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Full text of "Courts and lawyers of Illinois"



B R.AR.Y 

OF THE 

U N IVLR.SITY 
OF ILLINOIS 

A Bequest from 

Marion D. Pratt 



v 

CO/O.J) 



u-.NGJS fHSTdRY SURVEY 
LIBRARY 




u 4>^ffv^ > r - 
j/^tt-airfe/.T^/A* 




I5y Courtesy of Dean John Henry Wigraore, Northwestern University. 

ST. IVES 

Patron Saint of the Legal Profession. Born, 1253. Died, 

11503, Treguier, Brittany. 
As a just judge he became so famous that on popular 

petition, including king and nobles, he was canonized 

in 1347. 
This statue, in his old parish church near Treguier, shows 

him standing between a rich man and a poor man, 

dispensing justice. 




By 

FREDERIC B. CROSSLEY 

(OF THE CHICAGO BAR) 

Secretary Northwestern University Law School; Librarian Elbert H. Gary 
Library of Law; Managing Director Journal of the American Insti- 
tute of Criminal Law and Criminology; Associate Editor 
Illinois Law Review; Member Illinois Bar Association 
Committee on Legal History and Biography 



Advisory Committee 

NATHAN WILLIAM MAcCHESNEY, 

Formerly President Illinois State Bar Association 

MITCHELL D. FOLLANSBEE, 

Formerly President Chicago Bar Association 

JOHN F. VOIGT, 

Secretary Illinois State Bar Association 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



1916 

THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
CHICAGO 



Courts and Lawyers 
of Illinois 



NATHAN WILLIAM MACCHESNEY. * A year or two ago in idly 
turning the pages of that useful compilation, "Who's Who in 
America," I chanced to find a statement of the activities and 
achievements of the subject of this sketch. I read it, and was left 



J NoTE. Following are some of the important data of the career of Mr. 
MacChesney necessary for the completion and an understanding of this 
sketch. He was born at Chicago, June 2, 1878, a son of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Alfred Brnnson and Henrietta (Milson) MacChesney, and a grandson of 
Nathan MacChesney of Virginia. His father, a physician, was a surgeon in 
the United States Army, and his mother (who was a native of London, Eng- 
land) was also a physician and held the degree M. D. Mr. MacChesney was 
graduated A. B. at the University of the Pacific in 1898, was a student in 
Stanford University and in the University of Arizona (1898-1899), was a stu- 
dent at Northwestern University Law School in 1899-1900, graduated LL. B. 
in 1902 at the University of Michigan, and in 1902-03 took post-graduate 
courses in Northwestern University Law School. Mr. MacChesney married 
at Riverside, Illinois, December i, 1904, Lena Frost, daughter of W. E. Frost. 
The firm of MacChesney & Becker has handled litigation involving 
many important interests of individuals, corporations and the public. Only 
a few of these can be cited as suggestive of the whole. They have repre- 
sented numerous interests in the litigations involving the special assess- 
ment and revenue laws of Illinois, and during the last eight or ten years 
have been retained as attorney or special counsel in perhaps a majority of 
such cases affecting the general real estate interests of Chicago. They were 
of counsel before the Supreme Court in the Gage Park & Western Avenue 
sewer case for Hetty Green ; as special counsel secured new trial and 
favorable verdicts in cases testing the liability of landlord or railroad com- 
pany for death from disease caused by insufficient heat; secured modifica- 
tion of application of statute prohibiting refusal to rent to families with 
children, thus protecting building owners ; represented owners in sub-side- 
walk litigation in Chicago and in cases concerning the safety deposit law of 
the state; represent majority of landowners whose property is to be taken 
in largest condemnation and special assessment proceeding ever tried in 
Illinois the North Michigan Avenue improvement, a feature of the Chicago 
plan for City Beautiful; in -behalf of Chicago Real Estate Board and other 
interests defended the tax limitation ("Juul law"). 

435 



436 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

interested and puzzled. It was the most remarkable miscellany of 
memberships in boards of directors, boards of trustees, bar associa- 
tions, executive committees, leagues, lodges, clubs, commissions, fra- 
ternities, learned societies, and other organizations ranging through 
the entire alphabet, which I had ever seen. I shall not conceal the 
impression which I got from this reading : here, I thought, is a very 
ambitious man, a climber, a kind of Csesar transplanted into a com- 
plicated industrial age from an earlier century. At the moment a 
very surprising fact in connection with the unusual range of activi- 
ties chronicled escaped my attention that Mr. MacChesney was 
born in the year 1878. Whatever aspirations or motives we may be 
impelled to attribute to a man who has been active far beyond the 
average capacity or inclination for attachment to associational inter- 
ests, it cannot be doubted, when we find that a given individual 
still under the age of forty is, or has been, already, president of the 
American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, a director of 
the United Charities of Chicago, trustee of Northwestern Univer- 
sity, and president of the Illinois State Bar Association, we have 
discovered, if, perhaps, an ambitious character, a man whose aspira- 
tions are founded on unquestionable ability. 



Mr. MacChesney has represented also, as general or special counsel, 
such organizations and individuals as National Association of Real Estate 
Exchanges ; Illinois State Bankers Association ; California Fruit Growers 
Association in interstate matters ; shippers of Nevada & Arizona in connec- 
tion with "long and short haul" rates and other matters before the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission, besides a number of other organizations in 
various states ; many of the wholesale, banking, manufacturing firms and 
individual estates of Chicago and elsewhere. 

As chairman of its committee on amendment of the law for four years 
Mr. MacChesney drafted numerous statutes for the Chicago Bar Associa- 
tion and represented the association in five sessions of the Legislature as 
chairman of committee to promote law reform ; was member of committee 
and one of the draftsmen of the Federal and the Uniform Child Labor Law 
and had charge of the constitutional features of the same, making argument 
upon them in Washington in 1916; was' one of the draftsmen of the Bills of 
Lading Act and represented the Illinois State Bankers Association in secur- 
ing the passage of the same through the Legislature ; was a member of the 
committee who had charge of the Uniform Negotiable Instruments Act in 
this state and helped to secure the passage of the same; was on the com- 
mission for the consideration of the Workman's Compensation Act and have 
met with various legislative committees regarding same; was instrumental 
in framing the Uniform Sales Act which is a law in fourteen states, includ- 
ing Illinois ; the Uniform Stock Transfer Act, the Uniform Warehouse Re- 
ceipts Act, Uniform Marriage Evasion Act, Uniform Partnership Act and 
Uniform Vital Statistics Bill, as well as other legislation of like character. 

Mr. MacChesney was lecturer on American Constitutional History at 
Chautauquas in Arizona, California, and Minnesota in 1899, was press cor- 
respondent in California, Arizona, and New Mexico in 1897-99, ar >d associated 
with his father in business from 1899 to 1903. In 1902 he became a member 
of the Illinois bar. He has lectured in the College of Law of the University 
of Illinois since 1910, and at other universities. He is a member of the Com- 
parative Law Bureau ; the Section of Legal Education in the American 
Bar Association ; of the American Political Science Association ; the Ameri- 
can Society of International Law; member and president in 1910-11 of the 



437 

It is a tradition which militates considerably against freedom of 
discussion, that, except with a few qualifications grudgingly recog- 
nized by convention, nothing evil is to be said of the dead, and, con- 
versely, nothing good of the living. I am compelled to say that I do 
not accept the latter proposition in its absolute form, as founded in 
good sense; and, moreover, I have no inclination in attempting a 
personal sketch to limit my remarks to a wearisome card-index 
enumeration of facts or things after the fashion of the catalogue of 
ships in Homer. This much of digression is necessary in homage to 
the tradition. 

For the purposes of this sketch, I have read again the extraor- 
dinary list of interests with which Colonel MacChesney has seen fit, 
in a brief period of less than fifteen years, to ally himself, and I must 
again acknowledge my amazement at the range of these affiliations 
and exertions extending through such diverse catagories as lecturing 
on legal ethics in law schools, directing the affairs of a bank or a 
social mission, taking part in the management of a large university, 
improving penal conditions, helping in the editorial direction of law 
journals, investigating a high-pressure fire-system and municipal 
art, striving for uniformity in legislation and for labor and indus- 



American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology; member of the 
American Prison Association ; of the American Society of Military Law, 
which he served as president in 1913; of the Illinois State Bar Association, 
serving as president in 1915-; of the Illinois State Society of Criminal Law 
and Criminology, with service on its executive committee in 1911-15; Chicago 
Bar Association, in which he was chairman of the committee on Amendment 
of the Law in 1908-10, and chairman on committee of Legal Education, 
1912-13. 

Mr. MacChesney is president and treasurer of Northwestern University 
Press; director in United Charities of Chicago; trustee Northwestern Univer- 
sity ; director American Judicature Society ; member Internationale Verein- 
igung fur Rechts-und Wirtschaftsphilosophie (Berlin) ; of Illinois Commis- 
sion on Uniform State Laws, of which he has been president since 1912; was 
delegate to Mississippi Valley Legislative Conference on Uniform Legislation 
Concerning Women and Children ; a state delegate to National Civic Federa- 
tion Conference on Uniform Legislation at Washington in 1910; Illinois state 
delegate to the International Prison Congress of Washington in 1910; Na- 
tional Commission on Prison Labor, with membership on the executive com- 
mittee in 1913-14; member and vice president 1915-16 of National Conference 
on Uniform State Laws; of National Council of National Civic Federation; 
secretary of the National Conference on Criminal Law and Criminology at 
Chicago in 1909; and is a member, director, and officer of numerous other 
benevolent, law, historical, military, fraternal, social, scientific, business, 
civic, and quasi publi'c organizations. 

Mr. MacChesney was lieutenant-colonel and judge advocate of Illinois 
National Guard 1905-12, was aide-de-camp on Governor Deneen's staff in 
1908-12, and is now colonel of Illinois National Guard and judge advocate 
general of Illinois. 

He is author and editor of "Abraham Lincoln The Tribute of a Century" 
(McClurg 1910) ; The Lincoln Centenary, 1809-1909 (43 vols.) ; "The Sig- 
nificance of the War of 1812," "Race Development by Legislation," "Uniform 
Laws," and numerous other articles on labor, property, corporation, social, and 
legal matters ; is managing editor of the Illinois Law Review, and associate 
editor of the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. 



438 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

trial laws, taking an active part in military affairs, writing law 
articles, and laboring in one way and another in a considerable 
variety of other organized undertakings; to say nothing except by 
way of suggestion of what is required of the time and energies of a 
lawyer actively and successfully practicing his profession, and par- 
ticipating in a normal way in the affairs of family, church, and social 
life. What an indictment of sloth ! What an arraignment of the 
normal man who exerts himself with his mind or his hands to ac- 
cumulate the value-representative upon which he may count in the 
inevitable day of diminishing returns, and who, if he has reared and 
provided for a family, and has never been charged as a malefactor, 
is rated as a valuable element in the commonwealth ! 

It has been my good fortune to observe at close range, in one or 
two instances, the phenomenon of abnormal capacity for mental 
interests and activities, through which nature releases as through a 
safety-value its surplus energy. From this observation, I have come 
to believe that it may be laid down as a law governing such cases, 
and perhaps extending over the greater range of the mental field, 
that, ordinarily and within limits, the greater one's interests and 
activities, the better those interests individually are supported, and 
the more fruitful will be the activities which follow. This may be 
otherwise illustrated by the erosive action of the swift current as 
against the sluggish stream. The illustration, so far as the premise 
is correctly stated, would seem to be explanatory of the subject of 
this sketch ; and yet there is still something more to be said by way 
of explanation. Colonel MacChesney does not yield to the seduc- 
tions of the motor, he is not a yachtsman, or any other variety of 
sportsman, nor does he strut about in the Faubourg St. Germain. 
His surplus energies do not devise for him ways of convenience, 
ease, and luxury, but lead him away to the hard cell of social service. 
What for most men are hours of relaxation, are for him vigils of 
labor. 

Until I had come into contact with Colonel MacChesney in his 
activities outside his professional practice, I was prepared to think 
of his multiplied connections as decorations accumulated with the 
same care, and for something like the same general object, as men 
collect first editions, Holbeins, pipes, or postage-stamps ; but I dis- 
covered when the opportunity for first-hand observation came, so 
far, at least, as my own means of knowledge went, that as a presi- 
dent he presided, that as a director he directed, and that as a trustee 
he executed his trust. That his alliance with undertakings outside 
the orbit of professional money-making is not a mere garland to 
vanity may be seen very readily by a casual inspection of the 
Reports of the American Bar Association where Colonel MacChes- 
ney has proved himself a working factor with a vision and a will 
for constructive effort. 

Of the dry-as-dust details of the unfolding life of Colonel Mac- 
Chesney something: may be read at the beginning of this sketch, and 
more may, no doubt, be found elsewhere where such facts are usu- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 439 

ally collected. I call attention to these data again because they are 
in and of themselves highly misleading in any effort to penetrate the 
mask of personality of this dynamic individual. They would tell 
nothing of "the incessant care and labor of his mind," his scrupulous 
fidelity to obligation, his real human sympathies, his oratorical gifts, 
his judgment ripe far beyond his years, the southern flavor of his 
personal bearing, his insight into and patience with the shifts and 
turns of human nature, or of other qualities of mind and manner 
which have contributed to provide him with distinctions, position, 
and not without labors. We will concede that he is an ambitious 
man, but his ambitions are legitimate; and we believe that to the 
extent that such a man realizes his ambitions the moral world will 
gain. 

Mr. MacChesney, himself has said, and we think aptly, that no 
man knows what he is. He might have continued that no one else 
knows either. But there is a natural curiosity on the point when 
individuals are concerned who stand out in relief from the common 
background of inertia and negativity. Modern psychology has done 
much to explain away individuality; since it would seem that any 
given person is a great complex of heredity, environment, and will. 
Individuals, therefore, cannot be fully understood or explained, 
because we cannot explain all of heredity, or of environment, or of 
autonomous will. But adopting such standards of value and com- 
parison as have the surest non-technical meaning, we may be satis- 
fied that we have before us one biologically favored with the vital 
spark and endurance for labor and leadership, and that the objective 
evidences disclose a man with a fundamentally upright and generous 
mind an individual who is able to fight the battle of existence with 
the sword or the plowshare, but who exerts himself in accordance 
with his nature as becomes a tribal member in the interests of the 
tribe. To deny favorable recognition to that attribute of the mind 
which seeks leadership with service would be to depress humanity 
again to the level of the bludgeon, raw flesh, and a sunless cave. 

Of Colonel MacChesney's intellectual creation, I' am unfortu- 
nately least qualified to speak. He has not, I believe, written prolific- 
ally, nor, so far as I am aware, opened any new highways with his 
pen; and it would be difficult to appraise what he has done or 
attempted in view of the fact that most of his efforts have been 
de-personalized in the work of commissions, and other similar 
groups, where the work of the individual is merged in the joint pro- 
duction. I had already discovered that he is not likely to be a 
dormant partner in what attracted his intellect, or his sympathies ; 
and I have taken the precaution of looking further on my own 
account (since one who is to be inspected in this somewhat objective 
way cannot be consulted conveniently) and I have found, as for 
example in his bar association activities, evidence of thought and 
labor not easily reducible to quantitative measurement, but of im- 
portance for the just solution of some of the most urgent problems 



440 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

of the day. The best indirect evidence of his capacity and willing- 
ness to do the unselfish work which is to stand for the benefit of 
others, is that he has been selected by those competent to measure 
means and ends, to lift the burden of social ministration, as already 
indicated, in a variety of fields of effort. 

The span of life accomplished by Colonel MacChesney has been 
interesting as we have attempted briefly to point out, in its range of 
interest, its activity, and dynamic force, all of which are conspicuous 
in that the years of physical and mental maturity, and likewise the 
years of substantial achievement may properly be expected, as yet 
to come. We would be arrogating something beyond the power of 
the human mind to lay any but the most limited claims on the 
future; but with such means of projection as are allowable, we 
would expect in the subject of our sketch, a narrowing and deepen- 
ing of interests still greater human usefulness and influence, and, as 
not beyond the range of rightful speculation, high public and social 
distinctions coupled with comparable public and social service. 

ALBERT KOCOUREK. 

STEPHEN STRONG GREGORY, for forty years a member of the 
Chicago bar, was born at Unadilla, Otsego County, New York, 
November 16, 1849. His father, J. C. Gregory, in 1858 took the 
family to Madison, Wisconsin, where the son attended the common 
schools and in 1866 entered the University of Wisconsin. He was 
graduated A. B. in 1870, took his law degree in the same institution 
in 1871, and in 1873 received the Master of Arts degree. 

After his admission to the bar in 1871 Mr. Gregory practiced at 
Madison until the summer of 1874, and then removed to Chicago. 
For five years he was associated in partnership with Judge A. H. 
Chetlain, the latter as senior partner, and both members then joined 
the firm of Tenney & Flower. Later the firm became Flower, 
Remy & Gregory. From 1888 to 1893 Mr. Gregory practiced as 
head of the firm of Gregory, Booth & Harlan. After that he was 
alone for a number of years. He then organized the firm of 
Gregory, Poppenhusen & McNab. A new firm known as Gregory 
& McNab has been formed from this and of this he is the senior 
partner. The offices of this firm are at 69 West Washington Street, 
Chicago. 

Among the cases of some possible general interest with which 
he has been connected are the Lake Front case, in which he appeared 
as special counsel for the City of Chicago before the Supreme Court 
of the United States ; the case as to the constitutionality of the law 
creating the sanitary district of Chicago ; the defense of Prender- 
gast, the assassin of Mayor Harrison of Chicago ; the defense of 
Eugene V. Debs in the famous conspiracy case against that labor 
leader; and the case in the Supreme Court of the United States 
involving the validity of the will of Jennie McGraw Fisk, by which 
a large amount of property was left to Cornell University. The only 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 441 

political office Mr. Gregory ever held was that of election commis- 
sioner in Chicago for two years. 

In professional circles he has been frequently honored. He was 
elected president of the Chicago Bar Association in 1900, president 
of the Illinois State Bar Association in 1904, and in 1911 president 
of the American Bar Association. Mr. Gregory is a former presi- 
dent of the Law Club, and a number of years ago was president of 
the Iroquois Club. He is a democrat in politics and an Episco- 
palian in religious faith. Among his clubs are the Chicago, the 
Church, the Skokie Country, and the Lawyers Club of New York. 
November 25, 1880, he married at Madison, Wisconsin, Janet M. 
Tappan. Their three children are : Charlotte Camp, Arthur Tap- 
pan and Stephen Strong, Jr. 

JOHN McAuLEY PALMER. As a lawyer, military leader and 
statesman, the position of General Palmer must be among those 
eminent and distinguished Illinois men who during the middle 
period of the last century indelibly impressed their influence not 
only on the life of the state but on that of the nation. In his long 
life, which came to a close September 25, 1900, General Palmer 
had associated on terms of intimacy and professional and political 
relationship with all the notable characters of Illinois history from 
Lincoln and Douglas down. 

Of Kentucky birth and family, John McAuley Palmer was born 
in Scott County, September 13, 1817. His father, Louis D. Palmer, 
was born in Virginia, June 3, 1781, a son of Isaac and Ann (Mc- 
Auley) Palmer, who were born in the same county and both in 
the year 1747. General Palmer's mother was Ann Hansford Tutt, 
who was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, a daughter of Louis 
and Isabella (Yancey) Tutt. General Palmer's grandfather served 
as a minuteman in the Revolutionary war. In Christian County, 
Kentucky, where the Palmer family lived from 1818 to 1-831, John 
M. Palmer received his first instruction from the schools of that 
time. One of his teachers was named Boone, a relative of the 
famous Daniel Boone. In his reminiscences of this time General 
Palmer said : "I received my fair share of instruction and punish- 
ment and do not distinctly recollect when I could not read." As a 
boy in Kentucky he became familiar with the local politics of the 
time and with some of the great names in Kentucky history, par- 
ticularly that of Henry Clay. 

In 1831 his father moved to Illinois, settling about ten miles from 
Alton and an equal distance from Edwardsville. Here General 
Palmer came to know by personal experience the rugged toil and 
hardships of pioneering. He helped to clear the forests, also drove 
a prairie team of four yoke of oxen and in other ways made him- 
self generally useful about the old home. 

Of his independent start in the world which began in 1834 
when he was seventeen years of age, General Palmer has this to 



442 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

say in his reminiscences : "One evening, while my father, myself 
and younger brother were discussing the subject of education and 
matters of that kind, my father said to me, in reply to some expres- 
sion of a wish to obtain a good education : 'Very well, you owe 
me four years of service yet ; I will give you that ; go and get an 
education.' I looked at him with an expression of surprise, no 
doubt, and asked in an excited, trembling voice, 'When may I go 
sir?' He seemed amused and said, 'Tomorrow morning, if you 
like.' I remember that I left the room to conceal my feelings. 
After recovering my composure I returned to the room where my 
father was seated, and sat for some time in silence, when he said, 
with signs of emotion, 'I have no money to expend on your educa- 
tion, but a healthy boy as you are needs no help; you may go 
to-morrow morning. 1 give you your time. Do not disgrace me. 
May God bless you.' ''' 

On the following morning young Palmer started for the old 
college at Upper Alton, arid during the next year combined hard 
physical labor with the prosecution of his studies. In the spring 
of 1835 he planned to go South and join the Revolutionists in 
Texas, but was prevented by being served with a summons for a 
debt which he owed and which he had arranged with his cousin 
to pay, but the arrest caused his detention so that he was unable 
to embark upon the steamboat and thus he remained in Illinois 
instead of becoming a soldier of fortune in the far Southwest. 
In September, 1836, he again entered school at Upper Alton, and 
paid his board by employment in a private family of the town. 
In December, 1838, he began a term of school teaching in Fulton 
County, and while in that school began the reading of Blackstone's 
Commentaries and McNally on Evidence. The following spring 
he entered the office of John S. Greathouse as a student. Mr. 
Greathouse was one of the leading lawyers of Carlinville, and his 
office contained a considerable law library for the time, containing 
such treatises as Coke on Littleton, and the Reports of the Supreme 
Court of Illinois, which at that time embraced only one volume. 

Of his methods of law study General Palmer wrote: "It may 
be useful to students to state for their benefit my methods of study. 
I read carefully, with a glossary of law terms, and made full 
notes ; I did not, in my notes, as a rule, merely quote the language 
of the author, but my effort was to grasp the subject and state it 
in my own language. My conceptions of the meaning of what I 
read were often inaccurate, but I think, on the whole, the method 
was preferable to any other. It promoted brevity and terseness 
and aided in systematizing the knowledge acquired, and I think 
my experience justifies me in saying that knowledge of the law, 
acquired by the method I refer to, is much longer retained and 
more easily and intelligently applied to practical use than it can 
be when the student merely masters the words of his author or 
instructor. * * * I was aided in my studies by that great 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 443 

promoter of diligence, poverty ; I was compelled to earn something, 
and as there was some sales of land, and the volumes of the 
record were few, I examined titles and prepared deeds, and soon 
found some employment before justices of the peace. It was not 
long before I found myself able to meet my expenses, which, with 
board at one dollar or one dollar and a quarter per week, did not 
exceed one hundred dollars a year. The only interruption of my 
studies was that my friends insisted that I should become candidate 
for county clerk, and I now know that the leaders of my party 
(democratic) when they insisted upon my candidacy, had no ex- 
pectation that I would succeed. After the election I pursued my 
studies with great industry and made great progress in the acquisi- 
tion of the mysteries of the law, so that in December, 1839, I bor- 
rowed five dollars from a friend to pay my expenses," and went to 
Springfield to obtain admission to the bar. He found a friend in 
need at Springfield in the person of Stephen A. Douglas, who with 
J. Young Scammon obtained appointment from the court as exam- 
iners for the young applicant, and he was soon afterwards enrolled 
among the lawyers of the state. General Palmer first met Mr. 
Douglas in 1838 while traveling in Hancock County. At an inn 
at Carthage he was aroused from his sleep by the landlord, who 
compelled him to share his room with a fellow traveler, and on 
the following morning found that his bedfellow was "the little 
giant of the West." The acquaintance and friendship between 
these two men continued uninterrupted until Senator Douglas cham- 
pioned the Kansas-Nebraska bill in 1854, refusing to support Gen- 
eral Shields for the United States senate, General Palmer, who 
was then a member of the Illinois Legislature, came into open 
rupture with Douglas, and their friendship was not renewed until 
1861. 

Following his admission to the bar General Palmer was soon 
busied with a comfortable practice and his successful handling of 
cases soon gave him a distinction in the circuit where most of his 
work as a lawyer was performed. On December 20, 1842, he 
married Miss Malinda Ann Neeley. Though he was already a suc- 
cessful lawyer according to the standards of the time, he and his 
young wife began housekeeping with what seems now the utmost 
simplicity, and it is said that the entire cost of furniture and every- 
thing necessary for the household was less than fifty dollars. 

In 1888, (after the death of his first wife in 1885), he married 
Mrs. Hannah Lamb Kimball, who survives him. 

In August, 1843, General: Palmer was elected to the office of 
probate justice of the peace, with jurisdiction in probate cases as 
well as the work of the ordinary justice of the peace. He was 
defeated for this office in 1847, but was again elected in the spring 
of 1848, and the following November resigned to take the office 
of county judge of Macoupin County. In 1852 he was elected to 
fill a vacancy in the state senate, and was re-elected in 1854 as an 



444 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

anti-Nebraska democrat. Up to that time General Palmer had 
been a firm adherent of the democratic party, but was a strong 
anti-slavery man, and in the realignment of political parties during 
the middle '505 found himself naturally working with the republican 
party after its organization in 1856. In that year he resigned his 
seat in the state senate, and was president of the first republican 
convention which assembled in Illinois. In 1859 he was an unsuc- 
cessful candidate for Congress, and in 1860 was one of the electors 
at large pledged to vote for Mr. Lincoln. 

Early in the year 1861 he was a member of the peace confer- 
ence which assembled at Washington, but about three months later 
he raised the Fourteenth Regiment of Illinois Infantry at Jack- 
sonville, and by unanimous vote of the men was elected its colonel. 
He went into the services of the United States for three years, 
and remained with the armies of the Union until he resigned as 
major-general of volunteers September i, 1866. His gallant con- 
duct as a soldier and his efficiency as a leader brought him one 
promotion after the other, and for a time he commanded an army 
. corps, and in February, 1865, President Lincoln assigned him to 
the command of the department of Kentucky. He afterwards 
declined an appointment as brigadier-general in the regular army, 
and on resigning his commission as major-general soon afterwards 
returned to Illinois to take up the practice of law. In 1867 Gen- 
eral Palmer removed his family to Springfield, and that city was 
his home thereafter until his death. 

In the political annals of the state he is best remembered for 
his term as governor, to which office he was elected in November, 
1868, and he served four years with marked ability. He was a 
strong and independent executive, and his administration is per- 
haps most notable for the many vetoes which he placed upon bills 
that he regarded as unjust or in violation of the constitution. 

The present constitution of the State of Illinois was adopted 
during General Palmer's term of office. As governor, while the 
constitutional convention was in session, he took the greatest inter- 
est in its work, scrutinized every provision and was in constant 
consultation with the framers of the organic law. 

After the war General Palmer had returned to the ranks of the 
democratic party, and in 1888 was again its candidate for governor. 
In 1890 his name was prominently suggested as a candidate for 
United States senator, and the election involved one of the memor- 
able contests in the Illinois Legislature. He was finally elected on 
the 1 54th ballot in 1891. During his six years in the service he 
was one of the most distinguished members of that body. Over 
the nation at large General Palmer's name is probably most famil- 
iarly associated with the "Palmer and Buckner Sound Money 
Ticket" during the memorable campaign of 1896, when the con- 
servative element in the democratic party chose General Palmer as 
the presidential candidate to express the views of that large body 



445 

of democrats devoted to the principles of sound finance. In the 
intervals of these political activities General Palmer was for a 
great many years devoted to his practice as a lawyer at Springfield 
and for some time before his death was senior member of the firm 
of Palmer, Shutt, and Graham. 

His widow and three daughters survive him. The daughters 
are Mrs. Elizabeth A. Matthews, Carlinville, Illinois ; r Mrs. Harriet 
Palmer Crabbe, Corpus Christi, Texas; and Mrs. Jessie Palmer 
Weber, Springfield, Illinois, secretary of the Illinois State Histor- 
ical Society. 

JOHN MAYO PALMER. The oldest son of Gen. John M. Palmer 
and Malinda A. (Neely) Palmer, the late John Mayo Palmer like- 
wise realized some of the highest possibilities in the legal profession. 
He was active in the law and in public affairs for nearly thirty 
years. 

Born at Carlinville, Illinois, March 10, 1848, he died in the 
sanitarium at Battle Creek, Michigan, July 10, 1903. On the break- 
ing of the Civil war, though a lad of but thirteen years, he made 
several visits to his father at the front, and although of course not 
an enlisted soldier what he saw of army life gave him an appreciation 
of the courage and self-sacrifice of the soldiers. His enthusiasm 
and interest in military affairs were almost a matter of heritage, as 
were also his brilliant talents in the law. He was a great-grand- 
son of Isaac Palmer, who served with distinction with the Virginia 
troops in the American Revolution and was at the siege of York- 
town. He was also a grandson of Louis D. Palmer, who served in 
the War of 1812, as a member of the Kentucky Volunteers, and was 
at the battle of River Raisin. His father, as is well known, was 
distinguished as a soldier during the Civil war, having raised the 
Fourteenth Regiment of Illinois Infantry in 1861, was promoted 
from colonel to brigadier general, to major general, and during 
1865-66 was commander of the Fourteenth Army Corps, Department 
of Kentucky. 

John Mayo Palmer was educated at Blackburn University in 
Carlinville, at Shurtleff College at Alton, and in 1868 graduated 
from the law school of Harvard University with the degree LL. B. 
He was a natural lawyer, his excellent education and training re- 
enforcing his native talent, so that he was recognized as one of the 
best equipped lawyers in the West, and was so considered by his 
colleagues at the Springfield bar, where he practiced for more than 
twenty years as the partner of his father. Admitted to the bar in 
1868 at the age of twenty, he practiced at Carlinville until 1873, 
and in 1870 was elected city attorney. In 1873 he formed the law 
partnership with his father, Governor Palmer, upon the latter's 
retirement from the executive office. The firm was first John M. 
and John Mayo Palmer, and later became Palmers, Robinson & 
Shutt, when Hon. James C. Robinson and Hon. William E. Shutt 



446 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

became members of the firm. John Mayo Palmer practiced in 
that partnership until 1889, when for the benefit of his health he 
went to the State of Washington, spending two years on the 
Pacific Coast. At Tacoma, Washington, he was associated in prac- 
tice with James Wickersnam, who is now delegate in Congress 
from Alaska Territory. His health being practically restored Mr. 
Palmer returned to Illinois and resumed practice at Chicago, as 
a member of the law firm of Doolittle, Palmer & Tollman. In 
1893 Carter Harrison the elder appointed him assistant corpor- 
ation counsel of the City of Chicago, and a year later Mayor John 
P. Hopkins appointed him corporation counsel. His record of 
public service in Illinois was as city attorney of Carlinville from 
1870 to 1872; member of the general assembly of Illinois from 
1875 t J ^77 "> alderman of Springfield and corporation counsel of 
Chicago from 1893 to 1895. As a lawyer he was engaged in many 
famous cases, among which may be mentioned the Macoupin County 
bond cases, the so-called Pekin Whiskey Ring case, and the Snycarte 
Levee cases. 

Like his father, he was a sturdy democrat, and belonged to the 
Methodist Church. At Carlinville, Illinois, July 7, 1869, John 
Mayo Palmer married Ellen Clark Robertson, daughter of Dr. Wil- 
liam R. and Nancy (Holliday) Robertson. Of this union there were 
three children. The oldest Major John Me Auley Palmer of the 
United States Army, who was married in 1893 to Maude Laning, 
daughter of C. B. Laning of Petersburg, Illinois, and they have 
a child named Mary Laning Palmer. Robertson Palmer, the sec- 
ond son, is an attorney at law at Ocean Springs, Mississippi, and 
married Nettie Colby of Chicago. The third son is Dr. George 
Thomas Palmer of Springfield, who married in 1898 Maude Gregg 
of Alton, Illinois. 

Louis JAMES PALMER. One of the younger children of Gen. 
eral John M. and Malinda A. (Neely) Palmer, the late Louis 
James Palmer, who died at Springfield December 28, 1901, was 
identified with the Illinois bar as a practicing lawyer for a number 
of years, though most of his professional career was spent in the 
West. 

Born at Carlinville, Illinois, June 25, 1865, he possessed many 
of the talents and capabilities which have made his ancestry famous. 
He was educated in the Springfield grammar and high schools, 
under private tutors, and at Blackburn University at Carlinville. 
Before old enough to be admitted to the bar, he passed brilliant 
examination in the law and at the age of twenty-one went West to 
Cheyenne, Wyoming. He was youngest member of the constitu- 
tional convention which drafted the constitution for the new State 
of Wyoming. From 1887 to 1893 he practiced law at Rock Springs, 
Wyoming, and then returned to Springfield and was engaged in 
active practice there until his death in 1901. 

He served as a member of the Fifth Regiment, Illinois National 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 447 

Guard, and later was a member of the Engineer Corps until his 
death. In politics he was always a democrat and a Baptist in 
church affiliations. At Springfield on January 19, 1901, he married 
Josephine La Bonte. 

ALONZO K. VICKERS. During his service on the Supreme Bench 
of Illinois from 1906 until his death on January 21, 1915, the pro- 
found learning and broad experience of Judge Vickers were read 
into a majority of the decisions of the Supreme Court. Judge 
Vickers was identified with the Illinois bar and bench for more than 
thirty years, came up to professional prominence from a boyhood 
spent on a farm and with many struggles to secure an education. He 
possessed the experienced judgment of one who knew all sorts of 
men, was discriminating observer of character and motives, and had 
that qualification so essential to the good judge the judicial tem- 
perament. His death was a distinct loss to the profession and the 
state which he had served so loyally and with such integrity for 
many years. 

It was on a farm in Massac County, Illinois, that Alonzo Knox 
Vickers was born September 25, 1853, a son of James I. and Celia 
(Smith) Vickers, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of 
Alabama. His father came to Illinois in 1840, settled on Govern- 
ment land in Massac County, and that land continued in the owner- 
ship of the Vickers family until recent years. The father died in 
1 86 1 at the age of forty-five and the mother in 1874 at the age of 
seventy- four. 

The second of four children, Judge Vickers as a boy attended the 
country schools of Massac County, and led by a vision of better 
things later secured some training in the city high school and in the 
summer normal, and after being qualified taught school for several 
terms. His studies in law were pursued during his work as a 
teacher, and gave him admittance to the bar in 1882. Judge Vickers 
throughout his active practice as a lawyer was located at Vienna in 
Johnson County. 

His first public service was as a member of the Illinois House 
of Representatives, to which he was elected in 1886. In 1891 he was 
elected circuit judge of the first judicial circuit, re-elected in 1897 
and again in 1903, and finally resigned after fifteen years of work 
on the circuit bench. During that time he also served on the appellate 
bench at Ottawa. In 1906 Judge Vickers was elected judge of the 
Supreme Court from the first district, and thereafter kept his resi- 
dence in East St. Louis. Judge Vickers was a republican, a member 
of the East St. Louis, Illinois State and American Bar associations, 
was affiliated with the Masonic Order up to and including the Knight 
Templar degrees, with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and t,he Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and was a member of the Missouri Athletic Club of St. Louis and 
the Country Club of East St. Louis. He was a trustee of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 



448 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Judge Vickers was married at Metropolis, Illinois, November 18, 
1880, to Miss Leora E. Armstrong, daughter of William and Anna 
Armstrong, now deceased. There are three children : Jay F. Vickers, 
born in 1885, and now a rising yoimg attorney at East St. Louis ; 
Hazel, who lives at Carbondale, Illinois ; and Louise Vickers, born 
in 1893, and living with her mother at East St. Louis. 

EDWARD O. BROWN. First elected a judge of the Circuit Court 
of Cook County in 1903, Judge Brown has served by appointment 
as justice of the Appellate Court of the First Illinois District since 
1904. Judge Brown has been an active member of the Illinois bar 
more than fo.rty years, and an extensive experience as a prominent 
lawyer and the qualities of a splendid mind have enabled him to 
adorn and dignify the high judicial office he has held for over ten 
years. 

Edward Osgood Brown was born in the historic city of Salem, 
Massachusetts, August 5, 1847. His family is of English origin, 
was settled in Massachusetts about the middle of the seventeenth 
century, and several of its members, including his grandfather and 
his father, contributed to the fame of Salem as one of the most 
important centers of the early American merchant marine. Judge 
Brown is a son of Edward and Eliza Osgood (Dalton) Brown. He 
attended the Salem public schools, and graduated A. B. from Brown 
University in 1867. The following year was spent as a teacher in 
Southboro, Massachusetts, and he began his law studies with a firm 
at Salem, and in 1869 was graduated from the law department of 
Harvard University, winning first prize for an essay on Punitive 
Damages. He was admitted to the bar in 1870, and during 1870-71 
was assistant clerk to the Supreme Court of Rhode Island, and was 
in practice at Providence until April, 1872. 

Judge Brown came to Chicago with a college classmate, Orville 
Peckham, and the associations of these two prominent Chicago law- 
yers were maintained until the elevation of Judge Brown to the 
bench. The partners began their practice in Chicago the year fol- 
lowing the great Chicago fire, and their exceptional ability soon 
gave their services a wide demand. Much of their practice was in 
the field of corporation and commercial law, and for a number of 
years they were attorneys for the First National Bank of Chicago. 
Some of the cases in which Mr. Brown won his reputation as a 
lawyer may be briefly mentioned: He was an attorney in People 
vs. Knickerbocker, called the Probate-Court Case, involving the 
constitutionality of that court; in the Sanitary District cases, in- 
volving the constitutionality of the Sanitary District laws; in Zirn- 
gibl vs. Calumet Company, involving a large amount of real estate 
on the Calumet River; and from 1894 to 1897 was counsel of the 
Xincoln Park commissioners, and among other matters represented 
the commissioners in the McKee scrip matter, where claimants 
under congressional scrip undertook to locate their warrant on mil- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 449 

lions of dollars' worth of property along the lake shore on the north 
side of Chicago. 

Judge Brown in 1893 was candidate for judge of the Superior 
Court. In 1903 he was elected a judge of the Cook County Circuit 
Court, his first term covering the years from 1903 to 1909, and was 
reelected in 1910. In 1904 he was appointed a justice of the Appel- 
late Court in the First District, and was reappointed in 1910, the 
office which he now holds. Judge Brown has long been active in 
the democratic party, and is well known both at home and in the 
nation for his prominence in the single tax movement, and was a 
personal friend of the late Henry George. Judge Brown possesses 
a distinctive literary style, and it has been impressed not only in his 
decisions found in the reports of the Appellate Court, but in numer- 
ous articles on the single tax and other political and economic 
themes, and is also found in articles on medico-legal subjects, and 
in several monographs on the early history of Michigan and Illinois. 
Judge Brown is a member of the University, the City, the Chicago 
Literary, the Mid-Day, the Press and Iroquois clubs. He is also 
held in high esteem in the Chicago Bar Association, and the Chicago 
Law Club. On June 25, 1884, Judge Brown married Helen Ger- 
trude Eagle, of an old Detroit family. To their marriage were born 
five children : Edward Eagle, Helen Dalton, Walter Elliott, Robert 
Osgood, and Mary Wilmarth. Judge Brown became a convert to 
the Catholic faith in his early % youth. In 1893 ne served as presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts Society in Chicago. 

CHARLES ADLAI EWING. Distinguished for his intellectual 
attainments, for his profound knowledge of the law, for his business 
acumen and social gifts, the late Charles Adlai Ewing was no less 
noted for his solidity of character that made his public services, 
at different times, of inestimable value to his fellow citizens. In his 
death, while yet in the prime of life, the Decatur bar lost one of its 
distinguished members and Macon County a man hard to replace. 
He was one of a family of four children born to Fielding N. and 
Sarah Ann (Powers) Ewing, and was ever a dutiful son. 

Charles Adlai Ewing became a resident of Decatur in 1864 and 
this city remained his home throughout life. He was a student in 
the old Chicago University and later entered Princeton University, 
from which he carried off the honors of his class in 1867, subse- 
quently attending the Albany Law School, where he was graduated 
in the class of 1870. He entered into practice at Decatur and it was 
in the courts of Macon County that he pleaded and won his first 
case. As an exponent of the law he stood very high, natural ability 
combined with thorough preparation bringing professional success 
early in his career, and his first legal victories but presaged the later 
triumphs which brought about his recognition as a great lawyer. He 
continued in active practice until his death, which occurred Novem- 
ber 6, 1896. As a thoughtful and conscientious citizen he became 
interested in politics but never as an office seeker nor for financial 



450 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

gain. The basic principles of the democratic party appealed to his 
reason and he was willing to make personal sacrifices when he saw 
indications of his party turning aside from these principles. In 
1894 he became identified with that branch of the party known as 
sound money democrats and took an active part in a conference held 
at Chicago in August, 1895, the object of which was to establish a 
literary bureau for the education of the voters. He was subse- 
quently made chairman of the Democratic State Committee, in 
which position he toiled night and day, and when the campaign was 
at its height volunteered his services and took the stump and through 
his splendid oratory and convincing arguments rendered invaluable 
service. His many talents and his sterling character served to 
bring him before the public in several important and responsible 
capacities. During the last administration of Governor Oglesby he 
was honored by appointment as a member of a commission to revise 
the revenue laws of the State of Illinois, his associates on this board 
being some of the oldest and ablest public men of the state. 

On June 15, 1871, Mr. Ewing was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Giselle Palmer, a member of an exceedingly prominent family 
of New York. Mrs. Ewing is a daughter of Ambrose Wells and 
Mary (Bradley) Palmer, and a niece of Hon. Joseph P. Bradley, 
who was a United States Supreme Court judge from New Jersey. 
The father of Mrs. Ewing was born in New York, October 2, 1814, 
for many years was a prosperous merchant in Albany, and died 
August 15, 1889. The mother of Mrs. Ewing survived until April 
17, 1909. Mrs. Ewing was their only child. Seven children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Ewing, five of whom survive, one son, who 
worthily bears his father's honored name, being a member of the 
prominent law firm of Outten, Ewing, McCullough & Wierman, 
with offices over the National Bank Building at Decatur. The late 
Charles A. Ewing was a valued member of both County and State 
Bar associations, and was the first president of the Decatur Club. 
He possessed a winning personality, was very companionable and 
thus was welcome in social circles and additionally was known to 
those who were nearest to him as considerate, tender, strong and 
courageous. 

Charles Adlai Ewing, son of the late Charles A. Ewing, was 
born at Decatur, Illinois, April 18, 1878. His primary education 
was secured in the public schools and after attending both the High 
School and a collegiate preparatory school, he entered his father's 
alma mater, Princeton University, and the University of Illinois, 
and was graduated in June, 1903. He was at Princeton while Presi- 
dent Woodrow Wilson was at the head of the institution. Mr. 
Ewing was admitted to the bar in May, 1903, and as an attorney 
has rtiade rapid progress and more than justified his choice of career. 
On April 14, 1904, Mr. Ewing was married to Miss Idelle Kerrick, 
who is a daughter of L. H. Kerrick, of Bloomington, Illinois, and 
they have two daughters, Sarah E. and Mary I. The family belongs 
to the Presbyterian Church. Like his father, Mr. Ewing finds con- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 451 

genial his membership in the Country Club. The family resides at 
No. 509 Ewing Avenue, Decatur. 

JUDGE CHARLES J. SCOFIELD has practiced law or has been on 
the bench in Hancock County for forty years. For twelve years 
he was one of the judges of the Sixth Judicial Circuit, and for four 
years of that time was a member of the Appellate Court. By his 
work as a lawyer and judge, by his abilities as a public speaker, his 
service to church and in the public interests, Judge Scofield is one 
of the most prominent lawyers of Illinois. Possessed of scrupulous 
honesty and a fine sense of justice, his associates unite in declaring 
him to have been one of the most competent men who ever sat on 
the Circuit Court bench in that district. 

Charles J. Scofield was born at Carthage, Illinois, December 25, 
1853. His parents were Charles R. and Elizabeth (Crawford) Sco- 
field. The Scofield ancestors came from England and settled about 
Stamford, Connecticut, during the seventeenth century, while on the 
maternal side the Crawfords came from Scotland and were early 
settlers in Kentucky. Charles R. Scofield, who was born in Dewitt- 
ville, New York, in 1821, was a former lawyer in Hancock County, 
having come to that county in 1851, and joining his brother, Bryant 
T. Scofield, who was one of the most prominent and early attorneys 
of Carthage. He read law under his brother, and subsequently 
became his partner in practice. Later Charles R. Scofield entered 
partnership with David Mack under the firm name of Mack & Sco- 
field, and that firm was without doubt during its existence the strong- 
est legal combination in Hancock County. This relation was dis- 
solved by the death of Mr. Scofield in January, 1857. 

Charles J. Scofield acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Carthage, and in 1868 entered the Christian University at 
Canton, Missouri, where he was graduated with the degree Bachelor 
of Arts in the class of 1871. The following three years were spent 
as a teacher in the Carthage high schools, and during his spare 
time he read law with his uncle, Bryant T. Scofield, and also with 
William C. Hooker and George Edmunds, who occupied the same 
office. Admitted to the bar in June, 1875, Judge Scofield in the 
following October was appointed master in chancery for the Circuit 
Court of Hancock County, and held that office until his elevation 
to the bench. In February, 1879, he formed a partnership with 
Henry W. Draper, under the firm name of Draper & Scofield, and 
that partnership was dissolved by the death of Mr. Draper July 8, 
1 88 1. His next associate was Timothy J. Scofield, a brother now 
practicing law at Chicago, who had been recently admitted to the 
bar, and the firm of Scofield & Scofield was for several years well 
and favorably known to the Hancock County bar. In the fall of 
1884 A. W. O'Harra was admitted to the firm, which became Sco- 
field, O'Harra & Scofield. In June, 1885, Charles J. Scofield was 
elected one of the three judges of what was then the Sixth Judicial 
Circuit of Illinois, comprising the seven counties of Hancock, Adams, 



452 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Pike, McDonough, Fulton, Schuyler and Brown. Thus began Judge 
Scofield's long career on the bench. At the expiration of the first 
term of six years, he was re-elected, and thus gave twelve years of 
able and impartial service to the courts of justice of the state. In 
1897 Judge Scofield was urged to accept another term, but declined 
in order to devote his time to private practice. In 1893 he was 
appointed by the Supreme Court of the state as one of the judges 
of the Appellate Court for the Fourth District, and sat upon that 
bench for four years, until the close of his second term as circuit 
judge. Since retiring from the bench Judge Scofield has been 
engaged in practice with offices in Carthage, though his practice is 
one of unusual importance and takes him all over the state and to 
other states. 

Judge Scofield, had he not devoted himself to the law, would 
undoubtedly have made a name in church affairs, and as it is has 
filled many pulpits as assistant minister, and holds the degree of 
LL. D. from Eureka College and from Christian University at Can- 
ton, Missouri. He has long been a student of theology and practical 
religion, and among other distinctions is the author of two works, 
both on religious themes, one dealing with the temperance question, 
under the title "A Subtle Adversary," and the other a discussion of 
various problems of Christian faith, under the name of "Altar 
Stairs." Both volumes have had large sales. Judge Scofield's ability 
as an orator has brought his services into demand for public ad- 
dresses before many conventions and meetings in Boston, Denver, 
Chicago, and elsewhere. Judge Scofield in April, 1909, formed a 
partnership for the general practice of law with J. Paul Califf. Their 
law library is conceded to be one of the finest private libraries out- 
side the city of Chicago. Judge Scofield is a democrat in politics, 
and was one of the electors of the State of Illinois who cast the 
electoral vote of the state for Wilson and Marshall for president 
and vice president. Judge Scofield has been a man of large affairs 
and interests, and though much of his time has been given to relig- 
ious work, he has never accepted any remuneration for his services 
in the pulpit of the Christian Church. 

Judge Scofield was married September 12, 1876, to Miss Rose 
Spitler, daughter of Dr. Adam Spitler, of Carthage. Mrs. Scofield 
was graduated from Carthage College with the degree A. B., in 
1876, and both she and her husband were awarded the degree Master 
of Arts. She is an active member of the Woman's Club, and is 
prominent in both church and charitable affairs. Their home is at 
744 East Main Street, Carthage. Judge Scofield is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

JUDGE RICHARD S. TUTHILL. By his continued service on the 
circuit bench of Cook County since 1887 and by the fine care, un- 
derstanding and patience with which he administered the Juvenile 
Court of Chicago from its inception until it had become an institu- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 453 

tion of recognized value throughout America, Judge Richard S. 
Tuthill has undoubted rank among the foremost of Illinois jurists. 

Richard S. Tuthill was born November 10, 1841, at Tuthill's 
Prairie, Jackson County, Illinois, a son of Daniel Braley and Sally 
(Strong) Tuthill. His Puritan ancestors emigrated to New England 
prior to 1640. His father in 1829 moved from Vermont to Southern 
Illinois, and was a prominent educator. Judge Tuthill's maternal 
great-uncle, Maj.-Gen. Samuel Strong, commanded the Vermont 
Volunteers in the Battle of Plattsburg during the War of 1812. 

Judge Tuthill was liberally educated, being graduated A. B. from 
Middlebury College in Vermont in 1863. He received his A. M. 
from the same institution in 1868, and several colleges, including 
his alma mater, have since bestowed upon him the honorary title 
of LL. D. Immediately after his graduation in 1863 Judge Tuthill 
went to Vicksburg, where his father's friend, Gen. John A. Logan, 
was commanding a division, and he had his first service under that 
leader as a volunteer citizen scout. General Logan afterward se- 
cured for him a commission in Company H of the first Michigan 
Light Artillery, one of the most efficient batteries in the western 
army. He served as second and first lieutenant in this company, 
which was attached to the Seventeenth Army Corps in the Army 
of Tennessee, and served until he resigned, May 29, 1865, at the 
close of the war. Judge Tuthill had begun the study of law before 
he entered the army, was admitted to the bar in i860, and from 
that year until 1873 was in practice at Nashville and served as 
attorney-general of the Nashville Circuit during 1867-71. 

Judge Tuthill has been a member of the Chicago bar since 1873, 
and from 1875 to 1879 was city attorney of Chicago. Under ap- 
pointment from President Arthur he served as United States- dis- 
trict attorney for the Northern District of Illinois from 1884 * 
1886. In 1887 he was elevated to the bench as judge of the Cir- 
cuit Court of Cook County, and has been regularly re-elected to 
that office, his last endorsement by the people being in June, 1915. 
Of his career as a jurist it will be appropriate to quote an estimate 
written by one who has long been familiar with his services on the 
bench : "The judicial office is ordinarily not fruitful of events long 
remembered or upon which historians are likely to dwell. Indeed, 
it may be said that, as a rule, the less conspicuous the work of the 
judge is and the more transient the comment which his judicial acts 
produce, the better it is for the land in which he serves. Judges are 
not ordained to make, but to administer the law. Nevertheless it is 
the case that in the discharge of judicial duties imposed by law upon 
him. Judge Tuthill has become known and honored not only through- 
out the United States but in the greater part of Europe. In 1899 
what is now known as the Juvenile Court of Illinois was created by 
act of the legislature and by the unanimous vote of his associates 
upon the bench, Judge Tuthill was selected to preside over that 
court. As afterwards proved, a better choice could not have been 
made. Patient, considerate, ready to listen to all that the humblest 



454 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

had to say, broad minded and sympathetic, he took up the work as 
a labor of love. The report of inspectors and policemen, the plaint 
of fathers and mothers, the appeal of the poor and the outcast, the 
little child and the hardened hoodlum were heard by him with that 
tender consideration and intelligent regard to the welfare of the 
community, parent, friend and child, which only a man of his great 
learning, wide experience and profound knowledge of human nature 
could give. The Juvenile Court was, from the outset, under his 
administration a triumphant success, vindicating the faith of its pro- 
jectors and realizing the hopes of the humane men and women who 
had called it into being. An incident worthy to be remembered in 
this connection was the raising of one hundred thousand dollars 
with which a spacious farm of nearly a thousand acres was bought 
and presented to the State as a site for the St. Charles School for 
Boys. This much needed and admirable institution will serve to 
perpetuate the memory of the work done by Richard S. Tuthill for 
the youth of our country. Judge Tuthill became in universal de- 
mand as a writer, speaker and counselor for those who wished to 
establish a tribunal wherein could be judicially determined what 
had best be done for neglected, dependent and delinquent children ; 
and to his efforts, his zeal and experience more than to any other 
person is due the painstaking, intelligent, humane and tender care 
which juvenile courts now exercise ' concerning the multitude of 
juvenile waifs living, growing and dying about us. Of him most 
truly is it said 'justum virum fortiter in re.' 5: 

Judge Tuthill was a member of the board of trustees of the 
St. Charles School for Boys until a change in the law gave the ad- 
ministration into other hands. He has served as president of the 
Chicago Law School, and is a member of the various legal associa- 
tions. He is a member of the Illinois, the Hamilton, University 
and Evanston Golf clubs, is active in the Grand Army of the Re- 
public and the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, having served 
as commander of the latter in 1893, and is a member of the Grand 
Army Hall and Memorial Association. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, and a member of the Episcopal Church. Judge Tuthill was 
a delegate in 1880 to the Republican National Convention, and was 
one of the 306 delegates who voted to the last for the nomination 
of General Grant. 

On August 24, 1868, Judge Tuthill married Jane Frances Smith 
of Vergennes, Vermont. She died at Nashville, Tennessee, Decem- 
ber 22, 1872, leaving a daughter, Eliza S., who married Frank D. 
Ketcham. On January 2, 1877, Judge Tuthill married Harriet Mc- 
Key, daughter of Edward McKey, a merchant of Janesville, Wiscon- 
sin, who died April 29, 1909. In September, 1911, Judge Tuthill 
married Susan Payne Trimble. By his second wife Judge TuthilPs 
children were : Zoe Gertrude, wife of J. M. Fiske, Jr. ; Mary Eliz- 
abeth, wife of Alfred Borden ; Lilian McKey, wife of Thomas Hill 
Sidley; Genevieve Harmon, wife of James A. Linn, Jr.; Richard 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 455 

S., Jr., and Harriet McKey Tuthill. He has thirteen grandchildren. 
His residence is in Evanston, Illinois. 

RICHARD S. TUTHILL, JR. The only son of Judge Tuthill is 
now an active member of the Chicago bar and on his individual 
ability has proved himself a worthy member of the profession which 
his father has so distinctly honored. 

Richard S. Tuthill, Jr., was born in Chicago November 19, 1885, 
was educated in the public schools, in the Lewis Institute of Chi- 
cago and in Whipple Academy at Jacksonville, Illinois, graduating 
in 1903. He gained his higher education at Williams College, Wil- 
liamstown, Massachusetts, graduating A. B. in 1907, and on return- 
ing to Chicago entered the law department of Northwestern 
University, and finished the course and received the degree LL. B. 
in June, 1910. While at law school he entered the office of Walter 
W. Ross, and remained as his associate for 2^/2 years after being 
admitted to the bar. For the past three years he has been associated 
with Winston, Payne, Strawn & Shaw, with offices in the First 
National Bank Building. Mr. Tuthill is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association, the University Club, the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion, the Evanston Country Club, and the Phi Delta Phi 
Law Fraternity. 

Mr. Tuthill was married in May, 1915, to Caroline Elizabeth 
Garrett of St. Louis. He lives in Evanston. 

WILLIAM EMIL TRAUTMANN has been a prominent lawyer in 
Southern Illinois many years, and gained special prominence over 
the state in the office of United States attorney for the Eastern Dis- 
trict of Illinois. President Roosevelt appointed him to that posi- 
tion May 27, 1905, and on February 22, 1910, he was reappointed 
by President Taft. , 

He was born at Caseyville, Illinois, August 15, 1872, a son of 
Frederick and Dorothea (Deck) Trautmann. Mr. Trautmann 
received his higher education in McKendree College at Lebanon, 
Illinois, where he graduated LL. B. from the law department in 
1893, and subsequently continued his studies in the literary depart- 
ment, graduating Bachelor of Science in 1895 and Master of 
Science in 1898. In the meantime he had been admitted to the bar, 
and has been in active practice at East St. Louis since 1897. For 
four terms Mr. Trautmann was a member of the Illinois House of 
Representatives, from 1898 to 1906, and he took a prominent part 
in the deliberations of the legislative body and was one of the 
republican leaders in the House. He is a member of the Illinois 
State Bar Association and other professional organizations, is a 
Methodist, a Mason, and belongs to the East St. Louis Commer- 
cial and St. Clair Country clubs. On November 25, 1910, he mar- 
ried Evelyn L. Kinne of Bloomington, Illinois. 

JUDGE ARTHUR H. FROST. Few members of the Illinois bar are 
more secure in the honors of the profession and the esteem of their 



456 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

associates than Judge Frost, who for more than twenty years has 
been identified with public office at Rockford, and is now serving in 
the office of circuit judge, a position through which he is known all 
over Northern Illinois. 

Arthur Henry Frost was born at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, May 
12, 1855, was brought to Rockford in 1861, and finished his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Illinois. His law studies were pursued 
in the office of Norman C. Warner, and he was admitted to the bar 
in 1878. Thus his connections with the Illinois bar make him one 
of the older rrien in active practice in Northern Illinois. 

Judge Frost was in active practice until 1892, and was then 
elected state's attorney and served for ten years. He resigned dur- 
ing his third term in 1902 to become candidate for the office of cir- 
cuit judge, was elected and by re-election remains on the bench, 
one of the most popular circuit judges in north Central Illinois. 

Judge Frost is a director of the Forest City National Bank, is a 
member of the Winnebago County Bar Association and the State 
Bar Association, and belongs to the Hamilton Club of Chicago, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Masonic order and 
the Knights of Pythias and the Rockford Country Club. 

JOHN F. VOIGT is secretary and treasurer of the Illinois State 
Bar Association, and is engaged in the general practice of the law 
at Chicago as a member of the firm of Richards, Voigt & Darby, 
with offices at 72 West Adams Street. 

Mr. Voigt came into prominence in the Illinois bar by a suc- 
cessful career as a lawyer in Coles County, and by four years of 
service as assistant United States attorney at Chicago, from 1909 to 
1913. In 1912 Mr. Voigt was assigned to the handling of the 
anti-trust cases. He is professor of equity in the Hamilton Col- 
lege of Law at Chicago. 

John F. Voigt was born September 7, 1869, at Mattoon, Illi- 
nois, a son of John F. and Anna C. (Hess) Voigt. In 1888 he 
graduated from the Mattoon High School, was a student in the 
Illinois College at Jacksonville during 1890-91, and in 1896 took 
his degree Ph. B. from the University of Chicago and also his de- 
gree in law from the Chicago College of Law. After his admis- 
sion to the bar Mr. Voigt returned to his home city of Mattoon, 
where he served as city attorney and was also state's attorney of 
Coles County until accepting the appointment as assistant United 
States attorney. 

For a number of years he has been active in republican party 
affairs. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, as past grand, with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and with the various Masonic bodies including the Oriental 
Consistory and the Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. 
Voigt is a member of the Hamilton Club, the Illinois Athletic 
Club and the Chicago Literary Club, and his church is the Pres- 
byterian. 





a 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 457 

December 7, 1912, at Mattoon, he married Florence Edna Bell, 
daughter of Dr. F. E. Bell, mayor of Mattoon. They have one 
daughter, Marian Edna Voigt. 

EDWARD J. BRUNDAGE. Senior member of the firm of Brundage, 
Landon & Holt, with offices in the Westminster building, Edward 
J. Brundage has been a member of the Chicago bar since 1892, and 
outside of the courts and the bar his name is widely familiar 
through his service as president of the Board of County Com- 
missioners of Cook County, and as former corporation counsel of 
Chicago. In many cases of general public interest in the past fif- 
teen years the name of Mr. Brundage has appeared as one of the 
chief Counsel. His high standing as a lawyer and citizen is -thor- 
oughly appreciated, and his services and influence have helped to 
mold the Chicago of this century. 

Edward Jackson Brundage was born at Campbell, New York, 
May 13, 1869, a son of Victor and Maria L. (Armstrong) Brundage. 
In 1880 his parents removed to Detroit, Michigan, and his educa- 
tion, previously acquired through attendance at the public schools 
of Campbell, was continued in Detroit until 1883. At the age of 
fourteen he became self supporting and is an example of a success- 
ful lawyer who created his own early opportunities. He began 
working in a railroad office in Detroit at the age of fourteen and 
when the general office was removed to Chicago two years later he 
followed it, and by 1888 had risen to the position of chief clerk. 
He studied law in the intervals of other duties, and by 1892 was 
qualified and admitted to the Illinois bar. Mr. Brundage was 
graduated from the Chicago College of Law, LL. B. in 1893. 

Mr. Brundage was elected a member of the Illinois House of 
Representatives from the Sixth District in the Forty-first and Forty- 
third General Assemblies, and in November, 1904, was elected 
president of the Board of County Commissioners of Cook County 
and reelected in November, 1906. With the possible exception of 
the office of mayor of Chicago, no other position in Cook County 
carries with it graver responsibilities than that of president of the 
County Board. That office involves heavier duties than the posi- 
tion of governor in many states. The charity service alone involves 
the administration of several great institutions and the expenditure 
of millions of dollars of public money. Mr. Brundage came into 
the office with a reputation as a hard worker and a public adminis- 
trator with certain definite ideals as to efficiency and honesty in the 
handling of public office as a public trust. The introduction of 
business-like, competent and honest methods into the administra- 
tion of the county commissioner's office is in an important degree 
credited to the work of Mr. Brundage. When at the beginning of 
his term he stated that "politics has no business in a charitable in- 
stitution where the poor, the sick and the insane are being cared 
for," he set up a standard which was typical of all his subsequent 
work and acts as president of the County Board. He introduced 



458 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

a modified form of civil service in the appointment of members 
to the county hospital staff and throughout his administration 
was an earnest worker in behalf of an institutional service that 
should not be hampered by political expedients. 

Besides the administration of the various county institutions 
the term of Mr. Brundage was made noteworthy as a constructive 
enterprise in the erection of the splendid new county building. The 
efficiency, economy and thoroughness with which this task was 
carried out under his and subsequent administrations have fre- 
quently been commended with due reflection of credit upon Mr. 
Brundage. When he came into office the old courthouse was little 
more than a disreputable ruin. A proposal to remodel the old 
building at a cost of half a million dollars had been vetoed in a 
previous election, but President Brundage determined the county 
should have an entirely new building to cost five million dollars. 
He appointed a committee of leading Chicago business men who 
examined the old building, reported that it was not worth repairing, 
and recommended the proposed bond issue for a new structure. 
The bond issue was approved at the following city election, and 
five months later the work had begun in demolishing the old ruin 
and the plans for the new building were already perfected. 
Throughout the course of planning and construction of the new 
courthouse, Mr. Brundage was the man whose hard common sense 
and insistence upon efficiency and economy finally gave Chicago 
what has been pronounced as the finest county building in America, 
which was completed without a hint of extravagance and with such 
rapidity that the building was ready for occupancy soon after Mr. 
Brundage retired from the presidency of the board. The Cook 
County Courthouse is a beautiful architectural monument, yet dig- 
nity and classical outline have not been secured at the expense 
of such perfect adaptation to use and convenience as are found 'in 
modern business office buildings. Another feature of his adminis- 
tration as president of the County Board was the carrying out of 
his plan to provide a permanent individual home for the Juvenile 
Court. 

Mr. Brundage resigned his office as president of the Board of 
County Commissioners April 16, 1907, to accept the office of cor- 
poration counsel of the City of Chicago, and continued his duties 
in that capacity until a change of administration from a republican 
to- a democratic mayor in 1911. Again in that office his counsel 
was invaluable in solving the legal problems connected with a 
progressive and constructive period of the city's affairs. Since 
leaving the office of corporation counsel Mr. Brundage has been 
devoted to the general practice of law. It is characteristic of the 
habits and nature of the man that while in public office he made 
his office distinctive on account of the capable performance of its 
functions, and now that he is once more a private citizen, and 
while handling with rare judgment and ability his work as a law- 
yer, seldom allows his name to come into public print and desires 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 459 

only the recognition and rewards of the plain and unassuming in- 
dividual man of affairs. 

He was vice president for Illinois of the Pan American Exposi- 
tion at Buffalo, and in many ways has made himself a useful factor 
in the progressive citizenship of Chicago. Mr. Brundage is a 
Knight Templar Mason, a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
Royal League, and the Columbian Knights, and belongs to the 
Chicago Athletic, the University, and the Industrial clubs. He 
was married December 17, 1913, to Germaine Vernier. 

BURNETT M. CHIPPERFIELD. While Mr. Chipperfield has for 
many years been actively identified with the Illinois Bar, and is now 
senior member of the law firm of Chipperfield & Chipperfield at 
Canton, his name and services are at once recognized all over the 
state because of his important work as a legislator. In the field 
of social and industrial welfare legislation, it is doubtful if any 
name is associated with more valuable bills and amendments now 
in operation in the body of Illinois statutes, than that of Mr. Chip- 
perfield. Mr. Chipperfield's partner in the practice of law at Canton 
is his brother, Judge C. E. Chipperfield. 

Burnett M. Chipperfield is a native of the old town of Dover 
in Bureau County, Illinois, and was born there June 17, 1870. His 
father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and as 
the rules of the church at that time permitted a pastor to remain 
in one location not more than three years, the son spent his child- 
hood and youth in many different localities and was educated in the 
public schools of Sandwich, Sterling, Marseilles, Seneca, Rock 
Falls, Kankakee, Chillicothe and Chicago, and also in Hamlin Uni^ 
versity, a Methodist institution at St. Paul, Minnesota. For a time 
he was associated with the Commercial National Bank of Chicago, 
now consolidated under the name of the Continental and Com- 
mercial Bank, the largest bank west of New York. Later he made 
a surveying trip to the northwest, and for a time taught in the 
Green Prairie schools in Minnesota, and for a year was assistant 
principal of the school at Cuba, Illinois. 

Mr. Chipperfield was admitted to the Illinois Bar. In 1894 
he was elected city attorney of Canton, and that was his first im- 
portant office. His one term proved a revelation of his progressive 
attitude in all matters, subsequently best illustrated in his legislative 
career. One of the results of his administration while in the office 
of city attorney was a complete revision of the city ordinances and 
a thorough systematization of the city legal department. It is due 
to him that the system originated of suspending fines for misbe- 
havior and suspending sentences with the understanding that the 
favored individuals seek in other fields an opportunity to begin life 
anew. In disposing of five hundred criminal cases the city won all 
but two or three, and Mr. Chipperfield was attorney for the muni- 
cipality in litigation involving more than a total of $150,000. 

At the expiration of his term as city attorney Mr. Chipperfield 



460 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

was elected states attorney of Fulton County, and was the first 
republican elected to that office. His service in the General Assem- 
bly was during the Forty-third Legislature, representing both Knox 
and Fulton counties. Of primary importance in mentioning his 
legislative record was the bill reforming the convict system of the 
state. Mr. Chipperfield introduced the bill, and it passed the house 
by unanimous vote, and proved so far reaching and valuable in its 
operation that it proved a model for similar legislation undertaken 
in many other states. He made a close study of safety regulations 
in various industries, and was author of the bill regulating the firing 
of shot in coal mines, a measure which did much to minimize the 
danger from explosions. He also introduced a bill increasing the 
death limit from five thousand dollars to ten thousand dollars, and 
various other amendments to the mining laws. Another beneficial 
bill which he steered through both the house and senate prevented 
employers from compelling men to remain in their employ by with- 
holding a portion of their wages. He was also an advocate of and 
consistently supported all measures prescribing more sanitary shops 
and better inspection under the child labor law, and also supported a 
free employment bureau. He worked for the abolition of the intol- 
erable conditions of the sweat shops maintained by clothing manu- 
facturers, and voted against the increase of salaries of members of 
the Legislature and other state officers. During his presence in 
the Legislature Mr. Chipperfield was chairman of the committee on 
penal and reformatory institutions, a member of the committee on 
corporations, on fish and game, on judiciary and judicial apportion- 
ments, military affairs, mines and mining, railroads, rules, and also 
a member of the republican steering committee. 

Partly through his legislative record, his recognized knowledge 
of social and industrial and general political conditions, and his 
forceful ability as a speaker Mr. Chipperfield has been much in 
demand as an orator, and there is not a county in Illinois nor a 
state in the Middle West in which he has not been urged to speak. 
For years Mr. Chipperfield has been a member of the board of 
trustees of the Western Illinois State Normal School at Macomb. 

Mr. Chipperfield was married in 1895 to Miss Clara L. Ross of 
Canton. They have a son and daughter. Mr. Chipperfield is 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and in 
politics is a republican. 

RUDOLPH MATZ. Born in Chicago, December n, 1860, the son 
of the prominent- architect, Otto H. Matz, Rudolph Matz has 
been an active member of the Chicago bar since 1887, and for 
many years has divided his time among important legal and busi- 
ness interests and various benevolent and civic agencies. 

As a boy Rudolph Matz was a student in the Sheldon, the 
Ogden and the Haven public schools and the Central High School 



461 

of Chicago, and in 1882 graduated A. B. from Williams College. 
For two years following his collegiate course he was an instructor 
in the Higher School for Boys, later the University School of 
Chicago, and in 1886 graduated with valedictorian honors from 
the Northwestern University Law School. During 1885-86 he was 
also a student in the office of Dexter, Herrick & Allen, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1886, and the following year was spent in 
travel abroad, during which he went around the world. He then 
became an assistant in the firm of Barnum, Rubens & Ames, and 
in 1888 became associated in practice with Walter L. Fisher, under 
the firm name of Matz & Fisher. In 1897 William C. Boyden was 
admitted to the partnership, which continued as Matz, Fisher & 
Boyden, and within the last few years there has been added to the 
firm William Warren Case and Laird Bell. Though Mr. Fisher 
withdrew from active practice in Chicago in March, 1911, to ac- 
cept appointment from President Taft as Secretary of the Inte- 
rior, the firm style remained unchanged and he has since resumed 
an active partnership. Illinois lawyers generally recognize this 
as one of the strongest legal combinations in the state. For more 
than a quarter of a century its professional relations have been of 
a varied and important nature, too extensive for any brief outline. 
It may be mentioned that Matz & Fisher were attorneys for the 
Ways and Means Committee of the World's Columbian Exposition 

Mr. Matz is a director and president of the Legal Aid Society 
of Chicago, and has membership in the Chicago, the Illinois State 
and the American Bar associations, and is a trustee of the Civic 
Federation of Chicago. As executor of the estate of the late Charles 
M. Henderson, he served as vice president and director of that 
wholesale boot and shoe company from 1896 until 1902, and is 
now a director in the United Shoe Machinery Company, and a di- 
rector of the Chicago Savings Bank and Trust Company, and a 
director in the Chicago Auditorium Association. He has also 
served as a member of the executive committee of the Western 
Society for the Suppression of Vice. In politics he is a republican. 
While a resident of Chicago, Mr. Matz was a trustee of the Second 
Presbyterian Church from 1902 to 1904, and is now a trustee of 
the Winnetka Congregational Church, his home being in Hubbard 
Woods. Mr. Matz is a member of the University, the Indian Hill 
Country, the Chicago Literary, the Chicago Law and the City 
clubs, and the Alpha Delta Phi and Williams clubs of New York 
City. He belongs to the Alpha Delta Phi and Phi Beta Kappa 
college fraternities. 

His father, Otto H. Matz, has been an architect in Chicago since 
1854, and one of the oldest and most prominent members of his 
profession. Otto H. Matz was born in Berlin, Germany, March 
8, 1830. During the '505 he was architect for the Illinois Central 
and the Chicago & Alton railways, and built the Illinois Central 
depot at Chicago that was destroyed in the fire of 1871. During 
the war he was a civil engineer, with the rank of major, serving 



462 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

on the staff of Generals Fremont, Halleck and Grant. He worked 
with General Wilson in the preparation of the plans for the cap- 
ture of Vicksburg, and rode into that city with General Grant. 
From 1869 to 1871 he was school architect of Chicago, and in 
1892, while county architect, erected the present Criminal Court 
Building. After the Chicago fire he was awarded first prize in 
competition with other architects for plans for the City Hall and 
County Building. Otto H. Matz was married October 26, 1857, 
to Mary Elizabeth Lewis, who was born in Pulaski, Oswego County, 
N. Y., December 13, 1837, and came to Chicago in 1852. Her 
brother, Hiram LaMotte Lewis, was for many years a prominent 
Chicago lawyer, a partner of the late Thomas Hoyne. Mrs. Matz, 
who died November 13, 1911, was a leader in charitable and edu- 
cational work, was for many years president of the Mary Thomp- 
son Hospital for women and children, one of the founders of the 
Fortnightly Club, and at one time president of the Chicago Wo- 
man's Club. 

Rudolph Matz married November 19, 1890, Miss Florence 
Humphrey Henderson, daughter of Charles M. and Emily (Hol- 
lingsworth) Henderson. Mrs. Matz is interested in charitable 
work and a director of the Illinois Training School for Nurses, 
and of the Legal Aid Society of Chicago. Her father, Charles 
Mather Henderson, who was born in Connecticut in 1834, a direct 
descendant of Cotton Mather, was a prominent business man of 
Chicago from 1853 until his death in 1896. He was president of 
the C. M. Henderson Company, one of the largest boot and shoe 
houses in the West, and was also active in banking and civic affairs. 
After the fire of 1871 he assisted in the reorganization of the Chi- 
cago Fire Department, was at one time president of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, for many years superintendent of the 
Railroad Chapel Sunday School, was one of the founders of the 
Citizens Association and of the Chicago Relief and Aid Society, 
and a trustee of the Home for Incurables and of the Children's Aid 
Society. Mr. and Mrs. Matz have three children: Ruth Hen- 
derson, Charles Henderson and Emily Florence. 

HON. WALTER REEVES. While the late Walter Reeves was for 
more than thirty years identified with the Illinois bar, and gained 
many of the best distinctions and rewards of the successful and 
high-minded lawyer, his name is probably most familiar over the 
state at large through his eight years of service in Congress. In his 
home city of Streator and in La Salle County he had few peers as 
a lawyer, public leader and public-spirited citizen. 

Walter Reeves was born near Brownsville, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 25, 1848, and died April 9, 1909. He was a son of Harrison 
and Maria (Leonard) Reeves. His father was of Scotch-English 
descent, a Pennsylvania farmer before coming to Illinois, and the 
mother gave to the late congressman a strain of German and Welsh 
blood. The family located on a farm in La Salle County, Illinois, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 463 

in 1856. Walter Reeves grew to manhood in the country district 
of La Salle County, gained his education by attending the public 
schools and through private study, and like many other successful 
lawyers, had an experience as a teacher. He studied law as oppor- 
tunity offered, and was admitted to the bar at the June term of the 
Supreme Court in 1875. Throughout his professional career his 
home was at Streator, where he showed remarkable talent either as 
counselor or as a jury advocate, and for a number of years had the 
choice of the most important and profitable litigation in the local 
courts. He was admitted to practice in the United States Supreme 
Court in 1884. 

Walter Reeves was a splendid type of the political leader when 
the republican party was supreme in Illinois. In 1894 he was 
nominated to succeed the late Gen. Thomas J. Henderson as 
candidate for Congress for the Eleventh Illinois District, and in 
the election received a plurality of nearly 5,000 votes, and a major- 
ity over his three opponents. His majorities were increased in 
the three succeeding elections. Of his work in Congress the fol- 
lowing has been said : "Regarding himself as a public servant whose 
duty it was to advance the best interests of those he represented, he 
began devoting his energies to the work of internal improvement 
in the country and was appointed a member of the committee on 
rivers and harbors. In the river and harbor bill passed by the 
fifty-fourth congress he obtained from the general government for 
improvements in the State of Illinois between eight and nine million 
dollars. His position was that 'in the midst of exceedingly hard 
times the laboring people should be assisted through providing work 
in these internal improvements and that the farmers and business 
men would also be benefited by the internal development of our 
country. Thus he accomplished more for the internal improvements 
of the state by general government than had been accomplished for 
a score of years. He also prepared and introduced a bill in congress 
to control the patent system of the United States, and while it was 
under consideration the leading labor paper of New York said that 
if it passed it would accomplish more for the laboring people of the 
United States than any other bill ever introduced in congress. He 
stood for progress, disapproving of useless expenditure. He did 
not believe in the practice of economy to the extent of hindering the 
onward march of progress. Realizing that a nation like an indi- 
vidual, must advance or retrogression follows." 

In 1876 Mr. Reeves married Miss Metta M. Cogswell, of Wash- 
ington, Connecticut, a daughter of Lucius T. Cogswell and a mem- 
ber of a very old and prominent New England family. Mrs. Reeves 
was graduated from Mount Holyoke Seminary of Massachusetts. 
In personality the late Mr. Reeves was described as a man of modest 
demeanor and entire absence of all parade and ostentation, together 
with a simple dignity born of innate virtue and self-respect. His 
own experience and natural kindness gave him a practical sympathy 



464 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

with all young men who were struggling for an education and a 
higher life. 

WILLIAM H. BOYS. For many years one of the acknowledged 
leaders of La Salle County bar, William H. Boys, was admitted to 
the Illinois bar before the Supreme Court at Mount Vernon in 1886, 
and since 1887 has been in almost continuous practice at Streator. 
In 1891 he became associated with the late Hon. Walter Reeves, 
and until their association was dissolved by the death of Mr. Reeves 
in 1909, their firm controlled the largest corporation and general 
practice in La Salle County. Mr. Boys has been unusually honored 
both in his profession and as a citizen of Streator and of the state. 

William H. Boys was born in Marshall County, Illinois, Decem- 
ber 1 8, 1862, a son of John and Catherine (Long) Boys. Both his 
parents were natives of Marshall County, and his father, who was 
a farmer, died in 1865 at the age of thirty-two. The mother subse- 
quently married John S. Smith, who died in 1875, and she passed 
away at the age of seventy-four. The two children were William 
H. Boys and Lillian, now the wife of Fred Towner. 

William H. Boys lived on the home farm in Marshall County 
until 1871, when he went with his mother to Streator, attended the 
public schools of that city, and finished his literary education in 
Hedding College at Abingdon, Illinois. He studied law in the office 
of Judge Thomas Shaw and Robert Edwards at Lacon, Illinois, was 
admitted to practice in the Illinois .courts in 1886, and in 1906 was 
admitted to practice in the United States District and Supreme 
Courts. His first work as a lawyer was done in Norton in Western 
Kansas, but in the fall of 1887 he returned to Streator, and in April, 
1889, was elected city attorney for a term of two years. In 1891 
he was elected mayor of Streator, and held that office two years. 
From 1894 to 1903 Mr. Boys attended to all the legal business of 
the firm of Reeves & Boys, while Mr. Reeves was in Congress and 
during that time the firm were local attorneys for the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railway, the Chicago & Alton Railroad, the 
Santa Fe and the Wabash railroads as well as the New York Cen- 
tral lines. Since the death of the senior partner, Mr. Boys has 
continued to act as counsel to these different' railways, and for 
twenty years their interests have formed a large share of his legal 
practice. He has also been attorney and still represents the more 
prominent corporations doing business in Streator. After the death 
of Mr. Reeves Mr. Boys took into partnership Russell C. Osborn 
and Edward M. Griggs, and he is now senior member of the firm 
of Boys, Osborn & Griggs. 

In January, 1905, Mr. Boys was appointed first assistant attor- 
ney-general under Atty.-Gen. W. H. Stead, and held that 
office eight months. From 1906 to January i, 1909, he was chair- 
man of the Illinois Railroad and Warehouse Commission, and dur- 
ing that time maintained his residence in Springfield. He has always 
been ready both as a lawyer and as a citizen to respond to the needs 



465 

of his home city, and for six years was president of the high school 
board. 

Mr. Boys is a member of the La Salle County Bar Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association and the American Bar Associa- 
tion. Fraternally he is affiliated with Streator Lodge, No. 607, A. 
F. & A. M.; Streator Chapter, No. 168, R. A. M.; Streator Com- 
mandery, No. 70, K. T. ; Streator Lodge, No. 591, B. P. O. E., and 
with Findley Lodge, No. 82, of the Knights of Pythias. He is also 
a member of Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine in Chicago, and is 
a charter member of the Streator Club. Politically his activities have 
identified him with the republican party. 

October 15, 1885, Mr. Boys married Miss Althea Stire, who was 
born in Marshall County April i, 1865, daughter of Francis H. and 
Lydia (Dey) Stire, her father a native of Pennsylvania and her 
mother of New York. Her father came to Illinois in the early '503, 
was a farmer, and during the war was for three years a soldier. 
After the war he was engaged in the grain business at Lacon, later 
a clothing merchant there, and finally removed to Indianapolis. Mr. 
and Mrs. Boys have one son, Thomas L., who was born in 1887, was 
educated in Lake Forest University, and is now assistant superin- 
tendent of the Barr Clay Company at Streator. 

JESSE HOLDOM. Since 1898 Judge Holdom has employed his 
judicial office in Cook County as a means of broad and able service 
to the community and during that time has sat on the bench of the 
Superior, Appellate and Circuit Courts of Cook County. It is 
through his position and service as a judge that his name is most 
familiar to Chicago people, though he has been a member of the 
Chicago bar more than forty years, served one term as president 
of the Illinois State Bar Association, both in his profession and in 
his civic interests has found many opportunities for useful work. 

Born in London, England, August 23, 1851, Jesse Holdom is a 
son of William and Eliza Holdom. His European ancestors were 
refugees from the massacre of St. Bartholomew, and in 1572 set- 
tled at Spitalfield in London, and for 300 years the Holdoms were 
all born in the same parish. Judge Holdom was educated at the 
Homerton College, London, and at the age of seventeen came to the 
United States, and has had his home in Chicago since July of that 
year. He studied law, part of the time with Joshua C. Knicker- 
bocker, and was admitted to the bar September 13, 1873. He con- 
tinued with Judge Knickerbocker until 1876, then became chief 
clerk with Tenneys, Flower & Abercrombie, and in 1878 became 
associated with the brother of Judge Knickerbocker under the firm 
name of Knickerbocker & Holdom, a law firm of substantial repu- 
tation and with influential connections during its existence of ten 
years. Judge Holdom after that practiced alone until his election 
to the bench as a judge of the Superior Court of Cook County in 
1898. In June, 1906, he became a justice of the Appellate Court in 
the First Illinois District. In the recent judicial elections of June, 

Vol. II 3 



466 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

1915, the vote given to Judge Holclom as a candidate for the Cir- 
cuit Court placed him high in the list of the sitting judges who were 
continued in office. As a lawyer perhaps his best reputation rests on 
his work in chancery and probate cases and in litigations involving 
wills and titles to real estate. 

Judge Holdom is a republican, and during 1897-98 was presi- 
dent of the Hamilton Club, and in 1909 was president of the Union 
League Club, and for several years was a member of its committee 
on political action. He was president of the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation in 1901-02. He is also a member of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Chicago Law Club and the Chicago Law Institute. He 
has also been identified with the Chicago Art Institute and his other 
interests outside of his profession are indicated by his membership 
in such organizations as the Bibliophile Society of Boston and the 
Caxton Club of Chicago. Judge Holdom is a book lover and has a 
large general library and also a. collection of rare and old books. He 
is a member of the National Geographic Society and the American 
Forestry Association. He is warden of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

HON JAMES M. GRAY. Among the distinguished men whose 
achievements in different directions brought honor to themselves and 
reflected credit upon the State of Illinois, no one is more easily 
recalled or is more sincerely mourned than the late James M. Gray, 
of Decatur. He had the sound learning and all the versatile abilities 
of the true lawyer, and supplementing these were the wisdom and 
efficiency of disinterested statesmanship. Largely to this combina- 
tion is due the fact that many admirable laws have been placed on 
the statute books of the State of Illinois within the last decade. 

From the beginning of his practice until his death Mr. Gray's 
home was in Decatur. There he won eminent success as a lawyer, 
for a number of years being regarded as one of the most brilliant 
criminal attorneys in the judicial district. Whether regarded in the 
light of a lawyer, legislator and public leader, or as an accomplished 
gentleman, the late James M. Gray well deserves the memory and 
gratitude of his native state. He was born in Ramsey, in Fayette 
County, Illinois, June i, 1862, one of the five children of Richard 
H. and Emily (Hall) Gray. His father moved from Fayette into 
Coles County, Illinois, and there became a prosperous farmer. 

The wholesome environment of the country and the rugged dis- 
cipline of the home farm were factors of importance during the 
formative period of James M. Gray's life. He attended the high 
schools of Ramsey and Vandalia, Illinois, and later the university at 
Valparaiso, Indiana. Following this came three years of school 
teaching, by which means he secured capital with which to continue 
his studies through the scientific course at Valparaiso, until graduat- 
ing with an A. B. degree in the class of 1886. Those were years of 
hard work when his earnestness of purpose was well tested in over- 
coming numerous obstacles in the path of his ambition for the law. 
Meanwhile he had begun the study of law in the office of Henry & 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 467 

Foulke, of Vandalia, Illinois, but later returned to the university to 
complete his course. He graduated from the law department in the 
class of 1890, with the well-deserved degree LL. B. His intellectual 
powers came to be thoroughly appreciated even during his college 
course, and while there he led his class and during his senior year 
at university was class president. He came to Decatur in June, 1890, 
and in the following fall was admitted to the bar. He was not long 
in winning recognition and a profitable clientage. For one year he 
practiced in partnership with James M. Lee, and after this associa- 
tion was discontinued he was in practice alone for fourteen years. 
His skill in the handling of criminal cases was demonstrated early 
in his career, and he soon found this class of practice absorbing his 
time and energies. Through his keen perception, knowledge of law, 
and brilliant oratory, he acquired a reputation as the leading criminal 
lawyer in his part of the state. He possessed wonderful powers as 
a speaker, and at all times and under all circumstances was an honest 
and fearless advocate of the right. In 1904 Mr. Gray formed a 
second law partnership, associating himself with I. A. Buckingham, 
a well-known attorney of Decatur. This professional connection 
was still existing at the time of Mr. Gray's death, which occurred 
at his home in Decatur June 6, 1912. He was then fifty years of age, 
in the prime of his powers, and his solid achievements entitle him 
to lasting recognition among the eminent lawyers of Central Illinois, 
and his death could only be regarded as premature because of the 
brilliant work which continued life would have enabled him to per- 
form. In spite of his many public activities and his personal affairs, 
Mr. Gray was never too busy or occupied to decline to give advice 
and legal opinion to younger members of the bar, and this helpful- 
ness is gratefully recalled by many lawyers now in practice in the 
City of Decatur. 

In early manhood Mr. Gray became interested in politics, and he 
grew into great influence in this field. His efforts for the demo- 
cratic party first came into notice in 1884, while in 1888 he was 
chosen as a leading campaign speaker. In 1890 he served as chair- 
man of the democratic city organization, and in 1891 of the county 
committee, in the meanwhile being elected a delegate to the state 
convention. He was elected a delegate to each succeeding state con- 
vention as long as he lived. In 1898 Mr. Gray was first elected to the 
State Legislature, and subsequently re-elected in 1900, 1902 and 1904. 
During his third term he was chairman of the democratic caucus and 
also chairman of the democratic steering committee. Although his 
representative district has long been dominated by a large republican 
majority, Mr. Gray gained the unique distinction of being the only 
man, republican or democrat, who was ever elected by the district 
for four terms in the Legislature. In his public work as in his prac- 
tice as a lawyer, he was a fearless champion of every cause he 
believed to be right, and his name appears conspicuously with the 
passing of admirable laws in the interests of the people. His loyal 
defense of his honest convictions was one of the strongest elements 



468 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

of his popularity. He continued in public life as long as he lived, 
and was an influential factor always in democratic ranks, where he 
was universally recognized as a leader. For many years he was 
chairman of Macon County's Democratic Executive Committee, and 
in 1908 was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 
Denver. In 1912 he was elected a member of the State Central 
Committee. While his interests and activities thus covered a wide 
outside field, he never neglected those pertaining to Decatur or 
Macon County, being ever ready to lend his influence and the pres- 
tige of his name to forward laudable movements for the general 
welfare. He was a prime factor in locating the James Millikin 
University at Decatur, securing the passage of the bill through the 
Legislature providing for its location. He was a highly respected 
member of the State Bar Association as well as of the Macon 
County bar, and was always proud of his position as a director in 
the latter. 

Mr. Gray was united in marriage June 14, 1894, to Miss Lillie M. 
Belt, a daughter of the late James M. Belt, formerly a prominent 
banker of Bunker Hill, Illinois, where he died February 4, 1906. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gray became the parents of two children, James M. 
and Lucile B. The former is now attending the University of Illi- 
nois at Champaign. The family belongs to the First Presbyterian 
Church at Decatur, of which congregation Mr. Gray was a liberal 
supporter for its many avenues of usefulness. He was a thirty- 
second degree Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He was 
also identified with the Elks. The Decatur Chamber of Commerce 
found in him an active worker, while his social qualities made him 
a welcome member of the Decatur and the Country Clubs. Perhaps, 
after all, it is in the home circle that his most admirable traits were 
shown, for surely no greater praise can be accorded anyone than to 
say that he was a devoted and tender husband, a careful and 
judicious father, a dependable friend, and a loyal citizen. All these 
relations and obligations of private life the late James M. Gray 
effectively performed. He was a man whose character as well as 
attainments may well be held up to the world as a stimulating 
example. 

SIGMUND ZEISLER has been one of the distinguished members of 
the Chicago bar for thirty years, and besides his prominence in the 
profession has exerted his influence as a vigorous thinker and a 
courageous public leader in behalf of many reform movements in 
political and social life. 

Sigmund Zeisler was born at Bielitz, Silesia, Austria, April n, 
1860, a son of Isaac L. and Anna (Kanner) Zeisler. He is a grad- 
uate of the Imperial College (Gymnasium) at Bielitz, and received 
the degree of Dr. Juris (Doctor of Jurisprudence) in 1883 from the 
University of Vienna. He soon afterwards came to America, and 
in 1844 graduated from the Northwestern Law School of Chicago 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 469 

with the degree LL. B., being admitted to the Illinois bar the same 
year. 

Mr. Zeisler was associate counsel for the defense in the anarchist 
cases in 1886-87. ^ e was chief assistant corporation counsel of 
Chicago in 1893-94, but with that exception has been chiefly engaged 
in private practice, and is now senior member of the law firm of 
Zeisler, Friedman & Zeisler with offices in the Straus Building. Since 
1904 he has served as Master in Chancery of the Circuit Court. 

Mr. Zeisler was prominent as a sound money democrat in the 
-campaign of 1896. He was one of the speakers at the first anti- 
imperialist meeting held west of the Alleghanies, in Central Music 
Hall at Chicago, April 30, 1899. He became a member of the 
executive committee of the American Anti-Imperialists League in 
October, 1899, and was acting chairman during the entire business 
session of the National Liberty Congress of the anti-imperialists at 
Indianapolis on August 16, 1900. In the campaign of 1900 he went 
all over the country as a speaker under the auspices of the National 
Democratic Campaign Committee, favoring the election of Mr. 
Bryan on the anti-imperialist issue. In 1904 he was president of the 
German-American Parker League. Since 1904 he has been vice 
president of the American Free Trade League and is one of the 
strong advocates of the more important economic issues embodied 
in the platforms of the democratic party. 

From 1899 to 1905 Mr. Zeisler was a member of the executive 
committee, and since 1905 has been on the advisory committee of 
the Municipal Voters League of Chicago. He is first vice president 
of the Civil Service Reform Association of Chicago ; a member of 
the executive committee of the Illinois Constitutional Convention 
League 1914-15 ; member of the executive committee of the, Chicago 
Society of Advocates ; member of the American Bar Association, 
Illinois State Bar Association, Chicago Bar Association, and .the 
Chicago Law Institute. 

Mr. Zeisler is a member of the following clubs : Law, Chicago 
Literary, Quadrangle, Iroquois, City, South Shore Country, Cliff 
Dwellers, The Little Room, Book and Play (president since 1907). 
He has been occasional contributor to reviews and law journals. 
His residence is at 5749 Woodlawn Avenue. Mr. Zeisler was mar- 
ried in Chicago October 18, 1885, to Fannie Bloomfield, recognized 
as one of the greatest living pianists. Their children are : Leonard, 
Paul and Ernst. 

DAVID B. LYMAN. At the time of his death, April 8, 1914, David 
B. Lyman was one of the oldest members of the Chicago bar. He 
had located in Chicago soon after the close of the Civil war, and 
together with a large practice as a lawyer combined extensive busi- 
ness interests, and from 1895 to 1902 was president of the Chicago 
Title & Trust Company. For many years he was one of the out- 
standing figures in Chicago commercial and professional life. 

Of his work as a lawyer, no better estimate perhaps can be 



470 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

found than one which appeared in Palmer's "Bench and Bar of 
Illinois," about fifteen years ago : "From the beginning Mr. Lyman's 
career at the bar has been one of marked success. He is an untir- 
ing worker, preparing his cases with the utmost precision, exhaustive 
in research, clear and concise in thought and logical in argument, 
and such qualities predestined him for a foremost place in his pro- 
fession. The history of the cases with which he has been connected 
would comprise a record of much of the important civil litigation 
that has been heard in the courts of Cook county for almost thirty 
years, and yet his legal business is somewhat peculiar in that much 
of it seldom finds its way into the courts. Mr. Lyman may be said 
to be more of a counselor than advocate, and it has become known 
to the business community that he will not advise the bringing of 
a suit except in strong cases, and this only when there is no remedy 
save in litigation. While real estate and corporation law has claimed 
much of his attention, he is equally proficient in other branches of 
practice and is always ready for attack or defense. A firm believer 
in the maxim that there is no excellence without labor, he is noted 
for his untiring industry and his painstaking preparation and man- 
agement of his cases, no less than for his ability and learning in 
the law. The one class of cases which he refuses altogether is that 
which comes under the general designation of criminal practice. 
Though he has probably a higher reputation as an able and learned 
counselor than as an advocate, his arguments carry more weight 
from the very honesty of his character than those of some more 
eloquent but less trusted lawyers." 

Varied experience in interesting environment filled the early 
years of the late David B. Lyman, and his mature life was one of 
exceptional achievement. He was born at Hilo, Hawaii, March 27, 
1840, and spent the first twenty years of his life in the picturesque 
surroundings of those Pacific islands. . His parents were of old New 
England and Pilgrim stock. His father, Rev. D. B. Lyman, was in 
early life a resident of New Hartford, Connecticut, and was a 
graduate from Williams College and the Andover Theological Semi- 
nary. In 1831 he married Miss Sarah Joiner of Royalton, Vermont, 
and soon afterward as missionaries for the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions they sailed for the 'Sandwich 
Islands, where they labored in the cause of Christianity more than 
fifty years. 

In Hawaii David Brainerd Lyman had the advantage of instruc- 
tion from his parents, and also acquired business training through 
service in several governmental posts, a training that was not only 
a part of his practical education but also gave him the means for 
a higher education in the United States. In 1859 Mr. Lyman 
embarked on a vessel at Honolulu, sailed around Cape Horn and 
arrived in Massachusetts in May, 1860. In September of the 
same year he was enrolled as a student in Yale College and was 
graduated A. B. in 1864. Then followed a course in the Harvard 
Law School, where he was graduated in 1866, and won one of the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 471 

two prizes for the best legal essays. During 1864-65 he was con- 
nected with the Sanitary Commission as hospital visitor, and had 
charge of the Fifth Corps Hospital of the Army of the Potomac, 
and also of the hospital at the Point of Rocks, Virginia. Later he 
had supervision of the Sanitary Commission station for the forces 
concentrated about Washington. Mr. Lvman was admitted to the 
Massachusetts bar in 18,66. In 1874 he received the degree Master 
of Arts from Yale University. 

A few months after his admission to the bar Mr. Lyman came 
to Chicago, spent two years as clerk in the office of Waite & Clark, 
and on July I, 1869, became associated with Col. Huntington W. 
Jackson in the firm of Lyman & Jackson. When this firm -was 
dissolved in 1895 it was said to be the oldest law firm in the city in 
point of continuous existence under one organization. For several 
years before his death Mr. Lyman was senior member of the firm 
of Lyman, Lyman & O'Connor. One evidence of his high stand- 
ing in the profession was his service by election in 1893 as president 
of the Chicago Bar Association. 

The late Mr. Lyman was a republican, but was never in politics, 
and his chief official service was as member for nearly twenty-five 
years of the LaGrange School Board, and he was one of the effective 
leaders in the campaign which brought about the establishment of 
the Lyons Township High School at LaGrange, in which city he 
had his home for many years. Mr. Lyman was at one time presi- 
dent of the Church Club, and also belonged to the Chicago, the 
Union League and the University clubs. He was a member of the 
Episcopal church. October 5, 1870, Mr. Lyman married Miss Mary 
E. Cossitt, daughter of F. D. Cossitt of LaGrange. Their children 
were David B., Jr., an active member of the Chicago bar, and Mary 
C., now Mrs. Murray M. Baker, of Peoria, Illinois. Outside of his 
professional and business interests the late Mr. Lyman was devoted 
to his home and church. At LaGrange he indulged his taste in 
horticulture and other outdoor recreation. He served as senior 
warden of the LaGrange Episcopal Church from its organization in 
1873, and held several important lay positions in the church affairs 
of his diocese and in the general convention. 

DAVID B. LYMAN, JR. A son of the prominent Chicago lawyer 
and business man whose career has been sketched in preceding 
paragraphs, David B. Lyman, Jr., has been a member of the Chi- 
cago bar since 1897, and is now senior member of the firm of Lyman, 
Adams & Bishop, with offices in the Chicago Title & Trust Building. 

David Brainerd Lyman, Jr., was born in Chicago July n, 1871. 
He attended the university which was his father's alma mater, 
Yale, and graduated A. B. in 1895. He took his law course in the 
Northwestern University College of Law, and was admitted to the 
bar in August, 1897. He practiced as a member of the firm of 
Jackson, Busby & Lyman during 1899-1901, of Lyman, Busby & 



472 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Lyman from 1901 to 1907, and as a junior member of Lyman, 
Lyman & O'Connor from December, 1907, until the retirement of 
his father and the formation of the present professional partner- 
ship. 

Mr. Lyman is a trustee of the Grant Land Association, and is 
a director in Charles H. Beasly & Company and in the Duntley 
Pneumatic Sweeper Company. He inherited some of the philan- 
thropic and civic interests of his father, and on his own account 
has taken much interest in various benevolent organizations. He 
has served as treasurer of the Chicago Home for Boys since its 
incorporation, and is a director of Lawrence Hall, a home for 
boys. He is also a trustee of Waterman Hall, an Episcopal school 
for girls, and is active in the work of the Episcopal church. In 
politics he is a republican. Mr. Lyman served three successive 
terms as secretary of the Union League Club of Chicago, was for 
three years secretary of the Yale Club and also a director two years 
and vice president one year of that organization, and is now one 
of the five trustees of the Yale Scholarship Trust of Chicago and 
a member of the Yale Club of New York City. Other social rela- 
tions are with the Suburban and LaGrange Country Clubs at La- 
Grange. Mr. Lyman was married in New York City May 10, 
1894, to Miss Edith Oliver Rowe. They have one son, David 
Brainerd IV. 

MITCHELL DAVIS FOLLANSBEE. The name of Follansbee has 
been known at the Chicago bar for almost fifty years. George 
Alanson Follansbee was born in Cook County on February 26, 1843, 
a son of Horatio N. and Emeline (Sherman) Follansbee. He was 
graduated from Lawrence University at Appleton, Wisconsin, and 
later in law at Harvard, being admitted to the bar on March 17, 
1867, since which time he has practiced law on LaSalle Street. He 
served as president of the Chicago Bar Association in 1898, president 
of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Hyde Park before it 
became a part of Chicago, as trustee of the State University at 
Urbana, and is now associated as counsel with the law firm of 
Adams, Follansbee, Hawley & Shorey. During his career at the 
bar he has been identified with a number of notable causes and has 
been known as a hard and consistent worker, enjoying in an unusual 
degree the confidence of his clients and the esteem of the members 
of the bar. He is a Unitarian, a republican, and lives at Winnetka. 

His son, Mitchell Davis Follansbee, was born in Chicago, on 
January 23, 1870. He was educated in the Chicago public schools, 
Harvard University, and the Northwestern University Law School, 
being admitted to the bar June I, 1894, and is now a member of 
the law firm of Adams, Follansbee, Hawley & Shorey. 

He is general counsel and chairman of the executive committee 
of the Bucyrus Company, a director of the Erie Railroad and 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, and other corporate enter- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 473 

prises, and has lately been honored by the degree of LL. D. from 
the Northwestern University in recognition of his long devotion to 
the Law School, in which he taught for many years. He was 
president of the Chicago Bar Association for the year 1914-1915, 
and belongs to professional and social organizations in Chicago and 
New York. 

He was married on April 14, 1903, to Miss Julia Rogers Mc- 
Connell, daughter of Hon. Samuel P. and Sarah R. McConnell. 
Her father was a former judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County, 
Illinois, and one of her grandfathers, Judge John M. Rogers, was a 
judge on the same bench, and a great-grandfather was Chief Justice 
Crenshaw of Kentucky. 

HON. HORACE S. CLARK. To achieve marked success in one line 
of human endeavor is a consummation that all men, from their best 
efforts, do not realize, but to achieve along every line of exertion 
gives indication of superior mentality and unusual personality. 
Among the men so distinguished in Coles County was the .late 
Horace S. Clark, lawyer, judge, soldier and statesman, a great part 
of whose particularly useful life was spent in the State of Illinois. 

Horace S. Clark was born at Huntsburg, Ohio, August 12, 1840, 
and was a son of Joseph M. P. and Charlotte Clark, the father a 
native of Vermont and the mother of Ohio. He attended the public 
schools in Geauga county and entered the high school at Huntsburg, 
but when sixteen years of age, with youthful love of adventure and 
a man's dependence on himself, he started out to seek his fortune, 
as it were, in other fields. He is next found working on a farm in 
Kane County, Illinois, but he was formed for other than agricul- 
tural pursuits and shortly afterward he made his way to Iowa City, 
Iowa. In the meanwhile, realizing that his ambitious hopes for a 
future professional life could not be brought to fruition without 
further educational preparation, he devoted all his spare time to 
study and afterwards, in Missouri, engaged in teaching school for a 
time and then returned to Ohio and became a student of law in the 
office of Smith & Page, at that time a prominent law firm at Circle- 
ville. His law studies were interrupted, however, by the outbreak 
of the Civil war, and in 1861 he tendered his services as a soldier, 
enlisting in Company E, Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
He \vas rapidly promoted, serving first as orderly sergeant, then as 
second and later as first lieutenant, participating in many of the most 
serious battles of the great struggle, including Bull Run and Gettys- 
burg, remaining in active service until disabled and was honorably 
discharged on October i, 1863. All through his subsequent life he 
was interested in military affairs and later became identified with 
the Illinois National Guard and by Governor Tanner was appointed 
commander, with rank of general, of the Second Brigade, in which 
position he continued until his resignation, on account of other 
pressing duties, in 1903. He was deeply interested also in the affairs 



474 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and welfare of the Grand Army of the Republic and during 1891-2 
served as department commander of the Illinois Grand Army of the 
Republic. In this as in other prominent positions, he became widely 
known and thoroughly esteemed. 

General Clark, after completing his law course, came to Illinois 
and on February 25, 1865, was admitted to the bar and for many 
years afterward made his home at Mattoon, where he built up a 
large and substantial practice and became one of the stable citizens. 
In 1870 he was elected to the bench as judge of the Common Pleas 
Court, and through the entire period of judicial life sustained the 
reputation his earlier course had established. Nature and harsh 
experience had qualified him well to read human faces and determine 
hidden motives, while equally well was he equipped with that sense 
of justice which made him firm but impartial, conscientious but in- 
flexible. Politics inevitably claimed the attention and interest of 
such a man as General Clark and throughout life his affiliation was 
with the republican party. In 1880 he was elected a member of the 
Illinois State Senate, and during his term of service once more 
proved his high abilities and his usefulness as a public man, so much 
so that subsequently he was selected as his party's candidate for 
the office of governor. Numerous prominent positions were tendered 
him and in 1888 he served as a delegate at large to the National 
Republican Convention, and in 1896 was chosen an elector at large. 

General Clark was married on May 3, 1864, to Miss Lizzie Betts, 
of Pickaway County, Ohio. Four children were born to them, three 
of whom survive: Russel S:, who is a prominent attorney at 
Chicago; Horace W., who is one of the leading business men of 
Mattoon ; and Czarina, who is the widow of Dr. Charles H. Tillison. 
Dr. Tillison, who was one of the best known dental practitioners at 
Mattoon, died in this city April 9, 1914. One son of General and 
Mrs. Clark, George B., died at the age of seventeen years. Mrs. 
Clark and her daughter, Mrs. Tillison, are well known in the pleasant 
social life of Mattoon. Here are preserved many of the personal 
possessions of General Clark on which he set high value during life, 
but there is one that no price could take from them, this being a bit 
of deadly shell that struck him on the battle field, his life being pre- 
served by its glancing off and falling harmlessly in his shoe. 

General Clark was prominent in Masonic circles and belonged 
also to the Elks. For many years he was one of the most promi- 
nent public men in the Fifth Judicial District, but it is probable that 
his greatest value to his community was in his character. His deeds 
and words, whether in public, in the practice of his profession or in 
private life were the simple, direct, true expressions of his intellec- 
tual and moral integrity. Loyal to his country, just in the adminis- 
tration of office, considerate in friendship and tender in family life, 
such is the record of one who will long be remembered in Coles 
County and in Illinois. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 475 

GEORGE W. MANIERRE. Admitted to the Illinois bar fifteen 
years ago, George W. Manierre has since been in active practice 
at Chicago, and is now senior member of the firm of Manierre 
& Pratt, with offices in the Harris Trust Building. Mr. Manierre 
represents a name which has been prominent in Chicago since pio- 
neer times. He was born in Chicago, a son of Edward and Ella 
(Willard) Manierre. His father was one of Chicago's early set- 
tlers, having come to the city in 1835, and was one of the foremost 
citizens of Chicago from that time until his death in 1890. 

Mr. Manierre was educated in the public schools, graduating 
from the Hyde Park High School, and took his law studies in the 
Northwestern University Law School, graduating LL. B. in 1899. 
After his admission to the bar he practiced alone until 1902, and 
was then associated with William T. Underwood until the latter's 
death on December 8, 1910. Mr. Manierre was then in partnership 
with Thornton M. Pratt until February, 1912, when the firm of 
Holdom, Manierre & Pratt was organized. This firm was dissolved 
December i, 1914, when the new firm of Manierre & Pratt was 
formed. Mr. Manierre's practice is of a general nature. 

He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association, and the American Bar Association. His 
clubs are the Union League, the South Shore Country, and the 
Hamilton. He is affiliated with Covenant Lodge No. 526, A. F. 
& A. M., and with Chicago Chapter No. 127, R. A. M. ; and is a 
past grand regent of the Royal Arcanum of Illinois. Mr. Manierre 
married in 1900 Miss Irene Beardsley of Chicago. They have one 
daughter, Harriet. The family reside at 5760 Harper Avenue. 

JUDGE HARRY OLSON. In all the critical comment from the 
profession and the general public, both favorable and otherwise, 
directed upon the personnel of the Municipal Court judiciary of 
Chicago, there has been a remarkable concordance in the apprecia- 
tion and estimate of the splendid services of Harry Olson, the chief 
justice, who has been formal head of the institution since it was 
organized in the fall of 1906. 

It is difficult to conceive how any man could have better realized 
the hopes entertained of this new office. A great opportunity for 
public service was presented, and Harry Olson was the man with 
the character, training and ability to assume and discharge the 
responsibilities and make the Municipal Court a model institution of 
its kind in America. As chief justice he is both a judicial and admin- 
istrative officer a sort of general manager of the entire system with 
its thirty associate justices. Though he hears and decides cases, his 
most important work is executive. He has been called the dominant 
figure in the court since its organization. Besides the systematizing 
of its records, under his direction its procedure has been simplified, 
and its handling of cases has been rapid and less hampered by legal 
technicalities than other courts. In order the better to perfect and 



476 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

expedite the workings of the "people's court," Judge Olson has intro- 
duced a classification of cases, each class assigned to the jurisdiction 
of a special branch court. Those that have become most familiar are 
the court of domestic relations, the speeders' court, the morals court, 
the boys court and the night court. Perhaps a more important inno- 
vation, for which he is responsible, was the establishment of a 
psychopathic laboratory, under the direction of an expert psycholo- 
gist, for the examination of prisoners who manifest a defective 
mentality rather than criminal nature. 

Though Harry Olson is a native of Chicago and has been a mem- 
ber of its bar near a quarter of a century, most of his childhood and 
youth were spent in Kansas, and he is to a large degree a representa- 
tive of that sturdy class known as "country bred." His parents, 
Olof and Clara C. (Oberg) Olsen, were immigrants from Sweden, 
his father a stonemason and bricklayer by trade, who while in Chi- 
cago was employed in the construction of the old water tower on 
Chicago Avenue, long a landmark. The Olson home was on the 
north side on old Market Street, and there Harry Olson was born 
August 4, 1867. 

When he was three years old his father moved out to Kansas, 
still a new and undeveloped state, and became a pioneer farmer, and 
with his family faced the hard conditions that prevailed to such an 
extent as to justify the belief of many that there was "something 
the matter with Kansas," and continued to fight an uphill struggle 
until he died ten years later. The mother then called her son and 
told him impressively that he was the head of the family. Thus at 
the age of thirteen he assumed a responsibility which was probably 
one of the chief factors in the development of his positive and 
aggressive character. He has never prayed for an easy life, but for 
greater strength to bear increasing labors and responsibilties, and 
there has been a logical progress in the development of his power 
and ability, fitting him for the performance of each duty as it came, 
and finally for the competent direction of an office that measured 
in terms of real service is higher than a seat on the supreme bench. 

Needless to say, he was not sent to college as the son of a 
prosperous father. Between thirteen and twenty-four he managed 
to acquire the equivalent of a fairly liberal education, but he worked 
for it, economized, and paid his way at every step. While attending 
the high school at Pecatonica, Illinois, he learned the trade of car- 
riage painter and worked at it during vacations. Soon after getting 
his high school diploma in 1885, at the age of nineteen he was ap- 
pointed principal of schools at St. Marys, Kansas, near his father's 
old home, and was the youngest school principal in the state at the 
time. During the years 1887-88 he was a student at Washburn 
College in Topeka. While there he heard a speech by the late 
Senator Ingalls which influenced him to give up his college career 
and come to Chicago to study law. \Vhile in the old Union College 
of Law, then a department of Northwestern University, he paid 
his way by teaching in the night public schools. 



477 

Graduating in 1891 and admitted to the Illinois bar the same 
year, a few years sufficed to give him practice and standing among 
Chicago attorneys. Then another speech, this time by the late Carl 
Schurz, helped him to decide to give up a promising and profitable 
private practice and take a position as assistant to the prosecuting 
attorney of Cook County. Former Governor Deneen was then state's 
attorney, and the two men had become acquainted while teaching in 
the night schools and studying law. For eight years he served as 
assistant state's attorney under Charles S. Deneen and for two years 
under John J. Healy. During most of the time he was the chief 
trial lawyer, having developed remarkable powers in cross-examina- 
tion. He had charge of many of the most important criminal cases 
in the Cook County courts, and was occasionally detailed for service 
as special prosecutor in outlying courts. 

After the adoption of the Municipal Court Act, he was elected 
chief justice in 1906 and helped establish and organize the new 
system. In 1912 he was re-elected chief justice. His work in the 
Municipal Court has given Judge Olson a national reputation, at 
least among lawyers and people specially interested in court reform. 
His experience as judge and lawyer confers weight and value on his 
opinions off the bench, and he has taken an active part in various 
sociological organizations and has been a popular speaker and lec- 
turer both at home and in other states. Judge Olson is a member of 
the International Prison Congress, the National Congress of Char- 
ities and Corrections, the Chicago Vice Commission, the American 
Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, and has served as vice 
president of the Society of Mental Hygiene of Illinois. He is a 
member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Chicago Law Club, and 
the Illinois State Bar Association. In politics he has been identified 
with the republican organization, though his service and ideals are 
above partisanship, and he was recently accepted by both the pro- 
gressive republicans and the progressives as fusion choice for the 
nomination as mayor of Chicago. 

He has served as trustee of the Northwestern University, and is 
a member of the Lutheran Church. He is a Knight Templar Mason, 
a member of the Mystic Shrine, and of the Royal Arcanum, and 
belongs to the Press and University clubs. He has a hobby for 
farming, and has a place in the country where he indulges it and 
spends his holidays. Judge Olson was married June i, 1902, to 
Bernice Miller, of Pecatonica, Illinois. They have three children : 
Harry Jr., Sanford and Jane. 

COLONEL CHARLES L. WALKER. Senior member of the law firm 
of Walker, Ingram & Sweeney of Rock Island, Colonel Walker has 
made his professional career of nearly forty years notable for his 
many successes as general attorney and counsel and has also ren- 
dered a great amount of disinterested and capable public service to 
his home city and state. 



478 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

A native of Illinois, born in McHenry County, December 27, 
1851, he is a son of Rev. Leander S. and Miriam L. (Palmer) 
Walker, natives of New Hampshire and Ohio, respectively. His 
father was a Methodist clergyman and for forty years a member 
of the Rock River Conference. 

Colonel Walker entered the law only after a varied experience 
in other lines and gained most of his education through his own 
efforts. He attended the public schools of Mount Morris and in 
other towns where his father resided, and in 1870 finished the classi- 
cal course of the Mount Morns Seminary. He paid his expenses 
while there by teaching school and by working as a laborer on rail- 
road construction. He also learned telegraphy, was made agent 
for the Burlington Road at Hinsdale, Illinois, also at several other 
points, and became familiar with all branches and classes of railroad 
operating service. In 1873, having concluded to give up railroad 
business and become a lawyer, he removed to Rock Island and began 
study under Sweeney & Jackson, and continued to apply himself 
diligently until his admission to the bar by the Illinois Supreme 
Court at Springfield in January, 1878. He was then accepted as a 
partner by the firm of Sweeney & Jackson, whose new title became 
Sweeney, Jackson & Walker. After many years of practice Mr. 
Jackson retired from the firm owing to poor health and Sweeney & 
Walker then continued until the death of Mr. Sweeney. Mr. Walker 
then reorganized the partnership by taking in John J. Ingram, and 
Mr. Sweeney's son, William J., thus evolving the present firm name 
of Walker, Ingram & Sweeney. This firm acts as general attorneys 
for the Davenport, Rock Island & Northwestern Railroad Com- 
pany, as division attorneys for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, 
as local attorneys for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul and other 
railroads and corporations. 

On April 13, 1881, Colonel Walker married Miss Anna G. Stod- 
dard of Rock Island. Their daughter, Miriam A. Walker, born Feb- 
ruary 21, 1897, has completed the course of the public schools and 
is now a student in Vassar College. Colonel Walker is affiliated 
with Trio Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; with Barret Chapter, R. A. M., 
and Rock Island Commandery, K. T. 

From 1893 to I 97 Colonel Walker was president of the Rock 
Island Public Library Board, and his administration was made not- 
able among other things by the construction of the present library 
building, costing over $100,000. On January 28, 1901, Governor 
Yates appointed him aide de camp on his general staff with rank of 
colonel in the Illinois National Guard. In April, 1901, the governor 
selected him as attorney for the Illinois & Michigan canal, and he 
was retained in the same position by Governor Deneen as long as 
he was content to serve. He resigned in 1911, after rounding out a 
full ten years of service. 

JOHN SANBORN STEVENS. One of the oldest and most prominent 
members of the Illinois Bar was the late John Sanborn Stevens, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 479 

who died at Peoria March 4, 1912. At the time of his death he 
was senior member of the firm of Stevens, Miller & Elliott. He 
had been admitted to the bar in 1865 and for forty-seven years con- 
tinued an active representative of the legal profession, his ability and 
his industry maintaining him in a foremost position among the law- 
yers of the state. The high regard he enjoyed among his profes- 
sional associates is illustrated by the fact that in 1902 he was elected 
president of the Illinois State Bar Association. 

John Sanborn Stevens was born in Bath, New Hampshire, Sep- 
tember 16, 1838, a son of Joshua and Abigail (Walker) Stevens, 
natives of the same state. His father was of English lineage and 
his mother of Scotch stock, and they were -married at Bath, New 
Hampshire, lived there until 1849, an d then removed to Vermont. 
John S. Stevens prepared for college as a student in Caledonia Aca- 
demy in Vermont. He provided for his own support by working on 
a farm and teaching during vacations in the district schools. In 1858 
he enrolled as a student in Dartmouth College, was graduated A. B. 
with honors in the class of 1862, and later received the degree 
Master of Arts from the same school. 

It was as a young college graduate that he came to Peoria, where 
he spent two years as a teacher, one year in the grammar schools 
and one year in the high school. At the same time he carried on his 
studies of law, having long cherished a design to take up that pro- 
fession. He began reading under Alexander McCoy, a prominent 
Peoria attorney, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1865. He 
was associated in practice with Mr. McCoy until 1870, and then 
became a partner of Judge David McCulloch. He continued thus 
until 1876, when without solicitation on his part he was appointed 
postmaster by President Grant, and during the following four years 
gave most of his attention to the duties of that office. In 1877 
Senator John S. Lee had become associated with Mr. Stevens, and 
other subsequent associates were P. W. Gallagher and Walter S. 
Horton. For several years the firm was Stevens, Lee & Horton, and 
later W r illiam T. Abbott became a partner. Several years before 
the death of Mr. Stevens the firm of Stevens, Miller & Elliott came 
into existence. 

Mr. Stevens in June, 1868, married Miss Sarah M. Bartlett, who 
was born in Peoria, daughter of Amos P. Bartlett, a pioneer mer- 
chant. The two children of their marriage died in infancy. Mr. 
Stevens was a member of Christ's Church, Reform Episcopal, and 
was always a moral force in his community. Politically he was iden- 
tified with the republican party since its organization, and was fre- 
quently offered nominations to the State Legislature, but declined. 
He was interested in the success of the party, and was delegate to 
various conventions and a member of the state committee of 1900. 
In Peoria he served on the board of school inspectors. His labor at 
all times constituted an element in promoting progress and improve- 
ment along the lines which affect general interests of society and 



480 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

at the same time his devotion to his profession brought him to a 
position of distinction as a member of the Illinois Bar. He was a 
man entirely free from ostentation or display. He lived his life 
quietly, yet he held to profound convictions of right and wrong and 
strove to reach the high ideals of manhood and citizenship which he 
set up. The nobility of his character was found in this very simplic- 
ity, the strength of his position as a leading member of the bar had 
its root in the fact that he was always direct in his work and never 
sought to lead the court astray in the matter of fact or law. His 
entire life record was as an open book which all might read and on 
its pages there was found no stain nor dishonor. While he himself 
held to high ideals he was slow in condemnation of others and his 
hand at all times reached out in ready sympathy to assist those who 
were attempting to climb upward. 

Some extracts from the resolutions passed by the Peoria County 
Bar Association will serve to supplement the general facts of his 
career already given : "The character of the good citizen, as meas- 
ured after his decease, is always determined by his life's history; by 
his faithfulness, integrity and uprightness in his dealings ; by the 
confidence and esteem in which he was ever held by his associates 
and the general public, and their estimate of him as a man and citi- 
zen. Additional elements enter into the requisites of a true lawyer. 
We measure him not only by his ability and his knowledge of the 
law and of the fundamental principles of jurisprudence, but further 
by his individual uprightness and by his conscientious elevation of 
right, and truth and justice; by his condemnation of wrong; by 
his honest and faithful discharge of duty to his clientage ; by his 
fearless advocacy of his honest convictions and by his constant 
remembrance that he is part and parcel of the machinery under 
our system of government charged with the administration of justice. 

"Mr. Stevens was a typical lawyer and had an unusually exalted 
idea of the requirements of his profession, and never faltered in 
the expression of his opinions regarding legal ethics, and particularly 
with reference to those high principles of justice and equities re- 
quired in the administration of the law. It has been given to com- 
paratively few lawyers to possess in so large a degree so many of the 
high qualities required in a perfect lawyer as were found concen- 
trated in Mr. Stevens; and after a service of continuous practice 
of over forty-five years, with a large clientage during the entire 
period, the fact that such clientage at all times had in him the high- 
est degree of confidence and esteem and continued faithful to him 
until the end is a sufficient testimonial of his legal ability, faithful- 
ness and integrity. 

"With his associates in the practice and particularly with the 
younger members of the bar he at all times exhibited the same genial 
and kindly spirit. He was ever ready to give to others the benefit 
of his own long experience and his counsel. He- was never ruffled 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 481 

save when confronted with a case of wrong, oppression or injustice ; 
and for such cases he never failed to forcibly express his convictions 
of disapproval and hatred. 

"Apart from his profession of law, Mr. Stevens had great ad- 
ministrative ability and excelled in good common sense and sound 
judgment, and had a broad comprehensive knowledge of business 
affairs. It was his well-earned reputation for honesty, integrity and 
good business ability that rendered him a favorite instrument for 
the conduct of large and important trusts, and it can be truly said 
that the beneficiaries of said trusts never failed to find in him a 
faithful, able and conscientious servant and trustee. 

"In every department of life Mr. Stevens at all times stood, and 
was recognized throughout the entire state as a lawyer, citizen and 
man of distinguished character ; and by his decease not only the bar 
of Peoria, but our city and state, have lost a capable, honest and 
conscientious lawyer and a distinguished and highly esteemed 
citizen." 

FRANK T. MILLER. Few Illinois lawyers have a record of life 
experience more -fruitful in inspiration than that of Frank T. Miller, 
one of the recognized leaders of the Peoria Bar. He has been in 
practice at Peoria over fifteen years, and was one of the associates 
of the late John S. Stevens, a distinguished pioneer lawyer of Illi- 
nois, until the latter's death. 

Frank T. Miller was born at Muehlheim, near Cologne, Ger- 
many, January i, 1873, a son of Theodore D. and Clara A. Miller, 
natives of the same province. In July, 1882, the family came to 
America, and the household of six children that accompanied their 
parents was later increased by the birth of five others in America. 
The father was a carpenter, and when working steadily at his trade 
earned only about fifty dollars a month. In Germany he had been 
compelled to render military service in the German army, and was 
on duty during the Franco-Prussian war of 1870. As a family 
when they arrived in America they possessed absolutely nothing in 
material goods, and yet brought to the New World industrious habits 
and character which are the finest qualities of citizenship. It is one 
of the tributes to American opportunities that in spite of poverty 
and inability to speak or read a word of English language the family 
secured a foothold, and one at least has come to a considerable 
degree of fame and fortune. Frank Miller was about ten years 
old at the time, and as a poor German boy was often subjected to 
ill treatment by his American companions. He had secured three 
years of education in the German schools, and for three years was a 
pupil in the grade schools in Champaign and Bloomington, Illinois. 
At the age of twelve he began the battle for his own support. 
What he has since accomplished is an illustration of the fact that 
it is only under the pressure of adversity and the stimulus of neces- 
sity that the strongest and best qualities in man are brought out and 

Vol. II 4 



482 

developed. His first regular work was in a drug store, washing 
windows, bottles, floors and other menial work, twelve hours a day, 
at wages of a dollar and a quarter a week, all of which went to 
the family. At the age of fourteen he was earning two dollars a 
week in a dry-goods store. He had an ambition for better things 
and realized that an education was the first pre-requisite. Like 
many German lads he had musical talent, and had been encouraged 
and had had some opportunity in playing the violin. He began sell- 
ing Sunday papers on an agreement with his father that the money 
thus earned should go to violin instruction. In addition to other 
duties he kept up a constant practice and bought the services of a 
capable instructor on the violin, and thus at the age of sixteen was 
given an opportunity to play in a theater for experience. At the 
age of eighteen he was in demand as a musician, and at twenty 
had become a recognized factor in musical circles in his home city. 
In the meantime he had continued to work in stores, but in time the 
earnings from his violin were greater than the regular wages of the 
other employments. His aims and ambitions for the future now 
became concentrated upon the profession of law. He left his work 
as a clerk in a store, entered a law school, and with his night work 
on the violin made his way. He had, however, been out of school 
more than eight years, and in consequence did not know how to 
study. His early examinations proved his incapacity in that direc- 
tion, but at the end of two years he stood second in the class in 
examinations covering the entire course and drew a cash prize. The 
income from his music had steadily increased, and thus enabled 
him to pursue a two years' special literary course, followed by one 
year in a law office. He secured his education in the Illinois Wes- 
leyan University at Bloomington, graduating LL. B. in 1896 and 
finishing his literary work in the same institution in 1898. 

In May, 1899, Frank T. Miller opened a law office at Peoria with 
Judson Starr. At the outset of his legal career he resolved to give 
up music except for the pleasure of it, and to concentrate his efforts 
upon the law with no side issues, and placed particular emphasis 
upon his determination not to enter politics. He made slow progress 
during the first year as a lawyer, was obliged to live most economic- 
ally, but the tide of success turned in his favor, and for the past 
fifteen years his practice and influence have been steadily growing, 
and he is one of the undoubted leaders of the Peoria Bar. In 
March, 1900, he entered a partnership with Daniel R. Sheen, under 
the name Sheen & Miller. On July I, 1909, he retired from this 
association and become a member of the firm of Stevens, Miller & 
Elliott, his associates being John S. Stevens and J. M. Elliott. He 
took the place in this firm vacated by W. S. Horton. Although Mr. 
Stevens, senior member of the firm, passed away in 1912, the firm 
name remains the same, and is rated as one of the strongest firms 
of the Peoria Bar. The firm represents most of the railroads in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 483 

Peoria County; also several banks and many of the large corpora- 
tions. 

Mr. Miller has always taken a leading interest in the Peoria Bar 
Association affairs, and is now the president of that association. 
He has also interested himself in the business and civic interests of 
Peoria. He is a director and a member of the board of the Mer- 
chants and Illinois National Bank of Peoria; of the Home Savings & 
State Bank of Peoria ; of the Peoria Association of Commerce and 
of the Peoria Y. M. C. A. 

To some extent he relaxed his strict adherence to the rule not 
to enter politics. He has been staunch and stalwart as a republican, 
did active campaign work in 1900 and 1904, and is always ready 
to work for the betterment of his home community. In 1901 .he was 
appointed public administrator of Peoria County by Governor Yates 
and was reappointed by Governor Deneen in 1905 and again in 
1909. , 

Mr. Miller was married at Peoria September 16, 1903, to Miss 
Lillian Bruce Morgan, daughter of H. B. Morgan. Their ties of 
marriage have been strengthened by a kindred interest in the sphere 
of music. Mrs. Miller is an accomplished musician and studied 
piano four years in Chicago and Berlin, under such instructors as 
Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler, Leopold Godowski and Xavier Schar- 
wenka. They are the parents of two daughters : Jeannette M., 
born in 1906; and Lillian Bruce, born September 8, 1911. Mr. and 
Mrs. Miller have been prominent in Peoria musical circles. Frater- 
nally Mr. Miller is active in the Knights of Pythias, and since 1904 
has taken much part in the dramatic branch of that order, the 
Knights of Khorassan. He is affiliated with Schiller Lodge A. F. 
& A. M., and is a member of the Creve Coeur Club, Peoria Country 
Club and Kickapoo Golf Club. 

WILLIAM WIRT GURLEY. Probably no other Chicago lawyer has 
been more closely identified with the city's traction interests than 
W. W. Gurley, who has served as general counsel to the leading 
traction companies of Chicago, and is without doubt one of the 
ablest of the corporation lawyers of Illinois. 

William Wirt Gurley was born at Mount Gilead, Ohio, January 
27, 1851, and is a son of a lawyer. His parents were John J. and 
Anseville C. (Armentrout) Gurley. Mr. Gurley was graduated 
A. B. from the Ohio Wesleyan University in 1870, was superin- 
tendent of the public schools at Seville, Ohio, in 1871-72, and read 
law in his father's office, being admitted to the bar in June, 1873. 
Mr. Gurley has been in active practice at Chicago since September, 
1874, a period of more than forty years. His practice early brought 
him into connection with corporations, and that for many years has 
been his almost exclusive business. 



484 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

William W. Gurley is general counsel for the Chicago Surface 
Lines, comprising all of the street railroads within the city limits, 
and various other corporations. He is a director in Lyon Gary & 
Co. ; Wakem & McLaughlin, Incorporated ; Stearns & Culver Lum- 
ber Company; Lyon Cypress Lumber Company; Baker Lumber 
Company. 

Mr. Gurley is a member of the Chicago, the Exmoor, and the 
Chicago Golf clubs of Chicago, and of the Transportation Club, the 
New York Club, and the Ohio Society of New York in New York 
City. On October 30, 1878, he married Mary Eva Turney, daugh- 
ter of the late Hon. Joseph Turney, of Cleveland. They have one 
daughter, Helen Kathryn. Mr. Gurley 's law offices are in the 
Marquette Building. His residence is at 1416 North State Street. 

WILL HALSTEAD CLARK. A leading corporation lawyer of Chi- 
cago, Will H. Clark became a student in the fall of 1882 in the law 
firm of which one of the members was W. W. Gurley, and has 
had active associations with that lawyer ever since with the excep- 
tion of two years. 

Will Halstead Clark was born at Homer, Cortland County, New 
York, October 24, 1863, a son of Chester M. and Rachel Katherine 
(Haynes) Clark. His parents removed to Chicago and in that city 
he attended private schools in 1870-71, the Mosley public school in 
1872-76, and was a student in the Homer Academy of New York 
from 1876 to 1878. During 1878-79 he was in Professor Taylor's 
private school at Syracuse, and in the fall of 1879 became a law 
student in the office of Hiscock, Gifford & Doheny at Syracuse. 
He returned to Chicago in the fall of 1882 to enter the office of 
Cooper, Packard & Gurley, and in 1885 was graduated LL. B. from 
the Union College of Law of Chicago. 

Mr. Clark has served as a director on the board of the Metropoli- 
tan Elevated Railway Company, of the Rockford, Beloit & Janes- 
ville Railway Company, and a number of other corporations. He 
is now a director of the Chicago Railways Company. Politically he 
is a republican, but the heavy demands of practice have allowed him 
little time for participation in politics. For a number of years he 
was active in the Illinois National Guard, serving in the cadet corps 
of the First Infantry, as color sergeant in the First Cavalry, and as 
lieutenant and judge advocate of the Chicago Hussars during the 
World's Fair. Mr. Clark is a thirty-second degree Mason, being 
affiliated with Chevalier Bayard Commandery No. 52, K. T., Orien- 
tal Consistory, Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He served 
as secretary in 1898 of the Union League Club and is also a mem- 
ber of the Forty and the South Shore Country clubs. His office is 
in the Marquette Building. At Cleveland, Ohio, June 19, 1889, Mr. 
Clark married Cora Belle Turney. Their children are Margaret 
Alpha and Louise Asenath. His residence is at The Plaza. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 485 

JOHN S. MILLER. Illinois lawyers know John S. Miller as 
among the foremost of the profession in the state, while by his 
services in some of the most conspicuous cases tried in the state 
and federal courts during the past two decades he also stands in the 
front rank of American attorneys. For a number of years Mr. 
Miller has been associated in practice with two other recognized 
leaders of the Illinois bar George R. Peck, now retired, and 
Merritt Starr. 

John Stocker Miller was born at Louisville, St. Lawrence 
County, New York, May 24, 1847, a son f John and Jane (McLeod) 
Miller. He attended public schools, and was graduated A. B. from 
St. Lawrence University at Canton, New York, in 1869, and studied 
law in the same school during 1869-70. After his admission to 
the New York bar at Ogdensburg in 1870, Mr. Miller was in school 
work for several years, being professor of mathematics in 1871-72 
and of Latin and Greek in 1872-74 at St. Lawrence University. 

Since 1874 Mr. Miller has been identified with the Chicago bar. 
In 1876 the firm of Herbert, Quick & Miller was established, his 
associates being George Herbert and John H. S. Quick. With the 
death of Mr. Herbert in 1882 the firm became Quick & Miller, and 
in 1886 Mr. Miller became associated with Senator Henry W. Le- 
man. With the admission of Merritt Starr in 1890, and with George 
R. Peck as successor of Mr. Leman, the firm of Peck, Miller & 
Starr was for many years probably without a peer among the legal 
firms of Chicago. George R. Peck retired a year or so ago from 
active practice, and since then the firm has taken its present form, 
Miller, Starr, Peckard & Peckham, with offices in the First Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

For a number of years Mr. Miller's practice has been in chan- 
cery courts and as counsel for large corporations. The early cases 
of his career which brought him into prominence were those known 
as the Flagler litigation, the Riverside, the Phillips and South Park 
suits. In 1891 Mayor Washburne appointed him corporation coun- 
sel, an office he held until 1893. FJuring his term he argued in behalf 
of the city the celebrated Lake Front case against the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company, and procured a .decision establishing the 
principle that the bed of navigable waters is the property of the 
people and is held in trust by the state for their benefit. In later 
years few attorneys have been so active as Mr. Miller in establish- 
ing, defining and modifying state and national jurisprudence relat- 
ing to the conduct of great business and industrial corporations. 
He was the leading counsel for the defense in the noted Packing 
House, Standard Oil and John R. Walsh cases before the Federal 
Court. 

Mr. Miller was married in Chicago December 12, 1887, to Miss 
Ann Gross. In politics he is a republican, is a member of the 
St. James Episcopal Church, and of the Union League, the Chi- 



486 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

cago, the University, Wayfarers; Hamilton, Onwentsia and Exmoor 
clubs. 

GEN. ELISHA B. HAMILTON. One of the most distinguished 
citizens and lawyers of Illinois during the last half of the nineteenth 
century was Gen. Elisha B. Hamilton, whose long and active 
career in the bar was largely spent at Quincy. As a lawyer, soldier 
and private citizen his career was one distinctly deserving of a 
permanent memorial in a history of the Illinois courts and lawyers. 

Gen. Elisha B. Hamilton was born at Carthage, Illinois, Octo- 
ber 5, 1838. At his father's home in that city, as a boy, he met 
Stephen A. Douglas, Abraham Lincoln and other noted lawyers on 
the circuit. He attended Illinois College at Jacksonville, graduating 
in the class of 1860, and shortly after the outbreak of the Rebellion 
enlisted in the One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry. He 
was mustered in as quartermaster's sergeant, and in 1863 was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant. His regiment was assigned to the Army 
of the Tennessee and participated in Sherman's first attack on Vicks- 
burg, and was next with General McClernand in the campaign 
against Arkansas Post, participating in the two days' fight there. In 
the siege of Vicksburg he participated in the battles of Port Gibson, 
Champion Hills and the Black River Bridge, where an entire regi- 
ment of Confederate troops was captured. General Hamilton re- 
mained with his regiment at Black River Bridge until the surrender 
of Vicksburg, holding the rear against General Johnston's forces, 
with which there was almost constant skirmishing. The regiment 
joined General Sherman's command in the siege and capture of 
Jackson, Mississippi, while later it was transferred to the Depart- 
ment of the Gulf and was in numerous engagements in Louisiana, 
where it was on duty until the close of the war. In the Vicksburg 
campaign he was on the field staff of General Fonda. 

Following the war General Hamilton went to Quincy in 1866, 
read law and became a member^of the firm of Warren, Wheat & 
Hamilton, which was succeeded by Wheat, Ewing & Hamilton. For 
a number of years prior to his death General Hamilton was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Hamilton & Woods. Most of his professional 
life was spent at Quincy, where he attained great success in his pro- 
fession. He was noted for his wit and eloquence as an advocate, 
and his integrity and uprightness as an antagonist were recognized 
among all his professional associates. 

His services as a citizen were second only to those performed as 
a lawyer. To him the city of Quincy is largely indebted for its 
splendid public library, an institution in which he was deeply inter- 
ested and for which he worked and planned until it was a reality. 
He was always a loyal friend of the Quincy public schools, and 
throughout his career one of the best supporters of Illinois College, 
his alma mater. General Hamilton served on the staff of Governors 
Cullom, Oglesby and Fifer, was a brigadier-general in the Illinois 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 487 

National Guard and commanded troops at the great railroad strike 
in East St. Louis in 1877. As an orator and after-dinner speaker 
he had few peers in the Middle West. General Hamilton was a 
republican in politics, but always declined political preferment, 
though it was often tendered him, and he continued to devote him- 
self to his profession and those civic duties which he could perform 
best as a private citizen. General Hamilton was a member of many 
patriotic organizations, including the military order of the Loyal 
Legion and the Society of the Army of the Tennessee. He was a 
Knight Templar Mason, was an active member of the State His- 
torical Society, and one of the founders and for many years vice 
president of the Quincy Historical Society. General Hamilton re- 
mained in the active practice of law and died suddenly March 20, 
1902, while engaged in the trial of a case at Quincy. 

E. BENTLEY HAMILTON. The late Gen. E. B. Hamilton, of 
Quincy, had by his marriage to Mary Fisk, only two children, the 
daughter being Lucy, and the son, E. Bentley Hamilton. The latter 
has gained success in the profession which his father distinguished, 
and the first part of his professional career was in the city of 
Chicago, but he is now located in Peoria. 

E. Bentley Hamilton was born in Quincy August 23, 1879. His 
education came from the common and high schools of Quincy, and 
in 1902 he graduated with the degree of B. A. from Illinois College, 
at Jacksonville, which was the alma mater of his father. Mr. Hamil- 
ton finished the law course in the Northwestern University with the 
class of 1905, and from that year until 1913 was associated with the 
prominent. Chicago firm of Shope, Mathis, Zane & Weber, and in 
the latter year opened an office in Peoria with George W. Burton, 
under the firm name of Burton & Hamilton, where they are engaged 
in general practice. Mr. Hamilton is a member of the Hamilton 
Club of Chicago, of the military order of the Loyal Legion, and 
the Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity, the Illinois State. Bar Association 
and various other social clubs. In politics he is a republican. Mr. 
Hamilton married Ethel Burton and they have a son, George B. 

JOHN P. WILSON. While a continuous connection with the Chi- 
cago bar since 1867 makes Mr. Wilson one of the veteran lawyers 
of that city, his professional distinctions rest upon broader founda- 
tions than seniority. For many years Mr. Wilson has been regarded 
as the peer of any Chicago lawyer in the field of corporation and 
real estate law. Lawyers and business men have long had a high 
regard for his ability and services, but he has never taken any 
important part in politics, though on several important occasions he 
has exercised his professional ability in behalf of the public welfare 
of his home city. Mr. Wilson is senior member of the firm of 
Wilson, Moore & Mcllvaine, with offices in the Marquette Building. 

John P. Wilson was born on a farm in Whiteside County, Illi- 
nois, July 3, 1844, a son of Thomas and Margaret (Laughlin) Wil- 



488 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

son, who were of Scotch descent. His boyhood was spent in the 
environment of an Illinois rural district, he attended the public 
schools near the home farm, and in 1865 was graduated from Knox 
College at Galesburg. He studied law under private instruction, 
and at the same time taught school for two years, and since 1867 
has lived in Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in that year, 
opened an office and for a time was associated with the firm of 
Borden, Spafford & McDaid. After the dissolution of this part- 
nership he continued as an associate of John Borden. Mr. Wilson 
has known personally and has frequently been associated with 
some of the distinguished members of the older Chicago bar. In 
1870 he became the third member of the firm of Spafford, McDaid 
& Wilson, and in the past forty-five years has had a number of 
other associates in practice. 

Outside of a large private practice which has connected him 
with some extensive commercial organizations and in the handling 
and adjustment of many important matters in real estate, Mr. Wilson 
deserves to be remembered for having drafted the law which led 
to the establishment of the Chicago Sanitary District. The law 
creating the Sanitary District was approved by vote of the people 
in November, 1889, and Mr. Wilson was retained by the first board 
m order to test the legality of the special law under which it was 
constituted. He appeared as the chief attorney in the successive 
steps by which the constitutionality of the law was sustained first 
in the Circuit Court and afterwards affirmed by the Supreme Court 
Both in the framing of the law and in its support before the state 
courts Mr. Wilson won a deserved triumph for his ability, skill 
and foresight. Shortly afterwards, in 1890, his services were 
employed as general counsel by the commission having in charge the 
World's Columbian Exposition. He personally supervised the 
drafting of the constitutional amendment and the legislation passed 
by the special assembly session of that year, and thus laid the neces- 
sary legal foundation on which that great enterprise was prosecuted 
to success. As a citizen of Chicago Mr. WilSon has frequently 
used his profession for unselfish and disinterested service. Both 
in the bar and as a private citizen he is distinguished for his scholarly 
taste and has divided his time between his profession and his home 
to the exclusion of activities and affairs which attract many promi- 
nent Chicago professional men. 

On April 25, 1871, Mr. Wilson married Miss Margaret C. Mcll- 
vaine, daughter of J. D. Mcllvaine. Their children are Martha, 
John P. and Anna M. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Chicago, 
the Union League and the University clubs. 

ROBERT F. PETTIBONE. Thirty years of activity in Chicago as 
a member of the legal profession have brought to Robert F. Petti- 
bone a standing of worthy order and he is today reckoned among 
the representative lawyers of this city. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 489 

Mr. Pettibone is of New England birth and ancestry. He was 
born at Cornwall, Litchfield County, Connecticut, on May 21, 1857, 
and is a son of Col. Ira W. and Emily (Miner) Pettibone. Colonel 
Pettibone is a man of wide intellectual attainments and was for 
many years engaged in the teaching profession. He was for ten 
years a member of the faculty at Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin, 
and later was an instructor in the North Division High School of 
Chicago, but is now retired from active work. He was a gallant 
soldier and a distinguished officer of the Union in the Civil war, 
serving as a colonel of the Tenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry 
and passing through the entire war period. Colonel Pettibone is 
now living in Chicago at the venerable age of eight-one years ( 1914). 

Robert F. Pettibone was undeniably favored in being reared in 
a home of distinctive culture and refinement, and much of his 
earlier education was received under the careful direction of his 
father. A private school at Winchester, Connecticut, afforded him 
valuable advantages in his boyhood, and after the removal of the 
family to Wisconsin he continued his studies in Beloit College, from 
which institution he was graduated with the class of 1877. He 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts at graduation and his alma 
mater later conferred upon him his Master's degree. Soon after 
his graduation Mr. Pettibone went to Indianapolis, Indiana, where 
he began the study of law in the offices of McDonald and Butler 
at a time when the senior member of the firm was representing 
Indiana in the United States Senate. For three years Mr. Pettibone 
continued his studies there and on September 16, 1879, he was 
admitted to the bar of the State of Indiana. In the following year he 
engaged in independent practice at Burlington, Racine County, 
Wisconsin, and in the brief time he continued there he gained no 
little prominence in his profession. He served one term as justice 
of the peace and in 1882 withdrew from the community and came 
to Chicago where he became associated in practice with the firm 
of H. S. & F. S. Osborne. He continued with that firm until 
1896 and was then engaged in newspaper work until 1890, in which 
year he returned to the firm of H. S. & F. S. Osborne, with whom 
he remained until 1911, when he withdrew from the law firm. Since 
that time he has been engaged in independent general practice. 

Mr. Pettibone has long been known for a loyal and public- 
spirited citizen and he has served as a member of the board of 
aldermen from the Second Ward of his home city, Evanston, one 
of the finest of Chicago's many fine suburbs. He has been identi- 
fied with a considerable amount of important litigation in the courts 
of Chicago, and it is especially worthy of mention that he repre- 
sented the complainant in the celebrated Rosehill Cemetery litiga- 
tion which continued from 1882 to 1911 and which was finally 
decided in favor of his client. He was counsel for the defense in 
the well-remembered Air Line condemnation suit, in the Fulton & 
Paul elevator suits, in the Chicago Railway terminal elevator liti- 



490 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

gation, and has been concerned in many other important cases in 
which big interests were involved. In virtually all of them, it may 
safely be said, victory has crowned his efforts. His standing as a 
trial lawyer is based on actual results achieved, and in his charac- 
ter and service he has honored the bar of the state. 

Mr. Pettibone is a member of the Chicago and the Illinois State 
Bar Associations. In politics he is a republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Union League Club of Chicago, is president of the 
Evanston Club at this writing (1914) and is a member of the Glen 
View Club. With his wife, he has membership in the Congre- 
gational church of Evanston. He is a member of the Beta Theta 
Pi, his college fraternity, and a golf player of some enthusiasm. 

HORATIO LOOMIS WAIT. One of the veteran members of the 
Chicago bar, Horatio L. Wait has been known to an entire genera- 
tion of lawyers as one of the masters in chancery of the Cook 
County Circuit Court. To that office he has brought an experience 
and wisdom \vhich have given to his findings and decisions a char- 
acter for impartiality and accuracy which for many years have 
passed current among judges and litigants. He has had a varied 
and interesting career, and for a number of years before locating 
in Chicago was in the United States navy. 

Horatio Loomis Wait was born in New York City August 8, 
1836, a son of Joseph and Harriet Heileman (Whitney) Wait. 
He was educated in the Trinity School at New York and the Colum- 
bia College Grammar School, but instead of entering college came 
to Chicago in 1856 and was employed in the office of a well known 
lawyer, J. Young Scammon. In 1861, at the outbreak of the war, 
Mr. Wait enlisted in Company D of the Sixtieth Illinois Infantry. 
Soon afterwards he was made paymaster with rank of master in 
the United States Navy. He was under Admirals Dupont and 
Farragut in blockading Savannah, Pensacola and Mobile, and sub- 
sequently was on Admiral Dahlgren's flagship during the bombard- 
ment of Fort Sumter, and the siege of Charleston. He continued 
in the naval service after the close of the war, and was on the 
United States ship Ino in the European squadron. In 1865 he 
was promoted to paymaster with the rank of lieutenant commander. 
He continued in the naval service on various duties until 1870, 
when he resigned. 

Returning to Chicago and resuming his legal studies in the office 
of Barker & Tuley, he was admitted to the Illinois bar August 22, 
1870. His first practice was in association with Joseph N. Barker 
under the name of Barker & Wait, which firm subsequently became 
Barker, Buell & Wait. In June, 1876, Mr. Wait was appointed 
one of the masters in chancery of the Circuit Court of Cook 
County, and that has been his chief office and relationship with 
Chicago courts and lawyers for nearly forty years. 

Mr. Wait is a companion of the military order of the Loyal 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 491 

Legion and actively aided in organizing the Illinois Naval Reserve. 
He was one of the founders of the Charity Organization Society, 
which later merged into the Relief and Aid Society. He is a 
director of the Grand Army Hall and Memorial Association, and has 
been a member of the Chicago Library Board. He belongs to the 
Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association. 
Active in church affairs, he is a vestryman in St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church in Hyde Park, was for a number of years superintendent 
of the Tyng Mission Sunday School, and has also been identified 
with the Sunday school work of his home church. 

On May 7, 1860, Mr. Wait married Chara Conant Long. There 
are two sons, James Joseph and Henry Heileman. James Joseph 
has for many years been prominent in transportation and general 
commercial affairs in Chicago, being president of the Chicago Light- 
erage Company, in charge of the freight department of several large 
corporations, and is also an authority and writer on transportation 
subjects. The son, Henry H. Wait, is prominent as an electrical and 
mechanical engineer. 

CHARLES HENRY ALDRICH is well known to the bar, not only of 
the West, but throughout the United States, as a careful, painstak- 
ing, profound and conscientious lawyer. Retained at one time and 
another as general or special counsel for some of the great corpora- 
tions of the country, his practice is now confined practically to 
the federal courts, and from the time of his incumbency of the 
office of solicitor general he has been a more or less familiar figure 
in the highest federal tribunal the United States Supreme Court. 
Mr. Aldrich was born on a farm in Lagrange County, Indiana, 
August 26, 1850, and is a son of Hamilton M. and Harriet (Sher- 
wood) Aldrich. His early youth was passed much in the same 
manner as that of other farmers' sons of his day and community, 
attending the district schools during the winter months and pass- 
ing the summer seasons in the work of the homestead place. When 
he was sixteen years old, his parents removed to Orland, Steuben 
County, Indiana, in order that their children might secure better 
educational advantages, and Charles H. so eagerly and assiduously 
availed himself of these advanced opportunities that his health 
became impaired and his father refused to allow him the means 
wherewith to pursue a college course. In no way discouraged, the 
ambitious youth left the parental roof, secured employment whereat 
he worked for his board, and thus prepared for college, having 
partially completed his course at the University of Michigan when 
a friend advanced the funds to complete his training, and in 1875 
he was graduated in the classical course, his alma mater subse- 
quently, in 1893, conferring upon him the degree of Master of 
Arts. In 1876 he was admitted to the bar, after taking a course of 
lectures and studying in the office of Coombs, Morris & Bell, of 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, and almost from the start attained good 



492 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

standing among such able and distinguished members of the Indiana 
bar as Thomas A. Hendricks, Col. Abram Hendricks, Benjamin 
Harrison, W. H. H. Miller, Joseph E. McDonald, Tohn M. Butler, 
Oscar B. Hord, Noble E. Butler, W. P. Fishback, R. S. Taylor and 
Allen Zollars. In 1884 Mr. Aldrich was solicited to make the race 
for attorney general of Indiana, but made no canvass in his own 
behalf and was defeated for the nomination by a few votes. Mr. 
Aldrich came to Chicago in 1886 and became a member of the firm 
of Cratty Brothers & Aldrich, later practiced alone for a time, then 
was connected with Aldrich, Payne & Defrees, subsequently with 
Aldrich, Reed, Foster & Allen, and now doing business alone, with 
offices in the Home Life Insurance Building, where he has been 
for twenty-six years. In 1890 Mr. Aldrich was appointed special 
counsel for the United States in its litigation with the Pacific Rail- 
roads, which came as a result of the so-called Anderson Act. Suc- 
cessful in both cases, which he argued in the circuit courts of 
Nebraska and California, where he was opposed by some of the 
leading counsel of the country, Mr. Aldrich was appointed by 
President Harrison to the office of solicitor general of the United 
States to succeed ex-President William H. Taft. Of his incumbency 
of that office, a writer says: "In the position named Mr. Aldrich's 
name is especially associated with the famous Chinese, Cherokee 
and Hat-trimming cases, in two of which he won decided victories 
in the face of masterly opposition, and in the other his argument 
was said by a member of the Supreme Court to have been one of 
the most noteworthy ever addressed to that tribunal. The opinion 
prepared by Mr. Aldrich upon the power of the national govern- 
ment in matters of public health and quarantine regulations, and 
also that on the scope and effect of the election law, showed a broad 
grasp of facts and principles and met the cordial approval of those 
most competent to judge, while his opinion that the administration 
might issue bonds to maintain resumption and keep the money of 
the United States at par, .was practically adopted and acted upon 
during President Cleveland's second administration." On several 
occasions since retiring from the office of solicitor general to devote 
himself to private practice, Mr. Aldrich has been retained by the 
United States in important legal cases, and participated in the dis- 
cussion of the constitutional questions growing out of our war 
with Spain, also winning notable victories in the Insular and Kep- 
ner cases. He is identified with the American Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, the Chicago Bar Association and 
the Law Club. Civic, social and municipal problems of the city 
have always received his close and earnest attention, he has been 
an active member of the Civic Federation and at all times has been 
a hearty supporter of those movements which have made for the 
welfare of the community. Mr. Aldrich belongs to the Union 
League Club, of which he has served as vice president ; his political 
adherence is given to the republican party. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 493 

Mr. Aldrich was married October 13, 1875, to Miss Helen 
Roberts, of Steuben County, Indiana, and three children have been 
born to them : Charles Roberts, Marian Louise and Helen Burseley. 
The family home is at No. 700 Irving Park Boulevard. 

JAMES J. BARBOUR. The active career of James J. Barbour as 
a Chicago lawyer began in 1891. For several years he was con- 
nected with the office of prosecuting attorney in Cook County, and 
both there and in his private practice has shown peculiar ability as 
a trial lawyer and has an unusual record of participation in some 
of the most notable cases that have been before the Chicago courts 
and the public within recent years. 

James Joseph Barbour was born at Hartford, Connecticut, 
December 28, 1869, and comes of an old New England family and 
one that has furnished many members to the various professions. 
His first American ancestor, Thomas Barbour, settled at Windsor, 
Connecticut, in 1635. His grandfather, Heman H. Barbour, was 
a well known jurist in Connecticut, and an uncle, Joseph L. Barbour, 
of Hartford, was one of the leading lawyers of New England. His 
parents were Rev. H. H. and Frances E. (Luther) Barbour. His 
duties as a minister caused his father to remove to Newark, New 
Jersey, and the son. James J., had his education in the public schools 
of that city. In 1887 he worked as a reporter on a newspaper at 
Camden, New Jersey, and in 1888 came to Chicago and began the 
study of law with Judge Frederick A. Smith. In 1889 he became 
assistant to Henry F. Eames, president of the Commercial National 
Bank, and at the same time was a student in the Chicago College of 
Law from 1889 to 1892. 

Mr. Barbour was admitted to the bar in 1891, and represented 
the Commercial National Bank as attorney until the death of Mr. 
Eames in 1897. He was appointed assistant state's attorney in 
January, 1894, by Charles S. Deneen, and was reappointed by John 
J. Healy in December, 1904, and was first assistant in the state's 
attorney's office during 1907-08. Mr. Barbour resigned his public 
office December i, 1908, and was in practice with Clarence A. 
Knight and William G. Adams, in the firm of Knight, Barbour & 
Adams, until the death of his partners in June, 1911. Since then 
Mr. Barbour has practiced alone, and now has offices in the Otis 
Building. In 1913 Mr. Barbour organized and is now president 
of the Rogers Park National Bank of Chicago. 

This sketch would not be complete without a brief outline o 
his activity while an assistant in the state's attorney's office. He 
successfully prosecuted Inga Hanson for perjury committed by her 
in her suit against the Chicago City Railway for alleged personal 
injuries. He had charge of the proceedings against George S. 
McReynolds for fraudulent removal of grain covered by warehouse 
receipts, upon which McReynolds had borrowed over half a million 
dollars from Chicago banks. He had charge of the suit against 



494 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

William Eugene Brown, the Chicago lawyer, who was convicted of 
subornation of perjury and disbarred from practice for fraudulently 
obtaining three thousand dollars from the American Trust & Savings 
Bank. Among about fifty murder cases prosecuted by Mr. Barbour, 
one of particular note was that of Lucy Hagenow, who was 
sentenced to twenty years for murder resulting from an illegal oper- 
ation. In the trial of this case the proof of at least seven deaths 
resulting from criminal operations at her hands was held by the 
Supreme Court to have been proper as bearing on the question of 
intent. Mr. Barbour assisted in the prosecution of Paul O. Stens- 
land and other officials of the Milwaukee State Bank; conducted 
the trial of William J. Davis for manslaughter, in connection with 
the Iroquois Theater fire, at Chicago, Illinois ; and was also in 
charge of the first "Sunday closing" case. He removed the Ralph 
Lipsey habeas corpus case from the Superior Court to the Supreme 
Court by certiorari, and was there'successful in obtaining a decision 
denying right of habeas corpus writ to a defendant whose convic- 
tion had been affirmed by the Supreme Court. In the case of Her- 
man Billik, convicted of murder by poisoning, he obtained an initial 
decision in the United States Supreme Court that that court lacked 
jurisdiction to consider appeals from orders denying habeas corpus 
writs except upon certificate of nisi prius judge that appeal is meri- 
torious. On November 16, 1908, in one afternoon, the entire pro- 
ceedings occupying only three hours, Mr. Barbour caused the arrest, 
indictment, trial in court and sentence to the penitentiary for forgery 
of Peter Van Vlissingen, real estate dealer, who admitted forgeries 
of mortgage notes exceeding a million dollars. One of his last 
acts while connected with the state's attorney's office was in August, 
1908, when he obtained evidence of huge primary election frauds 
in the nominations for state's attorney. In 1909, after leaving the 
prosecutor's office, Mr. Barbour was active in conducting litigation 
in New York and Chicago in behalf of Mrs. Mary A. Yerkes, involv- 
ing her interests in the estate of her late husband, Charles T. Yerkes. 
Mr. Barbour was married September i, 1891, to Miss Lillian 
Clayton. Their children are Justin F., Heman H. and Elizabeth. 
Mr. Barbour is a member of the Masonic order, of the Birchwood 
Country and Evanston Golf clubs, and has his home at 7622 Sheri- 
dan Road, Birchwood. 

EDWIN W. SIMS. While Edwin W. Sims became well known 
not only in Illinois but over the nation through his effective work 
in the office of United States district attorney from 1906 to 1911, 
he has for twenty years been a successful Chicago lawyer, and has 
gained distinction both at the bar and in public affairs. 

Edwin W. Sims was born June 4, 1870, at Hamilton, Ontario, 
Canada, a son of Walter and Elizabeth (Knowles) Sims. His 
academic education was acquired at Bay City, Michigan, and he 
graduated LL. B. from the University of Michigan in 1894. Prior 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 495 

to 1892 Mr. Sims worked as reporter, editor and special corre- 
spondent with Bay City and Detroit newspapers. Admitted to the 
bar in 1894, he began practice at Chicago, and the first four or 
five years were spent in the quiet routine of professional work, in 
the course of which time he had made a reputation for exceptional 
skill in the handling of a varied range of litigation. 

Mr. Sims served as county attorney of Cook County from 1900 
to 1903. In the latter year he was appointed special attorney to the 
Bureau of Corporations at Washington, and in 1905 was promoted 
by President Roosevelt to the position of solicitor in the Department 
of Commerce and Labor. Mr. Sims in 1906 was sent by the Gov- 
ernment to investigate the Alaskan fur seal fisheries on the Pribilof 
Islands in the Behring Sea. While United States attorney for the 
Northern District of Illinois, with headquarters at Chicago, from 
1906 to 1911, Mr. Sims had charge of a large number of govern- 
ment suits for violations of the Interstate Commerce and Anti- 
Trust laws, notable among them being the famous case against the 
Standard Oil Company of Indiana, which resulted in conviction 
and the imposition of a fine of $29,240,000 by Judge Landis. Other 
cases were that against the Church and School Furniture Trust ; 
the conviction of John R. Walsh for violation of the National 
banking laws, and a large number of cases under the so-called White 
Slave Traffic laws, resulting in various convictions. 

Mr. Sims in 1909 was a member of the advisory board to the 
Fur Seal Service, and has been prominent in a number of reform 
movements in the City of Chicago. He is secretary to the Chicago 
Vice Commission, is secretary of the Committee of Fifteen, and one 
of the thoroughly progressive and public spirited men in Chicago. 
Mr. Sims has served as president of the Michigan Society of Chi- 
cago, was secretary of the National Ro'osevelt Committee in 1912, 
belongs to the Chicago, the Illinois and American Bar associations, 
and in politics is a republican. His clubs are the- Union League, 
the Hamilton, the Law, the South Shore Country, the Forty and 
the Kenwood. Mr. Sims is now engaged in private practice as 
senior member of the firm of Sims, Welch & Godman, with offices 
in the Marquette Building at Chicago. His home is at 4800 Ken- 
wood Avenue. 

FRANK AMBROSE HELMER. Beginning his practice as a lawyer 
at Chicago more than thirty years ago, Frank Ambrose Helmer has 
since enjoyed a prosperous season of activity, and his professional 
attainments and high character are recognized among all members 
of the Chicago bar. 

Mr. Helmer was born on a farm near Cuba, New York, April 
8, 1854. His parents were Herman Knox and Elizabeth M. 
(Keller) Helmer. His father was a teacher in his younger career, 
was engaged in farming in DeKalb County, Illinois, subsequently 
moved to the Town of DeKalb and finally to Wheaton, Illinois, 



496 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

where he now lives at the age of ninety-two, while his wife is 
eighty-one. 

Frank A. Helmer gained his early training in the public schools 
of DeKalb and is a graduate of the old University of Chicago, grad- 
uating with the class of 1878 A. B. and M. A. His law studies were 
pursued in the old Union College of Chicago, beginning with 1879 
and graduating LL. B. in the class of 1881. Mr. Helmer was 
admitted to the Illinois bar on diploma the same year, and in 
December, 1881, became a law clerk for Frank J. Smith. In the 
second year he was admitted to partnership, the firm being known 
as Frank J. Smith & Helmer until 1889. Then after a year alone 
Mr. Helmer on May i, 1890, became the second member of the firm 
of Smith, Helmer & Moulton. The senior member was Hon. Fred- 
erick A. Smith, who is now serving with distinction on the appellate 
bench of Illinois, while the junior member was Frank I. Moulton. 
When Judge Smith was elected a judge of the Circuit Court, the firm 
remained as Helmer & Moulton for a year, and the title now found 
on the offices in the Westminster Building is Helmer, Moulton, Whit- 
man & Whitman. Mr. Helmer for a number of years has practiced 
chiefly in corporation, commercial and real estate law. 

Mr. Helmer is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar 
associations and the Chicago Law Institute and belongs to the Uni- 
versity, the Law, the Hamilton, the Reynolds, the Midlothian Coun- 
try, the Indian Hill clubs and the Delta Kappa Epsilon, the Phi Delta 
Phi and the Phi Beta Kappa college fraternities. 

Mr. Helmer was married December 23, 1885, to Bessie Bradwell, 
daughter of Hon. James B. Bradwell, known everywhere in Illinois 
for his distinguished services as a lawyer and legal author. Mr. 
Helmer has one child, Myra, who for a number of years has been 
one of the most skillful women golf players in America. She won 
the Western championship in 1913 and still holds the championship 
among Chicago women players. Mr. Helmer and family reside at 
the Virginia Hotel during the winter, while their summer home is 
the Midlothian Country Club. Mr. Helmer finds his chief recrea- 
tions in golf and horseback riding. Politically he is a republican. 

WALTER CLYDE JONES. Every Illinois lawyer of standing knows 
Walter Clyde Jones as one of the authors and editors of Jones and 
Addington's Annotated Statutes of Illinois and of the Cyclopedia of 
Illinois Law and the Appellate Court Reports of Illinois. Since 
1906 he has been a member of the Illinois Senate from the Fifth 
District, and besides his leadership in the senate is also author of 
several important laws for political and economic reforms. Mr. 
Jones has been a successful member of the Chicago bar for twenty 
years. . 

Walter Clyde Jones was born at Pilot Grove, Iowa, December 
22, 1870, a son of Jonathan and Sarah (Buffington) Jones. Both 
the Jones and Buffington families came to America during the latter 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 497 

part of the seventeenth century. Jonathan Jones was born in Harri- 
son County, Ohio, went out to lo'wa with his brothers in 1833 an d 
preempted land in that territory, and subsequently laid out the town 
of Pilot Grove. He was of Quaker stock, of Welsh origin, while 
his wife was a native of Washington County, Pennsylvania, and of 
English lineage. Senator Jones' father died in Iowa in 1883 at the 
age of sixty-eight. 

Walter Clyde Jones acquired his early education in the grammar 
and high schools of Keokuk, Iowa, and in 1891 was graduated with 
the degree of mechanical engineer from the Iowa State College. In 
his career as a lawyer he has taken much interest in the mechanical 
side of law, especially as a patent lawyer, and is treasurer and 
director of the Benjamin Electrical Manufacturing Company. Mr. 
Jones attended the Chicago College of Law, the law school of the 
Lake Forest University, and graduated LL. B. in 1895, an d was 
admitted to the bar the same year. From 1897 to 1899 he was a 
member of the firm of Addington and Jones, and since then has 
practiced with Mr. Addington, the firm now being Jones, Addington, 
Ames and Seibold. Offices are maintained both in Chicago and in 
New York. It was in association with Mr. K. H. Addington that 
he became the author and editor of Jones and Addington's Annotated 
Statutes of Illinois and of the Cyclopedia of Illinois Law and the 
Appellate Court Reports of Illinois. 

Mr. Jones has been active in civic affairs, and was a member of 
the Chicago charter convention which drafted the proposed charter 
in 1906-07. He was on^ of the organizers of the Legislative Voters' 
League, and was actively identified with the organization until his 
election to the senate in 1906. As a senator Mr. Jones was floor 
leader of the senate during 1909-1 1, was author of the direct primary 
law, leading the fight for its enactment, and also author of the law 
limiting the labor of women to ten hours per day. His work in 
behalf of progressive legislation, including movement for civil service 
reform, and the enactment of rules for reformed legislative pro- 
cedure, has been highly commended by the great independent papers 
of the state, and he is one of the leaders in Illinois politics today. 
He was formerly identified with the republican party, but is now a 
member of the progressive party. 

Senator Jones is a member of the Franklin Institute of Philadel- 
phia, of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and is an 
ex-president of the Chicago Electric Association. In Chicago he is 
a member of the University, the Union League, the Hamilton, the 
Quadrangle, the Homewood, the City and the Press clubs, and is also 
a member of the Cosmos Club of Washington and the Lawyers 
Club of New York. He has traveled extensively, and finds his 
recreations in horseback riding and golf. In legal circles he is 
almost as well known in New York City as in Chicago. Senator 
Jones was married June 3, 1896, at Paulina, Iowa, to Miss Emma 
Boyd daughter of William O. Boyd. Their children are Walter 



Vol. II 5 



498 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Clyde, Clarence Boyd and Helen Gwendolyn. The family reside at 
5541 Woodlawn Avenue. 

JOHN WILSON HILL. One of the distinguished members of Chi- 
cago's legal fraternity, John Wilson Hill, has had a most interesting 
career. Commencing his active life in a lumber camp, he learned 
the business from felling the tree to placing the finished product 
upon the market, and, being placed in a position in which he was 
compelled by circumstances to learn something of the law, became 
so interested in the study that he determined to make it his life work. 
He is not alone known as one of the leading specialists in the field 
of patents, trade marks and unfair competition, but as a legislator 
of distinction, a Mason of high degree and a citizen who has taken 
a stirring part in those activities which have contributed to his 
adopted city's civic advancement. 

John Wilson Hill was born at Ottawa, Illinois, May 9, 1857, 
and is a son of Isaac and Sarah (Wilson) Hill. His father. was 
one of Ottawa's prominent men, being a teacher in what is now the 
high school at South Ottawa, subsequently a successful contractor 
and later an alderman of the city. Mr. Hill attended the primary 
schools of Illinois and Michigan and spent one year at the Michigan 
State Normal school at Ypsilanti, following which he taught school 
for several years during the winter months. Turning his attention 
to the lumber business, he entered that industry in a humble capacity, 
and worked his way up to the position of chief clerk and accountant 
of a large lumber concern, which, because of fire losses, became 
involved in financial difficulties. Mr. Hill was appointed trustee 
for the creditors, who quarreled among themselves and thus pro- 
longed the case for about three years, during which time Mr. Hill 
studied law in the office of Elbert A. Whitney, of Frankfort, Mich- 
igan. He was admitted to the bar in 1890, in Benzie County, 
Michigan, in open court, the judges and lawyers present conducting, 
the examination, which consumed an entire day, before a large 
audience. Mr. Hill is probably the only man who has had the 
distinction of being examined before an open court. 

After his admission to the bar, Mr. Hill came to Chicago and 
was associated with his brother, Lysander Hill, under the firm style 
"of Hill and Hill, this partnership continuing until January, 1898, 
when it was dissolved. Mr. Hill then practiced alone until joined 
by his son, Roy Wilson Hill, a graduate of Northwestern University 
law school, who before becoming a lawyer was an electrical engineer, 
having graduated from Rose Polytechnic Electrical College. The 
firm of Hill and Hill has offices in the Monadnock Block and spe- 
cializes in patents, trade marks and unfair competition, its practice 
covering the United States and being chiefly confined to the Federal 
courts. A stanch supporter of republicanism, Mr. Hill was elected 
a member of the Illinois State Legislature in 1905, and during the 
two terms he was connected with that distinguished body held various 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 499 

important positions. He was chairman of the committee chosen to 
investigate the state institutions, and was the author of the bill gov- 
erning the same, which was passed in the session of 1909. Mr. Hill 
is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois Bar Asso- 
ciation, the American Bar Association and the Patent Law Associa- 
tion of Chicago. He is well known in club life, belonging to the 
Chicago Athletic Club, the Exmoor Country Club and others. With 
his family, he attends the Episcopal church. Mr. Hill has long been 
prominent in Masonry. Passing through the blue lodge and 
chapter, he was one of the organizers of what are known as the day 
light bodies, St. Cecelia Lodge No. 865, A. F. & A. M., St. Cecelia 
Chapter No. 220, R. & S. M., and St. Cecelia Commandery No. 83, K. 
T., of which he is eminent commander for the years 1914 and 1915. 
He belongs to Oriental Consistory and Medinah Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S., and has the distinction of having had the thirty-third 
degree conferred upon him, this at Boston, Massachusetts, October 
i, 1912, in company with such distinguished personages as Hon. 
Chauncey Depew, Governor Osborn of Michigan, Senator Johnson 
of Maine, Admiral Forsyth, U. S. N., retired, Bishop Talbot of 
Pennsylvania and Senator Sherman. 

Mr. Hill was married September 28, 1878, to Miss Ida E. Watson 
of Frankfort, Michigan, and they have one son: Roy Wilson, who 
has also taken all the degrees of Masonry with the exception of the 
thirty-third. The pleasant family residence is situated at No. 1121 
Columbia Avenue, Rogers Park. 

AREA N. WATERMAN. One of the oldest members of the Chicago 
bar is Judge Arba N. Waterman, who began practice in this city 
after the war, in which he had served as a lieutenant-colonel, and 
served for sixteen years as a judge of the Cook County Circuit 
Court. 

Arba N. Waterman was born at Greensboro, Vermont, February 
'5, 1836, a son of Lowring F. and Mary (Stevens) Waterman. He 
was educated in the schools of his native state, graduated A. B. from 
Norwich University in 1856, and during 1860-61 was a student of 
law in the Albany Law School, which at that time occupied a pre- 
eminent position among the law schools of America. During the 
Civil War he served as lieutenant-colonel in the Hundredth Illinois 
Volunteers, and at the battle of Chickamauga had a horse shot from 
under him, and he himself was afterwards wounded. Judge Water- 
man began active practice in Chicago in 1866. At that time the local 
bar was distinguished for the versatile ability and brilliant character 
of its members. Judge Manierre, Corydon Beckwith, Samuel 
Fuller, Alfred W. Arrington, Joseph E. Gary, John M. Wilson, 
Francis H. Kales, Erastus S. Williams, Thomas Hoyne, B. T. Ayer 
and many others long since gone were then leaders in affairs as well 
as in the courts and bar. 

In 1887 Mr. Waterman began his service as a judge of the Cir- 



500 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

cuit Court of Cook County, and was later assigned a judge of the 
Appellate Court of the First District. After sixteen years on the 
bench Judge Waterman resumed private practice in 1903, and for 
several years was senior partner of the firm of Waterman, Thurman 
and Ross. His opinions as a judge are reported in the Thirty-third 
to One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Appeals. Judge Waterman 
has been dean of the John Marshall Law School since 1902. He is 
active in Grand Army affairs, a member of Grant Post No. 28, 
G. A. R., of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, and was presi- 
dent of the Grand Army Hall and Memorial Association during 
1901-02. For several years he was a member of the board of 
trustees of the Chicago Public Library. He is a member of the 
Hamilton, the Chicago Literary and Irving clubs, and finds his 
recreation in literary and philosophical pursuits. Judge Waterman 
is author of "A Century of Caste," 1901, and "A Consideration of 
the Influences That Have Made Chicago and the Promise as to its 
Future," 1908. Judge Waterman was married at Chicago December 
16, 1862, to Eloise Hall. 

Louis JOSEPH BEHAN was born in the City of New Orleans, 
Louisiana, March 10, 1876, and is a son of Frank A. and Catherine 
C. (Coffin) Behan. His father was long prominently known as one 
of the city's foremost business men, and at the time of his retire- 
ment in 1897 was president of the Crescent City Railway Company. 
Since that time he has been a resident of Chicago. Louis Joseph 
Behan received his preparatory education in the Jesuit College 
and High School of New Orleans, graduating from the former in 
1891 and the latter in 1893, in which year he came to Chicago. 
In 1895 ne entered Lake Forest University, graduating from the 
law department of that institution in 1898 with the degree Bachelor 
of Laws, and in the same year was admitted to the bar. Follow- 
ing this Mr. Behan accepted a position as private secretary to 
Perry A. Hull, but in 1902 entered upon the practice of his profes- 
sion and continued in practice until 1907. In that year Mr. Behan 
successfully passed the civil service examination for the position 
of assistant county attorney of Cook County, to which he was sub- 
sequently appointed, and he served therein until 1910 when he 
resigned and was admitted to practice before the United States 
Supreme Court. It was in that year the firm of Duncombe & 
Behan came into existence, and the association continued until 
April i, 1914, when Mr. Behan resumed practice alone, retaining 
offices in the Otis Building, and conducts a general practice, in addi- 
tion to serving as master in chancery of the Circuit Court, to 
which he was appointed December i, 1914. 

Mr. Behan has membership in the Chicago, Illinois State and 
American Bar associations, as well as the Commercial Law League 
of America. His social connections are with the City Club, the 
South Shore Country Club and the Automobile Club. He is a 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 501 

member of the Western Economic Society and is on the advisory 
board of the National Economic Society, and is fraternally asso- 
ciated with the Elks and the Knights of Columbus, being president 
of the Chicago chapter of that order. During the Spanish-Amer- 
ican war Mr. Behan was an active participant, serving as corporal 
of Troop H, First Illinois Volunteer Cavalry. 

Mr. Behan was married March 12, 1901, to Miss May Louise 
Hull of Chicago. Two children were born to them, Louis J., 
Jr., born July 4, 1909, and Dorothy, who is deceased. Mr. Behan 
is a member of St. Ann's parish, Roman Catholic Church. The 
home is at No. 5443 Prairie Avenue. 

FREDERIC BURN HAM. In his native city, where for more than 
a quarter of a century his father has been a successful merchant, 
Frederic Burnham has won for himself a place among the able 
and successful younger members of the Chicago bar. He proved 
his ability while serving as assistant state's attorney for Cook 
County, and since then has been engaged in independent practice of 
his profession, with offices at 1625 Harris Trust Building. 

Mr. Burnham was born in Chicago on the 7th of March, 1881, 
and he is a son of Edward and Mary (McGee) Burnham. The father 
is still in active business on State Street. The public schools of Chi- 
cago contributed to the early education of Frederic Burnham and he 
prepared for college at the Harvard Preparatory School. In 1898 
he entered Yale University and in 1902 was graduated with the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. His law studies were pursued in North- 
western University and in 1905 he gained his degree of Bachelor of 
Laws and was admitted to the bar of his native state. Mr. Burn- 
ham initiated his professional career with a term of service in the 
offices of general counsel of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad 
Company, and the four years he was thus occupied were rich in 
experience. His appointment in March, 1909, to the post of assist- 
ant state's attorney for Cook County prompted his resignation from 
that position. Mr. Burnham made an admirable record in his office 
of assistant to State's Attorney John E. W. Wayman, and his ability 
as a trial lawyer was much enhanced as o result of his activities. 
He retired from the office in August, 1912, and since that time has 
conducted a private law practice which is steadily growing in 
volume. Several representative corporations retain him as counsel, 
and, all considered, his less than ten years of practice have won for 
him a position and standing in legal circles of the city seldom real- 
ized in the profession in that length of time. 

In the Chicago Bar Association Mr. Burnham has served on the 
committee on defense of poor persons charged with crime and has 
acted as chairman of the committee on persons assuming to prac- 
tice law without a license. He is a member of the Illinois State 
and American Bar associations ; of the City Club, wherein he is a 
member of the committee on the administration of criminal jus- 



502 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tice. He is at present (1915) a director of the Hamilton Club and 
a member of its political action committee and has served on other 
important committees of the club. Other social affiliations are with 
the Illinois Athletic Club, the Phi Delta Phi and the Phi Beta Kappa 
college fraternities, and the Knights of Columbus. 

In the fall of 1914 he was a candidate for judge of the Municipal 
Court of Chicago on the republican ticket and received the indorse- 
ment of practically the entire press of the city, the Chicago Bar 
Association and other endorsing bodies. 

Mr. Burnham was married on January 4, 1911, to Miss Adda 
Marguerite Ghost of Denver, Colorado, and they live at 1426 Hyde 
Park Boulevard. 

HON. NATHANIEL C. SEARS. A former justice of the Illinois 
Appellate Court, Nathaniel C. Sears has been a distinguished mem- 
ber of the Chicago bar since 1878. Few men, while carrying the 
heavy burdens of a large and successful law practice, have exer- 
cised more influence on the city's affairs than Judge Sears. 

Nathaniel C. Sears was born in Southern Ohio at the old French 
town of Gallipolis August 23, 1854. His parents were Amos Gould 
and Susan (Davis) Sears. The family early came to Illinois and 
Judge Sears acquired his preparatory education in the Elgin Acad- 
emy. He was graduated in 1875 with the degree A. B. from Am- 
herst College, and the same institution gave him the Master of 
Arts degree in 1878. During 1875-76 Judge Sears was a law student 
in the University of Berlin, and later studied law in private offices 
in this country. Northwestern University in recognition of his 
achievements in the profession in 1898 conferred upon him the title 
LL. D. 

Judge Sears was admitted to the Illinois bar January i, 1878, 
and remained in successful private practice until his election in 1893 
as judge of the Superior Court of Cook County. In 1897 he was 
appointed associate justice of the Appellate Court of Illinois, was 
reappointed in 1900 and in 1902 made chief justice. Judge Sears 
resigned after nearly ten years of service on the bench on April i, 
1892, and has since practiced law as senior member of the firm of 
Sears, Meagher & Whitney. 

Judge Sears was republican candidate for mayor of Chicago in 
1897. He is a trustee of Beloit College, a member of the Chicago, 
Illinois and American Bar associations, and belongs to the Union 
League and the Press clubs of Chicago. His favorite recreations 
are fishing and hunting. He has a beautiful country place at Lake 
Geneva, Wisconsin, his summer home, and a winter home at Daytona 
Beach, Florida. His offices are in the First National Bank Building. 
Judge Sears was married at Elgin, Illinois, May 26, 1887, to Laura 
Raymond Davidson. When in Chicago the Judge and Mrs. Sears 
make their home at the Blackstone Hotel. 




NATHANIEL C. SEARS 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 503 

CHARLES J. O'CONNOR. In the City of Chicago, where he has 
offices in the Tribune Building, Charles J. O'Connor has been en- 
gaged in independent practice of his profession since he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1898. His professional standing today is com- 
mendable, and is the result of professional ability combined with 
close application to his work. 

Mr. O'Connor was born at Greenville, Drake County, Ohio, on 
the I2th day of January, 1876, and is a son of John and Delilah 
(Marker) O'Connor. The father was long a successful manufac- 
turer of wagons in Greenville. Charles J. O'Connor had his early 
training in the schools of his home community, following which 
he entered the law department of the University of Michigan. He 
was graduated from that institution in 1898 with the LL. B. degree, 
and soon thereafter came to Chicago, opened an office for the prac- 
tice of law, and within the year that marked his advent into the 
profession had gained admission to practice in all the courts. At 
no time since he began his work has he had an assistant or partner, 
so that full credit for his present position may properly be assigned 
to himself. His practice is of a general order, and he is equally 
well known as a successful trial lawyer and as a good counsellor. 
He has acted as attorney in some of the most important litigation in 
the United States in which insurance companies were involved and. 
interested. 

Mr. O'Connor has served on numerous committees of the Amer- 
ican Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and the 
Chicago Bar Association. He served for some years as a member 
of the board of directors of the Chicago Law Institute. He is a 
republican in politics and actively interested in the Hamilton Club 
of Chicago. He is a Mason, having his affiliations with Garden City 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Oriental Consistory Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite Masons and Medinah Temple of the Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

On February 5, 1912, Mr. O'Connor was married to Miss Anna 
Bradley of Milwaukee, and they have their home at 526 Roscoe 
Street, Chicago. 

ALBERT J. W. APPELL. While the office of prosecuting attorney 
is everywhere regarded as one of the best sources of training for 
the rising lawyer, in a metropolitan district like Cook County, the 
office is one of peculiar responsibility and importance, and some of 
the keenest lawyers of Chicago are found attached to the general 
staff that handle the large and complicated business of the office. 
The chief assistant prosecutor at the present time is Albert J. W. 
Appell, who has been in practice in the City of Chicago for the past 
fifteen years and has been identified with the prosecutor's office 
for nearly four years. 

Albert J. W. Appell was born in Chicago December 20, 1874, a 
son of Lewis and Sophia (Dal) Appell. His father was a merchant. 



504 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

The public schools of Chicago and also the schools at Covington, 
Kentucky, gave him his early training, and in 1899 Mr. Appell was 
graduated from the law department of Lake Forest University, now 
the Chicago Kent College of Law. Admitted to the bar the same 
year, his first year of practice was individual, after which for sev- 
eral years he was associated with W. S. Johnson. He again engaged 
in independent practice, and continued with growing success until 
his appointment in April, 1911, as one of the assistant prosecutors 
in the law department of the City of Chicago. On January i, 1913, 
Mr. Appell was made chief assistant prosecutor, and has since had 
charge of the more important business handled by the office. On 
December 9, 1914, he was appointed prosecuting attorney by Mayor 
Harrison. 

Mr. Appell is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, the American Bar Association, and 
the Lawyers Association of Illinois. He also belongs to the Iroquois 
Club, the Chicago Automobile Club, the Chicago Motor Club, the 
German Club of Chicago, is affiliated with the Loyal Order of Moose 
and belongs to the County Democracy. Mr. Appell was married 
February 15, 1912, to Miss Anna Jann, of Chicago. Mr. Appell's 
residence is at 2617 Leland Avenue. For a number of years he has 
been quite actively identified with Chicago politics, and as a lawyer 
has ample qualifications for his present work and a still larger 
career ahead of him. 

MILES J. DEVINE. During nearly a quarter of a century in 
which Miles Joseph Devine has been a member of the Chicago legal 
fraternity, his life has been passed upon the highest plane of a law- 
yer's work. Early taking rank as a successful attorney, he soon 
attracted to himself a highly profitable clientage, and the volume of 
his business has been bounded only by the limits of his own inclina- 
tion. He has also found time for helpful public service, for coopera- 
tion with other public-spirited citizens in movements for the city's 
welfare and for activities in political life that have made him a 
recognized leader in the ranks of the democrats. 

Mr. Devine is a native son of Chicago, born November i, 1866, 
and his parents were Patrick and Elizabeth (Conway) Devine, both 
of whom came to Chicago from Ireland as young people. Patrick 
Devine was sixteen years of age when he arrived in this city, and 
here he married the sister of Very Rev. Fr. P. J. Conway, vicar 
general of the Chicago diocese and pastor of Holy Name Cathedral. 
She was born in Wexford, Ireland, in 1846. Three sons and four 
daughters were born to Patrick and Elizabeth Devine. It was their 
wish that Miles J. should enter the priesthood of the Roman Catholic 
Church, and his studies up to 1885 were directed with that end in 
view. He commenced his education in the public schools, in 18/6 
entered St. Patrick's Brothers' School, of which parish his uncle, 
Father Conway, was then in charge, later spent two years in St. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 505 

Francis Seminary, Bay View, Wisconsin, and for four years was 
a student in the Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, at Niagara Falls, 
New York. It was in that latter year that Mr. Devine came to the 
conclusion he would change his vocation, and accordingly turned his 
attention to the law, a vocation that held for him peculiar attrac- 
tions, and offered a better field for the employment of such gifts as 
he had been endowed with. Accordingly he entered Lake Forest 
University and in 1887 became a student in the Chicago College of 
Law, now known as the Chicago Kent College of Law, and there 
was graduated in June, 1890, with the Bachelor of Laws degree. 
On his admission to the bar Mr. Devine formed a partnership with 
J. B. O'Connell, under the firm style of Devine & O'Connell, with 
offices in the United States Express Building. In 1893 Mr. Devine 
was appointed assistant prosecuting attorney, Mayor Carter H. 
Harrison, father of the present mayor of Chicago, making the ap- 
pointment, and he continued in the office under Mayors Hopkins and 
Swift, until 1896, when he resigned in order that he might devote 
more time to the increasing interests of his firm. During the years 
of his service in that office he ably handled a number of important 
and complicated cases, among them the "lumpy jaw" cattle cases in 
1894, the Craig burglary affair and the prosecution of cases in the 
violation of the registration laws. Mr. Devine's private practice 
has been largely of a criminal character, and in this branch of the 
law he is said to have few superiors at the Illinois bar. 

Mr. Devine is one of the most forceful figures in the democratic 
party in the state, but though an earnest worker for the advancement 
of the party, he has never allowed partisanship to interfere with his 
efforts in behalf of what he considered best for the city. In other 
words, he is a citizen first. Mr. Devine was but sixteen years old 
when he entered actively into politics, and at that time he stumped 
Lake, McHenry and Boone counties for E. M. Haines, who became 
speaker of the House of Representatives, and by his youthful elo- 
quence and the force and power of his argument won many votes 
for his candidate and earned for himself the sobriquet, "The Boy 
Orator." In 1894 he was nominated on the populist ticket for sen- 
ator of the Fifteenth Senatorial District, but declined, as he did 
also the nomination for Congress in 1896 from the Fourth Congres- 
sional District. But in 1897 wnen nominated for the office of city 
attorney he accepted the honor and was elected by the largest ma- 
jority ever given a candidate for that office, 38,000 votes, although 
his opponent, Roy O. West, was the most popular candidate on the 
republican ticket. Mr. Devine was the only city attorney who ever 
tried his own cases, and his record in office placed him high in the 
esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. He became a candidate 
for nomination for the office of state's attorney in 1912, but met 
defeat, and when offered the nomination for Congress in the same 
year he declined, as he did also the nomination for chief justice of 
the Municipal Court which was tendered him. During the past three 



506 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF/ILLINOIS 

years Mr. Devine has been president of the Cook County Democracy, 
one of the best organized and strongest political organizations in the 
state. 

Mr. Devine is a member of the Chicago, Illinois State and Ameri- 
can Bar associations. He is also a member of the Chicago Association 
of Commerce, and his social connections are mainly represented by 
his membership in the Illinois Athletic Club and the Chicago Press 
Club. He has a number of fraternal affiliations, among them being 
the Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Catholic Order of Foresters, 
the Knights of Columbus and the Hibernians. As a member of the 
Citizens Association of Chicago he has done good work. 

Mr. Devine was married February 15, 1894, to Miss Emma 
Gamash, daughter of Semuel and Ophelia Gamash of Waukegan, 
Lake County, Illinois. Six children have been born to them, Miles 
J. Jr., Paul B., Leo Jerome, Mabel Ruth, Raymond V. and Mildred 
G. The home of the family is at 1262 McAllister Place. 

HENRY M. HAGAN. In the Chicago bar, Henry M. Hagan has 
become best known in the field of commercial and corporation law. 
During the nineteen years he has practiced in the Illinois courts he 
has successfully represented some of the leading corporations of the 
state, and his connection with important cases has brought him a 
high reputation. 

Mr. Hagan was born at Shelbyville, Shelby County, Illinois, 
December 28, 1870, and is a son of John H. and Mary Catherine 
(Wallace) Hagan. His father, for many years an educator, held 
a professorship in the University of Virginia and was widely and 
favorably known for his scholarship. 

The public schools of Shelbyville furnished Mr. Hagan with his 
early training, which was followed by attendance at Eureka College, 
Eureka, Illinois, and after graduation he began the study of law in 
the office of ex-Attorney-General Howland J. Hamlin, of Shelby- 
ville. Under this preceptor he made rapid progress and on March 
6, 1896, was admitted to the Illinois bar. During that year Mr. 
Hagan came to Chicago and began practice with the firm of Parker 
& Pain, in the Marquette Building, where his offices have ever since 
been located. With the resignation of Mr. Pain two years after Mr. 
Hagan's advent into the office, Mr. Parker took Mr. Hagan into 
partnership with him, and for sixteen years the firm of Parker & 
Hagan was known for one of the strong legal combinations in the 
city. 

The partnership was mutually dissolved in 1911, and since that 
time Mr. Hagan has practiced alone, with offices at 1201 Marquette 
Building. Mr. Hagan has membership in the Chicago, Illinois State 
and American Bar associations, and he is well known in club circles 
of the city as a member of the Iroquois Club, the Chicago Auto- 
mobile Club, the Southern Club and the Riverside Golf Club. He is 
also a member of the Masonic fraternity. Politically he is a 
democrat. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 507 

Mr. Hagan was married to Miss Nannie Waggoner, of Sullivan, 
Illinois, and they have had two children, of whom one son, John, is 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Hagan are members of the Presbyterian 
Church at Riverside, in which community they make their home. 

JOHN S. GOODWIN. Forty years of practice in courts of law, 
with twenty-three of them before the Illinois bar, is the record 
of Judge John Samuel Goodwin, of Chicago. Judge Goodwin has 
long been prominent as a lawyer, particularly in the corporation 
field, but is perhaps equally well known over the state and the Union 
as a stock breeder. 

John Samuel Goodwin was born at Edinburg, Johnson County, 
Indiana, March 16, 1858, a son of Rev. William Rees Goodwin, 
D. D., and Susan A. (Keely) Goodwin. His father was a promi- 
nent clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The Goodwin 
family was founded in America in Colonial times and the record of 
five generations has been found, beginning with a branch of the 
family which was located about the time of the Revolution at Old 
Redstone Fort in Southwestern Pennsylvania, at the place now 
known as Brownsville. From that Pensylvania stock Judge Good- 
win is descended. 

Mr. Goodwin had favorable educational advantages, and after 
finishing local schools entered Indiana Asbury University, now 
DePauw University, at Greencastle, and was graduated with the 
first honors of his class in 1877 and the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In 1880 he received from the same institution the Master's degree. 
He studied law in Indiana under careful tutelage, was admitted to 
the bar in 1878, and soon afterward moved to Beloit, county seat of 
Mitchell County, Kansas, and while practicing there served on the 
bench of the Municipal Court and in 1879 was assistant county 
attorney. 

From Kansas Judge Goodwin came to Chicago on January I, 
1891, and soon afterward formed a partnership with Gen. John 
C. Black, one of the most honored members of the Chicago bar and 
a conspicuous military figure in Illinois. Since 1894 Judge Good- 
win's practice has been largely in connection with important busi- 
ness interests. He has been attorney for a number of Chicago banks, 
and among other interests that have made his record of business 
as a Chicago attorney he was in 1899 instrumental in effecting the 
consolidation of the street railway systems at Sioux City, Iowa, and 
served as director and general counsel of the Sioux City Traction 
Company from 1899 to 1902. In his home town of Naperville in 
DuPage County, Judge Goodwin served as city attorney from 1907 
to 1913. He is a director of Riverside Park at Sioux City, Iowa, 
served as a trustee of Kansas Wesleyan University in 1886, and 
since 1910 has been a member of the board of trustees of DePauw 
University. 

For more than thirty years Judge Goodwin has devoted time and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

capital to the business of stock breeding. At Naperville he is the 
owner of a splendid ranch of 500 acres, known as Heatherton, one 
of the finest country estates in Illinois, where wealthy farmers are 
the rule and not the exception. That farm is the home of a noted 
herd of Aberdeen-Angus cattle, known as the Heatherton herd, 
which is conceded to be one of the finest of its kind in the United 
States, and the nucleus of which was established by Judge Goodwin 
about 1883. As a breeder of this strain of cattle Judge Goodwin is 
known in live stock circles all over America, and the business is not 
only a profitable one but furnishes him recreation from professional 
cares and the strain of city life. For six years he served as a di- 
rector of the National Aberdeen-Angus Association, and was its 
president in 1905-06. 

Judge Goodwin has his law offices in the Temple Building at 108 
South LaSalle Street, but lives the year round at Heatherton House 
in Naperville, and from that suburban town makes daily trips to 
his Chicago office. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, 
is a republican and a member of the Methodist Church. Judge 
Goodwin is prominent in Masonic circles, has taken the thirty-second 
degree of Scottish Rite, is president of the Jubilee Consistory Class, 
and is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. His college fra- 
ternities are the Beta Theta Pi and the Phi Beta Kappa, and he 
belongs to the Union League Club and the Saddle and Sirloin Club 
of Chicago. 

October 7, 1880, Judge Goodwin married Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Forbes of Danville, Illinois. They have one daughter, Suzanne, 
wife of William Robert Johnson of Chicago. 

ROY D. KEEHN. Engaged in the work of his profession in Chi- 
cago since 1905, Roy D Keehn is admitted to practice in all of the 
state and federal courts of Illinois, as well as the Supreme Court of 
the United States and is in the general practice of law with offices 
at 1151 Otis Building. As a part of a substantial law business, he is 
general counsel and attorney for all of the interests of Hon. 
William Randolph Hearst in Chicago, including the Chicago Ameri- 
can and the Chicago Examiner, and during the administration of 
Mayor Edward F. Dunne was assistant corporation counsel of 
Chicago. 

Mr. Keehn is of German- American parentage and was born in 
Noble County, Indiana, November 7, 1875, and is a son of Jonathan 
N. and Harriet (Shobe) Keehn, the former of whom died March 10, 
1912, and the latter of whom now resides at Ligonier, Indiana. Mr. 
Jonathan Keehn was a substantial Indiana farmer. With the train- 
ing of the public schools of his native county, Roy D. Keehn took a 
collegiate preparatory course at DePauw University, Greencastle, 
Indiana. He then entered the University of Indiana at Blooming- 
ton, in which he continued his studies until his senior year. He 
withdrew to engage in teaching, and taught at Ligonier, Kendall- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 509 

ville and Goshen, being instructor in science and mathematics in 
Goshen and Kendallville high schools. Coming to Chicago he be- 
came a teacher of mathematics in the University of Chicago High 
School. By special appointment of President Harper he later was 
made instructor of mathematics in the University of Chicago. In 
the meantime he followed a regular course of study in the university 
and graduated in 1902, Bachelor of Philosophy. Mr. Keehn was a 
member and president of the first class which did full work at the 
University of Chicago Law School and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago Law School in 1904 with the degree of Doctor 
of Laws. In 1905 he was admitted to the Illinois bar. Since then he 
has been actively engaged in the general practice of his profession 
in Chicago. He was prominent in university activities, being a 
member of the Indiana University varsity football team, editor of 
the college paper at the University of Indiana and first editor of the 
University of Chicago literary magazine, the Monthly Maroon. 

Mr. Keehn is a member of the Chicago Bar Association. He is 
on its entertainment committee and is also identified with the Illinois 
State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He is a 
member of the University Club, the Chicago Automobile Club, the 
Chicago Press Club and the Iroquois Club. He is affiliated with 
various bodies of the Masonic fraternity, including Woodlawn 
Commandery of Knights Templar and Medinah Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is connected with the Phi Kappa Psi college 
fraternity and the Phi Delta Phi law fraternity. His residence is at 
5703 Blackstone Avenue. 

On the 23d of June, 1899, Mr. Keehn was married to Miss Jane 
Menaugh, of Columbia City, Indiana, and they have one son, Roy 
D. Jr., who was born in 1908. 

SIDNEY SMITH GORHAM was born in Rutland County, Vermont, 
November 6, 1874, and is a son of Frank E. and Mary J. (Smith) 
Gorham, the father, a merchant, coming to Chicago in middle life 
and dying at the age of about forty-five years, while the mother still 
survives and makes her home at Hamilton, Montana. The country 
schools of Rutland County and the graded schools of Rutland fur- 
nished Mr. Gorham with his preliminary educational training, and 
in 1890 he removed to Chicago, in July of which year he secured the 
position of office boy in the offices of Mills & Ingham, then one of 
the leading law firms of the city. Mr. Gorham attended night classes 
at the Chicago College of Law (now the Chicago Kent College of 
Law), and was graduated therefrom in 1894 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, being admitted to the bar in 1895, just after he 
had attained his majority. After the death of Mr. Ingham Mr. 
Gorham remained with Luther Laflin Mills, and in 1904 entered into 
a partnership agreement with Mr. Mills and his son, Matthew, un- 
der the firm style of Mills, Gorham & Mills, an association which 
continued until July i, 1905. He then continued in practice alone 



510 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

until May, 1906, when he associated himself with Henry W. Wales, 
under the style of Gorham & Wales. In 1912 Amos C. Miller was 
admitted to the firm, which adopted the name of Miller, Gorham & 
Wales, and has offices in the New York Life Building, the firm en- 
gaging in a general civil practice. 

Mr. Gorham is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Asociation and the Law Club, and holds member- 
ship in the Chicago Athletic Association and the Lagrange Country, 
Illini Country and Chicago Automobile clubs and the New England 
Society. He is one of the most enthusiastic devotees of automobiling 
in the West, is a member of the state and national organizations de- 
voted to the sport, has served as secretary of the Chicago Automobile 
Club for several terms, president of the Illinois State Automobile 
Association for two terms, and secretary of the American Automo- 
bile Association for one term, has contributed to the development 
and progress of the sport, particularly in the line of uniform state 
laws, in this connection attending the legislative session of 1905 as 
the representative of the Illinois motorists and securing the passage 
of a bill similar to the present motor vehicle law, although it was 
subsequently vetoed by Governor Deneen. At the session of the 
Forty-fifth General Assembly, in 1907, Mr. Gorham was again ap- 
pointed to look after the interests of the motoring fraternity of the 
state, and drafted the statute "defining motor vehicles and providing 
for the registration of the same, and uniform rules regulating the 
use and speed thereof." This passed the Legislature and became 
the law without the governor's signature, and the secretary of state 
assigned to Mr. Gorham's car license No. i. Mr. Gorham has re- 
sided in Lagrange since 1895. 

Mr. Gorham was married July 15, 1896, to Miss Myrtle Gene- 
vieve Willett, daughter of Consider H. and Lois A. Willett, of Chi- 
cago, and they have two children, Sidney S., Jr., and Willett N. 

DAVID L. WRIGHT. Twenty years of active practice have given 
David L. Wright a position as a leader in the Effingham County bar, 
and besides the general practice which he has successfully conducted 
in the local courts Mr. Wright has several times been called to 
responsible office. He has served as county judge of Effingham 
County and is now giving the greater part of his time and attention 
to the office of postmaster of Effingham, to which he was appointed 
by President Wilson in November, 1913. Mr. Wright has that sub- 
stantial reputation which is the ambition of the best lawyer, in that 
his clients feel that their interests are safely intrusted when under his 
direction. In all his relations he is a man of thorough trustworthi- 
ness, and has a high place among Southern Illinois attorneys. For 
many years until his appointment as postmaster Mr. Wright was 
associated in practice with his brother, B. W. Wright, and together 
they controlled probably the best practice in Effingham County. Mr. 
Wright still looks after the. interests of his older clients, though his 








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> 




COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 511 

duties as postmaster have interfered to a large extent with his 
legal work. 

David L. Wright was born in Effingham, Illinois, May 9, 1865, 
one of the nine children born to William and Jemima (Rinehart) 
Wright. His father was a native of New Jersey, came early in life 
to Illinois, settled in Effingham County, and subsequently was a suc- 
cessful real estate man. His death occurred at Effingham in Decem-, 
ber, 1890, at the age of sixty-three. His wife, who was born in 
Illinois, spent practically all her days in Effingham, where she died 
at the age of seventy-three. 

David L. Wright acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Effingham, and subsequently entered the Northern In- 
diana Normal College at Valparaiso, remained there until finishing 
the teacher's course, and for several years supported himself by 
teaching and by work in other lines. Entering the Wesleyan Uni- 
versity Law School at Bloomington, he was graduated LL. B. in 
1893, and admitted to practice in the same year. Mr. Wright became 
associated with his brother, B. W. Wright, and they continued their 
partnership with mutual profit and success until Mr. Wright's ap- 
pointment as postmaster. During his active practice of twenty years 
Mr. Wright was twice elected county judge of Effingham County, 
and the citizens of the county have good reason to remember grate- 
fully his capable administration of county affairs. 

Mr. Wright is an active democrat and has long been one of the 
popular citizens of Effingham County. Fraternally he is affiiliated 
with the Masonic order. In September, 1899, Mr. Wright married 
Miss Laura Wilson of Greenville, Indiana, a daughter of Judge 
Francis Wilson, who was prominent as a judge and citizen in 
Greenville. Both Mrs. Wright's parents are now deceased. 

WALTER WILLARD Ross. For years Walter W. Ross gave his 
time and attention to the duties of general counsel for leading cor- 
porations of Chicago, and gained an enviable reputation through his 
associations as such. He is now engaged in general practice, with 
office in the Borland Building on South LaSalle Street, and takes a 
prominent place among members of the Chicago bar. 

Of New England ancestry, Mr. Ross was born in Pulaski, this 
state, on March 29, 1866. He is a son of Edward T. and Ellen M. 
(Wall) Ross. Following his public school days he entered W'hipple 
Academy and Illinois College at Jacksonville, Illinois, after which 
he became a student at Princeton University. He was graduated 
from that institution in 1888 with the B. A. degree, which was sup- 
plemented three years later with the Master's degree, conferred 
upon him by his alma mater. His specific training for the law he 
had at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, and at 
Harvard Law School in 1889-90. In the latter year he was admitted 
to practice in Illinois, and concerning the early period of his legal 
career it has been said : "His thorough preliminary training and 



512 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

natural inclination toward the law were valuable assets in his early 
years, and, in fact, have been the greatest contributing factors to 
his success as a practitioner. It was not long after his first shingle 
attracted attention to the young Chicago barrister that he began to 
achieve some recognition and to enjoy the confidence of a growing 
clientele. Political preferment was the next honor conferred upon 
him. In 1894 he became assistant corporation counsel of Chicago 
and he participated in all of the essentially important litigation of 
that department. This experience further rounded out his training 
and added weight to his equipment for the law. Thus, a year later, 
in 1895, he was offered and accepted the position of attorney for the 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company, with which he 
was connected in this capacity for four years. He then formed a 
partnership with his maternal uncle, Hon. George W. Wall, under 
the title of Wall & Ross. His uncle was a distinguished lawyer and 
jurist who served for a score of years on the bench of the Illinois 
Appellate Court. The combination of youth and ripe experience 
proved a very effective one, and the firm figured prominently in the 
legal circles of Chicago during these years in which the alliance 
continued." 

In 1901 Mr. Ross was tendered the position of general counsel 
for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, 
which he accepted, and during his incumbency of this office he had 
his residence and official headquarters in New York City. There 
he made many firm friends and came not infrequently before the 
public eye. He felt himself drawn to the private practice of his 
profession, however, and in 1905 he resigned from his position and 
returned to Chicago, where he has since been active in general 
practice since 1905. He has a large and important clientage, and 
he has won many legal victories that have given him added place 
and prestige in his profession. 

Many pleasing traits have gone to make up the sum of his suc- 
cess and popularity, and in this connection we quote again from the 
article previously mentioned: "Mr. Ross is a man of fine physique 
and of patrician countenance. He is genial and considerate and his 
personality enables him to win and retain staunch friends. As a 
pleader before court or jury he is admitted to possess eloquence 
of no ordinary character, and his wide activitie's in the practice of his 
profession, coupled with early training, have given him a broad 
knowledge of jurisprudence, as shown in his preparation and pres- 
entation of his various cases. Possessed of that requisite of the 
really great lawyer, a legal mind, he stands well forward in the 
group of Chicago's more important attorneys. Coupled with fine 
intellectual attainments are sturdy character and unwavering honesty 
of purpose and action. Mr. Ross is of the type hard to convince, 
and careful to decide, but with conviction assured and decision made, 
he is a stalwart defender of his position." 

Mr. Ross is a member of the Chicago, Illinois State and Ameri- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 513 

can Bar associations, the University Club and the Evanston Golf 
Club. He is a republican in his political convictions. 

On May 14, 1891, Mr. Ross was married to Miss Jane Ames and 
they have their home in Evanston, where they take their place in 
the social activities of the community. They have three children, 
Ames Walcott, W. Willard and Robert. 

FRANK L. WEAN. Holding the important position of referee in 
bankruptcy for the Northern District of Illinois continuously since 
his first appointment in 1898, and having been engaged for more 
than ten years prior thereto in a successful practice in the Illinois 
courts, Frank Lincoln Wean is accounted one of the forceful mem- 
bers of Chicago's legal fraternity. Since 1890 he has been con- 
nected with cases which have gone to the highest state and federal 
tribunals and the high ability which he has displayed in each of 
his several capacities has won him a well-established and lasting 
reputation. 

Frank Lincoln Wean was born in Williamsfield, Ashtabula 
County, Ohio, August 6, 1860, and is a son of Ira E. and Malvina 
(Belknap) Wean. He was five years of age when he removed with 
his parents to a farm in Tuscola County, Michigan, where as a boy 
he attended the district school, and later, the high schools of Caro 
and Corunna, from each of which he was graduated, completing 
his preparation for the University of Michigan in 1880. In the 
meantime, he "taught school" during the winter months, being thus 
engaged from 1877 to 1879, and from 1881 until 1885 was principal 
of the high school at Alpena, Michigan. During the latter part of 
this period he began the study of law in the office of R. J. Kelley, 
afterwards Judge Kelley of the Circuit Court. In 1885 and 1886 
he attended the law school of Michigan University, at Ann Arbor, 
and in the latter year was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Cuort 
of Michigan. In July, 1886, Mr. Wean came to Chicago and en- 
tered the law office of Swett, Grosscup & Swett, as a clerk, and was 
admitted to the bar of Illinois March 16, 1887, receiving the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws from Union College of Law, Chicago, in June 
of the same year. Mr. Wean became a member of the firm of 
Swett & Grosscup, in September, 1887, the firm name being changed 
to Swett, Grosscup & Wean in 1888. After the death of Leonard 
Swett, in 1889, the surviving members organized the firm of Gross- 
cup & Wean, which existed until December, 1892, when Mr. 
Grosscup was appointed district judge for the Northern District of 
Illinois, to succeed Judge Blodgett. From 1892 to 1898, Mr. Wean 
practiced law alone and for fifteen years occupied the same suite of 
offices in the Montauk Block, then located on Monroe Street on a 
part of the site of the present First National Bank Building. He 
was admitted to the bar of the United States Supreme Court in 
1895, an d has been counsel in several important cases before that 
tribunal. He acted as special master in chancery in the case of 



514 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Atlantic Trust Company of New York v. The Peoria Water Com- 
pany, and as such made the sale of the waterworks property to the 
bondholders' committee in January, 1898, and was also special master 
in chancery, appointed to take testimony and report conclusions of 
fact in the case of the West Chicago Park Commissioners v. The 
Receiver of the National Bank of Illinois, in which case the plain- 
tiff sought to establish its claim of $316,000 against the insolvent 
bank. In 1898 Mr. Wean was appointed referee in bankruptcy for 
the Northern District of Illinois, and since that time, so ably have 
his duties been discharged, he has been reappointed every two years, 
without solicitation or application on his part. During this time, 
Referee Wean has tried more than ten thousand cases. 

Personally a man of fine appearance, with pleasing and courte- 
ous manners, Referee Wean has won the respect and friendship of 
all with whom he has come in contact, officially, professionally and 
socially. His executive abilities and judicial mind fit him admirably 
for the high office which he holds, and his decisions have seldom 
been reversed by the reviewing courts. He is a valued member of 
the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, 
and is popular with his fellow-members in the Chicago, Law and 
Exmoor Country clubs. While never very active politically, he 
has always been identified with the republican party. 

In December, 1887, Mr. Wean was married in Chicago to Miss 
Bertha M. Coombs, and to this union there has been born one 
daughter, Evangeline, who was married June 8, 1912, to O. Dick- 
inson Street, of New York City, where they now reside. They 
have one child, O. Dickinson Street, Jr., born May 8, 1913. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wean maintain their home at Highland Park, Illinois. 

HON. WILLIAM McKiNLEY. Probably no citizen of Illinois at 
the beginning of his legislative experience ever came so quickly 
into commanding position and prominence as Hon. William Mc- 
Kinley of Chicago, who in 1912 was elected as democratic member 
of the Forty-eighth General Assembly from the Thirty-first Sena- 
torial District. On the organization of the House he was elected 
speaker, on. the seventy-sixth ballot, after a deadlock lasting for 
three weeks, regarded as the longest delay in the annals of the Illi- 
nois House over the question of organization and election of a 
speaker. The interesting fact of this deadlock and the unusual 
honor bestowed upon Mr. McKinley is that he paid his first visit 
to the state capital of Illinois following his election, and had never 
before seen a legislative body in session. The Forty-eighth General 
Assembly was one notable for its work, and Mr. McKinley won high 
praise from all quarters on his skill as a parliamentarian and his 
influential leadership in carrying out the legislative program. As 
speaker Mr. McKinley was member of all the committees of the 
House, was chairman of the committee on rules, a voting member 
in all the standing committees, and was ex-officio chairman of the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 515 

democratic steering committee. His individual, influence was of 
particular value in promoting legislation affecting good roads and 
in bringing about the present state public utility law. He was vice 
chairman of the efficiency and economy committee authorized by 
the Forty-eighth Assembly to investigate and report on all branches 
of the state government of Illinois for the purpose of obtaining 
greater efficiency by consolidating and rearranging the various 
correlated departments and bureaus of the state administration. 
Governor Dunne appointed Mr. McKinley a deputy commissioner 
from Illinois to the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco 
in 1915. 

Born on a farm in Clayton County, Iowa, June i, 1879, a son 
of John and Ellen (McNamara) McKinley, substantial farming 
people of Iowa, William McKinley grew up in the country, attended 
country schools, the high school at Postville, Iowa, the Iowa State 
Normal University at Cedar Falls, and then for three years was a 
sucessful and popular teacher in his native state, during which time 
he was principal of schools at Castalia and Ashton. 

Mr. McKinley came to Chicago at the age of twenty-five, en- 
tered the Chicago Kent College of Law, graduating LL. B. in 1907 
and admitted to the Chicago bar in October of the same year. He 
has practiced alone since his admission to the bar, and enjoyed as 
much success in general practice as in his political activities. Mr. 
McKinley is lecturer on torts and constitutional law in the faculty 
of the Webster College of Law in Chicago. He is a member of the 
Chicago and Illinois State Bar associations, the Chicago Automo- 
bile Club, the Columbia Yacht Club and of the Irish Fellowship 
Club. His office is at 29 South LaSalle Street and his home at 909 
Airdrie Place, Chicago. Mr. McKinley was married November 26, 
1913, to Miss Katharine Riley of Chicago. 

RICHARD SWEET FOLSOM. In the long line of men who make 
up the legal profession in the State of Illinois it is especially pleasing 
to make mention of those native sons who have gained prominence 
and popularity in the pursuit of their calling. Richard Sweet Folsom 
is undeniably one of that group, and he is recognized today as one 
of the successful members of the Chicago bar. He is serving as 
general counsel to the Board of Education, is master in chancery 
of the Circuit Court of Cook County, and is secretary of the Chicago 
Bar Association. 

Born in the City of Chicago on the 5th day of August, 1872, 
Richard Sweet Folsom is the son of Charles A. and Sarah T. 
(Sweet) Folsom. The father was an attorney of standing for many 
years in Chicago, and he died here in 1905. Richard Folsom had his 
early schooling in the public schools of his native city, and at Wil- 
liams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, he had his higher 
training, and was graduated from that institution in 1894 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Returning to Chicago he promptly 



516 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

applied himself to the study of law and in 1896 he successfully 
passed his bar examinations and was admitted to practice. This 
city has since continued to be the center of his professional activities, 
and he is now a member of the firm of Folsom, Jennings & Fifer, 
with offices at 72 West Adams Street. 

Mr. Folsom's progress has been pleasing to contemplate. In 
February, 1911, he was appointed master in chancery to the Circuit 
Court of Cook County, and since July i, 1912, he has been general 
counsel to the Board of Education of Chicago. His election to the 
office of secretary of the Chicago Bar Association is sufficient com- 
mentary on his standing among his brother attorneys. 

A democrat, Mr. Folsom has staunchly supported the principles 
of his party at all times. He is a member of the University Club, 
the Illinois Athletic Club, the Chicago Yacht Club, the Chicago Law 
Club, and retains membership in his college fraternities, the Delta 
Upsilon and Phi Delta Phi. He is a member of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, as is also his wife. Mrs. Folsom was Miss Dorothy 
Moulton, the daughter of Gen. George M. Moulton of Chicago, and 
her marriage to Mr. Folsom was celebrated on May 30. 1905. The 
family home is maintained at 2218 Prairie Avenue. 

R. ALLAN STEPHENS. An active member of the Danville bar 
since 1902, R. Allan Stephens is particularly well known among 
Illinois lawyers over the state as publisher of the Quarterly Bulletin, 
the official publication of the State Bar Association. In the State Bar 
Association he has served as chairman of the committee on new 
members two years and is now chairman of the committee on or- 
ganization. Mr. Stephens is also a member of the American Bar 
Association and the Commercial Law League of America. 

Robert Allan Stephens was born at Potomac, Illinois, June 9, 
1878, and comes of English ancestry on both sides, his father's fam- 
ily having been Cornishmen, while his 'mother's family was from 
Oxford. His parents are Robert and Mary E. Stephens, his father 
a prominent Methodist minister of the Illinois Conference. For 
sixteen years he served as a district superintendent, and was a 
member of the general conferences at Cincinnati, Baltimore, Los 
Angeles and Minneapolis. At present he is a member of the general 
board of the M. E. Church and secretary of the Preachers Aid 
Society of the Illinois Annual Conference. 

R. Allan Stephens graduated in 1896 from the Mattoon High 
School, attended Northwestern University during 1896-98, and 
prepared for his profession in the Columbian University at Wash- 
ington, D. C, taking the degree LL. B. in 1901 and LL. M. in 1902. 
From 1898 to 1902 he was a clerk in the office of the auditor for the 
war department at Washington, and since that time has been in 
practice at Danville. He formed a connection with the firm of 
Swallow, Stephens & Swallow in 1901, then practiced two years 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 517 

from 1902 as Stephens & Barnhart, and since that time has been in 
individual practice, with a large general clientage. 

Mr. Stephens is a republican, and was candidate for the party 
nomination for county judge in 1909, being defeated by a very close 
margin. While in college he was a member of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity and at present is worthy grand master of ceremonies 
in that fraternity. He is chairman of the judiciary committee of the 
Grand Lodge of Illinois in the Knights of Pythias, and is also affili- 
ated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. His church is the Methodist. 

On September i, 1903, Mr. Stephens married Helen Prentiss 
Bennett, a daughter of the late Judge Charles Bennett of Mattoon, 
Illinois. Mrs. Stephens has membership in the Kappa Kappa 
Gamma sorority and the Daughters of the American Revolution. 
They are the parents of a fine family of four young Americans 
named Robert Allan, aged ten; Mary Ellen, aged eight; Charles 
Bennett, aged five, and William Cleaves, one year old. 

HARRY W. SISSON. The long and uniformly successful career 
of Harry W. Sisson has been characterized by activities in several 
fields of endeavor, in each of which his talents have brought credit- 
able accomplishment. Stock raising, real estate, merchandising 
and the law have at different times been the object of his endeavors, 
and he is also the inventor of several appliances, the usefulness of 
which is indicated by their extensive sale all over the country. Mr. 
Sisson is at present engaged in legal practice, in connection with 
extensive interests in realty operations. He is particularly well 
known on the South Side of Chicago, where he has been influential 
in promoting movements that have done much to build up and 
develop sections formerly of little value to the city. 

Mr. Sisson was born January 27, 1858, in Mercer County, Illi- 
nois, and is a son of Capt. Benjamin T. and Zilpah A. (Waugh) 
Sisson. His father was a sea captain, in the whaling business for 
eighteen years, sailing from New Bedford, Massachusetts, the chief 
whaling seaport of that time, and rounding Cape Horn no less 
than ten times in his whaling vessel. Making a success of his 
operations, he came to Chicago in 1856 with $25,000 in gold, but 
later went to Mercer County, Illinois. There, in 1858, he became 
involved in a law suit, Ellis vs. Sisson et al., which was tried in 
many counties by some of the best lawyers in the state, and finally 
settled in 1890. Captain Sisson died in Chicago in 1898. Mrs. 
Sisson's brothers were Henry W. Waugh, a well known landscape 
artist, DeWitt C. Waugh, leading scenic artist of the Cincinnati 
musical festivals, and Fred Waugh, a cousin, the noted marine 
artist. 

The early education of Harry W. Sisson was secured in the 
public schools of Mercer County and Davenport, Towa. As a young 



518 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

man he devoted his attention to breeding Shorthorn cattle, Poland- 
China hogs and trotting horses, and had a half-mile track on his 
farm, which was located in the vicinity of Monmouth. While en- 
gaged in this business he became the inventor of two appliances, 
Sisson's anti-kicking strap and Sisson's adjustable safety halter, 
both of which were sold by the thousands all over the world. 

Mr. Sisson first became interested in the study of law in 1882, 
although it was not until many years later that he took up the pro- 
fession as an active practitioner. At that time he purchased his own 
law books and studied during his leisure hours. In 1884 he went to 
Nebraska, where he remained for five years, and then returned to 
Monmouth, and remained there until coming to Chicago, in 1898. 
Here he engaged in the real estate busines, and is one of the lead- 
ing salesmen in that line. In preparation for the profession of law 
Mr. Sisson entered Chicago Kent College of Law, from which he was 
graduated in 1908, with the degree Bachelor of Laws, being ad- 
mitted to the Illinois bar the same year. 

Mr. Sisson's practice has had largely to do with realty cases. He 
was attorney for several of the defendants for a part of the lake 
front, from Fifty-third street south, and, although freely assured 
by some of his fellow-practitioners that he would be unable to clear 
the titles within ten years, his vigorous handling had matters satis- 
factorily settled within that many months. In connection with 
this he assisted in the widening of Everett avenue, and dedication 
of Fifty-fifth street east of that avenue, and arranged for a street 
on the lake front, which is now being constructed from Fifty-third 
street to Jackson Park, one of the most exclusive residential districts 
of the city. 

Mr. Sisson is a member of the Association of Commerce. Fra- 
ternally his relations are with Lodge No. 240, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Cook County Encampment, No. 215, of the same 
order. He is independent in politics. In June, 1892, Mr. Sisson 
married Miss Eva Gumming, daughter of Dr. J. S. Gumming, who 
was the oldest Methodist minister in Illinois, and former president of 
Hedding College. Three sons have been born to this union, Baird 
W., Duane M. and Niel K. The family resides at 4332 Greenwood 
Avenue. 

CHARLES LERov BROWN. During his active practice in the 
Chicago bar since 1897, Charles LeRoy Brown was for several years 
connected with the legal departments of street railway companies 
and has since developed a large general practice. He has had 
for many years an extensive practice in the courts of appeal, both 
state and federal, having appeared in several hundred appellate 
cases. At the present time he is one of the special counsel for the 
State of Illinois in the charter tax litigation with the Illinois Central 
Railroad Company. 

Charles LeRoy Brown was born at Meyersdale, Pennsylvania, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 519 

December 14, 1874, a son of Dr. George W. Ira and Magdalene 
(Miller) Brown. In 1878 his parents moved to Dixon, Illinois, 
where the son received his early education, and in 1892 graduated 
A. B. from Dixon College. During 1893-95 he was a student in the 
University of Michigan. He took his degree in law from the North- 
ern Illinois College of Law in 1897. Admitted to the bar the same 
year, Mr. Brown spent several months in practice at Dixon with 
William Barge. He moved to Chicago in the fall of 1897, and was 
in the law department of the North Chicago Street Railway Com- 
pany during 1898-99, and with the Chicago Union Traction Com- 
pany from 1899 to 1901. Mr. Brown was in general practice with 
James W. Duncan as a partner from 1901 to 1905, and was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Morrison, Brown & Gould from 1906 to 1910. 

In politics he is a republican, and is a member of the various 
bar associations and of the Chicago, the Mid-day, the Law, and 
the South Shore Country clubs. His offices are in the Otis Build- 
ing, and his residence at 1130 Hyde Park Boulevard. Mr. Brown 
was married June 28, 1911, to Miss Alice McHugh of Chicago. 

ADOLPH J. BORGMEIER. While Mr. Borgmeier has had a secure 
position in the Chicago bar for the past fourteen years, and controls 
a large general practice, his name is also familiar for its associa- 
tions with the Illinois military service, and he was one of the men 
who served in the trenches at Santiago. Captain Borgmeier's family 
has been identified with Chicago for more than half a century, and 
his grandfather, William Borgmeier, saw service with the United 
States troops in the capacity of quartermaster sergeant during the 
Mexican war in 1845-46. 

Adolph J. Borgmeier was born in Chicago January 18, 1869, son 
of Anton B. and Catherine (Fox) Borgmeier. His mother was a 
native of Ireland. His father, born in Germany, was brought to 
America when a boy, grew up in Chicago, and for many years was 
engaged in merchandising and manufacturing. Adolph J. Borg- 
meier was educated in the parochial schools, graduated in 1886 from 
the St. Patrick's Commercial Academy, and then for some time was 
employed in mercantile business. Before taking up the study of 
law he served as chief clerk in the general baggage department of 
the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway at Chicago. 

Mr. Borgmeier was a law student in the Northwestern Uni- 
versity, from which he graduated LL. B. in the class of 1900. His 
student career has been interrupted by his service with the United 
States forces in Cuba during the Spanish-American war. He had 
been a member of the Illinois National Guard, and at the beginning 
of the war enlisted in the First Illinois infantry of the United States 
volunteers. The regiment saw some arduous service and hard 
fighting before Santiago during the month of July, 1898, and Mr. 
Borgmeier was one of the men in the trenches around that city 
from July nth to July I7th. While at Santiago he received a 



520 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

corporal's warrant on July 5th. His discharge was dated November 
17, 1898. For the past twelve years Captain Borgmeier has been 
a commissioned officer in the Illinois National Guard, and at the 
present time is captain of Company A in the First Illinois Infantry 
Regiment. A few years ago he saw active service with his company 
during the negro riots at Springfield. 

Since beginning the practice of law Mr. Borgmeier has acquired 
a large clientele, handling general practice, and has conducted 
some important litigation in the state and federal courts. He is a 
member of the Chicago Bar Association, and also of the Santiago 
Society, of Columbia Camp of the United Spanish-American War 
Veterans, and the Knights of Columbus. 

Captain Borgmeier married October 4, 1906, Miss Wilhelmina 
K. Loth, of Ishpeming, Michigan. Their two children are Adolph 
C. and Eleanor R. The family reside at 1516 No.rth Oakley Boule- 
vard, and his law offices are in the Portland Block. 

EDWARD F. DUNNE, JR. A son of the present governor of Illi- 
nois, Edward F. Dunne, Jr., is known as one of the industrious and 
ambitious young attorneys of his native city, where, since 1909, he 
has been building up a substantial and representative general 
practice. 

Mr. Dunne was born in Chicago on the 26th day of November, 
1887, and is a son of Hon. Edward F. and Elizabeth Jane (Kelly) 
Dunne. After making good use of the advantages afforded in the 
public schools of Chicago, Mr. Dunne began to prepare for his 
profession, entering the law department of the University of Michi- 
gan. He was graduated with the class of 1909, with the degree 
Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar through the medium 
of the Supreme Court of Illinois, and is now eligible to practice 
in the various Federal courts of the state. In December, 1912, Mr. 
Dunne was appointed master in chancery by the Superior Court of 
Cook County. He is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State 
Bar associations, and his social memberships are with the Iroquois 
Club, the South Shore Country Club, the University of Michigan 
Alumni Association of Chicago, of which he is a director, and the 
Phi Kappa Phi Association of Chicago, of which he was president in 
1914. He is a member of Marquette Council, Knights of Columbus, 
and he and his wife are members of St. Thomas Catholic Church. 
Politically he follows in the footsteps of his father. 

Mr. Dunne was married on April 17, 1912, to Miss Rosina M. 
Powers, daughter of Harry J. Powers. They have one son, Ed- 
ward F. III., born October 15, 1913. 

JOHN MAXCY ZANE. As a trial lawyer John Maxcy Zane is 
regarded as one of the most skillful and successful at the Chicago 
bar, of which he has been a member for fifteen years. He is a son 
of Judge Charles S. Zane, at one time associated with Abraham 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 521 

Lincoln and otherwise distinguished in the Illinois bar and for 
many years chief justice of Utah. 

John Maxcy Zane was born at Springfield, Illinois, March 26, 
1863, a son of Charles S. and Margaret D. (Maxcy) Zane. Charles 
S. Zane was born in Gloucester County, New Jersey, in 1832, and 
came west and located in Sangamon County, Illinois, at the age of 
eighteen years. In 1852 he entered McKendree College, and by 
teaching, attending college and studying law gained admission to the 
bar five years later. In 1860, he became a member of the firm of 
Lincoln & Herndon, at Springfield, which was dissolved on ac- 
count of Mr. Lincoln's election as president of the United States, 
and in January, 1861, the firm of Herndon & Zane was formed. 
Mr. Zane later became a member of the firm of Cullom, Zane & 
Marcy, the senior member of which was the late United States 
senator, Shelby M. Cullom. Mr. Zane continued in regular practice 
until 1872, and from that year until 1884 was circuit judge of the 
Sangamon District. In 1884, by appointment from President Arthur, 
he became chief justice of the Territory of Utah, and save for brief 
intervals held that office until 1896, when he became chief justice 
under the state government after the admission of Utah to the 
Union, and so continued until 1900. He was regarded as one of 
the leading members of the Illinois bar, and as a judge his career 
left a permanent impress on the judicial history of the West. Since 
his retirement, he has been residing at Salt Lake City. Judge 
Zane married Miss Margaret D. Maxcy, daughter of John Cook 
Maxcy and a member of a family which has been well known at 
Springfield since 1819, when this branch moved to Illinois from 
Kentucky. 

After attending the graded and high schools of Springfield, 
John M. Zane entered the University of Michigan, where he was 
graduated in 1884, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. At that time 
he went to Salt Lake City and joined his father, taking up the 
study of law under his preceptorship and also serving as clerk of 
the Third Judicial Court of Utah until 1887. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1888, at Salt Lake City, and in March of the following 
year entered practice, continuing there until 1899, when he came 
to Chicago. He had been assistant United States attorney of Utah 
from 1889 to 1893 and reporter of the Supreme Court from 1889 
to 1894. Since 1899 he has been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession at Chicago. For seven years after his arrival in the city 
he was a member of the law firm of Shope, Mathis, Zane & Weber, 
which subsequently became Shope, Zane, Busby & Weber, and later 
Zane, Busby & Weber, and at this time he is senior partner of 
the firm of Zane, Morse & McKinney. Mr. Zane is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. His club connections include member- 
ship in the Union League, University and Quadrangle clubs, and 
he is also identified with the Phi Beta Kappa and the Order of the 



522 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Coif. He is not alone widely known as a lawyer, but as the author 
of "Zane on Banks and Banking" published in 1900, and as a 
lecturer in the law departments of the University of Chicago and 
Northwestern University. Politically he is a republican. His offices 
are in the Harris Trust Building. 

Mr. Zane was married April 25, 1894, to Miss Sara Rich Zane, 
of Philadelphia. 

GEORGE I. HAIGHT. A Chicago lawyer with large practice and 
influential connections, George I. Haight is a graduate of the North- 
western University Law School with the class of 1902, and has 
since that date been in active practice. He is a member of the firm 
of Haight, Brown & Haight, with offices in the Rookery Building. 

George I. Haight, who was born at Rockdale, Dane County, 
Wisconsin, March 26, 1878, represents one of the pioneer families 
of Wisconsin. His grandfather, Jonathan T. Haight, came from 
Vermont to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, locating in Milwaukee 
County. He was a grandson of Stephen Haight, at one time one 
of the ablest and best known judges in Vermont. Jonathan Haight 
was a civil engineer by profession, surveyed the noted highway 
from Milwaukee to the Wisconsin state line known as the Green 
Bay Road, was employed as a surveyor in different parts of Wis- 
consin and also did special engineering work for the United States 
Government in that state and in Tennessee. He associated in a 
professional way and was also a friend of such noted New Eng- 
landers as Daniel Webster, Caleb Cushing, Silas Wright, and some 
of his correspondence with these historic characters is now in the 
possession of George I. Haight in Chicago. George I. Haight is 
a son of Stephen and Etta (Ives) Haight, both of whom were born 
in Wisconsin, his father in 1843 and his mother in 1850. Stephen 
Haight is a farmer and during his active career was also a brick 
manufacturer. 

George I. Haight grew up on his father's farm in Dane County, 
attended district schools, was graduated from the Cambridge schools 
and the Fort Atkinson High School, and in 1899 was graduated 
from the literary department of the University of Wisconsin. For 
one year Mr. Haight was a student in the Chicago Law School 
and followed that with two years in the Northwestern University 
Law School. By his marriage on June 5, 1906, to Miss Edith Adcock, 
a native of Chicago, he has one daughter, Valerie Elizabeth. Politi- 
cally Mr. Haight is a progressive, and in 1912 his name was on that 
party ticket as candidate for state's attorney of Cook County. 

ALFRED ROY HULBERT. One of the progressive young members 
of the Chicago bar, Alfred Roy Hulbert is well grounded in the 
law and for the time of his practice has had a varied experience. 
His work is along the lines of general practice, particularly trial 
of cases in court. 



523 

Mr. Hulbert was born at Fremont, Nebraska, August 25, 1883, 
and is a son of Rev. Palmer S. and Rosa S. (Stacey) Hulbert. 
Palmer S. Hulbert, D. D., was a Presbyterian minister and a 
graduate of Wabash College and Auburn Theological Seminary, of 
Auburn, New York, where he was ordained in the ministry. He 
subsequently had pastorates in various parts of the country, including 
Nebraska, Massachusetts, New York City and Oak Park, Illinois, 
at which last named place he died in 1897. 

Alfred Roy Hulbert was educated in the public schools of New 
York City and Oak Park, Illinois, and he had his college training 
in the University of Michigan, following his graduation from the 
Oak Park High School. At Ann Arbor he was awarded the 
Bachelor of Laws degree on graduation in 1908. In the same year 
he was admitted to practice in Illinois, before the Federal and the 
United States Supreme Court. Mr. Hulbert entered upon his pro- 
fessional duties as a law clerk for D. S. Wentworth, with whom 
he remained one year, then becoming identified with the firm of 
Gorham & Wales, with whom he remained a like period. In March, 
1910, Mr. Hulbert was appointed assistant United States district 
attorney, an office wherein he served with ability for two and a 
half years, and since that time has continued in general practice, 
with offices in the Harris Trust Building associated with Mr. Fred- 
eric Burnham. He is known as a careful, studious and conscien- 
tious lawyer. He is a member of the Chicago, Illinois, and Ameri- 
can Bar associations, and his social connections are with the Ham- 
ilton Club, the Glen Oak Country Club and the Phi Delta Theta 
fraternity. 

Mr. Hulbert was married October 21, 1913, to Mrs. Cora E. 
Smith, of Chicago. They have one son, Bruce Walker Hulbert. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hulbert reside at Kenilworth, Illinois. 

CHARLES BENJAMIN OBERMEYER. One of Chicago's successful 
attorneys, Charles Benjamin Obermeyer has been in practice there 
for more than twenty years and has won a reputation for thorough, 
painstaking work, and his large general practice and relations with 
public office and with representative civic and social organizations 
are proof of his high standing. At the beginning of his career 
he was a brick layer, later was a telegrapher for a long time and 
studied law as opportunity offered and finally won his way to a 
place in his present profession. Courage and hard work have been 
the secret of his success, and although it has been a struggle he 
has rejoiced in it, for he is of fighting stock. 

Charles Benjamin Obermeyer was born at Winchester, Scott 
County, Illinois, September 23, 1866. His parents were Peter and 
Lucinda (Beasley) Obermeyer. His father, was born in the King- 
dom of Bavaria, now a part of the German Empire, emigrated to 
America and settled in Illinois in 1850, followed contracting and 
building during his active life and is now living at Winchester. 



524 

Charles Benjamin Obermeyer had a public school education in 
his native town, learned the trade of brick layer, worked at it with 
his father, and during the long winter nights practiced and learned 
the art of telegraphy. His first position was with the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railway, and in 1885 he came to Chicago and 
was employed as operator with the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany until 1889. In the meantime he had taken up the study of 
law as opportunity offered, and in 1887 became a night student in 
the Chicago College of Law, then conducted by Judge Joseph 
Bailey of the Supreme Court, and Judge Thomas A. Moran of 
the Appellate Court. In 1890 Mr. Obermeyer graduated from this 
school, was admitted to the Illinois bar the same year, and has 
since been in active practice in Chicago. From 1891 to 1893 ^ r - 
Obermeyer was first assistant attorney to the City of Chicago, and 
for a number of years has served as attorney to the North Shore 
Park District. He is vice president and director of the Illinois Brick 
Company. 

Mr. Obermeyer is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association, the Law Institute, has affiliations 
with various Masonic bodies, including Lincoln Park Commandery 
and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and is also a member 
of the Royal Arcanum, the Royal League, the Sons of Veterans 
Camp, No. 100, and the Elks. His clubs are the Illinois Athletic, 
the Hamilton, the Birchwood Country, the Builders Club, and the 
Evanston Golf. 

In 1896 Mr. Obermeyer married Miss Hannah M. Cloud of 
Chicago. Their three children are: Lucinda E., aged fifteen; 
Charles Benjamin, Jr., aged thirteen ; and Peter, aged six. The fam- 
ily reside at 6738 Newgard Avenue, and his offices are in the 
Woman's Temple. 

FRANCIS J. HOULIHAN. His appearance in a number of noted 
cases in Chicago has made the name of Francis J. Houlihan well 
known to the general public, while he has ever been recognized 
as one of the able lawyers of the Chicago bar, where he has prac- 
ticed for twenty-two years. 

Mr. Houlihan was born at Ogdensburg, New York, July 20, 
1865, and is a son of Francis R. and Mary (Gorman) Houlihan, his 
father being a successful contractor of New York State for many 
years. The public schools of his native state furnished Francis 
J. Houlihan with his early education, following which he became a 
student in Ogdensburg Academy. He was graduated from that 
institution in the class of 1887 with the Bachelor of Arts degree. 
He then took up the study of law in the office of a well known 
attorney of Ogdensburg, but after one year of study the greater 
opportunities of the west brought him to Chicago, where he became a 
student in the offices of Ryan, Weinschenck & Hirschl. There he 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 525 

had the opportunity of an excellent legal training, and in 1890 
he entered the law school of Northwestern University to fin- 
ish his studies, being graduated in 1892 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar in June of that 
year, and the firm of O'Hara and Houlihan came into existence 
soon after, Mr. O'Hara having been a classmate at the law school. 
This association continued successfully until 1898, when the part- 
nership was mutually dissolved and Mr. Houlihan became identified 
with the firm of Rosenthal, Kurz & Hirschl, which later became 
Rosenthal & Kurz, the members being James Rosenthal, Adolph 
Kurz and Francis J. Houlihan. Engaged in a general practice, 
with offices in the Rector Building, Mr. Houlihan has been con- 
nected with a number of cases that have attracted widespread at- 
tention. He closed successfully the case of the West Pullman Car 
Works, when the charge of graft of a million and a quarter dollars 
was placed against the officials and employes of that great corpora- 
tion. Mr. Houlihan was attorney in the notorious case of William 
T. Kirby, the private banker, in which "wire tappers" secured 
twenty thousand dollars, and in which John Henry Strosnider, 
"King of the Confidence Men," was sent to the .penitentiary. Mr. 
Houlihan has figured prominently as counsel in numerous other im- 
portant cases, as well. A member of the Chicago and Illinois State 
Bar associations, Mr. Houlihan bears a high reputation among his 
fellow practitioners. He is a member of the Catholic Church, of 
the Knights of Columbus, and is popular as a member of a number 
of social organizations of the city. 

In 1898 Mr. Houlihan married Miss Mollie Conway of Chicago, 
and four children have been born to them : Robert A., Mary, 
Eileen and Francis J., Jr. Their home is at 229 North Austin 
Avenue, in the suburb of Austin. 

JAMES I. ENNIS. For more than half a century, Ennis has 
been one of the most familiar names in Chicago legal circles. 

James Ignatius Ennis was born in Chicago, October 17, 1861, 
and is a son of James and Mary A. (Sexton) Ennis. His father 
was engaged in the active practice of law from 1856 until his 
death in 1880, and was an honored and influential citizen as well 
as a pioneer lawyer of Chicago. His wife was born in Chicago 
and was a member of a sterling pioneer family. She was a sister 
of the late Col. James A. Sexton, who served as postmaster of 
Chicago and as commander in chief of the national organization of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, having been a distinguished 
officer in the Civil war. Mrs. Ennis was likewise a sister of the 
late Austin O. Sexton, and the latter's son, William H., was but 
recently corporation counsel of the city. 

James I. Ennis acquired his early education in the parochial and 
public schools of Chicago and after finishing the course in the old 
Central High School, went, in 1878, to Wisconsin and became a 
teacher in the country schools in Marathon and Portage counties, 



526 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

which were at that time in the center of the pine forests, 
with lumbering as their principal industry. He continued to teach 
in Wisconsin until November, 1880, and earlier in that year he 
had served as United States census enumerator in Portage County. 
Called back to Chicago on account of the sudden death of his 
father, he assisted his elder brother, Maj. Lawrence M. Ennis, 
in caring for and rearing the younger children, their mother hav- 
ing died in 1876. The career of Mr. Ennis from this time forward 
is sketched in the following quotation : "Within about two weeks 
after his father's death, Mr. Ennis entered the employ of the 
Merchants Loan & Trust Company, Chicago's oldest banking in- 
stitution, and remained with them until January 31, 1896, when he 
took up the active practice of law. During the entire period of his 
active identification with the banking business, Mr. Ennis never lost 
sight of the fact that he wished to become a lawyer. In 1884, 
he entered the old Union College of Law, in which he attended 
lectures and passed the examinations for the junior year. But at 
the end of the year the strain of working all day in the bank 
and reading law half the night proved so ' severe a test of his 
health and eyesight that he was compelled, upon the advice of his 
physician, to forego the further prosecution of his college work 
for the time being. He did not give up his reading, however, but 
pursued his law studies in the offices of Mason and Ennis and of 
Joseph H. Fitch, who later was elevated to the bench of the Superior 
Court of Cook County. In 1892, he entered the Kent College of 
Law, graduating in 1893. He was elected the first president of 
the alumni association of this institution and was reelected at the 
close of his first term. 

"Upon the death of his brother, the late Maj. Lawrence M. 
Ennis, Mr. Ennis took up the practice of law, succeeding to the 
law business formerly controlled by his brother. In 1908, he be- 
came an office associate of Judge Fitch, the two having been stanch 
friends from the time when they were schoolmates in the old Cen- 
tral High School, on West Monroe Street. 

"Mr. Ennis has been prominent and influential as a member of 
the Illinois National Guard. In 1882 he became a member of the 
First Regiment of Infantry and he rose from private to the posi- 
tion of first sergeant of Company F, an office held until after the 
Stock Yards strike of 1896, when he was elected first lieutenant of 
the company. In 1890 he mustered Company K into the First 
Regiment and served as its captain until his entrance into the law 
college, when he felt it best to resign his command. He has never 
lost his interest in the National Guard, however, and is a member 
of the veteran corps of the First Regiment. He is also an honor- 
ary member of Companies F, H and K. 

"In the matter of civic improvement Mr. Ennis is an enthusiast. 
He is the founder of the Rogers Park Improvement Association, 
which has been in existence for twenty years. He believes that the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 527 

shores of Lake Michigan should be accessible to all the people and the 
North Shore Park district was organized to prevent the lake shore 
from being monopolized by selfish interests. He was a commis- 
sioner of the North Shore Park District for six years. He has done 
a large work in helping to organize improvement societies in various 
parts of Chicago. 

"In the American Institute of Banking Mr. Ennis has long been 
prominent and influential, not only as an active member, but also as 
one of its lecturers and debaters and as a delegate to its conventions. 
He is now one of the very few honorary members of the Chicago 
chapter of this important organization and is the regular commis- 
sioned law lecturer of the same in Chicago, where he has conducted 
a series of twenty-five lectures each winter, these having been 
eagerly attended by the men actively identified with banking inter- 
ests in the city. A successful completion of this course of lectures, 
together with a course on finance, entitles the successful student to 
a certificate as a fellow of the American Institute of Banking. Mr. 
Ennis' opinions on banking and finance are sound. For several 
years he wrote for prominent bankers' journals and magazines and 
in 1904 was elected an honorary member of the national convention 
of State Bank Examiners, in Indianapolis, this being in recognition 
of his reading a paper and delivering a speech of great interest and 
value at the convention. 

"Loving a home life, Mr. Ennis prefers the comfort of his quiet 
and attractive home in Rogers Park to the allurements of club life. 
Necessarily he belongs to clubs, but they are subordinated to the 
home associations. Mr. Ennis has continued a close student and his 
reading has covered a wide range of the best in academic and scien- 
tific literature. He is a member of the Illinois Society of Micros- 
copists, the Fellowship Club of the Merchants Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, the Irish Fellowship Club, the Iroquois Club, the Chicago 
Bar Association and the Illinois Bar Association." 

In addition to being law lecturer for the American Institute of 
Banking, Mr. Ennis is retained also as regular lecturer for the 
Chicago Business Law School, the Walton School of Accountancy 
and the Illinois Bankers' Association. In December, 1911, he was 
appointed master in chancery of the Superior Court of Cook County 
and it is especially grateful to him that this preferment came through 
his lifelong friend, Judge Joseph H. Fitch. He is a staunch demo- 
crat in politics. 

On the 1 5th of February, 1887, Mr. Ennis married Miss Geor- 
gina Wild, only daughter of the late Thomas S. and Georgina 
(Major) Wild. Mrs. Ennis is a sister of Harrison M. Wild, the 
distinguished musician, organist of Grace Church, Chicago, and 
conductor of the Apollo Club; and of the late Capt. Frederick 
S. Wild, of the United States Army. Of the four children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ennis, two are living, Arthur, in his father's office and a 
student in the Kent College of Law; and Marjorie, a member of 
the class of 1916 in the Senn High School, Chicago. 



528 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ROLLA R. LONGENECKER. Through father and son the name 
Longenecker has been prominent in the Chicago bar for more than 
a third of a century. The father was the late Hon. Joel M. Longe- 
necker, who began his career in the law at Olney, Illinois, and in 
1 88 1 located in Chicago, and continued in successful practice there 
until his death in September, 1906. Rolla R. Longenecker, the son, 
has been favored with the rewards of the successful lawyer, and 
at the same time has rendered valuable service such as only a leader 
at the bar can perform for his community. 

Rolla R. Longenecker was born at Olney, Illinois, April i, 1875, 
son of the late Hon. Joel M. Longenecker. The family having 
removed to Chicago when he was six years of age, he acquired his 
education in the public schools of that city, and spent five years as 
a student and clerk in his father's office. He was also a student of 
the old Chicago College of Law, subsequently consolidated and now 
the Chicago Kent College of Law. Admitted to the bar in 1900, 
Mr. Longenecker formed a partnership with his father and they 
handled a large and important legal practice until the death of the 
senior member in 1906. Since that time Mr. Longenecker has prac- 
ticed alone, with offices in the Chicago Stock Exchange Building. 
While his practice is of a general nature, he has handled a large 
amount of business for corporations. For several years Mr. Longe- 
necker has followed the custom of giving one day of his pro- 
fessional services each week to charity practice, and in that way 
has performed a large amount of good in behalf of those who 
need legal services but who are unable to pay for competent advice 
and representation. Mr. Longenecker has membership in the Chi- 
cago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association, is a life 
member of the Hamilton Club, and is one of the leading Masons in 
Chicago. 

His Masonic affiliation is with Candida Lodge No. 927, A. F. & 
A. M. ; Chicago Chapter No. 127, R. A. M. ; with Oriental Consistory 
of the Scottish Rite; and with Medinah Temple of the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Longenecker is a past master of his Blue 
Lodge, is librarian for the Oriental Consistory, and has been a very 
active worker in all of these Masonic branches. He is a director 
of the Gil W. Barnard Hospital and a member of the executive 
committee and counsel for the Masonic Hospital Association. Other 
affiliations connect him with the Knights of Pythias, and he is a 
member of the State Judiciary Committee and a member of the 
Grand Lodge. He is imperial nawab of the D. O. K. K. (Knights 
of Khorassan). A member and past adjutant and past judge advo- 
cate of the Sons of Veterans, Mr. Longenecker in 1898 raised a 
regiment among the Sons of Veterans for service in the Spanish- 
American war, and was commissioned captain of Company A in 
the headquarters at Douglas Hall, but the regiment did not reach 
the front nor engage in active service. Mr. Longenecker is also 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. For four- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 529 

teen years he was Professor of Medical Jurisprudence in the Chi- 
cago College of Osteopathy. 

September 20, 1904, occurred his marriage to Miss Grace Louise 
Brinkerhoff of Chicago. Their two children are Edwin Donald and 
Lula Florence. The family are members of the Methodist Church 
and their home is in Oak Park. 

HARRY BOYD HURD. Perhaps no more striking example of the 
high rewards attainable through a life of industry, energy, perse- 
verance and devotion to high ideals may be found than the career 
and achievements of Harry Boyd Hurd, a member of the firm of 
Pam & Hurd, and known as one of Chicago's leading and most 
accomplished lawyers. Beginning his career as a newsboy that he 
might earn the means with which to gratify his ambition for a 
higher education, working his way laboriously and determinedly 
through the initial steps of his legal learning, contentedly taking 
his place among the practitioners of his adopted city in a humble 
capacity, and finally gaining high reputation and the substantial 
emoluments which accompany it, his accomplishments should prove 
of a nature decidedly encouraging to the ambitious youth who enters 
upon life's struggle handicapped by the lack of superior advantages. 

Harry Boyd Hurd was born in Livingston County, Missouri, 
January 8, 1875, and is a son of Inscoe E. and Harriet (Andrew) 
Hurd, farming people of that community. Reared on the farm, 
Mr. Hurd attended the district schools of his native community 
until he was thirteen years of age, at which time he went to Mus- 
catine, Iowa, where for three years he made his home with his 
aunt, and there attended high school. He was possessed of industry 
and ambition, and in order to secure money to pay his transporta- 
tion to Chicago worked energetically carrying newspapers, and in 
1892 arrived in this city with a meagre capital. Here for a short 
time he studied stenography and subsequently secured a positon at 
$6 a week, and while thus employed began his preparation for the 
law. His daylight hours were passed in discharging the duties of 
his position, and in the evenings he attended the night classes at 
the Chicago College of Law, from which he was graduated in 1895 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. His employment was then 
changed for a better one, where he could have a chance of further- 
ing his legal knowledge, Mr. Hurd becoming stenographer in the 
law office of Moses, Pam & Kennedy, where his duties included 
stenography, the writing of briefs and occasional ventures into the 
field of his vocation. In 1897, when this firm was dissolved, Mr. 
Max Pam formed a partnership with Judge Charles H. Donnelly, 
and Mr. Hurd went to the new offices, continuing with the firm and 
in 1898 when it became Pam, Donnelly & Glennon being taken in 
as a partner. He was also a partner of the firm of Pam, Calhoun 
& Glennon, which succeeded it, and in 1904 this firm ceased to 
exist and the new combination of Pam & Hurd was formed, which 

Vol. II 1 



530 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

still exists and maintains offices in the Rookery, Chicago, with a 
branch office in the Empire Building, New York City. 

During his subsequent practice, Mr. Hurd has been connected 
with much important litigation that has come before the Illinois 
courts. His record, while still so young a man, is one of which he 
has every reason to be proud. Among his professional brethren 
his success has aroused no jealousy, for what he has achieved has 
been the result of hard work and continued and unwearying appli- 
cation, thorough conscientiousness and unquestionable integrity. 
Mr. Hurd is a valued member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
American Bar Association and the Law Institute. His social con- 
nections include membership in the Chicago Athletic, Mid-Day, 
Chicago Automobile and Evanston Golf clubs. 

On December 25, 1902, Mr. Hurd was married to Miss Margaret 
Frank, of Sterling, Illinois, and they have two children : Harriet 
Margaret and Anna Catherine. The pleasant family home is located 
at No. 932 Edgemere Place, Evanston, Illinois. 

QUIN O'BRIEN. In writing of the life and achievements thus 
far of Quin O'Brien, one of the able representatives of the Chicago 
bar, another has said that he "is a brilliant as well as a successful 
lawyer, a powerful and persuasive advocate. His work has im- 
pressed itself upon the profession, overshadowing the many legal 
battles of widely varying character, in which he has been a com- 
batant. His career at the bar may be epitomized as being a stimulant 
to both jurists and lawyers, an embodiment of the best traditions of 
the profession." 

Quin O'Brien was born in the mining town of Atlantic, in 
Houghton County, Michigan, on March 27, 1871. His parents were 
Quinlan and Margaret (Greene) O'Brien, both of whom were born 
in County Cork, Ireland. In the days before the Civil war they 
came to America and established a home in the copper mining dis- 
trict of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and there the father 
was employed by various mining companies until 1874, when he re- 
moved to Iowa. There he purchased farm land and applied him- 
self to the business of farming, becoming known as one of the repre- 
sentative farmers of Greene County. 

Quin O'Brien was a child of three years when the family settled 
in Iowa and his boyhood and youth were passed on the home farm. 
He attended the district schools of Greene County, later entered the 
high school at Panora, Guthrie County, Iowa, and followed his train- 
ing there with a college course in Highland Park College in Des 
Moines, from which he was graduated in 1894 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Later his alma mater conferred upon him the 
Master's degree. In 1894 Mr. O'Brien came to Chicago to make 
it his permanent home, and to carry out his plan for entering the 
legal profession. He secured employment in a law office and de 
voted his evenings to work in the evening classes of the Chicago 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 531 

College of Law, which awarded him his degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1896, with admission to the Chicago bar. 

In further mention of his career we quote again from the ex- 
pressions of the writer mentioned in the opening paragraph, as 
follows : "Mr. O'Brien at once commenced the practice of his 
profession. His distinctive ability was quickly recognized, as he 
was appointed trial attorney for the city of Chicago almost at the 
inception of his career. He remained in that office for two years 
and made the best record of percentage of cases won by any occu- 
pant of that position, before or since. He is at the present time 
attorney for the ice companies of Chicago, for the Hibernian Bank- 
ing Association, for the Rock Island & Southern Railroad Company 
and for numerous other important corporations and business con- 
cerns in and about the City of Chicago. Mr. O'Brien has the dis- 
tinction of having won some of the largest verdicts in the history 
of personal-injury cases tried in the courts of Illinois, and has the 
honor of establishing precedents in the following cases : On suit 
of heirs, he brought about the annulment of the marriage of an 
ancestor, and he. successfully defended a man charged with bur- 
glary by showing that the act .was committed when his client was 
in a state of somnambulism." 

Mr. O'Brien has been an influential figure in the educational 
work of his profession and for a number of years he was retained 
as lecturer on law in the Chicago Law School. He is a member 
of the Chicago Law Institute, the Chicago and the Illinois State- 
Bar associations. He is at present a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the National Bureau for the Advancement of Patriotism, 
and he is a progressive and public-spirited citizen, his membership 
in the Chicago Association of Commerce indicating his sentiment 
along those lines. He is prominent socially and has membership in 
the Press Club, the Iroquois Club, the Michigan Club, the City Club, 
the Hawkeye Club, and is fraternally associated with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Columbus. He was 
reared in the faith of the Roman Catholic Church and he and his 
wife are communicants of Mt. Carmel Church. 

Mr. O'Brien is a democrat, and in 1904 he was a candidate for 
the office of representative from the Ninth Illinois district in the 
United States Congress. He was defeated, and in 1906 the nomi- 
nation was again proffered him, but he declined. As an orator Mr. 
O'Brien has gained a considerable distinction, and he is much 
sought after as a lecturer before college assemblies and chautau- 
quas, and as a speaker at patriotic and politicl meetings, banquets 
and other public occasions. 

Mr. O'Brien was married on November 14, 1901, at Davenport, 
Iowa, to Miss Eileen McCortney, daughter of Dr. James Mc- 
Cortney, a representative physician of that city, and one of the 
five physicians appointed by President Lincoln to investigate the 
condition of federal prisons during the Civil war. They have 
four children: Kathleen, Brendan, Justin McCortney and Elaine. 



532 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

FRANK J. LOESCH. In the large group of Chicago attorneys 
who are largely engaged in corporation practice, Frank J. Loesch 
is one of the most successful. Mr. Loesch has been identified with 
the Chicago bar forty years, and since 1886 has represented the 
Pennsylvania Railroad lines west of Pittsburgh as counsel at Chi- 
cago. He represented the Pennsylvania and allied companies in 
their negotiations for terminal ordinances in Chicago, and he is 
the general counsel of the Union Station Company, which was in- 
corporated by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy and Pennsylvania companies. He is also senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Loesch, Scofield & Loesch, general attorneys', 
with offices in the Otis Building. His partners are Timothy J. 
Scofield, Charles F. Loesch, James Stillwell and Robert W. 
Richards. 

Mr. Loesch was born in the City of Buffalo, New York, April 
9, 1852, a son of Frank and Mary (Fisher) Loesch. He graduated 
from Grammar School No. 16 at Buffalo in 1868, and came to Chi- 
cago in June, 1870. In 1874 he was graduated LL. B. from the 
Union College of Law after a three years' course-. Admitted to the 
Illinois bar September 8, 1874, Mr. Loesch has since been in con- 
tinuous practice, specializing in real estate, railway, and in corpora- 
tion law. His present firm of Loesch, Scofield & Loesch was 
formed in 1905. 

As a loyal and progressive citizen, while without political am- 
bition, Mr. Loesch has at different times served the public interests 
of his community through his profession. He was special state's 
attorney for Cook County from September 30, 1908, to June, 1909. 
This appointment was accepted by him on the assurance of his being 
able to perform some valuable work through the investigation of 
the direct primary election frauds at the primary election held 
August 8, 1908. He retired from this special office in February, 
1909, following a test case in which the Supreme Court declared 
the then direct primary law of Illinois as unconstitutional. An- 
other occasion on which he was able to be of service to his home 
city was the four years spent as a member of the Chicago Board 
of Education. Mr. Loesch was appointed to that office July n, 
1898, for three years and was reappointed in July, 1901, resigning 
November u, 1902, during his second term. 

Mr. Loesch was honored by election as president of the Chicago 
Bar Association, holding that office during 1906-07, and has been 
one of its leading members for many years. He is also a member 
of the Illinois Bar Association and the American Bar Association, 
is a republican, and a member of the Union League Club, University 
Club and the Glen View Golf Club. Mr. Loesch was married 
October 2, 1873, to Lydia T. Richards. They have four children: 
Angeline, Winifred, Richard Llewellyn, and Joseph Benjamin. The 
daughter Angeline is now the wife of Robert Eliot Graves, and 
Winifred is the wife of Frederic Z. Marx, both of Chicago. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 533 

THOMAS J. YOUNG. One of cne most responsible offices con- 
nected with the law department of the State of Illinois is filled by 
Thomas J. Young, in the capacity of assistant attorney general in 
charge of the inheritance tax department of Cook County. Mr.' 
Young was appointed to this office by Attorney General P. J. Lucey 
in March, 1913. His duties demand a thorough knowledge of the 
law, as well as capable administrative work, since it is the province 
of his department to look after all the inheritance tax cases of 
Cook and Lake counties. Mr. Young has a corps of four assistant 
lawyers and twenty-two minor employes under his direction. The 
complex responsibilities and large volume of business transacted 
through this department are best illustrated by some figures show- 
ing the collections for the fiscal year from March i, 1913, to March 
i, 1914. During this time a total number of five hundred and fifty- 
seven cases were disposed of under the inheritance laws, the aggre- 
gate of revenue collected from this source through Mr. Young's 
department was- $1,548,891.90. 

Thomas J. Young, who has been a practicing member of the 
Illinois bar for more than a quarter of a century, was born in 
Ottawa, Illinois, December 30, 1866, son of John D. and Margaret 
C. ("Riordan) Young. His father, who died in Ottawa, was for 
many years a lumber merchant and held the office of mayor of that 
city one term. Thomas J. Young received his early education in 
the public schools of Ottawa, finished the high school, and then 
studied law under Hon. L. W. Brewer, at one time state's attorney 
of La Salle County. His admission to the bar came after examina- 
tion before the Appellate Court in Ottawa in 1887. His first ten 
years as a lawyer were spent in his native city, and since 1896 Mr. 
Young has been a member of the Chicago bar, and was success- 
fully engaged in private practice until his appointment to his 
present duties in March, 1913. 

Mr. Young is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, the Chicago Lawyers' Association, 
the Knights of Columbus, the Modern Woodmen, the Art Institute 
of Chicago and the Jeffersonian Democratic Club, and is secretary 
of the La Salle County Association. His offices are in the Otis Build- 
ing and his home at 331 N. Parkside Avenue. Mr. Young married 
July 7, 1904, Miss Anna C. Petras of Milwaukee. 

CHARLES E. VROMAN. A prominent Chicago lawyer since 1900, 
Charles E. Vroman is a native of Wisconsin, and practiced law 
with success and distinction in his native state from 1869 until his 
removal to Chicago. 

Charles E. Vroman was born on a farm in Dane County, Wis- 
consin, a few miles from Madison, October 5, 1846. His parents 
were William and Harriet (Field) Vroman. His father was born 
in Madison County, New York, in 1818 and died in Wisconsin in 
1886. His mother was born in New York in 1824 and at this writ- 



534 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ing is still living. William Vroman first came out to the territory 
of Wisconsin in the early '305, but owing to the disturbed condi- 
tions following the Black Hawk war, deemed it unadvisable to 
make a permanent location, and consequently returned to his family 
in New York and remained there until 1843. In that year he estab- 
lished a home near Madison, became one of the early settlers, and 
was a man of no little prominence. He was one of the first con- 
tractors to engage in building operations at Madison, and in 1850 
was elected treasurer of Dane County, and thereafter had his home 
in Madison. In the later years of his life he established and built 
up a large lumber trade. Charles E. Vroman had as part of his 
environment during youth the old homestead farm in Wisconsin, 
attended district schools, and was graduated Ph. B. from the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin in 1868. He then went East and became a law 
student in the Albany Law College of New York, graduating LL. B. 
in 1869. Admitted to the Wisconsin bar the same year, he was for 
a time in the office of the late Hon. William F. Vilas, one of Wis- 
consin's most distinguished lawyers and public men. He also served 
as deputy clerk of the Circuit Court, but in the spring of 1870 began 
the active practice of law at Green Bay, under the firm name of 
Vroman & Sale. For more than a quarter of a century Mr. Vroman 
was one of the leading lawyers of Green Bay. In 1890 he became 
second member of the firm of Green, Vroman, Fairchild, North & 
Parker, a legal association that probably represented more business 
in Green Bay than any other individual or firm of lawyers. Mr. 
Vroman was a member of that firm for ten years, and on May i, 
1900, withdrew from the partnership and established his home in 
Chicago, where his mature experience found a broader field for 
work. In Chicago he practiced as a member of the firm of Flower, 
Vroman & Musgrave, and on November 15, 1900, became assistant 
general solicitor for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. 
Thereafter he gave most of his time to his work as solicitor until 
April i, 1910, at which date he resumed general practice, in partner- 
ship with his son, William P., and Fayette S. Munro, under the 
name Vroman, Munro & Vroman. Since the death of his son in 
191 1 he has been senior member of the firm of Vroman & Munro. 

While living in Wisconsin, Mr. Vroman took an active part in 
republican politics. For several terms he was city attorney of 
Green Bay, and also for several years district attorney of Brown 
County. He is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and Royal Arch 
Chapter, is a member of the University Club of Madison, of the 
Wisconsin State Historical Society and the American Historical 
Association, is one of the active members of the Wisconsin Society 
of Chicago, and belongs to the Union League Club, the University 
Club and the City Club at Chicago. 

Mr. Vroman was married at Sun Prairie, Dane County, Wis- 
consin, May n, 1871, to Miss Emma R. Phillips. They became 
the parents of three children : The first, a daughter, died in in- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 535 

fancy ; William P., who was graduated LL. B. from the University 
of Wisconsin in 1901, had a successful though brief career as a 
lawyer, before his death in 1911 at the age of thirty-two; John C, 
the only livng child, was graduated from the Technical Schools of 
the University of Wisconsin, and is now practicing his profession 
as civil and mechanical engineer, with offices in Chicago. 

* 

WILLIAM ROUDEBUSH MEDARIS was an Ohio lawyer until Feb- 
ruary, 1909, when he accepted an appointment from United States 
Attorney General Bonaparte as a special assistant United States 
attorney, and came to Chicago to serve under Edwin W. Sims. 
He continued as one of the assistants in the federal attorney's 
office at Chicago until the latter part of 1911. He was intrusted 
with the management of a number of federal cases and was con- 
nected with the early trials of the beef trust. Since resigning 
his position as assistant federal attorney, Mr. Medaris has been 
in active private practice at Chicago, and has his law offices in the 
Harris Trust Building. 

William Roudebush Medaris was born at Owensville, Clermont 
County, Ohio, August 3, 1875, a son of Dr. Leonidas .H. and Ella 
(Roudebush) Medaris. His father was a well-known physican for 
many years in Cincinnati, and was distinguished as an author of 
medical subjects and a clinical writer. 

William R. Medaris received his early education in the public 
schools of Cincinnati, and in 1897 graduated LL. B. from the Cin- 
cinnati College of Law. Admitted to the Ohio bar, he was in active 
practice at Cincinnati until 1905, and then was appointed special 
counsel to the Ohio attorney general, Wade H. Ellis. It was his ex- 
perience in the office of the state attorney general which brought 
him into prominence and led to his appointment to a position in the 
federal attorney general's department. Mr. Medaris was the tem- 
porary secretary of the Chicago Society of Advocates, and is now 
treasurer of that society. He is also dean of the Hamilton College 
of Law and professor of corporation law. 

Mr. Medaris has taken a very active interest in the progressive 
party, and is one of the Illinois leaders. During the progressive 
national campaign of 1912 he served as business manager of the 
national committee, and was one of the organizers of the Chicago 
Progressive Club, its first secretary and later first vice president. 
Mr. Medaris married December 12, 1910, Evelyn C. Hayes, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. They reside at 6520 Woodlawn Avenue. 

THOMAS DIVEN HUFF, lawyer, Chicago, Illinois, was born at El- 
dora, Iowa, January 9, 1872, the son of Henry Lewis, and Eliza- 
beth B. (Diven) Huff. He married Ethelyn K. Allen, August 18, 
1903, at Helena, Montana. The issue of the marriage are Emorie 
Cannon Huff and Lewis Stevenson Huff. 

From the years of his earliest youth, Mr. Huff was surrounded 



536 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

with influence that pointed his way for his subsequent career as 
a member of the legal profession. His father had already achieved 
fame as a distinguished and able lawyer, when Mr. Huff began his 
preliminary studies, under his guidance. 

Mr. Huff spent his childhood days at Eldora, where he attended 
the grammar and high schools. He later attended the academy 
and college at Grinnell, Iowa. Between school terms he worked 
in his father's office, acquiring much knowledge and the high stand- 
ard of legal ethics that has always distinguished his practice of the 
legal profession. In 1893 he went to Chicago and entered North- 
western University Law School, from which he was graduated in 
1895, with the degree of LL. B. 

His first work in Chicago was with Thomas J. Diven, with whom 
he remained associated until 1903 ; and also during such period was 
associated with Horace Wright Cook, under the firm name of Huff 
and Cook, which co-partnership continued for seventeen years, 
until 1911 when it was enlarged, Joseph Slottow becoming a mem- 
ber of the firm, under the firm name of Huff, Cook and Slottow. 

From the very beginning of active practice, Mr. Huff has spe- 
cialized in corporation .law, and is considered one of the leading 
authorities on this branch of the law in the United States, and con- 
sequently is retained by other lawyers to assist in corporate matters 
of every nature. As an individual attorney he has assisted in the 
organization of more corporations than any lawyer in Chicago. He 
is recognized by the bar as an authority on corporate organization 
and management, and frequently retained as associate counsel in that 
connection. 

Mr. Huff is one of the ablest trial lawyers in Chicago and has 
been retained in many notable cases. He had largely to do with the 
construction of the present revenue laws of Illinois, and has served 
as counsel in many bondholders and re-organization committees 
of large public utilities and industrial corporations. 

Mr. Huff is Illinois editor of "The Corporation Manual," which 
is published in New York City. He is western counsel and a di- 
rector of the United States Corporation Company of New York, 
which corporation has an office in every state of the United States, 
the provinces of Canada, the Latin-American countries and the 
principal countries of Europe and is engaged in the business of or- 
ganizing and representing corporations in all of the same, and 
therefore his business is more or less international. He is also a 
director and secretary and treasurer of the George W. Stoneman 
Company, besides being a director and stockholder in numerous 
other corporations. He is associate counsel to Messrs. Johnson, 
Galston & Leavenworth of New York, probably the leading Latin- 
American lawyers of the United States. He has also served as 
assistant corporation counsel of the City of Evanston, Illinois. 

Although a member of the republican party, Mr. Huff's legal 
duties have always been so multifarious as to preclude him from 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 537 

accepting political office of any kind, although it is frequently offered 
him. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, Illinois 
State Bar Association, Chicago Law Institute and Commercial 
Law League of America. He is also a member of the Hamilton 
Club of Chicago, and Evanston Club of Evanston; also of many 
societies and civic associations. He resides with his family in 
Evanston, a suburb of Chicago. 

JOHN CHARLES WILLIAMS. One of Chicago's foremost lawyers 
and most helpful and stirring citizens, whose high abilities have 
been recognized by his appointment to positions of marked respon- 
sibility, John Charles Williams, who for several years was attorney 
for the Sanitary District of Chicago, occupies an important place in 
the city's busy life. He is a product of the farm, born on his 
father's homestead in the vicinity of Lime Springs, Howard County, 
Iowa, May 8, 1873, and is a son of Owen E. and Ann (Thomas) 
Williams. 

Mr. Williams' parents were born in Wales, the father in 1835 
and the mother in 1837, and came to the United States about the 
year 1858, locating in Racine County, Wisconsin, from whence 
they removed about 1870 to Howard County, Iowa. There the 
father was engaged in large farming operations for many years 
and passed away in 1901. The public schools of Iowa and South 
Dakota furnished John C. Williams with his early education, he 
graduating from the Aberdeen High School, in the latter state, in 
1891. While located there he supplemented his resources and 
added to his experience by teaching two terms of country school, 
the first when he was but sixteen years of age, and also, from 
1891 to February, 1892, by working in an Aberdeen bank. In the 
latter year he came to Chicago and entered the Chicago College of 
Law (the law department of Lake Forest University), being grad- 
uated in 1894 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in June of the same year. During the following 
four years he continued in practice in the offices of Dent & Whitman, 
but November i, 1901, began independent practice, and was so en- 
gaged until May i, 1904, when he formed a partnership with Emery 
S. Walker, the combination of Walker & Williams continuing for 
one year. In March, 1906, Mr. Williams received his appointment 
as assistant attorney for the Sanitary Board, and in July, 1907, was 
elected by the board general attorney, as successor of E. C. Lindley. 
In this capacity Mr. Williams had the direction and legal charge 
of matters which concern the people of Chicago as closely as those 
of any other department of the public service. Since its comple- 
tion in 1900, the Drainage Canal has assumed a vastly increased im- 
portance directly affecting the welfare of the city's residents, and 
as legal advisor for the board, Mr. Williams occupied a place of 
great responsibility, since upon his decisions and upholdings of the 
privileges of the district rests the value of the canal and its commer- 



538 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

cial development as the rightful property of the people who built it. 
Mr. Williams continued to discharge his duties in a most satisfac- 
tory manner, giving to them the same conscientious attention that 
characterized his personal interests and brought him success in the 
legal field, until he retired from this position in December, 1912. A 
stalwart republican in his political views, he served as representative 
from the Sixth Senatorial District in 1905 and 1906, in the Forty- 
fourth General Assembly. With his family he attends the Pres- 
byterian Church. Mr. Williams is widely known in fraternal circles, 
being a member of Evanston Commandery No. 58, K. T., and the 
Mystic Shrine, and is also fraternally connected with the Order of 
True Ivorites (Welsh) and Ouillmette Council of the Royal Ar- 
canum. He is greatly interested in the welfare of his resident com- 
munity, Evanston. His social connections include membership in 
the Evanston Club of Evanston, and the Hamilton and Union 
League clubs of Chicago, as well as the Law Club and Chicago and 
Illinois Bar associations. 

On June 16, 1896, Mr. Williams was married to Miss Lillian F. 
Whipple, of Evanston, and they reside at No. 1307 Chicago Avenue, 
in that suburb, with their two children : Gladys Elmeda, born in 
1898; and Helen Levina, born in 1900. Mr. Williams maintains 
law offices in the Corn Exchange Bank Building. 

JAMES ROSENTHAL. Nearly thirty-five years of active practice 
have given James Rosenthal a place among the older lawyers of 
Chicago, and his rank in ability and success, especially in the field 
of corporation and commercial law is one of the highest. James 
Rosenthal is a son of the late Julius Rosenthal, for many years 
prominent as a Chicago lawyer, and a younger brother is Lessing 
Rosenthal, likewise prominent as a lawyer and in civic and philan- 
thropic affairs. 

James Rosenthal was born in Chicago April 10, 1859, a son of 
Julius and Jette (Wolf) Rosenthal. After attending the graded 
and high schools of Chicago he entered Yale University, graduat- 
ing LL. B. in 1880. With his graduation he was admitted to the 
Connecticut bar, and to the Illinois bar in July, 1880. For the fol- 
lowing five years he was associated with his father's firm, Rosenthal 
& Pence. In 1894 he became senior member of the firm of Rosen- 
thai, Kurz & Hirschl, one of the leading firms in corporation and 
commercial law. Mr. Rosenthal is now at the head of the firm of 
Rosenthal & Kurz, with offices in the Rector Building, and their 
large and valuable practice covers corporation, commercial, probate 
and real estate law. 

Mr. Rosenthal was for three years a member of the Board of 
Education of Chicago. He was one of the organizers and was the 
first secretary during 1882-83 of the Young Men's Hebrew Charity 
Association. Politically he is a republican, is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association, the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 539 

American Bar Association, the Commercial Law League of 
America, the Illinois Law Institute, and belongs to the City Club, 
the Hamilton Club and the Ravisloe Country Club. His home is 
at 4801 Lake Park Avenue. Mr. Rosenthal married Emma Fried- 
man, daughter of Jacob Friedman. Mrs. Rosenthal died December 
24, 1910, leaving two children, Ernest and Ralph. In 1914 Mr. 
Rosenthal married Miss Cora Lindauer. 

LEWIS ABYRAM STEBBINS. While Mr. Stebbins of the Chicago 
bar handles a general practice, most of his business is as an ex- 
pert and counselor in insurance law and in general corporation 
practice. He is attorney for the National Life Insurance Company 
of the United States of America and several other insurance and 
trust companies, insurance law being his specialty. Mr. Stebbins 
is dean of the Webster College of Law, and in that school is a 
lecturer on the law of corporations and insurance and constitu- 
tional law. 

Lewis Abyram Stebbins was born in Bradford County, Penn- 
sylvania, June i, 1863, a son of Marcus M. and Elizabeth A. 
(Johnson) Stebbins. His father was a farmer, first in Pennsyl- 
vania and later in Kansas, where Mr. Stebbins grew up, gaining 
an education in the country schools and spending three years in 
the collegiate department of the University of Kansas and finishing 
his law course in the same institution, where he was graduated 
LL. B. in 1889. After his admission to the Kansas bar he prac- 
ticed at Topeka until 1904. In February of that year he was ap- 
pointed attorney for the National Life Insurance Company of the 
United States of America, and in the same year removed to Chicago, 
where he has now been in active practice for more than ten years. 
He also represents the Illinois Indemnity Exchange, the Commerce 
Trust Company, the Empire Security Company, the North Ameri- 
can Timber Holding Company a ten million dollar corporation 
with vast timber tracts in British Columbia, and several other com- 
panies. 

Mr. Stebbins is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and 
the American Bar Association, of the Union League Club and the 
City Club. While a resident of Kansas in 1896 he was a candidate 
for the office of judge of District Court, but was defeated. Polit- 
ically he is a democrat. September 14, 1885, Mr. Stebbins married 
Miss Katie Selden of Kansas. Their five children are : Inca L., 
Selden L., John M., Julia E. and Dorothy. Mr. Stebbins has his 
offices at 29 South La Salle Street and his home is at 6044 Harper 
Avenue. 

FRANCIS X. BUSCH. A young Chicago lawyer of fine profes- 
sional attainments and large private practice, Mr. Busch is also 
known to the Illinois bar as a legal author. 

Mr. Busch was born in Detroit, Michigan, on May 9, 1877. His 



540 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

early education was acquired principally in the public schools at 
Cold water, Branch County, his native state, where he completed the 
curriculum of the high school. In 1901 Mr. Busch graduated from 
the Illinois College of Law, at Chicago, this being the law depart- 
ment of St. Vincent de Paul University, from which he received 
at that time the degree, Bachelor of Laws. His alma mater has 
since taken recognition of his professional attainments by con- 
ferring upon him the supplemental degrees of Master of Laws, Doc- 
tor of Civil Law, and Doctor of Laws. He was admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar on the 5th of June, 1901, by the Supreme Court of the 
state, and Chicago has since continued to be the stage of his earnest 
and successful professional endeavors. Much of his practice con- 
sists in the trial of personal injury cases. He served as assistant 
corporation counsel of Chicago from 1904 to 1906. He is an active 
member of the Chicago Bar Association and is dean of the law 
department of De Paul University. 

In politics Mr. Busch is a democrat, and is a member of the 
City Club and other representative civic organizations. He is mar- 
ried and resides at 1700 Kenil worth Avenue. His office is at 29 
South La Salle Street, Chicago. 

SHELLEY B. NELTNOR, a representative member of the Illinois 
bar, commenced his professional career in Chicago fifteen years ago, 
and both as a lawyer and a citizen has earned a substantial and hon- 
orable reputation. He was born at West Chicago, Illinois, Septem- 
ber 18, 1873, and is a son of John C. and Mary Eames (Kinney) 
Neltnor, his father having been a police magistrate of West Chicago 
for a number of years. On his mother's side he belongs to an old 
Colonial family which settled in one of the first Connecticut colonies, 
and several members of the family, notably Capt. Eli Butler and 
Lieut. John Eames, were officers in the Revolution. 

Shelley B. Neltnor was granted excellent educational advan- 
tages during his youth, and entered his profession admirably pre- 
pared in every way for a successful career. After graduating from 
the West Chicago High School, he attended Elgin Academy and 
Wheaton College, and then took up the study of his vocation in 
Chicago Kent College of Law, where he was graduated with his 
bachelor's degree in 1899. Subsequently he received the degree of 
LL. M. from the Illinois College of Law, graduated from the law 
department of De Pauw University in 1899, and in 1912 received 
the degree of LL. D. from Oskaloosa (Iowa) College. Mr. Neltnor 
was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1899 and in that same year en- 
tered upon his professional career in Chicago, where he has since 
continued his labors with much success. For five years he was a 
member of the law firm of Tinsman, Rankin & Neltnor, but at this 
time is practicing independently, with offices at No. 802 Straus 
Building. His practice is general in character, and he has appeared 
in many of the most important cases passed upon by the state 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 541 

and federal courts of Illinois, always with marked results as to 
honorable success. Mr. Neltnor is a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association, and has always been a close student of his profession. 
He is widely known as an educator in the legal. field, being president 
of Hamilton College of Law, and was professor of contracts in the 
Illinois College of Law for ten years, from 1899 to 1909. 

Mr. Neltnor is a member -of the Chicago Press Club, and an 
ex-member of the Germarria Club and the Wheaton Golf Club. He 
holds membership also in the Phi Alpha Delta law fraternity and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. In political matters he is a 
democrat, but has not taken a particularly active part in political 
affairs, although he has given his aid to movements making for 
civic betterment and reform. Mr. Neltnor finds his recreation in 
travel, of which he is very fond, and is the possessor of a large 
and valuable collection of antiques, gathered in the various coun- 
tries which he has visited. He is unmarried. 

W. TUDOR APMADOC. Besides his progressive career in the 
law at Chicago since 1896, W. Tudor ApMadoc has become known 
over the state through his valuable service in the Legislature. 
While now in individual practice, he was for several years a mem- 
ber of the firm of Peckham, Packard, ApMadoc & Walsh. 

William Tudor ApMadoc was born in the City of Utica, New 
York, on the 2Oth of September, 1873, and is a son of William and 
Elizabeth (Jones) ApMadoc. His parents live in Chicago, where 
his father is a teacher of music in the city high schools. In his 
native city Mr. ApMadoc was afforded the advantages of the 
public schools, and after the family removal to Chicago completed 
a special course in Armour Institute. Entering the law department 
of the University of Michigan he was graduated, Bachelor of Laws, 
in the class of 1896. In the same year the Supreme Court of Illi- 
nois admitted him to practice in the state, and he has in the course 
of his legal practice brought numerous cases before this tribunal, 
as well as before the various federal courts of Illinois. Mr. 
ApMadoc is a capable trial lawyer and well fortified counselor, 
and has been identified with much important litigation in the vari- 
ous courts of Chicago. He is a member of the Chicago, Illinois 
State and American Bar associations. His service in the State 
Legislature covered a period of six years. In that time he served 
on various important house committees, and among the various 
measures championed and introduced by him was the bill that re- 
sulted in the enactment of the present statute creating a State Com- 
mission on Uniform Laws, this bill having been drafted by him. 
He redrafted and secured passage of Adult Probation Measure 
and the Crimes Against Children Statute. He was also chairman of 
the insurance commission of the Legislature, and he was regarded 
as one of the ablest members of the Chicago delegation in the Illi- 
nois House of Representatives. The welfare of his home city is 



542 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

with him always a matter of vital concern. He is a member of 
the University Club, the South Shore Country Club and the Ham- 
ilton Club, and in the Masonic fraternity he is past master of Land- 
mark Lodge. His politics are those of a republican, and with his 
family he has membership in the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. ApMadoc was married on September 26, 1909, to Miss Nelle 
Gill, of Chicago, and their home is at 5009 Grand Boulevard. His 
offices are in the First National Bank Building. 

JOHN LONG FOGLE, attorney for the Chicago Bar Association 
during the past ten years, both by reason of that position and his 
general ability displayed in his practice, is one of the best-known 
members of the Chicago bar. 

Born at Terra Alta, Preston County, West Virginia, February 
22, 1875, he is a son of Robert Bruce and Emeline (Long) Fogle, 
both natives of that state. The father in young manhood adopted 
the vocation of school teacher, and as such he came to Illinois. 
He was engaged in that work in Galena at the outbreak of the 
Civil war, when he enlisted in Company C, Forty-fifth Regiment, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, known as the Washburn Lead Mine 
Regiment. The regiment joined General Grant's forces at Cairo 
and with that army participated in the battles of Fort Donelson 
and Pittsburg Landing. While guarding a railroad bridge in 
Tennessee his company was captured but soon released, and Mr. 
Fogle shortly thereafter, in 1862, was honorably discharged be- 
cause of disability. Returning to his native state he passed the 
remainder of his life there, several years of that time as sheriff 
of Monongalia County, and afterwards as a druggist at Terra 
Alta in Preston County. 

The foundation for John Long Fogle's education was laid in 
the public schools of West Virginia, and this was followed by 
attendance in the University of West Virginia and Georgetown Uni- 
versity, where he earned his Bachelors and Masters law degrees 
and was graduated in 1896. Following this two years were passed 
in the United States Government printing office at Washington, 
D. C., and Mr. Fogle then came to Illinois and was admitted to the 
bar in 1898. His law experience began in the office of Dent & 
Whitman, and Mr. Fogle later formed a partnership with Thomas 
J. Holmes, under the firm name of Holmes & Fogle, this associa- 
tion continuing until 1904. In that year Mr. Fogle was appointed 
attorney for the Chicago Bar Association, in which capacity he 
has continued to act to the present time. Mr. Fogle's private prac- 
tice has been general and of an important character. His profes- 
sional associations are with the Law Club, the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Illinois State Bar Association, and the American Bar 
Association and his social memberships are with the Hamilton, 
Colonial and Calumet Country clubs. He is a Mason and is a 
member of Kenwood Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 543 

Mr. Fogle comes of Colonial stock, his great-grandfather, John 
Dent, having been captain of a Virginia company, while his great- 
grandmother, Margaret Evans Dent, was the only child of John 
Evans, colonel of a regiment of Virginia volunteers during the 
Revolution. 

In June, 1897, Mr. Fogle was married to Miss Nellie Carskadon, 
of Keyser, West Virginia, and eight children have been born to 
them. They are named Kenneth, Robert Bruce, Helen, John Dent, 
Dorothy, Mildred, Marjorie and William H. The family residence 
is at No. 4349 Forestville Avenue, and Mr. Fogle has his offices in 
the Fort Dearborn Building. 

EGBERT ROBERTSON. One of the youngest members of the Chi- 
cago bar, Egbert Robertson is a lawyer whose experience and par- 
ticular talents have led him into the specialty of trial practice, 
where he has had conspicuous success in important cases. In the 
field of office work he has become recognized as an expert on issues 
of bonds and corporate securities, and in corporation matters 
generally. 

Mr. Robertson was born at Cairo, Illinois, December 8, 1881, 
and is the son of Alexander S. and Lucretia (Walbridge) Robert- 
son, who removed to Chicago in 1882. He was educated in the 
grammar and high schools of Chicago, was graduated from the 
Lewis Institute of that city in 1900, and then entered the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, where he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1902. In preparation for his profession Mr. Robertson at- 
tended the law school of Lake Forest University, graduating in 
1905, with the degree of LL. B. While in law school he was 
awarded the Thomas A. Moran prize for scholarship, and was also 
given honorable mention for work in the practice court. 

In 1905, soon after his graduation from Lake Forest, he was 
admitted to the bar, and for a year continued his apprenticeship 
in the legal department of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad 
Company. After that he was associated with the law firm of 
Pringle, Northup & Terwilliger and remained with them until 
1908. In that year he became a trial lawyer with the firm of 
Felsenthal, Foreman & Beckwith, and was later admitted to a part- 
nership. In 1911 was formed the present firm of Foreman, Levin 
& Robertson, consisting of Milton J. Foreman, Jacob Levin, Mr. 
Robertson and David Blummrosen. 

Mr. Robertson served as secretary of the Civil Service Reform 
Association in 1907-08-09. Politically he was a republican until the 
formation of the progressive party, which he joined in 1912, and 
in 1914 he was one of the progressive candidates for the office of 
judge of the Municipal Court. He is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association, the Hamilton Club, the Progressive Club, the 
Kenwood Country Club, the Lincoln Park Yacht Club and the 
Palette & Chisel Club and of the college fraternity of Phi Gamma 



544 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Delta and the law fraternity of Phi Delta Phi. He has served 
four years in the First Cavalry Illinois National Guard. 

Mr. Robertson was married October 21, 1912, to Miss Mar- 
guerite C. Henneberry of Chicago. They reside at 907 Ainslie 
Street. 

TAYLOR EVERETT BROWN. In the field of patent law there is 
probably no Illinois attorney whose activities have connected him 
with a more extensive practice and whose unquestioned ability 
gives him higher rank in that specialty than Col. Taylor E. Brown, 
who began his professional career at Chicago thirty-five years ago. 

Taylor Everett Brown was born in St. Louis, Missouri, Janu- 
ary 22, 1860, a son of Capt. Henry Stuart and Emma Jane (Taylor) 
Brown. Until seventeen years of age he attended the grammar 
and high schools of St. Louis, then learned the trade of pattern 
maker at the Vulcan Iron Works in St. Louis. Employment at 
his trade until 1880 and work as patent office draftsman and 
designer of machinery for several years laid a technical and prac- 
tical experience which proved of the greatest value as a foundation 
to the professional career upon which he was about to enter. 

Colonel Brown attended, for a time, the Union College of Law 
at Chicago. In March, 1884, he was admitted to the bar by the 
Supreme Court of Illinois. Later he was admitted to practice in 
various District and Circuit courts of the United States, and to 
the Supreme Court of the United States in 1893. From 1887 
until a few years ago he was a member of the firm of Poole & 
Brown, patent lawyers and solicitors of United States and for- 
eign letters patent, giving almost his entire attention to patent and 
trade work litigation in the various Federal courts. His services 
have been retained in many important cases. In March, 1912, he 
organized the law firm of Brown & Mehlhope, under which style 
he is now practicing his specialty of patent and trade work law. 

Colonel Brown has a notable military record and has been 
prominent in the National Guard of both Missouri and Illinois, 
serving in Missouri from 1887 to 1880 and in Illinois from 1881 
to 1914. In the Illinois National Guard he rose through all the 
grades from private to colonel. On February 24, 1908, he was 
appointed inspector general of the Illinois National Guard with 
the rank of lieutenant colonel, and in May, 1910, was appointed 
chief ordnance officer of the Division. Illinois National Guard. On 
December 31, 1913, at his own request, he was placed on the retired 
list with the rank of colonel. 

During the war with Spain in 1898 he served as a captain in 
the First Illinois Volunteer Infantry and in the Provisional Bat- 
talion of Engineers, and saw service in Cuba and Porto Rico. 
He was the first officer of the United States army to land in 
Porto Rico (Guanica, July 26, 1898), and was recommended for 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 545 

brevet rank of Major of United States Volunteers "for gallantry 
in action" by General Miles. 

Colonel Brown is a member of the Military Order of Foreign 
Wars of the United States ; has served as commander of the Illinois 
Commandery of the Naval and Military Order of Spanish-Amer- 
ican war, and also commander-in-chief of the national com- 
mandery of that order. He is a past president of the Veteran 
Corps, First Infantry, Illinois National Guard. 

Mr. Brown is a prominent member in St. Paul's Protestant 
Episcopal Church, a member of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, 
and has been president of the National Conference of Church 
Clubs. He is a member of the Chicago Athletic, the Union League, 
the South Shore Country and Church clubs of Chicago; of the 
Army and Navy clubs in New York and Washington. January 30, 
1888, he married Fannie Garrison Dayton, who died December 28, 
1901. Their children were: Melville S. ; Taylor G., deceased; 
Charles Everett; Jessie Imogen; Dayton Reginald; and Fannie 
Susan. On November 3, 1904, Mr. Brown married Jessie May 
Catlin of Ripon, Wisconsin. His office is in Chicago. 

JOHN ROGERS MORELAND. A prominent firm of lawyers at 
Galesburg is that of Moreland & Moreland, brothers, the senior 
member being John R. Moreland, whose entire professional career 
has been connected with important people and interests in Knox 
County. He is of Scotch and Irish ancestry, a sturdy combination, 
and his forefathers many years ago settled in Pennsylvania, and 
the name is not unknown there at the present day. 

Prior to the Revolutionary War, his great-great-grandfather, 
Alexander Moreland, emigrated from Adams County and settled in 
that part of Westmoreland now Fayette County, Pennsylvania, 
locating on a farm of 300 acres, below Broadford on the 
Youghiogheny River, about two miles below where Connellsville now 
stands, where he built a home and improved the land and resided 
until his death in 1793 or 1794. 

He was survived by four children, David, William, Isaiah, and 
Nancy. Of these William was Mr. Moreland's great-grandfather 
who also settled in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in 1771 on a farm 
adjoining his father's. He was a soldier in the Continental 'Line of 
Pennsylvania, according to Penn. Archives, Vol. VI,_ page 325, and 
was in a campaign against the Indians after the burning of Hannas- 
town by the Indians in July, 1782, besides other services. On Jan- 
uary 17, 1777, he married Agnes Huston who was a daughter of 
Joseph Huston, also a soldier in the Revolutionary War, who served 
in Crawford's Sandusky expedition in 1782 and other campaigns. 

The children of William and Agnes (Huston) Moreland were 
Margera, Jane, Sarah, Agnes, Mary, Alexander, William, Joseph 
Huston, Margaret, John and David. He died April 24, 1830, and 
his wife died May 9, 1828. 



546 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Of these John was Mr. Moreland's grandfather and he was born 
July 4, 1800. On December 8, 1831, he married Priscilla Rogers, 
a daughter of William and Nancy Rogers also residents of the same 
locality. John Moreland was one of the pioneer coke manufacturers 
of that county, being among the first in the Connellsville coke region 
to manufacture coke and boat it to Pittsburgh and Cincinnati. The 
children of John and Priscilla Moreland were William Rogers, Ann 
Maria, Mary Agness, Thomas Rogers, Joseph, Daniel Rogers, 
Rebecca Stewart, Sarah Halliday, John Huston and Elizabeth 
Rogers. He died July 26, 1866, and his wife died in 1875. Of these 
William was Mr. Moreland's father. 

John Rogers Moreland was born September. 6, 1869, near La- 
fayette in Stark County, Illinois, and is a son of William Rogers 
and Anna E. (Hill) Moreland, the latter of whom resides at Gales- 
burg, Illinois. His mother was a daughter of Col. Alexander M. 
Hill of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, who was prominently identi- 
fied with the coking industry of that locality and represented his 
district in the general assembly of that state for a number of years. 
She was educated at Blairsville Seminary at Blairsville, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Both parents were born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, where 
they were married September 23, 1867, just before moving to Illinois. 
The father, who is now deceased and who was born March n, 1834, 
was a scholarly man and adopted teaching as his vocation. He was 
educated at Laurel Hill Academy in Pennsylvania and also at Jeffer- 
son College at Canonsberg, Pennsylvania, which was later con- 
solidated with Washington College. He taught school in different 
parts of the country, having charge of the public schools at Lafayette, 
Illinois, in 1857 and 1858, and when the Civil War broke out, hap- 
pened to be so engaged in a southern state. Complications arose 
which prevented his returning to the North and also made necessary 
his serving in the Confederate Army, connected with the hospital 
corps. 

After the war he returned to Illinois and engaged -in farming 
in which pursuit he was successful, retiring in 1893 and moving to 
Galesburg where he resided until his death on June 4, 1909. Of his 
three children, John R. was the second born. The others being Rosa 
Bell and Armor. Until he was fifteen years of age, John R. More- 
land enjoyed the educational advantages offered by the district 
schools, and after that attended the public schools of Galva for four 
years. In the fall of 1889 he matriculated in Knox College and was 
there graduated in 1894, with his degree of B. S., later receiving his 
A. B. degree. While in college he was a member of the Gnothautii 
Literary Society and held the office of treasurer in it. He was con- 
sidered an authority on parliamentary law by the members of his 
society. He was also a member of the college military organization 
and attained the rank of ranking first lieutenant and was commis- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 547 

sioned brevet first liteutenant in the Illinois State Militia by the 
governor of the state. 

In 1894 he began reading law in the office of J. J. Tunnicliff, 
who was an admirable instructor and for years one of the leading 
attorneys of the county. After two years under his teaching, Mr. 
Moreland went to Springfield, passed his examination and in the 
fall of 1896 was admitted to the bar, after which he remained in 
the office of Mr. Tunnicliff as assistant for one year. In 1897 he 
formed a partnership with his brother, Armor Moreland, under the 
present style, and this firm collectively and individually, has won 
prominent and substantial standing in Knox County, representing 
legal ability, fidelity to clients and the upholding of the honorable 
ethics of the profession. Such a reputation invites public confidence 
and much important business is placed in the hands of this firm. 
The members of his profession have shown their confidence in him 
by electing him vice-president of the Knox County Bar Association, 
of which he is a member and which position he held with credit. 
He is also a member of the Illinois State Bar Association and the 
Illinois State Historical Society. 

Mr. Moreland was united in marriage on November 18, 1912, to 
Miss Caroline Henshaw, who was born at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, 
and they have two daughters, Dorcas Rosanna, who was born 
December 25, 1913, and Caroline Priscilla, who was born January 
26, 1916. Mrs. Moreland is a daughter of William and Dorcas 
(Hazen) Henshaw of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and graduated 
from the high school there and also from the college at California, 
Pennsylvania. She comes of Revolutionary stock and belongs to 
the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is also a member 
of the Tuscarora Club and the Federation of Woman's Clubs. 

Mr. Moreland has a wide circle of loyal friends and many well 
wishing acquaintances both inside and outside his profession. In 
politics he is a republican and has always been interested in good 
government and conscientious citizenship, although he has never 
sought an office. Mr. and Mrs. Moreland attend the Presbyterian 
Church, of which they are both members. 

ARMOR MORELAND. The Knox County bar has no abler member 
than Armor Moreland, the junior member of the widely known law 
firm of Moreland & Moreland, at Galesburg, who, not only is an 
attorney of merited distinction, but is also prominent in city, county 
and state politics and also finds time to interest himself in civic 
progress and social and fraternal activities. He leads a busy life, 
one of usefulness and creditable endeavor and has built up a 
reputation, professionally and otherwise, that entitles him to be 
numbered with the leading men of this section. 

Armor Moreland was born near Galva in Henry County, Illinois, 
April 24, 1873, and is a son of William R. and Annie E. (Hill) 
Moreland, the latter surviving and residing at Galesburg. William 



548 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

R. Moreland and wife were both born in Fayette County, Penn- 
sylvania. He was an educator and when the Civil War broke out 
was engaged in teaching school in a southern state and on account 
of this environment, entered the Confederate army and was assigned 
to the hospital service with which he was identified until the close 
of hostilities. He was born March n, 1834, and his death occurred 
at Galesburg, Illinois, June 4, 1909. 

Mr. Moreland is of Scotch-Irish descent. His great-great-grand- 
father, Alexander Moreland, prior to the Revolutionary War 
emigrated from Adams County, Pennsylvania, and settled in Fayette 
County, Pennsylvania, and near Broadford on the Youghiogheny 
River. Taking up a farm from the Government, he improved it 
and lived there until the time of his death in 1793 or 1794. Mr. 
Moreland's great-grandfather, William Moreland, also settled in 
Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in 1771 on a farm in the vicinity of 
his father's farm. It was while he was living in Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, that he was a soldier in the "Continental Line of 
Pennsylvania" and was in the campaign against the Indians, after 
the burning of Hannastown in 1782. His wife was Agnes Huston 
who was a daughter of Joseph Huston, a Revolutionary soldier 
who served in Crawford's Sandusky expedition in 1782. 

Mr. Moreland's grandfather was John Moreland who also 
resided in the same vicinity as his father. He was a farmer and 
.pioneer coke maker of Western Pennsylvania. He together with 
Col. Alexander M. Hill were among the first to make commercial 
coke in the now famous Connellsville coke region. 

Mr. Moreland's mother was a daughter of Col. Alexander M. 
Hill just referred to. He was prominent in manufacturing and 
politics in Western Pennsylvania and represented his district in the 
General Assembly of that state for a number of years. 

In the district schools of Lynn Township, Armor Moreland 
received instructions until fourteen years of age, then became a 
student at Galva and was graduated in 1891 from the Galva High 
School and in the fall of the same year came to Galesburg and 
entered Knox College, from which he was graduated in 1895 with 
his B. S. degree, and later received the degree of A. B. from the 
same institution. While in college he took a prominent part in the 
Gnothautii Literary Society and attained marked distinction as a 
debater. It was also during his student days that he became a 
member of the Knox College Cadet Corps, serving until his gradu- 
ation and became ranking captain and subsequently was commis- 
sioned brevet captain by the State of Illinois and upon leaving 
college he entered the Illinois National Guard, serving four years. 
His military record presents him in a very creditable light. At the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American war, Mr. Moreland was made 
first sergeant of the battery commanded by Captain C. C. Craig 
(now Judge Craig). Although the early termination of the war 
made active service by this artillery regiment unnecessary, its readi- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 549 

ness and patriotism were typical of the American spirit, loyal to 
the core and ever quick to rally to preserve law and order either on 
the battlefield or in other struggles where the peace and prosperity 
of innocent people are imperiled. During the labor troubles at Pana, 
Illinois, and also at Virden, he served as a member of the National 
Guard, twenty days at each place, on strike duty. 

When Mr. Moreland began his law studies in the office of 
Daugherty and Boutelle, his mind had already been well trained, 
and after two years of law reading, he was admitted to the bar at 
Mount Vernon, Illinois, in 1897, and immediately thereafter he 
formed a law partnership with his brother, under the firm style of 
Moreland & Moreland, which has continued to the present, the 
offices of the firm being located at No. 151 Main Street, Galesburg, 
Illinois. As may be inferred from his success as a debater while 
at college, Mr. Moreland is a close reasoner, a master of logic, and 
is a brilliant speaker. The Knox County Bar Association has 
honored him at different times and in 1911, while serving as vice 
president of that body, elected him president. He is now a member 
of the State Bar Association of Illinois. 

He has been very active in the ranks of the republican party ; 
has been a delegate to numerous state conventions, and in March, 
1901, was elected city attorney of Galesburg, which office he served 
two years with the greatest efficiency. At the time of his nomination 
to the above office, he was serving as secretary of the republican city 
central committee, but the greater part of 'his political activity has 
been for others, his friends finding in him at all times a loyal sup- 
porter and his party a conscientious and willing worker. 

Mr. Moreland was married August 23, 1905, to Miss Josephine 
Cooledge, who is a daughter of James H. Cooledge, a prominent 
farmer and stock raiser of Galesburg and one of the best known 
men in the state. Mr. Cooledge was instrumental in establishing the 
agricultural department at the Illinois State University, and helped 
to purchase and install the first blooded stock at the agricultural 
college.- 

Mr. and Mrs. Moreland have two children : Margaret, who was 
born June n, 1907 ; and Joanne, who was born May 30, 1911. Mrs. 
Moreland has numerous interests as has the modern woman and 
these include activities in society and club life. She is a member 
of the Home Culture Club, the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, the Federation of Woman's Clubs and the Tourists' Club. Her 
children are being reared with intelligent care, surrounded by 
influences which cannot fail to normally develop them and prepare 
them for the pleasures and duties of life. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moreland attend the Presbyterian Church. He is 
a Royal Arch Mason and a Knight of Pythias and is an enthusiastic 
supporter of the-Galesburg Business Men's Club, and is a member of 
the Soangetaha Country Club. 



550 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

JESSE ELMER ROBERTS. Many of the most successful members 
of the bar have come into this profession through the avenue of 
hard work, self-reliance, and before they were privileged to take a 
single case had developed qualities which would have gained them 
success in other fields. One of the lawyers of high standing and 
successful position in Chicago is of this type of self-made men, hav- 
ing worked his way through college and earned every dollar that 
gave him his higher education and supported him until he became 
established in practice. Jesse Elmer Roberts has been a member 
of the Chicago bar for more than twenty years and has his offices 
at 76 West Monroe Street. 

Born in Rensselaer, Jasper County, Indiana, November 3, 1865, 
he is a son of Preston Floyd and Louisa R. (Keithley) Roberts. 
His father combined school teaching with farming, and was iden- 
tified with the work of the schoolroom for a period of forty years. 
Jesse E. Roberts while an Indiana farm boy acquired an educa- 
tion in the district schools, qualified for teaching, and worked three 
years as an educator in Indiana, and then spent a similar period in 
California. While in California Mr. Roberts taught in the Magnolia 
school in Riverside, in the famous orange belt, and was also in the 
Banning school and the old San Bernardino Mission school. In 
1889 he was a member of the San Bernardino county board of 
education. 

Mr. Roberts was twenty-five years of age before he was able 
to realize his ambition to study law. In 1890 he entered the law de- 
partment of the University of Michigan, and remained until grad- 
uating LL. B. in 1892. In university he also earned his own way 
and was assistant librarian of the law library. By competitive con- 
test he won the honors in oratory in the university in 1892, and was 
chosen representative of the university in the Northern Oratorical 
League in its contest on May 6, 1892, at Evanston, Illinois. He 
graduated as valedictorian of his law class, and during his career 
in the university had gained both the respect and esteem of his in- 
structors and fellow pupils. 

Mr. Roberts was admitted to the Michigan bar in June, 1892, 
before the Supreme Court and to the Illinois bar before the Supreme 
Court of that state in October of the same year. Since then he has 
been in practice in Chicago. During a residence of some years in 
LaGrange Mr. Roberts served as village attorney nine consecutive 
years, and was village attorney for several other villages around 
Chicago. He assisted in the organization of village government in 
several places, and for the past eighteen years has had a continuous 
experience in municipal law matters, and is one of the best qualified 
lawyers in that special field. That work he has carried on in addi- 
tion to his growing general practice. Mr. Roberts is a member of 
the Chicago and Illinois State Bar associations, the Chicago Law 
Institute, the Union League Club, the Automobile Club of Chicago, 
the Southern Club, the Iroquois Club and the Westward Ho Golf 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 551 

Club. He has also taken thirty-two degrees in Scottish Rite Ma- 
sonry, being a member of the Oriental Consistory and of the Me- 
clmah Temple of the Mystic Shrine and of Trinity Commandery at 
La Grange. On August 3, 1903, Mr. Roberts married Pauline E 
Boerlm of Chicago, who died February i, 1915. The home is at 511 
Belmont Avenue. 

P. C. HALEY. As a lawyer Mr. P. C. Haley is about equally 
well known in Joliet and Chicago, and for a number of years has 
had offices in both cities. He has long been prominent as a citizen 
in Joliet, and for twenty-three years as special counsel to the Sani- 
tary District. In Chicago he has his law offices in the Rector 
Building. 

P. C. Haley was born at Saranac, New York, March 17, 1849, a 
son of Thomas and Hannah (Caton) Haley. Mr. Haley was grad- 
uated from high school and then entered the law department of the 
University of Michigan, graduating LL.B in 1871. Admitted to 
the bar of Illinois the same year, he took up active practice in Joliet, 
and has been identified with the bar of Will County more than forty 
years. In 1874 he was elected city attorney of Joliet and at the 
conclusion of his term gave his full attention to a practice which 
has since been steadily growing and has required the opening of 
offices in Chicago as well as in Joliet. 

For twelve years Mr. Haley represented the Fifth Ward in the 
Joliet City Council, and in 1891 was elected mayor of Joliet, serving 
one term. He was twice a candidate on the democratic ticket for 
congressman from his district. Mr. Haley is a member of the 
Catholic Church. 

He was married at Joliet December i, 1875, to Mary A. D'Arty. 
Their children are Margaret, Robert, Columbia, Madeline, Gene- 
vieve, Paul and John P. The son Robert is one of Joliet's prominent 
attorneys. . 

EDMUND DAVID ADCOCK. In December, 1912, the Board of 
Trustees of the Sanitary District of Chicago unanimously elected 
Edmund D. Adcock as general attorney for the board. When the 
value and significance of the Sanitary District, as a property costing 
millions of dollars and instituted and maintained for the safeguard- 
ing of the health and general welfare of a city of 2,000,000 people 
are considered, the importance of such an office as general attorney 
to the district is better understood. Mr. Adcock has a department 
with about twenty employes, including assistant attorneys, and the 
importance of the interests entrusted to the district's law department 
makes it a position of the heaviest responsibilities and in many vital 
relations with Chicago's citizenship. 

Since becoming general attorney for the Sanitary District Mr. 
Adcock has had much important litigation under his supervision. 
One trial was the United States vs. the Sanitary District, a suit 



552 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

to enjoin the district from withdrawing from Lake Michigan through 
the district's main channel and adjuncts water in excess of the 
amount authorized by the secretary of war. This case, which is 
still undecided, has attracted much attention in Illinois, and if the 
decision of the courts is unfavorable, resulting in a curtailment of 
the volume of water taken from Lake Michigan, it will entail an 
expenditure of more than two hundred million dollars upon the 
people of Chicago and adjacent districts in solving the problem of 
protecting the water supply from sewage pollution. Ofher litiga- 
tion in which the district has been involved during Mr. Adcock's 
term concerns the right of land owners in the overflow zone of the 
Illinois River to bring suit, against the Sanitary District each year 
to recover damages to land. The Supreme Court had formerly 
upheld the right of owners to sue for permanent injury within five 
years after the Sanitary District was opened. However, the suits 
under present consideration are those brought for temporary dam- 
ages and recurrent injury, and it is obvious that if the privilege 
of instituting such proceedings was upheld, it would constitute a 
lasting and serious burden upon the Sanitary District, the amount 
involved having been estimated at upwards of seventeen million 
dollars. Since Mr. Adcock took office this class of litigation has 
been defeated. The question still pending relates to the question of 
obligation upon the Sanitary District for the construction and main- 
tenance of bridges across its various channels at the crossings of 
railway rights-of-way. It has been argued that inasmuch as the 
drainage channels are artificial, the expense of such bridges should 
be borne by the Sanitary District. However, the district maintains 
that the construction of the channels is an exercise of the police 
power delegated to it by the General Assembly, and that therefore 
on the principal of "uncompensated obedience to the police power" 
the railroad companies must build and maintain bridges at their 
own expense. These cases are only the, more important which 
have come under the supervision of Mr. Adcock, and are mentioned 
to indicate the responsibilities of his position. 

Edmund D. Adcock was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1902 and 
began practice in Chicago the same year. He was associated with 
Otis H. Waldo until 1904, then became a member of the law firm 
of Wood & Fyffe, later Fyffe & Adcock, and as Fyffe, Adcock & 
Ryner until the partnership was dissolved when Mr. Adcock ac- 
cepted his present position with the Sanitary District. By his work 
as general attorney for the Sanitary District, his experience as an 
individual lawyer and his affiliations with the profession, Mr. Ad- 
cock is regarded as one of the able and successful members of the 
Chicago bar. 

Edmund D. Adcock was born near Galesburg, Illinois. April 29, 
1877, a son of William and Mary J. (Henderson) Adcock. He was 
liberally educated, after the public schools entering Knox College 
at Galesburg, from which he graduated A. B. in 1898, and followed 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 553 

that with his law studies in the Northwestern University at Chicago 
until given the LL. B. degree in 1902. Mr. Adcock is a member 
of the Homewood Country Club, the Union League Club, the Chi- 
cago Yacht Club, and the City Club, and in politics is a democrat. 
His home is at 5219 Greenwood avenue. August 31, 1905, he mar- 
ried at Creston, Iowa, Mary Rex. One son, Edmund Rex Adcock, 
was born August 28, 1911. 

WILL HARTWELL LYFORD. General counsel to the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Railroad and for many years one of Chicago's 
well known lawyers, Will H. Lyford began his career as a prac- 
tical railway man, came up from the ranks to larger responsibili- 
ties, and in the meantime having fitted himself for the practice of 
law, was selected as the man best qualified by practical experience 
and by legal ability for the post which he has held now for more 
than twenty years. 

Will Hartwell Lyford was born at Waterville, Maine, September 
15, 1858, a son of Oliver Smith and Lavina A. (Norris) Lyford. 
His father's successful career is well known in railway circles. 
Beginning as a watchman on the old Boston & Lowell Railroad, 
he went up the ladder of promotion through the various grades in 
the operating service to some of the higher offices in executive 
management. Oliver S. Lyford was born at Mount Vernon, Maine, 
June 19, 1823, a son of Dudley and Betsey Lyford. After a high 
school education, he began railroading in 1846, was successively 
watchman, assistant baggage master, ticket agent, and passenger 
conductor on the Boston & Lowell until 1851, was shop clerk and 
passenger conductor on the Erie Railroad from 1851 to 1855, was 
joint station agent of the Erie and Atlantic & Great Western rail- 
ways at Salamanca, New York, during 1860-63, was division and 
assistant general superintendent of the Atlantic & Great Western 
from 1863 to 1871 and for the following two years was division 
superintendent on the Erie. He next became general superintend- 
ent of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, serving during 1872-73, 
was general superintendent of the Kansas Pacific in 1874-76, and 
in 1878 became identified with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois, 
being superintendent in 1878-86, general manager, 1886-87, vice 
president and general manager from 1887 to 1890, and in the latter 
year became vice president and director. He died October 15, 
1914, at the age of ninety-one. 

With the career of his father before him, Will H. Lyford gravi- 
tated naturally into the same service. He finished his education in 
Colby College at Waterville, Maine, and during 1879-80 was assist- 
ant engineer, then a stenographer to the general superintendent dur- 
ing 1881-82, was chief clerk for the general manager in 1882-83, 
was claim agent in 1883-84 with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois. 
In the meantime he had studied law in the intervals of his regular 
duties, and was admitted to the bar in 1884. Mr. Lyford was 



554 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

made assistant general solicitor of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois, 
a post he held from 1884 to 1887, and was attorney in charge of 
the law department from 1887 to 1889. In the latter year he was 
made general solicitor, and since March 15, 1892, has also been gen- 
eral counsel. Mr. Lyford is also a member and in practice with the 
law firm of Calhoun, Lyford & Sheehan, with offices in the McCor- 
mick Building in Chicago. 

April 28, 1886, at Nebraska City, Nebraska., he married Mary 
L. MacComas. Their children are Gertrude and Calhoun. Mr. 
Lyford is a republican, a member of the Phi Beta Kappa, Delta 
Kappa Epsilon, and belongs to the Chicago, the Union League, 
the Chicago Athletic, the University, and the South Shore Country 
clubs. His home is at 165 Erie Street. 

JOHN R. McCABE. While the name of John R. McCabe is fa- 
miliar to Chicago people in general because of his former services 
as city clerk and active relations with republican politics, local and 
national, his position as a lawyer has been of steadily increasing 
merit and success since his admission to the bar thirteen years ago. 
He now has a large individual practice, with offices in the Chamber 
of Commerce Building. 

John R. McCabe was born in Chicago January 5, 1879, a son 
of Michael S. and Julia (White) McCabe. His father was a vet- 
eran of the Chicago police department, and connected therewith 
for thirty-eight years. His death occurred in 1908. John R. was 
educated in private schools and in the Jesuit College, now Loyola 
University, graduating A. B. in 1896. He pursued his law studies 
in Kent College of Law, and took the LL. B. degree in 1901. Ad- 
mitted to the bar after examination at Springfield in 1901, he was 
for a time associated in the office with Hon. Judge Hiram T. Gil- 
bert and Timothy J. Fell. In 1906 Mr. McCabe began individual 
practice, and in 1907 was elected city clerk of Chicago and served 
with an admirable record of efficiency until 1909. In the latter 
year Mr. McCabe formed a partnership with William E. Cloyes 
and Frederick Kull, and that firm was continued until 1914. Since 
then Mr. McCabe has practiced alone. One interesting distinction of 
his practice is that he filed the first case in the Municipal Court of 
Chicago after its organization, and has the certified copy of the 
first writ issued by that court on December 3, 1906. 

Mr. McCabe is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the 
Lawyers' Association of Illinois and the Illinois State Bar Associa- 
tion. Fraternally his relations are with the Knights of the Mac- 
cabees, the Foresters and the Knights of Columbus. For several 
years he was active in the Illinois National Guard, belongs to the 
Seventh Illinois Infantry Veteran Corps, and at one time was 
captain and quartermaster in that organization. Mr. McCabe is a 
republican, and has been one of the vigorous leaders of his party 
in Chicago and also a figure in national politics. Mr. McCabe is 
unmarried and resides at 812. South Irving Avenue. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 555 

FRANCIS SERVICE WILSON. A Chicago lawyer whose position 
is with the leaders of the profession, Francis Service Wilson has 
practiced in that city since 1897, an d is the son of a distinguished 
Ohio lawyer and jurist. He was born February 7, 1872, at Youngs- 
town, Ohio, his parents being David M. and Griselda E. (Camp- 
bell) Wilson. 

David M. Wilson was a native of Medina County, Ohio, born 
there in 1823, and he had his early education in his native com- 
munity. He took up the study of law and was admitted to the 
bar in 1844. He continued to reside and practice his profession at 
Medina until 1862, when he removed to Canfield, the county seat 
of Mahoning County, and afterwards to Youngstown, when the 
county seat was removed to that point. Establishing himself in 
the practice of law he soon gained a place of prominence among 
his professional brothers, and among some of the most profound 
students and most eloquent exponents of law and jurisprudence 
produced in Northeastern Ohio, ably held his own. He was a 
brilliant advocate, a profound thinker, and was gifted with a clear, 
judicial mind, a penetrating and incisive wit and an intelligent 
grasp that has been rarely excelled. He was a forcible, vigorous 
and convincing speaker, and whether the subject was a case on 
trial or the principles of a political party, his hearers were equally 
impressed with his complete knowledge of the subject and his evi- 
dent sincerity of expression. He was deeply in earnest in all he 
undertook. His manner was winning and cordial and made for him 
hosts of friends. A strong democrat, residing in an overwhelm- 
ingly republican district, he was nominated by his party for attor- 
ney general of the state in 1863 and in 1874 as candidate for repre- 
sentative in Congress, and -by his personal popularity effected a 
change of more than 3,500 votes. He was one of the most active 
and prominent members of the Constitutional Convention of 1873, 
where he gave valuable aid to every suggestion that he believed 
to be for the best interests of the state. President McKinley at 
one time studied law in the office of Mr. Wilson, and the ac- 
quaintance thus formed ripened into esteem and friendship that 
was only terminated by death. President Garfield was another 
intimate friend, and so close were their relations that a law part- 
nership was at one time under serious contemplation by them. 
Some of the personal letters of Mr. Garfield submitted to the 
editor evidence very clearly the confidence and the intimacy ex- 
isting between the friends. In one of them, dated January 27, 1874, 
the writer, doubtless for the first time, expressed the beautiful sen- 
timent given to the public, with a variation of language, six years 
later in his speech accepting the high office of United States senator 
as the successor of Judge Thurman: "On the vines that grow 
over the walls of party politics are found the sweetest flowers that 
bloom in the garden of friendship." 

David M. Wilson died February 11, 1882, the last five years of 



556 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

his life having been associated in practice with his nephew, James 
P. Wilson. He was married in 1871 to Miss Griselda E. Campbell, 
daughter of Thomas Campbell, of Old Town, Trumbull County, 
Ohio, and they had one son, Francis Service. Mrs. Wilson was for 
some years a resident of Chicago, where she was an earnest mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, to which she had always given her 
faithful support and adherence. 

Francis Service Wilson received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Youngstown, following which he attended Hudson 
.Academy, Hudson, Ohio, and was graduated therefrom in 1890. 
He next became a student at the Western Reserve University in 
Cleveland, where he spent two years in the classical department and 
three years in the law department, receiving his Doctor's degree in 
1895 and being admitted to the bar at Cleveland soon after. There 
he continued for a short time, when he went to Youngstown and 
began practice. His abilities soon won him recognition and in 1896 
he was nominated for the office of probate judge of Mahoning 
County as a democrat, but met defeat owing to the great republican 
majority there. For two years he served as secretary of the demo- 
cratic county committee. Mr. Wilson came to Chicago in 1897, and 
for two years was engaged in practice alone. He then became asso- 
ciated with Altgeld, Darrow and Thompson, the firm later becoming 
Darrow, Masters & Wilson. In 1911 he was appointed county attor- 
ney, holding the position until 1913, when the state's attorney's 
office took over the business of the county attorney's office. 

Mr. Wilson is now associated with the firm of Felsenthal, Beck- 
with, Wilson and Spengler, the members of the firm being: Eli 
B. Felsenthal, John W. Beckwith, Francis S. Wilson, Edward C. 
Felsenthal and Walter J. Spengler. The offices of the firm are 
located in the -Title and Trust Building. Mr. Wilson has been con- 
nected with a number of cases that have attracted much attention, 
and tie is now associate special counsel for the State of Illinois in 
the Illinois Central Tax cases. He is a member of the democratic 
county managing committee and is generally prominent and influen- 
tial in public matters. He is a member of the Chicago and Illinois 
Bar associations and the Chicago Legal Club, and among his social 
connections may be named the Homewood Country Club, the Sons 
of the American Revolution, the Northwestern Alumni Association 
and the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 

On November 17, 1904, Mr. Wilson married Miss Caroline Seig- 
fried of Youngstown, Ohio, and they have two sons, David M. and 
Francis S., Jr. Their home is at No. 6028 Jackson Park Avenue. 

FREDERICK SASS is a member in the Chicago law firm of Foster, 
Payne, Reynolds & Sass, with offices in the Fort Dearborn Building. 
With ten years of active experience behind him, he has a secure 
position in the Chicago bar. 

Mr. Sass was born in Chicago, May 23, 1877, a son of Louis H. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 557 

and Christine (Breyer) Sass. Both parents were born and reared 
in Germany. They came to Chicago and there established a home 
in about 1856. Frederick Sass acquired his earlier educational train- 
ing in the public schools of his native city and then entered the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, graduating in 1901, with the degree Bachelor 
of Philosophy. His law studies were pursued in the Chicago Kent 
College of Law from which he was graduated in 1904, as Bachelor 
of Laws. Admission to the bar followed and he has since been 
engaged in the active work of his profession, finding the metropoli- 
tan field a fortunate choice for his career. He now practices in all 
the State and Federal courts of Illinois and has served since 1909 as 
master in chancery of the Cook County Circuit Court, the appoint- 
ment having been made by Judge Frederick 1 A. Smith. 

Mr. Sass is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar 
associations, and in a social way is identified with the Hamilton 
Club, the Park Ridge Country Club, the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity 
and the Masonic order. He is a republican in the matter of politics. 

On December 7, 1907, Mr. Sass was married to Miss Edith 
Ransdell Shaffer, of Springfield, Illinois, and they have two chil- 
dren, Frederick, Jr., and Louis Carl Henry. Their home is at Park 
Ridge, a Chicago suburb. 

WILLIAM ELMORE FOSTER has been for more than a quarter of a 
century a member of the Chicago bar. He was for a number of 
years connected with the legal department of the Lake Shore & 
Michigan Southern Railway Company. He has latterly been trial 
attorney for the Chicago Elevated Railroads, and he is also a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Chicago Kent College of Law. 

William Elmore Foster was born at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 
May 7, 1861, a son of William Avery and Sarah Ann (Himes) 
Foster. His ancestors were long prominent in public and profes- 
sional life in Maine, Hon. Paulinus M. Foster being at one time 
president of the Maine State Senate, while Benjamin Foster, his 
grandfather, was an able lawyer and accomplished student, speaking 
eight languages. William Avery Foster, a merchant, came West 
from Maine in young manhood, and for many years was engaged in 
business at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, but died in Maine while on 
a visit to his old home. 

In April, 1864, when a child of three years, William Elmore 
Foster was brought to Chicago by his mother, and in her arms 
viewed the remains of the assassinated President Lincoln as they 
lay in state in the Cook County Courthouse. The public graded 
schools furnished him with the foundation for his education, and 
in 1880 he was graduated from the old Central High School, as a 
member of the last class, under Principal George Howland, who 
subsequently became superintendent of Chicago schools. Mr. 
Foster began his career in the offices of the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railway, as private secretary to the local freight agent, 



558 

and while thus engaged devoted his spare time to educating himself. 
After five years in the service of the railroad company, Mr. Foster 
resigned his position, and on the following morning, in September, 
1886, became a student at the old Union College of Law, where he 
was graduated in 1888, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. After 
his admission to the bar he immediately entered the legal depart- 
ment of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway Company, 
as assistant attorney, and continued to be connected with that road 
until March, 1898, when he removed to the Fort Dearborn Building, 
where his office has continued to the present time. Mr. Foster's 
practice in later years might be classed as of general nature, and 
among numerous cases of importance may be mentioned that of 
Williams vs. Vanderbih, in which he represented the defendant and 
secured a favorable decision. In 1909 Mr. Foster became a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Chicago Kent College of Law, and since 
that time has had charge of the chairs of trial course and practice 
courts. 

Mr. Foster is well known in club life, belonging to the Union 
League and the South Shore Country clubs. For five years he 
served in the Illinois State Militia. Mr. Foster's fraternal affilia- 
tion is with Kenwood Lodge, A. F. & A. M. He resides at 4813 
Prairie Avenue. 

F. WILLIAM KRAFT. In the field of municipal and corporation 
bond law few Chicago lawyers have won greater or more deserved 
recognition than F. William Kraft. Coming to this country a poor 
boy of sixteen years, accepting such employment as presented itself, 
starting his legal education in a justice court, and finally rising 
to high position in the ranks of his chosen calling, his career is an 
exemplification of the theory of the eminent judge who declared, 
answering a question in regard to lawyers : "Some succeed by great 
talent, some by high connections, some by miracle, but the majority 
by beginning without a shilling." 

Mr. Kraft was born October 2, 1865, in the City of London, 
England, a son of Michael and Sarah F. (Hawkins) Kraft. His 
lather, a native of Germany, went to England for his bride as a 
young man, but later returned to the Fatherland and in 1882 came 
to America, settling in Chicago, where he spent the remainder of 
his life and passed away in 1902. F. William Kraft first learned 
the German language, being taken to Germany when he was two 
years old and residing there until reaching the age of five, but sub- 
sequently returned to London, and there attended the public schools. 
Laying aside his books when fourteen years old, Mr. Kraft began 
to "hustle" for himself, and in 1882 came alone to the United 
States and located in Chicago, here securing employment in a 
jewelry house. Later Mr. Kraft became employed as a clerk in a 
justice's office, and thus began his legal training. In this capacity 
he acted seven years, four years of which time were passed with 



559 

Justice Jarvis Blume, and in 1886, he entered the Union College of 
Law, taking the two-year course and graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in June, 1888. Two days after his graduation 
Mr. Kraft was admitted to the bar on his diploma, all of the supreme 
judges except one now being deceased. Mr. Kraft had become 
naturalized on the very day that he had been in the United States 
five years. His legal practice was commenced in association with 
his cousin, J. Henry Kraft, who is now assistant prosecuting attor- 
ney for the City of Chicago, but later became identified with the 
firm of Duke M. Farson, municipal bonds, and acted for some time 
as its office attorney. Mr. Kraft has been engaged in practice alone 
for many years and is known in his particular field all over this 
country. He passes upon millions of bonds annually, and his acu- 
men, research and vigor of understanding have combined to attract 
the business of some of the largest investment concerns of the coun- 
try. His offices are at Nos. 517-520 Harris Trust Building. 

Mr. Kraft was married October 21, 1891, to Miss Lillie Engle, 
of Freeport, Illinois, and six children have been born to them : Flora, 
Ruth, Stanley E., Marion, Frederick William, Jr., and Gordon W. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kraft are members of the First Methodist Church of 
Oak Park, and their pleasant home is situated in that suburb of 
Chicago, at No. 723 Linden Avenue. Mr. Kraft has been active in 
the promotion and support of movements for the educational, moral 
and civic welfare of his home locality, and at this time is a member 
of the high school board of education of Oak Park. In the line of 
his profession, he belongs to the Chicago and Illinois State Bar 
associations; he is also a member of the City Club, and in the 
Royal Arcanum has attained to the Supreme Court of Honor. In 
his home life and outside of his profession, Mr. Kraft is affectionate, 
companionable and unassuming, and both in and outside of his voca- 
tion may be designated an excellent product of metropolitan life. 

CHARLES O. LOUCKS. Numbered among the strong figures of 
the day who are courageously standing for political reform and 
civic betterment is Charles O. Loucks. A lawyer by profession, his 
acknowledged talents have brought him a large practice, but he 
has not been content to confine his energies to his professional 
duties, and his labors in the line of municipal betterment have 
brought him favorably before the public not alone in his immediate 
field of the Twenty-seventh Ward, but throughout the city. 

Mr. Loucks was born at Menasha, Wisconsin, June 7, 1877, and 
is a son of Charles N. and Mary Ellen (Reece) Lcnicks. His 
father, who brought the family to Chicago, was for a period con- 
nected in an official capacity with the Continental National Bank, 
and is now engaged in large real estate transactions. Charles O. 
Loucks was three years of age when brought by his parents to Chi- 
cago, and his primary education was here secured in the graded 



560 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and high schools. He subsequently had two years of work in the 
literary department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, 
following which he returned to Chicago and studied law with Fred 
H. Atwood and Frank B. Pease, and was admitted to the Illinois 
bar December 16, 1899, and to the Supreme Court of the United 
States December 21, 1906. Mr. Loucks practiced alone during the 
year 1900, but in January, 1901, formed a partnership with Messrs. 
Atwood and Pease, the firm becoming Atwood, Pease & Loucks, 
Vernon R. Loucks, a brother, also being a member of this concern. 
The practice of the members is a general one, although they have 
specialized to some extent in real estate and corporation law. Mr. 
Loucks is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He has 
taken an active part in local politics for several years, and for a 
time was chairman of the executive committee of the Republican 
League of the Twenty-seventh Ward. He was also for several 
years secretary of the Federated Improvement Club of the Twenty- 
seventh Ward, was formerly chairman and is now a member of the 
advisory council of the Legislative Voters League, and is chairman 
of the finance committee and a member of the executive committee 
of the Twenty-seventh Ward Non-Partisan Organization, which 
elected Oliver L. Watson alderman of that ward in April, 1914. In 
1912 Mr. Loucks transferred his support to the progressive party, 
in the success of which he has taken a great interest and an active 
part. 

He is a director in the Irving Park National Bank; member 
and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Irving Park; 
member of the street and bridges committee of the City Club, and a 
member of the National Union. He has taken a most active part in 
religious work, and is a member of the Methodist Social Union. 
Mr. Loucks is "also ex-president of the Federated Men's Club of 
Irving Park and of the Jefferson High School Alumni Association, 
now the Carl Schurz Association. 

On June 28, 1905, Mr. Loucks was married to Miss Lavina 
Williams, of Warsaw, Indiana, and to this union there have come 
three children: Mary, born June 14, 1907; Clarkson, born August 
3, 1909, and Elizabeth, born May 22, 1914. The Loucks home is 
located at the corner of Keeler and Byron streets, in Irving Park, 
while Mr. Loucks' office is in the Tacoma Building. 

FRANCIS W. WALKER. Since his admission to the Illinois bar 
in 1877, it 'is doubtful if any Chicago attorney has handled more 
noteworthy trials and cases involving more important rights and 
values to property holders, corporations and individuals than Fran- 
cis W. Walker. To a younger generation it may be necessary to 
recall the fact that he was one of the chief prosecutors for the state 
of the Haymarket anarchists thirty years ago, and his work there 
probably did more than any other case to establish his reputation as 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 561 

a trial lawyer. For many years he was one of the most constant 
advocates in connection with the more important litigation appear- 
ing in Chicago civil and criminal courts. Seldom accepting public 
office, his rare combination of talents, learning, tact, patience and 
industry in the handling of his private law business has enabled Mr. 
Walker to achieve some of the highest honors of the Illinois bar. 

Francis W. Walker is a native of Chicago, born October 12, 
1856, a son of Lucas B. and Lucinda (LeSuer) Walker, both na- 
tives of New York State. His father, who came from Quaker stock, 
was an early settler at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and for a time was 
city treasurer of that city. He was a tanner by trade, and in 
Chicago for a number of years was connected with the hide, wool 
and pelt business. He was forty-four years of age when he mar- 
ried, and came to Chicago in 1855, soon after that event, which 
was celebrated in Ann Arbor. Lucinda LeSuer was of Huguenot 
stock, and her grandfather served with the rank of ensign in the 
Revolutionary war. 

Francis W. Walker was liberally educated, first in the grammar 
and high schools of Chicago, and later in the Union College of Law, 
which at that time was the law school for both the old Chicago and 
the Northwestern universities. He was graduated LL. B. before 
reaching his twenty-first birthday, and was admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar in the fall of 1877. Subsequently he was licensed to prac- 
tice in all the state and federal courts. 

From December, 1884, to 1888 Mr. Walker was first assistant 
state's attorney under Julius S. Grinnell. It was during this term 
that he tried the anarchists after the Haymarket riot, an event indel- 
ibly impressed on the history of Chicago. Seven of these rioters 
were sentenced to be hanged, the sentences of two being commuted 
to life imprisonment, while one prisoner blew off his head with a 
gas pipe bomb. As assistant state's attorney he also prosecuted the 
boodle cases involving the county commissioners, several of whom 
were sent to the penitentiary. Later from 1890 to 1892 Mr. Walker 
served as county attorney for Cook County. Although a democrat, 
he was appointed by a joint vote of both democrat and republican 
members of the county board, who desired his services in particular 
for the defense of the claims growing out of the transactions of the 
"Boodle Board" suits at that time being sustained by the board 
and which he effectively handled. 

For a period of twenty-five years Francis W. Walker averaged 
a hundred eighty days each year in the court room. Especially in 
his earlier career he defended numerous murder cases and has the 
distinction of having obtained the largest libel verdict ever given 
in Illinois. Mr. Walker is busy on important cases all the time, and 
perhaps has spent more days in the active trial of law suits than any 
other lawyer in the state, and perhaps in the country. While he 
has been engaged in a general practice his work has largely been 



562 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

such as an English barrister would perform. For the past eighteen 
years he has been practically alone in practice, while during the first 
half of his career he was associated with Edward J. Judd under the 
firm name of Walker & Judd. 

In 1891 Mr. Walker was employed by the South Side Elevated 
Railroad in its condemnation work and also by the Metropolitan 
Road while it was being constructed. Since the erection of the vari- 
ous elevated railroads in Chicago Mr. Walker has defended every 
land damage suit brought against the various rights of way as well 
as in the loop district. There has never been one dollar in damages 
to pay on abutting property of the elevated roads as a result of any 
law suits against the elevated companies. This record is the more 
remarkable when it is considered that in New York City the elevated 
roads have paid many millions of dollars as a result of similar litiga- 
tion. Mr. Walker is now the head of the staff of trial lawyers 
employed by the elevated railways of Chicago. 

He was generous counsel for the property owners in the con- 
demnation proceedings for the acquirement of land for the North- 
western Railroad Union Station, a proceeding that required eight 
months with a jury in the box. During Mayor Dunne's administra- 
tion Mr. Walker was employed by the city to assist the corpora- 
tion counsel in the case of Weir & McGegney, the contracting firm 
which had brought suit to the amount of $700,000 for extras grow- 
ing out of the construction of the Northwestern water tunnel. 
McGegney had previously obtained a verdict for $600,000, but on 
rehearing it was reversed by the Supreme Court. Mr. Walker had 
conducted the second trial, resulting in a verdict favoring the city, 
and the verdict was sustained by the higher courts. While recog- 
nized primarily for his success in corporation and real estate litiga- 
tion, it may be mentioned as showing the versatility of his talents 
that Mr. Walker was chief attorney for the defense in the slander 
case of Esther Mercy against the University of Chicago. In the 
first trial a verdict for $2,500 had been awarded to the plaintiff, 
but Mr. Walker on appeal secured a reversal of the verdict. 

Mr. Walker is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and 
the State Bar Association, and was president in 1913-14 of the Chi- 
cago Law Club. He is a member of Covenant Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; 
St. Bernard Comrnandery, K. T. ; Oriental Consistory of the Scot- 
tish Rite; and the Royal Arcanum. He belongs to the Chicago 
Club, the Union League Club, the Iroquois Club, the Mid Day Club, 
and the South Shore Country Club. He is a member and was one 
of the founders of Booth Chapter, Phi Delta Phi. 

Mr. Walker married Anne M. Benson, daughter of Fred Ben- 
son, who for many years was manager of the Western Union 
Telegraph Company at Dubuque, Iowa. Their children are : Frank- 
lin J., who died November, 1910; Margaret Olive, Edwin R. and 
Everett W. Mr. Walker's offices are in the Marquette Building, 
and his home at 5222 University Avenue. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 563 

CHARLES S. BURTOISI has been a well known member of the Chi- 
cago bar more than thirty years. His special field is patent, copy- 
right, trade-mark and corporation law, and in that he has gained well 
deserved distinction. 

Charles S. Burton was born at Elyria, Ohio, November 9, 1852, 
and is a son of Nathan Smith and Sarah John (Fairfield) Burton. 
After his preliminary training in the public and preparatory schools 
of his native state, he entered the University of Michigan, being 
enrolled in the class of 1872, and in 1882 began practice in Chi- 
cago, and has since continued to apply himself to the successful prac- 
tice of his profession. Mr. Burton has represented Chicago manu- 
facturers in patent and copyright litigation in many different cir- 
cuits of the United States courts, and as senior member of the firm 
of Burton & Burton practices in the United States Patent Office. 
His offices are in the Marquette Building. 

Mr. Burton has many friends in the profession, and is a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation. Among his fellow lawyers he is recognized as one who has 
profound respect for the ethics of his calling. He makes his home 
at 41 1 North Grove Avenue, Oak Park, and has been a leader in civic 
and educational movements in his home locality, having been presi- 
dent of the board of education of Oak Park from 1894 to 1897 and 
president of the Oak Park and River Forest High School Board of 
Education from 1899 to 1909. 

Mr. Burton was married May 3, 1887, to Miss Phebe A. Millard, 
of Chicago, and they have had four sons : Robert N., Norman 
L., Ernest R. and Clifford K. 

GEORGE E. CHIPMAN is a Chicago lawyer and has enjoyed a large 
general practice in that city for fifteen years, and is particularly 
known to the profession through his services as a teacher and author 
of law publications. 

Mr. Chipman was born at Tupperville, Annapolis County, Nova 
Scotia, July 14, 1868, and is a son of David Scott Chipman and 
Helen (Brooks) Chipman, both likewise natives of Nova Scotia. 
In his native province, Mr. Chipman graduated from Acadia Col- 
lege in 1892, Bachelor of Arts. He then came to the United States 
and matriculated in Harvard University, taking a post graduate 
course and receiving the degree, Master of Arts, in 1895. He entered 
the law department of Washington University, graduating in 1898, 
Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the Missouri bar early in 
the following year and in 1900 gained similar recognition in Illi- 
nois. He is the senior member of the firm of Chipman and Jack- 
son, with offices in the Harris Trust Building. 

Mr. Chipman has been a member of the board of managers of 
the Chicago Bar Association and is identified also with the Illinois 
Bar Association and the American Bar Association. Mr. Chipman 
is professor of contracts and evidence in the John Marshall Law 



564 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

School. He is editor of the publications, "Illinois Cases on Common 
Law Pleading," "Illinois Cases on Contracts," and "Illinois Cases on 
Evidence," besides which he is author of "Outlines of Modern In- 
ternational Law" and of encyclopedic articles on "Law and Evi- 
dence" and "Landlord and Tenant," both of which have been pub- 
lished in book form as well as in the edition for which they were 
originally prepared. 

In politics, Mr. Chipman is a republican. He holds membership 
in the Hamilton Club, the Harvard Club, the City Club and the 
Canadian Club. He is affiliated with Woodlawn Park Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M. and the Phi Delta Phi law fraternity. He is a member 
of Hyde Park Baptist Church. 

GEORGE E. FINK. As house attorney for the State Bank of Chi- 
cago Mr. Fink finds that this representative financial institution de- 
mands the greater part of his time and attention in a professional 
way, and he has proved himself a most circumspect and effective 
executive in directing the legal department of the bank's extensive 
business. 

George Everett Fink was born at Nunda, McHenry County, Illi- 
nois, on the 23d of September, 1877, an d is a son of Emery D. and 
Minnie May (Gilbert) Fink, who have maintained their residence in 
Chicago since 1892, the father being identified with manufacturing 
enterprises in this city. George E. Fink was about fifteen years 
of age at the time of the family removal to Chicago, where he was 
afforded the advantages of the public schools and the Chicago Busi- 
ness College. He then entered the Illinois College of Law, in which 
he was graduated as a member of the class of 1899 an d from which 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He thereafter took a 
post-graduate course in the law department of the University of 
Michigan, in 1899-1900, and in 1906 he completed a special course 
in the Illinois College of Law, which conferred upon him the sup- 
plemental degree of Master of Laws. Mr. Fink was admitted to the 
Illinois bar in 1900 and from 1901 to 1912 he was associated with 
Samuel M. Fegtly in active law work, as house attorneys for the 
State Bank of Chicago (Trust Company.) In 1912 the firm of 
Fegtly & Fink dissolved partnership Mr. Fegtly retiring on account 
of ill health and since that time Mr. Fink has continued to be 
retained as house attorney for the State Bank of Chicago, with ex- 
ecutive headquarters in the office of the institution. He is a member 
of the Chicago Bar Association and the Lawyers' Association of Illi- 
nois, and is a member of Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, of which 
he was formerly supreme treasurer. He is identified also with the 
Royal League (Past Archon of Ben Franklin Council No. 85) and 
the Royal Arcanum, and is an unwavering supporter of the cause of 
the republican party, though not imbued with desire for political 
office. Mr. Fink and family reside in their own home at 4506 North 
Francisco Avenue. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 565 

Mr. Fink wedded Miss Kathleen E. Fry, of Chicago, and they 
have two children, Nena E. and Robert E. 

CYRUS J. WOOD. An active member of the Chicago bar is found 
in Cyrus J. Wood, senior member of the law firm of Wood & Wood, 
with offices in the Ashland Block. Mr. Wood was born in Cayuga 
County, New York, December 3, 1857, and is a son of Cyrus A. and 
Mary A. (Roe) Wood. 

Cyrus J. Wood spent his early years on his father's farm. He 
attended the public schools in Cayuga County, and in 1877 was 
graduated from the Cortland Normal and Training School. Two 
years of school teaching followed, at Moravia, New York, after 
which he entered the University of Rochester, where he was grad- 
uated in 1883, with the degree of A. B. In the same year he came 
to Illinois and at Monmouth, in this state, studied law, in 1885 being 
admitted to the Illinois bar. He established himself in practice at 
Galesburg, in partnership with James McKenzie, the firm name 
being McKenzie & Wood, which association continued until 1890, 
when Mr. Wood came to Chicago and here entered into practice 
and continued alone for twenty years, when his son William G. was 
admitted to the firm, under the firm name of Wood & Wood. The 
junior partner is a graduate of the Northwestern University and of 
the Kent Law School of Chicago. 

After coming to Chicago, Mr. Wood attended the Chicago Col- 
lege of Law in order to get the benefit of the late Judge Moran's 
lectures. He has engaged in a general* practice in this city since 1890 
and has had many cases in both Appellate and the Supreme courts, 
some of which were quite noted. Many personal injury cases have 
been placed in his hands and a number of stubbornly contested cases 
have been brought to a satisfactory conclusion through his efforts. 
He is a member of the Chicago Law Institute and of the Chicago and 
of the Illinois State Bar associations. 

Mr. Wood was married October 30, 1888, to Miss Hattie Galla- 
way, of Chicago. The father of Mrs. Wood for a number of years 
was vice president of D. B. Fisk & Co. Mr. and Mrs. Wood have 
two sons, William G. and Cyrus B. The latter is a graduate of the 
Northwestern University and of the medical department of the 
same institution, and at present is an interne at the Michael Reese 
Hospital, Chicago. 

Mr. Wood is on the directing board of the Garden City Equitable 
Loan and Building Association. He retains membership with his 
Greek letter fraternity of college days, the Alpha Delta Phi, and 
belongs also to the Royal Arcanum. The family resides at No. 1475 
Gregory Street, Chicago. 

ROBERT A. BURTON. A Chicago lawyer of many years experi- 
ence, Robert A. Burton is engaged in general practice and is senior 
member of the firm of Burton, Kannally & Megan, with offices in 



566 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the Ashland Block. He has been identified with the Chicago bar 
more than twenty years, and has high standing as a lawyer and 
wide acquaintance among all classes of citizens. 

He was born in Huntsville, Missouri, his parents having come 
to that state from North Carolina. When he was a boy they re- 
moved to Iowa, and in that state he acquired his education, taking 
the literary course in the Iowa Wesleyan University at Mount 
Pleasant, and from it has the degrees A. B. and A. M. In early 
life he taught school, and at the age of nineteen held a high school 
principalship. At the same time he carried on his law studies and 
later attended the law school of the Columbia (now the George 
Washington) University, at Washington, D. C. 

Admitted to the bar at Ottumwa, Iowa, immediately afterwards 
Mr. Burton moved to Little Rock, Arkansas, where he did his first 
court work as assistant to the solicitor general. He had charge of 
state foreclosures, and for a year or more was principally engaged 
in the Court of Chancery of Pulaski County, Arkansas. While there 
he participated in various contested congressional election cases, 
and was one of Brooks' attorneys in his celebrated contest with 
Baxter for the governorship. This last engagement took him to 
Washington, D. C., where he opened an office and continued in 
practice until 1892. In that year he came to Chicago, where he has 
since been continuously identified with general practice. 

He is a republican and one of the early members of the Ham- 
ilton Club. He is a church member, belongs to the Beta Theta Phi, 
and the Illinois State Bar Association. He married Frances S. Way, 
daughter of Judge Way of Ohio. One of his sons is in the practice 
of law at Peoria and another is a student in the University of Illi- 
nois, while .of the three daughters the youngest lives at home and 
the other two are married. Mr. Burton lives in Hyde Park, Chicago. 

GEORGE W. BURTON. A son of Robert A. Burton, the Chicago 
attorney above mentioned, George W. Burton is now serving as 
general counsel for the Illinois Traction System, with offices in the 
Mayer Building in Peoria. 

He was born in Washington, D. C., April 15, 1880, attended 
school in that city, but at the age of twelve removed with the 
family to Chicago, where he was graduated from the Hyde Park 
High School in 1897. After that for several years he did news- 
paper reporting, was employed in a law office, in street railway work, 
and in the census office at Washington, and in the meantime carried 
on his studies in the law department of Columbia University (now 
George Washington University) and graduated LL. B. in June, 
1902. His first two years of experience were in Chicago, and he 
was then employed in the office of L. E. Fischer, at that time gen- 
eral manager of the Illinois Traction System, with offices at Dan- 
ville. Mr. Burton removed to Peoria in December, 1908, and has 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 567 

since acted as general counsel to the Illinois Traction System and 
also carries on a general practice as a lawyer. 

He is a member of the Peoria and the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation, is aligned with the republican party in his political actions, 
and is a member of the Creve Coeur Club of Peoria. 

JOHN DE GRAZIA. Now one of the capable members of the 
Chicago bar, with offices in the Ashland Block, with a large private 
practice and a prestige in political affairs, John De Grazia is a 
man whose progress has encouragement and inspiration for every- 
one. At one time he sold papers in the vicinity of the Ashland 
Block, where he now has his law offices. 

John De Grazia was born in Italy July 17, 1878, a son of Luigi 
and Theresa De Grazia of Trivigno, Italy. A year after his birth 
his father died, and from 1884 to 1890 he lived in his native coun- 
try and attended the common schools. With his step-father he ar- 
rived in America in 1890 and has been a resident of Chicago since 
September of that year. His education after coming to America 
was largely the result of attending night schools. He studied in 
the Montefiore School, the Medill High School, and a business col- 
lege while following other employments and prepared for the bar in 
the Chicago and Kent Law schools, graduating with a well earned 
diploma in 1907 and was admitted to the bar in 1908. Mr. De Grazia 
began practice as a member of the firm of Quitman & De Grazia, 
which was discontinued in 1911, and since that date he has con- 
ducted an individual practice of a general nature. He is a member 
of the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois Bar Association. In 
politics he is a republican, is identified with the Seventeenth Ward 
Republican Organization, and in 1908 was a candidate before the 
primaries for state senator for the Twenty-first District. 

The successive steps of the career of Mr. De Grazia are a tribute 
not only to the abundance of American opportunity but also to his 
own vigorous character and ambition. He was twelve years old 
when he landed in New York, and after reaching Chicago earned 
his bread by selling newspapers. A little later he was a water-boy 
and from 1892 to 1894 had charge of a fruit stand. In 1895 he 
worked as a bartender and in the same year had employment for a 
few months in making sweepers, such as are used on the street cars. 
The same year he found a place in a store as a clothing salesman, 
worked at that until 1897, and then entered the employ of the West- 
ern Union Telegraph Company, and was a proficient operator of a 
telegraph key from 1897 to 1907. It was the earnings from this lat- 
ter occupation that largely paid his way through law school. 

Mr. De Grazia is a member of the Society of Arts and Profes- 
sions, of the Unione Sicilliana, of the Alleanza Italiana, the Imera 
Croce Bianca, and is a past grand in the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



568 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. MILLER. One of the strong law firms of Mc- 
Donough County is that of Miller & Walker, at Macomb, its senior 
member, Thomas H. Miller, being favorably known in this section 
of Illinois, both professionally and politically. Educated for the 
law he has devoted himself entirely to his profession, building up 
so honorable and substantial a reputation that he was elected state's 
attorney in 1908 and served in that exceedingly important office 
until 1912. 

Thomas H. Miller was born on his father's farm near Colchester, 
McDonough County, Illinois, October 19, 1873, and is a son of 
Marvin and Sarah (Shoopman) Miller. The mother of Mr. Miller 
was born in McDonough County, Illinois, and is a resident of 
Macomb. The father, who was born at Akron, Ohio, in 1834, is 
deceased. There were four children in the family, one of whom, 
Patience B., is deceased, the others being: Fred, Thomas H. and 
Jesse M. 

Thomas H. Miller assisted his father on the farm during boy- 
hood and attended the district schools, later attending the public 
schools of Macomb. In 1899 he entered the law department of the 
University of Illinois as a student, and was graduated with honors 
in 1902 and in October of the same year was admitted to the bar, 
at Springfield. Mr. Miller chose Macomb as the scene of his pro- 
fessional endeavor and has never been inclined to leave this city of 
old acquaintance and later hearty appreciation. For two years in 
early practice he was in partnership with T. B. Switzer, under the 
firm name of Switzer & Miller, following which he was alone in 
practice for two more years. In July, 1908, he became associated 
with Wallace A. Walker, under the firm name of Miller & Walker, 
which continues, with offices on the south side of the public square 
at Macomb. Many important court cases have been entrusted to 
this firm and the careful handling of the same has brought the firm 
well merited repute. In politics Mr. Miller has always been a 
republican and a conscientious party worker but outside of his 
profession, has no ambition for public honors. During his term of 
four years as state's attorney, he made a fine record for efficiency 
and a clean page in the legal history of the county. 

He was a member of the board of education from 1906-1908, 
when he was elected state's attorney, and again reappointed to that 
office April, 1915. 

Mr. Miller was united in marriage on December 8, 1910, to Miss 
Bertha Cox, who is a daughter of the late Jacob Cox, formerly of 
Augusta, Hancock County, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have one 
daughter, Maxine, who was born May 18, 1912. Mr. Miller belongs 
to the Elks but otherwise his connections are with bodies professional 
in character. The family resides at No. 313 South McArthur Street. 

WALLACE A. WALKER. The legal profession at Macomb is well 
represented and McDonough County has reason to be proud of the 



569 

county seat bar. It is an observable fact that many of the most 
able practitioners have been born and educated in this county and 
an example may be cited in Wallace A. Walker, who is the junior 
member of the widely known firm of Miller & Walker. 

Wallace A. Walker was born in McDondugh County, Illinois, 
not far distant from Macomb, December 8, 1876, and is a son of 
Theophilus G. and Emma C. (Thomson) Walker, both of whom 
were likewise born in this county, the families being numbered with 
the pioneer settlers. Wallace A. was the eldest born of the family 
of three children, the others being: Bertha, who is the wife of 
Loring H. Provine, and they have two children ; and Alta,. who 
resides with her parents. 

Reared on the home farm, Wallace 'A. Walker attended the 
district schools through boyhood and later became a student in the 
Macomb Normal School. In 1896 he entered Lake Forest 
University and was there graduated in 1900, with the degree of A. 
B. The law being his choice of profession, Mr. Walker then 
entered the Kent Law School, at Chicago, in September, 1901, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1904 and in the same year was 
admitted to the bar. An exceedingly useful term of experience 
followed as he was employed until February, 1907, in the law office 
of Healy & Caylor, at Chicago. Mr. Walker then returned to 
Macomb and opened a law office here, continuing alone in practice 
until January i, 1908, when he formed a law partnership with 
Thomas H. Miller, under the style of Miller & Walker, which still 
exists and maintains offices on the south side of the square at 
Macomb. In all that pertains to legal matters as general prac- 
titioners, this firm has a reputation for being able, honorable and 
trustworthy and as a natural consequence a large amount of busi- 
ness is entrusted to the firm. Always a stanch republican, Mr. 
Walker gives his party loyal support. In 1909 he was elected city 
attorney of Macomb and served effectively in that office until 1913. 
He has never identified himself with secret societies or social clubs 
but has a wide circle of personal and professional friends. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. His residence is No. 810 East 
Calhoun Street, Macomb. 

Mr. Walker was married April 24, 1915, to Minnie M. Worrell, 
of Macomb. She was reared in Monmouth, California, and is 
prominent in women's clubs. 

CHRISTIAN MEIER. A representative member of the Illinois bar, 
who has won distinction in his profession and has taken a consist- 
ently active part in public affairs, Christian Meier is one of those 
of foreign birth, but of Chicago training, who have so thoroughly 
absorbed the progressive spirit of the city and the times. Born in 
Hesse Darmstadt, Southern Germany, January 19, 1852, he is a 
son of Christian and Mary (Immelt) Meier, natives of the Father- 
land. Mr. Meier's father, who was a wood turner and wood machine 



570 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

worker, emigrated to the United States in 1854, the year of the 
cholera epidemic, and here found extensive employment at Chicago 
in making coffins. Returning to Germany in 1856, in that same year 
he brought his family to this country and settled again in Chicago, 
where both he and the mother passed away. 

Christian Meier is essentially a product of the Chicago schools. 
As a lad he studied at the old Franklin School, Sedgwick and Divi- 
sion streets, under Professor Lane, and early became identified 
with civic affairs, being appointed, in 1884, by the elder Mayor 
Harrison as clerk of the Police Court of the North Side, serving 
four years under Judge Kersten. It was while acting in this capac- 
ity that he decided upon a career in the law, attending Northwestern 
University and graduating from the law department of that institu- 
tion in 1888 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted 
to the bar during the same year, and has continued in active practice 
up to the present time. Mr. Meier has a large and remunerative 
professional business, but will accept no cases in criminal litigation. 
He maintains offices at Room 1002 Ashland Block. He is a member 
of the Chicago Bar Association and of the Lawyers Association. In 
the fall of 1878 Mr. Meier was elected to the Illinois State Legisla- 
ture, in which body he served one term, and from that time has taken 
an active and helpful part in promoting the interests of his city and 
state in various positions of responsibility. In 1879 he was elected 
councilman of the old Sixteenth Ward, on the North Side, and was 
re-elected in 1881, his services as a member of the council being 
marked by the greatest activity and the securing of much beneficial 
legislation for his constituents. He was appointed by Judge Scales 
as a member of the election board, in 1895, and also served an un- 
expired term on the board of education, being reappointed for a 
full term. Subsequently he was appointed a member of the Civil 
Service Commission, on which he acted one term. Mr. Meier is a 
member of Lessing Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Olympia Lodge, I. O. O. 
F., and the Lincoln Turnverein Society. 

On September i, 1876, Mr. Meier was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Bierdemann, whose parents were early German settlers on the north 
side of Chicago. She died in March, 1889, having been the mother 
of four children : Paul C, of St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, county 
attorney of Polk County; Frank E., who is actively engaged in the 
practice of law at Chicago; Elizabeth, who is the wife of Julius 
Erbeau, of Chicago ; and Bertha, the wife of Frederick Albrecht, of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Mr. Meier was married a second time, in 
1891, to Sophia Wiesner. The family home is located at No. 4246 
North Winchester Avenue. 

HON. MICHAEL L. IGOE has done some distinctive work as 
a lawyer since his admission to the Illinois bar in the fall of 1908 ; 
he is probably best known over the city and in the state as an 
influential young member of the Legislature, to which he was elected 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 571 

in 1912 from the fifth senatorial district and reelected in November, 
1914. When first a candidate Mr. Igoe had the endorsement of the 
leading civic and political organizations, and his record during the 
forty-eighth assembly was such as to strengthen his qualifications 
and he received the largest number of votes given to any of the three 
successful candidates from his district. While in the Legislature 
in the forty-eighth assembly Mr. Igoe was chairman of the revenue 
committee and a member of other important committees. In 1913 
he was appointed a special United States district attorney, made a 
good record in that office, but resigned January I, 1914. 

Michael L. Igoe was born at St. Paul, Minnesota, April 16, 1885, 
a son of James F. and Catherine (Sherin) Igoe. His father was for 
many years employed by the Associated Press service. Michael L. 
Igoe was educated in the parochial schools at Minneapolis and at 
Chicago, attended the De LaSalle Institute of Chicago, and took his 
law course at the Georgetown University at Washington, D. C., 
graduating LL. B. in 1908, and being admitted to the bar of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia in the same year. His home has been in Chicago 
since the fall of 1908. Mr. Igoe is a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association, of the Iroquois Club, the City Club, the Press Club, the 
Sportsmen Club, the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of 
Foresters and the Ancient Order of Hibernians. He is unmarried, 
and resides at 5429 Greenwood Avenue. 

Ross C. HALL. ,Now one of the successful attorneys of Chicago 
and at different times active in democratic politics Ross C. Hall be- 
gan his career as a lawyer in Southern Illinois, but has been a mem- 
ber of the Chicago bar more than twenty years. At the present 
time Mr. Hall is serving as assistant attorney of the sanitary dis- 
trict of Chicago. 

Born at Rushville, Illinois, October 29, 1866, Ross C. Hall is a 
son of Thomas M. and Harriet R. (Ross) Hall. His father was a 
merchant at Rushville, and the son grew up in that town, finished 
the high school course in Macomb, and took his law course at 
Georgetown University in the District of Columbia, where he was 
graduated LL. B. in 1888. He was admitted to the bar in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, but returned home in July, 1888, and began prac- 
tice in his old home town of Rushville. He served as city attorney 
there for one year, and in 1892 moved to Chicago and became a 
partner of Hon. William Prentiss under the firm name of Prentiss 
& Hall. For twenty years Mr. Hall has been regarded as one of the 
lawyers of exceptional ability in the Chicago bar, and for eight years 
served as one of the trial attorneys for the Union Traction Company 
and the Chicago Railways Company. 

Mr. Hall has been prominent in the democratic organization of 
Cook County, and in 1896 was elected a member of the State Legis- 
lature and served one term. In 1900 he was nominated for the 
State Senate, but was defeated with the rest of his ticket. In 1904 



572 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

he attended the St. Louis National Convention as a delegate, and 
helped to nominate Judge Parker for president. In 1908 he was 
unsuccessful candidate on the democratic state ticket for attorney- 
general, and in 1911 his party selected him as a candidate for the 
office of judge of the Superior Court. In 1912 Mr. Hall was a 
delegate to the national convention in Baltimore which nominated 
President Wilson. Since February, 1913, he has given much of his 
professional time to his duties as first assistant attorney for the 
Chicago Sanitary District. 

Mr. Hall is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar asso- 
ciations and belongs to the Oak Park Club. His home is in Oak 
Park. On August 9, 1890, he married Martha Catherine Twyman, 
of Macomb, Illinois. Their children are Carlos T., George R. and 
Charles M. 

JAMES V. O'DONNELL. A master in chancery of the Superior 
Court in Cook County, James V. O'Donnell has been engaged in the 
active practice of his profession in Chicago for more than a score 
of years and through ability and character enjoys a place of excep- 
tional confidence and esteem in his profession. 

Mr. O'Donnell was born in the City of Portland, Maine, Sep- 
tember 14, 1868, and is a son of Patrick and Mary (Gaugherty) 
O'Donnell. Patrick O'Donnell, who was a woolen merchant, estab- 
lished his home in Chicago about the year 1877 an ^ resided there 
until his death in 1902. James V. O'Donnell prepared for college 
in an excellent seminary at Nicolet, Province of Quebec, Canada, 
and then entered the University of Notre Dame at South Bend, 
Indiana, in which he completed a classical course. He was also 
graduated from the law department in the class of 1889, LL. B. 
The following year was spent in post-graduate work in the old 
Chicago College of Law, graduating in 1890, and in 1891 he was 
admitted to the bar of the state. For the first year he was asso- 
ciated with Judge John Gibbons, who is now serving on the bench 
of the Circuit Court, and at the end of the year Judge Marcus Kava- 
nagh, now on the bench of the Superior Court of the county, be- 
came a member of the firm, with the title of Gibbons, Kavanagh & 
O'Donnell, this continuing until the elevation of Judge Gibbons to 
the bench. Thereafter Kavanagh & O'Donnell continued in control 
of the large and representative law business until Judge Kavanagh 
was elected to his present judicial office in 1898. Thus deprived of 
his able and honored coadjutors, Mr. O'Donnell has since conducted 
an individual practice, with offices in the Reaper Block. He was 
appointed master in chancery by Judge Kavanagh, his former part- 
ner, and has ably filled this office for the past fifteen years. Mr. 
O'Donnell is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar asso- 
ciations. He has appeared in connection with many important cases 
in the various courts of the state and is known as a skillful trial 
lawyer, as well as an able counselor. He is a republican in his politi- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 573 

cal faith. His social connections include membership in the Chi- 
cago Athletic Club. 

Mr.,O'Donnell was married on the 2ist of June, 1899, to Miss 
Agnes Lynch, and they have three children John B., Ruth M. and 
Constance M. The family home is at 509 Barry Avenue, Chicago. 

JAMES G. CONDON'S work as a lawyer is chiefly in the field of 
corporation and insurance law. He has been identified with the 
Chicago bar nearly twenty years and is well known in legal circles. 
His offices are in the First National Bank Building. 

James Gregory Condon was born in the City of Bloomington, 
McLean County, Illinois, November 28, 1871, and is a son of Wil- 
liam and Maria (McNamara) Condon. Mr. Condon supplemented 
his preliminary education by higher academic studies in St. Viateur's 
College, at Bourbonnais, Kankakee County. He entered the law de- 
partment of Wesleyan University, in his native city, graduating in 
1893, Bachelor of Laws. He was at once admitted to the bar and 
practiced in Bloomington one year. He removed to Chicago in 
1895 and is a member of the firm of Ryan & Condon. 

Mr. Condon has taken special interest in the matter of court 
rules and those governing legal practice and is zealous in support of 
the movement to expedite the business of the courts, the achieve- 
ment of which end is necessary in the handling of the great volume 
of business in the various courts of Chicago. In the Chicago Bar 
Association, he is chairman of the Committee on Expedition of 
Court Business. Mr. Condon was retained in service in the munici- 
pal law department of Chicago about one year and was for three 
years a member of the board of managers of the Chicago Bar As- 
sociation, of which he has been second vice-president. 

In 1910 he served as president of the Iroquois Club. He is also 
a member of the directorate of the Chicago Athletic Association, 
besides holding membership in a number of other organizations. 
Mr. Condon is a democrat in politics. He is affiliated with the 
Knights of Columbus. 

In 1907, Mr. Condon married Miss Lucy Dalton, of Bloomington 
and they have two children, Marian and Jane. His home is at 1512 
Dearborn Parkway. 

DWIGHT B. CHEEVER. Like numerous other leading members of 
the Chicago legal profession, Dwight B. Cheever is a native of the 
State of Michigan, and was reared in that state and there educated, 
although his entire professional career has been spent in Chicago. 
Since engaging in practice in 1896 his connection with some of the 
leading cases tried in the courts in recent years has given him a 
reputation as a specialist in trade-mark and copyright law in 
Chicago. 

Mr. Cheever was born at Ann Arbor, Michigan, February 23, 
1868, and is a son of Dr. Henry and Laura E. (Bissell) Cheever. 



574 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

The father was a prominent physician and a professor in the medi- 
cal department of the University of Michigan. After graduating 
from the Ann Arbor High School, Mr. Cheever entered the Univer- 
sity of Michigan where he took a course in mechanical engineering 
and was graduated in the class of 1891 with the degree Bachelor of 
Science. He then followed engineering with various firms until Sep- 
tember, 1895, when he entered the Michigan Law School, finishing 
in the class of 1896 with the degree Bachelor of Laws. In the same 
year he was admitted to the bars of Michigan and Illinois. Mr. 
Cheever began the practice of his profession in 1896 in the office of 
Robert H. Parkinson, a Chicago patent attorney, and continued there 
as chief clerk in the office until May i, 1901, when he opened offices 
of his own, continuing in independent practice until November, 1904. 
Since that time he has been senior partner in the firm of Cheever & 
Cox, and the firm has been engaged in some very important litigation. 

A few of the more important cases may be mentioned as follows : 
W. F. Burns Company vs. Mills & Cunningham, 143, Federal, 325, a 
case reversing the lower court; Thayer & Chandler vs. Wold, 148, 
Federal, 227; Ajax Forge Company vs. Morden Frog & Crossing 
Company, 164, Federal, 843; James H. Channon vs. Empire Com- 
pany, 168, Federal, 705; Sheridan Company vs. Robert Law Com- 
pany, 172, Federal, 223; Myers & Company vs. Fairbanks Morse & 
Company, 194, Federal, 971. All these cases went to the Court of 
Appeals. 

Mr. Cheever is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
National Bar Association, the Chicago Patent Bar Association, the 
Law Club and the Legal Club. Other club memberships of Mr. 
Cheever are with the Union League, Hamilton, Homewood Country 
and Kenwood clubs. 

On September i, 1904, Mr. Cheever married Miss Arline H. 
Valiette, of Pasadena, California, and they have one child, D wight 
Martin. The city home of the Cheevers is at 5491 East End Avenue, 
and they have an attractive summer place at Flossmoor, Illinois. 

RALPH L. PECK. Both through his professional and through his 
business and civic relations Mr. Peck has had a successful career 
since taking up practice fourteen years ago. Mr. Peck is a Chi- 
cago lawyer, with offices in the American Trust Building, but has 
his home at Palatine, Illinois. 

Ralph L. Peck was born near Springfield, Illinois, May 6, 1873, 
son of Sanford and Susan (Stover) Peck. His father is a real 
estate man, now residing at Barrington, Illinois. Ralph L. Peck 
was educated in the public schools, spent one year as a student in 
the Northwestern Academy, and graduated Ph. B. from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago with the class of 1898. Mr. Peck took his law 
course in the Columbian University Law School, and graduated 
LL. B. in 1901. 

Admitted to the Illinois bar the same year, he has since been 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 575 

identified with an increasing general practice in Chicago. At Pala- 
tine, his home town, Mr. Peck has been president of the Board of 
Education for the past ten years, president of the Township High 
School Board since its organization, village and town attorney for 
the last thirteen years, is president of the Township Republican Club, 
and secretary of the Fifth District Republican Club. He is vice 
president of the Mount Prospect National Bank, is the Cook County 
civil service commissioner and is acting as receiver of the Wauke- 
gan, Rockford & Elgin Traction Company by appointment of Judge 
Baldwin of the Circuit Court and is interested as director and offi- 
cial in various other active business organizations. 

Mr. Peck is a member of the Chicago, the Illinois State and the 
American Bar associations, the Hamilton Club and the City Club. 
His college fraternity is the Chi Psi, and he is also identified with 
Palatine Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Palatine Lodge A. F. & A. M., St. Elmo Commandery of the 
Knights Templar and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 
March 12, 1904, Mr. Peck married Miss Caroline Kerkhoff of Oak 
Park, Illinois. Their two children are Ralph LeRoy Jr., and Wil- 
liam Sanford. Mr. Peck is a trustee of the Methodist Church at 
Palatine. 

HON. JAMES A. MCKENZIE. Of those men who adorned and 
added prestige to the Illinois bar during the last century one of 
the greatest was Hon. James A. McKenzie, of Galesburg. In 
his death on December 17, 1901, not only Knox County but the 
state lost one of the brightest legal minds. A record of his career 
as seen through a lawyer's eyes adds an interesting chapter to 
this publication. 

James A. McKenzie was born April 27, 1837, at Spring Corners, 
Crawford County, Pennsylvania, and death interrupted his life in 
his sixty-fifth year. He was a son of Alexander and Deidama 
(Hendryx) McKenzie. When he was a child his parents removed 
to Knoxville, Illinois, from which place in 1854 the father and son 
went across the plains to California, where they met indifferent 
success and returned home in the summer of 1855. In 1856 Mr. 
McKenzie entered Knox College at Galesburg, and in September, 
1858, determined to apply for admission to both the junior and 
senior classes. In each class were young men of excellent ability 
and intelligence. At the close of the college year in June James 
A. McKenzie was graduated with the highest honors, the acknowl- 
edged leader of each class. The genius for consecutive, painstak- 
ing, thorough labor, manifested in his college career, was the domi- 
nant trait in his after life. In the consideration of any undertaking 
it is said that he first ascertained the underlying principles, and 
these determined he concentrated the remarkable energy of his mind 
toward a performance which was never less than creditable. While 



576 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

in college he familiarized himself with Blackstone and Kent, devel- 
oping special fondness for Kent. 

In August, 1 86 1, Mr. McKenzie raised a company of volunteers 
and went to the front as captain of Company H, Thirty-third Illi- 
nois Infantry. For a time he filled the position of judge advocate 
of a military commission, both at Reeves Station and Bentonville, 
Arkansas, later was provost marshal of the division commanded by 
General Steele at Helena, Arkansas, was subsequently transferred 
to the staff of Major General Curtis as provost marshal general 
of the Army of the Southwest. Failing health compelled him to 
resign his commission, and he returned to Galesburg in 1863 and 
entered upon the practice of his profession as senior member of 
the law firm of McKenzie & Williams. 

In November, 1864, Mr. McKenzie was elected state's attorney. 
That fall the first political speech he ever made was delivered in 
Dunn's Hall at Galesburg, and those who heard it spoke of it as 
a masterpiece. He was reelected in 1868 and filled the office until 
1872. The title of the office at that time was district attorney, and 
his district comprised Knox, Henderson, Henry and Mercer coun- 
ties. As a public prosecutor he proved able and fearless. His in- 
dictments were known for their absolute correctness and none of 
them were ever quashed for informality. Mr. McKenzie's record 
as state's attorney added to his reputation as an attorney of re- 
markable analytic power and knowledge of the law. As speaker 
before a jury he had few equals. His power of illustration, his 
ability to present the case in bold outlines, his quickness in detect- 
ing deception and subterfuge, his wit and sarcasm, his skill in 
explanation, his great ingenuity made him an opponent to be feared. 
Few lawyers were so well known throughout the state or stood 
so high with the Supreme Court. It is true of him that during 
his entire career as state's attorney he never sought to convict an 
innocent man. His contemporaries say of him that he was the 
ablest prosecutor in this circuit during the past forty years. His 
motto was : "Semper Paratus," always prepared. 

He had a part in a large majority of the important cases tried, 
and his personal strength and legal equipment gained him note- 
worthy prestige. He 'of ten took cases in which successful prosecu- 
tion seemed impossible, and yet gained a verdict. While conspicu- 
ous in his work in open court, at the same time he compiled his 
briefs and arguments with consummate skill and his legal docu- 
ments were as clear as they were technically perfect. In the exami- 
nation of witnesses his skill was seldom rivaled. He saw the meat 
of issue, and could so turn his questions that the heart of matters 
was developed to his satisfaction. His powers of discernment 
quickly exposed a witness who had something to conceal. As an 
orator he was not flowery, but rather convincingly effective, and 
frequently swayed a jury to a decision not previously looked for. 
He never exhibited surprise at the sudden and unexpected turn of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 577 

a case, either in his favor or against it, and this very equanimity 
frequently disconcerted his opponents. 

His contemporaries have said that he was probably the best 
common law pleader at the Knox County bar. For years he was 
employed in the majority of legal fights held in the county. One 
case especially commented upon was one tried at Macomb in 1872 
on change of venue from Henderson County. It was the trial of a 
charge of murder, the committing of which grew out of a draft 
riot. Pitted against Mr. McKenzie as prosecuting attorney was 
Col. Robert G. Ingersoll, as chief counsel for the defense. The case 
was hotly fought. Mr. McKenzie conducted the prosecution with 
wonderful tact and force, and many who heard the trial expressed 
with admiration the belief that his plea exceeded in strength and 
eloquence that of the great orator who was his opponent, notwith- 
standing the latter won the case. Another of the early important 
cases in which Mr. McKenzie conducted the prosecution was one 
taken on a change of venue from Knox County to Lewistown, the 
home of Judge Shope. The judge supported the defense, and was 
confidently supposed irresistible, but was overshadowed by the abil- 
ity of the Knox County attorney who won the case. The trial of 
Frank Rand, desperado and murderer, gave another opportunity 
for the display of Mr. McKenzie's legal skill and generalship. He 
was appointed by the county to assist J. J. Lunnicliff. In a trial 
occupying a week, in which especially able lawyers were concerned, 
he took a prominent part, and the closing argument, lasting four 
hours, and not to be forgotten by any who heard it, has never been 
excelled for power and eloquence at the Knox County bar. 

But Mr. McKenzie was more than a lawyer. Outside of his 
profession he was a very busy man. Idleness was foreign to his 
nature. From boyhood he was intensely fond of mechanics. As 
early as 1871 he is said to have conceived a plan for an air brake, 
and when ten years later he showed his design to . Westinghouse, 
the latter said : "You would have been successful with this if you 
had pressed it." He was a great reader, and accumulated a fine 
library, where all his spare hours were spent. His fondness was 
especially for science and abstruse work, which he read with ease. 
His knowledge on scientific subjects frequently surprised even his 
friends. 

All his life Mr. McKenzie was a stanch republican until the 
monetary subject came up for decision. He then came out for 
free silver and stumped the country for William J. Bryan during 
the latter's first campaign. He made the introductory speech on 
the occasion of Bryan's appearance at Galesburg. The late Mr. 
McKenzie was a member of Post No. -45, G. A. R., of the Masonic 
Fraternity, of the Beta Theta Pi Greek letter society and the Guoth- 
antii Society of Knox College. He was also president of the Knox 
County Bar Association at time of his death. 

During his college career he formed the acquaintance and be- 

Vol. II 10 



578 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

came affianced to Miss Harriet Smith, sister of Judge A. A. Smith. 
They were united in marriage shortly after his graduation in 1859. 
She died December 31, 1863, leaving a daughter Harriet, who died 
in August, 1901. In October, 1865, Mr. McKenzie married Miss 
Louisa Thomas, a woman of beautiful life and character, who died 
in Galesburg, July 26, 1888. Of this union there is a daughter 
Kate, now the wife of Andrew Harrington of Galesburg. July 23, 
1895, Mr. McKenzie married Miss Sallie G. Sherrill, a lady of 
Southern birth and rearing with whom he became acquainted while 
she was attending Knox College. Two daughters came to them : 
Genevieve, born July 5, 1896; and Gail, born November 12, 1897. 
The older daughter is now a student of Knox College, and has 
much of her father's ability as a student. The younger is a student 
in the Galesburg High School, and is often called "Jim," her 
father's nickname, because of her quick wit. 

The esteem of his home city for tKe late Mr. McKenzie was well 
expressed in an editorial in the Galesburg Evening Mail, with some 
extracts from which this article will close : "In the death of Hon. 
J. A. McKenzie Galesburg loses one of the ablest men who ever 
made this city their home. Of magnificent mental endowment and 
tireless energy, Mr. McKenzie mastered his profession as few men 
have, and his ability as a lawyer has probably never been surpassed 
at the Knox County bar. He completed his four years' college 
course in three years with the highest honors, took up the law and 
conquered its every detail and went out into the world to achieve 
preeminence in his profession. Through a full, busy lifetime he 
has lived and worked in this community, and left his stamp upon 
it. The brilliant mind, the strong personality of Mr. McKenzie will 
long be remembered and recalled here and elsewhere, for his reputa- 
tion wag not bounded by the county line. 

"His splendid and varied abilities and broad tastes worked along 
many lines, and the very brilliancy of his talents seemed to make 
it difficult for him to confine and direct them in any one channel. 
Yet the law was always his chief diversion, as well as means of live- 
lihood, and the position he attained in its practice is only a sample 
of what he might have accomplished along any other line had he 
so chosen. The swift intuition, the unerring judgment, the marvel- 
ous comprehension, the great fund of knowledge, the persuasive 
eloquence, the thorough knowledge of human nature, the boundless 
energy, the strong will and broad experience of the man gave him 
a most remarkable power. His interesting personality and kind- 
ness of heart won for him many friends. His was a bold and 
striking figure which to see and know was never to forget." 

JOHN E. NORTHUP. It has been Mr. Northup's persistent and 
skillful handling of many notable cases during his term as assistant 
state's attorney of Cook County and as special prosecutor in election 



o 

ffi 

TJLi 





COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 579 

fraud cases that has made him best known in Chicago, where his 
career as a member of the bar began in 1899. 

Mr. Northup had an individual practice the first five years, and 
in 1904 became associated as a member of the firm of Pringle, 
Northup & Terwilliger, a relationship of two years' duration. In 
1906 John J. Healy appointed Mr. Northup one of his assistant 
state's attorneys, and he continued to serve through the administra- 
tion of the late John E. W. Wayman until December, 1912. Out 
of the mass of litigation and prosecutions handled by him during 
that time, there were a number of cases which attracted unusual 
interest. One of these was the case of Doctor Cleminson, who was 
convicted of chloroforming his wife ; the case of Jennings, a colored 
man, who was convicted of murder, an important element in his con- 
viction having been a coincidence of finger prints, the first case of 
the kind in the country of any marked importance, and the first of its 
kind in Cook County. He also prosecuted several homicide cases, 
and tried a number of conspiracy and graft cases. Since leaving 
the office of assistant prosecutor, Mr. Northup has been engaged in 
private practice and as special state's attorney in investigating the 
election frauds perpetrated in Cook County in November, 1912. In 
19.14 Mr. Northup was one of the strongest candidates on the repub- 
lican ticket, being the candidate of his party for the office of county 
judge. He is now practicing as senior member of the firm of 
Northup, Arnold & Fairbank, with offices at 139 North Clark Street. 

John E. Northup was born on an Iowa farm in Marshall County, 
August 28, 1868, a son of James E. and Lettie (Eastman) Northup. 
He attended the country schools, and in 1891 he graduated with 
the degree of A. B. from Drake University at Des Moines. Mr. 
Northup was a school teacher for several years, spent two years 
in post-graduate work at the University of Chicago, and during 
three years spent as principal of schools at Elmhurst, Illinois, pur- 
sued the study of law. He subsequently took a course in the Illi- 
nois College of Law, and after passing his examination was admitted 
to the Illinois bar in October, 1899. Mr. Northup is a member of 
the American Bar Association, the Hamilton Club, the Chicago 
Association of Commerce, and in Masonry has affiliations with 
Union Park Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Cicero Chapter, R. A. M., Siloam 
Commandery, Knights Templar, and Medinah Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine, and also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Austin, the Royal League, the American Union. 

Mr. Northup belongs to the Austin Athletic Association and the 
Glen Oak Golf Club and is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Mr. Northup resides at No. 161 North Menard Avenue with his wife 
and daughter, Miss Dorothy. Mrs. Northup was formerly Miss 
Elizabeth Chisholm, of Chisholm, Iowa. 

JAMES JAY SHERIDAN was bora in Virginia City, Nevada, when 
that city was at its zenith as a great gold-mining camp, to which 



580 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

place his father had gone from Marshall, Michigan, as a pioneer 
gold seeker. He was yet a young child when the family made its 
way back to Michigan, and in that state he grew to young manhood. 

Mr. Sheridan was born on August 16, 1868, and is a son of 
James C. and Bridget (Crawley) Sheridan. He spent his boyhood 
days in the town of Marshall, Calhoun County, Michigan, there 
attending school, and in course of time entered the University of 
Michigan, concluding his studies there and being graduated from 
the law department as a member of the class of 1894, with the 
Bachelor of Laws degree. He thereafter did post-graduate work in 
the Yale law school and finishing his studies there, in 1895, was 
admitted to the bar of Illinois. Since that time Mr. Sheridan has 
been commendably engaged in the practice of his profession in 
Chicago, and the passing years have been marked by ever increas- 
ing advancement in legal circles. 

Mr. Sheridan is a republican and has always been active in the 
party cause. Even as a university student he showed his political 
spirit by encouraging republican clubs among the student body. In 
1904 he was a member of a convention that assembled for the pur- 
pose of formulating a new city charter and in many ways has 
shown his enthusiasm in a civic way, always along progressive 
lines. 

Mr. Sheridan in 1903 was elected to the presidency of the Ham- 
ilton Club, one of the most prominent and influential in Chicago. 
During his administration his policies resulted in bringing to the 
club a large increase in membership of the most desirable order. 
He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the University Club 
and the Phi Delta Phi college fraternity. 

On March 25, 1911, Mr. Sheridan was married to Miss Ger- 
trude Sands. 

JOHN M. RANKIN. Since 1904 a member of the Chicago bar, 
Mr. Rankin has rapidly gained recognition as an able and thoroughly 
equipped lawyer, and was for a number of years a member of the 
firm of Davis & Rankin. In November, 1914, he became asso- 
ciated with Eugene A. Moran, a son of the late Judge Thomas A. 
Moran, in general practice under firm name of Rankin & Moran. 

John M. Rankin was born on a farm in Fulton County, Illinois, 
June 9, 1873, a son f J onn an d Anna (Dobson') Rankin. His 
father came from Ohio to Illinois in 1846, settled in Fulton County, 
and spent his active career in farming. 

Educated in the country schools, and living on a farm until the 
age of eighteen, John M. Rankin then took a teacher's course at the 
Western Normal College, spent three years as teacher in rural 
schools, and the first important break in this routine came with the 
beginning of the Spanish-American war. He was a member of the 
Sixth Illinois Volunteers who were sent to Porto Rico, and he was 
absent in the army for about seven months. On his return to Fulton 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 581 

County Mr. Rankin in the fall of 1898 was appointed deputy county 
clerk, and while looking after the duties of that position studied law 
for three years. Mr. Rankin came to Chicago in 1903, and after a 
year in the Chicago Kent College of Law was admitted to the Illinois 
bar in 1904. His first connection with actual practice was as clerk 
in the office of Erode B. Davis, and eventually he was admitted as 
a partner under the name of Davis & Rankin. This firm continued 
under that title until March, 1913. 

Mr. Rankin is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illi- 
nois State Bar Association, is affiliated with Covenant Lodge No. 
526, A. F. & A. M. In 1908 he married Miss Alice M. Flathers, of 
Chicago. They reside at 3964 Ellis Avenue. 

PAUL O'DoNNELL has been actively identified with his profes- 
sion in Chicago since his admission to the bar in 1909, with offices at 
109 North Dearborn Street. 

Paul O'Donnell was born at Vincennes, Indiana, acquired his 
early education in the parochial and high schools of that city, en- 
tered Notre Dame University at South Bend in 1902, and from 1903 
to 1909 was in the University of Chicago, where he acquired his 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Jurisprudence. 

Mr. O'Donnell is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, of 
Calumet Council of the Knights of Columbus, of the Irish Fellow- 
ship Club, and the Delta Sigma Rho. He is a companion in the 
Medal of Honor Legion by inheritance from his grandfather, 
Menonen O'Donnell. Mr. O'Donnell is an officer in the First Cav- 
alry of the Illinois National Guard. He has membership in the 
Reynolds Club of the University of Chicago and the Assemblers 
Club. His home is at 1368 East Sixty-second Street. 

MICHAEL D. DOLAN. While many men achieve a degree of suc- 
cess along many lines there can be no doubt but that Nature endows 
more generously in one direction than another, and when marked 
success follows earnest effort, special qualities have been a heritage 
that fortuitous circumstances have made adaptive. When choice 
of a career is possible and the law is chosen, a young man enters a 
profession that offers him a recompensing field for his efforts, for, 
unmistakably it is from the law that emerge the strong, vital men 
who influence, guide and regulate in the greater affairs of public life 
and leave indelible their impress on their day and generation. Aside 
from natural inclination, however, a practitioner of the law who 
advances beyond his fellows, must be far more thoroughly educated 
than in other callings in life, and must be far more industrious than 
his emoluments, at first seem to warrant. Whatever line of practice 
he may select a field will be open at long as human nature is as at 
present. The American Bar Association, the most representative 
body of the profession, has expressed its opinion in regard to mem- 
bers of the bar, urging that lawyers remember that their highest 



582 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

honor will be deserved reputations for fidelity to private trusts and 
to public duty, and it will be found that this is the aim of mem- 
bers of the Chicago bar who have reached prominence. In this 
connection, fully meeting with the approval of so important a pro- 
fessional body as the American Bar Association, of which he is a 
member, is Michael D. Dolan, who maintains his law office in the 
Unity Building, Chicago. 

Michael D. Dolan was born at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, Octo- 
ber 26, 1882, and is a son of James and Mary (Tonkin) Dolan. The 
father is engaged in farming in Wisconsin and the family is well 
known near Mineral Point. Wisconsin is a progressive state and 
the public schools, in which Michael D. Dolan was an apt pupil, 
maintain a high standard. The youth was given further educational 
advantages, attending De La Salle Institute, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1898, afterward St. Ignatius College, Chicago Kent College 
of Law, and was graduated with his degree of LL. B. in 1903. In 
the same year he was admitted to the Illinois bar and began an 
independent practice in which he has continued, and through 
natural ability, close attention and comprehensive knowledge of 
the law has earned the reputation he has desired and has thereby 
advanced his own interests honorably as well as those of his clients. 
His practice is general in character but he pays some attention to 
corporation law and represents several large corporations at 
present. 

Mr. Dolan is a man of pleasing personality and his circle of 
friends is wide. He belongs, as above mentioned, to the American 
Bar Association, and also to the Chicago Bar Association, the Illi- 
nois State Bar Association and the Lawyers' Association of Illinois. 
His fraternal connections are with the A. O. H. and the Knights 
of Columbus. Mr. Dolan resides at No. 842 East Sixty-fifth Street, 
Chicago. 

CHARLES REVELL .HOLDEN. For nearly half a century the name 
Holden has been identified with the Chicago bar. William H. 
Holden began active practice in the city in 1866, and his son Charles 
R. Holden has been one of the prominent lawyers of the city for 
the past twenty years. 

Charles Revell Holden was born in Chicago January 9, 1871, 
a son of William Hiram and Sarah J. (Revell) Holden. His father, 
William H. Holden, was born in Chicago June 6, 1843, a son of 
Charles N. and Frances W. (Woodbury) Holden, was graduated 
from the West Division High School in 1861, took his law degree 
from the Union College of Law in 1866, and at once began active 
practice. For twenty-one years he served as treasurer of the Chi- 
cago Law Institute, and was prominent as a lawyer in business 
affairs, and as a member of the Baptist Church. At one time he 
was trustee of the University of Chicago, was officially identified 
with various church institutions, and was a president of the trus- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 583 

tees of the Second Baptist Church, and for thirty years superin- 
tendent of its Sunday school. The wife of William H. Holden 
was a sister of Mrs. Dwight L. Moody, wife of the famous 
Evangelist. 

Charles R. Holden was liberally educated, graduated A. B. 
from Yale University in 1892, entered the Northwestern University 
Law School and continued his studies with the firm of Moran, 
Kraus & Mayer until admitted to the bar in 1893. He was clerk 
with that firm until 1899, then became junior partner, and in 1900 
joined Adolf Kraus of the firm making the new partnership of 
Kraus & Holden. In 1901 Samuel Alschuler was admitted as a 
partner, and for the past thirteen years Kraus, Alschuler & Holden 
have been one of the prominent firms of Chicago, representing a 
large general clientage, but chiefly identified with corporation prac- 
tice. The offices of the firm are in the Tribune Building. On 
October i, 1914, he became vice president and counsel of the Union 
Trust Company, of Chicago, and at the same time William H. Hol- 
den became affiliated with the firm of Kraus, Alschuler and 
Holden. 

Mr. Holden is a member of the Baptist Church, a republican 
in politics, belongs to the Chicago Bar Association and Law In- 
stitute, and is a member of the University, the City, the Kenwood, 
Hamilton and Midlothian Country clubs. For a number of years 
he has been actively interested in religious movements, is a trus- 
tee of the Baptist Theological Union, the Divinity School of the 
University of Chicago, a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Chicago, on the board of the Cook County Sunday 
School Association and of the Federated Church Council. Mr. 
Holden is also a member of the board of managers of the Chicago 
Y. M. C. A. and on the Committee of Management of the West 
Side Y. M. C. A. His present residence is. the Kenwood Hotel at 
4700 Kenwood Avenue. His first wife, whom he married in De- 
cember, 1893, was Mertie Towne. On August 12, 1901, Mr. Holden 
married Cora Eaton. He has one son, William H. T. 

WILLIAM R. Moss. When William R. Moss finished his studies 
in the Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilanti in 1891 he iden- 
tified himself with that line of effort for which his training had 
best fitted him, that of teaching. For five years he continued 
therein, four years in an executive position as head of the Wausau 
(Wisconsin) public schools, and his record in that time was indeed 
praiseworthy. But the legal profession held out to him attractions 
that were irresistible, and the year 1896 found him a student in 
the law school of Michigan University. In 1899 ne was graduated 
with the Bachelor of Laws degree, and since October of that year 
he has been identified with the Chicago bar as an active member 
of the profession in this city. This is the brief record of his active 
career since the close of his student days down to date. 



584 

Mr. Moss is a native of Michigan and his parents are pioneer 
settlers of the state. Myron S. and Mary (Price) Moss were born 
in the states of New York and New Hampshire, respectively, and 
both were children when their families left the settled regions of 
those eastern states and pioneered into the unfamiliar wilds of 
Michigan. They grew to mature years in Clinton County, and 
Myron S. Moss was long numbered among the representative farm- 
ers of his county. He was a citizen of commendable influence and 
standing, and on his homestead farm at Maple Rapids, Clinton 
County, William R. Moss was born on November 3, 1867. 

Such schools as Clinton County provided in his boyhood Wil- 
liam Moss was privileged to attend, and when he had finished his 
high school course he applied himself to the business of teaching 
in local schools. He continued for three years, and in 1887 entered 
the Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilanti, as has been men- 
tioned in a previous paragraph. His subsequent activities in the 
field of education have also been touched upon so that further 
mention of that phase of his life need not be set forth here. 

When in 1899 Mr. Moss finished his law course, he was admitted 
to the bar in the same month of his graduation. Very soon there- 
after he left his native state and came to Chicago and in October, 
1899, was admitted to practice before the Illinois bar. Mr. Moss 
is today eligible to practice in all courts except the United States 
Supreme Court. His law business is of a general order. In 1906 
he was retained as trial lawyer by the Chicago Elevated Railroad 
Companies, and he is still engaged in that capacity. Other promi- 
nent corporations have retained him in a similar capacity. He was 
village attorney for Oak Park from September, 1911, to December 
31, 1913, when he resigned. For some years he was attorney for 
the Oak Park Business Men's Association, of which he is a mem- 
ber, and he is a director of and attorney for the Oak Park State 
Bank. He has membership in the Chicago, Illinois State and Ameri- 
can Bar associations and for two years was a member of the griev- 
ance committee of the first named association. His membership in 
the Union League, the University Club, the City Club, the Chicago 
Executives Club, the Oak Park Club and the Westward Ho! Golf 
Club, of which last he was for three years secretary, have united to 
give him a wide acquaintance in social circles in the city, and his 
circle of friends is one that is ever widening. He is also identified 
with the time honored Masonic fraternity, and he is a member of 
the Chicago Association of Commerce. Politically he has staunchly 
supported the republican party, and for two years he was president 
of the Oak Park Republican Club, following a service of two years 
as vice president of the club. 

On December 27, 1892, Mr. Moss was married to Miss Carrie 
Gauss, and their home is at 238 North Kenilworth Avenue, in Oak 
Park. He and his wife are members of the First Congregational 
Church of that place. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 585 

CHARLES ALBERT KOEPKE. One of Chicago's native sons who 
is winning distinction and success in the field of law is Charles 
Albert Koepke, junior member of the firm of Tatge & Koepke. Mr. 
Koepke's practice, in connection with the firm mentioned, is gen- 
eral in character, and has won him a substantial reputation because 
of the splendid nature of his abilities. Mr. Koepke was born De- 
cember 1 8, 1876, in Chicago, and is a son of Frank and Augusta 
(Kliehn) Koepke, natives of Germany, who left the Fatherland for 
the United States in 1872 and settled in Chicago, where the father 
has since been successfully engaged in business as a carpenter and 
contractor. 

After attending the public schools and graduating from the high 
school, Charles A. Koepke began a course in a business college, but 
left before its completion to become a student in the law school 
of Northwestern University, Evanston. He was graduated in 1899, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, but a few days prior to this 
had been admitted to the bar upon examination. His professional 
career was commenced as office clerk with the law firm of Pinck- 
ney & Tatge, in 1895, and when the senior member of the firm, 
Merritt W. Pinckney, was elevated to the bench of the Juvenile 
Court, he became Mr. Tatge's partner, the firm taking the style of 
Tatge & Koepke, which has continued to the present time, having 
offices at 903 Schiller Building. Mr. Koepke's law practice has 
not been confined to any special or narrow field, but has been of a 
broad and general character, and his advice is sought by a number 
of the leading business interests of Chicago. He is a member of 
the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and 
the American Bar Association. Mr. Koepke belongs to the Royal 
Arcanum, and is prominently known in Masonic circles, being a 
member of Golden Rule Lodge No. 726, A. F. & A. M., Wiley M. 
Egan Chapter, R. A. M. ; Chicago Commandery, K. T. ; Oriental 
Consistory, S. R. M., and Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 

On October 7, 1903, Mr. Koepke was united in marriage with 
Miss Caroline G. Schmidt, of Chicago, and three children have 
been born to them : Louise, Charles and Marie. The family home 
is at No. 2219 West Walton Street. 

H. ERSKINE CAMPBELL. Admitted to practice in 1902, H. Er- 
skine Campbell is the second member of the firm of Pain, Camp- 
bell & Kasper of Chicago. He is the son of a prominent lawyer of 
the state, Washington Hilary Campbell, who practiced at Havana 
for twelve years, served as mayor of that city and was a promi- 
nent democrat. It was while campaigning as a speaker in behalf 
of Grover Cleveland after his first nomination that Mr. Campbell 
contracted a cold that resulted eventually in his death, November 
21, 1884. Mr. Campbell's mother bore the maiden name of Eliza- 
beth Conwell. 

H. Erskine Campbell was born at Havana, the county seat 



586 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

of Mason County, Illinois, October -3, 1876, and there for two 
years attended the public schools. In January, 1888, he went to 
Racine, Wisconsin, and entered the grammar school there, attend- 
ing until June, 1889, when he entered the University School at 
Kenosha, Wisconsin, there preparing for college until June, 1895. 
In October of the same year Mr. Campbell entered the University 
of Chicago, spending two and a half years in active study, and 
after an interval of one and one-half years went to Leland Stanford 
Junior University, at Palo Alto, California, and remained about one 
year. In 1900 Mr. Campbell returned to his native state and be- 
came a student in the law school of Northwestern University, and 
was admitted to the bar in September of 1902. A short period 
of practice alone followed and he then became associated with 
Charles E. Pain, at that time with the firm of Parker & Pain. Sev- 
eral changes in the firm's name have occurred, and the association 
is now known as Pain, Campbell and Kasper and is accounted one 
of the strong legal combinations in general practice in the city. 
The offices of the firm are maintained in the First National Bank 
Building. 

Mr. Campbell is a member of the Chicago and the Illinois State 
Bar associations and is well known in club and social circles. .Among 
his club memberships may be mentioned the Chicago Athletic Club, 
the Edgewater Country Club, of which he is ex-president, the Edge- 
water Golf Club, in which he is a member of the directing board, 
and the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Association, of which fraternity he 
was president for two years. In Masonry Mr. Campbell has at- 
tained high rank, being a member of Edgewater Lodge, A. F. & A. 
M., Corinthian Chapter, Chicago Council, Apollo Commandery, 
Oriental Consistory and Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 

Mr. Campbell was married June 25, 1901, to Miss Lorraine 
Decker, of Chicago, and they live at No. 1066 Berwyn Avenue. 
They are members of the Episcopal Church. 

F. MACDONALD LOWE. A member of the Chicago bar since 
October, 1903, F. MacDonald Lowe was for several years closely 
associated with Col. Richard S. Thompson, one of the old and promi- 
nent-lawyers of Chicago, and has his offices in the Chamber of Com- 
merce Building. 

F. MacDonald Lowe was born at Richview, Washington County, 
Illinois, August 22, 1879, son of Dr. Adolphus G. and Hattie C. 
(Cameron) Lowe. He was graduated from the Hyde Park High 
School in 1899, subsequently attending the University of Michigan 
in the literary and law departments. He took his degree of LL. B. 
in 1903 from the Chicago Kent College of Law. In October, 1903, 
he was admitted to the bar and for the following three years held 
a clerical position in the office of Judge Jesse A. Baldwin. Since 
1907 he has practiced alone. 

Mr. Lowe is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illi- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 587 

nois State Bar Association, the Chickaming Country Club, and the 
Delta Upsilon and the Phi Delta Phi college fraternities. He is sec- 
retary of several Chicago corporations and a member of the Chicago 
Real Estate Board. Mr. Lowe is a republican and is a member of 
the Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. On April 18, 1908, Mr. Lowe 
married Miss Helen Whitney, of Chicago. They have two sons, 
Whitney and MacDonald. The family residence is at Highland 
Park, Illinois. Mr. Lowe is the author of a book of verses entitled 
"Bubbie," published by The Alderbrink Press, a little volume that 
has been favorably received and celebrates the humorous side of 
child life. It is based upon his own experiences as the father of 
two sons. 

HON. WILLIAM CORWIN JOHNS. A man of rugged honesty, 
with supreme contempt for sham and pretense, with hatred for 
untruth and possessed of that broad human understanding that 
softened judicial decisions with kindly sympathy for the unfortu- 
nate, the personality of the late Judge William C. Johns stood forth 
and became an influential factor as part of a life of notable achieve- 
ment. With profound legal knowledge and with the gift of natural 
eloquence, at one time Judge Johns was considered the most bril- 
liant member of the Macon County bar, while later, on the circuit 
bench, which he adorned for eleven full years, his prudence, his 
innate sense of justice, his intense impartiality and his courageous 
determination to do right, made him one of the most thoroughly 
trusted and highly honored jurists who have ever sat upon the 
Illinois bench. 

William C. Johns was born at Circleville, Ohio, December 7. 
1846, and died at San Francisco, California, June 25, 1914. He was 
one of a family of five children born to Dr. Harvey C. and Jane 
Martha (Martin) Johns. Dr. Harvey C. Johns was born in Dela- 
ware County, Ohio, June 20, 1819, and died at Decatur, Illinois, 
April 22, 1899. 1 l &4 2 he was graduated from Jefferson Medical 
College, Philadelphia, immediately afterward establishing himself 
in medical practice at Circleville, Ohio, where he continued several 
years and then removed with his family to Piatt County, Illinois, 
locating on a farm near Allerton, but in 1853 settling permanently 
at Decatur. Here he erected the beautiful residence that has con- 
tinued the family homestead and which is still occupied by his 
widow, who, in spite of the passage of eighty-seven years over her 
head, remains young in heart and until the death of Judge Johns 
was the object of his most solicitous care. The residence stands on 
an elevation known as Johns' Hill, and commands a beautiful view 
of the surrounding country. Under its hospitable roof many dis- 
tinguished people have been entertained and on many occasions 
Abraham Lincoln was an honored guest, as he was an admired 
personal friend of Dr. Johns. In the practice of his profession, Dr. 
Johns became widely known and when the Civil war broke out he 



588 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tendered his services to Governor Yates and was commissioned 
regimental surgeon of the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Illinois 
Infantry, serving as such until 1864. He became interested in the 
development of agriculture and in the breeding of blooded stock 
and subsequently, for ten consecutive years, was either president 
or vice president of the Agricultural Board of Illinois ; also was 
purchaser and supervisor of the purchasing board of stock imported 
from Europe by the Illinois Breeders' Association, and additionally 
served as president of the State Agricultural Society. In consider- 
ing his talents and activities it is not difficult to see the same ener- 
getic qualities that were his son's heritage. After settling in Piatt 
County, Dr. Johns served as a member of the Illinois Legislature 
with credit. 

On October 29, 1845, Dr. Johns was united in marriage with 
Jane Martin, a daughter of William Martin, and ten children were 
born to them, five of whom grew to maturity : William C. ; Sheri- 
dan W., who is a resident of Decatur; Fannie W., now deceased, 
who was the wife of Robert Sedgwick; Laura, now deceased, who 
was the wife of George Danforth; and Nellie, who is the wife of 
Charles B. Moore, an admiral in the United States Navy and now 
stationed at Honolulu. 

William Corwin Johns attended the Decatur grade schools and 
the Normal School, then entered the University of Michigan and 
was graduated with the class of 1869, in 1870 graduating from the 
Albany, New York, School of Law. In the same year he was ad- 
mitted to the New York and also the Illinois bar, and at once 
entered upon practice at Decatur. Prior to this, however, he had 
had military experience, in 1863 enlisting in Company E, One Hun- 
dred and Forty-fifth Illinois Infantry, a loo-day regiment, and 
patriotically did his part in helping out the older soldiers, guarding 
bridges and outposts, this helpfulness enabling the seasoned sol- 
diers to go nearer the seat of war. It was sufficiently dangerous, 
however, to try the courage of the youths and the record shows 
that many did not survive the experience. In 1880 he was elected 
state's attorney and in that office, as later on the bench, proved 
absolutely honest and fearless. In 1903 he was first elected, as 
successor of Hon. E. P. Vail, as judge of the Circuit Court in the 
Sixth Judicial District, which is composed of Macon, Moultrie, 
DeWitt, Piatt, Douglas and Champaign Counties. In 1909 he was 
re-elected with a much larger majority and continued to serve until 
his death, a period covered by eleven years and nine days. He thus 
became widely known and many of his verdicts have gone down in 
history and are now accepted as models for pending decisions. Per- 
haps the most famous of these and one that attracted wide atten- 
tion, was that given when the Cumberland Presbyterian church was 
merged with the regular Presbyterian church. After much litiga- 
tion Judge Johns made his decision and it was subsequently upheld 
by the State Supreme Court. It later was taken as a model in the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 589 

case brought before the Tennessee Supreme Court. Another deci- 
sion which found its way into the Supreme Court and finally became 
a model was the case of Green vs. Weigle, in which the ownership 
of land was contested. Judge Johns' decision was affirmed by the 
higher court. At one time during his days of private practice, he 
was retained in the great legal battle of the State of Missouri against 
the State of Illinois for damages on the ground that the Chicago 
drainage district was endangering the lives of the Missouri people 
through contamination of the Mississippi river. 

In his judicial capacity Judge Johns was sometimes accused of 
being unnecessarily austere, although this attitude was largely the 
result of his earnestness and determination to be impartial, but in 
the domestic circle, in social life and in daily commingling with 
congenial friends, an entirely different view was gained of him. 
Scholarly and traveled, every subject was familiar to him and he 
had the tact that enabled him to bring familiar themes into the con- 
versation when any particular group surrounded him, either in his 
little office in the courthouse, in the lounging room of the Decatur 
Club, on the golf links, among politicians or in circles entirely to 
his personal taste, and in these hours of relaxation the real man was 
seen and the qualities came out that made him admired and loved. 

Although the law claimed almost his entire attention, Judge 
Johns was a member of the State Senate from 1887 to 1891. At" 
one time, before the malady which terminated his life had drained 
his energy, he was in much demand as a public speaker but occa- 
sionally on very special occasions in late years he consented to once 
more make addresses, although at the risk of exhaustion. One of 
these will never be forgotten by anyone who was so fortunate as to 
be within the sound of his voice. Reference is made to the com- 
memorative oration upon his friend, the late James Millikin, at the 
Founders' Day exercises at Millikin University in 1910. 

In 1882 Judge Johns married Miss Nellie Harper, whose father 
was a Presbyterian minister in Philadelphia. Mrs. Johns only sur- 
vived her marriage a few years. Judge Johns erected a handsome 
residence near the old Grace Methodist Church, on East Eldorado 
Street. He was an almost constant attendant at the services of the 
First Presbyterian Church, and his pastor, Rev. W. H. Penhallegon, 
valued an unbroken friendship of twenty-five years. Although his 
state of health, in his later years, prevented regular attendance, he 
prized his membership in the University Club and was an interested 
participant in the discussions and his opinion was eagerly sought on 
any question of a legal nature. It was in one of the'se meetings that 
he strongly opposed the view that a new constitutional convention 
was needed for Illinois. In younger years athletic sports attracted 
him and sometimes he mentioned the fact that once he had belonged 
to a Decatur baseball team. He was fond of golf and found recrea- 
tion at times in fishing trips, but in his closing years his absences 
from duty were mainly on account of necessary change of scene and 



590 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

climate, and it was while on his way to visit his sister, Mrs. Moore, 
in Honolulu, that he broke down completely and was hastened to a 
hospital in San Francisco, where the end came. He was ever a 
tender and devoted son, and however the loss might be felt in the 
many circles in which his talents and activities had made him useful 
and conspicuous for so many years, the blow fell heaviest on the 
one to whom, in spite of his years and public honors, he was always 
a boy needing and responding to her loving solicitude. 

WALTER H. ECKERT, although one of the younger members 
of the Chicago bar, has attained a secure position and has won the 
respect and esteem of profession and public. 

Like a good many other successful Chicago attorneys, Walter 
H. Eckert had his start on the farm. He was born at Woodstock, 
Illinois, March 10, 1880, and is a son of George W. and Bertha 
(Sigwalt) Eckert, farming people who still live in that vicinity. 
He passed his youth on the homestead place, his early education 
being secured in the country schools and the graded schools of 
Woodstock. The farm continued to be the scene of Mr. Eckert's 
activities until he reached the age of eighteen years, when he came 
to Chicago, and in December, 1901, entered the Kent College of 
Law. He spent two years in study there and then became a student 
'in Northwestern University, his graduation from the law school 
coming in June, 1904, when the Bachelor's degree was awarded 
him. Previous to that time, however, he had been admitted to the 
bar, that event taking place in September, 1903. Following his 
graduation Mr. Eckert became associated with the firm of Ela, 
Grover & Graves, becoming a member of the firm in 1906, and in 
1908 the firm style was changed to Ela, Grover, March and Eckert, 
continuing as such until May I, 1914, when Mr. Eckert withdrew 
from the partnership and established an office in the Otis Building, 
where he has since been engaged in practice alone. His business is 
mainly in the field of corporation and real estate law, and his suc- 
cess, gained without the aid of influential friends or other assist- 
ance, may be accounted for by his hard and industrious work. In 
addition to his private practice, which is large, Mr. Eckert repre- 
sents four banking institutions and an insurance company. 

On September 3, 1907, Mr. Eckert was married to Miss Geor- 
gia J. Cooper, of Chicago, and they have one daughter, Jane. The 
family home is at Hinsdale. 

Mr. Eckert is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Hamilton Club,* the Hinsdale Club and the Hinsdale Golf Club. 
He is a republican in his politics. 

THEODORE IRVING CHRISTOPHER. Among the able and reliable 
practitioners of law in the City of Chicago, Theodore Irving Chris- 
topher, who is associated with the prominent firm of Winston, 
Payne, Strawn & Shaw, is accorded a foremost place by those 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 591 

clients who seek honorable and thoroughly educated attorneys to 
look after their interests. For eighteen years Mr. Christopher 
has been a member of the Illinois bar, and in continuous practice 
with the exception of four years of his life, following his service 
in the Spanish-American war, which were devoted to the United 
States Naval service, during which he traveled around the world. 

Theodore Irving Christopher was born at Vincennes, Indiana, 
October 16, 1876, and is a son of Theodore D. and Sarah E. (Duffy) 
Christopher. From the public schools of St. Louis, Missouri, he 
entered the academic department of Washington University, later 
attended a business college in Chicago, and subsequently became a 
student in the law department of Lake Forest University, where 
he was graduated in 1897. In the same year he was admitted to 
practice in Illinois and was so engaged when the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war broke out in 1898. At that time he enlisted with the Illi- 
nois Naval Reserves, under a special war enlistment of four months, 
and served on the United States steamer Montgomery, mainly 
along the Cuban coast and at Porto Rico, until the war closed. He 
then returned to Chicago and resumed his law practice. There 
must have been in his family some maritime ancestor whose love 
of the water he inherits and after a year of practice, during which 
the call of the sea became more insistent than the settlement of dis- 
putes between litigants, no matter how important or profitable, and 
the day came when he closed his office and enlisted in the United 
States Navy for a cruise of four years. He was assigned to the 
United States steamer Chicago, which was Admiral Schley's flag- 
ship when he took charge of the South Atlantic squadron. Mr. 
Christopher's position at first was yeoman of the third class but 
before he was finally and honorably discharged, he had been pro- 
moted to be chief yeoman. He served nine months on the Wil- 
mington in South America, being transferred to that vessel imme- 
diately after reaching Buenos Aires. From that city the vessel 
went to Montevideo and from there, by way of the Mediterranean 
Sea and the Suez Canal to Manila, stopping at all the principal ports 
on the route. Two and one-half years were spent by Mr. Chris- 
topher in the Philippine Islands and along the China coast. One in- 
teresting experience while in the Orient was a trip of 900 miles up 
the great yellow Yang-tse-Kiang River. In November, 1902, he 
was transferred to the United States steamer Yorktown on which 
vessel he returned to the United States by way of the Hawaiian 
Islands, to the port of San Francisco. There were more places, 
however, that Mr. Christopher desired to visit, so he took passage 
on the United States steamer Wyoming for Mexico and the Panama 
Canal, crossing the isthmus and then being transferred to the 
United States steamer Mayflower, on which he reached Norfolk, 
Virginia, where he was honorably discharged after an absence of 
four years, in February, 1904. Entirely apart from the advantages 



592 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

that would accrue to a professional man through the broadened 
outlook such a period of travel would give, the personal enjoyment 
and the preservation in memory of the wonderful sights and un- 
usual experiences of such a journey, would have made it well 
worth while. 

Mr. Christopher once more returned to Chicago and again 
resumed the practice of law, at first with the firm of Rosenthal, 
Kurz & Hirschl, but since 1910 has been associated with the firm 
of Winston, Payne, Strawn & Shaw. He is a member of the Chi- 
cago Bar Association. His business office is in the First Na- 
tional Bank Building, Chicago. 

On January i, 1906, Mr. Christopher was married to Miss 
Daisy Racine, a resident of LaGrange, Illinois, and they have four 
children : Mary, Daisy, Dorothy and Edward. The family resi- 
dence is at LaGrange. Mr. Christopher's fraternal relationships 
are representative. He is past master of LaGrange Lodge No. 
770 A. F. & A. M. ; past grand of Suburban Lodge No. no Odd 
Fellows; and past consul of LaGrange Camp Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

EDGAR BRONSON TOLMAN was born at Nowgong, British India, 
September 5, 1859, being the son of Rev. Cyrus F. and Mary (Bron- 
son) Tolman, who in 1864 returned to the United States after the 
father's mission in India. Major Tolman is a graduate of the old 
University of Chicago, having taken his A. B. degree in 1880 and 
his A. M. in 1883. In 1882 he graduated from the Union College 
of Law, receiving the Horton prize. Admitted to the bar in 1882, 
Mr. Tolman in 1889 became a member of the law firm of Doolittle, 
McKey & Tolman, which later became Doolittle, Palmer & Tolman. 
Since 1905 he has been senior member of the firm of Tolman, Red- 
field & Sexton, with offices in the Stock Exchange Building. 

Major Tolman was attorney for the board of local improvements 
of Chicago during 1901-03, and served as corporation counsel for 
the city from June 13, 1903, to August i, 1905. During the Spanish- 
American war he was major of the First Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try and participated in the Santiago campaign. He is an active 
member of the Chicago Bar Association, served as president of 
that organization, and is chairman of its Committee on Rules of 
Court. He is also an ex-president of the Law Club, and a member 
of the Illinois State Bar Association, and the American Bar Asso- 
ciation. Politically he is a democrat, and has membership in the 
following patriotic and social orders: Sons of the American Rev- 
olution, Society of Foreign Wars of the United States, Society of 
the Army of Santiago de Cuba, Naval and Military Order of Span- 
ish-American war and United Spanish War Veterans ; the Chicago 
Athletic, Iroquois, Quadrangle, City, South Shore Country, and 
Flossmoor Country clubs. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 593 

RICHARD S. THOMPSON who passed away in June, 1914, was for 
more than forty years identified with the Chicago bar, and gained 
many of the distinctions and honors in law and public affairs. 
He saw two years of active service as an officer in the Civil war, 
until finally obliged to retire on account of wounds. 

Richard Swain Thompson was born at Cape May Court House, 
Cape May County, New Jersey, December 27, 1837, a son of Rich- 
ard and Elizabeth (Holmes) Thompson. For three years he was 
a student in the Norristown Seminary in Pennsylvania, and for 
three years studied under Rev. Alden Scovel, whose daughter he 
afterwards married. Colonel Thompson took his degree LL. B. 
from the Harvard Law School in 1861 and was admitted to the 
bar at Philadelphia March 8, 1862. In August, 1862, he raised a 
company of which' he became captain, and which was Company 
K of the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers. It was mustered into 
service September 4, 1862, and he served as district provost marshal 
at Ellicott's Mills in Maryland for two months, and on December 
19, 1862, the regiment joined the Army of the Potomac. He was 
commissioned major February 25, 1864, and lieutenant colonel July 
14, 1864, of the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers. He was severely 
wounded at the battle of Reams Station in Virginia August 25, 
1864, and on account of his wounds was mustered out of service 
February 17, 1865. 

In choosing a field for his profession Colonel Thompson located 
in Chicago in October, 1865, and soon acquired a good general prac- 
tice and became active in public affairs. From February i, 1867, 
to August, 1885, ne was a partner of Jeremiah Learning. He 
served as a member of the Illinois Senate from the Second Sena- 
torial District from 1872 to 1876, and was attorney of the Village 
of Hyde Park from 1869 to 1875, and from 1875 to i&7& was attor- 
ney for the South Park commissioners. He subsequently was di- 
rector of the Chamber of Commerce Safety Vaults Company. As 
a lawyer Colonel Thompson became an authority upon the law of 
eminent domain and was resorted to as a specialist upon that sub- 
ject. He was a good trial lawyer, very effective before a jury and 
a deadly cross-examiner. How unusually successful his practice 
was from a financial standpoint is evidenced by the comfortable 
size of his estate. 

Colonel Thompson was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
in Kenwood, a member of the Illinois Commandery of the Loyal 
Legion and of the Western Society of Army of the Potomac. He 
was a member of the Union League Club, was president during 
1891-1892 of the Kenwood Club, and his home was at 5406 East 
End Avenue. 

Colonel Thompson was married at Bloomington, Illinois, June 
27, 1865, to Catherine Scovel, daughter of Rev. Alden Scovel. 
There are two daughters : Louise, wife of Samuel A. Whitney, 
and Mary, Mrs. George Kenneth Sage. 

Vol. 1111 



594 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ARTHUR C. HOFFMANN. A member of the Chicago bar for more 
than twenty years, and always practicing individually, Arthur C. 
Hoffmann is a lawyer whose standing and ability are well indi- 
cated by the clientele which he has represented in the courts for 
many years, and which has included several of the large corpora- 
tions and all of his practice has been of the better class of corpora- 
tion and civil business. 

Born in Chicago February 15, 1867, Arthur C. Hoffmann was a 
son of Hugo and Emma (Koblitz) Hoffmann, who came to Chi- 
cago from Germany about 1861. Reared and educated in Chicago, 
Mr. Hoffmann spent one year in the University of Michigan and 
one year at the Chicago College of Law, and was graduated from 
the Kent College of Law in 1893, LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
in the same year, he has since practiced, and at no time in partner- 
ship. In a few years he had build up a clientele, largely in" cor- 
poration and civil practice. He has served as counsel in several 
very important cases, both in the state and federal courts, and 
is the regular legal representative of several corporations. Mr. 
Hoffmann has also been at different times concerned with con- 
structive legislation, and larger movements. A few years ago he 
drew up the bill known as the "Net Weight and Measure Law," 
and, largely through the direct influence of Mr. Hoffmann and sev- 
eral associates, the provisions of the bill were subsequently incor- 
porated in a federal law. 

Mr. Hoffmann in 1912 was president of the Kent College of 
Law Alumni, has membership in the Chicago Bar Association, and 
belongs to the Hamilton Club, the Ouilmette Country Club, the 
Men's Country Club, the Knights of Pythias, the North American 
Union and the Royal League. He was married April 14, 1903, to 
Miss Katharine Frances McGovern of Chicago. His residence is 
in Wilmette and his office in the Stock Exchange Building. 

HON. CHARLES M. THOMSON. As a lawyer Charles M. Thom- 
son has had some influential and prominent connections since be- 
ginning practice in Chicago in 1902. He is a former associate of 
Edwin W. Sims and is now of the firm of Gardner, Carton & Thom- 
son, attorneys and counsellors, with offices at 76 West Monroe 
Street. Mr. Thomson is probably best known to the people of 
Illinois and of Chicago as one of the active leaders in the progress- 
ive party, and in 1912 was one of the successful progressive can- 
didates elected from Illinois to Congress. He represented the tenth 
district in the Sixty-third Congress, and friends of good govern- 
ment had much to regret when Mr. Thomson was defeated for re- 
election on the progressive ticket in November, 1914. 

Charles Marsh Thomson was born in Chicago February 13, 
1877, a son of James and Julia (Marsh) Thomson, his father 
having for a number of years been a member of the firm of Thom- 
son & Taylor Spice Company. Mr. Thomson was educated in the 



595 

Chicago public schools and the Chicago Manual Training School, 
graduating in 1895, took his college work in Washington and Jef- 
ferson College from which he graduated A. B. in 1899 and received 
the degree Master of Arts in 1902, coincident with his graduation 
LL. B. from the Northwestern University Law School. Mr. Thom- 
son was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1902 and until 1905 was 
associated in practice with Edwin W. Sims, first in the firm of 
Malley & Sims and later with Sims, Munro & Thomson. When 
Mr. Sims in 1905 became solicitor for the bureau of corporations 
in Washington, the firm of Sims & Thomson was dissolved, and 
thereafter Mr. Thomson was engaged in individual practice until 
May, 1911. At that time he became associated with Henry A. 
Gardner and Alfred T. Carton under the present firm name of 
Gardner, Carton & Thomson. 

Mr. Thomson has always been a progressive factor in politics 
and allied with the forces of clean and honest administration. In 
April, 1908, he was elected as an independent from the Twenty-fifth 
Ward to the Chicago City Council, and was reelected in April, 1910, 
and in April, 1912. In the summer of 1912 he accepted a place on 
the progressive ticket as candidate for Congress from the Tenth 
District, and was elected in November of that year. During his 
term in Congress Mr. Thomson served on the Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands, the Committee on Expenditures in the Navy Department 
and Committee on Enrolled Bills. 

He is a member of the Chicago and Illinois state bar associa- 
tions, of the City Club, the Delta Tau Delta and the Phi Delta Phi 
Legal Fraternity. October 24, 1905, Mr. Thomson married Miss 
Besse Holbrook of Chicago. Their two children are Dorothy and 
John. Mr. Thomson resides at 847 Montrose Avenue. 

JOSEPH A. O'DONNELL. Engaged in the practice of law in 
Chicago for more than a quarter of a century, Mr. O'Donnell has 
marked the years with worthy achievement in his profession, with 
loyal and public spirited citizenship, with able service in the state 
Legislature, and was twice nominated for judicial office, but both 
times deprived of the honors of the bench because of the uncon- 
stitutionality of the law providing for the offices for which he was 
candidate. Mr. O'Donnell is a man of broad and exact knowledge 
of the law, has won many notable victories in the important cases 
presented by him in the various courts, and is a citizen of sterling 
character and high ideals. Few Chicago lawyers who had in early 
life to win their own way against heavy odds have gone further 
in professional standing and success than Mr. O'Donnell. 

He was born in the Town of Ballina, County Mayo, Ireland, 
where his family is an old and influential one. His parents, Pat- 
rick and Catherine (Nellis) O'Donnell, came to the United States 
when Joseph A. was six years of age. They established their home 
in Chicago, and in that city he had the advantages of St. Patrick's 



596 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Academy and the public schools. His education was interrupted 
by the demands placed upon him in aiding in the support of the 
family, the record of which may be said to have been not greatly 
different from that expressed by Abraham Lincoln relative to his 
own family history, "the short and simple of the annals of the 
poor." His first employment was as an office boy, and he later 
began an apprenticeship at the trade of mechanical engineer. His 
energy and industry brought rapid advancement, and at the age 
of twenty-two he was appointed foreman in the establishment. His 
ambition and good judgment were shown at this period of his 
career, since after the heavy work of the day he attended night 
school and applied himself assiduously to the study of mechanical 
drawing, engineering and kindred subjects. This stress upon his 
time and energies impaired his health, resulting in a change of 
plans which caused him to prepare for the profession in which he 
has won such success and prestige. Previously he had taken up the 
study of Blackstone's and Kent's Commentaries, had studied Latin 
in his leisure hours, and thus had a sound foundation for the syste- 
matic study of law. He finally entered the law school of the North- 
western University in Chicago, and was graduated a member of 
the class of 1887, winning a senior diploma and the degree Bachelor 
of Laws. 

Mr. O'Donnell was admitted to the bar in 1887, and from that 
time to the present has continued in the active general practice of 
law in Chicago. He has enjoyed a large and representative clien- 
tage, has appeared in many important litigations, with practice 
both in state and federal courts and in a number of causes he has 
appeared before the Supreme Court of the United States. In his 
profession he now has a valuable assistant in his only son, Joseph 
D., comprising the firm of O'Donnell & O'Donnell with offices in 
the Metropolitan Building. 

Mr. O'Donnell has been a prominent and influential figure in 
the councils of the democratic party in Illinois, and began advocat- 
ing its principles and policies as soon as he reached his legal major- 
ity. In 1889 he was elected representative of the ninth district in 
the lower House, and served three consecutive terms. He was a 
member of the special legislative session called to consider the 
World's Columbian Exposition Bill, and during the last two gen- 
eral sessions of the Legislature of which he was a member was 
on the steering committee of the House, and did a valuable service 
in concentrating the efforts of his party organization and securing 
cohesion on important measures. He introduced and ably cham- 
pioned a number of important measures that reached enactment. 
One of special note was the Australian ballot law, which was placed 
on the statutes of Illinois largely through his individual efforts. He 
was also one of the historic "one hundred and one" who effected 
the election of Gen. John M. Palmer to the United States Senate. 
A brief statement as to his legislative record was the following: 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 597 

"He was well known as one of the leading orators of the assembly, 
and while he did not resort to flowery phrases to any appreciable 
extent, his cogent logic and evident sincerity in all that he advocated 
never failed to make definite appeal to his auditors." 

In 1902 Mr. O'Donnell was nominated for judge of the Superior 
Court of Cook County, under the law of 1901 creating six addi- 
tional judges for that court. His name, however, did not appear 
on the ballot as the Supreme Court declared the law unconstitu- 
tional. The following year he was the democratic candidate for 
judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County, and in the election 
received a large majority, but neither he nor his colleagues assumed 
the honors of office since the Supreme Court again decided the law 
under which they were elected was unconstitutional. Among other 
public services which are associated with his name was several 
years of membership on the Board of West Chicago Park Com- 
missioners. 

Mr. O'Donnell is a member of the American Bar Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association, the Chicago Bar Association, 
and the Chicago Law Institute. When a young man he served five 
years in the Second Regiment, Illinois National Guard, and was 
a first lieutenant at the time of his retirement. Mr. O'Donnell is 
a member of the Iroquois Club and the Illinois Athletic Club, and 
has fraternal relations with the Royal League, the National Union, 
the Knights of the Maccabees, the Knights of Columbus and the 
Ancient Order of Hiberians. He and his wife and son are com- 
municants of the Catholic Church. 

In 1886 Mr. O'Donnell married Miss Rose E. Dugan, who was 
born and reared in Chicago. Her father, Thomas Dugan, was a 
pioneer settler, having established his home in the village of Chi- 
cago in 1836. Mr. and Mrs. O'DonnelPs one son Joseph D. is now 
one of the promising younger members of the Chicago bar. 

LAURENCE BLACK JACOBS. One of Chicago's attorneys of the 
younger generation whose versatile talents have led him into diver- 
sified activities both in and outside of his profession, is Laurence 
Black Jacobs, engaged in practice in this city since 1907. His career 
has been a somewhat varied one, and in one and another capacity 
he has been almost constantly before the public, whose favor he 
has gained no less by his pleasing personality than by his absolute 
sincerity and energetic endeavor to give the best of himself to each 
enterprise that he enters. 

Laurence B. Jacobs was born at Rock Island, Illinois, Novem- 
ber 2, 1879, and is a son of Webster W. and Sarah A. (Black) 
Jacobs. His early education was secured in the common schools 
of Springer, New Mexico, where his parents resided im- 
mediately after his birth and in the high school at Oakland, Illinois, 
and Wabash College, Crawfor.dsville, Indiana, and in 1902 he first 
came to Chicago in the capacity of assistant manager of a sheet 



598 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

metal and roofing company, with which he was connected during 
that and the following year. He then secured a position on the 
reporter ial staff of the Chicago Inter-Ocean, and was later, during 
1904, connected in a like capacity with the Chicago Tribune. From 
1904 until 1908 he served in various official positions in the offices 
of the county treasurer, the Circuit and Superior Court clerks, the 
corporation counsel and the city prosecutor, and in the meantime 
had assiduously applied himself to the study of law and graduated 
from Chicago Kent College of Law in 1897, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. 

In 1908 Mr. Jacobs was appointed assistant United States dis- 
trict attorney, a position in which he remained for five years, dur- 
ing which time he had for two years charge of the grand jury, 
and conducted one of the greatest raids in the Chinatown district 
of old Clark Street, breaking into numerous places of bad repute 
and seizing hundreds of dollars worth of opium. During this time 
he tried practically every manner of case which lies within the 
jurisdiction of the Federal courts. When he resigned from his 
office, the Chicago Record-Herald, issue of November 16, 1913, 
said: "Laurence B. Jacobs, for five years an assistant in the 
United States district attorney's office in Chicago, has tendered 
his resignation to take up private practice. Mr. Jacobs, during his 
service with the government, assisted in directing grand jury work 
and had much to do with prosecutions under the interstate com- 
merce laws. He also was connected with various trust prosecutions. 
It is understood that he intends to make a specialty of cases involv- 
ing federal prosecutions. He is a protege of Martin B. Madden, 
representative in Congress, and one of the latter's lieutenants on 
the south side." After his retirement from the Government service 
Mr. Jacobs was associated in the practice of law with Clarence 
S. Darrow, at No. 1202 Ashland Block. He has been connected 
with a number of cases which have attracted country-wide atten- 
tion, having represented Laura Leon, the Mexican girl, the question 
of whose deportation was made very prominent all over the country, 
and also represented W. L. Moyer, the New York, Chicago and 
Kansas City banker, who was accused of using the United States 
mails for fraudulent purposes in the promotion of banking enter- 
prises, and many other cases attracting public attention. He has 
been appointed special assistant corporation counsel. 

A stalwart republican in politics, Mr. Jacobs has upon many 
occasions done work which has proved of very great assistance and 
has gone far towards advancing the principles of his party. He 
has served as precinct committeeman of the twenty-seventh pre- 
cinct, of the Third Ward for many years, and as secretary of the 
Third Ward Republican Club, and during the Taft-Wilson cam- 
paign of 1912 was connected in an important capacity with the re- 
publican national committee. He is a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, and holds mem- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 599 

bership in the Kappa Sigma and Phi Alpha Delta fraternities, and 
the Illinois Athletic Club. An enthusiast upon the subject of avia- 
tion, during the meet of the airmen at Chicago in August, 1911, 
he served as mechanician for Capt. Paul Beck, U. S. A. Mr. Jacobs 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

JAMES CLARKE JEFFERY. A grandson of a former president 
of the Illinois Central Railway, and son of a prominent railway 
man, James C. Jeffery during his ten years of active practice as a 
lawyer has confined his attention largely to railway and inter- 
state commerce law. Mr. Jeffery is senior member of the firm of 
Jeffery & Campbell, who are attorneys for several railroads, and 
.their offices are in the First National Bank Building, Chicago. 

James Clarke Jeffery was born in Chicago January i, 1879, a 
son of Edward T. and Virginia O. (Clarke) Jeffery. His grand- 
father, James C. Clarke, was president of the Illinois Central Rail- 
way for a number of years, and that was at a time when this sys- 
tem was being extended, and he constructed several new branches 
of the road. Edward T. Jeffery for many years was prominent 
in Chicago affairs. He was one of the leaders in securing the Co- 
lumbian Exposition for Chicago, and was sent on a special com- 
mission by the city to the Paris Exposition of 1889 for the purpose 
of studying the methods employed in conducting a world's fair, and 
made a valuable report which served as a guide during the Chicago 
exposition. During that time he was chairman of the grounds and 
building committee. In later years his home has been in New York 
City, where he is a director in all the Gould system of railways, 
and is chairman of the board of directors of the Denver & Rio 
Grande, and the Western Pacific Railway Company. 

James Clarke Jeffery received his higher education in Yale 
University, graduating Ph. B. in 1899, and graduating LL. B. from 
the Harvard Law School in 1903. In the latter year he was ad- 
mitted to the bar before the United States Supreme Court, the 
United States Commerce and Circuit and District courts, and also 
to the Illinois bar. For six years Mr. Jeffery practiced as inter- 
state commerce attorney for the Missouri Pacific Railway System. 
The firm now has the legal affairs of several railways centering in 
Chicago. 

Mr. Jeffery is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, being 
a member of the Committee on Legal Education ; of the Legal Club ; 
the University Club, the Chicago Club, the University Club of 
Washington, the Calumet Country Club of Chicago, the Exmoor 
Country Club and Chicago Literary Club, and the Yale Club of 
New York. He is vice president of the First Realty Company. 
Mr. Jeffery was married April 21, 1896, to Miss Clara L. Whedon, 
of Chicago. His home is at 101 Bellevue Place. 



600 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ALBERT F. FAWLEY. As state's attorney of Henderson County, 
Illinois, Albert F. Fawley has a statewide acquaintance and a local 
reputation as an able member of the Oquakwa bar that has been 
won through his own perseverance and individual effort. The magic 
chambers of opportunity were not freely opened to him in youth 
and the advantages he insisted. on enjoying were those his own work 
provided. Under such circumstances success means something 
more than passing reputation or financial independence. 

Albert F. Fawley was born at Hillsboro, Highland County, Ohio, 
September 28, 1869, and is a son of James Madison and Rachel 
(Rohler) Fawley. Both families originated in England and after 
emigrating settled in Virginia, later generations locating in Ohio. 
Both the father and mother were born near Hillsboro, in Highland 
County, Ohio. They had seven children born to them, Albert F. 
being the eldest. His early education was secured in the district 
schools as he grew up on his father's farm and assisted until he 
was seventeen years of age. Through his own efforts he then 
secured two years of high school training at Nevin, Ohio, after 
which he taught school at Nevin for two years and then left his 
native state and came to Illinois. In educational work he found a 
congenial calling and he continued to teach school for eleven years, 
in both Warren and Henderson counties, but during all this time 
cherished an ambition for the law and, as opportunity offered, read 
law books by himself and had made solid progress in the funda- 
mentals when he became a student in the law office of Hanley & 
Cox, at Monmouth, Illinois. In June, 1898, having provided for a 
collegiate course by teaching and tutoring, he entered the law 
department of the Wesleyan University, at Bloomington, Illinois, 
and was admitted to the bar at Springfield, in October, 1903. He 
entered into practice at Oquakwa and this pleasant city has been his 
chosen home ever since. He has been an ambitious and useful citi- 
zen, taking part in all public movements for the general welfare 
and accepting the responsibilities of public office when his fellow 
citizens have called him, his faithful and able performance of duty 
resulting in continued advancement. He has served in the office of 
town clerk, also has been a justice of the peace and has been a 
member of the board of education, and on November 5, 1912, was 
elected state's attorney of Henderson County, for a term of four 
years. His administration of the office has justified every claim 
made by his friends and supporters as to his qualifications and his 
record has been one of the best ever credited to any incumbent of 
the responsible office of state's attorney of Henderson County. He 
is a member of the State and County Bar associations. 

On June 4, 1912, Mr. Fawley was united in marriage with Miss 
Adelaide M. Wilson, of Oquakwa. Mrs. Fawley is prominent in 
the pleasant social life of the city and is a member of the Elite Club. 
For a number of years Mr. Fawley has been identified with such 
fraternal organizations as the Masons and Odd Fellows. In politics 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 601 

he has always been active in the republican ranks. Mrs. Fawley is 
a member of the Episcopal Church, while Mr. Fawley belongs to the 
Reformed Church. 

FREDERIC E. VON AMMON was admitted to the Illinois bar in 
1895, shortly after graduating LL. B. from the Northwestern Law 
School. He began his practice with the firm of Lackner & Butz, 
and has been constantly associated with those principals for twenty 
years. The firm is now Lackner, Butz, von Ammon & Johnston, 
with a large general practice in all the courts. 

Frederic E. von Ammon was born in Chicago September 25, 
1873, a son of Ernst and Emilie (Rutishauser) von Ammon. His 
father was born in Cologne, Germany, a son of a judge in the 
courts of Cologne. The mother was born in Switzerland in the 
Canton of St. Gall. They both came to Chicago when young, 
were married in that city, where Ernst von Ammon was engaged 
in commercial lines. 

Frederic E. von Ammon was educated in the public schools, 
graduating from the high school in 1891, took two years in the 
University of Michigan, following which he was a student in North- 
western University until graduating in the law course. Mr. von 
Ammon is a .director of the Edgewater Country Club, a member 
of the City Club, the Art Institute and the Chicago Law Institute, 
also of the Chicago Bar Association and the Chicago Society of 
Advocates. Mr. von Ammon resides at 629 Fullerton Parkway and 
his office is in the Title & Trust Building. 

IRA W. FOLTZ. The foundation on which rest a people's personal 
rights and liberties is that law should be supreme, giving to every 
individual perfect justice and protection from unjust oppression. 
Thus declared our American forefathers and it is in the making 
and upholding of such a document that America has become typical 
of human freedom. Because of the humanity and noble dignity of 
this, the common law, men of intellect an,d a high sense of justice 
and responsibility have been attracted to its representative profes- 
sion, which, today, in its membership includes the highest intellects 
possessing those necessary attributes that insure the continuance of 
what is called civilization. The great City of Chicago offers a wide 
field for the exercise of legal talent and among those who have, 
through persevering effort reached an enviable position on her bar, 
is Ira W. Foltz, whose influence as an able lawyer and honorable citi- 
zen has been an active force here for more than a quarter of a 
century. 

Ira W. Foltz was born in Clark County, Ohio, not far from the 
county seat of Springfield, November 7, 1860, and is a son of 
Andrew and Mary Ann (Nauman) Foltz. He passed his boyhood 
on his father's farm and attended the public schools but beyond 
this received little assistance in the way of education. In the coun- 



602 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

try schools he taught, very often having pupils, at first, older than 
himself, and in this way provided for a course in the Northern 
Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, and still later, through simi- 
lar effort, making possible a collegiate course at McKendree Col- 
lege, at Lebanon, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated 
with his degree of LL. B., in 1887. He was admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar in March, 1888, and began practice in Chicago, where he 
has ever since continued. He received his initial encouragement 
by being accepted as a clerk in the private office of the late William 
C. Goudy, and was in the office of Goudy, Green & Goudy, one of 
the leading law firms of Chicago for many years, from 1888 until 
1890, a most valuable period of training and experience. Since 
then Mr. Foltz has conducted an individual practice and has been 
connected with a number of notable cases. One of these was as 
attorney defendant in the case of Richard Ives, who was accused 
and executed for the murder of Mrs. Hollister, in 1905, a case 
which attracted nation wide attention on account of peculiar 
features. 

While Mr. Foltz has built up a large practice and is known 
as able in every branch of the law, he yet has found time to devote 
many hours of close study and deep investigation to the considera- 
tion and elucidation of certain points of law that he placed in lit- 
erary form and these have appeared in the columns of so conserva- 
tive a journal as the Chicago Legal News. An article under the 
caption of "The Reform of the Procedure of Courts of Justice," 
appearing on April 13, 1912, presents facts and conclusions stated 
in so clear a way that it is as interesting and instructive to the 
laity as to the lawyer. With equal clearness of diction and with 
convincing logic, Mr. Foltz presented a remarkable article, appear- 
ing in the News in October, 1908, entitled "The Prescriptive Con- 
stitution," which excited much favorable comment. In this much 
discussed article, he pleads for a wiser interpretation and a more 
just application of the law, reminding his fellow citizens that there 
is a loud call in our country for a more vigorous and uniform en- 
forcement. His justifiable position may be understood by quoting 
a few lines. "That call must be heard and answered in the affirma- 
tive or dire results may soon come upon us. Certainty and still 
more certainty is that which is desired in the administration of the 
law a demand for the reign of law rather than the sway of public 
officials a most reasonable and just demand. If the same degree 
of certainty were used in the statement of a cause of action that is 
used in the statement of a mathematical proposition; and if like 
certainty prevailed in the production of the evidence on the trial 
of the case; and if less prominence were given to judicial prece- 
dents as a natural source or enunciation of the law, and more 
regard were had for the guiding principles of the law and their 
application to the point in question, then would our jurisprudence 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 603 

rise to the class of the exact sciences and would excel all other 
sciences in its influence for order, peace and happiness, jus est ars 
boni ct aequi." This admirable article will be found indexed in the 
public libraries. In his literary work Mr. Foltz has not confined 
himself to the law, of which he is so wise an exponent, and his con- 
tributions appear in many newspapers and magazines of the higher 
literary type. 

Mr. Foltz was married July 12, 1905, to Miss Charlotte M. Rey- 
nolds, who was born at Porsgrun, Norway, and they have one son, 
Andrew James. A hospitable atmosphere always prevails in the 
family home which is located at No. 1436 Olive Avenue. Mr. Foltz 
is a public spirited, interested and benevolent citizen but all his 
activities are more or less subordinated to the demands of the pro- 
fession to which he has devoted his life. He is a member of the 
American Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and 
the Chicago Bar Association. He occupies offices on the fifth 
floor of the Unity Building, No. 127 North Dearborn Street, 
Chicago. 

NORMAN K. ANDERSON. A Chicagoan by birth and training, 
a graduate of the University of Chicago and of the University of 
Michigan Law Department, Norman K. Anderson has been iden- 
tified with the Chicago bar since 1901. In the course of his prac- 
tice Mr. Anderson has been associated with several of the well 
known Chicago lawyers, but for several years has been alone in gen- 
eral practice, with offices in the First National Bank Building. In 
1914 Mr. Anderson was selected as progressive candidate for asso- 
ciate judge of the Municipal Court, and though defeated with the 
balance of the ticket received about four thousand more votes than 
the average of his fellow candidates. 

Norman K. Anderson was born in Chicago December 24, 1876, 
a son of Galusha and Mary E. (Roberts) Anderson. His father 
is a distinguished clergyman of the Baptist Church and educator, 
was president of the old University of Chicago, and after the estab- 
lishment of the new university was head of the department of 
homiletics until his retirement in 1904. Doctor Anderson is still 
living at the age of eighty-two. 

Norman K. Anderson was educated in public schools in differ- 
ent parts of the country, and was graduated A. B. from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in 1898. He took his law studies in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he was graduated LL. B. in 1901, was 
admitted to the bars of Michigan and Illinios in December of the 
same year. For one year he was a clerk in the office of Oliver 
& Mecartney, then for one year with Dent & Whitman, and for 
two years with the firm of Knight & Brown. He then began prac- 
tice for himself, and for some time was associated as a partner 
with the firm of Tinsman, Rankin & Neltnor, and for about five 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

years was senior member of the firm of Anderson & Eaton. Since 
then he has been in practice alone. 

Mr. Anderson is a member of the Illinois Athletic Club, the 
Alpha Delta Phi and the Phi Delta Phi Law Fraternity. On Sep- 
tember 3, 1902, he married Miss Louise Holden of Detroit, Mich- 
igan. Their three sons are Holden G., Elbridge G. and Owen G. 
Mr. Anderson and family reside at 5440 Ridgewood Court. 

HON. FREEMAN K. BLAKE. A member of the Chicago bar since 
1893, Hon. Freeman K. Blake was one of the first to be honored 
by election to the municipal bench, on which he served six years, 
until defeated by the Wilson landslide of 1912. As a judge he helped 
to realize the ideals of judicial service anticipated of the new 
municipal courts. A resident of the Twenty-sixth Ward he has 
participated in numerous movements that have made for civic bet- 
terment and progress, especially while representing his home 
locality in the city council. 

Judge Blake is a native of the Hoosier State, born in DeKalb 
County, March 25, 1858, his parents being James O. and Martha 
(Kelley) Blake. His father came to Indiana from the East at an 
early date, took up land and improved it and became one of the 
early justices of the peace in DeKalb County. Subsequently he 
prepared for the law, but his ambitions in that direction were not 
gratified, as at the early age of thirty-three years he was stricken 
with typhoid fever, which caused his death. 

The public schools of DeKalb County, Indiana, furnished the 
foundation for Freeman K. Blake's education, and after some 
further preparation he entered Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, 
Indiana, where he was graduated with the Master of Arts degree in 
1881. He then studied law in the offices of Coombs, Bell & Mor- 
ris, attorneys of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1883, being examined by a commission appointed by the 
late Judge Gresham, of Indiana. For the following five years he 
practiced at Auburn, Indiana, and then went to Wichita, Kansas, 
where he remained for a like period, and in the fall of 1893 came 
to Chicago, which city has since been the field of his labors and the 
scene of his successes. For a time he was identified with the firm 
of Allen, Payne & Blake, and later was a member of the firm of 
Blake & Feeley, the latter of whom served as congressman from 
1901 until 1903, and after Mr. Feeley's death Mr. Blake practiced 
alone until 1906. 

In 1899 Judge Blake was elected a member of the city council 
from the Twenty-sixth Ward, and was twice re-elected, serving in 
all a period of six years. Office 311 Unity Building. 

Judge Blake is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State and the American Bar associations. He has mem- 
bership in a number of representative social organizations, among 
them being the Hamilton Club. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 605 

In 1884 Judge Blake was married to Miss Iva A. Munich, who 
died in 1907 leaving one son, Guy M., who has adopted his father's 
profession and is a rising young member of the Chicago legal 
fraternity. In August, 1908, Judge Blake married Miss Florence 
B. Marble. They reside at 4125 Greenview Avenue. 

GUY M. BLAKE. A son of Judge Freeman K. Blake and one 
of the younger members of the Chicago bar, Guy M. Blake was born 
at Auburn, Indiana, March 29, 1886, and was two years of age 
when he was taken by his parents to Wichita, Kansas. When he 
was seven the family home was removed to Chicago, and he had 
his preparatory training in the public schools of this city. In 1903 
he entered the College of Liberal Arts, at Northwestern University, 
where he won his bachelor's degree in 1908, and in the following 
year he was graduated from the University Law School with the 
Bachelor of Laws degree. In October of that year Mr. Blake was 
admitted to the bar and in the following November was made chief 
attorney of the Chicago Legal Aid Society, a capacity in which he 
acted until January i, 1912. He then became associated with 
Henry S. Lighthall under the firm name of Lighthall & Blake, a 
firm that enjoys a large general practice, with offices at 118 LaSalle 
Street. Mr. Blake is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, 
and stands high in the esteem of his fellow practitioners. 

Mr. Blake is single and lives at 4620 Magnolia Avenue. He 
is a member of the Sigma Chi and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. For 
several years he has been a member of Troop F, First Cavalry, 
Illinois National Guards. 

ROBERT E. PENDARVIS. A native of Illinois and the representa- 
tive of a family whose name has been identified with the state for 
more than a half century, Robert Ellsworth Peridarvis has been 
engaged in the practice of law in Chicago since 1887, the year that 
marked his admission to the bar of Illinois. Careful application 
to his work combined with real ability have brought him a pleasing 
measure of success and professional standing. He has also gained 
some political prominence and during three successive terms he 
represented his district in the State Legislature. 

Robert Ellsworth Pendarvis was born in Henderson County, 
Illinois, on October 30, 1861, and he is a son of James P. and 
Louvisa (Sands) Pendarvis. His common school training was 
followed by his entrance at Hedding College, in Abingdon, Illinois, 
and he was graduated from that institution with the class of 1884, 
receiving then his Bachelor of Arts degree. He then gave some time 
to newspaper work as the editor of the Abingdon Enterprise, and 
in 1885 came to Chicago, where, for a short time, he identified him- 
self with the teaching profession. Soon thereafter he entered the 
Union College of Law and in 1887 received his law degree, his 



606 

admission to the bar following shortly. Since that time Mr. Pen- 
darvis has been identified with the Chicago bar in general practice. 

A republican, Mr. Pendarvis has always been active in the party 
and in 1900 he was elected representative from the then Eleventh 
Senatorial District in the lower House of the State Legislature. 
His service was pleasing and effective and there having been a 
senatorial reapportionment during his first term, he was returned to 
the Legislature in 1902 and again in 1904 from the new Twenty- 
fifth Senatorial District. During those years he took an active 
part in the deliberations of the House, and secured the enactment 
of much important legislation. In the session of 1905 he was elected 
temporary speaker of the House; and was also chairman of the 
Committee on Chicago Charter Legislation. He was a member 
of the Chicago charter convention that assembled in 1904 to make 
provision for a new city charter for Chicago. All through his 
service his unfailing loyalty to his home city was manifested, as it 
has been in his capacity as a private citizen. He has worked ear- 
nestly for the betterment of municipal government in Chicago, and 
as a member of the Chicago Plan Commission his service has been 
praiseworthy. 

Mr. Pendarvis is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar 
associations and of the American Bar Association. He is also 
affiliated with the National Union, a leading fraternal beneficial 
society. He has his offices at 54 West Randolph Street. 

On June .29, 1893, Mr. Pendarvis was married to Miss Lelia 
V. Rouse, of Chicago, and they have one son, Harry Reed, now a 
student in the State University at Urbana. The family have their 
residence at 2602 Neva Avenue, in the suburb of Mont Clare, and 
they are members of the Congregational Church of that place, of 
which Mr. Pendarvis is a trustee. 

FRANCIS ALEXANDER HARPER. A graduate from the law de- 
partment of the University of Michigan in 1896 with the degree 
LL. B., Mr. Harper was admitted to the bars of Michigan and 
Illinois in the same year, and has since been in active practice in 
Chicago. Throughout his career of nearly twenty years he has 
practiced as an individual, and his name has appeared in connection 
with much important litigation in Cook County courts. 

Mr. Harper resides at Tinley Park, where he is president of the 
village, is vice president of the Bremen State Bank of that place 
and one of the recognized leaders in local affairs. His Chicago 
offices are at 29 South LaSalle Street. For seven years Mr. Harper 
was a member of the faculty of the Chicago Law School, holding 
the chair of Evidence and Torts. He is a member of the Chicago 
and Illinois Bar associations, is affiliated with the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, belongs to the Hamilton Club, Woodlawn Park Club, the 
Irish Fellowship Club and the Michigan Society. 

Francis Alexander Harper was born at Ora, Province of On- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 607 

tario, Canada, March 28, 1874, a son of Marmaduke and Margaret 
(Thompson) Harper. His father was a farmer. The son received 
his education in district schools and prior to entering the Univer- 
sity of Michigan graduated from high school at Champion, Mich- 
igan. Mr. Harper was married October 12, 1898, to Miss Mary 
Angela Kennedy, of Ishpeming, Michigan. Their children are: 
Francis A. Jr., Ellen and Mary Angela. 

ALVIN H. CULVER, of the law firm of Culver, Andrews, King & 
Cook, with offices in the New York Life Building, is a native Chi- 
cagoan and has spent his entire professional career as a factor in 
the busy life of the city. He was admitted to the bar in 1895. 

Mr. Culver was born March 9, 1873, and is a son of Morton and 
Eugenia M. (Taylor) Culver. Pis father, who served in the 
Civil war as a member of Company A, One Hundred and Thirty- 
fourth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, was a lawyer by 
vocation, practiced at the Chicago bar for a period of thirty years, 
and died in this city in 1900. 

The public schools of Glencoe, to which suburb the family 
moved when Alvin Culver was a small child, furnished him with 
his early education, and after his attendance at the Evanston Pre- 
paratory School, he became a student in Northwestern University, 
graduating from the literary department in the class of 1893 with 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. Following this he entered the law 
school of the same institution and was graduated in 1895, with 
the Bachelor of Laws degree. While at college Mr. Culver be- 
came well known as an athlete, being on the Northwestern 'Varsity 
football track team. 

Mr. Culver commenced his practice in 1895 in the offices of 
Paden & Gridley, the latter of whom is now a judge of the Appel- 
late Court. In 1900, when Mr. Paden withdrew, the firm became 
Gridley, Culver & King, and this style continued until Mr. Gridley's 
election to the bench in 1910, when the firm name was changed 
to Culver, Andrews & King. On May i, 1914, the name was again 
changed, taking the form of Culver, Andrews, King & Cook, and 
so it remains at this time. The offices of the firm are at 916 New 
York Life Building. 

Mr. Culver is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar 
associations and among his social affiliations are the Hamilton 
Club, Skokie Country Club and the University Club. Politically 
he is a republican. 

On August 15, 1897, Mr. Culver married Miss Jean Gehan, of 
Chicago. They have three children, Alvin S., born June u, 1908; 
Jean, born August u, 1911; and Eleanor, born August 24, 1914. 
The Culver home is in Wilmette. 

EDWARD CHARLES KRAMER. In many respects the most distinc- 
tive professional honor that can be accorded by members of the 



608 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Illinois bar to one of their number has been paid to Edward Charles 
Kramer of East St. Louis in his election to the office of president of 
the Illinois Bar Association, by which dignity he is known to all the 
lawyers of the state. 

Edward Charles Kramer is a lawyer with more than thirty years 
of active practice in the state and is also a native Illinoisan. He was 
born in Wabash County February i, 1857, a son of Henry and 
Martha Kramer. His father was born at Saarbrucken, Germany, 
and is now eighty-five years of age, and the mother was born in Bev- 
erly, England, and is eighty-three years of age, their home being 
near Fairfield in Wayne County, Illinois. 

Mr. E. C. Kramer grew up on a farm, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and in the Central Normal College of In- 
diana. For three years he was employed as a teacher, and in 1882 
was admitted to the Illinois bar and practiced at Fairfield from that 
date until 1888. He has since practiced with offices in East St. 
Louis, St. Clair County. Judge Kramer since admission to the bar 
has been actively engaged in the practice of law, and has confined 
his efforts to his professional duties, though a number of times he 
has been honored and had had imposed upon him the responsibilities 
of public affairs. He was elected county judge of Wayne County, 
Illinois, in 1886, serving four years, and in 1893 was appointed com- 
missioner for the Southern Illinois Penitentiary, to which office he 
also gave four years. He was one of the leading spirits in the or- 
ganization of the park district of East St. Louis, and his name and 
influence have been associated with other movements calculated to 
promote the general welfare. . 

Judge Kramer is a democrat, a member of the American Bar 
Association, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 
Masonry he belongs to the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Knights Tem- 
plar Commandery and is also affiliated with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He took an active part in the organiza- 
tion of the St. Clair Country Club, and served as president of that 
organization from the beginning until 1914, and is still a member. 

At Grayville, Illinois, September 15, 1880, Judge Kramer mar- 
ried Laura J. Ellis, daughter of John and Mary Ellis. Mrs. Kramer 
takes an active interest in woman's club affairs, believes in wo- 
man suffrage, and since the extension of the voting privilege to 
women in Illinois has expressed her sentiments concerning public 
policy uncontrolled by her husband or anyone else. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kramer have two children: Kenneth Edward Kramer, aged twen- 
ty-two; and Pauline Ida Kramer, aged twenty. 

THOMAS J. GRAYDON has practiced law in Chicago continuously 
for seventeen years and his position in the bar is one of unques- 
tioned ability and he enjoys a high class practice. He has been 
content to rest his reputation as a hard-working lawyer and was 
never a candidate for any public office until he allowed his name to 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 609 

be placed before the people as a candidate for Judge of the Circuit 
Court of Cook County in 1915. In the election he lacked about 
3,000 votes of the number necessary for a choice. 

Born in Norfolk County, Ontario, forty-seven years ago, of 
Scotch and English ancestry, Thomas J. Graydon was educated in 
the public schools and in a collegiate institute in Canada, and for 
three years was a teacher at Sand Beach, Michigan. For a year 
and a half he worked on the Evening Press of Grand Rapids, and 
later while employed in the law offices of Taggart, Wolcott & Gan- 
son of Grand Rapids studied law. Coming to Chicago, he entered 
the Kent College of Law with the class of 1898, was graduated and 
admitted to the bar on November 21, 1898, after taking an examina- 
tion before the State Board of Bar Examiners, then recently 
created. 

During his practice in Chicago Mr. Graydon has been attorney 
in many important cases which have reached the highest courts of 
the states and of the United States. He is and for many years has 
been an active member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association and the Chicago Law Institute. He is a 
member of the Hamilton Club, the City Club of Chicago and the 
Edgewater Golf Club. He is also an Odd Fellow, a member of 
Covenant Masonic Lodge, Oriental Consistory and Medinah Temple. 

ROBERT J. FRANK. A member of the Chicago bar for the past 
eighteen years, Mr. Frank is best known as a specialist in the field 
of business organization and corporate management. He is author 
of the work "Science of Organization and Business Development," 
which was first published in 1907, and has gone through four edi- 
tions and six reprints, and is probably the most popular and the 
pioneer work of reference covering this important, field. The sale 
of many thousand copies since the work was first published is per- 
haps the best comment on its popularity and usefulness. The book 
has elicited many favorable comments from different reviewers, 
among them the Green Bag, a legal publication, which said : 
"This work, which has reached a third edition as an indication 
of its usefulness, deals chiefly with the organization and financing 
of business corporations, and is addressed chiefly to business men, 
to whom it gives many excellent suggestions regarding those mat- 
ters of which the officer of a corporation should have at least a 
general knowledge, and in which he is likely to require the assist- 
ance of an attorney. The book is also useful to lawyers interested 
in corporation practice, because of the light which it throws on 
many details of business organization and management." 

Mr. Frank was born at Ravenna, Ohio, September u, 1865, a 
son of George W. and Anna (Cope) Frank. His father was a 
farmer and is still living at Ravenna. Mr. Frank was educated 
in the Ohio public schools, attended a private preparatory school 
in his native county, and spent several years thereafter as a travel- 



610 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ing salesman. Coming to Chicago in 1891, in 1894 he entered the 
Kent College of Law, and graduated therefrom with the degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar the same year, he began practice 
alone, but subsequently became a member of the firm of Young, 
Makeel, Bradley & Frank until the dissolution of the partnership 
at the time of the death of Mr. Young. Since then Mr. Frank 
has practiced alone and has given nearly all his time to his specialty 
work, and he is now one of the very few lawyers in the West who 
confine their attention to the branch of legal practice indicated in 
the title of his book. 

Mr. Frank is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illi- 
nois State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. 
He has no affiliations with clubs or fraternities, devoting all his 
time to his profession. His home is in the Windermere Hotel, and 
his office is in the First National Bank Building. 

CHARLES P. MOLTHROP, born Knoxville, Illinois, September n, 
1873, son f David O. and Esther L. (Britain) Molthrop. At- 
tended Woodhull (Illinois) High School. Graduated from Chi- 
cago Law School, 1902, and was admitted to Illinois bar same year. 
Immediately upon his admission he opened a law office in Chicago 
where he has practiced his profession continuously since that time. 

In 1905, he became associated with George E. Q. Johnson under 
the firm name of Johnson & Molthrop. In 1912 the firm arrange- 
ments were changed and enlarged to Smietanka, Johnson, Mol- 
throp & Polkey. Mr. Polkey has since retired from the firm. 

Mr. Molthrop is a past master of Columbian Lodge A. F. & 
A. M., a member of Oriental Consistory, Medinah Temple and 
Prairie Council Royal Arcanum. He is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association and Chicago Law Institute. 

He was married in 1899 to Myrtle Goodman and resides at 
2317 Millard Avenue. He has two daughters, Charlotte P. and 
Jean Ellen Molthrop. , 

JULIUS F. SMIETANKA has been a member of the Chicago bar 
twenty years. He has been active in his profession, in public 
affairs, and was a member of the Chicago Board of Education until 
he resigned to accept the office of collector of internal revenue in 
the First Illinois District. Mr. Smietanka is senior member of 
the law firm of Smietanka, Johnson & Molthrop. 

Born in Chicago, May 31, 1872, he -is a son of Frank and Jo- 
hanna Smietanka, and represents one of the oldest families of 
Polish settlers in Chicago. In his work as a lawyer Mr. Smiet- 
anka has served as legal adviser to the Polish National Alliance. 
He attended the public schools in Chicago, and received his de- 
gree LL. B. from the Kent College of Law in 1894. In the same 
year he was admitted to the bar and has since been in practice. 
He has been attorney to several large industrial enterprises, and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 611 

is one of the directors and vice presidents of the Northwestern Trust 
& Savings Bank. 

Mr. Smietanka- in 1905 was democratic nominee for judge of 
the Superior Court, but was defeated with the other names on that 
ticket. In July, 1909, Mayor Busse appointed him a member of 
the Board of Education, and he was reappointed by Mayor Harri- 
son in 1912, and served until his present honors were accorded him 
by President Wilson on May 27, 1914. 

Mr. Smietanka is a member of the Chicago Bar Association 
and the Illinois State Bar Association, and of the City, Iroquois and 
several other clubs and fraternities. He was married February 
18, 1901, to Mary Barzynski, of Chicago. 

OLAF A. OLSON. Among men of professional ability, who has 
won a place for himself and aims still higher, is Olaf A. Olson, who 
maintains his office at 1114, No. 69 West Washington Street. 

Olaf A. Olson was born in the City of Chicago, November i, 
1884, and is a son of Michael and Enokine (Hanson) Olson. They 
were born in Norway and from there came to Chicago in 1879. 
The father is a contractor and builder and is well known in the 
section of the city in which he located 'and where he has carried 
on his industries for a quarter of a century. 

In the excellent public schools of his native city, Olaf A. Olson 
secured his preliminary educational training and from the high 
school entered the Association College, which is the educational 
department of the Young Men's Christian Association, following 
which he entered Northwestern University and in 1908 was grad- 
uated from its law department. In the same year he was admitted 
to the Illinois bar. Prior to entering the law school, for about ten 
years he was associated with the firm of Mason Brothers, one of 
the oldest law firms in Chicago, thereby having an excellent train- 
ing in the law before entering the university. Mr. Olson practices 
alone and makes a specialty of real estate and corporation law. 
He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and is past chan- 
cellor of the Delta Theta Phi, now consolidated, formerly the Alpha 
Kappa Phi, a college law fraternity. He belongs also to the Illi- 
nois Athletic Club and the Park Ridge Country Club, his recreations 
bringing him into association with a pleasant and congenial circle. 
Unmarried, Mr. Olson resides at No. 4125 North Harding Avenue, 
Chicago. 

E. C. WESTWOOD. When the door of opportunity not only 
stands wide open but when money and influence make easy the 
path of education, even the reluctant and slothful have some in- 
ducement to become studious, and there are many, doubtless, who, 
without great personal effort acquire the knowledge that enables 
them to pursue successfully the various callings to which their 
inclinations lead them. All over the country, however, in towns, 



612 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

villages, hamlets and in remote sections, on quiet farms, in moun- 
tain fastnesses and in mining regions, there are hundreds of youths 
who have, practically, no advantages and few opportunities for the 
pursuit of special study, their environment or occupation completely 
shutting the path of progress no matter what may be their ambi- 
tion or readiness for self denial. They see their youth passing and 
with it passes youth's enthusiasm and as hope goes they adopt 
modes of life entirely uncongenial and the outside world seems 
to move selfishly and remorselessly on. It is for the relief of this 
surprisingly numerous class that, in recent years, the method of 
teaching by means of correspondence has been adopted and schools 
have been founded which provide instruction in almost every line 
of study. One of the best known institutions of this kind is the 
Chicago Correspondence School of Law, which was founded in 
1892, of which E. C. Westwood, an experienced and well known 
attorney at law in this city, is president. 

E. C. Westwood was born at Rock Island, Illinois, March 12, 
1866, and is a son of Joseph and Phoebe (Meese) Westwood. The 
mother survives but the father died at Streator, Illinois. In boyhood 
E. C. Westwood attended the country schools, later the city night 
schools and afterward was' a student for one year in the Wesleyan 
University, following which he turned his attention to the law and 
in 1901 was graduated with his degree of LL. B. from the Union 
College of Law, Chicago. In the same year he was admitted to the 
Illinois bar and entered into practice, continuing alone f?r some 
time and then becoming a member of the law firm of Westwood, 
Barrickman & Whitaker, which shortly afterward became West- 
wood & Whitaker and continued two years, since which time Mr. 
Westwood has engaged in individual practice, mainly in civil law. 
For some years Mr. Westwood realized, before entering into his 
present educational enterprise, the useful medium that such a 
school would be and by 1892 had so perfected his plans that he 
was able to establish the Chicago Correspondence School of Law, 
associating with him Col. James H. Davidson as vice president and 
Charles F. Westwood, as secretary. The perfected methods through 
which this school is carried on have appealed to those interested 
and a very hearty response has been given, the school roster show- 
ing that there are interested students all over the country. Its pros- 
pects for the future are bright. 

Mr. Westwood was married November 24, 1907, to Miss Mil- 
dred E. Robb, of Chicago, and they have one daughter, Mary E. 
The family resides at Oak Park, of which village Mr. Westwood 
was a trustee for four years, and he maintains his office in the 
Reaper Block, Chicago. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, and is a Knight Templar Mason, belonging to Siloam Com- 
mandery at Oak Park. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 613 

ALFRED A. NORTON. Successfully engaged in the practice of 
law at Chicago since 1902, Alfred A, Norton is a graduate in law 
from the University of Minnesota, and has the distinction of being 
the only alumnus of that institution actively identified with the 
Chicago bar. Mr. Norton is well known in local republican politics, 
being secretary of the Swedish-American Republican League of 
Illinois and president of the Cook County Club. He is a member 
of the Chicago Bar Association, the Hamilton Club, and is a mem- 
ber and past master of King Oscar Lodge, No. 855, A. F. & A. M., 
as well as of Oriental Consistory of the Scottish Rite and of Me- 
dinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is unmarried, resides at 
1653 East 55th Street, and has his offices in the Title & Trust 
Building. 

ARTHUR L. BALLAS. Among the promising younger genera- 
tion of Chicago lawyers, one who is acquiring reputation and the 
emoluments that go with high position in the profession is Arthur 
L. Ballas, a general practitioner with offices in the Hartford Build- 
ing. Although engaged in practice only since 1908, and at the head 
of a business of his own for but a little more than three years, he 
has gained a place in his profession that entitles him to the esteem 
and regard of his fellow-practitioners and the public at large. 

Mr. Ballas is a product of the farm, having been born on his 
father's homestead in the vicinity of Bloomfield, Wisconsin, June 
15, 1882, a son of Peter A. and Ida (Hoffman) Ballas. Arthur L. 
Ballas received his early education in the public schools of his na- 
tive locality and grew up on the homestead farm. He was not 
content, however, to remain a tiller of the soil, and after some prep- 
aration entered the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where 
for one year he pursued a collegiate course, then spending one year 
in the law department of the same institution. Coming to Chicago, 
Mr. Ballas completed his education in the John Marshall College 
of Law, from which he was graduated in June, 1908, and in Novem- 
ber of the same year was admitted to the bar. Succeeding this Mr. 
Ballas was associated with the firm of Horton & Miller for one 
year and with Horton, Wichert, Miller & Meier for a like period, 
and in January, 1911, opened an office at No. 1218 Hartford Build- 
ing, and since that time has practiced alone. Mr. Ballas' practice 
is general in character. He represents, in a legal way, many 
prominent business firms and corporations, and in addition has a 
large and rapidly increasing general practice. He is of an intensely 
studious nature, and passes much of his time in his law library, also 
keeping abreast of the various advancements being constantly made 
in his calling by retaining membership in the Chicago Bar Associa- 
tion. Mr. Ballas is well known in fraternal life, being a valued 
and popular member of the North American Union and the Order 
of the Moose, in both of which he has numerous friends. A stanch 
republican, his party has always received his ardent support, but 



614 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the pressing duties of his practice have precluded the idea of his 
being more than an outside influence in politics. 

Mr. Ballas was married, August 15, 1913, to Miss May Erie, 
a resident of Chicago. 

HON. JOHN STELK. In twenty years devoted to active law prac- 
tice in Chicago John Stelk became so well established among the 
members of his profession and in so definite and substantial a man- 
ner that on the 3d of November, 1914, he was elected associate 
judge of the Municipal Court of Chicago, receiving practically the 
united support of the bar. At present he is presiding over that 
branch which deals exclusively with all attachments, garnishment 
and replevin suits brought into the Municipal Court of Chicago, a 
highly technical branch of the law. He had a representative prac- 
tice in the city, and close attention to his work, combined with a 
goodly measure of professional ability had prior to his election, 
brought him undeniable material rewards. 

John Stelk was born in Chicago, September 10, 1875, a son of 
William and Mary (Kraase) Stelk, both natives of Germany. They 
made their home in their native land up to the time of marriage, 
when they immigrated to America, arriving in 1871, the year of the 
great Chicago conflagration. Their son received his early education 
in a German parochial school in the city, and later he attended 
evening sessions of the public schools and a business college. He 
was ambitious from boyhood and planned his studies with a view 
to the future which led to his entrance in the law department of 
Lake Forest University, known as the Chicago Law School. In 
June, 1896, he was graduated with the B. L. degree, and his admis- 
sion to the bar of the state followed immediately. From that year 
until November, 1914, he was engaged in the active practice of law 
in Chicago. 

The first association of the young lawyer was with the late John 
C. King, and from 1889 to 1899 he was with the law firm of King 
& Gross, composed of John C. King and Alfred H. Gross. From 
1899 he conducted an independent law business, and his advance- 
ment in his profession has been sure and certain. 

From December, 1910, to December, 1914, Mr. Stelk was the 
attorney for the sheriff of Cook County, and from December, 1912, 
to December, 1914, was the attorney for the bailiff of the Municipal 
Court. He is a member of the Chicago, Illinois and American Bar 
associations and of the Chicago Law Institute. His social member- 
ships are with the Chesterfield Country Club and the German Club 
of Chicago. Mr. Stelk is a democrat of definite and well balanced 
convictions, and he has taken an active part in the party ranks in 
Chicago and Cook County. As a campaign speaker he has done 
excellent work, and served as president of the Twelfth Ward Demo- 
cratic Organization for five years prior to his election to the bench. 

On April 29, 1899, Mr. Stelk was married to Miss Emma Rent- 



615 

ner, of Chicago, and they live at 2711 West Twenty-third Street. 
They have six children. George, the eldest, was born February 
22, 1900, and was named in honor of George Washington. Viola 
was the second born. Lincoln was born on the birthday anniversary 
of Abraham Lincoln, and was named accordingly. Mildred and 
Milton are twins, and Winston was born on June I4th, a day that 
has in recent years been celebrated as Flag Day. 

DELBERT A. CLITHERO' s relations to the Chicago bar have been 
maintained with growing professional success and reputation for 
twenty years. Like many successful lawyers, he spent his youth in 
the country and comes of solid American stock. 

Mr. Clithero was born on a farm in Grundy County, Illinois, on 
November n, 1870, a son of Edward S. and Eliza N. (Scott) 
Clithero, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Illinois. 
The Clithero family was founded in America in the colonial epoch 
of our national history, the original representatives of the name 
coming from Lancastershire, England, and establishing a residence 
in Virginia, whence members in a later generation followed the 
tide of emigration to the West and became pioneers of Ohio. In 
the Civil war, representatives of this family were found as soldiers 
in both the Union and Confederate armies. Edward S. Clithero was 
reared and educated in Ohio and was one of its volunteers in the 
Civil war. He was a member of the One Hundred and Sixteenth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry and during the campaign in the Shenan- 
doah Valley of Virginia was wounded, in an engagement at Snick- 
er's Gap. While engaged in transporting supplies from Winchester 
to Fredericksburg he was captured by the enemy, but he soon con- 
trived to make his escape. He was married while in the army, 
his wife having crossed over the Ohio River to join him and be- 
come his bride. She then served as a nurse in the army. After 
the war, Mr. Clithero, Sr., became a substantial farmer of Grundy 
County, Illinois, but in 1886 the family removed to Chicago and have 
since resided there. 

Delbert A. Clithero was reared on the old homestead farm, the 
place of his birth, and was identified with its work and management 
until he reached the age of eighteen years, in the meanwhile having 
attended the public schools. He left the farm to take up the study 
of law. After reading for some time under private preceptor- 
ship he entered the Kent College of Law, in Chicago, graduating in 
1895, with the degree, Bachelor of Laws. He has been admitted 
to practice in all of the States and Federal courts of Illinois and 
the Supreme Court of the United States. In the year of his gradua- 
tion, Mr. Clithero engaged in practice in Chicago, where he was as- 
sociated with Mr. George W. Warvelle for thirteen years, under 
the firm name of Warvelle & Clithero. Since that time he has con- 
ducted an individual general practice. His offices are at 1018 Hart- 
ford Building. 



616 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, in which he 
was chairman of the Grievance Committee and is now chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee, and is identified also with the Illinois Bar 
Association and the American Bar Association. Like his former 
partner, Mr. Warvelle, he is prominently identified with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. He organized and is affiliated with Metropolitan 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of which he is past master and holds mem- 
bership in Washington Chapter, R. A. M. of which he is past high 
priest; Chicago Commandery, Knights Templar; Oriental Consis- 
tory, Scottish Rite ; and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. His 
name is found enrolled on the list of members of the Chicago Ath- 
letic Club. 

On June 29, 1899, Mr. Clithero married Miss Harriet A. John- 
son, of Chicago, and they have one child, Helen Elizabeth. They 
live in Oak Park. 

NICHOLAS J. PRITZKER. Among the members of the Chicago 
bar who have overcome innumerable obstacles in their rise from 
obscurity and poverty to positions of prominence and financial 
independence, Nicholas J. Pritzker is worthy of more than passing 
mention. Brought to this country as a lad, ignorant of the customs 
and language of America, with the sturdy industry and progressive- 
ness of his countrymen when given the opportunity he worked his 
way to a professional education, established a paying business, and 
finally turned his attention to the law, in which he has won deserved 
success. 

Mr. Pritzker is a native of Kiev, Russia, and was born July 19, 
1871, a son of Jacob Nicholas and Sophia (Schwartzman) Pritzker, 
natives also of that country. The father, who was engaged in com- 
mercial pursuits, came to the United States in 1881 to prepare a 
home for his family, who followed him here in 1882, settling in Chi- 
cago. Nicholas J. Pritzker had received his early training in pri- 
vate Hebrew schools in his native land, which he had attended 
from his fourth to his eleventh year, and when he came to this coun- 
try enrolled as a student at the Jones School, on Harrison Street. 
He was ambitious and persevering, applying himself diligently to 
his studies and attending high school at nights, so that, about 1888 
by special examination under George A. Howland, superintendent 
of schools, he was graduated. He next went to the Chicago College 
of Pharmacy and later to the department of pharmacy at North- 
western University, and was graduated in the class of 1892 and 
became a registered pharmacist. Securing employment in that line, 
he was identified with the drug business for seven years, and showed 
himself a thorough master of his calling and an excellent business 
man. However, Mr. Pritzker had always cherished a desire for a 
career in the law, and after some preparation entered the Illinois 
College of Law, in 1899, and was graduated with his bachelor's 
degree with the class of 1902. He was admitted to the Illinois bar 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 617 

June 6th of that year, and from that time to the present has con- 
tinued in the practice of his calling, carrying on his activities inde- 
pendently. Mr. Pritzker has offices in the First National Bank 
Building, and while his practice is of a general nature, he has been 
engaged for the most part in cases dealing with real estate, corpora- 
tion and bankruptcy law. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Law Institute, and stands high in the regard and 
confidence of his fellow-practitioners, who have found him a val- 
uable associate, a worthy opponent, and at all times an adherent of 
the highest ethics of the calling. Mr. Pritzker is a member of the 
B'nai B'rith, and is director and counsel of Mark Nathan Jewish 
Asylum of Chicago, in the work of which he has taken a very active 
and helpful part. He is also interested in Masonry, and holds mem- 
bership in Oriental Lodge No. 33, F. & A. M., and Cicero Chapter 
No. 180, R. A. M. His residence is located at No. 2437 North 
Kedzie Boulevard. 

On June 8, 1891, Mr. Pritzker was married to Miss Anna Cohn, 
of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and to this union there have been born 
three children, namely : Harry N., a senior in the literary department 
and a freshman in law at Northwestern University, who enjoys col- 
lege reputation as a swimmer and all-round athlete; Abraham N., 
who is a sophomore at the University of Chicago; and Jacob N., 
who is attending the graded schools. 

CHARLES L. OGDEN. To be recognized as a leading member of 
the Knox County bar is no slight distinction, for the profession here 
is made up of men of notable ability, and for almost a decade 
Charles L. Ogden has occupied a foremost place, his home city 
being Galesburg. He was born at Cameron, Warren County, Illi- 
nois, February 21, 1876, a son of Franklin Delos and Harriet Ann 
(Lewis) Ogden. The paternal ancestors came from England and 
settled in New York, and at Rome in that state the father of Charles 
L. Ogden was born, removing later in life to Warren County, Illi- 
nois. During the Civil war Franklin D. Ogden was in the govern- 
ment service as an enrolling officer. He was a man of sterling 
character and very highly esteemed, and on numerous occasions 
was elected to local offices. His death occurred February 13, 1912. 
He married Harriet Ann Lewis, who survives, and they had seven 
children, Charles L. being the sixth in order of birth. The ances- 
tors of Mrs. Ogden came to America from Scotland and Wales and 
settled in New Jersey, from which state her parents came to Illinois, 
and she was born in Berwick, Warren County. 

Charles L. Ogden was reared on his father's farm and attended 
the district schools. As farmers' sons usually do, he assisted his 
father during the summers and devoted himself to study during the 
winters until about eighteen years of age, after which for three 
more years he continued on the farm and then attended Knox 
Academy at Galesburg for one year. By this time his mind was 



618 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

fully made up as to his choice of career, and in 1900, as a special 
student, he entered the law department of the University of Illinois. 
Determined application enabled him to do two years' work in the 
preparatory department in addition to the regular law course, and he 
was graduated in 1903. In October of that year he was admitted 
to the bar at Springfield. Mr. Ogden gave himself no period of rest 
after his strenuous months of study, but, on the other hand, imme- 
diately opened law offices at two points, Augusta and Plymouth, 
Illinois, with William B. Hiller, but after a year and a half of prac- 
tice decided to come to Galesburg, where a wider field of endeavor 
was open. For a short time after locating here, in November, 1905, 
he was associated with George Shumway, but since that connection 
was severed has been alone in practice and has built up a very satis- 
factory business in a monetary way and through legal ability has 
secured wide recognition. Mr. Ogden is possessed of the clear, 
incisive mind that a successful lawyer must always have, and he is 
able to express his thoughts in cogent and convincing language. 
Furthermore, he is an indefatigable worker. He has been identified 
with much important litigation, and is held in high regard by his 
clients for his faithful attention to their interests. 

Mr. Ogden was married June 25, 1908, to Miss Stella M. Jack- 
son, a daughter of Owen P. Jackson, a well known retired farmer 
of Macomb, Illinois. The family residence is at No. 116 Cedar 
Avenue, Galesburg, and Mr. Ogden maintains his office at No. 19 
East Main Street. Thoroughly identified with the republican party, 
Mr. Ogden has served as a delegate to several county, senatorial 
and congressional conventions. In January, 1915, he was appointed 
city attorney for the City of Galesburg to fill out the unexpired 
term of James E. Davis, who had been elected to the Legislature. 
At the expiration of his term of office as city attorney, Mr. Ogden 
was not a candidate to succeed himself, but was retained by the 
City of Galesburg as special counsel in the matter of readjusting 
the rates of gas and standard of service with the local gas company. 
He is also the legal adviser for several corporations, is interested in 
civic improvement and expansion, and is a member of the Gales- 
burg Business Men's Club and of the State and County Bar asso- 
ciations. He has served as secretary and treasurer of the County 
Bar Association. Mrs. Ogden takes a prominent part in social and 
civic activities, and is an influential member of the Tuscarora Club 
and the Galesburg Women's Club. Mr. and Mrs. Ogden are mem- 
bers of the Baptist Church. 

JACOB NEWMAN. One of the well known members of the Chi- 
cago bar who has been the architect of his' own fortunes is Jacob 
Newman ; for over thirty years he has been engaged in the practice 
of law in the City of Chicago. Mr. Newman was born November 
12, 1853, a son f Salmon and Pauline (Lewis) Newman. The 
family settled on a farm near Jacksonburg, Butler County, Ohio, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 619 

and tilled the soil until the death of the father in 1860, when the 
mother with her children moved to Liberty, Indiana, where they 
lived many years. The subject of this sketch however, went in 
1860 to live with his married sister at Noblesville, Indiana, where he 
remained until he moved to Chicago in the summer of 1867. He 
came here in the hope of finding greater educational advantages. 
On his arrival he worked in several mercantile establishments and 
finally after having accumulated enough to pay his way for the first 
year, he entered the old Chicago University and worked his way 
though that institution by securing odd jobs of all sorts and kinds. 
He graduated with the class of 1873 and finished his law course 
in 1875. 

While attending the Union College of Law (now Northwestern 
University of Law) he worked and studied in the law office of the 
Hon. James R. Doolittle, who for many years was a United States 
senator from the State of Wisconsin. 

In 1875 Mr. Newman was admitted to the bar of Illinois and 
soon thereafter became associated in the practice of his profession 
with the late Judge Graham. This association continued until 1877 
when Judge Graham removed to the West. Mr. Newman continued 
in practice until 1882 when he formed a partnership with Mr. 
Adolph Moses, which continued until the summer of 1890. The 
firm of Moses & Newman conducted a substantial law business and 
became well known at the Chicago bar. This firm was dissolved 
in the spring of 1890, and from that time on Mr. Newman con- 
tinued the practice of the law with George W. Northrup and others 
until he organized the present firm of Newman, Poppenhusen & 
Stern. 

During all these years, Mr. Newman has been very active at 
the bar and participated in many celebrated cases. 

He has all his life belonged to the republican party and is a mem- 
ber of the Union League Club, the Standard Club, the Ravisloe 
Country Club, the Hamilton Club and others. 

Mr. Newman married on May 30, 1888, Miss Minnie Goodman, 
daughter of Hugo Goodman, an old resident of Chicago ; three chil- 
dren, John Hugo, Elizabeth and George Ingham were born. The 
home of the family has been for many years at 4738 Woodlawn 
Avenue. 

HAYNIE ROBERT PEARSON. In a quarter of a century devoted 
to the active practice of his profession in Chicago Haynie R. Pear- 
son has had a wide experience, and service to city and state in the 
department of law has marked his career. He resigned from his 
last office in 1900 since which time he has devoted himself to inde- 
pendent practice. 

Haynie Robert Pearson was born at Springfield, Illinois, on the 
22d of June, 1866, and is a son of Gen. Robert N. and Mary E. (Tut- 
hill) Pearson, his father having been a gallant soldier in the Army 



620 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

of the Tennessee in the Civil war, during which he arose to the rank 
of brigadier-general. While Mr. Pearson was yet a child the family 
moved to Chicago from Springfield, and in this city he had his early 
education. He later attended Middlebury College, at Middlebury, 
Vermont, and then entered the University of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor where he received his training for his legal career. His 
graduation came in 1899 and his admission to the bar followed 
immediately. He at once engaged in practice in Chicago as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Page & Pearson, and continued thus for two 
years. In 1893 he served as attorney for the Sanitary District of 
Chicago, and in that year he was appointed to the office of assistant 
state's attorney for Cook County by Jacob Kern. It was then he 
laid the basis for his present splendid reputation as a criminal 
lawyer, and in 1896 he was reappointed to the office by Hon. Charles 
S. Deneen, then governor of the state. During his service in that 
office Mr. Pearson prosecuted a greater number of men on the 
charge of murder than had any previous incumbent of the position 
of assistant state's attorney in Cook County and he secured convic- 
tion and death sentences for twenty-one . murderers, a number in 
excess of convictions secured by any other prosecutor in the United 
States within an equal period of time. His reputation in the de- 
partment of criminal law places him among the foremost of trial 
lawyers in the country, his standing having long since exceeded local 
limitations. 

Mr. Pearson is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and 
he is a member of the University of Michigan Alumni Association, 
as well as of his college fraternity, Delta Kappa Epsilon. In the 
Masonic order he has taken the thirty-second degree in the Scot- 
tish Rite. By virtue of his father's service during the Civil war 
he holds membership in the Society of the Tennessee and the 
Military Order of the Loyal Legion. He and his wife are members 
of St. Martin's Protestant Episcopal Church, in which Mr. Pearson 
is the organizer of a men's club that is now the largest of its 
kind in America, and of which he served as first president. 

On September 14, 1892, Mr. Pearson married Miss Blanche B. 
Arnold, daughter of James M. Arnold, and they have five children, 
Beatrice, Robert Swift, Caroline, Arnold and James M. A. 

MAX J. FARBER. Thorough and accurate knowledge of law 
and practice, native ability and unswerving integrity have made 
Max J. Barber one of the leaders of the younger generation prac- 
ticing at the Chicago bar; high personal character and a strong 
sense of duty have made him a desirable and stirring citizen. He 
is a self-made man, in that he has had to make his own way largely 
since his boyhood, while his education has been gained through 
tireless and persistent effort and his large and representative prac- 
tice has come as a reward of his own unaided effort. Mr. Farber 
was born in Austria, December 7, 1877, and is a son of Joseph and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 621 

Rose (Grossman) Farber. His father, who was for some years 
engaged in business in Austria, died in that country, and in 1887 
the mother and three sons emigrated to the United States, settling 
at Cleveland, Ohio. 

Max J. Farber received his elementary education in the public 
schools of Cleveland, and after graduating from the high school 
there, enrolled as a student in the Western Reserve University. 
There he applied himself so assiduously to his studies that he 
made rapid advancement, and in 1900 was graduated with high 
honors. During all this time Mr. Farber had been employed during 
his vacation periods and leisure hours, in this way making it pos- 
sible for him to continue his cherished studies. In 1900 he entered 
Harvard University Law School, and in 1903 was graduated with 
the degree of ( Bachelor of Laws, and in the same year was admitted 
to the Ohio bar. During the next four years he was engaged in 
practice at Cleveland, but, believing that Chicago offered better 
opportunities for his talents, he came to this city in January, 1908, 
was admitted to the bar of Illinois, and has continued in practice 
here to the present time. For a few years he was associated with 
the firm of Hiner, Bunch & Latimer, but is now engaged in an 
independent practice, with offices at 1133 First National Bank 
Building, and specializing in commercial and corporation law. 

Mr. Farber is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the 
Phi Beta Kappa fraternity, and maintains a high reputation among 
his fellow-practitioners. 

SAMUEL E. THOMASON. The personnel of the Chicago bar in- 
cludes among its younger members Samuel Emory Thomason, a 
member of the law firm of Shepard, McCormick, Thomason, Kirk- 
land & Patterson. This firm, with offices in the Tribune Building, 
is engaged in general practice, and has a commendable record be- 
hind it, though a brief one. 

Mr. Thomason was born in Chicago on January 24, 1883, and is 
a son of Frank D. and Diana (Bean) Thomason. The father 
is also a lawyer, and is successfully engaged in practice in the city 
today. Mr. Thomason had his higher education in the University 
of Michigan and he was graduated from that institution with the 
class of 1904, when he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He prepared for his profession in the Northwestern University Law 
School in Chicago, finishing his studies in the class of 1906, receiv- 
ing his law degree and admission to the Illinois bar simultaneously. 
He began his career in the law office of Stuart G. Shepard, and in 
1909 Mr. Shepard, together with Mr. Robert R. McCormick, and 
Mr. Thomason entered into a partnership under the firm name of 
Shepard, McCormick & Thomason. 

Mr. Thomason has appeared in connection with a number of 
more than ordinarily important cases in the various courts of Chi- 
cago, and he has won prestige as a trial lawyer of tact and resource- 



622 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

fulness. He successfully represented the plaintiff in the Corkery 
will case involving half a million dollars, and since 1911 has been 
retained by the Tribune Company as one of its attorneys, in whose 
interests he has appeared in a number of important cases. 

Mr. Thomason is a member of the Chicago, Illinois State and 
American Bar associations, and his further professional affiliations 
are with the Chicago Law Institute and the Legal Club. He has 
membership in the University Club and the Ridge Country Club, 
as well as his college fraternities, the Theta Delta Chi of his Uni- 
versity of Michigan days and the Phi Delta Phi law fraternity. 

Mr. Thomason is a republican. In 1912 he was a candidate on 
its ticket for a place on the board of Cook County commissioners, 
but was defeated with his ticket. He is chairman of the board of 
directors of the West Town State Bank, and is a director in a num- 
ber of other corporations. 

On September 10, 1907, Mr. Thomason was married to Miss 
Alexina E. Young, of Chicago, and they have one child, Elizabeth. 
Their home is at 10451 South Seeley Avenue. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER JENNINGS. The twenty years since his 
admission to the bar, William A. Jennings has devoted to a gen- 
eral practice, with an increasing reputation for professional ability 
and personal character. 

William Alexander Jennings was. born at Prairie Grove, Arkan- 
sas, January 24, 1872, and is a son of Fountain and Mary S. (Ellis) 
Jennings. His father was born in Tennessee, where he enlisted for 
service in the Confederate Cavalry, under the noted General For- 
rest, with whom he served during all the campaigns of that intrepid 
soldier, and he passed through the entire period of the war receiv- 
ing but one wound, a shot through the hand. On his return to 
private life at the close of the war he resumed farming, but later 
moved into Arkansas, and there he spent the remaining years of 
his life as an agriculturist and as a minister of the Methodist 
Church. 

The public schools of Arkansas furnished William A. Jennings 
with his early training, and when he had decided upon a profes- 
sional career, he entered the Chicago College of Law in 1892. He 
was admitted to the bar of the state in 1894, but was not graduated 
nor did he receive his law degree until the next year. Upon his 
admission to practice, Mr. Jennings began his work in Chicago, and 
in the twenty years that have elapsed since then he has built up a 
large and representative practice in and about the city. Early in 
his career he was able to demonstrate successfully his ability through 
his handling of a number of cases of litigation, and from that time 
he has enjoyed a liberal clientage. 

Mr. Jennings is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and 
of the Southern and Germania clubs. During the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war he enlisted for service in the army, his active duties carry- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 623 

ing him through the various engagements in which our soldiers 
participated in Cuba. 

Mr. Jennings was married in 1897 to Miss Olive Louise Nord- 
strom, of Madison, Wisconsin. They have their home at 929 Ainslee 
Street. 

HARRY L. SHAVER was admitted to the Illinois bar in October, 
1907, and has since been very active in practice at Chicago. He 
served as the first business manager of the Illinois Law Review 
during the first two years of its existence. Besides a practice that 
takes him into all the courts, Mr. Shaver has represented the Thirty- 
first Senatorial District in the Illinois House of Representatives 
during the Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth General Assemblies, 
where he made an excellent record, having been prominently iden- 
tified with some of the most important legislation enacted. 

Harry L. Shaver is a native of Iowa, born at Marshalltown 
September 30, 1884. His parents were Fred D. and Annie E. 
(Kempter) Shaver, who moved to Chicago in 1889. Mr. Shaver 
was educated in the grammar schools of Chicago, in the Lake View 
High School, and in 1907 graduated in the law course from the 
Northwestern University. He is a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, and in politics 
is a republican. Mr. Shaver is a member of the Phi Kappa Psi 
College Fraternity. 

FRANK J. C. KRAHN. A Rockford lawyer since 1909, Mr. 
Krahn was for a number of years in practice in Elgin, and is 
regarded as one of the strongest members of the Rockford bar, 
especially on the commercial side of the profession. 

Frank J. C. Krahn was born in Dundee Township of Kane 
County, Illinois, May 21, 1872, and grew up on a farm, was educated 
in country schools and a high school, took the course of the Dixon 
Business College and the Northern Illinois Normal College, and 
finished his law studies in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. 
Mr. Krahn graduated in 1895 and was admitted to the bar of 
Michigan and Illinois in the same year. He began practice at Elgin, 
and for nearly twenty years has been identified with a growing 
general practice. During his residence at Elgin he served one term 
as city attorney, and in 1909 moved to Rockford, and besides his 
regular practice now handles commercial law and collections through 
the American Creditors Association. Mr. Krahn is a member of 
the Winnebago County Bar Association. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Masonic Order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Mystic Workers of the World. 

BRUCE H. GARRETT. One of the members of the Rockford bar 
is Bruce H. Garrett, who has been in active practice for more than 
fifteen years, and controls a large clientage in general practice, but 
particularly in corporation law. 



624 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Bruce Hayes Garrett was born in Winnebago County, Illinois, 
November i, 1865, and was educated in the public schools, and 
through private schools and private tutors. He studied law with 
A. D. Early and was admitted to the bar in 1887. In the year 1900 
Mr. Garrett began a general practice at Rockford, and during much 
of the subsequent time has paid special attention to corporation, 
probate and chancery affairs. Mr. Garrett is a member of the 
Illinois State Bar Association and the Winnebago County Bar Asso- 
ciation, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and has taken thirty- 
two degrees in the Scottish Rite and belongs to the Mystic Shrine, 
and is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and the Hamilton Club of Chicago. 

EDWIN M. ASHCRAFT. For more than forty years the name 
Ashcraft has been identified with the Illinois bar, and Edwin M. 
Ashcraft has practiced at Chicago since 1887. About fifteen years 
ago his mature experience was combined with the energy and youth 
of his son, and the firm of Ashcraft & Ashcraft is one of recognized 
prominence and success at the Chicago bar. 

Edwin M. Ashcraft, the senior member of this firm, and for 
twenty-seven years a member of the Chicago bar, was born on a 
farm near Clarksburg, Harrison County, West Virginia (then 
Virginia) August 27, 1848. The family homestead was in the 
vicinity of some of the early campaigns during the Civil war, in 
which struggle several of the family took part. His parents were 
James M. and Clarissa (Swiger) Ashcraft, and he was the oldest 
of their two sons and two daughters. After attending the public 
schools of his native locality and Wheeling University, he studied 
at the State University at Normal, Illinois, and while teaching school 
during 1867, 1868 and 1869, devoted his leisure time to the study of 
law, having early decided upon a professional career. Mr. Ashcraft 
successfully passed his examination before the Supreme Court of 
Illinois, sitting at Springfield, and, admitted to the bar, engaged at 
once in practice at Vandalia, Fayette County. His ability attracted 
such favorable notice that before the end of the year he was elected 
prosecuting attorney of the county, and continued to serve three 
years. In 1876 Mr. Ashcraft was made the candidate of the repub- 
lican party for Congress from the sixteenth district, and although 
defeated at the polls reduced the normal democratic majority from 
5,000 to 1,400, his opponent being W. A. J. Sparks, who served as 
land commissioner under President Cleveland. 

Removing to Chicago in April, 1887, Mr. Ashcraft associated 
himself with Thomas and Josiah Cratty, under the firm name of 
Cratty Brothers & Ashcraft, an association which continued until 
June i, 1891, when Mr. Ashcraft withdrew to become a member of 
the firm of Ashcraft & Gordon. In 1900, with his sons, Raymond 
M. and Edwin M. Jr., he formed the strong combination of Ash- 
craft & Ashcraft, which has continued in existence to the present 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 625 

time and has a large general practice. It is generally accepted that 
as a trial lawyer Mr. Ashcraft has few superiors in the state, and 
during the long period of his practice in Chicago he has been 
identified in one or another capacity with some of the most notable 
cases tried in the Illinois courts. For years he has been a member of 
the Illinois State Bar Association, and the regard in which he is held 
by his fellow lawyers was shown by his election as president of the 
Chicago Bar Association. Mr. Ashcraft married, March 16, 1875, 
Miss Florence R. Moore, daughter of Risden Moore, of Belleville, 
Illinois. Their children are : Raymond M., Edwin M. Jr., Florence 
V. and Alan E. Mr. Ashcraft is not a confessed member of any 
religious body, but has been generous in his support of religious and 
charitable projects. His social connections are with the Union 
League, Hamilton and Calumet Country Clubs. 

RAYMOND MOORE ASHCRAFT was born at Vandalia, Fayette 
County, Illinois, January 9, 1876, commenced his education in the 
primary schools in 1884, and after coming to Chicago in 1887 
attended the city public schools until 1892. Following this he 
was a student in the Chicago Manual Training School, from which 
he graduated in 1894, and in the latter year entered Northwestern 
University, where he was graduated in 1897 with the degree 
Bachelor of Laws. In the following year he took a post-grad- 
uate course at Lake Forest University, and from that institution 
received a like degree. From 1894 until 1900, Mr. Ashcraft was 
employed by the firm of Ashcraft & Gordon, and in the meantime, in 
1897, was admitted to the bar, becoming associated with his father 
in the firm of Ashcraft & Ashcraft in 1900. Their offices are located 
in The Temple. Mr. Ashcraft has steadily advanced in the ranks 
of his profession, and is now recognized as a lawyer of thorough 
learning and talent. Like his father, he is a stanch republican, and 
holds membership in the Chicago, Illinois State, and American Bar 
Associations, being also connected with the Delta Chi college 
fraternity, the Chikaming Country Club and the Lakeside Golf Club. 
His residence is at 6127 Kimbark Avenue. 

Mr. Ashcraft was married August 3, 1901, to Miss Charleta 
Peck, daughter of Charles Peck, one of the founders of^the Academy 
of Design and a well-known artist of early Chicago. Two children 
have been born to this union : Charleta Jane, born December 8, 
1906; and Florence Elizabeth, born March 6, 1911. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ashcraft are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

CHARLES WESLEY FLACK. A foremost member of the Macomb 
bar and equally prominent in other lines of useful endeavor, Charles 
W T esley Flack, the senior member of the law firm of Flack & Lawyer, 
at Macomb, and president of the First Trust and Savings Bank of 
this city, is one of the best known men of McDonough County. 
While the law claims most of his attention, the educational and 



626 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

lecture field, after many years of success as a teacher, is yet attrac- 
tive, and his versatility is further demonstrated by his substantial 
standing as a financier. 

Charles W. Flack was born in Fremont County, Iowa, June 2, 
1865, a son of John W. and Louisa (Osborn) Flack. The paternal 
ancestors came from Germany. John W. Flack was born in Mc- 
Donough County, Illinois, December 30, 1840. For a number of 
years he has been a leading citizen of Industry, McDonough County, 
where he has served as a justice of the peace and on the village 
board, and at present is town clerk. Mrs. Flack was born in Mc- 
Donough County, Illinois, April 13, 1842. In the public schools of 
Industry Charles W. Flack secured his early educational training. 
Later he came to Macomb, and here was a student in the Normal 
School and subsequently attended the Normal College at Valparaiso, 
Indiana, after which, for almost a decade, he devoted himself to 
educational work. From 1887 until 1889 he was principal of the 
Carman School in Henderson County, Illinois, and from 1889 until 
1891, of the Biggsville School in the same county, and during 1892 
was principal of the Fourth Ward School at Macomb. During 1891 
he was president of the Henderson County Teachers' Association, 
his interest in educational work so continuing that on May 21, 1913, 
he was appointed by Governor Dunne one of the trustees of the 
Western Illinois State Normal School, and is now president of the 
board. 

Mr. Flack was admitted to the Illinois bar at Mt. Vernon August 
23, 1893. From 1896 until 1898 he officiated as master in chancery 
of the Circuit Court of McDonough County. His political identifi- 
cation has always been with the democratic party, and in 1889 he 
was made chairman of the Democratic County Central .Committee. 
In 1897 his personal popularity was shown when he was elected 
city attorney of Macomb by a majority of fifty-three votes when the 
city was republican by 400 majority. He has been very active in 
advancing every interest of the city, and has frequently been called 
upon to accept offices of civic importance, the public reposing great 
confidence in his attainments and in his public spirit. In 1886 he 
was made president of the Macomb Library Board and served until 
1899, and in July, 1905, was appointed to the same position, in 
which he served continuously until the spring of 1914, when he 
resigned on account of his many other pressing interests. In April, 
1910, he opened the First Trust & Savings Bank at Macornb, and 
has been its president from the start, his name being a guarantee of 
the stability of the institution, which is in a very prosperous condi- 
tion. 

Mr. Flack was married August 17, 1887, to Miss Ura M. Kee, 
of Industry, Illinois, and they have two children, Vera B. and 
Charles E. The daughter was born December 29, 1889, and makes 
her home with her parents at Macomb. Carefully and liberally 
educated, after graduating from the Macomb High School she com- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 627 

pleted the full course at the Western Illinois State Normal School 
and Northwestern University and is now an instructor in a high 
school, teaching German and Latin. The son, Charles E. Flack, was 
born March 29, 1892, and after completing the academic department 
of the Western Illinois State Normal School entered the North- 
western University in the fall of 1910, and the Northwestern Uni- 
versity Law School in 1913, where he is now continuing his studies. 
The family belongs to the Christian Church. They reside at No. 512 
South Randolph Street, Macomb. 

Mr. Flack is very prominent in Masonic circles, belonging to 
Mohammed Shrine, Peoria Temple and the Consistory at Ouincy, 
having reached the thirty-second degree. Locally he is affiliated 
with Macomb Lodge, No. 17, A. F. & A. M. ; Morse Chapter, No. 
19; and Macomb Commandery, No. 61, and during 1901 and 1902 
was worshipful master of Macomb Lodge No. 17. He is a member 
of the State and County Bar associations. His law office is main- 
tained on the West Side Square, Macomb, and he has one of the 
largest and best law libraries in this part of the state. 

DONALD L. MORRILL. For more than a quarter of a century 
Donald L. Morrill has been successfully engaged in the practice of 
law in the City of Chicago. He has gained a prominent position in 
the ranks of his profession as a result of his diligent attention to its 
demands during that period. 

The greater part of Mr. Merrill's life and all his professional 
career thus far has been spent in Chicago. He comes of an old and 
honored colonial family of the State of Maine, and was born at 
Auburn, in that state, in the early years of the Civil war. His 
parents, Nahum and Anna I. (Littlefield) Morrill, were both of 
English ancestry, and their respective families were established in 
the Pine Tree State in the early colonial period. His father, Judge 
Morrill of Auburn, Maine, is still living at the age of ninety-four 
years and is the Nestor of the Maine bar. During his active pro- 
fessional career of over fifty years, his prominence and influence 
at the bar and in public affairs has been widely recognized through- 
out the entire state. The mother of Mr. Morrill died in 1896. His 
elder and only brother is one of the leaders of the Maine bar. 

Donald Littlefield Morrill attended the schools of his native 
community, and when barely sixteen years of age entered Brown 
University from which institution he has received both the Bachelor's 
and Master's degrees. Soon after his graduation Mr. Morrill came 
to Illinois and devoted several years to effective work as principal 
of the high school at Moline, Illinois, and later as principal of one of 
the grammar schools of Chicago. He commenced the practice of 
law in Chicago in 1887, where he has been engaged ever since in the 
active, continuous practice of that profession. He has enjoyed a 
substantial and representative clientage and gives especial attention 
to corporation law and chancery practice. His offices are in the 



628 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Chicago Title and Trust Building and his residence is at 421 Barry 
Avenue. 

A man of high civic ideals, Mr. Morrill has always done his 
part in furthering the interests of the community. He served with 
efficiency and distinction as a member of the board of education and 
later he was attorney for that body for eight consecutive years. In 
1909 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the office of judge of 
the Circuit Court of Cook County. 

Mr. Morrill is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association and the American Bar Association, 
also of the board of managers of the Chicago Law Institute. He is 
president of the Associated Alumni of Brown University and a 
member of the University Club, the Law Club, the Edgewater Golf 
Club, and the Sons of the Revolution. 

He is the author of the following published works, "Federal 
and State Government," being an elementary text book in civics ; "A 
Students Manual of the Constitution of Illinois"; "Illinois School 
Law Annotated"; a treatise on "The Law of Persons, including 
Domestic Relations" and sundry pamphlets on historical, legal and 
political subjects. 

On October 17, 1892, Mr. Morrill was married to Miss Edith N. 
Storey, of Detroit, Michigan. They have one son, Nahum, who 
was graduated with high honors from Brown University with the 
class of 1914, receiving both the Bachelor's and the Master's degrees 
upon his graduation, and who is now a student at the Harvard Law 
School. 

JUDGE JOHN D. BRECKENRIDGE. Many successful lawyers have 
entered the profession comparatively late in life, after varied 
experience in other affairs, and it is a well recognized fact that those 
who take up legal studies with matured character and experience 
often attain front positions in the profession. An illustration of 
this fact is the career of Judge John D. Breckenridge of Fulton 
County, who in his early life was a farmer, a carpenter, a merchant, 
and only during his service as circuit clerk of Fulton County began 
the study of law. 

John D. Breckenridge was born in a log cabin on a farm in 
Waterford Township in Fulton County, Illinois, April 12, 1859, a 
son of John W. and Adaline (Preyir) Breckenridge, Jr. The 
Breckenridge ancestors were from Scotland, and the family .is said 
to have been founded by five brothers who emigrated to this country, 
some of them settling in Canada. John W. Breckenridge, Sr., the 
grandfather, was a cousin of the noted John C. Breckenridge of 
Kentucky, who in 1860 was a candidate of one branch of the 
democratic party for the office of president. John W. Breckenridge, 
Jr., came to Illinois in 1837, settled in Will County, and moved to 
Fulton County in 1845. During the Civil war he served as a member 
of Company B in the Eighty-fifth Illinois Infantry. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 629 

Judge Breckenridge acquired his preliminary education in the 
district schools near the home farm, and all his early life was spent 
in the wholesome environment of a farm and hard work. He 
divided his time for several years between farming and the carpen- 
ter's trade, and on reaching his majority turned his attention to mer- 
cantile lines. In 1 880-81 he conducted a store at Sepo in Fulton 
County, and from 1882 to 1884 was a merchant at Bybee. He also 
served as postmaster at both places. Mr. Breckenridge in 1884 
became clerk in a retail store at Lewistown, and four years later 
went on the road selling goods for a wholesale grocery house of 
Peoria. His experience as a traveling salesman continued until 
1892. In that year, having maintained his citizenship in Fulton 
County, where he had a large acquaintance and enjoyed the thor- 
ough confidence of the people, he was elected to the office of circuit 
clerk. The duties of the office necessarily brought him in close con- 
tact with the legal profession, and he took up the study of law at 
home and pursued it with such energy and persistence that at the 
end of three years he was admitted to the bar on June 14, 1895, 
and was admitted to practice in the federal courts at Peoria in April, 
1897. While gaining a legal education he had no assistance from 
anyone, and the fact that he qualified himself for the bar, while ably 
discharging the duties of a public office, is an incentive and inspira- 
tion for young men who comparatively late in life determine the true 
direction of their careers. On retiring from the office of circuit 
clerk on December i, 1896, Mr. Breckenridge took up the active 
practice of the law, and soon had a profitable business at Lewistown. 
In November, 1906, he was elected to the office of county judge, and 
entered upon his duties on December ist. He has also served as 
police magistrate at Lewistown, having been elected May i, 1897. 
Judge Breckenridge's record in his present judicial office has been 
one of unquestioned ability, fairness, and thorough competence, 
and he is regarded as the most popular official of the county. 

Judge Breckenridge is a democrat, is affiliated with Lewistown 
Lodge No. 104, A. F. & A. M. ; Havana Chapter, R. A. M. ; Damas- 
cus Commandery No. 42, K. T., with the Mystic Shrine at Peoria, 
and with the Knights of Pythias at Lewistown. He has long been 
a church worker in the Christian Church, and has served as elder and 
superintendent of the Sunday School. Mr. Breckenridge was mar- 
ried March 20, 1879, to Miss Ella A. Bradley of Lewistown. They 
are the parents of ten children: John L. ; Robert R. ; Mary, wife 
of Charles Bosworth ; George W. ; Frances, wife of William Brad- 
ley ; Grace, wife of Ralph Hall of Joliet; Elizabeth, wife of Allen 
Daily of Joliet ; Paul, Mildred and Jessie, at home. 

D. J. NORMOYLE. The continuous progress of D. J. Normoyle 
to a substantial standing at the Chicago bar has been the pure result 
of personal exertions and worth, as he has never been able to apply 
the influences of family influence or inherited wealth to his in- 



630 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

dividual affairs. It has been his fortune, however, to have prose- 
cuted his activities in a city where he has had many brothers in the 
unaided fight for recognition, and where those who have battled 
their own way to substantial positions have not been slow to appre- 
ciate manliness and merit. 

Mr. Normoyle is a native son of Chicago, born September 6, 
1876, a son of Denny R. and Mary (Gaffney) Normoyle, natives of 
Ireland. His father, a machinist by vocation, came to the United 
States about the time of the outbreak of- the Civil war, settling in 
New York, and subsequently enlisting in the Union army from the 
City of Troy. During his service he was stationed at the arsenal at 
that place, and also at Fort Hamilton, and although his term was of 
extended character and his services of a faithful nature, he would 
never apply for a pension, believing that as his service had been a 
voluntary one he was not entitled to further remuneration than that 
given him during the period of the war. In his later years Mr. 
Normoyle came to Chicago, and here passed the remainder of his 
life working at his trade. 

D. J. Normoyle was given only ordinary educational advan- 
tages in his youth, attending the graded and high schools of Chi- 
cago, and when he entered upon his career chose the trade of ma- 
chinist, at which he was engaged for nine years. It was not his 
intention, however, to make this his life work, taking it up merely 
as a means toward an end, and while working thus continued as a 
student at the night schools of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation Central Department. Later he went to the Chicago Athe- 
naeum, and when he had completed the classes there entered the 
Chicago College of Law, now known as the Chicago Kent College 
of Law, from which institution he was graduated in June, 1901, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, although he had been admitted 
to the Illinois bar by examination during the previous month. Dur- 
ing the first ten years of his practice Mr. Normoyle was associated 
with Pliny B. Smith, former counsel for the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad and president of the Chicago Law Institute, but 
at the present time is in independent practice, giving his attention to 
general professional business. His offices are maintained in the 
Unity Building. Although the scope of his professional work has 
always been broad, Mr. Normoyle has given close consideration to 
the civic, social and municipal problems of his native city. He was 
assistant city corporation counsel in 1911 and 1912, president of 
the State Board of Arbitration in 1913, and was Chicago counsel 
for the States Utilities Commission for some time. He has never 
omitted an opportunity to do what he could toward the improve- 
ment of the municipality. His reputation has extended far beyond 
the limits of his native city, and his high abilities are freely acknowl- 
edged by his fellow-members in the professional organizations with 
which he is identified, such as the American Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, the Chicago Bar Association and the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 631 

Chicago Law Institute. He holds membership in the Illinois State 
Historical Society, takes a keen and active interest in the affairs 
of the Knights of Columbus, and is also popular with his fellow- 
members in the Order of the Alhambra and the Loyal Order of 
Moose. 

In 1902 Mr. Normoyle was married to Miss Mary F. Brennan, 
of New Jersey, a member of an old and distinguished family of that 
state, and they have one daughter : Dorothy. 

GUY VAN SCHAICK. Few young lawyers enter their profession 
with a more liberal training and broader experience than Guy Van 
Schaick possessed when he was admitted to the Illlinois bar in 
August, 1909. 

He was born at Gilroy, California, December 6, 1876, a son of 
Holmes David and Mary A. (Wright) Van Schaick. His father 
was a California business man. His early education came from 
attendance at private schools and the high schools at Gilroy and 
San Francisco. He then entered the University of California, 
where he was graduated B. L. in 1898, following which he was a 
high school instructor two years in California, and then went out to 
the Philippines in the educational service of the Federal Govern- 
ment. For one year he was one of the staff of regular teachers 
and for four years was division superintendent of schools. 

Returning to the United States, he came on to Chicago and 
entered the law department of the University of Chicago, where 
he was awarded the degree J. D. in 1909. In the meantime he had 
also taken several courses in the Northwestern University Law 
School. 

Mr. Van Schaick began his professional career in the law office 
of Stewart G. Shepard and Robert R. McCormick. Later he was 
with the firm of Judah, Willard, Wolf & Reichmann and for a 
short time in the office of the Winston, Payne, Strawn & Shaw. 
Mr. Van Schaick is now associated in practice with Frank C. Rathje 
and Adolph H. Wesemann, with offices in the National Life Build- 
ing. This firm has a large general practice, and Mr. Van Schaick 
has already made no little reputation both as a counselor and advo- 
cate. 

He is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar associa- 
tions, the Chicago Law Institute, the Chicago Association of Com- 
merce, the City Club, and the California Society of Illinois. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Garden City Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 
On September 15, 1905, he married Esther Knapp of Jamestown, 
New York. They have one child, Harold G. Their home is at 
581 1 Maryland Avenue. 

FRANK C. RATHJE. Senior member of the firm of Rathje & 
Wesemann, with offices in the National Life Building at 29 South 
LaSalle Street, Frank C. Rathje is a lawyer of solid and even bril- 



632 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

liant attainments both in his profession and in business affairs. By 
hard work and study night and day he has found a successful posi- 
tion in the Chicago bar at a time when most young lawyers are only 
laying the foundation for a career. 

Frank C. Rathje belongs to a well known family of DuPage 
County, and was born at Bloomingdale, Illinois, August 20, 1883, 
a son of William and Louise (Ehlers) Rathje. His father is one 
of the substantial farmers of DuPage County. Mr. Frank Rathje 
was educated in country schools, and lived on a farm west of Chi- 
cago until nineteen years of age. He then entered St. John's Mili- 
tary Academy at Delafield, Wisconsin, subsequently was in the 
Armour Institute of Technology, and in 1907 graduated LL. B. from 
the Northwestern University Law School. He was admitted to the 
Illinois bar in June, 1907, and in November of the same year began 
practice alone, and so continued for two years. Then the present 
firm of Rathje & Wesemann was organized, the junior member being 
Adolph H. Wesemann, and they now have two junior associates. 
The firm looks after a large general practice. 

Mr. Rathje's special forte in law and business has been real 
estate and finance. He now represents several banks of Chicago 
and vicinity and several other corporations. For some time he was 
connected with the Chicago Title & Trust Company, and has given 
much of his professional attention to real estate law. During the 
first four years of his practice he organized four different banks in 
Chicago and vicinity, and all of them are in a prosperous condition. 

Mr. Rathje is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Hamilton Club, the Chicago Automobile Club, and in Masonry is 
a member of Englewood Lodge No. 690, A. F. & A. M., Englewood 
Chapter No. 176, R. A. M., and Siloam Commandery of the Knights 
Templar at Oak Park. He resides in Englewood. 

JUDGE CONRAD G. GUMBART has practiced law at Macomb 
for nearly twenty years. For a time he was associated with the 
present United States senator, Lawrence Sherman, and for a 
number of years has stood in the front rank of McDonough County 
attorneys, and for the past four years he has filled the office of 
judge of the County Court. 

Conrad G. Gumbart was born in Macomb, Illinois, November 5, 
1872, the same day on which U. S. Grant was elected for his second 
term as President, and this fact suggests the reason for the second 
initial in Judge Gumbart's name. His parents were George C. and 
Esther F. (Feilbaugh) Gumbart. His father, who was born in 
the country along the River Rhine in Germany, came to the United 
States in 1855, settled at St. Louis, and in 1864 came to Macomb, 
where he was active in business affairs until his death. His widow, 
who is still living in Macomb, was also of German ancestry, but 
long resident in America. Some of her ancestors came from Mo- 
ravia, and her great-great-grandfather, Rev. Johannes Herr, was 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 633 

one of the first ministers to preach in Pennsylvania. Judge Gum- 
bart was the youngest of six children, only three of whom are now 
living. 

His early education was acquired in the Macomb public schools, 
graduating from the high school in 1891, after which he spent two 
years reading law with the firm of Sherman & Tunnicliff. In the 
fall of 1893 Judge Gumbart entered the law department of the 
Northwestern University of Chicago, and was graduated LL. B. in 
June, 1895, and admitted to the bar at Chicago in the same month. 
Returning to Macomb he conducted an individual practice and made 
a reputation as a rising attorney for four years, and then joined the 
law partnership of Sherman & Tunnicliff, with whom he had first 
read law. After Senator Sherman retired from the firm owing to 
the responsibilities of his political career, the firm became Tunnicliff 
& Gumbart, and continued until December, 1910. At that time 
Judge Gumbart was elected and began his duties as judge of the 
County Court. From 1900 to 1904 he also served as city attorney of 
Macomb. In December, 1914, Judge Gumbart retired from the 
bench and again became associated with Mr. Tunnicliff, the firm 
name being Tunnicliff, Gumbart & Grigsby. In politics Judge 
Gumbart is a republican. 

October 12, 1905, occurred his marriage to Nellie E. Willis, 
daughter of James and Emma Willis. Her father was an active 
business man of Macomb, but died when Mrs. Gumbart was a child, 
while his widow is still living in Macomb. Judge Gumbart and wife 
have one son : James C., born September 28, 1908. 

JOHN C. LAWYER. Among the younger generation of profes- 
sional men at Macomb, who, through ability and enterprise have 
advanced to the front rank, may be mentioned John C. Lawyer, 
who has won public recognition as an attorney and is the junior 
member of the law firm of Flack & Lawyer, with offices on the 
west side of the Public Square, at Macomb. Mr. Lawyer was born 
at Tennessee, in McDonough County, Illinois, June 28, 1884, and 
is a son of Amos M. and Carrie (Farrenkopf) Lawyer, the former 
of whom was born also in the Village of Tennessee, and the latter 
at Colchester, McDonough County. There were five children in 
the family, John C. being the eldest born. Four survive and a sec- 
ond son, Joseph D., is following his older brother's example by pre- 
paring for the bar. Amos M. Lawyer, the father, is a prominent 
factor in democratic politics in his section of the county and has 
served as supervisor, assessor and highway commissioner. The 
Lawyer family originated in Holland and probably settled first after 
emigrating, in Virginia, and then spread to other states. On the 
maternal side the family may be traced to Germany and its early 
American settlers to Illinois. Mr. Lawyer's ancestors were quiet, 
peaceful people, mainly agriculturists, hence he claims no glorious 
war record for them, and is well satisfied for, in America, in these 



634 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

modern days, the fruits of peace are more dearly prized than the 
greatest triumphs of war. 

John C. Lawyer attended the district schools near his home 
through boyhood days, afterward entering the Tennessee High 
School from which he was graduated in 1903. For about a year 
afterward he assisted his father on the home farm and also taught 
school, making up his mind during this time as to his future career, 
his decision resulting in his entering the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, in September, 1904, and his more than creditable 
graduation in 1907, for he was the valedictorian of his class. In 
October of the same year, at Chicago, he was admitted to the bar 
and then came to Macomb. Here, for sixteen months he worked in 
the law office of Charles W. Flack, and in January, 1909, became 
Mr. Flack's partner, the firm style of Flack & Lawyer having pre- 
vailed ever since. It is a well balanced firm and successfully handles 
a large amount of law business. Reared to believe in and revere 
the principles of democracy, Mr. Lawyer has given hearty support 
to the democratic party, by which, at times, he has been tendered 
political preferment. In 1908 he received the democratic nomina- 
tion for state's attorney of McDonough County and at the election 
made a fine showing, but in that year the entire democratic ticket 
was defeated. This caused no loss of interest in good citizenship, 
however, for he has always been very willing to lend his influence 
to promote public movements in both city and county of which his 
judgment approves, and, like other members of his profession, re- 
sponds freely to the call of charity. In Junl, 1915, he was the choice 
of his party, and as the nominee for circuit judge of the Ninth Ju- 
dicial Circuit, but again the entire democratic ticket was defeated, 
although Mr. Lawyer ran far ahead in his county. He is a member 
of the State Bar Association. 

Mr. Lawyer was married June 14, 1911, to Miss Bess Dague, 
who is a daughter of Nathaniel H. Dague, who is secretary of the 
Danville Ice Company, of Danville, Illinois. They have one child, 
Ruth, who was born July 14, 1913. Mrs. Lawyer is a lady of 
superior educational attainments, a graduate of the Danville High 
School and a student formerly of the University of Illinois and the 
Macomb Normal School. The handsome family residence is at 
No. 624 South Randolph Street, Macomb. Mr. Lawyer is a mem- 
ber of the Lincoln Centennial Association but belongs to no clubs 
nor secret societies, being satisfied with the interest created by the 
problems his profession brings to him and by the comfort and com- 
panionship he finds at his own fireside. 

ANDREW LESLIE HAINLINE. Perhaps no law firm in Mc- 
Donough County does more business or handles more important 
interests than that of Elting & Hainline, of Macomb, and as the 
junior member of this firm, Andrew Leslie Hainline justifies his 
connection although one of the younger members of the Macomb 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 635 

bar. He bears a family name that has been conspicuous in McDon- 
ough County for many years, its activities identifying it with com- 
mercial development and with public affairs. 

Andrew Leslie Hainline was born at Macomb, December 28, 
1887, and is a son of William H. and Catherine L. (Voorhees) 
Hainline. Of their four children, two survive : Mrs. E. T. Walker, 
the wife of a banker at Macomb, and Andrew Leslie. William H. 
Hainline is one of McDonough County's foremost citizens. For the 
past sixteen years he has been postmaster at Macomb and formerly 
was county treasurer. For many years very active in the repub- 
lican party, served as a member of the Republican State Central 
Committee from 1896 to 1898 and was a member of the committee 
concerned in the erection of the soldiers' monument at Anderson- 
ville, Georgia. This was a fitting appointment as during the Civil 
war, Mr. Hainline, as a soldier, had been incarcerated at Anderson- 
ville prison for two months. He served through the war as a mem- 
ber of the Sixteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with the rank of 
corporal, and marched with General Sherman's forces to the sea, 
and subsequently attended the grand review of the victorious troops 
at Washington, D. C. 

Andrew Leslie Hainline attended the public schools at Macomb 
and was graduated from the high school in 1904. At that time 
his father was publishing the Macomb Daily Journal, and for two 
years Andrew L. was a reporter on the same, in this capacity dis- 
playing talent indicative of journalistic ability had he turned his 
serious attention in that direction. His choice, however, was fortu- 
nately, the law, and in 1906 he entered the law department of the 
University of Michigan and was graduated in 1909 and was ad- 
mitted to the Illinois bar in June of that year. He immediately 
entered into partnership at Macomb, with Philip E. Elting, under 
the firm name of Elting & Hainline, and this combination is very 
generally conceded to be one of the strongest law firms in the 
county. It has been entrusted with many important cases, one of 
recent date in which it was called by the state was that of the prose- 
cution of Ray Panschmidt, on a murder charge, sent on a change of 
venue from Adams to McDonough County. This law firm is not 
only distinguished for its legal ability but also for its honorable, 
faithful and courteous conduct of its cases. It maintains fine offices 
in the Stocker Building, Macomb. 

Mr. Hainline has always been identified with the republican 
party, and is a member of the State Bar Association. He is a young 
man of pleasing personality and is social by nature and is a valued 
member of the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is unmar- 
ried. 

GEORGE A. FALDER. A practicing member of the Illinois bar 
since 1893, George A. Falder was elected state's attorney of Mc- 
Donough County in 1912, and that is only one of a number of sue- 



636 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

cesses that have attended his professional career during the past 
twenty years. Previous to his removal to Macomb to assume the 
duties of his present office, Mr. Falder had his home and offices at 
Colchester. 

George A. Falder was born at Macomb, Illinois, May 2, 1872, 
the youngest of six children of Cornelius and Catherine (Cuba) 
Falder. Both his parents were natives of Germany. Mr. Falder 
spent the first fourteen years of his life near Tennessee, Illinois, was 
educated in the district schools, continued his training in the public 
schools at Macomb until eighteen, and in 1890 graduated from 
the Macomb Normal School. At the outset of his career he was a 
school teacher two years, and toolf up the study of law in the office 
of Prentiss, Bailey & Holly, at Colchester, beginning his readings 
in 1890. The members of that firm have subsequently become prom- 
inent in practice in Chicago. Mr. Falder was admitted to the bar 
at Mount Vernon, Illinois, in 1893, and at once located at Colchester 
and became associated in practice with Bailey & Holly, under the 
firm name of Bailey, Holly & Falder. This relationship was con- 
tinued about six years until the other members of the firm moved to 
Chicago. Since then Mr. Falder has conducted an independent 
practice, and has been frequently employed in litigation of more 
than ordinary importance and significance. For fourteen years con- 
tinuously he served as city attorney of Colchester, and in the fall 
of 1912 was elected state's attorney of McDonough County, for the 
regular term of four years, at once removing to Macomb. 

Mr. Falder is a democrat in politics, and fraternally is affiliated 
with the Masonic order, having taken thirty-two degrees of the 
Scottish rite, also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, the Improved 
Order of Red Men, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He is also a member of the State and County Bar Asso- 
ciation. His home is at 528 South Randolph Street, in Macomb. 
Mr. Falder was married May i, 1894, to Lenna J. Heppenstall, of 
Colchester. Mrs. Falder died June 4, 1899, leaving a son, Gerald 
H., who was born July 17, 1895, is a graduate of the Colchester 
High School, spent one year in Macomb Normal School, and is 
now a student in the University of Illinois. On July 17, 1900, Mr. 
Falder married for his second wife Albertha Canote, of Colchester. 
They have a son, Thurlo J., born June 19, 1903, and now in the 
Macomb public schools. 

OSCAR E. CARLSTROM. The junior member of the law firm of 
Graham, Carlstrom & Graham, at Aledo, Oscar E. Carlstrom is 
a man of recognized ability and has shown unusual energy in making 
himself a useful member of his profession. He had to earn his 
education, and studied law under the preceptorship of the vener- 
able Isaac N. Bassett, the oldest practicing lawyer in the State of 




\ / 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 637 

Illinois at the present time. Mr. Carlstrom is also a veteran of the 
Philippine war. 

Oscar E. Carlstrom was born at New Boston, Mercer County, 
Illinois, July 16, 1878, a son of Charles A. and Clara (Spang) 
Carlstrom. Both parents were natives of Sweden, his father born 
February 18, 1845, and still living at New Boston. His mother died 
in 1881. Oscar Carlstrom was the third among eight children. His 
half brother Fred is now studying medicine. 

Oscar E. Carlstrom acquired his early education in the district 
schools near the home farms, attended such a school until thirteen 
years old, and after that was dependent upon his own efforts largely 
to gain an education. He worked on the streets and at any employ- 
ment he could find in order to earn the money to get books and 
attend school. He was graduated from the high school at New Bos- 
ton at the age of eighteen, and for five months was a student of 
Dixon College. He studied at night during the time he was em- 
ployed in his self support, and proved himself diligent in those days 
and thus laid the foundation for his successful career as a lawyer. 

In April, 1899, Mr. Carlstrom began reading law in the office of 
Isaac N. Bassett of Aledo. This study was interrupted by his enlist- 
ment on August 26, 1899, in the Thirty-ninth United States Infan- 
try. This regiment was sent to the Philippines, saw active service 
during the Aguinaldo rebellion, and Philippine war, and Mr. Carl- 
strom participated in four battles. He received an honorable dis- 
charge on May 6, 1901, at the Presidio in San Francisco, after hav- 
ing been in service upwards of two years. On returning to Aledo 
he continued his law studies, and on February 24, 1903, was 
admitted to the bar at Ottawa, Illinois. On the i6th day of the 
following March Mr. Carlstrom began his active practice, as junior 
partner of Isaac N. Bassett. This partnership lasted one year, and 
Mr. Carlstrom was alone in practice until December, 1913, when he 
became associated with William J. Graham under the name of 
Graham & Carlstrom. Paul J. Graham has recently been admitted 
to the firm, and the name is now Graham, Carlstrom & Graham. 
This is one of the strong firms of Mercer County and has its offices 
in the Carlson Building. 

In 1909 Mr. Carlstrom was elected city attorney of Aledo, and 
was re-elected in 1911 and 1913 and is now in his third term. He 
is a republican in politics, a member of the Aledo Business Men's 
Club, is a Chapter Mason and member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and his church is the Presbyterian. 

On December 30, 1903, Mr. Carlstrom married Miss Alma C. 
Nissen, a daughter of Henry C. and Betsey Nissen of Grand Mea- 
dow, Minnesota. Mrs. Carlstrom was educated in' the public schools 
.of Grand Meadow and in the Conservatory of Music at Dixon, 
Illinois, where she met Mr. Carlstrom. They have one son, Charles 
H., who was born August 28, 1905. Mr. Carlstrom's father came 
to the United States in the fall of 1869, settled at Aledo, and later 



638 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

removed to New Boston. He is one of the older citizens of Mercer 
County, has given service on the school board and is well known 
locally. 

GEORGE D. TUNNICLIFF. The City of Macomb, Illinois, is the 
home of a number of the prominent men of the state who not only 
find here a satisfactory field for their activities and a home with de- 
sirable surroundings, but are bound by other ties, it being their 
birthplace. A well known example is found in George D. Tunni- 
cliff, one of the ablest members of the Macomb bar and formerly 
state's attorney. 

George D. Tunnicliff was born at Macomb, Illinois, December 
14, 1861, and is a son of Judge Damon G. and Mary E. (Bailey) 
Tunnicliff, the third born in their family of seven children. On 
the paternal side the ancestors were from England and probably 
also on the maternal side as well. The Tunnicliff family settled in 
New York, and the Bailey family in Virginia, and it is probably a 
fact that members of both participated in the Revolutionary war or 
the War of 1812, but authentic records are not at hand. The mother 
of George D. Tunnicliff died in his boyhood. The father survived 
until December 20, 1901. For many years he was a leader of the bar 
of McDonough County, and in 1885 was appointed by Governor 
Oglesby an associate justice of the Supreme Court of Illinois, to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Judge Pinckney H. \Valker. 

A studious youth during his public school course, George D. Tun- 
nicliff satisfied his father's hopes as to his future career, and in 1879 
entered the Northwestern University at Evanston, where he re- 
mained into his sophomore year and then became a student in the 
law department of the University of Michigan, from which he was 
graduated in June, 1885, and at once entered into active practice 
with his eminent father and J. H. Bacon. In a short time Judge 
Bacon withdrew and the father and son continued together until 
1890, when Judge Tunnicliff retired from active practice and Law- 
rence'Y. Sherman, the present United States senator from Illinois, 
became a partner, the firm name becoming Sherman & Tunnicliff. 
In 1901 C. G. Gumbart, now Judge Gumbart, became a member of 
the firm, the name then becoming Sherman, Tunnicliff & Gumbart, 
which style continued for seven years, when Mr. Sherman, after an 
association of eighteen years with Mr. Tunnicliff, retired, and the 
retirement of Judge Gumbart followed in 1910, when he was elected 
county judge. Mr. Tunnicliff was then in practice alone until 
December I4th, when Judge Gumbart was again taken into the firm, 
the name becoming Tunnicliff, Gumbart & Grigsby. He engages in 
general practice, confining himself to no special branch and is re- 
tained as the attorney for numerous corporations, including the Chi-, 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad for over twenty-nine years, 
the Toledo, Peoria, Pacific and Western Railway for over twenty- 
five years, the Union National Bank, the Sewer Pipe factories and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 639 

other important bodies. A stanch republican he has been loyal at all 
times to its principles and candidates but very seldom has he ac- 
cepted political preferment for himself although frequently urged 
by his friends to be a candidate. In the spring of 1887 he was 
elected city attorney of Macomb, and in the fall of 1888 was elected 
state's attorney of McDonough County. His administration of 
that office for four years distinguished him as a man of far more 
than ordinary ability and he retired from the office with a clear 
record. Since then his friends have never been able to tempt him 
back into the political arena. 

Mr. Tunnicliff was united in marriage on October 5, 1886, with 
Miss Isabella Baker, a daughter of Hon. Jonathan H. Baker, who, 
for several terms was judge of the County Court. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tunnicliff have three children : Helen D., who was born July 4, 
1887, is the wife of M. D. Mclntire, wholesale merchant, of Chi- 
cago ; Mary Louise, who was born September 10, 1889, is well known 
in the pleasant social life of Macomb, assisting her mother very 
frequently in dispensing hospitality in the family home, situated at 
No. 201 Carroll Street ; and Morris D., who was born Septem- 
ber 13, 1895, and was a member of the graduating class of June, 
1914, from the Western Military Academy. Mrs. Tunnicliff is a 
daughter of the American Revolution, through patriot forefathers 
who took part in that struggle. The family attends the Universalist 
Church. Mr. Tunnicliff is one of the busy men of his profession 
who, perhaps, is more thoughtful for others in the matter of recrea- 
tion and relaxation than for himself, but he enjoys his associa- 
tion and membership with the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. 

CLARENCE S. TOWNLEY. The professional career of Mr. Town- 
ley has been spent almost entirely within the limits of McDonough 
County. He was admitted to the bar in 1899, and soon afterwards 
located at Blandinsville in that county and was soon recognized as 
a lawyer of promise and in the enjoyment of a good business. In 
November, 1904, Mr. Townley was elected state's attorney of Mc- 
Donough County by the largest majority ever given to a candidate 
for that office in the county. In order to perform the duties of the 
office he removed to Macomb, and has since lived in that city and 
now looks after a large and profitable private practice. 

At Louisville, Kentucky, Clarence S. Townley was born Novem- 
ber 13, 1866, came to Illinois when a boy, acquired his early educa- 
tion in the district schools, and was also a student in the Carthage 
College and Eureka College, taking the regular classical course. He 
also pursued the study of law while in college and supported him- 
self meanwhile by teaching school in Hancock County. An impor- 
tant influence in his early career was Hon. William H. Warder, a 
former member of the Illinois Legislature and one of the ablest 
lawyers in Southern Illinois, who directed the studies of Mr. Town- 
ley until he was qualified for practice. 



640 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

June 27, 1892, at Rockford, Illinois, Mr. Townley married Miss 
Emma Cunningham. Mrs. Townley served several terms as presi- 
dent of the District Christian Endeavor Union and of the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union. There are two children : Fairfax, 
born April n, 1893 ; and Wayne, born August 26, 1894. Mr. Town- 
ley takes much interest in the Masonic order, is affiliated with Blan- 
dinsville lodge and chapter and with Macomb Commandery No. 61 
of the Knights Templar. He belongs to Bushnell Lodge No. 101, 
of the Knights of Pythias, to New Hope Lodge, No. 263, I. O. O. F., 
and to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is also special 
attorney of the Modern Woodmen of America. His politics are 
republican. He maintains office in the Ballis Building, 405 North 
Randolph Street. 

DANIEL VALENTINE HARKIN. A member of the Chicago bar 
since 1895, Mr. Harkin was in active practice until 1912, when 
appointed state bank examiner, and has since given all his time to 
the responsibilities of that office. 

Daniel Valentine Harkin, born in Chicago, a son of John and 
Mary (Hennessy) Harkin, graduated from the West Division High 
School, and then entered the law department of Northwestern Uni- 
versity, and took his degree LL. B. Admitted to the Illinois bar, 
he was soon favored with a profitable practice in the general field 
of law in Chicago, and with the exception of incidental political 
service confined himself strictly to his profession. State Auditor 
James J. Brady, on his election in 1912, appointed Mr. Harkin chief 
bank examiner for Cook County, and the value of his services in 
this office has been much appreciated. 

Mr. Harkin is an active democrat, served in the Forty-first Gen- 
eral Assembly of Illinois, and also served two terms as alderman 
of the City of Chicago from the Fourteenth Ward, being elected in 
1903 and 1905 ; is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the 
Illinois State Bar Association, and the Knights of Columbus, also 
a member of the Chicago Athletic Club. Mr. Harkin finds his rec- 
reation in walking and reading. His office is in the Otis Building. 

GEORGE C. HILLYER. As junior member of the firm of Lybarger 
& Hillyer, leading attorneys of Bushnell, George C. Hillyer has the 
same prestige as a lawyer in McDonough County which he formerly 
enjoyed in Warren County, where he served as state's attorney. 

George C. Hillyer was born at Brooklyn, Illinois, July 14, 1880, 
son of George and Catherine (Dunlavy) Hillyer. The father, a 
native of Ohio, and now residing at Rushville, Illinois, was a soldier 
during the Civil war, serving in Company A of the Seventy-eighth 
Illinois Infantry. He spent nearly four years in active service, and 
at one time was captured by the Confederates and spent a period of 
imprisonment at the notorious Libby prison. The Hillyer family 
came from England and settled in Ohio, while the Dunlavys were 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 641 

from Ireland, and were early settlers in Kentucky. Mr. Hillyer's 
mother was born near Louisville, Kentucky, and died in 1906. 
There were three children: Thomas A., lives at Mayville, North 
Dakota ; Luella, wife of C. A. Lantz of Rushville, Illinois ; and 
George C. 

Mr. Hillyer was educated in the district schools near his home, 
attended public school regularly until eighteen, then taught for two 
years, and in 1902 entered the University of Illinois in the academic 
department, and in 1903 became a student in the law department. 
Graduating in 1906 LL. B. he was admitted to the bar in October 
of that year at Springfield, and began practice at Monmouth in 
December. Six months were spent in the office of J. W. Clenden- 
ing, and he then formed a partnership with Charles A. McLaughlin. 
and that relationship continued until December, 1908. Mr. Hillyer 
then entered upon his duties as state's attorney of Warren County, 
and during the following four years made a record for efficiency 
and honest administration of the law. On the expiration of his term 
of office Mr. Hillyer joined the firm of Hanley & Cox, and prac- 
ticed as Hanley, Cox & Hillyer until April, 1913. The following 
year Mr. Hillyer spent on a vacation, visiting in the South and South- 
west, and on May 6, 1914, came to Bushnell and entered partner- 
ship with R. E. Lybarger under the firm name of Lybarger & 
Hillyer. This firm enjoys a large law business, and among other 
interests represents the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway. 
Mr. Hillyer is a republican, a member of the Methodist Church, 
and is affiliated with the Masonic order and the State Bar Associa- 
tien. 

JOHN H. LEWIS, JR. One of the leading attorneys of Galesburg 
and Knoxville is John H. Lewis, Jr., whose practice as a lawyer 
extends over a period of fifteen years. Mr. Lewis has his home in 
Knoxville, and at the present time is serving as master in chancery, 
with offices in the courthouse at Galesburg. 

John H. Lewis, Jr. was born at Knoxville August 30, 1874, a 
son of John Henry and Elizabeth S. (Russell) Lewis. His father 
is one of the distinguished men of Central Illinois, now living retired 
at Knoxville at the age of eighty-four. He served as circuit clerk of 
Knox County during the Civil war, was also a member of the Illi- 
nois Legislature, and represented his district in the National Con- 
gress during the forty-seventh session. 

John H. Lewis, Jr., received an exceptional training in prepara- 
tion for his career. From the public schools of Knoxville he entered 
St. Alban's Military Academy in 1890, graduating in 1894, was a 
student during 1894-95 of Parsons College at Fairfield, Iowa, was 
in the Armour Institute at Chicago in 1895-96, and in the fall of 
the latter year entered-the law department of the University of Mich- 
igan, and graduated LL. B. in 1899. Mr. Lewis was admitted to 
the bar in March, 1899, ar "d began active practice at Galesburg and 

Vol. II 14 



642 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Knoxville. Some of his earlier studies for the bar had been pur- 
sued in the office of the late Hon. James A. McKenzie and he con- 
tinued as an assistant in the latter's office until his death in 1901. 
Mr. Lewis practiced alone until 1905, for one year was in partner- 
ship with Roy Marsh under the name Lewis & Marsh, and after Mr. 
Marsh went into. the life insurance business his partner was R. B. 
Robinson one year, and since then he has been alone. 

Mr. Lewis served two terms as city attorney of Knoxville, and 
since 1908 has been master in chancery, this being his third term. 
He was for six years secretary and treasurer of the Knoxville Bar 
Association. Mr. Lewis is a republican, and a member of the 
Galesburg Business Men's Club, and the State Bar Association. 

September 21, 1899, he married Miss Isabel, daughter of the late 
William H. and Larissa Caldwell, of Galesburg. Her father was a 
farmer, and her mother is still living in Galesburg. To their mar- 
riage have been born two children : Marjorie, born January 13, 1903 ; 
and John H. Ill, born June 10, 1904. 

RUFUS E. LYBARGER. As senior member of the law firm of 
Lybarger & Hillyer at Bushnell, Mr. Lybarger is at the head of 
one of the firms now prominently participating in the legal busi- 
ness of McDonough County and has a record of six years successful 
individual practice behind him. 

Rufus E. Lybarger was born at Adair, Illinois, July 9, 1876, 
the third in a family of eight children, only three of whom sur- 
vive, born to Milton C. and Sarah E. Lybarger. His father was 
born in 1842 near Mount Vernon, Illinois, and the mother in 1854 
at Adair. Milton C. Lybarger is a successful farmer and he and 
his wife now live at Prairie City, Illinois. 

Rufus E. Lybarger received his education in the district schools, 
attended both country and village schools until the age of twenty- 
one, was a student for a time in the Western Normal College at 
Bushnell, and subsequently in high school. Mr. Lybarger, like many 
men who have gained success in the professions of law and medicine, 
was a teacher in the public schools for three years. He began read- 
ing law with Cyrus A. Lamb in 1901, in 1905 entered the law depart- 
ment of the University of Illinois, where he was a member of the 
Honorary Fraternity, and was president of his class in his senior 
year. He was graduated LL. B. in 1908. The same year came his 
admission to the bar in Chicago, and he at once returned to Bush- 
nell and opened an office. A little later Thomas B. Camp became 
his partner under the firm name of Camp & Lybarger, but after a 
year Mr. Lybarger practiced alone until the spring of 1914, when 
George C. Hillyer became associated with him, making the firm 
Lybarger & Hillyer. The senior member was elected city attorney 
of Bushnell in 1910 and was re-elected in 1912 and again in 1915. 

Mr. Lybarger was married in 1908 to Rilia M. Foster of Musk- 
ingum County, Ohio. Their three children are : Elma F., five years 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 643 

of age, Milton F., three years old, and James E., aged one year. 
Mr. Lybarger's ancestors came from Germany, first settling in New 
York, and later moving to Illinois, after a brief residence in New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania. His maternal ancestors came from Eng- 
land, settled in Canada, and then came to Illinois. Mr. Lybarger 
resides at 632 Dean Street in Bushnell. He is a Republican in 
politics, affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
is a member of the County Bar Association. 

RANSOM C. HUNT stands next to Mr. Williams as the oldest 
attorney in active practice in Knox County. He was admitted to 
the bar more than forty-eight years ago, and has practiced with 
rising reputation and a steady success at Galesburg since that time. 
Mr. Hunt, while his practice has been general, has been most suc- 
cessful in the criminal branch of law, and is regarded as one of the 
ablest criminal lawyers in Central Illinois. 

Ranson C. Hunt was born on a farm near Burlington, lov/a, Jan- 
uary 24, 1844, and is the only surviving member of a family of three- 
children. His sisters were: Clara, wife of W. T. Jeliff, and Lois 
V., wife of Jesse Pickerell. The parents were John B. and Mary 
(Love) Hunt, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Vir- 
ginia. John B. Hunt, who died November 14, 1904, at the age of 
eighty-four years and six months, was an Iowa farmer for many 
years, but subsequently moved to Illinois, and spent his last years 
in Galesburg. The mother died in 1887 at the age of sixty-five. 

Ransom C. Hunt was reared on the farm in Iowa, attended dis- 
trict school, the city schools of Burlington, and was also a student 
in a noted acadamy at one time conducted at Denmark, Iowa. He 
was also in- the schools at Bushnell, Illinois, and during 1859-61, was 
a student of Lombard College at Galesburg. When his father 
removed to Macomb, Illinois, he took up the study of law in the 
office of Hon. J. C. Thompson. The family in the fall of 1863 
moved to Galesburg, but Ransom C. and his father remained in 
Macomb until 1865. At Galesburg he read law in the office of Hon. 
A. C. Mason, who directed his studies until his admission to the bar 
in June. 1866. Ransom C. Hunt formed a partnership in 1869 with 
Mr. Mason, but for the past twenty years has practiced alone. 

On May i, 1879, Mr. Hunt married Miss Irene Johnson, a native 
of St. Paul, Minnesota. They have two sons and two daughters: 
Beulah M., wife of Harold M. Holland, of Galesburg; Albert V., 
who was educated in Lombard College and now resides in Chicago ; 
Harry C., who is in business at San Diego, California, both sons 
being married; and Florence I., now attending Lombard College. 

Mr. Hunt has for many years been a democrat, but aside from 
a term as police magistrate from 1889 until 1896 has had little to 
do with public office, and has never aspired to the official preferments 
in the course of his long career. He has been devoted to his pro- 
fession, has concentrated all his time and energy on his legal work. 



644 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and his reputation as a lawyer has been well earned. Mr. Hunt 
has served as a delegate to democratic state conventions, and for 
a number of years has attended the national conventions of his party. 
He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, belongs to the Knox 
County and State Bar associations, and he and his family are mem- 
bers of the Central Congregational Church. His home is at 848 
North Broad Street, and his office at 45 S. Cherry Street. 

HARVEY H. ATHERTON. Few of the younger members of the 
Illinois bar who have confined themselves strictly to the work of 
their profession have enjoyed more substantial success and stand 
higher on the merits of their attainments than Harvey H. Ather- 
ton, who was admitted to practice less than ten years ago and is 
easily one of the most successful lawyers of Lewistown and of Ful- 
ton County. 

Harvey H. Atherton was born in Vermont Township of Fulton 
County September i, 1881. He was the second in a family of five 
children born to Kester W. and Amelia (Wise) Atherton. The 
Atherton ancestors came from England, while the Wises were from 
Germany. The records show that the Atherton family through its 
various generations has been distinguished for the quiet industry 
of farmers, merchants and professional men, and as lovers of peace 
rather than of war. David and Ross Atherton were pioneer set- 
tlers in Illinois and Ross Atherton located in Fulton County about 
1844. Both Kester W. and Amelia (Wise) Atherton were natives 
of Fulton County. 

Until sixteen years of age Harvey H. Atherton lived in the 
country and attended the district schools, and then took a course in 
the high school at Ipava, graduating in 1901. At that time his mind 
was definitely made up to study law, and for two years, while teach- 
ing country school, he read law in the office of Lucien Gray. His 
studies were continued in the law department of the University of 
Michigan, from which he graduated LL. B. in 1905, was admitted 
to the Illinois bar at Chicago in July of the same year, and then 
returned to Lewistown and was employed in the office of Lucien 
Gray, one of the leading lawyers and prominent as a jurist. At the 
end of one year Mr. Atherton bought the law business of Mr. Gray, 
and since that time has practiced as an individual. He has never 
permitted himself to become a politician nor to accept any political 
preferment. His large law business demands all his time and atten- 
tion though he manifests a disinterested willingness to serve his com- 
munity and for several years has been a member of the board of 
education. His law library contains about 1,000 volumes. 

Mr. Atherton was married September 20, 1905, to Edna V. 
Lingenfelter, of Canton. They have two children: Lucien, born 
January 6, 1907, and Keith, born April 19, 1912. Mr. Atherton 
has his law offices in the Lewistown National Bank Building. He is 
affiliated with the Masonic order, having attained the consistory 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 645 

degrees of Scottish Rite, belongs to the Mystic Shrine, and also the 
Knights of Pythias, in politics is progressive and a member of the 
Methodist Church. He is also a member of the State and County 
Bar associations. 

EUGENE WILLIAM WELCH. For thirty-six busy years Eugene 
William Welch has been a member of the Galesburg bar and in his 
private practice as well as in public office he is well known over 
Knox County. A man of unswerving honesty, upright in thought 
and deed, his legal learning was built on a sound foundation and 
his professional success has been won along lines which have been 
personally creditable and have dignified his calling. Urged by early 
environment to become self reliant, he has been, in large measure, 
the architect of his own fortunes, possessing but not needing the 
prestige of honorable ancestry to open the doors of opportunity for 
him when he reached the threshold of manhood. 

Eugene William Welch was born at LaSalle, Illinois, October 
28, 1852, and is a son of Dr. William Wallace and Jane (Chad wick) 
Welch, the fourth born in the family of nine children. The mother 
was of New England birth and ancestry, born in July, 1827, at Wind- 
sor, Kennebec County, Maine. The father was born at Albany, 
New York, in September, 1821. He became a student of medicine 
and was graduated in Rush Medical College at Chicago in 1846. 
During the Civil war he served three years as a member of the Fifty- 
third Illinois Volunteer Infantry and after the close of his term 
of enlistment, re-entered the service and served as acting staff sur- 
geon with headquarters at Vicksburg, until the close of that war. 
For a number of years the family resided at LaSalle but in 1868 
came to Knox County and settled at Wataga. At that time Eugene 
W. Welch was sixteen years of age and had been attending St. Pat- 
rick's Academy, and after coming to Knox County spent a short 
period in the public schools and later on attended the Galesburg 
High School for two years, and Knox College. He taught school 
for eight consecutive winters in district schools of Knox County. 
The home farm, however, claimed a large amount of his time and 
energy and he became very familiar with all the wearying tasks that 
make up the laborious life of a farmer, without finding enjoyment 
in them because of his inclinations in an entirely different direction. 
He began to read law in June, 1875, his law books being his recrea- 
tion after his daily duties as a schoolmaster were over. He con- 
tinued his reading under the direction first of the law firm of Lan- 
phere and Brown and later with the firm of Douglas and Harvey, 
and was admitted to the bar in June, 1877, by the Supreme Court 
then sitting at Mount Vernon, Illinois. Through the winter fol- 
lowing he taught school but on March 26, 1878, opened a law office 
at Galesburg and here has continued in the practice of his profes- 
sion, always as an individual, and thus unhampered has been able 
to decide for himself the class of law business with which to iden- 



646 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tify his name. He early took a foremost place at the local bar, his 
capacity for close, logical reasoning making him a peculiarly force- 
ful and effective advocate and qualifying him for professional posi- 
tions of responsibility. In the spring of 1889 Mr. Welch was elected 
city attorney of Galesburg and was re-elected in 1891 and held the 
office until 1893. In the meanwhile, in the fall of 1892 he was 
elected state's attorney of Knox County and assumed the duties of 
that office in December of that year, his efficiency and fearlessness 
during his first term securing re-election and he served eight years. 
During this period he prosecuted and sent to prison more breakers 
of the law than were sent from any other county with the exception 
of Cook, and out of 700 cases that came under his jurisdiction in 
6 l / 2 years, but one indictment was quashed. In the cause of 
the people he was relentless as his office demanded and during 
his entire eight years of service not once was he accused of acting 
otherwise than according to the soundest of legal and equitable 
principles. At the termination of his second term as state's attor- 
ney, Mr. Welch resumed private practice and in much of the im- 
portant litigation in the courts of the county he still appears on one 
side or the other. He has several times served as a delegate to state 
conventions. He maintains his office at No. 50 South Cherry Street, 
Galesburg, his residence being at No. 363 West Tompkins Street. 
Mr. Welch was married June 24, 1879, to Miss Ida I. Spooner, 
who was born November 2, 1858, and died March 17, 1908. She 
was a daughter of Alfred A. Spooner, a prominent farmer of Knox 
County. To Mr. and Mrs. Welch four children were born: Nellie, 
who is the wife of J. N. Canfield, of Los Angeles, California, and 
they have one daughter, Helen ; Frank A., who is now reading law 
in his father's office, is a graduate of the Galesburg High School 
and of Brown's Business College; Bessie, who is the wife of Roy 
E. Bignall, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; and Sidney Post, who 
was born February 22, 1895, and was accidentally killed by the street 
cars in Galesburg, July 8, 1906, a domestic tragedy from which his 
mother never recovered. Mrs. Welch aside from her admirable 
qualities as wife and mother, was possessed of characteristics and 
talents that widened her circle of usefulness and made her an influ- 
ence for the betterment of society in many directions. As a writer 
she had rare descriptive powers and was well known in literary pub- 
lications. She was deeply interested in many charities and belonged 
to such organizations as the Woman's Relief Corps, the Ladies of 
Maccabees, the Ladies' Auxiliary to the Young Men's Christian 
Association, and the Mothers' Club. Mr. Welch has long been a 
valued member of the State Bar Association, is also identified with 
the Masons and the Elks, and with true public spirit promotes the 
laudable efforts of the Galesburg Business Men's Club. 

JUDGE FREDERICK A. SMITH. As judge of one of the branches 
of the Illinois Appellate Court, First District, at Chicago, Judge 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 647 

Frederick A. Smith fills a place of distinction and important public 
service. He is one of the oldest members of the Chicago bar in 
active standing, began the practice of law soon after the close of 
the war, in which he was a soldier, and has sat on the circuit and 
appellate bench since 1903. His record of service classifies him 
as a fine type of modern judge. Judge Smith has the experienced 
judgment of one who has known all sorts of men, is a discriminat- 
ing observer of character and motives, and the humanitarian spirit 
has always characterized his work. 

Frederick Augustus Smith was born at Norwood Park, in Cook 
County, Illinois, February n, 1844. His parents, Israel G. and 
Susan (Pennoyer) Smith, were both born in 1816, the former in 
New York and the latter in Connecticut. While Chicago was still a 
village on the lake shore, in 1835, Israel G. Smith moved to Cook 
County and selected a tract of prairie land in what is now the 
northwestern section of the city, and paid for it the usual govern- 
ment price. That is one of the oldest homesteads about Chicago. 

Judge Smith grew up on a farm, at that time situated a con- 
siderable distance out of the city, but has been familiar with the 
growth and development of Chicago for sixty years or more. From 
the public schools he entered the preparatory department of the old 
Chicago University in 1860. In 1862 he became a student in the 
collegiate department, and in 1863 left school to become a private in 
Company G of the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Illinois Infan- 
try. He saw active service in campaigns in Missouri and Ken- 
tucky, and was mustered out in 1864. On his return to Chicago he 
resumed his studies in the University, and was graduated Master 
of Arts in 1866. He had already chosen the law for his life work, 
and in 1867 received the degree LL. B. from the old Union College 
of Law. Thus his membership in the Illinois bar dates from 1867, 
a period of more than forty-five years. Early in his practice he was 
associated with C. C. Kohlsaat under the firm name of Smith & 
Kohlsaat until 1872. He then conducted an individual general 
practice, and in 1890 became senior partner of the firm of Smith, 
Helmer, Moulton & Price, and was with that firm until his elevation 
to the bench. 

In 1898 Judge Smith was republican candidate for judge of the 
Superior Court, but was defeated. In June, 1903, he was elected 
a judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County, for the term ending 
in June, 1909. He was re-elected in the latter year for another term 
of six years, and in June, 1915, was re-elected for a third term. 
Since December, 1904, Judge Smith has been assigned to the Appel- 
late Court, and was one of the presiding judges of one of the Appel- 
late Courts sitting in Chicago. As a judge he possesses the dignity, 
impartiality, broad knowledge and unbending integrity which have 
always made his decisions respected and have kept his record unsul- 
lied. As candidate for re-election to the circuit bench in June, 1915, 
Judge Smith received such endorsement as his previous record had 



648 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

earned, and his re-election for the term of six years following June, 
1915, assures Cook County of the services of one of its most cap- 
able jurists. 

Judge Smith has sustained many active relations with his home 
city and is also well known to the Illinois bar. He was elected 
president of the Chicago Law Club in 1887, and in 1890 was presi- 
dent of the Chicago Bar Association. He is a former president of 
the Hamilton Club, and a member of the Union League and the 
Chicago Literary Club. Since the beginning of the present Uni- 
versity of Chicago he has been a factor in its growth and advance- 
ment, and is a trustee of both the University of Chicago and Rush 
Medical College. Judge Smith was married July 25, 1871, to Miss 
Frances B. Morey, daughter of Rev. Reuben and Abby (Clemons) 
Morey, of Merton, Wisconsin. Mrs. Smith died December 26, 1910. 

FRANK M. Cox. In the past ten years it is probable that no 
Chicago lawyer has handled a greater volume of trial cases than 
Frank M. Cox, whose business has been more and more developed 
as a corporation and insurance attorney. This enviable position as 
a member of the Chicago bar shows the efficient industry and solid 
ability of a man whose career began in comparative obscurity as a 
blacksmith's apprentice. 

'A son of Ulysses S. and Lydia A. (Myers) Cox, the former a 
blacksmith, Frank M. Cox was born at New Vienna, Clinton County, 
Ohio, October i, 1856. The public schools of his native county 
provided his early and only education, and his first means of self- 
support was farm work and assisting his father in the blacksmith 
trade. He also worked as a brick maker for a year, and then was a 
farm hand until past his majority. 

In 1878 he took up the study of law at Vandalia, Illinois, with 
E. M. Ashcraft, who later became one of the prominent members of 
the Illinois and Chicago bar. He was admitted to the Illinois bar 
on examination in 1882, and was in practice at Vandalia until 1893. 
The only office he ever held was as city attorney of Vandalia for 
one term, at a salary of $75. After the removal of Mr. Ashcraft 
from Vandalia to Chicago about 1888, Air. Cox succeeded him as 
local attorney for the Vandalia Railroad, a part of the Pennsylvania 
system. He represented that company until 1892, and in 1893 moved 
to Chicago and entered the office of Judge Elbridge Hanecy. Sub- 
sequently Judge Hanecy secured for him a better connection in the 
offices of Paden & Gridley. About 1894 Mr. Cox became a member 
of the firm of Ashcraft, Gordon & Cox, and several years later 
became senior member of Cox, Heldman & Shortall, and subse- 
quently Cox, Heldman & Lipson. Mr. Shortall retired a few years 
later and Mr. Cox's name next appeared as an associate in Cox, 
Winslaw & Ward. For about fifteen years Mr. Cox has been 
engaged in an individual practice, and his present offices are in the 
Insurance Exchange Building. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 649 

In 1898 he became attorney for the Standard Life & Accident 
Insurance Company of Detroit, representing that corporation in 
Illinois. This was the important relation which has since caused 
him to specialize as a corporation and insurance lawyer. He also 
became trial attorney for the Maryland Casualty Company of Bal- 
timore, and one of the trial attorneys for the London Guaranty 
& Accident Company, and in some important cases was retained to 
represent other insurance companies. In 1906 Mr. Cox began try- 
ing cases for the Travelers Insurance Company of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, and in February, 1907, this company retained him per- 
manently as its counsel and trial attorney for Illinois. Since then 
the responsibilities of this position have increased so rapidly that he 
has given up his business with other companies, and now gives his 
entire time as attorney to the Travelers Insurance Company of 
Hartford. 

Mr. Cox is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, is affil- 
iated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his 
wife attend the Christian Science Church. On May 4, 1884, he mar- 
ried Miss Martha N. Arnold, of Vandalia, Illinois, daughter of 
former county treasurer Joshua Arnold, of Fayette County. Mr. 
Cox's home is at 4548 North Ashland Avenue. He is one of the 
comparatively few successful members of the bar who have not 
engaged in outside business, being primarily and exclusively a 
lawyer. 

ALBERT G. WELCH. Among Chicago firms that give especial 
attention to practice in the Federal courts, that of Sims, Welch 
and Godman is one of the best known, on account of the individ- 
ual prominence of its members and their broad experience as 
counsel for the Government and in association with cases con- 
tested before the Federal courts. 

Mr. Welch, who has been a Chicago lawyer since 1894, has 
in recent years paid special attention to the handling of cases 
arising under the Sherman anti-trust act. Mr. Welch has served 
as special assistant United States attorney, for the Northern Dis- 
trict of Illinois to which position he was appointed under the 
regime of Edwin W. Sims and reappointed under James H. Wilk- 
erson. He is a member of the board of managers of the Chi- 
cago Bar Association. 

Albert Gaylord Welch was born in Chicago, June 3, 1873, and 
is a son of Leon C. and Laura (King) Welch. He was educated 
in the public schools of Chicago and in Lake Forest Academy. He 
was admitted to the bar in November, 1894, so that his active work- 
as a lawyer has covered a period of twenty years. In addition to 
his active association with the Chicago Bar Association, Mr. Welch 
is identified with the Chicago Law Club, the Illinois Bar Associa- 
tion, and is a charter member of the Chicago Society of Advocates, 



650 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

besides which he has membership in the Union League Club of 
Chicago. His political allegiance is with the republican party. 

On January 10, 1906, Mr. Welch married Miss Katharine 
Strong, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David O. Strong, of Chicago. 

WILLIAM PRENTISS. With an active membership in the Illinois 
bar covering more than thirty-five years, William Prentiss has 
been a Chicago lawyer since 1891, and besides his successful prac- 
tice in his profession has become well known through his civic 
and political activities. 

William Prentiss was born at Davenport, Iowa, September 19, 
1848, a son of Dr. William and Elizabeth (Gapen) Prentiss. 
Soon after his birth his parents moved to Schuyler County, Illi- 
nois, and later to Fulton County, where his father died in 1854. 
In 1860 his mother married James Manley, a farmer of McDon- 
ough County, where William Prentiss lived during his early youth. 
After the public schools he entered Knox College at Galesburg, but 
ill health prevented his graduation. For several years he lived in 
Minnesota, and farmed and taught school in that state, for three 
years being county superintendent of Cottonwood County. Re- 
turning to Illinois he was admitted to the bar in June, 1878, and 
in the same year was elected state's attorney of McDonough 
County to fill a vacancy, and was re-elected in 1880 for the four 
year term. Since his removal to Chicago in 1891 Mr. Prentiss 
has been identified with large and important practice. 

He has been much in public life throughout his career as a 
lawyer. Besides filling the office of state's attorney in McDonough 
County, he was elected mayor of Macomb on the democratic ticket 
in 1 88 1. In 1888 he was nominee for Congress in the old Eleventh 
District, and made a strong campaign. In Chicago the democrats 
put him on the ticket for the office of circuit judge of Cook County 
in 1893, in 1898 and 1903. He was a delegate to the Democratic 
National Convention in 1896, and in 1898 was chairman of the 
state convention. As a political orator he has taken a prominent 
part in campaigns for a number of years, and worked in behalf 
of the democratic interests in the national campaigns of 1896 and 
1900. In 1904 he withdrew his name as a candidate for the 
democratic nomination for governor. In 1905 he was one of the 
leading democrats of Chicago who sought the nomination for the 
office of mayor, his individual platform being one providing for 
municipal ownership. When the present .Governor Dunne was nomi- 
nated on a platform embracing those principles he withdrew and 
supported Mr. Dunne, who was elected. During 1905-07 Mr. Pren- 
tiss was a civil service commissioner and was president of the board 
during the second year. Not long afterwards he became dissatisfied 
with the actual leadership in the democratic party, especially in Illi- 
nois, and accordingly declined to support Mr. Bryan in 1908, and 
gave his influence in behalf of the Roosevelt policies and the can- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 651 

didacy of Judge Taft. After that for several years he acted inde- 
pendently in politics, taking as his motto Lincoln's words of 1854: 
"Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he 
is right and part with him when he goes wrong." In 1912 Mr. 
Prentiss found the newly organized progressive party acceptable 
to his ideals of political action and was presidential elector at large 
on that ticket and in 1914 was one of the unsuccessful candidates 
on the progressive ticket for judge of the Cook County court. 

Mr. Prentiss has his offices in the Ashland Block, and his city 
home in Rogers Park. He finds recreation in farming, and has 
an attractive country place, known as "Willhelen" in Allegan 
County, Michigan. Mr. Prentiss was married in 1872 to Elizabeth 
Helen McCau'ghey, of Marietta, Fulton County, Illinois. Their 
children are: James Manley, deceased; Jackson McCaughey and 
William, Jr. 

JOSEPH K. McMAHON. A Chicago lawyer whose professional 
activities have brought the substantial results of secure position 
and influence, Joseph K. McMahon came to Chicago from the 
farm, and graduated from the Lake Forest University Law School. 
He has been connected with court and office practice in that city 
for seventeen years. 

Born at Amboy, Lee County, Illinois, November 9, 1868, he is 
a son of Patrick and Ann (Clancy) McMahon, his father a native 
of County Limerick and his mother of King's County, Ireland. The 
father came to the United States when about eighteen years of age, 
was married in Rochester, New York, and for a number of years 
was a merchant in LaSalle and later in Amboy, Illinois, and still 
later followed farming. 

Joseph K. McMahon waft reared on a farm and educated in dis- 
trict schools, and on coming to Chicago took up the study of law 
in the office of Hon. John Mayo Palmer. He continued his work 
in the law department of Lake Forest University, graduated LL. B. 
in 1897, was admitted to the Illinois bar the same year, and took 
active practice. Mr. McMahon was associated in the law office of 
F. H. Trude, one of the foremost of Chicago's lawyers, from 1898 
until Mr. Trude's death in November, 1913. Since that time Mr. 
McMahon has managed an individual practice. 

He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, is grand regent 
of the Royal Arcanum of Illinois and is a member of the state 
council of the Knights of Columbus. Mr. McMahon married No- 
vember 25, 1911, Miss Elizabeth Waugh, of Chicago. Their two 
children are Joseph K., Jr., and Brandon Waugh. Mr. McMahon 
has his offices in the Ashland Block and his residence at 637 North 
Lotus Avenue. 

SIMEON STRAUS. In the forty years of his active practice as 
a Chicago lawyer special pre-eminence has come to Simeon Straus 



652 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

through the ability and success with which he has handled chancery 
cases and real estate matters. In this department of the law he 
undoubtedly stands in the very front rank, with very few peers. 

Simeon Straus is a native of Milwaukee, but has spent nearly 
all his life in Chicago. He was born November 21, 1855, his 
parents being Samuel and Rosine Straus. Samuel Straus, his 
father, came to Chicago in 1852 and after living there until 1855 
moved to Milwaukee and returned to Chicago in 1856. Samuel 
Straus was a lawyer, well known in real estate work, and died in 
1878. Mr. Straus received his early education in a public school 
that has been famous for producing some of the leaders in the city's 
life, the Old Jones School, from which he graduated in 1869. He 
finished the course of the Chicago High School in 1872, and then 
entered the cla.ss of 1876 at Yale University. He abandoned his 
collegiate course to enter the Yale Law School, and was graduated 
LL. B. in 1874. Admitted to the Connecticut bar in June, 1874, 
the same year Mr. Straus established his practice in Chicago. 

From May, 1875, to December, 1877, he acted as attorney for 
the German National Bank, the German Savings Bank, and for 
Henry Greenebaum & Company, bankers. With that preliminary 
experience he engaged in private practice, and has since confined his 
work to chancery and probate cases and real estate law. For 
several years he has had his son Ira E. associated with him. Mr. 
Straus has had the settlement of some of the largest estates in Chi- 
cago, and the handling of some of the largest real estate cases in 
business. He has always been a republican in politics, is a member 
of the Hamilton Club and of the American, Illinois and Chicago 
Bar associations. 

FREDERICK JOHN NEWEY. For fifteen years, the entire period 
of his professional activities, Mr. Newey has practiced with one firm 
in Chicago, having begun as a junior and for the past twelve years 
has been partner with Wheelock, Shattuck & Newey, now Wheelock, 
Newey & Mackenzie, with offices in the Marquette Building. In 
this time Mr. Newey has had professional relations with a large 
clientage in Chicago and is a lawyer of successful attainments. 

Born in Wolverhampton, England, September 4, 1872, Frederick 
John Newey is a son of William Newey, a minister of the Methodist 
Church, who came to the United JStates about 1880 and for more 
than thirty years was identified with the work of his profession in 
the State of Michigan, where he had several charges. Frederick 
J. Newey had the beginnings of his education in the schools of his 
native town, and after coming to America attended public schools at 
Detroit, Hadley and Williamston in Michigan, graduating from the 
Hadley High School. For three years he was a student at the Athe- 
naeum in Chicago, and took the regular law course of the Lake 
Forest University, graduating LL. B. in 1899. Admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar the same year, he began practice with W r heelock & Shat- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 653 

tuck, was admitted to partnership in 1902, and has since been one of 
the active members of this firm engaged in general practice. 

Mr. Newey is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, the Law Club, the Hamilton Club, 
the Congregational Club, and his college fraternity is the Delta Chi. 
On June 27, 1901, he married Miss Gertrude E. Newton, of Chicago. 
Three of their four children are living: Harriet A., Kathryn and 
Helen. Mr. Newey and family reside in Wilmette. 

FRANK FREMONT REED. A member of the Chicago bar since 
1882, Frank Fremont Reed has brought to the practice of his chosen 
profession the natural aptitude which is inherent in a mind of great 
logical and analytical power, as well as the culture which is the 
product of a thorough education, aided by intelligent and persistent 
study. To untiring industry he has joined a thorough knowledge 
of the law and a close familiarity with authorities, and his citations 
are made with unerring judgment. Aside from the duties of his 
large and constantly-growing practice, he has found the time to labor 
in educational circles, and since 1903 has held a professorship in the 
University of Michigan. 

Mr. Reed was born at Monmouth, Illinois, August 18, 1857, and 
is a son of Philo E. and Minerva D. Reed. When he was still a lad 
he was taken by his parents to Warren, Ohio, where he attended the 
public schools from 1868 to 1875, in the latter year commencing the 
study of the profession upon which he had determined as his life 
work. After some preparation, Mr. Reed entered the University 
of Michigan, where he pursued a literary course, and in 1880 was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, immediately there- 
after beginning his practical experience in a Cleveland law office. 
Later he returned to Warren, where he continued to work in an 
attorney's office until 1882, and in that year was admitted to the 
bar and came to Chicago. Mr. Reed's practice has been somewhat 
general in its character, but he gives special attention to trademarks, 
unfair trade, copyright and anti-trust litigation, fixed prices and 
price maintained. Since 1903 he has been a lecturer on law of copy- 
rights and trade mark law in the University of Michigan, and since 
1908 on the same subjects in the University of Chicago. It has been 
his fortune to acquire a large and representative professional busi- 
ness, and to attain a substantial reputation among the members of 
the fraternity, the latter gained through strict adherence to the 
unwritten ethics of the calling. Mr. Reed is a member of the Chi- 
cago Bar Association and the American Bar Association. While 
he is a deep thinker and a profound student, he is fond of social 
pleasures and holds membership in such well-known organizations 
as the Chicago Athletic Association, the Riverside Golf Club and 
the University Club, all of Chicago, and the Baltusral Club, of Short 
Hills, New Jersey. 

Mr. Reed was married at Riverside, Illinois, August 2, 1888, to 



654 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Miss Hattie C. Allen, and they reside in that beautiful Chicago 
suburb. Mr. Reed maintains well-appointed offices in the Peoples 
Gas Building. 

ANTON ZEMAN. A rising young lawyer of foreign birth, but of 
Chicago training, Anton Zeman absorbed the best spirit of the city 
and the times and since his admission to the bar in 1908 has pur- 
sued his well-chosen career to such good purpose that he enjoys 
a large practice and a special reputation for successfully handling 
cases in the criminal courts. 

Mr. Zeman was born in Bohemia, January i, 1881, and is a 
son of Anton and Frances (Kubik) Zeman. When the family 
came to America his father was naturally attracted to Chicago, 
which contains the largest Bohemian element in the United States, 
and here the elder man was engaged in business for many years, 
although he is now living retired. That he was determined his son 
should familiarize himself with the customs and language of the 
adopted country is evident from the fact that Anton, then a lad of 
but six years, was sent to the public school the first day of the fam- 
ily's arrival in Chicago. In later years he took a private course 
of study at the Young Men's Christian Association, and following 
some little further preparation he began the study of his chosen 
profession at John Marshall Law School, where he was graduated 
in 1908 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. At the time of his 
graduation, it should be said, he had the highest average in his class 
in all the different branches. In the same year Mr. Zeman was 
admitted to the bar and he at once engaged in practice. He has 
since continued as he began, in independent practice, and has his 
offices in the City Hall Square Building. 

Of late Mr. Zeman has given his attention to criminal law. In 
the recent notorious murder trial, the Spencer-Rexroat case, Mr. 
Zeman represented the defendant, taking the case to the Supreme 
Court and repeatedly saving his client from the gallows, although 
the decision was finally given against him. This case, which was 
tried at Wheaton, attracted the attention of the country, and was 
financed throughout by Mr. Zeman, who made a brilliant fight for 
the life of his client. He is particularly well known among Chi- 
cago Bohemians and handles the major part of the criminal cases 
among his countrymen. 

Mr. Zeman is a member of the Lawyers' Association and his 
fraternal connections include membership in the Independent Order 
of Foresters and a number of Bohemian societies. He is a repub- 
lican, but has not found time from his large and growing practice 
to devote to politics. However, he takes a keen interest in move- 
ments making for progress and he has done much to advance the 
welfare of the community in which he resides. 

Mr. Zeman is unmarried and lives at 3909 West T\venty : sixth 
Street. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 655 

HENRY F. DICKINSON. When Mr. Dickinson began practicing 
in Chicago in 1898, he had not only the training but the energy and 
ambition for a successful career and his professional attainments 
now give him a high rank among the city's lawyers. 

Henry F. Dickinson was born in St. Louis, Missouri, March 23, 
1874, and is a son of Henry B. and Elizabeth (Martin) Dickinson, 
who now reside at Rockford, Illinois. His father is now retired 
after many years of business activity. Henry B. Dickinson was born 
in the city of Boston, Massachusetts, and was educated at Amherst 
College, that state. He became one of the pioneer representatives 
of the sewing-machine business, in which he was long associated 
with the old-time Grover & Baker firm of manufacturers. Prior to 
the Civil war he came to Chicago, whence he later removed to 
St. Louis and finally established his residence at Rockford, Illinois. 

Henry F. Dickinson, after leaving Rockford High School,- was 
given the special privilege of attending the excellent Latin School 
in Neufchatel, Switzerland, where he remained two years. He then 
attended Lake Forest Academy, Lake Forest, Illinois, and afterward 
entered the law department of the University of Wisconsin, at 
Madison, graduating in 1896, Bachelor of Laws. Following a post- 
graduate course in the Law School of Harvard University, he was 
admitted to the Illinois bar in 1898. He served his professional 
novitiate in Chicago, where for four years he was associated with 
George Steere, and since that time has conducted an individual 
practice. Mr. Dickinson is an active member of the Chicago Bar 
Association and the Illinois Bar Association. He is also a member 
of the University Club of Chicago, and in his home city of Evanston 
is affiliated with the University Club and the Evanston Country 
Club, and holds membership in the Phi Delta Theta college fra- 
ternity. While a student in the University of Wi'sconsin, Mr. Dick- 
inson was prominent in its athletic affairs, especially as a member 
of the university football team, on which he played end. Later he 
was a member of the Harvard law team. His present interest in 
sports is chiefly in hunting and fishing. 

On June 27, 1902, Mr. Dickinson married Miss Edith Baxter 
Colebrooke, daughter of the late William Colebrooke, who was a 
prominent Chicago lawyer and author of a valuable law publication 
entitled "Collateral Securities." Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson have four 
children Elizabeth, Henry, Edith and William Colebrooke. 

ROBERT W. FISK. As an active and successful attorney Robert 
W. Fisk has occupied a prominent place in his profession in Vermil- 
ion County for the past twenty-five years, and has had a varied and 
broad experience as a lawyer in all departments of practice. His 
home is at Ridgefarm in Vermilion County. 

Robert W. Fisk was born in Clark County, Illinois, November 7, 
1858, one of a family of four children born to James W. and Sarah 
A. (Dodd) Fisk. His father, who was born in Putnam County, 



656 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Indiana, was one of the substantial farmers of Clark County. On 
the old homestead and in the wholesome environment of the country, 
Robert W. Fisk grew to manhood, read law when a young man 
under Golden & Wilkins, and completed his studies in the Michigan 
University law department. Admitted to the Illinois bar in 1888, 
Robert W. Fisk has since been identified with much of the work in 
the courts and in office practice in Vermilion County. He is a 
member of the Vermilion County, the Illinois State and the Amer- 
ican Bar associations, served as supervisor for ten years of Elwood 
Township, and in 1910 was a candidate before the republican 
primaries for the Legislature. 

Mr. Fisk is affiliated with the Masonic order, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal Neighbors, 
belongs to the Methodist Church, while his wife is a Presbyterian. 
Mr. Fisk married Miss Belle Brown, daughter of Isaac and Virginia 
A. (Hutchison) Brown. They are the parents of one daughter, 
Una Fisk, now the wife of Wilbur H. Tribble, a progressive farmer 
at Ridgefarm, Illinois. 

GEORGE HAVEN MILLER. A lawyer who had reached a high 
position in his profession before his early death, George Haven 
Miller was a splendid representative of the scholarly and able law- 
yer, a high-minded public servant, and a courtly and popular gen- 
tleman. He spent nearly all his life in Evanst'on, where for a 
number of years he was connected with the Evanston Civil Service 
Commission in addition to his work as a lawyer. Following his 
death, which occurred February 6, 1915, his colleagues on the Civil 
Service Commission expressed their appreciation of his working fel- 
lowship and counsel in the following words: "Both by blood and 
training George Haven Miller belonged with those who devote 
time, effort and a high degree of skill to the wellbeing of the com- 
munity, with never a thought of reward. His keen sense of justice, 
his knowledge of the civil service law he was charged with admin- 
istering, and his manly and forceful presence cannot be replaced." 

George Haven Miller was born at Pittsfield, in Illinois, Novem- 
ber 3, 1876, and when six months of age was brought to Evanston 
by his parents, Henry H. C. and Harriet Scott (Lewis) Miller. 
His father was for many years an able member of the Illinois bar. 
Mr. Miller was educated in the public schools, graduating from 
grammar school and high school, finished his college course in the 
Northwestern University in 1898, and in 1901 was awarded the 
degree LL. B. from the Northwestern Law School. In university 
he was a member of the Beta Theta Pi, and was a leader in athletic 
affairs, particularly baseball. He played on the high-school team 
four years, and four years on the university team, being captain 
in his senior year. After his admission to the bar Mr. Miller 
became associated with his father in practice and together they 
enjoyed an extensive clientage. The elder Miller was peculiarly 



identified with civil service in Evanston, having served as president 
of the commission from its inception until his death in 1910. George 
H. Miller was appointed as his successor on the board, and his work 
in that connection well deserved the tribute above quoted from the 
resolution passed by his fellow associates. While this service was 
given without compensation, he made its duties paramount to all 
his other engagements. Many have recalled his impartiality as a 
judge when city employes were before him for trial. 

Mr. Miller was a director of the Country Club, a member of 
the Chicago Union League Club and the Chicago Law Club, and a 
short time before his death had resigned from the Evanston Golf 
Club and the Evanston Club. He is survived by his mother, his 
sister, Miss Alta, and a brother, Donald C. 

While his attainments as a lawyer were such as to justify his 
mention in a work on the Illinois Courts and Lawyers, he was also 
distinguished for his personality and companionable qualities. With 
reference to this, phase of his character the editor of the Evanston 
News-Index said : "He had a rare charm of manner that made 
his society eagerly sought by both men and women. Athletic, of 
fine figure and handsome face, he excelled in sports and was equally 
at home in the woods with a party of men as in the clubs of the 
city. Successful as a lawyer, with a well balanced mind and attain- 
ments much above the ordinary, he was especially remarkable for 
his high ideals and chivalrous bearing. He never forgot that he 
had a mother and sister. He was wholesome, upright and high 
minded, and had the respect of all classes and their cordial liking 
to a very remarkable degree." 

HARRY PUTNAM PEARSONS is one of the younger members of 
the Chicago bar and one who has made admirable progress in the 
years of his activity thus far. He was elected mayor of Evanston, 
Illinois, April 6, 1915, on the independent republican ticket, having 
won the election in a field of four candidates and with a plurality of 
1,492 votes from the largest vote ever polled in Evanston. 

Mr. Pearsons is a son of Henry A. and Catherine J. (West) 
Pearsons. Henry A. Pearsons was the founder of the firm of 
Pearsons & Taft, now the Pearsons-Taft Land Credit Company, 
the oldest farm mortgage house in the United States. He was a 
soldier of the Union in the Civil war, and rose to the rank of first 
lieutenant in his regiment, the Eighth Illinois Cavalry. His service 
was with the Army of the Potomac, and he was an active partici- 
pant in ninety engagements, including many of the important bat- 
tles that marked the four years' struggle between the North and 
South. He was one of the soldiers assigned as special escort to 
the remains of President Lincoln from Washington to Chicago, 
where the body lay in state at the courthouse of Cook County before 
being taken to its final resting place at Springfield. Three times 
was Lieutenant Pearsons wounded in battle, but at no time was 

Vol. 1115 



658 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

he long incapacitated for active service. When the war ended he 
returned to his Illinois home, and here he has since been active in 
business life. 

In Evanston Harry P. Pearsons had his early schooling, and 
finishing his attendance at an academy there, he entered Northwest- 
ern University, in the Liberal Arts department. His studies there 
at an end, he entered the Law School of Columbia University, in 
New York City, where he was a student during 1895-6. He com- 
pleted his law course in Northwestern University, and was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1898, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
In 1901 he was admitted to the bar of Illinois, and from then until 
1905 was attorney and secretary of the Pearsons-Taft Land Credit 
Company. He then engaged in general law practice in association 
with George P. Merrick and later with Hon. Leroy D. Thoman, 
formerly a member of the United States Civil Service Commission. 
Judge Thoman died in April, 1909, but his name is still retained 
in the firm of Thoman, Harnwell & Pearsons, Mr. Pearsons' associ- 
ate being Frederick W. Harnwell. 

Mr. Pearsons is a member of the Chicago, Illinois and American 
Bar associations, also of the Chicago Law Institute and Law Club. 
He has served in Evanston as alderman from the Seventh Ward. 
His social ties are with the University Club, the Evanston Country 
Club and the Evanston Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He also retains membership in his college fra- 
ternities, the Beta Theta Pi and the Delta Chi. By virtue of his 
father's war record he is a member of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion of the United States. He is a companion of the 
second class in the order, and his father is a companion of the first 
class in Illinois Commandery. 

Mr. Pearsons was married February 8, 1900, to Miss Frances 
Keyes, of Kenilworth, Illinois, and they have one daughter, Frances. 
Mr. Pearsons has membership in the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Evanston, where he has his home and where both he 
and his wife take their part in the social activities of the community. 

ANGUS ROY SHANNON. Admitted to the bar in 1896, the cred- 
itable work and attainments of Mr. Shannon have since given him 
a high rank in the profession. He is the attorney for the Chicago 
Board of Education. 

Born in Rochester, New York, March 27, 1873, he is a son of 
Michael and Margaret (McKenzie) Shannon. His father was a 
merchant, and during the Civil war was captain of the i4Oth New 
York Volunteers in the Army of the Potomac. The family came 
to Chicago in the years immediately following the war and in that 
city Angus R. Shannon acquired his education in the public schools, 
at Armour Institute, and in 1896 was graduated LL. B. from the 
University of Michigan. In the same year he was admitted to 
the bars of Michigan and Illinois and began the practice of his 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 659 

profession in Chicago alone. He has built up a large clientele as 
a general practitioner, has made a specialty of real estate law, but 
much of his time and service has been given to the Board of Edu- 
cation. At first he served as an assistant attorney to the board, but 
for many years has been its attorney, and in all has been connected 
with the legal department of the Chicago public school system for 
sixteen years. Mr. Shannon is a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association, the Illinois Bar Association and the American Bar Asso- 
ciation ; also of the Law Club, the Chicago Society of Advocates, the 
University Club, the Chicago Athletic Club and the City Club. He is 
a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity and the Masonic order, and 
in politics is a democrat. His home is at 5758 South Park Avenue, 
and his office at 35 North Dearborn Street. November 5, 1909, he 
married Turbie D. Taft, of Chicago. His two sons are McKenzie 
and Angus. 

CORYDON DELOS HENDRYX. Not only one of the leading but 
one of the oldest practicing attorneys of Knox County is Corydon 
Delos Hendryx, now devoting himself to a general law practice 
at Galesburg, but for many years one of the leading criminal law- 
yers of this section of Illinois. For thirty-one years he has been 
an honored resident of this city and a member of her bar, and in 
professional as well as private life has won public regard and 
personal esteem. 

Corydon D. Hendryx was born in Fulton County, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1841, and is a son of William and Lucinda (Day) Hendryx. 
The father was born at Pen Yan, New York, and the mother in 
Vermont. William Hendryx and wife settled on the old tarm 
in Fulton County, Illinois, in 1837, and there reared their family 
of eleven children, Corydon D. being the eighth in order of birth. 
The ancestry on the paternal side is traced to Holland, from which 
country came colonists who settled and helped to name and found 
New Amsterdam, New York. Grandfather Benjamin Hendryx 
served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. On the maternal 
side the ancestors came to America from Wales and settled in 
Vermont before the War of the Revolution, Ephraim Day being 
the grandfather of Mr. Hendryx. All were people of sturdy stock 
and moral worth and after the early wars probably followed the 
peaceful pursuits of agriculture. When William Hendryx located 
in Fulton County he had to contend with pioneer conditions and 
trie management and cultivation of his land entailed hard work. 
Therefore, when his son, Corydon Delos, under other conditions 
and in a better settled section of the country, would probably have 
been sent regularly to school, here had to assume a man's tasks on 
the farm when only sixteen years of age, having had, in the mean- 
while, but meager opportunities, during three months of the year 
attending the Virgil District School, in the neighborhood of his 
home. For four years he gave his father help on the farm, but 



660 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

when the Civil war was precipitated, began to make arrangements 
to enter the army should hostilities continue. On September 2, 
1862, he enlisted as a private in Company D, One Hundred and 
Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and remained in the service 
until the close of the war, when he was honorably discharged, with 
the rank of first lieutenant, and was mustered out at Chicago, July 
13, 1865. He had seen hard service, and although he was ever at 
the post of duty and participated in the battles of Chattanooga, 
Missionary Ridge, Nashville and others in which General Sherman 
was the commander, he was never sick, wounded nor taken pris- 
oner. Although no iron cross nor other decorative medal was pre- 
sented by his commander, he needed no such incentive in times of 
danger, but found his courage equal to every demand when he 
saw his duty before him but, he, with the other eight surviving 
members of his old company, perhaps have a still more fervent 
love for the old flag than has the younger generation, for he knows 
how it, as an emblem, has been preserved. Mr. Hendryx is the 
sole survivor of the number recruited for Company D at Galesburg. 

After the war was over, Mr. Hendryx returned to his father's 
farm in Fulton County, but shortly afterward began the study of 
law under Attorney Enos N. Boynton, of Prairie City, Illinois, and 
remained in the latter's office for two years as a student, and then 
was admitted to the bar at Springfield. For the two following years 
he practiced law at Prairie City and then came to Galesburg, where 
he entered into partnership with James A. McKenzie, remaining 
in that connection for two years, and then was a partner of C. C. 
Craig until the latter was elected to the bench. Mr. Hendryx 
then admitted James E. Davis to a partnership and they engage 
in a general law practice. For many years his legal responsibilities 
as a successful criminal lawyer were heavy and the court record 
proves how continuously he was concerned on one side or the other 
of notable cases, but for some years he has confined himself largely 
to office practice, finding his usefulness in no way diminished, for 
his reputation rests on a very firm foundation. He is a member of 
the state and county bar associations. 

Mr. Hendryx was married July 4, 1858, when but seventeen 
years of age, to Miss Sarah J. Hulick, who was born in Fulton 
County and still survives. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hendryx : Lucinda, who is the widow of David Copela'nd, of 
Avon, Illinois, has five children; William R., who has wife and 
four children, is connected with the C., B. & Q. Railroad at Gales- 
burg; Ruth A., who married Jasper Rand, of Galesburg, and they 
have five sons ; Martha J., who is the wife of Arthur Harrison, of 
Galesburg, and they have three children; Mark A., who is in busi- 
ness at Beardstown, Illinois ; Clyde S., who is a resident of Gales- 
burg; Corydon D., Jr., who is a resident of Galesburg, has wife 
and two children ; and Bertha, who is the wife of Lee Adams, a con- 
ductor on the C., B. & Q. Railroad, residing at Galesburg. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 661 

In his political views Mr. Hendryx is a republican. So admir- 
ably qualified is he for the administration of public office that repeat- 
edly he has been urged to accept the same, but has always declined, 
having no ambition in that direction. He is, however, one of the 
city's most alert and interested citizens and lends his influence to 
every movement toward stable government and substantial progress. 
He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, but this is the only 
organization in which he takes an interest, and neither does 
Mrs. Hendryx care to identify herself with the clubs and societies 
which occupy the time and attention of many of the women of 
today. Old-time hospitality prevails, however, in the comfortable 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Hendryx, their residence standing at No. 619 
Harvey Street, and once within its cheery portals, outside attractions 
may easily be forgotten. 

OSCAR W. BRECHER. The senior member of the well-known 
law firm of Brecher & Chindblom, Oscar W. Brecher has been 
actively connected with the Chicago bar for twenty-two years, 
during which time he has gained a substantial reputation among 
the general practitioners of the city as a capable lawyer and a 
reliable and public-spirited citzen. From the time of his admission 
to the Illinois bar, just after having attained his majority, he has 
advanced steadily in his profession, and his name has become well 
and favorably known. 

Mr. Brecher is an Illinoisan by birth and training. He was born 
in the village of Sandwich, DeKalb County, December 5, 1871, and 
is a son of Gustave and Barbara (Woelfel) Brecher, natives of 
Germany, who came to the United States in the '405 and settled 
in DeKalb County, the father being for many years a well-known 
and prominent citizen of Sandwich. Oscar W. Brecher received his 
early education in the graded schools of Chicago, and following his 
graduation from Lake View High School entered the Chicago Kent 
College of Law. In December, 1892, he was admitted to the Illinois 
bar, and at once entered upon the practice of his profession, being 
associated with several firms at various times until 1910, when 
occurred the formation of the present firm of Brecher & Chindblom, 
with offices at Nos. 167-169 West Washington Street. This associa- 
tion has proven an eminently satisfactory and successful one, and 
the firm is justly accounted one of the strong combinations in gen- 
eral practice. Mr. Brecher has allied himself with the various 
organizations of the law, including the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association and the Law Institute. He is also 
interested in civic work and is a member of the City Club. In 
politics a republican, he has taken an active interest in political 
campaigns and is known as one of his party's earnest supporters. 

On October 21, 1896, Mr. Brecher was united in marriage with 
Miss Dora Brauckmann, of Chicago, and of this union there have 
been born two children : Helen Georgine, who is seventeen years 



662 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

of age; and Paul Welford, aged eleven years. The family resi- 
dence is at No. 516 Briar Place. Mr. and Mrs. Brecher are mem- 
bers of the Wellington Avenue Congregational Church, of which 
Mr. Brecher is now a member of the board of trustees. 

MICHAEL E. MAHER. The life of a successful man is always 
interesting, because it shows strength and purpose, and particu- 
larly so when its achievements have been secured in the face of such 
great competition as prevails in every profession and industry in so 
crowded a city as Chicago. He has other claims to prominence, 
having been active in politics and a member of the State Senate for 
four years, representing the Third Senatorial District. 

Michael E. Maher was born in the City of Chicago, October 
31, 1871, and is a son of Patrick and Mary (Corcoran) Maher. 
They were of Irish parentage, but were born in the United States. 
The public schools of his native city provided young Maher with 
his youthful educational advantages and as he was ambitious he 
took advantage of the opportunities afforded by the night schools 
conducted by the Young Men's Christian Association. Subsequently 
he entered as a student the Chicago Kent College of Law, from 
which he was graduated with his degree of LL. B in 1895, and in 
the same year was admitted to the Illinois bar. Mr. Maher has 
chosen independence in practice and thus alone has built up his 
clientele and through his individual ability has won his successes. 
It is almost inevitable in these days when public questions command 
so large a part of public attention that men of education should 
give serious thought to the best methods of solving great and per- 
plexing questions and such men are the best qualified to assume 
official responsibilities and have the authority given them to bring 
about changes and reforms. Practically all his life a resident of 
the Fourth Ward, Chicago, Mr. Maher early became interested per- 
sonally in its welfare and at present is serving as chairman of the 
ward organization in the interest of the democratic party. In him 
his party found one who could unite many differing elements, and 
in 1902 he was elected to the State Senate from the Third Senatorial 
District. During his four years at Springfield he served usefully 
as a member of some important committees, being a member of 
the committee which furthered the passage of the charter bill, and 
was a hard worker on the practice commission bills which were 
framed by the Illinois commission. Upon his return to private 
life he resumed general practice in the civil courts, and in 1911 
was honored by Judge McKinley by appointment as master in 
chancery in the Superior Court and has served ever since in this 
capacity. Mr. Maher is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association and the Illinois Lawyers' Asso- 
ciation. He' maintains his office in Suite 1420, Unity Building, 
Chicago, and his residence at No. 3257 Emerald Avenue. Mr. Maher 
is a member of the Roman Catholic Church. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 663 

AMOS C. MILLER. In twenty-three years of active law practice 
in Chicago Amos C. Miller has made a name for himself in pro- 
fessional circles, while he has built up a substantial practice as 
a result of his labors. Not alone as a practitioner has he won place, 
but in the educational field of his profession has he gained prom- 
inence. He is at the head of the well-known firm of Miller, Gorham 
& Wales, with offices in the New York Life Building. 

Amos C. Miller was born at Marshalltown, Iowa, on December 
16, 1866, and is a son of Wells W. and Mary (Caswell) Miller. 
When he was yet a child the family took up its residence in San- 
dusky, Ohio, and there he had his early schooling. His high-school 
work was followed by entrance at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, 
and he was graduated with the class of 1889 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. In order to fit himself for the law in the fur- 
therance of his plans he came to Chicago and entered Chicago Kent 
College of Law in the same year of his graduation from Oberlin 
and in 1891 he was graduated with the B. L. degree. Admission to 
the Illinois bar followed immediately and he began his career in the 
position of assistant attorney for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railroad Company, in whose service he continued until 1893. In 
that year he engaged in private practice of his profession in Chicago. 
Two years later he became associated with the law firm of Lackner, 
Butz & Miller, which partnership continued for seventeen years. 
In 1912 he became senior member of the firm of Miller, Gorham & 
Wales. Mr. Miller is giving valuable service in connection with 
his work as instructor at the Northwestern University Law School, 
and his lectures on legal tactics are much esteemed. He is a mem- 
ber of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar associations, and other 
professional connections are with the Chicago Law Institute, the Law 
Club and the Legal Club. He is also a member of the Union 
League, the University Club, the City Club and the Riverside Golf 
Club, and he is a member of Riverside Lodge, Ancient, Free and 
Accepted Masons. He is vice president and a director of the 
Firestone Tire and Rubber Company and president of the United 
States Motor Truck Company. He is also a trustee of Oberlin 
College, his alma mater. 

Mr. Miller was married on December i, 1891, to Miss Jeanne 
Gilbert, of Cleveland, Ohio, and they have three children Gilbert 
A., Wells W. and Norman. 

WILLIAM COWPER BOYDEN. Among the general practitioners 
of the Chicago legal fraternity, few are held in higher esteem and 
regard than William Cowper Boyden, of the firm of Matz, Fisher 
& Boyden, who for a quarter of a century has maintained his posi- 
tion as one of the city's progressive and successful lawyers. 

Mr. Boyden is a native of the Prairie State, having been born at 
Sheffield, April 6, 1864, and is a son of Albert W. and Ellen (Webb) 
Boyden. He was graduated from Harvard University in 1886 



664 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and from the Harvard Law School in 1889. In the same year 
Mr. Boyden was admitted to the bar of Illinois. After eighteen 
months of clerkship in the office of Charles H. Aldrich. in 1891 he 
formed a partnership with Frank Hamlin and John F. Holland, 
under the firm style of Holland, Hamlin & Boyden. This con- 
tinued until October i, 1897, when Mr. Boyden joined the firm of 
Matz & Fisher, which became Matz, Fisher & Boyden. The firm 
has offices in the Corn Exchange National Bank Building. Mr. Boy- 
den's practice is broad and general in its lines, not being confined to 
any one specialty. Mr. Boyden maintains membership in the vari- 
ous organizations of his profession, including the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, of which he was formerly vice president ; the Law Club, 
of which he was president in 1902 and 1903 ; and the Illinois State 
Bar Association. He is a member of the University Club, of which 
he was president from 1905 until 1908, is ex-president of the Har- 
vard Club, and holds membership in the Chicago and City clubs. 
At the present time Mr. Boyden is an overseer of Harvard Univer- 
sity, a position to which he was elected in 1911. He is a director 
in the Central Trust Company of Illinois, and has a number of 
other business interests. As a citizen, Mr. Boyden has been active 
in many movements for civic and municipal improvement, and has 
given freely of his time, abilities and means in assisting beneficial 
enterprises. 

On April 13, 1893, Mr. Boyden was united in marriage with 
Miss Mabel G. Burlingham, of Chicago. Their residence is at 
Winnetka, in the environs of Chicago. 

HUGH O'NEILL. A scholarly Chicago lawyer, whose attain- 
ments are recognized both in the law and as a writer and lecturer, 
Hugh O'Neill has been a member of the Illinois bar more than 
twenty years, and since 1894 has been associated with Mr. L. 
Bastrup, under the firm name of Bastrup & O'Neill, with offices in 
the Reaper Block. 

Hugh O'Neill is a native of Ireland, born in County Derry, 
October 5, 1867, a son of Hugh and Ann (Smyth) O'Neill. His 
early education came from the schools and colleges of Ireland, and 
after coming to this country he was both a student and a professor 
in the University of Notre Dame at South Bend, an institution from 
which he received the degrees A. B., B. L., LL. B. and LL. M. 
For one year he was an instructor in the university. Mr. O'Neill 
was admitted to the bar in 1892. 

Besides attending to a large general practice as a lawyer, 
Mr. O'Neill has paid much attention to study and research along 
the lines of his profession and on historical and national subjects. 
He is author of lectures read at the celebrated University of Lou- 
vain, Belgium, and of articles on America, Irish problems and other 
subjects. Mr. O'Neill is a republican, a member of the Catholic 
Church, belongs to the Chicago Bar Association, the American Bar 




HENR.-V VAN 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 665 

Association, and the Hamilton, the Charlevoix and Irish Fellowship 
clubs. He was married at Creston, Iowa, September i, 1898, to 
Regina O'Malley. They have one daughter, Regina Bernadetta. 
Mr. O'Neill and family reside at 1117 Albion Avenue. 

HON. HENRY VAN SELLAR. One of the oldest practicing attor- 
neys of Eastern Illinois was the late Henry Van Sellar, of Paris. 
Admitted to the bar soon after the close of the Civil war, in which 
he played a brilliant part as a soldier and reached the rank of 
colonel, he began practice at Paris, and from that time on had more 
than a nominal membership on the roll of local attorneys, having 
looked after a large and complicated law business many years, and 
also having enjoyed official honors within the scope of his profes- 
sion. Judge Van Sellar was a man of strong intellect and high 
professional attainments. He early recognized that success at the 
bar depended upon not only a comprehensive knowledge of legal 
principles, but also upon a thorough understanding of every detail 
of his case. These two principles were the guiding lines to large 
and distinctive professional success. 

Henry Van Sellar was born on a farm in the State of Delaware 
in December, 1839, of New York and New England ancestry. His 
education came from the public schools, the Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity of Delaware, Ohio, the Dennison University at Granville, 
Ohio, and coming to Edgar County, Illinois, in August, 1860, took 
up the study of law in a local office. Six months later, and within 
three days after Fort Sumter had been fired upon, he abandoned 
his Blackstone and enlisted as a private in Company E of the 
Twelfth Illinois Infantry. It was a three months regiment, and on 
August i, 1 86 1, he was elected and commissioned second lieutenant, 
having in the meantime re-enlisted. On October 18, 1861, he was 
promoted to captain, and on February 19, 1864, was elected and 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel of his regiment, and was its active 
commander until it was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, July 
10, 1865. He was also commissioned colonel, but never formally 
took that rank, since the roll call of his regiment showed less than 
800 men. By reason of his record in the war and the distinctions 
that subsequently came to him in civil life, Judge Van Sellar was 
one of the best known of the Union veterans in the state. 

On returning to Edgar County after the war, Colonel Van Sellar 
again resumed the study of law, and was admitted in 1866 at the 
April term of the Supreme Court. Since that date he was en- 
gaged in practice either in Edgar County or elsewhere. In No- 
vember, 1884, Colonel Van Sellar was elected to the Legislature 
from, the Thirty-first District as successor to the late Atty.-Gen. 
George Hunt, and served during the Thirty- fourth Assembly. 
In June, 1897, ne was chosen circuit judge for the Fifth Judicial 
Circuit, and administered the duties of that office with an eminent 
impartiality and judicial dignity for the term of six years, finally 



666 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

retiring from the bench in June, 1903, and resuming his private 
practice. Judge Van Sellar was honored with public responsibility 
as often as his private affairs would allow him to accept, and be- 
sides the above offices he was supervisor for four years and for 
fifteen years a member of the Paris Board of Education and was 
the first mayor of the City of Paris. Judge Van Sellar cast his 
first vote for Abraham Lincoln and continued a consistent and 
earnest supporter of the republican party for more than fifty years. 
Judge Van Sellar at the time of his death was senior member of 
the prominent firm of Van Sellar & Van Sellar, his two sons being 
associated in practice with him. Harry H. Van Sellar, the older 
son, was born in Paris, is a graduate of the University of Michigan, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1893, and during the past twenty 
years has gained a high place in the profession. The other son is 
Frank C. Van Sellar, who is a graduate of Princeton University 
and the Northwestern Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 
1897. Judge Henry Van Sellar died April 28, 1915. 

Louis H. CRAIG. In the years of continuous active practice 
Louis H. Craig is one of the senior members of the Illinois bar, 
in which he has had a place for more than thirty-five years. Thirty 
years of his practice have been passed in the City of Chicago, where 
he is a successful lawyer and well-known citizen. His offices are in 
the Fort Dearborn Building. 

Louis H. Craig was born August 3, 1851, in Covington, Ken- 
tucky, son of Toliver and Sarah Jane (Davis) Craig. His father, 
though a farmer, was a man of remarkable scholarship, and though 
his life was spent in the atmosphere of the country and with prac- 
tically no association with higher schools and colleges, he acquired 
a liberal training in the law, medicine and chemistry, and was pro- 
ficient in his knowledge of astronomy. All this learning he acquired 
while managing a farm. 

Louis H. Craig grew up in Moultrie County, Illinois, where he 
attended public schools, and was also a student of Bastion College 
at Sullivan, Illinois. Mr. Craig has been a resident of Illinois since 
about 1860, his father having removed from Kentucky in that year. 
As part of his early experience he taught school in Moultrie and 
Montgomery counties, and in September, 1878, took up the study 
of law in the office of Judge Lane at Hillsboro. Mr. Craig was 
admitted to the bar on January 16, 1879, and took up practice at 
Greenville in June of the same year. He served as city attorney 
of Greenville from 1881 to 1885, and in the fall of the latter year 
moved to Chicago and from that time forward has appeared regu- 
larly before the various courts as an advocate and has enjoyed 
a large general practice. He was associated with his brother, Hart- 
mann H. Craig, until the latter's death. 

Mr. Craig is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illi- 
nois Bar Association, and is one of the official members of the Chi- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 667 

cago Art Institute. Politically, he is a republican. Mr. Craig 
resides at 2125 Warren Avenue. He has one living sister, Alice D., 
also a resident of Chicago. 

ALBERT R. GATES. Eighteen years of active practice at the 
Chicago bar have given Mr. Gates a rising prominence in the field 
of corporation law. He has been entrusted with and has handled 
successfully many important and intricate interests, has official con- 
nections with financial and business affairs in the city, and has been 
an active factor in the Chicago Bar Association. 

Albert R. Gates was born at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois, 
November 29, 1868, the son of a farmer. His parents, Francis E. 
and Polly M. (Robinson) Gates, were prosperous farming people 
of that rich and highly developed agricultural community. Mr. 
Gates was educated in the country schools, in the high school at 
Earlville, Illinois, and graduated from the Lake Forest University 
Law School in 1896. He had been admitted to the bar in January, 
1895, having read law in the office of Stephen S. Gregory and James 
S. Harlan, both eminent Chicago lawyers. October 14, 1898, was 
the date of his admission to the Supreme Court of the United States. 
Mr. Gates spent two years with Mr. Gregory and was associated 
with John V. Farwell under the firm name of Gates & Farwell 
for six years, 1897-1903. For the past ten years he has practiced 
alone. Mr. Gates is secretary and treasurer of the Gates-Pratt Land 
Company. 

He is on the Membership Committee of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, and. a member of the Illinois State Bar Association; member 
of the Hamilton Club, of which he was at one time a director and 
second vice president. Mr. Gates is an active follower of the sport 
of golf, and for a number of years has been prominent in the 
Western Golf Association, of which he was president in 1907-08. 
He was president in 1905-06 of the Calumet Country Club, and is 
a member of the South Shore Country Club. His recreations are 
golf, hunting and fishing. Mr. Gates has always been a republican, 
and while unconcerned with individual aspirations for office, has 
had an influential part in politics and public matters of importance, 
and was formerly chairman of the Political Action Committee of the 
Hamilton Club. On June 10, 1911, he married Miss Elizabeth H. 
Young, of Chicago. They have one child, William A. Gates. His 
home is at 4740 Dorchester Avenue, and his office in the Title & 
Trust Building. 

CHARLES BYRD ELDER is known to the legal profession in Chicago 
as a successful corporation and trial lawyer, and also as an instructor 
and writer on legal subjects. 

He is a native son of Chicago, born January 14, 1878, his parents 
being Robert S. and Hattie N. (Dewey) Elder. His father was 
for many years engaged in business in Chicago, being well known 



668 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

in realty circles. Mr. Elder finished his studies in the public schools 
as a boy and after some preparatory work entered Northwestern 
University, from which he was graduated in 1899 with the Bachelor 
of Laws degree. In October of the same year he was admitted to 
practice. Two years later he was admitted to practice in the Federal 
courts. 

His connection with certain important cases brought him into 
favorable prominence, and among those familiar with his work he 
has established a reputation as a safe counselor and a careful and 
resourceful litigant. In 1901 he was appointed an instructor in the 
Northwestern University School of Law, and is now professor 
of the law of judgments and extraordinary legal remedies in the 
same institution. Mr. Elder is associate editor of the Illinois Law 
Review and among his contributions to this periodical is an analytical 
study of conditions in the courts of Cook County relating to the 
writ of habeas corpus, published in May, 1912, under the title, 
"What Shall Be Done with the Writ of Habeas Corpus?" His 
practice has grown steadily, and he is in the enjoyment of a good 
high-class professional business. His offices are located in the 
Conway Building. 

Mr. Elder is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
American Bar Association, the Academy of Political Science in the 
City of New York, the Order of the Coif, Delta Upsilon fraternity, 
the City Club, Hamilton Club, and Park Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and Loyal Chapter, R. A. M. He is a republican in his political 
views, and though not active in the field of politics is steadfastly 
interested in all public movements of merit. He has his home at 
1320 Farwell Avenue. 

HERBERT WOLCOTT HOLCOMB. During his career of twenty-one 
years as a member of the Chicago bar, Herbert Wolcott Holcomb, 
whose death occurred January 3, 1915, apportioned his services 
among an important clientage and his varied business affairs, and 
devoted most of his attention to a group of corporations with which 
he was officially as well as professionally connected. 

Herbert Wolcott Holcomb was born October 4, 1869, in Ford 
County, Illinois, and is a son of William Horace and Elizabeth 
(Munson) Holcomb. His family and social environment was such 
as to afford early advantages, and after completing a course in Lake 
Forest Academy in 1885, he entered the Hopkins Grammar School, 
New Haven, where he was graduated in 1887. His entrance to Yale 
followed and he was there graduated in 1891, with the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. His law studies were carried on in the Northwestern 
University Law Department in 1893, and in that year he received 
his LL. B. degree and his admission to the bar of the state. From 
that time he was in active practice in Chicago. In 1895 Mr. Holcomb 
became house attorney for the firm of Naugle, Holcomb & Com- 
pany, railroad contractors, and he continued in that relation until 



669 

igoi, when he became confidential clerk to one of Chicago's veteran 
attorneys, Azel F. Hatch. From 1906 to 1909 he was senior member 
of the firm of Holcomb & McBean, but since January i, 1909, he 
had been alone in practice, with offices in the Title & Trust Building. 
Mr. Holcomb was attorney for the Hinsdale State Bank, and had 
additional business interests and responsibilities, among which may 
be mentioned the Economic Rubber Company, of which he was 
secretary and treasurer. 

In politics Mr. Holcomb was a progressive and took an active 
interest in local affairs since taking up his residence in Hinsdale, 
recognizing the fact that the leading men of a community must 
assume the larger responsibilities to insure the best civic conditions. 
He served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Village of 
Hinsdale from 1906 to 1910, a period of two terms, and was presi- 
dent of the board of education for six terms. Mr. Holcomb had 
numerous professional connections, being a member of the DuPage 
County, Chicago and Illinois State Bar associations, and at the 
time of his death was vice president of the first named. His college 
fraternity was the Phi Delta Phi. Relaxation may be said to have 
filled a comparatively small space in Mr. Holcomb's life, although 
he enjoyed membership in the Yale Club and the Hinsdale Men's 
Club, and was once a devotee of football, in 1890 having served 
as a substitute on the Yale team. 

On June 13, 1899, Mr. Holcomb was married at Hinsdale, to 
Miss Amy Jarrett, and their one son is Jarrett Holcomb. 

LOWELL B. SMITH. That in connection with the professional 
career of this representative attorney of the younger generation in 
DeKalb County there can be no application of the statement that 
"a prophet is not without honor save in his own country" needs 
no further voucher than the fact that though he has been engaged 
in the practice of law only six years, he has thus early in his career 
at the bar been chosen state's attorney of his native county and is 
numbered among the popular officials and progressive citizens of 
his native city, Sycamore, the county seat, where he was born on 
the 4th of July, 1883, his civic loyalty being in harmony with the 
patriotic date of his nativity. 

Mr. Smith is a son of Olin H. and Lillian (Babcock) Smith, both 
of whom still reside in Sycamore and both of whom were born and 
reared in DeKalb County, with whose development and progress 
the respective family names have been worthily identified since the 
pioneer days. He whose name initiates this article is the younger 
of the two children, and his sister, Rose, is now the wife of Waldo 
Mussell, of Bayfield, Wisconsin. Lowell B. Smith continued to 
attend the public schools of Sycamore until his graduation in the 
high school, in 1903, and in pursuance of his higher academic educa- 
tion he then entered the University of Illinois, in which he was 
graduated in 1908, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 



670 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the law department, of which he was graduated likewise as a mem- 
ber of the class of the same year, his reception of the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws being virtually coincident with his admission to 
the bar of his native state. His professional novitiate was served 
in the office of the firm of Faissler & Fulton, of Sycamore, and he 
soon proved his ambition as well as its excellent fortification for 
the work of his chosen calling. After having been concerned with 
various litigated cases in which he won decisive victories there came 
definite recognition of his eligibility for the office of state's attorney, 
to which he was elected on the 7th of November, 1912, and the 
duties of which he assumed early in the following month. As public 
prosecutor for his native county he has fully justified the result of 
the popular vote which brought him the preferment, as candidate 
on the republican ticket. In his county he ran far ahead of his 
party ticket, receiving 1,500 more votes than were given in the 
county for the presidential candidate of the party, Hon. William 
H. Taft. Mr. Smith is an appreciative member of the Illinois State 
Bar Association and the DeKalb County Bar Association, and is at 
the present time vice president of the Illinois State's Attorneys' 
Association, besides which he is affiliated with two college frater- 
nities. 

April 25, 1908, recorded the marriage of Mr. Smith to Miss 
Lenore McElroy, who was born in the City of Louisville, Kentucky, 
and they have one son, James Lowell. 

CORBUS P. GARDNER. As a vigorous and ambitious lawyer, one 
possessed of a large amount of ability, so that he never has to 
resort to pretense and display in order to hold his own in any 
issue in which he may be joined, Corbus P. Gardner has for nearly 
a quarter of a century practiced with growing success and influence 
in Mendota, and as a citizen of large public spirit and thorough 
devotion to the general welfare, has been honored with three terms 
in the State Senate and is one of the best-known men in northern 
Central Illinois. 

Corbus P. Gardner was born in Mendota, Illinois, September 2, 
1868, was educated in public schools, and in the class of 1890 gradu- 
ated from the Law Department of the University of Michigan. He 
was admitted to the bar of Illinois and Michigan in 1890 and at once 
began a general practice with office in Mendota. Among other 
associations Mr. Gardner has been local attorney for the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad since' 1897 and also local attorney 
for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul since 1904. He is one of 
the leading lawyers, so recognized by his associates, in La Salle, 
Bureau and Lee counties. From 1907 to 1913 Mr. Gardner had 
offices and spent most of his time in Chicago, where he had a large 
legal practice and business to attend to. During that time he was 
associated with John W. Dubbs under the firm name of Gardner & 
Dubbs, and Mr. Dubbs looked after most of the local business of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 671 

the firm at Mendota. Mr. Gardner is reputed to have one of the 
most complete private law libraries in the State of Illinois. 

He has been active in republican politics for a number of years, 
in 1898 was elected a member of the State Senate and re-elected in 
1902 and 1906. For six years he was chairman of the appropriation 
committee, and the records of the sessions show that Senator 
Gardner was an influential member in the shaping of much impor- 
tant legislation and a progressive and valuable worker throughout 
his three terms. Mr. Gardner in 1908 was admitted to practice in 
the United States District Court in Chicago, and on December 16, 
1909, was admitted to the United States Supreme Court. His prac- 
tice for several years has covered litigation in all courts, both 
Federal and State. He is a member of the La Salle County Bar 
Association, the Illinois State Bar Association, the American Bar 
Association. Fraternally, Mr. Gardner affiliates with Bethany Com- 
mandery No. 28, Knights Templar, and with Medinah Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine in Chicago. 

On December n, 1901, Mr. Gardner married Georgia Smith, 
who was 'born in Mendota. Their two children are Margaret W. 
and Robert Bruce. Mr. Gardner is a son of George W. and Mar- 
garet Gardner. His father was born in Lawrence County, Penn- 
sylvania, February 13, 1824, and died in December, 1902, while 
the mother was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, May 4, 
1825, and died in November, 1900. Of their union there were ten 
children, nine sons and one daughter, and Senator Gardner was the 
youngest. His father came to Illinois in 1862, locating in La Salle 
County, and for many years was one of the farmers of enterprise 
and respected ability and character iri that locality. For fully thirty 
years he served as an elder of the Presbyterian Church and was 
also identified with the republican party. 

COL. ASA CARRINGTON MATTHEWS. On June 14, 1908, death 
removed' one of the foremost citizens of Illinois and long one of 
the strongest lawyers of the Pike County bar. Colonel Matthews 
was then seventy-five years of age, and for fully half a century 
had been closely identified with the local history and affairs of Pike 
County. As a lawyer he was regarded an authority on drainage 
law, and helped to frame the first legislation ever placed on the 
Illinois statutes. His knowledge of the law as a general practitioner 
was profound, and his clients found in him a loyal advocate in the 
lower courts as in the highest tribunals. Outside of the law his 
career was notable for his achievements as a soldier during the 
great Civil war, and he was also a factor in politics, and was 
speaker of the House in the Thirty-sixth Assembly. He served as 
president of the Illinois Vicksburg Military Park Commission, and 
it was largely due to him that the name of every soldier and sailor 
from Illinois who participated in the Vicksburg campaign was in- 
scribed on bronze tablets. In May, 1907, about a year before his 



672 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

death, he was elected commander of the Department of Illinois of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and also served as a trustee of 
the Illinois Soldiers and Sailors Home at Quincy. 

Asa Carrington Matthews was born in 1833 and was reared on 
his father's farm in Perry Township of Pike County. His parents 
were Capt. B. L. and Minerva (Carrington) Matthews, his father 
a native of North Carolina and his mother of Kentucky. Colonel 
Matthews was a product of the local public schools, was a student 
in McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois, and in 1855 entered 
the Illinois College at Jacksonville, and soon took up the study of 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1857. He soon became known 
as one of the rising young members of the local bar, but his profes- 
sion was interrupted by the outbreak of the Civil war. Enlisting 
in the Ninety-ninth Illinois Infantry, he was unanimously elected 
captain of his company, and served with it in all its campaigns and 
engagements until the close of the Vicksburg campaign, having wit- 
nessed the surrender of that stronghold on July 4, 1863. Later in 
the war he was at the siege and capture of Mobile, and finally 
accompanied his regiment into Louisiana. In the last months of the 
Rebellion he took a prominent part in the negotiations with the tribes 
in Indian Territory which had been allies of the Confederate army. 
At the end of these services he was mustered out and became a 
private citizen on August 17, 1865. He had risen from the ranks 
through the grades of captain, major and lieutenant-colonel to the 
commission of colonel, but never had active service under the last 
title. 

On returning to his old home at Pittsfield, Colonel Matthews 
devoted his time to the law, and while his work in that profession 
brought him many rewards and distinctions, he was also called upon 
to fill various places of honor and trust. He served as collector of 
internal revenue for the states of Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan 
from 1875 until the office was abolished. He was three times elected 
to the Illinois -Legislature, and, as already mentioned, was chosen 
speaker of the House. In 1885 Governor Hamilton appointed him 
circuit judge to fill an unexpired term. A prominent Illinois repub- 
lican, he was a delegate to the national convention in 1884, and in 
May, 1889, President Harrison appointed him first comptroller of 
the United States Treasury. In 1904 Colonel Matthews was a 
presidential elector on the Roosevelt ticket and chairman of the 
state college. Other public services by which his name became well 
known throughout Illinois have already been mentioned. Some esti- 
mate of his work and career may be gathered from the following 
quotation : "He has given careful consideration to his work and 
to each question which has come up for settlement in connection 
with the various offices which he has filled and has been guided by 
an honorable purpose and loyalty of patriotism such as distinguished 
his services as a soldier upon southern battlefields. He was author 
of the first amendment to the Constitution of 1870 known as the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 673 

drainage amendment, and upon this has been erected a code of laws 
whereby hundreds of thousands of acres of Illinois land has been 
reclaimed for cultivation. Colonel Matthews has always taken an 
active interest in everything tending to promote the agricultural and 
stock-raising interests of this county and has given tangible support 
to many local measures which have proven of benefit to Pittsfield 
and this part of the state. As a distinguished member of the bar, as 
a statesman of prominence, as a public officer of reliability, Mr.. Mat- 
thews was well known. His career conferred honor and dignity 
upon the profession, and the political and civic organization with 
which he was associated, and there was in him a weight of character, 
a keen sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose 
that demanded the respect of all." 

Colonel Matthews was married October 5, 1855, to Miss Anna 
E. Ross, daughter of Col. William Ross, a Pike County pioneer. 
Their three children were: Mrs. Frank M. Lewis, Ross Matthews 
and Mrs. John L. Hull. 

The bar of Pike County is still represented by the Matthews 
family. A grandson of the late Col. A. C. Matthews is Ben H. 
Matthews, one of the younger members of the Pittsfield bar and 
associated with Mr. R. N. Anderson. 

Ben H. Matthews was born at Pittsfield November 27, 1885, 
a son of Ross Matthews, who is president of the Farmers State 
Bank. His early school days were spent in Pittsfield, and in 1907 
he graduated from the Law Department of the Illinois State Uni- 
versity, and at once took up practice in Pittsfield. Mr. Matthews is 
a member of the County and State Bar associations, is a republican, 
a Chapter and Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, and belongs to 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. On October 23, 1909, 
Mr. Matthews married Miss Gertrude Thackwray of Griggsville, 
Illinois, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Thackwray, of that town. 
They have one child, Gertrude Thackwray Matthews, born at Pitts- 
field, January 19, 1914. 

RAY N. ANDERSON. For fifteen years a member of the Pike 
County bar, Ray N. Anderson has from the beginning of his prac- 
tice had some prominent associations, and is now a partner of Ben- 
jamin Matthews in practice at Pittsfield. 

Mr. Anderson is a native of Pike County, born at Summer Hill, 
August 6, 1874, a son of H. L. and Eliza (Stebbins) Anderson. 
His father, who was a native of East Hartford, Connecticut, came 
to Illinois when about seventeen years of age, for some .years a 
merchant and also a farmer in Pike County, and latterly engaged in 
the grain business, which is his present vocation. During the Civil 
war he enlisted in the Ninety-ninth Regiment of Illinois Infantry, 
and saw much active service. H. L. Anderson is now seventy-three 
years of age, and his wife, who was sixty-four at the time of her 



674 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

death, March 28, 1915, was born in Pike County. They became 
the parents of six children, of whom Ray was the second in order 
of birth. 

Ray N. Anderson grew up in Pike County, attended public 
schools, and after graduating from high school entered the Univer- 
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and completed his course in law 
at that institution in 1899. Returning to his native locality, he took 
up active practice, and for a time was associated with the late 
Colonel Matthews, the grandfather of his present law partner. 

The firm of Anderson & Matthews are local attorneys for the 
Wabash and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroads. 

Mr. Anderson is a republican, is a Knight Templar Mason, and 
well known socially as well as a lawyer. He is a member of the 
State and American Bar associations. On October 18, 1906, at 
Pittsfield, he married Miss Helen Bush, daughter of W. C. Bush 
and wife. Their two children are: Nora Virginia Anderson, born 
at Pittsfield in 1909; and Winthrop Bush Anderson, born at Pitts- 
field in 1912. 

Louis A. MILLS. For almost a quarter of a century Louis A. 
Mills has been engaged in the practice of law at Decatur and has 
built up a substantial practice founded on honorable methods and is 
acknowledged a representative member of the Macon County bar. 
He was born on his father's farm in Putnam County, Illinois, the 
Mills family being numerous in that section and very generally 
noted for thrift and good citizenship. 

During boyhood and youth Louis A. Mills assisted his father 
along agricultural lines, learning the business of farming in the 
most practical way, in the meanwhile attending the country schools. 
Later he was a student in the Decatur High School and still later 
in Lincoln University. His preparation for the law was made in 
the office of Mills Brothers, one of the leading law firms of Decatur, 
and after his admission to the bar, in 1890, he was given an interest 
in the firm. On May i, 1896, Mr. Mills entered into a law partner- 
ship with J. R. Fitzgerald, this association continuing until 1905, 
since which time Mr. Mills has practiced alone. He is deemed one 
of the most careful of lawyers and engages in a general practice. 
Mr. Mills is interested in all matters, including legislation, that 
affect his profession and favors progressiveness when the funda- 
mentals are undisturbed, ever being careful that his public declara- 
tions shall be in accord with what his judgment convinces him is 
right. A number of public measures have greatly interested him, 
one being the matter of drainage of the low lands, this matter being 
particularly brought to his attention on account of having the super- 
vision of several farm estates and also because of his ownership 
of land in Macon County. 

In 1889 Mr. Mills was united in marriage with Miss Anna Hill, 
who was reared by her grandfather, H. W. Hill. Mr. and Mrs. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 675 

Mills have three children : Margaret, Walker H. and Anna Louise. 
Mr. Mills has been identified with the Masonic fraternity since 
1896, in which year he became a Master Mason in Macon Lodge, 
No. 8, A. F. & A. M. Believing in the underlying principles of the 
order, his interest has been continued and strengthened. He now 
belongs to Stephen Decatur Lodge, No. 979, A. F. & A. M ; Macon 
Chapter, No. 21, R. A. M.; Beaumanoir Commandery, No. 9, K. T., 
and Springfield Consistory A. A. Scottish Rite. He is deputy grand 
commander of the Grand Commandery Knights Templar of Illinois, 
and in the regular order of succession in that body, it is probable 
that Mr. Mills will be made grand commander of this state at the 
annual conclave in 1915. If this comes to pass the honor will be 
well merited and the dignity of the office will be in most worthy 
hands. 

WILLIAM H. CHEW. He whose name introduces this review 
is of the third generation of the Chew family to stand as a repre- 
sentative of the legal profession in Shelby County, where his pater- 
nal grandfather was a pioneer member of the bar, though the major 
portion of his time and attention were given in the early days to 
farming and to teaching in the pioneer schools. The records of 
Shelby County give place to the name of Morris R. Chew as one of 
the early members of the Shelby County bar, and he came to Illinois 
from Ohio. He became a prosperous farmer and influential citizen 
of Shelby County and here both he and his wife passed the remain- 
der of their lives. Their son William, father of the subject of this 
review, was born in Ohio and was a child at the time of the family 
removal to Shelby County, Illinois, where he was reared to manhood, 
became a well fortified attorney and counselor at law and gained 
distinct precedence both in his profession and as a progressive and 
public-spirited citizen. He was one of the leading attorneys at 
Shelbyville for a long term of years, and there his death occurred on 
the i8th of August, 1896, at the age of sixty-five years. 

Hon. William Chew was a leader in public sentiment and action 
and was one of the most influential Shelby County representatives 
of the republican party, as a member of which he served in the 
State Legislature in 1875-6-7. In Hon. John M. Palmer's History 
of the Bench and Bar of Illinois appear the following statements 
concerning William Chew : "He studied law with Moulton and 
Chafee, in 1867-8, and was engaged in practice in Shelby County 
until his death. William Chew was a minority member of the Legis- 
lature of 1876 and was one of the leaders of that General 'Assembly 
in which 'Long' Jones and Hon. J. A. Connolly first distinguished 
themselves. William Chew was an honest man, a stalwart repub- 
lican, and on occasion could make a fine speech. His education 
was gained in the common schools and, as he often remarked, in 
driving oxen to break the virgin sod of the great prairies. He 
owned several hundred acres of land at his death." 



676 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Hon. William Chew wedded Miss Anna Headen, who was born 
and reared in Illinois and who still resides at Shelbyville, at the age 
of nearly seventy years. Of the four children all are deceased 
except William H., who was the first born. 

William H. Chew acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Shelbyville and thereafter he read law under the effec- 
tive preceptorship of his father until the latter's death. He was 
admitted to the bar in May, 1897, and as a lawyer and citizen he 
has well upheld the high prestige of the name which he bears. In 
the year that marked his admission to the bar Mr. Chew formed a 
partnership with George D. Chafee, with whom he has since 
been continuously associated in practice, Mr. Chafee having been 
engaged in the work of his profession in Shelby County for more 
than half a century. Mr. Chew is a stanch advocate of the cause 
of the republican party but has had no desire for the honors or 
emoluments of public office. He is affiliated with the local organiza- 
tions of the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Improved Order of Red 
Men, in each of which he has held official positions. Mr. Chew's 
interposition has been enlisted in connection with the trial of a large 
number of important causes in the courts o>f this district, and he is 
a careful and able advocate and well informed counselor of much 
circumspection and judgment. 

On the I4th of September, 1914, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Chew to Miss Bessie Klauser, of Memphis, Tennessee, her 
parents, Rudolph and Elizabeth Klauser, being well known residents 
of Shelbyville, Illinois. 

JAMES S. BALDWIN. The world in modern days asks much of 
its professional men, and the qualifications demanded in a practi- 
tioner of law, practically cover a liberal education along almost 
every line. Life grows more complex every day and the profession 
that bases its reason for existing on the establishing of right, pro- 
tection of the weak and securing of justice for those wrongfully 
accused, must, indeed, be an invincible body. The bar of Macon 
County has many well equipped members and prominent among 
them is James S. Baldwin, senior member of the well known law 
firm of Baldwin & Carey. 

James S. Baldwin was born at New Albany, Indiana, September 
14, 1874, and is one of a family of six children born to his parents, 
Edward and Susan E. (Spitler) Baldwin. The mother of Mr. 
Baldwin was born in Indiana, while the father was a member of an 
old Kentucky family and was born at Louisville, in 1835. For sev- 
eral generations the Baldwins were river men, Edward Baldwin, 
like his father, Robert Baldwin, being well known pilots, and during 
the War of the Rebellion, Edward Baldwin was engaged as a river 
pilot by the government. 

After completing his high school course at New Albany, James 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 677 

S. Baldwin, following his graduation in 1893, entered the law depart- 
ment of the Michigan State University, at Ann Arbor, where he 
was graduated in the class of 1896, and in June of the same year 
was admitted to the bar and entered into practice at New Albany, 
and in March, 1897, was admitted to practice in the courts of Illi- 
nois, subsequently locating at Decatur. Here he has built up a very 
large practice along honorable lines, securing recognition thereby 
from bench and bar and public confidence not only in Macon but 
throughout other counties. For a number of years he has served 
as secretary and treasurer of the Macon County Bar Association. 
His name carries weight as the senior member of the law firm of 
Baldwin & Carey, while his individual connections are numerous and 
important. He was appointed corporation counsel for the City of 
Decatur and served in that capacity until his resignation in May 
of 1915. 

Mr. Baldwin has a happy home and small domestic circle. He 
married Miss Mary V. Dishman, who is a daughter of Frank E. 
Dishman, a prominent resident of New Albany, Indiana, and they 
have one daughter, Virginia. 

In political affiliation, Mr. Baldwin has always been a republican, 
and has served as president of the Young Men's Republican Club, 
of New Albany, Indiana, and also as chairman and secretary of the 
Republican Central Committee of Macon County, with which organ- 
ization he became identified in 1902. His professional connections 
include membership in both county and state bar associations, while 
fraternally he is a Knight Templar Mason and also belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and the Knights of Maccabees, among other like 
organizations. He has decided literary tastes and greatly assisted, 
in 1903, in the organization of the Decatur Chautauqua circuit, serv- 
ing as its first treasurer. He is a man of broad outlook and inca- 
pable of ignoble action, firmly believing that it becomes a responsible 
individual to put into life what is best in him, thereby calling forth 
from others what is best in them. It is not only his professional 
ability and intellectual superiority that have advanced him, but 
wholesome qualities have attracted others to him in confidence and 
friendship, and it is said of him that where best known he is most 
highly esteemed and respected. Mr. Baldwin maintains his home 
at No. 333 West North Street, and his offices in the Millikin Build- 
ing, Decatur. 

CLARK A. M'MILLEN. The Macon Country bar as a whole is a 
representative body of men, in that its members possess, education, 
marked ability and honorable standards and to occupy a foremost 
place in such an organization is a prize worth the struggle, although 
not every contestant may win. One of these prominent members is 
found in Clark A. McMillen, of the firm of McMillen & McMillen, 
of Decatur. 

Clark A. McMillen was born October i, 1883. His parents were 



678 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

David A. and Mollie (Patterson) McMillen, the former of whom 
died in 1889. During life he was interested in the lumber industry. 
There were two children in his family. 

Clark A. McMillen had public school advantages, and after com- 
pleting the high school course he entered Cornell College, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1903, after which he entered 
the law department of the University of Michigan, graduating in 
1906. In the same year he was admitted to the bar, entered into 
active practice and in 1906 became a member of his present firm. He 
is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association and the Macon 
County Bar Association. He is identified with the Masonic frater- 
nity and is a Knight Templar and Shriner. His firm is established 
in the Millikin Building. 

LEE BOLAND. A member of the Decatur bar who has made rapid 
strides forward in the practice of his profession, is Lee Boland, 
whose success as a lawyer has been marked. With legal acumen 
creditable to a much older man, Mr. Boland has handled some very 
important litigation, and in numerous cases has shown a rare dis- 
crimination and knowledge of law that has won favorable verdicts 
for his clients. 

Lee Boland was born at Paxton, Ford County, Illinois, July 24. 
1882, and is a son of John and Anna (Conover) Boland. There 
were four children in the family, three of whom survive. John 
Boland is one of Decatur's prominent business men, a large manu- 
facturer, and is secretary and treasurer of the Decatur Light & Fuel 
Company. 

The public schools provided Mr. Boland with his early educa- 
tional opportunities and after completing the high school course he 
entered Lake Forest University, Chicago, subsequently preparing 
for the law and being admitted to the bar in 1907. Decatur has 
been the field of his endeavors ever since, and here he has not only 
secured the confidence of the people as a well-qualified attorney, 
but has won friendship and esteem through his personal charac- 
teristics. 

Mr. Boland married Miss Edna McClelland, who is a daughter 
of George W. McClelland. Mr. Boland and wife are members of 
the Presbyterian Church. They have a wide social circle, and Mr. 
Boland is identified with the fraternal order of Knights of Pythias. 
In politics, as in law, he believes in advancing, and looks with favor 
on the new progressive organization. 

HON. JOHN H. McCov. For many years one of the leading 
members of the Macon County bar, widely known for his thorough 
knowledge of the law and his power of applying it, and also enjoying 
an equally enviable reputation for the integrity the profession 
honors, John H. McCoy, who was elected county judge of Macon 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 679 

County in November, 1914, is numbered with the prominent men 
of Central Illinois. 

Judge McCoy was born in Macon County, Illinois, December 17, 
1859, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Minerva D. (Helm) McCoy. 
Of their family of seven children six survive and two of these have 
become eminent in the law, John H. and James H., the latter being 
a judge of the supreme court of South Dakota. 

The boyhood of Judge McCoy was passed on his father's farm. 
After completing the public school course he spent three years as a 
student in the Wesleyan University at Bloomington, Illinois, and 
afterward read law under the supervision of Hon. Hugh Crea and 
Charles A. Ewing, the firm of Crea & Ewing being a leading one at 
Decatur. In 1888 Mr. McCoy was admitted to the bar and imme- 
diately entered into practice at Decatur, and in 1901 was elected a 
justice of the peace, which office he continued to fill until he was 
called to the bench. During the entire course of his public life Judge 
McCoy has commanded the respect and confidence of all who have 
known him, and the responsibilities resting on him in the high office 
to which he has been elevated, will in no way change his character. 
As ever before, he will stand by his convictions of right with inflex- 
ible determination and will give Macon County an administration 
that will be a model of impartial justice. He has always been iden- 
tified with the republican party and on this ticket was elected judge 
by a very flattering majority. 

Judge McCoy was united in marriage with Miss Ida Nickey, 
who is a daughter of William Nickey, and they have one son, 
William F. Judge McCoy and family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He belongs to the County Bar Association and 
also to the Masonic fraternity. Personally Judge McCoy is a man 
of genial presence whose kind and ready sympathy is apparent. 

STAGER & STAGER. Members of three successive generations of 
the Stager family have practiced law in Whiteside County, and 
there has been one or more of that name identified with the law 
there since 1868. The Stager family is of German origin, was settled 
in Pennsylvania in the early days, and has lived in Whiteside County, 
Illinois, since 1855. 

Walter Stager, senior member of the firm of Stager & Stager, 
at Sterling, was born at New Holland, Pennsylvania, was brought to 
Sterling in 1855, and acquired his early education in the local public 
schools. In 1868 he was graduated from the law department of the 
University of Michigan, and on April 14, 1868, was admitted to the 
bar at Ottawa, Illinois. His father, John S. Stager, was also a law- 
yer, having studied law and was admitted to practice February 24, 
1870, two years after his son. Walter Stager has enjoyed an increas- 
ing reputation and practice as a lawyer for more than forty-five 
years. He served as city attorney of Sterling, and for twenty-four 
years held the office of state's attorney of Whiteside County. Dur- 



680 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ing that time the court records show a long list of convictions ; one 
sentence to death; forty-nine sent to the reformatory; four fined 
and sent to the reformatory; jail sentences for seventy-three; jail 
and fine for 179; fines against 288, and penitentiary sentences for 
greater or less periods to 300. 

Walter Stager is a republican in politics, and affiliates with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was married to Elizabeth 
Mickle, of Sterling, and three of their five children are living. 

John M. Stager, junior member of the law firm of Stager & 
Stager, is well known as a lawyer and also in republican politics in 
Illinois. He was born at Sterling August 26, 1881, a son of Walter 
and Elizabeth (Mickle) Stager, attended the public schools of Ster- 
ling, graduating from the high school in 1900, and had previously 
spent two summers, in 1898-99, in the summer school of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. In 1900 he entered the literary department 
of the University of Michigan, spent one year there and three years 
in the law department, and was graduated LL. B. in 1904. Mr. 
Stager was admitted to the bar October 5, 1904, and has since been 
in active practice at Sterling. His partnership with his father was 
formed April i, 1905, and that is now regarded as one of the 
strongest law firms in Whiteside County. John M. Stager is now 
serving as city attorney of Sterling, and for four years was master 
in chancery of the city courts. He is a member of the Commercial 
Law League of America and the State Bar Association. 

May 15, 1907, he married Miss Eudora Downing, of Dixon. 
Their two daughters are Clara, born April 8, 1908, and Mary 
Elizabeth, born February 12, 1910. Mr. Stager is a Knight Templar, 
a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the 
Alpha Delta Phi college fraternity. He has a fine law library of 
about 3,000 volumes. The office of the firm of Stager & Stager is 
at ii East Third Street, in Sterling. 

SAMUEL McKEAN MCCALMONT. The Whiteside County bar has 
had one of its ablest members in Samuel M. McCalmont for the 
past twenty years. He is now senior member of the firm of McCal- 
mont & Ramsay, attorneys, with a large general practice and repre- 
sentatives of several corporations, with offices at Morrison. 

Samuel McKean McCalmont was born in Ustick township, 
Whiteside County, Illinois, December 30, 1867, being the only son 
and child of John J. and Sarah E. (McKean) McCalmont. His 
early education was acquired in the district school near his home, 
and later in the schools of Morrison and Fulton, being graduated 
from the Fulton High School in 1888. One year was spent as a 
student in the Northern Illinois College at Fulton, and in the fall 
of 1889 he entered the University of Michigan, where he was grad- 
uated LL. B. in 1892. In June of the same year came his admis- 
sion to the bar at Springfield, and for several years he practiced at 
Fulton. In March, 1895, Mr. McCalmont removed to Morrison, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 681 

the county seat, and there began a partnership with Judge Frank D. 
Ramsay, under the firm name of Ramsay & McCalmont. The firm 
was dissolved when Mr. Ramsay was elected to the bench of the 
Circuit Court in 1897, and the junior member then practiced alone 
until November I, 1899. At that date Luther R. Ramsay, a son of 
Judge Ramsay, joined him in practice, making the firm as at present, 
McCalmont & Ramsay, which is now one of the oldest legal partner- 
ships in point of continuous existence in Whiteside County, having 
existed fifteen years. 

Mr. McCalmont served as city attorney of Morrison in 1897-98, 
and was mayor of the city in 1903-05. For two terms he was 
chairman of the Republican County Central Committee of Whiteside 
County, the last time in 1912-14. He has served as delegate to 
numerous state conventions, having sat in the last convention held 
in .the state. The firm of McCalmont & Ramsay act as attorneys 
for the Illinois Refrigerator Company and several banking houses 
at Morrison, Albany and Erie. 

Mr. McCalmont is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, is a republican, and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. November 16, 1898, he married Miss Mary Alice Taylor, 
daughter of Dr. Samuel Taylor, of Morrison. Mrs. McCalmont 
was educated in the Morrison schools, and is a member of the 
Woman's League and other social organizations. Mr. McCalmont 
has a library of about 3,000 volumes. His offices are at 127 East 
Main Street, and his home at 509 North Genesee Street. 

LUTHER R. RAMSAY. Junior member in the law firm of Mc- 
Calmont & Ramsay, at Morrison, Luther R. Ramsay is a son of 
Judge Frank D. Ramsay, one of the best known circuit judges and 
one of the ablest lawyers in Whiteside County. 

Luther R. Ramsay was born at Morrison, Illinois, May 18, 1876, 
the first of two sons born to Frank D. and Louisa (McKenzie) 
Ramsay. Both his parents were natives of Illinois. Mr. Ramsay 
acquired his early education in the public schools of Morrison, grad- 
uating from the high school in 1894, and then after two years spent 
in Oberlin College in Ohio returned to Morrison and entered the 
offices of Ramsay & McCalmont, and after the election of his father 
to the circuit bench, continued his studies of law under Samuel M. 
McCalmont, but with the direction of his father. After three years 
he was admitted to the bar at Springfield in October, 1899, and at 
that date formed the present partnership with Mr. McCalmont, 
under the name of McCalmont & Ramsay, which has now been in 
existence for fifteen years. This firm are local attorneys for the 
Leander Smith & Son, Bankers ; the First Trust & Savings Bank, of 
Albany, and several other banks and corporations. Mr. Ramsav 
has applied himself to the law, and has never entered any political 
campaigns for the sake of honors for himself. He has a law library 
of about 3,000 volumes. 



682 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

July 9, 1902, he married Miss Ivy L. Seger, daughter of Dr. C. 
V. Seger, of Morrison. Mrs. Ramsay was educated in the public 
schools at Morrison and finished in a seminary in Ohio. She is 
prominent in club and social circles at Morrison. Mr. Ramsay 
is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and belongs to the Morrison Club and the 
Commercial Club. He has recently purchased the old home place 
in Morrison, and has remodeled it as a modern and attractive resi- 
dence. Mr. Ramsay is a republican in politics. His offices, which 
are the finest in Morrison, are at 127 East Main Street, and his 
residence at 511 Lincoln Way East. He is a member of the Com- 
mercial Law League. 

JUDGE CHARLES J. SEARLE is easily one of the lawyers of dis- 
tinction in Western Illinois. He is now practicing as senior member 
of the firm of Searle & Marshall, at Rock Island. The twenty-five 
years since his admission to the bar have been filled with many of 
the successes and dignities that go with high professional conduct 
and exceptional legal attainments. 

Born at Fort Smith, Arkansas, May 16, 1865, he is a son of the 
late Colonel E. J. and Cassie R. (Pierce) Searle. Colonel Searle 
was one of the pioneers of Rock Island County, served with honor 
in the Civil War, and died at his home in Rock Island August 18, 
1906, followed by his wife on September 12, 1908. 

During his youth Judge Searle resided in various localities and 
acquired his education in the public schools of Arkadelphia and 
Little Rock, Arkansas, at Chicago and Pana, Illinois. He is a grad- 
uate of the Pana High School. At the age of twenty he went out to 
Marshall County, Kansas, and did farm work and taught school in 
order to gain the funds sufficient to continue his education. While 
in Campbell University at Holton, Kansas, he paid part of his ex- 
penses by work as a janitor. He finally entered the law department 
of the Iowa State University, and was graduated LL. B. with the 
highest honors of his class. 

Admitted to the bar in 1889, Judge Searle began active practice 
at Rock Island. In 1892 he was elected state's attorney for Rock 
Island County and re-elected in 1906. In 1899 Governor Tanner 
gave him the unsolicited appointment as trustee of the Western 
Illinois State Normal School at Macomb. The Legislature had just 
given the appropriation for the establishment of this institution. 
Judge Searle was elected president of the Board of Trustees, and by 
far the greater share of the details and responsibilities connected 
with the establishment and the erection of the first buildings for one 
of the state's finest educational institutions devolved upon his shoul- 
ders. Again without solicitation in 1904 he was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Yates one of the judges of the Illinois State Court of Claims 
with- the rank and title of judge. This court has jurisdiction in all 
cases of disputed claims against the state and its institutions. From 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 683 

this position he resigned in 1909. Judge Searle has been presented 
three times by Rock Island County as candidate for congress, and in 
1912 was nominated at the republican primaries and his nomination 
was endorsed by the progressive party, but he failed at election by a 
small margin. He has served as a delegate to state conventions, is 
attorney for the Tri-City Light Company and other corporations 
and banks, and is a member of the state and county bar associa- 
tions. In 1898 Judge Searle formed a partnership with Charles B. 
Marshall under the firm name of Searle & Marshall, and that is 
one of the ablest law firms now in practice at Rock Island. 

On April 7, 1898, he married Miss Mary Pryce, the daughter of 
John J. and Margaret Pryce, of Coal Valley, Illinois. They have 
three children : Franklin, Charles and Margaret. 

JOHN A. RIORDON. Now serving his fourth term as city attorney 
of Morrison, John A. Riordon has been in active practice of the law 
in that city for the past fifteen years. He grew up on a farm in 
Whiteside County, and it was while a boy on the farm that he 
made the resolution which determined upon the law as his pro- 
fession, and the years of his practice have demonstrated the wis- 
dom of that choice. 

John A. Riordon was born in Newton Township, Whiteside 
County, Illinois, August 24, 1876, the fifth in a family of nine chil- 
dren born to Bartholomew M. and Ellen B. (Kane) Riordon. His 
father was a native of Vermont and his mother of New Jersey, and 
the former grew up on a farm and made farming his lifelong work. 
He came to Illinois in 1852, after having lived a short time in Wis- 
consin. 

John A. Riordon acquired his early education in the district 
schools in Newton township, at the age of nineteen determined to 
prepare for the law, and thereafter directed all his studies and pur- 
suits in such a way as to enter the profession well qualified and in 
the soonest possible time. In 1897 he entered the Northern Illinois 
College at Fulton, having previously taken a business course at 
Clinton, Iowa. He was graduated from the Northern Illinois Col- 
lege in June, 1900, and in the meantime had carried on the study 
of law in the office of Charles C. McMahon, of Fulton. In the 
spring of 1900 Mr. Riordon was admitted to the bar at Chicago, 
and in January of the following year began his active practice at 
Morrison, forming a partnership with William A. Blodgett, under 
the firm name of Blodgett & Riordon. On December i, 1910, Mr. 
Blodgett began his duties as county judge of Whiteside County and 
since that time Mr. Riordon has had an individual practice. He was 
elected city attorney of Morrison in 1909, and is now serving his 
fourth consecutive term. He is also attorney for the Morrison 
State Bank and attorney and legal adviser for other banks and 
corporations. He has been a delegate to several state conventions. 

Mr. Riordon was married February 20, 1908, to Miss Daisy M. 



684 

Boyd, daughter of Peter R. and Elizabeth A. (Fraser) Boyd of 
Morrison. Mrs. Riordon was educated in the schools at Morrison, 
finishing at Dixon, Illinois, and is an active member of the literary 
and other women's clubs. Mr. Riordon is a democrat in politics, 
and has affiliations with the Masonic order, including the thirty- 
second degree of Scottish Rite, and with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He has a fine law library of about 700 
volumes. His office is at 100 South Cherry Street, and his home 
at 530 East Main Street. 

HON. SUMNEU S. ANDERSON was born in Coles County, Illinois, 
and is a son of James M. and Dorothy A. (Leitch) Anderson. 
James M. Anderson was a native of Virginia but spent the greater 
part of his life as a farmer in Illinois. He married Dorothy A. 
Leitch, who was born in Coles County. They were people of ex- 
cellent standing and ample resources and were well known in this 
section of the state. Robert Leitch, a native of old Virginia, the 
maternal grandfather of Judge Anderson, was a pioneer of the finest 
type, of superior ability and was one of the first county judges 
of Coles County. Sumner S. Anderson received an academic educa- 
tion, taught school, read law in the office of his uncle, the late Samuel 
M. Leitch, attended special courses of instruction at the University 
of Michigan and later 1888 graduated from the law department 
of that university. 

One who was closely associated with him at this time afterward 
spoke admiringly of his earnestness and perseverance as a student, 
of his mental capacity and of his moral courage, qualities notably 
present in his subsequent career. He established himself in prac- 
tice at Charleston, where he was elected city attorney early in prac- 
tice and served also as a member of the county board of super- 
visors. In 1894 he was elected county judge of Coles County by 
1,000 majority. He was but a young- man then, the youngest county 
judge in the state, but his knowledge of law was sound and his 
decisions correct, for out of twenty cases appealed from his deci- 
sions to the Supreme Court, all but two were affirmed. Judge 
Anderson served out his full term but declined re-election, prefer- 
ring to devote himself entirely to his private practice, which has 
grown to include much of the most important litigation and legal 
business within his region. He is a dependable man along every 
line, public spirited and exerts an influence in many circles that is 
highly beneficial because of its practicality. He is a valued member 
of the Coles County Bar Association and of the State Bar Asso- 
ciation of Illinois. To sortie degree political affairs in the state 
have claimed his attention and from 1900 to 1902 he was chairman 
of the Republican Congressional Committee of the old Nineteenth 
District. He has honorably filled civic positions at different times 
and for a number of years has been president of the Charleston 




/ 

~&&t 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 685 

public library board. He has long been an active member of the 
Presbyterian Church and has been elected and served as delegate 
to the General Assembly The Supreme Court of that church. 

Judge Anderson was married in 1895 to Miss Mary Piper, a 
daughter of the late Rev. James A. Piper, who was pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church at Charleston for a quarter of a century. 
They reside at No. 1060 South Seventh Street, Charleston. 

JUDGE JOHN BUEL CRABTREE. Now serving as county judge of 
Lee County, Judge Crabtree is a son of the late Judge John Dawson 
Crabtree, who for a number of years was a distinguished lawyer of 
Northern Illinois, and held the office of judge of the Circuit Court 
in the Thirteenth Judicial District. The name has been identified 
with the legal profession in that section of Illinois for nearly half a 
century. 

The late John Dawson Crabtree was born at Nottingham, Eng- 
land, November 19, 1837, came to America in 1848, and located 
at Dixon, Illinois, in 1853. He finished his education in the public 
schools at Dixon, and in 1861 went from that town as a Union 
soldier, enlisting in Company A of the Thirteenth Regiment of 
Illinois Infantry. Though entering as a private he was soon 
advanced to the rank of lieutenant, later to captain, and at the date 
of his discharge on August 16, 1864, was brevetted with the rank 
of major. On his return to Dixon he took up the study of law, was 
admitted to the bar in 1866, and in the same year was elected state 
senator on the republican. ticket. He continued in active practice 
and was rated as one of the foremost members of the Lee County 
bar. In 1888 he was elected judge of the Circuit Court, was re- 
elected in 1891 without opposition, and in 1897 was returned to the 
office, which his services had dignified and distinguished for nearly 
ten years, but his death occurred May 22, 1902, one year before 
the expiration of his term. 

John Buel Crabtree was born at Dixon, Illinois, July 12, 1876, 
acquired his early education in the public schools, graduating from 
high school in June, 1894, and after some miscellaneous occupation 
entered the University of Wisconsin in the fall of 1898, and was 
graduated A. B. in 1901. He had in the meantime studied law, and 
in 1901 was admitted to the Illinois bar at Springfield, and began 
practice soon after returning home from Madison in 1902. Mr. 
Crabtree served as a justice of the peace in 1908-09, and on Novem- 
ber 3, 1914, was elected county judge of Lee County for the regular 
term of four years. He has been active both in the law and in busi- 
ness affairs, and was the first secretary, and is now president and 
treasurer of the Dixon Water Company, having succeeded his father 
in the latter office. He is also secretary of the Lee County Bar 
Association. 

John B. Crabtree was married May 27, 1914, to Miss Edna 
Dobbie, daughter of Alexander Dobbie, of Salida, Colorado. Mrs. 



686 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Crabtree received her education in the Salida public schools. Judge 
Crabtree is affiliated with the Masonic order, in which his father was 
also a well-known member, has been junior warden, and is a past 
exalted ruler in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He 
is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politic- 
ally he is republican and is a member of the Baptist Church. His 
office is in the Loftus Building, in Dixon, and his home at 412 East 
Third Street. 

HIRAM A. BROOKS. Senior member of the firm of Brooks & 
Brooks, at Dixon, Hiram A. Brooks has been in active practice more 
than twenty years, is regarded as one of the ablest members of the 
Lee County bar, and represents a family that has been identified 
with this section of Illinois since 1837. The Brooks estate in Lee 
County has been in the family name more than three-quarters of a 
century. The original ancestors came from England and Scotland, 
and settled at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Hiram A. Brooks was born in Marion township of Lee County, 
September 19, 1868, a son of Benjamin F. and Susan O. (Morris) 
Brooks. His early education came from the district and village 
schools of Lee County, with later attendance at Dixon College, and 
in 1890 he graduated from the Northern Illinois Normal School, at 
Dixon. In May, 1891, Mr. Brooks began the study of law in the 
office and under the direction of William Barge, of Dixon, and was 
admitted to the bar at Ottawa in May, 1893. Since the following 
year he has been in active general practice at Dixon. He has never 
mingled in politics, served two years as city attorney, and at a recent 
election for mayor was defeated by the narrow margin of sixty- 
three votes. During the campaign he never left his office in the 
interest of his candidacy nor made a single speech. His present 
political affiliation is with the socialist party. 

Mr. Brooks was married in 1893 to Miss Mary S. Fisher, of 
Dixon. She died April i, 1900, leaving a son, Byron A. Brooks, 
who was born February I, 1897. On June 20, 1903, Mr. Brooks 
married Mrs. Lottie Baldwin, widow of Major Baldwin of the 
Spanish-American War. Mr. Brooks has his office on Galena Av- 
enue and his residence at the corner of Cranford and Seventh 
Streets. 

CLARENCE C. BROOKS. Junior member of the firm of Brooks & 
Brooks, at Dixon, Clarence C. Brooks was born in Marion town- 
ship, Lee County, April 12, 1879, being one of the younger children 
of Benjamin F. and Susan (Morris) Brooks. He grew up in the 
country, acquired an education in the public schools, and in 1903 
graduated from Dixon College. His law studies were carried on in 
the office and under the direction of his brother, Hiram A., and 
since his admission to the bar at Mount Vernon, in 1906, he has been 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 687 

in active partnership with his older brother, and the firm enjoy a 
large business in all the courts of Lee County. 

JUDGE GEORGE A. COOKE. Since 1909 the broad experience of 
Judge Cooke as a lawyer has been read into the decisions of the Illi- 
nois Supreme Court, where he is recognized as one of its ablest mem- 
bers. Judge Cooke is a resident of Aledo, began practice there 
twenty years ago, and was elected a judge of the Supreme Court in 
September, 1909, as a successor of his former law partner, the late 
Judge Guy C. Scott. Judge Cooke, in 1912, was re-elected for the 
full term of nine years. 

George Anderson Cooke was born July 3, 1869, at New Athens, 
Ohio, the second of three children born to Dr. Thomas and Vanceline 
(Downing) Cooke. His father was born at New Athens in 1843, 
and died in May, 1872, and the mother was also a native of the same 
place and died in June, 1880. The Cooke ancestors were Scotch- 
Irish, and settled in Pennsylvania. Judge Cooke was the first of the 
family to come to Illinois, and has been a resident of Mercer 
County since 1880. He had attended the district schools of Ohio, 
and continued his education after coming to Mercer County for six 
years in the public schools. In 1886 he entered the Aledo High 
School, graduating in 1888, and in the same year matriculated in 
Knox College at Galesburg, where he was graduated A. B. in 1892. 
At the age of seventeen Judge Cooke had definitely determined upon 
the law as his profession, but while securing a thorough foundation 
of learning in high school and college was unable to take up his 
studies until 1892, when he became a student in the office of Pepper 
& Scott at Aledo. He was admitted to the bar at Mount Vernon in 
1895, practiced for eight months in Galesburg, and in 1896 formed 
a partnership with Judge Guy C. Scott at Aledo under the name 
Scott & Cooke, which was in active practice from 1896 to 1899. 
Judge Cook.e then formed a partnership with John F. Main, who is 
now one of the judges of the Supreme Court of the State of Wash- 
ington, but after one year Mr. Main went out to Seattle. His part- 
ner for the following five years was Alexander McArthur, and then 
John M. Wilson became associated with him in practice and con- 
tinued until elected state's attorney of Mercer County in 1908. Mr. 
Wilson is the present state's attorney of Mercer County. Judge 
Cooke then continued practice alone until his election September 
25, 1909, as judge of the Supreme Court of Illinois from the Fourth 
district to fill the unexpired term of Judge Guy C. Scott, who had 
died a short time before. In June, 1912, Judge Cooke was elected 
for the regular term. 

Judge Cooke was a member of the Illinois Legislature from 
1902 to 1906, representing the Thirty-third district. In politics he 
is a democrat, and both in the law and public affairs made a reputa- 
tion for thorough learning and general ability. He has a law library 
of about 2,500 volumes. Judge Cooke is a thirty.-second degree 



688 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Mason, a Knight Templar and Mystic Shriner, and has affiliations 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is a member of the University Club of Chicago, of the 
Iroquois Club of Chicago, the Rock Island Club of Rock Island 
and the Aledo Club of Aledo. His college fraternity is the Beta 
Theta Pi, and he is a member of both the State and County Bar 
Associations. His church is the Presbyterian. 

Judge Cooke was married October 20, 1896, to Miss Sarah S. 
Blee, a daughter of Robert and Martha J. Blee of Aledo. Mrs. 
Cooke is prominent in women's club and social work, and is a grad- 
uate of the Aledo High School and of Knox College. Their chil- 
dren are : Marjorie, born July 29, 1898, and attending Drury 
Academy of Aledo; Martha, born April 17, 1900, also a student in 
Drury; George Blee, born October 22, 1904, and in the public 
schools at Aledo; and Thomas Blee, born September I, 1908. 

ISAAC NEWTON BASSETT. At the time of this writing Isaac N. 
Bassett of Aledo is the oldest attorney in active practice in the 
State of Illinois. He is senior member of the prominent firm of 
Bassett, Morgan & Hebel. When Mr. Bassett was admitted to the 
Illinois bar in the fall of 1854, Abraham Lincoln was at the zenith 
of his career as a lawyer, and was still riding circuit out of Spring- 
field. Many other eminent men in Illinois law and politics were 
then in the prime of their powers, and Mr. Bassett has a range of 
personal association and recollection such as probably no other 
lawyer in the state at this time possesses. 

Isaac Newton Bassett was born September 8, 1825, nearly ninety 
years ago, in Lewis County, Kentucky, near Portsmouth, Ohio. His 
parents were Isaac and Frances A. (Hall) Bassett. His father was 
born August 4, 1791, in New Jersey and died in 1863. The mother 
was born in Ohio May 27, 1797. There were fourtteen children in 
the family, the Aledo lawyer being fifth in order of. birth. His 
brother John R. also became a prominent lawyer, and for years they 
were associated in practice. 

Isaac N. Bassett spent his boyhood at a time when schools were 
of the most primitive character throughout the middle \vestern coun- 
try, and all his education, so far as schools were concerned, came 
from a log schoolhouse, which had the slab seats, the rough desks 
and all the equipment made so familiar to readers of pioneer chron- 
icles. He attended such a school during winter season and worked 
on a farm during the summer. At the age of fourteen his school 
days were over, and after that he attended neither public school nor 
college. The rest of his boyhood was spent on a farm and when 
about twenty-one he and his brother, Luke Allan, engaged in the 
merchandise business, spending about three years in that field. In 
1850 Mr. Bassett began reading law, and his brother John also took 
up the same study, and they spent their spare time for the next 
four years in acquiring the fundamentals of jurisprudence. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 689 

Mr. Bassett came to Illinois in 1852, locating at New Boston. 
He was admitted to the Illinois bar before the Supreme Court in 
October, 1854, and in the following spring began active practice and 
settled at Keithsburg. He has had many partners in the course 
of his long career and a number of men now prominent in the pro- 
fession look back with gratefulness to instruction and help they 
have received from this venerable attorney. In 1858 his firm in 
one term of court appeared in 341 cases. Mr. Bassett practiced 
with Elias Willits under the firm name of Willits & Bassett for one 
year, after which he was alone a year, and then formed a partner- 
ship with his brother John R., Mr. Willits having also returned from 
Chicago, making the triple alliance of Bassett, Willits & Bassett. 
This partnership continued until February, 1860. At that time Mr. 
Bassett moved out to Denver, Colorado, on account of the poor 
health of his wife, who died at Denver. Mr. Bassett was a resident 
of that western city about one year, and while there was associated 
in practice with Daniel C. Collier under the name Bassett & Collier. 
In 1860 he was elected city attorney of Denver, being one of the 
first to hold that office. After the death of Mrs. Bassett he returned 
to Aledo and resumed practice with his brother John under the name 
of J. R. & I. N. Bassett. In 1869 J. H. Connell was taken in as 
partner, and after 1874 Mr. Bassett was alone in practice for one 
year. His next partner was John C. Wharton, and the firm of Bas- 
sett & Wharton was prominent in the Mercer County bar until 1888, 
at which time Mr. Wharton moved out to Omaha. Mr. Bassett then 
took into partnership his son Thomas W., who practiced with him 
until 1903, when the son moved out to Seattle. Oscar E. Carlstrom 
was then his associate for one year, and in 1906 George B. Morgan 
formed a partnership with Mr. Bassett, and in 1907 David A. Hebel 
was added to the firm. This made the name Bassett, Morgan & 
Hebel, which still continues. About two years ago Mr. Morgan 
removed to California, but at his own request the firm name has not 
been changed. 

Mr. Bassett first married March 4, 1847, Scienda Isle Moore of 
Scioto County, Ohio. Mrs. Bassett died January 24, 1861. Her 
children were : Fletcher S., deceased, who was a lieutenant in the 
United States navy ; Clayton W., who died at the age of ten years ; 
Flora A., widow of William N. Graham; Laura M., who lives with 
her father ; Thomas W., an attorney at Kent, Washington ; Luella, 
wife of James S. Adams of Galesburg. On February 26, 1862, Mr. 
Bassett married Mrs. Caroline Yerty of Aledo. She was a widow 
and had a daughter, Clara Yerty, who married O. J. Ingmire of 
Aledo and now of Galesburg. She died in 1908 without children. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Bassett are: Ray H., who died at 
the age of thirteen ; Bertram, who died when three years old ; Victor 
Hugo, who is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and now a 
resident of Savannah, Georgia; and Bessie, who lives at home. 
Mrs. Bassett died January 29, 1910. 



690 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Mr. Bassett has had many interesting experiences both as a 
lawyer and man of affairs. He assisted in 1854 in the organization 
of the republican party in Mercer County, and in the same year was 
elected a member of the first board of -supervisors for the new 
county, and in the same year also assisted in forming the first agri- 
cultural society of Mercer County. In the fall of 1855 he was 
elected county treasurer, and by re-election in 1857 held the office 
four years. He served as master in chancery during 1857-58, and 
was a director of the public schools for about four years. He was 
one of the organizers and a charter member of the Illinois State Bar 
Association, and for the past twenty years has been president of the 
Mercer County Bar Association. As a lawyer his large practice 
has extended not only over Mercer County, but across the river in 
Louisa County, Iowa, and he has been leading counsel in many 
cases tried at Burlington and other courts in Iowa, including the 
Supreme Court. Mr. Bassett was editor of a history of Mercer 
County, which was recently published. Politically he is now a 
progressive republican. He has fraternal affiliations with the 
Masonic order, and for ten years served as superintendent of the 
Methodist Sunday School and for twenty years of the Sunday 
School of the Congregational Church. He still maintains his offices 
in the Farmers National Bank Building at Aledo, and looks after 
affairs and gives the benefit of his experience in legal matters, 
having handled a large volume of law business during the years 
1914 and 1915. 

ROBERT L. WATSON. Admitted to the bar in 1894, Robert 
L. Watson has been continuously engaged in the successful prac- 
tice of law at Aledo for twenty years, and is now master in chan- 
cery for the Mercer County Circuit Court. 

Robert L. Watson was born August I, 1870, in MercerCounty, < 
Illinois, a son of William W. and Elizabeth (Erwin) Watson. His 
father was born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, in 1832, fol- 
lowed a career as teacher for most of his life, and died in 1904. 
The mother was born in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, in 1834 
and died in 1902. Of the two children, Nannie married Marion J. 
Merriman. 

The early education of Robert L. Watson was acquired in the 
common schools of New Windsor in Mercer County, spending ten 
years there, and then one year in Wheaton College at Wheaton, 
Illinois. Mr. Watson was a teacher for five years, and in 1892 
began the study of law in the office of Wilson & Church at Aledo. 
At Mount Vernon before the Supreme Court in its November ses- 
sion in 1894 he was admitted to the bar, and returning to Aledo 
began practice with W. T. Church as a partner under the firm 
name of Church & Watson. This firm continued until the election 
of Mr. Church as county judge and since that time Mr. Watson 
has practiced alone, enjoying extensive relations with the legal 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 691 

business of Mercer County. In 1913 he was appointed master in 
chancery of the Circuit Court. 

March 6, 1901, Mr. Watson married Besse L. Wolff, daughter 
of Edward L. and Frances A. Wolff of Aledo. Their three children 
are: Frances Elizabeth, born September 20, 1904; Edward W., 
born November 8, 1906; and Jean, born September 25, 1911. Mrs. 
Watson is a graduate of Knox College in the class of 1896, is a 
member of the P. E. O. Sisterhood and of other woman's clubs. 
Mr. Watson is a Scottish Rite, York Rite and Shriner Mason, and 
is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern W 7 oodmen of America. Active in the Presbyterian Church 
and an elder, he is also treasurer of the endowment fund for the 
Presbyterian College. He is a republican and is a member of the 
State and County Bar associations. 

JOHN M. WILSON. Since 1908 Mr. Wilson has been state's 
attorney of Mercer County. His record as a vigorous prosecutor is 
well known to both the bar and the general public in that county, 
and he is regarded as one of the ablest young lawyers in the Mercer 
County bar. 

John M. Wilson was born April 8, 1883, in Henderson County, 
Illinois. His father, Oscar A. Wilson, was a native of Mercer 
County, is now deceased, and belonged to an old family in Western 
Illinois. The mother, whose maiden name was Frances McPhee, 
was born in New York State and is still living. There were eight 
children, fifth among whom was Jonn M. 

His early education was acquired while living on a farm in the 
district schools, and at the age of nine he entered the Keithsburg 
public schools, graduating from the high school in 1898. Then 
after a course in a business college in 1900 he took up the study of 
law with the late Judge Guy C. Scott, subsequently a justice of the 
Illinois Supreme Court. He continued with Judge Scott two years, 
then was in the office of Judge W. T. Church one year, and in July, 
1904, was admitted to the bar at Chicago. Mr. Wilson began prac- 
tice at Aledo with Mr. F. L. Church under the name Church & Wil- 
son. A year and a half later he became a partner of Judge Cooke, 
now a member of the Illinois Supreme Court, and the firm of Cooke 
& Wilson existed three years. In 1908 Mr. Wilson was elected 
state's attorney of Mercer County, and was re-elected in 1912. On 
December 12, 1912, he formed a partnership for the practice of law 
with James A. Allen, and their relationship still continues. 

Mr. Wilson was married August 7, 1906, to Miss Edith M. 
Black, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Black of Aledo. They 
are the parents of three children, as follows: Elizabeth M., born 
January 6, 1909; John C., born October 21, 1910; and Frances 
Louise, born November 22, 1912. Mrs. Wilson is a member of the 
P. E. O. society. His fraternal affiliations are with the Masonic 
order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the 



692 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

World, and he is a member of the Aledo Club. For several years 
past he has served as president of the Aledo Board of Education. 
Mr. Wilson is a sterling republican and a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. 

JAMES W. WATTS. A distinguished member of the Dixon bar 
and an acknowledged authority in the domain of law, is Hon. James 
W. Watts, formerly president of the James W. Watts College of 
Law, at Dixon, and at present, by appointment of the Supreme 
Court, a member of the Board of Law Examiners of the State of 
Illinois. For many years taking part in almost all of the prominent 
or important trials in this section, his course was so fair and honor- 
able and his knowledge of every branch of law so profound, that a 
natural result was his invitation to assume the head of the law 
department of Dixon College and his subsequent career through 
many useful years, as a teacher of law and jurisprudence. The 
influence of his teaching is reflected in the personnel of the Lee 
County and other county bars noted for their high professional 
ethics as well as sound knowledge. Under his instruction the 
younger students became enthusiastic and learned not only every 
law of procedure and practice but also learned that trickery, dis- 
honesty and sharp practice have no place in the qualifications of a 
lawyer who hopes for eminence. 

James W. Watts was born near Terre Haute, Indiana, November 
1 8, 1849, and in 1853 accompanied his parents to Ogle County, 
Illinois. He attended the public schools and when twenty years of 
age began to teach school and continued to be a country school 
teacher in Lee County for the next three years. In 1872 he went 
to Ashton and applied himself to the preliminary study of law until 
the fall of 1874, when he entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he was graduated March 30, 1876. He 
was admitted to the bar of Illinois at Ottawa, Illinois, January 15, 
1878, and began practice at Ashton. For nine years Mr. Watts 
continued professional work at that place, removing from there 
in the fall of 1886 and located permanently at Dixon. On June 10, 
1889, he entered upon the duties of dean of the law department of 
Dixon College, and ever since has continued an instructor in the 
law in that institution. 

In May, 1913, the students of the law department of the North- 
ern Illinois College of Law organized the James W. Watts College 
of Law, of which Mr. Watts served as president as long as he found 
time to give to the enterprise, the college being discontinued on his 
retirement, in June, 1914. His recent appointment by the Supreme 
Court as a member of the Illinois Board of Law Examiners has met 
with the approval of both bench and bar. 

At Ashton, Illinois, May 25, 1875, Mr. Watts was married to 
Miss Mary Alice Williams, and they have one daughter, Mrs. Clea 
Bunnell, who is the widow of Edwin M. Bunnell, who died Novem- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 693 

ber 22, 1899. Two sons survive him and they, with their mother, 
reside with Mr. and Mrs. Watts. The family belongs to the 
Methodist Church. 

In politics a strong republican, Mr. Watts has honorably 
worked for his party's success. At times he has accepted public 
responsibilities, although never an office seeker, serving for five 
years as town assessor while living at Ashton, and in 1881 as super- 
visor. In 1889 he was elected a justice of the peace at Dixon and 
served until May i, 1898, and for fifteen consecutive years served 
as president of the North Dixon Board of Education. Possessed 
of a genial personality and inviting presence, Mr. Watts has been 
an ideal educator and his admirers and grateful students may be 
found in many sections of the country. He has long been identified 
fraternally with the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Elks and the 
Modern Woodmen. The family resides in a desirable residential 
section of this exceedingly beautiful little city, on North Ottawa 
Avenue, Mr. Watts maintaining his private office at No. 122 South 
Galena Avenue. 

HARRY EDWARDS. The people of Lee County have found many 
reasons to congratulate themselves upon the efficiency of their 
state's attorney, and as a result of the popular judgment Mr. 
Edwards has been identified with this office for thirteen years, six 
years as assistant and since 1908 as the chief prosecutor. His 
excellent service in that capacity practically tells the story of his 
professional career up to the present time. 

The Edwards family were among the pioneers of Lee County, 
where they settled about 1849. Mr. Edwards' ancestors came from 
Hampshire County, England, lived in New York f.or a time, and his 
grandfather soon afterward proved his loyalty to his adopted coun- 
try by serving as a soldier in the Mexican war under General Scott, 
and not long after the close of that contest he moved to Illinois. 
Harry Edwards was born at Friend, Nebraska, June 27, 1880, his 
parents, William H. and Eva A. (LaPorte) Edwards, having gone 
from Illinois to Nebraska. Mr. Edwards has a brother Frank who 
is a merchant. 

His early education was received while his parents lived at Paw 
Paw in Lee County, but at the age of twelve the family moved to 
Dixon, and they lived in that city ever since. He graduated from 
the Dixon High School in 1898, subsequently was a student at 
Dixon College, and in the fall of 1899 entered the University of 
Wisconsin, where he remained two years. Immediately after his 
admission to the bar at Springfield in October 17, 1902, he took up 
practice at Dixon, and in the same year was appointed assistant 
state's attorney. This was a valuable experience, and the vigor with 
which he performed his duties led to his election as state's attorney 
in 1908, and in 1912 there came a re-election for another four-year 
term. Mr. Edwards is not married and lives with his parents at 



694 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

516 Hennepin Avenue in Dixon. Mr. Edwards has a fine law 
library and has his office on Galena Avenue. He is affiliated with 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and in politics is a 
republican. 

HON. SOLON PHILBRICK. Distinguished in the law before he 
had reached middle life and elevated to the bench a few years later 
because of his eminent judicial character and professional attain- 
ments, the late Hon. Solon Philbrick was one of the distinguished 
men of his day in Illinois. He was a great lawyer, an able and 
fearless judge, a man of impressive personality, and a citizen who 
cherished as his life the honor of family, profession and country. 

As long as he lived, Judge Philbrick was proud that he was a 
native of Illinois, born at Adeline, in Ogle County, June 20, 1860. 
He was one of a family of five children born to Mayo H. and 
Mary (McFarland) Philbrick. His father, born in 1828, was a 
merchant during his entire active life. 

From the public schools, in which he was an unusually apt stu- 
dent, the youth entered the University of Illinois, where he was 
graduated in 1884, immediately afterward applying himself to the 
study of law and securing admission to the bar in 1887. Mr. Phil- 
brick then entered into a law partnership with George W. Gere, of 
Champaign, and very soon this firm became widely known for its 
professional ability, Mr. Philbrick's eloquence combined with his 
profound knowledge of every point of law, rapidly bringing him 
into the public limelight. It was no surprise to his brethren of the 
bar when he was appointed to the circuit bench, in the Sixth Judi- 
cial District, to succeed Judge Francis M. Wright, who had resigned 
to accept another position. In 1903 Judge Philbrick was elected 
circuit judge for the full term and in 1909 was re-elected, and 
shortly after was appointed by the Supreme Court of Illinois one 
of the judges of the Third District Appellate Court of the state, and 
served in both capacities up to the time of his sudden death, on 
April 13, 1914. His passing was typical of his life, in that, when 
called, it was when at the post of duty, being fatally stricken while 
sitting at a session of the Appellate Court. 

In his knowledge of law, Judge Philbrick probably had few 
equals and he was looked on as an authority and his opinion when 
in practice at the bar was usually held as final on any subject. As 
a judge he showed the great exactness and clearness of his intellect 
and in his judicial decisions never made a mistake. He entertained 
high ideals of his profession and as an official knew no right nor 
left, every case commanding his fair and impartial attention. His 
heart was big but his mind was trained, and to him a judicial deci- 
sion was a thing entirely apart from either his or a litigant's person- 
ality. Thus Judge Philbrick dignified the bench and elevated it to 
its proper position. It would be impossible to think of him as ever 
being swayed officially by politics or by prejudice. The loss of such 
an upright man, aside from official position, is a deep loss to any 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 695 

community. In a signed memorial prepared by the DeWitt County 
bar, the following words occur: "His private life was above 
reproach. He was of kindly spirit and clean thought, a man who 
always paid to true merit its just tribute. He always placed moral 
w r orth and good deeds prominently above mere wealth or public 
station. He was of courageous thought and had the bravery of his 
convictions. He was outspoken in his condemnation of evil and 
always stood for the betterment of mankind. He was a kind and 
loving father and husband, and a true citizen." Other resolutions, 
from various bodies, were equally appreciative of him as a man 
and universally called attention to his life of useful achievement in 
professional and public life. 

Judge Philbrick was married on May 28, 1891, to Miss Caroline 
J. Thomas, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Mrs. Philbrick is a daughter 
of Daniel M. and Louise L. (Fletcher) Thomas. Her father was 
born at Columbus, Ohio, in 1810, followed farming through his 
active life, retiring in 1872, and died in October, 1880. He married 
Louise L. Fletcher, who was born at Troy, New York, in 1822, and 
died in Champaign County in 1899. They had five children. Two 
daughters were born to Judge and Mrs. Philbrick, Lois and Gladys, 
who reside with their mother in the beautiful family home at 
Champaign. 

Judge Philbrick with his family attended the Presbyterian 
Church. He was a man who evinced a desire to conceal the extent 
of his charities, although known to be a man of the most benevolent 
impulses. He was true and deep in his attachments to family and 
friends. As a citizen he ever lived up to the full demands of his 
privileges and was identified with the republican party. His interest 
in the County and State Bar associations was well known and his 
membership in these bodies was very highly valued by his associates. 
His responsible duties for many years left him with only a small 
measure of time for recreation or social life, but he treasured his 
long time connection with such representative fraternal organiza- 
tions as the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. 



JUDGE WILLIAM T. CHURCH. As a result of the recent judicial 
election in Illinois there are two brothers at Aledo, in Mercer 
County, formerly associated as partners in private practice, who 
are now filling judicial positions, one of them on the county bench 
and the other as one of the judges of the Fourteenth Judicial Cir- 
cuit of Illinois. So far as known this is the only case on record in 
Illinois where two brothers in the same county have almost coinci- 
dently been honored with judicial responsibility. Mr. Friend L. 
Church was elected county judge of Mercer County in November, 
1914, while William T. Church was elevated to the bench of the 
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit on June 7, 1915. 

These brothers are the only two children of Thomas and Jennie 



696 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

(Childs) Church, who were long substantial farmers and highly 
respected people of New Boston Township in Mercer County. 
William T. Church was born on their farm March 10, 1871, and has 
now been an active member of the Mercer County bar more than 
twenty- two years. He has enjoyed a large private practice, and 
his two terms as county judge made him well known not only in his 
home county but in several adjoining counties in the northwestern 
corner of the state. 

Up to the age of eleven William T. Church attended country 
school in New Boston Township, spent three years in the Joy public 
schools and then three years in the New Boston High School. At 
the age of eighteen he determined upon the law as his profession, 
and began working and saving in order to secure money sufficient 
to defray his expenses while studying and getting established in 
practice. In March, 1889, he finished the course of the Iowa Com- 
mercial College at Davenport, and in June of the same year began 
reading law with James M. Brock, at that time state's attorney of 
Mercer County. After one year with Mr. Brock he entered the law 
department of the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, 
and was graduated LL. B. in June, 1891. In May of that year he 
passed the bar examinations at Springfield, and after spending some 
time looking around for a suitable location came to Aledo, where in 
July, 1892, he formed a partnership with Judge J. M. Wilson. They 
were together in practice three years, and he then became associated 
with Robert L. Watson under the firm name of Church & Watson. 
Their relations continued until about the time Mr. Church was 
elected in November, 1898, as judge of Mercer County. He was 
re-elected in 1902, thus giving two full terms to the office. On 
retiring from the county bench he formed a partnership with his 
brother, Friend L. Church, and the firm of Church & Church 
enjoyed a large and substantial practice in all the courts of Mercer 
County until by reason of the successive elections above noted they 
dissolved partnership. 

Judge Church while county judge of Mercer County was called 
to hold court in the counties of Rock Island, Henderson, Warren 
and Knox, and at one time was acting county judge of Henderson 
County six months. During his term as county judge in 1903 he 
was defeated by just one vote for the nomination for the office of 
circuit judge, so that the honors of that position were delayed until 
his recent election, twelve years later. His public record also 
includes several terms as mayor of Aledo, and it was during his 
administration that the sewer system was inaugurated. In addition 
to his legal practice Judge Church has always been strongly identi- 
fied with business affairs and has been especially earnest and urgent 
for every business and civic improvement for Aledo and vicinity. 

Judge Church is a lodge and chapter Mason, a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and several other fraternal societies, and belongs 
to the Rock Island Club and the Aledo Club. Politically he is a 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 697 

republican, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church. His law 
offices are in the Mercer Building. November 7, 1894, Judge 
Church married Bertha Boyd, daughter of Martin and Lyclia Boyd 
of Aledo. 

FRIEND L. CHURCH. Junior member of the law firm of Church 
& Church at Aledo, Friend L. Church has spent all his life in Mercer 
County, and has practiced law since 1902. While a republican he 
has never mingled in politics for the sake of himself until 1914, 
when he was nominated by his party for the office of county judge, 
and at the November election of 1914 was elected. 

Friend L. Church was born in New Boston Township, Mercer 
County, September 18, 1877. He and his brother, William T. 
Church, are the only children of Thomas and Jennie (Childs) 
Church. His life was spent on a farm until the age of seventeen, 
during which time he attended country schools, and in 1898 grad- 
uated from the Geneseo Collegiate Institute, studied law with his 
brother one year while the latter was county judge, and then 
entered the law department of the Illinois Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington, and in 1901 and 1902 attended the law department of 
Northwestern University in Chicago. Mr. Church was admitted to 
the bar at Ottawa April 3, 1902, and after a brief practice alone 
formed a partnership in 1903 with John M. Wilson, present state's 
attorney of Mercer County, and that relationship continued about 
two years. December i, 1906, about the time his brother retired 
from the office of county judge, a partnership was formed under 
the name Church & Church, which existed until Friend L. Church 
was elected county judge. During his practice Mr. Church has han- 
dled a number of estates in the County Court of Mercer County, 
and has enjoyed a large general clientele as a lawyer. He is known 
among his associates as a hard worker, and always faithful to the 
interests entrusted to his management. Judge Church married No- 
vember i, 1905, Rose W. McManus, daughter of William and Mary 
McManus of Aledo. Judge Church is a republican and a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

W. S. FORREST has been an active member of the Chicago bar 
for more than thirty-five years. In that time he has become chiefly 
distinguished for his successful work in the criminal law. He has 
conducted the defense in numerous celebrated cases, and partici- 
pated in the prosecution of criminal cases which attracted wide 
attention. Since 1880 he has been identified with the defense in 
upwards of 300 trials. Some of the cases, wherein the defense was 
conducted by Mr. Forrest, which ended in verdicts of not guilty, 
are the following: 

Lamb (second trial), O'Malley, Baginski, Kief el, Von Bieden- 
field, Slattery, Cassiday, and Maney, each of whom was charged 
with murder; Dalton (second trial), Becker, Monroe, Kahn, Cun- 



698 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ningham, and McLain, each of whom was charged with using the 
mails in and for executing a scheme to defraud ; Bridgef ord, 
Spaulding, and Chandler, each of whom was charged with embezzle- 
ment ; all the leading milk-dealers in Chicago, who were charged in 
1908 with a conspiracy to raise and fix the price of milk to the 
public ; Perry, who was charged with arson ; Loerrler, Wheeler and 
others (the tunnel case), who were charged with conspiracy to 
forge the records of the City Council of Chicago ; Carney, who was 
charged with mayhem ; Annenberg, who was charged with assault 
with intent to kill and murder; Abrams, who was charged with 
falsification of record of votes cast at public election ; Peasley and 
Johnson, who were charged with manslaughter by criminal negli- 
gence in the erection of 16 steel arches in the Coliseum in Chicago; 
Lenehan, who was charged with forging a juror's time card; Cor- 
coran and McAbee, who were charged with conspiracy to procure 
persons to vote in the names of other persons ; Hanley, who was 
charged with willful departure from the schedule rates in interstate 
commerce ; the directors of the Stensland Bank in Chicago, for 
receiving deposits knowing the bank to be insolvent. 

Mr. Forrest also participated in the prosecution of the following 
criminal cases : Mannow and Windrath, at Chicago, Illinois, mur- 
der, penalty, death ; Lake and Griswold, at Waukegan, Illinois, 
murder, penalty, life imprisonment; Chapman and others, at Chi- 
cago Illinois, conspiracy to deprive qualified voters of the right to 
vote by the abuse of the right of challenge, penalty, eighteen 
months in the penitentiary ; Alexander Jester, at New London, Mis- 
souri, murder, acquitted. 

Mr. Forrest secured the reversal of the judgments in the follow- 
ing criminal cases either in the Supreme Court of Illinois, or the 
Illinois Appellate Court of the First District, or in the United States 
Circuit Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit: Lamb (first 
trial), charge, murder; Cohen, charge, receiving stolen goods; Gra- 
ham, charge, attempt to obtain money by means of the confidence 
game ; \Varfield, charge, conspiracy to obtain money by means of 
the confidence game; McDonald, charge, conspiracy to defraud 
Cook County; Brennan and McCarle, charge, conspiracy to procure 
persons to vote in the names of other persons ; Tilden and Graham^ 
charge, forging fictitious promissory notes ; Miller, charge, using 
the mails in and for executing a scheme to defraud; Dalton (first 
and third cases), charge, using the mails in and for executing a 
scheme to defraud. 

Mr. Forrest has also participated in the trial of numerous civil 
cases. 

Born at Baltimore, Maryland, July 9, 1856, William S. Forrest 
was graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1875, and for three 
years was sub-master of the High School at Somerville, Massachu- 
setts. He took up the study of law while teaching and during vaca- 
tion periods, and in 1878 moved to Chicago and was admitted to 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 699 

the Illinois bar in January, 1879. Mr. Forrest has always practiced 
his profession alone. He is a member of the Chicago and Illinois 
State Bar associations, and is a prominent Mason, having member- 
ship in all the branches and bodies of that order. 

His home is at- Highland Park. On April 17, 1879, he married 
Elizabeth Whitney, who died March 6, 1896. His children by her 
are Elizabeth, Marshall and Jean. By his present wife, who was 
Elizabeth Conti Kimball, he has three children, Maulsby, William 
S., Jr., and Nelson. 

GEORGE CRAWFORD MASTIN. Probably no law firm in Chicago 
handles a larger amount of practice originating with the many coal 
corporations and firms that have business headquarters in the city 
than Mastin & Sherlock, whose offices are in the Fisher Building. 
Mr. Mastin is a lawyer of long standing in Chicago and for a num- 
ber of years his practice has been confined almost exclusively to 
representing the interests of coal companies. He has figured in 
some very important litigation and is one of the highly successful 
corporation lawyers of the state. 

He was bom at Roscoe, Ohio, April 19, 1853, a son of Jethro 
and Catherine .(Dougherty) Mastin. His father was a physician. 
The son was educated in the public schools and attended the old 
Chicago University, where he partly completed a course with the 
class of 1877. His law studies were pursued in the office of C. B. 
Smith at Mount Carroll, Illinois, and he was admitted to the Illinois 
bar in 1884, more than thirty years ago. During the two years of 
his practice at Mount Carroll following his admission he also served 
in the office of county superintendent of schools, having held that 
office for a period of five years. Then for four years he was a 
member of the bar of Wichita, Kansas. In 1890 Mr. Mastin 
removed to Washington, D. C., engaged in private practice there 
two years, and in 1892 settled permanently in Chicago. For a 
number of years he was senior member of the firm of Mastin, Moss 
& Sherlock, but since 1905 the firm has been Mastin & Sherlock. 
His partner is John J. Sherlock. 

Mr. Mastin is a member of the Chicago and State Bar associa- 
tions, 'the City Club, the Westward' Ho Golf Club, the Oak Park 
Country Club, and in Masonry is affiliated with Oak Park Lodge 
A. F. & A. M. and Lanark Chapter, R. A. M. He belongs to the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity and the Patriotic League, of 
Oak Park, an auxiliary of the G. A. R. 

Mr. Mastin resides in the suburb of Oak Park. He was married 
in 1877 to Miss Fannie Shelly of Shannon, Illinois, who died at 
Savanna, Illinois, in 1880. The one daughter of this marriage, 
Catherine, is now the wife of Frank L. Miller of London Mills, 
Illinois. In 1884 Mr. Mastin married Miss Ada A. Crummer of 
Mount. Carroll, Illinois. 



700 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

GEORGE A. BARR. Of the native sons of Will County who have 
here gained definite success and prestige as able and honored repre- 
sentatives of the Joliet bar is the progressive and popular citizen 
whose name initiates this review and whose offices are in the Wood- 
ruff Building. He is known alike for his excellent professional 
attainments and for his civic loyalty and public spirit, and in the 
practice of his profession he is a member of the representative law 
firm of Barr, McNaughton & Barr. 

Mr. Barr was born on the homestead farm of his father, in Man- 
hattan Township, Will County, Illinois, on the 25th of May, 1873, 
and is a son of George and Jane (McGrath) Barr, both of whom 
were born near Londonderry, Ireland, and the marriage of whom 
was solemnized at Joliet, Illinois, the respective families represent- 
ing the most sterling Scotch-Irish stock. He whose name intro- 
duces this article was the seventh in order of birth in a family of 
ten children, of whom six are now living. The father was reared 
and educated in his native land and as a young man came to the 
United States, where he established his home on a farm in Manhat- 
tan Township, Will County, and became one of the successful agri- 
culturists of this section of Illinois. He remained on the homestead 
farm until his death, in 1876, and his wife, now venerable in years, 
maintains her home in Joliet. 

George A. Barr was about three years old at the time of his 
father's death, and his early educational discipline was acquired in 
the public schools of his native county. After availing himself of 
the advantages of the Joliet High School he entered the University 
of Illinois, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1897 an d from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
At the university he simultaneously devoted two years to study and 
cadet service in the military department, in which he gained excellent 
tactical knowledge and discipline. After his graduation he was a 
student in the law department of the university for one year, and 
technical reading was continued in the office and under the precep- 
torship of his elder brother, Hon. Richard J. Barr, who was at that 
time one of the representative members of the Joliet bar, and who 
served with distinction as a member of the State Legislature. Mr. 
Barr was admitted to practice in the courts of his native state in 
December, 1899, and he forthwith formed a professional alliance 
with his brothers, Hon. Richard J. and Joseph, under the firm name 
of Barr, Barr & Barr, this fraternal and effective professional asso- 
ciation continuing until the death of Joseph Barr, in 1900. The 
two surviving brothers have since continued their partnership rela- 
tions and in 1910 Mr. McNaughton was admitted to the firm, the 
title of which has since been Barr, McNaughton & Barr. This 
firm controls a large and important general law business, exempli- 
fies at all times the best ethics of the profession and its members 
have been concerned with much noteworthy litigations in the courts 
of Will County, as well as in the tribunals of higher jurisdiction. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 701 

The reputation of George A. Barr as a strong and versatile trial 
lawyer was definitely advanced by his effective service as state's 
attorney of Will County, an office of which he was the incumbent 
from 1908 to 1912, when he retired, after having refused to become 
a candidate for re-election. Since that time he has given close atten- 
tion to private practice, in which his success has been of unequivocal 
order. He holds membership in the Illinois State Bar Association, 
has completed the circle of York Rite Masonry, in which his maxi- 
mum affiliation is with Joliet Commandery, No. 4, Knights Templar, 
besides which he is identified with Medinah Temple of the Ancient 
Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the City of 
Chicago, and holds membership in various other civic organizations 
in his home city. His political allegiance has been given to the 
republican party, and has shown no vacillation. 

On the i6th of October, 1902, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Barr to Miss Mary W. Speer, who was born and reared in 
Joliet and who is a daughter of James B. Speer, long an honored 
citizen of this place. Mr. and Mrs. Barr have two children, James 
Worrell and Joseph Milton. 

HON. VESPASIAN WARNER. Among the distinguished citizens 
of DeWitt County no one is held in higher esteem than Vespasian 
Warner, whose public career has been one of honorable achieve- 
ment, and whose public-spirited activities as a private citizen of 
Clinton have brought him deserved prominence. Proving the sin- 
cerity of his patriotism, in early manhood he became a soldier in 
the ranks, in the spring of 1861, and served throughout the entire 
period of Civil war, later winning success in the law and still later 
honorably filling eminent positions in public life. The career of so 
conspicuous and widely influential a man as Mr. Warner cannot fail 
to be of deep interest, showing, as it does, through long years of 
effort, that sturdy adherence to principle which arouses admiration 
and emulation in every true American. 

Vespasian Warner was born April 23, 1842, in DeWitt County, 
Illinois, at a village then called Mount Pleasant, which later became 
Santa Anna and at the present day bears the name of Farmer City. 
He passed his earlier years at Clinton, attending the public schools, 
and later entered Lombard University, at Galesburg, Illinois. Hav- 
ing decided upon the law as his choice of profession, early in 1861 
he began study under Hon. Lawrence Weldon, but had made little 
advance when the Civil war was precipitated, and in May of that 
year he put aside his books and visions of early professional success 
in order to take upon himself the responsibilities of a soldier, enlist- 
ing as a private in the first company recruited in DeWitt County, 
in answer to President Lincoln's first call for troops. This became 
Company E, Twentieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. His service 
was hard and long, terminated on July 13, 1866, at which time he 



702 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

was brevetted major, his promotions in rank having been made 
because of military valor. 

When his military life was over, Mr. Warner resumed his study 
of law, immediately entering the law department of Harvard Uni- 
versity, from which great institution he was graduated in 1868. 
Coming back to Clinton he was admitted to the Illinois bar and 
entered upon the practice of his profession in this city, entering 
into partnership with Clifton H. Moore, under the firm name of 
Moore & Warner, which continued until the death of Mr. Moore, 
in 1901. For many years this was one of the leading law firms of 
the county. 

It was the strong personality of Mr. Warner that first brought 
him into public life and in him the republican party has always had 
a strong advocate and many times has his party signally honored 
him. In 1894 he was elected to represent the Thirteenth District 
in Congress, in which body he served continuously for ten years, 
taking part in much important legislation and on every occasion 
acquitting himself with honor. In February, 1905, he was appointed 
by President Theodore Roosevelt Commissioner of Pensions of the 
United States, in which office he served with entire efficiency until 
November, 1909, when he resigned in order to be able to devote 
more time to his many business enterprises at Clinton and in DeWitt 
County, one important connection being with the John Warner Bank 
of Clinton, one of the solid institutions of the county. 

Mr. Warner has been twice married, first to Miss Winifred 
Moore, who died in 1894. She was a daughter of Clifton H. and 
Elizabeth (Richmond) Moore. Of their family of six children five 
reached mature years: John, Clifton M., Vesper M., Winifred and 
Mary Frances. The second marriage of Mr. Warner was to Miss 
Minnie M. Bishop, who is a daughter of William and Kate M. 
(Lewis) Bishop. 

For many years Mr. Warner has been prominent in Masonic 
circles and is a valued member of Frank Lowry Post No. 157, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of which organization he has ever 
been mindful and helpful, both individually and as a public official. 
Clinton has many reasons to regard Mr. Warner with admiration 
and gratitude, and owes to him its magnificent library building, a 
free gift representing more than $25,000. In everyday life Mr. 
Warner is very democratic and his fellow citizens know him as 
genial, kind, charitable and dependable. 

ISAAC R. MILLS. For more than thirty-five years the name of 
Mills has been honorably identified with the profession of law in 
Macon County, one generation succeeding the other, perpetuating, 
with the name, the same standards of professional conduct that orig- 
inally made it trustworthy. For many years Decatur was the home 
and scene of legal effort of Isaac R. Mills, who distinguished him- 
self and brought credit to his community and state through efficient 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 703 

official services extending over a long period. He was a man whose 
range of knowledge was wide, whose conception and understanding 
of the law was complete, and whose personal poise and moral cour- 
age served him well in the many difficulties he encountered during 
twelve years of continuous service as state's attorney during times 
when Macon County harbored a more or less turbulent element. 

Isaac R. Mills was born September 5, 1853, on his father's farm 
in Putnam County, Illinois. His parents were Eli and Elizabeth 
Mills, most worthy people and members of the Society of Friends. 
There were eight children in the family. In Putnam County Isaac 
R. attended school while he assisted his father on the farm, and after 
a course in the High School entered Lincoln University at Lincoln, 
Logan County, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 
the class of 1875. Having decided upon the law as a career and 
having shown unmistakable talent in that direction, he went to 
Chicago and there became a student of law in the office of the well- 
known firm of Dent & Black, where he remained until the fall of 
1879. He then located at Decatur, forming a law partnership under 
the style of Mills & Clokey, a combination of talent that proved 
very effective, and the partnership continued until 1881. When that 
firm was dissolved it was succeeded by the firm of Mills Bros., the 
partners being Isaac R. and Andrew H. Mills. The present firm 
style is Mills Brothers, the partners being Andrew H. and Walter H. 
Mills, the latter succeeding to his father's interest in 1904. 

As an attorney of great ability, many political offices were, at 
different times, tendered Mr. Mills, and as early in his career as 
1882 he was elected city attorney of Decatur, public approbation 
being shown by his re-election again and again, and he continued 
until 1887. In the following year he was appointed state's attorney 
of Macon County, in the fall of the same year being elected to this 
office by a large majority. He served in this capacity with signal 
honor to himself and to the satisfaction of the public for twelve 
continuous years. A man who does his duty in this office is often 
spoken of as relentless, but justice demands resolution in such an 
official and never could Mr. Mills be accused of showing any preju- 
dice or pa'rtiality. After retiring from the office of state's attorney 
he resumed private practice and continued connected with his firm, 
although in 1901 he was appointed to the collectorship ef internal 
revenue for the Eighth District of Illinois. He survived but a few 
years longer, his death occurring July 3, 1904. His burial was in 
Greenwood Cemetery at Decatur. 

In September, 1878, Mr. Mills was married to Miss Mattie A. 
Mahannah, who was a daughter of Stephen Mahannah, a -former 
very prominent man of Macon County. Mrs. Mills died in 1889, 
the mother of four children. In March, 1891, Mr. Mills was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Hachenberg, a daughter of Joseph 
Hachenberg, this being an old and prominent family of Christian 
County, Illinois. Two children were born to this marriage. 



704 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

In all the private relations of life Mr. Mills sustained a high 
character. With his family he belonged to the Presbyterian Church 
and was liberal in support of its benevolent movements. He was 
proud of his membership in the County and State Bar associations 
and was faithful to his vows as a Knight Templar Mason. 

Walter H. Mills, the present junior member of the firm of Mills 
Brothers, with offices in the Millikin Bank Building, Decatur, is 
recognized as an 'able attorney and a safe counselor. He was born 
at Chicago, June 5, 1879, was educated in Decatur, and after com- 
pleting the High School course, was prepared for the bar under his 
father's direction and was admitted to practice in 1904. He married 
Miss Martha S. Nicoll, who is a daughter of James Nicoll, and they 
have two children. Mr. Mills and family reside at No. 1040 East 
Lincoln Avenue. Like his late father, he is affiliated with the 
republican party. 

WILLIAM G. McCuLLOUGH. Theoretically every branch of the 
law is of equal importance and every qualified practitioner is sup- 
posed to be thoroughly conversant with all accepted rules of juris- 
prudence. However, experience counts for much and natural bent 
for more, and sometimes brilliant oratory is a possession of the 
greatest value, while, again a faculty for detail work is a strong 
point with other lawyers, so that many large firms, that have 
acquired clients with widely diversified claims, give recognition to 
these various talents and increase their firm memberships and divide 
their responsibilities. In the hands of so representative a law firm 
as that of Outten, Ewing, McCullough & Wierman, of Decatur, 
rest the interests of individuals, estates and corporations, and so 
completely are all cared for that the reputation of this aggregation 
of legal talent extends far beyond the bounds of city and county. 
An active and able member of this firm is found in William G. 
McCullough, who has been identified with it since 1907. 

William G. McCullough was born in DeWitt County, Illinois, 
one of a family of seven children born to Samuel O. and Maria 
(Michaels) McCullough. During his entire active life the father 
has been engaged in agricultural pursuits, a man of sterling character 
and respected and esteemed in his neighborhood. His children were 
reared carefully and given educational advantages. After complet- 
ing the public school course, William G. McCullough became a 
student in the University of Illinois and was graduated in 1901, 
applying himself afterward to the study of law and securing admis- 
sion to the bar in 1903, four years later becoming a member of his 
present firm. Mr. McCullough keeps thoroughly informed on pro- 
fessional matters through his active membership in the Illinois State 
Bar Association and the Macon County Bar Association. He is not 
interested in either fraternal or social organizations, probably 
because he finds his time sufficiently taken up with professional 
duties and the civic tasks which are imposed on all good citizens. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 705 

He is ever ready to listen to the call of charity and ready to put his 
shoulder to the wheel in the cause of public improvement. In his 
political affiliation he is a democrat. 

Mr. McCullough has a happy home circle, having married Miss 
Madaline Funk, who was born at Bloomington, Illinois, where her 
father, George Funk, was a prominent business man. The family 
residence is No. 1398 W. Macon Street, Decatur. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCullough are members of the First Methodist Church. 

ANDREW H. MILLS. Among the prominent members of the legal 
profession at Decatur, Andrew H. Mills occupies a recognized 
place. He was born on his father's farm in Putnam County, Illi- 
nois, October 6, .1851, and is a son of Eli B. and Elizabeth (Kimber) 
Mills, who were natives of Fayette County, Pennsylvania. 

Andrew H. Mills passed his boyhood on the home farm and 
attended the district schools until 1870, when he entered Lincoln 
University, at Lincoln, Illinois, where he completed the classical 
course in June, 1875. For two years he was employed as a tutor 
at the university, during which time he took advantage of his oppor- 
tunities and completed a post-graduate course. The succeeding 
three years were spent largely in educational work as teacher of the 
graded schools at Waverly, Illinois, and during this time he did 
considerable preliminary reading in the line of the law and when, 
in July, 1880, he came to Decatur and entered the law office of 
Clokey & Mills, he was well prepared for the hard study that awaited 
him. In June, 1881, he formed a law partnership with his brother, 
the late Isaac R. Mills, under the style of Mills Brothers. The firm 
prospered and built up a large law business, no change being made in 
its composition for twenty-three years. On July 3, 1904, occurred 
the wreck on the Wabash Railroad, in which Isaac R. Mills lost his 
life. He was succeeded in the firm, without change of firm style, 
by his son, Walter H. Mills, the present junior partner. This firm 
continues to- maintain its original high standing and numbers among 
its satisfied clients many substantial firms and corporations, as well 
as litigants in every walk of life who need their rights defended. 

On January 2, 1877, Mr. Mills was united in marriage with Miss 
Elizabeth E. Bell. She was reared at Lincoln, Illinois, and is a 
daughter of Rev. William C. and Sarah A. (Doss) Bell. Her father 
was born in Illinois and her mother in Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mills met as students at Lincoln University, developed the same 
tastes and talents and together pursued the same studies, and later 
both taught school at Waverly. Five children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Mills : Ralph G., who is a medical missionary in the 
Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea; Judith B., who is the wife of 
Keach Bone, of Petersburg, Illinois ; Helen E. and Harold E., twins, 
and Andrew Hubert, all three residing with their parents. Mr. 
Mills and family are members of the First Presbyterian Church. 
From early manhood he has been helpfully interested in Sunday 



706 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

school work, and for eighteen years was superintendent of the 
Sunday School in the above church and at present is teacher of the 
Sisterhood Bible class, numbering 185 members. For the past 
twelve years he has been chairman of the executive committee of the 
Illinois Sunday School Association, for a similar period has acted 
as the Illinois member of the International Sunday School Associa- 
tion, and is now filling his second term as president of the Illinois 
State Sunday School Association. These positions of importance 
and responsibility have broadened his influence and have made his 
name widely known in other than professional lines. Mr. Mills 
is not a man to shirk responsibilitity and has been active as a citizen 
in public matters, giving his personal support to republican candi- 
dates but not being blindly led by party feeling. He has frequently 
appeared on the rostrum during campaigns as he is a ready and 
convincing speaker. He is much interested in progressive legisla- 
tion, rejoicing that Illinois has passed so many admirable laws, but 
recognizes, as a lawyer, that the commonwealth needs to change 
some now existing in order to make them properly effective, and to 
pass others that changing times and opinions seem to demand. 

HON. WILLIAM G. COCHRAN. Among the prominent men of 
Moultrie County, no one deserves more appreciative mention than 
Hon. William G. Cochran, whose long and honorable connection 
with public affairs in the State of Illinois, and his continued service 
on the bench for eighteen years, have brought him before his fellow 
citizens as a man of great and worthy achievement. Judge Cochran 
was born in Ross County, Ohio, November 13, 1844, and is the 
adopted son of Andrew and Jane (Foster) Cochran, his father and 
mother having died when he was an infant, and a grandson of 
Andrew Cochran. The grandfather was of Scotch ancestry. 

In 1849, when William G. Cochran was five years old, his par- 
ents moved to Moultrie County, Illinois, where the father engaged 
in farming. He died at the age of eighty-two years, his memory 
being preserved by his son because of his long life of honorable 
effort. The mother of Judge Cochran, a warm-hearted, capable 
woman, lived to the age of seventy-six years. 

When the Cochrans came to Moultrie County almost primitive 
conditions prevailed, and especially were educational opportunities 
in great degree lacking, although William G. learned the rudiments 
in an old log schoolhouse in the neighborhood of his father's farm, 
which farm W. G. Cochran now owns. His father was made a 
justice of the peace and the lad was often present during the hearing 
of cases and this possibly made the impression on his understanding 
that could not be effaced, that he was destined for the law. Surely, 
at that time, there was little indication that such an ambition could 
be ever realized. He continued to assist his father on the farm and 
took advantage of every chance to educate himself through reading 
and observation, a naturally quick intellect materially assisting. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 707 

When he was seventeen years old the country became involved in 
civil war and on July 31, 1862, he enlisted for service as a soldier, 
entering Company A, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, in which he served bravely and faithfully for three 
years and was mustered out and honorably discharged August i, 
1865. 

Mr. Cochran returned then to Moultrie County and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits until January I, 1873, when he left the farm 
and removed to the Village of Lovington, where he embarked in a 
mercantile business and carried it on until February 23, 1876, after 
which he devoted himself as opportunity was afforded, to the study 
of law and gained admittance to the bar on May 23rd, 1879, thus 
satisfying his early cherished ambition, and time has proven that his 
greatest talents lay in this direction. While he has advanced to the 
highest elective position in the law-making body of the common- 
wealth and has had numerous other positions of honor conferred 
on him, he owes all to himself, to his force of character, his perse- 
verance and self denial and to his unflinching honor in all the affairs 
of life. 

While Mr. Cochran rapidly advanced in his profession and 
became one of the foremost members of the bar, politics and public 
affairs also interested him and he became one of the leading factors 
in the republican party in this section of the state, and on November 
6, 1888, was first elected to the Illinois Legislature, and through 
re-election continued a member of that legislative body for six years. 
On July 27, 1890, he was elected speaker of the House, and a second 
time was accorded this distinction, on June 27, 1895, and while pre- 
siding won the respect and confidence of all parties because of his 
thorough knowledge of parliamentary law and his fairness and 
impartiality. On June 7th, 1897, he was elected circuit judge of 
the Sixth Judicial District, an honor well deserved, and was 
re-elected in June, 1903, and in 1909. Judge Cochran was married 
September 13, 1866, to Miss Charlotte A. Keyes, of Moultrie 
County, and they have had five children : Oscar Fletcher, Grace 
May, Archie Elaine, Arthur G. and Laura O. The last named, who 
was the wife of F. T. Thompson, died August 2, 1912. Mrs. Coch- 
ran was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, to which state her parents 
had moved from near Phillipi, West Virginia. 

Judge Cochran was chosen department commander of the Illinois 
Department of the Grand Army of the Republic, in May, 1896, and 
he greatly values the confidence and esteem of his old comrades in 
arms. He has been identified with the Masonic fraternity since 
1868 and is a Knight Templar Mason and belongs also to the Odd 
Fellows. In 1866 he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Judge Cochran is an able man in many directions and his efforts 
have always been untiring in devotion to what, in his judgment, 
have been promotive of the best interests for whatever he has repre- 
sented. 



708 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

HON. JOHN A. BROWN. Of Revolutionary stock and distin- 
guished New England ancestry, the late Judge John A. Brown, for 
many years prominently identified with the bench and bar of Macon 
County, achieved notable success in his chosen career and illustrated 
in both private and professional life the sturdy virtues and steady 
elemental qualities bequeathed him as a heritage. Intellectually 
gifted, knowledge came to him easily, and fortunately so for his life 
activities were largely concerned with those things which demand 
learning along many and varied lines. In early manhood an edu- 
cator, later a journalist and afterward claimed by the law, his influ- 
ence was continuous for almost his entire life in some way beneficial 
to his fellow men. 

John A. Brown was born July 23, 1843, at Abington, Plymouth 
County, Massachusetts, a son of Lysander and Polly (Cushing) 
Brown, who had two children. The ancestors settled at Abington as 
early as 1732 and both grandfathers were soldiers in the war of the 
Revolution. 

The public schools at Abington gave John A. Brown his early 
educational training, and after completing the high school course 
he turned his attention to teaching school and taught several terms 
in Morgan County, after coming to Illinois, and also taught for a 
short time after locating at Decatur. In 1873 he became interested 
in the newspaper business and was identified with the leading repub- 
lican organ at Decatur, in the same year taking instruction in law 
from Hon. A. B. Bunn, of this city, and made such rapid progress 
that he was admitted to the bar in 1875 and entered into partnership 
with F. B. Tait, the style being Brown & Tait. This partnership 
existed for two years, dissolving in 1878, after which Mr. Brown 
continued alone in practice, without assistance building up an 
immense law business and gaining an honorable reputation that 
extended all over Macon County. From 1872 until 1892 he served 
as master in chancery for Macon County. While his practice cov- 
ered every branch of the law, he paid special attention to corporation 
and real estate law, being for many years the legal representative 
of large corporations and an expert adviser on all matters pertain- 
ing to real estate. In politics he was a zealous republican and was 
so influential a factor that it was largely through his efforts that 
lower freight and passenger rates were brought about on different 
lines in Illinois, he, with others, taking such an aggressive stand on 
the matter that legislation was resorted to. He was no seeker 
for political honors but never shirked responsibility and at times 
accepted office as a public duty and thus served for thirteen years 
as treasurer of Decatur Township. 

Judge Brown married Miss Annie L. Fowler, who is a daughter 
of James Fowler, a former prominent citizen of Decatur, and they 
became the parents of two daughters, Alma May and Jessie C. 
The elder daughter is the wife of Frank L. Elliott, of Decatur. The 
second daughter, Jessie C., is the wife of Elmer O. Brintlinger, a 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 709 

member of the firm of D. Brintlinger & Sons, undertakers, located 
at No. 543 North Main Street, Decatur. Elmer O. Brintlinger is 
now serving as coroner of Macon County. 

Judge Brown was a Methodist in religious faith and reared his 
children in the church. He was a careful father and gave his 
daughters every possible advantage educationally and socially, and 
was a man who enjoyed the refining influences of his home. He 
took sincere interest in the great economic questions of the day and, 
being possessed of a high moral character along with considerable 
proved business ability, was chosen by those in authority to serve 
as president of the State Board of Charities. He held other posi- 
tions of responsibility and for years was a member of the board of 
trustees of the Asylum for the Blind. 

The family residence is at No. 433 West Eldorado Street, Deca- 
tur, Illinois, and here Judge Brown died on November 21, 1904. 
His death left a vacancy in many circles but his memory survives 
and his name is recalled with those whose lives were ever actuated 
by the highest motives. 

HON. RICHARD A. LEMON. A great historian is credited with 
the declaration that every person has two educations, one which he 
receives from others, and one, more important, which he gives to 
himself. The life and career of the late Richard A. Lemon, a 
patriotic citizen and an eminent lawyer, widely known over Illinois 
and particularly esteemed in DeWitt County, is illustrative. 

Richard A. Lemon was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, 
October 16, 1848, and in 1854 accompanied his parents in the family 
removal to Piatt County, where the father, assisted by his older sons, 
followed farming until the call for volunteers, in -1861, to suppress 
rebellion, deprived him of three of his sturdy sons. They gave up 
their lives on the battlefields of the South and while two more sons 
were left, one died during the progress of the war, and Richard, 
although but sixteen years old in 1864, enlisted as a soldier in the 
Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and he alone lived to 
return. With age coming on and deprived of the expected help of 
his sons, the father sold his farm in 1866 and the little family 
removed to El Paso, in Woodford County. 

More ambitious than many youths, Richard A. Lemon deter- 
mined to prepare himself for a career in law and applied himself to 
its study through one year, during which time he came to a realiza- 
tion that his general education had not been ample enough to enable 
him to make headway as he hoped along his professional study. 
With a feeling of discouragement he put aside his law books and 
went to the other extreme, securing hard, manual labor in the 
freight house of the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad at El Paso. 
In the meanwhile he studied hard as opportunity presented and also 
made friends and by 1868 he had gained enough poise and self- 
confidence to once more take up the study of the law, at this time 



710 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

entering the law office of R. G. Ingersoll, who, at that time, was a 
young lawyer himself and not only gave instruction but the encour- 
agement that often marks a turning point in a young man's life. 
Mr. Lemon was so enthusiastic that he was able to pass his exam- 
inations by the time he was twenty-two years of age and on August 
13, 1870, was admitted to the bar. 

For forty-two years Mr. Lemon continued in practice and his 
industry, force of character, ability and determination caused him to 
advance in his profession as few other young lawyers in DeWitt 
County, and for many years there were few exceedingly important 
cases before the courts in which he was not an attorney. Giving 
every client his best efforts, for he was no time nor wealth server, 
his reputation as an honorable man as well as able lawyer extended 
far and wide and people had confidence in him and he enjoyed the 
esteem of both bench and bar. All his life he was a student, finding 
of most value the education he gave himself, recognizing that expe- 
rience had been his most valuable teacher. In 1890 he was asso- 
ciated with William Monson in law practice, and later, when Colonel 
Warner was elected to Congress, he became a member of the firm 
of Moore, Warner & Lemon. Later he associated his son, Frank 
K. Lemon, with him under the style of Lemon & Lemon, which 
continued until the close of his life. 

Mr. Lemon was married January 31, 1874, to Miss Opha A. 
Kyle, who died February 18, 1912 ; this domestic affliction undoubt- 
edly lessened the number of his own. years. Three sons survive: 
Frank K. and L. W., both residents of Clinton, Illinois; and Carl 
W., a resident of Shreveport, Louisiana. 

Politically Richard A. Lemon was a loyal and hearty worker 
for the success of the republican party. At one time he was nomi- 
nated by his party for state's attorney and in 1909 he sought the 
nomination for circuit judge, being defeated by existing local condi- 
tions for which he was not responsible. During the administration 
of Gov. John R. Tanner he served under the Governor's appoint- 
ment as a member of the first Board of Pardons, of which he was 
president four years. He served two terms as city clerk and three 
terms as city attorney of Clinton and every official act was founded 
on the law and his duty performed with scrupulous integrity. He 
was twice chairman of the Republican County Central Committee, 
and in 1908 was an elector. He was particularly interested in public 
education and accepted a position on the Clinton Board of Educa- 
tion and was made president of the same. 

For many years Mr. Lemon was noted for his physical vigor as 
well as his mental alertness and it was said of him that he was 
always in condition to make a strong contest and took pleasure in 
struggles with antagonists worthy of his efforts. For several years, 
however, symptoms of failing physical health alarmed his family 
and close friends, and while, at times, he was prevailed upon to seek 
change for a short season, a malady developed that required hospital 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 711 

care. In this weakened condition he was little able to survive the 
loss of his beloved wife, and grief and illness gained the victory, 
his death occurring December 27, 1912. So passed one who will 
long be remembered in DeWitt County. Through his splendid 
qualities of mind and heart he had won a place in the hearts of 
others, and through his legal attainments and his honorable use of 
them had written his name indelibly on the records of his county's 
bar. 

FRANK K. LEMON. One of the members of the Clinton bar at 
the present time is Frank K. Lemon. He was born at Farmer City, 
Illinois, March 6, 1875, and is a son of Richard A. and Opha A. 
(Kyle) Lemon. 

For many years Richard A. Lemon was a prominent attorney 
in DeWitt County and a foremost citizen of Clinton. He was born 
in Sangamon County, Illinois, October 16, 1848, and died at Clinton, 
December 27, 1912. When but sixteen years of age he enlisted for 
service in the Civil war, as had his three brothers, and was the only 
one of the four to live to return. He prepared for the bar at El 
Paso, Illinois, and was admitted to practice on August 13, 1870, 
immediately afterward opening an office at Farmer City, where he 
remained until August 13, 1877, when he moved to Clinton, which 
city continued to be the scene of his honorable career at the bar 
until the close of his life. He was prominent in republican political 
circles and was appointed by Governor Tanner a member of the 
first Board of Pardons. On January 31, 1874, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Opha A. Kyle, who died February 18, 1912. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lemon are survived by three sons : Frank K., L. W. 
and Carl W. 

Frank K. Lemon attended the public schools and. after completing 
his course at the Clinton High School entered the Wesleyan Uni- 
versity Law School, at Bloomington, Illinois, where he was grad- 
uated in 1896 and in the same year was admitted to the bar. He 
entered into partnership with his father, under the firm style of 
Lemon & Lemon, and this association continued until the father's 
death, since which time Mr. Lemon has continued alone. He is a 
member of the DeWitt County Bar Association. 

Mr. Lemon married Miss Ruth L. Keys, who is a daughter of 
Charles A. Keys. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

GEORGE B. MARVEL. As president of the State Bank of Clinton, 
Illinois, and postmaster of the county seat of DeWitt County, George 
B. Marvel stands forth as a representative citizen of this section of 
the state, but in professional circles his standing is still higher for 
he has long been recognized as one of the ablest lawyers of the 
DeWitt County bar. 

George B. Marvel was born on his father's farm in DeWitt 



712 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

County, Illinois, February 5, 1871, one of a family of nine children 
born to Wiley and Elizabeth M. (Williams) Marvel. They were 
well known and highly respected people who reared their children 
to be honest and industrious. 

In the country schools near his father's farm, George B. Marvel 
received early instruction and when he reached manhood became a 
student in the Illinois Wesleyan University, at Bloomington, and 
was graduated from that institution in 1896, following which he 
entered upon the study of law in the Bloomington Law School, 
where he completed his course and was graduated in 1898, in the 
same year being admitted to the bar. Mr. Marvel located at Fair- 
bury, Illinois, and there built up a fine practice, but, believing a 
wider field would be still more satisfactory, in 1902 he came to 
Clinton and this move has proved beneficial both to himself and to 
the people of this city. Mr. Marvel has continued in the practice of 
his profession but his public spirit and realization of business oppor- 
tunity has led to his investment of capital here and his forwarding 
of enterprises of merit that add to the general prosperity and the 
fair reputation of the city. One of these is the State Bank of 
Clinton, of which he was elected president in 1913. It is a solid 
institution, well financed, and its patrons are the most substantial 
men of the county, many of whom have known Mr. Marvel from 
childhood and have watched his upward career with interest. Mr. 
Marvel is a large stockholder in the above bank and he also owns 
valuable farm land in Waynesville Township. 

For many years Mr. Marvel has been somewhat active in poli- 
tics, a stanch democrat in his affiliation, but always declined public 
office for himself until 1914, when he was appointed postmaster of 
Clinton, an honorable office he felt free to accept, and has given 
close attention to the duties pertaining to the same. In law, finance 
and social relations he has ever proved trustworthy and his fellow 
citizens find him equally worthy of confidence in public office. He 
is a member of the County Bar Association and belongs to the 
fraternal orders of Elks and Knights of Pythias. Mr. Marvel mar- 
ried Phoebe H. Gramesly on June 9, 1915. She was born in Charles- 
ton, Coles County, Illinois, reared and educated there in the High 
School. She also attended the Northwestern University at Evan- 
ston, Illinois. 

HON. EDWARD B. MITCHELL. One of the prominent members 
of the legal profession at Clinton, DeWitt County, has made an 
honorable name for himself on both bench and bar, for twenty-two 
years being engaged in the practice of law at the bar with the excep- 
tion of the period during which he served as county judge. He was 
born at Springfield, Ohio, September 10, 1867, one of a family of 
five children born to John F. and Carrie (Myers) Mitchell, natives 
of Ohio. 

In his infancy, Edward B. Mitchell became a member of the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 713 

household of Eli and Catherine Brown, where he was reared as a 
son and reciprocated with a son's dutiful respect and affection. 
He assisted Mr. Brown on the home farm in DeWitt County, in the 
meanwhile attending the public schools, and made such good use of 
his educational opportunities that at the age of seventeen years he 
secured a certificate entitling him to teach school and afterward 
he became a student in the Clinton High School, from which he 
was graduated in 1887. During the next five years he taught school 
and also attended the Bloomington Law School, from which institu- 
tion he was graduated in 1892. In the same year he was admitted 
to practice and established himself at Clinton, which place has been 
his home ever since. As a sound, safe lawyer Mr. Mitchell is 
widely known, and as clients he numbers many people of promi- 
nence as well as those less fortunately situated. It is said of him 
that he has never refused advice and counsel because of lack of fee 
and that he is honorable in all his arrangements with those who seek 
his professional aid and just and equable in his demands, although 
never posing as a philanthropist. In 1896 he was elected city clerk 
of Clinton and served in that office until 1901, when he resigned in 
order to accept the position of county judge, for which his abilities 
well qualified him. He has always been deeply interested in the 
aims of the Clinton and DeWitt County Bar Association, of which 
he is the present vice president. 

Mr. Mitchell was united in marriage with Miss Eva M. Gilliland, 
who is a daughter of Rev. E. A. and Isadora (Holmes) Gilliland, 
and they have two children, Murial and Donald. Mr. Mitchell and 
wife take an active interest in the Christian Church, in which he is 
an elder, and they contribute to the success of many of its benevo- 
lent movements. 

For many years Judge Mitchell has been prominent as a citizen, 
taking a great deal of interest in educational matters and in the 
city's progress generally. In 1904 he was elected president of the 
Clinton Board of Education and largely through his influence and 
public-spirited efforts a new ward schoolhouse and a new high 
school building were satisfactorily completed. He is secretary of 
the Central Illinois Building, Loan and Homestead Association, a 
successful business organization with a large membership of sub- 
stantial citizens. 

Fraternal affiliations have interested Judge Mitchell and he is 
widely known in several of the leading organizations. He belongs 
to DeWitt Lodge No. 84, Free and Accepted Masons; Goodbrake 
Chapter, No. 59, R. A. M. ; Clinton Commandery, No. 66, K. T., 
and to the Mystic Shrine. For four years he served as master of his 
lodge, for two years was high priest of the chapter and for one 
year was eminent commander of Clinton Commandery. He belongs 
also to the Odd Fellows and to the Knights of Pythias, and in the 
last named organization has served as chancellor commander and as 
grand representative for two years. 



714 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

GROVER C. HOFF. Notwithstanding its numbers, age and 
prominence, there is probably no more successful, careful and 
dependable firm practicing at the bar of DeWitt County than is the 
comparatively young one of Hoff & Hoff, of Clinton, its members 
being Grover C. and Mattie M. Hoff, the latter enjoying the distinc- 
tion of being the only woman practitioner of the DeWitt County 
bar. 

Grover C. Hoff, senior member of the above firm, was born on 
his father's farm in DeWitt County, Illinois, July n, 1885, and is a 
son of Cornelius and Margaret (Howard) Hoff, one of their family 
of thirteen children. For many years Cornelius Hoff followed an 
agricultural life in this county, rearing his large family comfortably 
and giving them many advantages. In boyhood Grover C. attended 
the country schools and in 1903 graduated from the Maroa High 
School in Macon County, and in 1904, from the Clinton High 
School, after which he entered the employ of the Illinois Central 
Railroad Company and worked in the freight department until the 
fall of 1906. Later he entered the Wesleyan University at Bloom- 
ington, Illinois, and was graduated from the law department in 1909, 
and in the fall of the same year was admitted to practice and located 
at Clinton. 

Mr. Hoff was united in marriage, in 1907, with Miss Mattie M. 
Macy, who is a daughter of Oliver W. and Lillian (Wengate) Macy. 
Mrs. Hoff is a lady of exceptional talent. After graduating from 
the Normal High School, and attending Normal University and 
teaching in the public schools of McLean and DeWitt counties until 
her marriage, she was not satisfied, neither social life nor the ordi- 
nary occupations of her sex contenting her. Recognizing the pos- 
session of talents that indicated success in a profession, she chose 
the law- and under the direction and supervision of Mr. Hoff so 
applied herself that she secured admission to the bar in 1912, imme- 
diately afterward forming a law partnership with her husband, and 
since that time the firm of Hoff & Hoff has made an excellent record 
in the courts. Both partners are well trained intellectually, both are 
diligent, patient, careful and painstaking in the interest of their 
clients and individually and as a firm, they are held in honorable 
regard. They are members of the County Bar Association. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoff have one son, Paul M. Hoff. Mrs. Hoff is a 
member of the Royal Neighbors, the Eastern Star and the Rebekahs 
and is popular in all these organizations, for she is endowed together 
with her legal talents with a charming personality. Mr. Hoff is 
identified fraternally with the Masons, the Odd Fellows, and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. In his political views he is a demo- 
crat. The Presbyterian Church holds their membership. 

HON. GEORGE K. INCH AM. In recalling the prominent men of 
DeWitt County, those who brought distinction through their achieve- 
ments during life and whose memory is honored by those who sur- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 715 

vive, no name comes more quickly to mind than that of George K. 
Ingham, lawyer, judge, statesman and dependable private citizen. 
For many years he was a resident of Clinton and through his efforts 
various interests of this city were materially advanced. 

George K. Ingham was born July 19, 1852, and was one of a 
family of four children born to his parents, Samuel and Nancy 
(King) Ingram, who were natives of Ohio. He attended the district 
schools and afterward was a student in the Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington, Illinois, and subsequently in the University of Michi- 
gan, and in 1875 was graduated from the law department of the 
university, at Ann Arbor. In the fall of the same year he entered 
into practice at Kenney, Illinois, following his admission to the bar, 
and continued there until he came to Clinton. As a law practitioner 
he won confidence and respect, being well acquainted with every 
fundamental and being careful, patient and sure in his study of cases 
and faithful and sincere in dealing with every client. During these 
early years of practice he gave attention also to politics to a greater 
degree than later in life, when professional duties absorbed the 
most of his time, and thus came about his election to the State Legis- 
lature, on the republican ticket, and he served in 1879 with the 
greatest efficiency, during this entire period, with vote and influence 
championing measures of public usefulness. 

Still higher honors awaited him. In 1881 he was appointed 
county judge of DeWitt County, to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Judge John J. McGraw, and in this capacity served 
two years. In 1886 Judge Ingham was elected to the office of 
county judge, in which he had shown such wise discrimination and 
judicial ability, and was re-elected in 1890, 1894 and 1898, serving 
with equal honor for a period of seventeen years. On January I, 
1902, he declined further renomination and resumed private prac- 
tice and continued one of DeWitt County's ablest lawyers until his 
death in 1914. Aside from his profession he had business interests 
of importance and was one of the directors of the DeWitt County 
National Bank. 

On March 7, 1878, Judge Ingham was united in marriage with 
Miss Alice A. Tenney, who was born at Waynesville but later 
resided in DeWitt County. Her parents were Boynton and Eliza 
(Dragstrem) Tenney. Four children were born to Judge and Mrs. 
Ingham and three survive: Leonard W., who is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois and of the Harvard Law School, class of 
1905, was associated with his father in the practice of law; Rolla 
T., who is a bookkeeper for the First National Bank of Clinton; 
and Helen, who resides with her mother in the attractive family 
home situated at No. 613 North Monroe Street, Clinton. 

Judge Ingham so long filled so large a place in the business, 
social, philanthropic and religious life of Clinton, in fact, was such 
a vital personality, that his loss was one deeply felt. While the real 
business of his life was the profession of law, he was so broad- 



716 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

minded and so widely interested that his influence extended into 
many channels and will long be felt beneficially. He is survived by 
many friends who knew him well in the fraternal bonds of the 
Masonic and Knights of Pythias lodges, and in other organizations, 
open to the public view, where his advice was sought and freely 
given, and his benevolence was a matter of common comment. In 
all the relations of life he was true, honest and upright. With his 
family he belonged to the Presbyterian Church and its claims on 
his bounty were never stinted nor forgotten. 

HON. IRA J. O'HARRA, of the City of Macomb, McDonough 
County, for the past seventeen years has been a creditable member 
of the Macomb bar, and at the same time has proved his dependable 
citizenship and his genuine interest in all that concerns the progress 
of this section. 

Ira J. O'Harra was born at Bentley, Hancock County, Illinois, 
May 17, 1872, and is a son of Jefferson W. and Pauline (Robert- 
son) O'Harra. The paternal ancestors came from Ireland to Amer- 
ica and the branch from which Ira J. O'Harra descended located 
first in Ohio and from there came to Illinois, in 1837, settling first 
in Adams and later removing to Hancock County. Of the nine 
children born to the late Jefferson W. O'Harra, Ira J. is the young- 
est, all five sons adopting a professional career, two being attor- 
neys, one a minister of the Gospel and one a physician, one presi- 
dent of the State School of Mines of South Dakota and one sister, 
who for many years resided upon a farm, but who now with her 
husband and daughter have retired to private life in the City of 
Carthage, Illinois. 

After attending the district schools through boyhood, Ira J. 
O'Harra became a student in Carthage College and followed his 
collegiate days with three years of school teaching and then began 
the serious study of the law, reading for one year in the office 
of O'Harra, Scofield & Hartzell, at Carthage, Illinois, and in the 
fall of 1896 he entered the Kent Law School at Chicago, and was 
graduated from that well known institution in 1897, in June of 
the same year being admitted to the bar, at Springfield, Illinois. 
Mr. O'Harra came to Macomb on November i, 1897, opening a 
law office immediately thereafter and engaging in practice by him- 
self for one year. In 1898 he became associated with Philip E. 
Elting, under the firm name of Elting & O'Harra, which partner- 
ship continued for seven years, since which time he has been alone. 
Few men stand higher at Macomb than Ira J. O'Harra and his 
enviable reputation has been justly earned, and he is a valued 
member of both county and state bar associations. A democrat 
by inheritance and conviction, Mr. O'Harra has been particularly 
active in politics for the past eight years and within this period 
has served as a delegate to numerous county and state conventions. 
On April i, 1913, he was elected mayor of Macomb for two years, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 717 

being the third democratic mayor ever elected in said city, and his 
administration has been admirable in every way, his every action 
showing a broadmindedness that has been beneficial to the funda- 
mental and far-reaching interests of this growing city. 

Mayor O'Harra was united in marriage on June 26, 1901, at 
Macomb, to Miss Anna D. Gloyd, who is a daughter of the late 
Stephen V. R. Gloyd and Mary E. Gloyd, and they have three 
children: Miriam Esther, who was born August 18, 1903;. Law- 
rence G., who was born June 27, 1905, and Reuel E., who was born 
July 26, 1908. The family attends the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Mayor O'Harra has long been identified with the Odd Fellows and 
the Knights of Pythias, his busy life not affording him many hours 
to devote to pure recreation but he possesses the qualities which 
make him a welcome visitor in every social gathering. He main- 
tains his office in the Union Block and his residence is No. 538 
North Randolph Street, Macomb. 

DAVID SHEEAN. One of the oldest and ablest members of 
the Galena bar is David Sheean, who, for fifty-seven years has been 
in continuous practice here and during this long period has been 
connected many times with epoch-marking litigation. He has also 
been a citizen of worth and prominence, serving capably and honor- 
ably in public office and still continues an important factor in the 
city's life. 

David Sheean was born^at Boston, Massachusetts, July 3, 1833, 
and is a son of James and Mary (Lorden) Sheean. They were 
born in County Cork, Ireland. When David was three years old 
his parents left Boston and made their way to Galena, Illinois, 
founding here a family that has been worthily representative ever 
since. At that time Galena had excellent public schools, also pri- 
vate schools and an academy, all of which David Sheean attended 
and remained in Jo Daviess County until 1851, when he went to 
California. There he engaged in mining and remained four and 
one-half years. After he came back to Galena he applied himself 
to the study of law and about 1858 was admitted to the bar, imme- 
diately entering into practice here. His first partnership was with 
John A. Rawlins, the firm name being Rawlins & Sheean, which 
continued until 1862, when Mr. Rawlins became chief of staff for 
General Grant serving through the Civil war, and subsequently 
was made secretary of war in President Grant's cabinet. 

From 1862 until 1867 he practiced alone but later formed a law 
partnership with his brother, Thomas J. Sheean, and in 1893 his 
nephew, J. M. Sheean, was admitted to the firm. In 1859 Mr. 
Sheean was elected city attorney of Galena, and in 1864 he became 
mayor and his administration was one that was exceedingly credit- 
able to himself and beneficial to the city. He has always been in- 
terested in movements and measures which have given promise of 
practical benefit to the community and has frequently been called 



718 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

upon to act in civil offices where judgment has been especially 
essential. He has been president and director of the Galena Public 
Library and also of Greenwood Cemetery. 

Mr. Sheean was married September 21, 1876, to Miss Cora L. 
Spare, who died April 5, 1895, leaving no children. Mr. Sheean 
is a member of the Illinois State and the American Bar Associa- 
tions. 

THOMAS J. SHEEAN. Perhaps no name in the legal profession 
in Central Illinois' is better known than that of Sheean, a name that 
has been honorably connected with the courts at Galena for over a 
half century. It has many times been remarked that special talents 
continue to appear in a family, sometimes through generation after 
generation, and the learned men who announce a disbelief in hered- 
ity have trouble in satisfactorily explaining such an evident fact. 

The Sheean family was established at Galena in 1837 by James 
and Mary (Lorden) Sheean, the parents of Thomas J. Sheean, 
who was born in Guilford Township, Jo Daviess' County, Illinois, 
two years later, on December 15, 1838. He attended the common 
schools near his father's home until old enough for better educa- 
tional advantages, when he was sent to Sinsinawa College, in Wis- 
consin, and also attended Rock River Seminary at Mount Morris, 
Illinois. In the meanwhile, as opportunity offered, he read law 
and in 1868 was admitted to the bar and entered into practice in 
June, 1869, being associated with his older brother, David Sheean. 
For forty-five years Mr. Sheean has been in active practice and 
is well known all over this section of the state. He is a member 
of both county and state as well as the American Bar Association. 
He has a law library containing about. 2,500 volumes. 

Mr. Sheean was married December 25, 1865, to Miss Frances 
Delahunt, who was born in Ireland. They have the following 
children: James M., who is an attorney in practice at Chicago; 
Mary S., who is the wife of James W. Ryan, a resident of Chi- 
cago; Clara K., who lives at home; Henry D., who is an attorney 
in Chicago ; and Frank T., who is state's attorney for Jo Daviess 
County, and a very prominent man in law, business and politics. 

FRANK T. SHEEAN. It is a matter of considerable pride to 
the loyal resident of the great State of Illinois that she has so 
many excellent laws on her statute book, and, in many cases her 
officials are able and willing to carry them out. In the county 
organization there is no more important official than the state's 
attorney, whether as adviser to other officials, or as prosecutor in 
both civil and criminal actions. On account of the great responsi- 
bility attaching to this office, the selection of men to capably fill 
it is a matter of great concern, and election and subsequent re-elec- 
tion, gives conclusive proof of legal ability of a high order. A case 
in point is that of the widely known state's attorney of Jo Daviess 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 719 

County, Frank T. Sheean, who is serving in his second term in 
this office, preserving a reputation already made, for sterling in- 
tegrity combined with thorough efficiency. 

Frank T. Sheean was born at Galena, Illinois, April 22, 1878, 
and is the youngest of a family of five children born to his parents, 
Thomas J. and Frances (Delahunt) Sheean. He attended the 
public schools of Galena and after three years of study in the 
high school, in September, 1895, entered the University of Illinois, 
where he was graduated in 1899, with the degree of A. B. He 
then read law under the direction and supervision of his father, 
uncle and older brother, this being a family of lawyers, at Galena 
for about three years, he was admitted to the bar of Illinois, at 
Chicago, June 5, 1902. He chose his birthplace as his field of 
professional work and became a member of the law firm of Sheean 
& Sheean, the personnel of the firm being David, Thomas J., Henry 
D. and Frank T. Henry D. Sheean is a leading attorney at Chi- 
cago. Mr. Sheean continued in a general practice until 1908, when 
he was elected state's attorney and after four years of efficiency 
in this difficult and trying position, was re-elected in 1912. His 
administration of the office has distinguished him as a man of far 
more than ordinary legal ability. Although fearless in prosecution 
he has ever been credited with being entirely just, his official duties 
being performed according to the letter of the law and without fear 
or favor. 

Mr. Sheean has a delightful home circle, wife and children, the 
family residence being at No. 901 Third Street, Galena, Illinois. 
On June 26, 1906, he was united in marriage with Miss Effie 
Hodson, who is a daughter of Judge Hodson, of Galena, and they 
have two children : Jane H., who was born October 29, 1908, and 
Mary F., who was born February 19, 1912. Mr. Sheean was 
educated in the Galena schools and at Waterman Hall, at Sycamore, 
Illinois. She takes part in the pleasant social activities of the city 
and is interested in many movements for the spread of benevo- 
lence. 

For a number of years Mr. Sheean has been an active factor in 
county politics, a stanch supporter of the democratic party and 
many times has been chosen as a delegate to important conventions, 
state, congressional and senatorial. In 1908 and again in 1912 he 
was a delegate to the democratic state conventions assembled at 
Springfield, where important party policies were determined. 

The law firm of Sheean & Sheean is retained by a number of 
large corporations, and are attorneys for the Chicago Great West- 
ern Railroad, and also for the First State and Savings Bank, at 
Galena, Frank T. Sheean being one of the bank directors. His life 
has been such a busy one that he has not found leisure for much 
travel, but his library is comprehensive and his association with men 
is constant and in the great cosmopolitan citizenship that yearly 
comes to his direct attention, he finds types of every land he may 



720 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ever visit. He keeps in touch with his old college comrades by 
continuing his membership with the Greek letter fraternities of stu- 
dent days and belongs also to the Elks and the Modern Woodmen. 
He is also a member of the American and State Bar associations. 

FRANK LINDLEY. The senior member of the firm of Lindley, 
Penwell & Lindley, attorneys and counselors at Danville, has had a 
professional career, extending over thirty years, of more than ordi- 
nary successes and distinctions. Frank Lindley has the reputation of 
having won a greater percentage of cases than any other member of 
the Danville bar, and he has tried in the course of his long practice 
every kind of suit from those heard in the justice courts to those 
which come under the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. 

Frank Lindley was born at Dublin in Wayne County, Indiana, 
March 10, 1858. He comes of the substantial Quaker stock which 
furnished the distinctive element in the early population of Wayne 
County, and his parents, Osmond and Achsah W. (Wilson) Lindley, 
were both devout adherents of that simple religion. The father was 
a graduate of the Friends Boarding School, now Earlham College, at 
Richmond, was a teacher in his early days, and later a pork packer 
and farmer. His wife graduated from the same school. 

Frank Lindley grew up in a little Quaker community, distin- 
guished by the quiet habits and simple tastes of that sect, and he was 
well towards manhood before he heard an oath or saw a playing 
card. The discipline of an Indiana farm was one factor in his edu- 
cation, and his schooling was acquired partly in Henry County, and 
also in an academy conducted by the Quaker Church at Hopewell, 
Indiana. Mr. Lindley finished his course there in 1873, and in 
1874, at the age of sixteen, began teaching. He took up the study 
of law in the office of Thornton & Hamlin of Shelbyville, Illinois, 
and gained admission to the bar when twenty-one years of age. 

The first two years he practiced at Shelbyville, and became a 
member of the Danville bar on May i, 1881. At Danville Mr. Lind- 
ley formed a partnership with Frank W. Penwell, and that asso- 
ciation continued with mutual pleasure and profit until 1907. When 
his partner retired from practice the present firm of Lindley, Pen- 
well & Lindley was formed, the new members being Fred B. Pen- 
well, a son of Frank W. Penwell, and Walter C. Lindley, a nephew, 
and the partnership is probably one of the oldest in Eastern Illinois. 
As a lawyer Mr. Lindley has been known as a most indefatigable 
worker, prepares his cases with the greatest precision and care, 
and his investigations have never been confined to the obvious issue, 
but have always probed to the depths of the case and have safe- 
guarded every possible contingency. His arguments are forceful, 
and the effectiveness with which he has handled hundreds of cases 
at Danville is a fact familiar to every member of the bar. His 
devotion to his clients' interests has become almost proverbial in 
local legal circles, and this absorption in the strict work of his pro- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 721 

fession has prevented him from ever accepting any of the offices 
which usually come to a successful lawyer. At the same time Mr. 
Lindley has been a stanch supporter of the republican party, has 
made some campaign speeches, and has frequently attended the 
judicial and congressional conventions and in 1896 was a delegate 
to the state convention. His labors and concentrated efforts along 
the line of his profession has brought him a creditable success and 
high standing. 

On October 25, 1885, at Danville Mr. Lindley married Miss 
Jennie M. Gregg. Her father was a native of the North of Ireland, 
was educated for the Presbyterian ministry, and left home at the 
age of twenty years and emigrated to Indiana. Mr. Lindley owns a 
pleasant home in Danville, and has recently invested extensively in 
fafm lands, and gives his personal supervision to their management. 
Reared a Quaker, at the time of his marriage he became a member 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Danville, and is now serving 
on its board of trustees. Since reaching his majority he has been a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and for a num- 
ber of years has affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Lindley 
is a man of positive nature, strong in his convictions and firm in 
support of what he believes to be right, and this quality has won 
him the confidence of the courts and has secured him many favor- 
able verdicts. 

ROBERT L. BRACKEN. A highly educated and successful lawyer 
at Polo, Robert L. Bracken has been in active practice since his 
admission to the bar at Springfield on October 7, 1908. Soon after- 
ward he formed a partnership with George E. Reed under the firm 
name of Reed & Bracken, and this was one of the important firms 
in the Ogle County bar until September i, 1911. Since that time 
Mr. Bracken has had an individual practice, both civil and criminal, 
and has formed some influential connections in his part of the state. 
Among other interests intrusted to his charge he is local attorney 
and adviser to the Exchange National Bank, in which building he 
has his offices, and to the Mutual Telephone Company. 

Robert L. Bracken was born at Polo, Illinois, January 4, 1885, 
the only son of James E. and Alice (Doorley) Bracken. His father 
was also a native of Polo and is still living in that city. His mother 
was born in Grundy County, Iowa, and is now deceased. 

Robert L. Bracken attended the public schools of Polo, graduated 
from the high school in 1903 and in the fall of the same year 
entered Notre Dame University at South Bend, where he remained 
a student five years, two years in the regular collegiate course, and 
three years in the law department. He graduated LL. B. in 1908, 
and in the fall of the same year was admitted to practice in 
Illinois. He is an active republican, and in 1912 was a delegate to 
the state convention. 

On September i, 1910, he married Miss Lillis Lawrence, daugh- 

Vol. 1119 



722 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ter of the Hon. Johnson Lawrence of Polo. They have a daughter, 
Louise, born March 6, 1912. Mrs. Bracken was educated in the 
public schools of Polo and at Oberlin College of Ohio, and is prom- 
inent in club and social circles. Mr. Bracken is a Catholic, is af- 
filiated with the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Notre Dame Club of Chicago. 

JUDGE JOHN DOUGLAS WELSH. In the twenty-five years that 
Judge Welsh has spent as an active member of the Galesburg bar 
it is doubtful if any other lawyer has been so successful in winning 
cases, or has been more distinguished for influence and for all- 
around disinterested service in behalf of his community. Judge 
Welsh is undoubtedly one of the leaders in the Illinois bar, and his 
career has been an interesting progress from modest beginnings to 
ever increasing responsibilities and success. 

John Douglas Welsh was born in a log cabin, a distinction not 
enjoyed by many of his active associates in the Illinois bar at the 
present time. This log cabin was located in Truro Township, Knox 
County, and his birthday was September 10, 1858. His parents 
were Michael and Catherine (Grace) Welsh, both of them natives 
of County Kilkenny, Ireland. Michael Welsh was born September 
8, 1830, was married October 14, 1850, at the age of twenty, and 
with his bride set out for America, arriving at New Orleans January 
i, 1851, after a voyage of eight weeks across the ocean in a sailing 
vessel. From New Orleans they came up the Mississippi River 
to St. Louis, up the Illinois River to Peoria, and crossed the country 
by wagon to Maquoin in Knox County, where Michael Welsh spent 
three years in farming. In 1853 he moved to Truro Township in 
the same county, bought improved land, but for some years had a 
log cabin home, which was the type, of many residences in the county 
at that time. That farm remained his home for more than half a 
century, and in that time he won a creditable position as an indus- 
trious agriculturist, a citizen of thorough integrity and usefulness, 
and it was with an appreciation of his worth and ability that his 
fellow townsmen elected him to a number of local offices. For 
twenty years he served as justice of the peace, and though not legally 
trained made the notable record of never having an appeal taken 
from his decision. Every litigant who appeared before Justice 
W 7 elsh was convinced of his utmost fairness and impartiality. For a 
number of years he also served as collector and assessor, and as 
school trustee. Michael Welsh died at his home in Knox County 
July 28, 1907, when seventy-seven years of age, and his passing be- 
reaved the county of one of its most estimable pioneers. His wife 
died six months before him. Both were active members of the 
Catholic Church. There were seven children: William M., of Wil- 
liamsfield, Illinois; Alice, wife of David Cloonin of Zearing, Iowa; 
Benoni F., a resident of Williamsfield, Illinois ; J. D. ; Jay, of Wil- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 723 

liamsfield ; M. M., a physician and surgeon at Odell, Illinois; and 
Mary, wife of Ricard Judge of Pontiac, Illinois. 

Judge Welsh grew up on the old homestead with which so 
many of his early associations are identified, had the training of the 
average farmer boy in Central Illinois during the sixties and seven- 
ties, and from the district schools entered Lombard College at Gales- 
burg, graduating with the class of 1885. Judge Welsh studied law 
at the Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, was admitted to 
the bar in June, 1887, and spent his first two years in practice at 
Springfield, Missouri. Returning to Galesburg, he soon found him- 
self in the enjoyment of a living practice, and since then his reputa- 
tion has steadily grown, and for a number of years he has had his 
choice of business in that field. The only important interruption 
to his career as a lawyer came during his service as county judge of 
Knox County, an office he filled from December, 1902, until Decem- 
ber, 1906. From 1890 until 1895 Judge Welsh was associated with 
George W. Prince, and in August, 1895, a partnership was formed 
with E. P. Williams and George A. Lawrence. The firm in 1912 
admitted Mr. Green, and at present its title is Williams, Lawrence, 
Welsh & Green, without doubt the leading law firm of Galesburg. 

During the twenty-five years of his practice Judge Welsh has 
conducted important litigations in both the federal and state courts. 
Though possessed of great natural ability he has always been known 
as a hard student, is a versatile and ready debater, and has never 
contented himself until becoming master of every detail of a case. 
There are few lawyers who win a larger percentage of their cases 
before either judge or jury than Mr. Welsh. In addition to his law 
practice he is a director in the Farmers and Mechanics Bank of 
Galesburg. 

Judge Welsh was married June 27, 1888, to Miss Ella C. 
McCullough, daughter of Samuel K. and Emily Rosina (Reed) 
McCullough of Galesburg. Mrs. Welsh, who died May 2, 1913, 
was prominent socially at Galesburg, an active worker in the Ladies' 
Aid and the Free Kindergarten, and although not a member active 
in the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mrs. Welsh was a 
member of the Universalist Church and Judge Welsh is active in 
church affairs and a trustee of Lombard College, his alma mater, an 
institution conducted under the auspices of the Universalist denom- 
ination. Fraternally he is affiliated with Alpha Lodge No. 155 A. F. 
& A. M., and Galesburg Chapter, R. A. M. Politically he is a 
republican. His law firm represents the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, and a number 
of local banks. 

Judge Welsh's son, Vernon M., born August 15, 1891, graduated 
at Knox College in 1913, and is now a student in Harvard Law 
School. His record while in college gives promise of a brilliant 
career. He won several oratorical prizes in college, and in 1913 was 
awarded the prize offered by the Prohibition Society, and also that 



724 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

offered by the Peace Society, winning the first honors both in the 
local and state meetings, and also the first prize at St. Louis, and 
was sent as representative to the Peace Conference at Lake Mohonk, 
New York. 

SOLON W. CROWELL. More than half of the time since his 
admission to the Illinois bar S. W. Crowell spent in the office of 
state's attorney of Ogle County. His experience, his thorough train- 
ing, and certain personal qualifications have brought him a rank as 
one of the ablest and most successful attorneys of Oregon, where he 
has been more or less actively identified with public affairs for the 
last quarter of a century. 

Solon W. Crowell was born on a farm in Marion Township, 
Ogle County, February 22, 1869, and he still retains this old farm of 
450 acres. He was the eleventh in a family of twelve children born 
to the late Solon S. and Sarah (Kern) Crowell. His father was 
born at Concord, New Hampshire, and his mother in Madison 
County, New York. 

Solon W. Crowell attended district schools near the old home 
farm on which he was reared until about sixteen years of age, and 
then continued in the public and high schools at Oregon, graduating 
from high school in 1888. In the fall of the same year he entered 
the University of Illinois, and spent three years in the literary and 
scientific departments. Following that came three years as deputy 
circuit clerk of Ogle County, and it was while in that office that his 
ambition was permanently directed toward the law and he took 
advantage of opportunities to acquaint himself with court pro- 
cedure and also to study law in the office of and under the direction 
of H. A. Smith for one year. In the fall of 1894 Mr. Crowell 
entered the Northwestern University Law School at Chicago and 
was graduated from that institution LL. B. in the spring of 1896. 
His admission to the bar, however, was given at Chicago in the fall 
of 1895. On returning to Ogle County he took up active practice, 
and in the fall of 1896 was elected state's attorney, and held that 
office continuously for a period of twelve years. He has taken con- 
siderable part in republican party affairs, and was a delegate to 
the state convention at Springfield, Illinois, in 1912. He was named 
as a presidential elector-at-large on the republican ticket in the 1912 
campaign. He is vice president and one of the directors of the 
Oregon State Savings Bank of Oregon, Illinois. 

January 28, 1903, Mr. Crowell married Miss Edith B. McCrea, 
daughter of Alfred B. McCrea, of Creston, Illinois. Mrs. Crowell 
was educated in the public schools at Creston and in the normal 
college, at Normal, Illinois, and is well known in club and social 
circles at Oregon. Mr. Crowell is a member of the State Bar 
Association and is a popular member of such fraternities as the 
Masonic order, in which he is both a consistory and a Knight 
Templar Mason and also a member of the Mystic Shrine, and the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 725 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. His church is the Presbyterian. Mr. Crowell has 
offices in the Jacobs Block and his home is at 700 North Fourth 
Street, Oregon, on the banks of Rock River. 

BERT S. DUZAN. For a man still in his early thirties Bert S. 
Duzan has made a splendid record as a lawyer, and easily stands 
among the leaders of the Ogle County bar. He has the best law 
offices in Oregon, and a valuable law library comprising about a 
thousand volumes. 

Bert S. Duzan was born at Stittman Valley, Illinois, June 30, 
1882, and from an early age has depended largely on his own efforts 
to advance him in life. He attended the Oregon public schools, 
graduating from high school in 1901, and for three years was a 
student of law in the office and under the direction of J. C. Seyster 
at Oregon. Mr. Duzan was admitted to the bar at Chicago in Octo- 
ber, 1907, and soon afterwards formed a partnership with Orville 
Ely, the firm of Ely & Duzan continuing until January, 1910. Since 
that date Mr. Duzan has practiced as an individual, and besides a 
general practice is local attorney and legal adviser to several private 
corporations. In January, 1908, he became city "attorney of Oregon, 
and has succeeded himself in that office ever since. 

Mr. Duzan was married December 19, 1907, to Miss Carolyn 
Taylor, of Clinton, Illinois. She was educated in the schools of 
DeWitt and Leroy, Illinois. They have twin children, Donald T. 
and Duane S., born December 2, 1913. 

Mr. Duzan is a thirty-second degree Mason, has membership in 
the Mystic Shrine temple at Rockford, and is also affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the 
State Bar Association, and has taken much interest in republican 
party affairs, having been a delegate to the state convention in 1912. 
He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

WILBUR B. McHENRY. Since his admission to the bar at Ottawa 
November 4, 1897, Wilbur B. McHenry has been steadily increasing 
his prestige and success as one of the able members of the Rochelle 
bar. A few days after his admission to the bar he formed a partner- 
ship with George D. O'Brien, under the firm name of O'Brien & 
McHenry, and for a dozen years this existed as one of the most rep- 
resentative firms of the Ogle County bar. The partnership was dis- 
solved in April, 1909, after which Mr. McHenry looked after his 
large business as an individual practitioner, and he is now the senior 
member of the law firm of McHenry & Duster. For four years 
he served as city clerk of Rochelle, and his record of service as 
mayor covers twelve years, and he is at present executive head of 
this flourishing Northern Illinois city. He was elected and served 
one term as representative of Ogle County in the Forty- Fourth Gen- 
eral Assembly, during which term he served on the judiciary, the 



726 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

railroad and warehouse, the corporations and public grounds and 
buildings committees. 

Wilbur B. McHenry was born at Rochelle March 20, 1874, the 
younger of two children of James S. and Lovina (Sitterly) Mc- 
Henry. Both his parents were natives of New York State. His 
early education came from the public schools of Rochelle, and after 
graduating from the high school in 1894 he attended business col- 
lege at Rock ford, and then spent two years as a student in the 
law office of George D. O'Brien, with whom he became associated 
in practice as soon as admitted to the bar. He is attorney for the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company. 

Mr. McHenry was married November 30, 1898, to Miss Daisy 
Poole of Rochelle. Their one daughter, Lola, died when two years 
of age. Mrs. McHenry has taken a prominent part in club and 
social life at Rochelle, and is active in the women's club of that city. 
Mr. McHenry has taken thirty-two degrees in Scottish Rite 
Masonry, is a Knight Templar and a Shriner of that order, and 
is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is a member of the 
Business Men's Club. Politically he is a republican, and his church 
is the Presbyterian. His office at Rochelle is in the People's Bank 
Building and his home at 521 Fifth Avenue. 

FLOYD J. TILTON. Besides his successful practice as a lawyer 
for the past fifteen years, at first in Kewanee and later at Rochelle, 
Floyd J. Tilton had some active service as a soldier during the 
Spanish-American war and is one of the best known citizens of Ogle 
County. Since taking up active practice he has been devoted to the 
interests of his profession, has never been led away from the law 
into politics, although as a loyal democrat he has attended several 
state conventions as a delegate. His practice has always been suffi- 
ciently attractive and remunerative so that he has had no inclinations 
to hold office, and is first and last a lawyer. 

Floyd J. Tilton was born at Chana in Ogle County, Illinois, May 
24, 1875. There were three children, among whom he was the first, 
born to William W. and Alice (Canavan) Tilton, his father a native 
of Knox County, Ohio, and his mother of County Monaghan, Ire- 
land. 

Floyd J. Tilton acquired his early education in the Rochelle 
public schools, finishing the high school course in 1895, and after 
two years as a teacher began the study of law in the office of F. E. 
Dresser at Rochelle. One year later he entered the Northwestern 
University Law School, in the fall of 1897, and his career there was 
interrupted by his enlistment early in 1898 for service in the Span- 
ish-American war. He was one of the few volunteers who actually 
got to the front, and saw some active campaigning in Porto Rico. 
After nine months' service Mr. Tilton returned home, and in the fall 
of 1899 re-entered Northwestern University and was a student there 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 727 

until his admission to the bar at Chicago on June 7, 1900. Mr. 
Tilton began practice at Kewanee, where in January, 1902, he 
became associated with John T. Cummings under the firm name of 
Cummings & Tilton, and remained there in practice with Mr. Cum- 
mings until October, 1907. At that date he returned to Ogle County 
and located at Rochelle, and has since managed an individual prac- 
tice. In 1912 he was his party's nominee for state senator from 
the Tenth District, and for representative in the General Assembly 
in 1914. 

Mr. Tilton was married June u, 1908, to Mertha C. Bailey of 
Kewanee. Their three children are: Mary N., born July 14, 1910; 
John W., born November 24, 1911 ; and Norval B., born July 24, 
1914. Mrs. Tilton was educated in the public schools of Kewanee 
and in college at Dubuque, Iowa, and is an active member in social 
circles and of the Woman's Club. Mr. Tilton has fraternal rela- 
tions with the Masons, the Elks and other secret societies. His 
church home is the Presbyterian. His law office is at the corner 
of Main Street and Fourth Avenue and his home at 408 Third 
Avenue. 

HON. JOHN P. DEVINE. For ten years a member of the Lee 
County bar, Mr. Devine outside of the law is best known through his 
services as an Illinois legislator, being a member of the present 
House of Representatives. 

John P. Devine was born January 22, 1878, a son of James and 
Mary A. (Gugerty) Devine. His father was a native of Ireland 
and his mother of Lee County, Illinois. His early education came 
from the schools of Dixon, and he is a graduate of both the literary 
and law departments of the Northern Illinois College at Dixon. He 
finished his law course with the class of 1903, and was admitted 
to the bar at Chicago October 4, 1905. Mr. Devine at once began 
active practice at Dixon and has enjoyed substantial success. His 
office is at 123 Galena Avenue. 

Mr. Devine was elected to the Forty-eighth General Assembly in 
1912, and in 1914 was re-elected. During the first session he was 
chairman of the committee on canal, river improvement and com- 
merce, and a member of the committees on congressional apportion- 
ment, education, judiciary, municipal courts of Chicago, public utili- 
ties, state and municipal civil service reform, state institutions. He 
introduced the bill into the lower house providing for the employ- 
ment of state convicts on the public highways, and was author of 
several measures which became enacted as laws. He also introduced 
and secured the passage of the bill permitting proof of handwriting 
by comparison. 

Mr. Devine is an active democrat, has taken an interest in politics 
since reaching his majority, and has served as delegate to several 
conventions, including the last one held in the state. He is affiliated 



728 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and with the 
Knights of Columbus, and is a member of the Catholic Church. 

ORVILLE JAMES TAYLOR, JR., was born at Sioux City, Iowa, Sep- 
tember 8, 1885. A son of Orville J. and Eleanor S. (Harris) 
Taylor. His father is a lawyer and since the early '705 has been 
prominent in his profession at Sioux City. 

The son received his education in the public schools at Sioux 
City, and after graduation from high school entered the University 
of Chicago, thereafter matriculating in the law school of North- 
western University, from which institution he received a degree of 
LL. B. in 1908, and in the same year was admitted to the Illinois 
Bar. During his attendance in law school Mr. Taylor occupied the 
position of assistant agent of the Estate of Henry W. King. 

His first year of practice was spent with the firm of Judah, 
Willard, Wolf & Reichman. Later he became associated with Roger 
L. Foote, attorney for the Corn Exchange National Bank, and in 
1912 entered the offices of Gardner, Foote & Burns. In 1913 he 
was made a member of that firm, and in that capacity is now engaged 
in general practice. His offices are in the Corn Exchange Bank 
Building. 

Mr. Taylor is a member of the American Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, Chicago Bar Association, in which 
organization he is acting as a member of the legal education com- 
mittee, the University Club, the City Club, the Legal Club of Chi- 
cago, and Wheaton Golf Club. He belongs to the college fraternity 
of Beta Theta Pi and to the legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi. He 
is a director in Chicago of the Alumni Association of the former. 
For the past five years he has occupied a position on the faculty of 
the Chicago Law School as professor of law of private corporations. 

Aside from his profession, he devotes much time to social wel- 
fare work, and is a director in and attorney for the Emerson House 
Association, a prominent settlement situated in the slum district 
of the west side. 

On June 30, 1915, Mr. Taylor was married to Saide Prescott 
Pettit of Chicago. His residence is at 2632 Lake View Avenue. 

APOLLOS W. O'HARRA. The bar of Hancock County has one of 
its ablest members in Apollos W. O'Harra, who began practice in 
1880, and has made many high connections in his professional activi- 
ties. He is now senior member in the firm of O'Harra, O'Harra, 
Wood & Walker, one of the strongest firms in Hancock County. 

Apollos W. O'Harra was born on a farm near Camp Point, in 
Adams County, Illinois, February 22, 1857, a son of Jefferson W. 
and Paulina (Robertson) O'Harra. His father, who was born in 
Indiana June 4, 1833, was for a number of years 'a farmer in Adams 
and Hancock counties, but in 1866 moved to Bentley, in Hancock 
County, and was for thirty-two years proprietor of a general store. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 729 

In 1899 he came to Carthage, with the intention of retiring from 
business, but being unable to content himself with a life of idleness 
was from 1900 to 1908 active manager of the mortgage depart- 
ment in the office of his son. Mrs. Jefferson O'Harra was born 
in Adams County, Illinois, May 9, 1838. They became the parents 
of nine children, six of whom are now living : Apollos W. ; Dr. 
William G., a practicing physician in Chicago; Mary E., wife of 
George E. Burner, a retired farmer now living in Carthage; Dr. 
C. C, who is president of the State School of Mines in South 
Dakota ; Rev. M. L., now pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
at Carthage ; and Ira J., an attorney of Macomb, Illinois. 

Apollos W. O'Harra acquired his early education in the public 
schools, was a student in Carthage College, and for four years was 
one of the teachers in the schools at Bentley. His study of law 
was begun under the direction of Charles J. Scofield, and he later 
read in the office of Draper & Scofield, in Cartage, and was admitted 
to the bar January 5, 1880. Mr. O'Harra began practice alone, but 
at the end of two years admitted Frank H. Graves, who is now a 
leading attorney in Spokane, Washington. Two years later Mr. 
Graves removed from the city, and Mr. O'Harra then became asso- 
ciated with Charles J. and T. J. Scofield, both of w r hom were then 
leading members of. the Hancock County bar and have since reached 
increased distinctions and successes in the bar of Illinois. With 
the addition of Mr. O'Harra the firm became Scofield, O'Harra & 
Scofield, which continued until the ejection of Charles J. Scofield to 
the circuit bench. Mr. O'Harra and T. J. Scofield continued in prac- 
tice together for seventeen years. In 1891 they admitted William 
H. Hartzell to partnership, and he was with them in practice until 
1896. In 1890 O'Harra & Scofield opened an office at Ouincy, Mr. 
Scofield taking charge in that city, while Mr. O'Harra remained at 
Carthage. A .year later Col. W. W. Berry became associated 
with them and practiced with them until his death. On January 
i, 1897, Mr. Hartzell retired from the firm, and during the fall of 
the same year Judge Charles J. Scofield, having retired from twelve 
years of consecutive service on the circuit and appellate bench, again 
entered private practice and became a partner in the old firm under 
the style of Scofield, O'Harra & Scofield. This relationship was dis- 
solved by mutual consent on March I, 1899. Judge Scofield is still 
in practice, while T. J. Scofield is one of the leading attorneys in 
Chicago. Mr. O'Harra is now in practice with his son and two other 
younger members of the bar. He has a practice that extends over 
several states, and his firm are acting attorneys for the Mississippi 
River Power Company, and have a number of other important busi- 
ness relations. 

On October 14, 1880, Mr. O'Harra married Miss Eliza J. Burner, 
daughter of Isaac S. and Jane A. (Lionberger) Burner. Both her 
parents were natives of Virginia. Mr. O'Harra and wife have the 
following children: Clifton J., born May 23, 1884; Edith May, born 



730 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

May 22, 1886; Gladys, born June 8, 1890, and unmarried; Roswell 
B., born March 30, 1892, a graduate of the law department 
of the University of Michigan, and who became a member of the law 
firm of O'Harra, O'Harra, Wood & Walker in 1915. The daughter 
Edith May is the wife of Henry S. Walker, and they have two sons. 
Clifton J. O'Harra is a graduate of the Carthage High School with 
the class of 1902, completed the course in Carthage College in 1906, 
and in June, 1908, graduated from the Yale Law School and was 
admitted to the bar in the following July. He became a partner of 
his father under the name O'Harra & O'Harra, and subsequently his 
classmate in Carthage College and at Yale, Earl W. Wood, was 
admitted to the firm in 1909. Then a year later Henry S. Walker, a 
graduate of Carthage and from the law department of the University 
of Michigan, became a partner, thus making the firm of O'Harra, 
O'Harra, Wood & Walker. Clifton J. O'Harra was married Octo- 
ber 21, 1911, to Erma Rand of Carthage. He is affiliated with the 
Masonic Order and the Knights of Pythias. 

Apollos W. O'Harra has membership in the County and State and 
American Bar associations, is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and is a democrat who has served as delegate to 
various state conventions. 

LINUS CRUISE has been successfully identified with the bar at 
Carthage since 1897. His work in the profession has followed the 
lines of general practice, and during the past fifteen years his name 
has been connected with a number of important cases tried in 
Hancock County. 

Linus Cruise was born at Connersville, Indiana, April 5, 1859. 
His parents were John and Margaret (Moore) Cruise, the former 
born in Pennsylvania in 1826 and the latter in Morgan County, 
Ohio, in 1825. John Cruise early in life located in Ohio, subse- 
quently moved to Connersville, Indiana, and was a merchant there 
until the outbreak of the Civil war. He was one of the first to enlist 
in the Union army, going out in 1861, and was engaged in the cam- 
paigns through Kentucky, Tennessee and other sections of the Mid- 
dle West, until losing his life on the battlefield at Chickamauga. 
His body was buried at Chickamauga, and he now rests with his 
comrades in the Chickamauga battlefield cemetery. His widow 
survived him many years, and died February 13, 1899. In 1865 she 
brought her seven children to Adams County, Illinois, locating on a 
farm, and kept her family about her until they reached adult age. 
Later she moved to Hancock County, living near Burnside. 

Linus Cruise, though reared in a home of good influences and 
never lacking the necessities of life, had to depend upon himself 
for advancement after leaving the district schools of Adams County. 
He continued his education in the Camp Point High School and 
in the State Normal School at Normal, Illinois. He was engaged 
in educational work and in other lines of employment, and finally 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 731 

in 1895 entered the law department of Drake University at Des 
Moines, Iowa, and was graduated LL. B. in 1897. He was admitted 
to the bar of Springfield, and in the fall of the same year opened 
his law office at Carthage. Mrs. Cruise, his wife, had loyally 
co-operated with him in his efforts to prepare for the law, and 
while he was a student in college she read law at home, and has 
since been an able assistant to him in his profession. 

Mr. Cruise was married March 6, 1890, to Miss Anna H. Gen- 
try, who was born in Bloomington, Indiana. They had one son, 
Orville Gentry Cruise, born December 17, 1890, and died January 
17, 1891. Mr. Cruise has been active in local affairs only, has served 
on the school board for several years, but has declined any part in 
politics, since all his time is taken up with his profession. He is a 
democrat and has been a delegate to county conventions. His church 
home is the Christian, and he is identified with the Masonic Order, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and 
other fraternal organizations. 

SAMUEL XAYLOR. With ten years of successful experience 
behind him, Samuel Naylor is now regarded as one of the ablest 
attorneys of the Hancock County bar, and has been in practice at 
Carthage since 1903. 

Samuel Xaylor was born at Liberty, Illinois, June 8, 1879, son 
of Samuel and Barbara (Nations) Naylor. Samuel Naylor, who 
was born at Quincy, Illinois, Septernber 14, 1836, followed a career 
as a merchant, and died August n, 1910. During the Civil war 
he enlisted in Company E of the Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry, 
and for three years was away at the front fighting for the cause of 
the Union. His widow, a native of Liberty, died at the home of her 
son Samuel in Carthage on October 8, 1914. 

Mr. Naylor acquired his early education in the public schools, 
and was graduated in 1900 with the A. B. degree from Carthage 
College. His law studies were pursued under Judge D. E. Mack 
at Carthage, and three years later, in October, 1903, he was admitted 
to the bar. His practice began at once at Carthage, and although he 
now occupies offices with Senator O. F. Berry, he has never had a 
partner. Mr. Naylor was elected and served one term as city attor- 
ney of Carthage, and for six years was a member of the school 
board. Aside from his large general practice, he is now attorney 
for the Dime Savings Bank at Carthage, and also for the large 
loan company of Sharp & Berry Bros. 

Mr. Naylor was married August n, 1909, to Miss Forest M. 
Jones, daughter of Elijah and Emeline Jones of Springfield. They 
have two children : Barbara Eleanor Naylor, born October 20, 
1910, and Samuel J., born October 20, 1912. Mr. Naylor is a repub- 
lican in politics, is affiliated with the Masonic Order and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, is a member of the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation and president of the Hancock County Bar Association, and 



732 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

his church is the Lutheran. His office is in the Dime Savings Bank 
Building, and his home at 712 Wabash Avenue. 

ROLLAND M. WAGNER. A young lawyer who has done much to 
prove his ability and open a way for a large and successful career, 
Rolland M. Wagner, of the firm of Wolf & Wagner, is assistant 
state's attorney of Adams County, and has practiced at Quincy since 
his admission to the bar. 

Rolland M. Wagner was born at Liberty, Illinois, July 27, 1886, 
a son of Charles A. and Clara (Collins) Wagner. The grandfather 
was a native of Pennsylvania, moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
Charles A. Wagner was born, and the latter subsequently moved to 
Ohio and for a number of years has been senior member of the 
mercantile firm of Wagner & Collins at Liberty, Illinois. He is now 
sixty-two years of age, and his wife, a native of Illinois, is fifty. 
They had three sons and three daughters, and the Quincy lawyer 
was the third. 

His early education was acquired in the public schools of Lib- 
erty, finishing with a high school course, taught for two years at 
Columbus, Illinois, graduated B. A. at the University of Michigan, 
and entering the law school of the Northwestern University of Chi- 
cago was graduated LL. B. in 1909. Since then he has practiced 
at Quincy and has established an excellent reputation for skillful 
handling of cases. As assistant state's attorney he was one of the 
prosecutors of the famous Pfanschmidt murder case, which resulted 
in a sentence of death for the defendant, and the case is now before 
the Supreme Court. Mr. Wagner has been connected with a num- 
ber of other important cases. He is attorney for the Adams County 
Humane Society, attorney for the Ellington Electric Company of 
Quincy, and other corporations, is a member of the Adams County 
Bar Association and the State Bar Association, is lecturing knight 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
the Quincy Turnverein, the Quincy Country Club, and takes keen 
delight in all outdoor sports. 

Louis F. MEEK. Thirty years a member of the Illinois bar, 
Louis F. Meek has practiced in Peoria since 1888, and his success 
and attainments as a lawyer have been in proportion to the years 
of his activity. He has kept himself closely within the limits of 
professional work, his life has been characterized by a devotion to 
duty and the service of a capable lawyer such as to constitute true 
and substantial success. 

Louis F. Meek, who was born in Eureka, Woodford County, 
Illinois, in June, 1863, is in the same profession which was honored 
by his father, the late Bazel D. Meek, who died after a long and 
eventful career at Eureka, April 30, 1909. Colonel Meek was one 
of the early members of the Woodford County bar, and early in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 733 

the Civil war was associated with Col. Robert G. Ingersoll in rais- 
ing the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry. He became lieutenant colonel 
in that organization, and after two years in the field resigned his 
commission and returned home to his practice. He was regarded 
as one of the distinguished and able members of the bar in his 
county, figured in public life, and held such offices as county judge, 
county treasurer and county superintendent of schools. 

Louis F. Meek grew up in Eureka, attended the public schools 
and Eureka College, and prepared for his profession in the North- 
western Law School in Chicago. After graduating with the class 
of 1884 and being admitted to the bar, he was associated with his 
father until 1888. Seeking the opportunities of a larger city he then 
opened his office in Peoria, and for two years was in practice with 
R. J. Cooney, now of Chicago, who afterwards served as state's 
attorney of Peoria County. One step in his professional experience 
was two years of service as assistant state's attorney under John 
Niehaus. He was also public administrator of Peoria County four 
years. For a number of years he was associated with Mr. Ellwood, 
in the" firm of Ellwood & Meek. On August 2, 1913, was appointed 
postmaster of Peoria by President Wilson and the firm of Ellwood 
& Meek was dissolved, but Mr. Meek still maintains the office in 
Central National Bank Building, where he attends to such legal 
matters as his time will permit from his duties as postmaster. 
Politically he is a democrat and has always taken an active interest 
in politics. He was a delegate to the national convention in 1890 
and always stumps his congressional district and Central Illinois 
when campaigns are on. In 1906, during an absence from the state 
on business, the democratic convention nominated him for Con- 
gress. He accepted the honor reluctantly, and after a vigorous 
campaign succeeded in reducing the normal republican majority of 
6,000 to less than 3,000. 

Mr. Meek is married and there are three children in the family : 
Elizabeth, Perry and Louis. Mr. Meek is affiliated with a number 
of secret orders and business organizations and belongs to the Sons 
of the American Revolution. He is one of the leading Peorians 
both as a lawyer and citizen. 

EDWARD P. ALLEN. Engaged in practice at Quincy since 1907, 
Mr. Allen, who is now serving as city attorney, has gained a secure 
position in his profession as a result of hard work in overcoming 
the handicaps of meager advantages and by close diligence and 
application to his work as a lawyer. 

Born in Quincy January 15, 1884, Edward P. Allen was the 
youngest of four children born to John A. and Anna (Lane) Allen, 
the former a native of New York State and the latter of Ohio. 
Grandfather John Allen was a native of Fall River, Massachusetts. 
John A. Allen in early life studied for a lawyer, but at the beginning 
of the Civil war enlisted at Providence, Rhode Island, and went out 



734 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

as major of the Fourth Rhode Island Volunteers. It was one of 
the first regiments to reach Washington, D. C. His service was for 
three years, and included participation in the battles of first and 
second Bull Run, and though two horses were shot from under him 
he was never wounded. At one time he was military governor of 
both North and South Carolina, and subsequently was on General 
Burnside's staff as major. He came out of the army as lieutenant 
colonel, having resigned on account of ill health. In 1868 he came 
to Illinois, promoted and carried out several large land deals at 
Quincy and vicinity, and subsequently was in the tailoring business, 
employing at one time nineteen tailors. After retiring from that 
business, he held the office of justice of the peace for thirty years. 
His death occurred in November, 1908, at the age of eighty-two. He 
was married in Dallas City, Illinois, to Anna Lane, who died at 
Quincy February 13, 1908, at the age of sixty-nine. 

Edward P. Allen had to work and farm to get an education. 
His attendance in the public schools was interrupted, and he subse- 
quently was a student in the Union City Business College, and com- 
pleted the equivalent of a high school course by night study for two 
years. His law reading was pursued in the office of W. A. Vande- 
venter, and later with Homer Swope. He was also a student of 
law in the Gem City Business College, and was admitted to the bar 
at Quincy in 1907. Mr. Allen was elected city attorney in 1909 and 
held the office three terms. He refused to accept another term, 
preferring to give his entire time to his private and growing law 
business. He was nominated for Congress on the democratic ticket 
and defeated by a small vote in a large republican district, and is 
one of the leading democrats in Adams County. He has been a dele- 
gate to all the state conventions for the past fifteen years and was 
assistant sergeant at arms of the national convention at Denver 
in 1908. He was secretary of the Democratic County Committee, 
and is a member of the County and State Bar Association. His 
fraternities are the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Masonic lodge, and has taken thirty-two degrees of the Scottish 
Rite. 

On September 8, 1909, Mr. Allen married Miss Maude Homan, 
daughter of William A. and Emily (Rouer) Homan, both natives of 
Quincy, where they still reside. One child was born to their mar- 
riage, Anna Lane Allen, on December 14, 1910. 

HON. HARRY HIGBEE. Judge of the Circuit Court of Pike 
County, Judge Higbee is one of the best known lawyers and jurists 
of Illinois, is the son of a judge and lawyer who gained distinction 
in earlier Illinois courts, and in his own career has had fortunate 
associations, a liberal education, has for many years been prominent 
in professional and civic affairs, and all his acts as a judge or lawyer 
have contributed to the dignity of his profession. 

Harry Higbee was born at Pittsfield, county seat of Pike 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 735 

County, December 13, 1854. His father was the late Hon. Chaun- 
cey L. Higbee and his mother Julia M. (White) Higbee. Chauncey 
L. Higbee, a native of Ohio, moved to Illinois early in life, entered 
the law and for a number of years was a very widely known and 
learned attorney in Pike County. He was elected judge of the Cir- 
cuit Court at Pittsfield and honored that office by his services from 
1861 until his death in 1884. He was also a member of the Appellate 
Court of the state from 1877 to 1884. 

Judge Harry Higbee had not only the natural capacity but the 
fortunate environment which prepares men for the most efficient 
service. He entered Yale University, was graduated in 1875, subse- 
quently studied law at Columbia College, New York, for a year, 
and later, in 1878, graduated from the Union College of Law at 
Chicago, and then spent a year in European travel and study. Re- 
turning from abroad he was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1879. 
One of his partners was Mr. Wike, a prominent lawyer and at one 
time assistant secretary of the treasury of the United States. He 
was also associated in practice with the late Col. Asa C. Mathews. 

In 1888 he was elected a member of the State Senate, was 
re-elected in 1892, and in 1897 was elected judge of the Circuit 
Court, an office in which his thorough legal training and ability, his 
broad experience and unquestioned integrity have enabled him to 
render the finest quality of judicial service. 

Judge Higbee has been president of the First National Bank of 
Pittsfield since its organization. He is a member of the American 
Bar Association, the Illinois and Pik'e County Bar associations, and 
was honored with the office of president of the State Bar Associa- 
tion in 1912-13. In politics he is a democrat, is a member of the 
University Club and. the Iroquois Club of Chicago, and is a Royal 
Arch Mason. Judge Higbee was married December 18, 1879, at 
Pittsfield, to Miss Emma Hicks. Her father, Col. D. D. Hicks, 
who died in 1881, was for many years one of Pittsfield's prominent 
citizens. Judge Higbee's only child died in infancy. 

HON. EDWARD DOOCY. The professional record of Mr. Doocy 
includes forty years as a member of the Pike County bar, with 
twelve years of service as county judge and for the past nine years 
master in chancery. Among Illinois lawyers his name is representa- 
tive of the solid industry and ability which is at the basis of any 
long and successful career in the law. 

Edward Doocy was born at Griggsville, Pike County, Illinois, 
October 19, 1851. His parents were James and Sarah (Tracy) 
Doocy, both natives of County Tipperary, Ireland, who in 1847 
emigrated to America, and from New Orleans came to St. Louis, 
where they lived four years, and in the early part of 1851 located at 
Griggsville. The father followed various occupations while living 
in St. Louis, and in Pike County became a substantial farmer and 



736 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

was such up to his death in 1874 at the, age of forty-nine. The 
mother died at Springfield, Illinois, at the age of seventy-seven. 

The oldest of their seven children, Judge Doocy, had his primary 
education in the public schools of Pike County, subsequently was a 
student in the academic and law department of the Illinois College 
at Jacksonville, graduating in 1871, and thereafter read law with 
Judge James Ward; a retired lawyer. His admission to practice 
came in January, 1874, and then for eight years he practiced with 
increasing reputation in his native town. In 1882 Pike County 
elected him its county judge, and this caused his removal to the 
county seat at Pittsfield, where he was twice re-elected and adminis- 
tered the duties of county judge for three terms, or twelve years. 
Since leaving the bench Judge Doocy has given his attention to a 
large and important practice and for the past ten years has been 
master in chancery. He was a delegate to the democratic conven- 
tion at Baltimore in 1912. He is a member of both the State and 
American Bar associations, is a democrat in politics, and is a 
Knight Templar Mason, with lodge affiliations in Ascalon Lodge, 
No. 49, A. F. & A. M. 

Judge Doocy has a fine family. On December 28, 1886, at 
Griggsville he married Clara L. Butler, daughter of E. W. Butler, 
now deceased. To their marriage have been born five children : 
Clara Louise, born at Griggsville in 1889, is a graduate of the Illinois 
College with the degree of B. A., and is principal of the High 
School of Mount Sterling, Illinois; Edward Butler, born in July, 
1892, at Pittsfield, finished the electrical engineering course in the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Mississippi, and is now 
superintendent of a public service corporation ; Elmer Tiffany, born 
in November, 1894, at Pittsfield, is a graduate of the law depart- 
ment of Wesleyan University; Helen L., born January 25, 1896, at 
Pittsfield, has finished the Pittsfield High School course, and is now 
a teacher; Clarence Wellington, born in 1904, is attending school. 

NELSON F. ANDERSON. A lawyer with an unusually broad 
range of experience both in private and official practice, Nelson F. 
Anderson is the present state's attorney of Henry County and has 
been identified with the bar of that county a quarter of a century. 

Nelson F. Anderson was born in Sweden February n, 1860, a 
son of Nels and Maria (Kolakowski) Nelson. He was the oldest 
of their eight children, and. in the family are . two dentists, one 
physician, two lawyers and one in the grocery business, which is a 
fine showing of professional talent for one set of children. 

Nelson F. Anderson received his early education in the Latin 
School at Ystad, Sweden, but when twelve years of age the family 
emigrated to the United States, first locating at Greene in Butler 
County, Iowa. In that county he attended country schools for three 
years, and then went to Keokuk and learned the printer's trade. 
Mr. Anderson is a practical printer, and worked at his trade in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 737 

Keokuk, Galesburg and Chicago, spending about four years alto- 
gether. His literary education was acquired in Knox College at 
Galesburg, where he graduated with the degree Bachelor of Arts, 
and his wife has the same degree from the same institution. At the 
age of twenty-one Mr. Anderson determined to study law, but was 
confronted with the problem of providing his living expenses while 
pursuing his studies. While working at his trade in Chicago he 
began the reading of law in the office of Thomas E. Milchrist, whose 
record as United States District Attorney is well remembered. Mr. 
Anderson was with Mr. Milchrist two years, and in the fall of 1882 
entered the Union College of Law at Chicago, and was admitted to 
the bar December 6, 1886, before the Supreme Court. 

For about a year Mr. Anderson was employed by the law firm 
of Cook & Lawrence in Chicago, then for two years practiced at 
Salina, Kansas, with W. F. Musser as a partner under the firm 
name of Anderson & Musser. Returning to Illinois Mr. Anderson 
established an office at Galva, and for fourteen years served as vil- 
lage attorney. For six years he was assistant to Judge Bigelow, 
justice of the Appellate Court in the Sixth District. Mr. Anderson 
has been a resident of Kewanee for the past ten years, and in 1912 
was elected for the regular four-year term as state's attorney of 
Henry County. He has an office in the courthouse at Cambridge 
and his home law office is in the Fisher Building at Kewanee. 

Mr. Anderson was married December 25, 1888, to Mary W. 
Williams, daughter of W. P. Williams of Henry, Illinois. Their 
four sons are: Leland H., who was born in 1891 and is a graduate 
of the Kewanee High School and of the University of Chicago; 
Sumner B., born in 1895, now a student in the University of Chi- 
cago; Richard S., born in 1897; Nelson P., born in 1899. Mr. 
Anderson was for nine years a member of the Galva Board of 
Education, and has always interested himself in local affairs in what- 
ever community has been his home. Politically he is a democrat, is 
a member of the Congregational Church, of the Henry County Bar 
Association, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. His home is at 527 Elliott Street, Kewanee. 

JOHN B. HARRIS. Madison County claims Mr. Harris as one of 
its native sons and as one of .the representative younger members 
of its bar. He is engaged in the successful practice of his pro- 
fession at Granite City, and he has been in a significant sense the 
architect of his own fortunes, as he depended on his own resources 
in making advancement to eligibility for the exacting profession in 
which he is an earnest and effective worker and which he is honor- 
ing alike by his character and services. 

Mr. Harris was born on a farm in Moro Township, Madison 
County, Illinois, on the 22d of November, 1880, and is a son of 
John S. and Catherine (Keefe) Harris, the former of whom was 
born in St. Charles- County, Missouri, and the latter in the City of 

Vol. II 20 



738 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

St. Louis, that state, both having been children at the time of the 
removal of the respective families to Alton, Madison County, Illi- 
nois, where both were reared and educated and where their mar- 
riage was solemnized. As a young man John S. Harris was a 
successful and popular teacher in the public schools of Madison 
County, and he finally turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
in connection with which he became one of the substantial farmers 
of Madison County, where he continued to reside until his death, 
on the 27th of March, 1894, at the age of forty-eight years. His 
widow, who was born in December, 1851, now resides at East St. 
Louis, St. Clair County. Of the nine children seven are living, and 
of the number John B. was the third in order of birth. 

Mr. Harris passed his childhood days on the old homestead farm 
and acquired his early education in the public schools of his native 
township. He was about thirteen years old at the time of his 
father's death and his widowed mother soon afterward removed 
with her children to the Village of Bunker Hill, Macoupin County. 
In the village high school Mr. Harris was graduated in 1898, and 
he thereafter provided for his own support by various occupations, 
the while he gave close attention to the study of law at home and 
under effective private preceptorship. Knowledge thus gained indi- 
cates how effective must have been the spur of ambition, and in 
1907 Mr. Harris proved himself eligible for and was admitted to 
the bar of his native state, at Alton, the metropolis of Madison 
County. On the ist of March of the following year he engaged in 
the practice of his profession at Granite City, and his record has 
been one of consecutive advancement and pronounced professional 
success. He has appeared in connection with a number of specially 
important cases and up to the time of this writing has never yet 
lost a case that was carried to the appellate court. He is an appre- 
ciative and popular member of the Madison County Bar Associa- 
tion, is a director of the Granite City Commercial Club, and in 
politics is an uncompromising advocate of the cause of the demo- 
cratic party, being a member of the Young Men's Democratic Club 
of Granite City. He is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the 
Royal Arcanum and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and both he 
and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church. 

On the 29th of June, 1910, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Harris to Miss Grace G. Grote, daughter of Nelson and Mar- 
garet (Fitzgerald) Grote, the latter of whom still resides at East 
St. Louis, Mr. Grote having died in November, 1914. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harris have three children, whose names and respective dates 
of birth are here noted: John B., Jr., April 19, 1911; Genevieve, 
September 2, 1912; and Mary Frances, June 17, 1914. 

JOHN ROOT. One of the old and prominent lawyers of Henry 
County is John Root, now senior member of the firm of Root & 
Root at Galva. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 739 

John Root was born October 25, 1849, at Bishop Hill, Illinois, 
the only child of John and Charlotte Louise (Johnson) Root. Both 
his parents were natives of Sweden, and his father after coming 
to the United States fought as a volunteer in the American army 
during the war with Mexico, and soon after the close of that strug- 
gle located in Henry County, Illinois. 

John Root received his early education in the common schools 
at Bishop Hill. Subsequently attended Bryant & Stratton's Business 
College of Chicago, and Knox College at Galesburg. In 1876 he 
took up the study of law in the office of Judge Bigelow, and in 
order to defray his expenses while preparing for his profession 
taught school during the winter and worked on a farm in the sum- 
mer. He was admitted to the Illinois bar at Chicago in March, 
1880, and nine years later, in 1889, completed the course and was 
graduated from the old Union College of Law at Chicago. Mr. Root 
began his active practice at Galva and for twenty-five years con- 
ducted a large and individual practice, having a clientele both in 
Henry and adjoining counties. Though not partners, he and Judge 
Bigelow had offices together for some time. Mr. Root served as 
master in chancery of the Circuit Court from 1899 to iQii- 

He has fraternal affiliations with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America; in politics is a 
progressive and is a member of the. County Bar Association. On 
June 22, 1874, he married Betsy Ogren of Bishop Hill. Their five 
children are: Vincent J. ; Clarence, deceased; Amy L., wife of M. 
Peterson of Galva ; Ralph W., an attorney of Galva ; and Earl 

VINCENT J. ROOT. Junior member of the firm of Root & Root 
at Galva, Vincent J. Root has been an active member of the Illinois 
bar for the past ten years and has had a wide experience both as a 
lawyer and court reporter. 

Vincent J. Root was born on a farm near Bishop Hill, Illinois, 
June 27, 1875. His father, who is senior member of the above firm, 
has a brief sketch in preceding paragraphs. Vincent Root acquired 
his early education in country schools near Bishop Hill, in the public 
schools of that town and the high school at Galva, Illinois, and 
attended the Bryant & Stratton, and the Metropolitan Business 
colleges of Chicago, and for one year was an instructor in the 
latter school. For one year he was a student in the Illinois College 
of Law and completed his law course in the Northwestern Uni- 
versity, graduating LL. B. in the class of 1904. Mr. Root was 
admitted to the bar at Chicago in October, 1905, and before return- 
ing' to Galva spent about a year in the office of A. M. Cox, a Chicago 
lawyer. Since his return to Galva Mr. Root has practiced in part- 
nership with his father. They have the finest offices and law library 
in Henry County, and have an extensive practice in all the courts 
and in a large 'and varied litigation. For about five years Mr. Root 
was court reporter in Henry, Mercer, Rock Island and Whiteside 



740 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

counties. He is now serving his fourth year as city attorney of 
Galva, and in the 1914 primaries was defeated by only thirty votes 
for the nomination of county judge. 

October 5, 1905, Mr. Root married Miss Christine Wing of 
Galva. Mrs. Root is a member of the Eastern Star and the Daugh- 
ters of Rebekah, and Mr. Root belongs to the same auxiliary body 
and has taken thirty-two degrees in Scottish Rite Masonry, is a 
member of the Peoria Consistory, Kewanee Commandery and 
Mohammed Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He has filled the various 
chairs in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is also a 
member of the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. Politically his affiliation is with the republican party. He 
is a member of the County Bar Association. 

CLARK BENJAMIN ABY. With eighteen years of professional 
experience and success behind him, Clark B. Aby is now recognized 
as one of the leaders of the bar at Galva. He has confined his 
attention almost strictly to his profession and has engaged in poli- 
tics and other affairs only to the extent of meeting the responsibili- 
ties and obligations of a public-spirited citizen. 

Clark Benjamin Aby was born on a farm near Galva, Illinois, 
April 15, 1872, the youngest of eight children born to Alexander 
and Melvina (Barnes) Aby. Both parents are now deceased. 
Clark B. Aby grew up in the country, attended country schools 
near the old home until about twelve, and then entered the Galva 
public schools and remained until graduating from high school in 
1890. Not long afterward he definitely determined upon the law 
as a vocation and when about twenty-two spent a year in study in 
the office of Judge Bigelow. After traveling over the West as far 
as the Pacific coast, he returned home and in 1894 entered the 
Northwestern University law department, and gave close attention 
to his studies there until graduating LL. B. in 1896. Mr. Aby was 
admitted to the bar at Chicago in June of the same year, and soon 
afterward opened an office in Galva and has since been in active 
practice. He is reputed to have one of the best law libraries in the 
city. 

His public service has been chiefly along the line of his profes- 
sion. He served Galva as city attorney, also on the city council, 
has held several minor offices and is now a member of the local 
school board and also city attorney. 

On July 23, 1896, Mr. Aby married Miss Lillie A. Nordstrum, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Nordstrum of Galva. Mrs. Aby 
was educated in the Galva public schools. They are the parents of 
two children: Roland C. was born September 27, 1898, and is now 
a student in the high school; and Genevieve E. was born June 17, 
1908. Fraternally Mr. Aby is affiliated with the Masonic order, in 
which he is a past master, and also with the Knights of Pythias. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 741 

He is a member of the County Bar Association, is a republican, and 
a member of the Methodist Church. 

WILLIAM C. EWAN. Junior member of the firm of Sturtz & 
Ewan of Kewanee, William C. Ewan has been in active practice a 
little more than seven years, and possesses superior qualifications 
both as a lawyer and business man, and has also made himself active 
in citizenship. 

William C. Ewan was born March 12, 1881, near Lewistown, in 
Fulton County, Illinois, a son of William I. and Rena C. (Murchin- 
son) Ewan. His father was born March 12, 1849, at Port Republic, 
Virginia, and his mother April i, 1847, at Greenville, South Caro- 
lina. Both are now living at Cuba, Illinois, his father a retired 
farmer. There were seven children, one of whom died in infancy, 
and another of the sons is Dr. R. T. Ewan of Cuba. The Ewan 
ancestry settled in America from Wales, while the Murchinson fam- 
ily was of Scotch and English stock. Robert T. Ewan, who 
founded the family on this side of the Atlantic, came over in colonial 
times and saw active service during the Revolutionary war under 
Washington. He settled in Virginia, and it was in 1857 that the 
Ewan family came out to Illinois. 

William C. Ewan, the fourth of the seven children of his parents, 
attended country schools in Cass Township of Fulton County until 
fourteen years of age, after which he was educated in the public 
schools at Cuba, graduating from high school in 1900. Much of the 
strength and vigor which he has brqught into his professional work 
were acquired while a boy on the farm, and after leaving high 
school he spent three years assisting his father. In September, 
1903, he entered the University of Illinois, spent one year in the 
literary department, and then continued a student in the law depart- 
ment until graduating in June, 1907, LL. B. Mr. Ewan was admitted 
to the bar by the Supreme Court at Chicago June 25, 1907. A fact 
which shows his independence and industry is that he paid prac- 
tically all his expenses while in college. After his admission to the 
bar Mr. Ewan came to Kewanee, and was employed as assistant to 
Charles E. Sturtz for about fourteen months, and they then formed 
the partnership of Sturtz & Ewan in January, 1909, which has had 
five years of successful practice and is regarded as one of the strong- 
est law firms at Kewanee. Mr. Ewan served as assistant state's 
attorney for five years, from 1907 to 1912. Sturtz & Ewan are 
general attorneys for the Mystic Workers of the World, a fraternal 
insurance company, and their jurisdiction covers nine states in the 
Middle West, extending from Texas to Michigan. They are also 
local attorneys for the Galesburg & Kewanee Electric Railway 
Company, for the Consolidated Light & Power Company, the Local 
Street Railway Company and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad Company. The firm are said to have the largest law 
library in Kewanee and one of the largest in the county. 



742 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Mr. Ewan is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Kewanee Club and the Midland Country Club, and is 
a member of the American Bar Association and the County Bar 
Association. He is a democrat in politics and a member of the 
Congregational Church. He is unmarried and lives at 200 S. Tre- 
mont Street in Kewanee, with office at the corner of Tremont and 
Third streets. 

HENRY B. SAFFORD. Among the law firms at Monmouth that 
have special distinction on account of the individual abilities of their 
members and the extent of their practice, one of the most important 
is Safford & Graham, a relationship which has existed between these 
two well-known attorneys for twelve years. Mr. Safford is a lawyer 
of more than twenty years' experience in Illinois, and in addition 
to sound ability entered the profession with a thorough training 
and with a high standard of ideals that his mature career has done 
much to realize. 

Born at Hamilton, Illinois, October 19, 1868, a son of George 
B. and Penelope (Gray) Safford, he lived in his native village and 
attended the public schools until the age of sixteen. Following that 
came two years in the high school at Keokuk, Iowa, and two years 
in the* college at Carthage, Illinois. When he was about twenty 
years of age Mr. Safford definitely determined upon the law as a 
profession. While at Carthage he had the advantages of instruction 
from such well read lawyers as Judge Charles J. and Timothy Scho- 
field and A. W. O'Harra. He continued his reading for three years, 
and in May, 1894, was admitted to the bar at Springfield. His first 
six months after admission was spent at Carthage with the firm of 
Berry Brothers, and from 1895 to 1903 he enjoyed a considerable 
practice in Henderson County. Mr. Safford came to Monmouth on 
December i, 1903, and entered into a partnership with I. M. Kirk- 
patrick and W. F. Graham. A little later Mr. Kirkpatrick died, and 
since then the firm title has been Safford & Graham. While as 
attorneys they have been chiefly concerned with a general practice, 
they also represent the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad and 
the Rock Island Railroad and a number of banks. 

Mr. Safford was married November 16, 1898, to Anna Watson 
of Henderson County. She was educated in the public schools of 
Henderson County and finished at Valparaiso University, Indiana. 
She is a member of the Fortnightly Club of Monmouth. Their one 
child, Mary K., is now sixteen years of age. 

In a political way Mr. Safford has never shown any inclinations 
for office holding. He served as a member of the village board at 
one time, has been a delegate to state and county conventions of 
the republican party, but his best service to the public has been ren- 
dered within the limits of his profession. He is a member of the 
County and State Bar associations, and belongs to the Hamilton 
Club of Chicago and to the Benevolent and Protective Order of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 743 

Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. His office is in the Library Building and his home 
at 809 East First Avenue, Monmouth. 

WILLIS F. GRAHAM. Junior member of the firm of Safford 
& Graham, with offices in the Library Building at Monmouth, Mr. 
Graham was first admitted to the bar in the State of Nebraska, but 
for the past twenty years has practiced in Illinois, and is associated 
with one of the strongest law firms of Warren County. This firm 
has a large and extended general practice, and also represents sev- 
eral banks and the Santa Fe and the Rock Island and Southern 
Railroads. 

Mr. Graham was born April 16, 1870, at Ellison, Illinois, the only 
child of Charles W. and Mary (Coleman) Graham. Up to the age 
of sixteen he attended the public schools at Point Pleasant, Illinois, 
and in 1887 entered the Northern Indiana Normal School at Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, from which institution, now Valparaiso University, 
he was graduated A. B. in 1891. On the foundation of such an 
education he soon afterwards took up the study of law. These 
studies were carried on in the offices of Godfred & Godfrey at 
Minden, Nebraska, for three years. In 1894 he was admitted to the 
Nebraska bar, and for the following year practiced as junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Godfrey, Godfrey & Graham. In 1895 Mr. Gra- 
ham located at Oquawka, Illinois, was admitted to the Illinois bar 
at Springfield in the same year, and in the fall of 1899 moved to 
Monmouth. For a year and a hali he was associated with the late 
J. M. Kirkpatrick in practice, but for more than twelve years his 
senior associate has been Henry B. Safford. 

Mr. Graham was married January 7, 1894, to Mary Garner of 
Colfax, Illinois. Their two children are Charles C., born April 5, 
1898, and Robert G., born March 13, 1901, both now attending high 
school. Mr. Graham is a member of the County and State Bar 
associations, and in politics is a republican. He lives at 120 North 
C Street in Monmouth. His church is the Methodist. 

JOHN H. HANLEY. With a standing as a lawyer acquired by 
many years of successful experience, John H. Hanley is senior 
member of the firm Hanley & Cox, with offices in the Claycomb 
Building at Monmouth. While his ability as an attorney is now 
pretty well diffused all over North Central Illinois, a more personal 
interest attaches to the career of Mr. Hanley for the strenuous and 
self-sacrificing efforts which he put forth when a young man to gain 
an education and equip himself for the responsibilities of a learned 
profession. 

Though nearly all his active career has been spent -in Illinois, 
John H. Hanley was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, 
September 8, 1860, a son of Michael and Marie (Fitzpatrick) Han- 
ley. As a boy up to the age of fifteen he attended district schools, 



744 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

spent one year in the Hookstown Academy and four years in the 
Woodlawn Academy. In the meantime he had been thrown upon 
his self-supporting endeavors, and like many another successful 
man was at various times a school teacher, a rail splitter, and there 
was hardly any work too hard which he considered beneath his 
dignity as a means to carry him through school. In the course of 
his education he spent one term in Geneva College, and one year 
at the Industry Academy. Mr. Hanley has been identified with 
Monmouth as a place of residence since about 1883, in which year 
he entered Monmouth College and remained until graduating A. B. 
in 1885, and three years later received the degree of A. M. 

It was during his work as a teacher that Mr. Hanley decided to 
become an attorney, and as early as 1877, though he could hardly 
spare the money, he bought a two volume set of Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. At the present time Mr. Hanley has one of the largest 
law libraries in the state, but out of it all he cherishes especially 
that original nucleus which he bought at such sacrifice as has been 
given for the sake of no other books that have entered his collec- 
tion. For several years he devoted all his spare time to the reading 
and mastery of these commentaries, and in June, 1885, began regular 
study at Monmouth with the firm of Grier and Steward. He was 
admitted to the bar at Springfield in November, 1887, and on March 
4, 1888, began his active practice at Monmouth. For about ten 
years he was alone, and subsequently formed a partnership with 
George E. Cox, making the firm Hanley & Cox, as it remains to the 
present time. His attention has been given to handling a general 
practice, and he also represents several banks and railroad com- 
panies. In all his active career of more than thirty years Mr. Han- 
ley has never taken a vacation, and judging by the able and ener- 
getic manner in which he still handles his business he has apparently 
never needed one, his enthusiasm having sustained him through all 
the years of professional service. 

On September 5, 1889, Mr. Hanley married Sarah H. Bond of 
Monmouth. Mrs. Hanley has an interesting ancestry, and is promi- 
nent in Illinois in the Illinois organization of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, being state secretary. They have a daughter, 
Helen Bond Hanley, who was educated at Monmouth and finished at 
the Southern Seminary at Buena Vista, Virginia. Mr. Hanley is 
a member of the County and State Bar associations, and at one 
time served as city attorney and also had a place on the democratic 
electoral ticket in Illinois. His home is at 724 West Broadway, 
Monmouth. 

GEORGE E. Cox. Junior member of the law firm of Hanley 
& Cox at Monmouth, George E. Cox began his practice in that city 
about eighteen years ago, and his career has been a most successful 
one. 

He represents an old family at Canton, Illinois, where he was 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 745 

born April 18, 1871, a son of William and Mary E. (Batty) Cox. 
His father was born in England and the family settled at Canton, 
Illinois, during the early days. His mother was a native of Shel- 
bina, Missouri. George E. Cox depended for his early education 
upon the public schools of Canton, attending through high school 
and subsequently was in the Ottawa Business College. While work- 
ing as a molder at Canton he read law in the evenings in the office 
of Grant & Chipperneld for one year, and then came to Monmouth 
to pursue his trade and at the same time made effective advancement 
in the law under the direction of his present partner, J. H. Hanley. 
His admission to the bar occurred at Springfield November 4, 1897, 
and in the spring of 1898 he was elected police magistrate. A little 
later he resigned the office to enlist in Company H of the Sixth 
Regiment, Illinois National Guard, for service in the Spanish- 
American war, and was in- the Porto Rico campaign with the rank 
of corporal. For a number of years Mr. Cox has been associated 
with Mr. Hanley in practice, and also conducts a loan and real 
estate business. They are attorneys for the Rock Island Southern 
Railroad and the Rock Island Southern Railway Companies, the 
Second National Bank and the Monmouth Trust & Savings Bank. 

On December 5, 1900, he married at Monmouth Miss Jessie 
Baldwin, daughter of George and Clarissa Baldwin, who were early 
settlers at Monmouth. To this union was born two children, 
George B., born January i, 1902; and Glenn W., born May 5, 
1903. Mrs. Cox died May 8, 1904. On June 9, 1914, he married 
Martha Chapman, who is a member of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. Mr. Cox is affiliated with the Masonic order, 
being a member of the Mystic Shrine, and also with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is a republican, 
and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. They 
reside at 313 East Broadway. 

MELVILLE GLENN SOULE. One of the prominent law firms of 
Warren County that is held in esteem and confidence by a wide 
clientele and enjoys the patronage of many corporations, is that of 
Brown & Soule, of Monmouth, of which the junior member is Mel- 
ville Glenn Soule, who has been engaged in the practice of law here 
since 1902. Qualified through natural legal ability and thorough 
educational training, Mr. Soule has progressed rapidly in his chosen 
profession, and now occupies an enviable position at the bar. 

Melville Glenn Soule was born at Monmouth, Warren County, 
Illinois, July 6, 1874, and is a son of Rev. Melville C. and Ina Belle 
(Smith) Soule, both of remote English ancestry, the family records 
proving settlement in Connecticut as early as 1640. Melville C. 
Soule and wife had a family of eight children, Melville Glenn being 
the third in order of birth. Prior to 1872, Melville C. Soule was 
active as a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church but failing 



746 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

health compelled him to retire from the ministry, and in that year 
he went into the lumber business with W. F. Smith, under the firm 
name of W. F. Smith & Soule, the name afterward becoming Soule 
& Graham, which operated two large lumber yards until 1877, when 
Mr. Soule sold his interest. Afterward, for several years he was in 
the real estate business and also the boot and shoe business. For 
a long period he was a member of the board of trustees of the 
Wesleyan University at Bloomington and was also a member of 
the board of trustees of Redding College, at Abingdon, Illinois, 
for several years being president of the board. In the excellent 
public schools of Monmouth, Melville G. Soule continued a student 
until his graduation from the high school in 1893. In the fall of 
that year he entered De Pauw University at Greencastle, Indiana, 
where he remained one and a half years, in 1894 entering Monmouth 
College and graduating there in 1897, with his degree of A. B. Dur- 
ing the summer of this year he read law in the office of his present 
partner, John Burrows Brown, in the fall entering the law depart- 
ment of Harvard College, from which he was graduated in June, 
1900, with his coveted degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1900 he 
was admitted to the bar in Michigan and for one year was in prac- 
tice at Detroit, with the law firm of Walker & Spalding, following 
which he made a business trip to the Puget Sound country, which 
consumed six months. Upon his return to Illinois he located in his 
native place and was admitted to the Illinois bar at Springfield, 
October 23, 1902, and then entered into partnership with J. B. 
Brown, under the present firm name of Brown & Soule, with offices 
in the Patton Block. 

Mr. Soule was married April 16, 1903, to Miss Etha William- 
son, who was born at Keokuk, Iowa, and was educated there and 
at Monmouth College, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Soule have one son, 
William F., who was born March 23, 1904. They attend the Presby- 
terian Church. Their residence is No. 1133 East Broadway, Mon- 
mouth. In political affiliation Mr. Soule is a republican, is a member 
of the Hamilton Club of Chicago and fraternally is a Mason. He 
belongs also to Delta Kappa Epsilon, a pleasant reminder of old 
college days. 

IRVINE R. WASSON. In Peoria, where his family has long been 
prominent, Irvine R. Wasson has successfully practiced law since 
1908 and his experience in active competition with other members of 
the bar has already won him a creditable position. 

Irvine R. Wasson was born in Peoria December 9, 1878. His 
parents are James T. and Jennie E. (Erskine) Wasson. His mother 
was born in Clermont County, Ohio, and is now deceased. James T. 
Wasson, who was born in Schenectady, New York, came to Illinois 
and located on a farm in Peoria County in 1852. Few men had 
longer and more varied experience as a soldier in the war than this 
honored Peoria citizen. He enlisted at the first call for troops at 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 747 

the beginning of the war, and was in the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Oglesby. At the end of the three-month period of enlist- 
ment, he re-enlisted in the Eleventh Cavalry, commanded by the 
noted Colonel Robert Ingersoll. This was a three-year regiment, 
and as the war had not yet been concluded he volunteered at the 
end of that time as a veteran, and was with the Eleventh Cavalry 
in all its campaigns and engagements until the close of the war. 
He was mustered out as sergeant of Company E. Since that time 
he has been frequently honored with public responsibilities, has 
served as deputy sheriff of Peoria County, as superintendent of the 
county poor farm and as county supervisor. He has long been an 
active republican. James T. Wasson and wife were the parents of 
eleven children, five of whom are living. 

Irvine R. Wasson, the fifth of the children, was educated in the 
public schools of Peoria and studied law with Joseph A. Weil and 
Frank J. Ouinn. He was admitted to the bar at Columbus, Mis- 
sissippi, in 1905, and practiced law in that city until 1907. Since 
that time he has been identified with the Peoria bar and conducts a 
general practice. He is a member of the Peoria Bar Association, 
of Thrush Camp of the Sons of Veterans, and Peoria Lodge No. 20, 
B. P. O. E. Politically he is a republican. 

JOHN BURROWS BROWN. In calling attention to the foremost 
members of so able a body of lawyers as the Warren county bar, 
no favoritism is shown in mentioning John Burrows Brown, senior 
member of the well-known law firm of Brown & Soule, at Mon- 
mouth, because he is a man of assured reputation, of dominating 
legal ability and of thorough scholarship. For almost a quarter of 
a century he has been a law practitioner at Monmouth and his legal 
connections and accepted clients, past and present, attest his per- 
sonal as well as professional high standing. 

John Burrows Brown was born at North Stonington, Connecti- 
cut, October 25, 1864, the old family home section, where both par- 
ents, William B. and Phoebe Elizabeth (Collins) Brown, were also 
born and reared. Later removal was made to Illinois and William 
B. Brown became a man of political prominence in his locality, 
serving in numerous local offices, in that of assessor for thirty years. 
At one time, during early work on the Hennepin Canal, he served 
as a star witness for the Government. Both he and wife are now 
deceased. Of their family of six children, John B. was the fourth 
in order of birth. 

After completing the public school course at Rock Falls, Illinois, 
including graduation from the high school in 1880, John B. Brown 
spent two years at Knox Academy, at Galesburg, and four years at 
Knox College, where he was graduated in 1886, with his degree of 
A. B. Two years later he received his degree of A. M. During 
the two following years, while engaged in teaching school, he 
devoted all his spare time to the reading of law and thus prepared 



748 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

himself for the Columbia Law School, which he entered in 1888, 
and was there graduated in 1889 and in the same year was admitted 
to the bar, at Ottawa, Illinois. 

Mr. Brown lost no time in making a selection of a field for prac- 
tice, in the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota, entering into a law 
partnership with Thomas Gold Frost, a relationship which continued 
for two years, under the style of Frost & Brown. In 1891 Mr. 
Brown came to Monmouth and opened an office and practiced alone 
until 1896, when he was appointed master in chancery. At the close 
of his term of office, in 1902, he formed a law partnership with 
Melville Glenn Soule, under the name of Brown & Soule, which 
connection yet prevails. This able firm has been retained by some 
of the leading banks of Monmouth and Roseville. They are local 
attorneys for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, and dis- 
trict attorneys for the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad. Although 
a decided republican in his political classification, Mr. Brown does 
not claim to be a politician and has no ambitions in the direction of 
political office. He has served, however, on several occasions, as a 
trusted delegate to the republican state conventions held at Spring- 
field. In local movements, both at Monmouth and Roseville, he has 
shown interest and public spirit and has received much deserved 
praise and no little credit for his earnest and persistent efforts 
which resulted in the erection of the high school building at Rose- 
ville, which was a greatly needed institution. 

Mr. Brown was married June 5, 1890, to Miss Edna Bell Smith, 
who is a daughter of Edwin Smith, a prominent resident of Mon- 
mouth. Mrs. Brown is a graduate of Knox College, a member of 
the class of 1887. They attend the Congregational Church. Mr. 
Brown belongs to the Elks and retains his membership in the Phi 
Delta Theta, his college fraternity. He is a member of the State Bar 
Association and of the Hamilton Club, Chicago. There are many 
things in which he may take a justifiable pride, and one 'is his ances- 
tral line, which, on the paternal side, he can trace to 1632, when 
English colonists of the name left the shores of Britain and landed 
in Massachusetts, where they assisted in the founding of Lynn. His 
maternal great-great-grandfather was Asa Spaulding, who served 
in the war of the Revolution in 1775, and was the progenitor of a 
long line of sturdy descendants. 

HON. JAMES W. GORDON. Among the legal practitioners of 
Henderson County who have dignified both bench and bar, a promi- 
nent example is found in James W. Gordon, one of the leading 
attorneys of the county at the present time and a prominent citizen 
of Oquawka. Judge Gordon's legal experience has been gained in 
rich fields. While doubtless the fundamentals of the law are the 
same in all courts, the problems brought to be solved present phases 
that more or less partake of the atmosphere of the section in which 
they arise, and the broadening of view and widening of horizon 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 749 

necessitated by their solution must enrich and make priceless a 
faithful attorney's legal fund of knowledge. As probate judge, 
county attorney, state's attorney and private practitioner, Judge 
Gordon has been in the law continuously for twenty-two years. He 
was born at Monmouth, Warren County, Illinois, February 5, 1867, 
and is a son of Rev. John A. and Jemima (Walker) Gordon. The 
mother of Judge Gordon died in his infancy. His father, Rev. John 
A. Gordon, D. D., for a number of years was professor of English 
literature in Monmouth College, and is now a resident of Los 
Angeles, California. During the Civil war he served as a member 
of Company B, Eighty-third Illinois Infantry, later was captain of 
the Sixteenth United States Infantry and was promoted to the rank 
of major. The Gordons came originally from Scotland and set- 
tled in Georgia. The Walkers came to the United States from the 
northern part of Ireland, Ulster perhaps, locating first in Ohio and 
coming to Warren County, Illinois, before the Civil war. 

James W. Gordon attended the public schools at Monmouth, 
Illinois, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and for one year was a stu- 
dent at the Pittsburgh High School, when he returned to Illinois, 
and, after working on a farm for two years, returned to Monmouth 
and passed two years at Monmouth College, following which he 
taught school for one year in Henderson County. Leaving Illinois 
in 1886, he went to Anthony, Harper County, Kansas, where he 
worked in abstract offices and taught school for a year and then 
removed to Grant County, Kansas, where he went into the abstract 
business. In 1889 he took up the study of law with Hon. William 
Easton Hutchinson, a prominent lawyer of Grant County, Kansas, 
and afterward judge of the Thirty-second Judicial District of Kan- 
sas, his law studies covering the period from 1889 until he was 
admitted to the bar in 1892, at Richfield, Kansas. He opened an 
office for the practice of law at Ulysses, the county seat of Grant 
County, and remained in practice there until July, 1894, when he 
removed to Stronghurst, Henderson County, Illinois. In January, 
1892, he was appointed Probate Judge of Grant County, Kansas, by 
Gov. Lyman U. Humphrey, to fill a vacancy, and in November of 
that year he was elected county attorney of Grant County, which 
office he held until July, 1894, when he resigned, preparatory to his 
removal to Illinois. In November, 1896, Judge Gordon was elected 
state's attorney, on the republican ticket, and the efficiency which 
marked his administration of this office so cemented public confi- 
dence that he was continuously re-elected and served for sixteen 
consecutive years. When first elected he came to Oquawka, and this 
place has continued his home to the present. Not alone in the law 
has Judge Gordon been a foremost citizen. He has taken an active 
and useful interest in domestic politics and has served this city 
faithfully in offices of responsibility, during one term being mayor, 
one term a member of the board of trustees, and for four years 
president of the board of education, and is now again serving as 



750 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

mayor. He has frequently attended the state conventions of the 
republican party and has personal acquaintance with a majority of 
party leaders. 

Judge Gordon has been twice married. On April 30, 1890, he 
was united to Miss Mary A. Hickok, of Ulysses, Kansas, who died 
April 29, 1910, the mother of five children: Alexander, who died 
in infancy; Elizabeth O., who is the wife of J. W. Auld, a druggist 
at Cedar Falls, Iowa; Kenneth H., who is attending college; Paul 
W., who is a student at Drury Academy; and Mary Virginia, who 
is a student in the Oquawka High School. On December 25, 1913, 
Judge Gordon was married to Mrs. Adaline Wiseman, a resident of 
Oquawka. Mrs. Wiseman had one daughter, Isobel, now twelve 
years old and attending the public schools, whom Judge Gordon at 
the time of his marriage adopted. Judge Gordon and family attend 
the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Illinois State Bar 
Association and is the local attorney for the Chicago, Burlington & 
Oumcy Railroad. His membership is of many years' duration in 
the leading fraternities, the Masons, the Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Pythias, and he belongs also to the Hamilton Club, 
Chicago. 

SAMUEL S. HALLAM. A law firm that has in every way justified 
its high reputation over the central part of the state is that of Hal- 
lam & Hallam at Monmouth. Both the brothers comprising this 
partnership are attorneys of thorough education and high legal 
attainments, and it has been noted that for a number of years they 
have appeared in many of the most important trials in their section 
of the state. 

The senior member of the firm is Samuel S. Hallam, who was 
born in Warren County, Illinois, November 21, 1863, a son of 
David M. and Mary C. (Murphy) Hallam. His earty life was 
spent in the country, and the district school near his home supplied 
his education up to his seventeenth year. In 1881 he entered Abing- 
don College at Abingdon, from which he was graduated A. B. in 
1884. In the meantime his mind had been made up to become a 
lawyer, and after one year of reading in the office of Col. J. W. 
Davidson he continued his studies under the eminent attorney, Frank 
Quinby, until admitted to the bar at Springfield, November 20, 
1889. He was fortunate not only in his associations with such a 
preceptor as Mr. Quinby, but also began his practice as junior 
member of the firm of Quinby & Hallam. In 1891 Mr. Quinby 
removed to Washington, and then for three years the firm of Hallam 
& Lee existed, and in 1897 Mr. Hallam became associated with his 
brother, Frank M., and these two constitute the present partnership. 
Their sister, Minnie Hallam, who was graduated from the Wes- 
leyan Law School, was for eight years engaged in practice with 
her brothers, withdrawing from the firm and abandoning law prac- 
tice at the time she married. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 751 

Samuel S. Hallam was married November 14, 1897, to Ella 
Dredge of Monmouth, who was educated in the public schools of 
that city and at Monmouth College. She is a member of the Order 
of the Eastern Star. Mr. Samuel Hallam has for a number of years 
been more or less of an active figure as a democrat. He is a mem- 
ber of the Iroquois Club of Chicago, served as city attorney one 
term, has been a delegate to numerous state conventions, and was a 
member of the convention at Baltimore which nominated Woodrow 
Wilson for president. Mr. Hallam is a member of the County and 
State Bar associations, is attorney for the Illinois Life Association, 
a director in the Monmouth Savings Bank, and was one of the 
promoters and is still a stockholder in the Rock Island-Southern 
Interurban Railroad. 

Frank M. Hallam, the junior member of the firm, was graduated 
from the law department of Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloom- 
ington and admitted to the bar in 1896, and has been associated 
with his brother in practice since 1897. Frank Hallam married 
Carrie F. Freeman of Monmouth, who was also educated in the 
Monmouth schools. Frank Hallam leaves politics to his brother 
and has allowed no outside interests to interfere with his profession. 
The firm had their offices in the Woods & Hallam Building, and 
there is probably no law office in that section of Illinois better 
equipped and arranged. 'Their law library comprises about 1,500 
volumes. In religious matters Samuel Hallam is a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church and his brother is simply a Presbyterian. 

FRED G. WOLF. Now serving in his first term as state's attorney 
of Adams County, and in practice with Mr. R. M. Wagner, at the 
Quincy bar, Fred G. Wolf during the five years since his admission 
to the bar has made an exceedingly creditable record and has been 
especially skillful and successful in handling a number of important 
cases, as prosecuting attorney. 

Fred G. Wolf was born at Liberty, in Adams County, Illinois, 
December 21, 1876, the third of four children in the family of 
Jacob B. and Emily (Grubb) Wolf. His father, also a native of 
Adams County, was a farmer and later a merchant at Coatsburg, 
and for several years was superintendent of the county farm and 
also served as state supervisor. The mother was born in Illinois 
and died in 1880 at the age of twenty-five. 

Fred G. Wolf acquired his early education in the schools of 
Adams County, and is one of the law graduates of the University 
of Michigan, having finished his law studies with the class of 1909. 
Since then his home and professional interests have centered at 
Quincy. In November, 1912, Mr. Wolf was chosen to the office 
of state's attorney on the democratic ticket. He is a member of the 
County and State Bar associations, has filled all the chairs in the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is also a Mason. On June 



752 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

18, 1913, he married Miss Neta Williams, daughter of Dr. W. W. 
Williams, a prominent Quincy physician. 

LYMAN McCARL. A member of the Adams County bar twenty- 
five years, now serving as county judge, officially identified with a 
number of business and public organizations, Lyman McCarl began 
his career as a hard-working student, went to college on means 
earned by himself, and his education, like everything else he 
attained, was the result of his determined purpose and industrial 
labor. 

Lyman McCarl was born in Adams County May 3, 1859, a son 
of Alexander W. and Minerva (Likes) McCarl. His father, born 
in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, in 1825, was brought to Ohio at the 
age of eight years and thence to Illinois at the age of eighteen, and 
in 1859 settled on a farm in Adams County, where he spent the rest 
of his life and died February 22, 1911. His wife was a native of 
Indiana, came as a child to Illinois, and died March 23, 1893, at the 
age of sixty-eight. Six of their eight sons are still living. 

Lyman McCarl grew up in Adams County, and after finishing 
the course of the common schools and the High School at Camp 
Point, spent two years as a teacher in Adams and Pike Counties. 
Judge McCarl is a graduate of Lombard College at Galesburg with 
the class of 1885, and after his college career taught two years more 
at Liberty and during vacation time and at night read law under the 
direction of Capt. U. H. Keath. His admission to the bar came 
on June 16, 1888. The following two years were spent as deputy 
circuit clerk of Adams County and in 1890 began active practice at 
Quincy. In June, 1891, he was appointed master in chancery, serv- 
ing six years, and after that was engaged in private practice until 
December i, 1910, when he entered upon his duties as county judge. 

Judge McCarl is a member of the County Bar Association and 
the State Bar Association, is affiliated with the Masons, the Knights 
of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. For 
seventeen years he has been a director of the Quincy Humane 
Society, was its president four years, its secretary eleven years, and 
its attorney fifteen years. His business interests are extensive. 
He is a director in the Illinois State Bank, the Gem City Building 
& Loan Association, is president of the Adams County Mutual Life 
Association, and assistant director of the Iroquois Life Company of 
Louisville, Kentucky. 

Judge McCarl was married April 25, 1893, to Miss Hannah M. 
Berrian, daughter of Benjamin F. Berrian, who for seventeen years 
was county judge of Adams County. Their children are: Margaret, 
born in 1894 at Quincy; Richard B., born in 1896 and now a stu- 
dent in his father's old college, Lombard, at Galesburg; Donald E., 
born in 1900 and a high school student; and Charlotte, born in 1902 
and in the grade schools. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 753 

JUDGE CARL EPLER. For at least half a century the name Epler 
has been prominently associated with the Illinois bar. The late 
Judge Cyrus Epler was one of the distinguished jurists of Jackson- 
ville, and for nearly a quarter of a century was on the circuit bench. 
Judge Carl Epler has been a Quincy lawyer nearly thirty-five years, 
and has been repeatedly honored with public responsibilities, and 
now enjoys a large private practice in Adams County. 

Carl Epler was born at Jacksonville, Illinois, November 20, 1857, 
the third of seven children born to Cyrus and Cornelia M. (Nettle- 
ton) Epler. His father, a native of Indiana, came at an early age 
to Illinois, having been born November 12, 1823, in Clark County, 
Indiana. He studied law, was admitted to the Illinois bar, served in 
the State Legislature, and from 1872 to 1897, a period of twenty- 
four years, sat on the circuit bench at Jacksonville. His death 
occurred in that city July 9, 1909, when eighty-seven years of age. 
He had practiced until about one year before his death. His wife, 
a native of Ohio, was a daughter of Dr. Clark Nettleton, and she 
married Judge Epler in August, 1852. She was born in 1834 and 
is now living at the age of eighty at Jacksonville. 

Carl Epler grew up in Jacksonville, finished a course in the local 
schools in 1876, took his master's degree at Yale University in 1877, 
and finished the law course in the Yale Law School in 1879. Judge 
Epler began practice in 1880, in the following year was elected 
city attorney and held that office three years, from 1886 to 1889 was 
a partner of Col. William W. Berry and later in practice alone. 
From 1890 he served as state's attorney, being elected to fill an 
unexpired term, and in 1894 was elected county judge, and served 
by re-election in 1898 until 1902. Since then he has confined his 
attention to his large and profitable private practice at Quincy. 

Judge Epler took the lead in organizing the Adams County Bar 
Association, and is also a member of the State Bar Association. He 
has accomplished a great deal of public service through his profes- 
sion, and one item that should be mentioned was the reducing of 
the time for the filing of claims against estates and for contesting 
wills, to one year, by bills urged by the county and probate judges 
association. Judge Epler affiliates with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, and the Improved Order of Red Men. He is a Demo- 
crat and a member of the Episcopal Church. His recreations are 
in outdoor sports, and he enjoys automobiling, boating and other 
forms of outdoor diversion. 

CHARLES E. STURTZ has for more than twenty years been one 
of the active and successful attorneys of Kewanee, and has taken 
much interest in republican politics and has been considered one of 
the strongest men in the party in Henry County, with a large local 
following. 

Charles E. Sturtz spent the first eighteen years of his life on a 
vol. n 21 



754 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

farm with his parents southeast of Rock Falls, in Whiteside County, 
Illinois. At the age of sixteen he began the study of law in the 
firm of Manahan ;& Ward at Sterling, and subsequently qualified 
for teaching and was engaged in that vocation four years in White- 
side County, in the meantime continuing his law studies. During 
vacation intervals he was a student at Dixon College. Throughout 
his early career he was a hard fighter for those advantages which 
he considered essential to success, and the same qualities have pre- 
vailed in his law practice. Largely from his own earnings he spent 
four years in acquiring a general education in Knox College, grad- 
uating in 1891 Bachelor of Science, and in 1892 was graduated 
LL. B. from the University of Michigan. 

Mr. Sturtz began the practice of law at Kewanee in the fall of 
1893, an d has since become recognized as one of the leading trial 
lawyers in his part of the state, and his services have been employed 
in a number of leading criminal and civil cases in Henry, Rock 
Island and Bureau and other counties. His first important office 
was city attorney of Kewanee, to which he was elected in 1894 and 
which he held for five years. In 1903 Mr. Sturtz was elected state's 
attorney of Henry County, and in that office, from which he volun- 
tarily retired December i, 1912, he made a record as an aggressive 
and impartial public prosecutor that has since followed him in his 
private practice and is one of the chief foundation stones of his 
reputation. His success as state's attorney in his home county led 
to his selection as special prosecutor in adjoining counties in several 
important criminal cases. 

In June, 1912, Mr. Sturtz was elected general attorney of the 
Mystic Workers of the World, and the firm of Sturtz & Ewan are 
still actively employed as trial lawyers in all cases affecting the inter- 
ests of this society in nine states. They are also attorneys for the 
Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad. Mr. Sturtz is a public- 
spirited citizen of Kewanee, for a number of years served on the 
board of education, and in 1914 was candidate for the nomination 
by the republican party to Congress. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Masonic order, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Mystic Workers of the World. 
He is a member of the Kewanee Club and the Midland Club and of 
the City and County Bar associations. In 1892 Mr. Sturtz married 
Alice C. Price of Bureau County. Their two daughters are Zola 
and Katherine. 

J. PAUL CALIFF. Junior member of the firm of Scofield & CalifF 
at Carthage, J. Paul CalifF has been fortunate in the possession of 
unusual talents and qualifications for his chosen profession and also 
in his affiliations since becoming a member of the bar. He is one of 
the rising young attorneys of Hancock County. 

J. Paul Califf was born in Hancock County, Illinois, April 27, 
1885, being the fourth among nine children born to John A. and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 755 

Martha (Archer) Califf. Both his parents were natives of Han- 
cock County, his father born in 1852 and his mother born at War- 
saw in 1859. They now reside at Carthage. John A. Califf is well 
known to the citizens of Hancock County through his service of 
twelve years as county superintendent of schools, as a member of 
the Forty-fifth General Assembly, and as one of the present Man- 
aging Board of the State Reformatory at Pontiac. 

J. Paul Califf acquired his early education in the public schools 
of Carthage, graduating from high school in 1904, and after one 
year in the Carthage College he took up work as a teacher. He 
began his studies for the law with Judge Chas. J. Scofield, and after 
three years under that able attorney's direction was admitted to the 
bar in April, 1909, at Springfield. Returning to Carthage Mr. Califf 
was admitted to membership in the offices of Judge Scofield, and 
the firm of Scofield & Califf now combine the long experience and 
profound knowledge of one of the older lawyers and judges of 
Central Illinois with the youth, thorough training and enthusiasm 
of Mr. Califf. Mr. Califf was elected city attorney of Carthage in 
1913. In politics he is a democrat, is affiliated with the Masonic 
order and the Knights of Pythias, and his church is the Christian. 

Mr. Califf was married June 30, 1909, to Miss Edith A. Egbers, 
daughter of William D. and Helen Egbers, her father a well-known 
merchant of Carthage. To their marriage was born a son, Junius 
P. Mrs. Califf was educated in the Carthage schools and Carthage 
College. Their home is on Wabash Avenue, and Mr. Califf's office 
is in the Spitler Building. 

WILLIAM H. HARTZELL. In 1890 William H. Hartzell was 
admitted to the Illinois bar at Carthage, being then twenty-one years 
of age. His youth had been spent on a farm in Hancock County, 
and the resources of self-reliance and industry which propelled him 
from the commonplace existence of the farm into the difficult pro- 
fession of law have since been exemplified in a successful career as 
one of the able lawyers of Central Illinois. 

William H. Hartzell was born in Durham Township, Hancock 
County, November 8, 1869, a son of Noah and Rebecca (Weather- 
ington) Hartzell. His father was born in Pennsylvania in 1829 
and died in 1870. The mother was a native of Ohio and now lives 
at La Harpe. William H. Hartzell acquired his early education in 
the district schools near his home, subsequently in the high school 
at La Harpe, and after graduating there became a student in Git- 
tings Seminary. In 1886, at the age of seventeen, Mr. Hartzell took 
up the study of law under the direction of the firm of O'Harra & 
Scofield at Carthage, and four years later was admitted to the bar. 
He at once began practice of law in partnership with his former 
preceptors, the firm becoming O'Harra, Scofield & Hartzell. In 
1896, after the dissolution of the firm Mr. Hartzell joined Truman 
Plantz, Mr. Plantz maintaining an office at Warsaw, while Mr. Hart- 



756 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

zell looked after the business of the firm in Carthage. Less than a 
year later, William C. Hooker became associated with the two 
partners, and that relationship was maintained for three years. 
Since 1901 Mr. Hartzell has practiced in Carthage, at first alone, 
and now as senior member of the firm of Hartzell, Cavanaugh & 
Babcock. He has a large law library containing over 1,000 volumes. 

From 1892 until 1896 he served as state's attorney of Hancock 
County. Mr. Hartzell is a democrat and has been a delegate to 
state conventions. Fraternally his affiliations are with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On June 13, 1891, Mr. Hartzell married Miss Inez E. Charter, of 
La Harpe, Illinois. Her parents were Samuel and Salina (Lovett) 
Charter, both natives of Muskingum County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hartzell have six children: Ruth R., born March 27, 1892, grad- 
uated from the Carthage High School and State Normal School, and 
for two years was a student in the University of Illinois ; Franklin 
M., born in 1895; Philip W., born in 1898; Eloise, born in 1900; 
Grace, born in 1905 ; and Lucile L., born in 1910. Mrs. Hartzell is 
a member of the P. E. O. Sisterhood. 

JOHN FAISSLER. Of the representative Illinois lawyers who can 
claim Germany not only as their place of nativity but also as that 
in which they gained their academic or literary education, a status 
of special prominence must be accorded to Mr. Faissler, who has 
been engaged in the practice of law in this state since 1896 and who 
is now one of the prominent and honored members of the bar of 
Sycamore, judicial center of De Kalb County, where he is senior 
member of the representative law firm of Faissler, Fulton & Roberts. 
He has subordinated all extraneous interests to the demands of his 
exacting profession and his success has been on a parity with his 
recognized ability and unswerving fealty. 

Mr. Faissler was born in the fine old City of Stuttgart, the capi- 
tal of the Kingdom of Wiirtemberg, Germany, on the 4th of October, 
1865, and to the admirable schools of his Fatherland he is indebted 
for his early educational discipline, which included higher aca- 
demic lines. In 1888, when about twenty-three years of age, Mr. 
Faissler came to the United States, and he has been a resident of 
Illinois during virtually the entire period of his experience since 
that time, At Sycamore, De Kalb County, he studied law under the 
effective preceptorship of Judge David J. Carnes and George W. 
Dunton, and in 1896 he was admitted to the Illinois Bar. With a 
specially broad and exact knowledge of the science of jurisprudence 
and with an ambition of most insistent order, professional success 
came to him at an early period of his active practice, to which he 
has continued to devote himself assiduously and effectively, with 
no predilection for the honors or emoluments of public office. Since 
1909 he has been associated in practice, at Sycamore, with William J. 
Fulton, under the title of Faissler, Fulton & Roberts, and the firm 



. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF TT T INOIS 757 

have a substantial and important law business, in connection with 
which they are local attorneys for t 1 Chicago & Great Western 
Railroad Company, the Chicago, Mih\ .ee & St. Paul Railroad 
Company and other large corporations. Mr. Faissler personally 
is retained as attorney for the Aurora-De Kalb Traction Company, 
the De Kalb & Sycamore Traction Company, and the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad Company. 

Though never an aspirant for public office Mr. Faissler accords 
staunch allegiance to the republican party, and in a professional 
way he is identified with the American Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association and the De Kalb County Bar Association. 

On the i8th of December, 1900, Mr. Faissler wedded Miss Jane 
A. Byers, and they have four children, Marguerite, Jane F., John 
J., and William B. 

CHARLES A. JAMES. A former county judge of Hancock County, 
Judge James is now practicing at Carthage, has been a member of 
the Illinois bar for twenty years, and has had a varied and successful 
experience in several different locations. 

Charles A. James was born near Mindon, in Adams County, 
Illinois, January 12, 1870, a son of John H. and Martha V. (Taylor) 
James. His father was born at Boonville, Missouri, and his mother 
in Adams County; Illinois. The James ancestors came from Wales, 
settling first in Virginia, and coming out to Illinois in 1845, while 
on the Taylor side the family came -from Belfast, Ireland, and settled 
in Pennsylvania about 1800, thence moving out to Illinois about 1825. 
John H. James was a farmer, but for many years has been engaged 
in the grain business at Ursa, Illinois. His wife died in 1908. There 
were six children, Judge James being the youngest. He has a 
brother, Walter S., who is a banker at Archie, Missouri. 

Judge James acquired his early education in a district school 
while still living on the farm, and at the age of fifteen discontinued 
his schooling in the country, spent two years in the Quincy High 
School, and then began assisting his father in the grain business at 
Ursa, Illinois. After about five years of commercial effort, Mr. 
James began preparing for the law, and in October, 1892, entered 
the law department of the University of Michigan and was graduated 
in 1894. In June of the same year, admitted to the bar at Springfield, 
he opened an office at Quincy, and was in practice there as one of 
the rising young attorneys nine years. The last four years of that 
time were spent in partnership with Walter H. Bennett, under the 
firm name of Bennett & James. In 1903 Judge James moved to 
Augusta, Illinois, practiced alone there, and in 1906 was elected 
county judge of Hancock County. The duties of that office caused 
him to remove to the county seat of Carthage, and at the conclusion 
of four years of capable service to the county as judge, he opened 
an office and has since been in private practice at Carthage. 

Judge James is an active democrat, is a member of the Carthage 



758 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Business Men's Club, belongs to the Christian Church, and is active 
in the Masonic order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Judge James is a Knight Templar Mason, and was the first eminent 
commander of his commandery, and attended the conclave in 1910. 
On June 7, 1899, Judge James married Miss Faye Sammis, daughter 
of E. P. Sammis. They are the parents of a daughter, Dorothy, 
born December 10, 1905, and now attending the public schools of 
Carthage. Mrs. James was educated in the public schools of Louis- 
iana, Missouri. 

HON. ORVILLE F. BERRY. While Orville F. Berry has been a 
prominent member of the bar at Carthage for more than thirty-five 
years, his name is best known over the state at large for his dis- 
tinguished services in the state senate, as a special attorney and inves- 
tigator for the state in a number of noted cases, as the last chairman 
of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission, and for other features 
of his long and useful service to the state. 

Orville F. Berry was born at Table Grove, in McDonough 
County, Illinois, February 16, 1852. His father, Lee Berry, a native 
of Virginia, came to Illinois early in life, settled on a farm in Mc- 
Donough County, and lived there until his death in 1858. By his 
first wife he has two children : Charles L. Berry, the older, was a 
member of the One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Mounted 
Infantry until the close of the war, and is now a contractor at 
Wichita, Kansas ; while John Berry, the younger, was killed while 
serving in the United States navy during the war. Mr. Berry mar- 
ried for his second wife Martha McConnell, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and she was the mother of Orville F. Berry. Another brother, 
M. P. Berry, is equally well known in Carthage and that section of 
the state as a lawyer. The mother of these two sons died in 1860, 
and both parents now rest at Table Grove. 

Orville F. Berry acquired his early education in the common 
schools at Fountain Green Township, in Hancock County, and until 
the age of twenty-one was employed at monthly wages on a farm. 
In 1875, at Carthage, he took up the study of law in the office of 
Mack & Baird, and was admitted to the bar in 1877 at Springfield. 
Mr. Berry at once formed a partnership with Judge Thomas C. 
Sharp, now deceased, and subsequently his brother, M. P. Berry, 
entered the firm, which was known as Sharp & Berry Bros. Since 
his brother retired, Mr. O. F. Berry has practiced alone. 

From the beginning of his professional career, Mr. Berry showed 
a strong interest in politics and public affairs. He was honored by 
election as the first mayor of Carthage, after its incorporation as a 
city, and served three terms, from 1888 until 1894, and in 1902 was 
honored by another election to the office. In 1888 Mr. Berry was 
elected to the state senate, and served continuously in that office until 
1900, and after an interval of two years was elected to fill a vacancy 
and re-elected in 1904. He was one of the senatorial leaders, and any 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 759 

one familiar with the Illinois legislative record for the past twenty 
years recognizes his name as one of the most outstanding among all 
the leaders in the Illinois Legislature during that time. Mr. Berry 
served as president pro tern, of the senate, and was acting governor 
of the state from August 2/th to September 4, 1906. Under appoint- 
ment from Governor Deneen he served as chairman of the Railroad 
and Warehouse Commission of Illinois from 1909 until that body 
ceased to exist in 1913, and was replaced by the Public Utilities 
Commission. In January, 1914, Mr. Berry was appointed by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission as special examining attorney. 
During the administration of Governor Tanner he served as general 
attorney for the insurance department of the state, and under Attor- 
ney-General Hamlin was special attorney in the lake front litigation 
at Chicago. He was chairman of the special committee of the senate 
in 1897 to investigate the Chicago police management and justice 
courts, and one of the results of that investigation eventually led to 
the establishment of the system of municipal courts. He was also 
chairman of the senate committee which investigated the Globe 
Savings Bank at its failure. In 1907-08 he acted as receiver for the 
Peoria National Bank. Mr. Berry is also prominent as a banker, 
and is president of the Dime Savings Bank of Carthage, of which 
his brother is the cashier. He is one of the most influnetial repub- 
licans and public leaders in the State of Illinois today. 

On March 5, 1873, Mr. Berry married Miss Anna R. Barr, of 
Fountain, Green, Hancock County. Her parents were David and 
Jane (Barr) Barr. To their marriage were born five children, three 
of whom died in infancy, while two sons, Clarence and Frank, lived 
to be fourteen years of age. All are now at rest in the Moss Ridge 
Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Berry have an adopted daughter, Leonore, 
who is a graduate of the Carthage High School and of Ferry Hall 
at Lake Forest. Mrs. Berry is an active member of the Woman's 
Club, and belongs to the Society of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. Mr. Berry is a Knight Templar, and also is affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, and was 
grand master of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. For thirty 
years he has been superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday-school 
at Carthage, and is now a teacher in the Men's Brotherhood Bible 
Class. The Berry home is at 739 Walnut Street, in Carthage. 

WILLIAM C. HOOKER. A representative of that group of early 
Illinois attorneys, who were at the beginning of their careers when 
Lincoln, Douglas and other brilliant men were at the height of their 
activities in the law and in politics, the late William C. Hooker, 
at the time of his death was the oldest living practicing attorney in 
Hancock County, and one of the very oldest in the State of Illinois. 
His recollections of men and events, both in and out of his profes- 
sion, covered a period of fully fifty years. During this long time he 
held a high position as a lawyer, was frequently honored with those 



760 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

public offices which requires great self-sacrifice on the part of every 
incumbent, and was always honored as a public-spirited citizen. 

William C. Hooker was born at Auburn, New York, September 
13, 1828, and was in his eighty-seventh year at the time of his 
death. His parents were Harley and Mary (Beardsley) Hooker, 
both natives of Connecticut. One of the prominent ancestors of 
the family was the Rev. Thomas Hooker, who, in 1634, led from 
Massachusetts the colony which settled Newport, now Hartford, 
Connecticut. Dr. Harley Hooker, father of William C. Hooker, was 
a successful physician, and in 1839 came out to Illinois and located 
in Winnebago County, at first in Pecatonica and later at Rockton. 

Judge Hooker acquired his early education in the district schools, 
attending them during the winter season, and working on his father's 
farm in the open months of the year. For one year he had the 
privilege of attending the Onondaga Academy in New York, and in 
1847 entered Beloit College of Beloit, Wisconsin, and was graduated 
with the class of 1851, being a member of the first class to complete 
the regular course in that well-known Middle West college. In 
the meantime he had already become self-supporting, and among his 
early experiences was that of teamster in hauling goods to and from 
Chicago and other lake ports. He was also a school teacher, and for 
several years all his leisure time was devoted to the reading of law. 
Mr. Hooker completed his preliminary reading at Quincy in the fall 
of 1853, and in the spring of 1854 was admitted to the bar. His first 
location was at Nauvoo, where he became a law partner of Milton 
M. Morrill. In March, 1858, Judge Hooker removed to Carthage, 
and was identified with the bar of Hancock County for more than 
fifty-five years. For four years he was in practice with Hiram G. 
Ferris and George Edmunds, under the name of Ferris, Hooker & 
Edmunds. They were during that time one of the leading law firms 
in this section of the state. During all the intervening years Mr. 
Hooker continued in practice at Quincy, and looked after a large 
business as a general lawyer. He had a fine office and library, 
and though he reached that time of life when supposedly his best 
product was counsel, not action, he not infrequently appeared in 
behalf of litigants in the local courts. 

William C. Hooker was married in 1856 to Miss Anna M. Hume, 
of Clark County, Kentucky. She died one year later, in 1857. In 
December, 1862, Mr. Hooker married Mary Catherine McQuary, 
of Carthage. They became the parents of two daughters and two 
sons. Mary, who died in 1896, was the wife of Charles J. Daoust, 
of Defiance, Ohio. Frances, who died in 1898, was the wife of 
Michael C. Flynn. The son, Harley J., is now engaged in the real 
estate business at St. Louis. Chellis E., the other son, at the time 
of his death in July, 1901, had already reached a place of prominence 
in his profession and in public affairs. In 1898 he had been elected 
to the office of county judge of Hancock County, and was still in 
that office at the time of his death. An unusual tribute was paid to 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 761 

his father in his election without opposition to fill the unexpired 
term. Chellis E. Hooker studied law under his father's direction, 
was graduated from the Northwestern Law School at Chicago in 
1893, in 1897 was elected city attorney of Carthage, and was only 
twenty-eight years of age when honored with election to the office of 
county judge. Prior to his election he was a partner with his father 
under the firm name of William C. Hooker & Son. 

William C. Hooker was a lifelong democrat, and cast his first 
vote in 1854. He served as delegate to the local, congressional and 
state conventions, but never looked to politics for office, and accepted 
only those offices which were in line with his profession or which 
were opportunities for service to the community. He was master 
in chancery for twelve years, served several times as mayor of Carth- 
age, and for many years was a member of the school board. He 
was an independent democrat. Mr. Hooker, in 1852, was raised in 
the Masonic lodge in Alabama, and affiliated with Hancock Lodge, 
No. 20, A. F. & A. M. During his residence at Nauvoo he served 
as worshipful master of Reclamation Lodge, No. 54. He was also 
affiliated and for several terms was high priest of Carthage Chapter, 
No. 33, R. A. M., was formerly a member of the council, and was 
a member of the Carthage Commandery, No. 75, of the Knights 
Templar. Mrs. Hooker died February 5, 1900, and in 1915, on the 
7th of March, William C. Hooker also passed away. 

HENRY E. JACOBS. A recognized leader in the Marshall County 
bar is Henry E. Jacobs, now serving his third term as state's attor- 
ney, with residence at Henry. Mr. Jacobs has shown a splendid 
ability as a prosecutor, and his administration has gained him the 
complete confidence of his fellow citizens. 

Henry E. Jacobs was born in Marshall County, Illinois, on his 
father's farm, March 23, 1876, a son of Peter and Cecilia (Wer- 
scheid) Jacobs, both natives of Germany, but married in Illinois. 
There were nine children, seven of whom are living, and Henry E. 
was the sixth child. The father is now a retired farmer living 
in Henry. 

Henry E. Jacobs had the usual advantages of an Illinois farmer 
boy, and such as were not granted to him and which he considered 
necessary he obtained through his own efforts. After attending the 
public schools of Marshall County, and then teaching a couple of 
years, he entered the W r esleyan University at Bloomington and was 
graduated with the class in law of 1901. Mr. Jacobs first located 
in Lacon, the county seat of Marshall County, and practiced one 
year with Judge Elijah D. Richmond. In 1902 he established his 
home in Henry, where he has since, in addition to his office of state's 
attorney, built up a very large and lucrative civil and probate prac- 
tice, which extends throughout the several counties surrounding 
Marshall, in the loth and I3th judicial circuits. 

In 1904 Mr. Jacobs was elected to the office of state's attorney, 



762 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and was returned to that office by increased majorities in 1908 and 
1912. Few men have held this responsible position in Marshall 
County for a longer time and none have displayed a greater fidelity 
and efficiency in the discharge of his duty. 

Mr. Jacobs is a democrat in politics, and is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias. He was married October 6, 1907, to Alberta 
Kerry, of Henry. They have one son, Henry Albert. 

JOHN W. FLING, JR. The present state's attorney of Stark 
County, with law offices in Wyoming, John W. Fling, Jr., began 
practice in 1903 after a hard apprenticeship of teaching, night and 
vacation study and much practical training gained from association 
with an older lawyer at Wyoming. 

John W. Fling, Jr., was born at Cumberland, Indiana, January 
22, 1878, a son of John W. and Rebecca (Bolander) Fling. Both 
parents were natives of Indiana, and their children were four in 
number, three sons and one daughter, namely : John W., Jr., Leroy, 
Naomi and Frank M. 

The state's attorney was educated in the Wyoming High School, 
finishing on June 3, 1898, and during the following three years he 
was engaged in teaching school in Stark County, studying law at 
night and during vacation seasons with Frank A. Kerns at Wyoming. 
In 1901 Mr. Fling concentrated all his work on preparation for the 
law and continued in Mr. Kerns' office until admitted to the bar 
May 12, 1903. On July i of the same year he became associated 
with Mr. Kerns in the firm of Kerns & Fling. This association 
continued with mutual satisfaction and profit until May I, 1912, 
when Mr. Fling took over the business for himself. In June, 1907, 
he was appointed corporation counsel to Wyoming City, and held 
that office until May, 1912. On November 7, 1912, he was elected 
state's attorney of Stark County, and has shown all those qualities 
which make a successful administration in that office. 

Mr. Fling is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association, of 
Wyoming Lodge, No. 479. A. F. & A. M., Wyoming Lodge, No. 244, 
I. O. O. F., and in politics is a republican. November 22, 1904, he 
married Mamie McClyment. Their one son is Richard A. 

MARION L. HAY. Since beginning practice as a lawyer in Stark 
County, Marion L. Hay has been rapidly accumulating the wisdom 
of experience and a successful business, and is now serving as master 
in chancery, with offices in Toulon, the county seat of Stark County. 

Representing one of the older families of Central Illinois, Marion 
L. Hay was born on his father's farm in Bureau County, near the 
town of Bradford, in Stark County, June 28, 1884. His great-grand- 
father, Thomas Hay, came, to the United States in 1804 from Scot- 
land. The grandfather was Robert Hay, a native of Indiana, who 
moved to Illinois and located in Milo Township, of Bureau County, 
one of the pioneers, and the family has been well known and a sub- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 763 

stantial factor in that part of the state ever since. The Toulon 
lawyer is a son of Leroy S. and Catherine (Shriver) Hay. Leroy 
S. Hay was born on the farm that his son has as a birthplace, in 
1862, and is now living in Princeton, Illinois, engaged in the real 
estate business. In politics he is a democrat. The mother was born 
in Pennsylvania. They had three children, and the two now living 
are Marion L. and G. Dean. 

Marion L. Hay acquired an education by attending the public 
schools of Bureau County, also attended the Bradford schools, in 
Stark County, the Eureka College at Eureka, Illinois, and graduated 
with the class of 1910 from the Illinois College of Law in Chicago. 
Having finished his education Mr. Hay returned to Bradford, took 
up general practice, and remained there until appointed master in 
chancery in October, 1912, which caused him to move to the county 
seat of Toulon. 

Mr. Hay is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association, of 
Bradford Lodge, No. 514, A. F. & A. M., and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he has been associated with the 
republican party since reaching majority. Mr. Hay was married 
June 28, 1908, to Catherine E. Giles. Three children were born to 
them, and the two living are Leroy Giles and Wilton Shriver. 

EDWARD D. McCABE. One of the members of the Peoria bar 
who has been in active practice for a quarter of a century is 
Edward D. McCabe, a lawyer of sound learning, of notable industry, 
and fidelity and care in the handling of the interests of his clients 
and a secure position in his profession and civic circles at Peoria. 

Edward D. McCabe was born in Peoria County in 1859, a son 
of Patrick and Catherine McCabe, both of whom were natives of 
Ireland, and spent many years on a farm in Peoria County. Mr. 
McCabe attended the district schools near his. father's farm, later 
the Brimfield High School, and had a college course in St. Viateur's 
College, at Kankakee. At the close of his college career he followed 
farming until 1887, when appointed to a position as United States 
store keeper at Peoria, a service which kept him busy two years. 
He resigned his office in 1889 to enter the law department of the 
University of Michigan, where he was graduated LL. B. in the class 
of 1891. Admitted to the bar the same year, Mr. McCabe has since 
been in the active practice of his profession at Peoria, and for a 
number of years has had his offices at 127 North Jefferson Street. 
Outside of his profession his chief business interests have been as 
an officer in the Lake View State Bank of Chicago, of which his 
brother, George W. McCabe, is president, and he is also at present 
serving as Collector of Internal Revenue for the Fifth District of 
Illinois. 

Mr. McCabe is a member of the Peoria and the state bar asso- 
ciations. Politically he is a democrat, and was Democratic Central 
Committeeman of Peoria County from 1908 to 1910. He has since 



764 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

held the office of public guardian for Peoria County. Mr. McCabe 
is a member of several fraternal and social associations and clubs. 

JUDGE JAMES M. RAHN. In 1910 the citizens of Tazewell 
County chose for the office of county judge one of the rising younger 
lawyers of Pekin, and a man who in every relation of life, from 
farm boy, teacher to judge, has shown splendid ability in rising above 
the circumstances of life to the higher responsibilities and usefulness 
of real service. Judge Rahn is a man who has worked for every 
advancement he has won. 

Born on his father's farm in Cass County, Illinois, March 20, 
1868, James M. Rahn, after his education in the district schools, left 
home at the age of seventeen, and has since been dependent on his 
own efforts and has educated himself. At the age of twenty-one 
he engaged in teaching, and for nine years taught and earned the 
money to pay his way through college. Judge Rahn attended higher 
schools at the Western Normal in Bushnell, and finally graduated in 
law in the class of 1897. On being admitted to the bar he located 
at Pekin, and soon had acquired a successful general practice. Judge 
Rahn was elected to his present office as county judge in 1910, re- 
elected to that office in 1914, and in 1913 served as president of 
the Tazewell County Bar Association. He is also a member of the 
Illinois State Bar Association, a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and a member of Pekin Lodge, No. 1271, of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and of Empire Lodge, No. 126, A. F. & 
A. M. In politics he is a democrat. Judge Rahn was married Octo- 
ber 6, 1909, to Mary Kirby, of Petersburg, Menard County, Illinois. 
Their three children are : James M., Jr., Robert K. and Mary Louise. 

HON. JOHN DAILEY. With a record of twenty-five years in 
active practice as a lawyer, John Dailey is one of the leaders of the 
Peoria bar, and his record as a member of the State Senate since 
1909 has made him familiar to the people of Illinois at large, and 
his qualifications as a public leader have as yet gained him only a 
small measure of the honors which his friends confidently predict 
for him. 

John Dailey was born in the City of Peoria April 17, 1867, and 
was admitted to the bar and began practice in 1890, at the age of 
twenty-three. He is a' son of John and Hannah H. (Murphy) 
Dailey. His father was a veteran of both the Mexican and Civil 
wars. Not long after the close of the Mexican war he came out 
from New York State to Peoria in 1849, but after a few years 
returned east and at the beginning of the Civil war was enlisted in 
a Massachusetts regiment. His active services -as a soldier were 
terminated in the battle of Antietam, where he was wounded and in 
consequence given an honorable discharge. After the war he again 
settled in Peoria, and followed his trade as shoemaker, passing away 
in December, 1908, survived by his widow. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 765 

John Dailey was reared and educated in Peoria, was graduated 
from the high school with the class of 1885, and then entered the 
University of Michigan, where he pursued both the literary and 
law courses, graduating LL. B. in 1890. With the culture and dis- 
cipline of a liberal education, Mr. Dailey returned to Peoria, and in 
a few years had the standing and the business of a capable and 
rising attorney. He has been unusually successful as a jury lawyer, 
and it was his forte in this field that no doubt contributed to his 
success in politics. 

Mr. Dailey served as assistant city attorney of Peoria from 1894 
to 1896, and in the latter year was elected state's attorney of Peoria 
County. Since 1904 he has been senior member of the law firm of 
Dailey & Miller, his junior associate being Harry S. Miller. .This 
is one of the strongest law firms of the Peoria bar. As to his public 
record a quotation from a Peoria paper presents only a just estimate 
of his services at the time: "In 1895 he was appointed city attorney, 
and in that capacity demonstrated his capabilities to such effect that 
in the following year he was nominated for the office as state's attor- 
ney on the republican ticket and elected by a large majority. Here 
his talent was given full play, and during the four years that he 
held the office his profound knowledge of the law and his forensic 
ability brought him conspicuously to the front. In 1904 he was 
elected one of the representatives from the Peoria district to the 
Forty-fourth General Assembly, and in 1908 was elected a member 
of the State Senate. As a state senator his course has been marked 
with an honesty of purpose, an aggressiveness and a natural gift of 
oratory that have made him the leader on the floor and placed him 
in the front rank as one of the political leaders of the state in the 
interests of the republican party and of the people at large. John 
Dailey, in the exercise of natural qualities, rises far above the ordi- 
nary politician. Skilled in the rules of debate, gifted with a splendid 
oratorical presence and power, equal to any emergency and actuated 
by an inborn sense of right and justice, he exhibits all the qualities 
of the statesman." Mr. Dailey was re-elected to the Senate in 1912. 
His, name has been identified with much important legislation in Illi- 
nois. He served as chairman of the Legislative Public Utilities 
Committee, did much to perfect the present utilities commission law, 
was author of a corrupt practice bill which passed the Senate in his 
first term, but was defeated in the House, and was chairman of the 
Committee on Primary Election which passed one of the primaries 
laws of the state. 

In 1895 Mr. Dailey married Clara F. Johnston, of Peoria, daugh- 
ter of Robert F. Johnston, who was a farmer, and died in 1910. 
Mrs. Dailey was born and reared in Peoria County. They have 
one daughter, Lucile. Mr. Dailey is a member of the Masonic . 
order, has taken thirty-two degrees in the Scottish Rite, is a mem- 
ber of Mohammed Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and also has 
affiliations with the Knights of Pythias, the Knights of Khorassan, 



766 

the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He belongs to the Creve Coeur Club of Peoria, 
and has many stanch friends in his profession, in all political parties, 
and among all classes of citizenship. 

HENRY T. SCHUMACHER. Among the representative members 
of the Champaign Bar is Henry T. Schumacher, who entered into 
practice here in December, 1904, and within a decade has built up 
a large and lucrative business entirely through the honorable meth- 
ods which prevail among lawyers of recognized standing. He has 
been active in politics to some extent but never to the detriment of 
his professional activities. 

Henry T. Schumacher was born in Marshall County, Illinois, 
July 'i i, 1879, and is a son of Adolph and Hannah (Steinke) Schu- 
macher. They were born in Germany but passed the larger part of 
their lives in the United States. The father followed farming up 
to the time of his death, which occurred January 30, 1908. The 
mother still survives. They were the parents of four children. 

Reared on the home farm and during boyhood and youth giving 
his father assistance, Henry T. Schumacher was afforded oppor- 
tunity to attend the common school. In 1895 he attended Brown's 
Business College at Galesburg and then worked as stenographer in 
Prince, Post & Hardy's office until February, 1899, and afterward 
became a student in the Illinois State University, entering the insti- 
tution in 1899 and graduating in 1904, after completing a course in 
law. In October of that year he was admitted to the bar and 
immediately entered into practice, afterward forming a law partner- 
ship with Louis A. Busch, which continued until Mr. Busch's elec- 
tion to the office of state's attorney. Mr. Schumacher is known as 
a careful and able attorney and his legal knowledge may be depended 
upon, whether presenting a case before a jury, or giving counsel in 
the privacy of his office. He has successfully handled a number of 
important cases of litigation and on every occasion has acquitted 
himself more than creditably. He keeps fully abreast of profes- 
sional progress and is not afraid to express his sentiments concern- 
ing new law legislation as a member of the county and also of 
the State Bar Association. 

Mr. Schumacher was united in marriage with Miss Minnie 
Nuckolls, who is a daughter of William C. Nuckolls, and they have 
four children. Mr. Schumacher and family belong to the Presby- 
terian Church. He has always been a strong supporter of the 
principles of the republican party but has not been a seeker for 
office. During Hon. Charles Adkins' term as speaker of the Illi- 
nois House of Representatives, Mr. Schumacher served as his legal 
secretary, and in 1915 is serving as legal secretary for Speaker 
David E. Shanahan. He is identified with all the leading fraternal 
bodies, including the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Elks, and in all these organizations his personal 
qualities have won him warm and appreciative friends. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 767 

HON. FITZ JOHN CAMPBELL. Persistency has been a marked 
characteristic in the life of Judge Fitz John Campbell, of the Jo 
Daviess County bench, and to this element may be attributed, in a 
measure, the distinction which has crowned his years of study and 
effort. Judge Campbell was born in the Village of New Diggings, 
and for the first twenty-two years of his life as a farm hand, the 
farm environment, with its plodding tasks and, also, to an ambitious 
youth, its lack of inspiration, encompassed him, but his was the 
temperament that could await an opening and take advantage of 
opportunity when it came. 

In the Village of New Diggings, Lafayette County, Wisconsin, 
Fitz John Campbell was born, February 2, 1863. His parents were 
Thomas B. and Catherine (Gridel) Campbell, both probably of 
Scotch ancestry, although the father was born in Washington 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1830, and the mother at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
March 28, 1854. Both are deceased. 

Until his eleventh year, Fitz John Campbell attended the district 
schools, but afterward had school advantages only in the winter 
seasons, farm duties claiming his time and strength during the rest 
of the year. Realizing that his future rested almost entirely in his 
own hands, he applied himself to study at home and thus prepared 
himself for teaching school, and continued to teach in the country 
districts, although not continuously, until 1892. In the meanwhile, 
in 1889, he became a student in the German-English College, at 
Galena, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 1890, 
subsequently taking a post graduate course, and in 1891 received 
his degree of B. S. He continued to teach school and also began 
the study of law in the office and under the direction of Judge Wil- 
liam R. Hodson, of Galena, and was admitted to the bar at Ottawa, 
Illinois, March 26, 1895. He opened a law office at Savanna and 
continued in active practice there until 1901, when he came to Galena 
and formed a partnership with his former preceptor, Judge Hodson, 
and this relationship continued until November i, 1913, after which 
he practiced alone until he was elected to the bench on November 3. 
1914, taking his seat on December 7, 1914. 

Judge Campbell is a republican in political affiliation, and soon 
after locating at Savanna, was brought forward as his party's candi- 
date for city attorney, but was defeated by local issues. After 
becoming a permanent resident of Jo Daviess County he was at one 
time a candidate for state's attorney, but failed of election. In the 
recent campaign, Judge Campbell was elected county judge by a very 
large majority. That he possesses all the qualities demanded by his 
judicial position can not be disputed, and that his administration 
will be wise, honorable and impartial, is conceded almost universally. 
He also holds municipal court in Chicago, is attorney for the 
Scales Mound Banking Company, and is local attorney for the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, and the Chicago. Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railway, and until recently was attorney for the Illinois 



768 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Central, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul railroads. 

On April 26, 1896, Judge Campbell was united in marriage with 
Miss Lizzie Oldenberg, who is a daughter of John Oldenberg, a 
resident of Galena. Mrs. Campbell was a student and a classmate 
with her husband and was graduated from college at the same time. 

Judge Campbell has been a useful and public-spirited citizen of 
Galena, and has ever lent his influence to the support of upbuilding 
movements and has championed many measures that have been of 
benefit to the general public. He is identified with a number of the 
leading fraternal organizations, including the Knights of Pythias, 
the Woodmen and the Elks, being a past exalted ruler in the last- 
named order. 

ELIJAH DEWEY RICHMOND. For a period of sixty-five years the 
bar of Illinois has been distinguished by the ability and achievements 
associated with the name Richmond. Father and son, the lawyers 
of this name have practiced law, have held responsible positions on 
the bench and in public affairs, and the late Judge Samuel L. Rich- 
mond was in his time associated with several of those eminent law- 
yers and public leaders whom Illinois will always delight to honor, 
and had a long career as a circuit judge. His son, Elijah D. Rich- 
mond, has for more than thirty years been in practice in Marshall 
County, gained his entrance to the law by hard work, and has since 
represented the best in his profession, both so far as private suc- 
cess and accomplishment in the broader fields of citizenship are con- 
cerned. 

Elijah Dewey Richmond was born in Lacon, Illinois, March 18, 
1859, a son of Samuel Lee and Susan H. (Hunt) Richmond. His 
father was born in Vermont in 1824, moved to Ohio at an early date, 
acquired an academic education there and studied law and was 
admitted to practice in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1848 he married 
Susan Hunt, who was born in Granville, Ohio, in 1821, a daughter 
of Elijah Dewey Hunt, one of the early settlers of Ohio. After his 
marriage Samuel L. Richmond moved to Illinois, and lived at Prince- 
ton, at -Galena and for about four years was a resident in practice 
at St. Paul, Minnesota. He then returned and established a home 
at Lacon in Marshall County and formed a partnership with John 
Burnes. In 1861 Judge Richmond was elected circuit judge of the 
Twenty-third Judicial District, and was re-elected in 1867 and held 
the office until the time of his death, February 19, 1873, During his 
service on the bench Adlai Stevenson, who later became vice presi- 
dent of the United States, was prosecuting attorney of Wood- 
ford County, and they became intimate friends. Samuel L. Rich- 
mond was one of the ablest jurists in Central Illinois. As circuit 
judge he had jurisdiction over the counties of Woodford, Marshall 
and Putnam, and also held court in Peoria, Tazewell, McLean and 
Champaign counties. He was always identified with the democratic 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 769 

party, and in 1860 was a member of the Baltimore convention that 
nominated Stephen A. Douglas for president. In the early days as 
a practicing lawyer he came into close touch with such distinguished 
figures as Abraham Lincoln, Robert Ingersoll and other well-known 
attorneys of the time. Judge Richmond died while holding court in 
Champaign, Illinois. He was at that time in his forty-ninth year. 
There were six children, four of whom are still living, and Elijah 
Dewey was the youngest. 

Elijah Dewey Richmond was fourteen years of age when his 
father died, and the family was left in somewhat straitened circum- 
stances. The widowed mother established a home on a farm, and 
there the son spent most of his years until- reaching manhood. He 
was educated partly in the public schools of Lacon, in a business 
college at Peoria, and also attended district school. The work of 
the farm was not altogether to his taste, but its accompaniments of 
outdoor exercise undoubtedly did much to preserve his physical vigor 
for the exacting routine of a busy lawyer. Unable to pursue a 
collegiate education, he began the study of law with Shaw & Edward, 
in Lacon, and was admitted to the bar in January, 1883. The same 
year Mr. Richmond was elected city attorney, serving one term, and 
in 1884 was elected state's attorney of Marshall County and re- 
elected in 1888. He resigned his office in 1890 to become a candi- 
date for county judge, and was elected in November of that year 
and re-elected in 1894, serving two full terms. Since leaving the 
office of county judge Mr. Richmond has enjoyed a large general 
practice as a lawyer in Lacon, and at different times has identified 
himself actively with public affairs. He has served as a member of 
the board of education and early in his career was active in the 
Illinois National Guard, joining Company G of the Sixth Regiment 
in 1884, and being commissioned first lieutenant in 1886. He saw 
some active service during the East St. Louis strike in 1886. Mr. 
Richmond is a democrat, and a member of the Illinois State Bar 
Association. He is affiliated with Lacojn Lodge, No. 61, A. F: & 
A. M., with Lacon Chapter, No. 123, R. A. M., and has held offices 
in both branches. He and his family are members of the Congrega- 
tional Church. 

On July 28, 1892, at Lacon, Mr. Richmond married Jennie M. 
Hoyt. She was born in Marshall County, a daughter of James Hoyt, 
who settled in Marshall County in 1838, and in 1853 married Eliza 
J. Mathis. Mrs. Richmond is a graduate of both the Lacon High 
School and the Boston Conservatory of Music, and until her mar- 
riage taught music in Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa. Mr. 
and Mrs. Richmond are the parents of four children : Geraldine, a 
student at Knox College in Galesburg ; Lyle Lee, a student in Beloit 
College at Beloit, Wisconsin ; Paul J. and Donald Dewey. 

WALTER A. PANNECK. The relations of Walter A. Panneck 
with his home city of La Salle cover a successful record as a lawyer, 

Vol. 1122 



770 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

important service in municipal office, including three terms as mayor 
and the activities of a self-made man of affairs, who can be dependec 
upon by clients and the public in general for the exertion of solic 
ability and public spirit whenever those qualities are needed. 

Walter A. Panneck was born in Posen, Germany, August i, 1866 
and in 1874 accompanied his parents, Joseph and Antonia Panneck 
to America. Practically all his education was acquired in the publi< 
schools of La Salle, where he 'studied law with Thomas N. Haskins 
and was admitted to the bar in 1893. For about two years Mr 
Panneck was employed as law clerk by Mr. Haskins, and in 189; 
became junior member of the firm of Duncan, Haskins & Pan 
neck. Three or four years later a change was made to Haskins $ 
Panneck, and this firm continued until 1900. At that time Mr. Pan 
neck withdrew and has since confined his attention to individua 
practice. In 1898 he was elected city attorney of La Salle, and b^ 
re-election in 1900 served two full terms. In 1903 he was electee 
mayor of the City of La Salle, and served three terms, being re 
elected in 1905 and in 1907. On August i, 1913, Governor Dunn< 
appointed Mr. Panneck attorney for the Illinois and Michigai 
Canal Commission, an office he still holds in connection with hi: 
large private practice as a lawyer. 

Mr. Panneck is a member of the La Salle County Bar Associa 
tion, and affiliates with La Salle Lodge, No. 584, of the Benevolen 
and Protective Order of Elks, with the Knights of Columbus, ii 
Calvert Council, and also with the Modern Woodmen of America 
Politically he is a democrat. Mr. Panneck married December 10 
1804. Carrie L. Seepe. 

ROBERT E. LARKIN. A well-known StreatOr attorney, in prac 
tice there since 1906, Mr. Larkin was associated with Patrick J 
Lucey until the latter's election to the office of attorney-general o 
Illinois, and has since given his time to a large and increasing genera 
practice in both the Federal and State courts in Illinois. 

Robert E. Larkin was born in Eagle Township, of La Sall< 
County, on his father's farm, a son of Thomas and Delia (Conness 
Larkin. Both parents were natives of Ireland and were married ii 
La Salle County, Illinois. Five of their ten children are living, am 
Robert E. was the eighth in order of birth. The father came t( 
America when seventeen years of age, lived for a time in Nev 
York City, later went to Wheeling, West Virginia', and in 1851 
became a pioneer in the farming district of Minnesota Territory, anc 
lived there until 1860. He then returned to Illinois, and locatec 
in Eagle Township, of La Salle County. Farming and stock-raisins 
were his chief occupations until he retired from active affairs ir 
1900, and in 1910 his death occurred at the age of eighty-four. Hi; 
widow is still living. The mother came to La Salle County wher 
she was four years old. She was a niece of the late John Conness 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 771 

United States Senator from California. Senator Conness was a pall- 
bearer for Abraham Lincoln. The father was in politics a democrat. 
Robert E. Larkin acquired his education by attending the district 
schools of La Salle County, was also a student in the Streator High 
School and graduated from St. Bede's College in that county with 
the class of 1902. Mr. Larkin studied law in the office of Lloyd 
Painter at Streator, Illinois, and was admitted to the bar in 1906. 
Beginning practice at Streator he was alone until 1907, and then 
formed a partnership with Patrick J. Lucey, which continued with 
mutual profit and esteem under the name of Lucey & Larkin until 
January i, 1913, when Mr. Lucey withdrew in order to take up his 
active duties as attorney-general of Illinois. Since that time Mr. 
Larkin has continued in general practice under his own name, and 
now prosecutes a large amount of business, both in the local and 
general State courts and in the District and Circuit courts of the 
United States. Mr. Larkin is a member of the La Salle County Bar 
Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and the American 
Bar Association; affiliates with Streator Lodge No. 591, of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, with Streator Council of 
the Knights of Columbus, and with the Streator Club and the 
Streator Commercial Association. Politically he is a democrat. 

RECTOR C. HITT. An old and prominent lawyer in La Salle 
County, Rector C. Hitt has been a member of the bar at Ottawa 
for over thirty years, and has long had a reputation as one of the 
shrewdest and most skillful trial lawyers in this section of the 
state. 

Rector C. Hitt was born in Ottawa, Illinois, August 14, 1856, 
was educated in the public schools there, and studied law in the 
office of that veteran lawyer, Hiram T. Gilbert, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1881. For five years he practiced law as a member of the 
firm of Cullen & Hitt, the senior member of which was C. S. Cullen. 
Since that time Mr. Hitt has practiced as an individual and has 
found full scope for his independent ideals and a vigorous and pleas- 
ant career. 

Mr. Hitt is a member of the La Salle County Bar Association 
and the Illinois State Bar Association, also the American Bar Asso- 
ciation and the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminol- 
ogy. Fraternally his relations are with Occidental Lodge No. 37, A. 
F. & A. M. ; Shabbona Chapter No. 37, R. A. M. ; Ottawa 'Com- 
mandery No. 10, Knights Templar. In politics he is a republican. 
On June 18, 1899, Mr. Hitt married Mabel Cushman, daughter of 
Col. William H. W. Cushman. 

Mr. Hitt is a son of Daniel Fletcher and Phoebe (Smith) Hitt. 
His father was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1810 and died 
in 1899, while his mother was bom in Pennsylvania in 1827 and died 
in 1903. Of their six children three are still living, with Rector C. 
as the youngest. The father was a civil engineer by profession, 



772 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and in 1830 came out to Vermillion River, near Deer Park, in La 
Salle County, and was a pioneer in that section. He did surveying 
for the United States Government and was associated in that work 
with Colonel Stephenson, after whom Stephenson County was named 
in this state. He was one of the surveyors who marked out the 
course of the Illinois and Michigan Canal, and for many years was 
associated with T. B. Blackstone in laying out the Illinois Central 
Railroad. He was county surveyor of La Salle County many years. 
In politics he followed the fortunes of the democratic party until the 
Civil war, and then became a republican. He was also a member of 
the Masonic fraternity. 

CLARENCE B. CHAPMAN. One of the most prominent lawyers 
in Central Illinois is Clarence B. Chapman, of the firm of McDougall 
& Chapman, at Ottawa. Ottawa has for many years been dis- 
tinguished as the home of a group of lawyers second to none in the 
state, and a few years after beginning practice in 1880 Mr. Chapman 
had demonstrated his right to be classed among the leaders of the 
Ottawa bar. 

Clarence B. Chapman was born in Princeton, Bureau County, 
Illinois, January i, 1857. His parents were O. E. and Sarah L. 
(Beeman) Chapman, both natives of Ohio. His father was born 
in 1832, and is still living, while the mother died at the age of sixty- 
nine years. They were married in Ohio, and in 1854 came out to 
Bureau County, Illinois, locating at Princeton, and afterwards moved 
to Walnut, where O. E. Chapman was engaged in farming and 
stock-raising up to 1894. In that year he retired from active work. 
He continued to live in Walnut until 1902, and since then has been 
at Ottawa, Illinois. He has held township offices and has always 
been a loyal republican. There were five children in the family, 
four of whom are living, and the Ottawa lawyer is the second 
child. 

His education was acquired in the public schools of Bureau 
County, and he finished in the old Princeton Township High School. 
Mr. Chapman entered the law department of the Northwestern 
University of Chicago, was graduated with the class of 1880 and ad- 
mitted to the bar in that year. At the beginning of his practice he 
located in Ottawa, and soon had a profitable general practice in 
all the courts. While his work has been that of a general practi- 
tioner, Mr. Chapman has also represented many corporations, and 
the firm of McDougall & Chapman has long enjoyed some of the 
best distinctions of legal partnership and success in the Illinois bar. 
This firm was formed April i, 1887, and has been in existence for 
more than a quarter of a century. Mr. Chapman has served as 
county attorney of La Salle County two terms, and in 1914 was 
elected president of the La Salle County Bar Association. 

He is also a member of the Illinois State Bar Association ; of 
Humboldt Lodge No. 555, A. F. & A. M. ; Shabbona Chapter, R. A. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 773 

M. ; Ottawa Commandery No. 10, Knights Templars ; and Mohamed 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Peoria. He and his family worship 
in the Congregational Church, and in politics he is a republican. 
On October 12, 1886, Mr. Chapman married Katie H. Ebersol. She 
was born in Burlington, Iowa. 

GEORGE S. WILEY. For a young man of thirty-five years George 
S. Wiley has performed a great deal of important public service and 
gained many successes in his chosen profession of the law. Mr. 
Wiley is at the present time serving as state's attorney of La Salle 
County with offices in Ottawa. 

Born at Earlville in La Salle County, Illinois, March 15, 1879, 
George S. Wiley acquired his education in the common schools and 
finished the law course at the University of Michigan with the class 
of 1900. He was then twenty-one years of age, was admitted to the 
bar in Michigan and in Illinois in the same year, and took up general 
practice at Earlville. In 1901 Mr. Wiley was elected city attorney 
of Earlville and was re-elected to that office in 1903, 1905. 1907, 
1909 and 1911, serving five consecutive terms with credit to himself 
and to the benefit of that community. In 1912 Mr. Wiley was 
elected state's attorney, and from June, 1911, to June, 1912, served 
as chairman of the board of supervisors of La Salle County. His 
general popularity in his home county, his recognized qualifications 
as a lawyer and powers of public leadership were well exemplified in 
the November election of 1912, when he was the only democrat 
elected on the county ticket in La Salle County. La Salle has for 
years been one of the strongholds of the republican party in Illinois, 
and it is only in rare and exceptional cases that an individual is 
able to break the rule of normality of republican majority. 

Mr. Wiley is a member of Earlville Lodge No. 183, A. F. & A. 
M. ; Mendota Chapter No. 79, R. A. M. ; Bethany Commandery No. 
28, K. T. ; Mohamed Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Peoria; 
and Ottawa lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
Mr. Wiley has served three terms as master of his Masonic lodge. 
He is also a member of the La Salle County and the Illinois State 
Bar associations. Mr. Wiley was married February 14, 1901, to 
Ella Gettemy, of Chicago. Their two children are George H. and 
Donald F. 

WILLIAM J. FULTON. In the legal profession success stands as 
the criterion of character and ability, and by this mark Mr. Fulton 
may well be satisfied to be judged, for he has gained secure place 
as one of the representative members of the bar of De Kalb County, 
where he is a member of the well-known law firm of Faissler & Ful- 
ton, of Sycamore, the county seat. His professional coadjutor is 
John Faissler, of whom specific mention is made on other pages of 
this publication. The firm controls an excellent practice of general 
order and is local legal representative of a number of important 



774 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

corporations, including the Chicago Great Western Railroad 
Company ; the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company ; the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company; the De Kalb & Syca- 
more Traction Company ; and the Aurora & De Kalb Traction Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Fulton was born in the village of Lynedoch, Norfolk County, 
Province of Ontario, Canada, on the I4t