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Full text of "Course catalog, 1997-1998"

The University of the Arts 




llll 



Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 



1997-1998 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/coursecatalog199798univ 



The University of the Arts 
o 9nCD Un »versity Libraries 

320 S Broad St Philadelphia PA 19102 



UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES 

UNIVERSITY LIPRA Rill 

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS 

PHIUOELPHIA PA 19102 



ffip 



Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design 

Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

College of Media 
and Communication 



Undergraduate 
and Graduate 
Course 
Catalog 
1997-1998 



The University of the Arts 
320 South Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 

1 -800-6 16-ARTS 



The University of the Arts is the nation's only university devoted exclusively to 
education and professional training in design, visual, media, and performing arts. 
Located in central Philadelphia, The University of the Arts was founded in 1987 
through the consolidation of two century-old institutions: the Philadelphia College 
of Art and the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. Offering undergraduate 
and graduate degrees in crafts, dance, graphic design, industrial and museum 
exhibition design, fine arrs, illustration, media arts, multimedia, music, theater, 
writing, and museum and arts education, the University prepares its students to 
assume over 150 careers in Traditional and emerging arts and related fields. 






The University of the Arrs 
320 South Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 

215-732-4832 
1-800-6 16- ARTS 
fax 215-875-5458 



The University ot the Arts gives equal 
consideration to all applicants for admission and 
financial aid, and conducts all educational 
programs, activities, and employment practices 
without regard to race, color, sex, religion, 
national or ethnic origin, or disability. Direct 
inquiries to the Office of the Associate Provost/ 
ADA Coordinator, The University of the Arts, 
320 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102; 
(215)875-5484. 



This catalog was updated as of August, 199 7 . 
The University of the Arts reserves the right to 
revise any information herein at its discretion and 
without prior notice. 

Trademarked names appear throughout this 
catalog. Rather than list the names and entities 
that own the trademarks or insert a trademark 
symbol with each mention ot the trademarked 
name, the publisher states that it is using the 
names only tor editorial purposes and to the 
benefit of the trademark owner with no intention 
of infringing upon that trademark. 



PRINTED IN CANADA 



Contents 



4 Academic Calendar 1997-1998 
The University of the Arts 

6 Mission Statement 

6 History of the University of the Arts 

7 Accreditation 

8 Admission 

14 Tuition and Expenses 

16 Financial Aid 

23 Academic Regulations 

29 Student Services 

31 General Information 

32 Code of Conduct 

33 Student Code 

39 University Libraries 

40 Academic Computing 

40 Continuing Education Programs 

41 Undergraduate Degree Requirements 

42 Division of Liberal Arts 



Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design (PCAD) 

50 Philadelphia College of Art and Design 

52 Undergraduate Programs 

56 Foundation Program 

58 Crafts 

60 Crafts Studio Certificate Program 

60 Fine Arts 

61 Painting/Drawing 

62 Printmaking/Book Arts 

64 Sculpture 

65 Graphic Design 

66 Illustration 

67 Industrial Design 

68 Media Arts 

69 Photography 

70 Film/Video 

70 Animation 

71 Film/Animation 

72 Art Education 
74 Art Therapy 



PCAD continued 

75 Graduate Programs 

75 Master of Fine Arts in Book Arts/ 

Printmaking 
77 Master of Industrial Design 
79 Master of Fine Arts in Museum 

Exhibition Planning and Design 

81 Master of Arts in Art Education 

82 Master of Arts in Museum Education 

84 Master of Arts in 
Teaching in Visual Arts 

85 Extended Degree Options 

86 Mastet of Fine Arts in 
Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 



Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts (PCPA) 

90 Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 

91 The School of Dance 
93 Ballet 

93 Jazz/Theater Dance 

93 Modern Dance 

94 Dance Education 

94 Certificate in Dance 

95 Dance Extension 

96 The School of Music 
100 Bachelor of Music 

102 Diploma in Music 

103 MATPREP 

104 Master of Aits in Teaching in 
Music Education 

106 Master of Music in Jazz Studies 
108 The School of Theatet Arts 
1 1 1 Acting 
111 Musical Theater 



College of Media and 
Communication (CMAC) 

1 14 College of Media and Communication 

115 Multimedia 

1 17 Writing for Media and Performance 



Course Descriptions 

122 Art Education 

124 Art Therapy 

124 Ctafts 

129 Dance 

133 Dance Extension 

134 Electronic Media 
134 Fine Arts 

137 Foundation 

138 Graphic Design 

140 Graduate Seminars 

141 Liberal Arts 

152 Industrial Design 

155 Illustration 

156 Museum Exhibition Planning 
and Design 

157 Multimedia 
159 Music 

166 Media Arts 

Photography/Film/Video/Animation 

169 Printmaking/Book Arts 

172 Painting/Drawing 

174 Sculpture 

175 Theater Arts 

179 Writing for Media and Performance 



182 Administration 

182 Board of Trustees 

183 Index 

188 Campus Map 



Academic Calendar 
1997-1998 



Fall 1997 

Friday, August 29 
English placement exams 
Music placement exams 

Saturday, August 30 and Sunday, August 31 
New student orientation 
Student residences open/move-in 

Monday, September 1 
Labor Day holiday 

Tuesday, September 2 

Advising/registration for new transfers, graduate, and 

returning students, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm 

Wednesday, September 3 
Advising/registration lor new freshmen, 
10:00 am - 3:00 pm 

Thursday, September 4 
Fall semester classes begin 
Late registration 

Thursday, September 4 - Wednesday, September 17 
Drop/add period 
Late registration 

Friday, September 19 

Drop/add period for PCPA ensembles ends 

Saturday, September 20 
Dance Extension classes begin 

Friday, October 1 7 

Last day for removal of "Incomplete" (I) gtades from Spring '97 

Monday, October 20 

Automatic conversion from "I" to "F" grade 

Friday, Octobet 24 

Last day to withdraw with a "W" grade 

Saturday, October 25 
Open House 



Monday, November 3 - Friday, November 14 
Advising for Spring '98 registration 

Monday, November 10 - Friday, November 14 
Registration for Spring '98 
Graduation petitions for Dec. '97, May '98 and 
Aug. '98 due to Registrar 

Thursday, November 27 - Sunday, November 30 
Thanksgiving vacation 
Residence halls remain open 

Friday, December 12 
Fall 1997 classes end 

Monday, December 15 - Friday, December 19 
Examinations, critiques, and juries begin 

Friday, December 19 

Grades due to Registrar 

Documents for students graduating Dec. '97 due to Registrar 

Saturday, December 20 

Residence halls close at 12:00 noon 

Dance Extension classes end 



Spring 1998 

Thursday, January 1 
New Year's Day holiday 

Wednesday, January 7 
PCAD academic review 

Thursday, January 8 
PCPA academic review 
CMAC academic review 

Thursday, January 15 
New student orientation 
Residence halls open, 9:00 am 

Monday, January 19 
Martin Luther King holiday 

Tuesday, January 20 

Spring semester classes begin 

Tuesday, January 20 - Monday, February 2 
Drop/add period for all classes 
Late registration 

Monday, February 23 - Friday, February 27 
PCAD freshmen major selection week 

Friday, February 27 

Last day for students to resolve Incomplete "I" 

grades from Fall '97 semester 



Monday, May 4 
Spring '98 classes end 

Tuesday, May 5 - Monday, May 1 1 
Examinations 

Monday, May 4 and Tuesday, May 5 
Registration for Summer Sessions I & II 

Monday, May 1 1 - Thursday, May 14 
Studios, critiques and juries 

Friday, May 1 5 

Final grades due to Registrar 

Saturday, May 16 

Student residences close at 12:00 noon 

Wednesday, May 20 
Awards ceremony 

Thursday, May 21 
Commencement cetemony 



Summer 1998 

Monday, May 18 
Summer Session I begins 

Monday, May 25 
Memorial Day holiday 



Monday, March 2 

Automatic conversion from "I" to "F" grade 

Friday, March 6 

Last day to withdraw with a "W" grade 
Deadline for returning former students to 
petition for May '98 graduation 

Monday, March 9 - Sunday, March 1 5 
Spring break/residence halls remain open 

Sunday, March 1 5 

1998-1999 Financial Aid Applications Due 

Monday, March 16 
Spring '98 classes resume 

Saturday, April 4 
Open House 

Monday, April 6 - Friday, April 17 
Advising for Fall '98 registration 

Monday, April 1 3 - Friday, April 1 7 
Registration for Fall '98 



Wednesday, June 24 
Summer MFA program begins 

Friday, June 26 
Summer Session I ends 

Monday, June 29 
Summer Session II begins 

Friday, July 3 
Independence Day holiday 

Friday, August 7 
Summer Session II ends 

Friday, August 14 
Summer MFA program ends 



The University of the Arts is an institution of higher education 
centered in the arts. Its undergraduate and graduate academic 
programs prepare students for professions in the visual and 
performing arts and related fields. Honoring the traditions of the 
disciplines it teaches, the University provides a dynamic milieu 
for creative exploration, innovation, and intellectual investigation, 
extending the practice and undetstanding of the arts and the arts 
professions. Committed to lifelong education and the advancement 
of the arts in our society, the University serves as an educational 
and creative resource for the arts community and as a matrix, 
catalyst, and nexus for arts activities and organizations. Its 
instruction and related research, production, and service activities 
foster aesthetic excellence and creativity and encourage interaction 
among the arts. 



History of 

The University of the Arts 

The University of the Arts has evolved from two century-old 
institutions: the Philadelphia College of Art and the Philadelphia 
College of Performing Arts. 

The Philadelphia College of Art (PCA) was formed in 1876 
along with the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Initially known as the 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, the institution 
was established in response to the interest in art and the Art 
Centennial Exposition. In 1948, the school became known as the 
Philadelphia Museum School of Art, reflecting the expanded 
programs that trained artists in many other areas, including rhe 
fine arts. The school received accreditation in 1959, and in 1964 
separated from the Museum to become the Philadelphia College 
of Art. Today, the Philadelphia College of Art and Design (PCAD) 
of The University of the Arts offers curricula in crafts, design, fine 
arts, media arts, museum education, and art education. 

The petforming arts programs of The University of the Arts date 
from 1870, when three graduates of the Conservatory of Leipzig 
opened one of the first European-style conservatories of music in 
America: the Philadelphia Musical Academy (PMA). PMA 
became an independent college of music in 1950, granting a 
Bachelor of Music degree after a four-year course of study, one of 
only eight such music colleges in the nation at the time. While 
still offering only a music program, the school changed its name to 
the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts (PCPA) in 1976, the 
first such college in Pennsylvania. One year later the former 
Philadelphia Dance Academy became part of PCPA and in 1983 
the School of Theatet was created, thus achieving the college's ideal 
program of studies: dance, music, and theater arts. 

In 1983, PCA and PCPA joined to become the Philadelphia 
Colleges of the Arts, and in 1987, The University of the Arts was 
inaugurated. In the Fall of 1996, the University created a new 
academic unit, the College of Media and Communication, which 
emphasizes the integration of art, technology, and communication. 
The first two BFA degree programs offered by this new college are 
Writing for Media and Performance and Multimedia, to be 
followed by a BS degree program in mass media communication. 

The University of the Arts is the largest comptehensive educa- 
tional institution of its kind in the nation, preparing students for 
professional careers in design, visual, media and performing arts 
and emerging creative fields. 



Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design 

The Philadelphia College of Art and Design offers the Bachelor 
of Fine Arts degree in Crafts, Graphic Design, Illustration, Painting, 
Printmaking/Book Arts, Photography/Film/Video/ Animation, or 
Sculpture. A major in Industrial Design leads to the Bachelor of 
Science degree. Crafts offers a post baccalaureate certificate program. 

At the graduate level are programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Arts in Art Education, Master of Arts in Museum 
Education, Mastet of Industrial Design, Master of Arts in Teaching 
in Visual Arts, Master of Fine Arts in Book Arts/Printmaking, 
Master of Fine Arts in Museum Exhibition Planning and Design, 
and Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics, Sculpture and Painting. 
Teaching certification is offered on a non-degree basis, either 
independently or in conjunction with an undergraduate degree in 
the Philadelphia College of Art and Design. A concentration in 
Art Therapy is also offered. 



Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

The School of Dance offers four-year Bachelor or Fine Arts 
degrees in Ballet, Modern and Jazz/Theater Dance Performance, 
Dance Education, and a two-year Certificate in Dance. 

The School of Music offers a four-year Bachelor ot Music 
degree in Vocal Performance, Instrumental Performance with a 
jazz/contemporary focus, or Composition. Additional programs 
are the four-year Undergraduate Diploma and the two-year 
Certificate of Music. 

The School of Music offers the Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Music Education and the Master of Music in Jazz Studies. 

The School of Theater Arts offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts in 
Theater Arts, with programs in Acting or Musical Theater. 



College of Media and 
Communication 



In this new college, two four-year programs leading to the 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree are currently offered: the inaugural 
program, Writing for Media and Performance, and the second, 
Multimedia. A major in mass media communication leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree is in formulation. 



Accreditation 



The University of the Arts has the approval of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania to grant degrees in the visual, performing 
and related arts and is accredited by the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Schools (Commission on Higher Education, Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, 
Philadelphia, PA 19104; Telephone: 215-662-5606). The 
Philadelphia College of Art and Design is also accredited by the 
National Association of the Schools of Art and Design, and the 
Industrial Designer's Society of America. The School of Music is 
also accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. 



Admission 



Barbara Elliott 

Director of Admission 

First Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 

215-732-4832 

The admission requirements and procedures are designed to help 
the University select, from among the men and women applying, 
those best qualified to benefit from the educational opportunities at 
The University of the Arts. The University prefers applicants who 
express themselves through visual images, performance and creative 
writing; who demonstrate intellectual abilities through their 
academic record; who wish to increase their awareness of them- 
selves and their world and address their environment in a positive, 
individual manner; and who bring energy, concern and humor to 
their inquiry. The University values diversity, liveliness, thought- 
fulness, and curiosity and seeks in its students a broad range of 
intellectual, artistic, extracurricular and personal energies. Admis- 
sion is offered without regard to race, color, national or ethnic 
origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, 
age or handicap. Each applicant is considered individually, and the 
Director of Admission may make an exception to any requirement. 

Each college at The University of the Arts has special admission 
criteria related to its course of study. Admission to the College 
of Performing Arts is based primarily on an audition, specific to 
the discipline the applicant intends to pursue. Applicants to the 
College of Art and Design are evaluated on the basis of their 
portfolio and academic performance. Candidates to the College of 
Media and Communication are evaluated on their academic 
performance, supported by a portfolio. 

Since admission to the University is based upon a combination of 
factors, students should be aware of all of the admission requirements 
when submitting an application and realize that the Admission 
Committee will base its decision on the sum total of these factors. 

Students regularly enter the University at the beginning of the 
academic year in September, although the College of Art and 
Design accepts a number of Foundation students for a special 
January matriculation program. Advanced-standing applicants to 
major departments in the College of Art and Design are considered 
on a space-available basis. January applicants to the School of 
Music and School of Dance are also accommodated on a space- 
available basis. First-time freshmen are admitted to The School of 
Theater Arts only in the fall semester. However, transfer students 
may be accepted for spring semester entrance. Theater applicants 
are expected to have had substantial college level course work in 
theater to qualify for midyear admission. Applicants to the 
Writing for Media and Performance and Multimedia programs will 
be considered for midyear admission on a case-by-case basis. 



Undergraduate Application Process 

1. Application Form. All candidates are required to submit a 
completed application for admission and $40 application fee. The 
application fee for international applicants who are not US citizens 
or Permanent Residents is $75. The University of the Arts will 
waive the application fee in cases of extreme family financial need. 
A fee-waiver request is required from a high school guidance 
counselor, two-year college counselor or other authorized person. 



2. Secondary School Record. An official copy of the secondary 
school transcript is required of all applicants. A curriculum of 
college preparatory subjects is recommended. Specific course 
distribution is not required, although a minimum of four (4) years 
of English and two (2) years of history is strongly recommended. 
Remaining courses should be selected from the approved college 
preparatory program, including study in languages, mathematics, 
science, humanities, art history, psychology, and sociology. These 
courses should be augmented by study in visual art, music, dance, 
drama, or creative writing. 

Applicants not holding a regular high school diploma may 
qualify for admissions consideration upon conversion of the General 
Education Development Test (GED) to a state diploma through the 
Department of Public Instruction of the applicant's resident state. 

3. Standardized Test Scores. The submission of official standard- 
ized test scores is required for admission. The SAT, SAT 1 , or ACT 
are acceptable. Applicants with a diagnosed learning disability or 
other qualifying impairment may submit nonstandard administra- 
tion test results. Test results should be sent to the University 
directly from the testing agency. The University of the Arts' CEEB 
code is 2664. 

Applicants who have completed a college level English Composi- 
tion course with a grade of "C" or better, or applicants who have 
been out of school for more than five years are not required to 
submit the standardized test scores. 

4. Recommendations. Applicants are required to submit a letter 
of recommendation from a teacher, guidance counselor, or em- 
ployer. Recommendations should comment on the applicant's 
demonstrated abilities in the arts, maturity, ambition, determina- 
tion and seriousness of purpose. 

5. Personal Statement. All applicants are requited to submit a 
150-300 word statement that describes their personal reasons for 
choosing to study the arts and the influences that led to this choice. 
The statement should be typed on a separate sheet of paper and 
attached to the application. The applicant should list his/her name, 
social security number, and the semester for which he/she seeks 
admission on the Statement. 

6. Artistic Presentation. Refer to the Portfolio and Audition 
Brochure for specific requirements. 

7. Interview. Although not required, all applicants are encour- 
aged to visit The University of the Arts and interview with a 
member of the Admission staff or University faculty. Applicants to 
the College of Art and Design are expected to present their 
portfolio during the interview. Applicants to the College of 
Performing Arts or the College of Media and Communication 
should be prepared to discuss their academic record, personal 
achievements, extracurricular activities and artistic goals. The 
interview also provides the applicant with an opportunity to ask 
questions about the University. Applicants should feel tree to note 
questions about the application process, programs of study, courses, 
instructors, student life, or financial aid and bring these with them 
to the interview. 

8. Financial Aid. Obtain the Free Application tor Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) from a high school guidance counselor if 
applying for financial aid or scholarship. Submit the FAFSA to the 
Federal Student Aid Program by February 15 for priority consider- 
ation. List The University of the Arts as the institution to receive 
your information. The Title IV Code for The University of the 
Arts is 003350. 



Transfer Applicants 

Transfer students are admitted to The University of the Arts 
under policies that vary from College to College. The University 
considets any applicant who has been enrolled in a college-level 
program of study after secondary school to be a transfer applicant. 
Transfers enjoy a preferred position among applicants for admission 
since it can be assumed they have matured in their goals and have 
demonstrated their abilities at the college level. 

Transfer Application Requirements 

The application process rot undergraduate transfer students is 
the same as for freshmen with the exception that, in addition to the 
process described in the above section, applicants must have sent 
official transcripts from all colleges attended. Candidates should 
include a listing of any courses in which they are currently enrolled 
or intend to complete ptior to matticulation at The University 
of the Arts. To aid in the assessment of transfer credits, a catalog 
containing the course descriptions, credit assignment, and credit- 
hour ratio for each college attended should be sent to the Office of 
Admission. A minimum G.P.A. of 2.0 is required for transfers. 

Transfer of Credit 

Students may receive credit rot courses taken at other regionally 
accredited institutions that ate similar in content, putpose, and 
standards to those offered at The University of the Arts. A 
minimum gtade of "C" is required in order to present a coutse for 
transfer credit. Only credits are transferable, not the specific grades. 

Students are given a preliminary transfer credit evaluation at 
the time of admission; final awarding of transfer credit and 
placement level are subject to receipt of final official transcripts and 
vetification by the registrar at the time of enrollment. 

Residency Requirements 

The time it takes fot a student to reach graduation will depend 
upon the time needed to satisfactorily fulfill The University of the 
Arts' degree requirements. 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum of four 
semesters in residence preceding graduation and must earn a 
minimum of 48 credits in studio and/or liberal arts courses. 
Transferable credits will be applied only to the specific studio and 
liberal arts tequitements stipulated for a UArts degree. For this 
reason, transfer students may be required to remain in residence 
at the Univetsity for more than the minimum fout semesters 
and ro complete more than the minimum 48 ctedits, despite the 
number of credits earned at previously attended institutions. 
Ttansfet credit is evaluated by the department chair or school 
director and the Director of Liberal Arts in consultation with the 
Office of the Registrar. 

College of Art and Design 

Upon completion of the preliminary credit evaluation, the 
applicant will be invited to schedule an interview and portfolio 
review with a faculty member from the major department. If 
unable to attend a personal interview, the applicant must submit a 
portfolio in the form of 35mm color slides for faculty review. 



Advanced Standing 

Students transferring into the second of thitd-year level studios 
of majot depattments are considered advanced standing candidates. 
The first year in the College of Att and Design includes 21 
credits of studio classwork in the Foundation core (Drawing, Two- 
Dimensional Design, Three-Dimensional Design, and an optional 
course, Time and Motion) and elective coutses. Students who 
have completed between 18 and 21 credits in studio and who 
have studied in the foundation ateas may be considered for 
advanced status. 

Decisions concerning admission to a major department, class 
standing, and mandated prerequisites are made by major depart- 
ment faculty upon an evaluation of the admission portfolio and 
preliminary transfer-credit analysis. 

Three-Year Transfer 

Applicants who have not had substantial studio instruction but 
who present a minimum of 24 ttansferable credits in liberal arts 
may qualify for the three-year transfer program. Under this 
program, students have the opportunity to fulfill the College of Aft 
and Design's graduation requirements in three years. In the first 
year, the Foundation Program curriculum is combined with studies 
in the major department. If approved by both the Foundation 
Program and major department chairpersons, the ttansfet student 
may attain third-year status at the start of his or her second 
year. This program imposes an extremely demanding schedule 
and is best suited to mature students who have definitely decided 
upon a major. 

Freshman Transfers 

Transfer students with fewer than 24 transferable liberal arts 
credits and without qualifications for advanced standing in studio 
should expect to be tegistered for the Foundation Program and 
anticipate being enrolled at The Univetsity of the Atts for the 
equivalent of eight semesters. Those who qualify for either the 
three-year program or advanced standing but wish to take advan- 
tage of the Foundation Program and elective coutses may also apply 
as freshman transfers. 

College of Performing Arts 

At the time of the entrance audition, the appropriate Audition 
Committee evaluates the applicant's performance with respect to 
the level of achievement required for advanced standing. Transfer 
credit in the major may be granted for comparable previous 
undergraduate credit earned, up to the level of placement. 

Transfers to the College of Performing Arts are not given credit 
for studio coutses until after the completion of the first semester 
at The University of the Arts. Transfer students to the College 
of Performing Arts should assume that they will receive freshman 
status unless more advanced status is clearly indicated in their 
letter of admission. 

College of Media and Communication 

Transfet applicants to Writing for Media and Performance 
and Multimedia ate evaluated on an individual basis, depending 
on the nature of prior educational expet ience and demonstrated 
cteative abilities. 



Application Notification 

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis beginning in 
December for fall admission and September for spring admission. 
Prioriry is given to fall candidates who file an application by March 
15, although the University will accept and review applications as 
long as space in the class is available. All applicants are notified by 
mail of the Admission Committee's decision. Generally, students 
can expect to receive notification of the decision within two weeks 
of completing all admission requirements. 



Tuition and Housing Deposits 

Applicants who are offered admission and wish to enroll at The 
University of the Arts are asked to submit a $300 tuition deposit 
within two weeks of the offet of admission to reserve a place in the 
enteting class and receive an application for student housing. The 
tuition deposit is credited to the student's first semester tuition 
charges and may be refunded if the student cancels his/her fall 
enrollment in writing prior to the May 1 Candidates' Reply Date. 
Requests for a refund of the tuition deposit that are postmarked 
after May 1 cannot be honored. Tuition deposits for spring 
admission are not refundable. After May 1, the Admission staff 
assumes that a student's tuition deposit to The University of the 
Arts is his/her only deposit. The University reserves the right ro 
cancel the offer of admission if a student posts a tuition deposit at 
another college or university. 

A $200 Housing Deposit is required to reserve a student's space 
in the dormitory facilities. After June 1, space is available on a 
first-come, first-served basis only. The tuition deposit is required 
before the housing deposit activates the housing reservation. 

All deposits must be made in U.S. dollars. Housing deposits 
are not refundable. 

During the summer, information concerning orientation, 
registration, and housing assignment is sent to all deposited 
students. 



Deferred Admission 

Undergraduate and graduate students who are admitted to 
The University of the Arts and then seek to defer their admission 
must submit their requests, in writing, to the Office of Admission. 
If permission is granted, a $300 nonrefundable tuition deposit 
must be paid in order to confirm enrollment fot the following 
semester or year. Deferred students who enroll in a degree program 
at another institution in the interim will not retain their deferred 
status; they must reapply to the University as transfer students. 

Deferred candidates are also required to submit a statement of 
activities and reaffirm their intent to enroll ar The University 
of the Arts. Candidates seeking fall or summer enrollment must 
file this statement by January 15; spring candidates must submit 
this statement by November 15. Students are permitted only 
one deferment. 

Those who are not approved for deferred admission may reapply 
for the following year. A new application form must be filed with 
a reapplication fee of $10; additional credentials may be required. 



Early Admission 

Extremely capable students may be ready for college before they 
have completed the normal four-year secondary school program. 
The University welcomes applications from those who feel they are 
scholastically and artistically prepared, and sufficiently mature- 
personally and socially-to undertake college work. 

Early Admission candidares must be able to fulfill either of the 
following conditions: 

1. By taking an overload during the junior year of high school or 
summer courses, the applicant is able to complete high school 
diploma credit requirements and receive the diploma before 
enrolling at the University. 

2. Under a written agreement, the candidate's high school 
authotities grant the applicant a high school diploma upon 
completion of the freshman year at The University of the Arts. 



Conditional Admission 

The University of the Arts has designed alternative admission 
programs to consider those whose potential may not be indicated in 
standardized test scores or class rank, or who have had limited 
fotmal training in the arts. 

Offers of admission may specify one or more of the following 
conditions: 

1 . Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program. The admission of 
PCAD applicants may be contingent upon successful completion of 
the University's Summer Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 
(PREP). This condition is made when the application review 
indicates that additional preparation in studio and/or academics is 
necessary to ensure the student's success in the Foundation Program 
curriculum. PREP includes studies in drawing, two-dimensional 
and three-dimensional design as well as courses in writing and art 
history. Classes are scheduled for a six-week session, with thirty 
hours of instruction per week. PREP is a noncredit program, but 
grades are given to measure performance. A minimum 2.0 (C) 
grade point avetage indicates successful completion. 

2. Academic Warning. A student who is admitted under 
Academic Warning must achieve a "C" (2.0) grade point average 
at the end of the freshman year in order to be promoted to 
sophomore standing. 

3- Academic Achievement Program. Applicants may be 
required to participate in the Academic Achievement Program 
(AAP). The purpose of the program is to provide developmental 
maintenance and transition services to students who, because of life 
cifcumstances, may not have achieved their potential in secondary 
school and need additional preparation in art and academics to 
ensure their success. AAP is funded by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania's Higher Educarion Opportunity Act (ACT 101). 
Students selected to participate in the program musr be Pennsylva- 
nia residents and meet the family income eligibility guidelines 
established by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 



Advanced Placement 

CEEB Advanced Placement Program 

The University of the Arts may award three credits toward 
the liberal arts requirements for a score of 4 or better in any CEEB 
Advanced Placement Examination in an academic subject. An 
official report of scores must be submitted to The University of 
the Arts directly from The College Board, Advanced Placement 
Program, Princeton, NJ. AP credit is not given for studio art 
or performance. Students are notified of AP credits awarded 
prior to registration. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The University of the Arts cooperates with the College Examina- 
tion Board in its College Level Examination Program (CLEP). 
Credits may be awarded for Subject Examinations in composition 
and literature, foreign language, history and social studies, or 
science and math depending on the score earned in the examination 
and other factors as follows: 

1. The credit must be directly applicable to the student's 
degree requirements. 

2. The credits cannot be used to fulfill upper-level 
course requirements. 

3. The total number of credits awarded through CLEP 
is limited to 12. 

4. A score equivalent to the minimum acceptable score 
or higher as recommended by the American Council on 
Education is necessary. 

College-level Course Work 

The University may also award credit for college work com- 
pleted while the student was still in high school. Applicants who 
have taken college courses should arrange to-have their college 
transcripts sent to the Office of Admission for transfer-credit 
evaluation. Students should also send official descriptions of the 
college courses so that the University can make accurate evalua- 
tions. Transfer credit cannot be granted for courses that wete taken 
to fulfill high school gtaduation requirements; nor for credits 
earned in a dual enrollment program that granted secondary school 
and college credit for the same course. Credit will not be granted 
for pre-college programs. 

International Baccalaureate 

The University of the Arts recognizes the International Baccalau- 
reate Examination (IB). The University may award 6 credits 
towatd the liberal arts requirements for a score of 4 or better in a 
higher level (HL) examination and 3 credits for a score of 4 or 
better in a subsidiary level (SL) examination in an academic subject. 
An official report of scores on the IB exams should be sent to the 
Office of Admission for evaluation. Students are notified of the 
credits awarded prior to registration. 



Credit from Nonaccredited Institutions 

Credit may be awarded at the time of admission by the depart- 
ment chairperson of the intended major, up to but not exceeding 
the number of credits earned at the nonaccredited institution 
(as adjusted to conform with the University's credit evaluation 
policies) based on the student's portfolio. These credits may be 
assigned to fulfill specific requirements of The University of 
the Arts degree as agreed upon by the department chair or director, 
and the registtat. 

Credit by Portfolio 

A maximum of 18 credits may be granted by portfolio review 
for artistic experiences independent of any course work. Credit by 
portfolio is granted only for studio work done prior to matricula- 
tion at The University of the Atts. Academic standing and course 
credit based on portfolio review are determined by the appropriate 
department chairperson during the admission process. This 
portfolio work cannot have been part of the assigned work for a 
secondary or post-secondary course. 

Credit by Audition 

Students who qualify may be granted credit by audition in 
performance subjects. Audition credit requires the approval of the 
Audition Committee and the school director. Academic standing 
and course credit based on the audition are determined during the 
admission process. 



International Students 

Applicants who are neither US citizens not Petmanent Residents 
are considered International Students. The University encourages 
international candidates with strong academic and artistic qualifi- 
cations to apply for admission to The University of the Arts. 

International students who apply to the University should follow 
the procedures outlined in the appropriate section of this catalog. 
International applicants should also be aware of the following 
additional requitements and procedures: 

1 . English proficiency. Applicants to the undergraduate 
programs whose first language is othet than English are required to 
demonsttate their proficiency in English in one of two ways: 

Submit official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 500 is required 
for admission to the undergraduate programs. 

or 

Complete Level 109 in the English Language Program offered 
by any one of the more than 20 ELS Language Centers located 
throughout the USA. Information about these programs can be 
obtained directly from: 

ELS Language Centers 
5761 Buckingham Parkway- 
Culver City, CA 90230 USA 
Telephone: (310)642-0988 
FAX: (310)410-4688 

International candidates for admission to a graduate program, 
whose first language is other than English, must present an official 
TOEFL score of 550 or above. 

2. Transcripts/Mark/Grade Sheets. All applicants must provide 
a complete, notarized ttansctipt from every school attended on the 
high school/secondary level and postsecondary level. Each 
transcript must be translated into English by a certified translator 
and the translation must be notarized. 

International students who wish to be considered for advanced 
standing and receive ttansfer credit for coursework already 
completed should submit an Evaluation of Foreign Educational 
Credentials Comprehensive Report from the Academic Credentials 
Evaluation Institute (ACEI). It is the applicant's responsibility 
to contract with ACEI directly for this service. Instructions and 
application for foreign credentials evaluation can be obtained 
directly from: 

Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute, Inc. 

PO Box 6908 

Beverly Hills, CA 90212 USA 

Telephone: (310)559-0578 

FAX: (310)204-2842 



3. Certification of Finances. International students who plan to 
enroll at the Univetsity are responsible for all of their educational 
and personal expenses for the full duration of their education at The 
University of the Arts. Certification that these financial obligations 
can be met is required in order to qualify for the F-l visa. A 
Certification of Finances form is sent to international students upon 
receipt of their application. The form must be completed in 
English and notarized by a bank official. This statement must 
declare the availability of funds of at least (US) $23,770 to cover 
the cost of one year of education and personal expenses. The 1-20, 
used to apply for the F-l visa, will not be issued without a valid 
Certification of Finances. 

4. Financial Aid. Financial aid is not available for International 
Students, not are International Students eligible for installment 
payment plan progtams. 

5. Scholarships. A limited number of partial merit scholarships 
may be awarded to international students who demonstrate 
outstanding academic and artistic achievement and potential. 
International merit scholarship recipients are notified of the 
scholarship award within two weeks of the offer of admission. 



Admission Requirements for 
Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate 
Programs 

The University of the Arts offers these graduate degrees: Master 
of Fine Arts degrees in Book Arts/Printmaking, Museum Exhibi- 
tion Planning and Design, Cetamics, Painting, and Sculpture; 
Master of Industrial Design; Master of Arts in Art Education; 
Master of Arts in Museum Education; Master of Arts in Teaching 
in Visual Arts; Master of Arts in Teaching in Music; Master of 
Music. In addition to the graduate programs, The University of 
the Arts also offers post-baccalauteate non-degree programs in 
Crafts and teacher certification in visual arts. 

Applications fot fall admission should be submitted by March 1 
for priority consideration. After March 1, applications will be 
accepted on a space-available basis. Applications for spring 
admission (education and post-baccalauteate programs only) should 
be submitted by November 15. 

Applications for rhe MFA program in Ceramics, Sculpture and 
Painting are accepted for summer only. These applications should 
be filed by February 1 5 for priority consideration. After February 
15, applications will be accepted on a space-available basis. 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six credits may be transferred and applied toward 
graduate degree requirements with the approval of the program 
director and registrar. Only credit for graduate courses in which a 
grade of "B" or higher has been earned may be transferred. 

Graduate Application Requirements 

All applicants for admission to graduate study at The University 
of the Arts must hold a Bachelor's degree from a U.S. institution 
which is accredited by a recognized regional association or have the 
equivalent of a Bachelor's degree from a foreign institution of 
acceptable standards. 

1. Application Form. All candidates are required to submit a 
completed graduate application fot admission and $40 application 
fee. The fee for international applicants who are not US citizens or 
Permanent Residents is $75. The application fee will be waived for 
The University of the Arts' alumni. 

2. College Transcripts. An official transcript from each 
undergraduate school attended is required of all applicants. 

3. Recommendations. Applicants are required to submit thtee 
letters of recommendation. Two of these recommendations must 
come from professors or professionals in the area of the student's 
intended majot who are familiar with the applicant's capabilities 
and credentials. 

4. Personal Statement. All applicants are required to submit a 
one to two-page statement that describes their professional plans 
and goals. The statement should be typed on a separate sheet of 
paper and attached to the application. Applicants should list name, 
social security number and the semester for which rhey seek 
admission on the statement. 

5. Proof of Secondary School Graduation. An official copy of the 
secondary school transcript or diploma is required of all applicants. 
The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires that The University 
maintain this infotmation on file for all undergraduate and 
graduate students. 



6. Interview. A personal interview with the director of the 
program to which the candidate is applying is strongly 
recommended. Appointments should be scheduled directly 
with the department. 

7. Financial Aid. Obtain the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) if applying for financial assistance. Submit 
the FAFSA to the Fedetal Student Aid Program by February 1 5 
for priority consideration. The Title IV Code for The University 
of the Arts is 003350. A Financial Aid Transcript (FAT) must be 
requested from the Financial Aid Office of each college or 
postsecondary institution attended. The FAT should be sent to 
The University of the Arts' Office of Financial Aid. 

8. Special Requirements for graduate education applicants. 
Students entering the MA and MAT programs should hold a 
bachelor's degree in art or music, including at least 40 semester 
hours of studio credit with a "B" average. Applicants to the MA 
program in Museum Education must have completed 18 semester 
hours in Art History, including a comprehensive survey course 
and a course in Twentieth-Century Art. Deficiencies in this 
minimum must be made up as prerequisites or corequisites; a 
maximum of 12 such credits may be taken while a matriculated 
graduate student. With approval of the program director, a 
maximum of six srudio credits may be applied to the elective 
requirements in the program. 

Graduate Portfolio and Audition Information 

Every student applying to the Philadelphia College of Art and 
Design must submit a portfolio of his/her work. Every student 
applying to the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts must 
audition. An application must be filed with the Admission Office 
before a portfolio review or audition is scheduled. Please refer to 
the Graduate Program Brochure for specific requirements. 

Crafts Studio Post-Baccalaureate Certificate 

Admission to the Ctaft Studio Program is based on portfolio and 
interview. The program is designed for students who already hold 
an undergraduate degree. Applications may be obtained from the 
Office of Admission. 

Teacher Certification Program 

Candidates fot this program must hold a BFA or BA in Art, or 
equivalent, with a minimum of 40 semester credits in studio and 
12 semester credits in Art History with a minimum of a "B" 
average. Students who wish to pursue teacher certification apart 
from a degree program should apply for Special Student status 
through The University of the Arrs' Continuing Studies Office. 



13 



Tuition and Expenses 

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees 

Annual tuition is charged to all full-time undergraduate students, 
with one-half payable prior to the start of each semester. Full-time 
students carry a minimum of 12 credits per semester and may carry 
up to 18 credits without incurring additional charges. Excess 
credits are subject to additional charges at the standard semester 
credit rate. Permission of the dean of the appropriate college is 
required for a student to carry more than 18 credits in one semester. 

In addition to the annual tuition charge, all students registered 
for 12 credits or more are required to pay an annual general student 
fee. The general student fee is applied toward the cost of library 
facilities, studio and laboratory operations, orientation, student 
activities, and special services, including health services, placement, 
and registration. The annual general student fee is not refundable. 

Students registering for fewer than 1 2 credits are charged per 
credit. There are no other mandatory course fees or charges except 
for deposits and the cost of expendable materials in selected studio 
classes. Reservation deposits for housing and tuition are credited to 
the student's bill and are not refundable. 

Schedule of Annual Undergraduate 
Charges and Fees 



Schedule of Annual Graduate Charges and Fees 



1997-98 Academic Year 

Full-time tuition 
(12-18 credits/semester) 
Tuition per credit 
General Student Fee 

Housing Fees 

Housing: 

Furness Hall or 1500 Pine 
Housing reservation deposit 
Housing damage deposit 



$ 14,570 

$630 

$ 500 (all full-time students) 



$4,100 
$100 
$ 200 (refundable) 



Graduate Tuition and Fees 

Graduate students are considered full-time if enrolled in at least 
9 credits. Teacher Certification students in visual arts are consid- 
ered full-time at 9 credits. Full-time graduate students pay annual 
tuition plus the general student fee. General student fee charges 
are the same for graduate and undergraduate students. Tuition for 
part-time graduate studies is charged on a per credit basis. 

A student who has completed all the course requirements for the 
Masters degree and is currently working on the graduate project, 
either on or off-campus, must register and pay a graduate project 
continuation fee (equal to the cost of 0.5 credits/semester). This 
registration, through the Office of the Registrar, is required in each 
succeeding semester until all degree requirements are met. 

A student without an approved leave of absence who does not 
register each semester will be considered to have withdrawn from 
candidacy for the degree. Students who have not maintained 
continuous registration must apply through the Office of the 
Registrar for readmission to the program, and will be retroactively 
charged for the intervening semesters. 



1997-98 Academic Year 

Full-time tuition 
Tuition per credit 
General Student Fee 



$ 14,570 (9-18 credits/semester) 
$ 735 
$ 500 (all full-time students) 



Tuition Payments and Financial 
Responsibility 

Payment in full for each semester is required before students may 
attend classes. Tuition invoices are mailed to students each July 
and November. The first-semester bill must be paid by mid- 
August and the second-semester bill must be paid by mid- 
December. Any amount unpaid after the due date as indicated on 
the invoice is subject to a late payment fee of $60 unless an 
alternative payment plan has been arranged through TMS (see 
"Payment Plans"). Settlement of all financial obligations of the 
University rests with the student, or the student's parents if the 
student has not attained independent adult status. 

Failure to receive an invoice does not excuse a student from 
paying tuition and fees before attending classes each semester. 
Student accounts are considered settled when students receive 
Finance Office Approval and a validated ID card. 

Students may not withdraw in good standing unless all financial 
obligations to the University have been met. Students whose 
accounts become delinquent are subject to dismissal. Students may 
not receive diplomas, certificates, transcripts, or letters of recom- 
mendation, and may not be allowed to register for the following 
semester if their accounts have not been paid in full. 

Any unpaid balance at the end of the semester will be referred to 
the University's outside collection agency for collection and legal 
action. Students or their paying agents will be responsible for all 
collection costs and attorney fees. 



Payment Plans 

As a service to our students and their parents, the University 
offers the following commercially sponsored tuition payment plan. 
The plan allows for the total sum of all tuition and fees to be paid 
over ten months, from May through February. 

Tuition Management Systems, Inc. (TMS) offers a budget plan 
that allows you to pay all or part of your annual charges in ten 
monthly installments for a nominal annual administrative fee. 
A separate insurance program is also available to participants with 
this plan. For more information contact Tuition Management 
Systems Inc., at (800) 722-4867. 



Tuition Remission 

Alumni Discount 

Sons and daughters of alumni of The University of the Arts are 
eligible for a 10% remission on their tuition. To qualify, a student 
must present to the Registrar an official copy of the long-form 
birth certificate, which lists the names of both parents. The 
temission applies to each semester that the student matriculates on 
a full-time basis. 

For purposes of this policy, alumni are defined as graduates who 
have teceived a diploma, degree, or certificate as a matriculated 
student in an undergraduate of graduate program from either the 
College of Art and Design or the College or Performing Arts, 
excluding the Evening or Continuing Education Divisions of each 
College. The discount will be issued commensurate with the 
number of years that a student's alumni parents attended the 
University (i.e., if an alum received a cerrificate from a two-year 
program, the discount would only be offered for two years). 

Sibling Discount 

Families that have two or more members attending The 
University of the Arts are eligible for a tuition-remission. Presen- 
tation of the long-form birth certificate is required for each sibling 
attending. The youngest member oi the family may receive a 10% 
tuition remission each semester during which both are full-time 
matticulating students. 

Spousal Discount 

A husband and wife attending The Univetsity of the Arts are 
eligible for tuition-remission. Presentation of a marriage license 
to the Registrar's Office is required. The second person of the 
married couple to register at the University may receive a 10% 
tuition-remission each semester during which they are borh full- 
time matriculated students. 

Students are entitled to only one type of tuition discount (i.e., 
alumni discount, sibling discount, spousal discount, etc.) in any 
given academic year For more information, contact the Office of 
the Registrar at 215- 875-4848. 



Housing Fees 



Students are nor permitted to move into University housing 
until all tuition and fees are paid in full. A damage deposit is 
required of all students who live in University housing. This 
deposit is held in escrow and will be refunded to the student after 
the apartment is vacated. Any charges for damage to the apartment 
will be subtracted from this deposit. An additional Housing 
Reservation Deposit is required to reserve a space in University 
housing. This deposit will be credited to the student's bill and 
is not refundable. 



Special Charges and Fees 



Application Fee 

An application fee of $4 
admission or readmission. 



' is required with every application for 



Tuition Deposit 

Once the student has been accepted for admission to the 
University, a $300 tuition deposit is required ro reserve a place in 
the class. This deposit will be credited to the student's bill and is 
not refundable. The tuition deposit must be paid in U.S. dollars 
within three weeks of the offer of admission. 

Late Registration 

A late registtation fee of $35 will be charged to any student 
registering after the dates listed in the Academic Calendar. 

Late Payment 

A late payment fee of $60 will be charged to any student failing 
to pay his or her tuition and/or housing bill by the due date. 

Bad Check Penalty 

A $25 fine is charged for all checks issued to the University and 
not paid upon presentation to the bank. 

Transcript Fee 

A $5 fee is charged to students requesting an official transcript 
from the University. 

Tuition Refund Policy 

The following tuition and housing refund policy is in effect. 
A student's general fee and other chatges are not refundable. 
For withdrawal: 

Prior to the first class 100% refund 

Before end of second week 809? refund 

During third week 40% refund 

After end of third week 0% refund 

Please note that withdrawing prior to the end of a semester could 
resulr in rhe loss of financial aid for that semester, in some cases 
causing the student to owe the Universiry rather than receive a 
refund. If you do nor plan to attend the Universiry, you must 
tequest eithet a leave of absence or an official withdrawal in writing 
from the Registrar's Office. 

A student required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons will not 
be entitled to a tuition of housing fefund. 

Undergfaduate students attending this institution for the first 
time who have received Title IV aid will be subject to the pro-rata 
refund policy, up to the ninth week, in accotdance with the 
Department of Education Regulations. 



Financial Holds 

Students who do not satisfy their financial obligations to the 
University will have a financial hold placed on their record. Such a 
hold may result in cancellation of the student's pteregistration and 
will prevent the student from being permitted to register for future 
courses until the financial hold is lifted. Furthermore, students 
with outstanding financial obligations to the University will nor be 
eligible to receive official copies of their transcripts nor their 
diplomas. To avoid incurring late fees and/or a hold on the 
academic records, students are expected to make arrangements to 
pay all tuition, fees, and dormitory charges by the due date on their 
bill. Students are encouraged to apply early for financial aid. 



Financial Aid 



The University of the Atts offets a variety of financial aid 
programs to assist students in meeting their educational goals. Aid 
may be offered in the form of grants, scholarships, loans or 
employment, and is funded through federal, state, institutional or 
private organizations. Grants and scholarships are considered 
gift aid and need not be repaid. Loans, which must be repaid, 
are usually offered at a low interest rate and have an extended 
repayment period. 

Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of 
education and the family's federally calculated contribution to these 
costs. Where need exists, the University assists in meeting costs 
within the resources available to the institution. 

Eligibility tor aid is based upon the applicant's financial need, 
the ability to meet individual program requirements, and the 
availability of funding. 

Typically, seventy-five percent of the University's students 
enrolled on a full-time basis are eligible for some type of need- 
based aid. Therefore all students, undergraduate and graduate, are 
encouraged to apply. 

Information on application procedures, types of aid, program 
requirements, educational costs as determined by the University, 
and the students' rights and responsibilities is detailed in the 
following pages. Most general questions will be answered in these 
pages. Contact the Financial Aid Office with any specific questions 
you may have. 



Eligibility Criteria 



In order to qualify for financial aid a student must: 

Be a U.S. citizen, or eligible non-citizen per Immigration 

and Naturalization Service (INS) regulations. 

Be accepted to the University. 

Not have received a bachelor's degree or its equivalent. 

Some forms of aid are offered to post-undergraduate students 

as specifically noted under "Special Students. " 

Not have received aid for the maximum number of 

allowable semesters. 

Not have defaulted on a previous Federal loan. 

Be matriculated in a program which terminates in a 

degree or certificate. 

Be enrolled as a full time student. (A full time student is 

one who completes at least 12 credits per semester.) 

Some forms of aid are offered to less than full-time students 

as specifically noted under "Special Students. " 

Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined 

by the University. 

Apply for Financial aid by the deadline. 

Demonstrate financial need as determined by the analysis 

of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). 



Deadlines 

Deadlines are used to assist the University in determining how 
many students wish to be considered for aid from the available 
funds. We also use deadlines so that we will receive the necessary 
information, and be able to forward a response to you, in time for 
you to make important decisions regarding your enrollment plans. 

Students who miss the filing deadlines may not receive all of the 
aid for which they may have been eligible. Late applicants are also 
subject to out-of-pocket expenditures for aid which has not been 
processed, as well as the withholding of registration and class 
attendance in the event of outstanding balances. 

Currently Enrolled Students 

The University of The Arts' postmark deadline for 
submission of the FAFSA is March 15th. 

Incomplete applications, and applications submitted after 
March 15, will be considered only after on-time applications have 
been awarded. Some types of aid (University Grants, scholarships, 
SEOG Grants, Perkins Loans, work study, and PHEAA Grants) are 
awarded on a one-time basis and may not be available to otherwise 
eligible, but late applicants. 

New Students 

Incoming students are considered on a rolling, funds-available 
basis. Applicants are advised to submit all application materials by 
February 15th, or as soon as possible. Some sources of funding (as 
above) are limited and will not be available to otherwise eligible 
but late applicants. 

PHEAA State Grant Deadlines - All Students 

The state's deadline for receipt of the completed FAFSA 
application is May 1st. Applications received after that date may 
render a student ineligible for PHEAA grant as well as the other 
types of aid specified above. 

All eligible students are considered for financial assistance 
regardless of filing date, depending upon availability of funds. 
However, University-administered funds will not be used to replace 
federal or state grants or loans for which a student may have been 
eligible but for which he/she failed to apply successfully. 



Financial Aid Application 
Procedure 

Prerequisite 

To be considered for financial aid, students must be accepted for 
admission to the University, or be currently enrolled and making 
satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Univetsity. 

Requisite 

All students who wish to be considered for aid must file the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The informa- 
tion must be released to the U.S. Department of Education and 
to the University. 

The FAFSA application is basic to the Univetsity 's Financial 
Aid application process, and is essential to the determination of 
your eligibility for all types of aid (PELL, FSEOG, and PHEAA 
Grants, University Scholarships, as well as work study and loans). 
You cannot be considered for any type of financial aid until a 
correct and complete FAFSA has been processed. 

The University does not require the CSS, ACT, FAF Profile, or 
other financial aid applications to be considered for financial 
assistance. 

The FAFSA application must be mailed directly to the 
processor in the envelope provided, and requires approximately 
4-6 weeks to process. 

Transfer students must submit financial aid transcripts to the 
University. Federal regulations require that students have financial 
aid transcripts sent from each post-secondary institution they have 
attended, whether or not aid was received. 

All first time financial aid applicants must have financial aid 
transcripts submitted from each post-secondary institution as above. 

If you are a returning student who has previously submitted 
financial aid transcripts, it is not necessary to submit duplicates. 

Financial Aid Transcript forms are available in the Financial 
Aid Office of your previous institution and will be mailed to 
you upon request. 

Title IV Code 

The University's Federal Title IV code is 003350. 

State Grant Information 

If you are a resident of Pennsylvania (per PHEAA's guidelines), 
you will be evaluated for a PHEAA grant by filing the FAFSA. 

Residents of: Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Colum- 
bia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, North Dakota, Ohio, 
Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota ot Vermont. 

Students who are residents of these states and are currently 
receiving a state grant MUST file the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). A separate state grant application form may 
also need to be submitted to the Higher Education Assistance 
Agency in your state. 



i of states not listed above: 
If you are a resident of a state not listed above, your state does 
not allow its state grant to be used in Pennsylvania. 



Types of Aid 

Each student who completes a FAFSA will be considered for all 
of the following types of aid. Parental enrollment will not be 
considered when eligibility for University aid is calculated. 

University Merit Scholarships 

University Metit Scholarships are awarded on the basis of 
academic excellence and demonstrated talent. 

Named Scholarships 

The Univetsity offets a number of scholarships which have been 
donated by individuals or groups to help support promising artists. 
These named scholarships are awarded based on need and merit. 

University Grant 

These grant funds are need-based and are awarded by the 
Financial Aid Office to supplement all other financial aid assistance. 



Federal/State Grants 

Pell Grant 

The Pell Grant is a federally funded program that awarded 
individual grants in amounts ranging from $400 to $2700 in 
1997-1998. Pell grants are awarded to students who have not 
received a previous bachelor's degree nor been aided for the 
maximum semesters allowed. 

Eligibility is determined by the federal government and 
notification is sent directly to the student in the form of a Student 
Aid Report (SAR), which should be received 4-6 weeks after the 
FAFSA has been filed. The SAR should be reviewed for accuracy, 
and corrected if necessary. The correct SAR should be rerained by 
the student as confirmation of receipt of the FAFSA. 

PHEAA Grant 

Awards are made to Pennsylvania residents who have not 
attained the bachelor's degree nor been aided for the maximum 
numbet of semesters allowed (8). The maximum grant in 
1997-1998 was $2700. 

Eligible students must demonstrate financial need, Pennsylvania 
residency, and be enrolled for at least 6 credits. To continue to be 
eligible fot state grant assistance a full-time student must complete 
a minimum of 24 credits per academic year. 

Your award letter may indicate an estimated state grant amount; 
howevet, eligibility is determined by the state, and official 
notification is sent directly to the student beginning in May. 

NOTE: students must meet state residency requirements in 
accordance with PHEAA guidelines. PHEAA's filing deadline 
is May 1st. 

Other states have scholarship programs for their residents. 
Information and applications are available from the respective State 
Boards of Education. 



Remember: you must reapply for financial aid 
each academic year! 



Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 

FSEOG is a federally funded University administered program. 
These grants are awarded to needy students who do not hold 
a bachelor's degree. Typically FSEOG grants are awarded to 
Pell recipients who have met the filing deadlines on a funds- 
available basis. 

Outside Scholarships 

The University encourages students to explore all options for 
outside scholarship assistance. Local businesses, foundations, 
churches, unions, civic organizations, etc., often sponsor scholar- 
ships that can be used toward your educational costs. 

As a service to students, the Financial Aid Office maintains a 
scholarship notebook containing useful information about such 
funding. This notebook can be viewed in the Financial Aid Office. 

The Financial Aid Office must be notified if any additional 
awards are received. Notification of all grants and scholarships will 
be included in the award letter. 



Student Loans 

Student loans are available at low interest rates, and with 
extended repayment terms to assist students in meeting both 
tuition and living expenses. Because loan indebtedness has serious 
implications, students should carefully consider the amount of their 
borrowing (both yearly and cumulative) and borrow the minimum 
necessary to reasonably meet those expenses which remain above 
the Financial Aid Award. 

Students wishing to borrow should secure an application from the 
bank, savings and loan, or credit union of their choice. All students, 
regardless of state of residency, may borrow from Pennsylvania banks 
and are urged to do so. The Financial Aid Office can provide an 
application from one of our recommended lenders. 

If the student has previously borrowed under any of the student 
loan programs, he or she is encouraged ro use the same bank to 
avoid having multiple loan payments upon graduation. (Pennsylva- 
nia borrowers are required to use the same lender.) 

All loan applications are based on the FAFSA application; thus 
this application is prerequisite to the filing of the loan application. 

While the loan application is an element of the Financial Aid 
application process, it also has the quality of being a separate 
transaction between the student and his or her bank. It is critical 
that the student understand that it is he or she alone who is 
responsible for repaying funds borrowed, and that for most students 
this will be the most serious long-term financial obligation yet 
undertaken. 

All first-time borrowers are required to attend an Entrance 
Interview before loan funds will be released by the University. 
Additional information will be available at orientation and 
registration. 

First-time borrowers are also subject to the federal regulation 
that their loan checks not be negotiated until thirty days after the 
first day of classes during the first semester of enrollment. Students 



who submit loan applications in a timely manner (by June 1) will 
be allowed to deduct the amount of the anticipated loan check from 
their fall balance. 

Graduating students who have borrowed under any federal loan 
program (as well as those who leave the University prior to 
graduating) are required to attend an Exit Interview. Students 
intending to discontinue enrollment at the University must contact 
the Financial Aid Office. 



Student Loan Programs 

Federal Perkins Loan (Perkins) 

This is a federal loan which is need based and is awarded by the 
University. The Federal Perkins Loan is currently offered at a fixed 
5% interest rate and is repayable to the University over a maximum 
ten-year period. Repayment begins nine months after graduation 
or cessation of at least half-time enrollment at an eligible institu- 
tion in an approved program of study. 

Because Perkins loan funds are limited, this loan is offered 
to students whose Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is lowest. 
Notification of eligibility for this loan is included in the 
award letter. 

Parent Plus Loan For Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS) 

The parent of a dependent student may borrow up to the cost 
of education minus any other financial aid the student is scheduled 
to receive. Repayment begins 60 days after loan funds have 
been disbursed. 

Loan applications are available from the lender of the student's 
choice. The parent must borrow from the same lender the student 
has chosen for the Stafford loan, unless that lender does not 
participate in the program. A PLUS loan cannot be approved until 
a complete FAFSA has been processed. 

Typically the loan application process requires 6-8 weeks from 
application to receipr of check. Therefore, parents wishing to use 
PLUS proceeds toward the fall balance must submit a complete 
application by June 1 in order to deduct the amount of the 
anticipated loan check from the Fall Invoice. 

Federal Stafford Student Loan (Stafford) 

Applications for the Stafford loan are available from the lender 
of your choice. Students may choose to use a bank, credit union or 
savings and loan association. 

We are pleased to recommend a preferred lender to those 
students who have not previously borrowed. Please contact the 
Financial Aid Office for additional information. 

A Stafford loan cannot be approved until a complete FAFSA 
has been processed. Students wishing to use proceeds from the 
Stafford loan must submit a complete application by June 1st. 
Students who use Pennsylvania lenders must submit the loan 
application directly to the lender. Students who use out-of-state 
lenders must submit the loan application directly to the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Per federal regulations, only one Stafford or PLUS loan can be 
processed for each student. 



PLUS/Stafford 

The lender will deduct origination and insurance fees from 
Stafford and PLUS loans before they are disbursed. These fees are 
usually approximately 4% of the principal amount borrowed. 
Thus, the amount available from the loan to pay educational costs 
is always less than the amount initially borrowed. 

Students who have previously defaulted on a federal 
loan are not eligible for Stafford or Perkins loans, or other 
financial aid while enrolled at The University of the Arts. 

Students and their parents are strongly urged to make an 
appointment in the Financial Aid Office to discuss questions 
regarding any ot the student loan programs. 

PHEAA Loan Line (To check on the status of your loan): 

1-800-692-7392. 
Remember: 

If you intend to use your Stafford or PLUS Loan proceeds 
toward your Fall invoice you must submit your loan application(s) 
by June 1st. 



Student Employment 

Federal Work Study (FWS) 

FWS is a federally funded program administered by the Univer- 
sity. Eligibility for this program is based upon the availability of 
funds to the University, and the student's EFC. 

The Financial Aid Office will make a determination of the 
student's eligibility to earn money through the FWS Program. 
Notification of eligibility will be included in the Award letter. 

A FWS award is not an offer or a guarantee of a job; it is the 
amount a student is eligible to earn should she or he secure a job. 
Work study awards are not applied against the invoice. Payment 
is made directly to employed students by University payroll check. 

Eligible students are permitted to work up to twenty hours 
weekly when classes are in session. Students are paid at least 
minimum wage and hours may be arranged to accommodate the 
class schedule. 

Jobs are usually available throughout the University in the areas 
of security, University offices, the library, et cetera. Positions 
require various levels of skill and experience. 

For students who are interested in working in the larger 
community, there are several off-campus work study positions 
available. These jobs are located at sites such as community and 
arts organizations, theaters, and museums. 

Job openings and additional information for fall placement will 
be available in the Financial Aid Office in late summer. 

Non-Federal Work Study (NFWS) 

Students who do not qualify to work under the Federal Work 
Study program may work on-campus under the NFWS program. 

Information about job availability and placement is as listed in 
the Federal Work Study section. 

Detailed information about Federal and Non-Federal Work 
Study is available in the Student Employment Handbook. 



Award Notification 

Award letters will be sent to new students beginning in March 
and to returning students beginning in June. The Financial Aid 
Office staff will be available to counsel students at any point during 
the application process. Students should be aware that some aid is 
conditional on the availability of funds to the University, and if 
these funds are reduced, the University will reduce aid accordingly. 

Students must return a signed award letter with acceptance of aid. 
Failure to return the award letter may result in cancellation of aid. 

Additional steps are required to claim these forms 
of financial aid: 

Federal Work Study 

In order to claim a FWS award the student must locate a job on 
campus. Once hired, the student must come to the Financial Aid 
Office to complete the necessary paperwork. Students cannot work, 
nor can they be paid, until this paperwork is submitted and proper 
identification is documented. 

Pell Grant 

Approximately 4-6 weeks after the FAFSA is filed the student 
will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). This document will 
notify a student as to Pell grant eligibility. 

The award letter will list the Pell Grant amount. Changes to the 
FAFSA information may affect the student's Pell Grant eligibility. 

Perkins Loan 

To claim these funds the student must endorse a Perkins 
promissory note in the Student Billing Office. Funds cannot be 
credited until a complete, correct note is negotiated. 

PLUS and Stafford Loans 

These loans must be applied for through the student's lender. 
Proceeds from these loans are disbursed to the University and 
require the borrower's signature. These funds cannot be credited to 
the student's account until the endorsements have been made. 
Stafford loan checks will be available in the Finance Office for 
signature, PLUS checks will be mailed to the parent borrower. 

The award notice is subject to revision under the following 
circumstances: 

1. If government funding levels to the University are reduced, 
individual awards will be adjusted accordingly. 

2. Verification - The Financial Aid Office is required by federal 
regulation to resolve any discrepancies in information submitted 
per verification to that already in a student's file. Any such 
discrepancies may result in revision to a student's aid amounts 
and/or types. 

3. As above, if at any point in the year we become aware of 
information that conflicts with other documentation in the 
student's file, we will resolve the discrepancy and will revise the 
award accordingly. 

4. Outside Scholarships - per federal regulation a student is not 
permitted to be over awarded. That is, a student's total amount of 
scholarships, grants, loans, and work study may not exceed the 
student's calculated need. If a student would be over-awarded due 
to an outside scholarship, we are required to adjust the other 
elements of the aid package to eliminate the over-award. We 
encourage students to seek outside scholarships, and will only 
adjust institutional aid if absolutely necessary. 

19 



Special Circumstances 

Income Reduction 

The FAFSA collects information about a family's income and 
assets from the previous year (1997). For most people this 
information is a good predictor of the current year's (1998) income, 
since most of us do not experience wide swings in income from 
year to year. 

If, however, a family's income in the current year will be 
significantly different from last year's, please notify the Financial 
Aid Office in writing, including all available documentation. 
Reductions in income which are caused by involuntary job loss, 
unusually high un-reimbursed medical expenses, separation, 
divorce, death of a wage earner, or the like will be considered. 

If a family's circumstances meet these criteria we will calculate 
the financial aid award based upon the estimated current year 
(1998) figures for the fall semester. At the end of the fall semester 
the family will be required to provide documentation (such as final 
pay stub, or an estimated 1998 return) for evaluation of the spring 
semester's award. 

Unfortunately, we are not able to considet teductions in income 
due to voluntary job changes, back taxes owed, high consumer 
debt, multiple mortgages, employment bonuses received in the 
previous year, self employment losses, fluctuations in income from 
commission sales, or discretionary purchases. 

Divorce or Separation 

When a married student or parent separates from or divorces 
his/her spouse subsequent to the filing of the financial aid applica- 
tion, the custodial parent should notify the Financial Aid Office 
in writing. 

Please be aware that in the case of separation or divorce the 
Financial Aid Office is permitted to discuss the student's record 
only with the custodial parent. 

Death 

Sadly, we occasionally are called upon to assist a student 
whose parent or spouse has died subsequent to the filing of the 
financial aid application. Should this occur, the Financial Aid 
Office should be contacted immediately, and we will offer every 
assistance possible. 

Dependency Override 

The Financial Aid Office is frequently asked to reevaluate a 
student's status due to the student's assertion that he or she should 
be considered independent of parental support. 

The guidelines for dependency are set by federal law, and thus 
each student must first be evaluated against them. A dependent 
student is someone who is younger than twenty-four (24), is not 
a veteran, is not a graduate or professional student, is not married, 
is not an orphan or ward of the court, or does not have legal 
dependents. 

An Independent student is someone who is older than twenty- 
four, a veteran, a graduate or professional student, married, or has 
legal dependents. (See the FAFSA.) 



A student who wished to be considered independent must write 
a letter of appeal to the Financial Aid Office. The letter must 
clearly state the reasons for appealing your dependency status. The 
student will be required to document his/her means of support as 
well as other items. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for 
additional infotmation. 



Academic Progress 



Students who receive assistance in any form, which includes but 
is not limited to University grant, merit scholarship, Federal Pell 
Grant, FSEOG, FWS, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal PLUS/Stafford, 
et cetera, must maintain satisfactory academic progress in their 
program of study in order ro continue to receive those funds. 

Satisfactory academic progress for students at the University 
is defined as 

(1) earning between 12 and 18 credits each semester, and 

(2) maintaining a minimum cumulative and semester grade 
point average (G.P.A.) of 2.0 ("C" average). 

If a student's semester or cumulative grade point average is 
below 2.0 ("C" average), he or she is automatically placed on 
academic warning/probation and required to attain at least a 2.0 
cumulative grade point average by the end of the next semester, 
and meet other requirements as specified by the dean's office. 

A student who does not meet the above cited grade poinr 
average and credit load requirements will jeopardize his/her 
financial aid eligibility. 

Students who have had two semestets of academic censure 
(Warning, Initial Probation, Final Probation) are not eligible to 
receive financial aid of any type during a third semester of 
academic censure. 

Students who receive University sponsored scholarships may be 
required to maintain a G.P.A. greater than 2.0 ("C" average). The 
student will be notified of specific G.P.A. requirements when 
receiving notification of the scholarship. 

Insufficient Credit Accumulation 

In addition to the qualitative standatd (G.P.A.), students are also 
required to meet a quantitative measure of academic progress (rate 
of credit accumulation). Students who receive merit and/or need 
based aid must earn sufficient credits each semester toward 
graduation. Students who enroll for at least 12 credits during a 
given semester must complete, with a grade of "D" or higher, at 
least 12 credits in order to continue to receive financial assistance. 

Be advised that while 12 credits is the minimum pet-semester 
credit accumulation to maintain eligibility tot financial assistance, 
the student will NOT be on track to graduate in four years at this 
rate. Also, "D" grades will cause the student to fail the qualitative 
(G.P.A.) ptogtess standard. 

We review each student's total credit accumulation at the end of 
each semester. Students who complete fewer than 24 credits per 
academic year will be placed on FINANCIAL AID PROBATION 
for the following semester. It, by the end of the probationary 
semestet, the student has not earned at least 36 ctedits, (for the 
three semestet period being reviewed) the student then loses his/her 
eligibility fot financial assistance. Students can fail the quantita- 
tive standard regardless of G.P.A. 

The student's eligibility for financial assistance will be restored 
when the student has earned at least 36 credits, and has meet all 
other academic ptogtess tequirements. 



PHEAA Grants 

The state grant agency requites that a student eatn a minimum 
of twenty-four (24) ctedits each academic year in order to continue 
to receive state grant assistance. Any student who earns less than 
twenty-four credits will forfeit his/her state gtant for the first 
semester of the following year. Forfeited grant funds will not be 
teplaced with Univetsity awards. 



Change in Enrollment Status 

Unless specifically designated othetwise, all awards are issued 
based upon the student's anticipated enrollment as a full-time 
undergraduate (completing 12 ctedits or more per semester, in a 
degree-granting program). 

Students who become less than full-time or who enroll as "non- 
degree" may lose their eligibility fot aid in full or in part. 

The Financial Aid Office periodically reviews all student 
accounts and will immediately temove any aid credited to the 
account of a student who has failed to satisfy progress or enrollment 
requirements as above. 

To avoid unexpected balances, students must contact the 
Financial Aid Office with any questions pettaining to this subject. 



Special Students 



Graduate Students 

Gtaduate students are eligible to apply for Stafford loans, and 
should refer to the section on student loans for furthet information. 
Graduate students may also be eligible fot assistantships or 
fellowships through the department in which they ate enrolled. 
Contact the depattmental office for additional information and 
application fotms. 

Graduate students are required to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress in order to continue to teceive financial aid as 
specified in this catalog. 

Students who have attained a bachelot's degree or its equivalent 
are not eligible to receive PELL, PHEAA, FSEOG, FWS, Perkins, 
and mosr other forms of financial aid including Institutional grants. 

Graduate students who have previously defaulted on a Federal 
student loan are not eligible to receive assistance of any type while 
enrolled ar the Univetsity. 



Transfer Students 

Ttansfet undergraduates are eligible for aid on the same basis as 
othet undetgraduates (with exceptions as listed below). 

All ttansfet students must submit a Financial Aid Transcript 
(FAT) from each prior post-secondary institution attended, whether 
or not financial aid was received while enrolled. 

Financial aid will not be awarded to students from whom the 
tequired FATs have not been received. 

Transfer students who have borrowed the undergraduate 
maximum under the Stafford program are not eligible fot contin- 
ued Staffotd assistance while enrolled at the University. 

Any transfer student who has previously defaulted on a Fedetal 
loan is ineligible for financial aid of any type while enrolled at 
the University. 

Transfer students who enroll for the spring semestet should be 
aware that financial aid teceived for enrollment during the fall 
semester at anothet institution is not ttansferable. Students must 
teapply for most fotms of aid at the University. Contact the 
Financial Aid Office lot additional information and instructions. 

Bachelor's Degree Holders 

Students who have earned a bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
and who enroll as undergraduates are eligible to apply fot Stafford 
loans (with exceptions as below). In some cases these students may 
also be eligible fot Univetsity sponsored aid. 

Students who have alteady botrowed the undetgtaduate maximum 
under the Stafford program are ineligible for continued Stafford 
assistance while enrolled at the University. 

Those who have previously defaulted on a Fedetal student loan 
are not eligible fot aid of any type while enrolled at the University. 

Students must satisfy rhe financial aid ttanscript requirement 
as desctibed undet "transfer students." 

Part-Time Students 

Part-time students may be eligible tot some fotms of financial 
aid. Part-time students who are enrolled in degree programs may 
be eligible for PELL and PHEAA grants, as well as Stafford loans. 

Patt-time students ate subject to all tequirements governing the 
financial aid programs, except that they be enrolled full time. 

Part-time students should follow application procedures as 
detailed in this catalog. 

Continuing Education Students 

Students who enroll through the Continuing Education program 
are not eligible for financial aid of any type. 

International Students 

Students who ate neithet U.S. citizens nor eligible noncitizens 
(as confitmed by the Immigtation and Natutalization Service) are 
not eligible to receive any form of Federal Title IV financial aid 
while enrolled at The University of the Arts. 

International students will be reviewed for scholarships when 
offered admission. Those students who demonsttate exceptional 
artistic ability in their portfolio review or audition will be 
considered for the University's Merit Scholarship Program. 



Budgets 

Educational costs include not only tuition and fees, but indirect 
costs such as room, food, books, supplies, personal and living 
expenses. Direct costs reflect the actual amount a student will be 
billed by the University. Indirect costs are what a typical student 
might expect for out-of-pocket expenses such as supplies, books, 
clothing, food, medical expenses, personal items, and transporta- 
tion over a nine-month period. 

Naturally, one's own habits and personal spending patterns 
can dramatically influence these costs. Therefore, these are 
estimates only. 

These factors are used in formulating a student's budget and 
determining financial need. The Financial Aid Office will assign 
each student a budget depending on the information provided 
on the FAFSA. If the budgets shown below differ significantly 
from the expenses you expect to incur, please inform the Financial 
Aid Office. 

1997-1998 

Estimated Direct Expenses 

These figures are intended for your use in estimating your costs 
for the upcoming academic year. 



Tuition 

(12-18 Credits) 
General Fee 
Room 
Sub Total 

Indirect Expenses 

Books & Supplies 

Room 

Food 

Living Expenses 

Total 



Resident/ 

Commuter Off-Campus 

14,570 14,570 



500 



500 
4,100 



Graduate 
14,570 

500 



$15,070 


$19,170 


$15,070 


1,700 


1,700 


1,700 


925 


— 


4,600 


850 


1,700 


1,700 


2,355 


1,330 


3,830 



$20,900 



$23,900 



$26,900 



Rights and Responsibilities 

The receipt of financial aid is a privilege which creates both 
rights and responsibilities. 

Students have the right to know the method used to determine 
their need; the right to have access to information and records used 
in determining need; and the right to be awarded aid as equitably 
as funds permit. 

Students applying for financial aid are responsible for 
accurately portraying financial resources and circumstances and 
notifying the Financial Aid Office of any changes in status; for 
applying in a timely manner; and for maintaining satisfactory 
academic progress and good standing. 

Students who fail to maintain adequate progress will be placed 
on probation. Failure to correct academic deficiency will result in 
the loss of financial aid until the required credits and grade point 
average have been earned. 

Students or parents who knowingly provide false information 
on any financial aid form will be denied financial aid and will be 
refused for all subsequent years without the possibility of appeal. 
Additionally, students so identified will be billed for all aid 
disbursed and may face prosecution by the Department of 
Education which may result in fine, imprisonment, or both. 

While the Financial Aid Office staff is available to assist students 
through the application process it is the student's responsibility to 
see to the correctness and completeness of his or her applications. 
If you receive notification that your FAFSA or loan application is 
incomplete, you must determine what is necessary to complete your 
application(s), and submit the required information. 

An application for financial aid will have no effect on the 
decision concerning the admission of an applicant. The admission 
decision is made without having access to financial aid data. 



For Additional Information 

Listed below are numbers to call if you receive an incomplete 
notification, or do not receive notification within six weeks of 
application filing. 



Commuter 

Students who live within reasonable commuting distance of 
the University and reside with parents or relatives. 

Resident/Off-Campus 

Students who reside in University-owned housing, or who reside 
in housing which is owned by neither the University nor their 
parents or relatives. Students who live within commuting distance 
of the University will not be funded as residents, or as off-campus. 

Graduate Students 

Most graduate students maintain their own homes and have 
correspondingly higher living expenses. Graduate students who 
live with patents or relatives will be assigned a commuter budget. 

Part-time Students 

Budgets for part-time students are determined on an 
individual basis. 



To check the status of yout FAFSA: 

1-319-337-5665 

1-800-4-FEDAID 



PHEAA Grant Line 
1-800-692-7435 

The University of the Arts 
1 -800-6 16-ARTS 



PHEAA Loan Line 
1-800-692-7392 

Office of Financial Aid 
1-215-875-4858 



Inquiries and requests for application forms should be directed to: 
Office of Financial Aid 
320 South Btoad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 



Academic Regulations 

Anita Reece 

Registrar 

Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 

215-875-4848 

The Office of the Registrar develops and maintains all records 
and files relating to the students' academic life at the University. 
Course and program transactions or changes are not official unless 
properly processed through the Office of the Registrar In order to 
registet, srudents must be formally admirted to the University and 
pay all applicable tuition and fees. 

Students must have a program of courses documented and 
approved by the required advisor(s). All students ate advised to 
obtain a copy of their curriculum requirements as soon as possible 
after admission to the University, and to check those against theit 
ttanscripts after each tetm. Student copies of the transcript are 
available upon request. The Office of Registrar is responsible for 
certification of completion of requirements for graduation. 

Matriculated Students 

Matticulated students are those who have applied, been accepted, 
and enrolled in a degree program at rhe University of the Arts 
during the semester for which they were admitted. Course credits 
completed prior to matriculation at the University will not 
necessarily be accepted into the degree programs. In no case will 
more than six credits taken as a non-matriculated student at The 
University of the Arts be accepted into the degree program. 
Degree students may enroll for part-time or full-time study. 

Credit Load/Overloads 

Full-time undergtaduate students are defined as those who are 
enrolled in at least 12 credits a semester. Students wishing to take 
mote than 18 credits in a semester must obtain permission from 
the dean of theit college. Factors such as grade poinr average and 
progress in meeting degree requirements will be consideted in 
giving permission for an overload. Excess credits are subject to 
additional charges at the standard semester credit rate. Registra- 
tion as Audit or Pass/Fail is counred the same as registration for 
credit for the putpose of determining tuition. 

Graduate students ate considered full-time if enrolled in ar least 
9 credits per term. 



Student Classification 

A student's class is determined by the number of credits earned, 
regardless of the number of semesters it took to complete these 
credits and regardless of the student's standing in his or her major 
program. Class status is an important factot in determining 
financial aid eligibility and is one indicator of overall academic 
progress. In addition, class standing is used to prioritize schedul- 
ing duting tegistration. Undergraduate class status is determined 
as follows: Ul up to 29.5 credits 

U2 30 - 59.5 credits 

U3 60 - 89.5 credits 

114 90-123 credits 

U5 more than 123 credits 
Graduate class status is determined as follows: 

Gl up to 17.5 credits 

G2 18 credits or more 



Academic Advising and Student 
Responsibility 

Academic advising at the University is designed to assist 
students in ditecting and completing theit degree programs by 
providing guidance through conract with informed advisots and by 
providing information in various publications. Students are 
encouraged to tefer to this catalog, course bulletins, and the 
student handbook fot information on policies, procedures, and 
deadlines. Students in doubt about any College ot Univetsity 
tegulation should seek advice from theit academic advisot or the 
Office of the Registrar. 

In preparing for registration, students consult with their faculty 
advisors, who help them assemble schedules for the semester and 
who give final approval to all coutse selections. Students entering 
the final year of their degree program are urged to consult with the 
Registrar to ensure that all major requirements will be completed 
on schedule for graduarion. Students are responsible for knowing 
the specific tequirements of their particular degree program and 
for tracking their academic progress toward the degree. Meeting 
requirements for graduation is ultimately the student's 
responsibiliry. 

Each student is personally tesponsible fot observing all regula- 
tions in the catalog which may affect academic progress, financial 
obligations, relationships with University authorities, ttansferabil- 
ity of credits, acceptance of credits for graduation, and eligibility 
to graduate. 



23 



Registration 

Official registration forms must be filed in order for the student 
to attend class. Students are responsible for knowing regulations 
regarding withdrawals, refund deadlines, program changes, and 
academic policy. 

Matriculating students must register for subsequent semesters in 
accord with the posted schedule (see Academic Calendar). Failure 
to register will result in a late registration fee (see below). A 
student is not considered registered until Finance Office clearance 
has been obtained. 

In order to register for classes, it is necessary to meet any 
financial or academic criteria that have caused a hold to be placed 
on a student's record. 

All students are responsible for successfully completing any 
prerequisites required for enrollment in a coutse. Failure to 
complete prerequisites may result in cancellation of registration in 
the course requiring the prerequisite. 



Late Registration 

A late-regisrration fee of $35 will be charged to any student 
registering after the dates listed in the Academic Calendar. Late 
registration may jeopardize a student's chances of obtaining the 
program desired. 



Schedule Revision — Drop/ Add 

Beginning the first week of the semester, only students who have 
obtained finance office clearance may make revisions to their 
schedules. Any schedule revision must be approved in writing by 
the appropriate instructor or department chairperson. This is 
accomplished by completing a drop/add form, obtaining the 
appropriate signatures, and submitting the form to the Registrar's 
Office for processing. The drop/add period takes place during the 
first ten days of classes each semester in accordance with the 
academic calendar, during which time schedule changes can be 
made without academic penalty. 



Registering for Other Categories 
of Study 

Independent Study 

Students who wish to work on a project or pursue an individual 
course of study may apply to take an Independent Study. In order 
to register for this option, the student must follow these guidelines: 

1 . Prepare a proposal with a University of the Arts faculty 
member who will serve as the course advisor and complete the 
Independent Study form which may be obtained from the Office of 
the Registrar or the Dean's Office. Include a semester plan for rhe 
course of study, indicate the number of credits being taken, and 
obtain the signatures of the instructor and the department chair/ 
school director. 

2. Present this approved proposal at registration along with 
your registration form. The course number for an independent 
study is the department code and course number "999." 
(Example: CR 999) 



3. Independent studies may be taken for 1.5 to 6 credits in 
PCAD, 1 to 6 credits in PCPA, 1 to 6 credits in CMAC, and 3 
credits in Liberal Arts. 

4. The student is responsible for documenting the content of the 
independent study work to other institutions or outside agencies. 

5. Students may not elect the Pass/Fail or Audit options for 
Independent Studies. 

6. Graduate students must obtain the signature of the Dean in 
addition to the other signatures of approval. The course number 
for a graduate-level independent study is the department code and 
course number "799." 

Internships 

Internships allow matriculated students to earn credits while 
working in the field. Internship courses are scheduled during the 
fall and spring semesters, and with special permission, during the 
summer. To register for an internship, see rhe course bulletin and 
the appropriate department for current offerings. Internship 
courses are graded on a pass/fail basis. 

Cross-College Elective Options and Prerequisites 

The University encourages students to take courses outside of 
their major department and college. To facilitate this goal, the 
University offers a wide selection of courses that are open for 
enrollment without prerequisites, including introductory electives 
and courses for non-majors. In general, upper level courses will have 
specific prerequisites which must be satisfied prior to registration. 
Please contact the depattment Chairperson or school Director 
regarding specific course offerings and prerequisite requirements. 

Private Lessons 

Private instrumental/vocal lessons for non-majors may be taken 
for elective credit (1.5 credits, 7 hours of instruction per semester) 
with petmission of the Director of the School of Music. An 
additional fee above the tuition payment is required. 

Pass/Fail Option 

1. In courses taken on a pass/fail basis, the standard letter grades 
of "A" to "C" are converted to "OP" by the registrar. A grade of 
"C-" to "F" is recorded as an "OF." 

2. The pass/fail grading option must be selected prior to the end 
ot the drop/add period; no change from Pass/Fail to a regular grade 
or a regular grade to Pass/Fail may be made after that deadline. 

3. Grades of "OP" or "OF" are not computed in the grade 
point average. 

4. The Pass/Fail policy stipulates that the instructor is not to 
be informed as to who is enrolled on a Pass/Fail basis. 

5. Availability ot this option is limited to a total of nine (9) 
credits in Liberal Arts courses or electives during the student's 
undergraduate career. 

Auditing a Course 

Audited courses carry no credit and do not satisfy degree 
requirements. Once a course has been audited, the course may 
not be repeated for credit. Regular tuition rates are charged 
for audited courses. 



Undergraduates Enrolled for Graduate Credit 

A student in the last yeat of the bachelor's degree program may 
take a maximum of 6 credits of graduate courses towards a master's 
degree, subject to all of the following conditions: 

1. The student must have completed the junior year. 

2. The credits must be over and above the credits required for 
the bachelor's degree and may not be applied to that degree. 

3. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or better. 

4. Permission is obtained from the department and dean 
of the college. 

5. No more than a total of 6 credits, taken eithet as an under- 
graduate or non-matticulated student, or taken at another college 
or university, may be applied to the graduate program. 



Grading System 



A 


4.00 


C+ 


2.33 


A- 


3.67 


C 


2.00 


B+ 


3.33 


C- 


1.67 


B 


3.00 


D+ 


1.33 


B- 


2.67 


D 


1.00 






F 


0.00 



Grades nor included in computing averages: 

I Incomplete 

NG No Grade Reported 

NC No Credit 

W Withdrawal 

OP Optional Pass (Grade of "C" or better) 

OF Optional Fail (Grade of less than "C") 

AU Audit 

P Pass 



Change of Grade 

A change of grade can be made only if an error occurred in 
computing or recording the final grade or a reevaluation of 
previously submitted work is warranted. Extta work, beyond that 
required of other class members during the period when the class 
met, shall not be offered as a reason for a grade change. If a student 
questions the correctness of a grade, the student should first discuss 
the matter with the instructor. If a satisfactory resolution is not 
reached, the chairperson of the department or directot of the school 
should be consulted. The student may, as a last resort, bring the 
matter ro the attention of the dean of the appropriate college. Any 
change of final grade requested by a student must be approved by 
the course instructor, who must submit the signed Change of Grade 
form-with the signature of the college dean-to the Office of the 
Registrar, no later than the end of the semester following the one in 
which the grade was given. 



Withdrawal from Course 

A student may withdraw from a course with a notation of "W" 
(Withdrawal) on his/her academic record through the last day of 
the seventh week of the semester. The withdrawal form must be 
signed by the instructor of the course and returned to the Office of 
the Registrar prior to the published deadline. 

After the seventh week, a "W" is possible only under unusual 
circumstances (accident, illness, etc.) which must be documented. 
Permission in this case is by signature of both the instructor and 
the Dean/Assistant Dean of the college. 

A student who wishes to withdraw from all of his or her 
classes must initiate an official Withdrawal from the University 
as outlined below. 



Computing Grade Point Average 
(GPA) 

The GPA is computed by multiplying the numbet of credits 
earned for a course by the numerical value of the grade. The 
resulring figures from all courses for that semestet are then totaled, 
and this figure is divided by the total number of credits attempted 
that semester. The grades of I, NG, NC, W, OP, OF, P, and AU are 
not enteted in this computation. 



Grade of Incomplete "I" 

An incomplete grade may be granted only in extraordinary 
circumstances, either personal or academic, which prevent the 
student from complering coursework by the end of the semester. 
The grade "I" is given only when the completed portion of the 
student's work in the course is of a passing quality. In order to 
receive the grade of Incomplete, the student must obtain the 
approval of rhe course instructor and the Dean of the College prior 
to the conclusion of the semester. An Incomplete grade must be 
removed by the end of the sixth week of the following semester or 
a grade of "F" for the course is automatically assigned. Forms are 
available from the Office of the Registtar. 



Withdrawal from the University 

A student may withdraw completely from the University by 
initiating an official withdtawal with the Office of the Registrar. 
Students who wish to take a leave from the University for one 
or two semesters should request an Official Leave of Absence. 
An approved leave of absence permits a student in good standing 
to return after one or two semesters without having to reapply 
for admission. 

Students who withdraw from the University prior to the 
beginning of the fall or spring semesters or prior to the end of the 
drop/add period (the first 10 days of classes) may do so without 
academic penalty. Withdrawals after the drop/add period but prior 
to the end of the seventh week of the semester result in a notation 
of "W" (Withdrawal) for all courses. 

Srudents are not permitted to withdraw from the University 
after the seventh week except if the dean's approval is granted when 
nonacademic extenuating circumstances exist. Documentation by a 
physician or a counseling professional must be presented when 
requesting the dean's approval. Note that nonattendance in classes 
or nonpayment of tuition does not constitute an official withdrawal. 

Students who have withdrawn and wish to resume their studies 
at a later date will be required to complete a Request for Readmis- 
sion form and pay the readmission application fee of $40. See the 
section on tuition and fees for the tuition refund policy. 



25 



Leave of Absence 

A leave may be granted for one or two semesters at the discretion 
of the department chairperson or school director. The request 
must also be endorsed by the dean of the appropriate college. A 
student who remains absent past the date of expected return must 
apply for readmission to the University. A leave of absence 
must be requested in writing through the Office of the Registrar. 
An extension of the leave may be granted for an additional one 
or two semesters. 

A student may request a leave of absence prior to the start of the 
spring or fall semester to be effective fot the following semester. 
A student who requests a leave once the semester has begun will be 
subject to the same grading, withdrawal periods and withdrawal 
refund policies as listed in the above statement on Withdrawal 
from the University. 

A graduate student may take a leave of absence prior to the 
completion of all course work and with the program director's 
approval. Students may take a maximum of two, one-semester 
leaves of absence throughout their course of study, either in 
sequence ot as needed. Once the thesis or the Master of Music 
graduate project has begun, and all course work has been com- 
pleted, students must register and pay for a continuation fee for 
successive semesters and are not eligible for a leave of absence. 



Readmission 

Written appeal for reinstatement as a degree candidate should be 
addressed to the Office of the Registrar by June 1 for the fall 
semester and November 1 for the spring semester There is a $40 
application fee. Appropriate departmental chairpersons/directors 
and the Finance Office must endorse the readmission prior to any 
registration process. Credit for courses taken seven or more years 
prior to the date of readmission will be reevaluated in conjunction 
with degree programs currently offered. Academic units may 
choose not to accept courses regardless of when they were completed 
for credit toward the degree. Final determination will be made by 
the dean of the college. 



Dean's List 

This list is compiled each semester in the respective dean's 
offices. The Dean's List honors those undergraduate students who 
have met the following criteria: 

1. Ate full-time undergraduate degree candidates. Candidates 
for Certificate, Diploma, and Master's Degrees are not eligible. 

2. Have attained a minimum semester GPA of 3.60. 

3. Have received no grade lower than a "B" in any course. 

4. Have no grade of "I" or "F." 

5. Take at least 12 credits for a letter-grade (no "OP" or "OF") 
during that semester. 



Academic Review 

Academic Warning 

A student whose cumulative and semester GPAs are 2.0 or 
better is considered "in good standing." 

When a student, previously in good standing, receives a 
semester GPA between 1.0 and 2.0, the student will receive a letter 
of Academic Warning from the Dean's Office of their college on 
advisement from the Academic Review Committee (ARC). 
Students will be advised to achieve semester and cumulative GPAs 
of 2.0 during the next semester and may be advised to meet 
additional requirements in order to avoid further probationary 
action. A student who receives below a 1.0 GPA will automati- 
cally be placed on Initial Probation and will not receive an 
Academic Warning. 

Initial Probation 

If in the following semester the student is unable to achieve 
semester and cumulative GPAs of 2.0 in response to the conditions 
of Academic Warning, the student will receive a letter of Initial 
Probation from the Dean's Office on behalf of the ARC. The 
student will be advised that if a 2.0 GPA and/or orher conditions 
are not attained by the following semester, the student will be 
placed on Final Probation and may possibly lose financial aid 
accotding to federal regulations. 

Final Probation 

If a student fails to attain semester and cumulative GPAs of 2.0 
and/or othet conditions for a third semester, a letter of Final 
Probation will be sent advising the student that financial aid will 
not be granted for that semester and that, if a 2.0 cumulative GPA 
is not achieved by the end of the semester, the student may be 
dismissed from the College. 

Dismissal 

It is the University's prerogative to dismiss a student for a stated 
cause including: 1) failure to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0, 
2) failure to resolve academic probationary requirements specified 
by the Academic Review Committee, 3) failure to meet the GPA 
specified by the Academic Review Committee by the end of the 
second consecutive semester on probation, or 4) suspension or 
expulsion upon recommendation ot rhe Campus Srandards 
Committee fot student conduct unacceptable at the University. 

Graduate Probation and Dismissal Policies 

A cumulative GPA ot 3.00 is tequired tor good standing and tor 
graduation for graduate students. If a student is unable to achieve 
a semester or cumulative GPA ot 3.00, he or she will be placed on 
probation. If a 3.00 GPA and/or other conditions are not attained 
by the following semester, the student will be dismissed from the 
program. While on probation, a student will be ineligible to hold 
a graduate assistantship ot to receive a University supplemental 
grant-in-aid or scholarship. 



26 



Departmental Requirements 

In addition to the gtade point criteria listed in the above 
academic review process, students are also subject to departmental 
requirements which may include minimum satisfactory grades in 
major coursework. Students who fail to meet the minimum grade 
requirements in major coursework required by the department, 
school, or University program will be reviewed by the Academic 
Review Committee and may be advised to meet additional 
tequirements in order to avoid probation or dismissal. Each 
department or school will provide its students with written 
statements describing program requirements at the beginning of 
the academic year. 

Academic Grievance Procedure 

Students who have a concern or grievance regarding an academic 
mattet should first discuss their concern with the instructor or their 
advisor. If a satisfactory resolution is not reached, the chair of the 
department or the director of the school should be consulted. If the 
student believes that his/her concern requires further attention, 
he/she may bring the matter to the attention of the dean or 
assistant dean of the appropriate college or the Director of Liberal 
Arts. The college dean's office may convene an academic review 
committee or similar committee to review the concern. As a last 
resort, the dean's office may forward concerns to the Office of the 
Provost for final resolution. 



Change of Major/Degree Program/ 
College 

Students may request a change of major through the Office of 
the Registrar. Students are advised to initiate the Change of Major 
Petition prior to registration for the upcoming semester The 
petition requires the approval of the appropriate chairpersons or 
directots of both the former and the intended new depattment or 
school. Deadlines are June 1 for the fall semester and November 1 
for the spring semester. 

Change of Major forms are available in the Office of the Regis- 
ttar. Aftet completion of a change of major, students are advised 
to review their degree program requirements with their new 
academic advisor, the depattment chair or school director, and the 
dean of the appropriate college. The student will be required 
either to present a portfolio or to audition, as patt of the transfer 
requirements. 



Change of Address 

It is essential that students keep the Office of the Registrar 
informed of all current addresses: permanent, local, and billing. 
Change of Address forms are available in that office. Grades, 
schedules and other important information ate mailed to the 
addtesses provided by the student. 



Graduation Requirements 

It is the student's responsibility to complete the requirements of 
the degree program in which he or she is enrolled. 

To be certified for graduation, a student must fulfill all degree 
requirements, satisfy the minimum residency requirements (four 
semesters in residence, a minimum of 48 UArts credits, and 
completion of the final semester on campus), achieve a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 (C average) for the undergraduate degrees 
and a 3.0 (B average) for the graduate degrees, receive the approval 
of his/her department chairperson or director as having met all 
major requirements, including any and all requirements unique to 
the departments, and submit a graduation petition to the Office of 
the Registrar. Once the student has submitted a petition for 
graduation, and the Registrar has certified that student as having 
completed the degtee requirements, the degree will be awarded. 
The only exception is students pursuing the bachelor's degree in 
combination with the pre-certification concentration in Art 
Education, who may request a delay in the awarding of their degree 
until the completion of the ninth professional semester. 

Requirements for graduation must be approved by the Dean 
of the College. 



Graduate Degree Candidacy and 
Completion 

Midway through their respective program, graduate students' 
progress in their discipline and proposal for thesis will be reviewed 
by the appropriate Gtaduate Committee to formally determine 
whethet a student becomes a degree "candidate," and is ready to 
continue toward development and completion of the thesis or 
graduate project. 

Graduate students have up to seven years from matriculation 
date to complete a two-year master program, and up to six years, 
from matriculation date, to complete a one-year program. 



Graduation — Conferral of Degrees 
and Diplomas 

Students expecting to complete requirements for a degree within 
the year (December, May or August) are required to file a graduation 
petition in the Office of the Registrar at the November registration 
for the spring semester. The Office of the Registrar is responsible 
for certification of completion of tequirements for graduation. 

Degrees and diplomas are conferred once a year at the spring 
Commencement Exercises. For students who complete degree 
requirements in other terms, the transcript will be posted "degree 
granted" with either the date of December 30 for fall semester or 
August 31 for summer semester graduates. 



Change of Name 

Students must notify the Office of the Registtar of any change of 
name (through marriage, divorce, etc.) by bringing to the office an 
original legal document showing the change, which can be 
photocopied and kept on file. This is important in otder to 
maintain all of the student's records in one place, and prevents 
future confusion with transcript tequests, etc. 



Graduation with Honors 

Only candidates for the baccalaureate degree may graduate with 
honors if they achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.6. 



Class Attendance/Notice of 
Deficiency 

All students are expected to attend classes regularly and 
promptly and for the duration of the scheduled instructional 
time. Individual instructors will decide the optimum time for 
taking attendance and may penalize for habitual lateness or 
absence. Repeated, unexcused absences may result in a grade 
of "F" for a course. 

Instructors may advise a student whenever his or her perfor- 
mance in the course is considered unsatisfactory by use of a Notice 
of Deficiency in coursework. This form is filed with the Office of 
the Dean of the College, which will mail a copy to the student. 

Students who withdraw from the University must notify the 
Registrar's Office in writing. Nonattendance does not constitute an 
official withdrawal. 



Absences 

An "excused" absence is one which has received the prior consent 
of the instructor; is due to illness or emergency, appropriately 
documented by medical certificate, etc.; or due to attendance at an 
official school function with the approval of the appropriate 
Director, Chair, or Dean. All other absences are "unexcused." 

It is the responsibility of the student to arrange with his/her 
instructors to make up all missed work. Failure to do so will result 
in lowered grades. Students who are excessively absent will receive 
an "F" in the course. (Due to the ensemble nature of the courses, 
work in Acting Studio and musical ensembles cannot be made up.) 

Students must notify their college concerning absences involving 
private lessons and/or rehearsals involving other participants. 
Messages should be directed to the office of their director or 
department chair. 



Class/Lesson Cancellations or 
Lateness of Instructor 

Srudents must check every morning for notices regarding class or 
lesson changes. Such notices are posted in a designated area. If 
none is posted for the scheduled class or lesson and the instructor is 
not present, students are expected to wait for 10 minures for an 
hour-long class/lesson and 15 minutes for those of longer duration. 
In the event the instructor fails to appear within the 10-15 minute 
waiting period, students are to report to the appropriare School 
Director's or Department Chairperson's office, and may then leave 
without penalty. 



28 



Student Services 



John Klinzing 

Dean of Students 

1st Floor, 1500 Pine Street 

215-875-2229 

The Student Services Division consists of a group of concerned 
professionals committed to assisting students of the University in 
reaching their goals. The division provides students with opportu- 
nities to develop the interpersonal, leadership, organizational, and 
communications skills that will serve them on a personal and 
professional level. The office of the Dean of Students administers 
and coordinates student services and represents student concerns to 
campus groups, faculty, staff, and administration. 



Counseling Department 

Frequently, students have concerns about their emotional and 
social adjustment to college life. Their concerns range over the 
spectrum of issues: relationships, identity, career goals, achieve- 
ment, and roommates. To assist students in dealing with these 
needs, free counseling is available on an individual basis as well as 
from peer-support groups. 

Students in need of psychiatric or long-term psychological 
counseling may consult the counseling staff for assistance in 
contacting recommended resources available in the Philadelphia 
community. 

Workshops are also conducted to help students effectively 
deal with these personal, emotional, and social aspects of their 
college adjustment. 

As with medical emergencies, students are strongly encouraged to carry 
health insurance for psychological emergencies. 

All Medical and Counseling issues are strictly confidential. 
Brian Hainstock, Director 
Telephone: 215-875-5004 
1500 Pine Street, 1st floor 



Health Services 

The University maintains a health office with a Registered Nurse 
from Monday through Friday, during the academic year and for six 
weeks in the summer. First-aid is rendered, minor illness treated, 
and appropriate referrals to other health professionals are made. 
Health counseling is offered, emphasizing disease prevention, 
health maintenance, stress control, and wellness activities. 

Medical services are offered to UArts students by contractual 
agreement with Jefferson Family Medicine Associates (JFMA), a 
group of physicians who specialize in Family Medicine Practice. 
Students may use these doctors as they would use their family 
physician at home and need only a referral from the University's 
nurse to obtain an appointment. Besides treating acute and chronic 
illness, there are services for Drug Abuse, Sexually Transmitted 
Diseases, Birth Control, and Mental Health. Our students are not 
chatged for these office visits. There will be charges for these 
services if specialists are called in, if X-ray or laboratory work is 
needed, and for Emergency Room visits. 



In the event of an emergency after office hours, JFMA 
physicians are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and may 
be reached by phone. 

Jefferson Family Medicine Associates 
Telephone: 215-955-7190 
Location: 1100 Walnut Street, 5th floor 
Hours: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm M T W F 
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm Thursday 

If an ambulance is necessary, the student will be billed for this 
service. The cost of the Emergency Room visit is the responsibility 
of the student. 

Because of the high cost of medical care, The University of 
the Arts strongly recommends that students have adequate health 
insurance to cover any unforeseen illness or accident. For those 
students who are not enrolled in an insurance program of their 
parents and need a low cost insurance plan, the University 
offers The Sentry Student Security Plan. Information and bro- 
chures may be obtained at the Health Office or the Office of 
the Dean of Students. 

Health Records 

All entering students must have a physical exam, complete 
the Student Health Form, and file it with the Office of Health 
Services. In addition, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania insists 
that the University screen for immunization deficiencies of all first- 
time students. Students failing to meet these requirements will 
not be allowed to attend classes. 

Anne Whitehead, RN-C, Health Director 

Telephone: 215-875-1097 

Mezzanine of Anderson Hall 

333 South Broad Street, Room M-36 

Hours: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Student Activities/Special Events 

The Student Activities Office sponsors a variety of activities to 
complement the academic programs. Annual events include 
Halloween, a "battle of the bands," a Fall carnival, and concerts. 
Other events include a Sunday Night Film Series, an intramural 
volleyball team, ski trips, ice skating parties, and trips to New 
Yotk and Washington, D.C. 

Students play a major role in determining the character of the 
student life program. The University Student Council helps 
develop, plan, and implement activities that are a benefit to the 
student body. Students are welcomed and encouraged to join this 
organization which acts as the voice of the student body. 

Student organizations also contribute to campus activities 
through Earth Week celebrations, multicultural and international 
students' affairs, and Black History Month events. 

To encourage participation in sports and physical fitness, the 
University offers a partially subsidized membership to a local 
fitness center. For more information, contact the Student 
Activities Office. 

Jennifer R. Barr, Director 

Telephone: 215-875-2257 

1500 Pine Street, 1st floor, Room 101 



29 



Residential Life 

The University of the Arts has made a strong commitment to 
providing a supportive living/learning environment. Furness Hall 
is an historic, remodeled building which houses students. The 
residence features three- and four-person apartments with separate 
kitchen and bathroom facilities. The facility is located within the 
historic block of the University and is within a one-block walk of 
all University facilities. 

1500 Pine is a 10-story building acquired by the University in 
1989- Its furnished apartments all include a kitchen and bath. 
Two to five students are housed in studio, one and two-bedroom 
apartments. Laundry facilities are located within each building. 

All living environments are supervised by specially selected 
Resident Advisors. Advisors are upperclass students, trained in 
peer-advising and crisis intervention, who assist students in their 
adjustment to college as well as to life in rhe city. The entire 
residence program is supervised by rhe Director of Residential Life. 

Students will receive a housing packet outlining all facilities and 
accommodations after they are admitted to the University. 

Freshmen from outside the Philadelphia area are guaranteed 
housing if the office receives their contracts by June 1 . 

The office also assisrs students in finding off-campus accommo- 
dations through its off-campus housing services. Early inquiries 
regarding this service are strongly recommended. 
Glenn Smith, Director 
Telephone: 215-875-2205 
1500 Pine Street, 1st floor 



Meals 

Most student residences feature separate kitchens within each 
apartment. Students prepare their own meals according to their 
individual schedule and dietary preference. In addition, the 
University maintains a cafe that serves breakfast and lunch and an 
optional meal-plan. Snack and beverage vending machines are 
accessible at all times. 



Academic Support Services 

The Academic Support Services are available to all students as a 
supplement to their classroom instruction. They help students 
develop skills in reading, writing, and other academic and studio 
areas, including successful classroom strategies and improvement 
of study habits. 

Professional and peer tutoring are available to undergraduate 
students for general skills, and for specific subjects or courses. 
Computer-assisted academic instruction is also available. 
Throughout each semester, workshops are given that are designed 
to address students' academic and studio concerns and needs. 
Professional counseling is provided to enhance students' academic 
and personal strategies and skills. Further, specific support services 
are available to learning-disabled students to assist them in 
meeting academic requirements. 

Although students may be referred to the services by their Studio 
or Liberal Arts instructors, students are also welcome to avail 
themselves freely of these support services. 



Academic Achievement Program 

The Academic Achievement Program (AAP) is part of the 
Higher Education Opportunity Act of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. At The University of the Arts, the purpose of the 
program is to provide developmental maintenance and transition 
services ro students who need preparation in arts and academics. 
Students are selected to participate in the program because they are 
Pennsylvania residents with financial and/or academic needs. With 
the extra support of the AAP, these students in particular become a 
highly motivated, cohesive group whose determination to succeed 
is reflected in their retention and success rates. 

For more information, contact the Academic Achievement 
Program. 

Anita Tiambeng, Director 
Telephone: 215-875-2261 
1500 Pine Street, 1st floor 



Learning Specialist 

The University is committed to supporting students with 
learning disabilities to ensure that they have an equal opportunity 
to participate in University programs. The Learning Specialist 
provides individual support to students with documented learning 
disabilities and serves as a liaison between students and faculty 
when needed. Specifically, the Learning Specialist assists students 
in the areas of wriring, study skills, organizanon, word processing 
and advising. 

In addition to tutorial support, program and instructional 
accommodations may be implemented, if appropriate, to enable 
students to be as successful as possible in theit course work. It is 
the student's responsibility to request these services. 

To be eligible tor support services, a student must submit a copy 
of a recent psycho-educational evaluation that documents a learning 
disability and the need for specific accommodation(s). The 
evaluation should be performed by a licensed psychologist or 
learning disability specialist. For additional information, please 
contact: 

Marilyn Longo, Learning Specialist 

Telephone: 215-875-2254 

1500 Pine Street, 1st floor, Rm 103 

For assistance with another type of disability, students should 
contact the Dean of Students. 



30 



International Student Services 

In an effort to meet the special needs of the international 
student, the Student Services Division has developed a network of 
University personnel and offices to provide specialized services to 
students from abroad. These services are provided through 
Admissions, the International Student Advisor, the Director of 
Residential Life, and the Dean of Students. 

The Student Services Division has designated one member of 
the professional staff as the International Student Advisor. In 
addition to serving as liaison for students from abroad, the 
International Student Advisor will assist the student in securing 
necessary services provided through the support areas of the 
University. Special programs designed to help international 
students include: ESL tutorial assistance, Immigration Service 
advisement, and Orientation. 

Students interested in participating in the Residential Life 
program will deal directly with the Office of Residential Life, as do 
all other entering students. While there is not a distinct residen- 
tial ptogtam for students from abroad, special efforts are made 
by the Office of Residential Life to consider the needs of the 
international student. 

Likewise, the University Health Service, while meeting the needs 
of all enrolled students, also considers the support needs of 
inrernational students. All international students should take 
special note of the University's requirement that they maintain or 
secure appropriate medical insurance coverage, either through 
their family or through the medical insurance plan offered through 
the Univetsity. 

When in need of assistance, students are advised to contact either 
the International Student Advisor at 1500 Pine Street, Room 102, 
215-875-2262 or the Office of the Dean of Student Services at 
215-875-2229. 



General Information 



Campus Security 

The University has security personnel in all of its buildings to 
provide 24-hour protection. Every semester, identification catds are 
issued and validated by the Public Safety Office for all students, 
faculty, and employees. Public Safety officers may deny access to 
University facilities for anyone not carrying a validated identifica- 
tion card. Spot checking of identification cards occurs throughout 
the day. Complete identification checking occurs each weekday 
from 7:15 p.m. until 8 a.m.; aftet 12 noon on Saturday until 8 
a.m. on Monday; and when classes are not in session. A limited 
escort service is provided for students living on or near the 
University's campus. The general campus area is patrolled on a 
regular basis. 

Campus Security also provides programs to develop student 
awareness of safety and security concerns in an effort to isolate 
exposute to loss. The campus Security Department administers the 
Univetsity Safety Program to ensure the safety of all students, 
faculty, and staff. 

In the event of a family emergency about which you wish to 
contact your son or daughter at the University, call (215) 875-1010 
at any time of the day. Security personnel will take the necessary 
information, contact the appropriate offices to locate the student 
and deliver the message. 



School Closings 



In the event of inclement weather, students should listen to 
KYW or the local radio stations that announce official school 
closings. The Univetsity code number is 116. 



Career Services 

Career planning is important for all students. They are encour- 
aged to become acquainted with the Career Services Office during 
their freshman year. They receive assistance with career decisions 
through individual counseling tailoted to their specific needs. As 
students continue to develop academically and artistically, they 
receive help in creating or improving resumes and/or portfolios. 
Answers to questions about graduate school, internships, and career 
planning in general can also be found in the Cateet Services Office. 

The Career Office offers opportunities and assistance in finding 
full-time, part-time, and free-lance jobs while at The University of 
the Arts and after gtaduation. 

Marion Mendelson, Director 

Telephone: 215-875-5472 

Dorrance Hamilton Hall, 1st Hoot 



Automobiles 

Because parking in Philadelphia can become very costly, the 
University discourages students from bringing automobiles. 

Veterans 

As an accredited degtee-granting institution, the University is 
approved for the training of veterans. Information about education 
benefits may be obtained from any VA office. 



31 



Code of Conduct 



The University's regulations governing nonacademic student 
conduct safeguard the particular values and common welfare of 
the student body, and promote the best possible environment for 
study. Membership in the University is regarded as a privilege, 
and the student is expected to exercise self-discipline and good 
judgment. By registration, the student acknowledges the 
University's authotity to define and enforce standards of acceptable 
conduct. Adjudication of alleged student misconduct is the 
responsibility of the Office of the Dean of Student Services. A 
committee on campus standards, representing the student body, 
faculty, and administration, serves in an advisory capacity to the 
Dean. The Campus Standards Committee may recommend 
suspension or expulsion for student conduct considered unaccept- 
able at the University 

A complete set of rules and procedures is contained in the 
current code for student rights, responsibilities, and conduct. A 
copy of the Student Code of Conduct is available in the Office of 
the Dean of Student Services. 

University policy provides that a student may be required to 
withdraw from the University for psychological/health reasons. A 
student who is withdrawn under this policy is one whose behavior 
necessitates a leave from the University community. 



Academic Honesty/Integrity Policy 

The University of the Arts does not condone any form of 
academic dishonesty, whether it involves cheating on exams, 
plagiarism, or similar types of behavior. Lack of knowledge of 
citation procedures, for example, is an unacceptable explanation for 
plagiarism. Penalty may include a reprimand, a failing grade for a 
particular assignment, a failing grade in the course, and/or 
suspension from the University. 



Smoking Policy 

The University of the Arrs maintains a smoke-free environment. 
Smoking is prohibited in the studio and office areas of all buildings. 
Smoking is permitted only in ARCO Park, rhe Furness Courtyard, 
and on designated floors in the dormitories. Smoking is prohibited 
in dormitory hallways and elevarors. 



Sexual Harassment Policy 

Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination and will not be 
tolerared. This type of harassment may be blatant but is often 
subtle. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and 
orher verbal or written communications or physical conduct of a 
sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: 

Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or 
implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment 
or academic standing. 

Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is 
used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting 
such individual, or 

Such conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with an 
individual's work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, 
ot offensive working environment. 

Violation of the University Sexual Harassment policy will 
subject the accused to disciplinary acrion as stated in the Universiry 
Code of Conduct, Section X. 

Any student who believes he/she has been the victim of sexual 
harassment should bring the matter to the attention of the Dean of 
Students. The incident should be reported as soon as possible after 
the incident has occurred so that it may receive prompt attention. 



Campus Alcohol and Drug Policy 

In supporr of the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 
The University of the Arts prohibirs the unauthorized possession 
and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages on University premises. 

The Universiry prohibits the illegal and/or unauthorized 
manufacture, sale, or delivery, holding, offering for sale, possession 
or use of any controlled substance as defined undet the Pennsylva- 
nia Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, 35 P.S. 
Section 780-102, the Uniform Controlled Subsrances Act, the 
Uniform Narcoric Drug Act, or the Federal Food, Drug and 
Cosmetic Act, 21 U.S.C. Section 301 et seq., on University properry. 

Such controlled substances for the purposes ot this policy shall 
include but not be limited to alcoholic beverages, narcotics, 
hypnotics, sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants, hallucinogens, and 
other similar known or habit-forming drugs and/or chemicals as 
defined under the afotesaid laws. 



Student Code 



Part One - Student Rights, 
Responsibilities and Conduct 

I. Definitions 

As used in this Code, the following tetms shall have the 
following meanings: 

A. "Univetsity" means The Univetsity of the Arts and, 
collectively, those responsible for its control and operation. 

B. "Student" means all persons whose primary relationship to 
the University is as a student, presently registered at the Univer- 
sity, either full-time or part-time, pursuing undergraduate or 
graduate studies. 

C. "Instructor" means any person hired by the University to 
conduct classroom or studio activities. 

D. "Student organizarion" means a group of students who have 
complied with the requirements of the University for formal 
recognition as set fotth in Section V of this Code. 

E. "Group" means a number of students who have not 
complied with the requirements for formal recognition as a 
student organization. 

F. "Student media" means either an organization whose primary 
purpose is to publish/prepare and distribute any publication/ 
presentation on the University campus or a regular publication of 
any student otganization. 

G. "Custodian" means the administrative officer of the 
University with applicable supervisory authority. 

H. "Shall" is used in the imperative sense. 

I. "May" is used in the permissive sense. 

J. All other terms have their natural meaning unless the context 
dictates otherwise. 

II. Student Rights 

A. This Code recognizes that the students of the University, 
as members of an academic community, are enrirled to the rights 
set forth hetein, including, to the extent provided by applicable 
law, the right to be free from discrimination and harassment 
based on gender, religion, race, national origin, creed, disability, 
or sexual preference. 

B. The University reserves the right to change the provisions 

of this Code as it deems necessary. In addition, except to the extent 
expressly provided herein, the Code is not intended to deal with 
academic issues, financial obligations, mental health problems or 
residence assignmenrs: the University retains its traditional powers 
in these and all other areas of campus life. 



III. Campus Expression 

A. Discussion and expression of all views are permitted 
within the University, subject to requirements for the maintenance 
of order. Supporr for any cause by orderly means which do not 
disrupt the operation of the University is permitted. The Univer- 
sity retains the right to act to protect the safety of individuals, the 
prorection of property and the continuity of the educational process. 

B. Students, student groups and student organizations may invite 
and hear any speaker of their choosing, subject to the requirements, 
set forth in Section VI below, for use of University facilities. 

C. All University students have the right to express their views, 
both individually and collectively, on issues relating to University 
policy, through the means provided by the Budget Planning 
Committee, the Educational Policy Committee, and the Student 
Affairs Committee of the University Senate. 

IV. Student Organizations 

A. Student organizarions may be established within the 
University for any legal purpose, upon recognition by the Office of 
Student Activities. To apply for recognition, the proposed 
organization musr submit a list of its officers and a copy of its 
constitution and bylaws. Where a proposed srudent organization is 
affiliated with an extramural organization, that organization's 
constitution and bylaws must also be submitted to the Office of 
Student Activities. 

B. Any group which has been in existence for ar least one 
academic year musr apply for recognition as a student organization 
in order to continue to receive benefits from the University. 

C. Recognition of a student organization by the Universiry does 
nor imply approval by the University of the aims or objectives of 
the organization. 

D. After recognition, all amendments to a student organization's 
constitution or bylaws must be submitted to the Office of Student 
Activities four weeks prior ro the effective date. 

E. Any organization which engages in illegal activities on or off 
campus may have sanctions imposed upon it, including withdrawal 
of University recognirion. 

F. Membership in all campus organizations shall be open, within 
the limits of their facilities, to any member of the University 
community who is willing to subscribe to the stated aims and 
objectives of the organization and to meet its stated obligations. 

G. Discriminarion by any student organization on the basis of 
gender, religion, race, creed, national origin, disability, or sexual 
preference is prohibited. 



33 



V. University Facilities 

University facilities may be assigned to organizations, groups, and 
individuals within the University community for regular business 
meetings, for social programs, and for programs open to the public. 

A. The Office of Facilities Management shall have the responsi- 
bility for assigning University space to campus organizations, 
groups and individuals. 

B. The individual, group, or organization requesting space must 
inform the University of the general purpose of the function, so 
that the University can schedule an appropriate location. 

C. Allocation of space shall be based on the demonstrated needs 
of the organization, group or individual, as determined by the 
Office of Facilities Management. 

D. Preference may be given to programs designed for audiences 
consisting primarily of members of the University community. 

E. Conditions may be imposed to regulate the timeliness of the 
requests, to determine the appropriareness of the space assigned, to 
regulate time and use, and to insure proper maintenance. 

F. Charges may be imposed for any special services required in 
connecrion with the event. 

G. Physical abuse of assigned facilities will require restitution 
for all damages and may result in limitation on future allocations of 
space to offending parties. 

VI. Student Rights and Residence Halls 

A. Resident students can have a representative voice in 
making recommendations with respect to the policies of the 
University's residence program. (Additional policies of the 
residence hall contract.) 

B. The University shall, to the extent set forth herein, respect 
each resident student's right to privacy. The University may 
conduct room searches of resident students in good standing only 
1) with the consent of the student; 2) in conjunction with legal 
authorities who have obtained a search warrant; or 3) to insure 
compliance with University regulations, as reflected in the 
Residence Contract. Access to rooms, unless for an emergency, 
apparenr breach of University regulations, or conditions beyond the 
control of rhe University, shall be announced 24 hours in advance. 
If rhe University determines that a danger ro rhe safety of the 
Universiry, rhe residents, or the community exists, consent to enter 
and search a room will be considered implicit. 

C. When a resident student requests maintenance service for his 
room consent to enter shall be considered implicit. Such service 
calls will be announced 24 hours in advance whenever possible. 



VII. Access to Student Records 

In 1974, the Congress of the United States enacted the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Public Law 93-380, as 
amended, setting out requirements designed to protect the privacy 
of students. Specifically, the statute governs 1: access to records 
maintained by certain educational institutions and agencies, and 2: 
the release of such records. In brief, the statute provides that such 
institutions must provide students access to official records directly 
related to themselves and an opportunity for a hearing to challenge 
such records; that institutions must obtain the written consent of 
the student before releasing personally identifiable data from 
records to other than specified exceptions; and that students must 
be notified of these rights. 

As such, all students of The University of the Arts have the 
following rights with regard to educational records maintained by 
the University: 

A. The right to teview educational records which are maintained 
by the University. These records generally include all records of a 
personally identifiable nature; however, they exclude the financial 
records of parents and confidential letters and statements of 
recommendation received prior to June 1, 1975. 

B. Records which have been created or maintained by a 
physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, or other recognized profes- 
sional or paraprofessional while an individual has been a student at 
the University, are not available for review; however, the student 
does have the right to select a physician or other appropriare 
professional, at personal expense, to review these records on the 
student's behalf. 

C. University educational records are maintained by: 

1 . Office of the Registrar 

2. Office of the Dean of Students 

3. Financial Aid Office 

4. Finance Office 

5. Office of Continuing Studies 

6. Some educational records may also be maintained by the 
Dean of the College, academic major departments, the 
Learning Skills Center, and the AAP Office. 

D. The Universiry may not generally release any information 
outside the University which is maintained in educational records 
without prior consent or waiver. However, the University does 
have the righr ro release the following information: 

1. Name 

2. Address 

3- Telephone listing 

4. Date and place of birth 

5. Major field of study 

6. Participation in officially recognized activities 

7. Dates of attendance 

8. Degrees and awards received 

9. The most recent previous educational institution 
attended by the student. 

If a student does not wish any of this information made public, 
either in a directory of students or in any other manner, the student 
must inform the Office of the Registrar-no later than the end of the 
second week of classes each semester-of the information not to be 
released. 



34 



E. The permanent record maintained by the University 
will consist of: 

1. Directory information as noted above 

2. Application for admission 

3. Applicant's secondary school records 

4. Cumulative University of the Arts records of grades, 
credits, grade point average, and academic actions 

5. Correspondence (or copies thereof) re: admission, 
enrollment, registration, probation 

6. Student petitions 

7. Letters of reference/recommendation dated 
after January 1, 1975 

8. Disciplinary actions 

9. Departmental appraisals and evaluations of student progress 

F. The permanent records of the University do not include: 

1. Parents' and students' confidential financial documents 

2. Counseling psychologists' files 

3. Health Office files 

4. Faculty and staff memoranda/files retained for 
personal/ professional use 

G. Requests to inspect and review records may be made by 
completing an "Access Request for Educational Records," which is 
available in the Office of the Registrar. Upon receipt of request an 
appointment will be made to review records within 7 days. 

H. If a student believes any information in the file is inaccurate 
or misleading, that individual may request, in writing, the 
custodian of the record to amend, delete, or otherwise modify the 
objectionable material. If said request is denied, the student may 
request that a hearing be held to further pursue the request. At 
this hearing, the student may be represented by a person of his or 
her choice, if so desired. If after the hearing, the request to 
amend is again denied by the University, the student has the right 
to place in the file a statement or other explanatory document, 
provided that such statements or documents relate solely to the 
disputed information. 

I. If a student believes that any of his or her rights hereunder 
have been violated by the University, he or she should make such 
facts known to the Dean ot Students in writing. If the Dean of 
Students does not resolve the matter and the student still feels that 
his or her rights have been violated, he or she may so inform the 
Department of Education in writing. 

J. Release of information from permanent records to outside 
parties requires the student's explicit consent. Those exceptions 
which do not require the student's consent are: 

1. Compilation of general enrollment data for reports 
required by U.S. Government and Commonwealth 

of Pennsylvania authorities 

2. Participatory information-sharing with educational service 
associations such as the College Scholarship Service, the 
American Council on Education 

3. Information about an individual student in the event of a 
personal emergency which is judged to threaten the health 
and/or safety of that student 

4. Compliance with judicial orders and lawfully 
issued subpoenas 



5. Response to inquiries by parents of dependent students 
(see section K) 

6. Reference by appropriate University of the Arts' faculty 
and professional staff 

Any release of information as outlined above which identifies an 
individual student and requires that student's consent will be 
logged in his or her permanent record. 

K. As provided by the Act, the Office of the Dean of Students 
will respond to valid requests by parents of dependent students for 
grades and related cumulative information. Although the student's 
consent is not required, he or she will be informed that such a 
request has been made. 

A dependent student is defined as one who is declared a depen- 
dent by his or her parents for income-tax purposes. The University, 
however, will continue to mail semester grade reports and actual 
transcripts of records directly to the student at his/her permanent 
address. 

VIII. Recruiting on Campus 

Any job-recruitment agency or employer desiring to tecruit at 
the University must register with the Office of Career Development 
and agree in writing not to discriminate in its recruiting and hiring 
on the basis of gender, race, national origin, creed, disability, or 
sexual preference, to the extent provided by applicable law. 

IX. Violation of University Standards 

The University reserves the right to impose discipline for any 
misconduct which adversely affects the pursuit of the University's 
stated purposes and objectives by the University community. In 
addition, the specific types of misconduct listed below may subject 
a student to disciplinary action by the University: 

A. Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic 
program at the University; 

B. Furnishing false information to the University with the 
intent to deceive; 

C. Unauthorized use of, or misuse, including mutilation 
and/or defacing, of educational materials, University records or 
University property; 

D. Forgery, alteration, unauthorized use or misuse of any official 
University document, name, symbol, record, or student or faculty 
identification card; 

E. Theft, misappropriation, vandalism, grossly negligent 
damage or arson to any University property or private property of 
any member of the University community or any other person on 
University property; 

F. Threat of, or actual infliction of, bodily harm or physical 
abuse or injury to any member of the University community or any 
other person on University property; 

G. Physical obstruction or verbal disruption of teaching, 
research, disciplinary proceedings or authorized University 
programs, events, functions or activities; 



3.5 



H. Obstructing access to any University building or other 
facility; unauthorized use or occupation of any University meeting 
facility, classroom, common indoor or outdoor area, faculty office, 
or any other component of the Univetsity physical plant or property; 

I. Use, possession, distribution, transfer or sale of illegal 
narcotics, hallucinogenic agents or abusive drugs anywhere on 
University property; 

J. Construction of or actual possession of firearms or other inher- 
ently dangerous weapons or explosive materials, including fireworks; 

K. Violation of any criminal statutes of the United States or 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or ordinances of the City of 
Philadelphia, which occurs on University property or which 
directly affects the University community; 

L. Resisting Campus Security Guards acting in the proper 
performance of their duties on University property; 

M. Failing to repay, by agreed deadlines, monies borrowed from 
official student loan funds; 

N. Failure by a resident student to abide by the University 
Residence Hall Contract and any other rules and regulations of the 
University applicable to tesident students; 

O. Failing, after a warning, to wear clothing or foot covering 
while attending classes or utilizing any University facility; 

P. Smoking on campus property, except in designated areas. 

Q. Consuming food or beverages in areas designated 
"No Food or Beverages"; 

R. Unauthorized consumption, possession, distribution, transfer 
or sale of alcoholic beverages anywhere on University property; 

S. Failing to comply with the directions or instructions of 
University officials, relating the provisions of this Code or other 
regulations which the University may adopt; and 

T. Soliciting or assisting another student to do any act 
which could subject him to discipline for violation of University 
standards or regulations. 

X. Disciplinary Actions 

The University may impose discipline on a student for a 
violation of any University standard according to the procedures set 
forth in Part Two of this Code. The penalties for a violation are set 
forth below. One or more of the listed penalties may be imposed at 
the discretion of the University. The maximum penalty is 
dismissal from the University. 

A. Warning: A notice to the student orally or in writing, that 
continuation or repetition of conduct found to be a violation may 
be cause for additional disciplinary action. A copy of a written 
warning is retained by the Office of the Dean of Students until the 
student leaves the University; it does not become a part of the 
student's file. 



B. Censure: A written reprimand which states that more severe 
disciplinary measures will be imposed for a subsequent violation of 
University standard or regulation within a stated period of time. A 
censure becomes part of the student's file for the period of enroll- 
ment plus one year. 

C. Fine: A money penalty, intended as a deterrent, to cover the 
costs of replacing physical property of the University damaged or 
stolen by the student. The payment of any fine by a student shall 
in no way limit the right of the University to seek complete 
restitution through civil proceedings. 

D. Other: The assignment of appropriate task for the purpose of 
resitution and/or exclusion from participation in privileged or 
extracurricular activities for a period not to exceed one year. 

E. Disciplinary Probation' Disciplinary probation is an official 
written notice to a student that violations of University regulations 
or policies, or patterns of behaviot contrary to University standards 
or expectations, will not be tolerated. Repeated offenses will result 
in more severe action, including possible suspension or expulsion 
from the University. Disciplinary Probation lasts for a stated 
period of time and a copy of the probation notice is maintained in a 
disciplinary file in the Office of the Dean of Students until a 
student leaves the University. 

F. Suspension: Suspension is the termination of student status 
and separation from the University until a specified date. Suspen- 
sion means the loss of all tights and privileges normally accompa- 
nying student status. Suspension is imposed in instances of serious 
misconduct. Upon termination of the period of suspension, the 
student shall be considered for readmission in compliance with 
academic standards then in effect, provided the student is academi- 
cally eligible for re-admission. Suspension is recorded in a 
disciplinary file in the Office of the Dean of Students. 

G. Expulsion: Expulsion is a petmanent termination of student 
status and petmanent separation from the University. Expulsion is 
imposed in instances of the most serious misconduct or in instances 
of continued serious misconduct usually following the imposition 
of probation or suspension. Expulsion is recorded as dismissal from 
the University on the transcript. Expulsion is recorded in a 
disciplinary file in the Office of the Dean of Students. 



Part Two - The Hearing Process 

I. Initiation of Disciplinary Proceedings 

A. Charges of a violation of the Code may be filed against a 
student, student group or student organization by any member of 
the University community. When a complaint is filed against a 
student otganization, the appropriate officers shall act as represen- 
tatives in the disciplinary proceedings. 

B. The charges shall be filed in writing with the Office of the 
Dean of Students. Upon such filing, the Office of the Dean of 
Students shall notify the student of the charges and of the proce- 
dures to be followed. 



36 



C. The office of the Dean of Students shall make a preliminary 
investigation of all charges. If the Dean determines that there is no 
substance to the charges, they will be dropped. The person charged 
and the complainant will be so informed. 

D. If the Dean's preliminary investigation indicates that the 
charges warrant only a warning, the Dean of Students or his 
designee shall meet with the student to discuss the chatges and 
issue a warning. The issuance of such warning shall terminate the 
complaint procedure. 

E. If the Dean's preliminary investigation indicates sufficient 
evidence to warrant penalties beyond a warning, the Dean of 
Students or his designee shall prepare and serve on the student 
a written complaint setting forth the nature, time and place 

of the violation. 

F. Service of the complaint shall be in person or by certified 
mail, return receipt requested, on the student, with date, time, and 
place of hearing set out. 

G. The student shall have the right to file countercharges 
against the party who fired the charges against him/her. 

H. If more than one charge arises from the same incident, all 
such charges shall be heard at the same time. 

I. The student shall be given the opportunity of defending his/ 
her conduct before the Campus Standards Committee within two 
academic weeks of receipt of the complaint OR of having the 
charge resolved by the Dean of Students in an administrative 
hearing within one academic week of receipt of the complaint, 
unless the Dean determines that the complaint must be handled by 
the Campus Standards Committee. 

II. Administrative Hearings 

A. If a student wishes to acknowledge that he/she has violated a 
standard or regulation as charged and waives his/her right to a 
formal hearing before the Campus Standatds Committee, he/she 
may sign a waiver to that effect. Upon the presentation of this 
waiver to the Dean of Students, he/she or his/her designee shall 
determine the appropriate disciplinary action and impose it. 

B. If a student wishes to deny that he/she has violated a standard 
or regulation as charged, but waives his/her right to a formal 
hearing before the Campus Standards Committee, he/she may sign 
a written waiver to that effect. Upon presentation of this waiver to 
the Dean of Students, he/she or his/her designee shall hear the 
evidence by and against the student. 

C. At the hearing, the student shall have the right: 

1 . to be present; 

2. to be informed of the evidence against him/her; 

3. to present evidence on his/her behalf; 

4. to have adequate opportunity to respond to 
the evidence; and 

5. to have the assistance of an advisor of his/her choice who 
is a member of the University community. 

Note: The University and the student both may retain an attorney 
at his/her own expense and have that attorney present provided 
that neither attorney assumes an active role in the hearing itself. 



D. If, after the administrative hearing, the Dean of Students or 
his/her designee determines that the student warrants only a 
warning, the warning will be given by the Dean and the matter 
shall be deemed closed. 

E. If, after the administrative heating, the Dean of Students or 
his/her designee determines that the violation warrants censure, 
probation, suspension, the levying of a fine, or other discipline, 
such discipline shall be applied, and the student shall be informed 
in writing of such discipline. 

F. If, after the administrative hearing, the Dean of Students or 
his/her designee determines that the student has not violated a 
standard or regulation, he/she will inform the student and the 
complainant, and the matter shall be deemed closed. 

III. The Campus Standards Committee 

A. Power: The power to review complaints or charges against 
students, student groups or student organizations by a member of 
the University community is vested primarily in the Campus 
Standards Committee. This committee serves as a recommending 
body to the Dean of Students. 

B. Membership: The Campus Standards Committee shall be 
composed of eight members: 

1 . four students designated by the Dean of Students from a 
list of nominees submitted by the Student Affairs Committee; 

2. two administrative staff designated by the Dean of Students 
from a list of nominees submitted by the Student Affairs 
Committee; and 

3. two faculty members designated by the Dean of Students. 

C. Chairperson: The Chairperson shall be chosen by the Dean of 
Students. The Chairperson shall serve as an ex-officio member, 
voting only in the event of a tie. 

D. Jurisdiction: 

1. The Campus Standards Committee shall be the principal 
body to hear charges of student misconduct or noncompliance 
with the Code. 

2. The Campus Standards Committee shall have the authority 
to prescribe supplementary rules of procedure consistent with 
requirements contained herein. 

3. The Campus Standards Committee shall have the authority 
to develop and recommend to the Dean of Students 
appropriate policies, statements and revisions to the Code 
and to any other official University document that pertains 

to student welfare. 

E. Hearings: 

1. An action before the Campus Standards Committee shall 
commence by notification from the Office of the Dean of 
Students to the Chairperson of the Committee. 

2. In order to conduct a hearing, there must be a quorum, 
which consists of 50% of the membership of the Committee. 
Majority, as used in this Code, means a majority of a quorum. 

3. If, after proper notice of the complaint and the date, time, 
and place of hearing, the charged student fails to appear, and 
the majority of the Campus Standards Committee is satisfied 



37 



that the student had adequate notice and no valid excuse for 
his/her nonappearance, the Committee may then hold the 
hearing without the student. 

4. The student charged may be assisted or represented during 
the proceedings by an advisor of his/her choice from within 
the University community. 

5. Prior to each hearing, any member of the Committee who 
has a particular bias, ethical conflict, or personal relationship 
with or animosity against the charged student or complainant 
which he/she believes would prevent him/her from rendering 
an objective recommendation shall excuse him/herself from 
participating in that hearing. 

6. The hearing shall be conducted in a manner to do 
substantial justice and shall not be unduly restricted by legal 
rules of procedure or evidence. The Chairperson shall take 
notes of the evidence and testimony presented. 

7. Only Committee members, the charged students, their 
advisors, complainants and witnesses, if any, and the Dean of 
Students, shall be allowed to attend the hearing. 

8. If two or more are charged within the same complaint, 
individual hearings shall be permitted when requested by 
any of them. 

9. The Chairperson shall open the hearing by stating the 
charges and the procedures to be followed. 

10. The Chairperson shall ask the student whether or not he/ 
she has violated each standard or regulation charged. 

11. The complainant shall present his/her evidence first, 
including any witnesses he/she may have. 

12. The charged student shall then present his/her evidence, 
including witnesses, if any. 

13. Witnesses shall not be sworn. Any witness may be 
questioned by any party to the action and by any member 
of the Committee. 

14. The complainant and the charged student (or his/her 
advisor, if desired) may offer summations. 



mail, 1) whether he/she accepts the Committee's 
recommendation and the discipline recommended, if any 
and 2) if the student is found guilty of the charges, the 
discipline, if any, that will be imposed by the Dean of 
Students. The Dean shall also inform the Committee of 
his decision. 

8. A copy of the Committee's written findings and conclusion 
of the Dean's decision shall be placed in the student's file, 
and shall remain there for the period of the student's 
enrollment plus one year. 

G. Appeal: 

1 . The student shall have the right to appeal the decision 
of the Campus Standards Committee and the discipline 
imposed by the Dean of Students or his/her designee, to the 
Office of the President within ten calendar days of the receipt 
of notice of the imposition of discipline by the Dean of 
Students of his/her designee. 

2. The appeal shall be in writing and shall be a reasonable 
expression of the student's desire to appeal the decision. 

3. Upon receipt of such notice of appeal, the President shall 
advise the Campus Standards Committee and the Dean of 
Students or his designee that such an appeal has been filed. 
The Committee and The Dean shall then make the record of 
the proceedings available to the President. 

4. In his discretion, the President may give the student an 
opportunity to present additional information and his/her 
reasons for appeal, and may request additional information 
from the Dean of Students or his designee. 

5. Upon consideration of the record and any additional 
information requested, the President shall make a final 
decision and insttuct the Dean of Students to impose 
appropriate discipline, if any. 

6. The decision of the President is final. No further appeals 
may be taken. 



F. Committee Deliberations and Recommendations: 

1. At the completion of the testimony, the members of the 
Committee shall retire to anothet room or clear the hearing 
room in order to deliberate. 

2. No evidence other than that received at the hearing and 
rhat contained in the student's file shall be consideted by 
the Committee. 

3. Confidentiality shall be maintained by all participants. 
Cases shall be discussed only while the Committee is 

in session. 

4. Recommendations in all cases shall be detetmined by 
a simple majority vote. 

5. Within three academic days after the conclusion of the 
hearing, the Committee shall prepare in writing findings of 
fact and conclusions as to the validity of the charges, and a 
recommendation for appropriate action, and transmit rhat 
information to the Dean of Students. 

6. Within that same time, the Committee shall notify the 
charged student by letter delivered in person or by certified 
mail, of the Committee's recommended action to the Dean 
of Students. 

7. Within three academic days of receipt of the Committee's 
recommendation, the Dean of Students shall notify the 
charged student by letter, delivered in person or by certified 



H. Administrative Suspension: 

1. If a charge has been filed against a student, the status of 
the chatged student within the Universiry shall not be altered 
prior to a hearing and action by the Dean unless 1) the 
continued presence of the student on the University campus 
shall be found by the Dean of Students in his judgment to 
constitute a serious threat to the student or the community; 
or 2) the off-campus conduct of the student is deemed by 

the Dean ot Students to be deletetious to the student's welfare 
or to that of the University community. 

2. Where the Dean ot Students concludes that either ot such 
situations exist, he/she may, in his discretion, place the 
student on probation or suspension pending final disposition 
of the charges against him/her. 

3. The administrative suspension and probation recognized 
in this Section are in addition to the Univetsity's right to 
impose emergency withdrawal on a student, pursuant to the 
University's Policy on Emergency Withdrawal (copies 
available in the Office of the Dean of Students). The Dean of 
Students shall have the sole disctetion to determine whether to 
substitute the ptocedutes ot emergency withdrawal for the 
procedures of this Code for student misconduct. 



38 



University Libraries 

Stephen Bloom 

Director of University Libraries 
Greenfield Library, 1st floor Anderson Hall 
215-875-1013 

The University Libraries are central to the educational mission of 
the University, enabling and enriching every student's professional 
preparation and general education. Through the services the 
Library staff provides, and through the materials it collects or to 
which it provides access, the University Libraries seek to enhance 
teaching and improve learning, and to educate students in the arts 
to be successful and productive users of information. 

The Libraries of the University of the Arts include the following 
three campus locations: 

The Albert M. Greenfield Library, on the first floor and lower 
level of Anderson Hall (333 South Broad Street), is one of the finest 
art and design school libraries in the country. For most areas of 
interest, it is the main library for the campus, containing matetials 
in many formats related to art and design, dance, theater, film and 
TV, liberal arts, and other general subjects. The Greenfield Library 
also houses the Libraries' administrative offices and technical 
services operation, as well as the Libraries' Picture Resource File, 
University Archives and the Libraries' Special Collections, with 
particular strengths in book arts and textiles. 

The Music Libtary, on the third floor of the Merriam Theater 
Building (250 South Broad Street), is a specialized library serving 
academic programs and interests in music. Its holdings and 
services are also useful for students and faculty studying or needing 
information about dance, musical theater, and other areas related to 
music. The Music Library contains a listening facility for recorded 
sound in addition to general reading areas and specialized com- 
puter-workstations. 

The Slide Collection, in Anderson Hall, adjacent to the lower 
level of the Greenfield Library, houses a large collection of 35 mm 
slides relating to subjects of interest to all University visual and 
performing arts programs. Light tables and slide carousels may be 
used for viewing the Library's and one's own slides. 

The total holdings of the Libraries are more than 90,000 books 
and bound periodicals, 14,000 music scores, 110,000 mounted and 
encapsulated pictures, 160,000 slides, and 16,000 items of 
recorded music in lp and cd formats. The library also has a 
growing collection of audiovisual materials in videocassette, 
videodisc, and multimedia formats. Listening and viewing 
facilities, CD-ROM indexes, multimedia computer workstations, 
and Internet/World Wide Web access are available in addition to 
general reading facilities. 



Information about the Libraries' collections is available through 
an on-line computer catalog that is accessible from terminals in the 
Greenfield and Music Libraries or by dialing into the system from 
outside the library with a computer and modem. Information can 
be searched by author, title, keyword, subject, and call number. 
Once a record is found, information including its shelf location and 
whether or not it is available for circulation is displayed. Tradi- 
tional card catalogs are also maintained for some specialized 
collections which have not yet been added to the automated system. 
Other computerized reference tools are also available, including 
electronic multimedia encyclopedias. CD-ROM periodical indexes 
have been enhanced with information about Library holdings. 

Reference assistance and course reserves are available at every 
University Library location. The Libraries also provide a wide 
range of other information services such as interlibrary loan, 
class instruction in research techniques and library use, and 
advanced electronic research capabilities including discounted on- 
line database searching for students and Internet access. The 
Library maintains reciprocal use arrangements with other nearby 
academic libraries. 

Albert M. Greenfield Library 
215-875-1111 

Music Library 
215-875-2248 

Slide Collection 
215-875-1006 



39 



Academic Computing 

Ken Kramar 

Supervisor of Academic Computing Labs 
Mezzanine of Anderson Hall 
215-875-1094 

The department of Academic Computing is dedicated to the 
support and integration of appropriate digital technology within 
the University's academic programs. The department maintains 
nine separate computer labs equipped with industry standard 
software located throughout the campus. In addition to two 
word processing labs and five high-end graphics labs using 
enhanced Power Macintosh's, the University hosts a New Media 
Center comprised of two dual-platform digital laboratories that 
enable the integration of animation, graphics, text, music and 
sound. The University is proud to be a member of the New Media 
Centers, a group of the nation's leading academic institutions 
and technology corporations dedicated to the advancement of 
technology in education 

Open access to the computer labs is available daily to facilitate 
individual exploration and to ensure adequate time outside of 
class for independent work. Students are not required to bring 
personal computers, but may find it beneficial to have their own 
depending on their major, individual schedule and needs. 
Students interested in purchasing their own computers are welcome 
to contact the Academic Computing office for advice on hardware 
and software selection and information on the educational 
discounts available. The University does not accept responsibility 
for the installation, maintenance, repair or security of student 
owned computers. 



Continuing Education 
Programs 

Bobbie Lippman 

Director 

Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 

215-875-3350 

The Center for Continuing Studies at The University of the Arts 
is dedicated to providing a program of diverse educational 
opportunities. Classes are offered for credit and noncredit in 
various formats to accommodate the needs and schedules of our 
students. Courses in fine arts, crafts, computers, creative writing, 
and music industry are available in the fall, spring and summer. 
Selected courses from the degree program are made available on a 
non-matriculated basis through Continuing Studies. In addition, 
there are summer programs for pre-college and post-college 
populations. Saturday programs are offered for young artists from 
grades 1-12 during the academic year. 

The Professional Institute for Educators (formerly the New 
Studies Center) was launched in 1973 to serve the educational and 
cultural needs of professionals in the field of education. A full 
program of non-matriculated credit courses are offered for teachers 
interested in continuing their education. Most classes meet on 
weekends. There is also a unique Travel/Study program designed 
to provide educational travel seminars. 

The Dance Extension program offers noncredit courses for 
teens and adults from beginning through advanced levels. The 
program offers a wide variety of courses, taught by highly 
qualified instructors. 

Catalogs are available for all programs offered. Please refer to 
them for specific listings and registration procedures. Please note 
that the degree programs at the University have specific course and 
curriculum requirements. Courses taken for credit in the Continu- 
ing Studies programs are rarely accepted by the degree programs 
and will be evaluated at the time of admission to determine, which, 
if any, may be accepted. For additional information, please contact: 

Continuing Education 
215-875-3350 

Professional Institute for Educators 
215-875-3360 

Saturday School and 
Pre-College Summer Programs 
215-875-3355 

Dance Extension 
215-875-2269 



40 



Undergraduate Degree 
Requirements 

Understanding the degree requirements is crucial to the smooth 
progression to gtaduation. Students are encouraged to consult with 
their academic advisors regularly to ensure that they are making 
appropriate progress toward their degree and to consult their 
academic deans' ottice and the Office of the Registrar for assistance 
and clarification of degree requirements. An overview of the degree 
requirements for the baccalaureate follows. Refer to the section of 
the catalog that describes the major programs and to the Division 
of Liberal Arts section for specific course requirements. Students 
should keep in close contact with their academic advisors regarding 
official departmental and major specific requirements. 

Freshman Common Core (12 credits) 

First Year Writing 
Introduction to Modernism 

All students at The University of the Arts must take First Year 
Writing and Introduction to Modernism. 

Freshmen typically take two semesters of First Year Writing 
(HU 1 10 A, HU 1 10 B). Based on transcripts, SAT score, TSWE 
score on the verbal text of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language), and initial essay assignments, students may be placed 
in HU 008 (ESL) or HU 009. These courses do not satisfy the First 
Year Writing requirements. Students who successfully complete 
HU 008 or HU 009 will then take HU 1 10 A, or may in some 
cases be assigned to HU 109 B, First Year Writing, which counts 
toward the degree and substitutes for HU 1 10 A. 

In addition, freshmen take two semesters of Introduction to 
Modernism (HU 103 A & B). Students in HU 008 (English as a 
Foreign Language) and HU 009 begin the Introduction to 
Modernism sequence in the second semester of their studies 
at the University. 

Satisfactory completion of the First Year Writing sequence is 
required prior to registration for upper-level liberal arts courses. In 
addition, failure to complete this sequence may prevent the student 
from proceeding in his or her major studio coursework. 

University Writing Standards 

The faculty of the University have established a standard of 
professionalism for all formal papers written for liberal arts and 
studio courses. 

1. Citations of any text used in the writing must be documented 
as appropriate. The MLA and APA styles, as detailed in Diane 
Hacket's A Writer's Reference, are taught in First- Year Writing 

HU 110A/B. Lack of knowledge of citation procedures will not be 
an acceptable explanation for plagiarism. 

2. Papers must be free of consistent patterns of error in punctua- 
tion and grammar and must be spell-checked and proofread. 

3. Papers must be word-processed and printed with appropriate 
margins. In addition, papers must be conceptually and visually 
divided into paragraphs as appropriate. 



Discipline History (9 credits) 

Discipline history acquaints students with the historical 
framework of their respective majors. These courses provide a 
historical foundation and are where professional training and liberal 
arts education intersect. The specific courses of this requirement 
vary by college and program. 

Liberal Arts Distribution (21 credits) 

The liberal arts distribution requirement ensures that students 
have an opportunity to explore the literature, philosophy, 
institutions, and art of their own and other cultures. Acquaintance 
with the humanities, social sciences, and sciences is essential for 
any educated person in understanding the world, and provides a 
knowledge base for informing the creative endeavors of the artist. 
Students may choose from a range of courses in each of the required 
areas of study and must complete at least 12 credits at the 300 or 
400 level. The specific distribution requirements are outlined in 
the following section, beginning on page 42. 

Major (varies by program) 

Major requirements have been carefully designed by the faculty 
to provide the student a professional education in his or her chosen 
field of study. Refet to the appropriate section of the catalog for 
specific major and departmental requirements. 

Electives (9) 

Free electives play an important role in the University's mission 
of providing a "dynamic milieu for creative exploration, innovation 
and intellectual investigation, extending the practice and under- 
standing of the arts and the arts professions." They give the student 
the opportunity to explore subjects beyond those required for the 
majot and encourage educational autonomy on the student's part. 

"Elective" is defined as any course, studio or liberal arts, which 
is neither a requirement for the student's major nor a requirement 
for the University's liberal arts core. "Electives" are courses which a 
student can choose freely without restriction. While advisors may 
make recommendations regarding electives, the final choice for 
elective, courses must rest with the student. Obviously, pterequi- 
sites and corequisites apply to any course that a student may 
elect to take. 

Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree 

1. Satisfactory completion of all course requirements and total 
number of credits tequired in the student's curriculum. 

2. Meeting the minimum residency requirements of four 
semesters in residence, a minimum of 48 UArts credits, and 
completion of the final semester on campus. 

3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 earned in courses 
taken at The University of the Arts. 

4. Successful completion of the major, including any and all 
requirements unique to the major department. 

5. Petition for Graduation submitted to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

Requirements for graduation must be approved by the Dean 
of the College. 



41 



Division of Liberal Arts 

Robert Ackerman 
Director 

215-875-1077 

In addition to the major requirements for earning a bachelor's 
degree at The University of the Arts, all undergraduate students 
are required to complete approximately one third of their studies in 
the liberal arts, reflecting the University's conviction that the 
liberal arts are essential for the education of artists, designers, and 
performers. The aims of the division are to develop students' 
powers of critical thinking and their understanding of the history 
and criticism of the creative arts, to introduce them to philosophic 
and scientific modes of thought, and to the study of human cultures 
and societies-in sum, to refine students' perceptions of both their 
inner world and the outer world and to help make them both 
intellectually responsible and creative. The Liberal Arts Division 
represents a common ground in the curriculum where students 
from all the colleges meet. It thus offers a unique forum for artistic 
and academic exchanges. 

Students are expected to meet with their advisors regularly and are 
responsible for knowing and fulfilling their liberal arts requirements. 

Transfer Requirements 

The University of the Arts will accept transfer credit for Liberal 
Arts courses completed elsewhere, after review, provided that 
the course work completed is determined to be equivalent to 
University of the Arts offerings, is from an accredited college or 
university, and a grade of "C" or better is earned. Students are 
required to present official transcripts of coutses taken at other 
institutions as well as course bulletins in order for evaluation of 
transfer credits to take place. Contact the Office of the Registrar 
for further information. 

Once they have matriculated, students in PCAD and CMAC 
may transfer up to 15 credits in the Liberal Arts provided they 
have not already transferred that many or more at the time of 
matriculation; students in PCPA may transfer up to 9 credits. 
Students who wish to take Liberal Arts credits at other colleges 
must secure prior written approval from the Director of the 
Division of Liberal Arts. Such courses may not duplicate courses 
already taken for credit at The University of the Arts. 

Credit-Hour Ratio 

Liberal arts credit is earned at the ratio of one credit per class 
contact hour. 



Liberal Arts Requirements for 
Students Matriculated Prior to Fall 1996 

Studies in the liberal arts are divided into four categories: 
Language and Literature, History and Social Studies, Art History, 
and Philosophy and Science. Students must satisfy the credit 
total for each college as indicated below. In addition to the 
required and elected liberal arts courses, students will also be 
taking discipline history courses in their majors. 

Please note that liberal arts requirements are slightly different 
for students who matriculated prior to Fall 1993- Please contact 
the Office of the Registrar if you have questions about liberal 
arts requirements. 



All students: 

HU 110 A/B First Year Writing 

HU 103 A/B Introduction to Modernism 

PCAD: 

HU 151 Language of Art History or 

HU 140 A Art History Survey I 

Art History 

History and Social Studies 

Language and Literature 

Philosophy and Science 

Liberal Arts Electives 

12 credits at the 300/400 level 

PCPA: 

100/200 level or above 
300/400 level or above 
Discipline History 



6 credits 
6 credits 



3 credits 
6 credits 
6 credits 
6 credits 
6 credits 
3 credits 



9 credits 

12 credits 

6 credits 



New Liberal Arts Requirements for 
Entering Freshman Fall 1996 

The faculty recently approved new curricular requirements for 
the liberal arts core. These new requirements apply to all students 
who enter the University as freshman in the fall of 1996 and 
thereafter. Beginning in the fall of 1997, the course offerings of 
the Division of Liberal Arts will be reorganized to reflect the 
revised curriculum and categories of study. 



Common Core 






12 credits 


HU110A/B 




First-Year Writing 


6 credits 


HU 103 A/B 




Modernism 


6 credits 


Discipline History 




9 credits 


Majors in: 








Dance 




DA 211 A/B; DA 117 




Music 




MU 301 A/B; MU 401 B 




Acting 




TH311 A/B; TH213 




Musical Theater 




TH 312 A/B; TH213 




Animation 




HU 140 A/B; WM251 




Film 




HU 140 A/B; WM251 




Photography 




HU 140 A/B; HU255 




All other PCAD 


Majors 


HU 140 A/B; Art History 


elective 


Writing 




HU 320 A/B; Drama course 


Multimedia 




MM 27 1 ; six credits from: 


HU 140 A 



DA 117, DA 211 A/B, TH 311 A/B, 
WM251,WM252 



Liberal Arts Distribution 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Natural Science and Mathematics 

Literature 

Humanities 

Liberal Arts Electives 



21 credits 

6 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
6 credits 



At least four (12 credits) of the courses taken to satisfy the liberal 
arts distribution requirement must be at the 300 or 400 level. 

All students will be required to take at least one multicultural 
course within the liberal arts distribution where the study is largely 
or entirely devoted to non-Western cultures. 



Liberal Arts Distribution Requirements 

This grid shows how liberal arts courses may be used to 
satisfy the liberal arts distribution requirement, depending upon 
year of matriculation. 



Key: L&L 
AH 



= Language & Literature LIT 
= Art History Electives 



H/SS = History/Social Studies 
P/Sci = Philosophy/Science 
HU Elec = Humanities Elective 



All 


= Art History 


SS 


= Social Science 


SCI/M 


= Science/Math 


HU 


= Humanities 


DH 


= Discipline History 



Pre-Fall 1996 

PCAD 

Distribution 



Distribution 
for Students 
Matriculating 
Fall 1996 and after 



HU130A French I 

HU 130 B French I 

HU 131 A German I 

HU 131 B German I 

HU 132 A Italian I 

HU 132 B Italian I 

HU 140 A Art History Survey I 

HU 140 B Art History Survey II 



L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
required 



HU211 
HU212 
HU213 

HU216 
HU217 
HU218 



Women Writers 

Introduction to Mythology 

World Drama 

The Short Story 

African American Literature 

Super Heroes 



HU 219 Children's Literature 

HU 221 Forms of Autobiography 

HU230A French II 

HU230B French II 

HU232A Italian II 

HU232B Italian II 

HU 240 Ancient Art 

HU241 Medieval Art 

HU 242 A Northern Renaissance Art 

HU 242 B Italian Renaissance Art 

HU 243 Baroque Art 

HU 244 Mythology in Oriental Art 



HI 
HU 

HU 
HU 
HU 
HU 

HU (DH/all 
PCAD majors) 
HU elective HU (DH/all 
PCAD majors) 



HU 162 Individual & Society H/SS 

HU 181 A Child & Adolescent Psychology P/SCI 

HU 181 B Adult Psychology P/SCI 

HU 201 Lyric Poetry L&L 

HU210A 19th C. American Writers L&L 

HU210B 20th C. American Writers L&L 



L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 

L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 

AH 

AH 
AH 
AH 

AH 

AH 



SS 

SS 

SS 

LIT 

LIT 

LIT 

LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 

LIT 
LIT 
HU 
HU 

HU 
HU 

AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 



43 



Pre-Fall 1996 
PCAD 

Distribution 



Distribution 
for Students 
Matriculating 
Fall 1996 and after 



Pre-Fall 1996 

PCAD 

Distribution 



Distribution 
for Students 
Matriculating 
Fall 1996 and after 



HU245A History of Western Arch I AH 

HU 245 B History of Western Arch II AH 

HU246 19th Century Art AH 

HU248A Film History AH 

HU 248 B Issues in National Cinema AH 

HU250 History of Sculpture AH 

HU251 History of Design AH 

HU253 History of Crafts AH 

HU 255 History of Photography AH 



HU255A History of 19th C. Photography AH 
HU 255 B History of 20th C. Photography AH 



AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
(= WM251) 
(= WM 252) 

AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
(DH/Photo ma]ors) 



HU259 


Listening To Music 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU 260 A 


Human Origins I 


H/SS 


SS 


HU 260 B 


Human Origins II 


H/SS 


SS 


HU 262 A 


History of China 


H/SS 


SS 


HU 262 B 


History of Japan 


H/SS 


SS 


HU263 


History-Italian Renaissance 


H/SS 


SS 


HU264 


Modern American History 


H/SS 


SS 


HU 266 A 


History of Classical World 


H/SS 


SS 


HU 266 B 


History of Medieval Europe 


H/SS 


SS 


HU 267 


Intro to Cultural Anthropology 


H/SS 


SS 


HU268 


Introduction to the Bible 


H/SS 


SS 


HU270 


Introduction to Aesthetics 


P/SCI 


hi: 


HU274 


Introduction to Philosophy 


P/SCI 


III' 


HU282A 


Fundamentals of College Math 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


HU282B 


Calculus 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


HU285A 


Life Sciences 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


HU 285 B 


Physical Sciences 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


HU293 


Dance & Expressive Culture 


HU elective 


HU 


HU310 


The Stories of Chekhov 


L&L 


LIT 


HU311 


Greek Drama 


L&L 


LIT 


HU313 


Poetry Writing Workshop 


L&L 


HU 


HU314 


Literature & Film 


L&L 


LIT 


HU315 A 


Modern Drama 


L&L 


LIT 


HU315B 


Contemporary Drama 


L&L 


LIT 


HU316 


American Playwrights 


L&L 


LIT 


HU317A 


Romanticism 


L&L 


LIT 


HU317B 


William Blake 


L&L 


LIT 


HU318 


Literature ot the Roman Empire 


L&L 


LIT 



HU 320 A Masterpieces- West. Tradition I L&L 
HU 320 B Masterpieces- West. Tradition II L&L 



HU322 
HU323 
HU325 
HU326 
HU342 
HU343 

HU344 
HU345 
HU346 
HU347 
HU348 
HU349 



Scriptwriting 
Arts Criticism 
Fiction Writing 
Contempotary Arts 
Arts of China 
Art of Venice 

Avant Garde Cinema 
Modern Architecture 
Folk Art & Architecture 
Arts of Africa 
American Art to 1945 
American Film Genres 



HU351 Electronic Video 

HU 353 A Impressionism 

HU 353 B Post Impressionism 

HU 354 Women Artists 

HU 355 Dada and Surrealism 



L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
L&L 
AH 
AH 

AH 
AH 
AH 
AH 
AH 
AH 

AH 
AH 
AH 

AH 
AH 



HU 357 Modern Art AH 

HU 359 Politics and the Media AH 

HU 360 A Renaissance and Retormation H/SS 

HU360B Age of Enlightenment H/SS 

HU 362 A American Civilization I H/SS 

HU 362 B American Civilization II H/SS 

HU 363 Modern Culture H/SS 

HU364 Sociology of Art H/SS 

HU 365 A Hist. & Culture-Latin Amer. I H/SS 

HU 365 B Hist. & Culture-Latin Amer II H/SS 

HU 366 The City H/SS 

HU 367 Eastern Religions H/SS 

HU 368 Sociology of Politics H/SS 



LIT (DH/WMP 

majors) 

LIT (DH/WMP 

majors) 

HU 

HU 

HU 

LIT 

AH/HU 

AH/HU 

AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 

AH/HU 
AH/HU 
AH/HU 

AH/HU 
AH/HU 

AH/HU 
SS 
SS 
SS 

SS 
SS 

SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 









Distribution 




Pre-Fall 1996 


for Students 




PCAD 


Matriculating 




Distribution 


Fall 1996 and after 


HU369 


Cultural Ecology 


H/SS 


SS 


HU370 


Greek Philosophy 


P/SCI 


HU 


HU372 


Continental Philo & Existentlsm 


P/SCI 


HU 


HU373 


Ethics 


P/SCI 


HU 


HU374 


Personality & Creativity 


P/SCI 


SS 


HU382 


Social Psychology 


P/SCI 


SS 


HU383 


Personality & Adjustment 


P/SCI 


SS 


HU384 


Abnormal Psychology 


P/SCI 


SS 


HU385 


Concepts of Modern Physics 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


HU388 


Perception 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


HU390 


Mass Media 


HU elective 


SS 


HU392 


American Musical Theater 


HU elective 


HU 


HU393 


African-American Culture 


HU elective 


SS 


HU411 A 


Renaissance Literature 


L&L 


LIT 


HU411B 


Shakespeare 


L&L 


LIT 


HU412 


Detective Film and Fiction 


L&L 


LIT 


HU413 


Lit & Film:From Text to Screen 


L&L 


LIT 


HU 414 A 


Big Fat Famous Novel 


L&L 


LIT 


HU414B 


European Novel 


L&L 


LIT 


HU415A 


Modern Poetry 


L&L 


LIT 


HU415B 


Contemporary Poetry 


L&L 


LIT 


HU416A 


Contemporary Novel 


L&L 


LIT 


HU416B 


Contemporary American Fiction 


L&L 


LIT 


HU417 


Lyric 


L&L 


LIT 


HU419 


American Modernists 


L&L 


LIT 


HU420 


Major Writers 


L&L 


LIT 


HU421 


On the Nature of Poetry & Art 


L&L 


LIT 


HU422 


Amer. Politics & Cult. 1945-75 


L&L 


LIT 


HU440 


Wagner and the Ring Cycle 


AH 


HU 


HU442 


Abstract Expressionism 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU 448 A 


American Art Since 1945 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU 448 B 


European Art Since 1945 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU449 


Diaghilev and the Ballet Russe 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU450 


Arts of India 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU451 


Arts of Islam 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU452 


Topics in Design 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU453 


Arts of Japan 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU456 


Major Artists 


AH 


AH/HU 


HU462 


American Social Values 


H/SS 


SS 


HU463 


Middle East Art and Cultute 


H/SS 


SS 


HU464 


Holocaust 


H/SS 


SS 


HU466 


Comparative Religion I 


H/SS 


SS 


HU467 


Compararive Religion II 


H/SS 


SS 


HU474 


Contemporary Philosophy 


P/SCI 


HU 


HU475 


Freud and Mahler 


P/SCI 


HU 





Distribution 


Pre-Fall 1996 


for Students 


PCAD 


Matriculating 


Distribution 


Fall 1996 and after 


P/SCI 


HU 


y P/SCI 


SS 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


P/SCI 


SCI/M 


P/SCI 


SS 



HU 478 Aesthetics Seminar 

HU 480 Psychology of Creativity 

HU481A Physics 

HU481B Physics 

HU 483 Theories of Personality 



HU 492 Vienna and Berlin HU Elective HU 

HU493 Don Juan and Faust HU Elective HU 

HU 495 Dante in the Modern World HU Elective LIT 

HU497 Women and Sex Roles HU Elective LIT 



DA 117 Survey of Music 

DA 211 A Dance History I 

DA 21 IB Dance History II 

MU301 A Music History I 

MU301 B Music History II 

MU 306 History of Rock Music 

MU401 A Jazz History 

MU 401 B American Music History 

MU 402 Wotld Music 



MU411 


Twentieth Century Music 


MU417 A 


Opera Literature 


MU417B 


Opera Literature 


MU424 


Wagner and the Ring Cycl 


TH213 


Script Analysis 


TH311 A 


Theater History I 


TH311 B 


Theater History II 


TH312 A 


Musical Theater History I 


TH 312 B 


Musical Theater History II 


WM251 


Narrative Cinema I 


WM252 


Narrative Cinema II 



HU (DH/Dance majors) 
HU (DH/Dance majors) 
HU (DH/Dance majors) 

— HU (DH/Dance majors) 

— HU (DH/Dance majors) 

HU elective HU 
HU 

— HU (DH/ Music majors) 
HU Elective HU 

HU Elective HU 

HU Elective HU 

HU Elective HU 

AH HU 

— HU (DH/Acting & 
MusTh majors) 

— HU (DH/Acting majors) 
HU (DH/Acting majors) 

HU (DH/MusTh 

majors) 

HU (DH/MusTh 

majors) 

— HU (DH/Film & 
Anim Majors) 

— HU (DH/Film & 
Anim Majors) 



Key: L&L 



Language & Literature LIT 



AH = Art History Electives 

H/SS = History/Social Studies 

P/Sci = Philosophy/Science 

HU Elec = Humanities Elective 



AH 


= Art History 


SS 


= Social Science 


SCI/M 


= Science/Math 


HU 


= Humanities 


DH 


= Discipline History 



45 



Liberal Arts Faculty 

Robert Ackerman 

Director 

BA, College of the City of New York 

MA, PhD, Columbia University 

Juan Sebastian Agudelo 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, MA, Southern Illinois University 

Joan Beaudoin 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 

Ninotchka Bennahum 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Swarthmore College 

MA, PhD, New York University 

Stephen Berg 

Professor 

BA, State University of Iowa 

Yong Ming Cai 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, Shanghai University of Science 

and Technology 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Kent Christensen 

Associate Professor 

BA, Columbia University 

MA, University of Connecticut 

Karen Clark-Schock 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Rosemont College 
MCAT, Hahnemann University 
PsyD, Immaculata College 

Lawrence Curry 

Associate Professor 

BA, MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Nancy Davenport 

Professor 

BA, MA, Bryn Mawr College 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

John F. DeWitt 

Associate Professor 

BA, Northeastern University 

MA, PhD, University of Connecticut 



Mary Ellen Didier 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Wisconsin 

MA, University of Chicago 

Samuel Durso 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, MA, Temple University 

Richard Farnum 

Assistant Professor 

AB, Princeton University 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Martha Finney 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Yale University 

MEd, Tufts University 

MArch, University of Pennsylvania 

Gloria Fox 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Delaware 

MA, Hahnemann University 

Constance Goodwin 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

MEd, EdD, Temple University 

Kevin Harris 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Hampton Institute 

MFA, University of Cincinnati 

Ronald E. Hays 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Northwest Missouri State University 

MS, Hahnemann Medical College 

Nancy Heller 

Professor 

AB, Middlebury College 

MA, PhD, Rutgers University 

Eugene Howard 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Antioch University 

MA, Norwich University 

Anne Karmatz 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MS, University of Pennsylvania 
MA, Villanova University 



Ruqqaya Khan 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Goucher College 

MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Frederique Krupa 

Assistant Professor 

BA, MA, Parsons School of Design 

Sharon Lefevre 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Princeton University 

MA, MPhil, Columbia University 

Gail Maxwell 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Colorado 

MA, University of Lancaster (UK) 

Mary Martin 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Macalester College 
MA, Washington University 

Bruce Metcalf 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Temple University 

Martha Nichols 

Senior Lecturer 
BA, Antioch College 
MFA, Bard College 
MA, Villanova University 

Martin Novelli 

Adjunct Professor 
BS, St. Joseph's University 
MA, Purdue University 
PhD, JD, Temple University 

Jeanne Nugent 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Camille A. Paglia 

Professor 

BA, Harpur College, SUNY Binghamton 

MPhil, PhD, Yale University 

Diane D. Perkins 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, MA, Temple University 



46 



Robin Rice 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Ohio Wesleyan University 

MA, University of Missouri 

Catherine Robert 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Connecticut College for Women 

MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Gabriela Roepke 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Catholic Universiry of Chile 

Donna Rondolone 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Temple University 

MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Steven Saylor 

Assistant Professor 

AB, Franklin & Marshall College 

MA, MFA, Temple University 

Mikhail Sergeev 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Moscow State University 

MA, PhD, Temple University 

Frank Smigiel 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Pittsburgh 

MA, PhD, University of Delaware 

Patricia Stewart 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, University of Pennsylvania 

Anita Tiambeng 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Beaver College 
MA, Temple University 

Fabian Ulitsky 

Associate Professor 

BA, MEd, Temple University 

Judith Vassallo 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, American International College 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Susan T. Viguers 

Associate Professor 

BA, Bryn Mawr College 

MA, University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 



Joanne E. Walsh 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, College of Mt. St. Vincent 

MA, Marquette University 

Stanley Ward 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, Duke University 

MA, PhD, Harvard University 

Faith Watson 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, MA, University of Pennsylvania 

William Webster 

Associate Professor 

BM, Curtis Institute of Music 

BA, University of Iowa 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Carla Weinberg 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Dottore in Lingue, University of Pisa 

Burton Weiss 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, MA, PhD, Princeton University 

Lily Yeh 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, National Taiwan University 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Simone Zelitch 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Wesleyan University 

MFA, University of Michigan 

Toby Silverman Zinman 

Professor 

BA, MA, PhD, Temple University 



47 



48 



© The 

University 
of the 
Arts 



Philadelphia College 
of Art and Design 

Stephen Tarantal, Dean 
Carol Moore, Assistant Dean 

215-875-1100 

The Philadelphia College of Art and Design is a comprehensive 
visual arts college offering a full range of undergraduate and 
graduate programs in fine arts, crafts, design, and art and museum 
education. All programs are dedicated to: the development of the 
individual artistic spirit and vision within each student; the study 
of the historical and contemporary precedents which have shaped 
our culture; and the full range of analog and digital methods and 
processes that give form to the visual arts. 



Class Size and Structure 

Each department is unique, with its own curriculum and 
structure, but in every department classes are small and informal. 
Faculty advisots and the generous student/faculty ratio assure close 
individual attention and assistance throughout a course of study. 

One of the important teaching modes in the college is the 
critique, or "crit," an evaluation of student work by the instructor 
with the participation of the class. Given informally to the class or 
individual as often as once a class, crits have proven to be an 
invaluable method for the development of critical thinking and 
self-awareness, which are major educational goals in our programs. 



Credit-Hour Ratio 

In general, credit is earned at the ratio of one credit for two class- 
contact hours in studio courses. Please refer to the course descrip- 
tions for specific information. 



Digital Technology at 

the Philadelphia College of 

Art and Design 

Advances in digital technologies have established the computer 
as an essential tool for creative work. Artists, designers and 
performers will increasingly be responsible for the development of 
new digital media. These advances are creating a wealth of job 
opportunities for individuals with creative talent that is 
unparalleled in the history of the arts. 

Since 1981, The University of the Arts has been a leader in the 
field of computet-mediated art and design education in the north- 
east region. The University has carefully integrated new media 
technologies into traditional fields of study within art and design 
disciplines. Additionally, the Electronic Media department offers 
studio elective coutses in computer concepts, digital multimedia, 
and electronic media production, at introductory, intermediate, and 
advanced levels for all students regardless of theit major. UArts 
remains dedicated to continuing this leadership role of preparing 
students for career opportunities in traditional and electronic media. 



Major Areas of Study 

The college offers course work toward the BFA degree with 
major programs in Painting and Drawing, Printmaking/Book Arts, 
Photography, Film/Video, Animation, Sculpture, Graphic Design, 
Illustration, and Crafts (Ceramics, Fibers, Glass, Metals, and 
Wood); a BS degree in Industrial Design; an MA degree in Art 
Education and Museum Education; an MAT (Master of Art in 
Teaching) in Visual Arts; MFA's in Book Arts/Printmaking, 
Ceramics, Painting and Sculpture, and Museum Exhibition Plan- 
ning and Design; an MID (Master of Industrial Design); a special 
concentration in Art Therapy, a pre-certification program in Art 
Education; and a post baccalaureate certificate program in crafts. 



Exhibition Program 

The Exhibition Program showcases major contemporary 
exhibitions that relate to the University's diverse academic 
programs. In recent years, The University of the Arts has ptesented 
exhibitions that feature professional developments and issues 
pertaining to the following areas: Architecture, Crafts, Graphic 
Design, Industrial Design, Papermaking, Painting and Drawing, 
Photography, Sculpture, and Book Arts. 

Over the years, the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, the University's 
primary exhibition space, has presented high quality exhibitions, 
having atttacted national and international artists to the campus. 
Additional exhibition space in Dorrance Hamilton Hall Galleries, 
the Great Hall Gallery, Wagman Hall Gallery, Drake Theater 
Gallery, and the recently created Window on Broad furnish 
exhibition opportunities for faculty, alumni, students ot the 
Univetsity, and local artists. 

Many smaller galleries are available, as well as departmental 
exhibition spaces. Nearly every academic department launches its 
own series of shows featuring the work ot students, faculty, and 
outside artists. The Mednick Gallery in Media Arts, the Painting/ 
Drawing Gallery, the Illustration Gallery, and the Ceramics/ 
Sculpture Gallery all show work of emerging and established 
artists. Students gain experience in hanging shows, and there are 
student-run invitationals and juried exhibitions. Highlights of the 
year are the Annual Student Show, which is a featured Commence- 
ment event, the Annual Student Scholarship Exhibition, and senior 
student exhibits. 



50 



Special Facilities 

Studios 

Anderson Hall is a nine-story visual arts facility which houses a 
dramatic gallery, studios, classrooms, and a library designed with a 
feeling of openness. Through the combination of Anderson Hall 
and Dorrance Hamilton Hall, across the street, the University 
provides a wealth of modern studios, shops, labs, equipment, 
galleries, and libraries to support the making of art. 

The variety of studios and equipment is extensive, ranging from 
woodworking and metal shops, printmaking and computerized 
typesetting shops, to fine arts, crafts, and design studios and photo 
and film labs. Four large kilns enhance ceramic-making capabili- 
ties and a forge has been built for sculpture. A large weaving shop 
is complete with dozens of looms and a dyeing room. A nine- 
teenth-century- carriage house was converted into a skylit figure- 
modeling studio for sculpture students. 

Advanced Computing and Simulation Laboratory 

A computer-based laboratory that provides advanced three- 
dimensional modeling and rendering capabilities, animation, video 
editing, and interactive simulation of virtual environments and 
products is operated by the graduate Industrial Design Program. 
Equipped with Silicon Graphics workstations, Macintosh AV 
computers, a Media 100 Video editing suite, and a fully instru- 
mented driving simulator enabling real-time interaction with 
virtual worlds, the laboratory is server-supported and networked to 
include on-line access to the Internet and other services. The lab 
supports Alias modeling, rendering, and animation software: 
Coryphaeus scene generation software, Cumulus image database 
software, the Jack® anthropometric human figure modeler, 
Labview instrumentation software, and a wide variety of Macintosh 
applications. The research program is pioneering the creation of 
integrated systems to support design and its intetactive assessment, 
developing tools for project management, text and image genera- 
tion and archiving, concept modeling, interactive simulation, 
human factors and usability analysis, and orher activities essential 
to design by multi-disciplined teams. 

Media Arts Studios 

The Media Arts Department (photography/film/video/animation) 
houses two Master Series Oxberry animation stands-those used by 
Disney and other professional firms to film animation drawings- 
which enable students to produce professional quality work. 

Other Media Arts facilities include darkrooms and all the 
essential equipment for studio photography, a fully-equipped sound 
studio, animation drafting tables with 12-field light disks, five 
flatbed film editors, as well as video editing, splicers, synchronizers, 
and projectors. 



Borowsky Center for Publication Arts 

The Borowsky Center for Publication Arts is both a unique 
educational arm of the University and a printing facility that 
provides students, staff, faculty and visiting artists a resource to 
explore the creative potential inherent in the offset lithographic 
printing medium. The Center enables qualified users to experience 
the complete graphic arts process from initial conceptualization 
through production, while maintaining the highest printing 
standards. The Center is equipped with state of the art equipment, 
including a Heidelberg Kors 19" x 25" offset press, a Dos flatbed 
horizontal camera, a darkroom tor shooting and developing 
negatives, and platemaking and stripping facilities. Staffed with 
two master printers and student assistants, the Borowsky Center 
produces a wide variety of printed material including posters, 
catalogs, brochures, announcements, and limited edition prints. 
The Center's Fact Sheet, which includes all procedures for project 
submittal, is available in the PCAD Dean's office. 



Undergraduate Programs 

All freshman students enter the 18-credit Foundation core 
program that includes courses in drawing, two-dimensional design, 
three-dimensional design, and time-motion studies. The Founda- 
tion program introduces the basic language and processes of the 
visual arts and prepares the students fot entry into a major 
department. Through freshman elective course offerings, students 
are introduced to major course options and opportunities offered by 
the College of Art and Design. 

Students enter a major in the sophomore year from one of the 
following departments: 

Crafts: Ceramics, Fibers, Glass, Metals, Paper, Wood 

Fine Arts: Painting & Drawing, Printmaking, Sculpture 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Industrial Design 

Media Arts: Photography, Film/Video, Animation 
The major studio concentration is augmented by required and 
elective courses in othet departments in PCAD, PCPA and CMAC 
to encourage an awareness of the productive interaction that can 
occur between the many disciplines available at the University. 
Alternative career opportunities are often developed by students 
stimulated by courses outside their major. 

The college currently offers seven minor programs that can 
augment or complement the student's major course of study. 
Many departments offer opportunities to study off-campus 
during the junior and senior years. Frequent field trips to muse- 
ums, galleries, artists' studios, and design studios in Philadelphia, 
New York, and Washington, D.C. supplement their regular work 
in studios and workshops. 



Academic Advising 

Academic advising at the University is designed to provide 
maximum information and assistance to students from the time 
they enter the Foundation Program in their freshman year until 
they complete their final semester as seniors. 

In the Foundation year, each student is assigned to a Foundation 
section with its own advisor. Each student is required to meet 
with the advisor at least once each semester and encouraged to seek 
out the advisor as soon as any difficulties begin to occur. 

At the end of the Foundation year, when the student selects and 
enters one of the major departments, the student is assigned to a 
faculty member who teaches in that department. This faculty 
member serves as that student's advisor for the next three years. 
Each student meets with his or her advisor at least once a semester 
to discuss the student's academic program. 

In addition, there are three formalized advising sessions: (1) 
First semester, sophomore year, first two weeks: When students 
enter a major department, the advisor meets in small groups (4-5 
students) to orient them to collegiate and departmental academic 
requirements and standards, departmental expectations, elective 
options and opportunities, program strategies, two-year planning, 
introduction to other advisors (Liberal Arts and Studio), and office 
hours; (2) Second semester, junior-year: Individual meetings to 
review progress and credit-counting sheets, plan final year (both 



semesters), and review graduation requirements; (3) Last semester: 
Exit interview, and meetings with advisors as often as necessary to 
deal with any problems that arise. 

Each studio department is assigned one or more Liberal Arts 
faculty members who assist both faculty advisors and their assigned 
students in the selection of a Liberal Arts course of study. 

Transcript copies of student records are supplied on request to 
faculty advisors by the Registrar following the recording of grades 
each semester. 



Credit Distribution 

The student is ultimately responsible for completion of all 
course requirements for the degree program in which he/she is 
enrolled. The College requires a minimum of 123 credits for 
graduation (126 for the BS in Industrial Design). A student 
carrying an average of 15.5 credits per semester would be making 
normal academic progress toward graduation. 

The general credit structure for the BFA is as follows: 



Courses 


Credits 


Foundation 


18 


Major department credits 


42 


Studio Elective 


21 


Liberal Arts 


42 


Total credits 


123 



Studio Electives 

• Major studio departments may require up to 6 credits in 
another studio majot, and/or Liberal Arts. 

• Students may elect to replace up to 6 studio elective credits 
with Liberal Arts courses. 

• Students are required to take at least 9 credits of studio 
elective courses outside of their major department. 

• Elective studio credits may be completed in any department at 
the College of Art and Design, the College of Performing Arts, or 
the College of Media and Communication. 



52 



Departmental Requirements 

General program requirements vary within each department. 
Departments issue a list of required courses at appropriate times 
during the year. Majors must follow both deparrmental require- 
ments for specified courses and the recommended sequence in 
which these courses are to be taken. The department chairperson 
must approve any exception to these regulations. 

The Art Therapy and Educanon programs are special courses of 
study that are offered in conjunction with a studio major program. 
Inreresred students should refer to the program descriptions of 
those departments. 

The chairperson, wirh the concurrence of the faculty, may: 

1. Establish a minimum major course grade or major grade- 
point average requirement higher than the minimum set by the 
University; students must be given written notification of such 
requirements. 

2. If a student receives "D" grades in a major course, notify the 
Academic Review Committee that the student is on Deparrmental 
Warning even if the student's GPA is above a 2.0. Excessive "D" 
grades (3 or more) may result in dismissal from the department. 
Students will be advised to transfer to another major. 

3. Place on academic probation srudents who fail to meet the 
minimum grade requirement in a course required for a departmen- 
tal major or a University program. 

4. Dismiss a student from the department for academic 
deficiencies with written notification to the student and the Dean. 
Students who are dismissed may submit a written appeal to the 
Academic Appeals Committee. 

5. Require a student to repeat a "D" grade in a major course. If 
a department feels a student must repeat a course in which they 
received a "D" grade, then the departmental major requirement for 
that student will be increased by the appropriate number of credits 
for rhar course. 

If a student fails to meet the minimum grade requirement in 
major course work required by the department or a University 
program, the chair may submit a written recommendarion to the 
Dean of the College for submission to the Academic Review 
Committee that due to an unsatisfactory academic record, the 
student be considered for probation or dismissal. 

Each deparrment will provide its students with wrirten state- 
ments describing any additional requirements for the programs at 
the beginning of the academic year. 

Every student must have the approval of his or her department 
to proceed to the next level of coursework. Advising is a shared 
responsibility between the department and the student. Each 
must remain informed about the student's progress roward 
graduation. Finally, the student's petition to graduate must be 
approved by the department advisor or chairperson in consulration 
with his/her faculty. 



Minors 

The College of Art and Design offers minors that enable a 
student to focus on a specific discipline through organized electives. 
Students wishing to include a minor concentration are governed by 
the following guidelines: 

1 . A student may not take a major and a minor in rhe same 
subject. Minors must be taken in a department other than the major. 

2. Courses applied to the minor may not be used for the major, 
but students may include the minor coursework as parr of their 
studio elective degree requirement. 

3. All minors require a minimum of fifteen credits, which 
are defined by the department. Descriptions of the individual 
minors may be obtained in the Registrar's Office or the Office of 
rhe Dean, PCAD. 

4. Srudents must declare their intent to complete a minor by 
filing the Minor Declaration Form in the Office of the Registrar. 
This form must be signed by the student's major and minor 
advisors. Once a minor is on file in the Registrar's Office, any 
changes must be discussed with the faculty advisor. 

5. A student pursuing a minor may be required to complete 
more than the minimum number of credits required for graduation. 

6. Minors are available only to undergraduate students. 

7. Students wishing to pursue a minor must meet eligibility 
requirements, which may include satisfactory completion of 
foundation courses, prerequisites, and departmental portfolio review. 

Currently available minors: 

Animation Drawing 

This minor concentrates on the development of drawing skills 
that embrace a sense of timing and movement. The program also 
includes instruction in the basics of film and video technology. 

PF210A Film I 3.0 credits 

PF 212 A Animation Drawing I 3.0 

PF212B Animarion Drawing II 3.0 

PF 312 A Junior Animation Workshop 3.0 

PF 312 B Junior Animation Workshop 3.0 

Book Arts 

This minor emphasizes rhe development of skills related to 
designing and creating books, incorporaring both type and 
imagery. Insrruction in image making in multiples through 
printmaking techniques, basic typesetting techniques, and basic 
bookbinding methods are studied. 

PR 201 Print I/Relief Monotype 3-0 credits 

PR 204 B Print I/Screenprinting - Etching 3.0 

PR 305 Book Atts I/Type - Binding 3.0 

PR 326 Intro to Offser Litho 3.0 

PR 410 Book Arts II/Type - Image 3.0 



Figurative Illustration 

The focus of rhis minor is on work with the figure in space. 
Old masrer and traditional drawing and painting techniques are 
demonsttated and utilized as the student concentrares on the 
development of skills related to figurative drawing and painting. 



IL 200 A 


Pictorial Foundation 


3.0 credits 


IL 200 B 


Pictorial Foundation 


3.0 


IL 202 A 


Anatomy 


3.0 


IL 202 B 


Anatomy 


3.0 


IL303 


Figurative Utilization 


3.0 



53 



Film/Video 

This minor provides training in film and video technology. 
Students work on their own as well as in teams with other students. 

PF210A Intro to Film/Video I 3.0 credits 

PF210B Intro to Film/Video II 3.0 

PF310A Junior Cinema Production 3.0 

PF 320 Film Sound 3.0 

PF 322 Film/Video Technology 3.0 

Illustration Photography 

The basics of black and white as well as color 35mm photogra- 
phy are studied. Emphasis is placed on gaining experience in a 
wide range of pictorial photographic applications. Students will 
explore materials and processes that are used to manipulate 
photographic imagery. 



PF211 A 


Photo I or 


3.0 


PF209 


Photo for Illustrators 




PF211 B 


Photo II 


3.0 


PF217 


Color Concepts 


3.0 


PF311 A 


Junior Workshop 


3.0 


PF315 


Digital Photo Workshop 


3.0 



Studio Photography 

This minor is designed to give the student mastery of the full 
range of cameras from a 35mm small format up to a 4x5 studio 
view camera. Technical training covers electronic strobe and 
tungsten studio lighting as well as color transparency film and 
conventional black and white, and color photographic print 
materials and techniques. Advanced level classes concentrate on 
design and creative approaches to staged and directed shooting. 



GD310 


Photographies 


3.0 credits 


PF211 A 


Photo I or 


3.0 


PF209 


Photo for Illustrators 




PF217 


Color Concepts 


3.0 


PF 313 A 


Basic Studio I 


3.0 


PF313B 


Basic Studio II 


3.0 



Typography 

The student learns the basic visual grammar of typography, 
incorporating this knowledge into information-based interpreta- 
tions. Intermediate studies are concerned with the informational 
and editorial uses of typography as well as multi-page formats. The 
advanced level develops a sophisticated expertise in solving 
complex messages through typographic expression. 

GD210B Letterforms 30 credits 

GD 304 A Electronic Media/Production I 1.5 * 

GD 304 B Electronic Media/Production II 1.5 ** 

GD 306 A Typography Emphasis 30 * 

GD 306 B Typography Emphasis 3.0 ** 

GD 426 A Advanced Typography 3-0 

* It is recommended that these two courses be taken concurrently, 
when possible. 

** It is recommended that these two courses be taken concurrently, 
when possible. 



Internships 

Crafts, Fine Arts, Media Arts and Illustration sponsor an 
internship course open to all PCAD students regardless of their 
majors. Internships are voluntary and valuable. They reinforce and 
expand classroom theory and practice and allow the student to test 
possible career choices and get a feel for the workplace. 

Each participating department has an Internship Faculty Advisor 
who is responsible for coordinating the internships, placing 
students with workplace sponsors, advising students on course 
requirements, and deciding on the final pass/fail grades. 

Students who are interested in pursuing an internship may 
obtain Internship information from their faculty advisor, the Career 
Services Office, or the Dean's Office in PCAD. Students sign up for 
internships during the registration process. The internship course 
is graded on a pass/fail basis and carries three academic credits. 



Foreign and Summer Study 
Programs 

Foreign and summer studies are available through a number of 
programs hosted by other institutions. Those most popular with 
Philadelphia College ot Art and Design students are: 

• The Academies of Fine Arts in Florence and Rome, Italy 

• Parsons School of Design in Paris, France 

• Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine 

• Tyler School of Art in Rome, Italy 

• Vermont Studio Center, Vermont 

The University of the Arts is the accrediting institution for 
the Vermont Studio Center and our students receive a discount 
on tuition charges. Interested students should contact the Office 
of the Dean for advising and the Office of the Registrar for 
registration procedures. 



Cooperative Program with the 
Philadelphia College of Textiles 
and Science 

An agreement between The University of the Arts and the 
Philadelphia College of Textiles and Sciences permits a limited 
number of students in each institution to register for a maximum 
of 3 credits per semester at the sister institution without the 
payment of additional tuition. 

Students are limited to a total of 6 exchange credits during their 
four year enrollment at the home institution. Registration is 
available on a selective basis for qualified students and is restricted 
to courses not offered at the home institution. 

Interested students should contact the Office of the Registrar for 
additional information and registration materials. 



54 



Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts Degree Coordinate Program 

Established in 1970, the Coordinate Degree Program enables 
students and alumni of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
(PAFA) the opportunity to earn a degree from The University of the 
Arts by successfully completing the Academy's Certificate Program 
and the University's prevailing liberal arts requirements for its 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Candidates for this program must file 
an application for undergraduate admission and submit an official 
copy of their PAFA transcripts, a letter from their Dean in support 
of the application, and proof of secondary school graduation. 

Degree Coordinate students are not required to maintain full- 
time enrollment and they may register for any courses offered by 
the University. This includes studio art, art therapy, and art 
education. A maximum of 9 liberal arts credits from other 
accredited institutions may be accepted in transfer. 



Montserrat College of Art 

Moore College of Art and Design 

Otis College of Art and Design 

Pacific Northwest College of Art 

Parsons School of Design 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

Pratt Institute 

Rhode Island School of Design 

Ringling School of Art and Design 

San Francisco Art Institute 

School of the Art Institute of Chicago 

School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

School of Visual Arts 

Students apply through their home institutions, which are 
responsible for the selection of participants. For further informa- 
tion, contact the Office of the Dean, 215-875-1100. 



Student Exchange 

Students in good standing from other institutions may attend 
the College for either one or two semesters on a full-time basis. To 
be eligible, a student must have completed the freshman year at the 
home institution and receive approval from the department chair of 
the major department in the Philadelphia College of Art and 
Design. In addition, the student must provide a letter from the 
dean of the home college granting permission to take courses at 
The University of the Arts and agreeing to accept those credits for 
credit at the student's own institution. All University expenses are 
the responsibility of the student. Inquiries should be addressed to 
the Office of the Dean, at 215-875-1100. 



Return Degree Program 

Diploma graduates of the Philadelphia College of Art and 
Design may apply credits earned for the diploma towards the 
University's baccalaureate requirements. For additional informa- 
tion and to apply, contact the Office of the Registrar. 



Association of Independent Colleges of Art 
and Design (AICAD) Mobility Program 

The Philadelphia College of Art and Design at The University of 
the Arts is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of 
Art and Design (AICAD). Students in good standing may spend a 
semester (with a possible extension to two semesters on a space- 
available basis) as a guest at another member institution. Students 
remain matriculated at The University of the Arts, and with their 
advisor's prior approval, will receive full credit for work done at one 
of the following cooperating institutions: 

Art Academy of Cincinnati 

Art Centet College of Design 

Art Institute of Boston 

Art Institute of Southern California 

Atlanta College of Art 

California College of Arts and Crafts 

Center for Creative Studies 

Cleveland Institute of Art 

Columbus College of Art and Design 

Cooper Union School of Art 

Corcoran School of Art 

Kansas City Art Institute 

Kendall College of Att and Design 

Maine College of Art 

Maryland Institute, College of Art 

Massachusetts College of Art 

Memphis College of Art 

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design 

Minneapolis College of Art and Design 



55 



Foundation 
Program 



Robert McGovern 
Michael Rossman 

Co-Chairpersons 
215-875-1030 

The Foundation Program in the College 
of Art and Design provides incoming 
freshmen with a year devoted to a basic 
understanding of principals and concepts in 
the visual arts. During the first semestet 
each student is a member of a Foundation 
section and takes Two-Dimensional Design, 
Three-Dimensional Design, and Drawing. 
During the second semester students select 
a minimum of nine credits (3 courses) from 
the four courses offered by Foundation: 
Two-Dimensional Design, Three-Dimen- 
sional Design, Drawing, and Time and 
Motion. Each class meets for three hours, 
twice a week. 

Each section of students is taught by a 
team of faculty who are professionals in 
their various fields of art and design; many 
hold the rank of Professor and Associate 
Professor. In Foundation courses, faculty 
stress not only the independent qualities 
of a discipline but its intetdependent 
character. Through these basic studies and 
their interaction, students discover the 
underlying values and principles important 
to all visual arts. 

Classroom work is enriched by home 
assignments, critiques and reviews, guest 
artists, films, slides, and class trips. One 
faculty member from the section's team is 
designated as the advisor to that section. 
Students meet individually with the advisot 
to discuss concerns, the registration process, 
and their choice of major. 

The student chooses an additional course 
offered by the major studio departments 
each semester. These elective courses are 
designed to acquaint the student with the 
practices of the majot studio areas. 
Students also register for two Liberal Arts 
courses in each semester, as required by the 
University core. 



Midyear Admission: 

In addition to the typical September start 
date, students may also enter midyear and 
begin the Foundation Program in January. 
The department schedules first-semester 
core courses during the spring semester, 
and a six-week, nine-credit, intensive 
second semester between mid-May and the 
end of June. Midyeat admits who success- 
fully complete the two-semester Founda- 
tion program between January and June can 
enter their major program of study in the 
fall of the same calender year in which they 
enteted the program. 



The full-time freshman student is 
rostered for 16.5 credits each semester, 
usually as follows: 

First Semester Credits 

FP 100 A Drawing 3.0 

FP120A Two-Dimensional Design 3-0 

FP190A Three-Dimensional Design 3.0 

Studio Electives 1.5 

HU 1 10 A First Year Writing 3.0 

HU 103 A Introduction to Modernism 3.0 

Second Semester Credits 

Three of the following FP courses: 
FP 100 B Drawing 3.0 

FP 120 B Two-Dimensional Design 3.0 
FP 190 B Three-Dimensional Design 3-0 
FP 140 Time and Motion 3.0 

Studio Electives 1.5 

HU 1 10 B First Year Writing 3.0 

HU 103 B Introduction to Modernism 3.0 
Freshman Year Total 33.0 



56 



Foundation Faculty 

Lowell Boston 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, The University of The Arts 

MFA, California Institute of The Arts 

Mark Campbell 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Mills College 

Sharon Church 

Associate Professor 
BS, Skidmore College 
MFA, School for American Craftsmen, 
Rochester Institute of Technology 

Michael Grothusen 

Senior Lecturer 
BFA, University of Kansas 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Gerald Herdman 

Associate Professor 

Certificate, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Steven Jaffe 

Associate Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Elsa Johnson 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Cooper Union 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

David Kettner 

Professor 

BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, Indiana University 

Niles Lewandowski 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

David Love 

Lecturer 

BFA, Columbus College of Art & Design 

MFA, Pennsylvania State University 



John Mathews 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Skidmore College 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Robert McGovern 

Professor 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Barry Parker 

Professor 

BFA, Eastern Michigan University 

MFA, University of Massachusetts 

Diane Pepe 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Carnegie Mellon 

MFA, University of New Mexico 

Boris Putterman 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Indiana University 

Leo Robinson 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Howard University 

MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Michael Rossman 

Professor 

BID, Pratt Institute 

MFA, Ptatt Institute 

Karen Saler 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

Richard Stetser 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 



57 



Crafts 



Roy Superior 

Chairperson 
215-875-1050 

The Crafts Department seeks to develop 
artists of originality and resourcefulness 
who can excel in the most competitive 
professional environment. Studio experi- 
ence is provided in five major craft areas: 
ceramics, fibers, glass, metals, and wood. 
There are also offerings in plaster and 
papermaking to complement the curriculum. 

Each crafts area offers a balanced 
concentration in both the technical and 
aesthetic aspects of the medium. While 
practical ttaining and specialized skills are 
necessary for creative ability, the conceptual 
and expressive evolution of each student is 
the essential focus of the department. An 
ongoing study of the contemporary crafts 
movement is seen as an integral element for 
those involved in the program. The range 
of faculty in each area provides the student 
with exposure to a diversity of professional 
perspective and experience. 

Through an incisive and rigorous 
cutticulum, the department prepares 
students fot professional involvement in 
their craft. 

Upon graduation, students elect to 
become independent artists, teachers, or 
designers, or find employment in industry. 
Individuals often combine these occupa- 
tions in order to meet their individual 
needs and goals. 



Crafts Faculty 

Sarah Bodine 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Cornell University 

Susie Brandt 

Assistant Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, The School of the Art Institute 
of Chicago 

Sharon Church 

Associate Professor 
BS, Skidmore College 
MFA, School for American Craftsmen, 
Rochester Institute of Technology 

William Daley 

Professor Emeritus 

BA, Massachusetts College of Art 

MA, Columbia Teachers College 

Christopher Darway 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Larry Donahue 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Michael Dunas 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, New York University 

Roland Jahn 

Associate Professor 

BA, MS, MFA, University of Wisconsin 

Jeanne Jaffe 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 
MFA, New York State College at 

Alfred University 

Barbara Mail 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, State University College at Buffalo, NY 
MFA, State University College 
at New Paltz, NY 



Rod McCormick 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 
MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Kris Parker 

Senior Lecturer 
BFA, Maryland Institute 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Diane Pepe 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Carnegie Mellon 

MFA, University of New Mexico 

Peter Pierobon 

Senior Lecturer 

Wendell Castle School of Woodworking 

Richard Reinhardt 

Professor Emeritus 

BAA, Philadelphia Museum School of 
Industrial Art 

Warren Seelig 

Distinguished Visiting Professor 

BS, Philadelphia College of Textiles 

and Science 
MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Judith Schaechter 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Lizbeth Stewart 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Moore College of Art 

Roy Superior 

Professor 

BFA, Pratt Institute 

MFA, Yale University 

Petras Vaskys 

Professor Emeritus 

BFA, Art Institute Kanas, Lithuania 

MFA, Academy of Fine Arts, Rome, Italy 



James Makins 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Cranbrook Academy 



Crafts Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

CR200A/B Projects I 6.0 

CR XXX Media Specific Courses * 9.0 

Studio Electives 3-0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Junior Credits 

CR300A/B Projects II 6.0 

CR XXX Media Specific Courses * 9.0 
Studio Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts 9.0 

Junior Year Total 



30.0 



Senior Credits 

CR400A/B Projects III 6.0 

CR XXX Media Specific Courses * 6.0 
Studio Electives 9.0 

Liberal Arts 9-0 

Senior Year Total 30.0 



* Choose "Media Specific Courses," 
including at least 12 credits at 300-level, 
from: 

CR 211 A/B Introduction to Throwing 
CR 212 A/B Introduction to Handbuilding 
CR 221 A Introduction to Fibers 

Mixed Media 
CR 221 B Introduction to Color and 

the Loom 

CR 222 Introduction to Dyeing and 

Off Loom Construction 
CR 223 A/B Papermaking 
CR 227 Experimental Costume Design 
CR 231 A/B Introduction to Glassblowing 

CR 232 Stained Glass 

CR 241 A Body Adornment 

CR 241 B Introduction to Jewelry 

CR 242 Introduction to Metalsmiching 



CR243 


Jewelry Rendering and Design 


CR245 


Art for the Body 


CR249 


Enameling 


CR251 


Introduction to Molding 




and Casting 


CR252 


Plaster Workshop 


CR 253 


Ceramic Technology 


CR256 


Ceramics 


CR261 


Introduction to Wood 


CR277 


Fabric Resist and 




Embellishment 



CR 278 Fabric Printing 

CR 279 Paper Casting 

CR 280 Introduction to Metal Casting 

CR 281 Introduction to Electroforming 

CR 282 Metal Furniture 

CR 285 Introduction to Furniture 

CR 286 Wood Carving 

CR 287 Low Tech Furniture 

CR 322 A/B Advanced Fibers Mixed Media 
CR 329 Advance Textile Design 
CR 331 Advanced Glassblowing 

CR 332 Advanced Fusing and 
Stained Glass 

CR 370 A/B Advanced Throwing 
CR 371 A/B Advanced Ceramics 
CR 380 A/B Advanced Jewelry/Metals 

CR 381 A/B Advanced Metals 
CR 385 A/B Advanced Furniture 
CR 386 Advanced Wood 



Core Studio Projects 
Courses 

Each semester, all crafts students take 
Projects, a core studio course. These 
courses provide aesthetic structure and 
involve advanced discussion and investiga- 
tion of broader crafts issues, with critique 
of students' work. Students then have 
freedom to choose from a variety of 
technique-based courses, which aid in 
crafting that aesthetic. Students are 
advised into the appropriate levels (sopho- 
more, junior, or senior) of Projects. 

At the senior level, Projects is a forum 
for the discussion of the modern craft 
aesthetic. Students examine late 19th- and 
20th-century art and design ideas and 
issues that have informed the contemporary 
crafts fields. Emphasis is placed on the 
interdependency of all of the arts with 
particular attention given to the unique 
contribution of crafts' ideology and 
practice. Topical discussions with student 
participation, guest lecturers, and analyses 
ol historical precedents aid students in 
finding validity and contemporary 
relevancy in their work. Topics include: 
making an artist's presentation, resume and 
porttolio preparation, writing an artist's 
statement, record keeping and taxes, grant 
writing, and career opportunities. 



Media-specific Studio 
Courses 

Media-specific studio courses are offered 
in the following areas: ceramics, fibers, 
glass, jewelry, metalsmithing, paper and 
wood. These courses present information 
on materials, processes, and/or formats in 
tandem with crafts issues and concepts. 

A significant portion of rime is spent in 
lecture and demonstration, with individual 
faculty attention centering on technique. 
Equal emphasis is placed on both, "why 
make it," and, "how to make it." Students 
can focus on a single area or access multiple 
areas to combine media. 

Certificate students must take a mini- 
mum of 12 media-specific credits at the 
300 course level. The prerequisite for 300 
level courses is two 200 level courses in that 
same medium. However, if an applicant's 
portfolio indicates enough experience in a 
particular medium, 200 level prerequisites 
may be waived at the time of acceptance. 

See the preceding section for listing of 
the Media Specific Courses. 



59 



Crafts Studio Certificate 
Program 

A Post-Baccalaureate Portfolio 
Development Program 

The University's 30-credit certificate 
program offers an intensely focused 
education in crafts. The program is 
designed for those students with bachelors 
degrees who wish to become proficient 
artists in one or more of the following 
media-specific areas: ceramics, fibers, glass, 
jewelry, metalsmithing, paper, or wood. 
Courses dealing with technique, philoso- 
phy, and contemporary issues are aimed to 
develop an individual's portfolio for further 
graduate study, or a career as an indepen- 
dent studio artist or design professional. 

The Crafts Studio Program offers the 
studio component of the University's 
undergraduate crafts program in a focused 
one-and-one-half or two year period. 
Students accepted to the program take a 
minimum of 7.5 credits to a maximum of 
12 credits per semester. 

Certificare students benefit from taking 
courses with degree candidates in a quality 
undergraduate program. In addition to 
technically-oriented, media-specific courses, 
students take core courses involving design/ 
theory issues, criticism, and professional/ 
career practices. 

Admission is by portfolio and interview. 
Students with little or no formal art 
training will be required to take Founda- 
tion courses. The program advisor (in 
consultation with the student) will set the 
number of required prerequisites. These 
may be taken in advance of, or concurrently 
with, the certificate program. 



Fine Arts 



Lois M. Johnson 

Department Chair 
215-875-1080 



The Fine Arts Department provides 
srudents interested in Painting 'Drawing, 
Printmaking/Book Arts, and Sculpture an 
integrated opportunity to experience these 
fine arts media and concepts on the 
sophomore level. In the junior and senior 
years, concentrations in each area allow for 
further development of the individual 
student as an emerging contemporary artist 
and professional. 

Engaging diverse media from charcoal to 
the computer, Fine Arts graduates find 
career opportunities as professional, 
exhibiting artists, curarors and gallery 
personnel, crirics, mural and portrait 
painters, decorative artists, set designers, 
printmakers, book binders, paper and book 
conservarors, graphic designers, commercial 
printers, mold-makers, commercial 
sculptors, cinematic prop makers, special 
effect artists, and teachers at elementary, 
secondary and university levels. 



Painting/Drawing 

Gerald Nichols 

Coordinator 
215-875-1080 

The Painting/Drawing concentration 
provides a firm basis for students to develop 
a professional involvement with their work. 
A balance is sought between the acquisition 
of studio skills and the development of a 
critical intelligence. 

Students are encouraged, through the 
rigor of studio activity, to understand the 
breadth of art in both its traditional and 
contemporary forms, and to gain increasing 
authority in their own work. 

Courses evolve from the study of basic 
working methods and concepts to the 
refinements of personal vision and aesthetic 
judgment. In the final semester of the 
senior year, each student is required to 
complete a thesis project, which culminates 
in a formal presentation of a paper and an 
exhibition of a coordinated body of work. 

The faculty of pracricing professional 
artists represents a diversity of attitudes and 
ideals. Through the format of studio 
instruction, dialogue, and critique, they 
seek to instill in each student a habit of 
self-instruction which will serve far beyond 
the program at the University. 

The Painting/Drawing Department 
features its own gallery space where faculty, 
students, alumni, and invited artists have 
an opportunity to exhibit their work. 

Studio activity is augmented by lectures, 
symposia, seminars, visiting artists, and 
field trips to museums and galleries. 



Painting/Drawing Faculty 

Eugene Baguskas 

Associate Professor 
BFA, Yale University 

Eileen Goodman 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of An 

Gerald Herdman 

Associate Professor 

Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Steven Jaffe 

Associate Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

David Kettner 

Professor 

BFA, Cleveland institute of Art 

MFA, Indiana Univetsity 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MA, Florida State University 

Eileen Neff 
Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, Temple University 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Gerald Nichols 

Professor 

Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Boris Putterman 

Associate Professor 

Diploma, Cooper Union School of Art 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 



Painting/Drawing 
Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

Required Courses: 

PT202A/B Sophomore Painting 6.0 

FA 222 A Drawing: Form and Space 3.0 
Select 9 credits from the following courses: 9-0 
SC 201 Sculpture I 3.0 or 

SC 202 Sculpture II 3.0 

FA 222 B Drawing: 

Form and Space 3.0 or 
FA 223 Figure Modeling 3.0 or 

FA 205 Concepts/Works 

on Paper 3.0 

PR 201 Relief/Monotype 3.0 or 

PR 204 Screen/Etching 3.0 
Liberal Arts 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Credi 



Junior 

Required Courses: 

FA 333 A/B Attitudes/Strategies 6.0 

PT 302 A/B Junior Painting 6.0 

Related Arrs Electives ** 6.0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 

Junior Year Total 



30.0 



Senior Credits 

Required Courses: 

PT 402 A/B Senior Painting 6.0 

PT 424 Drawing References 3.0 

PT 450 Advanced Projects 3.0 

Related Arts Electives ** 12.0 

Liberal Arts 6.0 
Senior Year Total 



30.0 



** Related Arts Electives 

Total of 21 credits - must include at least 

9 studio credits outside of the Fine Arts 

Department. 



61 



Printmaking/Book Arts 

Lois M. Johnson 
Coordinator 
215-875-1119 

The Printmaking concentration bases its 
instructional program on the development 
and realization of visual ideas through 
multiple image-making processes. The 
primary objectives are to develop concep- 
tual abilities and technical proficiencies 
leading the student to acquire personal 
imagery and professional competence in 
printmaking media. 

The department provides the expertise 
of a faculty of professional artists for study 
in traditional and contemporary methods. 
The major graphic media explored include 
relief processes, etching (intaglio), lithogra- 
phy-stone, metal plate, and offset and 
waterbased screenprinting and non-silver 
photographic printmaking. Courses in 
book and typographic design stimulate 
experimentation in unifying the elements of 
paper, prints, typography, and bookbinding. 

Visiting artists, field trips, and guest 
lecturers supplement the studio experience. 
Using the city as an extended workshop, 
Print students attend seminars and museum 
collections. The Print Study Seminar is 
held in the Print Room at the Philadelphia 
Museum of Art and furnishes a unique 
opportunity to study original prints from the 
fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. 

The main emphasis over the three-year 
undergraduare period of study is on the 
evolution of students as artists who make 
individualized demands upon rhe media. 
As with any study in the fine arts, the 
experience should be multidimensional, 
reflective of a broad range of personal and 
professional involvement, and reinforced 
with stimulation from related areas of 
interest, including drawing, painting, 
photography, graphic design, illustration, 
sculpture, and crafts. 

The undergraduate curriculum is 
enhanced by the graduate program in Book 
Arrs/Printmaking. This two-year course of 
study of 60 credits culminates in a Master 
of Fine Arts Degree. The program provides 
the oppottunity for individual artist's 
expression in limited edition bookworks. 
Undergraduate students work alongside 
MFA candidates in studios, workshops, and 
some major and elective classes. (Students 
interested in the MFA degree in Book 
Arts/Printmaking should contact the 
Department of Printmaking or the Office 
of Admissions.) 



Facilities 

The Prinrmaking Deparrment provides 
extensive facilities for waterbased 
screenprinting, stone and plate lithography, 
relief, etching and non-silver phorographic 
processes. The bookbinding room houses 
book presses, board shear, and a guillotine 
paper curter. The letterpress studio 
contains three Vandercook presses for 
printing handset type and polymer plates 
over 100 fonrs of varied type. The offset 
lithography press room features a Davidson 
901 offset press used by the students for 
hands-on experience. 

Another impottant resource is the 
Borowsky Cenrer for Publication Arts, 
which is equipped with a Heidelberg 
KORS offset press and full darkroom for 
experimental and production printing of 
student, faculty, and visiting artist works. 



Printmaking Faculty 

Carol Barton 

Lecturer 

BFA, Washington University 

Denise Carbone 

Lecturer 

BFA, Glassboro Srate College 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

James Dupree 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, Columbus College of Art 

and Design 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

James Green 

Lecturer 

BFA, Oberlin College 
MPh, Yale University 
MLA, Columbia University 

Lori Hamilton-Spencer 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, State University of New York, 

Purchase 
MFA, The Universiry of the Arts 

Lois M. Johnson 

Professor 

BS, University of North Dakota 

MFA, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MA, Florida State University 

Hedi Kyle 

Senior Lecturer 

Diploma, Werk-Kunstschule Wiesbaden, 
West Germany 



62 



Peter Lister 

Senior Lecturer 

Pennsylvania Academy ot the Fine Arts 

The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia 

Mary Phelan 

Associate Professor 

BS, The College of Saint Rose 

MA, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Anthony Rosati 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, Rider College 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Patricia M. Smith 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Immaculata College 

MAEd, Philadelphia College of Art 

Sarah Van Keuren 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, Swarthmore College 
MFA, University of Delaware 



Printmaking 

Credit Requirements 



Credits 



Sophomore 

Required Courses: 

FA 222 A Drawing: Form 
and Space 
Relief Printing 
Screen/Etching 
Sophomore Painting 
Sculpture I 

Choose 3 credits from the following courses: 3.0 

FA 222 B Drawing: Form 

and Space 3.0 or 

Figure Modeling 3.0 or 

Concepts/Works 

on Paper 3.0 

12.0 



PR 201 
PR 204 
PT202 
SC201 



FA 223 
FA 205 



Liberal Arts 



Sophomore Year Total 


30.0 


Junior 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




FA 333 A/B Attitudes/Straregies 


6.0 


PR 300 Lithography 


3.0 


PR 306 Print Study Seminar ] 


1.5 


PR 307 Book Arts: Concepts 




and Structure 


3.0 


Related Arts Electives * 


6.0 


Liberal Arts 


12.0 


Junior Year Total 


31.5 


Senior 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PR 400 Printmaking: 




Advanced Workshop 


3.0 


PR 406 Print Study Seminar 1 


(I 1.5 


PR 407 A/B Thesis Seminar I-II 


3.0 


PR 420 Thesis Workshop 


3.0 


Related Arts Electives * 


12.0 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 



Senior Year Total 



28.5 



* Related Arts Electives 

Total of 21 credits - must include at least 

9 studio credits outside of the Fine Arts 

Department. 



63 



Sculpture 

Barry Parker 

Coordinator 
215-875-4885 

Sculpture reflects one of the deepest 
creative impulses of artistic endeavor. 
Sculptors today are called upon to create 
images that range in size from coins to 
monuments. Usually working as indepen- 
dent artists, sculptors make objects for 
exhibition and sale, or work on commission 
for architects and planners. 

The Sculpture concentration offers 
instruction and experience in both the 
traditional and the most innovative aspects 
of the art. Resources are available for work 
in clay, wood, stone, ferrous and nonferrous 
metals, plaster, wax, and plastic. 

The department's instructional aim is to 
provide a sound, balanced exposute to the 
formal technical and intellectual aspects of 
sculpture, in preparation fot continued 
professional growth beyond the under- 
graduate years. The curriculum is carefully 
designed to provide both disciplined 
instruction and time for individual creative 
development. 

At the introductory level, fundamentals 
of sculpture are taught along with technical 
procedures in a variety of materials. At 
advanced levels, students may specialize 
and are incteasingly expected to initiate and 
complete works reflecting their own artistic 
interests under critical supervision. 

Studio and shop facilities are comprehen- 
sive and include air tools for carving, a 
foundry for bronze and aluminum casting, a 
wood and fabricating shop, a complete 
metal shop for forging and three types of 
welding, and a moldmaking shop. Techni- 
cal assistance and supervision in the 
facilities is provided by a full-time shop 
supervisor who is in charge of maintaining 
the equipment. 

Faculty members are chosen from a 
variety of backgrounds, and field trips to 
New York, Washington, and neighboring 
museums serve to expand students' visions. 



Sculpture Faculty 

Harvey Citron 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA Ed, Pratt Institute 

Diploma, Academy of Fine Arts, Rome 

Laura Frazure 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Jeanne Jaffe 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Arr, Temple 

University 
MFA, Alfred University 

Elsa Johnson 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Cooper Union 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Barbara Lekberg 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, MA, University of Iowa 

Mashiko 

Senior Lecturer 

Brooklyn Museum School of Art 

Barry Parker 

Professor 

BFA, Eastern Michigan Universiry 

MFA, University of Massachusetts 

John Phillips 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Temple University 

Thomas Stearns 

Associate Professor 
Memphis Academy of Art 
Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Academy di Belli Arti, Venice IT 



Sculpture Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

Required Courses: 

SC 201 Sculpture I 3.0 

SC 202 Sculpture I 3.0 

FA 223 Figure Modeling 3.0 

Select 9 credits from the following courses: 9-0 
PT 202 A Sophomore Painting 3.0 or 
PT 202 B Sophomore Painting 3.0 

PR 201 Relief/Monotype 3.0 or 
PR 204 Screen/Etching 3.0 

FA 222 B Drawing: 

Form and Space 3.0 or 

FA 223 Figure Modeling 3-0 or 
FA 205 Concepts/Works 

on Paper 3.0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Junior Credits 
Required Courses: 

FA 333 A/B Attitudes/Strategies 6.0 

Sculpture Electives * 6.0 

Related Arts Electives ** 6.0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 



Junior Year Total 


30.0 


Senior 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




SC401 Sculpture III 


3.0 


SC 402 Sculpture III 


3.0 


Sculpture Electives * 


6.0 


Related Arts Electives ** 


12.0 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 



Senior Year Total 30.0 



* Sculpture Electives 

Choose from: 

SC 220 A Molding and Casting 

SC 241 Intro, to Sculpture Projects 

SC 242 Intro, to Sculpture Projects 

SC 260 A Structure of the Figure 

SC 260 B Structure of the Figure 

SC 321 Carving 

SC421 Metals" 

SC 431 A Advanced Figure Modeling 

SC 431 B Advanced Figure Modeling 

SC 441 Advanced Projects 

SC 442 Advanced Projects 

** Related Arts Electives 

Total of 21 credits - must include at least 

9 studio credits outside of the Fine Arts 

Department. 



64 



Graphic Design 



Chris Myers 
Chairperson 
215-875-1060 

The foundation of graphic design is the 
combination of words, numbers, symbols, 
drawings, photographs, and diagrams to 
communicate information, ideas, and 
emotions. Designets work across several 
media and venues-from handmade images 
to digital images, from still images to time- 
based communications, from print-otiented 
problems to communications in cyberspace. 

Throughout the three years of major 
concentration, problems in graphic com- 
munication are combined with exploratory 
and experimental studies in drawing, color, 
photography, typography, and emerging 
technologies. The curriculum is supple- 
mented by special lecture programs; 
workshops with invited design firms; and 
on-site studio seminars in selected design 
offices and studios, paper and printing 
plants, museums and libraries, and with 
film and computer graphic producers. 

Opportunities for additional study in fine 
arts, illustration, photography, animation, 
filmmaking, and emerging technologies are 
available. 

With successful completion of the 
program, students are prepared for entry- 
level positions as graphic designers with 
design studios, publishets, corporations, 
nonprofit institutions, governmental 
agencies, architects and planners, network 
or cable broadcasters, film and video 
producers, or advertising agencies. 

The faculty are practicing professionals 
with distinguished records of accomplish- 
ment, sensitive and responsive to the 
changes in the field of design, yet not 
limited by its current practices. 



Graphic Design Faculty 

Hans Allemann 

Adjunct Professor 

Swiss National Diploma, School of Design, 
Basel, Switzerland 

Jan Almquist 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Laurence Bach 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Graduate Study, School of Design, 
Basel, Switzerland 

Deborah Drodvillo 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
BFA, Cooper Union 
MFA, Yale University 

Inge Druckrey 

Professor 

AB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland 
Swiss National Diploma, School of Design, 
Basel, Switzerland 

Richard Felton 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BS in Design, University of Cincinnati 

MFA, Yale University 

Kenneth Hiebert 

Professor 

BA, Bethel College 

Swiss National Diploma, School of Design, 
Basel, Switzerland 

William Longhauser 

Professor 

BS in Design, University of Cincinnati 
MFA, Indiana University 
Graduate Study, School of Design, 
Basel, Switzerland 

Chris Myers 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Toledo 

MFA, Yale University 

Chris Zelinsky 

Associate Professor 

Swiss National Diploma, School of Design, 
Basel, Switzerland 



Graphic Design 
Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

Required Courses: 

GD 210 Letterform Design 6.0 

GD211 Descriptive Drawing 6.0 

GD213 Design Systems 6.0 

PF 21 1 A Intro to Photography 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts 6.0 

Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Junior Credits 
Required Courses: 

GD 306 Typography Emphasis 6.0 

GD311 Communications 6.0 
EM 304 Production/Elec. Media 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 

Junior Year Total 



30.0 



Senior Credits 

Required Courses: 

GD411 A Design Studio 3.0 
GD411 B Design Studio: 

Senior Degree Project 3.0 

GD412 Problem Solving 6.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 

Senior Year Total 30.0 



65 



Illustration 



Phyllis Purves-Smith 

Chairperson 
215-875-1070 

Illustrators give visual substance to 
thoughts, stories, and ideas. The Illustra- 
tion Department seeks to prepare its 
students for entry into the fields of book 
and periodical publishing, promotion, 
education, advertising, and specialty fields. 

Illustrators must call upon a broad 
range of traditional and up-to-date 
competencies to respond to today's visual 
problems. As visual problem-solvers and 
communicators, illustrators need to be 
open-minded, eclectic, flexible, and 
imaginative. The illustrator's solution 
should be appropriate, intelligent, 
exptessive, and visually engaging. 

In order to prepare for a career in this 
competitive field, The University of the 
Arts Illustration student develops skills 
that encompass two-dimensional media: 
from painting and drawing to photography, 
technical image-making, teptoduction 
processes, and emerging opportunities in 
electronic imaging. Students may 
concentrate on either a design oriented or 
pictorially oriented curriculum. These 
skills are nurtured within a stimulating 
cultural climate provided by the resources 
of the faculty, visiting professionals, the 
University, and the city at large. Each 
student progresses trom general competen- 
cies to a personal viewpoint, clarified career 
goals, and a professional attitude. 



Illustration Faculty 

Christine Cantera 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts 

Michael Dooling 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Glassboro State College 

MFA, Syracuse University 

Jonathan Ellis 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Renee Foulks 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Moore College of Art 

MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 



Robert Stein 

Professor 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Stephen Tarantal 

Professor 

BFA, Cooper Union 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Mark Tocchet 

Associate Professor 

BFA, School of Visual Arts 



Illustration 

Credit Requirements 





Sophomore 


Credits 


Ralph Giguere 


Required Courses: 




Adjunct Associate Professor 


IL 200 Pictorial Foundations 


6.0 


BFA, The University of the Arts 


IL 202 Figure Anatomy 


6.0 




IL 204 Typogtaphy 


3.0 


Al Gury 


Required Studio: 




Senior Lecturer 


PF 209 Photo for Illustrators 


3.0 


BA, St. Louis University 


Liberal Arts 


12.0 


Lars Hokanson 


Sophomore Year Total 


30.0 


Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 


Junior 

Required Courses: 

IL 300 Illustration Methods 


Credits 


MFA, Royal College of Art, London 


6.0 


Sabin Howard 


IL 301 Design Methods 3.0 
IL 302 Figurative Communication 3 


Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts 

MFA, New York Academy of Art 


Select 3 credits from the following courses: 3-0 
IL 303 Figure Utilization II 3.0 
IL 304 Sequential Format 3-0 


Paul King 

Senior Lecturer 


Studio Electives 
Liberal Arts 


6.0 
9.0 


Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy 


Junior Year Total 


30.0 


of Fine Aft 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Boston University 


Senior 

Required Courses: 

IL 400 Illustration 


Credits 
6.0 


Earl Lewis 

Lecturer 

BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 


IL 403 Portfolio Seminar 
Studio Electives 
Liberal Arts 


6.0 
9.0 
9.0 


University 


Senior Year Total 


30.0 


Philip Singer 






Lecturer 






BFA, School of Visual Arts 






Phyllis Purves-Smith 






Associate Professor 






BFA, Cooper Union 






MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 






University 







66 



Industrial Design 

Anthony Guido 

Chairperson 
215-875-1040 

The Industrial Design Department 
provides a professional education for those 
wishing to bring beauty and appropriate- 
ness to the products, presentations, and 
settings of modern sociery. The program 
prepares students fot careers in product, 
packaging, and exhibit design, as well as 
for the design of communications, furni- 
ture, equipment, vehicles, and interiors. 
Ir also addresses problems of human factots 
research, computer-aided design, product 
development, manufacturing, marketing, 
and a host of other considerations related 
to the humanistic uses of technology. 

Industtial Design involves considerable 
conceptual experimentation. An encom- 
passing search into the enlarged product 
fotmation provides a forum in which 
students can draw from every source: high- 
technology, fine-arts, industrial production, 
architectural consttuctions, invention, 
social behavior, craft techniques, and 
industrial design culture. 

The department places emphasis on 
the development of graphic, sculptural, 
and spatial design skills as a complement 
to creative problem solving, technical 
innovation, and effective communications 
during the solution of actual problems 
of design. 

After initial coursework to introduce 
basic design and production processes, 
includingcomputer-aided design and model 
making, students begin to develop and 
apply theory, skill, and knowledge to real 
design problems, many brought into the 
studio by industry. Visiting designers also 
bring knowledge of current design, 
manufactuting, and marketing practices 
into studio and lecture courses, while visits 
to industry provide opportunities fot direct 
observation and firsthand knowledge of 
manufacturing processes. Based on this 
foundation of skills, experience, and 
information, emphasis in the final year 
shifts the responsibility for knowledge of 



design to the individual student, who 
works directly with a client/sponsor on a 
thesis project prior to gtaduation. During 
the final semestet the instructional focus 
also shifts to career planning, portfolio 
preparation, and the development of 
information gathering and business 
communication skills to better prepare the 
student to enter the job market. 

Due to the wide scope, and creative yet 
practical character of an Industrial Design 
education, many career opportunities await 
the graduate: with consulting fitms, 
corporate design staffs, manufacturing 
firms, exhibit houses, retailers, advertising 
agencies, tesearch organizations, museums, 
educational institutions, and government 
agencies, all of whom recognize the need to 
constantly improve the appearance, 
manufacture, performance, and social value 
of their products. 



Industrial Design Faculty 

Charles Burnette 

Professor, Joseph Carreiro Professorship 
in Design 

BAtch, MArch, PhD 
University of Pennsylvania 

Jean Gerth 

Senior Lecturer 

BSID, Ohio State University 

Anthony Guido 

Chair, Associate Professor 
BSID, Ohio State University 

Jamer Hunt 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
BA, Brown University 
PhD, Rice University 

Frederique Krupa 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

MA, The Parsons School of Design 

Jonas Milder 

Assistant Professor 

BID, Fachhochschule fuer Gestaltung 

MID, Hochschule der Kuenste 

Karl Olsen 

Lecturer 

BS, The University of the Arts 

Karim Rashid 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
BID, ADI (Rome, Italy) 



Industrial Design 
Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

Required Courses: 

ID 200 Studio 1: Projects 6.0 

ID 220 Studio 2: Techniques 6.0 

ID 290 Design Issues Seminar 3.0 

ID 214 Materials and Processes 3.0 

Studio Electives 3-0 

Liberal Arts 9.0 
Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Junior Credits 
Required Courses: 

ID 300 Studio 3: Projects 6.0 

ID 320 Studio 4: Techniques 6.0 

ID 326 Intro to Human Factors 3.0 
ID 327 Contempotary Technologies 

Seminar 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts 12.0 

Junior Year Total 



33.0 



Senior Credits 
Required Courses: 

ID 400 Studio 5: Projects 6.0 
ID 420 Studio 6: Professional Comm. 6.0 

ID 490 Design Seminar 6.0 

Srudio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts 9.0 
Senior Year Total 



30.0 



Recommended Electives 

While none of the following are required 

for graduation, rhey are recommended by 

the department. 

ID 113 Freshman ID 

ID 312 Architectonics 

ID 425 Advanced Computer 

Aided Design 
PF 208 Photography for Industrial 

Designer 
CR 252 ID Plaster Wotkshop 
EM 110 Computer Conceprs 
HU 251 History of Design 
HU 452 Topics of Design 



67 



Media Arts 



Harris Fogel 

Chairperson 
215/875-1020 

The Media Arts Department offers major 
concentrations in photography, film/video, 
and animation while providing elective 
classes to the University at large. The 
three-year curriculum of each major is built 
around a sequence of classes designed to 
move the student to a position of indepen- 
dence within the discipline. An introduc- 
tion to the fundamental ideas and tech- 
niques or the medium fills much of the 
sophomore year. During the two remaining 
years, the student is expected to refine 
techniques, develop a sense of personal 
vision, identify goals, and pursue activities 
directly related to professional practice. 

The Media Arts Department provides 
extensive studio facilities and equipment 
for students enrolled in its courses. A 
nominal fee is required for access. 

Philadelphia's professional resources have 
allowed the department to develop an 
extensive internship program for advanced 
Media Arts majors. This program allows 
students to gain professional experience 
while earning academic credit. Internship 
sponsors have included commercial 
photography studios; galleries; indepen- 
dent artists; animation, film, video, and 
multimedia production houses; television 
stations; medical facilities; magazine and 
book publishers; and digital imaging 
studios. 

The Media Arts Department also offers 
minor concentrations in all three of its 
programs-film/video, animation, and 
photography, which are available to 
students majoring in studio areas outside 
of the Media Arts Department. Those 
interested in this option should consult 
with both their major advisor and the 
Media Arts Department. 



Media Arts Faculty 

George Akerley 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BM, Composition, Philadelphia 

Musical Academy 
MM, Composition, Philadelphia College 

of Performing Arts 

Laurence Bach 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Graduate Study, School of Design, 
Basel Switzerland 

Lowell Boston 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

MFA, California Institute of the Arts 

John J. Carlano 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

A.D. Coleman 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Hunter College 

MA, San Francisco State College 

Connie Coleman 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

John Columbus 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, Hartford Art School 
MFA, Columbia University School 
of the Arrs 

David Deneen 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 



David Fain 

Lecturer 

BFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

MFA, California Institute of the Arts 

Alida Fish 

Professor 

BA, Smith College 

MFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 

Harris Fogel 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Humboldt State University 

MA, New York University 

Michael Gitlin 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Indiana University 

MFA, Batd College 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Jenny Lynn 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Tylet School of Art, Temple 
University 

Gabriel Martinez 

Lecturer 

BFA, University of Florida, Gainsville 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Nora Monroe 

Lecturer 

BA, Ohio State University 

MFA, Temple University 

Bernardo Morillo 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Nicholas Muellner 
Lecturer 

BA, Yale University 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Vladan Nikolic 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Belgrade University 

MA, The New School for Social Research 

Jeannie Pearce 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 

MFA, University of Delaware 



68 



Peter Rose 

Professor 

BA, City College of New York 

MA, San Francisco State College 

John Serpentelli 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

MAT, The University of the Arts 

Sandy Sorlien 

Lecturer 

BA, Bennington College 

Louis Squillace 

Lecturer 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 
MFA, University of Oregon 

Karl Staven 

Assistant Professor 
BA, Yale University 
MA, Harvard University 
MFA, New York University 

Lynn Tomlinson 

Assistant Professor 
BA, Cornell University 
MA, The University of the Arrs 
MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Jayne Wexler 

Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
and Design 

John Wood in 

Lecturer 

BFA, University of New Orleans 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Ken Yanoviak 

Lecturer 

BA, Temple University 



Photography 

This program prepares students for a 
wide range of careers in photography by 
providing a solid grounding in traditional 
photography and digital imaging. In the 
sophomore year, students receive in-depth 
training in craft and ideas fundamental to 
photographic imaging. Technical exercises 
concentrate on electronic imaging as well as 
on traditional black and white and color 
processes. The curriculum covers both 
descriptive photography and more 
experimental manipulated image making. 

During the junior year, students 
consider photogtaphic forms beyond the 
traditional print such as the photogtaphic 
book, non-silver processes, and installation 
work. Large-format photography and 
studio practice with its control of artificial 
lighting are also part of the junior curricu- 
lum. In both the junior and senior 
years, students may putsue the study of 
specialized issues on an elective basis, 
including illustration and editorial 
photography, photojournalism, environ- 
mental portraiture, creative portfolio 
development, advanced digital imaging, 
and professional practice. 

The senior year primarily involves the 
production of an independent body of work 
of the student's own choosing and direc- 
tion. The senior thesis provides the 
oppottunity to begin the process of self- 
definition as photographer and artist. A 
required senior-level course in photographic 
criticism, coupled with tequired classes in 
the history of photography, culminates the 
strong emphasis that the department places 
on critical thinking and self expression in 
wotds as well as through photographs. 

An outstanding resource available to 
students of photography is the Paradigm 
lecture series, hosted by the Media Arts 
Department each spring. Through this 
series, photographers of national and 
international reputation visit the campus 
to discuss their work and meet with 
the students. 



Photography 
Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 
Required Courses: 

PF210A Introduction to Film I 3.0 
PF 21 1 A/B Introduction to 

Photography I & II 6.0 

PF217 Color Concepts 3.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts* 12.0 
Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Junior Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 31 1 A/B Junior Photo Workshop 

I & II 6.0 

PF 313 A/B Basic Photo Studio I & II 6.0 
PF 315 Digital Photography 

Wotkshop 3.0 

Select 3 credits from the following courses: 3.0 
PF 323 Selected Topics: Photo 3.0 

PF 413 Professional Practices 3.0 

PF 499 Internship 3.0 

PF 999 Independent Study 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts * 9.0 



Junior Year Total 


30.0 


Senior 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PF 411 A/B Senior Photo 




Wotkshop I & II 


6.0 


PF 415 A/B Senior Photo 




Seminar I & II 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


9.0 


Liberal Arts * 


9.0 



Senior Year Total 



30.0 



* Please note: HU 255 History of 
Photography is tequired of all Photogtaphy 
majors as part of the total Liberal Arts 
distribution. 



69 



Film/Video 

The independent film and video artist 
serves as the model for our program in 
both live-action film and animation. At the 
same time, a solid preparation and 
foundation in craft has enabled an extremely 
high percentage of our graduates to enter 
the professional field as free-lance editors, 
sound recordists, cinematographers, 
technicians, animators, screenwriters, 
and directors. 

The filmmaking area provides its 
students with a background in all phases 
of film and video production, including 
film cinematogtaphy, videography, film 
and video editing, and sound/image 
manipulation. As in still photography, the 
filmmaking students acquire a strong 
background in criticism, theory, and 
history of media. All film/video majors 
pursue at least one practical internship as 
part of the degree requirements. 

Media study at the University has 
been supplemented by a number of other 
activities, including the Paradigm 
Lecture Series. Through this series, 
which occurs each spring, film and video 
artists of national and international 
reputation have visited the campus for 
lectures and screenings. 



Film/Video 

Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 210 A/B Introduction to 

Film I & II 6.0 
PF 211 A Introduction to 

Photography I 3.0 
PF212A Animation Drawing I 3.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts* 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 30.0 



Junior Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 310 A/B Junior Cinema 

Production I & II 6.0 

WM219 Writing for Film 3.0 
PF 324 Film Forum: 

Selected Topics 3.0 

PF 320 Film Sound 3.0 

PF 322 Media Technology 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts * 9.0 
Junior Year Total 



30.0 



Senior Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 410 A/B Senior Cinema 

Production I & II 6.0 
PF 424 Time: A Multi- 
disciplinary Seminar 3-0 
PF 499 Internship 3.0 
Studio Electives 90 
Liberal Arts * 9.0 
Senior Year Total 30.0 



Animation 

Animation brings together a wide variety 
of interests and skills. While the final 
presentation utilizes the technology of 
filmmaking, the visual materials being 
animated may be generated through such 
diverse disciplines as painting and drawing, 
sculpture, illustration, graphic arts, and 
still photography. The Animation program 
offets instruction in both traditional and 
experimental approaches to the medium. 

This broad-based approach has allowed 
graduates to obtain professional positions 
both in the animation industry and as 
independent free-lancers. Alumni become 
directors, storyboard artists, production 
assistants, special-effects animators, and 
character designers. 

Animation 

Credit Requirements 

Sophomore Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 210 A/B Introduction to 

Film I & II 6.0 

PF 212 A/B Animation Drawing I & U 6.0 
PF 216 Computer Animation I 3.0 

Studio Electives 3-0 

Liberal Arts* 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 



* WM 251 and WM 252 Narrative Cinema 
I & II are required of all Film/Video majors 
as part of the total liberal arts distribution. 



33.0 



Junior Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 312 A/B Junior Animation 

Workshop I & II 6.0 

PF 316 Computer Animation II 3.0 

PF 320 Film Sound 3.0 

PF 322 Media Technology 3.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts * 9.0 

Junior Year Total 30.0 



Senior Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 412 A/B Seniot Animation 

Workshop I & II 6.0 

WM219 Writing for Film 3.0 or 

or 

PF 424 Time: A Multi- 

disciplinary Seminar 3-0 

PF 324 Film Forum: 

Selected Topics 3.0 

Studio Electives 9-0 

Liberal Arts * 9-0 

Senior Year Total 30.0 



* WM 251 and WM 252 Narrative Cinema 
I & II are required of all Animation majors 
as part ot the total Liberal Arts distribution. 



Film/Animation 

This dual Film/Animation major requires 
132 credirs for graduation. 



Film/ Animation 
Credit Requirements 



Sophomore 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PF210A/B Introduction to 




Film I & II 


6.0 


PF 211 A Introduction to 




Photography I 


3.0 


PF212A/B Introduction to 




Animation I & II 


6.0 


PF 216 Computer Animation 


I 3.0 


Studio Electives 


3.0 


Liberal Arts * 


12.0 


Sophomore Year Total 


33.0 


Junior 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PF310A/B Junior Cinema 




Production I & II 


6.0 


PF312A/B Junior Animation 




Workshop I & II 


6.0 


PF 316 Computer Animation 


II 3.0 


PF 320 Film Sound 


3.0 


PF 322 Media Technology 


3.0 


Studio Electives 


3.0 


Liberal Arts * 


9.0 


Junior Year Total 


33.0 



Senior Credits 

Required Courses: 
PF410A/B Senior Cinema 

Production I & II 6.0 

PF412A/B Senior Animation 





Workshop I & II 6.0 


WM219 


Writing for Film 3.0 or 


or 
PF424 


Time: A Multi- 




disciplinary Seminar 3.0 


PF 324 


Film Forum: 




Selected Topics 3.0 


PF499 


Internship 3.0 


Studio Electives 3.0 


Liberal Arts 


* 9.0 


Senior Year Total 33.0 



* WM 251 and WM 252 Narrative 
Cinema I & II are required of all Film/ 
Animation majors as part of the total 
Liberal Atts distribution. 



Art Education 



Janis Norman 

Chairperson and Direcror 
215-875-4881 or 4882 

Pre-Certification 
Concentration in Art 
Education 

The teaching of art is a profession that 
allows for the artist-teacher's continued 
growth while nurturing the aesthetic and 
creative experience of others. Recent 
national as well as statewide attention to 
education and to the role of the arts in 
education makes this an especially good 
time for students to consider becoming an 
art teacher and artist. In preparing 
students for careers in art education, the 
University is committed to the ideal of 
exemplary teachers who are also able to 
produce their own competent works. To 
that end, the University offers a flexible 
program of competency-based education at 
the undergraduate level to prepare students 
to complete a professional certification 
program after graduation or within a nine- 
semester undergraduate program. 

The Pre-Certification concentration is 
designed to be taken in conjunction with a 
regular studio major in the BFA program. 
In addition to meeting the requirements of 
a major studio department, students 
enrolled in the teacher certification 
program take courses in the Art Education 
Department, plus prescribed courses in 
liberal arts, photography, electronic media, 
and other studio areas. These courses are 
taken within the general Liberal Arts and 
studio electives requirements. 



The Art Education concentration 
provides a strong theoretical and practical 
foundation for teaching as a career. 
Through field experiences starting in the 
sophomore year, the student is able to 
explore teaching in a variety of traditional 
and alternative settings. Students are also 
provided with the necessary competencies 
in teaching Discipline-Based Art Education 
and the state and national standards 
through special studies in education 
combined with liberal arts coursework in 
art history, aesthetics, criticism, social 
sciences, plus psychology, and studies in 
studio production. 

The Pre-Certification Concentration may 
be taken in its entirety or in part to fit 
individual plans and needs. Students who 
satisfactorily complete the program will be 
able to enroll directly in the Professional 
Semester, completing the student-teaching 
requirement, the PRAXIS National 
Teachers Exam, and qualifying for the 
Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate to 
teach Art K-12 in as little as one regular 
semester beyond the bachelor's degree. 
Anothet viable alternative is that qualified 
graduates may enter the Master of Arts in 
Teaching program in which it is possible to 
earn a Masters degree and certification in as 
little as one additional year. 

The Pre-Certification progtam, if taken 
in conjunction with the BFA degree, allows 
for the majority of the concentration in Art 
Education to be completed within the lour 
years required for the bachelor's degree. 
The remaining requirements for certifica- 
tion may be completed in one additional 
professional semester, in which AE 659 
Student Teaching Practicum is taken, along 
with AE 552 The Art of Teaching. 



Academic Regulations 

Students working toward certification 
are required to maintain a 3-0 cumulative 
average in certification coursework. 
Admission to the Student Teaching 
Practicum is by permission of the depart- 
ment, based on satisfactory completion 
ol all prerequisites, on evidence of promise 
as a teacher demonstrated in prior 
coursework, and on good academic 
standing. A grade of "B" or better in the 
Student Teaching Practicum is required for 
recommendation for certification. 



Art Education Faculty 

Paul Adorno 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, Georgetown University 

MS in Ed, University of Pennsylvania 

Kathy Browning 

Assistant Professor 
BFA, York University 
BEd, University of Toronto 
MFA, York University 
PhD, Univetsity of Toronto 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

MA, University of Nebraska 

Vivian Ford 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BS, MS, Cheyney State College 

PhD, Pennsylvania State University 

Diane Foxman 

Lecturer 

BA, Antioch College 

MA Art Ed, Goddard College 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Delaware 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Janis Norman 

Associate Professor 

BAE, University of Kansas 

MA, University of Missouri, Kansas City 

PhD, University of Kansas 

Susan Rodriguez 

Adjunct Professor 

BFA, MEd, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Barbara Suplee 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, West Chester University 

MEd, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 
PhD, Pennsylvania State University 



Recommended Schedule of 
Courses for Pre-Certification in 
Art Education 



Freshman 

Standard Foundation and 

Liberal Arts Program 

*HU 140 A/B Survey of Visual Art 



6.0 



Sophomore 

First Semester or Second Semester 
AE 200 Presentation Skills 
AE 201 Intro, to Visual Arts 

Education 
*HU 162 Individual and Society 
*HU 270 Introduction to Aesthetics 
*HU 181 Child and Adolescent 

Psychology 



3.0 



*HU 357 Modern Art (preferred choice) 3.0 
or Discipline Art History 3.0 

Junior 

First Semester or Second Semestet 

AE 559 Saturday Practicum 3-0 

*HU 363 Modern Culture 3.0 

or 

*HU 462 American Social Values 3.0 

*HU388 Perception 3.0 

or 

a natural science course 3-0 

*HU 323 Arts Criticism 3.0 

Senior 

First Semester 

AE 547 Program Design/Methods 

in Elementary School 3.0 

AE 548 Program Design/Methods in 

Middle/Secondary School 3-0 

9th/Professional Semester of BFA Program 
AE552 The Art of Teaching 3.0 

AE 659 Student Teaching Practicum 9-0 



Required Studio Electives 

Pre-Certification students should complete 
at least three credits in a two-dimensional 
media if their major is in a three-dimen- 
sional area, and vice versa. Other studio 
work must include at least one course each 
in photography and computer graphics. 



Recommended Electives 
in Art Education 

AE 531 Multicultural Learning 3-0 

1.0 AE 532 Design for Interdisciplinary 

Learning 3.0 

2.0 AE 632 Applications of 
30 Interdisciplinary Learning 3-0 



The Professional Semester 

The Pre-Certification Concentration, 
when coupled with the Professional 
Semester, is accredited by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education as an approved 
program to prepare students to receive 
the Instructional I Certificate to teach 
ArtK-12. 

Since June, 1987, all applicants for 
certification in Pennsylvania must also 
pass the Core Battery and Art Education 
Specialty Test of the PRAXIS Series, 
Professional Assessments for Beginning 
Teachers, of the National Teachers 
Exam, to qualify for the certificate. 

The Professional Semester is an intensive 
experience built around a twelve-week 
student teaching practicum, in which the 
student devotes six weeks to teaching at the 
elementary school level and six weeks to 
teaching at the middle or secondary school 
level under the guidance and supervision of 
highly qualified master teachers and Art 
Education Department faculty. 

Supplementary courses and activities 
complete the preparation of the future 
teacher to enter the profession. The 
professional semester is available ro 
students only after major requiremenrs have 
been met, and normally after graduating 
with a bachelor's degree. 

Professional Semestet or 9th Semester of 
BFA Program 

AE 552 The Art of Teaching 3.0 

AE 659 Student Teaching 

Practicum 9-0 



* Balance of required Liberal Arts. 
** Photography and Computer competency 
is required for certification with a 
minimum requirement of one course in 
each area. 



73 



Art Therapy 



Karen Clark-Schock 
Director 

215-875-4880 

Concentration in Art Therapy 

Art therapy, a well-respected discipline 
within the human services profession, offers 
an exciting career alternative for the studio 
art major. It utilizes att as a nonverbal 
means of communication and self-expres- 
sion, and thereby provides a creative vehicle 
with which to explore personal problems as 
well as personal strengths and potentials. 

Art therapists work with children and 
adults of all ages in a variety of settings. 
These include psychiatric and medical 
hospitals, schools, clinics, community 
centers, nursing homes, drug and alcohol 
treatment clinics. As members of a team, 
art therapists may work with physicians, 
psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers 
and educators. The art therapist uses 
artwork for both diagnosis and treatment. 
Art therapy can also be utilized as a means 
of promoting creativity and wellness, and 
can therefore be viewed as a force in the 
prevention of illness. 

The concenttation in art therapy at The 
University of the Arts gives students a 
chance to explore a career option while 
engaged in undergraduate study. This 
preparation is invaluable when considering 
graduate school. 



Students who do not wish to pursue the 
professional degree will nonetheless find 
that their study of art therapy is beneficial 
in other fields, particularly in education, 
and in their own personal development. 

While enrolled in one of the BFA 
programs of the College, students can also 
elect a concentration in Art Therapy, which 
introduces them to the discipline on the 
undergraduate level. 

Students who elect the Art Thetapy 
program take four designated courses in 
psychology and behavioral science, which 
can also count toward the Liberal Arts 
requirements of their BFA program, and 
fifteen credits of art therapy courses, which 
are considered as studio electives in 
fulfilling the BFA program requirements. 
At gtaduation, Art Therapy Concentration 
students receive a certificate of completion 
in Art Therapy along with the BFA degree. 

AUHS Articulation Agreement 

For the students intetested in applying to 
Allegheny University of the Health 
Sciences, an articulation agreement with 
AUHS gives a limited numbet of qualified 
students guatanteed admission to the 
Master's Degree Program in Art Therapy. 



Art Therapy Faculty 

Karen Clark-Schock 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Rosemont College 
MCAT, Hahnemann University 
PsyD, Immaculata College 

Nancy Gerber 

Lecturer 

BS, Pennsylvania State Univetsity 

MS, Hahnemann University 

Ronald Hays 
Senior Lecturer 
MS, Hahnemann University 



Art Therapy 

Credit Requirements 



Sophomore 


Credits 


HU 181 A 


Child and Adolescent 






Psychology 


3.0 


HU 181 B 


Adult Psychology 


3.0 


Junior 






HU384 


Abnormal Psychology 


3.0 


AT 300 


Intro, to Art Therapy 


3.0 


AT 301 


Social and Group Process 


3.0 


AT 302 


Theories & Tech. Art 






Therapy 


3.0 


Senior 






AT 303 


Clinical Aspects of Att 






Therapy- 


3.0 


AT 401 


Senior Practicum 


3.0 


HU483 


Theories of Personality 


3.0 


Total 




27.0 



74 



Graduate 
Programs 



Graduate study in the College of Att and 
Design is on the cutting edge of today's 
professional att world, providing intensive 
professional preparation in a stimulating 
multi-arts environment. A select range of 
specialized graduate degrees in Fine Arts, 
Design, and Visual Arts Education features 
focused curricula, small classes, dedicated 
faculty, and access to outstanding facilities 
and resources. All programs address 
interarts and/or interdisciplinary issues 
through both studio activity and the 
University Seminars: "Structure and 
Metaphor," and, "Art and Society," which 
brings students together from all graduate 
programs at the College of Art and Design. 
Additionally, all MFA students take the 
University Seminar: "Criticism." 

A University of the Arts education 
extends beyond the classroom and studio. 
Through partnerships, workshops, 
residencies, internships, and symposia, 
students engage the larger art, design, and 
education communities and interact 
with some of today's most important 
artists, designers and educators in a broad 
range of disciplines. 



Master of Fine 
Arts in Book Arts/ 
Printmaking 

Mary Phelan 
Director 
215-875-1119 

The Master of Fine Arts Degtee in Book 
Arts/Printmaking is built upon the 
University's forty-year tradition of 
involvement with the book and printed 
image. Open to all qualified students with 
an undergraduate degree in Liberal Arts, 
Design, Photography, Printmaking or Fine 
Arts, the program emphasizes the artist's 
demands upon the book as an art form. 
The course of study, based upon each 
student's interest and level of experience, 
allows for the advancement of conceptual 
abilities while developing technical 
proficiencies in both traditional and state- 
of-the-art processes. Investigation of 
related fields of study in studio arts and 
liberal arts encourages an approach that is 
experimental, interdisciplinary and 
reflective of a broad range of personal and 
professional involvement. 



The sixty-credit, two-yeat program is 
offered within the Printmaking Depart- 
ment and draws upon the expertise of a 
faculty of professional artists and a full 
complement of technical facilities. Visiting 
artists, field trips, and guest lecturers 
supplement the studio experience. Access 
to Philadelphia's rich heritage of public and 
private collections furnishes a unique 
opportunity to study rare and contemporary 
manuscripts, prints and books. Internships 
in professional book and print-related 
organizations and libraries are available for 
qualified students. 

Specialized Facilities 

In addition to studios for stone and plate 
lithography, intaglio and relief printing, 
waterbased screenprinting, and non-silver 
photography, the Printmaking Department 
contains a bookbinding room with 
stationary vertical and portable book 
presses, a tabletop and floor board shear, 
and a guillotine paper cutter. The 
letterpress studio is equipped with 4 
Vandercook proof presses, a photopolymer 
platemaking system, and over 150 fonts of 
foundry type and monotype in varied style 
and size. The offset lithography pressroom 
holds an ATF-Davidson offset press and an 
ATF-Davidson Super Chief two-color press 
tor hands-on experience. 



MFA in Book Arts/Printmaking Credit Requirements 

Year One 

PR 600 A/B Book Arts Colloquium 

PR610A/B01 Book Arts Studio 

PR 610 A/B 02 Book Arts Studio 

PR 623 A/B Bookbinding , 

PR 626 Offset Lithography 

GR 692 University Seminat: Art & Society 

Liberal Arts or Studio Electives 



Year Two 

PR 700 A/B Book Arts Colloquium 

PR 710 A/B 01 MFA Thesis Studio 

PR 7 10 A/B 02 MFA Thesis Studio 

PR 723 A/B Bookbinding 

GR 691 University Seminar: Structure and Metaphor 

GR 791 University Seminar: Criticism 

Liberal Arts or Studio Electives 



Total Credits 

For a description of each course, please refer 
to pages 84 through 86 under "Printmaking." 



Fall 


Spring 


1.5 


1.5 


3.0 


3.0 


4.5 


3.0 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


— 


— 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


15 


15 


Fall 


Spring 


1.5 


1.5 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


1.5 


1.5 


>hor 3.0 


— 


— 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


15 


15 



60 



75 



The program also utilizes the Typogra- 
phy Lab, adjacent to the Printmaking 
facilities, which houses a darkroom facility 
equipped with enlargers, one horizontal and 
three vertical copy cameras, and a Linotype 
LI 00 Macintosh computer typesetting 
system that is integrated with the 
University's Macintosh Labs. 

Another important resource is the 
Borowsky Center for Publication Arts, 
equipped with a Heidelberg KORS offset 
press and a full darkroom for experimental 
and production printing. Sepatate graduate 
studio space for Book Arts students 
provides work stations, light tables, 
portable book presses, and a paper cutter. 

The core program of letterpress, offset 
lithography and bookbinding courses is 
augmented by investigations into related 
fields of study in studio-arts and liberal 
arts. An approach that is experimental, 
interdisciplinary, and reflective of a broad 
range of personal and professional involve- 
ment is encouraged. A qualifying review at 
the conclusion of the first year's coursework 
is required to continue in the program. 
The second year extends concentration in 
coursework towards the MFA Thesis 
Exhibition under the supervision of a 
selected MFA Advisory Committee. 



MFA in Book Arts/Printmaking 
Faculty 

Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Antioch College 

BFA, Yale University 

MA, The University of the Arts 

James Green 

Senior Lecturer 
BFA, Oberlin College 
MPh, Yale University 
MLS, Columbia University 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Lois M. Johnson 

Chair, Fine Arts 

Coordinator of Printmaking Department 

Professor 

BSEd, University of North Dakota 

MFA, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Peter Kruty 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Chicago 

MLS, MA, University of Alabama 



Robin Rice 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Ohio Wesleyan University 

MA, University of Missouri 

Patricia M. Smith 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Immaculata College 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Yoshida Hanga Academy, Tokyo 

Lori Spencer 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, SUNY, Purchase 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

Susan T. Viguers 

Associate Professor 

BA, Bryn Mawr College 

MA, University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 



Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Florida State University 

Hedi Kyle 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Diploma, Werk Kunst Schule, Germany 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Mary Phelan 

Director, Book Arts/Printmaking 

Associate Professor 

BS, College of Saint Rose 

MA, University of Wisconsin-Madison 



76 



Master of 
Industrial Design 

Charles Burnette 
Director 

215-875-1065 

The two-year, 60 credit Master of 
Industrial Design degree focuses on the 
design knowledge, technological potentials 
and ctitical issues needed to meet human 
needs in the development of industrially 
produced objects, environments and 
systems. During the first three semesters of 
the two year program, candidates explore 
research methods, ideation strategies, and 
design processes informed by new media 
and manufacturing technologies in 
preparation for a thesis project based on 
personal career interests which is completed 
during the last semester. 

Within the discipline of Industtial 
Design, the program addresses the complex 
range of concerns that infotms the develop- 
ment and use of product and furniture 
design, a variety of real and virtual 
environments, the role of design in 
education, and the development and 
application of new tools, techniques and 
knowledge to suppott design. Issues and 
skills that are critical to the design of 
manufactured products and environments 
include an awareness of new media and 
technologies; changing cultural and 
behavioral paradigms; the semantics and 
poetics of form and space; smart materials 
and management systems; new manufac- 
turing, production and distribution 
options; human factors; environmental and 
ecological considerations; and design 
assessment. 



The Masters Thesis tequires the research, 
development, planning, representation and 
evaluation of a design for an advanced 
product, technique, environment or 
program that addresses a recognized or 
potential need. Industries are encouraged 
to propose and sponsor thesis projects and 
to support degree candidates in research 
and development programs of mutual 
interest. Candidates may also benefit from 
the resources, expertise, and support 
provided through funded research and 
industry sponsorships within the Univer- 
sity. Students have the option to take a 
component of the Advanced Project 
Tutorial (a course, workshop, internship, 
etc.) in the profession, industry, and/or 
other universities under appropriate 
academic supervision. 

The program seeks candidates with 
professional design, engineering or 
scientific backgrounds, and at least one 
year of professional experience, who have a 
career interest in a specialty or subject area 
within the scope of the program. Candi- 
dates are expected to be qualified to 
undertake tutored independent study, to 
have proven writing skills, and be able to 
articulate their educational objectives as a 
condition of admission. 



Master of Industrial Design 
Faculty 

Charles Burnette 

Director, MID Program 
Professor 

BArch, MArch, PhD, University 
of Pennsylvania 

Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Antioch College 

BFA, Yale University 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Daniel Formosa 

Guest Lecturer 

MA, New York University 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Florida State University 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BAtch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Pavel Ruzicka 

Human Factors Lab Manager 
MME, University of Engineering, 

Czeck Republic 
MID, The University of the Arts 

Mark Scott 

Systems Developer 
BS, Duke University 



Specialized Facilities 

Graduate design studios are equipped 
with Macintosh computers and adjoin an 
advanced computing lab equipped with 
Silicon Graphics and Macintosh multime- 
dia computers and a Media 100 video 
editing suite. All systems are networked 
and supported by workgroup servers, die 
sublimation and laser printers and direct 
connections to Internet and other net- 
worked services. The suite includes an 
experimental human factots laboratory 
featuring product design and assessment in 
a virtual reality environment. Software 
includes Alias, Coryphaes, and Jack® 
human figure software running under Unix, 
and a wide range of software running under 
Apple's System 7. The program is also 
supported by extensive departmental metal, 
wood, and plastics shops on the same floor. 

MID Credit Requirements 

Year One 

ID 601 / 602 Advanced Design Studio 

ID 600 ID Seminar: Thesis Research 

ID 622 Advanced Production Technologies 

ID 625 Advanced Computing Applications 

ID 627 Human Factots: Intetactivity 

GR 692 University Seminar Aft and Society 

Electives 



Year Two 

ID 710 / 7 1 1 Advanced Project Tutorial I, II 

ID 700 ID Seminar 

ID 749 Masters Thesis Documentation 

GR 691 University Seminat: Structute and Metaphor 

Electives 



Total Credits 60 



Fall 


Spring 


6 


6 


— 


3 


3 


— 


3 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


3 


— 


15 


15 


Fall 


Spring 


6 


6 


— 


3 


— 


6 


»r 3 


— 


6 


— 


15 


15 



78 



Master of Fine 
Arts in Museum 
Exhibition 
Planning and 
Design 

Jane Bedno 

Director 

215-875-1110 

Recognized formally as a part of the 
museum profession by the American 
Association of Museums, the field of 
exhibition planning and design has become 
a demanding, fast-growing profession as 
museums respond to the demand for 
exhibitions addressed to public needs and 
interests. With the cooperation of a group 
of major regional museums, following the 
guidelines established by NA.M.E. 
(National Association for Museum 
Exhibition), The University of the Arts 
offers a two-year, 60-credit Master of Fine 
Arts degree which prepares students for 
professional careers in the planning and 
design oi exhibits for museums and 
interpretive centers, focusing on methods 
of presentation for collections and informa- 
tion, and exploring the full range of 
exhibition communication and methodology. 

Representatives of cooperating museums 
and the resident staff offer a curriculum 
that addresses the conceptualization, 
research, organization, design, and 
production of museum exhibits and 
presentations, utilizing a variety of 
techniques and media. It also explores 
exhibit programming, evaluation and 
management methods applicable in a wide 
range of museum situations. Visiting 
experts teach many aspects of museum 
presentation, education and management, 
and students make privileged visits to 
design departments, production shops, 
galleries, exhibits and programs in 
numerous varied museums in Philadelphia, 
the Mid-Atlantic Region, Washington, 
and New York. 



Students undertake a thesis project and a 
supervised museum internship related to 
their career interests during the second year 
of the program. To preserve the intimate 
contact with museum professionals and to 
guarantee participants studio facilities, the 
program is limited to nine entrants per year. 

Most candidates for this program will 
have previously completed a baccalauteate 
degree in industrial, graphic, interior, or 
architectural design and demonstrate an 
acceptable level of professional accomplish- 
ment through a portfolio or another 
appropriate means. Alternatively, they may 
seek admission with a baccalaureate in a 
discipline related to a particular career 
direction, and take courses to develop the 



necessary background in design. Students 
from non-design, non-art backgrounds, are 
encouraged to apply. 

The first year provides a basic under- 
standing of the exhibition process, with 
the first semester focused on conceptual 
development, planning, systems, and 
intellectual analysis of problems, and the 
second on the practical implementation of 
concepts and on understanding materials 
and methods of exhibition design and 
production. The second year is dedicated 
to practice of skills learned during the 
first year, practical exposure to actual 
exhibition development practice in 
museums and museum consultancies, and 
thesis development and completion. 



MFA in Museum Exhibition Planning and Design 
Credit Requirements 

Year One 

ME 500 / 501 The Museum Course/History of Museum 

ME 610 A/B Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

ME 620 Environmental Graphics 

ME 623 Exhibition Materials and Technology 

GR 692 University Seminat: Aft and Society 

Elective 



Year Two 

ME 759 Museum Internship* 

ME 710 Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

ME 508 The Museum Audience 

ME 622 Media for Museum Communication 

ME 749 A/B Thesis Development 

GR 691 Univetsity Seminar: Structute and Metaphor 

GR 791 University Seminar: Criticism 

Elective 



Total Credits 



* Students with at least six months of direct 
exhibition-related experience in a museum, 
equivalent institution, or a museum 
consultancy may substitute one three-hour 
elective for the internship requirement. 





Fall 
3 
6 

3 


Spring 
3 
6 
3 

3 




3 


— 




15 


15 


Summer 

3 


Fall 

6 


Spring 


r — 


3 

3 
3 


3 
3 


— 


— 


3 
3 


3 


15 


12 



60 



79 



Specialized Facilities 

The Graduate studios in Museum 
Exhibition Planning and Design feature 
direct student access to a computer-aided 
design center. The Computer-Aided 
Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing 
(CAD/CAM) facility and the academic 
computing laboratories are completely 
equipped computer centers dedicated to 
drafting, rendering, model making, desktop 
publishing, computer-aided graphic design, 
multimedia, and illustration. 



MFA in Museum Exhibition 
Planning and Design Faculty 

Ed Bedno 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA, Art Institute of Chicago 
MS/GD, Institute of Design, 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

Jane Bedno 

Director, Museum Exhibition Planning 

and Design 
Associate Professor 
BA, Roosevelt University 
JD, College of William and Maty 

Michael Blakeslee 

Associate Professor 
BS, Oklahoma State University 
BA, Centtal State University 
MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Elizabeth Bogle 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BS, Philadelphia College of Art 



Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Antioch College 

BFA, Yale University 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Alice Dommert 

Senior Lecturer 

BArch, Louisiana State University 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

MA, University of Nebraska 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

John Holland 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Bennington College 

MArch, University of Pennsylvania 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Flotida State University 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Tom Porett 

Professor 

BS, University of Wisconsin 
MS, Institute of Design, Illinois 
Institute of Technology 

Robin Rice 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Ohio Wesleyan University 

MA, University of Missouri 

David Wolfe 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Philadelphia College of Art 



Master of Arts in 
Art Education 



Janis Norman 

Director 

215-875-4881 or 875-4882 

The Master of Arts in Art Education 
program at The University of the Arts is 
designed to develop the studio, intellectual, 
and professional education background of 
art educators, enabling them to meet 
advanced professional goals. 

Coordinating professional education 
coutses with work in liberal arts, graduate 
research and a concentration in studio, the 
MA in Art Education Program offers 
custom-designed programs of study to meet 
individual needs. A series of graduate 
education seminars address historical and 
contemporary issues in art theory, criticism, 
and education. Drawing on the wide range 
of studio departments, nearly half of the 
program is reserved for work in one or more 
studio area, depending upon the student's 
particular background and career needs. 
The independent thesis or graduate project, 
which is normally completed in two 
semesters, may take the form of either an 
academic research paper or a graduate 
project in an appropriate format. 

Designed for established or new teachers, 
the degree may satisfy credit accrual 
requirements for Permanent Certification or 
lead to other career advancement. Gradu- 
ates have also found the program relevant 
to positions in museum education, college 
(especially junior college) teaching, arts 
administration, educational media, and 
other related fields. Applicants must hold a 
Bachelot's degree or equivalent with no less 
than 40 credits in studio work with a "B" 
or better cumulative average. A teaching 
certificate is not required. Students not 
holding degrees in the visual arts can 
expect to complete 18 credits of foundation 
studies and/or up to 40 credits of studio 
work, depending upon faculty review of 
their portfolio. 

The degree may also be taken in 
conjunction with the Certification Program 
in Art Education thereby allowing the 
student to earn a Masters degree plus 
Certification. The difference between this 
combination and the MAT, Masters of Arts 
in Teaching, is the concentration in 
graduate studio work and the research and 
thesis required for the MA degree. 



Full-time students may complete the 
MA program in one academic year plus a 
summer or three semesters. Part-time 
students may take coursework over as many 
as five years. Depending on the needs of 
the individual student, professional 
education courses and selected studio and 
liberal arts courses may be taken in the 
evenings and summers. 



MA in Art Education Faculty 

Kathy Browning 

Associate Professor 
BFA, York University 
BEd, University of Toronto 
MFA, York University 
PhD, University of Toronto 

Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Antioch College 

BFA, Yale University 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

MA, University of Nebraska 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Delaware 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 



Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Florida State University 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Janis Norman 

Chairperson. Art Education 

Associate Professor 

BAE, University of Kansas 

MA, University of Missouri, Kansas City 

PhD, University of Kansas 

Susan Rodriguez 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, MEd, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Karen Clark-Schock 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Rosemont College 
MCAT, Hahnemann University 
PsyD, Immaculata College 

Barbara Suplee 

Coordinator Saturday Lab School 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, West Chester University 

MEd., Temple University 

PhD, Pennsylvania State University 



MA in Art Education Credit Requirements 

Scheduling option for full time enrollment: 

AE 606 Research in Education 

GR 691 University Seminar: Structure and Metaphor 

AE 610 Graduate Studio Seminat 

AE 602 History of Ideas in Art and Museum Education 

AE 649* Graduate Project/Thesis 

GR 692 University Seminar: Art and Society 

Studio Concentration 

Liberal Arts Elective 



Total Credits 



*AE 649, Graduate Project/Thesis may be taken 
as a 6 credit block or in two 3 credit blocks. 



Summer 


Fall 
3 
3 


Spring 


— 




3 
6 
3 


3 


7.5 


1.5 


3 


— 


— 


6 


16.5 


13.5 



36 



Master of Arts 
in Museum 
Education 



Anne El-Omami 
Director 
215-875-4879 or 875-4881 

The Master of Arts in Museum Educa- 
tion is a concentrated program focused on 
the development and implementation of 
appropriate pedagogical practices and 
critical/interpretive skills for communi- 
cating to the public about culture and the 
arts. Coursework comprises three distinct 
areas: a broad education core addressing 
theory and methods, a concentration in 
museum studies and practices, and a 
professional core including research and an 
internship with a cooperating museum. 

Applicants should have had a core of at 
least 40 credits in the arts, liberal arts, and/ 
or communications, with a minimum of 18 
credits in art history (or 1 2 credits in art 
history and 6 credits in anthropology or 
communications). This degree is an 
appropriate option for those with a strong 
commitment to providing educational 
programming within a museum context or 
alternative site, as well as for teachers who 
wish a concentration in museum education 
so they may utilize museum resources more 
effectively in the classroom. 

Museums and galleries worldwide are 
becoming more dependent upon their 
audiences for support. Consequently, the 
role of museums is changing to meet 
audience demands, including expectations 
for more relevant and accessible public 
educational programming to promote 
cultural knowledge and interests. This 
growing trend has created a greater demand 
for well-trained professionals with special 
knowledge and expertise in planning and 
implementing museum programs. Addi- 
tionally, current educational theory and 



methodology embrace the inclusion of art 
history, criticism, and aesthetics as critical 
components of the arts education curricu- 
lum, all areas heavily dependent upon 
museums for exemplary resources and 
reference. The MA in Museum Education 
focuses on a wide variety of museums and 
institutions with similat missions and 
operations and prepares educators to 
function within the changing context of 
contemporary schools, museums and related 
institutions. The MA in Museum Educa- 
tion may be completed in two semesters 
and a summer or in three semesters. 



The Museum Studies core may be taken 
separately or in conjunction with another 
Master's Program at The University of the 
Arts. The core includes courses from the 
museum studies core and may also include 
the Graduate Museum Project and 
Internship with special approval. This 
series of courses may be combined with the 
Master of Arts in Teaching in the Visual 
Arts or the Master of Arts in Art Educa- 
tion. This option may be completed in 
three semesters and a summer, depending 
upon fulfillment of the prerequisites and 
scheduling considerations. 



MA in Museum Education Credit Requirements 



Education Core 

AE 606 Research in Education 

GR 691 University Seminar: Structure and Metaphor 

AE 550 Creative and Cognitive Development 

GR 692 University Seminar: Art and Society 



Fall Spring 

3 
3 
3 



Summer 
Fall 



Museum Studies Core 

AE 510 Museum Education Practicum 3 
ME 508 The Museum Audience and Evaluative Techniques 3 

ME 501 History of the Museum — 

AE 530 Interactive Media — 
AE615 Educational Programming for 

Museums & Alternative Sites . — 

Professional Core 

AE 648 Graduate Museum Project — 

AE 658 Museum Internship — 



Total Credits 



Note: Additional elective courses may be 
taken in either semester in Interactive Media, 
Multicultural Learning, Design for 
Interdisciplinary Learning and/or History 
of Ideas in Art and Museum Education. 



36 



MA in Museum Education 
Faculty 

Paul Adorno 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
AB, Georgetown University 
MSC, University of Pennsylvania 

Ed Bedno 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA, Art Institute of Chicago 
MS/BD, Institute of Design, Illinois 
Institute of Technology 

Jane Bedno 

Associate Professor 

BA, Roosevelt University 

JD, College of William and Mary 

Kathy Browning 

Associate Professor 
BFA, York University 
BEd, University of Toronto 
MFA, York University 
PhD, University of Toronto 

Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Antioch College 

BFA, Yale University 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

MA, University of Nebraska 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Florida State University 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 



Janis Norman 

Chairperson, Art Education 

Director of Art Education Graduate Programs, 

Associate Professor 

BAE, University of Kansas 

MA, University of Missouri Kansas City 

PhD, University ot Kansas 

Tom Porett 

Professor 

BS, University of Wisconsin 
MS, Institute of Design, Illinois 
Institute of Technology 

Portia Hamilton Sperr 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Lead Faculty, Museum Education 

Diploma in Pedagogy, Assoc. Montessori 

International 
BA, Barnard College 

Barbara Suplee 

Coordinator Saturday Lab School 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, West Chester University 

MEd., Temple University 

PhD, Pennsylvania State University 



83 



Master of Arts 
in Teaching in 
Visual Arts 



Janis Norman 
Director 
215-875-4881 or 875-4882 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual 
Arts is a professional degree program 
incorporating preparation for the Pennsyl- 
vania Instructional I Certificate to teach Art 
K-12, including a student teaching 
practicum. Additional coursework includes 
the history, theory, and practice of art 
education. Depending on the completeness 
of the student's background, the MAT 
Program provides a flexible mix of 
professional education, advanced studio, 
and liberal arts study in a 36-credit 
program which may be completed in a 
summer and two regular semesters or in 
three full semesters. 

Although the program normally leads to 
certification upon receiving the degree, all 
candidates must, in addition, successfully 
complete the National Teachers Exam, 
PRAXIS Series, with satisfactory scores to 
qualify for State certification. This unique 
degree program allows a student to obtain 
his/her certification requirements for 
teaching while also earning a master's 
degree recognized by potential employing 
school districts and educational institu- 
tions. In many cases this enables the MAT 
recipient to qualify for a higher salary and 
often preferred placement. 



Applicants to the MAT Program should possess a BFA or BA degree in studio an 
with a minimum of forty (40) studio credits with a "B" or better cumulative average. 
They also must have satisfactorily completed the coursework and/or acquired competencies 
in fields relating to teacher certification described below. If any deficiencies exist, 
up to 12 corequisite credits may be completed concurrently with the degree and applied 
to elective requirements. 

Corequisites: 

• 3 upper division credits in a 3-D studio area, if a 2-D studio major for bachelor degree 

• 3 upper division credits in a 2-D studio area, if a 3-D studio major for bachelor degree 

• Introduction to computers, preferably including graphic applications 
(required competency), minimum requirement of one course 

• Basic Photography (required competency), minimum requirement of one course 

• Art History, 12 credits, including at least one course in 20th Century Art 

• Introduction to Psychology or Child and Adolescent Psychology 

• Sociology or Cultural Anthropology (may be satisfied by GR 692) 

• Aesthetics (may be satisfied by GR 691) 

• Art Criticism (may be satisfied by GR 691) 

• Speech or Acting (recommended; may be satisfied by AE 200 Presentation Skills) 

Electives which may be required to meet aesthetics and criticism competencies: 
GR 691 University Seminar: Structure and Metaphor 3 credits, Fall 
GR 692 University Seminar: Art and Society 3 credits, Spring 



Electives of particular interest: 
AE 532 Design for Interdisciplinary Learning 
AE 531 Multicultural Learning Through the Ages 
AE 632 Applications of Interdisciplinary Learning 



3 credits, Spring 

3 credits, Fall or Summer 

3 credits, Spring 



MA in Teaching in Visual Arts Credit Requirements 

Recommended scheduling option: Summer 

AE 550 Creative and Cognitive Development 3 c 

AE 547 Program Design and Methods: Elementary 3 c 

AE 548 Program Design and Methods: Middle and Secondary — 

AE 559 Saturday Practicum — 

AE 606 Research in Education — 

AE 552 The Art of Teaching — 
AE 602 History of Ideas in Art and Museum Education 

AE 659 Student Teaching Practicum — 
Studio, Education, or Liberal Arts Electives 

(University Seminar GR 691 and GR 692 may be required) — 
Total Credits 



Fall 


Spring 


3 


or 3 


3 


or 3 


3 


or 3 


3 


or 3 


3 


— 


3 


or 3 


— 


3 


9 


or 9 



36 



Note: Courses to satisfy requirements for the MAT 
are offered at varying times, allowing graduate 
students' programs to be customized to their needs. 



MA in Teaching in Visual Arts 
Faculty 

Paul Adorno 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
AB, Georgetown University 
MSC, University of Pennsylvania 

Kathy Browning 

Associate Professor 
BFA, York University 
BEd, University of Toronto 
MFA, York University 
PhD, University of Toronto 

Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Antioch College 

BFA, Yale University 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

MA University of Nebraska 

Diane Foxman 

Adjunct Senior Lecturer 
BA, Antioch University 
Diploma Program, Philadelphia 

College of Art 
MA, Art Education, Goddard University 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Delawate 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor 

BA, Pacific University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 



Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MFA, Florida State University 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Janis Norman 

Chairperson, Art Education 

Director of Art Education Graduate Programs, 

Associate Professor 

BAE, University of Kansas 

MA, University of Missouri Kansas City 

PhD, University of Kansas 

Susan Rodriguez 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, MEd, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Barbara Suplee 

Coordinator Saturday Lab School 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, West Chester University 

MEd, Temple University 

PhD, Pennsylvania State University 



Extended Degree 
Options 

Master of Arts in Art 
Education 

With Teacher Certification 

Those who seek to become certified to 
teach art and are qualified to enter the MAT 
program directly, but prefer the graduate 
studio concentration and academic research 
orientation of the MA program, may 
augment the MA program with the 
required certification coursework, thus 
becoming eligible for certification as early 
as the completion of the second semester of 
full-time study. This option normally 
requires a minimum of 57 credits, and leads 
to the single degree. 

Master of Arts in 
Teaching in Visual Arts 

Augmented Program 

For those who seek to become certified to 
teach art but do not yet have a sufficient 
background to prepare for certification 
within the normal three semester frame- 
work of the MAT program, the 36-credit 
degree may be augmented by coursework in 
the areas needed. The principal difference 
between the augmented MAT degree and 
the MA with teacher certification program 
is that the latter involves completion of a 
graduate research project in addition to the 
student teaching experience. 

Teacher Certification 
Program 

Post-Baccalaureate Non-Degree Program 

In addition to the MA and MAT 
programs, the Art Education Department 
offers a 24-credit post-baccalaureate 
program leading to the Pennsylvania 
Instructional I Certificate (Art K-12). 
Students may pursue the certificate 
concurrently with the MA program or 
independently. Students wishing to pursue 
teacher certification apart from a degree 
program should schedule an appointment 
with the Chairman of the Art Education 
Department. In order to be admitted, a 
candidate must hold a BFA or BA in Art, or 
the equivalent, with a minimum of forty 
(40) credits in studio and 12 credits in Art 
History with at least a "B" average. 



Master of Fine 
Arts in Ceramics, 
Painting, or 
Sculpture 



summer program 

Carol Moore 
Director 
215-875-1100 

These studio-based Master of Fine Arts 
degree programs are intended to broaden 
and advance the conceptual, critical, 
historical, and practical knowledge needed 
to sustain a contemporary studio. The 
programs have been designed to meet the 
needs of artists holding BFA or BA degrees 
who are interested in pursuing an MFA in 
either Ceramics, Painting or Sculpture 
within a time frame that accommodates 
their employment or academic year 
schedule. 

Departing from the more traditional 
semester format, students enter this three 
year program in summer and complete the 
major portion of their work during four 
annual seven-week summer residencies of 
intensive, individually focused studio 
experience. In addition to exploration in 
the major, students pursue interdisciplinary 
investigations in studio topics common to 
each discipline and address contemporary 
critical issues and methodology in univer- 
sity graduate seminars. Two independent 
studios are completed per academic year. 
Students attend annual on-campus winter 
weekend critiques and present work 
completed during the Fall Independent 
Studio. Work completed during the Spring 
Independent Studio is reviewed at the start 
of each summer. A final thesis review and 
exhibition is held following completion of 
the fourth summer. 



Studios and Facilities 

During residence at the University, 
summer MFA students enjoy access to well- 
equipped studios and facilities that support 
work undertaken in each discipline. These 
include: dedicated painting studios, three 
major gas kilns with 90, 40 and 30 cubic 
foot capacity, numerous electric kilns, wood 
and metal shops, carving studios, a forge 
and foundry. Students are expected to 
locate off-campus studio space for work 
undertaken during the fall and spring 
independent studio semesters. In addition, 
students have access to the University's 
extensive facilities that include the 
Greenfield Library, whose visual arts 
collection ranks among the largest of the 
nation's visual art schools; state-of-the-art 
academic computing laboratories; numer- 
ous galleries and performance spaces; and 
the more than 100 museums and cultural 
institutions that comprise the extended 
campus of the city of Phildadelphia. New 
York and Washington, DC cultural 
resources are only hours away. 

Students will be challenged by the 
broadly diverse aesthetic and critical 
opinions of distinguished studio faculty 
and notable visiting artists and critics who 
are invited to participate in the program 
each summer. 

Recent visiting artists and critics 
include: Barry Bartlett, Paul Bloodgood, 
Tom Butter, William Daley, Arthur Danto, 
Larry Day, Patrick Murphy, Howardena 
Pindell, Elaine Reichek, Sandy Skoglund, 
Judith Stein, Stephen Tanis, Ursula Von 
Rydingsvard, and Mary Ann Unger. 

Summer MFA candidates are expected 
to follow the curriculum as structured 
in order to complete the program within 
four years and present a final thesis 
exhibition following the completion of 
the fourth summer. 

Summer MFA students who matriculate 
prior to the summer, 1997, are subject to 
the course requirements in effect at the 
time of entry. 

Vermont Studio Center 
Graduate Study Exchange 

The University of the Arts has a special 
relationship with the Vermont Studio 
Center in Johnson, Vermont. A limited 
number of Summer MFA candidates may be 
offered the opportunity to spend their third 
summer intensive at the Vermont Studio 
Center. For further information, contact 
the Director of the Summer MFA Program. 



MFA in Ceramics, Painting, or 
Sculpture Faculty 

Nancy Carman 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of California, Davis, 

San Francisco Art Institute 
MFA, University of Washington, Seattle 

Deborah Curtiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Yale University School of Art 

MA, The University of the Arts 

AP. Gorny 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, The State University of New York 

at Buffalo 
Institute Del'Arte, Sienna, Italy 
MFA, Yale University School of Art 

Jeanne Jaffe 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 
MFA, New York State College of Ceramics 

at Alfred University 

Alec Karros 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Carol Moore 

Senior Lecturer, Director. Summer MFA Program 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Eileen Neff 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BA, Temple University 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

and Design 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 

Gerald Nichols 

Professor 

Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 



86 



Jeanne Nugent 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Atts 

Barry Parker 

Adjunct Professor 

BAE, Eastern Michigan University 

MFA, University of Massachusetts 

Phil Simkin 

Adjunct Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 

University 
MFA, Cornell University 



MFA in Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture Credit Requirements 

Note: Prefixes (XX) for the major studio courses will reflect the student's area 
of concentration: Ceramics (CR), Painting (PT), or Sculpture (SC). 

Summer I, II, III, IV Credits 

XX 610, 611, 710, 711 Major Studio in Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 5 

FA 610 Studio Topics 2 

GR 691, 692, 791 University Seminar I: Structure and Metaphor * 3 



Fall I, II 

FA 691, 693 



Independent Studio I, II in 
Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 
Winter Critique I, II 



10 x 4 



40 



3 x 2 



Spring I, II 




FA 692, 694 


Independent Studio I, II in 




Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 




Summer Critique I, II 


Fall III 




FA 793 


Thesis Preparation 




Winter Critique III 


Spring III 




FA 794 


Thesis Preparation 




Summer Critique III 


Fall IV 




FA 795 


Thesis Exhibition 


Total Credits 





60 



* GR 692 Seminar II, Art and Design in 
Society, and GR 791 Seminar III, Criticism, 
are offered during Summer II and IV 
respectively. During Summer III, a 3 credit 
studio elective is required. 



© The 

University 
of the 
Arts 




Philadelphia College 
of Performing Arts 



Stephen Jay, Dean 

215-875-2240 

The Philadelphia College of Performing Arts is comprised of the 
Schools of Dance, Music, and Theater Arts. Its curricula combine 
the performance emphasis of the traditional conservatory, stressing 
individualized training, practice, and discipline, with a liberal arts 
education. 

Founded in 1870 as the Philadelphia Musical Academy, and 
merged with the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music in 1962, the 
College has long been regarded as one of America's foremost 
professional schools of higher education. Many of its early 
graduates and faculty were members and founders of the Galley 
Philadelphia Otchestra when it was formed in 1900. The Academy 
of Music, home of the world-famous Philadelphia Orchestra, is 
adjacent to the historic Merriam Theater building, headquarters of 
the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. 

In 1976 the institution was renamed the Philadelphia College of 
the Performing Arts, thereby signaling its intention to expand its 
program to include all three of the performing arts disciplines- 
Music, Dance, and Theater. In 1977, the Philadelphia Dance 
Academy joined the College to become the School of Dance. 
Founded in 1947, The Philadelphia Dance Academy was one of the 
foremost conservatories of dance in the nation and one of the first 
three institutions in the country to grant a degree in dance. The 
School of Theater was initiated in 1983- 

The Philadelphia College of Performing Arts thus became 
Pennsylvania's first and only independent college dedicated 
exclusively to the performing arts, and one of the first of its kind in 
the United States. Its philosophy is founded on the principle that 
there is a common bond among artists, whatever their discipline, 
and that artists must interact with each other for their inspiration 
and growth. Indeed, many of the College's students have developed 
interdisciplinary careers which require familiarity with all the 
performing arts. The milieu of The University of the Arts adds an 
extraordinary dimension to PCPA's artistic training by bringing 
performing, visual, and media artists together in a single, profes- 
sional, educational community. 



Major Areas of Study 



All students are assigned to a faculty advisor. Lists are posted in 
each of the Schools' offices during the first week of the academic 
year. Appointments are made at the mutual convenience of the 
student and the faculty advisor. 

Students should feel free to see their advisor at any time 
concerning problems they may encounter. 

School of Dance 

Undergraduate Programs 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance Education 

Certificate in Dance 
Dance Majors 

Ballet 

Dance Education 

Jazz/Theater Dance 

Modern 

School of Music 



Bachelor of Music (BM) in Composition Jazz/Contemporary 

Bachelor of Music (BM) in Instrumental Jazz/Contemporary 

Bachelor of Music (BM) in Voice 

Diploma Program 

Certificate Program 
Graduate Programs 

Master of Arts in Teaching, Music Education 

Master of Music, Jazz Studies 
Areas of Concentration 

Flute 

Clarinet 

Saxophone 

Woodwinds 

Ttumpet 

Trombone 

Tuba 

Guitar 

Electtic Bass 

Upright Bass 

Violin 

Percussion 

Drums 

Piano 

Voice 

Composition 

School of Theater Arts 

Undergraduate Program 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Theater Arts 
Programs 

Acting 

Musical Theatet 

Credit-Hour Ratio 

Please refer to the coutse descriptions for specific information. 



90 



The School of 
Dance 



Susan B. Glazer 

Director 
Kevin Linehan 

Assistant Director 
309 South Broad Street 
215-875-2269 

The School of Dance is dedicated to the 
training of young artists for careers as 
professional performers, dance educators, 
and choreographers, and provides an 
intensive exploration of dance in its 
physical, intellectual and creative aspects. 
The School provides an environment in 
which students may develop an individual 
artistic vision while being exposed to a 
variety of artistic roles. 



Facilities 

The three main studios of the School of 
Dance are located at 309 South Broad 
Street. These spacious, bright, and well- 
lighted studios are fully equipped with 
barres and mirrors, huge windows, pianos, 
audio consoles, and ceiling fans. Their 
floors are constructed with four-inch, state- 
of-the-art suspension for the safest and most 
comfortable dancing surface available. 
Lockers, dressing rooms, showers, and 
lounges are found adjacent to the studios. 
Three additional studios ate located at 313 
South Broad Street. The University has 
completely restored its historic Merriam 
Theater, which serves as the institution's 
major performance hall for students, as well 
as "home" to a number of regional perform- 
ing arts organizations, including the 
Pennsylvania Ballet. The UArts Dance 
Theater, a 200-seat theater, is used for 
dance-student performances. The Albert 
M. Greenfield Library contains books, 
journals, and videotapes devoted to dance, 
which are available to students for research 
and coursework. 



Programs of Study 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance 
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance Education 
(BFA Dance Ed) 

Certificate in Dance - two-year program 
Majors 
Ballet 

Jazz/Theater Dance 
Modern Dance 
Dance Education 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance: 
Ballet, Modern, or Jazz/Theater 
Dance 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree 
in Dance is a program designed for those 
students who wish to prepare for profes- 
sional careers in dance performance and/or 
choreography. The BFA in Dance program 
is normally completed in four years of 
full-time study with a total requirement 
of 128 credits (130 credits for Dance 
Education). 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance 
Education 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in 
Dance Education is a program designed 
specifically for students whose primary 
intention is to enter the profession as a 
teacher of dance. Although there is 
currently no Pennsylvania State certification 
for dance teachers, this program includes 
supervised class teaching in schools and/or 
private dance studios. The BFA in Dance 
Education is designed as a four-year 
program of full-time study with a total 
requirement of 130 credits. 

Certificate in Dance 

The Certificate in Dance is a two-year, 
5 5 -credit program intended for those 
students who wish to concentrate exclu- 
sively on dance studies. This intensive 
program is designed to develop the 
student's familiarity with and proficiency in 
a broad spectrum of dance styles. The 
Certificate in Dance is awarded in recogni- 
tion of achievement, and does not consti- 
tute an academic degree. 

Students wishing to transfer from this 
program to the Bachelor's degree program 
may apply to do so and will be tequired to 
obtain the approval of both the Director of 
the School of Dance and the Director of 
Liberal Arts. 



The Curriculum 

The curriculum in the School of Dance 
has been carefully organized to allow the 
students to grow to their maximum 
potential as dancers. It has been developed 
over the years by professionals who are 
experienced with the world of dance and 
its demands. 

Daily technique classes in ballet, 
modern dance, and jazz dance are basic to 
all courses of study and are the heart of 
the program. One year of tap is required. 
Each student must be familiar with all 
major styles of dance in order to become 
as versatile as possible. Dance electives 
offered every semester include African 
dance, Spanish dance, Brazilian dance, 
Character, pointe, men's class, 
partnering, and yoga. 

In addition to the rigorous study of 
technique, the dance curriculum includes 

a. creative subjects such as improvisa- 
tion, eurythmics, and composition; 

b. academic dance subjects such as dance 
history, music, labanotation, anatomy/ 
kinesiology, pedagogy; 

c. ensembles, repertory and other 
performing courses; 

d. free electives including voice, acting, 
and visual arts courses. 



91 



School of Dance Faculty 

Ballet 

Andrew Pap, Associate Professor 
Barbara Sandonato, Assistant Professor 
Carol Luppescu Sklaroff, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Jon Sherman, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Suzanne Slenn, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Barbara Weisberger, 

Visiting Distinguished Guest Artist 

Jazz/Theater Dance 

Peter Bertini, Associate Professor 
Beth Hirschhaut-Iguchi, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Nancy Kantra, Assistant Professor 
Ronen Koresh, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Wayne St. David, Lecturer 

Modern Dance 

Ruth Andrien, Assistant Professor 
Manfred Fischbeck, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Nancy Kantra, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Gabriel Masson, Visiting Artist 
Faye B. Snow, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Eddy Taketa, Visiting Artist 
Pat Thomas, Assistant Professor 

Tap Dance 

Joan Lanning, Part-time Instructor 

La Vaughn Robinson, Adjunct Professor 

African Dance 
Jeanine Lee Osayande, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Spanish Dance 

Nancy Heller, Associate Professor 

Brazilian Dance 

Peter Bertini, Associate Professor 



Dance Studies 

Conrad Bender, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Peter Bertini, Associate Professor 
Annette DiMedio, Associate Professor 
Manfred Fischbeck, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Susan B. Glazer, Director 
Terry Greenland, Senior Lecturer 
Nancy Kantra, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Neil Kutner, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Pearl B. Schaeffer, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Connie Vandarakis, Senior Lecturer 

Accompanists 
Larissa Bell 
Hans Boman 
Saine Hsu 
Richard Iannacone 
John Levis 
Tom Lowery 
Valentina Slutsky 

Technical Director 

Jay Madara 

Costumer 

Clyde Michael Hayes 



Dance Core Curriculum 

The Core Curriculum is common to all 
Bachelor of Fine Arts programs in the 
School of Dance for the first two years. 
These required courses develop a solid 
foundation from which students pursue 
their specific areas of interest. 



Freshman Year 

DA 100 Rhythm for Dancers 

DA 101 A/B Ballet I-II 

DA 103 A/B Modern Dance I-II 

DA 113 A/B Jazz Dance I-II 

DA 123 A/B Tap I-II 

DA 107 Eurythmics 

DA 109 Improvisation I 

DA 116 A/B Fundamentals of 

Dance I-II 

DA 117 Survey of Music 

DA 190 Language of Music 

HU 1 10 A/B First Year Writing 

HU 103 A/B Intro, to Modernism 
Electives 



Semester 
1st 2nd 
1 

2 2 
2 2 
1 1 
1 1 
1 







16 


18 


Sophomore Year 






DA 201 A/B 


Ballet III-IV 


2 


2 


DA 203 A/B 


Modern Dance III-IV 


2 


2 


DA 213 A/B 


Jazz Dance III-IV 


1 


1 


DA 205 A 


Notation I 


2 


- 


DA 209 


Anatomy for Dancers 


1 


- 


DA 210 


Kinesiology 


- 


1 


DA 211 A/B 


Dance History I-II 


3 


3 


DA 216 


Music for Dancers 


1 


- 


DA 217 


Dance Composition I 


- 


1 


DA 77- 


Dance Ensembles 


1 


1 


HUXXX 

Electives 


Liberal Arts 


1 


1 



92 



Ballet Major 

Credit Requirements 

Total Credits: 128 

The final two years of the Ballet major 
emphasize advanced technique in ballet, 
including Pointe or Men's Ballet class. In 
addition, Ballet majors continue non-major 
studies in either Modern or Jazz Dance. 

Junior Year Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

DA301A/B Ballet V-VI 4 4 

DA308A/B Dance Pedagogy I-II 2 2 

DA307A/B Ballet Repertory I-II 1 1 

DA309A/B Partnering I-II 1 1 

DA 319 Theater Functions - 1 

DA 324 Character Dance - 1 

DA 326 A/B Modern Dance for 

Non-Majors V-VI 1 1 

DA 321 A/B Pointe I-II or 1 1 

DA 327 A/B Men's Class I-II 

DA 77- Dance Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

Electives 2 1 

Junior Year Total 



16 17 



Senior Year 

Required Courses: 

DA 401 A/B Ballet Major VII- VIII 4 4 

DA 419 A/B Dance Production I-II 2 2 

DA 426 A/B Modern Dance for 

Non-Majors VII- VIII 1 1 

DA 77- Dance Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6 3 

Electives 1 3 

Senior Year Total 15 14 



Note: DA 328 and DA 428 may substitute 
for DA 326 and DA 426. 



Jazz/Theater Dance Major 
Credit Requirements 

Total Credits: 128 

The Jazz/Theater Dance major empha- 
sizes acting, music, and voice in addition to 
the technical study of jazz dance, and 
prepares students for dance careers related 
to theatrical performance. 

Junior Year Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

DA 311 A/B Jazz V-VI 4 4 

DA 308 A/B Dance Pedagogy I-II 2 2 
DA 317 A/B Dance 

Composition II-III 2 2 

DA 319 Theater Functions - 1 

DA 323 A/B Tap III-IV 1 1 
DA 325 A/B Ballet for 

Non-Majors V-VI 1 1 

DA 345 A/B Voice I-II or 1 1 
TH 100 A/B Acting I-II 

DA 77- Dance Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

Electives 2 1 

Junior Year Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

Required Courses: 

DA 411 A/B Jazz VII-VIII 4 4 

DA 419 A/B Dance Production I-II 2 2 

DA 425 A/B Ballet for 

Non-Majors VII-VIII 1 1 

DA 77- Dance Ensembles 1 1 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 6 3 

Electives 1 2 

Senior Year Total 15 13 



Note: DA 326 and DA 426 may substitute 
for DA 325 and DA 425. 



Modern Dance Major 
Credit Requirements 

Total Credits: 128 

Modern Dance majors further develop 
technique, repertoire, and composition in 
the area of Modern Dance. In addition, 
Modern Dance Majors also pursue non- 
major studies in either Ballet or Jazz Dance. 

Junior Year Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

DA 303 A/B Modern Dance V-VI 4 4 
DA 305 A/B Modern 

Repertory I-II 1 

DA 308 A/B Dance Pedagogy I-II 2 
DA 317 A/B Dance 

Composition II-III 2 
DA 319 Theater Functions 

DA 322 A/B Improvisation II-III 1 
DA 325 A/B Ballet for 

Non-Majors V-VI 1 

DA 77- Dance Ensembles 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

Electives 1 1 
Junior Year Total 



16 17 



Senior Year 

Required Courses: 

DA 403 A/B Modern 

Dance VII-VIII 4 4 

DA 419 A/B Dance Production I-II 2 2 
DA 425 A/B Ballet for 

Non-Majors VII-VIII 1 1 
DA 77- Dance Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6 3 

Electives 2 2 

Senior Year Total 16 13 



Note: DA 328 and DA 428 may substitute 
for DA 325 and DA 425. 



93 



Dance Education Major 
Credit Requirements 

Total Credits: 130 

Students choosing to pursue the Bachelor 
of Fine Arts in Dance Education continue 
dance technique studies in one major area 
and one non-major area of concentration. 
The culmination of the program is an 
internship as a student teacher. 

Junior Year Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

DA3XXA/B Major Technique 4 4 

DA3XXA/B Non-Major Dance 1 1 

DA308A/B Dance Pedagogy I-II 2 2 
DA317A/B Dance 

Composition II-III 2 2 

Theater Functions - 1 

Dance Ensembles 1 1 

Liberal Arts 6 3 



3 



DA 319 

DA 77- 

HUXXX 

Electives 

Junior Year Total 17 17 



Senior Year 
Required Courses: 

DA4XXA/B Major Technique 4 

DA4XX Non-Major Dance 1 
DA 408 A/B Dance Symposium I-II 3 3 

DA 410 Student Teaching - 7 

DA 419 A/B Dance Production I-II 2 2 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6 

Electives 1 1 

Senior Year Total 17 13 



94 



Certificate in Dance 
Credit Requirements 

Total Credits: 55 



Semester Credits 



Is 



2nd 



First Year 

Required Courses: 

DA 100 Rythym for Dancers 

DA 101 A/B Ballet I-II 

DA 103 A/B Modern Dance I-II 

DA 107 Eurythmics 

DA 109 Improvisation I 

DA 113 A/B Jazz Dance I-II 

DA 116 A/B Fundamentals of 

Dance I-II 
DA 117 Survey of Music 

DA 123 A/B Tap I-II 
DA 190 Language of Music 

DA 319 Theater Functions 

Electives 2 

First Year Total 12 1 



Second Year 

Required Courses: 

DA 201 A/B Ballet III-IV 

DA 203 A/B Modern Dance III-IV 

DA 209 Anatomy for Dancers 

DA 210 Kinesiology 

DA 211 A/B Dance History 

DA 213 A/B Jazz Dance III-IV 

DA 216 Music for Dancers 

DA 217 Dance Composition I 

DA 308 A/B Dance Pedagogy-II 

DA 77- Dance Ensembles 

Electives 

Second Year Total 



Special Regulations/ 
Requirements 

Dance Technique Class 

Presence in Dance Technique class is 
especially vital to the student's professional 
development. Dance Technique classes 
meet up to five times per week, depending 
upon the course and level. Absences musr 
not exceed twice the number of weekly 
class meetings per semester for the 
particular course. Extensive absences, 
whether "excused" or "unexcused," will 
adversely effect the course grade. 

Dance Ensembles 

Dance majors are expected to actively 
participate each semester in a Dance 
Ensemble. (Note: There is no ensemble 
requirement for freshmen, however, 
freshmen do perform.) Dance Ensembles 
are performance-oriented groups in Ballet, 
Jazz, and Modern Dance. Repertory for 
Dance Ensembles may be an original work 
by a faculty member, an exceptional 
student work, or one reconstructed from 
dance notation. 

Students are expected to complete six 
ensemble credits (one each semester). 

Required performance credit may also be 
satisfied by participation in Senior Con- 
certs, Composition Concerts, and approved 
outside professional work. 

Additionally, Seniors may earn perfor- 
mance credit in conjunction with their 
Dance Production course. Sophomores and 
Juniors may be awarded ensemble credit by 
doing their own choreography if the work 
is shown in concert form. 



Senior Dance Concert 

In addition to the general PCPA 
tequirements for graduation, each Dance 
Major must fulfill the Senior Dance Concert. 

1. Preparation for the senior concert 
takes place during the two-semester Dance 
Production course under the supervision of 
a senior faculty member. Each student may 
select an advisor who will assist in the 
choreographic and technical production of 
the concert. Performance dates are chosen 
in September. Most concerts are shared by 
several seniors and are performed in the 
UArts Dance Theater. 

2. Jury: All senior dance students will 
present their finished concert three weeks 
before their scheduled date of performance 
to a jury consisting of three faculty 
members and the Ditector of the School of 
Dance. During this presentation, all 
technical cues should be in place and 
announced, and the technical crew must 
also be present. A draft of the program 
copy is to be submitted for review. 

3. Requirements: 

a. Choreography - Modern majors must 
choreograph a solo work and a large or 
small group piece. Ballet majors must 
choreograph one work, either solo or small 
group. Jazz/Theater majors must choreo- 
graph one solo and one group piece, or two 
group pieces. If any singing is included, 
the School of Dance vocal coach must be 
consulted and approve the work. 

b. Performance - All students must 
perform in at least one work of their own 
choreography and one work of a fellow 
student. Additionally, Ballet majors 
must perform in a piece from the standard 
ballet repertory. 

c. Technical Assistance - Each student 
must fulfill a technical-personnel require- 
ment either as Stage Manager, Lighting 
Technician/Designer, or Sound Technician. 
Personnel are selected well in advance of 
the concert date and meet with the 
Technical Director of the Theater early in 
the semester to set up rehearsal dates. 



4. Responsibilities: The University will 
provide the theater, a technical director, and 
the basic technical facilities. Any addi- 
tional support, special lighting, or sound 
needs must be provided by the student. All 
programs, flyers, and promotional material 
can be duplicated by the Dance Office if 
presented well in advance of the production 
in a finished (typed) state. 

5. Evaluation: Dance students view 
their Senior Concert as the culmination of 
their four years at The University of the 
Arts and a most important aspect of their 
college experience. The faculty, too, 
judges this performance as a serious 
demonstration of the student's ability as 

a dance artist. Evaluations of the content 
of the performance are offered by at least 
three faculty members after the pte-concert 
jury presentation. 

The production aspect of the concert 
will be graded by the faculty in charge of 
the course. The final grade thus reflects 
both the process and the choreographic 
end result. 



Dance Extension 



309 South Broad Street 
215-875-2269 

The Dance Extension Division offers 
credit and noncredit dance courses for 
students of all ages, from beginner through 
advanced levels. The programs enable 
students to explore their potential in a 
stimulating and professional environment. 
The Extension Division presents a wide 
variety of courses, taught by the same 
highly qualified instructors who work with 
our tull-time students of the School of 
Dance. These courses for non-Dance Majors 
are open to all University of the Arts 
students for elective credit. 



95 



The School of 
Music 



Marc Dicciani 

Director 

Richard Hotchkiss 

Managing Coordinator 
250 South Broad Street 
215-875-2206 

The School of Music is dedicated to the 
preparation and training of musicians for a 
career in music performance, composition, 
and music education. The student's 
growth as a musician is the primary goal 
of the program. 

The music program is distinguished 
by its emphasis on American music idioms, 
such as jazz and contemporary music, as 
well as European and World traditions. 
The School's mission of training professional 
musicians and educators of the highest 
caliber is maintained through a conserva- 
tory atmosphere, which stresses individual- 
ized training, and a comprehensive 
curriculum that includes private lessons 
and group coachings with master faculty and 
an abundance and diversity of ensembles. 
Course work for instrumental and composi- 
tion majors includes jazz improvisation, 
jazz theory and ear-training, arranging, 
orchestration, film scoring, music and 
computer technology, MIDI, recording 
engineering, music business, music 
histories (classical, jazz, American, rock, 
and World music); courses for vocal majors 
include music skills, diction, acting, 
movement, and piano accompanying. 

Performance opportunities play an 
important part in the student's education 
by sharpening technical skills and incteas- 
ing the student's command of repertoite 
and styles. The School's more than forty 
performance ensembles represent all styles 
and categories of jazz and American music. 
Students are involved in a rigorous schedule 
of performances, with over 150 concerts 
and recitals presented each year. 

This contemporary curriculum is 
organized in three degree programs: the 
Bachelor of Music in Performance, which 
prepares students for careers as music 



professionals in vocal or instrumental 
performance, or composition, the Master of 
Arts in Teaching in Music Education, 
which prepares students for certification as 
music teachers for kindergarten through 
12th grade, and the Master of Music in Jazz 
Studies. A unique aspect of the under- 
graduate program allows students to select 
a special Music Education or Jazz Studies 
track that may enable them to eat n both a 
Bachelor's and Master's degree in five years. 

The School of Music faculty is made up 
of experienced and practicing professionals, 
many of whom have attained international 
stature as performing and recording artists. 
This professional faculty is supplemented 
by a long list of guest artists and a 
regular series of workshops, master classes, 
and performances with greats that have 
included Wynton Marsalis, Randy and 
Michael Brecker, Arturo Sandoval, 
Dave Weckl, Joshua Redman, Ernie Watts, 
Mike Stern, Bob Berg, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, 
Dennis Rowland, Gregg Field, Grover 
Washington, Jr., Max Roach, Eddie Gomez, 
Phil Woods, Yo-Yo Ma, Ray Brown, 
Scott Henderson, John Fedchock, 
Pat Martino, Phil Ramone, Bill Watrous, 
Bob Mintzer, Billy Joel, Peter Erskine, 
Marvin "Smitty" Smith, Dave Samuels, 
Rob McConnell, and Dennis Chambers. 

Founded in 1870 as the Philadelphia 
Musical Academy, which latet merged with 
the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, 
the School counts among its alumni some 
of the nation's most accomplished musi- 
cians including bassist Stanley Clarke, 
pianists Kenny Barron, Andre Watts, and 
Sumi Tonooka, vocalists Florence Quivar 
and Osceola Davis, drummer Gerry Brown, 
saxophonist Lew Tabackin, composer 
Vincent Persichetti, and TV/Film compos- 
ers John Davis and Edd Kalehoff. 



96 



Facilities 

The School of Music is located in the 
Merriam Theater building at 250 S. Broad 
St. and at Laurie Wagman Hall, 31 1 S. 
Broad Street. Facilities include fully 
equipped music studios, large practice 
rooms, a class piano laboratory, and various- 
sized classrooms. The school's MARS 
(MIDI and Recording Studios) is a state-of- 
the-art recording and music technology 
facility, with a complete 32-input recording 
studio, MIDI and computer labs, a 
computer and synthesizer workstation labs, 
and an audio-for-video dubbing and editing 
lab. Practice rooms are generous in size, 
and most are equipped with a grand piano. 
A suite of fully equipped percussion studios 
is available for student practice. 

The University's newly-restored historic 
Merriam Theater, Laurie Wagman Hall, 
and the Arts Bank are used for student and 
faculty performances. The music library, 
located in the Merriam building, contains 
books, manuscripts, journals, scores, 
records, tapes, and compact discs as well as 
listening and viewing facilities, and a music 
education information center. 



Performance 
Opportunities 

Big Band 

"Blue Note" Ensemble 

Brass Ensemble 

Brazilian Jazz Ensemble 

"Brecker Brothers' Ensemble 

Chamber Singers 

Chorus 

Fusion Ensemble 

"GRP" Ensemble 

Handbell Choir 

"Horace Silver" Ensemble 

Jazz Guitar Ensemble 

"Jazz Messengers" Ensemble 

Jazz Percussion Ensemble 

Lab Band 

Latin Jazz Ensemble 

"Maynard Ferguson" Ensemble 

"Miles Davis" Ensemble 

Musical Theater Ensemble 

New Music Ensemble 

Saxophone Ensemble 

Trombone Ensemble 

Vocal Jazz Ensemble 

"Yellowjackets" Ensemble 

Faculty Recitals 

Guest Artist Concerts 

Opera Scenes 

Over 30 Small Jazz Ensembles 

Student Recitals 



Programs of Study 

Major Areas of Concentration 

Flute 
Clarinet 
Saxophone 
Woodwinds 
Trumpet 
Trombone 
Tuba 
Guitar 

Bass (Electric and/or Upright) 
Percussion 
Drums 
Piano 
Violin 

Composition 
Voice (Classical and/or 
Jazz/Contemporary) 



Undergraduate 
Programs 

Bachelor of Music in 
Instrumental Performance in 
Jazz/Contemporary Music 

The Jazz/Contemporary instrumental 
curriculum provides a direct and pragmatic 
education for students interested in 
establishing a career as a performer, 
arranger, or composer in jazz and/or 
contemporary music. Students receive 
weekly, one-hour private lessons in their 
major area. Performance opportunities are 
plentiful in the school's award-winning jazz 
ensembles. Special courses include Jazz 
Improvisation, Jazz Theory, Jazz Ear- 
Training, Basic Piano, Jazz Piano, Jazz 
Arranging, History of Jazz, The Business of 
Music, MIDI Synthesis, Recording 
Engineering, History of Rock, Styles and 
Analysis of Jazz/Contemporary Music, 
Transcription and Analysis, Orchestration, 
Film Scoring, World Music, Wagner, 
20th Century Music, Advanced Rhythmic 
Theory, and Advanced Improvisation. 

Woodwind majors may elect to enroll in 
a woodwind specialist program which 
includes the study of various woodwind 
instruments. 

Bachelor of Music in Vocal 
Performance 

The vocal program in the School of 
Music is a unique curriculum which 
provides strong training in traditional 
vocal technique, and combines skills and 
knowledge in a range of vocal styles and 



literature including classical, jazz/ 
contemporary, and musical theater. 
Students receive private and semi-private 
instruction in voice, and take a core of 
course work in Music Skills, Sight 
Singing, Diction, Movement, Styles, 
Acting, Piano Accompanying for Vocal 
Majors, Recording, and Careers in Music. 
Additionally, vocal majors select classes 
and ensembles which most accurately 
reflect petformance and study interests, 
which may include Opera Scenes, Jazz 
Vocal Ensembles, Chorus, Chamber 
Singers, and classroom activities such as 
Jazz, American, Western, and Musical 
Theatet Music History, Vocal Workshops, 
and an ongoing series of Master Classes. 

Bachelor of Music in 
Composition 

Students enrolled in this program take 
private instruction in composition in 
addition to course work in orchestration. 
MIDI and synthesis, jazz atranging, and 
conducting. Wherever possible, student 
compositions are read by an ensemble or 
performed, and frequent performances of 
students' music highlight the school's 
concett schedule. Student composers are 
also encouraged to collaborate with dancers, 
choreographers, filmmakers, animators, and 
actors, taking full advantage of the creative 
environment of the University. 

Diploma Program 

This four-year program is designed 
primarily for students who wish to take the 
entire musical portion of the undergraduate 
curriculum without liberal arts courses. 
Students wishing to transfer from this 
program to the Bachelor's degree program 
may apply to do so in any year of their 
matriculation and will be required to 
obtain the approval of both the Director of 
the School of Music and the Director of 
Liberal Arts. 

Certificate in Music 

The two-year Certificate in Music 
program consists of the musical studies 
notmally taken during the first two years of 
the Bachelor of Music program. No liberal 
arts courses are required. 

Students interested in the Certificate 
program must meet with the Director of 
the School of Music to discuss specific- 
course requirements. 



MATPREP 

Master of Arts in Teaching - 
Corequisite Program 

MATPREP is a seventeen-credit course 
of study designed to satisfy corequisite 
requirements for entrance into the Mastet 
of Arts in Teaching in Music Education 
program. Open to all undergraduate music 
majors, classes include an Introduction to 
Music Education, Basic Conducting, Lab 
Teaching, Psychology of Music Teaching, 
and Orchestration. Completion of the 
MATPREP program with an average of 3.0 
or higher in these courses satisfies most 
MAT entrance requirements. 

Graduate Programs 

Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Music Education (MAT) 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Music 
Education is a thitty-six credit program 
designed for students who have completed 
Bachelor's degrees in applied music, music 
theory/composition, music history/ 
literature, or othet non-education, music 
related curricula. The MAT can be 
completed in a summer-plus-one academic 
year format, provided that cotequisite 
requirements have been met and placement 
testing does not indicate the need lot 
supplementary studies. Undergraduate 
students in music at the University may 
take advantage of the preparatory program 
known as MATPREP, a seventeen-credit 
course of studies which satisfies all 
corequisites. The MAT in Music Education 
leads to teaching certification in the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Master of Music in Jazz 

The Master of Music in Jazz Studies is a 
thirty-two ctedit program designed for 
students who have completed a bachelor's 
degree in jazz performance or other applied 
music with significant experience in jazz/ 
contemporary music studies. The MM can 
be completed in a one-year, two semester 
schedule, providing that all prerequisite 
skills ate satisfied prior to beginning the 
program. The entrance requirements 
include advanced technical and stylistic 
facility on the major instrument, and skills 
in improvisation, jazz theory and ear 
training, and jazz history. The MM program 
is intended to dramatically increase the 
student's petformance abilities, as well as 
provide a diversity of other professional- 
level competencies, preparing the student 
for a career as a music professional. 

97 



School of Music Faculty 

Applied and Ensemble Studies 

Voice 

Sean Deibler, Chair, Associate Professor 

Jeffrey Kern, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Patricia Raine, Assistant Professor 

Anne Sciolla, Senior Lecturer 

Patricia Stasis, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Strings 

John Blake, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Barbara Hanna Creider, Senior Lecturer 

Saxophone 

Chris Farr, Senior Lecturer 
Ronald Kerber, Assistant Professor 
Frank Mazzeo, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Greg Osby, Senior Lecturer 
Anthony Salicondro, Senior Lecturer 
Bill Zaccagni, Assistant Professor 

Trumpet 

Richard Kerber, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
John Swana, Senior Lecturer 
Dennis Wasko, Senior Lecturer 

Trombone 

Richard Genovese, Senior Lecturer 
John Fedchock, Senior Lecturer 

Keyboards 

George Akerley, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Annette DiMedio, Associate Professor 
Don Glanden, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
David Hartl, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Trudy Pitts, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
David Posmontier, Senior Lecturer 
Edward Simon, Senior Lecturer 

Guitar 

Jimmy Bruno, Senior Lecturer 
Robert DiNardo, 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Thomas Giacabetti, Senior Lecturer 
Patrick Mercuri, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Upright Jazz Bass/Electric Bass 

Kevin MacConnell, Senior Lecturer 
Craig Thomas, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Gerald Veasley, Senior Lecturer 



98 



Percussion/Drums 

Marc Dicciani, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Joseph Nero, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
James Paxson, Senior Lecturer 

Ensembles and Conducting 
Chorus and Chamber Singers 

Sean Deibler, Associate Professor 
Jeffrey Kern, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Jazz Ensembles 

Richard Kerber, Lab Band, 
Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Evan Solot, Fusion Ensemble, Professor 
Bill Zaccagni, Big Band, Assistant Professor 
All Jazz Faculty, Small Jazz Ensembles 

Music Studies 

Composition and Theory 

George Akerley, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Donald Chittum, Co-Chair, Professor 
Andrew Rudin, Co-Chair, Professor 
Evan Solot, Professor 

Computer and Electronic Music 

George Akerley, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Thomas Rudolph, 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Conducting 

Jeffrey Kern, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Regina Gordon, Senior Lecturer 
Theodore Pasternak, Senior Lecturer 

Musicianship 

Sean Deibler, Associate Professor 
Rick Kerber, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Ronald Kerber, Assistant Professor 
Jeff Kern, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Evan Solot, Professor 

Music History and Literature 

George Akerley, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Donald Chittum, Professor 

Annette DiMedio, Associate Professor 

Mark Germer, Senior Lecturer 

Andrew Rudin, Professor 

Bill Zaccagni, Assistant Professor 

Recording 

James Gallagher, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Music Business 

Marc Dicciani, Adjunct Associate Professor 



Music Education - 
Undergraduate and Graduate 
Studies 

Barbara Hanna Creider, Senior Lecturer 
Marc Dicciani, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Annette DiMedio, Associate Professor 
Janice K. Goltz, Assistant Professor, 

Division Head 
Robert Goltz, Senior Lecturer 
Regina Gordon, Senior Lecturer 
Richard Kerber, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Jeffrey Kern, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
John Knebl, Senior Lecturer 
Theodore Pasternak, Senior Lecturer 
Andrew Rudin, Professor 
Thomas Rudolph, 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Anthony Salicondro, Senior Lecturer 
Patricia Stasis, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Bill Zaccagni, Assistant Professor 

Latin/American Music 

Orlando Haddad, Brazilian Jazz, 

Senior Lecturer 
Edward Simon, Latin Jazz, Senior Lecturer 

Opera Scenes 

Leiland Kimball, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Patricia Raine, Assistant Professor 

Class Piano 

Annette DiMedio, Associate Professor 
Andrea Clearfield, Lecturer 
David Hartl, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Elizabeth Manus, Senior Lecturer 
David Posmontier, Senior Lecturer 

Music Librarian 

Mark Germer 

Jazz Improvisation 

Ronald Kerber, Assistant Professor 
Jimmy Bruno, Senior Lecturer 

Special Adjunct Faculty 

Bob Berg, Saxophone 
Rand)' Brecker, Saxophone 
Kevin Eubanks, Trombone 
Mike Stern, Guitar 



Special Regulations/ 
Requirements 

Attendance 

The number of hours of "Unexcused 
Absences" permitted per semester in the 
School of Music may not exceed the number 
of credits per course; i.e., in a three-credit 
course no more than three hours of 
unexcused absences are permitted, in a two- 
credit course, no more that two hours of 
unexcused absences are permitted, etc. 

Attendance at Lessons 

Students must attend all private lessons 
as scheduled except in the case of illness or 
emergency. It is the student's responsibility 
to notify the teacher if he/she is unable to 
keep the appointment time. Failure to give 
at least 24 hours prior notice may mean 
forfeiture of the lesson. A maximum of 
three lessons per semester will be made up 
in the case of excused absences. Lessons 
missed because of unexcused absences will 
not be made up. 

Lessons missed due to the teacher's 
absence will be rescheduled and made up 
by the teacher. 

Unless circumstances render it impos- 
sible, "make-up" lessons for the Fall 
semester are to be completed prior to the 
Spring semester; "make-up" lessons for the 
Spring must be completed by June 15. 

Normally, students are entitled to 
twenty-eight, one-hour lessons during the 
academic year (fourteen per semester). 

Change of Major Teacher 

Students who wish to petition for a 
change of major teacher must: 

1. Secure "Request for Change of Major 
Teacher" form from the Director of the 
School of Music. 

2. State reasons for requesting a 
change of teacher. 

3. Obtain the approval of the present 
and the requested teacher. 

4. Obtain the approval of the Director 
of the School of Music. 

Such changes are not usually effected 
during the semester or in the final year 
of study. If the change is approved during 
the semester, in addition to the process 
stated above, the student must also 
complete a drop/add form to correct the 
current major teacher designation. The 
drop/add form must be signed by the 
Director of the School of Music and 
submitted to the Office of the Registrar. 



Faculty Advisory 

All students are assigned to a faculty 
advisor. Lists are posted in the Merriam 
Lobby during the first week of the academic 
year. Appointments can be made at the 
mutual convenience of the student and the 
faculty advisor. 

Students should feel free to see their 
advisor at any time concerning problems 
that they may encounter. 

Jury Examinations 

Each student takes a jury examination in 
the major area at the end of each academic 
year. Students do not have to take a jury 
examination in their final year of study. 

Jury Recital Requirements 

Regulations regarding jury examinations, 
Junior and Senior Recitals are available in 
the office of the School of Music. 

Major Grade Policy 

Students whose semester GPA is below 
2.0 and/or receive a grade below "B-" in 
their major lessons will be placed on 
probation for one or two semesters, as 
determined by the Scholastic Standing 
Committee. Failure to meet the stipulation 
for removal of Probation by the end of the 
specified period will result in dismissal. 

"First Wednesday" 

The first Wednesday of each month is 
devoted to faculty and guest recitals, 
lectures, master classes, and workshops, 
as well as student performances. 

Music majors should not schedule 
other commitments during the time 
designated as First Wednesday. In 
addition, all music students are encouraged 
to attend student and professional perfor- 
mances on a regular basis. 



Graduation 
Requirements 

In addition to the general PCPA 
requirements for graduation, the following 
must be fulfilled: 

Undergraduate Requirements 

1 . Performance Majors must present 
a satisfactory Graduation Recital before 
the public ("satisfactory" performance 
to be determined by majority vote of a 
faculty Jury). 

2. Composition Majors must submit a 
satisfactory substantial work in the Senior 
year, to be publicly performed, adjudicated 
by the faculty of the Composition 
Department. 

Exit Requirements for the 
MAT in Music Education 

Successful completion of all course and 
related requirements shall lead to the 
granting of the Master of Arts in Teaching 
with a major in Music Education, provided 
that an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher is 
maintained. However, approval of the MAT 
in Music Education Committee is required 
for recommendation for teacher certifica- 
tion. It should be noted also that the 
initial Instructional I Certificate cannot be 
issued by the Commonwealth of Pennsylva- 
nia Department of Education unless PDE 
testing requirements have been met. 

Exit Requirements for the 
Master of Music in Jazz Studies 

All MM students must complete a 
satisfactory graduate project and a graduate 
recital in order to meet the degree 
requirements for completion of the Master 
of Music. 



99 



BM - Instrumental 

Performance 

Jazz/Contemporary 

Total Credits: 126 

Freshman Yeat Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

MU192A/B Major Lessons 3 3 
MU 103 A/B Musicianship 

Studies III 3 3 

MU 107 A/B Music Theory I-II 3 3 

MU 131 A/B Piano I-II* 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

HU 103 A/B Intro, to Modernism 3 3 

HU 1 10 A/B First Year Writing 3 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Freshman Year Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

MU 292 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 209 A/B Jazz Ear Training I-II 3 3 

MU 208 A/B Jazz Theory I-II 3 3 

MU 213 A/B Jazz Improvisation I-II 2 2 

MU 232 A/B Class Jazz Piano I-II 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Sophomore Year Total 



16 16 



Junior Year 

MU 392 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 301 A/B Music History I-II 3 3 
MU 310/311 Transcription and 

Analysis 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 6 

Electives 3 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Junior Year Total 14 17 

Senior Year 

MU 492 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU413A Recording I 2 

MU 420 B Careers in Music ** - 2 

MU401A Jazz History 3 
MU 401 B American Music 

History - 3 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

Electives 3 

Senior Recital 

Senior Year Total 16 13 



N.B. All Instrumental majors are required 
to complete successfully 1 year of Chorus 
and 1 semester of New Music Ensemble, 
which may be taken as Ensemble credits. 



BM - Vocal Performance 

Total Credits: 126 

Freshman Year Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

MU 191 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

TH 122 A/B Music Skills I-II 2 2 

MU 131 A/B Piano I-II 1 1 

MU772 Chorus 1 1 

TH 100 A/B Acting I-II 1 1 

DA XXX Dance (Movement) 1 1 

HU 103 A/B Intro, to Modernism 3 3 

HU 110 A/B First Year Writing 3 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Freshman Year Total 15 15 

Sophomore Year 

MU 291 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

TH 222 A/B Music Skills III-IV 2 2 

MU 232 A/B Jazz Piano I-II 1 1 
MU 241 A/B Vocal Styles and 

Diction I-II 2 2 

MU772 Chorus 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

DA XXX Dance (Movement) 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 
TH312A Musical Theater 

History 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Sophomore Year Total 17 14 

Junior Year 

MU 391 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 301 A/B Music History I-II 3 3 
MU 341 A/B Vocal Styles and 

Diction III-IV 2 2 

MU 347 A/B Adv. Sight Read. I-II 1 1 

MU772 Chorus" 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 
MU 331 A/B Advanced Piano for 

Vocalists I-II 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

Electives 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Junior Year Total 18 15 

Senior Year 

MU 491 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 401 A Jazz History 3 

MU 441 A/B Vocal Workshop I-II 1 1 

MU420A Business of Music ** 2 

MU772 Chorus 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 6 

Electives 3 3 

Senior Recital 

Senior Year Total 17 15 



* Note: Piano MU 131 A/B not required 
for Jazz Piano Majors. Substitute addi- 
tional 2 elective credits. 

** Note: All undergraduate Music 
students are required to take MU 420 A or 
MU 420 B. Students who take both may 
use one towards elective credits. 



BM - Composition 






Total Credits: 126 






Freshman Year Semester Credits 


Required Courses: 


1st 


2nd 


MU 193 A/B Major Lessons 


3 


3 


MU 103 A/B Musicianship 






Studies I-II 


3 


3 


MU 107 A/B Music Theory I-II 


3 


3 


MU 131 A/B Piano I-II 


1 


1 


MU 772 Chorus 


1 


1 


HU 103 A/B Intro, to Modernism 


3 


3 


HU 1 10 A/B First Year Writing 


3 


3 


MU 002 Jury Examination 








* Note: Piano MU 131 A/B not required 
for Jazz Piano Majors. Substitute addi- 
tional 2 elective credits. 

** Note: All undergraduate Music 
students are required to take MU 420 A or 
MU 420 B. Students who take both may 
use one towards elective credits. 



Freshman Year Total 



17 17 



Sophomore Year 

MU 293 A/B Major Lessons 

MU 209 A/B Jazz Ear Training I-II 

MU 208 A/B Jazz Theory I-II 

MU 315 A Jazz Arranging 

MU 232 A/B Class Jazz Piano I-II 

MU 7XX Ensembles 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 

MU 002 Jury Examination 

Sophomore Year Total 

Junior Year 

MU 393 A/B Major Lessons 
MU 301 A/B Music History I-II 
MU 317 A Orchestration I 
Ensembles 
Intro to MIDI 
Liberal Arts 



MU7XX 

MU415A 

HUXXX 

Electives 

MU002 



Jury Examination 



16 14 



Junior Year Total 


16 


16 


Senior Year 








MU 493 A/B Major Lessons 


3 


3 


MU413A 


Recording I 


2 


- 


MU420B 


Careers in Music ** 


- 


2 


MU401 A 


Jazz History 


3 


- 


MU401B 


American Music 








History 


- 


3 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


1 


1 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3 


3 


Electives 




3 


3 


Senior Recital 





- 



Senior Year Total 



15 15 



Diploma in Music - 
Instrumental Performance 
Jazz/Contemporary 

Total Credits: 104 

Freshman Year Semester Credits 

Required Courser. 1st 2nd 

MU 192 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 
MU 103 A/B Musicianship 

Studies I-II 3 3 

MU 107 A/B Music Theory I-II 3 3 

MU 131 A/B Piano I-II* 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 2 2 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Freshman Year Total 12 12 

Sophomore Year 

MU 292 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 
MU 209 A/B Jazz Ear Training I-II 3 3 

MU 208 A/B Jazz Theory I-II 3 3 
MU 213 A/B Jazz Improvisation I-II 2 2 
MU 232 A/B Class Jazz Piano I-II 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 2 2 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Sophomore Year Total 14 14 

Junior Year 

MU 392 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 301 A/B Music History I-II 3 3 

MU413A Recording I 2 

MU7XX Ensembles 2 2 
MU 310/311 Transcription and 

Analysis 1 1 

Electives 3 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Junior Reciral 

Junior Year Total 14 12 

Senior Year 

MU 492 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU420A Business of Music 2 

MU 420 B Careers in Music - 2 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU 401 A Jazz History 3 
MU 401 B American Music 

History - 3 

Electives 3 3 

Senior Reciral 
Senior Year Total 



13 13 

*Note: Piano MU 1 3 1 A/B not required 
for Jazz Piano Majors. Substitute addi- 
tional 2 elective credits. 

N.B. All Instrumental Majors are required 
to successfully complete 1 year of Chorus 
and 1 semester of New Music Ensemble, 
which may be taken as ensemble credits. 

102 



Diploma in Music — 






Vocal Performance 






Total Credits: 104 






Freshman Year Semesrer Credits 


Required Courses: 


1st 


2nd 


MU 191 A/B Major Lessons 


3 


3 


TH 122 A/B Music Skills I-II 


2 


2 


MU 131 A/B Piano I-II 






DA 347 A/B Acting I-II 






DA XXX Dance (Movement) 






MU 772 Chorus 






MU 7XX Ensembles 






Electives 


3 


3 


MU 002 Jury Examination 


- 






Freshman Year Total 



13 13 



Sophomore Year 

MU 291 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

TH 222 A/B Music Skills III-IV 2 2 

MU 232 A/B Class Jazz Piano I-II 1 1 
MU 241 A/B Vocal Styles and 

Diction I-II 2 2 

DA XXX Dance (Movement) 1 1 

MU772 Chorus 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 
TH 312 A/B Musical Theater 

History I-II 3 3 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Sophomore Year Total 14 14 

Junior Year 

MU 391 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 301 A/B Music History I-II 3 3 
MU 341 A/B Vocal Styles and 

Diction III-IV 2 2 
MU 347 A/B Advanced Sight 

Reading I-II 1 1 
MU 331 A/B Advanced Piano for 

Vocalists I-II 1 1 

MU772 Chorus 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Junior Year Total 12 12 



Senior Year 








Electives 


MU 491 A/B 


Major Lessons 


3 


3 


Senior Recital 


MU401 A 
MU401 B 


Jazz History 
American Music 


3 


- 


Senior Year Total 


MU441 A/B 
MU413A 
MU 420 B 


History 

Vocal Workshop 
Recording 
Careers in Music 


1 
2 


1 
2 




MU772 


Chorus 


1 


1 




MU7XX 


Ensembles 


1 


2 




Electives 




3 







Senior Recita 







- 




Senior Year Total 


14 


12 





Diploma in Music - 
Composition 

Total Credits: 104 

Freshman Year Semester Credirs 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

MU 193 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 
MU 103 A/B Musicianship 

Studies I-II 3 3 

MU 107 A/B Music Theory I-II 3 3 

MU 131 A/B Piano I-II 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 2 2 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Freshman Year Total 12 12 

Sophomore Year 

MU 293 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU 209 A/B Jazz Ear Training I-II 3 3 

MU 208 A/B Jazz Theory I-II 3 3 

MU315 A/B Jazz Arranging 2 

MU 232 A/B Class Jazz Piano I-II 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 2 2 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Sophomore Year Total 14 12 

Junior Year 

MU 393 A/B Maior Lessons 3 3 

MU 301 A/B Music History I-II 3 3 

MU317A Orchestration I 3 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU415A Intro to MIDI 3 

Electives - 6 

MU 002 Jury Examination - 

Junior Year Total 13 13 

Senior Year 

MU 493 A/B Major Lessons 3 3 

MU413A Recording I 2 

MU420A Business of Music 2 

MU 420 B Careers in Music - 2 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU7XX Ensembles 1 1 

MU 401 A Jazz History 3 
MU 401 B American Music 

Hisrory - 3 

3 3 




15 13 



MATPREP 

MAT in Music Education 
Preparatory Program 

All undergraduate degree students in 
music at The University of the Arts may 
enroll in, and take advantage of, the MAT 
in Music Education Preparatory Program 
(MATPREP). Completion of this program 
allows students to satisfy all corequisite 
requirements for admission to the MAT in 
Music Program. MATPREP is also an 
important means for maintaining continuity 
between undergraduate and graduate 
experiences and for fostering communica- 
tion between students and faculty in 
Music Education. 

Admission to the University as a BM/ 
MAT student in Music indicates acceptance 
into the Bachelor of Music program and 
into the MATPREP program. Full 
admission to the MAT in Music Education 
program must be granted prior to the 
beginning of graduate-level instruction on 
the same bases as other MAT candidates. 

A minimum grade point avetage of 3.0 
in MATPREP courses, and a minimum 
overall cumulative grade point average of 
2.75 must be achieved in order to be 
considered as a candidate for admission into 
the MAT in Music Education Program. 



MATPREP Credit 
Requirements 

Course Credit 

MU 1 5 1 A Introduction to 

Music Education I 1 
MU 151 B Introduction to 

Music Education II 1 

MU 257 A Lab Teaching/Practicum I 2 

MU 257 B Lab Teaching/Practicum II 2 

MU 254 Basic Conducting 2 

MU 356 A Music Teaching Skills I * 1 

MU 356 B Music Teaching Skills II * 1 
MU451 A Psychology of 

Music Teaching I 2 
MU451B Psychology of 

Music Teaching II 2 

MU 317 A Orchestration I 3 

Total Credits 17 



* Incorporates advanced skills in functional 
piano, guitar, recorder, writing/arranging 
for elementary classroom ensembles, 
handbells, and establishment of classroom 
environment. 



103 



Master of Arts in 
Teaching in Music 
Education 



Janice Goltz 

Division Head 
215-875-2250 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Music Education is an advanced teacher 
certification program designed to prepare 
individuals with established musical skills 
and subject matter mastery for successful 
careers in teaching and education-related 
fields. It is a unique program in that 
candidates for the MAT in Music Education 
typically will have completed undergradu- 
ate studies in applied music, composition, 
theory, history/literature, or other profes- 
sional areas. After satisfying Pennsylvania 
standardized testing requirements, MAT 
graduates will be eligible to receive K-12 
certification in music from the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania Department of 
Education. In addition, completion of the 
MAT program fulfills continuing studies 
requirements so that after three years of 
full-time teaching service, graduates may 
apply for permanent certification without 
taking additional courses. 

Music Education graduates of The 
University of the Arts are currently serving 
successfully as teachers, supervisors, school 
administrators, and in education-related 
fields such as computer software develop- 
ment, broadcasting, law and the arts, and 
private studio teaching. 



The MAT curriculum in music education 
comprises 36 credits and may be completed 
in a summer plus one academic year schedule, 
if all prerequisites are satisfied prior to 
matriculation. Prerequisite requirements 
may be satisfied in a number of ways, 
including taking courses in the under- 
graduate MATPREP program. Professionals 
in the field may choose to complete the MAT 
in Music Education over an extended period 
of time on a part-time basis. The following 
listing presents the normal sequence of 
courses if completed within one year: 



MAT in Music Education Credit Requirements 



Summer 



MU 554 A Elementary Methods and Materials 

MU 554 B Secondary Methods and Materials 

MU551 Education in American Society 

MU 550 Advanced Conducting - Choral or Instrumental 

MU 560 A Workshop in Instrumental Methods I 

MU 560 B Workshop in Instrumental Methods II 

MU 552 Workshop in Vocal Methods 

MU 553 Music and Special Children 

MU 557 Music Administration and Supervision 

MU 559 Research, Evaluation, and Technology 

in Music Education 

MU 555 Elementary Student Teaching 

MU 556 Secondary Student Teaching 

MU 558 Student Teaching Seminar and Major Project 



Spring 



Fall 
3 
3 
3 
3 






— 3 



Total Credits 



36 



MAT in Music Education 
Faculty 

Barbara Hannah Creider 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Oberlin Conservatory 

MM, MMA, DMA, Yale University 

Marc Dicciani 

Director, School of Music 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Annette DiMedio 

Associate Professor 
BA, Swarthmore College 
MM, Temple University 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 

William F. Garton 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, MA, Glassboro State College 

Janice K. Goltz 

Assistant Professor 

BM, BME, Philadelphia College 

of Performing Arts 
MM, Temple University 

Robert D. Goltz 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Chester University 

MA, Beavet College 

Regina Gordon 

Senior Lecturer 

BME, Temple University 

MM, Westminster Choir College 

Richard Kerber 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BME, Temple University 

Jeffrey Kern 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BS, Lebanon Valley College 
MM, University of Michigan 

John Knebl 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, BME, Philadephia Musical Academy 

MA, Villanova University 



Theodore Pasternak 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College 

of Performing Arts 
Music Ed Certificate, Chestnut Hill College 

Andrew Rudin 

Professor 

BM, University of Texas 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Thomas Rudolph 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BM, BME, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

MM, West Chester University 

EdD, Widener University 

Anthony Salicondro 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 



105 



Master of Music in 
Jazz Studies 

Evan Solot, 

Chair, Graduate Jazz Studies 
215-875-2288 

The Master of Music in Jazz Studies 
degree has its roots in three decades of 
University of the Arts' leadership in the 
field of jazz education, carefully balancing 
aesthetic goals and a pragmatic approach to 
vocational responsibility in the context of 
this American music idiom. Open to a 
small and highly advanced group of 
students who have an undergraduate degree 
in jazz studies or an undergraduate degree 
in music with significant experience in jazz 
and contemporary music, or the equivalent 
thereof, the program-while providing a 
solid foundation in contemporary music- 
encourages a primary focus on individual 
career goals. 

Curriculum 

Among the one-year, 32 credit program's 
unique curricular components are advanced 
private instruction in the major area to 
develop professional-level artistry and 
skills; hands-on internships and pedagogy 
study; ensemble performances; transcrib- 
ing and analyzing jazz and contemporary 
music; study of MIDI and music technol- 
ogy; and a final thesis/project/recital which 
integrates in-depth research on a topic of 
special relevance into personal instrumental 
growth, culminating in a public perfor- 
mance. Graduate Applied Studies are the 
core of the Master of Music in Jazz Studies. 
Additionally, applied study at the graduate 
level includes a pedagogy component. 
Teaching is a facet of almost every 
performer's and composer's career; 
coursework in the major applied area 
acknowledges this importance. 

Students, in addition to completion of 
the requisite 32 credits, must take or have 
taken two corequisite courses of two credit 
hours each: Recording and The Business 
of Music. 



MM in Jazz Studies Faculty 

Strings 

John Blake, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Saxophone 

Ronald Kerber, Assistant Professor 

Frank Mazzeo, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Greg Osby, Senior Lecturer 

Anthony Salicondro, Senior Lecturer 

Bill Zaccagni, Assistant Professor 

Trumpet 

Richard Kerber, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
John Swana, Senior Lecturer 
Dennis Wasko, Senior Lecturer 

Trombone 

Richard Genovese, Senior Lecturer 
John Fedchock, Senior Lecturer 

Keyboards 

Don Glanden, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
David Hartl, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Trudy Pitts, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
David Posmontier, Senior Lecturer 
Edward Simon, Senior Lecturer 

Guitar 

Jimmy Bruno, Senior Lecturer 
Robert DiNardo, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Thomas Giacabetti, Senior Lecturer 
Patrick Mercuri, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Upright Jazz Bass/Electric Bass 

Kevin MacConnell, Senior Lecturer 
Craig Thomas, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Gerald Veasley, Senior Lecturer 

Percussion/Drums 

Marc Dicciani, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Joseph Nero, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
James Paxson, Senior Lecturer 

Jazz Ensembles 

Evan Solot, Professor, Transfusion Ensemble 
Bill Zaccagni, Assistant Professor, Big Band 

Small Jazz Ensembles 
All Jazz Faculty 

Composition and Theory 

George Akerley, Adjunct Assistant Professor 



Recording 

James Gallagher, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Latin American Music 

Orlando Haddad, Senior Lecturer, 

Brazilian Jazz 
Edward Simon, Senior Lecturer, 

Afro-Cuban Jazz 

Music Technology 

George Akerley, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Thomas Rudolph, 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Special Adjunct Faculty 

Randy Brecker, Trumpet 
Bob Berg, Saxophone 
Kevin Eubanks, Trombone 
Mike Stern, Guitar 



106 



MM in Jazz Studies Credit Requirements 



Fall Spring 



MU 692 A/B 


Major 


3 


3 


MU 615/616 


MIDI and Music Technology 


2 


2 


MU617 


Transcription and Analysis 


3 





MU 620/621 


Professional Internship 


1 


1 


MU622 


Graduate Arranging 


2 





MU624 


Composing for Performers 





2 


MU 625/626 


Advanced Improvisation 


2 


2 


MU 627/628 


Graduate Forum 


1 


1 


MU764 


Ensembles 


2 


2 


MU603 


Graduate Project/Recital 





3 






16 


16 



Total Credits 



32 



Additional prerequisite/corequisite courses: 

MU413 Recording 

MU 420 Business of Music 

Total Credits with corequisites 



36 



107 



The School of 
Theater Arts 



Paul Berman 

Director 

3 1 3 South Broad Street 

215-875-2232 

The School of Theater Atts of The 
University of the Arts is committed to 
developing the skills, craft, and attitudes of 
its students to prepare them for careers in 
the professional theater. 

The goal of the theater school is to create 
artists, that is to say, men and women with 
a personal vision of life. We teach the craft 
to enable them to express that vision. The 
training of the actor is different from most 
other professional training in that the 
instrument of the training is the human 
being itself-the body and soul of the actor. 
An actor has to be trained in a variety of 
disciplines, each vital in itself and inti- 
mately related to all the others. The 
curriculum acknowledges that the focal 
point of the training is the Acting Studio; 
that voice and body training are the 
principal support areas; that all other 
curricular programs address themselves to 
the basic knowledge of techniques necessary 
to produce the craft. The program is based 
on the conservatory approach combining 
studio training with rehearsal and perfor- 
mance in varying kinds of productions that 
challenge the actor's ability to petform 
demanding roles. The highly focused and 
demanding ttaining is enhanced by 
appropriate courses in the liberal arts. 

The two degree programs normally take 
four years of full-time study to be com- 
pleted. The BFA Acting Program requires 
124 credits fot graduation; the BFA 
Musical Theater Program requires 128. 



Facilities 

The School of Theater Arts is located in 
the 313 South Broad Street building. 
Facilities include classrooms for Acting 
Studio classes and Stage Combat classes. 
Large dance studios and music facilities are 
also used by acting students. Performances 



are held at the Arts Bank, a new, techni- 
cally up-to-date, 240-seat theater at 601 
South Broad Street; two theaters in 313 
South Broad Street; the Black Box theater, 
an exciting, flexible space that allows for 
theater-in-the-tound, 3/4 thrust, environ- 
mental, and many other possible arrange- 
ments; and an intimate 200-seat 
proscenium theater. In addition, the 
University's historic Merriam Theater, 
located at 250 South Btoad Street, is used 
for performances. 



Programs of Study 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Acting Program 

The four-year BFA Acting Program pre- 
pares students for careers in the professional 
theater or for continued study in graduate 
school. In the first year, students concen- 
trate on finding the "core of the actot" 
through the study of improvisation, mask 
characterization, speech, and movement. 

The first year of training in the Acting 
Program is designed to encourage an in- 
depth self-analysis of the student's 
commitment to the craft as well as foster 
the development of particular acting skills. 

Progress from one semester to the next is 
by faculty invitation and is based not only 
on the successful completion of the course 
work, bur also on the faculty's positive 
assessment of the student's potential for a 
career in the professional theater 

The second year is devoted to additional 
study to establish depth of characterization 
and to refine physical and vocal technique. 
The third year devotes itself to the 
development of diverse acting styles. 
Shakespeare, melodrama, clown work, etc. 
are studied in depth. The focus of the 
fourth year is on performance, testing the 
student's ability to achieve the full 
dimension of a characterization and to 
sustain that character over the length of a 
play. The fourth year also prepares the 
student to enter into the profession. 
Students are given instruction in audition 
techniques, resume preparation, how to find 
an agent, etc. The fourth year culminates 
with a showcase of the gtaduating seniors 
given for agents, directors, and casting 
directors. 



Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Musical Theater Program 

The four-year BFA Musical Theater 
Program prepares students for professional 
careers as performers in the musical theater 
or for continued study in graduate school. 
The program defines the term "musical 
theater" in a way that embraces the richness 
and diversity of this challenging interdisci- 
plinary art form, which includes musical 
comedy, the musical play (in the 
Hammerstein-Sondheim tradition), new 
and alternative music theater, "Broadway 
opera," cabaret and revue. Students receive 
the same "core" of technique training as 
do acting students; this training is 
complemented by training in vocal 
technique, musicianship and dance, and the 
study of the tepertoire of the musical 
theater in print, recordings, and in rehearsal 
and performance. 

Opportunities for master classes, guest 
speakers, internships, and apprenticeships 
with many professional companies in the 
city and region are among the experiences 
open to students in this program. 



School of Theater Arts Faculty 

Acting Studio 

Irene Baird, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Mary Lisbeth Bartlett, Senior Lecturer 
Johnnie Hobbs, Jr., Associate Professor 
Drucie McDaniel, 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Gregor Paslawsky, Assistant Professor 
Rick Stoppleworth, Senior Lecturer 

Directing Studio 

Paul Berman, Director, School of Theater 

Charles Conwell, Studio. Associate Professor 

Voice Production/Speech 

Susanne Case, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
David Howie, Head. Speech, 

Associate Professor 
Neil Hartley, Senior Lecturer 



Stage Combat/Fencing 

Charles Conwell, Associate Professor 

Performance Coaching/ 
Audition Techniques 

Irene Baird, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Paul Berman, Director, School of Theater 
Johnnie Hobbs, Jr., Associate Professor 

Acting for Film 

Jiri Zizka, Adjunct Professor 

Mask Characterization; 
Makeup 

Clista Townsend, Senior Lecturer 

Theater Studies 

Paul Berman, Director, School of Theater 

Charles Conwell, Script Analysis, 

Associate Professor 
Mari Fiedler, PhD, Theater History, 

Adjunct Professor 

Dance/Movement 

Manfred Fischbeck, Movement, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Rex Henriques, Musical Theater Dance, 

Visiting Senior Lecturer 
Nancy Kantra, Head, Dance/Movement, 

Assistant Professor 
Rachel Mausner, 

Alexander Technique, Lecturer 

Musical Theater 

Charles Gilbert, Chair, Musical Theater, 

Associate Professor 
Linda Henderson, Coach, Accompanist 
Mary Ellen Grant Kennedy, Voice, 

Senior Lecturer 
Patricia Raine, Voice, Assistant Professor 
Dr. Neal Tracy, Voice, 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Technical Director/Production 
Manager 

Edward Johnson, Technical Director 
Neal Ann Stephens, Production Manager 



The Curriculum 

An actor must be well versed in a variety 
of disciplines, each vital in itself and 
intimately related to the others. Training 
in voice, movement, dance, speech, 
improvisation, masks, combat, music, 
mime, history, and literature supports work 
done in the acting studio, the heart of the 
curriculum. Students are exposed to a 
variety of methods and approaches to 
acting, and encouraged to utilize that 
which works best. One semester of stage 
combat is required of acting majors. 
Combined skills are tested through the 
rehearsal and performance of productions 
that challenge the student's ability to 
perform a variety of demanding roles. 
Electives are offered that emphasize 
directing and dramatic criticism, and 
appropriate courses in the liberal arts 
provide a sense of the history of the craft 
and its impact on other disciplines. 

In the sophomore year, students are 
reexamined by audition. They are respon- 
sible for presenting two contrasting 
monologues which are prepared without 
faculty supervision. At that audition they 
are also examined on the playwrights, the 
choices they have made, and the context 
of the plays. Musical Theater students 
also each present a solo song prepared 
independently. 

Performance Requirements 

The School of Theater Arts presents at 
least six major productions a year, both 
musical and dramatic plays. Plays are 
selected based on the availability and needs 
of student actors. All students are required 
to audition and an attempt is made to cast 
as many as possible. These productions, the 
keystone of the program, are professionally 
directed and designed. 

The fourth-year students are expected to 
participate in a showcase production 
designed to aid them in entering the 
profession. For this production, agents 
from the Philadelphia area, as well as New 
York City, are invited to attend. 



School of Theater Arts 
Regulations 

Absences 

Students in the School of Theater Arts 
are expected to attend all classes, studios, 
workshops, rehearsals and crews for which 
they are registered or otherwise committed. 
The School does not permit lateness, 
except for unavoidable and unforeseeable 
emergencies, when the Director, Assistant 
to the Director, Technical Director, or the 
faculty member should be contacted 
immediately. 

On the occasion of the second absence, 
the student will receive a verbal warning 
from the instructor and a letter of warning 
from the Assistant to the Director of the 
School of Theater Arts. 

On the third absence, the student will 
receive a deficiency notice and be asked to 
meet with the Director. At this time the 
student will be placed on departmental 
probation. 

A student who is absent a fourth time 
may be dropped from the course with a 
grade of "F" and placed on academic 
probation. If the course is in one of the 
major areas (Studio, Speech, or Movement) 
the student, if on academic probation, may 
be asked to leave the program. 

Advisors 

Students are assigned advisors when they 
enter the School of Theater Arts. Advisory 
lists are posted in the theater lounge during 
the first week of the academic year. The 
advisor conveys information from the 
faculty to the students and counsels the 
student in artistic and academic matters. 
The student, however, is wholly responsible 
tor fulfilling his or her artistic and academic 
obligations and for meeting the require- 
ments for graduation. 

Call Boards 

All Theater students must check the call 
boards daily and will be responsible for all 
official notices posted there within 24 hours. 

The call boards are used for the posting 
of all rehearsal and crew notices, as well as 
School and professional audition notices. 

Call boatds are located in the theater 
lounge on the first floor of 3 1 3 South Broad 
Street, next to the Theater Offices, and near 
the Production Office just outside the Black 
Box Theater. 



109 



Crew Assignments 

All first- and second-year students are 
required to serve on production crews. 
Crew assignments and calls are scheduled 
and monitored by the Technical Director. 

All crew persons are expected to be 
prompt for crew calls. Lateness will not be 
tolerated and action may be taken against 
anyone who misses an assigned call. A 
student who misses a crew call without 
prior permission from the Technical 
Director may be dropped from crew and 
required to serve on crew in the second year. 

Extra-Curricular Activities 

Students in the School of Theater Arts 
sometimes accept jobs ot roles in extracur- 
ricular projects. At no time should a 
student accept an activity that conflicts 
with a class, rehearsal, crew assignment, 
etc., or that prevents the student from 
being fully prepared for class, rehearsal, 
and/or performance. Certain professional 
work outside the School can be undertaken, 
but only with the permission of the 
Director of the School of Theater Arts. 

Physical Demands of the 
Program 

The Theater Arts program is physically 
demanding. Good health and its 
maintenance are of paramount importance 
to an actor. 

Occasional illness or injuries are, of 
course, justification for short-term absences. 
Specific chronic physical or emotional 
disorders that impair attendance or ability 
to function within the program over a 
longer period of time should be covered by 
a formal leave-of-absence. 

In either case, the student should confer 
with his or her advisor as soon as a potential 
health problem arises. 

Professional Standards and 
Behavior 

It is expected that students maintain 
high standards of professionalism with 
respect to studio, classroom, rehearsal, crew, 
and performance commitments. Profes- 
sional habits and attitudes are necessary 
during rehearsals. 



Student Evaluations: Warnings, 
Probations, Dismissals 

Each student is evaluated twice each 
semester by the School of Theater Arts 
faculty and the Director. The School of 
Theater Arts recognizes that in this art 
form it is possible for a student to receive 
an adequate grade for a specific course, but 
not show promise for a future career in the 
theater as an actor. The School's obligarion 
to its students, therefore, is to keep them 
abreast of their progress by personal 
contact and review. 

In addition to demonstrated ability and 
progress in the Major areas -Studio, Speech, 
and Movement-the student's attitude and 
seriousness of purpose are also evaluated. 
Progress from one semester to the next is by 
invitation only. 

There are three academic/artistic reasons 
why a student in the School of Theater Arts 
might be placed on probation or not 
invited to return for additional study: 

1 . receiving a grade of "B-" or lower in 
one or more of the Major area courses 
(Studio, Speech, Movement, Voice for 
Musical Theater, Dance for Musical Theater); 

2. conduct which proves disruptive to 
the educational process and/or the overall 
well-being of the ensemble; 

3. the realization that the program 
offered by the School of Theater Arts does 
not or cannot address the specific needs 

of the student. In this instance, the faculty 
will work with students and parents to find 
an appropriate alternative theater or related 
training. 

It is expected that the student's commit- 
ment to professional training will be clearly 
reflected in the quality of work in each 
studio and class. 

Warnings - In addition to cases of 
absences, a student will be verbally warned 
if his/her performance in class is below par 
as defined by the instructor's expectations 
expressed in the class syllabus, rules, etc. 
More specifically, a student will receive a 
verbal warning, followed by a deficiency 
notice from the Director's Office if he/she is 
not demonstrating ability, lacks seriousness 
of purpose, demonstrates attitudinal 
behavior which proves disruptive to the 
ensemble or educational process, is 
excessively tardy, is not prepared to work in 
class, or is not seriously committed to 
professional training. 



Evaluations - Students who receive 
unfavorable evaluations (i.e., recommenda- 
tion for probation) will meet with the full- 
time and major faculty (Studio, Speech, and 
Movement) to clarify and discuss problem 
areas and strategies fot improvement. At 
the conclusion of the session, the student 
will be given two copies of a letter from the 
Director detailing the reasons and the 
conditions of the probationary status. The 
student will be asked to sign both copies of 
the letter indicating that he or she 
understands the reasons, conditions, and 
possible consequences of the probationary 
status. The student will keep one copy; 
the other will be placed in the student's file 
in the School of Theater Arts' office. 

Except in unusual circumstances, a 
srudent who receives an unfavorable 
evaluation should have received at least 
one verbal warning from the instructor 
and a copy or copies of the instructor's 
deficiency notice(s). 

The probationary period shall last 
from the date of the meeting until the 
next evaluation meeting (approximately 
6 or 7 weeks). 

A senior placed on probation during 
the Spring semester who fails to success- 
fully address his or her deficiency by the 
end of the semester will not be allowed to 
graduate. 

Counseling - The instructor will meet 
formally with the student at least twice 
before the next evaluation to apprise the 
student of his or her progress. These 
meetings are documented and copied to the 
Assistant to the Ditector. 

Final Evaluation Session - At the next 
evaluation session, approximately six 
weeks later, the major and full-time faculty 
will again discuss the progress of each 
student. Those students who are to be 
placed or continued on probation, or 
asked ro leave the program, will come 
before the committee. 

A student who has shown improvement 
in t elation to the terms of the probation 
by the next evaluation, but who has 
violated another rule which could result 
in probarionary status, may be asked to 
leave the program. 

In each case, the student will receive a 
letter which explains the faculty's decision 
and his/her recommendation to the Dean of 
the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. 



BFA - Acting 

Total Credits: 124 

Freshman Year Semester Credits 
Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

TH103A/B Acting Studio I-II 3 3 

TH 103 L Crew 

TH105A/B Stage Combat I-II 2 2 

TH109A/B Speech for Actots I-II 2 2 

TH 114 Mask Characterization 1 
TH 115 A/B Movement 

for Actors I-II 1 1 

TH 116 A/B Dance for Actors 1 1 

TH 119 A/B Business of the Arts 1 1 

TH211 Makeup 1 

TH213 Script Analysis 3 

TH 3 1 1 A Theater History I - 3 

HU 110 A/B First Year Writing 3 3 

Freshman Year Total 18 16 

Sophomore Year 

TH 203 A/B Acting Studio III-IV 3 3 

TH 209 A/B Speech 

for Actors III-IV 2 2 
TH 215 A/B Movement 

for Actors III-IV 2 2 

TH 219 A/B Business of the Atts 1 1 

TH 31 1 B Theater History II 3 

HU 103 A/B Intro, to Modernism 3 3 

HUXXX Liberal Arts - 3 

Electives 2 2 
Sophomore Year Total 



16 16 



Junior Year 

TH 303 A/B Acting Studio V- VI 3 3 

TH 309 A/B Speech 

for Actots V-VI 3 3 

TH 315 A/B Movement 

fot Actors V-VI 2 2 

TH 319 A/B Business of the Atts 1 1 
HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 3 

Electives 3 3 

Junior Year Total 



15 15 



Senior Year 

TH 403 A/B Acting 

Studio VII-VIII 3 3 

TH 409 A/B Speech 

for Actors VII-VIII 3 3 
TH 415 A/B Movement 

for Actots VII-VIII 2 2 
HUXXX Liberal Arts 6 6 

Senior Year Total 14 14 



BFA - Musical Theater 

Total Credits: 128 

Freshman Year Semester Credits 

Required Courses: 1st 2nd 

TH 103 A/B Acting Studio I-II 3 3 

TH 103 L Crew 

TH 109 A/B Speech for Actors I-II 2 2 

DA 115 A/B Movement for Actors 1 1 

TH 119 A/B Business of the Arts 1 1 

TH 122 A/B Music Skills I-II 2 2 
TH 140 A/B Voice for Musical 

Theater I-II 2 2 
TH 150 A/B Dance for Musical 

Theater I-II 1 1 

TH213 Script Analysis 3 

HU 110 A/B First Year Writing 3 3 

HU 103 A Intro, to Modernism - 3 

Freshman Year Total 18 18 

Sophomore Year 

TH 203 A/B Acting Studio III-IV 3 3 

TH 209 A/B Speech 

for Actors III-IV 2 2 

TH211 Makeup 1 
TH 215 A/B Movement 

for Actors III-IV 2 2 

TH 219 A/B Business of the Arts 1 1 

TH 222 A/B Music Skills III-IV 2 2 
TH 240 A/B Voice for Musical 

Theatet III-IV 2 2 
TH 250 A/B Musical Theater 

Dance III-IV 2 2 

HU 103 B Intro, to Modernism 3 

HUXXX Liberal Arts - 3 
Sophomore Year Total 



18 17 



Juniot Year 

TH 303 A/B Acting Studio V-VI 3 3 

TH 312 A/B Musical Theatet 

History I-II 3 3 

TH 318 A/B Musical Theatet 

Repettoty 2 2 

TH 319 A/B Business of the Atts 1 1 
TH 340 A/B Voice for Musical 

Theater V-VI 2 2 

TH 350 A/B Musical Theater Dance 1 1 
HUXXX LibetalAtts 3 3 

Junior Year Total 



15 15 



Senior Year 

TH 440 A/B Voice for Music 

Theatet VII-VIII 2 2 

TH 450 A/B Musical Theater Dance 1 1 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6 6 

Electives 5 4 

Senior Year Total 14 13 



® The 

University 
of the 
Arts 



The College of Media and 
Communication 

Virginia Red, Acting Dean 

The College of Media and Communication has approval of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to grant Bachelor of Fine Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees as part of The University of the Arts. 



Programs of Study 

The College of Media and Communication is dedicated to the 
integtation of art, technology and communication. In recognition 
of the new artistic opportunities that have recently emerged, and of 
the importance of technology in many aspects of artistic endeavor, 
programs in the College of Media and Communication are 
characterized by their interdisciplinary nature, reliance on text, the 
use of appropriate technologies, and on collaboration and other 
strategies that take advantage of the potential of individual 
expertise and creative vision in a cooperative setting. 

The programs offered in this new college are a BFA degree in 
Writing for Media and Performance, and a BFA degree in Multi- 
media. A third program leading to a BS degree in mass media 
communication is in planning. Each program is designed as a 
rigorous sequential course of study, balancing major requirements 
with studio electives and a 42 credit liberal arts core. 

A unique aspect of the College is its interdisciplinary nature. 
Specialized courses that are unique and essential to the field are 
augmented by majot courses drawn from various programs 
throughout the university. Students are encouraged to explore the 
University's vast artistic and academic offerings through electives 
and minor courses of study. 



New Media Center 

The University of the Arts is proud to be a member of the 
New Media Centets. This group of the nation's leading academic 
institutions and technology cotporations is dedicated to the 
advancement of technology in education. The Univetsity of the 
Arts is one of only four art schools world-wide to be welcomed into 
this organization, whose members include New York University, 
Cornell, MIT, and UCLA. 

The University of the Arts' New Media Center (NMC) is a 
pair of state-of-the-art digital laboratoties that enable the integra- 
tion of text, graphics, imagery, animation, music, and sound. 
While these labs are used by the entire University community, the 
NMC is the primary classroom for students in the Writing for 
Media and Performance and Multimedia programs. The labs also 
provide an arena for collaboration with other NMC members, 
bringing real-world projects and cutting edge research inro the 
learning environment of every student in the College of Media 
and Communication. 



College of Media and 
Communication Faculty 

George Akerley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BM, MM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Tsia Carson 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Nova Scotia College of Art 

and Design 
MFA, The Ohio State University 

Hope B. Chollak 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BA, Dickinson College 

MSEd, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Peter Rose 

Professor 

BA, City College of New York 

MA, San Francisco State College 

Jeff Ryder 

Director, Writing for Media and Performance 
BA, Rider College 

Elizabeth Saperstein 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Emerson College 

Steven Saylor 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Franklin and Marshall College 

MA, MFA, Temple University 

Sloane Seale 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Arizona State University 

MA, The Ohio State University 

Karl Staven 

Assistant Professor 
BA, Yale Univetsity 
MA, Harvard University 
MFA, New York University 



114 



Multimedia 



TBA, Director 

215-875-5465 

Multimedia involves the combined use of 
text, image, video and animation, and 
sound to educate, entertain and communi- 
cate in a digital, interactive environment. 
The BFA degree program in Multimedia 
prepares creative people for work in the 
complex field of multimedia. Four key 
elements are stressed in rhe curriculum: 
collaboration, close interaction among arts 
disciplines, digital fluency, and a commit- 
ment to effective communication. Empha- 
sis is placed on development of the 
student's ability to create, organize and 
refine multimedia products. Working in 
the New Media Center on state-of-the-art 
digital systems, students develop the skills 
to confront new technology and integrate it 
into their work. This preparation enables 
graduates to take leadership roles in this 
rapidly growing field as Internet developers 
and information managers, software 
infotainment designers, CD-ROM 
developers, multimedia producers, virtual 
reality designers, computer animators, 
electronic artists, and hypertext and 
interactive multimedia developers. 

In their first year, students are introduced 
to the basic aesthetic and technical issues 
essential to multimedia. These are 
approached visually, aurally and rextually as 
a way of addressing their potential for 
communication. Students develop an 
understanding of the history and evolution 
of multimedia in relation to other art 
forms, the ability to work collaboratively, 
basic design skills, facility in the use of 
digital tools most commonly used in the 
field, sensitivity to general communications 
concepts, and an understanding of the 
principles of interactivity, music, and 
information management for multimedia 
design. Social and erhical issues of new 
media forms are also examined. 



Freshman students in the Multimedia 
program are required to take an introduc- 
tory or appropriate level class in any other 
major within the University, referred to as 
the Freshman Major Option. This 
requirement will: 

• begin or advance the development of 
skill in a particular creative discipline, 
enabling each student to bring a specialty 
to the collaborative projects that will be 
part of their work in the program; 

• expand students' understanding of the 
arts and expose them to other members of 
the University's artistic community; 

• develop a sensitivity to the attributes 
of traditional media; 

Examples of classes that students may be 
able to take to fulfill the Freshman Major 
Option include: 

FP 100 A Drawing 

FP 190 A 3-D Design 

TH 213 Script Analysis 

WM 1 1 1 Traditions of Narrative 

DA 107 Eurythmics 

DA 210 Kinesiology 

MU 107 A Music Theory 

Presentation of a portfolio and/or 
audition, and permission of the instructor 
may be required for entry to these classes. 

Work in the sophomore year builds upon 
the foundation of the first year, addressing 
in greater depth components of multimedia 
such as video, sound, writing and content, 
and interactivity. A discipline history 
course reviews the development of multi- 
media and analyzes its historical influences. 
The sophomore year also marks the start of 
a series of seven elective courses required for 
graduation. These elective courses are 
intended to encourage a multimedia 
student, under the guidance of advisors, to 
find a secondary concentration that will 
function as a specialty or focus within 
multimedia, as well as encourage a diversity 
of interests within the population of the 
Multimedia program. 



Students entering the junior year will 
round our their skills with the addition of 
computer animation and more advanced 
work in interactivity, preparing rhem 
conceptually and technically for the 
integrated work required in the senior year. 

The last year of the multimedia program 
allows the student to synthesize the 
concepts and techniques taught throughour 
the program while preparing for entry into 
the profession. Full-length projects with 
self-direcred rhemes enable the student to 
explore the art of multimedia and its 
potential for personal expression and 
communication. Business skills and 
industry issues are addressed, preparing 
student's for practicums which immerse 
them in real work environmenrs and 
professional issues. 



115 



* The choice of Freshman Major Option will influence the track 
recommended by the faculty advisor for the discipline history 
option (as part of the University's core) in the sophomore year. 
Discipline History option possibilities include: 
HU 140 A/B Survey of Art History 
DA 117 Survey of Music 

DA 211 A/B Dance History 
TH 311 A/B Theater History 
WM 251, 252 Narrative Cinema I, II 



116 



Multimedia 




Junior Year 




Total Credits: 123 




Fall 








Required Courses 


Credits 


Freshman Year 




PF 316 Computer Animation II 


3 


Fall 




MM 310 Multimedia Studio I 


3 


Required Courses 


Credits 


MM 320 Advanced Interface Seminar 


1.5 


Freshman Major Option 


3 


Elective 


3 


MM 1 10 Visual Concepts I 


3 
3 


Liberal Arts 
Fall Total 


6 


MM 130 Communication Concepts 


16.5 


MM 150 Collaboration & Spontaneity Seminar I 


3 






HU 103 A Modernism I 


3 


Spring 




HU110A First Year Writing I 


3 


Required Courses 




Fall Total 


18 


MM 311 Multimedia Studio II 


3 






MM 350 Business Seminar 


1.5 


Spring 




Electives 


6 


Required Courses 


3 


Liberal Arts 
Spring Total 


6 


MM 1 1 1 Visual Concepts II 


16.5 


MU 149 Aural Concepts 

MM 121 Introduction to Interface Design 


3 
1.5 


Junior Year Total 




33 


MM 1 5 1 Collaboration & Spontaneity Practicum 


1.5 






HU 103 B Modernism II 


3 


Senior Year 
Fall 

Required Courses 




HU110B First Year Writing II 


3 




Spring Total 


15 


Credits 


Freshman Year Total 


33 


MM 410 Senior Studio I 


4.5 






MM 470 Issues in Multimedia Seminar I 


1.5 






Elective 


3 


Sophomore Year 




Liberal Arts 
Fall Total 


3 


Fall 


12 


Required Courses 


Credits 






PF218 Creative Sound or 3 or 


3 


Spring 




MU415A Introduction to MIDI 3 




Required Courses 




MM 221 Interactive Studio I 


3 


MM 411 Senior Studio II 


4.5 


MM 223 Interactive Narratives 


3 


MM 47 1 Issues in Multimedia Seminar II 


1.5 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


Liberal Arts * 


6 


Liberal Arts 
Spring Total 
Senior Year Total 


3 


Fall Total 


18 


12 




24 


Spring 








Required Courses 








PF 322 Media Technology 


3 






MM 222 Interactive Studio II 


3 






Elective 


3 






Liberal Arts * 


6 






Spring Total 


15 




Sophomore Year Total 


33 





Writing for Media 
and Performance 



Jeff Ryder 

Director 

215-875-3366 

The exponential growth in the produc- 
tion and consumption of media products 
places greater importance than ever on the 
role of the writer in shaping television, 
film, video, theater, interactive games and 
educational tools. The Writing for Media 
and Performance program is designed to 
prepare graduares for professional work as 
writers for the various totms of media. 
Students cultivate their creative writing 
ability to apply style, story and technique 
appropriately to any media format. They 
learn to create original narrative prose and 
to adapt stoties to different media through 
a combination of intensive creative writing 
experiences coupled with the study of 
mainstream and experimental literarure 
from various cultures, emphasizing the art 
of storytelling. In each writing studio 
coutse, students work on a networked 
computer system to facilitate sharing of 
written material for discussion and critique, 
and collabotation on writing projects. 

A strong Liberal Arts background in 
drama, literature, sociology, psychology and 
history, along with courses in the perform- 
ing and visual arts gives students the 
breadth of knowledge required of the 
professional writer. Requirements of the 
program also include studio electives in the 
visual and performing arts, depending on 
students' interests. 

In the freshman year, all students take a 
core of courses including a history of 
television and of film, and Ttaditions of 
Narrative, the writing studio which is the 
primary building block of program. 

By the end of the first semester of the 
second year, students in the major select 
either dramatic writing or multimedia 
writing as theit atea of focus. To help 
inform their choices, all students in the 
major are required to take introductory 
courses in television, film, and multimedia, 
as indicated in the course outline. 

The thitd and fourth yeats of the ptogtam 
allow the student to develop full-length 
wotks for the ateas of media in which they 
ate most interested. Internships in the 
senior year will provide students with 
exposure to a professional work setting, 
reinforcing classroom theory and practice. 



Writing for Media and 
Performance 

Total Credits: 124 

Freshman Year 

Fall Credits 

Required Courses 

WM111 Trad, of Narrative I 3 

WM 253 History of Television 3 

HU 1 10 A Freshman Writing 3 

HU 103 A Modernism 3 

WM251 Narrative Cinema I 3 



Fall Total 


15 


Spring 

Required Courses 

WM112 Trad, of Narrative II 


3 


WM 252 Narrative Cinema II 


3 


MM 231 Digital Storytelling 
HU HOB Freshman Writing 


3 

3 


HU 103 B Modernism 


3 


Performing Arts Elective 


1 


Spring Total 


16 


Freshman Year Total 


31 



Sophomote Year 

Fall Credits 

Required Courses 

WM241 Arts of the Media 3 

WM 2 1 1 Stt ucture of Drama I 3 

MM 223 Interactive Narrative 3 

PF210A Introduction to Film I 3 

HU 320 A Western Lit. Masterpieces I 3 

(Discipline Histoty) 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 

Fall Total MT 



Spring 

Required Courses 

WM 2 1 2 Stt ucture of Drama II 3 

WM 213 Scriptwriting or 3 or 3 

MM 219 Introduction to 

Multimedia 3 

HU 320 B Western Lit. Masterpieces II 3 

(Discipline History) 
HUXXX Drama Distribution 3 

Elecrive 3 

Spring Total 
Sophomore Year Total 



15 



33 



Junior Year 

Fall Credits 

Required Courses 

Writing Studio: 3 

WM 321 Advanced 

Screenwriting I or 3 or 
WM 323 Advanced 

Playwriting I or 3 or 

MM 310 Multimedia Studio I 3 

WM 3 1 6 Adaptation for Media/ 

Non Fiction 3 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 

HU411 B Shakespeare or 3 or 3 

HU 413 02 Literature & Film: 

Shakespeare 3 

(Discipline History) 
Elective 3 

Fall Total 15~ 

Spring 

Required Courses 

Writing Studio: 3 

WM 322 Advanced 

Scteenwriting II or 3 or 
WM 324 Advanced 

Playwriring II or 3 or 
MM 311 Multimedia Studio II 3 

MM XXX Multimedia 

elective or 3 or 3 

WM 341 Acting/Directing 

fot Writers 3 

HU 264 Modern American History 3 
HUXXX Liberal Arts 3 

Elective 3 



Spring Total 


15 


Junior Year Total 


30 


Senior Year 






Fall 




Credits 


Required Courses 




WM331 


Issues in Mass Media 


3 


WM431 


Interatts Project 


3 


WM411 


Senior Thesis I 


3 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3 


Elective 




3 


Fall Total 




15 


Spring 






Required Courses 




WM412 


Senior Thesis II 


3 


WM499 


Internship 


3 


WM421 


Business of the Writer 


3 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3 


Elective 




3 


Spring Total 


15 


Senior Year Total 


30 



119 





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University 




of the 
Arts 






Art Education 



AE200 
Presentation Skills 

1 credit 

A component of the Introduction to Visual 
Atts Education, this course addresses effective 
speech and presentation skills for the teacher, 
artist, and administtator communicating 
with groups, classes, or clients. 

AE201 

Introduction to Visual Arts Education 

3 hours 

2 credits 

A theotetical and practical introduction to 
the entite field of art education. A survey of 
various aspects of teaching in a vatiety of 
situations and environments, through field 
observarions and classroom lectute-discus- 
sions, including public and private schools 
K-12, as well as specialized and alternative 
settings in museum education, early 
childhood education, special education (for 
handicapped and gifted childten), and adult 
education. 

AE510 

Museum Education Practicum 

3 houts 
3 credits 

This course is designed to develop the 
practiced insight and skills needed as a 
professional in a museum environment with 
all age groups. It provides opportunities for 
preliminary observations and expetience with 
professional museum educators and ditectors. 
The seminar is conducted in conjunction with 
the museum visits and guest speakets. 
Through this process, students develop 
dynamic teaching techniques which explote 
and interpret information, concepts, and 
cultutal values of a museum collection. 
Hands-on techniques and expetiences with 
curriculum development and methodology 
ptepare students fot research and internships. 



AE 530 

Interactive Media for Art and 

Museum Educators 

3 houts 
3 credits 

This coutse acquaints students with existing 
technology and media available fot instruc- 
tion to aft and museum educators. Students 
learn to design and create interactive 
multimedia projects using HyperCard, 
Directot and othet software. 

AE 531 

Multicultural Learning-Arts 

3 houts 
3 credits 

The artistic expressions of Africa, Asia, and 
the Americas, the Near and Middle East, and 
related societies ate examined for their 
aesthetic and contextual meanings. Cross- 
cultural conttibutions to world art history ate 
tecognized through the study of characteristic 
styles and techniques, dynastic periods of art 
and artists, as well as the relationship of art to 
vat ied systems of belief. 

AE532 

Design for Interdisciplinary Learning 

6 hours 
3 credits 

An introduction and cutticular model for 
integrated learning in which design and the 
visual atts, music, theater, and dance are the 
centtal means of integrating all disciplines to 
provide a more holistic approach to learning. 
An approach to arts-centeted learning 
through a design based problem-solving 
model is emphasized to solve problems 
creatively and addtess issues in all subjects 
and at all levels of education. 

AE547 

Program Design and Methods: 

Elementary 

3 houts lectute-discussion, 
3 hours field work 
3 credits 

Through review of current literature, lecture, 
discussion, field observation, and mini- 
teaching, students explote various educational 
philosophies and develop and implement 
effective classroom curricula based on 
prevailing theories of learning and child 
development. 

Prerequisite: AE 201. May be taken by 
classroom teachers or artists who wish to have a 
broader knowledge of methodology and content jor 
teaching elementary art. 



AE548 

Program Design and Methods: 

Secondary 

3 hours lectute-discussion, 

3 houts field wotk 

3 credits 

Continuation of AE 547 with emphasis on 

middle and secondary school. 

Prerequisites: AE 201 and either AE 547 or 

AE 559. 

AE550 

Creative and Cognitive Development 
3 hours 
3 credits 

This course is designed to develop skills in 
recognizing the developmental stages of 
childten, adolescents, and adults accotding to 
the theories of Jean Piaget, Lawrence 
Kohlberg, Viktot Lowenfeld, and Erick 
Erickson. In addition, the course will explote 
the learning theories of Jerome Bruner, B.F. 
Skinner, Howard Gardner, Madeline Hunter 
and Bernice McCatthy toward undetstanding 
individual difference in creative and cognitive 
development and leatning styles. 

AE552 

The Art of Teaching 
3 hours 
3 credirs 

Teacher preparation and knowledge of 
insttuctional techniques will be addressed, 
including development ot presentation and 
speaking skills, professional image, teachets' 
rights and responsibilities, and aspects of 
group processes. The coutse will explore 
cultutal and family factots that influence 
learning, expecrations conveyed by teachets 
and peer behavior, and techniques of 
insttuction and cteativity. A retrospecrive 
analysis ot each student's individual education 
expetience and his/het perceptions of teaching 
will be exploted through interactive 
simulation of classroom situations and 
teaching styles. 
Prerequisite: AE 201 

AE 559 

Saturday Practicum 

3 houts lectute-discussion, 

3 hours field work 

3 credits 

Students are involved in various aspects ol the 

Satutday Lab School. They observe classroom 

instruction, plan and teach lessons, and 

exhibit student wotk undet the supervision of 

cooperating mastet teachets and through the 

insttuction of a professot in the seminat 

portion of the coutse. 

Prerequisite: AE 201 



AE600, 700 

Colloquium: Learning and Teaching 

in the Arts 

1 credit each summer 

This course assumes that some ot the program 
participants either are teachers now or may 
teach at some level during their professional 
careers. The colloquium is an interdiscipli- 
nary forum intended to telate studio 
development and accomplishment, as well as 
critical, aesthetic, and historical aspects of 
att, to the process and implementation of 
learning and teaching. Utilizing lectures, 
readings, visual resources and directed group 
dynamics and discussions, the colloquium 
explotes varied topics during each of the 
fout summers. 

AE602 

History of Ideas in Art and Museum 

Education 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Seminar on major issues and trends in the 
history of Art Education, with an emphasis 
on child-centered and content-centered 
theoties and the theoretical antecedents of the 
Discipline Based Att Education movement 
and outcome-based education. 

AE606 

Research in Education: 

Methods and Trends 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A graduate education seminar on the 
principal approaches to tesearch for art and 
museum education. The course examines 
types of teseatch, applications and recent 
studies for their methodologies and findings, 
grant wtiting, and assessment techniques. 

AE610 

Graduate Studio Seminar 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A one-semestet interdisciplinary seminar 
exclusively for arts educators. Topics of broad 
concern to artists will be addressed in 
response to students' work, assigned readings, 
and occasional public lectutes or othet att 
events in the Univetsity and the community. 
Corequisite: Student should be currently enrolled 
in studio work while taking this course. 



AE615 

Educational Programming for Museums 

and Alternative Sites 

3 houts 
3 credits 

This coutse is designed for museum educa- 
tots. It ptepares them in developing 
educational programs and plans for diverse 
types of museums and alternative learning 
sites. It exposes the students to cutrent issues 
and trends in museum education such as 
intetdisciplinary and integtated learning, 
multicultural issues, outcome based 
education, and DBAE. Methods of interpret- 
ing artifacts and collections are studied and 
used in hands-on situations of lesson 
teaching. 

AE632 

Applications of Interdisciplinary 

Learning 

3 hours 
3 credits 

This course practically applies the knowledge 
gained in Design for Interdisciplinary 
Learning by offering a variety of curriculum 
frameworks through which elementary and 
secondary school teachers can implement 
this curriculum. Students use a variety of 
models and thematic approaches to develop 
integtated arts curricula that relates the arts 
to othet disciplines. In keeping with 
interdisciplinarity in a postmodern aesthetic, 
students use a variety of intetactive media. 

Class sessions include lectures, media 
presentations, discussions, intetactive group 
activities, guest presenters, and workshops in 
the univetsity and the community. 

This graduate level course is available for 
advanced undergraduates with an intetest in 
integrated arts. 
Prerequisite: AE .532 

AE648 

Graduate Museum Project 

3 hours 
3 credits 

This course requires a culminating tesearch 
project concerning museum studies, 
management, and education. The project is 
completed in one semester and includes the 
study of teseatch in the field, a team project 
with the Museum Education and Planning 
program, and an individual project related to 
the student's main area of interest within the 
museum profession. This course provides 
preparatory research for the culminating 
museum internship (AE 658). 
Prelcorequisites: AE 510, AE 530, ME 500, 
ME 508. 



AE649 

Graduate Project/Thesis 

6 credits (or 3 credits per semestet for 
two semesters) 

A culminating independent project super- 
vised by a faculty advisot. The project or 
thesis may take either of two distinct fotms: 
a) an academic thesis presenting original 
research in a significant historical, theoretical, 
or pedagogical question relating to visual arts 
education, or b) a studio or curriculum 
project intended fot use as a pedagogical tool. 
Prerequisites: AE 602, AE 606, AE 610. 
Other conditions: Students must also complete a 
University seminar, and be approved by the Chair 
of Art Education to enroll for the Thesis Project. 

AE658 

Museum Internship 

6 credits 

Taken in a cooperating museum, the 
internship represents full-time employment 
equivalency undet the mentorship of a 
professional museum educator. It is intended 
to provide practical on-site experience in 
which the intern is integrated into the 
museum staff, assuming professional-level 
responsibilities and experience. A University 
professor also observes, advises, and assesses 
the student during the internship. 
Prerequisites: AE 510, AE 548, ME 500, 
ME 508. 

AE659 

Student Teaching Practicum 

5 full days a week fot twelve weeks 
4.5 to 9 credits 

An intensive expetience built around a 
twelve-week student teaching practicum, in 
which the student devotes six weeks to 
teaching at the elementary school level and 
six weeks at the middle ot secondary-school 
level under the guidance and supervision of 
highly qualified master teachers and Att 
Education Department faculty. 
Prerequisites: AE 201, AE 547, AE 548, 
AE 559. 



123 



Art Therapy 



AT 300 

Introduction to Art Therapy 
3 hours 
3 credits 

The field of Art Therapy and the possibilities 
inherent in its scope and approaches are 
introduced. Normal children's art develop- 
ment is studied as a foundation fot under- 
standing the artwork of clinical populations. 
Art therapists who work within a wide range 
of settings are invited to present to the class. 
Prerequisite: HU 181 AIB. 

AT 301 

Social and Group Process 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A course designed to introduce students to a 
basic understanding of social groups, group 
behaviors, group therapy and group art 
therapy. The class helps students to better 
identify their own role as well as that of 
others within a group setting. Experiential 
art tasks are used to underscore course 
matetial and exemplify group dynamics. 
Prerequisite: HU 181 AIB, AT 300. 

AT 302 

Theories and Techniques 

of Art Therapy 

3 houts 

3 credits 

This coutse reviews a vatiety of mental and 

behavioral disorders and explotes how each 

would be addressed by the genetal theories 

and practices in the field of art therapy. 

Indicators of emotional, cognitive and 

behavioral disturbance as seen in att 

productions ate introduced. 

Prerequisite: AT 500 or AE 550. HU 384- 



AT 303 

Clinical Aspects of Art Therapy 

3 hours 
3 ctedits 

A survey of Art Therapy in practice is 
demonstrated through the use of case material 
from a variety of clinical populations. Issues 
of both long and short term tteatment are 
presented, as well as the rich vatiety of 
interventions at the att therapist's disposal. 
Prerequisite: AT 302. 

AT 401 

Senior Practicum 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A field placement is artanged to provide an 
opportunity for the student to apply 
classroom knowledge to an experience with a 
specific clinical population. This practicum 
includes on-site supervision by an art 
thetapist as well as small group supervision 
with Art Therapy faculty. 
Prerequisite: AT 300, AT 301, AT 302, 
AT 303, and HU 483. 



Crafts 



CR 111 

Freshman Ceramics 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Through lectute and demonsttations, 
students learn basic skills such as 
handbuilding, throwing, and press molding 
with an introduction to loading and firing 
kilns and mixing clay and glazes. While 
teaching basic skills, problems are given with 
emphasis on developing each students' 
potential for personal expression and artistic 
invention. Fteshman students are encouraged 
to patticipate in the departmental guest 
lecture series and field trips. 

CR121 

Freshman Fibers and Mixed Media 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This coutse provides foundation students 
with a hands-on studio experience grounded 
in fabric processes and materials as a means of 
personal expression. The student receives an 
introduction to stamp printing and direct 
painting on fabric, collage, thtee-dimensional 
off-loom structutes, as well as tapestry 
weaving on frame loom. Guidance is offered 
in the fotm of demonstrations, slide 
ptesentations, field trips, informal discus- 
sions, and intensive group critiques. 

CR 131 
Freshman Glass 

3 hours 

1.5 ctedits 

This course explores glass as an expressive and 

cteative medium. Students work with flat 

glass in stained glass techniques. 

CR141 

Freshman Jewelry and Metalsmithing 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An introduction to metalwotk through 
several beginning jewelry projects. Students 
leatn basic fabrication techniques through 
simple hollow construction; movement is 
approached through aspects of linkage and 
chainmaking; forming and fabrication ate 
covered as well. 



1.24 



CR161 

Freshman Furniture and Wood 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

The introduction of wood as a material, basic 
joinery theory, and the ability to manipulate 
the material safely with both hand and power 
tools. Lecture and demonsttation of the 
properties of wood, the proper use of the 
bandsaw and shaping tools, including rasps, 
chisels, small hand planes, and gouges. 

CR 200 A/B 
Projects I 

6 hours 

3 credits/semester fall and spring 
A studio course where students make art 
dealing with crafts issues and concepts. 
Individual project consultations are supple- 
mented by lectures, visiting artists, and 
group critiques. As this course is content- 
based, students use any/all crafts studios 
during in-class work time and open studio 
hours. (Students have access to crafts studios 
where they have completed ot are currently 
taking a media-specific course.) Non-crafts 
majors taking this course may also work in 
their accustomed media. 

CR 211 A/B 
Introduction to Throwing 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Beginning studio work with clay using the 
throwing process and related glazing and 
firing techniques. Problems are given with 
an emphasis on developing each student's 
potential for personal expression and artistic 
invention. 

CR 212 A/B 

Introduction to Handbuilding 

6 houts 
3 credits 

Beginning studio work with clay using the 
handbuilding processes of slab, coil pinch, 
and pressing form molds, plus related glazing 
and firing techniques. Problems are given 
with an emphasis on developing each 
student's potential for petsonal expression and 
artistic invention. 

CR221 A 

Introduction to Fibers Mixed Media 
6 hours 
3 credits 

An introduction to both ttaditional and 
experimental uses of materials and sttuctural 
processes in the fabric media. Assignments 
focus on the exploration of two- and three- 
dimensional forms in preparation for 
versatile approaches to the fibers media. 
A range of off-loom mixed media techniques 
is covered. 



CR221B 

Introduction to Color and the Loom 

6 hours 
3 ctedits 

An introduction to both traditional and 
experimental uses of materials and structural 
processes in the fabric media. Students 
explore the potential of two- and three- 
dimensional forms in preparation for 
versatile approaches to the fibers media. 
Loom-woven structures, tapestry, and woven 
color are covered. 

CR222 

Introduction to Dyeing and Off Loom 

Construction 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Through a series of developmental assign- 
ments, students are provided with a solid 
technical and conceptual base in the fabric 
media. Non-loom constructions, colot, and 
multifibet dye techniques are covered. 

CR 223 A/B 
Papermaking 

3 hours 
1,5 credits 

Through slide lectute/demonsttations and 
films, this studio course introduces students 
to all aspects of traditional Western and 
Japanese papermaking techniques including 
pulp preparation, sheet formation, ptessing, 
and drying sheets. Students learn refined, 
professional methods as well as explore the 
cteative versatility of pulp. Classes include: 
casting three dimensional objects and bowls, 
building subtle relief images in colored pulp 
and painting with pulp. Various fibers 
explored throughout the semester include 
unique ones made from garden vegetables 
and indigenous plants. 

CR227 

Experimental Costume Design 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An introductory mixed media Fibers 
studio where students transform the body 
into a fantastical art form through hat, mask, 
and unconventional garment construction. 
Students are introduced to a wide range 
of soft materials including fabrics, plastics, 
net, gauze, rugger yarns, paper, etc., 
and to simple printing/dying fabric embel- 
lishment processes. 



CR 231 A/B 

Introduction to Glass Blowing 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Through demonsttations, assignments, and 
tutoring by the instructor the students are 
guided toward mastery in offhand blowing. 
Blowing of well-balanced functional and 
nonfunctional forms is emphasized. The 
aesthetics of contemporary and historical 
glass ate introduced. Demonstrations and 
tutoring guide the students in exploring the 
use of color in glass, two- and three- 
dimensional surface treatment, the relation- 
ship between volume and skin of forms, 
blowing into molds, and working in a variety 
of scales. The aesthetics of contemporary and 
histotical glass are investigated as they relate 
to the students' work. 

CR232 

Stained Glass 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Students work with transparent and 
opaque glass sheet to produce both two- and 
three-dimensional artwork. Techniques 
include glass cutting and gtinding, use of 
earning and copper foil, soldering, enameling, 
sandblasting and carving, and kiln-firing. 
Typical projects include stained glass windows 
or panels, containers, and shallow bowls. 

CR 241 A/B 

Body Adornment/Introduction 

to Jewelry 

6 hours 
3 credits 

The student is asked to explore notions of 
jewelry and body adornment as means of 
personal expression. Projects tange from 
precious jewelry making to adornment that 
extends into performance. Basic goldsmith 
skills are taught as essential, while three- 
dimensional sketching and expetimentation 
in mixed media is encoutaged. Successful 
integration of design, material, and process is 
the goal. Projects are designed to provide 
students with broad exposure to the many 
possibilities inherent in jewelry and ornament 
as related to the human form. 



125 



CR242 

Introduction to Metalsmithing 
6 hours 
3 credits 

Metal is an extremely versatile material; 
though hard and durable, it is quite 
malleable and easily worked. This course 
covers direct working of metal. Sheet, wire, 
bar, and rod are given form by hammering, 
seaming, bending, etc. The majority of work 
is done in bronze, brass, and copper, though 
steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and precious 
metals may be used as well. Emphasis is on 
basic hand and machine processes conveyed 
through organized, comprehensive, and 
technical information. The focus is on the 
possibilities of metal for the contemporary 
artist. Contemporary issues include the 
object as sculpture, process as a source 
material, the importance of surface and detail, 
and functional objects made by artists. 

CR243 

Jewelry Rendering and Design 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Students explore two-dimensional pencil and 
gouache techniques effective in creating the 
illusion or finished pieces of jewelry. 
Emphasis is placed on the skill development 
necessary to communicate and evaluate ideas 
prior to making. Presentation and develop- 
ment of a portfolio are an integral part of the 
course. 

CR245 

Art for the Body 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This introductory mixed-media course will 
focus on the body as the site-specific locus for 
a variety of art fotms. Looking at a range of 
cultural and historical examples, students 
gain an appreciation for the many personal 
and social influences that underlie our 
conception of the human body and how we 
construcr for it. Studio work in an array of 
media, with specific emphasis on rhe use of 
metal, paper, fabric and leather. Technical 
information includes flat pattern making, 
piecing and sewing; forming and fabrication; 
mixed media construction; systems of 
attachment, linkage and closure. Emphasis 
on the students' ability to generate unique 
solutions to the physical challenges imposed 
by the human body on the content of attire. 



CR249 
Enameling 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Enameling is the art of firing colored 
glass onto metal. The transparent, opaque, 
and opalescent enamel colors are layered 
to produce richness, detail, depth, and 
brilliance in this durable and painterly 
medium. Traditional techniques such as 
cloisonne, grisaille, Limoges, basse taille, 
plique-a-jour, and champleve, as well as 
contemporary and experimental processes. 
Once they have gained a facility with the 
medium, students produce jewelry or small 
jewellike paintings. 

CR251 

Introduction to Molding and Casting 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A course in modelmaking, moldmaking 
and casting techniques, using plaster and 
synthetic compounds. Emphasis is given to 
developing proficiency in slip casting for 
use in the artist's studio and in industry for 
serial production. 

CR252 

Plaster Workshop 

3 hours 

1.5 credits 

An introductory course in modelmaking, 

moldmaking, and casting techniques using 

plastet and synthetic compounds. This 

course emphasizes the usefulness of these 

media to designers and artists. 

CR253 

Ceramic Technology 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

A lecture and laboratory course designed to 
initiate investigation of basic clay and glaze 
materials. The primary intent is for the 
student to gain an intuitive understanding of 
ceramic materials, their practical and 
aesthetic properries, and to develop a series of 
personal glazes ranging from bright gloss to 
matt. Additionally, the natute of clays and 
the relationship among clay bodies, slips, 
sigallatas and glazes is explored. 

CR256 

Ceramics 

3 hours 

1.5 credits 

Through lecture and demonstration, students 

learn basic skills such as hand-building, 

throwing, and press molding with an 

introduction to loading and firing kilns. 

Mixing clay, slips, and glazes are also covered. 



CR261 

Introduction to Woodworking 

6 hours 

3 credits 

An introduction to basic woodworking skills 

and processes, including sharpening and 

setting up hand tools and machinery, theory 

of solid wood joinety, and construction. In 

addition to building technical skills, thete is 

emphasis on contemporary and hisrorical 

furnitute design issues. 

CR277 

Fabric Resist and Embellishment 
3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course extends the students' basic color 
and drawing vocabulary inro the realm of 
ancient techniques and tools of Indonesia, 
Japan, and Africa. Fabric dyeing and resist 
methods covered include drawing and 
stamping with waxes, stitching and binding 
with threads, and more. Students acquire a 
broader sense of "mark-making," an 
understanding of the special colot properties 
of dyes, and an ability to use non- Western 
traditional craft methods to create contempo- 
rary art fabric. 

CR278 
Fabric Printing 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course focuses on the fundamental 
ptinciples of ttanslating drawings and 
photogtaphs into designs and images for 
screen prinred fabric, using a fine arr 
approach. Exploration of myriad possibilities 
in creating fabric using silkscreen and fabric 
pigmenrs. 

CR279 
Paper Casting 

3 hours 

1.5 credits 

Students use paper pulp to build up thtee- 

dimensional forms. Molds are made of 

plaster and other materials. The emphasis 

is on papet as a material for the craftspetson 

and sculptor. 



126 



CR280 

Introduction to Metal Casting 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Wax working for jewelry and sculpture, 
rubber molding processes, and lost wax/ 
centrifugal casting of bronze and (optional) 
sterling silver and karat golds. Extensive 
technical information for students who are 
design-oriented. Assignments allow projects 
in all formats (design, one-of-a-kind jewelry, 
fine art, etc.) and students are encouraged to 
use the techniques demonsttated innovatively 
and exptessively. 

Students taking the course a second time 
choose one aspect of the course (wax carving, 
wax modeling, wax impressions, vulcanized 
rubber molding, etc.) and produce a small 
body of work investigating that aspect in 
depth. Procedures for jobbing out work to 
professional contract castets; more experi- 
enced students send some of their work out 
to be molded or cast. 

CR281 

Introduction to Electroforming 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Electroforming is electroplating metal onto 
a nonmetallic surface or object. Metal may be 
built up on nonporous matetials such as wax, 
plastic, glass, stone, and lacquered found and 
natural objects. Wax may be removed from 
electroformed objects to leave a strong, 
lightweight, hollow, self-supporting metal 
shell. Students will wotk in electroformed 
copper assignments are sttuctuted to allow 
students to work in accustomed fotmats and/ 
or combine electroforming with other 
materials and processes. 

CR282 

Metal Furniture 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course questions our cultural assump- 
tions about furniture. Are common furniture 
forms dictated by functional requirements or 
arbitrary choices which have become 
traditional? Meral (steel, aluminum, bronze) 
is used for its strength and versatility; other 
materials are combined with metal according 
to student ideas and interests. Techniques 
include bending/torming of rod, tube and 
plate, oxyacetylene welding, btazing, 
mechanical fastenets/tap and die, riveting, 
and light blacksmithing. Typical student 
projects include small tables, lamps, chairs, 
ourdoor/public furnishings, and experimental 
forms. 



CR285 

Introduction to Furniture 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course will present a series of design 
problems emphasizing exploration of ideas 
through drawing and model making. 
Historic and contemporary examples will be 
studied. Fundamental joinery techniques will 
be covered, but the emphasis will be on 
design exploration, imagination, and 
inventiveness. Students will be providing 
their own materials and some hand tools. 

CR286 
Wood Carving 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An introducrory course focused on the 
development of skills and a survey of 
historical and contemporary precedents. The 
class will cover tools: selection, use, and 
sharpening; laminarion and joinery utilized 
for carving; finishing techniques; materials, 
choice of woods; lettet carving, design and 
content. Students will provide their own 
carving tools. 

CR287 

Low-Tech Furniture 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Using materials gatheted from natute 
students make chairs, tables, and other 
functional objects with a minimum of 
technical and mechanical procedures. 
Inspired by the design inhetent in natural 
materials, branches and twigs, found objects, 
and imaginative thinking, the class conceives 
and executes a series of projects, mostly with 
simple hand tools. The woodworking 
techniques demonstrated are simple and 
straightforward; even the most ten-thumbed, 
tool-inept, and machine-wary students are 
welcome in this class. 

CR 300 A/B 
Projects II 

6 houts 
3 credits 

A studio course where students make art 
dealing with crafts issues and concepts. A 
continuation ot Projects I, work becomes 
increasingly student-determined as the 
dialogue becomes mote subjective. As this 
coutse is content-based, students use any/all 
crafts studios during class time and open 
studio houts. (Students have access to crafts 
studios where they have completed or are 
currently taking a media-specific course.) 
Non-crafts majors taking this course may also 
work in their accustomed media. 
Prerequisites: CR 200 A/B 



CR 322 A/B 

Advanced Fibers Mixed Media 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Through a series of developmental assign- 
ments with a conceptual emphasis, and by 
using acquired knowledge from previous 
semestets, students ate encouraged to explore 
forms that reveal the inherent physical 
qualities and potential image-making 
possibilities of fabric. Loom-woven and 
mixed-media fabric techniques ate used as 
apptoptiate, depending on the student's 
intetest in the development of a divetse range 
of two-dimensional constructions, sculptural 
forms, costume, etc. 
Prerequisites: CR 221 A/B. and/or CR 222. 

CR329 

Advanced Textile Design 

1.5 houts 
1.5 credits 

This course uses the computer in the study of 
woven textile design. The course introduces 
fabric structutes from simple, plain, and rib 
weaves, through twills, satins, waffle weaves, 
double cloth, composite sttuctutes, and colot 
effects. Students learn the language of cloth 
through the inctemental development of 
structures, first making notation of those 
structures by hand on point paper, and then 
using vatious computer software progiams to 
develop a wide range of fabric structutes. At 
least one structute is realized through 
weaving on a 32-harness hand-weaving 
computer loom. 

CR331 

Advanced Glass Blowing 

3 hours 

1.5 credits 

Glass is consideted as an expressive medium, 

and development toward a personal style is 

encouraged. Students wotk with hot glass in 

advanced offhand work, blowing into molds, 

casting, and enameling, as well as advanced 

stained glass work incorporating blown and 

cast pieces on two- and three-dimensional 

stained glass problems. 

Prerequisites: CR 231 A/B. 



CR332 

Advanced Fusing and Stained Glass 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Glass is the vehicle for creative expression 
and aesthetic growth. During the first 
semester the students focus on developing a 
petsonal theme in their work under close 
guidance of rhe instructor During the 
second semester the students create a 
consistent body of work and present it in a 
small show, and trace the historical and 
contemporary sources of inspiration of their 
work in a written or oral paper. 
Prerequisites: CR 231 A/B andlor CR 232. 

CR 370 A/B 
Advanced Throwing 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Concentration on tesolving conceptual and 
formal issues as they relate to individual 
exploration on the wheel. Problems 
encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. 
Typical issues include usage and symbolic 
function, serial production, the table, site- 
oriented applications, and medium to large- 
scale use of materials. All problems stress 
practical as well as aesthetic tesourcefulness 
with clay on the wheel. Senior craft majors 
taking this coutse may choose to spend all or 
part of their time producing thesis work to 
supplement the thesis component of the 
Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 211 A/B. 

CR 371 A/B 

Advanced Ceramics 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Concentration on resolving conceptual and 
fotmal issues as they relate to individual 
exploration. Problems encourage uniqueness 
and challenge abilities. Typical issues include 
usage and symbolic function, production, and 
site-oriented applications, and medium to 
large-scale use of marerials. All problems 
stress practical as well as aesthetic resource- 
fulness. Senior Crafrs majors taking this 
coutse may chose to spend all or part of their 
time producing rhesis work to supplement 
the thesis component of Ctafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR212 A/B. 



CR 380 A/B 

Advanced Jewelry/Metals 
6 hours 
3 credits 

Built upon a basic grounding in jewelry 
concepts and techniques. Lectutes, technical 
demonstrations, and conceptual projects vary 
from year to year so that those students 
retaking the course will not find it redun- 
dant. The goals of the course are to increase 
the student's awateness and understanding of 
jewelry as a componenr of our culture, aid the 
student in the development of a petsonal 
aesthetic, and develop the student's thinking 
and problem-solving abilities. More 
experienced students are encouraged to focus 
on one specialized area of the jewelry field. 
Senior Crafts majors taking this course may 
chose to spend all or part of their time 
producing rhesis work ro supplement the 
thesis component of Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 241 A/B andlor CR 242. 

CR 381 A/B 
Advanced Metals 
6 hours 
3 credits 

Built upon basic grounding in metalsmithing 
skills. Technical demonstrations and 
conceptual projects vary from year to year so 
that those students retaking he course will 
not find it redundant. The goals of the coutse 
are to inctease the student's awateness of 
metal's possibilities, increase the student's 
metalworking skill, aid in the development of 
a personal aesthetic, and develop the student's 
thinking and problem-solving abilities. 
Senior Crafts majors taking this course may 
chose to spend all or part of their time 
producing thesis work to supplement the 
thesis component of Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 241 A/B andlor CR 242. 

CR 385 A/B 
Advanced Furniture 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Continuation of CR 285 (Introduction to 
Furniture) involving more complex design 
projects, combinations of objects, and 
advanced model making and finishing 
techniques. Emphasis on imagination, 
inventiveness, and depth of content. Senior 
Crafts majors taking this course may chose to 
spend all or part of their time producing 
thesis wotk to supplement the thesis 
component of Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 261 and CR 285. 



CR386 
Advanced Wood 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course covers tools, joinery, methods and 
materials. Content progresses wirh increasing 
complexity, involving machining, hand tools, 
finishing, and surface treatments. Senior 
crafts majors taking this course may choose to 
spend all or part of their time producing 
thesis work to supplement the thesis 
component of Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 261 and CR 285. 

CR 400 A/B 
Projects III 

6 hours 
3 credits 

The student selects a topic and produces a 
thesis body of work for the Ctafts Senior 
Thesis Exhibition. Part of this course is 
Senior Seminar, a forum for the discussion of 
ideas and issues through student participa- 
tion, guest lectures, and professional 
offerings. The modern craft aesthetic is 
examined in terms of late 19th- and 20th- 
century ideas and issues. Emphasis on the 
interdependency of all the arts with an eye to 
the unique contribution of crafts ideology and 
practice. Topical discussions encourage 
students to find contemporary relevancy and 
validity in an analysis of historical precedents. 
Other topics include: making an arrist's 
presentation, resume preparation, writing an 
artist's statement, tecotdkeeping and taxes, 
grant writing, and career opportunities. 
Particular attention is paid to the style and 
survival Techniques of contempotaries 
working in crafts media. 
Prerequisites: CR 300 A/B. 



IN 449 

Crafts/Fine Arts Internship 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Conditions for enrollmenr: Must be 

enrolled as a junior or senior in a BS or BFA 

program; must have a 2.5 cumulative 

GPA; and cannot enroll for more rhan 18 

credits, including those earned from the 

Internship during rhat semestet. 



MFA in Ceramics 

The following courses are open to students in the 
summer MFA program only. Each major summer 
studio concludes with an assessment of and 
planning for the work to be completed as two 
independent studios during the remainder of the 
academic year. A winter review weekend will be 
scheduled to assess progress of the fall independent 
studio work. 

CR610 
Major Studio I 

5 credits 

Evaluation of the student's artistic involve- 
ment, projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the student's graduate work. 

CR611 

Major Studio II 

5 credits 

Futthet exploration of the options, with 
increased awareness of theoretical issues and 
personal vision. 

CR710 

Major Studio III 

5 credits 

Greater focus in the student's work, with a 
view to completing the petsonal repertoire of 
skills and expression in the medium needed 
to undertake a thesis project. 

CR711 

Major Studio IV 

5 credits 

Planning and initiation of a sustained body 
of mature work to be presented in a thesis 
exhibition during the following summer. 



Dance 



DA 100 

Rhythm for Dancers 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

This course provides an understanding and 

expetience of rhythm that enables students to 

hear, feel, count, and notate rhythmic 

strucrures and enhance sensibility and 

cteativity. 

Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 101 A/B 
Ballet I-II 

6 hours 

2 credits 

Fundamentals of ballet technique including 
barre and center floor work. The course 
serves to introduce and develop basic ballet 
technique and vocabulary. Body placement 
and alignment is stressed through an 
undersranding and application of rhese basics. 
Continuous advancement and development is 
provided from beginning to advanced levels 
throughout this four-semester sequence 
(Ballet I-IV). 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 103 A/B 
Modern Dance I-II 

4.5 hours 
2 credits 

Basic technique of modern dance for rhe 
development of skills, intellectual under- 
standing, kinetic perception, and maximum 
versatility. Includes batte work, center floor, 
isolation, falls and recoveries, contractions 
and release. Part of a two-year sequence 
(Modern Dance I-IV). 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 107 
Eurythmics 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

A beginning coutse in dance theory and 
composition which explores the development 
of rhythm perception through movement 
improvisation. Students receive weekly 
movement assignments directed roward 
specific rhythm and dance problems. 
Open to Dance majors only. 



DA 109 
Improvisation I 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

This course comprises brearhing and 
centering warm-ups, isolation exercises, and 
technical improvisation on movement 
qualities, including swinging, gliding, 
falling, rising, slow motion. Students learn 
to develop choreographic ideas through group 
improvisational structutes. A continuation of 
the crearive work of DA 107. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 111 
Spanish Dance 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

A study of the basic techniques of playing 

castanets fot the Sevillanas, as well as 

development of fundamental skills in 

tootwotk and handclaps for flamenco. 

DA 113 A/B 
Jazz Dance I-II 

3 hours 
1 credit 

A ptesentation of styles designed ro broaden 
knowledge and technique of concert and 
theater jazz dance. Classes employ floor 
stretches and center barre as warm-up 
procedures. Movement patterns emphasize 
simultaneous cootdination of multiple 
rhythm patterns in different parts of the 
body. Combinations advance from simple to 
complex throughout this four-semestet 
sequence (Jazz Dance I-IV). 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 115 
Mime 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

An exploration of the commedia dell'arte, 
Kabuki, and twentieth-century techniques 
developed by Decroux, Barrault, and 
Matceau. Emphasis is placed on animals as 
the primary key to fundamental movement, 
as well as analysis of human movement, 
including elements of age, environment, body 
type, and facial features. 



129 



DA 116A/B 
Fundamentals of Dance I-II 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

This freshman course deals with basic 

aesthetic considerations of the dance arr form. 

The first semester examines the nature and 

forms of dance and care of the body. The 

second semester allows dance students the 

opportunity to work with their peers in an 

interarts project. 

Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 117 
Survey of Music 

3 hours 

3 credits 

This coutse surveys the history of music from 

ancient to modern, including jazz. 

Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 119 
Yoga 

1.5 hours 

1 credir 

The study of a system of exercises to achieve 

physical and spiritual well-being. 

DA 120 
Pilates Mat 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

The Pilates Mat is a part of the Pilates 
method of exercise. The Pilates Mat helps 
build strength while maintaining flexibility. 
The Pilates exetcise has been used for over 70 
years by dancers, musicians and athletes to 
help them enhance their performance. 

DA 121 

The Alexander Technique 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

A method for moving with ease and grace 
which can be used in any situation (ballet, 
jazz, modern dance, and also everyday 
activities). By releasing unnecessary tension 
in movement, the student learns to avoid 
dance injuries or change harmful habits so 
that chronic injuries can heal. 

DA 123 A/B 
Tap I-II 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

Basic vocabulary ot tap, and development of 
rhythmically accutate footwork and accom- 
panying body movements. 
Open to Dance majors only. 



DA 124 
African Dance 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

The study of the contribution of black dance 

to the development of American dance 

through the mastery of the technique. 

DA 126 

Dance Ethnology 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

A survey of the broad perspectives of dance 
as an expression of culture through investiga- 
tion of Western and non- Western dance 
forms. 

DA 129 

Nutrition 

1 hour 

1 credit 

The study of nutrition and its application to 

food selection, with special emphasis on the 

nutritional needs of the dancer. 

DA 130 
Dance Therapy 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

An examination of the use of dance move- 
ments as thetapeutic tools in working with 
the physically and mentally handicapped. 

DA 190 

Language of Music 
1.5 hours 

1 credit 

The study of rhythm, melody and harmony, 
tempo, dynamics, and musical forms. 
Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 201 A/B 
Ballet III-IV 

4.5 hours 

2 credits 

Continuation of DA 101 A/B. 
Prerequisite: DA 101 A/B. 
Open to Dance majors only, 

DA 203 A/B 
Modern Dance III-IV 

4.5 hours 

2 credits 

Continuation of DA 103 A/B. 

Open to Dance majors only. 



DA 205 A/B 
Notation I-II 

3 hours 

2 credits 

Notation I is an introduction to the Laban 
system of recording dance movement. The 
course deals with the study of basic notation 
symbols for reading and writing movements 
involving steps, arm and leg gestures, turns, 
and rhythmic and spatial patterns. Notation 
II comprises intermediate study in reading 
and writing dance phrases including torso, 
parts of the limbs, and head. 
Notation 1 required of all Dance majors. 

DA 209 

Anatomy for Dancers 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

A study of the structuted makeup of the 
human body, and the relationship of body 
systems to each othet. Included is a study of 
the structute and function of the nervous, 
pulmonary, circulatory, and digestive systems. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 210 
Kinesiology 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

A study of the mechanics of the body in 

motion based upon the background provided 

in Anatomy for Dancers (DA 209). Muscular 

and biomechanical aspects are presented, with 

a stress on overuse syndrome and prevention 

of dance injuries. 

Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 211 A/B 
Dance History I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The study ot the interaction between dance 
and the society in which it develops, 
emphasizing the changing role and nature of 
dance. Dance History I deals with dance 
trom the Renaissance through Diaghilev's 
Ballet Russe. Dance History II surveys dance 
from pre-World War II to the ptesent. 

DA 213 A/B 
Jazz Dance III-IV 

3 hours 

1 credit 

Continuation of DA 113 A/B. 

Open to Dance majors only. 



130 



DA 216 

Music for Dancers 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

An exploration of various kinds of musical 

materials and literature, from Gregorian 

chant to New Music, relating the selection of 

music to the creation of dance composition. 

Improvisation utilizing different sounds and 

instruments. 

Prerequisite to Dance Composition (DA 21 7). 

Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 217 

Dance Composition I 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

The course integrates the improvisational 
skills acquired earlier in Eurythmics, 
Improvisation, and Music for Dancers. 
Designed to provide the beginning choreog- 
rapher with the tools needed to structure a 
dance composition in solo and duet forms. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 301 A/B 
Ballet V-VI 

7.5 hours 

4 credits 

Continuation of DA 201 A/B. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

Required of students majoring in Ballet. 

DA 303 A/B 
Modern Dance V-VI 

7.5 hours 

4 credits 

Continuation of DA 203 A/B. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

Required of students majoring in Modern Dance. 

DA 305 A/B 

Modern Repertory I-II 

3 hours 
1 credit 

A study of contemporary and/or classical 
repertory by resident or guest choreographers 
or notators, as well as the viewing, discussion, 
and analysis of great works on video and film. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 
Required of Modern Dance majors. 

DA 307 A/B 

Ballet Repertory I-II 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credit 

The study and performance of dances of the 

Renaissance and Baroque periods, followed by 

major classical and modern ballets. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

Required of Ballet majors. 



DA 308 A/B 
Dance Pedagogy I-II 

1.5 hours 

2 credits 

Dance Pedagogy I is an introduction to 
current philosophies and practices of teaching 
dance, and a historical survey of the role of 
dance in education. The second semester 
deals with identification and exploration of 
basic concepts of teaching dance, and 
application of these principles to the concrete 
development of lesson plans. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 309 A/B 
Partnering I-II 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

The basic technique of adagio (pas de deux). 
Students perform major classical works. 
Required of Ballet majors. 
May be taken as an elective by other Dance majors 
with permission of the instructor. 

DA 311 A/B 
Jazz V-VI 

7.5 hours 
4 credits 

Continued development of technique and 
various styles as introduced in DA 113 A/B. 
The course progresses from basic to complex 
rhythm and isolation exercises, and move- 
ment combinations stressing subtlety of 
dynamics, as well as preparation of repertory 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 
Required of students majoring in 
Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 317 A/B 

Dance Composition II-III 

3 hours 

2 credits 

Continuation of DA 230. Problem solving 
and analysis of materials through individual 
projects. Special emphasis on group 
choreography. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 319 

Theater Functions 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

A basic production course dealing with 

concepts of lighting and set design for dance. 

Students are required to gain practical 

experience by working in the theater on 

dance concerts during the year. 



DA 321 A/B 
Pointe I-II 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

Basic technique of dancing ballet on pointe. 

Women's dance variations from the classical 

repertoire. 

Required of female students majoring in Ballet. 

May be taken as an elective by other Dance majors. 

DA 322 A/B 
Improvisation II-III 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

Individual improvisations are performed on 

themes with objects in restricted or altered 

spaces and times. Various structures are used 

for group improvisation. Free improvisation 

with live music is stressed. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

Required of students majoring in Modern Dance. 

DA 323 A/B 
Tap III-IV 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

The study and practice of the tap style of 

dance from simple rhythmic footwork to 

more complex multi-rhythms and repertory. 

Required of students majoring in 

Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 324 
Character Dance 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

The course deals with the study of the 

relationship between ethnic styles of dance 

and classical ballet, and the proper technique 

tor performing national dances stylized for 

the classical ballet repertory. 

Required of students majoring in Ballet. 

May be taken as an elective by other Dance majors 

with permission of the instructor. 

DA 325 A/B 

Ballet for Non-majors V-VI 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credit 

Continuation of DA 201 A/B. For students 

majoring in Modern or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 326 A/B 

Modern Dance for Non-majors V-VI 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credit 

Continuation of DA 203 A/B. For students 

majoring in Ballet or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 



131 



DA 327 A/B 

Men's Class I-II 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

The technical movements of dance frequently 

performed by the male dancer. 

Required of male students majoring in Ballet. 

May be taken as an elective by other Dance majors. 

DA 328 A/B 

Jazz for Non-majors V-VI 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credit 

Designed for Ballet and Modern majors. The 

course further develops the vocabulary and 

skills learned in DA 213 A/B. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 341 A/B 
Pointe I-II 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

A course designed to instruct students on the 

use of the pointe shoe in classical ballet. 

Co-rerequisite: A technique class and permission of 

the instructor. 

Required of all Ballet majors. 

DA 345 A/B 
Voice I-II 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

Vocal training for the non-Voice major. 
Designed to develop the vocal instrument to 
meet both the musical and nonmusical vocal 
requirements of the theater. 
Required of students majoring in 
Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 401 A/B 
Ballet VII-VIII 

7.5 hours 

4 credits 

Continuation of DA 301 A/B. 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

Required of students majoring in Ballet. 

DA 403 A/B 

Modern Dance VII-VIII 

7.5 hours 

4 credits 

Continuation of DA 303 A/B. 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

Required of students majoring in Modern Dance. 



DA 408 A 

Dance Symposium T 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A course designed specifically for those 
students who will be completing their 
student teaching requirement in the 
following semester. The course includes 
observation techniques, source material 
preparation, and evaluation criteria. Discus- 
sions center around the application of dance 
principles to the learning situation. The role 
of dance teacher is examined. 
Must be taken Senior year. 

DA 408 B 

Dance Symposium II 

3 hours 

3 credits 

This course is designed to complement the 

actual student teaching experience. Specific 

situations, problems, and achievements of the 

student teaching process are discussed and 

evaluated. 

Must be taken concurrent with DA 410. 

DA 409 A/B 
Partnering 

1 credit 

DA 410 
Student Teaching 

14 hours 

7 credits 

Students teach under supervised direction for 

one semester in a public or private school. If 

placement for student teaching is not within 

a school system, arrangements are made for 

the student to do this supervised teaching 

through local dance studios. 

Student Teaching must be taken concurrently with 

DA 408 B. 

Prerequisite: DA 408 A. 

DA 411 A/B 
Jazz VII-VIII 

7.5 hours 

4 credits 

Continuation of DA 311 A/B. 
Prerequisite: Senior status 
Required of students majoring in 
Jazz/Theater Dance. 



DA 419 A/B 

Dance Production I-II 

1.5-3 hours 
2 credits 

Designed to assist senior students in meeting 
their graduarion performance requirement. 
Each student participates in the rehearsal, 
performance, and Technical aspects of the 
senior graduation concerts scheduled at the 
end of each spring. Srudents are expected to 
take major responsibility for the producrion 
of these programs. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 421 A/B 
Pointe HI-IV 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

Continuation of DA 341 A/B. 

Prerequisite: DA 341 A/B. 

DA 422 
Styles of Jazz 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

An exploration of Jazz styles of historic and 

contemporary Jazz dance artists. 

DA 425 A/B 

Ballet for Non-majors VII-VIII 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credit 

Continuation of DA 325 A/B. For students 

majoting in Modern or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

DA 426 A/B 

Modern Dance for Non-majors VII-VIII 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credir 

Continuation of DA 326 A/B. For students 

majoring in Ballet or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

DA 427 A/B 
Mens Class III-IV 

1.5 hours 

1 credir 

Continuation of DA 327 A/B 

DA 428 A/B 

Jazz for Non-majors VII-VIII 

1.5-3 hours 

1 credit 

Continuation ot DA 328 A<B. For students 

majoring in Ballet and Modern Dance. 

Prerequisite: Senior status 



132 



DA 445 A/B 


Dance Extension 


DA 211 X 


Voice III-IV 

1.5 hours 


Courses 


Intermediate Spanish Dance 
1 credit 


1 credit 






Continuation of DA 345 A/B. 


DA 101 X 


DA 213 X 


Prerequisite: DA 345 A and 345 B 


Beginning Ballet 


Advanced/Beginner Brazilian 




1 credit 


1 credit 


DA 77- 


A fundamental ballet technique course for 




Dance Ensembles/Labs 


non-dance majors. 


DA 223 X 


3 hours 




Advanced/Beginner Tap 


1 credit 


DA 103 X 

Beginning Modern Dance 


1 credit 


DA 771 


1 credit 


DA 301 X 


Ballet Ensemble 


A fundamental modern dance technique 


Intermediate Ballet 


3 hours 


course for non-dance majors. 


1 credit 


1 credit 








DA 104 X 


DA 401 X 


DA 773 


Beginning Brazilian Dance 


Advanced Ballet 


Modern Ensemble 


1 credit 


1 credit 


3 hours 






1 credit 


DA 111 X 

Beginning Spanish Dance 




DA 774 


1 credit 




Jazz Ensemble 






3 hours 


DA 113 X 




1 credit 


Beginning Jazz Dance 

1 credit 




DA 775 


A fundamental jazz dance technique coutse 




Senior Ensemble 


for non-dance majors. 




3 hours 






1 credit 


DA 114 X 
Karate Elective 

1 credit 





DA 123 X 
Beginning Tap Dance 

1 credit 

A fundamental tap technique course for non- 
dance majors. 

DA 201 X 
Advanced/Beginner Ballet 

1 credit 

DA 203 X 

Advanced/Beginner Modern 

1 credit 

DA 204 X 
Advanced/Beginner Brazilian 

1 credir 



133 



Electronic Media 



EM 110 

Computer Concepts 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Designed as both a conceptual and hands-on 
course that will introduce the student to the 
foundations of digital processes in the arts. 
Experience with word processing, basic 
spteadsheet usage, database search tech- 
niques, digital photogtaphy, scanning, image 
processing, compositing, and the basics of 
HTML website development. This course 
includes an introduction to on-line services 
including Dialog and the Wotld Wide Web. 
Softwate includes Clarisworks, Photoshop 
and PageMill. Assignments in each of the 
softwate environments as well as supplemen- 
tal readings. No prior computer experience 
is tequired. 

EM 210 

Digital Multimedia 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The elements of digital multimedia produc- 
tion techniques used to create Internet 
Websites and intetactive programs. Hands 
on production experience as well as a 
perspective on developments in this rapidly 
growing field through readings and lectures. 
In the first third of the semester, students 
learn to cteate World Wide Web pages using 
the PageMill progtam along with some 
HTML coding. 

The balance of the semestet is dedicated to 
learning the basics of Macromedia Director 5, 
Quicktime movie production, and Sound Edit 
16 to create interactive projects that combine 
images, sound, and animation. Emphasis is 
on clear communication and the creation of 
intuitive interactive interfaces. 
Prerequisite: EM 110 or equivilalent introduc- 
tory course that includes experience with the 
Macintosh operating system and a working 
knowledge of Photoshop. 



EM 304 A/B 

Electronic Media/Production 

3 hours 

1.5 credits/per semestet 
The development of advanced computet skills 
in image scanning technology, desktop 
publishing, pre-press production, color, 
output technologies, digital photographic 
technologies, and introduction to digital 
time-based environments and cyberspace 
software. Technical expertise and efficient 
working methodologies are applied to 
problems from othet design coutses as well as 
from both individual and group assigned 
projects. All software is standard to current 
graphic design industry practices. 
Prerequisites: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 



Fine Arts 



Vine Arts courses are open on an elective 
basis as space and experience permits to 
non-Fine Arts majors. 

FA 205 

Concepts/Works on Paper 

6 houts 
3 ctedits 

This course offers the student an opportunity 
fot idea development, visual perception, and 
the organization of experience into composi- 
tions. Piimary emphasis is on developing 
visual expression, skill in using various 
materials, and growth of critical evaluative 
abilities through group discussions and 
critiques. Contour drawing, collage, Xerox 
transfer, book arts, and other experimental 
drawing and printing techniques are 
explored. Students are encouraged to 
combine media. 

FA 222 A/B 

Drawing: Form and Space 

6 hours 
3 credits 

An introduction to the issues of drawing, 
including perception, analysis, invention, 
and experimentation. A variety of thematic 
ideas, sttuctural possibilities, and imaginative 
intetpretations are exploted. Students are 
exposed to a wide spectrum of precedents in 
the history of drawing and are encouraged to 
enlarge their working definitions of how form 
and space can be effectively expressed. 

FA 223 

Introduction to Figure Modeling 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Modeling from life for the beginner, stressing 
direct observation, eye-hand cootdination, 
and depth discrimination. Both perceptual 
and conceptual skills ate developed and 
fundamental studio practices are taught, such 
as armature construction, clay utilization, and 
modeling techniques. Works are fired in clay 
or cast in plaster. 



134 



FA 324 

Drawing: Object, Subject, Metaphor 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A studio course that treats the recognition of 
meaning and motive in figuration. How is an 
image interpreted? What is signified by the 
mode, the format, and the forms presented? 
Assignments explote options for investing 
images with thought and feeling. 

FA 330 

Drawing: Site-Specific Projects 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Focus on the production of drawings and 

models of site-specific projects. Issues related 

to public art, environmental art, public and 

private realms, materiality, site selection and 

site specificity are explored. 

FA 333 A/B 

Attitudes and Strategies 
6 hours 
3 credits 

A studio-criticism course that focuses on the 
issue of artistic strategy as it applies to the 
cteation of art. Assignments attempt to aid 
students in recognizing their own and 
alternative tendencies through projects that 
are made to reflect attitudes like expression- 
ism, idealism, mathematical systems, 
decoration, naturalism, etc. 
Required of Fine Arts majors, open as an elective. 

FA 424 

Drawing References 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Advanced issues focusing on the relationship 

between a given work and its references and 

resources, whether they be historical, cultural 

or personal, and from nature, text, or other 

art. Emphasis on the manner in which a 

reference or resource influences the outcome 

of a work. This studio course aims at 

connecting the student's ideas to the larger 

context of historical ptecedent and univetsal 

meanings. 

Prerequisites; FA 222 A/B, FA 333 A/B. 



FA 450 
Advanced Projects 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Painting assignments dealing with the larger 
issues of the format and language of painting. 
Students are expected to give individualized 
responses to these issues and convene in 
group critiques to discuss the results. 
(Formerly PT 450) 
Prerequisite: FA 333 A/B. 

FA 460 (Formerly PT 490) 
Senior Fine Arts Seminar 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

The artist's role in historic and contemporary 
contexts. Issues surrounding the various 
purposes of art and how culture deals with 
artists are explored through discussion with 
visiting artists, alumni and faculty. Students 
work toward the acquisition of a professional 
profile in resume, artist statement, and slide 
preparation. Discussion of gallery practices 
and portfolio presentations cultivate an 
awareness of professionalism and career 
opportunities in the fields of painting, 
printmaking, and sculpture. 

IN 449 

Fine Arts Internship 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Opportunities to apprentice to practicing 

artists, gain gallery experience, work with 

nonprofit organizations which lead to practical 

experience and knowledge about the field. 



135 



MFA in Ceramics, 
Painting, or Sculpure 

The following courses are open to students in the 
summer MFA program only. 

FA 610 
Studio Topics 

2 credits, repeatable 

This course brings together students from 
each of rhe major disciplines to explore studio 
issues common to all visual arts. 

FA 691, 692, 693, 694 
Independent Studio 
Fall and Spring I, II 

3 credits per semester 

At the conclusion of Major Summer Studios I 
and II and Winter Critiques I and II, the 
student and faculty mentot agree on a plan of 
work to be pursued during the fall and spring 
off-campus semesters as described in the 
Independent Studio Contract. Working 
independently, students are expected to 
consult with the faculty mentors, to record 
results of their investigations in a journal of 
inquiry, and to submit periodic written and 
visual documentation of their progress during 
these semesters. Access to off-campus studio 
space during these semesters is necessary as 
the intention of this experience is to develop 
a pattern of studio investigation to be 
integrated into the demands of daily life. 
Students return to campus for a weekend 
Winter Critique of work completed during 
the Fall Independent Studio. Following this 
evaluation, plans for the Spring Independent 
Studio are formulated. Work completed 
during the spring semester is evaluated at the 
start of the following Major Summer Studio 
session. 



FA 793, 794 
Thesis Preparation 
Fall and Spring III 

3 credirs per semester 

Once students have completed Major Summer 
Studio III and have been formally declared a 
candidate by the graduate faculty, they may 
begin independently producing a body of 
work intended fot eventual presentation in a 
thesis exhibition following the successful 
completion of Major Summer Studio IV. 
Wotk completed during the fall semester is 
evaluated at the Winter Critique. During the 
spring semester, students submit 
a preliminary draft of their artist's statement 
for review. Work complered during the 
spring semester is reviewed by the thesis 
committee at the start of Major Summer 
Studio IV. At this juncture, work focuses on 
finalizing the thesis presentation and the 
artist's statement. Summer IV concludes with 
a full slide presentation by students of theit 
work in preparation for the thesis exhibition 
where they will be expected to present 
themselves and theit work to the thesis 
review committee and in pteparation for 
futute presentations to galleries, foundations, 
and teaching institutions. 

FA 795 

MFA Thesis and Exhibition 

2 credits 

The MFA degree certifies that the artist has 
attained a high level of competence and 
independent judgement in the discipline and 
is qualified to stand with his/het mentors as a 
master artist. The thesis exhibition and 
statement ate intended to serve as a demon- 
stration of this mastety. With faculty 
guidance, the student is responsible for 
securing an on or off-campus exhibition site, 
cutating, planning, and installing their 
exhibirion. The artist's statement and slide 
presentation of their work accompanies the 
exhibition. 



136 



Foundation 



FP 100 A 
Drawing 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Drawing is approached as a process by which 
the student examines and investigates the 
visual world. Line, mark, and shape are 
among the drawing elements emphasized in 
the first semester. With these tools, students 
examine the form and structure of various 
subjects while they improve their manual 
skills, strengthen their vision, and begin to 
define their drawing vocabulary. Graphite 
and charcoal pencils and a range of appropriate 
papers are the most ftequently used materials. 
Histotical precedents are discussed, master 
works analyzed, and relevant practical 
information-including the elements of spatial 
representation-is assimilated into the flow of 
class assignments. Focus is on the challenges 
and rewards of developing perceptual skills. 

FP 100 B 
Drawing 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Building on the sensibilities, skills, and 
information of FP 100 A, students refine 
their perceptual abilities, utilize new media 
such as charcoal and inks and develop 
additional drawing strategies. Students 
undertake the analysis of complex natural 
objects, sculpt volume with line and tone, 
encounter the challenge of drawing the 
human figure, and meet other situations 
which demand the assimilation of new 
information and the application of advanced 
skills. Controlling proportion, building 
volume, engaging the illusion of space, while 
at the same time developing the desired 
quality of light and illumination are the 
descriptive goals of the semester. Faculty 
bring skills, projects, and infotmation 
developed in the two- and thtee-dimensional 
design classes into the service of drawing. 
Prerequisite: FP 100 A. 



FP 120 A 
Two-Dimensional Design 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A focused introduction to the two-dimen- 
sional plane and its elements. The first 
semester defines the terminology and 
sharpens the ability to discern and use the 
visual elements of point, line, shape, and 
pattern. These fundamental elements are 
studied as independent units and brought 
together, supporring and animating one 
another, in a variety of formats. Skills in the 
use of black and white media such as inks, 
plaka, and acrylic pigments and equipment 
including technical pens, brushes, and 
drafting tools are developed in the first 
semester. The visual forces discovered during 
efforts to combine these elements and 
materials define the more complex subject of 
the class. 

FP120B 
Two-Dimensional Design 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course builds on the projects and skills 
established in FP 120 A. The majority of FP 
120 B is devoted to the introduction and 
extended study of color The major works of 
the semester are based in the use of acrylic 
paints and require skills of mixing and 
application. Other color mediums such as 
collage, pastels, watercolors, and oil sticks are 
also explored. Color theories are discussed, 
projects requiring tinting, shading, and 
toning clarify these basic concepts and master 
works of color are studied. Ideas developed in 
the class are shared with other Foundation 
courses and skills from three-dimensional and 
dtawing classes are imported to support 
current two-dimensional projects. Represen- 
tational and nonrepresentational form is 
developed as students integrate past 
experience, refine their skills of observation, 
expand the study of visual forces, and explore 
more complex principles ot organization. 
Prerequisite: FP 120 A. 



FP 140 

Time and Motion 

6 hours 
3 credits 

An introduction to the fundamental 
ptinciples of time-based art: sequence, 
movement, timing, motion design, principles 
ol animation, perception, and concepts of 
narrative. Students work in a variety of 
media using manual, computer, video, and 
body-based approaches. 

FP 190 A 
Three-Dimensional Design 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Introduction to concepts of mass, volume, 
space, the properties of materials, and the 
unique visual qualities of three-dimensional 
form. The introduction ot three-dimensional 
ideas and related tetminology is combined 
with the instruction in the use of materials 
such as paper, wood, plaster, and clay and the 
operation of hand and power tools. Students 
develop the practical experiences needed to 
make objects which counteract and respond 
to forces and answer visual requirements. As 
the semestet progresses, challenges of 
assembly, scale, and visual complexity 
increase. Invenrive processes, form genera- 
tion, and construction are undertaken as 
properties of materials, join with visual goals 
to develop new forms. Most importantly, 
students understand that they have access to a 
new language as they leatn to see, think, and 
plan three-dimensionally. 

FP 190 B 
Three-Dimensional Design 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Building on the skills, language, and 
sensibilities of FP 190 A, the second semester 
undertakes more complex projects. Some 
projects involve the combining of several 
materials and tequire the assembly of 
multiple parts. The semester builds in 
complexity exploring the challenges of scale 
and engaging time and movement as part of 
their conception. The introduction of 
environmental works, setting in place new 
principles of three-dimensional organization, 
researching rhe order of natute and taking up 
the challenge of representation in thtee 
dimensions. Faculty relate works and share 
principles with either the two-dimensional or 
drawing classes and attempt to harvest skills 
and sensibilities developed in those classes 
into the service projects in 
Three-Dimensional Design. 
Prerequisite: FP 190 A. 



137 



Graphic Design 

GD 105 

Freshman Graphic Design Projects 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An elective coutse introducing the Founda- 
tion student to the profession of graphic 
design and its working processes. The 
classwotk begins with directed fotmal studies 
and leads to an introductory communication 
pro|ect. Emphasis on the craftsmanship and 
working methods of the student as well as the 
breadth and depth of the student's individual 
investigative process. Studio lecture/ 
demonsttations focusing upon professional 
case studies and field trips. 

GD210A 
Letterform Design 

6 hours 
3.0 credits 

The analysis and development of lettetforms. 
The norms ot weight, proportion, chatactet 
width, and alphabetic relationships are 
developed perceptually, by hand. This course 
stresses the inherent optical telationships that 
exist in the construction of typefaces detived 
from the Latin alphabet. 
Prerequisites: Completion of the Foundation 
program, or permission of the instructor by portfolio 
review and interview. 

GD210B 
Letterform Design 

3 hours 
3.0 credits 

An extension and continuation of GD 210 A. 
The ptecision and clarity of designed 
chatacters and character sets. The course also 
addresses the basic fotmal language of 
typography and the application of typo- 
graphic principles to frame basic communica- 
tion messages. All typographic investigations 
are achieved by hand using provided type 
samples and without the use of computers. 
Prerequisite: GD 210 A. 



GD211 A 
Descriptive Drawing 

6 hours 
3.0 credits 

A fteehand dtawing course based upon 
observation and analysis of the underlying 
structure and form of man-made and natural 
objects. Logical representation and problem 
solving are emphasized. A visual vocabulary 
of line, shape, value, texture, and spatial 
otganization are addressed to develop 
drawing as a methodology fot tesearch and 
invention. 

GD211 B 
Descriptive Drawing 

6 houts 
3.0 ctedits 

A continuation of GD 211 A. A freehand 
analytical drawing course that addresses 
organic form and objects from natute. 
Drawing skills are developed to sketch and 
research visual concepts, as well as to use the 
medium for the invention of original images 
in uppet-level courses. 

GD213 A 
Design Systems 
6 houts 
3.0 ctedits 

An intensive laboratory whete the fotmal 
aspects of composition, otganic and geometric 
form, color, symbolic drawing, craftsmanship, 
and processes of conceptualizing are 
investigated. Assignments ate founded on 
directed goals and playful investigation to 
train the student in areas of selection, self- 
criticism, set theoty, and visual logic. 
Prerequisites: Completion of the Foundation 
program, or permission of the instructor by portfolio 
review and interview, 

GD213B 
Design Systems 
6 hours 
3 credits 

A continuation of GD 213 A. Furthet 
investigation of the visual language of 
design, culminating in a basic communica- 
tion problem. 
Prerequisite: GD 213 A. 



GD 306 A 

Typography Emphasis 
6 hours 
3.0 credits 

This coutse investigates and defines basic 
principles of typography in a communication 
context. Directed tesearch based upon 
typogtaphic norms addresses the issues of 
infotmational hierarchies achievable through 
visual form and sttucture as well as the 
editorial and expressive potentials of 
typography. Coursework uses ttaditional and 
digital technologies. 

Students must have working knowledge 
of QuarkXptess and basic Macintosh 
operation or be concutrently enrolled in EM 
304 A. Working knowledge of Adobe 
Illustrator is preferred. 

Prerequisites: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department, or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 

GD 306 B 

Typography Emphasis 
6 houts 
3.0 ctedits 

An extension and continuation of GD 306 A. 
The typographic ptinciples ot the grid, text 
typography, text hietatchies, image integra- 
tion, all within the context of a multi-page 
format. 

Students must have working knowledge of 
QuarkXpress and basic Macintosh opetation 
or be concuttently enrolled in EM 304 B. 
Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator and 
Adobe Photoshop is preferred. 
Prerequisite: GD 306 A or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 

GD310A 
Photographies I 
6 hours 
3.0 credits 

This elective coutse develops a designees 
methodology and viewpoint to achieve both 
structute and meaning in photography, and as 
a way to extend the range ot how objects and 
natute can be seen and ttanslated using 
photographic processes. The course explotes 
darkroom techniques, controlled lighting, and 
studio setups. Students use both traditional 
photography and digital software to create 
hybrid, photogtaphic images. Extensive 
studio and darkroom work is required. 
Prerequisites: PF 211 A and Junior status in the 
Graphic Design department or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 



GD310B 
Photographies II 

6 hours 
3.0 credits 

An upper-level elective studio in photography. 
Students undertake self-initiated projects 
to explore various applications of the 
constructed photograph. The designer's 
perspective and working process are used to 
focus the communication aspects of the 
imagery. Past topics have included medium- 
and large-format cametas, advanced studio 
lighting, and advanced printing and 
darkroom techniques. Extensive studio and 
darkroom work. Traditional and digital 
media can be explored. 

GD311 A 
Communications Studio 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Developing an understanding of visual 
relationships and how to use them to create 
visual impact and clarity while solving 
communications problems. Invention, 
intuition, and discovery combined with 
logical thought and thorough preliminary 
research. Special attention is given to 
refining the student's perceptual abilities, 
hand skills, and the integration of vatious 
media. Use of both tradirional and computet 
technologies. 

Students must have working knowledge 
of Adobe Illustrator, basic image scanning, 
and basic Macintosh operation or be 
concurrently enrolled in EM 304 A. 
Prerequisites: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department or by permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 

GD311B 
Communications Studio 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A continuation of GD 311 A, concentrating 
on the development of color, sensitivity, and 
petceptual abilities within a communications 
context. A working process that develops 
invention through logical thought and 
intuition is applied to communicate 
problems. Use of both traditional and 
computer technologies. 

Students must have working knowledge 
of Adobe Illustrator, basic image scanning, 
and basic Macinrosh operation or be 
concurrently enrolled in GD 304 B. 
Prerequisites: GD 304 A. and GD 311 A. 



GD313 A 
Color Studies 

6 hours 
3.0 credits 

An elective course addressing color concepts 
developed deductively from nature and 
inductively through experimental, perceptual 
analysis. A communication problem in 
which color is the prominent vehicle for the 
solution is addressed in a thorough research 
process. Diverse media are explored. 
Applications may use two- and three- 
dimensional formats. 

Prerequisites: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 

GD316A 

Drawing Applications I 

6 hours 
3.0 credits 

The use of drawing as both an expressive and 
an informational vehicle to solve communica- 
tion problems. Formal issues of composition, 
selection, and color as well as the conceptual 
issues of narrarive, sequence, and representa- 
tion are focused towards the communication 
of ideas, emotions, and information. 
Prerequisites: GD 211 A/B or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 

GD316B 

Drawing Applications II 

6 hours 
3.0 credits 

An upper-level elective drawing course in 
which students initiate individual projects 
which use drawing as the primary medium to 
solve communications problems. . Various 
media, mixed media, and hybrid images are 
explored in a thorough research-oriented 
design process. Connection between formal 
issues and communication effectiveness 
is stressed. 

Prerequisites: GD 316 A or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 



GD322 

Three-Dimensional Graphic Design 

6 hours 
3 credits 

The design of messages in spatial environ- 
ments from packaging to exhibitions. 
Investigations of the relationship between the 
communication of messages within the 
context of scale, surface texture, light 
modulation, and their application to three- 
dimensional form combine both experimental 
and practical criteria. Although traditional 
methods of conceptualizing are used in a 
thorough visual process, extensive computer 
work is involved. 

Students should have expertise in 
QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and 
Adobe Photoshop. 

Prerequisites: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 

GD411 A 
Design Studio 
6 hours 
3 credits 

A wide-tanging exploration of the connec- 
tions between image and text, and symbolic 
and narrative imagety, supported by studies 
in semiotics, information theory, and research 
methodology. Both traditional and computet 
technologies within a thorough research 
process. Preliminary research and definition 
of a self-genetated degree project is under- 
taken by Graphic Design majors in this 
course. 

Students should have expertise in 
QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and 
Adobe Photoshop. 

Prerequisites: Senior status in the Graphic Design 
department or by permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 



139 



GD411B 

Design Studio: Senior Degree Project 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course develops a self-generated degree 
project involving research, proposals, 
complete design formulation, and final 
presentation. Topics are reviewed by a panel 
of faculty in Graphic Design, with projects 
reviewed by an outside critic midway through 
the preliminary stages of development. This 
course uses both traditional and computer 
technologies within a thorough research 
process. 

Students should have expertise in 
QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and 
Adobe Photoshop. 
Prerequisites: GD 411 A, andGD 412 A. 

GD412A 
Problem Solving 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Approaches to solving communications 
problems of diverse character and increasingly 
practical application. The course assumes a 
high level of formal competence and places 
special emphasis on working within technical 
and time constraints by developing clear and 
concise thought patterns. This course uses 
both traditional and computer technologies 
within a thorough research process. 
Students should have expertise in 
QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and 
Adobe Photoshop. 

Prerequisites: Senior status in the Graphic Design 
department or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 



GD412B 
Problem Solving 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A continuation of GD 412 A, developing 
approaches to solving communications 
problems of broad scope and increasingly 
practical application. Students work within 
technical and time constraints while 
developing clear and concise thought 
patterns. The course assumes a high level of 
formal competence and places special 
emphasis on the development of unified 
visual and conceptual relationships across 
varied formats and scales. Both tradirional 
and computer technologies within a thorough 
research process. 

Students should have expertise in 
QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and 
Adobe Photoshop. 
Prerequisite: GD 412 A. 

GD426 

Advanced Typography 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This elective course addresses typogtaphy as 
both the primary vehicle ro communicare 
information and as a support to images. 
Assignments range from informational design 
to expressive, conrent-based problems, to 
intuitive investigations and formal experi- 
ments. Although traditional methods of 
conceptualizing are used within a thorough 
visual process, extensive computer work is 
involved. 

Students should have expertise in 
QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and 
Adobe Photoshop. 

Prerequisites: Senior status in the Graphic Design 
department or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 



Graduate Seminars 



GR691 

University Seminar: 

Structure and Metaphor 

3 hours 

3 credits 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which 

students from the several graduate programs 

examine theorerical issues of structure and 

metaphor in relation to an and design. 

Topics include cognition and perception, 

meaning and representation, and systems of 

organization and expression. 

(May be taken to satisfy Aesthetics and Art 

Criticism corequisites for the MAT program.) 

GR692 

University Seminar: Art and Design 

in Society 

3 hours 
3 credits 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which 
srudents from the sevetal graduate programs 
examine theoretical issues relating to the 
place of att and design in society. Topics 
include the social role of the artist/designer, 
public policy and the arts, issues of post- 
modernism, and aesthetic and ethical 
implications oi emetging arts and communi- 
cations technologies. 

(May be taken to satisfy Sociology/Anthro- 
pology corequisites for the MAT program.) 

GR791 

University Seminar: Art Criticism 

3 hours 

3 credits 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which 

advanced graduate students further examine 

the nature of image-making and design with 

particular attention to the theories and 

applications of criticism. 



Graduate students may register for upper 
level undergraduate liberal arrs courses (with 
permission of the graduate directot and 
director of liberal arts) for graduate credit. 
Graduate students will be expected to 
contribute at a higher level in the classroom 
and will have additional assignments 
(readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted 
graduate credit. Students are advised to 
select an atea of study that broadens or 
intensifies theit background in the arts, 
education, and related disciplines. Often this 
work conttibutes directly to preparation of 
the graduate projecr proposal. 



140 



Liberal Arts 



HU 008 A/B 

English as a Second Language I-II 

3 credits 

This course prepares students for whom 
English is a second language to produce the 
kinds of writing expected or them on the 
college level, and to improve their reading 
and critical thinking skills. This is a two 
semester requirement. HU 008 A provides a 
review of English grammar, sentence 
structure, and patagraph development. It 
focuses primarily on the development of 
fluency in writing and reading. The second 
semesrer of this course focuses on the 
different kinds of prose techniques and on 
responding in writing to readings and to the 
work of other students. It has a workshop 
format and engages students in collaborative 
learning activities. 

Weekly proctored writing sessions with a 
minimum of ten essays per semester and 
tutoring sessions are mandatory. Credits for 
HU 008 A or B do not count toward 
graduation. On rare occasions, studenrs may 
be exempted from HU 008 B by the 
instructor. HU 008 A and B are graded on a 
pass/no grade basis. A student who 
successfully completes the sequence enters 
HU 110 A. 

HU 103 A/B 

Introduction to Modernism 

3 credirs 

A course wirh an explicitly multi-arts 
viewpoint that explores the historical and 
cultural inheritance of the West over rhe last 
two centuries. The first semester concentrates 
on the period 1776-1914 and examines the 
complex movements known as romanricism 
and realism; the second semester covers the 
next half-century of high modernism and its 
consequences. 
Required of all freshmen. 



HU 009 and HU 109 B 

First Year Writing 

3 credits - 

Note: HU 009 ctedits do not count towatd 
graduation; HU 109 B credits count toward 
graduarion. These courses are designed to 
help students improve reading, writing, and 
study skills. The emphasis is on the technical 
aspects of wriring, specifically grammar, 
punctuation, spelling, and paragraph 
construction, along with reading comprehen- 
sion, vocabulary, sentence structure, logical 
relarionships, and usage. Students may 
work on particular problem areas in the 
Learning Resource Center. Grades in 
HU 009 will be assigned on a pass/no grade 
basis. Srudents completing HU 009 enter 
HU 109 B. Students successfully completing 
HU 109 B will enter HU 1 10 B in the 
following semester. 

HU 110 A/B 
First Year Writing I 
3 credits 

A yearlong writing course, the theme of 
which is "Artists as Writers." The course 
covers the various kinds of writing rhar artists 
may be expected to produce, ranging from 
informal generative writing to formal critical 
analysis and presentational writing. The 
student will write about the arts (including 
the student's own work), the artist, and the 
arrmaking process. The first semester focuses 
on the artisr and artmaking, and the second 
semesrer on the various arts-visual arts, 
dance, music, theatet, and literarure-regarded 
from various cultural perspectives. 
This course (formerly called "Language and 
Expression") is required of all freshmen. 

HU 130 A/B 
French I 

3 credits 

Study of the basic elements of French 
grammar rhrough conversation and drills 
derived from readings of easy modern prose 
and from a cultutal reader. 

HU 131 A/B 
German I 

3 credits 

A one-year course of basic grammar. The aim 
of the course is to develop the reading, 
writing, and speaking skills of the first-year 
Getman student. 

HU 132 A/B 
Italian I 

3 credits 

This course covers conversation about 
everyday Italian life and culture and basic 
grammar through reading of Italian prose. 



HU 140 A 

Art History Survey I 

3 credits 

A survey of Western visual arts (including 
architecture) from rhe earliesr extant 
examples (the cave paintings) to the 
Renaissance. The focus will be on ancient 
Greece and Rome and medieval Europe. The 
arrs will be presented in cultutal and 
historical context. 

Required of all students in PC AD who matricu- 
lated as freshman beginning Fall 1 996. 

HU 140 B 

Art History Survey II 

3 credits 

A continuation, from the Renaissance onward 
to the presenr day, of the survey of Western 
visual arts begun in HU 140 A. Major styles 
and periods: baroque, romanticism, realism, 
modernism. The arts are presented in 
cultural and hisrorical context. 
Required of all students in PC AD who matricu- 
lated as freshman beginning Fall 1996. 



HU 162 

Individual and Society 

3 credits 

An introduction to the sociological perspec- 
tive that views the "social" as a distinctive 
aspect of the human condition, through an 
examinarion of patterns of human interaction 
in modern socieries. The course seeks to 
develop a sensitivity to the ways in which 
group norms and roles shape individual 
behavior and rhought as well as an under- 
standing of the structure and function of 
some of the basic institutions of society. 
Topics will be drawn from the following: 
social solidarity, norms and values, socializa- 
tion, deviant behavior, family and kinship, 
social class, morality, erhnicity, religion, and 
education. 

HU 181 A 

Child and Adolescent Psychology 

3 credits 

This developmentally oriented course focuses 
upon Erikson's psychosocial stages of lite 
from birth to adolescence. Major topics 
include pregnancy, the birth process, and the 
physical, intellectual, emotional, and social 
development of the child. Family life and 
parenr-child relationships are also examined, 
with particular attention given to the impact 
of our social institutions upon parents and 
children. 



141 



HU 181 B 
Adult Psychology' 

3 credits 

This developmentally oriented course focuses 
upon Erikson's psychosocial crises from 
adolescence to death. Major topics include 
career choice, human sexuality, love, 
marriage, values, mental health and mental 
illness, aging, and death. 

HU201 
Lyric Poetry 

3 credits 

Close textual study of great short opems from 
Greek and Roman antiquity through the 
Renaissance and romanticism to the 
twentieth century. 

HU210A 

19th Century American Writers 

3 credits 

The major ideas and trends in nineteenth- 
century American literature, including works 
by Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, and 
James. 

HU210B 

20th Century American Writers 

3 credits 

Twentieth-century American writers 
including works by Wharton, Lewis, 
Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Steinbeck. 

HU211 
Women Writers 

3 credits 

Examination of literature written by women 
for its uniqueness and, equally important, for 
its significance in the mainstream of 
literature. The course begins with such 
writers as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, and 
Virginia Woolf, and concludes with contem- 
porary writers. 

HU212 

Introduction to Mythology 

3 credits 

This course begins by defining mythmaking 
(a creative process essential to all societies, 
past and present) and by analyzing the 
different approaches to myth. It moves on to 
examine creation myths from around the 
world and, finally, a selection of myths from 
three different cultures: Greek, Norse, and 
Native American. 



HU213 
World Drama 

3 credits 

This course examines some of the most 
important periods in dramatic literature 
before the modern period, in both the 
Western and non-Western traditions: 
Classical Greece and Rome, India of Kalidasa, 
Medieval Europe, Japan (Noh and Kabuki), 
Renaissance Italy and Spain, Neoclassical 
France, Romantic drama and opera. The 
relation of drama to ritual as a worldwide 
phenomenon. Emphasis on the relations of 
dramatic styles to the cultures and theaters 
within which they developed, and exploration 
of the idea of "total theater" in which poetry, 
song, dance, and music fuse together. 

HU216 

The Short Story 

3 credits 

A study of the short story from Poe to the 
present. Samplings from the British, the 
American, and the European, with particular 
attention to the major authors who rein- 
vented the genre. At the end of the semester, 
students look at developments in contempo- 
rary fiction: the anti-stoty, the new wave, the 
surreal, the minimal, the funny, the mythic. 

HU217 

African-American Literature 

3 credits 

Literarure by African-Americans, including 
Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph 
Ellison, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, 
Imamu Baraka, and Gwendolyn Brooks, to 
name but a few, who have created a distin- 
guished body of work that, with a few 
exceptions, does not appear in the reading 
lists of other American literature courses. 
Although the course will focus on the larger 
question of the role of the African-American 
writer in American society, it may also 
introduce students to other, less well-known 
African- American writers (e.g., Frank Yerby, 
Chester Himes) who have made significant 
contributions to "popular" American 
literature. 

HU218 

Superheroes: From Beowulf 

to Spiderman 

3 credits 

This course examines the most important 
heroes of popular culture in the Middle 
Ages-Beowulf, Roland, Siegfried, and King 
Arthur. What do these heroes and the epics 
in which they appear reveal about their 
culture' How do they compare to modern 
popular superheroes? 



HU219 

Children's Literature 

3 credits 

The anonymous oral traditions of world 
literature, which continue to nurture the 
imagination and sense of identity of children 
today, and the modern tradition of children's 
literature. The course focuses on children's 
literature as an introduction to the principles 
and forms of art and to the role of the 
imagination in child development. 

HU221 

Forms of Autobiography 

3 credits 

Intimate, revelatory explorations of the many 
worlds of the self; Hemingway as a young 
writer in Paris meeting Fitzgerald, Stein, 
Picasso; Salinger as Holden Caulfield, 
preppie sage; Freud on himself on psycho- 
analysis; Roth's Portnoy complaining in the 
throes of lust; Proust's great theories of love, 
death, and art; Van Gogh as artist and moral 
thinker in his letters; Greene's portrait of a 
woman's obsession with love and God; Andre 
Malraux's Lazarus; Tillie Olsen's struggles to 
write as a housewife; and others. Readings 
from letters and diaries by the authors of the 
books. 

HU 230 A/B 
French II 

3 credits 

Open to students who have completed 

French I or have had two or more years of 

high school French. Modern French short 

stories and a novel. La Ptincesse de Cleves, by 

the eighteenth-century writer Mme. de la 

Fayette. 

HU 232 A/B 
Italian II 

3 credits 

Open to students who have completed 
Italian I or have had two or more years of 
high school Italian. 

HU240 
Ancient Art 

3 credits 

An investigation of the art and architecture 
of the ancient world, concentrating on the 
classical art of Greece and Rome, but also 
considering the arts of Mesopotamia and Egypt. 



HU241 
Medieval Art 

3 credits 

The sculpture, architecture, painting, and 
decorative atts of Europe from the early 
Christian petiod in the third century A.D. to 
the proto-Renaissance in Italy in the 
fourteenth century, observing the emergence 
and flowering of a northern European 
mystical Christian vision separare from the 
monumental classical vision of Greece and 
Rome. 

HU 242 A 

Northern Renaissance Art 
3 credits 

The painting of the late Gothic illuminators 
and the fourteenth-century German and 
Flemish Mannerists such as Cranach, 
Brueghel, and Bosch. Students investigate 
the complex symbolism of northern iconogra- 
phy, the new techniques developed, and the 
historical background of a style often called 
Northern Realism. 

HU 242 B 

Italian Renaissance Art 

3 credits 

The major figures in the artistic centers of 
Italy from Giotto in the fourteenth century to 
the early work of Michelangelo at the end of 
the fifteenth century. The architects, 
sculptors, and paintets of Florence are the 
focus, but artists in Venice, Padua, and Rome 
are discussed as well. 

HU243 
Baroque Art 

3 credits 

The works of the major European artists of 
the seventeenth century: Bernini, Rubens, 
Velasquez, Rembrandt, Poussin, and Vermeer. 
Through the genres ot landscape, still life, 
and portraiture, all mature by the seventeenth 
century, othet artists such as Hobbema, 
Ruisdael, Zurbaran, and Hals are also 
studied. 

HU244 

Mythology in Oriental Art 

3 credits 

An introduction to the symbolism of 
mythology in Oriental art. The coutse 
investigates myths in the major Oriental 
cultures and their basic patterns, functions, 
and meanings. 



HU 245 A/B 

History of Western Architecture 

3 credits 

In the first semester, this course surveys the 
development of Western architecture from 
the ancient world of the Greeks and the 
Romans through the Renaissance to the end 
of the nineteenth century. In the second 
semester, emphasis is on the twentieth 
century. This course should be taken in 
sequence; the second semestet assumes 
knowledge of the first semester's work. 

HU246 
Nineteenth-Century Art 

3 ctedits 

Painting and sculpture made in the modern 
age in the West are examined in an interna- 
tional context. Emphasis is on the works of 
the major French, English, German, and 
American artists. The variety of subjects 
these artists exploted and the new styles they 
developed as they responded to the world of 
the nineteenth century will be among the 
topics discussed. 

HU250 

History of Sculpture 

3 credits 

A chronological survey of three-dimensional 
art produced ttom the end of the eighteenth 
century to the present day. Works by major 
artists from Europe and the United States- 
including Auguste Rodin, Pablo Picasso, 
Alexander Calder, David Smith, Louise 
Nevelson, and Christo— will be discussed and 
compared to the works of earlier artists. 

HU251 

History of Design 

3 credits 

A history of both industrial and graphic 

design in the West, paying patticular 

attention to developments in the twentieth 

century. 

HU253 
History of Crafts 

3 credits 

A survey of the principal movements and 
tendencies in Western crafts since the middle 
of the 19th century. Main topics include the 
arts and crafts movement, art nouveau, the 
Bauhaus, the intetrelationships among fine 
arts, crafts, and design, and postmodernism. 



HU255 

History of Photography 

3 credits 

Objectives: to provide an introduction to the 
significant photographers and their work in 
the history of the medium, to describe 
technical developments and their impact, to 
discuss the major visual and aesthetic trends 
in the development of photography and their 
relationship to art in general, and to describe 
the larger social context in which photogra- 
phy has developed. 
Require J of all Photography majors. 

HU 260 A 
Human Origins I 

3 credits 

An introduction to the history of ideas with 
emphasis on the theory of evolurion; an 
introduction to the order Primate; and a 
survey of living nonhuman primate species 
from prosimians to the gteat apes, stressing 
general characteristics and evolutionary 
trends of the order. 

HU 260 B 
Human Origins II 

3 credits 

An introduction to human biological and 
cultural evolution, a survey of the major 
evolutionary stages in hominid evolution, an 
introduction to Paleolithic technologies, and 
a comparison of contemporary Stone Age 
societies with Paleolithic populations. 

HU 262 A 
History of China 

3 credits 

The time span is from rhe earliest days to the 
present, with special emphasis on the modern 
period and relations with the United States 
and other Western powers. Intellectual and 
cultural developments will take precedence 
over political and economic history. 

HU 262 B 
History of Japan 

3 credits 

The time span is from the earliest days to the 
present, with special emphasis on the modern 
period and relations with the United States 
and other Western powers. Intellectual and 
cultural developments will take precedence 
over political and economic history. 



HU263 

History of the Italian Renaissance 

3 credits 

A historical and sociological inquiry into the 
Italian situation from the end of the 
fourteenth to the middle of the sixteenth 
centuries. Great changes in artistic expres- 
sion and philosophy, philology, and politics 
come together to characterize a new cultural 
atmosphere, a new way of life. Various areas 
of the peninsula participated, if not with the 
same intensity, in this "renaissance": the 
great city-states, Milan, Venice, Rome and 
most of all, Florence, but also the petty courts 
of Urbino, Ferrara, Mantua. The history of 
each state and the mode of life in all strata of 
the population. To illustrate the culture of 
that world, we read excerpts from literary 
sources of the time and view slides of 
paintings, sculpture, and urban architecture. 

HU264 

Modern American History 

3 credits 

A study of contemporary developments, values, 
and issues as a product of twentieth century 
phenomena. The course seeks to understand 
the dramatic changes that have occurred in 
American society over the last fifty years. 

HU 266 A 

History of the Classical World 

3 credits 

A survey of the history of ancient civilizations in 
the Near East and Europe. The focus is on Greek 
and Roman history, mythology, and culture. 

HU 266 B 

History of Medieval Europe 

3 credits 

A survey of the leading themes in the history 
of medieval Europe: the classical inheritance, 
the primacy of the Church, feudalism. 

HU267 

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

3 credits 

The nature and variation in human culture 
and various explanations of these differences 
(i.e., symbolic, functional, and historical). 
This survey of culture in Western and non- 
Western societies considers religion, 
mythology, and art; marriage, kinship, and 
group organization; ecological adaptation, 
economic and political organization; and the 
relationship of culture to personality. 
Readings and films chosen to illustrate the 
effect of variations of size, environment and 
subsistence and social complexity on cultural 
expression within groups. 



HU268 

Introduction to the Bible 

3 credits 

The main themes of the Bible are explored 
from a modern, critical, nondenominational 
point of view. No knowledge of the Bible is 
assumed. Using historical and literary 
analysis, continuities as well as differences 
between the Hebrew and Christian testa- 
ments are examined. 

HU 270 

Introduction to Aesthetics 

3 credits 

An introduction to the philosophy of art. 
After a brief examination of analytic, 
philosophical methods and the history of 
aesthetics, a consideration of some of the 
fundamental problems in aesthetics, such as 
the intention of the artist, the physical 
object/aesthetic object distinction, and the 
nature and comparison of different kinds of 
media. The relationship between language 
and art is central to the course. 

HU274 

Introduction to Philosophy 

3 credits 

A course specifically tailored to students with 
no experience in reading philosophy. Several 
basic issues are considered, including 
freedom, God, morality, death, mind, 
appearance, and reality. In addition to brief 
readings of primary sources, readings of 
discussions of these issues along with 
innovative fiction illustrating salient points. 

HU 282 A 

Fundamentals of College Mathematics 

3 credits 

An introduction to the fundamental 
mathematical principles and operations used 
in undergraduate courses in the physical and 
social sciences. Topics include sets, logic, 
probability, statistics, number theory, algebra, 
and geometry. 

HU 282 B 
Calculus 

3 credits 

An introduction to calculus emphasizing the 
applications of differential and integral 
calculus to the physical and social sciences. 
Prerequisite: HU 282 A, equivalent college- 
level mathematics, or pre-college advanced 
algebra and geometry. 



HU 285 A 
Life Sciences 

3 credits 

The study of life as it evolved from unicell- 
ular organisms to humans. Special emphasis 
is placed on an exploration of behavior, 
instinct and learning, aggression and human 
nature, and ecology. 

HU 285 B 
Physical Sciences 

3 credits 

An investigation of astronomy, geology, and 
other physical sciences, including the origin 
of the universe and solar system and the 
nature of physical science, matter, and energy. 
This course provides a background for 
understanding the problems of the impact of 
science on human values. 

HU293 

Dance and Expressive Culture 

3 credits 

Dance is woven into the mythology, theater, 

music, poetry, and literature of many 

cultures. The course considers dance as it has 

influenced and has been influenced by these 

forms of creative expression in the Western 

world. 

HU 310 

The Stories of Chekhov 

3 credits 

Anton Chekhov is among the world's great 
writers of short stories. His presentation of 
human relationships is profoundly humane 
and revealing. The readings include most of 
Chekhov's best stories, excerpts from his 
letters, some critical interpretations, and 
supplementary material on family life. 
Consideration of the literary merits of his 
stories and exploration of what goes on 
between the people in them. 

HU3H 
Greek Drama 

3 credits 

Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and 
Aristophanes are examined to understand 
their own integrity as works of art and to 
develop an appreciation of the extraordinary 
achievement of Greek drama. 



144 



HU 313 

Poetry Writing Workshop: 

Composition and Theory 

3 credits 

Students' poems are discussed, criticized, 
revised, and improved. Principles governing 
the decision to change a poem in various 
ways, the study of poems by American and 
English poets, the reading of some criticism, 
and concentration on the basic principles of 
craft are all included. Theories involve 
sound, content, meaning, and purpose of 
student poems and of poetry in general. The 
poet's sense of an audience also figures in 
the discussion. 

HU314 
Literature and Film 

3 credits 

This course explores different subjects 
through the arts of literature and film. 
Among the topics treated have been Images 
of Vietnam, The Thriller, and Science Fiction. 

HU315A 

Modern Drama 

3 credits 

A study of the modern theater from the end 
of the nineteenth century to the present. 
Students will read some of the world's best 
playwrights: Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, 
Shaw, Pirandello, Lorca, Brecht, and Beckett. 
Theater trips are part of the experience of 
this course. 

HU315B 
Contemporary Drama 

3 credits 

A study of the experimental developments in 
today's theater, both on Btoadway and off, 
from Waiting for Godot to the present 
moment. Students will read some of the best 
known playwrights of our time: Genet, 
Beckett, Ionesco, Albee, Pintet, and Shepard, 
as well as some not so well known. Theater 
trips are part of the experience of this course. 

HU316 

American Playwrights 

3 credits 

A study of the American theater in the past 
fifty years, looking at the works of such 
authors as O'Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, 
and Shepard. Theater trips as well as showings 
of filmed plays are part of this course. 



HU317 A 
Romanticism 

3 credits 

A study of the Romantic movement in 
England, including the major poets (Blake, 
Wordswotth, Coletidge, Byron, Shelley, and 
Keats), several novelists (including Bronte's 
Wuthering Heights and Mary Shelley's 
Frankenstein), and samplings from the letters 
and essays. Some of the dominant Romantic 
themes-the artist as outcast, revolution, 
man's relation to nature-will be addressed. 

HU317B 

William Blake 

3 credits 

A study of Blake the poet, Blake the prophet, 
Blake the revolutionary, and Blake the artist 
through an examination of his poems and 
illustrations. Included will be an introduc- 
tion to English Romanticism and an 
introduction to the art of illumination. 
Using facsimile editions, the student will 
read selections from Songs ot Innocence and 
Songs of Experience, The Marriage of Heaven 
and Hell, and then plunge into Blake's 
cosmology with Urizen and his visionary 
politics with America. Discovery of the 
meaning of some difficult poetty and the 
complex relationship between literary and 
visual art. 

HU318 

Literature of the Roman Empire 

3 credits 

After a glance at Gteek influences, the course 

will focus on the litetature of classical Rome. 

Readings from epic, drama, and lyric, with an 

emphasis on the interaction between those 

classical forms and the culture that produced 

them. 

HU 320 A 

Western Literary Masterpieces I: 
Ancient through Renaissance 

3 credits 

A selection of the greatest literary works of 
the West, from ancient Greece through the 
Renaissance. The course focuses on the 
perspectives and values those works reveal: 
what questions the different cultures asked; 
how they approached and defined human 
potential, fate, reality; and, finally, how they 
defined att and the artist's role-entertainer, 
recorder, shaper, conscience, or hero. 
Required of all students in the Writing for Media 
and Performance program. 



HU 320 B 

Western Literary Masterpieces II: 

Neoclassic, Romantic, and Modern 

3 credits 

A continuation of Humanities 320 A, 
focusing on the same issues but from the 
seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. 
Readings include wotks by such writets as 
Moliere, Voltaire, Austen, Goethe, and 
others, and end with two twentieth-century 
wt iters, D. H. Lawrence and James Joyce, 
who tepresent two significantly different 
modern traditions. 

Required of all students in the Writing for Media 
and Performance program. 



HU322 
Scriptwriting 

3 credits 

This workshop course introduces students to 
the discipline oi writing for theater and film. 
Focusing on the elements necessary for the 
creation of producible scripts, the student 
develops practical skills leading to the 
cteation of a shot t wotk fot stage ot screen by 
the end of the semester 

HU323 
Arts Criticism 

3 credits 

A writing coutse designed to promote 
undetstanding and interpretation of the arts 
across a multi-disciplinary spectrum and to 
provide students with the basic tools of 
critical analysis. Group discussion and 
selected teadings. 

HU325 
Fiction Writing 

3 credits 

A workshop course on wtiting short fiction. 
Students will study the elements of creative 
writing, experiment with several fotms, 
develop a clear voice, and learn how to 
criticize the work of others usefully. The goal 
is to produce a portfolio of finished pieces. 

HU326 
Contemporary Arts 

3 c ted its 

A continuation of the two-semester Modern- 
ism sequence, this course focuses primarily on 
contemporary literatute (mainly plays and 
novels) and contempotary visual art (mainly 
painting and sculptute), with occasional 
forays into music. Investigation, by studying 
ptimary sources, the way various works of art 
express the contemporary aesthetic in 
Ametica. 



145 



HU342 
Arts of China 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and 
decorative arts from the Neolithic period 
(sixteenth century B.C.) to the Ching dynasty 
(eighteenth century A.D.). Special emphasis 
on Shang bronze ware, H'an and T'ang 
sculpture, and Sung and Ching pottety. The 
various styles are related to their historical, 
religious, and social background, with 
particular attention paid to the impact of 
Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism on 
Chinese art and architecture. From time to 
time, Eastern and Western cultures will be 
compated to understand better the similari- 
ties and differences between them. 

HU343 
Art of Venice 

3 ctedits 

An emphasis on light, an apparent spontaneity 
of organization, and a delight in richness and 
sensuality guided the development of painting 
in Venice from Bellini through Tiepolo. The 
course presents Venetian painting from the 
mid- 15th to the later eighteenth century, 
pausing to focus especially on the art of 
Titian, Veronese, and Tintoretto, and themes 
peculiat to Venetian art: the female figure 
"poesia"; Venetian light and landscape; 
portraiture; couttiers, humanists, and 
beauties; the confraternity nartatives; and 
the fresco decoration of the Venetian villas. 

HU344 
Avant-Garde Cinema 

3 credits 

An examination of the art of film and, in 
particular, the history of the New Ametican 
Cinema movement (1940s through 1980s); 
the mythic structures, mental states, visual 
metaphots, and internal tensions of the 
underground film. The focus will be on the 
coexistence of avant-garde film and its 
industrial or commercial counterparts. The 
course will consider film language in its 
relationship to other art disciplines. 

HU345 

Modern Architecture 

3 ctedits 

The course investigates modern architecture, 
its theoretical premises, and the social context 
that generated it. Students will also inquire 
into modern architecture's legacy: 
postmodern architecture. 



146 



HU346 

Folk Art and Architecture 

3 credits 

A survey of American vernacular art and 
architectute, with special attention to the 
eastern United States. Attention will be paid 
to the ethnic traditions from which this 
architecture springs, principally English and 
German. Social considerations, including 
those of gender, occupation, and religion, will 
be discussed. 

HU347 
Arts of Africa 

3 credits 

Artistic, religious, sociological, and geo- 
graphic aspects of societies in sub-Sahatan 
Africa will be studied in order to establish 
continuity as well as distinction between 
their art forms. Black American folk art, an 
extension and ttansformation of African art, 
will also be analyzed. 

HU348 

American Art from the Colonial 

Period to 1945 

3 credits 

A survey of American art, architecture, and 
design, emphasizing the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. The material is divided 
into a series of sections or themes and is 
considered in relation to tradition. Each 
section or theme is studied through the work 
of the majot artists who best represent it. 

HU349 

American Film Genres 

3 credits 

A course, the content of which will vary each 
time it is offered, that will consider various 
film genres and styles in American cinema, 
such as comedy, film noir, the Western, the 
musical, and the American independent film. 

HU351 
Electronic Video 

3 credits 

The history of video as an art form from the 
early 1960s to the ptesent. Basic film 
concepts are reviewed in their application to 
emerging new electronic formats. Video art 
is examined in all of its aspects-as computer 
art, installation, and sculpture. The survey 
explores the variety of styles, genres, and 
forms which constitute the distinctive 
achievement of American video art. The 
videotapes and documentation of artists' 
projects are examined and placed within the 
social and cultural context in which they were 
produced. The market forces and the 
political/psychological systems shaping the 
audience and cteating an increasingly 
problematic role for artists are important 
considerations. 



HU353A 
Impressionism 

3 credits 

The nineteenth-century style known as 
Impressionism is often considered to be the 
foundation of European modern art. The 
course chronologically investigates Impres- 
sionism in its historical and cultural context. 
The technical and conceptual philosophies 
that underlie its development will also be 
considered. 

HU 353 B 
Post-Impressionism 

3 credits 

Post-Impressionism is chronologically 
investigated with respect to its historical, 
cultural, and aesthetic context. The technical 
and philosophical concepts that underlie 
Post-Impressionism's development are also 
exploted. Although it is not a prerequisite, it 
is recommended that HU 353A be taken 
first. 

HU354 
Women Artists 

3 credits 

A chronological survey of professional female 
painters and sculptors active in Western 
Europe and the United States, from the 
sixteenth century to the present. The role 
played by women artists in earlier ages, other 
nations, and different media will also be 
examined. 

HU355 

Dada and Surrealism 

3 credits 

The history of the post-Wotld War I 
antirational movements Dada and Surrealism. 
Since these were literary and political as well 
as artistic movements, attention is given to 
texts by such authors as Artaud, Breton. 
Freud, Jarry, Rimbaud, and Tzara, as well as 
to works of visual art. 

HU357 

Modern Art 

3 credits 

At the beginning of the twentieth century, 
artists responded to new technological forces 
and the pressures of mass cultute in styles 
such as cubism, constructivism, and 
surrealism-styles that are still being explored 
by our contempotaries. The course surveys 
the period 1880-1980, emphasizing the 
continuity of the modern artist's situation 
and role. 



HU 360 A 

Renaissance and Reformation: 

1400-1648 

3 credits 

The intellectual and cultutal explosion that 
hetalded the modetn eta in Western 
civilization. Political, economic, philosophi- 
cal, teligious, and cultutal developments. 

HU 360 B 

Age of Science and Enlightenment: 

1648-1815 

3 ctedits 

The dtamatic intellectual tevolution of the 
Age of Science and the applications of the 
tevolution to evety province of human 
expetience. The Enlightenment and the 
Ftench Revolution, which are also part of the 
transfotmation of Europe, are studied from 
the petspective of their consequences for the 
modern world. 

HU 362 A/B 
American Civilization 

3 credits 

An in-depth study of the origins of American 
society with an emphasis on the patticular 
political, social, and cultural patterns that 
shaped the coutse of American development. 
The first semester surveys the process of 
settlement, colonial societies, independence, 
the growth of the egalitarian spirit, and the 
Civil War. The second semester studies 
American society in the modern period. 
From the perspective of today, the course 
examines the legacy of Reconstruction, the 
Industtial Revolution, the Reform Move- 
ments, the World Wars, and the Cold Wat. 
The factots in the past that have shaped 
contempotary society are sttessed. 

HU363 

Modern Culture 

3 credits 

A sociological explotation of various aspects 
of the condition of cultute in modetn society. 
Topics include the nature and rise of mass or 
popular cultute and its relationship to high 
cultute; advertising and the cultutal ctitique 
of capitalism; modernism and the avant- 
garde in the arts; the intellectual's role in 
society, and the telationship berween culture 
and politics. 



HU364 
Sociology of Art 

3 credits 

An examination of the relationships that exist 
between art and society. Focus on the social 
influences that shape the cteation and 
reception of artistic works. Topics include 
the social role of the artist; ait as a socially 
organized form of work; the social institu- 
tions of artistic production, transmission, and 
audience reception; and the understanding of 
art in terms of its social context. 

HU 365 A/B 

History and Culture of Latin America 

3 credits 

The history and culture of Latin America, 
including indigenous as well as European 
cultural sources. National distinctions and 
the origins of modern society in the area will 
be developed. 

HU366 
The City 

3 credits 

A study of the city in history, the forces 
which shaped its development, and the 
impact of the city on history. The American 
city from the seventeenth century to the 
present is used as the model for this study. 

HU367 

Eastern Religions 

3 credits 

An exploration of Hinduism, Buddhism, 

Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Each is 

studied in its historical and cultural context, 

including its development into various forms 

over the years and in different places, and its 

beliefs regarding views of the cosmos, society, 

the self, and good and evil. In addition to a 

text, students read from the literature of each 



HU368 

Sociology of Politics 

3 credits 

This course will study the intetaction of 
political, social, economic, technological, and 
cultural forces in American society with their 
resultant impact on the political system. A 
brief introduction to political science is 
incorporated early in the semester. Factors 
such as population profiles, "suburbanites," 
elite groups, party otganization, elections and 
reform movements will be considered. 



HU369 
Cultural Ecology 

3 credits 

A review of the various cultural adaptations 
found in different environments such as 
desetts, gtasslands, circumpolar regions, 
tropical and remperate forests, islands, and 
high altitude and utban areas. These 
adaptations include hunting and gathering, 
fishing, and agriculture (shifting, irrigated, 
and industrial). The attitude towatd the 
environment, popularion growth, and the use 
of labot, technology, energy, and orher 
resources will be considered. 

HU370 

Greek Philosophy: 

Thales through Aristotle 

3 credits 

After examining fragmenrs from pre-Socraric 
philosophers, we consider the writings of 
Plato, including three or four dialogues and 
the Republic. Selections from Aristotle's 
writings on physics, the soul, and aesthetics. 

HU372 

Continental Philosophy and 

Existentialism 

3 ctedits 

Continental philosophy examined as a 
Western alternarive to the analytic method. 
Following some historical background, we 
concentrate on the works of Jean-Paul Sartre, 
both philosophic and litetary. 

HU373 
Ethics 

3 credits 

The history of ethics and the fundamental 
ethical problems that have concerned 
philosophers for the past 2500 years. The 
study begins with Plato and Aristotle and 
extend to contemporary analyric philosophy, 
phenomenology, and exisrentialism. 
Problems include the "is/ought" distinction, 
the ultimate objective of life, religious issues, 
human rights, justice, and welfare. 



147 



HU374 

Personality and Creativity 

3 credits 

Through readings of works of major theorists 
on the nature of personality and creativity, 
the course poses two major questions: "What 
do major theorists have to say about the 
human personality?" and "What do major 
theorists have to say about what it means to 
be a creative person?" There are a number of 
ways of answering these questions and it is 
not the purpose of the course to choose the 
"best" answer, bur rather, to put the student 
in a better position to make his/her own 
decisions. 

HU382 

Social Psychology 

3 credits 

A survey of major social problems in the 

West today and an analysis of society's 

resistance to implementing the necessary 

painful solutions. Students study the current 

status of major social institutions and their 

increasing failure to meet and satisfy human 

needs. Some of the areas that are studied are 

mental health and mental illness, human 

values, love and marriage, dreams, and 

preventive programs. 

Prerequisite: One course in psychology. 

HU383 

Personality and Adjustment 

3 credits 

The study of petsonality and the patterns of 
behavior and predispositions that determine 
how a person will perceive, think, feel, and 
act. The inner life of men and women, the 
quality of their charactet, their adjustment to 
theit social milieu, and their potentialities for 
self-fulfillment are all explored. Special 
attention is given to adjustment problems of 
artists in work and in love. 

HU384 

Abnormal Psychology 

3 credits 

Human development and abnormal psychol- 
ogy: ego defenses, emotional disorders, 
therapeutic theories, and treatment tech- 
niques. Clinical diagnosis and classification 
of mental disorders. 
Prerequisite: One course i 



HU385 

Concepts of Modern Physics 

3 credits 

A survey of important concepts in 20th 
century physics, including chaos theory, 
cosmology, quantum mechanics, and 
telativity. Without mathematics, students 
examine the tumultuous changes that have 
taken place in the scientific view of space, 
time, and physical reality. 

HU388 
Perception 

3 credits 

The structure and function of the senses of 
vision, audition, olfaction, gustation, touch, 
temperature, kinesthesis, time, and the brain 
and nervous system are considered as they 
relate to petception. 

HU390 

Mass Media and the Arts 

3 credits 

The purpose of this course is to develop an 
understanding of mass media and popular 
culture, primarily in the United States since 
the 1890s. Various forms of mass media are 
defined and the shared techniques by which 
these fotms seek ro communicare are 
analyzed. Finally, the values, both aesthetic 
and social, embodied in both these media and 
popular culture will be examined in relation 
to social and economic change. 

HU392 

American Musical Theater 

3 credits 

This course explores aspects and accomplish- 
ments of the Amencan musical theater from 
the twenties to the eighties. It emphasizes 
the social, political, and psychological 
elements which combine from Gershwin to 
Sondheim to offet entertainment with a 
serious message. 

This course is not open to students who have 
received credit for TH 312 A. 

HU393 
Afro-American Culture 

3 credit 

A survey of some of the most imporrant Afro- 
American contributions to American culture, 
with special attention to the twentieth 
century and to the arts. Among those whose 
wotk will be discussed ate W. E. B. DuBois, 
Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes, and 
Paul Robeson. 



HU411 A 
Renaissance Literature 

3 credits 

Works by Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Erasmus, 

Rabelais, Cervanres, Jonson, Calderon, and 

others are read to explote the remarkable 

contribution of these writers and to develop 

an understanding and appreciation of the 

Renaissance. 

HU411B 
Shakespeare 

3 credits 

The dramatic works of the supreme writer of 
the English Renaissance-Shakespeare. A 
selection of his comedies, histories, ttagedies, 
and romances are read. The course focuses on 
rhe plays not only as litetary accomplish- 
ments but also as theatrical performances 
existing in three-dimensional space. Thus 
the course is concerned both with the 
parameters of the original Renaissance stage 
and with modern translations and transforma- 
tions of the plays. 

HU412 

Detective Film and Fiction 

3 credits 

An examination of the genre known as hard- 
boiled detective fiction as it developed in 
literature and then was extended by feature 
films. Among the authots to be considered 
are Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, 
and Ross MacDonald; among the films are 
"The Maltese Falcon," "The Big Sleep," and 
"The Long Goodbye." 

HU413 

Literature and Film: From Text 

to Screen 

3 credits 

This coutse prepares the student to make the 
conceptual and the technical leap between the 
written text and its transformation to a 
cinematic text on the screen. Students 
examine what happens to plot, characreriza- 
tion, and bound and free description when a 
narrarive text is converted to an audiovisual 
presentation. In certain examples, the 
transformation of narrative structure is traced 
from the novel to the screenplay to the 
finished film. Students gain insights into the 
relationships between written and filmed 
dialogue, between written description and 
cinematic mise-en-scene, between the novel's 
omniscient natrator and the film's voice-over. 



148 



HU414A 

The Big, Fat Famous Novel 

3 credits 

We will read three of the world's best and 
most important novels: Tolstoy's War and 
Peace, Melville's Moby Dick, and Joyce's 
Ulysses. Each provides great pleasure to the 
serious reader and much material for intense 
discussion. Each novel has the equivalent of 
its own little course, about one month long. 

HU414B 
European Novel 

3 credits 

Study ot some of the most admired, best 
loved books of the wotld, written in the 
heyday of the novel, the 19th century: Crime 
and Punishment by Dostoevsky, Madame 
Bovary by Flauberr, Wuthering Heights by 
Bronte, Great Expectations by Dickens, 
Porrrait of a Lady by James. This is a coutse 
for people who love to read. 

HU415 A/B 
Contemporary Poetry 

3 credits 

Reading and interpretation of major modern 
poets-Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Whitman, 
Bishop, for example-and some important 
contemporary poets such as Kinnell, Levertov, 
and Wrighr. Foreign poets in translarion are 
also part of the course: Milosz, Pavese, 
Hikmet, Akhmatova, to name four. Prose by 
most of the poets concerning poetry is 
included as an important part of understand- 
ing and interpreting the teadings. Several of 
the poets have wrirten important criticism. 
Analysis of each poet's style and why the poet 
has developed it; aesthetic theory and the 
function of poetry as a social force. 

HU 416 A/B 
Contemporary Novel 

3 credits 

A course for people who like to read. We 
srudy ten (count 'em ten!) novels by some of 
the most interesting authors of the past two 
decades - including works from North and 
South America and Eastern and Western 
Europe. Some will be weird, some beautiful, 
some sexy, some funny. 



HU417 
Lyric 

3 credits 

A study of how contemporary song lyrics 
developed from the tradition of lyric poetry 
and folk ballads. Line-by-line analysis of 
famous lyric poems from literary hisrory will 
be conducted. Populat songs of the past fifty 
years are used in the discussion of the 
problems and challenges of putting words to 
music, with special attention paid to Bob 
Dylan. Other artists include Billie Holiday, 
Simon and Garfunkel, the Mamas and the 
Papas, the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, and 
Stevie Wonder. There is a substantial writing 
requirement: students may elect to study 
poetry, librettos, or song lyrics or to write 
original song lyrics of their own. 

HU419 

American Modernists 

3 credits 

In reading and discussing key works of three 
American novelists-Fitzgerald, Hemingway, 
and Faulkner-the student considers ro what 
extent and how they reflect such modernist 
concerns as style, language, narrative point of 
view, myth, psychology, and history. In 
addition, students will lead discussions of 
selected short fiction by Hemingway and 
Faulkner supported by research into criticism 
conducted at a major research library, and 
will finish the course wirh an essay on one 
additional major work by rhe writers studied. 

HU420 
Major Writers 

3 credits 

A course that focuses on the life and work of a 
single important writer. Among the authors 
who have received this intense examination 
have been James Joyce and Samuel Beckett. 

HU421 

On the Nature of Poetry and Art 

3 credits 

An explotatory course on the nature ot poetry 
and art in which a variety of texts will be 
used-literature, philosophy, art, letters, 
criticism. We contend with some major 
figures, including Wallace Srevens, Rilke, 
Eliot, Giacometti, Monet, and Van Gogh. 
Contemporary artists such as Sidney 
Goodman, Warren Rohrer, Ray Metzger, and 
Tom Chimes are discussed; some may 
themselves join in our discussion. 



HU440 

Wagner and the Ring Cycle 

3 credits 

A detailed examination of Richard Wagner's 
gigantic four-opera cycle of music dramas, 
The Ring of the Nibelungen, a crowning 
achievement of Romanticism. Wagner's hope 
to combine all the arts remains a fundamental 
inspitation in film, theater, and performance 
art today. No previous musical training or 
knowledge is assumed. 

HU442 

Abstract Expressionism 

3 credits 

Abstract Expressionism was the most 
impottant movement in post- WW II 
American art. This course will survey its 
origins, accomplishments, and decline. 

HU 448 A 

American Art Since 1945 

3 credits 

In 1945, World War II ended and the focus 
of modern art shifted from Paris to New York 
City. The course begins with Abstract 
Expressionism; studies other major American 
sryles, such as pop art and minimalism; and 
concludes with postmodernist developments 
such as performance and decoration by artists. 

HU 448 B 

European Art Since 1945 

3 credits 

Arr since World War II has been dominared 
by the New York market and by the issue 
of abstraction; in Europe, however, artists 
continued to use the human figure as a 
vehicle for social and ethical concerns, and in 
rhe last ten years their engagement has 
become a model for younger artists in both 
Europe and America. The course examines 
crafts and book arts as well as fine arts; 
it also makes use of plays and films. 



HU422 

American Politics and Culture, 1945-75 

3 credits 

This course considers the interaction of 
politics and culture from 1945 to 1975. 
Course material will include fiction and 
poetry, history and journalism, and film. 



149 



HU449 

Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes 

3 credits 

This course will investigate the role of the 
impresario Serge Diaghilev and his Ballets 
Russes in shaping the coutse of music and 
dance ca. 1909-1929- Special emphasis on 
the relationships among various artists, 
dancers, choreographers, and writers 
including Michel Fokine, Alexandre Benois, 
Pablo Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Vaslav Nijinsky, 
Tamata Karsavina, George Balanchine, Leon 
Bakst, Leonide Massine, and others. Works 
to be studied include Igor Stravinsky's 
Firebird, Petrushka, Rite of Spring, Les 
Noces, and Chloe; Erik Satie's Parade; 
Manuel de Falla's The Three-Cornered Hat; 
Datius Milhaud's Le Train Bleu; Francis 
Poulenc's Les Biches; Serge Prokofiev's Chout 
(The Buffoon); and Constant Lambert's 
Romeo and Juliet. Excerpts trom othet 
Diaghilev ballets are also introduced. The 
course focuses on activities in Paris. 

HU450 
Arts of India 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
Indus Valley civilization of the second 
millennium B.C. through the different 
periods of Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic 
dominance to the Rajput painting of the 
eighteenth century A.D. The different art 
styles are related to their historical, religious, 
and social background. 

HU451 
Arts of Islam 

3 credits 

Architectute, architectural decotation, 
calligraphy, book illustration, textile, and 
ceramic art of the Middle Eastern countries 
from the beginning ot the Islamic eta 
(seventh to eighteenth centunes A.D.). A 
study of the impact ol Islamic religion on the 
character of Islamic art and atchitectute. 
Various regional styles within this unified 
visual mode of expression. From time to time 
Islamic and Christian cultures are compared 
so as to undetstand bettet the similarities and 
differences of the two. 



HU452 

Topics in Design 

3 credits 

A seminar in the history of design. Each 
semestet the coutse is taught, a diffetent 
aspect of design history is studied. Indi- 
vidual designets under consideration have 
been Wtight, Le Corbusier, and Aalto; other 
topics have been patticular design histories: 
crafts history, graphic design history, 
industtial design history; and particular 
styles of design: the Arts and Crafts 
movement, Att Nouveau, Bauhaus, de Stijl 
and Consttuctivism, Art Deco, and 
postmodernism. 

HU453 
Arts of Japan 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor 
arts of Japan from the Neolithic period to the 
eighteenth century A.D. The emergence and 
the development of a unique national style 
from an art world dominated by Chinese 
influence. The development of painting from 
the medieval Yamoto-e narrative scrolls 
through the fifteenth century. The evolution 
of various architectutal styles from the gteat 
Buddhist temples of the seventh centuty to 
the majestic castles of the seventeenth 
century. In sculpture and pottery, the 
technical improvements and the change of 
aesthetic values from the Jomon and Yayoi 
phases to the porcelains of the seventeenth 
centuty ate analyzed. A brief historical and 
social background of Japan accompanies the 
study of the various art styles. Special 
attention is given to the influence of Zen 
Buddhism on Japanese cultute. 

HU456 
Major Artists 

3 credits 

The course concenttates on the work of a 
single artist or a group of artists. Among the 
artists who have come under this intense 
investigation have been Donatello, 
Michelangelo, Rembtandt, and Picasso; 
othets may be chosen in the future. 



HU462 

American Social Values 

3 credits 

The cultural values of any society provide the 
fundamental principles around which it is 
organized and patterned; at the same time 
they justify the society by investing it with 
meaning and purpose towatd which its 
members orient their actions. This course 
attempts to understand the natute and 
meaning of American society at the highest 
level of genetality through an examination of 
some of its centtal value orientations. These 
include individualism, equality, achievement, 
activism, practicality, progress, materialism, 
freedom, democracy, and secular rationalism. 
The origin and meaning of some of these 
orientations are developed as well as their 
consequences both for the quality of 
American society as a whole and for the 
chatactet of individuals trying to live their 
lives in it today. 

HU463 

Middle Eastern Arts and Culture 

3 credits 

An introduction to the atts and culture of the 
Middle East through the perspective of 
anthropology and att history. The course 
examines design, symbols, and techniques of 
Middle Eastern art, particularly painting, 
architectute, cetamics, glassware, textiles, and 
metal work. These atts ate examined in their 
social, cultural, and historical context, which 
includes the role of the artist and ctaftsman 
in Middle Eastern society, the influence of 
Islam on ritual and symbol, the influence of 
environment on matetials and architecture, 
urban-rural traditions, trade patterns and 
market organization, and diffusion of design 
and materials. 

HU464 

The Holocaust 

3 ctedits 

The Holocaust is a watershed event in modern 
history. This traumatic episode left indelible 
matks on Western society, probably lot gener- 
ations to come. It was caused by factots that 
still exist in the wotld. This course examines 
the history that led to the Holocaust, and will 
attempt to understand what happened and 
what meaning it has for us today. 



HU 466, 467 
Comparative Religion I-II 

3 credits 

A study of the world's major religions 
through theit historical development, beliefs, 
sacted litetatute, and the works of contempo- 
rary writets. The fitst semestet is concerned 
with Eastern religions such as Hinduism, 
Buddhism, and Taoism; the second semestet 
deals with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 



HU474 

Contemporary Philosophy 

3 credits 

A survey of major social problems of today 
and an analysis of society's tesistance to 
implementing the necessary painful solutions. 
Some of the areas to be covered include 
mental health and mental illness, human 
values, love and marriage, and preventive 
programs. 

HU475 

Freud and Mahler 

3 ctedits 

This course examines and discusses the 
theories ot Sigmund Freud. All basic areas 
will be included, beginning with his work on 
dreams (c. 1890), aspects of psychoanalysis, 
the nature of the person, and his rather 
pessimistic attitude regatding the prospects 
for the survival of the human species. The 
class will also listen to the work of the great 
Viennese composer Gustav Mahler. Freud 
and Mahler were not only contemporaries 
and soul mates, but Mahlet saw Freud as 
a therapist, in what has since become a 
famous session. 

HU478 
Aesthetics Seminar 

3 credits 

An advanced coutse in the philosophic 
problems related to wotks of art and discourse 
about works of art. Students review the 
analytic method of philosophic inquity and 
discuss the philosophy of Wittgenstein and 
othet twentieth-century philosophers 
interested in the philosophy of language. A 
centtal text is Languages of Art by Nelson 
Goodman. 

HU480 

Psychology of Creativity 

3 credits 

The problems involved in defining and 

attempting to measure creativity. The coutse 

is developmentally otiented, focusing on 

telationships between cteativity and normal 

growth and development, and intelligence 

and personality. Problems that the artist 

encountets with productivity are explored, as 

well as the values of society towatd creativity 

and the attist. 

Prerequisite: one course in psychology. 



HU481 A/B 
Physics 

3 credits 

An introductory college physics course. The 
first semester covers kinematics, dynamics, 
energy, structural analysis, and waves; the 
second semester concentrates on a study ot 
light, electricity, and magnetism. Both 
semesters include frequent refetences to 
atchitectute, design, and the fine arts. 
Competence in algebra is required. 

HU483 

Theories of Personality 

3 ctedits 

This course emphasizes psychoanalytic theory, 

but it also includes behaviorism, humanism, 

existentialism, and other perspectives. 

Required for Art Therapy students. All 

others must receive permission from the 

insttuctor. 

Prerequisite: two courses in psychology. 

HU492 

Vienna and Berlin: 1900-1925 

3 credits 

At the beginning ot the twentieth century, 
Vienna and Betlin were important centers 
during one of the richest periods in the 
cultural and artistic histoty of the Western 
wotld. Much of the science and att of this 
century was given its focus and thtust by the 
men of genius working in these two cities. In 
this coutse, students examine the works ot 
Einstein, Freud, Mahler, Schoenbetg, 
Wittgenstein, Kafka, and the German 
Expressionists. An interdisciplinary course 
involving the visual, musical, and literary 
arts, as well as philosophy. 

HU493 

Don Juan and Faust 

3 ctedits 

Don Juan and Faust ate two great literary 
characters who have inspired writers and 
attists in all media from the seventeenth 
centuty to the ptesent. Students examine a 
number ot wotks, focusing on the teflection of 
the creator's personality in each piece; dtama 
(Marlowe, Tirso di Molina. Moliere, Goethe, 
Shaw); opeta (Mozart, Gounod, Stravinsky, 
Liszt, and Strauss); poetry (Byron) will be 
explored. 



HU495 

Dante in the Modern World 

3 credits 

Dante's Divine Comedy has been highly 
influential on att, music and dtama from its 
own time to the present. The shaping power 
of the poet's joutney in his seatch for answers 
to ultimate questions, his quest for otder 
and its reflection in his art continue to inspire 
reactions from fellow artists. The course 
considers a number of works reflecting this 
influence in sevetal media: drama (Beckett, 
Sattte, Brecht), poetry (Baudelaire), music 
(Liszt, Puccini, Zandonai), and the visual 
arts. Concentration is on the Inferno, but 
consideration of Paradtso and Purgatorio may 
also be included. 

HU497 

Women and Sex Roles 

3 credits 

An introduction to the history of women and 
to theories of gender An interdisciplinary 
course combining histoty, litetatute, and the 
visual arts. Slide lectutes on images of 
woman in art, myth, and religion, from 
ancient times to modern. Economic and 
historical factors affecting how women have 
lived. Definitions of masculinity and 
femininity. The nature-nurture debate over 
hormonal differences. 

HU999 

Independent Study 

3 credits 

Independent study considets a particular issue 
of intetest to the student and one or mote 
faculty which is not covered in a regular 
coutse. Prior approval by the Directot of 
Liberal Arts is required. 



151 



Industrial Design 

ID 113 
Freshman ID 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course introduces Foundation students 
to the issues surrounding the profession and 
highlights its importance in informing 
culture and shaping the way we live. The 
fundamental skills required to support the 
process of concept ideation, design develop- 
ment, and presentation of products and 
furniture, introduced throughin-class 
exercises, lectures by visiting professionals, 
and direct involvement in relevant activities 
within the Industrial Design department 
itself. 

ID 200 A/B 
Studio 1: Projects 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A conceptual and practical understanding of 
design and three-dimensional problem 
solving processes. This studio provides 
focused fundamental design instruction and 
integrated experiences covering a wide range 
of subjects including the tools, processes and 
languages of design and modelmaking. 
Emphasis is on the development of three- 
dimensional modelmaking skills, problem 
solving, and creative thinking and their 
application to problems of design. 

ID 214 

Materials and Processes Seminar 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A hands-on seminar course introducing the 
student to the nature ot materials used in 
industrial products and the various processes 
by which they are formed. Films, lectures, 
and field trips familiarize students with 
wood, metal, and plastic materials as well as 
processes such as injection molding, laser 
cutting, and stereolithography. Emphasis on 
the study of material characteristics and the 
appropriate use of forming methods. 
Introduction to technical information, 
specification writing, and professional 
communications. 



ID 220 A/B 

Studio 2: Techniques 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This studio will assist the student in 
acquiring essential two- and three-dimen- 
sional representational skills to support the 
process of design, including conceptualization, 
production and presentation. It is taught in a 
collaborarive manner; the instructors conduct 
projects individually or as a team in order to 
provide instruction and experiences over a 
wide range of subjects, including the tools, 
processes, and languages of conceptual 
drawing and modeling, rendering and 
detailing, using both the computer and 
traditional media as a means to assist design 
and control production. Students learn to 
apply these techniques to design problems 
addressed in ID 200 A/B. 

ID 290 

Design Issues Seminar 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Designed to assist the student in developing 
an understanding of the major issues of 
design in modern society. Discussions range 
from issues such as the ecological responsibil- 
ity of designers to the contributions of 
individual designers and design organizations 
throughout the history of the discipline. 
Assignments include research and demonstra- 
rion projects that explore ideas and illumi- 
nate ethical, practical, and moral issues with 
which designers should be concerned. 
Students prepare information and present 
their views on issues through written, oral, 
and visual means. 



ID 300 A/B 

Studio 3: Projects Studio 
6 hours 
3 credits 

The first semester introduces problems of 
design from a highly conceptual point of view 
with an emphasis on user interface, informa- 
tion technology, and areas of use. In the 
second semester, the students apply this 
humanistic understanding to develop more 
complex products involving mechanical and 
control technology and systems. Emphasis is 
on the ability to apply the process of design 
to both hypothetical and real problems while 
developing an appreciation of meaningful 
form and the appropriate use of technology to 
meet human needs. Students discover 
relevant knowledge and apply it to practical 
problems of design-many brought to the 
studio by industry. Visiting experts also 
bring knowledge of current design, market- 
ing, and manufacruring practices into studio 
projects organized to explore the nature of 
different product types in different industries. 
Prerequisites: ID 200 A/B, ID 214. 
ID 220 MB, and ID 290. 

ID 312 

Architectonics 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Visual principles for structuring and ordering 
architectural space. Introduction to formal 
issues as applied to interior installations and 
exhibition design will be developed through 
drawing, model-building skills and other 
representational means such as computer- 
aided drafting. This course will develop 
concepts through analytical studies of objects/ 
spaces and will culminate in an actual built;' 
altered environment. 



ID 320 A/B 

Studio 4: Techniques 

6 hours 
3 credits 

These courses assist the student in developing 
graphic communication skills using 
computational media and applying these 
skills to both two- and three-dimensional 
images and presentations. The student is 
taught to conceptualize, develop, detail, 
present and communicate design ideas 
through graphic design, computer imaging, 
three-dimensional computet modeling, basic 
animation and intetactive design presenta- 
tion. The fitst semester focuses on learning 
the software and the development of printed 
presentations. The second semester focuses 
on the development of interactive digital 
presentations. 

Prerequisites: ID 200 A/B, ID 214, 
ID 220 A/B, and ID 290. 

ID 326 

Human Factors Seminar 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The object of this writing intensive course is 
to develop the ability to apply technology 
effectively to meet human needs through the 
study of human engineering principles for the 
design of products and equipment. Human 
anatomy, anthropometrics, and motion and 
strength of body components are considered, 
as are sensory systems, human perception, and 
sensitivities. Lectures are complemented by 
laboratory experiments designed to teach 
students methods of testing and evaluating 
their own product design concepts in human 
terms. Concepts of scientific wriring and 
reporting are demonstrated through the 
documentation of coursework. 
Prerequisites: ID 200 A/B. ID 214. 
ID 220 A/B, and ID 290. 

ID 327 

Contemporary Technologies Seminar 

3 hours 
3 credits 

This seminar addresses design as a languaging 
process of social interaction. Semantic 
principles and vocabulary are introduced 
through lectures, weekly readings, discus- 
sions, and exercises. Students work on 
individual as well as team-based projects to 
increase the competence of translating these 
ideas, concepts and principles into design 
practices, applying replicable design methods 
towards proposing particular products whose 
meanings matter and whose use is dominated 
by facets of human understanding. 
Prerequisites: ID 200 A/B, ID 214. 
ID 220 A/B, and ID 290. 



ID 400 A/B 

Studio 5: Projects Studio 

6 hours 

3 credits 

In these senior design studio courses, the 

curriculum focuses on a highly critical and 

responsible position in formulating new 

directions into producr realization. 

Students are encouraged through critical 
discourse and research on historical and 
contempotary cultural shifts to formulate 
their own ideology. Investigations into the 
social, ergonomic and ecological consequences 
of product development, followed by a 
specific program and context, abstractions 
and conceptual studies, physical and material 
experimentation, and the research of 
techniques of construction. Development of 
manual skills, highly communicative design 
drawings, sketch models, computer model- 
ing, prototypes, and one-off objects are all 
involved in the process. 

Industry-sponsored projects of interna- 
tional caliber give opportunities for "client 
interaction" from initial contact and 
proposals to final ptesentations of projects. 
One semester is dedicated to production 
furniture design for the new domesticity. 
The other semester is dedicated to product 
design. A highly academic and theoretical 
thesis project tuns simultaneously with a 
highly pragmatic product development studio. 
Prerequisites: ID 300 A/B, ID 320 A/B. 
ID 326. and ID 327. 

ID 420 A/B 

Studio 6: Professional Communication 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This studio refines the students' written, 
verbal and visual presentation skills and 
assists them in developing communication 
materials for their senior theses and industry 
sponsored projects. Intensive group critique 
of individual presentations prepared outside 
of class. Students develop self-promotion, 
presenration and correspondence materials 
utilizing service bureaus and contemporary 
technologies such as digital files, fax and the 
World Wide Web to prepare and transmit 
this information. 

Prerequisites: ID 300 A/B. ID 320 A/B. 
ID 326, and ID 327. 



ID 425 

Advanced Computer-Aided Design 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Students work on UNIX-based SGI Indigo 
computers running Alias Studio software to 
learn basics of high-end modeling, rendering 
and animation through extensive in-class and 
homework exercises. Modeling covers the 
generation and modification of surfaces. 
Rendering work involves the generation and 
control of lights, cameras and surface 
attribute specification. Animation includes 
turntable and flythrough techniques with an 
introduction to keyframe procedures. Final 
projects conclude with the creation of printed 
and videotaped portfolio materials. 

ID 490 A 

Design Theory Seminar 

3 hours 

3 credits 

Prerequisites: ID 300 A/B, ID 320 A/B, 

ID 326, and ID 327. 

ID 490 B 

Design Practice Seminar 

3 hours 

3 credits 

This course exposes the student to the 

industrial design practice through discussion, 

lectures, and research. The following subjects 

are addressed: 

1. Running a practice. 

2. Legalities and contracts. 

3. Publications. 

4. Exhibiting. 

5. Client interaction. 

6. Portfolio. 

Visitors representing a broad spectrum of the 
design community from across the United 
States, including design shop ownets, design 
curators from galleries or museums, industrial 
design entrepreneurs, and copyright lawyers. 
Prerequisites: ID 300 A/B, ID 320 A/B. 
ID 326. and ID 327. 



153 



Master of Industrial 
Design 

ID 600 

ID Seminar: Thesis Research 

3 credits 

A seminar focused on the understanding and 

application of research methodologies, 

techniques, and technologies appropriate to 

the career objectives and interests of 

individual candidates. A comprehensive plan 

for undertaking the Mastets Thesis Project is 

produced in this course. 

ID 601 

Advanced Design Studio: 

Product Design 

6 credits 

The major studio where design ideology, 
process, development, and production are 
emphasized through the integration of 
critical issues that infotm product design. 
Issues discussed and studied are: human 
experience and lifestyles; cultural and 
political issues; ergonomics; poetics; 
semantics; interactivity; imagery and form. 
The design process will consider above issues 
in rhe formulation of a design program; 
conceptual and abstract srudies; physical and 
material investigations; simulated and 
physical representation; and the application 
of manufacturing processes. 

ID 602 

Advanced Design Studio: 

Environments 

6 ctedits 

The major studio where real and virtual 
environments are explored through projects 
dtawn from the fields of exhibit, retail, 
recrearion and performance design. Students 
work in teams using both computational and 
traditional media to develop a particular 
environment that integrates objects, graphic 
imagery, lighting, and interactive intetfaces 
within a defined space to enrich the human 
experience. 

ID 610, 611 
Project Tutorial I-II 

6 credits each semester 

Personalized tutorial to assist the candidate in 

specific topics related to their course of study. 



ID 622 

Advanced Production Technologies 

3 credits 

A studio/practicum where students are 
introduced to new manufacturing processes 
and materials including: rapid prororyping, 
stereolithography, 4-D CNC, low cost tooling 
options, "smart" innovative materials, process 
representation and management systems. 
Students design experimental projects 
informed by these new industrial processes 
and materials. 

ID 625 

Advanced Computer Applications 

3 ctedits 

A laboratory/practicum in the use of advanced 

computing capabilities with emphasis on 3D 

computer modeling, rendering, animation, 

and human figure modeling to evaluate and 

ptesent design solutions with attention to 

collaborative design support systems. 

ID 627 

Human Factors: Interactivity 

3 credits 

A seminar course which addresses human 
behavior through the interaction with 
manufactured objecrs, environmenrs and 
systems, and the ergonomic, functional, 
informational, aesthetic and safety require- 
ments encountered in the design of these 
products for human use. 

ID 700 

ID Seminar: Career Development 

3 credits 

A professional seminar/workshop which 
addresses the individual career interests of 
each degree candidate especially as it relates 
to the student's thesis project. The product 
of this course is the formulation of a career 
plan and objectives tailored to each candidate, 
and the development of a porrfolio, resume, 
and other documentation targered roward the 
ptactical application of the candidate's 
knowledge and skill. 
Prerequisites: ID 610, ID 611, and ID 710. 



ID 710, 711 

Advanced Project Tutorial I-II 

6 credits each semester 
The primary studio/practicums in which 
design concepts are explored and skills, 
techniques, tools, and products are developed, 
demonstrated, and tested related to the 
thesis. Individual weekly meetings are 
scheduled with faculty and with outside 
advisors as dictated by thesis project 
objectives and sponsorship. A faculty- 
monitored educational practicum in a 
professional or industry setting may be 
arranged to fulfill preplanned project 
objectives. 
Prerequisite: ID 610. 

ID 749 

Masters Thesis Documentation 

6 credits 

A tutorial providing the opportunity for 
individual candidates to develop and ptesent 
their thesis in a manner which directly 
reflects their career objecrives. The thesis 
project and document must exhibit an in- 
depth exploration of an approved topic which 
addresses an area of importance to the 
Industrial Design field and contributes to the 
body of knowledge pertaining to that area. It 
may be carried out under industry sponsor- 
ship, as part of a research projecr, or 
independently based. 



154 



Illustration 



IL 100 

Foundation Illustration 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Within the context of the illustration 
assignments, students are introduced to a 
variety of media, methods, styles, and 
techniques used to create both black and 
white, and color illustrations. The course 
will include conceptual, perceptual, and 
technical problems. The development ot 
narrative skills, logical steps to problem 
solving, research, and creative thinking will 
also be covered. 

IL 200 A/B 
Pictorial Foundation 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Introduction to drawing and painting skills 
as they relate to illustration. Objective visual 
perception, clarity in drawing, and technical 
facility are stressed. Continuing slide lectures 
expose the student to applicable areas of art 
history. Also presented are methods of 
research and development useful in creating 
illustrations. 
Prerequisites: FP 100 A/B. and FP 120 A/B. 

IL 202 A/B 
Figure Anatomy 

2 hours (lecture) 

4 hours (drawing lab) 

3 credits 

Focus on the investigation and application ot 
line, plane, mass, light and shade, shadow, 
perspective, anatomy, and proportion as they 
relate to figure drawing. Weekly sessions 
include a lecture, demonstrations from the 
skeleton, and drawing from life. 
Prerequisites: FP 100 A/B. and FP 120 A/B. 

IL204 
Typography 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Beginning studies in the form, use, nomen- 
clature, and history of typography. Indi- 
vidual letters, word formations, text 
arrangements, and the application of type to 
simple communication exercises will be 
addressed. Use of Macintosh computer for 
generating type. 
Prerequisites: FP 100 A/B, and FP 120 A/B. 



IL 300 A/B 

Illustration Methods 

6 hours 

3 credits 

The development ot narrative imagery, 

pictorial illusion, space, and their combined 

potential for communication. Procedures 

focus on developing visual awareness, 

personal imagery, and conceptual directions. 

Direct drawing situations and photographic 

reference (existing or student-produced) also 

serves as source material for pictorial 

development. Various media and technical 

procedures are explored. Assignments and 

lectures focus on the requirements of applied 

illustration. 

Prerequisites: IL 200 A/B. IL 202 A/B, 

and PF 209. 

IL301 

Design Methods 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Further development of the design process in 
con|unction with the requirements and 
options available through photomechanical 
techniques. Projects deal with image/ 
typography relationships and are presented 
fot their intrinsic design intetest as well as 
being useful as vehicles to understanding the 
processes of commercial teproduction. One 
project will be printed on the University 
offset press. 
Prerequisite: IL 204. 

IL 302 

Figurative Communication 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Work from life is combined with wotk from a 
wide range of resources. Composing figures 
in rational space with a convincing relation- 
ship to the environment is stressed. Drawing 
and painting media are examined. The 
history of poses, contexts, and pictotial 
conventions is discussed. 
Prerequisites: IL 200 A/B. IL 202 A/B. and 
PF 209 or approval by instructor. 



IL303 

Figure Utilization 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Studies ot the figure in nattative contexts are 

explored, as is work from single and grouped 

models, nude and costumed. Concentration 

on developing compositions and concepts 

from different and often combined resources. 

Drawing and painting techniques are utilized. 

Prerequisite: IL 302 or approval by instructor. 

IL304 

Sequential Format 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Course focuses on sequential formats. 

Potential areas of inquiry include brochures, 

direct-mail pieces, simple animations, slide 

presentations, multi-page spreads, and 

identity programs. 

Prerequisite: IL 301. 

IL 310 

Children's Book Illustration 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The design and Hlusttation of children's 
books. Emphasis on the stages ot develop- 
ment of a book from manuscript through 
dummy design to finished art. Professional 
practice, and working with editors and art 
ditectors are discussed. Students will become 
familiar with the wotk of past and present 
book illustration and design. Guest lectutets 
share their professional experiences with the 
class. 

Prerequisite: Student must be a Sophomore for 
enrollment in this course. Juniors preferred. 

IL 400 A/B 
Illustration 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Assignments revolve around specific areas of 
illustration-advertising, book, documentary, 
editorial, and institutional. Emphasis is on 
solutions, both practical and relevant, to 
professional needs and demands. A senior 
thesis project (the Ely Competition) will be 
incorporated in the spting semester. 
Prerequisites: IL 300 A/B. and IL 302. 



IL 403 A/B 
Senior Portfolio 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Development of a pottfolio based on the 
student's petsonal intetests and abilities. 
Students focus on a ftee-lance or studio 
orientation and develop, over the year, a 
portfolio of work for presentation at the end 
of the spring term. In addition to the 
portfolio, the course offers instruction in 
markering and promotion, business practices 
and procedures, resume writing, taxes, and 
small business requirements as they relate to 
artists. 

IL440 

Design Internship 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Open to second semester Juniors and Seniors 
only, this course places srudents with local 
businesses to test their developing skills in a 
real-work environment. Placements vary and 
can include advertising agencies, design 
studios, publishers, individual free-lance 
artists, TV stations, museums, and the like. 
This course includes a seminar and the 
development of a learning plan. 
Enrollmenr is limired to 12 students. 
Portfolio review and approval by client and faculty 
advisor required. 



Museum 
Exhibition 
Planning and 
Design 

ME 500 
Museum Course 

3 credits 

A lecture/seminar course exploring the 
philosophy and history of museums and the 
development of the museum exhibition form. 
Guest speakers bring a wide range of 
knowledge and practices from their respective 
professional disciplines and provide insighr 
inro museum exhibition practice. The course 
provides srudents wirh an overall understand- 
ing of the role exhibitions can and do play 
in public institutions. Offered in the 
evening. Priority for enrollment is given to 
gtaduate students in the Museum Education 
and MEPD programs. 
Prerequisite: Upperclass undergraduate or 
graduate standing. 

ME 501 

History of the Museum and the 

Museum in Society 

3 credits 

A lecture/seminar course exploring the history, 
organization, and opetation of the museum 
as a cultural/educational institution, an 
economic entity, and a management enterprise. 
Guesr speakers bring a wide range of 
knowledge and pracrices from their respective 
institutions and consultancies to provide the 
student with insight into the differences 
between museums of different types, sizes, 
and missions. The coutse provides students 
with an overall understanding of the museum 
as an institution and an introduction to the 
many roles played by museum professionals. 
Offered in the evening. 
Prerequisite: Upperclass undergraduate or 
graduate standing. 

ME 508 

The Museum Audience 

3 credits 

A lecture course focusing on museum 
communications and learning, identifying the 
characteristics of the museum visitor, the 
ways in which visitors expetience museum 
exhibitions, cognitive and affective behavior, 
the relationship of museum exhibitions and 
educational programming, and the impact of 
museum visitor srudies on the planning and 
design of museum exhibitions and the 
environment. 



ME 610 A/B 

Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 

6 credits 

The primary vehicle for exploring and 

developing museum exhibirion planning, 

design, project organizarion and presentation 

skills, and techniques. 

Prerequisite: Admission to MEPD program. 

ME 620 

Environmental Graphics 

3 hours, twice a week 

3 credits 

A studio course dealing with color, lighting, 

wtiting design, and production of the graphic 

componenrs of an exhibition. 

Prerequisite: Admission to MEPD program. 

ME 622 

Media for Museum Communication 

3 houts, twice a week 
3 credits 

A laboratory'workshop course on utilization 
of appropriate technological media, with 
emphasis on the creation of visitor inreraction. 
Computer literacy, familiarity with Macintosh 
System 7 required. Prerequisite: Admission to 
MEPD program. 

ME 623 

Exhibition Materials and Technology 

3 credits 

A demonstrarion/visirarion course directed at 
the problems of exhibit production, the 
choice of materials and methods, budgeting, 
and suppliers of materials and services. 
Prerequisite: Admission to MEPD program. 

ME 710 

Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

6 hours, rwice a week 

6 credits 

The primary vehicle for exploring and 

developing museum exhibition planning, 

design, project organization and presentation 

skills and techniques. 

Prerequisites: ME 500 and ME 610 A/B. 

ME 749 A/B 
Thesis Development 

6 credits 

Independent research and design in an area 

supporting the student's career objecrives and 

interests. 

Prerequisites: ME 610 A/B. 

ME 759 

Museum Internship 

3 credits 

A 3-month, supervised practicum in a 

cooperating museum. 



156 



Multimedia 



MM 110, 111 

Visual Concepts I and II 

3 credits 
6 hours 

The fall semester covers fundamental visual 
concepts including point, line, shape, 
composition, texture, color and image. 
Although non-digital techniques are 
occasionally used, the mastery of digital tools 
is a primary aspecr. Exercises require students 
to develop a vocabulary for discussing their 
work while at the same time learning a basic 
set of software tools. The spring semester 
builds upon issues addressed in Communica- 
tion Concepts and continues with an 
introduction to the visual concepts of 
typography, 3-D structure and form, series, 
sequence and narrarive. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor or 
completion of MM 110 for MM 111. 

MM 121 

Introduction to Interface Design 

1.5 credits 
1.5 hours 

The software inrerface represents the focal 
point of user interaction with the various 
modes of multimedia communication. 
Readings by interface theorists will inform 
discussions on the evolution of the software 
inrerface, conceptual models, prototypes, 
interaction design, deliverables and basic 
concepts of human-computer interaction. 
Avenues for pursuing interactive media 
design in entertainment, publishing and 
education will also be addressed. Current 
technologies, including the trend from soft to 
hard interfaces, in terms of their potential 
short- and long-term influence on communi- 
cation and multimedia. Basic methods for 
rapid prototyping and testing. 
Prerequisite: Open to non-majors with permission 
of the instructor 



MM 130 
Communication Concepts 

3 credits 
3 hours 

Emphasis is on the imporrance of organizing 
and communicating information in a digital 
world. Students will acquire a basic 
understanding of how computers operate and 
communicate with each other, as well as an 
understanding of the evolution of the 
personal computer and the industries which 
have spun out of this technology. Student 
assignments include readings, data base 
projects and wtitten analyses. 
Prerequisite: Open to non-majors with permission 
of the instructor. 

MM 150 

Collaboration and Spontaneity 

3 credits 
6 hours 

This class, through a series oi exercises, class 
discussions and readings explores what it 
means to work as parr of a team. Students 
learn to develop environments in which the 
crearive process is encouraged to unfold. The 
basic assumptions that affect the formation ot 
collaborative groups, such as personal 
responsibility, authority relations, leadership 
issues, individual differences, competition, 
the development of norms, and the genera- 
tion and uses of power, is experienced, 
explicared, and examined. Students work 
within this collaborative environment to 
explore the connections between spontaneous 
vetbal and nonverbal communication. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MM 151 

Collaboration and Spontaneity 

Practicum 

1.5 credits 

1.5 hours 

Students have the opportunity to apply, and 

in doing so, continue to develop the skills 

cultivated in the first semestet as they focus 

on the Freshman Project, a university-wide 

collaborative, creative experience. 

Prerequisite: MM 150. 



MM 219 

Introduction to Multimedia 

3 credits 

6 hours 

An introduction to the basic software 

environments for digital interactivity. Aftet 

concentrating on creating nonlinear texts, 

students investigate the integtation of 

other media elements. Subjects include the 

use of buttons, screen navigation, transitions, 

basic scripting, and controlling sound and 

video. 

Prerequisite: EM 110 or MM 231. 

MM 221, 222 
Interactive Studio I, II 

3 credits 
6 hours 

A year-long sequence introducing the tools 
of interactivity within a studio framework. 
Examples are examined to inform creative 
exercises. Students are introduced to an 
overview of the various metaphors invoked in 
authoring for intetactivity to prepare them to 
understand and exploit intetactivity as a 
communication concept. The spring semestet 
emphasizes programming possibilities within 
these environments. 

Prerequisites: MM 111, MM 121, MM 130 (or 
EM 304 and permission of the instructor.) 



MM 223 

Interactive Narrative 

3 credits 
3 hours 

This course introduces students to new ways 
of thinking about interactivity and 
storytelling. Students analyze how the 
interactive structure of an experience creates 
narrative. Short readings discussed in class 
range from Surrealist Dada and Fluxus 
language games to the experimental literature 
of Joyce and Burroughs to the literary theory 
of Barthes and Eco. Students examine 
contemporary examples of intetactive media 
such as CD-ROMs, role-playing games and 
Internet sites. 

Prerequisites: Completion of the first year of the 
multimedia program, or HU 1 10 B and MM 
231, or permission of the instructor. 



157 



MM 231 

Digital Storytelling 

3 credits 

4 hours 

The mastery of language is always at the 
heart of a good story. This class explores how 
visual and aural languages complement the 
verbal. After collecting old photographs, 
movies, tape recordings and meaningful 
objects, students create stories associated with 
them in digital form. 
Prerequisites: None. 

MM 271 

Development of New Media 

3 credits 
3 hours 

A review of the history of multimedia and 
focus on contemporary applications and 
variety within the form. The course exposes 
students to the ideas of art and technology 
visionaries, the development of electronic 
music, sound art, and computer music, the 
development of image-processing concepts 
and technologies. Writets and thinkers who 
have helped shape the new nonlinear forms of 
written communication from poster art to 
installations to hypertext are discussed. 
Prerequisites: HU 103 MB. 

MM 310, 311 
Multimedia Studio I, II 

3 credits 
6 hours 

A sequence intended to give students 
experience in the creation of a finished 
multimedia piece, wotking in collaborative 
teams with students from the Writing for 
Media and Performance program. Appropri- 
ate technologies such as advanced scripting 
environments, HTML, Shockwave, Java, Java 
Script, Perl and CGI scripts, external control 
devices and virtual reality hardware and 
software are addressed. 

Prerequisites: MM 111, MM 223 and MM 219 
or permission of the instructor. 

MM 320 

Advanced Interface Seminar 

1.5 credits 
1.5 hours 

An advanced-level class that considers the 
implications of 2-, 3-, and 4-dimensional 
design concepts as they relate to interactive 
interface design. Issues include concepts of 
space, thythm and continuity, and ways of 
connecting information using imagery, 
sound, movement, and nartative structures. 
Prerequisite: MM 222. 



MM 350 
Business Seminar 

1.5 credits 
1.5 hours 

Field trips to various multimedia studios 
and production houses raise issues for 
discussions, readings, and participatory 
exercises intended to prepare students to 
enter the professional wotld of multimedia. 
Topics include project planning, apportion- 
ment of responsibility, leadership, 
distribution, finance, marketing, portfolio 
presentation, and interview techniques. 
This class reinforces the work of Senior 
Studio I and II. 

Prerequisite: MM 310. Required for all majors 
prior to enrollment in the Senior year. 

MM 410, 411 
Senior Studio I, II 

4.5 credits 
4.5 houts 

In this 2-semester course, students complete 
two individual or collaborative projects: one, 
a practicum intended to provide experience 
in solving real-world multimedia problems; 
the other, a project of their own design. 
These projects, tunning simultaneously, 
expose students to the diffetences between 
working on client-driven and individually- 
motivated projects. An ovetall portfolio 
presentation is required for successful 
completion of this class. 
Prerequisites: Open only to majors. MM 350. 

MM 470, 471 

Issues in Multimedia Seminar I, II 

1.5 credits 

1.5 hours 

These courses serve as vehicles for discussion 

of current topics in multimedia. Special 

attention is paid to the discussion of 

emerging technologies and criteria for 

evaluating their effectiveness, appropriate use 

and potential. Ethical issues sutrounding 

new media are discussed. 

Prerequisite: MM 310, 311- Open only to majors. 



158 



Music 



MU 007 A/B 

Introduction to Music Theory 

4.5 hours 

3 credits 

Fundamentals of music theory, designed to 

introduce students to the basic principles of 

theory and harmony. 

MU 103 A/B 

Musicianship I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The establishment of fundamental skills 
through the singing and recognition of 
diatonic materials, i.e., scales, intervals, 
triads, and seventh chords, both as isolated 
phenomena and in musical contexts. 
Solfeggio performance of diatonic melodies 
and rhythmic performance in all basic metets 
is emphasized, as well as the dictation of 
these materials. 
Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 107 A/B 
Music Theory I-II 

3 hours 

3 credits 

An introduction to basic theory. Including 

the study ot scales, intervals, chords of various 

types, harmonic progression, and the analysis 

of small musical forms. Other conditions for 

enrollment in this coutse: Theory Placement 

Test. 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 121 
Calligraphy 

1 hour 
1 credit 

Professional methods of musical score and 
part preparation, both in the traditional way 
with papef and pen, and with computer 
programs. Required for composition majors; 
an elective for all other majors. 
Prerequisite: MU 107 B 
Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 123 A/B 

Guitar Class for Non-Majors 

1 hour 

1 credit 

One hour class of guitar instruction in 

contemporary guitar. Course covers basic 

technique including fingering, scales, chords, 

and chord melodies. 



MU 130 A/B 

Piano Class for Non-Majors 

1 hour 

1 credit 

One hour class of piano instruction in 

traditional beginning piano. Coursework 

includes basic technique including scales, 

chords, and chotd melodies. 

MU 131 A/B 
Class Piano I-II 

1 hour 
1 credit 

Introductory and elementary keyboard training 
using theotetical, harmonic, and technical 
concepts in ptactical keyboard application: 
transposition, melody harmonization, elemen- 
tary improvisation, technique, and repertoite. 
Required of non-Keyboard Music majors. 
Open to majors only. 

MU 141 A/B 

Voice Class for Non-Majors 

1 hour 

1 credit 

One hour class of voice instruction using 

traditional methods. Course covets proper 

technique of breathing, suppott, focus of 

tone, production of clear vocal line, and some 

musical intetpretation of literature. 

MU 149 
Aural Concepts 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course, for non-musicians, is an intro- 
duction to the use of music and sound as 
components of multimedia and their 
potential for enhancing communication. 
Students are exposed to special sound effects, 
the role of spoken communication and the 
tools used to create sound fot multimedia, 
including sound sampling, creation of digital 
sounds, sound manipulation, and the visual 
analysis of sound. The student's understand- 
ing of when and how to work with musicians, 
composers and/ot sound designers and the 
acquisition of basic skills in MIDI and 
electronic technology is emphasized. 

MU 151 A/B 

Introduction - Music Education 
1 hour 
1 credit 

A two-semester sequence required of all 
students in the MATPREP program, and 
open to any student interested in exploring 
Music Education as a career option. Intro- 
duction to Music education is a survey course 
designed to provide an overview of music 
teaching - past, present, and future, and to 
serve as an introduction to the philosophy, 
methodology, and professional role of the 
music teacher. 



MU 190 A/B 

Applied Instruction Non-Majors 

0.5 hour 

1.5 credits 

Private instruction in all insttumental, vocal, 

and composition areas. 

MU 208 A/B 
Jazz Theory I-II 

3 hours 

3 credits 

A study of diatonic and chromatic theory as 

related to jazz and contempotary music. 

Prerequisite: MU 107 B 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 209 A/B 

Jazz Ear Training I-II 

3 hours 

3 credits 

Melodic, harmonic and rhythmic aural skill 

development in the jazz and contemporary 

music idioms. 

Prerequisite: MU 103 B 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 213 A/B 

Jazz Improvisation I-II 

2 hours 
2 credits 

The application of improvisational techniques 
encompassing all standard forms and styles. 
Performance practices ate related to the 
individual student's abilities, background, 
and experience. Coursework includes solo 
transcription and analysis, a comparison of 
improvisational methods, and a survey of 
educational resources. 

Required of all Jazzl Contemporary Music majors. 
Open to majors only. 

MU 232 A/B 

Class Jazz Piano I-II 

1 hour 

1 credit 

Harmonic concepts in keyboard application 

for jazz and contemporaty music; chord 

voicings for popular tunes, standards, and 

original harmonizations; continuation of jazz 

improvisation. 

Required of non-keyboard instrumental majors. 

Prerequisite: MU 131 B 

Open to majors only. 



159 



MU 241 A/B 

Vocal Styles and Diction I-II 

2 hours 

2 credits 

This course brings together 2nd and 3rd year 

vocal majors to expose them to the wide 

variety of literature and styles required of 

professionals. Students perform and are 

critiqued by faculty and guests. English, 

Italian, French, and German diction are 

studied. 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU254 

Basic Conducting 

2 hours 
2 credits 

A study of fundamental conducting skills and 
techniques with emphasis upon physical 
aspects of conducting, score reading and 
preparation, and rehearsal principles. 
Undergraduate corequisire for full acceptance 
into the MAT in Music Education program. 
Open to all candidates for the Bachelor of 
Music degree. 

MU 257 A/B 

Lab Teaching/Practicum I-II 

2 hours 

2 credits 

Observation and introduction to teaching in 
the schools. Course includes field experience 
as well as classroom seminars. 
Open to majors only. 

MU 301 A/B 
Music History I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Designed to define the major style periods 
from Greek times to the present in terms ot 
their philosophies, accomplishments, and 
interrelationships. Composers, performers, 
and theorists are examined in the context of 
musical literature with emphasis upon styles, 
forms, and techniques of composition as they 
evolve and change. The sequence puts into 
historical perspecrive the materials presented 
in the Music Theory courses. Through 
listening assignments, students are expected 
to further develop their aural skills and 
knowledge of musical literature. 



MU 306 A/B 

History of Rock Music 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The history of Rock from irs inception in the 
1950s to the ptesent. Begimng with the 
important antecedents of Rock and Roll, the 
course historically traces the vatious styles 
that evolved from that time to the present. 
There are live demonstrations and illustra- 
tions by guests in class. May be taken for 
elective credit. 

MU 307 A/B 

Advanced Jazz Theory and Ear Training 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A pracrical study of jazz and pop theoty 
combined with an advanced ear-training 
program, emphasizing insrrumenral 
application. Students are required to bnng 
theit instruments to class. Coursework 
includes recognition, writing, dictation, and 
sight reading of advanced chords, chord 
additions and altetations, chord substitutions, 
progressions, and rhythm. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B 
Open to majors only. 

MU 308 A/B 

Analysis and Composition of 
Contemporary Music 

1.5 credits 

An examination of compositional techniques 
used in pop songs, jingles, soundtracks, and 
underscores for radio, TV, records, films, 
shows and industrials. Students investigate 
the ways in which music serves to enhance 
the ovetall goals of the product or project. 
Musical analysis demonstrates how each style 
is created. Students produce their own 
musical compositions in each media context. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. 
Open to majors only. 

MU 310, 311 
Transcription and Analysis 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

This coutse is designed to advance the skills 

of ear training, theory, and improvisation 

using ttanscription and analysis. Students 

transcribe melodies, rhythms, harmonies and 

arrangements in increasingly more complex 

forms. The musical theory underlying each 

transcriprion is discussed and sometimes 

performed and used as a basis tor further 

work. 

Prerequisite: MU 208 B. MU 209 B. 

and MU 2MB. 



MU 313 A/B 

Jazz Improvisation III-IV 

2 hours 

2 credits 

Continuation of MU 213 A/B. 

Prerequisite: MU 213 B. Open to majors only. 

MU 315 A/B 

Jazz Arranging I-II 

2 hours 

2 credits 

A functional approach to ensemble scoring 
including score analysis, combo arranging, 
arranging for mixed instrumentation, musical 
settings for vocalists, string writing, writing 
fot pop tecording, and special techniques for 
multi-track recording. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. MU 209 B. 

MU317 A 
Orchestration I 

3 hours 
3 credits 

An introduction to instrumentation, designed 
to acquaint the student with ranges, trans- 
positions, and characteristics of individual 
instruments. Four orchestration projects are 
scored, performed, recorded, and critiqued, 
comprised of: 1) four woodwinds, 2) four 
woodwinds and seven brasses, 3) string 
ensemble, and 4) small orchestra wirh winds 
in pairs. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. Open to majors only. 

MU317B 
Orchestration II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Primarily intended for composers and music 
theorists, this course presents an analytical 
history of orchestration centering on the 
works ot Ravel, Schonberg, Prokofieff, 
Wagner, Strauss, Debussy, and Stravinsky. 
Coursework culminates in a large project for 
tull orchestra which is scored, performed, 
recorded, and critiqued. Composers are 
encouraged to orchestrate one ot their own 
compositions. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. 
Open to majors only. 

MU331 A/B 

Advanced Piano for Vocalists 

1 hour 
1 credit 

Designed primarily for vocalists, this course 
continues in the development of piano 
techniques with an emphasis on learning self- 
accompaniment. Literature from all vocal 
areas including oratorio, musical theater, jazz, 
opeta, and contemporary. Students accom- 
pany other singers. 
Prerequisite: MU 232 B 



MU 341 A/B 

Vocal Styles and Diction III-IV 

2 hours 

2 credits 

Continuation of MU 241 A/B. 
Prerequisite: MU 241 B. 

MU 344 A/B 
Opera Staging I-II 

3 hours 
1 credit 

The interpretation and performance of opera 
roles. Technical and artistic preparation for 
public performance from workshops to major 
productions of full operas. 
Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 347 A/B 

Advanced Sight Reading 

1 hour 

1 credit 

An advanced music reading course designed 

to further develop the student's music 

reading, writing, recognition, and inner-ear 

skills. 

Prerequisite: MU 208 B or TH 222 B. 

MU 356 A/B 

Music Teaching Skills I-II 

1 hour 

1 credit 

Incotporates advanced skills in functional 
piano, guitar, recorder, writing/arranging for 
elementary classroom ensembles, handbells, 
establishment of classroom environment. 
Projects include arranging, performing, and 
simulated teaching. 
Open to majors only. 

MU401 A 
Jazz History 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Study of jazz from its African and European 
roots through its emergence at the turn of the 
twentieth century as a unique and distinctive 
American art form. The various styles of jazz 
are studied (ragrime, New Orleans Dixieland, 
Chicago style, swing, be-bop, cool, hard-bop, 
free-form, third stream), including their 
effect on the populat music with which jazz 
has coexisted. An in-depth study of the 
primary exponents of the various styles. 
Audio and video materials are used to provide 
students with a better understanding of jazz 
and its influences on the music industry. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. MU 209 B. and 
MU 213 B or permission of the instructor. 



MU 401 B 

American Music History 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The development of both classical and 
popular American musical styles from the 
17th to the 20th century. Recordings and 
films as well as in-class performances will 
help bring to life the music of our American 
past. Students gain a clear understanding of 
the social, histotical and musical time line 
that evolved into our current musical 
environment. 

MU402 
World Music 

3 houts 
3 credits 

The classical and folk music of various 
countries in Asia, Indonesia, the Middle East, 
Africa, and the Western Hemisphere. A 
course open to all University students which 
may be taken for music or for Liberal Arts 
elective ctedit. 

MU406 

Advanced Rhythmic Theory and 

Practice 

3 hours 

3 credits 

A study of the rhythmic theories and 

practices of such composers as Hindemith, 

Messiaen, Stravinsky, Carter, Reich, Bartok, 

and Babbitt, as well as contemporary and jazz 

composers. 

Prerequisite: MU 208 B. MU 209 B, and 

MU213B. 

Open to majors only. 

MU411 

Twentieth Century Music 

3 hours 

3 credits 

A study and analysis of the music of the first 

half of the twentieth century, such as 

Schonbetg, Berg, Webern, Stravinsky, 

Hindemith, Varese, Bartok, Copland, and 

Messiaen. 

Prerequisite: MU 208 B. MU 209 B, and 

MU 213 B or permission of the instructor. 

MU 413 A/B 
Recording I-II 

2 hours 
2 credits 

A study of the recording process and the 
many facets of the recording srudio. 
Designed to familiarize the student with 
conventional and creative recording tech- 
niques through practical experience in the 
studio. 

I of all J azzl Contemporary Music majors. 



MU 415 A/B 

Introduction to MIDI and Electronic 

Technology 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A detailed "hands-on" examination of the use 
of microcomputers in the present day 
composition environment. The course 
includes the uses of computer, the language 
of MIDI, sequencing, FM and other types of 
synthesis, and a survey of currently available 
music software packages. Students are 
strongly encouraged to engage in indepen- 
dent work based on their own compositional 
interests. No prior computer or synthesis 
experience is needed. 

MU 416 A/B 
MIDI Synthesis I-II 
0.75 hour 
1.5 credits 

Students become proficient at the skills 
necessary to work creatively in the MIDI 
studio. Information includes current 
synthesis methods and programming of 
original sounds and drum machines; 
sampling procedures; collecting and editing 
original samples; MIDI studio recording 
processes; the use of sync codes. 
Prerequisite: MU 415 B. 

MU 417 A/B 
Opera Literature 

3 hours 

3 credits 

Survey of operatic styles and genres. 

Emphasis on the cultural and social contexts 

of a wide diversity of operas, and upon 

character analysis. Intensive examination of 

complete operas. 

MU 420 A 
Business of Music 

2 hours 

2 credits 

An examination of the legal, practical, and 

procedural problems encountered by the 

practicing musician. Specific course content 

varies each year according to the needs of the 

students and their particular career goals. 

MU 420 B 
Careers in Music 

2 hours 

2 credits 

A study in the career options available to 

musicians and the knowledge and craft 

necessary for the successful recognition and 

exploitation of these opportunities. 

Open to majors only. 



161 



MU424 

Wagner and the Ring Cycle 

3 hours 

3 credits 

An in-depth study of Wagnetian Opera with 

special emphasis on the four opetas that 

constitute the Ring Cycle. Lectures and 

discussions will cover libretti, harmonic 

idiom, staging and symbolism. 

MU427 

Diaghilev and His Time 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The role of Serge Diaghilev and his famous 
Ballet Russes in shaping the course of music 
and dance from c. 1909-1929- Special 
emphasis on the wotks of Igor Stravinsky 
with teference to his music for the stage. The 
interrelationships between various artists, 
dancers, and writers such as Picasso, Cocteau, 
Nijinsky, Bakst, Massine, and others who 
were active in Paris. Works are examined 
from the perspective of the composer, the 
choreographer, the set and costume designer, 
the dancers and the audience. Literature 
includes Stravinsky (Firebird, Petrushka, 
Rite of Spring, Les Noces, Pulcinella, 
Oedipus Rex), Debussy (Jeux), Ravel 
(Daphnis and Chloe), Satie (Parade), De Falla 
(The Three-Cornered Hat), Milhaud (Le Train 
Bleu, La Creation du Monde), Poulenc 
(Les Biches) and Prokofiev. 

UV 441 MB 
Vocal Workshop 

1 hour 
1 credit 

An exit-level course for vocal majors which 
prepares students for the musical, career and 
performance practices they will encounter in 
the competitive professional marketplace. 
Class includes lectures by guest singers, 
composers, opera and musical directors, 
vocal coaches, and record producers. 
Prerequisite: MU 331 B, MU 341 B, and 
MU 347 B. 



MU 444 A/B 

Opera Staging III-IV 

3 hours 

2 credirs 

Continuation of MU 344 A/B. 

Prerequisite: MU 344 B. 

MU451 A 

Psychology of Music Teaching I 

2 hours 
2 credits 

This course is intended to acquaint the 
prospective music educator with the major 
theories and developments associated with 
the psychology of child growth and develop- 
ment in physical, emotional, and psychologi- 
cal terms; and a volume of principles 
supported by psychological observation and 
investigation which appear to possess import 
fot the teaching/learning endeavor in music. 
Open to majors only. 

MU451 B 

Psychology of Music Teaching II 

2 hours 

2 credits 

Emphasis on the application or learning 
theories to practical considerations of 
teaching, including motivation, learning 
sequence, student-teacher interaction, and 
classroom management. Developmental 
theories, like those of Piaget and Erikson, are 
explored with attention to selecting learning 
experiences in the music classroom. 
Open to majors only. 

MU550 

Advanced Conducting - Choral or 

Instrumental 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Advanced conducting techniques and 
applications of these techniques to instru- 
mental of choral music teaching at the 
secondary-school level. Emphases include the 
selections of appropriate literature, style and 
interpretation, rehearsal planning and 
implementation, evaluating performance 
outcomes, and special considerations relative 
to the teaching of music through the vehicle 
of performance. Students select eithet 
instrumental ot chotal emphasis. 
Prerequisite: A course in Basic Conducting: full 
admission to the MAT program or consent of the 
Head of Music Education Division. 
Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music 
Education. 



MU551 

Education in American Society 

3 hours 
3 credirs 

The course utilizes lecture/discussion, seminar, 
field and research presentation experiences to 
address historical, philosophical, and 
contemporary issues in American Education. 
Students are required ro complete four major 
papers dedicated to the afotementioned issues 
and present them during seminar sessions. 
Assigned readings and the keeping of a 
notebook devoted to cutrent events in 
education are required. Students are granted 
released time from class to complete research 
papers and are counselled individually to 
facilitate their projects. Guest speakers 
typically include a school administrator, 
counsellor/social worker, a supervisor or 
teacher from anothet cutricular area other than 
music, and related school petsonnel. 
Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music. 
Prerequisites: full admission to the MAT 
program or consent of the Head of the Music 
Education Division. 

MU 552 

Workshop in Vocal Methods 

1 hour 

2 credits 

Class instruction and participator}' experi- 
ences in voice theoty, vocal production, 
teaching methods, and instructional materials 
for use in elementary and secondary schools. 
The physiology of the voice is studied with 
reference to principles of choral singing. 
Special problems of the child and adolescent 
voice are considered. Required ot all 
candidates for the MAT in Music Education. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MAT program 
or consent of the Head of Music Education 
Division. 



MU553 

Music and Special Children 

2 hours 

2 credits 

Through readings, discussions, guest speakers, 
classroom observations and simulated 
teaching, the goals of the course are: 

1 . to define and examine various types of 
disabilities. 

2. to offer a background on special education 
practices and laws in America. 

3. to aid students in developing an apprecia- 
tion of the needs of handicapped persons in 
general society, in education, and in music 
education. 

4. to guide music education students in 
developing goals and objectives, adapting 
lessons and preparing meaningful lesson plans 
for special students in the music classroom. 
Participation in class discussion based on 
assigned reading, a written/verbal presenta- 
tion on a specific disability, field observations, 
and two written examinations provide bases 
for evaluating student achievement. 
Required of all MAT in Music Education degree 
candidates. Prerequisites: Full acceptance into the 
MAT program or consent of the Head of Music 
Education Division. 

MU554A 

Elementary Methods and Materials 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A concentrated study of methods and 
materials involved in planning, implement- 
ing, and evaluating instructional programs in 
elementary music education. Lecture, 
workshop, and simulated teaching sessions. 
Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MAT program. 

MU554B 

Secondary Methods and Materials 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A concentrated study of methods and 
materials involved in planning, implement- 
ing, and evaluating instructional programs in 
secondary music education. Lecture, 
workshop, and simulated teaching sessions. 
Required of all candidates to the MAT in Music. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MAT program. 



MU555 

Elementary Student Teaching 

Students in the field 

4 credits 

Taken concurrently with MU 556 and MU 

558. Offered only during the spring semester 

to students in their final semester of study. 

The equivalent of six weeks experience at the 

elementary level is required to receive credit 

for this course. Placement in schools is 

determined by the Director of Music 

Education. 

Open to majors only. 

MU556 

Secondary Student Teaching 

Students in the field 

4 credits 

Taken concurrently with MU 556 and MU 

558. Offered only during the spring semester 

to students in their final semester of study. 

The equivalent of six weeks experience at the 

secondary level is required to receive credit 

for this course. Placement in schools is 

determined by the Director ot Music 

Education. 

Open to majors only. 

MU557 

Music Administration and Supervision 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Course addresses issues and concerns of 
administering school music programs- 
program planning and development, budget 
and finance, facilities, equipment, public 
relations, scheduling, concert planning, and 
related matters. Principles and methods of 
effective supervision of programs and 
personnel constitute a second focus of the 
course. 

Required of all candidates for the MAT 
in Music Education. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MAT program. 

MU558 

Student Teaching Seminar and 

Major Project 

2 hours 
2 credits 

Taken concurrently with MU 555 and MU 
556. Required of and limited to students 
who are student teaching. Discussion and 
analysis of field experiences, special work- 
shops and field trips. Major paper comprises 
a thorough status-study and evaluation of the 
programs in which each student is interning. 
Successful completion of an oral exit 
examination is required. 
Open to majors only. 



MU559 

Research, Evaluation, and 

Technology in Music Education 

3 hours 

3 credits 

The course has three primary foci: 

1 . Examination of the role of research in 
music education, sources of research, analysis 
of research types and methods, and the 
criticism of research in terms of internal and 
external criteria. 

2. Principles of effective evaluation 
strategies in music education; standardized 
and teacher-constructed approaches to 
evaluating music teaching and learning in 
the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective 
domains. 

3. Study of computer applications and 
related technological advances relative to the 
teaching and administration of programs in 
music education. 

Required of candidates for the MAT 

in Music Education. 

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the MAT program. 

MU 560 A 

Workshop in Instrumental Methods I 

2 hours 
2 credits 

Class instruction and participatory experi- 
ences in performing on woodwind and string 
instruments and teaching woodwinds and 
strings in elementary and secondary schools. 
The class will constitute a lab ensemble for 
exploring methods and materials. Full class 
sessions will be supplemented with small- 
group instruction, and clinics will focus on 
instrument care and repair, instrument 
selection, developing beginning instrumental 
programs in schools, and related issues. 
Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MAT program 
or consent of the Head of Music Education 
Division. 

MU 560 B 

Workshop in Instrumental Methods II 

2 hours 
2 credits 

Class instruction and participatory experi- 
ences in performing on brass and percussion 
instruments and teaching brass and percus- 
sion in elementary and secondary schools. 
The class will constitute a lab ensemble for 
exploring methods and materials. Full class 
sessions will be supplemented with small- 
group instruction, and clinics will focus on 
instrument care and repair, instrument 
selection, developing beginning instrumental 
programs in schools, and related issues. 
Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MAT program 
or consent of the Head of Music Education 
Division. 1( ^ 



MU603 

Graduate Project/Recital 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Independent research project designed to 
enable the student to work in depth on a 
topic of special relevance which is applicable 
to petformance. The graduate project is 
evaluated in two parts: as a thesis, with the 
expectation that the student has completed 
extensive research in a comprehensive 
mannet; and as a recital, in which the 
student incorporates aspects of the project 
and demonstrates personal instrumental 
growth. Students give presentations 
throughout the semester in a seminar setting 
showing their progress in research and its 
application to performance. 
Required of all candidates for the MM. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MM program 
or consent of the Head of JazzlContemporary Musk 
Division. 

MU 615, 616 

MIDI and Music Technology 

2 hours 
2 credits 

Hands-on exploration of music technology 
applicable to performer, composer, arranger 
with focus on fluency with MIDI sequencing 
including MAX to create interactive live 
performance situations. Students work with 
modular digital multi-ttacks and edit and 
create original sounds for synthesizers and 
samplers. Hard disk recording using Pro- 
Tools III and Digital Perfotmer, SMPTE and 
synchronization in the studio, and composi- 
tion and sound design for film, video and 
theater are also explored. Training in 
notation software is an integral and essential 
aspect of the coutse: aftet the first month, 
assignments for all graduate courses require 
use of professional notation software. 
Required of all candidates for the MM. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MM program 
or consent of the Head of JazzlContemporary Music 
Division. 



MU617 

Transcription and Analysis 
3 houts 
3 ctedits 

Accurate notation, transcription fluency and 
recognition of theoretical concepts are 
developed through a regime of continual and 
rigorous assignments-all designed to further 
advance skills in ear training and theory. 
Projects begin with single line melodies in 
varying instrumental registers and progress 
through advanced rhythms and chotd 
progressions to complete arrangements and 
compositions. Sources include bass lines, 
synthesizer sequences, pop recordings, jazz 
improvisations and drum solos. Students 
learn techniques and petformance practices of 
varying styles and petiods, and then perform 
transcribed parts and solos. 
Required of all candidates for the MM. 
Prerequisite: Full admission to the MM program 
or consent of the Head of Jazz/Contemporary Music 
Division. 

MU 620, 621 
Professional Internship 

1 hour 

1 credit 

Provides hands-on, sitting-in experience in 
a variety of professional settings-rehearsals, 
performances, meetings with producers, and 
in-studio projects such as recording, 
arranging, or project coordination. The 
program is developed by the graduate advisor 
and major teacher in conjunction with the 
student to select topics and expetiences most 
televant and beneficial to that particular 
student's education. 

MU622 

Graduate Arranging 

2 hours 
2 credits 

Emphasis is on effective writing in vatious 
contemporary styles and building on basic 
arranging skills, with a focus on specific 
arranging techniques such as writing 
effectively fot the thythm section, horn 
voicings, sax soli, and contemporary fusion 
styles. Arrangements are studied in score 
format and aurally, and then techniques are 
applied to student projects. 



MU624 

Composing for Performers 

2 hours 
2 ctedits 

A dual emphasis-on acoustic instruments and 
on technologies-exposes students to a variety 
of professional composing situations, 
including latge jazz ensembles, fusion, 
acoustic/electronic hybrids, films, videos, and 
musical theatet, and jingle writing. Tech- 
niques using MIDI, MAX and electronic 
composition are explored. Faculty and guest 
composers ptesent workshops on their own 
approaches. Students learn to use the 
recording studio as an instrument and use 
notation softwate for score and part prepara- 
tion. Student works ate teheatsed and 
performed by graduate and advanced 
undetgiaduate ensembles. 

MU 625, 626 
Advanced Improvisation 

2 hours 
2 credits 

Improvisational styles, techniques and devices 
ate studied. Intervallic improvisation, 
modem triad improvisation, and advanced 
pentatonic concepts are addressed, as well as 
study of the pioneers of jazz improvisation 
through tecorded solos that mark turning 
points of improvisation. Topics include 
melody embellishment, improvising in 
phrases, silence, time-feel, pacing, syncopa- 
tion, chord tone soloing, dynamics, non- 
harmonic triads, contracting and expanding 
chotd duration, tri-tonic cells, sustaining 
peak points, and unaccompanied soloing. 

MU 627, 628 
Graduate Forum 

1 hour 

1 credit 

A graduate seminat whete various aspects of 

study, including musical development and 

accomplishment, are correlated with critical, 

aesthetic and historical components. 

Additionally, attistic and professional issues 

are tesearched and discussed, and guest artists 

and professionals conduct Master Classes and 

workshops. A module on research techniques 

is included. 

Required of all candidates for the MM. 

Prerequisite: Full admission to the MM program 

or consent of the Head of JazzlContemporary Music 

Division. 



164 



Ensembles 

BM and MM students participate in a range 
of ensembles selected lor their diversity of 
style and instrumentation, designed to 
present varied musical experiences. Each 
ensemble is directed by a faculty artist expert 
in the selected idiom. 

MU761 
Handbell Choir 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU762 

Chamber Singers Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU764 

Small or Specialty Jazz Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU765 

New Music Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU772 
Chorus 

1 credit 

Pennission of instructor is required. 

MU774 

Jazz Band - Big Band/Fusion Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 



Private Lessons 

The following courses are open to majors only. 

MU 191 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 



MU 192 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 

MU 193 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 

MU 291 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 191 B. 

MU 292 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 

quisite: AW 192 B. 



MU 293 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credirs 

Prerequisite: MU 193 B. 

MU 391 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 291 B. 

MU 392 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 292 B. 

MU 393 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 293 B. 

MU491 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 391 B. 



MU 492 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 392 B. 

MU 493 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: MU 393 B. 

MU 692 A/B 

Major Lessons (Graduate Instrumental) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MM program. 



165 



Media Arts 



Photography/Film/ 
Video/ Animation 

PF 125 

Freshman Photography 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An introduction to fundamental techniques 
used in black-and-white photogtaphy, 
including camera operation, developing, and 
printing. Lectures and presentations on the 
technical aspects of photogtaphy as well as 
the creative and conceptual aspects related to 
the field. Demonstrations on the production 
of photograms and pinhole images, the use of 
the copy stand and slide film, mural printing, 
and a brief description of the 4x5 camera. 

PF 127 

Freshman Animation 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An introduction to the basics of animation, 
with an emphasis on the development of 
storytelling capabilities. Inventive studio 
projects explore production techniques used 
both in experimental and charactet anima- 
tion. In addition, an histotical overview is 
provided through film screenings and group 
discussion. 

PF 128 
Freshman Film 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

A short survey of film and video production, 
with an emphasis on the discussion of the 
artistic possibilities inhetent in this medium. 
Topics will covet elements of nar rative, the 
poetics of film, (early histotical experimenrs, 
dream form, and visionary film), the 
documentary idiom (propaganda, social 
analysis, and political activism), video as an 
art form (technology, fine art video, and 
performance art), and kinetic design in the 
commercial sector (text and moving image 
design, and kinetic structure in television 
commercials). Students write two short 
papers and prepare a treatment for a work in 
film or video. Studio assignments concen- 
trate on stotyboard development and group 
shooting projects. 



PF203 

Portfolio Documentation 

6 houts 
3 credits 

The goals of this course are the expansion of 
the skills necessary to compile a cohetent 
visual portfolio, the development of an 
understanding of the role of photography and 
video as a tesearch tool, and the acquisition of 
the skills needed to produce high-quality 
documentation of two- and thfee-dimensional 
artwork. Insttuction addresses a range of 
creative lighting and shooting techniques as 
well as the problems posed by lighting in a 
non-studio setting. Students deal with the 
photographic problems posed by variations in 
scale and the differing materials of glass, 
wood, clay, paint, metals, and fibets. Each 
student is tequired to ptesent a slide portfolio 
of theit art work supplemented by a short 
video document describing artistic process. 
Prerequisite: PF 125 Prahman Photography or 
PF 211 A Intro to Photography, 

PF209 

Photography for Illustrators 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Introduction to basic concepts and techniques 
of cameta work and photographic digital 
imaging. Emphasis is placed on film 
selection and lighting for both studio and 
environmental shooting. The fundamentals 
of Photoshop are employed for digital image 
manipulation. Lectures and projects are 
designed to provide the tools necessary for 
illustrators who wish to use photogtaphy in 
their work. 

PF210A 
Introduction to Film I 

6 houts 
3 ctedits 

A hands-on introduction to the principles 
and techniques of media production: 
shooting 16mm film, developing a sensitivity 
to the nuances of movement, understanding 
lighting and exposure, composition, and the 
logic of editing. A survey on the historical 
and aesthetic development of the medium in 
otder to expand the students' sense of the 
possibilities of media. 



PF210B 
Introduction to Film II 

6 hours 

3 credits 

A continuation of PF 210 A with an emphasis 

on timing, staging and blocking exercises to 

develop a feel for direction, experimentation 

with multiple-image techniques, the 

investigation of relarionships between sound 

and image, and the production of a short film 

or video that integrates these explorations 

creatively. Much of the coursework is done in 

video. 

Prerequisite: PF 210 A 

PF211 A 

Introduction to Photography I 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Introduction to basic concepts, processes, and 

techniques of black and white photography, 

including camera operation, exposute, 

darkroom procedures, lighting, and their 

controlled applications. Emphasis on the 

normative standard of photogtaphic 

rendering. 

Required for admission to all other 

Photography courses. 

PF211 B 

Introduction to Photography II 

6 hours 
3 credits 

While consolidating the student's control of 
the medium, this course introduces the 
student to a departure from normative 
photographic rendering, techniques, and 
modes of expression and form. Strong 
emphasis on manipulation of materials, 
including traditional photographic methods 
as well as an introduction to computer- 
manipulation. 

Prerequisite: PF 211 A. or by presentation 
of portfolio. 

PF212 A 
Animation Drawing I 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Through a series of exercises concentrating on 
timing and movement, the student acquires a 
basic understanding of drawn animation. 
Sound is introduced for the final project, 
which consists of a short, animated film shot 
on 16mm using the Oxberry camera. 
Prerequisites: FP 100 A and FP 120 A. 



166 



PF212B 

Animation Drawing II 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Continuing with issues of Animation 
Dtawing I, the student is introduced to 
under-the-camera animation using varied 
mediums such as cutouts, sand, and painting- 
on-glass. All projects are shot on 16mm 
using the Bolex cameta. The final project 
may consist of any medium selected by the 
student. A lab fee is required fot this course 
in order to offset the cost of film stock and 
lab expenses. 
Prerequisites: FP 100 BandPF212 A. 

PF216 

Computer Animation I 

6 hours 

3 credits 

This is an introductory course in computer 

animation. Emphasis is placed upon 

developing the student's expertise with 

computet hardware, software tools, and the 

video utilized in creating electronic images 

that move. 

Prerequisite: PF 212 A. 

PF217 

Color Concepts 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Introduction to methods of colot shooting 

and printing leading to an explotation of the 

technical and creative possibilities of color in 

photography. Processes covered include 

negative and ttansparency films, filtration, 

chemical printing, and digital color controls 

with Photoshop. 

Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A or by portfolio review. 

PF218 
Creative Sound 

6 houts 
3 credits 

An explotation of the creative use of sound as 
a ptimary artistic medium. Topics include 
sound and hearing, microphones and 
recording, tape editing and manipulation, 
sound aesthetics and production styles, voice 
and nartation, signal processing and sound 
manipulation, and production formats. 
Through audio production projects, students 
gain insights into new ways of using sound, 
both on its own and with other media. 



PF219 

Character Layout and Design 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Designing characters, backgrounds, pans, 
and cteative camera moves for the animated 
scene. Design styles and techniques are 
explored tor their potential in developing a 
wide range of character types, traits, moods, 
petsonalities, and attitudes. Students learn to 
lay out scenes around character action, wotk 
with camera fields, deal with issues of 
composition and petspective, and to create 
moods through layout. A final project 
requires the development of an "Animator's 
Bible," a production wotkbook, for the 
student's personal film portfolio. 
Prerequisite: PF 212 A or by portfolio review. 

PF310A/B 

Junior Cinema Production I and II 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Production techniques in actual filming 
situations: starting from the script through 
budgeting, script breakdown, camera work, 
and editing, to the finished telease print. 
Students ate expected to execute specific 
assignments in lighting, editing, and sound, 
and are introduced to synch-sound procedutes. 
Prerequisites: PF 210 A/B. 

PF311 A/B 

Junior Photography Workshop 

6 houts 

3 ctedits 

Exploration of photographic imagery through 

a series of problems aimed at personal vision 

and creative growth. 

Prerequisites: PF 211 A/B. or by portfolio review. 

PF 312 A/B 

Junior Animation Workshop I and II 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This coutse consists of a series of advanced 
drawn-animation exetcises culminating in a 
one-minute animated film. A short, 
additional film is produced during the second 
semester Aspects of career concerns in 
animation are introduced: grant writing, 
resumes, budgets, and the process of entering 
film festivals. The student also teceives 
detailed instruction on opetating procedutes 
for the Oxbetry camera. 
Prerequisites: PF 212 A/B. and FP 190 B. 



PF 313 A/B 

Basic Photography Studio I and II 

6 houts 
3 credits 

This coutse is designed to familiarize the 
student with the tools, techniques, and 
language of studio photogtaphy. The course 
entails extensive use of the 4" x 5" view 
cameta. The first semester deals exclusively 
with black and white materials-sheet film 
exposure, hand processing, and printing 
latge-format negatives. The second semestet 
statts with the introduction of color 
ttanspatency films and strobe lighting. 
Prerequisites: PF 21 1 A/B. and FP 190 A/B. 

PF315 

Digital Photography Workshop 
6 hours 
3 credits 

This coutse concentrates on the production of 
cteative digital photogtaphy; students are 
encouraged to expetiment with new tools and 
techniques. Film and print scanners, CD 
ROM discs, and digital cametas are used to 
produce images that are critiqued on the basis 
of both technical proficiency and aesthetic 
accomplishment. Portfolios ate printed on 
digital output machines, silvet-based photo 
materials, and four-color offset. Frequent 
readings, lectutes, and site visits expand the 
on-going studio expenence. 
Prerequisite: PF 211 B and PF 217. or by 
portfolio review. 

PF316 

Computer Animation II 

6 houts 

3 credits 

An advanced coutse in computer animation 

which builds upon the student's personal 

exploration of the electronic multimedia 

environment established in PF 216. 

An integration of digital audio, video, 

two- and thtee-dimensional software tools 

is emphasized. 

Prerequisites: PF 212 B and PF 216. or 

PF 322 and MM 222. 



167 



PF320 
Film Sound 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Students in this course explore creative sound 
design in finished films with instruction and 
practice in the use of sound recording 
equipment, sound transfers, building and 
editing multiple synchronous sound tracks, 
and preparing tor the sound mix. Students 
work in groups to create and complete a 5" 
sync sound film that incorporates the concept 
of "sound design." 
Prerequisite: PF 210 A/B. 

PF322 

Media Technology 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A hands-on exploration of some of the 
technical materials and procedures that 
complement the media artist's production 
skills: video editing and post-production 
technologies, sound mixing and processing, 
basic electronics, optical printing, computer 
sound editing, and computer image process- 
ing. Field trips to high-end facilities 
supplement classroom work and students are 
expected to work with Dance and Music 
majors in the completion of a final project. 
Prerequisite: PF 210 A/B, FP 100 A/B, 
FP 190 A/B, and PF 320. 

PF 323 

Selected Topics in Photography 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Study ot one or more various media, methods, 
or problems in still photography to be offered 
according to the instructor's interests and 
students' requests. Topics include: portrai- 
ture, documentary photography, digital 
imaging, color manipulation, photographic 
illustration, and photo-based mixed media. 
quisite: PF 211 A. 



PF324 

Film Forum: Selected Topics 

3 hours 

3 credits 

Concentrated study of a particular area of 

film, video, or animation. Courses deal with 

specific issues and have included: film theory; 

seminars in sound; media, theater, and 

performance; history of video art; and 

history of animation. 



PF328 

Selected Topics in Animation 

6 hours 
3 credirs 

An exploration of media used in animation. 
The content of each course offering will 
reflect the professional interests of rhe 
instructor. Topics include clay and puppet 
animation, character layout and design, and 
narrative storytelling development. 
Prerequisites: PF 212 A/B. 

PF 410 A/B 

Senior Cinema Production I and II 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Each student produces an independent thesis 

film. 

Prerequisites: PF 310 A/B. PF 314 A. PF 320. 

and PF 322. 

PF411 A/B 

Senior Photography Workshop 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Continuation of junior workshop; students 

work on long-term individual projects or 

shorter-term problems to develop technical, 

aesthetic, and conceptual mastery of the 

medium. The course culminates in a group 

thesis exhibition and production of an 

individual portfolio. 

Prerequisites: PF 311 A/B. and PF 313 A/B. 

PF 412 A/B 

Senior Animation Workshop 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Directed independent production of a short 
film project in an idiom of the student's 
choosing; additional production of a VHS 
video portfolio composed of several short 
animated sequences that each student will be 
able to use when applying for work as eirher a 
free-lance animator or for employment with 
an animation company. 
Prerequisites: PF 312 A/B. PF 320 and 
PF 322. 

PF413 

Professional Practices 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Study of the practice of professional photog- 
raphy, with attention to various career 
opportunities, portfolio presentation, business 
practices, professional ethics, photogtaphic 
law, and personal objectives. A variety of 
professional guests visit the course. 
Prerequisites: PF 311 A and PF 313 A. 



PF 415 A/B 

Senior Photography Seminar I and II 

6 hours 

3 credits 

An analysis of contemporary criticism in 

photography. Extensive reading and some 

writing with attention to current showings 

and exhibitions are required. 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 

chairperson required. 

PF424 

Time: A Multidisciplinary Seminar 
3 hours 
3 credits 

The concept of Time considered from a 
multidisciplinary perspective, drawing on 
readings in philosophy, literature, psychology, 
sociology, and film theory. Relevant works in 
film and video are screened. Students are 
responsible for a final term paper that 
interrelates two or more of the readings with 
one of the screened works. 

PF499 
Internship 

90 hours/semester 
3 credits 

An internship program in which the student 
is placed in one of several professional 
situations. Placements in photography may 
include assisting in professional studios, 
practice in biomedical photography laborato- 
ries, and curatorial positions in galleries, 
among others. Placements in film and 
animation are sponsored by local independent 
production houses and television stations, 
design firms, and free-lance animation artists; 
students ot film may assist in location 
shooting, set production, editing, casting 
and scripting, and a myriad of other 
practical tasks. 

Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A/B (for Photo intern- 
ships}: PF 210 A/B (for Film/Video internships): 
or PF 212 A/B (for Animation internships). 



168 



Printmaking/ 
Book Arts 



All Print making! Book Arts classes are open 
on studio elective basis if prerequisites are met 
and space available. 

PR 102 

Freshman Screenprinting 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An introduction and investigation of various 
stencil methods, based on three primary types 
of screen stencils-cut paper, blockout/resist, 
and photo emulsion, using water-based inks 
on both paper and fabric. Emphasis on the 
acquisition of personal expression and 
technical skills, within the capabilities of 
screenprinted opaque and transparent colors; 
and the use of editions in collaborative class 
image exchange. Additionally, the various 
media unique to Printmaking are shown and 
discussed, to introduce the beginning student 
to the wide possibilities of expression 
inherent in Printmaking. 

PR 201 
Relief/Monotype 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Introduction to the graphic and expressive 
qualities of woodcut, linoleum, collograph 
processes printed in monochrome and color. 
Monoprinting ideas from direct drawing and 
painting on plexiglass and metal plate is also 
explored. 

PR 202 

Screenprinting 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Introduction and investigation of stencil 
methods in screenprinting with waterbased 
inks. Idea development and acquisition of 
visual skills in expression in color, line and 
form through drawn, photographic or 
computer-generated stencil processes. 



PR 204 

Screenprinting/Etching 
6 hours 
3 credits 

The graphic qualities of expression in 
screenprinting and etching/intaglio are 
presented through historic and contemporary 
examples and demonstration of the methods 
which convey ideas in these two media. 
Various stencil processes from direct-drawn to 
photographic and computer-generated are 
explored in screenprinting with waterbased 
opaque and transparent inks. Handwork on 
the metal plate includes drawn drypoint, 
etching, and tonal processes. Emphasis is 
placed on the understanding of the qualities 
of these methods and development of personal 
ideas through their combination. 

PR211 

Etching/Monotype 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Individual expression with the graphic 
qualities of etched and directly drawn ideas 
created on the metal plate by hand or acid 
etching in color and monochrome. Processes 
also include printing from drawing and 
painting directly on plexiglass and metal 
plate with oil and waterbased materials. 

PR 222 

Non-silver Processes 
3 or 6 hours 
1.5 or 3 credits 

Students are introduced to the basic 
techniques of non-silver by building images 
in color with layers of brushed-on light- 
sensitive emulsion. Light-resists can range 
from photogram objects to drawings and 
paintings, to film or paper negatives. 
Processes covered are VanDyke brown, 
cyanotype, gum bichromate, and palladium 
printing. 

PR 223 
Bookbinding Methods 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

A workshop class familiarizing the student 
with the characteristics and handling 
qualities of materials used in various book 
sttuctures. Some of the structures covered 
include pamphlet binding, multi-signature 
books, clamshell boxes, portfolios, accordion 
sttuctures, and oriental binding. Emphasis 
will be placed upon both the use of archivally 
sound materials and the use of these 
structures as vehicles for the students' 
creative expression. 



PR 224 

Book Arts: Structures 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Historical book forms serve as models and as 
a departure point for innovative new work. 
Students are made familiar with traditional 
binding techniques, encouraged to explore 
new applications and to experiment by 
combining images and text into unique book 
structures. Some of the structures presented 
are signature binding, Japanese binding, 
accordion structure, pop-up structures, and 
tunnel books. 

While this course is an introductory level 
course, it may also serve as a follow-up course 
for students who have already completed PR 
223 Bookbinding Methods or PR 305 Book 
Arts I: Type and Binding, since much of the 
material covered is different. 

PR 300 
Lithography 

6 hours 
3 credits 

All of the basic techniques of drawing, image 
making, and printing skills that are necessary 
to produce hand-pulled, black and white 
lithographs from lithographic stones and 
plates will be experienced. An emphasis will 
be placed on visual expression and develop- 
ment of ideas through group discussions and 
critiques. 

PR 306 

Print Study Seminar I 

3 hours, alternate weeks 
1.5 credits 

Students meet at the Philadelphia Museum 
of Art Print Study Room to discuss and study 
original prints and rare books from the 
museum collection. Masters of the 15th 
through the 18th centuries are introduced 
and researched. Printmaking processes that 
parallel the material covered are demon- 
strated and practised in the printmaking 
studios. 



169 



PR 307 

Book Arts: Concept and Structure 
6 hours 
3 credits 

The course offers students an opportunity to 
explore the integration of type and telief 
image in unique and editioned book 
structures. Hands-on experience in dealing 
with composition (metal) type and computer 
typesetting is on an intetmediate level. 
Methods of relief printing will be explored 
and cultivated. Wood engraving, photopoly- 
mer relief, color reduction printing, and 
related traditional and contemporary methods 
of multiple image making will be pursued. 
Special emphasis on development of 
a personal visual language. 

PR 308 

Advanced Lithography Workshop 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Students are offered the opportunity for 
further investigation and development of 
lithographic image making, including 
photographic techniques and multi-color 
printing. Editioned prints of greater scope 
and complexity are undertaken, consistent 
with the student's interest and experience. 
misite: PR 300. 



PR 322 

Advanced Non-silver Processes 

3 or 6 hours 

1.5 or 3 credits 

Students will have the opportunity for 

continued development of image and skills m 

combinations of non-silver processes. 

Prerequisite: PR 222. 

PR 326 

Introduction to Offset Lithography 

3 or 6 hours 
1.5 or 3 credits 

Students are offered a hands-on course which 
develops skills in image preparation and 
printing techniques using offset lithography. 
An emphasis will be placed on personal 
imagery. Both hand-drawn and photographic 
methods of image making will be investi- 



PR327 

Advanced Offset Lithography 

3 or 6 hours 

1.5 or 3 credits 

Students will have the oppottunity for a 

continued investigation of offset lithography. 

Prerequisite: PR 326. 



PR 400 

Advanced Workshop 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Students continue to develop their ideas, 

images, and techniques while establishing 

theit direction and personal original 

expression. The workshop atmosphere 

permits a comfortable handling of all 

procedures and pnntmaking processes. 

Students are encouraged to be involved with 

adjacent expressive means such as drawing, 

painting, sculpture, photography, crafts, etc. 

Prerequisites: PR 201, PR 204, PR 300, 

PR 305, and FA 333 A. 

PR 406 

Print Study Seminar II 

3 hours, alternate weeks 
1.5 credits 

The historical and conceptual context of 
prints, portfolios and book arts of the 19th 
and 20th centuries are studied at the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art. Written and 
printed expression of the ideas and processes 
involved are integrated into this coutse 
of study. 

PR 407 A/B 
Thesis Seminar I-II 

3 hours fall and spring 
1.5 credits 

Students wotk towatd the acquisition of a 
professional profile, including a resume and 
artist's statement. In addition, they develop 
pottfolio and slide ptesentations. They 
participate in discussions of works in 
progress, with faculty and guest lecturers, 
and cultivate an awareness of contemporary 
conditions and practices in the field through 
gallery visits, readings, discussions, and guest 
lectures. 

PR 412 

Advanced Printmaking Media: Digital 

Applications 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Continued investigation into pnntmaking 
processes on an advanced level in terms of 
technical undetstanding and the development 
of imagery. Emphasis on the integration of 
idea and process and the incorporation of 
computer-generated material to be extended 
through the matk-making qualities, size 
extension, and color overlays possible through 
screenprinting, etching, relief, and lithogra- 
phy. 

Prerequisite: Introductory class in one or more 
printmaking processes: Photoshop. 



PR 420 

Thesis Workshop 

6 hours 

3 credits 

This course offers the student the opportunity 

to develop a body of work in preparation for 

portfolio and exhibition presentation. An 

emphasis is placed in the development of 

ideas and content of individual student's 

wotk, which is suppotted by a series of 

individual and group critiques by faculty and 

visiting artists. The student is expected to 

participate in group exhibitions as well as a 

solo exhibition and to present a professional 

portfolio of wotk. 

Prerequisites: PR 201. PR 204. PR 300, 

and FA 333 A. 

PR 421 

Collaborative Printmaking 

3 or 6 hours 

1.5 or 3 credits, on tutorial basis 
Involvement in the business, technology and 
experience of printing limited editions fot 
faculty, student, or professional artist by 
guiding the attist in preparation of the idea, 
then proofing and printing the edition. 
Advanced students only; demonstration of 
mark-making and editioning abilities. 

PR 425 

Book Production 

3 or 6 hours 
1.5 or 3 credits 

This advanced course of study will focus on 
the development and production of a printed 
book ot pottfolio of wotks: design and 
fotmatting of a publication including 
investigation of sequence, page design, and 
binding possibilities; hands-on experience in 
the preparation of images fot press produc- 
tion, pre-press techniques, and assisting the 
Mastet Printer in the printing. All work is 
produced in the Borowsky Center for 
Publication Arts, the University's state of the 
art offset lithography facility. Students may 
choose to collaborate on projects or work 
independently. 

Prerequisite: Recommendation from the 
participant's major department chair is required. 



MFA Book Arts/ 
Printmaking 

PR 600 A 

Colloquium: Text and Image 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

An understanding of language and verbal 
constructs enables the individual to explore 
the telationship between text and imagety. 
Emphasis is placed on the individual's 
personal vision throughout the program's 
course of study. 

PR 600 B 

Colloquium: History of the Book 

3 houts 
1.5 credits 

Hands-on study of fate books and manu- 
scripts from antiquity to the ptesent with 
discussions dealing with theit sttuctural, 
histotical, and artistic significance. The class 
meets at the Library Company of Philadelphia 
with field ttips to local special collections. 
Prerequisite: PR 600 A. 

PR 610 A 01 

Book Arts Studio: Color/Mark 

3 credits 

Provides the student with an oppottunity to 

explote a broad range of image-making 

approaches. Emphasis on mark making with 

a numbet of instruments and media, the use 

of color as a structural basis for composition, 

and the compositional and expressive use of 

letter forms. 

PR 610 A 02 4.5 credits 

PR 610 B 01/B 02 3 credits 
Book Arts Studio 

A series of studio courses exploring concep- 
tual concerns intrinsic to the cteation of a 
book. The student learns to incorporate 
calligraphic, handset ot computer-generated 
letterforms with images in unique and 
editioned books. Emphasis on proficiency in 
process and the creation of a personal visual 
language. Focus on achieving a strong 
foundation in technical and conceptual skills. 
Ftequent faculty and visiting artist critiques 
encourage and evolution in ideas and imagery. 

PR 623 A/B 

Bookbinding 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Basic book sttuctures are explored in the first 
semester with emphasis on sound conserva- 
tion techniques and good craftsmanship. In 
the second semester historic book structures 
serve as models and departure points for 
innovative bindings. 



PR 626 

Offset Lithography 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Offers the student hands-on expetience with 
offset lithography as an artist's medium. The 
primary focus is on the creation of personal 
imagery (photographic and/or hand drawn) 
lor prints and books. The course enables 
students to take advantage of state-of-the-arr 
production methods and develop skills in 
photomechanical processes, platemaking and 
color printing. 

PR 700 A/B 

Colloquium: Professional Practices 

3 houts, alternate weeks 
1.5 ctedits 

Professional practices and issues related to the 
fields of printmaking, book, and publication 
atts are explored through discussions, 
lectures, and field trips in the first semester. 
In the second semestet, the focus is on the 
completion of the individual's written thesis 
tequirements. Each thesis candidate prepares 
a resume, an artist's statement, and presents a 
slide lecture to be placed on record in the 
University Library. 
Prerequisites: PR 600 A/B. 

PR 710 A/B 

MFA Thesis Studio 

3 credits 

A continuation ot book and printmaking 
projects are combined with related visual 
concerns in preparation fot the required MFA 
Thesis Exhibition to be ptesented during the 
final semester. The MFA candidate develops 
an individual course of study and defines the 
projects in a written contract. A thesis 
committee to advise the student through the 
thesis exhibition process is chosen during the 
fall semester. The evolution of ideas and 
imagery is encouraged through ftequent 
faculty and visiting artist ctitiques. 
Prerequisites: PR 610 A/B. 

PR 723 A/B 
Bookbinding 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Continued investigation of the book 
structure at an advanced technical level. 
Individual attention to developing cteative 
solutions to support book content will start 
in the first semester. Through critiques 
and individual insttuction the final semester 
will be devoted to developing sttuctutes 
that support thesis work. 
Prerequisites: PR 623 A and PR 623 B. 



Painting/Drawing 

PT 101 

Freshman Painting 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course is primarily an introduction to 
the decisions, general methods and problems 
of painting. Students ate introduced to oil 
painting with both still life and figurative 
subject marter. Technical instiuction are 
relevant to the broad image possibilities in 
painting. Students work from setups, models 
and landscapes. 

PT124 

Freshman Drawing 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course is designed to increase rhe 
beginning student's awareness of drawing as 
an expressive pictorial form. It is meant to 
entich rather than duplicate the Foundation 
Drawing experience. Included in the coutse 
of study is an investigative perceiving and 
representing of objects and scenes, mark- 
making as a conveyor of feelings, sensations, 
and ideas, and compositional and stylistic 
sttategies that present meaning. The 
emphasis is always on the awareness of 
options for expression rathet rhan on 
prescribed systems of drawing. 

PT 202 A/B 
Sophomore Painting 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course is required of all Fine Arts 
majors. Studio work will introduce the 
student to the domain of painting through 
projects that cover not only the basic 
elements of form, color, and technique, but 
also the basic conceptual challenges unique to 
painting. Students will be exposed to the 
origins and purposes of paintings and the 
range of possibilities offered by both 
traditional and contemporary approaches. 

PT211 
Painting Studio 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

A general study of painting subjects, such as 
the still life, landscape, the city, the human 
figure and irs environs. This course usually 
will include a subtitle, such as Figure in the 
Landscape, which defines the thematic basis 
for the studio projects. 



PT213 

Anatomy and the Figure 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course gives rhe student the opportunity 
to investigate the basic visual strucrure of the 
human figute-both skeletal and muscular. 
During the second semester, the human head 
will be studied as well as basic positions of 
the figure with their context. 

PT219 
Watercolor 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

A course in which the preferred medium is 
ttansparent watercolor, the particular charac- 
teristics of which will be explored. Both 
perceptual and non-perceptual approaches 
will be introduced. 

PT225 

Figure Drawing 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This coutse is intended to teach students to 
draw the figute using both two- and three- 
dimensional methods. Students will work 
from the clothed and nude model using a 
wide variety of materials. Emphasis will be 
placed on the process of drawing, the 
development of visual perception and 
manual control rathet than on the production 
of completed drawings and modeled figures. 

PT226 

Abstract Drawing and Composition 

6 hours 

3 credits 

Studies in the diverse forms and processes of 

absttaction. Using both improvisational and 

systematic methods, drawings will explore 

compositional principles based on narure, 

chance, and geometry. 

PT227 
Figure Painting 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A studio course that develops increasing 
authority in representing figures in pictorial 
art. Through studio projecrs the student 
becomes more awate of the various issues to 
be considered in creating human figures. 
Pictorial qualities such as volume, gesture, 
weight, scale, distance, color and tone, figute- 
ground relationships and compositional 
grouping and intervals will be explored 
through numerous small works and one or 
two larger projects at the end of the semester. 
Assignments lead students to respond 
directly to models, to construct images from 
various sources, and ro investigate and 
emulate different stylistic possibilities 
through examination of master works. 



PT236 

Figure Composition 
3 hours 
1.5 credits 

A drawing course emphasizing the develop- 
ment of images using multiple figure 
arrangements. Assignments are designed to 
foster awareness of the significance of poses 
and groupings relative to formal design 
virtues, narrative and symbolism. 

PT237 

Representational Painting 
6 hours 
3 credits 

A studio course addressing ttaditional and 
contemporary concepts and styles in 
representational images. Special emphasis on 
the relationship between content and 
pictorial choice made by the student artist. 
Throughout the semester, the role of form, 
color, space, interval and gestute, and surface 
in the composition of images will be 
investigated. Paintings are generated both 
from direct observation of nature and human 
figures and from the students own resources. 
The series may focus on contemporary 
prototypes (painting since 1945) or estab- 
lished specific traditions such as American 
portraiture. Assignments are ptesented with 
supportive examples and discussed in 
individual and group critiques. 

PT238 

Abstract Painting 

6 houts 

3 credits 

The genesis of abstraction can be nature, 

idea, emotion. An abstract painting is one in 

which the pictorial form is primarily a 

product of invention and imagination. It 

may or may not reflect a reality outside itself 

Assignments investigate a range of concepts. 

sources, and procedures. 

PT240 

Materials and Techniques 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course concerns itself with the materials 
and processes used in making pictorial works 
of art. Information on the appropriate use of 
materials, such as pigments and painting 
supports, is given and explored by the 
students. This coutse delves into materials 
and processes to cteate aesthetically signifi- 
cant surfaces. 



PT241 
Color Studies 

3 hours 

1.5 credits 

Studio work and independent projects will 

consider the purposes and effects of color 

organization, color perception, and color 

theory. Color will be approached as emotive, 

symbolic, descriptive, and structural. 

PT245 

Figure Drawing and Modeling 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course is based on the concept that 
drawing and modeling are mutually 
supportive. Students draw from the model 
using a variety of materials and approaches. 
They model in clay. Emphasis is placed on 
the exploration of intentions and concepts, 
and the development of visual perception. 

PT269 

Collage: The Constructed Image 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Studio projects are assigned which promote 
the development of images through the 
aggregation of fragments. Collage as a 
principle of construction reexamines 
compositional notions of unity and harmony 
and can involve the interaction of diverse 
and incongruous materials, methods, styles 
and/or images. 

PT 302 A/B 
Junior Painting 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Studio activity that develops a professional 
working routine in the student, who is 
encouraged to show increasing personal 
initiative and direction. Regular critiques on 
both an individual and group basis will 
connect the student to the values of the past 
and the present, stimulate interest in the 
major questions of our time, and provide 
resources for progress. Visiting artists will be 
invited to participate through lectures and 
studio critiques. 



PT 402 A 
Senior Painting 

6 houts 
3 credits 

This course promotes the individual's 
development of identity as a painter. It 
simulates the studio based circumstance that 
the painter is likely to maintain as a 
professional artist. The painter is the 
architect of the place where he or she will 
initiate short or long term projects as needed. 
Within this context, the senior painting 
major consolidates and develops issues that 
have emerged from coursework and study of 
prior and contemporary art. 

One-on-one weekly critiques from faculty, 
monthly senior group critique, and periodic 
critiques from visiting artists insure the 
student diverse response to recently devel- 
oped work. The senior painting faculty may 
assign specific projects if the student's 
initiative requires broadening or focus. 
Prerequisites: PT 302 A/B. and FA 333 A/B. 

PT 402 B 

Senior Painting 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Continuing on the structure of PT 402 A, 
the painting major formulates a senior thesis 
project. Wotking with senior faculty who 
read and critique early drafts, the student 
develops a formal, written thesis, and a body 
of artwork that will be presented at the end 
of the term in a senior thesis panel and 
exhibition. This panel is comprised of studio 
faculty, liberal arts faculty, and student peers. 

PT403 
Drawing III 

6 hours 
3 credits 

The course centers on the student's personal 
interpretation of the human figure. Various 
conceptual and perceptual modes are offered 
for exploration and understanding according 
to the student's needs. The student is 
expected to formulate, develop and seek 
authority in a particular mode or modes 
relevant to him/her. The pictorial concerns 
under general scrutiny are: the figure and its 
environment; interval and gesture, the 
various approaches and possibilities in color 
and surface. 
Prerequisites: FA 222 A/B. 



MFA in Painting 

The following courses are open to students in the 
summer MFA program only. Each major summer 
studio concludes with an assessment of and 
planning for the work to be completed as two 
independent studios during the remainder of the 
academic year. A winter review weekend will be 
scheduled to assess progress of the fall independent 
studio work. 

PT610 
Major Studio I 

5 credits 

Evaluation of the student's artistic involve- 
ment, projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the student's graduate work. 

PT611 

Major Studio II 

5 credits 

Further exploration of the options, with 

increased awareness ot theoretical issues and 

personal vision. 

PT710 

Major Studio III 

5 credits 

Greater focus in the student's work, with a 

view to completing the personal repertoire of 

skills and expression in the medium needed 

to undertake a thesis project. 

PT711 

Major Studio IV 

5 credits 

Planning and initiation of a sustained body of 
mature work to be presented in a thesis 
exhibition during the following summer. 



173 



Sculpture 



SC101 

Freshman Sculpture 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course is an introduction to sculptural 
thinking and methods using a variety of 
materials and processes, including modeling 
and fabrication. Form-making options are 
undertaken that are especially suited to 
acquaint beginning students with the 
diversity of sculptural activity. 

SC201 
SC202 
Sculpture I 

6 hours 

3 credits 

This introductory coutse emphasizes the 

fundamental and formal aspects of sculpture. 

Projects are assigned to help the student 

experience and understand the unique 

exptessive values of mass, space, plane, line, 

texture, along with such visual phenomena as 

balance, rhythm, scale, movement, and 

transformation. This course also serves to 

introduce the student to a variety of materials 

and techniques. Assigned projects, group 

critiques and slide lectures are a standard part 

of this course. 

One semester required of all Fine Arts majors 

(SC 201 or SC 202), 

Both semesters required of all Sculpture majors. 

SC 220 A/B 
Molding and Casting 
3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course sequence covers processes and 
techniques utilizing plaster, rubber, plastics, 
clays, and wax for making hard and flexible 
molds and for casting sculpture in durable 
materials. It also provides a thorough 
foundation in foundry practices, including 
wax preparation, investing, pouting bronze or 
aluminum, chasing, finishing, and patinating 
finished metal casts. 



SC241 

SC242 

Introduction to Sculpture Projects 

6 hours 
3 credits 

An open studio oriented toward helping the 
development of individual initiative. How 
ideas ate transformed into sculptural 
statements through aesthetic reasoning and 
the internal logic of a sculpture's color, 
material, and physical construction. 

SC 260 A/B 

Structure of the Figure 

6 hours 
3 credits 

An anatomic and morphological analysis of 
male and female bodies for artists through a 
three-dimensional constructional method. 
Covered are proportions, anatomic structure, 
surface topology, motphological variation, 
and the body in movement. This course is 
directed toward two-dimensional artists as 
well as sculptors, and what is stressed are the 
means by which the body's salient features 
can be recognized from any viewpoint in any 
pose. 

SC321 
Carving 
3 hours 
1.5 credits 

This course introduces the student to stone 
carving, one of the basic methods of forming 
sculpture. Students learn to prepare, 
maintain, and use the tools of the carver. 
They are introduced to the chatacteristics of 
suitable carving materials. Emphasis on the 
exploration of the formal and expressive 
potential of carved stone. 

SC401 
SC402 
Sculpture III 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Terms like site-specific, monumental, genre, 
narrative, emblematic, environmental, etc., 
reflect the cluster of types of sculptutal 
imagery. This studio course is concerned 
with the ideational and technical issues raised 
by various types of sculptural imagery which 
are assigned in turn. What is stressed in each 
case is the relationship that sculptures have 
with the context they exist in and the purpose 
they serve. 
Prerequisite: SC 202. 
Required of all Sculpture majors. 



SC421 
Metals 

3 hours 
1.5 credits 

Forming metal has contributed much to the 
history of sculpture, particularly in the 
present, where the idiom has become as 
familiar as carving and modeling. Concur- 
rently offering both basic and advanced 
technical instruction in welding and forging, 
using both fetrous and non-ferrous metals, 
this course is concerned with both the 
technical and aesthetic aspects of metal 
sculpture. 

SC431 

SC432 

Advanced Figure Modeling 

6 hours 
3 credits 

For students setiously involved with the 
figure, this course provides an atehet to 
continue figute modeling on increasingly 
advanced levels, and a context to help 
formulate a personal figurative sculptural 
idiom. Works are sculpted at vatious scales 
and independent projects are undertaken in 
consultation with the faculty. Cfitiques 
involving the meaning and sculptural 
significance of the works are an integral part 
of the ongoing class activity. 
Prerequisites: SC 223. SC 231. and SC 232. or 
by permission. 

SC433 

Projects in Figure Modeling 

6 houts 
3 credits 

SC441 
SC442 
Advanced Projects 

6 hours 

3 credits 

This coutse provides a studio context where 

matuting, self-initiated ateas of concentration 

in sculpture can be developed to fruition on 

an advanced level. Whatever the ditection, a 

critical emphasis is placed through both open 

and devised assignments on how materials 

and forms compatible to personal statements 

are found. 

Prerequisites: SC 241 and SC 242. 



174 



MFA in Sculpture 

The following courses are open to students in the 
summer MFA program only. Each major summer 
studio concludes with an assessment of and 
planning for the work to be completed as two 
independent studios during the remainder of the 
academic year. A winter review weekend will be 
scheduled to assess progress of the fall independent 
studio work. 

SC610 
Major Studio I 

5 credits 

Evaluation of the student's artistic involve- 
ment, projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the student's graduate work. 

SC611 

Major Studio II 

5 credits 

Further exploration ot the options, with 
incteased awareness of theoretical issues and 
personal vision. 

SC710 

Major Studio III 

5 credits 

Greater focus in the student's work, with a 
view to completing the personal repertoire of 
skills and expression in the medium needed 
to undertake a thesis project. 

SC711 

Major Studio IV 

5 credits 

Planning and initiation of a sustained body of 
mature work to be presented in a thesis 
exhibition during the following summer. 



Theater Arts 



TH 100 A/B 

Acting for Non-Majors 

1.5 hours 

1 credit 

This course introduces the non-actor to 
improvisation, character development, and 
the basic idea of action and objective in 
performance. The first four weeks acclimate 
the new actor to being expressive in a group 
using body and voice through improvisation, 
theater games, movement; breathing and 
relaxation techniques are also taught. The 
student is introduced to script analysis, write 
and develop monologues, and create dramatic 
characters for performance. Grading is based 
on class participation and progress with the 
work on monologues. 

TH 103 A/B 
Acting Studio I-II 
6 hours 
3 credits 

An introductory studio focusing on the 
fundamentals of acting, basic skills for stage 
communication, voice and movement 
exercises, centering techniques, and exercises 
designed to increase physical and emotional 
stamina, identify and strengthen poor 
technique, develop focus and concentration, 
and to introduce the student to the demands 
of the theater. In the process of demystifying 
the craft, the student discovers the energy, 
power, and vulnerability of self. 

TH 103 L 
Crew 

2 hours 
O credits 

TH 105 A/B 
Stage Combat I-II 

3 hours 

2 credits 

This introductory course teaches the 
integration of safety and acting with the 
techniques of unarmed combat and knife- 
fighting. 

TH 109 A/B 

Speech for Actors I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

General American pronunciation is intro- 
duced. Alexander Techniques are incorpo- 
rated to assist with relaxation, breathing, 
resonance, articulation and text work. 
Physical and vocal warm-ups are an integral 
part of each class. Shakespearean verse is 
introduced in the second semester. 



TH 114 

Mask Characterization 

3 hours 
1 credit 

Introductory course in character development 
focuses on a process designed to release and 
open the student's emotional and physical 
range, stimulate the imagination, place great 
emphasis on physical actions, acting with the 
whole body, and ridding the student of self- 
conscious mannerisms. Through the use of 
oversized masks (and a series of challenging 
exercises), the student is allowed the freedom 
to become someone else. The work aims to 
integrate the student's skills with his/her 
instincts, allowing impulses and the 
imagination to flow in conjunction with a 
flexible and vulnerable body. The wotk 
culminates with the presentation of a fully 
realized character; a synthesis of the entire 
semester's work. 

TH 115 A/B 

Movement for Actors I-II 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

Introduces basic movement vocabulary in 
modern dance using, primarily, basic 
improvisational technique. The coutse is 
designed to provide the student with 
awareness of his/her body and the basic skills 
of movement and dance, such as stretching, 
breathing, posture, coordination, balancing, 
etc. The course also allows student the 
experience of creative application of move- 
ment and movement expression through 
various forms and structures of improvisation. 
Each semestet concludes with a presentation 
of a creative project which emphasizes 
movement in conjunction with other 
theatrical forms. 

TH 1 16 A/B 

Dance for Actors I-II 

1.5 hours 
1 credit 

A foundation course for actors which uses 
basic Vaganova ballet technique to develop 
alignment, flexibility, cootdination and 
discipline, and introduces the actor to the 
movement vocabulary of this tradition. 
Development of body awareness with 
attention toward the vertically, two 
dimensionality, control and restraint of ballet. 
Performance projects at the end of semester. 



175 



TH 119 A/B 

TH219A/B 

TH 319 A/B 

TH 419 A/B 

Business of the Arts 

1 hour 

1 credit 

Exploration of the business and legal aspects 

of theater and the actor's career: the roles of 

agents, managers, producers, and managing 

directors are explored. Guest lecturers from 

the field conduct seminars on various topics 

such as unions, contracrs, and starting theater 

companies. 

TH 122 A/B 
Music Skills I-II 

3 hours class 

1 hour lab 

2 credits 

Skill training in sight reading, ear training, 
keyboard and music theory, orienred to the 
needs of the musical theater performer. First 
year focuses on rudiments of notation, 
pitches, intervals, rhythms and simple chords. 
Students learn to read from "lead sheet" 
notation. Examples are drawn from musical 
theater and classical repertoire. In-class 
exercises and drills are supplemented with 
computer-based instruction and keyboard lab. 
Required of all musical theater students. 

TH 140 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater I-II 

1.5 hours class 

0.5 hour lesson 

2 credits 

Vocal Technique training for musical theater 
students. Individual coaching sessions are 
combined with group sessions in which 
students rehearse and perform solo and 
ensemble musical theater repertoire. Each 
student will develop a working understand- 
ing of vocal anatomy, breathing, support, 
placement, tesonance and diction and a 
regimen for out-of-class practice. Students 
work with cassettes outside of class. 
Required for all musical theater students. 

TH 150 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater I-II 

3 hours 

1 credits 

Dance technique training oriented to the 
specific needs of the musical theater per- 
former. Classes in jazz and ballet build 
strengrh and awareness and extend the 
student dancer's physical and expressive range. 
Required of all musical theater majors. 



TH 203 A/B 
Acting Studio III-IV 

6 hours 
3 credits 

This course continues the work started in 
TH 103. Sensory/emotional wotk and their 
relation to characterization is further 
explored, leading to an in-depth study of 
motivation and subtext. Sensory, emotional 
and adaptation exercises, as well as improvisa- 
tion and two-character scenes are used to 
deepen the actor's ability to execute honest 
and purposeful stage action and communica- 
tion. With the aid of method and othet 
techniques, emphasis is placed on the "truth 
of the movement.'' Both performance and 
personal journals are maintained on a 
continuing basis, and outside rehearsals on 
scenes are expected. All scene work is 
directed by the instructor, using individual- 
ized hands-on approach. 

TH205 

Stage Combat III 

3 hours 

2 credits 

This intermediate course teaches the 
integration of safety and acting with the 
techniques of Broadsword and rapier-and- 
dagger. This course continues the work 
started in TH 105 A/B. 

TH 205 B 
Stage Combat IV 

3 hours 
2 credits 

This course specifically prepares the student 
for the certification test of the American 
Society of Fight Directors. Fights are 
choreographed and perfected using sevetal 
weapons and unarmed techniques in a 
ctedible, clear, and exciting stage fight in the 
context of a theatrical scene using dialog. 
Students admitted by invitation. 
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "B" 
in TH 205 A. 



TH 209 A/B 

Speech for Actors III-IV 

3 hours 

2 credits 

Through the course of the year each student is 
expected to achieve a high degree of 
proficiency in General American pronuncia- 
tion. Resonance, placement and range are 
developed, supported by the Alexander 
Technique and using Shakespearean and other 
text. The first semester is spent restrengthen- 
ing muscles, correcting pronunciation and 
placement, and redeveloping range. Strict 
attention is paid to Standard English 
pronunciation. The student is also drilled in, 
and expected to be proficient in General 
American pronunciation both Polished and 
Common. The second semester continues the 
work of the first and begins the study of vocal 
interpretation from scripted material, both 
poetry and prose. Using unfamiliar texts, the 
actor is asked to interpret vocal character and 
develop vocal emotional line. The final step 
in the process is to train the actor to add the 
physical chatacter without undermining vocal 
placement or creative strain. 

TH213 
Script Analysis 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Introduces the student to practical analysis of 
texts/scripts fot enhancing the move from 
script to performance. The course explores 
rhe concepts of conflict, human action, 
character, action/teaction cycle, objective, 
dramatic structure, translations, and resources 
external ro rhe script (historical perspective). 
At the course's end, the student should 
possess a firm understanding of the process 
involved in script analysis, be thoroughly 
familiar with the composite types ot dramatic 
litetature, begin to understand the nature ot 
an informed aesthetic, and understand the 
consequences ot each element of a perfor- 
mance on its audience. 

TH 215 A/B 

Movement for Actors III-IV 

3 hours 
2 credits 

Movement tot actors utilizing intensive 
physical-emotional improvisation work, 
including exercises in calisthenics, aerobics, 
rhythmic movement, combinations, center 
floor work, stretches, and the use ot physical 
impulse to expand emotional range. 



176 



TH 222 A/B 
Music Skills III-IV 

3 hours class 

1 hour lab 
3 credits 

Continued skill training in sight reading, ear 
training, keyboard and music theory, oriented 
to the needs of the musical theater performer. 
Examples are drawn from a wide range of 
musical repertoire. In-class exercises and 
drills are supplemented with computer-based 
instruction. 
Required of all musical theater students. 

TH 240 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater III-IV 

1 . 5 hours class 
0.5 hour lesson 

2 credits 

Individualized coaching sessions are used to 
solve individual vocal problems and continue 
development of the student's unique 
instrument. Students also meet weekly in 
group sessions to rehearse and present solo 
and ensemble musical theater repertoire. 
Listening assignments introduce students to 
the artistry of significant musical theatet 
performers, past and present. 
Prerequisite: Voice for Musical Theater l-ll. 
Required of all musical theater students. 

TH 250 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater III-IV 

4.5 hours 

2 credits 

A continuation of the previous year's dance 
training. Technique training in jazz, tap, 
ballet, social dancing, and related subjects is 
continued, with focus on the technical needs 
of the musical theater performer. 
Prerequisite: Dance for Musical Theater l-ll. 
Required of all musical theater majors. 

TH 303 A/B 
Acting Studio V-VI 
6 hours 

3 credits 

The overall emphasis of the course is on 
theatrical styles of acting. Shakespeare, 
melodrama, and clown work among others 
are usitlized to develop the student's ability 
to relate to an audience in extremely 
theatrical styles. 



TH 309 A/B 

Speech for Actors V-VI 

3 hours 
3 credits 

The purpose of this course is to give the 
student a thorough and practical understand- 
ing of the voice and how it works as applied 
to acting. Starting with physical awareness, 
the aim is, through techniques of self- 
sensing, to uncover and dismantle tensions 
which prohibit primary impulses. As the 
main element in the function of support, 
much emphasis is placed on spinal alignment 
and lengthening of the vertebral structure so 
the breathing is able to operate with more 
efficiency and economy. The goal is to undo 
blocks so that each area-jaw, tongue, soft 
palate-are systematically examined and 
specific exercises are done which are designed 
to create a full awareness and understanding 
of how these muscles function. 

TH 311 A/B 
Theater History I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A two-semester survey of the history of 
theater: its dramatic literature, theater 
structutes and production methods, styles of 
acting, and historical trends, through 
readings, discussions, and lectures. The 
course will explore the history of theater 
through its artistic, spiritual, political and 
cultural sources of empowerment. Students 
are provided with the historical background 
to apply acting, directing, and designing 
techniques to the theater of other periods of 
history. 

TH 312 A/B 

Musical Theater History I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A two-semester survey of the history of the 
American musical theater in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Students develop 
insight into the writers, performers and 
theater artists who created the legacy of the 
musical theater in America, and examine 
representative works from a variety of 
periods. Students undertake research projects 
focusing on major performers, writers, 
directors and choreographers. Artists and 
their work are studied in print and on audio 
and video recordings. 

Corequisite for Musical Theater majors: TH 318 
Musical Theater Repertory. 



TH 315 A/B 

Movement for Actors V-VI 

3 hours 
2 credits 

A course sequence designed to aid the 
student in developing ease and flexibility of 
movement through increased awareness of 
habitual movement patterns. The student is 
guided through the process of substituting 
useful movement patterns for those that 
interfere with comfort and freedom of 
expression. A vocabulary and a consistent 
technique is developed which the student can 
apply to stage movement, vocal work, 
dance, etc., and a greater kinesthetic sense 
enhances expressive movement and relaxed, 
controlled speech. 

TH 318 A/B 

Musical Theater Repertory 

5 hours 

2 credits 

Scenes, songs, and dances are drawn from the 
diverse musical theater repertory, enabling 
the student to develop versatility and a sense 
of style. 

Prerequisite: Dance for Musical Theater 111 -IV. 
Required of all musical theater majors. 

TH320 

Musical Theater Performance 

3 hours 

2 credits 

An elective course for actors, singers and 
dancers in which students can explore the 
craft of the singing actor through exercises, 
improvisations and repertoire study. Students 
will learn and rehearse solos, scenes and 
ensembles from the musical theater reper- 
toire. Emphasis is on developing honesty, 
ease and expressiveness in musical theater 
performance. 

Prerequisite: One year of voice training, one year 
of acting training. 

TH325 

The Art of Oral Interpretation 

3 hours 
2 credits 

The course examines the elements of form 
and structure in various kinds of literature, 
and appies that analysis to the craft of the 
performance. Studies begin with fairy tales, 
investigate modern and contemporary 
retellings of fairy tales, and continue with 
modern and contemporary short stories. The 
techniques of oral interpretation-different 
than those used in a studio acting class-focus 
on the meaning of literature via suggestive 
vocal dexterity and subtlety of revelation, 
rather than explicit action. Students are 
required to write papers analyzing the 
literature they choose to perform. The course 
will close with a class performance. 

177 



TH 340 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater V-VI 

1.5 hours class 
0.5 hour lesson 

2 credits 

A continuation of the musical theatet vocal 
training sequence. Students work on more 
demanding and diverse literature in 
individual and group sessions. Students ate 
coached on vocal skills pertinent to repertoire 
being represented in productions. 
Prerequisite: Voice for Musical Theater 111 -IV. 
Required of all musical theater students. 

TH 350 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater V-VI 

3 hours 
1 credit 

Continued study of ballet and jazz technique 
and musical theater styles. 
Prerequisite: Musical Theater Dance IV. 
Required of all musical theater majors. 

TH 400 A/B 
Acting For Film I-II 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Designed for acting students who want to 
gain knowledge and experience in acting for 
film and television. The primary goal of the 
class is to bring out each actor's natural talent 
which is often the most "marketable" in the 
film and television industry. Each actor 
works on a monologue or scene chosen in 
consultation with the instructot to make his/ 
her work in front of a camera compelling, 
secure, and believable. Special video sessions 
will take place throughout the course to give 
each participant a valuable, hands-on 
experience in acting for rhe camera. The 
actots are able to see and evaluate each other's 
film work during a special screening session 
at the end of the course. Special benefit: the 
actors use excerpts from their monologue/ 
scene for a "video audition" commonly 
required by today's casting directors, actor's 
agents, and film/TV directors. 



TH 403 A/B 

Acting Studio VII-VIII 

6 hours 
3 credits 

The senior acting student will be prepared 
for his/her entry into the theatet profession 
through a research and practicum approach 
to interview and audition techniques. 
Research into the type of theater companies 
available, theatet and casting agents, 
showcase opportunities, useful sources for 
jobs, of theater companies available, rheater 
and casting agents, showcase oppottunities, 
a survey of Actor's Equity Association, 
and current trade papers are included, as 
well as an actual experience of interviewing 
and auditioning for a play direcror or 
casting agent with valuable critique 
following. Emphasis in the first semester is 
placed on the seniot actor's one-person 
performance projects. 

TH 405 A/B 

Stage Combat VII-VIII 

2 hours 

2 credits 

Direction in stage fighting with a wide 
variety of weapons. 

TH 409 A/B 

Speech for Actors VII-VIII 

3 hours 
3 credits 

Emphasis is on dialects. Standard English, 
regional and national accents, using Standard 
English as a base, is the focus in the first 
semester. During the year, individual vocal 
and speech problems are addressed through 
class clinics and tutorials. 

TH 415 A/B 

Movement for Actors VII-VIII 

3 hours 

2 credits 

Continuation of TH 315 A/B. 



TH417 
Directing Studio 

3 hours 
3 credirs 

An introduction to the basic fundamenrals of 
directing including a thorough investigation 
of the ditecting vocabulary, exercises in space 
and composition, exploration of scripts from 
the director's point of view, and practical 
experience with ground plans. The student is 
asked to demonstrate his/her understanding 
of blocking values and textual analysis by 
conceptualizing and then staging simple 
scenes. The second semester introduces the 
basics of acting coaching and is coordinated 
with the script analysis and dramatic 
criticism. Semester culminates with student 
staging and coaching a medium-length scene 
from a modern play. 

TH 440 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater VII-VIII 

1.5 hours class 
0.5 hour lesson 

2 credirs 

Emphasis in the senior year is on preparation 

ol audition songs and professional 

outplacemenr. 

Prerequisite: Voice for Musical Theater VI. 

Required of all Musical Theater majors. 

TH 450 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater VII-VIII 

3 hours 
1 credit 

Continued study of ballet and jazz technique 
and musical theater styles. 
Prerequisite: Dance for Musical Theater VI. 
Required of all Musical Theater majors. 

TH449 
Internship 

3.0-15.0 credits 

TH999 
Independent Study 



Writing for Media 
and Performance 



WM 111, 112 

Traditions of Narrative I, II 

4 hours 

3 credits 

A two-semester studio writing class 
examining different genres of narrative prose 
adapted in writing for media. Literary works 
read and analyzed include, "coming of age," 
satire, magical realism, anti-hero and hero 
fiction. Students are required to write 
extensively in class, as well as out of class, 
adapting the narrative and literary character- 
istics of the works discussed. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and 
review of a portfolio of written work. 

WM211,212 
Structure of Drama I, II 

4 hours 

3 credits 

A two-semester studio writing class 
concentrating on various forms of dramatic 
writing, including plays, screenplays and 
teleplays. Extensive writing and reading is 
accompanied by discussion and critical 
analysis of the assignments, supplemented by 
video examples of the dramatic works. 
Students are required to adapt the dramatic 
principles discussed in class in 
their writing. 

Prerequisite: HU 1 10 AIB and Permission 
of the instructor and review of a portfolio of 
written work. 

WM213 
Scriptwriting 

4 hours 
3 credits 

A studio writing class designed for advanced 
students in writing for film and television. 
Students focus on three-act narrative 
structure in film, as well as various formats 
for television writing. Scene and sequence 
structure are highlighted. Students are 
required to write in-class dramatic exercises, 
as well as written assignments outside of 
class. Workshops occur in class, along with 
supplemental readings and film highlights. 
Students are required to produce an outline/ 
Treatment and a fully developed short script. 
Prerequisite: HU 110 AIB and WM 111. 112: 
or WM 219: or permission of the instructor based 
on a review of a portfolio of written work. 



WM219 
Writing for Film 

4 hours 
3 credirs 

A studio writing class introducing students 
to the basic elements of screenwriring for 
film. Students are required to write dramatic 
exercises in class, as well as outside of class. 
Supplemental readings are discussed and film 
highlights shown to assist the students in 
their writing. 
Prerequisites: HU 110 AIB. 

WM241 

Arts of the Media 

3 hours 

3 credits 

A course designed to introduce students to 

the various production values which directly 

influence the character of the dramatic 

product. Subjects of study include music, 

cinematography, art and production design, 

editing, sound, costume design 

and special/ computer effects as they relate 

to the writer's intention and the quality of 

the final product. 

Open to all students. 

WM 251, 252 
Narrative Cinema I, II 
6 hours 
3 credits 

A two-semester course examining and 
analyzing film through the perspective of 
narrative structure. Various forms, schools of 
film, styles, and genres from both the 
domestic and international film community 
are studied chronologically, emphasizing the 
influence and integration of the various forms 
with one another. 

The course requires supplemental weekly 
screenings of the work being studied. 
Students who have successfully completed 
HU 248 AIB are not eligible to enroll for credit 
in this course. 
Open to all students. 

WM253 

History of Television 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A survey course designed to provide an 
overview of the medium of television. The 
impact of television, since its inception, has 
become increasingly pervasive and influenced 
an entire society through its ability to 
educate and entertain. Video examples of the 
medium are supplemented by class discussion 
and teading assignments. Two term papers, a 
midtetm and final exam are required. 
Open to all students. 



WM315 

Adaptation for Media/Fiction 

4 hours 

3 credits 

A studio writing course developing the craft 
of adaptation, focusing on the use of fictional 
matetial as the source for the dramatic form. 
The various genres of fictional material, 
including novels, short stories, plays, and 
musicals are examined and students learn to 
handle the conceptual and technical 
challenges inherent in the process of altering 
written text for the mediums of television, 
film, and interactive software. 
Prerequisite: HU 110 AIB or permission 
of the instructor based on a review of a portfolio 
of written work. 

WM316 

Adaptation for Media/Non-Fiction 

4 hours 

3 credits 

A studio writing course developing the craft 
of adapting nonfictional sources to the 
dramatic and documentary form. Various 
genres of nonfictional material, including, 
but not exclusive to, newspapers, periodicals, 
autobiographies, biographies, memoirs, 
letters, diaries, and historical texts are 
examined. Students learn to manage the 
conceptual and technical challenges inherent 
in the adaptation of nonhction fot television, 
film and interactive media. 
Prerequisite: HU 1 10 AIB and permission 
of the instructor based on review of a portfolio of 
written work or WM 111. 112. 

WM 321, 322 

Advanced Screenwriting I, II 

4 hours 
3 credits 

A studio writing course preparing the student 
for the entire process of crafting a full length 
script for Television, film or theater. In the 
first semester, students develop a concept, 
pitch the project, prepare an ourline/ 
treatment for a full lengrh work and draft the 
first act. The second semester is devoted to 
the completion of the full-length work and 
the revision process. 
Prerequisites: WM 213 or permission of 
the instructor. 



179 



WM 323, 324 

Advanced Playwriting I, II 

4 hours 
3 credits 

A studio course preparing students to write 
a full-length play. The first semester focuses 
on development of a theme and preparation of 
a draft of the first act. The second semestet is 
devoted to the completion and refinement of 
the piece, resulting in a full-length work. 
Prerequisites: WM 213 or permission of 
the instructor. 

WM331 

Issues in Mass Media 

3 hours 
3 credits 

A course examining topical issues directly 
related to the impact of television and film on 
race, gender, and class issues, patterns of 
consumption, privacy, and the ethical use of 
technology. The impact of the media on 
society is addressed as they directly and 
indirectly affect our culture on a variety of 
levels. Individual reactions to the media is 
explored with special attention paid to how 
we view ourselves and others as a result of 
what we see, hear and read. 
Prerequisites: HU 103 A/B, HU 110 MB. 

WM341 

Acting/Directing for Writers 

6 hours 

3 credits 

A studio course addressing the collaborative 
aspect of dramatic production involving 
writets, actors and directors. Students ate 
introduced to ditecting and acting, using 
theit own dramatic texts as the source 
material. All students should have polished 
dramatic scenes already written prior to the 
beginning of the course. 
Prerequisite: WM 213 or WM 219. 

WM 411, 412 
Senior Thesis I, II 

4 hours 
3 credits 

A studio writing course cenrering on the final 
writing project in the program and the 
development of the student's portfolio of 
written wotk. Ovet the yeat, the student 
develops an outline/treatment and the 
completion of a full length work in the area 
of concentration in writing for media. 
Prerequisite: WM 321, 322 or MM 310, 311. 



WM421 

Business of the Writer 

3 hours 

3 credits 

A course providing the practical knowledge 

specific to the world of professional writing in 

media. Subjects include professional business 

practices, the selection and importance of a 

litetary agent, resume writing, the "art of the 

pitch," the differences between working as a 

free-lance writer and life as a staff writer, and 

the respective issues facing wtiters in the 

various fields of media. Visiting professionals 

from the field of writing conduct seminars 

and discussions, lending their expertise to the 

course. 

Prerequisites: MM 311 or WM 322 or WM 324. 

WM431 
Interarts Project 

6 hours 
3 credits 

A course providing an opportunity for writers 
and students throughout the University to 
collaborate on a semester-long project. 
Students jointly submit project proposals for 
approval and develop rhem to completion. 
Emphasis will be placed on the students' 
ability to consider the artistic and technical 
implications of the combined media while 
successfully integrating art fotms in a 
considered and polished final piece. 
Open to all students with permission of 
the instructor. 

WM499 
Internship 

6 hours 
3 credits 

Seniors are placed with regional companies to 
expose them to a real work environment in 
the field of media. Placements vary and can 
include local network-affiliated television 
stations, public broadcasting stations, film- 
production companies or multimedia 
manufacturers. A paper or journal chroni- 
cling the experience is required upon 
completion of the internship. 
Corerequisite: WM421. Open to seniors only. 



The University of the Arts 



Administration 

Peter Solmssen, AB, JD 
Virginia Red, BA, MA, MMus 
Stephen Jay, BM, MM 
Stephen Tarantal, BFA, MFA 
Robert Ackerman, BA, MA, PhD 
Patricia M. Woldar, BA, MPA 
Laura J. Zarrow, BFA, MSEd 
Barbara Elliott, BA 
Anita Reece, BS 
Aquila W. Galgon, BA 
John Klinzing, BS, MA, EdD 
Stephen Bloom, MA, MSLS 
John Trojan, BS, MBA, CPA 
Stephanie C. Chiappardi, BS, MBA 



President 

Provost 

Dean, Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 

Dean, Philadelphia College of Art and Design 

Director, Division of Liberal Arts 

Associate Provost for Student Affairs 

Assistant Provost for Academic Affairs 

Director of Admission 

Registrar 

Director of Financial Aid 

Dean of Students 

Director of University Libraries 

Chief Financial and Administrative Officer 

Director of Development and External Affairs 



Board of Trustees 

Dorrance H. Hamilton, Chairman 

Peter Solmssen, President 

I. Gary Bard 

George A. Beach 

Mary Louise Beitzel 

Irvin J. Borowsky 

Ira Brind 

Eleanor Davis 

Anne F. Elder 

Jane Scaccetti Fumo 

John C. Goodchild, Jr. 

Charles B. Grace, Jr. 

Marvin D. Heaps 

Barbara A. Hillier 

Stephen R. Holstad 

Judith Jamison 

Barbara J. Kaplan 

The Honorable Bruce W. Kauffman 

Harold E. Kohn, Esq. 

Berton E. Korman 

William G. Krebs 

Al Paul Lefton, Jr. 

Elaine Levitt 

Jeff Lotman 

Seymour G. Mandell 

Noel Mayo 

Francis J. Mirabello, Esq. 

Ronald J. Naples 

Adolf A. Paier 

Suzanne F. Roberts 

Stephen B. Rossi 

Jerry J. Siano 

Harriet G. Weiss 

George A. Weymouth 

Albert E. Wolf 

Life Trustees 

H. Ober Hess, Esq. 

Sam S. McKeel 

Emeritus Trustees 

Nathaniel R. Bowditch 
Schuyler G. Chapin 
Bodine Lamont 
Thomas V. Lefevre 
Sondra Myers 
Ronald K. Porter 
William L. Rafsky 
Roger L. Stevens 
Philip H. Ward, III 
Dorothy Shipley White 

Ex Officio Trustees 

The Honorable Augusta A. Clark 
Joan L. Specter 

Faculty Representative 

Professor Larry Mitnick 



Index 



Absence 28 

Leave of 26 

See also - Attendance 
Academic Achievement Program 10, 30 
Academic Advising 23 

PCAD 52 
Academic Calendar 4 
Academic Computing 40 
Academic Grievance Procedure 27 
Academic Honesty/Integrity 32 
Academic Regulations 23 
Academic Review 26 
Academic Support Services 30 
Academic Warning 10, 26 
Access to Student Records 34 
Accreditation 7 
Acting curriculum 108, 111 

Course descriptions 175 

See also - School of Theater Arts 
Activities, Student 29 
Address, Change of 27 
Administration 182 
Admission 8 

Advanced Placement 1 1 

Advanced Standing 9 

Application Process 8 

Audition, Credit by 1 1 

Conditional Admission 10 

Crafts Studio Post-Baccalaureate 
Certificate 13 

Credit by Audition or Portfolio 1 1 

Deferred Admission 10 

Early Admission 10 

Freshman Applicants 8 

Graduate Programs 13 

Housing Deposits 10 

International Baccalaureate 1 1 

International Students 12 

Interview 8 

Portfolio, Credit by 1 1 

Post-Baccalaureate Programs 13 

Readmission 26 

Residency Requirements 9 

Teacher Certification Program 13 

Transfer Applicants/Application 9, 13 

Transfer of Credit 9, 13 

Tuition Deposit 10 

Undergraduate 8 



Advanced Computing and Simulation 

Laboratory 5 1 
Advanced Placement 1 1 
Advanced Standing 9 
Advising, Academic 23 

PCAD 52 

School of Music 99 

School of Theater Arts 109 
AICAD 55 

Alcohol and Drug Policy 32 
Allegheny University of Health Services, 74 
Alumni Discount 15 
Animation curriculum 70 

Course descriptions 166 
Animation Drawing Minor 53 
Application Notification 10 
Application Process 8 
Art Education curriculum 72 

Course descriptions 122 

Pre-Certification in 72 
Art Education, MA curriculum 81 

Course descriptions 122, 140 

Extended Degree Option 85 
Art Therapy curriculum 74 

Course descriptions 124 
Arts History 

Course descriptions 141 
Association of Independent Colleges of Art 

and Design (AICAD) 55 
Attendance 28 

School of Music 99 

School of Theater Arts 109 
Auditing a Course 24 
Audition, Credit by 11 
Audition, Graduate 13 
AUHS 74 
Automobiles 31 



B 

Ballet curriculum 91, 93 

See also - School of Dance 
Board of Trustees 182 
Book Arts Minor 53 
Book Arts/Printmaking curriculum 62 

Course descriptions 169 

MFA curriculum 75, 76 
Borowsky Center for Publication Arts 51 



Calendar, Academic 4 

Campus Expression 33 

Campus Security 31 

Campus Standards Committee : 

Career Services 31 

CEEB Advanced Placement 1 1 



Ceramics, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 

MFA Summer Program 86 

Course descriptions 129, 136, 140 
Certificate in Dance 91, 94 
Certificate in Music 97 
Certification Program, Teacher 13, 72 
Change of Address 27 
Change of Grade 25 
Change of Major/Degree/College 27 
Change of Name 27 
CLEP 1 1 

Closings, School 31 
Code of Conduct 32 
Code, Student 33 

College Level Examination Program 1 1 
College of Art and Design 7, 50 
College of Media and 

Communication 7, 114 
College of Performing Arts 7, 90 
College of Textiles and Sciences, Philadelphia, 

Cooperative Program 54 
Common Core, Liberal Arts 40 
Composition BM curriculum 97, 101 

Course descriptions 159 

Diploma curriculum 97, 102 

See also - School of Music 
Computing, Academic 40 
Computing/Simulation Laboratory 51 
Conditional Admission 10 
Conduct, Code of 32 
Continuing Education 40 
Coordinate Degree Program, Pennsylvania 

Academy of the Fine Arts 55 
Counseling Department 29 
Course 

Auditing a 24 

Withdraw from a 25 
Course Descriptions 121 

Acting 175 

Animation 166 

Art Education 122 

Art Therapy 1 24 

Arts History 141 

Book Arts/Printmaking 169 

Ceramics, Crafts 124 

Ceramics, MFA summer 129, 136, 140 

Crafts 1 24 

Dance 129 

Dance Extension 133 

Drawing, Painting/ 172 

Electronic Media 134 

Fibers, Crafts 124 

Film 166 

Fine Arts 134 

Foundation 137 

Freshman Core, Liberal Arts 141 



183 



Course Descriptions continued 

Glass, Crafts 124 

Graduate Seminars 140 

Graphic Design 138 

Histoty and Social Studies 141 

Humanities (Liberal Arts) 141 

Illustration 155 

Industrial Design 152 

Jewelry, Crafts 124 

Liberal Arts 141 

Language and Literature 141 

Master of Industrial Design 140, 154 

Master of Music in Jazz 159 

MAT in Music Education, 
MATPREP 159 

Media Arts 166 

Metals, Crafts 124 

MFA in Book Arts/Printmaking 140, 171 

MFA in Ceramics, Painting, or 

Sculpture 129, 136, 140, 173, 175 

Multimedia 157 

Museum Exhibition Planning and 
Design 140, 156 

Music 159 

Musical Theater 175 

Painting/Drawing 172 

Painting, MFA summer 136, 140, 173 

Paper, Crafts 124 

Philosophy and Science 141 

Photography/Film/Animation 166 

Printmaking/Book Arts 169 

School of Dance 129 

School of Music 159 

School of Theater Arts 175 

Science, Philosophy and 141 

Sculpture 174 

Sculpture, MFA summer 136, 140, 175 

Social Studies, History and 141 

Summer Program (MFA) 129, 136, 
140, 173, 175 

Theater Arts 175 

Video, Film/ 166 

Wood, Crafts 124 

Writing for Media and Performance 179 
Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 
Crafts Studio Post-Baccalaureate 

Certificate 13, 60 
Credit by Audition 1 1 
Credit by Portfolio 1 1 
Credit Distribution, PCAD 52 
Credit from Nonaccredited Institutions 1 1 
Credit-Hour Ratio 42, 50, 90 
Credit, Insufficient Accumulation 20 
Credit, Transfer of 9, 13 
Curriculum - See specific Department, 
Program, or School 



D 

Dance curriculum 91, 93 

Course descriptions 129 

See also - School of Dance 
Dance Extension 95, 133 
Dean's List 26 
Deferred Admission 10 
Degree Requirements 41 
Design 

Graphic Design 65 

Illustration 66 

Industrial Design 67 
Digital Technology at PCAD 50 
Diploma in Music curriculum 97, 102 

Course descriptions 159 
Disciplinary Proceedings 36 
Discount, Tuition 15 
Dismissal Policy 26 

School of Theater Arts 1 10 
Drawing - See Painting/Drawing 
Drop/Add 24 
Drug and Alcohol Policy 32 



)•: 



Early Admission 10 
Education 

Art 72, 81, 84 

Dance 91, 94 

Museum 82 

Music 97, 103, 104 

Visual Arts 84, 85 
Electronic Media (Technology) 51 

Course descriptions 134 
Employment, Student 19 
Exchange Student, PCAD 55 
Exhibition Program, PCAD 50 
Exit Requitements, MAT in Music 

Education 103 
Expenses 14, 22 
Extended Degree Options 85 



Facilities 

Advanced Computing and Simulation 
Laboratory 5 1 

Book Arts/Printmaking 62, 75 

Borowsky Center for Publication 
Arts 51 

Exhibition Program, PCAD 50 

Industrial Design, Masters of 78 

Media Arts studios 5 1 

Museum Exhibition Planning and 
Design 80 

School of Dance 91 

Printmaking/Book Arts 62, 75 

School of Music 96 

School of Theater Arts 108 

Studios, Media Arts 5 1 

Studios, PCAD 51 

University 34 
Federal Grant Programs 17, 18, 20 
Federal Perkins Loan 18, 19, 20 
Federal Stafford Student Loan 

(SSL) 18, 19, 20 
Federal Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 18, 20 
Federal Work-Study (FWS) 19 
Fees 14, 15, 22 
Fibers, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 
Figurative Illustration Minor 53 
Film/Animation curriculum 71 

Course descriptions 166 
Film/Video cutriculum 70 

Course descriptions 166 
Film/Video Minor 54 
Final Probation 26 
Financial Aid 16 
Financial Holds 15 
Financial Responsibility 14 
Fine Arts curricula 60 

Course descriptions 134, 169, 172, 174 

MFA Summer Program 86 

Painting/Drawing curriculum 61 

Printmaking/Book Arts curriculum 62 

Sculpture curriculum 64 
Foreign Study Programs, PCAD 54 
Foundation curriculum 56 

Course descriptions 1 37 
Freshman Applicants 8 
Freshman Transfers 9 
FSEOG 18, 20 
FWS 19 



Glass, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriprions 124 
GPA - Grade Poinr Average 25 
Grade(s) 25 

Change of 25 

Grading System 25 

Incomplete, Grade of 25 

Pass/Fail Option 24 
Graduate 

Admission Requirements 13 

Application Requirements 13 

Course descriptions - See specific Programs 

Credit, Transfer of 13 

Curriculum - See specific Programs 

PCAD Programs 75 

PCPA Programs 99, 104 

Tuition 14 
Graduate Seminar course descriptions 140 
Graduation 27, 28 
Graduation Requirements 27 

Master of Music in Jazz 99 

MAT in Music Education 99 

School of Dance 95 

School of Music 99 
Graduation with Honors 28 
Grants and Scholarships 16, 17, 18, 20 
Graphic Design curriculum 65 

Course descriptions 138 
Grievance Procedure, Academic 27 



H 

Harassment Policy, Sexual 32 
Health Services 29 
Hearing Process 36 
Hearings, Administrative 37 
History and Social Studies 

Course descriptions 141 
History of The University of the Arts 6 
Housing Deposits/Fees 10, 15 
Humanities - See Liberal Arts 



I 

Illustration curriculum 66 
Course descriptions 155 

Illustration Minor, Figurative 53 

Illustration Photography Minor 54 

Incomplete, Grade of 25 

Independent Study 24 

Index 183 

Industrial Design curriculum 67 
Course descriptions 152 



Industrial Design, Master of 
curriculum 77 

Course descriptions 140, 154 

Initial Probation 26 
Instrumental BM curriculum 97, 100 

Course descriptions 159 

Diploma curriculum 97, 102 

See also - School of Music 
International Baccalaureate 1 1 
International Student Services 31 
International Students, Admission 12 
Internships 24, 54 
Interview for Admission 8 



J 

Jazz, Master of Music in 97, 99, 106 
Jazz/Contemporary - See Instrumental or 
Composition under School of Music 
Jazz/Theater Dance curriculum 91, 93 

See also - School of Dance 
Jewelry, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 



Language and Literature 

Course descriptions 141 
Late Registration 15, 24 
Lateness of Instructor 28 
Learning Specialist 30 
Leave of Absence 26 
Lesson Cancellation 28 
Lessons, Private Music 24, 99, 165 
Liberal Arts, Division of 42 
Common Core 41 
Course descriptions 141 
Arts History 141 
Faculty 46 
Freshman Core 128 
History and Social Studies 141 
Language and Literature 141 
Philosophy and Science 141 
Degree Requirements 41, 42 
Transfer Requirements 42 
Writing Standards 41 
Libraries 39 
Literature, Language and 

Course descriptions 141 
Loan Programs 18, 19 



M 

Major, Change of 27 

Majors - See specific College, Department, 

Program, or School 
MATPREP curriculum 97, 103 

Course descriptions 159 
Meals 30 
Media and Communication, 

College of 7, 114 
Media Arts curricula 68 

Animation curriculum 70 

Course descriptions 166 

Film/Animation curriculum 71 

Film/Video curriculum 70 

Photography curriculum 69 

Video, Film/ curriculum 70 
Media Arts Studios 51 
Metals, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 
Minors, PCAD 53 
Mission Statement 6 
Modern Dance curriculum 91, 93 

See also - School of Dance 
Multimedia curriculum 115, 116 

Course descriptions 157 
Museum Education, MA curriculum 82 

Course descriptions 122, 140, 156 
Museum Exhibition Planning and Design, 
MFA curriculum 79 

Course descriptions 140, 156 
Music - See School of Music 
Music Education, MAT curriculum 97, 104 

Course descriptions 159 

Graduation Requirements 99 

Preparatory Program (MATPREP) 97, 103 
Music, Master of in Jazz curriculum 97, 
99, 106 

Course descriptions 159 

Graduation Requirements 99 
Musical Theater curriculum 108, 111 

Course descriptions 175 

See also - School of Theater Arts 



N 

Name, Change of 27 

New Media Center 114 

Norice of Deficiency 28 

Nonaccredited Institutions, Credit from 11 



185 



Painting/Drawing curriculum 61 

Course descriptions 172 
Painting, MFA Summer Program 86 

Course descriptions 136, 140, 173 
Paper, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 
Parent Plus Loan for Undergraduate Students 

(PLUS) 18, 19 
Pass/Fail Option 24 
Payment Plans 14 
Pell Grant 17, 19, 20 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Coordinate Degree Program 55 
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance 

Agency (PHEAA) 16, 17, 21 
Perkins Loan 18, 19, 20 
PHEAA 16, 17, 21 
Philadelphia College of Textiles and Sciences, 

Cooperative Program 54 
Philosophy and Science 

Course descriptions 141 
Photography curriculum 69 

Course descriptions 166 
Photography Minor, Illustration 54 
Photography Minor, Studio 54 
PLUS 18, 19, 20 
Portfolio, Credit by 1 1 
Portfolio, Graduate 13 
Post-Baccalaureate Programs 

Admission Requirements 13 

Application Requirements 13 

Crafts Studio Certificate 13, 54 

Teacher Certification 13, 66, 79 
Pre-Certification in Art Education 72 
Printmaking/Book Arts curriculum 62 

Course descriptions 169 
Printmaking, Book Arts, MFA 
curriculum 75 

Course descriptions 140, 171 
Probation 26 

School of Theater Arts 1 1 
Programs of Study - See specific College, 
Department, Program, or School 



Readmission 26 
Recruiting on Campus 35 
Refund Policy 15 
Registrar, Office of the 23 
Registration 23, 24 
Regulations 

Academic 23 

Art Education 66 

School of Dance 94 

School of Music 99 

School of Theater Arts 109 
Residence Halls, Student Rights and 34 
Residency Requirements 9 
Residential Life 30 
Return Degree Program, PCAD 55 



Schedule Revision 24 

Scholarships 17, 18 

School Closings 31 

School of Dance 91 

Certificate in Dance curriculum 91, 94 

Course descriptions 129 

Dance curriculum 91 

Dance Education curriculum 91, 94 

Dance Extension 95, 133 

Facilities 91 

Graduation Requirements 95 

Regulations/Requirements 94 

School of Music 96 
Attendance 99 

Composition BM curriculum 97, 101 
Certificate in Music curriculum 97 
Course descriptions 159 
Diploma in Music curriculum 97, 102 
Facilities 96 
Graduate Programs 97 
Graduation Requirements 99 
Instrumental BM curriculum 97, 100 
Lessons, Private 24, 99, 165 
Master of Music in Jazz curriculum 97, 

99, 106 
MAT in Music Education 
curriculum 97, 104 
MATPREP curriculum 97, 103 
Regulations/Requirements 99 
Vocal BM curriculum 97, 100 



School of Theater Arts 108 

Acting curriculum 108, 111 

Course descriptions 175 

Facilities 108 

Musical Theater curriculum 108, 111 

Regulations/Requirements 109 
Science, Philosophy and 

Course descriptions 141 
Sculpture curriculum 64 

Course descriptions 174 
Sculpture, MFA Summer Program 86 

Course descriptions 136, 140, 175 
Security, Campus 31 
Sexual Harassment Policy 32 
Simulation/Computing Laboratory 51 
Smoking Policy 32 
Social Studies, History and 

Course descriptions 141 
Special Charges and Fees 1 5 
Special Events 29 

Stafford Student Loan (SSL) 18, 19, 20 
Standards Committee, Campus 37 
State and Federal Grant 

Programs 16, 17, 20 
Student Activities 29 
Student Code 33 
Student Conduct 32, 33 
Student Employment 19 
Student Exchange, PCAD 55 
Student Loans 18, 19, 20 
Student Organizations 33 
Student Records, Access to 34 
Student Responsibilities 23, 33 
Student Rights 33 
Student Services 29 
Srudio Photography Minor 54 
Studios, PCAD 5 1 
Studios, Media Arrs 51 
Summer Program, MFA in Ceramics, 

Painting, or Sculpture curriculum 86 

Course descriptions 129, 136, 140, 
173, 175 
Summer Study Programs, PCAD 54 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant, Federal (FSEOG) 18, 20 
Support Services, Academic 30 



186 



Teacher Certification Program 13, 72, 85 
Teaching 

Certification Program 13, 72, 85 

Dance Education 91, 94 

Extended Degree Option 85 

MA in Art Education 81, 85 

MA in Museum Education 82 

MAT in Music Education 97, 104 

MAT in Visual Arts 84, 85 

MATPREP 97, 103 

See also - Education 
Technology, Digital at PCAD 50 
Theater - See School of Theater Arts 
Three-Year Transfer 9 
Title IV Code 17 
Transcript Fee 15 
Transfer 9 

Advanced Standing 9 

Applicants 9 

Application Requirements 9 

College of Art and Design 9 

College of Media and Communication 9 

College of Performing Arts 9 

Credit 9 

Freshman Transfer 9 

Liberal Arts Requirements 42 

Residency Requirements 9 

Three Year Transfer 9 
Tuition 10, 14, 22 
Typography Minor 54 



Vermont Studio Center 86 

Veterans 3 1 

Video - See Film/Video 

Violation of University Standards 35 

Visual Arts, MAT curriculum 84, 85 

Course descriptions 122, 140 

Extended Degree Option 
Vocal BM curriculum 97, 

Course descriptions 159 

Diploma curriculum 9 7 , 

See also - School ot Music 



85 

loo 



102 



W 

Withdrawal from Course 25 
Withdrawal from the University 25 
Wood, Crafts curriculum 58 

Course descriptions 124 
Work-Study 19 

Writing for Media and Performance 
curriculum 117 

Course descriptions 179 
Writing Standards 41 



U 

Undergraduate Curriculum - See specific 

Department or School 
Undergraduate Degree Requirements 41 
University Facilities 34 
University Libraries 39 
University Standards, Violation of 35 



The University of the Arts Campus Map 




Locust Street 





Lombard Street 



South Street 





1 


1500 Pine Dorm 


2 


Furness Dorm 


3 


Hamilton Hall 


4 


ARCO Park 


5 


Delancy House 


6 


UArts DanceTheater 


7 


Merriam Theater 


8 


309 South Broad 


9 


Wagman Hall 


Id 


313 South Broad 


11 


Anderson Hall 


12 


ArtsBank