(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Course catalog, 1973-1974"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/coursecatalog1973tows 



T0W90f1 

COLLGGG 
BULLCTIM 





'IOW9DM SMT€ CaL€G€ BULLGTri 1973-19:^1 



TS 



Table Of Contents 



THE COLLEGE 1 

ADMISSION 5 

EXPENSES 12 

STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 15 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 25 

THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM 33 

GRADUATE STUDIES 43 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 47 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 182 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 182 

BOARD OF VISITORS 182 

OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 183 

INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 186 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 200 

INDEX 201 



Hoz5S\ 




DR. JAMES L. FISHER, President 



The College 



PHILOSOPHY The Towson program rests fundamentally on the idea that a liberal 
education is indispensable for the preservation of a free society. 
Secondly, it rests on the belief that the means of acquiring special 
competence should be available at the undergraduate level in a tax- 
assisted multi-purpose college. 

These two principles go hand in hand. If it is vital that all 
students take on the mental habits and values necessary to thought- 
ful citizenship, it is also important that every student be able to 
acquire a sense of professional direction. The curriculum is designed, 
then, so that all students will pursue those studies — the traditional 
arts and sciences — that promote critical thought about man and 
his environment; and so that each student may discover and culti- 
vate a particular intellectual or occupational bent. 

OBJECTIVES In order to implement its philosophy, Towson State College seeks 
to challenge every student: 

1. To make college life a model community which breeds a sensi- 
tivity to the dignity of others and is relevant to the needs of 
the ongoing society. 

2. To develop an appreciation of and respect for the inherent wis- 
dom and values of the past through knowledge of the discoveries 
and art forms of his own and other cultures. 

3. To use this knowledge selectively and objectively in the search 
for new knowledge. 

4. To develop an understanding of himself in relation to others 
in his community, the nation, and the world. 

5. To develop the skills necessary to prepare himself to assume the 
role of a responsible member of the professional, social, and 
intellectual community. 



HISTORY Towson State College, the oldest and largest of Maryland's public 
colleges, traces its history back to 1865. At that time the General 
Assembly of Maryland established a state-wide public school system 
and authorized the first state teacher training institution, The 
Maryland State Normal School, later known as the State Teachers 
College at Towson, and since 1963, Towson State College. 

Formally opened in Baltimore on January 15, 1866, the school 
was, for many years, the only institution devoted exclusively to the 
preparation of teachers for the public schools of Maryland. 

The School occupied three different locations in the city of 
Baltimore before moving to its present suburban location in 1915. 

In 1946 the arts and sciences program was introduced at Tow- 
son. Beginning as a two-year transfer program, it was extended to 
a four-year, degree-granting program in 1960. 

A graduate program for elementary school teachers leading to 
the Master of Education degree was inaugurated in 1958. 

In 1963 the College was authorized, by action of the Legislature, 
to expand its offering in the arts and sciences while maintaining a 
strong program in teacher education and to change its name to 
Towson State College. 

In 1965 the College expanded its graduate program to include 
offerings for guidance counselors and secondary school teachers. 



In 1966 the College completed 100 years of service to the State, 
having graduated more than 12,000 students during its first century. 



ACCREDITATION 



Towson State College is accredited by the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Maryland State Board of 
Education and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. The College is a member of the American Council on 
Education and is approved by the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women. 



BOARD OF The College is governed by a nine-member Board of Trustees — 

TRUSTEES eight members appointed by the Governor for nine-year terms — 

and the state superintendent of schools, a permanent member, ex 

officio. This same board also controls the five other state colleges. 



THE CAMPUS AND 
FACILITIES 




The College is situated on a campus of over 320 acres located a mile 
and one-half beyond the northern border of the city of Baltimore 
on beautifully rolling wooded grounds. 

Within an eight-mile radius of the campus are all the cultural 
advantages of the city of Baltimore — the Peabody Conservatory 
of Music and Library, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the Walters 
Art Gallery, the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the many theaters 
and other cultural centers necessary for a well rounded college 
experience. 

Campus buildings and facilities give excellent support to the 
various College programs. The following are of particular interest: 

1. Stephens Hall, the original academic building erected in 1915, 
houses the main public performance auditorium, the studio 
theatre, classrooms, and the departments of mathematics, psy- 
chology, and driver education. This Jacobean building with its 
clock tower has become a landmark in the Baltimore area. 



1 2, 



The modern five-story Albert S. Cook Library has well-developed 
holdings in the arts and sciences and teacher education. Towson's 
long history of teacher education is reflected in the extensive 
collections of bound volumes, reference works and periodicals in 
this field as well as substantial holdings in microfilm and micro- 
card. The collections of curriculum materials, text books, trade- 
books and audiovisual aids are particularly noteworthy. 

The Center for Asian Arts, located on the fifth floor of the 
library, will move to the new Fine Arts Building in the summer 
of 1973. 

3. Van Bokkelen Hall contains classrooms and faculty offices for 
the departments of speech and mass communication arts. 

4. Linthicum Hall, completed in 1967, is the largest classroom 
building on campus. It houses the departments of English, mod- 
ern languages, history, geography, political science, economics, 
sociology, and business administration. 

5. Smith Science Hall was first occupied in the fall of 1965. In- 
cluded in the building are biology, chemistry, physics, and 
science education offices, classrooms, laboratories, and speech 
function rooms such as student and faculty work and prepara- 
tion areas. The Watson-King Planetarium is on the top floor. 



2 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 




6. Lida Lee Tall Learning Resources Center, a laboratory school 
of grades K-6, greatly facilitates field studies of schools and 
children. The center's program also includes a nursery for four- 
year olds and a day-care center. 

7. Burdick Hall, the health and physical education building com- 
pleted in 1968, houses three gymnasiums, an Olympic size swim- 
ming pool, classrooms, and various training and dressing rooms. 

8. The Audiovisual Communications Building is the remodeled 
former Albert S. Cook Library. It contains the audiovisual 
communications department and the College Media Services 
which includes equipment and film rentals, television studios, 
and graphics and photography services. It is one of the best 
equipped audiovisual centers in the state. 

9. The College Center, a new three-story building opened in the 
fall of 1971, provides cultural and recreational activities for the 
entire campus. Located in the new center are the post office, 
book store, box office, dining areas for private and banquet size 
groups, bowling alleys, and a billiard room. 

For complete information concerning the College Center, 
please refer to the index. 

10. The Administration Building, a new three-story structure at the 
corner of Osier and Towsontown Boulevard, opened in 1972. 
It contains all of the principal administration offices and some 

I faculty offices. 

11. The Health Center contains on the lower level a foyer and wait- 
ing room, offices for the physicians, examination rooms, and 
physio-therapy equipment. There are eight beds available for 
in-patient care. 

12. The General Services Building, opened in the spring of 1970, 
contains offices for the directors of the physical plant and secu- 
rity, managers of fire and safety, housekeeping, transportation 
and grounds supervisor. 

Central Receiving and Central Stores are also located there. 
The building also houses maintenance and trade shops including 
electrical, carpentry and plumbing. 

13. Glen Esk, formerly the president's home, is now occupied by 
Counseling & Psychological Services. 

14. The Residence Halls : A total of 862 students are presently living 
in Prettyman Hall, Scarborough Hall, Ward Hall, West Hall, 
and the new residence tower. The additional residence halls, 
Richmond and Newell, are undergoing complete renovation. The 
completion of these buildings and the opening of the top floors 
of the new residence tower will increase the total student occu- 
pancy to approximately 1,200. 

15. The new $6.5-million Fine Arts Building opened in May, 1973, 
and houses the art, music and theatre arts departments as well 
as public performance areas and art galleries, studios, labora- 
tories and offices. 



FUTURE 
DEVELOPMENTS 



Located in one of the fastest growing areas of the county, the 
Towson State College enrollment is increasing rapidly. The College's 
1972 enrollment was 6,450 day students and 5,000 evening students 
including 2,000 graduate students. In addition, over 6,500 students 
enrolled for two five-week summer sessions. 



THE COLLEGE 3 



An optimal enrollment ceiling is under study which may suggest 
the college level off at 8,500 to 9,000 day time students. 

Construction funds are available for a new classroom building 
which will house the psychology and education departments, a new 
science building and a $7-million physical education building with 
construction scheduled to begin in 1973 for all of these new 
structures. 

The renovation of Richmond and Newell Halls also begins in 
1973. 




4 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Admission 




iii.?',7m^^ 



Admission to Towson State College is granted to all applicants whose 
academic and personal qualifications give promise of success in the 
College. Because of limited facilities, the College reserves the right 
to close admissions vi^hen no further space remains. It is therefore 
advisable for high school students to make their college choice at 
the close of their junior year or early in their senior year. 

Students seeking admission should file applications during the 
first semester of the senior year. Priority for admission will be 
given to those whose applications and admissions material are re- 
ceived by March 1. Admission for February is limited to students 
with advanced standing (one year or more of college work com- 
pleted). No application for February admission will be accepted 
after November 15. All admission material for February entrance 
must be received by December 1. 

Applicants with excellent records are granted admission on the 
basis of high school work completed, with the condition that the 
remaining high school work will be satisfactory. Candidates for 
admission to Towson State College are strongly urged to complete 
a college preparatory program in high school. 

The following are the admission requirements established by 
the Board of Trustees of the State Colleges. 

1. Admission to the State Colleges shall be determined without 
regard to race, color, religion, or sex. 

2. Admission : High school graduates 

A. Admission shall be granted to graduates of high schools on 
the basis of grades, rank, admission test scores, and such 
other evidence, including the recommendations of appropriate 
high school officials, as may be deemed indicative of the abil- 
ity of the applicant to complete a course of study in college 
leading to a degree. 

No admission offer shall be made prior to receipt of a candi- 
date's scores on the admission tests administered in the can- 
didate's senior year or subsequent thereto, except as herein 
provided. Early admission may be offered to not more than 
a maximum of twenty percent of the anticipated enrollment 
in the freshman class. Such an offer shall be made only to an 
applicant of demonstrated superior scholarship and promise, 
as evidenced by his record through the junior year and by 
his performance on the admission tests administered in his 
junior year or subsequent thereto. 

The tests to be used for admission purposes shall be the 
College Board Scholastic Aptitude Tests, effective with appli- 
cants for admission in September, 1967. 

Admission prior to graduation from high school shall be 
conditional upon completion of the high school curriculum in 
a manner that would qualify the student to admission under 
paragraph A. 

In the evaluation of academic credentials no preference shall 
be granted as between residents of the State, upon the basis 
of their places of residence. 

Completion of a college preparatory curriculum shall not be 
a condition of admission. High school graduates who have 
not followed a college preparatory curriculum, but whose 



B. 



D. 



E. 



grades, rank, and aptitude test scores indicate the potential 
to complete a college degree program, shall not be denied 
admission on that ground. 
Admission: non-graduates of high school 

Admission shall be granted to applicants who are not high school 
graduates on the basis of high school equivalence examinations, 
the admission test scores, and such other evidence, including the 
recommendations of appropriate persons, as may be deemed in- 
dicative of the ability of the applicant to complete a course of 
study in college leading to a degree. 
Admission : Out-of-state 

A maximum of fifteen percent of the total student body at each 
college may be composed of out-of-state students and foreign 
students not resident in Maryland. However, the college will be 
expected to meet its obligations to qualified resident students 
before approaching the maximum enrollment of out-of-state and 
non-resident foreign students. 
Foreign Students 

A. A foreign student not resident in the United States shall 
receive the same schedule of fees as an out-of-state resident. 

B. All foreign student applicants will be required to take the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language which is administered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Student Residency Classifications for Tuition Purposes 

A. General. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes for 
any given semester, an individual must have maintained 
his/her domicile in Maryland for at least six months imme- 
diately prior to the last date available for initial registration 
for that semester in the applicable State College. 

B. Domicile, 

(1) Establishment of domicile. The term "domicile" shall be 
synonymous with the term "residence." Domicile is a 
person's permanent place of abode ; namely, there must be 
an intention to live permanently or indefinitely in Mary- 
land. Domicile must be established in Maryland for a 
purpose independent of attendance at a State College. 

(2) Maintenance /change of domicile. For the purpose of 
residency for tuition purposes, only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

(a) A domicile in Maryland is lost when a new one is 
established elsewhere, or if an individual leaves the 
State with no intent to return to Maryland. After 
residing elsewhere for six months, regardless of in- 
tent to return, a student's status as a resident for 
tuition purposes is in question. 

(b) The domicile of a student shall be determined at the 
time of initial registration but may thereafter be 
changed for any subsequent semester if circumstances 
change in relation to these regulations. 

(c) The burden of proof of domicile shall necessarily 
rest with the student. 

(3) Domicile of a minor. The domicile of an unmarried, un- 
emancipated minor is normally that of the parent having 
custody of the minor. The following extenuating circum- 
stances shall apply: 



6 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 





(a) If both parents are deceased, the domicile of the 
minor shall normally be that of the legal guardian 
if one has been appointed. If no legal guardian has 
been appointed, the minor's domicile shall normally be 
that of the person in loco parentis to the minor. A 
person stands in loco parentis to a student when he 
has put himself in the situation of a lawful parent 
by assuming the obligations incident to the parental 
relation without going through the formalities neces- 
sary to legal adoption. The determination of such 
status will be made on a case by case basis by the 
responsible college official who will consider who has 
custody or control of the student, who is financially 
supporting the student, and who has assumed general 
responsibility for his/her welfare. 

(b) If the parent, legal guardian, or person in loco 
parentis (whichever is applicable) having custody 
of the minor changes his/her domicile to another 
state, the student shall be charged out-of-state tuition 
for any semester commencing six months after the 
person having custody changes his/her domicile. 

(c) A non-resident student who reaches the age of 
twenty-one while attending a State College does not 
qualify for classification as a resident for tuition 
purposes simply by virtue of having become an eman- 
cipated student. 

(d) An emancipated student is considered an adult for 
the purpose of determining his/her residence classi- 
fication. 

(e) The residence of a married minor shall be determined 
in the same manner as an adult. 

(4) Domicile of a ivoman. 

(a) A married woman must establish her domicile inde- 
pendently of her husband, even though they live 
jointly. 

(b) A divorced woman must establish her own domicile. 

(c) A separated woman must establish her own domicile. 

(d) A minor whose marriage is annulled takes on the 
domicile of her parent, legal guardian, or person in 
loco parentis. 

(e) A woman over twenty-one whose marriage is annulled 
is responsible for establishing her own domicile. 

(5) Emancipation. 

(a) Minors claiming emancipation from their parent, 
legal guardian, or person in loco parentis Tif appli- 
cable) must present one or more of the following 
documents to substantiate any claim of emancipation : 
(i) Proof of place and length of domicile in the State; 
(ii) Marriage Certificate; 

(iii) Court order declaring that a student under the 
age of twenty-one is emancipated from his/her 
parent or legal guardian, (A notarized letter and 
a copy of the previous year's tax return from the 
parent (s) or legal guardian may suffice if the 
costs of obtaining a court order place an undue 
financial burden on the student.) 



ADMISSION 7 



•A *- 



.^f<i' 




(b) Minors claiming emancipation must meet the domi- 
cile requirements of an adult. 

(6) Adults. A person twenty-one years of age or older is a 
resident if he/she has maintained continuous domicile 
in Maryland for six months immediately prior to the last 
date available for initial registration. 

(7) Military Personnel. 

(a) Members of the Armed Forces not from Maryland at 
the time of entrance into the Armed Forces and 
stationed in Maryland may be considered residents 
of this State if they establish domicile in Maryland. 

(b) The dependents of men and women in any branch of 
the Armed Forces who are stationed in Maryland and 
who have established domicile in the State six months 
prior to their first registration are granted residence 
status for tuition purposes. 

(c) A member of the Armed Forces who was a resident 
of Maryland at the time he/she entered the Armed 
Forces retains his/her residency status as long as 
he/she remains in the Armed Forces provided he/she 
does not establish domicile elsewhere. 

(d) An adult sent by a branch of the Armed Forces to 
a State College for the purpose of completing degree 
requirements may be granted residence status for 
tuition purposes. 

(8) Foreign Nationals. 

(a) Any foreign national holding a permanent United 
States immigrant visa must meet the domicile re- 
quirements of an adult or a minor, as applicable. 

(b) A foreign national possessing a student visa cannot 
be classified as a resident of Maryland. 

(c) The minor sons and daughters of citizens of other 
countries who are holders of a G-4 visa and whose 
parent (s) or legal guardian establish domicile in 
Maryland for a period of six months prior to regis- 
tration at a State College may be granted residence 
status for tuition purposes. 

(d) Adults on refugee visas of other countries may be 
granted Maryland residence status provided they 
establish domicile in the State for a period of six 
months prior to their first registration at a State 
College. Minors acquire the residence of their par- 
ent (s) or legal guardian. 

(9) Responsibility of Students. 

(a) Any student or prospective student in doubt con- 
cerning his/her residence status is responsible for 
receiving a ruling from the designated oflftcial at the 
applicable State College. 

(b) A student who alters his/her status from resident 
to non-resident, or vice-versa, has the responsibility 
of informing the designated official at the applicable 
State College. 

(c) The residency status of a student may be altered by 
the applicable State College on the basis of its own 
findings. 



8 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 




7. Admission: Advanced undergraduate standing 

A. An applicant for advanced undergraduate standing must 
present from a college or university regionally accredited or 
accredited by the Maryland State Department of Education, 
the last that he attended, a transcript and record showing 
he left in good standing. Credit shall be allowed for all courses 
that approximate the requirements of the particular college, 
or, if not offered at the college, are approved by the appro- 
priate department of the college, or, in the absence of an 
appropriate department, by the Admissions Committee of the 
college. No transfer credit shall be allowed for courses in 
which the applicant has earned a "D" or "F" grade. In all 
cases the applicant must spend the final year "in residence" 
at the college as a full-time student. Exemption from the 
preceding requirement may be granted on an individual basis 
by the Standards Committee, except that in no case shall 
transfer credit be allowed for courses in which the applicant 
has earned a "D" or "F" grade. 

B. It is the policy of the Board of Trustees that every effort 
shall be made to facilitate the transfer of graduates from 
the public community-junior colleges of the State of Maryland 
to the State Colleges. Such graduates who have pursued a 
transfer program and who have achieved an Associate in 
Arts Degree within four semesters in the case of full-time 
students, or the equivalent in the case of part-time students 
shall have priority over other transfer applicants for upper 
class standing. The equivalency of their credits shall be given 
a liberal interpretation. Nothing in this paragraph, however, 
shall be construed to allow transfer credit for courses in 
which the applicant has earned a "D" or "F" grade. 

*C. Every student must meet the general education requirements, 
departmental requirements and earn 128 credits in order to 
graduate. 

A maximum of 98 credits may be transferred to Towson 
State College from another regionally accredited institution; 
not more than 64 of these transfer credits may be from a 
two-year institution. The sequence in which the credits are 
obtained at 2-year and/or 4-year institutions does not affect 
in any way the determination of the previously stated total 
number of credits accepted for transfer. Transfer students 
are reminded of the rule that a minimum of 32 semester 
hours of upper division work is required for graduation. 

Towson State College students must obtain prior approval 
of the Academic Standards Committee to take courses at 
another institution for the purpose of transferring them for 
credit. In general the Committee will not approve taking 
courses for credit at a 2-year institution once junior status 
(64 credits) has been attained. 

D. Transfer credit will not be given for correspondence courses 
or for U.S. A. F.I. or military courses. Transfer credits will 
not be given for courses taken at a college or university which 
is not accredited by its regional association or the Maryland 
State Department of Education. 



*For specific details regarding this policy contact Secretary of the Academic 
Standards Committee or Director of Admissions, Towson State College. 



ADMISSION 9 



8. Admissions : Veterans 

Any recently discharged veteran, eligible for G.I. benefits who 
has a high school diploma or equivalency will be admitted regard- 
less of their previous academic record. Applicants should follow 
the regular admission procedures as outlined for freshmen, how- 
ever, they will not be required to take the S.A.T. examination. 
In addition, veteran applicants should submit a copy of their 
Form DD 214 as verification of military service. Veterans who 
have had college level work since their discharge must apply for 
admission as a transfer student. Priority for admission will be 
granted to veterans who are residents of the state of Maryland. 
Admission for out-of-state veterans will be on a space available 
basis. 



ADMISSIONS 1. An applicant may secure an application form from the guidance 
PROCEDURE office of the secondary school or from the Admissions Office of 

the College. 

2. The applicant should complete the personal part of the form and 
forward it with the application fee of ten dollars to the Director 
of Admissions. The Secondary School Record should be given 
to the high school counselor immediately upon submitting the 
application to the College. The high school counselor will com- 
plete this record and forward it to the Director of Admissions. 
The transfer applicant, in addition, should arrange to have for- 
warded an official transcript of his college work. 

3. The standardized test required for admission is the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. The 
applicant should arrange to have forwarded to the Director of 
Admissions the results of this test. Students should take the 
test in their senior year of high school (either the November, 
December, or January administration) . 



ADVANCED 

PLACEMENT AND 

CREDIT FOR 

ENTERING 

STUDENTS 



The College does not wish students to repeat work already taken. 
Entering freshmen who have had the opportunity for advanced 
work may receive advanced placement (and in some cases advanced 
credit) for this work. 

During the summer prior to registration or during the opening 
week, freshmen take placement tests in various fields, and registra- 
tion is based on the results of these tests. 

Students who would like advanced credit as well as advanced 
placement are required to take the Advanced Placement Tests of the 
College Entrance Examination Board in May of the senior year of 
secondary school. In addition, students wishing to continue studying 
a foreign language should arrange to take the Language Listening 
Examination along with the Advanced Placement Tests. The results 
of these tests are received by the College about July 15. They are 
reviewed, along with grades in these subjects, by the departments 
concerned, and when appropriate, placement and/or credit is granted. 
Prior to final registration students are notified about advanced 
placement and credit. Additional information may be obtained by 
contacting the Director of Admissions at Towson State College. 

A bulletin of information about the Advanced Placement Tests 
may be secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, 
P. 0. Box 592, Princeton, N.J. 



10 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



CREDIT FOR 

EXPERIENCE AND 

PREVIOUS 

LEARNING 



Departments are permitted to grant credit to students for experi- 
ence and previous learning when the student's achievement in a 
particular area is equal or is superior to that of a student having 
earned a C in the course taken. This is the level at which credit is 
generally granted to transfer students. While departmental stand- 
ards for the granting of credit for experience and previous training 
may exceed this minimum, credit may not be given when achieve- 
ment IS below C level work. Departments may also offer advanced 
placement with no credit given if they wish. 

When departments use standardized evaluative instruments 
such as CLEP, the College Board Advanced Placement Tests, or 
others, the same principle shall be adhered to. If the faculty mem- 
ber's evaluation reveals that the student's achievement is equal or 
superior to that of a student having earned a C in the course taken 
in a traditional way, the department will report the grade of PE 
to the Registrar on the form for granting course approval to 
students. 



EVALUATION 

OF TRANSFER 

CREDITS 



An applicant who has been admitted to the College as a transfer 
student will receive an evaluation of his previous course work from 
the Admissions Office with his letter of acceptance, or shortly 
thereafter. This evaluation will be preliminary in nature if the 
student is still taking course work. If the student accepts Towson's 
offer of admission, a final evaluation of transfer credit will be made 
upon receipt of the transcript showing his grades for the most 
recent semester. 

Upon receipt of his final evaluation, a student should carefully 
review its contents. If he has any questions or feels there is an 
error, he must so advise the Admissions Office within 30 days. In 
no case will changes, additions, or corrections be made to the evalua- 
tion after the student has completed his first semester at Towson 
State College. 



PLEDGE TO TEACH 
IN MARYLAND 



The tuition waiver program to encourage students to prepare for 
teaching positions in Maryland was abolished after 1 October 1972. 

All students enrolled under the tuition waiver agreements in 
the fall semester 1972 may continue their program to graduation 
providing they are continuously in good standing from the fall of 
1972 until graduation. 

Students who are required to interrupt their attendance after 
the fall semester 1972 would be able to resume the tuition waiver 
agreement providing the student had officially withdrawn from the 
College for a period not exceeding one year. 



EVENING Information pertaining to these programs may be obtained by refer- 
AND SUMMER ring to the Evening College Bulletin or the Summer Session Bulletin. 
PROGRAMS 



ADMISSION 11 



Expenses 



TUITION Those who enroll in the arts and sciences program, and those in 
teacher education program pay $100 per semester tuition. 

For out-of-state students the tuition is $325.00 per semester 
for enrollment in either the arts and sciences or teacher education 
program. 

Special students (normally those who register for less than 12 
semester hours) in the regular session, and all summer and evening 
session students pay $25 per credit hour each semester for under- 
graduate and $38.00 per credit hour for graduate work. 

Tuition charges and fees are subject to change at any time by 
action of the Board of Trustees. 



HOUSING AND 
BOARDING COSTS 



Students who live on campus pay a maximum of $587.50 for room 
and board for the academic semester. For all students who live off 
campus and who have been approved as resident students, the cost 
for meals varies for the academic semester. Various meal plans are 
available for your selection and vary in cost below the maximum 
listed above. 

As residence space becomes available, those students who are 
eligible to reside in residence will be requested to room in one of 
the halls. For those students who enter the residence hall after the 
beginning of a semester, the charge will be prorated for the re- 
mainder of the semester plus one week. 

Rates for living expenses are subject to change by the Board 
of Trustees. 



OTHER FEES 
AND EXPENSES 




A comprehensive fee of $118.00 is charged each full-time student 
each semester. The yearly fee is $236.00. This includes fees for 
student activities, athletics, college center, registration, and cur- 
riculum costs. 

A limited number of lockers are available upon request at the 
College Center for student use in Stephens Hall. The College as- 
sumes no responsibility for personal property placed in the lockers. 
Lockers to be used by students taking physical education courses 
are assigned by the Departments of Physical Education in Burdick 
Hall. College Center lockers are available for $1.00 per semester and 
may be obtained from the recreation office. 

A graduation fee of $15.00 for those receiving a bachelor's 
degree and a $30.00 fee for those receiving a master's degree, plan 
A (with thesis) $30.00, plan B (without thesis) $25.00. 

Dormitory students are assigned individual mail boxes. Each 
student shares a mail box with one or more students. There is a 
fee of $1.00 per student included in the comprehensive fee. 

A student is expected to buy the textbooks for his courses. 
They may be purchased in the College Bookstore. Students are 
required to buy gymnasium suits for the courses in physical 
education. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 is charged to any student who 
does not pre-register as prescribed. 

A late change of course fee of $5.00 is charged to students 
for making student-initiated changes in their academic schedule. 

Evening and summer students are charged $25.00 per credit 
hour and a $14.50 comprehensive fee for each semester. 



12 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



students enrolled in a practice teaching experience (student 
teaching) are charged $106 per practice experience. 

The Board of Trustees reserves the right to make any changes 
or adjustments in tuition, fees, or charges when such charges are 
deemed necessary. 



EXPENSES FOR 
MARYLAND 
RESIDENTS 



Arts and Sciences students and Teacher Education students 

Semester Semester 

I II Total 

for Year 

Comprehensive Fee $118.00^-- $118.00* $ 236.00* 

Tuition $100.00 $100.00 $ 200.00 

Total Day Students $218.00 $218.00 $ 436.00 

Room and Board $587.50 $587.50 $1175.00 

Total Boarding Students $805.50 $805.50 $1611.00 

•Because of rapidly increasing costs and virtually a standstill budget appropriation, 
it may be necessary to increase the comprehensive fee $50 to $100. 



PAYMENT OF FEES 



All checks or money orders should be made payable to Towson State 
College for the exact amount of the charges. All fees are due and 
payable at the time of registration. No student will be admitted to 
classes until such payment has been made. A late fee of $5.00 is 
charged when a check given in payment of fees is returned by 
the bank. 

Financial policy set by the Board of Trustees and supported by 
the Legislative Auditors of the State of Maryland states that all 
previous balances must be paid prior to registration for the follow- 
ing academic semester. 



ADVANCE Each applicant must pay a non-refundable application fee of $20.00 
PAYMENTS and no application will be processed without this fee or a valid 
waiver. 

A deposit of $40.00 for room reservation is required of appli- 
cants for housing upon notification from the Housing Office that 
space is available. This fee is applied to the final amount of room 
and board due at the time of registration. 

The above room deposit is refundable if the student cancels 
his application and notifies the Admissions Office, in writing, prior 
to June 30 for those entering in September and prior to December 
15 for those entering in February, or if the College denies admis- 
sion to the applicant. 

The fee is forfeited if notice of cancellation is received after 
June 30. 

All advance payments are sent to the Admissions Office. 



LIABILITY FOR 
UNPAID TUITION 



A Maryland student enrolled in the teacher education program who 
paid no tuition because of signing a pledge to teach in the State, is 
liable for unpaid tuition if he voluntarily withdraws from the 
teacher education program before graduation. 

If he leaves college before graduation or transfers to the arts 
and sciences program, he will be billed at the arts and sciences 
tuition rate for the education he obtained at the College. 

He may be released from the above tuition payment if he 
transfers to a Maryland institution which has a teacher education 
program approved by the State Department of Education and if he 



EXPENSES 13 



REFUNDS ON 
WITHDRAWAL 





reaffirms his pledge to teach for two years in the Maryland publi( 
schools upon graduation. Strict enforcement of the Teacher Waivei 
Contractual Agreement will be followed. 

A student withdrawing from the College must complete an official 
withdrawal card and file it in the Registrar's Office before he is 
entitled to any refund. 
Refund Policies 

1. Towson State College shall adhere to the following policies witl;' 
respect to refunds to students of tuition, room and board fees 
and other charges. 

2. The timing for effecting tuition refunds shall be as follows : 

a. Prior to registration and before classes start — all tuition and 
fees except the application/registration fee shall be refundec 
the student. 

b. Prior to the fifteenth calendar day of the official beginning of 
classes at the College — 100 percent of tuition, less a $10 admin- 
istrative cost fee and $25 application fee, shall be refunded 
the student. 

c. Beginning with the fifteenth day after the official beginning 
of classes at the college to mid-semester, as shown on the col- 
lege calendar — 50 percent of tuition, less a $10 administrative 
cost fee and $25 application fee, shall be refunded the student. 

d. After mid-semester — no tuition shall be refunded the student, 

3. The same time span shall be utilized for fee refunds, except that: 

a. Registration/application fee — non-refundable, 

b. Room Deposit fee — non-refundable after July 1 prior to the 
fall semester. 

Room Rent fee — non-refundable. 
Student Union fee — non-refundable. 
Auto Registration fee — non-refundable. 
Student Activity fee — non-refundable. 

g. Curriculum fee — non-refundable. 

h. Athletic fee — non-refundable. 

i. Applied fees (private instruction) — non-refundable. 

j. Board fee shall be pro-rated on a weekly basis, plus one week 

up to mid-semester — thereafter, non-refundable, 
k. Key Deposit fee — 100 percent refundable. 

The timing for effecting tuition and fee refunds for summer! 
sessions shall be the same as for regular sessions except that for' 
a period not to exceed fifteen calendar days after the official 
beginning of classes at the College, only 50 percent of the tuition 
shall be refunded the student. Beginning with the fifteenth day 
after the official beginning of classes at the College, no tuition 
shall be refunded the student. 

Individuals who register for a full schedule and who drop courses 1 
after the official beginning of classes at the College shall not be 
entitled to a refund based on a credit-hour charge. 
Any student dismissed by a college for disciplinary reasons shall 
not be entitled to any tuition or fee refund. 



14 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



student Personnel Program 

The central purpose of the Personnel Program is to promote the 
kind of environment in which college students may develop into 
mature, well-balanced citizens, self-disciplined and aware of the life- 
long process of education and individual fulfillment. The program 
fosters student initiative, student responsibility and the rights of 
students to plan and execute. It provides opportunities for student 
involvement, for creativity, for accomplishment, and fosters a cli- 
mate conducive to intellectual stimulation and growth. The program 
also provides services for those students who meet difficulties they 
themselves cannot resolve. 



ADVISEMENT 



During the Orientation-Registration period, freshmen, transfers, 
and re-entry students are familiarized with the academic policies 
and procedures of the college by student advisors as well as by the 
Director of Advising. 

An advising program is also available for minority students 
under the study skills support services center. Additional informa- 
tion can be found on page 41. 



Students Who Have Selected a Major 

Immediately upon deciding upon a major, the student should go to 
the department of that major to choose, or be assigned a faculty 
member who will serve as his advisor for the remaining years the 
student is in college. 

Arts and Sciences majors are assigned advisors through the 
coordinators of that program, the Associate Academic Deans. 

Students Who Have Not Selected a Major 

Students who have not chosen a major also need to discuss profes- 
sional, and educational problems with faculty advisor. Therefore, 
any student without a major who needs academic advice will be 
assigned through the Office of the Associate Dean of Students. 



COUNSELING 
CENTER 



In recognition of the principle that educational experience encom- 
passes all aspects of human behavior, the Counseling Center has 
been established to help students develop social and emotional 
maturity. 

Services of trained counselors are available to students who 
feel themselves to be in need of assistance in making personal, edu- 
cational or career decisions. In a confidential and accepting climate, 
the student is afforded the opportunity to gain deeper insight into 
his needs and goals. 

In addition to individual counseling, the center offers a program 
of group counseling, limited testing facilities, and extensive voca- 
tional and educational information. 

The center staff participates in student and faculty activities 
which are concerned with the mental health of the college com- 
munity. 

15 



FINANCIAL AID The Financial Aid Office at Towson State College believes that it 
is the responsibility of both the student and his parents to pay 
college expenses. Financial aid may be designed to supplement, hut 
not replace, these primary resources. Therefore, most of TSC's aid 
programs are based on the financial need of the family. 

The nationally standardized procedures suggested by the Col- 
lege Scholarship Service (CSS) through its Parents Confidential! 
Statement are utilized to demonstrate need. This program is based; 
on need analysis procedures required and approved by Federal law. 
Independent students use the Student Financial Statement (SFS) 
and a parental statement of non-support (College Supplement Form 
B) to demonstrate need. Please check with the Financial Aid Office 
to determine if you may file as an independent student. 

Application Procedures for Financial Aid Programs 

Incoming freshmen should obtain the Parents Confidential State- 
ment (PCS) from their high school counselors or from the TSC 
Financial Aid Office. A TSC Form A application supplement must 
be sent to the TSC Financial Aid Office before processing may be 
completed. Upperclassmen should apply directly to the Financial 
Aid Office for a renewal PCS and Form A. Independent students 
should submit a Student Financial Statement (SFS) in addition 
to the Form A and Non-Support Statement, Form B, all of which 
are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office. (All 
appropriate forms must be on file before processing begins) . There 
is a $3.75 processing fee for the PCS and $3.50 fee for the SFS, 
payable to the College Scholarship Service at the time the applica-j 
tion is filed. (Fees are subject to change) . 1 

All prospective freshmen and transfer students should file their 
TSC financial aid application when they submit their TSC admis- 
sions application although financial aid applications will not be 
processed by the College until the student has been oflTered and 
accepted admission. Applications for all financial aids by freshmen 
students should reach our Office by April 1 for the following school 
year. Deadline for applications by transfer students is May 1. 
Applications for summer should reach our Office before April 1. 
(Please note that 4 to 5 weeks processing time by CSS must be 
allowed in meeting these office deadlines). Students who are ad- 
mitted as new students after April 1 may be given consideration 
for funds after the deadline date. After April 1, we cannot assure 
immediate processing nor announcement of results prior to the 
beginning of the school year. If funds are still available, necessity 
cases will be processed during the school year. 

Federal Aid Programs 

The National Direct Student Loan Program. (Formerly National' 
Defense Student Loan) makes up to $7500 in five years available 
on a loan basis to undergraduate-students and $10,000 aggregate 
for graduate students who have proven financial need. There is no 
interest charge on this loan as long as the student continues in at 
least half-time status, but there is interest of 3% beginning ten 
months after the student leaves school. The recipient may have up 
to ten years to repay the loan following his or her departure from 
school. Special education teachers and teachers teaching in eco- 
nomically and culturally deprived areas may receive a specified 

16 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 





percentage cancellation of principal for each teaching year up to 
100^;. The money cannot be received until the student is registered 
for the semester for which the loan is granted. 

Sirpplemental Educational Opportimittj Grants. TEOG) These are 
out-right grants to students with exceptional financial need. These 
grants may provide up to half of the actual need of the student and 
do not have to be repaid. The other half of the actual need must be 
met by scholarships, college loans, employment, Work-Study jobs 
or other aids, or the grant may not be received. Eligible students 
who are accepted for enrollment on a half or full-time basis may 
receive EOG consideration. 

The College Work-Study Program CCWS) makes jobs available to 
students with exceptional financial need. These jobs are usually 
assigned as part of the "Financial Aid Package." If at all possible, 
students are placed in positions that are related to their academic 
major or special interest. Employment may be obtained in depart- 
mental offices on-campus and non-profit private or governmental 
agencies on a contracted arrangement off-campus. 
Basic Opportunity Grants CBOG) provide grant funds to eligible 
students equaling the lesser of $1400 or one-half the institution's 
cost minus the expected family contribution or 50-60^ of the 
student's need. TThe difference between total cost and family 
contribution). 

The Law Enforcement Education Program CLEEP) provides loans 
of up to $1800 per academic year and grants up to $300 per semester 
for college studies by police, courts, and corrections employees and 
students preparing for careers in these law enforcement fields. Addi- 
tional information and applications for LEEP can be obtained in 
the Financial Aid Office. Deadline for loans in April 1 for the follow- 
ing academic year. Deadline for grants is one month prior to 
registration. 

The Nursing Student Loan and Scholarship Program provides 
financial assistance to full and part time students of exceptional 
need who plan to undertake courses of study leading to careers in 
nursing. The maximum scholarship or loan to be received is $2500 
per academic year depending upon financial need. The student must 
be accepted into the nursing program (usually the second semester 
of the sophomore year) before being eligible to apply under the 
Loan and Scholarship Program. 

State Programs 

Other Race Grant (ORG) An out-right grant for minority students, 
attending on a full-time basis, who are legal residents of Maryland 
and have financial need. These grants are usually awarded as part 
of the "Financial Aid Package." Applicants should follow the pro- 
cedure for applying for the Federal aid programs. The deadline 
is April 1. 

The Maryland Higher Educatioyi Loan Program is geared toward 
the family with less actual financial need, but who desires to utilize 
credit to meet college expenses. These bank loans provide up to 
$1250 per year for undergraduates and $1500 for graduate stu- 
dents. If the applicant can demonstrate financial need (through the 
financial aid application procedure) the Federal Government will 
pay the 7*^ interest on these loans as long as the student is in school 



STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 17 





and for nine months after graduation or leaving school (regardless 
of reason for departure) . If the applicant cannot demonstrate need, 
he may still qualify for the loan but not for the Federal interest 
subsidy. Applications may be received and must be processed by the 
Financial Aid Office before final arrangements for the loan are made 
with the bank. Further information may be received from the 
Financial Aid Office. There is no deadline for applying. 

State Scholarships 

A. The Teacher Tuition Waiver (Pledge) is abolished as of October 
1, 1972. Only students who signed the Pledge prior to that date 
may continue on the program. 

B. The state of Maryland each year awards General State and 
House of Delegates Senatorial Scholarships to legal residents 
of the state. Interested high school students should consult their 
school counselors. Students presently enrolled at Towson State 
College may obtain an application from the Financial Aid Office 
or the State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Balti- 
more, Maryland. The application deadline is December 1 for 
the following academic year. 

C. War Orphan and Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Students 
are entitled to financial assistance if they qualify for either oi 
the above programs. Eligible students should report the fact 
immediately to the Comptroller's Office of the College. 

D. Professional School Scholarships are available to TSC students 
majoring in Nursing. Further information should be obtained 
from the TSC Financial Aid Office. 

College Programs 

Ed^vard Moultin Fund. This fund is a short term loan fund whereby 
a student may borrow up to $75.00 without interest. Applications 
may be secured from the Financial Aid Office. There is no deadline. 
College Loan Fund. The College Loan Fund is designed to assist 
students on a short term basis. Loans are based on financial need 
and may be given up to a maximum of $400. Loans are made at 2% 
interest while the student is in school. Applications may be secured 
from the Financial Aid Office. There is no deadline. (Regulations 
are subject to change). The Sarah E. Richmond Loan Fund was 
established by Sarah E. Richmond, who was affiliated with the Col- 
lege for 50 years as student, teacher, principal, and dean of women. 
This fund has been increased by gifts from the Alumni Association. 
The "College Loan Fund was made by contributions from the follow- 
ing: the Class of 1900 Memorial to Katherine Muhlback, the Class 
of 1925, the Normal Literary Society, the Pestalozzi Society, the 
Reese Arnold Memorial, the Lillian Jackson Memorial, the Esther 
Sheel Memorial (Class of 1927), the Carpenter Memorial, the 
Eunice K. Crabtree Fund (gift of the Class of 1931), the Pauline 
Rutledge Fund (gift of the Class of 1934) , the Pearle Blood Fund 
(gift of the Class of 1940), the 1933 Gift Loan Fund of Faculty 
and Students, the Gertrude Carley Memorial, Washington County 
Alumni, the Grace Boryer Downin Fund, the Class of 1941 Fund, 
the Martha Richmond Fund, the Towerlight Fund, the M. Clarice 
Berch Fund (gift of the Class of 1951), the Bettie^ Sipple Fund 
sponsored by the Maryland Federal of Women's Clubs, the Lucy 



18 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 




Scott Memorial Fund, the James B. O'Toole, Jr. Memorial Loan 
Fund, the Ellen Pratt Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund, the Rodgers 
Forge PTA Loan Fund in memory of Ellen Pratt Hamilton, the 
Mrs. Carrie Gischel Obrecht Beta Delta Loan Fund, and periodic 
contributions from the Alumni Association. There also exists a loan 
fund for music education majors and a Student Government Asso- 
ciation Loan fund administered by the Treasurer of the S.G.A. 
College Scholarships. The Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships were 
established by the will of Mrs. Linthicum, widow of J. Charles 
Linthicum, who was a member of the class of 1886. The fund is 
administered by the trustees of the estate and the Financial Aid 
Office. All entering and continuing students are eligible to qualify 
for these sixty awards. The Edith C. Sheridan Scholarship, estab- 
blished by Mrs. Sheridan, a member of the class of 1906, is also 
administered by the Financial Aid Office. One upper-class student 
may receive the Minnie V. Medwedeff Endowment Scholarship. This 
award is made annually to an outstanding student selected by the 
trustees of the fund. The scholarship was established in memory 
of Minnie V. Medwedeff by her father. Miss Medwedeff was an 
instructor in the College from 1924 until her death in 1935. 
Regular Student Employment. (Other than Work-Studyj positions 
as well as off-campus job positions are maintained on the Job 
Boards in the Financial Aid Office and the College Center. The 
on-campus jobs may be in the various areas throughout the College. 
Clearance from the Financial Aid Office is required. All students on 
the College payroll must be in good standing. The off-campus jobs 
are posted on the Job Boards and are received from outside organi- 
zations during the academic year and summer. These jobs include 
work for a variety of community agencies and stores and summer 
camp experiences. 



HEALTH SERVICES 



Health Services are maintained in a modern two-story building 
located on campus. For specific information, the student is referred 
to the Health Center Booklet which is distributed to all new students. 

For more serious illnesses, the student will be referred to his 
or her home or hospital for definitive treatment. With the student's 
knowledge and consent, the staff works closely with the parents and/ 
or family physician in all important illnesses or accidents. 

The professional staff consists of college physicians, college 
psychiatrists, registered and practical nurses. Physician Services 
are available daily during office hours, and in emergency situations 
at any time. 

A completed medical record is required of all students prior to 
the time of their admission. Certain exceptions may be made for 
those applicants whose religious principles preclude compliance and 
whose affiliation with an organization is official. Additional exami- 
nations are given when conditions warrant. A student is expected 
to correct remediable defects as soon as possible, preferably before 
the opening of the college year. 

Annual chest X-rays or other proof of freedom from tubercu- 
losis (i.e. a negative tuberculin test) are compulsory for all students. 
Health education and prevention of illness and accident are essential 
parts of the college health program. 

The College assumes no financial responsibility for illness of 
sufficient seriousness to require hospitalization. X-rays, or special 



STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 19 







ORIENTATION 



treatment. The College does not assume financial responsibility for 
any injury incurred upon the athletic field or in any physical edu 
cation class. 

A student who has a physical condition which prevents complete 
participation in the regular physical education program may be 
permitted upon authorization of the College Physician and the 
Academic Standards Committee to take a modified program or to be 
exempt from physical education requirements. 

Accident Insurance 

For the benefit of those students who wish to participate, the College 
enters into an agreement with an approved insurance company to 
cover students against any accidental injury either at College or at 
home during the academic year. Participation in the plan is volun 
tary and costs approximately $25.00 per year. Students desiring 
this coverage should make application at the Comptroller's Office, 
Students planning to major in physical education or participate in 
intramural activities are required to enroll in the insurance program 

Mental Health 

Psychiatric services are available to all students without charge at 
the campus Mental Health Service. Psychiatrists from Sheppard 
Pratt Hospital are in offices at the Health Center every day for 
appointments with students who wish to see a psychiatrist for brief 
consultation or short-term therapy. Often problems can be resolved 
quickly, but psychological testing, longer-term therapy, or other 
referrals can be arranged if needed. 

All contacts with the Mental Health Service are entirely con 
fidential. Students may make their own appointments by contacting 
the Health Center nurse in person or by telephone. 

In addition, the Mental Health Service is available to work with, 
various groups on campus in regard to mental health concerns in 
specific areas or in the college community as a whole. Students who 
wish to have psychiatric collaboration or participation in their 
activities may feel free to request this service by contacting the 
Supervisor of the Mental Health Service, at the Health Center. 

The purpose of the Orientation program is to help the student make 
the optimal educational choices, to help him or her explore possible 
ways of reducing anxieties about coming to college, and to familiar- 
ize the student with some of the policies, college services, and 
options that are available to a member of the Towson State College 
community. 

To accomplish these goals, a student attends an orientation 
session. The student takes the Self-Directed-Search, a self-scored 
educational and vocational guidance instrument; then discussion 
groups about relevant fields of study and plans for the future are 
held. 

In connection with the Advising program, possible courses of 
study are discussed with student and faculty advisors in a free and 
open type atmosphere. 

There are also on-going group discussions about problems the 
student may face in coming to college, led by students especially 
trained in Leadership. 



20 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



The options a student has are discussed — e.g., opportunities 
for switching majors, for spending less or more than four years 
at college or for helping change policies. 

Thus Orientation is an opportunity for the students to learn 
about Towson State, to examine his or her goals and to discuss them 
with faculty and other students in an open, supportive situation. 



RESIDENCE 
PROGRAM 




The purpose of the Residence Program is to provide living facilities 
for full-time undergraduate students and to provide educational 
programs and activities which supplement the academic mission of 
the college. The Residence Staff and the elected executive councils 
of the Resident Student Government Association strive to maintain 
an environment conducive to the individual's achievement of aca- 
demic goals and development of self-reliance and leadership. The 
elected Resident Student's Judicial Board handles cases involving 
violation of college policies. Upon recommendation of the Judicial 
Board and its acceptance by College authorities, a student may be 
required to leave residence. 

A referral service for off-campus housing is provided through 
the Residence Office. Students in need of off-campus housing may 
obtain listings of rooms and apartments available in the Towson 
area. 

Priority for campus residence is given to students who reside 
beyond a twenty-mile radius of any four-year state institution. 
Priority for space assignment is given to students participating in 
the Living-Learning programs. 

All resident students must sign a yearly contract for college 
housing. Acceptance to residence is on a yearly basis, and not for 
the duration of a student's college career. A student who withdraws 
from residence forfeits his reserve space but may reapply should 
he wish to return. 

Residence facilities are available to students only when classes 
are in session. No student is permitted to remain in residence more 
than forty-eight hours after he has ceased attending classes. 

Additional information may be found in the brochure. Housing 
at Towson State College, and the publication, Handbook for Resi- 
dence Living. 



CAREER 

PLANNING AND 

PLACEMENT 



The Placement Office is a centralized service for all departments of 
the college. The purpose of the Placement Office is to assist all 
students of Towson State College in securing employment. 

The Placement Office furnishes occupational and vocational in- 
formation and provides career counseling for all interested students, 
arranges for an on-campus recruiting program to bring employers 
to the campus to meet the students, informs students of job oppor- 
tunities, and keeps on file credentials for all students utilizing the 
services of the Placement Office. 



COLLEGE CENTER 



The complexity of society, campus bureaucracies, advances in com- 
munication, increasing enrollments, professional pressures on fac- 
ulty, and changes within individuals are producing impersonal 
communities of intellectuals. The College Center facilities are de- 
signed to overcome the impersonalization of the large college, serving 
both as an educational center for out-of-class activities and also as 



STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 21 





a service center. The College Center as a program is organic, vital, 
changing, and alive. The Center houses educational and cultural 
programs of value for the entire academic community, which com 
plement programs offered in the classroom. The Center is also the 
place where resident and commuting students can establish their 
social activities, relax, and make the out-of -class time in their lives 
meaningful. The College Center displays, through its facilities and 
programs, to its various publics the character of the institution it 
serves. 

The first level of the three-story brick structure includes a 
Snack Bar, Bookstore, Vending Area, Post Office, Dry Cleaning 
Service, Locker Rooms, Music and Study Lounge, T.V. Lounge, 
Billiards and Games Room, and eight bowling lanes. The second and 
main level of the building includes a cafeteria, a Special Dining 
Room and Lounge, Art Gallery, spacious main lounge area, studenlj 
organization offices, campus reservations offices, College Box Office 
and College Center administrative offices. The third level of th( 
building contains the Studies Skills Center, eight conference rooms 
a photographic laboratory, a reception lounge, and a large multij 
purpose room which is divisible into three sections. Covered decl 
areas, lobbies, patios, and fountains round out the Center. 

Although many may come to the Center for food, it differs fron 
other campus buildings in the following respects: Individuals foi 
the most part must choose to come to the Center. The activitie, 
housed in the building are extra-curricular and voluntary. The stu 
dents participating in special interest or governmental groups havi 
an opportunity to experiment, assume responsibility, interact witl 
the faculty and administration and by so doing come to know mor 
about themselves and the College. 



College Box Office 

The College Box Office Manager provides students, faculty, an 
administrators with a discounted ticket service to the local theaters 
The manager will arrange for the purchase of any tickets for recog 
nized groups on campus. The Manager also handles the studer 
sponsored activity tickets and arranges for off -campus travel c 
student groups. 



Post Office 

The Post Office is located on the first level of the College Center. A 
resident students and commuter students who desire are assign* 
a mailbox and combination to that box. 



College Book Store 

The College Book Store is located in the College Center and carri 
a complete line of books, trade fiction, non-fiction paperbacks, refe 
ence, technical, and course outlines and aids. 

Also for sale are general school supplies, typewriters, leatb 
goods, college clothing, gifts, records, and toiletries. The Collej 
Store also carries a complete line of art supplies and a wide selecti< 
of arts prints. Framing materials are also available. 



22 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



The Student Government Association is the governmental organ of 
the student body. It is an integral part of the college community 
and is recognized as a contributing organization in the overall 
government of the College. 

Upon enrollment at Towson, each full-time student automati- 
cally becomes a member of the SGA. The organization consists of 
an executive committee, composed of the President, Vice President 
and Treasurer of the SGA and various appointed officers, and a 
Student Senate composed of eighteen senators elected from each 
class. 

The broad objectives of the SGA are outlined in the Preamble 
of the Student Government Association Constitution: 

1. To improve student awareness and welfare. 

2. To foster the recognition of the rights and responsibilities of 
students. 

3. To responsibly fulfill those privileges of self-government. 

The activities of the Student Government Association primarily 
concern the educational experience of the student, as a member of 
the College community, both in and out of the classroom. These 
activities are justified in a collegiate setting by the extent to which 
they contribute to the educational experience of each student. All 
students are invited to aid the SGA in their expressed goals and 
objectives. 



STUDENT 
ORGANIZATIONS 




Groups of students may feel free to meet in campus facilities. In 
order to be recognized as a College organization, however, their 
constitution must be approved by the SGA. 

Recognized student groups include music organizations, honor- 
ary societies and fraternities, organizations related to an academic 
field, political organizations, religious organizations, service orga- 
nizations, social fraternities, athletic organizations, and special 
interest organizations. 

Student publications are: Talisman, a literary magazine; 
Towerlight, the weekly official student newspaper; Tower Echoes, 
the yearbook; Gold and White, the official student handbook; the 
Journal of International Affairs; the Student Telephone Directory 
and the Who's Who of Student Leaders. 

Athletic Activities 

Towson State College is committed to comprehensive intercollegiate 
and intramural athletic programs for men as integral parts of the 
student's total educational experience. An opportunity is provided 
for all students who desire to participate. The College is a member 
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the Mason-Dixon 
Conference. The varsity schedules include many of the finest uni- 
versities and colleges in the East. Competition on the varsity level 
includes football, soccer, cross country, basketball, wrestling, swim- 
ming, gymnastics, baseball, lacrosse, tennis, track and golf. Facili- 
ties and leadership are provided for intramural sports during all 
seasons. Students are encouraged to participate according to their 
interest. 

The Women's Physical Education Department and the Women's 
Athletic Association promote an active sports program for all women 
enrolled at Towson State College. The intramural and varsity pro- 
gram is organized to include a variety of activities: archery, bad- 

STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM 23 



minton, basketball, bowling, dance, fencing, field hockey, golf, gym- 
nastics, lacrosse, softball, swimming, tennis and volleyball. Special 
events conducted by the Women's Athletic Association each year 
include: dance recitals, ski trips, camping outings, and the annual 
banquet. 



24 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 




Academic Regulations 



REGISTRATION 



Each student is assigned a time to register. Students are not per- 
mitted to attend classes without having completed registration. A 
late registration fee is assessed for registering after the time as- 
signed and within the late registration period. Students are expected 
to discharge all financial obligations to the institution before being 
permitted to register. 



TRANSFER CREDIT 



Credit is accepted for a course completed at any accredited college 
or university if it is equivalent to a course taught at Towson State 
College or acceptable as an elective and if the final mark is "C" or 
higher. This credit will count toward graduation but will not be 
used in computing the academic average required for graduation. 
Transfer students may obtain specific information from Director 
of Admission. Towson State College students must obtain prior 
approval from Academic Standards Committee. 



CREDIT HOURS 



The unit of credit is the semester hour. It is defined as one 50- 
minute class per week (or its equivalent) for one semester. A three- 
hour class meets three 50-minute periods or two 75-minute periods 
a week for one semester. Laboratory and studio classes normally 
require two or three hours in class as the equivalent of one semester 
hour. Two hours of preparation is usually necessary for each hour 
in class for the average student. 



PROGRAM Students in good standing in either the teacher education or the 
TRANSFER arts and sciences program may transfer to the other program by 
filing a request form with the Registrar, as Secretary to the Aca- 
demic Standards Committee. Upon approval of the Academic Stand- 
ards Committee, the transfer will be effective for the semester 
following the one in which the request is made. 

Those wishing to transfer to the arts and sciences program will 
be obligated in the amount of $100 for each semester of work com- 
pleted in the teacher education program if the teaching pledge was 
signed in lieu of tuition payment. 



EXEMPTION FROM 

REQUIRED 

COURSES 



STUDENT LOAD 



Believing that students should not be required to devote time to 
courses the substances of which they have mastered, the College 
provides opportunity to qualify for exemption from required courses. 
Towson students may apply through the Dean of the College to be 
examined for exemption, from courses required of all students and 
those required in a major field. The department concerned and the 
Director of Research and Testing cooperate in the evaluation. When 
exempted, the student is privileged to choose an elective in any 
department or an advanced course in the same department. Required 
courses in the following fields are at present involved in this plan: 
biology, English, geography, mathematics, music, speech, history, 
political science, and sociology. Credit for Experience and Previous 
Learning is an option also open to students. See Admission, page 11. 

The normal student load is 15-18 semester hours of credit each 
semester. 



25 



students may take up to 19 semester hours for credit. It is 
suggested that students possess a minimum cumulative average of 
2.00 to take 18 semester hours and a cumulative average of 2.50 to 
take 19 semester hours. 

Students w^ith a 3.25 cumulative average based on at least 30 
hours taken at Towson State College may carry 20 hours. In his 
last semester of his senior year a student may carry 20 semester 
hours provided the number is necessary to be graduated and pro- 
vided his cumulative average is 2.50 or better. 

Students with a 3.50 cumulative average or better, based on at 
least 30 hours taken at Tovi^son State College may carry 21 hours. 

No student will be permitted to carry more than 21 hours or 
less than 12 hours except by special permission of the Academic 
Standards Committee. 

Students must have the approval of the Registrar to register 
for more than 19 semester hours during any one semester. 



AUDITING A student may audit a course with the permission of the instructor 

COURSES of the course. No credit may be earned in a course which is audited. 

Audited courses will not appear on the student's record. Students 

who wish to take the course for credit may do so only during the 

Change of Schedule Period as an added course. 



CHANGE OF 

COURSE 

SCHEDULE 



WITHDRAWAL 
FROM A COURSE 



All changes in a student's schedule of courses (adding or dropping 
a course or a change in sections or credits) are valid only if the 
student completes the Course Schedule Change Form and files it 
with the Registrar. Failure to do so will result in a grade of "NC 
in the course dropped and no credit in the course added. The grade 
will appear on the Grade Roster of the course, the student's Perma- 
nent Record. 

No student may enter a class after the first week of classes. 
Exceptions to this will be considered only after approval of the 
department chairman of the course involved and the Dean of the 
College. 

Entering freshmen wishing to obtain waiver of courses for the 
honors plan may arrange to take Advanced Placement Tests of the 
College Entrance Examination Board in fields in which they feel 
qualified. Arrangements to take these examinations in May of the 
high school senior year may be made through the school counselor 
or through the College Entrance Examination Board, P. 0. Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 



Students wishing to drop a course may do so as follows: 

Students may drop up to the end of the first two weeks oi 
classes and no grade will be recorded. 

Students who have not dropped a course at the end of the 
first two weeks of classes may withdraw from a course up tc 
three weeks after the mid-semester date. Students withdrawing 
during this period will have the grade of "W" recorded for th( 
course. This grade may be removed by repeating the course. 

Students registered for a course who do not drop or with 
draw during th periods referred to above must receive grades 
of A, B, C, D, NC or I as determined by the faculty member. 



26 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



CLASSIFICATION Students are classified according to the number of semester hours 
OF STUDENTS passed as follows: freshmen, 0-30 semester hours; sophomores, 
30-60 semester hours; juniors, 60-90 semester hours; seniors, 90 
semester hours or above. 



MARKING AND 
POINT SYSTEM 





A four-point system is used to identify quality of academic work. 
The letter "A" designates work of superior quality; "B", work of 
good quality; "C", work of satisfactory quality; "D", work of less 
than satisfactory quality but allowable for credit, subject to the 
restrictions under the Degree Requirements; "NC", work of such 
unsatisfactory quality that no credit is given. The mark of "S" (Sat- 
isfactory) or "NC" is given for non-credit courses or student teach- 
ing. The mark of "PA" (Pass) or "NC" (No Credit) is given for 
the courses elected on the Pass Option. The mark of "PE" is given 
for courses passed under the Credit for Experience or Prior Train- 
ing option. All grades are recorded on the student permanent record. 

A mark of I, (incomplete because of illness or other reason be- 
yond control of student) at the end of a semester carries no credit. 
Unless such a course is satisfactorily completed within six months 
of the last day of class for the course, the grade for the course 
becomes "NC". It is the responsibility of the student to make 
arrangements to complete course requirements for the removal of 
the "I". 

In computation of grade point averages the following quality 
point values are used: 

A — 4 quality points C — 2 quality points 

B — 3 quality points D — 1 quality point 

Grades of "I", "NC", "PA", "PE", "W" and "S" are not used in 
computation of averages. 

The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the hours 
of credit in a course by the points assigned to the grade earned in 
the course. Totaling the credit hour points for all courses passed in 
the semester, and dividing the total number of points by the total 
number of hours of credit passed yields the grade-point average 
for the semester. For example : 

(4 points each) 16 points 

(3 points each) 12 points 



4 hours 


of 


A 


4 hours 


of 


B 


3 hours 


of 


C 


3 hours 


of 


D 


2 hours 


of 


NC 



14 Total hours passed 



(2 points each) 6 

(1 point each) 3 

(No Credit Given) 

37 



points 
points 



Total 
points 

average for 



this 



Dividing 37 by 14, the student's grade-point 
semester is found to be 2.64. 

The student's cumulative grade-point average is found by 
dividing the total points earned in all courses completed at Towson 
by the total number of credit hours passed (including hours at- 
tempted prior to 1 September 1970) at Towson. For example: a 
junior has passed 76 credit hours and has earned a total of 190 
points. His cumulative grade-point average is 2.50. 

A cumulative grade-point of at least 2.00 is required for 
graduation. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 27 



STANDARDS OF 
WORK REQUIRED 



Philosophical Premises i 

Academic Standards are set to insure that a degree from Towson^ 
signifies student work meeting or exceeding a particular level of; 
excellence. 

The intent is to reinforce appropriate learning behavior, and 
to help the student work independently and develop intellectually in 
a variety of ways. 



STANDARDS FOR 
FULL-TIME 
STUDENTS 




Repeating of Courses 

Students may repeat any course only once where credit has been 
earned or a mark of "NC" or "W" has been awarded. When the 
course is repeated, the student will receive the credits for the course 
counted once and the higher of the two grades if repeated for the 
first time after 1 September 1970. Students repeating courses must 
indicate this at the time of registration. Upon completion of the 
repeated course a change of grade form must be submitted to the 
Registrar by the student concerned. The lower of the marks earned 
is not maintained on the student permanent record. Courses taker: 
for which creditws received with a letter grade may not be repeated 
under the pass/no credit option. 



In order to remain in the college, a student must possess the re 
quired minimum credits in relation to semesters of study as indi 
cated in Table I and have a cumulative grade point average as 
indicated in Table II. 

Table I 

REQUIRED MINIMUM CREDITS THAT MUST BE PASSED 

IN RELATION TO SEMESTERS OF STUDY 



Semester of Study 
Two 
Four 
Six 
Eight 
Ten 



Required Minimum 

Credits Passed 

18 

40 

66 

96 

Degree requirements 

must be completed 



Table II 
MINIMUM GRADE POINT AVERAGE TO BE IN COLLEGE 



Minimum GPA 
To Be in College 

1.00 

1.25 

1.50 

1.67 

1.78 

2.00 



Minimum Lev€ 

of Satisfactorj 

Progress 

1.85 

1.85 

1.85 

1.95 

1.95 

2.00 



TRANSFER The expected minimum number of credits passed for transfer stu 

STUDENTS dents will be determined by dividing the number of credits trans 

ferred in by 15, rounding the answer to the nearest lower whol 

number, and relating it to Table III. (Required Minimum Credit 

Passed for Transfer Students) For instance, a student transfei 



28 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



i\ 




ring 64 hours would start at the 4 Semesters of Study point on the 
scale (64 divided by 15 = 4.27). To meet the minimum credits 
passed after two semesters of study, he would be exper-ted to have 
passed 66 credits at the end of six .semesters of study. 

In addition, at the end of the first semester, transfer students 
must earn a grade point average as shown in Table II above based 
on total credits passed. However, no student will be required to 
earn more than a 1.50 grade point average during the first semester. 
In succeeding semesters a transfer student must attain a grade 
point average as shown in Table II. (For instance, a student who is 
required to have earned 52 credits at the end of two semesters at 
Towson should be required to have earned a 1.78 or better at that 
time to remain at Towson.) 

Table III 

REQUIRED MINIMUM CREDITS ACCUMULATED 

FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS 



Semester of Study 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
10 



Required Minimum 
Credits Accumulated 

9 
18 
28 
40 
52 
66 
80 
96 
Degree requirements 
must be completed 



PASS OPTION 



Students will be able to elect on a voluntary basis 12 credits toward 
their degree for which they may be graded on a pass/no credit 
basis. No more than six hours per semester can be taken on a 
pass/no credit basis. This option is not available for courses re- 
quired for the major and for certification in Teacher Education 
unless special permission is sought from the department. The option 
must be elected during the first two weeks of classes. The Registrar 
will make this information available to the instructor upon request. 



PROCEDURES FOR 
REINSTATEMENT 



Those no longer in good standing may appeal for reinstatement. In 
most cases students who are dismissed for academic purposes will 
be expected to remain out of the day school for two semesters. 
Those students who bring their cumulative average up to the credits 
completed and GPA Norm by taking courses in the Evening. Sum- 
mer Program and January Session are eligible for reinstatement; 
however, a student must take courses in which letter grades are 
given in order to have this work apply before the completion of the 
one year period. A student must achieve an average of 2.00 on all 
work taken during the period of academic dismissal. Up to 18 credits 
can be taken in the Evening and Summer Program for this purpose. 
Deadline for readmission is 15 July and 15 November. 

In evaluating requests for reinstatement, the Academic Stand- 
ards Committee, without changing previous policies, will weigh 
heavily an indication of improved performance. 

The personal development of each student is considered. The College 
may exercise its right to ask a student to withdraw at any time. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 29 



DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 




Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Those wishing to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree may do so 
by fulfilling the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
and by completing the intermediate course or the equivalent of a 
modern foreign language. 



Bachelor of Science Degree 

A student who satisfactorily meets the following requirements will 
receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 

1. A minimum of one hundred twenty-eight hours and a maximum 
of one hundred forty-four hours of college credits of which 
thirty-two hours must be upper division work. 

2. Credit in the courses required of all students. 

3. Credit in the required courses of the curriculum he has elected. 

4. Successfully complete a major except for those in Early Child- 
hood or Elementary Education. 

With prior approval of the Standards Committee, a student may 
substitute an interdisciplinary program designed to meet his 
particular objectives. 

A mark of "C" or higher is required in all courses taken in the 
department and applied toward the major or minor of that de- 
partment. If this standard is not attained, the student must 
repeat the course or substitute another course in the field at the 
direction of the department. 

5. A cumulative average of at least 2.00. 

6. Record of attendance at the College for at least one academic 
year during which thirty semester hours of credit were earned. 
A student is expected to earn his final thirty credits at the Col- 
lege unless he receives special permission to the contrary. 

7. Demonstration of personal qualities which are expected of an 
educated person. 

8. File with the Registrar a Graduation Application according to 
following schedule: 

December Graduates : file by May 31st of the year of graduation. 

June Graduates : file by September 30th of the year of graduation. 

August Graduates: file by July 1st of the year of graduation. 



GENERAL COURSE 

REQUIREMENTS 

OF ALL STUDENTS 



The new general course requirements went into elfect in September 
1969, and affect all incoming freshmen and transfer students. How- 
ever, Towson State College returning students have the option to 
remain on the plans under which they were admitted or elect to 
follow the new plan as follows. 

All students are reminded that the adoption of a new set of 
General College Requirements does not change their departmental 
requirements, or the requirements for State certification of teacher 
education students. Students should consult their advisors if they 
have any questions regarding their degree programs. 



30 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Group 



Number of 

One-Semester 

Courses 




Group I 

Disciplines of Art, Drama, English, Modern 6 

Languages (the first semester of any ele- 
mentary course can not be used) Music, 
Philosophy and Religion, Speech (at least 
two, but no more than three courses must 
be in the English Department; and no more 
than one course can be taken in any one of 
the other disciplines) 

Group II 

Disciplines of Biological Sciences, Mathe- 3 

matics. Physical Sciences, Psychology (no 
more than one course can be taken in any 
one discipline) 

Group III 

Disciplines of Economics, Geography, His- 4 

tory. Political Science, Sociology, (courses 
must be taken in at least three of these 
disciplines) 

Group IV 

Disciplines of Physical Education, Health 2 

(at least one course must be in Physical 

Education area) 

The requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree are the same 
as those listed above for the Bachelor of Science degree plus 12 
hours or the equivalent in one foreign language. 



OPTIONAL GENERAL Optional general education plans are permissable under certain 
EDUCATIONAL circumstances when approved by the Curriculum Committee. Addi- 
PLANS tional information available in the Office of the Registrar. 

ATTENDANCE Students are expected to attend all classes. Each faculty member 
sets his own policy on absences. Policies vary and it is the responsi- 
bility of the student to understand clearly the absence policy of each 
instructor and to act accordingly. Students are expected to notify 
the Dean of Students by phone or in writing of any absence exceed- 
ing three days. 

LENGTH OF Only in unusual cases may a student who has completed degree re- 
ATTENDANCE quirements remain in the College for longer than eight semesters. 
Any requests for deviation from this plan must be submitted to the 
secretary of the Committee on Academic Standards . 



WITHDRAWALS 



A student wishing to withdraw from the College is to obtain a 
withdrawal card from the Office of the Dean of Students. Before 
the withdrawal is official, the student must submit the completed 
withdrawal card to the Office of the Registrar. The student will be 
marked according to grading policies if the withdrawal occurs 
during a semester. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 31 



SEMESTER Each semester a student registers and has not cancelled or with- 
OF STUDY drawn prior to the first day of class counts as a semester of study. 

Withdrawal for medical reasons or entry into the Armed Forces 
will not count as a semester of study. The student must inform the 
Registrar upon readmission in such cases and present evidence of 
reason for withdrawal. 

Those students withdrawing from the College who intend to 
return must comply with the deadlines established for readmission 
— 15 July for the fall semester and 15 November for the spring 
semester. 



TRANSCRIPTS 

OF ACADEMIC 

RECORD 



HONORS 
PROGRAMS 




Transcripts will be sent only upon written request of the student. 
Transcript request forms may be obtained at the Office of the Regis- 
trar. The College requires at least two weeks notice for issuance 
of a transcript record. A fee of $1.00 will be assessed for each 
request. 

A student with an outstanding indebtedness to the institution 
will not be eligible for transcripts of record. 

Under the direction of a College Honors Programs Board, a number 
of departments of the College offer Honors Programs in their dis- 
ciplines or cooperatively offer interdisciplinary Honors ProgramsJ 
The student who completes an approved program will receive a 
diploma with the designation Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Sci- 
ence with honors in the appropriate discipline. 

The program is developed for the junior and senior years and; 
includes 9 to 12 semester hours credit in seminars, directed readings, 
and research projects. A senior thesis is required as well as an oral 
defense of the thesis. A candidate will also be expected to make a 
respectable showing on the Graduate Record Examination. 

To be admitted to the program a student must present a cumu- 
lative average of 3.0 and a 3.25 cumulative average in his discipline. 
To graduate from the program the recipient of an Honors degree 
must present a 3.0 cumulative average and a 3.5 cumulative average 
in his discipline. 

Details of the departmental plans may be obtained from the 
office of the department chairman. 

Graduation with Honors 

To receive a bachelor's degree with honors, a student must have 
completed work taken at Towson State College with the following 
cumulative grade point average : 

3.75 to 4.00 Summa Cum Laude 
3.50 to 3.75 Magna Cum Laude 
3.25 to 3.49 Cum Laude 

Students must have, in addition, a 3.25 or better average for 
work completed at other institutions and a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of work at Towson State College. If students meet all other 
requirements, the Academic Standards Committee will hear an 
appeal of the 60 semester hour rule. 

Transfer students eligible for Summa Cum Laude awards 
based on work completed at Towson State College must be approved 
by the Academic Standards Committee. 

To receive a bachelor's degree with honors in a discipline, a 
student must have completed a departmental honors program and 
be recommended for honors by that department. 



32 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



The College Curriculum 



THE ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 
PROGRAM 



The arts and sciences program at Towson offers opportunities of 
higher education to those who are interested in obtaining a broad, 
liberal education. Students in the arts and sciences program may- 
pursue courses leading to further preparation for a variety of ca- 
reers. In some professions, such as law and medicine, it is usually 
advisable to complete a four-year liberal arts course before begin- 
ning professional study. In others, students should plan to transfer 
to a professional school after one or two years, unless the profes- 
sional school's admission plan permits a longer period of pre- 
professional study. 

Those who decide it is appropriate to enter professional study 
should study carefully the catalogue of the institution which they 
wish to attend in order that they may select the Towson courses 
required for admission to the professional program. 

A foreign language should be elected by those wishing to earn 
a Bachelor of Arts rather than a Bachelor of Science degree. 

The following paragraphs outline how the liberal arts curricu- 
lum can provide basic preparation for several professions or voca- 
tional fields. Students may obtain further information from their 
advisers and from the chairman of the department in which the 
major or most of the preparatory study is to be taken. 

Students who look forward to graduate work should make early 
selection of the school they hope to enter in order that they may 
meet the entrance requirements of the chosen institution. Current 
catalogues of graduate and professional schools are on file in the 
Admissions Office. The Dean of the College has additional data on 
opportunities for advanced study, including available fellowships 
and scholarships. 



Business 

A four-year course in business administration is offered to the 
individual who is interested in a business career or who wants a 
business background for admission to a graduate or professional 
school. 

College Teaching 

The future college professor should build a strong undergraduate 
major in his chosen field and prepare for graduate study leading 
eventually to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Inquiry should be 
made at several graduate schools with a view to meeting their 
entrance requirements. Preparation for reading proficiency in 
French or German should be begun as soon as possible in the under- 
graduate program. 



Foreign Service 

A student considering a career in the Foreign Service of the De- 
partment of State, or other overseas programs should plan a cur- 
riculum emphasizing a good general education, with particular 
attention to the use of the English language with skill and fluency, 
to a foundation in economics, geography, government and modern 

33 





history, and to reading with comprehension and conversing with 
intelligibility in at least one modern foreign language of general 
utility. The Department of State now requires of all candidates both 
a written and oral examination in French, German, or Spanish. 
Mastery of additional foreign languages enhances a candidate's 
value to the Service. 



Conservation, Wildlife and Forestry 

Broadly educated persons interested in outdoor life and possessing 
a strong background in the biological sciences are desired by govern- 
ment, industry and universities having graduate programs in these 
areas. Programs of study may be planned with the aid of the 
biology department in accordance with the needs of the student. 



Mass Communications 

Students interested in careers in broadcasting, journalism, film or 
public relations are able to select a Mass Communications major. 
This major provides the student with a broad background upon 
which they can then specialize. Additional courses in various liberal 
art fields such as the Social Sciences, Psychology, History and Eng- 
lish are desirable. 



Law 

Students interested in admission to a law school should make an 
excellent academic record in a wide variety of liberal arts courses. 
Their preparation should develop the ability to write, speak, and 
understand clearly, but preparation in any particular field can be 
left to the particular interest of the individual student. Therefore, 
a "major" in "pre-law" appears ill-advised and it is recommended 
that students interested in admission to law schools contact the 
pre-law advisor in the department of Political Science and discuss 
with him whether in their particular case an existing departmental 
major is advisable or whether it might be better that a liberal arts 
major with the thematic option of "pre-law" be worked out to fulfill 
the students particular needs and interests. 

In general, students who have a definite interest in entering 
the legal career should become members of the "pre-law council," 
where they can discuss their objectives and needs with interested 
faculty members and fellow students. They can cooperate in this 
manner to foster a better general understanding of our legal system 
in other students and in the college community. The "pre-law coun- 
cil" will also attempt to keep its members current on conditions for 
admissions to law schools and on any career questions which might 
be of interest. 



Library Work 

Prospective librarians should plan for a four-year program of arts 
and sciences followed by a one-year graduate course in a school 
accredited by the American Library Association. A good under- 
graduate record and a reading knowledge of at least one foreign 
language are customary requirements for admission to a degree 



34 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



program in library science. Prospective librarians may prepare for 
positions in which they would work primarily in the subject matter 
area of their special interest. 

Medicine and Dentistry 

A student expecting to graduate from Towson State College before 
entering professional school can meet the general admission require- 
ments of a number of medical and dental schools by completing a 
major in biology plus two years of chemistry, and two years of 
English, mathematics, physics, and French or German. Electives 
may be chosen in health education, social sciences, English, and 
fine arts. The student who expects to transfer to a medical or dental 
professional school after three years at Towson is advised to consult 
the catalogue of the school to which he expects to apply to make 
sure that he meets the entrance requirements of that school. The 
following pre-professional course pattern is suggested for consid- 
eration along with the requirements of the professional school to 
be attended : 

First Year 

Hours 

Engl 30.102 Freshman Composition 3 

Biol 14.101 Contemporary General Biology 4 

Biol 14.109 Functional Anatomy of Vertebrate 4 

Chem 22.101-102 General Chemistry 8 

Modern Language 6 

*Electives 2 to 6 

Total 32 to 31 

Second Year 

Hours 

Engl 30.204-205 Literature 6 

Modern Language 6 

Phys 66.211-212 General Physics 8 

Chem 22.231-232 Organic Chemistry 8 

*Electives 2 to 6 

Total 32 to 34 

Prospective medical and dental students should also consult 
with a biology faculty member as early as possible upon admission 
to Towson to plan a course program to meet the admission require- 
ments of the professional school chosen by the student. 



Ministry 

In addition to complete devotion to his vocation, the prospective 
minister, priest, or rabbi should process or acquire academic ability, 
sympathy for and skill in working with people, facility in writing 
and speaking, and broad knowledge in several fields. As a college 
student he should be active in his church or synagogue and in a 
campus religious organization. A four-year course in arts and sci- 
ences is required for admission by most theological schools. Most 
of the eight or more years of study for the Roman Catholic priest- 



'Electives chosen from such courses as College Algebra; History of Western Civil- 
ization; Introduction to Sociology; Government of the U.S.; Health Educ; Public 
Speaking; Modern Lang.; Art in the Culture; Music Appreciation; General Psych. 

THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM 35 



hood takes place in a seminary. More information may be sought 
from the student's minister, priest, or rabbi. 

Medical Technology 

A student interested in Medical Technology should consult with 
Dr. Carl Henrikson, Biology Department, as early as possible upon 
admission to Towson to plan the course program required. For 
description of the program, see Biology Department. 

For those taking pre-professional work prior to studying medi- 
cal technology, a three-year course leading to a biology major is the 
recommended minimum. This is followed by twelve months of clini- 
cal training in a hospital. 

Nursing 

The Department of Nursing offers a baccalaureate program for 
preparation of the professional nurse practitioner. Graduates of the 
College with a major in Nursing receive the Bachelor of Science 
Degree and are eligible to take the examination offered by the 
Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses for licensure as a 
Registered Nurse. 

The four-year program provides for completion of the College's 
general education requirements; foundational courses in the physi- 
cal, biological and social sciences, as well as the nursing offerings. 
The latter are heavily concentrated in the Junior and Senior years 
and include both classroom and clinical learning opportunities. 

For additional information concerning the program, refer to 
Nursing Department. 

Personnel Work 

Personnel work in educational institutions and psychological testing 
positions may sometimes be entered directly from college, but a 
graduate degree is usually required. Personnel work is a field in 
which work experience is important, particularly in industry and 
business, and one in which there is keen competition for starting 
positions. In addition to the general college requirements, the fol- 
lowing suggestions are made: a major or minor in psychology, 
courses from the following areas : sociology, economics, and political 
^^ science. 

*^ M Pharmacy 

Although a four-year college course is desirable as background for 
admission to a pharmacy school, two years of college is usually 
sufficient. Basic requirement of a typical pharmacy school would 
be met by a Towson student completing two years of work as out- 
lined in the pattern that follows: 

First Year Hours 

Biol 30.102 Freshman Composition 3 

Math 50.115 Math I 3 

Phed *101-159 Physical Education 2 

Biol 14.101 Contemporary General Biology 4 

Biol 14.105 General Botany 4 

Engl 14.101-102 General Chemistry 8 

**Electives to 3 

Total 24 to 27 

36 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 





THE TEACHER 

EDUCATION 

PROGRAM 



Second Year Hours 

Engl 30.204-205 Literature 6 

Phys 66.211-212 General Physics 8 

Chem 22.211 Analytical Chemistry 4 

Econ 24.202 Economic Principles & Problems 3 

Hist 40.145-146 History of the United States 6 

PoSc 68.206 American National Government 3 

**Electives 2 to 6 

Total 33 to 36 

A student interested in pharmacy should also consult with a 
biology faculty member as early as possible upon admission to Tow- 
son to plan a course program to meet the admission requirements 
of the pharmacy school chosen by the student. 

Physical Therapy 

The minimum requirements for admission into an approved school 
of physical therapy is sixty credit hours of college work, including 
eight credit hours in biology or zoology, six credit hours of college 
work, including eight credit hours in biology or zoology, six credit 
hours in physics and/or chemistry, and six hours in psychology. A 
list of approved schools and their admission requirements may be 
obtained from The American Physical Therapy Association, 1790 
Broadway, New York 19, New York. 

Public Administration 

A student expecting to enter some field of public service (such as 
federal, state or local governmental organizations as administrators) 
should choose a major in the social science area suited to his ob- 
jectives. Courses in political science, economics, sociology, psychol- 
ogy and business administration are recommended. 

Social Work 

Although social welfare agencies employ many individuals who have 
a four-year college education, leaders in the field consider two years 
of graduate education desirable. Undergraduate courses suggested 
include economics, political science, history, psychology, sociology, 
statistics, biological sciences, literature, public speaking, and news 
writing. Volunteer service with youth serving organizations and 
summer employment in social agencies are recommended for the 
college student interested in this vocation. 

Towson has been preparing teachers for the public schools of ilary- 
land for more than one hundred years. Out of this long experience 
have come the present three programs for teachers, directed toward 
three-grade-levels; early childhood education (pre-school through 
the third grade), elementary (first through sixth grades), and 
secondary (seventh through twelfth grades). 

Professional education courses, comprising about twenty per- 
cent of the four years' work, consist of approximately two-thirds 



'Prefix coed 60, men 61, women 62. 

•"Electives chosen from such courses as College Algebra; History of Western 
Civilization; Introduction to Sociology; Government of the U.S.; Health Educ; Public 
Speaking; Modern Lang.; Art in the Culture; Music Appreciation; General Psych. 



THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM 37 




classwork at the College and one-third laboratory experiences, in- 
cluding student teaching in the classrooms of public school systems. 
Prior experience with children is strongly recommended for those 
seeking admission to student teaching. 

Approximately forty percent of the college program is given 
over to studies of a general nature — in the humanities, the social 
sciences, and the natural sciences — providing a well-rounded college 
education. Certain basic courses are required, assuring foundations ^ 
in all broad areas of knowledge; but even among these there are 
frequent choices, and beyond them is the opportunity for electives 
that make possible the pursuit of special interests. 

The balance of the four years' work, approximately forty per- 
cent, is given over to electives which permit the student to develop 
competency in the field in which he will eventually teach or to pursue 
his special interests. 

In general a student with a minimum of a 2.0 cumulative aver- 
age is eligible to enter student teaching when (a) he has completed 
the required freshman and sophomore courses; and (b) he has 
completed all professional prerequisites. He must in addition have 
the approval of the Director of Laboratory Experiences to enter 
and remain in the student teaching program. 

The teacher education program may lead directly to positions 
such as: nursery and kindergarten teaching, primary grade teach- 
ing, upper elementary teaching, junior and senior high school teach- 
ing, college teaching, special educational teaching, guidance work in 
schools, and librarianships in schools and public libraries. 

With experience and additional training, graduates of the 
teacher education program may become administrators such as 
supervisors, principals, and superintendents. 

Other vocations and areas of work in which teacher education 
graduates enter include: social work, religious education (including 
the ministry of education and the ministry of music), personnel 
work, recreation work, educational TV, audio-visual education in 
the schools and in business and industry; industrial education, 
programmed instruction in business and industry as well as in the 
schools, the field of testing in education and in business and industry, 
and educational positions in governmental agencies. 

Required courses for each area and suggested course sequences 
are listed under each area in the Education Department course 
descriptions. ; 

Teaching Certificates 

Each graduate of a teacher education program at Towson will be 
qualified for Maryland certification at the early childhood education, 
elementary, or high school level. Early childhood education graduates 
may teach nursery school, kindergarten, and grades one, two, and 
three. Elementary education graduates may teach grades one 
through six and they may teach an academic subject in grades 
seven, eight, or nine, provided they meet the content requirements 
for a secondary school certificate in this subject. Secondary school 
graduates may teach in grades seven through twelve, and grades 
six when departmentalized. The Standard Professional Certificate is 



38 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



^ 



issued for three years at graduation and is renewable for seven 
years upon completion of six semester hours of graduate or ad- 
vanced undergraduate courses. 

The Towson graduate program affords opportunity to qualify 
for the Advanced Professional Certificate. Thereafter a master's 
degree or "equivalent" is required for the Advanced Professional 
Certificate. Certification to teach in Baltimore City is based in part 
upon the passing of a professional examination. 





General College Requirements for Bachelor's Degrees 

All degree programs of the College are based upon a fundamental 
background of general studies. Work in four area disciplines of 
liberal arts or general education courses are required of all students 
working toward the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degrees. 
Additional courses in general education are required of prospective 
early childhood and elementary school teachers; but it is possible, 
and sometimes desirable, to pursue a major in an academic field. 
Students pursuing a program in secondary education are required 
to complete a major in addition to required education courses. 



Specialization 

A major in an academic field is earned by completing about eight 
courses, generally, beyond the basic required courses in the chosen 
field — or about 36 credit hours of work, the exact amount being 
set by the various departments. Three possible benefits make the 
pursuit of a major course of study desirable: it prepares the student 
for graduate study in the field; it prevents a possible too-wide 
dispersion of effort which would result in a lack of real competency 
in any branch of knowledge; it qualifies the graduate from the 
teacher education program to teach the subject in junior and senior 
high schools. 

Students may select a major or approved department program 
from one of the following fields; art, business administration, biol- 
ogy, chemistry, economics, elementary education, elementary school 
science, English, geography, history, high school science, early 
childhood education, mathematics, modern foreign languages, music 
education, physical education, physics, political science, psycholog>% 
philosophy, sociology, social science, speech and dramatics, speech 
education. The required courses for programs are listed with de- 
partment course descriptions. 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements 
for graduation as set forth in the College Bulletin. When the re- 
quirem.ents are changed after a student has enrolled in the College, 
the student has the option of meeting in full the requirements that 
were in effect at the time of entrance or those that are in effect 
at the time of graduation, if graduation occurs within seven years 
of date of admission. If the student does not complete graduation 
requirements within seven years he must meet requirements in 
effect at the time of graduation. When the College withdraws former 
required courses, the Standards Committee will approve substitu- 
tions for students graduating under the former requirements. The 
student's advisor assists in the planning of a program, but the final 
responsibility for meeting the requirements for graduation rests 
with the student. 



THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM 39 



FOREIGN STUDY 



Students with upperclass standing desiring to pursue study in a 
specialized academic area at a college or university outside the 
United States must make application and obtain College approval for 
the study program. The appropriate form for making application 
may be obtained at the Registrar's Office. Approval is gained through 
the department chairman of the academic area involved, who will 
assist the student in the selection of a program satisfactory to the 
department. For final approval, the department chairman will for- 
ward the proposed program to the Academic Standards Committee 
through the office of the Dean of the College. After the student has 
returned to the College, transfer credit for a program of study 
undertaken outside the United States will be granted only upon 
recommendation of the department chairman and after an evalua- 
tion has determined the student's successful completion of the 
program. 



THE COOPERATIVE 

EDUCATION 

PROGRAM 



>'£^^ 



The Cooperative Education Program at Towson State College is 
designed to foster an interchange of students between Towson State 
and the other State Colleges of Maryland as well as other institu- 
tions of higher learning in the Baltimore Metropolitan area. The 
institutions included in the program are the State Colleges at Bowie, 
Coppin, Frostburg, Morgan, Salisbury, and the University of Mary- 
land, Baltimore County; and the private colleges, Goucher and 
Loyola. The program is also designed to allow students to take 
courses not ordinarily available at Towson as well as study under 
eminent professors in residence at other institutions. Students are 
encouraged to develop their academic curriculum with the Coopera- 
tive Education Program as an important part of their plans. 

There are no additional costs to the student to participate in 
the Cooperative Program. 

Students desiring information concerning the Cooperative Edu- 
cation Program should consult with the Coordinator of the Co- 
operative Education Program. Cooperative Education Program 
applications, participating college bulletins and class schedules are 
available from the Coordinator, the Assistant Registrar. 

Academic Requirements 

Students participating in the program are expected to maintain the 
same degree of proficiency in their academic studies at the coopera- 
tive institution as at Towson State. 

Courses taken at the cooperative institution are part of the 
student's academic record, and the grades will be computed into the 
student's grade point average at Towson. 

Only students who are in good standing academically in an 
undergraduate or graduate degree program are eligible to partici- 
pate in the Cooperative Education Program. 

Programs With Coppin, Morgan, and UMBC 
The public Colleges in the Baltimore metropolitan area are Coppin, 
Morgan and UMBC. Students are especially encouraged to select 
courses from the curriculum of these two schools, since they are 
within easy commuting distance of Towson State. 

Undergraduate (except freshmen) and graduate students are 
eligible to participate in the Cooperative Program. Undergraduate 
students may pursue courses of instruction equivalent to three 
semesters of fuUtime work (54 credit hours). Graduate students 



40 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



are limited to 12 credit hours. Students can take an entire semester's 
academic load or any part of it at either Coppin, Morgan or both 
while in attendance at Towson. 

Specially arranged courses are also offered to permit greater 
freedom of choice, especially those courses either taught by eminent 
professors or not ordinarily available at Towson. 

Students may elect courses offered either in the day or evening. 

Programs With The State Colleges — Bowie, Frostburg, 
and Salisbury 

Students are encouraged to make use of the academic curriculum 
available at Bowie, Frostburg, and Salisbury. Distance precludes 
simultaneous part-time attendance at Towson and one of the other 
colleges. However, students can spend three full semesters at any 
one of the three colleges. Undergraduate students can elect up to 
54 credit hours, and graduate students can elect up to 12 credit hours. 

Programs With The Private Colleges — 
Loyola and Goucher 

Towson has a Cooperative Education Program with both Loyola 
and Goucher. Undergraduate students (except freshmen) are eligi- 
ble to participate in this program. Students are permitted to take 
only those courses which are not offered at Towson. Students inter- 
ested in either Loyola or Goucher should consult with the Coordi- 
nator of the Cooperative Education Program. 



STUDY SKILLS 

SUPPORT 

SERVICES 

CENTER 



In recognition of the fact that not all students manage to achieve in 
college without study skills support, the Study Skills Support Serv- 
ices Center has been established to assist minority and other 
students in developing methods of study and study skills proficiency. 

Professional language arts personnel and student tutors are 
available to students who experience the need for assistance in 
developing adequate academic readiness. In an environment which is 
conducive for study and at the same time relaxed enough for 
healthy conversation, the students are afforded the opportunity to 
grow academically. 

In addition to individual tutoring, the center offers seminars 
and experimental courses in English and Reading. 







';-#»f«% -'*^'v 2. 



THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM 41 



JANUARY BegiTining in January, 1972, Towson offered its first Minimester 
SESSION or January Session. 

Courses may be of the traditional lecture or discussion type, 
or they may be entirely new and experimental. They may be a 
combination of old and new. Courses hopefully will cover a narrower, 
more topical range of subject matter than most courses offered 
during the regular semester. Independent study, directed readings, 
travel study, practicums, and other courses that could lend them- 
selves to a concentrated, full-time effort by a student would be 
appropriate for a Mini-Term, 

Credits for the Minimester will be equivalent to credits earned 
during the regular semester. Each student is limited to one course 
during the Mini-Term, carrying a load of from one to three credits. 
This restriction is intended to preserve the Mini's main feature: 
The opportunity to concentrate on one educational theme without 
the competition of other courses or other teaching responsibilities. 

Special students and part-time degree candidates may be ad- 
mitted to the January session, however, the College Center fee will 
be assessed for these students. 

Fees will be assessed on a per-credit basis plus a registration 
fee payable at the time the student registers for a course. 

Faculty and students who choose not to participate in the 
January session would have the period covered by the Minimester 
free — for research, study, travel or work. 




42 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Graduate Studies 



PROGRAMS 

AND 

PURPOSES 



GENERAL 

ADMISSIONS 

POLICY 



ADMISSION 

TO COURSES FOR 

GRADUATE CREDIT* 



Wilfred B. Hathaway, Dean of Graduate Studies 

Frederick C. Arnold, Associate Director of Graduate Studies 

Golden E. Arrington, Coordinator, Music Education Program 

Grayson S. Burrier, Coordinator, Secondary Education Program 

Norman R. Diffenderfer, Coordinator, Geography Program 

Regina I. Fitzgerald, Coordinator, Elementary Education Program 

Joseph P. Gutkoska, Coordinator, Reading Program 

Billy D. Hauserman, Coordinator, Urban Teaching Program 

Theodora R. Kimsey, Coordinator, Early Childhood Education Program 

Fredericka Kundig, Coordinator, Biology Program 

Charles Lonegan, Jr., Coordinator, Speech Pathology and Audiology Program 

Stuart Miller, Coordinator, General Psychology Program 

John B. Mitchell, Coordinator, Art Education Program 

Edward Neulander, Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Program 

Barbara Slater, Coordinator, School Psychology Program 

Robert Z. West, Coordinator, Audiovisual Communications Program 

The Master of Arts degrees in Geography, General Psychology, and 
School Psychology and the Master of Science degrees in Audio- 
visual Communications, Biology, and Speech Pathology and Audi- 
ology are intended to develop further specific knowledge in the 
respective fields. It is the intent of these programs to enable stu- 
dents to meet their needs through the flexibility within each 
program. 

The programs leading to the Master of Education degree have 
been developed primarily to help school teachers and guidance 
counselors increase their competency in the following general areas: 
Art Education Music Education 

Early Childhood Education Reading 

Elementary Education Secondary Education 

Guidance and Counseling Urban Teaching 

Admission to the Graduate Division at Towson State College is 
granted to all applicants whose academic and personal qualifications 
give promise of success in graduate study. The Board of Trustees 
of the State Colleges has established the requirement that admission 
to the State Colleges shall be determined without regard to race, 
color, religion, or sex. 

All students seeking admission to a graduate degree program 
must file an "Application for Admission to Graduate Studies" prior 
to first enrollment and have official transcripts of all college work 
sent to the Graduate Division. Transcripts must be sent directly 
from the institutions attended to the Graduate Office at Towson 
State College. Programs have the option of requiring additional 
admissions devices (including the Graduate Record Examination 
Aptitude and/or Advanced Tests and the Miller Analogies). Stu- 
dents should consult the Graduate Division for information con- 
cerning specific programs. 

Students for whom English is a second language must t^ake the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit the 
scores to the Graduate Division prior to first enrollment. 

An applicant for admission to courses for graduate credit (classifi- 
cation : Graduate Student) must meet admission requirements in 
one of two ways: 1) By holding a Master's or Doctor's degree from 
a regionally accredited college or university, 2) By holding a Bache- 



* e.g., safety and driver education courses do not receive graduate degree credit. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 43 




lor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, a 
grade average of 3.00 ("B") and an acceptable score on the Apti- 
tude portion of the Graduate Record Examination, if required by 
the program. At the option of the coordinator the grade requirement 
may be satisfied by a "B" average in one of the following areas of 
the applicant's undergraduate academic record: a) The complete 
record of four years' work, b) The most recent 60 hours of course 
work, c) The courses making up the undergraduate major and minor 
if the student plans to continue his studies in these same fields. The 
quality of graduate work taken beyond the Bachelor's degree, either 
as post-baccalaureate (non-graduate credit) courses or graduate 
credit courses, will be evaluated as part of the undergraduate record. 
Recommendations from persons who can appraise the student's 
academic qualifications may be required. 

All required application credentials (see General Admissions 
Policy) must be filed with the Dean of Graduate Studies no later 
than August 15 for the Fall Semester, January 1 for the Spring 
Semester, or May 15 for the Summer Session to be considered for 
admission. Those who are admitted as Graduate Students may regis- 
ter for courses numbered 100-699, but will receive graduate credit 
only in graduate level courses numbered 300-699 completed with 
grades of "C" or better. Certain experimental courses approved by 
the Graduate Studies Committee may receive graduate credit. Serv- 
ice Courses- and several 300-level and 400-level undergraduate 
prerequisite courses are not given graduate credit. In order to 
maintain the classification of Graduate Student, a good academic 
record must be achieved even if the student is not in a degree 
program. 



CANDIDATES 

FOR DEGREES 

AT OTHER 

INSTITUTIONS 



A student who is a candidate for an advanced degree at another col- 
lege or university may enroll as a Graduate Student at this college 
for occasional work. He must present, at least two weeks before 
registration, a letter from the Graduate Dean of his parent institu- 
tion indicating that he is in good standing and that credit earned 
at Towson State College is acceptable towards his degree. 



COURSES FOR Students who do not meet the standards required for classification 

POST- as Graduate Student are permitted to register with the classifica- 

BACCALAUREATE tion of Non-Graduate Student and pursue non-degree programs, 

nrrppp Those students receiving Non-Graduate standing are eligible to take 

^ PRnpRAMc;^ courses at the 100-level through the 400-level, but receive graduate 

credit only in courses numbered 300-499 and listed in the current 

bulletin as "Undergraduate and Graduate." 

Non-Graduate Students pursuing non-degree programs at the 
post-baccalaureate level, however, must file the appropriate applica- 
tion. 

Students who believe they can meet the admission requirements 
for Graduate Student standing but who fail to file the required 
application credentials in advance must register as Non-Graduate 
for the semester. However, they will be considered for admission to 
Graduate Student standing if their application credentials are re- 
ceived by the college before the end of the first quarter of the semes- 
ter. If they are admitted to Graduate Student standing they will 
then be permitted to receive graduate credit for satisfactory com- 
pletion of any 300-level and 400-level graduate courses (except Serv- 

* e.g., safety and driver education courses do not receive graduate degree credit. 

44 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



ice Courses* and several undergraduate prerequisite or specifically 
senior courses) in which they may be enrolled. Approval for course 
work beyond one semester will not be given until the application 
credentials are received. 



GRADUATE WORK 

BY SENIORS 

AT TOWSON 

STATE COLLEGE 



Seniors in their last semester of work at Towson State College may 
take 300-level and 400-level courses for graduate credit and 500-level 
and 600-level courses if they meet the following requirements: 1) 
The graduate courses must be in excess of the 128 hours required 
for the Bachelor's degree, 2) An application to the Dean of Grad- 
uate Studies for Graduate Student classification ("which requires a 
3.00 average), submitted in advance for specific graduate courses 
(by August 15 for the Fall Semester, January 1 for the Spring 
Semester, and May 15 for the Summer Session) must be approved. 
3) The student must submit all required application credentials 
(see General Admissions Policy) and receive Graduate Student 
Standing prior to receipt of graduate credit for satisfactory com- 
pletion of the courses, and prior to initiation of further course work. 



CONDITIONAL 
ADMISSION 



Conditional Admission may be granted to those students whose 
academic achievement falls short of the standards required for 
Graduate Student standing but whose records show promise on 
several other grounds. 

Other factors which will be considered in determining whether 
an applicant should be granted Conditional Admission are: 1) aca- 
demic average in all collegiate work must be at least 2.30 in one or 
more of the areas of the student's record listed above in "ADMIS- 
SION TO COURSES FOR GRADUATE CREDIT." 2) The quantity 
and quality of teaching or counseling experience in the field in which 
he plans to major as a Graduate Student. In addition, recommenda- 
tions from persons who can appraise the student's academic qualifi- 
cations and professional experience may be required. 

The student granted Conditional Admission must complete two 
specified courses with the grade of "B" or better in each course. The 
courses must be completed within one year of admission and may be 
used towards the degree when applicable. 

Students admitted conditionally are enrolled as Non-Graduate 
Students. 



REQUIREMENTS The requirements for the Master's degree are contained in the cur- 
FOR THE rent "Towson State College Bulletin: Graduate Studies. 1972-1973," 
MASTER'S DEGREE and may be obtained from the Graduate Oflice. 



TRANSFER The following regulations govern the transfer of credits from other 
CREDIT regionally accredited colleges: 

1. A maximum of six transfer credits for graduate courses taken 
prior to enrollment at Towson State College is allowed if the student 
is initially admitted to Graduate Student Standing at this college 
and if the courses are relevant to the student's major. 

2. Transfer credit after a student has attained Graduate Student 
Standing may be permitted if the student applies in writing to the 
Dean of Graduate Studies for permission prior to taking the course. 
Normally, approval will be given only for courses which are not 



* e.g., safety and driver education courses do not receive graduate degree credit. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 45 



offered by Towson State College during the period of the student's 
attendance. 

a. A maximum of twelve transfer credits may be allowed for grad- 
uate work satisfactorily completed at the State Colleges: Bowie, 
Coppin, Frostburg, Morgan, and Salisbury. 

b. A maximum of six transfer credits may be allowed for graduate 
courses completed at accredited colleges or universities not listed 
above. Permission for these credits can be granted only if the stu- 
dent has not transferred courses taken prior to entrance at Towson 
State College. 

3. The total accumulation of transfer credits from all courses listed 
in 1 and 2 above may not exceed twelve. 

4. All transfer credits must be completed with a grade of "B" or 
higher and must remain wuthin the total span of seven years al- 
lowed for completion of degree requirements. 



ADMISSION PRIOR 

TO RECEIVING 

BACCALAUREATE 

DEGREE 



Admission of applicants whose required application credentials are 
incomplete because the baccalaureate degree has not yet been con- 
ferred may be granted to seniors in their last semester of work. 
Evaluation will be made on the basis of their undergraduate work 
through the first semester of the senior year. Standing granted in 
the pre-degree category is at the option of the Graduate Pro- 
gram Coordinator to enable the student to begin work in courses 
carrying graduate credit immediately upon completion of the senior 
year. The applicant must have all application credentials completed 
during the first month after classes begin in the semester he 
initiates his course work. Admission standing is subject to cancella- 
tion or change if the admission credentials remain incomplete or 
do not meet the requirements for admission. If admission as a Grad- 
uate Student is denied, the student will be required to withdraw 
from any 500-level or 600-level course for which he has registered. 
Continuation of students in courses below the 500-level will be 
permitted. 




46 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Course Descriptions 



The Meaning of Course Numbers 

Each department of the College has one or more code numbers and abbreviations 
for each general subject area (e.g., French in the Modern Language Depart- 
ment). The code abbreviations are shown in parentheses at the head of the course 
listings. The code numbers form a two digit Subject Classification Number, 
which precedes a three digit Course Classification Number, forming a five digit 
Course Number. Each course has a distinctive number, with the following 
significance: 

Course Classification Significance of 

Numbers Numbers 

.001-.009 Two Year Experimental Courses. 

.010-.099 Service Division Special Courses with 

credit and Service Courses with no 

credit. 
.101-.299 Lower Division Undergraduate Courses. 

.301-.499 Upper Division Undergraduate and 

Graduate Courses, as noted. 
.501-.699 Graduate Division Courses. 



Sequential Courses 

Semesters of a year course whose numbers are separated by a hyphen are 
to be taken in sequence. When course numbers are separated by a comma, either 
semester may be taken independently of the other. (See Prerequisites.) 

Elective Courses 

Students majoring in the various areas will need to choose their electives with 
extreme care. Before registering for courses which are not required students 
should consult their advisers. The advice of the instructor in the course or the 
chairperson of the department in which the elective course is listed may be needed 
before a wise decision is made concerning the choice of an elective. 

Credit Value of Courses 

The semester credit value of the course is indicated in the parentheses following 
the title. 

Time of Offering 

All required courses are usually offered each semester. Elective courses in each 
department are usually offered at least one semster each year. All non-required 
courses are offered subject to sufficient enrollment. 

Prerequisites 

The order in which courses may be taken is determined by the prerequisites of 
all courses to be taken. (See Sequential Courses). 



47 



Art 



Professors: MITCHELL, ZINDLER, MILLER 

Associate Professors: GUILLAUME, POLLACK, MONTENEGRO, CUBBISON, NASS 

Assistant Professors: FLOOD, SUPENSKY (Chairman), JACOBSON, FIX, 

PAULSEN, GILCHRIEST 
Instructors: ROBB, OUNDJIAN, DENNER, COHEN, DAVIS, LADD, PITMAN, JOYNER 

Understanding the principles of art gives a vital insight into understanding the 
world around us. The Art Department provides the student with essential ele- 
ments of education related to the visual and plastic arts. A variety of under- 
graduate programs is offered plus a graduate program in art education. 

Art Major 

All prospective art majors and minors must register with the Art Department as 
early as possible during the first year on campus. The purposes of a major in art 
are to provide a background for personal creativity, to prepare for graduate 
work, and to provide a foundation for a career in art. Required courses are: 
12.103, 12.104, 12.111, 12.121, 12.122, 12.229, 12.230, 12.231, 12.240 or 12.241 
and a course in Graphic Processes. 

In addition, art courses are required to reach the minimum total of 42 credits. 
Transfer students must take half the total required art credits with this depart- 
ment. Participation in the annual student exhibit is required. The department 
reserves the privilege of retaining student work, including rights of reproduction 
and publication. 

Art Education Major 

The department offers dual certification only (Elementary and Secondary Level) 
for teaching certificates in art. All courses and statements for the art major 
apply also to the art education major. These plus 12.225, 12.475, 12.479, Educ. 
28.319, Psychology 70.203 must precede student teaching. Proseminar 12.455 is 
taken concurrent with student teaching (26.497-27.398). Students may register 
for "Methods" (12.475-12.479) and student teaching only if at least half the 
studio-art history requirements were taken in this department. Education 27.401 
is also required for certification. 

Art Minor 

Students who wish a minor in art should select the following courses: 2.103, 
12.111, 12.121 or 12.122, 12.229, 12.240, plus additional art electives to total at 
least 20 credits. 

The Arts and Sciences Program 

For general information please refer to the Arts and Sciences program in this 
bulletin. Students who wish to select art as their "core" of concentration must 
take the following courses: 12.103, 12.104, 12.105, 12.111, 12.121 or 12.122. 
Students in this program must register with the Art Department. 

ART COURSES 

Experimental 

12.001 WORKSHOP IN EXPERIMENTAL ART Written consent of instructor. May be re- 
FORMS (3) The creation of new and ex- elected, 
perimental art forms through the Investiga- 
tion of light, sound, video tape, lasers, 12.009 THE ART OF CHINA (3) A survey of 
environments, events, etc. Prerequisites: the development of Buddhist art and archi- 

48 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



tecture as they were introduced from India, 
and Chinese painting, sculpture, porcelain 
and the ritual bronzes, slide lectures, di- 
rected readings and independent study 
course kits. Prerequisite: 12.121, 12.122 or 
consent of instructor. 

12.010 THE ART OF JAPAN (3) A survey of 
the development of Buddhist art and archi- 
tecture in Japan and the formation of in- 
digenous art forms such as narrative scroll 

Lower Division — Undergraduate 

12.102 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN FOR NON- 
ART MAJORS (3) Elements and Principles 
of design and aspects of their application. 

12.103 TWO DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3) Ele- 
ments and Principles of two dimensional 
design and aspects of their application. 
Studio & discussion. 

12.104 THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3) An 
introduction to three dimensional concepts 
as they relate to the elements and principles 
of design. Form and space problems involv- 
ing various materials, tools and techniques. 

12.105 ART IN THE CULTURE (3) A study of 
art and its relation to man's culture, his- 
torically as well as a strong emphasis on 
contemporary western culture. Slide lec- 
tures to include a broad media of art forms, 
readings and museum visits. 

12.106 DRAWING AND PAINTING FOR NON- 
ART MAJORS (3) An introductory course 
for non-art majors. Studio experience in 
drawing and painting. Critiques and museum 
visits. 

12.111 DRAWING AND THE APPRECIATION OF 
DRAWING I (3) Problems of expressive 
draftsmanship in a variety of media. Drawing 
from the costumed and nude figures, still 
life and landscape. 

12.121 PREHISTORIC TO MEDIEVAL ART (3) 
An historical survey of art. Slide lectures, 
directed readings and museum trips. 

12.122 RENAISSANCE TO CONTEMPORARY 
ART (3) An historical survey of art. Slide 
lectures, directed readings and museum 
trips. 

12.202 ADVANCED DESIGN (3) The applica- 
tion of aesthetic principles to graphic and 
plastic problems. Emphasis on independent 
Investigation. Prerequisites: 12.103, 12.104. 

12.205 THE ART OF PUPPETRY AND MARION- 
ETTE PRODUCTION (3) Design and con- 
struction of puppets and marionettes; adapt- 
ing plays, stories, and events; designing and 
constructing scenery; lighting; production. 

12.206 ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS (2) The 
organization of space and materials for hu- 
man needs. Contemporary and historical 
aspects of the design of private and public 
buildings and of communities. Lectures and 
Discussion. 



painting, screens, and wood-block prints. 
Prerequisite: 12.121, 12.122 or consent of 
instructor. 

12.012 PRACTICAL APPLICATION IN KILN 
CONSTRUCTION (3) Theory and practice 
in kiln construction. Instruction in materials 
related to kiln construction. Discussion of 
firing techniques, safety factors and basic 
heating and refractories information 



12.211 DRAWING II (3) Continued stuaio work 
in drawing; landscape, still life and figure. 
Prerequisite: 12.111. 

12.213 LIFE DRAWING AND ANATOMY (3) 
The study of anatomical structure of the 
human figure for art students. Drawing from 
the nude and draped model. Prerequisite: 
12.111. 

12.215 PROJECTIVE DRAWING (2) Methods of 
perspective, orthographic and isometric pro- 
jections. The use of various media in the 
rendering of three dimensional form. 

12.220 EXHIBITION TECHNIQUES (2-3) The 
practical and theoretical problems involved 
in museum and gallery installation of art 
works. Includes study of past exhibition 
techniques and observation of contemporary 
methods. Directed museum trips. Prerequi- 
site: 12.103, 12.104 or consent of instructor. 

12.221 GREEK AND ROMAN ART (3) Studies 
in architecture, the decorative arts and 
sculpture, slide lectures, readings and mu- 
seum visits. Prerequisite: 12.121. 

12.222 BYZANTINE TO GOTHIC ART (3) Stud- 
ies in architecture, the decorative arts and 
sculpture, slide lectures, readings and mu- 
seum visits. Prerequisite: 12.121. 

12.223 ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART: 15TH- 
16TH CENTURIES (3) Studies in architec- 
ture, painting and sculpture, slide lectures, 
readings and museum visits. Prerequisite: 
12.121 and 12.122. 

12.224 THE BAROQUE AND 18TH CENTURY 
(3) Studies in European architecture, paint- 
ing and sculpture of the period. Slide lec- 
tures, readings and museum visits. Prerequi- 
site: 12.122. 

12.225 DESIGN FOR COMMERCIAL ART (3) 
Drawing, painting, lettering and typography 
as visual communication. Prerequisite: 
12.103. 

12.227 DESIGN IN WOOD AND METAL (3) Stu- 
dio problems in functional design with em- 
phasis on metal smithing and woodworking 
techniques. Prerequisites: 12.103 and 12.104. 

12.229 OIL PAINTING AND RELATED MEDIA I 
(3) Varied approaches to painting and a 
variety of media (e.g. acrylic, encaustic, oil 
painting) are explored through demonstra- 
tion and experimentation. Prerequisites: 
12.103 and 12.111. 



ART 49 



12.230 WATERCOLOR AND RELATED MEDIA I 
(3) Varied approaches to watercolor and a 
variety of media (e.g. gouache, casein, water- 
color) are explored through demonstration 
& experimentation. Prerequisite: 12.103 and 
12.111. 

12.231 CERAMICS I (3) Creative investigation 
of ceramic materials w/ith an emphasis on 
the potter's wheel. Studio work, lectures and 
discussion on ceramic design, techniques 
and materials. Prerequisite: 12.103, 12.104 
or consent of instructor. 

12.234 DESIGN: THE PHOTOGRAPH IMAGE (3) 
A comprehensive investigation into the tech- 
nique and aesthetic of still photography. 



Students must have a camera with adjustable 
diaphram and shutter. Prerequisite: 12.103, 
12.104 or written consent of instructor. 

12.240 SCULPTURE: THE HUMAN FIGURE (3) 
An introduction to the use of the human 
figure in sculpture. Clay modeling from the 
nude, with experience in direct plaster mod- 
eling and plaster casting. Prerequisites: 
12.103, 12.104. 

12.241 SCULPTURE: CONTEMPORARY MEDIA 
AND CONCEPTS (3) Technical and aes- 
thetic considerations in the use of current 
sculptural concepts and media, including 
lights, kinetics, sound, plastics, etc. Prere- 
quisites: 12.103, 12.104. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



12.314 THE ART OF ENAMELING ON METAL 
(3) Design as applied to the art of enamel- 
ing on copper and silver. The appreciation 
of master works of enameling from medieval 
to contemporary times. Studio work and lec- 
tures. Prerequisites: 12.103, 12.104. 

12.318 JEWELRY (3) Investigation into aes- 
thetics, history, function and design of jew- 
elry. Lecture and directed studio problems in 
forming, joining and finishing of metallic and 
non-metallic materials. Prerequisite: 12.103 
and 12.104 or consent of instructor. 

12.323 PICASSO TO THE PRESENT (3) Art 
History with emphasis on painting from 1900 
to the present. Slide lectures, directed read- 
ings and museum trips. Prerequisites: 12.121 
and 12.122. 

12.324 HENRY MOORE TO THE PRESENT (3) 
Art History with emphasis on sculpture from 
1900 to the present including new media and 
happenings. Directed readings and museum 
trips. Prerequisites: 12.121 and 12.122. 

12.325 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TO THE PRES- 
ENT (3) Art History with emphasis on archi- 
tecture from 1900 to the present including 
time-space concepts. Prerequisites: 12.121 
and 12.122. 

12.326 FABRIC DESIGN (3) Design problems 
executed with fabric. Instruction in tie dying, 
batik, block printing, silk screen on fabric. 
Prerequisites: 12.103, 12.104 or consent of 
instructor. 

12.328 WEAVING AND FIBER CONSTRUCTION 
(3) Design problems executed in fibers and 
fabrics. Instruction in loom and hand weav- 
ing, macrame, stitchery, rug hooking. Aes- 
thetic and historical considerations. Prere- 
quisites: 12.103, 12.104 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

12.329 OIL PAINTING AND RELATED MEDIA 11 
(3) Continued studio experiences in paint- 
ing. Prerequisite: 12.229 or consent of in- 
structor. (Not for Graduate Credit) 

12.330 WATERCOLOR AND RELATED MEDIA II 
(3) Continued studio experiences in paint- 
ing. Prerequisite: 12.230 or consent of in- 
structor. (Not for Graduate Credit) 



12.331 CERAMICS II (3) Continued studio ex- 
perience in ceramics. Assigned problems 
utilizing a variety of clay construction meth- 
ods plus independent work. Lectures and 
discussion including clay mixing, glaze ap- 
plication and kiln operation. Prerequisite: 
12.231. (Not for Graduate Credit). 

12.334 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY (3) Con- 
tinued research with the photographic aes- 
thetic. Emphasis on independent investiga- 
tion. Student must have camera with adjust- 
able diaphram and shutter. Prerequisite: 
12.234 or written consent of the instructor 
based on demonstration of technical com- 
petence. 

12.339 METAL SCULPTURE (3) Conceptual 
and technical problems involved in forging, 
forming, welding, soldering and finishing 
both ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Prere- 
quisite: 12.240 or 12.241. 

12.340 SCULPTURE STUDIO (3) Continued stu- 
dio experience with emphasis on modeling 
and carving with a variety of materials: 
plasters, cements, epoxies, wood, stone, etc. 
Prerequisites: 12.240 or 12.241. 

12.347 SCREEN PROCESS (3) Personal ex- 
pression in traditional and experimental tech- 
niques of screen printing: Serigraphy in 
color, tusche, stencil, glue. Prerequisites: 
12.103, 12.111 or consent of instructor. (Not 
for Graduate Credit) 

12.349 RELIEF PROCESS (3) Personal expres- 
sion in printmaking: Woodcut, wood engrav- 
ing, linocut, subtractive color printing and 
other relief processes. Prerequisite: 12.103, 
12.111 or consent of instructor. 

12.371 ART AND THE CHILD (2-3) Major con- 
siderations of art education appropriate to 
the work of the elementary teacher; experi- 
ences with art materials. (Not for Graduate 
Credit). 

12.405 ART PRINCIPLES AND CRITICISM (3) 
Principle concepts of art; theories of per- 
ception and aesthetics; application of theo- 
ries to the interpretation of specific works 
or art. Prerequisite: 12.105 or 12.121 or 
12.122. 



50 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



12.414 ADVANCED STUDIO (1-4) Practice for 
advanced students in their field of special 
interest. May be re-elected to a total of four 
credits. Prerequisite: Must have exhausted 
other courses in particular field or w/ritten 
consent of instructor. Student must make 
arrangements with instructor of his choice. 

12.415 ADVANCED STUDIO (1-4) Practice for 
advanced students in their field of special 
interest. May be re-eiected to a total of four 
credits. Prerequisite: Must have exhausted 
other courses in particular field or v^^ritten 
consent of instructor. Student must make 
arrangements with instructor of his choice. 

12.431 ADVANCED CERAMICS (3) Individually 
designed studio problems for advanced stu- 
dents in ceramics. Prerequisite: 12.331. 

12.433 ADVANCED PAINTING (3) Individually 
selected studio problems for advanced stu- 
dents in area of special interest. Prerequi- 
site: 12.329. 

12.440 ADVANCED SCULPTURE (3) Individu- 
ally selected studio problems for advanced 
students in their area of special interest. 
Prerequisite: 12.340. 

12.449 INTAGLIO PROCESS (3) Personal ex- 
pression in printmaking: Etching, drypoint, 
acquatint, engraving, and other intaglio proc- 
esses. Prerequisite: 12.103, 12.111 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

12.451 LITHOGRAPHIC PROCESS (3) Personal 
expression through printing from Litho stones 
and plates. Prerequisite: 12.103, 12.111 or 
consent of instructor. 

12.455 PRO-SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF 
ART (3) A professional seminar for Art Ed- 
ucation majors. Discussion of problems in 
the current teaching experience. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of Department. Concurrent 
with student teaching. 



12.461 INTRODUCTION TO ART THERAPY I (3) 
A survey of the concepts and procedures of 
creative expression in the service of per- 
sonal understanding and development. Con- 
sideration of educational, rehabilitory and 
psychiatric settings. Lectures, discussion, 
workshops, and readings. Prerequisite: At 
least junior standing as a major in Art, 
Psychology, Health, Mental Health or asso- 
ciated fields. Approved work experience in 
one of the above fields. 

12.462 INTRODUCTION TO ART THERAPY II 
(3) Continuation of Art Therapy I, the work 
of the therapist. Case studies, observations 
and participation in a variety of settings. 
Discussion, field work and readings. Pre- 
requisite: 12:461 or consent of instructor. 

12.471 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION (3) Art 
education problems at all levels; materials 
and skills in relation to classroom needs. 
Prerequisite: 12.371 or equivalent. 

12.475 TEACHING ART IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (2) Concurrent course with 479, 
Art in the Secondary School. For course 
description see 479. Open only to Art Edu- 
cation Majors. Prerequisite: Approval of Art 
Department. 

12.479 TEACHING ART IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL (2) Theoretic basis of art educa- 
tion, the function of the art specialist, and 
instructional materials and skills. Concurrent 
course with 475. Open only to art education 
majors. Prerequisite: Approval of Art De- 
partment. 

12.485 SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY (3) Inten- 
sive analysis of a defined historical period or 
stylistic development in art. Directed read- 
ings in both period and contemporary 
sourcess. Discussions and museum tours. 
Variety in content each year, may be re- 
elected. Prerequisite: 12.121 and 12.122 or 
consent of instructor. 



Graduate Division 

12.511 DRAWING (3) Advanced problems in 
expressive draftsmanship. Prerequisites: 
12.211 or consent of instructor. 

12.514-515 GRADUATE STUDIO (1-4, 1-4) In- 
dependent work in field of special interest 
with weekly criticism by staff. May be re- 
elected to total of four credits each course. 
Prerequisite: Must have exhausted other 
courses in particular field or written consent 
of instructor. Student must make arrange- 
ments with instructor of his choice. 

12.529 OIL PAINTING (3) For students with 
previous experience in painting, considera- 
tion of current trends and styles; studio 
work, museum visits, lectures. Prerequisite: 
12.329 or equivalent. 

12.530 WATERCOLOR (3) Consideration of 
current trends and outstanding painters and 
styles. Studio work, museum visits, lectures. 
Prerequisites: 12.330 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 



12.531 CERAMICS (3) Advanced work in ce- 
ramic design and techniques of glazes, clay 
bodies, firing. Prerequisites: 12.331 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

12.540 SCULPTURE (3) For students with 
previous experience in sculpture; considera- 
tion of current trends and styles: studio work, 
museum visits, lectures. Prerequisites: 12.340 
or 12.241 and 12.339 or consent of instructor. 

12.551 GRAPHICS: INTAGLIO, RELIEF (3) Stu- 
dio work for artists with basic knowledge of 
intaglio and/or relief processes. Aspects of 
mixed media explored. Prerequisites: 12.349 
or 12.449 or equivalent. 

12.553 GRAPHICS: LITHOGRAPHY. SERIGRA- 
PHY (3) Studio work for artists with a basic 
knowledge of lithography and/or serigraphy. 
Prerequisites: 12.347 or 12.451 or equivalent. 

12.595 RESEARCH IN ART AND ART EDUCA- 
TION (3) Methods of research applicable 



ART 51 



to art and art education. Examination of course in master's program. Prerequisite: 
recent research in this field. Students will 12.595 and consent of instructor, 
explore areas of their choice. Prerequisites: 12.699 ART THESIS: CREATIVE PROJECT (3) 
Consent of instructor. If approved, student will pursue his project 
12.697 SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION (3) in- resulting in an exhibition of his work plus a 
vestigation of problems in art education and paper defining the project's scope and phi- 
related fields; Examination of theories of art losophy. Prerequisites: 12.697 and consent 
and art education. To be taken as final of the department. 

The Art Department offers a variety of highly specialized courses during the minimester 

session. 

Pending final approval, regular additional courses will be offered in the Art Department as 

follows: Color Photography, Street Art and Metalsmithing. Contact the Art Department for 

complete information on new courses. 

The following art education courses are supervised by members of the art faculty. Course 

descriptions will be found under the Education Department. 

26.487 STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ART. 
27.398 STUDENT TEACHING IN SECONDARY SCHOOL ART. 



52 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Arts and Sciences 

Coordinator: CHARLES C. ONION 

The Arts and Sciences Majors are proposed to offer the student an opportunity 
to cultivate his interests in the Arts and Sciences, to seek out his own cultural 
heritage, to pursue his education by following a thematic plan, and to develop 
a capacity for intellectual adventure and cultural awareness. There are two ma- 
jors, each with a thematic option : 

MAJOR A — The Liberal Arts and Sciences Major constructed around a "core" 
discipline in the traditional Liberal Arts and Sciences fields. 

MAJOR B — The General Studies Major in the Arts and Sciences constructed 
around a "core" discipline in General Studies, which incorporates all of the Arts 
and Sciences. 

THEMATIC OPTION — A student may fulfill the requirements for either Major 
A or Major B by substituting a thematic plan for the "core" discipline. We 
recognize that it is possible for Major A to be constructed out of Major B. We 
have made a formal distinction, however, because we wished both to create a 
major which preserves the concept of "liberal" arts and sciences in its traditional 
and widely understood meaning, and also to create a major (Bj which offers 
maximum freedom of choice. In this way, a student who elects the former will 
carry a distinctive label. 

Major A — The Liberal Arts and Sciences Major 

1. The student must satisfy General Education Requirements. 

2. To declare the major, the student must be a sophomore or junior with a 2.0 
CPA. 

3. From the Liberal Arts and Sciences — Art, Biology, Chemistry, English, His- 
tory, Modern Languages, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics and The- 
atre — the student must take a minimum of 54 semester hours of upper divi- 
sion course work. These 54 hours must include work from a minimum of 4 
different departments. Eighteen credits must be from the Arts and 18 credits 
from the Sciences (Mathematics being considered a Science). 

4. At least 18, but no more than 24, of the 54 upper division hours must come 
from one discipline which shall serve as the "core" discipline in the student's 
program. 

Major B — The General Studies Major in the Arts and Sciences 

1. The student must satisfy General Education Requirements. 

2. To declare the major, the student must be a sophomore or junior with a 2.0 
CPA. 

3. From the Arts and Sciences, which are construed to be the following — Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, Geography, History, Modern Lan- 
guages, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, Speech and Theatre — the student must take a minimum of 
54 semester hours of upper division course work. With the approval of the 
student's advisor and the appropriate associate dean, courses in departments 
not listed above may be allowed if these courses are needed to complement the 
student's program. 

4. At least 18, but no more than 24, of the 54 upper division hours must come 
from one discipline which shall serve as the "core" discipline in the student's 
program. 



53 



Thematic Options to the Arts and Sciences Majors 

With the approval of his advisor and the appropriate association dean, a student 
may elect to substitute a thematic plan for the "core" discipline in either Major 
A or B. By following this plan the student could develop an academic concentra- 
tion in areas such as urban studies, American studies, environmental issues, etc. 
Except for the following, the requirements will be the same as for Major 
AorB: 

1. A minimum of 18, but not more than 24, of the 54 upper division hours must 
relate specifically to a chosen topic or theme. 

2. All course work must be on an upper division level unless the faculty advisor 
approves the inclusion of some particularly significant course work at the lower 
division level. For example, a course important to the student's theme may 
exist only at the lower division level. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION 

A new thematic option entitled, Law Enforcement and Correction is now 
being offered. Among its objectives are the following: 

1. To provide in-service law enforcement and correctional personnel the oppor- 
tunity to further their education beyond the junior college with a minimum 
loss of credits from their junior college program. 

2. To provide an interdisciplinary degree with a strong emphasis on sociology, 
psychology and political science. 

3. To provide the community with law enforcement personnel who are able to 
make good value judgment, to maintain their perspective, to understand under- 
lying causes of human behavior, and to communicate clearly and precisely. 

The specific requirements of this thematic option will consist of the follow- 
ing upper division courses to be taken at Towson State College or a cooperative 
school : 

Business Administration: 6 credits from the following: Business Management, 
Business Law I, Business Law II, Personnel Management, Accounting I or 
Accounting II. 

Geography: 6 credits beyond Elements and must include one of the following: 
Urban Geography or Zoning and Planning. 

Health: 6 credits beyond Current Health Problems. Must include Drugs in the 
Culture, and Sex Education and Family Living. 

History: 6 credits beyond U.S. I and II. May include The City in American His- 
tory, History of Black America, The Immigrant in American History, Con- 
stitutional History of the U.S. or Social History of the U.S. 

Political Science: 9 credits including Public Administration, Urban Government 
and Politics, Introduction to Law or Constitutional Law. 

Psychology : 12 credits beyond General Psychology and Mental Hygiene. May 
include Personality, Adolescent Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Inter- 
viewing Techniques, Social Psychology, and Foundations of Rehabilitation 
Counseling. 

Sociology: 12 credits beyond Introduction, Juvenile Delinquency, and Criminol- 
ogy. May include Minority Groups, Collective Behavior, Social Welfare, 
Community Organization, Urban Sociology, Social Deviance, and Cultural 
Anthropology. 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

Purpose : 

The American Studies concentration within the General Studies' major is an 

interdisciplinary program which allows a student to take courses in various 

academic departments. The American Studies approach, by stressing the inter- 

54 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



relatedness of such elements in our civilization as the fine arts, architecture, his- 
tory, technology, literature and popular culture cuts through the traditional aca- 
demic lines of specialization so that a student can study American culture as a 
whole. The American Studies concentration prepares the student for graduate 
studies as well as for careers in teaching, museumology, government service and 
other areas where a broad knowledge of American civilization is required. 

Organization and Administration 

The program is administered by a committee consisting of the following mem- 
bers of the faculty : 

Joseph Cox, Associate Dean Elaine Hedges, English 

Paul Douglas, English Douglas Martin, History 

Dean Esslinger, History Fred Rivers, History 

George Friedman, English 

The members of the American Studies committee will serve as advisors to 
students majoring in the program. 

Major Requirements 

1. Twenty four credits at the 300-400 level 

Introduction to American Studies (41.301) 3 credits 

Seminar in American Studies (41.401) 3 credits 

American literature courses 18 credits 

or 
American history courses 18 credits 



^4 



2. Thirty credits at the 300-400 level 

American history courses (if Ic chosen) 6 credits 

or 

American literature courses (if Id chosen) 6 credits 

Courses relating to American culture from other than 

the History or English Departments 12 credits 

Courses in any of the Arts or Sciences 12 credits 

3. Six credits at the 300-400 level 

Non-American literature courses 6 credits 

or 
Non-American history courses 6 credits 



-30 



41.301 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUD- can civilization by examining literature, the 

lES (3) The first part of the course will be fine arts, architecture, history, technology, 

an examination of the aims and methods of and popular culture. Prerequisites: 6 hours of 

American Studies. The second part will be a American history or 6 hours of American 

study of a specific topic or period in Ameri- literature. 

BLACK STUDIES MAJOR 

The Black Studies program is interdisciplinary concentrating mainly in 
courses offered in the English, History, Sociology and Political Science depart- 
ments. The curriculnm is subject to review and flexibility, as courses may be 
added or substituted when the need arises with the permission of the Advisory 
Committee and the Associate Dean. 

Advisory Committee 

Johnnella Butler, English James Linder, Education 

Thomas P. Knox, English Richard Nzeadibe, History 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 55 



A. The student must satisfy General Education Requirements which should 
include the f oWowing five courses : 

American Literature 30.211 j^^^^^^^^^ed 

U. S. History I and II 40.145 ) 

40.146 y required 
Introduction to Sociology 80.101 J 

B. To declare the major, the student must be a sophomore or junior with a 
2.0 C.P.A. 

C. From the Arts and Sciences— Art, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, Geog- 
raphy, History, Modem Languages, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, 
Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Speech and Drama. Requirements in the 
Arts and Sciences are subject to review and change depending on each student's 
program. A viable program is available to students desirous of secondary certifi- 
cation. 

15 hours 

Survey of Black Literature I and II 30.251 

30.252 
The History of Black America 40.381 

The African World 40.133 

40.134 

15 hours 

3 hours from Group A 
6 hours from Group B 
6 hours from Group C 

"A" African Government and Politics 68.341 

Africa in World Politics 68.435 

The Geography of Africa 34.431 

Sub-Saharan Africa 40.333 

History of West Africa 1500-1885 40.334 

History of Contemporary Africa 40.335 

"B" The Literature of Black America 30.401 

Minority Groups 80.381 

Black-White Relations 80.470 

Blacks in America : Myths and Realities 80.472 

"C" Urban Economics 24.351 

Urban Education 28.002 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 

The Women's Studies concentration within the General Studies major is an 
interdisciplinary program which offers students the opportunity to study the 
particular nature and role of women as individuals and as members of society. 
The concentration consists of eleven hours in a core curriculum of three inter- 
disciplinary courses: Women In Perspective, Women In Art and 

Literature, and Women In Society, plus twelve hours selected from depart- 
ment courses in Women's Studies. Women In Perspective is strongly rec- 
ommended as preparation for any upper division work in Women's Studies. 

The Women's Studies concentration is administered by a committee of 

56 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



faculty and students. The faculty members on the committee will serve as advisors 
to students majoring in the program : 

Sara Coulter, English Fred Rivers, History 

Jo Ann Fuchs, Philosophy Jane Sheets, Modern 

Elaine Hedges, English Languages 

Eric Miller, Art John Toland, Sociology 

Donald Mulcahey, Evening 
and Summer Division 



33.231 WOMEN IN PERSPECTIVE (3) A sur- 
vey of the past, present, and possible future 
place of wonnen as individuals and as menn- 
bers of society with ennphasis on the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries in America. 

00.000 WOMEN IN ART AND LITERATURE (4) 
Study of selected art and literature by 
women with emphasis on the nature of the 
contributions of women and the conditions 



for creativity. Prerequisites: 6 hours in art 
and/or literature. 

00.000 WOMEN IN SOCIETY (4) An examina- 
tion of the distinctive role and contribution 
of women in society from the perspectives 
of several disciplines: history, philosophy, 
sociology, political science. Prerequisites: 
6 hours in the social sciences. 



*AII courses are pending approval by the College Curriculum Committee. Please consult the current 
Schedule of Courses Booklet for approved courses. 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 57 



Audiovisual Communications 



Professor: LOGAN (Chairman) 
Associate Professor: ROSECARNS 
Assistant Professor: WEST 
Instructor: BURTON, DIETZ, JONES 
Assistant Instructor: BARNES 

Audiovisual communications are becoming increasingly more important as mod- 
ern education becomes more complex in keeping with the development and trends 
of society in areas such as urbanization, technology, and the accumulation of 
new knowledge. Under the pressure of a rapidly expanding population to be edu- 
cated, more and more reliance will be placed upon the effective utilization of 
audiovisual communications. 

Consequently, the audiovisual communications curriculum has been designed 
to meet the needs of different types of potential users . . . undergraduate stu- 
dents, especially prospective teachers, who have had limited contact and experi- 
ence with this field, those seeking advanced degrees or who desire to know more 
about the rapidly developing field of instructional equipment, devices, and mate- 
rials; and those who have the task of organizing practical audiovisual programs 
including audiovisual coordinators, administrators, directors of youth activities 
and religious education, government and industrial personnel, media specialists 
and librarians. 

Though no undergraduate major is offered in audiovisual communications 
at the present time, courses are open as electives to all students of junior or 
senior standing except courses 13.369 which is required by all secondary educa- 
tion majors prior to their graduation. A master's degree is offered (see Graduate 
Studies Bulletin). 



AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNICATIONS COURSES (AVCO) 
Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 



13.301 SURVEY OF INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 
(3) Demonstrations and supervised experi- 
ences are provided to emphasize skills and 
techniques used to operate basic multi- 
sensory equipment and devices used in the 
classroom. Contributions, vglues, and prin- 
ciples of audiovisual communications are 
correlated v/ith utilization of equipment and 
devices. Not open to students who have 
taken 13.415 Methods and Materials in New 
Education Media. 

13.302 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN IN- 
STRUCTIONAL MEDIA (3) Stressed are the 
skills used in the preparation and production 
of selected types of sensory materials of 
instruction. Various methods and techniques 

Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



are also employed to demonstrate how these 
materials can be ultlized effectively in in- 
structional communications. 

13.369 LABORATORY IN NEW EDUCATIONAL 
MEDIA (1 or 2) Experience in operation of 
multisensory aids to teaching, preparation of 
teaching aids, and application oif transpar- 
encies, tape and video recordings, slides, 
filmstrips, motion pictures and still pictures 
to the modern classroom. 

a. Required of ail Secondary Education 
majors during student teaching: course 
315, or 301 may also be used to fulfill this 
requirement. 

b. Not open to students who have completed 
AVCO 301 or 315. 



13.401 HISTORY OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOL- 
OGY AND MATERIALS (3) An examination 
of the development of education technology 
with particular emphasis on the influence of 
government, state departments of education, 
institutions of higher learning, industry, and 
professional organizations on the various in- 
structional media. Identification of the con- 
tributions of media leaders. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.415 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN NEW 
EDUCATIONAL MEDIA (3) Methods of vital- 



izing learning through the use of motion pic- 
tures, television, audio and video recording, 
field trips, transparencies, filmstrips, slides, 
and pictures; location of materials, operation 
of basic equipment and devices; preparation 
of basic tools of learning. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.417 CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGING 
OF AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS (3) Empha- 
sis is placed on all types of classifying and 
cataloging non-print materials in accordance 
with the Dewey Decimal System. Other sys- 



58 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



terns of classification and cataloging are sur- 
veyed. Rules for form of entry, factors deter- 
mining choice and form of subject tieading 
and descriptive cataloging are studied. This 
course is designed especially for librarians, 
media specialists, and teachers. Audio-visual 
equipment, devices, and materials are used 
to optimum advantage throughout. LAB FEE 
$5.00. 

13.431 INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION IN CLASS- 
ROOM EDUCATION (3) Designed to pro- 
vide students with understandings of the his- 
tory, status, and goals of television as it is 
used in education. Topics covered include 
television systems, programming sources, 
legal ramifications, sources of funds, special 
projects, comparative costs, sources of data, 
and current research as applicable to public 
and non-public school classrooms only. LAB 
FEE $5.00. 

13.433 INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION (3) This 
course is concerned with ITV systems and 
terminology, the ITV movement, elements of 
production, classroom utilization of the ITV 
product, developing the ITV workshop, ca- 
reers in ITV, and aspects of administration, 
philosophy, evaluation, and research in ITV. 
Class projects and some utilization of tele- 
vision equipment play a role in the course. 
LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.441 COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AND UTILI- 
ZATION (3) Exploratory course concerned 
with the rationale for, and the use of com- 
puters in various phases of education and 
related areas. The applications of computers 
are treated in areas such as instructional 
design (computer-assisted instruction), ad- 
ministrative and personnel services, and cost 
analysis. Techniques are examined for the 
organization, storage, processing and re- 
trieval of data. Flow charting and keypunch- 
ing experiences are included. (Course will 
not prepare students for positions as pro- 
grammers). LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.453 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOVISUAL PHO- 
TOGRAPHY (3) Basic philosophy, scope, 
planning, and laboratory methods and tech- 
niques of preparing photographic audiovisual 
materials. Includes production of color and 

Graduate Division 

13.501 ORGANIZATION, ADMINISTRATION AND 
SUPERVISION OF AUDIOVISUAL COM- 
MUNICATIONS PROGRAMS (3) Organiza- 
tional patterns, management procedures, and 
supervisory methods and techniques for 
audiovisual communications programs are 
considered. Major topics include: facilities; 
finance; selection, procurement, security and 
basic maintenance of equipment and ma- 
terials; center operation; extension and in- 
service programs; assessments of systems 
and programs; and public relations. Pre- 
requisite: Six hours of audiovisual com- 
munications courses and/or departmental 
approval. LAB FEE $5.00. 



black and white slides, prints, and filmstrips. 
LAB FEE $10.00. 

13.455 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS (3) Lan- 
guage and design of graphics communica- 
tions; principles from psychology and the 
visual arts; basic design principles; labora- 
tory experiences such as layout, air brush 
techniques, "stat-king" utilizations, headliner 
and polaroid systems familiarization. LAB 
FEE $10.00. 

13.485 SEMINAR WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION- 
AL TECHNOLOGY (3) Special problems in 
educational technology are treated including 
the philosophy, scope, planning, and tech- 
niques of the preparation and production of 
selected types of photographic and related 
graphic materials. Computer-assisted in- 
struction, random access and information 
and retrieval systems, simulators and 
trainers as well as significant developments 
in "hardware" and "software" are also 
stressed. Prerequisite: Three hours of audio- 
visual communications courses or depart- 
mental approval. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.487 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF LINEAR 
PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION. (3) Ac- 
quaints students with philosophy and prin- 
ciples of linear programming; analysis and 
evaluation of commercially prepared and 
instructor-made programs; instructional utili- 
zation; current research, developments, and 
trends. An opportunity is provided for the 
student to develop a linear program in his 
own area of concentration. Prerequisite: 
Teaching experience and department ap- 
proval. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.488 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF IN- 
TRINSIC PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION (3) 
Principles and philosophy of intrinsic pro- 
gramming as related to the Crowderian tech- 
niques of programming; analysis of develop- 
ment; consideration of psychological learn- 
ing principles involved; relation to and utili- 
zation in computer-assisted instruction. An 
opportunity is afforded the student to de- 
velop an intrinsic program in his area of 
interest. Prerequisite: Teaching experience 
and course in linear programming. LAB FEE 
$5.00. 



13.557 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN THE PREPARA- 
TION OF AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS (3) 
The theory, planning, and application of ad- 
vanced methods and techniques in the prep 
aration of audiovisual materials will be 
stressed. Student projects may involve 
aspects of photography, printing, holography, 
and related materials production. Field trips 
will also play an important role. Prerequisite: 
13.453 or departmental approval. LAB FEE 
$5.00. 

13.563 APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 
(3) Includes Gagne's types of learning and 
recent psychological findings as applied to 
instructional communications in such areas 



AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 59 



as: programmed instruction, sensory ma- 
terials of learning, random access and infor- 
mation retrieval systems, and instructional 
television. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.573 INSTRUCTIONAL AND FACILITY DE- 
SIGN (3) A systems approach to the inte- 
gration of hardware, software, and personnel 
into a single unit with a schedule of time and 
sequential phasing to ensure orderly rela- 
tionships and interaction of human, technical, 
and environmental resources to fulfill instruc- 
tional goals. Included are the application of 
systems design to mediated self-instruction 
as part of individually prescribed instruction 
as well as systems design to large group or 
multi-media instruction. Student projects in- 
clude both instructional and facility designs 
for academic or training utilization. Pre- 
requisite: Six hours of audiovisual com- 
munications courses and/or departmental 
approval. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.689 INTERNSHIP IN AUDIOVISUAL COM- 
MUNICATIONS (3-6) Practical experience in 
audiovisual communications is provided. The 
intern will work cooperatively under the 
direction of an appropriate College faculty 
member and appropriate audiovisual field 
supervisor. He will engage in all aspects of 



the school system program as related to 
audiovisual communications. In addition, he 
will become familiar, through visitation, with 
State and national audiovisual communica- 
tions programs. Prerequisite: Six hours of 
audiovisual communications courses and de- 
partmental approval. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.695 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN AUDIO- 
VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS (3) Basic ele- 
ments of communications theory are studied 
and applied to audiovisual communications. 
Relationships between the learning process 
and perception are reviewed in terms of 
communications. Selected communications 
systems are examined and research in audio- 
visual communications is analyzed and dis- 
cussed. Prerequisite: Six hours of audiovis- 
ual communication courses or departmental 
approval. LAB FEE $5.00. 

13.699 MASTER'S THESIS IN AUDIOVISUAL 
COMMUNICATIONS (3) An original inves- 
tigation, using an acceptable research 
method and design of a research problem, 
to be conducted under the direction of one 
or more faculty members. Credit granted 
only after thesis has been accepted by stu- 
dent's thesis committee. 



60 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Biological Sciences 



Professors: CROOK, ERICKSON (Chairman), ODELL 

Associate Professors: ANDERSON, KUNDIG, MORSINK, MUMA, WALKER 

Assistant Professors: BUCHANAN, CASTELLI, DAIHL, EWIG, HENRIKSON, HILTON, 

LAUTERBACH. LEWIS, MECHLING, SCARBROUGH, SCHUETZ, SHOEMAKER. 

SMOES, WINDLER 
Instructors: HOOE, JOHNSON, SCARSELLA, SCHURMAN 

Students interested in biologically oriented careers in teaching, fundamental 
and industrial research, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary science, ocean- 
ography, conservation and allied fields should major in this department. Staff 
members will aid each student in designing a program to meet his special needs. 

Biology Major 

The requirements for the major are: Biology 14.101, 14.105, 14.109, 14.331, 
14.351, 14.401, and six credit hours from other courses offered by the depart- 
ment; Chemistry 22.101, 22.102, and 22.231; Physics 66.211 and 66.212; and 
Mathematics 50.115. At least 15 hours in Biology must be taken while in resi- 
dence at Towson State College. 

Biology 14.004, 14.113, 14.114, 14.301, 14.303 and 14.387 may not be included 
in the basic 30 hours required for the major without permission of the depart- 
ment chairman. 

Honors Program: To graduate with honors in biology a student must com- 
plete Biology 14.486 and 14.498-14.499 to be taken in consecutive semesters of the 
senior year. The research thesis must be presented in an oral defense before 
the Honors Research Committee. An oral presentation open to the public is also 
required. In addition, a minimum of three credit hours must be selected from 
14.491 and/or 14.481 in the junior year. For eligibility and general information 
consult the College Honors Program description. 

Medical Technology 

This program is listed under Health Science. Students should consult Dr. Carl 
Henrikson of the biological Sciences Department, Director of Medical Tech- 
nology, for further information. 

Natural Science Major 

The program is designed to give a broader view of the sciences than obtained 
in a traditional undergraduate major in a single science. This is done at the 
sacrifice of depth and students should, therefore, be aware that this major will 
not prepare them for graduate work in a single science. Course requirements 
are: 

Biology 14.101, 14.105, 14.109, 14.291 or 14.491 for Physical Science 64.401\ 
Chemistry 22.101-102; one course of either 210, 211, 230, or 231, Physical Science 
64.121, 64.211, Physics 66.211-212 (or 66.221-222) science electives (including 
one field course) for 11 credit hours, and Mathematics 50.115, for a total of 54 
hours in science and mathematics. 

Prospective secondary school teachers of general science should elect this 
major. To meet State Certification requirements a total of 36 hours of science 
are needed. Eighteen hours must be taken in either biology, chemistry, or 
physics, 6 hours in each of the other fields, and the remaining 6 hours from any 
of the above. 



61 



Graduate Program 

The course of study leading to the Master of Science in Biology is designed to 
provide greater knowledge and understanding of biology and to help the student 
develop a proficiency in independent thought, inquiry and research. The student 
may pursue either the Thesis Program (30 credits and a thesis) or the Non- 
Thesis Program (36 credits). Detailed information regarding both programs is 
given in the Graduate Studies Bulletin. 



BIOLOGY COURSES (BIOL) 

NOTE: 14.101 is a prerequisite for all other biology courses. For details on exemption from this required 
course, see the Academic Regulations section of this bulletin. 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

14.004 B.S.C.S. BIOLOGY METHODS IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL (3) The course is 
designed to give the student an intensive 
study of the history, rationale and method 
of B.S.C.S. in the secondary school biology 
classroom. Special attention will be given to 
the laboratory as a teaching tool with stu- 
dents performing laboratories in the various 
versions. Evening and summer programs. 

14.101 (103) CONTEMPORARY GENERAL BIOL- 
OGY (4) The basic biological principles 
common to plants and animals. Topics in- 
clude cell structure and processes (both 
physical and biochemical), mitosis, gameto- 
genesis, aspects of embryology, genetics, 
evolution and ecology. Average of two lab- 
oratory hours per week. Each semester. 

14.105 (204) GENERAL BOTANY (4) Morphol- 
ogy, anatomy, and physiology explored 
through the study of selected plant types. 
Average of three laboratory hours per week. 
Each semester. 

14.109 (214) FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY OF VER- 
TEBRATES (4) Organ systems of selected 
vertebrate types with emphasis on basic 
physiological processes. Average of two 
hours per week in laboratory work. Students 
who have taken 14.113-114 Human Anatomy 
and Physiology may not take this course. 
Each semester. 

14.113-114 (209-210) HUMAN ANATOMY AND 
PHYSIOLOGY (4, 4) Skeletal, muscular, 
nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, 
excretory, endocrine, and reproductive sys- 
tems. Average of two laboratory hours per 
week. In order to receive credit, both semes- 
ters must be completed. Courses must be 
taken in sequence except with special per- 
mission of the instructor. Students who have 
completed 14.109, Functional Anatomy of 
Vertebrates, may not take this course with- 



out permission of the Department. 14.113 
each semester, 14.114 each semester. 

14.195 COURSE RESEARCH (1) Research re- 
lated to a specific course successfully com- 
pleted by the student. By invitation or with 
the consent of the instructor. Each semester. 

14.207 (229) INTRODUCTION TO PALEONTOL- 
OGY (4) Examination of major forms of life 
with the emphasis on appearances, diversi- 
fication, and extinctions during the different 
geologic periods. Spring, odd years. 

14.221 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL PARASI- 
TOLOGY (4) A survey of the major groups 
of animal parasites and their vectors. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the more important 
human parasites. Prerequisite: 14.109 or con- 
sent of instructor. Spring, even years. 

14.235 ECONOMIC BOTANY (2) A study of 
the plants and plant products which provide 
man with various luxuries and necessities. 
Emphasis will be on higher plants commer- 
cially important in North America, Prerequi- 
site: 14.105 or consent of instructor. Fall, 
odd years. 

14.253 (353) INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4) 
Aquatic and terrestrial species of phyla from 
the Protozoa through the Echinodermata with 
special emphasis on local forms. Insects are 
not considered. Economic, ecological, and 
taxonomic considerations. Average of two 
laboratory hours per week. Fall, each year. 

14.291 (396) INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 
(2) Laljoratory work of an advanced nature 
under the guidance of the department. Each 
student will present and defend his work at 
a seminar. Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. Spring, each year. 

14.295 COURSE RESEARCH (1) Research re- 
lated to a specific course successfully com- 
pleted by the student. By invitation or with 
the consent of the instructor. Each semester. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

14.301 (401) FIELD NATURAL SCIENCE (4) A 
study of various environments to determine 
their physical and biological components and 
to understand the relationship of these forms 



to one another and to man. Emphasis is on 
field observation. An average of three labora- 
tory hours per week. Once each year. 



62 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



14.303 LIFE SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (3) Emphases placed on the 
conceptual approach to science teaching, 
the modes of scientific inquiry, and the 
utilization of living organisms in the class- 
room. Each semester. 

14.304 (403) GENERAL ECOLOGY (4) Basic 
principles of ecology. Interrelationships be- 
tween animals and plants and their natural 
environments, emphasizing the specific 
biomes available for study in f^aryland. 
Studies vj\\\ be based on observations and 
data collected in the field. An average of 
two laboratory hours per week. Spring, odd 
years. 

14.310 (471) ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVA- 
TION (4) Basic conservation practices and 
problems. Soil, water, forest, and wildlife 
resources with emphasis on interrelation- 
ships. Specialists in various phases of local, 
state, and federal conservation work conduct 
or assist in the conduct of numerous field 
trips. Average of two laboratory hours per 
week. Once each year. 

14.315 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (4) General 
microbiological techniques. Pathogenesis of 
bacterial, viral, rickettsial and fungal dis- 
eases with emphasis on medically important 
bacteria. Recommended for students pursu- 
ing a career in the medical sciences. Pre- 
requisites: CHEM 22.101, 22.102. The latter 
may be taken concurrently. Spring, each 
year. 

14.318 (407) MICROBIOLOGY (4) A course in- 
vestigating the basic principles of such 
groups of organisms as bacteria, protozoa, 
and lower plant forms, with emphasis on 
bacteria. Average of three laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 22.101, 
22.102. The latter may be taken concurrently. 
Fall, each year. 

14.322 (421) MICROTECHNIQUE (3) Tech- 
niques used in preparation of plant and ani- 
mal tissues for histological examination. 
Average of two laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 22.101, 22.102. Spring, 
even years. 

14.331 (205) FIELD AND SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 
(4) Plant kingdom centered around tax- 
onomy and ecology. Methods of collection, 
identification, and preservation will be de- 
veloped in the field and laboratory. Average 
of three laboratory hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: 14.105 or consent of instructor. 
Each semester. 

14.341 PHYCOLOGY (4) The systematics, 
structure, ecology, physiology, and life his- 
tories of algae. Laboratory will include meth- 
ods of collection, culture, and experimental 
study of selected species. Prerequisite: 
14.105. Fall, even years. 

14.345 (445) MYCOLOGY (4) An introductory 
study of the morphology, classification, life 
histories, and economic applications of the 
fungi. Average of three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisite: 14.105. Fall, even years. 



14.351 (355) FIELD AND SYSTEMATIC VER- 
TEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4) Evolution, distri- 
bution, and definitive features of each class 
are studied comparatively. Extensive field 
and laboratory work deals with morphologic, 
taxonomic, ecological, and behavioral fea- 
tures of selected vertebrate groups and 
species. Average of three laboratory hours 
per week. Each semester. 

14.360 (422) HISTOLOGY (3) Tissues of the 
vertebrate body. Average of two laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: 14.109. Spring, 
odd years. 

14.367 GENERAL ENDOCRINOLOGY (3) En- 
docrine mechanisms regulating homeostasis 
and functional integrity of animals, with em- 
phasis on vertebrates. Prerequisites: 14.109 
or equivalent, CHEM 22.101, 22.102. Fall, 
even years. 

14.371 (451) ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (4) The 
classification and evolutionary aspects of 
behavior with emphasis on behavioral mech- 
anisms. An average of three laboratory hours 
per week. Spring, odd years. 

14.381 (493) BIOLOGICAL LITERATURE (2) 
Familiarization with the literature of biology 
through the preparation of papers requiring 
a knowledge of techniques for exploring the 
literature. Two one-hour lectures per week. 
Prerequisite: at least 6 hours of biology. 
Fall, each year. 

14.383 (391) HISTORY OF BIOLOGICAL CON- 
CEPTS (3) Historical development of bio- 
logical concepts through the reading of 
classical and contemporary writings. Fall, 
odd years. 

14.385 (489) SELECTED GENERAL PRINCIPLES 
IN BIOLOGY (3) Current directions of bio- 
logical investigations will be discussed to- 
gether with a treatment of recent contribu- 
tions to biological areas and principles. 
Sufficient background will be given to pro- 
vide coherence and understanding. Three 
one-hour lectures. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Evening and summer programs. 
Not for graduate credit, but for recertifica- 
tion. 

14.387 BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY (3) Considera- 
tions given to the biological aspects of the 
environment; its concepts and problems and 
their effects upon the population. Once each 
year. 

14.395 COURSE RESEARCH (1) Research re- 
lated to a specific course successfully com- 
pleted by the student. By invitation or with 
the consent of the instructor. Each semester. 

14.401 (411) GENETICS (4) Heredity and var- 
iation, and their application to evolution and 
development. Gene action at the morphologi- 
cal, physiological and biochemical levels. 
Laboratory work entails use of Drosophila, 
corn, and Neurospora in the application of 
genetic principles. Average of three labora- 
tory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 63 



22.101, 22.102 and MATH 50.115 or consent 
of instructor. Each semester. 

14.403 (412) ADVANCED GENETICS (3) Em- 
phasis on the molecular basis of gene action. 
Discussion of current work and methods re- 
lated to the problem of gene structure, func- 
tion, and mutation including the translation 
and regulation of genetic information. Pre- 
requisite: 14.401 or its equivalent or consent 
of instructor. Spring, odd years. 

14.404 ECOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (3) A se- 
ries of lectures and readings on standard 
investigative techniques employed by ecolo- 
gists in the various specialty fields. An Indi- 
vidual investigation, laboratory or field, using 
appropriate equipment, Is required. Prerequi- 
site: 14.304 or its course equivalent. Fall, 
even years. 

14.408 (409) CELL BIOLOGY (4) A study of 
the molecular and morphological organiza- 
tion of the cell in relationship to functions of 
the cell's organelles. An average of three 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: 
14.105, 14.109, CHEM 22.231. Spring, even 
years. 

14.411 (405) WILDLIFE BIOLOGY (4) Impor- 
tant wildlife species with emphasis on 
aspects of research and management. Spe- 
cific techniques and problems are studied 
in the field. Average of two hours per week 
in laboratory and field work. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. Fall, even years. 

14.421 IMMUNOLOGY (4) Fundamental prin- 
ciples of immunology with emphasis on the 
nature of antibodies and antigens, blood 
groups, antibody — antigen reactions, hyper- 
sensitivity, autoimmunization tumor immu- 
nology, artificial grafting and the preparation 
of vaccines. Prerequisites: 14.315 or 14.318 
or consent of instructor. Fall, odd years. 

14.429 BIOANALYSIS (3) Microscopic and 
biochemical methods used in determining 
major components and important contami- 
nants of feeds, spices, stabilizers, adhesives, 
bakery materials, fats and oils, meat prod- 
ucts, crystal mixtures, dairy products, etc. An 
average of two hours per week in laboratory 
and field work. Prerequisite: 14.105, CHEM 
22.101, 22.102, or permission of instructor. 
Evening and summer programs. 

14.432 VASCULAR PLANT TAXONOMY (4) A 
study of the history and principles of vascu- 
lar plant systematics with laboratory time 
devoted to collection and identification of 
plants in the local flora. Prerequisites: 14.105, 
14.331 or consent of instructor. Fall, even 
years. 

14.433 PLANT SPECIATION (3) A study of 
such speciation phenomena as race isola- 
tion, hybridity, polyploidy, pomixis, and self- 
compatibility as they influence the evolution 
of new populations. Prerequisite: 14.331. 
Spring, even years. 



14.436 (437) PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (4) Life 
functions of plants as related to structure at 
all levels: cells, organs, and the complete 
organism. Consideration of the interaction of 
environmental and genetic factors on plant 
metabolism. Average of three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisites: 14.105, CHEM 
22.101, 22.102. CHEM 22.231 recommended. 
Spring, odd years. 

14.439 PLANT ANATOMY (4) Origin and de- 
velopment of organs and tissue systems In 
vascular plants. Average of three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: 14.105. Spring, 
even years. 

14.441 PLANT PATHOLOGY (4) A study of 
plant diseases, their symptoms, causal 
agents, etiology, epidemiology, prevention, 
and control. Average of 'three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: 14.105. Fall, 
odd years. 

14.456 (457) ORNITHOLOGY (4) Lecture, lab- 
oratory and field course in bird identification, 
structure, behavior, ecology, and general 
economic relationships. Emphasis is on birds 
of the Baltimore area. A banding station is 
operated in conjunction with the course. 
Occasional field trips. Average of two lab- 
oratory hours per week. Spring, even years. 

14.458 (459) MAMMALOGY (4) The evolution, 
comparative morphology, systematics, and 
distribution of mammals. Representative life 
histories are considered. Average of two 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of instructor. Spring, odd years. 

14.461 ENTOMOLOGY (4) Laboratory and field 
course in insects. Recognition of the more 
common orders, and a study of their struc- 
ture, behavior, ecology, economic impor- 
tance, and control. Average of three labora- 
tory hours per week. Fall, even years. 

14.463 ANIMAL EMBRYOLOGY (4) Develop- 
mental anatomy and the underlying prin- 
ciples involved in development. This last 
area will be approached from an experi- 
mental base. Average of three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: 14.109. Fall, 
odd years. 

14.465 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (4) Functioning 
of animal organ systems, with emphasis on 
the vertebrate body. Average of three lab- 
oratory hours per week. Prerequisites: 
14.109, CHEM 22.101, 22.102. Fall, odd years. 

14.481 (491) DIRECTED READING IN BIOLOGY 
(1-3) Independent reading in an area se- 
lected by the student in consultation with 
the instructor. Prerequisite: a minimum of 
10 hours in biology. Each semester. 

14.486 SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOL- 
OGY (1-2) Study and discussion of topics in 
a specialized area to be selected by instruc- 
tor. Areas will vary from semester to semes- 
ter. Prerequisites: a minimum of 10 semester 
hours in biology or consent of instructor. 
Spring, each year. 



64 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



14.491 (496) INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN 
BIOLOGY (2-3) Independent investigation of 
a problem under the supervision of a staff 
member culminating in a written presenta- 
tion. Prerequisite: a minimum of 15 semester 
hours in biology and consent of instructor. 
Each semester. 

14.495 COURSE RESEARCH (1) Research re- 
lated to a specific course successfully com- 
pleted by the student. By invitation or w/ith 
the consent of the instructor. Each semester. 

14.498 (497) HONORS RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY 



(2) Individual research of an extensive na- 
ture under the direction of a staff member, 
culminating in an honors thesis. Credit for 
14.498 not av^arded until 14.499 is success- 
fully completed. Prerequisites: open only to 
advanced honors candidates and by consent 
of instructor. Each semester. 

14.499 (498) SENIOR THESIS IN BIOLOGY (2) 
Writing of an honors thesis based on indi- 
vidual research done under the direction of 
a staff member. Prerequisites: open only to 
advanced honors candidates and by consent 
of instructor. Each semester. 



Graduate Division 

14.501 CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (3) 
Discussion of current topics in a specific 
area of biology. The area w/ill vary each 
semester; therefore, this course may be 
taken twice. Prerequisites: a suitable back- 
ground in the area emphasized. Evening and 
summer programs. 

14.505 PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY (1-3) Labora- 
tory or literature research on a particular 
problem of interest to the student that does 
not pertain to his thesis. Regular conferences 
with the instructor are required. A prelim- 
inary paper is submitted for discussion, sug- 
gestions and corrections. The final paper 
should incorporate the necessary changes. 
Credits to be arranged by consultation with 
the instructor. Evening and summer pro- 
grams. 

14.507 PHYSIOLOGICAL ANIMAL ECOLOGY (4) 
A study of the physiological responses of 
animals to varying ecological conditions. 
Prerequisites: 14.304, 14.465. Evening and 
summer programs. 

14.509 AQUATIC BIOLOGY (4) A study of 
freshwater and brackish water plants and 
animals of the local area with a field em- 
phasis. Several representative habitats are 
considered comparatively, using various 
methods of collecting and identifying species 
of the fauna and flora. Prerequisites: 14.331, 
14.351, 14.253 or consent of instructor. Eve- 
ning and summer programs. 

14.533 PLANT MORPHOGENESIS (4) The mor- 
phological growth and development of plants 
in response to natural and artificial stimuli 
at the cellular, tissue, and organ level. Pre- 
requisites: two botany courses. Evening and 
summer programs. 

14.534 PLANT DISTRIBUTION (3) A study of 
the present distribution of the earth's major 
vegetational formations as related to en- 
vironmental factors. Special emphasis is 
given to the terrestrial biomes of North 
America. Prerequisites: 14.331, 14.432 rec- 
ommended. Evening and summer programs. 

14.535 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 
(3) Physiological interactions between 
plants and environments at the organism 
level. Exchanges of physical and chemical 
factors such as energy, gases, water, pesti- 



cides, air and water pollutants, fertilizers, 
lime, radioactive materials. Prerequisites: 
14.436 or consent of instructor. Evening and 
summer programs. 
14.553 BIOLOGY OF TERRESTRIAL AND 
FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES (4) An 
advanced study of invertebrates including 
classification, physiology and various eco- 
logical parameters influencing distribution of 
local fauna in freshwater and terrestrial 
habitats. Parasites and insects are excluded. 
Prerequisites: 14.253 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Evening and summer programs. 

14.561 INSECT ECOLOGY (4) A study of in- 
sect communities and populations empha- 
sizing conditions of the environment that 
favor abundance of insects in various habi- 
tats. Field work involves examination of 
various aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Pre- 
requisites: 14.461, 14.253 recommended. 
Evening and summer programs. 

14.601 GRADUATE RESEARCH (PLAN B) (3) 
An individual research project is carried out 
under the guidance of a graduate faculty 
advisor. Prerequisite: successful completion 
of all requirements for the Advancement to 
Candidacy Examination. Evening and sum- 
mer programs. 

14.608 INVESTIGATIONS IN CELL PHYSIOL- 
OGY (3) Individual research on problems 
in cellular activity. Emphasis is directed to- 
ward the effect of various factors, including 
environmental agents, on cellular metab- 
olism, membrane function, or enzyme activ- 
ity. Prerequisites: 14.408, CHEM 22.351. Eve- 
ning and summer programs. 

14.631 EXPERIMENTAL PLANT ECOLOGY (3) 
The design and implementation of experi- 
mental procedures involving ecological plant 
relationships. Emphasis will be on the col- 
lection, interpretation, and presentation of 
data from laboratory and field experiments. 
The taxa to be investigated will be selected 
by the instructor and the student. Prerequi- 
sites: 14.304, 14.331, 14.405 or consent of 
the instructor. 

14.697 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) Student 
reports and discussion dealing with bio- 
logical research. The subject matter will 
vary each semester. An outline of the sem- 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 65 



inar and a bibliography are required. Stu- 
dents are required to enroll for two semes- 
ters. Evening and summer programs. 

14.699 THESIS (6-9) An original investigation 
to be pursued under the direction of one or 



more faculty members. Credit granted only 
after thesis has been accepted by the stu- 
dent's thesis committee. Evening and sum- 
mer programs. 



SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES (SCIE) 

The following courses are staffed by the Depart- 
ments of Biological Sciences and Physics and 
are offered in cooperation with the Education 
Department. Descriptions of these courses are in- 
cluded under Education Department listings. 



(333) EARLY CHILDHOOD EDU- 
PROFESSIONAL BLOCK I— SCI- 



EDUC 26.341 
CATION 
ENCE 

EDUC 27.398 (390) STUDENT TEACHING IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL— BIOLOGY 

EDUC 27.398 (390) STUDENT TEACHING IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL— SCIENCE 

SCIE 76.002 FIELD COURSE IN SECONDARY 
TEACHING METHODS 



SCIE 76.371 (335) TEACHING SCIENCE IN 
EARLY CHILDHOOD 

SCIE 76.375 TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOL 

SCIE 76.379 (383) TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 

SCIE 76.488 (SUMMERS) AEROSPACE EDUCA- 
TION WORKSHOP 

SCIE 76.585 (509) SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL SCIENCE 

5!0L 14.303 LIFE SCIENCE FOR THE ELE- 
MENTARY TEACHER 



66 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Business Administration 

Chairman: HAMPTON 

Professor: CHANDLER 

Associate Professor: ROWE 

Assistarit Professors: CAMPBELL, CASTALDI, GIBNEY, SEGANISH 

Instructors: BUCHOFF, HAIGHT, MACCHIETTE, NEVILLE 

The Business Administration program seeks to develop personal and professional 
skills related to business and management. It provides training for careers in 
business or government as well as preparation for graduate study in business 
or management. 

Requirements for the Major 

Students majoring in business administration are required to take 39 credit 
hours in three categories: core courses; associated courses; upper-division busi- 
ness electives. 

Core Courses 

The student must complete the following 15 hours of courses with the grade of 
C or better: BUAD 16.101 Introduction to Business Management; BUAD 16.201 
Accounting Principles I; BUAD 16.202 Accounting Principles II; BUAD 16.331 
Financial Management; BUAD 16.341 Marketing. 

Associated Courses 

The student must complete the following 9 hours of courses with a grade of D 
or better: MATH 50.231 Basic Statistics (Math 50.331 and 50.332 may be sub- 
stituted. ECON 24.301 and 24.302 may be substituted. For business psychology 
double majors, PSYC 70.111 may be substituted.) ECON 24.101 Economic Prin- 
ciples and Problems (Micro-economics) ; ECON 24.102 Economic Principles and 
Problems (Macro-economics). 

Upper-division Business Electives 

The student must complete 15 hours of business administration courses in addi- 
tion to the core courses. The 15 hours must be chosen from upper division courses 
and must be completed with a grade of C or better. 

Transfer Credit 

Credit towards the business major will be given for approved courses taken at 
other schools. Students planning to transfer from junior or community colleges 
are encouraged to take an Introduction to Business course and six hours of ac- 
counting as part of their first two years of college. Six hours of economics may 
also be taken. Students are encouraged to take finance and marketing after trans- 
ferring to Towson State College. Transfer students must complete, with a C 
or better, at least 21 hours of business administration credits at Towson State 
College in order to qualify for the business major. 

Students currently enrolled at Towson State College may be given credit 
for courses taken at other accredited 4-year colleges. Approval should be gained 
in advance. 

Requirements for the Minor 

Students minoring in business administration must take 33 hours of courses 
including the core courses, associated courses, and 9 hours of upper-division 
business electives. 



67 



Areas of Concentration 

Although not required, students are encouraged to select an area of concen- 
tration within the business administration major. Each area is designed by the 
student in conjunction with an advisor selected from the full-time faculty in the 
business administration department. The areas are designated so that students 
may gain depth and high levels of skills in specific functional areas. 

The areas of concentration within the business administration major are: 

Accounting — courses in areas such as basic, intermediate and advanced 
accounting, tax and cost accounting and auditing are available. This concentra- 
tion is designed for students selecting careers in corporation accounting or plan- 
ning to take the exam to be a certified public accountant. 

Finance — courses in financial management, investment analysis, money and 
banking, economics. Designed for students seeking careers in banking or corpo- 
rate finance. 

Marketing — courses in market research, advertising, and transportation. 
Designed for students planning a selling, advertising, distribution or marketing 
career. 

Personnel — courses in personnel, industrial relations, labor economics and 
management. Designed for students selecting a personnel or management career. 

International Business — courses in international business, marketing and 
finance. Designed for students interested in learning the nature of international 
business and management. 

General Business — courses selected from the overall program. Designed to 
develop a broad management background for students not seeking a specific func- 
tional area. 

Additional electives recommended to business majors are: ECON. 24.309 
Intermediate Price Theory; ECON. 24.323 Money and Banking; 24.327 Inter- 
national Economics; ECON. 24.381 Labor Economics; ECON. 24.407 Business 
Cycles and Forecasting; POSC. 68.207 State Government; POSC. 68.305 Urban 
Gov. & Politics; POSC. 68.375 Public Administration; PSYC. 70.104 Applied 
Psychology; MATH. 50.209 Math of Finance; MATH. 50.271, 272 Calculus; 
MATH. 50.337 Computer Programming; MCOM. 53.215 Bus. & Prof. Speech; 
MCOM. 53.256 Feature Writing; MCOM. 53.353 Publicity and Public Relations; 
and MCOM. 53.385 Mass Media in Modern Society. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES (BUAD) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 



16.101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS MAN- 
AGEMENT (3) This course is concerned 
with the problems of organization dynamics 
and behavior of people, within and outside 
the business, with which management must 
deal in attaining the objectives of the enter- 
prise. 

Upper Division — Undergraduate 

16.221 BASIC REAL ESTATE (3) Principles of 
Real Estate and Allied Fields. Maryland State 
Code of ethics, rights, transfer of property, 
financing transfer, and the real estate market. 
This course fulfills the credit requirement for 
the Real Estate Salesman's Licensing exam- 
ination. (Not for major credit.) 

16.223 LIFE INSURANCE (3) Fundamental 
principles, contracts, cost to policy holders, 
premium holders, premium computation, cal- 
culation, apportionment of surplus. Laws and 
regulations, estate planning and group insur- 
ance. (Not for major credit.) 



16.201-202 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I, II 
(3, 3) Fundamentals of accounting as ap- 
plied to proprietorships, partnerships, and 
corporations. The recording process; con- 
struction, interpretation, and managements' 
use of financial statements. 



16.225-226 REAL ESTATE I, I! (3,3) I— Re- 
view of basic real estate, state laws and 
regulations, sales agreements, listing agree- 
ments, miscellaneous contracts, financing, 
mortgaging process, secondary markets; 
appraising fundamentals and ethics. Pre- 
requisite: Permanent Salesman's License or 
16.221 

II — Review Real Estate I, state regulations, 
zoning, internal management, public rela- 
tions, truth in lending law, national real 
estate aspects, tax aspects, data processing. 



68 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



real estate 
16.225. 



management. Prerequisite: 



16.301-302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I, I! 
(3, 3) Preparation and analysis of financial 
statements. Accounting theory. Valuation of 
working capital, noncurrent assets and lia- 
bilities, revenue and expenses. Prerequisite: 
16.202 

16.303-304 COST ACCOUNTING I, II (3, 3) 
First semester will offer components of man- 
ufacturing cost under the job order and 
processing cost system. The second semes- 
ter will cover preparation of budgets and 
budgetary controls, standard costs and their 
application in budgetaries control. Prerequi- 
site: 16.202 

16.305-306 TAX ACCOUNTING I, II (3,3) I— 
Federal income tax laws governing gross in- 
come, deductions, calculation of taxable in- 
come and income tax rates. Emphasis is 
placed on the effect of these laws on the 
income of individual tax payers. II — Federal 
income tax laws dealing with partnerships, 
corporations, special tax areas and State of 
Maryland income tax laws. Prerequisite: 
16.202 

16.325 BUSINESS LAW ! (3) The function of 
the law with particular attention to contracts, 
agency, sales, commercial paper, personal 
property, and real property. 

16.326 BUSINESS LAW II (3) The law of part- 
nerships, corporations, estates, bankruptcy, 
and of government relationships with busi- 
ness. Prerequisite: 16.325 

16.331 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3) An an- 
alytical approach to the study of financial 
problems of business concerns. Instruments 
and institutions significant for financial man- 
agement are studied. Prerequisites: 16.101, 
16.202 

16.332 ADVANCED CORPORATE FINANCE (3) 
This course covers selected topics in man- 
agerial finance including cost of capital, 
capital-structure management, techniques of 
financing, and tools of financial decision- 
making. Prerequisite: 16.331 

16.333 PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENTS AND 
SECURITY ANALYSIS (3) The valuation of 
stocks and bonds: safety, income, and mar- 
ketability. Analysis of financial statements. 
Portfolio management. Prerequisites: 16.101, 
16.202 

16.341 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3) An an- 
alytical approach to the study of marketing 
problems of business firms. Attention is 
focused on the influence of the marketplace, 
the industry structure, and the role of gov- 
ernment. Prerequisite: 16.101 

16.343 PHYSICAL DISTRIBUTION MANAGE- 
MENT (3) A study of the elements involved 
in physical distribution management. Topics 
include transportation, packaging, materials 
handling, warehouse location. A systems 
approach is employed emphasizing the 



trade-offs between the various functions. Pre- 
requisite: 16.341 

16.345 ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT (3) Anal- 
ysis of promotional strategies for different 
classifications of products and services. 
Planning, preparing and scheduling adver- 
tisements. Media selection and determina- 
tion of effectiveness. Advertising research. 
Prerequisite: 16.341 

16.346 INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING (3) Func- 
tions of industrial advertising, research of 
the industrial market, management and 
agency relations, budgeting product promo- 
tion, media, advertising preparations. Pre- 
requisite: 16.345 

16.355 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS (3) International payments, im- 
porting and exporting, foreign investment, 
market entry, foreign taxation, international 
business law. Prerequisite: 16.101 

16.361 MANAGEMENT THEORY (3) The na- 
ture development and future prospects of 
management and organization theory. Man- 
agement functions and processes are viewed 
in terms of organization, directing, commu- 
nication, goals and responsibilities. Prere- 
quisites: 16.101 or consent of instructor. 

16.363 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BUSI- 
NESS (3) A course examining the proc- 
esses, tools, and techniques for quantitative 
analysis for management. Covers basic the- 
ory for solving deterministic and probablistic 
models with emphasis on applications to the 
business environment. Includes linear pro- 
gramming, optimization models, inventory, 
queueing, scheduling and game theory. Pre- 
requisites: 50.115 and 50.231. 

16.371 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION (3) 
Study of the economic and political factors 
affecting transportation and transportation 
systems. Development problems and govern- 
ment regulation. Study of freight and pas- 
senger carrier modes. Prerequisite: 16.101 

16.381 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (3) Re- 
cruiting, selecting, utilizing, and maintaining 
an effective and satisfied work force. Pre- 
requisite: 16.101 

16.401-402 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING I. II (3, 3) 
I — The theory and practice of accounting 
for partnerships, installment sales, consign- 
ments, branch offices, and special account- 
ing situations. II — A continuation of theory 
and practice of accounting as it pertains to 
consolidations, estates and trusts, municipal 
institutional accounting. Prerequisite: 16.302 

16.403-404 AUDITING I, II (3,3) I— Examina- 
tion of generally accepted auditing stand- 
ards, internal control, professional ethics, 
and an introduction to auditing procedures. 
II — A continuation of Auditing I concentrat- 
ing on auditing procedures, techniques, and 
standards of reporting. Prerequisite: 16.302 

16.435 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3) The op- 
erating framework of international finance in- 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 69 



eluding balance of payments, foreign ex- 
change, foreign money markets and financial 
management of the multi-international cor- 
poration. Prerequisites: 16.331, 16.355 

16.441 MARKETING RESEARCH (3) The theory 
and application of marketing research as a 
tool facilitating the corporate decision mak- 
ing process from sales research market 
analysis through motivational analysis, ad- 
vertising policy and product and package 
design. Course projects will provide oppor- 
tunity to develop proficiency in research 
design. Sampling theory, data collection, 
interview techniques and statistical analysis. 
Prerequisites: 16.341, 50,231 

16.445 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3) The 
environment of international marketing in- 
cluding channels of distribution, advertising, 
and legal, economic and cultural factors. 
Problems and obstacles related to market 
surveys and development of policies. Re- 
gional studies. Prerequisites: 16.341, 16.355 

16.461 ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYSIS (3) Tech- 
niques of increasing management efficiency, 
including organization analysis, systems 
analysis, time and motion study, automatic 
data processing and feasibility studies. Pre- 
requisites: 16.101, 16.202 

16.463-464 CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS PROB- 
LEMS I. II (3,3) A seminar course designed 
to challenge the student's ability to form 
soundly developed business decisions. The 
emphasis is on relating the appropriate mar- 



keting, financial and production information 
available to management. Prerequisite: nine 
hours upper level BUAD courses. 

16.481 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (3) Studies 
in contract negotiation and collective bar- 
gaining. Labor disputes, internal problems in 
unions, management problems, and legal 
constraints. Prerequisites: 16.381, 24.381 

16.482 GRIEVANCES AND ARBITRATION (3) 
Case study analysis of the Grievance and 
Arbitration procedure or a means of con- 
flict resolution in existing Industrial Rela- 
tions systems. Discharge, discipline, working 
conditions, past practice, promotion, over- 
time, and other specific arbitrable issues 
will be discussed. Prerequisite: 16.481. 

16.497 DIRECTED READINGS (3) Readings in 
selected functional or conceptual areas of 
business or management. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. 

16.498 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN BUSI- 
NESS ADMINISTRATION (3) Directed re- 
search on specific problems in a functional 
area of business or management. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 

16.499 BUSINESS PRACTICUM (1.2,3) Stu- 
dents are required to work in assigned proj- 
ects in an actual business environment dur- 
ing mini-semester. Priority will be given to 
graduating seniors. Students must have com- 
pleted at least 21 credit hours in Business 
Administration to participate in the mini-term. 



70 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Chemistry 



Professor: KASK 

Associate Professors: BLANKENSHIP (Cfiairman), MILIO, YARBROUGH 

Assistant Professors: SWEETING, TOPPING 

Chemistry Major 

This major may be elected by students who intend to do graduate work in 
chemistry, to teach in secondary schools, to work in industrial, government and 
hospital laboratories, technical libraries, etc. Students who plan chemically 
oriented careers such as fundamental and industrial research, medicine, dentistry, 
pharmacy, veterinary medicine, agriculture, and other allied fields, may also elect 
this major. Students electing this major should select an advisor from the faculty 
of the chemistry department to assi.st them in designing a program to meet their 
special needs. Students should see their advisors early in their time at Towson State 
College and upon occasion of any change in courses or schedule in their program. 

In addition to the general requirements for a bachelor's degree the following 
chemistry and supporting courses are required for all chemistry majors: Chem- 
istry 22.101-102 for 22.103-104), 22.211, 22.231-232, 22.341, 22.342, 22.343, 
22.344, 22.411, 22.422; Physics 66.221-222 (or 66.211-212); Mathematics 50.273- 
274. Chemistry 22.241 is recommended for most students. 

For those who intend to go to graduate school in chemistry at least two post- 
physical chemistry courses in chemistry and two semesters of German or Russian 
are strongly recommended. Additional physics and mathematics courses are also 
recommended, especially Computer Science 23.337 and/or 50. 171. 

Students in the secondary education program (planning to teach chemistry 
in accredited schools) have an additional certification requirement of Biology 
14.101. These students should be registered with the Secondary Education depart- 
ment, should have an advisor in addition to their Chemistry Faculty Advisor on 
their education program, and should consult with him concerning current certifi- 
cation and program requirements, 

A package of optional four-year suggested schedules is available by applica- 
tion to the chemistry department. 

Natural Science Major 

This major is designed to give a broader view of the sciences than is obtained 
in a traditional undergraduate major in a single science. This is done at the 
sacrifice of depth and students should, therefore, be aware that this major will 
not prepare them for graduate work in a single science. 

Course requirements are Biology 14.101, 14.105, 14.109; Chemistn,- 22.101- 
102, and one of 22.210, 22.211, 22.230 or 22.231; Mathematics 50.115; Physical 
Sciences 64.121, 64.211; Physics 66.211-212 (or 66.221-222); Biology 14.291 or 
14.491 or Physical Sciences 64.401; biological or physical sciences electives (in- 
cluding one field course) for eleven credit hours: a total of 54 or 55 hours in 
physical sciences, biological sciences and mathematics. 

Prospective secondary school teachers of general science should elect this 
major. Students should plan their programs to meet the certification requirements 
of the area in which they plan to teach. 

CHEMISTRY COURSES (CHEM) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

22.100 CHEMISTRY FOR NON-SCIENTISTS (3) try. Chemical principles will be discussed 

A course for the non-scientists to help him in the light of such topics as: nuclear power, 

or her understand and evaluate current and environmental pollution and body chemistry, 

future technological and scientific develop- The approach will be non-mathematical, 

ments, especially those related to chemis- Three lecture hours and one discussion hour. 

71 



22.101-102 GENERAL CHEMISTRY (4, 4) 
Atomic and molecular structures and their 
relation to properties of matter; solutions; 
types of reaction, energetics, kinetics, equi- 
libria, and the related study of some impor- 
tant metallic and non-metallic elements. 
Laboratory work involves individual quanti- 
tive experiments and semimicro qualitative 
analysis. Three lecture hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: High 
school algebra. 

22.103-104 GENERAL CHEMISTRY FOR 
MAJORS (4, 4) For chemistry majors and 
other qualified students. Essentially the 
the same as CHEM 22.101-102 but a more 
rigorous treatment of problems and a more 
extensive study of the elements. Three lec- 
ture hours and one three-hour laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Entrance examination 
or a grade of at least C in college algebra- 
trigonmetry or the equivalent. 

22.210 PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF CHEM- 
ICAL ANALYSIS (4) A one semester course 
in chemical analysis for non-chemistry maj- 
ors emphasizing the theory and application 
of common gravimetric, volumetric, chroma- 
tographic, spectrophotometric, and electro- 
metric techniques. Prerequisite: 22.102, Two 
lecture, one recitation, and four laboratory 
hours. 

22.211 QUANTITIVE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 
(4) Principles and methods of treatment 



of data pertaining to chemical analysis fol- 
lowed by a development of the theory and 
techniques associated with common gravi- 
metric, volumetric, and spectrophotometric 
methods of analysis. Two lecture hours and 
two three-hour laboratory periods. 

22.230 ESSENTIALS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
(5) A one semester course in organic 
chemistry for non-chemistry majors taught 
on a conceptional basis. Emphasis will be 
on principles, mechanisms, and modern 
techniques. Laboratory will include synthe- 
sis and identification of organic compounds. 
Prerequisite: 22.102. Three lecture hours, 
one recitation and one three hour labora- 
tory. 

22.231-232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (5, 5) Struc- 
ture, reactions, preparation and properties 
of the compounds of carbon, as well as 
mechanisms of organic reactions. Labora- 
tory techniques, synthesis of typical organic 
compounds and modern methods of organic 
qualitative analysis. Three lecture hours and 
one four-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 22.104 or 22.102. 

22.241 PREPARATION FOR PHYSICAL CHEM- 
ISTRY (1) Practice in the strategy of solv- 
ing physical and chemical type problems in 
preparation for use in physical chemistry. 
One lecture hour. Prerequisite: MATH 50.274 
(or concurrently) 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



22.341 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY — THERMO- 
DYNAMICS (3) Thermodynamics, phase 
relations, solution properties, chemical equi- 
librium and electrochemistry. Three lecture 
hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 22.102, MATH 
50.274, and PHYS 66.222 or 66.212; CHEM 
22.241 is recommended. 

22.342 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY — STRUCTURE 
AND KINETICS (3) Introduction to quantum 
chemistry; atomic and molecular structure, 
atomic and molecular spectroscopy, intro- 
duction to statistical thermodynamics, kine- 
tic theory, chemical kinetics. Three lecture 
hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 22.102, MATH 
50.274, and PHYS 66.222 or 66.212; CHEM 
22.241 is recommended. 

22.343 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I 
(1) Five short laboratory projects in phys- 
ical chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 22.211 
and CHEM 22.341 or 22.342. 

22.344 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II 
(1) Five short laboratory projects in physi- 
cal chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 22.211 
and CHEM 22.341 or 22.342. 

22.351 BIOCHEMISTRY (3) Introduction to the 
chemical structure and properties of the con- 
stituents of living matter, including amino 
acids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, car- 
bohydrates and lipids. Enzyme kinetics, equi- 
libria and thermodynamics in biochemical 
transformations will be presented. Three 



lecture hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 22.232 
or 22.230. 

22.352 BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (2) To 
provide a basic working knowledge of a wide 
variety of laboratory techniques currently in 
use in the field. One recitation and one three- 
hour laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 22.351. 

22.381 MODERN CONCEPTS OF CHEMISTRY 
(4) Principles of modern chemistry includ- 
ing some inorganic, organic, analytical, and 
physical chemistry in an integrated treat- 
ment. Primarily for secondary school science 
teachers. Three lecture hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period. May not be counted 
for credit by chemistry majors since the 
course content is covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. Prerequisite: CHEM 22.102 or 
22.104 and two other science courses. 

22.382 STATISTICAL TREATMENT OF CHEM- 
ICAL DATA (3) Designed to develop skill 
in chemistry students and those in related 
fields in the application of simple statistical 
procedures and tables to laboratory data. 
One two-hour lecture and one three-hour 
laboratory period. Prerequisite: Sophomore 
standing or higher; high school algebra; an 
aptitude for logic and arithmetric is desir- 
able. A course in quantitative analysis is rec- 
ommended. 

22.391 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY 
(1-3) A laboratory or library problem in any 



72 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



particular area of chemistry to be selected 
by the student in consultation with the in- 
structor. Students are required to submit a 
written report. May be repeated for credit as 
CHEM 22.392, 22.393, etc. Prerequisite: Writ- 
ten consent of instructor. Offered each se- 
mester. 

22.411 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALY- 
SIS (4) Theory, instrumentation, and appli- 
cation of various electrochemical, chroma- 
tographic, spectroscopic and spectrophoto- 
metric techniques to chemical analysis. Two 
lecture hours and one six-hour laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: CHEM 22.211, 22.341, 
and 22.342 or concurrently. 

22.412 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 
(3) A special topics course dealing with 
the theory and application of more recent 
and specialized techniques of chemical 
separation and analysis. Three lecture hours. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 22.411. 

22.422 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) Nuclear 
and extranuclear structure, molecular orbital 
and ligand field theories, aqueous and non- 
aqueous reactions, coordination chemistry, 
inorganic synthesis, modern instrumenta- 
tion, etc. Three lecture hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: CHEM 
22.342 or concurrently. 

22.431 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
LABORATORY (2) Methods of organic syn- 
thesis. Emphasis on general types of organic 
reactions, relying, in part, on original litera- 
ture sources. Includes considerable individ- 
ual instruction in laboratory techniques and 
in the use of equipment and instruments. 
Two three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequi- 
site: CHEM 22.232. 

22.432 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 
Review of fundamentals. Advanced treat- 
ment of selected topics in organic chemis- 
try. Typical subject matter areas: (1) reac- 
tion mechanisms; (2) structure elucidation; 
(3) stereochemistry; (4) linear free energy 



relationships; (5) molecular orbital calcula- 
tions. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 22.232, CHEM 22.342 or concurrently. 

22.441 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3) 
Two topics in the area of Physical Chemistry 
to be covered in depth. Topics will be se- 
lected by the instructor after consultation 
with the students. Examples of possible topics 
are: formal wave mechanics, bonding, solid 
state, liquid state, surface chemistry, col- 
loids, high polymers, rheoiogy, ionic conduc- 
tivity, electrochemical cells, scattering 
phenomena, statistical thermodynamics. 
Three lecture hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 
22.341 and 22.342. 

22.452 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY (3) Reac- 
tions and mechanisms involving the syn- 
thesis and metat>olism of the constituents of 
living matter. A consideration of biological 
functions on the basis of fundamental princi- 
ples of chemical thermodynamics and kine- 
tics. Buffers, osmometry, chromatography 
and spectrophotometry are presented as ap- 
plied to biochemical systems. Three lecture 
hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 22.351. 

22.453 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY LABORA- 
TORY (2) Basic laboratory techniques in- 
volving the synthesis, isolation, purification, 
identification, and further reactions of sub- 
stances in biochemical systems. Two three- 
hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: CHEM 
22.351. 

22.491 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN 
CHEMISTRY (1-3) An individual laboratory 
and/or library investigation in research in- 
terest of an instructor. May be repeated for 
credit as CHEM 22.492, 22.493, 22.494, etc. 
At the completion of a project the student is 
required to give a public seminar on the 
work done and the principles involved. The 
vote of the chemistry faculty present in the 
seminar will be considered by the research 
supervisor in assigning final grades. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. 



CHEMISTRY 73 



Communication Arts and Sciences 

Professor: WALLACE (Chairman) 

Associate Professors: LONEGAN, STONE 

Assistant Professors: BOSLEY, DWIN, GLADSTONE, MACKERRON, ROWAN, 

SCHWARTZ, VIRDEN 
Instructors: KEANE, MORELL, SHIPMAN, STANLEY, TAYLOR 

The Department of Communication Arts and Sciences is composed of two areas of 
concentration, i.e., General Speech-Mass Communications, and Speech Pathology 
and Audiology, 

The Curricula in the Department are designed to provide the best possible 
learning and training in the communication arts and sciences. The programs of 
study are designed to provide, in cooperation v^^ith other departments, a broad 
liberal education as well as a special professional training with emphasis placed 
upon acquiring knowledge as well as skill. Students can select from five programs 
of study: (1) Speech and Drama major. Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science; 
(2) Speech and Drama major. Secondary Education Program; (3) Public 
Address major; (4) Mass Communications major; or (5) Speech Pathology and 
Audiology major. 

Students who wish to qualify for any of the five programs in communication 
arts and sciences must register with the area coordinator of their chosen major. 
Students who wish to major in speech pathology and audiology must also register 
with the Coordinator of the Speech Pathology and Audiology Program. Students 
majoring in speech and drama should register as soon as possible in their college 
careers, preferably early in their freshman year and certainly no later than the 
beginning' of their sophomore year. Transfer students should register during 
their first semester at the College. 

Transfer students are required to take twenty hours in residence in their 
major area. 

No transfer credits will be accepted toward the major or minor in Programs 
(1), (2), (3) or (4) until satisfactory completion of a proficiency examination 
in specific course area. The student must make application for the credit trans- 
fer and examination through the area coordinator. A scheduled testing time will 
be arranged the beginning of each semester. Application for transfer credits 
and the exam is the responsibility of the student and application must be made 
one semester prior to examination. 

Only those students maintaining a grade point of 2.75 in their major courses 
taken at Towson State College in Programs (1), (2), (3) or (4) will be recom- 
mended for a major in those programs of study. 

Students pursuing a minor in Programs (1), (2), (3) or (4) must also 
maintain a grade point of 2.75 in order to be recommended for a minor at Towson 
State College. 

Speech and Drama Major, Arts and Sciences Program 

Thirty-six semester hours are required as follows : 
Required of all majors: 21 semester hours plus 15 electives 

1.84.106, Voice and Diction; 84.203, Advanced Public Speaking; 84.131, Funda- 
mentals of Speech Communication; 84.221, Oral Interpretation of Literature; 
84.310, Phonetics of American English; 86.103, Introduction to the Theater; 
86.211, Theatre Production. 

2. Advanced courses selected from the following courses — 9 semester hours. 

a. 53.212, Introduction to Film & Broadcasting; 53.261, Basic TV Techniques; 
53.267, Film Communication; 84.216, Group Discussion; 84,231, Argumen- 
tation & Debate; 84,249, Forensics I; 84,250 Forensics II; 84,304, Persua- 

74 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



sion; 84.320, Readers Theatre; 84.349, Forensics III; 84.350, Forensics 
IV; 84.395, Independent Study in Oral Interpretation; 84.403, Classical & 
Modern Rhetoric; 84.405, American Public Address; 84.423, Advanced Oral 
Interpretation; 84.432, Coaching & Management of Forensics; 84.495, Inde- 
pendent Study in Public Address. 

Six semester hours to complete the major program chosen from the following 
groups : 

a. Three semester hours chosen from the following: 30.309, American Drama; 
30.321, Modern Drama; 30.312, 30.313, World Drama; 30.319, English Medi- 
eval & Renaissance Drama; 30.320, English Drama from Restoration to 
Shaw; 30.415, 30.416, Shakespeare. 

b. Three semester hours chosen from the following: 84.213, General Semantics; 
84.402, Speech Science; 84.421, Experimental Phonetics; 87.105, Speech & 
Language Development; 87.241, Introduction to Audiology; 87.302, Speech 
Pathology. The student who prepares to teach in the high school is also 
required to complete 84.379, Teaching Speech & Drama in the Secondary 
School. 

In addition, the student is strongly urged to complete satisfactorily a minor 
program of advanced course work in an area closely allied to the field of speech 
and drama, but chosen from courses offered in a department other than Speech 
and Drama. The minor program should be chosen with the approval of the stu- 
dent's Speech Department adviser. 

Speech and Drama Major, Secondary Education Program 

The course of study for the teaching major follows the program of the general 
major but requires, in addition, 84.379, Teaching Speech and Drama in the 
Secondary School, a course in speech education for professional preparation. 
The prospective speech and drama teacher in the high school should also com- 
plete the required courses in secondary education in order to be certified for 
teaching. Speech Education majors should consult with adviser to determine 
minor area of certification. Student must complete 24 hours of Speech before 
taking 84.379. Student teaching should be done the first semester of the senior 
year. 

Speech and Drama Minor 

Requirements are the satisfactory completion of 24 semester hours of Speech 
and Drama courses including: 84.106, Voice and Diction; 84.131, Fundamentals 
of Speech Communication; 84.203, Advanced Public Speaking; 84.221, Oral Inter- 
pretation of Literature; 84.310, Phonetics of American English; 86.103, Intro- 
duction to the Theatre; 86.211, Theatre Production. 

Public Address Major 

This program is designed to allow the student to pursue, in depth, study in the 
area of rhetoric and public address; i.e., the theory and practice of speechmak- 
ing. This study includes the scientific nature of the speech process, theories of 
interpersonal communication, introduction to the speech arts of discussion, de- 
bate, oral interpretation of literature, persuasive speaking, and the history and 
criticism of public speaking. The program is designed for the student interested 
in college teaching, coaching, and research in speech communication. It also 
serves as excellent preparation for a career in business or government. 

Requirements for a Public Address major: 36 semester hours are required as 
follows : 

COMMUNICATION ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 



1. Required of all majors: (12 semester hours) 84.106, Voice and Diction; 84.131, 
Fundamentals of Speech Communication; 84.203, Advanced Public Speaking; 
53.212, Introduction to Film and Broadcasting. 

2. 18 semester hours of advanced courses chosen from three groups of courses. 

a. Six semester hours chosen from the following: 84.216, Discussion; 84.231, 
Argumentation and Debate; 84.249, 84.250, 84.349, 84.350, Forensics; 
84.432, Coaching and Management Forensics. 

b. Six semester hours chosen from the following: 84.221, Oral Interpretation 
of Literature; 84.320, Readers Theatre; 53.261, Basic Television Tech- 
niques ; 53.361, Advanced Television Techniques. 

c. Six semester hours chosen from the following : 84.304, Persuasion ; 84.402, 
Speech Science; 84.403, Classical and Modern Rhetoric; 84.405, American 
Public Address; 84.406, British Public Address; 84.495, Independent Study 
in Public Address ; 53.385, Mass Media in Modern Society. 

3. Six semester hours to complete the major program chosen from courses di- 
rected more specifically towards the student's vocational objectives with the 
advice and consent of the student's speech department's advisor. 

Public Address Minor 

Requirements are the satisfactory completion of 24 semester hours of speech 
courses including: 84.106, Voice and Diction; 84.131, Fundamentals of Speech 
Communication; 84.203, Advanced Public Speaking; 53.315, Business and Pro- 
fessional Speech; 84.221, Oral Interpretation of Literature. 

Mass Communications Major 

This program offers a broad understanding of the processes, functions and re- 
sponsibilities of mass communications. Development of skills in fact finding, 
analysis and communication through the mass media is stressed. The program 
prepares the student for graduate work and offers excellent background for 
many careers such as law, public relations, business, communications media, 
sales and management. Flexibility is purposely built into the program so that 
the needs of students with special vocational objectives may be met. 

Majors are advised to obtain a broad background in the fine arts, humani- 
ties, and social sciences. 
Requirements for a Mass Communications major: 

1. Required of all majors (18 semester hours): 53.151, Journalism in a Free 
Society; 53.212, Introduction to Film and Broadcasting; 53.315, Business and 
Professional Speech; 53.353, Publicity and Public Relations; 53.356, Feature 
Writing; 53.385, Mass Media in a Modern Society. 

2. Electives (18 hours) chosen from the following, 3 credits selected from the 
following courses: 53.261, Basic Television Techniques; 53.265, Basic Radio 
Production ; and 53.267, Film Communication. 

15 credits selected from the following courses: 53.001, Washington Film Semi- 
nar; 53.211 Communication Process; 53.214, Introduction to Advertising; 53.261, 
Basic Television Techniques; 53.265, Basic Radio Production; 53.267, Film Com- 
munication; 53.351, Public Opinion and the Press; 53.352, History of Journalism; 
53.355, Newswriting; 53.361, Advanced Television Techniques; 53.363, History of 
Film to the Present; 53.364, Aesthetics of the Film; 53.367, Television Writing; 
53.385, News Editing & Copyreading; 53.491, Independent Study in Film; 53.493, 
Independent Study in Radio; 53.495, Independent Study in Television; 53.496, 
Independent Study in Journalism ; 53.497, Independent Study in Public Relations ; 
53.003, Broadcast Production Engineering ; 53.002, Producing a Television Series ; 
84.216, Group Discussion; 84.221, Oral Interpretation of Literature; 84.231, Argu- 
mentation & Debate ; and 84.304, Persuasion. 

76 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Mass Communications Minor 

Requirements for a Mass Communications minor are the satisfactory completion 
of 24 semester hours chosen as follows. 

Courses required for a minor (15 hours): 53.212, Introduction to Film & 
Broadcasting; 53.151, Journalism in a Free Society; 53.353, Publicity & Public 
Relations; 53.356, Feature Writing; and 53.385, Mass Media In Modern Society. 

Electives (9 hours): 3 credits selected from the following courses; 53.261, 
Basic Television Techniques; 53.267, Film Communication, and 53.265 Basic 
Radio Production. 

6 credits selected from the following: 53.001, Washington Film Seminar; 
53.211, The Communication Process; 53.214, Introduction to Advertising; 53.252, 
History of Journalism; 53.261, Basic Television Techniques; 53.267, Film Com- 
munication; 53.351, Public Opinion and the Press; 53.358, News Editing and 
Copyreading; 53.361, Advanced Television Techniques; 53.364 Aesthetics of the 
Film; 53.496, Independent Study in Journalism; 53.497, Independent Study in 
Public Relations; 84.219, Parliamentary Procedure; 84.221, Oral Interpretation 
of Literature; 84.363, History of Film to the Present; 84.495, Independent Study 
in Public Address; and 84.216 Group Discussion. 

Major in Speech Pathology and Audiology 

Students who major in this area pursue a course of study which prepares them 
(a) to do clinical work in public schools, in colleges, in medical and paramedical 
institutions, (b) for graduate study, (c) for certification by the Maryland State 
Department of Education, (d) and partially meets certification requirements 
for A.S.H.A. Majors in this program participate in the College's American Speech 
and Hearing Association's Certified Speech and Hearing Clinic in public schools, 
and in other agencies and institutions. This program is supplemented by courses 
from the Department of Psychology and the Department of Education. 

It is recommended that students interested in declaring a major in this area 
should do so as soon as possible and preferably no later than the end of the first 
semester of the sophomore year. 

Curriculum in Speech Pathology and Audiology 

The Department proposes the following curriculum for the undergraduate who 
wishes to major in speech pathology and audiology and meet certification re- 
quirements as a speech and hearing clinician in the public schools. The require- 
ments for the major are : 

1. Satisfactory completion with a grade-point average of 2.5 or better of 36 
semester hours of speech pathology, audiology, related technical and scientific 
content courses, and clinical practice in speech. 

General requirements are: 87.105, Speech and Language Development; 87.302, 
Speech Pathology I; 8.302,304, Speech Pathology II; 87.306 Speech Pathology 
III; 87.241, Introduction to Audiology; 87.305, Stuttering; Etiology and 
Therapy; 84.310, Phonetics of American English; 84.402. Speech Science; 
87.487, Clinical Practice in Speech Correction; 87.488, Clinical Practice in the 
Public Schools. (Those wishing to pursue a program leading to a B.S. in Speech 
Pathology and Audiology without meeting state certification requirements, 
should take 84.213, General Semantics in place of 87.306. Speech Pathology 
III and must take 6 credit hours of 87.487 in place of 4 credit hours of 87.487 
and 2 credit hours of 87.488^ . 

The additional six semester hour requirements for the major should be elected 
from the following speech courses: 84.106. Voice and Diction; 84.213. General 
Semantics; 87.305, Stuttering Etiolog>' and Therapy; 87.343. Clinical Audi- 

COMMUNICATION ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 



ology; 87.401, Speech Reading and Auditory Rehabilitation; 87.489, Clinical 
Counseling in Audiology and Speech Pathology. 

2. Satisfactory completion of 18. semester hours of selected courses in psychology 
and education. (Specific courses in these areas are to be determined by the 
Department in conjunction with the student.) 

3. Satisfactory completion of 200 clock hours of supervised clinical practice in 
speech and hearing therapy. 



MASS COMMUNICATION COURSES (MCOM) 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

53.151 JOURNALISM IN A FREE SOCIETY (3) 
Examination of the role of journalism in the 
mass communication process and its signifi- 
cance in a free society. Prerequisite: English 
30.102. (F, W) 

53.211 COMMUNICATION PROCESS (3) Intro- 
duction to the communication process with 
emphasis on the functions of language and 
the problems of responsibility in communi- 
cation. (F, even-numbered years) 

53.212 INTRODUCTION TO FILM AND BROAD- 
CASTING (3) Survey of the contemporary 
film, television and radio media. (F, W) 

53.214 INTRODUCTION TO ADVERTISING (3) 
Review of the contribution made by advertis- 
ing to the United States economy, and of the 
principles and practices as applied to elec- 
tronic and printed media. (F) 

53.252 HISTORY OF JOURNALISM (3) Critical 
study of the development of the English lan- 
guage press; emphasis on the American 
press and its role in the political and eco- 
nomic progress of this country. (W) 



53.261 BASIC TELEVISION TECHNIQUES (3) 
History of television practices in the United 
States and the study of writing production 
and performance in various areas of com- 
mercial and educational television. (F, W, S) 

53.265 BASIC RADIO PRODUCTION (3) A 
course structured to introduce the student 
to the equipment and performance tech- 
niques necessary to produce a variety of 
radio show formats. The student will be re- 
quired to participate on the campus radio 
station. Prerequisites: 53.212, 84.131. (F,W) 

53.267 FILM COMMUNICATION (3) An intro- 
duction to the techniques and theories of 
film production through the use of 8-mm 
cameras, editors and sound equipment. Pre- 
requisites: 53.212 and consent of instructor. 
(S) 

53.315 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL 
SPEECH (3) The student will participate in 
various types of speeches and study discus- 
sion, conference techniques, and parlia- 
mentary procedure. Prerequisites: Speech 
84.131 or its equivalent. (F, W, S) 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

53.351 PUBLIC OPINION AND THE PRESS (3) 
Journalistic aspects of public opinion and 
propaganda; the irripact of mass communi- 
cations media on the formation of public 
opinion. Techniques of polling and testing 
public opinion. 

53.353 PUBLICITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 
(3) Provides an awareness and understand- 
ing of public relations activities. Students 
learn publicity techniques and how to orga- 
nize campaigns. (F, W, S) 

53.355 NEWSWRITING (3) Introduction to news- 
writing from the standpoint of style, struc- 
ture and readability. Prerequisites: 53.151, 
one English Composition course. (F) 

53.356 FEATURE WRITING (3) Preparation of 
long and short articles, editorials and news 
features. Prerequisite: One English Compo- 
sition course. (W) 



53.358 NEWS EDITING AND COPYREADING (3) 
Practice in editing, headline writing, page 
make-up and use of pictures and type in 
newspapers, and editing copy for use on 



radio and television. Prerequisite: 53.355 or 
53.356. (F, even-numbered years) 

53.361 ADVANCED TELEVISION TECHNIQUES 
(3) Advanced techniques in television pro- 
duction and performance for commercial 
and educational television. Major emphasis 
on directing. Prerequisite: 53.261 or consent 
of instructor. (F, W) 

53.363 HISTORY OF THE FILM TO THE PRES- 
ENT (3) Survey of the Motion Picture from 
its conception to the distribution of sound 
films. Prerequisite: 53.212. (F) 

53.364 AESTHETICS OF THE FILM (3) Survey 
of film theory and aesthetics of silent, sound 
and avant-garde motion pictures. Prerequi- 
site: 53.363 or consent of instructor. (S) 

53.367 TELEVISION WRITING (3) Training and 
practice in writing commercials, documen- 
taries and plays for the specific medium of 
television — commercial and educational. 
Prerequisites: Eng. 30.102, 30.204 and 53.261. 
(W) 



78 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



53.385 MASS MEDIA IN MODERN SOCIETY (3) 
Seminar in mass media, concentrating on 
audience, content and effects of the media. 
Prerequisites: 53.151, 53.212. (W) 

53.475 FILM WORKSHOP (3) Designed pri- 
marily to provide experienced or future 
teachers with background about film so that 
they may better help pupils to become in- 
formed about and to develop critical reac- 
tions to the films they view. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. (First summer session) 

53.485 NEWSPAPER WORKSHOP (3) Spon- 
sored by the member newspapers of the 
Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association, 
and Towson State College. Designed pri- 
marily to provide public school teachers 
with background about the mass media so 
that they may better help pupils to become 
informed and develop intelligent opinions on 
current affairs. Students will be expected to 
take one afternoon field trip. Class limit 100 
(Graduate or Undergraduate credit). Prere- 
quisite: Consent of instructor for undergrad- 
uates. Sect. 51 — Hours: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. 

53.491 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN FILM (1-6) 
Independent work in film production and re- 
search. Production students may work in- 
dependently, with campus production unit 
or with professional production company. 
Prerequisites: 53.212, 53.267. Consent of 
Instructor. (F, W, S and mini) 

53.493 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN RADIO (1-6) 
Independent study in selected areas of radio 



through directed readings, projects in con- 
junction with the operation of the student 
radio station or work with a full-time profes- 
sional in the community. Selected students 
may work as laboratory assistants in the 
53.265 Basic Radio Production class. Pre- 
requisites: 53.265 and/or participation as a 
staff member on a campus or community 
radio. (F, W, S and mini) 

53.495 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN TELEVISION 
(1-6) Independent study in selected areas 
of television production and research 
through selected readings, projects, papers 
and seminars. Prerequisites: 53.361, Con- 
sent of Instructor. (F, W, S & mini) 

53.496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN JOURNALISM 
(1-6) Independent study in the varied as- 
pects of newspaper writing. Opportunity will 
be provided to work under the guidance of 
professional newspapermen connected with 
the Baltimore papers. Prerequisites: Consent 
of Instructor. (F, W, S, mini) 

53.497 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PUBLIC RE- 
LATIONS (1-6) Independent study in se- 
lected areas of public relations through di- 
rected readings, projects, papers or semi- 
nars. When possible opportunity will be pro- 
vided for the student to work outside the 
classroom, under the cooperative guidance 
of his instructor and a full-time professional 
public relations person in the field of the 
Student's choice. Prerequisites: 53.353 and 
consent of Instructor. (F, W, S and mini) 



GENERAL SPEECH COURSES (SPCH) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

84.106 VOICE AND DICTION (3) Analysis of 
articulatory and vocal usage as they relate 
to spoken language. Improvement of skills in 
voice, articulation, and pronunciation. (F, W) 

84.131 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH COMMU- 
NICATION (3) Course is designed to assist 
the student in developing skills needed in 
interpersonal communication . . . effective 
listening and speaking, expressing social 
consciousness, ethical responsibility and 
self identification. (F, W, S) 

84.203 ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) Prin- 
ciples of speech composition and organiza- 
tion. Study of manuscript, extemporaneous 
and impromptu speaking. Principles and ap- 
plication of speech analysis and criticism. 
Prerequisite: 84.101, or 3^ 'Gl, or consent of 
instructor. (F, W) 

84.213 GENERAL SEMANTICS (3) The effects 
of language and symbols upon individual 
adjustment and maladjustment. Semantic 
applications in audiology, education, speech 
pathology, and other arts and sciences. 

84.216 GROUP DISCUSSION (3) Theory and 
methods of group discussion; practice in 



forums, panels, and other forms of group 
communication. Prerequisite: 84.101 or 
84.131. (F, W, S) 

84.219 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE (1) Brief 
analysis of history .and philosophy of parlia- 
mentary law and study and practice of the 
procedure for conducting and participating 
in meetings. Fall — even numbered years. 

84.221 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERA- 
TURE (3) General principles of oral reading 
and the art of interpretation in poetry, drama, 
and the short story. Prerequisite: 84.101 or 
84.131 and consent of instructor. (F) 

84.231 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (3) 
Essentials of argumentation; research, analy- 
sis, evidence, reasoning, case construction 
and refutation. Applications in public speak- 
ing and in college debate. Prerequisites: 
84.101 or 84,131 or consent of instructor. (F) 

84.249-84.250 FORENSICS I, II (1.1) Practical 
work in debate, oratory, extemporaneous 
speaking, and other speech projects. Study 
of national debate questions, and opportunity 
to participate in forensic activities or a 
Speakers Bureau. Prerequisite: Consent of 
Instructor. (F, W) 



COMMUNICATION ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 



Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

84.349-84.350 FORENSICS (1, 1) Refer to 
84.249, 84.250 for course description. Pre- 
requisite: 84.249-250 and consent of instruc- 
tor. (F, W) 

84.371 PLAY PRODUCTION FOR THE CLASS- 
ROOM TEACHER (2) 

84.375 SPEECH IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
(3) A study of speech needs of the elemen- 
tary school child and current methods and 



materials used by the classroom teacher in 
meeting needs. (F, W) 

84.379 TEACHING SPEECH AND DRAMA IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) Problems, 
materials, methods and techniques in spe- 
cific speech instruction areas; integration of 
speech and drama in co-curricular school 
activities. Open only to students in the stu- 
dent block. (F, W) 



84 



84 



84 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

84.304 PERSUASION (3) Rhetorical and psy- 
chological principles of influencing individ- 
uals and groups; application of persuasive 
principles in speaking performance; analysis 
of the use of persuasion in formal and in- 
formal communication. Prerequisite: 84.203 
or consent of instructor. (F), odd numbered 
years. 

84.310 PHONETICS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH 
(3) Analysis of speech sounds of American 
English and the use of phonetic symbols to 
record them. Emphasizes ear training, pho- 
netic transcription, and language recordings. 
Prerequisite: 84.131 or 84.106 or 87.105 
(F, W) 

84.320 READERS THEATRE (3) Oral interpre- 
tation of selections from dramatic literature 
and individual and group reading. Includes 
principles of selecting, cutting, and pro- 
gramming in literature. Prerequisite: 84.221 
and consent of instructor. (W) 

84.395 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ORAL INTER- 
PRETATION (1-6) Independent study in 
selected areas of oral interpretation through 
directed readings, projects, papers or semi- 
nars. Prerequisite: 84.221, and consent of 
instructor. (F, W) (S, by request.) 

84.402 SPEECH SCIENCE (3) Lectures, read- 
ings, and demonstrations presenting the 
structure and function of the physiological 
systems involved in respiration, phonation, 
resonation, and articulation. Fundamentals 
of the physiology of the speech mechanism 
and the physics of sound transmission. Pre- 
requisite: 84.310. 

84.403 CLASSICAL AND MODERN RHETORIC 
(3) Survey of rhetorical theory from Isoc- 
rates to contemporary communication the- 
orists. Particular attention is given to Aris- 
totle, Cicero and Quintillian. Designed to 
develop standards of rhetorical criticism. 
(W) — odd numbered years. 

84.405 AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS (3) His- 
tory and criticism of two centuries of public 
address in the United States, the great 



84. 



84 



84 



speakers, their historical environment, their 
beliefs and effects on American life. Pre- 
requisite: 84.303 or 40.221 or consent of in- 
structor. (F) — even numbered years. 

,406 BRITISH PUBLIC ADDRESS (3) Public 
address in Great Britain, the great speakers, 
their historical environment, their beliefs and 
effects on American life. Prerequisite: 84.303 
or 40.121 or consent of instructor. (F) — odd 
numbered years. 

421 EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS (3) An 
advanced course in the study of Phonetic 
Science. Concerned with the application of 
experimental methods to study and research 
in voice and phonetics, especially spectro- 
graphic analysis. Includes critical review of 
research literature in Scientific Phonetics. 
Prerequisite: 84.310 or consent of instructor. 

,423 ADVANCED ORAL INTERPRETATION (3) 
Advanced theory and practice of oral inter- 
pretation with emphasis placed upon the 
relationship of the dramatic structure to the 
interpreter's performance. Prerequisites: 
84.221 and consent of instructor. (W) 

,432 THE COACHING AND MANAGEMENT 
OF FORENSICS (3) 2nd semester of even- 
numbered years only. Problems of organiz- 
ing, financing, and directing the forensic 
program in schools and colleges. Coaching, 
schedules, and techniques for debate and 
individual speech events. Competing philos- 
ophies of forensics and secondary school 
and college-level forensic organization are 
studied. (W) — even numbered years. 

,493 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN READERS 
THEATRE (1-6) Independent study in se- 
lected areas of Readers Theatre through 
directed readings, projects, papers or sem- 
nars. Prequisite: 84.320 and consent of in- 
structor. (F, W) (S, upon request.) 

,495 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PUBLIC AD- 
DRESS (1-6) Independent study in selected 
areas of public address through directed 
readings, projects, papers, or seminars. Pre- 
requisite: consent of Instructor. (F, W, S) 



SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY COURSES (SPPA) 
Service Division 



87.091 (090) CORRECTIVE SPEECH (0) Speech 
correction and improvement for students who 
have defective speech. Students who regis- 



ter for the course must pass it before they 
begin practice teaching.,.. 



80 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

87.105 SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DEVELOP- 
MENT (3) Analysis of normal speech and 
language development, including the pho- 
netic, semantic, and syntactic elements. 
Physiology of speech and language learning. 
Observation will be required. 



87.241 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY (3) 
Anatomy, physiology and pathologies of the 
hearing mechanism. Symptoms and causes 
of hearing disorders. Pure tone air conduc- 
tion testing and screening methods. Obser- 
vation and practice will be required. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

87.302 SPEECH PATHOLOGY I (3) Academic 
information and clinical methods for the 
problems of articulation and delayed lan- 
guage. Observation will be required. Prereq- 
uisite: 87.105, 84,310. 

87.304 SPEECH PATHOLOGY II (3) Academic 
information and clinical methods for the 
problems of cleft palate and voice. Observa- 
tion and participation will be required. Pre- 
requisite: 87.105, 84.402. 

87.305 STUTTERING — ETIOLOGY AND THER- 
APY (3) Analysis of etiologies, symptoms 
and therapeutic management of stuttering. 
Prerequisite: 87.302 or consent of instructor. 

87.306 SPEECH PATHOLOGY III (3) Academic 
information and clinical methods for the 
problems of aphasia, mental retardation and 
cerebral palsy. Observation and participation 
will be required. Prerequisite: 84.402 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

87.401 CLINICAL AUDIOLOGY (3) This course 
deals with: audiometric procedures for dif- 
ferential diagnosis of auditory disorders; 
functional loss; noise; air and bone conduc- 
tion; masking; and principles of examination 
and interviewing techniques. Students will 
be required to observe and participate in 
audiologic workups. Prerequisite: 87.241 or 
consent of instructor. 

87.404 PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM. PROBLEMS 
AND RELATIONSHIPS (3) Organization and 
administration of speech pathology and au- 
diology programs in various professional 
settings; personal, professional and commu- 
nity relationships and responsibilities. Ob- 
servation will be required. Prerequisite: 87.- 
487 or consent of instructor. 

87.407 SPEECH READING AND AUDITORY RE- 
HABILITATION (3) Theories, objectives and 
techniques for the teaching of speech read- 
ing, speech conservation and auditory train- 
ing. Observations and practice will be re- 
quired. Prerequisite: 87.241. 

87.408 SPECIAL PROBLEMS SEMINAR— CLEFT 
PALATE (3) A multidisciplinary approach 
to all aspects of the patient with a cleft 
palate which would include lectures on eti- 
ology, embryology, speech patterns, otolog- 
ical and audiological considerations, dental 
and plastic reconstruction, speech therapy 
and follow-up. Prerequisites: 87.304 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

87.409 SPEECH AND LANGUAGE FOR THE 
DEAF CHILD (3) Principles and techniques 
for developing speech and language in the 



deaf child using whole-word and analytical 
methods; consideration of multiple handi- 
caps; demonstration and observation will be 
required. Prerequisite: 87.105, 87.241, 87.407 
or consent of instructor. 



87.410 SPECIAL PROBLEMS PRACTICUM — 
CLEFT PALATE (3) Clinical practice in all 
aspects of the patient with a cleft palate. 
Prerequisites: 87.306 or professional experi- 
ence and/or consent of instructor. 

87.411 SEMINAR / WORKSHOP IN SPEECH 
PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY — SPEECH 
AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE 
SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DEPRIVED (6) 
Diagnostic, therapeutic and methods for the 
management of children who are deprived 
in the areas of speech and language. Pre- 
requisite: 87.306, or professional experience 
and/or consent of instructor. 

87.414 SPECIAL PROBLEMS SEMINAR (3) 
Concentrated investigation of particular 
problems in the field of speech pathology 
and audiology. The problems will vary each 
semester the course is offered. (Individuals 
having professional experience may receive 
credit through a proficiency examination.) 

87.421 SEMINAR/WORKSHOP — HEARING IM- 
PAIRED (6) Psychology and science of 
hearing and anatomy of the hearing mechan- 
ism will be reviewed. Investigation of com- 
munication, educational, vocational, psycho- 
logical and social problems of the hearing 
impaired as these relate to personal adjust- 
ment in today's society. The study of the 
principles and techniques of teaching the 
hearing impaired. 

87.451 AUDIOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT OF THE 
EXCEPTIONAL CHILD (3) Principles and 
techniques for identifying and evaluating 
hearing impaired children; consideration of 
multiple handicaps; demonstration and prac- 
tice. Prerequisite: 87.401, or professional ex- 
perience, or consent of instructor. 

87.485 VOICE AND ARTICULATION SEMINAR 
(3) Investigation of nature and treatment 
of organic and functional voice and articula- 
tion disorders in children and adults, includ- 
ing vocal strain, nodules, carcinoma, man- 
agement of the laryngectomized, and dys- 
arthria. Prerequisites: 87.304 and 87.487. 

87.487 CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPEECH COR- 
RECTION (1-3) Clinical observation of and 
practice in therapeutic procedures with vari- 
ous types of speech, language and/or hear- 
ing disorders in the Towson State College 



COMMUNICATION ARTS AND SCIENCES 81 



Speech and Hearing Clinic. Students may 
also be assigned a practicum in the Lida 
Lee Tall School and/or various centers that 
offer speech, language or hearing therapy, 
such as hospitals or private agencies. (Credit 
is for 2 semester hours per semester, except 
summer.) Prerequisite: 87.302 or consent of 
instructor. 

87.488 CLINICAL PRACTICE IN PUBLIC 
SCHOOL (6-9) Students assigned to an 
approved therapy program for observation 
and practice teaching. The student will earn 
a minimum of 100 of the 200 clinical clock 
hours required for certification. Prerequisite: 
3 credits of 87.487. 

87.489 CLINICAL COUNSELING IN AUDIOLOGY 
AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY (3) Systems of 
directive and nondirective counseling utilized 
by speech and hearing clinicians for the 
management of organic and nonorganic dis- 
orders. Techniques of interviewing, case 
history recording, and the conditioning of 



semantic reactions through interpersonal 
interaction. Prerequisites: 87.241 and 87.304. 

87.496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH 
PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (1-4) In- 
dependent study in selected areas of Speech 
Pathology and Audiology through projects, 
papers and seminars. A portion of the course 
may involve assisting in laboratory experi- 
ences in connection with Speech Pathology 
and Audiology course(s). Prerequisites: In- 
vitation of Department only and upper divi- 
sion standing. 

87.497 DIRECTED READINGS IN SPEECH 
PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (1-4) Di- 
rected readings in selected areas of Speech 
Pathology and Audiology in order to provide 
for the individual a comprehensive coverage 
of a special area within the broader range 
of communication disorders or to meet spe- 
cial needs of students. Prerequisites: Upper 
division standing and by invitation of the 
department. 



Graduate Division 

87.501 LANGUAGE DISORDERS OF CHILDREN 
(3) Investigation of mental retardation, emo- 
tional disturbance and hearing loss in chil- 
dren in terms of speech and language dis- 
orders. Prerequisite: 87.105 and 87.302. 

87.505 NEUROPATHOLOGIES OF SPEECH (3) 
Etiology, nature and management of cerebral 
palsy and minimal brain damage in children, 
and dysphasia in adults. Prerequisite: 87.306 
and 87.487. 

87.507 DIAGNOSTIC fVIETHODS IN SPEECH 
PATHOLOGY (3) Standardized and non- 
standardized techniques for testing the 
speech, language and general intellectual 
functioning of children and adults. Practicum 
experience in speech evaluations and report 
writing. Prerequisite: 87.485 and 87.505. 

87.511 APPLICATION OF LINGUISTICS TO 
SPEECH PATHOLOGY (3) Investigation of 
traditional and contemporary research in the 
area of psycholinguistics and generative 
grammar. Application of this to diagnosis 
and management of those with language dis- 
orders. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. 

87.513 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN 
SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (1) 
Discussion of research methods, techniques 
and needs in speech pathology and audiol- 
ogy. Reading and understanding professional 



journal articles. Prerequisite: consent of in- 
structor. 

87.585 SEMINAR IN MAXILLOFACIAL DIS- 
ORDERS (3) Emphasis on the etiology, na- 
ture and team-management of the individual 
with cleft palate/lip. Discussion of other 
maxillofacial deformities resulting in defec- 
tive speech. Prerequisite: 87.304 and 87.487. 

87.645 ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICE (2) 
Experience in the College Clinic as well as 
externship in public schools, hospital clinics 
and rehabilitation settings with the speech 
defective. Introduction to the supervision of 
undergraduate trainees. Prerequisites: 87.487 
and/or professional experience. 

87.695 GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER IN 
SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (3) 
Preparation of extensive paper dealing with 
a current area of research in the field or with 
the results of a clinical experiment. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of graduate committee. 

87.696 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH 
PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (3) Prepa- 
ration of extensive paper dealing with pro- 
fessional clinical experiences. Discussions 
of techniques, innovations, methods em- 
ployed and recommendations for improve- 
ments. Prerequisite: Professional experience. 



82 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Economics and Political Sciences 

Professors: BELGRAD, COLEMAN, EHRLICH, GROSSMAN (Chairman), MERANl, SANBORN 

Associate Professors: EKPO, PAUL, SHIN 

Assistant Professors: GERMAN, KUMAR, WEINTRAUB 

Instructor: DENT 

Lecturer: LEE 

The program of courses in political science and economics aims to promote under- 
standing of the nature of political relationships and the workings of economic 
systems. The majors in political science and economics are designed to provide 
preparation for advanced study and to provide the foundation for careers in 
public administration, law, public relations, business, and research. 

Economics Major 

Thirty credit hours are required for the major in economics, including 24.101, 
24.102, 24.301, 24.302, 24.309, 24.323, and 24.335. 

Economics Minor 

Twenty-four hours are required for the minor in economics, including 24.101, 
24.102, and 24.323. 

Six hours can be taken in the following courses to satisfy the requirements 
for a major or minor in economics: Geography 34.231 Economic Geography; 
History 40.417, 418 Economic History of Europe; and History 40.365, 366 
Economic History of the United States. 

Political Science Major 

Thirty credit hours are required for the major in political science, including 
six hours from among 68.101. 68.103, 68.107, or 68.137, and three hours from 
among 68.455, 68.456, 68.481, 68.487, or 68.491. Twenty-one hours must be taken 
at the upper division. 

Twenty-four hours are required for the minor in political science, including 
six hours from among 68.101, 68.103, 68.107, or 68.137, and fifteen hours of upper 
division courses. 

Six hours can be taken in the following courses in other disciplines to satisfy 
the requirements for a major or a minor in political science: Economics 24.101- 
102, Principles and Problems; Economics 24.311, Government and Economic 
Life; Economics 24.327, International Economics; Geography 34.381, Political 
Geography; Economics 24.381, Labor Economics and Labor Relations; Economics 
24.337, Public Finance; History 40.370, Diplomatic History of the United States: 
and History 40.367, 368, Constitutional History of the United States. 

Normally a student who transfers to Towson State College with senior 
standing will be expected to complete fifteen hours of upper division political 
science courses here to satisfy the requirements for a major; those who transfer 
below senior standing normally will be expected to complete twenty-nne hovn-s 
of upper division political courses. 

ECONOMICS COURSES (ECON) 

Lower Division — Undergraduate 

24.101 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES AND PROB- Farm policy. The role of the government in 

LEMS I (3) How private enterprise deter- our economy. 

mines v^rhat is produced, prices, wages, 24.102 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES AND PROB- 

profits. Supply and demand. Competition and LEMS II (3) Inflation and unemployment — 

monopoly. Labor unions, income distribution. causes and remedies. Money and banking. 

83 



Government spending and taxation. Inter- 
national trade. Prerequisite: 24.101 

24.201 ECONOMICS OF HEALTH (3) Study of 
the current structure of the delivery of health 



services and methods of financing health 
expenditures. Current issues in the eco- 
nomics of health. Prerequisite 24.102 or 
24.101 and consent of instructor. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 



24.301 FUNDAMENTAL STATISTICS FOR ECO- 
NOMICS I (3) Analysis and presentation of 
business and economic data; frequency dis- 
tribution; measures of central tendency and 
variability; sampling and estimation of pa- 
rameters; testing of hypotheses; simple re- 
gression analysis; measuring changes In 
price. Prerequisites: Mathematics 50.115 or 
equivalent, (Not open to freshmen) 

24.302 FUNDAMENTAL STATISTICS FOR ECO- 
NOMICS II (3) Bayesian decision theory; 
probability models and decision making; 
analysis of variance; measuring and fore- 
casting economic change with time series; 
forecasting and decisions by partial and 
multiple regression models; stochastic func- 
tions; statistical quality control. Prerequi- 
sites: 24.301 or Mathematics 50.231 or 
equivalent, (not open to freshmen) 

24.309 INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY (3) 
Determination of prices, output, wages, re- 
source allocation. Theory of the firm. Theory 
of competition, monopolistic competition, 
oligopoly, and monopoly. Prerequisite: 
24,102, 

24.311 GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMIC LIFE 
(3) The rationale of government control 
and regulation of private enterprise. Main- 
tenance of competition, antitrust policy. 
Public utility regulation. Prerequisite: 24,102, 

24.315 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) Theory 
of economic growth. Problems and programs 
relating to underdeveloped countries. Pre- 
requisite: 24.102, 

24.323 MONEY AND BANKING (3) Organiza- 
tion and function of the money, credit and 
banking system of the United States; bank- 
ing institutions, Federal Reserve System; the 
relation of money and credit to prices; for- 
eign exchange. Prerequisite: 24.102, 

24.327 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3) In- 
ternational trade theory; balance of pay- 
ments, problems, and adjustment mecha- 



nism; foreign exchange; foreign trade policy; 
theory of tariffs and other trade restrictions; 
international monetary system and organi- 
zation; trade and economic growth. Prerequi- 
site: 24.102. 

24.331 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 
(3) Contemporary economic systems with 
emphasis on methods of social control. Cap- 
italism, socialism, communism. Economic 
planning. Prerequisite: 24.102. 

24.335 MACROECONOMIC THEORY (3) The 
overall level of output, prices, employment, 
interest rates. Keynesian economics. Pre- 
requisite: 24.102. 

24.337 PUBLIC FINANCE (3) Principles of tax- 
ation, government expenditure and public 
debt; relationship of fiscal policy to income 
and growth. Prerequisite: 24.102. 

24.351 URBAN ECONOMICS (3) Economic 
bases for the existence of metropolitan 
areas. The economy of the metropolitan 
area; its growth, income distribution, eco- 
nomic stability. Transportation and land use 
patterns. Social and other . problems of 
metropolitan areas. Application of elemen- 
tary price theory to the analysis and solution 
of urban issues and problems. Prerequisite: 
24.102. 

24,381 LABOR ECONOMICS AND LABOR RE- 
LOTJONS (3) The determination of wages. 
Labor unions: history, structure, activities, 
effects. Government labor policy. Prerequi- 
site: 24.102. 

24.401 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3) 
Development of economic theory; eighteenth 
and nineteenth century classical schools. 
Modern economic literature on price, invest- 
ment, and employment. Prerequisite: 24.102, 

24.407 BUSINESS CYCLES AND FORECASTING 
(3) Business cycles theory; measuring eco- 
nomic activities; policy proposals for con- 
trolling economic fluctuations. Prerequisite: 
24.323 or 24.335, 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



24.481 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3) Individual 
and supervised study in selected areas of 
economics. Admission by consent of instruc- 
tor, 

24,485 PROSEMINAR ON ECONOMIC ISSUES 
(3) Research and writing of papers on an 
economic issue selected by the instructor. 



Prerequisites: 24,309, 24.323, and 24,335. 

24.489 WORKSHOP ON ECONOMIC EDUCA- 
TION (3) Designed to help teachers and 
school administrators gain a better under- 
standing of the economic workings of the 
society in which we live. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of the instructor. 



84 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



POLITICAL SCIENCE (POSC) 



Each 100 level course — 101, 103, 107, 137 — is at the introductory level. Each may 
be taken without prerequisites. Each fulfills the general education requirement. 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

68.101 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCI- 
ENCE (3) The origins of modern govern- 
ments. The nature of constitutions and con- 
stitutionalism. A definition and Interpretation 
of politics. Prerequisite: sophmore standing. 

68.103 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN NA- 
TIONAL GOVERNMENT (3) Structure and 
functions of the government of the United 
States and the problems involved in the ex- 
tension of the scope of democratic govern- 
ment in our contemporary life. 

68.107 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS (3) An introductory examina- 
tion of principles of legal, political, and 
social relations among nations. 



68.137 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE 
POLITICS (3) The study of politics Is Intro- 
duced through an examination of different 
political systems. The activities of parties, 
movements, and pressure groups are exam- 
ined In the -context of different social, politi- 
cal, and economic frameworks. 

68.207 STATE GOVFRNMENT (3) Historical 
background, state constitutions, and the 
legislative and judicial branches of govern- 
ment. Problems of state administration and 
federal-state relations. Prerequisite: 68.103. 
or consent of the instructor. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

students may be admitted to upper division 
courses without the listed prerequisites after ob- 
taining the consent of the instructor. 



68.303 THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICS 
(3) The theories of mutual relations of 
states. Elements of national power; inter- 
national politics as a struggle for power. 
Restraints upon the struggle for power. Pre- 
requisite: History 40.264 or 68.107. 

68.305 URBAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 
(3) The political system of the American 
urban area. The formal structures of the 
governments in the metropolis are analyzed 
in the context of the evolution of relations 
between citizens and leaders. Prerequishte: 
68.103. 

68.307 CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL 
POLITICS (3) An examination of the con- 
duct of international relations by the West- 
ern, the Communist, and the non-aligned 
blocs In the Post-World War period. Prere- 
quisite: 68.303. 

68.337 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF FOR- 
EIGN POWERS: THE WESTERN WORLD (3) 
Constitutional and legal processes of Eng- 
land, France, Italy, and Germany. Some at- 
tention given to the small social-democratic 
states of Europe. Prerequisite. 68.137. 

68.338 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT OF FOR- 
EIGN POWERS: RUSSIA AND THE EAST (3) 
Constitutional and legal processes of Rus- 
sia, Japan, China and other Eastern powers. 
Prerequisite: 68.137 

68.339 COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 
(3) The course will attempt to bring to- 
gether the analytical concepts and method- 
ology techniques that may be applied to the 
study of political systems in a comparative 
sense. Prerequisite: 68.101 or 68.137. 



68.341 AFRICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 
(3) The politics and governments of the 
nations of the African continent. 

68.351 THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF 
LATIN AMERICA (3) Presents both the for- 
mal governmental structure of Latin Ameri- 
can nations and the basic factors which 
influence their political life. Prerequisites: 
History 40.121 and 122. 

68.355 THE LATIN AMERICAN POLICY OF THE 
UNITED STATES (3) Diplomatic and cul- 
tural relations between the United States 
and Latin America. The Pan-American Move- 
ment, Implementation of the Monroe Doc- 
trine, and the Advent of the Good Neighbor 
Policy. Prerequisites: History 40.145, 146. 

68.361 POLITICAL BEHAVIOR (3) An introduc- 
tion to the substantive theory and method- 
ology of behavioral analysis. Topics include 
voting behavior, elite behavior, an analysis 
of types of political conflict, and personality 
and politics. 

68.375 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) Admin- 
istration as a central element of contempo- 
rary society, with special reference to the 
problems of government organization, con- 
trol, personnel, finance, and public relations. 
Prerequisite: 68.103. 

68.381 THE PRESIDENCY (3) A discussion of 
the origin of the office, the selection of the 
president and policy-making in the executive 
branch. Prerequisite: 68.103. 

68.383 CONGRESS (3) An investigation of the 
relations of Congress with the other branches 
of government and with the political parties 
and interest groups. The course also exam- 
ines the relationships between a member of 
Congress and his constituency as well as 
the internal dynamics of Congress. Prerequi- 
site: 68.103. 



ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 85 



68.401 INTRODUCTION TO LAW (3) The legal 
processes in the United States. This course 
is designed primarily for the liberal arts 
student. Prerequisite: sophomore standing 
and 68.103. 

68.417 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES (3) 
Origin and development of the American 
two-party system. The activities of pressure 
groups and organizations, and their effects 
upon the party system. Prerequisite: 68.103 
or History 40.145, 146. 

68.418 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3) A study of 
the constitution of the United States based 
on leading judicial decisions interpreting 
the constitution and statutes from 1789 to 
the present. Prerequisite: 68.103. 

68.427 POLITICAL THEORY I (3) Political 
thought in the West from the Greeks to the 
end of the sixteenth century. Prerequisite: 
History 40.263, 264 or consent of instructor, 

68.428 POLITICAL THEORY II (3) Political phi- 
losophers and their writings since the six- 
teenth century. Attention given to the con- 
flict of ideologies in the twentieth century. 
Prerequisite: History 40.263, 264 or consent 
of instructor. 

68.430 POLITICAL IDEAS OF SOCIALISM AND 
COMMUNISM (3) This course deals with 
selected topics in the political theory of 
socialism and communism including social- 
ism and the ancient regimes, socialism and 
political organization, Russian, Leninist and 
Stalinist theory, and socialist ideas in the 
post cold war period. Prerequisite: 68.428. 

68.432 UNITED STATES-SOVIET RELATIONS 
(3) Diplomatic, cultural, and economic re- 
lations between the U.S.S.R. and the U.S. 
Emphasis on the period since 1933 with- a 
careful study of the effects of the Second 
World War upon the balance of power. Pre- 
requisite: History 40.263, 264, 145, 146, or 
consent of instructor. 

68.435 AFRICA IN WORLD POLITICS (3) The 
role of African nations in the nuclear age, 
and their efforts to achieve unity. Prerequi- 
site: History 40.264 or consent of instructor. 

68.439 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY IN 
SOUTHEAST ASIA (3) American foreign 
policy in Southeast Asia in the Post World 
War II period. Prerequisites: 68.303, and 
History 40.110, 146, or consent of instructor. 

68.441 CONTEMPORARY UNITED STATES- 
WESTERN EUROPEAN RELATIONS (3) Em- 
phasis will be on NATO, the European Eco- 
nomic Community, and the Anglo-American 
efforts to create an Atlantic partnership be- 
tween Europe and the United States. Pre- 
requisite: History 40.264 and 40.146, or con- 
sent of instructor. 

68.445 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY IN 
SOUTH ASIA (3) A discussion of American 
foreign policy in South Asia mainly since 



1945. Emphasis will be on India and Paki- 
stan. Prerequisite: 68.303, History 40.109, 
146, or consent of instructor. 

68.450 GROUP POLITICS AND PUBLIC OPIN- 
ION (3) The role of pressure groups and 
public opinion in the American political sys- 
tem. Prerequisite: Junior standing and nine, 
hours of political science, or consent of 
instructor. 

68.455-456 INTERNATIONAL LAW AND ORGA- 
NIZATION I, II (3, 3) An examination of the 
theories and the development of international 
law up to the present. The character of the 
modern state system, the role of Interna- 
tional organizations, and international law 
and resort to force. Prerequisites: 68.303, 
and History 40.264, or consent of instructor. 

68.461 RESEARCH METHODS IN POLITICAL 
BEHAVIOR (3) The major emphasis of this 
course will be on the use of quantitative 
techniques in political research. Topics in- 
clude the preparation of a research design, 
statistical analysis, and the methods used 
in the conduct of political inquiry. Prerequi- 
site: Any course at 100 level. 

68.465 EDITORIAL WORK — TOWSON STATE 
JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (1) 
Members of the Editorial Board of The Tow- 
son State College Journal of international 
Affairs prepare the issues of that journal 
under the supervision of the faculty advisors. 
Admission by consent of the instructor only. 

68.481 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) Individual 
and supervised study in selected areas of 
political, science. Prerequisite: Eighteen 
hours of political science. Admisison by con- 
sent of instructor only. 

68.485 DEMOCRATIC THEORY SEMINAR (3) 
This course attempts to trace the sources of 
Democratic Theory to their 16th century 
origins and to analyze the variants to that 
theory which have been proposed since that 
time. Prerequisite: 68.428. 

68.487 SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (3) 
Various methods and techniques of researcii 
in political science, culminating in the prep- 
aration of a seminar paper. Prerequisite: 
eighteen semester hours in political science, 
or consent of instructor. 

68.491 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY UNITED 
STATES FOREIGN POLICY (3) An exam- 
ination of the nature, basis, and instruments 
of American foreign policy in the contempo- 
rary age. The formulation, control, and exe- 
cution of American foreign policy will also 
be noted. Prerequisites: 68.303, and History 
40.146, or consent of instructor. 

68.497 PRACTICUM IN POLITICS (3-9) An In- 
ternship program in government and/or poli- 
tics. Prerequisite: Junior standing, major In 
political science, and consent of the de- 
partment. 



86 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Education 



Professors: BROYLES, BURRIER (Graduate Coordinator, Secondary Education). 

CORNTHWAITE, DUMAS, ELY-FLICKINGER, FITZGERALD (Graduate Coordinator. 
Elementary Education), GUTKOSKA (Director of Reading), B. HAUSERMAN (Associate 
Dean; Director of Teacher Education), HEAGNEY, JESSUP (Chairman, Department of 
Secondary Education), KILEY, K\MSEY (Graduate Coordinator, Early Childhood 
Education), KJER (Chairman, Department of Early Childhood Education), LINDNER, 
SCHMID (Chairman, Department of Elementary Education), SPRAGUE, VAN NORMAN 
(Director of Professional Programs), WESLEY, WILLIAMSON, WILLIS. 

Associate Professors: BARBOUR (Director of Laboratory Experiences), 

BELLOWS, BINKO (Associate Director of Laboratory Experiences), BRAMBLETT, 
BRANDWINE, BRODBELT, COHEN, COLIMORE, COX. EPSTEIN, GARNER, HANSON, 
N. HAUSERMAN (Director of Research, Lida Lee Tall Learning Resources Center), 
HELFRICH, LEWIS, LOOMIS, B. TAYLOR (Director, Lida Lee Tall Learning Resources 
Center), TRITCH, VELDER, WALL, WILLIAMS. 

Assistant Professors: BEHLING, BOND, BOYD, CARPENTER, COHN, FINK, FLAD, 

FRIEMAN, GEHRING (Coordinator of Educational Technology), HOLMES, HUGHES, 
KARFGIN, LINDSAY, MARTIN, NICHOLAS, O'NEILL, POUR, RAY, SMITH, SUHORSKY, 
M. TAYLOR, TROUPE, VLANGAS, WATERS, WILNER (Librarian, Lida Lee Tall 
Learning Resources Center). 

Instructors: BALDWIN, BEINER, JORDAN, LAWLOR, LOUDERMILK, LUDLOW, LYONS, 
McGILL, OLSON, PATRICK, POLLACK, SHORES. 

Visiting Lecturers: BLAKE, HAWKINS, LAMB, MEDWIN, NASS, MAY. 

LIDA LEE TALL LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 

The Lida Lee Tall Center is primarily a research facility at Towson State Col- 
lege focusing on major problems of education. With a strong focus on applied 
or field research, the Lida Lee Tall faculty and staff provide direction for edu- 
cators in the continuing challenge of educational inquiry. 

There are many opportunities for educational research at the Lida Lee Tall 
Center. With the guidance of a full time research director, the following are 
available for perspective researchers : 

1. A nursery school program for two year old children, with parents having 
full organizational and administrative responsibility; 

2. A nursery school program for four and five year old groups of children, 
closely allied with the Early Childhood Department of Towson State College; 

3. A full-time day care center for three and four year old children, working 
closely with the Early Childhood Department of Towson State College; 

4. An educational media teaching and learning center emphasizing the develop- 
ment of learning stations which are used independently by children; 

5. Closed circuit programming (in the planning stage) focusing on instructional 
strategies ; 

6. A Parent Lounge focusing on the development of Parent-Teacher partner- 
ships; 

7. A fully equipped and staffed reading center serving Lida Lee Tall as well as 
the community at large ; 

8. Special facilities and programs in art, music, physical education, drama, 
theatre arts, language and speech; 

9. Current standardized test data on file for every child in the Lida Lee Tall 
Learning Resources Center; 

10. An innovative "family" or "vertical" grouping of children in one class, simi- 
lar to the British infant school organization, with an age span of four and 
one half years to almost nine years of age : 

IL A liaison with the computer center for the Maryland State Colleges which is 
located on this campus. 



87 



In order to share the results of the research studies carried out at the Cen- 
ter, our publication called "Probe," (Probing Resources of Better Education) 
is distributed nationwide. 

The Lida Lee Tall Center welcomes inquiries from students, faculty, or any- 
one interested in exploring the parameters of the educational milieu. 

The Teacher Education Program 

The Teacher Education program is designed to help the student mature in the 
varied understandings and competencies needed by the beginning teacher. Build- 
ing upon the foundation of a sound general education, the student is guided 
toward an understanding of the child, the school, and the educative process. 
Teacher Education students may include in their professional program such 
experiences as the following: observation and participation in open space schools, 
as well as self-contained classrooms; utilization of micro-teaching and video- 
taping; and familiarization with social agencies in the school community. In- 
creasingly, efforts are being made to individualize aspects of the student's pro- 
fessional program. All aspects of the programs have as their major objective 
the development of teachers who are broadly prepared individuals, who work 
well with children and youth, and who are ready and able to take intelligent 
action on current educational issues. 

Entering the Program 

Students who plan to enter one of the education programs should file an applica- 
tion with the Education Department Office no later than the second semester 
of the sophomore year. (Those who transfer to Towson in their junior or senior 
year should file an application in their first semester at Towson.) Students must 
update their application forms regularly. To be eligible, students must be in good 
standing, have a college cumulative average of 2.00 plus and satisfy the require- 
ments of the Screening-Advisement committee. 

Entering Student Teaching 

All Teacher Education students must apply for student teaching on a form pro- 
vided by the Director of Laboratory Experiences during the semester preceding 
the student teaching experience. (Secondary majors must also meet the academic 
requirements of the department involved.) 

Each Teacher Education student who has reached the appropriate level of 
competency is placed in one of eight to ten cooperating school systems. Oppor- 
tunities are available in rural or urban schools, "self-contained" or "open-space" 
classrooms, with individual teachers or with teams. Students may be placed in 
schools where methods courses are taught by a college supervisor, or individual 
placements are made for students who have taken methods courses on campus. 
Every attempt is made to secure the available placement that best meets the 
needs of the individual. 

Differentiated student teaching may be taken by students who secure special 
permission from the Director of Laboratory Experiences. 

Numbering of Courses 

The numerical prefixes indicate teacher education programs as follows : 25 Early 
Childhood Education, 26 Elementary Education, 27 Secondary Education as well 
as Dual Certification programs and Adult Education courses, 28 Special Certi- 
fication programs. Prefix 29 designates courses which may apply to a number 
of programs. 

Following the prefix: courses numbered to 99 are new "experimental" 
courses; courses numbered 100 to 299 are termed "lower division"; and courses 
numbered 300 to 499 are termed "upper division" and normally have pre- 
requisites. Some upper division courses and all courses numbered 500-699 are 
I taken by graduate students. 

88 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



For detailed information about graduate and evening programs, consult the 
specialized catalogs for those studies. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Undergraduate Program 

The early childhood education major is designed for students who have an in- 
terest in working with young children from birth through age eight. It is built 
on the premise that special capabilities and understandings are necessary to 
teach successfully in the preschool and primary grades. There is a demand for 
specialization by men and women in early childhood education. 

The major in early childhood education leads to State Certification to teach 
nursery school, kindergarten, and primary grades. It also prepares students for 
positions in other programs for young children such as day care centers, parent 
and child centers, private and other non-public preschools and primary programs. 

To meet both the College and Maryland State Certification requirements in 
general education (academic work) the student must complete a total of 80 hours 
in the arts and sciences. The required professional education courses in early 
childhood education total 35 or 36 hours. The remaining hours are elected by 
the student to obtain the total of 128 hours needed for graduation. For specific 
details of the early childhood education program see the guide included in this 
section on page 84. 

Deviations from the program pattern for early childhood education majors 
are permitted only with the consent of the Chairman of Early Childhood Educa- 
tion. In addition to the major in early childhood education, a student, by using 
his elective hours carefully, may develop a major or a minor in a subject matter 
area. 

It is recommended that the student seek an adviser at the earliest possible 
time. 

Alternate Major in Early Childhood Education — The Evening College 

As a service to teachers who wish to pursue work toward a degree in early child- 
hood education while they are on their teaching assignments and to other 
workers in various programs for young children, the Evening College offers an 
alternate program during evening and summers for the preparation of nursery 
school, kindergarten, day care center, and primary teachers which will enable 
them to major in early childhood education. See Evening College Bulletin for 
further information. 



Undergraduate 

25.101 THE YOUNG CHILD AS A LEARNER (3) 
Introduction to the developing child and 
educational programs available for young 
children. Focuses primarily on the child him- 
self. Prerequisite: Approval of the Depart- 
ment. 

25.102 THE CURRICULUM FOR YOUNG CHIL- 
DREN (3) Curriculum content and methods 
of teaching in programs for young children. 
Prerequisite: Child Psychology, Child Growth 
and Development, 25.101, or approval of 
Department of Education. 

25.121 LABORATORY EXPERIENCES IN PRO- 
GRAMS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN (3) Prac- 
tical application of educational theory 
through observation of and participation with 
young children in classroom situations. Con- 



current with EDUC 25.102, summers only. 
Prerequisite: 25.101 or a course in child 
psychology, child growth and development, 
or approval of Department of Education. 

25.301 MATERIALS AND EXPERIENCES FOR 
THE YOUNG CHILD (3) Stimulating the in- 
tellectual, physical, social, and emotional 
development of young children through the 
use of varied Instructional materials and 
activities. Prerequisite: Six hours of Early 
Childhood Education or approval of Depart- 
ment of Education. 

50.321 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (2) (Course de- 
scription will be found under the Mathe- 
matics Department listings.) 



EDUCATION 89 



TOWSON STATE COLLEGE — EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Major in ECE, including TSC, Departmental and State Certification Requirements Leading to Certification 
to Teach and Work with Children Ages Three through Eight Years. 

COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS 



ART 


Credit 


PSYCHOLOGY 




12.105 Art in the Culture 


3 


70.101 Gen. Psychology 


3 


Elective 


3 


70.211 Child Psychology 


3 


ENGLISH 




HISTORY 




30.102 Freshman Composition 


3 


Elective 


6 


Elective 


6 


GEOGRAPHY 




MUSIC 




34.101 or 102 Elements of Geog. 


3 


54.101 Intro, to Music Lit. 


3 






Elective 


2 


SOCIOLOGY 








80.101 Intro, to Sociology 


3 


SPEECH 




Elective 


3 


87.105 Speech & Lang. Dev. 


3 


HEALTH 




SCIENCE 




38.101 Current Health Prob. 


3 


14.101 Fund, of Biology 


4 






64.101 Physical Science 1 


4 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




14.303 Life Science OR 




Elective 


2 


64.303 Earth-Space Science 


3 


TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION 


66 


MATHEMATICS 








50.204 Fund. Concepts of Arith. 


3 






50.205 Gen. College Math. 


3 







Note: To meet certification requirements, students must chooss 14 additional hours in academic subjects 
(Art & Sciences) for a total of 80 semester hours of academic work. 



TOTAL NUMBER HOURS REQUIRED IN ACADEMIC SUBJECTS 



AT LEAST 80 



ACADEMIC ELECTIVES 

Select other courses in Sociology, Psychology, Music, Art, Speech and Drama, Health, Foreign Language, 
Political Science, Economics, Philosophy, Geography, Government, Science, English, History. 



PROFESSIONAL TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES— MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



28.101 Careers in Education 
70.201 Educational Psychology 

25.341 Prof. Block I 

25.342 Prof. Block II 

50.321 Prof. Block II— Teaching 
Math, in ECE 

25.361 Prof. Block 11- Teaching 
Reading in ECE 



25.343 Prof. Block III 2 

25.351-352 Student Teaching 10 

Two terms of 8 wks. each on two 
different age or grade levels 
(NS-KDG/Primary) 

29.401 Foundations of Education 3 

Approved elective for ECE 1 



TOTAL NUMBER PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

AT LEAST 35 

APPROVED ELECTIVE COURSES FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION MAJORS: 
Educ. 29.417, Child. Lit. (3); Educ. 25.421, Prob. in ECE (3); Sp. 84.375, Sp. in Elem. School (3); Theater 
86.307, Teacher Arts for Children (2); Art 12.371, Art & the Child (2); Music 54.307, Tchg. Mus. in the 
Elem. School (2); Educ. 25.301, Mat. & Exp. for Young Child. (3); Educ. 25.355 Differentiated Stud. Tchg. 
in ECE (1-8); Educ. 25.411, Teachers & Parents: Partners in ECE (3), Educ. 25.413 Infants and Children 
Under Three (3); Educ. 25.415 Day Care Cnt. (3); Educ. 25.417 Learning Disabilities in Young Children 
(3); Educ. 25.419 Measurement and Evaluation in ECE (3). 



TOTAL NUMBER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION 
90 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



128 



25.341 PROFESSIONAL BLOCK I THE RELATED 
ARTS AND SCIENCES OF THE ARTS (5) 
Interdepartmental instruction by specialists 
In art, music, physical education and science 
with emphasis on the personal development 
of the becoming teacher and coordinated by 
a faculty member from Early Childhood Edu- 
cation program. Classroom participation. 
Prerequisite: Open only to Early Childhood 
Education Majors. Educational Psychology 
and Child Psychology or approval of Depart- 
ment of Education. 

25.342 PROFESSIONAL BLOCK II CURRICU- 
LUM ANALYSIS AND METHODS OF IN- 
STRUCTION (4) Emphasis on objectives, 
materials, and methods of teaching the lan- 
guage arts, and social studies in programs 
for young children. Participation one day 
weekly In an assigned classroom for young 
children. Prerequisite: Open only to Early 
Childhood Education Majors. 25.341 or its 
equivalent. 

25.343 PROFESSIONAL BLOCK III CURRICU- 
LUM CONCEPTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (2) 
Parallels student teaching and is concerned 
with classroom problems encountered in 
student teaching. Prerequisites: 25.341 and 
25.342 or the equivalent. Open only to Early 
Childhood Education Majors. 

25.351, 352 STUDENT TEACHING IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD (10) Assignment in nursery 
school, kindergarten, and primary grades or 
other types of programs for young children 
under expert guidance. Two terms of ap- 
proximately 8 weeks at two different age 
levels, four consecutive days weekly. Con- 
current with 25.343. 

25.355 DIFFERENTIATED STUDENT TEACHING 
IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (1-8) Student teach- 
ing experiences in addition to those in re- 
quired student teaching courses (25.351, 
25.352), according to needs and interests of 
the student. This experience may be in pub- 
lic schools, or may occur in such centers for 
young children as Day Care Centers, Parent- 
Child or Infant Centers, hospitals, or other 
special programs in early childhood educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: Approval of student's 
adviser. Chairman of Early Childhood Edu- 
cation, and Director of Laboratory Experi- 
ences. 

25.361 TEACHING READING IN EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (3) Teaching reading 
in early childhood education with special 
emphasis on early learning as related to the 
reading process and the teaching of begin- 
ning reading. Critical examination of content, 
procedures, materials in programs for nurs- 
ery school through third grade. Prerequisite: 
Major in Early Childhood Education. 

25.403 CURRICULUM IN PRIMARY EDUCATION 
(3) The child, curriculum content, methods 
and materials of teaching, and program or- 
ganization in the primary school years. Eve- 



nings and Summers only. Prerequisite: 6 
semester hours of Early Childhood Educa- 
tion. (G) 

25.411 PARENTS AND TEACHERS: PARTNERS 
IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) 
The development of a rationale for improved 
parent-teacher relationships in early child- 
hood education programs. The role of para- 
professionals and specialists and volunteers. 
Observation, participation, home and school 
visits by teachers and parents functioning as 
a team. Prerequisites: Six hours of Early 
Childhood Education. (G) 

25.413 INFANTS AND CHILDREN UNDER 
THREE (3) Nature of the infant and very 
young child. Types of programs providing 
care of infants and children under three. 
Focus on developmental needs. Organiza- 
tion, curriculum, and methods of working 
with parents and children. Observations. 
Resource persons from allied agencies. Pre- 
requisites: 6 hours Psychology; 6 hours 
Early Childhood Education; or approval of 
Chairman, Early Childhood Education. (G) 

25.415 THE DAY CARE CENTER (3) An inter- 
disciplinary course designed to prepare day 
care personnel. Resource persons from re- 
lated agencies will participate. Topics in- 
clude purposes of day care, problems of 
organization, administration and supervision, 
records, pre irams, community interaction, 
and parent relations. Field trips and observa- 
tion of day care centers. Prerequisites: 6 
hours of Early Childhood Education or ap- 
proval of Department of Education. (G) 

25.417 LEARNING DISABILITIES IN YOUNG 
CHILDREN (3) Survey of the nature of 
learning disabilities in the young child; theo- 
retical positions; current research; neurologi- 
cal aspects involved; major categories; eval- 
uative and remediation procedures are pre- 
sented. Seminar-discussion and programmed 
units. Prerequisites: 6 hours of psychology 
and 6 hours of Early Childhood Education. (G) 

25.419 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 
IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) 
Backgrounds and principles of assessment 
in early childhood education. Statistical con- 
cepts. Types of instruments and methods for 
evaluating growth and achievement of young 
children. Prerequisite: 6 hours of psychology 
and 6 hours of Early Childhood Education. (G) 

25.421 (26.381) PROBLEMS IN EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (3) Research findings 
used as a basis for program planning in 
nursery school, kindergarten and primary 
grades; current trends and issues are con- 
sidered. Prerequisite: student teaching and/ 
or teaching experience in preschool or 
primary grades; junior standing; approval of 
Department of Education. (G) 

25.423 (26.391) LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 
IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) 
Classroom experiences with children in pre- 

EDUCATION 91 



Va3 5'6'l 



school and primary grades in a variety of 
teaching-learning situations. Analysis of ob- 
servations in light of current research. Con- 
current with 25.421. Summers only. Prerequi- 
sites: junior standing and approval of Depart- 
ment of Education. (G) 

25.494 TRAVEL AND STUDY: EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (1-6) Study abroad of 
educational facilities, programs or practices, 
or selected projects in education topics. By 
special arrangement with the program chair- 
man and sponsoring instructors. 

25.495 INDEPENDENT STUDY: EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (1-4) An opportunity 

Graduate Only 

25.509 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF 
YOUNG CHILDREN (3) Study of findings of 
current research in growth and development 
of young children; methods of studying and 
evaluating behavior; implications of case 
study data for curriculum improvement. Pre- 
requisite: Psych. 70.511 (501) and consent 
of the Department of Education. 

25.521 READING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDU- 
CATION: ADVANCED (3) Emphasis on con- 
temporary issues; advanced interpretation 
and critical evaluation of research in lan- 
guage development and reading instruction 
in light of basic needs, developmental levels, 
and individual differences in young children. 
Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in read- 
ing and consent of the Department of Edu- 
cation. 

25.547 THE TEACHING PROCESS: EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) Study of re- 
cent theories, methods, and findings in re- 
search on the teaching process. Analysis of 



for especially qualified students to under- 
take research problems or study projects 
relevant to their interest and training under 
the direction of a staff member. Prerequisite: 
Consent of program chairman. 

25.496 DIRECTED READING: EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (1-4) Independent read- 
ing in selected areas of Early Childhood 
Education in order to provide for the individ- 
ual a comprehensive coverage or to meet 
special needs. By invitation of the Depart- 
ment to major students. 

G — may be available for graduate credit. See 
graduate bulletin. 



teaching behaviors and exploration of teach- 
ing strategies in educational programs for 
young children. Prerequisite: Teaching ex- 
perience, Psyc. 70.511 or 29.501, and con- 
sent of Department of Education. 

25.553 PERCEPTUAL AND COGNITIVE DE- 
VELOPMENT OF YOUNG CHILDREN (3) 
Survey of significant research affecting the 
theory and programs of education for chil- 
dren ages three to eight years. Prerequisites: 
Psych. 70.511 and/or Educ. 25.509 and con- 
sent of the Department of Education. 

25.573 SEMINAR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDU- 
CATION (3) Seminar approach to current 
practices and trends in curriculum, materials, 
methods, and organization of educational 
programs for children ages three through 
eight years. A seminar paper is required. 
Prerequisite: Nine hours of graduate work in 
Early Childhood Education and 29.691. 

25.599 MASTERS THESIS IN EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION 



Master of Education in Early Childhood Education 

For more detailed information regarding the Master of Education in Early 

Childhood Education see the Graduate Studies Bulletin. 



Elementary Education Program 

Undergraduate Program 

The major in elementary education leads to certification to teach grades 1 
through 6, grades 1 through 8 in the middle schools organization, and grade 9 
provided content requirements for secondary certification are met. The program 
is designed to integrate classroom and laboratory experiences in such ways as 
to prepare students for beginning teaching in public schools. 

In meeting the general course requirements and certification requirements 
the student must complete at least 80 hours in arts and sciences; at least 35 
hours in professional education, and electives, to make a total of 128 semester 
hours. A checklist guide can be found on page 88. 

A concentration of related courses or a major in arts or sciences is desir- 
able for the student in elementary education. 

Deviations from the program pattern for elementary majors (i.e. in content 
or sequence of professional education courses) are permitted only with the 
written consent of the Chairman of Elementary Education. 



92 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Elementary Education Major with Mathematics Minor: Through a coopera- 
tive program of the Elementary Education and Mathematics Departments, stu- 
dents can use a middle school student teaching experience as a route to elementar>' 
certification with a mathematics minor. Interested students should consult with 
the chairmen of the Elementary Education and Mathematics Departments as early 
in their college program as possible. 

Elementary Majors may arrange programs with minors in other selected 
areas by arrangement with the chairman of Elementary Education and the chair- 
man of the other department concerned. 

Master of Education in Elementary Education 

For detailed information regarding the Master of Education in Elementary 

Education see the Bulletin of Graduate Studies. 

Master of Education in Reading 

The Master of Education Degree Program in Reading is designed to offer experi- 
ences that will improve the teaching of reading at all levels from kindergarten 
through college. Specifically, the program seeks to offer courses in reading for 
teachers and administrators who are interested in improving their knowledge 
of reading and to prepare reading clinicians to teach developmental, corrective, 
and remedial reading. Furthermore, the program is designed to prepare reading 
specialists who will be capable of filling learnership roles in reading improve- 
ment programs in schools and clinics. 

The Course Requirement for the Degree include 29.621, 29.623, 29.625 and 
29.629 and are listed under the prefix 29 "Other Education Courses." Detailed 
information regarding the program is given in the Bulletin of Graduate Studies. 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION COURSES 
Undergraduate Courses 

12.371 (12.371) ART AND THE CHILD (2-3) 
Major considerations of art education appro- 
priate to the work of the elementary teacher; 
experiences in planning and teaching art. 

12.471 ADVANCED ART EDUCATION (3) (See 
Art Dept. Listings.) 

12.475 (12.375) TEACHING ART IN THE ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOL (2) Concurrent course 
with 396, Art In the Secondary School. For 
course description see 396. Open only to Art 
Education Majors. Prerequisite: Consent of 
Art Department. 

14.303 LIFE SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (3) Emphasis placed on the con- 
ceptual approach to science teaching, the 
modes of scientific inquity, and the utiliza- 
tion of living organisms In the classroom. 
Prerequisite: 14.101. Register through Edu- 
cation Department. 

50.323 (50.323) TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2 or 3) Nature of 
Instruction. Organization of units of instruc- 
tion. Provisions for developing understand- 
ings. New programs and research findings. 
Techniques of evaluation. Required of all 
Elementary Education Majors. Prerequisite: 
50.204 and 50.205. 

50.325 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE MID- 
DLE SCHOOL (3) (See Math. Dept. Listings.) 



50.421 MATHEMATICS EDUCATION FOR IN- 
SERVICE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACH- 
ERS (1-4) (G) (See Math Dept. Listings.) 

50.427 READINGS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCA- 
TION FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
TEACHER (1-3) (G) (See Math Dept. Listings.) 

54.307 (54.345) TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOLS (2) Acquaints stu- 
dents with music programs in the elementary 
school through lecture, class discussion, and 
practice with children. Prerequisite: 54.233. 
2 credits (non-music major), 3 credits (music 
majors). Day, night, and summer school. 

60.324 (60.324) TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) 
Observation and participation at Llda Lee 
Tall Learning Resources Center. Time Is 
devoted to planning, preparation, and pres- 
entation. Prerequisite: Any non-major physi- 
cal education courses totaling a minimum of 
one credit for general education require- 
ments and physical education 60.101 and 
60.102. 

64.303 EARTH-SPACE SCIENCE IN CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (3) Physical science 
principles used to develop Earth-Space sci- 
ence concepts. Emphasis on the individual- 
ized discovery approach as may be applied 



EDUCATION 93 



CHECK LIST OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Courses starred (*) should be completed before Student Teaching 
128 semester hours, including at least — 
A. ARTS AND SCIENCES, 80 hours including: 



M4.101 


4 


*64.101 


4 


* 14.303 


3 


64.303 


3 



SCIENCE— 14 hours' 

Fundamentals of Biology 

Physical Science I 

Life Science in Elem. School 

Earth-Space Scl. in Childhood 
Ed. 

PSYCHOLOGY (General)— 3 
hours 

'70.101 3 General Psychology 

MATHEMATICS— 6 hours 
Fund. Concepts of Arithmetic 

General College Mathematics 
ART — 2 hours 
MUSIC— 2 hours 
Music Fundamentals 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION— 
2-3 hours 

*60.009-059 1 Freshman Physical Education 

*60.101 1 Sophomore Physical Education^ 

*60.102 1 Sophomore Physical Education^ 



50.204 


3 


50.205 


3 


12. 




54.233 


2 



•38.101 


3 


HEALTH— 2-3 hours 
Current Health Problems 


*30.102 


3 


ENGLISH— 12 hours 
Freshman Composition 


*30. 


3 




*30. 


3 




30. 


3 





SOCIAL SCIENCES— 15 hours' 
*34.102 3 Elements of Geography 

*40. 3 History 

*40. 3 History 

40. 3 History 

* 3 Econ., Pol. Scl., or Sociology 

TOTAL 60-63 hours 

B. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION, 36 hours in- 
cluding: 

*29.101 2 Careers in Education 

29.401 3 Foundations of Education (Pre- 

requisite: Student Teaching) 

*70.201 3 Educational Psychology 

29.315 2 Ed. Meas. for CIrm. Teachers 

MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY IN CURR. I 
SEMESTER 

*26.361 4 Elem. Curriculum I (Overview; 

Reading Methods) 

*50.323 2 Tchg. Math, in Elem. School 

*TWO of the Following THREP 

12.371 2 Art and the Child 

and/or 

54.307 2 Tchg. Music In Elem. School 

and/or 

60.324 2 Tchg. Phys. Ed. In Elem. School 

MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY 

26.462 6 Elem. Curriculum II (Methods in 

Read., Lang. Arts, Soc. Studies) 

26.497 10 Student Teaching 

TOTAL 36 hours 



SPEECH, DRAMA, OR 
PHILOSOPHY— 2-3 hours 



EDUCATION ELECTIVES 
ELECTIVES IN ARTS AND SCIENCES— at least 17-20 hours. A major is desirable. 



1 Science transition pattern: 14.101, 64.101, 4-hour elective, and 14.303 or 64.303. 

2 Required of all students who take 60.324 Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School. 

3 Some counties and states require 40.145-146 United States Histoiy. 

4 The student must take prerequisite courses in Art, Music, and/or Physical Education for the two 
chosen. The third methods course may be taken as an elective after Student Teaching. 

Schedules for Elementary Curriculum I and II semesters will be provided by the Department. 

94 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



to elementary school science Instruction. 
Prerequisite: 64.101. Register through Edu- 
cation Department. 

76.375 TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE ELEMEN- 
TARY SCHOOL (2) Significance of science 
for the elementary school child; its contribu- 
tion toward his development; criteria for 
selecting science experiences for children. 

76.488 AEROSPACE EDUCATION WORKSHOP 

(3) In cooperation with CAP, USAF, NASA 
and others. The general principles of avia- 
tion and space exploration with emphasis on 
teaching materials, resources and field ex- 
periences for K-12 teachers, supervisors, 
administrators and students of teaching. 
Special requirement: Students must com- 
plete registration or notify director 30 days 
prior to first class in order to qualify for 
Air Force flights. Offered summers only. 

78.375 TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) Locating, orga- 
nizing, synthesizing, and Interpreting funda- 
mental social information. Evenings and sum- 
mers only; part of Curriculum II In day pro- 
gram. 

84.375 SPEECH IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
(See Communications Dept. Listings.) 

26.305 (26.405, 26.001) CREATIVE EXPRESSION 
(6) Experiences in planning and teaching 
an Integrated and creative program of art, 
music and physical education activities at 
the elementary level. To be taken concur- 
rently with Curriculum I. Prerequisite: Art, 2 
or more hours; Music 54.233; Ph. Ed. 60.101, 
60.102. 

26.311 (26.411) CHILD AND THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL CURRICULUM (3) The child, the 
school, and community, and the curriculum 
of the modern elementary school are inter- 
preted in terms of the roles and functions of 
the public school in a democratic society. 
Prerequisite: 70.101, 70.201. Evenings and 
summers only. 

26.321 (26.401, 26.421) TEACHING LANGUAGE 
ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) 
Language needs and abilities of children. 
Development of effective language skills with 
emphasis on reading. Evenings and sum- 
mers only; part of Curriculum II in day pro- 
gram. 

26.323 (26.423) TEACHING READING IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) Introduction to 
reading In the elementary school. A survey 
of varied approaches with emphasis on skills 
development. Evenings and summers only; 
part of Curriculum I In day program. 

26.361 (26.461) ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM I 

(4) Foundations of reading Instruction and 
an overview of elementary schools including 
curriculum, organization, planning, evalua- 
tion, teacher characteristics; observation and 



(G) May be available for graduate credit. See 
Graduate Bulletin. 



participation in public schools. Prerequisite: 
Consent of Education Department. 

26.427 (26.453) READING AND OTHER LAN- 
GUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL— ADVANCED (3) Application of 
theory and research to the teaching of read- 
ing and the other language arts. Prerequisite: 
26.321, 26.323, or 26.462. May be taken for 
graduate or undergraduate credit in evenings 
and summers. (G) 

26.429 (26.454) METHODS AND PRINCIPLES 
OF READING INSTRUCTION— ADVANCED 
(3) Principles involved in building a de- 
velopmental reading program; prevention of 
reading difficulties; methods of remedial 
reading. Prerequisite: 26.323 or 26.462. May 
be taken for undergraduate or graduate 
credit in the evenings and summers. (G) 

26.441 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2-3) The child and 
his curriculum. The teacher's role in cur- 
riculum as a process. Principles and philos- 
ophies of curriculum development. Objec- 
tives, practices, materials, and evaluation 
trends. Prerequisite: 26.497. (G) 

26.462 (26.362) ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM II 
(6) Integration of language arts (spelling, 
writing, literature, listening, usage, vocabu- 
lary development), social studies (nature of 
groups, research units, history, economics, 
government, sociology), and advanced read- 
ing instruction. Prerequisite: Elementary Cur- 
riculum I and consent of Education Depart- 
ment. To be taken during student teaching 
semester. 

26.494 TRAVEL AND STUDY: ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION (1-6) Study abroad of educa- 
tional facilities, programs, or practices, or 
selected projects in Elementary Education 
topics. By special arrangement with program 
chairman and sponsoring instructors. 

26.495 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION (1-4) An opportunity for espe- 
cially qualified students to undertake re- 
search problems or study projects relevant 
to their interest and training under the direc- 
tion of a staff member. Prerequisite: Consent 
of program chairman. 

26.496 DIRECTED READINGS IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION (1-4) Independent reading in 
selected areas of Elementary Education in 
order to provide for the individual a com- 
prehensive coverage or to meet special 
needs. By invitation of the Department to 
major students. 

26.497 (26.397) STUDENT TEACHING IN ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOL (6-10) Ten to twelve 
weeks, full time, in public school classrooms 
under the guidance of master teachers. Con- 
ferences with the college supervisor. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of Education Department. 
(Variable credit in Art, Music, and Physical 
Education.) 



EDUCATION 95 



26.498 (26.497) DIFFERENTIATED STUDENT 
TEACHING— ELEMENTARY (1-8) Student 
teaching experiences in addition to those in 
26.497 or student teaching in special subject 
areas, according to needs and interests of 
the student. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
Director of Laboratory Experiences. 



Graduate Only 

50.521 SEMINAR IN TEACHING ARITHMETIC 
(3) (See Math Dept. Listings.) 

76.585 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
SCIENCE (3) Seminar approach to current 
practices and trends in organizing, teaching 
and improving programs in elementary school 
science. A seminar based on action research 
is required. Prerequisite: At least three basic 
science courses and elementary teaching 
experience. 

78.585 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES (3) Trends, content, is- 
sues, and materials in the teaching of social 
studies. Each student will be expected to 
explore in depth one aspect of the subject 
and present his findings to the group. (G) 

26.616 (26.516) THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) Analysis of 
principles of elementary school administra- 
tion, the administrator's roles and responsi- 
bilities, human relations and personnel man- 
agement, public relations, management of 
the school unit and curriculum. Prerequisite: 
Three years teaching experience, teacher 
certification and nine hours of graduate 
credit. 

26.647 THE TEACHING PROCESS: ELEMEN- 
TARY EDUCATION (3) Study of recent 
theories, methods, and findings in research 
on the teaching process. Analysis of teach- 
ing strategies in educational programs for 
elementary children. Prerequisite: Teaching 
experience, and PSYCH 70.511 (70.501) and 
consent of Department of Education. 



26.648 INDIVIDUALIZING LEARNING IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) Consideration 
is to be given to the theory of individualiz- 
ing learning and to the related restructuring 
of organizational patterns. Emphasis is to 
be placed on behavioral objectives, learn- 
ing centers, listening stations, task folders, 
and media centers. A project is required. 
Prerequisites: Certification and Teaching 
Experience or Consent of Instructor. 

26.665 (26.525) THEORETICAL AND PRACTI- 
CAL BASES OF CURRICULUM DEVELOP- 
MENT IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) 
History of curriculum development in the 
elementary school; basic considerations 
affecting curriculum development; patterns 
of organization; objectives, practices and 
evaluation; problems in curriculum develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

26.675 (575) SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY EDU- 
CATION (3) Scientific investigation of se- 
lected aspects of education wXh emphasis 
on classroom application. A paper involving 
description and evaluation of the investiga- 
tion will be required. Prerequisite: 30 hours 
of graduate work including 29.691. 

26.681 (26.581) SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY 
SUPERVISION (3) Role of the supervisor; 
supervisory practices and techniques. Stu- 
dents may concentrate in areas related to 
their professional interests. Prerequisite: 
Nine hours of graduate work. 

26.699 MASTERS THESIS IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 



Secondary Education and Dual Certification Programs; 
Adult Education 

The programs of education for junior and senior high school teachers are de- 
signed to bring about a close integration between teaching methods and the 
practical experiences of observation and student teaching. After introductory- 
courses in the nature of today's schools and their students, the prospective sec- 
ondary teacher enters the student teaching semester. Methods, philosophy, tech- 
niques, and practice are combined to provide a thorough preparation for teach- 
ing. The student teaching semester is followed by a course in the sociological, 
philosophical, psychological, and historical foundations of education. 

There is not simply a single "Secondary Education" major. Rather, a stu- 
dent must satisfy the general course requirements of the college and complete 
a major in a department whose subject area is among those for which a sec- 
ondary school teaching certificate may be issued. In addition to this major, the 
following courses are required in Teacher Education : 



96 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 





When Taken 


Sem. Hrs. 


Year Semester 


2 


I or II 1 or 2 


3 


II 1 or 2 



Professional Courses Required 
(29.101) Careers in Education 
(70.201) Educational Psychology 

(Prequisite: General Psychology) 
(27.341) Principles of Secondary Education — 3 III 1 or 2 

(Prerequisite: 70-201)— Taken the 

semester prior to student teaching 
(27.360) Teaching Reading in the Sec. Sch. 3 III 1 or 2 

(Above course required of English and Social Science majors — recommended to 
others. Taken concurrently with Principles of Sec. Ed.) 

Methods of Teaching Major Subject 3 III-2 or IV-1 or 2 

(Taken during Student Teaching semester) 
(13.369 > Educational Media Laboratory* 1 III-2 or IV-1 or 2 

(•Above course is combined for those students teaching in a Middle School 

Center in a 3 credit course titled "Teaching in the Middle School." In the 

case of Music Majors it is also combined in a 3 credit methods course.) 
(27.398) Student Teaching 10 III-2 or IV-1 or 2 

(A minimum grade of "C" in Principles of Secondary Ed. or Survey of Educa- 
tional Programs, and in teaching methods is one of the pre-requisites. Students 
must also satisfy academic requirements of the departments concerned.) 
(29.401) Foundations of Education 3 IV 1 or 2 

Prerequisite: Student Teaching 

The following Majors are recognized for Secondary Certification. The list- 
ings here are general guides only and subject to revision by the departments 
concerned. Students must check with the appropriate department to be sure all 
details of the requirements for the major are fulfilled. It is also the student's 
responsibility to see that he is meeting the State Requirements under which he 
wishes certification. 

Biology 
Required in Major (30 hrs.) : 101 Fundamentals of Biology (4) ; 105 General 
Botany (4) ; 109 Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates (4) ; 331 Field and Sys- 
tematic Botany (4) ; 351 Field and Systematic Vertebrate Zoology (4) ; 401 
Genetics (4) ; plus 6 semester hours of electives from departmental offerings. 

Required in Related Subjects (23 hrs.) : 101-102 General Chemistry (8) ; 
231 Organic Chemistry (4) ; 211-212 General Physics (8) ; 115 Mathematics I 
(3). 

Chemistry 
Required in Major (38 hrs.) : 101-102 General Chemistry (8) ; 211 and 411 
Analytical Chemistry (8) ; 231-232 Organic Chemistry (10) ; 341-342 Physical 
Chemistry (8) ; 422 Inorganic Chemistry (4). 

Required in Related Subjects (26 hours.) : Fundamentals of Biology (4) ; 
General Physics I and II (8) ; Mathematics I and II (6) ; Calculus I and II (8). 

English 

Required in Major (36 hrs.) : Freshman Composition (or Advanced Freshman 
English) (3) ; English Literature (6) ; Elements of Poetry (2) ; Approaches to 
English Study (2) ; plus 23 hours from departmental offerings (four of which 
may be lower division courses). At least one course must be chosen from offer- 
ings in each of the following areas: Language or Literary Criticism; Literature 
Beginnings to 1700; Literature 1700 to 1832; Literature 1832 to 1900; Indi- 
vidual Major Authors; One course must be in American Literature. 
Intermediate level of a foreign language is strongly recommended. 

EDUCATION 97 



Teacher education majors are also required to take 27.360 Teaching Reading 
in the Secondary School and elect either 30.332 Comparative Grammar, or 30.431 
Structure of the English Language. Either 30. 327 Structural Linguistics, or 
30.430 History of the English Language is strong!;;- recommended. Othe)- recom- 
mended electives for Teacher Education Major:^ ir : : 30.226 Introduction to 
Classical Mythology; 30.331 Advanced Exposition; 30. 401 I.iterature of Black 
America; 84.106 Voice and Diction; 84.213 General Semanti: i; 27.359 Contempo- 
rary Materials for Teaching English in Secondary Schools ; 27.358 Teaching Com- 
position in the Secondary School. And from Morgan State College: Introduction 
to the Negro in American Literature, The Negro in American Prose, and Ameri- 
can Folklore. 

French 

Required in Major (27 semester hours beyond the Intermediate [2nd year] Level 
of the Language) : 321-322 Survey of French Literature I & II (6) ; 301-302 
Advanced Conversation and Composition (6) ; 391 Advanced Grammar (3) ; 
plus 12 additional semester hours of electives in the major. French Phonetics 
(32.395) is highly recommended before student teaching. 

General Science (Natural Science) 

Required in Major (51 hrs.) : 101-102 General Chemistry (8) ; 101 Fundamentals 
Biology (4) ; 211-212 General Physics (8) ; 105 General Botany (4) ; 109 Func- 
tional Anatomy of Vertebrates (4) ; 211 Analytical Chemistry or 231 Organic 
Chemistry (4) ; 121 General Geology (3) ; 211 General Astronomy (3) ; Ad- 
vanced Laboratory 291 or 491 or 401 (2) ; Electives (11) . 

Required in Related Subjects (3 hrs.) : 115 Mathematics I (3) . 

Geography 

Required in Major (30 hrs.) : Lower Division (IGCr v200's) courses (9) ; Upper 
Division (300's-400's) courses (21). (At least 9 h: -. c: ^vhicb must be courses 
designated as systematic or technique courses) . 

German 

Required in Major (27 Semester Hours beyond the Intermediate [2nd year] 
Level of the Language.) : 321-322 Survey of German Literature I & II (6) ; 
301-302 Advanced Conversation & Composition I & II (6) ; 391 Advanced Gram- 
mar (3) ; plus 12 additional semester hours of electives in the major. 

Health Education 

Required in Major (43 hrs.) : 101 Current Health Problems (3) ; 103 First Aid 
(2) ; 401 Sex Education & Family Living (3) ; 202 Principles and Practices of 
Public Health (3) ; 201 Health Education in the School I (3) ; 205 Health Edu- 
cation in the School II (3) ; 405 Drugs in Our Culture (3) ; 302 Preparation for 
Field Work (3) ; 303 Field Work in Public Health (8) ; 402 Seminar in Health 
(3). Three health elective courses (chosen from .208, .104, .204, .451, .403, .485, 
.209, .001, .002, .003, .004, .005) . 

Required in Related Subjects (26 hrs.) : Fundamentals of Biology (4) ; 
General Chemistry (4) ; Human Anatomy & Physiology I «& II (S) ; General 
Psychology (3) ; General Sociology (3) ; Microbiology (4). 

Note: Health Education majors presently prepare only for secondary certi- 
fication. However, they do take "Survey of Education Programs" in lieu of 
"Principles of Secondary Education." Also, they take 8 semester hours of student 
teaching instead of 10. (An additional 8 hours of "Field Work" is taken as part 
of the major) . 

98 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



History 

Required in Major (36 hrs.) : History of the United States 145-146 (6) ; History 
of Western Civilization 262, 263, or 264 (choice of 2 semesters) (6) ; Choice 
of 40.290 Introduction to Historical Study or 40.490 Interpretive Problems in 
History or 40.498 Philosophy of History (3) ; A course from African, Asian or 
Latin American fields (3) ; plus 18 additional hours elected from offerings of 
the department (12 hours must be upper division) . 

Mathematics 

Required in Major (30 hrs.) : 261 Fundamentals of Math (3) ; 273 Calculus I 
Differential (4) ; 274 Calculus II Integral (4) ; 353 Elementary Geometry from 
an Advanced Standpoint (3) ; 361 Algebraic Structures (3) ; Electives in Mathe- 
matics (12). 

Required in Related Subjects (8 hrs.) : General Physics I & II (8). 

Physics 

Required in Major (28 hrs.) : 221-222 or 211-212 General Physics (8) ; 301 
Mechanics or 305 Electricity and Magnetism (4) ; 302 Thermodynamics & 
Kinetic Theory or 321 Introductory Mathematical Physics (3) ; 311 Modern 
Physics (4) ; 385, 386, 387 Advanced Physics Laboratory (any 6) ; 313 History 
& Philosophy of Physics (2) ; 401 Physics Seminar (1). 

Required in Related Subjects (16 hrs.) : Fundamentals of Biology or General 
Chemistry (any 8) ; Calculus I (4) ; Calculus II (4). 

Social Science 

Required in Major (54 hrs.) : 262 Western Civilization I, 263 Western Civiliza- 
tion II, or 264 Western Civilization III (any two of these three courses for 6 
credits) ; U.S. History I (3) ; U.S. History II (3) ; Elements of Geography I 
(3) ; Elements of Geography II (3) ; Courses in Political Science (6) ; Courses 
in Sociology (6) ; Courses in Economics (6) ; plus 18 hours of Upper Division 
courses of which 6 hours must be in history (due to certification requirements) 
and 12 hours in any, and/or all five Social Science Departments. 

Sociology 

Required in Major (30 hrs.) : 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) ; 407 Social 
Theory (3) ; 111 Behavioral Statistics (3) ; 495 Research Methods (3) ; plus 
18 semester hours of electives from offerings of the department. 

Spanish 

Required in Major (27 semester hours beyond the Intermediate r2nd year] 
Level of the Language) : 321-322 Survey of Spanish Literature I & II (6) ; 
301-302 Advanced Conversation & Composition I & II (6) ; 391 Advanced Gram- 
mar (3) ; plus 12 additional semester hours of electives in the major. 

Speech-Drama 

Required in Major (36 hrs.) : 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) ; 
106 Voice and Diction (3) ; 203 Advanced Public Speaking (3) ; 103 Introduc- 
tion to the Theater (2) ; 310 Phonetics of American English (3) ; 221 Acting 
I (Oral Interpretation of Literature) (3) ; 211 Play Production (4) ; plus 15 
semester hours of specified electives from departmental offerings. Speech and 
Drama Secondary majors are very strongly urged to complete 26 hours of Eng- 
lish courses. 

Dual Certification 

The following majors are recognized only for dual certification (both elementary 
and secondary), and students must prepare to teach K-12. They must complete 

EDUCATION 99 



the general course requirements of the college, the requirements of the major 
department, and the following Teacher Education courses: Educational Psychol- 
ogy (Prerequisite: General Psychology) ; Survey of Educational Programs 
27.319 prerequisite 70.201 (in lieu of "Principles of Secondary Education) ; 
Methods of teaching major subject in Elementary School; Methods of teaching 
major subject in Secondary School; Student teaching in Elementary School; 
Student teaching in Secondary School; Foundations of Education 29.401 (pre- 
requisite : student teaching) . 

Art Education 

Required in Major (41 hrs. now [under revision] ) : 103 Two Dimensional Design 

(2) ; 111 Drawing & Appreciation of Drawing I (2) ; 104 3-D Design (2) ; 121 
History of Art-Ancient Renaissance (3) ; 122 History of Art-Baroque-Modern 

(3) ; 202 Design, Advanced (2) ; 329 Oil Painting & Related Media (3) ; 330 
Watercolor & Related Media (3) ; 231 Ceramics (3) ; 240 or 241 Sculpture (3) ; 
225 Advertising Design (2). 

Plus at least one of the following: 12.347 Screen Process, 12.349 Relief 
Process, 12.449 Intaglio Process, or 12.451 Lithographic Process (3). 

Plus 10 additional hours — from departmental offerings, preferably in an 
area of specialization. (Electives also permitted in Stage Design, Photography, 
Films) (10). In addition to the Teacher Education courses, 12.455 "Proseminar 
in Teaching of Art" is required. 

Music 

Required in Major (Instrumental Music 63', Vocal and General Music 63) 
Music Theory and Laboratory (16) ; Music Organizations (7) ; Piano Class (2) 
Voice Class (1) ; Brass Class* (2) ; String Class* (2) ; Percussion Class* (2) 
Woodwind Class* (2) ; History of Music I & II (6) ; Choral and Instrumental 
Arranging (3) ; Conducting (Either Instrumental or Choral) as case may be 
(3) ; Form and Analysis (3) ; Private Lessons (7) ; General Music (3). 

In addition, the following course is required which could be considered part 
of the professional courses. Organization and Administration of Music Education 
(3). 

*Note; Vocal majors take these classes for one semester hour only. In lieu 
of this they must elect 3 additional hours, and take Voice Class for only 2 semes- 
ter hours instead of 1. 

Physical Education 

Required in Major (45 hrs.) ; 103 First Aid (1) ; 199 Overview of Physical 
Education (2) ; 203 Curriculum in Physical Education (3) ; 311 Kinesiology 
(3) ; 313 Physiology of Exercise (2) ; 303 Organization and Administration of 
P.E. (3) ; 309 Test and Measurements (P.E.) (3) ; 401-402 Principles & Prob- 
lems of Physical Ed. I & II (4) ; 321-322 Coaching and Officiating I «& II 62 
(Women) (Required for men majors, elective for Women) (2) ; 423 Adaptive 
Physical Education (Required for women majors, elective for men) (2) ; 201 
School Health Programs (3) ; 101 Current Health Problems (3) ; 315 Care & 
Prevention of Athletic Injuries (Required for men, elective for women) (2) ; 
plus 12 hours of laboratory skills, 9 of which are specified. 

Required in Related Subjects (16 hrs.) : 101 General Biology (4) ; 101 
Physical Science (4) ; 113-114 Human Anatomy & Physiology I & II (8) ; 50.201 
Elements of Mathematics is elective but recommended. 

Master of Education in Secondary Education 

For detailed information regarding the Master of Education in Secondary Edu- 
cation see the Bulletin of Graduate Studies. 

100 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

eludes: grammar vocabularies, motivational 
techniques, evaluation, student publications, 
varieties of purposes for writing, oral com- 
position, laboratory experiences and Individ- 



27.001 SLOW LEARNER IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL (3) Revision and development of 
curriculum and instruction to meet needs of 
the slow learner. Emphasis upon individuali- 
zation. Prerequisites: Ed. Psychology, and 
either Principles of Sec. Ed. or Survey of 
Ed. Programs, student teaching, or teaching 
experience, or consent of instructor. 

27.007 DEVELOPMENTAL READING FOR THE 
EARLY ADOLESCENT (3) Teaching meth- 
ods specifically for the development of com- 
prehension, study and word recognition skills 
for the middle school or junior high school 
student. Prerequisites: Teaching Reading in 
the Sec. Sch., or Teaching Reading in the 
Elementary Sch. (G) 

27.319 SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 
(3) Survey of educational programs and 
services K-12. Combines theoretical aspects 
of (26.361), Elementary Curriculum I and 
(27.341) Principles of Secondary Education. 
Open only to those students In art, music, 
physical education, speech pathology, and 
health, whose majors lead directly to certifi- 
cation In elementary and secondary educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Educa- 
tional Psychology (70.201) and consent of 
instructor, the chairman of student's major 
department and the chairman of secondary 
education. 

27.341 PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCA- 
TION (3) Philosophy and purpose of sec- 
ondary education; nature of secondary edu- 
cation programs; principles of teaching and 
learning; basic techniques In instruction. Pre- 
requisite: Junior standing. Educational Psy- 
chology 70.201 and permission of chairman 
of Secondary Education. Field experience 
required. To be taken the semester prior to 
student teaching. 

27.353 TEACHING MODERN FOREIGN LAN- 
GUAGE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Aims and purposes of foreign language in- 
struction; current curricular trends, including 
the importance of modern language teaching 
practices. Open to Juniors or seniors, who 
plan to teach foreign language, with consent 
of instructor. Prerequisite: 27.341. 

27.355 TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL (3) Objectives, cur- 
riculum, materials and instructional proce- 
dures in the teaching of social studies, his- 
tory, geography, government, political sci- 
ence. Open to students in the student teach- 
ing block and others with equivalent back- 
grounds and objectives. Prerequisite: 27.341. 

27.357 TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE SECOND- 
ARY SCHOOL (3) Language Arts as taught 
in secondary schools. Open to students in 
the student teaching block and to others 
with equivalent backgrounds and objectives 
with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: 
27.341 

27.358 TEACHING COMPOSITION IN THE SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOL (3) This course in- 



ual problem analysis. Prerequisite: 27.357 
(30.379) or consent of instructor. (G) 

27.359 CONTEMPORARY MATERIALS FOR 
TEACHING ENGLISH IN SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (3) Application of new materials 
designed for teaching the language arts In 
the secondary school including records, 
films, SRA materials, programmed learning, 
and television. Prerequisite: 27.357 or con- 
sent of Instructor. (G) 

27.360 TEACHING READING IN THE SECOND- 
ARY SCHOOL (3) General developmental 
reading skills; identification, diagnosis and 
remediation of reading problems; compre- 
hension, vocabulary building, work-study 
skills. (G) 

84.379 TEACHING SPEECH AND DRAMA IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (see Communi- 
cations Dept. Listings). 

50.423 (50.379) TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (3) Aims and 
purposes of mathematics instruction; exam- 
ination of courses of study and textbooks; 
study of conceptual approaches. Open to 
students in the teaching block. Prerequisite: 
Math 50.353 and 50.361. Open to other stu- 
dents with equivalent backgrounds and ob- 
jectives with the consent of the Mathematics 
Department. 

50.429 READINGS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCA- 
TION FOR THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
TEACHER (see Math Dept. Listings). 

54.309 METHODS OF TEACHING CHORAL AND 
GENERAL MUSIC IN SECONDARY SCHOOL 
(See Music Dept. Listings). 

54.308 METHODS OF TEACHING INSTRU- 
MENTAL MUSIC— ELEMENTARY, SECOND- 
ARY (See Music Dept. Listings). 



12.479 (379) TEACHING ART IN THE SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOL (2) (See Art Dept. List- 
ings). 

61.325 (61.325) TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) 
Methods of teaching sports, track, and field, 
stunts, combatives, rhythms, relays, and 
mass games. Open only to Physical Educa- 
tion majors and other interested students in 
the student teaching block. 

76.001 FIELD COURSE IN SECONDARY SCI- 
ENCE TEACHING METHODS (2) Analysis 
and evaluation of cufrent materials and 
techniques in secondary science teaching. 
To be taken concurrently with student teach- 
ing at off-campus center. 



(G) May be available for graduate credit. 
Graduate Bulletin. 



See 



EDUCATION 101 



76.379 (76.379) TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) Selection of 
appropriate content, method and evaluation 
techniques, analysis of textbooks and re- 
source materials. Open only to students in 
the student teaching block. 

76.380 TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE SECOND- 
ARY SCHOOL (3) Selection of appropriate 
content, method and evaluation techniques, 
analysis of textbooks and resource materials. 
Open only to Special Professional Program 
Students, or to those completing work in 
Summer and Evening classes. 

27.398 (26.398) STUDENT TEACHING IN SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOL (6-14) Practical experi- 
ence in observation, participation, and stu- 
dent teaching in public school situation. 
Prerequisite: 27.341 or 27.319 and appro- 
priate methods course. Student Teaching is 
offered in the follov/ing subject areas: 



27.398 (26.398) Art 


(6) 


27.398 (26.398) English 


(10) 


27.398 (26.398) Speech and Dramatics (10) 


27.398 (26.398) Mathematics 


(10) 


27.398 (26.398) French 


(10) 


27.398 (26.398) German 


(10) 


27.398 Health 


(8 or 14) 


27.398 (26.398) Music 


( 6) 


27.398 (26.398) Physical Education 


( 7) 


27.398 (26.398) Biology 


(10) 


27.398 (26.398) Secondary School 




Science 


(10) 


27.398 (26.398) Social Studies 


(10) 


27.398 (26.398) Spanish 


(10) 



27.399 DIFFERENTIATED STUDENT TEACH- 
ING—SECONDARY (1-8) Student teaching 
experiences in addition to those in 27.398 or 
student teaching in special subject areas, ac- 
cording to needs and interests of the stu- 
dent. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's 
area director. 

27.421 (441) THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL (3) 
Principles, purposes^ functions, and charac- 
teristics of the Junior High School, with 
emphasis upon its organization and curric- 



ulum. Prerequisite: 26.361 or 27.319 or 
27.341. (G) 

27.423 (443) THE MIDDLE SCHOOL (3) Func- 
tions and characteristics of the middle 
school; emphasis on nature of transcendent 
youth (ages 10-14), curriculum, and organi- 
zational patterns. Prerequisite: 26.361, or 
26.462, or 27.319, or 27.341. (G) 

27.425 (445) TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE 
SCHOOL (3) Instruction in the methods, re- 
quired for teaching in the middle school. An 
individualized program of instruction, read- 
ings, observations and teaching experiences 
will be planned for each student. Prerequi- 
site: Teacher experience, student teaching, 
or concurrent with student teaching. (G) 

27.461 TEACHING READING IN THE SECOND- 
ARY CONTENT AREAS (3) Teaching read- 
ing study skills leading to reading efficiency 
and problem solving associated with specific 
subject matter content. Prerequisites: 
Teaching Reading in the Secondary School. 
(G) 

27.494 TRAVEL AND STUDY IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION (1-6). Study abroad of educa- 
tional facilities, programs or practices, or 
selected projects in education topics. By 
special arrangement with program chairman 
and sponsoring instructors. 

27.495 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION: (project to be named) (1-4) 
An opportunity for especially qualified stu- 
dents to undertake research problems or 
study projects relevant to their interest and 
training under the direction of a staff mem- 
ber. Prerequisite: Consent of Chairman of 
Secondary Education. 

27.496 DIRECTED READINGS IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION (1-4) Independent reading in 
selected areas of Secondary Education in 
order to provide for the individual a com- 
prehensive coverage or to meet special 
needs. By invitation of the Department to 
major students. Obtain consent of chairman 
of Secondary Education. 



Graduate Only 

27.641 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL (3) Principles and 
philosophies of curriculum development; ob- 
jectives, practices and evaluation trends; the 
teacher's role. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

27.643 THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOL (3) Analysis of prin- 
ciples of school administration, the adminis- 
trator's roles and responsibilities, human re- 
lations and personnel management, public 
relations, management of the school unit and 
curriculum. Prerequisite: Three years teach- 
ing experience, teacher certification and nine 
hours of graduate credit. 

27.647 THE TEACHING PROCESS: SECOND- 
ARY EDUCATION (3) Study of recent theo- 



ries, methods, and findings in research on 
the teaching process. Analysis of teaching 
behaviors and exploration of teaching strat- 
egies in educational programs for Secondary 
students. Prerequisite: Teaching experience, 
either Psyc. 70.511 or Educ. 29.501, and 
consent of Education Graduate Coordinator. 
One semester per year, day or/and evening 
and Summer. 

27.679 SEMINAR IN SECONDARY SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES (3) A seminar approach 
to current research, trends, practices, issues, 
content, materials, and problems in the 
teaching of contemporary secondary school 
social studies. Individual reading and re- 

(G) May be available for graduate credit. See 
Graduate Bulletin. 



102 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



search will be pursued on selected topics 
culminating in a seminar paper. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor, or prior teaching ex- 
perience in social studies. 

27.681 SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 
(3) Scholarly investigation of selected as- 

pecfE. of sccondcy ecijci'ion v/ii'-. cnohasis 
on classroom application. A paper involving 
description and evaluation of the investiga- 
tion will be required. Prerequisite: Twenty- 

COURSES IN ADULT EDUCATION 

27.485 ADULT EDUCATION (3) Introduction to 
the historical and philosophical evolution of 
adult education in the Un'ted States in rela- 
tionship to current aims, types of programs, 
and issuer. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc- 
tor. 

27.487 TEACHING THE ADULT LEAR.MER (3) 
Teaching-learning activities at various levels 
of adult education. The needs, motivation, 



four hours of graduate work including 29.691. 

27.683 SEMINAR IN SECONDARY SUPERVI- 
SION (3) Role of the supervisor: super- 
visory practices and techniques. Students 
may concentrate in areas related to their 
professional interests. Prerequisite: Nine 
hours of graduate work in the field of edu- 
cation including 28.691. 

27.699 MASTERS THESIS IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION 



and abilities of the adult learner are stressed. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

27.489 PRINCIPLES OF READING INSTRUC- 
TION FOR ADULTS (3) Causes of adult 
reading disabilities, evaluation relevant to 
reading disability, and the methods and ma- 
terials employed In the remediation process. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



General Studies in Education Majoi 

The Major in General Studies in Education permits highly individualized 
programs or thematic options described in terms of the students' recognized 
needs ar.c] the requirements of positions for which they hope to prepare. (Eg., one 
such emphasis ha."? been developed in Library Media Education.) Inquiries should 
be made to the Director of Professional Programs, Division of Education. The 
following guidelines must be followed: 

A. The student must achieve a 2.0+ C.P.A. and must declare the major by 
submitting a plan of study no later than the first semester of the junior year. This 
plan of study must be approved by the student's Education advisor and the 
Associate Dean of Education. 

B. The student must satisfy the General Education Requirements of the 
College (38-45 hrs.) and a minimum of 128 hrs. for graduation. 

C. The student must complete 40 or more additional hours in liberal Arts and 
Sciences courses from Art, Biology, Chemistry, English, Geography, Health, 
History, Modern Languages. Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, or Theatre. These hours must include work from a minimum of 
four different departments and be approximately balanced between the arts and 
the sciences (physical or social). A rationale for the selection of these courses 
must be followed. 

D. The student must JiSo include in his program a professional component 
of approved professional courses planned to prepare him for a specialty. This 
component must be designed with appropriate competencies in an area of expertise 
chosen by the student. Thi.<^ part of his program must consist of at least 80"^ 
upper-division courses and center around a "core" specialty which leads to profes- 
sional certification or expertise in an Education-related occupation. 

Special Certification Programs 

Programs leading to State certification for Safety and Driver Education instruc- 
tors. School Librarians, Urban teachers, and Speech and Hearing Clinicians for 
the schools. 

Safety and Driver Education Program 

Requiremevts for a Minor in Safety and Driver Education 

General requirements : (1) A bachelor's degree and (2) A teaching certificate 



EDUCATION 103 



with a teaching major; or (1) Complete the General Education Requirements, 

(2) Develop a major and meet certification requirements in the major, and 

(3) Complete the following as elective courses: Educational Psychology; Prin- 
ciples of Secondary Education; Audio- Visual Laboratory or Methods and Mate- 
rials in New Educational Media; and First Aid (Standard or Advanced Red 
Cross Certificate) . 

Specific requirements: (1) Complete 15 credit of required Safety and Driver 
Education courses: 28.430, 28.431, 28.432, 28.433, and 28.434 and (2) Complete 
9 credits of Safety, Driver Education or Transportation courses as electives. 



28.430 (26.471) PRINCIPLES OF ACCIDENT 
PREVENTION (3) Includes a survey of the 
history and philosophy of the safety educa- 
tion movement, need for safety education, 
aims and objectives, accident causation and 
prevention, and the role of education in 
eliminating environmental hazards and re- 
ducing avoidable human error. (G) 

28.431 (26.472) HIGHWAY TRANSPORTATION 
SYSTEM AND DRIVER TASK ANALYSIS (3) 
History and philosophy of automobile and 
highway safety engineering, U.S. and Inter- 
national traffic controls, traffic laws and reg- 
ulations, critical analysis of traffic accidents 
and causation, and attitude factors. (May be 
taken concurrently with 28.432.) (G) 

28.432 (26.473) METHODS OF TEACHING IN 
DRIVER EDUCATION AND SAFETY (3) 
Specialized techniques for safety and driv- 
ing instruction, including A-V aids, psycho- 
physical testing and evaluation, programmed 
instruction, multiple-car facility, on-street in- 
struction, detonator demonstration and ap- 
plications. (May be taken concurrently with 
28.431.) (G) 

28.433 (26.494) MULTIPLE CAR FACILITIES 
AND ON-STREET INSTRUCTION IN DRIVER 
EDUCATION (3) Supervised student teach- 
ing in Driver Education, including classroom 
and in-car, and utilization and planning for 
multiple-car facility: (May be taken concur- 
rently with 28.434.) Prerequisite: 28.431 and 
28.432; Maryland license and 3 years driving 
experience with good record. (G) 

28.434 (26.494) FIXED BASE SIMULATION AND 
ON-STREET INSTRUCTION IN DRIVER EDU- 
CATION (3) Supervised student teaching 
using driving simulators. Theory, mechanics, 
techniques, utilization and evaluation of 
driving simulators. (May be taken concur- 
rently with 28.433.) Prerequisite: 28.431 and 
28.432; Maryland license and 3 years driving 
experience with good record. (G) 

28.435 PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION FOR 
DRIVER EDUCATION (3) Philosophies and 
principles of programmed instruction. Analy- 
sis and evaluation of commercial programs 
and teacher-made programs; current re- 
search and trends. Programing project is re- 
quired with direct application through in- 
structional utilization. Prerequisite: 15 cred- 
its in approved Safety and Driver Education 
courses and/or approval of Director. (G) 



28.436 MULTI-MEDIA TECHNIQUES FOR DRI- 
VER EDUCATION (3) A laboratory ap- 
proach to the planning and utilization of 
multi-media instruction. Principles and theory 
of multi-media communications; survey of 
literature and current trends. A project is 
required in the design, production and field 
testing of an instructional package. Pre- 
requisite: 15 credits in approved Safety and 
Driver Education courses and /or approval of 
Director. (G) 

28.437 AUTO MECHANICS FOR DRIVING IN- 
STRUCTORS (2) Acquaints students with 
mechanics of automobile to enable him to 
better teach this area and "trouble-shoot' in 
minor mechanical emergencies. Laboratory 
approach utilized. Prerequisite: 15 credits In 
approved Safety and Driver Education 
courses and/or approval of Director. (G) 

28.438 (26.475) CONCEPTUAL MODELS IN AC- 
CIDENT CAUSATION (3) Treatment of the 
driver-behavior problem in its relation to 
many of the psycho-physical factors and 
forces in the traffic environment that im- 
pinge upon the man behind the wheel. Pre- 
requisite: 15 credits in approved Safety and 
Driver Education courses and/or approval of 
Director. (G) 

28.439 (26.478) BASIC PUPIL TRANSPORTA- 
TION (3) Consideration of organization and 
administration of state, county, and district 
pupil transportation service with emphasis 
on safety and economy. Selection and train- 
ing of drivers, route planning, maintenance 
mechanics, bus specifications and procure- 
ment are included. Prerequisite: 15 credits 
in approved Safety and Driver Education 
courses and/or approval of Director (G) 

28.440 (26.484) ADVANCED PUPIL TRANSPOR 
TATION (3) Consideration of the problems 
of school bus transportation, solutions em- 
ployed, and a review of research and tech- 
niques in this field. Workshop approach util- 
ized. Prerequisite: 15 credits in approved 
Safety and Driver Education courses and/or 
approval of Director. (G) 

28.441 (26.474) ADMINISTRATION AND SUPER- 
VISION OF SAFETY EDUCATION (3) Back- 
ground and experience in administration and 
supervision of Safety education programs, 
K-12. Methods, techniques, matenals pro- 
gram planning, records and report' fr>.9n 

(G) May be available for graduate credit. 



104 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



cing and Insurance. Prerequisite: 15 credits 
in approved Safety and Driver Education 
courses and/or approval of Director. (G) 

28.442 (28.436) ADMINISTRATION AND SUPER- 
VISION OF DRIVER EDUCATION (3) Back- 
ground and experience in administration and 
supervision of Driver Education programs. 
Methods of organization, techniques, ma- 
terials, program planning, records and re- 
ports, financing and insurance, procurement, 
personnel selection, planning classroom and 
in-car laboratory experiences are included. 
Prerequisite: 15 credits in approved Safety 
and Driver Education courses and/or ap- 
proval of Director. (G) 

28.443 (26.476) PROBLEMS IN SAFETY AND 
DRIVER EDUCATION (3) Consideration of 
the individual problems encountered in the 
teaching of driver and safety education. The 
psychology of teaching and learning are 
emphasized and consideration is given to 
the implications of emotional and attitudinal 
factors in driver and traffic education. Pre- 
requisite: 15 credits in approved Safety and 



Driver Education courses and/or approval of 
Director. (G) 

28.444 (26.477) FIELD STUDIES IN SAFETY 
AND DRIVER EDUCATION (1-4) Designed to 
meet the needs of persons in the field^with 
respect to research projects in special areas. 
Includes examination of existing courses of 
study, current trends current research, eval- 
uation, supervision, and techniques. Students 
will be expected to carry out a special field 
project in their area of interest. "May be 
taken more than once, but not to accumulate 
more than 4 credits." Prerequisite: 15 credits 
in approved Safety and Driver Education 
courses and/or approval of Director. (G) 

28.445, 446 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN 
SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION (3,3) 
History of curriculum development in safety 
and driver education; principles; philos- 
ophies; objectives; current practices; evalu- 
ation techniques; laboratory experience; and 
field study. Prerequisite: 15 credits in ap- 
proved Safety and Driver Education Courses 
and/or approval of Director. (G) 



Library Media Education Programs 

Certification standards are changing. These possibilities are being developed and 

subject to confirmation : 

1. "Minor" Program: State certification for the position of school librarian 
(Education Media Associate Level I) may be obtained by completing one of the 
majors in teacher education plus an additional eighteen semester hours of Library 
Media Education as a "minor" elective. 

28.255; 28.355; 28.357; 28.359; either 28.455, or 28.457; and 28.459. 

2. Major Program: The General Studies in Education Major provides for a 
thematic option in Library Media Education vi^hich is designed to prepare students 
for certification as school librarian (Education Media Associate Level I). Stu- 
dents interested should consult the Coordinator of General Studies Programs or 
inquire in Division of Education. 

3. Graduate Study: Students* who have bachelor's degree and \vish to pre- 
pare for an advanced certification in school librarianship (Education Media 
Specialist, Level II) should consult the Education Coordinator in the graduate 
office. 



28.255 (26.255) BACKGROUNDS OF SCHOOL 
LIBRARIANSHIP (3) History of libraries, 
role of books and communications media in 
our culture today, objectives of all types of 
libraries; literature of librarianship; profes- 
sional associations, principles and philos- 
ophy of librarianship. 

28.359 (26.359) INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 
FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIANS (3) Learning 
materials, K-12, with emphasis on the factual, 
on multi-media in curriculum areas as social 
studies, science, language arts, mathematics, 
etc. 

28.451 (26.355) REFERENCE MATERIALS FOR 
SCHOOL LIBRARIANS (3) Introduction to 
general and subject bibliographies and in- 
dexes, trade and national bibliographies, 
general reference tools, encyclopedias and 
dictionaries. (G) 

28.453 (26.357) ORGANIZATION OF MEDIA 
CENTERS FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIANS (3) 



Principles of bibliographic control, use of 
printed catalog cards, and commercial proc- 
essing services, introduction to book cata- 
logs, and methods of controlling non-print 
media. (G) 

28.455 (26.455) CHILDREN'S LITERATURE FOR 
SCHOOL LIBRARIANS (3) Emphasizing the 
multi-media approach this v^^ould introduce 
the student to the wealth of imaginative 
literature in print, on recordings, on film, 
etc. available for children K-6. (G) 

28.456 STORYTELLING (3) The selection and 
presentation of stories for children. A study 
of sources for the storyteller in folklore, 
myth, legend, poetry, and writings of story- 
tellers. Development of skills in storytelling. 
Prerequisites: Children's Literature or Chil- 
dren's Literature for School Librarians, or 
consent of instructor. 

(G) May be available for graduate credit. 



EDUCATION 105 



28.457 (26.457) YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 
FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIANS (3) Covers 
fiction, biography, travel — a wide range of 
recreational and imaginative materials for 
young people in their teens including means 
of introducing the materials to young people. 
(G) 



28.459 (26.459) ADMINISTRATION AND SERV- 
ICES OF MEDIA CENTERS FOR SCHOOL 
LIBRARIANS (3) Culminating course. Em- 
phasis on evaluation of the community and 
services of media center. Analysis of student 
and faculty, community and range of serv- 
ices — reading guidance, reference and In- 
structional services. (G) 



Urban Education Program 

Project Mission is a program designed to train teachers to teach in the inner 
city schools. Towson, Morgan and Coppin State Colleges have joined with the 
Baltimore City Public Schools in offering this specialized training. The curricu- 
lum is offered in an inner city school in Baltimore City with one half of the day 
spent in the classroom with a master teacher. The other half of a day is spent 
in the same schools with the project professors from the three colleges. Cur- 
rently, new students are not being admitted. 



28.371-372 PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS 
(1,2) Psychological understanding needed 
for guiding the learning of disadvantaged 
children and youth. The values, attitudes, 
and aspirations as well as the cognitive 
learning style of disadvantaged students. (G) 

28.373-374 SOCIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF 
URBAN EDUCATION (1, 2) Introduction to 
concepts and principles related to the social 
foundation in an urban environment. Planned 
to help students to relate themselves posi- 
tively and functionally to the social aspects 
of education and to integrate these Into their 
professional skills and attitudes. (G) 

28.375-376 URBAN FIELD EXPERIENCES (2, 2) 
This course provides first hand experiences 
relating theory and practice in Psychological 
and Sociological Foundations and Communi- 
cations Skills. (G) 

28.377-378 COMMUNICATION SKILLS (1, 2) 
Speech, semantics, linguistics and sentence 
structure, a communication model, and psy- 
chological aspects of communication. (G) 

28.381-382 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (3, 3) Focus on 
reading, diagnosis of disabilities, special 
concerns for the disadvantaged child, reme- 
diation techniques. Pedagogy, planning and 
organizing, presentation, evaluation, use of 
realia, and teaching the language arts. (G) 

28.383-384 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 
SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (3, 3) Teaching social studies at 

Graduate Only 

28.571-572 (28.501) TEACHING THE DISAD- 
VANTAGED CHILD (3) Concern will be 
given to planning, organizing, and providing 
of appropriate curriculum experiences for 
pupils in urban schools. Emphasis will be 
placed on those methods and materials 
which are especially appropriate to meeting 
the needs of children attending schools in 
disadvantaged communities. 

28.575 (28.515) BACKGROUNDS IN URBAN ED- 
UCATION (3) This course aims to acquaint 
teachers with sociological factors, family 
organization and disorganization, and edu- 



the junior high level to disadvantaged youth. 
In addition, attention is given to such topics 
as: the curricular organization of social 
studies, developing social studies skills, in- 
structional planning, social studies materials 
and resources, and evaluation in the social 
studies. (G) 

28.385-386 METHODS AND MATERIALS— ENG- 
LISH (3, 3) Methods and materials which 
may be used in directing the language and 
literary experiences of disadvantaged ado- 
lescents. Emphasis is placed on creativity 
and imagination in developing new ap- 
proaches to meeting the classroom needs of 
the disadvantaged. The course gives particu- 
lar attention to techniques for developing 
skills in reading and oral communication. (G) 

28.471-472 PROBLEMS IN INSTRUCTIONAL 
AID AND RESOURCES (2, 2) Opportunities 
will be provided for the student to become 
acquainted with all types of instructional ma- 
terials. As new instructional aids become 
available, students will examine and evaluate 
their usefulness in the instructional programs 
of educationally deprived children. In addi- 
tion, resource personnel of the Baltimore 
City Department of Education, the cooperat- 
ing colleges, and the community will be 
brought in to discuss their contributions to 
the improvement of the school programs of 
the disadvantaged child. Because of the 
nature of the course no credit is being 
offered. (G) 

28.477-478 INTERNSHIP IN TEACHING (6, 6) 



cational deprivation of children living in a 
crowded and urbanized society. Attention 
will be given to the special learning styles 
of these pupils. 
28.577 (28.571) SEMINAR IN URBAN EDUCA- 
TION (3) This course is designed as an 
advanced course for those who have had 
previous courses in this field and who are 
engaged in working with children who are 
educationally disadvantaged. It will focus on 
anthropological, ecological and psycholog- 
ical research related to the problems of the 
disadvantaged learner. 



106 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Special Education Courses 

28.481 METHODS OF TEACHING THE VISUAL 
HANDICAPPED (3) Instructional techniques, 
materials and resources used in teaching 
the visually handicapped. Include Braille 
materials. Prerequisites: 70.101 and 70.201. 



28.483 BRAILLE READING AND WRITING (3) 
Reading and writing of braille. Additional in- 
dividual project required of students taking 
course for graduate credit. Prerequisites: 
70.101, 70.201 and consent of instructor. 



Speech Pathology and Audiology 

A program to meet certification requirements as a speech and hearing clinician 
in the Public Schools is offered by the Speech Department. A major (B.S.) 
consists of a minimum of 36 credits from the major field plus 18 credits from 
related subjects. 

Courses Required in Major Subjects are: 87.105 Speech and Language 
Development; 87.302, 304,306 Speech Pathology I & II & III; 87.241 Introduction 
to Audiology; 84.310 Phonetics of American English; 84.402 Speech Science; 
87.487 Clinical Practice in Speech Correction; 87.488 Clinical Practice in the 
Public Schools; and 87.305 Stuttering: Etiology and Therapy. 

At least six semester hours must be selected from the following: 84.106 
Voice and Diction; 84.213 General Semantics; 87.401 Clinical Audiology; 87.407 
Speech Reading and Auditory Rehabilitation; 87.489 Clinical Counseling in Audi- 
ology and Speech Pathology; and 87.404 Professional Program, Problems, and 
Relationships. 

Courses in Related Subjects must total at least 18 semester hours in psy- 
chology and education courses. The education courses selected are limited to 9 
hours and must include either "Foundations of Education" or "Survey of Educa- 
tional Programs." 

OTHER EDUCATION COURSES 

(Courses available to students in more than one Education Program) 



29.006 (28.006) INTRODUCTION TO CAREER 
DEVELOPMENT: THEORY AND PRACTICES 
(3) Resources, methods, and recent trends 
In career development school programs (K- 
12). Prerequisite: Student teaching or teach- 
ing experience, or equivalent experience in 
school programs. Bachelor's degree or 
equivalent for graduate credit. 

29.007 (28.007) PRACTICUM IN TUTORING 
READING (1) Off-campus tutoring in read- 
ing of elementary school pupils. Tutors v^^ill 
receive instruction in the teaching of basic 
word recognition skills and will tutor indi- 
viduals or small groups. Course may be re- 
peated for additional credit. (Not to exceed 
three credits) Prerequisite: None. 

29.008 APPLIED LEARNING THEORY (3) Prac- 
tical application of pupil-oriented techniques 
derived from a broad range of current psy- 
chological theory. Laboratory practice of 
strategies for motivation, reinforcement, be- 
havior modification, interactive processes, 
improving self-perception. Prerequisites: 
Educational Psychology, and either Prin- 
ciples of Secondary Education or Survey of 
Educational Programs. 

29.101 (27.101) CAREERS IN EDUCATION (2) 
Guided field experiences, designed to help 
students expand their knowledge of careers 



in education as a basis for choosing a major 
emphasis. Examination of careers in educa- 
tion and the scope of education in a democ- 
racy. 

29.301 (27.301) HISTORY OF EDUCATION (3) 
Major developments, personalities, and 
movements in the evolution of education. (G) 

29.315 (28.315) EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT 
FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS (2) Prob- 
lems in measurement; principles underlying 
choice of test instruments; survey of test 
literature: dealing with test data; constella- 
tion and interpretation of tests. 

29.325 (28.325) FIELD EXPERIENCES: EDUCA- 
TION IN INFORMAL SETTINGS (1-3) Study- 
ing and/or working with children in non- 
classroom settings such as camps, recrea- 
tional centers, or field trips. Individual plans 
of study and evaluation will be developed 
with the instructor. Prereauisite: Consent of 
instructor. 

29.401 (27.401) FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCA- 
TION (2-3) Sociological, philosophical, 
psychological and historical foundations of 
western education. Perspective in these 
areas as they relate to current educational 
issues and practices. Prerequisite: Student 
teaching and consent of Chairman, Depart- 
ment of Secondary Education. (G) 



EDUCATION 107 



29.403 (27.403) COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (3) 
A study of patterns of education in different 
cultural setting with implications for the 
student of American education. Emphasis 
on cross-cultural, political, economic and 
social aspects of education. Prerequisite: 
Foundations of Education or equivalent. (G) 

29.405 (27.405) PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 
(3) Philosophic dimensions of the teaching 
learning process, as discriminated and dis- 
cussed by major philosophers and educa- 
tional philosophers. (G) 

29.406 (28.405) RECENT TRENDS IN TEACH- 
ING (3) Emerging concepts of teaching and 
organization for instruction. Prerequisite: 
Student teaching or senior standing with 
consent of instructor. (G) 

29.407 (27.407) CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN 
EDUCATION (3) Seminar approach to cur- 
rent issues in education. Prerequisite: Stu- 
dent teaching or senior standing with con- 
sent of instructor, (G) 

54.408 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
OF MUSIC EDUCATION (See Music De- 
partment Listings.) 

29.409 (28.409) FIELD STUDIES OF THE CHILD 
AND HIS COMMUNITY (2) Planning and 
working with groups of children in approved 
social agencies or making extensive studies 
of recreational and non-recreational social 
agencies. Class discussions and field trips. 

29.414 (28.403) EDUCATIONAL TESTS AND 
MEASUREMENTS (3) Problems in meas- 
urement; principles underlying choice of test 
instruments, survey of test literature; dealing 
with test data; constellation and interpreta- 
tion of tests. Not open to those who have 
had EDUC 28.315 or 29.315. 

29.415 (28.415) EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS (3) 
Designed as a practical course in statistics 
for the student in education. Emphasis on 
educational applications of descriptive sta- 
tistics, including central tendency, variabil- 
ity, and association. Prerequisite: 50.204, 
50.205, or equivalent. 

29.417 (28.417) CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (3) 
Examination of children's books; study of 
content and form. (G) 

29.418 (26.418) LITERATURE FOR THE ADO- 
LESCENT (3) Examination of literature as 
an expression of basic needs and ideas of 
youth: studying criteria for selection; evalu- 
ating in terms of forces affecting society 
and the adolescent. (G) 

29.425 (26.425) CORRECTIVE READING (3-6) 
The psychology of reading; methods, princi- 
ples, techniques, and materials for the class- 
room teacher in meeting typical learning 
patterns. Experience in a laboratory center 
for disadvantaged youth for the development 
of skill in analysis and correction of reading 
disabilities. In evening school, experience in 
the laboratory center is replaced by tutoring 



a child. Prerequisite: Student teaching or 
26.427 or 26.429, or consent of instructor. 
(G) 

29.431 THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM (3) An 
examination of curriculum patterns and 
practices; includes sociological, philosophi- 
cal and psychological factors which shape 
the curriculum. Prerequisites: Student teach- 
ing or professional experience in education. 
(G) 

29.433 THE NON-GRADED CURRICULUM (3) 
Study and analysis of the non-graded ap- 
proach to curriculum organization: focus on 
rationale, principles and models of con- 
tinuous-progress curricular programs in ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. Prerequi- 
sites: Student teaching or professional 
experience in education. (G) 

29.445 HUMAN RELATIONS INSTITUTE ON 
INTERGROUP EDUCATION I: THE INDIVID- 
UAL (3) Consideration will be given to: 
understanding one's self, the nature of preju- 
dice, and environmental factors which influ- 
ence minority groups and cultures, and re- 
lationship of these factors to the develop- 
ment of meaningful educational programs. 
Prerequisite: For undergraduates: student 
teaching, and at least one course each in 
sociology and psychology. For graduates: 
teaching experience, or certification. (G) 

29.446 HUMAN RELATIONS INSTITUTE ON IN- 
TERGROUP EDUCATION II: THE COMMU- 
NITY (3) Consideration of political, eco- 
nomic, social, and educational factors as 
they affect minority cultures and implica- 
tions for school and college programs. Pre- 
requisite: For undergraduates: student teach- 
ing and at least one course each in sociol- 
ogy and psychology. For graduates: teach- 
ing experience or certification. (G) 

29.449 CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION IN THE 
SCHOOL (3) The development and imple- 
mentation of activities for citizenship edu- 
cation in the school: philosophy, concepts, 
principles, techniques and resources for 
teacher and administrator. Prerequisite: 
Teaching experience, 27.401, and 78.375 or 
equivalents, consent of instructor. (G) 

29.451 (28.401) GUIDANCE IN THE PUBLIC 
SCHOOL (2-3) Scope and function of a 
guidance program; the role of the classroom 
teacher in guidance. (G) 

29.461 (28.461) LANGUAGE AND THE URBAN 
CHILD (3) Language theory in reference to 
psychological, sociological, and cultural ef- 
fects in the classroom will be studied. Spe- 
cial emphasis will be given to the analysis 
of dialects and "standard" and "non-stand- 
ard" speech patterns as well as practical 
classroom applications. Prerequisite: Teach- 
ing or student teaching experience — or con- 
sent of instructor. 



(G) May be available for graduate credit. See 
Graduate Bulletin. 



108 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



29.467 (28.467) TEAM TEACHING WORKSHOP 
(3) Conducted to assist teachers who are 
actively engaged in team teaching or will be 
participating as members of a team in the 
future. (G) 

29.471 SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN TEACH- 
ER EDUCATION (3) Experiences and study 
in developing particular skills and compe- 
tencies for supervising quality laboratory/ 
field experiences. Content is designed for 
supervising teachers, team leaders, and re- 
source personnel. Prerequisite: Teaching ex- 
perience. Graduates count this as a work- 
shop elective. (G) 

76.488 (26.488) AEROSPACE EDUCATION- 
WORPSHOP (3) In cooperation with CAP, 
USAF, NASA and others. For elementary and 
secondary school teachers, supervisors, and 
administrators. A fund of general knowledge 
about aviation and space exploration, their 
impacts, and the development of resources 
for uses in teaching. Field trips, two of which 

Graduate Only 

12.595 RESEARCH IN ART AND ART EDUCA- 
TION (3) (See Art Dept. Listings.) (G) 

12.697 SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION (3) 
(See Art Dept. Listings.) (G) 

54.501 CURRENT TRENDS IN MUSIC AND 
MUSIC EDUCATION (See Music Dept. 
Listings.) (G) 

54.595 RESEARCH METHODS IN MUSIC AND 
MUSIC EDUCATION (See Music Dept. List- 
ings.) 

50.525 SEMINAR IN MATH EDUCATION (See 
Math Dept. Listings.) 

29.501 (27.501) EDUCATIONAL IDEAS IN HIS- 
TORICAL PERSPECTIVE (3) Current trends 
and issues in education as reflecting and 
influencing the social, economic, and politi- 
cal forces in our cultural heritage. 

29.507 (26.507) HOME, SCHOOL, COMMUNITY 
(3) The interaction between home and 
school and community in educational pro- 
grams; survey and evaluation of techniques 
for working with parents; study of various 
agencies contributing to the education and 
well-being of children and youth at home 
and at school. Prerequisite: A course in 
Sociology and consent of Department of 
Education. 

29.511 (28.511) SUPERVISION OF STUDENT 
TEACHING (3) An analysis of the roles of 
the cooperating teacher, college supervisor, 
and student teacher; current practices, is- 
sues, problems, trends and evaluation in 
laboratory experiences, current research. 
Prerequisite: Teaching experience. 

29.517 (28.517) SCHOOL LAW (3) A study of 
the legal framework within which the public 
and non-public schools function. The course 
will give attention to the legal relationships 
among federal, state, and local governments; 



may extend all day. Air and ground trans- 
portation by the college and cooperating 
agencies. (G) 

29.494 TRAVEL AND STUDY EDUCATION; 
(PROJECT TO BE NAMED) (1-6) Study 
abroad of educational facilities, programs or 
practices, or selected projects in educational 
topics. By special arrangement with program 
chairman and sponsoring instructors. 

29.495 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EDUCATION: 
(PROJECT TO BE NAMED) (1-4) An oppor- 
tunity for especially qualified students to 
undertake research problems or study proj- 
ects relevant to their interest and training 
under the direction of a staff member. Pre- 
requisite: consent of program chairman. 

29.496 DIRECTED READINGS IN EDUCATION 
(1-4) Independent reading in selected areas 
of Education, in order to provide for the 
individual a comprehensive coverage or to 
meet special needs. By invitation of the 
Department to major students. 



the legal status of school districts, boards 
of education, and school administrators; the 
legal status of non-public schools; and the 
law regarding all facets of the school pro- 
gram, staff, and pupils. Prerequisite: Founda- 
tions of Education or equivalent. 

29.549 AMERICAN POLITICS AND EDUCATION 
(3) The American political structure and 
its relation to policy making and administra- 
tion of public education. Topics include edu- 
cational opportunity, community responsibil- 
ity and control, accountability, role of the 
courts, church-state relations, academic free- 
dom. Prerequisite: Education 401 Founda- 
tions of Education and Political Science 103 
or equivalent. 

29.550 ANALYSIS AND MODIFICATION OF 
TEACHING BEHAVIOR (3) The analysis of 
teaching learning situations to aid the ad- 
vanced teacher education students to de- 
velop, refine and prescribe skills and strat- 
egies and field work. Prerequisites: Teach- 
ing experience, supervisory experience, 
29.471 and/or 29.511. 

29.585 (28.495) INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR 
IN PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION (3) An 
interdisciplinary seminar with two aspects: 
(1) Current thought in the philosophy of a 
variety of academic fields. (2) Their impli- 
cations for the broad field of education. 
Concentration will be upon development in 
the present century. 

29.595 INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY (3-6) Individ- 
ually planned programs which will permit 
students to engage in research and/or field 
experiences relative to his professional 
growth. Prerequisites: Admission by appli- 
cation to the Graduate Program Coordinator, 
only. 

(G) May be available for graduate credit. See 
Graduate Bulletin. 



EDUCATION 109 



29.601 (28.601) REPRESENTATIVE AMERICAN 
EDUCATORS (3) A biographical approach 
to the development of American Education 
through selected group of American educa- 
tors whose contributions have significantly 
shaped its form and substance from the 
colonial period to the present. Prerequisite: 
Educational Ideas in Historical Perspective. 

29.607 SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL CLASSICS 
I: ANCIENT PERIOD THROUGH THE REN- 
AISSANCE (3) An in-depth study of the 
classical works of selected authors. Con- 
centration on liberalizing and humanizing 
influences. A seminar paper will be devel- 
oped by each student. Prerequisites: Founda- 
tions of Education, or History of Education, 
or Educational Ideas in Historical Perspec- 
tive. 

29.609 SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL CLASSICS 
II: RENAISSANCE TO THE PRESENT (3) 
An in-depth study of the classical works of 
selected authors. Concentration on liberaliz- 
ing and humanistic influences. Prerequisites: 
Foundations of Education, or History of 
Education or Educational Ideas in Historical 
Perspective. 

29.621 (26.621) READING DISABILITIES (3) The 
content of this course includes the follow- 
ing: causes of reading disabilities; observa- 
tion and interview procedures; standard and 
informal tests; report writing; materials and 
methods of instruction. Prerequisite: Cur- 
riculum I and II or consent of instructor. 

29.623 (26.623) METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 
TEACHING READING IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (3) For teachers-in-service and 
other professional school personnel who 
have not had professional courses in reading 
such as 26.427 or 26.429 (426). Covers 
trends in methods, materials, and individu- 
alized reading designs essential to the or- 
ganization and administration of a functional 
reading program. Prerequisite: Curriculum 
'I and II or consent of instructor. 

29.625 (26.625) CLINIC PRACTICUM IN READ- 
ING (3) A clinical or laboratory experience. 



Students diagnose and treat reading dis- 
ability cases under the supervision of the 
directors of the reading program. Prerequi- 
site: 29.621 and 29.623. 

29.627 (26.627) EVALUATION OF READING RE- 
SEARCH (3) The student will be exposed 
to the tools of research and experimentation. 
The emphasis will be on past and present 
research relevant to reading. Prerequisite: 
Course in Tests and Measurement or Statis- 
tics and consent of instructor. 

29.629 (26.629) SEMINAR IN READING (3) An 
advanced course to familiarize the student 
with interdisciplinary aspects of the reading 
process. The highlight of the course will be 
the team teaching aspect. Consultants such 
as psychologists, pediatricians, optometrists, 
guidance teachers, etc. will play an impor- 
tant role in this course. Prerequisite: 26.621 
and 26.623. 

29.631 DIAGNOSIS AND EVALUATION OF 
READING DISABILITIES (3) Emphasis on 
the practical uses of standardized and non- 
standardized instruments and procedures for 
evaluating reading disabilities. Prerequisites: 
26.621 Reading Disabilities. 

29.691 (28.691) INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 
IN EDUCATION (3) Research as a method 
for solving problems. Contributions of re- 
search to education. Prerequisite: Under- 
graduate course in Tests and Measurements, 
or Elementary Statistics, or consent of in- ' 
structor. 

29.699 (28.699) MASTER EDUCATION THESIS 
(3) Carefully executed investigation and 
accurate recording of a specific problem 
selected with reference to the student's pro- 
fessional goals and resources. Historical, 
descriptive, experimental, or action research 
can provide a single or multiple framework 
within which the student may work, includes 
an outline of the proposed thesis submitted 
for inspection and approval by the Graduate 
Council, an application of techniques de- 
rived from the research course, and the 
guidance of Research Adviser. 



110 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



English 



Professors: BEVINS, HENRY, HUGHES, LEWIS, PLANTE (Co-Chairman), 

SHEETS, THEARLE 
Associate Professors: GUESS, HANSON, HEDGES, HILL, KOOMJOHN, WRIGHT, COULTER 

GRAVER, FLOWER 
Assistant Professors: CASKIE, CONNOLLY, DOUGLAS, DOWLING, ECONOMOU, FRIEDMAN 

HAHN, HATCHER, JONES (Co-Chalrman), WILKOTZ 
Instructors: BUTLER. FRANKEL, THOMAS, WILLIAMS, WOLKOWITZ, WOOD 

Every student in the College must complete 30.102 or 30.104 and one semester (3 
credit hours) of a lower-division course in English, American, World Survey, 
Ideas in Literature, or Black American Literature: 30.201, 202, 204, 205, 211, 212, 
213, 251, or 252, A student may offer a third course in English in partial fulfill- 
ment of the General Education Requirements of the College. He may, of course, 
offer other English credits as elective credit. 

English Course Prerequisites 

30.102 or 30.104 is prerequisite to all other English courses. The second course 
will be one of the following: 30.201, 30.202, 30.204, 30.205, 30.211, 30.212, 30.213, 
30.251, 30.252. Concurrently with these courses, a student may take any lower- 
division (200-level) elective in English. Three English courses, including 30.102 
or 30.104, are prerequisite to registration for upper-division (300-400 level) Eng- 
lish courses. 

English Major 

To satisfy the requirements for the major a student must complete 36 semester 

hours of work in the departmental offerings in language, composition, and 

literature. 

The 36 hours will include either 30,102 or 30.104, 30.204-30.205, 30.233. 
Four additional hours of lower division work may be counted toward a major, 
with 30.224 and 30.243 recommended. 

Upper-division courses must include 30.351 Approaches to English Study. 

At least one course must be selected from the courses in Language or Liter- 
ary Criticism: 30.325 (325) Historical Linguistics: 30.327 (327) Structural Lin- 
guistics; 30.332 (332) Comparative Grammar; 30.430 (430) History of the 
English Language; 30.431 (431) Structure of the English Language; 30.432 
(432) Old English Language; 30.433 (433) Middle English Language; 30.405 
(405) Literary Criticism I: 30.406 (406) Literary Criticism IL 

At least one course from each of two of the following three lists of period 
courses: (a) Beginnings to 1700 — 30.302 (302) The English Renaissance; 30.303 
(303) Seventeenth Century English Prose and Poetry; 30.319 (319) English 
Medieval and Renaissance Drama; 30.340 (340) Medieval Literature, (b) 1700- 
1832—30.320 (320) English Drama from the Restoration to Shaw; 30.335 (335) 
Literature of the English Romantic Period; 30.345 (345) Eighteenth Century 
English Prose and Poetry; 30.422 (422) Development of the English Novel I; 
30.427 Literature of the American Romantic Period ; 30.438 Prose of the English 
Romantic Period (c) 1832-1900—30.337 Victorian Prose and Poetry I; 30.338 
Victorian Prose and Poetry II; 30.423, (423) Development of the English Novel 
II; 30.445 Nineteenth-Century American Novel; 30.447 Major American Poets to 
1900. 

One course must be selected from Major Figure courses: 30.410 (410) 
Chaucer; 30.412 (412) Milton; 30.415 (415) Shakespeare (Comedies); 30.416 
(416) Shakespeare (Tragedies). 



Ill 



One upper-division course from any one of the above lists or from other 
departmental electives must be in American literature. 

The English Department strongly recommends that every major complete 
at least the intermediate level of a foreign language. 

The Department participates in the Advanced Placement Programs of the 
College. A selected number of entering freshmen are placed in 30.104 rather than 
in 30.102. It also participates in the Credit for Prior Experience Program. Stu- 
dents applying for credit under the program complete an examination, an inter- 
view, and a paper in the area. 

Students interested in majoring in English or in participating in any of 
its programs should consult their advisers, and one of the co-chairs of the Depart- 
ment. Majors must register with the Department and are urged to consult with 
their advisers during each pre-registration period. 

Teacher Education Program for English Majors 

The Education Department requires that a student preparing to teach English 
take either 30.332 Comparative Grammar or 30.431 Structure of the English Lan- 
guage. It strongly recommends in addition either 30,327 Structural Linguistics or 
30.430 History of the English Language. Further recommendations are 30.226 
Introduction to Classical Mythology, 30.331 Advanced Composition, and either 
30.251-52 or 30.401, Black Literature. 



ENGLISH COURSES (ENGL) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

30.102 (102) FRESHMAN COMPOSITION (3) 
Review of grammar, writing of compositions, 
and reading of various forms of literature. 

30.104 (104) ADVANCED FRESHMAN ENGLISH 
(3) Readings in expository and imaginative 
literature, short compositions, and research 
experience. Open only to freshmen selected 
by the English Department on the basis of 
superior high school records and aptitude 
test scores; for them 30.104 replaces 30.102. 

30.201 (333) READINGS IN WORLD LITERA- 
TURE I (3) European writings in translation 
from the time of Homer to the Renaissance. 

30.202 (334) READINGS IN WORLD LITERA- 
TURE II (3) European writings in transla- 
tion from the Renaissance to 1900. 

30.204-30.205 ENGLISH LITERATURE I, II (3, 3) 
First semester — the Middle Ages through 
the Neoclassical Age; second semester — 
the Romantics through the moderns. 

30.210 (210) INTRODUCTION TO FOLKLORE 
(2) Celtic and other types of folklore which 
provide a wide and varied background for 
literature. 

30.211 (307) AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3) 
Major writers from the Colonial Period to 
the Civil War. 

30.212 (308) AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3) Ma- 
jor writers since the Civil War. 

30.213 IDEAS IN LITERATURE (3) A thematic 
approach to selected American, British, and 
World Literature. 



30.215 (215) THE BALLAD (2) The popular 
ballad as a literary form: its origin, sources, 
characteristics, and literary influence. 

30.224 (224) ELEMENTS OF FICTION (2) Tech- 
niques of fiction, with emphasis on the short 
story. 

30.226 (226) INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL 
MYTHOLOGY (3) The study of myth in se- 
lected works from Greek and Roman litera- 
ture. 

30.233 (233) ELEMENTS OF POETRY (3) Ver- 
sification, and the forms and purposes of 
poetry, 

30.243 (102) ELEMENTS OF DRAMA (2) Forms 
of drama, with emphasis upon structure and 
conventions. 

30.251-252 BLACK AMERICAN LITERATURE 
I, II (3, 3) First semester — Early European 
travelogues, the problems of prejudice, psy- 
chological motives in Black history move- 
ments, and racial climates of various literary 
periods studied in conjunction with a survey 
of the literature of Black American, 1619 to 
present; second semester — Major contem- 
porary black writers in fiction and drama, 
including Wright, Ellison, Jones, Hughes. 251 
is recommended but not required as a pre- 
requisite to 252. 

30.283 INTRODUCTION TO IMAGINATIVE WRIT- 
ING (2) Theories and technical considera- 
tions pertinent to writing poetry and fiction, 
with discussion of student writing. 



112 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

30.328 HfSTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE 
OLD TESTAMENT (3) The chief books of 
the Old Testament and the Apocrypha stud- 
ied from a literary and historical point of 
view. 

30.331 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) Study 
of expository style and practice in writing 
and criticizing non-fiction prose, with atten- 
tion to individual student writing concerns 
and analysis of student writing in class. 

30.332 (332) COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR (3) 
Study of English grammar; traditional, struc- 
tural, transformational. 



30.351 APPROACHES TO ENGLISH STUDY (3) 
English as an academic discipline, critical 
approaches to literature; methods of inves- 
tigation In language and literature. (Restrict- 
ed to undergraduate English majors. To be 
elected as soon as the English major has 
completed 3 lower-division courses in 
English.) 

30.383 (383) IMAGINATIVE WRITING (3) The 
nature of the creative process and the art of 
imaginative expression. Concentration in 
writing fiction or in writing poetry, alternat- 
ing in different semesters. Prerequisite: Up- 
per division standing and consent of instruc- 
tor. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



30.301 TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE (2 or 3) 
Consideration of special figures, periods, 
genres, or conventions. Variation in content 
from year to year; may be re-elected. 

30.302 (302) THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (3) 
Non-dramatic literature of the Elizabethan 
period. (Formerly 424) 

30.303 SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH 
PROSE AND POETRY (3) Major English 
non-dramatic literature of the seventeenth 
century; the approach will be both critical 
and historical. 

30.305 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (2 or 
3) Consideration of special figures periods, 
genres or conventions. Variation in content 
from year to year; may be re-elected. 

30.309 AMERICAN DRAMA (3) A study of 
American drama from the beginning tc the 
present. 

30.311 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (2 
or 3) Consideration of special figures, peri- 
ods, genres, or conventions. Variation in con- 
tent from year to year; may be re-elected. 

30.312 (312) WORLD DRAMA I (3) An histori- 
cal and critical study of world drama and 
the cultural forces which produced it from 
the ancient Greel<s to the Neo-Classic period. 

30313 (313) WORLD DRAMA II (3) An histor- 
ical and critical study of world drarra and 
the cultural forces which produced it from 
the Neo-Classic period to the late nineteenth 
century. 

30 317 (317) LITERARY BIOGRAPHY (3) Criti- 
cal reading from the literary point of view of 
important biographies, principally English 
and American. 

30.319 (319) ENGLISH MEDIEVAL AND REN- 
AISSANCE DRAMA (3) Development of the 
English Drama from the Middle Ages through 
the Renaissance, excluding Shakespeare 

?0 120 (3?0) ENGLISH DRAMA FROM TMf PFS- 
70RATI0N TO SHAW (3) Dfvel. pnr^nt o* 
thp Enqlish Drama in the seventeenrh eight- 
eenth , and nineteenth centuries. 



30.321 (321) MODERN DRAMA (3) Critical 
reading of plays of the late nineteenth cen- 
tury and the twentieth century. 

30.323 THE CONTINENTAL NOVEL (3) A study 
of major continental novels in translation. 
Emphasis will be upon related and compara- 
tive elements in the novels of writers of 
France, Germany, Italy and other European 
countries. 

30.325 (325) HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS (3) An 
introduction to language typology and Indo- 
European philology; historical development 
of linguistics up to the twentieth century. 

30.326 (326) MYTH AND LITERATURE (3) The 
reinterpretation of themes and figures from 
Greek and Roman mythology. 

30.327 (327) STRUCTURAL LINGUISTICS (3) A 
study of the developments in linguistic theory 
In the twentieth century; major figures, De- 
Saussure, Sapir, Bloomfield, Trubetzkoy, 
Chomsky. 

30.329 HISTORY OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (3) 
Origins and history of American dialects; 
development of elements of vocabulary, 
sounds, and grammar which distinguish 
American English; standards of American 
English. 

30.335 (335) LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH 
ROMANTIC PERIOD (3) Major writers, so- 
cial and political background, important liter- 
ary Ideas, and criticism. 

30.337 VICTORIAN PROSE AND POETRY I (3) 
A study of the works of Tennyson, Arnold; 
and the Victorian "prophets" — Macauley, 
Carlyle, Newman, and Mill. 

30.338 VICTORIAN PROSE AND POETRY II (3) 
A study of the works of Browning: Ruskin 
and the Pre-Raphaelites; Pater, Hardy, Hous- 
man, and Yeats. 

30.340 (340) MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3) Eng- 
lish literature duf^-ng the Middle Ages, with 
emphasis on 'he mystical writers. Piers Plow- 
man, the Gawain poet, and Arthurian litera- 
ture. 



ENGLISH 113 



30.345 (345) EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH 
PROSE AND POETRY (3) A study of back- 
grounds, literary trends, and significant au- 
thors, with emphasis on Swift, Pope, John-' 
son, and Boswell. 

30.40-1 THE LITERATURE OF BLACK AMERICA 
(3) The literature of black expression in the 
United States with emphasis on the twentieth 
century. Non-fiction, fiction, and poetry by 
black writers will be studied. 

30.405 (405) LITERARY CRITICISM ! (3) His- 
tory and principles of literary criticism. Spe- 
cified prerequisites and consent of instructor. 

30.406 (406) LITERARY CRITICISM II (3) Prac- 
tice in writing literary criticism. Specified 
prerequisites and consent of instructor. 

30.407 (407) MODERN POETRY (3) Work of 
the important twentieth century poets. (For- 
mally 319) 

30.408 (408) MODERN FICTION TO WORLD 
WAR I! (3) Work of the modern masters of 
fiction. 

30.409 (409) MODERN FICTION SINCE WORLD 
WAR II (3) Works of the significant writers 
— English, American, and Continental — of 
the past twenty years. The works of these 
writers carry on or chaJlenge the tradition 
established by the modern masters of fiction. 

30.410 (410) CHAUCER (3) A study of the ma- 
jor poetry. 

30.412 (412) MILTON (3) A study of the po- 
etry and major prose works. 

30.415 (415) SHAKESPEARE (COMEDIES) (3) 
Shakespeare's development as a poet and a 
dramatist during the period of the comedies 
and historical plays. 

30.416 (416) SHAKESPEARE (TRAGEDIES) (3) 
The great tragedies and the late romantic 
comedies of Shakespeare. 

30.419 TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL 
(3) Survey of the British novel from Conrad 
to the present. 

30.420 TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITISH POET- 
RY (3) Survey of British poetry from Hop- 
kins to the present. 

30.422 (422) DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH 
NOVEL I (3) History and development of the 
English novel through the eighteenth century. 

30.423 (423) DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH 
NOVEL II (3) History and development of 
the English novel through the nineteenth 

csritury. 

30.427 LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN RO- 
MANTIC PERIOD (3) Major writers, social 
and political background, important literary 
ideas, and criticism. 

30.430 (430) HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LAN- 
GUAGE (3) Changes and reasons for the 
changes in grammar, sound, and vocabulary 
of the language, from Old English to modern 
times. 



30.431 (431) STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE (3) A linguistic approach to 
sounds, forms, syntax, and usage. 

30.432 (432) OLD ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) 
Grammar and syntax of Old English; transla- 
tion of elementary texts; introduction to Ge--- 
manic philology. 

30.433 (433) MIDDLE ENGLISH LANGUAGE lo; 
Grammar and syntax of Middle English; study 
of Middle English dialects; rea-.;;-;g of se- 
lected texts of twelfth to fifteent;, centuries. 

30.435 AMERICAN SHORT STORY (3- A study 
of the American short story from I'.a begin- 
ning to the present. 

30.437 SURVEY OF ENGLISH PROSE '3) A 
survey of non-fictional prose in En&iish lit- 
erature from 1500 to the prerif ' 

30.438 PROSE OF THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC 
PERIOD (3) Readings in the prose of the 
English Romantic Period with emphasis on 
Keats, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Lamb, and De- 
Quincey. 

30.445 NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN 
NOVEL (3) A study of major American nov- 
elists of the nineteenth century '.ith empha- 
sis on Cooper, Melville, Hawthorns, Howells, 
James, CrafiSj and Norris. 

30.446 TWENTIETH CENTURY AME V.CAN NOV- 
EL (3) A study of major American novelists 
of the twentieth century with emphasis on 
James, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, 
Malamud, Bellow, Barth, and Nabokov. 

30.447 AMERICAN POETRY TO 1900 (3) A 
study of American poetry from its beginnings 
through the 19th century. Emphasis on major 
figures. 

30.448 TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN PO- 
ETRY (3) A study of major American poets 
since 1900. 

30.485, 486 (440, 441) SEMINAR IN ENGLISH 
STUDIES (3, 3) Thorough study of one ma- 
jor area of literature (author, period, move- 
ment, etc.) not available through other elec- 
tives. Areas covered will vary from semester 
to semester. Emphasis on reseach and schol- 
arly writing with extensive research paper 
required. Open only to seniors and, with 
consent of the instructor, to juniors having 
an exceptionally strong background in Eng- 
lish. May be taken one or two semesters. 

30.491 (480) DIRECTED READING IN ENGLISH 
(2-4) Independent reading in literature or in 
literature and related disciplines dealing v/ith 
specific periods, topics, problems or com- 
parative developments selected by :ne stu- 
dent in consultation with the instructor. Pre- 
requisites: 18 hours in English or 12 hours in 
English and 6 hours in the related discipline, 
a minimum average of 3.00 in English and 
the related discipline, and the consent of 
the Department Chairman and the instructor 
involved. 



114 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



30.494 TRAVEL AND STUDY (3-6) Countries 
and topics to be selected by the Depart- 
ments and instructors sponsoring the pro- 
gram. For enrollment procedures, write the 
Chairman of the Department early in the 
fall of the academic year preceding the 
summer of intended study. 



30.497-498 COLLOQUIUM IN ENGLISH (3. 3) A 
two semester course of reading and critical 
discussion, ranging over the spectrum of 
literature, conducted by a team of three in- 
structors on a discussion/tutorial basis. 



30.521 STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (3) 
Thorough study of one major area of English 
Literature (author, period, movement, etc.). 
Areas covered will vary from semester to 
semester. Substantial research required. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent 
of instructor. 

30.523 STUDIES IN LITERARY CRITICISM (3) 
Thorough study of one major area of Liter- 
ary Criticism (author, period, movement, 
etc.). Areas covered will vary from semester 
to semester. Substantial research required. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent 
of instructor. 

30.525 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 
(3) Thorough study of one major area of 
American Literature (author, period, move- 



ment, etc.). Areas covered will vary from 
semester to semester. Substantial research 
required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
and consent of instructor. 

30.527 STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE (3) 
Thorough study of one major area of World 
Literature (author, period, movement, etc.). 
Areas covered will vary from semester to 
semester. Substantial research required. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and con- 
sent of instructor. 

30.531 STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS (3) Topics 
in the technology and philosophy of lan- 
guage: descriptive grammar, psycholinguis- 
tics, sociolinguistics, etc. Topic to vary. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing and consent of 
instructor. 



ENGLISH 115 



Geography 



Professors: BEISHLAG, FIRMAN 

Associate Professors: DIFFENDERFER (Cfiairman), MARTIN 

Assistant Professor: HAYUK 

Instructors: HARLIN, MCKIM, STEVENSON, WALTON 

The Department offers a major and a minor in geography. The purpose of the ma- 
jor is to encourage the student to explore the discipline in some depth. Such inves- 
tigation, performed well, leads to an appreciation of the structure and function 
of the area, prepares the student for graduate work, and offers excellent back- 
ground for many careers, particularly teaching and certain types of government 
service. The student is also expected to take correlative courses which broaden 
his academic background and offer valuable insights into the subject. 

Geography Major 

Thirty credit hours are required as a minimum for the major in geography, 
of whicti a minimum of nine credit hours must be selected from courses with 
a Lower Division number (100-200) and a minimum of twenty one credit hours 
from Upper Division courses. At least nine credit hours of Upper Division 
level courses (300-400) must be from those designated as sj'stematic or tech- 
nique courses. 

Geography Minor 

Eighteen credit hours are required for a minor in geography, of which a mini- 
mum of six credit hours must be selected from courses with a Lower Division 
number (100-200) and a minimum of twelve credit hours from Upper Division 
courses (300-400). 

Geography Course Prerequisites 

Some Lower Division course work in geography or consent of the instructor 
are general prerequisites for all Upper Division courses, with the exceptions 
specified under some courses. Graduate courses require graduate status, consent 
of the instructor and indicated prerequisites. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students must take a minimum of 18 credits of upper division courses 
in geography to fulfill requirements for the major. 

Master of Arts in Geography 

The Master of Arts in Geography is designed for students who are primarily 
interested in an advanced degree. 

Masters in Education (emphasis in geography, see Secondary Education). 

Admission to Courses in Geography for Graduate Credit 

1. Acceptable achievement on the Graduate Record Examination in geography. 

2. At least an undergraduate minor in geography or the equivalent. 

3. At least a 3.00 or "B" grade average in the geography courses presented for 
admission. 

4. Under extraordinary or peculiar circumstances an applicant who does not meet 
all of the above requirements may petition the Department of Geography 
for admission. 

116 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



5. 



6. 



Program for the Master of Arts in Geography 

1. Candidacy: After 9 semester hours and before the completion of 15 hours of 
graduate study in geography. 

2. Number of 500 level courses: At least 15 semester hours in Graduate Geog- 
raphy must be earned at the 500 level. 

3. Grade Average: A student must maintain a 3.00 average after candidacy. 

4. Comprehensive Examination : The department reserves the option of requiring 
or not requiring this examination after the completion of 9 semester hours 
prior to the completion of the semester in which 15 hours are attained. 
Statute of Limitations: All requirements must be completed by August of the 
seventh year of graduate study. 

Credit Transfer: Six semester graduate hours in geography may be trans- 
ferred from another institution and applied. A student may petition the de- 
partment for consideration of transfer credits that exceed six semester 
graduate hours. 
Specific Requirements. 

a. Each student, in consultation with his advisor, will prepare a program of 
study in geography and will present it to a Graduate Committee of the 
Geography Department. Candidates may be required to justify their pro- 
gram before the Committee. 

b. Presentation of evidence of at least a fourth semester of college level 
competency in one modern language OR proficiency in statistics or com- 
puter science. 

c. Thesis: Students may elect Plan A which will require a thesis to demon- 
strate a student's ability to do independent research or students may elect 
Plan B which requires no thesis. 



Prescribed Courses: 

Plan A 
Seminar 34.481 
Research Techniques 

34.521 
Thesis 34.697 
Electives 



3 hours 

3 hours 

6 hours 

18 hours 

30 hours 



PlanB 
Seminar 34.481 
Regional Seminar 34.671 
Electives 



3 hours 

3 hours 

30 hours 



36 hours 



GEOGRAPHY COURSES (GEOG) 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

34.101 (103) ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY I (3) 
Introductory topical studies of fundamental 
natural and selected cultural phenomena in 
man's environment. Emphasis on climate, 
landforms, soils, vegetation, and minerals. 

34.102 (104) ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY II (3) 
Introductory regional studies of man in rela- 
tion to his natural and cultural environments. 
Emphasis is on the distinctive and compara- 
tive nature of major regions; man's utilization 
of resources. 

34.121 INTERPRETATION OF MAPS (3) Intro- 
duction to map elements and map interpreta- 
tion; study of various types of maps, index 
systems, and general application of maps in 
geography. 

34.221 (307) CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (3) 
Study of origins and diffusion of cultures and 



the resulting Impact in creating the world's 
contrasting cultural landscapes. 

34.231 (316) ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY (3) Re- 
gional distribution of the world's resources, 
industries, and population; emphasis upon 
problems of international trade. An analysis 
of the productive and extractive industries, 
manufacturing and commerce in relation to 
the geographic environment. 

34.299 INTRODUCTION TO SOURCE MATERI- 
ALS AND RESEARCH IN GEOGRAPHY (3) 
Designed to provide the student with a basic 
working knowledge of research materials; 
study and review of principal reference litera- 
ture, journals, and other sources of data 
used in geographic field and library research. 
Students may be required to do field work. 



GEOGRAPHY 117 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 
SYSTEMATIC COURSES 



34.001 FIELD RESEARCH IN PLANNING (3) 

Field research in contemporary planning 
problems in the suburban environment. Re- 
search projects conducted under supervision 
of the Baltimore County Office of Planning 
and Zoning and the Department of Geog- 
raphy. Open only to senior geography majors 
v^'ith department approval. 

34.002 INTRODUCTION TO URBAN PLANNING 
(3) A survey of principles in current prac- 
tice of urban and regional planning for stu- 
dents seeking an introduction to the field. 
Extensive reference to activities and tech- 
niques of planning agencies in the Baltimore 
region. Open to upper classmen. 

34.003 PRINCIPLES OF ZONING (3) Introduc- 
tion to the field of zoning; applicable to 
studies in urban geography, real estate, and 
sociology. Background of zoning, principles, 
uses, limitations, regulations, adoption pro- 
cedures, and related problems. 

34.005 URBAN DESIGN — MAN-SPACE-EN- 
VIRONMENT (3) Introduction to urban de- 
sign; the city as an experience as vievi/ed 
through physical structuring and social and 
physical focal points; role of landscaping in 
urban design. Prerequisites: 34.101-102 or 
consent of instructor. 

34.319 SOILS AND VEGETATION (3) A re- 
source study of the world's soil and plant 
formations with emphasis placed upon gen- 
esis and spatial differentiations. Prerequi- 
sites: 34.101, 102 or consent of instructor. 

34.361 ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 
(3) Studies mainly of the secondary and 
tertiary industries with some emphasis on 
quantitative analyses of selected economic 
activities. 

34.371 (301) ADVANCED PHYSICAL GEOG- 
RAPHY (3) Detailed analysis of character- 



istics, distribution, and geographical signifi- 
cance of the earth's physical features. 

34.373 (395) CLIMATOLOGY (3) Character, 
causes, and distribution of climatic types. 
Emphasis upon world patterns. Students may 
be required to do field work. 

34.375 QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN GEOG- 
RAPHY (3) Focus on statistical problems 
associated with the analysis of geographic 
data. Emphasis on the unique spatial prob- 
lems of point pattern analysis, areal associa- 
tion, and regionalization. 

34.377 DESCRIPTIVE METEOROLOGY (4) An 
introduction to the various meteorological 
elements. Emphasis is placed on the inter- 
action of temperature, pressure, wind, and 
moisture in creating weather patterns. Three 
hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. 
Field work may be required. 

34.381 (331) POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY (3) 
Effect of political groupings upon man's use 
of the world, and the influence of the geo- 
graphic base upon political power. 

34.385 GEOGRAPHY OF POPULATION AND 
SETTLEMENT (3) Regional analysis of en- 
vironmental resource factors contributing to 
various population densities and the result- 
ant settlement patterns of man's use of the 
land. Prerequisites: 3 credits of geography 
in 100 or 200 series or consent of instructor. 

34.391 (413) URBAN GEOGRAPHY (3) Survey 
of the structure, functions, forms and de- 
velopment of urban units. Emphasis upon the 
locational features of social, economic, and 
cultural phenomena. Field work. 

34.401 GROWTH OF GEOGRAPHIC THOUGHT 
(3) History, nature, and methodology of 
geography as a discipline. Analysis of 
schools of geographic thought; critical eval- 
uation of important geographic works. 



TECHNIQUE COURSES 



34.321 (300) INTERPRETATION OF AERIAL 
PHOTOGRAPHS (3) Reading and interpre- 
tation of aerial photographs. The application 
of the aerial photograph in the fields of 
geography, geology, and photogrammetry. 

34.323 (330) CARTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS I 
(3) Study in design, construction, and effec- 
tive application of maps and charts for anal- 
ysis and publication; practical exercises in 
the use of cartographic tools, materials, and 
techniques. 

34.324 CARTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS II (3) 
Advanced exercises in map graphics and 
areal distribution maps. New techniques in 
presentation of graphic data and spatial 

relationships. 



34.327 MAP ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 
(3) Principal types of maps and their uses. 
Emphasis on understanding map components 
and the range of physical and cultural phe- 
nomena indicated on maps. Includes selected 
exercises which illustrate the analytical and 
graphical values of maps. 

34.341 TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS FOR 
GEOGRAPHY TEACHERS (3) A systematic 
review of geographic concepts in relation to 
interdisciplinary studies in the physical and 
social sciences. Examination of the content 
of geography and problems of presentation. 



118 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



REGIONAL COURSES 



3'>.421 (230) GEOGRAPHY OF ANGLO-AMERICA 
(3) Common social, economic, and political 
interests of the major regions of the United 
States and Canada. The culture patterns of 
each region in relation to the natural settings 
in which they have developed. 

3 .423 (320) HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF 
MARYLAND (3) Political, social and eco- 
nomic development of the state and Its rela- 
tion to major events In the development of 
the nation. Natural resources; regional land 
use; industrial development, particularly in 
the Baltimore area. Field trips. Reld trip ex- 
penses about $15.00, payable when trips are 
taken. 

...431 (318) GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA (3) 
Material resources and human geography of 
Africa. Problems of economic development, 
nationality and cultural conflicts. 

.1.441 (390) GEOGRAPHY OF AUSTRALIA AND 
OCEANIA (3) Regional approach in analyz- 
ing and interpreting the physical and cultural 
patterns, natural resources, current prob- 
lems, and strategic importance of the Pacific 
world. 

.443 (315) GEOGRAPHY OF EAST ASIA (3) 
Regional studies of the physical and cultural 
foundations in China, Japan, and Korea. Em- 
phasis upon human and economic resources, 
and role in world affairs. 

;'445 (314) GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH AND 
SOUTHEAST ASIA (3) Regional studies of 



the physical and cultural foundations of 
India, Pakistan, Ceylon, Philippines, and In- 
donesia. Principal human and econcmic re- 
sources, problems of development, and role 
in world affairs. 

34.447 ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL GEOG- 
RAPHY OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3) A re- 
gional and systematic analysis of Southwest 
Asia and North Africa. Study of major natural 
and cultural resources and related patterns 
of spatial organization, economic and politi- 
cal development, and associated problems. 

34.451 (311) GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE (3) 
Regional analysis and appraisal of the hu- 
man geography and natural resources of 
Europe. Problems of nationality, economic 
development, and cultural conflicts. 

34.453 (319) GEOGRAPHY OF THE USSR (3) 
Physical and cultural patterns and their 
bearing on the Soviet Union as a v/orld 
power. Regional distribution and use of nat- 
ural and human resources in agriculture and 
industry. Problems in economic development 
and production. 

34.461 (309) GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA 
(3) Distribution and character of the eco- 
nomic activities in various Latin American 
countries in relation to physical and cultural 
features. Resources and problems of their 
development; importance of foreign trade to 
the. economy; relationship with the United 
States. 



cE V.INARS AND SPECIAL COURSES 

i.Ai} SEMINAR: SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOG- 
RAPHY (3) Reading and research in se- 
lected topics in the field of geography. Sem- 
inar topics will be announced. 
31. '.83 (487) SEMINAR: THE AMERICAS (3) 
;.i.;',idual study in selected problems of the 
...aphy of the Americas. 
.u;)(4B8) SEMINAR: SOUTH ASIA (3) Read- 
ing, research, and discussions on special 
topics related to India, Pakistan, Ceylon, the 
Himalayan Kingdoms, and Afghanistan. 

34.487 (489) SEMINAR: GEOGRAPHY AND MAN 
IN THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Selected stud- 
ies on the role of geographic factors in eco- 
nomic and political affairs and in the devel- 
opment of technology. Analysis of contribu- 
tions of applied geography to the solution of 
urban and rural problems. 

34.489 SEMINAR: STUDIES IN ENVIRONMEN- 
TAL QUALITY (3) Studies of selected 
problems in the quality of man's physical 
and cultural environments. Readings, dis- 
cussions, and research on geographical and 
other aspects of man's use of natural re- 
sources and major forms of environmental 
pollution. Prerequisites: 34.101, 34.102, or 
consent of instructor. 

34.493 FIELD GEOGRAPHY (2-6) Practical lab- 



oratory experience in techniques in the col- 
lection and analysis of data by observations, 
measurements, mapping, and photographic 
records. Such techniques are to be applied 
to selected geographic problems. 

34.494 TRAVEL AND STUDY (3-6) Countries 
and topics to be selected by departments 
and instructors sponsoring the program. For 
complete information write the chairman of 
the department early in the Fall of the aca- 
demic year preceding the summer of in- 
tended study. Prerequisite: Upper division 
status and consent of instructor. 

34.495 DIRECTED READING IN GEOGRAPHY 
(3) Independent reading in selected areas 
of geography. Open by invitation of the geog- 
raphy department to students taking a major 
or minor in geography. Prerequisite: 15 
hours of geography and a minimum average 
of 3.0 in geography courses. 

34.496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOGRAPHY 
(1-6) Independent research, study, or field 
experience under supervision of a member 
of the Geography faculty. Designed for ad- 
vanced students who wish to conduct inde- 
pendent investigations on aspects of Geog- 
raphy which are of special interest or not 
covered in other courses. 



GEOGRAPHY 119 



Graduate Division 

34.521 RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN GEOG- 
RAPHY (3) A course designed to investi- 
gate the primary sources of information in 
geograpliy and to learn the nature of original 
investigation, 

34.571 STUDIES IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 
(3) The study of selected geographical 
topics dealing with physical landscape phe- 
nomena, especially in regards to distribution, 
relationships, and significance to man. 
Topics will be announced. No more than six 
semester hours may be applied toward a 
degree. 

34.581 SEMINAR IN POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 
(2-6) Special subjects dealing with the 
geography of international politics, e.g. 
boundary problems, global strategy, space, 
sovereignty. Topics to be announced. No 
more than six semester hours may be ap- 
plied toward a degree. 

34.583 SEMINAR: ENVIRONMENTAL PROB- 
LEMS IN MARYLAND (3) Individual re- 
search on a selected environment problem 
in Maryland; oral and written presentations. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status and either 
geography major, previous work in Maryland, 
previous seminar, or consent of instructor. 



34.591 URBAN GEOGRAPHY STUDIES (2-6) 
Selected topics dealing with the application 
of geography to planning, retail and Indus- 
trial location, and trade analysis. Topics to 
be announced. No more than six semester 
hours may be applied toward a degree. 

34.601 LAND USE STUDIES (2-6) Certain se- 
lected problems on urban, rural and rural- 
urban landscapes which consider and ac- 
count for geographic differences in land 
utilization. Topics will be announced. No 
more than six semester hours may be ap- 
plied toward a degree. 

34.671 SEMINAR IN REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY 
(2-6) The description, analysis and inter- 
pretation of natural and cultural phenomena 
in certain significant geographic regions 
Seminar topics will be announced. No more 
than six semester hours may be applied 
toward a degree 

34.697 RESEARCH (2-6) Directed investigation 
of a pertinent and appropriate geographical 
problem or problems based upon field and 
library study, which will contribute to geo- 
graphical knowledge. Designed for the 
Masters thesis credit or individual research. 



Attention is also called to the following courses: 

24.331 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 64.222 GEOMORPHOLOGY (Physical Sciences) 

(Economics Department) 50 231 BASIC STATISTICS (Mathematics) 

64.121 GENERAL GEOLOGY (Physical 
Sciences) 



120 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Health Science 

Professor: BRUESS (Chairmart) 
Associate Professors: AINLEY. OSMAN 
Assistant Professors: GALLAGHER. GOETZ 
Instructors: AGLEY. JOHNSON. KAPLAN. McMAHON 

The health science courses are jreared to bridjfe the Rap between scientific health 
discoveries and man's application of these to daily livinK, to develop man's poten- 
tial to an optimal level, to aid in the selection of healthy behavior patterns for 
man and his environment, and to help man make the most of life. 



Major in Health 

The undergraduate major in health is specifically designed to allow the student 
to select one of three specializations — school health, public health, or school and 
public health. Depending upon the specialization selected, sufllcient background 
will be acquired to deal with health in elementary and secondary .schools or in 
community and public health agencies. The foundation for graduate education 
in school or public health is also provided the health major student. 

Requirements for the Health Major 

In addition to the General College Requirements, the following courses are 
required of health majors: 

School Health Specialization 

Professional Education; 29.101 Careers in Education, 70.203 Educational P.sy- 
chology, 28.319 Survey of Educational Programs, 27.401 Foundations of Educa- 
tion, 27.398 Student Teaching, and 38.205 Health Education in the School II. 
Health Requirements; 38.101 Current Health Problems, 38.103 First Aid. 38.201 
Health Education in the School I. 38.202 Principles and Practices in Public 
Health, 38.208 Mental Health, 38.401 Sex Education and Family Life, 38.402 
Health Seminar, 38.405 Drugs in Our Culture, and two health elective courses. 
Other Required Courses; 14.101 Contemporary General Biolog>', 22.100 Chemistry 
for Non-Scientists or 22.101 General Chemistry, 14.113 Human Anatomy and 
Physiology, 14.114 Human Anatomy and Physiology, 14.315 Medical Microbiology, 
70.101 General Psychology, 80.101 Introduction to Sociolog>-, 50.231 Basic Stati.s- 
tics (special section for health majors), and two semesters of physical education 
electives. 

Public Health Specialization 

Health Requirements; 38.101 Current Health Problems, 38.104 Parental and Child 
Health, 38.201 Health Education in the School I. 38.202 Principles and Practices 
in Public Health, 38.208 Mental Health, 38.302 Preparation for Field Work in 
Public Health, 38.303 Field Work in Public Health. 38.311 Epidemiology. 38.451 
Ecological Aspects of Health, and two health elective courses. Other Required 
Courses; 14.101 Contemporary General Biology, 22.101 General Chemistry, 22.102 
General Chemistry, 14.315 Medical Microbiology. 16.101 Introduction to Business 
Management, 24.101 Economic Principles and Problems I. 24.201 Economics of 
Health, 70.101 General Psychology. 80.101 Introduction to Sociolog>-. 50.231 Basic 
Statistics (special section for health majors), and two semesters of physical edu- 
cation electives. It is strongly recommended that students electing the public 
health track also complete a minor in sociology, biology, psychology, or other 
appropriate related area. 



121 



School and Public Health Specialization 

Professional Education; 29.101 Careers in Education, 70.203 Educational Psychol- 
ogy, 28.319 Survey of Educational Programs, 27.401 Foundations of Education, 
27.398 Student Teaching, and 38.205 Jiealth Education in the School II. Health 
Requirements; 38.101 Current Health Problems, 38.103 First Aid, 38.201 Health 
Education in the School I, 38.202 Principles and Practices in Public Health, 
38.208 Mental Health, 38.302 Preparation for Field Work in Public Health, 38.303 
Field Work in Public Health, 38.401 Sex Education and Family Life, 38.402 
Health Seminar, 38.405 Drugs in Our Culture, and one health elective course. 
Other Required Courses; 14.101 Contemporary General Biology, 22.100 Chemistry 
for Non-Scientists or 22.101 General Chemistry, 14.113 Human Anatomy and 
Physiology, 14.114 Human Anatomy and Physiology, 14.315 Medical Microbiology, 
70.101 General Psychology, 80.101 Introduction to Sociology, 50.231 Basic Statis- 
tics (special section for health majors), and two semesters of physical education 
electives. 

Graduate Program 

A specialization in health education as part of a Master of Education program in 
Secondary Education has recently become available. For further information con- 
sult the graduate studies bulletin. 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

38.101 CURRENT HEALTH PROBLEMS (3) 
Health problems of current Interest or im- 
portance on an individual, community, na- 
tional, and international basis. Includes a 
general overview of the state of the nation's 
health. 

38.103 FIRST AID (2) Designed for people who 
may be called upon to give first aid care In 
the course of their daily activities. Course 
content of the American Red Cross Stand- 
ard and Advanced First Aid Courses is in- 
cluded. Red Cross First Aid Certificates 
awarded. (Does not meet general college 
graduation requirements.) 

38.104 PARENTAL AND CHILD HEALTH (3) 
An introduction to parental and child health 
in its contemporary, social, and cultural set- 
ting. Discussion will include parenthood, 
prenatal care, growth and development of 
the child, the school environment, physical 
handicaps, and public health programs 
serving the maternal, infant, and preschool 
populations. Prerequisite: 38.101. 

38.201 HEALTH EDUCATION IN THE SCHOOL 
I (3) An introductory overview of the total 
school health program with emphasis on 
what health education is, what health serv- 
ices are available, and guidelines for teach- 
ing elementary and secondary school health 
education. Prerequisite: 38.101. 

38.202 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES If^ PUB- 
LIC HEALTH (3) Principles and practices 
in the field of public health, and the organi- 
zation and administration of various 
agencies. Major public health problems. 
Prerequisite: 38.101. 



38.203 FIRST AID INSTRUCTORS (2) Ameri- 
can Red Cross First Aid Course for Instruc- 
tors certification. Prerequisite: 38.103 (Does 
not meet general college graduation require- 
ments.) 

38.204 NUTRITION (2-3) A basic course cov- 
ering the chemical nature and utilization of 
nutrients; the composition, digestion, ab- 
sorption of foods; and the normal nutritional 
requirements of the human body, with atten- 
tion to the relationship between nutrition and 
general health. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
22.101, or consent of instructor. (Does not 
meet general college graduation require- 
ments.) 

38.205 HEALTH EDUCATION IN THE SCHOOL 
II (3) An in-depth consideration of the total 
school health program with emphasis on 
interpretation of school health services, 
analysis of selected health education cur- 
riculum guides, development of teaching 
materials, and actual observation and par- 
ticipation in health education in elementary 
and secondary schools. Prerequisites: 
38.101, 38.201, 50.231. 

38.206 HEALTH AND URBAN LIVING (3) 
Study of those conditions of urban living 
with particular relevance for the health and 
well-being of urban dwellers. Nature, extent, 
and programs and problems in dealing with 
atmospheric pollution, water supply, hous- 
ing, sanitation, behavioral disorders, mental 
illness, communicable disease, etc. Pre- 
requisite: Health 38.101, Introduction to 
Sociology. 



122 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



38.207 MEDICAL CARE IN THE UNITED 
STATES (3) An examination of the medical 
care process and the medical care system; 
the health occupations, hospitals, and re- 
lated institutions; the drug industry; the 
organization of services and financing; the 
quasi-public sector, social values and re- 
sponsibilities, and current trends in health 
care. 

38.208 MENTAL HEALTH (3) Study of factors 
affecting mental adjustment in today's world. 
Emphasis is on positive aspects of mental 
adjustment and consumer decision making. 
Prerequisite: 38.101. 

Upper Division — Undergraduate 

38.302 PREPARATION FOR FIELD WORK IN 
PUBLIC HEALTH (3) Examination of tech- 
niques needed to work in various public 
health capacities; observation of public 
health situations. Prerequisites: 38.202, 
50.231. 

38.303 FIELD WORK IN PUBLIC HEALTH 
(8 or 14) Practical experience in participa- 
tion in public health situations. 

38.305 PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (3) 
A survey of current approaches to the 



38.209 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3) The course 
is designed to examine consumer behavior 
in light of psychological, sociological, and 
ecological principles. Taught on an inter- 
departmental basis with the psychology 
department. Prerequisite: 38.101, 70.101. 

38.221 HUMAN SEXUALITY (3) An individually 
oriented discussion course designed to ex- 
plore the multi-disciplinary scope of human 
sexuality. An in-depth look at the physiologi- 
cal, psychological emotional, cultural, and 
social aspects of human sexuality will focus 
on establishing one's sexuality as a healthy 
entity. Prerequisite: 38.101. 



theories, practices and organization of com- 
munity health services administration. Pre- 
requisites: Principles and Practices in Pub- 
lic Health (38.202) 

38.311 EPIDEMIOLOGY (3) Introduction to 
epidemiology including study of factors gov- 
erning the occurrence of diseases in popu- 
lations. Laboratory problems are illustrative 
of basic epidemiologic methods. Prerequi- 
sites: 38.101, 14.101, and Consent of In- 
structor. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



38.401 SEX EDUCATION AND FAMILY LIFE (3) 
Designed for the present and future teacher, 
the course includes an overview of human 
sexuality. Emphasis will be placed on the 
need for education about sexuality, theories 
of sexual education, selection of content, 
sequential unit planning, survey and avail- 
ability of A-V materials and the qualifications 
of the effective sex educator. Prerequisites: 
38.221 or 38.101, 70.201, 14.101. 

38.402 HEALTH SEMINAR (3) Examination of 
recent trends in school and public health, 
reports of student projects, consultation with 
experts in health field. Prerequisite: Consent 
of department. 

38.403 HEALTH EDUCATION CURRICULUM (3) 
Development of school health education pro- 
grams based on health needs and problems 
of school children. Prerequisite: 38.101, 
38.201. 

38.405 DRUGS IN OUR CULTURE (3) An in- 
depth review of harmless, harmful, useful 
and useless substances which may affect 



behavior or mood; the interaction of psy- 
chological, sociological and physiological 
components is included. Prerequisite: 38.101. 

38.451 ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH 
(3) An examination of the inter-relationship 
between man and his environment. Emphasis 
is placed upon health aspects of pollution, 
housing, sanitation, radiation, behavioral 
disorders and epidemiology. Prerequisites: 
38.101, 80.101. 

38.485 HEALTH WORKSHOP (3) For teachers, 
administrators, and individuals concerned 
about health related fields. Contemporary 
health aspects are considered with emphasis 
on implementation of positive behavior 
aimed at improving the health of the indi- 
vidual and the community. Enrollment is 
limited to 25. Prerequisite: Consent of 
Department. 

38.497 HEALTH DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) 
Independent reading in health or related 
disciplines. Prerequisite: A minimum of 10 
credits in health and consent of Department 
Chairman. 



Graduate 

38.501 PROBLEMS IN SCHOOL HEALTH (3) 
Designed to assist the student in developing 
an understanding of current problems in 
school health programs. The structure, 
organization, scope, content and practices 
in the field as revealed through literature 
and research is studied. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of department. 



38.511 CURRENT LITERATURE IN HEALTH (3) 
Critical analysis of current and past research 
findings concerning health knowledge, atti- 
tudes, behavior, and educational techniques. 
A comprehensive review of health-related 
periodicals is included. Prerequisite: Under 
graduate major in health, consent of in- 
structor, or 15 semester hours of health. 



HEALTH SCIENCE 123 



38.513 ANALYSIS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CON- 
CEPTS (3) Analysis of research and lab- 
oratory applications of the physiological 
factors that affect human efficiency before, 
during, and after exercise. Factors to be in- 
vestigated include: metabolism, circulation- 
respiration, muscular physiology, endocrine 
system, ergogenic aids, environmental fac- 
tors, etc. Prerequisite: Consent of Depart- 
ment chairman. 



38.597 DIRECTED READINGS IN HEALTH (3) 
Individual study of a significant problem in 
health through consultation with appropriate 
faculty members. Emphasis is on increased 
know/ledge of health. Prerequisite: Under- 
graduate major in health, consent of In- 
structor, or 15 semester hours of health. 



Major in Medical Technology (Dr. Carl V. Henrikson, Director) 

The four year program is designed to prepare allied health personnel for special- 
ized work in hospital and medical laboratories and leads to the Bachelor of Science 
degree in Medical Technology. It provides sufficient background for the student 
to pass the medical technologist's examination for certification. 

Requirements for the Medical Technology Major 

In addition to the General College Requirements, the following courses are re- 
quired of Medical Technology Majors: Biology; 14.101 Contemporary General 
Biology, 14.113 Human Anatomy and Physiology, 14.114 Human Anatomy and 
Physiology, 14.315 Medical Microbiology, four elective hours. Chemistry; 22.101 
General Chemistry, 22.102 General Chemistry, 22.230 Essentials of Organic 
Chemistry, 22.210 Principles and Mechanisms of Chemical Analysis, four elective 
hours. Other Required Courses; 38.101 Current Health Problems, 50.115 Algebra 
and Trigonometry, 66.213 General Physics. Strongly Recommended Courses; 
14.421 Immunology, 14.401 Genetics, 22.351 Biochemistry. Recommended Courses; 
14.221 Introduction to Animal Parasitology, 38.204 Nutrition. 

Ninety-six credit hours are to be completed in the first three years at Towson 
State College. During the fourth year, thirty-two credit hours are to be com- 
pleted at Union Memorial Hospital, St. Joseph's Hospital, or other appropriate 
hospital determined by Towson State College. Before beginning the fourth year 
at the affiliated hospital, students must attain at least a 2.0 cumulative average, 
a minimum grade of C in all Biology and Chemistry courses, and be accepted by 
the respective hospital screening committee. During the fourth year, the twelve 
month course of study in the hospital includes: 



Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

51.401-402 BLOOD BANK (0,3) Methods used 
in collecting blood and procedures required 
in preparing blood for blood bank. 

51.403-404 CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY (0.8) 
Biochemical tests used in all medical diag- 
nosis. 

51.405-406 HEMATOLOGY (0,8) Blood cell 
morphology and various tests to determine 
their presence. 

51.407-408 HISTOLOGIC TECHNIQUE (0,2) 
Methods and stains used in preparing smears 
and permanent slides of tissues. 



51.409-410 DIAGNOSTIC MICROBIOLOGY (0,5) 
Stain preparations and chemical tests used 
in identifying bacteria and in diagnosing 
diseases caused by them. 

51.411-412 HUMAN PARASITOLOGY (0, 2) 
Microscopic identifications of all disease 
producing organisms other than those 
caused by bacteria. 

51.413-414 SEROLOGY (0,2) Identifications of 
the types of serous fluids and interpretations 
of tests showing these types. 

51.415-416 URINALYSIS (0.2) Microscopic ob- 
servations and chemical tests necessary to 
identify materials present in urine. 



124 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



History 



Professors; ANDREWS, BLUMBERG, J. COX, FALCO, KAHL (Chairman), KERR 

MATTHEWS, McCLEARY, MRUCK, ONION, RYON 
Associate Professors: BOLES, ESSLINGER, JOCHENS, LAREW, PIOTROWSKI, RIVERS, 

F. SANDERS, SCHOLNICK, VAN OSDELL 
Assistant Professors: HIRSCHMANN, D. MARTIN, McWILLIAMS, NZEADIBE, SCARPACI, 

SLADEK. WHITMAN 
instructor: ELDRIDGE 

The Department offers a major to encourage the student to explore in some 
depth the study of history. Such investigation, performed well, leads to an appre- 
ciation of the structure and function of the discipline, prepares the student for 
graduate work, and offers excellent background for many careers, particularly 
teaching and certain types of government service. The student is expected to 
take correlative courses which broaden his academic background and offer valu- 
able insights into his major subject. The Department of History also strongly 
recommends the completion of two years of a foreign language. 

The Department offers an honors program in history. Eligibility require- 
ments and rules governing the college honors program are described elsewhere 
in this Bulletin. Students interested in the history honors program should con- 
sult their advisers and the Chairman of the Department. 

Requirements for the Major 

Thirty-six credit hours are required for a major in history, eighteen of which 
must be 40.145, 40.146; and six hours from the Western Civilization series 
(40.262, 40.263 or 40.264) ; three hours from 40.290, 40.490, 40.498 (once a 
student has reached senior standing he is not eligible to take 290 and must 
choose from 490 or 498) ; and three hours in Asian, African or Latin American 
• history. At least twelve hours must be in upper division courses. Further details 
about requirements and policies concerning the major may be obtained in the 
Department office. Majors should register with the Department and select an 
academic adviser during the second semester of the freshman year or at the 
beginning of the sophomore year. 

HISTORY COURSES (HIST) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

40.109 (109) INTRODUCTION TO THE CIVILI- 
ZATION OF THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT 
(3) The development of the civilization of 
South Asia with emphasis on the rise of 
British rule and its replacement by the re- 
publics of Pakistan, India and Ceylon. 

40.110 (110) INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN 
CIVILIZATION: CHINA AND JAPAN (3) An 
outline of the development of the civilizations 
of China and Japan, with emphasis on prin- 
cipal cultural and political themes. 

40.121 (321) LATIN AMERICA, COLONIAL 
PERIOD (3) The political, economic, and 
social developments in Portuguese and 
Spanish America from the pre-Columbian 
period to the movements for independence. 

40.122 (322) LATIN AMERICA, NATIONAL 
PERIOD (3) The struggle for political, eco- 
nomic and social stability, international rela- 
tions and cultural patterns in the develop- 



ment of independent Latin America in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

40.133 (001) THE AFRICAN WORLD I (3) A 
multi-disciplinary approach to the study of 
African people from about 4500 B.C. to the 
fifteenth century. 

40.134 (002) THE AFRICAN WORLD II (3) A 
multi-disciplinary approach to the study of 
African people south of the Sahara from the 
fifteenth century to the present. 

40.145 (221) HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

I (3) Political, economic, social, and cul- 
tural forces which shaped the pattern of life 
in the United States from the founding of the 
colonies to 1865. 

40.146 (22) HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

II (3) Continuation of 40.145 from 1865 to 
the present. 

40.201 (303) SURVEY OF ENGLISH HISTORY 
TO 1783 (3) Evolution of the political, legal, 



125 



social, economic, and cultural institutions of 
England and the spread of the Empire over- 
seas. The triumph of Parliament over the 
monarcny and the development of individual 
rights of Englishmen. 

40.202 (304) BRITISH HISTORY SINCE 1783 (3) 
Struggle against France, the Industrial Revo- 
lution, and the rise of the bourgeoisie to 
political control. The spread of empire, the 
symbolism of the Victorian era, and the 
evolution of democratic processes. 

40.262 (262) HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZA- 
TION I (3) Political, social, economic, and 
Intellectual forces which shaped the pattern 
of Near Eastern and European life from the 



Stone Ages through the decline of the 
Roman Empire. 

40.263 (121) HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZA- 
TION II (3) Political, social, economic, and 
Intellectual forces which shaped the pattern 
of western life from post-Roman times 
through the seventeenth century. 

40.264 (122) HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZA- 
TION Ml (3) Political, social, economic, and 
intellectual forces which shaped the pattern 
of western life from the seventeenth century 
to the present. 

40.290 (290) INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL 
STUDY (3) Survey of historical writings, the 
theory of history, introduction to research. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



40.301 (301) ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN CIVILI- 
ZATIONS (3) The civilizations of Mesopo- 
tamia and Egypt and the peripheral develop- 
ments in Syria-Palestine and Asia Minor. 
Prerequisite: 40.262 or consent of the in- 
structor. 

40.302 (302) CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS (3) 
The civilizations of Greece and Republican 
Rome with emphasis on their comparative 
developments to 30 B.C. Prerequisite: 40.262 
or consent of the instructor. 

40.303 (303) HELLENISTIC CIVILIZATION (3) 
The civilization that arose in the Mediter- 
ranean Basin after the conquests of Alex- 
ander and the Roman Empire within this 
context. Prerequisite: 40.262 or consent of 
the instructor. 

40.309 (309) HISTORY OF EAST ASIA UNTIL 
THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (3) The his- 
torical development of the civilizations of 
China, Japan, and Korea prior to the intru- 
sion by the Western powers, with special 
emphasis on the evolution of the Confucian 
culture of China. Prerequisite: 40.110 or con- 
sent of the Instructor. 

40.310 (310) HISTORY OF EAST ASIA SINCE 
1600 (3) A study of the historical develop- 
ment of China, Japan, and Korea in the past 
three centuries focusing on their respective 
responses to the Western World. Prerequi- 
sites: 40.110, or 40.309 or consent of the 
instructor. 

40.311 (367) HISTORY OF INDIA TO 1750 (3) 
A survey of the history and culture of the 
Indian subcontinent from prehistoric times 
to the beginning of the British Raj. Prerequi- 
site: Six hours of history or consent of the 
Instructor. 

40.312 (368) HISTORY OF MODERN INDIA AND 
PAKISTAN (3) The history of the Indian 
subcontinent since 1750, stressing the rise 
of British power, the colonial experience, the 
development of nationalist movements, and 
the problems of statehood in present-day 
India, Pakistan, Ceylon, and Nepal. Pre- 
requisite: Six hours of history or consent of 
the instructor. 



40.313 (313) HISTORY OF MODERN SOUTH- 
EAST ASIA (3) The development of Burma, 
Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia, 
Vietnam, and the Philippines since 1500, 
with emphasis on the colonial experience 
and development of modern nationhood. Pre- 
requisite: Six hours of history or consent of 
the Instructor. 

40.316 (459) CHINESE HISTORY SINCE 1800 
(3) China from the beginnings of the West- 
ern penetration through the Nationalist and 
Communist revolutions of the twentieth cen- 
tury. Prerequisite: 40.110 and 40.264 or con- 
sent of the instructor. 

40.317 (317) HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN (3) 
The political, economic, and cultural aspects 
of Japan's rapid modernization from the 
mid-nineteenth century and her subsequent 
expansion, defeat, and recovery. Prerequi- 
site: Nine hours of history to Include either 
40.110 or 40.310 or consent of the instructor. 

40.321 (321) HISTORY OF MEXICO: PRE- 
COLUMBIAN AND COLONIAL (3) The po- 
litical, economic, social, and cultural de- 
velopments from early Pre-Columbian civili- 
zations to the movement for independence. 
Prerequisite: Six hours of lower division 
history. 

40.322 (322) HISTORY OF MEXICO: NATIONAL 
PERIOD (3) The political, economic, social, 
and cultural developments from Independ- 
ence to the present. Prerequisite: Six hours 
of lower division history. 

40.327 (327) SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HIS- 
TORY OF LATIN AMERICA (3) A study of 
the impact of ideas on the organization of 
Latin American society In different epochs. 
Prerequisites: 40.121, 40.122 or consent of 
the instructor. 

40.333 (430) SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (3) Se- 
lected aspects of the development of African 
cultures, emphasizing changing assumptions 
and Interpretations and the contributions of 
other disciplines to the reconstruction of 
Africa's past. Prerequisite: Six hours of his- 
tory, or three hours of history and three 
hours of anthropology, archeology, linguis- 
tics, or political science; or consent of the 
instructor. 



126 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



40.334 (334) HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA, 1500- 
1885 (3) The cultural, social, economic, 
and political institutions of the West African 
pople from 1500 to 1885 with emphasis on 
the contributions made to African history by 
the Ashanti, the Old Oyo, the Dahomey, and 
the Bini. Prerequisite: 40.133 or 40.134 or 
80.207 or consent of the instructor. 

40.335 (335) A HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY 
AFRICA (3) The political, economic, cul- 
tural, and intellectual forces which shaped 
the lives of the African people since World 
War II. Prerequisite: 40.133 or 40.134 or 
40.264. 

40.345 (345) THE AMERICAN COLONIES: 1492- 
1763 (3) Founding and the political, eco- 
nomic, and social development of the Ameri- 
can colonies. Prerequisite: 40.145, or 40.263 
or consent of the instructor. 

40.346 (340) THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY 
PERIOD: 1763-1789 (3) From the end of the 
Seven Years' War to the ratification of the 
Constitution. Prerequisite: 40.145 or 40.263 
or consent of the instructor. 

40.347 (346) THE EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD 
(3) The United States from the Constitu- 
tional Convention to the Election of 1820. 
The Federalist Decade and the Jeffersonian 
Era. Prerequisite: 40.145. 

40.348 (347) THE JACKSONIAN ERA (3) The 
United States from 1815 to 1845; political, 
social, and economic currents of the period. 
Prerequisite: 40.145. 

40.349 (348) CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUC- 
TION I (3) Sectional crises leading to the 
Civil War; political, economic, and social 
issues arising during the years of the war 
and Reconstruction. First semester to the 
end of the Civil War. Prerequisite: 40.145 
and 40.146. 

40.350 (349) CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUC- 
TION II (3) Continuation of 40,349 from the 
election of Lincoln to 1877. Prereonisite: 
40.145 and 40.146. 

40.351 (337) THE GILDED AGE (3) History 
the United States from 1877 to 1892 with 
emphasis on the political, economic, and 
social questions of the era. Prerequisite: 
40.145 and 40.146. 

40.352 (338) THE POPULIST-PROGRESSIVE 
ERA (3) History of the United States from 
1892-1920 with emphasis on the political, 
economic, and social questions of the era. 
Prerequisite: 40.145 and 40.146. 

40.359 (350) RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY, 
1920-1945 (3) History of the United States 
from the 1920's through World War II, with 
emphasis on the presidential years of Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt. Prerequisite: 40.146. 

40.360 (351) RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY 
SINCE 1945 (3) History of the United States 
from World War II to the present, including 
political, social, economic, and diplomatic 
developments. Prerequisite: 40.146. 



40.361 (413) AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HIS- 
TORY TO 1859 (3) Main issues in American 
thought from the colonial period to the pub- 
lication of Darwin's The Origin of Species. 
Emphasis on religious thought, political 
theory, and ideas in literature. Prerequisite: 
40.145 or 30.211. 

40.362 (414) AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HIS- 
TORY SINCE 1859 (3) Main issues in Amer- 
ican thought from the publication of Darwin's 
The Origin of Species to contemporary times. 
Emphasis on religious thought, social theory, 
ideas in literature and philosophy. Prerequi- 
site: 40.146 or 30.212. 

40.363 (415) SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES I (3) History of American life from 
the seventeenth century to the present, 
focusing on problems relating to social struc- 
ture, popular culture, religious and educa- 
tional institutions. First semester to 1865. 
Prerequisite: 40.145. 

40.364 (416) SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES II (3) Continuation of 40.363 from 
1865 to the present. Prerequisite: 40.146. 

40.365 (333) ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES I (3) American economic 
development with an emphasis upon trends 
and problems of contemporary importance, 
colonial times to 1865. Prerequisite: 40.145. 

40.366 (334) ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES II (3) Continuation of 
40.365 from 1865 to the present. Prerequi- 
site: 40.146. 

40.367 (402) CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF 
THE UNITED STATES 1 (3) Development 
of American constitutionalism in theory and 
practice to 1868. Prerequisite: 40.145. 

40.368 (403) CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF 
THE UNITED STATES II (3) Continuation of 
40.367 since 1868. Prerequisite: 40.146. 

40.369 (451) DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES TO 1900 (3) Evolution of 
the American national interest in foreign re- 
lations with Europe. Latin America, and the 
Far East from colonial times to 1900. Empha- 
sis upon the changing character and role of 
objectives, policies, commitments, and 
forces. Prerequisite: 40.145 and 40.146. 

40.370 (452) DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES SINCE 1900 (3) Continua- 
tion of 40.369 to the present with added in- 
terest in the emergence of the United States 
as a major world power. The role of the 
United States in modern warfare, world wide 
economic and financial affairs, overseas ex- 
pansion, the diplomatic impact of conflict 
in ideologies, and current international crisis. 
Prerequisite: 40.145 and 40.146. 

40.371 (371) UNITED STATES RELIGIOUS HIS- 
TORY I (3) The interactions between reli- 
gion, society, reform, and education in the 
American past. Emphasis on how religious 
ideals have shaped American institutions and 
character. First semester to 1865. Prerequi- 
site: 40.145. 



HISTORY 127 



40.372 (372) UNITED STATES RELIGIOUS HIS- 
TORY II (3) Continuation of 40.371 since 
1865. Prerequisite: 40.146. 

40.373 (373) THE AMERICAN FRONTIER I (3) 
The westward movement of the American 
people and the effect of the frontier process 
on the social, economic, and political insti- 
tutions of the United States and on the atti- 
tudes of the American people to 1840. Pre- 
requisite: 40.145. 

40.374 (374) THE AMERICAN FRONTIER II (3) 
Continuation of 40.373 since 1840. Prerequi- 
site: 40.146. 

40.375 (405) THE CITY IN AMERICAN HISTORY 
(3) The development of the city and its 
Impact on American social, cultural, intellec- 
tual, political, and economic life. Prerequi- 
site: 40.145, 40.146 or two of the following: 
34.391, 80.344, 68.305 or consent of the in- 
structor. 

40.377 (407) THE IMMIGRANT IN AMERICAN 
HISTORY (3) The history of the immigrant 
experience in America from the colonial 
period to the present. Emphasis on migra- 
tion patterns, receptivity of native society, 
assimilation and acculturation processes. 
Prerequisite: 40.145 and 40.146. 

40.379 (379) INDIAN-WHITE RELATIONS IN 
AMERICAN HISTORY (3) The interplay of 
societal attitudes, cultural beliefs, and official 
government policy and their impact on the 
Indian population of North America, from 
1492 to the present. Prerequisite: Three 
hours of American history. 

40.381 (417) HISTORY OF BLACK AMERICANS 
(3) History of Americans of African ances- 
try from their West African background to 
the present. Emphasis on black Americans' 
thought, activities, organizations, and their 
role in developing America. Prerequisite: 
40.145 and 40.146. 

40.391 (418) HISTORY OF CANADA (3) Ca- 
nadian history with emphasis on the period 
since 1867. Particular attention will be given 
to the problems of cultural dualism and con- 
federation. Prerequisite: 40.145, 40.146, 
40.263, and 40.264. 

40.397 (320) HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF 
MARYLAND (3) Political, social, and eco- 
nomic development of the state and its rela- 
tions to major events in the development of 
the nation. Natural resources; regional land 
use; industrial development, particularly in 
the Baltimore area. Field trips. $15.00 field 
trip fee payable by the time of registration. 
Prerequisite: 40.145, 40.146, 34.101, and 
34.102. 

40.400 (420) SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY 
(3) Reading and research dealing with a 
phase of history to be selected by the in- 
structor; considerable attention to sources 
and historiography. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor and fifteen hours of history in- 
cluding either 40.290 or 40.490 or 40.498. 

128 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



40.401 (357) MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION I (3) 
The principal currents of political, social, in- 
tellectual, and artistic developments In 
medieval Europe from the early middle ages 
to about 1050. Prerequisite: 40.263. 

40.402 (358) MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION II (3) 
Continuation of 40.401 — the high middle 
ages, 1050 to 1350. Prerequisite: 40.263. 

40.403 (362) EUROPE IN TRANSITION 1300- 
1530 (3) Political, economic, social, and 
cultural changes in late medieval and Ren- 
aissance Europe. Prerequisite: 40.262 and 
40.263. 

40.404 (363) THE REFORMATION (3) Religious, 
political, economic, and social changes in 
Reformation and Catholic (Counter-) Ref- 
ormation Europe. Prerequisite: 40.262 and 
40.263. 

40.405 (363) EUROPE: 1648-1815 (3) European 
state system and expansion of European 
civilization; intellectual growth and class re- 
lationships culminating in the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon. Prerequisite: 40.263 and 
40.264. 

40.406 (364) EUROPE: 1815-1914 (3) Major 
economic, political, social, and intellectual 
currents of the period. The effects of the 
industrial revolution, the development of 
nationalism and imperialism, and the origins 
of World War I. Prerequisite: 40.263 and 
40.264. 

40.407 (463) EUROPE: 1914-1939 (3) Events 
leading to World War I, the conflict, and the 
peace which followed. The rise of conflicting 
political ideologies and the road to World 
War II. Prerequisite: 40.263 and 40.264. 

40.408 (464) EUROPE SINCE 1939 (3) World 
War II — diplomacy, strategy, and results. The 
economic, social, and political recovery of 
post-War Europe and the development of 
new alliance structures. Prerequisite: 40.263 
and 40.264. 

40.413 (425) EUROPEAN MILITARY HISTORY 
SINCE 1815 (3) The major wars, and inter- 
war military developments of post-Napol- 
eonic Europe seen in the context of diplo- 
matic, economic, and technological history. 
Prerequisite: 40.264 or consent of the in- 
structor. 

40.415 (426) DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF EU- 
ROPE: 1815-1939 (3) A study in depth, with 
emphasis upon specific diplomatic crises. 
Prerequisite: 40.264. 

40.417 (328) ECONOMIC HISTORY OF EUROPE 

I (3) The modern economic institutions of 
Western Europe. The commercial revolution, 
the industrial revolution, and the age of mass 
production and technology to 1750. Pre- 
requisite: 40.263. 

40.418 (329) ECONOMIC HISTORY OF EUROPE 

II (3) Continuation of 40.417 since 1750. 
Prerequisite: 40.264. 



40.421 (470) BRITAIN IN THE TWENTIETH 
CENTURY (3) The role of Britain, the Com- 
monwealth, and the Empire. Social reform 
and World War I. Efforts to recover economic 
equilibrium. World War II. Decline of the 
Empire and Socialism. Prerequisite: 40.263 
and 40.264. 

40.431 (428) FRANCE: 1763-1871 (3) Old Re- 
gime and the impact of successive revolu- 
tions upon French society. Emphasis upon 
the role of France In the growth of European 
liberalism and nationalism. Prerequisite: 
40.264. 

40.441 (460) MODERN GERMANY: 1871-1945 
(3) Brief topical analysis of the nineteenth 
century background. Concentration on the 
Bismarckian Empire, Weimar Republic and 
the Third Reich, emphasizing the interrela- 
tionships between internal developments and 
Germany's role in Europe and the world. 
Prerequisite: 40.264. 

40.451 (423) RUSSIA TO 1894 (3) From Kievan 
Rus to the reign of Nicholas II. Prerequisite: 
40.263 and 40.264 or consent of the instruc- 
tor. 

40.452 (424) RUSSIA SOVIET UNION SINCE 
1894 (3) From the reign of Nicholas II to 
the present. Prerequisite: 40.263 and 40.264 
or consent of the instructor. 

40.461 (419) SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 
(3) Reading and research dealing with a 
phase of history to be selected by the In- 
structor; considerable attention to sources 
and historiography. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor and fifteen hours of history 
including either 40.290 or 40.490 or 40.498. 

40.463 (433) INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF 
WESTERN CIVILIZATION I (3) Religious 
and scientific thought in the context of broad 
historical trends; social theory also consid- 
ered. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reforma- 
tion history covered briefly; emphasis on 
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Pre- 
requisite: 40.264 or consent of the instructor. 

40.464 (434) INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF 
WESTERN CIVILIZATION II (3) Continua- 
tion of 40.463 from 1800 to the present. Pre- 
requisite: 40.264 or consent of the instructor. 

40.477 (435) MODERN WESTERN COLONIAL- 
ISM (3) Expansion of Western culture and 
Institutions with particular reference to their 
effects on the peoples of Asia and Africa in 
the period since 1870. Prerequisite: 40.264. 

40.479 (437) A HISTORY OF DIPLOMACY (3) 
Evolution from its origins to the present with 
emphasis on the modern period. Historic 
changes which shifting ideologies and new 
technologies have wrought in the role of 
the diplomat. Prerequisite: 40.263 and 
40.264. 

40.483 (483) MODERN JEWISH HISTORY TO 
1948 (3) The political, cultural, and socio- 
economic experiences of World Jewry with 
emphasis on developments since the French 
Revolution. Prerequisite: 40.264. 



40.490 (490) INTERPRETIVE PROBLEMS IN 
HISTORY (3) An in-depth study of histori- 
cal interpretations of selected topics. Pre- 
requisite: Twelve hours of history. 

40.491 (214, 215, 216, 217) BIOGRAPHICAL 
STUDIES IN HISTORY (3) A study of se- 
lected historical figures who have shaped 
or refected the past. Figures to be selected 
by the instructor. Prerequisite: Six hours of 
history. 

40.492 (492) HISTORICAL THEMES (3) A study 
through lectures and discussions of a his- 
torical topic selected by the instructor. Pre- 
requisite: Six hours of history appropriate 
to the topic as determined by the Instructor. 

40.493 (493) PRACTICUM (2-6) Experience de- 
signed to combine the research and content 
of history with work in historical libraries, 
museums, archival depositories, and similar 
agencies. No more than six hours to be 
earned with any one agency. Prerequisite: 
Twenty-seven hours of history courses and 
consent of the Department Chairman. 

40.494 (490) TRAVEL AND STUDY (3-6) Coun- 
tries and topics to be selected by the De- 
partments and instructors sponsoring the 
program. For complete information, write the 
Chairman of the Department early in the fall 
of the academic year preceding the summer 
of intended study. Prerequisite: Upper divi- 
sion status and consent of the instructor. 

40.495 (495) SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE 
STUDIES (3) Reading and research in his- 
tory or related disciplines approached from 
a viewpoint that is primarily historical and 
dealing with specific topics, problems, or 
developments selected by the instructor(s). 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and 
fifteen hours of history including either 
40.290 or 40.490 or 40.498, or six hours of 
history and a research methods course and 
six additional hours of the related discipline. 

40.496 (496) COLLOQUIUM (3) Group discus- 
sion of reading in history or related disci- 
plines approached from a viewpoint that is 
primarily historical and dealing with broad 
periods, topics, problems or comparative de- 
velopments selected by the instructor(s). 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and 
fifteen hours of history or nine hours of 
history and six hours of the related dis- 
cipline. 

40.497 (485) DIRECTED READING (2-4) Inde- 
pendent reading in history or related dis- 
ciplines approached from a viewpoint that 
is primarily historical and dealing with spe- 
cific periods, topics, problems or compara- 
tive developments selected by the student 
in consultation with the instructor(s). Pre- 
requisite: Fifteen hours of history or nine 
hours of history and six hours of the related 
discipline and a minimum average of 3.00 of 
history and the related discipline and con- 
sent of the Department Chairman. 



HISTORY 129 



40.498 (498) PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (3) 
Metaphysical foundations of historical knowl- 
edge (epistomology) and metaphysical in- 
terpretations of the course of history. "Sci- 
entific" history, history of historical meta- 
physics. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of his- 
tory or six hours of history and 6 hours of 
philosophy. 



40.499 SENIOR THESIS (2-4) Research and 
the writing of a thesis, to be directed by a 
faculty member in a chosen area of special- 
ization. Prerequisite: Admission to Depart- 
mental Honors Program. 



Graduate Division 

40.599 (599) SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES 
HISTORY TO 1865 (3) Research dealing 
with a phase of United States history to 
1865 to be selected by the instructor. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing and consent of 
the instructor. 

40.600 (600) SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES 
HISTORY SINCE 1865 (3) Research dealing 
with a phase of United States history since 
1865 to be selected by the instructor. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing and consent of 
the instructor. 

40.661 (661) SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH CEN- 
TURY EUROPEAN HISTORY (3) Research 
dealing with a phase of nineteenth century 



European history to be selected by the in- 
structor. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
consent of the instructor. 

40.662 (662) SEMINAR IN TWENTIETH CEN- 
TURY EUROPEAN HISTORY (3) Research 
dealing with a phase of twentieth century 
European history to be selected by the in- 
structor. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
consent of the instructor. 

40.697 (697) DIRECTED READING IN HISTORY 
(2-4) Independent reading in areas of his- 
tory selected by the instructor and the stu- 
dent. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
consent of the instructor and Department 
Chairman, 



fh. 



130 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



International Studies 

Coordinator: ERIC A. BELGRAD 

I. Purpose: 

To provide an interdisciplinary system of courses which will lead to an arts and 
science major in international studies, with opportunities to specialize in foreign 
areas. The major program is designed to prepare students for graduate studies, 
for careers in government foreign service and other government agencies, and 
in commercial and industrial fields where foreign area specialists are required. 

II. Organization and Administration: 

The program is administered by a Committee composed of one representative 
from each of the following disciplines; economics, geography, history, political 
science and sociology. The current members of the Committee who will also 
serve as advisers to the students majoring in international studies are: Pritam 
T. Merani, Professor of Political Science (Chairman of the Committee) ; Arnold 
Blumberg, Professor of History; David Firman, Professor of Geography; 
Abolmajd Hojjati, Professor of Sociology; and Henry N. Sanborn, Professor 
of Economics. 

III. Scope: 

All students majoring in international studies will complete 33 credit hours of 
required courses (indicated under IV A) and 27 credit hours of related electives 
under one of the two plans listed below : 

Plan A — Functional Specialization (Non-Area) 

Under this plan, students will complete 27 elective credit hours of courses 
related to international affairs without concentration on any geographical area. 

Plan B — Area Specialization 

This plan is designed to focus on important world regions. Students will 
complete 27 credit hours in related elective courses which concern a particular 
nation or region. 

IV. Major Requirements: 

A. Required Courses for the major are as follows : 

1. Economics 9 credit hours 

24.101-102 Economic Principles and Problems 

6 credit hours 
24.327 International Economics 3 credit hours 

2. Geography 6 credit hours 

34.101-102 Elements of Geography 3 credit hours 

34.381 Political Geography 3 credit hours 

3. History 6 credit hours 

40.263-264 History of Western Civilization 6 credit hours 

OR 40.145-146 History of the United States 6 credit hours 

4. Political Science 9 credit hours 

68.303 Theory of International Politics 3 credit hours 

68.337 Comparative Governments of Foreign Powers 

OR 3 credit hours 

68.338 Comparative Governments of Foreign Powers 

3 credit hours 
68.427 Political Theory 3 credit hours 



131 



5. Sociology 3 credit hours 

80.101 Introduction to Sociology 3 credit hours 

OR 80.105 Introduction to Anthropology 3 credit hours 

B. Related Electives 27 credit hours 

These may be selected from any department which offers related electives, 
i.e., sociology, English, literature, languages, art, philosophy, etc. Such courses 
will be selected by students in consultations with advisers, in order to broaden 
and/or specialize as desired under Plans A or B. 

C. Foreign Language. 

A foreign language is required for the B.A. degree. Students must select one 
of several languages in relation to their foreign area or functional interests as de- 
termined by their advisers. A student should be prepared to demonstrate a work- 
able reading knowledge of that language. This requirement may be met by 
completing the intermediate course or equivalent of a modern foreign language. 

V. Transfer Students: 

Transfer Students must take a minimum of 18 credits of upper division courses 
in International Studies at Towson State to fulfill requirements for the major. 



132 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Mathematics 



Professors: PERREAULT, VOLPEL 

Associate Professors: BECKY, DAVIS, HANSON,' HASTE, HORAK, SIEGEL, 

ZIMMERMAN (Chairman), ZIPP 
Assistant Professors: CHEN, CHINN, DUSTIRA, FISCHER, GRAVES, JONES, KIM, 

ILGENFRITZ, KAPLON, LIDTKE, RIGGLEMAN, RUTENBERGS, SMITH, 

SWENSEN, WAGNER 
Instructors: JEFFERS, NEUBERT, ROSE 

The mathematics curriculum provides opportunities for students to do abstract 
reasoning applicable to many scientific or academic areas, to survey the field of 
mathematics, to study the applications of the discipline, to prepare for graduate 
work in mathematics, to become teachers of mathematics in the elementary and 
secondary schools, and to enter fields of industry and government requiring 
mathematics. 

Any student submitting mathematics credits vv^hich are more than ten years 
old at the time the student is admitted or readmitted, may be asked, after the 
records are reviewed by the department chairman, to repeat the courses or to 
substitute new ones. 

All students in the elementary education program or the early childhood 
education program are required to take both 50,204 and 50.205 or equivalent. 

Placement 

Each student should consult those portions of this catalog describing his major 
and minor programs to see whether specific mathematics courses are required 
or recommended. 

It is recommended that those students having at least 1^/2 years of high school 
algebra, ^/^ year of trigonometry and i/^ year of analytic geometry take the 
Mathematics Placement Test, which will cover the above subjects. Call 823-7500, 
ext. 296 by May 1st to register for this test. (It is expected that some, but not 
necessarily all, students who have had the above courses will enroll in Calculus I 
as an initial mathematics course at Towson). Those taking the Placement Test 
will be notified of the results and will be advised regarding placement in a mathe- 
matics course prior to registration. 

Students should enroll in that Mathematics course for which they have the 
necessary prerequisites, but for which they are not over-prepared, 

50.111 and 50.211 are courses specifically designed for students of business, 
economics, psychology and other social sciences. 

50.204 and 50.205 may be used to satisfy the group II general education 
requirements for elementary and early childhood education majors. 

For other majors, any mathematics or computer science course (with the 
exception of 50.010, 50.204, 50.205, 50.321 and 50.323) may be used to satisfy the 
group III required. 

Mathematics Minors 

All mathematics minors are required to take 50.261, 50.273, 50.274 and enough 
mathematics courses above the 100 level, excluding 50.201. 50.205, 50.211, 50.321, 
50.323 and 50.423, to make a total of 20 semester hours. At least one upper- 
division course, excluding computer science courses, must be taken; and at most 
one computer science course may be counted toward the minor. The program of 
the minor should be approved by the student's mathematics department advisor. 
(A minor in mathematics enables a student to meet the subject-matter require- 
ments for a Maryland secondary school teacher's certificate to teach mathe- 
matics.) 

MATHEMATICS 133 



students interested in the option, Elementary Education with Mathematics 
Minor should consult the Education section of the Bulletin. A student in this 
program must take 50.204 (Fundamental Concepts of Arithmetic) among the 
twenty required credit hours. A student in this program will be advised by the 
chairman, Elementary Education. In addition, the student should seek advice in 
the Mathematics Department. 

Mathematics Majors, Secondary Education Program 

All mathematics majors who plan to be secondary school teachers are required to 

take 50.261, 50.273, 50.274, 50.353, 50.361 plus enough mathematics courses at 

the 300 and 400 level to make a total of 30 semester hours in mathematics. One 

of the Computer Science courses, 23.337 or 23.338, may be counted in these 30 

hours, but not both. Physics 66.211 and 66.212, or 66.221 and 66.222 are also 

required. 

All students should do their student teaching in their senior year. Any student 
wishing to deviate from this policy must obtain permission from the Department 
of Mathematics, prior to the beginning of his junior year. 

Secondary education mathematics majors are required to take 50.423 and at 
least three upper-division courses of their mathematics major program at Towson 
State College. 

Students should consult the Education Department section in this Bulletin 
for additional course requirements for prospective secondary school teachers. 

Mathematics Majors, Arts and Science Program 

All mathematics majors in an arts and science program (therefore not necessarily 
prospective teachers of mathematics) are required to take 50.261, 50.273, 50.274, 
50.361, 50.365, 50.373, 50.473 and 50.474 plus enough 300 and 400 level mathemat- 
ics courses to make a total of 36 semester hours in mathematics. One of the Com- 
puter Science courses, 23.337 or 23.338, may be counted in these 36 hours, but 
not both. Physics 66.211 and 66.212, or 66.221 and 66.222, and computer Science 
23.235 are also required. 

Arts and science mathematics majors are required to take at least four 
upper-division courses of their mathematics major programs at Towson State 
College. 

Mathematics Majors and Minors 

Mathematics majors or minors who receive a grade of D in a 100 level course 

prerequisite to calculus must repeat the course no later than concurrent with 

calculus. 

Mathematics majors or minors must attain a grade of at least C in any 200, 
300 or 400 level course used as a prerequisite. Unless otherwise noted, prerequi- 
sites must be satisfield prior to taking a course. 

Mathematics Courses 

A note on the numbering system: The left digit of the course number indicates 
the level of the content. The middle digit of the course number indicates the 
area of the content: zero-general; 1-service; 2-mathematics education; 3-proba- 
bility and statistics, numerical analysis; 5-geometry; 6-algebra; 7-analysis; 9- 
readings, special topics, and seminars in mathematics. 

Service Division 

50.010 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (0) Real icals, functions, polynomial algebra, progres- 

number system, solutions of equations and sions and complex numbers. Prerequisite: 

inequalities in one and two variables, solu- One year high school algebra, 
tions of quadratic equations, exponents, rad- 

134 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

50.111 ALGEBRA FOR APPLICATIONS (3) In- 
tended primarily for students in business, 
economics, psychology and the social sci- 
ences. Included is an introduction to the 
real number system, inequalities, graphing 
of algebraic relations and basic algebraic 
techniques. The emphasis will be on appli- 
cations of linear equations, matrices, deter- 
minants, linear programming and simple 
games. Prerequisites: Two years high school 
algebra or 50.010. (Not open to mathe- 
matics majors or minors.) 

50.115 MATHEMATICS I (3) Real numbers and 
sets, equations and inequalities, functions 
(including logarithmic and exponential func- 
tions) and trigonometry. Prerequisites: High 
school geometry and two years of high 
school algebra; or 50.010. 

50.116 MATHEMATICS II (3) Complex num- 
bers; determinants; and analytic geometry of 
the line, plane, conies, and three-space sur- 
faces. Prerequisite: 50.115 or two years high 
school algebra and Va year trigonometry. 

50.119 PRE-CALCULUS (3) Real numbers, 
functions (including exponential, logarithmic, 
trigonometric and circular functions), ma- 
trices and determinants, analytic geometry 
using vectors in two- and three-space. Pre- 
requisite: IV2-2 years algebra, Vz year trig- 
onometry and V2 year analytic geometry. 

50.201 ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICS (3) 
Topics selected from systems of numeration, 
logic, sets, algebraic properties of real num- 
bers, abstract algebraic structures, proba- 
bility, and geometry. Prerequisite: One year 
of high school algebra. (Not open to mathe- 
matics majors, mathematics minors, early 
childhood education or elementary educa- 
tion students or any students who have 
received credit for any college level mathe- 
matics course.) 

50.204 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ARITH- 
METIC (3) Sets, systems of numeration, 
principles underlying fundamental opera- 
tions, and development of the number sys- 
tem through rational numbers. Prerequisite: 
One year of high school algebra. 'Required 
of all early childhood education and elemen- 
tary education students. Satisfies mathe- 
matics requirement for these students. Not 
open to others.) 

50.205 GENERAL COLLEGE MATHEMATICS (3) 
Elements of algebra and geometry, real num- 
bers, abstract systems, logic, probability and 
measurement. Prerequisite: 50.204. (Required 
of ail early childhood education and ele- 
mentary education students. Not open to 
others.) 



50.209 MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE (3) Com- 
pound interest and discount, amortization, 
sinking funds, annuities, and elements of 
insurance. Prerequisite: 50.111 or 50.115 or 
50.119 or equivalent. (No credit toward a 
mathematics major.) 

50.211 CALCULUS FOR APPLICATIONS (3) 
Intended primarily for students in business, 
economics, psycliology and the social sci- 
ences. Elements of differential and integral 
calculus from an intuitive standpoint with 
emphasis on the use of calculus in the 
above fields. Exponential and logarithmic 
functions, sequences and series included. 
Prerequisite: 50.111 or 50.115 or 50.116 or 
50.119. (Not open to mathematics majors or 
minors.) 

50.231 BASIC STATISTICS (3) Frequency dis- 
tributions with emphasis on binomial and 
normal distributions, percentiles, measures 
of central tendency and variability, sampling 
theory, tests of hypotheses, regression anal- 
ysis, correlations, and analysis of variance 
or time series. Emphasis will be placed on 
practical applications of statistics. Prerequi- 
site: 50.111 or 50.115 or equivalent. (Not 
open to mathematics majors.) 

50.25.1 GRAPH THEORY (3) A course designed 
as a general education mathematics course 
for students with an interest in the social 
sciences. Also of interest to elementary edu- 
cation majors. Covers concepts and uses of 
graph theory. Applications from sociology, 
economics, genetics, games, etc. Prerequi- 
site: Three years high school mathematics 
or any college mathematics course or con- 
sent of instructor. 

50.261 FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS (3) 
Logic, sets and functions, cardinality, intro- 
duction to algebraic structures, and mathe- 
matical induction. Prerequisite: 50.116 or 
50.119 or consent of instructor. 

50.273 CALCULUS I (4) Functions, limits and 
continuity; introduction to sequences; differ- 
entiation of algebraic, inverse, and trans- 
cental functions; mean value theorem; dif- 
ferentials; completeness property of the real 
numbers; application. Prerequisite: 50.116 
or 50.119 or Calculus course in high school 
or adequate score on Placement Test. 

50.274 CALCULUS II '4) Definite and indefinite 
integrals, formal integration and applica- 
tions; indeterminate forms; sequences and 
series of numbers, and power series. Pre- 
requisite: 60.273. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

Upper division courses not marked with an 
asterisk (*) may be submitted for mathematics 
credit to the graduate school for the master's 
degree in education provided they have not been 
submitted for undergraduate credit. 



■50.001 STATISTICS — A PRACTICAL AP- 
PROACH (4) The theory and practice of 
basic statistical analysis and inference with 
emphasis on analyzing and solving real 
problems using statistics. Descriptive sta- 



MATHEMATICS 135 



tistfcs, introduction to probability, sampling 
distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, 
regression, correlation, nonparametric tech- 
niques and analysis of variance. Computer 
programming will be incorporated through- 
out the course. Prior knowledge of program- 
ming is not necessary. This is an experi- 
mental course. Prerequisite: 50.274, which 
may be tal<en concurrently. (Not open to 
students who have taken 50.332.) 

50.002 MATHEMATICAL MODELS (3) Consid- 
eration of some mathematical problems in 
sociology, psychology, economics, manage- 
ment science and ecology and developing 
appropriate mathematical models and tech- 
niques to solve them using ordinary differ- 
netial equations and convexity. Prerequisite: 
50.274 or consent of instructor. 

*50.321 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (2 or 3) Materials 
of instruction and methods of presentation 
with emphasis on the discovery approach. 
Prerequisites: 50.204 and 50.205. (No credit 
toward a mathematics major or minor.) 

*50.323 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOL (2 or 3) Nature of in- 
struction, organization of units of instruc- 
tion, provisions for developing understand- 
ings, new programs and research findings, 
and techniques of evaluation. Required of 
all elementary education majors. Prerequi- 
sites: 50.204 and 50.205. (No credit toward 
a mathematics major or minor.) 

50.325 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL (3) Philosophy, learning, 
teaching models, specific methods ap- 
proaches, planning for teaching and learn- 
ing, and applicable contemporary curricula 
in the middle school mathematics curricu- 
lum. Prerequisites: 50.261 and 50.273 and 
approval of Instructor. (No credit toward a 
mathematics major or minor). 

50.331 PROBABILITY (3) Probability in sample 
spaces, discrete and continuous random 
variables, distribution theory, Tchebyshev's 
theorem, central limit theorem, expected 
values and moments. Prerequisite: 50.274, 
which may be taken concurrently. 

50.332 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS (3) Sam- 
ple theory and distributions, point estima- 
tion, confidence intervals, tests of hypoth- 
eses, regression, correlation and analysis of 
variance. Prerequisite: 50.331. (Offered only 
in the spring semester of the academic year.) 

*50.351 ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY (3) De- 
signed to give the elementary education stu- 
dent additional background in geometry. In- 
volves geometric definitions, vocabulary and 
techniques, constructions and scale draw- 
ings, and measurement of plane and space 
figures. Prerequisite: 50.205. (Not open to 
mathematics majors.) 

'50.353 ELEMENTARY GEOMETRY FROM AN 
ADVANCED STANDPOINT (3) Review of 
synthetic Euclidean geometry; non-Euclid- 
ean geometries; finite geometries and sys- 



tems of axioms; classical theorems; elemen- 
tary transformations. Prerequisites: 50.261 
and 50.273. (No credit toward a mathematics 
major for arts and science students.) 

50.357 COLLEGE GEOMETRY (3) Projective 
geometry, both synthetic and analytic, in- 
cluding duality; Desargues theorem, har- 
monic sequences. Pappus theorem, homog- 
eneous coordinates, conies, polarities. Pre- 
requisites: 50.261 and 50.273. (Offered only 
in the fall semester of the academic year.) 

50.361 ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES (4) Groups, 
rings, fields, integral domains, and poly- 
nomial rings. Prerequisite: 50.261. 

50.365 LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) Matrices, vector 
spaces, determinants, systems of linear 
equations, linear transformations, character- 
istic vectors and values, canonical forms. 
Prerequisite: 50.361. 

50.367 THEORY OF NUMBERS (3) Theory of 
prime numbers, the division algorithm, the 
fundamental theorem of arithmetic, poly- 
nomials, congruences, number theoretic 
functions. Prerequisite: 50.261. 

50.373 CALCULUS ill (4) Differential and in- 
tegral calculus of functions of several vari- 
ables; differential and integral calculus of 
vector valued functions, including the diver- 
gence and Stokes theorems; selected topics 
from Fourier series, Laplace transform, 
special functions and differential equations. 
Prerequisite: 50.274. 

50.421 MATHEMATICS EDUCATION FOR iN- 
SERVICE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACH- 
ERS (1-4) Selected topics in the teaching 
of elementary school mathematics. (Open 
only to in-service personnel in elementary 
education who have not had 50.204 or 50.205 
or equivalent within the last five years. Grad- 
uate credit only with prior approval of ad- 
visor.) 

*50.423 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOLS (3) Objectives of math- 
ematics instruction, examination of courses 
of study and textbooks, study of methods of 
teaching. Open only to students in the stu- 
dents in the student teaching block. Prere- 
quisites: 50.353 and 50.361. (No credit to- 
ward a mathematics major or minor.) 

50.427 READINGS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCA- 
TION FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
TEACHER (TBA) Directed study for the 
teacher of elementary school mathematics. 
Prerequisites: 50.321 or 50.323 and approval 
of instructor. (No credit toward a mathe- 
matics major.) 

50.429 READINGS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCA- 
TION FOR THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
TEACHER (TBA) Directed study for the 
teacher of secondary school mathematics. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (No credit 
toward a mathematics major for arts and 
science students.) 



136 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



50.435 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I (3) Error 
analysis, interpolation, nunnerical differentia- 
tion and integration, numerical solution of 
algebraic equations and of systems of alge- 
braic equations. Prerequisites: 23.235 and 
50.274. 23.235 may be taken concurrently. 
Offered only in the fall semester of the aca- 
demic year.) 

50.436 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II (3) Numeri- 
cal solution of differential equations. Least 
squares and its applications, linear program- 
ming and extensions of the concepts of 
50.435. Prerequisite: 50.435. (Offered only In 
the spring semester of the academic year.) 

50.451 MATH RESEARCH IN GRAPH THEORY 
(3) A course designed to give an advanced 
mathematics major the opportunity to do 
Independent, significant research in a field 
of mathematics through graph theory. Topics 
may include Hamiltonian and Euleriangraphs, 
coloring graphs, planar and non-planar 
graphs, connectivity problems and isomorph- 
ic graphs. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc- 
tor. 

50.457 D<FFERENTIAL GEOMETRY I (3) Curv- 
atures of curves and surfaces in E3, geo- 
desies, invariants, mappings and special 
surfaces. Prerequisite: 50.373. 

50.458 DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY II (3) Con- 
tinuation of 50.457. Prerequisite: 50.457. 

50.461 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ALGEBRA (3) 
Extension of the concepts of 50.361. Prere- 
quisite: 50.361. (Offered only in the fall se- 
mester of the academic year.) 

50.462 HOMOLOGY THEORY (3) Axioms and 
uniqueness of homology groups, singular 
homology theory, applications of the axioms, 
computations of homology groups. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 



50.471 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) Theory 

and application of linear ordinary differential 
equations. Solutions of non-linear ordinary 
differential equations of the first order. Pre- 
requisite: 50.274. 

50.473 ADVANCED CALCULUS I (3) Dedekind 
cuts; Euclidean spaces; compact and con- 
nected sets, continuity, uniform continuity, 
limits, sequences and completeness In a 
metric space; Heine-Borel theorem; Weier- 
strass theorem; numerical sequences and 
series; differentiation, mean value theorem 
and differentiation of vector valued functions. 
Prerequisites: 50.261 and 50.274. 

50.474 ADVANCED CALCULUS II (3) Riemann- 
Stieltjes integral, sequences and series of 
functions, convergence and uniform con- 
vergence, Stone-Weierstrass theorem, and 
functions of several variables. Prerequisite: 
50.473. (Offered only In the spring semester 
of the academic year.) 

50.475 COMPLEX ANALYSIS (3) Complex num- 
ber system, analytic functions, Cauchy's in- 
tegral theorem and integral formula, Taylor 
and Laurent series, isolated singularities, 
Cauchy's residue theorem and conformal 
mappings. Prerequisite: 50.373. (Offered only 
in the fall semester of the academic year.) 

50.477 TOPOLOGY (3) Basic concepts of point- 
set topology, separation axioms, compact 
and connected spaces, product and quotient 
spaces, convergence, continuity and homeo- 
morphisms. Prerequisite: 50.473. (Offered 
only in the spring semester of the academic 
year.) 

50.491 READINGS IN MATHEMATICS (TBA) 
Independent reading in selected areas of 
mathematics. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. (Open only to seniors.) 



Graduate Division 

50.501 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS (3) An 
historical survey of the classical roots of 
contemporary mathematics with selected top- 
ics chosen from number theory, geometry, 
analysis and algebra. Prerequisites: 50.274, 
50.353 or 50.357, and 50.361. 

50.521 SEMINAR IN TEACHING ARITHMETIC 
(3) Analysis of new topics, techniques, and 
materials in arithmetic instruction. Prerequi- 
site: 50.321 or 50.323. (No credit toward a 
mathematics major or minor.) 



50.525 SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS EDUCA- 
TION (3) An investigation of recent cur- 
ricula, methods, and materials in secondary 
school mathematics instruction. Prerequisite: 
50.423 or equivalent. 

G0.553 TOPICS IN GEOMETRY (3) Axiomatic 
development of Euclidean, elliptic and hyper- 
bolic geometries; the study of the analytic 
plane, the sphere and the Poincar6 model, 
as models for these axiomatic systems. Pre- 
requisites: 50.274 and 50.361. 



COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES 

23.211 INTRODUCTION TO DATA PROCESSING 
(3) An introduction to the concepts of data 
processing: definitions, historical background, 
punched card systems, computer systems, 
basic concepts of programming, I/O devices, 
source data, operating systems and data 
communication. (No credit toward a mathe- 
matics major.) 



23.212 COBOL PROGRAMMING (3) Study of 
COBOL language with students writing, test- 
ing and debugging programs, using cards, 
tapes, and disks. Applications will be from 
business data processing, including payroll, 
accounting, inventory, file maintenance and 
simulation. Prerequisites: 23.211 and 16.201 
or consent of instructor. (No credit toward 
a mathematics major.) 



MATHEMATICS 137 



23.235 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTING (3) 
A first course in computing to provide ttie 
student with tlie requisite knowledge and 
experience to use computers effectively in 
in the solution of numeric and non-numeric 
problems. Two lecture hours and two labo- 
ratory hours. Prerequisite: Two years of high 
school algebra or equivalent. (No credit to- 
ward a mathematics major.) 

23.313 PRACTICUM IN PERIPHERALS (3) A 
course limited to students preparing to teach 
data processing, giving practical experience 
with peripheral data processing equipment. 
Ten hours of laboratory per week in a data 
processing facility with varied supervised 
experiences. Evaluation by data processing 
facility supervisor and instructor. Prerequi- 
site: 23.212. (No credit toward a mathe- 
matics major.) 

23.315 SURVEY OF PROGRAMMING LAN- 
GUAGES (3) Survey of the significant fea- 
tures of existing programming languages 
with emphasis on understanding the con- 
cepts abstracted from those languages. The 
course covers: algorithmic languages such 
as ALGOL, problem oriented languages such 
as SNOBOL, theoretically interesting lan- 
guages such as LISP, and general purpose 
languages such as FORTRAN and PL/1. 
Prerequisites: 23.235 and 23.212 or 23.337. 
(No credit toward a mathematics major.) 

23.337 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCI- 
ENCE I (3) This course develops the back- 
ground for further study in computer science 
by developing a better understanding of 
programming techniques and computer orga- 
nization. Prerequisites: 23.235 and 50.273. 

23.338 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCI- 
ENCE II (3) A continuation of 23.337. Pre- 
requisites: 23.337 and 50.274. 



23.339 PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS (3) This 
course introduces the student to basic com- 
puter organization, machine language pro- 
gramming and the use of assembly language 
programming. Emphasis will be on the over- 
all structure of machines and programming 
systems. Prerequisite: 23.212 or 23.338. (No 
credit toward a mathematics major.) 

23.411 SYSTEMS AND DESIGN (3) A course 
designed to guide the student through the 
stages of the evolution of data processing 
systems including analyses of present in- 
formation flow, system specifications, equip- 
ment selection, and the implementation of 
the system to provide an understanding of 
the skill and knowledge needed for the ef- 
fective use of data processing equipment in 
meeting information needs. Prerequisite: 
23.339. (No credit toward a mathematics 
major.) 

23.437 FILE AND DATA STRUCTURES (3) This 
is a study of the relations which hold among 
elements of data involved in problems, the 
structures of storage media and machines, 
the methods which are useful in represent- 
ing structured data in storage, and the tech- 
niques of storing data; strings, arrays, linear 
and orthogonal lists. The representation of 
trees and graphs is covered. Storage sys- 
tems and structures, symbol tables, search- 
ing techniques and sorting techniques are 
developed. Formal specification of data 
structures in programming .languages and 
generalized data management systems are 
investigated. Prerequisite: 23.339, (No credit 
toward a mathematics major.) 



138 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Modern Languages 



Professors: MAGILL (Chairman), VIDAL-LLECHA, SHEETS 
Associate Professors: CACOSSA, GIRO, McDERMOTT, SABIN 
Assistant Professors: EVANS, HAUPT, LEVNO, POIRIER, RIEDNER 
Instructor: WEBER 
Visiting Lecturer: VRIGNAUD, BARRESI 



The purposes of the Modern Language Department are to offer language elec- 
tives to all students of the college, to offer the requirements for the teaching 
of a modern foreign language, and to offer a major or minor in French, German, 
and Spanish to students interested in acquiring reading comprehension and 
ability to converse with intelligibility in one or more of these languages. Russian, 
Hebrew, Japanese, Kiswahili, and Italian courses are offered on the lower levels 
and will be expanded as required by interest. 

Language Major 

A major consists of a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the intermediate level 
in the major language, as indicated in the outlines below; no more than half of 
the 30 credit hours may be transferred from other colleges; each major program 
includes at least 9 hours of literature courses at the 400 level. Any modification 
of this program, including adjustments for courses taken abroad, must be 
approved in writing by the department chairman. Teacher education candidates 
should note that the advanced grammar course is to be taken before they do their 
practice teaching. Students with home or family background in the language 
studied will have their programs, as described below, modified according to their 
proficiency in the language. 



Major Program in French & German 
composition & conversation (6 hours) 
survey of literature (6 hours) 

18 hours of electives from 

within the department's 

offerings in the target 

language, including 9 

hours of literature 

courses at the 400 level (18 hours) 



(6 hours) 
(6 hours) 



30 hours 



Major Program in Spanish 
composition & conversation (6 hours) 
survey of literature 
culture & civilization 
12 hours of electives from 

within the department's 

offerings in the target 

language, including 9 

hours of literature 

courses at the 400 level (12 hours) 

30 hours 



Language Minor 

The minor officially does not exist at Towson State College. The term "minor" 
refers to the Maryland State Department of Education teaching certificate require- 
ment. These are either (a) 24 hours of college credit in the particular language, 
or (b) 18 hours if two or more years were absolved in a secondary school after 
the ninth grade. In addition. Education 26.397 is required of teacher candidates. 

Policies Concerning Language 

The second semester of an elementary language course must be completed suc- 
cessfully before credit is granted for the first semester's work. 

The completion of the intermediate level, or its equivalent, is required of 
all candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. This requirement may be met 
by (a) completing two or more years of the language in high school plus the 
intermediate level course in college, (b) completing the elementary and inter- 



139 



mediate level courses in the language in college, (c) successfully completing an 
equivalence examination administered by the Department of Modern Languages 
at Towson State College or successfully completing one semester of any course 
beyond the intermediate level. 

Students who present two or more years of a language from high school 
and wish to continue in that language are normally placed in the intermediate 
course in college, since the college elementary course would be a repetition of 
the work already taken in high school; these students may not receive college 
credit for the elementary course without permission from the department. 
Qualified students may enroll in the advanced courses (300 level) as a result of 
placement tests, administered by the Towson State College Department of Mod- 
ern Languages, which should be taken prior to the student's first registration in 
the college. 



FRENCH COURSES (FREN) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

32.101-102 FRENCH ELEMENTS I, II (4, 4) A 
thorough foundation in grammar; drills In 
pronunciation; elementary conversation; com- 
position and translation. 

Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

32.301 FRENCH CONVERSATION (3) Intensive 
exercises in French conversation beyond the 
intermediate level. Prerequisite: 32.201-202 
or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.302 FRENCH COMPOSITION (3) Intensive 
exercises in French composition beyond the 
intermediate level. Prerequisite: 32.201-202 
or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.311 FRENCH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION 
(3) A brief survey of the history, geography, 



32.201-202 FRENCH INTERMEDIATE I, II (4, 3) 
Review of grammar; conversation and prose 
composition; reading of texts of cultural 
value; outside readings. Prerequisite: 32.101- 
32.102 or equivalent. Conducted in French. 



and institutions of France. Prerequisite: 
32.201-32.202 or equivalent. Conducted in 
French. 

32.321,322 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE 
I, II (3, 3) French literature from Chanson 
de Roland to the present. Prerequisite: 32.- 
201-202 or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.391 ADVANCED FRENCH GRAMMAR (3) 
French syntax, idiomatic construction, word 
formation. Conversation and oral drill. Prere- 
quisite: 32.301, 32.302. Conducted in French. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



32.325 MASTERPIECES OF FRENCH LITERA- 
TURE IN TRANSLATION (3) An intensive 
study of English translations of a limited 
selection of works chosen from the acknowl- 
edged masterpieces of French literature, 
presented in chronological order (not open 
to French majors). Prerequisite: English 
30.102. 

32.401 FRENCH PHONETICS (3) The pronun- 
ciation of contemporary French; drill in pro- 
nunciation. Prerequisite: completion of in- 
termediate French 32.201, 202. 

32.402 FRENCH LINGUISTICS (3) The linguis- 
tic structure of the French language with an 
introduction to transformational grammar. 
Prerequisite: 32.301-302. 

32.411 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE 
AGES (3) Selections from the major works 
of the period from the 12th through the 15th 
centuries in Modern French Versions. Pre- 
requisite: 32.321-322. Conducted in French. 

32.415 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SIX- 
TEENTH CENTURY (3) Principle works of 
the major writers of the sixteenth century 



with special attention to Rabelais, the PI6- 
iade, and Montaigne. Prerequisite: 32.321, 
322 or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.421 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SEVEN- 
TEENTH CENTURY I (3) Principal works of 
the major writers in poetry, drama, philoso- 
phy, criticism, and the novel, to about 1660. 
Prerequisite: 32.321, 322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in French. 

32.422 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SEVEN- 
TEENTH CENTURY II (3) Continuation of 
French 32.421 -from 1660 to 1700. Prerequi- 
site: 32.321, 322 or equivalent. Conducted 
in French. 

32.425 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHT- 
EENTH CENTURY (3) Principal works of 
the major writers with the concurrent literary 
and philosophical trends. Prerequisite: 32.- 
321, 322 or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.431 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE NINE- 
TEENTH CENTURY I (3) The rise, flower- 
ing, and decline of Romanticism, with the 
contemporary writers outside the movement. 
Prerequisite: 32.321, 32.322 or equivalent. 
Conducted in French. 



140 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



32.432 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE NINE- 
TEENTH CENTURY II (3) The major literary 
figures and doctrines of the latter half of the 
nineteenth century. Prerequisite: 32.321, 322 
or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.441 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE TWEN- 
TIETH CENTURY I (3) From Gide, Proust, 
Val6ry, P6guy, and Claudel to the Second 
World War. Prerequisite: 32.321, 322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.442 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE TWEN- 
TIETH CENTURY II (3) Sartre, Camus, 
Anouilh, and other present-day writers. Pre- 
requisite: 32.321, 322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted In French. 

32.451-452 FRENCH POETRY I, II (3, 3) The 
development of French poetry from the Mid- 
dle Ages to the present day. Conducted in 
French. Prerequisite: 32.321, 322. 

32.461-462 FRENCH DRAMA I, II (3, 3) The 
development of French drama from the Mid- 
dle Ages to the present day. Conducted In 
French. Prerequisite: 32.321, 322. 

32.471 THE FRENCH NOVEL I (3) From the 
17th century to Flaubert (theory of the novel 
as a genre, the novel from Pr6ciosit6 to "La 
Princesse de Cloves" in the 17th century, 
the picaresque and philosophical novel in 
the 18th century, Balzac and Stendhal In the 
19th century). Prerequisite: 32.321, 322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in French. 

32.472 THE FRENCH NOVEL II (3) From Flau- 
bert to the "Nouveau Roman" (evolution of 
the novel from Flaubert to Proust, Gide, 
Malraux, Giono and the theories of the "Nou- 
veau Roman", Robbe-Grillet and Butor). Pre- 
requisite: 32.321, 322 or equivalenL Con- 
ducted in French. 



32.481 THE CONTE (3) Emphasis on the real- 
ists and some of the more recent authors. 
Prerequisite: 32.321, 32.322 or equivalent. 
Conducted in French. 

32.487-488 TRAVEL AND STUDY ABROAD (4- 
19) Study in a French University. Students 
m\\ live and take courses at the University 
of Clermont-Ferrand, France. Dates: Choice 
of October through June (2 semesters) or 
February through June (1 semester). Prere- 
quisite: Three years of college French or 
equivalent. 

32.491 DIRECTED READING IN FRENCH LITER- 
ATURE (3) Reserved for superior students 
under the guidance of a department advisor. 
Prerequisite: at least three hours of litera- 
ture study at the 400 level. Conducted In 
French. 

32.492 DIRECTED READING IN FRENCH (3) 
Similar to 32.491 with concentration on a 
different subject matter. Prerequisite: at 
least three hours of literature study at the 
400 level. Conducted in French. 

32.495-496 HONORS SEMINAR (3, 3) Discussion 
of a central topic to be determined by the 
department, with independent work by the 
students. Required of all students in the 
Honors Program. Prerequisite: 32.491, 32.492. 
Conducted in French. 

32.498-499 SENIOR THESIS IN FRENCH (2. 2) 
Research and writing of a Thesis, to be di- 
rected by a departmental advisor. Oral de- 
fense of the Thesis before a committee of 
members of the department and at least one 
outside examiner. Credit for 32.498 not 
awarded until 32.499 is successfully com- 
pleted. Prerequisite: 32.495, 32.496. 



Graduate Division 

32.503 HISTORY OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE 
(3) A rapid survey of the major phenomena 
of French linguistic history. Some knowledge 
of Latin desirable. Prerequisite: Undergrad- 
uate degree in French. Conducted in French. 

32.505 FRENCH STYLISTICS (3) Practice In 
writing and comparison of style of various 
writers. Intensive and detailed explications 
de texte. Discussion, oral and written re- 
ports. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in 
French. Conducted in French. 

32.533-534 SEMINAR ON FRENCH CLASSICISM 
I, II (3, 3) The origins and underlying ideas 
of classicism. Study of main classic writers, 
with shifting emphasis from year to year. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in 
French. Conducted in French. 

32.535 HISTORY OF OLD FRENCH LITERA- 
TURE (3) The history of French Literature 
from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries, 
with illustrative readings. Prerequisite: Un- 
dergraduate degree in French. Conducted 
in French. 



32.536 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE RENAIS- 
SANCE (3) Seminar on French Literature of 
the Sixteenth Century, concentrating on one 
or two major v/riters, with shifting emphasis 
from year to year. Prerequisite: Undergrad- 
uate degree in French. Conducted in French. 

32.538 SEMINAR IN 18TH CENTURY FRENCH 
LITERATURE (3) The literature of the French 
Enlightenment, concentrating on one or two 
major authors, with shifting emphasis from 
year to year. Prerequisite: Undergraduate 
degree in French. Conducted in French. 

32.539 THE ROMANTIC ERA IN FRANCE (3) 
Sources and theories of French Romanticism. 
Works of major French romantic writers, 
with shifting emphasis from year to year. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree In 
French. Conducted In French. 

32.540 THE LATE 19TH CENTURY IN FRANCE 
(3) A study of the main writers of the later 
Nineteenth Century, with shifting emphasis 
from year to year. Prerequisite: Undergradu- 
ate degree in French. Conducted in French. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 141 



*32.541 PERSPECTIVES OF 20TH CENTURY 
LITERATURE I (3) Critical study of a ma- 
jor Twentieth Century writer (1st semester — 
1880-1930) with shifting emphasis from year 
to year. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree 
in French or permission of instructor. 

*32.542 PERSPECTIVES OF 20TH CENTURY 
LITERATURE II (3) Critical study of a ma- 
jor Twentieth Century writer (2nd semester — 
contemporary) with shifting emphasis from 
year to year. Prerequisite: Undergraduate 
degree in French or permission of instructor. 

32.543-544 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO FRENCH 
LITERATURE (3, 3) A history of French liter- 
ary criticism leading to the study of the 



various techniques and objectives of all lit- 
erary criticism and analysis, eventuating in 
the application of these techniques by the 
student himself to selected works of French 
Literature. Prerequisite: Undergraduate de- 
gree in French. Conducted in French. 

32.555-556 FRENCH REALISM AND NATURAL- 
ISM (3, 3) The main worl<s of Balzac, Stend- 
hal, Flaubert, Les Goncourt, Zola, Maupas- 
sant and Daudet with shifting emphasis 
from year to year. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. Conducted in French. 

32.699 THESIS (6) Optional for students in the 
French Master of Arts program. Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate degree in French. Conducted 
in French. 



GERMAN COURSES (GERM) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

36.101-102 GERMAN ELEMENTS I, II (4, 4) A 
thorough foundation in grammar; drills in 
pronunciation; elementary conversation; 
composition and translation. 

Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

36.301-302 COMPOSITION AND CONVERSA- 
TION I, II (3, 3) Composition and conversa- 
tion beyond Intermediate level. Prerequisite: 
36.201-202 or equivalent. Conducted in Ger- 
man. 

36.303 GERMAN STYLISTICS (3) Development 
of writing skills with stress on language 
structure and important aspects of style. 
Prerequisite: 36.301-302 or the equivalent. 

36.311 CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION (3) A 
brief survey of the history, geography, and 



36.201-201 GERMAN INTERMEDIATE I, II (4, 3) 
Review of grammar; conversation and prose 
composition; reading of texts of cultural 
value. Prerequisite: 36.101-102 or equivalent. 
Conducted in German. 



Institutions of Germany. Prerequisite: 36.201- 
202 or equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.321-322 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE 
I, II (3, 3) German literature from the Hilde- 
brandslied to the present. Prerequisite: 
36.201-202 or equivalent. Conducted in Ger- 
man. 

36.391 ADVANCED GERMAN GRAMMAR (3) 
German syntax, idiomatic construction, word 
formation, original composition. Conversation 
and oral drill. Prerequisite: 36.301-302. Con- 
ducted in German. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



36.325 MASTERPIECES OF GERMAN LITERA- 
TURE IN TRANSLATION (3) An intensive 
study of English translations of a number of 
acknowledged masterpieces of German liter- 
ature. Not open to German majors. Prerequi- 
site: English 30.102. 

36.401 GERMAN PHONETICS (3) The pro- 
nunciation of contemporary German, drill in 
pronunciation. Prerequisite: Completion of 
intermediate German 36.201-202. 

36.411 MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE (3) 
Special emphasis on the flowering period of 
epic and lyric poetry. Readings are in New 
High German translation. Prerequisite: 36.- 
321-322 or equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.421 HUMANISM, REFORMATION AND THE 
BAROQUE (3) A survey of the philosophy 
and literature from the end of the Middle 
Ages to 1750. Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.425 PRE-CLASSICISM (3) German literature 
from the end of the Baroque to the begin- 
nings of Classicism. Focus on the Aufklarung 



and Strum und Drang. Prerequisite: 36.321- 
322 or equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.427-428 CLASSICISM I, II (3, 3) First se- 
mester: the beginnings of German classicism: 
Goethe, Schiller, Lessing; second semester: 
the later works of Goethe and Schiller. Pre- 
requisite: 36.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted In German. 

36.431 ROMANTICISM (3) German literature 
during the Romantic era (1790-1830). Hold- 
erlin, Novalis, Tieck, Brentano, Grillparzer. 
Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in German. 

36.432 REALISM (3) A study of German liter- 
ary realism from the Vormarz through Poetic 
Realism. Heine, Buchner, Hebbel, Wagner, 
Keller, Fontane. Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.441 MODERN GERMAN LITERATURE (3) 
The modern masters: Kafka, Mann, Hesse, 
Rilke, Brecht. Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted In German. 



142 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



36.442 GERMAN LITERATURE SINCE 1945 (3) 
Themes and movements since World War II. 
Poetry: Eich, Enzensberger, Celan, Bach- 
mann; prose fiction: Boll, Grass; drama: 
Borchert, DiJrrenmatt, Frisch. Prerequisite: 
36.321-322 or equivalent. Conducted in Ger- 
man. 

36.451 STUDIES IN THE GERMAN LYRIC (3) 
Focus on a particular period, movement or 
author, to be determined after consultation 
with majors. Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.461 GERMAN DRAMA OF THE 19TH AND 
20TH CENTURIES (3) The development of 
modern German drama in the successive 
literary movements, beginning with Kleist. 
Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in German. 

36.465 GOETHE'S FAUST (3) A study of the 
background, themes and structures of this 
masterpiece. Prerequisite: 36.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in German. 

36.471 THE GERMAN NOVEL (3) A study of 
the origins and development of the genre 
In German literature. Prerequisite: 36.321- 
322 or equivalent. Conducted in German. 



36.481 THE GERMAN NOVELLE (3) The theory 
and development of the Novelle in German 
literature from Goethe to the present. Pre- 
requisite: 36.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted In German. 

36.491-492 DIRECTED READINGS IN GERMAN 
(3, 3) Reserved for superior students under 
the guidance of a departmental advisor. Con- 
tent related to student's previous program. 
Prerequisite: at least three hours of study 
at the 400 level. 

36.495-496 HONORS SEMINAR (3, 3) Discus- 
sion of a central topic to be determined by 
the department, v^'ith independent work by 
the students. Required of all students in the 
Honors Program. Conducted in German. 
Prerequisite: 36.491 or 36.492. 

36.498-499 SENIOR THESIS IN GERMAN (2, 2) 
Research and writing of a Thesis, to be di- 
rected by a departmental advisor. Oral de- 
fense of the Thesis before a committee of 
members of the department and at least one 
outside examiner. Credit for 36.498 not 
awarded until 36.499 is successfully com- 
pleted. Prerequisite: 36.495, 36.496. 



HEBREW COURSES (HEBR) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

39.101-102 ELEMENTS OF HEBREW I, II (3, 3) 
An introduction to Hebrew. Speaking, read- 
ing, and writing, the development of conver- 
sational ability, free composition, and trans- 
lation from English into Hebrew. Credit given 
on completion of both semesters. 



ITALIAN COURSES (ITAL) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

46.101-102 ITALIAN ELEMENTS I, II (4, 4) A 
thorough foundation in grammar; drills in 
pronunciation; elementary conversation; 
composition and translation 

Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

46.301-302 ITALIAN COMPOSITION AND CON- 
VERSATION I, II (3, 3) Composition and 
conversation beyond the intermediate level. 
Prerequisite: 46.201-202. Conducted in Ital- 
ian. 



46.201-202 ITALIAN INTERMEDIATE I. II (4, 3) 
Review of grammar, conversation and prose 
composition; translation of texts of cultural 
value; outside readings. Prerequisite: 46.101- 
102 or equivalent. 



46.321-322 SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE 
I, II (3, 3) A thorough examination of Italian 
literature from the thirteenth century to the 
present. Prerequisite: 46.201-202. Conducted 
in Italian. 



JAPANESE COURSES (GEST) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

33.105-106 JAPANESE ELEMENTS I, II (3, 3) 
Development of elementary vocabulary and 
sentences, forms of written language, con- 
versation, composition and translation. This 
course will be given using the techniques of 
programmed instruction. 



33.205-206 JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE III, IV 
(3, 3) Review of elementary Japanese; in- 
termediate Kanji; conversation and prose 
composition; translations; outside readings 
commensurate with the ability of individual 
student. This course will be given using the 
techniques of programmed instruction. Pre- 
requisite; Completion of 33.105-106. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 143 



KISWAHILI COURSES (BLST) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

15.001 KISWAHILI (EXPERIMENTAL) (3) An in- 
troductory course in the Kiswaliili language. 
Emphasis will be placed on the grammatical 
structure of the language and elementary 
conversation. The course may also serve as 
a preparation for those who want to under- 
stand the culture of the Kiswahili speaking 
people. 

RUSSIAN COURSES (RUSS) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

74.101-102 RUSSIAN ELEMENTS I, II (3, 3) A 
thorough foundation in grammar; drills in 
pronunciation; elementary conversation; com- 
position and translation. 

SPANISH COURSES (SPAN) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

82.101-102 SPANISH ELEMENTS I, II (4, 4) 
Thorough foundation In grammar; drills in 
pronunciation; elementary conversation; com- 
position and translation. 

82.201-202 SPANISH INTERMEDIATE I, II (4, 3) 
Review of grammar; conversation and prose 

Upper Division — Undergraduate Only 

82.301-302 COMPOSITION AND CONVERSA- 
TION I, II (3, 3) Composition and conversa- 
tion beyond intermediate level. Prerequisite: 
82.201-202 or equivalent. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

82.311 CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF THE 
SPANISH-SPEAKING PEOPLES I (3) Value- 
system and way of life as embedded in the 
language, history, arts and customs of Spain. 
Prerequisite: 82.301-302 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 

82.312 CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF THE 
SPANISH-SPEAKING PEOPLES II (3) Value- 



74.201-202 RUSSIAN INTERMEDIATE I, II (3, 3) 
Review of grammar; conversation and prose 
composition; translation of texts of cultural 
value; outside readings. Prerequisite: 74.101- 
102 or equivalent. 



composition; reading of texts of cultural 
value; outside readings commensurate with 
the ability of the individual student. Prere- 
quisite: 82.101-102 or equivalent. Conducted 
in Spanish. 



system and way of life as embedded in the 
language, history, arts and customs of Ibero- 
America. Prerequisite: 82.301-302 or equiva- 
lent. 

82.321-322 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 
I, II (3, 3) Spanish and Spanish-American 
literature, with collateral readings. Prerequi- 
site: 82.201-82.202 or equivalent. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

82.391 ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR (3) 
Spanish syntax, idiomatic construction, word 
formation, original composition. Conversa- 
tion and oral drill. Prerequisite: 82.301, 
82.302. Conducted in Spanish. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



82.325 MASTERPIECES OF SPANISH LITERA- 
TURE IN TRANSLATION (3) An intensive 
study of English translations of a limited 
selection of works chosen from the acknowl- 
edged masterpieces of Spanish literature, 
presented in chronological order (not open 
to Spanish majors). Prerequisite: 30.102. 

82.401 SPANISH PHONETICS (3) The pro- 
nunciation of contemporary Spanish, drill in 
pronunciation. Prerequisite: Completion of 
intermediate Spanish 82.201-202. 

82.417-418 THE GOLDEN AGE IN SPANISH 
LITERATURE I, II (3, 3) Principal attention 
to Cervantes, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, 
and Ruiz de Alarc6n; G6ngora and his role. 
Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted In Spanish. 



82.431 NINETEENTH CENTURY SPANISH LIT- 
ERATURE (3) The main literary movements 
of the century: neo-classicism, romanticism, 
realism, naturalism, and special emphasis 
on "cbstumbrismo." Prerequisite: 82.321-322 
or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.435 NINETEENTH CENTURY SPANISH- 
AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3) Principal 
works of the major writers to about 1860. 
Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 

82.436 NINETEENTH CENTURY SPANISH- 
AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3) Principal 
works of the major writers from 1860-1900. 
Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 



144 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



82.441 TWENTIETH CENTURY SPANISH LIT- 
ERATURE I (3) Special attention to the lit- 
erary movement called "The Generation of 
"98." Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or equivalent. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

82.442 TWENTIETH CENTURY SPANISH LIT- 
ERATURE II (3) The writers of the last 
thirty years. Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.443 TWENTIETH CENTURY SPANISH-AMER- 
ICAN LITERATURE I (3) Modernism to the 
Contemporary Period. Prerequisite: 82.321- 
322 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.444 TWENTIETH CENTURY SPANISH-AMER- 
ICAN LITERATURE II (3) The Contempo- 
rary Period. Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.451 SPANISH POETRY I (3) Special em- 
phasis on Gustavo Adolfo B^cquer, Rub^n 
Dario, Antonio Machado. Prerequisite: 
82.321-322 or equivalent. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

82.452 SPANISH POETRY II (3) Emphasis on 
the poets of the generation of 1927, Pablo 
Neruda, and Vicente Aleixandre. Prerequi- 
site: 82.321-322 or equivalent. Conducted In 
Spanish. 

82.461 SPANISH DRAMA I (3) Nineteenth and 
early twentieth century. Prerequisite: 82.321- 
322 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.462 SPANISH DRAMA II (3) Contemporary 
playwrights such as Casona, Usigli, and 
Valiejo. Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or equiva- 
lent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.471 SPANISH NOVEL I (3) Emphasis will 
be given to Benito P6rez Gaid6s and Pfo 
Baroja. Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or equiva- 
lent. Conducted in Spanish. 

Graduate Division 

82.503 HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LAN- 
GUAGE (3) Survey of the development of 
the Spanish language from its origins to 
present day in Spain and in Spanish-America. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree In 
Spanish. 

82.505 SPANISH STYLISTICS (3) Intensive 
and detailed analysis of selected texts. Dis- 
cussion and oral reports. Required weel<iy 
compositions. Prerequisite: Undergraduate 
degree in Spanish. 

82.521 SEMINAR IN UNAMUNO (3) Life's 
tragedy: conflict between reason and faith 
as shown in his novels, theatre, essays, and 
poetry. Prerequisite: B.A. or 18 hours credit 
of Spanish beyond intermediate or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.531 SEMINAR ON BENITO PEREZ GALDOS 
(3) His vision of the condition of man in 
XlXth-Century Spain and his effort to im- 
prove society by changing individual be- 
havior. Prerequisite: B.A. degree in Spanish. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

82.535 SPANISH LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE 
AGES (3) Reading, discussion and analysis 



82.472 SPANISH NOVEL II (3) Emphasis on 
contemporary writers including; Camilo Jos6 
Cela, Miguel Angel Asturias, Ram6n Sender, 
Juan Goytisolo. Prerequisite: 82.321-322 or 
equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.481 SPANISH SHORT STORY (3) The short 
story in Spain and Spanish America with 
emphasis on twentieth century authors. Pre- 
requisite: 82.321-322 or equivalent. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 

82.491 DIRECTED READING IN SPANISH LIT- 
ERATURE (3) Reserved for superior stu- 
dents under the guidance of a departmental 
advisor. Prerequisite: At least three hours 
of literature study at the 400 level. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 

82.492 DIRECTED READING IN SPANISH (3) 
Similar to Span 491 with concentration on a 
different subject matter. Prerequisite: At 
least three hours of literature study at the 
400 level. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.495-496 HONORS SEMINAR (3,3) Discus- 
sion of a central topic to be determined by 
the department, with independent work by 
the students. Required of all students in the 
Honors Program. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: 82.491 or 82.492. 

82.498-499 SENIOR THESIS IN SPANISH (2, 2) 
Research and writing of a Thesis, to be 
directed by a departmental advisor. Oral 
defense of the Thesis before a committee of 
members of the department and at least one 
outside examiner. Credit for 82.498 not 
awarded until 82.499 is successfully com- 
pleted. Prerequisite: 82.495, 82.496. 



of early Spanish literature. Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate degree in Spanish. 

82.536 POETRY & DRAMA OF THE SPANISH 
GOLDEN AGE (3) Study of major writers 
of the Siglo de Oro, with shifting emphasis 
from year to year. Prerequisite: B.A. degree 
in Spanish. Conducted in Spanish. 

82.539 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO SPANISH 
LITERATURE (3) Study and analysis of the 
formal aspects of selected Spanish literary 
texts. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in 
Spanish. 

82.541 SEMINAR IN RAMON DEL VALLE- 
INCLAN (3) Analysis and discussion of the 
works of Ramon del Valle-lnclan. Prerequi- 
site: Undergraduate degree in Spanish. 

82.551 SEMINAR IN PIO BAROJA (3) Analysis 
and discussion of the works of Pfo Baroja. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in 
Spanish. 

82.553 MIGUEL DE CERVANTES (3) Don 
Quijote de la Mancha and the Novelas 
Ejemplares, reading and detailed analysis. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in 
Spanish. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 145 



Music 



Professors: ALPER, ARRINGTON (Chairman) 

Associate Professors: COULANGE, DRUCKER, DURO, MARCHAND, MYERS, REYES 

Assistant Professors: BUSEN, CRAWFORD, CYR, GRISWOLD, MELIGK, MOORE, 
OLSON, RAUSCHENBERG, RICHARDSON, TAN, TERWILLIGER 

Instructors: ANTHONY, BLAKE, HOFFMAN, LEVY, MINGER, PALANKER, PHILLIPS, 
FINKELSTEIN, CHESTER, SMITH, KELLY, BARNES 
The Music Department serves both music majors and general students. 

For the non-major, or general student, the purposes are to give opportunities 
for enrichment of cultural background and creative expression; for the music 
major, the purposes are to give professional training so that he will attain a 
high standard of artistic performance, be prepared to teach, and be qualified in 
his chosen field. Ample opportunity is given for student participation in musical 
organizations and ensembles which provides both valuable experience, and con- 
tributes to the cultural life of the College and the Community. 

Non-Majors may elect any music course for which they have the prerequi- 
sites. Participation in musical organizations is open to all interested students. 
There is an additional fee for private lessons and registration for same must 
be made with the consent of the Music Department Chairman. 

Music Major 

Students wishing to major in music or music education should write to the 
Chairman of the Music Department at the time they make application to Towson 
State College through the Director of Admissions. 

A placement examination in performance and music theory will be given 
prospective applicants on the third Saturday in May preceding their college 
admission. The purpose of this examination is to aid the Music Department in 
determining the most satisfactory curriculum pattern for the individual student. 

Each music major is required to choose a primary instrument or voice, and 
study with teachers provided by Towson State College. Every music major will 
perform on his primary instrument before a faculty jury at the end of each 
semester of private study. 

Every Music Major will perform a senior recital on his primary perform- 
ing medium as a requirement for graduation. Every music major will take a 
piano proficiency examination at the end of the sophomore year. Student may 
repeat examination until satisfactory completion which must be done before stu- 
dent teaching and/or graduation. Requirements may be procured in the Music 
Department office. 

Each music major is required to participate in 6 semesters of major en- 
semble. 

The following number of music credits are required for graduation in the 
various music degree programs: BS (Music Education), instrumental major, 
67 credits plus an additional 12 credits in Student Teaching; BS (Music Educa- 
tion), vocal major, 64 credits plus an additional 12 credits in Student Teaching; 
BA (Performance, Music Literature, and Music Theory) requires 73 credits. 

The academic program in music will be determined on an individual basis 
for each transfer student based upon transcript evaluation, placement examina- 
tion, and audition by the Music Department. 

The Department of Music offers the following two courses of study: 
1. A course of study preparing students to teach music as specialists, leading to 
a Bachelor of Science Degree in Music Education. 

Requirements: (a) General Education Requirements for all students; (b) 
Music Theory 16 credits; Private Lessons 7 credits minimum, more credits 
required if not adequately prepared for senior recital; Voice Class (Instru- 

146 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



mental Majors) 1 credit, (Piano, Guitar Majors) 2 credits; Music Organiza- 
tions (Choirs, Bands, Orchestra, etc.) 6 semesters; Introduction to Music 
Literature (for Majors) 3 credits; Music History 6 credits; Class Instrument 
Lessons, String, Brass, Percussion, Woodwind, (Instrumental Majors) 2 
credits of each, (EXCEPTION: Brass Majors take only second semester of 
Brass Class, Percussion Majors take only first semester of Percussion Class), 
(Vocal Majors) 1 credit; conducting 3 credits; Music in the Elementary Schools 
3 credits (Music Majors section) ; Music in Secondary Schools 3 credits; Organi- 
zation and Administration of Music Education 3 credits; Choral and Instrumental 
Arranging 3 credits; Form and Analysis 3 credits; General Psychology 3 credits; 
Educational Psychology 3 credits; Foundations of Education 3 credits; Survey of 
Education 3 credits; Student Teaching (both elementary and secondary) 12 
credits. 

2. A course of study in the field of arts and sciences leading to a Bachelor of 
Arts degree with emphasis in performance, music theory, or music literature. 
The Bachelor of Arts degree in music is a program designed for the study 
of music within a liberal arts curriculum with a broad coverage of the field. 
The burden of study should be upon the literature of music designed to de- 
velop basic musicianship, the ability to perform the literature well, and pro- 
vide a set of principles and terms that lead to a fuller intellectual grasp of 
the art. It means to give an appropriate background for prospective candidates 
for advanced degrees who are preparing for such careers as musicology, com- 
posing, and performance. 

Requirements: (a) General Education Requirements, (b) Foreign language 
requirement, 12 credits, (c) Music Course Requirements: 

BA in PERFORMANCE: Music Theory 16 credits; Private Lessons 16 
credits; Introduction to Music Literature 3 credits; Music History 6 credits; 
Music Organization 8 semesters; Form and Analysis 3 credits; Conducting 
3 credits; Pedagogy and Practice 3 credits; Literature Survey in Major 3 
credits; Electives (liberal arts) 3 credits, (Music) 9 credits; Recital. 

BA in MUSIC LITERATURE: Music Theory 16 credits; Private Lessons 
8 credits; Music Organization 8 semesters; Introduction to Music Literature 
3 credits; Music History 6 credits; Counterpoint 3 credits; P'orm and Analysis 
3 credits; Choral and Instrumental Arranging 3 credits; Advanced Music 
History 15 credits; Elective 9 credits; Research in Music 3 credits. 

BA in MUSIC THEORY: Music Theory 16 credits; Private Piano (and Class 
Piano) 8 credits (Private Lessons in sophomore, junior, and senior year may 
be in area other than piano with approval of theory advisor) ; Voice Class 1 
credit; Music Organization 8 semesters; Introduction to Music Literature 3 
credits; Music History 6 credits; Counterpoint 6 credits; Choral and Instru- 
mental Arranging 6 credits; Composition 6 credits; Form and Analysis 3 
credits; Conducting 3 credits; Advanced Music History 3 credits; Electives 
10 credits. 

MUSIC COURSES (MUSC) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

54.101 (103) INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC LIT- 
ERATURE (3) Music literature to acquaint 
the student with music through class discus- 
sions and listening. Suggested course for the 
General Education requirennent. 

54.131-132 MUSIC THEORY I AND II (4. 4) The 
study and practice of sight singing, ear 
training and harmony in integrated course. 
Prerequisite for Theory I: Ability to read 
treble and bass clefs and knowledge of 



nnajor and minor scales. Prerequisite for 
Theory II: Theory I. 

54.141-142 BRASS ENSEMBLE (1,1) Study 
and performance of advanced brass litera- 
ture, required of all students majoring in 
brass instruments. Admission by permission 
of the director. 

54.145-146 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE (1,1) 
Study and performance of advanced percus- 
sion literature; supplement and improve the 



MUSIC 147 



percussion student's musical training by 
acquainting tiie student with the various 
techniques involved in performing on the 
numerous percussion instruments. Required 
of all percussion majors. 

54.149-150 STRING ENSEMBLE (1, 1) Study 
and performance of advanced string litera- 
ture, required of all students majoring in 
string instruments. Admission by permission 
of the director. 

54.151-152 VOICE ENSEMBLE (1,1) Small 
group study and performance of advanced 
chcral literature. Admission by permission 
of director. 

54.153-154 WOODWIND ENSEMBLE (1,1) 
Study and performance of advanced wood- 
wind literature required of all students ma- 
joring in woodwind instruments. By permis- 
sion of the director. 

54.155-156 CLARINET CHOIR (1, 1) Study and 
performance of clarinet choir literature. 
Open to all students by audition. 

54.157-158 JAZZ ENSEMBLE (1, 1) Study and 
performance of music of the jazz idiom. 
Open to all students by audition. 

54.171-172 (150) BRASS PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in brass. Fee of $50.00 
per semester per credit. One half-hour les- 
son per week. 

54.173-174 (150) ORGAN PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in organ. Fee of $50.00 
per semester per credit. One half-hour les- 
son per week. 

54.175-176 (150) PERCUSSION PRIVATE LES- 
SONS (1-3) Private lessons in percussion. 
Fee of $50.00 per semester. One half-hour 
lesson per week. 

54.177-178 (150) PIANO PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in piano. Fee of $50.00 
per semester per credit. One half-hour les- 
son per week. 

54.179-180 (150) STRING PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in strings. Fee of 
$50.00 per semester per credit. One half- 
hour lesson per week. 

54.181-182 (150) VOICE PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in voice. Fee of $50.00 
per semester per credit. One half-hour les- 
son per week. 

54.183-184 (150) WOODWIND PRIVATE LES- 
SONS (1-3) Private lessons in woodwinds. 
Fee of $50.00 per semester per credit. One 
half-hour lesson per week. 

54.185-186 (150) GUITAR PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in guitar. Fee of 
$50.00 per semester per credit. One half- 
hour lesson per week. 

54.187-188 COMPOSITION PRIVATE LESSONS 
(1-3) Private lessons in composition. Fee 
of $50.00 per semester. One half-hour lesson 
per week. 

54.211-212 BRASS CLASS (1, 1) Class instruc- 
tion in brass instruments. 



54.215-216 PERCUSSION CLASS (1, 1) Class 
instruction in percussion instruments. 

54.217-218 (242, 243) PIANO CLASS (1, 1) 
Class instruction in piano playing, with one 
hour daily practice in preparation required. 
Open to beginning students and students 
with a minimum of piano work, by permis- 
sion of the department chairman. 

54.219-220 (220, 221) STRING CLASS (1, 1) 
Class instruction in string instruments. 

54.221-222 (205, 206) VOICE CLASS (1, 1) 
Class instruction in singing, with emphasis 
upon basic singing techniques and voice 
production through the use of song material. 

54.223-224 WOODWIND CLASS (1, 1) Class in- 
struction in woodwind instruments. 

54.225-226 GUITAR CLASS (1,1) Class instruc- 
tion in guitar. 

54.231-232 THEORY III AND IV (4, 4) The study 
and practice of sight singing, ear training, 
and harmony in an integrated course. Pre- 
requisite for Theory 111: Theory II. Prerequi- 
site fo' Theory IV: Theory 111. 

54.233 (203) MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS (2) 
Basic music skills and experience in the use 
of music instruments for prospective kinder- 
garten and elementary teachers. 

54.243 RECORDER CLASS (1) Studying and 
performing works written particularly for the 
recorder. This course cannot be used to- 
wards fulfillment of the College's General 
Education Requirements. Prerequisites: Abil- 
ity to read music. 

54.257-258 PEP BAND (1, 1) Wind ensemble 
which performs at various college functions 
such as athletic events, assemblies, etc. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

54.259-260 COMMUNITY CHORUS (1, 1) Study 
and performance of advanced choral litera- 
ture. Admission by permission of the direc- 
tor. 

54.261-262 (211, 212) CONCERT CHOIR (1, 1) 
Study and performance of advanced choral 
literature. Open to all students with audition. 

54.263-264 (217-218) MEN'S GLEE CLUB (1, 1) 
Study and performance of choral literature 
written and arranged for male voices. Open 
to all male students by permission of direc- 
tor. 

54.265-266 (209, 210) WOMEN'S CHORUS (1, 1) 
Study and performance of choral literature 
for female voices. Open to all female stu- 
dents by permission of director. 

54.267-268 (21 5, 21 6) ORCHESTRA (1,1) Study 
of orchestral literature. Open to all students 
by audition. 

54.269-270 (240, 241) CONCERT BAND (1, 1) 
Study and performance of band literature. 
Open to all students by audition. 

54.271-286 (250) PRIVATE LESSONS (1-3) Re- 
fer to 171-186 for course description, fee and 
time. 



148 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Upper Division — Undergraduate 



54.301-302 (228, 229) HISTORY OF MUSIC (3, 3) 
Study of development of music in the west- 
ern world through discussion, performance 
and recording. First semester includes music 
from the Greeks to the end of the Baroque 
period. Second semester traces the develop- 
ment of music from the Classic period to 
the present. 

54.307 (372) TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOLS (2,3) Acquaints stu- 
dents with music programs in the elementary 
school through lecture, class discussion, and 
practice with children. Prerequisite: 54.233. 

54.308 METHODS OF TEACHING INSTRUMEN- 
TAL MUSIC (3) Methods and materials in 
the instruction of instrumental music, ele- 
mentary though seconday. Prerequisite: To 
be taken with student teaching. 

54.309 METHODS OF TEACHING CHORAL AND 
GENERAL MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL (3) Methods and materials in the 
instruction of a general music program for 
the non-performing student, and a choral 
program for the performing student. Prereq- 
uisite: Taken with student teaching. 



54.311-312 ACCOMPANYING (3,3) Study of vo- 
cal and instrumental accompanying with 
emphasis upon sight reading, transposition, 
and acquaintance with vocal and instru- 
mental literature. Permission of instructor. 

54.327(316) CHORAL CONDUCTING (3) Group 
instruction in basic conducting techniques 
and interpretation with relation to choral 
organizations. Prerequisite: 54.132 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

54.329 (317) INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING (3) 
Group instruction in basic conducting tech- 
niques and interpretation with relation to 
instrumental organizations. Prerequisite: 
54.132 or permission of instructor. 

54.335 (324) CHORAL AND INSTRUMENTAL 
ARRANGING (3) Composition and arrang- 
ing techniques for voices and/or instru- 
ments. Prerequisite: 54.231-54.232, equiva- 
lent, or permission of instructor. 

54.371-386 (350) PRIVATE LESSONS (1-3) Re- 
fer to MUSIC 171-186 for course description, 
fee and time. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



54.401 (403) MUSIC PRIOR TO 1600 (3) The 
{ rt of music in the West from its tentative 
beginnings in Greek and Hebrew music to 
the year 1600 A.D. Prerequisite: Consent of 
Department Chairman. 

54.402 (404) MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE PERIOD 
(3) Style, forms and musical techniques 
from 1600 to 1750. Prerequisite: Consent of 
Department Chairman. 

54.403 (405) MUSIC OF THE CLASSICAL PE- 
RIOD (3) Styles, forms and techniques of 
the period from 1750-1820. Particular em- 
phasis is placed on instrumental categories 
of the siring quartet, sonata, symphony and 
concerto as illustrated in the works of Haydn, 
Mozart and Beethoven. Attention is given to 
operatic and sacred compositions of the 
same masters. Prerequisite: Consent of De- 
partment Chairman. 

54.404 (406) MUSIC OF THE ROMANTIC PE- 
RIOD (3) Musical styles, forms and tech- 
niques in the 19th century with special atten- 
tion to the intellectual foundations of the 
Romantic movement. Prerequisite: Consent 
of Department Chairman. 

54.405 (407) CONTEMPORARY MUSIC (3) 
Styles, forms and musical techniques since 

I 1900. Prerequisite: Consent of Department 
Chairman. 

54.408 (400) ORGANIZATION AND ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF MUSIC EDUCATION (3) Sem- 
inar discussion of the problems of organiza- 
tion and administration of music education. 
Prerequisite: Music Student Teaching, and/ 
or consent of the instructor. 



54.411 (412) SURVEY OF OPERA (3) Study of 
opera literature of various periods and 
styles. Consent of Department Chairman. 

54.413 (245) SYMPHONIC LITERATURE (3) 
Orchestral music from the baroque to the 
present. The concerto, symphony, overture 
and other orchestral forms are examined. 
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Chair- 
man. 

54.421 (413) AMERICAN MUSIC (3) American 
music from the Colonial Period to the pres- 
ent. Prerequisite: Consent of Department 
Chairman. 

54.423 (414) HISTORY OF JAZZ (3) Develop- 
ment of jazz and its peripheral effects upon 
music. 

54.424 ADVANCED WOODWINDS (Double 
Reeds) (3) Study of advanced techniques 
on bassoon and oboe. Special emphasis 
given to reed-making and instrument repair. 
Prerequisites: 54.223, or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

54.425 (424) ADVANCED PERCUSSION (3) 
Study of advanced performance techniques 
on all percussion instruments. Prerequisite: 
Music 54.215, or consent of instructor. 

54.427-428 JAZZ ARRANGING (3, 3) Study and 
practice of arranging of standard material 
for Jazz Ensembles. Prerequisite: 54.232 or 
consent of instructor. 

54.429-430 JAZZ IMPROVISATION (3, 3) Study 
and practice of improvising in various jazz 
styles. Prerequisite: 54.231-232 or consent of 
instructor. 



MUSIC 149 



54.433 (423) ADVANCED THEORY (3) Con- 
tinued development of skills in more ad- 
vanced melodic, liarmonic and rliythmic 
aspects of music tfirough hearing, playing 
and writing. Prerequisite: 54.232. 

54.435 (425) FORM AND ANALYSIS (3) Anal- 
ysis of vocal and instrumental literature. 
Prerequisites: 54.231-54.232. 

54.449-450 STRING ENSEMBLE (1,1) Study 
and performance of advanced string litera- 
ture, required of all students majoring in 
string instruments. Admission by permission 
of director. 

54.459-460 COMMUNITY CHORUS (1, 1) Study 
and performance of advanced choral litera- 
ture. Admission by permission of the direc- 
tor. 

54.467-468 ORCHESTRA (1,1) Study of or- 
chestral literature. Open to all students by 
audition. 



54.469-470 CONCERT BAND (1,1) Study and 
performance of band literature. Open to all 
students by audition. 

54.471-486 (450) PRIVATE LESSONS (1-3) Re- 
fer to MUSIC 171-186 for course description, 
fee and time. 

54.493 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN MUSIC 
LITERATURE (3) Supervised research and 
musicological investigation of a selected 
topic culminating in a written senior thesis. 
May be repeated with credit. Prerequisite: 
54.301, 54.302, and six hours of Advanced 
Music Hist, courses. 

54.499 SENIOR RECITAL (1) Recital perform- 
ance for graduation requirement. Prerequi- 
sites: Minimum of 6 credits of Private Les- 
sons and approval of Department Chairman. 
Undergraduate credit only. 



Graduate Division 

54.501 CURRENT TRENDS IN MUSIC AND 
MUSIC EDUCATION (3) A survey of cur- 
rent philosophies and objectives of music 
in the schools, and the scope and sequence 
of the music curricula, vocal and instru- 
mental, on the elementary and secondary 
levels. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate 
Program. 

54.515 THE CONCERTO (3) A survey of the 
concerto form from its inception to the pres- 
e.nt. Analysis of stylistic, formal, and com- 
positional aspects will be included. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to Graduate standing 
with Music Major, or Consent of Department 
Chairman. 

54.535 (524) ADVANCED CHORAL AND IN- 
STRUMENTAL ARRANGING (3) Advanced 
arranging techniques including the scoring 
of original and other works for various com- 
binations of instruments and/or voices. Pre- 
requisite: 54.335, or equivalent, or consent 
of instructor. 

54.539 MUSIC COMPOSITION (3) Analysis and 
discussion of works of major composers. 
Writing of original compositions in vocal and 
instrumental idioms. Prerequisites: 54.232, 
54.335, 54.435. 

54.561 SEMINAR IN INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 
(3) Comparative analysis of current meth- 
ods and materials used in schools and col- 
leges. Instrumental conducting and reper- 



toire. Construction of acoustical properties 
and basic techniques of instruments. Prob- 
lems of ensemble and balance. Intonation, 
precision and interpretation are studied. 
Materials and music literature for bands, 
orchestras and small ensembles are evalu- 
ated. Prerequisite: Admission to the Grad- 
uate Program. 

54.562 SEMINAR IN CHORAL (VOCAL) MUSIC 
(3) Comparative analysis of current meth- 
ods and materials used in schools and col- 
leges. Choral conducting and repertoire. 
Style, interpretation, tone quality, diction, re- 
hearsal and conducting techniques are anal- 
yzed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Grad- 
uate Program. 

54.571-586 (550) PRIVATE LESSONS (1-3) Re- 
fer to MUSIC 171-186 for course description, 
fee and time. 

54.595 (550) RESEARCH METHODS IN MUSIC 
AND MUSIC EDUCATION (3) The applica- 
tion of methods of research to problems in 
the field of music and music education, the 
preparation of bibliographies and special- 
ized techniques for the location, collection 
and treatment of data. The written exposi- 
tion of research projects in the area oif the| 
student's major interest. Prerequisite: Ad 
mission to the Graduate Program. 

54.699 THESIS (3) 



150 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Nursing 



Associate Professor: SCHWALM (Chairman) 

Assistant Professors: BURCH, COX, DAVIES, HUGHES, KEENEN, WIKOFF 

History 

In response to community needs for professional nurses in health care delivery, 
the Board of Trustees granted approval for the initiation of a baccalaureate 
program in professional nursing leading to the Bachelor of Science De^ee. 
Development of the curriculum in the Nursing major was begun in September 
1970 with the acceptance of the first group of students in February 1972. The 
curriculum is designed to meet the changing conceptual role of nursing — 

THAT of using a unique core of knowledge and skills in assisting individuals 
and groups in varied environmental settings to promote, maintain and/or restore 
a balanced level of well being; 

THAT of preparing committed citizens who value thought as well as earthly 
things. 

Therefore, courses in the nursing major are designed around the episodic- 
distributive nursing care concept.* 

Objectives 

In the broad spectrum of contemporary health settings, the graduate from the 

Nursing major at Towson State College 

. . . accepts self and others as persons of inherent worth and dynamic potential ; 

... is committed to the total well-being of man and society ; 

. . , assesses the essential economic, psychosocial and medical factors that con- 
tribute to the well-being of individuals and groups of all ages ; 

. . . uses critical thought and sensitivity in assessing health needs and in planning, 
providing and evaluating distributive and episodic nursing care; 

. . . shows skill in organizing nursing functions and establishing priorities in the 
delivery of health care; 

. . . gives competent, professional nursing care based on a broad foundational 
knowledge of the biological, physical and social sciences ; 

. . . communicates effectively and is sensitive to individual and group dynamics; 

. . . teaches individuals and groups health maintenance through an interdisciplinary 
team endeavor and/or independently; 

. . . participates reciprocally in the efforts of the allied professions in the deliverj- 
of distributive and episodic health services to the community; 

. . . performs nursing within ethical and legal boundaries of the profession ; 

. . . functions as a participant in and consumer of research in nursing and allied 
disciplines; 

. . . supports the concept of improved nursing practice through on-going systematic 
study; 

. . . accepts the opportunities for informed membership in professional organiza- 
tions or activities concerned with the well-being of man and society; 

... is self directed in assessing and attaining personal and professional goals; 

. . . possesses the academic foundations for graduate education in professional 
nursing. 

151 



Attainment of these objectives is accomplished through course study in the liberal 
arts, the sciences and nursing. The completion of the general course offerings 
required of all students of the College — plus selected academic and professional 
courses — requires four academic years (full-time enrollment is required during 
the Nursing major). As an integral part of each Nursing course, the learning 
process is extended from the College to a variety of health agencies which include : 
The Baltimore County Department of Health; The Childrrai's Hospital, Inc.; 
Good Samaritan Hospital; Greater Baltimore Medical Center; Saint Joseph Hos- 
pital ; Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital and Stella Maris Hospice. 

Requirements for Matriculation in the Nursing Major 

1. In addition to students initially enrolling at Towson State College, eligible 
persons transferring from other two- and four-year educational institutions, as 
well as those seeking a second baccalaureate degree, may seek acceptance into 
the Nursing major. 

Presently, the Department of Nursing is unable to offer Registered Nurses 
seeking a baccalaureate degree challenge opportunities for academic credit for 
previous nursing education and experience. The earliest date anticipated for the 
latter is September 1974. Meanwhile, Departmental Faculty will be happy to 
advise Registered Nurses concerning lower division course requirements should 
they vsdsh to pursue study at the College on either a full-time or part-time basis. 

ALL STUDENTS WISHING TO PURSUE THE NURSING MAJOR 
SHOULD CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT OF NURSING, ADMINISTRA- 
TION BUILDING, ROOM 134, AT THE TIME OF APPLICATION FOR 
ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE TO COMPLETE THE "PRE-NURSING 
INFORMATION FORM." (The absolute deadline for the above is October 
1st of the Semester preceding matriculation in the Nursing major and enroll- 
ment in NURS 55.221.) 

2. Enrollment at the high school level in the following courses is strongly recom- 
mended to provide the foundational base for pursuance of the Nursing major: 
Mathematics — 3 units including two years of Algebra; Chemistry — 1 unit; 
Biology — 1 unit and Physics — 1 unit. 

3. Admission to the College as a full-time student. (Although students do not 
enroll in the first Nursing course until the Spring Semester of the Sophomore 
year, persons wishing to pursue the major are urged to seek admission to the 
College at least by the previous September. Where this is not possible, the Depart- 
ment of Nursing must be informed in writing by October 1st that the student 
has filed for College admission for February and desires to be considered for 
acceptance into the Nursing major that same Semester.) ADMISSION TO THE 
COLLEGE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE OR GUARANTEE ACCEPTANCE INTO 
THE NURSING MAJOR. Acceptance into the Department of Nursing can be 
granted only by the Faculty teaching in the Nursing major. 

4. Review of student credentials by Departmental Faculty (these reviews are 
completed from mid-October through early November annually) which include: 

a. evidence of successful completion of and/or satisfactory progress in the 
lower division courses specified in the Curriculum Plan which follows; 

b. evidence of a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale ; 

c. evidence of sound health status for pursuance of the major; this to be 
documented by submission of an appropriate medical examination form 

(College and/or Departmental) from a practicing physician, together with 
other reports deemed necessary ; 

d. student interview data as compiled by Departmental Faculty ; 



* Please refer to the course descriptions for the definitions of episodic and distributive nursing care. 
152 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



e. evidence of October 1st or earlier notification to the Department of intent 
to pursue the major. 

DUE TO EXISTING AND ANTICIPATED FUTURE LIMITATIONS IN NUM- 
BERS OF FACULTY AND CLINICAL OPPORTUNITIES, THE DEPART- 
MENT MAY NOT BE ABLE TO GRANT ACCEPTANCE TO ALL STUDENTS 
MEETING THE ABOVE CRITERIA. STUDENTS ARE, THEREFORE, 
ADVISED TO SEEK ALTERNATIVE ENROLLMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 
OTHER FOUR-YEAR NURSING PROGRAMS. 

The Curriculum Plan for the Nursing Major 

1. Lower Division Course Requirements 

FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester: ENGL 30.102 Freshman Composition 
(3) ; BIOL 14.101 Contemporary General Biology (4) ; CHEM 22.101 Gen- 
eral Chemistry (4) ; SPCH 84.131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication 
(3); PHED 009-059 Physical Education (student selection) (1), totalling 
15 hours; Second Semester: MATH 50.115 (3) ; BIOL 14.315 Medical Micro- 
biology (4) or BIOL 14.318 Microbiology (4) ; PSYC 70.101 General Psychol- 
ogy (3) ; CHEM 22.102 General Chemistry (4) ; ELECTIVE from areas of 
Art, Drama, English, Modern Languages, Music or Philosophy and Religion 
(3), totalling 17 hours; for the SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester: BIOL 

14.113 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) ; SOCI 80.101 Introduction to 
Sociology (3) ; ENGL (student selection) (3) ; PSYC 70.203 Human Growth 
and Development C3) ; ELECTIVE from areas of Economics, Geography, 
History or Political Science (3), totalling 16 hours; Second Semester: BIOL 

14.114 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) ; HEAL 38.204 Nutrition (3) ; 
SOCI 80.203 The Family (3) ; NURS 55.221 Introduction to Professional 
Nursing Practice (4) ; ELECTIVE from areas of Economics, Geography, 
History or Political Science (3), totalling 17 hours. 

2. Upper Division Course Requirements 

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester: NURS 55.311 Distributive Care: Contempo- 
rary Family Health Care (4); NURS 55.312 Episodic Care: Contemporary 
Family Health Care (9) ; ELECTIVE from the areas of Art, Drama, English, 
Modern Languages, Music or Philosophy and Religion (3), totalling 16 hours; 
Second Semester: NURS 55.321 Distributive Care: Acute-Chronic Health 
Problems (4); NURS 55.322 Episodic Care: Acute-Chronic Health Problems 
(9) ; ELECTIVE from areas of Art, Drama, English, Modern Languages, 
Music or Philosophy and Religion (3), totalling 16 hours; for the SENIOR 
YEAR First Semester: NURS 55.411 Distributive Care: Complex Community' 
Health Problems (4); NURS 55.412 Episodic Care: Complex Clinical Situa- 
tions (9) ; PSYC 70.431 Group Dynamics (3) or SOCI 80.410 Small Groups 
(3), totalling 16 hours; Second Semester: NURS 55.421 Advanced Distribu- 
tive Care (4) or NURS 55. 422 Advanced Episodic Care (4) ; NURS 55.423 
Nursing Leadership (9); SOCI 80.392 Demography (3), totalling 16 hours. 
The Nursing courses must be completed in a sequential pattern because each 
course is foundational for the subsequent ones. 

Academic Standards 

In order to remain in the Nursing major and to graduate from it, the student 
must maintain a grade of "C" (2.0) or better in each Nursing course (in addition 
to attaining the cumulative grade point average required by the College). 

Program Approval 

Development of the curriculum in the Nursing major was based on guidelines 
from the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses and the National League 



NURSING 153 



for Nursing. The State Board granted approval for the initiation of the curricu- 
lum. After graduation of the first class from the major, the Departmental Faculty 
will seek final approval of the program from the Maryland State Board of Exam- 
iners of Nurses and accreditation from the National League for Nursing. 

Students graduating from the Nursing major will be eligible to write the 
State Board examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse in the State of 
Maryland. 

Financial Aid and Special Obligations 

Federal Nursing Student Scholarship and Loan Funds and other sources of 
assistance are available to eligible students. Information may be obtained from 
the College's Office of Financial Aid. 
Enrollees in the Nursing major are expected to : 

a. carry student nurses' liability insurance through an insurance company 
selected by the Departmental Faculty and endorsed by the American Nurses' 
Association (approximately $10.00 annually) ; 

b. purchase appropriate clinical attire initially selected by students in the 
Nursing major and Departmental Faculty (approximately $200.00 for total pro- 
gram) ; 

c. provide travel to and from clinical facilities. 



NURSING COURSES (NURS) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

55.221 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL 
NURSING PRACTICE (4) This course con- 
centrates on developing intellectual skill in 
the assessment, nursing intervention and in- 
struction of health maintenance for man and 
society. Attention is given to selected forces 
which alter the well being of man followed 

Upper Division — Undergraduate 

55.311 DISTRIBUTIVE CARE: CONTEMPORARY 
FAMILY HEALTH CARE (4) This course 
concentrates on developing intellectual sen- 
sitivity to the changing developmental needs 
and conceptual role of the family and its 
members. Attention is given to the study 
and application of prevention and health 
maintenance concepts specific to each de- 
velopmental stage from birth to young adult- 
hood. Nursing practice takes place in a 
variety of environmental settings exclusive 
of hospital confinement. Prerequisite: 55.221. 

55.312 EPISODIC CARE: CONTEMPORARY 
FAMILY HEALTH CARE (9) Course em- 
phasis is on the application of a defined 
scope of scientific knowledge and skill 
unique to curative and restorative nursing 
care of hospitalized patients from birth 
through young adulthood. This course is 
taken concurrently with the course 55.311 
to provide comprehensive study in applying 
nursing practice to the dynamic needs of 
persons of the aforestated age groups in 
various environmental settings. Prerequisite: 
55.221. 

55.321 DISTRIBUTIVE CARE: ACUTE-CHRONIC 
HEALTH PROBLEMS (4) This course con- 

154 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



by study and observation of man's adaptive 
behaviors to biological, psychosocial and 
environmental changes. Selected historical 
perspectives in nursing are included. Pre- 
requisite: acceptance into Nursing major by 
Departmental Faculty. 



centrates on developing keen intellectua 
sensitivity to the nurturing needs of individ- 
uals within society. Emphasis is on the pre 
vention of acute-chronic diseases and th€ 
maintenance of health for people from younc 
adulthood to senescence. Nursing practice 
is directed toward the continuous care o 
persons not confined to hospitals. Pr«*requir 
site: 55.311 and 55.312. 

55.322 EPISODIC CARE: ACUTE-CHRONI(| 
HEALTH PROBLEMS (9) Course emphasi 
is on the application of a defined scope c 
scientific knowledge and skill specific t 
curative and restorative nursing care of hos 
pitalized patients with acute or chroni 
health problems. This course is taken cor 
currently with the course 55.321 to provid 
comprehensive study in dynamic, progre 
sive nurse-patient care in various hospitij 
settings. Prerequisite: 55.311 and 55.312 

55.411 DISTRIBUTIVE CARE: COMPLEX CO^l 
MUNITY HEALTH PROBLEMS (4) Th 
course offers study in the inter-relationsh 
and application of nursing interventioi 
specific to multi-faceted health problen 
within contemporary urban and suburb; 
settings. Attention is given to the nurse 



an interdisciplinary health team member 
who provides psycho-social, as well as phys- 
ical care to individuals and families. Pre- 
requisite: 55.321 and 55.322. 

55.412 EPISODIC CARE: COMPLEX CLINICAL 
SITUATIONS (9) This course focuses on 
comprehensive knowledge of human be- 
havior, technology and procedures. Con- 
centration is judiciously applied to curative 
and restorative care of patients with com- 
plex health problems and confined to gen- 
eral or psychiatric health care institutions. 
Prerequisite: 55.321 and 55.322. 

55.421 ADVANCED DISTRIBUTIVE CARE (4) 
This course offers further study and in- 
creased competence in nursing practice. 
Emphasis is on health maintenance and dis- 
ease prevention for persons not confined to 
health care institutions. According to inter- 
est, the student selects the environmental 
setting and the particular individual-group 
health problems for independent study. Pre- 
requisite: 55.411 and 55.412. 

55.422 ADVANCED EPISODIC CARE (4) This 
cojrse offers further study and increased 
competence in nursing practice. Emphasis 
is on curative and restorative care for hos- 
pitalized persons with acute-chronic physio- 



logic and psychiatric problems. According 

to interest, the student selects the clinical 
setting and the particular individual-group 
problem for independent study. Prerequisite: 
55.411 and 55.412. 

55.423 NURSING LEADERSHIP (9) The focus 
of this course is on the study of cross- 
relationships between human relations and 
organizational effectiveness for the delivery 
of health care. Attention is given to leader- 
ship sl<ills, professional ethics, legal bound- 
aries, the economics of health services and 
citizenship. Prerequisite: 55.411 and 55.412. 

NOTE: DISTRIBUTIVE CARE is the area of con- 
centration in nursing practice which empha- 
sizes that aspect essentially designed for 
health maintenance and disease prevention. 
This is generally continuous in nature, sel- 
dom acute and increasingly will take place 
in community or emergent institutional 
settings.* 

EPISODIC CARE is the area of concentra- 
tion in nursing practice which emphasizes 
that aspect essentially curative and restora- 
tive, generally acute or chronic in nature, 
and most frequently provided in the setting 
of the hospital or in-patient facility.* 



* National Commission for the Study of Nursing and Nursing Education, An Abstract for Action (New York: McGraw- 
Hill Book Company, 1970), pp. 91 and 92. 



NURSING 155 



Philosophy and Religion 

Professors: EBERHARDT (Chairman), MADDEN 
Associate Professor: HILL 

Assistant Professors: deBRABANDER, FUCHS, MURUNGI 
Instructor: ROBERTSON 

Courses offered by the Department are historical, systematic, analytic, or specu- 
lative, according to the nature of the course, the interests of the instructor, and 
the composition of the particular class. The attitude that informs all courses is 
scholarly or speculative, rather than sectarian or dogmatic. 

Requirements for the Major and Minor 

Basic Requirements: 58.101 Introduction to Philosophy, 58.203 Logic, 58.403 
Ethics. And four courses from the following — 58.321 Pre-Socratic and Classical 
Greek Philosophy, 58.322 Late Classical and Medieval Philosophy, 58.323 Renais- 
sance to 17th Century Philosophy, 58.324 18th and 19th Century Philosophy, 
58.325 Schools of Contemporary Philosophy, or 58.326 American Philosophy. 

Additional requirements for the minor: All of the above, plus any other 
term course (3 credits) for a total of 24- credits. 

Additional requirements for the major: In addition to the above basic re- 
quirements, four other term courses (12 credits) including at least two term 
courses in the 409 or 411 series are required. Two term courses (6 credits) may, 
with the permission of the Chairman, be taken in allied disciplines, e.g., history, 
mathematics, political theory, psychology, religion. In exceptional instances stu- 
dents may, with permission, make substitutions for required courses, e.g., a higher 
numbered course may be substituted for a lower numbered course. 

Note: Courses numbered 409 (Philosophical Systems) and 411 (Philosophi- 
cal Problems or Topics) may be taken in two or more terms provided the sub- 
ject matter of the course differs. The subject matter of courses 409 and 411 
will be indicated by the subtitle in the Schedule of Courses issued each term 
by the Registrar's Office. For example, 58.409: Philosophical Systems: Plato, 
and 58.409: Philosophical Systems: Kant, might both be taken for credit in the 
same or different terms, the difference in the content of the courses being indi- 
cated on the student's transcript by the different subtitles of the courses. 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

58.101 (101) INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 
(3) An introduction to some fundamental 
problems of philosophy and to various pro- 
posals for the solution of these problems. 

58.203 (203) LOGIC (3) Study of and practice 
in inductive and deductive reasoning, the 
composition of argument, and demonstration, 



and the detection of logical and non-logic£ 
fallacies. 
58.207 (207) PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVE 
(3) The course will consider contemporar 
issues from the uniquely philosophical pe 
spective in order to stimulate independei 
reflection on the part of the student. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



58.301 (301) PHILOSOPHIES OF INDIA (3) Ex- 
amination of some major philosophical sys- 
tems through selected writings in translation. 
Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or 
consent of instructor. 

58.302 (302) PHILOSOPHIES OF CHINA AND 
JAPAN (3) Examination of some major phil- 
osophical systems through selected writings 
in translation. Prerequisites: One course in 
philosophy or consent of instructor. 

156 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



58.321 (321) PRE-SOCRATIC AND CLASSIC/ 
GREEK PHILOSOPHY (3) 

58.322 (322) LATE CLASSICAL AND MEDIEV/ 
PHILOSOPHY (3) (Should not be attempt* 
without having taken 58.101 or 58.321.) 

58.323 (323) RENAISSANCE TO 17TH CE 
TURY PHILOSOPHY (3) (Should not | 
attempted without having taken 58.101 
58.321.) 



58.324 (324) 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY PHI- 
LOSOPHY (3) (Should not be attempted 
without having taken 58.101 or 58.321.) 

58.325 (325) SCHOOLS OF CONTEMPORARY 
PHILOSOPHY (3) A survey with varying 
emphases on a number of such contempo- 
rary philosophical positions as pragmatism, 
phenomenology, logical positivism, the anal- 
ysts, neo-Aristotelianism, the philosophers of 
science, and the existentialists. (Should not 
be attempted without having taken 58.101 or 
58.321.) 

58.326 (326) AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (3) A 
study of the main currents of American 
philosophical thought as exemplified in such 
writers as Edwards, Emerson, Peirce, James, 
Royce, Dewey and Whitehead. (Should not 
be attempted without having taken 58.101 or 
58.321.) 

58.354 (453) PHILOSOPHY OF BIBLICAL LIT- 
ERATURE: OLD TESTAMENT (3) Major 
themes of the Biblical Literature, and of its 
religious, philosophical and cultural implica- 
tions. 

58.401 (401) THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (3) An 
historical and systematicv approach to the 
truth value and elements of the forms of 
human knowledge. The theories of major 
philosophers will be studied. 

58.403 (403) ETHICS (3) Analysis of reading 
from the principle classical and contempo- 
rary ethical sources; study of the basic 
moral concepts as found in these sources; 
application to contemporary moral concerns. 

58.405 (405) AESTHETICS (3) An analytic and 
historical examination of concepts of the 
nature of art, beauty, aesthetic value, 
aesthetic perception, and of the modes of 
existence of artifacts. 

58.409 (409) PHILOSOPHICAL SYSTEMS (3) 
The study of a major philosophical system 
or position, classical or modern, and of its 
Important proponents. Prerequisites required: 
58.203, one other lower level course in 
philosophy, and consent of the Department. 

58.411 (411) PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS (3) 
A consideration of one of the perennial in- 
terests of philosophy. Prerequisites required: 
58.203, one other lower level course in phi- 
losophy, and consent of the Department. 

58.421 (421) ARCHAEOLOGY OF PALESTINE 
AND TRANS-JORDANIA (3) A study using 
audio-visual aids of the aims, techniques and 
artifacts of biblical archaeology. Research 
exercises may require the use of museums, 



collections and libraries. Prerequisites: 
58.461 or, any introductory course in Geog- 
raphy, History, Philosophy or. Consent of 
Department. 
58.451 (451) PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3) 
Exposition of various approaches to the 
philosophy of religion with an analysis of the 
major issues on which they differ and agree. 

58.454 (454) PHILOSOPHY OF BIBLICAL LIT- 
ERATURE: NEW TESTAMENT (3) Major 
themes of the Biblical Literature, and of its 
religious, philosophical and cultural implica- 
tions. 

58.455 (455) HELLENISTIC ERA (3) Three sig- 
nificant phases of the preparation of the 
Mediterranean world for the Hebraic-Hellenic 
synthesis: (1) Judaism, (2) Hellenism, and 
(3) the Roman conquest. Contribution of 
archeology will be indicated. 

58.457 (457) COMPARATIVE RELIGION I (3) 
Examination of Eastern religions, culture 
and life — Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucian- 
ism, Taoism, Shinto. Prerequisites: At least 
one lower division course in Philosophy, 
Religion or History. 

58.458 (458) COMPARATIVE RELIGION II (3) 
Examination of the religious life and culture 
of the Near East and Africa. Prerequisites: 
At least one lower division course in Philos- 
ophy, Religion or History. 

58.459 (459) PROTESTANT, CATHOLIC, JEW 
(3) Judaism and Christianity. A study of 
their biblical, historical and cultural sources. 

58.461 (461) HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
PALESTINE (3) The course seeks to assess 
the role of geographical and historical dis- 
ciplines (the provenance), used conjointly, in 
biblical interpretation. Prerequisites: Any in- 
troductory course in Geography, History or 
Philosophy or. Consent of '"department. 

58.471 (471) THE IDEA OF WOMAN IN PHILOS- 
OPHY (3) Course will study various con- 
cepts which philosophers have used to de- 
fine woman. An historical approach with 
readings by philosophers such as Plato, 
Aristotle, Schopenhauer, and ending with 
Beauvoir. Prerequisites: Any lower level 
course in Philosophy or. Consent of Depart- 
ment. 

58.495 (495) RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN PHILOS- 
OPHY (3) Directed readings and research 
leading to a thesis paper under one or more 
members of The Department. Open only to 
philosophy majors or students with demon- 
strated competency and having senior stand- 
ing. 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 157 



Physical Education 

Men's Department 

Professors: SHEETS 

Associate Professors: KILLIAN, MEiNHARDT, SLEVIN, ZEIGLER (Chairman) 

Assistant Professors: ANGOTTI, FIELD, McDONALD, McGINTY, RIORDON, RUNK, 

FORBES, STINAR 
Instructors: ALBERT, GIOVANDO, BRITT 

Women's Department 

Professor: BIZE (Ctiairman), CONARD 

Associate Professors: EASQN, KELLY, MYRANT, ROACH, VERKRUZEN 

Assistant Professors: BLANN, BOUTON, HARRIS 

Instructors: BOUCHER, DUNCAN, FAULKNER, FINCH 

Visiting Professors: CLEAVES, WALTER 

Program for Non-Majors 

Service Division 

The program of physical education is planned to provide the student with an 
opportunity to acquire the skills and understanding of selected physical activi- 
ties. Emphasis is placed on the development of sufficient competence to promote 
satisfaction and enjoyment in sports and recreational activities. To meet the 
general course requirements of all students in Group IV, a minimum of one 
credit must be taken from 011-059 (60-coed, 61-men, 62-M^omen) course offer- 
ings. Students v^^ith medically screened physical limitations may elect adapted 
physical education (60,009). Activity courses may be taken each semester of the 
student's academic career. 

A partial list of course offerings follows: 009 Adaptive-Modified; Oil 
Archery; 013 Badminton; 015 Baseball; 017 Basketball; 019 Body Mechanics; 
020 Bowling; 021 Conditioning; 023 Fencing; 025 Field Hockey; 027 Folk Dance; 
029 Football; 031 Golf; 033 Gymnastics; 035 Handball; 036 Lacrosse; 037 Modern 
Dance; 039 Movement Fundamentals; 040 Rhythmic Fundamentals; 041 Soccer; 
042 Jazz Dance; 043 Softball; 045 Swimming I; 046 Swimming II; 047 Swim- 
ming III; 049 Synchronized Swimming; 051 Senior Life Saving; 052 Water 
Safety Instructor; 053 Tennis; 055 Track and Field; 057 Volleyball; and 059 
Wrestling. 

Non-Major students may apply for credit by examination for prior experi- 
ence or skill by contacting the respective chairperson for college and Depart- 
mental procedures. 

Elementary Education — Physical Education Division 

101-102 PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR ELEMEN- analysis of group behavior. Prerequisites to 

TARY EDUCATION STUDENTS The course 60.324. 

t>il1llfJf'\^^^ •^^"'^'' H^ ^J^";^"*^^y 324 Special sections of The Teaching of Physi- 

TnH nL^inn h c>^T.l .^"f ^^J^^.^'"?. ^^ cal Education in the Elementary School rJ^ay 

and develop a basic ability in the basic skills ^e selected by students in the elementary 

of children s activities. The course provides education block program. The course is de- 

opportunity to become familiar with methods 3, ^^ to i,3 the student knowledge and 

o learning skills and to appreciate the needs g^tical experience in teaching the elemen- 

of the individuals in motor learning and ^ary child. Prerequisites: 101-102. 

Program for Physical Education Majors 

Students may select a major in physical education. The purpose of the major 

is to prepare competent teachers of physical education for the public schools of 

158 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Maryland. Graduates are certified to teach at the elementary and secondary 
level. A planned sequence of courses is designed to provide the student with 
skills and leadership experiences needed to direct a balanced program in class, 
intramural and extramural activities, and varsity sports. All men physical edu- 
cation majors are requested to serve two semesters as a member of an intercol- 
legiate team or serve an equivalent time in the athletic training or intramural 
programs. 

A physical education major takes the general college requirements, and must 
complete Physics, Biology and Human Anatomy and Physiology. Additional re- 
quirements are listed below. A total of thirty-eight to forty credit hours of 
physical education is required for a major in physical education. 



IV. 





Course No. 


Cr. 


V. Physical Education 






Biology 






Theory — Men and Women 






Human Anatomy and 






Overview of Physical 






Physiology 


14.113-144 


8 


Education 


199 


2 


Psychology 






Curriculum in Physical 






General Psychology 


70.101 


3 


Education 


203 


3 


Educational Psychology 


70.201 


3 


Organization & 






Health 






Administration 


303 


3 


Current Health Problems 


38.101 


3 


Tests & Measurements 


309 


3 


First Aid 


38.103 


1 


Kinesiology 


311 


3 


Health Education in the 






Physiology of Exercise 


313 


2 


School 1 


38.201 


3 


*Care & Prevention of 






Education 






Athletic Injuries 


315 


2 


Introduction to Teaching 


27.101 


1 


'Coaching & Officiating 


321-322 


1-1 


Student Teaching 






Teaching Physical Education 






Elementary 


26.497 


7 


in the Elementary School 


324 


2 


Secondary 


27.398 


7 


Teaching Physical Education 






Survey of Education 


28.319 


3 


in the Secondary School 


325 


2 


Foundations of Education 


27.401 


2 


Principles and Problems of 






Laboratory in New 






Physical Education 


401-402 


2-2 


Educational Media 


13.369 


1 


** Adaptive Physical Education 


423 


2 


Required (men); Elective (women) 










Required (women); Elective 


(men) 











Professional Laboratory Skills 

Professional laboratory skill courses (103-159) (0.5-1.0) provide instruction in 
the basic activities appropriate for a teacher of physical education, including 
acquisition of skills and methods of instruction. Twelve credits are required. 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 



MEN (Required — all courses are .5 credits) 






9 credits 


106-157 Badminton-Volleyball 


130 


Gymnastics 1 




107-143 Baseball-Softball 


131 


Gymnastics II 




109 Basic Rhythms 


133 


Lacrosse 




111 Basketball 


141 


Soccer 




116 Conditioning 


*145 


Swimming 1 




118 Elementary Games 


*146 


Swimming II 




124 Folk Dance 


153 


Tennis 




126 Football 


155 


Track & Field 




128 Golf 


159 


Wrestling 




MEN (Elective — six courses) 






3 credits 


103 Archery 


135 


Modern Dance 




112 Basketball II 


137 


Social Dance 




113 Body Mechanics 


151 


Senior Life Saving 




114 Bowling 


*147 


Swimming III 




128 Golf II 


**152 


Water Safety Instructor 




132 Gymnastics III 


148 


Water Polo 




140 Handball 


153 


Tennis 




139 Jazz Dance 









Total of 12 credits required 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 159 



WOMEN {Required — all courses are .5 credits 


) 




9 credits 


103 Archery 


131 


Gymnastics II 




105 Badminton 


133 


Lacrosse 




109 Basic Rhytlims 


135 


Modern Dance 




111 Basl<etbali 


141 


Soccer 




113 Body Mechanics 


143 


Softball 




118 Elementary Games 


*145 


Swimming 1 




122 Field Hocl<ey 


153 


Tennis 




124 Folk Dance 


155 


Track & Field 




130 Gymnastics 1 


157 


Volleyball 




WOMEN {Elective — six courses) 






3 credits 


112 Basl<etball II 


136 


Modern Dance II 




114 Bowling 


137 


Social Dance 




120 Fencing 


*146 


Swimming II 




128 Golf 1 


*147 


Swimming III 




129 Golf II 


*149 


Synchronized Swimming 




132 Gymnastics III 


151 


Senior Life Saving 




139 Jazz Dance 


**152 


Water Safety Instructor 






154 


Tennis II 





Total of 12 credits required 
*Students will be screened through the use of placement tests and assigned to aquatic courses (145 
through 152) according to individual ability. 
**1.0 credit 



Professional Theory Courses 

199 OVERVIEW OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (2) 
A brief history of physical education empha- 
sizing the place of physical education in ed- 
ucation today, identification of leaders in the 
field, the role of professional ethics and 
standards, professional organizations (their 
purpose and function), and an introduction 
to professional literature. 

203 CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
(3) Physical education as a part of general 

Upper Division — Undergraduate 

301 RECREATION (3) Preparation for leader- 
ship and organization of after-school activi- 
ties for children, such as club, hiking, camp- 
ing and playground activities. Visits to rec- 
reation centers. Specialists in story telling, 
crafts, recreational singing, playground and 
cIuId work give part of the course. Participa- 
tion in some organized recreation with chil- 
dren. 

303 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
(3) Investigation of policies and procedures 
in the organization and administration of 
physical education. Areas covered include 
facilities, equipment, budget, scheduling, 
special events, records, awards. 

305 SCHOOL CAMPING AND OUTDOOR EDU- 
CATION (2) Aims, organization, administra- 
tion, and program of the school camp. 

309 TESTS AND MEASUREMENT IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (3) Background for develop- 
ment of measurement programs in physical 
education; elementary statistical procedures; 
interpretation of data; selection and adminis- 
tration of tests measuring strength, fitness, 
motor ability, and sports skills applicable to 
various grade and age levels. 

311 KINESIOLOGY (3) Mechanical and ana- 
tomical analysis of movement in relation to 



education, aims and content. Principles for 
development of a sequential physical educa- 
tion curriculum in grades one through twelve. 
205 CAMP LEADERSHIP (2) The role of the 
camp counselor in organized camping. Em- 
phasis on camp related skills of campcraft, 
trips, crafts and nature study. Several field 
trips. 



human performance. Prerequisite: PhSc 64.- 
101 or 66.211, Biology 14.113-114. 

313 PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE (2) Applica- 
tion of principles of physiology to large 
muscle activity, with special emphasis on the 
interrelations of muscular, nervous, circula- 
tory, and respiratory functions during exer- 
cise. Prerequisite: Biology 14.113-114. 

315 CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC 
INJURIES (2) Theoretical and practical 
methods of preventing and treating athletic 
injuries; techniques of taping and bandag- 
ing; emergency first aid; massage; use of 
physical therapy modalities. Prerequisite: 
Biology 14.113-114. 

317 MODERN DANCE COMPOSITION (2, 3) Ap- 
proaches to composition through short stud- 
ies directed toward a feeling of phasing and 
form in dance. To be offered as an elective 
for the physical education major or for any 
interested student. Prerequisite: Approval of 
instructor. 

319-320 CHOREOGRAPHIC PROBLEMS (3, 3) 
Studies on the intermediate level using Pre- 
Classic forms and modern idioms of dance. 
Problems involved in choreographing for 
solo, duet, and small group dances. Prere- 
quisite: 317. 



160 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



321-322 COACHING AND OFFICIATING (1, 1) 
Fundamentals, tactics, strategy, ethics and 
other factors in coaching and officiating 
sports. Prerequisite: Professional Laboratory 
Skills related to Team Sports. 

324 TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) The focus of 
this course is the child-in-movement. Spe- 
cific attention centers on individual and 
group progressions for a wide variety of 
movements, methods of organization, direct 
and problem-solving teaching methods, and 
motor development. Opportunities to observe 
and teach children are provided. 

325 TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOLS (2) Course provides 
an extended period of observation-participa- 
tion in a junior or senior high school. The 
course includes responsibilities of the sec- 
ondary school physical education teacher. 



teaching methods, lesson and unit planning, 
and topics resulting from the participation 
experience. 

401-402 PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (2, 2) The applica- 
tion of knovi/iedge derived from psycholog- 
ical, sociological and philosophical research 
findings about human movement to the teach- 
ing of physical education. The courses will 
emphasize research technique, individual 
projects and the synthesizing of information 
into logical foundations for teaching prac- 
tices. Prerequisites: 199, 203. 

403 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
OF INTRAMURALS Course designed to per- 
mit the graduate and undergraduate student 
to acquire the skills of administration neces- 
sary in the development and organization of 
intramural programs in schools and colleges. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



60.412 THEORY AND ANALYSIS OF GYMNAS- 
TICS MOVEMENT (3) Theoretical and 
practical ar«plication of mechanical analysis 
of movement concepts as related to proper 
execution of skills in gymnastics: The tech- 
niques and methods used in this course are 
designed to provide the teacher a logical 
system for presenting gymnastic skills to 
facilitate learning for the student; to demon- 
strate that gymnastic skills are logically 
founded on basic physics or terrestrial 
mechanics; to present aiding and spotting 
techniques. 

60.419 SWIMMING AND POOL MANAGEMENT 
(3) An advanced course in teaching meth- 
ods for all levels of swimming and diving. 
Modern methods of training the competitive 
swimmer with emphasis on technique and 
conditioning of the individual. The organiza- 
tion and administration of swimming pools 
and clubs with regard to staff, recreation 
and pool filtration. Prerequisites: Senior 
Lifesaving and Water Safety Instructors, or 
consent of instructor. This is a certifiable 
course for pool management, approved by 
the Department of Health, Baltimore County. 

60.421 PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) Aims of 
the physical education program, trends in 
methods, materials and curriculum. Current 
issues and research concerned with ele- 
mentary school physical education programs. 

60.423 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION (2) 
Recognition of pupils with physical devia- 
tions, and use of special or modified physi- 
cal education activities. Prerequisite: 311. 

60.425 MODERN DANCE IN SECONDARY 
SCHOOL (3) Dance techniques and ele- 
ments of composition for the secondary 
school teacher. Not open to those who have 
taken Modern Dance Composition. Pre- 
requisite: Approval of instructor (Offered 
only in evening and summer) 



60.430 MOVEMENT EDUCATION IN THE ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOL (3) Application of 
problem solving and individualized methods 
to teaching of movement for the elementary 
school child. Development materials for 
teaching creative dance, games, sports. 
Survey of current literature. 

60.441 THE SPORTSWOMAN IN AMERICAN 
SOCIETY (3) The purpose of this course 
is to examine the American woman in sport. 
Literature from the historical, physiological, 
sociological, psychological and philosophi- 
cal perspective will be reviewed. Concepts 
revealed will be contrasted with myths about 
and societal attitudes toward women who 
participate in sport. Prerequisites: Phed 203 
and 303, or permission of instructor. 

60.453 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
OF ATHLETICS (3) Designed to aid those 
persons responsible for organizing and ad- 
ministering intramural and interschool ath- 
letic programs. Topics such as organiza- 
tional patterns, objectives of the programs, 
controls, game management, records, con- 
duct of tournaments, officials, awards, and 
means of promoting the programs will be 
considered. Study will be made of competi- 
tive as well as informal recreation programs 
on all educational levels, with special em- 
phasis on the secondary schools. 

60.485 SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICAL EDU- 
CATION (3) Workshop designed for study 
of special topics of current interest in physi- 
cal education and athletics. Content varies 
and will focus on substantive material or 
operational problems. 

60.509 PSYCHOLOGY OF MOTOR LEARNING 
(3) Investigation of the various psychologi- 
cal factors that affect the acquisition of 
motor skills. Emphasis will be focused on 
teaching and practice methodology, motiva- 
tional factors, learning theories, physical 
and motor considerations, anxiety, stress, 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 161 



tension, competition, mental practice, trans- 
fer of training, level of aspiration, etc. Pre- 
requisite: Bachelor's degree with a major in 
Physical Education. 

60.512 SIGNIFICANT PERIODS IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (3) An examination of the in- 
fluence of Greek, Roman, European and 
English concepts of physical education upon 
American physical education. Emphasis on 
the formation and development of American 
concepts of physical education. 

60.513 ANALYSIS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CON- 
CEPTS (3) Analysis of research and lab- 
oratory application of the physiological fac- 
tors that affect human efficiency before, 
during and after exercise. Factors to be 
investigated include: metabolism, circula- 
tion-respiration, muscular physiology, en- 
docrine system, ergogenic aids, environ- 
mental factors, etc. Prerequisite: Consent of 
department chairman. 

60.530 MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF MOVE- 
MENT (3) Various basic mechanical prin- 
ciples are analyzed as they relate to 
efficient human movement. The physical 
laws to be studied are leverage, motion, 
projectiles, gravity, buoyancy and equilib- 
rium. The design of the course will be re- 
search oriented. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 
and an undergraduate major in Physical 
Education or consent of the department 
chairman. 

60.533 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 
OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) Designed 
to acquaint the student with the scope, prob- 
lems and techniques of administering and 
supervising a program of physical education. 
The work of the chairman of the department, 
problems of personnel, program, facilities, 
and evaluation will be discussed. Prerequi- 
site: Undergraduate degree in Physical Edu- 
cation and consent of instructor. 

60.539 CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF CURRENT 
LITERATURE (3) Designed to facilitate the 
depth and quality of the knowledge of stu- 
dents, teachers, administrators, supervisors 
and research personnel in their assessment 
and investigation of the following aspects of 
the physical education profession: contem- 
porary leaders, books, journals, periodicals, 
projects, trends, issues, innovations, etc. 



Prerequisite; Undergraduate degree in phys- 
ical education or consent of department 
chairman. 

60.541 EVALUATIVE TECHNIQUES IN PHYSI- 
CAL EDUCATION (3) Designed primarily 
to develop analytical ability in the adminis- 
tration, assessment and interpretation of test 
results. Research and laboratory application 
involves the evaluation of measurements of 
classification indexes, power, agility, motor 
ability, balance, flexibility, kinesthetic per- 
ception, speed and recreation time, strength, 
muscular endurance, cardiovascular condi- 
tion, sport skills, etc. Prerequisites: Under- 
graduate major in physical education. 

60.545 FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT FOR 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) Designed to 
cover the principles of programming and 
planning facilities for physical education. 
Indoor and outdoor activity areas will be 
studied as well as their maintenance. Pro- 
cedure related to selection, purchase and 
care of equipment will be included. Pre- 
requisite: Undergraduate degree with a 
major in Physical Education or consent of 
the department chairman. 

60.547 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (3) Research on a project of 
particular significance to the individual 
through consultation with designated faculty 
members. Focus will be on the experimental 
design and the proper structural format for 
project or thesis formulation. Prerequisite: 
Consent of department chairman. 

60.551 COMPARATIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
—CONTEMPORARY AND INTERNATIONAL 
(3) A comparative analysis of contempo- 
rary patterns of physical education in se- 
lected countries throughout the world. Pre- 
requisite: Undergraduate major in physical 
education or consent of the department 
chairman. 

60.553 CONTEMPORARY PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION CURRICULUM (3) Curriculum design 
for elementary and secondary school physi- 
cal education. Examination of current litera- 
ture pertinent to aims, objectives, content, 
and method of physical education. Pre- 
requisites: Teaching experience, under- 
graduate physical education major or per- 
mission of instructor. 



162 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Physics Department 



Professors: BAREHAM, COX, NEWMAN (Co-Chairman), PELHAM (Co-Chairman) 
Associate Professors: HUANG, JOHNSON, MOOREFIELD, RUBENDALL 
Assistant Professors: CHEN, GREENE, KREISEL, LOH, MOLITOR, UKENS, ZIPFEL 

The Department offers two majors programs, physics and natural science, and 
many other service courses in liberal art's physics, and science education. 

Physics Major 

The major program is designed to meet the needs of three groups of students, 
those planning (1) to be physics teachers in the secondary schools, (2) to enter 
graduate study in physics, environmental science, mechanics, oceanography, 
geophysics or other applied physics, and (3) to be physicists in industry, govern- 
ment, and other non-teaching professions. The last two groups are classified as 
regular physics major and the first group is classified as physics teacher major. 
Their respective requirements are expressed in the following: 

Regular Physics Majors: 66.221, 222 (or 66.211, 212); 66.301; 66.305; 
66.311; 66.313; 66.321; any two of 66.385, 386, 387; 66.401; 66.471 (35 credits 
of physics) ; 50.373. 

Physics Teacher Majors: 66.221, 222 (or 66.211, 212); 66.311; any two of 
66.385, 386, 387; 66.302 or 66.321; 66.301 or 66.305; 66.401 (28 credits of 
physics) . 

The above majors are required to have the following non-physics courses: 
50.273, 274 (calculus) ; 22.103, 104 or 22.103 and 14.101. 

Physics teacher major students need to take 22 semester hours of education 
courses. Students who intend to be physics majors should see one of the follow- 
ing instructors, Newman, Loh, Huang, Greene, and Zipfel, during the early part 
of their education in this College. 

For the above majors 12 credits of upper division Physics courses must be 
taken in this department. 

A Suggested Schedule for Physics Majors 

For Freshmen who had algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in high 
school, it is highly recommended to take PHYS 66.221-222 (or 211-212) and 
MATH 50.273-274 in their first year. Other students may take the following 
kind of schedule. 

First Year: 1st Semester: Chemistry 22.101 or 103 (4), Mathematics 50.115 
or 119 (3), English 30.102 or 104 (3), German 36.101 or Russian 74.101 (3), 
Speech 84.101 or Elective from General Education Requirements (2 or 3) ; total 
of 15 or 16 credit hours. 2nd Semester: 22.102 or 104 (4), 50.116 or 273 (3 or 4), 
English elective (3), German 36.102 or Russian 74.101 (3), Elective from Gen- 
eral Education Requirement (3) ; total of 16 or 17 credit hours. 

Second Year: 1st Semester: General Physics 66.221 (4), Biolog>' 14.101 
(4), Mathematics 50.273 or 274 (4), Elective from General Requirements (4 or 
5); total of 16 or 17 credit hours. 2nd Semester: General Physics 66.222 (4), 
Mathematics 50.274 or 373 (4), Health or Physical Education Requirements 
(1 or 3) , Elective (6) ; total of 15, 16, or 17 credit hours. 

Third Year: 1st Semester: Mechanics 66.301 (4), Mathematic Physics 
66.321 (3), Electricity and Magnetism 66.305 (4), Advanced Lab 66.385-387 or 
Basic Electronics 66.335 (3), Electives from General Requirements (1 to 3); 
total of 15, 16, or 17 credit hours. 2nd Semester: Thermodynamics 66.302 (3), 
Modern Physics 66.311 (4), Advanced Lab 66.385-387 or Basic Electronics 66.335 
(3), Electives (6 or 7) ; total of 15 or 16 credit hours. 



163 



Fourth Year: 1st Semester: Physics Seminar 66.401 (1), Physical Optics 
66.411 (3), Quantum Mechanics 66.471 (3), Other Electives (9); total of 16 
credit hours. 2nd Semester: Advanced Lab 66.385-386 or Electronics 66.437 (3), 
Statistical Mechanics 66.472 (3), Other Electives (10) ; total of 16 credit hours. 

Students planning to teach in public schools (physics teacher majors) may 
schedule the required education courses (22 credits) in the 3rd or 4th year. The 
electives must be chosen to satisfy the total 128 semester hours College Require- 
ments. Students should beware that most of the advanced physics courses (300 
and 400 levels) may be offered in either the first semester or the second semester, 
but not in both semesters. Usually General Physics 66.211 (or 221) is also offered 
in the second semester and 66.212 (or 222) in the first semester. Students should 
plan their schedules according to the offering in each semester. It is the respon- 
sibility of the student to plan his program so that he may complete all require- 
ments before graduation. 

Physics Minor 

The requirements for physics minor are 20 credits in physics courses including 
PHYS 66.211-212 (or 221-222), 301, 311. For further information consult De- 
partment Chairmen. 

Natural Science Major 

The program is designed to give a broader view of the sciences than is obtained 
in a traditional undergraduate major in a single science. This is done at the 
sacrifice of depth and students should therefore be aware that this major may 
not prepare them for graduate work in a single science. Course requirements 
are: BIOLOGY 14.101, 105, 109; CHEMISTRY 22.101-102; one course either 
210, 211, 230, or 231; MATHEMATICS 50.115; PHYSICAL SCIENCES 64.121, 
211; PHYSICS 66.211-212 (or 212-222) ; BIOLOGY 14.291 or 14.491 or PHYSI- 
CAL SCIENCES 64.401; biological or physical sciences electives (including one 
field course) for eleven credit hours, for a total of 54 hours in physical sciences, 
biological sciences and mathematics. 

Prospective secondary school teachers of general science should elect this 
major. Students should plan their programs to meet the certification require- 
ments of the area in which they plan to teach. 



PHYSICS COURSES (PHYS) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

66.001 THE PHYSICS OF SOUND AND MUSIC 
(3) Study of sound and its production by 
various instruments (human voice included) 
in terms of basic physical concepts to be 
introduced. Physical interpretations will be 
given of pitch, loudness, harmonics and 
timbre, scales and temperament, etc. Other 
topics to be treated on an elementary level 
include: the mechanics of the inner ear, 
acoustics, electronic production and repro- 
duction. Two lecture hours and one two-hour 
laboratory period. 

66.002 AIR POLLUTION (3) 

66.101 GENERAL PHYSICS B (5) One semes- 
ter General Physics with special emphasis 
on motion including kinematics and dy- 
namics of linear and angular motion. 

66.211-212 GENERAL PHYSICS I, II (4, 4) For 
Arts and Science, Biology, and Natural Sci- 
ence Majors: Mechanics, heat, light, elec- 



tricity, magnetism and a brief introduction 
to modern physics. Three lecture hours and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Prerequi- 
site: MATH 50.115, or good standing of high 
school algebra and trigonometry. 

66.213 GENERAL PHYSICS A (5) Ane semes- 
ter General Physics with special emphasis 
,on geometric and physical optics, optical 
instruments, electricity and magnetism, ac 
and dc circuits, atomic and nuclear physics 
and fluid flow. Prerequisites: 50.115, 22.102 
or 22.104. 

66.221-222 GENERAL PHYSICS I, II (4, 4) For 
Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics Ma- 
jors: Mechanics, heat, light, electricity, mag- 
netism and a brief introduction to modern 
physics. Three lecture hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: MATH 
50.273 or concurrently. 

66.295 COURSE RESEARCH IN 200-LEVEL 
COURSES 



164 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



66.301 MECHANICS (4) Systems of coordi- 
nates and kinematic components of motion; 
Newtonian dynamics of particles and linear 
systems, including planetary motion and 
oscillations in damped and undamped sys- 
tems; virtual work; generalized coordinates 
and Lagrange's equations; Hamiton's prin- 
ciple with elementary applications of least 
action, varying action and the canonical 
equations. Some nonlinear effects will be 
introduced. Four lecture hours. Prerequisite: 
PHYS 66.222 or 66.212. MATH 50.274. 

66.302 THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETIC THE- 
ORY (3) Principles and laws of classical 
thermodynamics applied to simpler irrever- 
sible processes, including chemical, elastic, 
electric and magnetic phenomena; thermo- 
dynamic functions and Maxwell's relations; 
the conservation equations in elementary 
kinetic theory; fluctuations and irreversible 
transfer effects. This course may be taken 
concurrently with PHYS 66.212 or 66.222 by 
permission. Three lecture hours. Prerequi- 
site: PHYS 66.212 or 66.222. MATH 50.274. 

66.305 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (4) 
Theorems of Gauss and Stokes as applied 
to electrostatics and magnetostatics; dia- 
magnetism and paramagnetism; steady and 
transient current effects; alternating currents; 
conduction in gases, photoelectricity; and 
electron theories of solid state phenomena; 
the classic treatment of Maxwell-Lorentz elec- 
tromagnetic and propagation effects. And 
possibly the following topics will be in- 
cluded: the special theory of relativity; intro- 
duction to microwaves and wave guides; 
plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics. 
Four lecture hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 
66.212 or 66.222. MATH 50.274. 

66.311 MODERN PHYSICS (4) The specific 
details of this course will be changed from 
time to time as necessitated by student in- 
terests and needs. In general, the inter- 
mediate principles and applications of rela- 
tivity, quantum physics, elementary particles, 
nuclear physics and solid state theory will 
serve as the foundation for additional spe- 
cialized developments of current interest. 
Four lecture hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 
66.222 or 66.212. MATH 50.274. 

66.313 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF PHYS- 
ICS (2) The works of Sarton, Cohen, Singer 
and Dampier on the history and significance 
of physical concepts. The philosophical con- 
cepts of Bridgeman, Russell, Heisenberg and 
other contemporaries interpreted in the his- 
torical development. Two lecture hours. 

66.321 INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICAL PHYS- 
ICS (3) As the mathematical maturity of the 
students will allow, selected topics will be 
examined such as the generalized expres- 
sions for forces and potentials, vector analy- 
sis, applications of Fourier series and com- 
plex variables, and solutions of the harmonic 
oscillator and wave equations. Three lecture 



hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 66.222 or 66.212, 
MATH 50.373 or concurrently. 

66.335 BASIC ELECTRONICS (4) Circuit com- 
ponents, characteristics of semiconductors, 
electrical measurements, method of circuit 
analysis, electronic devices. Three lecture 
hours and one three-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: 66.212 or 66.222 or consent of 
instructor. 

The following three, single-semester courses, 
called ADVANCED PHYSICS LABORATORY, 
may be taken independently subject to the 
requirements as specified for each. Three 
laboratory hours and three hours of inde- 
pendent work. 

66.385 MECHANICS AND HEAT (3) Equilib- 
rium of rigid bodies; moments of inertia; 
laws of angular motion; physical and tor- 
sional pendulums; servomechanisms; surface 
tension; vapor pressure and hygrometry; 
viscosity of fluids; continuous flow calorim- 
etry; thermal conductivity; black-body radia- 
tion; acoustics. Prerequisite: PHYS 66.301 
or concurrently. 

66.386 MODERN PHYSICS (3) Milikan oil drop 
experiment, e/m measurement, photoelec- 
tric effect, electron diffraction, Franck-Hertz 
experiment, radioactivity, lasers, soft x-ray 
and additional specialized developments of 
current interests. Prerequisite: PHYS 66.311 
or concurrently. 

66.387 ELECTRICITY AND OPTICS (3) Kirch- 
hoff's laws; potential differences; galvanom- 
eter measurements; resistance thermometers, 
fuel cells; thermoelectricity; indices of re- 
fraction — of lenses; interference effects; 
spectroscopy. PHYS 66.305 is a requirement 
which may be taken concurrently. 

66.395 COURSE RESEARCH IN 300-LEVEL 
COURSES 

66.401, 402 PHYSICS SEMINAR (1, 1) Students 
participate in colloquia on topics of current 
interests in physics research under guidance 
of instructor. One lecture hour. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

66 411 PHYSICAL OPTICS (3) Electromag- 
netic theory of light, wave solutions, interfer- 
ence, diffraction, scattering, radiation from 
coherent and incoherent sources, elementary 
theory of masers and lasers. Three lecture 
hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 66.305 or consent 
of instructor. 

66.435 ELECTRONICS (3) Principles of tran- 
sistors with emphasis on their design and 
construction and an introduction to logic 
circuits. Two lecture hours and one two-hour 
laboratory period. Prerequisite: PHYS 66.305, 
66.335. 

66.471 INTRODUCTORY QUANTUM MECHAN- 
ICS (3) The Schroedinger equation, states 
of one particle in one dimension, potential 
barrier problems in one dimension, the har- 



PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 165 



monic oscillator, system of particles in one 
dimension, motion in three dimensions, ang- 
ular momentum, spin, application to atomic 
physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 66.301. MATH 
50.373. 
66.472 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL ME- 
CHANICS (3) Distribution function, micro- 
canonical, canonical and grand canonical en- 
sembles, the partition function and thermo- 
dynamic relations. Fermi-Dirac and Bose- 
Einstein statistics, some simple model and 



applications, the Maxwell-Botzman transport 
equation and the hydrodynamic equations, 
transport coefficients. Three lecture hours. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 66.471. 

66.496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHYSICS (1-4) 
Prerequisite: At least junior status and one 
course in the Physics Department. 

66.497 DIRECTED READINGS (1-4) Prerequi- 
site: At least junior status and one course 
in the Physics Department. 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE COURSES (PHSC) 

64.101 PHYSICAL SCIENCE I (4) Principles of 
physics with an emphasis on the application 
of scientific method. 

64.121 GENERAL GEOLOGY (3) Composition 
and structure of the earth. The internal and 
external forces acting upon it and the sur- 
face features resulting. Laboratory studies 
of the common rocks and minerals, geologic 
and topographic maps and aerial photo- 
graphs. Field studies in the Baltimore area. 
Two lecture hours and one two-hour labora- 
tory period. 

64.131 LIGHT AND COLOR (3) Some aspects 
of light and color and of vision will be ex- 
amined on a factual and descriptive basis. 
Predominantly qualitative explorations will 
be made of the origin of light, of its wave 
and particle behavior, of the polarization of 
light, of lasers and holography, of the origin 
and physical basis of color, and of the phys- 
ics of vision. This course in liberal arts 
physics is offered for curious inquirers who 
have had minimal contact with physics. 
Three lecture hours. 

64.195 COURSE RESEARCH IN 100-LEVEL 
COURSES 

64.201 CLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY 
WRITINGS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES (1) 
Discussion of writings of eminent scientists 
and scholars — ancient and modern — in the 
physical sciences as they pertain to broad 
philosophical questions. Prerequisite: A 
course in Physical Science. 

64.202 PHYSICAL SCIENCE II (4) A course for 
non-science majors who are interested in 
more rigorous and quantitative work in the 
physical sciences. Enough non-rigorous cal- 
culus will be taught with the help of a pro- 
grammed text so applications in classical 
thermodynamics will be possible. Other 
topics: rigorous development of the tem- 
perature concept; heat transfer and engines. 
Three lecture hours and one three-hour lab- 
oratory period. Prerequisite: PHSC 64.101 



and consent of instructor. Only high school 
algebra assumed. Not offered in 73-74. 

64.203 PHYSICAL SCIENCE III (3) Principles 
of hydrostatics, mechanics, electricity and 
electronics through a study of selected prac- 
tices in the transmission of energy and in- 
telligence. Two lecture hours and one two- 
hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: PHSC 
64.101. Not offered 73-74. 

64.204 PHYSICAL SCIENCE IV (3) Principles 
of fluid dynamics, aeronautics, astronautics, 
optics and astronomy. Two lecture hours and 
one two-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: 
PHSC 64.101. Not offered 73-74. 

64.211 GENERAL ASTRONOMY I (3) Science 
of astronomy; investigations and theories 
concerning the solar system, galaxies and 
the universe. Two lecture hours and one 
two-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: 
PHSC 64.101, or consent of instructor. 

64.212 GENERAL ASTRONOMY II (3) A study 
of stars, stellar systems, galaxies, and cos- 
mology. Emphasis will be placed on the 
determination of the distance scale and 
modern trends in astronomy including meth- 
ods used on space probes. Three contact 
hours. Prerequisite: PHSC 64.211, or accept- 
able substitute. 

64.222 GEOMORPHOLOGY (3) Origin and evo- 
lution of surface features of the earth as 
controlled by the interaction of geologic 
structures and erosional processes. Field 
work in the Maryland area. Two lecture hours 
and one two-hour laboratory period. Pre- 
requisite: PHSC 64.101, 64.121. 

64.234 STILL PHOTOGRAPHY (3) Emphasis 
will be on the production of photographs, 
rather than the mastery of many techniques. 
Camera operation, developing, printing and 
other topics according to student interest. 
Five contact hours. 



64.295 COURSE RESEARCH 
COURSES 



IN 200-LEVEL 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

64.303 EARTH-SPACE SCIENCE IN CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION (3) Physical science 
principles applied in the study of earth and 



space. Emphasis on experimental and dis- 
covery approaches that may be used in the 
elementary school. 



166 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



64.322 GEOMORPHOLOGY OF THE EASTERN 
UNITED STATES (3) Extent, nature, and 
geological history of the geomorphic prov- 
inces of the Eastern United States. Empha- 
sis on the middle Atlantic states. Field ex- 
cursions in the Maryland area. Prerequisites: 
64.121 Geology. 

64.401 ADVANCED LABORATORY IN PHYSI- 
CAL SCIENCE (2) Exacting Laboratory 
work of an advanced nature under the 
guidance of the Physics Department staff. 
Each student will present and defend his 
work at a seminar. Prerequisite: Consent of 
Instructor. 



64.405 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN THE 
EARTH SCIENCES (3) Principles of astron- 
omy, geology and related earth sciences. 
Methods of investigation employed by earth 
scientists. Observations in the planetarium 
and field studies in the Baltimore area. Two 
lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: PHSC 64.101 or equiv- 
alent. No credit allowed if student has taken 
PHSC 64.211 (Astronomy) and/or PHSC 
64.121 (Geology). Designed especially for 
the elementary school teacher. 

64.495 COURSE RESEARCH IN 400-LEVEL 
COURSES 



SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES (SCIE) 

The following courses are taught by instructors in the Department of Physics 
and Biological Sciences. Course descriptions will be found under the Education 
Department listings : 



EDUC 26.323 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
PROFESSIONAL BLOCK 1— SCIENCE 

SCIE 76.371 TEACHING SCIENCE IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD 

SCIE 76.375 TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE ELE- 
MENTARY SCHOOL 



SCIE 76.379 TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE SEC- 
ONDARY SCHOOL 

SCIE 76.488 (SUMMERS) AEROSPACE EDUCA- 
TION WORKSHOP 

SCIE 76.585 SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL SCIENCE 



Elementary School Science Concentration 

For prospective elementary school teachers who wish a somewhat broader back- 
ground in science than that obtained from the required courses. Also open to 
other students, but arts and science and secondary education students should be 
aware that this program does not provide them with the "major" they must 
have in order to earn a degree. Course requirements are: BIOLOGY 14.101, 105, 
109, 301; PHYSICAL SCIENCES 64.101, 121, 202, 203, 204, 211 for a total of 
36 hours. Students electing this concentration are urged to take MATHE- 
MATICS 50.115. 



PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 167 



Psychology 



Professors: CASSATT, FURUKAWA (Chairman), HILL, NEULANDER, SAXTON, SUYDAM 

Associate Professors: GROENHEIM, RASKIN, SLATER 

Assistant Professors: ALLEN, BAILEY, DAVIS, DICESARE, DYER, FIGLER, LAVIN, 

LEYHE, MILLER, PETRI, RABIN, RAVAL, SANDERS, SIEGEL, URBAN, 

WALEN, WEBSTER, YOUNG, ZWEBACK 
Assistant Instructor: CRANE 
Instructor: FINK 

Visiting Professors: GIBSON, POPE 
Visiting Assistant Professor: McGEE 

A student may elect either a major (32 hours) or minor (24 hours) in psychology- 
programs aimed at understanding and predicting behavior. Electives beyond the 
basic requirements facilitate preparation for: (1) graduate work in psychology 
and in guidance, (2) training in special and in general education, (3) vocations 
requiring a liberal arts background, and (4) providing clinical services. 

Psychology Major 

The minimum requirements for a major in psychology are 70.101, 70.111, 70.261, 
and 70.805, along with an approved program of 18 elective hours in psychology. 
Majors in the clinical concentration, however, will be required to take other 
specific courses, as indicated below. 

Clinical Concentration for Psychology Majors 

The combined Sheppard Pratt-Towson State Clinical Concentration in Psychology 
will lead to a B.S. in Psychology from Towson State College and a certificate 
as a Mental Health Specialist from the Sheppard Pratt Hospital School of Allied 
Mental Health Sciences. The curriculum requirements consist of three com- 
ponents : 

A. Basic college and psychology department requirements, as follows : 

First year, first semester (17 credits: credits — 17, practicum — 0) : 30.102 
Freshman Composition, 84.101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (Option from 
Art, Drama, English, Music, Philosophy, and Religion, Speech), 70.101 General 
Psychology (two options from Economics, Geography, History, and Political 
Science) . 

First year, second semester (15 credits: credits — 15, practicum — 0) : 
two options from Art, Drama, English, Music, Philosophy and Religion, Speech; 
14.101 Fundamentals of Biology (Lab) (Option from Economics, Geography, 
History, Political Science) ; and 009-059 Physical Education for Non-Majors. 

Second year, first semester (16 credits: credits — 16, practicum — 0) : 70.111 
Behavioral Statistics; 70.361 Abnormal Psychology; 80.101 Introduction to Soci- 
ology; 1 option from Health and Physical Education; 1 option from *Clinical 
Program selections (listed below) . 

Second year, second semester (16 credits: credits — 16, practicum — 0) : 70.261 
Experimental Psychology; 70.350 Personality; 70,437 Clinical Interviewing I, 
70.413 Clinical Testing I ; *1 option from Clinical Program selections. 

Third year, first semester (15 credits: credits — 13, practicum — 2): 70.305 
Learning, 70.414 Clinical Testing II, 70.439 Clinical Interviewing II, 70.453 In- 
troduction to Psychotherapy I, 80.347 Community Organization or equivalent. 

Third year, second semester (16 credits: credits — 12, practicum — 4) : 70.311 
Behavior Modification I, 70.455 Introduction to Psychotherapy II, 70.431 Group 
Dynamics. One option from Group I; *One option from Clinical Program selec- 
tions. 

168 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Fourth year, first semester (16 credits: credits — 10, practicum — 6) : 70.312 
Behavior Modification II; 70.435 Field Experience in Group Dynamics, 70.457 
Adjunctive Services to Families of Patients, 1 option from Math or Physical 
Science, *One option from Clinical Program selections. 

Fourth year, second semester (13 credits: credits — 11, practicum — 2) : 70.435 
Field Experience in Counseling and Work concerning Community Resources, 
70.451 Introduction to Activity Therapy, *Two options from Clinical Program 
selections. 

Clinical Program Options are: PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT— 70.211 
Child Psychology, 70.321 Adolescent Psychology, 70.425 Introduction to the Help- 
ing Relationship, 70.309 Behavioral Pharmacology, 70.471 Introduction to the 
Exceptional Child, 70.370 Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling, (new) Psy- 
chology of Aging. SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT— 80.203 The Family, 80.381 
Minority Groups, 80.383 Criminology, 80.386 Juvenile Delinquency. MORGAN 
STATE COLLEGE— 19.410 Addiction & Alcoholism I, 19.411 Addiction and 
Alcoholism II, 19.301 Community Mental Health, 19.302 Community Mental 
Health, 19.403 Community Action for Mental Health I (Seniors). 

B. Work-Study Blocks. 

There are nine work-study blocks, each consisting of courses and closely 
related practicum experiences. Eight work study blocks lead to the development 
of skills in clinical areas, and the ninth, in research. The study blocks are: (1) 
Dyadic helping relationship (Individual therapy) ; (2) Group interaction (Group 
therapy; Psychodrama) ; (3) Interviewing; (4) Counseling and work with com- 
munity resources; (5) Therapeutic services for family (relatives) of patient; 
(6) Psychological testing; (7) Activity Therapy; (8) Behavior Modification; 
and (9) Research. 

C. Field Training in Human Services, 70.443 (4 credits — 2 per summer) 

In contrast to the practicums, which are supervised clincial experiences 
closely related to courses in the curriculum, the field experiences are brief, ex- 
posures to on-the-job training. There will be five such field experiences, the first 
a three week period during the minimester of the Sophomore year, and the 
remaining four coinciding with the two summer sessions after the Sophomore 
and Junior years. Each of the five field assignments is a supervised work experi- 
ence, with stipend. Two of the field assignments will be required; these will be 
on in-patient halls at Sheppard Pratt Hospital. The remaining three will be 
elective, to be chosen from a list of twelve available clinical facilities. Super- 
vision for the field experiences will generally be provided by the placement 
facilities. 

D. Minimum Requirements. 

All Psychology courses required for the clinical concentration must be com- 
pleted with a minimum grade of C. 

Psychology Minor 

The minimum requirements for a minor in psychology are 70.101, 70.111, 70.261, 
and 70.305, along with an approved program of 10 elective hours in psychology. 

Psychology Honors 

Admission is granted at the end of the sophomore year or beginning of the 
junior year to students who have the following qualifications: Grade point 
average of at least 3.00 overall and 3.25 in major field, recommendations from 
Departmental Chairman and advisor, and approval by the College Honors Pro- 
gram Board. The minimum requirements for graduation with honors in p.sy- 
chology are grade point averages of 3.00 overall and 3.50 in major field and 
completion of 70.385, 70.485 and 70.499. 

PSYCHOLOGY 169 



PSYCHOLOGY COURSES (PSYC) 



Lower Division — Undergraduate 

70.101 (101) GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) 
Methods and principles. Attention to: IVleas- 
urement, experimentation, sensation, per- 
ception, learning, emotion, thinking, remem- 
bering, personality, adjustment, development 
and individual differences. Students will be 
required to participate in two supervised 
experiments (outside of class time) to fur- 
ther their understanding of the application 
of methods of science to the study of hu- 
man behavior. Prerequisite: None. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. 

70.106 (104) APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3) Psy- 
chologists' contributions to education, medi- 
cine, law, mental health and business. Appli- 
cation to problems in these areas. Lectures 
and field trips. Prerequisite: None. Spring. 

70.111 (110) BEHAVIORAL STATISTICS (4) 
Distributions and graphs, notation, levels of 
measurement, percentiles, measures of cen- 
tral tendency and variability, principles of 
probability, the normal curve, standard 
scores, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, 
significance of differences, correlation and 
prediction, computation on computer termi- 
nals, Chi square, Non-parametrics, One-Way 
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: None. 
Fall, Spring, Summer. 

70.201 (203) EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) 
The learning process and related concepts; 
human development; individual differences; 
measurement and evaluation; personality 
and adjustment. Prerequisite: 70.101. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. 

70.203 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 
(3) A study of research and theories re- 
lated to the overall development of the child 
and the adolescence with emphasis on the 
relative influences of the home, the peer 
group, the school and the social milieu on 
the developing self. Prerequisite: 70.101. 
Spring & Fall. 

70.209 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3) Basic psy- 



chological concepts concerning consumer 
behavior such as the cognition, perception, 
learning, attitudes, cognitive dissonance, 
risk-taking, motivation, and personality of the 
buyer. Emphasis on the interrelation of eco- 
nomic and sociocultural factors on consumer 
decision-making, including recent research 
findings and marketing applications. Prereq- 
uisite: 70.101 Spring & Fall. 

70.211 (205) CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (3) The- 
ories and research methods of child be- 
havior. Development of major psychological 
functions. Prerequisite: 70.101. Fall, Spring, 
Summer. 

70.221 (322) SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) The 
structure and function of groups. Recent ad- 
vances in sociology, anthropology and psy- 
chiatry as related to psychology. Prerequi- 
site: 70.101. Fall & Spring. 

70.223 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) A sur- 
vey of psychological principles applied to 
man at work, to work tasks, to work settings, 
and to the design of equipment used in 
work. Prerequisite: 70.101. Fall. 

70.230 (420) MENTAL HYGIENE (3) Adjust- 
ment as related to mental health, problems 
to which adjustment is made, and the nature 
of conflict. Prerequisite: 70.101. Spring. 

70.261 (210) EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY I 
(4) The experimental method and its appli- 
cation to recent problems in psychological 
research; introduction to experimental de- 
sign and inference; animal and human learn- 
ing, perception, social, personality, matura- 
tion. Three hours lecture, two hours labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisites: 70.101 and 
70.111. Fall, Spring. 

70.262 (211) EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY II 
(4) The experimental analysis of behavior. 
Introduction to independent research and to 
computer technology. Three hours lecture, 
two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
70.261. Spring. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 

70.305 (308) PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING (3) 
Analysis of selected problems in both human 
and animal learning including reinforcement, 
punishment, verbal learning and verbal be- 
havior. Prerequisite: 70.261. Fall. 

70.309 BEHAVIORAL PHARMACOLOGY (3) A 
systematic investigation of the effects of 
drugs on behavior. Drug classification, his- 
torical aspects, methodological considera- 
tions, uses in treatment, drug abuse, and 
related topics will be considered. Prerequi- 
site: 70.261 or consent of instructor. Fall, 
Spring, alternate summers. 

70.311 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION I (3) Ex- 
amination & application of the basic prin- 
ciples of the experimental analysis of be- 



havior, with an emphasis on the applied 
aspects of this modern discipline to schools, 
jobs, interpersonal relations and self control. 
Prerequisites: 12 hours of Psychology, in- 
cluding 70.261. Spring. 

70.312 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION II (3) in- 
tensive academic and practicum training in 
various individually oriented behavior ther- 
apy techniques. Close individual supervision 
in practicum work. Prerequisite: 70.311. Fall. 

70.315 (303) MOTIVATION (3) Theories of 
motivation, motivational antecedents, and the 
consequences of such antecedents on in- 
strumental behavior, learning and percep- 
tion. Prerequisite: 6 hours. Fall. 



1 70 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



70.317 SENSATION AND PERCEPTION (3) A 
systematic investigation on the basic senses 
such as vision, audition, taste, smell, and 
touch will be undertaken. The organization 
of sensory input will also be emphasized. 
Both human and non-human data will be 
presented. Prerequisite: 70.261. Spring. 

70.321 (407) ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3) 
Physical, emotional, intellectual development 
during adolescence; social development and 
heterosexuality; adolescent personality; 
problems of adjustment; juvenile delin- 
quency. Prerequisite: 70.211 or 70.201. Fall, 
Spring. 

70.330 (304) PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL 
DIFFERENCES (3) Individual differences in 
human traits and characteristics; methodol- 
ogy, basic principles, and major findings in 
research. Prerequisites: 70.101 and 70.111. 
Spring. 

70.350 (305) PERSONALITY (3) Theoretical 
and practical approaches to the study of 
personality. Introduction to psychodynamics 
and to methods and materials of assessment. 
Prerequisite 6 hours. Spring. 

70.361 (306) ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) 
Disordered personal reactions to life. Or- 
ganic and functional phenomena plus thera- 
peutic techniques. Prerequisite: 9 hours. 
Fall. 

70.370 (331) FOUNDATIONS OF REHABILITA- 
TION COUNSELING (3) The development 
of rehabilitation programs; their legal basis 
and historical background. The role of med- 
ical, psychological, educational and com- 
munity resources in the rehabilitation pro- 
gram are explored. Client eligibility, deter- 
mination, and counselor responsibilities will 
be reviewed. Prerequisite: 70.101. Spring. 

70.381 (391) READINGS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-2) 
(Honors) A survey of relevant research lit- 
erature under the guidance of a staff mem- 
ber who will direct the students' research. 
Prerequisite: 70.261, Honors approval or con- 
sent of instructor. Fall, Spring. 

70.383 PROCTORING IN PSYCHOLOGY (3) 
Students serve as teaching apprentices or 
proctors in a course which they have already 
completed (such as General Psychology), 
and which they must relearn to 100% mas- 
tery. Students will manage the learning and 
evaluate individual progress of the members 
of the class assigned to them. The experi- 
ence includes guidance, support, and moti- 
vation of the assigned students, all in a 
supervised situation. Prerequisite: Success- 
ful completion of 5 or more Psychology 
courses and permission of the instructor. 
Fall, Spring, Summer. 

70.385 (385) SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3) 
(Honors) Survey and critical evaluation of 
modern literature pertaining to selected 
problems in Psychology. Prerequisite: 70.261, 
Honors approval, or consent of instructor. 
Fall, Spring. 



70.411 (410) TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS (3) 
Psychological and educational testing and 
evaluation. The construction, administration, 
interpretation and use of various evaluative 
devices of aptitude and achievement. Pre- 
requisites: 70.101 and 70.111. Fall, Spring, 
Summer. 

70.413 CLINICAL TESTING PROCcJURES I (3) 
Introduction to testing in a cli-iical setting. 
The nature of tests. The natute of person- 
ality assessment. Referral problems. Psycho- 
metric approach to specific tests of intelli- 
gence and organicity. Role of examiner. 
Ethical standards. Prerequisite: 70.111 and 
70.361. Spring. 

70.414 CLINICAL TESTING PROCEDURES II (3) 
Psychometric use of projective techniques. 
Test observation. Reporting test data. Ethi- 
cal use of psychometrical techniques. Pre- 
requisite: 70.413. Fall. 

70.416 (411) PERSONALITY MEASUREMENT 
(3) A continuation of 70.411 that will em- 
phasize the use and interpretation of instru- 
ments for measuring attitudes, interests and 
related aspects of personality. Instruments 
studied will include paper-pencil inventories, 
projective devices and observational proce- 
dures. Prerequisite: 70.411 and 70.230, or 
70.361. Spring. 

70.425 (423) INTRODUCTION TO THE HELP- 
ING RELATIONSHIP (3) Current concepts 
of the helping relationship and an explora- 
tion of the conditions that facilitate its effec- 
tiveness. Prerequisite: 70.101, and psychol- 
ogy major or minor planning to enter one 
of the helping professions, or graduate stu- 
dent in Guidance and Counseling, or consent 
of the department. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

70.427 INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEWING 
TECHNIQUES I (3) The theory and methods 
of delivery of helping services via the inter- 
view. Prerequisites: minimum of 2 months 
interviewing experience and permission of 
instructor. Course is offered in 1 week ses- 
sion. Jan. and June. 

70.430 (426) SYSTEMS AND TECHNIQUES OF 
COUNSELING PRACTICE (3) Review and 
application of current theoretical approaches 
to the helping relationship. Prerequisites: 
70.425 and either 70.230 or 70.361 or 70.540. 
Spring. 

70.431 GROUP DYNAMICS (3) Intensive study 
of group interactions with emphasis upon 
reciprocal group influence of behavior. Pre- 
requisite: 70.221 or consent of instructor. 
Fall. 

70.435 (427) SUPERVISED FIELD EXPERIENCE 
(3-6) Placement in a community service 
agency to familiarize the student with its 
current practices. Supervised client contact 
will be provided. Prerequisites: 70.370, 
70.430 and departmental consent. 

70.437 CLINICAL INTERVIEWING I (3) Com- 
bined didactic and experiential coverage of 
types of interviews, dimensions of inter- 



PSYCHOLOGY 171 



viewer input, interviewee response and of 
relationships. Prerequisite: 70.425 plus ad- 
mission in Clinical Concentration in Psychol- 
ogy. Fall. 

70.439 CLINICAL INTERVIEWING II (3) Clin- 
ical observation and practicum experience. 
Focus on interviewer and interviewee di- 
mensions and relationship with patients. Use 
of tapes, seminars and individual super- 
vision. Prerequisite: 70.437. Fall. 

70.441 INFORMATION SERVICE IN COUNSEL- 
ING AND GUIDANCE (3) Educational and 
vocational resources. Evaluation, classifica- 
tion and use of such information. Prerequi- 
site: 70.101. 

70.443 FIELD TRAINING IN HUMAN SERVICES 
(1) Work experience in a hospital or clinic 
setting in the field of human services. Pre- 
requisite: Acceptance in Clinical Concentra- 
tion. Summer. 

70.451 INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVITY THER- 
APY (4) Principles and procedures of activ- 
ity as a method of therapy (e.g., occupa- 
tional, recreational, vocational, music, dance, 
art, drama). Practicum includes observation 
of various methods and participation under 
supervision in occupational and recreational 
therapy. Prerequisite: 70.350, 70.361, 70.431. 
Spring. 

70.453 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOTHERAPY 

I (3) Readings, lectures, and seminars re- 
lating to psychological emergencies and the 
modes of intervention during psychological 
crises. Prerequisite: 70.425. Fall. 

70.455 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOTHERAPY 

II (4) Survey of methods and techniques to 
dyadic therapy using selected readings. 
Practicum involving observation and seminar 
discussions and participation with individual 
supervision. Prerequisite: 70.425 and 70.453. 
Spring. 

70.457 ADJUNCTIVE SERVICES TO FAMILIES 
OF PATIENTS (4) Organization and adapta- 
tion of treatment procedures to the family 
as a group, and to individual relatives. Prac- 
ticum at a neighboring state hospital, under 
supervision. Prerequisite: 70.211, 70.321, 
70.361, 70.453, 80.203. Fall. 

70.460 (409) COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY (4) 
The differences in behavior between species 
will be compared within a framework of 
learning, ethology, and neuropsychology. 

Graduate Division 

70.511 (501) DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 
(3) Psychological structures and functions 
in human development. Theoretical and re- 
search approaches. Prerequisite: 70.201 or 
equivalent. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

70.520 INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE TESTING 
(3) Construction, standardization, adminis- 
tration, scoring and interpretation of the 
Wechsler Individual Intelligence Tests, the 
Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Human 
Figure Drawings, the Bender Gestalt, the 



Three hours of lecture, two hours laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite: 70.261. Spring. 

70.461 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3) This 
course will deal with the nature of the cog- 
nitive processes, an analysis of the organiza- 
tion oif cognitive abilities, and problems in 
cognition. Theoretical viewpoints will be ex- 
plored, including those of Piaget, J. P. Guil- 
ford, Ausubel, Lewin, Skinner. A comparison 
among theories will be made as they relate 
to the thinking processes. Prerequisites: 
70.203, 70.205 or with permission of instruc- 
tor. Spring. 

70.465 (412) PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 
(4) The physiological basis of behavior, 
with consideration of receptor, central and 
effector structures and function. Three hours 
lecture, 2 hours laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite: 70.261 or permission of instructor. 
Fall. 

70.471 (460) INTRODUCTION TO THE EXCEP- 
TIONAL CHILD (3) Children with a typical, 
physical, mental, social and emotional de- 
velopment, including the physically handi- 
capped, the mentally retarded, the gifted, 
and emotionally disturbed children. Pre- 
requisite: 70.201 or 70.211. Fall. 

70.480 (488) SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (3) 
Schools of psychology with their theoretical 
and methodological approaches. Prerequi- 
site: At least a junior psychology major and 
consent. Spring. 

70.485 (486) EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (4) (Hon- 
ors) Design and analysis — Analysis of vari- 
ance (completely randomized design, re- 
peated measurement designs, etc.), multiple 
comparisons, nonparametrics, general prob- 
lems related to sampling, experimental 
effects, etc. Prerequisite: 70.111. Honors 
approval or consent of instructor. Fall, 
Spring. 

70.491 (490) INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION 
IN PSYCHOLOGY (3) An opportunity for 
especially qualified students to undertake 
research problems according to their inter- 
est and training under the direction of a 
staff member. Prerequisite: 70.261 and con- 
sent of department. Fall, Spring. 

70.499 (499) SENIOR THESIS IN PSYCHOLOGY 
(4) (Honors) Independent research on spe- 
cial problems in Psychology or closely re- 
lated fields. Prerequisite: 70.261, 70.485, 
Honors approval. Fall, Spring. 



Gray Oral Reading Test and the Wide Range 
Achievement Test. Prerequisite: 70.111 and 
70.411. Open only to M.A. candidates in 
School Psychology Program. Consent of co- 
ordinator. Fall. 
70.521 (505) ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSY- 
CHOLOGY (3) Survey of current research 
in Child Psychology, Learning, Mental Hy- 
giene, and Tests and Measurements. Em- 
phasis on critical analysis of studies. Pre- 
requisite: 70.511. Fall, Spring, Summer. 



172 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



70.531 (506) ADVANCED ABNORMAL PSY- 
CHOLOGY (3) Current and historical per- 
spectives of psychopathology. Empiiasis on 
varied approaches in contemporary schools. 
Methods of assessment and treatment. Pre- 
requisite: 70.230 or 70.361. Spring. 

70.540 (553) MENTAL HYGIENE IN EDUCATION 
(3) Principles of mental hygiene and their 
application to the educational setting. Major 
emphasis on wholesome personality develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: 70.511. Spring. 

70.543 INTRODUCTION TO SCHOOL PSY- 
CHOLOGY (1) An introduction to ethics 
and issues in school psychology and prep- 
aration of the student to move efficiently 
through the program. This course should be 
taken at the beginning of the student's 
course of studies. Prerequisite: Graduate 
student in School Psychology Program. Con- 
sent of coordinator. Fall, Spring. 

70.550 (577) DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES IN 
EDUCATION (3) Use of standardized and 
teacher-constructed instruments for diag- 
nostic and instructional purposes. Prerequi- 
sites: 70.511, 70.411 or equiv. Spring. 

70.551 TECHNIQUES OF GROUP INTERVEN- 
TION IN THE SCHOOLS (3) A theoretical 
and experiential introduction to the tech- 
niques available for use with children ex- 
periencing difficulty in the school environ- 
ment. Emphasis will be on learning the tech- 
niques through action participation. Pre- 
requisite: M.A. candidate in School Psychol- 
ogy or Guidance and Counseling Programs. 
Consent of coordinator. Spring, Summer. 

70.553 ISSUES AND RESEARCH IN SCHOOL 
PSYCHOLOGY (3) Provides for analysis 
of major issues in school psychology through 
the study of selected research. Prerequisite: 
70.111, open only to graduate students in the 
School Psychology Program. 

70.563 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOTHERAPY (3) 
Course is designed to acquaint students with 
the more prominent schools of psychother- 
apy. Particular emphasis is placed on the 
psychotherapeutive aspect of educational 
and clinical settings. Prerequisites: 70.350, 
70.361 or 70.230, 70.531. Spring. 

70.570 (519) REFERRAL RESOURCES FOR THE 
SCHOOL AGE CHILD (3) A study of refer- 
ral services for the enhancement of the emo- 
tional, vocational, and the behavioral adapta- 
tion of children in need of services beyond 
the classroom situation. The course attempts 
to give direct knowledge to the student of 
all such specialized facilities both school 
and community sponsored. Prerequisite: 
70.511. Summer. 

70.573-70.574 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL PSY- 
CHOLOGY (4, 4) The first semester is com- 
prised or experimentation in the field of 
human behavior, and the second will em- 
phasize experimentation in the field of ani- 
mal behavior. Prerequisite: Consent of de- 
partment. Spring. 



70.577 LEARNING (3) A thorough coverage of 
major learning theories and models. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of department. Fall. 

70.579-580 SEMINAR (1,1) Selected readings 
of the current literature will be investigated 
by the students and faculty. Prerequisite: 
Consent of department. 579 (Fall), 580 
(Spring). 

70.581 ADVANCED HISTORY AND SYSTEMS 
OF PSYCHOLOGY (3) Ancient and modern 
psychological history; discussion of ancient 
history will draw heavily from both philos- 
ophy and physiology; discussion of modern 
history will develop psychology in various 
countries. The analysis of systems will in- 
clude a study of functionalism, structural- 
ism, behaviorism gestalt and psychoanalysis. 
Prerequisite: Consent of department. Sum- 
mer. 

70.584 COLLEGE TEACHING SEMINAR (3) 
Materials and procedures for producing suc- 
cessful students in lower level courses will 
be explored. Prerequisite: Consent of de- 
partment. Spring. 

70.587-588 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (3, 3) In 
the first semester, emphasis will be placed 
on the techniques of analysis of variance 
and non-parametric statistics. The second 
semester is comprised of a detailed survey 
of correlational and factor analytic tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 
587 (Fall), 588 (Spring). 

70.591 (515) PROJECTIVE TECHNIQUES I (3) 
This is the first of a two-course sequence 
dealing with projective techniques. Credit 
will be awarded only upon completion of the 
first and second semester of the sequence. 
The first semester emphasizes an introduc- 
tion to the administration, scoring and inter- 
pretation of projectives in current clinical 
use. Prerequisite: Open only to M.A. candi- 
dates in School Psychology Program. Con- 
sent of coordinator. Fall. 

70.592 (516) PROJECTIVE TECHNIQUES II (3) 
The second of a two-semester sequence in 
projective techniques. This semester em- 
phasizes the interpretation and appropriate 
transmission of projective data. Particular 
emphasis will be placed on the evaluation 
of learning problems. Prerequisite: 70.591, 
open only to M.A. candidates in School 
Psychology Program. Consent of coordina- 
tor. Spring. 

70.605 (511) PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE (3) 
Aims at establishing a philosophy and gain- 
ing a knowledge of the principles of guid- 
ance. Includes an introduction to the litera- 
ture of the field. Prerequisite: 70.511 or 
equivalent. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

70.607 (520) OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION 
(3) Provides students with knowledge of 
educational and vocational opportunities and 
community referral sources essential to a 
sound guidance program. Includes evalua- 
tion, classification and use of such informa- 



PSYCHOLOGY 173 



tion in the instructional program. Group 
guidance, counseling and placement. Pre- 
requisite: 70.605. 

70.611 (512) ANALYSIS OF THE INDIVIDUAL (3) 
Techniques available in studying the individ- 
ual. Emphasizes data in the areas of voca- 
tional, educational and personal adjustment. 
Prerequisites: 70.605 and 70.411. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. (70.605 may be taken con- 
currently.) 

70.615 (510) TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING 
(3) Counseling and therapy techniques 
used by counselors and other professional 
personnel working with children and adults. 
Prerequisites: 70.430 or equivalent Spring, 
Fall, Summer. 

70.617 THE HOLTZMAN INKBLOT TECHNIQUE 

I (3) Introduction to the Holtzman Inkblot 
Technique, administration and scoring of the 
test record. Prerequisites: 70.591. 

70.618 THE HOLTZMAN INKBLOT TECHNIQUE 

II (3) Interpretation of scored records (a) 
based on the 22 scoring variable and (b) 
based on Personality variables. Prerequisites: 
70.617. 

70.621 (514) GROUP TECHNIQUES IN GUID- 
ANCE AND COUNSELING (3) The selec- 
tion, organization and effective use of group 
guidance materials and techniques in pro- 
viding for the common needs of groups of 
students in making more effective educa- 
tional, occupational, social and personal ad- 
justment. Prerequisites: 70.430 and 70.441. 
Fall. 

70.625 COUNSELING OF MINORITY GROUPS 
(3) A study of the counseling function with 
emphasis upon minority group needs, coun- 
selor attitudes, and techniques. Special 
focus on counseling in the urban school 
setting and techniques to be used with 
minority students. Prerequisite: 70.430. 

70.627 (527) USE OF TESTS IN COUNSELING 
(3) Practice in the use and analysis of 
techniques for understanding the individual 
with emphasis upon standardized procedures 
used in the public schools. Prerequisites: 
70.611. Fall. 

70.630 (517) COUNSELING THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL CHILD (3) Study of the dynamics 
of child behavior, techniques of assessing 
and counseling. Study of the family, school, ' 
and community structures and their effect 
on the child. Prerequisites: 70.430. Spring. 

70.635 (530) COMMUNICATION MEDIA WITH 
CHILDREN I (3) Introduction to the methods 
and materials used in diagnostic and thera- 
peutic approaches to children. Use of toys, 
art media and play activities emphasized. 
Prerequisites: 70.615 or equivalent. Fall. 



70.636 (531) COMMUNICATION MEDIA WITH 
CHILDREN II (3) A continuation of Psyc 
530 with emphasis upon practical application 
of the theoretical principles involved in the 
psychodiagnostic and therapeutic use of play 
media. Use of the play-room and its materi- 
als will be emphasized. Prerequisites: 70.645 
and 70.635. Spring. 

70.645 (523) COUNSELING PRACTICUM I (3) 
Supervised experience in educational, voca- 
tional and personal counseling. Prerequisites: 
615 plus consent of the department. Fall, 
Spring, Summer. Credit will be granted for 
this course upon completion of Psychology 
646 or Psychology 635-636. 

70.646 (525) COUNSELING PRACTICUM II (3) 
Field experience in educational, vocational 
and personal counseling. Prerequisites: 70.- 
645 plus consent of the department. Fall, 
Spring. Students registering for this course 
will be required to have one half day (1 p.m. 
to 5 p.m.) free for Practicum assignments. 

70.651 (521) CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL 
PSYCHOLOGY I (3) Provides an opportu- 
nity to participate in diagnostic, remedial 
and therapeutic planning as well as follow-up 
studies under supervision of certified psy- 
chologists. Prerequisites: M.A. candidate in 
School Psychology Program. 70.520, 70.591, 
70.592. Consent of Coordinator. Fall. 

70.652 (522) INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSY- 
CHOLOGY (3) Each student must be a full- 
time student during the semester he enrolls 
in this course, typically the last semester of 
work. The student will be placed on intern- 
ship in a school or clinic depending upon 
his specific orientation. He will participate 
in the complete workings of that agency 
under the direct supervision of a practicing 
certified psychologist. Prerequisite: 70.651, 
consent of coordinator. Spring. 

70.656 (595) SEMINAR IN COUNSELING— ELE- 
MENTARY (3) Analysis of research trends; 
examination of critical issues, reports of 
student research projects, professional prob- 
lems and ethics. Prerequisites: 70.645. Sum- 
mer. 

70.660 (596) SEMINAR IN COUNSELING— SEC- 
ONDARY (3) Analysis of research trends, 
examination of critical issues, reports of stu- 
dent research projects, professional prob- 
lems and ethics. Prerequisites: 70.645. Sum- 
mer. 

70.690 (591) SEMINAR IN SCHOOL PSYCHOL- 
OGY (3) Consideration of current practices, 
trends and evaluative techniques In School 
Psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of coordi- 
nator. Fall. 

70.699 THESIS (3) Optional for students In 
Master of Arts for School Psychologists 
program. Required for students in Master's 
of Arts in General Psychology. 



174 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Social Sciences 

Coordinator: JOSEPH A. FALCO 

This is an interdepartmental major made up of the Department of Economics 
and Political Science, the Department of Geography, the Department of History, 
and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. The program is administered 
by a Committee composed of a representative from each discipline of the social 
sciences. The members of the Committee are: Joseph A, Falco, Professor of 
History, Chairman of the Committee and Coordinator of the Social Science Pro- 
gram; George C. Coleman, Professor of Political Science; David Firman, Profes- 
sor of Geography; Irwin Goldberg, Professor and Chairman, Department of 
Sociology and Anthropology; Fred M. Rivers, Associate Professor of History; 
Henry N. Sanborn, Professor Economics. 

The Program is designed for those students who do not wish to be confined 
to a major in a single social science discipline, but are interested in a broad 
education, transcending traditional department boundaries. It is useful for those 
students who plan to enter graduate school for an advanced degree in one of the 
social sciences; for those students who plan to enter professional schools for a 
degree in law, social service, or a phase of law enforcement; for those students 
who seek a broad background in preparation for employment in business and 
industry, or with a governmental agency. It is particularly designed for students 
planning to teach social studies at the secondary school level. 

The major offers the student the choice of two distinct social science pro- 
grams: a social science major in liberal arts or a social science major in secondary 
school teaching. 

The requirements for the Social Science Major in Liberal Arts are 66 credit 
hours as follows: Economics: 24.101 and 102 (6 hours); Geography: 34.101 or 
102, and one upper division course depending on the interests of the student (6 
hours) ; History: 40.262, 263, 264 — any two courses (6 hours) and 40.145, 146 (6 
hours); Political Science: 68.101, 103, 107, 207— any two courses (Q hours); 
Sociology and Anthropology: 80.101 and 10.207 (6 hours); Plus: 30 hours of 
upper division courses selected from any of the social sciences with a minimum 
of 9 hours in each of three disciplines selected. 

The requirements for the Social Science Major in Secondary Teaching are 
54 credit hours as follows: Economics: 24.101 and 102 (6 hours); Geography: 
34.101 or 102, and one upper division course depending on the interests of the 
student (6 hours); History: 40.262, 263, 264— any two courses (6 hours) and 
40.145, 146 (6 hours) plus 6 hours of upper division history electives; Political 
Science: 68.101, 103, 107, 207 — any two courses (6 hours) ; Sociology and Anthro- 
pology: 80.101 and 10.207 (6 hours); Plus: 12 hours upper division electives 
selected from any of the social sciences. 

Transfer Students : 

It is expected that all transfer students in the Social Science Program will earn 
at Towson State College a minimum of one-half the total number of credit hours 
required for the major. 

Degree Programs : 

A student may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in secondary education, a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Liberal Arts without a foreign language require- 
ment, or a Bachelor of Arts degree with a foreign language. The language 
requirement is met by completing the intermediate course or equivalent of a 
modern foreign language. 



175 



Sociology and Anthropology 

Professors: HOJJATI, KRANZLER, TOLAND, GOLDBERG (Chairman) 
Associate Professors: KANDEL, LEONS, STANLEY 
Assistant Professors: FISHER, SMITH, SEDLACK, WOLF 
Instructors: COCKEY, JONES, REYNOLDS, GAFFERATA 

The Purpose of the major in Sociology and Anthropology is to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the methods and perspectives of these disciplines, to help him under- 
stand the society in which he lives, and to prepare him for graduate study in 
either Sociology or Anthropology. 

Requirements for the Major 

Students may choose one of three concentrations offered by the Department. 

Concentration in Sociology 

Introduction to Sociology (80.101) ; Behavioral Statistics (70.111) or Basic 
Statistics (50.231) ; Sociological Theory (80.407) ; Research Methods (80.495) ; and 
eighteen additional hours of elective courses offered by the Department of which 
no more than six may be in Anthropology courses and at least twelve of which 
must be in courses at the 300 or 400 level. At least twelve of the required thirty 
credits must be taken in residence at Towson. 

Concentration in Sociology and Anthropology 

Requirements are identical to that stated above for the Concentration in Sociology 
except that students may choose their eighteen credits of electives from among 
any courses in the Department, Sociology or Anthropology. 

Concentration in Anthropology - 

Cultural Anthropology (10.207) ; Human Evolution and Prehistory (10.208) ; 
Behavioral Statistics (70.111) or Basic Statistics (50.231) ; Anthropological 
Theory (10.401) ; and eighteen additional hours of elective courses of which no 
more than six may be in Sociology. At least twelve credits are selected from 
courses at the 300 or 400 level. At least twelve of the required credits must be 
taken in residence at Towson. 

Research Methods (80.495) is strongly recommended. If taken, a total of 
twelve credits may be selected from among courses in Sociology. 

The following courses in linguistics may be credited toward the concentra- 
tion: Comparative Grammar (30.322); Historical Linguistics (30.325); and 
Structural Linguistics (English 30.327). 

SOCIOLOGY COURSES (SOCI) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

80.101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3) 80.231 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3) Problems in so- 
Sociological concepts, theories, methods; a cial relations created by the organization of 
study of society and culture; the influence of society, exploration of alternative, means of 
the social environment on individual be- achieving social goals. Prerequisites: 80.101; 
havior. junior and senior majors in Sociology. 

80.203 THE FAMILY (3) The family as the 
basic group in human societies; its develop- 
ment; its relation to other social institutions; 
the family in modern industrial societies. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

176 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



80.303 SOCIAL WELFARE (3) Historical de- 
velopment; philosophy and theory; processes 
developed and fields of social work; Federal, 
state and community programs. Prerequisite: 
SOCI 80.101. 

80.342 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION (3) The na- 
ture of social stratification; relationship of 
social mobility to social organization; social 
class structure in traditional and dynamic 
societies. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.343 SOCIAL CHANGE ( 3) A sociological 
analysis of the sources, processes and con- 
sequences of social change. Prerequisite: 
SOCI 80.101 and consent of instructor. 

80.344 URBAN SOCIOLOGY (3) Survey of the 
theoretical and sociological conceptulations 
of modern Western industrial cities (80.101 
plus 12 hours SOCI strongly suggested). 

80.345 ORGANIZATIONS (3) Structure and 
functioning of large scale organizations; 
formal and informal aspects of bureaucracies 
in business, government, politics, education 
and other institutional spheres of society. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.347 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION (3) The 
organization of the community as a vehicle 
for identifying and meeting human needs; 
processes and techniques of community 
planning and development, traditional and 
contemporary. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.349 POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY (3) The con- 
temporary relevance of the classic theorists 
in Political Sociology: Tocqueville, Marx, 
Weber, and Mosca. Prerequisite: SOCI 
80.101. 

80.357 IDEOLOGY, POWER AND SOCIETY (3) 
Problems in the relationship social structure 
and belief systems; analysis of the concepts 
of mass society, elite dominance, and the 
political consequences of bureaucracy. Pre- 
requisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.363 INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY (3) A social 
psychological approach to the interrelation- 
ships of the individual and his social and 
cultural environment; behavioral character- 
istics resulting from social experience. Pre- 
requisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.381 MINORITY GROUPS (3) An examina- 
tion of intergroup life as an aspect of society; 
conflicts between races, ethnic groups, and 
minorities; prejudice, segregation and inte- 
gration. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.383 CRIMINOLOGY (3) The nature of crime; 
factors underlying criminal behavior; police, 
courts, law, and correctional institutions. 
Prerequisite: 80.101. 

80.386 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3) A study 
of delinquency; the process of socialization 
and delinquent behavior in society; preven- 
tion and treatment of delinquency. Prerequi- 
site: SOCI 80.101. 



80.392 DEMOGRAPHY (3) Social, economic, and 
political problems related to changes, dis- 
tribution and movement of population; analy- 
sis of contemporary population trends in the 
U.S. and the world. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.401 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY (3) A study of 
social and cultural perspectives on illness; 
demographic trends; the health professions; 
and institutions for the delivery of health 
care services. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.403 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR (3) Study of 
historical and contemporary major unstruc- 
tured and semi-structured situations; crowds, 
mobs, riots. Prerequisite: 80.101. 

80.406 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION (3) Soci- 
ological analysis of education as a basic 
social institution; formal and informal orga- 
nizations of education systems; relationship 
to socialization; major social trends in edu- 
cation; concept of academic freedom. Prere- 
quisite: SOCI 80.101, 

80.407 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY (3) Major 
systems of sociological theory; the works, 
assumptions, and workings of major Euro- 
pean and American schools. Prerequisites: 
Junior Standing, SOCI 80.101 and 9 addi- 
tional hours SOCI. 

80.408 ADVANCED SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY 
(3) Critical analysis of emerging theoretical 
schools. Attention will be given to contem- 
porary theoretical problems. Prerequisites: 
80.101 and 80.407. 

80.457 SOCIAL DEVIANCE (3) Deviance as an 
aspect of social living; the problem of under- 
standing conformity and deviance; identifica- 
tion of deviants; society's response to devi- 
ant behavior. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101. 

80.470-479 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 
(3) An examination of current topics in 
Sociology. The content of the course will 
depend upon mutual faculty and student 
interest. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.101 and con- 
sent of instructor. 

80.485 SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY (3) Explor- 
ing and analyzing major areas of sociology. 
For senior students with a major in sociol- 
ogy. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.407 and consent 
of instructor. 

80.495 RESEARCH METHODS (4) A considera- 
tion of methodology of sociological research; 
the various steps in conducting research 
projects, from statement of the problem to 
final analysis of data. Prerequisite: SOCI 
80.101; 9 additional hours of SOCI; and 
either PSYC 70.111 or Math 50.231. 

80.499 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3) Super- 
vised research and sociological investigation 
leading to preparation of a research project 
or a supervised laboratory experience in a 
social agency. For senior students with a 
major in sociology. Prerequisite: SOCI 80.495 
and consent of department chairman. 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 177 



ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES (ANTH) 
Lower Division — Undergraduate 

10.207 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) In- 
troduction to social and cultural anthropol- 
ogy; cultural theory, social structure, human 
ecology, language and culture, technology, 
religion, art, and literature. Prerequisite: 
SOCI 80.101. 



10.208 HUMAN EVOLUTION AND PREHISTORY 
(3) The study of man: his biological and 
cultural development through time. This 
course is equivalent to Anthropology 105 
previously offered. Students who have had 
Anthropology 105 may not receive credit for 
Anthropology 208 but may take Anthropology 
207. 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



10.346 POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) Com- 
parative political institutions and behavior 
among contemporary non-literate societies. 
Theoretical problems of social control, state 
and non-state systems, symbolic aspects of 
power, levels of political integration, and 
warfare. 

10.364 RELIGION, MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT 
(3) The world view, beliefs and rituals of 
selected non-literate peoples considered 
with reference to religion as a universal cate- 
gory of human culture. Prerequisite: SOCI 
80.101 or ANTH 10.207. 

10.365 ETHNOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA (3) 
A comparative description and interpretation 
of native American Indian culture. Prerequi- 
site: ANTH 10.207. 

10.366 ETHNOLOGY OF SOUTH AMERICA (3) 
Survey of the native peoples of South 
America with emphasis on Pre-Columbian 
societies. Offered in alternate years. Pre- 
requisite: ANTH 10.207. 

10.367 ETHNOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3) 
Survey of the Middle East as a culture area 
with emphasis on culture change. Prerequi- 
site: ANTH 10.207. 

10.377 SOCIETIES AND CULTURES OF LATIN 
AMERICA (3) An anthropological perspec- 
tive will be brought to bear on contemporary 
Latin American cultures and societies from 
the standpoint of the community and as total 
national systems. Prerequisites: SOCI 80.101 
ANTH 10.208 or 10.207. 



10.381 ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHODS AND 
THEORY (3) Methods of excavating and 
recording archaeological data. Investigation 
of problems of current research interest. 
Prerequisite: ANTH 10.207. 

10.383 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) 
Regional survey of the prehistory of the 
North American Indians with emphasis on 
the American Southwest and the Eastern 
Woodlands. Prerequisite: ANTH 10.207 and 
consent of instructor. 

10.388 PEASANT CULTURES (3) The course 
will focus on the rural agricultural popula- 
tion of modern states; their traditional life- 
ways and the changes being wrought by 
modernization. Prerequisites: SOCI 80.101 or 
ANTH 10.207. 

10.401 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3) Sur- 
vey of the theoretical contributions made by 
American, British and Continental anthro- 
pologists. ANTH 10.207 and 9 hrs. of ANTH. 

10.470-479 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOL- 
OGY (3) An examination of current topics 
in Anthropology. The content of the course 
will depend upon mutual faculty and student 
interest. Prerequisites: ANTH 10.207. 

10.499 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3) Super- 
vised research and anthropological investi- 
gation leading to preparation of a research 
project or a supervised field experience. For 
senior students with a concentration in an- 
thropology. Prerequisite: At least 12 credits 
in ANTH and consent of department chair- 
person. 



178 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Theatre Arts 



Professor GILLESPIE 

Associate Professors: BERMAN (Chairman), MANLOVE 

Assistant Professor: BAKER 

instructors: FUQUA, LOESCHKE 

Assistant Instructors: APPLE, MARCHIONE 

The curriculum in the department is designed to provide the best possible learn- 
ing and training for the student wishing to major in theatre arts. The pro- 
gram is designed to provide, in cooperation with other departments, a broad 
liberal education as well as specialized professional training with the emphasis 
placed upon skill as well as knowledge. The main emphasis is the creation of 
an artistic point of view on the part of the students. 

Major in Theater Arts 

The major in theater arts is time consuming and physically demanding. Majors 

must be free to participate in theater activities evenings and weekends. 

Participation in the college drama productions is a part of the educational 
program of theater arts majors. 

At the end of the sophomore year, students must be approved individually 
by the department each semester in order to continue in the program. 

Students transferring from other institutions and planning to major in 
theatre arts at Towson are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of 
theatre arts courses in residence at Towson. 

The Curriculum 

Majors must take a minimum of 36 credit hours in theatre or dramatic literature, 
including the following required courses: 86.105, 86.106, 86.107, 86.108, and at 
least 2 courses from the following: 86.411, 86.412, 86.413, 86.493, 86.494. 86.495, 
86.496, 86.497, 86.498, 86.480, 86.481, 86.482 and a minimum of 8 to 10 additional 
elective hours in theatre to make a total of 36 credit hours. Each student will 
work out an individualized program in conjunction with a faculty advisor. All 
students are required to successfully participate in production seminar each 
semester. 

Curriculum for a Minor in Theatre Arts 

Any 18 hours in theatre courses approved in advance, as a minor, by the director 
I of theatre. 

THEATRE ARTS COURSES (THAR) 
Service Division 

86.025 DRILL IN MOVEMENT FOR THE STAGE 86.027 THEATRE MANAGEMENT (0) Organiza- 
(1) Analysis of individual problems in move- tion and control of the business, box office, 
ment for the stage, and drill in corrective house and publicity programs of the theatre. 
exercises. Prerequisites: None — offered on demand. 

86.026 DRILL IN VOICE FOR THE STAGE (1) 
Analysis of individual problems in voice for 
the stage, and drill in corrective exercises. 

Lower Division — Undergraduate 

86.103 INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATRE (2) 86.105 THEATRE AND THE HUMANITIES I (3) 

Theatrical experience through study of the History of the Theatre and its relation to the 

various types, styles, and production proc- Arts and Sciences. Greek to Medieval pe- 

esses of the theatre. Theatre as a public art riod. Meets three periods for lecture and 

and its relationship to our culture. one period for discussion. 

179 



86.106 THEATRE AND THE , HUMANITIES 1! (3) 
History of the Theatre and its relation to the 
Arts and Sciences. Renaissance period. 
Meets three periods for lecture and one pe- 
riod for discussion. 

86.107 THEATRE AND THE HUMANITIES III (3) 
History of the Theatre and its relation to the 
Arts and Sciences. Age of Reason and Ro- 
mantic period. Meets three periods for lec- 
ture and one period for discussion. 

86.108 THEATRE AND THE HUMANITIES IV (3) 
History of the Theatre and its relation to the 
Arts and Sciences. The Modern World. Meets 
three periods for lecture and one period for 
discussion. 

86.141 GRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE THEA- 
TRE (2) A course in the standard graphic 
practices of the draftsman. The emphasis 
will be on the reading and producing of 
working drawings, for lighting, costume, and 
scenic design. 

86.143 VISUAL ELEMENTS IN THE THEATRE 
(3) An examination of visual elements in 
theatrical production to aid the designer, 
director, and actor to think in terms of visual 
metaphors for the stage. 

86.201 TECHNIQUES FOR THEATRE DESIGN 
(3) Practice in such techniques as drafting, 
elevation, drapery sketching, figure drawing, 
and rendering techniques to prepare a stu- 
dent to work in set or costume design. 

86.211 THEATRE PRODUCTION (4) A survey 
of acting, directing, technical theatre tech- 
niques and resources for the school and 
community theatre. Students will be ex- 
pected to participate in the production crews 
for the college plays. Prerequisite: 86.103. 



86.221 ACTING I (3) Theory and practice of 
acting. The development of the actor's imag- 
ination and techniques through improvisa- 
tions, pantomimes, exercises, and simple 
scenes. 

86.222 ACTING II (3) Theory and practice of 
acting. Work in role analysis and character 
building. Prerequisites: 86.221 and consent 
of instructor. 

86.231 MIME I (3) Basic techniques of the art 
of Mime. Exercise work in images and illu- 
sions. Three credit hours, four contact hours. 

86.232 MIME II (3) improvisations with images 
and illusions. Three credit hours, four con- 
tact hours. 

86.241 COSTUME HISTORY AND DESIGN: 
EGYPT TO RENAISSANCE (4) Study of 
costume from the ancient Egyptian civiliza- 
tion to the Renaissance. Costume design and 
construction. Work on crews for college 
drama productions. 

86.242 COSTUME HISTORY AND DESIGN: ELIZ- 
ABETHAN TO 1940 (4) Study of costume 
from the Elizabethan to 1940. Costume de- 
sign and construction. Work on costume 
crews for college drama productions. 

86.245 STAGE MAKEUP I (1) Survey of ma- 
terials and study of theories and techniques 
of stage makeup. Class meets for two hours 
per week. 

86.246 STAGE MAKEUP II (1) Advanced stage 
makeup using materials such as home latex, 
rubber, collodion, and mask making and 
doing complete detailed character makeups. 

86.251 STAGECRAFT (3) Technical aspects of 
play production including scene construc- 
tion, scene painting, property building and 
stage lighting. (Work on technical crews for 
college drama productions required.) 



Upper Division — Undergraduate and Graduate 



86.307 THEATRE ARTS FOR CHILDREN (2) 
Theory and techniques of playmaking for 
children. Lecture, demonstration, and par- 
ticipation in pantomime, improvisation, and 
story dramatization. 

86.321 ACTING III (3) An examination of the 
problems of the actor in Shakespearean roles. 
Both theory and practice of Shakespearean 
acting are dealt with. Prerequisites: 86.222, 
limited to majors and consent of instructor. 

86.331 PLAY DIRECTING I (3) Fundamentals 
of play directing through exercises, direc- 
torial play analysis, and projects in directing 
short scenes. Prerequisites: 86.103 or 86.105 
and 86.221 or consent of instructor. 

86.355 STAGE LIGHTING (3) Theory of light 
and electricity with emphasis on the plan- 
ning of light plots. Aesthetic effort of stage 
lighting and problems of lighting small stages 
with minimum equipment. Prerequisites: 
86.251 or consent of instructor. 



86.361 DESIGN FOR THE STAGE (3) Theory 
and practice of designing scenery for the 
stage. Includes a study of the relationship 
of the set design to the script and other 
elements of production; and examination of 
research techniques in preparation for scene 
designing and practice in designing scenery 
for many styles and types of drama. Prereq- 
uisites: 86.251 or consent of instructor. 

86.371 THEATRE GAMES I (1) Exercises in 
acting designed to develop the individual's 
creativity and encourage work on personal 
acting techniques. Prerequisite: 86.221. 

86.372 THEATRE GAMES II (1) Exercises in 
acting designed to develop the individual's 
creativity and encourage work on personal 
acting technique. Prerequisite: 86.221. 

86.401 THEATRE AS A PROFESSION (1) Work- 
ing conditions, unions, employment oppor- 
tunities in the theatre. Preparation of pro- 
fessional credentials, audition material, etc. 
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts major or consent 
of instructor. 



180 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



86.407 THEATRE ARTS FOR CHILDREN— AD- 
VANCED (2) Practical experience in direct- 
ing and guiding Theatre Arts with children 
in a classroom or other arranged situation. 
Prerequisite: 86.307 — Theatre Arts for Chil- 
dren. 

86.421 PLAY DIRECTING II: THE CONTEMPO- 
RARY PLAY (3) Preparation techniques and 
directorial approaches to contemporary 
drama. Individual directing projects of scenes 
from representative contemporary dramas. 

86.431 PLAY DIRECTING III: THE PERIOD PLAY 
(3) Research techniques and directorial 
approaches to period drama. Individual di- 
recting projects of scenes from representa- 
tive period dramas. 

86.441 COSTUME DESIGN (3) Study of the 
theories, principles, of costume design and 
practice in designing costumes for the stage. 
Including a study of the relationship of color, 
texture, and historical period to the script 
and style of a theatrical production. Also 
practical use of costume research techniques 
in preparing designs. Experience in design- 
ing costumes for many historical periods 
and styles of plays. 

86.487 PROFESSIONAL THEATRE SEMINAR 
(12) A semester's internship in a resident 
theatre company. For majors only. Prerequi- 
site: Approval of director of theatre. 

86.493 PROBLEMS IN THEATRE I (1-3) Inde- 
pendent study of an academic or creative 
nature. For majors only. Prerequisites: Ap- 
proval of plan of study by instructor and 
director of theatre. 

86.494 PROBLEMS IN THEATRE II (1-3) Inde- 
pendent study of an academic or creative 
nature. For majors only. Prerequisites: Ap- 
proval of plan of study by instructor and 
director of theatre. 

86.495 PROBLEMS IN THEATRE III (1-3) Inde- 
pendent study of an academic or creative 
nature. For majors only. Prerequisites: Ap- 
proval of plan of study by instructor and 
director of theatre. 



86.496 PROBLEMS IN THEATRE IV (1-3) Inde- 
pendent study of an academic or creative 
nature. For majors only. Prerequisites: Ap- 
proval of plan of study by instructor and 
director of theatre. 

86.497 PROBLEMS IN THEATRE V (1-3) Inde- 
pendent study of an academic or creative 
nature. For majors only. Prerequisites: Ap- 
proval of plan of study by instructor and 
director of theatre. 

86.498 PROBLEMS IN THEATRE VI (1-3) Inde- 
pendent study of an academic or creative 
nature. For majors only. Prerequisites: Ap- 
proval of plan of study by instructor and 
director of theatre. 

86.411 PROBLEMS IN ACTING I (1-3) An 
upper level course designed to deal with the 
student's individual acting problems on an 
advanced level. Prerequisites: 86.221, 86.222, 
86.231 and approval of plan of study by in- 
structor and department chairman. 

86.412 PROBLEMS IN ACTING II (1-3) An 
upper level course designed to deal with the 
student's individual acting problems on an 
advanced level. Prerequisites: 86.221, 86.222, 
86.231 and approval of plan of study by 
instructor and department chairman. 

86.413 PROBLEMS IN ACTING III (1-3) An 
upper level course designed to deal with the 
student's individual acting problems on an 
advanced level. Prerequisites: 86.221, 86.222, 
86.231 and approval of plan of study by 
instructor and department chairman. 

86.480 PROBLEMS IN TECHNICAL THEATRE 

I (1-3) An advanced course enabling the 
student to derive credit for special problems 
in the area of Technical Theatre. Prerequi- 
sites: 86.201, 86.241, 86.251. 

86.481 PROBLEMS IN TECHNICAL THEATRE 

II (1-3) An advanced course enabling the 
student to derive credit for special problems 
in the area of Technical Theatre. Prerequi- 
sites: 86.201, 86.241, 86.251. 

86.482 PROBLEMS IN TECHNICAL THEATRE 

III (1-3) An advanced course enabling the 
student to derive credit for special problems 
in the area of Technical Theatre. Prerequi- 
sites: 86.201, 86.241, 86.251. 



THEATRE ARTS 181 



Boards 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



ELAINE C. DAVIS, Chairman 
Baltimore 

J. CARSON DOWELL, Vice Chairman 
Cumberland 

EDGAR F. BERMAN 
Lutherville 

FRANK A. DECOSTA, JR. 
Baltimore 



VICTOR FRENKIL 
Baltimore 

A. HARRIS GROSSMAN 
Chevy Chase 

H. GRAY REEVES 
Salisbury 

JAMES A. SENSENBAUGH 
Frederick 



BOARD OF VISITORS 



ROBERT Y. DUBEL, Chairman 
Baltimore 

M. MELVIN BERGER 
Baltimore 

JUANITA G. HAWKINS 
Baltimore 

MICHAEL LAMBROS 
Cockeysville 

ARTHUR G. MADDEN 
Baltimore 



SAMUEL P. MASSIE 
Laurel 

M. JACQUELINE McCURDY 
Arnold 

ERIC DANOFF 
Baltimore 

EARL T. WILLIS 
Baltimore 



FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



M. MELVIN BERGER, President 
Baltimore 

PAUL E. WISDOM, Executive Vice President, 

ex officio 

Baltimore 

WAYNE N. SCHELLE, Secretary-Treasurer, 

ex officio 

Baltimore 

EDGAR F. BERMAN 
Lutherville 

JAMES L FISHER 
Baltimore 

RAMSAY W. J. FLYNN 
Baltimore 

HERBERT S. GARTEN 
Baltimore 



CLIFTON E. MORRIS 
Wilmington, Delaware 

JAMES D. NOLAN 
Baltimore 

FRANK G. ROBERTS 
Baltimore 

JOHN D. SEYFFERT 
Baltimore 

SAYDE SKLAR 
Baltimore 

R. AUSTIN TYDINGS 
Baltimore 

JOSEPH F. WELSH, JR. 
Baltimore 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



QUINTON D. THOMPSON, President 
Baltimore 

EDWARD B. LORENZ, Vice President 
Parkton 

PAULA J. COTTRELL, Secretary 
Baltimore 

JOHN B. TWIST, Treasurer 
Lutherville 

ROBERT E. ANASTASI 
Rockville 

JOSEPH T. BARLOW 
Towson 



B. MELVIN COLE 
Towson 

DAVID CORNTHWAITE 
Cockeysville 

MICHAEL D. CORKRAN 
Dundalk 

MARGUERITE H. COSTELLO 
Towson 

JACK EPSTEIN 
Baltimore 

JAMES L. FISHER, £x Officio 

WAYNE R. HARMAN 
Towson 



182 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



MYRA A. HARRIS 
Baltimore 

MARIA B. HEER 
Jarrettsville 

GEORGE A. HENDERSON 
Baltimore 

JOHN HORST, Director of Alumni Services. 
Ex Officio 

VEDA B. HORTON 
Baltimore 

JULIAN L LAPIDES 
Baltimore 

WILLIAM J. LOWMAN 
Baltimore 

THOMAS A. MEDWIN 
Towson 

DONALD P. MERRYMAN 
Upperco 

RUSSELL L. McCOMAS 
Forest Hill 

CHARLES N. MILLER 
Baltimore 

RICHARD D. NEIDIG 
Baltimore 



ANNE W. NICODEMUS 
Baltimore 

G. HUDSON QUARLES 
Towson 

CARROLL S. RANKIN 
Baltimore 

ELIZABETH E. ROBERTS 
Baltimore 

JEROME RUBIN 
Baltimore 

NOLA H. STUART 
Phoenix 

MARGARET F. TATE 
Luthen/ille 

MAYNARD W. WEBSTER 
Monkton 

W. NORRIS WEIS 
Westminster 

JOSHUA R. WHEELER 
Timonium 

M. THERESA WIEDEFELD, Ex Officio 

PAUL E. WISDOM, Ex Officio 



Administrative Officers 



JAMES L. FISHER 
President 

KENNETH A. SHAW 
Vice President 

C. RICHARD GILLESPIE 
Vice President 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 
Executive Council 

WAYNE N. SCHELLE 
Vice President 

PAUL E. WISDOM 
Vice President 



JAMES L. FISHER 
President of the College 
Professor, Psychology 

JOHN L. WIGHTON 
Assistant to the President 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

CHARLES A. HASLUP 
Assistant to the President, 
Associate Professor, Music 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 183 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



KENNETH A. SHAW 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and 

Dean of the College 

Associate Professor, Sociology 

GILBERT A. BRUNGARDT 
Associate Dean of the College 
Professor, Music 

RIA FRITJERS 

Associate Deem of the College 

Professor, Business Administration 

BILLY D. HAUSERMAN 
Associate Dean of the College 
Professor, Education 

MICHAEL T. MURPHY 
Associate Dean of the College 
Director of Instructional Services 

NORMAN L SHEETS 
Associate Dean of the College 
Professor, Physical Education 

JACK W. TAYLOR 
Associate Dean of the College 

JULIUS CHAPMAN 
Associate Dean of the College 
Minority Students Relations 

WILFRED B. HATHAWAY 

Dean of Graduate Studies, Professor, Biology 

FREDERICK C. ARNOLD 

Associate Director of Graduate Studies 

JOSEPH W. COX 

Dean of Evening and Summer Division 
Professor, History 

DONALD C. MULCAHEY 

Associate Director of Evening and Summer Division 



JOHN M. BOWEN 

Associate Director of Evening and Summer Division 

ELLEN KLEYLEIN 
ANDREW SIWULEC 
Academic Coordinators for 
Evening and Summer Division 

JAMES BACHMAN 

Fiscal Officer 

Evening and Summer Division 

MICHAEL L. MAHONEY 
Director of Admissions 

EVERETT GRINER 

Associate Director of Admissions 

VIVIENNE M. LEE 

Associate Director of Admissions 

LINDA J. COLLINS 
Admissions Counselor 

GERARD A. SARTORI 
Registrar 

DONALD P. DEAN 

Associate Registrar 

WILLIAM J. REULING 
Associate Registrar 

FRANCES L MINER 
Assistant Registrar 

EDWIN F. SASAKI 

Director of Academic Systems Research 

MARILYN A. LAMB 
Director, Day Care Center 

ROBERT WALLING 
Director of Financial Aids 



STUDENT SERVICES 



C. RICHARD GILLESPIE 

Vice President for Student Affairs, Professor, 

Theatre Arts 

THOMAS KNOX 
Associate Dean of Students 

ROSEMARY MALCOLM 
Associate Dean of Students 

JOHN HARRIS 
Associate Dean of Students 

PATRICIA OUTLAW 
Director, Study Skills 
Support Services Center 

PATRICK C. PHELAN 
Director of Health Center 

LONNIE McNEW 

Director of Residence Programs 



KENNETH S. RUSSELL 

Director of Counseling Center, 
Associate Professor of f'sychology 

CHARLES E. MALOY 

Associate Director, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

MARTHE QUINOTTE 

Counselor, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

JAMES SPIVACK 

Senior Counselor, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

STEPHEN SOBELMAN 
Senior Counselor 

BETTYE FLOYD 

Counselor, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BETTY ROBINSON 

Director of Mental Health Services 



184 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



WAYNE N. SCHELLE 

Vice President, Associate Professor, 

Business Administration 

STEPHEN R. KRUBA 
Systems Analyst 

FRED G. BANK 
Director of Personnel 

JOHN J. BAROCH 

Assistant Director of Personnel 

ALVIN TILGHMAN 

Personnel Training and Development Manager 

H. WILLIAM BAUERSFELD 
Director of Administrative Services 

CHARLES ECKELS 
Special Services Manager 

JOHN MILLER 
Purchasing Agent 

GERALD SMITH 
Office Services Manager 

JOSEPH ROBERTS 
Materiel Manager 

ROBERT F. PREVILLE 
Data Center Manager 

JOHN F. CHRISTHILF 
Director of Capital Improvements 



DONALD N. McCULLOH 

Director of Finance 

S. JOSEPH CREEL 

Financial Accounting and Analysis Manager 

TERRENCE C. SMITH 
Financial Operations Manager 

JOHN H. SUTER 

Director of Auxiliary Services 

H. AL DUKE, JR. 
Book Store Manager 

JAMES CRUMBAKER 
Food Services Administrator 

MARY LEE FARLOW 
Director of Residence 

RICHARD S. METZ 

College Center Operations Manager 

LEON D. HERRING 
Director of Physical Plant 

JAMES WOODS 
Assistant Director 

GENE E. DAWSON 

Director of Security and Safety 

W. NORVAL PUTMAN 

Assistant Director 



INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 



PAUL E. WISDOM 

Vice President, Associate Professor, General Studies 

DONALD P. HUTCHINSON 
Executive Associate 

ADELE E. KATZ 
Administrative Aide 

JOHN HORST, JR. 
Director of Alumni Services 



WILLIAM R. BROWN 

Director of Corporate and Foundation Programs 

FRANCIS J. LEMIRE 
Director of Placement 

WILLIAM A. CAREY 

Director of News and Publications Services 

MICHAEL DUNNE 
Assistant Director 



THOMAS E. STRADER, A.B., M.S. in L.S. 
Director, Albert S. Cook Library 

MURIEL L. BULLOCK, A.B. 

Acquisitions Assistant 

DOROTHY CHOW, B.A., M.S. in L.S. 
Acquisitions Librarian 

LOUISE H. FORSHAW, B.A., M.S. in L.S. 
Reference Librarian 



LIBRARIANS 

SUSAN M. MOWER, B.A., M.S. in L.S. 
Assistant Cataloger 

JANE PARSONS, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 
Serials Librarian 

GRACE M. SCHROEDER, B.S., M.L.S. 
Assistant Cataloger 

RICHARD T. SHOTWELL, B.A., M.A. in L.S. 
Reference Librarian 



ELEANORE O. HOFSTETTER, B.S., M.S. in L.S., 

M.A. 

Associate Director for Public Services 

MARGARET HUANG, B.Ed., M.S. in L.S. 
Assistant Catalog Librarian 

HELEN P. KALTENBORN, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Director for Technical Services 

ANN E. KENYON, A.B., M.S. in L.S. 
Assistant Cataloger 

JESSELYN LAMB, A.B.. M.A. in L.S. 
Senior Cataloger 

ANNE L. McCLOSKEY, A.A., B.S. 
Audiovisual Librarian 



ROBERT E. SHOUSE, B.A., M.S. in L.S. 
Reference Librarian 

JEAN R. TOMKO, B.A., B.S. in L.S. 
Reference Librarian, Teaching Aids 

NENITA VALINO, B.S.E. 
Assistant Cataloger 

ELIZABETH VAN ARSDALE, A.B.. M.S. in L.S. 
Circulation Librarian 

AGNES E. ZAMBOKY, B.A., M.S. in L.S. 
Catalog Librarian 

DOROTHY W. REEDER, A.B., B.S., M.A.L.S. 
Archivist 

A. ISABEL WILNER, B.A.. B.S. In L.S. 
Librarian, LIda Lee Tall Learning Resources Center 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 185 



Instructional Faculty 



The date in brackets following the listing 
of each person is the date of first 
appointment in the college. 

JAMES L. FISHER, President, Professor, 

Psychology 

B.S., M.S., Illinois State University; Ph.D., 

Northwestern University. [1969] 

KENNETH A. SHAW, Vice President of Academic 
Affairs and Dean of tfie College, Associate 
Professor, Sociology 

B.S., Illinois State University; M.Ed., University of 
Illinois; Ph.D., Purdue University. [1969] 

DANIEL AGLEY, Instructor, Health 
B.S., M.S., Indiana University. (1971) 

KENNETH I. AINLEY, Associate Professor, 
Health Science 

B.S., University of Rhode Island, M.S., Ph.D., Indiana 
University. [1972] 

PHILIP S. ALBERT, Instructor, lien's 

Physical Education 

B.S., University of Arizona. [1968] 

FRANCIS X. ALLEN, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

A.B., St. Charles College; M.Ed., Loyola College. 

[1970] 

CLIFFORD D. ALPER, Professor, Music 
B.M., M.M., University of Miami; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. [1960] 

MAURITZ G. ANDERSON, Associate Professor. 

Biology 

A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., Indiana University. 

[1963] 

HERBERT D. ANDREWS, Professor, History 
A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. [1959] 

VINCENT A. ANGOTTI, Assistant Professor, 
lien's Physical Education 
B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.S., West Virginia 
University. [1965] 

JAMES M. ANTHONY, Instructor, Music 
B.M., B.A., University of Arkansas; M.A., University 
of Michigan. [1971] 

GOLDEN E. ARRINGTON, Professor, and 
Chairman, Department of Music 
B.M., M.M., University of Idaho; Ph.D., University of 
Texas. [1968] 

STEPHEN BAILEY, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Yeshiva University; M.S., Rutgers University. 

[1971] 

GEORGIA O. BAKER, Assistant Professor, 

Theatre Arts 

B.S., University of Kansas; M.A., Stanford University. 

[1966] 



SHIRLEY BALDWIN, Instructor, Learning 

Resource Center 

B.A., Knox College; M.Ed., Goucher College. [1970] 

CHANDLER BARBOUR, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Washington State College; M.Ed., University 

of Maine; Ed.D., Wayne State University. [1970] 

JOHN R. BAREHAM, Professor, Physics 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D., 

Teachers College, Columbia University. [1956] 

ANNA BARRESI, Visiting Lecturer, Modern 

Language 

B.A., M.A., Hunter College. [1972] 

ROBERT D, BECKEY, Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Ed., Miami University. 

[1959] 

MAXINE BEHLING, Assistant Professor, Learning 
Resources Center 

B.S., Kent State University; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1966] 

BETTY BEINER, Instructor, Education 
A.B., Goucher College; M.Ed., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1969] 

GEORGE A. BEISHLAG, Professor, Geography 
A.B., Wayne University; M.A., Clark University; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. [1954] 

ERIC A. BELGRAD, Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. [1966] 

SUSIE M. BELLOWS, Associate Professor, 

Education 

A.B., College of Charleston; M.A., George Peabody 

College for Teachers. [1961] 

PAUL BERMAN, Associate Professor and Chair- 
man, Department of Theatre Arts 
B.A., Queens College; M.A., Hunter College. (1970) 

L. EDWARD BEVINS, Professor, English 
A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Virginia. [1952] 

JAMES BINKO, Associate Professor, Education 
B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. [1962] 

CORINNE T. BiZE, Professor and Chairman, De- 
partment of Women's Physical Education 
B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., New York University; 
Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. [1951] 

BONNIE BLAKE, Visiting Lecturer, Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Towson State College. [1972] 

SAUNDRA BLAKE, Instructor, Music 

B.S., M.Ed.Mus.Ed., Towson State College. [1971] 

FLOYD A. BLANKENSHIP, Associate Professor 
and Acting Chairman, Department of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
[1966] 



186 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



MARY BLANN, Assistant Professor, Women's 
Physical Education 

B.S., State University College, Cortland; M.Ed., State 
University of New York, Buffalo. [1971] 

ARNOLD BLUMBERG, Professor, History 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 11958] 

ANGELO S. BOLEA, Visiting Lecturer, Education 
B.A., Evangel College; M.Ed., Wayne State University; 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska. [1972] 

JOHN B. BOLES, Associate Professor, History 
B.A., Rice University; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
[1969] 

FRANCES T. BOND, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., M.Ed., State Teachers College at Towson. [1962] 

PHYLLIS B. BOSLEY, Assistant Professor. 
Communication Arts & Sciences 
B.A., Southwestern College, Kansas; M.A., University 
of Nebraska. [1964] 

ANDREA BOUCHER, Instructor, Women's 

Ptiysical Education 

Diploma in Physical Education, University of Adelaide, 

Australia; M.Ed., Western Washington State College. 

[1970] 

JEAN M. BOUTON, Assistant Professor, Physical 

Education 

B.S., Tufts University, M.A., Smith College; 

C.A.S.E., The Johns Hopkins University. [1966] 

DAVID E. BOYD, Assistant Professor, Education 
B.A., Washington College; M.Ed., University of Miami. 
11964] 

ELLA BRAMBLETT, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State College; M.A., 

George Peabody College for Teachers. [1951] 

ALIZA BRANDWINE, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.A., New School of Social Research; M.A., Ed.D., 

Yeshiva University. [1969] 

HELENE BREAZEALE, Instructor, Women's 
Physical Education 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University. [1972] 

NED BRITT, JR., Instructor, lien's Physical 

Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, Eastern Shore; M.S., 

Springfield College. [1972] 

SAMUEL BRODBELT, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Ohio State University. [1969] 

MAUD J. BROYLES, Professor, Education 
A.B., Concord State Teachers College; M.A., 
Northwestern University; Ed.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1958] 

CLINT BRUESS, Professor and Chairman, 
Department of Health Science 
B.S., Macalesler College; M.A., University of 
Maryland; Ed.D., Temple University. [1970] 

GILBERT A. BRUNGARDT, Associate Dean of 
the College, Professor, Music 
B.M.Ed., Fort Hays State College; M.M., Washington 
University; D.M.A., University of Illinois. [1967] 



JOHN L. BUCHANAN, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.A., University 

of North Carolina. [1965] 

1971-72.) 

BARRY BUCHOFF, Instructor, Business 
B.S., University of Maryland. [1972] 

JUDY BURCH, Assistant Professor, Nursing 
R.N., B.S., M.S., University of Maryland. [1972] 

GRAYSON S. BURRIER, Professor, Education 
A.B., Catawba College; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 
[1956] 

LINDA G. BURTON, Instructor, Audiovisual 

Communications 

B.S., Radford College; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

[1968] 

KATHERINE L. BUSEN, Assistant Professor, Piano 
B.S., M.A., M.Ed., University of Missouri. [1967] 

ANTHONY A. CACOSSA, Associate Professor, 
Modern Languages 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Syracuse 
University; D.M.L., University of Catania (Italy); 
Certificate in Hispanic Studies, Universidad de los 
Andes (Columbia). [1965] 

GAIL CAFFERATA, Instructor, Sociology 
B.A., M.A., State University of New York at 
Stonybrook. [1972] 

ROBERT S. CAMPBELL, Assistant Professor, 

Business 

B.S., Baltimore College of Commerce; C.P.A., 

State of Maryland. [1972] 

ELIZABETH P. CARPENTER, Assistant Professor, 

Learning Resources Center 

B.S., Earlham College; M.A., Towson State College. 

[1969] 

M. MAXWELL CASKIE, III, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., 

University of Michigan. [1971] 

DONALD L. CASSATT, Professor, Psychology 
B.S., Indiana State College, Pennsylvania; M.L., Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh. [1960] 

RAYMOND J. CASTALDI, Assistant Professor, 

Business 

B.S., Mt. St. Mary's; C.P.A., District of Columbia. 

[1970] 

MARY R. CASTELLI, Associate Professor, Botany 
B.A.. Marshall University; A.M., Ph.D., Smith College. 
[1967] 

CLEVELAND CHANDLER. Professor. Business 
A.B., Moorehouse College; MB. A., Atlanta 
University; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. [1972] 

HENRY CHEN. Assistant Professor, Physics 
B.A., Harvard University, M.A., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1965] 

PETER C. C. CHEN, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., St. Anselm's College; M.A., Syracuse University. 

[1966] 



INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 187 



PHYLLIS Z. CHINN, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

A.B., Brandeis University; A.M.T., Harvard University; 
M.A., University of California, San Diego; Ph.D., 
University of California. [1969] 

MARION J. COCKEY, Instructor, Sociology 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., 
University of Tennessee. [1969] 

EDWIN COHEN, Associate Professor, Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Johns Hopkins University. [1969] 

EILEEN W. COHN, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., M.Ed., State Teachers College at Towson. [1962] 

GEORGE 0. COLEMAN, Professor, Political 

Science 

A.B., The College of the Ozarks; M.A., University of 

Oklahoma; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. [1956] 

VINCENT J. COLIMORE, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.A., Loyola University; M.A., Fordham University, 

Ph.D., New York University. [1967] 

RUTH M. CONARD, Pofessor, Women's Pfiysicai 

Education 

A.B., Shepherd College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; 

Ed.D., Temple University. [1963] 

JOHN E. CONNOLLY, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.A., University of Scranton; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Pennsylvania. [1970] 

DAVID L. CORNTHWAITE, Professor, Education 

B.S., Towson State College; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University; Ed.D., George Washington 
University. [1952] 

ESTHER S. COULANGE, Associate Professor, 

Music 

B.S., Indiana State College, Pennsylvania; M.A., 

New York University. [1959] 

SARA COULTER, Associate Professor, English 
B.A.. Colorado College; Ph.D., University of Colorado. 
[1969] 

GEORGE W. COX, Associate Professor, 

Education 

A.B., University of Richmond; M.A., Ed.D., University 

of Virginia. [1963] 

JOSEPH W. COX, Dean of Evening College and 

Summer Session, Professor, History 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1964] 

LOUIS T. COX, Professor, Physics 

B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.A., Ed.D., 

Teachers College, Columbia University. [1947] 

MELANIE COX, Assistant Professor, Nursing 
R.N., B.S., Alderson-Broadus College; M.S., University 
of Maryland. [1972] 

DONALD H. CRAVER, Associate Professor, 

English 

B.S., Wake Forest College; M.A., Duke University; 

M.Phil., Ph.D., George Washington University. [1962] 

LAWRENCE E. CRAWFORD, Assistant Professor, 

Music 

B.A., M.M., University of Oregon. [1965] 



COMPTON N. CROOK, Professor, Biology 
B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
[1939] 

RONALD W. CUBBISON, Associate Professor, 
Art 

B.S., Philadelphia College of Art; M.F.A., 
Pennsylvania State University. [1966] 

GORDON CYR, Assistant Professor, Music 
A.B., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 
[1971] 

ROBERT E. DAIHL, Assistant Professor, Biology 
B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.A., Ohio State 
University. [1962] 

CHARLOTTE E. DAVIS, Assistant Professor, 

Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, Concord Hospital School of 

Nursing; B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.S., 

University of Maryland. [1971] 

EDWARD L. DAVIS, Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 

Ed.B., Ed.M., University of Rhode Island; Ed.D., 

University of New Mexico. [1970] 

LUCY DAVIS, Instructor, Art 

B.A., Goucher College; M.F.A., Maryland Institute. 

[1970] 

NANCY DAVIS, Assistant Professor, Psychology 
B.S., M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland. [1972] 

WILLIAM A. DENNER, Instructor, Art 
B.F.A., Maryland Institute College of Art; M.F.A., 
Yale School of Art and Architecture. [1971] 

DAVID W. DENT, instructor. Political Science 
B.A., M.A., San Diego State College; Ph.D., University 
of Minnesota. [1972] 

ANTHONY DiCESARE, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

A.B., Suffolk College; M.A., Michigan State University; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1971] 

RENE deBRABANDER, Associate Professor, 

Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., University of Louvain; Ph.D., Georgetown 

University. [1970] 

RONALD DIETZ, Instructor, Audiovisual 

Communications 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania 

State University. [1971] 

NORMAN R. DIFFENDERFER, Associate Profes- 
sor and Chairman, Department of Geography 
B.S., Shippensburg State College, Pennsylvania; 
M.A., University of Nebraska. [1957] 

PAUL H. DOUGLAS, Assistant Professor, English 
B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of 
Oregon. M.Phil., George Washington University. [1969] 

H. FILMORE DOWLING, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., University of 

Wisconsin. [1966] 

RUTH L. DRUCKER, Associate Professor, Voice 

B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music, University of 
Rochester. [1967] 



188 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



A. ANDERSON DUMAS, Professor, Education 
B.S., Alabama State College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America. [1968] 

MARY A. DUNCAN, Instructor, Physical 

Education 

B.S., University of Wisconsin. [1966] 

JOHN DURO, Associate Professor, Music 
B.Mus., M.Mus., Syracuse University. [1956] 

ALICE W. DUSTIRA, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., Smith College; M.A., Columbia University. [1965] 

CAROL DWIN, Assistant Professor, 
Communication Arts & Sciences 
B.A., M.A., University of Maryland. [1969] 

ROBERT S. DYER, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Grinnell College; Ph.D., State University of 

New York, Buffalo. [1971] 

J. ELLEN EASON, Associate Professor, 
Physical Education 

B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina; Ed.D., George Peabody College for 
Teachers. [1971] 

CHARLES R. EBERHARDT, Professor and 
Chairman, Department of Philosophy and Religion 
B.S., New York University; S.T.M., Biblical Seminary, 
New York; Ph.D., Drew University. [1965] 

GEORGIA ECONOMOU, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.A., Scripps College; M.A., Columbia University. 

[1965] 

GERD W. EHRLICH, Professor, Political Science 
A.B., College of Idaho; M.A., Washington State 
University; LL.B., University of Maryland; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University. [1966] 

SMART A. EKPO, Associate Professor, 
Political Science 

B.A., Howard University; M.A., Ph.D., American 
University. [1967] 

LAURA R. ELDRIDGE, Instructor, History 

B.A., Wilson College; M.A., Bryn Mawr College [1970] 

GENEVA ELY-FLICKINGER, Professor, Education 

A.B., Hood College; M.A., Ph.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1967] 

JACOB EPSTEIN, Associate Professor, Education 
B.S., M.A., Johns Hopkins University. [1970] 

HOWARD R. ERICKSON, Professor and 
Chairman, Department of Biology 
B.S., Indiana State College, Pennsylvania; M.S., 
Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Cornell 
University. [1959] 

DEAN R. ESSLINGER, Associate Professor, 

History 

B.A., University of Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Notre Dame. [1968] 

THOMAS E. EVANS, Assistant Professor, German 
B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1967] 

JAMES EWIG, Assistant Professor, Biology 
B.A., Washington-Jefferson College; M.S., Ph.D.. 
Pennsylvania State University. [1971] 



JOSEPH A. FALCO, Professor, History 

B.A., Duquesne University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh. [1957] 

MARGARET E. FAULKNER, Instructor, 
Physical Education 

B.S., West Chester College; M.A., Trenton State 
College. [1970] 

CHARLES A. FIELD, Assistant Professor, Men's 
Physical Education 

A.B., Belmont Abbey College; M.S., West Virginia 
University. [1966] 

MICHAEL FIGLER, Assistant Professor. 

Psychology 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan 

State University. [1971] 

GERALDINE FINCH, Instructor, Physical 

Education 

B.S., Panzer College; M.A., Montclair State College. 

[1969] 

CECELIA FINK, Assistant Professor, Education 
B.S., Towson State College; M.L.A., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1969] 

ROGER FINK, Instructor, Psychology 

B.A., B.D., Concordia College; M.A., Loyola College. 

[1972] 

DAVID FIRMAN, Professor, Geography 

B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1955] 

FLORENCE FISCHER, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., University of Delaware. 

[1966] 

VICTOR B. FISHER, Assistant Professor, 

Sociology 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., Pennsylvania State 

University. [1961] 

REGINA L. FITZGERALD, Professor, Education 
A.B., Western Maryland College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Maryland. [1951] 

JOHN H. FIX, Assistant Professor, Art 
B.F.A., Ohio State University; M.F.A., Cranbrook 
Academy of Art. [1967] 

KARDYNE FLAG, Assistant Professor, Education 
B.A., Allegheny College; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1969] 

JAMES W. FLOOD, Assistant Professor, Art 
B.S., Philadelphia Museum College of Art; M.Ed., 
University of Illinois. [1966] 

ANNETTE C. FLOWER, Associate Professor, 

English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1969] 

WILLIAM FORBES, Assistant Professor, Men's 
Physical Education 

B.S., Loch Haven State College; M.A., University of 
Pittsburgh. [1967] 

BARBARA FRANKEL, Instructor, English 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., University of 
Wisconsin. M.L.A., Johns Hopkins University. [1968] 

RONALD C. FREDERICK, Assistant Professor, 

Physical Science 

B.S., Central Missouri State College. [1968] 



INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 189 



GEORGE S. FRIEDMAN, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., Dul<e University. 

[1966] 

BARRY FRIEMAN, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1970] 

RIA FRIJTERS, Associate Dean of the College 
and Professor of Business Administration 
Doctoral Degree, Netherlands School of Economics, 
Rotterdam. [1967] 

WOLFGANG FUCHS, Assistant Professor, 

Philosophy 

B.S., Duquesne University; M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

State University. [1969] 

V. C. FUQUA, Instructor, Theatre Arts 
B.F.A., University of Texas. [1972] 

JAMES FURUKAWA, Professor and Chairman, 
Department of Psychology 
B.S., Sophia University; M.Ed., Loyola College; J.D., 
University of Maryland; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1967] 

NEIL E. GALLAGHER, Assistant Professor, Health 

Education 

B.S., University of Dayton; Ed.M., Temple University. 

[1970] 

CAREY GARNER, Associate Professor, Education 
A.B., Catholic University, M.Ed., Ed.D., University of 
Maryland. [1969] 

WILLIAM L. GEHRING, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Towson State College; M.Ed., Johns Hopkins 

University. [1966] 

JEREMIAH J. GERMAN, Assistant Professor. 

Economics 

A.B., A.M., University of Chicago. [1970] 

MATTHEW J. GIBNEY, Assistant Professor, 

Business 

A.B., Harvard University; M.A., University of 

Pennsylvania. [1967] 

LORENZO GILCHRIEST, Assistant Professor, Art 
B.F.A., Newark State College; M.S., Pratt Institute. 
[1967] 

C. RICHARD GILLESPIE, Vice President of , 
Student Affairs and Professor, Drama, Speech 
B.A., Principia College; M.A., Ph.D., State University 
of Iowa. [1961] 

KENNETH O. GIOVANDO, Instructor, Men's 

Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., University of Arizona. [1971] 

VIC GLADSTONE, Assistant Professor, 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania State University. [1971] 

JORGE A. GIRO, Associate Professor, Spanish 
Dr. of Law, Universidad de Villanueva; B.A., M.S., 
Indiana State University. 

PHYLLIS A. GOETZ, Assistant Professor, Physical 

Education 

B.S., West Chester State College; M.Ed., East 

Stroudsburg State College. [1967] 



IRWIN GOLDBERG, Professor and Chairman, 
Department of Sociology 

B.S.S., City College of New York; M.A., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Michigan. [1972] 

WILLARD GRAVES, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Drury College; B.S.E., M.S., Ph.D., Johns 

Hopkins University. [1971] 

DAVID GREENE, Assistant Professor, Physics 
B.S., Alfred University; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. [1970] 

DIANNE H. GREYERBIEHL, Instructor, 
Communication Arts and Sciences 
B.A., M.A., University of Maryland. [1972] 

HAROLD E. GRISWOLD, Assistant Professor, 

Music 

B.A., Evansville College; M.M., Indiana University. 

[1969] 

HENRI GROENHEIM, Associate Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., George 

Washington University; Ph.D., Florida State 

University. [1969] 

MICHAEL GROSSMAN, Professor of Political 
Science and Chairman, Department of Economics 
and Political Science 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1963] 

W. FRANK GUESS, Associate Professor, English 
A.B., Presbyterian College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina. [1946] 

DAVID F. GUILLAUME, Associate Professor, Art 
B.F.A., Alfred University; M.A., Syracuse University. 
[1959] 

JOSEPH P. GUTKOSKA, Professor, Education, 
and Director of Reading 

B.S., Towson State College; M.Ed., Temple University; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland. [1967] 

NANCY J. HAGELGANS, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., Goucher College; M.A., Johns Hopkins 

University. [1968] 

HENRY GEORGE HAHN, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College; M.A., University of 

Maryland; M.L.A., Johns Hopkins University. [1965] 

GARY T. HAIGHT, Instructor, Business 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Dayton. [1972] 

JOHN J. HAMPTON, Assistant Professor, and 
Chairman, Department of Business Administration 
A.B., Stetson University, M.B.A., D.B.A., George 
Washington University. [1969] 

IRENE W. HANSON, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., M.S., Temple University; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota. [1968] 

PAUL E. HANSON, Associate Professor, English 
B.A., San Francisco State College; M.A., Ph.D., 
New York University. [1960] 



190 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



ROBERT B. HANSON, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Towson State College; M.A., Bowdoin College; 

Ed.D., University of Maryland. [1966] 

JOHN M. HARLIN, Instructor, Geography 
B.S., Southwest Missouri State College; M.A., 
University of Iowa. [1971] 

PHOEBE J. HARRIS. Assistant Professor, 

Physical Education 

B.A., Syracuse University; M.S., Smith College. 

[1967] 

CHARLES A. HASLUP, Assistant to the President, 
Associate Professor, Music 
B.S., State Teachers College at Towson; M.Ed., 
University of Maryland. [1957] 

ALVIE L. HASTE, Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S. in Education, Ohio State University; M.A., 

University of Cincinnati. [1964] 

ELIZABETH R. HATCHER, Assistant Professor, 

English 

B.A., Dominican College of San Rafael; M.A., Ph.D., 

Johns Hopkins University. [1969] 

WILFRED B. HATHAWAY, Dean of Graduate 
Studies, Professor, Biology 
B.S., Massachusetts State College; M.S., University 
of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Cornell University. [1950] 

THOMAS F. HAUPT, Assistant Professor, Spanish 

Ph.B., Loyola College; M.A., MIddlebury College 
of Madrid. [1962] 

BILLY D. HAUSERMAN, Associate Dean of the 
College. Director of Teacher Education, and 
Professor of Education 

B.S., State Teachers College at Brockport; M.Ed., 
University of California at Los Angeles; Ed.D., 
University of Buffalo. [1965] 

NORMA HAUSERMAN, Associate Professor, 
Learning Resources Center 
B.S., State University of New York, Brockport; 
Ed.M., University of Buffalo; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland. [1971] 

MORRO HAWKINS, Visiting Lecturer, Education 
B.S., Coppin State College; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1972] 

HLIB S. HAYUK, Assistant Professor, Geography 
B.A., City College of New York; M.A., University of 
Wisconsin. [1969] 

GENEVIEVE HEAGNEY, Professor, Education 
B.S., Syracuse University; M.A., Cornell University; 
Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. [1950] 

ELAINE HEDGES, Associate Professor, English 
B.A., Barnard College; M.A., Radcliffe College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University. [1967] 

RICHARD C. HELFRICH, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., University of Scranton; M.Ed., University of 

Pittsburgh; Ed.D., University of Maryland. [1970] 

CARL V. HENRIKSON, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.S., University of North Dakota; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of South Dakota. (1970) 



MARJORIE R. HENRY, Professor, English 
A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Ph.D., University of 
Washington. [1959] 

EVELYN F. HILL, Professor, Psychology 
B.A., Goucher College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic 
University. [1967] 

JAMES J. HILL, Associate Professor, Philosophy 
B.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. [1964] 

JAMES J. HILL, JR., Associate Professor, 

English 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Temple University; 

Ph.D., University of Texas. [1970] 

RICHARD L. HILTON, JR., Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University 

of Arizona. [1969] 

EDWIN A. HIRSCHMANN, Assistant Professor, 

History 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Pennsylvania 

State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

[1969] 

ABOLMAJD HOJJATI, Professor, Sociology 
B.A., University of Tehran; M.S., Southern Illinois 
University; Ph.D., St. Louis University. [1968] 

EDWARD HOLMES, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., State University College, Oneonta; M.Ed., State 

University College, Cortland. [1971] 

TOM HOOE, Instructor, Biology 

B.A., Evansville College; M.A., Drake University. 

[1970] 

MARTIN HORAK, Associate, Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola College; M.S., University of Notre Dame; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1967] 

JACOB HUANG, Associate Professor, Physics 
B.S., Taiwan University, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1967] 

ELIZABETH HUGHES, Assistant Professor, 

Nursing 

B.S., Columbia University; M.S., University of 

Maryland. [1970] 

GLADYS C. HUGHES, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

A.B., Women's College, University of North Carolina; 

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. [1938] 

NINA HUGHES, Professor, English, Speech 
A.B., Florida State College for Women; M.A.. Catholic 
University of America; Ed.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1947] 

ERNEST ILGENFRITZ, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

A.B., Gettysburg College; M.S., Brown University. 

[1966] 

HELEN JACOBSON, Assistant Professor. Art 
Graduate, Maryland Institute. [1964] 

HESTER GRAHAM JEFFERS, Instructor, 

Mathematics 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Women's College; M.A., 

Syracuse University. [1963] 



IINSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 191 



MICHAEL H. JESSUP, Professor and Chairman, 

Secondary and Foundations Education; Director 

of Field Services 

A.B., A.M., Ed.D., George Washington University. 

[1967] 

JENNY JOCHENS, Associate Professor, History 

Cand. Phil., cand. mag., University of Copenhagen. 
[1969] 

EMOGENE JOHNSON, Instructor, Health Science 
B.S., Norfolk State College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee. [1972] 

ROBERT W. JOHNSON, Associate Professor, 

Physics 

B.S., Wayne State University; M.A., University of 

Michigan; Ed.D., Wayne State University. [1969] 

VIRGINIA A. JOHNSON, Instructor, Biology 
B.S., Lamar State College of Technology; M.Ed., 
University of Georgia. [1968] 

ANNETTE J. JONES, Instructor, Sociology 
B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., George Washington 
University. [1966] 

DAN L. JONES, Assistant Professor and Co- 
Chairman, Department of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Utah. [1966] 

PAUL JONES, Instructor, Audiovisual 

Communications 

A.B., Pfiffer College; M.A., Appalacian State 

University. [1971] 

SHARON JONES, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Ottawa University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota. [1971] 

BROOKS JOYNER, Instructor, Art and Gallery 

Director 

B.A., M.A., University of Maryland. [1972] 

MARY CATHERINE KAHL, Professor and 
Chairman, Department of History 
A.B., M.A., University of Maryland. [1943] 

BERNADINE KAMINSKI, Instructor, Art 
B.S., Philadelphia College of Art; M.F.A., Tyler 
School of Fine Art. [1970] 

NANETTE S. KANDEL, Associate Professor, 

Sociology 

B.A., Hunter College; M.S.W., University of 

Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1968] 

NILES KAPAN, Instructor, Health Science 
B.S., Brooklyn College; M.P.H., University of 
California at Los Angeles. [1972] 

HOWARD S. KAPLON, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Towson State Teachers College; M.S., Ohio 

State University. [1966] 

ELEANORE KARFGIN, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.A., American International College; M.S. in Ed., 

Hofstra University. [1964] 

UNO KASK, Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Georgia; M.A., University of 

Minnesota; Ph.D., University of Texas. [1966] 



ROBERT KEANE, Instructor, Communications 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A., Towson State College; M.A., University of 
Michigan. [1970] 

ELIZABETH KEEN EN, Assistant Professor. 

Nursing 

R.N., B.S., M.S., University of Maryland. [1972] 

DARLENE A, KELLY, Associate Professor, 

Physical Education 

B.A., Pacific Lutheran University; M.A., University of 

Washington; Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

[1969] 

MITCHELL W. KERR, Professor, History 
B.S., University of Oregon; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 
University. [1967] 

EARL W. KILLIAN, Associate Professor, Men's 
Physical Education 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1950] 

MARGARET A. KILEY, Professor, Education 
B.S., University of Buffalo; M.A., Ed.D., George 
Washington University. [1969] 

OHEO KIM, Visiting Lecturer, Mathematics 
B.A., Korea University; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Rochester. [1972] 

THEODORA R. KIMSEY, Professor, Education 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., Ph.D., Teachers 
College, Columbia University. [1969] 

DELL C. KJER, Professor, Education 

B.E., Wisconsin State College; M.A., Ph.D., George 

Peabody College for Teachers. [1965] 

CHARLOTTE A. KOOMJOHN, Associate 
Professor, English 

B.S., St. Louis University; M.A., Miami University; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester. [1968] 

GEORGE KRANZLER, Professor, Sociology 
MA., Ph.D., Columbia University; Ph.D., Jul. Max. 
University, Germany. [1966] 

ELMER C. KREISEL, JR., Assistant Professor, 

Physics 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.Ed., Loyola College. 

[1966] 

MARTHA J. KUMAR, Assistant Professor, 
Political Science 

B.A., Connecticut College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 
University. [1971] 

FREDERICKA KUNDIG, Associate Professor, 

Biology 

B.A., College of Wooster; Ph.D., University of 

Rochester. [1967] 

FREDERICK J. LADD, Instructor, Art 
A.C.I.S., Bristol College of Commerce; University of 
Bristol Cert. Ed., Bath Academy of Art; M.A., Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. [1971] 

MARILYN A. LAMB, Visiting Lecturer, 
Learning Resources Center 
B.S., University of Minnesota. [1971] 

KARL G. LAREW, Associate Professor, History 
B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., Ph.D., Yale 
University. [1966] 

MARA B. LAUTERBACH, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.A., Drew University; M.S., University of Maryland. 

[1967] 



192 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



PAUL J. LAVIN, Assistant Professor, Psychology 
B.S., Boston College; M.Ed., Springfield College; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1971] 

JAMES C. LAWLER, Instructor, Education 
B.S., Towson State College. M.L.A., Johns Hopkins 
University. [1971] 

BYUNG S. LEE, Visiting Lecturer, Economics 

and Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Korea University. [1972] 

BARBARA LEONS, Associate Professor, 

Sociology 

B.A., Brandies University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

California, Los Angeles. [1970] 

ARLEY W. LEVNO, Assistant Professor, French 
B.A., University of Montana; M.A., University of 
Maryland; University of Paris, (E.S.P.P.F.E.; Institut 
de Phoentique). [1967] 

HENRY LEVY, Instructor, Music 
B.S., Tovi^son State College. [1970] 

CARYL LEWIS, Assistant Professor, Biology 
A.B., Western Maryland College; M.A., Bryn Maw^r 
College. [1960] 

JOHN SMITH LEWIS, Professor, English 
A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Brown University; 
Ph.D., New York University. [1957] 

MARILYN G. LEWIS, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University; D.Ed., 

University of Virginia. [1970] 

EDWARD W. LEYHE, Assistant Profescor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University. [1968] 

DORIS K. LI DIKE, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S.. University of Oregon. [1968] 

JAMES A. G. LINDNER, Professor, Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., 
Michigan State University. [1969] 

HELEN E. LINDSAY, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Towson State College. [1967] 

MARAVENE LOESCHKE, Instructor, Theatre Arts 
B.S., M.Ed., Towson State College. [1970] 

EDWIN M. LOGAN, Professor and Chairman, 

Audiovisual 

B.S., Towson State College; M.A., College of William 

and Mary; Ph.D., University of Virginia. [1967] 

EDWARD LOH, Assistant Professor. Physics 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. [1969] 

CHARLES LONEGAN, JR., Associate Professor, 

Communications Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Montclair State College; M.S., Pennsylvania 

State College; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

[1970] 

JUDSON LOOMIS, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Ithaca College; M.L.S., Syracuse University. 

[1970] 

GLORIA LOUDERMILK, Instructor. Education 
3.S., M.S., Towson State College. [1972] 



ELSIE LUDLOW, Instructor, Learning 

Resources Center 

B.S., Cornell University; M.A., New York University. 

SELMA E. LYONS. Instructor, Education 
8.S., M.S., University of Maryland. [1968] 

BARTON L. MACCHIETTE, Instructor, Business 
B.S., Nasson College; M.B.A., American University. 
[1971] 

JAMES MacKERRON, Assistant Professor, 
Communications Arts & Sciences 
B.S., State University of New York, Fredonia; M.A., 
Syracuse University. [1971] 

ARTHUR G. MADDEN, Professor, Philosophy 
A.B., Fordham University; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Fordham University. [1967] 

ROBERT A. MAGILL, Professor and Chairman, 
Department of Modern Languages 
B.A., M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., Columbia 
University. [1962] 

JOHN MANLOVE, Associate Professor, Theatre 

Arts 

B.A., Reed College; M.A., DePauw University; Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota. [1967] 

DAVID MARCHAND, Associate Professor. Music 
B.S., Bemidji State College; M.S., University of 
Illinois; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. [1970] 

CURTIS V. MARTIN, Associate Professor, 

Geography 

B.S., Trenton State College; M.A., Clark University. 

[1957] 

DOUGLAS MARTIN, Assistant Professor. History 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington. [1970] 

KEITH MARTIN, Assistant Professor, Education 
B.S., M.S., Indiana University. [1971] 

JOHN CARTER MATTHEWS, Professor. History 
A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Virginia. [1948] 

YVETTE MAY, Visiting Lecturer, Education 
B.S., Morgan State College; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1971] 

JOHN W. McCLEARY, Professor, History 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., University of 
Wisconsin; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. [1947] 

MADELEINE G. McDERMOTT, Associate 
Professor, French 

Licence es Lettres, Sorbonne; M.A., Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. [1969] 

JOHN C. McDonald, Assistant Professor, Men's 
Physical Education 

B.S., Davis-Elkins College; M.S., West Virginia 
University. [1967] 

ALICE P. McGILL, Instructor, Learning Resource 

Center 

B.S., Elizabeth City State University. [1971] 

GEORGE C. McGINTY, Assistant Professor. 
Men's Physical Education 

A.B., University of North Carolina; M.Ed., University 
of Maryland. [1966] 

WAYNE McKIM. Instructor, Geography 
B.A., M.A.. Michigan State University. [1971] 

INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 193 



MARY J. McMAHON, Instructor, Health 
B.S., DePaul University; M.S., Indiana University. 
[1971] 

WAYNE C. McWILLIAMS, Assistant Professor, 

History 

B.A., Thiel College; M.A., University of Hawaii. [1969] 

WILLIAM H. MECHLING, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.A., Haverford College; M.S., Cornell University. 

[1965] 

THOMAS MEDWIN, Visiting Lecturer, Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Tow^son State College. [1972] 

THOMAS MEINHARDT, Associate Professor, 
/Ifen's Ptiysical Education 

B.S., M.E., Kent State University; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. [1970] 

JOHN MELICK, Assistant Professor, Music 
B.M., Curtis Institute of Music; M.M., Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. [1969] 

PRITAM T. MERANI, Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. [1965] 

FRANK R. MILIO, Associate Professor, Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., University of Maryland. [1965] 

LLOYD D. MILLER, Professor, Art 

B.F.A., University of Iowa; M.A., Harvard University; 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. [1954] 

STUART MILLER, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.A., Holllns College; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1967] 

JOHN B. MITCHELL, Professor, Art 

B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 

Ph.D., New York University. [1949] 

LORETTA MOLITOR, Assistant Professor, Physics 
B.S., M.S., State University of New York, Buffalo; 
M.S.T., Cornell University; Ed.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. [1971] 

ENRIQUE MONTENEGRO, Associate Professor. 

Art 

B.F.A., University of Florida. [1970] 

RAYMOND J. MOORE, Assistant Professor, Music 
B.S., State University of New York; M.M., Peabody 
Conservatory. [1966] 

WILLIAM T. MOOREFIELD, Associate Professor, 

Physics 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.Ed., Loyola College. 

[1959] 

RAYMOND L. MORELL, Instructor, 

Communications Arts and Sciences 

B.A., West Liberty State College; M.A., West Virginia 

University. [1968] 

FREDERICK MORSINK, Associate Professor, 

Biology 

M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of New 

Hampshire. [1966] 

ARMIN MRUCK, Professor, History 

STAATS EXAMEN, Ph.D., George August University, 

Germany. [1967] 

HAROLD E. MUM A, Associate Professor, Biology 
B.S., M.S., University of Maryland. [1957] 



JOHN J. MURUNGI, Assistant Professor, 

Philosophy 

B.A., Beloit College; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University. [1969] 

THELDON MYERS, Associate Professor, Music 
B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.A., Fresno State 
College; D.M.A., Peabody Conservatory. [1963] 

MARY-ANN MYRANT, Associate Professor, 
Physical Education 

B.S., University of Oregon; M.S., Indiana University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. [1970] 

LUCILLE R. NASS, Visiting Lecturer, Learning 
Resource Center 

B.S., Ohio University; M.Ed., Towson State 
College. [1972] 

SAMUEL H. NASS, Associate Professor, Art 
B.S., Ohio University; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1956] 

JOYCE C. NEUBERT, Instructor, Mathematics 
B.A., Mount Saint Agnes College; M.A., Catholic 
University of America. [1968] 

EDWARD NEULANDER, Professor, Psychology 
B.S., City College of New York; M.S., Ed.D., Cornell 
University. [1950] 

ROBERT S. NEVILLE, Instructor, Business 

B.A., M.A., Western State College of Colorado. [1972] 

JOHN B. NEWMAN, Professor and Co-Chairman, 
Department of Physics 

B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. [1967] 

MARILYN NICHOLAS, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

A.B., Regis College; M.Ed., Boston University. [1969] 

RICHARD NZEADIBE, Assistant Professor, 

History 

B.A., University of Berren Springs; M.A., Howard 

University. [1971] 

LOIS D. ODELL, Professor, Biology 

A.B., New York State College for Teachers at Albany; 

M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University. [1947] 

BARBARA K. OLSON, Instructor, Education 

B.S., Hamline University; M.A., University of 
Minnesota. [1966] 

PHYLLIS E. OLSON, Assistant Professor, Music 
B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music, University of 
Rochester. [1968] 

GWENYTHE J. O'NEILL, Assistant Prfessor, 

Education 

B.S., Simmons College; M.Ed., Worcester State 

College. [1966] 

CHARLES C. ONION, Professor, General Studies 
B.S., University of Minnesota; B.M., MacPhail School 
of Music; M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota. [1956] 

JACK D. OSMAN, Associate Professor, Health 
B.S., West Chester State College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. [1971] 

HAIG OUNDJIAN, Instructor, Art 
B.A., M.F.A., Rutgers University. [1970] 

ALAN PATRICK, Instructor, Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Towson State College. [1971] 



194 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



HARVEY PAUL, Associate Professor, Economics 
B.A., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., State University of New 
York at Buffalo. [1966] 

JAMES R. PAULSON, Assistant Professor, Art 
B.A., Western Illinois University; M.A., Northern 
Illinois University. [1969] 

WILLIAM F. PELHAM, Professor and 
Co-Chairman, Department of Pfiysics 
B.Ch.E., Clarkson College of Technology; M.A., Ed.D., 
Teachers College, Columbia University. [1955] 

JACQUELINE PERREAULT, Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., Rosary College; M.S., Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin. [1970] 

HERBERT f ETRI, Assistant Professor, 

Psycholoi,: 

A.B., Miami University; M.A., Johns Hopkins 

University. [1971] 

GERALD PHILLIPS, Instructor, t^usic 

B.S., Central Michigan State College; M.A., University 

of Cincinnati. [1971] 

HARRY PIOTROWSKI, Associate Professor, 

History 

B.S., State University of New York; M.A., Ph.D., 

Syracuse University. [1966] 

ROBERT A. PITMAN, Visiting Lecturer, Art 
B.S., Maryland Institute; M.Ed., Tov\/son State 
College. [1972] 

PATRICIA R. PLANTE, Professor and 
Co-Chairman, Department of English 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.A., St. Michael's 
College; Ph.D., Boston University. [1969] 

ROGER L. POIRIER, Assistant Professor, French 

Baccalaureat, University of Paris; M.A., Western 
Reserve University. [1968] 

JEAN POLLACK, Instructor, Education 

B.S., Texas Technological Collec "•; M.A., Teachers 

College, Columbia University. [1972] 

STANLEY M. POLLACK, Associate Professor, Art 

B.S.S., City College of New York; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University. [1951] 

BARBARA POUR, Assistant Professor, Education 
A.B., Hood College; M.A., New York University. [1969] 

JOAN RABIN, Assistant Professor, Psychology 
B.A., Queens College; Ph.D., State University of 
New York, Buffalo. [1971] 

BETTY L. RASKIN, Associate Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Goucher College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

University. [1967] 

DALE RAUSCHENBERG, Assistant Professor, 

Music 

B.M.E., Youngstown University; M.M., Indiana 

University. [1966] 

BINA D. RAVAL, Assistant Professor, Psychology 
B.A., Behar University; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America. [1969] 

JACK W. RAY, Assistant Professor, Education 
B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., Bucknell University. 
[1962] 



REYNALDO REYES, Associate Professor, Music 
B.M., Santo Tomas University; M.M., Peabody 
Conservatory. [1967] 

DIANE A. REYNOLDS, Instructor, Sociology 
B.A., M.A.. Stanford University. [1972] 

VERNAL E. RICHARDSON, Assistant Professor, 

Music 

B.M., B.M.E., M.M., Indiana University School of 

Music. [1968] 

ERWIN D. RIEDNER, Assistant Professor, 
Modern Language 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., University of 
Michigan. [1969] 

GERALD O. RIGGLEMAN, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

A.B., B.S., Eastern Nazarene College; M.A.T.M., 

University of Detroit. [1962] 

R. RAYMOND RIORDON Assistant Professor, 

Men's Physical Education 

A.B., Shepherd College; M.Ed., Miami University. 

[1964] 

FRED M. RIVERS, Associate Professor, History 
B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Hunter College; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. [1966] 

MARY E. ROACH, Associate Professor, 
Physical Education 

B.S., New York University; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. [1926] 

CARMEN ROBB, Instructor, Art 

A.B., Kansas State Teachers College. [1965] 

BRUCE ROBERTSON, Instructor, Philosophy 
B.A., Elmhurst College; B.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. [1971 ] 

WILLIAM ROSE, Instructor, Mathematics 
B.A., Queens College; A.M., University of Illinois. 
[1971] 

GARY ROSECRANS, Associate Professor, Audio 

Visual 

B.S., Wichita State University; M.Ed., Ed.D., Universit 

of Virginia. [1972] 

BONNIE ROWAN, Assistant Professor, 
Communication Arts and Sciences 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin. [1970] 

DAVID K. ROWE, Associate Professor, Business 
B.A., Haverford College; M.S., New York University; 
M.A., Columbia University. [1972] 

EDWARD I. RUBENDALL, Associate Professor, 

Physics 

A.B., Illinois College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

[1954] 

CARL A. RUNK. Assistant Professor, Men's 

Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Arizona. [1967] 

DZIDRA RUTENBERGS, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., Western Reserve; M.A., New York University. 

[1967] 

RODERICK RYON, Professor, History 
A.B., Western Maryland College; A.M., Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University. [1965] 



INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 195 



FRANCISCO SABIN, Associate Professor, 

Spanish 

Dr. of Law, Dr. of Public Law, Dr. of Philosophy and 

Letters, University of Havana. [1966] 

HENRY N. SANBORN, Professor, Economics 
B.A., George Washington University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. [1965] 

FRANK J. SANDERS, Associate Professor, 

History 

B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., University of Toronto; 

Ph.D., University of Arizona. [1967] 

JEFFREY L. SANDERS, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Towson State College; M.A., University of Texas. 

[1968] 

HARVEY L. SAXTON, Professor, Psychology 
B.S., Central Connecticut State College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut. [1957] 

AUBREY C. SCARBROUGH, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.S., M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University 

of Illinois. [1970] 

JEAN A. SCARPACI, Assistant Professor, History 
B.A., Hofstra University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers 
University. [1968] 

ANGELO J. SCARSELLA, Instructor, Biology 
B.S., Edinboro State College; M.A., University of 
Northern Iowa. [1968] 

WAYNE N. SCHELLE, Vice President, 
Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., Johns Hopl<ins University; M.B.A., George 
Washington University. [1967] 

JOHN A, SCHMID, Professor and Chairman, 
Elementary Education 

B.S., Towson State College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University 
of Maryland. [1968] 

MYRON \. SCHOLNICK, Associate Professor, 

History 

B.A., American University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Maryland. [1967] 

JOAN M. SCHUETZ, Assistant Professor, Biology 
B.A., Adrian College; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
[1966] 

VIRGINIA J. SCHURMAN, Instructor, Biology 
B.A., Western Maryland College; M.A., University of 
Delaware. [1967] 

RUTH C. SCHWALM, Associate Professor and 
Chairman, Department of Nursing 
Diploma, Harrisburg School of Nursing; B.S., 
University of Pennsylvania; M.R.E., United Theological 
Seminary; M.S., University of Maryland School of 
Nursing. [1970] 

JOYCE REITZEL SCHWARTZ, Assistant 
Professor, Communication Arts and Sciences 
B.S., M.A., Ohio State University. [1965] 

R. GUY SEDLACK, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Maryland. [1970] 

MICHAEL SEGANISH, Assistant Professor, 

Business 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Maryland. [1970] 



JANE M. SHEETS, Professor, German 

B.S., Purdue University; A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana 

University. [1968] 

LOUIS A. SHEETS, Professor, English 
A.B., M.A., Marshal University; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. [1966] 

NORMAN L. SHEETS, Associate Dean of the 
College, Professor, Men's Physical Education 
B.A., Glenville State College; M.S., Ed.D., West 
Virginia University. [1969] 

BONG JU SHIN, Associate Professor, Economics 
B.A., University of Pusan; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. [1966] 

IRENE SHIPMAN, Instructor, Communication 
Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Towson State College; M.A., University of 
Maryland. [1970] 

ROBERT E. SHOEMAKER, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.A., Carleton College; M.S., University of Minnesota. 

[1964] Ph.D., University of Minnesota. [1969] 

ROSEANN R. SHORES, Instructor, Laboratory 

School 

B.A., Towson State College; M.Ed., Goucher College. 

[1969] 

DOROTHY SIEGEL, Associate Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Temple University. [1966] 

MARTHA SIEGEL, Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., Russell Sage College; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Rochester. [1971] 

WILLIAM SLADEK, Assistant Professor, History 
B.A., Mary Knoll Seminary; B.D.M.Th., University, 
State of New York. [1970] 

BARBARA SLATER, Associate Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., M.Ed., St. Lawrence University; Ph.D., Teachers 

College, Columbia University. [1971] 

ROBERT L. SLEVIN, Associate Professor, Men'i 
Physical Education 

B.S., Ball State University; M.S., Baylor University; 
Ed.D., Louisiana State University. [1970] 

JAMES W. SMITH, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

A.B., University of Rochester; M.A., State Universitv 

of New York. [1967] 

ROBERT E. SMITH, Assistant Professor, 

Sociology 

B.A., M.A., University of Maryland. [1965] 

SHIRLEY T. SMITH, Assistant Professor, 

Learning Resource Center 

B.S., M.Ed., Towson State Teachers College. [1964] 

ROBERT L. SMOES, Assistant Professor, Biology 
B.A., Hope College; M.A., Western Michigan 
University. [1969] 

CARLTON W. SPRAGUE, Professor, Education 
A.B., Bard College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. [1960] 

JAY STANLEY, Associate Professor, Sociology 
B.S., M.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland. [1971] 



196 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



MICHAEL STANLEY, Instructor, Communication 

Arts and Sciences 

B.J., M.A,, University of Missouri. [1972] 

MARSHALL L. STEVENSON, Instructor, 

Geography 

B.A., University of Vermont; I^.A., East Carolina 

University. [1968] 

RAYMOND STINAR, Assistant Professor, Men's 

Physical Education 

B.S.E., M.S.E., Northern Illinois University. [1972] 

MARLENE C. STONE, Associate Professor, 
Communication Arts and Sciences 
B.A., M.A., University of Missouri. [1965] 

JOSEPH SUHORSKY, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Indiana State University; M.Ed., Loyola College. 

[1971] 

EDITH B. SUMMERLIN, Visiting Lecturer, 

Nursing 

B.S.N., Ohio State University; M.S.N., Catholic 

University of America. [1972] 

THOMAS G. SUPENSKY, Assistant Professor and 
Chairman, Department of Art 
B.F.A., Ohio State University; M.Ed., Towson State 
College. [1968] 

MARY M. SUYDAM, Professor, Psychology 
B.S., St. Laurence University; M.A., Michigan Stata 
University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts. 
[1966] 

LINDA SWEETING, Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 

B.S., M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., University of 

California at Los Angeles. [1970] 

BEN SWENSEN, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.A., University of Texas; M.A., Sam Houston State 

University. [1967] 

JANE C. TAN, Assistant Professor, Piano 
B.M., University of Santo Tomas; M.M., Peabody 
Conservatory. [1967] 

BRENDA L. TAYLOR, Instructor, Communication 
Arts and Sciences 

B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., Purdue 
University. [1970] 

MARY D. TAYLOR, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ed.M., Boston 

University. [1964] 

JAY TEMPLIN, Visiting Lecturer, Biology 
B.S., Albright College; M.S., University of 
Maryland. [1972] 

JOHN B. TERWILLIGER, Assistant Professor, 

Music 

B.M., M.M., Westminster Choir College. [1966] 

BEATRICE JUNE THEARLE, Professor, English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1955] 

JEANIE G. THOMAS, Instructor, English 

B.A., Mills College; M.A., New York University. [1968] 

JOHN I. TOLAND, Professor. Sociology 

B.A., University of Tulsa; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Maryland. [1966] 



JOSEPH J. TOPPING, Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 

B.S., LaMoyne College; M.S., Ph.D., University of 

New Hampshire. [1970] 

VINCENT A. TRITCH, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Millersville State College; M.Ed., Temple 

University. [1968] 

CAROLYN H. TROUPE, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Miner Teachers College; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University. [1970] 

LEON UKENS, Assistant Professor, Physics 
B.S., Fort Hays State College; M.A., University of 
Northern Colorado; Ph.D., New York University. [1971] 

WILLIAM G. URBAN, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.S., Loyola College; M.Ed., Ph.D., Catholic 

University. [1970] 

ROYCE W. VAN NORMAN, Professor, and 
Director of Professional Programs, Education 
B.S., Wilson Teachers College; MA., Catholic 
University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. [1967] 

JOHN G. VAN OSDELL, Associate Professor, 

History 

B.A., Ph.D., Tulane University. [1967] 

MILTON VELDER, Associate Professor, 

Education 

A.B., M.A., University of Maryland. [1969] 

MARGUERITE L. VERKRUZEN, Associate 

Professor, Pnysical Education 

A.B., Barnard College; M.S., Wellesley College. 

[1962] 

JOSEP VIDAL-LLECHA, Professor, Modern 

Languages 

B.A., B.S., Lie, University of B?"celona; Ph.D.. 

University of Madrid; D.S.C.F.( University of Paris. 

[1963] 

VIRGINIA D. VIRDEN, Assistant Professor, 
Communication Arts and Sciences 
B.A., M.A., University of Maryland. [1970] 

ALEXANDER E. VLANGAS, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., Towson State College; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University. [1970] 

MARVIN C. VOLPEL, Professor, Mathematics 
A.B., Western Michigan University; M.A., University 
of Michigan; Ed.D., Michigan State University. [1952] 

J. C. L. VRIGNAUD. Visiting Lecturer. French 
License d'Anglais, Universite de Poitiers; C.A.P.E.S. 
Universite de Nantes. [1972] 

ANN L. WAGNER. Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Holy Family College; M.A., Bowling Green State 

University. [1968] 

SUSAN R. WALEN, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1970] 



INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 197 



ALLEN A. WALKER, Associate Professor, Biology 
B.A., Hobart College; M.A., University of Texas. 
[1960] 

BILL L. WALLACE, Professor, and Chairman, 
Department of Communication Arts and Sciences 
B.S., M.S., Central Michigan University; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University. [1968] 

JAMES C. WALLACE, Instructor, Business 
B.A., Towson State College, M.B.A., George 
Washington University. [1971] 

ROBERT WALL, Associate Professor, Education 
B.S., Iowa State University; M.A., Kent State 
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1970] 

VERNON O. WALTON, Instructor, Geography 
B.A., California State College; M.S., Pennsylvania 
State University. [1967] 

PATRICIA WATERS, Assistant Professor, 

Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Towson State College. [1964] 

IRVIN WEINTRAUB, Assistant Professor, 

Economics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., Columbia 

University. [1966] 

MARIE E. WEBER, Instructor, Modern Language 
B.A., St. Lawrence University; M.A., Columbia 
University. [1971] 

JOHN W. WEBSTER, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

A.B., Ed.M., Ed.D., Rutgers University. [1972] 

THOMAS J. WEIRATH, Instructor, Sociology 
B.A., University of Altron; M.A., University of 
Wisconsin. [1971] 

DONALD A. WESLEY, Professor, Education 
A.B., Western Reserve University; M.A., Ohio State 
University; Ed.D., Western Reserve University. [1965] 

ROBERT Z. WEST, Assistant Professor, Audio- 
visual Communications 
A.B., Harvard College; M.S., M.S. in Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. [1969] 

MARK WHITMAN, Assistant Professor, History 
B.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., Harvard University. 
[1967] 

SYLVIA WILLIAMS, Instructor, English 

B.A., Howard University; M.S., Georgetown University. 

[1970] 

RICHARD J. WILLIAMS, Associate Professor, 

Education 

B.A., Gettysburg College; Ed.M., University of 

Delaware; Ph.D., Michigan State University. [1970] 

WALTER W. WILLIAMSON, Professor, Education, 
and Director of Laboratory Experiences 
A.B., Lafayette College; Ed.M., Temple University; 
Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania. [1954] 



EARL T. WILLIS, Professor, Education 
A.B., Washington College; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University; Ed.D., George Washington 
University. [1968] 

DONALD R. WINDLER, Assistant Professor, 

Biology 

B.S., M.A., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina. [1969] 

PAUL E. WISDOM, Vice President, Associate 
Professor, General Studies 
A.B., Dartmouth; M.A., University of Northern 
Colorado. [1970] 

GUY H. WOLF, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
A.B., M.A., University of Alabama. [1969] 

ALFRED D. WOLKOWITZ, Instructor, English 
A.B., Columbia College; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., New Yorl< University. [1970] 

GARY WOOD, Instructor, English 

B.A., Westminster College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh. [1971] 

PHINEAS P. WRIGHT, Associate Professor, 

English 

A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., University 

of Virginia. [1949] 

ARTHUR C. YARBROUGH, JR., Associate 
Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers. [1957] 

PHILLIP B. YOUNG, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Wabash College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern 

University. [1972] 

ROBERT ZEIGLER, Associate Professor and 

Chairman, Department of Men's Physical 

Education 

B.S., West Chester State College; M.S., D.Ed., 

Pennsylvania State University. [1971] 

CARL L. ZIMMERMAN, Associate Professor, and 
Chairman, Department of Mathematics 
B.S., Washington College; M.A., Louisiana State 
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1962] 

MILDRED ZINDLER, Professor, Art 

A.B., Florida State University; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers 

College, Columbia University. [1956] 

CHRISTIE ZIPFEL, Assistant Professor, Physics 
A.B., M.S., Vassar College; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan. [1971] 

MARGARET C. ZIPP, Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 

B.S., Douglass College, Rutgers University; M.A., 

University of Pittsburgh. [1959] 

STANLEY ZWEBACK, Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 

B.A., Trenton State College; M.Ed., Rutgers University; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. [1970] 



198 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



LECTURERS 

ALBERT ADLER, Mass Communications 

VIVIAN BRAUN, Hebrew 

B.A., Case Western Reserve (Flora Stone Mather). 

IRVIN H. COHEN, Psychology 
M.D., University of Maryland. 

JUDITH DOUGLAS, English 
B.S., M.A., Northwestern University. 

ROBERT E. DURELL, Medical Technology 
B.S., Wittenberg University. 

ROBERT W. GIBSON, Psychology 
M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

SHIRLEY GILLESPIE, Drama 

B.A., Principia College; M.A., University of Iowa 

ERIC K. GRATZ. Psychology 

B.A., Ohio State University; B.D., Wesley Theological 

Seminary; M.S.W., Howard University. 

SUE GREENE. English 

B.A., M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Michigan 

State University. 

JOHN HOFFMAN, Music 

B.M., M.M., University of Denver; M.S.M., Union 

Theological Seminary, School of Sacred Music. 

RAYMOND HAMBY, Mass Communications. 

THOMAS R. KOCH, Medical Technology 
3.S., Lebanon Valley College; Ph.D., University 
3f Maryland. 

HARLES I. KRATZ, Speech 
V.B., University of Alabama; M.L.A., Johns Hopkins 
Jniversity. 

DCK-KYUNG P. LEE. Art 
3.S.. M.A., Columbia University. 

SAMUEL C. H. LEE, Medical Technology 
J.S., Belmont College, M.D., Vanderbilt University. 



JAMES McGEE, Psychology 
Ph.D., Catholic University. 

DEZSO K. MERENYI, Medical Technology 
M.D., Pecs, Hungary and Eriangen, Germany. 

LAWRENCE F. MISANIK, Medical Technology 
B.S., DePaul University; M.D., Loyola University 
(Chicago). 

REYNALDO ORJUELA-GOMEZ, Medical 

Technology 

B.S., Colegio Mayor de Nuestra Senora del Rosario; 

M.D., National University School of Medicine. 

Bogota, Columbia. 

EDWARD S. PALANKER, Music 
B.M., Manhattan School of Music. 

ELIZABETH PALMER, English 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., Johns 

Hopkins University. 

BENJAMIN POPE, Psychology 

Ph.D.. University of California at Berkeley. 

HELEN R. PULLEN, Art 
B.F.A., Maryland Institute of Art. 

EDITH B. SUMMERLIN, Nursing 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.S., The Catholic 

University of America 

CHARLES W. THOMPSON, Psychology 

A.B., University of Illinois; M.Ed., Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina. 

CAROLYN G. WALTER. Physical Education 
B.S., West Virginia University. 

SARA WINOCOUR, Russian 
M.A., Moscow University, Russia. 

ANTOINETTE M. WOLSKI, Medical Technology 
B.S., Merrimack College. 



199 



Academic Calendar 1973-1974 



September 4, Tuesday- 
September 4, 5, 6 

Tuesday, Wednesday, 

Thursday- 
September 7, Friday- 
September 10 thru 13 

Monday thru Thursday 

October 26, Friday 
October 29, Monday 
November 16, Friday 
November 21, Wednesday 
November 26, Monday 
December 12, Wednesday 
December 13, Thursday 
December 14, Friday 
December 21, Friday 



Fall Semester for 1973 

Residence Halls open 

Complete Registration and Change of Schedule for 
pre-registered students and Orientation for new 
students — late registration by permission of 
Registrar. 

Classes begin 

Schedule changes accepted 

Mid-Semester 

Mid-Semester evaluations due 

Last day to drop a course 

Thanksgiving Holiday after 3:00 p.m. 

Classes resume 

Last day of classes 

Reading Day 

Final examinations begin 

Last day of examinations and semester 



January 3, Thursday 
January 30, Wednesday 



Januaury Session — 1974 

Session begins 
Session ends 



January 30, Wednesday 

January 30, 31, 
;^ebruary 1 

Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday 

February 4, Monday 

February 6 thru 12 
Wednesday thru Tuesday 

March 22, Friday 

March 25, Monday 

April 5, Friday 

April 16, Tuesday 

May 15, Wednesday 

May 16, Thursday 

May 17, Friday 

May 24, Friday 

June 2, Sunday 



Spring Semester 1974 

Residence Halls open 

Complete Registration and Change of Schedule 
for pre-registered students and Orientation for 
new students — late registration by permission of 
Registrar. 

Classes begin 

Schedule changes accepted 

Mid-Semester 

Mid-Semester evaluations due 

Spring vacation begins after last class 

Classes resume — Last day to drop a course 

Last day of classes 

Reading Day 

Final examinations begin 

Last day of examination and semester 

Commencement 



200 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Index 



Academic regulations, 25 
Accreditation, 2 
Administrative Officers, 183 
Admission, 5 

advanced placement, 10 

credit for experience and 
previous learning, 11 

pledge to teacli, 11 

advance payments, 12 
Advisement, 15 
Alumni Association Board, 182 
Anthropology, 176 
Application Fee, 13 
Art, 48 

Arts and Sciences — General Studies, 53 
Athletic Activities, 23 
Attendance, 31 

Audio Visual Communications, 58 
Auditing Courses, 26 
Awards and Honors, 32 

Biological Sciences, 61 
Board of Trustees, 182 
Board of Visitors, 182 
Boarding costs, 13 
Buildings, 2 

Business Administration, 63 
Black Studies, 55 

Calendar, Academic, 200 

Campus, 2 

Career Planning and placement, 21 

Certification, 38 

Change of course schedule, 26 

Chemistry, 71 

Classification of Students, 27 

College Center, 21 

College, Philosophy and Objectives, 1 

Communication Arts and Sciences, 68 

Co-operative Education Program, 40 

Counseling, 15 

Course Descriptions, 47 

Credit Hours, 25 

College Curriculum, 33 

Arts and Sciences Program, 33 
Teacher Education Program, 37 
Elementary Education, 92 
Early Childhood Education, 89 
Secondary Education, 96 

Degrees, requirements, 30 

Economics, 83 

Education, 87 

Employment, Student, 17 

Elective Courses, 47 

English, 111 

Evening Program, 11 

Exemptions from required courses, 25 

Expenses, 12 



Faculty, 186 

Fees, 12 

Financial aid, 16 

Foreign study, 40 

French, 140 

Future development of college, 3 

General Administration, 182 
General College Requirements, 30 

Optional Plan, 31 
Geography, 116 
German, 142 
Graduate Studies, 43 

Health Science, 121 
Health Service, 19 
History, 125 
History of College, 1 
Honors Programs, 32 
Housing costs, 12 

International Studies, 131 
Italian, 143 

Length of attendance, 31 

Liability for unpaid tuition, 13 

Library Science, 105 

Lida Lee Tall Learning Resources Center, 82 

Loans, 17 

Marking and point system, 26 
Mathematics, 123 
Medical Technology, 57 
Modern Language, 139 
Music, 146 

Nursing, 151 

Officers of the College, 183 
Orientation, 20 
Out-of-state students, 12 

Pass option, 29 
Payment of fees, 13 
Philosophy and Religion, 156 
Physical Education, 158 
Physics, 163 
Pledge to teach, 11 
Political Science, 83 
Preparation for career, 21 
Procedures for Reinstatement, 29 
Program Transfer, 25 
Psychology, 168 
Publication, 23 
Public Law Recipients, 17 

Refunds, 14 
Registration, 25 
Required courses, 30 
Residence Program, 21 
Russian, 143 

Scholarships, 18 
Social Sciences, 175 



201 



Sociology, 176 

Spanish, 144 

Special Certification Programs, 103 

Speech, 74 

Speech requirements, 74 

Standards of academic work, 28 

Student Employment, 17 

Student Government Association, 23 

Student organizations, 23 

Student Personnel Program, 15 

Student load, 25 



Summer Session, 11 

Teacher Education Programs, 37 
Theatre Arts, 179 
Transcripts, 32 
Transfer students, 28 
Transfer credit, 25 
Tuition, 12 

Withdrawal from a course, 26 
Withdrawals, 31 
Women's Studies, 56 



TELEPHONE NUMBER: 823-7500 Switchboard opens Monday thru Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, 
7:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday, Closed 



OFFICE HOURS: 
MAILING ADDRESS: 



8:30 a.m. — 5:00 p.m. week days during academic year 

Towson State College 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 



Specific correspondence should be addressed as follows: 

ADMISSIONS 

BUSINESS 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

HOUSING OF STUDENTS 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AIDS 

STUDENT AFFAIRS AND WELFARE 

TRANSCRIPTS, ACADEMIC RECORDS, REGISTRATION 



Director of Admissions 

Vice-President, Business and Finance 

Vice-President for Academic Affairs 
and Dean of tlie Coliege 

President 

Director of Residence Halls 

Director of Financial Aid 

Vice-President for Student Affairs 

Registrar 



202 TOWSON STATE COLLEGE 



Calendar for 1973-1974 



1973 



JANUARY 








MAY 






SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


I W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


6 






1 2 3 


4 


5 


1 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


28 29 30 31 




27 


28 


29 30 31 






23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


FEBRUARY 






JUNE 






OCTOBER 


1 2 


3 








1 


2 


12 3 4 5 6 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


25 26 27 28 




24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


28 29 30 31 


MARCH 








JULY 






NOVEMBER 


1 2 


3 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 


29 


30 


31 






25 26 27 28 29 30 


APRIL 






AUGUST 




DECEMBER 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 






1 2 


3 


4 


1 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


29 30 




26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 



1974 



JANUARY 








MAY 






SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


5 






1 2 


3 


4 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 




26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




29 30 


FEBRUARY 






JUNE 






OCTOBER 


1 


2 










1 


12 3 4 5 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


24 25 26 27 28 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


27 28 29 30 31 


MARCH 








JULY 






NOVEMBER 


1 


2 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 
31 


30 


28 


29 


30 31 






24 2'> 2(> 27 28 29 30 


APRIL 






AUGUST 




DECEMBER 


12 3 4 5 


6 






1 


2 


3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


la 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 23 


28 29 30 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 30 31 




UJ 
«r 2 



Ui UJ 

u 



<. 

flC 

s 

se 

Ui UI 

i ? 
of 

©OS 

UI O 

g^ 

Oo 

v< 

s 

s 

UI 



TJ 



oq^ 



"I 



n\ 




V3«y s.)iaiiO)iidvyo3 






/M/V 



TOWSON STATE COLLEGE " -" "^ '" Non-profit Org. 

Baltimore, Maryland 21204 U.S. Postage 

Return Postage Guaranteed PAID 

Baltimore, IVId. 
Permit No. 1530 



N/EDSS/DDqa3/5SllX