, shipping, routing, 
government regulations, etc. Internal problems of writing, methods, 
handling are also covered. The importance of the work of the traffic 
department in connection with over-all efficiency is emphasized. 

45-24 Advanced Management — This course will analyze by the case meth- 
od timely significant problems that general management faces. Specific 
course content will vary but the student will learn by practice how to 
tackle the more complex problems of everyday business. 

45-25 Purchasing and Procurement — This is a study of the organization, 
functions, and duties of the purchasing department and its relations 
with other departments. Topics covered will include specifications, 
sources of supply, types of procurement and governmental regulations, 
inventory controls, tests and inspection, and traffic problems. 

45-31 Business and Government — The object of this course is to develop 
a thorough understanding of the relationships between government 
(local, state, national) and business. The attitudes of our government 
towards business since 1885 as evidenced by legislative, judicial, execu- 
tive, and administrative action will be analyzed in detail. 

45-32 Business Policy — This course is set up as a seminar for B.A. Seniors 
in which the members of the class will examine the problems that the 
business executives face daily in their relations with government, labor, 
the market, and the community. The ethical features of business policy 
formation will be stressed along with the social implications. An attempt 
will be made to determine the criteria by which fair business practices 
can be distinguished from unfair. 

Drawing 

12-05 Technical Dravuing — A course which presents the fundamentals of 
the graphic language as it is employed in business and industrial relation- 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMZNZSTRATION 147 

ships and intended to facilitate a better understanding between the fabri- 
cation and marketing phases of industrial products. The course includes 
a study, of drawing equipment and its use, lettering, geometric construc- 
tions, multiplaner orthographic projection, freehand and technical 
sketching, pictorial representation, and elements of dimensioning, with 
a study and interpretation of drawings from the various industrial fields. 



Economics 

20-01 Economic Geography — In order to provide an adequate background 
for the study of economics and to develop a better understanding of the 
world in which we do business, the course. Economic Geography, is 
divided into three parts. The first part is primarily concerned with fun- 
damental geographic and geologic principles and facts. 

20-02 Economic Geography — This is the second part of Economic Geog- 
raphy and emphasizes the socio-economic principles that underlie the 
development of resources in the different countries and climates of the 
world. 

20-03 Economic Geography — This is the third part of Economic Geog- 
raphy and analyzes the politico-economic aspects of resource distribu- 
tion and development in the form of trade and world relationships. The 
student will now be able to derive any two of the following bodies of 
information if given one of them: resources, living habits and institu- 
tions, climate. 

20- J 3 Economic Principles — A thorough grounding in the fundamental 
principles and laws of economics is the aim of this basic course. The 
main topics include the nature and organization of production, the na- 
ture and importance of wants, the relation of money and prices, the 
process of exchange, the nature of international trade, the determina- 
tion of price under conditions of competition and monopoly, the dis- 
tribution of wealth and income in the form of wages, economic rent, 
interest, and profits. 

20-14 Economic Problems — In this course the application of economic 
principles to some of the major economic problems of modern society 
is emphasized. The problems studied include consumption, protective 
tariffs and subsidies, labor problems such as unemployment and labor 
unions, and the business cycle. 

20-15 Economic Problems — A continuation of 20-14 Economic Problems. 
Among the problems considered are the following: price stabilization, 
the agricultural problem, the relation of government to business includ- 
ing the control of monopolies and public utilities, insurance, public 
finance, and proposals for the remodeling and improving of the eco- 
nomic system. 



148 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

20-18 American Economic History — The economic development of the 
United States is traced from the colonial period to the present with spe- 
cial emphasis upon the period since the Civil War. Stress is laid upon 
the importance of economic factors and changes in our history in the 
description of the development of manufacturing, agriculture, domestic 
and foreign commerce, finance and banking, transportation and labor 
organizations. Consideration is given to European developments which 
have been closely related to those of the United States. 

20-20 Statistics in Business — This course is intended to give the student an 
understanding of statistical principles and methods and their practical 
application in the administration of modern business. A study is made 
of the nature, sources, collection and organization of business facts; the 
presentation of such facts in tabular or graphic form, the various aver- 
ages, measures of dispersion, and the construction and use of index 
numbers. Laboratory periods provide an opportunity for each student 
to demonstrate his ability to apply the principles studied. 

20-21 Statistics in Business — The major portion of this continuation of 
20-20 Statistics in Business concerns the analysis of time series and in- 
cludes the methods of obtaining trends, seasonal indexes, and the meas- 
urement of cyclical variation. Correlation of time series is related to the 
problems of business forecasting. In the laboratory work each student is 
required to make a complete analysis of an individual time series, prefer- 
ably associated with his co-operative work. 

20-26 Labor Economics — After an intensive study of the application of 
economic principles to the labor markets and of the development of col- 
lective bargaining in the United States, the course will be devoted to an 
analysis of organization of unions, rights and responsibilities under the 
law, the bargaining process as reflected in the labor contract, and griev- 
ances and grievance procedures. 

20-27 International Economic Relations — A careful examination of the im- 
portant principles of international trade and finance precedes a critical 
survey of the international commercial policies of modern nations, with 
special reference to the United States. Such broader problems as the 
international control of raw materials, exchange restrictions, interna- 
tional cartels and the economic activities of international organizations 
are considered. 

English 

30-01 English I — A review of basic sentence structure and the grammat- 
ical functions of clauses and phrases, followed by a study of effective 
sentence writing, paragraph development, and reading techniques. 
Theme assignments are planned to develop practical skill in each of the 
phases studied. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 149 

30-02 English I — A study of the structure and organization of written 
compositions: outlining, development of compositions by phases, and 
the analysis of expository writings. Experimental work in each phase is 
carried out by means of theme assignments and readings. 

30-03 English I — A study of the problems peculiar to each of the four 
main types of discourse: exposition, description, narrative, and argu- 
ment. Theme work includes, in addition to these basic types, some as- 
signments in the framing of reports and the writing of business letters. 

30-04 Introduction to Literature — A study of the aims and techniques of 
various common types of literature: the play, the short story, lyrical and 
narrative poetry, and the literary essay. Instructional methods include 
assigned reading and the writing of short critical reports. 

30-05 Public Speaking — The fundamentals of good speech with emphasis 
on the conversational approach and a maximum of actual speech ex- 
perience. The course aims to help the student meet the everyday de- 
mands of modern business, professional, and social life for clear, con- 
cise, and pleasing oral expression. 

30-06 Public Speaking — A continuation of 30-05 with particular atten- 
tion to speech organization, audience analysis, and the problems of 
impromptu speaking. 

30-08 Business Communication — A survey of the basic techniques and 
forms of expression and communication in business. The principles and 
methods of oral communication are studied, with emphasis on the oral 
report, the discussion, the conference, and types of informal speech. By 
the use of cases, problems, and class exercises, the student is given 
practice in the forms of business communication. 

30-10 Problems in Writing — A course in the clear, accurate, and effective 
presentation of factual data, opinions, policies, and judgments. Em- 
phasis is laid on sound organization, completeness of data, and pointed 
expression. 

Government 
22-01 American Government and Politics — The study of our National 
Government with respect to its organization, functions, and constitu- 
tional powers and limitations. 

22-02 American Government and Politics — A continuation of 22-01. Par- 
ticular attention is paid to the legislative, administrative, and judicial 
machinery under the party system of government. The problems of 
bureaucracy are analyzed. 

22-03 American Government and Politics — A study of the relationships of 
our federal, state and municipal governments. Consideration is given 



150 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

to the various types of state and municipal governments with respect to 
the state and local agencies for carrying out the executive, legislative, 
and judicial functions of government in a democratic country. 

History 

23-01 History of CivilizcLtion — This is primarily a background course. In- 
troductory lectures deal with primitive society, the development of lan- 
guage and writing, and the early contributions of Egypt and Asia. More 
detail is given to the structure of Greek and Roman society and the rise 
of the Christian Church. 

23-02 History of Civilization — A continuation of 23-01. This course con- 
siders the decline of the Roman Empire, the barbarian invasions of the 
Empire, the growth of Islam, life in the early Middle Ages, the growth of 
monarchies in Europe, and the medieval church. 

23-03 History of Civilization — The Renaissance and the Reformation re- 
ceive extended attention in this course. Stress is placed upon the art and 
literature of the era as well as the social, economic, and political de- 
velopments. 

23-04 History of Civilization — A continuation of 23-03. The chief topics 
of the course include the economic revolution, the Age of Reason in 
France and England, the Old Regime and the Revolution in France, and 
the growth of science and industrialism. 



Finance and Insurance 

44-01 Principles of Banking — In this course the organization and admin- 
istration of American banks is described in detail. All banking functions 
will be examined, but special emphasis will be laid upon the supplying of 
fixed and operating capital. The ABC of the Federal Reserve System will 
form an important part of the course along with the banking operations 
and agencies of our government. 

44-02 Principles of Insurance — The purpose of the course is to provide a 
comprehensive knowledge of insurance principles and coverage such as 
will provide a broad foundation for the student who plans to enter the 
business of insurance or enable the man or woman in business to plan 
a satisfactory program for personal needs or business responsibilities. 
Content: the basic principles of insurance, solving the economic prob- 
lem of risk, types of insurance contracts, legal interpretation of the 
insurance contract, types of insurance companies, the needs of the 
buyer of insurance, co-operative organizations in the field of insurance. 

44-11 Business Finance — The fundamental principles of finance are ap- 
proached in this course from the point of view of the businessman. A 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADM IN/STR AT/ON 151 

Study is made of the two basic ways of financing, namely, equity and 
borrowed funds, and their use in original and expansion financing. In 
addition, consideration is given to working capital requirements and the 
distinctions between short-term and long-term financing. This course, 
also, deals with the application of the principles of finance to such prob- 
lems as surplus, dividend and reserve policies, the relation of the corpo- 
ration to banks and the investing public, and the problems of both trade 
and economic risk. 

44-12 Business Finance — The corporation, rather than business in general, 
is here considered. An analysis is made of the changing concepts in the 
corporation, such as separation of ownership and management, and the 
roles played by private initiative and private property. Through use of 
actual examples, a study is made of financial policies affecting sales, 
prices, markets, and control. The course includes an analysis of such 
combinations as trusts, holding companies, consolidations, and pools 
from both the public and financial points of view. Analysis is also made 
of aspects of reorganization problems in the light of present legislation. 
The course concludes with an analysis of government and state agencies 
now supplementing private sources of business funds. 

44-21 Real Estate — Consideration of land as an economic institution, 
and the importance of a sound land policy; the problems of owners and 
builders, the service to be rendered the ordinary purchaser; organization 
of the real estate office, renting, leasing, and property management; the 
importance of acquaintance with valuation principles; building opera- 
tions, the financing of transactions, subdividing and planning; taxation; 
legal considerations, professional relationships. 

44-22 Investments — This course consists of a review of the principles of 
investment, a study of investment policies, and the mechanics and 
mathematics of investments. It includes a basic study of the advantages 
and disadvantages of stocks and bonds as media of investment from 
present and historical points of view. 

44-23 Investments — A practical study is made of the various fields of in- 
vestment such as industrials, rails, banks, real estate, government, and 
foreign investments. Emphasis is placed on security analysis as it per- 
tains to the individual issues. The course not only concerns itself with 
an intensive study of particular companies and issues, but also includes 
an analysis of the various current methods of market analysis. 

44-24 Problems in Finance and Insurance — In this course students are 
taught to look at the problems confronting banks and insurance com- 
panies from the executive's point of view. Through a series of problems, 
most of which are actual cases, the matter of loan and investment pol- 
icies will be studied at length with other problems concerning methods 
of increasing efficiency, volume of business, and earnings receiving the 
proper amount of attention. 



152 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

44-25 Public Finance — One of the biggest problems confronting the peo- 
ple of all nations following the war will be the question of taxation. In 
recognition of this fact and of the enormous difficulties facing business 
organizations and individuals because of the tax burden, the course in 
Public Finance is offered. This course teaches the kinds of taxes imposed 
by municipal, state, and federal governing bodies and the effects of these 
taxes upon the structure of business and its well-being. 

Industrial Relations 

42-11 Personnel Administration — A consideration of what modern indus- 
try is doing in making an application of science to the obtaining and re- 
taining of an effective and co-operative working force. The student 
studies thoroughly personnel administration systems now in use, in- 
cluding the preparation and use of many forms among which are the 
occupational description, application, and interview blanks, promotion 
charts, wage scale, personnel control charts, etc. The day-to-day work 
of the employment office will be covered in detail. 

42-12 Personnel Administration — This course brings to the attention of the 
student an understanding of the related, yet varied, problems with which 
the modern personnel department is confronted. These include prob- 
lems of guidance, job evaluation, adjustment of rates, employee rating 
systems, promotion, layoff, restriction of output, and employee security 
and welfare policies. The effect of governmental regulations upon the 
work of the personnel department will be examined. 

42-13 Wage Administration — This is an intensive study of the laws, prin- 
ciples, and practices of government, business, and unions that bear 
directly upon the wage problem. The purpose is a detailed analysis of a 
rational wage plan, its creation and administration. 

42-14 Wage Administration — ^This is a continuation of 42-13. 

42-16 Testing — This is a study of the creation and administration of 
industrial tests. The purpose is to provide a background for organizing 
a battery of tests, and providing practice in the use of these tests. 

42-20 Production Processes — This is a course in the techniques, processes, 
and machines used in the production of manufactured articles. The sub- 
ject matter is presented in lectures supplemented by slides, exhibits, and 
demonstrations. 

42-21 Motion and Time Study — This course comprises a detailed study 
of time and motion study work, a complete study and actual practice in 
micromotion which is the use of motion pictures in the motion study 
work, a preparation of simo-charts (the use of colored charts and sym- 
bols called Therbligs which show all the elements in an operation cycle), 
and the making of process charts which is the use of specifically designed 
symbols, or industrial shorthand, to record motion analysis. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMIMSTRATIOT^ 153 

42-22 Industrial Relations Seminar — For advanced study of the actual 
problems faced by industrial relations departments, with special em- 
phasis upon the relationship between government and labor-manage- 
ment relations. Students will engage in research in order to understand 
the problems better and to develop familiarity with research methods. 

42-23 Industrial Relations Seminar — This is a continuation of 42-22. 



Marketing and Advertising 

43-01 Principles of Marketing — This course is designed to acquaint the 
student with the principles underlying the distribution of merchandise. 
Textbook assignments and lectures introduce a knowledge of the place 
of marketing in our modern economic order; the basic structure of mar- 
kets; the main functions of marketing such as assembling, grading, stor- 
ing, buying, selling and financing of goods; and the general classifica- 
tion of commodities into major types for the purpose of analytical study. 
The course gives further and more detailed consideration to the activi- 
ties of the several types of middlemen such as brokers, wholesalers, and 
retailers, and their utilization, as channels of distribution; the work of 
the commodity exchanges and co-operative marketing associations; and 
the development of chain stores, mail order houses, and department 
stores. 

Other topics considered are market risk, pricing, selling terms and 
discounts, hedging, advertising, and the legal aspects of price mainte- 
nance and discount practices. Supplementary lectures and illustrative 
material will be given to explain in some detail the methods used in 
marketing several specific commodities. 

43-02 Principles of Advertising — The purpose of this course is to acquaint 
the student with the fundamental principles and facts which must be 
known by the men and women who are planning to select advertising 
as a career. The economic background of the subject and its develop- 
ment is presented, together with a survey of the methods for planning 
and preparing advertisements actually followed in advertising offices. 
Consideration is given to human instincts, buying habits, argumentative 
and suggestive appeals, color, headlines, layout, illustrations, and trade- 
marks. 

43-10 Conference Leadership — The course is divided into two parts: (1) 
lectures to develop the techniques involved in planning and conducting 
conferences, (2) practice sessions in the actual handling of conferences. 

43-11 Sales Management — The study of actual case material forms the 
basis of this course. In each case the facts are analyzed and a solution 
proposed. The major problems of sales management may be stated as 
questions: What to sell? To whom shall products be sold? At what price 
and terms shall products be sold? The answering of these questions in- 



154 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

volves a consideration of merchandising policies and organization, 
market channels, market research and analysis, and pricing and credit 
policies. 

43-12 Sales Management — Continuing 43-11 Sales Management, this 
course deals primarily with the following problems: sales methods, sales 
promotion, sales campaigns, management of sales force, and the plan- 
ning and control of sales operations. 

In the field of sales management the solution of problems involves 
two types of mental effort. First, there is the suggestion of plans or alter- 
natives, a task requiring imagination; second, there is the choice be- 
tween the alternatives so suggested, a matter of judgment. It is essential 
that the student of business management acquire the habit of weighing 
alternatives before deciding, but much more is to be gained if the student 
possesses and develops imagination. 

43-13 Problems in Advertising and Marketing — Using actual case material, 
this course analyzes and suggests solutions to a wide variety of selling 
problems in typical industries and trades. It is aimed throughout to 
develop the analytical powers of the student so that he may decide a 
problem from the viewpoint of a marketing or advertising executive. 
Consideration is given to consumers' buying habits and buying motives, 
to the important types of retail and wholesale enterprise, and to an 
analysis of the channels of distribution with the object of formulating 
a basis for selecting suitable channels for various products. Careful 
attention is given to the analysis and solution of a wide variety of ad- 
vertising problems of the various advertising media. The case method 
is used throughout the course. 

43-14 Problems in Advertising and Marketing — This is a continuation of 
43-13. 

43-15 Advanced Problems in Advertising and Marketing — Conclusion of 
work carried in 43-13 and 43-14 on the basis of individual research. 

43-21 Merchandising — A primary concern of this course is to develop an 
approach and a technique for the solution of problems of selling in our 
complicated markets. The emphasis is upon expense distribution, credits 
and collections, and special phases of accounting. Consideration is 
given to fashion, salesmanship, customer service, and the training and 
welfare of employees. 

43-22 Merchandising — This course is divided into two parts. First, it does 
for other fields what 43-21 does for the retail field. The course will, 
therefore, analyze selling of industrial goods, wholesaling, co-operative 
policies and procedures, and other middlemen's functions and organi- 
zations. Secondly, this course will study the whole field of merchandising 
from the point of view of the advertising department, the part it plays, 
why, and how. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMrNISTRATlOhl 155 

43-23 Store Management — The purpose of this course is to study the prin- 
ciples of successful retailing and to solve actual problems involving these 
principles. Layout, location and equipment of retail stores are first con- 
sidered. Store organization, market contacts, buying, receiving and mark- 
ing merchandise, and invoice procedure are taken up next. Mark-up and 
mark-down are dealt with in detail through practical examples requiring 
solution by the students, as are inventory and stock control methods. 
Merchandise planning is discussed and illustrated. 

43-24 Marketing Research — The purpose of this course is to show the 
student what market research is and how it is conducted. It analyzes the 
different checks and tests used to measure the effectiveness of sales pro- 
motion work. It points out in some detail the reasons why research has 
become an important part of the marketing-advertising mechanism. 

Mathematics 

14-25 Mathematics of Finance — This course starts with the algebra and 
logarithms necessary for the understanding and use of the formulas 
developed in business mathematics. Then the subjects covered are inter- 
est, discount, annuities, sinking funds, depreciation, amortization, val- 
uation of bonds, the use of graphs, the interpretation of statistical data, 
and insurance. 

Physical Education 

16-01 Hygiene — This course aims to provide the student with funda- 
mental information which will be useful in developing and maintaining 
good health and in the practice of personal hygiene. The course in- 
cludes enough of the fundamentals of physiology and anatomy to en- 
able the student to understand such parts of the work as require some 
knowledge of these subjects. 

16-02 Hygiene — A continuation of 16-01 completing a study of the func- 
tion and care of the several systems of the body. 

16-10 Physical Training — All first-year men students are required to take 
physical training. Health, strength, and vitality do not come by chance, 
but by constant attention to those factors involved in their develop- 
ment. It is very essential for the student to acquire good habits of life. 

The work in the course includes a formal calisthenic program, special 
exercise classes for the correction of postural defects, participation in the 
regular athletic program, including baseball, basketball, hockey, track, 
and many types of informal games. All members of the class are also 
required to learn to swim. 

Students wishing to be excused from physical training, because of 
physical defects, are required to present a petition to the faculty sup- 
ported by a physician's certificate. 

16-11 — This is a continuation of 16-10. 

J 6-1 2 — This is a continuation of 16-11. 



156 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Psychology 

25-01 Introductory Psychology — An elementary study of the structure, 
functions, and laws of mental life. The course considers the special re- 
lation of psychology to the social sciences; the scientific approach to a 
study of mental processes; the dynamics of animal and human behavior; 
the relationship between the individual's environment, his response 
mechanisms, and his personality; the biological and social sources of 
drives, desires, wishes, and incentives and their relation to interest, 
effort, adjustment, and maladjustment. 

25-02 General Psychology — The course makes a systematic study of the 
psychological mechanisms underlying human behavior and it presents 
the more important theories of thought and action. It deals with the 
neurophysiological and psychological mechanisms involved in learn- 
ing, memory, thought, imagination, motivation, emotion, sensation, and 
perception; the nature and extent of individual differences; aptitudes 
and aptitude testing. It emphasizes the practical application of psy- 
chological principles to mental and social adjustment. It presents the 
main problems in psychology and gives the points of view of the differ- 
ent schools of thought. 

25-23 Industrial Psychology — A study of the principles and techniques of 
psychology in their relation to the problems which affect industrial 
efficiency. The course includes such topics as training and transfer, 
fatigue, monotony, motivation, accident prevention, conditions and 
methods of work, vocational fitness, adjustment, and the techniques of 
human control. 

Special consideration is given to the motives controlling owner and 
manager of industry and that of the employees; to the conflicts of desire 
which result; to the emotional appeals which are used to resolve these 
conflicts; and to the unconscious impulses which are rationalized in 
idealistic and philosophical formulations. 

25-24 Industrial Psychology — A continuation of 25-23. 

Sociology 

26-01 Principles of Sociology — In presenting a survey of the origins and 
sources of human society, this study provides orientation for the course 
in principles and problems which follows. The several theories of or- 
ganic evolution are discussed. The antiquity of man and basic anthro- 
pological data are considered. The racial and ethnic groupings of man 
are then studied in the light of biological, geographical, and cultural 
factors. 

26-02 Principles of Sociology — Facts and principles basic to a general 
knowledge of the field of sociology are presented. The origins, forms, 
and forces of human associations are discussed. A study is made of the 
principal socio-political groups such as socialism, communism, fascism, 
and democracy. The course is practical in emphasis and is designed to 
meet the needs of the student who desires a survey of the subject. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMZN/STRATION 157 

Business Administration Theses 

A thesis in the College of Business Administration is considered to 
be an essay involving the statement, analysis, and solution of some prob- 
lem in a special field of business administration. Its purpose is to demon- 
strate a satisfactory degree of initiative and power of original thought 
and work on the part of the candidate. A mere resume of existing knowl- 
edge in some subject is not acceptable. This, it is true, must usually be 
made, but in addition thereto the student must show his ability to deal 
constructively with the data he has collected and his power to draw 
significant and reliable conclusions from his investigations. The com- 
pleted thesis will be examined for acceptance or rejection from the tech- 
nical viewpoint by the departments interested and then forwarded to 
the Secretary of the Faculty. Final approval of the thesis rests with the 
Dean. When it is accepted, the thesis becomes the property of the school 
and it is not to be printed, published, nor in any other way made public 
except in such manner as the department and the Dean shall jointly 
approve. 

Theses are not required of seniors in the College of Business Admin- 
istration. To certain students who wish to do so, however, the privilege 
of writing a thesis may be granted by the Dean in accordance with the 
following regulations: 

1. To be eligible to write a thesis a student must have attained a scho- 
lastic average of at least 2.0 or better during the middler year and the 
first half of the junior year. 

2. Students who have met this minimum requirement may petition 
the Dean for the privilege of substituting a thesis for any one of the 
required courses of the fifth year. 

3. In his petition the student must state the subject which is to be 
investigated and give a brief statement of the purpose and scope of the 
proposed thesis. 

4. Petitions for the privilege of writing theses must be submitted in 
writing to the Dean not later than the middle of the second college period 
of the junior year. 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



COLLEGE OF 



ENGINEERING 

cAdmission Requirements and Courses of Study 

19464947 




{CO-EDUCATIONAL) 



BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

DECEMBER, 1945 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 161 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
c5^ims and (Methods 

ENGINEERING has been defined as the art of applying the resources 
of material and power in nature to the use and convenience of 
man. The design and construction of bridges, power plants, water 
works, skyscrapers, industrial plants, machinery, transportation sys- 
tems, and communications systems thus clearly fall within the scope of 
engineering. And as scientific research has advanced into new areas, the 
task of putting these discoveries to practical use has also fallen to the 



engineer. 



Because an engineering education teaches the student to search out 
the truth, to think clearly, and to formulate conclusions based upon a 
solid foundation of facts, engineers are being called upon more and more 
to occupy positions of responsibility in the management of our great in- 
dustrial enterprises. Even in such diverse fields as banking, public health, 
and public administration, this so-called engineering approach is in 
demand. 

In consequence of this extremely wide field of endeavor open to 
engineers, the problem of providing a technical training adequate to 
cope with the design and construction of buildings, machinery, and 
equipment, and at the same time a training broad enough to develop a 
well-rounded personality and a sense of social responsibility, is by no 
means simple of solution. Northeastern University seeks, by means of 
its educational program, first of all to develop students of well-rounded 
personality capable of meeting and discharging their responsibilities as 
future citizens and leaders in their own communities. At the same time, 
the courses of study prescribed for students in the College of Engineering 
are designed to develop engineers technically competent to undertake 
professional responsibilities in their chosen fields of endeavor. 

To this end, the College of Engineering offers separate curricula in five 
major branches of engineering: namely, civil, mechanical, electrical, 
chemical, and industrial. Since a basic training in science and mathe- 
matics is essential to all fields of engineering, the first year's curriculum 
is identical for all engineering students, and it is possible for any of them 
to change their field of specialization at the end of the first year without 
loss of time. Students are required to take a number of courses of a cul- 
tural nature designed to broaden their point of view and to help develop 
a well-balanced outlook. Individual laboratory instruction in addition 
to classroom work is employed as far as possible, and the Co-operative 
Plan of education, enabling the students to obtain a firsthand acquaint- 
ance with actual industrial and engineering operations, goes a long way 
toward bridging the gap between "theory" and "practice." 



162 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



(Admission "^quirements 

Applicants for admission to the freshman class must qualify by one of 
the following methods: 

1. Graduation from an approved course of study in an accredited 
secondary school, including prescribed subjects listed below. 

2. Completion of fifteen acceptable secondary school units with a 
degree of proficiency satisfactory to the Department of Admissions. 

3. Examinations. 

(Certificate of entrance examinations passed for admission to recog- 
nized colleges and technical schools may be accepted.) 



Prescribed Subjects for Admission 




College of Engineering 




Algebra (quadratics and beyond) 


2 units 


Plane Geometry 


1 unit 


Physics 


1 unit 


History, Social Studies, Mathematics and /or Foreign 




Language 


6 units 


English (4 years) 


3 units 


*Electives 


2 units 



Total 15 units 

A unit is a credit given to an acceptable secondary school course 
which meets at least four times a week for periods of not less than forty 
minutes each throughout the school year. 

Entrance examinations are not required of students whose transcripts 
of record are acceptable, but the Committee on Admissions reserves the 
right to require a candidate to be present for an examination in any 
subjects that it may deem necessary because of some weakness in the 
secondary school record. 

Other Requirements 
These formal requirements are necessary and desirable in that they 
tend to provide all entering students with a common ground upon which 
the first year of the college curriculum can be based. But academic credits 
alone are not an adequate indication of a student's ability to profit by a 
college education. Consequently, the Department of Admissions takes 
into consideration, along with the formal requirements stated above, 
other factors regarding candidates for the freshman class. A student's 
interests and aptitudes in so far as these can be determined, capacity for 
hard work, attitude toward classmates and teachers in high school, 
physical stamina, and most important of all — character are considered. 
In this way the University seeks to select for its student body those who 
not only meet the academic admission requirements but who also give 

* Not less than four of the "electives" must be in one or more of the following aca- 
demic branches: Languages, Natural Science, Mathematics, Social Sciences, History. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 163 

promise of acquitting themselves creditably in the rigorous program of 
training afforded by the Co-operative Plan and of being useful members 
of society. 

Personal Interview 

A personal interview is always preferred to correspondence, and par- 
ents are urged to accompany the applicant whenever this is possible. 
Effective guidance depends in large measure upon a complete knowledge 
of a student's background and problems. Parents invariably are able to 
contribute information that aids the admissions officer in arriving at a 
decision. 

Candidates should visit the Office of Admissions for personal inter- 
view if it is possible for them to do so before submitting their applica- 
tions. Office hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily; Saturdays to 
12:00 M. The Department of Admissions will interview applicants on 
Wednesday evenings but by appointment only. 

Application for Admission 

Each applicant for admission is required to fill out an application 
blank stating previous education as well as the names of persons to 
whom reference may be made. 

A fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required when the application is filed. 
This fee is non returnable. 

The last page of this catalog is in the form of an application blank. It 
should be filled out in ink and forwarded with the required five-dollar 
fee to Director of Admissions, Northeastern University, Boston 15, 
Massachusetts. Checks should be made out to Northeastern University. 

Upon receipt of the application, properly filled out, the University 
secures the references and secondary school record. As soon as possible 
after the Committee on Admissions has reviewed the completed applica- 
tion, a report of the status with respect to admission will be sent to each 
candidate. 

Early filing of applications is recommended. 

The University reserves the right to place any entering student upon 
an indefinite trial period. Reclassification will be determined upon the 
academic success of the student. 

Registration 

Eligibility for admission does not constitute registration. Freshmen 
will register at the University on September 5, 1946, and November 14, 
1946. Students are not considered to have met the requirements for ad- 
mission until they have successfully passed the required physical ex- 
amination. 

Advanced Standing 
Students transferring from approved colleges will be admitted to ad- 
vanced standing provided their records warrant it. Whenever a person 
enters with advanced standing and later proves to have had inadequate 



164 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

preparation in any prerequisite subjects, the faculty reserves the right to 
require the student to make up such deficiencies. 

Applicants seeking advanced standing should arrange to have tran- 
scripts of their previous college records forwarded with their initial in- 
quiry. Students admitted to advanced standing are not eligible for place- 
ment at co-operative work until they have completed a full year of 
academic work at the University. 

Entrance Examinations 

Candidates who are lacking in required units for admission may re- 
move these deficiencies by examination. Such examinations are held at 
the University unless special arrangements are made with the Depart- 
ment of Admissions to administer them elsewhere. 

Students are advised to take such examinations on the earliest pos- 
sible date in order that any deficiencies which they fail to clear may be 
made up in time to permit registration with the desired class and division. 

Examinations will be given approximately three weeks before each 
registration date from ten to twelve and from one to three on days to 
be announced. 



COLLEGE OF ENOrNEERTNG 165 

Qraduation "^quirements 

The College of Engineering offers five-year curricula, conducted on 
the Co-operative Plan, leading to the following degrees: 

1. Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

2. Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

3. Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

4. Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

5. Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

These curricula are described in the following pages. Since the first 
year is the same for all engineering students, final choice of curriculum 
need not be made until the beginning of the second year. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete all of 
the prescribed work of the curriculum in which they seek to qualify. A 
total of 234 credit hours is required for the degree. Students who under- 
take co-operative work assignments must meet the requirements of the 
Department of Co-operative Work before they become eligible for their 
degrees. 

No student transferring from another college or university is eligible 
to receive the S.B. degree until he has completed at least one academic 
year at Northeastern immediately preceding his graduation. 

Students who fail to show a satisfactory standard of general efficiency 
in their professional fields may be required to demonstrate their quali- 
fications for the degree by taking such additional work as the faculty 
may prescribe. If they are clearly unable to meet the accepted standard 
of attainment, they may be required to withdraw from the University. 

Graduation With Honor 

Candidates who have achieved distinctly superior attainment in their 
academic work will be graduated with honor. Upon special vote of the 
faculty a limited number of this group may be graduated with high 
honor or with highest honor. Students must have been in attendance 
at the University at least three years before they may become eligible for 
honors at graduation. 



166 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Engineering Curricula 

I, Qivil Engineering 



The field of civil engineering has to do with the planning and building 
of all kinds of structures and public works. None of the structures of 
civil engineers lend themselves to quantity production in a factory. Not 
only are civil engineering works designed to fit a single location, but 
ordinarily their value is dependent upon their ability to resist forces 
tending to move them. 

Civil engineering is as old as civilization itself and, until recent times, 
it embraced all phases of engineering except those of a military character. 
Today its major branches include topographical, municipal, railroad, 
highway, structural, hydraulic, and sanitary engineering. It covers land 
surveying, the building of railroads, soil mechanics, harbors, docks, and 
similar structures, the construction of sewers, water works, streets, and 
highways, the design and construction of flood control projects, bridges, 
buildings, walls, foundations, and all fixed structures. 

Because civil engineering covers such a broad field, it is not possible 
to become expert in all its branches. All of these, however, rest upon a 
relatively compact body of principles and, broadly speaking, it may be 
said that the civil engineer deals largely with accurate descriptions of 
locations (surveys) and with applications of the mechanics of resistance 
to motion (statics). 

Since the first step in every civil engineering project involves accurate 
measurement of the surface features of the land, of the nature of the 
soil, and of the character of the underlying rock, the study of surveying 
and related subjects occupies a large place in the civil engineering curric- 
ulum. And since the primary consideration in designing any structure is 
to make certain that it will withstand safely any forces to which it m.ay 
be subjected, the mechanics of static bodies, strength of materials, and 
theory of structures are studied in detail. The curriculum is thus intended 
to prepare the young civil engineer to take up the work of design and 
construction of structures, to solve the problems of water supply and 
waste disposal in urban areas, and to undertake intelligently the super- 
vision of work in allied fields of engineering and in general contracting. 

Upon graduation, the young engineer may expect a period of appren- 
ticeship either in the field, surveying and plotting, or in the office, over 
the drafting board. As experience is gained, the graduate is entrusted 
with greater responsibilities in actual design and supervision of con- 
struction. Those who prefer a roving existence should direct their am- 
bitions toward private fields, while those who prefer a stable home and 
community life will seek opportunities in the public service of the Federal 
Government and the various states and municipalities. 



COLLEGE OF ENGlhlEERMG 



167 



Curriculum in Civil Engineering (I) 



j FIRST YEAR 

Term 1 

}Jo. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 

11-01 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 

12-01 Drawing 6 3 3 

14-01 Math. 5 7 4 

15-01 Physics 3 6 3 

30-01 English 3 6 3 

16-01 Hygiene 10 2 1 

i 16-10 Phys. Tr. 2 

i 15 11 30 18 



SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 

11-04 Chemistry 3 3 6 2 

15-04 Physics 3 6 1>^ 

14-04 Math. 5 10 2}4 

23-05 Am. Hist. 6 12 3 



17 3 34 9 



Term 2 



No. Course 
11-02 Chem. 
12-02 Drawing 
14-02 Math. 
15-02 Physics 
30-02 English 
16-02 Hygiene 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 



ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 




5 
3 
3 
1 




6 




2 



3 
7 
6 
6 
2 




3 
4 
3 
3 
1 



Term 
No. Course 
11-03 Chem. 
12-03 Drawing 
14-03 Math. 
15-03 Physics 
30-03 English 
16-12 Phys. Tr. 



15 11 30 18 



Term 
20-11 Econ. 
14-05 Diff. Calc. 
15-05 Physics 

3-01 Elec. Eng. 

1-10 Surveying 



3 
4 
3 
3 
4 





3 

3 



6 
8 
6 
6 
5 



3 
4 
4 
3 
4 



Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 




5 
3 
3 




3 

10 
6 
6 





3 
5 
3 
3 



14 11 31 18 



Term 
20-12 Econ. 
14-06 Int. Calc. 
15-06 Physics 

3-02 Elec. Eng. 

2-20 App. Mech. 



3 
4 
3 
3 
4 





3 





6 
8 
6 
6 
8 



3 
4 
4 
3 
4 



17 6 31 18 



17 3 34 18 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 7* 

22-05 Am. Govt. 4 8 2 

2-30 Pwr. PI. Eq. 5 10 2)4 

12-04 Mach. Draw. 9 3 2 

2-50 Prod. Proc. 5 10 2>^ 



14 9 31 9 

.FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 

30-07 EfF. Spkg. 6 12 3 

1-13 Surveying 18 3 

Lib. Elective 6 12 3 



12 18 24 9 

HFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
46-03 Contracts &. 

Agency 6 12 3 

50-01 Prof. Devel. 6 12 3 

Lib. Elect. 6 12 3 



18 36 9 



Term 8 

14-07 Diff. Eq. 3 6 3 

2-21 App. Mech. 3 6 3 

2-31 Thermo. 3 6 3 

1-11 Surveying 4 3 5 4 

13-01 Gen. Geol. 3 6 3 

2-40 Materials 2 4 2 

18 3 33 18 



Term 11 

2-23 SgthofMtls. 3 6 3 

1-40 Struc. Anal. 3 6 3 

1-49 Conc.T. Lab. 1 4 4 3 

1-21 Hydraulics 3 6 3 

44-13 Cons. Fin. 3 6 3 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

16 4 34 18 



Term 14 

1-42 Struct. Anal. 3 6 3 

1-51 Concrete 3 6 3 

1-55 Des. ofStruc.3 6 3 

1-24 San. Eng. 3 6 3 

1.30Transp. 4 5 3 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

19 6 29 18 



Term 9 
41-06 Cons. Costs 3 
2-22 Sgth.of Matls 4 



1-20 Hydraulics 
1-12 Surveying 
13-11 Eng. Geol. 



3 


3 




4 
4 
3 
4 
3 



17 6 31 18 



Term 12 

1-54 Des. of Struc. 2 4 2 

1-41 Struct. Anal. 4 8 4 

1-50 Concrete 3 6 3 

2-64 Test. Mat. L. 14 4 3 

2-24 Adv. Mech. 3 6 3 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

16 8 30 18 



Term 15 

1-43 Struct. Anal. 4 8 4 

1-57 Found. Eng. 2 4 2 

1-56 Des. of Struc. 9 3 

1-25 San. Eng. 3 3 6 4 

1-31 Transp. 2 4 2 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 



14 12 28 18 



•Summer term — 5 weeks. 



168 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

II. (Mechanical Engineering 

The field of mechanical engineering is concerned with the harnessing 
of power resources by means of machinery to perform useful work. With 
the increasing mechanization of all industry which has taken place dur- 
ing the last century, the field has so broadened as to include all lines of 
industry. 

In contrast to the civil engineer who deals primarily with static forces, 
the mechanical engineer is more concerned with the mechanics of mo- 
tion or kinetics. And because moving parts require constant care and 
adjustment, the mechanical engineer has the task not only of designing 
and installing complicated machinery but also of operating it efficiently 
after it has been installed. 

Among the major branches of mechanical engineering are included 
combustion or power production engineering, machine and machine- 
tool design, railway mechanical engineering, automotive engineering, 
aeronautical engineering, refrigerating engineering, and air conditioning 
engineering. The construction and operation of furnaces, boilers, and 
engines, the design of all kinds of machinery from pocket watches to 
steel mills, the construction and operation of railway and other trans- 
portation equipment including automobiles and airplanes, and even 
control of atmospheric conditions by means of heating, and air con- 
ditioning equipment, all fall in this field. 

Since machinery is so predominantly the concern of the mechanical 
engineer, the program of study is designed to give the student consider- 
able training in the principles underlying the design and operation of 
engines, power transmission devices, machine tools, and other machin- 
ery. This, of course, implies a thorough study of the physical laws con- 
cerning motion and transfer of energy. Applied mechanics and thermo- 
dynamics occupy a prominent place in the curriculum. The program of 
instruction thus gives the student a broad foundation in those funda- 
mental subjects essential to all engineering practice and, in the senior 
year, provides opportunity for limited specialization. 

For those students desiring to specialize in the field of industrial man- 
agement, attention is called to the curriculum in industrial engineering, 
the basic training of which is essentially the same as that in mechanical 
engineering. 

The graduate mechanical engineer generally finds employment in an 
industrial plant, either in design and research or in plant operation and 
maintenance. And if one's abilities lie in that direction, one frequently 
is entrusted after a time with greater and greater responsibility for the 
successful management of the enterprise. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



169 



^RST year- 
Term 

Vo. Course 
[1-01 Chemistry 
12-01 Drawing 
14-01 Math, 
15-01 Physics 
50-01 English 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 



Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering (2) 



1 

Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 




5 
3 
3 
1 




6 





2 



3 
7 
6 
6 

2 




3 
4 
3 
3 
1 



Term 
No. Course 
11-02 Chemistry 
12-02 Drawing 
14-02 Math. 
15-02 Physics 
30-02 English 
16-02 Hygiene 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 



CI.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 




5 
3 
3 
1 




6 





2 



3 
7 
6 
6 
2 




Term 
No. Course 
11-03 Chemistry 
12-03 Drawing 
14-03 Math. 
15-03 Physics 
30-03 English 



CI.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 




5 
3 
3 



6 







3 

10 

6 

6 



3 
5 
3 
3 



16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 



15 11 30 18 



15 11 30 18 



14 11 31 18 



SECOND YEAR 

Term 4* 

11-04 Chemistry 3 3 6 

15-04 Physics 3 6 

14-04 Math. 5 10 

i3-05 Am. Hist. 6 12 



Term 

2 20-11 Economics 
1}4 14-05 Diff. Calc. 
2}4 15-05 Physics 

3 ■ 3-01 Elec. Eng. 

1-10 Surveying 



3 
4 
3 
3 
4 





3 

3 



6 
8 
6 
6 
5 



3 
4 
4 
3 
4 



Term ( 
20-12 Economics 
14-06 Int. Calc. 
15-06 Physics 

3-02 Elec. Eng. 

2-20 App. Mech. 



3 
4 
3 
3 

4 





3 





6 
8 
6 
6 
8 



3 
4 
4 
3 

4 



17 3 34 9 



17 6 31 18 



17 3 34 18 



THIRD YEAR 

Term 7* 

22-05 Am. Govt. 4 8 

2-30 Pwr. PI. Eq. 5 10 

12-04 Mach. Draw. 9 3 

2-50 Prod. Proc. 5 10 



14 9 31 9 



Term 8 

14-07 Diff. Eq. 3 6 3 

2-21 App. Mech. 3 6 3 

2-32 Ht.Eng.Ther 4 8 4 

5-10 Ind. Mgt. 13 6 3 

2-40 Materials 2 4 2 

30-07 Eff. Spkg. 3 6 3 

18 36 18 



3-03m.Meas. 2 2 5 3 

2-22 Sgth of Matls 4 8 4 

1-20 Hydraulics 3 6 3 

5-11 Ind. Mgt. II 2 4 2 

2-33 Ht. Eng. 3 6 3 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

17 2 35 18 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
^37 Htg & Air 

Cond. 6 

Lib. Elect. 6 
Lib. Elect. 6 



12 3 
12 3 
12 3 



18 36 9 



Term 11 

1-21 Hydraulics 3 6 3 

2-23 Sgth of Matl 3 6 3 

2-34 Ht. Eng. 3 6 3 

2-60 Mech. Lab. 3 3 2 

2-10 Mechanism 6 6 4 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

12 9 33 18 



Term 12 

2-24 Adv. Mech. 3 6 3 

2-25 Aerodynam. 3 6 3 

2-35 Ht. Eng. 4 8 4 

2-61 Mech. Lab. 4 5 3 

5-15 Meth. Eng. 12 4 2 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

15 4 35 18 



FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 
241 Metallog. 4 4 10 3 
2-66 Mech. Lab. 12 6 3 
Lib. Elect. 6 12 3 



10 16 28 9 



Term 14 

2-26 Eng. Dyn. 3 6 3 

2-11 Mach. Des. 6 3 3 

2-62 Mech. Lab. 4 5 3 

l-46Structs. 3 6 3 

2-36 Ht. Eng. 3 6 3 

50-01 Prof.Dvlpmt 3 6 3 

12 10 32 18 



Term 15 
2-38 Pwr. PI. Eng 
2-12 Mach. Des. 
2-63 Mech. Lab. 
1-47 Structs. 
Lib. Elect. 



4 





8 


4 





9 


6 


5 





4 


5 


3 


3 





6 


3 


3 





6 


3 


10 


13 


31 


18 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



170 NORTHEASTERN UNP/ERSITY 

III. Electrical Engineering 

Electrical engineering is still comparatively new; it was barely two 
generations ago that Thomas Edison built the first central electric power 
station in New York City, and it was only a generation ago that the 
radio made its first appearance. In consequence, we find this branch of 
engineering more closely related to research in pure science than are the 
older branches of civil and mechanical engineering. Moreover, the tre- 
mendous developments of the past decade in theoretical physics have 
been largely in areas closely related to electrical engineering as exempli- 
fied by Radar, Amplydine and similar tools used in World War 11. So 
that today greater opportunities for intellectual pioneering appear to 
exist in this field of engineering than in other branches of the profession. 

The electrical industry and the field of electrical engineering are usually 
divided into two main branches, one having to do with electrical power 
and the other, communications, with the field of electronics overlapping 
both. The power group deals principally with large equipment and ap- 
paratus employing heavy currents; the communications group handles 
smaller, more delicate equipment employing small or even minute cur- 
rents. Electrical engineering thus embraces the generation, transmission, 
and distribution of electricity for light and power purposes, the opera- 
tion of all types of electrical equipment including telephone, telegraph; 
and industrial electronics, radio, television and ultra-high frequency as 
well as lamps, motors, and household appliances. In addition, the field 
of illuminating engineering, having to do with the problems of proper 
light intensities, has in recent years assumed increasing importance. 

Since electricity is without material embodiment and can be treated 
only by mathematical reasoning, the electrical engineer is frequently 
required to go into higher mathematics seldom used in other fields. It is 
also absolutely essential that the electrical engineer who hopes to make 
a success of his work be able to grasp readily and absorb effectively the 
meaning and content of the many scientific papers having to do with 
research in this field. For these reasons, the program of study in electrical 
engineering includes more work in the pure sciences of mathematics and 
physics than do the other courses, as well as a solid grounding in en- 
gineering fundamentals. This is followed by a thorough study of elec- 
trical theory and its applications in the power, high voltage, and elec- 
tronics fields. 

The profession of electrical engineering affords a wide diversification 
of employment opportunities. If one is research-minded, opportunity to 
develop one's talents may be found in one of the great laboratories; if 
one is more interested in plant problems, opportunity can be found in 
the manufacturing or operating organizations; and if one is sales-minded 
he may find a career as a sales engineer. 



COLLEGE OF ENGJNEERJNG 



171 



1^ 

RRST YEAR 




Curriculum in Electrical Engineer 


■ing (3) 






Term 
No. Course 
11-01 Chemistry 
12-01 Drawing 
14-01 Math. 
15-01 Physics 
30-01 English 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 
6 3 3 
5 7 4 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
11-02 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 
12-02 Drawing 6 3 3 
14-02 Math. 5 7 4 
15-02 Physics 3 6 3 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course ClLab.Pr.Cr. 
11-03 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 
12-03 Drawing 6 3 3 
14-03 Math. 5 10 5 
15-03 Physics 3 6 3 
30-03 English 3 6 3 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 




15 


11 


30 


18 


15 


11 30 


18 


14 


11 31 


18 


SECOND YEAR 






















Term 4* 
11-04 Chemistry 3 
15-04 Physics 3 
14-04 Math. 5 
23-05 Am. Hist. 6 


3 






6 

6 

10 

12 


Term 5 

2 20-11 Economics 3 
l}4 14-05 Diff. Calc. 4 
2H 15-05 Physics 3 

3 3-01 Elec. Eng. I 3 
1-10 Surveying 4 


6 
8 
3 6 
6 
3 5 


3 
4 

4 
3 
4 


Term 6 

20-12 Economics 3 

14-06 Int. Calc. 4 

15-06 Physics 3 

3-02 Elec. Eng. I 3 

2-20 App. Mech. 4 


6 
8 
3 6 
6 
8 


3 
4 
4 
3 

4 




17 


3 34 


9 


17 


6 31 


18 


17 


3 34 


18 


THIRD YEAR 






















Term 7* 
22-05 Am. Govt. 4 

2-30 Pwr. PI. Eq. 5 
12-04 Mach. Draw. 

2-50 Prod. Proc. 5 




9 



8 
10 

3 
10 


2 
2 


Term 8 
14-07 Diff. Eq. 3 
2-21 Appl. Mech. 3 
2-31 Thermo. 3 
3-10 D.C. Mach. 5 
2-40 Materials 2 
Lib. Elect. 3 


6 
6 

6 
7 
4 
6 


3 
3 
3 

4 
2 
3 


Term 9 
3-13 Elec. Meas. 3 
2-22 Str. Mat. 4 
1-20 Hydraulics 3 
3-11 Adv.ACThe.3 
3-12 E.E.Lab.D.C. 1 
Lib. Elect. 3 


6 
8 
6 
6 
3 2 
6 


3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 




14 


9 


31 


9 


19 


35 


18 


17 


3 34 


18 


FOURTH YEAR 






















Term 
30-07 Eff. Spkg. 
3-14 E.E.Lab.D.C 
Lib. Elect. 


10* 
6 

:. 2 

6 



6 



12 
10 
12 


3 
3 
3 


Term 11 
2-23 Str. Mat. 3 
3-15 Polyphase 

ACCirc. 3 

3-16 Electronics 3 

3-17 Elec. Meas. 4 

3-18E.Meas.Lab.O 

Lib. Elect. 3 


6 

6 
6 
5 
3 6 
6 


3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Term 12 
3-19 El.Fld.Theo. 3 
3-20 Transformers 

Theory 3 

3-21 Electronics 3 

3-22 A.C.Test Lab. 1 

3-23 Electronic Lab. 1 

Lib. Elect. 3 


6 

6 
6 
3 5 
3 5 
6 


3 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 




14 


~6 34 


9 


16 


3 35 


18 


14 


6 34 18 


HMH YEAR 






















Term '. 
3-24 Electronic L. 
3-25 Adv. Meas.L 
Lib. Elect. 


13* 

, 2 

,.0 

6 


6 
6 




10 
12 
12 


3 
3 
3 


Term 14 
3-26 Syn. Mach. 3 
3-27 H. F. Eng. 3 
3-28 Trans. Lines 

&. Ntwrk 3 

3-29 Ad.F'ld Th. 3 

2-65 Mech.E.Lab. 2 

50-01 Prof.Dvlpmt 3 


6 
6 

6 
6 
3 4 
6 


3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 


Term 15 
3-30 Ind. Mach. 3 
3-31 H. F. Eng. 3 
3-32 Filters 3 
3-33 H. Freq. Lab. 1 
3-34 Adv.E.E.Lab. 1 
Lib. Elect. 3 


6 
6 
6 
3 5 
3 5 
6 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 




8 


12 34 


9 


17 


3 34 18 


14 


6 34 


18 



•Summer term — 5 weeks. 



172 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



IV. Chemical Sngineering 



The field of chemical engineering is relatively new. It has grown out 
of the discoveries of the chemical laboratories which have served as a 
foundation for a great many new industries whose production processes 
involve chemical as well as physical changes. Petroleum refining, coal 
carbonization, plastics, manufacture of nylon and cellophane, and hun- 
dreds of other industries require men and women trained in chemistry 
as well as in engineering. Many older industries such as foods, textiles, 
and leather are also employing chemical engineers. 

The chemical engineer has been defined as a "professional man ex- 
perienced in the design, construction, and operation of plants in which 
materials undergo chemical and physical change." It is the duty of the 
chemical engineer to cut the costs, increase production, and improve 
the quality of the products in the industry. 

The chemical engineer must possess a working knowledge of the fun- 
damental sciences and must understand and know how to work with 
people. In addition it is necessary that the chemical engineer recognize 
clearly the "correct appraisement of values and costs" and possess a 
knowledge of the ability to apply the knowledge possessed to the devel- 
opment and operation of chemical processes and plants. 

In addition to the fundamental courses in chemistry, mathematics, 
and physics required of all engineering students, a considerable amount 
of time is devoted to more advanced work in chemistry as a foundation 
for the study of chemical technology. Instruction in the elements of 
mechanical and electrical engineering also gives the student a fairly broad 
engineering background upon which to base his study of chemical en- 
gineering unit operations. Courses of a more liberal nature are included 
in the curriculum in order that the student may broaden his educational 
background. Since the field of chemical engineering is so varied, the 
curriculum has been designed to give the students a broad training 
rather than a specialized training in one specific industry. It is believed 
that this training will enable the students readily to acclimate them- 
selves to whatever industry they may choose to enter. 

Because of the complex nature of many chemical processes and be- 
cause of the difficulty of translating laboratory results into full-scale 
plant operations, there has developed in many chemical plants the so- 
called semi-works or pilot plant. Here new processes developed by the 
chemists in the research laboratory are put to the test of actual plant 
conditions on a small scale. And it is here that the young chemical en- 
gineers often find themselves upon graduation. If they are able to under- 
stand the chemist on the one side and the plant operator on the other, 
and if they are technically competent as well, they will soon find oppor- 
tunity for advancement either in one of the technical branches of the 
industry, such as design, development, research, and production, or in 
the sales and management fields in which chemical engineering is 
essential. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERlhJG 



173 



FIRST YEAR 




Cuiiiculum in Chemical Engineering (4) 






Term 
No. Course 
11-01 Chemistry 
12-01 Drawing 
14-01 Math. 
15-01 Physics 
30-01 English 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 
6 3 3 
5 7 4 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 
hlo. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
11-02 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 
12-02 Drawing 6 3 3 
14-02 Math. 5 7 4 
15-02 Physics 3 6 3 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
11-03 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 
12-03 Drawing 6 3 3 
14-03 Math. 5 10 5 
15-03 Physics 3 6 3 
30-03 English 3 6 3 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 




15 


11 30 


18 


15 


11 


30 


18 


14 


11 31 


18 


SECOND YEAR 






















Term 4* 
11-04 Chemistry 3 
15-04 Physics 3 
14-04 Math. 5 
23-05 Am. Hist. 6 


3 6 
6 
10 
12 


Term 5 

2 11-41 Chem. Lit. 1 
1)4 14-05 Diff. Calc. 4 
2K 15-05 Physics 3 

3 11-11 Qual. Anal. 3 

Lib. Elect. 3 




3 

10 



2 
8 
6 
5 
6 


1 
4 
4 
6 
3 


Term 6 

14-06 Int. Calc. 4 

15-06 Physics 3 

2-20 App. Mech. 4 

11-12 Quant. Anal. 4 


8 
3 6 
8 
6 8 


4 
4 
4 
6 




17 


3 34 


9 


14 


13 


27 


18 


15 


9 30 


18 


THIRD YEAR 






















Term 
4-01 Flow Fluids 
22-05 Am. Govt. 
Lib. Elect. 


7* 
5 
4 
6 


3 16 

8 
12 


4 
2 
3 


Term 8 

20-11 Economics 3 

2-21 App. Mech. 3 

2-32 Thermo. 4 

14-07 Diff. Equa. 3 

11-14 Quant. Anal. 3 






6 


6 
6 
8 
6 
6 


3 
3 

4 
3 

5 


Term 9 
20-12 Economics 3 

2-22SgthofMatls 4 
11-30 Phys. Chem. 4 

4-02 Ch. E. Calc. 2 
41-06 Const. Costs 3 


6 
8 
3 8 
4 
3 6 


3 
4 
5 
2 
4 



15 3 36 9 



16 6 32 18 



16 6 32 18 



FOURTH YEAR 

Term 10* 
4-22 Ch.E.Econ. 6 12 3 
Lib. Elect. 6 12 3 
Lib. Elect. 6 12 3 



18 36 9 

FIFTH YEAR 

Term 13* 

4-13 Unit Opera. 3 6 9 3 

50-01 Prof. Dvlpmt 6 12 3 

Lib. Elect. 6 12 3 



Term 11 

4-11 Unit Opera. 4 4 10 6 

11-20 Org. Chem. 3 6 6 5 

ll-33Phys. Chem. 4 2 6 4 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 



14 12 28 18 



15 6 33 9 



4-31 Ch.Pr.Dev. 2 6 4 4 

3-04 Elec. Eng. 4 3 8 5 

4-03 Ch.E.Ther. 4 8 4 

11-22 Org. Chem. 3 6 3 

11-25 Org. An.Lab.O 6 2 

13 15 26 18 



Term 12 

4-12 Unit Opera. 4 4 10 6 

11-21 Org. Chem. 3 6 6 5 

11-34 Phys. Chem. 4 2 6 4 

Lib. Elect. 3 6 3 

14 12 28 18 



Term 15 

4-21 Chem. Pits. 4 8 4 

4-32 Ch. E. Des. 2 7 9 6 

4-23 Eng. Mats. 3 4 8 5 

30-07 Eff. Spkg. 3 6 3 



12 11 31 18 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



174 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

V. industrial Sngineering 

It has become increasingly evident that the success of a business or 
industrial organization, large or small, is dependent upon the skilful 
direction, supervision, and co-ordination of the various parts of the 
enterprise. The competent performance of these functions requires a 
constant supply of industrial managers well trained in the intelligent 
utilization of men, materials, machines, and money. Industrial engineer- 
ing is the profession which supplies such individuals who, by aptitude 
and preparation, are able to apply engineering and scientific principles 
to the varied problems in the field of production management and effect 
solutions in the best interests of capital, labor, and consumer. 

About sixty years ago, Frederick W. Taylor undertook to apply to the 
problems of industrial management what we now call "the scientific 
method" or "the engineering approach." He reasoned that it was man- 
agement's business to know what constituted a proper day's work and 
that the way to get the facts was through research and experiment on a 
scientific basis. He defined "scientific management" not as any device 
or scheme or gadget, but as a new outlook — a new viewpoint based 
upon a solid foundation of fact. The methods employed by Taylor and 
by those who came after him have undergone some modification, but 
the concept of scientific management which he formulated has gained 
wider and wider recognition from both employers and employees. 

This growing recognition of the value of a scientific approach to the 
problems of industrial management early created a demand for men and 
women trained in engineering and science, who possessed a knowledge 
of business as well, to assume positions of administrative responsibility 
in industry. To meet this demand, courses were established in many 
engineering colleges to provide a thorough training in engineering funda- 
mentals together with a specialized training in business administration, 
which would prepare the students for managerial responsibilities in 
technical industries. These curricula are variously entitled industrial 
engineering, administrative engineering or engineering administration, 
but all are designed to lead ultimately to positions of administrative or 
executive responsibility, rather than to positions which involve highly 
specialized engineering responsibility. 

The curriculum in industrial engineering, then, provides a course of 
study which is essentially the same as that for mechanical engineering 
in the first three years. In the last two years, however, advanced engi- 
neering courses are replaced by courses in business management. 

Upon graduation, the young industrial engineer may find his way 
into such factory staff departments as Methods Engineering, Production 
Planning and Control, Wage Administration, Quality Control, or Time 
Study. If he prefers, he may select work in Cost Accounting or Sta- 
tistical Analysis; then again he may incline towards sales engineering 
activity and serve in the "field" as a Sales and Service representative. 

More and more there is opportunity for the experienced Industrial 
Engineer to serve industry in a consulting capacity. Upon becoming 
especially skilled in his profession, he is called in by industry for assist- 
ance in the installation and maintenance of sound management prin- 
ciples, and to aid in the reorganization of enterprises which have failed. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



175 



TRSl YEAR 




Cuniculum in Industrial Engineering (5) 






Term 
Vo. Course 
1-01 Chemistry 
.2-01 Drawing 
.4-01 Math. 
.5-01 Physics 
JO-01 English 
16-01 Hygiene 
16-10 Phys. Tr. 


1 

Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
3 3 6 4 
6 3 3 
5 7 4 
3 6 3 
3 6 3 
10 2 1 
2 


Term 2 
No. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
11-02 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 
12-02 Drawing 6 3 3 
14-02 Math. 5 7 4 
15-02 Physics 3 6 3 
30-02 English 3 6 3 
16-02 Hygiene 10 2 1 
16-11 Phys. Tr. 2 


Term 3 
No. Course Cl.Lab.Pr.Cr. 
11-03 Chemistry 3 3 6 4 
12-03 Drawing 6 3 3 
14-03 Math. 5 10 5 
15-03 Physics 3 6 3 
30-03 English 3 6 3 

16-12 Phys. Tr. 2 




15 


11 


30 


18 


15 


11 30 


18 


14 


11 31 


18 


SECOND YEAR 






















Term 4* 
11-04 Chemistry 3 
15-04 Physics 3 
14-04 Math. 5 
23-05 Am. Hist. 6 


3 






6 

6 

10 

12 


Term 5 

2 20-11 Economics 3 
1J4 14-05 Diff. Calc. 4 
2H 15-05 Physics 3 

3 3-01 Elec. Eng. 3 
1-10 Surveying 4 


6 
8 
3 6 
6 
3 5 


3 

4 
4 
3 
4 


Term 6 

20-12 Economics 3 

14-06 Int. Calc. 4 

15-06 Physics 3 

3-02 Elec. Eng. 3 

2-20 App. Mech. 4 


6 
8 
3 6 
6 
8 


3 
4 
4 
3 
4 


1 


17 


3 34 


9 


17 


6 31 


18 


17 


3 34 


18 


THIRD YEAR 






















Term 7* 
22-05 Am. Govt. 4 

2-30 Pwr. Pi. Eq. 5 
12-04 Mach. Draw. 

2-50 Prod. Proc. 5 




9 




8 
10 

3 
10 


2 

2H 
2 


Term 8 
14-07 Diff. Eq. 3 
2-21 App. Mech. 3 
2-32 Thermo. 4 
5-10 Ind. Mgt. 3 
2-40 Materials 2 
30-07 Eff. Spkg. 3 


6 
6 
8 
6 
4 
6 


3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 


Term 9' 
3-03 El. Meas. 2 
2-22 Sgth of Mtls. 4 
1-20 Hydraulics 3 
5-11 Ind. Mgt. 2 
2-33 Ht. Power 3 
Lib. Elect. 3 


2 5 
8 
6 
4 
6 
6 


3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 




14 


9 


31 


9 


18 


36 


18 


17 


2 35 


18 


FOURTH YEAR 






















Term 10* 

2-37 Htg.&.Air.C. 6 

Lib. Elect. 6 

Lib. Elect. 6 







12 
12 
12 


3 
3 
3 


Term 11 
1-21 Hydraulics 3 
2-23SgthofMds 3 
2-34 Ht. Power 3 
2-60 Mech. Lab. 
2-10 Mechanism 
Lib. Elect. 3 


6 
6 
6 
3 3 
6 6 
6 


3 
3 
3 
2 
4 
3 


Term 12 

2-61 Mech. Lab. 

5-15 Methods Eng.1 2 

42-10 Personnel 3 

41-07Th. of Accts 4 

20-22 Ind. Statistics I 2 

Lib. Elect. 3 


4 5 
4 
6 
8 
2 5 
6 


3 
2 
3 
4 
3 
3 




18 


36 


9 


12 


9 33 


18 


14 


6 34 18 


HMH YEAR 






















Term 13* 
2-66 Mech. Lab. 
46-03 Contracts 

and Agency 6 
Lib. Elect. 6 


12 





6 

12 
12 


3 

3 
3 


Term 14 

2-11 Mach. Des. 

41-08 ElmtsofCost 

Acctg. 2 

20-23Ind.Stat'ticsII2 

5-17 Prod. PI. Con.3 

5-16 Metd. Eng. II 2 

50-01 Prof.Dvlpmt 3 


6 3 

2 5 
2 5 
6 
2 5 
6 


3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Term 15 
5-18 Qual. Control 3 
41-09 ElmtsofCost 

Acctg. 2 

42-17 Prob. in PersnL3 

43-08 Sales Eng. 3 

44-14 Ind. Fin. 3 

Lib. Elect. 3 


6 

2 5 
6 
6 
6 
6 


3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



12 12 30 9 



12 12 30 18 



17 2 35 18 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



176 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Synopses of Courses of instruction 

On the pages which follow are given the synopses of courses offered 
in the several curricula of the College of Engineering. Curricula in each 
of the three colleges on either the co-operative or full-time plan com- 
prise 130 weeks of classroom instruction: namely, three ten-week periods 
in the freshman year and 100 weeks of upperclass work. On the co- 
operative plan, the upperclass courses are evenly distributed over four 
years so that each division of co-operative students has 25 weeks of 
college work, 26 weeks of co-operative work, and one week of vacation 
annually. 

A complete list of the courses of instruction offered in each of the Day 
Colleges is included in a special section of the catalogue beginning on 
page 205. This section lists the prerequisite and preparation requirements, 
class and laboratory hours per week, the number of hours normally 
required for study preparation hours, and the number of credits which 
have been assigned to each course. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the 
courses offered or to change the order or content of courses in any 
curriculum. 

Accounting 

41-06 Construction Costs — The fundamental concept of cost and the 
application of the basic principles of cost accounting to engineering 
works is the primary purpose of this course. The analysis of the elements 
of cost in the product unit, job costs, and total cost of construction is 
studied in detail. The use of cost records as a basis for the preparation 
of estimates on jobs to be undertaken, the comparison and analysis of 
estimated and actual cost, and the setting of standards is studied and 
applied through the working of practical problems. 

The methods of assembling and presenting cost data and the use of 
cost records in measuring and evaluating the efficiency of performance 
of the organization and its several departments is fully developed. 

41-07 Theory of Accounts — This course treats of the law of debit and 
credit, the principle of nominal accounts, the trial balance, and the 
balance sheet. Consideration will be given to the construction and inter- 
pretation of accounts. 

41-08 Elements of Cost Accounting — This course is designed to meet the 
needs of the professional engineer. It studies collection of cost data, 
process and job cost, estimated and standard cost. 

41-09 Elements of Cost Accounting — This is a continuation of 41-08. It 
emphasizes methods of costing, cost variations, and budgetary control. 



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be fiHiiifiiH widt mao^ kg^ and gfrimi am: . r - ji Trder 11 cc-rzTjrsrc 
in hi nes -Tr tii jv.v ■ er- r::?^!. 

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178 l^ORTHEASTEKN UNIVERSITY 

11-30 Physical Chemistry — Structure of matter: the three states of matter, 
solutions, coUodial dispessions, molecular and atomic structure. 

11-33 Physical Chemistry — Class work same as 11-31. Less laboratory 
work. 

11-34 Physical Chemistry — Class work same as 11-32. Less laboratory 
work. 

11-41 Chemical Literature — Types of chemical journals; library procedure; 
problems in obtaining information. 

Chemical Engineering 

4-01 Flow of Fluids — A study of the methods of determining rates of 
flow and power consumption of fluids flowing through pipe lines. This 
course differs from the usual course in hydraulics chiefly in the amount 
of emphasis placed on the flow of gases and oils. Laboratory work is 
included. 

4-02 Chemical Engineering Calculations — This is essentially a problem 
course developed around the study of fuels and combustion. Special 
attention is given to the principles underlying the methods of calcula- 
tion, which are of value to the chemical engineer. 

4-03 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics — A study of the fundamental 
principles of thermodynamics as they apply to chemical engineering. 
Special attention will be given to high pressure operations because of 
their vital importance. The usefulness of thermodynamics to the chem- 
ical engineer for the purpose of determining properties of materials, 
energy balances, equilibrium conditions, and in determining the avail- 
ability of energy, the driving force for all unit operations, is emphasized. 

4-1 1 Unit Operations — This course consists of a study of the mechanical 
operations peculiar to the chemical industry. The unit operations studied 
are flow of heat, evaporation, and air conditioning. Experiments are 
performed on small-scale plant equipment that has been specially de- 
signed or selected for the purpose. Detailed reports are required. 

4-12 Unit Operations — This course is a continuation of 4-11. The unit 
operations studied are drying, distillation, gas absorption, extraction, 
and crystallization. Experiments are performed in the laboratory on the 
unit operations studied. 

4-13 Unit Operations — This course is a continuation of 4-12. The unit 
operations studied are filtration, mixing, crushing and grinding, size 
separation and conveying. Laboratory experiments are performed. 

4-21 Chemical Plants — The object of this course is to present to the 
student a cross section of modern chemical and process industries. The 



COLLEGE OF ENGZNEER7NG 179 

presentation is through the use of flow sheets with division into the 
unit operations and unit processes stressed. The chemistry involved, the 
equipment used, the energy requirements, and the economics of the 
processes are presented. 

The basic inorganic and organic chemical industries are studied in- 
tensively and the similarities to other industries are considered. 

Plant inspection trips serve to give practicality to the classroom 
discussion. 

4-22 Chemical Engineering Economics — The fundamentals of economics 
and statistics previously acquired by the student are specifically applied 
to raw materials, markets, labor, power, fuel, water, transportation and 
similar economic factors as related to the chemical industry. Laws re- 
lating to waste disposal, nuisance, and patents are discussed. 

4-23 Engineering Materials — A study of the properties of materials which 
chemical engineers utilize in their work. The effect of composition, heat 
treatment, and mechanical work upon the physical properties of metals 
and their alloys is emphasized. Other materials are studied in a similar 
manner. 

The causes of corrosion and methods of preventing or minimizing 
the same are given particular attention. 

Co-ordinated laboratory experiments afford practical application of 
principles and include preparation and examination of metallographic 
specimens as well as corrosion studies. 

4-31 Chemical Process Development — This course attempts to teach the 
fundamentals of research by determining the optimum conditions for 
carrying out some unit process. After a survey of the literature has been 
made, a research plan is formulated. Variables are noted and their effect 
on the chemical process determined through laboratory experiments. 
The writing of reports is an essential feature of the course. 

4-32 Chemical Engineering Design — The design of equipment of commer- 
cial size forms the basis of the course. Design data are taken from the 
literature when it is available. Other data are obtained by experiment 
on small-scale industrial equipment in the laboratory. From these data 
and information acquired in previous courses, the commercial scale 
equipment is designed. Students qualified by industrial experience are 
sometimes assigned problems suggested by their co-operative employer 
which are worked out under the joint supervision of the plant engineers 
and the members of the staff. 



Civil Engineering 
I'lO Surveying — Fundamental and basic principles of surveying are pre- 
sented to the student in this first course in surveying for the following 
topics: taping, compass, the level, differential leveling, profile leveling, 
the transit, closed traverse (D.M.D. method), stadia, and the proper 



180 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

methods of plotting ordinary surveying data. The closed traverse is fur- 
ther studied with particular emphasis on the rectangular co-ordinate 
method of computing closed traverses. The ordinary procedures for 
balancing field data and methods of back traversing are thoroughly dis- 
cussed, preparing the student for horizontal control as a basis for map 
projections or photogrammetry. 

The laboratory portion of this course is devoted to the use and care 
of the tape, the level, and the transit; and the field work consists of 
practice taping, leveling, and turning of angles. The student is then re- 
quired to run a closed differential level circuit, run a small tape and trans- 
it closed traverse, and to collect by stadia or by other methods physical 
features necessary to make a complete map of the traversed area. 

I'll Surveying — The first portion of this course deals with horizontal and 
vertical curves, thus providing the student with basic surveying data for 
"Route Surveying." Both the railroad curve and the highway curve 
(circular arc) are studied simultaneously. The rectangular co-ordinate 
method is used extensively in the study of horizontal control. The 
various field procedures used when collecting data for cross sections and 
the methods of obtaining cross sectional areas are taught. From this raw 
earthworks data, the student is taught to prepare earthwork tables and 
diagrams culminating the earthworks portion of this course with the 
mass diagram solution. 

The theory and use of the plane table (including the intersection prob- 
lem, the resection problem, and three point problem) and the theory of 
the spiral or transition curve as applied to the railroad and the highway 
location are also studied. 

The data as collected for the closed traverse in course 1-10 are used 
for complete traverse calculations, by both the D.M.D. and the rec- 
tangular co-ordinate methods. The closed traverse is plotted by co- 
ordinates, and a plan completed by plotting the physical details. At the 
conclusion of this semester's office work the student is required to sub- 
mit an inked tracing of this map and a complete set of traverse calcula- 
tions similar in all details to the requirements as set forth by the Massa- 
chusetts Land Court. 

1-12 Surveying — The celestial sphere and a review of spherical trigonom- 
etry are studied as a basis of stellar and solar observations for latitude, 
longitude, time, and azimuth determinations. The above material is fol- 
lowed by the basic principles of geodetic surveying, namely precise level- 
ing and triangulation; and this course concludes with a discussion of the 
basic principles of photogrammetry. 

In the field portion of this course a random traverse is run as a "Route 
Survey," and the physical features are located with respect to this trav- 
erse. Using the above data, a map is prepared, a location line plotted 
upon this map, and then the location line is staked out on the ground 
in the field. At the conclusion of this semester's laboratory work, the 
student is required to submit a tracing of the map with the location line 
plotted thereon; and a complete set of calculations for the location line. 



COLLEGE OF ENGlNEERIhlG 181 

1'13 Surveying — This course is a continuation of the laboratory portion 
of course 1-12 where the following surveying problems are performed: 
precise and Coast and Geodetic leveling; cross sections; earthworks cal- 
culations; mass diagram solution; plane table problems; observations on. 
the sun for latitude, longitude, time, and azimuth; observation on Po- 
laris for azimuth; and basic problems of photogrammetry including 
differential parallax measurements. 

1'20 Hydraulics — This course is divided into two parts, the first part 
which treats with the laws of hydrostatics, and the second part which 
deals with the laws of hydrokinetics. 

Under the topic of hydrostatics the following material is studied: open 
end U gauges, differential manometers, pressure intensity, total pres- 
sures, location of center of pressure (horizontally and vertically), pres- 
sures on curved and inclined surfaces, hoop tension and end tension, 
simple dams, and flotation problems. 

The laws of hydrokinetics, including those of the flow of liquids 
through Venturi meter, orifices, short tubes, pipe lines, and open chan- 
nels are studied with particular reference to Bernoulli's theorem. 

In the hydraulic demonstration laboratory the following demonstra- 
tions are made: Venturi meter, orifice meter (submerged orifice), dis- 
charge of orifice into the atmosphere, discharge through orifice or short 
tube under falling head, and trajectory of discharge for either a short 
tube or an orifice. 

1-21 Hydraulics — This course is a continuation of course 1-20. Equiva- 
lent pipes are studied by the Hazen and Williams' flow diagram method, 
and simple grid systems are studied by both the Hazen and Williams' 
equivalent pipe method and the Hardy Cross method. Rectangular 
weirs , with or without end contractions and with or without velocity of 
approach, together with triangular weirs are studied. 

Dimensional analysis is presented to the student so that the student 
is capable of making model analyses by Froude's number and Reynolds' 
number. The flow of gases and fluids through closed conduits is con- 
sidered by the application of Reynolds' number. 

This course concludes with the study of open channel flow of the fol- 
lowing topics: Lower alternate stage, critical velocity, upper alternate 
stage, hydraulic jump, and nonuniform flow of the drawdown curve 
and the backwater curve. 

The following demonstrations are made in the hydraulics laboratory: 
rectangular weirs, triangular weir, pitot tube, and by Reynolds' number 
apparatus laminary and turbulent flow. 

1-24 Sanitary Engineering — This is a general course in water supply en- 
gineering and the following items are studied: forecasting the future 
population of a given location; the quantity of water used by the various 
consumers; rainfall; runoff; storage of ground water and surface water 
supplies; dams, both earth filled and masonry; slow sand and rapid sand 
filters; treatment of waters for the removal of hardness, iron and other 
impurities; disinfection of waters; and the distribution system. 



182 hlORTHEASTEKN UNIVERSITY 

1-25 Sanitary Engineering — This is a companion course to 1-24. It deals 
with the collection and disposal of sewage and storm water, including 
the following items: the quantity of sewage and storm water to be col- 
lected; the combined or separate sewerage systems; the collection of 
data in order to prepare plans for the design and construction of col- 
lection systems, and a discussion of the modern methods of sewage 
treatment together with the operation of these treatment works. 

The laboratory portion of this course is designed to familiarize the 
student with proper methods of collecting samples of water and sewage; 
transportation and storage of said samples; and the basic principles of 
water and sewage analysis for both chemical and bacterial properties. 

1-30 Transportation — This course consists of a thorough discussion of 
traffic engineering, administration, surveys and plans of modern high- 
ways. The economics of highway rates of grade and general layout 
features, such as vertical curves, horizontal curves, superelevation, traffic 
control, accidents and general highway safety, are discussed. 

Roadway foundations, grading and excavating equipment as well as 
highway drainage problems are also considered. 

A study is made of soil tests and classifications. The elementary prin- 
ciples of soil mechanics as they are applied to highway and airport de- 
sign and construction are considered. 

The manufacture and testing of bituminous products as well as the 
construction of the low cost road types (earth and gravel) and methods 
of soil stabilization are included. 

1-31 Transportation — A course which is a continuation of 1-30 and in- 
cludes a detailed discussion of the design and construction of the higher 
cost types of roadways such as penetrated macadam, Portland cement 
concrete and asphaltic concrete pavements. A brief discussion of airport 
design and layout concludes the course. 

The application of the latest research developments is considered 
throughout all phases of the material as given in both this course and 
1-30. 

1-40 Structural Analysis — This first of a series of four courses in structural 
analysis is devoted to a study of the algebraic and graphical methods of 
determining reactions, shears, moments and stresses developed by loads 
acting upon all kinds of statically determinate structures, such as simple 
roof trusses and simple bridges of the girder and truss type. 

This is followed by a discussion of roof loads encountered in practice 
and the determination of design stresses for a typical roof truss. 

Classes are conducted on both the lecture and recitation basis. 

1-41 Structural Analysis — A continuation of 1-40, covering a discussion 
of the various types of girder, simple truss, and subdivided truss high- 
way and railway bridges. Consideration is given to the dead load stresses 
developed in such structures and a complete study of influence lines is 
undertaken, together with their function in determining the shears. 



COLLEGE OF ENGrNEERl}<IG 183 

moments and stresses produced by moving load systems, both distrib- 
uted and concentrated, with their dynamic or impact effect. Upon 
conclusion of the dead, live and impact stress studies, a discussion of 
design stresses is included. 

This is followed by a consideration of lateral, sway and portal bracing. 

1-42 Structural Analysis — A continuation of 1-41 covering the slope and 
deflection of beams and girders by the method of work, the moment- 
area process, and the method of elastic weights; and, for truss deflections 
by the method of work and the Williott-Mohr diagram. 

1-43 Structural Analysis — Continuation of 1-42, covering the analysis of 
continuous beams, simple indeterminate trusses and frameworks (with- 
out and with sidesway) by the methods of least work, slope-deflection 
and moment distribution. 

A study is made of the shears, moments and stresses developed in tall 
building frames by the various conventional methods of treatment. 

The course concludes with analyses for the internal effects developed 
in three-hinged arches and cantilever bridges. 

1-46 Structures — This course, designed for mechanical engineering stu- 
dents, comprises a study of loads and the analysis of ordinary building 
frames and trusses encountered in this field, followed by the design of 
the members of such structures and their connections. 

1-47 Structures — A continuation of 1-46 covering the transformed area 
method of design and analysis of reinforced concrete members such as 
beams and columns. The treatment of combined bending and axial 
loading follows and the course concludes with a study of the analysis 
and design of machine bases and foundations. 

1-49 Concrete Testing Laboratory — This course covers the testing of Port- 
land cement and aggregate as used in forming concrete. The cement tests 
include normal consistency, fineness, tensile strength, compressive 
strength, soundness and time of set. Some of the tests usually run on 
the aggregate include a test for organic impurities, surface moisture, 
effect of surface moisture (bulking), sieve analysis, structural strength, 
specific gravity, absorption and unit weight. 

Demonstration tests are run by the students to illustrate the water- 
cement ratio law as well as some of the factors affecting the strength of 
concrete such as curing conditions and age. Discussions and laboratory 
tests are run on some of the various theories of proportioning concrete 
mixes. The course concludes with tests on brick as used in masonry 
construction. 

1-50 Concrete — The fundamental principles involved in the theory of 
reinforced concrete behavior are thoroughly reviewed and investigated, 
and the transformed area method of design is developed. This is fol- 
lowed by the application of the method to the analysis and design of 



184 NORTHEASTERN IINIVERSITY 

elementary members such as the rectangular beam, the tee beam and 
beams reinforced in compression. Shear, diagonal tension, vertical and 
inclined stirrups, bond and anchorage are also treated. In addition, a 
discussion of specifications and current standard practice is included. 

1-51 Concrete — Continuation of 1-50, covering the analysis and design of 
centrally loaded tied and spiral columns with a study of the effects of 
shrinkage and plastic flow. This is followed by consideration of mem- 
bers subjected to combined bending and axial effects. The balance of 
the time is spent on the topics of earth pressure, the analysis and design 
of retaining walls, rectangular and flat slab construction and to the 
study and interpretation of the Joint Committee Report on Recom- 
mended Practice and Standard Specifications for Concrete and Rein- 
forced Concrete as affecting such construction. 

1-54 Design of Structures — This first course consists of lectures and prob- 
lem work in the theory and practice of designing connections for various 
structural elements using rivets, welding and timber connectors. Con- 
sideration is given to connections for direct stress and eccentric loading. 
Bracket connections for fixed end beams are designed and detailed. 

1-55 Design of Structures — This course is a continuation of 1-54 and con- 
sists essentially of the design of the individual members in a structural 
framework. Tension members, compression members (columns), bend- 
ing members (beams), and combined direct and flexural stress members. 
The latter part of the course consists of the comparative design of a 
typical interior bay of a building using one-way concrete slab with steel 
beams, concrete slab with T-beams, and flat slab constructions. Shop 
drawings are made of the steel beams. Each student uses different design 
data in working out these problems. 

J -56 Design of Structures — This course consists of the design of reinforced 
concrete footings (spread footings, footings on piles and combined foot- 
ings). A design and shop drawing is made of a plate girder for a building 
or bridge. The design of continuous beams, both steel and concrete, 
concludes the course. 

1-57 Foundation Engineering — By means of lectures and assigned readings 
and various methods of soil sampling, types of piles, pile driving equip- 
ment, pile loading capacity, the destructive action of marine borers and 
methods of prevention is studied. A discussion of the various types of 
caissons and cofferdams is included as well as methods of underpinning 
and the control of ground water in foundation construction. Considera- 
tion of dredging operations concludes the course. 



Co-ordination 

50-01 Professional Development — An over-all discussion of job-getting 
techniques covering in order such items as a survey of the occupational 



COLLEGE OF ENG/NEERING 185 

field wherein the engineering training can be profitably applied, a market 
survey of opportunities, a study of the accepted techniques related to 
job-getting efforts, such as qualification records, prospect files, letter 
writing, interviews, etc., planning and executing the job-getting cam- 
paign. 

Concurrently and co-ordinated with the foregoing, the purposes, ob- 
jectives and activities of the professional societies and of the Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development will be developed with specific 
reference to the ethics of the profession, the licensing of engineers, and 
after college continuation of educational progress. 

Draiving 

12-01 Engineering Drawing — A course in fundamentals of the graphic 
language as used in engineering. It comprises a thorough study of multi- 
planar orthographic shape description as the foundation for a later 
study of working drawings. The work is laid out to include the following 
divisions: care and use of drawing equipment, freehand lettering, geo- 
metric constructions, multiplanar orthographic projection including 
primary and secondary auxiliary views, freehand and technical sketch- 
ing. 

12-02 Engineering Drawing — This is a continuation of course 12-01 and 
includes a study of pictorial drawing; working drawings and applications 
of A.S.A. standards. Isometric, oblique and angular perspective are 
studied in the pictorial field and sections, dimensioning, screw threads, 
fastenings and ink tracing are applied to simple detail and assembly 
drawings. Pencil work on vellum is made suitable for the various re- 
production processes. 

12-03 Descriptive Geometry — This is a course in the theory of projection 
drawing. It is designed to develop powers of visualization and to solve 
by revolution, auxiliary and direct method problems involving space 
relationships. In addition to problems with point, line and plane, the 
course includes a study of intersection and development of surfaces, 
shadows, mining problems, graphic solution of stresses in framed struc- 
tures and other problems of a practical nature. 

12-04 Machine Drawing — Detail working drawings of machine parts and 
assembly drawings of simple machines are made according to recom- 
mendations of the American Standards Association. Such simple phases 
of mechanism as are essential to a complete understanding of machine 
drawing are included in the course. Fastenings, machine parts and 
samples of small machines are made available for reference. Drawings 
are reproduced by students in blueprint, ozalid, blackline and porta- 
graph. 

Economics 
20-11 Economics — After an analysis of the main characteristics of our 
modern economic order, attention is turned to the fundamental eco- 



186 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



nomic laws and principles governing the production of economic goods, 
the organization of business enterprise, money, banking, the business 
cycle, control of the price level, and international trade. 

20-12 Economics — A continuation of 20-11. The first part of the course 
deals with the principles of price determination under competitive and 
monopolistic conditions, and the principles underlying the distribution 
of wealth and income into wages, interest, and profits. Consideration is 
then given to the major aspects of the economic problems of agriculture, 
public utility regulation, labor, consumption, public finance, and eco- 
nomic reform. 

Elective Courses 

Students in the College of Engineering, in order to satisfy the elective 
requirements, may choose such courses as the following from among 
those offered by the College of Liberal Arts. 

Biology — 10-10 General Biology 

Economics — 20-06 Current Economic Problems 

20-07 International Economic Relations 
20-08 Labor Problems 

English — 30-11 Shakespeare 

30-12 Great European Writers 

30-14 Contemporary Drama 

30-15 Contemporary Novel 

Government — 22-06 Municipal Government 

22-07 Government and Business 

History — 23-06 Modern European History 

23-07 History of Latin America 

23-08 History of the Far East 

23-24 History of Art I 

23-25 History of Art II 

23-26 History of Architecture 



Modern 
Languages 



— 31-05 Introduction to French 

31-06 Introduction to French 

31-07 Introduction to French 

31-08 Introduction to French 



32-05 Introduction to German 

32-06 Introduction to German 

32-07 Introduction to German 

32-08 Introduction to German 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 187 

33-05 Introduction to Spanish 

33-06 Introduction to Spanish 

33-07 Introduction to Spanish 

33-08 Introduction to Spanish 

Philosophy — 24-07 Introduction to Philosophy 

24-08 Problems of Philosophy 

Psychology — 25-03 Fundamentals of Psychology 

25-04 Social Psychology 

25-05 Applied Psychology 

Sociology — 26-03 Introduction to Sociology 

26-04 Social Ethics 

26-05 Social Pathology 

26-06 The Family 



Electrical Engineering 

3-01 Electrical Engineering I — This course is designed to give a sound 
limited background in the field of Electrical Engineering covered by the 
general topics of electric currents and conductors, electrical measuring 
instruments, measurement of resistances, electromotive force, electrical 
network theorems, electromagnetic induction, magnetic circuits and 
magnetic forces. The material covered being supplemented by basic en- 
gineering problems covering these fields which the Civil, Mechanical, 
and Electrical student will meet in engineering work. 

3-02 Electrical Engineering I — This course is a continuation of 3-01. It 
deals with the Electrical Engineering in the field of Alternating Current 
covered by the general topics, instantaneous voltage, current and power; 
effective current and voltage; average power; vector algebra (as applied to 
alternating current); sinusoidal single phasecircuit analysis. The problems 
covering these fields being basic in nature to the general engineering field. 

3-03 Electrical Measurements — This course comprises a brief study of 
measurements in general and precision measure as applied to electrical 
measurements in particular. Resistance devices, galvanometers, am- 
meters and voltmeters are next discussed, the treatment of other instru- 
ments being taken up later in connection with their use. This is followed 
by a detailed discussion of the methods of measuring various electrical 
quantities: resistance, resistivity, conductance; DC electromotive force, 
current, power, and energy; induction and magnetic induction. This 
part of the work involves the student's use of both visual and sound 
indicating devices. Some consideration is given to the principles and 
operation of electronic devices. Appropriate laboratory experiments are 
included. 



188 r^ORTHEASTEKN UNIVERSITY 

3-04 Electrical Engineering — This course is designed to meet the needs of 
the Chemical Engineering students in so far as their knowledge of ele- 
mentary electrical engineering is concerned. This involves a considera- 
tion of principles of AC and DC power circuits including motors: their 
operating characteristics, control and application; selection of motors 
and their duty cycles. The latter part of the course is devoted to the 
study of elementary vacuum tube theory, with emphasis on electronic 
control devices, involving the phototube, thyratron and other tubes 
applied to circuits used in the chemical engineering industry. 

A laboratory course accompanies this lecture course and study is 
made of both AC and DC motor operation and control, with further 
work on industrial electronic control devices. 

3-10 Direct Current Machinery — ^This course deals with the principles of 
DC machinery including structural parts of dynamos, armature wind- 
ings, commutation, armature reaction, ratings, excitation methods and 
operating characteristics of shunt, series and compound generators. The 
principles of operation of DC motors are also studied with emphasis on 
shunt, series and compound characteristics, stray power, efficiencies and 
applications. Attention is also given to auxiliary protective and control 
devices as well as to work on DC power transmission. 

3-11 Advanced Alternating Current Circuit Theory — In this course atten- 
tion is given to those single-phase AC principles not taken in previous 
courses. The subject matter includes a study of AC transients in linear 
circuits, nonsinusoidal wave form analysis, effective resistance and re- 
actance, and elementary filter circuits. 

3-12 Electrical Engineering Laboratory — Direct Current — This is a laboratory 
course intended to develop a thorough understanding of the operation 
of DC machinery as studied in Course 3-10. Experiments include work 
on armature and field resistance measurements, shunt, series and com- 
pound motor load characteristics, manual and electronic control of 
speed, stray power, generator characteristics and parallel operation of 
generators. This course also enables the student to develop an ability 
to make tests of engineering nature and to accumulate and present test 
data and calculations in the proper accepted report form. 

3-13 Electrical Measurements — This course is designed to acquaint the 
student with the theory of precision measure as applied to electrical 
measurements in particular. Some of the subjects covered are theory of 
measurements, directly and indirectly measured quantities, recording of 
observations, rules of significant figures, classification of error, law of 
error, characteristics of error and law of average deviation. 

Most of the problems studied fall in the following two general classi- 
fications: (1) Given the precision measures of the directly measured 
quantities, to determine the precision measure of the indirectly measured 
quantity as calculated by the use of engineering equations which apply 
to measurements work. (2) Given the prescribed precision to be ob- 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 189 

tained in the indirectly measured quantity, to determine the precision 
measure of the directly measured components which enter into its 
calculation. 

In this course, parts and theory of operation of resistance devices, 
galvanometers, indicating instruments are discussed. This is followed 
by a detailed discussion of the methods of measuring various electrical 
quantities: resistance, resistivity, conductance; DC electromotive force, 
current, power, and energy. 

The principles taught in this course are immediately applied in all 
experiments run in the measurements laboratory and so far as necessary 
in the machine testing laboratory. 

3-14 Electrical Engineering Laboratory — Direct Current — This laboratory 
course is a continuation of Course 3-12, presenting to the student the 
more advanced DC machinery experiments. It includes work on stray 
load losses, retardation method of obtaining losses, electrical supply of 
losses, separation of losses, heat runs on DC machinery and generator 
regulation. 

3-15 Polyphase Alternating Current Circuits — This course deals principally 
with polyphase circuits. Voltage, current and power relations in poly- 
phase circuits are studied in detail with emphasis on three-phase con- 
ditions both balanced and unbalanced. Particular attention is given to 
the methods of measuring power in these cases and to the application 
of symmetrical phase components to the solution of unbalanced poly- 
phase circuits. Included also is a study of methods of calculating short- 
circuit and incremental currents in polyphase power systems under fault 
conditions. 

3-16 Electronics — This is an introductory course in electron tubes and 
is concerned with the motion of electrons in electric and magnetic 
fields, thermionic emission, static and dynamic vacuum tube character- 
istics, equivalent circuit methods, and graphical solutions. The object 
of the course is to give the student a thorough knowledge of the basic 
construction and operation of thermionic vacuum tubes and to demon- 
strate the mathematical and graphical procedures used in solving circuit 
problems. 

3-17 Electrical Measurements — This course is a continuation of Electrical 
Measurements 3-13. The measurements of resistance, capacity, induct- 
ance, magnetic induction, AC power and energy are treated in this 
course with a detailed discussion of the methods of measuring them and 
the standards which apply. This phase of the subject involves the use of 
both visual and sound indicating devices, and includes some work with 
the use of circuits and bridges designed for high-frequency measurements, 
tube constant determination, attenuators and attenuator design. In all 
this work the student is given a general discussion of the construction, 
theory of operation, methods of use, sources of error, etc., of the types 
of measuring instruments and bridges used in commercial and standard- 
izing laboratories. 



190 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



3-18 Electrical Measurements Laboratory — This course consists of a series 
of experiments emphasizing the principles developed in 3-13 and 3-17. 
The student becomes familiar with standard testing apparatus and pro- 
cedure. The experiments include bridge measurements of resistance, in- 
ductance, and capacitance, standardizing and testing of instruments and 
meters. Experiments are also included on networks of various types. 

3-19 Electric Field Theory — This course is designed to meet the require- 
ment that the student who graduates with a bachelor's degree in electrical 
engineering have information concerning the fundamentals underlying 
the techniques of static and dynamic electric and magnetic field theory. 
The subject matter is taken up in the following order: electrostatics; 
vector analysis, unit vectors, vector algebra, gradient; divergence, curl, 
polar co-ordinates; theorems related to fields, curl, scalar potential, 
solenoidal fields and vector potential; electrostatic fields, conductors, 
charged sphere, inverse square law, electrostatic energy; dielectrics, 
polarization; electric current, electromotive force; magnetic fields, mag- 
netic force, magnetic flux, emf by motion, convention signs; fields and 
wire, magnetic flux linkages; examples and interpretation, boundary 
surface, fields within conductor, induction; Maxwell's field equations; 
plane waves, electric fields, magnetic fields, power and Poynting's Vector, 
reflection; radiation, magnetic vector potential, electrodynamic potential. 

3-20 Transformer Theory — The purpose of this course is to present a de- 
tailed careful study of the construction, theory and operation of trans- 
formers used in power work. Both single-phase and polyphase applica- 
tions are involved, with particular emphasis on regulation and efficiency 
calculation and test methods. Special types of transformers, such as the 
constant current transformer, the autotransformer, and instrument 
transformers are also included. 

3-21 Electronics — This course is a detailed study of the design, calculation, 
and operation of vacuum tube circuits. Among the topics considered 
are low power audio and radio frequency amplifiers, oscillators, modu- 
lators, detectors, and measuring equipment. In addition, an introduction 
to the performance of gas-filled tubes is given. Problems are solved on 
modern practical circuits and the student is given practice in both 
equivalent circuit and graphical methods of solution. 

3-22 Alternating Current Test Laboratory — This is a laboratory course de- 
signed to present tests on alternating current circuits and transformers 
at power frequencies. It includes work on series and parallel R, L, C 
circuits, resonant condirions, power measurements by the two-watt- 
meter and polyphase wattmeter methods, load tests on transformers, 
polyphase transformer connections and the constant-current trans- 
former. 

3-23 Electronics Laboratory — The experiments performed in this course 
are based upon the material given in 3-16. They include the determina- 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 191 

tion of static and dynamic vacuum tube characteristics, tube constants, 
and the performance of tubes in amplifiers and similar circuits. Emphasis 
is placed upon checking experimental results with those obtained by 
calculation. 

3-24 Electronics Laboratory — The experiments in this course deal with 
measurements at radio frequencies including broadcast-band and short 
wave. The types of apparatus experimented upon include a typical super- 
heterodyne receiver, detectors, Class C amplifier, reactance modulator, 
frequency discriminator, coaxial line, and matching networks. The stu- 
dent acquires practice and experience in using test equipment such as 
primary and secondary frequency standards, cathode-ray oscilloscopes,- 
vacuum tube voltmeters, and frequency meters. 

3-25 Advanced Measurements Laboratory — This laboratory course is a 
continuation of the work done in 3-18. The experiments are intended to 
give practice in more advanced methods of measurement and to give 
the student experience in using audio oscillators, vacuum tube volt- 
meters, cathode-ray oscilloscopes, and similar equipment. Typical experi- 
ments are concerned with filters, artificial lines, audio transformers, 
harmonic analysis, and radio frequency bridge measurements. 

3-26 Synchronous Machinery — In this course a detailed study is made of 
alternating current synchronous machines. In addition to the study of 
the synchronous generator and the synchronous motor, considerable 
time is spent in discussing the problems involved in operating syn- 
chronous generators in parallel. 

3-27 High Frequency Engineering — This course is based on the material 
covered in Electronics 3-16 and 3-21 continuing into the field of radio 
engineering, taking up the following topics: electron conduction of gases, 
glow and discharge tubes and circuits; power supplies, design and 
analysis; voltage and current stabilizers, Class B and AB2 power ampli- 
fiers, Class C r.f. power amplifiers, trigger circuits and pulse generators. 

3-28 Transmission Lines and Netu)orks — This course deals with those fun- 
damental principles of the electrically long transmission line which are 
common to its use, throughout the entire range of frequencies, to the 
point where circuit theory must be replaced by field theory. 

After a brief discussion of skin effect and the variation in the circuit 
"constants" R L C &. G with frequency, the steady state of the line 
with various terminations is considered, followed by reflection phenom- 
ena, the quarter and half wave length (or integral multiples thereof) 
lines, under open and short circuit conditions, with special attention to 
the dissipationless and distortionless lines. Then the equivalent T and 
Pi networks in detail for uniform and composite lines, which is followed 
by a discussion of insertion loss, iterative and image impedance con- 
nections, and finally a thorough discussion of two terminal reactance 
arms potentially equivalent and inverse, together with a full considera- 
tion of Foster's Reactance Theorem. 



192 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

3-29 Advanced Field Theory — This course is based on the material covered 
in Electric Field Theory 3-19. The material covered may be subdivided 
into three general classifications: antennas, propagation, and wave 
guides; the subdivision of these are antennas, low and high-frequency 
antennas, antenna arrays; propagation, general nature of propagation 
and dependence on frequency; wave guides; propagation through rec- 
tangular and circular guides, resonance phenomena in wave guides, 
application of resonant elements, practical utilization of wave guides. 

3-30 Induction Machinery — This course is a continuation of 3-26. It deals 
with other types of alternating current machinery. The machines studied 
in detail include the synchronous converter, the mercury arc rectifier, 
single-phase and polyphase induction motors, induction generators, 
series and repulsion motors. The method of symmetrical phase com- 
ponents is used in the study of unbalanced conditions in certain types 
of motors. 

3-31 High'Frequency Engineering — Continuation of High -Frequency En- 
gineering 3-27 covering the following topics: power oscillators, U H F 
generators, negative grid oscillator, positive grid oscillator, velocity- 
modulated tubes and circuits, magnetron and special tubes; light sen- 
sitive tubes and cells, electron tube instruments and measurements. 

3-32 Filters — This course is a continuation of 3-28; beginning with an 
introduction dealing with the purpose and use of filter networks in 
general, and next taking up in detail the four principal forms of Low- 
High- Band-pass and Band elimination; in the Constant K, m-derived 
and double m types. Then follow methods of improving constancy of 
image impedance by fractional and mm' terminating half sections; effects 
of dissipation in filters and methods for allowing and correcting for it; 
special arrangements in filters when operating in parallel to distribute a 
broad band of frequencies between different paths without interference. 
Some attention lastly is given to the application of filters in power 
systems for machine-neutral wave-traps, and machine resonant shunts, 
line shunt filters for modifying resonant characteristics, and rectifying 
filters both AC and DC for preventing rectifiers from increasing har- 
monics in AC supply systems. 

3-33 High-Frequency Laboratory — All of the experiments in this course 
are performed at frequencies above 300 megacycles. The equipment in- 
cludes resonant line oscillators, ultra-high-frequency generators, antenna 
field pattern equipment, wave guides, resonators, and ultra-high-fre- 
quency meters. Typical experiments include the determination of field 
patterns from parasitic and driven antenna arrays, determination of the 
resonance curve of various resonators at 1000 megacycles, and calibra- 
tion of an iris diaphragm at 3000 megacycles, etc. 

3-34 Advanced Electrical Engineering Laboratory — In this laboratory course 
tests are performed on alternating current machinery involving work on 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 193 

synchronous motors, the brush-shifting motor, alternator load runs, 
parallel operation of alternators and synchronizing, and the squirrel 
cage and wound-rotor types of induction motors. Included also is work 
on the ignitron rectifier, inverter, electronically controlled synchronizing 
and AC generator voltage regulation. 

English 

30-01 English I — A review of basic sentence structure and the gram- 
matical functions of clauses and phrases, followed by a study of effective 
sentence writing, paragraph development, and reading techniques. 
Theme assignments are planned to develop practical skill in each of 
the phases studied. 

30-02 English I — A study of the structure and organization of written 
compositions: outlining, development of compositions by phases, and 
the analysis of expository writings. Experimental work in each phase is 
carried out by means of theme assignments and readings. 

30-03 English I — A study of the problems peculiar to each of the four 
main types of discourse: exposition, description, narrative, and argu- 
ment. Theme work includes, in addition to these basic types, some 
assignments in the framing of reports and the writing of business letters. 

30-07 Effective Speaking — A study of the report as a means of oral and 
written presentation of technical data. Reports of various types are 
planned and written. Considerable class time is devoted to the presenta- 
tion of oral reports and oral summaries of written reports. 

Finance and Insurance 

44-13 Construction Finance — The financial problems confronting the set- 
ting up of engineering and construction organizations and the methods 
of providing funds to carry on projects constitute the subject matter to 
be studied. This will include a consideration of the various forms of 
business organization from the legal as well as the operational point of 
view. The uses of capital stock, mortgage bonds, land trust certificates, 
purchase money mortgages, together with the importance of appraisals 
in the financing of public projects, projects of private enterprise, public 
utilities and expansion of these services are studied. The problems of 
providing working capital and the use of bank credit are also considered. 

44-14 Industrial Finance — This course covers the ways of financing a 
business, operating and fixed capital for long and short periods, for the 
different forms of business current in our economy. Emphasis will be 
placed upon the corporate forms and the part played by the government 
in financial control. 

Geology 

13-01 Geology — This introductory course in geology is designed primarily 
for civil engineering students. 



194 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

The basic concept of the structure of the earth and a brief discussion 
of the significance of geological time serves as an introduction to this 
course. Among the other topics considered are rocks, rock making 
minerals, weathering, underground water, glacial action, and mountains. 
Considerable time is given to the discussion of surface water in its vari- 
ous locations such as rivers, lakes, swamps, and the sea and its action. 
The courses close with lectures on volcanism, deep seated igneous action- 
and earthquakes. 

The lectures are illustrated by lantern slides, films and exhibits from a 
large collection of rocks and minerals available at the University. 

13-11 Engineering Geology — Geology and its relation to such problems as 
highways, structures, tunnels, reservoirs and dams. The emphasis is 
upon the practical application of the information acquired in 13-01, 
General Geology. 

Government 

22-05 American Government — An analysis of the structure and functions 
of American Government with emphasis upon its constitutional powers 
and limitations. Consideration is given to current problems of state and 
local government. 

History 

23-05 American History — A study of the growth of American democracy 
with particular attention to the economic phases of our development 
during the last half-century. 

Industrial Engineering 

5-10 Industrial Management I — The administrative and managerial as- 
pects of factory and plant operation are given thorough treatment in 
this course. Emphasis is placed upon such managerial functions as budg- 
eting; the selection of the factory loca'tion and factory machines and the 
maintenance of equipment; methods of analyzing production costs and 
the profit potentials of the business; plant layout, materials handling, 
and storeskeeping; and product standardization, simplification, and 
specialization. The course is designed to bring to the student a realization 
of the social and economic significance of the "management movement," 
to give him an understanding of the management of the physical prop- 
erty of the plant and the organization of the physical plant itself. 

5-11 Industrial Management II — This is a continuation of course 5-10 
Industrial Management I. It deals with the management of manpower 
and the control of plant operations. The over-all problem of effective 
utilization of men, materials, machines, and money is considered. These 
management principles and practices which apply to this problem are 
presented from the standpoint of practical application under typical 
shop conditions with emphasis upon the "scientific approach." 

Phases of management which are considered in some detail are 
organization and morale, selection and training, motion and time study. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 195 

job evaluation and merit rating, wage payment plans, production plan- 
ning and control, and cost control. At no time is the student permitted 
to lose sight of the impact of these managerial activities upon the type 
of labor-management relations which exist within the plant. 

5-15 Methods Engineering I — This course presents in detail the functions 
of the factory staff department commonly known as the Methods De- 
partment. These include process analysis through the use of process 
charts and flow diagrams; the principles and technique of plant layout; 
operation analysis through the use of operation charts, man-and-ma- 
chine charts, time study, and micromotion study; the application of the 
principles of motion economy to all phases of factory operation, clerical 
and mechanical. 

Complete laboratory facilities provide opportunity for the student to 
apply the subject matter of the course to a typical factory operation set 
up for this purpose. In the development of the laboratory project, par- 
ticular attention is given to the method of approach, workplace layout, 
the elimination of fatigue through the use of labor-saving tools and 
equipment, and to the problems of installing the approved solution in 
the factory. 

5-16 Methods Engineering 11 — Like the course in Methods Engineering I, 
the subject matter of Methods Engineering II deals with the activities of 
a staff department which aids in the "scientific managing" of the factory, 
in this case the Time Study Department. A discussion of wage incentive 
plans paves the way for a thorough understanding of the other topics 
treated in detail; relation of time study to motion study and micromo- 
tion study; time study technique and procedure; performance rating, 
development of concept of "normal," use of personal, fatigue, delay, 
and other allowances; the analysis of data, treatment of variables, and 
the preparation of standard data; setting job and element standards 
directly from time study versus the use of standard data; industrial re- 
lations problems connected with the application of time-studied wage 
incentive plans. 

The use of the completely equipped laboratory makes possible the 
practical application of the principles presented, and permits a critical 
analysis of the value of the more familiar practices in the field. A highly 
important part of the course is the study of the use of elemental body 
motion time values for standard-setting and motion-analysis purposes 
versus the more conventional time study methods. 

5-17 Production Planning and Control — This course deals with the highly 
important "operating management" activity of planning and controlling 
the flow of materials through the shop and the utilization of the equip- 
ment and manpower to best advantage. Although closely allied with the 
subjects of Methods Engineering, Time Study, and Quality Control, 
this function of production planning warrants separate treatment. 

Included in the course is the following subject matter: factory organi- 
zation, factory planning and layout, nomenclature, storeskeeping con- 



196 -NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

trol, development and engineering, planning procedure, scheduling, 
routing, dispatching, the use of special control charts and boards, fore- 
casting and budgeting. 

Of particular importance is the presentation of the special problems 
of production planning and control as related to the four main types of 
productive processes: (1) the job-shop type, (2) the mass-production 
type, (3) the available-equipment type, and (4) the co-ordinated-efFort 
type. 

5-18 Quality Control — The materials presented in this course are designed 
to give the student a working knowledge of the theory behind the con- 
trol chart method and an appreciation of its use. The subject matter in- 
cludes fundamentals of quality control, theory of control charts, anal- 
ysis of control chart data, sampling methods, control chart applications, 
the Poisson distribution, planning for statistical quality control, accept- 
ance sampling, control chart techniques, and industrial applications. 
Practical adaptations of the method in the solution of quality control 
problems from local industrial plants aid in familiarizing the student 
with the possibilities of Quality as a "tool of scientific management" for 
decreasing costs and increasing production. 

Industrial Relations 

42-10 Personnel — The purpose of this course is to survey the work of the 
personnel department. The what and how of the employment office will 
be analyzed along with the current practices in the conduct of human 
relationships in industry. 

42-17 Problems in Personnel — This course is an examination of selected 
problems in industrial relations. The major portion will be devoted to a 
discussion of wage problems. Other problems such as testing, promotion, 
layoff, and government regulations will be covered. 

Marketing and Advertising 

43-08 Sales Engineering — This course deals with classification of com- 
modities, structure of markets, and functions of the sales departments. 
It treats, also, the development of research, and finally, presents by the 
case method problems covering the broad field of sales management. 

Mathematics 

14-01 College Algebra — The study of algebra is scheduled to begin with 
the solution of the quadratic equation, simultaneous quadratics, and 
equations in quadratic form. However, a rapid but thorough review of 
the fundamentals of algebra precedes this. The solution of the quadratic 
is followed by a detailed study of the theory of exponents. Then follow 
radicals, series, variation, inequalities, and the elementary principles of 
the theory of equations. Considerable time is given to plotting and the 



COLLEGE OF EhlCrNEERING 197 

use of graphs in the solution of equations. The elementary theory of 
complex numbers is also covered. 

14-02 Trigonometry — This is a complete course in trigonometry and 
should enable the student to use all branches of elementary trigonometry 
in the solution of triangles as well as in the more advanced courses where 
the knowledge of trigonometry is essential. Some of the topics covered 
are the trigonometric ratios; inverse functions; goniometry; logarithms; 
circular measure; laws of sines, cosines, tangents, half angles; solution of 
oblique and right triangles; transformation and solution of trigono- 
metric and logarithmic equations. Considerable practice in calculation of 
practical problems enables the student to apply his trigonometry to 
problems arising in practice at an early stage. Additional work, graphical 
and algebraic, is done with the complex number, introducing De- 
Moivre's theorem and the exponential form of the complex number. 

14-03 Analytic Geometry — This being a basic course in preparation for 
any further study of mathematics, it requires a thorough knowledge of 
the fundamentals of algebra. The course covers cartesian and polar co- 
ordinates; graphs; the equations of simpler curves derived from their 
geometric properties; thorough study of straight lines, circles, and conic 
sections; intersections and curves; transformation of axes; plotting and 
solution of algebraic equations of higher order and of exponential, trig- 
onometric, and logarithmic equations; loci problems. The general equa- 
tion of the second degree is thoroughly analyzed in the study of conic 
sections. 

14-04 Introduction to Calculus — Explicit and implicit functions, depend- 
ent and independent variables, some theory of limits, continuity and 
discontinuity are given special attention from both the algebraic and 
the geometric points of view. Some theorems on the infinitesimal are 
introduced, and a study is made of infinity and zero as limits. Relative 
rates of change, both average and instantaneous, and the meaning of 
the slope of a curve follow. The differential and the derivative as applied 
to algebraic functions with the geometric interpretation are then studied. 
Tangents to curves of the second degree follow here. Simple applications 
with interesting practical problems help to develop the interest here and 
lay a solid foundation for the study of the calculus. The introduction of 
the differential at the same time with the derivative helps considerably 
to bridge the large gap which usually exists when the student passes 
from the study of the elementary analytic geometry to the infinitesimal 
of calculus. 

14-05 Differential Calculus — The differential is introduced and defined 
at the outset of the course together with the derivative; geometric and 
practical illustrations are given of both, and both are carried along 
throughout the course. The work in the course consists of differentiation 
of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, 
both explicit and implicit; slopes of curves, maxima and minima with 



198 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

applied problems; partial differentiation; derivatives of higher order; 
curvature; points of inflection; related rates; velocities, acceleration; 
expansion of functions; series. Although the subject matter deals with 
considerable theory, constant sight is kept of the practical application 
of the theory. The geometric interpretation of every new subject is care- 
fully defined and problems are continually solved dealing in practical 
applications of the theory in geometry, physics, and mechanics. 

14-06 Integral Calculus — ^This is a continuation of Calculus 14-05, and 
deals with integration as the inverse of differentiation as well as the 
limit of summation. The topics covered are methods of integration; use 
of integral tables; definite integrals; double and triple integrals; areas in 
rectangular and polar co-ordinates; center of gravity; moment of inertia; 
length of curves; volumes of solids; areas of surfaces of revolution; vol- 
umes by triple integration; practical problems in work, pressure, etc., 
depending on the differential and integral calculus for solution; solution 
of simpler differential equations. 

14-07 Differential Equations I — The elementary theory and solution of 
ordinary differential equations is offered here as a general course in 
mathematics. Although principally a problem course in solving dif- 
ferential equations, properties of equations and of their solutions are 
deduced, and applications to the various fields of science are analyzed. 

Mechanical Engineering 

2-10 Mechanism — This course includes mathematical and graphical solu- 
tions of problems involving angular and linear velocities and gear trains. 
It covers a careful study of parts of mechanical movements and the ap- 
plication of velocity diagrams, quick-return mechanisms, and cams. 
The theory of gear tooth outlines is illustrated by graphical methods, 
and various miscellaneous mechanisms are considered. 

2-11 Machine Design — Practice is given the student in the application of 
theoretical principles previously studied, so that he becomes familiar with 
the many practical details which must be considered in design work. The 
problems taken up are both of a static and of a dynamic nature. Typical 
designs taken up include hydraulic press, hydraulic flanging clamp, 
crane, air compressor, punch and shear, stone crusher. 

In each design, the construction details are carefully considered, with 
special attention to methods of manufacture, provision for wear, lubri- 
cation, and so forth. The work is based on rational rather than em- 
pirical methods, the student being required to make all calculations for 
determining the sizes of the various parts and all necessary working 
drawings. 

2-12 Machine Design — This course comprises a continuation of Machine 
Design 2-11, with special reference to designs involving dynamic 
stresses. A thorough discussion of the principles and methods of lubri- 
cation forms a part of the course. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 199 

2-20 Applied Mechanics (Statics) — The subjects treated are collinear, 
parallel, concurrent, and nonconcurrent force systems in a plane and 
in space; the determination of the resultant of such systems by both alge- 
braic and graphical means, special emphasis being placed on the string 
polygon method for coplanar force systems; the forces required to pro- 
duce equilibrium in such systems; first moments as applied to varying 
intensity of force and to the determination of centers of gravity of areas 
and solids; second moments and problems involving static friction, such 
as the inclined plane and the wedge. 

2-21 Applied Meclianics (Kinetics) — The subjects treated are second mo- 
ments and their application to the determination of moment of inertia 
of plane and solid figures, radius of gyration, polar moment of inertia; 
product of inertia; principal axes; principal moments; uniform motion, 
uniformly accelerated motion, variable accelerated motion, harmonic 
motion, simple pendulum; rotation, plane motion; work, energy, mo- 
mentum and impact. 

2-22 Strength of Materials — The topics covered in this course are physical 
properties of materials, stresses in thin hollow cylinders and spheres, 
riveted connections of the structural and continuous plate type, welded 
connections; and beams, covering shearing force and bending moment 
diagrams, stress analysis of beams, and the design of beams. 

2-23 Strength of Materials — This is a continuation of the subject matter 
of 2-22 covering the deflection of beams by the double integration and 
by the moment-area methods; indeterminate beams and continuous 
beams; torsion of circular shafts, including stress, horsepower and angle 
of twist; combined axial and bending loads; and column action in com- 
pression members. 

2-24 Advanced Mechanics — The analysis of stress at a point is treated by 
analytical and graphical (Mohr's Circle) methods. An investigation of 
the existing theories of failure is made and the results applied to the 
special problems of thick hollow cylinders, shafting, curved bars in 
bending, nonsymmetrical bending, noncircular torsion, flat plates and 
allied subjects leading to the applications of mechanics in machine de- 
sign, the elastic theory and photoelasticity. 

2-25 Aerodynamics — The course comprises a study of the fundamental 
theory of aerodynamics which underlies all calculations concerning the 
performance and stability of airplanes including characteristics of air- 
foils and elementary propeller theory. 

2-26 Engine Dynamics — The main considerations of this course are the 
discussion of mechanical vibrations, both free and forced types, par- 
ticularly those of one degree of freedom and the balancing of engines. 
Coriolis' law; gyroscopic action; the principles of impulse and momen- 
tum both linear and angular, and impact are also treated. 



200 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

2-30 Heat Engineering {Power Plant Equipment) — This course is largely 
description, and covers most of the equipment used in modern power 
plants. Particular attention is given to modern boilers, and boiler ac- 
cessories, ash and coal handling systems, the various types of engines 
with their valve gears and governing devices, condensers, feed water 
heaters and pumps. Steam turbines, gas turbines and other prime movers 
are taken up. 

2-31 Heat Engineering (Thermodynamics) — In this introductory course in 
the fundamentals of thermodynamics the following subjects are dis- 
cussed: general theory of heat and matter; first and second laws of 
thermodynamics; equations of state; fundamental equations of thermo- 
dynamics; laws of perfect gases; properties of vapors including develop- 
ment and use of tables and charts; thermodynamic processes of gases, 
and saturated and superheated vapors; and the general equations for 
the flow of fluids. 

2-32 Heat Engineering (Thermodynamics) — This course covers the same 
subjects as 2-31 but more extensively. In addition, some time is devoted 
to the General Equations of Thermodynamics. 

2-33 Heat Engineering — The principles of thermodynamics are here ap- 
plied to various problems of heat engineering. These include the funda- 
mental laws governing the flow of gases and vapors through nozzles and 
orifices with and without friction; the theory of vapor engines, includ- 
ing discussions of the Rankine, the reheating, the regenerative and the 
binary vapor cycles; and the efficiencies and power calculations for actual 
steam engines and steam boilers. 

2-34 Heat Engineering — The various types of modern airplane, diesel and 
automobile internal combustion engines are taken up in detail and the 
theory, analysis, and construction of such engines are carefully studied. 
The work includes the study of flame travel, the combustion process, 
efficiencies of the many cycles and types of engines used under diff^erent 
conditions. 

The course is based mainly on theory but careful consideration is also 
given to these data compiled from research in the different phases of 
internal combustion engineering. 

2-35 Heat Engineering — ^The principles of heat transfer for steady flow 
conditions and their applications to practical problems, and the analysis 
of single and multistage compressor cycles form the first part of this 
course. The balance of the time is devoted to the history, theory, equip- 
ment and applications of mechanical refrigeration. This includes a study 
of the properties of refrigerants, simple and compound compression 
cycles, absorption system and the jet or vapor system. 

2-36 Heat Engineering (Steam Turbines) — A study is first made of the flow 
of steam through nozzles, dynamic action of jets on moving blades, and 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 201 



other elements in the design of steam turbines. This material is followed 
by a consideration of the various types of turbines, their governing 
mechanisms, condensing equipment, and other constructional details. 
The principles and performance of gas turbines are treated in the latter 
part of the course. 

2-37 Heating and Air Conditioning — The important methods of heating 
and air conditioning various types of buildings are studied in this course. 
The principles of heat transfer and air flow are discussed and their appli- 
cation in the various systems are brought out through lectures and 
problems. 

2-38 Power Plant Engineering — This course consists of topics and prob- 
lems chosen largely from engineering practice selected to give to the 
engineering students a firm grasp of fundamental principles and en- 
gineering methods of attacking and analyzing problems in power plant, 
not only from the point of view of scientific theory, but also with due 
consideration of the limitations imposed by practice and by costs. 
Efficiency and operating costs of different types of plants such as steam, 
hydroelectric, and diesel engines are also carefully studied to determine 
the type of plant best suited for the conditions and location involved. 

2-40 Materials — A study of the physical properties, composition and to 
some extent the methods of production of the ferrous and nonferrous 
metals and their alloys, plastics, timber, lime, clay products, cement and 
concrete. 

2-41 Metallography — This course is designed to show the student the re- 
lation between the crystalline structure of metals and their physical 
properties. 

The theory of crystallization and some of the various equilibrium 
diagrams are studied. Different metallic specimens of known composition 
are polished, etched, photographed and studied by use of the metallo- 
graph and their physical properties are compared. The effect of heat 
treatment on the crystalline structure is noted. 

2-50 Production Processes 1 — A course in the techniques, processes, and 
machines used in the production of manufactured articles. 

Some of the processes covered are heat-treating, forging, welding, 
foundry practice, die casting, and plastics. The metallurgical principles 
involved are correlated with good shop practice in each case. 

The construction nomenclature, and operation of the following 
machine tools are discussed: lathe, milling machine, planer, shaper, 
broaching machine, and grinder. 

2-60 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — This course consists of a pre- 
liminary series of tests upon various types of apparatus used in steam 
power plants to illustrate under actual conditions the principles de- 
veloped in Thermodynamics 2-32. These exercises are in preparation 



202 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

for more complete tests to be performed during the following se- 
mester in 2-61. 

The following tests are illustrative of the type of work performed: 
calibration of gages, plain slide valve setting, tests on steam calorimeters, 
flow of steam through orifices, weir calibration, steam injector, tests on 
friction of drives, fuel calorimeters and flow of water in pipes. 

2-61 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — This course comprises a series 
of tests on various types of power plant equipment, more complete than 
those made in course 2-60. Included in the apparatus tested are the fol- 
lowing: steam engine, gasoline engine, steam-driven air compressor, 
triplex power pump, steam pulsometer, rotary power pump, Pelton 
water wheel, centrifugal pump, air blower and steam turbine. 

A complete report is made on each test describing the machine tested, 
method of test, results, and discussion, all in accordance with the 
ASME Power Test Codes. 

2-62 Mechanical Egnineering Laboratory — ^The tests in this course deal 
mainly with the testing of materials of engineering which are of interest 
to the Mechanical Engineer. Correlation of the tests with the theories 
of strength of materials, with the heat treatment in the case of steels, 
and the compositions of brasses, bronzes and alloy steels is an essential 
part of the work. In addition, some experiments relating to the fields of 
aerodynamics and the vibrations are also made. 

2-63 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — This is a continuation of 2-62. 
Included in the apparatus tested are the following: steam heating boiler, 
carrier air conditioner, unit heater, diesel engine, radiator test, oil test- 
ing, multistage centrifugal pump, Warren steam pump, hot air heater, 
and uniflow steam engine. A complete report is required for each test. 

2-64 Testing Materials Laboratory — A detailed study is made of the meth- 
ods of inspecting and the testing of the structural materials of engineer- 
ing. Complete stress-strain diagrams are determined for metals in ten- 
sion, evaluating the standard physical properties. Other tests are made 
for the hardness, elastic limit, transverse strength, torsional resistance, 
compressive strength, column action, impact resistance and bending 
properties of metals; compressive and transverse tests of timber and the 
correlation of these tests with the usual standards. 

2-65 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — The principles developed in 
Heat Engineering 2-31 are illustrated by a series of tests on various types 
of apparatus used in power plants. A report on the equipment tested is 
made by the student. The following experiments illustrate the type of ma- 
chines tested: air blower, steam calorimeters, steam engine, steam tur- 
bine, air compressor, multistage centrifugal pump, Pelton water wheel, 
triplex power pump, steam injector and steam heating boiler. 



COLLEGE OF ENCMEERING 203 

2-66 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory — This course consists of a study 
of the various methods in processing metals, and includes the study of 
machine tools, small tools, metal working costs and a study of the most 
effective way of removing metal. 

The course also includes a study of the heat treatment of tools, and 
the use of jigs and fixtures in the operation of modern manufacturing 
processes. 

Physical Education 

16-01 Hygiene — This course aims to provide the student with funda- 
mental information which will be useful in developing and maintaining 
good health and in the practice of personal hygiene. The course in- 
cludes enough of the fundamentals of physiology and anatomy to en- 
able the student to understand such parts of the work as require some 
knowledge of these subjects. 

16-02 Hygiene— A continuation of 16-01 completing a study of the func- 
tion and care of the several systems of the body. 

16-10 Physical Training — All first year men students are required to take 
Physical Training. Health, strength, and vitality do not come by chance 
but by constant attention to those factors involved in their develop- 
ment. It is very essential for the student to acquire good habits of living. 

The work in the course includes a formal calisthenic program, special 
exercise classes for the correction of postural defects, participation in the 
regular athletic program, including baseball, basketball, football, hockey, 
track, and many types of informal games. All members of the class are 
also required to learn to swim. 

Students wishing to be excused from Physical Training because of 
physical defects are required to present a petition to the faculty sup- 
ported by a physician's certificate. 

16-11 Physical Training — A continuation of 16-10. 

16-12 Physical Training — A continuation of 16-11. 



Physics 
15-01 Physics — A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics. The 
topics treated are kinematics, dynamics, and statics. 

15-02 Physics — This course completes the study of mechanics, and starts 
the subject of electricity and magnetism. Energy, power, machines, vi- 
bratory motion, elasticity, fluids, magnetism and electrostatics are 
studied. 

15-03 PKysics— Continues the subject of electricity. The topics covered 
are resistivity, circuits, electromagnetism, magnetic circuits and con- 
densers. 



204 NORTHEASTERN WNIVERSITY 

15 '04 Physics — Completes the study of electricity. Basic principles of 
alternating current generation and series circuits, thermoelectric, photo- 
electric, and thermionic effects, and electromagnetic radiation are the 
topics studied. 

15-05 Physics — A first course in the study of light, covering all the details 
within the scope of standard college texts on the subject. Lectures, dem- 
onstrations, and laboratory experiments on selected topics in mechanics 
and light. 

15-06 Physics — A study of wave motion, sound and heat. Lectures, dem- 
onstrations, and laboratory experiments, the latter covering topics in 
sound, heat, and electricity. 

Statistics 

20-22 Industrial Statistics — The increasing use of statistics in business and 
in the field of industrial engineering makes essential an understanding 
of the fundamental methods and applications of statistical analysis. In 
this course the important topics considered include the following: the 
collection of statistical data; the presentation of statistical data in tabular 
and graphic forms; and the uses and construction of frequency distribu- 
tions, averages, measures of dispersion and skewness, and the normal 
curve. Specific attention is given to the practical uses and limitations of 
statistics in the work of the industrial engineer. 

20-23 Industrial Statistics — Time series analysis receives major considera- 
tion in this course. The standard procedures for measuring, separating, 
and eliminating trend, periodic, seasonal, cyclical, and irregular move- 
ments of time series are carefully studied. Students are required to 
analyze a time series related to their co-operative employment or to a 
field of industry in which they have especial interest. The construction 
of index numbers, the use of currently published index numbers, corre- 
lation, and business forecasting complete the course content. Particular 
regard is paid to the internal use of statistics in industrial concerns. 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



DAY COLLEGES 

COURSES 
OF INSTRUCTION 

iru 

Liberal c9lrts 

business cSAdministradon 

Sngineering 

19464947 




BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

DECEMBER, 1945 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 207 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Courses of Instniction Offered in the 
T>ay Colleges 

IISTED BELOW and on the following pages are the course offerings 
in the Day Colleges of Liberal Arts, Business Administration, and 
■^ Engineering. While not all of the courses listed here are given 
every year, all will be offered during the normal period of each student's 
curriculum. The term "Prerequisite" indicates a course must be com- 
pleted with a passing grade before a student will be permitted to register 
for an advanced course to which it applies. The term "Preparation" 
indicates a course of such a preparatory nature that students undertaking 
an advanced course without having had the Preparation course specified 
will ordinarily find themselves greatly handicapped and may not register 
in the advanced course without the consent of the Dean of the college 
involved. 

A credit hour equals three clock hours of work: ordinarily one hour 
of class and two hours of preparation a week for a term of ten weeks. 
Credit hours can be converted to standard semester hours by multi- 
plying by ten-sixteenths, the ratio of the number of weeks in the term 
to the usual number of weeks in the semester. Courses not included in 
the specified curricula may be taken only after the approval of the stu- 
dent's faculty adviser. Except where otherwise indicated, electives are 
not open to freshmen. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the 
courses offered or to change the order or content of courses in any 
curriculum. 



Course 






Pre- 


Prep- 










No. 


Course 




requisite 


aration 


Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 






Accounting 












41-01 


Introduction to Accounting 




— 


2 


2 


8 


4 


41-02 


Prin. of Accounting 




— 


41-01 


2 


2 


8 


4 


41-03 


Prin. of Accounting 




41-02 


— 


2 


2 


8 


4 


41-04 


Intermediate Accounting 




41-03 


• — 


2 


2 


8 


4 


41-05 


Intermediate Accounting 




41-04 


— 


2 


2 


8 


4 


41-06 


Construction Costs 




— 


— 


3 


3 


6 


4 


41-07 


Theory of Accounts 




— 


- — 


4 





8 


4 


41-08 


Elements of Cost Accounting 


41-07 




2 


2 


5 


3 


41-09 


Elements of Cost Accounting 


41-08 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


41-11 


Cost Accounting 




41-05 


— 


3 


3 


9 


5 


41-12 


Cost Accounting 




41-11 


— 


3 


3 


9 


5 


41-15 


Trust Accounting 




41-05 


— 


2 


4 


6 


4 


*41-21 


Problems in Accounting 




41-12 


— 


5 


5 


11 


3H 


41-22 


Accounting Problems 




41-05 


— 


2 


4 


6 


4 


Ml-23 


Accounting Problems 




41-22 


— 





9 


9 


3 


41-24 


C.P.A. Problems 




41-23 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


41-25 


C.P.A. Problems 




41-24 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


41-26 


Auditing 




41-23 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



208 



NORTHEASTERN UMVERSITY 



Course 

No. 



Course 



Pre- 
requisite 



Prep- 
aration 



Class Lab. Prep. Credit 



10-04 



11-27 
10-02 10-04 



10-21 



10-45 

10-02 



10-02 



Biology 

10-01 General Zoology — 

10-02 General Zoology — 

10-03 General Botany — 

* 10-04 General Botany — 

tlO-07 Morphology of Thallophytes 

1 10-08 Morphology of Bryophytes and 

Pteridophytes 

tlO-09 Morphology of Spermatophytes 

10-10 General Biology 

10-20 General Bacteriology 

10-21 General Bacteriology 
tlO-22 Advanced Bacteriology 
tlO-23 Advanced Bacteriology 

10-40 Animal Physiology 

10-41 Animal Physiology 
tlO-42 Advanced Physiology 
tlO-43 Advanced Physiology 

10-44 Nutrition 

10-45 Nutrition 
tlO-46 Advanced Nutrition 
tlO-47 Advanced Nutrition 

10-55 Vertebrate Zoology 

10-56 Vertebrate Zoology 
tlO-57 Invertebrate Zoology 
tlO-58 Invertebrate Zoology 

10-59 Animal Histology 

10-60 Animal Histology 
tlO-61 Vertebrate Embryology 
tlO-62 Vertebrate Embryology 

10-63 General Parasitology 

10-64 General Parasitology 

10-65 Principles of Genetics 

10-66 Principles of Genetics 
tlO-67 Mammalian Anatomy 
1 10-68 Mammalian Anatomy 
tlO-69 Histological Technique 
tlO-70 Histological Technique 
1 10-71 History of Biology 
tlO-72 History of Biology 
1 10-73 General Entomology 
tlO-74 Economic Entomology 

10-75 Seminar in Zoology 

10-76 Seminar in Zoology 
tlO-106 Parasitic Protozoa 
110-107 Helminthology 
110-108 Sanitary Entomology 
tlO-109 Advanced Histology 
{10-110 Advanced Histology 
{10-111 Research in Zoology 
{10-112 Research in Zoology 
{10-113 Thesis 
{10-114 Thesis 

{10-115 Reading and Conference 
{10-116 Reading and Conference 
*Summer term — 5 weeks. 
tMay be taken for graduate credit. 
IThese courses are for graduate credit only. 



10-56 — 



10-41 11-27 



10-56 10-58 — 



10-56 



10-58 — 



10-02 10-04 — 



10-56 
10-60 



10-02 — 



10-01 
10-03 



10-07 
10-08 



10-20 
10-22 
10-40 
10-42 
10-44 
10-46 
10-55 
10-57 
10-59 
10-61 
10-63 
10-65 
10-67 
10-69 
10-71 
10-73 
10-75 



10-64 

10-106 — 
10-74 — 
10-70 — 

— 10-109 

— 10-111 

— 10-113 



2 
2 
2 
3 
2 

2 
2 
3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
2 
2 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



3 
3 
3 
3 
6 

6 
6 



6 
6 
6 
6 








6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


8 
8 
8 
8 


6 
6 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



4 
4 
4 
6 
4 

4 
4 
6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
8 
8 
3 
3 
3 
3 
8 
8 
4 
4 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



3 
3 
3 
2 
4 

4 
4 
3 

4 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



COURSES OF ll^STRUCTlOhl 



209 



Course 




Pre- 


Prep- 










h]o. 


Course 


requisite 


aration Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 




Bus, 


iness Law 












M6-01 


Business Law I — Contracts 


— 


— 


8 





13 


3K 


*46-02 


Business Law II — Negotiable 
















Instrum. 


46-01 


— 


9 





15 


4 


♦46-03 


Contracts and Agency 


— 


— 


6 





12 


3 


46-11 


Business Law III. Personal 
















Property &. Sales 


46-01 


— 


3 





6 


3 


46-12 


Business Law IV. Agency 


46-01 


— 


3 





6 


3 


46-21 


Income Tax Law 


41-05 46-01 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 




Business Management 










45-01 


Industrial Management 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


45-02 


Industrial Management 


45-01 


— 


4 





8 


4 


45-03 


Business Machines 


— 


— 





3 





1 


45-04 


Business Machines 


45-03 


— 





3 





1 


45-21 


Public Administration 


— 


45-02 


4 





8 


4 


45-22 


Public Administration 


45-21 


— 


4 





8 


4 


45-23 


Traffic Management 


45-02 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


45-24 


Advanced Management 


45-02 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


45-25 


Purchasing &. Procurement 


45-02 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


45-31 


Business &. Government 


— 


20-18 


4 





8 


4 


45-32 


Business Policy 


45-31 


— 


4 





8 


4 




Chemistry 












11-01 


General Chemistry 


— 


— 


3 


3 


6 


4 


11-02 


General Chemistry 


— 


11-01 


3 


3 


6 


4 


11-03 


General Chemistry 




11-02 


3 


3 


6 


4 


♦11-04 


General Chemistry 


— 


11-03 


3 


3 


6 


2 


11-09 


Adv. Inorganic Chemistry 




11-32 


3 





6 


3 


11-11 


Qualitative Analysis 


11-04 


— 


3 


10 


5 


6 


11-12 


Quantitative Analysis 


— 


11-11 


4 


6 


8 


6 


11-13 


Quantitative Analysis 




11-12 


3 


9 


6 


6 


11-14 


Quantitative Analysis 


— 


11-12 


3 


6 


6 


5 


11-15 


Instrumental Analysis 


— 


11-13 


2 


6 


4 


4 


11-20 


Organic Chemistry 


— 11-13 or 11-14 


3 


6 


6 


5 


11-21 


Organic Chemistry 


— 


11-20 


3 


6 


6 


5 


11-22 


Organic Chemistry 




11-21 


3 





6 


3 


11-23 


Organic Analysis Laboratory 


— 


11-21 





9 





3 


11-24 


Organic Chemistry 


— 


11-23 


3 


6 


6 


5 


11-25 


Organic Analysis Laboratory 


— 


11-21 





6 





2 


11-26 


Organic Chemistry 


— 


11-04 


5 


6 


10 


7 


11-27 


Organic Chemistry 


— 


11-26 


5 


6 


10 


7 


11-28 


Biological Chemistry 


— 11-27 or 11-22 


3 


6 


3 


4 


11-29 


Biological Chemistry 


— 


11-28 


3 


6 


3 


4 


11-30 


Physical Chemistry 


11-12 


11-13 


4 


3 


8 


5 


11-31 


Physical Chemistry 


— 


11-30 


4 


4 


7 


5 


11-32 


Physical Chemistry 


— 


11-31 


4 


4 


7 


5 


11-33 


Physical Chemistry 




11-30 


4 


2 


6 


4 


11-34 


Physical Chemistry 


— 


11-33 


4 


2 


6 


4 


11-35 


Thermodynamics 


— 


11-32 


3 





6 


3 


IMO 


Colloid Chemistry 




11-32 


3 


3 


6 


4 


11-41 


Chemical Literature 


— 


11-04 


1 





2 


1 


11-42 


History of Chemistry 


— 


11-32 


2 





4 


2 


1143 


Thesis 




11-32 





9 





3 



♦Summer term — 5 weeks. 



210 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Course 




Pre- 


Prep- 










hlo. 


Course 


requisite 


aration 


Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credi 




Chemistry 


— Continued 










11-44 


Thesis 


— 


11-32 





9 





3 


J 11-100 Advanced Physical Chemistry 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


Jll-lOl 


Advanced Physical Chemistry 


— 


11-100 


3 





6 


3 


jl 1-102 Advanced Physical Chemistry 


— 


11-101 


3 





6 


3 


tll-103 


Advanced Organic Chemistry 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


tl 1-104 Advanced Organic Chemistry 


• — 


11-103 


3 





6 


3 


tll-105 


Advanced Organic Chemistry 


— 


11-104 


3 





6 


3 


jl 1-106 Advanced Organic Chemistry 


— 


11-105 


3 





6 


3 


Jl 1-107 Thesis 


— 


— 


To be 


arranged 


1 


tl 1-108 Thesis 


— 


11-107 


To be 


arranged 


1 


Jll-109 Thesis 


— 


11-108 


To be 


arranged 


3 


tll-110 Thesis 


— 


11-109 


To be 


arranged 


3 


111-111 


Thesis 




11-110 


To be 


arra 


nged 


3 




Chemical Engineering 










* 4-01 


Flow of Fluids 


14-03 


— 


5 


3 


16 


4 


4-02 


Chemical Engineering Calcula- 
















tions 


11-12 


— 


2 





4 


2 


4-03 


Chemical Engineering Thermo- 
















dynamics 


2-32 


— • 


4 





8 


4 


4-11 


Unit Operations 


4-01 4-02 


— 


4 


4 


10 


6 


4-12 


Unit Operations 


4-01 4-02 


-^ 


4 


4 


10 


6 


* 4-13 


Unit Operations 


4-01 4-02 


■ — 


3 


6 


9 


3 


4-21 


Chemical Plants 


11-20 


— 


4 





8 


4 


* 4-22 


Chemical Engineering Economics 20-21 


— 


6 





12 


3 


4-23 


Engineering Materials 


11-14 


— 


3 


4 


8 


5 


4-31 


Chemical Process Developm.ents 


4-12 4-11 


— 


2 


6 


4 


4 


4-32 


Chemical Engineering Design 


4-11 4-12 


— 


2 


7 


9 


6 




Civil Engineering 










1-10 


Surveying 


14-03 


— 


4 


3 


5 


4 


Ml 


Surveying 


1-10 


— 


4 


3 


5 


4 


1-12 


Surveying 


— 


Ml 


4 


3 


5 


4 


* 1-13 


Surveying 


1-12 


1-12 





18 





3 


1-20 


Hydraulics 


2-20 


2-21 


3 





6 


3 


1-21 


Hydraulics 


1-20 


1-20 


3 





6 


3 


1-24 


Sanitary Engineering 


1-21 


— 


3 





6 


3 


1-25 


Sanitary Engineering 


— 


1-24 


3 


3 


6 


4 


1-30 


Transportation 


Ml 


— 


4 





5 


3 


1-31 


Transportation 


— 


1-30 


2 





4 


2 


1-40 


Structural Analysis 


2-22 


2-22 


3 





6 


3 


1-41 


Structural Analysis 


— 


1-40 


4 





8 


4 


1-42 


Structural Analysis 


1-41 


1-41 


3 





6 


3 


1-43 


Structural Analysis 


— 


142 


4 





8 


4 


1-46 


Structures 


2-23 


— 


3 





6 


3 


1-47 


Structures 


— 


1-47 


3 





6 


3 


1-49 


Concrete Testing Laboratory 


— 


2-22 


1 


4 


4 


3 


1-50 


Concrete 


2-22 2-23&1-49 


3 





6 


3 


1-51 


Concrete 


1-50 


1-50 


3 





6 


3 


1-54 


Design of Structures 


2-22 


— 


2 


4 





2 


1-55 


Design of Structures 


1-54 1-50 


1-54 1-50 


3 


6 





3 


1-56 


Design of Structures 


— 


1-55 





9 





3 


1-57 


Foundation Engineering 


— 


— 


2 





4 


2 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 

JThese courses are for graduate credit only. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 211 

Course Pre- Prep- 
No. Course requisite aration Class Lab. Prep. Credit 

Co-ordination 

50-01 Professional Development — — 3 6 3 

*50-01 Professional Development — — 6 12 3 

Drawing and Graphic Arts 

12-01 Engineering Drawing — — 6 3 3 

12-02 Engineering Drawing 12-01 — 6 3 3 

12-03 Descriptive Geometry — 12-01&.12-02 6 3 3 

♦12-04 Machine Drawing 12-01&12-02 — 9 3 2 

12-05 Technical Drawing — — 3 6 9 3 

Economics 

20-01 Economic Geography — — 3 6 3 

20-02 Economic Geography — 20-02 3 6 3 

20-03 Economic Geography — 20-03 3 6 3 

20-05 Economic Geography — — 4 8 4 

20-06 Current Economic Problems — — 3 6 3 

20-07 International Economic Relations — — 3 6 3 

20-08 Labor Problems — — 3 6 3 

20-11 Economics — — 3 6 3 

20-12 Economics — 20-11 3 6 3 

20-13 Economic Principles — 1 20-05 LA ' 4 8 4 

20-14 Economic Problems — 20-13 4 8 4 

20-15 Economic Problems — 20-14 4 8 4 

20-16 Principles of Accounting — — 3 2 7 4 

20-17 Principles of Accounting — 20-16 3 2 7 4 

r 20-15 B.A. 

20-18 American Economic History — {20-11 or 4 8 4 

i 20-13 L.A. 

20-20 Statistics — — 3 2 7 4 

20-21 Statistics — 20-20 3 2 7 4 

20-22 Industrial Statistics I — — 2 2 5 3 

20-23 Industrial Statistics II — 20-22 2 2 5 3 

20-24 Money and Banking 20-15 — 4 8 4 

20-25 Business Cycles — 20-14 4 8 4 

20-26 Labor Economics — 20-14 4 8 4 

20-27 International Economic Relations — ■ 20-15 3 6 IJ^ 

20-28 Economic Systems 20-15L.A. 20-15B.A. 4 8 4 

20-31 History of Economic Thought — 20-15 4 8 4 

20-32 Advanced Economic Theory — 20-31 4 8 4 

20-61 Seminar — — 4 

20-62 Seminar — 20-61 4 

Education 

21-01 History of Education — — 4 8 4 

21-02 History of Education — — 4 8 4 

21-03 Educational Measurements — — 4 8 4 

21-04 Educational Organization and 

Administration — — 4 8 4 

21-05 Comparative Education — — 4 8 4 

21-06 Educational Sociology — — 4 8 4 

21-07 Educational Philosophy — — 4 8 4 

21-08 Principles of Secondary Education ■ — — 4 8 4 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



212 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Course 
No. 



Course 



Pre- 
requisite 



Prep- 
aration 



Class Lab. Prep. Credit 



21-09 



Education — Continued 

Methods of Teaching in Second- 
ary Schools — 



— 4 



Electrical Engineering 



3-01 


Electrical Engineering I 


/ 15-03 
I 15-04 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-02 


Electrical Engineering I 




3-01 


3 





6 


3 


3-03 


Electrical Measurements 


3-01 3-02 — 


2 


2 


5 


3 






f 14-07 












3-04 


Electrical Engineering 


\ 15-03 
i 15-04 


— 


4 


3 


8 


5 


3-10 


Direct Current Machinery 


3-01 


— 


5 





7 


4 


3-11 


Adv. Alternating Current Cir- 
















cuit Theory 


3-02 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-12 


Elec. Eng. Lab., Direct Current 


3-10 


— 


1 


3 


2 


2 


3-13 


Electrical Measurements 


— 


3-01&3-02 


3 





6 


3 


* 3-14 


Elec, Eng. Lab., Direct Current 


3-10 


— 


2 


6 


10 


3 


3-15 


Polyphase Alternating Current 
















Circuits 


3-11 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-16 


Electronics 


— : 


15-03&15-04 


3 





6 


3 


3-17 


Electrical Measurements 


— 


3-13 


4 





5 


3 


3-18 


Electrical Measurements Lab. 


— 


3-13 





3 


6 


3 


3-19 


Electric Field Theory 


/ 3-11 
t 14-07 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-20 


Transformer Theory 


3-12 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-21 


Electronics 





3-16 


3 





6 


3 


3-22 


Alternating Current Test Lab. 




3-15 


1 


3 


5 


3 


3-23 


Electronics Laboratory 


/ 


3-16 


1 


3 


5 


3 


* 3-24 


Electronics Laboratory 


- 


3-21 
3-11 3-17 


2 


6 


10 


3 


* 3-25 


Adv. Measurements Laboratory 


- 


3-18 &. 3-13 
3-17&3-11 





6 


12 


3 


3-26 


Synchronous Machinery 


V 


3-20 


3 





6 


3 


3-27 


High-Frequency Engineering 


3-16 3-21 — 


3 





6 


3 


3-28 


Transmission Lines and Networks — 


14-07 


3 





6 


3 


3-29 


Advanced Field Theory 


3-19 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-30 


Induction Machinery 


— 


3-26 


3 





6 


3 


3-31 


High-Frequency Engineering 


3-27 


— 


3 





6 


3 


3-32 


Filters 


— 


3-28 


3 





6 


3 


3-33 


High-Frequency Laboratory 


-{ 


3-19 & 3-29 
3-28 &. 3-27 


1 


3 


5 


3 


3-34 


Adv. Electrical Eng. Lab. 




3-26 


1 


3 


5 


3 




English 












30-01 


English I 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


30-02 


English I 




30-01 


3 





6 


3 


30-03 


English I 


— 


30-02 


3 





6 


3 


*30-04 


Introduction to Literature 


— 


30-03 


5 





10 


2y2 


30-05 


Public Speaking 


— 


— 


4 





5 


3 


30-06 


Public Speaking 


— 


30-05 


4 





5 


3 


♦30-07 


Effective Speaking 




— 


6 





12 


3 


30-07 


Effective Speaking 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


30-08 


Business Communication 




30-04 


5 


4 


9 


3 



♦Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COURSES OF MSTRUCTlOhl 



213 



Course 




Pre- 


Prep- 










No. 


Course 


requisite 


aration 


Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 




English — 


- Continued 










30-09 


Report Writing 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


30-10 


Problems in Writing 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-11 


Shakespeare 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


30-12 


Great European Writers 




— 


3 





6 


3 


30-14 


Contemporary Drama 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


30-15 


Contemporary Novel 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


30-21 


Advanced Composition 


— 


30-03 


4 





8 


4 


30-22 


Advanced Composition 




30-21 


4 





8 


4 


30-23 


Creative Writing 


— 


30-22 


4 





8 


4 


30-24 


Creative Writing 


— 


30-23 


4 





8 


4 


30-29 


Foundations of the English Lang, 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-30 


Foundations of the Eng. Lang. 


— 


30-29 


4 





8 


4 


30-31 


Western World Literature 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-32 


Western World Literature 




30-31 


4 





8 


4 


30-33 


Survey of English Literature 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-34 


Survey of English Literature 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-35 


American Literature to 1860 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-36 


American Literature after 1860 


— 


30-35 


4 





8 


4 


30-37 


Saxon and Anglo-Norman Lit. 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-38 


English Lit. from 1200 to 1600 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-39 


19th Century in England 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-40 


17th Century in England 




30-39 


4 





8 


4 


30-41 


18th Century in England 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-42 


18th Century in England 




30-41 


4 





8 


4 


30-43 


19th Century Prose 




— 


4 





8 


4 


30-44 


19th Century Prose 


— 


30-43 


4 





8 


4 


30-45 


19th Century Poetry 




— 


4 





8 


4 


30-46 


19th Century Poetry 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-47 


The Modern Novel 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-48 


The Modern Drama 




— 


4 





8 


4 


30-49 


Modern Poetry 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-51 


Introduction to Journalism 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-52 


Introduction to Journalism 




30-51 


4 





8 


4 


30-53 


Techniques of Journalism 


— 


30-52 


4 





8 


4 


30-54 


Techniques of Journalism 


— 


30-53 


4 





8 


4 


30-61 


Shakespeare 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-62 


Shakespeare 


— 


30-61 


4 





8 


4 


30-63 


Chaucer 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


30-64 


Chaucer 


— 


30-63 


4 





8 


4 


30-71 


Seminar 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


30-72 


Seminar 


— 


30-71 


— 


— 


— 


4 




Finance and Insurance 










44-01 


Principles of Banking 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


44-02 


Principles of Insurance 




— 


3 





6 


3 


44-11 


Business Finance 


— 


44-01 


4 





8 


4 


44-12 


Business Finance 


44-11 


— 


4 





8 


4 


44-13 


Construction Finance 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


44-14 


Industrial Finance 


—- 


— 


3 





6 


3 


44-21 


Real Estate 


44-12 


— 


6 





12 


3 


44-22 


Investments 


44-12 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


44-23 


Investments 


44-22 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


44-24 


Probs. in Finance &l Insurance 


44-12 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


44-25 


Public Finance 


44-12 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 




French 












31-01 


Elementary French 


^— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


31-02 


Elementary French 


— 


31-01 


3 





6 


3 



214 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Course 




Pre- Prep- 










No. 


Course 


requisite aration Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 




French — 


- Continued 










31-03 


Elementary French 


— 31-02 


3 





6 


3 


*31-04 


Elementary French 


— 31-03 


3 





6 


IK 


31-05 


Introduction to French 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


31-06 


Introduction to French 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


31-07 


Introduction to French 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


31-08 


Introduction to French 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


31-11 


Introduction to French Lit. 


_f 31-04 or 2 
\ yrs. ofH.S. 


3 





6 


3 


31-12 


Introduction to French Lit. 


— 31-11 


3 





6 


3 


31-13 


Introduction to French Lit. 


— 31-12 


3 





6 


3 


*31-14 


Introduction to French Lit. 


— 31-13 


3 





6 


1>^ 


31-15 


Intermediate French 


— 31-04 


4 





8 


4 


31-16 


Intermediate French 


— 31-15 


4 





8 


4 


31-21 


Modern French Literature 


— 31-14 or 31-16 


4 





8 


4 


31-22 


Modern French Literature 


— 31-21 


4 





8 


4 


31-23 


French Classicism 


— 31.14or31-16 


4 





8 


4 


31-24 


French Classicism 


— 31-23 


4 





8 


4 


31-25 


French Romanticism 


— 31-14or31-16 


4 





8 


4 


31-26 


French Romanticism 


— 31-25 


4 





8 


4 


31-31 


Advanced Comp. & Convers'n 


/ 31-22 4 
~1 31-24 or 31-16^ 





8 


4 


31-32 


Advanced Comp. &. Convers'n 


- 31-31 


4 





8 


4 




Geology 










13-01 


General Geology 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


13-02 


General Geology 


— 13-01 


3 





6 


3 


13-03 


Historical Geology 


— — 


4 





8 


4 


13-04 


Historical Geology 


— 13-03 


4 





8 


4 


13-11 


Engineering Geology 


— 13-01 


3 





6 


3 




German 










32-01 


Elementary German 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


32-02 


Elementary German 


— 32-01 


3 





6 


3 


32-03 


Elementary German 


— 32-02 


3 





6 


3 


*32-04 


Elementary German 


— 32-03 


3 





— 


IK 


32-05 


Introduction to German 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


32-06 


Introduction to German 


— - — 


3 





6 


3 


32-07 


Introduction to German 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


32-08 


Introduction to German 


— . — 


3 





6 


3 


32-11 


Introduction to German Lit. 


/ 32-04 or 2 
~\ yrsofH.S. 


3 





6 


3 


32-12 


Introduction to German Lit. 


— 32-11 


3 





6 


3 


32-13 


Introduction to German Lit. 


— 32-12 


3 





6 


3 


*32-14 


Introduction to German Lit. 


— 32-13 


3 





6 


IK 


32-15 


Intermediate German 


— 32-04 


4 





8 


4 


32-16 


Intermediate German 


— 32-15 


4 





8 


4 


32-21 


Modern German Literature 


— 32-14 or 32-16 


4 





8 


4 


32-22 


Modern German Literature 


— 32-21 


4 





8 


4 


32-23 


Classical Period of German Lit. 


— 32-14 or 32-16 


4 





8 


4 


32-24 


Classical Period of German Lit. 


— 32-23 


4 





8 


4 


32-25 


German Lit. of the 19th Cent. 


— 32-14 or 31-16 


4 





8 


4 


32-26 


German Lit. of the 19th Cent. 


32-25 


4 





8 


4 


32-31 


Adv. Comp. &. Conversation 


/ 32-22 
1 32-24 or 32-26 


4 





8 


4 


32-32 


Adv. Comp. & Conversation 


— 32-31 


4 





8 


4 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



215 



Course 
No. 



Course 



Pre- 
requisite 



Prep- 
aration 



Class Lab. Prep. Credit 





Government 










22-01 


American Govt. &. Politics 




— 


3 





6 


3 


22-02 


American Govt. & Politics 


— 


22-01 


3 





6 


3 


22-03 


American Govt. &. Politics 


— 


22-02 


3 





6 


3 


♦22-05 


American Government 






4 





8 


2 


22-06 


Municipal Government 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


22-07 


Government and Business 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


22-11 


Comparative Government 


— 


- — 


4 





8 


4 


22-12 


Comparative Government 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


22-13 


Origins of Political Theory 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


22-14 


Modern Political Theory 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


22-15 


American Constitutional Law 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


22-16 


American Constitutional Law 


— 


22-15 


4 





8 


4 


22-17 


International Law 


— 


22-03 


4 





8 


4 


22-18 


International Relationships 


— 


22-17 


4 





8 


4 


22-20 


Public Administration 


— 


22-03 


4 





8 


4 


22-21 


Public Administration 


— 


22-20 


4 





8 


4 




History 












23-01 


History of Civilization 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


23-02 


History of Civilization 


— 


23-01 


3 





6 


3 


23-03 


History of Civilization 


— 


23-02 


4 





8 


4 


♦23-04 


History of Civilization 


— 


23-03 


4 





8 


4 


♦23-05 


American History 


— 


— 


6 





12 


3 


23-06 


Modern European History 


— 


- — 


3 





6 


3 


23-07 


History of Latin America 




— 


3 





6 


3 


23-08 


History of the Far East 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


23-11 


Europe 1789-1870 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


23-12 


Europe 1870-1920 


— 


23-11 


4 





8 


4 


23-13 


England to 1688 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


23-14 


England since 1688 


— 


23-14 


4 





8 


4 


23-15 


English Constitutional History 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


23-16 


American Constitutional History 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


23-17 


The United States to 1865 




— 


4 





8 


4 


23-18 


The United States since 1865 


— 


23-17 


4 





8 


4 


23-19 


Latin American History 




— 


4 





8 


4 


23-20 


Latin American History 


— 


23-19 


4 





8 


4 


23-21 


Far Eastern International Re- 
















lations 1840-1900 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


23-22 


Far Eastern International Re- 
















lations since 1900 




23-21 


4 





8 


4 


23-23 


Recent European History 




23-18 


4 





8 


4 


23-24 


History of Art I 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


23-25 


History of Art II 




— 


3 





6 


3 


23-26 


History of Architecture 


• — 




3 





6 


3 




Industrial Engineering 










5-10 


Industrial Management I 


— - 


2-50 


3 





6 


3 


5-11 


Industrial Management II 


— 


5-10 


2 





4 


2 


5-15 


Methods Engineering I 


— 


5-11 


2 





4 


2 


5-16 


Methods Engineering II 


— 


5-15 
5-11 


2 


2 


5 


3 


5-17 


Production Planning & Control 


" 


5-15 desir- 
5-16 able 


3 





6 


3 


5-18 


Quality Control 




' 20-22 


3 





6 


3 



♦Summer term — 5 weeks. 



216 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Course 




Pre- 


Prep- 










No. 


Course 


requisite 


aration 


Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 




Industrial Relations 










42-10 


Personnel 




— 


3 





6 


3 


42-11 


Personnel Administration 


— 


45-02 


4 





8 


4 


42-12 


Personnel Administration 


42-11 


— 


4 





8 


4 


42-13 


Wage Administration 


42-12 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


42-14 


Wage Administration 


42-13 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


M2-16 


Testing 


— 


25-02 


5 


5 


11 


3>^ 


42-17 


Problems in Personnel 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


42-22 


Industrial Relations Seminar 


42-14 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 


42-23 


Industrial Relations Seminar 


42-22 


— 


2 


2 


5 


3 



43-01 
43-02 
43-08 
*43-10 
43-11 
43-12 
43-13 

43-14 

*43-15 
43-21 
43-22 
43-23 
43-24 



Principles of Marketing 
Principles of Advertising 
Sales Engineering 
Conference Leadership 
Sales Management 
Sales Management 
Problems in Advertising and 

Marketing 
Problems in Advertising and 

Marketing 
Advanced Probs., Adv. &.Mktg 
Merchandising 
Merchandising 
Store Management 
Marketing Research 



Marketing and Advertising 



43-02 
43-11 

43-12 

43-13 
43-14 
43-12 
43-21 
43-12 
43-12 



3 





6 


3 


3 





6 


3 


3 





6 


3 


5 


5 


11 


3^ 


3 


3 


9 


5 


3 


3 


9 


5 





6 


6 


4 





6 


6 


4 





9 


9 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


3 





6 


3 



Mathematics 



14-01 College Algebra 

14-02 Trigonometry 

14-03 Analytic Geometry 

* 14-04 Introduction to Calculus 

14-05 Differential Calculus 

14-06 Integral Calculus 

14-07 Differential Equations I 

14-08 Differential Equations II 

14-10 Analytic Mechanics 

14-11 Curve Analysis 

14-12 Modern Geometry 

14-13 Spherical Trigonometry 

14-14 History of Mathematics 

14-15 Advanced Calculus 

14-16 Advanced Calculus 

14-17 Infinite Series 

14-18 Theory of Equations 

14-20 Special Topics in Math. 

14-21 Basic Mathematics I 

14-22 Basic Mathematics II 

14-23 Basic Mathematics III 

14-25 Mathematics in Finance 

14-28 Mathematical Statistics 

14-29 Math. Statistics &. Probability 



14-01 



14-05 
14-03 
14-02 

14-06 

14-06 



14-01 
14-02 
14-03 

14-04 
14-05 
14-06 
14-07 
14-07 



14-06 
14-15 
14-06 



14-21 
14-22 



— 14-06 



5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 






























7 
7 

10 
10 
8 
8 
6 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
6 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
6 
6 
6 
8 
8 
8 



4 
4 
5 

4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 



♦Summer term — 5 weeks. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 217 



Course 




Pre- 


Prep- 










No. 


Course 


requisite 


aration Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 




Mechanical Engineering 










2-10 


Mechanism 




2-21 





6 


6 


4 


2-11 


Machine Design 


— 


2-24 





6 


3 


3 


2-12 


Machine Design 


— 


2-11 


c 


9 


6 


5 


2-20 


Applied Mechanics (Statics) 


15-02 


— 


4 





8 


4 


2-21 


Applied Mechanics (Kinetics) 


— 


2-20 


3 





6 


3 


2-22 


Strength of Materials 


2-20 


2-21 


4 





8 


4 


2-23 


Strength of Materials 


2-22 


— 


3 





6 


3 


2-24 


Advanced Mechanics 


— 


2-23 


3 





6 


3 


2-25 


Aerodynamics 


— 


2-21 & 1-21 


3 





6 


3 


2-26 


Engine Dynamics 


— 


2-21 & 14-07 


3 





6 


3 


* 2-30 


Heat Engineering (Power Plant 
















Equip.) 


— 


— 


5 





10 


2y2 


2-31 


Heat Engineering (TTiermo.) 


— 


15-06 


3 





6 


3 


2-32 


Heat Engineering (Thermo.) 


— 


15-06 


4 





8 


4 


2-33 


Heat Engineering 


2-32 


2-30 


3 





6 


3 


2-34 


Heat Engineering 


— 


2-32 


3 





6 


3 


2-35 


Heat Engineering 


— 


2-33 


4 





8 


4 


2-36 


Heat Engineering (Steam Turb,) 


— 


2-34 


3 





6 


3 


♦ 2-37 


Heating &. Air Conditioning 


— 


2-32 


6 





12 


3 


2-38 


Power Plant Engineering 


— 


2-34 


4 





8 


4 


240 


Materials 


— 


— 


2 





4 


2 


♦ 2-41 


Metallography 


— 


2-50 & 2-40 


4 


4 


10 


3 


* 2-50 


Production Processes I 


— 


— 


5 





10 


ly^ 


2-60 


Mechanical Engineering Lab, 


— 


2-30 &. 2-33 





3 


3 


1 


2-61 


Mechanical Engineering Lab. 


— 


2-34 & 2-60 





4 


5 


3 


2-62 


Mechanical Engineering Lab. 


— 


2-23 & 2-40 





4 


5 


3 


2-63 


Mechanical Engineering Lab. 


— 


2-61 





4 


5 


3 


2-64 


Testing Materials Laboratory 


— 


2-23 &L 2-40 


1 


4 


4 


3 


2-65 


Mechanical Engineering Lab. 


— 


2-31 


2 


3 


4 


3 


*2-66 


Mechanical Engineering Lab. 


— 


2-50 





12 


6 


3 




Philosophy 












24-01 


Introduction to Philosophy 




— 


4 





8 


4 


24-02 


Problems of Philosophy 


— 


24-01 


4 





8 


4 


24-03 


History of Philosophy 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


24-04 


History of Philosophy 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


24-05 


Philosophy of Religion 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


24-06 


Logic 




— 


4 





8 


4 


24-07 


Introduction to Philosophy 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


24-08 


Problems of Philosophy 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 




Physical Education 










16-01 


Hygiene 


— 


— 


1 





2 


1 


16-02 


Hygiene 


— 


16-01 


1 





2 


1 


16-10 


Physical Training 


— 


— 





2 








16-11 


Physical Training 




16-10 





2 








16-12 


Physical Training 


— 


16-11 





2 








16-21 


Principles of Physical Education 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


16-22 


Play and Recreation 


— 




4 





8 


4 


16-23 


History of Physical Education 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


16-24 


Admin, of Physical Education 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


16-25 


Football 


_ 





4 





8 


4 


16-26 


Track &. Field Events 





— 


4 





8 


4 


16-27 


Basketball &. Baseball 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 



218 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Course 




Pre- 


Prep- 










No. 


Course 


requisite 


aration Class 


Lab. 


Prep. 


Credit 






Physics 












15-01 


Physics 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


15-02 


Physics 


— 


15-01 


3 





6 


3 


15-03 


Physics 


— 


15-02 


3 





6 


3 


*15-04 


Physics 


— 


15-03 


3 





6 


1>^ 


15-05 


Physics 


— 


15-04 


3 


3 


6 


4 


15-06 


Physics 


— 


15-04 


3 


3 


6 


4 


15-07 


Survey of Physical Sciences 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


15-08 


Survey of Physical Sciences 


— 


15-07 


3 





6 


3 


15-09 


Survey of Physical Sciences 


— 


15-08 


3 





6 


3 


*15-10 


Survey of Physical Sciences 




15-09 


4 





8 


2 


*15-11 


General Physics 




14-23 


6 





12 


3 


15-12 


General Physics 


— 


15-11 


3 


3 


9 


5 


15-13 


General Physics 


— 


15-12 


3 


3 


9 


5 


15-14 


Advanced Physics 


— 15-06 14-06 


2 


2 


5 


3 


15-15 


Advanced Physics 


— 15-06 14-06 


2 


2 


5 


3 


15-20 


Optics 


15-06 14-06 




3 


2 


7 


4 


15-21 


Optics 


— 


15-20 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-22 


Acoustics 


15-06 14-06 


— 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-23 


Acoustics 


— 


15-22 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-24 


Electronics 


15-06 14-06 


— 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-25 


Electronics 


— 


15-24 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-26 


Modern Physics 


15-06 14-06 


— 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-27 


Modern Physics 


— 


15-26 


3 


2 


7 


4 


15-65 


Thesis 


— 


— 










15-66 


Thesis 


— 


15-65 










J15-101 Theoretical Physics 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


:;15-102 Theoretical Physics 


— 


15-101 


4 





8 


4 


::15-103 Quantum Mechanics 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


115-104 Quantum Mechanics 


— 


15-03 


4 





8 


4 


j 15-105 Applied Mathematics 




— 


4 





8 


4 


J15-107 Graduate Thesis 


— 


— 










J15-108 Graduate Thesis 


— 


15-07 










J15-109 Graduate Thesis 


— 


15-08 










tl5-110 Graduate Thesis 


— 


15-09 












Psychology 












25-01 


Introductory Psychology 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 


25-02 


General Psychology 


— 


25-01 


4 





8 


4 


25-03 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


25-04 


Social Psychology 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


25-05 


Applied Psychology 


— 


— 


3 





6 


3 


25-11 


Measurements in Psychology 


— 


25-02 


3 


3 


6 


4 


25-12 


Experimental Psychology I 


— 


25-11 


3 


3 


6 


4 


25-13 


Experimental Psychology II 


— 


25-12 


3 


3 


6 


4 


25-14 


Social Psychology 


— 


25-02 


4 





8 


4 


25-15 


Educational Psychology 


— 


25-02 


4 





8 


4 


25-16 


Educational Psychology 


— 


25-15 


4 





8 


4 


25-17 


Abnormal Psychology I 


— 


25-02 


4 





8 


4 


25-18 


Abnormal Psychology II 


— 


25-17 


4 





8 


4 


25-19 


Psychology of Personality I 


— 


25-02 


4 





8 


4 


25-20 


Psychology of Personality II 


— 


25-19 


4 





8 


4 


25-21 


Child Psychology 


— 


25-02 


4 





8 


4 


25-22 


Child Psychology 




25-21 


4 





8 


4 


25-23 


Industrial Psychology 




25-02 


4 





8 


4 


25-24 


Industrial Psychology 


— 


25-23 


4 





8 


4 


25-31 


Advanced Psychology I 


— 


— 


4 





8 


4 



*Summer term — 5 weeks. 
{Graduate credit only. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



219 



Course 
No. 



Course 



Pre- 
requisite 



Prep- 
aration 



Class Lah. Prep. Credit 



Psychology 



25-32 Advanced Psychology II 
25-61 Seminar 
25-62 Seminar 



Continued 

— 25-31 

— 25-62 



8 4 

4 

- 4 



Sociology 



26-01 


Principles of Sociology 


— — 


4 





8 


4 


26-02 


Principles of Sociology 


— 26-01 


4 





8 


4 


26-03 


Introduction to Sociology 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


26-04 


Social Ethics 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


26-05 


Social Pathology 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


26-06 


The Family 


— — 


3 





6 


3 


26-11 


Social Problems 


— 26-02 


4 





8 


4 


26-12 


Social Problems 


— 26-11 


4 





8 


4 


26-13 


Social Ethics 


— 26-02 


4 





8 


4 


26-14 


Social Ethics 


— 26-13 


4 





8 


4 


26-15 


The Family 


— 26-02 


4 





8 


4 


26-16 


Criminology 


— 26-02 


4 





8 


4 


26-17 


Urban Sociology 


— 26-02 


4 





8 


4 


26-18 


Social Progress 


— 26-12 


4 





8 


4 


26-19 


Sociological Theory 


— 26-12 


4 





8 


4 


26-20 


American Social Thought 


26-12 


4 





8 


4 


26-21 


Sociology of Religion 


— 26-12 


4 





8 


4 


26-22 


Principles of Social Work 


— 26-12 


4 





8 


4 


26-61 


Seminar 


— — 


— 


— 


— 


4 


26-62 


Seminar 


— 26-61 


- — 


— 


— 


4 



Spanish. 



33-01 Elementary Spanish — 

33-02 Elementary Spanish — ■ 

33-03 Elementary Spanish — 

*33-04 Elementary Spanish — 

33-05 Introduction to Spanish — 

33-06 Introduction to Spanish — 

33-07 Introduction to Spanish — 

33-08 Introduction to Spanish — 

33-11 Introduction to Spanish Lit. — 

33-12 Introduction to Spanish Lit. — 

33-13 Introduction to Spanish Lit. — 

*33-14 Introduction to Spanish Lit. — 

33-15 Intermediate Spanish — 

33-16 Intermediate Spanish — 

33-21 Spanish Lit. of the Golden Age — 

33-22 Spanish Lit. of the Golden Age — 

33-23 Modern Spanish Literature — 

33-24 Modern Spanish Literature — 

33-25 Modern Spanish American Lit. — 

33-26 Modern Spanish American Lit. — 

33-31 Adv. Comp. & Conversation — 

33-32 Adv. Comp. &. Conversation — 



— 


3 





6 


3 


33-01 


3 





6 


3 


33-02 


3 





6 


3 


33-03 


3 





6 


I'A 


— 


3 





6 


3 


— 


3 





6 


3 


. — 


3 





6 


3 


— 


3 





6 


3 


/ 33-04 or 2 yrs. 


3 





6 


3 


\ of High Schl 


33-11 


3 





6 


3 


33-12 


3 





6 


3 


33-13 


3 





6 


VA 


33-04 


4 





8 


4 


33-15 


4 





8 


4 


33-14 or 33-16 


4 





8 


4 


33-21 


4 





8 


4 


33-14 or 33-16 


4 





8 


4 


33-23 


4 





8 


4 


33-14 or 33-16 


4 





8 


4 


33-25 


4 





8 


4 


f 33-22 
\ 33-24 or 33-26 


4 





8 


4 


33-31 


4 





8 


4 



*Summcr term — 5 weeks. 



DAY COLLEGES 111 



Qeneral ^ndex 



Page 

Absences 49 

Accounting — Law Club 36 

Activities ■ 32 

Activities Assembly Hall 30 

Administrative Officers 8 

Administrative Staff 9 

Admission Requirements 

College of Liberal Arts 68 

College of Business Administration 130 

College of Engineering -. 162 

Advanced Standing 

College of Liberal Arts 69 

College of Business Administration 131 

College of Engineering 163 

Aims and Methods 61, 62, 128, 161 

Alumni Association 57 

Application for Admission 

College of Liberal Arts 69 

College of Business Administration 131 

College of Engineering 163 

Application Blank 223 

Assistant Instructors 13 

Assistant Professors 12 

Associate Professors 11 

Athletic Association 32 

Athletic Field 31 

Attendance 49 

Awards and Prizes 54 

Beacon Hill Building 22 

Biological Laboratory Equipment 24 

Books and Supplies 47 

Boston — A Great Educational Center 22 

Buildings and Facilities 22 

Business Administration, College of 125 

Business and Statistical Laboratory 29 

Calendar for College year, 1946-1947-Freshman 4 

Camera Club 34 

Cauldron, College Annual 33 

Changes in Program 46 

Chapel Preachers 18 

Chemical Engineering Laboratory Equipment 28 

Chemical Laboratory Deposit 45 

Chemistry Laboratories and Equipment 24 

Chess Club 34 

Civil Engineering Laboratories and Equipment 25 

Condition Examinations 47 

Convocation Lecturers 17 

Convocations 37 

Co-operative Plan 39 

Correlation of Theory and Practice 41 

Earnings 42 

Faculty Co-ordinators 39 

How It Works 39 

Location of Work 42 

Placement at Work 40 

Positions Available 41 

Records of Co-operative Work 41 

Reports 41 



222 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Co-operative Plan — Continued Page 

Supervision and Guidance 40 

Training Schedules 43 

Types of Co-operative Work 42 

Corporation 5 

Counsdors 52 

Courses of Instruction, List of 207-219 

Courses of Instruction, Synopses of 

College of Liberal Arts 85-123 

Business Administration 142-156 

Engineering 176-204 

Dean's List 48 

Debating Society 34 

Degrees 

Liberal Arts 70 

Business Administration 133 

Engineering 165 

Deposit, Laboratory 45 

Design and Drafting Rooms 29 

Discipline 49 

Dormitories 50 

Dramatic Club 34 

East Building 22 

Elective Courses, College of Engineering 186 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory Equipment 27 

Engineering, College of 159-204 

Engineering Societies, National 35 

Entrance Examinations in Boston 70, 132, 164 

Entrance Requirements 

College of Liberal Arts 68 

College of Business Administration 130 

College of Engineering 162 

Evening Courses, College of Liberal Arts 62 

Examinations 47 

Executive Council 6 

Expenses 46 

Faculty 10 

Faculty Committees 7 

Fees 44, 45 

Finance and Insurance Club 35 

Fraternities 38 

Freshman Academic Calendar 4 

Freshman Counseling 52 

Freshman Orientation Period 52 

General Information 44 

General Statement 19 

Grades 47 

Graduate Study 71 

Graduation Fee 45 

Graduation with Honors 70, 133, 165 

Graduation Requirements 70, 133, 165 

Gymnasium 31 

Honor Societies 33 

Housing Regulations 50 

Industrial Engineering Equipment 29 

Industrial Relations Club 35 

Instructors 12 

Inter-Fraternity Council 38 

International Relations Club 36 

Laboratories 23 

Laboratory Deposits and Fees 45 



DAY COLLEGES 223 



Page 

Law and Accounting Club 36 

Lecture Assembly Halls 30 

Liberal Arts, College of 59-124 

Liberal Arts, Preparation for a Career 63-67 

Libraries 30 

List of Courses Offered 207-219 

Location of University 22 

Marketing and Advertising Club 36 

Marks 48 

Mathematics Society 36 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Equipment 26 

Musical Clubs 36 

Natatorium 31 

National Engineering Societies 35 

New Building 23 

Northeastern News 33 

Omega Sigma Society (for women students) 37 

Part-Time Work 47 

Payments, Tuition 45 

Personal Interview 69 

Physical Examination 52 

Physical Training Equipment 31 

Physics Laboratories Equipment 24 

Postwar Curricula 2 

Prizes 54 

Professional Societies and Clubs 34 

Professors 10 

Program Changes — Policy of University 46 

Programs of Study 73-84, 137-141, 166-175 

Publications 33 

Radio Club 37 

Refunds 46 

Registration 69, 131, 163 

Report Cards 48 

Requirements for Graduation 70, 133, 165 

Richards Hall 23 

Rifle Club 37 

Scholarships 54 

Scholastic Year for Seniors 49 

Science Club 37 

Secretarial Staff 15 

South Building 23 

Student Activities 32 

Student Activities Fee 44 

Student Council 33 

Student Union 34 

Supplies 47 

Theses 123, 157 

Tuition 44 

University Committees 6 

Veterans at Northeastern 50 

Yacht Club 37 

Yearbook 33 



OFFICE HOURS 

DEPARTMENT OF ADMISSIONS 
9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

daily 

Saturday 12.00 
Noon 

Wednesday Eve- 
nings by Appointment 



}^ ortheastern University 

360 Huntington Avenue 

Boston 15, Mass. 



Paste a Small 
Photo or 
Snapshot 

in This Space 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

(A non-returnable fee of five dollars must accompany this application. 

Make checks, money orders, or drafts payable to 

Northeastern University) 

To Director of Admissions: 

T / Please print \ 

\ name in full ) '. 

hereh-y respectfully apply for admission to the College of. 

for the school year beginning 

I expect to major in 



NOTE: The applicant should fill out the following form 
(both sides) with care. 



Address 

Tel 

Date of Birth Age 

Place of Birth 

Race Religion Nationality 

Graduate of. High School, Year. 

Location of High School 

Name of Principal 

Other high schools you have attended 



Names of Principals 

If not a gxaduate, state the years of attendance and why you left. 
Father's, Mother's, or Guardian's Name 



Address 

Father's work, business or profession 

Names and addresses of two other persons to whom we may direct 
inquiries concerning you. 



Weight Height... 

Have you any physical infirmities? Explain, if any. 



Defects of speech 

Defects of hearing 

Defects of sight 

Bodily infirmities 

Is your general health good, fair, or poor? 

Have you done collegiate work elsewhere? 

If so, name and address of college or university. 



Name of person who will furnish transcript of your college record. 
Do you expect advanced credit for past collegiate work? 



List all athletics and other extracurricular high school activities you have 
engaged in 



Names and addresses of all past employers with brief description of 
each job, length of employment, and wages received: 



Declaration of Parent or Guardian 

This application has been read by me and has my approval. 



Signature of Parent or Guardian 



Date 

Milton J. Schlagenhauf, Director of Admissions 
Northeastern University 
360 Huntington Avenue 
Boston 15, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

Please send me additional information on the following points: 



Name 

Street and Number. 

Town or City 

State 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Offers a broad pro'^ram of college subjects serving as a foundation for the understanding of 
modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. Varied opportunities available 
for vocational specialization. Degree: Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Offers curricula in Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical and Industrial Engineering. 
Classroom study is supplemented by experiment and research in well-equipped labora- 
tories. Degree: Bachelor of Science in the professional field of specialization. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Offers curricula in Accounting, Industrial Relations, Marketing and Advertising, Finance 
and Insurance, and Business Management. Each curriculum represents in itself a broad 
survey of business technique, differing from the others chiefly in emphasis. Degree: 
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

Offers day and evening undergraduate programs admitting those who present a minimum 
of one-half of the work accepted for a bachelor's degree in an approved college or its full 
equivalent, each program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Offers curricula through evening classes leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business 
Administration with appropriate specification in Accounting, Management, and Engineer- 
ing and Business. Preparation for C.P.A. examinations. Intensive programs arranged to 
meet special needs. 

EVENING COURSES OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during evening hours in the fields 
of Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, History, Government, Psychology and Soci- 
ology. A special program preparing for admission to the School of Law is also available. 
The program is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirement for the A. B. or S.B. degree. 
Special courses also available. Degree of Associate in Arts conferred. 



The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering, and Business Administration offer day programs 
and are conducted on the Co-operative Plan. After the freshman year students may alternate 
their periods of study with periods of work in the employ of business or industrial concerns. 
Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large part of their college ex- 
penses. Full-time curricula are available for students who do not desire the Co-operative 
Plan. 

In addition to the above schools the University has affiliated with it and conducts the 
Lincoln Technical Institute offering, through evening classes, courses of college grade in 
various fields of engineering leading to the degree of Associate in Engineering; and the 
Lincoln Preparatory School, an accredited evening school preparing for college entrance 
and offering other standard high school programs. 



For further information regarding any of the above schools, address 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

School of Law Other Schools 

47 Mt. Vernon Street Telephone: KENmore 5800 360 Huntington Avenue 



TOM^STBEK] [DCaK^illgfM 




1946-1947 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
School of Law 

47 MT. VERNON STREET- BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 
Telephone KENmore 5800 



STUART M. WRIGHT, Dean 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Forty-eighth Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Sc4a^ 0^ ^auA 




19 4 6 feffif^ylpl 19 4 7 



and Summer Term 1946 



Day and Evening Divisions 





CALENDAR 


1946 


Summer 


Term 


20 May 


Monday 


Classes begin. 


20 May 


Monday 


First tuition instalment due. 


8 July 


Monday 


Second tuition instalment due 


6 September 


Friday 


Summer Term ends. 




Fall Term 


16 September 


Monday 


Classes begin. 


16 September 


Monday 


First tuition instalment due. 


4 November 


Monday 


Second tuition instalment due 


21 December 


Saturday 


Christmas recess begins. 


1947 






6 January 


Monday 


Classes resumed. 


17 January 


Friday 


Fall Term ends. 




Winter Term 


20 January 


Monday 


Classes begin. 


20 January 


Monday 


First tuition instalment due. 


10 March 


Monday 


Second tuition instalment due 


9 May 


Friday 


Winter Term ends. 


• 


Summer 


Term 


19 May 


Monday 


Classes begin. 


19 May 


Monday 


First tuition instalment due. 


7 July 


Monday 


Second tuition instalment due 


5 September 


Friday 


Summer Term ends. 



THE NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY CORPORATION 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 

Frank Lincoln Richardson, Vice-Chairman 

Carl Stephens Ell, President of the University 

Henry Nathaniel Andrews, Treasurer 

Everett Avery Churchill, Secretary 



Joseph Florence Abbott 

Charles Francis Adams 

Roger Amory 

O. Kelley Anderson 

Arthur Atwood Ballantine 

George Louis Barnes 

Thomas Prince Beal 

Farwell Gregg Bemis 

Samuel Bruce Black 

Henry Goddard Bradlee 

George Augustus Burnham 

Godfrey Lowell Cabot 

Paul Codman Cabot 

Walter Channing 

William Converse Chick 

Paul Foster Clark 

William H. Collins 

Sears B. Condit 

Amory Coolidge 

Albert Morton Creighton 

Marshall Bertrand Dalton 

Edward Dana 

Edward Dane 

Justin Whitlock Dart 

William James Davidson 

Bernard W. Doyle 

Paul Augustus Draper 

David Frank Edwards 

William Partridge Ellison 

Joseph Buell Ely 

Robert Greenough Emerson 

John Wells Farley 

Joseph Fabian Ford 

Ernest Bigelow Freeman 

Franklin Wile Ganse 

Harvey Dow Gibson 

David Greer 

Merrill Griswold 

George Hansen 

Henry Ingraham Harriman 

Carroll Sherlock Harvey 

Harold Daniel Hodgkinson 

Harvey P. Hood 

Chandler Hovey 

Weston Howland 

Howard Munson Hubbard 

Maynard Hutchinson 
Raymond Winfield James 

Ray E. Johns 
Arthur Stoddard Johnson 

Sinclair 



Charles Berkley Johnson 

Jacob Joseph Kaplan 

Harry Hamilton Kerr 

Frank Howard Lahey 

Halfdan Lee 

Galen David Light 

Edward Abbott MacMaster 

John Russell Macomber 

Albert Edward Marshall 

Harold Francis Mason 

James Franklin McElwain 

Hugh Dean McLellan 

Irwin Likely Moore 

Fred Lester Morgan 

Ira Mosher 

Irving Edwin Moultrop 

Samuel Norwich 

George Olmsted, Jr. 

Olaf Olsen 

AuGUSTiN Hamilton Parker, Jr. 

George Edwin Pierce 

Matthew Porosky 

Frederick Sanford Pratt 

Roger Preston 

Sidney R. Rabb 

Stuart Craig Rand 

William MgNear Rand 

James Lorin Richards 

James C. Richdale 

Harold Bours Richmond 

Charles Forest Rittenhouse 

John James Robinson 

Robert Billings Rugg 

Leverett Saltonstall 

Russell Maryland Sanders 

Andrew Sebastian Seiler 

Joseph P. Spang, Jr. 

Frank Palmer Speare 

Francis Robert Carnegie Steele 

Charles Stetson 

Earl Place Stevenson 

Robert Treat Paine Storer 

Frank Horace Stuart 

Edward Watson Supple 

Ralph Emerson Thompson 

James Vincent Toner 

Eliot Wadsworth 

Samuel Wakeman 

EusTis Walcott 

Edwin Sibley Webster 

Weeks 



COMMITTEES 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF THE CORPORATION 
FOR THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 

George Louis Barnes Jacob Joseph Kaplan 

John Wells Farley Stuart Craig Rand 

THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 

Everett Avery Churchill Milton John Schlagenhauf 

Albert Ellsworth Everett William Crombie White 

THE UNIVERSITY CABINET 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 

William Thurlow Alexander Winthrop Eliot Nightingale 

Everett Avery Churchill Rudolf Oscar Oberg 

Albert Ellsworth Everett Edward Snow Parsons 

Roger Stanton Hamilton John Butler Pugsley 

Charles William Havice Milton John Schlagenhauf 

Wilfred Stanley Lake J. Kenneth Stevenson 

Donald Hershey MacKenzie William Crombie White 

Harold Wesley Melvin William Greene Wilkinson 

Stuart Mead Wright 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Robert Gray Dodge, A.B., A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

Chairman oj the Corporation 

Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., Sc.D. 

President oj the University 

Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D. 

Vice-President of the University 

Stuart Mead Wright, A.B., LL.B. 

Dean of the School of Law 

FACULTY 

Stuart Mead Wright, A.B., LL.B. 

Dean and Professor of Law 

Edwin Wilson Hadley, A.B., J.D., LL.M. 

Professor of Law 

Russell Davey Greene, LL.B., LL.M. 

Professor of Law 

Joseph Gerard Crane, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Law 

John W. Ervin, LL.B., LL.M. 

Professor of Law 

Francis Xavier Carmody, B.S., LL.B. 

Assistant Professor of Law 



Bertram H. Loewenberg, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Mortgages 

Reuben Levi Lurie, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Criminal Law 

Conrad W. Oberdorfer, J.U.D., LL.B., LL.M. 

Lecturer in Constitutional Law 

Harold Benjamin Roitman, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Labor Law 
Frederick William Schenk 

Lecturer in Legal Research 

Austin Wakeman Scott, Jr., A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Negotiable Instruments 



Frederick William Schenk 

Librarian 

Doris Edna Koch 

Registrar and Secretary to the Dean 

Pauline Ellen Heinonen 

Recorder 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

ORGANIZATION AND PURPOSE 

Northeastern University School of Law was estabHshed in 1898. Among 
its original incorporators were Judge James R. Dunbar, James Barr Ames, 
then Dean of the Harvard Law School, and Samuel Bennett, at that time 
Dean of the Boston University School of Law. Later, such men as Ezra 
Thayer, Dean of the Harvard Law School, Samuel Elder, and Robert G. 
Dodge have been active upon the Corporation of the School and have been 
instrumental in shaping its policies and aiding in its development. 

The purpose of the School is the preparation of men and women for the 
active practice of the law, particularly in Massachusetts and the other New 
England states. The faculty is chosen with this purpose in mind. In addi- 
tion to the full-time teachers, outstanding leaders in the profession and 
noted specialists in particular fields of the law not only give special lec- 
tures but also many of the courses. The School in this manner relates the 
work of the classroom as closely as possible to the profession. Instruction is 
based upon the case method, which combines the study of basic principles 
with the analysis and interpretation of decided cases. 

ACCREDITATION 

Northeastern University School of Law fully meets all requirements as 
to legal education of the American Bar Association and is upon the ap- 
proved list of that body. 

The School is a member of the Association of American Law Schools 
and has been approved by the Board of Regents of the University of the 
State of New York. 

LOCATION 

Located at 47 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston, the Law School is near the 
State House and the Court House, where the Supreme Judicial Court, the 
Superior Court for Suffolk County, the Land Court, the Probate Court of 
Suffolk County, and the Municipal Court for the City of Boston are 
housed. It is within a few minutes' walk of the business center of the city 
and from the Park Street subway station. The Law School Building pro- 
vides well-equipped classrooms, an extensive Law Library, reading areas, 
conference rooms, and administrative and instruction offices. 

LIBRARY 

The Law School Library contains more than 16,000 volumes and is 
steadily growing. It is so arranged as to give the student direct access to the 



8 Northeastern University 

books in the stacks as well as in the reading room. The library contains 
many of the State Reports, the complete National Reporter System, the 
Federal Reports, and the Reports of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, the English Reports, Dominion Law Reports, English and Ameri- 
can Digests, various State Digests and Statutes, and an extensive collection 
of encyclopedias, annotations, treatises, legal periodicals, approved text- 
books, and all current casebooks. 



School of Law 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

DAY AND EVENING DIVISIONS 

The Law School is divided into two divisions — the Day Division and 
the Evening Division. The same curriculum is offered in each Division, 
and the standards of work and requirements for graduation are the same. 
A minimum of eighty semester hours of classroom instruction is required 
for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

The completion of the course of study in the Day Division requires that 
students devote substantially all of their working hours to their law studies. 
The evening program is designed for those who are regularly employed 
during the day and can attend only the evening sessions of the School. 

ACCELERATED PROGRAM 

For the present and so long as it is deemed necessary, as a result of the 
desire of returning veterans to enter school as soon as possible after their 
discharge from the armed forces, the School will operate on a program 
accelerated by the addition of a summer term. In both the Day and Eve- 
ning Divisions, because of the accelerated program, the school year is 
divided into three equal terms of sixteen weeks each. Students may enter 
at the beginning of any term. For the opening dates see calendar, page 3. 

RETURNING VETERANS 

Men and women who have served in the armed services of the United 
States or of any of the Allied Nations may be admitted to the School of 
Law under the plan hereafter outlined: 

{a) The Faculty recognizes the difficulties of the returning veteran whose 
law school program was interrupted by entrance into the armed 
forces in re-orienting himself to the study of law. Accordingly, those 
veterans who have successfully completed any portion of their law 
studies at this School or at any other accredited law school may enter 
at any time, even in the middle of a term. Attendance until the be- 
ginning of the following term will not count toward degree credit, but 
will be solely for the purpose of aiding the student in regaining his 
capacity to resume his law school program successfully. In subsequent 
terms the student will pursue his studies for degree credit. 

{b) Those veterans who have not previously studied law in an accredited 
school, but who are qualified for admission, may enter at the begin- 
ning of any term. 



10 Northeastern University 

COMBINED PROGRAMS 

Students in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Business 
Administration of Northeastern University are allowed in their senior year 
to elect courses in the Law School in lieu of the regular senior programs of 
these colleges. 

Upon the completion of the semester hour equivalent of the senior year 
requirement through courses in the Law School, they become eligible for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or of Bachelor of Science according to the 
curriculum in which they have qualified. Upon the completion of their 
law studies, they become eligible for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

These combined programs shorten the time required to obtain both 
degrees and also the time required to qualify for admission to the practice. 

PRE-LEGAL PROGRAM 

Students desiring to study law but who have not completed at least 
one-half the work required for a Bachelor's degree in an accredited college 
should write to or consult the Director of Admissions for Northeastern 
University, whose office is located in Richards Hall, 360 Huntington 
Avenue. 

The College of Liberal Arts of Northeastern University conducts both 
day and evening pre-legal programs which prepare adequately for ad- 
mission to the Law School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred upon those candidates 
who are of good moral character and who: 

(1) Have pursued in residence the study of law for the required period of 
time and have completed the program of study prescribed by the 
Faculty. 

(2) Have passed examinations in at least eighty semester hours of required 
courses and have attained a minimum weighted average of sixty- 
seven per cent. 

In recognition of superior scholarship, the degree will be granted with 
special honors, as follows: 

Cum Laude. To students who have met all the requirements for the 
degree and have attained a weighted grade average of eighty-five per cent 
to ninety per cent. 

Magna Cum Laude. To students who have met all the requirements 
for the degree and have attained a weighted grade average of ninety per 
cent or better. 



School of Law 1 1 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

Entering students will be admitted to the Summer Term beginning 
May 20, 1946; to the Fall Term beginning September 16, 1946; and to 
the Winter Term beginning on January 20, 1947. 

I. Requirements for admission 

A. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.). 

1 . Men and women eighteen years of age or over who have com- 
pleted at least one-half of the work required for an acceptable 
college degree at an accredited college and attained records 
therein which meet the standards set by the Committee on 
Administration will be admitted as candidates for this degree. 

2. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of 
Business Administration of Northeastern University who have 
elected the first year of the law course as their senior year may 
in this way obtain both the degrees of Bachelor of Arts or 
Science and Bachelor of Laws. 

3. Students entering with advanced standing — 

A student transferring from any law school approved by the 
American Bar Association who has maintained a satisfactory 
academic record may be admitted to advanced standing on 
such terms and conditions as the Committee on Administration 
may prescribe. Transcripts showing both college and law school 
work must be submitted with the application. Successful com- 
pletion in residence of at least one full academic year of study 
is required for the degree. An applicant who has been denied 
readmission in another law school will not be admitted to this 
School. 

B. Special Students 

A limited number of applicants, who are at least twenty-three 
years of age and who cannot qualify under the foregoing re- 
quirements for admission as candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, may, in exceptional cases and at the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty, be admitted as special students. Appli- 
cants for admission as special students must give evidence of 
such general education and experience as will enable them to 
carry on and profit by the work of the School. 



12 Northeastern University 

II. Readmission 

Former students are readmitted only at the discretion of the Faculty 
and must upon their return to the School meet the degree requirements 
in force at the time of their re-entry. The Faculty reserves the right to 
refuse admission or readmission to any applicant. 

III. Application for admission 

All applications for admission should be made as early as possible before 
' the beginning of the term. 

A. Each applicant for admission to the School should secure from the 
Dean's office an application form, which should be filled out and 
returned to that office, together with the application fee of $5. 
Checks or money orders should be made payable to Northeastern 
University. 

B. The completed application form should be accompanied or fol- 
lowed by an official transcript from each college attended by the 
applicant, which transcript should give a complete record of the 
college work done to date. 

IV. Registration 

Every student is required to register in person and arrange for the pay- 
ment of tuition at that time. It is urgently requested that each entering 
student register before the opening of the term. The filing of an applica- 
tion does not constitute registration. 

TUITION AND FEES 

The following Schedule of Tuition Charges is effective beginning with 
the Fall Term, September, 1946. 

Application Fee % 5.00 

Each student is required to pay an application fee when he 
first enters the University. It is payable but once and is not 
refundable. 

Tuition per Term {Day Division) $150.00 

The tuition in the Day Division is based upon a normal 
schedule of twelve to fourteen hours of class work each week 
for a term of sixteen weeks, payable in two equal installments. 

Tuition per Term {Evening Division) $112.50 

The tuition in the Evening Division is based on a normal 
schedule of ten hours of class work each week for a term of 
sixteen weeks, payable in two equal installments. 



School of Law 13 

Tuition per Semester Hour S 15.00 

The tuition charge for students carrying less than, or more 
than, a full program is at the rate of |15 each semester hour 
and the minimum tuition fee for any student for less than a 
full program of study is S45 a term. 

Special Examination Fee $ 10.00 

Library Fee {each term) $ 2.00 

Deferred Payment Fee $ 2.00 

The deferred payment fee will be added to all bills which are 
not paid when due. Failure to make the required payments 
on time, or to arrange for such payments, is considered suffi- 
cient cause to bar the student from classes until the matter has 
been adjusted with the Dean. 

Gradu.^tion Fee $ 10.00 

This fee is payable thirty days before the student is to be 
recommended for the degree. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

A limited number of scholarships for part of the annual tuition have 
been established for upper-class students. These scholarships are awarded 
under the direction of the Dean to applicants who are deserving and 
needy, and who have maintained a satisfactory record in their law studies 
for at least one academic year. 

Alumni have generously made available the following five tuition 
scholarships of $100 each in honor of former distinguished members of the 
Faculty of the School: 

Arthur A. Ballantine Judge Hugh D. MgLellan 

Elias Field Oscar Storer Judge John V. Spalding 

These scholarships are awarded to first-year students on the basis of 
their academic record for the first term and promise of future success. 

For the year 1946-47 the Arthur A. Ballantine scholarship has been 
awarded to Leo Flaherty. The Elias Field scholarship for 1946-47 has 
been awarded to Stuart Randall Peterson. 

Daniel J. Dowd Scholarship. This scholarship, in the principal sum of 
$1,000.00, is the gift of a friend of the Law School in memory of a worthy 
citizen of the State of Vermont. The income from this fund is available to 
provide a tuition scholarship for such worthy and needy student as the 
Dean of the School of Law shall select, preference being given to (1) resi- 
dents of Windsor County, Vermont, (2) residents of the State of Vermont, 
and (3) other students. 

Phi Epsilon Nu Sorority Prize. The Phi Epsilon Nu Sorority will present 
a Law Dictionary to the Junior woman student, in the Day or Evening 
Division, who attained the highest scholastic average in the second year 
class while carrying a full program of study. 



14 Northeastern University 



REGULATIONS 

GENERAL POLICY 

The School reserves the right to cancel any course if registration for it 
does not justify continuance. 

The School also reserves the right, at any time, to make any changes 
which are deemed advisable in the number and content of courses, their 
order in the curriculum, and in the rules, regulations and fees of the School. 

Attendance at the University is a privilege and not a right. The Com- 
mittee on Administration reserves the right to require at any time the 
withdrawal of any student whom it may deem unworthy either on account 
of his neglect of study, his incapacity for the law or for any grave defect of 
conduct or character, and no reason for requiring such withdrawal need 
be given. 

WITHDRAWALS 

In the event a student is obliged to withdraw from the School for causes 
deemed adequate by the Committee on Administration, a refund of the 
unused tuition may be granted provided the application for withdrawal, 
together with the request for refund, and supporting data, are filed within 
forty-five days after the student has ceased attendance. 

ATTENDANCE 

Students are expected to attend with regularity the sessions of all 
courses in which they are enrolled. Students who are irregular in class at- 
tendance without justifiable cause may be dropped from the class rolls or 
be refused permission to take the final examinations in the course. No stu- 
dent during his attendance at the Law School may be registered in any 
other school or college, whether of Northeastern University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the Dean. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

A — 90-100 Superior attainment 

B — 80-89 Above average attainment 

C — 70-79 Average achievement 

D — 60-69 Lowest passing grade 

F — Failure Failure to be removed as the Faculty shall determine 

Inc. Postponed examination 



School of Law 1 5 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
REQUIRED COURSES 

First Year 
Agency: Cr. 2 Semester Hours 

Rights and liabilities arising out of the relation of principal and agent 
and master and servant. Seavey, Cases on Agency. 

Contracts: Cr. 6 Semester Hours 

Rights and duties arising from promises; requisites for formation of 
contracts; performance and discharge of contracts; contracts for benefit 
of third persons; assignments. Shepherd's Revision, Costigan's Cases on 
Contracts, 4th ed. 

Criminal Law: Cr. 4 Semester Hours 

A preliminary study of the administration of criminal justice with 
special reference to characteristics of particular crimes and the general 
principles of liability to punishment. Sayre, Cases on Criminal Law. 

Property I: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

Concerning the possessory acquisition of interests in land and chattels, 
accession, confusion, fixtures, emblements, waste and nuisance. Where 
common principles are applicable, chattels and land are treated together. 
Adverse possession and prescription; bailment, liens, and pledges; fix- 
tures and emblements; transfer of chattels by gift, sale and miscellaneous 
inter vivos transactions. Legal relations of a land owner in respect to land, 
air and water. Fraser, Cases on Property, Volume II, 2d ed. 

Pleading and Practice I: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

A study of the judicial process. Consideration of the substantive and 
adjective characteristics of each of the common-law remedies; the relation 
between remedial and substantive law; proceedings in an action at law; 
the different modes in which remedies developed at law and in equity; 
proceedings in a suit in equity; distinctions between actions and suits. 
Magill and Chadbourn, Cases on Civil Procedure, 3d ed. 

Torts: Cr. 6 Semester Hours 

Liability in damages for injuries to person and property inflicted in- 
tentionally, negligently or innocently; justification and excuse; contribu- 
tory negligence; proximate cause. Liability for false representations, def- 
amation, inducing breach of contract, interference with business relations, 
unfair competition, strikes, etc. The measure of damages in tort cases. 
Thurston & Seavey, Cases on Torts. 



16 Northeastern University 



Upper Classes 
Administrative Law: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

The constitutional problems involved in the creation of agencies to 
administer law; the method of statutory creation and manner in which 
some of the more important of these agencies function, including the 
National Labor Relations Board, Interstate Commerce Commission, and 
Securities and Exchange Commission; problems of what constitutes ade- 
quate notice and a fair hearing, evidence and procedure, unbiased tri- 
bunal, necessity of findings; the nature and scope of control by courts over 
administrative determinations and the remedies available to parties seek- 
ing judicial review. Gellhorn, Administrative Law, Cases and Comments. 

Bills and Notes: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

The law of bills of exchange, promissory notes and checks with special 
reference to the Negotiable Instruments Law. Campbell, Cases on Bills 
and Notes. 

Business Associations: Cr. 5 Semester Hours 

Adaptability of conventional forms of organization to the purposes of 
the business enterprise. Organization and structure of joint ventures, 
partnerships, joint stock associations, business trusts, and corporations 
with relation to allocation of control and risk, and limitation of liability. 
Duties and rights in property of enterprisers, with remedies for protection 
and enforcement. Dissolution of the solvent unit. Ballantine and Lattin, 
Cases on Private Corporations. 

Conflict of Laws: Cr. 4 Semester Hours 

Nature of jurisdiction; executive, legislative, and judicial jurisdiction; 
problems of domicil and situs for purposes of jurisdiction. Recognition and 
enforcement of rights created in other jurisdictions. Cheatham, Dowling, 
Goodrich and Griswold, Cases on Conflict of Laws. 

Constitutional Law: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

A general study of the judicial process; scope of, and limitations upon, 
governmental action — due process, equal protection, police power, taxa- 
tion, eminent domain; the federal system — scope of federal and state 
powers, jurisdiction to tax, intrastate and interstate commerce. Dowling, 
Cases on Constitutional Law, 2d ed. 

Creditors' Rights: Cr. 2 Semester Hours 

Enforcement of judgments; fraudulent conveyances; assignments for 
the benefit of creditors; receivership; bankruptcy. Hanna and McLaugh- 
lin, Cases on Creditors' Rights, 3d ed. 



School of Law 17 

Damages: Cr. 2 Semester Hours 

Rules and standards applicable to the law of damages; interest, expenses 
of litigation, certainty, avoidable consequences. Exemplary damages. 
Mitigation of damages. Liquidated damages. Damages in tort and con- 
tract actions. Procedural aspects of the assessment of damages. Crane, 
Cases on Damages, 2d ed. 

Domestic Relations: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

The law of husband and wife, the contract to marry; nature and re- 
quirements of marriage; relations between husband and wife; parent and 
child; dissolution of marriage by annulment, divorce and judicial separa- 
tion. Casebook to be announced. 

Equity: Cr. 5 Semester Hours 

Origin and history of the jurisdiction of the Court of Chancery; nature, 
enforcement and effect of equitable decrees; a brief study of specific en- 
forcement of contract, injunctions against tort and crime, and other forms 
of equitable relief. McClintock, Cases on Equity. 

Evidence: Cr. 5 Semester Hours 

The rules of evidence developed in the courts of common law and under 
the statutes, arranged under the topics — judicial notice, examination of 
witnesses, privilege and competency, illegally obtained evidence, remote 
and prejudicial evidence, opinion testimony, hearsay rule and its excep- 
tions, best evidence rule, parol evidence rule, burden of proof and pre- 
sumptions, judge and jury. Morgan and Maguire, Cases on Evidence, 
2ded. 

Federal Jurisdiction: Cr. 4 Semester Hours 

Jurisdiction and procedure in federal courts; diversity of citizenship; 
jurisdictional amount; removal jurisdiction and procedure; res judicata 
on determination of jurisdiction; conflicts between state and national 
judicial systems; substantive law applied in federal courts; detailed study 
of procedure in district court including venue, process, parties, joinder, 
pleading and motions, and trial; appellate jurisdiction and procedure in 
the circuit court of appeals and Supreme Court of the United States. 
McCormick and Chadbourn, Cases on Federal Courts. 

Insurance: Cr. 2 Semester Hours 

Nature and form of the insurance contract and its interpretation and 
application with respect to various kinds of insurance. Vance, Cases on 
Insurance, 2d ed. 



IS Northeastern University 

International Law: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

Sources and sanctions of international law; recognition; intervention, 
jurisdiction, nationality, protection of citizens abroad, diplomatic and 
consular practice, the interpretation of treaties; enemy property and en- 
emy nationals in the territory of the other belligerent; the effect of war on 
litigants, agencies, commercial relations and contracts involving parties 
who have become enemies; enemy business domicile and enemy status of 
corporations; the effect of action taken by the occupier of occupied terri- 
tory and that of action taken by governments in exile in the same territory; 
the requisition of commodities and ships by go\ernments; private property 
— the nationality of private property captui^ed or destroyed at sea and the 
insurance adjustments involved; neutrality, its obligations and rights, 
prize courts, and the adjudication of the various interests in the subject 
matter of the prize. Scott's Cases on International Law. 

Labor Low: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

A study of problems lelating to labor organizations and collective bar- 
gaining, including legality of labor tactics at common law and under the 
antitrust laws; remedies of employers in labor disputes under Federal asd 
State anti-injunction statutes; enforcement of collective contracts; collec- 
tive bai'gaining, mediation, and arbitration under the National Labor 
Relations Act, Railway Labor Act, and State Statutes. Landis and Manoft\ 
Cases on Labor Law, 2d ed. 

Landlord and Tenant: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

This course considers the rights and duties of landlord and tenant as an 
incident of the relationship form, and also as reg\ilaied by the terms of an 
expressed lease. The legal consequences of various covenants found in 
leases of farm, business, and residential property will be included in the 
study. Attention will be given to the creation of the tenancy, legal aspects 
of its operation, and methods of termination and enforcement. Jacob's 
Cases on Landlord and Tenant, 2d ed. 

Legislation: Cr. 2 Semester Hours 

History and place of various types of legislation in the development of 
law; a study of the matters contained in legislative law making, such as 
the nature and extent of legislative power, formulation of legislative policy, 
legislative organization and procedure, sources and forms of \>Titten law, 
mechanics of enactment; relation of the legislative process to the making 
of law; means of making laws effective; various types of legislation and 
the elements of statutor\- interpiTtation. 



School of Law 19 

Mortgages: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

Form, substance, and elements of the mortgage; position of mortgagee 
and mortgagor; transfer of the mortgaged interest; priority and marshal- 
ling. Campbell, Cases on Mortgages, 2d ed. 

Pleading and Practice II: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

Courts; jurisdiction; venue; process; service; return; entry of actions; 
pleadings; motions; interrogatories; trial; verdict; judgment; appellate 
practice. 

Property II: Cr. 4 Semester Hours 

A survey of the history of conveyancing and of important types of inter- 
ests in land and chattels indicating the legal relations constituting each 
type; fee simple, fee tail, life estate, estate for years, at will and sufferance, 
and concurrent estates. The history and significance of the Statute of Uses 
and methods of creating and transferring interests originating in equity or 
under the statute of wills. The Rule in Shelley's Case. Powers. Mergers. 
Rule against perpetuities. Throughout the course considerable material 
on landlord and tenant is included. Fraser, Cases on Property, Volume I, 
2ded. 

Property ill: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

A study of methods of conveying interests in land both at common law 
and under modern statutes with special attention to recording and title 
registration. Formal requirements of conveyances; description of the land 
conveyed; rent, profits, easements, and licenses; covenants and agreements 
running with the land; estoppel by deed; and priorities. Kirkwood, Cases 
on Conveyances, 2d ed. 

Sales: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

Transfer of interests in personal property by agreement; rights and 
remedies of the seller, buyer, and third persons; Statute of Frauds. Void, 
Cases on Sales. 

Suretyship: Cr. 2 Semester Hours 

Rights of the creditor; rights of the surety against the principal, includ- 
ing reimbursement, subrogation and exoneration; rights of a surety 
against a co-surety, including subrogation and contribution; subsurety- 
ship; creditor's interest in securities held by the surety; problems arising 
out of bankruptcy and insolvency; the Statute of Frauds; the surety's other 
defenses against the creditor. Case book to be announced. 



20 Northeastern University 

Taxation: Cr. 5 Semester Hours 

The problems involved in the federal taxation of individuals and busi- 
ness associations; special consideration will be given to the estate, gift, 
and income taxes and the manner in which they interrelate in the taxa- 
tion of individuals and trusts; other federal taxes dealt with include excess 
profits, capital stock, and social security taxes; constitutional problems, 
history and development of the tax statutes; study of the structure of the 
present Internal Revenue Code, regulations, and other administrative 
and judicial interpretations thereof; procedure in the courts and before 
administrative officers; estoppel and res judicata in tax cases. Griswold's 
Cases and Materials on Federal Taxation; Prentice-Hall's Student's Tax 
Service. 

Trusts: Cr. 4 Semester Hours 

The creation, administration and termination of express trusts; chari- 
table trusts; resulting and constructive trusts. Scott, Cases on Trusts, 
3ded. 

Wills: Cr. 3 Semester Hours 

The rationale of succession; descent and distribution; the making and 
revoking of wills; some problems of construction, including the use of 
extrinsic evidence in aid of construction ; grant of probate and administra- 
tion, and the administration and final settlement of estates. Costigan, 
Cases on Wills and Administration, 3d ed. 



Northeastern University 



21 



DEGREES AWARDED — JUNE, 1946 
BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Truman A. Barstow 

{Class oj 1941) 
James Andrew Brennan 
John J. Donna 

Townsend MacNicol Gunn 

Magna cum Laude 

Maud Sanderson Hoff 
Stanley Martin Jacks 

{Class of 1940) 

Eugene Kelley 

{Class of 1941) 

George E. Kelley 

Carl Liddy 

Thomas Francis McSharry 

STUDENT 

AusiELLO, Armand M. 
Beeson, Eunice Wadhams 
BiLiLiES, Charles Andrew 
Black, Carl Arthur 
Brebner, James Walter 
Bynoe, Victor Cameron 
Callahan, William Francis 
Cargill, Thomas Edward, Jr. 
Carlisle, Gordon 
Case, Edward Earl 
Charest, Peter Paul 
Christensen, Orland M. 
Cole, Arthur Edward 
Coleman, Robert Ellsworth 
CoLSON, Charles E. 
Costigan, Joseph Gerard 
Crowell, William Henry, Jr. 
CuRcio, Vincent Christopher 
Davidson, George Andrew 
Davis, Elbridge G. 
Deasey, William Robert 
Deery, James Francis 
DeLuca, John 
Devlin, John Henry 



Thomas Hugh Maguire 

Lee J. Manning 

Davis Goodwin Maraspin 

{Class of 1943) 

John Joseph Melican 

{Class of 1943) 

William Wilbur Molla 

{Class of 1941) 

Frederick P. O'Connell 

{Class of 1943) 

Philip Nicolas Savage 

{Class of 1944) 

Howard Paul Schweitzer 
Irving Melvin Smolker 

BODY, 1945-1946 

DiNicoLA, Albert 
DowD, Arthur Jennings 
Doyle, Frederick Leo, Jr. 
Elton, Sumner W. 
Engles, Richard Charles 
Farmer, Elmer Capen 
Fay, Martin Francis 
Finn, George Joseph 
Fitzgerald, Clarence Oliver 
Foley, Leonard Maurice 
Flaherty, Leo 
French, Palmer Donaldson 
Gallup, Dana Huling 
Garrity, James Frederic 
Hall, Brinley Morgan 
Hand, Lynwood E. 
Hanna, Ruth Jane 
Hanson, Clarence Alexander 
Harrigan, Earle Francis 
Harris, Harold Lincoln 
Heist, Ray Kenneth 
Hickey, John Christy 
Holbrook, Robert Wilkinson 
Houghton, Hor.-kce Carter 



22 



Northeastern University 



JoDREY, Harvey Lawrence, Jr. 
Kachinsky, Sarah Sue 
Keating, Aurel Hannah 
Kutteruf, Robert H. 
Lake, Frederick George 
Lane, Arnold Sterling 
Lena, Sossio Louis 
Leonard, Roger John 
Leontine, Frank Homer 
Lepore, Amato Victor 
Lesmerises, Rene Oliva 
Lewis, Frank Mohr 
Luedeka, Edwin Miller, Jr. 
MagDougall, Leo Daniel 
Marshall, Alexander Powers 
Marshall, Arthur Murray 
McCarren, John Francis 
McLaughlin, Edward Francis,Jr. 
McMackin, John Francis Xavier 
Millar, Robert Gerrish 
Morale, John Joseph 
Murphy, Edward Joseph 
Nicholson, Mary Helen 
Parsons, Ruth Isabel 
Paterson, Stanley Charles 
Pearlman, Shelley A. 
Peterson, Stuart Randall 
Peoples, Charles Frederick 
Reed, John Giveen 



Rich, Paul Seymour 
Richmond, Milton 
Rundle, Ralph Arnold 
Schofield, Parker Fall 
Schwartz, Maurice 
Schweitzer, Howard 
Sharkey, John Arthur 
Shaw, Robert James 
SouLE, Howard Currier 
Spear, Earle Thayer 
Sproul, Manley James 
Sproul, Stanley Edwin 
Stone, Paul Mitchell 
Sullivan, Allen Francis 
Tagrin, Marnold 
Taylor, Ruth 
Trudel, Gerald Eugene 
van der Walde, Ludwig 
VoKE, Edward Richard 
Walter, Frederick Earl, Jr. 
Wheeler, George Frederick 
Whitmore, William Davie 
Wilkinson, Sara Frances 
Wisgirda, Francis 
WoNDOLOWSKi, Peter Stanislaus 
Woods, Thomas Joseph 
Wypler, Alfred Robert, Jr. 
Zallen, Joseph 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
School of Law 

47 MT. VERNON STREET, BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 

Application for Admission 

Date 19.. 

Name {Prtnt in full) 

Address Telephone 

Date of Birth Place of Birth 

Citizen of 

Colleges or Universities attended 

Length of attendance (specify years by date) 

Where situated If a graduate, what degree 

Have you ever made application to any other Law School? 

Have you ever been in attendance, dropped, suspended or expelled from any college or 

Law School? 

If the answer is Yes, attach a full statement of facts. 

If you have been a student in any other school of the Northeastern University system give 

name of school and years in which you were in attendance. 

Name and address of employer 



Telephone 

Have you ever been complained of, indicted for or convicted of any violation of the law? 
If so, attach a full statement of facts. 

All statements made by me in this application are true and complete to the best of my 
knowledge and belief. 

Signed 

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

A fe« of five dollars must accompany this application. Make checks, money orders or drafts payable 
to Northeastern University. (This fee is not refundable.) 

Attach a transcript of your college record. (If transcript will not be issued to you, arrange to 
have it sent to this School direct.) 

Attach to this application at least two letters addressed to the Dean by persons not members of 
applicant's family (preferably his employer and the Dean or some teacher of his school or college) 
testifying to applicant's intelligence, industry and good character. 

If you have studied law at another school, whether or not you claim credit, also attach hereto 
an ofRcial certificate of work done there, showing subjects, hours and grades. 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Coeducational 

College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. Varied 
opportunities available for vocational specialization. Degree: Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Arts. 

College of Engineering 

Offers curricula in Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical and Industrial Engineer- 
ing. Classroom study is supplemented by experiment and research in well-equipped 
laboratories. Degree: Bachelor of Science in the professional field of specialization. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers curricula in Accounting, Industrial Relations, Marketing and Advertising, 
Finance and Insurance, and Business Management. Each curriculum represents in 
itself a broad survey of business technique, differing from the others chiefly in emphasis. 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

School of Law 

Offers day and evening undergraduate programs admitting those who present a 
minimum of one-half of the work accepted for a bachelor's degree in an approved 
college or its full equivalent, each program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

School of Business 

Offers ciuricula through evening classes leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business 
Administration with appropriate specification in Accounting, Industrial Management, 
Distribution, Law- and Business, and Engineering and Business. Preparation for C.P.A. 
examinations. Intensive programs arranged to meet special needs. 

Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts arc offered during evening hours in 
the fields of Economics, English, History, Government, Psychology and Sociology. 
A special program preparing for admission to the School of Law is also available. The 
program is equivalent in iiours to one-half the requirement for the A.B. or S.B. degree. 
Special courses also available. Degree of Associate in Arts conferred. 



The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering, and Business Administration offer day 
programs and are conducted on the cooperative plan. After the freshman year students 
may alternate their periods of study with periods of work in the employ of business or 
industrial concerns. Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large 
part of their college expenses. Fidl time ciuricula are available for students who do not 
desire the cooperative plan. 



In addition to the above schools the University has affiliated with it and conducts: 
the Lincoln Technical Institute, offering, through evening classes, courses of college 
grade in various fields of engineering leading to the degree of Associate in Engineer- 
ing; and the Lincoln Preparatory .School, an accredited evening school preparing 
for college entrance and offering other standard high school programs. 



For further information regarding any of the above schools, address 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

School of Law Other Schools 

47 Mt. Vernon Street Telephone KENmore 5800 360 Huntington Avenue 




NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON - AAASSACHUSEHS 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



1 946-1947 

EVENING SESSIONS 

THIRTY-NINTH YEAR 



OFFICE HOURS 

October 1, 1945 —June 8, 1946 

Monday — Friday 8:45 a.m -9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 8:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m. 

June 10, 1946 — August 10, 1946 

Monday and Tuesday 8:45 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Wednesday— Friday 8:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

August 12, 1946 — June 7, 1947 

Monday — Friday 8:45 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays, 8:45 a.m.-12:00 Noon through August 24. 

8:45 A.M.-4:00 P.M. Month of September. 

8:45 A.M.-1:00 P.M. October 5, 1946 — June 7, 1947. 



Gifts and Bequests 

Northeastern University will welcome gifts and bequests for the 
following purposes: 

(a) For its building program. ' 
(h) For general endowment. 

(c) For specific purposes which may especially appeal to 
the donor. 

It is suggested that, when possible, those contemplating gifts or 
bequests confer with the President of the University regarding 
the University's needs before legal papers are drawn. 

Gifts and bequests should be made only in the University's 
legal name, which is "Northeastern University." 



Address Communications w 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

360 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, BOSTON 15. MASS. 
telephone: kenmore 5800 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

EVENING DIVISION 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 




39th Year 
19464947 



The University is located at 
the entrance to th e Huntington 
Avenue subway within nine 
minutes of Park Street and 
. easily accessible from all points.. 



i; 



A DISTINCTIVE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

providing opportunities for men and tuomen to receive advanced training 

in Business during convenient Evening Hours 



School of Business 



Qalendar 



hdy 



September 


3-6 


September 


9-13 


September 


16-20 


October 


12 


"November 


11 


November 


21 


December 


20 


December 


22-Jdr 


}une 


8 



1946 

Students may register for the school year 1946-1947 any time after July 1. 

Registration must be completed before attending classes. 
Examinations for Removal of Conditions and Advanced Standing. 
Upper classes begin.* English 7, 8 Reports due. 
Freshman classes begin.* 
Columbus Day — No class sessions. 
Armistice Day — No class sessions. 
Thanksgiving Day — No class sessions. 
Last class session before Christmas recess. 
tary 1. Christmas Recess — No class sessions. 
Commencement Exercises. 



January 


2 


January 


6-24 


February 


22 


March 


15 


May 


1 



May 



5-29 



1947 

First class session after Christmas recess. 
Second semester classes begin. 
Washington's Birthday — No class sessions. 
Last date for the submission of theses. 

Last date for filing application for degrees and for the payment of the grad- 
uation fee. 
Final examination period. 
Commencement Exercises (date to be announced). 



♦Students must register before attending classes. See page 36 for late registration. 
Class sessions which fall on holidays are made up at the end of the course or as announced. 



Table of Contents 



Northeastern University, General Statement 

Administrative Organization .... 

Purpose and Program ..... 

Location ....... 

School of Business 

Calendar of Evening Sessions . 
The Background of an Institution . 

PURPOSE, POLICY, METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 
VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 
SUCCESS OF ALUMNI . 
PLACEMENT SERVICE . 



Administrative Organization 
Staff of Instruction 



Programs of Instruction . 

ACCOUNTING . 
MANAGEMENT . 
ENGINEERING AND BUSINESS 
LABOR RELATIONS INSTITUTE 



Description of Courses 

ACCOUNTING . 

BUSINESS READINGS 

DISTRIBUTION 

ENGLISH . 

ECONOMICS 

LAW 

MANAGEMENT 

THESIS . 

OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE 

Administrative Policies . 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS . 
REGISTRATION . 
ATTENDANCE . 
EXAMINATIONS 
MARKS AND CREDITS . 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 



General Information 

CLASSROOMS, TEXTBOOKS, RECREATION 
STUDENT COUNCIL . 



Tuition and Other Fees 



Withdrawals and Refunds 



Page 

12 

5-6 

12 

14 



15 
15 
17 
15 
17 

7 

8-11 

18 

19-20 

21-23 

24 

25 

26 

26-28 

30 

29 

29-30 

30-31 

31 

31-33 

34 

34 

35 
35 
36 
37 
37 
38 
39-40 

41 
41 
41 

42-43 
44 



Northeastern University 



cAdministratwe Organization 



The Northeastern University Corporation 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 

Frank Lincoln Richardson, V ice-Chairman 

Carl Stephens Ell, President of the University 

Henry Nathaniel Andrews, Treasurer 

Everett Avery Churchill, Secretary 



Joseph Florence Abbott 

Charles Francis Adams 

WiLMAN Edward Adams 

Roger Amory 

O. Kelley Anderson 

Arthur Atwood Ballantine 

George Louis Barnes 

Thomas Prince Beal 

Farwell Gregg Bemis 

Samuel Bruce Black 

Henry Goddard Bradlee 

George Augustus Burnham 

Godfrey Lowell Cabot 

Paul Codman Cabot 

Walter Channing 

William Converse Chick 

Paul Foster Clark 

William H. Collins 

Sears B. Condit 

Amory Coolidge 

Albert Morton Creighton 

Marshall Bertrand Dalton 

Edward Dana 

Edward Dane 

Justin Whitlock Dart 

William James Davidson 

Bernard W. Doyle 

Paul Augustus Draper 

David Frank Edwards 

William Partridge Eluson 

Joseph Buell Ely 

Robert Greenough Emerson 

John Wells Farley 

Joseph Fabian Ford 

Ernest Bigelow Freeman 

Franklin Wile Ganse 

Harvey Dow Gibson 

David Greer 

Merrill Griswold 

George Hansen 

Henry Ingraham Harriman 

Carroll Sherlock Harvey 

Harold Daniel Hodgkinson 

Harvey P. Hood 

Chandler Hovey 

Weston Howland 

Howard Munson Hubbard 

Maynard Hutchinson 

Raymond Winheld James 

Arthur Stoddard Johnson 

Charles Berkley Johnson 



Jacob Joseph Kaplan 

Harry Hamilton Kerr 

Frank Howard Lahey 

Halfdan Lee 

Galen David Light 

Edward Abbott MacMaster 

John Russell Macomber 

Albert Edward Marshall 

Harold Francis Mason 

James Franklin McElwain 

Hugh Dean McLellan 

Irwin Likely Moore 

Fred Lester Morgan 

Ira Mosher 

Irving Edwin Moultrop 

Samuel Norwich 

George Olmsted, Jr. 

Olaf Olsen 

Augustin Hamilton Parker, Jr. 

George Edwin Pierce 

Matthew Porosky 

Frederick Sanford Pratt 

Roger Preston 

Sidney Rabinovitz 

Stuart Craig Rand 

William McNear Rand 

James Lorin Richards 

James C. Richdale 

Harold Bours Richmond 

Charles Forest Rittenhouse 

John James Robinson 

Robert Billings Rugg 

Leverett Saltonstall 

Russell Maryland Sanders 

Andrew Sebastian Seiler 

Joseph P. Spang, Jr. 

Frank Palmer Speare 

Francis Robert Carnegie Steele 

Charles Stetson 

Earl Place Stevenson 

Robert Treat Paine Storer 

Frank Horace Stuart 

Edward Watson Supple 

Ralph Emerson Thompson 

James Vincent Toner 

Eliot Wadsworth 

Samuel Wakeman 

Eustis Walcott 

Edwin Sibley Webster 

Sinclair Weeks 



Northeastern University 



Qeneral University Qommittees 



Executive Council 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 
Everett Avery Churchill Milton John Schlagenhauf 

Albert Ellsworth Everett William Crombie White 



University Cabinet 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 



William Thurlow Alexander 

Everett Avery Churchill 

Albert Ellsworth Everett 

Roger Stanton Hamilton 

Charles William Havice 

Wilfred Stanley Lake 

Donald Hershey MacKenzie 

Harold Wesley Melvin 



WiNTHROP Eliot Nightingale 

Rudolf Oscar Oberg 

Edward Snow Parsons 

John Butler Pugsley 

Milton John Schlagenhauf 

J. Kenneth Stevenson 

William Crombie White 

William Greene Wilkinson 



Stuart Mead Wright 



Library Committee 

Everett Avery Churchill, Chairman 
Albert Ellsworth Everett 
Roger Stanton Hamilton 

William Crombie White 



Wilfred Stanley Lake 
Myra White 



School of Business 



(Administrative^ Organization^ 



General Officers of Administration 

Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., Sc.D., President of the University 

Frank Palmer Speare, M.H., LL.D., President Emeritus of the University 

Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D., Vice-President of the University 

Albert Ellsworth Everett, S.B., M.B.A., Dean of the School of Business 



Local Officers of Administration 
BOSTON 

Albert Ellsworth Everett, S.B., M.B.A., Dean 

J. Kenneth Stevenson, B.C.S., Assistant to the Vice-President 

Milton John Schlagenhauf, A.B., B.D., M.A., Director of Admissions 

Rudolf Oscar Oberg, S.B., Ed.M., Director of Alumni Relations 

Daisy Milne Everett, Bursar 

Myra White, Librarian 

Mary B. Poor, Manager of the Bookstore 

SPRINGFIELD DIVISION 

John Doane Churchill, A.B., A.M., Director 

Earl Henry Paine, B.C.S., Treasurer 

Guy Dolphus Miller, A.B., Ed.M., C.P.A., Associate Dean 



Office Staff 

Mabel Ellen Bean, Bookkeeper 

Ruth C. Bodemer, B.S., Assistant Librarian 

Alice Riama Crawford, A.B., Assistant Librarian 

Eleanor Florence Gale, Cashier, Central Offices 

Elizabeth Harriett Howard, Statistical Clerk, Central Offices 

Dorothy Milne Murray, Secretary to the Dean ■ ' 

Ruth Everett Newell, Purchasing Clerk, Central Offices 

Elin Victoria Peterson, Secretary to the Vice-President 

Caroline Frances Pettingell, Assistant Bursar 

Marjorie Graffte Prout, A.B., Secretary to the President 

Priscilla Shepard, Secretary to the President 

Jean Simonds, Assistant Librarian 

Helen Margaret Stoddard, Recorder ' 

Beatrice Emma Tourtillott, Bookkeeper, Central Offices 

Hazel M. Young, Bookkeeper, Central Offices 



School of Business 



Staff of ^nstructioru 



Boston 

Frederick Morse Bassett, B.C.S., Northeastern University; C.P.A. 
Constructive Accounting 
Accountant, Stewart, Watts and BoUong 

Elliot Sheffeld Boardman, Bowdoin College; M.B.A., Harvard University 
Business Administration Seminar, Business Planning and Research 
Manager, Industrial Statistics Division, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 

Charles Albert Cederberg, Boston University 
Introductory Accounting, Intermediate Accounting 
Instructor in Bookkeeping, Boston Clerical School 
Cost Consultant, Boston Chapter, Non-Ferrous Founders' Association 

Sumner Daniel Charm, B.S., Tufts College; M.B.A., Harvard Graduate School, M.I.T. 
Personnel Administration 
Industrial Relations Department, American Woolen Company, Ayer Mills 

Thomas Cooper, Jr. 
Conference Leadership 
Northeastern University 

Raymond Frank Dauer, A.B., Indiana University 
Industrial Management Problems and Policies 
Production Manager, West Lynn Works, General Electric Company 

Wayne Edward Davis, B.S., M.B.A., University of Michigan 
Principles of Selling 
Assistant to Distribution Manager, Dennison Manufacturing Company 

John Enneguess, B.C.S., B.B.A., Northeastern University; Harvard University 
Accounting Problems 

Chairman, Department of Accounting, Worcester Junior College; Income Tax Specialist, 
Harry W. Wallis 

James Joseph Flynn, B.S., Fordham College; M.A., Fordham Graduate School 
Business Economics 
Acting District Historical Officer, U. S. Navy, First Naval District 

Leo Thomas Foster, A.B., A.M., Holy Cross College; Harvard University; Boston University 
Income Tax Procedure 
Head of Tax Department, Charles F. Rittenhouse and Company 

Warren Lincoln Ganong, S.B., Northeastern University 
Time Study 
Instructor in Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University 

Howard Eaton Gorton, B.S., Hobart College; M.B.A., Harvard University 
Mar /coring 
Merchandise Manager, Dennison Manufacturing Company 

Howard Francis Greene, Northwestern University; C.P.A. 
Advanced Accounting Problems, Auditing, C.P.A. Problems 
Public Accountant 
Chairman Accounting Department, Northeastern University, Evening Division 

Oilman Clifton Harvey, Massachusetts Teachers College; Bentley School of Accounting 
and Finance; C.P.A. 
Accounting Aids to Management 
Comptroller, Hawkbridge Brothers Company 
Assistant Treasurer, Alcoma Association, Inc., Alcoma Packing Company, Inc. 

8 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 



Hugh Healey, S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Methods Engineering 
Methods Department, Section Leader, General Electric Company 

J. Keene Horner, B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.B.A., Harvard University 

Public Speaking, Business Reports and Conferences, Financial Organization, Business Readings 

Counsellor 
Director, Division of Finance and Assistant to the Chancellor, Babson Institute 

Karl P. Lipsohn, A.B., Dartmouth College 
Business Administration Seminar 

Assistant Manager, Department of Information and Research, Chamber of Commerce, 
Boston; Assistant Editor, "Boston Business" 

A. Howard Myers, A.B., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Collective Bargaining 
Labor Arbitrator 

Harry Olins, A.B., LL.B., Harvard University 

Legal Aspects of Business, Trade Regulation, Government Controls in Business 
Attorney at Law 

Arthur L. Peck, Jr., Tufts College 
Scientific Management 
Methods Department Head, Raytheon Manufacturing Company 

Andrew Petersen, B.B.A., M.B.A., Boston University; C.P.A. 
Accounting Aids to Management 
Charles F. Rittenhouse and Company 

Wtman S. Randall, B.B.A., Boston University 
Purchasing 
Purchasing Agent, Rust Craft Publishers, Inc. 

Nicholas Alfred Rasetzki, A.B., Hobart College; A.M., Boston University 
Business English 
Director of Personnel, Tobe Deutschmann Corporation 

Frederick L. Robinson, B.S., University of New Hampshire 
Principles of Selling, Sales Management 
Staff Assistant, Merchandise Development Division, Dennison Manufacturing Company 

Daniel A. Rush, LL.B., Georgetown University, School of Law; LL.M., National University 
Law School 
Income Tax Procedure 
Tax Attorney, Tax Department, United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Boston 

Irwin Spear, Ph.B., University of Vermont 
PrirKiples of Advertising, Retail Store Advertising 
Advertising Service 

Benjamin F. Stacey, A.B., Dartmouth College; M.C.S., Tlie Amos Tuck School 
Business Economics 
U. S. Chamber of Commerce 

Harry Wilbur Thompson 
Credits and Collections 

Credit Manager, General Sea Foods Corporation 
Vice-President, Wholesale Fish Dealers' Credit Association 

Lawton Wolf, B.B. A., Rider College 
Principles of Production 
Production Manager, Holtter-Cabot Electric Company 



10 STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 



Springfield Division 

Inoham Chamberlain Baker, A.B,, Dartmouth College; The Amos Tuck School 
Marketing 
Director and Assistant Treasurer, G. &. C. Merriam Company 

Ernest Adolph Berg, B.C.S., LL.B., Northeastern University; C.P.A. 
Advanced Accounting Problems 
Partner, Hitchcock &. Co., Accountants; Attorney at Law 

Reginald Nelson Blomfield, A.B., Williams College 
Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry 
Personnel Department, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company 

David Holbrook Brown, A.B., Middlebury College; LL.B., Boston University; A.M., 
Trinity College 
Business Economics; Financial Organization; Ecorwmic Development of the U. S. 
Instructor, Classical High School 

Clarence Irving Chatto, A.B., Bates College; A.M., Harvard University 
Advanced English, Public Speaking 
Curriculum Specialist, Springfield Public Schools 

Carl Odlin Chauncey, LL.B., Northeastern University 
Legal Aspects of Business 
Member of Legal Staff, Farm Credit Administration of Springfield; Attorney at Law 

Clifford Scholes Cody, B.S., Iowa State College 
Heat Engineering 
Member of Engineering Staff, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company 

Timothy David Crimmins, B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Mt'cKanics 
Engineer, Palmer Plant, Wickwire Spencer Corporation 

Alexander Duncan Davis, B.T.E., Lowell Textile Institute 
Engineering Drawing 
Instructor, Technical High School 

Leoiviard Colerick Flowers, B.S., M.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Physics 
Member of Engineering Staff, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company 

Nelson Hatward Foley, Boston University 
Industrial Management Problems and Policies 
Member of Staff, Scovell, Wellington and Company 

MoTT Abram Oarlock, B.S., Dartmouth College; M.B.A., Harvard University 
Busincis and Industrial Management 
Security Analyst, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company 

Edward Phelps Grace, B.C.S., Northeastern University; C.P.A. 
Accouiuing Aids to Management, Accounting Problems 
Assistant General Manager, Springfield Merchants, Inc. 

Clarence Mortimer Hall, B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Electricity 
Instructor, Classical High School 

William Otto Henschke, B.S., Cooper Union Institute of Technology 
Advanced Engineering Drawing 
Member of Engineering Staff, American Bosch Corporation 

Frank Yaeger Hess, S.B., Harvard College 
Chemistry 
Instructor, Classical High School 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION U 



George Wright Howe, A.B., M.B.A., Harvard University 
Business Administration Seminar, Business Planning and Research 
Treasurer, Century Manufacturing Co. 

Fred Wooding Hutchinson, B.S., Wesleyan University, Boston University 
Arxalytic Geometry, Calculus 
Instructor, Technical High School 

Cyrus Walter Jones, S.B., Harvard College 
Business English 
Instructor, Technical High School 

GusTAv Henry Koch, M.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Strength of Materials 
Engineering Staff, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company 

Guy Dolphus Miller, A.B., Ohio University; University of Wisconsin School of Law; 

Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration; Ed.M,, Harvard University; 

C.P.A. 
Business Reports and Conferences; Counsellor to Students iru:luding Theses and Business Readings 
Instructor, Technical High School 

John Haynes Miller, A.B., Washington and Jefferson College 
Business Statistics and Forecasting 
Vice-President and Actuary, Monarch Life Insurance Company 

Frederick Chapin Ober, A.B., Harvard University 
Credits and Collections 
Assistant Treasurer, Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 

Haldimand Sumner Putnam, Jr., B.S., Syracuse University 
Intermediate Accounting 
Accountant, Scovell, Wellington and Company 

Horace Jacobs Rice, B.S., Wesleyan University; LL.B., Harvard University 
Government Controb in Business 
Attorney at Law 

James Thoburn Smith, B.C.S., Northeastern University 
Iru:ome Tax Procedure 
Assistant Trust Officer, Union Trust Company of Springfield 

Leland William Smith, A.B., Harvard College; A.M., Columbia University 
Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry 
Instructor, Classical High School and Springfield Junior College 

Lloyd Hagen Stanton, Northeastern University; Bentley School of Accounting and Finance 
Cost Accounting 
Assistant Treasurer, Van Norman Company 

Elo Carl Tanner, B.M.E., University of Minnesota; University of Pittsburgh 
Design 

Refrigeration Development and Design Engineer, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing 
Company 

Gilbert Creighton Walker, A.B., Ed.M., Harvard University; Northeastern University 
Introductory Accounting 
Instructor, High School of Commerce 

Ernest Wiesle, Ph.B., A.M., B.D., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Psychology for Business ar\d Industry 
Professor, Springfield College 

Eliot Leland Wight, B. A., Yale College; University of Colorado, Graduate School 
Advertising Principles; Advertising Campaigns; PriTu:iples of Selling; Sales Marmgement 
Advertising Manager, United States Envelope Company 

Paul Almy Wilks, A.B., Harvard College 
Busirxess English 

Chief Accountant, Strathmore Paper Company, on leave of absence for military service 
as Major, United States Ordnance Department, assigned to Hartford Ordnance EHstrict 



Northeastern University 



Qeneral S^^^temeriP-^ 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY is incorporated as a philanthropic 
institution under the General Laws of Massachusetts. The State 
Legislature, by special enactment, has given the University general 
degree granting powers. 

The Corporation of Northeastern University consists of men who occupy 
responsible positions in business and the professions. This Corporation 
elects from its membership a Board of Trustees in whom the control of the 
institution is vested. The Board of Trustees has four standing committees: 
(fl) an Executive Committee which serves as an Ad Interim Committee be- 
tween the regular meetings of the Board of Trustees and has general super- 
vision of the financial and educational policies of the University; (b) a 
Committee on Buildings which has general supervision over the building 
needs of the University; (c) a Committee on Funds and Investments which 
has the responsibility of administering the funds of the University; (d) a De- 
velopment Committee which is concerned with furthering the development 
plans of the University. 

Founded in 1898, Northeastern University, from the outset, had as its 
dominant purpose the discovery of human and social needs and the meeting 
of these needs in distinctive and highly serviceable ways. While subscribing 
to the most progressive educational thought and practice, the University has 
not duplicated the programs of other institutions but has. sought "to bring 
education more directly into the service of human needs." 

With respect to program. Northeastern has limited itself: 

— To offering, in its several schools, basic curricula from which non- 

essentials have been eliminated; 

— To effective teaching; 

— To advising and guiding students; 

— To giving students the chance to build well-rounded personalities 

through a balanced program of extracurricular activities. 

The Northeastern Plan of Education is especially designed for the student 
who must earn while he learns. In the main, it consists of two definite types 
of education: 

— Co-operative Education by Day, 

— Adult Education by Night. 

The plan has been developed in such a way that experience in jobs with pay 
is utilized to help students of limited financial resources secure an education 
and at the same time gain the maximum educational benefit from their 
practical experience. So far as the New England States are concerned, 
Northeastern University is the only institution whose day colleges, other 
than the School of Law, are conducted under the Co-operative Plan. 

The several schools and programs of the University are conducted either 
under the name "Northeastern University" or by its affiliated schools — the 
Lincoln Schools, and The Huntington Day School for Boys. The following 
is a brief outline of the principal types of educational opportunities offered. 

12 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 13 



In the field of Co-operative Education there are three day colleges — the 
College of Liberal Arts, the College of Engineering, and the College of Busi- 
ness Administration. The College of Liberal Arts offers majors in the usual 
fields of the arts and the sciences leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science. The College of Engineering, one of the largest 
engineering colleges in the United States, has curricula in Civil, Mechanical 
(with Industrial and Aeronautical options), Electrical, and Chemical Engi- 
neering. The College of Business Administration has curricula in Accounting, 
Marketing and Advertising, and Industrial Administration. The College of 
Engineering and the College of Business Administration confer the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with specification indicating the field of specialization. 
The Co-operative Plan, under which all of these day colleges operate, enables 
the student to alternate regular periods of classroom instruction with super- 
vised employment in an industrial or commercial position, thus combining 
theory and practice in an exceedingly effective manner. Apart from the 
educational advantages of the Co-operative Plan is the opportunity for self- 
support while the student is pursuing his studies at Northeastern University. 
During the co-operative periods, students not only gain experience but are also 
paid for their services. Approximately three hundred business and industrial 
concerns co-operate with Northeastern University in making this program 
effective. 

The School of Law conducts both a day and an evening undergraduate 
program which prepares for admission to the bar and for the practice of the 
law and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

The Adult Education Program has been developed in the evening work of 
the School of Law as indicated above, in the School of Business, and in the 
evening courses of the College -of Liberal Arts. The School of Business has 
curricula in Management, Accounting, and Engineering and Business. This 
School awards the Bachelor of Business Administration degree with specifica- 
tion. The University also operates a division of the School of Business in 
Springfield. The College of Liberal Arts offers certain of its courses during 
evening hours constituting a program, three years in length, equivalent in 
hours to one-half the requirements for the A.B. or S.B. degree, and providing 
a general education and preparation for admission to the School of Law. The 
degree of Associate in Arts is conferred upon those who complete this pro- 
gram. 

The Adult Education Program has also been developed through the 
Lincoln Schools, which are affiliated with and conducted by Northeastern 
University. The classes in these schools are held at convenient evening 
hours. The Lincoln Technical Institute offers curricula upon a college level 
in various phases of engineering leading to the degree of Associate in Engineer- 
ing; whereas the Lincoln Preparatory School, accredited by the New England 
College Admissions Board, prepares students for admission to college and 
offers other standard high school programs. 

The University also operates a Bureau of Business and Industrial Service 
which provides training at the college level through intensive, practical courses 
in highly specialized areas which are especially designed for business and in- 
dustry. These courses are conducted either in the industrial plant or at the 
University. 

The Huntington Day School for Boys, also affiliated with and conducted 
by Northeastern University, is the outgrowth of a demand in the city of 



14 NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



Boston for an urban preparatory school with high educational standards 
which would furnish thorough preparation for admission to the leading 
colleges and universities. While easily accessible to the various sections of 
Boston and to the suburbs, it has the facilities of a country day school and 
offers a country day school program. This School is one of the leading pre- 
paratory schools of the country. 



Location of University Buildings 

Northeastern University is located in Boston, a city which is rich in educa- 
tional and cultural opportunities. The School of Business is in the University 
center on Huntington Avenue just beyond Massachusetts Avenue at the 
entrance to the Huntington Avenue Subway. The School is easily reached 
from the various railroad stations and from all points of the Boston Elevated 
System. Ample parking space is available in the rear of Richards Hall. 

Richards Hall 

Richards Hall, a four-story building at 360 Huntington Avenue, contains 
over one hundred thousand square feet of floor space devoted to adminis- 
trative and instructional purposes. On the first floor are the general ad- 
ministrative offices of the University. The University Bookstore, the "Husky 
Hut" and the student checkroom are located on the ground floor. On the 
various floors are three large lecture halls and numerous classrooms and 
laboratories. The offices of the Evening Division are located on the first floor. 

New Building 

This building contains forty-two thousand square feet of floor space. Here 
are located the Chemical Engineering and Biological laboratories, a large com- 
mons room open to day and evening students, and eighteen classrooms and 
lecture halls. 

East Building 

This building contains the University library, classrooms, and certain 
laboratories. 

South Building 

The South Building of the University contains certain laboratories, a large 
lecture hall, and several classrooms. 

Beacon Hill Building 

The Beacon Hill Building, now occupied exclusively by the School of Law, 
is located at 47 Mt. Vernon Street, within sight of the State House, and con- 
tains administrative offices, a library, classrooms, student lounges, and other 
facilities. 



School of Business 



^he background of an institution-^ 



THIRTY-SEVEN YEARS ago, in March of 1907, the first undergraduate 
evening school of business in New England was organized. This was 
the beginning of Northeastern University School of Business, a pioneer 
endeavor to bridge an existing gap in business and professional education. 
Four years later, the School was authorized by the Massachusetts Legislature 
to grant university degrees to its graduates. 

Administrative Policy 

The School of Business was founded to serve those who have only evening 
hours free for study — a special field, limited to the education of the person 
who has permanently left day school and gone to work. The Northeastern 
University evening student is an adult, usually more mature than the student 
of a day school. He is in direct touch with business and is expected to take 
an active part in his own supervised training. The constant effort of the 
administrative and teaching staff is toward more effective means of suiting 
their educational service to the individual evening student. 

Purpose 

Now, just as at the start, the School seeks first to determine what business 
needs in its personnel, and then to supply properly trained men and women 
who can fulfill those needs. 

The training of a student at Northeastern has always been conducted so 
that a graduate receives not only a B.B.A. degree, but an immediately applica- 
ble vocational training equipping him to fill a better position in some one busi- 
ness activity. For his future, he has the advantage of a thorough background of 
business methods and an appreciation of the problems of management, which, 
if properly used, may lead to advancement and executive responsibilities. 

Staff of Instruction 

The teaching staff of the School in Boston and Springfield is recruited from 
business and professional leaders of New England business. The instructors 
are college-trained men who have proved their ability in their various fields 
of specialization. They are selected on the basis of their ability to convey 
knowledge to others in an interesting, inspiring, and effective manner. They 
are also chosen for the breadth of their training and experience. 

Success of the Alumni 

The best indication of the cumulative rewards to be won by pursuing a 
systematic program of study in spare evening hours is to be found in the 
records of Northeastern School of Business Alumni. 

A study made just prior to the war covering all Boston graduates conclu- 
sively shows that better positions and increased incomes are directly traceable 
to the evening hours spent in preparation at Northeastern. 

A portion of this study is the comparison of positions held by the alumni 
when they entered the School as freshmen with the positions they held at 
the time of the study. 

15 



16 THE BACKGROUND OF AN INSTITUTION 



ALUMNI POSITIONS 








Upon 


Date of 




Entrance 


Study 




% 


% 


Presidents and Other Corporation Officers 


0.0 


3.8 


Owners of Business 


1.0 


13.1 


Treasurers and Comptrollers 


0.3 


7.7 


Accountants 


7.0 


16.9 


Office Managers 


1.6 


7.4 


Department Managers 


2.9 


11.5 


Salesmen 


3.8 


3.8 


Educators 


8.6 


7.0 


Government Employees 


2.6 


7.7 


Bookkeepers 


18.8 


1.3 


Clerks 


34.2 


6.4 


Factory Workers 


5.8 


2.2 


Unemployed 


2.9 


1.9 


Miscellaneous 


10.5 


9.3 



This pronounced trend to better and more responsible positions is further 
substantiated by a study of the income of the same alumni group over the 
same period. 

It was found that the alumni who had been out of the School of Business 
not more than ten years had increased their income an aggregate of 73.2%. 
For those who graduated more than ten years ago, this increase amounts to 
223.6%. Another study of the income of students still in school shows that 
the average School of Business student begins his advancement in business 
and in income even while he is still at his training. On the average, the 
increase in income during the period of attendance more than covers tuition 
charges. 

The Student Body 

The character of a student body determines the standards which a school 
can maintain. Nothing is more essential to the success of an educational 
institution than a careful selection of incoming students. This principle 
applies just as readily to an evening school as to a day school. Standards are 
invariably adjusted to the average intelligence of the students. For this 
reason, Northeastern University School of Business maintains standards of 
admission which result in a student body capable of pursuing work of stand- 
ard college grade during evening hours. 

The student body consists of 383 men and women of widely varied ages 
and occupations. The youngest student is 17 years of age and the oldest 53 
years. The average age is 23 years. 

About one-sixth of the students are married men who have realized that 
if they are to increase their earning power they must fit themselves for ad- 
vancement. That the training offered by the School has enabled the students 
to improve their earning capacities and enlarge their responsibilities is 
conclusively proved by a study which showed that students in the School 
substantially increased their incomes in the six-year period between entering 
the School and graduation. 



THE BACKGROUND OF AN INSTITUTION 17 

Placement Service 
For Graduates 

While the School cannot guarantee positions to its graduates, the number 
of requests for men usually exceeds the number available in the graduating 
class of any given year. The policy of the School is to find the best equipped 
and qualified men and women among its graduates for the positions which the 
School is called upon to fill. 

The School in recommending a graduate for a position furnishes the 
prospective employer with the facts as to the graduate's ability, character, 
attitudes, habits, and other qualifications for the position as revealed by the 
School records. In the last analysis, however, placement in a position de- 
pends quite largely upon the graduate's ability to sell his services to the 
prospective employer. Most employers prefer to consider two or more candi- 
dates for a position and generally request the School to suggest more than 
one person. Many manufacturing and commercial firms throughout New 
England call upon this School to assist them in filling important executive 
and managerial positions. 

No charge is made for placement service. 

For Students 

Many requests from employers are received by the School, during normal 
times, for young men and women of potential ability to fill important clerical 
and junior executive positions. It is the policy of the School to serve the 
students whenever possible by placing them in those positions which promise 
attractive opportunities for development and advancement. The School, 
however, cannot guarantee to place its students, but it does endeavor to keep 
in close touch with those who desire placement service and to assist them in 
obtaining satisfactory advancements in positions and income. No charge is 
made for placement service. Those needing this assistance should file an ap- 
plication at the School Office. 



School of Business 



T^rograms of instruction^ 



THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS provides the following major programs 
of instruction for undergraduate students: 

Accounting 

1. A specialized four-year program leading to the title of Associate in Account- 
ing. 

2. A six-year program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration in Accounting. (See page 20.) 



Management 

Four- and six-year programs with opportunity for specialization in one of the 
following fields: 

Business and Industrial Management 

Distribution 

The four-year programs lead to the title of Associate in Business Administra- 
tion and the six-year programs to the degree of Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration in Management. (See page 22.) 



Engineering and Business 

A six-year program combining the study of engineering and business, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration in Engineering 
and Management. (See page 24.) 



Special Programs 

The School will arrange special one-year, two-year, or longer programs ot 
study to meet the needs of individual students. These special programs will be 
arranged upon consultation with the Dean. 



Single or Unit Courses 

Northeastern University sponsors through the Bureau of Business and 
Industrial Service courses designed to meet specific needs of persons employed 
in business and industry. Many of them are designed to supplement basic 
courses of study in undergraduate programs. Students in degree programs de- 
siring to take any of these courses for credit must receive prior approval of 
the Dean. 

18 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 19 

Accounting 

The Accounting Profession 

Taxarion, legal requirements governing qualifications for listing in the 
stock market, corporation laws governing the preparation of financial reports, 
the needs of government, and many other developments in the conduct of 
business have broadened the scope of accounting to such a degree that in 
normal times the supply of trained accountants is not adequate to meet the 
demand. Moreover, a knowledge of accounting is universally regarded as 
essential in all phases of business management. There is a large field of public 
accounting which is being developed and, with the increased emphasis which 
financial institutions are placing upon accounting, the need for college-trained 
Certified Public Accountants is increasing every year. 

Opportunities in the field of accounting are many. Financial returns 
compare favorably with those of other professions such as law, medicine, 
and engineering. The normal development for those employed by an account- 
ing firm is fairly well standardized from the position of junior assistant through 
that of the senior accountant into firm membership. As a firm member, the 
usual earnings range from $4,000 to $25,000 a year, and frequently even higher. 

While the remuneration in the field of public accounting for properly 
trained men is attractive, the field of commercial and private accounting 
offers even more attractive inducement. The latest census figures show that 
there are 191,571 persons engaged as accountants and auditors in the United 
States. From trained accountants are selected many of the business and in- 
dustrial executives, including office managers, comptrollers, treasurers, and 
other officers of business concerns. Salaries of treasurers and comptrollers vary 
from $4,000 to $15,000; office managers from $3,000 to $6,000; chief account- 
ants from $2,500 to $5,000. Many senior accountants have advanced into 
responsible executive positions paying $10,000 and more. 

The Accounting Programs 

Students of accounting in the School of Business may follow programs of 
training in this specialized subject which prepare them to take the examination 
for Certified Public Accountant (C.P.A.) or to carry on work of major 
responsibility in commercial accounting with private or public business firms. 

Thoroughness of instruction is all-important. The trained accountant 
must be able to adapt himself quickly to the rapidly changing conditions of 
modern business. He should be ready to assume executive responsibility 
outside the field of accounting. This involves, of course, a background of 
understanding of various functions of business quite apart from the specialized 
accounting field. The shorter accounting program includes prescribed sub- 
jects for the title of Associate in Accounting and adequate preparation for 
the C.P.A. examination. 

Upon completion of the four years of prescribed subjects for the title of 
Associate in Accounting, students may take two years of additional study 
required for the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration. These two 
additional years are greatly to the advantage of the student, since they give an 
opportunity to study managerial and administrative subjects which fit him 
to assume responsibility outside of the accounting field, and give him the 
basic understanding of business at large, which is of vital importance to 
accountants who hope to make real progress. 



20 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 



Accounting 

Leading to the Degree of B.B.A. in Accounting 

PROGRAM OF COURSES 



First Semester 
Course 
No. 


FIRST YEAR 

Semester Course 
Hours No. 


Second Semester 


Semester 
Hours 


Al-2 Introductory Accounting . . 
El Business Communications . 


5 


A3-4 
E2 


Intermediate Accounting. . . 
Business Communications . 


.. 5 
7K 



SECOND 

A7 Accounting Problems 2}4 

A13 Income Tax Procedure 2)4 

Eel Business Economics 2}4 

711 



YEAR 

A8 Accounting Problems. . 
A14 Income Tax Procedure. 
Ec2 Business Economics . . . 



2y2 
2y. 

2H_ 

ly 



THIRD 

A17 Adv, Accounting Problems . . 2^ 

A9 Cost Accounting 2>^ 

Ec3 Financial Organization 2>^ 

ly 



YEAR 

A18 
AlO 
Ec4 



Adv. Accounting Problems 

Cost Accounting 

Financial Organization .... 



2y 
2y 

2}^ 

1}^ 



FOURTH 

A19 C.P.A. Problems 2^ 

All Auditing 2>^ 

Ec7 Bus. Statistics & Forecasting.. 2>^ 

73^ 



YEAR 

A20 C.P.A. Problems 

A12 Constructive Accounting. . . 
Ec8 Bus. Statistics St Forecasting. 



2y 
2y 
iy_ 



FIFTH 

E5 Public Speaking 2}i 

M7 Credits and Collections 2^4 

Elective 2}4 



YEAR 

E6 
MS 



Bus. Reports and Conferences 

Credits and Collections 

Elective 



2y2 
2y 
2y 

ly 



Mil 
LI 



Govt. Controls in Business . 
Legal Aspects of Business . . 
Elective 



SIXTH 

2y 

. 2y2 

ly 



YEAR 

M12 
L2 



Govt. Controls in Business . 
Legal Aspects of Business. . 
Elective 



2y 
2y 
2y_ 

ly 



'Ke.quiye.vmnts for the B.B.A. Degree in Accounting 

Six -Year Program Semester Hours 

Required Courses and Electives (listed above) 90 

E7-8, Business Readings or T3-4, Thesis 5 

Occupational Experience 30 

Total Requirements for the Degree 125 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Accounting 

Four-Year Program 

The first four years of the degree program outlined above constitute a practical and inten' 
sive preparation for general accounting work in industrial or public accounting, and for those 
planning to take the C.P.A. examinations. 

The program requires a total of 60 semester hours' credit. Substitution of non-accounting 
c ourses may be made upon approval of the Dean. 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 21 



Business and Industrial Management Programs 

The School of Business offers two optional curricula under the Management 
Program. 

1. Business and Industrial Management 

This program of courses comprises an integrated series of courses covering 
the fundamental manufacturing processes, industrial organization, relation 
of product design to the market, production processes and methods of produc- 
tion planning and control, motion and time study and related topics. This 
program is designed to provide training for managerial responsibility in com- 
mercial and industrial enterprises requiring a technical knowledge of manage- 
ment problems combined with a business background. 

2. Distribution 

Due to the increasing complexity of our national and international economy 
the distribution of our resources of both natural and manufactured com- 
modities will occupy a position of increasing importance. The program is 
developed around the study of markets and marketing problems including the 
methods of selling and sales management, merchandising principles and 
practices, advertising, with sufficient background courses in business and in- 
dustrial management to tie in with the production phases of the problems. 
It also includes the legal aspects, the growing government control of business, 
and allied topics. This program provides basic instruction for those looking 
forward to managerial responsibility in one of the several phases of this 
important field. 

A recent extensive study of occupational opportunities shows that most 
college men who enter work in distribution, industry, transportation, and 
banking become involved sooner or later in some function of operating 
management where they become responsible for the direction of human effort 
within their organization. 

In each of these optional curricula there is offered a six-year program leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration in Management and also 
a special four-year program leading to the title of Associate in Business Ad- 
ministration. 



22 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 



Business and Industrial Management 

Leading to the Degree of B.B.A. in Management 

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT OPTION 

PROGRAM OF COURSES 



FIRST YEAR 
First Semester 
Course Semester Course 
No. Hours No. 


Second Semester 

Semester 
Hours 


*M1 Bus. and Ind. Management. . 2}4 
*A5 Accounting for Management I 2}4 
*E1 Business Communications .. . 2}4 


*M2 
*A6 
*E2 


Bus. and Ind. Management . . lyi 
Accounting for Management I lyi 
Business Communications. . . 2)4 


V/2 




IH 



*Ecl Business Economics 2^ 

*A15 Acctg. for Management II . . . 2>^ 
*M13 Motion Study 2^4 



SECOND YEAR 

*Ec2 Business Economics 

*A16 Acctg. for Management II. 
*M14 Time Study 



m 



2^ 
7J^ 



*D1 
*Ec3 
A21 



THIRD YEAR 

Marketing 2>^ 

Financial Organization 25^ 

Cost Acctg. for Management 2yi 



m 



*D2 
*Ec4 
M6 



Marketing 2}^ 

Financial Organization 2}4 

Purchasing 2}4 

1}^ 



*M3 

*M15 

Ec7 



FOURTH YEAR 



Principles of Production 2)4 

Wage Administration 2>^ 

Bus. Statistics and Forecasting 2}4 



*M16 
*D4 
Ec8 



Prod. Planning and Control. . 2}4 

Sales Management 2}4 

Bus. Statistics and Forecasting 2}4 



*M9 
M5 
E5 



FIFTH YEAR 

Indus. Management Problems 2}4 *M10 
Psychology for Bus. and Indus. 2}4 M22 
Public Speaking 2^ E6 

IV2 



Indus. Management Problems 2j4 

Labor Relations 2^ 

Bus. Reports and Conferences 2}4 



M19 
*L1 
Mil 



Bus. Administration Seminar 
Legal Aspects of Business. . . 
Govt. Controls in Business. . 



SIXTH 

2)4 

2y 

2K 
7M 



YEAR 

M20 
*L2 
M12 



Bus. Administration Seminar. 
Legal Aspects of Business. . . . 
Govt. Controls in Business. . . 



2y2 
2y 
2y 

ly 



The above is a suggested program designed to provide an integrated and balanced curriculum 
for students training for executive positions in the Management aspects of business and in- 
dustry. Substitution of courses from the other curricula more closely related to training needs 
of the individual student may be arranged upon approval of the Dean. 

Re^^fuiVements jor the V>.V>.h. Degree in Management 

Semester Hours 

Required Courses (listed above) 90 

E7-8, Business Readings or T3-4, Thesis 5 

Occupational Experience ; 30 

Total Requirements for the Degree : . . . 125 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Management 

Four -Year Program 

This program requires a total of 60 semester hours credit. It comprises those courses in the 
six-year program marked with asterisks*. Substitutions may be made upon approval ot the \ 
Dean. 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 



23 



Business and Industrial Management 

Leading to the Degree of B.B.A. in Management 

DISTRIBUTION OPTION 
PROGRAM OF COURSES 



FIRST YEAR 
First Semester 
Course Semeste^ Course 
No. Hour^ No. 


Second Semester 


Semester 
Hours 


*MI Bus. and Ind. Management . . 2>^ 
*A5 Accounting for Management I 2>^ 
*EI Business Communications .. . ly 


*M2 
*A6 
•E2 


Bus. and Ind. Management 
Acctg. for Management II . 
Business Communications . 


.. ly 
.. ly 
.. ly 


ly 






ly 



*Ecl 

♦Dl 

♦A15 



Business Economics 

Marketing 

Acctg. for Management II. 



SECOND YEAR 

2]4 *Ec2 Business Economics 

*D2 Marketing 

*A16 Acctg. for Management II. 



2y 
ly 



ly 



ly 
ly 
ly 

ly 



•Ec3 

*D3 

*D5 



Financial Organization . . 

Principles of Selling 

Principles of Advertising. 



THIRD 

ly 
ly 
ly 



YEAR 

*Ec4 Financial Organization . 

*D4 Sales Management 

*M6 Purchasing 



^y 
ly 
ly 

ly 



FOURTH 

E5 Public Speaking 2j^ 

Ec7 Bus. Statistics and Forecasting 1]/i 
*D7 Retail Store Management .... ly 

ly 



YEAR 

E6 Reports and Conferences .... 

Ec8 Bus. Statistics and Forecasting 

*D6 Retail Store Advertising 



ly 
ly 
ly 

ly 



FIFTH 

*M7 Credits and Collections 2^ 

M17 Bus. Planning and Research . . lyi 
M5 Psychology for Bus. and Indus, lyi 

IV2 



YEAR 

*M8 
M18 
M22 



Credits and Collections 

Bus. Planning and Research. 
Labor Relations 



ly 
ly 
ly 

ly 



M19 Bus. Administration Seminar 

*L1 Legal Aspects of Business. . . . 

Mil Govt. Controls in Business. . . 



SIXTH YEAR 



ly 
ly 
2y 

ly 



M20 
*L2 
M12 



Bus. Administration Seminar 
Legal Aspects of Business. . . . 
Govt. Controls in Busness. . . 



ly 
ly 
ly 

ly 



The courses listed in the above program are suggested as comprising an integrated curriculum 
for students planning careers in the field of Distribution Management. Substitutions of courses 
from the other curricula more closely related to the student's training needs may be arranged 
upon approval of the Dean. 

Requirements for the B.B.A. Degree in Management 

Semester Hours 

Required Courses (listed above) 90 

E7-8, Business Readings or T3-4, Thesis 5 

Occupational Experience 30 

Total Requirements for the Degree 125 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Management 

Four-Year Program 
This program requires a total of 60 semester hours credit. It comprises those courses in the 
six-year program marked with asterisks*. Substitutions may be made upon approval of the 
Dean. 



24 PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 



Engineering and Business Program 

The Engineering and Business curriculum offers basic training by combining 
fundamental engineering and business courses in a six-year degree program. 
It provides reliable training for those now engaged in or who plan to enter 
positions of managerial responsibility in industrial or commercial enterprises 
where a scientific or engineering background is required. 

Many technically trained men find it impossible to assume greater mana- 
gerial responsibility because they do not have a knowledge of fundamental 
business principles so essential in many of the better positions in industry. 
On the other hand, many business trained men are employed in industrial 
plants where a scientific background is most desirable if not necessary for 
advancement. This program has been developed to serve both groups. 

In Boston, the Engineering courses in this program are given under the 
auspices of an affiliated school of Northeastern University, the Lincoln 
Technical Institute, which offers several four-year curricula in Engineering 
leading to the title of Associate in Engineering. These curricula permit special- 
ization in Chemistry, Civil and Structural Engineering, Electrical Engineering, 
Electronic, Industrial, and Mechanical Engineering with an Aeronautical 
option. The business courses are conducted by the School of Business which 
awards the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration in Engineering 
and Management. 

The required business courses are largely in the field of industrial manage- 
ment and are designed to supplement the engineering work of the student. 
A careful study is made of the fundamental manufacturing processes, factory 
organization, production design, methods of production and production 
control, and time and motion study. 

Students pursuing a program of engineering and business subjects ordinarily 
complete the work required for the title of Associate in Engineering before 
starting business study. The following minimum credits and courses are 
required to meet degree requirements. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration 

in Engineering and Management 

Subjects Semester Hours 

Lincoln Technical Institute courses 60 

Accounting Aids to Management 5 

Business Reports and Conferences 2J^ 

Business Readings or T 3-4, Thesis 5 

Business Economics 5 

Business and Industrial Management 5 

Principles of Production 23^^ 

Scientific Management 23^ 

Purchasing 23^ 
Industrial Management Problems and Policies 5 

Occupational Experience 30 

Total Semester Hours Required for Degree 125 



Coi 


urse Numbers 




A 


5-6 




E 


6 




E 


7,8 




Ec 


1-2 




M 


1-2 




M 


3 




M 


4 




M 


6 




M 


9-10 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 25 



Labor Relations Institute 

The management of labor relations presents the most vital and challenging 
aspect of our industrial development of the immediate future. Continuance 
of our American way of industrial democracy demands a harmonious under- 
standing of the underlying principles of labor and industrial management 
for the peaceful adjustment of their common problems. 

The Labor Relations Institute of Northeastern University was organized 
to serve this need. It is dedicated to the service of both labor and management. 
It directly concerns the work of industrial and labor executives, plant man- 
agers, personnel directors, union shop councillors and stewards. Teachers 
in the fields of management and the social sciences will also find that the 
program provides a valuable academic background for their instruction. 



REQUIRED COURSES 

Labor-Management Relations — The his- Collective Bargaining II — The Labor Con- 
tory and development of Collective Bar- tract, 
gaining. 

Collective Bargaining I — Government and Labor Relations Seminar — Case studies in 
Labor-Management Relations. Collective Bargaining. 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

Accounting Aids to Management Motion Study 

Conference Leadership Advanced Motion Study 

Grievance Analysis and Procedure Personnel Administration 

Industrial Psychology Psychometric Testing in Industry 

Industrial Safety Public Speaking 

Job Evaluation, Merit Rating Time Study 

Job Relations and Supervisory Training Advanced Time Study 

Wage Administration 

Students may register for the complete program or may take any one or 
more of the courses which serve their particular needs. A student may complete 
the entire program by attending two evenings per week for two years. Each 
individual course is one semester or sixteen weeks in length and carries two 
and one-half semester hours of credit for students qualified for the degree 
programs of Northeastern University Evening School of Business. 

A diploma will be awarded to the student upon satisfactory completion of 
the program and a certificate upon completion of each individual course. 

The tuition charge is twenty-five dollars for registration in the first course 
and twenty-two dollars and fifty cents for each subsequent course in a con- 
tinuous series or for students enrolled in a degree program of the Evening 
School of Business. 



School of Business 



nDescription of Qourses 



THE UNIVERSITY reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the 
courses offered, or to change the order of courses in curricula as may 
seem advisable. 
The University further reserves the right to withdraw in any year any 
elective or special course for which less than twelve enrollments have been 
received. Regular students so affected by such withdrawal will be permitted 
to choose some other course. In the case of special students a full refund of 
all tuition and other fees will be made. 

The University also reserves the right to change the requirements for gradu- 
ation, tuition and fees charged, and other regulations. However, no change in 
tuition and fees at any time shall become effective until the school year fol- 
lowing that in which it is announced. 

All full-year courses are numbered with a double consecutive number and 
all half-year courses with a single number. The letter or letters immediately 
preceding the numbers indicate the classification of the course. The number 
of class sessions indicated for each course includes the final examination 
session. All full-year courses will have mid-year examinations and course 
credit will be granted on a semester basis. 

ACCOUNTING (A) 

Applicants for admission to the Sclwol wlio have had experience in accounting or book' 
keeping or who have pursued systematic courses in institutiorv of less than college grade may 
take an examination for placement purposes in Introductory Accounting. Those who pass 
this examination will be admitted to Intermediate Accounting and may substitute an elective 
course in lieu of Introductory Accounting. 

INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING 

A 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. No previous knowledge of bookkeeping or 
accounting necessary. 

This course provides basic instruction for those who plan to specialize in accounting or 
for those who wish to enroll later for more advanced courses. Emphasis is placed upon pro- 
prietorship accounts, including books of entry, statements, business practices, adjustments, 
and an introduction to partnership accounts. Drill and practice work are required for pro- 
ficient handling of simple accounting transactions. 

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 

A 3-4 Prerequisite: A 1-2, or the passing of a placement examination. Thirty-three sessions; 
5 hours' credit. I 

A study of partnership accounting, including organization, dissolution, and liquidation of 
the partnership, emphasis being given to the corporate form of accounts with attention to 
manufacturing and trading activities. In addition to the drill and practice work on accounting 
technique, a mastery of basic principles of general accounting is required. 

ACCOUNTING AIDS TO MANAGEMENT 

A 5-6 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. No previous knowledge of bookkeeping or 
accounting necessary. 

A study of the broad background of accounting and business transactions so as to enable 
the student to analyze and interpret intelligently financial statements and other accounting 
reports. The course demonstrates the use of accounting in management and financial control. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of accounting fundamentals, preparation of financial 

26 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 27 



statements, corporation and manufacturing accounts, evaluation of balance sheet items, 
analysis and interpretation of financial statements and other trends, and the use of accounting 
as an aid to management. 

ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS 

A 7-8 Prerequisite: A 3-4 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
This course is designed to develop the student's reasoning power and his ability to apply the 
proper accounting principles in solving a specific problem. Emphasis is placed on principles 
and their application, rather than on individual situations. Subjects covered are the prepara- 
tion of financial statements; accounting for and valuation of cash items, receivables, inven- 
tories, liabilities, and net worth accounts. Capital stock, treasury stock, and surplus are dis- 
cussed in detail. 

COST ACCOUNTING 

A 9-10 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 

Acquaints the student with the relationship of cost accounting to management and ad- 
ministration control and shows how adequate cost systems may further the intelligent manage- 
ment of business enterprises. Numerous problems serve as the basis for a study of the various 
accounts, records, systems, and methods commonly used in modern cost accounting. 

AUDITING 

All Prerequisite: A 7-8 Seventeen sessions; 23^ hours' credit. 

This course covers both theory and practice of auditing, discussion being supplemented 
with problems and questions on balance sheet audits. Procedure in verifying cash, receivables, 
inventories, investments, tangible and intangible fixed assets, deferred charges, liabilities, and 
net worth accounts is covered. An audit report is prepared. 

INCOME TAX PROCEDURE 

A 13-14 Prerequisite: A 3-4 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours* credit. 
A detailed study is made of Federal and State tax laws, their administration and application 
to the incomes of individuals, partnerships, corporations, and fiduciaries; treasury and tax 
department regulations and rulings; and of the decisions of the Board of Tax Appeals, and 
of various Federal and State courts. Practice in making out reports and returns, and a study of 
the procedure of handling claims form the basis of applied instruction. 

CONSTRUCTIVE ACCOUNTING 

A 15 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Seventeen sessions; 2J^ hours' credit. 
To acquaint students with the principles underlying the construction of accounting systems 
and the procedure of system installation. The course is developed by means of problem 
projects beginning with an analysis of the accounting needs of a small business. By gradual 
steps increasingly larger businesses are studied and accounting systems developed to meet 
their needs. Special attention is given accounting records in relation to the expansion of the 
accounting system. 

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS 

A 17-18 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
Tliis course is designed primarily to meet the requirements of students intending to enter 
the accounting profession. Application of accounting principles to special situations such as 
insolvent companies, estates and trust, stock brokerage houses, public utilities, and munici- 
palities. Considerable time is spent on preparation of consolidated statements. 

C.P.A. PROBLEMS 

A 19-20 Prerequisites: A 9-10; A 11; A 17-18; L 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
A complete review of the theories encountered in A 7, 8, 9, 10, 17, 18. Tliis course is de- 
signed primarily for students intending to take the state C.P.A. examinations. Considerable 
practice is required, using largely problems from previous C.P.A. examinations. Emphasis is 
placed on the technique of adequate problem solutions. 



28 DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



AUDIT PRACTICE 

A 22 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Seventeen sessions; 2J^ hours' credit. 
For students who intend to enter the public accounting or internal auditing fields. A practice 
audit by independent accountants is conducted, and procedures compared with those of in- 
ternal auditors. Preparation of adequate working papers is emphasized. 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTING 

A 23 Prerequisite: A 22 Seventeen sessions; 2}^ hours' credit. 
The work of the professional independent public accountant. Organization of the account- 
ant's office; division of work between principal, senior and junior; organization of working 
papers. Problems of a small practice discussed as well as those of the large organization. Re- 
sponsibility of auditor to client, to third parties, to regulatory bodies covered. Ethics of the 
profession. Recent auditing literature. 

BUDGET PROCEDURE 

A 24 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Seventeen sessions; 2}4 hours' credit. 
Procedure in carrying out budget policies. Various budgets are discussed and illustrated; 
sales; production; purchases; manufacturing expenses; administrative expenses; financial- 
comparison of budget with financial statements at end of budget period; revision of budget. ' 

MATHEMATICS FOR THE ACCOUNTANT 

A 25 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Seventeen sessions; 23^^ hours' credit. 
Mathematical computations required in business practice and in C.P.A. examinations are 
covered. Considerable practice material is assigned to develop facility and accuracy in mathe- 
matics. 

Arithmetical computations: Percentages, averages, interest, discounts, partial payments, 
instalment sales, valuation of good will, logarithms. 

Algebraic computations: Tax and bonus problems, determination of net worth of inter- 
owned companies. 

Actuarial science: Compound interest, compound amounts and present values; ordinary 
annuities and annuities due; sinking fund computations; debt amortizations; effective 
interest on bonds. 

Depreciation: Sinking fund, annuity, fixed percentage of diminishing value, and composite 
rate methods. 

PAYROLL ACCOUNTING 

A 26 No prerequisite Seventeen sessions; 2}4 hours' credit. 
This course covers the recent developments in social security laws and procedures; federal 
old age benefit contributions and federal and state unemployment compensation taxes. Prac- 
tice material illustrates handling of various payroll deductions and analyses of payrolls for 
workmen's compensation insurance and other purposes. Manual and machine procedures are 
discussed. 

ENGLISH FOR THE ACCOUNTANT 

A 27 Prerequisite: A 7-8 Seventeen sessions; 2}-^ hours' credit. 
This course is designed to promote facility of expression in accounting work. Considerable 
practice is required in writing answers to questions on accounting theory and in preparation 
of reports. Emphasis is placed on use of good grammar, complete and concise expression, and 
in writing so that statements cannot be misunderstood. 

WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTANT 

A 28 Prerequisite: A 17-18, Ec 3-4, or equivalent Seventeen sessions; 2}4 hours' credit. 

An advanced course in the work of the comptroller and work of the treasurer. Organization 
of the comptroller's office; objectives to be served by the accounting system; preparation of 
routine and special reports; interpretation of reports; accounting aspects of duties of the 
treasurer. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 



DISTRIBUTION (D) 



Marketing enters into and influences every field of business and includes not only the direct 
process of the sale of goods, but the whole organization by which goods find their way from 
the original producer to the ultimate consumer. The change in the economic structure during 
the past ten years, growing out of higher standards of living, the development of new occu- 
pational interests, and the shift of population to large cities, has tended to increase the cost 
of marketing of goods. Just as the elimination of waste in production was the keynote of 
business fifteen years ago, the reduction of expense and the introduction of more efficieru 
methods in distribution are the foremost thought of busitKss leaders today. For this reason 
courses in marketing form one of the basic elements in a business education. 

MARKETING 

D 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
An understanding of the various methods in common use for selling goods and of the 
typical problems that arise in the course of distributing goods from the manufacturer through 
the middlemen and dealers to the consumers is provided. The selling problems of the manu- 
facturer, the wholesaler, the retailer, and the specialty agent are studied in relation to the 
various types of industries and commodities. 

PRINCIPLES OF SELLING 

D 3 Seventeen sessions; 2H hours' credit. 
This course deals with the evolution of modern salesmanship, its history, development, and 
opportunities. The psychology of selling, preparation for the interview, the proper approach, 
arousing the buying urge, the meeting of sales resistance, the closing of the sale, and the 
qualities of good salesmen are among the topics discussed. 

SALES MANAGEMENT 

D 4 Seventeen sessions; 2J^ hours' credit. 

This is a continuation of the course in the Principles of Selling. It includes study of the 
types of sales organizations, the work of sales executives, sales planning and policies, sales 
campaigns, management of the sales force, financing of sales, and the control of sales opera- 
tions. 

PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 

D 5 Seventeen sessions; 2^ hours' credit. 
A comprehensive course designed to familiarize the student with the nature and scope of 
advertising and its place in the commercial and economic structure. History, definition, 
and functions of advertising. Organization and functions of advertising departments and 
advertising agencies. Varieties of advertising and media. Problems, market investigation, 
planning campaigns. Laws, ethics, and regulations. A study of the broader aspects of ad- 
vertising with special emphasis on current trends and developments. 

RETAIL STORE ADVERTISING 

D 6 Seventeen sessions; 2H hours' credit. 
This course is devoted to the study of the elements of retail advertising. The various media 
used by retailers are considered with drill in the preparation of copy therefor. A study is 
made of institutional, straight merchandise, and sales copy as exemplified in current adver- 
tising of important retail concerns. The principles of layout receive attention as well as the 
mechanics of production including art work, plates, typography, and printing. The aim is 
to furnish a practical foundation fitting students for a creative career in retail advertising. 



ENGLISH (E) 



The value that comes from the effective use of good English in business reports and com- 
munications is being increasingly emphasized by business leaders. All students who are 
candidates for the degree or certificate are required to pursue systematic courses in English. 
Those having outstanding deficiencies may be required to take additional courses in English. 

BUSINESS ENGLISH 

E 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
Efficient training is provided in the use of correct and forceful English for business purposes. 
Practice in the construction of sales, collection, credit and application letters, business articles, 



30 DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



reports and newspaper stories provides opportunities for written expression on business 
topics. Study is devoted to the elements of logic as related to the organization and expression 
of thought. The course includes study of the fundamentals of sales promotion practice with 
special emphasis on buying motives. Oral work in class is intended to prepare students for 
participation in business conferences and public meetings. 

ADVANCED ENGLISH 

E 3-4 Prerequisite: E 1-2 or equivalent. Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
Literature of value and interest to business men forms the basis of study and practice in 
writing so as to develop an effective, easy style of expression. The student acquires a cultural 
basis which will serve not only as a source of entertainment in leisure hours but also an aid 
for business communications. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

E 5 Seventeen sessions; 2J^ hours' credit. 

Those who wish to speak convincingly, to overcome self-consciousness, and to develop 
self-confidence will find this course meeting their needs. Students are trained in the selection 
and organization of speech materials, the delivery of the speech, and in other important 
essentials of effective speaking. The entire course is practical and not theoretical. Work is 
centered around the interests and topics of business men and is specifically adapted to their 
needs. 

BUSINESS REPORTS AND CONFERENCES 

E 6 Seventeen sessions; 2H hours' credit. 
This course is devoted to the preparation and presentation of business reports and to the 
techniques of planning for, participating in, and conducting business conferences. Tliese 
reports and conferences are based upon business problems and situations. The nature of a 
thesis, the selection of a subject, the preparation of an outline, the collection and organization 
of data are considered in this course. Students are given the fullest possible opportunity to 
participate actively at each session. 

BUSINESS READINGS 
E 7 and E 8; 2H hours' credit for each course. 

The two courses in Business Readings are designed to broaden the student's acquaintance 
with selected writings in the field of business and to introduce him to the real pleasure and 
values that come from such reading. There are no required lectures for these courses, each of 
which carries two and one-half semester hours' credit and for which a charge of ten dollars 
is made. 

At the beginning of the Upper Middler and the Junior years, each degree candidate registers 
for a Readings course and is furnished a list of titles from which he makes selections for 
readings in accordance with the course requirements. Written reports are submitted on these 
readings, and are due on or before registering for classes the following year. 



ECONOMICS (Ec) 



Economics is the basic foundation upon which the general principles of business as a 
science are founded. A mastery of the underlying economic laws enables the student to see 
clearly the forces which business men must use in arriving at solutions to their problems. 
An appreciation and understanding of economics is a necessary factor in the equipment of a 
progressive business man. 



BUSINESS ECONOMICS 

Ec 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
The characteristics of modern business and industry are studied in terms of their operations 
and relationship to the modern economic system. Economic laws and principles are con- 
sidered in terms of business conditions peculiar to our own time and country and how these 
laws govern prices, wages of labor, profits, credit, competition, work and working conditions, 
and rewards for business enterprise. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 



FINANCIAL ORGANIZATION 

Ec 3-4 Prerequisite: Ec 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
The functions and services of money and credit as mediums of exchange are discussed. A 
detailed study is made of the organixation and functions of modern financial institutions such 
as commercial banks, trust companies, investment security houses, savings institutions, stock 
exchanges, the Federal Reserve System, and other credit and financial institutions. 

INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE 

Ec 5-6 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
Consideration is given to the determination of investment policies and to the analysis of 
various kinds of securities such as types of bonds, preferred and common stocks, and their 
place and use in the investment field. Attention is also given to the economic factors and 
changes as they affect investments. 

BUSINESS STATISTICS AND FORECASTING 

Ec 7-8 Prerequisite: Ec 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
The objective of this course is to train the student to use statistics in making better analyses 
of the business problems than is possible without statistics. The point of view of the business 
man and not the professional statistician is maintained throughout the study. In the early 
part of the course the emphasis is placed upon the necessary technical methods, using business 
problems as illustrations; in the second part of the course, the point of view is changed and 
the emphasis is placed upon solving practical problems, using statistical methods as tools 
when necessary. The practical application of statistics to business is directed toward business 
forecasting, business budgeting, production and labor, market analysis, investment and 
financial analyses, and executive and management statistics. 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

Ec 9 Seventeen sessions; 2J^ hours' credit. 
A broad general survey is made of the economic and industrial development of the United 
States from the colonial period to the present time. Emphasis is placed upon the origin and 
development of American industries, changes in industrial and commercial policies, economic 
forces at work in business and social institutions, and upon problems arising from the growth 
and development of business and industry in the United States. 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS 

Ec 11-12 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
A seminar course for advanced students in the field of economics. Current developments 
in international relations as they affect business in the United States are considered from an 
objective point of view. The student is taken behind the scenes of international relations 
to analyze the basic problems of economics, finance, and diplomacy involved. The effect 
of foreign policies upon business in the United States is studied. 



LAW (L) 



Underlying the ever-increasing complexity of modem business is a growing body of law 
which defines and directs business operations. 

LEGAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS 

L 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
A study of the application of legal machinery to the current needs and demands of modern 
business for facilitating organization, credit, finance, security or protection from risks, market- 
ing, and commercial and industrial peace. The course also provides excellent preparation for 
the law phase of the C.P. A. examination. 



MANAGEMENT (M) 



With the complex and rapidly changing conditions of modem business, the functions of 
administration and management must be clearly defined and maximum economies effected. 
Through the problem approach, these courses train the student to supplant guesswork and 
trial and error processes with organized knowledge and proven management methods. 

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 

M 1-2 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
An introductory survey of the whole field of business and industrial administration with 
special emphasis upon training the student in the analysis of business and industrial problems. 



32 DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



The functions of the business and industrial administrators are discussed with particular 
reference to the control policies and devices of the manager. The course presents the prob- 
lems of business and industry as an interrelated whole and helps the student to see the lines 
of study which lead to solution of those problems. 

PRINCIPLES OF PRODUCTION 

M 3 Prerequisite: M 1-2 Seventeen sessions; 2}4, hours* credit. 
A basic treatment of the fundamental manufacturing processes. Topics studied include 
factory organization, manufacturing and assembly sequences, selection and co-ordination of 
productive facilities, product design, inspection and salvage. 

SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT 

M 4 Prerequisite: M 3 Seventeen sessions; 2)4, hours' credit. 
The practical application of the principles of scientific management to production problems. 
The course embraces study in process research including time and motion study, standardiza- 
tion of materials, analysis of operations, methods of production, and production control 
including wage incentive systems. 

PSYCHOLOGY FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

M 5 Seventeen sessions; 2H hours' credit. 
Business psychology is the study of predicting and influencing human behavior in business. 
It provides an understanding of man's mental life, of how the individual and the group behave 
and are influenced in their behavior, and of how the business man may predict and control 
his own behavior and that of those with whom he works. The study and analysis of the 
student's own personal problems and behavior constitute a valuable and interesting phase of 
the course. 

PURCHASING 

M 6 Seventeen sessions; 2H hours' credit. 
A practical study of the functions and duties of the purchasing agent, the oi^anization and 
administration of his department, and his relations with other departments. The following 
are representative of subjects discussed: the purchasing function, qualifications of the pur- 
chasing agent, selection of supply sources, purchasing policies and budgets, cataloguing infor- 
mation, testing and inspection of purchases, and stores control. 

CREDITS AND COLLECTIONS 

M 7-8 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
TTiis course furnishes instruction in the theory of credit, the workings of a Credit Depart- 
ment, whether in the wholesale or retail field, and in the analysis and use of credit statements 
as aids to efficient management. 

INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS AND POLICIES 

M 9-10 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
Co-ordination of the functional relationships which exist between the different depart- 
ments of business with the problems affecting the determination of administrative and mana* 
gerial policies is the purpose of this study. Special attention is given to scientific manage- 
ment of industry and business and to the co-ordination of production with purchasing, sales, 
finance, and transportation. Cases and problems dealing with organization and expansion, 
consolidation and combinations, reorganizations, internal administration, industrial and 
human relations, and governmental control form the basis of discussion and study. 

GOVERNMENT CONTROLS IN BUSINESS 

M 11-12 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
A study of the economic and political relationships which exist between business and 
government, with particular emphasis upon the work of the Interstate Commerce Commission 
and the Federal Trade Commission; also other government agencies including the U. S. 
Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Labor, and particularly the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Social as well as economic aspects of government control will be considered. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 



MOTION STUDY 

M 13 Seventeen sessions: 2^ hours' credit. 
The course is designed to present the fundamental principles underlying motion analysis 
and work simplification. Included in the subjects considered are the following: Process and 
operation analysis through the use of process charts, flow diagrams, operation charts, man- 
and-machine charts, micromotion study, principles of motion economy. Work place layout, 
labor-saving tools and equipment, laboratory development work. Elementary time study. 
Setting up synthetic standards using elemental time values. Wage incentives, problems in- 
volved in the introduction of work simplification with particular emphasis upon employee 
morale. 

TIME STUDY 

M 14 Seventeen sessions; 2J/^ hours' credit. 

Based upon the best established methods procedures, the fundamental principles of time 
study are considered as a basis for standardization. Subjects included in the course are the fol- 
lowing: Introduction to wage incentives and current wage plans. History and development of 
time study, relation to motion and micromotion study, preliminary observation, technique 
of making time studies. Rating procedure, development of proper concept of "normal" per- 
formance, applying the rating and relaxation factors. Setting job and element standards, use 
of allowances, treatment of variables, introduction to standard data, synthetic standards, prob- 
lems in the application of standards. Laboratory practice will supplement the classroom work. 

WAGE ADMINISTRATION 

M 15 Seventeen sessions: 2H hours' credit. 
The matters related to the establishment of an effective and equitable wage payment plan 
and the administration of the same is of prime importance from the production as well as the 
labor relations point of view. The course is a comprehensive study of the underlying theory 
of industrial wages. Specific consideration is given to job and salary analysis and evaluation; 
merit rating; incentive wages; wage payment plans. The importance of a sound wage structure 
to healthy employer-employee relations. 

PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL 

M 16 Seventeen sessions: 2J^ hours' credit. 
This course is designed to include basic problems involved in the production department 
related to planning, scheduling and control. This course is a sequel to Principles of Production 
and includes the following subjects: Factory organization, factory planning and layout, ma- 
terials handling, storage, maintenance, power. Forecasting and budgeting, planning, schedul- 
ing, routing, dispatching, subcontracting. Quantity control, quality control, waste control, 
priorities, allocations, controlled materials plan, records and reports. 

BUSINESS PLANNING AND RESEARCH 

M 17-18 Prerequisite: Ec 7-8 Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 

This course is devoted primarily to a study of economic and business planning and to the 
technique of research and study in relation to planning. The fundamental principles 
underlying the solution of research problems will be analyzed and students will be required 
to apply those principles to specific problems involving planning and research. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SEMINAR 

M 19-20 Prerequisites: A 5-6, D 1-2, Ec 3-4, Ec 7-8. Thirty-three sessions; 5 hours' credit. 
This course provides the unique opportunity to use the information acquired from other 
courses in an intelligent, intimate discussion of live current problems which arise daily in 
marketing, production, and finance, with notes as to social significance. Emphasis is placed 
on the translation of problems out of the academic book atmosphere into the personal terms 
in which these problems must be met in business life and solved. Work is conducted upon a 
prepared individual conference basis. 

LABOR RELATIONS 

M 22 Seventeen sessions: 2J'^ hours' credit. 
The course is designed to develop an understanding of the problems involved in labor- 
management relations with procedures for promoting sound, healthy industrial relations. 
Consideration is given to the following: Historical background of industrial relations, 1896- 



34 DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



1945. Policies of labor and management in respect to hiring and layoffs, technological changes, 
wages and market positions. Effects of collective bargaining upon income of labor, employ- 
ment, accumulation of capital, and national income. The first trade agreement and renewals. 
Tlie nature of grievances and grievances procedures especially as they relate to wage incentive 
systems and job evaluation. 



THESIS (T) 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE THESIS 

T 3-4, 5 hours' credit. 
Each candidate for the B.B.A. degree may submit a thesis or the Business Readings reports. 
The conditions to be fulfilled in connection with a thesis are: 

1. The selection of the subject, preparation of the outlines, and the collection of data must 
be worked out in accordance with the requirements of the Committee on TTieses. 

2. Two typewritten copies of the completed thesis must be presented to the Dean or the 
Director in the Divisions, not later than March 15 of the year in which the candidate 
expects to graduate. 

3. The thesis is expected to meet the equivalent of the work required in a full-year course. 
It is expected to give evidence that its writer has made a thorough study of the subject or 
problem selected, that he has marshaled the data in a businesslike manner, and has given 
evidence of his ability to reach sound and reasoned conclusions, and to present his findings 
in dear and convincing terms. 

OCCUPATIONS (O) 

The School considers that the knowledges, skills, and experiences acquired in the full-time 
employment of its students are the equivalent in many respects to the work carried on in a 
laboratory. For this reason all members of the three upper classes who expect to qualify for 
the Bachelor of Business Administration degree must meet the occupational experience 
requirements listed below. 

In order that this occupational experience may have the maximum educational value, the 
School maintains a Department of Vocational Guidance and Placement under the supervision 
of a competent Director. It is the responsibility of this Department to assist those students: 

a. who need advice and guidance about employment in business; 

b. who are unemployed and need placement service, and 

c. who are already employed but need to change their present employment connections 
in order to obtain the greatest possible benefit from their training and experience. 

There is no tuition charge for the occupational courses listed below, even though thev are 
required for the degree. Furthermore, all services of the Department of Vocational Guidance 
and Placement are without charge to the student. 

ELEMENTARY OCCUPATIONS 

O 1-2 10 hours' credit. 
In this course students are required to meet with the Director of Vocational Guidance and 
Placement in groups or individually as he may direct, and to submit in the Upper Middler 
year a complete and detailed record of their employment for the college year. This report is 
one factor in evaluating the occupational experience credit of the student. 

INTERMEDIATE OCCUPATIONS 

O 3-4 10 hours' credit. 
A continuation of O 1-2. Continuing guidance under the supervision of the Director of 
Vocational Guidance and Placement. Consideration of psychological and economic factors 
affecting vocations; vocational objectives. A complete report of the employment of the Junior 
year is required. 

ADVANCED OCCUPATIONS 
O 5-6 10 hours' credit. 
A critical consideration of the student's present employment in the light of present-day 
occupational trends. Individual conferences with a view to vocational adjustments, if deemed 
desirable. A complete report of the employment of the Senior year is required. 



School of Business 



^Administrative^ Tolicies 



Requirements for Admission 

All applicants whose credentials are approved by the Committee on Educa- 
tion, and who are admitted for degree or other programs, are classified as 
regular or conditioned students. 



Regular Students 

Applicants for admission as regular students must present evidence of the 
completion of an approved secondary school course, or the equivalent 
15 units.* 



Conditioned Students 

Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular 
students may be admitted as conditioned students provided they present 
satisfactory evidence of ability to profit by the work of the School. 
Conditioned students may remove their admission conditions and be 
re-classified as regular students by using a, h, c, or a combination of a and b. 

a. By applying courses which they have completed in the School of Business 
or in another approved college or university at the rate of one unit for 
each two and one-half semester hours. A course cannot be credited 
both for the removal of admission conditions and for the degree. 

b. By applying units for work completed in an approved secondary school, 
or for work certified by an accredited certifying agency. 

c. By action of the Committee on Education based upon all factors 
affecting the achievement and ability of the student in the School, when 
the student shall have completed the first thirty semester hours of work 
in his program; provided this work shall have been completed in not 
less than three years of attendance and with an average grade of not less 
than 70%. All conditioned students are required to take prescribed 
aptitude tests during the first year of attendance. These tests, for which 
no specific preparation can be made, are designed to test intellectual 
capacity and general fitness for college work rather than preparation in 
the specific subject matter of a secondary school program. 



*A unit represents a year's work in any subject in any approved secondary school consti- 
tuting approximately a quarter of a full year's work, or the equivalent. A four-year day 
high school course is regarded as representing at least 15 units of work, or 3 units in junior 
high school and 12 units in a three-year senior high school. 



35 



36 ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES 



Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing credit in the School may be obtained in one or both 
of two ways, as follows: 

By Transfer of Credit. Subject to the approval of the Committee on Edu- 
cation, credit may be given for work completed in other approved schools, 
colleges, and universities. Applicants desiring credit by transfer should 
indicate their desire at the time the application for admission is filed. A 
copy of the catalog of the institution from which the transfer is sought 
should accompany the application for admission. 

By Examination. Applicants who desire to secure advanced standing credit 
by examination are required to apply in writing for examination in those 
subjects for which credit is sought. Proper forms should be obtained from 
the School Office and filed at the time the application for admission is filed. 
Applications for examinations are approved by the Committee on Educa- 
tion which will take into account previous training, business experience, and 
other factors showing the applicant's special preparation and ability in the 
subject or subjects in which credit is sought by examination. 

A grade of 75% must be obtained in an examination in order to secure 
advanced standing credit for the subject. Upon successfully passing an ex- 
amination, the applicant may be given full credit as though the subject had 
been pursued in the School, or may be excused from the subject and per- 
mitted to select an elective course in lieu thereof. 

The same subject cannot be offered both for admission credit and as 
a basis for advanced standing. 

Registration 

Before attending classes, students should report at the School Office for 
registration. Students are requested to assist in lessening congestion during 
the opening week by registering during the two weeks previous to the opening 
of the School. 

Late registration for those unable to enter at the opening of the School 
year will be permitted at the discretion of the Dean, or the Director in the 
case of the Divisions. 

Class Sessions 

Classes are held each evening of the week except Saturday. The normal 
schedule for students pursuing a degree, title, or certificate program is three evenings 
a week. Students may arrange their schedules so as to attend classes one, two, three 
or four evenings a week depending upon the number of subjects taken. Students 
interested in the schedule of classes should apply to the office of the school 
in the city in which they expect to attend. 

Notify the Office Immediately 

Of change of address. 

Of withdrawal from any course — otherwise the fee for that course will be 
charged. 

Of withdrawal from the School, giving date of the last session attended, i 



ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES 37 



Attendance 

The limited amount of time devoted to each subject and the rapid rate of 
progress in covering the essential content of a course make it highly desirable 
that students be present at every session. Because of the importance of regular 
attendance and its bearing upon the quality of scholarship, the policies 
governing attendance are: 

Students who attend 75% or more sessions in a course are entitled to pass 
in that course if they attain a minimum final grade of D. 

Students who attend between 50% and 74% of the sessions in a course are 
entitled to pass in that course if they attain a minimum final grade of C. 
Those who do not attain the minimum required grade of C may remove the 
condition only by means of a make-up examination in which they must 
receive a mark sufficient to raise the course grade to C. 

Students who attend less than 50% of the sessions in a course will be 
considered ineligible to take the final examination or to receive any credit 
for the course. 

Attendance credit is granted only when the student is in attendance at 
least three-quarters of the class period. Three separate absences of less than 
30 minutes each constitute one complete absence unless such partial absences 
are canceled by satisfactory excuses. 

Outside Preparation 

It is expected that students will devote on the average two hours to prepara- 
tion for each hour spent in the classroom. A student carrying a normal 
program of three evenings a week will, therefore, be expected to devote to 
outside preparation an average of eleven to twelve hours a week. Some 
courses require more time for preparation than others. 

Regular Examinations 

The general policies governing regular examinations are: 

A final examination will be held at the end of each course unless an an- 
nouncement to the contrary is made. 

The minimum passing grade in a regular final examination is D. 

In case a student is excused from a final examination by the Dean or 
Director, he may take the next regular or conditioned examination in the 
subject. The student who fails to complete a course within one year from the 
termination of that course must repeat the course, except that in special 
cases for justifiable cause the Committee on Education may waive this rule. 

The student who has received a passing mark in a final examination and 
in a course may not take another examination for the purpose of raising his 
grade unless he repeats the course in its entirety. 

Condition Examinations 

The following policies govern re-examinations: 

Permission for taking a make-up examination is dependent upon the 
quality of the work which the student has done throughout the course and is 
a privilege which the Committee on Education may grant to students who 
have received an E grade or an incomplete (Inc.). 



38 ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES 



The condition or make-up examinations are given in September. Students 
should consult the School Office for the specific dates of each examination. 

Only one make-up examination in any given subject is allowed for the 
purpose of removing a conditional failure, 

A make-up examination for purposes of removing a condition or an 
incomplete grade must be taken within the next School year. In such cases 
students may take either the examination at the condition examination 
period or the final examination when next given if within a period of one 
year. A fee of $2 is charged for each School of Business examination taken 
out of course. 

A minimum grade of 65% is required on each make-up examination unless 
a higher minimum is specified. 

Whatever grade the student obtains on the make-up examination is credited 
as the final examination grade, but in no case can the final grade in the course 
be more than 70% except in the case of students who have been excused 
from taking the regular final examination. 

Tests 

Four tests in full-year courses and two tests in half-year courses are regularly 
scheduled. These tests are regarded as a part of the term or course work. 
Since no make-up tests are given, students who miss a test should confer 
with their instructors regarding their status. 



Marks and Credits 

The following system of grading is in use: 

Superior Work, A; Above Average Work, B; Average Work, C; Lowest 
Passing Grade, D; Unsatisfactory Work, E; Failure, F; Incomplete, Inc. 

Students receiving an E, or unsatisfactory work grade, in an examination 
or as a final grade in the course, may remove the unsatisfactory grade by 
taking a make-up examination when it is next given, or at the time of the 
conditional examinations in September. The minimum passing grade of 
65% is required on the make-up examination, unless a higher minimum is 
designated. In no case will a student taking a make-up examination be 
allowed more than a C for a final grade even though a higher grade may be 
obtained. 

Students receiving an F grade in a course must repeat the course in its 
entirety including term work, examinations, and attendance. 

The policy is followed of mailing all grade and status reports to students 
instead of issuing these reports at the School Office or over the telephone. 

A passing grade in a final examination as well as a passing final grade in 
the course is necessary in order to receive credit in the course. 

Credit for one-half of a full-year course is not generally given, and in any 
event only upon approval by the Dean in advance of beginning the course. 

In order to qualify for a degree, title, or a certificate the student must 
maintain a general average of C for the entire program. This is not interpreted 
to mean that each course must be passed with a grade of C, but that the 
average of all courses must be at least C. Grades of courses credited by 
transfer or by examination are not included in computing averages. 



ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES 39 



Graduation with Honors 

Honors are based upon the excellence of the work performed by the 
students in the School. Three honorary distinctions are conferred upon 
properly qualified candidates for the bachelor's degree upon graduation: 

Highest honors to those who have completed all work with an average of 
95% with no grade less than C. 

High honors to those who have completed all work with an average of 
90% with no grade less than C. 

Honors to those who have completed all work with an average of 85% 
with no grade less than C. 

These honors are subject to further conditions as follows: 

To be entitled to honors a student must have completed a minimum of 
two full years of study in the School. 

Courses credited by advanced standing whether by transfer or by examina- 
tion will be eliminated in determining honors. 

Scholarships, Awards, and Loan Funds 

The following scholarships and awards are available to students enrolled 
for a normal schedule of fifteen or more semester hours of class work who 
are pursuing a degree or title program in the School of Business in Boston. 
One-fourth of the scholarship is applied to the tuition of the recipient at each 
quarterly payment. 

School of Business Honor Awards 
A half tuition scholarship award is made each year to the highest ranking 
student of that year in the Junior, Upper Middler, Lower Middler, Sopho- 
more and Freshman classes who re-enrolls the following year for a normal 
schedule of study. 

A quarter tuition scholarship award is made each year to the second highest 
ranking student of that year in the Junior, Upper Middler, Lower Middler, 
Sophomore and Freshman classes who re-enrolls the following year for a 
normal schedule of study. 

To be eligible for either a half or a quarter tuition honor award, a student 
entering the School with advanced standing credit, except by examination, 
must have completed at least thirty semester hours of classroom work at the 
time the award is made. 

The Clarkson-Alumni Scholarship 
This scholarship, made available through the generosity of the Alumni 
Association of the School of Business in Boston, is in memory of George S. 
Clarkson, a member of the Class of 1914 and an instructor in accounting for 
many years. This scholarship, which is indeterminate in amount, is granted 
to the student who obtains the highest final grade in the course in Auditing 
unless he is eligible for an award of greater monetary value, in which event the 
Clarkson-Alumni award will be made to the highest ranking student in 
Auditing who is not eligible for such an award. To be eligible for this scholar- 
ship the student must pursue a normal schedule the following year. 

Dean Russell Whitney Memorial Scholarship 
Alpha Chapter of the Pi Tau Kappa Fraternity sponsors an annual tuition 
scholarship in memory of former Dean Russell Whitney. The award consists 



40 ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES 



of a half tuition of sixty dollars awarded to the man in the Junior Class of the 
School of Business whose qualities of leadership and influence among his 
fellow students, whose strength of character, whose record of scholarship 
and broad achievement, mark him as outstanding. The award is made avail- 
able to the student in his senior year. To be eligible for this scholarship the 
student must pursue a normal schedule during his senior year. 

Kappa Tau Phi Scholarship 
This scholarship award, amounting to thirty dollars, is made available by 
the Kappa Tau Phi Sorority. It is granted annually to the woman student 
who ranks highest in her class at the end of the Sophomore year unless she 
is eligible for an award of greater monetary value, in which event the award 
will be made to the highest ranking woman student who is not eligible for 
such an award. To be eligible for this scholarship the student must pursue a 
normal schedule the following year. In determining this award grades of all 
courses completed in the Freshman and Sophomore years shall be considered. 

Alumni Loan Fund 
The Alumni Association of the School of Business in Boston has provided 
a loan fund which is available to students in the Senior and Junior classes in 
Boston who are in need of financial assistance in order to continue their 
studies. Applications for loans should be addressed to the Dean of the School. 
All applications must be approved by the Alumni Loan Fund Committee. 

School of Business Loan Fund 
By vote of the Student Council a part of the Student Activities fees for 
1937-1938 was set aside to provide a loan fund which is available to students 
temporarily in need of small loans for tuition or other School charges. 
Students needing assistance from this fund should confer with the Dean who 
administers it. 

Probation and Discipline 

The Committee on Education, in dealing with students whose work in 
the School may be unsatisfactory, or whose conduct is such as to make it 
inadvisable for them to continue as members of the student body, considers 
each case upon its individual merits. The following general principles are 
kept in mind in handling such cases: 

Students whose scholarship in any given year is unsatisfactory may be 
dropped from the School or may be placed on probation with the privilege 
of spending a year in review. 

When a student is placed on probation, the probation is formally imposed 
for a definite time and can only be extended by approval of the Committee 
on Education. 

This Committee has the authority to dismiss from the School or place on 
probation at any time or to strike off from the list of candidates for the degree 
any student whom it may deem unworthy either on account of unsatisfactory 
scholarship or for any great defect of conduct or character. The Committee 
may ask any student to withdraw from the School who is obviously out of 
sympathy with the aims and ideals of the School. 



School of Business 



Qeneral ^nformatioru 



Classrooms and Libraries 

The classrooms are furnished with modern equipment and are thoroughly 
adapted to evening school work. Improvements in classroom facilities are 
constantly being made to meet the needs of the student body. 

In connection with the General Library of the University in Boston a 
special section is devoted to books on business subjects. In addition, the 
leading trade and business magazines are available for student use. Additions 
are constantly being made to the business section of the Library in recognition 
of the new demands for business education and research. The reading rooms 
of the Library are open Monday through Friday from 8:45 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
They close at 5 p.m. on Saturdays and are not open Sundays and holidays. 

All members of the School in Boston are entitled to the privilege of using 
the Boston Public Library including the Business Branch at 20 City Hall 
Avenue. The same privilege is accorded students in the Divisions for the use 
of the libraries in their respective cities. 

Textbooks and Supplies 

The Northeastern University Bookstore is a department of the University 
and is operated for the convenience of the student body. All books and 
supplies which are required by the students for their work in the University 
may be purchased at the Bookstore. In addition, the Bookstore also carries 
a large number of general supplies. In Boston the main store is situated in the 
basement of Richards Hall. 

Student Council 

The social and extracurricular life of the School is in charge of Student 
Councils consisting of representatives from each class or school group. In 
addition to arranging for occasional social affairs, special lectures, and meet- 
ings, the council represents the interests of the student body. The faculty 
and the officials advise with the council in regard to School policies. 

Honor Fraternity 

Sigma Epsilon Rho is the honor fraternity in the School of Business. Its 
purposes are: 

To promote acquaintance and good fellowship among those men who have 
attained highest scholastic standing in the School. 

To stimulate the student body to higher scholastic accomplishment through 
the bearing, influence, and work of these selected men. 

To develop methods of mutual improvement and advancement among 
the members of this fraternity. 

To support high moral, professional and scholastic ideals. 

Only students with honor standing are admitted to the fraternity. Admis- 
sion is by invitation, after nomination by the School faculty. 

An outstanding business book is awarded each year by Sigma Epsilon Rho 
Fraternity to the highest ranking student for that year in each of the Sopho- 
more, Lower Middler, Upper Middler, and Junior classes. Students will 
receive the award only in the event that they enroll for the subsequent year. 

41 



School of Business 



guidon and Other ^ees 



Matriculation Fee 

The University matriculation fee of $5 must accompany the initial applica- 
tion for admission to the University. This fee is not refundable. 

University Fee 

All students enrolled in the School of Business are charged a University fee 
based on the number of semester hours for which the student is enrolled. The 
charge is 70 cents a semester hour of classroom work, but not exceeding $10 
in any one year. This fee covers in part library, general materials, general 
university service charges, and similar items for which separate fees are fre- 
quently charged by other colleges and universities. It is payable by all students 
regardless of date of admission or the curriculum in which they are enrolled. 
For students enrolled for the entire year, the University fee is payable one-half 
when the student enrolls in September, and one-half with the January pay- 
ment. If enrollment is for a single semester, the fee is payable with the first 
payment of the semester. 

Tuition Fees 

Tuition fees for courses in the School of Business are based on a charge of 
$8 a semester hour. 

Complete Programs 
A student carrying a normal program of three full-year courses throughout 
the School year will complete fifteen semester hours of work for which the 
charge is $120. This charge is payable in four payments of $30, the first being 
due during the opening week of School and the other three during the weeks 
of November 13, January 15, and March 5. 

Single Courses 
The charge for each half-year course carrying two and one-half semester 
hours' credit is $20, payable in two payments of $10, and for each full-year 
course carrying five semester hours' credit, $40, payable in four payments of 
$10, except that payment for any course completed in one semester must be 
made during the semester in which the course is completed. 

Deferred Payment Privilege 
Students who would be denied the advantages of a systematic education if 
required to meet the tuition payments in the manner specified above, may 
make other payment arrangements with the Dean. A nominal charge is made 
for this service. 

Courses in Other Departments of the University 

School of Business students assigned to courses in other departments of 
the University are charged the tuition rates and other fees effective in the 
departments to which they are assigned. 

42 



TUITION AND OTHER FEES 43 



Late Registration 

No reduction in tuition is made for late registration. A student is neither 
entitled to classroom privileges nor considered as registered and enrolled 
until tuition due has been paid or satisfactory arrangements made in person 
with the Dean. 

Student Activities Fee 

An activities fee is charged all students on the following basis: 

$1 for students enrolled for courses not exceeding five semester hours. 
$2 for students enrolled for courses exceeding five semester hours. 
The fee is payable during the opening week in September. Students register- 
ing in the second semester pay the fee at the time of registration. It is adminis- 
tered by the University authorities in the interest of the students, and is used 
primarily to promote extracurricular activities. 

Other Fees 

A fee of $2 is charged for each make-up examination or advanced standing 
examination. This fee must be paid on or before the date of the examination. 

A fee of $10 is charged for each of the Business Readings courses. One- 
half is payable with the November tuition payment and one-half with the 
March tuition payment. This fee applies only to those who elect to submit 
Business Readings in lieu of a thesis, and is payable ordinarily during the 
Upper Middler and Junior years. 

A thesis fee of $20 is required of all degree candidates who elect to write 
theses. This fee is payable upon presentation of the thesis which is due not 
later than March 15 of the year in which the student expects to receive the 

degree. j j r 

The University graduation fee, charged to those who are candidates tor a 
degree, is $10, payable on or before May 1st of the year in which the student 
expects to graduate. A fee of $5 is charged to all candidates for a title or 
certificate and is payable on or before May 1st of the year the program is to 
be completed. 

Expense for Books and Materials 

Students purchase their own textbooks and working materials. The cost 
varies according to the subjects for which the student is enrolled. The average 
cost for a normal program of three subjects is about $13, with a maximum of 
approximately $20. The textbooks for single courses range from $1.25 to $5. 

General Financial Information 

Checks should be drawn payable to Northeastern University. 

Students who have withdrawn from a course for good cause and who are 
permitted to repeat it are credited with the tuition previously paid on that 
course, provided they re-enroll for the same course within the next two 
college years. The credit cannot be applied, however, until the balance due 
on the course has been paid. 

Students are not permitted to attend class sessions or take any examinations 
or tests until they have paid their tuition fees or have made satisfactory 
arrangements for payments. 



44 TUITION AND OTHER FEES 



Students will not be advanced in class standing, or permitted to re-enroll 
in the University, nor will degrees be conferred until all financial obligations 
to the University have been met. 

No certificate of honorable dismissal will be issued to any student who has 
not fully met his financial obligations to the University. 

Withdraw^als and Refunds Policy 

In the event a student is obliged to withdraw from the School in which he 
is enrolled for causes deemed adequate by the Committee on Withdrawals, 
the balance of the tuition paid after the following deductions have been 
made will be refunded: 

a. Four per cent of the total yearly tuition charge shall be deducted for 
each week of attendance or fraction thereof, in the event of enrollment 
for a full School year. 

h. Ten per cent of the total tuition charged shall be deducted for each week 
of attendance or fraction thereof, in the event of enrollment for a 
semester. 

The amount of tuition to be charged in the case of withdrawals shall be 
computed as indicated under a and b above from the date of each quarterly 
payment. 

Matriculation, examination, thesis, and other fees are not refundable 
except that graduation and certificate charges will be refunded in case of 
nonqualification. 

No refunds are granted unless the application for withdrawal is filed within 
forty-five days after the student has ceased attendance. 



I 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

COEDUCATIONAL 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foutidation for the understanding of 
modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. Varied opportunities available 
for vocational specialization. Degree: Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Offers curricula in Civil, Mechanical (with Industrial and Aeronautical options), Electrical, 
and Chemical Engineering. Classroom study is supplemented by experiment and research in 
well-equipped laboratories. Degree: Bachelor of Science in the professional field of specialization. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Offers curricula in Accounting, Marketing and Advertising, and Industrial Administration. 
Each curriculum represents in itself a broad survey of business technique, differing from the 
others chiefly in emphasis. Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

Offers day and evening undergraduate programs admitting those who present a minimum 
of one-half of the work accepted for a bachelor's degree in an approved college or its full 
equivalent, each program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Offers curricula through evening classes leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business 
Administration with appropriate specification in Accounting, Management, and Engineering 
and Business. Preparation for C.P.A. examinations. Intensive programs arranged to meet 
special needs. 

EVENING COURSES OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during evenihg hours in the fields 
of Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, History, Government, Psychology and Sociology. 
A special program preparing for admission to the School of Law is also available. The program 
is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirement for the A.B. or S.B. degree. Special courses 
also available. Degree of Associate in Arts conferred. 



The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering, and Business Administration offer day programs 
and are conducted on the Co-operative Plan. After the freshman year students may alternate 
their periods of study with periods of work in the employ of business or industrial concerns. 
Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large part of their college expenses. 
Full-time curricula are available for students who do not desire the Co-operative Plan. 



In addition to the above schools the University has affiliated with it and conducts the 
Lincoln Technical Institute offering, through evening classes, courses of college grade in 
various fields of engineering leading to the degree of Associate in Engineering; and the Lincoln 
Preparatory School, an accredited evening school preparing for college entrance and offering 
other standard high school programs. 



For further information regarding any of the above schools, address 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY , 

360 Huntington Avenue 

BOSTON 15, MASS. * 
Telephone: KENmore 5800 

School of Law 1 14 Chestnut St. 

47 Mt. Vernon Street Tel.: Spr. 6-3681 

Boston, Mass. Springfield, Mass. 



NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 

College of CiberalMts 



BULLETIN OF EVENING COURSES 




OFFICE HOURS 

August 15-June 15 

Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m.- 9:15 p.m. 

Saturdays 

Until Labor Day 8:45 .-k.m.-I 2:00 p.m. 

During September 8:45 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

After October 1 8:45 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. 

June 15-August 15 

Monday and Tuesday 8:45 a.m.- 9:00 p.m. 

Wednesday through Friday 8:45 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

The office is closed on all legal holidays. 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

Northeastern University will welcome gifts and bequests for the follow- 
ing purposes; 

(a) For its building program. 

(b) For general endowment. 

(c) For specific purposes which may especially appeal to the donor. 

It is suggested that, when possible, those contemplating gifts or bequests 
confer with the President of the University regarding the University's 
needs before legal papers are drawn. 

Gifts and bequests should be made only in the University's legal name, 
which is "Northeastern University." 

A 



For further information or an interview 

ADDRESS: D'lrector of Evening Courses 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

360 Huntington Avenue, Boston 15, Mass. 

Telephone: KENmore 5800 



NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 

College ofObeml^rts 



BULLETIN OF EVENING COURSES 

COEDUCATfONAL 




The University is located at the entrance to the Huntington 

Avenue subway v/ithin nine minutes of Park Street oad 

easily accessible from all points. 



(r*vq^«^ 




I 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Calendar 4 



NORTHEASTERN U^^IVERSITY 

The Northeastern University Corporation 6 

General Univ'ersity Committees 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Chairmen of Instructional Departments 8 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Evening Courses 

General Statement 9-1 1 

Location 11-12 

Statement of Purpose 13 

Programs 1 6-1 8 

Chemistry 17 

Labor-Relations Institute 18 

Law-Liberal Arts 16 

Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental and Pre- Veterinarian 16 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Arts 14 

Requirements for A.B. or S.B. Degree 15 

Admission Requirements 15 

General Information 19 

Advanced Standing 19 

Application for Admission 19 

Registration 19 

Attendance and Examinations 19 

Grades 20 

Honor List 20 

Scholarships 20 

Tuition and Fees 21 

Description of Courses 22-30 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Evening Courses 

CALENDAR 

Registration August 15-September 10 

Make-up Examinations September 4, 5 

First Semester Begins Monday after Labor Day 

Christmas Recess Christmas Week 

through New Year's Day 

Final Examinations — First Semester Third week in January 

Second Semester Begins Last week in January 

Make-up Examinations Second week in March 

Final Examinations First week in June 

Commencement Exercises To be announced 

Class sessions will be omitted on all legal holidays. 



Ciberal^rts 

AND THE POSTWAR PERIOD 

"The frontier of the future is the frontier of the mind." These 
forward looking words of Winston Churchill direct our thinking as 
we search for solutions of our world problems of the future. The 
world-wide moral and spiritual destruction and social disorder 
created by the war present a far graver problem in our postwar 
reconstruction than the destruction of properties and physical 
resources. The world must be rebuilt. 

National leaders are increasingly of the opinion that more men 
and women must be trained in the liberal arts with particular refer- 
ence to government, history, sociology, literature and allied fields. 
Our responsibilities for world order can be discharged only through 
trained leaders and a citizenry enlightened in the fundamental 
truths of human relations. 

Men and women who are graduating from high schools or are 
now employed in war industry and would prefer to work in fields 
more immediately related to social problems will find many oppor- 
tunities for more essential service in the postwar reconstruction 
period. A clear realization of the true and enduring values proven 
throughout the history of civilization is our only promise for per- 
manent peace in either our domestic social problems or in our 
international political economy. 



THE NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY CORPORATION 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 

Frank Lincoln Richardson, Vice-Chairman 

Carl Stephens Ell, President of the University 

Henry Nathaniel Andrews, Treasurer 

Everett Avery Churchill, Secretary 



Joseph Florence Abbott 

Charles Francis Adams 

WiLMAN Edward Adams 

Roger Amory 

Arthur Atwood Ballantine 

George Louis Barnes 

Thomas Prince Beal 

Farwell Gregg Bemis 

Samuel Bruce Black 

Henry Goddard Bradlee 

George Augustus Burnham 

Godfrey Lowell Cabot 

Paul Codman Cabot 

Walter Channing 

William Converse Chick 

Paul Foster Clark 

William H. Collins 

Sears B. Condit 

Albert Morton Creighton 

Edward Dana 

Edward Dane 

Justin Whitlock Dart 

William James Davidson 

Bernard W. Doyle 

Paul Augustus Draper 

David Frank Edwards 

William Partridge Ellison 

Joseph Buell Ely 

Robert Greenough Emerson 

John Wells Farley 

Allan Forbes 

Ernest Bigelow Freeman 

Franklin Wile Ganse 

Harvey Dow Gibson 

Merrill Griswold 

George Hansen 

Henry Ingraham Harriman 

Carroll Sherlock Harvey 

Harvey P. Hood 

Chandler Hovey 

Weston Howland 

Howard Munson Hubbard 

Maynard Hutchinson 

Raymond Winfield James 

Arthur Stoddard Johnson 

Charles Berkley Johnson 

Jacob Joseph Kaplan 



Harry Hamilton Kerr 

Frank Howard Lahey 

Halfdan Lee 

Galen David Light 

James Franklin McElwain 

Hugh Dean McLellan 

EIdward Abbott MacMaster 

John Russell Macomber 

Albert Edward Marshall 

Harold Francis Mason 

Irwin Likely Moore 

Fred Lester Morgan 

Irving Edwin Moultrop 

Clarence Lucian Newton 

Samuel Norwich 

Olaf Olsen 

AuGusTiN Hamilton Parker, Jr. 

George Edwin Pierce 

Roger Pierce 

Matthew Porosky 

Frederick Sanford Pratt 

Roger Preston 

Sidney Rabinovitz 

Stuart Craig Rand 

William McNear Rand 

James Lorin Richards 

Harold Bours Richmond 

Charles Forest Rittenhouse 

John James Robinson 

Robert Billings Rugg 

Leverett Saltonstall 

Russell Maryland Sanders 

Andrew Sebastian Seiler 

Frank Palmer Speare 

Russell Henry Stafford 

Francis Robert Carnegie Steele 

Charles Stetson 

Earl Place Stevenson 

Robert Treat Paine Storer 

Frank Horace Stuart 

Edward Watson Supple 

Ralph Emerson Thompson 

James Vincent Toner 

Eliot Wadsworth 

Eustis Walcott 

Edwin Sibley Webster 

Sinclair Weeks 



GENERAL UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 
Everett Avery Churchill Milton John Schlagenhauf 

Albert Ellsworth Everett William Crombie White 

UNIVERSITY CABINET 

Carl Stephens Ell, Chairman 
Everett Avery Churchill Winthrop Eliot Nightingale 

Albert Ellsworth Everett Rudolf Oscar Oberg 

Roger Stanton Hamilton Edward Snow Parsons 

Charles William Havice John Butler Pugsley 

Wilfred Stanley Lake Milton John Schlagenhauf 

James Wallace Lees J. Kenneth Stevenson 

Harold Wesley Melvin William Crombie White 

Stuart Mead Wright 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Everett Avery Churchill, Chairman 
Albert Ellsworth Everett Wilfred Stanley Lake 

Roger Stanton Hamilton Myra White 

William Crombie White 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Evening Courses 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., Sc.D., President of the University 

Frank Palmer Speare, M.H., LL.D., President Emeritus 

Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D., Vice-President of the University 

Albert Ellsworth Everett, B.S., M.B.A., Director of Evening Division 

Wilfred Stanley Lake, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

Milton John Sghlagenhauf, A.B., B.D., M.A., Director of Admissions 

CHAIRMEN OF INSTRUCTIONAL DEPARTMENTS 

Charles Frederick Barnason, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages 
Res. 122 Downer Ave., Hingham 

Stanley Goddard Estes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 
Res. 60 Pinckney St., Boston. On Leave of Absence. 

Roger Stanton Hamilton, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics 
Res. 1367 Walnut St., Newton Highlands 

Charles William Havice, A.B., M.A., S.T.B., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 
Res. 178 Goden St., Belmont 

Frederick William Holmes, A.B., M.A., Professor of English 
Res. 43 Lincoln St., Dedham 

Stanley Demetrius Miroyiannis, S.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Biology 
Res. 8 Cumberland St., Boston 

Carl Frederick Muckenhoupt, A.B., S.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physics 
Res. 332 Winchester St., Newton Highlands 

Joseph Spear, A.B., M.A., Professor of Mathematics 
Res. 31 Matchett St., Brighton 

Arthur Andrew Vernon, S.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 
Res. 14 Standish St., Newton Highlands 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Northeastern University is incorporated as a philanthropic institu- 
tion under the General Laws of Massachusetts. The State Legislature, by 
special enactment, has given the University general degree granting powers. 

The Corporation of Northeastern University consists of men who 
occupy responsible positions in business and the professions. This Corpora- 
tion elects from its membership a Board of Trustees in whom the control 
of the institution is vested. The Board of Trustees has four standing com- 
mittees: (a) an Executive Committee which serves as an Ad Interim Com- 
mittee between the regular meetings of the Board of Trustees and has 
general supervision of the financial and educational policies of the Uni- 
versity; (b) a Committee on Buildings which has general supervision over 
the building needs of the University; (c) a Committee on Funds and In- 
vestments which has the responsibility of administering the funds of the 
University; (d) a Development Committee which is concerned with 
furthering the development plans of the University. 

Founded in 1898, Northeastern University, from the outset, had as its 
dominant purpose the discovery of human and social needs and the meet- 
ing of these needs in distinctive and highly serviceable ways. While sub- 
scribing to the most progressive educational thought and practice, the 
University has not duplicated the programs of other institutions but has 
sought "to bring education more directly into the service of human needs." 

With respect to program, Northeastern has limited itself: 

— To offering, in its several schools, basic curricula from which 

non-essentials have been eliminated; 

— To effective teaching; 

— To advising and guiding students; 

— To giving students the chance to build well-rounded personalities 

through a balanced program of extracurricular activities. 

The Northeastern Plan of Education is especially designed for the 
student who must earn while he learns. In the main, it consists of two 
definite types of education: 

— Co-operative Education by Day, 

— Adult Education by Night. 

The plan has been developed in such a way that experience in jobs 
with pay is utilized to help students of limited financial resources secure an 
education and at the same time gain the maximum educational benefit 
from their practical experience. So far as the New England States are 
concerned, Northeastern University is the only institution whose day 



10 Northeastern University 

colleges, other than the School of Law, are conducted under the Co- 
operative Plan. 

The several schools and programs of the University are conducted either 
under the name "Northeastern University" or by its affiliated schools. 
The Lincoln Schools and The Huntington Day School for Boys. The 
following is a brief outline of the principal types of educational oppor- 
tunities offered: 

1. In the field of Co-operative Education there are three day colleges 
— the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Engineering, and the 
College of Business Administration. The College of Liberal Arts offers 
majors in the usual fields of the arts and the sciences leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. The College of 
Engineering, one of the largest engineering colleges in the United 
States, has curricula in Civil, Mechanical (with Industrial and Aero- 
nautical options). Electrical, and Chemical Engineering. The College 
of Business Administration has curricula in Accounting, Marketing 
and Advertising, and Industrial Administration. The College of En- 
gineering and the College of Business Administration confer the degree 
of Bachelor of Science with specification indicating the field of special- 
ization. The Co-operative Plan under which all of these day colleges 
operate enables the student to alternate regular periods of classroom 
instruction with supervised employment in an industrial or commercial 
position, thus combining' theory and practice in an exceedingly effec- 
tive manner. Apart from the educational advantages of the Co- 
operative Plan is the opportunity for self-support while the student is 
pursuing his studies at Northeastern University. During the co-opera- 
tive periods, students not only gain experience but are also paid for 
their services. Approximately three hundred business and industrial 
concerns co-operate with Northeastern University in making this 
program effective. 

2. The School of Law conducts both a day and an evening undergraduate 
program which prepares for admission to the bar and for the practice 
of the law and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

3. The Adult Education Program has been developed in the evening work 
of the School of Law as indicated above, in the School of Business, and 
in the evening courses of the College of Liberal Arts. The School of 
Business has curricula in Management, Accounting, and Engineering 
and Business. This School awards the Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration degree with specification. A division of the School of Business is 
also conducted in Springfield with curricula in Accounting, Manage- 
ment, and Engineering and Business, leading to the Bachelor of Busi- 
ness Administration degree. The College of Liberal Arts offers certain 
of its courses during evening hours constituting a program, three years 
in length, equivalent in hours to one-half the requirements for the A.B. 
or S.B. degree and providing a general education and preparation for 
admission to the School of Law. The degree of Associate in Arts is 
conferred upon those who complete this program. 



Evening Courses 11 



4. The Adult Education Program has also been developed through the 
Lincoln Schools, which are affiliated with and conducted by North- 
eastern University. The classes in these schools are held at convenient 
evening hours. The Lincoln Technical Institute offers curricula upon 
a college level in various phases of engineering leading to the degree 
of Associate in Engineering; whereas the Lincoln Preparatory School, 
accredited by the New England College Admissions Board, prepares 
students for admission to college and offers other standard high school 
programs. 

5. The Huntington Day School for Boys, also affiliated with and con- 
ducted by Northeastern University, is the outgrowth of a demand in 
the city of Boston for an urban preparatory school with high educa- 
tional standards which would furnish thorough preparation for ad- 
mission to the leading colleges and universities. While easily accessible 
to the various sections of Boston and to the suburbs, it has the facilities 
of a country day school and offers a country day school program. This 
School is one of the leading preparatory schools of the country. 

LOCATION OF UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

Northeastern University is located in Boston, a city which is rich in 
educational and cultural opportunities. The University center is on 
Huntington Avenue just beyond Massachusetts Avenue and opposite the 
Boston Opera House. Here on an eight-acre campus are located the edu- 
cational buildings of the University except that of the School of Law. 
Evening classes for the College of Liberal Arts are held at the University 
center on Huntington Avenue. 

Richards Hail 

Richards Hall at 360 Huntington Avenue contains over one hundred 
thousand square feet of floor space devoted to administrative and instruc- 
tional purposes. On the first floor are the general administrative offices of 
the University. The University bookstore, the "Husky Hut" and the 
student checkroom are located on the ground floor. There are three large 
lecture halls and numerous classrooms and laboratories. The office of the 
Director of the evening courses of the College of Liberal Arts is located on 
the first floor of this building. 

New Building 

This building contains forty-two thousand square feet of floor space. 
Here are located the Chemical Engineering and Biological laboratories, a 
large Commons Room open to day and evening students, and eighteen class- 
rooms and lecture halls. 

East Building 

This building contains the general University library, classrooms, and 
certain laboratories. 



12 Northeastern University 

South Building 

The South Building of the University contains certain laboratories, a 
large lecture hall, and several classrooms. 

Beacon Hill Building 

The Beacon Hill Building, located at 47 Mt. Vernon Street, within a 
few minutes' walk of the State House, and occupied exclusively by the 
Law School, contains administrative offices, a library, classrooms, student 
lounges, and other facilities. 



TRANSPORTATION 

The University center is easily reached from the various railroad sta- 
tions and from all points on the Boston Elevated System. The new Hunt- 
ington Avenue Subway comes to the surface at the University center. 
Ample parking space is available for the use of students coming by auto- 
mobile. 



Evening Courses 13 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Evening Courses 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

The College of Liberal Arts through its evening courses offers a program 
in general education and a special pre-legal program preparing for admis- 
sion to Northeastern University School of Law. 

By conducting its classes at convenient evening hours, it gives high 
school graduates who are obliged to seek work immediately upon gradua- 
tion an opportunity to continue their education. In general those who 
seek admission to the evening classes of the College of Liberal Arts are 
divided into two groups. 

The first group is composed of those who wish to continue their educa- 
tion along cultural lines. The second group is composed of those who wish 
to prepare for admission to the School of Law. Under the rules of the 
Supreme Judicial Court in relation to the admission of attorneys in Massa- 
chusetts, an applicant is required to complete one-half of the work accept- 
able for a bachelor's degree in an approved college or university before he 
begins the study of law. The evening pre-legal program of the College of 
Liberal Arts is especially designed for those who wish to prepare for ad- 
mission to either the day or evening division of the Northeastern Univer- 
sity School of Law. 

Increasingly the value of a broad cultural education is being realized. 
This is recognized in the pre-legal study required before admission to law- 
school in nearly all states. It is also recognized in newly required courses 
of a cultural nature for accounting and engineering training. This cultural 
education is obtainable either before or after the completion of one's 
specific vocational training. Not only is a cultural education valuable in 
and of itself, but from a strictly vocational point of view it is highly im- 
portant, the broadly educated man or woman in many instances having a 
distinct advantage so far as vocational advancement is concerned. 



14 Northeastern University 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 
OF ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Each evening course meets the same academic standards and carries 
the same semester hour credit as the corresponding course in the day 
program of the College of Liberal Arts. The courses, however, have been 
carefully selected to meet the needs of evening students. 

The following requirements must be fulfilled by candidates for the degree 
of Associate in Arts: 

1. A candidate must complete a total of not less than sixty-eight semester hours 
of academic work with a degree of proficiency acceptable to the faculty. 

2. A candidate must meet through his program of studies the minimum course 

requirements listed below: 

Semester Hours 
Required 

Economics 4 

English 14 

Government 6 

History 8 

Psychology or Sociology 4 

Science 8 

Other Courses 24 

Total 68 

The above requirements may be met by class attendance three nights 
a week, forty weeks each year for the three years. In some cases it may be 
advisable for the best interest of the student to take more than three years 
to complete this program. 

Graduation >vith Honor 

Candidates who have maintained an honor grade average will be 
graduated with honor. To be eligible for honors a student must have 
completed a minimum of two full years of study in the College of Liberal 
Arts. 



Evening Courses 



15 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A.B. OR S.B. DEGREE 

Any student who completes the requirements for the Associate in Arts 
degree and who also meets the requirements for admission to the Day 
College may become a candidate for a bachelor's degree in the College of 
Liberal Arts by completing an additional sixty-seven semester hours of 
work and by meeting major, minor and language requirements in the Day 
College. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants for admission to the evening courses as candidates for the 
degree of Associate in Arts must qualify by one of the following methods: 

1. Graduation from an approved course of study in an accredited secondary 
school. 

2. Completion of fifteen secondary school units with a degree of proficiency 
satisfactory to the Department of Admissions. 

Applicants who later desire to qualify for the A.B. or S.B. degree or to 
enter law school must have included in their secondary school course the 
prescribed subjects in either Group A or Group B. 

Group B 



Group A 

EngUsh 3 

*Foreign Language 3 or 4 

(Ancient or Modern) 

Social Sciences 2 

* *Electives 6 or 7 



English 3 

Mathematics 2 or 3 

Natural Sciences 1 

**Elecdves 8 or 9 



Total . 



15 



Total . 



15 



•One year of a foreign language is not accepted. Therefore, this requirement may 
consist either of three years of one language or two years of each of two languages. 

**Not less than four of the "electives" must be in one or more of the following 
academic branches: Languages, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Social Sciences, 
History. 



16 Northeastern University 



LAW — LIBERAL ARTS 

(Combined Program) 

The combined curriculum in the College of Liberal Arts and the School 
of Law enables students to reduce by one year the time ordinarily required 
for obtaining the A.B. or S.B. and the LL.B. degree. Students who have 
completed before entering the School of Law a total of 105 semester hours 
of academic work, of which at least 70 must have been earned in the North- 
eastern University College of Liberal Arts, and who have fulfilled all other 
graduation requirements, will receive the A.B. or S.B. degree upon the 
satisfactory completion of the full first year program in the Day Division 
of the School of Law. Students who enter the Evening Division of the 
School of Law will be eligible for the first degree upon satisfactory comple- 
tion of the fuU equivalent of the first year of the day Law School program. 

In both instances the first degree will be conferred at the next commence- 
ment following determination of eligibility for the first degree. 



BIOLOGY 

The following courses are offered for those wishing further study in the 
field of Biology. The four courses comprise the Biology requirements for 
the Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental and Pre- Veterinarian Programs. 

Ble General Zoology 3 semester hour credits 

B2e General Botany 3 semester hour credits 

B5e Vertebrate Zoology 2 semester hour credits 

B6e Vertebrate Zoology 2 semester hour credits 



Evening Courses 17 



Associate in Science Program in 
CHEMISTRY 

This program is a sequence of courses covering more than one-half of 
the course requirements in Chemistry for the Bachelor of Science Degree. 
The entire program can be completed in three years. The three-year 
period is based on prerequisite courses in college algebra, trigonometry 
and physics. 

First Semester Second Semester 

Prerequisite: College Algebra, Trigonometry and Physics 

First Year 

Hours Hours 

per Week per Week 

M3 Analytical Geometry \ ^j. M4 Integral Calculus 2}/^ 

M5 Differential Calculus] ■ ■ "^ Ch2e General Chemistry 2^ 

Chle General Chemistry 2J^ ChL2e General Chemistry 

ChLle General Chemistry Laboratory 3 

Laboratory 3 

Second Year 

Ch3e Qualitative Analysis. . . 2}^ Ch4e Quantitative Analysis. . 3 
ChL3e Qualitative Analysis ChL4e Quantitative Analysis 

Laboratory 6 * Laboratory 7** 

Third Year 

Ch5e Organic Chemistry 2^ Ch6e Organic Chemistry 2}/^ 

GhL5e Organic Chemistry ChL6e Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory 3 Laboratory 3 

Ch7e Physical Chemistry] Ch8e Physical Chemistry] 

ChL7e Physical Chemistry [. . . 3 ChL8e Physical Chemistry [. . . 3 

Laboratory J Laboratory J 



*Meets two evenings per week — three hours f>er evening. 
* *Meets two evenings per week — one evening of three hours and the second four 
hours. 



18 Northeastern University 



LABOR RELATIONS INSTITUTE 

The management of labor relations presents the most vital and challeng- 
ing aspect of our industrial development of the immediate future. Con- 
tinuance of our American way of industrial democracy demands a har- 
monious understanding of the underlying principles of labor and industrial 
management for the peaceful adjustment of their common problems. 

The Labor Relations Institute of Northeastern University was organized 
to serve this need. It is dedicated to the service of both labor and manage- 
ment. It directly concerns the work of industrial and labor executives, 
plant managers, personnel directors, union shop councillors and stewards. 
Teachers in the fields of management and the social sciences will also find 
that the program provides a valuable academic background for their 
instruction. 



PROGRAM OF COURSES 

Required Courses 

Labor-Management Relations — CoLLECTrvE Bargaining II — The 
The history and development of Col- Labor Contract 

lective Bargaining 

CoLLECTrvE Bargaining I — Govern- Labor Relations Seminar — Case 
ment and Labor-Management Re- studies in Collective Bargaining 

lations 

Elective Courses 

Accounting Aids to Management Motion Study 

Conference Leadership Advanced Motion Study 

Grievance Analysis & Procedure Personnel Administration 

Industrial Psychology Psychometric Testing in Industry 

Industrial Safety Public Speaking 

Job Evaluation, Merit Rating Time Study 

Job Relations and Supervisory Advanced Time Study 

Training Wage Administration 



To complete the program for a certificate requires two evenings a week 
for two years. It is designed to accommodate those students wishing to take 
individual courses in preference to the full program. The courses have 
college credits in either the College of Liberal Arts or the School of Busi- 
ness upon prior approval of the dean of the respective school. 



Evening Courses 19 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Advanced Standing 

Students transferring from approved colleges will be admitted to ad- 
vanced standing provided their records warrant it. Whenever a student 
enters with advanced standing and later proves to have inadequate 
preparation in any of his prerequisite subjects, the faculty reserves the 
right to require the student to make up such deficiencies. 

Application for Admission 

The college year begins in September. Students are also admitted at the 
beginning of the second semester to courses for which they have the 
required background. 

Each applicant for admission is required to file an application blank 
setting forth his previous education and the name of one person to whom 
reference may be made concerning his character and previous training. 

Inside the back cover of this catalogue is an application blank. It should 
be filled out in ink and forwarded to the Director of the Evening Courses 
of the College of Liberal Arts, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston 15, Massachusetts. Upon receipt of the application, the 
Director obtains the previous school records, the statement from the refer- 
ence and, after considering these, informs the applicant as to his eligibility 
for admission. 

Applications should be filed preferably before the registration period, 
thus allowing time to determine eligibility for admission and to adjust 
any schedule problems before the opening night. Applicants are urged to 
visit the school for a personal interview if it is possible for them to do so. 

Applicants seeking advanced standing should arrange to have tran- 
scripts of their previous college records forwarded with their application. 

Registration 

The filing of the application for admission does not constitute registra- 
tion. All students are required to register at the college and arrange for 
the payment of their tuition during the registration period. (See calendar, 
page 4.) 

Attendance and Examinations 

Attendance is required of all students at recitations and lectures con- 
tinuously throughout the academic year. 

Regular final examinations are held at the close of each course. 

No student will be permitted to take a final examination in a course 
who has been present at less than seventy per cent of the lectures. To be 



20 Northeastern University 

entitled to attendance credit a student must be present at least one hour 
in a one and one-half hour lecture. 

Make-up examinations are scheduled in March and September of each 
year. (See calendar, page 4.) Unsatisfactory and incomplete grades must 
be removed not later than the next school year following that in which 
they were received. 

Grades 

The work of each student shall be graded upon examinations according 
to the following scale: 

A Superior K, /-. j 

„ A L > Honor Grades 

B Above average J 

C Average 

D Lowest passing grade 

E Unsatisfactory* 

F Failure * * 

I Incomplete — no examination*** 

Honor List 

The Honor List, issued at the end of each semester, contains the names 
of all students taking a full program who have an honor grade average in 
all subjects with no grade below "C" in any subject. 

Scholarships 

Partial tuition scholarships are awarded annually to the two highest 
ranking students of the freshman and middler classes. These awards are 
made during the summer and are based on the record made during the 
previous school year. 

Freshman Class — One $80.00 scholarship is awarded to the highest ranking 
student. 

One $40.00 scholarship is awarded to the second highest rank- 
ing student. 

Middler Class — Similar awards are made to the two highest ranking students. 

In order to be eligible for these awards, students must fulfill the follow- 
ing conditions: 

1 . They must be carrying a full program — not less than twenty semester hours. 

2. They must register for a full program in the fall succeeding the award. 



* An unsatisfactory grade may be made up by taking the make-up examination and 
obtaining a satisfactory grade. 

* * A feiilure may be made up only by repeating the course in its entirety and obtain- 
ing a satisfactory grade. 

* * * An incomplete grade may be made up by taking the next make-up or regular 
examination. 



Evening Courses 21 



TUITION AND FEES 

Application Fee 

An application fee of $5.00 is required when the application for ad- 
mission is filed. This fee is not refundable. 

Tuition 

A full-year program for 1 945-1 946 will consist of twenty-four semester 
hours and all students carrying such a program are charged SI 60 which 
is payable in four installments. The first installment is $35 and is due on 
September 7. The remaining installments are due as follows: $45, Novem- 
ber 26; $40, February 11; $40, April 29. Students carrying less than a full 
program of twenty-four semester hours are charged at the rate of $8 per 
semester hour. 

University Fee 

All students enrolled in any school of the University are charged a 
University Fee which is based on the number of semester hours for which 
the student is enrolled. The charge is fifty cents per semester hour of class 
work, not to exceed $10 in any one year. This fee covers in part library 
costs, general material costs, general university service charges and similar 
items for which separate fees are frequently charged by other colleges and 
universities. For students enrolled for programs extending over the full 
year this fee is payable one-half with the September tuition payment and 
one-half with the February tuition payment. In the case of students 
enrolled for single courses the fee is payable at the beginning of the course. 

Late Payment Fee 

Students who do not pay their quarterly tuition bills during the week 
when they are due must pay a late payment fee of $1.25. This is a fixed 
fee and does not vary with the amount of the tuition bill. 

Examination Fees 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for each make-up examination taken by a 
student. 

Graduation Fee 

A graduation fee of $5.00 is charged each student during the senior 
year. This fee is payable with the fourth installment of tuition on April 29. 

Payments 

Checks or money orders should be drawn payable to Northeastern 
University. 

Withdrawals and Refunds 

In the event a student is obliged to withdraw from the school for causes 
deemed adequate by the Committee on Administration, the unused tuition 
may be refunded in accordance with the regulations governing refunds. 



22 Northeastern University 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Not all courses are offered every year. The University reserves the right to with- 
draw any course in which there are less than eight enrollments. 

ECONOMICS 

Ec 3e Economic Principles 

A thorough grounding in the fundamental principles and laws of economics is 
the aim of this basic course. The main topics include the nature and organization 
of production, the nature and importance of wants, the relation of money and 
prices, the process of exchange, and the nature of international trade. 

2 semester hour credits 

Ec 4e Economic Principles 

A continuation of Ec 3e. A careful analysis is made of the determination of price 
under conditions of competition and monopoly, and of the distribution of wealth 
and income in the form of wages, economic rent, interest, and profits. The elements 
of insurance are discussed in connection with profits. 

Preparation: Ec 3e 2 semester hour credits 

Ec 12e Economic Systems 

After developing various criteria for evaluating the different economic systems, 
the course proceeds to a comparative analysis of capitalism, co-operation, socialism, 
communism, and fascism. The problems of economic planning receive particular 
attention. 

Preparation: Ec 3e, Ec 4e 2 semester hour credits 

ENGLISH 

E 1-Ae English I 

The aim of this course is to help the student attain competence in the under- 
standing and evaluating of modern literature and in written expression. It includes 
a review of the structural essentials of the English language, various written assign- 
ments, and the study of essays and informational articles. 

2 semester hour credits 

E 2-Ae English I 

Continuing the general purposes of E 1-Ae, this course proceeds to a study of the 
special problems of description and narration, and to a critical reading of poems, 
short stories, and plays. 2 semester hour credits 

E 5e Advanced Composition 

The technique of writing in the shorter literary form will be studied in detail and 
applied systematically toward the building up of the student's individual style. A 
part of the time each week will be devoted to personal conference between the 
student and the instructor. 

Preparation: E 1-Ae, E 2-Ae ' 2 semester hour credits 

E 6e Advanced Composition 

The continuation of the technique of writing and the building up of an individ- 
ual style for the student. 

Preparation: E 5e 2 semester hour credits 



Evening Courses 23 



E 13e Effective Speaking 

This course offers practical training in the preparation and presentation of the 
various types of speeches. The instruction is planned to eliminate defects of voice, 
posture, and delivery, and to develop in the student an ability to speak easily, 
naturally, and forcefully. 7 semester hour credit 

E 14e Effective Speaking 

Continued practice in impromptu and extempore speaking, organization of 
material, consideration of the audience, and vocabulary building form the basis of 
the course. 

Preparation: E 13e 1 semester hour credit 

E 15e Survey of English Literature 

A survey of English literature to 1800. After a brief study of the social and politi- 
cal background of each literary period, the writing of the period is considered, and 
the more important writers are studied and read in detail. The purpose of the 
course is to give the student an appreciation of English literature as a whole, and 
an intimate knowledge of its major figures. 2 semester hour credits 

E 16e Survey of English Literature 

A survey of English literature from 1800 to the present century. The outstanding 
writers are read, studied, and related to the general background of nineteenth- 
century England. The purpose of the course is to give the student an understand- 
ing of the writers who contributed most to the formation and development of 
modern literature in England; 2 semester hour credits 

E 25e American Literature to 1860 

A survey of American literature from colonial times to the triumph of the trans- 
cendental movement in New England. The work of Bryant, Irving, Cooper, Poe, 
Emerson, Thoreau, Lowell, Holmes, Longfellow, and Melville will be emphasized. 

2 semester hour credits 

E 26e American Literature After 1860 

Continuing E 25e, the course will consider the rise of realism after the Civil War, 
the development of American humor, the appearance of local color writers, and 
modern trends since 1 900. 2 semester hour credits 

GOVERNMENT 

Gv 1e American Government and Politics 

The study of our National Government with respect to its organization and 
function; its powers and limitations under the Constitution; its legislative, adminis- 
trative, and judicial machinery under the party system of government and bureauc- 
racy. 2 semester hour credits 

Gv 2e American Government and Politics 

A more detailed study of the relationships of our federal, state, and municipal 
governments, including an analysis and comparison of the various state govern- 
ments and types of municipal government with respect to state and local agencies 
for carrying out the executive, legislative, and judicial functions of government in 
a democratic country. 2 semester hour credits 



24 Northeastern University 

Gv 3e Comparative Government 

The older governments of Europe, those principally of Great Britain and France, 
but also of Switzerland and the Scandinavian countries, are described and analyzed 
in this course. Institutions are compared in these various states with reference to 
America and the newer governments of Europe. 2 semester hour credits 

Gv 4e Comparative Government 

A study of the newer governments of Europe, as found in Germany, Italy, and 
the Soviet Union. Democracy and dictatorship are analyzed as different modes of 
life and rule. These states are compared to each other, to the older governments of 
Europe, and to the United States. 2 semester hour credits 

Gv 8e Modern Political Theory 

A critical study is made of the major developments in political theory since 
Bentham, with special reference to the influence of these developments upon 
American politics and political institutions. Attention is paid to the modern con- 
flict between the democratic and the totalitarian conceptions of the state. 

2 semester hour credits 

HISTORY 

Hie History of Civilization 

This is primarily a background course. Introductory lectures deal with primitive 
society, the development of language and writing, and the early contributions of 
Egypt and Asia. More detail is given to the structure of Greek and Roman society, 
the rise of the Christian Church, the barbarian invasions of the Empire, the growth 
of Islam, and the life of the early Middle Ages, 4 semester hour credits 

H 2e History of Civilization 

This course deals with the growth of the monarchies in Europe, the medieval 
Church, the art and literature of the Renaissance and Reformation, the economic 
revolution, the Age of Reason in France and England, the Old Regime and the 
Revolution in France, and the growth of science and industrialism. 

As in H le, the emphasis is upon the cultural rather than the political history of 
Europe. 4 semester hour credits 

H 9e The United States to 1865 

This course is an interpretation of the events which shaped the American nation 
to the Civil War. Social customs, economic influences, racial contributions, and 
humanitarian movements are not neglected, though the political history is stressed. 

2 semester hour credits 

H lOe The United States Since 1865 

Major attention is given to the social, economic, and political foundations of 
recent history in this survey of the transition of America from an agricultural to an 
urban industrialized society since the Civil War. Consideration is given to the 
problems arising with the emergence of America as a world power. 

2 semester hour credits 



Evening Courses 25 



H 13e English Constitutional History 

This ccmrse is devoted to a consideration of the English constitution and of the 
common law; local government vs. central government; the origin and growth of 
Parliament; the development of the British cabinet system; and a comprehensive 
study of statutes and documents. 2 semester hour credits 

H 14e American Constitutional History 

In this course a study is made of the historical development of the United States 
Constitution with particular emphasis on its progressive adaptation to a changing 
social and economic order. 2 semester hour credits 

PHILOSOPHY 
Ph 1e Introduction to Philosophy 

This introductory course combines the historical and systematic approaches to 
the subject. The historical treatment includes a survey of the chief philosophers 
and the development of basic philosophical ideas. The systematic treatment pre- 
sents the several types of philosophy, such as realism, materialism, idealism, and 
pluralism. The place of philosophy is considered in its relation to ethics, religion, 
and natural sciences. The course both acquaints the student with facts about 
philosophy and trains him to think philosophically. 2 semester hour credits 

Ph 2e Problams of Philosophy 

The chief systems of thought are applied to what may be termed the persistent 
problems of philosophy. The problems are to be found in the fields of epistemology, 
teleology, and metaphysics. The following topics suggest representative problems 
which will be studied: the relation between mind and body, the nature and extent 
of freedom of the will, the validity of knowledge, and the bearing which the more 
recent views in physics and psychology have upon related philosophical problems. 
Preparation: Ph 1e 2 semester hour credits 

PHYSICS 
P 1-Ae Survey of the Physical Sciences 

The purpose of the course is to give a definite conception of the physical world 
to those students who ordinarily would not elect a science course but who need to 
know something about the contributions and the place of the physical sciences in 
contemporauy civilization. This course begins with a study of the universe and 
solar system. Consideration is given to the principles of distance, mass and weight, 
and the simple dynamics of bodies. The earth is studied from the viewpoint of its 
geological, meteorological, and chemical aspects, these main fields introducing a 
non-mathematical discussion of magnetism, heat, and electricity. 

4 semester hour credits 

P 2-Ae Survey of the Physical Sciences 

In this course, which continues P 1-Ae, the phenomena of light are taken up. 
Following this, consideration is given to spectroscopy and matter structure, the 
periodic table, acids, bases, salts, and organic compounds. The course concludes 
with a discussion of certain aspects of physics which are of practical importance in 
the household, such as heating, lighting, refrigeration, and electrical appliances. 

4 semester hour credits 



26 Northeastern University 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Ps 1e Introduction to Differential Psychology 

An elementary survey of the psychology of individual differences including per- 
sonality differences, together with a presentation of some of the practical applica- 
tions of the findings of differential psychology. 2 semester hour credits 

Ps 2e General Psychology 

An introduction to general experimental psychology. The topics considered in- 
clude learning, memory, thought, imagination, motivation, emotion, sensation, 
and perception. 

Preparation: Ps 7e 2 semester hour credits 

Ps 7e Social Psychology of Everyday Life 

A course devoted to the psychological examination of some of the phenomena 
observable in everyday social life. This includes an analysis of the socialization 
process, the development and role of language in everyday life, and those problem* 
which are particularly important in wartime — propaganda, rumor, and morale. 

2 semester hour credits 

Ps 9e Psychology of Personality 

Presents a survey of historical and contemporary theories of the nature of per- 
sonality. The problems of the generality of traits, the consistency of expression, and 
the relation of cultural factors to personality, growth, and integration will be 
discussed. 

Preparation: Ps 2e 2 semester hour credits 

Ps lOe Abnormal Psychology 

An introduction to the field of psychopathology. The psychology of the neuroses 
and the minor disturbances of everyday life are emphasized. Interpretation of 
clinical findings in the light of some contemporary schools of psychology is included. 
Preparation: Ps 9e 2 semester hour credits 

SOCIOLOGY 

S 1e Introduction to Sociology 

In presenting a survey of the origins and sources of human society, this study 
provides orientation for the courses in principles and problems which follow. The 
several theories of organic evolution are discussed. The antiquity of man and basic 
anthropological data are considered. The racial and ethnic groupings of man are 
then studied in the light of biological, geographical, and cultural factors. 

2 semester hour credits 

S 2e Principles of Sociology 

Facts and principles basic to a general knowledge of the field of sociology are 
presented. The origins, forms, and forces of human associations are discussed. Con- 
sideration is given the several leading schools of sociological thought. The course is 



Evening Courses 27 



designed to meet the needs of the student who desires only an elementary survey of 
the subject, as well as the student who plans to take advanced courses in social 
science. 2 semester hour credits 

S 3e Social Problems 

Attention is given the nature, complex causation, and interrelatedness of social 
problems in general. Cultural change, with its attendant lags, as well as other 
social forces and conflicts are studied. While sociological theory is occasionally 
introduced to clarify the problem at hand, the course is essentially practical in 
character. Such problems as poverty and unemployment, race antagonisms, 
population pressures, and the broken home are considered. Optional field trips to 
various institutions give concreteness to the problems studied. 

Preparation: S 7e, S 2e 2 semester hour credits 

S 4e Social Pathology 

Similar to the course in Social Problems in background and approach, this study 
deals with the maladjustments and ills of human society. Emphasis is given those 
pathological conditions which exist in relations between the individual and the 
group. Typical subjects presented include mental defectiveness and disease, al- 
coholism and drug addiction, suicide, delinquency and crime, and pathologies of 
domestic relations. The field trips arranged for this course add to the practical 
knowledge of the social ills which are studied. 

Preparation: S Je, S 2e 2 semester hour credits 

S 7e Principles of Social Ethics 

To clarify the meaning of morality in social relations is the aim of this study. 
Right and wrong conduct is analyzed in the light of the highest values for human 
society. Moral laws are discussed, and the various systems of ethics are evaluated. 
Scientific attitudes are encouraged in order that one's moral judgments may be 
compatible with one's best reflective thought. 

Preparation: S 1e, S 2e 2 semester hour credits 

CHEMISTRY 

Ch 1e General Chemistry 

The fundamental ideas of matter and energy; the properties of gases, liquids, 
and solids; molecular weights; equations, atomic structure, classification of the 
elements; ionic reactions; the chemistry of the non-metals; and radioactivity are 
among the topics which are covered in the course. 3 semester hour credits 

Ch 2e General Chemistry 

A continuation of Ch le. Modern ideas covering the theory of solutions of elec- 
trolytes are discussed together with experimental facts. The chemistry of the metals 
is covered thoroughly, and time is devoted to an introduction to organic chemistry. 
The latter part of the course is given to qualitative analysis with particular em- 
phasis on the laboratory work. 

Preparation: Ch le 3 semester hour credits 



28 Northeastern University 

Ch 3e Qualitative Analysis 

The object of this course is to give the student knowledge of the various funda- 
mental qualitative laws and principles. A portion of the time is devoted to the 
formulation of numerical terms which are essential to the understanding of the 
mass action law, ionic equilibria, solubility product, hydrolysis, and redox in- 
stants. The use of the newer spot tests is stressed and, where possible, their reactions 
explained. Whenever necessary, lectures demonstrating the various semi-micro 
techniques are given, as well as those designed to illustrate more fundamental 
properties of solutions. 

Prerequisite: Ch Je, Ch 2e 3 semester hour credits 

Ch 4e Quantitative Analysis 

It is the purpose of this course to give to the student a realization of the scientific 
development of quantitative methods. Each of the major operations such as weigh- 
ing, measurement of volumes, titration, filtration, ignition, and combustion, is 
considered from the standpoint of the theoretical principles involved, and with due 
consideration of the manipulative technique necessary. 

This is followed by the combination of these operations and their application to 
actual analysis, including a comprehensive study of volumetric methods. 

After consideration of gravimetric analysis and of systematic mineral procedures, 
the remainder of the course consists of a critical discussion of common technical 
methods, including the standard ones for the analysis of steel, non-ferrous alloys, 
fuels, oils, gas, water, fertilizers, foods, etc. 

As the correct calculation of analytical results is of no less importance than the 
actual procedures of analysis, a number of problems forms a very important part 
of the course. 

Preparation: Ch 3e 

Must be taken concurrently: ChL 4e 4 semester hour credits 

Ch 5e-6e Organic Chemistry 

A study of the basic principles of the aliphatic organic compounds. The resem- 
blance of classes is stressed, and emphasis is placed on genetic charts. The industrial 
significance of the subject is discussed to show the practical nature of organic 
chemistry. 

The course then deals with the preparation and characteristic reactions of the 
ziromatic organic compounds. Special attention is given to polymerization, dia- 
zotization, dyes, and the use of catalysts, nitration, and sulphonation. 

The last part of this course includes a study of the preparation and reactions of 
heterocyclic and alicyclic compounds. 
Prerequisite: Ch 1e, Ch 2e 
Must be taken concurrently: ChL 5e-6e 6 ^ semester hour credits 

Ch 7e Physical Chemistry 

This course begins with a short resume of the field of physical chemistry, and its 
relationship to the other courses in chemistry and chemical engineering. Following 
this, atomic and molecular weights, and the properties of gases, liquids, solids, 
ionized, non-ionized, and colloidal solutions are taken up. 

Prerequisite: Ch 4e 

Preparation: ChL 4e 3 semester hour credits 



Evening Courses 29 



Ch 8e Physical Chemistry 

A continuation of Ch 7e, this course includes a consideration of the following 
topics: rates of reaction, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, and 
thermochemistry. 

Prerequisite: Ch 4e 

Preparation: Ch 7e 2^2 semester hour credits 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

ChL 1e General Chemistry Laboratory 

This course is coordinated with the lectures of Ch le. The student performs a 
series of experiments that stress some of the fundamental principles discussed in 
the lecture class. 7 semester hour credit 

ChL 2e General Chemistry Laboratory 

After a few preliminary experiments on electrolysis, complex ions, hydrolysis, 
and solubility product the student learns to use a qualitative analysis scheme. 
Several "unknown" substances are analyzed. 

Prerequisite: ChL le 1 semester hour credit 

ChL 3e Qualitative Analysis Laboratory 

This course, which is carried out on a semi-micro scale, applies the material 
covered in Ch 3e to actual problems. After some preliminary experiments, certain 
procedures are combined and the separations and identifications made on both 
known and unknown solutions. Finally, these are combined into a complete, 
systematic scheme which is applied to artificially prepared mixtures and industrial 
materials. Careful manipulations, thoroughness in observation, and accuracy in 
arriving at conclusions are expected of each student. 

Prerequisite: Ch le, Ch 2e 

Must be taken concurrently: Ch 3e 2}/^ semester hour credits 

ChL 4e Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 

This is a laboratory course intended to illustrate by actual use the various 
analytical methods considered in Ch 4e, After certain preliminary experiments de- 
signed to acquaint the student with the apparatus used, volumetric analysis, in- 
cluding acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidation, reduction, and precipitation 
methods are taken up. 

This is followed by gravimetric analysis not only the usual illustrative gravi- 
metric determinations, but also electrolytic, electrometric, combustion, and optical 
methods. 

In the latter half of the course actual industrial methods are used so that at its 
completion the students should be able to perform satisfactorily any ordinary' 
analysis. 

Preparation: ChL 3e » 

Must be taken concurrently: Ch 4e 3]/^ semester hour credits 

ChL 5e Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Preparations and reactions designed to teach the laboratory technique involved 
in organic chemistry. The method of keeping notes on the work performed and 
reactions involved is stressed. 

Prerequisite: Ch le, Ch 2e 

Must be taken concurrently: Ch 5e 1}/^ semester hour credits 



30 Northeastern University 

ChL 6e Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

This is a continuation of ChL 5e. The preparations in this course serve to acquaint 
the student with such types of chemical reactions as sulphonation, the Grignard 
reaction, the Perkins reaction, Skraup's synthesis, the Friedal-Crafts reaction, and 
the preparation of dyes. 

In addition to the manipulation techniques taught in ChL 5e, this course intro- 
duces the use of vacuum distillations, fractional crystallization, and separations by 
physical and chemical means. 
Preparation: ChL 5e 
Must be taken concurrently: Ch 6e 1]^ semester hour credits 

ChL 7e Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

This course carries into actual practice the theory discussed in Ch 7e, Experi- 
ments include Determination of Vapor Density, Densities of Gas by Effusion 
Method, Surface Tension of Liquids and Viscosity of Liquids. 

Preparation: ChL 4e Credit combined with Ch 7e 

ChL 8e Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

A continuation of ChL 7e, this course covers experiments in Vapor Pressure of 
Liquids; Solubility Curve for a Pair of Liquids, Liquid -Vapor Equilibrium Curve, 
Distillation with Steam and Index of Refraction. 

Preparation: ChL 7e Credit combined with Ch 7e 

BIOLOGY 

B 1e General Zoology 

An introductory course dealing with the basic principles of zoology. A survey of 
the main types of animals; their classification, structure, life history, distribution, 
and economic value. The laboratory work illustrates the lectures. 

3 semester hour credits 

B 2e General Botany 

An introductory course dealing with the basic principles of botany. A general 
survey of the more important plant types throughout the vegetable kingdom; their 
classification, structure, life history, distribution, and economic value. The funda- 
mentals of plant physiology are stressed. The laboratory work illustrates the 
lectures. 3 semester hour credits 

B 5e Vertebrate Zoology 

This course deals with the comparative anatomy of the integument; the skeletal, 
muscular, digestive and respiratory systems of the principal classes of vertebrates. 
The laboratory work consists of detailed dissection of representative types. 
Prerequisite: B 1e 2 semester hour credits 

B 6e Vertebrate Zoology 

Continues and presupposes course B 5e. In this part of the course, the lectures 
deal with the comparative anatomy of the vascular, excretory, reproductive and 
nervous systems together with the organs of special sense of the principal classes of 
vertebrates. The laboratory work consists of detailed dissection of representative 
types. 

Preparation: B 5e 3 semester hour credits 



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NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

COEDUCATIONAL 

College of Liberal Arts 

OfTcrs a Ijioad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. Varied 
opportunities available for vocational specialization. Degree: Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Arts. 

College of Engineering 

OfTcrs curricula in Civil, Mechanical (with Industrial and Aeronautical options), 
Electrical, and Chemical Engineering. Classroom study is supplemented by experi- 
ment and research in vvcll-cquipped laboratories. Degree: Bachelor of Science in the 
professional field of specialization. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers curricula in Accounting, Marketing and Advertising, and Industrial Adminis- 
tration. Each curriculum represents in itself a broad survey of business technique, 
dififering from the others chiefly in emphasis. Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration. 

School of Law 

OfTcrs day and evening undergraduate programs admitting those who present a 
minimum of one-half of the work accepted for a bachelor's degree in an approved 
college or its full equivalent, each program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Coeducational. 

School of Business 

OfTers curricula through evening classes leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business 
.Administration with appropriate specification in Accounting, Management, and 
Engineering and Business. Preparation for C.P.A. examinations. Intensive programs 
arranged to meet special needs. 

Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are ofTered during evening hours in the 
fields of Economics, English, Historv, Government, Psychology, and Sociology. A 
special program preparing (ov admission to the School of I>aw is also available. The 
program is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirements for the A.B. or S.B. degree. 
Special courses also available. .Associate in Arts degree conferred. 



The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering, and Business Administration offer day 
programs and arc contluctcd on the Co-operative Plan. After the freshman year 
students may alternate their periods of study with periods of work in the employ of 
business or industrial concerns. Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn 
a large part of their college expenses. Full-time curricula are available for students who 
do not desire the Co-operative Plan. 



In addition to the above schools the University has affiliated with it and conducts: 
the Lincoln Technical Institute offering, thrtnigh evening classes, courses of college 
grade in various fields of engineering Ic-ading to the degree of .Associate in Engineering; 
and the Lincoln Preparatory -School, an accredited evening school preparing for college 
entrance and ofTering other standard high school programs. 



For further infoiination icgarding any of the abo\c schools, address 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Law School Ofher Schools 

47 Mt. Vernon Street 360 Huntington Avenue 

Boston 15, Massachusetfi 
Telephone : KENmore 5800 



LINCOLN 
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

SvcHing Sessions 




1946-1947 



FORTY-FIFTH YEAR 

Colkge Courses in Sngmeritt0 



INTERVIEWS 

Prospective students, or those desiring advdce or guidance regard- 
ing any part of the school work or curricula, are encouraged to 
arrange for personal interviews with the Dean or other officers of 
instruction. Career planning through competent guidance provides 
an understanding of professional requirements and develops that 
definiteness of purpose so vital to success. 



OFFICE HOURS 

JUNE 17, 1946 — AUGUST 10, 1946 

Monday and Tuesday 8:45 a.m.-8:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 8:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 8:45 a.m.-12:00 noon 

AUGUST 12, 1946 — JUNE 14, 1947 

Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 8:45 a.m.-12:00 noon through August 31 

8:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Month of September 

8:45 A.M.-1:00 p.m. October 5, 1946-June 14, 1947 

JUNE 16, 1947 — AUGUST 9, 1947 

Same as for corresponding period for summer of 1946 



CALENDAR 

1946 

Registration Period — First Semester September 3-1 6 

Advanced Standing and Condition Examinations September 6 

Classes Begin September 16 

Legal Holiday. No Classes November 1 1 



Thanksgiving. No Classes November 21 

Final Class Session before Christmas Recess December 20 

1947 

First Class Session after Christmas Recess January 2 

Division B Classes Begin January 6 

Registration Period — Second Semester January 27 

Legal Holiday. No Classes May 30 

Summer Term Classes Begin June 2 

Commencement June 15 



LINCOLN 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



Evening Engineering Courses 
of College Grade 



1946 




1947 



The Institute is situated at the entrance to the 
Huntington Avenue subway within nine minutes 
of Park Street and easily accessible from all points. 



The Lincoln Technical Institute oilers courses in Engineering leading to the De- 
gree of Associate in Engineering which, through cooperation with Northeastern 
University Evening School of Business, carry credit toward the Degree of Bachelor 
of Business Administration in Engineering and Management 
awarded by Northeastern University. 



education 

AN INVESTMENT IN ENDURING VALUES 



Now that the war has ended, and the postwar period is 
assuming reality, ambitious young men are reaHzing that 
never before has training been so vitally necessary. Never 
before has education been a better investment than now 
when such an investment holds so much promise for 
the enduring values of a successful career. 

The war-devastated world must be rebuilt. The necessi- 
ties of civilized living must be provided. The materials 
destroyed must be replaced. All these needs will provide 
an opportunity not only in other countries but in our 
own for those who are prepared to provide the services 
which will be in demand. 

The curtain is about to rise on a world full of oppor- 
tunities. The same forces netessitating the unimaginable 
destruction have at the same time brought forth tre- 
mendous advancements in engineering and science. The 
world of tomorrow will present unlimited opportunities 
for those trained in technology to participate in the 
reconstruction and progress of a peace-time world. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Administrative Organization 5 

Faculty 6 

Lincoln Technical Institute, General Statement 11 

General Information 13 

Student Body 13 

The Campus 14 

Transportation 15 

Textbooks and Supplies 16 

Scholarships 16 

Scholarship Awards 16 

Admission Requirements 18 

Classification of Students 19 

Administrative Regulations 20 I 

Tuition and Fees 24 

Programs of Instruction 27 

Special Courses in Chemistry 28 

Chemistry 29 

Civil and Structural Engineering 30 

Electrical Engineering 31 

Electronic Engineering 32 

Industrial Engineering 33 

Mechanical Engineering 34 

Bachelor of Business Administration Program 35 

Engineering Laboratories 38 

Description of Courses 45 

Chemistry 45 

Civil Engineering 47 

Electrical Engineering 49 

Electronic Engineering 50 

Industrial Engineering 53 

Mechanical Engineering 54 

Drawing 57 

Mathematics 58 

Physics 60 



LINCOLN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Robert Gray Dodge 
Chairman 

Frank Lincoln Richardson 
Vice-Chairman 



WiLMAN Edward Adams 
Henry Nathaniel Andrews 
George Louis Barnes 
Farwell Gregg Bemis 
Henry Goddard Bradlee 
Godfrey Lowell Cabot 
Paul Codman Cabot 
Walter Channing 
William Converse Chick 
Everett Avery Churchill 
Paul Foster Clark 
Edward Dana 
David Frank Edwards 
Carl Stephens Ell 
William Partridge Ellison 
John Wells Farley 
Ernest Bigelow Freeman 
Franklin Wile Ganse 
Merrill Griswold 



Henry Ingraham Harriman 
Chandler Hovey 
Maynard Hutchinson 
Arthur Stoddard Johnson 
Harry Hamilton Kerr 
Irving Edwin Moultrop 
AuGUSTiN Hamilton Parker, Jr. 
Frederick Sanford Pratt 
Roger Preston 
Stuart Craig Rand 
James Lorin Richards 
Harold Bours Richmond 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Frank Palmer Speare 
Francis Robert Carnegie Steele 
Charles Stetson 
Earl Place Stevenson 
Robert Treat Paine Storer 
James Vincent Toner 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., ScD. 
President 

Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D. 
Vice-President 

Albert Ellsworth Everett, B.C.E., S.B., M.B.A. 

Director of Evening Program 

Donald Hershey MacKenzie, B.Ch.E., B.S., Ed.M. 

Acting Dean 



OFFICE STAFF 

Edna Edison Norvish 
Executive Secretary 

Mildred L. Christensen 
Bookkeeper 

Maude-Almy Connor 
Recorder 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



FACULTY 

The Strength of any educational institution lies in the quality of 
its faculty. This is especially true in a technical institute devoted 
to the training of mature men and women most of whom are already 
employed in their chosen professions. 

The instructional staff of the Lincoln Technical Institute is com- 
posed of men who have an active interest in the welfare of ambitious 
evening school students. They are men of culture and high ideals 
and are well qualified by training and experience to teach in their 
respective fields. 



Wayland S. Bailey Appointed 1939 

S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1919; M.S. Lehigh University, 1928; 
Assistant Professor, Northeastern University; Lecturer in Mechanics, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 
Applied Mechanics 

HoLLis Baird Appointed 7945 

Instructor in Physics, Northeastern University; Consulting Engineer, Twentieth 
Century Fox Television. 

Industrial Electronics, Communication Engineering, Frequency Modulation, Television 
Chairman of the Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering 

Frank Raymond Berman Appointed 1946 

S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1936; S.M. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1938; Sc.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1946. Structural 
Engineering, Cram & Ferguson. 

Concrete Design, Hydraulics 

William Bettencourt Appointed 1946 

B.S. Boston University, 1931; Ed.M. Boston University, 1946; Instructor, Belmont 
High School. 
Engineering Drawing 

Edward Bobroff Appointed 1946 

B.M.E. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, New York, 1940; Mechanical and Elec- 
trical Engineer, Boston Navy Yard. 
Engineering Mathematics 

Fletcher S. Boig Appointed 1945 

B.S. Tufts College, 1932; M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1933; Ed.M. 
Tufts College, 1937; Instructor in Chemistry, Northeastern University. 

Chemistry 

Chairman of the Department of Chemistry 

Earl George Boyd Appointed 1946 

A.B. University of Maine, 1920; M.A. Boston University, 1935; Head of Mathe- 
matics Department and Director of Mathematics for the city of Chelsea. 

Engineering Mathematics 



Faculty 7 

William Brauner Appointed 1946 

B.S. Loyola University, 1942; M.S. Purdue University, 1944; Development En- 
gineer, General Electric Company. 
Engineering Mathematics 

John H. Buck Appointed 7945 

S.B. Harvard University, 1906; Instructor, Gamaliel Bradford High School, 
Wellesley. 
Sub-Freshman Mathematics 

Laurence Fuller Cleveland Appointed 1931 

B.S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1929; M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Northeastern University. 
Electrical Laboratory 

Wilfred James Combellack Appointed 1939 

A.B. Colby College, 1937; M.A. Colby College, 1938; Ph.D. Boston University, 1944; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Northeastern University. 
Mathematics 

Warren C. Dean Appointed 1941 

A.B. Boston University, 1931; M.A. Boston University, 1940; Instructor of Mathe- 
matics, Northeastern University. 
Mathematics 
Chairman of the Department of Mathematics 

John James Devine Appointed 1939 

B.S. Rhode Island State College, 1927; Sc.M. Brown University, 1936; Assistant 
Professor of Drawing, Northeastern University. 
Engineering Drawing 

Gilmore Colby Dickey, Jr. Appointed 1944 

Associate in Engineering, Lincoln Technical Institute, 1943; Research Engineer, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Direct and Alternating Current Theory 

Stanley Willard Doroff Appointed 1946 

S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1934; Marine Engineer, Boston Navy 
Yard. 
Engineering Mathematics 

Charles Phillip Engelhardt, Jr. Appointed 1942 

B.S. Harvard University, 1928; Master of Architecture, Harvard University, 1930; 
Engineer, John R. Nichols. 
Engineering Drawing 

Royal Merrill Frye Appointed 1930 

A.B. Boston University, 1911; A.M. Boston University, 1912; Ph.D. Boston Univer- 
sity, 1934; Professor of Physics and Chairman of the Department of Physics, Graduate 
School, Boston University. 
Physics, Mathematics 

Warren L. Ganong Appointed 1945 

B.S. Northeastern University, 1937; Instructor in Industrial Engineering, North- 
eastern University. 
Time Study and Advanced Time Study 
Chairman of the Department oj Industrial Engineering 



8 Lincoln Technical Institute 

Robert Edgar Hodgdon Appointed 1927 

B.S. University of New Hampshire; M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Instructor, Rindge Technical School. 
Drawing, Mathematics, Physics 

G. David Johnson Appointed 7938 

A.B. Clark University, 1915; M.A. Boston University, 1935; Associate Professor of 
Physics, Northeastern University. 
Physics 

Ralph E. Kimball Appointed 7946 

B.S. Tufts College, 1934; Research Engineer, Servomechanisms Laboratory, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 
Direct and Alternating Current Theory 

Horatio W. Lamson Appointed 7945 

S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1915; A.M. Harvard University, 1917; 
Research Engineer, General Radio Company. 
Introduction to Electron Tubes 
Electronic Tests and Measurements 

Herbert C. Lang Appointed 7936 

B.S. Northeastern University, 1934; Chief Draftsman, Mason-Neilan Regulator 
Company. 
Engineering Drawing 

John Robert Leighton Appointed 1975 

B.C.E. Northeastern University, 1914; Lens Manufacturer, John R. Leighton. 
Applied Mechanics, Strength of Materials 

Waldemar S. McGuire Appointed 7936 

S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1928; M.A. Boston University, 1930; 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Northeastern University. 
Qualitative and Quantitative Chemistry 

Wendell Eugene Matchett Appointed 1944 

B.S. University of Maine, 1936; M.S. University of Maine, 1937; Electrical En- 
gineer, General Electric Company. 
Electricity III 

Leodore E. Maynard Appointed 1945 

B.S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1922; Electrical Engineer, Boston Edison 
Company. 
Direct and Alternating Current Theory 

George Harris Meserve, Jr. Appointed 1929 

B.C.E. Northeastern University, 1925; B.S. Northeastern University, 1931; Ed.M, 
Boston University, 1940; Associate Professor of Drawing, Northeastern University. 

Engineering Drawing 

Chairman of the Department of Drawing 

William C. Paxton Appointed 1945 

B.C.E. Northeastern University, 1930; Superintendent of Department of Public 
Worksj Town of Lexington, 1940-45. 
Highway Engineering 

WiNFiELD C. Potter Appointed 1944 

Ph.B. Brown University, 1910; Ed.M. Rhode Island College of Education, 1938; 
Principal, Foxboro High School. 
Sub-Freshman Mathematics 



Faculty 9 

Henry E. Richards Appointed 1921 

B.S. 191 8, .M.S. 1937, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate Professor of 
Electrical Engineering, Northeastern University. 
Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering 

Gerrit J. RoHNER Appointed 1946 

Radio Engineering, R.C.A. Institute, 1942; Electronics Engineer, Gary Company. 
Direct and Alternating Current Theory 

GusTAV Rook Appointed 1941 

B.S. Northeastern University, 1939; Graduate Study, Harvard University; Instructor 
in Drawing, Northeastern University. 
Machine Drawing 

Barnet Rudman Appointed 1942 

A.B. Harvard University, 1921; Ed.M. Boston Teachers' College, 1934; Instructor, 
English High School. 
Engineering Mathematics 

Albert E. Sanderson, Jr. Appointed 1936 

B.C.E. Northeastern University, 1926; B.S. Northeastern University, 1940; Assistant 
Professor of Drawing, Northeastern University. 
Structural Drawing and Design 

Charles F. Seaverns Appointed 1941 

Harvard University, 1915-17; Associate in Engineering, Lincoln Technical Institute, 
1944; Instructor, Everett High School. 
Engineering Drawing 

Ernest L. Spencer Appointed 1941 

B.S. Northeastern University, 1936; M.S. Harvard University, 1943; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering, Northeastern University. 
Concrete, Concrete Design, Engineering Structures 
Chairman of the Department of Civil Engineering 

Frederick Arlington Stearns Appointed 1921 

B.S. 1917, M.S. 1934, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering, Northeastern University. 
Heat Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

William Wallace Appointed 1945 

B.S. Northeastern University, 1941; Instructor in Mathematics, Northeastern 
University. 
Engineering Mathematics 

Leslie J. Weed Appointed 1945 

B.S. 1927, M.S. 1928, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Distribution Engineer, 
Boston Edison Company. 
Direct and Alternating Current Theory 

Ralph E. Wellings Appointed 1944 

A.B. Boston College, 1920; A.M. Boston College, 1925; Ed.M. Boston Teachers' 
College, 1930; Instructor, Dorchester High School for Boys. 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics 

Albert E. Whittaker Appointed 1936 

B.M.E. Northeastern University, 1924; Ed.M. Harvard University, 1932; B.S. North- 
eastern University, 1933; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, North- 
eastern University. 
Mechanism 



10 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



Chester Henry Wolowicz 

B.S. Northeastern University, 1937; M.S. Harvard University, 1941 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering, Northeastern University. 
Aerodynamics, Aeronautical Laboratory, Airplane Design, Airplane Engines 
Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering 



Appointed 7938 
Assistant Pro- 



Harry E. a. Wright Appointed 7943 

B.S. Lafayette College, 1934; Application Engineer, Westinghouse Electric and 
Manufacturing Company. 
Electricity II 



Lincoln Technical Institute 1 1 



THE LINCOLN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

The Lincoln Technical Institute is affiliated with Northeastern 
University. It offers evening engineering courses of college grade 
leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering. These courses 
are acceptable towards the degree of B.B.A. in Engineering and 
Management offered by Northeastern University Evening School 
of Business. 

All classes in the Lincoln Technical Institute are held in the 
evening and are especially designed to meet the needs of those 
who are employed during the day. 

The Lincoln Technical Institute has its origin in the North- 
eastern Evening Polytechnic School. The latter received its title 
in 1901, when the work of various technical departments, such 
as the Department of Steam Engineering, the Department of 
Art, the Automotive School and the Department of Naval Archi- 
tecture, were grouped together into curricula. By 1904 the School 
offered definite curricula, generally of three years' duration, in 
Architecture, Chemistry, Marine Engineering, Structural Engi- 
neering, Steam Engineering, along with courses in Art, Naviga- 
tion, Surveying, Seamanship, and other related fields. In 1925 
the title Lincoln Technical Institute was given to the North- 
eastern Evening Polytechnic School. At this time the Lincoln 
Technical Institute remodelled, lengthened, and consequently 
improved the former courses, offering a number of four-year 
curricula, which are described on pages 28 to 34. 

In addition, provision was made so that students need not 
pursue a complete curriculum but could elect individual courses 
related to their present occupations, the only prerequisite of 
entry being ability to pursue the course with profit to themselves. 
At the present time there are nearly seven hundred students receiv- 
ing instruction in the Lincoln Technical Institute in the various 
branches of engineering. 

Since 1936 the curricular courses of the Institute have been credited by 
Northeastern University Evening School oj Business towards the Degree of 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Engineering and Management 
offered by that school. 

Effective 1939 the Lincoln Technical Institute was empowered 
to award the Title of Associate in Engineering to those who satis- 
factorily complete any one of the prescribed curricula. Effective 



12 Lincoln Technical Institute 

with the Commencement Exercises, June, 1944, the Degree of 
Associate in Engineering has been awarded. 

The Officers of Administration are constantly alert to changing 
conditions and from time to time will modify existing courses to 
meet new needs and develop new courses so that real educational 
opportunities Nvill be available to employed men and women at 
convenient es'ening hours. The School is sincerely interested in the 
problems of each student and the Dean and the officers of instruc- 
tion encourage interviews for vocational and educational guidance. 

The Lincoln Technical Institute has made it possible for many 
men to secure ti-aining which has enabled them to succeed in the 
work for which they are adapted by abilits' and interest. 



General Information 



13 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

STUDENT BODY 

The Students of the Lincoln Technical Institute are men and 
women of earnest purpose and firm endeavor who bring to bear 
on their work a thoroughness which promises future success. Their 
ages last year ranged from seventeen to fifty-two, the average age 
being twenty^-six years. Almost all the students are engaged in 
work during the day and many diff'erent occupations have their 
representatives in the student body, a fact which demonstrates 
that the School can be of service to men in many walks of life. 
Some students are preparing to enter engineering work; many are 
already engaged in engineering work and are studying to prepare 
themselves for increased responsibility and rewards. 

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 

During the school year 1945-1946 the following cities and towns 
were represented in the student body of the Lincoln Technical 
Institute. 



Abington 


Hanover Center 


Randolph 


Allston 


Haverhill 


Reading 


Andover 


Hingham 


Readville 


Arlington 


Holliston 


Revere 


Ashburnham 


Hudson 


Rockport 


Ashland 


Hyde Park 


Roslindale 


Auburndale 


Ipswich 


Roxbury 


Belmont 


Jamaica Plain 


Salem 


Beverly 


Lawrence 


Saugus 


Billerica 


Lexington 


Sherborn 


Boston 


Lowell 


Somerville 


Braintree 


Lynn 


South Boston 


Brighton 


Maiden 


Stoneham 


Brockton 


Mansfield 


Stoughton 


Brookline 


Marshfield 


Swampscott 


Burlington 


Mattapan 


Wakefield 


Cambridge 


Medford 


Walpole 


Canton 


Medway 


Waltham 


Charlestown 


Melrose 


Watertown 


Chartley 


Methuen 


Wellesley 


Chelmsford 


Middleton 


West Acton 


Chelsea 


Milford 


West Bridgewatcr 


Danvers 


Milton 


West Newton 


Dedham 


Nashua 


West Roxbury 


Dorchester 


Natick 


Whitman 


East Boston 


Needham 


Wilmington 


East Weymouth 


Newton 


Winchester 


Everett 


North Quincy 


Winthrop 


Fitchburg 


Norwood 


Woburn 


Foxboro 


Peabody 


Wollaston 


Framingham 


Quincy 


Woonsocket, R. I 



14 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



HIGH SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 

During the yeai- 1945-1946 the following high schools and pre- 
paratory schools were represented in tlie student body: 



Admiral Farragut Academe 


f Franklin 


New Bedford 


Andover 


Gardner 


New Britain, Conn. 


Arlington 


Gloucester 


Newton 


Ashland 


Greenfield 


Newton Trade 


Attleboro 


Hanover 


North Quincy 


Aver 


Haverhill 


Norton 


Bangor, Me. 


Hingham 


Norwood 


Belmont 


HoUiston 


Oliver Ames 


Berkeley, California 


Holten 


Orange 


Berlin, Germany 


Howe 


Oswego, N. Y. 


Beverh- 


Hudson 


Pawtucket, R. I. 


Boston College 


Huntington 


Peabody 


Boston English 


Hutchinson, Kansas 


Pleasantville, N. Y. 


Boston Public Latin 


Jamaica Plain 


Ponce de Leon, Fla. 


Boston Technical 


Jeremiah E. Burke 


Porter 


Boston Trade 


Keith Academy 


Quincy 


Boys' High School, Brooklyn Kuon Mi, China 


Quincy Trade 


Braintree 


LaSalle Academy, R. L 


Reading 


Brighton 


Lawrence 


Revere 


Brimfield 


Leominster 


Rindge Technical 


Brockton 


Lexington 


Rockland 


Brookline 


Lincoln Preparatory 


Roger, R. I. 


Brooklyn Preparatory, X. Y 


. Lockwood, R. I. 


Roxbury Memorial 


Buffalo Bennett, N. Y. 


Long Branch 


Salem 


Cambridge High & Latin 


Lowell 


Saugus 


Canton 


Lynn Classical 


Sherborn 


Central, Tenn. 


Lynn English 


Somcrville 


Charlestown 


Maiden 


St. Charles 


Chelmsford 


Manchester, N. H. 


St. Clement 


Chelsea 


Mansfield 


St. Joseph's 


Clark, Me. 


Marblehead 


St. Mary's 


Coalport, Penn. 


Marlborough 


Stoughton 


Commerce 


Marshfield 


Thayer Academy 


Compton L'nion, California Maynard 


Umitalla, Fla. 


Coylc 


McBurney, N. Y. 


\'ienna, Austria 


Dean Academy 


McPherson, Kansas 


Wakefield 


Dedham 


Melrose 


Walpole 


Dorchester 


Memphis Technical, Tenn. 


Waltham 


Duxbury 


Nliami Edison, Fla. 


Watertown 


East Boston 


Millburn, N. J. 


\Vatertown, N. Y. 


Everett 


Milford 


Wellesley 


Exeter Academy 


Milton 


West High, R. I. 


Falmouth 


Nashua, N. H. 


West Seneca, Canada 


Foxboro 


Natick 


\Vilmington 


Framingham 


Necdham 


Winthrop, Wash. 



General Information 15 

THE CAMPUS 

The Lincoln Technical Institute is affiliated with North- 
eastern University and enjoys the use of all the excellent classrooms 
and modern laboratory facilities. It is easily reached from the 
North and South Stations, and from the various points of the 
Boston Elevated System since it is situated at the entrance of the 
Huntington Avenue Subway. 

The work of the School is carried on in the following buildings: 

Richards Hall contains the administrative headquarters of the 
Institute. The major portion of the building is given over to labora- 
tory and classroom areas. Laboratory space is provided for the 
following: Mechanical Engineering, General and Advanced 
Physics, Inorganic, Organic, Analytical, Radio and Physical 
Chemistry, together with several research laboratories. It also 
contains several well-equipped drawing rooms extensively used for 
courses in drafting and designing which form so important a part 
in technical work. 

The New Building, completed in 1941, contains the Chemical 
Engineering and Biological Laboratories, student activities rooms, 
classrooms, conference rooms and lecture halls for meetings of pro- 
fessional engineering societies. 

The East Bltilding houses the University Library, a chemistry 
laboratory, several classrooms and the Business Administration 
Laboratory. 

The South Building is largely devoted to work in Electrical and 
Civil Engineering. Here is located the Sanitary, Concrete, Photo- 
grammetric, Electronics, and Electrical Measurements and Dynamo 
Laboratories in addition to department offices, classrooms and 
conference rooms. 

TRANSPORTATION 

The Railroad Systems entering Boston issue students' tickets to 
students under twenty-one years of age. Applications for these may 
be obtained at a railroad office and must be presented at the school 
office for signature. 

The Administrative Office will do everything possible to make 
share-the-ride arrangements among members of the student body 
to accommodate those who have transportation problems. 

LIBRARY AND STUDY AREAS 

The University Library, located in the East Building, is well 
equipped in technical literature and is available for use of students 



16 Lincoln Technical Institute 

of the Institute. The reading rooms are open from 9:00 a.m. to 
7:30 P.M. on weekdays, and from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Satur- 
days. The privilege of obtaining books from the Boston Public 
Library is extended to students of the Institute. Applications for 
this privilege should be made at the Administrative Office of the 
Institute where the necessary blanks may be obtained. 

Adequate study areas are available in the Library and New 
Building for student use. 

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

The University Bookstore is operated for the convenience of 
the student body. All books and supplies which are required by 
the students for their work in the Institute may be purchased at the 
Bookstore. Students taking Engineering Drawing should be pre- 
pared to expend a sum of approximately S5.00 for drawing supplies, 
exclusive of the cost of a satisfactory set of drawing instruments. 

VISITORS 

Visitors are always welcome at one class session in any depart- 
ment. Those who wish to visit any of the classes should call at 
the school office and obtain a visitor's card signed by the Dean. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Executive Council has made available a few scholarships to 
assist needy students of good mental capacity who, because of finan- 
cial limitations, might be deprived of educational opportunities. 
The award when a scholarship is granted may range up to one- 
half of the cost of tuition for the year depending upon the student's 
need and scholastic achievement. 

AWARDS FOR SCHOLASTIC ACHIEVEMENTS 

For the school year 1946-47 the Executive Council has offered 
the following scholarships. To the highest ranking Sub-Freshman, 
Division A and B Freshman, Sophomore and Junior who returns 
for the following school year a scholarship of $60. To the second 
highest ranking Sub-Freshman, Division A and B Freshman, 
Sophomore and Junior who returns for the following school year a 
scholarship of $30. These scholarships will be awarded only to 
students pursuing a full program for the Degree of Associate in 
Engineering. 



General Information 



17 



The winners of these scholarships for the past school year were: 
Sub-Freshman No award 



Freshman 
Division A 



Division B 



Sophomore 



Junior 



First, Richard E. Fricks 
Second, Frederick R. O'Brien 

First, Charles B. Shannon 
Second, Dorothy M. Lewis 

First, Irving B. Ruggles 
Second, Timothy Leary, Jr. 

First, Earle D. Hardy 
Second, Thomas J. Donovan 



18 Lincoln Technical Institute 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

REGULAR STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission who present evidence of completion 
of an approved secondary school course, or the equivalent of 
fifteen units (including one unit in Algebra and one in Plane 
Geometry) may be admitted as regular students, candidates for 
the Degree of Associate in Engineering and also eligible to proceed 
later, if they so desire, to the Degree of Bachelor of Business Ad- 
ministration in Engineering and Management offered by North- 
eastern University Evening School of Business. 

CONDITIONED STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission who do not meet the full requirements 
for admission as regular students may, at the discretion of the 
Committee on Admission, be admitted as conditioned students pro- 
vided such secondary school work as has been completed embraces 
one unit of Algebra and one unit of Plane Geometry. 

A conditioned student whose scholarship is satisfactory but who 
has not removed his conditions within the time specified by the 
Committee on Admission may be permitted to continue with his 
program of studies but on the completion of the chosen four year 
curriculum, he will receive a diploma indicating the completion of 
the program, but not carrying the award of the Degree of Asso- 
ciate in Engineering. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who wish to register for a special program or for single 
courses will be admitted as special students, not candidates for the 
diploma or Degree, provided their previous education and training 
permit them to pursue the courses with profit. 

Programs are planned to meet individual needs and should 
prove of benefit to those who wish rapid and immediate knowl- 
edge of certain fields, whether to supplement former training or 
to obtain preparation which will permit them to enter a new line 
of endeavor. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Students should avoid late registration. Those who find it 
necessary to register late may be permitted to enter the School 
provided that they have not lost so much work as to render it 
unlikely that they will succeed in their courses. JVo deduction from 
tuition fees is made because of late enrollment. 



Classification of Students 19 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

DIVISION A 

Students who enter school at the beginning of the normal school 
year in September are termed Division A students. Programs for 
these students can be arranged so that the work of the school year 
is completed by May or in early June by attendance three evenings 
a week. Students, however, may elect to carry a lighter scholastic 
load than the regular program. Summer courses are not necessary 
for Division A students. 

DIVISION B 

Students entering school in January are termed Division B 
students. These students terminate the first part of their studies by 
the end of May, attending three evenings a week. However, to 
complete the work of the Freshman year, it is necessary that they 
attend a summer course which meets for two evenings a week. 
Students pursuing this program may continue with the Sophomore 
program in September of the year in which they enter school, and 
thereafter attend during the normal school year. 

Summer attendance is not compulsory, but in the event that a 
student does not pursue a summer course, attendance is neces- 
sary over a period of five school years to complete graduation 
requirements. 

SUB-FRESHMEN 

Students who have not completed Algebra and Geometry, or 
those who wish to review these subjects because of the remoteness 
of their former period of study are termed Sub-Freshmen, Their 
course will consist of Algebra and Geometry and the Freshmen 
courses in Engineering Mathematics and Engineering Drawing. 
These courses begin in September and extend for thirty-two weeks. 
During the Summer Term the program consists of the Freshman 
course in Physics. 

Students who complete these courses will be admitted to the 
work of the Sophomore year. This program permits them to save 
a year which would otherwise be lost, since it enables them to 
graduate in the customary period of four years. 

Students are admitted to this course only after a personal inter- 
view with the Dean. 



20 Lincoln Technical Institute 



ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

Applications for admission should be filed as early as possible 
in order that the necessary investigations may be made and the 
status of each student definitely determined before the opening day. 



REGISTRATION 

Each student is required to present himself at the school office, 
and to have his course approved by the Dean or his assistants and 
to complete his registration. A student is expected to pay the first 
tuition installment and other fees required before beginning 
attendance. 

Late registration will be permitted only at the discretion of the 
Dean. 

THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year is divided into two semesters of seventeen weeks ' 
each. The first semester extends from September 16 to January 24, 
and the second semester from January 27 to May 23, except that 
make-up sessions for public holidays may extend either term. At- 
tention is drawn to the fact that Division B students begin their 
studies on January 6. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students may register for single subjects or for complete courses 
provided such registration meets with the approval of the Dean; 
but to receive the Degree of Associate in Engineering the student 
must fulfill the following conditions: 

a. He must complete all the courses of his particular curriculum, 
either by attendance at this Institute, or by receiving advanced 
standing credit for those courses, or the equivalent of those 
courses, as determined by the Dean. 

h. He must pass such final examinations as are required in the 
courses he has pursued. The various curricula have been ar- 
ranged so that the courses can be completed in four years. 
However, an extension of time will be granted to those who 
wish to take longer to meet the requirements for graduation. 



Administrative Regulations 21 

c. Regardless of the advanced standing credit he receives, he 
must have been in attendance for at least a year preceding the 
date on which he expects to graduate; that is, he must complete 
at least one full year's work in the Lincoln Technical Institute. 

SESSIONS 

Classes meet on weekday evenings. There are no classes on 
Saturdays. A full schedule will include three evenings a week. As 
a rule classes are scheduled from 7 p.m. till 9.30 p.m. Laboratory 
periods in Chemistry are of three hours' duration. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A careful record of attendance upon class exercises is kept for 
each student. Absence from regularly scheduled classes on any 
subject will seriously affect the standing of the student. It may 
cause the removal of certain subjects from his schedule and the 
listing of these as "conditioned subjects." However, if reasonable 
excuse for absence be presented, the student may be allowed to 
make up the time lost, and be given credit for the work; but he 
must complete the work at such time and in such manner as his 
instructor in the course shall designate. 

Students who are unavoidably absent from class may receive 
the home work assignments by telephoning the school office. 

A minimum attendance record of 75 per cent must be maintained in all 
classes before a student will be admitted to examination. 

EXAMINATIONS AND QUIZZES 

Examinations and quizzes are held throughout the term at the 
discretion of the instructors. Quizzes are to be made up at the 
discretion of the instructor. The fee for each make-up quiz is $1.50. 
Final examinations are required upon the completion of all courses. 
The following system of grading is used: 

A — 90 to 100 — Excellent 
B — 80 to 89 — Good 
C — 70to 79 — Fair 
D — 60 to 69 — Lowest Passing Grade 
F — 50 to 59 — Conditioned Failure 
FF — Below 50 — Complete Failure 



22 Lincoln Technical Institute 

A student marked "F" in a final examination may receive one 
special examination. If he fails in that, he must repeat the course. 
It is to be noted that a student whose grade is "F" must petition for 
re-examination. Permission to take a make-up examination is a privi- 
lege, not a right, and is dependent upon the quality of work the 
student has done throughout the course. Conditioned or make-up 
examinations are given in September before the opening of the 
next school year. 

A student marked "FF" must repeat the course. The fee for 
each special examination is $3. Grades and reports are mailed to 
the students and will not be given out at the school office. Under 
no circumstances will grades be given over the telephone. 

It is to be noted that no student will be permitted to graduate who does not 
maintain a "C" average and that students who have not maintained such an 
average by the end of the Sophomore year will not be permitted to continue 
in school. 

TRANSFERS 

Students are not permitted to change from one course to another 
without first consulting the Dean and receiving a Transfer Order 
signed by him. 

REPORTS OF STANDING 

An informal report of the student's standing is issued at the end 
of the seventeenth week; and the formal report, covering the year's 
record, is issued at the close of each year. 

In the case of students who are under twenty-one years of age, 
reports may be sent to parents in the event of unsatisfactory work 
on the part of the student, non-compliance with administrative 
regulations, continued absence, and withdrawal. Parents of minors 
may obtain reports at any time on request. 



STUDENTS ADMITTED WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who, upon admission, were granted provisional ad- 
vanced standing credit, but did not present evidence of their 
eligibility to such credit, may not continue in school unless their 
credentials are presented to the Dean before the close of the first 
semester. The School is glad to aid students in obtaining transcripts 
of record. 



Administrative Regulations 23 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, laboratory 
work, and practical work in the drawing rooms. Great value is set 
upon the educational effect of these exercises, which constitute the 
foundation of each of the courses. Oral and written examinations 
are held at the discretion of the instructors. 

The attention of every student is drawn to the fact that home 
assignments must be dutifully done and written work submitted 
as assigned if the student's grade is not to be seriously affected. 
Wilful disregard of this matter will result in disciplinary action by 
the Administrative Officers. 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 

On pages 45 to 60 will be found a detailed statement of the scope 
of the subjects offered in the various courses. The subjects are num- 
bered for convenience of reference in consulting the various curric- 
ulum schedules. 

Required courses, and those prerequisite thereto, must have been 
successfully pursued before any advanced course may be taken. 



24 Lincoln Technical Institute 

TUITION AND OTHER FEES 

MATRICULATION FEE 

A matriculation fee of $5 must accompany the initial application 
for admission to the Institute. This fee is returned when the student 
is refused admission. 

TUITION 

Tuition fees are based on a charge of $10 a semester hour. The 
student may determine his cost for tuition by consulting the Pro- 
grams of Instruction shown on pages 28 to 34 where the semester 
hour credit for each course is indicated. The schedule for payments 
for the year is as follows: 

Division A Students 

The first payment is due during the first week of school and the 
other three during the weeks of November 11, January 27, and 
March 10. 

Division B Students 

The first payment is due during the week of registration and the 
second during the week of March 18. The summer term payment is 
due during the week of registration in June. 

Sub-Freshmen Students 

The tuition charges for sub-freshmen students will be at the rate 
of $10 a semester hour with $30 additional for Review Algebra and 
Plane Geometry. The first payment is due during the week of regis- 
tration and the other four payments during weeks of November 1 1 , 
January 27, and March 10 and during the week of registration of 
the summer program. 

DEFERRED PAYMENT PRIVILEGE 

Students who find considerable difficulty in meeting payments 
according to the schedule specified above may make other payment 
arrangements upon consultation with the Dean. 

UNIVERSITY FEE 

All students will pay, in addition to tuition and laboratory fees, 
a University fee based on the program they are carrying. 

For students enrolled in three full courses $10.00 

For students enrolled in two full courses 7.00 

For students enrolled in one full course 3.50 



Tuition and Other Fees 25 

LABORATORY FEES 

All students taking courses which require laboratory work are 
charged laboratory fees in accordance with the following rates: 

Aeronautical Laboratory S 5 

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory 15 

Electrical curriculum 2nd, 3rd, 4th years — per year 5 

Electronic curriculum 2nd, 3rd, 4th years — per year .... 5 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 5 

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 15 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 15 

Laboratory fees for students taking individual courses, excepting 
chemistry laboratory, are $2.50 per semester. The fee for chemical 
laboratory for individual course students is $7.50 per semester. 

Laboratory fees are not returnable. 

For students taking Chemistry there is in addition a Chemistry laboratory 
deposit of $5, the unused portion of which will be refunded after deductions 
for breakages and non-returnables. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATION FEES 

The fee for each special examination for advanced standing, for 
conditioned students, or for students who have for justifiable cause 
omitted to take the regular scheduled examinations is $3. The fee 
must be paid before the examination is taken. 

GRADUATION FEE 

On completing the curricular requirements for the Degree of 
Associate in Engineering the student will pay a graduation fee of 
$10. This fee must be paid by May 15 in the year of the student's 
graduation. 



26 Lincoln Technical Institute 

REFUND POLICY 

Students who are forced to withdraw from a course or from the 
Institute are expected to notify the Administrative Office by com- 
pleting the withdrawal blank which will be furnished. Requests for 
a refund must be filed within forty-five days after withdrawal. For 
causes deemed adequate by the Committee on Withdrawals the 
balance of the tuition paid after the following charges have been 
made will be refunded: 

Thirty-four-week courses — four per cent of the total charges for 
each week of attendance in each semester. 

Twenty-week courses — six per cent of the total charges for each 
week of attendance each half term. 

Seventeen-week courses — eight per cent of the total charges for 
each week of attendance. 

The same charges are applicable in the event that a student 
abandons a part of his program. In addition the full Laboratory 
Fee is charged in those cases where a student is pursuing a labo- 
ratory course. 



Programs of Instruction 27 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN ENGINEERING 

The Lincoln Technical Institute offers four-year courses in 
Chemistry, Civil and Structural Engineering, Electrical Engineer- 
ing, Electronic Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Me- 
chanical Engineering, the last of which is also available with an 
Aeronautical option. Schedules of the various curricula are given 
on the following pages. 

On the satisfactory completion of a prescribed four-year course 
the Degree of Associate in Engineering is awarded to all regular 
students. 

All these courses are of strictly college grade. In those cases where 
students are unable, because of circumstances, to carry all of the 
work prescribed in any year, an extension of time will be granted by 
the Dean, who will determine which subjects shall be excluded, and 
also the order in which the omitted subjects shall later be studied. 

When a student elects a curriculum he is expected to complete 
all the subjects in that curriculum in order to receive the Degree 
unless he has the permission of the Dean to drop or omit certain 
subjects and substitute others for those omitted. 

Graduation from these programs carries four years' credit to- 
wards a six-year program leading to the Degree of B.A.A. in En- 
gineering and Management offered by Northeastern University 
Evening School of Business. 



28 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



SPECIAL COURSE IN CHEMISTRY 
Leading to a Diploma 







FIRST YEAR 








First Semester 






Second Semester 




Course 
No. 


Course 


Class 
Hours 


Course 
No. 


Course 


Class 
Hours 


*Ghl 
GhLl 


General Ghemistry. . . . 
General Ghem. Lab. . . 


. . 3 


Gh2 
GhL2 


General Ghemistry. . . . 
General Ghem. Lab. . . 


. . 3 



SECOND YEAR 



*Gh3 Qualitative Ghemistry . . 
GhL3 Qualitative Ghem. Lab. 



2M 
3 



Gh4 Quantitative Ghemistry. 23^ 
GhL4 Quantitative Ghem. LalD. 3 



sV' 



THIRD YEAR 



*Gh5 Organic Ghemistry 23^ 

GhL5 Organic Ghem. Lab 3 



Ch6 Organic Ghemistry 2]^ 

GhL6 Organic Ghem. Lab 3 



An additional course, Industrial Ghemistry, Lectures and Laboratory, will be offered 
in any year if sufficient students desire it. 

These courses carry credit towards the Degree of Associate in Engineering and the 
Degree of B.B.A. in Engineering and Management offered by Northeastern University 
Evening School of Business. 

Students wishing to pursue programs for the Degree should consult the Dean regarding 
particulars. 

* No credit allowed until completion of second semester. 



Programs of Instruction 



29 



CHEMISTRY 
leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

The Sciences of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering have undergone a marked 
development in recent years. It has grown out of the discoveries of the chemical labora- 
tories which have launched many new industries whose production processes involve 
chemical as well as physical change. The chemist is in demand and his aid is sought in 
the operation of plants producing drugs, oils, rayon and cellophane, plastics and vari- 
ous synthetic products resulting from intensive research during the war. The chemist 
may assist in the creadon of more economical manufacturing processes, promote the 
development of manufacturing by-products, and be instrumental in the discovery of 
new products in the research laboratories. 

In addition to the fundamental courses in chemistry, mathematics, and physics, a 
considerable amount of time is devoted to more advanced work in chemistry. Since the 
field is so varied, the curriculum has been designed to give the students a broad training 
rather than a specialized training in one specific industry. 



FIRST YEAR 



Course 

No. 

Ml 
*P1 
*D1 



First Semester 

Course 

Algebra 

Physics I 

Engineering Drawing. . 



Class 
Hours 

2H 
2^ 

73^ 



Course 
No. 

M2 

P2 

D2 



Second Semester 

Class 
Course Hours 

Trigonometry 2 J^ 

Physics II IM 

Engineering Drawing. ... 2J^ 

IV2 



SECOND YEAR 



M3 Analytical Geometry \ 

M5 Diflferential Calculus j 

*Chl General Chemistry. . . . 

ChLl General Chem. Lab. . . 



2H 
3 

8 



M6 

Ch2 

ChL2 



Integral Calculus 23^ 

General Chemistry 2J^ 

General Chem, Lab 3 



THIRD YEAR 



♦MEl Applied Mechanics I. . . . 

*Ch3 Qualitative Chemistry . 

ChL3 Qualitative Analysis Lab. 



23^ 
2H 
3 

8 



ME2 Applied Mechanics II . . . 2^^ 
Ch4 Quantitative Chemistry. . 2\^ 
ChL4 Quantitative Analysis Lab. 3 



8 



FOURTH YEAR 



** 



Engineering Elective .... 2 

*Ch5 Organic Chemistry 23^ 

ChL5 Organic Chem. Lab 3 

7^ 



* Engineering Elective .... 2 

Ch6 Organic Chemistry 23^ 

ChL6 Organic Chem. Lab 3 

7M 



* No credit allowed until completion of second semester. 
** Among the elective subjects deemed desirable are Heat Engineering, Electricity 
and Machine Drawing. 



30 



Lincoln Technical Institute i 



CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 
Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

The field of Civil Engineering has to do with the planning and building of all kinds 
of structures and public works. Today its major branches include topographical, munic- 
ipal, railroad, highway, structural, hydraulic, and sanitary engineering. It covers land 
surveying, the building of railroads, soil mechanics, harbors, docks, the construction of 
sewers, water works, streets and highways, the design and construction of flood control 
projects, bridges, buildings, walls, foundations, and all fixed structures. 

This curriculum is designed to offer the relatively compact body of principles upon 
which all work in Civil Engineering depends. It is intended to prepare the young civil 
engineer to take up the work of design and construction of structures, to solve the 
problems of water supply, and to undertake intelligently the supervision of work in 
allied fields of engineering and general contracting. 



FIRST YEAR 



Course 
No. 

Ml 
*D1 
*P1 



First Semester 

Course 

Algebra 

Engineering Drawing. . 
Physics I 



Class 
Hours 

2^ 
2H 



Course 
No. 

M2 

D2 

P2 



Second Semester 

Class 
Course Hours 

Trigonometry 2 J^ 

Engineering Drawing. ... 2 J^ 
Physics II lyi 

m 

Integral Calculus 2)4. 

Applied Mechanics II . . . 2j^ 
Surveying II 2^ 



M3 

M5 

*ME1 

*CE1 



SECOND YEAR 



Analytical Geometry 1 
Differential Calculus / 
Applied Mechanics I. . 
Surveying I 



2M 

2H 

7M 



M6 

ME2 

CE2 



*ME3 

CE3 

*GD1 



Strength of Materials I 
Highway Engineering . 
Structural Drawing I . . 



THIRD YEAR 

2 

2H 



ME4 Strength of Materials II . 

CE4 Hydraulics 

CD2 Structural Drawing II . . . 



2H 
2Vi 

2y2 

7H 



*CE5 

GE7 

*GE9 



FOURTH YEAR 



Engineering Structures I . 

Concrete 

Structural Design I . . . . 



23^ 

2 

2^ 



CE6 
GE8 
GEIO 



Engineering Structures II 2J^ 

Concrete Design 2 

Structural Design II 2]^ 



* Credit not allowed until completion of second semester. 



Programs of Instruction 



31 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
. Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

The profession of electrical engineering aflfords a wide diversification of employ- 
ment opportunities. The electrical industry and the field of electrical engineering are 
usually divided into two main branches, one having to do with electrical power and the 
other, communications. The power group deals principally with large equipment and 
apparatus employing heavy currents; the communications group handles small, more 
delicate equipment employing small, even minute currents. Electrical engineering thus 
embraces the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity for light and power 
purposes, the operation of electric railways, the design, construction, and operation of 
all types of electrical equipment including telephone, telegraph, and radio apparatus 
as well as lamps, motors, etc. 

This course provides a good theoretical background with practical applications. 
Instruction is carefully planned and the time divided among recitations, lectures, 
laboratory tests, homework, and reports. 



Course 
No. 

Ml 
♦PI 

EEl 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 



Class 
Course Hours 

Algebra 2]4 

Physics I 2li 

Direct Current Theory . . 2\^ 



7M 



Course 

No. 

M2 

P4 

EE2 



Second Semester 

Class 
Course Hours 

Trigonometry 2 J^ 

Physics III 21^ 

Alternating Current 

Theory 2]4 

m 

Integral Calculus 2J^ 

Direct Current Ma- 
chinery II 23^ 

Applied Mechanics II . . . 2J4 



IV2 



SECOND YEAR 



M3 Analytical Geometry "I 
M4 Differential Calculus / 
EE3 Direct Current Ma- 
chinery I 

*ME1 Applied Mechanics I . . 






M5 

EE4 

ME2 



EE5 

•EDI 
♦ME3 



Alternating Current Ma- 
chinery 1 2J^ 

Electrical Drafting. 2}/^ 

Strength of Materials. ... 2J^ 



THIRD YEAR 

EE6 



ED2 

ME4 



Alternating Current Ma- 
chinery II 

Electrical Drafting 

Strength of Materials. . . , 



2H 
2J^ 

ly^ 



*ME5 

♦EE7 

*EL1 



FOURTH YEAR 



Heat Engineering 2 

Electricity III 2 

Advanced Elec. Lab. I . . . 2J^ 

6^ 



ME6 

EE8 

EL2 



Heat Engineering. . . 

Electricity IV 

Advanced Elec. Lab. 



II. 



2 

2J^ 

2^ 



* No credit allowed until completion of second semester. 



32 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

This course is designed to train students for the various branches of the field of 
Electronics. The new advancements in the fields of radio, television, radar, and sonar 
created by the urgencies of war have opened up greater opportunities for intellectual 
pioneering in these fields of engineering than in other branches of the profession. 

Since electron tubes and circuits function around the principles of Electricity, this 
subject is adequately treated in the first two years of the course. After a thorough study 
of the various types of electron tubes and their basic circuits in the second and third 
years, the fourth year is devoted to the various important fields that the student may 
wish to enter, such as Industrial Electronics, Communications, Broadcast Stations, and 
the new fields of Frequency Modulation and Television, 

The whole course is a good balance between theory and practice, and experiments 
involving electron tubes and their applications are used through the entire last three 
years of the course. Laboratory reports and home work problems are used to supple- 
ment the experiments and lectures so that the student will absorb the material in a 
thorough manner. 



FIRST YEAR 



Course 
No. 

Ml 
*P1 

EEl 



First Semester 

Course 



Class 
Hours 



Algebra 2]^ 

Physics 1 2K 

Direct Current Theory. . 2J.^ 



7M 



Course 

No. 
M2 
P4 
EE2 



Second Semester 

Class 
Course Hours 

Trigonometry 2^ 

Physics III 2y2 

Alternating Current 

Theory 2 H 

7^ 



SECOND YEAR 



M3 Analytical Geometry ^ 

M4 Differential Calculus / ' 

EE3 D.C. Machinery I 

EE9 Intro, to Electron Tubes. 



2)^ 

2H 
2M 

7H 



M5 Integral Calculus 2J^ 

**EE10 Electron Tubes and Cir- 
cuits 1 5 



VA 



THIRD YEAR 



EE5 A. C. Machinery 1 2^ 

*ED1 Electrical Drafting 2^ 

EEll Electron Tubes and Cir- 
cuits II 2J^ 

7K 



ED2 
**EE12 



Electronic Drafting 

Communication Engineer- 
ing I 



23^ 
5 

7H 



FOURTH YEAR 



'*EE13 Communication Engineer- 
ing II 

EEl 5 Industrial Electronics I . . 

fEEl? Electronic Test Equip- 
ment and Measurement 
I 



5 
2^ 



2^ 

IV2 



and 



**EE14 Freq. Modulation 

Television 

Industrial Electronics II 

Electronic Test Equip' 

ment and Measure 

ment II , 



EEl 6 
tEE18 



5 






* No credit allowed until completion of second semester. 
* * Two nights per week, 
t This course may be substituted for EE15-16. 



Programs of Instruction 



33 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
. Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

Meeting the tremendous production requirements of World War II has called for 
every economy of time in man and machine hours to produce the maximum output. 
The scientific approach to the problems of industrial management has created an in- 
creasing demand for those trained in engineering and in the fundamentals of industrial 
management to assume administrative responsibility. 

The competition of the postwar period will require continued emphasis on this 
phase of management and provide many opportunities for trained personnel in methods 
engineering, time study, production planning and control and other phases of industrial 
relations pertaining to men and machines. 



Course 
No. 

Ml 
*D1 
*P1 



FIRST YEAR 

First Semesfer 

Class Course 

Course Hours No. 

Algebra 2)4 M2 

Engineering Drawing.. . . 2J^ D2 

Physics I 2y2 P2 

iy2 



Second Semester 

Class 
Course Hours 

Trigonometry 2 J^ 

Engineering Drawing. .. . 2]^ 
PhysicsII 2H 

7^ 







SECOND YEAR 








M3 

M5 

*ME1 

lEl 


Analytical Geometry "1 
DiflTerential Calculus J 

Applied Mechanics 

Job Evaluation and Merit 
Rating 


2K 
2K 

2 

7 


M6 

ME2 

IE2 


Integral 
Applied 
Methods 


Calculus 

Mechanics. . . . 
Engineering. . . 


. 2K 
. 2^ 
. 2H 

7H 



THIRD YEAR 



*ME3 

*MD1 

IE3 



Strength of Material 2}/2 

Machine Drawing 2J4 

Production Planning and 

Control 2H 



ME4 
MD2 
IE4 



Strength of Material. 
Machine Drawing . . 
Time Study 



2H 
2M 



7U 



FOURTH YEAR 



*ME9 
♦ME5 
♦*IE5 



** 



♦ ♦ 



IE7 
IE9 



Machine Design 2 

Heat Engineering 2 

Accounting Aids to Man- 
agement 23/^ 

Labor-Management Re- 
lations 2 

Quality Control by Sta- 
tistical Method 2H 

6^ 



MEIO Machine Design 2 

ME6 Heat Engineering 2 

*IE6 Accounting Aids to Man- 
agement 2J^ 

*IE8 Industrial Safety Engi- 
neering 2^ 

*IE10 Advanced Time Study .. . 2J^ 



ev 



*No credit allowed until completion of second semester. 
* *Fourth year students may select one of the starred courses in each semester. 



34 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering 

The field of mechanical engineering is concerned with the harnessing of our power 
resources by means of machinery to form useful work. In contrast to the civil engineer 
who deals primarily with static forces, the mechanical engineer is more concerned with 
the mechanics of motion or kinetics. And because moving parts require constant care 
and adjustment, the mechanical engineer has the task not only of designing and in- 
stalling complicated machinery, but also of operating it efficiently after it has been 
installed. 

Among the major branches of mechanical engineering are included power pro- 
duction engineering, machine and machine-tool design, railway mechanical engineer- 
ing, automotive engineering, aeronautical engineering, refrigerating engineering, air 
conditioning engineering, and the numerous mechanical problems related to modern 
industrial operation. 

This program of study is designed to give the student considerable training in the 
principles of mechanical engineering and equip him for advancement in the many sub- 
divisions of this branch of engineering. Students interested in Aeronautical work may 
select appropriate courses in Aerodynamics, Airplane Engines, and Airplane Design in 
the senior year. 



FIRST YEAR 



Course 

No. 
Ml 
*D1 
*P1 



First Semester 

Course 

Algebra 

Engineering Drawing. 
Physics I 



Class 
Hours 

2H 
2K 



Course 

No. 

M2 
D2 
P2 



Second Semester 

Course 

Trigonometry 

Engineering Drawing. 
Physics II 



Class 
Hours 

2K 
2K 
2K 

iy2 



M3 Analytical Geometry 

M5 Differential Calculus 

*MD1 Machine Drawing. . 

*ME1 Applied Mechanics. , 



SECOND 

2K 

. 2H 
. 2H 

7M 



YEAR 

M6 

MD2 

ME2 



Integral Calculus . . 
Machine Drawing. 
Applied Mechanics . 



2^ 

2y2 



iy2 



THIRD YEAR 



*ME3 Strength of Materials. 

ME7 Mechanism 

*ME5 Heat Engineering. . . . 



2H 
2^ 
2 



ME4 

CE4 

ME6 



Strength of Materials. 

Hydraulics 

Heat Engineering. . . . 



23^ 
2^ 
2 



*ME9 
*ME11 



FOURTH YEAR 

Machine Design 2 

Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory 2J^ 

Engineering Elective. ... 23^ 



7 



MEIO Machine Design 2 

ME 12 Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory 2j^ 

Engineering Elective. ... 2J^ 



7 



ME13 
*ME15 



FOURTH YEAR (Aeronautical Option) 



Aerodynamics 2}^ 

Airplane Design I 2 



*ME17 Airplane Engines I 2 



63 



'2 



ME14 Aeronautical Laboratory 2^^ 

ME16 Airplane Design II 2 

ME18 Airplane Engines II 2 

6H 



* No credit allowed until completion of second semester. 
** Among the elective subjects deemed desirable are Concrete (1), Electricity, and 



Airplane Design. 



Programs of Instruction 35 



DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

PROGRAM 

The Lincoln Technical Institute in conjunction with the 
Evening School of Business, Northeastern University, offers a six- 
year program leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration in Engineering and Industrial Management. Graduates of 
the Lincoln Technical Institute holding the Degree of Associate in 
Engineering can complete the remainder of the program to qualify 
for the B.B.A. degree in two years. 

DEGREE PROGRAM 

Semester 
Lincoln Technical Institute: Hours 

Twelve approved full courses in chosen engineering 
program (any of the curricula listed on pages 
28 to 34). 60 

School of Business: 

Accounting Aids to Management 5 

Business Economics 5 

Industrial Management Problems and Policies 5 
Business and Industrial Management 5 

Principles of Production and Scientific Manage- 
ment 5 
Principles of Purchasing * 2/^ 
Business Reports and Conferences 2/^ 30 
*Business Readings 5 
fOccupational Experience 30 



Total Semester Hours Required for Degree 125 



* There are no lectures in the Business Readings Course, which is designed to broaden 
the student's acquaintance with selected readings in the field of business. 

t Occupational Experience is awarded to a maximum of ten semester hours for each 
of the last three years of the course. The award is based on the nature and quality of 
the student's occupation during this period. 



36 



Lincoln Technical Institute 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SUBJECTS IN ALL CURRICULA 

Course Semester 

No. Subject Given Day Time 

IE5 Accounting Aids to Management 1 1 Monday 7-9:30 

IE6 Accounting Aids to Management II 2 Monday 7- 

ELl Advanced Electrical Laboratory 1 1 Friday 7- 

EL2 Advanced Electrical Laboratory II 2 Friday 7- 

lElO Advanced Time Study 2 Monday 

ME13 Aerodynamics 1 Monday 

ME14 Aeronautical Laboratory 2 Monday 

ME15 Airplane Design 1 1 Wednesday 

ME16 Airplane Design II 2 Wednesday 

ME17 Airplane Engines 1 1 Friday 

ME18 Airplane Engines II 2 Friday 

Ml Algebra 1 , 2, S Monday 

EE5 Alternating Current Machinery 1 1 Wednesday 

EE6 Alternating Current Machinery II 2 Wednesday 

EE2 Alternating Current Theory 2, B Wednesday 

M3 Analytical Geometry 1 Monday (2) 

MEl Applied Mechanics 1 1 Friday 

ME2 Applied Mechanics II 2 Friday 

EE12 Communication Engineering 1 2 Monday and 

Wednesday 

EE13 Communication Engineering II 1 Monday and 

Friday 

CE7 Concrete 1 Monday 

CE8 Concrete Design 2 Monday 

M5 Differential Calculus 1 Monday (2) 

EE3 Direct Current Machinery 1 1 Wednesday 

EE4 Direct Current Machinery II 2 Wednesday 

EEl Direct Current Theory 1,2 Wednesday 

EDI Electrical Drafting 1 Friday 

EE7 Electricity III 1 Monday 

EE8 Electricity IV 2 Monday 

EEIO Electron Tubes and Circuits 1 2 Wednesday and 

Friday 7-9:30 

EEll Electron Tubes and Circuits II 1 Monday 7-9:30 

ED2 Electronic Drafting 2 Friday 7-9:30 

EEl 7 Electronic Test Equipment and 

Measurement 1 1 Wednesday 7-9:30 

EEl 8 Electronic Test Equipment and 

Measurement II 2 Wednesday 7-9:30 

Dl Engineering Drawing 1 1 » 2, S Wednesday 7-9:30 

D2 Engineering Drawing II 2, B, S Wednesday 7-9:30 

CE5 Engineering Structures 1 1 Friday 7-9:30 

CE6 Engineering Structures II 2 Friday 7-9:30 

EEl 4 Frequency Modulation and Television. ... 2 Monday and 

Friday 7-9:30 

Chi General Chemistry 1 1 Wednesday 7-9:30 

Ch2 General Chemistry II 2 Wednesday 7-9:30 

ChLl General Chemistry Laboratory 1 1 Friday 7-10 

ChL2 General Chemistry Laboratory II 2 Friday 7-10 

ME5 Heat Engineering 1 1 Wednesday 7-9 

ME6 Heat Engineering II 2 Wednesday 7-9 

CE3 Highway Engineering 1 Friday 7-9 

GE4 Hydraulics 2 Friday 7-9:30 

EEl 5 Industrial Electronics 1 1 Wednesday 7-9:30 

EE16 Industrial Electronics II 2 Wednesday 7-9:30 

IE8 Industrial Safety Engineering 2 Monday 7-9:30 

M6 Integral Calculus 2 Monday 7-9:30 

EE9 Introduction to Electron Tubes 1 Friday 7-9:30 



9:30 

9:30 

9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9 

9 

9 

9 

9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 
7-9:30 

7-9:30 

7-9:30 

7-9 

7-9 

7-9:30 

7-9:30 

7-9: 

7-9: 

7-9:30 

7-9 

7-9:30 



:30 
:30 



Programs of Instruction 



37 



Course 
No. 
lEl 
IE7 
ME9 
MEIO 
MDl 
MD2 
MEll 
ME12 
ME7 
IE2 
Ch5 
Gh6 
ChL5 
ChL6 
PI 
P2 
P4 
IE3 
Ch3 
ChL3 
IE9 
Ch4 
ChL4 
ME3 
ME4 
CE9 
CEIO 
GDI 
CD2 



GEl 
GE2 
IE4 
M2 



Semester 

Subject Given 

Job Analysis and Evaluation 1 

Labor Management Relations 1 

Machine Design I 1 

Machine Design II 2 

Machine Drawing I 1 

Machine Drawing II 2 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I . . . . 1 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II . . . 2 

Mechanism 1 

Methods Engineering 2 

Organic Chemistry I 1 

Organic Ghemistry II 2 

Organic Ghemistry Laboratory I 1 

Organic Ghemistry Laboratory II 2 

Physics 1 1,S 

Physics II 2, S 

Physics III 2, S 

Production Planning and Gontrol 1 

Qualitative Ghemistry 1 

Qualitative Ghemistry Laboratory 1 

Quality Gontrol by Statistical Methods ... 1 

Quantitative Ghemistry 2 

Quantitative Ghemistry Laboratory 2 

Strength of Material I 1 

Strength of Material II 2 

Structural Design I 1 

Structural Design II 2 

Structural Drawing I 1 

Structural Drawing II 2 

Sub-Freshman Mathematics 1 

Surveying 1 1 

Surveying II 2 

Time Study 2 

Trigonometry 2, B, S 



Day 


Time 


Wednesday 


7-9 


Monday 


7-9 


Friday 


7-9 


Friday 


7-9 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Friday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Friday 


7-10 


Friday 


7-10 


Friday 


7-9:30 


Friday 


7-9:30 


Friday 


7-9:30 


Friday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-10 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-10 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Monday and 




Friday 


7-10 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Wednesday 


7-9:30 


Friday 


7-9:30 


Monday 


7-9:30 



(1) 1 =» First Semester; 2 = Second Semester; B = Repeated for Division B about 

March 15; S = Summer Term. 

(2) Analytical Geometry and DifTerential Galculus are given as one course. 



38 Lincoln Technical Institute 

ENGINEERING LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

A considerable amount of demonstration equipment including 
many models is available for use in the study of structures, hydrau- 
lics, sanitary engineering, highways, concrete and soil mechanics. 

Surveying 

The Department of Civil Engineering is provided with a variety 
of excellent and up-to-date equipment for field work. The instru- 
ments have been chosen to make possible the working out of ad- 
vanced as well as elementary field problems, and to acquaint the 
students with the principal makes and types of instruments in 
general use. 

Hydraulics and Sanitary Engineering 

This laboratory, located on the first floor of the South Building, 
is equipped with demonstration measuring devices for use in con- 
nection with the courses in hydraulics. 

Complete equipment is also provided for studies of water soften- 
ing, filtration, coagulation, analysis of water and sewage by the 
photelometer, and analysis of bacterial condition of water and 
sewage. Also specialized equipment for advanced courses in sani- 
tary research. 

Concrete and Highway Engineering 

Located on the second floor of the South Building, this laboratory 
is equipped for conducting all the routine tests on cement and 
aggregate. The 300,000 lb. Riehle testing machine in the Me- 
chanical Engineering Department is available for compression tests 
on concrete cylinders. 

Equipment is also available for conducting a major portion of the 
accepted tests on bituminous materials as used in highway work. 
Soil Mechanics equipment consists of a general soil sampler, con- 
solidometer, wet-mechanical gram-size analysis and a quicksand 
demonstration tank. 

Aerial Photogrammetry' 

The apparatus in this laboratory may be used to instruct the 
students in the basic principles of photogrammetry, or may be used 



Engineering Laboratory Equipment 39 

to instruct the students in the more technical phases of photogram- 
metry such as horizontal control, vertical control, stereoscopic 
plotting, mechanical triangulation, and the tri-metrogon method 
of plotting. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORIES 

For experiments and investigations in Chemistry there are avail- 
able two laboratories with the following equipment: 

Analytical Chemistry 

The laboratory for Analytical Chemistry is fully equipped for 
giving instruction in the usual undergraduate courses. Each 
student is supplied with the necessary Pyrex and Kimble laboratory 
glassware, Stillimanite and Coors porcelain, and the standard pieces 
of hardware. Special equipment of all needed types is available. 

An adjoining balance room is equipped with Becker and Voland 
balances suitable for quantitative analytical work. 

Industrial Chemistry 

This laboratory is equipped with high pressure steam, vacuum, 
and the facilities usually found in a chemical laboratory. The 
various instruments and other chemical equipment necessary for 
the examiination, testing, and analysis of the raw materials, inter- 
mediate and final products of the various industries are at hand. 

The electrical equipment includes a Kimley electro-analysis 
machine for the determination of copper, lead, nickel, and zinc; 
a Hevi-duty electric furnace for use in ignition and combustion 
work; and a Freas drying oven capable of adjustment for various 
temperatures. Power is available in a variety of D.C. and A.C. 
voltages. 

Inorganic Chemistry 

In the locker assigned to each student for his individual use are 
the articles needed more or less continually by him as he does his 
experiments in the laboratory sessions. He has a liberal supply of 
glass, porcelain, metal and other articles. Additional pieces of ap- 
paratus are issued from the stockroom or otherwise made available 
for use in particular experiments where they are needed. 

The laboratories are equipped with general facilities appropriate 
to this course, such as gas, electricity, cold and hot water, fume 
hoods. 



40 Lincoln Technical Institute 

Organic Chemistry 

The needed equipment is available. There are individual lockers 
and apparatus, fume hoods for general use, and special equipment, 
as required. 

Drying operations are carried out with the aid of a steam-heated 
drying chamber, and electrically heated drying oven. Steam lines 
on the benches supply the steam for steam distillations, eliminating 
the necessity of individual steam generators. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The Electrical Engineering laboratories are located in the South 
Building. Four laboratories are included in this unit: Dynamo, 
Measurements, High Tension, and Electronics and Communi- 
cations. 

Dynamo 

This laboratory is provided with both 60 cycle three-phase 230 
volt alternating current and 1 1 5-230 volt three-wire direct current. 
The equipment includes more than sixty motors and generators of 
different types together with the necessary auxiliary equipment to 
operate and test them. The motors and generators have been 
selected so as to reduce as much as possible the risk from high volt- 
age while making available to the students a representative range 
of commercial apparatus. 

Electrical Measurements 

The equipment here is of two distinct types: first, that planned 
primarily for teaching principles of measurement, and secondly that 
which is used in teaching advanced standardizing methods as well 
as for calibrating instruments in other laboratories of the Univer- 
sity. Briefly, this laboratory is equipped for practically any work in 
electrical measurements except for the absolute determinations 
carried on in national standardizing laboratories. 

High Tension 

This laboratory is equipped with the necessary transformers and 
auxiliary equipment to provide 4 Kva. at 50,000 volts potential. A 
special room has been equipped for cable and insulation testing, 
and impulse testing of insulation is made possible by a surge genera- 
tor capable of producing waves having crest values up to 300,000 



Engineering Laboratory Equipment 41 

• 

volts. A 4,000 ampere low voltage transformer is also available for 
the study of the effects of heavy currents in conductors, switches, 
and contacts. 

ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The Electronics laboratories are located in Richards Hall and the 
South Building. 

Electron Tubes and Circuits 

Equipment is available to study the operating of all types oi 
electron tubes that are normally used, extending from diodes 
through to beam tubes, gas triodes, photocells, cathode ray tubes, 
and the various rectifier, amplifier and other basic circuits used with 
them, including vacuum tube voltmeters, regulated power supplies, 
resistance coupled amplifiers, inverse feedback amplifiers, etc. 

Electronics and Communications 

These laboratories are equipped with modern apparatus for work 
in the fields of electronics, networks, radio engineering, ultra-high 
frequency techniques and industrial electronics. The equipment 
includes Westinghouse Ignitron Rectifier, Industrial X-Ray Equip- 
ment, Motor Control Unit and equipment on Induction and Di- 
electric Heating. 

Industrial Electronics 

Equipment available for this course includes: photocell and time 
delay relays, motor controls, cathode ray oscilloscopes, grid con- 
trolled rectifiers, oscillators, induction and dielectric heating equip- 
ment, and welding control equipment. 

Communication Engineering 

Equipment available for this course includes crystal oscillators, 
radio frequency amplifiers, frequency doublers, plate and grid 
modulation units, complete transmitters, radio frequency trans- 
mission lines. The frequency modulation apparatus includes 
balanced modulators, reactance modulators, phase modulators, 
discriminators, limiters, networks, antenna units, and complete 
receivers. 

Apparatus for television includes sweep oscillators and ampli- 
fiers, synchronizing circuits, video amplifiers, multivibrators, count- 
ers, clipping, shaping and D.C. insertion circuits, and television 
receiving equipment. 



42 Lincoln Technical Institute 

In the newer fields such as Industrial Electronics and Tele- 
vision equipment is added from time to time as practical experi- 
ments are developed. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

The Industrial Engineering Laboratory is located in Richards 
Hall and is devoted exclusively to methods engineering and time 
study analysis. This laboratory is completely equipped with the 
latest facilities and tools used by industrial engineers. Besides the 
general equipment consisting of benches, tables, lathes, jigs, fix- 
tures, and racks, the laboratory has an ample supply of time study 
boards, stop watches and timers for time study work. There is also 
available complete motion picture equipment and microchronom- 
eters for micromotion work. 

Students in the Department of Industrial Engineering also share 
in the use of the Mechanical Engineering Laboratories. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The Mechanical Engineering Department has a suite of well- 
equipped laboratories, containing a large variety of modern ma- 
chines and occupying over 10,000 square feet of floor space in the 
basement of Richards Hall. Special areas have been set aside and 
equipped for oil testing, mechanics research, and similar purposes. 
Auxiliary equipment is, of course, available for making all the usual 
tests and measurements. 



Steam Power 

This equipment includes a wide variety of steam engines, 
ines, pumps, heat exchangers, and measuring instruments. 



Testing Materials and Heat Treatment 

For tension, compression, bending, and shearing tests, the labora- 
tory is equipped with a 300,000 lb. capacity Riehle and a 50,000 
lb. capacity Olsen, as well as several smaller testing machines. For 
other tests the laboratory has cement testers, torsional testing ma- 
chines, impact testers, fatigue testers, hardness testers, extensom- 
eters, oil testing equipment calorimeters, as well as instruments 
for measuring speed vibration, temperatures, pressures and flow 
of fluids. 



Engineering Laboratory Equipment 43 

For heat treatment studies, an electric furnace and a gas-fired 
furnace are available. Equipment magnifying up to 2600 diameters 
is available for photographing crystalline structures, and the labora- 
tory has polaroid equipment for photoelastic stress analysis. 

Machine Shop 

Adjoining the laboratory is a machine shop fully equipped with 
machine tools, welding equipment, and a small forge. 

Internal Combustion and Aeronautics 

The internal combustion equipment includes a number of gas 
and oil, automobile, airplane, and Diesel engines. Most of these are 
set up for running experimental tests, but several are available for 
dismantling and demonstration purposes. 

An open circuit Venturi type wind tunnel having a three-foot 
throat and capable of 120 miles per hour wind velocity is available 
for experimental and demonstration work in the measurement of 
air forces on model planes and other structures. The tunnel is 
equipped with three component hydraulic balances having variable 
degrees of sensitivity. 

DESIGN AND DRAFTING ROOMS 

The School possesses large, light, and well-equipped drawing 
rooms for the carrying on of the designing and drafting which form 
so important a part of engineering work. These rooms are supplied 
with lockers containing the drawing supplies, and files containing 
blueprints, and photographs of machines and structures that 
represent the best practice. Drafting room blackboards are equipped 
with traveling straightedge devices which facilitate speed and 
accuracy in blackboard demonstrations. 

PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 

The Physics equipment has been carefully selected and is ample 
for demonstrating physical principles. The following apparatus is 
available for this purpose: 

Motor driven Hyvac pump, mechanical oscillator, elasticity 
apparatus; Joly balance; barometers; pulleys; specific gravity 
bottles; torsion balance; eight-foot slide rule; wave apparatus; 
spherometers; organ pipes; tuning forks; Hartl optical disk; arc 
illuminator; projection lantern; refraction apparatus; metronome; 



44 Lincoln Technical Institute 

lenses; calorimeters; hydrometers; thermometers; burners; appara- 
tus for measuring latent heat, specific heat, expansion and mechani- 
cal equivalent of heat; optical bench and supplies; diffraction 
grating; spectroscopes; rheostats; galvanometers; magnets; electro- 
static apparatus; electroscope; Wimshurst machine; induction coil; 
ammeters; voltmeters; resistance boxes; condensers; wheatstone 
bridges; thermocouples; demonstration table equipped with water, 
compressed air, exhaust hood, 110 volts D.C., 110 volts A.G., and 
220 volts A.C. 



Description of Courses 45 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The Lincoln Technical Institute reserves the right to withdraw, 
modify, or add to the courses offered or to change the order or 
content of courses in any curriculum. 

The Lincoln Technical Institute further reserves the right to 
change the requirements for graduation, tuition and fees charged, 
and other regulations. However, no change in tuition and fees at 
any time shall become effective until the school year following that 
in which it is announced. 

Any changes which may be made from time to time pursuant to 
the above policy shall be applicable to all students in the school, 
college, or department concerned, including former students who 
may re-enroll. 

CHEMISTRY 
Ch 1-2 General Chemistry 

This course will instruct in the fundamental ideas of matter and energy; 
properties of gases, liquids, and solids; molecular weights; equations and 
valence; classification of the elements; ionic reactions; chemistry of metals 
and non-metals; electrochemistry; introduction to organic chemistry 
including industrial applications to petroleum, rubber, synthetic resins, 
plastics; chemotherapy; laboratory experiments demonstrating the prin- 
ciples discussed in class. 2^2 semester hours credit 

ChL 1-2 General Chemistry Laboratory 

This course consists of a series of laboratory experiments operated in 
conformance with the lecture course in General Chemistry (Ch 1-2). 

3 semester hours credit 

Ch 3 Qualitative Chemistry 

The object of this course is to give the student knowledge of the various 
fundamental laws and principles. A portion of the time is devoted to the 
formulation of numerical terms which are essential to the understanding 
of the mass action law, ionic equilibria, solubility product, hydrolysis, 
and redox instants. The use of the newer spot tests is stressed and, where 
possible, their reactions explained. 

{Prerequisite, Ch 7-2) 2}/^ semester hours credit 

ChL 3 Qualitative Analysis Laboratory 

This course applies the material covered in Ch 3 to actual problems. 
After some preliminary experiments, certain procedures are combined and 
the separations and identifications made on both known and unknown 
solutions. Finally, these are combined into a complete, systematic scheme 



46 Lincoln Technical Institute 

which is applied to artificially prepared mixtures and industrial materials. 
Careful manipulations, thoroughness in observation, and accuracy in 
arriving at conclusions are expected of each student. 

{Prerequisite, Ch L 7-2) 3 semester hours credit 

Ch 4 Quantitative Chemistry 

It is the purpose of this course to give to the student a realization of the 
scientific development of quantitative methods. Each of the major opera- 
tions such as weighing, measurement of volumes, titration, filtration, 
ignition, and combustion, is considered from the standpoint of the theo- 
retical principles involved, and with due consideration of the manipulative 
technique necessary. 

This is followed by the combination of these operations and their appli- 
cation to actual analysis, including a comprehensive study of volumetric 
methods and of the more elementary parts of gravimetric analysis. 

As the correct calculation of analytical results is of no less importance 
than the actual procedures of analysis, a number of problems forms a very 
important part of the course. 

(Prerequisite, Ch 3) 2}/^ semester hours credit 

ChL-4 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 

This is a laboratory course intended to illustrate by actual use the 
various analytical methods considered in Ch 4. After certain preliminary 
experiments designed to acquaint the student with the apparatus used, 
volumetric analysis, including acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidation, 
reduction, and precipitation methods are taken up. This is followed by 
simple gravimetric analysis. 

(Prerequisite, Ch L 3) 3 semester hours credit 

Ch 5 Organic Chemistry 

A study of the basic principles of the aliphatic organic compounds in- 
cluding hydrocarbons and isomerism, petroleum, alcohols, carboxylic 
acids, halogen compounds, and stereochemistry. The resemblances of 
classes is stressed, and emphasis is placed on genetic charts. The industrial 
significance of the subject is discussed to show the practical nature of 
organic chemistry. 

{Prerequisite, Ch 1-2) 2}/2 semester hours credit 

ChL-5 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Preparations'^and reactions of the aliphatic compounds. 
{Prerequisite, Ch L 1-2) 3 semester hours credit 

Ch 6 Organic Chemistry 

A continuation of Ch 5 dealing with the preparation and characteristic 
reactions of the aromatic organic compounds. Special attention is given to 
polymerization, diazotization, aromatic hydrocarbons, benzene, substi- 
tution in the benzene ring, phenols, aromatic acids, dyes, rubber, synthetic 
resins and plastics. A few of the more important heterocyclic compounds 
may be covered. 

{Prerequisite, Ch 5) 2}/2 semester hours credit 



Description of Courses 47 

ChL-6 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Preparations and reactions of the ardmatic compounds. 
{Prerequisite, Ch L 5) 3 semester hours credit 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
CE1-2 Surveying 

{a) A course of lectures which treats the basic principles, such as: taping, 
compass, theory and use of the transit as applied to both random and 
closed traverses, differential leveling, profile leveling, and double-rodded 
leveling. The D.M.D. and rectangular co-ordinate methods (of computing, 
plotting and running traverses) are stressed and especially as they may 
apply to such work or procedure as outlined by the Massachusetts Land 
Court. 

(/>) A continuation of Surveying (a), consisting of lectures and problems 
on simple curves (railroad curves and circular arcs), vertical curves, com- 
pound Stadia surveying, the theory and use of the plane table, plane tri- 
angulation aurves, and elementary earthwork problems. 

{Prerequisite, M 7-2) 5 semester hours credit 

CE3 Highway Engineering 

An outline of the principles governing the finance of highway projects. 
Thorough discussion of the survey for a highway project. Lectures on the 
fundamental principles of highway design. Various present-day road 
surfaces are discussed. A study of the fundamental principles of soil me- 
chanics as it relates to Highway design. 2 semester hours credit 

CE4 Hydraulics 

This course is a study of the principles of both hydrostatics and hydro- 
dynamics. The subjects considered are: the pressure on submerged areas 
together with their points of application; the laws governing the flow of 
fluids through orifices, short tubes, nozzles, weirs, pipe lines, and open 
channels; Reynolds numbers; and viscosity. 

{Prerequisite, ME 1-2) 2}/2 semester hours credit 

CE5-6 Engineering Structures 

First term in this theory course covers the equilibrium of forces and 
structures by analytical and graphical methods. Shear and moment 
diagrams are reviewed and expanded. Analytical and graphical analysis 
of roof trusses and mill building frames are worked out. The use of 
influence lines in analyzing stresses in beams, girders, and trusses is 
discussed as well as absolute maximum moment in beams. 

The work in the second term consists of analyzing the stresses in various 
types of railroad and highway bridge trusses by means of move-up load 
method and equivalent uniform loadings. Counters and lateral forces on 
the trusses are discussed. Deflections of beams and trusses by method of 
work (dummy load) and moment-area method are studied. The course 
closes with an introduction to the slope and deflection method as well as 
moment distribution method of analyzing statically indeterminate beam 
and portal problems. 

{Prerequisite, ME 3-4) 5 semester hours credit 



48 Lincoln Technical Institute 

CE 7 Concrete 

A consideration of the theoretical and practical principles involved in 
the design of concrete and reinforced concrete structures. The following 
subjects are thoroughly discussed: the manufacture of Portland Cement; 
the specification requirements for fine and coarse aggregates, followed by 
the design of a concrete mix; the design and capacity of existing single 
reinforced rectangular beams, double reinforced rectangular beams, and 
"T" beams; the fundamental principles underlying diagonal tension and 
bond stress; column design and methods of determining stresses in existing 
columns; the origin of curves and tables and their uses. Problems involving 
the above types of sections, first by the transformed area method and later 
by curves and tables, are done by the students. 

{Prerequisite, ME 1-2) 2 semester hours credit 

CE 8 Concrete Design 

This course will consist of the design of a cantilever retaining wall, re- 
taining wall with counterforts, a typical bay of a reinforced concrete 
building, footing design, and a reinforced concrete bridge. The course will 
also include a detail discussion of the Hardy Cross method of moment 
distribution, column analogy, and a comparative discussion of stress 
analysis in rigid frames. 

{Prerequisite, CE 7) 2 semester hours credit 

CE 9-10 Structural Design 

This course consists of a study of the design of such structural units as 
steel beams, girders, columns, trusses, riveted connection and steel frames 
as a whole. Particular attention is given to the practical phases of construc- 
tion and their relation to design. The design of structural timber is also 
studied. In the first half of the year the student is given many problems 
which he works out at home and in class and the last half of the year is 
usually devoted to the design and detailing of some larger, more compli- 
cated structures or portions of structures. 

Students with a previous record of study in Structural Design may be 
admitted to this course for work of an advanced nature. Individual 
problems may be assigned, such as the design of a highway or railroad, a 
bridge, a roof truss or a portion of an office building. 

{Prerequisite, CD 1-2 and ME 3-4) 5 semester hours credit 

CD 1-2 Structural Drawing 

The course in Structural Drawing consists of making shop drawings of 
the various members of modern steel frames. After making drawings of 
structural sections and standard connecdons, the student is given data 
from which he makes framing plans and shop details. The problems usually 
covered are: portions of a steel frame building, a bridge girder, and a roof 
truss. 

{Prerequisite, D 1-2) 5 semester hours credit 



Description of Courses 49 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

EE-1 Direct Current Theory 

This course is designed to give the student the required understanding 
of direct current fundamental circuits. The course deals with such con- 
cepts as: emf., current, resistance, conductance, circular mil, Ohm's Law, 
series and parallel D.G. circuits, D.G. power and energy, primary and 
secondary cells, Kirchoff's Laws, instruments, magnetic circuits and elec- 
trostatics. V/l semester hours credit 

EE-2 Alternating Current Theory 

This course consists of lectures and problems dealing with elementary 
A.C. circuit theory involving sinusoidal currents and emfs, effective value, 
power and energy, power factor, complex and polar notations, series and 
parallel circuits, resonant conditions, elementary polyphase circuits. 

2]/2 semester hours credit 

EE-3-4 Direct Current Machinery I and II 

(Lecture and laboratory.) This course consists of the D.G. shunt, series 
and compound motor and generator. Emphasis is placed upon commuta- 
tion, armature reaction, losses, efhciencies, stray power, ratings, methods 
of test as well as on auxiliary equipment such as protective devices. The 
application of D.G. machinery in industry is also involved. 

{Prerequisite, EE-1) 5 semester hours credit 

EE-5-6 Alternating Current Machinery I and II 

(Lecture and laboratory.) This course involves more advanced alter- 
nating current theory as applied to transformers, induction motors, syn- 
chronous motors and alternators. Methods of construction, characteristics, 
operation and methods of testing are emphasized. 

The accompanying laboratory includes some of the more difficult D.G. 
machinery experiments, as well as those dealing with A.G. circuits and 
transformers. 

{Prerequisite, EE-2) 5 semester hours credit 

EE-7 Electricity III 

A course of lectures and problems dealing with the transmission and 
distribution of electric power by means of direct and alternating current. 
A complete study of the application of the various types of electrical 
machinery to industry. 

{Prerequisite, EE 5-6) 2 semester hours credit 

EE-8 Electricity IV 

A continuation of Electricity III consisting of lectures and problerns 
covering the principles, characteristics, and applications of electronic 
tubes to industrial and commercial processes. This course is co-ordinated 
with appropriate laboratory work. 2 semester hours credit 



50 Lincoln Technical Institute 

EL-1-2 Advanced Electricity Laboratory I and II 

This course includes tests on many different types of alternating current 
motors, generators, transformers, and rectifiers. Reports are written on 
the tests performed as in the previous course in Electrical Laboratory. The 
apparatus available for testing is sufficiendy diverse so that experiments 
can be selected to fit the interests and need of individual students. 

Typical experiments include the following: Load Test on Synchronous 
Generator; Determination of the Voltage Regulation of an Alternator by 
the American Standards Association Method; Tests on several diff"erent 
types of Induction Motors; Determination of the V-curves and Efficiency 
of a Synchronous Motor; Parallel operation of Alternators 3-phase trans- 
former circuits. 

{Prerequisite, EE 5-6) 5 semester hours credit 

ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
EE-9 Introduction to Electron Tubes 

The object of this course is to acquaint the student with the various 
types of electron tubes that will be used in the later courses on circuits and 
applications. It begins with a review of electron theory, then the theory of 
electron emission, by thermionic, photo-electric, secondary and field 
means, including the study of the construction and processing of the 
various types of cathodes. The construction and evacuation of tubes will 
be discussed. Then the diode tube with the space charge phenomena will 
be taken up leading into the control of electrons in vacuum tubes. The 
static and dynamic characteristics of the various tube types will be covered. 
Equivalent amplifier circuits will be discussed in preparation for a more 
complete study of them in Electron Tube Circuits. Rectifier action will be 
covered and the addition of gas in vacuum tubes and the control of dis- 
charges in gas filled tubes. 

The laboratory work comprises a group of experiments to parallel the 
theory given in the lecture course. These experiments cover electron 
emission, plate resistance of diodes, both gas and vacuum, static and 
dynamic characteristics of triodes, tetrodes, pentodes and beam tubes. 

{Prerequisite, EE 1-2) 2}4 semester hours credit 

EE-10 Electron Tubes and Circuits I 

This course is designed to follow Introduction to Electron Tubes. The 
first part of the course deals with a study of thyratrons, photocells, cathode 
ray tubes, ignitrons, multi-purpose and special tubes. 

After completing the study of tubes, the basic circuits will be investi- 
gated beginning with rectifier circuits, both single and three phase, in- 
cluding filters that form a part of most complete rectifiers. Then the am- 
plifier circuit will be covered for direct current, audio and radio frequency, 
voltage and power amplifiers, with the various modes of operation with 
respect to electrode voltages and signal voltages, known as Class A, AB, 
B, and C operations. Push-pull and inverse feedback circuits will be 
included. 



Description of Courses 51 

The experiments in the laboratory will cover almost every type of tube 
and circuit that is studied in theory. These include thyratrons, photocell, 
cathode ray tubes, rectifier, R-C amplifier, power and feedback amplifier, 
and radio frequency amplifier circuits. 

{Prerequisite, EE-9) 5 semester hours credit 

EE-11 Electron Tubes and Circuits II 

The material in this course begins where the Part I has stopped and the 
first subject is the study of oscillators, including feedback, relaxation, 
electro-mechanical, and several others. 

This will be followed by modulators, demodulators, pulse generating, 
shaping, clipping, differentiating, integrating and trigger circuits will also 
be covered. Much of this last group will be used in the study of Television 
later in the course. 

The laboratory experiments include audio and radio frequency oscilla- 
tors, crystal and relaxation oscillators, magnetostriction oscillators, plate 
and grid modulators, balanced modulators, various types of demodulators, 
pulse generating, shaping, square wave, clipping differentiating, integrat- 
ing and trigger circuits. Laboratory reports are written on all of these 
experiments. 

{Prerequisite, EE-10) 2}/2 semester hours credit 

EE-12 Communication Engineering I 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of 
radio receiver operation and practice. After briefly covering the early 
types of radio receivers such as the regenerative and radio frequency cir- 
cuits the super-heterodyne will be covered, both for broadcast and com- 
munications use. Particular attention will be paid to pre-selectors, mixers 
and convertors, intermediate frequency amplifiers, automatic volume 
control, and loud speakers. Audio amplifier and rectifier circuits will be 
reviewed as to use in receivers, as they will have been covered in a previous 
course. Attention will be given to problems of selectivity, sensitivity, sta- 
bility and fidelity of receivers. 

In the laboratory, experiments will be conducted on all of the above 
subjects including the use of an RCA dynamic demonstrator which allows 
the student to see a typical super-heterodyne circuit in large detail in 
operating condition with test points to attach meters or an oscilloscope. 

{Prerequisite, EE 10-11) 5 semester hours credit 

EE-13 Communication Engineering II 

In this course the requirements for broadcast transmitters and associated 
equipment will be covered and then the types of circuits and adjustment 
'of these circuits to fulfill these requirements. This material will include 
studios, microphones, transcription equipment, audio amplifying equip- 
ment, telephone lines for broadcasting, including their equalization. Then 
on to the transmitter, starting with the crystal oscillator, buffer, amplifier 
power amplifiers, modulators, transmission lines and the antenna, includ- 
ing directional antennas. 

{Prerequisite, EE- 12) 5 semester hours credit 



52 Lincoln Technical Institute 

EE-14 Frequency Modulation and Television 

Principles and advantages of frequency modulation will be covered 
first, then the various methods of obtaining it in the transmitter and the 
special circuits found in the receiver. Ultra-high-frequency transmission 
characteristics will also be covered in this course. Experiments in fre- 
quency modulation will parallel most of the lectures. 

The basic principles of various methods of picture transmission such as 
wire photo, radio photo, facsimile and then television. Review of the me- 
chanical methods used in early television. Electronic television systems, 
using the iconoscope and image dissector for transmission, and cathode ray 
tube for reception. Synchronizing circuits and problems. Video amplifiers, 
deflecting circuits, television transmitters, receivers and antennas. Prob- 
lems and technique of transmission of motion pictures and outdoor and 
studio scenes. 5 semester hours credit 

EE-15 Industrial Electronics I 

In this course the use of electron tubes in industrial applications will be 
studied. Subjects include photocell relays, time delay relays, grid con- 
trolled rectifiers, and motor control circuits. 

The laboratory experiments cover almost every subject covered in the 
theory part of the course: photocell and time delay relays, grid controlled 
rectifiers and inverters, and motor control circuits. Laboratory reports are 
required for each experiment. 

(Prerequisite, EE 70- 7 7) 2}/^ semester hours credit 

EE-16 Industrial Electronics II 

This course consists of studies of welding control circuits, induction, 
dielectric heating circuits and applications, and cathode ray oscilloscope 
in industrial applications. 

The laboratory experiments cover welding controls, induction and di- 
electric heating applications, and cathode ray oscilloscopes.' Laboratory 
reports are required for each experiment. 

(Prerequisite, EE- 75) 23^2 semester hours credit 

*EE-T7-18 Electronic Test Equipment and Measurements I and II 

This course is designed for those who may wish to specialize in the fourth 
year, and instead of covering both the Industrial Electronic and Com- 
munication, Frequency Modulation and Television field will want to con- 
centrate on one group or the other. 

The subject material will be useful in either the field of Industrial 
Electronics or Communications. The course content includes review of 
D.C. and A.C. meters; measurement of R, L, and C; vacuum tube measure- , 
ments; vacuum tube voltmeters; impedance at audio frequencies; imped- 
ance at radio frequencies; measurements of audio frequencies; measure- 
ment of radio frequencies; use of signal generators and audio oscillators 
in alignment and curves; cathode ray oscilloscopes; wave analyzer; and 
square wave testing. 

*Fourth Year Elective. This course may be substituted for EE-15-16. 



Description of Courses 53 



Laboratory experiments cover all of the above subjects and reports are 
made up of each experiment. 5 semester hours credit 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

IE 1 Job Analysis and Evaluation 

Basic principles underlying theory of wage calculation, job elements and 
their definitions, rating scales, writing job descriptions and specifications, 
selection of appropriate rating plan, setting up job factors and maximum 
point values, use of several methods of determining specific point values. 
Discussion of special cases from individual companies. 

2 semester hours credit 
IE 2 Methods Engineering 

Process and operation analysis through the use of process charts, flow 
diagrams, operation charts, man-and-machine charts, micromotion study, 
principles of motion economy. Work place layout, labor-saving tools and 
equipment, laboratory development work. Elementary time study. 
Setting up synthetic standards using elemental time values. Wage incen- 
tives, problems involved in the introduction of work simplification with 
particular emphasis upon employee morale. 2}/^ semester hours credit 

IE 3 Production Planning and Control 

Factory organization, factory planning and layout, materials handling, 
storage, maintenance, power. Forecasting and budgeting, planning, 
scheduling, routing, dispatching, subcontracting. Quantity control, 
quality control, waste control, priorities, allocations, inventory control, 
records and reports. 2}/2 semester hours credit 

IE 4 Time Study 

Introduction to wage incentives and current wage plans. History and 
development of time study, relation to motion and micromotion study, 
preliminary observation, technique of making time studies. Rating pro- 
cedure, development of proper concept of "normal" performance, apply- 
ing the rating and relaxation factors. Setting job and element standards, 
use of allowances, treatment of variables, introduction to standard data, 
synthetic standards, problems in the application of standards. Laboratory 
practice will supplement the classroom work. 2}/^ semester hours credit 

IE 5-6 Accounting Aids to Management 

A study of the broad background of accounting and business trans- 
actions so as to enable the student to analyze and interpret intelligently 
financial statements and other accounting reports. The course demon- 
strates the use of accounting in management and financial control. Em- 
phasis is placed on the development of accounting fundamentals, prepara- 
tion of financial statements, corporation and manufacturing accounts, 
evaluation of balance sheet items, analysis and interpretation of financial 
statements and other trends, and the use of accounting as an aid to 
management. 5 semester hours credit 



54 Lincoln Technical Institute 

I 
IE 7 Labor-Management Relations I 

The industrial relations policy and legislation affecting industrial rela- i 
tions, labor-management committees, collective bargaining in theory and I 
practice, grievance procedures, settling labor disputes, negotiating labor I 
contracts, problems of interpretation, renegotiating of contracts, responsi- ! 
bilities of employers and employees in terms of employment, investment ; 
and the public. 2 semester hours credit 

IE 8 Industrial Safety Engineering 

Organization of safety department, economic advantages, plant lay- 
out, job analysis, machine safeguarding, hand tools, materials handling, 
prevention of falls, industrial health hazards, fire prevention and protec- 
tion, plant housekeeping, investigations and reports, first aid, administer- 
ing safety program, training the worker, off-job accidents. 

2}/2 semester hours credit 

IE 9 Quality Control by Statistical Methods 

Fundamentals of quality control. Theory of control charts. Analysis of 
control chart data. Sampling methods. Control chart applications. The 
poisson distribution. Planning for statistical quality control. Reports on 
quality control installations. Acceptance sampling. Control chart tech- 
niques and industrial applications. 2^2 semester hours credit 

IE 10 Advanced Time Study 

Review of stop-watch time study. Use of special timing devices and 
their relative accuracy; use of motion pictures for rate-setting and training 
purposes. Current trends in wage payment policy and in the use of time 
study data. Problems involved in setting up standard data for a variety of 
operations. Development of tables, families-of-curves, formulae, nomo- 
graphs, and multi-variable charts for synthetic rate-setting purposes. 

The laboratory part of the course will involve the complete analysis and 
time study of a selected operation performed upon a series of products 
within a definable variable range, and the building of standard data from 
the time studies made by the students. Operations submitted by individual 
students may be used for this purpose. 

{Prerequisite, IE 4) 2}^ semester hours credit 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
ME 1 Applied Mechanics (Statics) 

The subjects treated are collinear, parallel, concurrent, and non- 
concurrent force systems in a plane and in space; the determination of the 
resultant of such systems by both algebraic and graphical means, special I 
emphasis being placed on the string polygon method for coplanar force 
systems; the forces required to produce equilibrium in such systems; first 
moments; and problems involving static friction, such as the inclined 
plane and the wedge. 

{Prerequisite, P 7) 2J^ semester hours credit 



• 



: Description of Courses 55 

ME 2 Applied Mechanics (Kinetics) 

The subjects treated arc continuation of first moments as applied to 
varying intensity of force and to the determination of center of gravities 
of areas and solids; second moments and the application to the determina- 
tion of moment of inertia of plane and solid figures, radius of gyration, 
polar moment of inertia; product of inertia principal axes, uniform mo- 
tion, uniformly accelerated motion, variable accelerated motion, har- 
monic motion, simple pendulum, rotation, plane motion, work, energy, 
momentum and impact. 

(Prerequisite, ME 7) 2]/2 semester hours credit 

ME 3-4 Strength of Materials 

This course comprises the study of the stresses and strains in bodies 
subjected to tension, compression, and shearing; common theory of beams 
with thorough description of the distribution of stresses, shearing forces, 
and bending moments; deflection of beams. 

A study is made of the strength of shafting and springs; combined 
stresses in beams subjected to tension, compression, and bending; also 
strength of riveted joints, columns, and thin hollow cylinders, and brief 
consideration of strains and the relation of the stresses on different planes 
in a body. 

{Prerequisite, AiE 1-2) 5 semester hours credit 

ME 5-6 Heat Engineering 

The fundamentals of thermodynamics are discussed in this course and 
include the general theory of heat and matter; first and second laws of 
thermodynamics; equations of state; fundamental equations of thermo- 
dynamics; laws of perfect gases; properties of vapors including use of 
tables and charts; and the general equation for the flow of fluids. Particu- 
lar emphasis is given to the properties of steam, the use of the steam tables, 
and the Mollier diagram. 

The course also embraces a study of fuels and combustion of fuels as 
applied to steam boilers. 

The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the theory 
of heat as applied to prime movers. 

Descriptions of many different kinds of apparatus used in the steam 
power plant such as engines, turbines, and auxiliary equipment, including 
pumps, condensers, heaters, fans, etc., comprise the major part of the 
course. A large number of problems related to the apparatus discussed are 
solved. In addition to the above, such items as draft, chimneys, coal and 
ash handling equipment, piping and valves, and technical power plants 
are studied. In addition to the study of steam apparatus, air compressors 
and internal combustion engines are discussed. 

(Prerequisite, P 7-2) 4 semester hours credit 

ME 7 Mechanism (I) 

The object of this course is to acquaint the student with the principles of 
mechanism which are met in practice and in machine design. The topics 



56 Lincoln Technical Institute 

considered are belting, pulley, and gear train calculations, both simple and 
epicyclic, cam design and theoretical design of gear-tooth shapes. The 
instant center calculations and velocity diagram plots or common linkages 
are studied. 

{Prerequisite^ MD 1-2) lYi semester hours credit 

ME 9-10 Machine Design 

This course applies to machines the principles of which were presented 
in Course MEy. Typical problems presented for design are the triplex power 
pump, power shearing machine, and a twenty-ton hydraulic press. 

Minimum sizes of the various parts are calculated and an assembly of 
the complete machine is drawn and traced. All calculations are carefully 
presented in notebook form. 

Also, numerous miscellaneous small problems are taken up. 

{Prerequisite, ME 7) 4 semester hours credit 



ME 11-12 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

This course includes a series of experiments upon various kinds of equip- 
ment used in modern power plants to demonstrate under actual conditions 
the principles developed in the Heat Engineering course. Additional ex- 
periments which include calibration of instruments, performance of hy- 
draulic equipment, steam equipment as used in power plants, heating 
units for the household, air conditioning apparatus, internal combustion 
engines, and testing materials are performed. A complete report of each 
experiment is made. 

{Prerequisite, ME 5-6) 5 semester hours credit 



ME 13 Aerodynamics 

Among the topics covered in this course are: the flow of an ideal fluid, 
development of the wing theory, properties of airfoils, engine and pro- 
peller characteristics, performance calculations, and stability. 

2}/2 semester hours credit 

ME 14 Aeronautical Laboratory 

Laboratory exercises, such as the determination of airfoil characteristics, 
the effect of auxiliary lifting devices, lift, drag, and moment coefficients, and 
wind-tunnel calibration are carried on. Use is made of the smoke-tunnel 
to study air flow about various aircraft shapes. Allied tests are made on 
such equipment as gauges, fluid flow meters of all types, air blowers and 
pumps. 

Experiments are carried on in the internal combustion laboratory where 
various engines are tested and experiments dealing with fuels and lubricat- 
ing oils are made. 

Detailed reports are required of each experiment. 

2}/2 semester hours credit 



Description of Courses 57 

ME 15-16 Airplane Design 

I The object of this course is to acquaint the student with the methods of 
practical airplane design as prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Authority. 
The student will begin with the specifications of an airplane and complete 
the following phases of the design: (1) balance diagram; (2) weight esti- 

I mate and balance table, (3) three view drawing, (4) estimate performance, 
(5) calculate stability, (6) stress analysis of the structure. 

Students must have completed a course in Aerodynamics or must be 
taking it concurrently with this course. 2 semester hours credit 

ME 17-18 Airplane Engines 

j Essentially a course in internal combustion engines, it deals with an 
exhaustive study of engine thermodynamics, emphasis being placed on the 
standard-air Otto and Diesel cycles. Many problems are solved to demon- 
strate the importance of compression ratios, variable specific heats, volu- 
metric efficiency, and engine performance. 

I Fuels and their combustion are studied and calculations of theoretical 
and excess air are made based on fuel compositions, products of combus- 
tion, and experimental Orsat data. 

j A study is made of the functions and design of the moving parts in an 
aircraft engine. Problems in strength of materials are solved in the design 
of crankshafts, connecting rods, and valve springs. The effect of high tem- 
peratures and the heat treatment of metals are discussed in regard to the 
proper design of cylinders and valves. Other problems dealing with 
engine dynamics, inertia forces and balance are considered. 

Detailed studies are made of carburetion, ignition, and lubrication; in 
addition to auxiliary equipment. 4 semester hours credit 

I DRAWING 

D 1-2 Engineering Drawing 

I This course is planned to meet the requirements of a class composed of 
students who have had no previous instruction in drafting, and also for 
those who may have had one or two years' work in preparatory schools. 

Instruction is given in the testing, use and care of the instruments and 
drawing supplies, and solutions are required for problems which are pre- 
sented on about thirty drawing sheets. The topics studied in these sheets 
include: technique practice, lettering, geometric construction, ortho- 
graphic projections, auxiliary views, revolution of objects, isometric, 
cavalier, cabinet and perspective projection, intersections, sections, helix 
and application, screw threads, dimensions and inking. A number of 
practical problems, pertaining to the professional courses to be taken, in 
which drawing is the application, are also given. 

I ^ These give the student a thorough training in the fundamental prin- 
ciples of Engineering Drawing, so that he may easily do the drafting 
required in his professional course. A short lecture is given at the opening 
of each class based on the work at hand, and individual instruction is given 
during the remainder of the class period. 



58 Lincoln Technical Institute 

For those who have had some experience in Mechanical Drawing, a 
special course is devised which will take care of individual needs and offers 
students more advanced work. 5 semester hours credit 

ED 1 Electrical Drafting 

This course will provide training in electrical drafting basic to electrical 
design. The instruction will include fundamentals of mechanical drawing; 
electrical drafting symbols; one-line circuit diagrams; two and three-line 
D.C. and A.C. circuit diagrams including power transformers, motors and 
generators and circuit breakers; current and potential transformers, volt- 
meter, ammeter, wattmeter and watt-hour meter connection diagrams; 
relay and control circuits; conduit layout, details, conduit and wire sched- 
ules. 

{Prerequisite y EE 7, EE 2) 2}/^ semester hours credit 

ED 2 Electronic Drafting 

This course is designed to provide training in the preparation of manu- 
facturing drawings (including schematics, details and assemblies) for the 
radio and electronics industries. Instruction includes schematic diagram 
using the several systems of standards; electrical parts, their function, 
characteristics and mountings; insulation; materials and methods; sheet 
metal layout, tolerances and fabrication; fastenings; mechanics; layout 
and design, complete details and assembly drawings. 

{Prerequisite, ED 7) 2}/2 semester hours credit 

MD 1-2 Machine Drawing 

This course is taught on a problem basis with the student working out 
problems under the supervision of the instructor. The lectures and reading 
assignments correlate with the class problems. Short quizzes are given to 
cover the reading assignments. The principles covered include preliminary 
machine sketches, detailing from machines and from assembly drawings, 
dimensions with reference to basic size system, sectioning and the making 
of assembly drawings from details, and also problems in cam and gear 
construction. 

The lectures and assigned readings take up such topics as fastenings, 
machine elements, methods of manufacture, jigs and fixtures, methods 
of reproducing drawings and those drawing techniques that are to be 
applied to the particular problem being done. 

{Prerequisite, D 1-2) 5 semester hours credit 

MATHEMATICS 

Sub-Freshman Mathematics 

The first part of this course is devoted to a thorough study of Algebra 
and Plane Geometry. It then proceeds to more advanced work embraced 
by the course in Engineering Mathematics as described in Course M 1 
and M 2. 5 semester hours credit 



Description of Courses • 59 

M 1 Algebra 

Although the primary purpose of this course is to lay a thorough ground- 
work for the subsequent courses in Analytical Geometry, Calculus, and 
Applied Mechanics, it is nevertheless a complete unit in itself, and will 
enable the student to handle a considerable number of the problems aris- 
ing in engineering practice. 

Proceeding from a rapid review of the fundamental operations of 
Algebra, the work continues with a thorough study of fractions, linear and 
quadratic equations, graphs, exponents, logarithms, binomial theorem 
and related topics. 

Early in the course complete instruction is given in the theory of the 
slide rule, and considerable practice in its use. 

(Prerequisite, first courses in Algebra and Plane Geometry) 

2^/2 semester hours credit 

M 2 Trigonometry 

This course includes the solution of all triangles by both natural and 
logarithmic functions, identities, radian measure, principal values and the 
solution of trigonometric equations. Particular attention is given to the 
applications of Trigonometry to engineering practice. 

(Prerequisite, M 7) 2}/2 semester hours credit 

M 3 Analytical Geometry 

In this course instruction is given by lectures and recitations in the 
following subjects: plotting of functions, interpolation, the straight line, 
the conic sections, curves represented by various equations of common 
occurrence in engineering, graphic solution of equations, determination 
of laws from the data of experiments, simplification of formulas, and align- 
ment charts. The plotting and analysis of charts in order to determine 
empirical formulas is an important part of the course. 

(Prerequisite, M 1-2) with M 5, 2]/^ semester hours credit 

M 5 Differential Calculus 

The work in the course consists of differentiation of algebraic, trigono- 
metric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, both explicit and implicit; 
slopes of curves, maxima and minima with applied problems; partial 
differentiation; derivatives of higher order; curvature; points of inflection; 
related rates; velocities, acceleration; expansion of functions; series. Al- 
though the subject matter deals with considerable theory, constant sight 
is kept of the practical application. 

(Prerequisite, M 3) with M 3, 2}/2 semester hours credit 

M 6 Integral Calculus 

This is a continuation of Calculus M 5, and deals with integration as the 
inverse of differentiation as well as the limit of summation. The topics 
covered are methods of integration; use of integral tables; definite inte- 
grals; double and triple integrals; areas in rectangular and polar co- 



60 Lincoln Technical Institute' 

ordinates; center of gravity; moment of inertia; length of curves; volumes 
of solids; areas of surfaces of revolution; volumes by triple integration; 
practical problems in work, pressure, etc. 

{Prerequisite, M 5) 2]/2 semester hours credit 

PHYSICS 
P 1 Physics I 

A course covering the fundamental principles of mechanics, wave^ 
motion and sound. The lectures are illustrated by demonstration and 
motion pictures. Each lecture period is supplemented with a problem 
period in which the student learns the practical applications of the laws 
of physics. Some of the topics covered are force, energy, work, machines, 
concurrent forces, parallel forces, elasticity, linear and rotational motion, 
harmonic motion, fluids, gases, wave motion and sound. 

23^2 semester hours credit 
P 2 Physics II 

The work of this course covers the subjects of heat and electricity. Under 
heat is included thermometry, expansion, calorimetry, behavior of gases, 
humidity, mechanical equivalent, thermodynamics. Under electricity are 
included magnetism, electrostatics, resistance, cells, thermoelectricity, 
capacitance, inductance, alternating currents, simple circuits in series 
and parallel. 

{Prerequisite, P 7) 23^2 semester hours credit 



P 4 Physics III 

This course is open only to those taking Electrical and Electronic Engi- 
neering curricula. The course includes the fundamental principles of heat 
and light. The section in heat includes thermometry, expansion, calorim- 
etry, behavior of gases, vaporization, mechanical equivalent, transfer of 
heat, thermodynamics. Under the subject of light are included nature and 
propagation, reflection, refraction, dispersion, spectra, optical instru- 
ments, interference, diffraction, and polarized light. 

{Prerequisite, P 7) 2}/2 semester hours credit 



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THE 
LINCOLN SCHOOLS 

Evening Sessions 
OPEN TO MEN AND WOMEN 

LINCOLN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

Degree of Associate in Engineering Programs 

Courses leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering are 
offered in the following major fields: 

Aeronautical Mechanical Electronics 

Civil Electrical Chemistry 

Structural Industrial 

Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration Program 

A six-year program conducted in conjunction with Northeastern 
University School of Business is available which leads to the Degree of 
B.B.A. in Engineering and Management awarded by Northeastern 
University. 

Special Programs 

For those who do not wish to take one of the regular programs, 
special programs consisting of one or more courses can be arranged 
to meet individual needs. 

LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Fully accredited by the New England College Admissions Board, 
General, Classical, and Technical high school courses are available. 
Students may enter in September, January, and June. 

For further information write, indicating the School in which 

you ore interested 



THE LINCOLN SCHOOLS 

360 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 
r«/«phefi«, Kanmortt 3177 



1946-1947 

EVENING SESSIONS 
FORTY-NINTH YEAR 



LINCOLN 

PREPARATORY 

SCHOOL 




THE LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Evening high school courses are conducted on day-school standards by 
a competent faculty in a school accredited by the New England College 
Admissions Board as preparation for: 

Employment in Business and Industry 

Courses that offer sound general training whereby students develop the 
ability, poise, and self-confidence that make for success for those who do 
not plan further study on the college level. The competition of the recon- 
version period in business and industry will require the fullest development 
of one's abilities. 

Colleges 

Courses preparing student for admission to colleges — 

By High School Diploma 

By College Entrance Board Examinations 

By Certification (without examination) 

Professional Schools 

High school courses designed to prepare students for entrance to 
colleges of Engineering, Business, and the pre-legal college programs 
preparing for entrance into Schools of Law, both day and evening. 

Nurses' Training in Hospitals 

A high school course which prepares students to enter upon a training 
program in accredited hospitals. 

Courses which prepare graduate nurses who are not high school gradu- 
ates to fit themselves for graduate study, and for teaching and administra- 
tive positions in hospitals. 



LINCOLN 

PREPARATORY 

SCHOOL 



ACCREDITED BY THE NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE ADMISSIONS BOARD 




Tha Scbool H situated at the entrance to the Huntington Avenue subway within nine minutes 
of Parle Street and easily accessible from all points 



EVENING SESSIONS 

Admits Men and Women 



EFFECTIVE METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 
Adapted for Evening Students 



Dec. 15-Jan. 7 
January 7, 8 
February 22 
April 19 
May 20-24 



CALENDAR, 1946-1947 

Winter Term, January, 1946-May, 1946 

Registration period. 
Classes begin. 

Legal holiday. No classes. 
Legal holiday. No classes. 
Final examinations. 



Summer Term, June, 1946-September, 1946 

June 3, 4 Classes begin. 

July 4 Legal holiday. No classes. 

September 2 Legal holiday. No classes. 

September 9-13 Final examinations. 

School Year, September, 1946-May, 1947 

September 9-23 Registration period. 

September 23, 24 Classes begin. 

November 1 1 Legal holiday. No classes. 

November 21 Legal holiday. No classes, 

December 20 Last session before Christmas recess. 



January 2 
May 12-16 



January 6, 7 
May 19-23 



1947 

Classes resume. 
Final examinations. 

Winter Term, January, 1947-May, 1947 

Classes begin. 
Final examinations. 



OFFICE HOURS 

September 1945-June 15, 1946 

Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 8:45 a.m.-I :00 p.m. 

June U, 1946-August 10, 1946 

Monday and Tuesday 8:45 a.m.-8:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 8:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

August 12, 1946-June 14, 1947 

Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 8:45 a.m.-12:00 noon through August 31 

8:45 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. Month of September 

8:45 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. October 5, 1946-June 14, 1947 

INTERVIEWS 

Prospective students, or those desiring advice or guidance regarding any part 
of the school work, are encouraged to arrange for personal interviews with the 
Dean or other officers of instruction. Career planning through competent guid- 
ance provides an understanding of requirements for reaching vocational objectives 
and develops that definiteness of purpose so vital to success. 



THE NEED 
FOR EDUCATIONAL PLANNING 

The period of reconversion which will extend over these years immedi- 
ately following the war brings with it that keen competition which per- 
vaded business and industry. Applicants for employment who have not 
finished high school will be handicapped in applying for positions offering 
promising futures. The trained person is the best investment for the employer who 
must get the most for his money. 

A realization of the stern facts brings one to the conclusion that educa- 
tion is not a "hit or miss" job but one that requires careful planning. The 
first step, of course, is to complete one's high school work. That should not 
be left undone. Such an omission half a century ago might not, probably 
would not, have been serious. But today it can be a calamity. On this 
foundation of high school work there can then be built a variety of struc- 
tures: engineering training, nurses' training, business training, profes- 
sional work of many kinds to which the individual may be adapted. 

It is interesting to note that such work may now be done at convenient 
evening hours while the student pursues his regular daytime employment. 
Nothing stands between a prospective student and the completion of his 
high school work except the extent of his ambition. 

Metropolitan Boston is rich in evening educational opportunities. The 
Lincoln Preparatory School is an accredited evening school maintaining 
day-school standards of performance, and enjoying for many years the 
confidence of the New England College Admissions Board, on whose 
approved list it stands. 

Interviews are encouraged and counsellors are always available to give 
careful thought to the planning of an educational program to meet the 
need of each individual student. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 
Frank Lincoln Richardson, Vice-Chairman 



WiLMAN Edward Adams 
Henry Nathaniel Andrews 
Arthur Atwood Ballantine 
George Louis Barnes 
Farwell Gregg Bemis 
Henry Goddard Bradlee 
Paul Codman Cabot 
Godfrey Lowell Cabot 
Walter Channing 
William Converse Chick 
Everett Avery Churchill 
Paul Foster Clark 
David Frank Edwards 
Carl Stephens Ell 
William Partridge Ellison 
John Wells Farley 
Ernest Bigelow Freeman 
Franklin Wile Ganse 
Harvey Dow Gibson 



Henry Ingraham Harriman 

Chandler Hovey 

Maynard Hutchinson 

Arthur Stoddard Johnson 

Irving Edwin Moultrop 

Augustin Hamilton Parker, Jr. 

Frederick Sanford Pratt 

Roger Preston 

Stuart Craig Rand 

James Lorin Richards 

Harold Bours Richmond 

Leverett Saltonstall 

Frank Palmer Speare 

Francis Robert CARNEGmfSTEELE 

Charles Stetson 

Earl Place Stevenson 

Robert Treat Paine Storer 

Edward Watson Supple 

James Vincent Toner 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., Sc.D., President 
Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D., Vice-President 

Albert Ellsworth Everett, B.C.E., M.B.A., S.B. 

Director of Evening Program 

Donald Hershey MacKenzie, B.S., Ed.M., Principal 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



FACULTY 

The faculty of the Lincoln Preparatory School has been carefully 
chosen from the leading high and preparatory school teachers in Boston 
and its vicinity. They are college trained men who have proved their 
ability in their various fields of specialization. They are selected on the 
basis of their ability to convey knowledge to others in an interesting, in- 
spiring and effective manner. Most of these men have served with the 
School for many years. They have an understanding of and a sincere 
respect for evening school students and take a personal interest in their 
ambitions and success. 

Walter E. Antunes Appointed 1941 

B.S. Boston University, 1930; M.A. Boston University, 1932; Instructor in Biology, 
Long Island University, New York, 1931-33; Instructor in Science, Wakefield High 
School, 1936-. 
Chemistry 

Walter Alfred Baldwin Appointed 1910 

A.B. Ohio Wesleyan University, 1906; graduate study University of Chicago and 
Harvard University; Head, Department of Mathematics, Ghillicothe High School, 
Ohio, 1906-08; Head, Department of Mathematics, Mansfield High School, Ohio, 
1908-10; Head, Science Department, Huntington School for Boys, Boston, 1912-14; 
Instructor in Physics and Chemistry, Lincoln Preparatory School, 1910-. 
Chemislrjt 

William Tilden Bentley Appointed 1916 

A.B. Harvard University, 1907; Submaster, Maiden High School, 1914-24; Prin- 
cipal, Belmont School, 1924-29; Principal, Charles A. Daniels School, 1929-41; 
Principal, Glenwood School, 1942-. 
History 

Carl F. Christianson Appointed 1933 

A.B. Wesleyan University, 1923; Tilton School, New Hampshire, 1923-24; Abington 

High School, 1924-27; Huntington School for Boys, 1927-. 

History 

Michael D'Amelio Appointed 1942 

A.B. Harvard College, 1922; Instructor, Brookline High School, 1922-26; Instructor, 
Boston Latin School, 1926-27; Instructor in Mathematics, English High School, 
1927- 
Mathematics 

Percy Edward Jones Appointed 1923 

Sloyd Training School, 1920; B.S. Boston University, 1930; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics and Drawing, Huntington School for Boys, 191 9-. 
Mathematics 

A. Robert Kelman Appointed 1930 

B.B.A. Boston University, 1925; School of Education, Harvard University; Instruc- 
tor, Quincy Senior High School, 1921-25; Instructor, Weaver High School, Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, 1925-26; Instructor, Bulkeley High School, Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, 1926-29; Head of the Department of Social Studies, The Senior High School, 
Watertown, 1930-. 
History 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



Alfred Blanchard Kershaw Appointed 1928 

A.B. Amherst, 1904; A.M. Amherst, 1907; Instructor, The Allen School, West i 
Newton, 1908-09; Instructor in English, Brockton High School, 1909-11; Master, I 
English High School, Boston, 191 1-. 
English 

John W. McGuckian Appointed 1944 

B.Sc. Massachusetts State College, 1931; M.Ed. Boston Teachers College, 1937; 
Instructor, Jamaica Plain High School, 1931-42; Junior Master, Roslindale High 
School, 1942- 
Biology 

Richard Lawrence McGuffin Appointed 1928 

B.A. Boston University, 1920; M.A. Boston University, 1925; Ed.M. Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 1926; Instructor in English, Lebanon Boys' School, 
Suk-ei-Gharb, Syria, 1921-24; Directeur, Foyer De Garcons, Tunis, North Africa, 
1927-28; French Master, Boston Latin School, 1929-. 
French 

Marshall Newton Appointed 1940 

A.B. Dartmouth College, 1925; M.A. Harvard University, 1929; Instructor, Bow- 
doin College, 1928-30; Instructor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1931-32: 
Instructor, Tufts College, 1933-. 
Spanish 

Theodore Woods Noon Appointed 1922 

A.B. Yale College, 1896; M.A. Yale University, 1898; Exhibitioner, Emmanuel 
College, University of Cambridge, England, 1906-07; Master, Lawrenceville School, 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey, 1908-18; B.D. University of Chicago, 1913; S.T.M. 
Boston University, 1922; Ed.M. Harvard University, 1924; Instructor in Lincoln 
Preparatory School and Huntington School for Boys, Boston, 1922-. 
Latin and Ancient History 

Deane Stanfield Peacock Appointed 7931 

A.B. Bowdoin College, 1917; A.M. Bates College, 1927; Ed.M. Harvard University, 
1932; Principal, Oakland High School, Maine, 1919-24; Principal, Freeport High 
School, Maine, 1924-31; Junior Master, English High School, Boston, 1932-. 
History 

Olan a. Rand Appointed 1943 

B.A. Washington and Lee, 1926; Graduate Study, University of Vermont; Teacher, 
Franklin High School, New Hampshire, 1926-28; Teacher, Barre High School, Ver- 
mont, 1929-43; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1943-. 
English 

Barnet Rudman Appointed 1942 

A.B. Harvard University, 1921; Ed.M. Boston Teachers' College, 1934; Instructor 
in Mathematics, Rocky Grove High School, Franklin, Pennsylvania, 1921-23; 
Instructor in Mathematics, Pittsfield High School, 1923-28; Head of the Department 
of Mathematics, 1927-28; Instructor in Mathematics, South Boston High School, 
1929-32; Instructor in Mathematics, English High School, 1932-. 
Mathematics 

Alfred Loring Skinner Appointed 1927 

A.B. Harvard University, 1919; Instructor in Mathematics, North Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, 1919-22; Instructor in Mathematics, Huntington School for Boys, Boston, 
1922- 
Mathematics 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 7 



Ralph E. Wellings - Appointed 7944 

A.B. Boston College, 1920; A.M. Boston College, 1925; Ed.M. Boston Teachers' 
College, 1930; Teacher, Brighton High School, 1925-28; Teacher, Dorchester High 
School for Boys, 1928-44. 
Mathematics, Physics 



Edna M. Edison Executive Secretary 

Mildred L. Spraker Bookkeeper 



8 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The Lincoln Preparatory School, affiliated with Northeastern Univer- 
sity and known for many years as the Northeastern Preparatory School, 
had its real beginning in 1897 in the separate evening courses offered in 
History, Science, and other subjects of a cultural nature, and in certain 
trade courses intended to benefit men engaged in various occupations. 

Gradually the trade courses were discontinued and the remaining 
subjects were welded into a regular high school program, upon the com- 
pletion of which a standard high school diploma was awarded. 

All classes in the Lincoln Preparatory School are held in the evening 
and are especially designed to meet the needs of those who are employed 
during the day. 

The primary purpose of the School has been effective preparation of 
students for college entrance. For this reason constant attention has been 
paid through the years to the maintenance and improvement of standards. 

In 1 925 women were admitted to classes on the same basis as men. Since 
1924 the School has been accredited by the New England College Entrance 
Certificate Board, now called the New England College Admissions 
Board. This is a marked distinction in the case of an evening school, and 
an expression of confidence that day-school standards are maintained. The 
School today offers curricula in the general, scientific, and classical fields. 
The enrollment has increased from fewer than fifty students to almost five 
hundred, of whom two-fifths are women. The faculty has been increased 
until it now numbers from twenty to twenty-five men of wide experience 
and training, drawn from the leading day preparatory and high schools 
of Metropolitan Boston. 

Through the Lincoln Preparatory School many men and women have 
been able to solve their problems and to secure that education which has 
enabled them to succeed in the work for which they are adapted by ability 
and interest. Without these facilities many of these alumni would still be 
occupying minor positions with little opportunity for advancement on 
account of lack of training. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



THE LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Characteristics of the School 

Before a prospective student makes a final decision regarding the eve- 
ning school he wishes to enter, he should ascertain some of the characteris- 
tics of a good preparatory school. Following are the outstanding charac- 
teristics of the Lincoln Preparatory School: 

1 . It is non-proprietary, and organized exclusively for service to students, 
the income being devoted to that end rather than being organized 
for profit. 

2. Adequate fees are charged to insure the employment of the best 
teachers attainable and to provide constant improvement in the 
educational processes. 

3. Scholarship funds are available to assist deserving and needy students 
who cannot meet the fees that must be charged if high standards are 
to be maintained. 

4. It has a trained and experienced faculty; that is, the men who form 
its staff are teachers of experience with long practice in dealing with 
the individual problems of students. 

5. All work is conducted on a regular classroom basis to meet the ap- 
proval of higher institutions and the New England College Admis- 
sions Board requirements. 

6. The size of the classes is such as to permit reasonably individualized 
attention. 

7. The courses are conducted so that the content of each course is 
thoroughly covered in order that it may be of the maximum value to 
the student, not only in the interests of his personal growth, but as 
preparation for further study. 

8. The student body is adequately prepared for the type of instruction 
which is to be imparted in the classroom. The level of achievement is 
iK>t lowered by the admission of unfit students. 

9. High quality of performance is maintained in the classroom, and 
students bring to bear on their studies an interest and enthusiasm 
which permit all work to be conducted on a high, qualitative plane. 
Classes are not conducted to be a vehicle by which students may 
obtain credit by easy and slipshod methods. Credit is awarded only 
when the quality of the student's work meets the definition of Re- 
quirements of the College Entrance Examination Board and the New 
England College Admissions Board. 

10. Its graduates have proved successful in college, in the professions, and 
in business life. 

11. There are adequate laboratories, classrooms, and other facilities. 

12. The employment of a full-time administrative organization affords 
opportunities for skilled educational and vocational guidance. 



10 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Aims of the School 

The aims of the Lincoln Preparatory School may be classified as follows: 

1. The offering of educational opportunities to men and women by 
methods of instruction carefully adapted to the needs of adult students. 

2. The providing of this instruction at convenient evening hours, so that 
the student need not leave his or her present employment while ob- 
taining an education. 

3. The conducting of the school work on such a high qualitative plane 
that those students who wish to prepare for college may be ade- 
quately prepared for entrance examinations, or for entrance by cer- 
tificate if their ability and performance warrant. 

4. The offering of a general program to those who do not plan to enter 
college, that they may develop a taste for the better things in life and 
that they may advance to a larger personal growth. 

5. The oiTering of special courses for those who have particular needs 
related to specialized occupations. 

6. The selection of the most competent and experienced faculty available. 

7. The maintenance of the excellent work which has earned for the 
School the approval of the New England College Admissions Board. 

8. The personal interest of every school officer in the problem of the 
individual student. 

Location of the School 

The work of the School is conducted in the following four buildings of 
Northeastern University situated on Huntington Avenue just beyond 
Massachusetts Avenue at the entrance to the Huntington Avenue subway. 

Richards Hall is situated at 360 Huntington Avenue. This building is 
adequately equipped with classroom, drawing room, and laboratory 
facilities. In the basement are the checkroom, the bookstore, and the 
Husky Hut. The School office is located on the first floor. 

New Building. In this building are located the Chemical Engineering 
and Biological laboratories, a large Commons room open to day and 
evening students, and eighteen classrooms and lecture halls. 

The East Building, in which are situated the University library, several 
classrooms, and the Chemical laboratories. 

The South Building is situated in the rear of the East Building and 
contains several classrooms and the Electrical laboratories. 

Student Body 

The students of the Lincoln Preparatory School are men and women of 
earnest purpose, who have come to recognize the value of education but 
who through force of circumstances have been unable to complete a high 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



11 



school course. The ages of the students v2Li\g^ from fifteen to sixty-nine, with 
the average age twenty-two. 

Some students are attempting to increase their vocational opportuni- 
ties; some are completing a high school education begun elsewhere but 
interrupted; some are beginning here their high school work; some are 
adding to their training cultural or practical subjects which were formerly 
omitted; some are undertaking special courses to prepare them for in- 
creased usefulness in war work. In fact, the School is ready to serve stu- 
dents of all ages at a point where they need real service. The student body 
represents also men and women from all walks of life. 

Alumni 

The Alumni of the Lincoln Preparatory School are excellent witnesses 
of the work the School has done and is doing. 

Many of our graduates are engaged in the various professions, such as 
Engineering, Law, Medicine, Teaching, and Dentistry, or are engaged in 
successful business activities and in public life. Furthermore, the School 
has been of benefit to many who did not complete our graduation require- 
ments but obtained here the credits necessary for college entrance or for 
some other specific purpose, having completed elsewhere part of their high 
school training. 

Women graduates of this School are in the hospital training schools of 
the State or have graduated therefrom. Some occupy teaching and ad- 
ministrative positions in our hospitals. Many others have proceeded to 
colleges and professional schools to prepare for positions in teaching, 
library science, and business. 

Our former students are in colleges and professional schools scattered 
across the country. The following are some of the colleges that have been 
attended by Alumni of the Lincoln Preparatory School: 



Harvard UNrvERsrrv 
Tufts College 
Massachusetts Insiituik 

OF Technology 
Boston University 

IjNrVERSITY of MICHIGAN 

Jackson College 
Purdue Universh-v 
University of Alabama 
Columbia Unfversity 
Colby College 



Simmons College 
Unlversity of Maine 
Clark University 
Massachusetts State College 
University of Chicago 
Syracuse UNfVERsrrY 
Yale Unfversity 
Dartmouth College 
Bovvt)Oin College 
Bates College 
Northeastern UNrvERsrry 



12 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



INFORMATION REGARDING ADMISSION 

Admission Requirements 

Any man or woman of good moral character, regardless of occupation, 
race or creed, who has completed at least eight grades of a grammar school, 
or the equivalent, may enroll in the School. 

The courses offered are designed to prepare students to enter institu- 
tions of higher learning. Those students, however, who do not intend to 
proceed to higher institutions may select from the offering of courses a 
special combination of subjects which will benefit them in the work in 
which they are engaged during the day. Before enrolling for such subjects, 
students are urged to see the Headmaster, explaining the particular nature 
of the employment in which they are engaged, so that he can arrange the 
program best suited for their needs. Special combinations of subjects may 
be selected to embrace business, science, or special technical work. 

Applications for Admission 

Students who plan to enter the School must file the official application 
blank which must be accompanied by the registration fee of five dollars. 
All applications for admission should be filed as early as possible in order 
that the status of each student may be definitely determined and a satis- 
factory program arranged before the actual opening of the term. 

Credit from Other Schools 

Students who have completed high school work in other approved 
institutions may obtain credit for that work towards the diploma of this 
School by presenting a certified transcript of record from the school pre- 
viously attended. The officers of the School are glad at all times to obtain 
for prospective students transcripts of their records of work at other schools, 
evaluate such records in terms of diploma credits and suggest a program, 
indicating the cost of the program and the time necessary to meet gradu- 
ation requirements. 

The responsibility devolves upon the student for making sure that his pro gram does 
not contain a subject for which prior credit has already been awarded in some other 
school. Such courses, however, may be taken without credit as review 
courses preparatory to later advanced work. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 13 



ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

Examinations and Quizzes 

Examinations are held throughout the term at the discretion of the 
instructors. Final examinations are required upon the completion of all 
courses. The following system of grading is used: 

A — 90 to 100 — Excellent 

B — 80 to 89 — Good 

C — 70 to 79 — Fair 

D — 60 to 69 — Lowest Passing Grade 

E — 50 to 59 — Conditioned 

F — Below 50 — Failure 

A student marked E (Conditioned) may enroll in the advanced course 
in the same subject immediately following, but upon condition that he 
remove his deficiency by special examination early in the next term. A fee 
of $3 is required for each such examination regularly scheduled. 

A student receiving the grade of B is exempt from examination when 
applying for admission to the colleges composing the New England College 
Admissions Board. A list of these colleges is given on page 20. It is to be 
noted, however, that colleges retain the right to accept or reject applicants 
for admission. 

Transfers 

Students are not permitted to change from one course to another with- 
out first consulting the Headmaster or other duly authorized officer of 
the School and receiving a Transfer Order. 

Reports of Standing 

An informal report of the student's standing is issued at mid-term; and 
the formal report, covering the full record of the term, is issued at the close 
of each year. 

In the case of students who are under twenty-one years of age, rep>orts 
may be sent to parents in the event of unsatisfactory work on the part of 
the student, non-compliance with administrative regulations, continued 
absence, and withdrawal. Parents of minors may obtain reports at any 
time on request. 

Attendance Requirements 

A careful record of attendance upon class exercises is kept for each 
student. Absence from regularly scheduled classes on any subject will 
seriously affect the standing of the student. It may cause the removal of 
certain subjects from his schedule and the listing of these as "conditioned 



14 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

subjects." However, if reasonable excuse for absence be presented, the 
student may be allowed to make up the time lost, and be given credit for 
the work; but he must complete the work at such time and in such manner 
as his instructor in the course shall designate. 

A minimum attendance record of 75 per cent must be maintained in all classes 
before a student will be admitted to examination. 

Scholarships 

The Executive Council has made available a few scholarships to assist 
needy students of good mental capacity who, because of financial limita- 
tions, might be deprived of educational opportunities. The award when a 
scholarship is granted is never in excess of one-half of the student's tuition 
fees for the year. 

Late Registration 

Those who find it necessary to register late may at the discretion of the 
Headmaster be permitted to enter the School provided they have not lost 
so much work as to render it impossible for them to proceed with the 
courses. 

No reduction in fees is made because of late enrollment. 

Examination Fees 

The fee for a condition or make-up examination regularly scheduled 
is $3. 

The fee for a make-up quiz regularly scheduled is $1.50. 

Charges for Damages 

Students who damage apparatus in the laboratories or who willfully 
destroy School property will be responsible for the replacement of such 
damaged articles or for the cost of replacing where this is undertaken by 
the School. 



I 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 15 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Libraries 

In the East Building a large and well-equipped library is available for 
the use of students. The reading rooms are open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. on 
weekdays, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Students have also the 
privilege of securing books from the Boston Public Library and its branches. 
To obtain this privilege application should be made at the School office, 
where the necessary blanks will be furnished. 

Textbooks and Supplies 

The Bookstore, which is situated in Richards Hall, is operated for the 
convenience of the student body. All books and supplies which are re- 
quired by the students for their work in the School may be purchased at 
the Bookstore. 

Railroad Tickets 

Vouchers for half-fare tickets on the Boston Elevated Railroad are 
issued by the School office on the first, sixth, and eleventh Fridays of each 
term. The railroad systems entering Boston issue students' tickets to stu- 
dents under twenty-one years of age. Applications for these may be ob- 
tained at a railroad office and presented at the School office for signature. 

Visitors 

Visitors are always welcome at one class session in any department. 
Those who wish to visit any of the classes should call at the School office 
and obtain a visitor's card signed by the Headmaster. 

Educational Guidance 

Prospective students or those desiring advice or guidance with regard 
to any part of the school work or curricula, or who wish assistance in the 
solution of their educational problems, should note the fact that interviews 
are available without obligation, and that the officers of the School will do 
their utmost to see that a program is designed which is the most satisfac- 
tory for the individual student. In certain cases, other institutions may be 
recommended which suit the student's needs better. Furthermore, it is 
important that those with educational problems to solve should realize the 
necessity for care in approaching educational work so that the program 
selected will be on the best educational basis. 



16 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



TUITION FEES 

Registration Fee. $5 is payable by all students on their initial entrance 
to the School. This fee is not returnable except where a student is refused 
admission. 

Payment Plans 

For each term indicated below is listed the appropriate payment plan. 
When these plans are adopted, they must be rigidly adhered to. In certain 
cases, however, even the special plan of payment will not meet the rueds oj many 
deserving students. Such students are requested to confer with an officer of the School, 
who will arrange a satisfactory plan for the payment of fees. 



Regular Term and Winter Term 

The Regular Term begins in September and continues for 32 weeks. 
During this term students may carry three full-unit courses. 

The Winter Term begins in January and extends for 20 weeks. The 
work is carried on more intensively than in the Regular Term, but the 
same ground is covered, primarily by means of a longer classroom period. 
During this term students are permitted to carry two full-unit courses. 

The cost of each course is $40. Fees are payable in monthly installments. 
The first installment is due on registration; thereafter payments are due 
on the first Tuesday of each month. 

Summer Term 

The Summer term begins in June and extends for 1 5 weeks. During this 
term students may carry two full-unit courses. A full year's work is covered 
in each course. 

The cost of each full-unit summer course is $30. Fees are payable in 
three successive monthly installments. 

The first installment is due on registration. Subsequent payments are 
due on the third Tuesday of July and August. 



Special Rates for Sciences 

Biology 

Tuition fee $40.00 

Laboratory fee 5.00 

Physics 

Tuition fee $40.00 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 17 

Chemistry 

Tuition fee $40.00 

Laboratory fee 5.00 

Laboratory deposit 5.00 

The unused portion of the chemistry deposit is refunded after deduction 
for breakages and for non-retumables. 

Charges for Partial Attendance 

In the event of a student's withdrawal from school, he is charged on a 
pro rata basis for the weeks he has attended. These charges are as follows: 

32-week courses — 4 per cent of the total charges for each week of attendance 
in each semester. 

20- week courses — 6 per cent of the total charges for each week of attendance 

in each half term. 
15- week courses — 8 per cent of the total charges for each week of attendance. 

The same charges are applicable in the event that a student abandons 
a part of his program. In addition, the full Laboratory Fee is charged in 
those cases where a student is pursuing a laboratory course. 

Refund Policy 

Students who are forced to withdraw from a course or from the School 
are required to notify the School office by completing the withdrawal 
blanks which will be furnished. 

Since the School assumes the obligation of carrying the student through- 
out the year for which he registers, and since the instruction and accommo- 
dations are provided on a yearly basis, the Officers of Administration have 
ruled as follows: 

A. The registration fee is not refundable. 

B. Applications for refunds must be presented within forty-five days after with- 
drawal from School. 

C. Refunds in the case of complete withdrawal from School will be 
granted by the Committee on Withdrawals for reasons which they 
deem adequate. 

D. Refunds are computed from the date of application for refund, not 
from the date of last attendance; hence students who are compelled to 
discontinue attendance should immediately report the fact to the School 
office. 



18 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



INFORMATION REGARDING PROGRAMS 

The Unit System Explained 

Frequent reference is made in this catalog to "units," and that there 
may be no misunderstanding in the minds of students, this explanation is 
offered. A unit of high school credit is given upon the satisfactory comple- 
tion of the work of one school year in a single standard subject, the equiv- 
alent of which is covered by this School in thirty-two weeks or in the in- 
tensive courses of twenty and fifteen weeks offered in the winter and sum- 
mer terms respectively. The following exception is to be noted: Four full 
courses in English total three units towards graduation or towards college 

entrance. 

Terms and Hours of Attendance 

When arranging a program for a student the School officers usually 
assign work which requires attendance for onlji two evenings a week. 

All classes are scheduled to meet between the hours of 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. 

Each term a schedule is prepared listing the courses to be offered and 
the hours at which they meet. A copy may be obtained on request. 

Following is the general arrangement for the completion of a course in 
each term of the school year. 
Fail Term (32 Weeks) 

One full-unit course requires attendance for one hour twice a week. 
Students may carry one, two, or three courses during this term. 
Winter Term (20 Weeks) 

One full-unit course requires attendance for one and a half hours twice 
a week. Students may carry one or two full-unit courses during this term. 
Summer Term (1 5 Weeks) 

One full-unit course requires attendance for one and a half hours twice 
a week. Students may carry one or two full-unit courses during this term. 

Courses of Study 

Algebra 1 French 1 History (English) 

Algebra 2 French 2 History (United States) 

*Biology French 3 Latin 1 

*Chemistry Geometry (Plane) Latin 2 

Economics Geometry (Solid) Latin 3 

English 1 German 1 Latin 4 

English 2 German 2 *Physics 

English 3 Government Spanish 

English 4 History (Ancient) Trigonometry 

History (European) 



*These courses meet only once a week in the fall term and twice a week in the 
winter and summer terms. All other courses meet twice a week, usually on Tuesdays 
and Fridays. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 19 

How to Plan Your Program of Classes 

In choosing subjects each term, students should bear in mind: 

(a) The requirements for graduation from the Lincoln Preparatory 
School. These are given on page 20. 

(b) The admission requirements of the higher institution they wish to 
enter. Catalogs of most colleges are on file at the School office. In case 
of doubt, consult these and talk with the Headmaster or his assistants. 

(c) The special requirements for various professions and vocations. 

(d) Their special interests, in the event that courses are chosen from the 
cultural point of view. 

It is especially important to meet the requirements for graduation so 
that a diploma may be obtained. Most colleges and hospitals and many 
lines of business and industry not only require fifteen units of high school 
work, but also insist that the student be a graduate of a recognized high 
school. Moreover, in business and in everyday life it means infinitely more 
to say one is a high school graduate than merely to say one has completed 
fifteen units of high school work. 

How Long Will It Take to Obtain a Diploma? 

The flexible schedule and the twelve months' operation of the Lincoln 
Preparatory School enable a student to save considerable time. The exact 
time that it will take to obtain a diploma is dependent upon credit from 
former institutions attended, hours available for study, and the number of 
courses pursued. A student who enters school without any credit for former 
high school attendance can complete his course in from three to five years, 
according to the number of summer terms he attends. However, it is 
urged upon students that a high school education is a matter of accomplishment 
and not a matter oj time, and the School insists on a high standard of accom- 
plishment. 

Admission to College 

Since the Lincoln Preparatory School offers regular college preparatory 
courses for those who wish to enter college, a student, according to his 
record and his plan of procedure, may enter college in one of the following 
ways: 

By Diploma. Certain colleges will admit students on the diploma from 
this School. Among these colleges are all those that accept a standard 
high school diploma. 



20 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

By Examinafion. A few colleges, notably Harvard, Yale, and the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, require certain examinations 
from all candidates. This School prepares students for all college en- 
trance examinations and for the examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

By Certificate. The School is accredited by the New England College 
Admissions Board. Some of the colleges which accept the certificate of 
this School are Amherst, Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, Massachusetts State 
College, Clark, Middlebury, Tufts, Wesleyan, Williams, and Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. Generally speaking, institutions that accept students 
by the certificate method will accept the certificate oj this School. The certificate 
grade is 80 per cent. 

Admission to Hospital Training Schools 

Since the School is fully accredited, most hospitals will admit students 
who hold the diploma of the School even though all grades are not of 
certificate rank. A few hospitals, however, require certificate grades of 
candidates for training. Certificate grades from this School are acceptable. 
Each student should ascertain, however, the definite entrance require- 
ments of the hospital she plans to enter. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The diploma of the Lincoln Preparatory School is granted without 
charge to the student on the completion of a total of fifteen units of work, 
of which at least four must have been earned in the Lincoln Preparatory School. In 
addition, each student must have completed in this School or elsewhere 
the required subjects for the diploma for which he is a candidate. 

Curricula 

COLLEGE COURSE DIPLOMA 
A. For admission to Liberal Arts Colleges 

This course prepares for most colleges that offer the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Required: Units 

College Preparatory English 3 

Algebra 2 

Plane Geometry' 1 

French or German or Spanish 2 

Physics or Chemistry or Biology 1 

United States History 1 

Latin or Greek 2 

12 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 21 

Eltctive: 

The remaining three units may be selected from the following: 

Units 

Spanish 2 to 3 

Latin 1 to 2 

French 1 to 2 

European History 1 

Ancient History 1 

Solid Geometry H 

Trigonometry 7^ 

Chemistry or Physics or Biology 1 

One unit of a foreign language is not acceptable/or credit. 

Language and Mathematics requirements vary somewhat for entrance to the 
different colleges. This is especially true of the Latin requirements. Some colleges 
require three entrance units in either French or German. It is the students respon- 
sibility to meet the requirements of the college he elects to enter. 

In addition, other electives may be permitted by special consent provided they 
are acceptable by the college to which the student seeks entrance. 

B. For admission to Engineering Schools and Colleges of Liberal Arts offering the degree of 
Bachelor of Science 

Required: Units 

English 3 

French or German or Spanish 3 

Algebra 2 

Plane Geometry 1 

Physics or Chemistry 1 

United States History 1 

Trigonometry and Solid Geometry 1 

12 

Two units of two modern languages will be accepted for three units of one 
language. 

Language and Mathematics requirements vary somewhat for entrance to the 
different colleges. It is the student's responsibility to meet the requirements oj the college 
he elects to enter. 

Elective: 

Subjects may be selected from either the Required or Elective List of the 
College Course to make up the necessary fifteen units. 

One unit of a foreign language is not acceptable for credit. 

GENERAL COURSE DIPLOMA 

The General Course offers a general education and also, if the right selection of 
subjects is made, enables students to enter certain colleges. A wide selection of sub- 
jects is available but choice of as many college preparatory subjects as p>ossible 
should be made. 



22 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Required: Five Unils Units 

English 3 

United States History 1 

Physics or Chemistry or Biology 1 

5 

Limited Electives: Three Units {choose one option) 

Mathematics Option 

Algebra 1, Algebra 2 or Physics, and Plane Geometry 3 

Language Option 

Three units of any one of the following or two units of any two: 

French, Latin, German, and Spanish 3 or 4 

Social Science Option 

Economics, Government, English History, Ancient History, 

European History, etc 3 

Free Electives: Seven Units 

Any standard high school subjects to complete total of 15 units 

One unit oj a foreign language is not acceptable for credit. 

Special Program for Admission to Training Schools for Nurses 

The work conducted by the Lincoln Preparatory School is accredited 
by the Massachusetts hospitals and by the State Board of Registration in 
Medicine. The State Board of Registration in Medicine and the Board of 
Registration of Nurses have ruled that a high school education or its 
equivalent is a prerequisite for admission to hospital training schools. The 
high school certificate must show? the completion of fifteen units accepted 
by the high school in meeting graduation requirements. These fifteen units 
are to be as follows: 

Required (7 units) Units 

1 . English (4 years) 3 

2. History 1 

3. Mathematics 1 

4. Science 2 

Free Electives (8 units) * 

1. Greek or Latin 5. Social Studies 

2. Foreign modern language 6. Commercial Studies 

3. Mathematics 7. Fine and Practical Arts 

4. Science 8. Miscellaneous 

An officer of the School will be glad to arrange a program so that these 
electives will be judiciously chosen, not only to aid the student in the sub- 

*Not more than 4 units will be accepted in one group. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 23 

sequent subjects, but to meet the requirements of other states with which 
a reciprocal arrangement exists with the State of Massachusetts. 

For those already engaged in the profession of nursing, attention is 
directed to facilities which are available to those who have not completed 
a high school education in accordance with the above demands. New 
regulations have been formed regarding institutional promotion and re- 
garding teaching and administrative positions in hospitals, and while such 
legislation is not retroactive, it will certainly prove helpful to those who 
already occupy such positions to be adequately equipped for advancement 
and promotion in the event of transfer. 

Because of the war emergency and the great need for nurses, some 
hospitals have modified their entrance requirements. Students should 
inquire at their hospitals for a definite statement regarding entrance 
requirements. 



24 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



OUTLINES OF COURSES 

The Lincoln Preparatory School reserves the right to change the ar- 
rangement of courses, the requirements for graduation, tuition fees, and 
other regulations affecting the students. Such regulations will affect both 
old and new students. 

Note: The courses of the School are arranged in "units." 

A unit is ordinarily the amount of work covered in a single subject taken four 
or five times a week for a year in a standard day high school. 

In this School a unit may be covered in each subject in thirty-two weeks. 
See page 18 for explanation of unit system. 

Students carry one, two or sometimes three subjects at a time. Fifteen units, 
properly selected (see pages 20 and 21), are required for graduation. 

The high school courses described below are the equivalent of similar courses 
offered in a standard day high school. 

English 

The fundamental purposes of the department are to give the student efficient 
training in grammar in order to afford a sound basis for correct speech and writing; 
to instill correct principles of constructing sentences and paragraphs; to help him 
enlarge his vocabulary and to acquire an interest in words; to train him in the 
elements of logic as related to the organization and expression of thought; to teach 
him how to study; to impart an elementary knowledge of the types and the history 
of English literature; and to aid him in forming a taste foi good literature and a 
genuine appreciation thereof. 

English 1. This course is designed to bridge the gap between grade and high 
school English. Fundamentals of English grammar, the correct sentence, the more 
important rules of spelling and punctuation, simple compositions — especially 
the letter — and an introduction to literary selections as models for voluntary 
reading are presented. 

English 2. This course marks the beginning of a more intensive study of English, 
both as a tool and as literature. Functional grammar, development of the para- 
graph, careful planning of themes, and a beginning of the critical study of literary 
forms, both poetry and prose, form the basis of the course. 

English 3. This is an advanced course in composition including precis-writing 
and the structure of paragraphs and sentences. There is a rapid review of grammar 
and punctuation. The essay, the drama, the novel, and types of poetry are studied. 

English 4. This course completes the two-year sequence begun in English 3. 
It prepares students for college entrance and College Board examinations and also 
stresses the needs of the student who does not intend to pursue formal study in a 
higher institution. By means of thought-provoking reading material, both classic 
and modern, it stimulates written expression on subjects of interest to the individ- 
ual student. Compositions are submitted at regular intervals throughout the term. 
The essay, the drama, the lyric poem, and prose fiction are studied, and the 
principles underlying these forms of art are presented. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 25 

Latin 

Elxercises in translation at sight begin with the first lessons in which Latin 
sentences of any length occur, and continue throughout the course to insure cor- 
rect methods of work on the part of the student. In the translations of passages 
from the Latin, the use of clear and natural English is insisted upon. Reading 
aloud is encouraged. The work in Latin Composition aims to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of the fundamental principles of Latin syntax. It has been 
found advantageous to use a double system of notebooks, calling for special written 
work from the student. This work deals with Latin forms, principles of Latin 
syntax, writing of English-Latin sentences, and finished translations of selected 
passaiges from the Latin. These courses in Latin fulfill the requirements of college 
entrance examinations. 

Latin 1. Exercises in translations, English-Latin, Latin-English. Drill in Latin 
forms, drill in Latin syntax. The course aims to give the student a thorough 
knowledge of the fundamental principles of Latin syntaix. 

Latin 2. The Latin reading is not less in amount than Caesar, Gallic War, 
I-IV. This amount of reading is taken from Caesar (Gallic War and Civil War), 
NepxM (Lives), Aulus Gellius, Eutropius, Phaedrus, Quintus Curtius Rufus, and 
Valerius Maximus, or books of selections containing some of these with other 
authors of prose works. Special attention is given to sight translation, to vocabu- 
lary study, to the Latin Word List, which contains those words the student is 
expected to know at the end of two years of the study of Latin. There is continued 
drill in Latin syntax and in Latin forms. This course in second year Latin aims to 
meet the needs of those students who plan to enter colleges that require only two 
years of Latin. 

Latin 3. The Latin reading is not less in amount than Cicero, the oration 
against Catiline, for the Manilian Law, and for Archias. This amount of reading 
is selected from Cicero (orations, letters, and De Senectute), Sallust (Catiline and 
Jugurthine War). The reading for the year includes selections from such authors 
as Pliny, Livy, or books of selections containing these and other authors of prose 
works. Special attention is given to the study of passages of Latin prose set for 
comprehension. The course aims to cultivate in the student the ability to render 
unseen passages of Latin prose into clear and natural English, as well as the ability 
to write simple Latin prose. Due attention is given, therefore, to vocabulary study, 
to the Latin Word List, which contains those words the student is expected to 
know at the end of three years of the study of Latin. The political and social life 
in Rome in the time of Cicero is studied. 

Latin 4. The reading is not less in amount than Virgil, Aeneid I-IV. This 
amount of reading is taken from Virgil (Bucolics, Georgics, Aeneid), Ovid (Meta- 
morphoses, Fasti, and Tristia), or from books of selections containing fxjems or 
extracts from other poets. Special attention is given to the study of passages of 
Latin verse set for comprehension. The course aims to cultivate in the student 
the ability to render unseen passages of Latin verse into clear and natural English, 
2is well as the ability to write simple Latin prose. Due attention is given, there- 
fore, to Latin forms, Latin syntax, to vocabulary study, to the Latin Word List, 
which contziins those words the student is expected to know at the end of four 



26 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

years of the study of Latin. Literary and historical allusions, prosody, and ques- 
tions on subject matter are studied. 

French 

The courses in French are planned with the purpose of giving the students (1) 
an appreciative comprehension of French, both as literature and as a spoken 
language; and (2) a sufficient knowledge to fit them for advanced work. The essen- 
tials of the grammar are mastered by continued drill and constant application. 
The attainment of good pronunciation receives careful attention, and from the 
beginning the student is trained to understand spoken French. 

French!. This course begins with instruction in pronunciation. Phonetic 
symbols are not used. The acquisition of a basic vocabulary is stressed and the 
memorizing of word groups and short sentences. 

The instruction in grammar consists of the elementary forms and uses of articles, 
nouns, adjectives, pronouns, adverbs, regular verbs, and a few common irregular 
verbs. Much emphasis is placed upon written translation of English into French. 

The reading text provides for the translation of at least fifty pages of simple 
French. This is largely oral translation. 

French 2. This course completes the elements of grammar and syntax, with 
special emphasis upon forms and practice in their use in written composition. 
Frequent review lessons help to make the student familiar with the essentials. 

French 3. Camahan's "Short French Review Grammar" is used and provides 
a general review and further advance in grammar and in written translation or 
connected prose. All the common irregular verbs and many idioms should be 
learned. 

Bordeaux' "La Peur de vivre" provides for the reading of modern standard 
French. 

German 

At the end of the elementary course in German, the student should be able to 
read at sight and to translate a passage of easy German prose. He should be able 
to put into German, short English sentences taken from the language of everyday 
life, and to answer questions upon principles of German grammar. The course 
aims to meet the needs not only of those students who are seeking a general knowl- 
edge of German, but also of those students who are planning to take the college 
entrance examinations. 

German 1. Wesselhoeft "Elementary German Grammar" is used as a grammar 
and composition book. This is supplemented by reading Gueber Marchen und 
Erzah lungen I, II, Immensee by Storm. Drill in pronunciation; practice in read- 
ing the German text aloud; memorizing of simple verse and prose selections. 

German 2. "Chiles German Composition and Conversation" is used as a 
textbook. This is supplemented by reading "Emil und die Detektive" by Kastner, 
followed by translating such works as "Germelshausen" by Gerstacker, "Die 
Braune Erica," by Jensen. Exercises in comprehension; memorizing of simple 
German verse and prose selections. "German Frequency Word Book" by Morgan, 
"German Idiom Word List" by Hauch are used. 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 27 

Spanish 

Spanish 1. The work of the first year is so planned that it serves as a complete 
unit in fundamentals for the student who wishes to continue the language inde- 
pendently by travel or reading. Correct pronunciation, a knowledge ol the gram- 
matical structure of the language, and an ability to read and write within the 
limits of a practical vocabulary are the goals of the course. Standard elementary 
readers are used in connection with a grammar text such as Hills and Ford, "First 
Spanish Course." 

Spanish 2. After a rapid review of the work covered by Spanish 1, the second 
year is devoted to the enlargement of vocabulary, including common idioms, the 
increase of skill and speed in translation, with special emphasis upon sight trans- 
lation and free composition. The course prepares for the elementary examination 
in Spanish given by the College Entrance Examination Board. The use of a stand- 
ard composition book is supplemented by much reading of current as well as 
classical Spanish. 

History, Government, Economics 

The aim of the department is to give a broad knowledge of vital conditions in 
the growth of the leading countries of the world. This includes the study, not only 
of important historical facts, but more especially of the progress of development 
in government, society, business, religion, and education. The past is studied that 
the present may be better understood. 

History (English). This course is a study of English History from the time of 
the Roman Conquest to the present. Special emphasis is given to the study of the 
structure of government and the legal system because of their bearing upon 
American development. Study of English foreign policy is essential to a better 
understanding of international problems of the present. Study of church problems, 
the Industrial Revolution, democratic growth are stressed because of present-day 
tolerant attitude in regard to religion, views as to wisdom of dictatorial or demo- 
cratic government, and ever-changing economic conditions. 

History (United States). A careful and comprehensive study is made of 
United States History, including not only the story of earlier times, but also an 
analysis of events from the Civil War down to and including our own times. Special 
reference is made to the social and industrial development of the country, economic 
progress, sources and effects of immigration, and of American government. The 
course is designed to cover the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

History (European). In this course a study is made of the European powers 
from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present. Autocracy rampant 
in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries begins to decline in the latter eigh- 
teenth century with the French Revolution. The decline continued in the nine- 
teenth century, giving way to democracy, which reached its peak following the 
World War, only to yield in many countries to dictatorships of the present day. 
International relations are traced, noting especially the influence of commerce and 
the subsequent imperial rivalries and wars. The Industrial Revolution, with its 
profound effect upon humanity, forms another important part of the course. Con- 
siderable stress is given to great leaders of the different European powers. 



28 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

HisJory (Ancient). This course devotes one term to the study of the Ancient 
Orient and Greece as far as the death of Alexander and the break-up of his empire, 
with the expansion of Greek culture in the Mediterranean world. The second term 
is devoted to the study of the history of Rome to the year 476 a.d. The course 
emphasizes the characteristic elements of these civilizations. The work calls for 
the study of an accurate historical textbook, in which not less than five hundred 
pages of text are devoted to the particular subject. Special attention is given to 
map study. The work is supplemented by a topical study of outstanding phases of 
the history of the period, including growth of institutions, historic characters, 
outstanding events and periods. The work calls for consultation of standard writers 
on Ancient History, especially books of Readings in Ancient History. The aim of 
the course is to meet the needs of those students who are seeking a general knowl- 
edge of the subject as given in a high school, to prepare students for the examina- 
tions that are given by the College Entrance Examination Board as defined in the 
Definition of Requirements, published by the Board. 

Government. The forms of our local and state governments are taken up first. 
These are followed by a careful analysis of the Constitution of the United States, 
showing the relationship of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of our 
National Government. 

During the second semester a study is made of South America and the principal 
nations of Europe, and in addition the smaller nations where innovations may 
make investigation of governmental methods worth while. 

Economics. A careful study is made of the origin and development of our 
industrial system, and an analysis into its component parts, together with the 
economic phenomena accompanying them. It is intended to make economics of 
practical value in everyday life. 

During the second semester the course embraces the reform and improvement 
of our industrial system; taxation, the tariff, international trade, transportation, 
labor and capital, public ownership, wages and profits, and other current economic 
problems are treated. 

Mathematics 

The courses in mathematics are planned to meet the needs of all secondary 
students. They afford an opportunity for preparation in the mathematical processes 
which are necessary for success in industrial, commercial, or professional careers. 
They are intended (1) to acquaint the student with such mathematical processes 
and methods as he is most likely to need in the successful pursuit of other studies 
and in the various trades and occupations; (2) to prepare the student for the suc- 
cessful pursuit of the more advanced branches of mathematics in technical schools 
and colleges. 

Algebra 1. This course introduces the student to: (1) the positive and the 
negative number; to its application in the four fundamental operations leading up 
to the solving of formulas and equations, both linear and fractional, in one and two 
unknowns; (2) the function of the graph for both pictorial representation and the 
solving of equations; (3) the literal number and the study of problems. 

Algebra 2. Review of Elementary Algebra with more difficult problems. 
Quadratics and simultaneous quadratic equations, with application.s, ratio, pro- 



LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 29 

portion, and variation, progressions, binomial theorem, logarithms, and that part 
of Trigonometry required by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Geometry, Plane. The five books of Plane Geometry are studied. The 
numerous original exercises stimulate the power to reason clearly and to derive 
logical proofs. Special attention is given to those who expect to take college 
entrance examinations. This course meets College Entrance Board requirements. 

Geometry, Solid. This course deals with appreciation of three dimensional 
relations, formal proofs of the standard theorems and originals, locus problems, 
prop>erties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and the sphere. 

Trigonometry. The major topics covered by this course are the theory and use 
of logcirithms, solution of right and oblique triangles, trigonometric equations, 
proofs of fundamental formulas and identities based upon them, radian measure. 

Drawing 

Mechanical Drawing. The fundamentals of Mechanical Drawing are stressed 
in this course. A credit towards college entrance will be granted upon the com- 
pletion of sixty-five problems or the equivalent. All work is individual and admits 
of progress according to the student's ability. 

Instruction is given in the testing, use and care of the instruments and draw- 
ing supplies, and about thirty drawing plates are made. The topics studied in 
these plates include: technique practice, lettering, geometric constructions, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, revolution of objects, isometric, cavalier, cabinet 
and perspective projection, intersections, sections, helix and application, screw 
threads, dimensioning and inking. 

Science 

Biology. This is a comprehensive course in Biology designed to meet the re- 
quirements of the following persons: (1) prospective college students who are 
preparing for college entrance and College Board Examinations; (2) students who 
plan to enter institutions requiring credits in some science; (3) prospective nursing 
students; (4) those who desire an elementary knowledge of the structure and 
function of plant and animal life. 

The multiple objectives of the course are: to gain the best approach to an under- 
standing of facts, principles, and theories and to apply them in various ways; to 
help the student to develop a special interest in some part of the course; to give a 
fundamental understanding of living things, of their structure and function; to 
give a survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with the primary objective of 
creating interest in and appreciation of nature; to present the economic aspects of 
Biology; to present an adequate understanding of hygienic principles underlying 
all healthful living organisms; to meet the requirements of an elementary course 
in any life science which aims to contribute to both avocational and vocational 
training. 

The course consists of lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and laboratory 
work. 

Physics. This course is intended for two groups of students. First, it will meet 
the requirements of those expecting to enter a college or technical school. Secondly, 



30 LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

it is intended to help those who wish a general knowledge of the innportant laws 
and principles of Physics as applied to modern everyday experiences. The applica- 
tions of Physics in such fields as household appliances, the weather, the automobile, 
the airplane, radio, etc., are particularly stressed with the idea of giving a back- 
ground of culture and enjoyment. 

Many students interested in mechanical lines will find it giving them a clearer 
understanding of the operations of devices of which they make constant use. 

Laboratory experiments and lecture table demonstrations will illustrate the 
subject matter studied in the text. 

Although the course is not intended to be highly theoretical, an elementary 
knowledge of Algebra and Geometry will be of assistance in the solution of problems. 

Chemistry. This course has the twofold aim of preparing the student in 
Chemistry for entrance to any college or technical school and providing a general 
introduction to the subject for other purposes. 

There are class discussions of chemical principles and of chemical materials, 
solution of numerical problems, practice in such exercises as writing of equations, 
demonstration experiments carried through by the instructor. The student does 
assigned experiments in the laboratory and writes reports of his work. 

The more important elements, both non-metallic and metallic, as well as 
numerous compounds, are studied. Important laws and hypotheses of Chemistry 
are constantly stressed. 

Unless there is urgent reason for following a different order, the student is 
advised to arrange his succession of courses in such a way that Chemistry will be 
preceded by a study of Physics, 



THE LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

360 Huntington Avenue, Boston 15, Mass. 

Application for Admission 

Application Received by Date 



19. 



A fee of five dollars most accompany this application. Make checks, money orders, or drafts 

payable to The Lincoln Preparatory School 

This fee is not refundable except when a student is refused admission 



(date) 



To the Headmaster: 
I,. 



(First Name) (Middle Name) (Last Name) 

hereby apply for admission to the Lincoln Preparatory School, and submit the following 
information: 



(Street Address) 

Age Date of Birth , 



(Town) 



Place of Birth Nationality . 

Home Telephone 

Business Address 



(Concern) (Street) (City) 

Business Telephone Occupation 



List other high schools attended (State whether day or evening) 



Name of School 


Approximate Date 
of Attendance 


Day or Evening 



























Do you wish to receive the diploma of this scnool? 

Do you merely wish to earn credits here without qualifying for the diploma? . 

Do you plan to enter college? 

If so, which college? 

If under 21, give name of parent or guardian 

(Sipiature) 



THE 
LINCOLN SCHOOLS 

Evening Sessions 
CLASSES OPEN TO MEN AND WOMEN 



LINCOLN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

Associate in Engineering Programs 

Courses leading to the Degree of Associate in Engineering are offered 
in the following major fields: 

Aeronautical Electrical 

Chemistry . Electronics 

Civil and Structural Industrial 

Mechanical 

B.B.A. Degree Program 

A six-year program conducted in conjunction with Northeastern Uni- 
versity School of Business is available which leads to the degree of B.B.A. 
in Engineering and Management awarded by Northeastern University. 

Special Programs 

For those who do not wish to take one of the regular programs, special 
programs consisting of one or more courses can be arranged to meet 
individual needs. 

LINCOLN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Fully accredited by the New England College Admissions Board. 
General, Classical, and Technical high school courses are available. 
Students may enter in September. January, and June. 

For further information write, indicating the school in which you are interested 

THE LINCOLN SCHOOLS 

360 HUNTINGTON AVENUE, BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 
Telephone: KENmore 3177 



Cllhc Huntittgtan S> Aoal 




THE HUNTINGTON SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS 



An Urhan Indcj^cndcnt QDay School 

WITH THE ADVANTAGES AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES 
OF A COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 




320 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 
BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 



Scftcmlcr 23 
October 12 . 
Ns)vcmhcr 21 , 22 
Dcccmhcr 21-]amiar\ 5 
JciHiwrv 27-31 
Fcbruarv 3 . 
Fcbnurv 22 
Mcinli 22-30 
April 19 . 
Ma)' 26-Ji()it 3 
/h)u- 6 
Jul)' 7-Ai(^ii5t 30 



CALENDAR 
1946-1947 

School Year Begins 

Legal Holiday 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Christmas Vacation 

First Semester Examinations 

Second Semester Begins 

Legal Holiday 

Spring Vacation 

Legal Holiday 

Final Examinations 

Commencement 

Summer Session (1947) 



Sept cm kv 30 
Oaobix \2 . 
^ovcwXw 21, 22 
DtTt'Mil\-r 21-]amLny 5 
January 27-31 
Fchruary 3 . 
Fcbnur)' 22 
April 19 
Uay 1 9-23 
July 7-AuiTU5t 30 



VETERANS' SECTION CALENDAR 
1946-1947 

School Year Begins 
Legal Holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Vacation 
First Semester Examinations 
Second Semester Begins 
Legal Holiday 
Legal Holiday 
Final Examinations 
Summer Session (1947) 



Foreword 

Superior instruction is the essential ingredient of 
sound college preparation. It is not, however, suffi- 
cient in itself. Instruction must be supplemented by a 
personal and friendly relationship between the 
school, the parent, and the student to the end that the 
boy may develop the emotional stability and self- 
confidence necessary to achieve his purposes. The 
satisfactory maintenance of such a relationship has 
long been recognized by The Huntington School as 
the most solid basis upon which to build the structure 
of a boy's secondary education. 



Tlie Huntington School forBoys 



Board ofTnistus 

Robert Gray Dodge, Chairman 
Frank Lincoln Richardson, ViwChairman 



WiLMAN Edward Adams 
Henry Nathaniel Andrews 
George Louis Barnes 
Farwell Gregg Bemis 
Henry Goddard Bradlee 
Godfrey Lowell Cabot 
Paul Codman Cabot 
Walter Channing 
Willlam Converse Chick 
Everett Avery Churchill 
Paul Foster Clark 
Edward Dana 
David Frantc Edwards 
Carl Stephens Ell 
William Partridge Ellison 
John Wells Farley 
Ernest Bigelow Freeman 
Franklin Wile Ganse 
Merrill Griswold 



Henry Ingraham Harriman 
Chandler Hovey 
Maynard Hutchinson 
Arthur Stoddard Johnson 
Harry Hamilton Kerr 
Irving Edwin Moultrop 
AuGUSTiN Hamilton Parker, Jr. 
Frederick Sanford Pratt 
Roger Preston 
Stuart Craig Rand 
James Lorin Richards 
Harold Bours Richmond 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Frank Palmer Speare 
Francis Robert Carnegie Steele 
Charles Stetson 
Earl Place Stevenson 
Robert Treat Paine Storer 
James Vincfnt Toner 



Administrative Ojjiccrs of the School 

Carl Stephens Ell, A.B., M.S., Ed.M., Sc.D. 
Prcsulcnt 

Everett Avery Churchill, A.B., Ed.D. 
Vicc'Prcsiiicnt 

William Greene Wilkinson, A.B., Ed.M, 
Headmaster 

William Newell Randell, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant HeaJimaster 



Faculty 



Robert O. Bates, B.S. Appointed 1940 

B.S. St. Lawrence University, 1937; Graduate Study, School of Education, Boston 
University, 1937-; Teacher, Harrisburg Academy, 1938-40; Instructor, The Huntington 
School, 1940-. 

Mathematics, Physics 

Carl F. Christianson, A.B. Appointed 1927 

A.B. Wesleyan University, 1923; Instructor, Tilton School, New Hampshire, 1923-24; 
Teacher, Abington High School, 1924-27; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1927-. 

History, Economics 

Norman Greene, B.S. Appointed 1939 

B.S. Boston University, 1938; Graduate Study, School of Education; Teacher, Rogers 
High School, Newport, Rhode Island, 1938; Instructor, Nichols Junior College, 1938-39; 
Instructor, The Huntington School, 1939-. 

History, Economics 
Adviser of Forum 

Preston Harvey, A.B., Ed.M. Appointed 1931 

A.B. Bowdoin College, 1928; Ed.M. Boston University, 1942; Teacher, Portland 
Country Day School, 1928-31; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1931-. 

Latin, Mathematics 
Ahiscr, The Huntington Record 

Percy E. Jones, B.S. Appointed 1919 

B.S. Boston University, 1930; Sloyd Training School, 1919; Instructor, Mechanical 
Drawing, The Huntington School, 1919-30; Instructor, Mathematics, The Huntington 
School, 1930-. 

Mathcmatics, Draiving 

Roland Leach, A.B., Ed.M. Appointed 1927 

A.B. Tufts College, 1925; Ed.M. Harvard University, 1930; Instructor of French, 
Providence Country Day School, 1926; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1927-. 

Modem Languages, English 
Coach of Dramatics 

Roland S. Littlefield, A.B., M.A. Appointed 1945 

B.A. Yale University, 1932; M.A. Harvard University, 1934; Teacher, Wells, Maine, 
High School, 1939-45; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1945-. 

English, French 
6 



Olan a. Rand, B.A. Appointed 1943 

B.A. Washington and Lee, 1926; Graduate Study, University of Vermont; Teacher, 
Franklin High School, New Hampshire, 1926-28; Teacher, Barre High School, Vermont, 
1929-43; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1943-. 

Enolish 



a 



William N. Randell, A.B., M.A. Appointed 1945 

B.A. Yale University, 1938; M.A. Middiebury French School, 1940; M.A. Yale Uni- 
versity, 1942; Instructor, Admiral Billard Academy, 1942-43; Assistant Principal, Admiral 
Billard Academy, 1943-45; Assistant Headmaster, The Huntington School, 1945-. 

Modern Languages 

Arthur W. Reynolds, A.B. Appointed 1945 

B.A. Harvard University, 1927; Graduate Study, University of Maine, Boston University; 
Teacher, Sudbury, Massachusetts, High School, 1927-29; Head of the Science Department, 
Stoneham, Massachusetts, High School, 1929-36; Instructor, Worcester Academy, Worcester, 
Massachusetts, 1936-38; Teacher, Melrose, Massachusetts, High School, 1938-1942; 
Instructor, U. S. Army Air Force, 1942-45; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1945-. 

Mathematics 

Alfred L. Skinner, A.B. Appointed 1923 

A.B. Harvard College, 1919; Teacher, Milford High School, Rhode Island, 1919-20; 
Teacher, North Andover High School, 1920-23; Instructor, The Huntington School, 1923-. 

Mathematics 

Harold C. Wilcox, S.B., M.S. Appointed 1924 

SB. Rhode Island State College, 1915; M.S. Brown University, 1917; Instructor, 
Columbus Academy, Columbus, Ohio, 1917-18; Head of Science Department, Monson 
Academy, 1918-20; Principal, South Academy, 1920-24; Instructor, The Huntington School, 
1924-. 

Physics, Chemistry 
Director, Science Cluh 



Sdiool for Vctcnms Faculty 

Frederick R. Henderson, B.S., M.S. Senior Master 

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) 
Former Lieutenant, U. S. N. R. 

JoiLv B. Nash, A.B. Mathematics 

(Bates College, Massachusetts State Teachers' College) 
Former First Lieutenant, U. S. Army Air Corps Reserve 

7 



Frank D. Robins, B.A., M.Ed. EnglisJi 

(Wesley an University, Boston University) 
Former Captain, U. S. Army Air Corps Reserve 

Ernest R. Spinney, B.S., M.Ed. Mathematics 

(Harvard University, Boston University) 
Former Lieutenant Gg) U. S. N. R. 

Thomas H. Wallace, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Physics 

(Boston University, Harvard University) 

Former Instructor in Pre-Meteorology, Army Air Corps, Bowdoin College 

Former Instructor in V-12 Program, Williams College 



Coaching Stajf 

Director of Athletics, Track Robert O. Bates 

Baseball Thomas A. Blake 

Basketball Benjamin B. Zecker 

Football Coach to be Appointed 

Skiing Olan A. Rand 

Swimming Raymontj E. Millard 

Tennis Alfred L. Skinner 

School Physician, Dr. Henry A. Kontoff 
School Librarian, Miss Myra White 



Secretarial Staff 

Miss Marquita MacHugh 
Mrs. Phyllis W. Leake 
Mrs. Virginia M. Leister 
Miss Mary F. Malloy 



Qencral Information 

The Huntington School was founded in 1909. It had its 
origin in the apparent need in Greater Boston for a first-class inde- 
pendent day school possessing the following outstanding features: 

(a) it would permit its students to remain under the direct influence of 
the home; 

(b) it would offer a strong college preparatory program in an environment 
w^here character is emphasized; 

(c) it would furnish sports, games, and extra-curricular activities to 
round out the needs of the growmg boy; 

(i) it would not be too large to permit ample attention to the individual 
student. 

Huntington has been eminently successful in its aims. Its 
students come from all parts of Boston and the neighboring cities 
and towns, and are furnished the opportunity not only of securing 
a sound formal education for entrance to, and success in, college, 
but of attaining a strong body, strong character, and independence 
of thought through daily contact with well-rounded Christian 
men. Graduates are to be found in almost all of the New England 
colleges and in many colleges and universities throughout the 
country. 

Huntington limits its enrollment to not more than two hun- 
dred boys. There is no desire to increase this number, -which is 
sufficiently large to promote school activities of interest and value 
to growing boys. The size of the School thus makes it possible for 
the Headmaster and his associates to keep m close touch with the 
individual student. During the current school year, the School is 
conducting a special program of study exclusively for veterans, 
v/ith a separate faculty, at 47 Mount Vernon Street. 

While Huntington is essentially a day school, a few boarding 
students are accepted. The School accepts no responsibility with 
respect to the activities of such students after school hours. How- 
ever, It will cooperate wholeheartedly in arranging for satis- 
factory living quarters for those who come from a distance. 

9 




AN INTERVIEW WITH TI 



^TER 




OUTSIDE THE HEADMASTER'S OFFICE 

10 



Buildings 

The School is housed in a building especially equipped for 
educational work, with every facility for carrying out the com- 
plete program which it sponsors. 

The recitation rooms are pleasant and designed for small 
classes, which permit a friendly yet diligent atmosphere to exist 
at all times. The number of students assigned to any class is 
rarely in excess of twenty. 

The Physics and Chemistry laboratories are well equipped 
for the thorough study of these Sciences. Through their facilities 
they afford opportunity for ample experimentation. A standard 
drafting room is available for those students assigned to Mechanical 
Drawing. 

The swimming pool, seventy-five feet long by twenty-five feet 
wide, is supplied with filtered water heated to a proper tempera- 
ture by an elaborate system of pipes. T* ne of the finest in New 
England. The School has special ' -.rved for the use of the 

pool. 

In addition, there is a 1 he gift of Huntington 

Alumni, where students gati hours to play various 

games, to chat together, or read tr. .nagazines and periodi- 

cals provided by the School. Additional ooms are available for 
special meetings, forums, rehearsals, etc., that are held through- 
out the school year. 

According to a pre-arranged schedule. The Huntington 
School has the exclusive use of the Samuel Johnson Memorial 
Gymnasium, which is the largest in Boston and is situated in the 
rear of the School and connected with it. On the mam floor is the 
gymnasium proper, equipped with the best of apparatus. It is 
encircled by an elevated running track, twelve laps to the mile. 
The gymnasium also contains a visitors' gallery, a special locker 
room, shower baths, and various exercise rooms. 

Grounds 

The outdoor athletic activities of the School are held at 
the Huntington Field in the Longwood section of Brookline 

11 



on Kent Street, one and one-half miles from the school building. 
Transportation is furnished free of charge to and from the field. 
Here are ample and excellent facilities for all out-of-door sports. 
A completely equipped field house furnishes adequate facilities for 
both home and visiting teams. The School has one of the best 
athletic fields in Greater Boston. In addition to these grounds 
there are available at the school building tennis courts and other 
facilities for games and sports. 

Location 

The Huntington School leases its quarters in the Educa- 
tional Wing of the Young Men's Christian Association Building at 
320 Huntington Avenue, in the educational and cultural center 
of Boston. It is within easy reach from all parts of Metropolitan 
Boston. The School is situated at the entrance of the Huntington 
Avenue subway and can be reached from Park Street in approx- 
imately nine minutes. 

It is also w^ithin easy walking distance of the railroad stations 
at Back Bay, Trinity Place and Huntington Avenue, and of the 
Massachusetts subway station. Ample parking space is available 
to those who come to the School by automobile. 

Morning Assemblies 

On Wednesday mornings, all students assemble in Bates 
Hall to take part in a brief devotional program. The School is 
non-sectarian but thoroughly Christian in the conduct of its 
religious activities. After these exercises matters of general 
school interest are briefly presented to the students. 

On Friday the assembly is devoted to some special pro- 
gram. These generally consist of talks by distinguished visiting 
speakers, concerts, short plays, movies, and programs in observ- 
ance of days of national importance. 

The Complete Development Program at Huntington 

The School believes in the complete development of the 
individual boy and furnishes many opportunities for a boy to dis- 
cover and develop his latent powers. For this reason, there has 

12 



been developed, under competent leadership, an extra-curricular 
program offering opportunities for supervised play, athletics, 
musical and other club activities. 

Naturally, in a college preparatory school, scholarship must 
occupy the first place in the efforts of the teaching staff; but it is 
unquestionable that a boy w^ho graduates with an appreciation of 
values as they should exist in a normal, healthy, and active life is 
more likely to succeed than one deprived of such opportunities for 
development. 

Parent-Teacher Co-operation 

Successful preparation for college demands the co-operation 
of the boy, his parents, his teachers, and the college Director of 
Admission. The Headmaster, the Assistant Headmaster, and 
teachers are available by appointment to discuss problems that 
may arise. Parent-teacher meetings are held at regular intervals; 
these meetings enable parents to meet all their son's teachers at 
one time. 

The School, on its part, requests the co-operation of the 
parents. They should make sure that the student spends sufficient 
time on home study, they should make sure that he reports to 
school according to his program and avoids being tardy, they 
should keep his absences to a minimum by making dental and other 
appointments outside of school hours. 

In cases where parents are obviously out of sympathy with 
the aims and purposes of the School, it is necessary that they with- 
draw their boys from school. 

Accreditation 

Huntington is recognised by all the leading colleges. It is a 
member of the New England Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools and of the Private School Association. 

It has full certification privileges as granted by the New 
England College Admissions Board The School has a chapter 
of the Cum Laude Society. This honor society is represented by 
chapters in all of the leading independent schools, and corresponds 
to the Phi Beta Kappa Society of colleges and universities. 

13 



Geographical Distribution of Students 
Huntington is primarily a day school and. because of this most 
ot the boys in the School come from towns and cities within com- 
muting distance. Because of the ease with v^hich the School is 
reached by automobile, tram, and trolley, each year finds boys 
enrolled from not less than fifty towns ^vithin a forty mile radius 
of Boston. It is true, of course, that a large number of our student 
group live within the confines of Greater Boston. Such towns as 
Arlington, Brookline, Cambridge, Dedham, Lynn, Maiden, 
Medford, Medway, Melrose, Milton, Natick, Needham, Newton, 
Somerville, Stoughton, Taunton, Waltham, Wellesley, Win- 
chester, and Woburn are, however, the homes of many of our boys. 
Several boys come to the School from a distance. For such, 
satisfactory living conditions are arranged, usually in private 
families. 

Faculty 

Since the heart of a good school lies in its faculty, the members 
of The Huntington School teaching staff have been selected w^ith 
the utmost care. They are graduates of the leading colleges and 
universities w^here they have specialized in their particular fields. 
They are all professional teachers who have chosen to make educa- 
tion their life work. 

These men have had extensive experience in college prepara- 
tory work so that they are well acquainted with the problems 
which boys must face. Their success has been due in no small 
measure to their ability to cope patiently with a boy's problems 
from the point of view of the boy himself. 

The School is proud of the fact that its teachers are men of 
culture and high ideals and that so many have seen such long 
service with the School. 



14 



Admission Requirements 



Parents or guardians who wish to enter their boys in 
Huntington should turnjiigt for a conference with tlu Headmaster or 
Assistant HuuhntisttT. A( the time, an afylieation blank may he complctctl. 
A registration of five dollars must accompany this application. 
This fee is in addition to the regular tuition charge and is not 
refundable. 

Early registration results in advantage to the student since 
it enables the officers of the School to discuss every phase of a 
student's educational problem before he begins attendance, thereby 
saving time throughout the school year. Where possible, parents 
should obtain the boy's transcript of record from his former school 
and forward it with the application for admission, or request his 
high school to mail it to Huntington. 

When the School has received the applicant's school record 
and character credentials, the student and his parent or guardian 
are requested to call for a personal interview in order that the 
boy's whole educational problem may be discussed in detail. It 
is expected that no boy will apply for admission whose conduct 
in other schools has been discreditable. 

Boys are accepted for admission to all grades from the ninth 
through the twelfth. Special programs can be arranged for high 
school graduates which will meet their individual needs. 

References 

Applicants for admission to The Huntington School must 
furnish the names of two persons, not relatives, v^ho are able to 
vouch for the character and ability of the student and the financial 
responsibility of the parent. 

The School IS always pleased to refer those who inquire to 
parents, alumni, or educators, who are thoroughly familiar with 
the work of the School. Names and addresses will be furnished 
upon request. 

Most ot our students come to us through the recommendations 
of former students, their parents, and college deans. 

15 




AWAY TO A GOOD START 




THE ALUMNI ROOM 



16 



Aptitude and Achievement Tests 

While The Huntington School does not require formal 
entrance examinations, all students are given a general aptitude 
test. In certain cases, achievement tests may also be prescribed 
as a guide to planning a student's program. 




TYPICAL CLASS 



17 



Graduation Rc(juiumcnts 

Students in The Huntington School must meet definite 
requirements with regard to duration of attendance, scholastic 
record, and program of studies before a diploma will be awarded. 

The Huntington Diploma 

To receive the Huntington diploma, students must have earned 
fifteen units in subjects that are acceptable for college entrance. 
The pattern of these subjects may vary in content according to the 
type of college chosen and the professional goal of the student. A 
unit is ordinarily the amount of work covered in a single subject 
taken four or five times a week throughout the school year, or the 
equivalent thereof, except that four years of English are counted 
as three units. The student must complete in The Huntington 
School one full and continuous year of work embracing four to five 
units. Huntington Summer School credits are acceptable units 
towards the diploma. 

Advanced Credit 

Students from accredited high schools and other preparatory 
schools may receive credit towards the diploma for work that has 
been satisfactorily completed. How^ever, such credit is not awarded 
automatically but is based on the general quality of past perform- 
ance and the needs of the student with respect to his educational 
goal. For instance, a student who has earned a low passing grade 
in French I and who is apparently eligible for French II may be 
requested to repeat the course before proceeding with the advanced 
course 

Promotion at Huntington is entirely by subjects; hence the 
School IS in an admirable position to help students who cannot 
meet or do not wish to meet graduation requirements, but merely 
require certain additional units, along with those earned else- 
where, to meet the entrance conditions of their chosen college. 



18 



Courses oj Instruction 



The following subjects are customarily offered by The Hunt- 
ington School: 

Languages Physical Sciences 

English, I, II, III, IV Chemistry 

French I, II, IH Physics 

German I, II, III Social Sciences 

Latin I, II, III, IV United States History 

Spanish I, II English History 

Mathematics European History 

Algebra I, II Economics 

Plane Geometry Civics 

Solid Geometry Mechanical Drawing 
Trigonometry 

Descriptions of these courses are to be found on pages 33—36. 

Course for High School Graduates 

Huntington offers a one-year course which has proved of great 
advantage to many boys, particularly to certain high-school gradu- 
ates who fall into one or more of the following groups: 

(a) boys who need an additional year of preparation before proceeding 
to college because the pattern of their credits does not meet the 
demands of their chosen college; 

(h) boys who need to strengthen their foundation before entering college; 

(c) boys who need additional units of certificate grade; 

(4) boys who are eligible for college entrance, but rather young or imma- 
ture to enter immediately, and who would distinctly benefit by addi- 
tional study devoted to review or new subjects. 



19 



Admission to College 



There are four principal methods by ^vhlch a student may 
enter college. These are: 

(1) By Diploma. Many colleges will admit students who 
hold the diploma of The Huntington School. 

(2) By Certificate. In this instance students whose average 
grade is B may be admitted to certain colleges without 
examination. 

(3) By Certificate and Examination. Under this plan students 
who do not have a B average are required to take certain 
examinations to prove their efficiency. All colleges 
admitting students by certificate accept certification of 
The Huntington School. 

(4) By Examination. A few colleges, notably Harvard, Yale, 
and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, require 
examinations of all candidates. This School provides 
excellent preparation for the entrance examinations of 
all colleges and for the examinations of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. 

At the present time, the regular College Board examinations 
are suspended, and only the Aptitude and certain Achievement 
tests are being given. Future procedure is uncertain. One thing, 
however, remains: With respect to college entrance, much impor- 
tance will be attached to the student's school record and his head- 
master's recommendation. 

While Huntington does all it can to prepare a boy to enter a 
particular college, it does not guarantee entrance to that college. 
Every student should bear in mind that his chances of entering the 
college that he and his parents choose is in direct proportion to 
the scholastic record he makes. 



20 



School Policies 

Textbooks and Course Content 

All textbooks and other material used as teaching aids are 
carefully selected and arranged to furnish the best possible prepara- 
tion for college entrance and to be of maximum value to the individual 
students. 

Hours of Attendance 

The School is in session five days each w^eek. Attendance 
on Saturday mornings may be required of students w^ho need 
supplementary instruction, who are behind in their work, or 
who are called back for disciplinary reasons. 

The daily hours of attendance for boys in the School are from 
9 A.M. until 2.15 p.m. Recreational and extra-curricular activities 
are held after 2.15. The schedule is as follows: 

9.00— 9.15 Assembly 

9.15 — 12.15 Recitations 

12.15—12.45 Lunch 

12.45 — 2.15 Recitations 

2.30 — 3.30 Extra-help period 

2.30 — 4.00 Sports and extra-curricular activities 

At Huntington it is the belief that habits of promptness and 
regularity formed in the secondary school years will tend toward 
dependability in college and later life. Close check is kept on 
tardiness and absences. A note from the parents is required to explain 
all ahsenees. 



21 




22 



Examinations 

Examinations and tests are given at intervals throughout the 
school year at the discretion of the instructors. Major examinations 
are held at the close of each semester. Boys who fail in examina- 
tions must make up the deficiency within a prescribed time or 
revert to a lower grade in the subjects in which they failed. 

Marking System 

The following is the marking system used by the School: 

A 90% to 100% 

B 80%oto 90%o 

C 10% to 80% 

D 60% to 70% (unsatisfactory) 

F Failure 

Inc. Incomplete 

A is a mark of high distinction and is given to a student whose 
work approaches perfection, or it may be considered as a grade 
representing approximately the best that may be expected of a 
student. 

B IS given for work plainly above the average. Students who 
are to succeed in the best colleges should be able to attain this 
grade consistently. 

C IS given for average work. The standards of the School are 
such that students obtaining some C grades with a majority of B 
grades or better may expect to succeed in many colleges and will 
be recommended for entrance to many institutions not requiring 
B grades for certification. 

D IS given throughout the year for work between passing and 
absolute failure. It is usually given to inform the student that by 
increased effort he may enter the C group. It is not given as a 
final grade, nor does it count towards the diploma credits. 

F indicates failure and requires repeating the subject. 

Inc., meaning Incomplete, is given for work which may be 
graded later as a result of make-up work or examination. 

23 



Reports 

Reports of the boys' work are sent home six times a year. 
Work missed for any logical reason is marked "incomplete" until 
made up, when the grade obtained in making up the w^ork is sub' 
stituted. Parents are invited to visit the School to discuss report 
cards with the Headmaster and teachers. At certain intervals 
throughout the school year parent-teacher meetings are held. 
Parents are urged to attend these meetings even in those cases 
where report cards appear satisfactory. 

Parental Responsibility 

The co-operation of all parents in the enforcement of policies 
is requested. Each boy is expected to be punctual in his attendance 
at every school exercise. The dismissal of a student before the 
close of the school day interferes seriously with the school routine 
and with the student's advancement. Only in case of unusual 
urgency should such requests be made. Outside appointments 
should be made at a time when they do not interfere with the 
school work. 

Absence from school should be reduced to a minimum. 

The School does not seek to enroll students who require 
severe restrictions. The right is reserved by the School to dismiss 
any boy whose conduct, influence, industry, or progress is unsatis- 
factory in the judgment of the Headmaster. 

Special Study Periods 
The School reserves the right to detain students after regular 
school hours, or on Saturdays, for disciplinary reasons, for tardi- 
ness, or to make up arrears of work. 

Lunch Room 

A large lunch room is available in the building, where a satis- 
factory lunch may be obtained at moderate cost. There are also 
many restaurants in close proximity to the School. 



24 



Honors and Awards 

•Scholarship medals are awarded at the Commencement 
Exercises to the student in each Form who maintains the highest 
rank during the school year. 

The Albert Walter Swenson Memorial Medal 

Established in 1929 by Mrs. Swenson in memory of her husband. Mr. 
Swenson for nine years served the School faithfully as Head of the Modern 
Language Department and for two and a half years as Associate Headmaster. 
Awarded for excellence in French III. 

The Class of 1928 Medal 
Established in 1928 by the graduating class of that year. Awarded at 
Commencement to the member of the Senior Class who excels in English. 

The Richard John Carroll Memorial Medal 

Established in 1928 by the parents of Richard John Carroll, a graduate of 
the School in 1927 and president of his class. Awarded at Commencement to 
the student in the Junior Class who excels in English Composition. 

The Arthur Stanton Carleton Memorial Medal 

Established by the parents of Arthur Stanton Carleton in 1930, the year in 
which Arthur would have graduated from The Huntington School had he lived. 
Awarded each year to the member of the Intermediate School whose play, 
spirit, and character have best maintained the traditions of the School. 

The Albert Walter Swenson Public Speaking Medal 

Established in 1929 bv friends of Mr. Swenson from the student body and 
alumni of the School . Awarded to the winner of the Public Speaking Contest. 

Rensselaer Medal 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute awards a medal to that Huntington boy 
who obtains the highest record in the fields of Science and Mathematics. 

Faculty Awards 
The Faculty offers prizes to the high ranking student in most Junior and 
Senior subjects. 

Cum Laude Society 

The Huntington Chapter of the Cum Laude Society was established in 
1928. This is a national honorary society which in preparatory schools corre' 
sponds to the Phi Beta Kappa Society in colleges. Each chapter may elect to 
membership teachers of the school who are members of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, or any similar honorary society approved by the Board of Regents. 

25 



Extra-Curricular Activities 

Clubs 
The School sponsors several extra-curricular activities. These 
vary somewhat from year to year, depending upon the desires of the 
student body. Generally, we have a Public Speaking Group, a 
Literary Club, a Chess Club, a Current Events Club, a French 
Club, a Science Club, a Spanish Club, a Glee Club and Orchestra. 
The Huntington Record is edited and published by the boys them- 
selves. 

Physical Education 

While seeking the bodily development of the student through 
exercises suitable to his physique and interests, we at Huntington 
are not concerned exclusively with bodily development but alsa 
with general development. We believe that the by-products of 
games and sports are of great importance. For this reason the 
various squads are under the direction of men who because of their 
character and leadership provide valuable character training. 

Play is just as much an essential part of any school program 
as study, provided it is properly supervised. A well-balanced 
program of physical education invariably does much to increase 
efficiency in the classroom. All boys are urged to take advantage 
of the opportunities available for athletic activity. The School 
has exceptionally well-equipped facilities for athletics. 

Sports 

Many diff^erent sports are off^ered during the school year. 
These are generally as follows: 

Fall Sports — Football, Tennis, Swimming 
Winter Sports — Track, Swimming, Skiing, Basketball 
Spring Sports — - Baseball, Tennis 



26 



Financial Information 



"Twition The tuition rate for a student enrolled in a regular schedule (four 

Fees or five subjects) is $450, payable as follows: 

Two-fifths upon entrance; 
Two-fifths on December 1 ; 
One-fifth on February 1 . 

Parents may occasionally arrange to make tuition payments on some 
other basis. Those who wish to depart from the customary plan 
should consult the Headmaster. However, it is to be pointed out 
that a student cannot be enrolled until a tuition payment has been 
made. 



Registration 
Fu 



Single 
Courses 



Lahoratory 
Fees 

Graduation 
Fee 



Books auii 
Supplies 



Medical 
Attention 



StHtlcnts' 
tickets 



a 



\argcs for 



Damages 



A registration fee of $5 is due from all new students when a place 
is reserved. This fee is not refundable, even when the application 
is rejected. 

The flexible schedule at Huntington permits certain students to 
pursue individual subjects to a maximum of three subjects. The 
rate is $125 per subject. 

Students taking Physics or Chemistry are required to pay a labor* 
atory fee of $10. 

The graduation fee is $10. All financial obligations to the School 
must be met before a student can be awarded a diploma or receive 
credit for work completed. 

All students purchase their own books and supplies. These may 
be purchased from the Northeastern University Bookstore, which 
IS situated in a near-by building. Parents who wish their boys to 
open a charge account at the bookstore should make the request in 
a letter addressed to the Headmaster. 

The School will not assume responsibility for injuries received or 
for expense incurred because of medical attention in connection 
with participation in athletics. 

Parents are advised that for a small fee their boys may be insured 
against such injuries and also any injuries arising from travel to and 
from School. 

Students who live in a suburban town can secure railroad tickets 
at greatly reduced rates by applying at the office of the railroad. 
Students of the School are permitted to ride on the Boston Elevated 
on payment of one-half fare. 

Students who damage apparatus in the laboratories or who will- 
fully destroy school property will be responsible for the replace- 
ment of such damaged articles or for the cost of replacing where 
this is undertaken by the School. 



27 




WARMING UP 




THE WINNER 



28 



RcjunJs The School assumes the obligation of carrying the student through- 

out the year. Instruction and accommodations are provided on a 
yearly basis. Therefore, no refunds are granted except in cases 
where students are compelled to withdraw because of personal 
illness. In such cases a medical certificate must accompany the 
application for refund. 

Boys w^ho withdraw from school to enter military service will be 
charged on a pro-rata basis. Here, too, appropriate documentary 
evidence is necessary. 

Scliolarsliip Huntington has a small Scholarship Fund designed to furnish 
Fwui financial assistance to those who, without such assistance, w^ould 

be denied the advantages of the School. At present scholarships 
are available only to a limited degree. In all cases awards are based 
on (1) character, (2) ability, (3) need. All three items must be 
present before an application for scholarship will be considered. 




SWIMMING INSTRUCTION 



29 



Huntington Summer School 

Coeducational 

Each year, the School conducts a Summer Session beginning 
about the first of July and ending about the first of September. 

The Huntington Summer School was established in 1912 
and since that time has prepared a large number of students for 
entrance to the New^ England colleges and other colleges outside 
this area. 

The aim of the School is to provide classroom instruction for 
those who are conditioned in grammar school, high school or 
college entrance subjects; for those who wish to complete a four- 
year high school course in tvv^o years and three summer sessions; 
and for those who wish to make special preparation for college 
entrance examinations given in the fall. 

The teaching force is made up of the men of the regular school 
faculty and qualified teachers from neighboring schools. 

All classes are small. The program of work is so arranged 
that a year's work m each subject is completed during the Summer 
Session. Because day school standards are maintained, students 
who elect w^ork which they have not before attempted usually 
pursue only one or two courses. Those v^ho are reviewing are 
limited to the amount of work that they can do well. 

Charges 

The rate of tuition in the Summer School is $50 per subject. 

Tuition is not refunded because of withdrawal or change of 
schedule. A laboratory fee of ten dollars is charged all students 
taking either Chemistry or Physics; the Biology fee is five dollars. 
These fees are payable on August 1. 

Each student pays a registration fee of five dollars in addition 
to the tuition. Fees are not refunded in case of withdra\val. All 
fees are in addition to the regular tuition charge. 

Three-fifths of the tuition is due upon entrance, plus the reg- 
istration fee. The balance, including laboratory fees, is due on 
August 1. 

A special circular of this School will be sent upon request. 

30 



S'j^ccial Events Calcnda) 



1945-1946 

1. President Carl S. Ell Delivers 

Address of Welcome October 19 

2. Foreign Foods Club Visits The Moongatc, 

Chinese Restaurant October 25 

3. Mr. Frazee, Old-Time Movies November 2 

4. Dr. Nathan, The Army Psychological 

Warfare Program November 1 6 

5. Nicholas Slominsky, Methods of Musical 

Composition November 29 

6 . Foreign Foods Club Visits Lc Restaurant Francais . . December 6 

7. "Adventures of Chico," Spanish Film December 7 

8. Winter Dance at The MylesStandish Hotel December 7 

9. Colonel Furlong, "Turkey, Past and Present" . . .January 11 

10. Professor lUingworth, Interpretive Readings . . . .January 18 

11. Mr. Abbott Demonstrates the Theremin, 

the Latest of Musical Instruments February 1 

12. Miss Barr, Methods of Fingerprinting February 8 

13. Spanish Club Forum on Latin- American 

Customs and View^s February 14 

14. Mr. Payne, Creator of "Billy, the Boy Artist," 

Demonstrates the Art of Cartooning February 15 

15. The Ski Club Visits North Conv^ay February 23 

16. School Variety Show March 1 

17. "La Guerre des Boutons," French Film March 11 

18. Winter Athletic Dance at Bates Hall March 15 

19. Gordon Atkins, Sports March 29 

20. Harvey Davies, Piano Interpretations April 12 

21. Annual Spelling Bee April 26 

22. Prize Speaking Contest May 3 

23. Commencement June 7 

31 



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TWO POINTS 



32 



Dcscnpion oj Courses 



ENGLISH 

English I: Fundamentals of grammar with drill in punctuation, spelling, and 
sentence structure. Special emphasis upon the development of reading of 
modern and classical literature at levels that may be appreciated by first year 
pupils. Oral and written compositions, including letter writing. 

Ewgiisit II: Functional grammar, paragraph development, planning and outlining 
of oral and written compositions. Vocabulary building and testing. Repre- 
sentative works of several types of literature are read, with emphasis upon the 
development of good taste in reading. The theory and practice of debating and 
group discussion. 

English III: Study of rhetoric and composition w^ith attention to paragraph develop- 
ment and sentence structure. Precis writing and paraphrasing. Vocabulary 
building. Study of style and literary types from a wide selection of modern and 
classical literature, including study of one play by Shakespeare. Some attention 
given to poetry. Creative writing. 

English IV: Training and preparation for college entrance examinations in English 
composition. Planning and outlining for creative writing. A detailed study of 
all the mam types of literature. Practice in critical reading of modern and 
classical literature. The drama is emphasized with plays of Shakespeare, Ibsen, 
Galsworthy, and contemporary dramatists being read. Special attention is 
given to the novel as a literary form. 

LATIN 

Latin I: The aim of the Latin I course is to develop the ability to comprehend 
and translate Latin sentences of simple grammatical construction. Emphasis is 
placed on accumulation of vocabulary and recognition of roots common to Latin 
and English. 

Latin II: The course in Latin II is designed to speed up the rate of comprehension 
and translation, especially of sentences involving infinitive, participial, or sub- 
junctive constructions. The materials selected for reading content are graded 
for the entire year in respect to their degree of difficulty. Caesar's Gallic Wars 
are read in the second semester. 

Latin III: Selections from the orations, letters, and philosophical works of Cicero, 
as well as selections from Livy, Pliny the Younger, and Sallust provide the 
reading content of Latin III. The objective is the accomplishment of reading 
facility and power of comprehension, with increasing emphasis on appreciation 
of the prose style. 

Latin IV: An appreciation of the literary merits of the Latin poets is developed 
through reading selections from the poems of Vergil, Ovid, Horace, Catullus, 
Tibullus, and Propertius. One semester is given to the study of Vergil's Aeneid. 

FRENCH 

French I: Study of the elementary principles of grammar. Practice in pronuncia- 
tion and in easy conversation, including some dictation. Short written themes 

33 



and reading of French stories ranging from the simple to those of moderate 
difficulty. Introduction to the study of irregular verbs and common idioms. 

Frencli II: Complete review and continuation of the study of basic grammar and 
of the most common irregular verbs. Drill on vocabulary and the most fre- 
quently used idioms. Written composition and reading of selections of increas- 
ing difficulty. Simple conversational French and dictation exercises. Attention 
given to preparation for examinations required for entrance to college. 

French III; Rapid survey of the fundamentals of grammar and stress on the w^riting 
of connected compositions involving the speech and idiomatic usage of everyday 
life. Review of irregular verbs and common idioms. Development of an ade- 
quate vocabulary based on word frequency. Drill to attain facility in oral com- 
prehension and expression. Readings from French classics and modern w^orks 
of moderate difficulty. Comprehension exercises on selections of greater diffi- 
culty. Dictation and the writing of original themes. Special instruction directed 
towards preparation for entrance requirements to colleges. 

GERMAN 

German I: An elementary course designed to acquaint the beginner with the 
rudiments of grammar as v/ell as to give him training in pronunciation and easy 
German conversation. Drill exercises for the learning of vocabulary and word 
inflection. Reading of easy German stories and poems. 

German II: Continual drill in grammar and syntax. Exercises in writing German 
from texts and from dictation. Composition work involving common everyday 
idioms. Reading of classical and modern poetry and prose. Some preparation 
given for entrance examinations to college. 

SPANISH 

Spanisli I: The work of the first year is so planned that it serves as a complete unit 
in fundamentals for the student who wishes to continue the language independ- 
ently by travel or reading. Correct pronunciation, a knowledge of the gram- 
matical structure of the language, and an ability to read and write within the 
limits of a practical vocabulary are the goals of the course. Standard elementary 
readers are used in connection with a grammar text such as Hills and Ford, 
"First Spanish Course." 

S-panish II: After a rapid review of the work covered in Spanish I, the second year 
is devoted to the enlargement of vocabulary, including common idioms, the 
increase of skill and speed in translation, with special emphasis upon sight 
translation and free composition. The course prepares for the successful further 
study of Spanish in college. 



SOCIAL STUDIES 

United States History: A comprehensive course, intended to give boys as complete 
an understanding as possible of our history. Problems of government, foreign 
policies, finances and currency, tariff, business, labor, and social reform are 
stressed. Map study is included. 

34 



Englisft History: This course is designed especially for first and second year 
students. An effort is made to teach boys how to study history. Development 
of national unity, origin ot indictment and trial jury, supremacy of Parliament, 
foreign policies, social and political reform are particularly emphasized. 

European History: This course consists of a study of the rise and p^ ^ -^f the 

leading nations of the world. Special attention is given to development of 
world powers and international relations, the growth of democracy , and political, 
economic, and social reform. Biographical sketches and map study are also 
included. 

Cii'ics: Democracy cannot be built upon stupidity; nor can its achievement be 
left to chance. Every generation must rediscover the tenets of democracy in all 
aspects of its daily living, and reaffirm its principles in government, social rela- 
tions, and economic practices. It is the purpose of this course not only to 
acquaint the pupil with the nature and structure of government; but also to 
instill an appreciation of the duties and responsibilities which accompany the 
rights and privileges of citizenship. 

Economics: The first half-year of this course consists of a description and historical 
analysis of the evolution of man's economic behavior from the Roman Empire, 
through the Middle Ages, into our present economic organization. The assump- 
tion is that the economy of any people results from the habits of thinking (institu- 
tions) which are formulated by adaptation and adjustment to a changing world. 
The second half-year is concerned with an analytical and critical study of our 
present economic organization and the conditions underlying economic problems: 
wages and profits, international trade, the farm problem, taxation, unemploy- 
ment, etc. 

MATHEMATICS 

Algebra I: Fundamental laws and operations, linear equations, special products, 
factormg, fractions and fractional equations, simultaneous equations, radicals 
and exponents, graphs, formulas, functional relations, verbal problems. 

Algebra II: Review of topics in Algebra I; quadratic equations, simultaneous 
equations involving quadratics, arithmetic and geometric series, binomial 
theorems, logarithms, trigonometric solution of right triangles, graphs, special 
emphasis on verbal problems. 

Plane Geometry: The standard theorems of the five books of Plane Geometry with 
special emphasis on original theorems and numerical problems. 

SoliJi Geometry: The standard theorems of the four books of Solid Geometry, with 
special emphasis on numerical problems, locus, and original theorems. 

Trigonometry: Logarithms, solution of right and oblique triangles, the general 
angle and relations between its functions, identities, trigonometric equations, 
radian measure, navigation problems. 

SCIENCE 

Physics: The School endeavors to give its students a thorough grounding in the 
fundamentals of this science and to prepare them for further training in this field, 

35 



if the opportunity arises. Scientific reasoning is stressed throughout the course, 
as it is believed that this is the heart and core, not onlv of success in school, but of 
success in life itself. The course includes lectures, discussions, laboratory 
experiments and problems, designed to meet the requirements of our best 
colleges. 

Chemistry: This is one of our most rapidly expanding sciences. We find here a 
subject which challenges the interest of young people in general, as they stand 
upon life's threshold. A spirit of exploration and discovery is fostered here, 
which has led many in the past to continue chemistry as a life work. A funda- 
mental aim is the development of a scientific logical organization of thinking 
processes, in the belief that here we have the key to a successful life. A well- 
rounded course of lectures, discussions and laboratory experiments fill the 
requirements for admission to any college. 

DRAWING 

Mechanical Drawing, First Year: Correct use of instruments, geometrical construc- 
tions, orthographic projection, cross sections and isometric drawings. Lettering 
is stressed. Neatness and accuracy are held as ideals. 

SeconJi Year: Continuation of above. Intersections, developments, working 
draw^ings and inking. Threads and assembly drawings. 




IN NEW HAMPSHIRE WITH THE SKI CLUB 

36 



X3 



m 



BINDERY 
ALIHAfy^, MASS. 
AUG. 1946 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES DUPL 



3 9358 01114040 4