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Full text of "Courts and lawyers of Illinois"

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ILLINOIS HISTORY SURVEY 
LIBRARY 





By 

FREDERIC B. CROSSLEY 

(OF THE CHICAGO BAR) 

Secretary Northwestern University Law School; Librarian Elbert H. Gary 
Library of Law; Managing Director Journal of the American Insti- 
tute of Criminal Law and Criminology; Associate Editor 
Illinois Law Review; Member Illinois Bar Association 
Committee on Legal History and Biography 



Advisory Committee 

NATHAN WILLIAM MAcCHESNEY, 

Formerly President Illinois Slate Bar Association 

MITCHELL D. FOLLANSBEE, 

Formerly President Chicago Bar Association 

JOHN F. VOIGT, 

Secretary Illinois State Bar Association 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME III 



1916 

THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
CHICAGO 



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JUDGE WILLIAM A. WALL. For nearly twenty-five years 
William A. Wall has been identified with the law, with public affairs, 
and with the business institutions of Mound City and vicinity. As 
a lawyer, though with a general practice, he has helped to establish 
some important principles in Illinois jurisprudence. His connection 
with much of the litigation growing out of the State Drainage Act, 
creating a drainage district in Southern Illinois and forcing the 
adjustment of many matters in the courts even to the Supreme 
Court of the state, was extensive. His connection with suits involv- 
ing interpretation of the fire insurance laws of the state by the 
Supreme Court was the means of placing a new decision on record 
regarding the admissibility of evidence in a suit brought for the 
collection of a fire loss. In this particular case the plaintiff was the 
defendant in a prior suit brought by the insurance company for 
burning his property for the insurance. A witness for the plaintiff 
said that he burned the barn, among other things, yet the defendant 
was acquitted. Subsequently the defendant and the witness against 
him got into an altercation and the witness was killed. Then the 
defendant brought suit against the insurance company for the 
amount of his policy and the company offered to introduce the testi- 
mony of the deceased witness as part of the defense. This move 
was checked by an objection of Judge Wall, the plaintiff's counsel, 
that such testimony was incompetent for use in the case and was 
sustained in the Circuit Court, and on appeal the judgment was 
affirmed. 

Judge Wall was born in Union County, Illinois, August 17, 1864, 
a son of James B. and Anne (Wright) Wall, both natives of Ten- 
nessee. His father, who settled in Illinois in 1864, was born at 
Lebanon, Tennessee, February 22, 1842, and is now a retired 
farmer. 

The oldest of twelve children, Judge Wall grew up on a farm 
near the village of Western Saratoga, attended a country school, 

843 



844 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

spent two terms in Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbon- 
dale, and a like period in the Union Academy at Anna, and paid 
for his tuition in these schools by work as a teacher. Later Judge 
Wall studied law in the Illinois Wesleyan University at Blooming- 
ton, but left before graduating and was admitted to the bar by 
examination on April 15, 1890. Since taking up practice at Mound 
City, his ability has placed him in the front rank of attorneys in 
Southern Illinois. He was associated with Joseph P. Robarts until 
the latter's election to the judicial bench, and was then with Judge 
Caster until the latter's death in 1909. Since then Judge Wall has 
been head of the firm of Wall & Martin, the junior member being 
former Dist.-Atty. George E. Martin. 

Throughout almost all the years of his practice Judge Wall has 
been officially identified with public affairs. He was elected county 
judge in 1890, serving one term, and in December, 1909, Governor 
Deneen appointed him to a vacancy in that office caused by the death 
of Judge Caster, and in November of the following year he was 
elected without opposition. He served for eight years as a member 
of the State Board of Equalization, having been elected in 1896 
and re-elected in 1900, and in that body was on the railroad com- 
mittee, the committee on farm lands and town lots, and chairman 
of the auditing committee. In 1904 Judge Wall was appointed a 
member of the Cache River Drainage Commission, and was chair- 
man of the commission during his two years of service. This com- 
mission drew up the plans for the drainage of eighty-five thousand 
acres of land in the counties of Massac, Johnson, Union and Pulaski, 
the largest district in this state. 

In business affairs Judge Wall has been identified as a stock- 
holder and official with the First State Bank of Mounds, the First 
National Bank of Mound City, the First National Bank of Ullins 
and the First State Bank of Grand Chain, and also with the Mound 
City Building & Loan Association and the Mounds Building & Loan 
Association. His political action has always been with the repub- 
lican party, and it is a matter of interest that he ascribes to his 
mother's strong character and mind his early affiliations with that 
party. For ten years he served as chairman of the Pulaski County 
Central Committee, and was head of the judicial committee of the 
district for twelve years. For many years he has attended repub- 
lican state conventions, and was a delegate to the notable convention 
in Pulaski County which nominated Judge Robarts for the office of 
district judge. Fraternally his relations are with the Modern Wood- 
men of America, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Judge Wall was married at Mayfield, Kentucky, January 8, 
1882, to Miss Louie Kaltenback who died November 9, 1897, leav- 
ing a son Warner, who was born in 1893 and is now connected 
with the St. Louis & Cairo Railroad Company. On June 5, 1907, 
Judge Wall married Miss Margaret Browner, daughter of Thomas 
and Mary (McCarthy) Browner, her father having come to the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 845 

United States from Ireland. Of Judge Wall's personality and man- 
ner an associate has described him as follows : "The large figure 
of Judge Wall has a commanding air of vigor, of will and of strong 
personality, and everything about him testifies to his integrity, yet 
he is the most courteous and affable of men, his warm-hearted 
cheerful disposition making friends and intrenching him in the 
esteem and good will of his fellow citizens." 

GEORGE ELSWORTH MARTIN. Since 1909 associated with Judge 
W. A. Wall in the firm of Wall & Martin, whose extensive practice 
and combined ability make them generally recognized as the leading 
lawyers of Pulaski County, George E. Martin has been successful 
both in his chosen profession and also in public affairs. His service 
in the Forty-first Legislature, to which he was elected from the 
Fifty-first district in 1898, was one that should stand to his special 
credit. Though his presence in the Legislature was for only one 
term, in that time he secured the passage of a law increasing the 
minimum term of school held in any district during one year from 
five months to six months, and that piece of progressive legislation 
enabled Illinois to raise its standards of education among the states. 
He was also chairman of the .Committee on Judicial Department 
and Practice and a member of several other important committees. 
Mr. Martin was elected in 1900 state's attorney of Pulaski County, 
and in 1904 re-elected, giving eight years of careful and efficient 
administration, one that was marked by an unusual enforcement of 
the law in the district. Though renominated without opposition in 
1908, Mr. Martin declined to become a candidate, and has since 
devoted his time to the practice of law with Judge Wall, though 
since then he has served as city attorney of Mount City. 

George E. Martin was born in Franklin County, 111., on a farm, 
July 7, 1865. He was one of four children born to Stephen B. and 
Narcissa J. (Russell) Martin. His father, who was born in Ken- 
tucky in 1823, came to Illinois in 1857, and died in 1887, was for 
many years a successful farmer in Franklin County. The mother 
was a daughter of James S. Russell, who served in the Black Hawk 
war, while two of his sons gave up their lives while serving with the 
Union army in the Civil war. 

George E. Martin grew up on a farm, attended the district 
schools, the Southern Illinois Normal University, and for nine years 
was identified with educational affairs as a teacher in both country 
and village schools, his last work being as principal of the schools at 
Ullin. Teaching was the avenue through which he realized the 
means necessary to prepare himself for the law. Mr. Martin read 
law for a time under Judge Wall, his present partner, and was 
graduated from the law department of the Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 
versity at Bloomington in 1893, and admitted to the bar in August 
of the same year. Mr. Martin has a commanding presence, a broad 
scholarship and experience with men and affairs which make both 
the successful lawyer and the public leader. For a number of years 



846 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

he has been one of the active men in the republican party of Pulaski 
County. His business relations are as a director in the Mound City 
Building & Loan Association and in the First National Bank. He 
is a member of the State Bar Association. Mr. Martin is affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor, 
and his church is the Grace M. E. Church of Mound City. 
Mr. Martin was married at Mound City, December 24, 1895, to Miss 
Ada L. Read, whose father, I. W. Read, was a Union soldier from 
Middle Tennessee. To their marriage was born one son, Russell 
Read, in 1900, now a student in the Mound City High School. 

HON. LAWRENCE T. ALLEN. Vermilion County may well be 
proud of the high standard set and maintained by her bench and bar, 
few sister counties being able to show more illustrious names or 
point to abler men who have reached legal prominence before they 
have touched middle life. An example of the leadership above 
claimed is found in Hon. Lawrence T. Allen, who is efficiently 
serving as judge of the County Court of Vermilion. He is a worthy 
representative of an honored pioneer family of this section and was 
born at Hoopeston, October 24, 1882, and is a son of Hon. Charles 
A. and Mary (Thompson) Allen, and a grandson of two pioneers 
who had much to do with the early settlement and development of 
Vermilion County, William I. Allen and James Newell. 

Charles A. Allen has long been recognized as one of Vermilion 
County's most representative men, and one who, through distin- 
guished services in the State Legislature achieved distinction that 
carried his name all over the country. Mr. Allen was born at Dan- 
ville, Vermilion County, Illinois, July 26, 1851, and is a son of 
William I. and Emily (Newell) Allen. William I. Allen was born 
in Madison County, Ohio. From there he came to Vermilion 
County, Illinois, and was one of the first settlers of East Lynn and 
once owned the entire site of the present town and kept adding to 
his land until he owned 3,000 acres in the vicinity of Hoopeston. 
He was very enterprising in all directions and later in life moved to 
Perrysville, Indiana, where he established a bank, but later his affairs 
became involved and he died a poor man. He was a practitioner 
also of law at Danville and many times appeared in court at the 
same time as did Abraham Lincoln. After coming to Vermilion 
County he married Miss Emily Newell, who was born at Flemings- 
burg, Harrison County, Kentucky, and was a daughter of James 
Newell, an early settler in Newell Township, which was named in 
his honor. James Newell lived into extreme old age, dying in 1846, 
and his burial was in the Grove Cemetery, where others of the 
family were later laid to rest. To William I. Allen and wife the 
following children were born: Charles, Hugh, Mary, Emily, Kli- 
mena and Anna. 

Charles A. Allen was reared on the home farm in Ross Town- 
ship, Vermilion County. He attended the district schools, later 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 847 

the public schools at Danville and subsequently, after earning the 
money with which to pay his college expenses by teaching school, 
entered the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann 
Arbor, from which he was graduated March 25, 1874, and after 
being admitted to practice in the State of Illinois, located at Ross- 
ville, in Vermilion County. Six years later he removed to Hoops- 
ton, where he has since followed his profession, together with 
attending to business and public interests. Well versed in the law 
and a prominent figure for a number of years in many of the legal 
controversies of county and state, he is, perhaps, still mcfre distin- 
guished on account of his value as a statesman, Vermilion County 
having profited largely through his efforts on its behalf. In 1884 
his fellow citizens elected him to the General Assembly and for 
twenty-two consecutive years he continued, through their votes, to 
represent them in that governing body. In 1902 he was chosen 
speaker of the house. Always a fearless champion of whatever 
course he felt to be right in safeguarding the interests of his con- 
stituents, he was the promoter of many measures that found their 
way to the statute books of the state. One of the bills which he 
promoted and which was known under his name, was the street 
railway bill that gave to the city councils and boards of supervisors 
the right of granting franchises for a period not exceeding fifty 
years. This bill was not only carried by both houses but was signed 
by the governor, but was repealed, under other public conditions, in 
the following session, and the present law limits the term of fran- 
chise to twenty years. 

At Rossville, April 4, 1878, Mr. Allen was married to Miss Mary 
Thompson, a member of one of the old county families, and they 
have three children: John Newell, Lawrence T. and Esther Mary. 
The family residence, one of great attractiveness, is situated on 
Washington Street, Hoopeston. Mr. Allen owns much other prop- 
erty in the county and has 1,500 acres in Fulton County. During the 
Spanish- American war he was commissioned colonel of the Six- 
teenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which he had raised and had 
occasion demanded would have transported to the scene of war. 
In many other ways has Mr. Allen shown his good citizenship and 
his sterling character as a man. Few indeed are the worthy charities 
or needy benevolent enterprises which have not been benefited by 
his liberality. He has long been identified with the leading fraternal 
organizations and takes pride and pleasure in his membership with 
the Masons, Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen. 

Lawrence T. Allen attended the public schools of Hoopeston until 
he completed the high school course, when he entered the University 
of Illinois at Urbana, where he was a student of law and was grad- 
uated in 1905. Additionally he took a literary course in that institu- 
tion and also was a student at the University of Chicago, so that, 
with trained understanding, he was well equipped for practice after 
his admission to the bar in 1905. In association with his father at 
Danville he entered professional life and so thoroughly did he meet 



848 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

every legal requirement and so far ahead of his years and expe- 
rience did his knowledge, foresight and judgment prove his capacity 
that general recognition was given him as a safe counselor as well 
as able advocate and he was elected judge of the County Court 
June 8, 1909, and was re-elected November 8, 1910, without opposi- 
tion, having served at first to fill a vacancy and during both terms 
so acceptably discharged the duties of the office that in 1914 he was 
once more elected. Judge Allen is the youngest man to occupy the 
position of county judge in Vermilion County and perhaps the 
youngest in the State of Illinois. While his record of accomplish- 
ment has been exceptional, he takes much pride, and justifiably so, 
in several features, one of which was his handling of juvenile cases. 
On many occasions, when his duty required that he commit youthful 
delinquents to state institutions, he has visited them there, in fact, 
has made an interest in them not only a judicial duty but a personal 
concern, and the result has been compensating and encouraging. 
He is an active and influential republican. In 1911 Judge Allen 
formed a law partnership with John G. Thompson, which still 
exists. He is a member of the State Bar Association and the Ver- 
milion County body, in both of which he is considered worthy of 
professional honor and of personal esteem. 

Judge Allen was married November 14, 1911, to Miss Bess 
Trevett, who is the daughter of John R. Trevett, of Champaign, 
Illinois, and they have two children, John Trevett Allen, who was 
born October 22, 1912, and Lawrence Thompson Allen, Jr., born 
February 2, 1915. Judge Allen was reared in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and Mrs. Allen in the Presbyterian Church. For 
some years he has been a member of the Illinois National Guard, 
being lieutenant in Battery A, artillery battalion, and highly values 
this military connection as he does also his membership in the frater- 
nal orders of Elks, Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of 
America. He also retains membership in his old college society, 
the Sigma Chi, and enjoys nothing more than to meet occasionally 
with its congenial spirits. While stern and uncompromising when 
duty demands such an attitude, Judge Allen has a tender heart, as 
so often evidenced in dealing with the young brought into his court, 
and his influence is continually directed toward the improvement of 
laws that, in many cases, modern conditions and environment have 
made cruel and unjust. Judge Allen has but recently completed one 
of the finest private residences at Danville, modern in every particu- 
lar. Its situation is in a choice residential section of the city, at 
No. 1130 Logan Avenue. His private offices are in the Baum 
Building. 

HON. F. L. DRAPER. Enjoying a large and substantial practice 
as a member of the Vermilion County bar, and a prominent citizen 
of Danville, Judge F. L. Draper has other claims to the respectful 
notice of the people of Illinois, for, since May I, 1909, he has been 
serving in the office of United States commissioner, appointed 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 849 

thereto on account of his legal ability and high personal standing. 
He was born November 30, 1868, at Danville, Vermilion County, 
Illinois, arid is a son of A. I. and Sarah A. (Partlow) Draper. He 
comes of old pioneer stock on both sides of the family, his grand- 
fathers, Abraham Draper and Reuben Partlow, being among the 
early settlers of Vermilion County and upbuilders in the true sense 
of the word. Grandfather Partlow was one of the founders of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Danville. For many years A. I. 
Draper, father of Judge Draper, was a leader in business circles 
at Danville, for twenty years engaging in the dry goods line and 
afterward becoming interested in realty. His death occurred at 
Danville, May 29, 1914, having survived his wife since 1895. They 
had two sons, F. L. and Oscar. 

F. L. Draper had school advantages in his native city and after- 
ward, for five years, assisted his father in the dry goods business, 
although from boyhood he cherished a desire for a professional 
career in the field of law. After determining to prepare for the law 
he entered upon a course of study in the law office of J. B. Mann 
and so industriously applied himself that he was admitted to the bar 
in 1890, immediately starting his practice in his home city and in a 
comparatively short, time had won attention and a creditable posi- 
tion on the Danville bar. Whether exercising the function of 
adviser, representative or advocate, he shows intense zeal for his 
client, and this devotion has not only made him unusually successful 
in the conduct of many important cases,- but has brought him a large 
amount of desirable business. Through his earnestness he inspires 
confidence and recognizing every obligation, he wins through justi- 
fiable methods. Although during the larger period of practice he 
has done business as an attorney, he served ably and efficiently 
for one year as judge of the County Court, having been appointed 
to the bench to fill out the unexpired term of Hon. S. Murray Clark. 
As United States commissioner Judge Draper's activities have been 
broadened and his reputation for sound judgment and thorough com- 
prehension of law fully sustained. He has, in the court room, the 
earnest manner and excellent presence which command attention, 
while his gifts of oratory only serve to make more effective his clear 
presentation of facts. Judge Draper maintains his law office in the 
First National Bank Building, Danville. 

In 1897 Judge Draper was married to Miss Eva McCarty. In 
politics he is a republican and on many occasions has shown his 
fealty, although in no aggressive manner. Civic progress and im- 
provement always have claimed his interest and attention and he 
was a very useful member of the city council during 1905 and 1906, 
and has served also three terms as a school trustee, the cause of 
education being very near to his heart. He has a wide acquaintance 
and many friends and belongs to a number of fraternal organiza- 
tions, included with these being the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 



850 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

WALTER J. GRANT. Honorable achievement in the face of mod- 
ern competition, in any profession, is worthy of note and demon- 
strates the possession of talent of a high order. This remark carries 
truth with it when applied to the short but brilliant career of one of 
Danville's leading lawyers, Walter J. Grant, referee in bankruptcy 
for the Eastern District of the Illinois United States Court. In little 
over a decade of professional practice, Mr. Grant has advanced to 
a foremost place on the Vermilion County bar, and for nine years 
has filled the responsible position above referred to. Mr. Grant 
was born in Vermilion County, and is a son of Edwin H. and Irene 
(Stewart) Grant, the father being a clergyman, his birth taking 
place February 16, 1874. After completing the public school course 
at Huron, South Dakota, he entered the law office of Judge D. D. 
Evans, at Danville, as a student, and in October, 1899, was admitted 
to practice in the State of Illinois. Ambitious and enterprising, 
Mr. Grant made rapid advance along professional lines and soon 
built up a satisfactory practice in general law, afterward becoming 
more particularly interested in those cases which come under the 
bankruptcy act, and his knowledge and experience in this direction 
led to his appointment, on April 15, 1905, as referee in bankruptcy, 
his jurisdiction in the United States Court covering the entire East- 
ern District of Illinois. He is a valued member of the Vermilion 
County Bar Association and also of the State Bar Association of 
Illinois. Professional duties have closely claimed his attention and 
thus he has never been particularly active in politics, but his funda- 
mental interest is alive and the weight of his influence is ever given 
to the making of wise laws and the election to office of honest men. 
His party affiliation has always been with the republicans. 

Mr. Grant was married at Danville to Miss Myrtle C. Cook, who 
is a daughter of William I. Cook, one of Danville's prominent rail- 
road men, now retired but formerly with the C. & E. I. system. 
They have two children. Mr. and Mrs. Grant reside at No. 2001 
North Vermilion Street. They are well known in social life and 
Mr. Grant is identified with the Masons, Elks and Knights of 
Pythias. His offices are situated in the United States Postoffice, 
Danville. 

JOHN H. LEWMAN. The responsible office of state's attorney is 
one that demands much ability and resourcefulness in a lawyer 
elected to such a position, and John H. Lewman, state's attorney of 
Vermilion County, fully measures up to its requirements. For 
twenty years he has been an able member of the bar of this county 
and since 1908 has filled the office of state's attorney, in the faithful 
discharge of the duties of his office winning approbation from all 
law-abiding citizens. Mr. Lewman was born at Danville, Illinois, 
December 28, 1866, and is a son of Hugh and Mary (Liggett) Lew- 
man. His paternal grandfather, James Lewman, was a native of 
Kentucky and in pioneer days he came to Vermilion County, where 
he purchased land and became a farmer. In 1875, after disposing 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 851 

of his property he removed to Kansas and there spent the rest of 
his life. The maternal grandfather, Jesse Liggett, was born in Vir- 
ginia, in 1805, and in infancy was taken to Ohio by his parents, 
where he lived until 1835 when he came to Vermilion County, Illi- 
nois. He secured land from the Government situated in Pilot Town- 
ship and resided on the same until his death, in 1898, when aged 
ninety-three years. His son, Hugh Lewman, also followed agricul- 
tural pursuits but died early, his son, John H., becoming fatherless 
when but three years old. 

John H. Lewman spent his early years on a farm and attended 
the country schools, but later had better advantages at Danville, and 
in 1888 was graduated from the Danville High School. Although 
his choice of profession was made early, circumstances did not favor 
his immediately devoting himself to the study of law, and he accepted 
a position as teacher in the Danville schools and remained in that 
capacity for two years, following which he was a student in Cornell 
University for two years, and for two succeeding years was a stu- 
dent in the University of Michigan, and in 1894 was graduated from 
the law department at Ann Arbor. The same year saw his admis- 
sion to the bar and his establishment in the practice of law at Dan- 
ville. There is an oft quoted saying that deplores the fact, by sug- 
gestion, that individuals must go to some other section than their 
own in order to be properly appreciated, but this, like many another 
ancient saw, often does not apply and certainly does not in the 
instance of John H. Lewman. Not only has he built up a substantial 
law practice in his birthplace, but his sterling character has won him 
the confidence of old friends and new, and in different ways they 
have combined to pay him honor. A man of his educational attain- 
ments naturally became, early in life, interested in public affairs, and 
just as naturally has become a leader in the same. In 1899 he was 
elected city attorney, in which office, through re-election, he served 
for six years, and since November, 1908, he has filled the office of 
state's attorney and during his administration has effectively prose- 
cuted many exceedingly important cases. In 1905 his fellow citizens 
elected him mayor of Danville and so usefully and acceptably did 
he carry on the administration of civic affairs that in 1907 he was 
re-elected and served the city in this office for four continuous years. 
He has, also, other just claims to prominence, for ten years having 
been a member of the Illinois National Guard, and during five years 
of this period was captain of his company. That he was no merely 
professional soldier was shown in 1898, when he enlisted in Battery 
A, First Illinois Volunteers, for service in the Spanish- American 
war, and accompanied his command to Porto Rico, and after a few 
months of willing service and considerable exposure, returned to 
Danville, where they were honorably mustered out. He resumed 
his official duties with his company, but subsequently found that 
the demands made upon him by his profession and public activities 
so absorbed his time that his military connection would have to be 
given up and in 1909 he resigned from the National Guard. 



852 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

THOMAS B. JACK. Energy, perseverance, adaptability and tact 
are all helpful elements in success at the bar, but modern times call 
for much more, a very general as well as a thorough professional 
education seeming to be a necessary qualification. By no means is 
the work of the older generation discredited for the modern lawyer 
would lose much without the old decisions and books of precedents, 
but new questions have come to the front, new situations have been 
developed and new expedients have to be evolved in the protection 
of clients, when twentieth century advocates are pitted against each 
other. Thoroughly equipped for any and every legal contest is 
Thomas B. Jack, one of Decatur's most prominent lawyers. 

Thomas B. Jack was born at Decatur, Illinois, July 2, 1872, and 
is a son of Samuel S. and Josephine (McKee) Jack, who were 
parents of four children. The late Samuel S. Jack was a man of 
public importance at Decatur, serving long in the office of post- 
master and also being a well-known journalist. For some years 
prior to his death he lived retired. 

The public schools, including attendance at the Decatur High 
School, prepared Thomas B. Jack for college, and he attended Stan- 
ford University, California, where he was graduated in 1895. His 
preparation for the law was made under the supervision of the late 
W. C. Outten, of Decatur, and in 1897 Mr. Jack was admitted to the 
bar. In the following year he began practice, forming a partnership 
with Jesse L. Deck, under the firm name of Jack & Deck, the latter 
subsequently being elected state's attorney. In 1911 the firm became 
Jack, Deck & Whitfield, which continued until 1913, when Judge 
Whitfield, a sketch of whom will be found in this work, was elected 
circuit judge of the Sixth Judicial District, to serve out the unex- 
pired term of the late Judge Johns, a sketch of whom appears in 
this volume. Since then Mr. Jack has continued individual practice, 
maintaining his office at No. 141 East Main Street. He is a member 
of the Illinois State Bar Association and also of the Macon County 
Bar Association, keeping thoroughly abreast of the progressive 
movements in both bodies and lending his influence to reforms when 
he feels justified in doing so. Mr. Jack's connection with much 
important litigation for many years makes his influence carry 
weight. 

Mr. Jack was united in marriage with Miss Helen B. Outtoway, 
who is a daughter of a prominent Presbyterian divine, of Rochester, 
New York. Mr. and Mrs. Jack have one daughter, Caroline Ruth. 
The family belongs to the First Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Jack is 
interested in charitable organizations and bears a part in the pleas- 
ant social life of the city as becomes her husband's high professional 
standing. 

Mr. Jack has devoted himself mainly to his profession, but 
nevertheless has found time to enter political life to some extent. 
He has always been stanch in his adherence to the democratic party 
and has loyally worked for the success of its candidates and the car- 
rying out of its policies, and is a factor in its councils, being a 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 853 

member of the Democratic Central Committee. Decatur recognizes 
in him not only a fine lawyer but also credits him with being an 
exceedingly useful and worthy citizen. 

WILLIAM W. WHITMORE. Associated in the practice of law 
with two of the most prominent attorneys of McLean County, under 
the firm style of Welty, Sterling & Whitmore, William W. Whitmore 
has built up an enviable personal reputation for legal ability arid 
has proved a valuable member of an already strong firm. A man of 
literary tastes and of thorough educational training, he possesses 
also that distinctive talent for the law, lacking which no man, how- 
ever academic, can successfully understand and solve the complexi- 
ties of the law and secure advancement at the bar. 

William W. Whitmore is a native of Illinois, born in Grundy 
County, July 14, 1870. His parents were Benjamin F. and Matilda 
(Shelly) Whitmore and they had two other children. The father 
was a farmer, and the boyhood of William W. was passed on the 
homestead, where he gave assistance while attending the country 
schools, but very early decided that his natural bent was not in the 
direction of an agriculturaHife. Probably he received home encour- 
agement, at any rate he became a student in the Wesleyan Uni- 
versity at Bloomington, where he was graduated in 1894 from the 
literary department of that institution, and in the fall of the same 
year, upon examination, was admitted as a practicing attorney, hav- 
ing previously been a student of law under the direction of Hon. 
George W. Houston, of Morris, Illinois. In 1895 he graduated from 
the Bloomington Law School and has been in active practice ever 
since, devoting himself entirely to his profession with the exception 
of a short time during which he served as city attorney of Peoria, 
to which position he was appointed to serve out an unexpired term. 
In 1903 he became a member of his present firm, entering as the 
junior member, the senior member being now circuit judge of the 
Eleventh Judicial Circuit, and the second member, Hon. John A. 
Sterling, being a member of the national Congress. Mr. Whitmore 
has never aspired to public office nor been a candidate for the same, 
his energies being centered in his profession, and there are many 
indications that the bar of McLean County will have further reason 
to take pride in his progress. 

Mr. Whitmore was united in marriage with Miss Stella Eldred, 
who is a daughter of Eli Eldred and a member of one of the old 
and substantial families of the state. They take part in the pleasant 
social life of the city and reside at No. 1103 Fell Avenue, Bloom- 
ington. In politics Mr. Whitmore is affiliated with the republican 
party. He is identified with such representative professional bodies 
as the McLean County and the Illinois State Bar associations, and 
finds congenial fraternal companionship with the Masonic, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen organizations. When the 
stable, sterling citizens of Bloomington are mentioned, his name is 
pretty sure to be included. 



854 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

CHARLES L. CAPEN. The dean of the Bloomington law schools, 
Charles L. Capen has been engaged in practice at Bloomington con- 
tinuously since February, 1871, and during this long period of years 
has advanced steadily and deservedly to a high position in his pro- 
fession. Mr. Capen is an easterner by birth, but from boyhood has 
resided in the Prairie State, so that he considers himself a thorough 
Illinoisan. He was born at Union Springs, New York, January 31, 
1845, and is a son of Luman W. and Eliza (Hunger) Capen. 
There were six children in the family. 

Mr. Capen began his education in the public schools of his native 
place, which he attended until he was eleven years of age, and at 
that time accompanied his parents on their journey to Illinois. 
Locating at Bloomington in March, 1856, he was fitted for college 
at the high school of the State Normal University, where he was 
graduated in 1865, and then entered Harvard, completing his course 
at that institution in 1869. He received his degree in that year, but 
was not admitted to the bar until February, 1871. He began his 
experience in the law as a clerk in the office of Williams & Burr, 
attorneys, of Bloomington, and in 1873 was admitted as a partner, 
the firm style being then changed to Williams, Burr & Capen, which 
continued until Mr. Burr's withdrawal, when the name became 
Williams & Capen. Mr. Williams died in 1899, and since that time 
Mr. Capen Has continued in practice alone. Mr. Capen is considered 
one of the most learned, thorough and acute members of his profes- 
sion practicing at the Bloomington bar, and that he is held in high 
esteem in his profession is shown by his election to the presidency 
of the Illinois State Bar Association, in 1903-04. He is also widely 
known in educational circles, and in 1893 became a member by 
appointment of the State Board of Education, a position which he 
has continued to hold to the present time, and for the past two 
years has been president of the board. In addition to his connection 
with various professional organizations, he is affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity. 

Mr. Capen was married October 27, 1875, to Miss Ella E. Briggs, 
daughter of Robert W. Briggs. 

CHARLES A. PHELPS is a Chicago lawyer who has practically 
created a legal specialty in a profession already highly subdi- 
vided and specialized. Mr. Phelps for a number of years has 
given his exclusive attention to practice as a representative of 
building contractors. He is regularly retained as attorney and 
counselor for a number of the leading contractors in Chicago and 
as his ability has become developed and better known a number of 
construction companies all over the country have employed him for 
legal advice. He has served as attorney for the Allen Construction 
Company, which put up nineteen buildings on the Cook County Poor 
Farm; is attorney for the inventor of the mushroom system of 
reinforced concrete construction; was attorney for the contractors 




CHARLES A. PHELPS 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 855 

who erected the tubercular hospital on the west side of Chicago ; for 
the contractors who did the repair work on the criminal court build- 
ing; for the contractors of the Moser Paper Company's building 
at Harrison Street and Plymouth Court; the contractors for the 
Thomas Flyer Building at Twenty-third Street and Michigan 
Avenue. These are only a few of the interests he has represented 
in the past ten years, and he is also consulting attorney for a number 
of bonding companies that bond the contractors in construction 
work. 

Charles A. Phelps was born in Johnstown, Fulton County, New 
York, December 31, 1873, a son of Emerson J. and Lizzie (Belding) 
Phelps. He grew up in New York, attended the public schools of 
Johnstown, later the Fairfield Military Academy of Fairfield, New 
York, and the Troy Conference Academy at Poultney, Vermont, and 
the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut. Coming to 
Chicago, he was for a time a student in the Northwestern Uni- 
versity, and took his law course in the Chicago Kent College of 
Law. Mr. Phelps was admitted to the bar in 1901, and having been 
a student in a law office prior, to admission, he began active practice 
with Joseph W. Merriam, under the name Merriam & Phelps. Since 
November, 1904, Mr. Phelps has practiced alone, and has his offices 
in the Hartford Building. While a young man in New York Mr. 
Phelps was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a 
former member of the Hamilton Club. He is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association and belongs to several fraternal insurance 
orders. Politically he is a progressive republican, and the late Mayor 
Busse appointed him on the Chicago Plan Commission. Politics 
has not been in his line, though in many ways he has helped to 
advance good government and improvement in his home city. Mr. 
Phelps was married February 14, 1899, to Miss Sadie L. M. Gray. 
Their two children are Dorothy Louise and Gray Phelps. 

ROY V-. SEYMOUR. The law, as an attractive profession, does 
not make an appeal to every young man when he faces the necessity 
of making choice of career, but that its difficulties serve to stimu- 
late many ambitious, intellectual youths and repay these with almost 
certain honors and often large emoluments, must be conceded. It 
often opens wide the door to political advancement and as the basis 
of peaceful, prosperous and contented living, it occupies an elevated 
plane which may well urge young talent and wholesome endeavor 
to reach as a part of the world's work. When Roy V. Seymour, 
one of the prominent attorneys of Dwight, Illinois, completed his 
public school course, it was with the fixed determination to study 
and excel in the law, and his career has shown that he has been able 
to live up to his ambitions and has proved the wisdom of accepting 
natural leanings in a choice of profession or vocation. 

Roy V. Seymour was born at Dwight, Illinois, December 10, 
1876. His parents were George A. and Mary B. (Drynau) Sey- 



856 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

mour. The father was a native of Ohio but for many years con- 
ducted a drug store at Dwight, Illinois, where his death occurred in 
1900. His children, four in number, three of whom are living, are 
all well known in Livingston County, Roy V., however, being the 
only one prominent in the law. After his public school course was 
completed he attended the University of Illinois, where he received 
the degree of A. B., and the Harvard Law School, where he com- 
pleted his studies in 1904. In 1905 he was admitted to the Illinois 
bar and has been established at Dwight ever since. Through ability 
and industry he has built up a very satisfactory practice both in the 
home and state courts, and at one time he served as an assistant to 
the attorney general. This experience and training in public service 
was beneficial both to the state and to himself and in the perform- 
ance of duty he showed a comprehensive mind, organizing talent 
and capacity for close and discriminating research. 

HON. PHILLIP A. GIBBONS. Although one of the younger mem- 
bers of the very able bar of Livingston County, Phillip A. Gibbons 
in a few years of professional practice had so unmistakably demon- 
strated unusual knowledge of law and stability of character, that he 
was chosen by the chief executive of the state to take a place on the 
county bench, when a necessity arose for the filling out of an unex- 
pired term. In this position Judge Gibbons displayed no lack of 
knowledge or of the qualities which mark a satisfactory judge, and 
his term of service was creditably completed. 

Phillip A. Gibbons was born in Livingston County, Illinois, May 
29, 1886, and is a son of Austin and Margaret (Cane) Gibbons. 
They had four other children and all were reared comfortably on 
the home farm and carefully instructed in the Catholic faith. 

After attending the country schools, Phillip A. Gibbons became 
a student in the Dwight High School and subsequently in the Illinois 
Wesleyan University. From that institution he was graduated in 
1908 and in June of the same year was admitted to the bar. He 
established himself at Pontiac and immediately made his ability 
felt in the courts and so gained public confidence that in 1911 he 
was elected city attorney, serving the city two years in that capacity. 
In December, 1913, Governor Dunne appointed him county judge 
to fill out the unexpired term of Hon. W. C. Graves, a position he 
filled with extreme judicial competency. Judge Gibbons is widely 
known and is a leading factor in the Livingston County and the 
Illinois State Bar associations. He maintains his law offices in the 
Sterry Building, Pontiac. 

Judge Gibbons was united in marriage with Miss Sadie Cain, 
who is a daughter of Patrick Cain, who is now a resident of Chicago. 
The judge and wife have many pleasant social connections and their 
hospitable home is at No. 729 West Henry Street, Pontiac. They 
are members of the Catholic Church. Judge Gibbons preserves his 
membership in his college fraternity, the Phi Delta Phi, and he 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 857 

belongs also to the Elks, the Knights of Columbus, the order of 
Moose, the Red Men and the Modern Woodmen. His stability as 
a citizen is universally recognized and he enjoys high personal as 
well as professional regard. 

DOUGLAS D. HILL. One of the prominent rhembers of the legal 
profession at Decatur is Douglas D. Hill, attorney and counselor, 
practicing in the common, chancery and probate courts, and also a 
notary public. Possessing a thorough knowledge of the principles 
of law, he has the ability to make use of this knowledge for the 
benefit of his clients, and his progress has been steady ever since his 
admission to the bar. While he has never aimed to be spectacular, 
he has ably handled a number of very important cases before the 
different courts, and also has been a valuable assistant in the prose- 
cution of many others. The law has practically engaged his entire 
attention and his prominence at the bar has been honorably won. 

Douglas D. Hill was born in Missouri, September 5, 1860, and 
is a son of John W. and Frances J. (Barlow) Hill, a grandson of 
William Hill and a great-grandson of John Hill, all of Crawford 
County, Illinois. It was the great-grandfather who founded the 
family in Illinois and who emigrated from North Carolina in 1799. 
His son, William Hill, was born in Crawford County in 1801, and 
in that county John W. Hill was born in 1826, and his wife was 
likewise born therein, and they spent the larger part of their lives 
there. They moved to Missouri about 1855 but returned to Craw- 
ford County, Illinois, their native home, in the spring of 1865, where 
his wife, the mother of our subject, died in 1897. 

The first five years of 'his life Douglas D. Hill passed in Mis- 
souri. After the return of the family to Crawford County he began 
to attend the country school and as he grew older helped his 
father in the shop and on the farm, faithfully attending to the duties 
assigned him but all the time cherishing an ambition for a fuller 
and wider field of usefulness, this leading finally to the study of 
law and subsequent admission to the bar at Springfield. In the 
meanwhile, however, the youth was faced with conditions which 
have discouraged many another aspiring young man, this being a 
lack of ready capital. In his case it was no great handicap, for he 
studied diligently and in that way prepared for school teaching, a 
profession he followed for four years in winter and farmed in the 
summer, at the end of which period he was able to enter Valparaiso 
University and took normal and scientific courses therein. School 
teaching once more offered a substantial field of effort and the 
leisure that he required in order to do preparatory reading of law 
and subsequently he entered upon serious study of law in the office 
of Hon. E. Callahan and Hon. Alfred H. Jones, of Robinson, Illi- 
nois, satisfactorily completing his course in 1886. He immediately 
entered into practice, forming a law partnership with Judge John C. 
Maxwell, which association continued for six years. Recognition 



Vol. Ill 2 



858 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

was shown Mr. Hill in the line of his profession when he was 
elected city attorney of Robinson, Illinois, an office he filled with 
credit for two years. In 1892 he came to Decatur, opening offices 
in the Millikin Bank Building, and has never had reason to regret 
becoming a member of the Decatur bar. He is a valued member of 
the Macon County Bar Association, and is well and honorably 
known. 

In 1889 Mr. Hill was united in marriage with Miss Delia Kurtz, 
who is a daughter of Abraham E. Kurtz, a representative of one of 
the very prominent and substantial families of Crawford County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hill have three children : June Marie, Lyle Kurtz and 
Barlow Hill. Another member of Mr. Hill's family circle is his ven- 
erable father, John W. Hill, who has passed his eighty-eighth birth- 
day, but, nevertheless, continues in the best of health and still is 
interested in family and local affairs and also in the great world 
movements in other lands. The comfortable family residence is at 
No. 1258 North Church Street, Decatur. All his life Mr. Hill has 
been a busy man intellectually and his tastes have led him to find 
recreation along literary and cultured lines. Although he lays no 
claim to being a politician, he has always believed in the principles 
of the democratic party, and has loyally supported its candidates and 
numbers among his friends many of the leading and influential men 
.of that political organization. 

HON. WILLIAM K. WHITFIELD. As an able and honorable 
member of the Macon County bar, William K. Whitfield, now circuit 
judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of the State of Illinois, won pro- 
fessional standing and public esteem during almost two decades of 
practice, and since his elevation to the bench has justified every claim 
his friends have ever made for him. Judge Whitfield was born at 
Sullivan, in Moultrie County, Illinois, September .29, 1872, and is one 
of a family of seven children born to his parents who were Zachariah 
B. and Hannah (Baker) Whitfield. The father of Judge Whitfield 
was a prosperous farmer in Moultrie County, and resided there until 
his death, which occurred November 20, 1896. 

William K. Whitfield attended the public schools in boyhood and 
after creditably completing his high-school course, entered the law 
department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and was 
graduated therefrom with the class of 1895. In the same year he 
was admitted to the bar, first in Michigan and then in Illinois, and 
immediately afterward opened his law office at Sullivan, in his native 
county. His intellectual acquirements and his legal ability seem to 
have been immediately recognized, for he was elected state's attorney 
in 1896, of Moultrie County, and was continued in the office until 
1904, his record in this important position proving admirable in every 
way, his handling of cases being fearless, perhaps relentless, but 
always just. Since 1911 Judge Whitfield has been a resident of 
Decatur. His first law partnership was with Jesse L. Deck, the firm 



859 

style being Deck & Whitfield. In 1911 the firm became Jack, Deck 
& Whitfield, which continued until 1913, when the business was con- 
tinued as Jack & Whitfield, Judge Whitfield retiring when appointed 
circuit judge, by Governor Dunne, on July n, 1914, to fill out the 
unexpired term of the late Judge William C. Johns, whose death 
occurred June 6, 1914. This recognition of high legal attainments 
and dignified and honorable personality gave great satisfaction to 
the residents of the entire Sixth Judicial District, and that. Judge 
Whitfield continues in the course that made him so particularly use- 
ful as state's attorney, may be inferred by very recent action in 
which he passed sentence with heavy penalty against a number of 
convicted breakers of the law, known in common parlance, on ac- 
count of their particular crimes as "bootleggers." 

Judge Whitfield was married July 21, 1897, to Miss Addah O. 
Wright, who is a daughter of Hon. S. W. Wright, formerly a mem- 
ber of the State Senate, of Sullivan, Illinois. Judge and Mrs. Whit- 
field have two sons and one daughter. The family residence is 
situated at No. 860 West Wood Street, Decatur. Judge Whitfield 
is a member of the Macon County Bar Association. For a number 
of years he has been an interested and valued member of the fra- 
ternal order of Knights of Pythias, and his term as past grand 
chancellor of the order expired in October, 1914. Judge Whit- 
field has always entertained a laudable ambition to advance pro- 
fessionally and has worked patiently and perseveringly to that end 
and in every way is qualified to sustain the force and dignity 
of the bench and to administer the law understanding!^ and im- 
partially. He has a wide and distinguished acquaintance in profes- 
sional, political and literary circles, and a personal following that is 
a fair testimonial that his life, aside from professional distinction, 
is not without beneficial influence. His services as a judge during 
the short term for which he was appointed received a convincing 
testimonial in the judicial elections of June, 1915, when he was the 
only democrat elected in the Sixth District. 

HON. ALPHONSO CAIN NORTON. As long as the world values 
conscientious effort, unselfish devotion to high standards, stability 
of character and the honorable use of influence in directing men and 
affairs, will the death of such a man as the late Alphonso Cain Nor- 
ton be deplored as a distinct loss to a community. His active and 
useful life was largely spent in Livingston County, and since 1879 
he had been identified with every progressive interest of Pontiac for 
which city he entertained a deep affection. 

Alphonso Cain Norton was born on a farm in Newton Township, 
Livingston County, Illinois, April 18, 1859. His parents were Dr. 
Eben and Phoebe Jane (Cain) Norton, who were natives of Farm- 
ington, Franklin County, Maine. In May, 1854, they moved to Liv- 
ingston County, Illinois, where the father engaged in the practice 
of medicine until 1872, when he removed with his family to Cornell, 



860 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

where he continued in practice and also conducted a drug store until 
1885, when removal was made to Pontiac. Dr. Norton died in this 
city April 30, 1895, survived for some years by his widow. Two of 
their sons yet live, Eben D. and J. H., both of whom are residents 
of Chicago. 

Taking advantage of such opportunities as were afforded in the 
country schools in his boyhood, in Newton Township, Alphonso C. 
Norton prepared as best he could, for a future career and later at- 
tended Grand Prairie Seminary, at Onarga, Illinois, during his vaca- 
tions assisting his father in conducting the drug store at Cornell and 
in this way gained quite a knowledge of drugs and chemicals. His 
natural inclination, however, was in the direction of the law, and in 
1877 ne entered the law department of Michigan University, at Ann 
Arbor, where he pursued the study of law for two years, being ad- 
mitted to the Illinois bar in 1879, his preliminary reading having been 
done in the office of Hon. L. E. Payson, with whom he was asso- 
ciated in practice as long as Mr. Payson remained a resident of 
Pontiac, taking over the latter's business and also his office quarters 
when the- older lawyer retired. Very soon he evidenced such thor- 
ough knowledge of the law and developed such clearness and logic 
in conducting cases that his reputation grew until he became known 
for his legal acumen and professional success in many parts of the 
state and was recognized as one of the strong and mentally virile 
lawyers of the county. Heavy demands were made on him in the 
volume of practice that came into his office, resulting finally in loss 
of health and culminating in a stroke of paralysis about 1910. From 
this calamity he partially recovered, but other troubles ensued, for 
which he submitted to an operation by a Chicago specialist. He 
seemed to have improved, but the hope of his family and friends 
was shattered by his sudden death on Sunday evening, February 28, 
1915. At this time he was associated in the practice of law with 
F. A. Ortman, state's attorney of Livingston County. He was an 
interested and valued member of both county and state bar associa- 
tions and his relationships with his associates were cordial and mu- 
tually pleasant. 

While the greater part of his time was devoted to his profession, 
Mr. Norton, at times had made investments and beside being inter- 
ested in some of the business enterprises of the city as a partner, 
was a director in the Livingston County National Bank and the Illi- 
nois State Savings Bank. 

Mr. Norton was married March 17, 1887, to Miss Annie Sims, 
who is a daughter of Capt. W. S. Sims, an early resident of Pon- 
tiac. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Norton, all of whom 
survive : William E., who is a resident of Columbus, Ohio ; Harry, 
who lives in the City of Chicago ; Glenn D., who is a student of law ; 
and Helen Josephine, who resides with her mother in the old family 
home at No. 406 East Washington Street, Pontiac. With his family 
Mr. Norton attended the First Methodist Episcopal Church. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 861 

Mr. Norton was at all times heartily in accord with the basic 
principles of the democratic party, but not often was willing to 
accept political honors, showing his civic interest, however, by serv- 
ing as a member of the city council during 1888 and 1889, represent- 
ing the First ward. He belonged to the Benevolent- and Protective 
Order of Elks, and was very prominent as a Mason, being a member 
of Lodge, No. 2.94, A. F. & A. M. ; Pontiac Chapter, No. 215, Royal 
Arch ; St. Paul Commandery, Knights Templar, at Fairbury ; and 
Mohammed Shrine at Peoria. He was a man of keen intellect and 
great legal capacity. Personally his characteristics were agreeable 
hence he attracted men to him and his instincts were high and noble 
and thus men learned to cherish his friendship. Ever charitably 
inclined, he gave generously in support of many enterprises, and 
perhaps no man in the county gave more freely or continuously of 
professional help to those who were not able to pay. This was but 
one mark of an unusually unselfish character. 

HON. FRANK A. ORTMAN, It has been said by a historian that 
large cities have never, in history, been the fruitful mothers of men 
who, in the aggregate, did great things; rather from the country, 
and after a youth of discipline on a farm, have emerged the men 
with the ambition that has led the way to unusual success. A case 
in point is concerning the present able and forceful state's attorney 
of Livingston County, Hon. Frank A. Ortman, who is an unusually 
young man to occupy so important and difficult public office in the 
state. Mr. Ortman was born on his father's farm in Iroquois 
County, Illinois, November 20, 1882, and was reared there and 
gained his early education in the country schools. His parents were 
Anton and Caroline (Kirby) Ortman, who had but two children. 

An unusually apt student, Frank A. Ortman made rapid progress 
in his studies and very early determined on his future career. The 
law attracted him and after preliminary reading he entered the law 
department of the University of Michigan and was graduated at Ann 
Arbor in 1907, securing his degree and subsequent admission to the 
bar. He began the practice of his profession with the late A. C. 
Norton, at Pontiac, with whom he continued to be associated until 
Mr. Norton's death, in March, 1915. In the meanwhile his legal 
ability had received recognition and he was elected city attorney of 
Pontiac, in which office he served acceptably during 1911, resigning 
the same when, in 1912, he was elected state's attorney. His ad- 
ministration of this office has been fearless and efficient, and has 
added materially to his reputation as an able, well qualified lawyer. 
He is a valued member of the Livingston County Bar Association. 

Mr. Ortman was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Bald- 
win, who is a daughter of James and Margaret (Cooney) Baldwin, 
natives of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Ortman have two sons, James A. 
and Francis J. The family residence is No. 219 West Reynolds 
Street, Pontiac. Mr. Ortman and family are members of the Cath- 



862 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

olic Church, and he and wife are actively interested in its many bene- 
volent activities. He is identified with the Knights of Columbus and 
belongs also to the Red Men and the Elks. In the healthful process 
of struggle and achievement, which has characterized his career, he 
has never selfishly lost sight of his responsibilities to others and can 
number many warm friends among his acquaintances, and many 
grateful clients who have profited by taking his advice and thereby 
have made better men and women of themselves. 

HON. STEVENS R. BAKER. As master in chancery of Livingston 
County and as a recognized able member of the Pontiac bar, Stevens 
R. Baker may well be numbered with the prominent men of his state, 
demonstrating officially and otherwise, the value of persevering effort 
as an assurance of success. He is a native of Illinois, born at Dwight, 
January 7, 1878. His parents are William E. and Sarah Z. (Chese- 
brough) Baker, who reared a family of six children. William E. 
Baker is a leading citizen of Pontiac, serving at present as a justice 
of the peace and also as a member of the state board of equalization. 

Stevens R. Baker improved his time during his attendance in the 
public schools and early determined on a career in the law. He was 
fortunate in being accepted as a student by the well-known Attorney 
Herbert Powell, of Fairbury, Illinois, with whom he made rapid and 
substantial progress through his industry and close study, and was 
admitted to the Illinois bajr on October 15, 1901. On May i, 1902, 
he established himself in practice at Pontiac, and this city has been 
his chosen home ever since, his citizenship being valued and his pro- 
fessional ability reflecting credit on the community. In a few years 
Mr. Baker had built up a fine practice, his legal talent and his honor- 
able treatment of clients bringing him the confidence and esteem of 
those with whom the incidents of daily life brought him into contact. 
Although an earnest republican, he has not sought political honors, 
his preference having always been for an entirely professional life. 
On May 15, 1912, he was appointed master in chancery of Liv- 
ingston County, by Hon. George W. Patton, the present circuit judge 
of the Eleven Judicial District. In this official capacity he has con- 
tinued the careful, persistent application and painstaking effort which 
has characterized his whole career. He maintains pleasant relations 
with the county bar association, of which he has been a member for 
a number of years. 

Mr. Baker was united in marriage with Miss Hattie F. Thrasher, 
a daughter of Joseph M. Thrasher, a well-known resident of Pontiac. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baker are members of the Presbyterian Church, and 
many of their social interests center in it. Mr. Baker is identified 
fraternally with the Masons and the Elks. He maintains his office 
at No. 222 North Main Street, and his home at No. 222 West Lincoln 
Street, Pontiac. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 863 

HON. ROBERT Ross WALLACE. Sitting on the bench of Living- 
ston County for twenty-one years and retiring with a clear record 
and unblemished reputation, Judge Robert R. Wallace is entitled to 
extended notice in a volume dedicated to the representative men of 
Illinois in connection with the achievements of her bench and bar. 

Robert Ross Wallace comes of substantial if not of distinguished 
ancestry, and was born in Belmont County, Ohio, March 13, 1835. 
His parents were David and Frances C. (Ross) Wallace, also natives 
of Ohio. They reared a family of eight children on their Ohio farm 
and seven of these survive. 

In the country schools near his father's farm, Robert R. Wallace 
began the educational training which he completed in Monmouth 
College, Monmouth, Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1861. 
One year later he enrolled as a private soldier to assist in preserving 
the unity of the states, and the faithfulness of his service during the 
long siege of battle and hardship, brought him deserved approval, 
and in 1866 he was honorably discharged with the rank of captain, 
and laid aside a uniform which he had made a badge of honor. He 
then entered upon his professional career, in 1867 being admitted to 
the bar, selecting Livingston County as his field of effort and Pontiac 
as his home city. Very soon his legal ability was shown appreciation 
and he built up a substantial practice and displayed such unmistakable 
judicial qualities that in 1873 he was elected to the county bench in 
Livingston County, on which he served with increasing usefulness 
for twenty-one years. His decisions were uniformly accepted as 
wise and unbiased, backed by precedent and by sound, practical good 
sense. 

Judge Wallace was united in marriage with Miss Louise C. 
Strawn, who is a daughter of Isaiah Strawn, of an old La Salle 
County family, and they have three children. 

In politics Judge Wallace has always been identified with the 
democratic party and his repeated elections to office have indicated 
great personal popularity as Livingston County is normally repub- 
lican. He has been observant and interested as a citizen in all that 
concerns Pontiac and his influence has been often manifested in edu- 
cational progress here, he having served both as a member of the 
city board and the township high school board. He is one of the 
older members of the county bar association and he belongs also to 
the G. A. R. 

HON. Louis F. STRAWN. Prominently identified with the Illinois 
National Guard and also well known in law circles in the state, par- 
ticularly in Livingston County, Maj. Louis F. Strawn, formerly 
special assistant United States District Attorney, has been a resident 
of Pontiac for the past twenty-one years, and is the junior member 
of the law firm of C. C. & Louis F. Strawn, a firm that has been con- 
cerned in a large amount of important litigation here for an extended 
period. 



864 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Louis F. Strawn was barn in Nebraska, November 2, 1866, and 
is one of a family of four children born to his parents, Christopher 
C. and Clara F. (Bouvrain) Strawn. Christopher C. Strawn, now 
practically retired from law practice, is one of the oldest members 
of the Pontiac bar, and is the senior member of the law firm of C. 
C. & Louis F. Strawn. 

After attending the public schools, Louis F. Strawn received an 
appointment to West Point Military Academy, which he attended 
during 1886 and 1887. Although he did not remain to conclude his 
military education, the law proving a stronger attraction, the young 
man preserved an interest in military matters and after becoming a 
resident of Illinois identified himself with the National Guard, and, 
rapidly advancing in rank served with distinction in the Spanish- 
American war, and on August 14, 1899, was elected Field Major in 
the state organization. In 1904 he was re-elected and again in 1910 
and subsequently, and at present is the senior Field Major of the 
Illinois State National Guard. 

After completing his preliminary law course under the direction 
of his father, Mr. Strawn entered the Northwestern University, 
from which he was graduated and on January 16, 1894, was admitted 
to the Illinois bar. He established himself at Pontiac and here has 
built up a very substantial practice, general in character and covering 
every branch of practice and at times has served professionally in 
high public office. 

Major Strawn was united in marriage with Miss Esther Tracy, 
who is a daughter of Albert Tracy, and they have three children, 
one son and two daughters. The eldest, Christopher C., is a student 
in the John Marshall Law School, Chicago. The daughters, Virginia 
L., 'Margaret F., and Georgiana, are well-known in the pleasant 
social life of the city and are active in various benevolent organi- 
zations connected with the Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Strawn was 
reared in the Congregational and Major Strawn in the Episcopal 
Church, and he gives hearty financial support to all three organiza- 
tions as he also does to many worthy charitable enterprises in other 
directions. He has lived through many experiences, his interests 
are varied and his outlook on life seems to particularly fit him for 
the solving of the intricate problems which his fellow men daily bring 
for his consideration. 

HON. JOHN R. EDEN. More than passing mention and tribute 
should be paid to this pioneer lawyer of Illinois, who died at his 
home in Sullivan June 9, 1909, at the age of eighty-three years, four 
months, nine days. He had been for fifty-seven years a lawyer, was 
for four years a public prosecutor, and spent ten years in the 
Congress of the United States. Such statistics of his record 
furnishes no measure of his real influence and worth. He was one 
of the exalted characters of his time, not only prominent in his 
profession, but well known in public affairs, had associated with all 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 865 

the great men of Illinois and with many of national reputation for 
fully half a century, and it would require many pages to include all 
the sincere tributes paid to his memory and achievements at the time 
of his death. 

He came of fine old English and early colonial stock. His grand- 
father, Jeremiah Eden, was a native of England, and early in the 
nineteenth century moved from Maryland to Kentucky. The late 
John Rice Eden was born in Bath County, Kentucky, February i, 
1826, a son of John Paul and Catherine (Cann) Eden. His mother's 
people had moved from Virginia to Kentucky in the early days. 
His parents were married in Kentucky in 1819, and in 1831 moved 
to Rush County, Indiana, where the father, who was a modest 
farmer, died in 1835. In 1852 the widowed mother located in 
Moultrie County, Illinois, where she died in 1870. When she 
became a widow she had the care and responsibilities of a family of 
four children. Her oldest child was Judge Joseph Edgar Eden, 
who survived his brother John R. a few years. The late Mr. Eden 
was also survived by his youngest sister, Mrs. Nancy Jane Sampson 
of Sullivan. 

John Rice Eden grew up in a country and in a time when educa- 
tional advantages were limited, and when the pressure of economic 
necessity kept boys at home rather than in 'school. He attended 
such schools as existed in Rush County, Indiana, while he was a 
boy, usually only two or three months each winter season, while the 
rest of the year was passed on the home farm in rendering such 
assistance as he could give to his mother. For a number of years 
the family lived in somewhat straightened circumstances, and 
limited means prevented John R. Eden from obtaining a collegiate 
education. Studious by nature, like many celebrated men of that 
generation, he acquired the equivalent of a liberal education, and his 
youth was spent in what has been called the "heroic age of Indiana 
oratory," and no doubt the speeches he heard as a boy at political 
meetings greatly stimulated and encouraged him to work for his 
chosen career. He was especially fond of history and biography, 
and two of his special favorites were "Weem's Life of Washington" 
and a biography of Francis Marion. He also showed a decided 
preference for the classical in literature, and few men were better 
read and more intimately acquainted with the greatest thoughts of 
the master minds. After leaving school and before coming of age 
he became a teacher, and followed that occupation for six or seven 
years, the summer seasons being devoted to farming. 

In the spring of 1850 Mr. Eden began the study of law in the 
office of Bigger & Logan, then the leading law firm of Rushville, 
Indiana. In April, 1852, he came on horseback to Illinois. 

Arriving at Shelbyville, at the next term of Circuit Court he 
made application for admission to the bar before Judge David Davis, 
who was then the presiding judge of the circuit. He was admitted 
to the Illinois bar in June of the same year, his examiners, appointed 



866 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

by Judge Davis, having been Abraham Lincoln, Usher F. Linder 
and Samuel W. Moulton. The examination was conducted by Mr. 
Linder and Mr. Moulton, Mr. Lincoln having been at the time 
engaged in the trial of an important case. He signed the report of 
the other two members, and heartily congratulated the young 
aspirant on his admission to practice. After a brief time spent at 
Shelby ville Mr. Eden moved to Sullivan in August, 1853, his brother 
Joseph Edgar having preceded him by several months. Sullivan 
was his home and the center of his enlarging professional business 
from that time forward with the exception of two years, 1870-71, 
spent at Decatur in the interests of his clients. As a pioneer lawyer 
Mr. Eden rode the circuit, going from one county to another as the 
judge convened court in the various places. In these courts he met 
both professionally and through personal intercourse some of the 
most brilliant minds of the early Illinois bar, and their influence was 
a potent factor in the development of his own powers. Some of his 
contemporaries during his early practice were Abraham Lincoln, 
U. F. Linder, O. B. Ficklin, Samuel W. Moulton, Anthony Thornton 
and Charles Constable. 

As a lawyer he stood in the front rank of the lawyers Of his 
time. His great success in practice was undoubtedly due to the 
fact that he served his clients rather than himself. He was con- 
trolled by his sense of justice and it was the rights of his clients for 
which he contended. His greatness as a lawyer was recognized 
wherever put to test, and it is a matter of instruction as well as what 
is due to this individual record that some estimate of his character 
as a lawyer should be quoted from one of the addresses delivered 
at the time of Mr. Eden's death. 

"As a lawyer Mr. Eden stood at the head of the Moultrie county 
bar for a long period of years, and ranked as one of the strongest 
and best lawyers in this section of the state. Few, if any, better in 
the state. He was of the old school, and one of the best special 
pleaders. If it could be said of him that he had any special branch, 
in which he excelled, it was in that of special pleading. He was a 
splendid real estate lawyer and took great delight in unraveling the 
knotty problems that branch of law furnishes. 

"As an advocate before the court or jury he was a convincing, 
eloquent and powerful speaker. In preparing and prosecuting cases 
on appeal in the upper courts he was accurate and logical and knew 
perfectly the procedure of the higher courts from years of expe- 
rience. No important trials have been had in this county for a long 
term of years without he was one side or the other. His loyalty 
to his clients, his honesty and integrity, was never questioned and 
few lawyers have been as successful in the conduct of litigation 
entrusted to them. He was a great lawyer. In any branch of the 
law he had the sound knowledge of the expert specialist coupled 
with a fearless honesty and a determination to contest every point 
that never faltered or ended except with victory. He was a tower 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 867 

of strength to his clients. How secure his clients rested, can only 
be told by them. We all know how fully he discharged his every 
duty to them. To the young lawyer he was ever kind and courteous, 
encouraging us by compliments and advice. He seemed never to 
forget his own early struggles." 

He was thirty years of age when he first entered public life in 
an official capacity. His first office was as state's attorney for the 
Seventh Judicial District, including Moultrie and eight other, coun- 
ties. He was elected to that office in 1856 and served the full term 
of four years. In 1862 Mr. Eden was elected to the Thirty-eighth 
Congress, where he had part in the critical business of that body 
during the concluding years of the Civil war. In 1872 he was 
elected to the Forty-third Congress from the Fifteenth District, and 
in 1874 was re-elected. During the first term he served on the com- 
mittee on war claims and freedmen's affairs, and in the second term 
was chairman of the committee on war claims and was on the special 
committee to investigate the presidential election in South Carolina. 
In 1876 he was returned to the Forty-fifth Congress for the third 
successive term, and again served as chairman of the committee on 
war claims. Mr. Eden was elected in 1884 for his fifth term in 
Congress, from the Seventeenth District, and during that term was 
a member of the committee on judiciary, on the election of president 
and vice president, and on the special commission to investigate the 
Pan-Electric Telephone Company. He helped frame the bill pro- 
viding, in case of the death or disability of the president, for the 
presidential succession, and also the bill providing the mode of 
ascertaining and counting the votes for the election of president and 
vice president. In 1868 Mr. Eden was democratic nominee for 
governor of Illinois. As a member of Congress he was not only a 
strong and influential party leader, but had a statesmanlike grasp of 
large public questions, and left his impress on much of the national 
legislation of the time. 

Beginning in 1856 he took part in every political campaign in the 
state and was not only one of the influential men of his party but as 
a lawyer stood abreast of the best talent in the bar of Central 
Illinois. It has been well said that he was as distinctly a leader in 
his own party as Logan and Oglesby were the leaders of the repub- 
lican party in their time. After 1886 Mr. Eden was steadfastly 
devoted to his profession as a lawyer at Sullivan. 

August 7, 1856, Mr. Eden was married at Sullivan to Roxanna 
Meeker, daughter of Ambrose Meeker of Moultrie County. Mrs. 
Eden died in 1888. Eight children were born to them. Two sons, 
Finley and Joseph Edgar, died in early childhood. One son, Thomas 
Hartwell, died in 1879. Mrs. Rose E. Martin, a daughter, died in 
November, 1907. The children who survive their honored father 
were one son, Walter Eden, and three daughters, Miss Emma Eden, 
Mrs. Belle Martin, and Mrs. Blanche Thackwell, besides a number 
of grandchildren. 



868 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

In conclusion there should be quoted one brief paragraph from 
the many letters from notable lawyers and public men that served to 
measure the high esteem in which Mr. Eden stood. A distinguished 
lawyer of Decatur wrote to the Moultrie County Bar Association as 
follows: "He was more than a member of your association. He 
was a member of the bar of the state and known far beyond its 
boundaries as an honorable politician, a prudent statesman and an 
able lawyer. It will be long before his life will be forgotten and 
it has left its imprint on other lives, making them nobler and better 
for their association with him." 

HON. JOEL K. MARTIN. For the past six years state's attorney 
of Moultrie County and one of the leading lawyers of Sullivan, Joel 
K. Martin read law under the late Mr. Eden, whose sketch as one 
of the distinguished Illinois lawyers has been given above, and has 
been in active practice of his profession for more than twenty years. 

Joel K. Martin, one of a family of five children, was born in 
Moultrre County on a farm January 20, 1861. His parents were 
John N. and Rachel E. (Martin) Martin, his father a substantial 
farmer. The paternal ancestors of Mr. Martin were among the 
pioneer settlers of Kentucky and Illinois, one of them having 
emigrated from North Carolina to Kentucky at the beginning of the 
American Revolution and engaged in the Indian warfare of that 
period. His son, James Scott Martin, was born in Kentucky in 1780 
and removed to Illinois in 1831 with his family, including John 
Martin, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch. A settlement 
was made a few miles from where the city of Mattoon now- stands 
and in 1837 the family located in what is now Moultrie County. 
John N. Martin was a justice of the peace for many years and the 
contested cases in his court first attracted the son to the study of the 
law. 

Joel K. Martin was educated in the public schools of Moultrie 
County, supported himself for several years of his young manhood 
in farming and other occupations, and took up the study of law 
under Hon. John R. Eden. He was admitted to the bar in 1893, 
and has since enjoyed a large practice in Moultrie County. He 
served three terms as city attorney of Sullivan, and in 1908 was 
elected to his present office as state's attorney, and re-elected in 1912 
on the democratic ticket. 

Mr. Martin is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, 
and has active membership in the various bar associations. Mr. 
Martin married Miss Belle Eden, a daughter of the late John R. 
Eden. Mr. and Mrs. Martin are the parents of six children. 

HON. N. J. PILLSBURY. Among the distinguished jurists of Liv- 
ingston County, whose long and faithful service resulted in much 
notable achievement, no name commands greater respect than that 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 869 

of Hon. N. J. Pillsbury, an honored retired resident of Pontiac. 
First elevated to the bench in 1873, he continued in a judicial posi- 
tion continuously until he retired to private life in 1901, serving on 
both the circuit and appellate bench, although, during a part of the 
time he attended to his duties under great stress, on account of his 
being a victim of an accident, on June I, 1882. It was caused by 
the unbridled passions of a riotous crowd which used pistols in an 
irresponsible manner and seriously injured a number of totally inno- 
cent persons, Judge Pillsbury among the others, against whom the 
rioters had no feeling of anger. 

Judge Pillsbury is of .New England birth and ancestry, coming 
of a sturdy line of the old Pine Tree State. He was born in York 
County, Maine, October 21, 1834, the eldest of a family of six 
children. His parents were Stephen N. and Susan (Averill) Pills- 
bury, both of whom were born in 1812, also in York County. The 
father was a machinist by trade, but after coming to Illinois with 
his family in November, 1855, he followed an agricultural life until 
1880, when he removed to Pontiac and died in this city in 1890, 
having survived his wife five years. 

In the public schools of York County and later for a short time 
in an academy, N. J. Pillsbury pursued his studies and with such 
success that he was accepted as a teacher and for seven winter sea- 
sons he was master of a country school, spending his summers in 
assisting his father on the farm. Nevertheless this outdoor life did 
not satisfactorily establish his health, and it was not until after a 
change of climate, when he came to Illinois, that he saw much 
improvement, and within two years he had become entirely normal. 
In the meanwhile he had not been able to afford himself any lux- 
uries, in fact, providing for his actual necessities sometimes seemed, 
in his enfeebled condition, an impossibility. He located on a farm 
in Bureau County after coming to Illinois, and in September, 1857, 
bought eighty acres in Nebraska Township, in Livingston County. 
Here he was obliged to labor hard in order to cultivate and improve 
his .land, on which he remained until the spring of 1863, when ill 
health again overtook him and he then determined to turn his 
attention to a vocation that, perhaps, might not tax so heavily his 
physical strength. 

After moving to Pontiac he entered the law office of Atty. Samuel 
L. Fleming and developed such interest and aptitude that his admis- 
sion to the bar followed in a comparatively short time and he then 
entered into a partnership with Mr. Fleming. With new interests 
and more important responsibilities, his health improved and he 
rapidly advanced to a leading position at the bar of Livingston 
County, and in 1866 was appointed city attorney and re-appointed 
for a second term. At this time, just after the Civil war, every sec- 
tion of the country was more or less in a disturbed condition, and 
every official found his duties onerous and sometimes dangerous. 
In 1869 Mr. Pillsbury was elected a delegate to the constitutional 



870 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

convention of 1870, and took part in framing the organic law of 
the state. In 1873 he was elected judge of the Thirteenth Judicial 
District, comprising the counties of Livingston, Iroquois and Kan- 
kakee, and he entered upon his judicial duties to find that the docket 
was eighteen months behind. It took hard and continuous work for 
three years to clear it, he, nearly the entire time, holding three ses- 
sions of court daily. In 1877 tm ' s circuit was consolidated with that 
made up of McLean and Ford counties, under the name of the 
Eleventh Circuit. At the same session of the Legislature the appel- 
late courts were established and Judge Pillsbury was appointed one 
of the judges of the Second District Appellate Court, sitting at 
Ottawa. In June, 1879, he was elected circuit judge of the con- 
solidated district and re-appointed to the Second District Appellate 
Court in June, 1882. 

On the first day of June, 1882, while returning to his home on 
a railroad train, Judge Pillsbury was the victim of the accident from 
which he has suffered ever since. Local history has covered every 
incident of the unfortunate occurrence, but no history can adequately 
portray the suffering of the innocent, nor reveal the physical and 
mental sufferings of the victims and their friends. In the case of 
Judge Pillsbury, his strong will assisted as it had done years before, 
in partly putting aside his physical disabilities, and he continued his 
labors of the bench, but did not seek re-election. Nevertheless, in 
1885 he was again elected and was appointed to the Appellate Court 
for a three-year term. His wound continued to give him trouble 
and at the close of his six year term as circuit judge, he positively 
declined to be a candidate again and, as previously mentioned, in 
1891, retired to private life. He has always been regarded as an 
able lawyer and upright official. While upon the appellate bench he 
decided some very important questions of legislation and several of 
these may be here mentioned. In the case of Flexman versus the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Company (9 Brad. 250), in an 
able decision, Judge Pillsbury held the railroad company liable for 
the act of one of its brakemen, who, on being accused of stealing a 
passenger's watch, struck the passenger with his railroad lantern, 
doing a serious injury. This decision was affirmed by the Supreme 
Court. Judge Pillsbury also decided the case of the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railroad Company versus Barrett (16 Brad.), hold- 
ing a railroad company liable for an assault upon a passenger. Many 
other of his decisions proved his knowledge of law and precedent 
and thus very firmly established his standing as a jurist. He has 
always had a large and appreciative following among his fellow 
citizens and he is pardonably proud of the fact that he was never 
defeated at an election nor in the nominating conventions. 

Judge Pillsbury was married January i, 1855, at Biddeford, 
Maine, to Miss Eliza J. Cole, who died January n, 1906. On the 
maternal side she was connected with General Warren, of Revolu- 
tionary war fame. To this marriage the following children were 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 871 

born: Cora A., born May 3, 1857, who died in infancy; Clara A., 
born December 16, 1858, who is the wife of S. E. Sims, a prominent 
business man of Pontiac; Avis, born April 13, 1862, who is the wife 
of E. J. Walker, a resident of Imperial, California ; Ernest, born in 
July, 1864, who died in infancy; Louis L., born December 30, 1868, 
who died July i, 1888; and Dale E., born March 30, 1875, who is in 
business at Pontiac. 

Judge Pillsbury, in spite of the handicaps mentioned, has led an 
unusually busy and useful life. His acquaintance includes all the 
prominent men of the day in this section of the state, and he was 
associated in personal friendship with many who have passed off the 
scene of life. During 1863-64 he was a member of the Union League. 
In 1864 he became a member of Pontiac Lodge, No. 262, of the 
order of Odd Fellows, of which he is now the oldest surviving mem- 
ber and has been presented with a diamond and gold medal as a 
token of fifty years of membership in the organization at Pontiac. 
He belongs also to the grand lodge and the grand encampment. His 
identification with the Masonic fraternity occurred May 21, 1872, 
and he belongs to Pontiac Lddge, No. 294, A. F. & A. M., and to 
St. Paul Commandery, No. 34, Knights Templar. 

DAVID DAVIS. Of that goodly company of really eminent jurists 
and lawyers who graced the annals of the Illinois bench and bar 
during the last century, one of the greatest was Judge David Davis. 
While his qualifications as a lawyer were everywhere acknowledged, 
his chief claims to greatness rest rather upon a broad and courag- 
eous service to the state and national government as a judge and man 
of affairs. The chief facts in connection with his origin and family 
and his individual career are set forth in the following paragraphs 
and will serve to indicate his important relations with the history 
of his time. 

David Davis, of Welsh and English ancestry, was born March 9, 
1815, at the Rounds Sassafras Neck, Cecil County, Maryland, at the 
home of his mother's father, John Mercer. His father was David 
Davis, a physician, who died before his son was born. His mother 
was Ann Mercer, daughter of John and Rebecca (Davis) Mercer. 
Ann Mercer afterwards married a second time and died at Odsdawa, 
New York. Judge Davis' uncle, Rev. Henry Lyon Davis, an Episco- 
pal rector, was the father of Henry Winter Davis, who was a mem- 
ber of congress from Maryland during the Rebellion and was largely 
instrumental in keeping Maryland from going with the south. 

David Davis graduated from Kenyon College in Ohio in 1832. 
Secretary of War Stanton was in college at the same time. After 
leaving Kenyon he studied law with Judge Henry W. Bishop at 
Lenox, Massachusetts, and afterwards attended law lectures at the 
Yale Law School. Coming to Illinois in 1835, he first located at 
Pekin, and in 1836 moved to Bloomington, where he resided until 
his death June 26, 1886. 



872 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Judge Davis was a member of the Illinois House of Representa- 
tives in 1844, and was a delegate in the Constitutional Convention of 
1847. In 1848 he was elected judge of the Eighth Judicial Circuit, 
which comprised fifteen counties in the central part of the state. 
Practically the entire bench and bar of the circuit traveled together 
from one court to the other, and Judge Davis, the state's attorney, 
and Abraham Lincoln each rode the entire circuit twice a year on 
horseback, until Mr. Lincoln and Judge Davis could each afford a 
buggy. Out of the close association developed by this old-time 
method of law practice there frequently developed the warmest 
friendships, and it was this long companionship in making the 
rounds of the old Eighth Circuit that accounted for the warm friend- 
ship between Judge Davis and Mr. Lincoln. The latter frequently 
stopped at Judge Davis' house, where he wrote some of his debates 
and other speeches. 

Judge Davis was reared a Henry Clay whig, and after the dis- 
solution of that party in the early '505 he was among the strong 
men of Illinois who fostered the new republican organization. He 
helped to organize the republican party at Bloomington in 1856, and 
as a personal friend of Mr. Lincoln's did a great deal to nominate 
him for the presidency in 1860. Judge Davis was Mr. Lincoln's 
confidential manager at the Chicago convention in that year. Un- 
doubtedly one of the greatest elements of strength in Mr. Lincoln's 
campaign in 1860 came from his wide acquaintance in the Eighth 
Circuit and with the lawyers of Western Indiana. It may be noted 
in this connection that Judge Davis was the administrator of Mr. 
Lincoln's estate and the guardian of Tad Lincoln. 

In 1862 Judge Holt, David Davis and Hugh Campbell of St. 
Louis were appointed a commission to examine and pay the amounts 
really due from the United States Government for the bills and 
purchases made by Gen. John C. Fremont and his quartermasters, 
which were in a tangled condition. They examined the accounts 
and claims and ordered paid what was really due. 

To fill a vacancy, Mr. Lincoln commissioned Judge Davis as 
associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States on 
October 17, 1862. After the appointment was confirmed he was re- 
commissioned December 8, 1862. While judge of the Eighth Circuit 
in Illinois Mr. Davis had given particular attention to the estates of 
widows and orphans. As associate justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States, his circuit comprised Indiana, Illinois and Wiscon- 
sin. He was opposed to any interference in his circuit by the mili- 
tary authorities. His courts were always open to give a fair trial 
to anyone properly indicted, and the judgment of history now gives 
high praise to those men who like Judge Davis upheld the authority 
of the civil jurisdiction over the military power during the Civil 
war decade. An example of Judge Davis' firm stand in this matter is 
found in his telegram to Mr. Lincoln protesting against the sus- 
pension of the Chicago Times, and as a result of his telegram the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 873 

order was countermanded. Another case is still more noteworthy. 
In October, 1864, Larnden P. Milligan and others, citizens of In- 
diana, were arrested and tried by a military commission and sen- 
tenced to be hanged the next May. The sentence was approved by 
the Secretary of War and the President. In January, 1865, the 
United States Circuit Court met in Indianapolis, presided over by ( 
Mr. Justice Davis and the judge of the District Court. The grand 
jury did not indict the military prisoners and they were brought 
before the court on a writ of habeas corpus. By agreement the court 
divided in order that the case could go to the Supreme Court of the 
United States. They sustained the writ and freed the men and de- 
cided by a divided court that the courts were supreme and could not 
be interfered with by the military. This attitude of Judge Davis 
required great courage, as all his friends wanted the men hanged. 

In 1876, when Tilden and Hayes were candidates for the presi- 
dency, there was a great controversy about which were legal and 
which were fraudulent returns from some of the southern states. 
As those living at the time and readers of history know, this con- 
test nearly brought on a Civil war, and was finally settled by a com- 
mission of five justices of the Supreme Court. Two of these com- 
missioners were republicans and two democrats, and it was the 
expectation of both parties that the fifth member would be Judge 
Davis. So far as his personal career is concerned it can be consid- 
ered fortunate that he escaped the obligations of this service as a 
result of his election on January 25, 1877, to the United States 
Senate from Illinois. This election to the senate was the result 
of a combination between independents and democrats in the Illinois 
Legislature. 

In 1 88 1, after the death of President Garfield and the transfer 
of Vice President Arthur to the vacancy, the Senate being equally 
divided between the two parties, Judge Davis was elected president 
of the Senate, an office he held to the end of his term. As the law 
was then, if President Arthur had died in office, Judge Davis would 
have succeeded to the presidency until a new president was elected. 

In politics Judge Davis was pre-eminently a man of independent 
convictions and one whose courage in supporting his ideals of public 
policy not infrequently led him into crossed currents with his own 
organization. In 1872 a large share of the republicans were dis- 
satisfied with General Grant, and out of this dissatisfaction origi- 
nated the liberal republican party, adherents of which met in mass 
convention at Cincinnati May i, 1872. Illinois was at that time 
divided in its loyalty between Davis, Palmer and Trumbull, and 
owing to this division the great state did not have the influence it 
normally wielded in the councils of the party. In the Cincinnati 
convention the Illinois adherents of Davis were more than those for 
all the others, and should properly have controlled the entire^ 
state delegation, but the timidity of some of the judge's friends 
divided the delegation with .the others, and as a result the nomina- 



874 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tion went to another state and, as an after judgment must affirm, to 
a weaker nominee. Many influential and well informed people con- 
sidered that Horace Greeley was nominated by the Belmont interest 
in New York primarily to kill the liberal movement in the republican- 
party, as these interests realized that the people would not support a 
visionary like Greeley, and at the same time were opposed to the 
nomination of a western man. There are many who have found 
reason to regret that a man was not nominated who could have 
been elected, since his election would probably have ended the influ- 
ence of the democrats as a party and have caused its members to 
become disbursed among the old and new republican parties. As an 
echo of this campaign there came to Judge Davis the honor of the 
presidential nomination by a convention of labor reformers on Feb- 
ruary 22, 1872. Judge Davis thanked them for the honor, but 
formally declined four months later. 

In his home city of Bloomington Judge Davis was long a man 
of distinctive leadership. He organized the Bank of Bloomington, 
which was one of the three banks in the state that did not suspend 
the gold payments of their notes in 1861. This old state bank was 
the nucleus of the present First National Bank of Bloomington. 
Judge Davis was reared in the Episcopal Church, and was a student 
in Kenyon College when Bishop Chase was its president. He was 
always in sympathy with the Low Church and in later years attended 
the First Presbyterian Church of Bloomington with his wife. 

On October 30, 1838, at Lennox, Massachusetts, Judge Davis 
married Sarah Woodruff Walker, daughter of William Perrin and 
Lucy (Adam) Walker. Her father graduated at Williams College 
in 1798 and was judge of the Berkshire County Courts. Her grand- 
father, William Walker, was at Bunker Hill as adjutant of the 
Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, and was also adjutant of the Fifteenth 
Continental in 1776 in the Canada campaign and in the New Jersey 
campaign at Princeton and Trenton. He was also present at the 
battle of Bennington. He likewise served as judge of the Berkshire 
courts. 

Of the children of Judge Davis and wife that survived infancy 
there are two: George Perrin Davis, who married Ella Hanna of 
Attica, Indiana; and Sarah Davis Lillard, wife of John T. Lillard. 
All these live at Bloomington. 

ROBERT S. MC!LDUFF. Among the prominent law firms of Pon- 
tiac, Illinois, is that of Mcllduff & Thompson, the senior member of 
which, Robert S. Mcllduff, is one of the representative men of Liv- 
ingston County. He was born at Cassville, Pennsylvania, June i, 
1848. His parents were James and Agnes C. (Speer) McMduff, who 
had two other children. The father followed merchandising in 
Pennsylvania and farming in Illinois. 

Robert S. Mcllduff attended the Cassville Seminary, the schools 
of Dwight, Illinois, and the Huntingdon Academy at Huntingdon, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 875 

Pennsylvania, and read law in the latter city in the office of his 
uncle, Robert M. Speer, and was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar 
on August 13, 1870. Following his said admission he went to South- 
west Missouri and was admitted to the Missouri bar in February, 
1871, by Judge Robert W. Fyan, and located at Bolivar, Polk County, 
where he remained for about six months and then returned to 
Dwight. He was admitted to the Illinois bar January 5, 1872, and 
practiced at Dwight for a year before going to Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, where he remained for two years and then returned to Dwight 
and engaged in the general practice. He was admitted to the Iowa 
bar May 3, 1875. He was elected state's attorney of Livingston 
County in 1880, and this necessitated his removal to Pontiac, where 
he took up his residence October n, 1881, and has from thence con- 
tinued to reside in that place. During his incumbency of the office 
of state's attorney, he was so fortunate as not to have an indictment 
quashed. In 1906 his present law firm was formed, his partner being 
Hon. B. R. Thompson, who was elected county judge in 1914. 

Mr. Mcllduff was united in marriage with Miss Mary J. Paul, 
daughter of James and Martha B. (Braden) Paul, and they have 
two daughters: Gratia, who is the wife of Judge Thompson; and 
Helen S., who resides at home, the family residence being located 
at No. 405 South Mill Street, Pontiac. Mr. Mcllduff and family 
are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

In national politics Mr. Mcllduff maintains an independent atti- 
tude and in local matters he gives support to the candidate approved 
by his judgment. At times he has served on- the board of aldermen 
and also on the school board at Pontiac. He belongs to both county 
and state bar associations and for years has taken an active interest 
in their deliberations. His fraternal connection is confined to the 
order of Elks. 

HON. ALBERT J. HOPKINS. While his service in congress cover- 
ing a period of almost a quarter of a century made Albert J. Hop- 
kins one of the most eminent political figures in Illinois since the 
close of the Civil war and gave him rank among the leading public 
men of the nation, he is even more of a lawyer than politician, and 
few men have devoted themselves more zealously to their profession 
in spite of the insistent demands of public duty. 

Mr. Hopkins began his professional career at Aurora forty-five 
years ago, and in a couple of decades was credited with having the 
largest and most valuable law practice in Northern Illinois outside 
the City of Chicago. For many years Mr. Hopkins has maintained 
an office in Chicago, and his practice has been more and more asso- 
ciated with the great metropolitan interests. 

His family were pioneer settlers of De Kalb County, his parents 
Cyrus B. and Fannie (Larkin) Hopkins having come from their 
native state of New York to Illinois about 1838. .Albert J. Hopkins 
was born on his father's farm near Courtland in De Kalb County, 



876 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

August 15, 1846. His early life has been described as that of the 
typical farmer boy in such an environment as prevailed in the coun- 
try districts of Illinois half a century or more ago. With only a dis- 
trict school education, he had an ambition to advance himself in the 
world, and at the age of seventeen entered the city schools at Syca- 
more. The following year he entered the preparatory department 
of Hillsdale College at Hillsdale, Michigan, and remained at that 
institution until graduating A. B. in 1870. His choice of a career had 
already been made, and he refused an offer to take charge of an 
academy in the east in order to lose no time in entering his pro- 
fession. His chief preceptor in his law studies was C. J. Metzner, of 
Aurora, at that time one of the leading attorneys of Kane County. 
When Mr. Hopkins was admitted to the bar in 1871 and started to 
practice at Aurora he had to compete with some of the ablest law- 
yers in the state, who were at that time members of the Kane County 
bar. With reference to this critical point of Senator Hopkins' career 
the folio wing" sentences were written a number of years ago : "There, 
among such attorneys, the fittest survived, and only the very fit did 
survive. The young lawyer found it a hard school, for an enterpris- 
ing youngster often had to bear what a weakling would have been 
spared or an older man would have evaded. But it afforded good 
training ; and as Hopkins measured strength with the best, his mind 
was developed, his intellectual powers were quickened and strength- 
ened, and he acquired a readiness in action, a fertility of resource, 
and a courage under stress that could have been gained in no other 
school." 

An early experience that did much to improve his powers and 
develop his resources was his service from 1872 for four years as 
state's attorney of Kane County. As chief prosecutor he showed 
himself no mean rival of the fine legal ability that was often pitted 
against him in the criminal cases tried during that four years. He 
refused a renomination at the end of his term, and in a few years 
had built up such a professional business as few other members of 
the Illinois bar at that time enjoyed. 

In soundness of learning, in a broad comprehension of not only 
the legal but the business and political field, in resourcefulness as a 
trial advocate, and in the logic of debate and eloquence of oratory, 
Mr. Hopkins' reputation has long been established. At the bottom 
of all his brilliant intellectual attainments was a spotless integrity, 
which perhaps more than anything else carried him to some of the 
highest offices in the gift of the state. 

His active career in politics has covered about forty years. He 
was elected to the office of state's attorney by a great majority as a 
republican candidate, and from 1878 to 1880 was a member of the 
Republican State Central Committee. In 1882 he failed by a nar- 
row margin to secure the republican nomination for Congress. In 
1884 he was a presidential elector and as such gave his vote to 
James G. Blaine. Owing to the death of the representative of the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 877 

Eighth Congressional District in the summer of 1885, Mr. Hopkins 
received the republican nomination for the vacancy, and received 
a majority that was exceptional in a special election. He took his 
seat in the Forty-ninth Congress and was continuously re-elected at 
the close of each two years by the Eighth "District until he had 
served nine successive terms, concluding with the Fifty-seventh Con- 
gress which expired in 1903. In the Fifty-second Congress, when 
the democrats were in control of the lower house, he was placed on 
the Ways and Means Committee, and was the first republican from 
Illinois to secure a seat on that important committee, for a genera- 
tion. He served for nearly fourteen years on that committee and 
was a leading factor in the preparation of all of the tariff bills that 
were placed on the statute books of our country during that period. 
He was one of the sub-committee of the House that prepared what 
is known as the Dingley law and was also one of the conferees be- 
tween the House and Senate in settling the differences between the 
two houses on questions that had arisen in the preparation of that 
great tariff measure. 

While a member of the House he was also a member of the Civil 
Service Committee and the Merchants Marine and Fisheries Com- 
mittee. On both of those committees, he took a very active and 
leading part in legislation and in debates that occurred touching the 
legislation that was presented by those committees. He was also, 
during his service in the House of Representatives, a stanch defender 
of the civil service law. On the questions that arose with the Mer- 
chants Marine and Fisheries Committee he was among the first to 
appreciate the opportunities afforded the United States for the de- 
velopment of trade with the South American states. 

Mr. Hopkins did not retire from Congress in 1903, but merely 
transferred his seat from the House of Representatives to the Sen- 
ate of the United States, and for six years, from 1903 to 1909, was 
the junior senator of Illinois. Among his early committee assign- 
ments in the Senate was a position on the Finance Committee of 
the Senate. This is the leading committee of the Senate. The chair- 
man is recognized as official leader of the Senate. During Mr. 
Hopkins' service in the Senate on this committee, Mr. Aldrich of 
Rhode Island was the chairman of the committee. 

Mr. Hopkins was also a member of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mittee, of which Senator Hanna, of Ohio, at the time of Mr. Hop- 
kins' entrance into the Senate, was chairman. It was at the special 
request of Mr. Hanna that Mr. Hopkins was placed on this com- 
mittee. 

There was a sharp division of sentiment in both houses of Con- 
gress, touching the form of canal that should be constructed at 
Panama ; one class advocated a sea level canal and the other a lock 
level canal. The Senate committee, of which Mr. Hopkins was a 
member, took the testimony of all of the leading engineers of this 
country and Europe, as to which was the best method of construe- 



878 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tion, and the majority of the committee decided to report a bill for 
a sea level canal. The investigation that Mr. Hopkins had given the 
subject lead him to believe that a sea level canal could not be suc- 
cessfully constructed and maintained. He therefore favored a lock 
level canal. When the Senate committee reported a bill for a sea 
level canal, Mr. Hopkins brought in a minority report with a bill 
for a lock level canal, in the form in which the canal was subse- 
quently constructed and offered his bill as a substitute for the Senate 
committee's bill. After a very interesting discussion, which was 
participated in by the leading members of the Senate, both democrats 
and republicans, Mr. Hopkins' substitute won by five majority. It 
was immediately passed by the House and signed by President 
Roosevelt. He has the distinction of having originated legislation 
that has given to the country and the world, the present form of 
canal that connects the two oceans at Panama. 

Mr. Hopkins was married September 9, 1873, to Miss Emma 
Stolp, whose father, James B. Stolp, was an early settler at Aurora. 
The four children born to their union were Fannie M. ; James S. ; 
Albert J., Jr., and Mark. Mr. Hopkins and family still reside at 
Aurora, while his Chicago offices are in the Corn Exchange Bank 
Building. 

JESSE M. LORING. In some ways, perhaps, the task of the law- 
yer was once an easier one than at present, for, in earlier days there 
were fewer complexities in the business of life, there were 
fewer people in any community, there were fewer recognized 
ordinances to regulate coming and going, and all these, mayhap, 
made people less contentious and their differences more easily ad- 
justed. In modern days a lawyer, in order to be successful, must 
not only be master of all the fundamental principles of the law, 
but must keep thoroughly abreast of the times as to all precedents 
and rulings and, additionally, must have a general education that 
might equally fit him for any of the other professions. In spite 
of this necessity the lure of the law is strong among intellectual 
young men in making a choice of life work, and there are many who 
enter the profession, not only because of its dignity and probable 
emoluments, but from love of the principles which are its inherent 
parts. Among the well-known practicing attorneys of Schuyler 
County, is Jesse M. Loring, formerly city attorney of Rushville, and 
one of the foremost members of its bar. 

Jesse M. Loring was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, February 
n, 1874, and is a son of William and Sarah M. (Gregg) Loring. 
The Loring family has long been known in Southern Illinois and the 
father of Mr. Loring was born in this county and still resides here, 
being now in his seventy-ninth year. He has followed an agricul- 
tural life and has been a useful and respected citizen. During the 
Civil war he served in the army with the three-months inlistment 
men. He married Sarah M. Gregg, who was born in Ohio and died 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 879 

in Illinois, in 1907, at the age of sixty-seven years. Of their family 
of six children, Jesse M. was the fifth in order of birth. 

During his boyhood, Jesse M. Loring attended the country 
schools in the neighborhood of his father's home farm, and after- 
ward took a commercial course in a business college at Rushville. 
Still later, largely through his own enterprising efforts, he was able 
to enter the Wesleyan University .at Bloomington, as a student, fol- 
lowing which he became a student of law at the Indiana University, 
and on May 25, 1899, was graduated and received his degree from 
the Chicago Law School. Mr. Loring chose his home city of Rush- 
ville as the scene of professional endeavor and his success has been 
so marked, among those who, to some extent, have known him from 
boyhood, that he has never seen any reason to move farther afield. 
He has proved his legal ability in many notable cases, and in 1911 
was elected city attorney and served continuously until 1913. To 
some extent he is active in republican politics and his loyalty to 
friends has been more marked than has been his effort to secure pre- 
ferment for himself. 

In October, 1900, Mr. Loring was united in marriage with Miss 
Bessie M. Danner, who is a -daughter of Aaron D. Danner, a well- 
known farmer of Schuyler County, and they have one daughter, 
Marguerite, who was born at Rushville in 1902 and is attending the 
public schools. Mrs. Loring has domestic tastes but also is inter- 
ested in social life in her immediate neighborhood, while Mr. Loring 
is prominent and valued in several of the leading fraternal organiza- 
tions, being a Knight Templar Mason and identified also with the 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

JUDGE JOHN C. WORK. Since 1910 county judge of Schuyler 
County, Judge Work has had a varied and interesting career, has 
been an educator, was a soldier in the Spanish-American war, and 
for the past ten or twelve years has been actively identified with pub- 
lic office in Rushville. 

John C. Work was born in McDonough County, Illinois, May 26, 
1873, the oldest of five children born to Samuel and Laura (Crown- 
over) Work, who were married in Illinois in 1871. Both were 
natives of Pennsylvania and came to Illinois when young people. 
Samuel Work, who was born in 1842, was a private in the One Hun- 
dred and Forty-first Ohio Regiment, and after his honorable dis- 
charge moved to Illinois, settling in McDonough County, has been a 
farmer all his active career, and now lives in Schuyler County. The 
mother is now sixty-two years of age. 

Judge Work acquired his early education in the country schools 
of McDonough County, is a graduate of the Rushville High School, 
and having received an appointment as cadet in the.United States 
Military Academy at West Point, was for two years a student in 
that institution, but did not continue his studies and chose other 
vocations than a military career. His work after returning from the 



880 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

East was teaching school in Schuyler County from 1894 to 1898. He 
was one of many young Illinois men to respond to the call for arms 
at the beginning of the Spanish-American war, and on account of 
his previous military instructions was assigned to a position in the 
signal corps. He served nine months in Porto Rico, and was ad- 
vanced from private to first class sergeant, being discharged at San 
Juan. On returning to Illinois he again resumed his work in the 
schoolroom, and for two years was principal of the Quincy public 
school, from 1900 to 1902. Judge Work then became assistant 
postmaster of Rushville from 1903 to 1908, was for two years 
justice of the peace and deputy circuit clerk, from 1908 to 1910, and 
in the latter year was elected to his present office as county judge. 
His administration of county affairs has been both efficient and 
economical, and made him the favorite candidate for re-election, 
and in 1914 he was re-elected in a democratic county, the democrats 
and the progressives having candidates. In 1915 he was called to 
hold court in the Municipal Court for six months. 

Judge Work has affiliations with the Masonic order, being wor- 
shipful master of Rushville Lodge, No. 9, and past commander of 
Rushville Commandery, No. 56; the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, and with Greeley Camp 
of the Spanish War Veterans. He was appointed patriotic instruc- 
tor of the United Spanish War Veterans on the staff of the depart- 
ment commander of the state by Commander M. J. Donahue of 
Streator. He is treasurer of the Schuyler County Fair Association. 
For a farmer boy who started out without capital and has de- 
pended on his own efforts, his position is one highly creditable to 
his energy and ambition. Judge Work was married June 24, 1903, 
at Rushville to Mary 'Neill, daughter of James Neill, who is still 
living in Schuyler County. They are the parents of three children : 
Eleanor Work, born in June, 1905, at Rushville; Robert Work, 
born in 1908; and Margaret Work, born in 1911. 

JOSEPH W. RICKERT. The name of Joseph W. Rickert is known 
all over Southern Illinois, and seniority in his profession has also 
been accompanied by many of the best distinctions awarded to the 
able lawyer and leading citizen. Mr. Rickert is quite well advanced 
in years now, and has lived his life while history was in the making, 
and in scenes where men showed their real caliber, and all of his 
experiences with men and affairs have given him the wisdom that 
only comes with years well spent. There is no man of his profes- 
sion in the state more highly respected or admired than Mr. Rickert. 
He has been a member of the bar and in active practice at \Vaterloo 
for forty-five years. 

Joseph W. Rickert was born at Vicksburg, Mississippi, July 9, 
1840, son of Andrew and Margaret (Slund) Rickert. His mother 
came from Bavaria as a child with her parents. She was born in 
1808, was married in 1838, and died in Monroe County, Illinois, in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 881 

1861. Andrew Rickert was born in 1808 in the Province of 
Alsace, then a part of France, and now a territory of Germany, 
though subject to the issues of the present war. Early in 1832 he 
came to America, settled at Vicksburg, Mississippi, was married 
there, and later established a home near Waterloo, Illinois. He took 
up a tract of farming land, and became one of the prosperous and 
well known citizens of that community. His death occurred in 1880. 

The second among six children, Joseph W. Rickert was reared 
in Monroe County, attended country school, and for seven years was 
a student in the St. Louis University, finally graduating with honors 
in the classics and with the degrees of A. B. and A. M. in 1864. 
Then followed a career as a teacher with nine months in Monroe 
County and one term in Marion County, and he then began the study 
of law under some of the oldest and best known members of the 
Southern Illinois Bar. Among his preceptors were James A. Ken- 
nedy and H. K. S. O'Melveny, of Centralia. Mr. Rickert continued 
reading law there until 1866, and the following year was spent at his 
birth place in Mississippi. Returning in 1868 to Illinois, he resumed 
his studies and was admitted to the bar in Waterloo in 1869. His 
practice began as partner of J. P. Johnson, and in the fall of the 
same year he was elected county superintendent of Monroe County 
schools, and served until 1873. 

Mr. Rickert has occupied the same suite of offices at Waterloo 
for forty-two years, and there is no lawyer in Monroe County has 
had a broader and more diversified experience and with a better 
average of success. Mr. Rickert was a member of the Legislature 
from 1874 to 1876 in the Twenty-ninth Assembly, which was the last 
held at the old capitol building at Springfield. On the democratic 
ticket he was twice elected to the office of state's attorney, from 1876 
to 1884. In 1888 he was elected state senator from the forty-eighth 
district and sat as a member of that body until 1892. Other public 
service has included terms as city councilman and as member of the 
board of education of Waterloo. He was a delegate from the 
twenty-second district to the National Democratic Convention at 
Kansas City, and in 1904 was one of the democratic electors. Mr. 
Rickert is a director and co-partner in the Commercial Bank of 
Waterloo, a private bank, owns one of the fine homes at Waterloo, 
with extensive farming property in that section of the state. 

On May 22, 1876, Mr. Rickert married Miss Minnie Zeibold, who 
was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, daughter of G. Ziebold. Mrs. Rickert 
died at St. Augustine, Florida, in 1900. The nine children born 
to their union are mentioned as follows : Josephine L. and Minnie 
E. are deceased, and both were graduates of Sacred Heart 
Convent at St. Louis and were accomplished musicians ; Nelson A. 
is a graduate of the Washington University and Christian Brothers' 
College, formerly editor of the Waterloo Times, and now connected 
with the Fisher Shein Company of East St. Louis; George, who 
died in infancy ; Luella C., a graduate of Hosmer Hall, St. Louis, 



882 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and living with her father ; Isabella, who died in infancy ; Charles J ., 
who died at ten years of age; Marie M., a graduate of Hosmer Hall 
and living with her father; and Margaret L., also a graduate of 
Hosmer and at home. These living children have all received the 
best of training, have developed musical talent, and have all had the 
benefit of extensive foreign travel. Mr. Rickert is a member of the 
Catholic Church. Besides his work as a lawyer, Mr. Rickert has 
studied deeply of history and other subjects, and has a more than 
local reputation as an author, having contributed a number of articles 
to different publications. 

HON. JOHN McNuxx for many years has been a leader of the 
Coles County Bar and is now serving in his second term as judge of 
the city court at Mattoon. He was born in Humboldt Township, 
Coles County, Illinois, in 1872, and is a son of John and Camelia 
(Wells) McNutt. He was fortunate in youth in being so situated as 
to take advantage of educational opportunities and in 1894 was grad- 
uated from the Illinois State University at Champaign. College life 
and instruction had indicated to him the line of work for which he 
was apparently best fitted and as inclination and ambition led in the 
same direction, he then entered as a student the Northwestern Col- 
lege of Law and in 1895 was graduated from that institution with 
his LL. B. degree. In 1896 he established himself in practice at 
Mattoon and this city has continued his home and the field of his 
professional advancement. In 1899 ne was elected city attorney, 
in which capacity he served for two years, and in 1910 he was 
elected to the bench and through re-election continues judge of the 
city court, an office of responsibility including many lines of judicial 
service. For many years he has been a zealous republican and at 
times has taken a very active part in party councils. During his 
eighteen years of professional life at Mattoon, he has made a lasting 
reputation for thorough knowledge of the law and also for main- 
taining honesty in its practice. As a citizen he has been identified 
with all movements promising to be substantially beneficial and has 
been liberal in contributing time, advice and money when needed. 

Judge McNutt was married December 31, 1901, to Miss Clemen- 
tine Eichorn, of Delaware, Ohio. The family residence is at No. 
1500 Wabash Street, Mattoon, and Judge McNutt's office is located 
at No. 117^/2 South Seventeenth Street. Judge McNutt is a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Elks. 

JOSEPH P. GULICK. The name of Gulick has been identified with 
the profession of law, at Champaign, for many years, its present 
representative, Joseph P. Gulick, having been in active practice here 
for the past twenty years, for the same length of time having served 
also as a notary public. Mr. Gulick was born December 20, 1870, 
at Vandalia, Illinois, one of a family of six children born to his 
parents, Jesse R. and Louisa (Everett) Gulick. For many years 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 883 

the father occupied a prominent place on the bar of Champaign 
County, but now lives somewhat retired, being in his seventy-fifth 
year. 

In boyhood Joseph P. Gulick attended the public schools and 
after completing the high school course entered the University of 
Illinois in the fall of 1887, and graduated therefrom with the degree 
of B. L. in 1892. He prepared for the bar under his father's instruc- 
tions and in 1895 was admitted to practice in all the courts of the 
state. Mr. Gulick has spent the greater part of his life at Cham- 
paign and commands a very satisfactory practice, general in char- 
acter, as he is well grounded in every branch of law. For many 
years he has been a valued member of both county and state bar 
associations. 

Mr. Gulick married Miss Lillian L. Terwilliger, who is a daugh- 
ter of Alonzo Terwilliger. In politics he is a democrat and fra- 
ternally is a Mason. 

ALBERT N. EASTMAN. In legal circles at Chicago the name of 
Mr. Eastman is associated with sound ability and substantial success 
as a lawyer, and outside of his profession he has come to be widely 
known in the city by his active connection with various political, 
civic and social organizations. His professional career covers more 
than a quarter of a century and he is now senior member of the well- 
known firm of Eastman & White. 

Born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, October 17, 1864, Albert N. 
Eastman is a graduate of Kingsville Academy, which was a noted 
educational institution of the Western Reserve of Ohio, and is also 
a graduate of the Ashtabula High School. After leaving high school 
he pursued a complete collegiate course under the instruction of a 
private tutor. Coming to Chicago in 1885 at his majority he entered 
the office of Frank J. Smith and F. A. Helmer, studied law and was 
admitted to the bar in 1887. At that time he entered the employ of 
Weigley, Bulkley & Gray, a firm name that was subsequently 
changed to Weigley, Bulkley, Gray & Eastman. Since 1896 Mr. 
Eastman has been practicing alone or with his brother, Edward P. 
Eastman and Frank White (both now deceased) and with his pres- 
ent partners, Harold F. White and Ralph R. Hawxhurst. 

During the McKinley campaign of 1896 Mr. Eastman was presi- 
dent of the Lincoln Club, one of the largest republican clubs 
in the United States, and is a life member and ex-officer of the 
Hamilton Club, now the largest republican club in the United 
States. He has always been keenly interested in politics though not 
for the sake of office. For fifteen years his home has been in Edge- 
water, a suburb of Chicago, and he is a former president of the 
Edgewater Country Club, and was one of the founders and trustees 
of the Edgewater Presbyterian Church. His name is well known 
among lawyers throughout the country as a former president of the 
Commercial Law League of America, an organization of 4,000 law- 



884 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

yers scattered over the United States and Canada. He is a member 
of the American Bar Association, the International Law Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association, and the Chicago Bar Association. 
In Masonry he is affiliated with the Ravenswood Lodge, is an honor- 
ary member of the Edgewater Lodge, and with Columbia Chapter, 
Oriental Consistory, Illinois Commandery and Medinah Temple. He 
is a life member of the Hamilton Club and the Chicago Press Club 
and is now vice president of the Chicago Automobile Club and a 
member of the Chicago Athletic Association. He has always refused 
to accept political offices. 

HAROLD FERRIS WHITE. In 1901 Harold F. White was grad- 
uated from the law department at Lake Forest University with the 
degree LL. B., and was soon enrolled among the active attorneys 
of Chicago. Since his admission to the bar he has been associated 
in practice with Albert Eastman and Edward Eastman and with 
his brother, Frank White, and the present firm of Eastman & White, 
in existence since 1906, enjoys both a large practice and a most 
creditable position in the Chicago bar. 

While most of the years of his manhood have been spent in 
building up a reputation as a lawyer, in wJiich endeavor few of his 
contemporaries have been more successful, Mr. White has also 
accepted a number of the offices which- come to the able lawyer for 
civic and social service, and has identified himself with a number of 
the professional and social organizations of his home city. Harold 
Ferris White was born in Chicago December 8, 1877, and is a son 
of Capt. Lyman A. and Annie H. White. His father, who died 
in 1904, was a veteran of the Civil war, and one of the founders of 
Bridges Battery of Light Artillery. After the Chicago fire of 1871 
he conducted the Clarendon House on the north side for a number 
of years. Mr. White's mother is a physician by profession, and 
practiced on the south side from 1895 to 1910, and is now dividing 
her residence between Chicago and New York City. 

Mr. White was graduated from the Hyde Park High School 
in 1895, and a year or so later entered the law department of Lake 
Forest University. In politics he is a republican of progressive 
tendencies. He has been an .active member of the City Club of 
Chicago, also in the Law Club, the Chicago and Illinois Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Commercial Law League of America, and has made 
himself a factor in the Stock Yards Council of the United Charities, 
as well as the Municipal Voters League, in which he has served on 
the executive committee for several years. He is a member of the 
Calumet Country Club, the Quadrangle Club, and various other 
social organizations. 

June 21, 1904, Mr. White married Catharine C. Cleaver, daughter 
of Charles S. and Ida A. Cleaver of Chicago. She was born in 
Chicago in the old homestead which represented the original estate 
of the Cleaver family, and subsequently put on the market as a sub- 



COURTS -AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 885 

division known as Cleaverville, at Thirty-ninth Street and Ellis 
Avenue. Mr. and Mrs. White have three children : Roger Quincy, 
born in 1905 ; Harold Ferris, Jr., born in 1908 ; and Philip Cleaver 
White born in 1913. 

RALPH R. HAWXHURST. One of the younger members of the 
Chicago bar, now practicing with the firm of Eastman & White, 
Ralph Reynaud Hawxhurst was born in Chicago January 24, 1887, 
a son of Arthur and Marie R. Hawxhurst. His father is insurance 
manager for Marshall Field & Company. 

Mr. Hawxhurst was educated in the public schools of Chicago, 
attended the Lewis Institute, and in 1909 graduated LL. B. from 
the Northwestern University Law School. Prior to his graduation, 
from 1907 to 1909, he was manager and publisher of the Illinois 
Law Review, and then engaged in active practice with the firm of 
Eastman & White, and became a member of that law firm January 



. 

He is a republican, a member of the Beta Theta Pi college fra- 
ternity and the Beta Theta Pi Alumni Club, of the Delta Chi and 
Delta Sigma legal fraternities, and his name is also found on the 
rolls of membership of the City Club, the Chicago Bar Association, 
the Illinois Bar Association, and the Commercial Law League of 
America. Mr. Hawxhurst is a member of the Catholic Church. On 
August 23, 1910, at Evanston, Illinois, he married Jeannette Leggett. 
Their two children are Stephen and Jacqueline Hawxhurst. 

FIELDING A. COGGESHALL. One of the leading lawyers in gen- 
eral practice at Champaign, Illinois, and formerly, for eight years 
state's attorney of Champaign County, is Fielding A. Coggeshall, 
whose professional ability is supplemented by the sturdy citizenship 
which has made him known and popular all through this section of 
Illinois. He was born June 20, 1867, in Randolph County, Indiana, 
and his parents were Dr. Job S. and Sarah E. (Barley) Coggeshall. 
They reared a family of five children. Dr. Job S. Coggeshall was 
a prominent physician, first in Indiana and later in Illinois. 

Primarily educated in the public schools, Fielding A. Coggeshall 
later became a student in the Wesleyan University at Bloomington, 
Illinois, and making a specialty of the law was there graduated in 
1896 and in the same year was admitted to the bar. In the offices 
of different law firms he secured very desirable practical experience 
preceding his coming to Champaign, in 1900, and here he has built 
up a very substantial practice, having handled many difficult cases 
as a private practitioner, in so judicious and able a manner as to 
make evident his knowledge of law and its proper application. In 
1904 he was elected state's attorney and as a representative of the 
people his performance of duty was so satisfactory that he was re- 
elected in 1908 and served out his second term. Since retiring from 
office Mr. Coggeshall has resumed private practice, and the body of 



886 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

his clients represent those who desire honorable methods used in 
the transactions with which they are connected, rightly realizing that 
it would be useless to appeal to Mr. Coggeshall if their motives were 
underhanded or their claims fraudulent. An honorable, upright, 
clear-sighted and wholesome man, Mr. Coggeshall stands deservedly 
high professionally and personally. 

Mr. Coggeshall was united in marriage with Miss Fanny Taylor, 
who is a daughter of Ebenezer Taylor, and they have one son, Wen- 
dell T. Mr. Coggeshall and family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. To some extent he is active in the councils of the 
republican party. He is a member of the County and State Bar 
associations and takes keen interest in everything pertaining to his 
profession. For many years he has been a Mason and is identified 
also with the order of the Modern Woodmen and with the Sons of 
Veterans. 

HON. WILLARD F. ELLIS. Undoubtedly the qualified professors 
of the law, from their present standing and relations to society, have 
a marked influence on the moral, civil and political affairs of the 
world. Many of them are models of splendid eloquence and pro- 
found reasoning ability, and all must be more or less erudite and 
possess an industry that is guided by intelligence and sustained by 
unwavering firmness of purpose. To the many special requirements 
which seem to assure success in the law, there are many others most 
desirable and in modern times a professional educational training is 
more or less necessary. In many cases of notable prominence on 
both bench and bar, this education has only been secured through 
personal effort and self denial, which doubtless may be excellent 
discipline but often works discouragement in ambitious youths dur- 
ing their most vigorous years. Such discouragement, however, did 
not prevent Willard F. Ellis, who is now serving in his fourth term 
as judge of the county court of Jackson County, Illinois, and a man 
as eminent on the bar as on the bench, from steadily pursuing his 
course until difficulties were overcome and the means for his law 
education were secured through his own efforts. 

Willard F. Ellis was born at Springfield, Illinois, February 13, 
1874, and is a son of A. Y. and Catherine (Flagg) Ellis, both fami- 
lies being old settled ones of Sangamon County. On the maternal 
side the grandfather, Willard P. Flagg, came to Illinois from Ver- 
mont and established a home here and became a man of substantial 
importance. On the paternal side the family was established in 
Illinois by A. Y. Ellis, the grandfather of Judge Ellis, who was 
born in Virginia. He was identified with public men and political 
movements in Illinois and was a personal friend and vigorous sup- 
porter of Abraham Lincoln. He was well known over the state and 
served many years as postmaster at Springfield, an office to which 
his son, A. Y. Ellis, Jr., father of Judge Ellis, was subsequently 
appointed to a clerkship and in which he served continuously for 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 887 

thirty-two years. He is still a resident of the capital city, being 
now in his seventy-eighth year. The mother of Judge Ellis died at 
Springfield, in 1912, at the age of sixty-seven years, the beloved 
mother of four children, Judge Ellis being the youngest. 

While attending the public schools of Springfield young Ellis 
began to plan his future career and his ambition gave impetus to 
diligence in study and he was very creditably graduated from the 
high school. His first efforts at earning a competence were carried 
on as an employe of the newspaper office of T. W. S. Kidd, at 
Springfield, and after that he entered the Illinois Watch factory and 
there, through industry and fidelity to employers, he worked his 
way up to a position of trust. It was then that he definitely decided 
upon the study of law and entered the law offices of the well-known 
firm of Schnapp & Barnes, at Springfield, and after a course of read- 
ing entered the law department of the Valparaiso University, where 
he was graduated in 1897 and in the same year was admitted to the 
bar. Judge Ellis entered into practice at Carbondale, Illinois, where 
he remained until 1902, when he was first elected county judge of 
Jackson County, in which position he has continued with the great- 
est efficiency for four terms. He is a valued resident of Murphys- . 
boro and there maintains his office. As an able attorney Judge Ellis 
has long been a leader of the bar, while, on the bench he has shown 
the judicial qualities which mark him as a man of profound knowl- 
edge not only of the law but of human nature. 

Judge Ellis was united in marriage on October 22, 1895, to Miss 
Josie M. Beecher, of Makanda, Illinois, who is a daughter of Alex- 
ander Beecher, who served with distinction in the Civil war as a 
lieutenant in the Union army. He died at Carbondale, Illinois, in 
1912, his widow still residing at Carbondale. Five children have 
been born to Judge and Mrs. Ellis: Helen L., who was born in 
1899, at Carbondale, is a student in the Murphysboro High School ; 
Carabel, who was born at Carbondale in 1902 ; Willard F., Jr., who 
was born at Murphysboro, in 1904; Alexander, who was born in 
1906 ; and Josephine, who was born in 1908. 

Judge Ellis is an honored member of the Illinois State and the 
Jackson County Bar associations. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Modern Woodmen of America and with the Elks and addi- 
tionally takes an interest in political movements and in such social 
affairs as comport with the dignity of his office. 

HON. GEORGE FRANKLIN WOM BACKER. How many intensely 
interesting stories are buried in the consciousness of the people met 
every day as humanity passes to and fro. Many of these stories 
might not be agreeable to hear for a number would be concerned 
with thwarted ambitions, with disheartening failures, with nervous 
strains and discouraged hours, but even these could awaken under- 
standing sympathy and, when these hundreds of obstacles were over- 
come, what an uplift of encouragement this reward would be to 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

those still in the wave of struggle. It is to be fervently hoped that 
the time will never come when honor will not be attached to a man's 
title of self-made. Circumstances so entirely control early effort 
that only persistent, determined perseverance toward a certain goal 
can later lead into other paths and sometimes these very adverse 
early discouragements prove the spur needed in order to succeed. 
It is remarkable how many of the prominent men of our country 
have had to fight their way upward by themselves and it is not sur- 
prising that they prize success so won. A prominent example of 
self-made man widely known in St. Clair County, Illinois, where he 
has attained both professional and political eminence, is Hon. George 
Franklin Wombacher, the leader of the Mascoutah, Illinois, bar and 
the present democratic candidate for the State Senate. 

George Franklin Wombacher was born at Mascoutah, St. Clair 
County, Illinois, November 3, 1869, and is a son of Peter and Mrs. 
Eles (Wetzer) Wombacher. The father was born in Germany and 
the mother in France and both came to America with their parents. 
They were reared, educated and married at Belleville, Illinois, but 
later moved to Mascoutah and there the venerable mother still 
resides, being aged now eighty-three years. The father was a well- 
known farmer in St. Clair County, where he died in December, 
1913, aged eighty-five years. Of their eight children George Frank- 
lin was the sixth in order of birth. In boyhood he went to school at 
Mascoutah but farm duties prevented him seeking other advantages 
and his further educational opportunities were those he secured 
through his own efforts. Agriculture is an honorable and necessary 
calling but when natural talent in an entirely different direction 
makes its demands manifest in every breath drawn and points to a 
possible future beyond the obstacles of the present, where laudable 
ambition may be satisfied and great deeds accomplished, the cultiva- 
tion of the soil and the ordinary plodding life work of the farmer 
can hold little charm. With practically no encouragement the youth 
decided to conquer the intricacies of the law by himself and in his 
leisure hours so closely applied himself that he succeeded where 
many others, less persistent, would have signally failed, and later 
.worked his way through school and in 1896 was admitted to the 
Illinois bar. It is not necessary to add that from the first he has 
been a successful advocate, prosecutor and counselor and today 
stands as the leader in his profession in his section. Mr. Wom- 
bacher has also become prominent in public matters, so directing his 
life as to win the confidence and approbation of his fellow citizens, 
and was honored by the democrats of the Forty-ninth District, who 
elected him a member of the Forty-second General Assembly. He 
proved an able and honest representative and served on a number of 
important committees with the utmost efficiency. His party has 
again honored him, making him its candidate for the Senate, being 
convinced that public interests will be safe in his hands. Mr. Wom- 
bacher is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association and the 



889 

St. Clair County Bar Association. He is interested in several pros- 
pering business enterprises, including the Mutual Creamery Com- 
pany, of which he is president and a member of its board of 
directors. 

Mr. Wombacher was married September 23, 1897, to Miss Annie 
K. Glatz, of Trenton, Illinois. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Glatz, died in her childhood. The family is well known in the 
vicinity of Nashville, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Wombacher have 
three children: Olma F., who was born in 1899, is a student in 
Notre Dame Academy at Belleville, Illinois; Laura M., who was 
born in 1901, is a student in the Mascoutah High School; and 
Leona T., who was born in 1906. Mr. Wombacher is a charter 
member of the Knights of Columbus at Belleville, but otherwise has 
not identified himself with fraternal organizations. He is a keen 
lawyer, a clear-headed business man and an honest public official, 
is deeply concerned in all that promotes the welfare of Mascoutah, 
gives unostentatiously to charities and the cause of religion, and, 
withal, is genial, companionable and kind hearted. He takes more 
than a superficial interest in the welfare of earnest young men in 
their struggles to gain a footing in life. 

WILLIAM U. HALBERT. While William U. Halbert has been 
active as a member of the Belleville Bar since 1897, an d widely 
known in that district as an able lawyer with a large practice, his 
father before him was successfully engaged in the practice of law 
at Belleville and vicinity since about the close of the Civil war, and 
his grandfather, Judge William H. Underwood, was one of the most 
distinguished lawyers and judges in Southern Illinois. 

William U. Halbert was born at Belleville October 10, 1873, a 
son of Robert A. and Emma L. (Underwood) Halbert. Judge Wil- 
liam H. Underwood, her father, served as circuit judge at Belle- 
ville for many years, and was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of Illinois. Both parents were natives of this state, the 
father born near Freeburg and the mother at Belleville. Robert A. 
Halbert was a graduate of McKendree College, was born February 
9, 1841, enlisted for service in the One Hundred and Seventeenth 
Illinois Regiment and served throughout the war, studied law under 
William H. Underwood, was admitted to the bar in 1866, and con- 
tinued in active practice at Belleville until his death on December 
27, 1888. He served as state's attorney of St. Clair County from 
1866 until 1872, and was frequently honored with public positions 
of trust. His wife died in. February, 1903, at the age of sixty-five? 
Their children were : Mrs. Clara Needles ; William U. ; and Miss 
Mary Halbert, who is an assistant librarian at Belleville. 

William U. Halbert grew up in Belleville, attended the Belle- 
ville High School, the Lake Forest University, read law under Judge 
Frank Perrin, now probate judge of St. Clair County, and was 
admitted to practice November 4, 1897. He has since built up a 

Vol. Ill 4 



890 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

large business as a lawyer, and under Governor Deneen served as 
public administrator. Mr. Halbert is a member of the County, State 
and American Bar associations, is affiliated with the Masonic Order 
and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and in politics is a republican. 
Mr. Halbert married in Belleville in 1909 Pauline Mary Thon, 
member of a well known family of Belleville. 

HON. PATRICK J. LUCEY. The present attorney-general of the 
State of Illinois, Hon. Patrick J. Lucey, is a lawyer of long standing 
at the Illinois bar, having commenced practice at Ottawa in May, 
1894. During his career he has won a position as a thorough, astute 
and learned legist, and his various important public services have 
brought him into prominence in the affairs of the state. He was 
born at Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois, May 2, 1873, and is one 
of eight children born to John and Johanna (Doud) Lucey. 

Educated in the public and high schools of his native town, where 
his father was engaged in a general business, Patrick J. Lucey early 
displayed a predilection for the law, and as a youth devoted his 
leisure moments to hard study in the offices of the well-known 
Chicago law firm of Duncan & Gilbert. He made rapid progress 
and was admitted to the bar in May, 1894, at once beginning practice 
at Streator in LaSalle County, where he soon attracted to himself a 
professional business of the most desirable kind. Early entering 
democratic politics, he was first elected city attorney and later mayor 
of Streator, and in 1912 became the candidate of his party for the 
office of attorney-general, to which he was elected, and since that 
time has made his home at Springfield. As the chief law officer of 
the state, empowered to act in all litigation in which the law-execut- 
ing power is a party, he has ably conserved the state's interests and 
forcibly prosecuted its claims. He belongs to the LaSalle County 
Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and the American 
Bar Association, and his fraternal connection is with the Elks. 

Mr. Lucey was married to Miss Frances G. Casey, a daughter of 
Nicholas Casey, and to this union there has come one child. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lucey are members of the Catholic Church. 

MILLARD McMuRDO has been identified with the St. Clair County 
Bar for thirty years, and while never active in politics and with no 
desire for official preferment, has enjoyed substantial success in the 
strict lines of his profession. 

Millard McMurdo was born at Randolph, Illinois, September 27, 
1856, a son of William McMurdo. His father was born in Chester, 
England, a son of James McMurdo who came to America in 1818 
and settled with his family at Kaskaskia, Illinois, while the first 
Legislature of the state was in session. Grandfather James Mc- 
Murdo was a millwright by trade. William McMurdo followed 
farming in Randolph County until his death in 1871. He married 
Harriet Steel, who was born in Steelville, Randolph County, Illi- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 891 

nois, and is now living at Marissa, Illinois, at the age of seventy- 
nine years. They were the parents of five children. 

Millard McMurdo attended the schools of Randolph County, 
finished in the Sparta High School, studied law with R. J. Goddard 
at Sparta, and was admitted to the bar January n, 1884. After 
about eighteen months of practice at Sparta, Mr. McMurdo moved 
to Marissa, and for fully thirty years has been favored with a large 
share of business of the local bar. Some years ago he served as 
president of the board of trustees of the Village of Marissa, Illinois, 
for two terms. 

Mr. McMurdo was married in 1876 to Miss Martha A. Finley, 
whose father, James Finley was an early settler of Randolph County. 
To their marriage were born five children. One died in infancy. 
Mrs. Mary Alberta McMurdo was born in Randolph County, Illi- 
nois, near Houston ; Dr. William Wilford was a physician at 
Marissa and died in August, 1914; J. Ralph McMurdo is a leading 
lawyer of St. Clair County; Ward F. McMurdo is now studying 
law in his father's office. 

JAMES R. McMuRoo. The name McMurdo has been represented 
in the legal profession of Southern Illinois for many years, and 
James R. McMurdo of East St. Louis is the son of an able lawyer 
and his uncle was for a number of years, until his death, identified 
with the profession in East St. Louis. 

James R. McMurdo was born at Sparta in Randolph County 
February 18, 1882. His parents are Millard and Martha (Finley) 
McMurdo, both natives of Randolph County, and descended from 
some of the early settlers in that part of the state. Millard Mc- 
Murdo, though a farmer for a number of years, subsequently took 
up the law and is now one of the leading attorneys at Marissa in 
St. Clair County. He is fifty-eight years of age, and his wife is 
about the same age. Of their four children, one was Dr. Wilford 
McMurdo, of Marissa, who died August 6, 1914; W. Frenton, at 
Marissa, is now reading law with his father; and the daughter is 
Alberta. 

James R. McMurdo, the third of the children, attended the 
public schools at Marissa and also the Marissa Academy, but before 
graduating entered his father's law office and read law until his 
admission to the bar on December 10, 1906. He spent one year in 
practice with his father. His uncle, Joseph H. McMurdo, had for 
a number of years been engaged in practice at Belleville, and finally 
moved to East St. Louis and was assistant state's attorney. His 
"death occurred January 19, 1908, at East St. Louis, and his nephew, 
James R. McMurdo, then took up his practice and continued in his 
uncle's office for two years, and has since moved to one of the large 
modern buildings, maintains a finely equipped office, and has a 
splendid clientage in East St. Louis business circles. 

Mr. McMurdo is a democrat who has never manifested an in- 



892 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

clination for office. He is a member of the East St. Louis Bar 
Association. 

On July 7, 1910, at Chicago he married Margaret May Lyons, 
daughter of William M. K. and Sarah J. Lyons, her father a drug- 
gist at Marissa, Illinois. They have one child, Harriet Eleanor 
McMurdo, born at East St. Louis, July 12, 1913. 

JOHN J. ROLOFSON. Well qualified in every way to carry into 
the practice of an honorable profession all the requirements neces- 
sary for success, John J. Rolofson, an able member of the Clinton 
Bar, has proved his ability in many important cases in the courts of 
DeWitt County. He was born April 10, 1885, on his father's farm 
in Wilson Township, DeWitt County, Illinois, and is the only son 
of John J. and Effie M. (Wilson) Rolofson. 

John J. Rolofson, the elder, belonged to one of the pioneer fam- 
ilies of DeWitt County, and he was born in Wilson Township, 
October i, 1862, a son of John B. and Mary (Bird) Rolofson. His 
early schooling was obtained near his home, in the district schools 
and he grew to manhood with a practical knowledge of farming. 
Subsequently he embarked in the mercantile business at Wapella 
and was made postmaster of that village. Later in life he became 
an auctioneer. On February 27, 1884, he married Miss Effie M. 
Wilson, and they had one child, John J., who worthily bears his 
father's name. 

John J. Rolofson was creditably graduated from the Clinton High 
School and then entered the Wesleyan University at Bloomington, 
Illinois, being graduated from the law department of that institu- 
tion in 1908, with the degree of LL. B., and in June of that year was 
admitted to the bar, later taking a course at Yale, where, in 1909, 
he received the degree of Master of Law. He located at Clinton 
and here has built up a very satisfactory practice and stands high 
in the County Bar Association, of which he is an active member. 

Mr. Rolofson married Miss Flossie Brown, who is a daughter 
of Mathias D. and Sarah Bailey Brown. They are very active in 
the work of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. Rolofson being 
superintendent of the Sunday school. He is identified with the 
republican party, having served as secretary of the Republican State 
Central Committee for past ten years and in August, 1915, was 
appointed master in chancery of DeWitt County. Mr. Rolofson 
values his membership with his college fraternities and still keeps 
in touch with Tau Kappa Epsilon and the Phi Delta Phi. He be- 
longs also to the Masonic and Elk lodges and is a member of 
Mohammed Temple at Peoria. In addition to his knowledge of law 
and his general literary acquirements, Mr. Rolofson has the advan- 
tage of possessing a pleasing personality, which, in this profession 
as in others, arid, in fact in almost every vocation, is an important 
factor contributive to success. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 893 

HON. RAYMOND D. MEEKER. Both the bar and the Legislature 
have been honored by the services of the Meeker family from Moul- 
trie County. The name has been continuously associated with law 
practice in that district for more than half a century, the present 
Senator Raymond D. Meeker being a son of the late Jonathan 
Meeker, who is well remembered for his various activities of a pub- 
lic nature in the county, particularly as county judge, as well as for 
his sound learning in the law and fine integrity as a citizen, qualities 
which have likewise distinguished the state senator of that name. 

In the early days of Moultrie County before the war there was 
a young blacksmith's apprentice and workman by the name of Jona- 
than Meeker, who was born in what is now Marion County, but at 
that time was a part of Delaware County, Ohio, on July 25, 1831. 
His parents were Ambrose and Hannah Meeker, the former a native 
of Orange, New Jersey, and the latter of Plymouth, Massachusetts. 
Ambrose Meeker was a blacksmith by trade, and early in 1848 
brought his family from Ohio to Nauvoo, Illinois, thence to Clark 
County and then to Sullivan in Moultrie County, Illinois. The 
mother died not long afterwards, and the father passed away in 
1882. Jonathan Meeker acquired a common school education, was 
seventeen years of age when he removed to Sullivan, and though 
trained to the blacksmith's trade his studious disposition and his 
marked inclination for the law led him to take up its study and he 
gradually merged from the trade into the profession which was his 
life work. Jonathan Meeker for many years had a large practice as 
a lawyer, varied by much public service within his home county. In 
1872 he was elected a member of the State Legislature, but his 
longest service was as county judge, an office to which he was elected- 
in 1877 and which he filled for nine consecutive years. In 1892 he 
was elected state's attorney, and after the expiration of his term in 
that, position gave his undivided attention to private practice until 
his death on December 6, 1900. He was one of the sturdy democrats 
in his county. In November, 1860, in Rensselaer, Indiana, Jonathan 
Meeker married Miss Nancy Parker, who died March 23, 1907. The 
five children born to their union were Gertrude, Estella, Clara B., 
Raymond D. and Grace. 

Raymond D. Meeker, who for a number of years practiced law 
with his father as junior member of the firm of Meeker & Meeker 
at Sullivan was born in Moultrie County April 7, 1869. He attended 
the grammar and high schools in Sullivan, was graduated from 
Butler University in 1891, and took up the study of law with the 
firm of Edson & Edson at Dtiluth, Minnesota, and in his father's 
office at Sullivan. Mr. Meeker was admitted to the bar in March, 
1893, so that his continuous experience as a lawyer covers more than 
twenty years. For four terms he filled the office of city attorney of 
Sullivan, and in the fall of 1912 was a successful candidate on the 
democratic ticket for the office of state senator and has been one 
of the able working members of the last two general assemblies of 



894 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Illinois. Fraternally Senator Meeker is affiliated with Sigma Chi 
Fraternity and the Improved Order of Red Men, and is one of the 
lawyers in the southern half of the state to unite with high ideals, 
a practical vigor in accomplishment which lends them the dignity 
of honor and usefulness in whatever sphere they choose their 
activities. 

PERRY SMITH PATTERSON. The excellent professional average 
of the younger element of lawyers in Chicago, as exemplified by the 
eminent positions attained by a substantial proportion of its mem- 
bers, their acknowledged ability as orators, comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the fundamental principles of law, and the energy, vigor and 
shrewdness with which they prepare and present their cases, has 
made the Chicago legal fraternity famous throughout the country. 
One of the best known of the generation of lawyers to whom refer- 
ence is made is Perry Smith Patterson, of the firm of Shepard, 
McCormick, Thomason, Kirkland & Patterson, whose success at the 
bar has shown him to be the possessor of most, if not all, of those 
qualities which are desirable to the conduct of a varied and repre- 
sentative law business, and who has shown marked ability in prop- 
erly applying them in his chosen calling. 

Mr. Patterson is a native of Chicago, born February 18, 1881, a 
son of Charles A. and Mary (Kennedy) Patterson, his father having 
for a number of years been a successful business man of this city. 
After attending the graded schools, Mr. Patterson became a student 
in the Englewood High School, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1900, and from the time of his graduation until May, 
1905, taught school in Chicago and at various points in Cook County. 
In the meantime, he had prepared himself for college in the summer 
under-graduate law school, and in the fall of 1905 entered as a resi- 
dent student in the University of Chicago. In the fall of 1907 Mr. 
Patterson entered the law school of Northwestern University, from 
which he was graduated in June, 1909, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws, and in the following October was admitted to the Illinois 
bar and has been engaged actively in practice ever since. Until 
April, 1912, Mr. Patterson carried on an independent practice, but 
at that time became a member of the well known firm of Shepard, 
McCormick, Thomason & Patterson, general practitioners, with 
offices in the Tribune Building. Mr. Patterson has proven himself an 
untiring worker in the interests of his profession, and his devotion to 
his clients' interests is proverbial. Great care and precision mark his 
preparation of cases, and before court or jury he is a logical, con- 
vincing advocate, commanding the respect of bench and bar by his 
fairness and unfailing courtesy. 

Mr. Patterson is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association and the Law Institute. He is popular 
socially, belonging to the Legal Club, the City Club and the Beverly 
Country Club, and his fraternal connections are with the Sigma 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 895 

Nu fraternity and the Knights of Columbus. He was a resident 
of West Hammond, Illinois, where his residence was at No. 438 
Mott Avenue, and has long taken a keen interest in the civic affairs 
of that community, having been special attorney for the City of 
West Hammond since 1911. In May, 1915, he was appointed cor- 
poration counsel of West Hammond. In all respects he is a stirring 
and progressive citizen. Mr. Patterson is a bachelor. 

HON. OLIVER ALBERT HARKER. Among the prominent profes- 
sional men of Illinois, Hon. Oliver Albert Harker, formerly judge 
of the Appellate Court of Illinois, and now dean of the law depart- 
ment of the University of Illinois, occupies a foremost place. Not 
only as an authority in the law but as an invigorating presence has 
Judge Harker been invaluable to the great state institution, and in 
every other relation of life and association with important affairs, 
he has shown great talents and has exemplified the virtues that 
have made him worthy of an old and honorable ancestry, as well 
as of the admiration and esteem of those of his own and of the 
younger generations with whom his activities have so closely con- 
nected him. 

Oliver Albert Harker was born December 14, 1846, one of a 
family of ten children born to Rev. Mifflin and Anna W. (Wood) 
Harker, the former of whom was a prominent minister of the Con- 
gregational church. In boyhood the youth attended the public 
schools and later the Wheaton High School, and in 1866 was gradu- 
ated with the degree of A. B. from McKendree College. Prior to 
this, however, he had served as a soldier in the Civil war, in June, 
1862, answering the call for loo-day men and enlisting in Company 
D, One Hundred and Ninety-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
After returning from the battlefields, he resumed his studies and 
completed his law course in the Northwestern University. In 1868 
he was admitted to the bar and entered into practice at Vienna, in 
Johnson County, Illinois, and in 1869 was made city attorney. He 
became a man of wide influence in Johnson county and served on 
the county board of supervisors" with extreme usefulness during 
1874 and 1875. In 1878 he was elected judge of the First Judicial 
District of Illinois, and was re-elected in June, 1879, and subse- 
quently, in 1885, in 1891 and in 1897 was recalled to the bench, from 
1891 to 1894 serving as judge of the appellate court, and being re- 
elected and serving from 1897 to 1900, as judge of the Third Judi- 
cial District. 

In 1903 Judge Harker became dean of the law department of 
the University of Illinois, his thorough knowledge and long experi- 
ence in practice and on the bench, especially qualifying him for 
such distinction. In this office his duties have included the personal 
conducting of the pleading and practice courses, a strong feature of 
the work of the college. Since the organization of the college he 
has been one of its most earnest advocates, conducting for a long 



896 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

time the regular weekly sessions of the Moot Court, and exerting 
a strong influence in strengthening the courses offered by the college 
and in dignifying the study of law. Judge Marker is one of the 
older but yet active members of the County and State Bar associa- 
tions, and in 1895 and again in 1896, served as president of the 
Illinois State Bar Association. 

Judge Harker was united in marriage with Miss Sidney Bain, 
whose father, John Bain, was formerly a prosperous merchant and 
much respected citizen of Vienna, Illinois. One daughter and one 
son were born to Judge and Mrs. Harker, the former of whom is 
the wife of Frank M. Hewitt, and the latter, George M. Harker, is 
an attorney and business man of Los Angeles, California. Judge 
Harker and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He has always been affiliated politically with the republican party. 
He belongs to the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
to the Fraternal Order of Odd Fellows and has continued his inter- 
est in his old fraternity of college days, the Phi Delta Phi. 

HON. EDMUND BURKE. Like many other men who have attained 
high positions in the realm of the law in Illinois, Hon. Edmund 
Burke, state's attorney of Sangamon County, is a native of the 
Prairie State. Here his entire career has been passed, with the 
exception of several years during the period of his education, and 
here he has steadily advanced in his chosen calling, fairly winning 
public honors and material success, and thoroughly vindicating the 
faith placed in him by his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Burke was born at the Town of Buffalo, Sangamon County, 
Illinois, in 1876, and there received his education in the graded and 
high schools. After some further preparation, he entered the law 
department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and grad- 
uated therefrom with his degree in 1898, and immediately located 
in Springfield, which city has continued to be his home to the present 
time. From the outset of his career he became interested in the 
activities of the democratic party, and soon became recognized as 
a man of influence in the ranks of that organization. In 1908 he 
was offered and accepted the nomination for the office of state's 
attorney of Sangamon County, was elected thereto, and so ably dis- 
charged his duties during his first term that he received the re-elec- 
tion in 1912. The work of the state's attorney's office, under the 
supervision of Mr. Burke and three assistants, has been carried on 
in a most satisfactory and effective manner, and has been char- 
acterized by prompt attention to the county's legal business. 

Mr. Burke is a valued member of the Sangamon County Bar 
Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, and is affiliated 
with various fraternal and social bodies. His offices are maintained 
at the courthouse, while his residence is located at No. 126 North 
Walnut Street, Springfield. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 897 

HON. HERSHEL R. SNAVELY. The time has come when it is 
universally recognized that industrial, political and social progress 
can be achieved only through law and order. People of the most 
divergent views on many questions, agree upon the supremacy of 
the law, and, with careful discrimination chose those for judicial 
positions whose motives cannot be questioned and whose private lives 
are without reproach. Often the virtues of honesty, courage and 
sincerity are reckoned more essential than wide experience. Atten- 
tion is thus called to a very prominent citizen of Clark County, 
Hon. Hershel R. Snavely, who has been county judge of Clark 
County for the past eight years, to which position of dignity and 
responsibility he rose by unassuming and obvious merit. 

Hershel R. Snavely was born in Clark County, Illinois, February 
2, 1882, and is. a son of Louis C. and Phebe J. (Roberts) Snavely, 
of Western Reserve pioneer stock. The father, Louis C. Snavely, 
was born in Ohio and from there came to Clark County, Illinois, in 
1855, where the rest of his life was passed and where he engaged 
in business for many years as a contractor. His death occurred in 
1911. In the public schools of Clark County, Hershel R. Snavely 
received his early educational training. Later he entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he was creditably graduated in 1903, but 
literary achievement alone did not satisfy his ambition as preparation 
for life work' and he afterward returned to the university and in 
1904 was graduated from the law department. Locating at Marshall 
he entered into practice and within two years proved legal talent of 
a high order, ably sustaining a leading position on the Clark County 
Bar. He was elected county judge of Clark County, on the repub- 
lican ticket in 1906, and served in that capacity with so much effi- 
ciency that he was re-elected to the bench in 1910. The court 
records show the -ability and the patient, conscientious thoroughness 
with which he has administered his high office, one to which few 
men attain so early in professional life. He is identified with all the 
law bodies of accepted value in the country, including the Clark 
County Bar Association, the Illinois Bar Association and the Ameri- 
can Bar Association. 

Judge Snavely was united in marriage with Miss Mabel Miller, 
who is a daughter of John O. Miller, and they have one child, 
Anna E. Judge Snavely and their family reside at 701 North Eighth 
Street, Marshall. In his fraternal relations he is a Mason and be- 
longs also to the beneficiary order of the Court of Honor. As a 
private citizen Judge Snavely is helpful, public spirited and liberal. 

ARTHUR POORMAN. A prominent member of the Clark County 
Bar, a body that may justifiably claim much legal talent, is Arthur 
Poorman, formerly state's attorney, and now a prominent lawyer 
at Marshall. Time was when the subject of human valuation was 
not as clearly apprehended as it is today and in the law age alone 
was able to command the confidence that ensured recognition. As 



898 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

a general rule the younger law practitioners, no matter how brilliant 
their talent, were set aside in important cases, to await experience. 
A change has surely come when comparative youth is no longer a 
bar to recognition of ability and to honorable professional prefer- 
ment. An example may be found in Arthur Poorman, who has 
served with the greatest efficiency in several responsible offices and 
for many years has been a representative citizen as well as an able 
attorney at the county seat. 

Arthur Poorman was born in Kansas, August 25, 1880, and is 
a son of Benjamin and Alice Beulah (Shawler) Poorman. The 
father of Mr. Poorman was born in Clark County, Illinois, and at 
different points he followed the trade of miller, at all times being 
a respected member of the community in which he lived. Arthur 
Poorman is one of a family of seven children born to his parents 
and in boyhood, with his brothers and sisters, attended the public 
schools. In 1900 he was graduated from the high school at Mendon, 
Indiana, after which he became a student of law at Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, and was graduated from the law school of the University 
of Michigan in 1903 and subsequently admitted to the Illinois Bar. 
His rise in his professional line was rapid, his abilities being such 
as could not be overlooked, and in 1904 he was elected on the repub- 
lican ticket to the important office of state's attorney. In this office, 
one that requires exceptional qualities, he served four years, his 
record through the entire term showing faithful adherence to duty, 
irrespective of any political bias. After retiring from the office 
of state's attorney, he resumed practice at Marshall and has been 
connected with much important litigation in city and county, and 
in 1912 was made master in chancery and served in that office until 
1914. Mr. Poorman's relations with bench and bar have always 
been cordial and dignified and his personal friends in the profession 
are numerous. He is a valued member of the Clark County Bar 
Association and also the American Bar Association. He was reared 
in the republican party and his faith in its principles has never been 
disturbed. 

Mr. Poorman was married to Miss Ruth Booth, a daughter of 
Edwin Booth. Mr. and Mrs. Poorman reside at No. 315 South 
Fifth Street, and he maintains his office on the east side of the 
public square. They are members of the Congregational Church. 
His professional engagements absorb much of his time but fraternal 
life also claims a portion, belonging as he does, to the Masons, 
Knights of Pythias, Red Men, Woodmen of the World and the 
Knights of Honor. 

HON. JAMES WILLIAM GRAHAM. What a wealth of experience 
must accompany forty continuous years of practice at the bar. To 
one who has been called upon constantly to counsel, advise, assist 
and defend, how unrevealed must stand out the virtues and failings 
of humanity. Such has been the opportunity of James William 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 899 

Graham, now the dean of the Clark County Bar, and the oldest prac- 
ticing attorney at Marshall. Not only, thereby, has he achieved dis- 
tinction but prominence also attaches to his name in other fields, 
public office having brought him honor and private acquaintance the 
respect and esteem of his community. 

James William Graham was born April 8, 1849, m Ohio, one of 
a family of four children born to his parents who were Richard and 
Eleanor (Sloan) Graham. Scotch and Irish blood mingled in the 
ancestry but the father was born in Virginia and the mother in Ohio. 
The father's business as a blacksmith, was sufficiently profitable to 
enable him to give his children advantages, and after James W. had 
completed the common school course he was given high school 
training and later entered the State Normal School at Bloomington, 
Illinois. Having decided upon the career of law, the young man 
became a student with the late Judge Schofield as his preceptor, 
and also was under the supervision of Judge Wilkins, a noted jurist 
of the state, and in June, 1875, was admitted to the Illinois Bar. 
His practice has been wide in its scope and his clients have been 
both high and low for there is no record that Mr. Graham ever 
refused advice or 1-egal help on account of lack of money or friends, 
to any one worthy of assistance. Monumental fortunes are seldom 
built up in the law but its emoluments are usually satisfactory 
although more charity is extended by this profession than the public 
at large has any knowledge of, and during his long period of practice 
Mr. Graham has secured a competency which has been increased 
through wise investment. From early manhood he has been inter- 
ested in politics, his convictions making him a democrat, and on the 
ticket of that party he was elected a member of the General Assem- 
bly and served honestly and usefully as a statesman, during that 
period advocating many measures that have proved beneficial as 
laws. He is, at present, a notary public. 

Mr. Graham was united in marriage with Miss Etta Crusen, who 
was born in Illinois, and is a daughter of Richard Crusen, a native 
of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Graham have two children : Harry C, 
who is a resident of Washington, D. C. ; and Mabel G., who is the 
wife of H. H. Knipe, who is president and general manager of the 
Telephone Commission Company, at Olney, Illinois. Mr. Graham's 
acquaintance through the state is wide and he is a member of the 
Clark County Bar Association and long has maintained pleasant 
fraternal relations with the Masonic bodies and the Knights of 
Pythias. His business office is located on the east side of the public 
square at Marshall and his handsome residence is at No. 401 North 
Sixth Street. 

WILLIAM P. EARLY. An Edwardsville lawyer with twenty-five 
years of active experience, William P. Early has frequently been 
honored with the more important offices of county and city, and has 
a well secured reputation among the lawyers of Southern Illinois. 



900 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

He was born in Madison County, Illinois, in July, 1860, a son 
of Matthew R. and Elizabeth (Surrells) Early. His father was 
born in Virginia, came to Illinois when a young man, and became a 
Madison County farmer, where he lived until his death in 1897 at 
the age of eighty years. The mother was born in Illinois, and died 
in 1876 at the age of forty-four. They were the parents of nine 
children. Fifth among these children, William P. Early attended 
the public schools of Madison County, qualified himself for teaching, 
and with the means earned by his work in the schoolroom and from 
other sources took the law course at Valparaiso University in 
Indiana, finishing there in 1889. In that year he was admitted to 
the bar and began practice at Edwardsville. Mr. Early has filled 
the office of city attorney, has served as county judge and also on 
the circuit bench, has been a member of the Edwardsville Board of 
Education, and in the course of his long career a number of other 
distinctions have come to him. Mr. Early is a member of the 
County and State Bar associations, and is affiliated with the Masons, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Improved Order of Red Men. In 1894 at Edwardsville he married 
Miss Richie Ground, daughter of Richard Ground. They have two 
children: Dorris and Dudley, both of whom are graduates of the 
Edwardsville public schools. 

BYRON PIPER. A young lawyer at Effingham whose work has 
brought him into active prominence and who is now serving as 
state's attorney of Effingham County, Byron Piper was born. at 
Altamont in Effingham County, April 10, 1880. His parents 
were D. F. and Nancy (Mayhen) Piper, the father a native of 
Indiana and the mother of Illinois. The father is now living at the 
age of seventy-seven, and has spent many years as a painter in 
Altamont. He saw three and a half years of active service as a 
Union soldier during the Civil war, entering as a private in an 
Indiana company and regiment. The mother is still living at Alta- 
mont at the age of sixty-six. There were three children. 

Byron Piper received his early education in Effingham County, 
and as a young man worked at various occupations to assist sup- 
porting himself and his family. He then entered the office of Jacob 
Zimmerman, a local attorney, and after a thorough course of read- 
ing was admitted to the bar in September, 1907. While reading 
law Mr. Piper served as city attorney of Altamont three terms and 
was "city clerk for three terms. He is a democrat and was elected 
on that ticket to the office of state's attorney, and now has his office 
in the courthouse at Effingham. 

Mr. Piper is affiliated with the Masonic Order, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. At Alta- 
mont in December, 1913, he married Genevieve Kelly, daughter of 
R. G. Kelly of Altamont. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 901 

WILLIAM M. HURST. Admitted to the bar in 1905, William M. 
Hurst is now identified with the bar at Jonesboro and stands high 
in professional circles in that county. 

William M. Hurst was born in Union County, Illinois, March 
13, 1877, the oldest of the three children of Samuel D. and Jennie 
(Walker) Hurst. His father was a native of Tennessee and his 
mother of Illinois. Samuel D. Hurst after coming to Illinois first 
settled in Chicago and then engaged in the real estate business in 
Union County, and is now a resident of Jonesboro, at the age of 
sixty-six, while the mother is living at the age of sixty-two. The 
other two children are Mrs. H. G. Lawyer and Mrs. Morris J. John. 

During his boyhood William M. Hurst attended the Jonesboro 
public schools, graduating in the high school, and read law in the 
office of James Lingle in Jonesboro until admitted to the bar in 1905. 
Mr. Hurst did most of his active practice in Kentucky, having begun 
professional work at Clay in Webster County, and remained there 
for six years. A stroke of paralysis then caused him to give up 
active practice, "and he has since lived at Jonesboro, where he was 
elected justice of the peace in 1912, and also city clerk, an office he 
still holds. Mr. Hurst is affiliated with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. At Clay, Ken- 
tucky, on August 17, 1907, he married Miss Virginia Pride, daughter 
of Charles Pride. Her mother is still living. 

HON. JOHN A. STERLING. A member of the McLean County 
Bar for a period of thirty years, Hon. John A. Sterling, of Bloom- 
ington, is not only a thorough and able lawyer, but a republican 
leader of high reputation, who, since 1902, with the exception of 
two years, has been a member of the House of Representatives of 
the United States from the Seventeenth Illinois Congressional Dis- 
trict. 

Mr. Sterling was born near Leroy, in McLean County, Illinois, 
February i, 1857, and is a son of Charles and Anna (Kesler) Ster- 
ling, who had two other sons and three daughters, Mr. Sterling's 
elder brother being United States Senator Thomas Sterling of South 
Dakota. He attended the country schools until he was eighteen 
years of age, in the meantime being reared to agricultural work, but 
did not desire a career as a farmer and accordingly took a course in 
the Illinois Wesleyan University, an institution from which he was 
graduated in June, 1883. Following this Mr. Sterling engaged in 
teaching school for four years, and for two years of this time was 
superintendent of public schools of Lexington, Illinois. In the mean- 
time, he had been putting his spare time in as a student of law, 
reading in the office of Fifer & Phillips, and being admitted to the 
bar in February, 1885. Since that time Mr. Sterling has been en- 
gaged actively in practice at Bloomington, where he has steadily 
advanced to a recognized position among Illinois legists. At the 
present time Mr. Sterling is a member of the firm of Welty, Sterling 



902 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

& Whitmore, an acknowledged strong combination, in the enjoyment 
of a large and important clientele. Mr. Sterling belongs to the 
McLean County Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association, while fraternally he is associated 
with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of 
Red Men. A republican from early manhood, his first connection 
with official position was in 1892, when he was elected state's attor- 
ney for McLean County, an office in which he remained until 1896. 
In 1902 he was sent from his district to the United States Congress, 
in which he served continuously for ten years, meeting with defeat 
in the election of 1912, but being sent back to the House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1914. He has worked faithfully in behalf of his con- 
stituents' interests and has been successful in securing some valuable 
legislation for Illinois generally and McLean County in particular. 
Mr. Sterling was married to Miss Clara M. Irons, daughter of 
Nelson B. and Amanda Irons, and they have become the parents of 
three children. 

MAX LUSTER. A Chicago attorney with offices at 127 North 
Dearborn Street, Max Luster came into the legal profession about 
twelve years ago after a varied experience in paying his own way, 
and among other employments it is interesting to note that about 
twenty years ago he was a conductor on a West Madison Street 
car line. 

He was born in New York City June. 27, 1873, but in the course 
of the same year his parents Isaac and Lena (Lincoln) Luster, 
came to Chicago, where his father has for many years been en- 
gaged in the contract express business. The opportunities as a 
youth allowed him but a limited education and at the age of thir* 
teen he began paying his way as a helper in a carriage paint shop. 
Three months later he was given work as driver of an express 
wagon for his father, and was thus employed one year. Up to the 
fall of 1893 he was in a wholesale cloth cutting and trimming busi- 
ness, and for the next few years was a conductor of a West Madi- 
son Street car. In 1895 he returned to his former position, and while 
employed in that way until 1897 determined upon the study of law. 
In the meantime he had served a brief engagement as assistant in 
the office of the county clerk. He was also employed by Erder- 
heimer & Stein, wholesale clothing manufacturers, was insurance 
solicitor and was deputy collector of internal revenue, and for sixty 
days an appointee in the office of county clerk. This work gave him 
a broad experience and contact with men and affairs, and in 1900 
he rented desk room at 79 Dearborn Street in order to devote 
more time to his legal studies. While preparing for the bar he 
served six months as investigator under John F. Smulski, who was 
at that time Chicago City attorney. 

In 1902 Mr. Luster graduated from the Illinois College of Law, 
LL. B., and was admitted to the bar in 1903, and at once took up the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 903 



general practice which he has continued with gratifying success. 
He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois Bar 
Association, the Knights of Pythias, the Royal Arcanum, the 
Knights and Ladies of Honor, and in politics is a republican. On 
December 24, 1895, he married Miss Rosie Lincoln. Their three 
children are named Julian, Arthur and Orrin. The family reside 
at 1223 North Hoyne Avenue. 

JUDGE J. H. WEBB. With more than thirty years of active prac- 
tice at Vandalia, Judge Webb is now one of the senior members of 
the local bar, in private practice has always enjoyed a large clientage, 
and is especially popular for his efficient service to the county in 
the office of county judge. 

Though his home has been in America since infancy, Judge 
Webb is an Englishman by birth, born in England in December, 
1856. On July 7, 1857, his parents, Henry and Ann Webb, arrived 
in America, and went direct to Illinois, locating at Effingham, where 
the father followed farming until his death in June, 1887, at the age 
of sixty-five. The mother died in August, 1912, at the age of eighty- 
two. 

Judge Webb was the oldest of their three children. He gained 
his education in the public schools of Effingham, continued his train- 
ing while teaching as assistant principal of schools and also took up 
the study of law, often burning the midnight oil in order to accom- 
plish his ambition to become a lawyer. In June, 1881, Mr. Webb 
was admitted to the bar at Vandalia, and began practice in that city 
the same year. His public service has been in the office of city attor- 
ney, and at different periods he has served as county judge, being 
now in his fourth term in that office. His work has been charac- 
terized by the efficiency with which he has performed all his pro- 
fessional service, and he is one of the prominent men of that city. 

Judge Webb has membership in the County Bar Association, and 
is a member of the executive committee of the Old Folks Home at 
Smithsboro. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and is a democrat in politics. 
In 1883, in Marion County, Judge Webb married Ida M. Thrapp, 
daughter of Rev. J. A. Thrapp. They have two children: Arthur 
M. and Gladys E. Webb, both born in Vandalia. 

J. J. WELSH. One of the hard working lawyers in the central 
part of the state is J. J. Welsh, whose active membership in the 
Galesburg bar began more than twenty years ago. He is one of the 
comparatively few lawyers of such long standing who have never 
been attracted into the field of politics, though his solid learning, his 
industry and integrity are excellent qualifications for the bench. In 
1915 he declined an urgent invitation to make the race for circuit 
judge, and had he consented he would undoubtedly have been 
elected. 



904 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 



Mr. Welsh was born near Williamsfield, Knox County, Illinois, 
May 1 8, 1866, a son of Richard and Johanna (Murphy) Welsh. 
His years up to eighteen were spent on the home farm, during 
which time he acquired the fundamentals in a district school. In 
1885 he entered Lombard University, now Lombard College, and 
was graduated A. B. in 1890. After some preliminary studies of 
the law he entered, in 1892, the University of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor and was graduated LL. B. in 1894. Admitted to the bar at 
Ottawa in 1894, he at once took up active practice at Galesburg, and 
for five years was associated with one of the eminent attorneys of 
the state, A. M. Brown, under the firm name of Brown & Welsh. 
This was followed by three years of individual practice, at which 
time he formed a partnership and for three years practiced with 
George C. Gale. Mr. Gale was likewise distinguished for his high 
legal attainments in Illinois, and finally removed from Galesburg to 
Chicago. Mr. Welsh's next partnership was with Hardy, Welsh 
& Hardy, a firm that was in existence until May i, 1915. Since that 
date Mr. Welsh has maintained offices of his own in the Galesburg 
National Bank Building. He is attorney for and director of the 
People's Trust & Savings Bank and is legal adviser for several 
other corporations. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic Order, the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, and is 
a member of the Galesburg Club and the Country Club, and of 
the County and State Bar associations. In politics he is a democrat. 
Mrs. W r elsh was formerly Miss Etta M. Dick of Galesburg. They 
reside at 745 South Academy Street. 

FRANK HALBOWER. One of the leading attorneys of Hancock 
County, now serving as assistant state's attorney, Frank Halbower 
has practiced at Carthage thirty years, and his success as a lawyer 
has been of more than a local nature since he has been employed 
in a number of state cases. 

Frank Halbower was born December 9, 1857, in Hancock 
County, being the second of seven children born to David and Mary 
(Wood) Halbower. His father was born in Germany August 8, 
1823, and his mother in Scotland in January, 1825. Both are still 
living, with their home in Warsaw. While Frank Halbower has 
gained distinction as a lawyer, his brothers are all bankers. 

His early education was acquired in the public schools at Green 
Plain to the age of eighteen, followed by three years as a student in 
Carthage College. Mr. Halbower began reading law in the office of 
William E. Mason, a brother-in-law at Carthage in 1880, and was 
admitted to the bar in Mount Vernon in February, 1883. Mr. Hal- 
bower at once returned to Carthage and became a partner of William 
E. Mason, under the firm name of Mason & Halbower. This was 
one of the successful partnerships of Hancock County until the 
death of Mr. Mason. Since that time Mr. Halbower has practiced 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 905 

alone. Mr. Halbower was elected to the office of state's attorney of 
Hancock County in the fall of 1884 and was re-elected four years 
later, serving two terms. He is now assistant state's attorney. By 
several different governors of the state he has been appointed to 
handle some of the large cases in behalf of Illinois, and Attorney- 
General Hamlin made him one of the special attorneys to look after 
the noted lake front cases in Chicago. Mr. Halbower is a democrat, 
and has been a delegate to a number of party conventions, both 
state and judicial. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic 
Order. 

On July i, 1885, Mr. Halbower married Miss Catherine Osborne 
of Lenawee, Michigan. They have three children : Ralph, aged 
twenty-three; Carl, twenty-one years of age, and employed as an 
electrician in Chicago; and Frances, who is married and lives in 
Peoria. 

EDMUND P. NISCHWITZ. For exact and ready knowledge of the 
law, ability both as counselor and advocate, and successful results, 
there is no member of the Mason County Bar with a better record 
than Edmund P. Nischwitz, who has practiced law at Havana since 
1896. Mr. Nischwitz has been honored with several of the important 
offices that are in direct line with the legal profession, and has been 
particularly successful as state's attorney. Out of forty-eight cases 
prosecuted by him since taking office, there have been only four 
acquittals, and the remaining forty-four cases have all resulted in 
convictions. 

Edmund P. Nischwitz was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, March 
2, 1872, a son of Phillip and Annie (Mackey) Nischwitz. His 
father was born in Germany and his mother in Ireland, both came 
to America when children, grew up in New Jersey, and were married 
in that state. The father was a New Jersey farmer and lived there 
until his death in 1897 at tne a g e f sixty-eight. The mother died 
in New Jersey in 1902, at the age of sixty-five. 

The fourth among five children, Edmund P. Nischwitz was edu- 
cated in the grammar and high schools at Plainfield, graduated 
B. A. in 1894 at Rutgers College in New Brunswick, and following 
his college days came West and entered the office of John W. Pepin 
at Havana, Illinois. Mr. Nischwitz was admitted to practice in 
1896, and has now been identified with the local bar for eighteen 
years. Since 1897 he has held the office of city attorney, was for 
four years master in chancery to the circuit court, and for three 
successive terms has served as state's attorney. He is also a trustee 
of the public schools. Mr. Nischwitz is a democrat in politics, and 
fraternally has affiliations with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Court of Honor, the Fraternal Reserve 
Life Association, and with the college fraternity of Beta Theta Phi. 

On December 9, 1895, Miss Ann Heberlie became his wife. Her 
father was the late Warren Heberlie, a prominent old resident of 



906 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Mason County. To their marriage have been born four children : 
Sadie, born in 1899 at Havana and now a student in the high 
school; Edmund Phillip, born in 1901 and a student in the high 
school; Ruth, born in 1904, in grammar schools; and Catherine, 
born in 1907, and also in school. Mr. Nischwitz owns one of the 
fine homes in Havana and has an attractive summer place on the 
banks of the Illinois River a few miles from Havana, and uses a 
launch in making his daily trips between his home and office. Mr. 
Nischwitz not only has won a high .place in his profession, as a 
result of close application and hard work, but he and his family are 
prominent socially in Havana. 

Louis LAMET has a well established position in the bar of 
Illinois, being junior member of the firm of Plantz & Lamet at War- 
saw, where for ten years they have been leading attorneys. Mr. 
Lamet has spent all his life in Hancock County, was for a time a 
teacher, and since his admission to the bar in 1901 has been steadily 
advancing in professional success. 

Louis Lamet was born at Warsaw December 28, 1874, a son of 
Julian and Eloise (Sylvester) Lamet. The ancestors on both sides 
came from France, his mother's people settling in Ohio and finally 
moving to Hancock County, Illinois, while his father located in 
Illinois in 1871. The parents still live at Warsaw. Louis Lamet 
acquired his early education in the Warsaw public schools, graduated 
in 1892, from the high school, and for three winter terms engaged 
in teaching. In 1896 he entered the University of Illinois, pursued 
his studies there in the literary, engineering and law departments, 
and was graduated LL. B. June 12, 1901. A few weeks later he was 
admitted to the bar at Chicago, and in 1902 took up active practice 
at Carthage. He soon returned to Warsaw, and formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. Truman Plantz, an association which has continued 
with mutual profit and satisfaction to the present time. Mr. Lamet 
was elected city attorney of Warsaw in 1905, serving one term, and 
from 1912 to 1914 was mayor of that progressive little city. He has 
also been clerk of the school board. Politically a democrat, his 
service has consisted chiefly as delegate to state conventions. Mr. 
Lamet was at one time consul of the Woodmen Camp No. 340, and 
is a member of the Business Men's Commercial Club. 

On January 10, 1905, Mr. Lamet married Miss Amee Magdalena 
LeMaire, daughter of Edward LeMaire of Basco, Hancock County. 
Mrs. Lamet received her education in the schools of Basco, Oquawka 
and Carthage. They have two children : Leon L., born November 
22, 1905, and Helene Anne, born September 20, 1907, and both now 
students in the Warsaw public schools. 

LEONARD D. QUINN. Since his graduation from Northwestern 
Law School about ten years ago Leonard D. Quinn has been identi- 
fied with the Kewanee Bar, now enjoys an individual practice that 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 907 

places him among the leaders, and is prominent in public affairs and 
is one of the able and influential young men of Henry County. 

Leonard D. Quinn was born at Kewanee December 23, 1879, 
a son of Michael C. and Mary C. (White) Quinn. His father was 
born in Connecticut and his mother in New York State. Michael C. 
Quinn was prominent as a farmer and grain dealer, is now deceased, 
and his widow is still living in Kewanee. 

Leonard D. Quinn was the third of four children, was educated 
in the common schools at Weathersfield until fourteen, spent a year 
in St. Alban's Military Academy, was graduated from the Kewanee 
High School in 1897 and to fit himself for a commercial career, on 
which his ideas were then turned, he spent one year in the Gem 
City Business College at Quincy. Mr. Quinn in 1899 entered North- 
western University, later for two years was a student of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, and then returned to the Northwestern 
University and was graduated LL. B. from the law department in 
1904. Previously in October, 1903, he was admitted to the bar at 
Springfield, and began practice at Kewanee. For a time Mr. Quinn 
was associated in practice with James H. Andrews, and afterwards 
with Robert C. Morse as partner under the firm name of Morse & 
Quinn, which continued for five years. Since 1909 has been in in- 
dividual practice, and now has a" profitable and extensive clientage. 
For five years he has served as village attorney of Weathersfield, 
was a member of the village board one year, and is now president 
of the township high school board. Among other professional con- 
nections he is attorney for the Kewanee Building & Loan Associa- 
tion. 

Active in democratic politics, Mr. Quinn has for a number of 
years attended state conventions and has usually served as alternate 
delegate. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Improved Order of Red Men. His 
church is the Presbyterian. May 18, 1910, Mr. Quinn married Miss 
Flora M. Fleming, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Fleming of 
Kewanee. Mrs. Quinn was educated in the Kewanee schools and is 
prominent in club and social work. Their home is 32 Dwight Street, 
while his office is at 217 North Main Street. 

JUDGE ALBERT E. BERGLAND. A former county judge of Henry 
County, for twenty years in active practice at Galva, Judge Bergland 
has a fine office and large law library and is the favorite attorney for 
an extensive clientage, including several banks. 

Albert E. Bergland was born on a farm near Galva November 9, 
1869, the second in a family of four children born to Jonas and 
Helen (Peterson) Bergland, both of whom were natives of Sweden. 
Judge Bergland was eight years old when his father died, but his 
mother is still living. A brother, Victor A., is a physician in Rock 
Island. 

Judge Bergland pursued a rather difficult course in preparation 



908 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

for the bar, since it was necessary to lend his hand beginning at an 
early age to the work of the home, and practically all the money 
that went into his education was earned by his individual efforts. 
In the district school near the old home he was a student until about 
thirteen years old, then attended village schools, and two years in 
the Galva High School. In 1885 he entered Knox College, but took 
out two years for teaching in order to get funds to continue his col- 
lege education, and was graduated in 1891 Bachelor of Science. 
Mr. Bergland read law in the office of Finley & McKenzie, and took 
his regular law course in the University of Maryland Law School 
at Baltimore. He was admitted to the Maryland Bar in June, 1894, 
and in the fall of the same year was admitted to the Illinois Bar at 
Chicago. Since opening his office at Galva Judge Bergland has 
always conducted an individual practice, and has preferred to handle 
his business alone rather than under partnership relations. 

Judge Bergland served several terms as city attorney of Galva, 
being the first city attorney after Galva was incorporated as a city. 
He was elected county judge of Henry County, but at the end of 
the four-year term declined a re-nomination in order to resume his 
private law business. Judge Bergland is local attorney for the First 
National Bank of Galva, the Farmers Co-operative State Bank and 
the Galva State Bank. He has long been active in democratic poli- 
tics, has served as delegate to numerous national and state conven- 
tions, and sat as an alternate in the Baltimore Convention which 
nominated Wilson and Marshall. He is now a member of the staff 
connected with the Inheritance Tax Department of Illinois! 

Judge Bergland was married March 16, 1897, to Miss Pearl J. 
Hindricks, daughter of Dr. William S. Hindricks of Chicago. They 
have one daughter, Martha Helen Bergland, born July 22, 1903. 
Mrs. Bergland was educated in the public schools at Carthage, fin- 
ishing at Knox College, and is an active member of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, being regent of the Kewanee Chapter. 
Judge Bergland is affiliated with the Masonic Order, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and other 
social organizations, and is a member of the college fraternity Phi 
Delta Beta. His church is the Congregational. Judge Bergland has 
his offices in the Johnson Building in Galva, and his home is at 217 
Northwest Fourth Avenue. 

W. THOMAS COLEMAN. That hoary age does not always nor 
exclusively possess the qualities most necessary for success in the 
learned professions, especially the law, is being daily proven by the 
rapid advances made by the younger generation, toward the goal 
of large achievement. A notable -case in point is found in W. 
Thomas Coleman, a comparatively youthful member of the Douglas 
County Bar, who is ably and effectively serving in the responsible 
office of state's attorney. 

W. Thomas Coleman was born in Douglas County, Illinois, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 909 

November 29, 1883, and is a son of William and Rosa B. (Cox) 
Coleman. They had nine children. In his earlier years the father 
' was a farmer but later lived retired. He died, highly respected, on 
November 2, 1914. 

In the public schools of Douglas County, Mr. Coleman received 
his education and after leaving the high school entered upon the 
study of law under the supervision of Attorney Charles G. Eckhart 
and Attorney Perry M. Moore, applying himself so diligently that 
he gained admittance to the Illinois Bar in 1908. He remained in 
his native county as a law practitioner and rapidly built up a sub- 
stantial practice and demonstrating such ability that in 1912 he was 
elected state's attorney, an office demanding many special qualifica- 
tions. So far in his administration of the office he has handled 
every case brought to his attention with remarkable discrimination, 
without fear or favor. 

Mr. Coleman was united in marriage with Miss Blanche Sprinkle, 
who is a daughter of I. A. Sprinkle, a well known citizen of Villa 
Grove, Illinois. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Coleman is somewhat active in politics and has always 
given his support to the republican party. Fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Masonic Order, being a Knight Templar and a Shriner. 
He is also identified with the Knights of Pythias and maintains 
membership with different professional bodies. Personally he is 
exceedingly popular, possessing the solid qualities which arouse kind 
feelings in daily life and which, in times of stress, prove the value 
of true friendship. 

HON. WILLIAM G. SPURGIN. During the last decade, the bench 
and bar of Champaign County has ably sustained its reputation for 
efficiency, the learning of both branches being balanced with effec- 
tiveness, while the honorable ethics maintained has reflected credit 
on the profession and individual prominence to lawyers and judges 
alike. Among "the representative men of the law in Champaign 
County is Hon. William G. Spurgin, who, both as attorney and as 
jurist, has won public approbation and personal consideration. Judge 
Spurgin was born in Fayette County, Illinois, December I, 1870, 
and is one of a family of six children born to his parents, George W. 
and Susannah (Riley) Spurgin, the former of whom died on his 
farm in Fayette County, in 1876, and the mother died in Urbana in 
April, 1902. 

William G. Spurgin attended school through boyhood in his home 
neighborhood and afterward became a student in the Paxton High 
School, from which he was graduated in 1888, following which he 
began the study of law under Attorney A. J. Miller, of Urbana, and 
so closely applied himself that, after taking a course in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois Law School, he was admitted to the bar in 1902. 
In the practice of his profession he soon met with marked success 
and in the conduct of his cases in the courts proved himself emi- 



910 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

nently qualified for judicial position, and in 1910, on the republican 
ticket, was elected county judge of Champaign County. During his 
four years on the bench, Judge Spurgin ably sustained the dignity 
of his high office and retired, having declined re-election in the fall 
of 1914, with a reputation for efficiency and impartiality of which 
he may justifiably feel very proud, one that the people of the 
county, irrespective of political bias, unite in declaring honestly 
earned. Prior to accepting election as judge, he had served for 
years as city attorney of Urbana, giving close and careful attention 
to all matters coming within the scope of that office. He is a valued 
member of both county and state bar associations. 

Judge Spurgin was united in marriage to Miss Anna McLeod, 
who is a daughter of Norman McLeod, a well-known resident of 
Champaign County. They are members of the Universalist Church. 
Judge Spurgin has served nine years as a member of the board of 
education at Urbana, belonging to that dependable class of citizens 
whose influence is ever in the direction of progress. He is a Knight 
Templar Mason and also a Shriner, and belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and to social organizations of the city that have for their 
object the gathering together of people of congenial tastes. Judge 
Spurgin is a foremost member of the Urbana Bar. 

CLARENCE WASHINGTON DIVER. The professional career of 
Clarence W. Diver began in 1908, and since that time he has added 
in large measure to his professional reputation and has also per- 
formed some valuable service to his community. Mr. Diver has 
spent practically all his life in the City of Waukegan, and the man- 
ner in which he has discharged his duties and upheld the dignity of 
his profession reflects credit upon himself and has opened a way 
for a large and successful career. 

Clarence Washington Diver was born in Waukegan, Lake 
County, Illinois, March 31, 1883, was educated in the public schools, 
finishing the high school in 1901. He then entered the Lake Forest 
University and was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1905. 
Mr. Diver entered the University of Michigan law school, receiving 
the degree of LL. B. in 1908. He was admitted to the bar of Michi- 
gan on June 16, 1908, and to the Illinois bar on October 7 of the 
same year. He at once returned to his old home in Waukegan, 
opened an office and began the general practice of law. On Sep- 
tember 13, 1910, Mr. Diver was elected an alderman of Waukegan 
and served until April 30, 1911. At that time he was one of the 
members of the city government, retained for service under the new 
commission form of government adopted by Waukegan. Mr. Diver 
had charge of the department of finance, one of the several depart- 
ments of local government under which- the management of Wau- 
kegan affairs is now concentrated. Mr. Diver is also serving as 
attorney for the Waukegan National Bank. He is active in affairs 
outside his profession, and was moderator of the Chicago Baptist 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 911 

Association for the year 1914. He is a member of and former 
secretary of the Lake County Bar Association and a member of the 
Illinois State Bar Association. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Masonic Order, the Phi Delta Phi, Kappa Sigma, and a member 
of the Waukegan University Club. He was elected president of 
Lake Forest University Alumni Association for the year 1915 and 
1916. In 1910 he was married to Miss Grace Stowell, a daughter 
of the late Corydon G. Stowell, principal of the Newberry School 
in Chicago, Illinois, and unto them have been born three children 
Helen Elizabeth, aged four years, and William Stowell, aged one 
year and six months, and Thomas Ward, aged two months. 

CHARLES F. MANSFIELD. Of the ranking members of the Piatt 
County Bar, perhaps none is more genuinely distinguished for sound 
ability united with an excellent record of achievements within the 
limits of his profession than Charles F. Mansfield, whose practice 
covers more than a quarter of a century and whose name is fre- 
quently found in the reports of the higher courts of the state in 
connection with notable cases. 

He came into the world with the fortune of a good ancestry and 
family, and his father was a man of distinction in whose honor 
one of the villages of Piatt County was named. Charles F. Mans- 
field was born in January, 1862, one of the nine children of Gen. 
John L. and Josephine A. (Turner) Mansfield. General Mansfield, 
who died in 1876, was perhaps best known as an educator, having 
been professor of mathematics and at one time president of Tran- 
sylvania University, of Lexington, Kentucky. The son received 
his early education in the public schools of Indianapolis, Indiana, 
and attended school for a time at Mansfield, Illinois, the village 
with whose founding his father was so prominently associated. He 
also attended the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, 
and a college at Racine, Wisconsin. Mr. Mansfield was graduated 
in law from the Wesleyan University at Bloomington, and was 
admitted to the Illinois Bar in 1887. 

His first office was set up in the Town of Mansfield in Piatt 
County, but for many years now he has practiced at Monticello, 
the county seat of Piatt County. For two terms he served as state's 
attorney, and was at one time assistant to the attorney general of 
Illinois. Among a number of notable causes in which he has ap- 
peared as one of the principal attorneys, he conducted the defense 
in the case of the State of Illinois vs. Joseph Klein, a member of 
the Illinois National Guard, a case which attracted wide attention 
at the time of its trial, and it was a triumph for his skill and ability 
that his client was discharged. 

Mr. Mansfield is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Masons and the Knights of Pythias, and in politics is 
a republican. He married Miss Minnie B. VanMeter, and they 



912 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

are the parents of three children. The family are members of the 
Episcopal Church. Mr. Mansfield is well known as a lawyer not 
only in his home county, but throughout the state, and is actively 
associated with the Illinois State Bar Association. 

ALBERT C. EDIE. One of the prominent members of the Piatt 
County Bar is Albert C. Edie, attorney at law at Monticello, and 
filling the office of Master in Chancery, who was born on his father's 
farm, August 28, 1868. His parents were William H. and Amelia 
J. (Funk) Edie, well known and highly respected people of their 
community. 

In the public schools Albert C. Edie obtained his education, and 
when he was ready to specialize, he became a law student under 
the supervision of Attorney W. G. Cloyd and later under the late 
distinguished Judge Johns. Mr. Edie, however, owes much of his 
success to himself, for his studies were, for a time, frequently 
interrupted. Finally perserverance and determination brought their 
certain rewards and he was admitted to the bar in 1892. He began 
the practice of law in Piatt County in 1894, with the late S. R. 
Reed, with whom he was associated until 1904. His substantial 
progress came early, bringing with it public confidence. For eight 
years he served as city attorney of Monticello, during that time 
satisfactorily performing all of the numerous duties relating to 
this office, and was equally efficient as state's attorney, in which 
office he served through one term. Mr. Edie was appointed Master 
in Chancery in 1910, to fill out the unexpired term of the late R. I. 
Tatman, and has continued in this office ever since. He values his 
membership in the Piatt County, the Illinois State and the American 
Bar associations, and is popular with his fellow members because 
they can respect him professionally and esteem him personally. 

Mr. Edie was united in marriage on April 15, 1896, to Miss Callie 
M. Fisher, who is a daughter of E. P. Fisher, and they have two 
children : Burl A. and Willis R. In his political life he has always 
been identified with the republican party, taking an active interest 
in the success of its policies and loyally supporting its recognized 
candidates. His fraternal connections are with the Masons and the 
Knights of Pythias. 

JAMES H. CAREY. This history of the Courts and Lawyers of 
Illinois has as one of its primary functions the according of specific 
recognition to representative contemporary members of the bars of 
the various counties in the state, and in Iroquois County Mr. Carey 
is definitely entitled to such consideration, as he has long con- 
trolled a large and important practice at Watseka, the county seat, 
has been concerned in much of the noteworthy litigation in the courts 
of this section of the state within the past fifteen years, and is 
honored as a citizen of sterling character and much progressiveness 
and public spirit. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 913 

Mr. Carey was born in Kendall County, Illinois, on the 2(1 of 
November, 1861, and the place of his nativity was a primitive log 
house of the type common to the pioneer days, he having been the 
third in order of birth in a family of eight children, all of whom 
are living. He is a son of Peter and Mary (Kelly) Carey, both 
natives of Ireland and representatives of fine old families of the 
Emerald Isle. Peter Carey was reared and educated in his native 
land and was seventeen years of age at the time of his immigration 
to the United States. He established his residence in Massachu- 
setts, where he learned the shoemaker's trade, and in that state his 
marriage was solemnized. In 1860 he came with his family to 
Illinois and established his home on a pioneer farm in Kendall 
County, where he remained until 1873, when he engaged in the 
same basic line of industry in Iroquois County, where he continued 
to reside until his death, at the comparatively early age of forty- 
seven years, his wife having attained to the age of fifty-five years, 
and both having been earnest communicants of the Catholic Church ; 
his political support was given to the democrat party from the time 
he became a naturalized citizen until his death. 

Reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm, James H. Carey is 
indebted to the public schools of Kendall and Iroquois counties for 
his early educational advantages, and he has been a resident of the 
latter county since he was a lad of about twelve *years. Thereafter 
he attended the Northern Indiana Business University and Normal 
School, an institution now known as Valparaiso University, and 
after a course in the normal department he turned his attention to 
the pedagogic profession, in the work of which he continued his 
successful endeavors for a total period of eight years, within which 
he taught principally in the country schools of Iroquois County and 
the public schools of Watseka. In this city he studied law under 
the effective preceptorship of the firm of Morris & Hooper, and he 
devoted himself to the absorption and assimiliation of the science 
of jurisprudence with characteristic energy and singleness of pur- 
pose, the result being that he was admitted to the bar of his native 
state in 1897, since which time he has been engaged in active gen- 
eral practice at Watseka, where he has a substantial and repre- 
sentative clientage. He served two years as city attorney and four 
years as master in chancery, but has had no desire for official pre- 
ferment aside from his profession until he became an aspirant 
for the position of postmaster of Watseka, to which office he was 
appointed on the I2th of February, 1914, and in which he is giving 
a most efficient and satisfactory administration, his candidacy for 
the position having met with marked approval on the part of the 
local public and the recognition being further merited by the zealous 
service he has given in the furtherance of the cause of the democrat 
party. Mr. Carey has been dependent upon his own resources from 
early youth, and thus his success is the more gratifying to contem- 
plate, his course having been dominated by unswerving integrity, 



914 

so that he has merited and received the high regard of his fellow 
men. 

On the 22d of May, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Carey to Miss Bertha Apgar, who was born and reared in Iroquois 
County, and they have two children, Irene V. and Walter J. 

WAYNE H. DYER. With offices in the City National Bank Build- 
ing, Kankakee, Mr. Dyer is maintaining high vantage-place as one 
of the popular and representative younger members of the bar of his 
native county, has served as city attorney of Kankakee, and is now 
the incumbent of the important office of state's attorney for Kanka- 
kee County, these preferments attesting not only to his professional 
ability but also to his personal popularity in the county in which 
he was born and reared. 

Wayne Hamilton Dyer was born on the homestead farm of his 
parents, in Yellowhead Township, Kankakee County, Illinois, on 
the 1 7th of February, 1880, and is a son of Thomas H. and Mary 
A. (Smith) Dyer, his father, still a representative farmer and influ- 
ential citizen of Kankakee County, being a member of one of the 
early pioneer families of the county, where his parents established 
their residence in 1835, the family name having been worthily linked 
with the civic and material development and progress of this section 
of the state. 

Third in order of birth in a family of five children, the present 
state's attorney of Kankakee County was not denied the usual quota 
of youthful experience in connection with the work of the home 
farm, and after availing himself of the advantages of the public 
schools at Momence, this county, he completed the curriculum of 
the high school in the City of Kankakee, after which, in consonance 
with his ambition and well matured plans for a future career, he 
entered the law department of the celebrated University of Michi- 
gan, in which he was graduated on the igth of June, 1902, and from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws, with concomitant 
admission to the Michigan Bar. Returning to his native county, 
Mr. Dyer established his residence in the City of Kankakee, judicial 
center of the county, and his initial professional service after his 
admission to the Illinois Bar was in the capacity of attorney for 
the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company, controlling the 
so-called Frisco lines. He served in the company's claim depart- 
ment, but shortly he became attorney in the claim department of 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, a position of which he 
continued the zealous and efficient incumbent from 1903 to 1906. 
On the 1 2th of January, 1907, Mr. Dyer was elected city attorney 
of Kankakee, and, in addition to controlling a substantial private 
law business, he continued in tenure of this office until October, 
1911, when he resigned, as he had become the republican candidate 
for the office of state's attorney of the county, a position to which 
he was elected in December of that year, and in which he has since 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 915 

continued to give most careful and effective service, with an admir- 
able record of achievement as a public prosecutor. He is not only 
actively identified with the Kankakee County Bar Association and 
the Illinois State Bar Association, but is also one of the popular 
and influential members of the Illinois State's Attorneys Association, 
of which he served as secretary and treasurer in 1914. 

Mr. Dyer has been a loyal and aggressive advocate of the prin- 
ciples of the republican party, and has abiding faith in the same. 
In the Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with Kankakee Lodge, No. 
389, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons ; Kankakee Chapter, No. 78, 
Royal Arch Masons; and Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 33, Knights 
Templars, besides which he holds membership in Kankakee Lodge, 
No. 627, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 2d of March, 1908, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Dyer to Miss Bessie Paddock, of Kankakee, and they have two 
children, Cynthia and Dorothy. Mrs. Dyer was born and reared in 
Kankakee, and is a daughter of the late Daniel H. Paddock, who 
was one of the leading members of the bar of Kankakee County 
for many years prior to his death, which occurred in 1905. Mr. 
Paddock served as state's attorney and for a number of years held 
the office of representative of Kankakee County in the State Legis- 
lature. His father, Col. John Paddock, was one of the leading 
pioneer lawyers of Kankakee County and was a gallant soldier and 
officer in the Civil war, in which he was colonel of an Illinois regi- 
ment of volunteer infantry. 

EBEN B. GOWER. From an early period in Illinois history law- 
yers of fine talent, sterling character and resolute purpose have 
maintained the high standard of the bar of Kankakee County, and 
of those of contemporary prominence who are thus maintaining such 
prestige for the county stands Judge Gower, who here instituted 
the active practice of his profession nearly twenty years ago, and 
who now controls a large and important law business, after having 
given most efficient service on the bench of the county court, of 
which judicial office he was the incumbent above five years. He is 
a native of Illinois and a representative of a sterling pioneer family 
of Livingston County, this state, his services as lawyer and jurist 
having conferred honor upon the great commonwealth which has 
ever been his home. 

Judge Gower was born on the old homestead farm of the family, 
in Sunbury Township, Livingston County, on the 23d of December, 
1868, and is a son of Hon. Bailey A. and Olive C. (Day) Gower, 
whose marriage was solemnized in Livingston County and both 
of whom were young at the time of the removal of their parents to 
that county, in the early '505, Judge Gower being thus a scion of 
sturdy Illinois pioneer ancestry in both the paternal and maternal 
lines. Hon. Bailey A. Gower was born in New Sharon, Franklin 
County, Maine, and his wife at Temple, that county, and both are 



916 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

now venerable pioneer citizens of Livingston County, Mr. Gower 
having celebrated his seventy-ninth birthday anniversary in 1914, 
and his wife her seventy-fifth birthday. They have three children: 
Louis J., Frank W. and Eben B. 

Bailey A. Gower was reared to maturity in the old Pine Tree 
State, where he received good educational advantages, and as a 
young man he accompanied his parents on their immigration to 
Illinois, in 1856, the family home having been established on a 
pioneer farm in Livingston County. He is a great-grandson of 
Robert Gower, who was the founder of the family in America, this 
worthy ancestor having been born in England and having passed 
the closing period of his life in the State of Maine, where he died 
in 1806, at the age of eighty-four years. After coming to Illinois 
Bailey A. Gower put his New England energy and scholastic attain- 
ments into effective play by becoming a teacher in the district 
schools of Livingston County, and he was one of the early and 
popular young representatives of the pedagogic profession in that 
section of the state. He marked the passing years with large and 
worthy achievement as one of the leading representatives of the 
agricultural and stock-growing industries in Livingston County, and 
he is now the owner of a valuable landed estate of about one 
thousand acres. Since 1899 he has lived virtually retired, though 
he still gives a general supervision to his farms, which he rents 
to eligible tenants. He has been a veritable stalwart in the camp 
of the republican party, and has never wavered in his allegiance to 
its basic principles, the while he has served in various township 
offices, including that of treasurer and member of the school board, 
and was a representative of Livingston County in the State Legisla- 
ture for two terms, the Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth general 
assemblies. Both he and his wife are zealous members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and they are revered pioneer citizens 
of the county which has been their home for more than half a 
century. 

Reared to the sturdy and invigorating discipline of the home 
farm, Judge Eben B. Gower waxed strong in mind and body, and 
incidentally felt the quickening power of laudable ambition after 
he had fully availed himself of the advantages of the public schools 
of his native county. He was signally fortunate in the advantages 
which were his in the acquirement of his higher academic educa- 
tion and also that of professional order. He entered the University 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1893, with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 
As an undergraduate he also had entered the law department of 
the university, and in the same he was graduated in 1894, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws and with concomitant admission to 
the Michigan Bar. On his return to his native state he was forth- 
with admitted to the Illinois Bar, and his noviatate in private law 
practice was served in Livingston County, Illinois, where he re- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 917 

mained only a short time, as in February, 1895, ne established his 
residence in the County of Kankakee, where he soon gained a 
substantial practice, and where he has continued his effective service 
as an active practitioner save for the period of his tenure of judicial 
office. In 1897 he was elected judge of the County Court, to fill a 
vacancy, and at the regular election in November of the following 
year he was re-elected for the full term of four years. He made 
an admirable record on the bench, his rulings being signally fair 
and impartial and his earnest effort being always directed to the 
insuring of equity and justice in the causes presented for his adjudi- 
cation, with the result that few of his decisions met with reversal 
on the part of courts of higher jurisdiction. Judge Gower retired 
from the bench in 1902, and has since given his undivided atten- 
tion to his substantial private law business, save that he has served 
for two years as master in chancery of the Circuit Court. His 
allegiance has been with the republican party, he is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife 
hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On the 3Oth of November, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of 
Judge Gower to Miss Mary F. Gray, of Momence, Kankakee 
County, and they have two children, Benjamin F. and Charlotte D. 

HAMILTON K. WHEELER. A resident of Illinois from early 
childhood, Mr. Wheeler has long been numbered among the repre- 
sentative members of the bar of this state, in the control of a large 
and important general law business, and he has been engaged in 
the active practice of his profession for more than forty years, 
within which he has won many victories in connection with litiga- 
tions of important order and in numerous cases of more than local 
celebrity. The City of Kankakee has been his home and professional 
headquarters during the long period of his active career as a lawyer, 
and the very characteristics that have given him secure status as 
one of the strong and resourceful members of the Illinois bar have 
made him also specially eligible for the various public offices which 
he has filled with great loyalty and efficiency, including service as a 
member of the State Senate of Illinois and as representative of the 
Sixteenth District in the United States Congress. His life has been 
one of earnest and fruitful endeavor and the basis of his advance- 
ment has been that of sterling integrity of purpose and deep appre- 
ciation of the responsibility that canopies every human career. 

This worthy scion of one of the honored pioneer families of 
Illinois was born at Ballston, Saratoga County, New York, on the 
5th of August, 1848, and is a son of Andrew and Sarah (Jewett) 
Wheeler, both natives of Vermont, where they were reared and 
educated, and both representatives of staunch Colonial families of 
New England. Andrew Wheeler was born at Shaftsbury, Benning- 
ton County, Vermont, as was also his father, and his wife was a 
native of the City of Bennington, the lineage of the Wheeler family 



918 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tracing back to sterling Scotch and English origin. From the old 
Green Mountain State Andrew Wheeler finally removed to Saratoga 
County, New York, and from that state he came to Illinois in 
1853, and numbered himself among the pioneer settlers of Yellow- 
head Township, Kankakee County, where he developed a productive 
farm and became influential in community affairs, as a man of 
sturdy integrity .and mature judgment. He continued his residence 
in this county until his death, in 1882, at the age of sixty-five years, 
his widow surviving him by more than a score of years and having 
been summoned to the life eternal in 1904, one of the venerable 
and revered pioneer women of Kankakee County. Of the six chil- 
dren, five of whom are living, the subject of this review was the 
second in order of birth and he was about five years of age at the 
time of the family removal to Illinois. 

Mrs. Sarah J. (Jewett) Wheeler was a daughter of Levi Jewett 
and a granddaughter of Col. Thomas C. Jewett, who served as a 
gallant officer in the command of General Stark in the war of the 
Revolution, in which he participated in various engagements, in- 
cluding the battle of Bennington, which historical conflict virtually 
brought an end to polemic activities in Vermont and proved pri- 
marily influential in causing the surrender of General Burgoyne, at 
Saratoga, in 1777. The ancestral farmstead of Colonel Jewett, in 
Bennington County, Vermont, is still owned by his descendants, in 
the fourth generation, the Jewett family being of English and 
Welsh extraction. 

Hamilton K. Wheeler was reared to adult age under the con- 
ditions and influences of the pioneer farm, and in this connection 
early gained fellowship with sturdy toil, his incidental educational 
advantages being limited to attending the pioneer schools during 
the winter terms, when his services were not in requisition in con- 
nection with the work of the home farm. He was the eldest son of 
the family, and in this opulent twentieth century he often reverts 
to the labors that fell to his portion in driving ox teams to the 
breaking plow, in the planting and harvesting of crops and in 
attending to manifold other duties in connection with the farm. He, 
like many another son in a pioneer family of Illinois, felt the urge 
of worthy ambition and determined to fit himself for a broader 
sphere of activity than that in which he was reared. He profited 
fully by the meager educational privileges afforded in the district 
schools and in the study and reading of the standard books in the 
little library which had been collected by his mother, besides which 
he read with equal devotion such books as he could borrow from 
the neighbors. 

Mr. Wheeler thus continued to study and to assist in the work 
and management of his father's farm until he had attained to the 
age of nineteen years, when he established his residence in the City 
of Kankakee, which at that time had few metropolitan pretensions, 
and here, while working mornings and evenings for his board, he 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 919 

attended school for one year. He thereafter continued his studies 
for some time in St. Paul's Academy, and that he made good use 
of his scholastic advantages is shown by the fact that for four years 
he was a successful and popular teacher in the schools of this sec- 
tion of the state, besides which he initiated and earnestly carried 
forward the study of law, as he had formulated definite plans for his 
future career. Carefully conserving his earnings, Mr. Wheeler was 
finally enabled to enter the law department of the great University 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and in this institution he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1872 and with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. Upon his return to Illinois he established his permanent 
home at Kankakee, and this city has been the stage of his pro- 
fessional activities during the long intervening years. He was forth- 
with admitted to the Illinois Bar, and engaged in active general 
practice. Concerning his career at the bar the following pertinent 
statements have been made and are worthy of perpetuation in this 
connection : ''Being young, industrious and ambitious, Mr. Wheeler 
soon won prestige at the bar and became recognized as the peer of 
his professional brethren in this part of the state. His practice and 
reputation grew apace, and eventually he gained, in his mature 
years, stable vantage-ground as one of the acknowledged leaders of 
the Illinois Bar. During all this time he has, with one exception, 
and that for only a brief interval, practiced alone, so that his suc- 
cess has been decisively the result of his own ability and efforts." 

Mr. Wheeler was for a term of years actively identified with 
the important and bitterly contested litigation against the Illinois 
Central, the Chicago & Eastern Illinois, and the Cleveland, Cincin- 
nati, Chicago & St. Louis railroads, and for seventeen years, while 
continuing in general practice, he served as general solicitor for the 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad Company. He has long retained 
a clientage of distinctively representative character and has won 
many noteworthy forensic triumphs in the higher courts. 

In politics Mr. Wheeler has ever been an unswerving and effect- 
ive advocate of the basic principles and policies of the republican 
party, and he has been one of its influential representatives in 
Illinois. In 1884 he was elected a member of the State Senate, as 
representative of the Sixteenth Senatorial District. As a member 
of the senate he supported the late General John A. Logan in the 
latter's candidacy for the United States Senate, and was one of 
the famous "103" who presented a solid and impregnable front with 
each recurring ballot in this connection. In 1892 Mr. Wheeler was 
made the republican nominee for representative of the Ninth Dis- 
trict in the United States Congress, his service as State Senator 
having been in the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth general assem- 
blies of the Illinois Legislature. The election of 1892 will be re- 
called, resulting in a veritable landslide for the democratic party, 
but, notwithstanding this fact, Mr. Wheeler won a decisive victory 
at the polls, by defeating his able democratic opponent, Col. Henry 



920 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

W. Snow, though Illinois carried general victory to the democratic 
party in that election. Mr. Wheeler served, with characteristic 
loyalty and ability, as a member of the Fifty-third Congress. In 
the reapportionment of Illinois congressional districts in 1893 Mr. 
Wheeler's district was broken up by a virtual gerrymander, and 
he retired after serving one term in Congress, with an admirable 
record to his credit. He has not appeared as a candidate for public 
office since that time, but has continued a valiant advocate of the 
cause of the republican party, which he represented as a delegate to 
the national convention of 1896, in St. Louis. He gives close atten- 
tion to his large and important law business, but has found pleasing 
diversion, as well as incidental success, in the development of a fine 
stock farm of 1,600 acres, in northwestern Iowa. 

Mr. Wheeler is one of those fine representatives of the Illinois 
Bar who have persistently upheld the best ethics and the dignity of 
the profession, and further than this he has been earnest in en- 
couraging high standards on the part of the younger members of 
the bar. Apropos of his attitude in this respect the following perti- 
nent words have been written : "He has been specially helpful to 
young men whom he has observed to be of promising talents, those 
justly ambitious and systematically industrious, and to such he has 
extended counsel and tangible aid at a time when needed, the result 
being that there are many now in the fullness of successful careers, 
not alone lawyers, but also business men, who pay him a tribute of 
gratitude for the encouragement which made such success possible." 

In the year 1873 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Wheeler to 
Miss Mary A. Storrs, of Hamilton, New York, and they became the 
parents of four sons, Lester W., Everett S., Hamilton H., and 
Thomas J., of whom only Lester W. and Hamilton H., are living. 
Hamilton H. Wheeler was graduated in the law department of the 
University of Iowa, was admitted to the bar of Iowa and also that 
of Illinois, in 1900, and is now associated with his 'father in practice. 

Mr. Wheeler has been a close and appreciative student of .the 
teachings and history of the time-honored Masonic fraternity, with 
which he has been for many years in active affiliation, and he is one 
of its prominent representatives in Kankakee, where he is president 
of the Masonic Temple Association. 

CALEB E. ANTRAM. The City of Joliet, metropolis and judicial 
center of Will County, claims as one of the prominent and repre- 
sentative members of its able coterie of lawyers, the progressive and 
popular citizen whose name introduces this paragraph and who has 
here been engaged in the active general practice of his profession 
for nearly a quarter of a century. He has marked the passing 
years with large and worthy achievement in his exacting vocation, 
and his success attests his ability and his possession of those personal 
characteristics that ever beget popular confidence and good will. 

Though he has been a resident of Illinois from early childhood, 



921 

Mr. Antram claims the old Keystone State as the place of his 
nativity. He was born at New Salem, Fayette County, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the 1 2th of February, 1865, and is a son of Robert M. 
and Sarah (Woodward) Antram, both likewise natives of Penn- 
sylvania and representatives of families early founded in that state. 
The parents have been for more than forty years residents of La 
Salle County, Illinois, where they established their home in 1869, 
and where the father has long been numbered among the representa- 
tive agriculturists and stock-growers of Farm Ridge Township, as 
well as a citizen who has been influential in public affairs of a 
local order and has 'served in various township offices, including 
those of supervisor and treasurer. In politics he has ever been 
aligned as a stanch supporter of the cause of the democratic party. 
Prior to his removal to Illinois Robert M. Antram had been en- 
gaged in the operation of flour and sawmills in Pennsylvania, but 
West he has found ample scope for successful enterprise as a 
representative of the great basic industry of agriculture. Of the 
eight children six are living, and Caleb E. of this review was the 
second in order of birth. 

Caleb E. Antram was four years of age at the time of the 
family removal to Illinois, and was reared to adult age on the 
home farm in La Salle County, in the meanwhile duly availing 
himself of the advantages of the public schools. Thereafter he 
continued his studies in Lincoln University, at Lincoln, this state, 
and Knox College, of Galesburg, Illinois. After devoting about 
one year to teaching in the district schools, Mr. Antram went to 
the City of Chicago, where he studied law in the office and under 
the able preceptorship of Thomas S. McClelland, for a period of 
about one year. He then became a clerical assistant and student in 
the office of the well known Chicago law firm of Hoyne, Folansbee 
& O'Connor, with which likewise he remained about one year. 
During this period of residence in Chicago Mr. Antram also at- 
tended the Union College of Law, and in this institution he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1891, and with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. He was forthwith admitted to the Illinois 
bar and established his residence in the City of Joliet, where he 
has continued in active and successful practice during the interven- 
ing years, and where his clientage is one of important order. Mr. 
Antram has shown a singleness of purpose in his close application 
to the work of his profession and has manifested no ambition for 
the honors or emoluments of public office or the turmoil of prac- 
tical or professional politics. He holds aloof from strict partisanship 
in politics and gives his support to the men and measures meeting 
the approval of his judgment. 

In 1897 Mr. Antram wedded Miss Lillian Van Wormer, who 
was born in the State of Michigan, and they have four children, 
Robert S., Frederick E., Margaret M., and Bessie Marie. 



Vol. Ill 6 



922 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

GEORGE WARNER YOUNG. A graduate in law from Columbia 
University, of New York, George Warner Young has been an 
active member of the Joliet bar for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury. The law has represented to him both a profession and a great 
opportunity for capable service in behalf of others. He has never 
divided his practice with politics, though as a citizen there is no 
man who has more effectively interested himself in the community 
welfare than Mr. Young. 

Representing one of the old families of Will County, and an 
American lineage of many generations, George Warner Young was 
born at Manhattan, Will County, March 25, 1866. His early educa- 
tion was given him partly by his grandfather and partly by private 
tutors and he attended the Joliet city schools to the age of sixteen, 
when he began earning his own living. His father had suffered busi- 
ness reverses about that time, and the boy made his own way by 
driving a delivery wagon, clerking in a store and afterwards in 
the general offices of the old Chicago, Pekin & Southwestern Rail- 
road at Joliet. In 1883 he entered the office of the Joliet Republican 
and Sun, under Major Robert Mann Woods. Mr. Woods was an 
ardent republican and had great influence over his young employe, 
whose people had long been supporters of the democracy, and 
through the influence of Mr. Wood and of the cogent personality 
of James G. Elaine, then a dominant political figure in America, Mr. 
Young was converted to the republican party. In September, 1885, 
he left the newspaper office to enter the Columbia University Law 
School, at New York, and at the same time carried studies in the 
School of Political Science. He was graduated Bachelor of Laws 
(cum laude) in 1887. 

Returning to Joliet and passing the bar examination, Mr. Young 
entered the office of Judge Olin and Captain Phelps, and remained 
with them until 1890, when he began an independent law practice. 
The first two years he was alone, but in 1892 formed a partnership 
with George J. Cowing. This firm gave particular attention to the 
handling of money for clients, advising financial interests, examin- 
ing land titles, and a general chancery and pro"bate practice. The 
partnership continued until Mr. Cowing was elected county judge in 
the fall of 1906, since which time Mr. Young has conducted an 
individual practice. He is primarily a chancery lawyer, and as such 
probably the leader of the Will County bar. He has handled a 
great many chancery cases and is a specialist in real estate law. 
Besides his local interests Mr. Young has personal investments and 
represents the interests of others in western lands, and is extensively 
engaged in the development of large tracts in the western states. 
His law offices are in the Woodruff Building. 

Mr. Young in the earlier half of his career was too busily en- 
gaged in developing a practice to take any part in politics, and 
refrained from such participation on the ground that only a man 
substantially independent can afford the sacrifice which office hold- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 923 

ing involves. In later years he has found ample opportunities to 
make his citizenship effective without resort to office seeking. In 
1897 there came to him an unsolicited nomination for the office of 
city attorney, but his poor health at that time compelled him to 
decline. In 1899 he sought the office but failed of the nomination 
by two votes. His most important work was as president of the 
Joliet Improvement Association for ten years, during which time 
he did much to improve the appearance of the city and advance 
municipal interests in general. He has served as president of the 
University Extension Circle, as chairman of the Industrial Commit- 
tee of the Commercial Club, and secretary of the Deep Waterway 
Committee. He has always stood for honesty, competence and 
efficiency in public affairs, has a number of times severely criticised 
machine methods of politics, but all this with such sincerity and 
broad mindedness that he has never been regarded as a captious 
critic, and has many warm friends in all parties. Since his early 
school days Mr. Young has been interested in historical subjects, 
and has written a number of historical articles which have been pub- 
lished in the public press. 

Having defined Mr. Young's position as a lawyer and citizen, it 
would be only appropriate to give some attention to his family. 
His ancestral line goes back to Rev. John Young, a missionary of 
the Church of England, who was driven out of Massachuetts by the 
Puritans and later out of Rhode Island by the Baptists. About 1640 
he settled near Sag Harbor, on Long Island. From that pioneer 
churchman has descended many generations, represented in the 
eastern states of New York and New Jersey, and in many localities 
of the West. Alexander Young, the great-grandfather of George 
W. Young, was celebrated as a Hicksite Quaker preacher. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Lawrence, of the same family as Captain James Law- 
rence, the American naval hero whose words "Don't give up the 
ship," are known to every schoolchild. John Young, a son of Alex- 
ander and Elizabeth, was born at New Paltz on the Hudson, July 
1 8, 1798. He was liberally educated and for many years president 
of the Brooklyn Collegiate Institute. In 1848 he came out to Illinois 
and settled at Manhattan Center, in Will County. He gave the name 
to that town, served as supervisor eight years, and was the first 
president of the Will County Agricultural Society. He died Decem- 
ber 24, 1884. It was from this strong-minded and highly educated 
citizen that George W. Young received part of his earliest instruc- 
tion. John Young, in 1825, married Caroline Elizabeth Thompson, 
who introduces another prominent line into the ancestry. Her 
father, Rev. James Thompson, an Episcopal clergyman, married 
Anna Humphreys, daughter of Major Elijah Humphreys, who 
served in a Connecticut regiment in the Revolutionary army. Major 
Humphreys married Anna Mansfield, a daughter of the celebrated 
Rev. Dr. Richard Mansfield, of Derby, Connecticut. A brother of 
Elijah Humphreys was Gen. David Humphreys, who served on 



924 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Washington's staff, was the first American minister to Spain, and 
by the introduction of Merino sheep into America did much to 
develop the growing and manufacture of wool in the United States. 
John Young and his family were all closely identified with the 
Episcopal Church, and to them belong the credit for having built the 
church at Manhattan Center, which subsequently was removed to the 
village of Manhattan one mile west and is still in existence. 

Edward Young, son of John and Caroline Elizabeth Young, was 
born in Durham, New York, February 6, 1837, came to Will County 
at the age of eleven years, and after the war took charge of the 
family business, building a new house one mile east of Manhattan 
Center, where he continued as a farmer until 1876. He then en- 
gaged in the hay and grain business at Joliet and became one of 
the successful men of that city. For many years he was a vestry- 
man and junior warden of Christ's Episcopal Church at Joliet. 
Edward Young, in 1865, married Ann Eliza Hoyt, who was born 
in Ridgefield, Connecticut, June 15, 1839, a daughter of Rev. Warner 
and Elizabeth P. (Reynolds) Hoyt. Both the Hoyt and Reynolds 
families came to America in early colonial times. Edward Young 
and wife were the parents of six children: George Warner, Rev. 
Charles Herbert, who for many years has been rector of Christ's 
Episcopal Church, in Woodlawn, Chicago; John Mansfield, a pub- 
lisher in Chicago ; Heusted Thompson, a railroad man, now assistant 
freight agent Erie Dispatch ; Francis Edward in the land and loan 
business at Bismarck; and Margaret Hoyt, a former teacher in 
Joliet and Chicago, and now married. 

George W. Young was married at Galesburg, Illinois, by the Rev. 
John Wilkinson, September 5, 1889, to Miss Corabelle Beers Rugar. 
Her parents were Capt. Francis a,nd Elizabeth (Beers) Rugar, and 
both the Beers and Rugar families came west from Central New 
York. Captain Rugar was a cousin of Gen. Thomas Rugar of 
the United States army, and of William Rugar, chief justice of the 
State of New York. In Germany, where the family originated, the 
name was spelled Ruegner. They came from the Rhine Valley, 
near where the River Rhine is joined by the River Main. There 
are three branches of the family in America at the present time, 
but that in Illinois is the only one using the "ar" in the last syllable. 
Captain Rugar settled at Galesburg, Illinois, in 1852, was a mer- 
chant there and at the beginning of the Civil War joined the army 
with the Sixty-fourth Illinois Regiment and his talent for business 
gave him a special field for service in the quartermaster's depart- 
ment. After the battle of Chickamauga General Thomas told him 
he was the best quartermaster he knew in the army. Mr. and Mrs. 
George W. Young are the parents of two living children: Rugar, 
born October 23, 1891; and Elizabeth Rugar, born April 30, 1897. 
One scm, Warner Rugar, was born July 2, 1895, and died July 
15, 1896. 

Mr. Young is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and has 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 925 

served as vestryman and treasurer of the Christ's Episcopal Church 
at Joliet. Of a social nature, education, culture and training have 
made him an interesting and entertaining gentleman. He is fond 
of flowers and of literature, and has always been an interested 
student of history. Though not a political leader, he has figured 
prominently in the public life of Joliet. 

JAMES F. CLARK. An able member of the Champaign County 
Bar, who has made an enviable reputation in his profession and is 
well known in different sections of the state, is James F. Clark, 
who has been a resident of Rantoul since 1907, and has been highly 
valued here as a citizen. 

James F. Clark was born at St. Charles, Illinois, one of a family 
of two children born to Henry B.-and Jessie (Ferson) Clark. His 
father, who was born on the Island of Saint Helena, and his 
mother still survive and the father for many years has been en- 
gaged in the jewelry line at Rantoul. 

After completing his public school course, James F. Clark 
entered the University of Michigan, and in 1898 was graduated from 
the university law school at Ann Arbor. In the same year he was 
admitted to the ba'r in both Michigan and Illinois, following which 
he entered into practice in the City of Chicago. Perhaps no more 
prolific field of experience for a young professional man could be 
selected than a great, cosmopolitan city, with all its fierce competi- 
tion, and in such a center an early practitioner of law soon is brought 
to realize facts which largely contribute to his after success, these 
including, perhaps, the absolute necessity for labor unceasing, 
patience unlimited and tenacity of purpose not to be turned aside 
by either prosperity or failure. For nine years Mr. Clark continued 
to practice law in Chicago and became well known as a safe and 
able attorney there, but in 1907 he decided to locate in Champaign 
County, and chose the pleasant little city of Rantoul as a place 
of residence. Here he has built up a very satisfactory practice, 
and it is acknowledged that he has few equals on the fine points of 
the law. After coming to Rantoul he entered into a law partnership 
with J. W. Boyd, which continued until 1912, since when Mr. Clark 
has been alone. He has served as special attorney of the City of 
Rantoul and in that capacity proved the soundness of his legal 
knowledge. 

On June 16, 1909, Mr. Clark was united in marriage with Miss 
Eunice Craigmile, who is a daughter of A. Craigmile, of Champaign 
County, and they have two daughters, Elizabeth and Janis. Mrs. 
Clark is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and they 
take part in the pleasant social life of the city to which they are 
welcome additions. Mr. Clark is a member of the Champaign 
County Bar Association as well as the Illinois State Bar Association. 
His sentiments and convictions on public questions have made him 
receptive to the principles of the progressive party. 



926 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

LEWIS W. PARKER. Admitted to the bar and beginning prac- 
tice in Chicago in 1890, Lewis W. Parker has had many influential 
relations both with the law and with business, has been identified 
with railway management, and is one of the abler corporation and 
general lawyers of the state. 

Born at Centralia, Illinois, August 14, 1868, Lewis W. Parker 
is a son of Lewis H. and Mary E. (McDoel) Parker. His father 
a railway man, served as the first mayor of Centralia after it was 
granted a city charter, and at the time of his death was president 
of the Consolidated Stone Company, with offices in Chicago. Lewis 
W. Parker acquired his education chiefly in the public schools of 
Dubuque, and in the University of Michigan, finishing the literary 
course in 1889 and receiving the degree LL. B. in 1890. He was 
admitted to the Michigan bar and also the Illinois bar and began 
practice at Chicago in 1890 as clerk in a law office. Then followed 
an individual practice from 1892 to 1895, from that year until 1903 
he was senior member of the firm of Parker & Pain, was head of 
Parker & Hagan until 1911, and since that time the firm has been 
Parker & King. For some time Mr. Parker served as a director 
in the Monon Railroad Company, and was president of the In- 
dianapolis & Louisville Railroad, a subsidiary line of the Monon 
system. Through his practice as a corporation attorney, he has 
been closely associated with a number of large business concerns, 
and is a director in several corporations. 

Mr. Parker is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. 
His clubs are the Chicago Athletic, the Glenview Club and the 
Evanston Country Club. On April 27, 1893, he married Miss Ger- 
trude M. Bundy of Chicago. Their five children are John C. B. (a 
student at the University of Michigan), Eleanor M. (a student at 
Smith College), Priscilla, Rosalind and Lewis W., Jr. 

Mr. Parker resides at 624 Sheridan Square in Evanston, where 
he has had his home for twenty-one years, and his office is in the 
Marquette Building. He has occupied space in that building since 
it was erected in 1895. Mr. Parker is a democrat and an active 
man in his party, although he has never permitted his name to go 
on a party ticket for any office. 

HON. WILLIAM P. GREEN. Now serving as County Judge of 
Washington County, William P. Green was in early life a school 
teacher, and through that avenue entered into the profession of 
his choice, having acquired the means which enabled him to complete 
his education, and the same industry and perseverance have charac- 
terized his work as a lawyer. 

William P. Green was born in Washington County, Illinois, June 
4, 1874, a son of Hugh P. and Elizabeth (Troutt) Green. His 
mother was born in Todd County, Kentucky, came to Illinois when 
a child, and previous to her marriage was a teacher. She is now 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 927 

living at the age of sixty-seven. The father, a native of St. Clair 
County, Illinois, was a well known farmer and stock-raiser, and for 
two terms served as county treasurer of Washington County. He 
died in 1890 at the age of fifty-six. There were eight children. 

Judge Green, the fourth in the family, attended the public schools 
of Washington County, took the literary course in McKendree Col- 
lege, returned home and taught school until he had sufficient means 
to complete his work in the law department of McKendree, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1897. He began practice at once at 
Belleville under Judge Thomas, and soon after came to Nashville. 
Judge Green for several years was manager of the Washington 
County Abstract Company, served three terms as city attorney, and 
in 1910 was elected to his present office as county judge, and his 
administration has been faultless in the vigor and impartiality and 
care which he has given to all the varied matters that come under 
his jurisdiction. 

Judge Green is a member of the County Bar Association, affil- 
iated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. At Nashville, in 1907, he married Clara 
Becker, daughter of William Becker. Her father is in the shoe 
business at Nashville. To their marriage have been born four chil- 
dren: William, born August 13, 1908; Vera, born in 1909; Eugene, 
born in 1911 ; and Augustus Albert, born in 1913. 

WILLIAM P. WELKER has practiced law at Vandalia since 1904, 
has served in the office of state's attorney eight years and enjoys 
a reputation for thorough ability and successful work in connection 
with a general practice. 

William P. Welker was born in Fayette County, Illinois, Decem- 
ber 24, 1871, being the third in a family of six children, of whom 
Morris and Christina (Zeitler) Welker were the parents. His father 
was a native of Illinois and his mother of Ohio, coming to this state 
when a child. Morris Welker is now living at the age of seventy- 
two, and for many years has been a successful farmer in Fayette 
County. During the Civil War he saw three years of active service 
as a member of Company G, in the Thirty-fifth Illinois Infantry, 
and went through the war without wounds. The mother is also 
living at the age of seventy. 

William P. W r elker attended the public schools of Fayette 
County, but for the greater part of his education depended upon his 
own efforts and paid his own way. In 1900 he was graduated in 
the scientific course from Valparaiso University in Indiana, took one 
year in .the law department of the same school, and continued his 
studies with the law firm of Brown & Burnside until admitted to the 
bar in 1904. He has since been in active practice at Vandalia. Mr. 
Welker served two terms as state's attorney, and the admirable 
record he made in that office has served to strengthen his position 
as a lawyer. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America 



928 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and the Knights of Pythias, and in politics is a republican. On 
November 20, 1913, at East St. Louis Mr. Welker married Oral N. 
Starnes, daughter of Isaac Starnes, of Vandalia. They have one 
child, Lloyd Morris, born June 22, 1915. 

H. H. HOUSE. A lawyer whose success has given him a definite 
position in the Washington County Bar, H. H. House early in life 
was in the railroad service and other lines of employment, and 
studied law while supporting himself and has already gone far in 
his profession. 

H. H. House was born at Rolla, Missouri, July 14, 1877, son 
of Harold H. and Hattie (Krewson) House. His parents moved 
from New York State, settled in Rolla, Missouri, where his father 
was a contractor and builder until his death in 1881 at the age of 
twenty-nine years. The mother is now living at St. Louis, at the 
age of fifty-seven. 

H. H. House, the only child, attended school at Rolla, taught for 
two terms in the rural districts, found employment in the general 
freight offices of the Frisco Railroad for three and a half years and 
then was employed in the same capacity with the Missouri Pacific, 
and during that time took up the study of law at the Benton Law 
School in St. Louis. Mr. House was admitted to the Missouri Bar 
in 1901, remained at St. Louis until 1903, and after coming to 
Illinois in that year was employed in educational work in Washing- 
ton County for two years. Admitted to the bar in 1905, Mr. House 
has since been in active practice at Nashville. He served one term 
as master in chancery, but now gives all his time to his large gen- 
eral practice. 

Mr. House is a member of the County Bar Association, is 
affiliated with the Royal Arch Masons, is past grand of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. On July 3, 1901, at Richview, Illinois, he 
married Miss Olive B. Edwards, daughter of W. H. and Mary A. 
Edwards, who are still living in Richview. To their marriage have 
been born four children: Orville Byron, in 1902, at St. Louis; 
France May, in 1904, in Washington County; Beulah Madeline, in 
1906, in Washington County ; and Lawrence Emerson, in February, 
1914. The three older children are all attending school. 

WILBUR MOORE WARNOCK. Characterization as a "learned, 
thorough and industrious lawyer," was the estimate applied to the 
late W. M. Warnock, for thirty years a distinguished and useful 
member of the Edwardsville Bar. As one of the leading Southern 
Illinois lawyers, now called to his long reward, it is appropriate in 
this publication to quote somewhat at length from a character 
sketch drawn by one who had been Mr. Warnock's professional 
associates through the greater part of his career. A portion of the 
address of Thomas Williamson at the memorial meeting of the 
Madison County Bar Association, is as follows : 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 929 

"Next to his private home was his professional home, his office. 
This was his workshop. It was there in early life, that he might 
be found from early morn until late at night. The midnight quietude 
was familiar to him as a worker and the midnight lamp was a mute 
witness of the industry that marked his professional career. In 
his office life he exhibited the same courtesy, kindness and consid- 
eration that so marked him in his association with others. No 
one ever heard a harsh or unchivalric word from his lips.. 

"To his clients, he was an adviser to whom appeal could be 
made in the utmost confidence. Were the experiences of thirty 
years in his office spread upon the records, that the public might 
gaze thereon, what a picture would be reflected of the woes, heart- 
aches, misfortunes, ambitions and frailties of human life. No 
worthy person in the need of counsel ever appealed to him in vain. 
The man borne down with the burden of poverty, received the 
same kindly, careful, considerate advice and counsel that was given 
to the man of independent fortune. He was marked in his extreme 
generosity to those who needed help. He was ever ready to sub- 
scribe liberally to any public enterprise, and acted promptly with his 
ability and means in the hour of misfortune or distress. 

"His library was of the best. His unceasing examination of its 
pages made him the thorough lawyer that he was. Thoroughness 
was one of his fixed rules. Those who were his opponents realized 
that in Mr. Warnock they had an opponent who was ever on guard, 
and who vigorously and honorably maintained the interests of his 
client. 

"Mr. Warnock was successful as a trial lawyer, because of his 
thorough preparation ; because he was respected by the court, its 
officials and every one with whom he came in contact ; and by 
reason of his most excellent judgment in passing upon jurors; but 
the crowning virtue of his successful trial career was in his absolute 
earnestness and sincerity in the cause which he advocated. 

"Another reason which might be assigned for his wonderful suc- 
cess in the trial court was his aversion to unnecessary litigation. 
He never engaged in a law suit, that, in his judgment should be 
settled, if there was an opportunity to do so. In the adjustment 
of those matters out of which litigation usually grows, he was a 
master. With that keen perception of the rights of man and of 
property, with absolute sincerity and unquestioned integrity, he 
was remarkably successful in adjusting difficulties and disputes. 

"He detested what is usually termed 'sharp practice.' He ad- 
mired an opponent who was clean, clear-cut and aggressive. He 
had no patience with those who were not honest and sincere. Mr. 
Warnock was a successful business getter, but his methods were 
such as might be set as a standard by any bar association, with 
credit. He never obtained business by reflection on the ability or 
standing of other attorneys, but rather would he insist that such 
attorneys should retain the business which had been assigned to 
them. 



930 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

"His thirty years' practice not only of his chosen profession, but 
of those manly qualities which we all love so well, stamped him as 
a factor in the uplift of the entire community. He stood for those 
things that were progressive; that were beneficial to humanity; 
that were right. To the young attorney, struggling for a position 
at the bar, he was ever a friend. 

"His interpretation of the law was always based on his concep- 
tion of its object rather than of its technique. In such interpreta- 
tion his judgment was ever found to be sound. 

"His identification with the courts has ever been such that when 
he spoke he was given respectful attention. In this court, besides 
being a member of its bar, he was for many years its master in 
chancery. He brought to that office the same thoroughness, skill 
and judgment that was his in the practice. On his findings the 
titles to the most valuable property in our county now rests. In 
this as in other affairs he was the personification of courtesy and 
fairness. 

"His practice in the courts of review of the state commenced in 
early life. We find that he first appeared in the Appellate Court 
when he was of the age of twenty-one. As an indication of his 
future success the Appellate Court held that the position taken by 
him in this case was sound and recorded judgment accordingly. 
His first appearance in the Supreme Court was two years later, and 
continued with regularity until the time of his death. The reports 
show that he took part in seventy-five cases in the Appellate and 
fifty in the Supreme Court, and a number in the Federal Appellate 
courts. In these courts of review his briefs reflected his wonder- 
ful industry and keen perception. There was never any surface 
reasoning. His statement of a case was convincing. His brief 
contained all the authorities that his research could unearth on the 
points involved ; his arguments were logical, thorough and ever gave 
evidence of a complete grasp of the controlling points." 

Wilbur Moore Warnock was born at Columbia, Illinois, April 
23, 1862, and died December 7, 1911. His great-grandfather, Jo- 
seph Warnock, had served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 
His grandfather, Judge John Warnock, was born in South Carolina, 
studied law, and was appointed by the President of the United 
States as territorial judge for the western district of Illinois. He 
served in that capacity until Illinois was admitted to the Union, 
in 1818, and presided over the last term of territorial courts held 
at Madison County. Later he was postmaster of the old capital at 
Vandalia, subsequently was a farmer in St. Clair County, and his 
death occurred in Texas in 1858. He married Jane McClure, whose 
father had also been a Revolutionary soldier. Lafayette Warnock, 
father of the late Mr. Warnock, was born at Vandalia, Illinois, in 
1824, was educated in McKendree College at Lebanon, in 1854 began 
his career as merchant, miller, and large land owner at Columbia. 
He married Lucinda (Moore) Stanley, whose grandfather, Enoch 
Moore, was the first white child born on Illinois soil. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 931 

The late W. M. Warnock was educated in his native town, 
attended the academy at Butler, Missouri, from 1878 to 1880, began 
the study of law at Edwardsville under Judge Burroughs, was grad- 
uated from the Union College of Law (Northwestern University) 
at Chicago, in 1884, and began a partnership with Judge Burroughs 
at Edwardsville on August i, 1882. During the next thirty years 
his associates in practice were some of the best known lawyers of 
Madison County, and his death removed the senior member of 
Warnock, Williamson & Burroughs. 

The late Mr. Warnock was a democrat, was prominent in York 
and Scottish Rite Masonry, and in other fraternal orders, and at 
one time was vice president of the Illinois State Bar Association. 
He was married at Edwardsville June 24, 1896, to Maud Bur- 
roughs, daughter of the late Judge Burroughs. 

JAMES H. SMITH. As a lawyer James H. Smith has been iden- 
tified with Louisville for over ten years, and was active as a resi- 
dent of that town at a still earlier period, having taken up law 
somewhat late in life. Mr. Smith is a capable lawyer and has filled 
several offices in line with his profession. 

James H. Smith was born at Indian 'Spring, Indiana, August 5, 
1874, son of Oscar and Elizabeth (Whitley) Smith. Both parents 
were natives of Indiana, and in 1894 moved to Illinois and located 
in Clay County. His father, who is now sixty-nine years of age, 
has been for thirty-five years actively identified with the ministry 
of the United Brethren Church and is known in many parts of the 
country. The mother died in Clay County in 1907 at the age of 
sixty-two. 

James H. Smith, the older of two children, received his early 
schooling in Westfield, Clark County, Illinois, in the Orchard City 
College at Flora, Illinois, and for ten years his career was spent 
in the useful service of teaching in Clay County. In the meantime 
he read law with Judge Rose at Louisville, and was admitted to the 
bar June 4, 1903. Since then Mr. Smith has been in active practice, 
and has established profitable and influential connections in Jasper 
County. He has served as city attorney at Louisville for several 
terms, was president of the village for six years, and is a member 
of the State Bar Association and in Masonry is affiliated with the 
Royal Arch and Knight Templar branches. 

December 30, 1895, at Louisville, Mr. Smith married Miss Sylvia 
Bales, daughter of George W. Bales, now deceased, while her 
mother still lives in Louisville. The children are : Roy, born in 
1899, and attending the Louisville high school; Clarence, born in 
1901, in the Louisville grade schools; Margaret, born in 1904, and 
one that is deceased. 

HARRY S. PARKER. One of Effingham's ablest and most repre- 
sentative lawyers is Harry S. Parker, who has been in active prac- 
tice since 1896. 



932 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Harry S. Parker was born at Parkersburg, Illinois, January 3, 
1871, a son of Thomas H. and Emma E. (Moore) Parker. His 
father was a prosperous farmer and stock-raiser near Dieterich, 
in Effingham County, and the mother is still living at the age of 
sixty-seven. Harry S. Parker attended the public schools and Austin 
College in Effingham, and was a student in the Kent College of Law 
at Chicago and finished his studies in the office of Wood Brothers, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1896. Since then he has been in 
active practice at Effingham, with the exception of one year spent 
as adjutant in the Fourth Illinois Infantry during the Spanish- 
American war. He went to Cuba, but was never in active service. 
Mr. Parker is a republican. He is a Master Mason and is affiliated 
with the Modern Woodmen of America. On September 19, 1896, 
at Wheaton, Illinois, he married Miss Mary Stuart Rice, daughter 
of Dr. S. S. Rice, at one time a prominent physician at Altamont, 
Illinois. They are the parents of two children : Mary Maurece 
Parker, born October 23, 1898, at Effingham, and now attending high 
school; and Howard Stuart Parker, born December 21, 1903, at 
Effingham and attending the grade schools. 

SAMUEL N. FINN. Now serving as state's attorney of Marion 
County, Samuel N. Finn was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1909, 
and had previously been identified with business affairs for a num- 
ber of years in this part of the state. His very successful record 
as state's attorney has increased his high standing as a lawyer 
at Salem. 

Samuel N. Finn was born on a farm in Marion County, Illinois, 
July 28, 1869, a son of Alfred C. and Art (Mercer) Finn. Both 
parents were natives of Illinois, and the father has been for many 
years active as a farmer and stock-raiser and is still living in Marion 
County at the age of seventy-eight. The mother died in 1902 at 
the age of fifty-six. 

The second among five children, Samuel N. Finn attended the 
public schools of Marion County, also took a course in the State 
Normal School at Carbondale, and spent one term in De Pauw Uni- 
versity, at Greencastle, Indiana. Mr. Finn is vice president and 
director of the Salem Mercantile Company, and spent a number of 
years in business and other lines before entering the legal profession. 
For three years he was a student in the law department of the 
University of Illinois, graduating LL. B. in 1909, and at once began 
practice at Salem. During 1911-13 he served as city clerk, and was 
elected to his present office as state's attorney in the fall of 1912. 
Mr. Finn is a member of the County Bar Association, has taken 
the Chapter and Council degrees in Masonry, and also belongs to the 
Eastern Star, and is a member of the Lodge, Encampment and Re- 
bekah auxiliary of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Other 
fraternities are the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and 
Modern Woodmen of America, and he is popular in both social and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 933 

professional life. In politics he is a democrat, and is a member of 
the Christian Church. 

In January, 1894, at Salem Mr. Finn married Miss Nena M. 
Hays, daughter of O. J. Hays, who died in 1912 in Marion County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Finn have two children: Hazel Finn, born in Febru- 
ary, 1895, was educated in the public schools of Salem and is now 
a student in the State Normal at Carbondale ; Roscoe S., born at 
Carter, Illinois, in 1896, is also attending the State Normal at Car- 
bondale. 

HON. J. E. HILLSKOETTER. Among men who have attained 
prominence both as a practicing lawyer and on the bench in South- 
ern Illinois is Judge Hillskoetter of Edwardsville, who has prac- 
ticed in Madison County for the last twenty years and has served 
three terms on the county bench. 

J. E. Hillskoetter was born in Osceola, Wisconsin, January 12, 
1873, the eighth in a family of twelve children born to Herman and 
Sophie (Langhorst) Hillskoetter. Both his parents were natives of 
Germany, were brought to America when children, grew up and 
were married in Minnesota, and his father was an active farmer 
near Osceola until his death in 1898 at the age of seventy-three years, 
two months and twenty-four days, while the mother is still living in 
Wisconsin, aged eighty. 

Judge Hillskoetter was educated in the common schools of Wis- 
consin, and the chief reason which caused him to make his perma- 
nent home in Southern Illinois was his attendance at McKendree 
College at Lebanon, since after his graduation in the law department 
in 1894 he moved to Edwardsville and began practice. He was 
elected city attorney of Edwardsville, and in 1902 was first elected 
to the office of county judge. His first election was by a majority 
of about twelve hundred, and his second by thirty-six hundred, and 
the third by twenty-four hundred. He filled the office of county 
judge and probate judge of the county one term, having both offices 
at the same time. Judge Hillskoetter is a member of the County Bar 
Association and the State Bar Association, affiliates with the Lodge 
and Chapter of Masonry, of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and both lodge and encampment, and the Improved Order 
of Red Men. On June 23, 1903, Judge Hillskoetter married Miss 
Medora A. Judd, daughter of C. H. Judd of Edwardsville. 

THOMAS WILLIAMSON. As a member of the Madison County 
Bar Mr. Williamson's position and success have been securely estab- 
lished for many years, and through his ability as a lawyer, his work 
in public affairs and his distinctive gifts as an orator he is known 
much beyond the circle of his immediate professional activities. 

Thomas Williamson was born May 19, 1867, in Macoupin 
County, Illinois, in a log cabin, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth 



934 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

(Creighton) Williamson. His father was a native of Ireland, lived 
in Philadelphia from 1850 to 1860, married there, later settled on a 
little farm in Macoupin County, Illinois, and died in 1877. The 
mother died when their son Thomas was fourteen months of age. 
He grew up in the home of relatives, attended the country schools, 
and at the age of seventeen was granted a teacher's certificate, and 
for five or six years was one of the capable educators of Madison 
and adjoining counties, varying his work in the schoolroom with 
attendance at the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, 
with labor on the railroad and one summer in the St. Louis Gas 
Works. In 1890 he began the study of law after borrowing two 
books from a lawyer friend, continued his reading under W. P. 
Early and R. E. Dorsey and after a brief course in the law depart- 
ment of Washington University was granted a license by the 
Supreme Court in May, 1891. For eight years Mr. Williamson was 
engaged in practice at Mount Olive, and since September, 1899, 
his home has been in Edwardsville, the county seat of Madison 
County. In 1905 he became a member of the noted law firm of 
Warnock, Williamson & Burroughs, the senior partner of -which, 
one of the eminent lawyers of Southern Illinois, died in 1911. For 
more than twenty years Mr. Williamson has had a large and profit- 
able practice, and is a well known member of the County and State 
Bar associations. For several years he was legal representative in 
Illinois for the United Mine Workers, and was active in their behalf 
during the strike of 1898. He has taken much interest in school 
affairs, has served as president and is still a member of the Edwards- 
ville board of education, and is one of the citizens of Edwardsville 
always counted upon for assistance in every forward movement. 

Mr. Williamson has taken thirty-two degrees in Scottish Rite 
Masonry, is also affiliated with the Knight Templar Commandery, 
the Mystic Shrine, belongs to the Knights of Pythias, and has been 
especially prominent in the Modern Woodmen of America. He is 
active in the Edwardsville Presbyterian Church. On a number of 
public occasions as well as in the regular routine of court practice, 
Mr. Williamson has gained more than ordinary reputation as an 
orator. He has delivered a number of exceptional addresses, one 
of the most impressive having been that delivered before the Madi- 
son County Bar Association on the death of his partner, W. M. 
Warnock. 

Mr. Williamson was married October 14, 1891, to Miss Mattie 
L. Binney, daughter of Walter P. Binney, of Madison County. 
Their children are : Bessie E., born in 1893 ; Jessie C., born in 1897 ; 
Thomas Binney, born in 1899; and Robert W., born in 1911. 

FRANK H. BICEK. Engaged in practice in Chicago since admis- 
sion to the Illinois bar in December, 1907, Frank H. Bicek's high 
standing as a lawyer is based on hard and conscientious work. 

Mr. Bicek was born in Chicago, October 16, 1886, a son of Mar- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 935 

tin and Marie (Vanek) Bicek. The parents were natives of Bo- 
hemia and they reached Chicago when it was in ashes, soon after 
the devastating fire of 1871. The father was a tailor by trade. In 
the parochial schools of the parish in which his home was located, 
Frank H. Bicek had his early education, after which he made him- 
self useful "in his father's business until he secured a position as 
clerk in a justice court. He remained for four years in that posi- 
tion, until 1906, when the justice, courts were replaced by the 
municipal courts. This clerical position gave him many opportuni- 
ties along the line of the career he had chosen, having commenced 
the study of law in 1904, entering the Illinois College of Law, now 
affiliated with DePaul University, and in 1907 was graduated with 
the Bachelor of Laws degree. He was associated for some years 
thereafter with the law firm of Guthman & Rothschild, after which 
he entered into independent practice. For a time Mr. Bicek served 
as assistant chief clerk of the Probate Court, and in his practice 
pays especial attention to real estate and probate law, applying to 
excellent advantage the knowledge gained along these lines in for- 
mer years. As a' lawyer Mr. Bicek is credited with a thorough 
knowledge of law and on many occasions has won the approbation 
of his brother attorneys as well as the grateful assurances of esteem 
of his clients. Mr. Bicek has always exhibited a devotion to public 
interests when called upon and has taken an active interest in politi- 
cal affairs. Professionally he is identified with the Chicago Bar 
Association and the Chicago Law Institute. He is a member of the 
Rieger Club, the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of For- 
esters, and to a number of Bohemian fraternal and literary socie- 
ties. He was elected supreme counsellor of the Catholic Workmen 
(a fraternal organization) at its last convention. He is attorney 
and one of the directors of the Adams State Bank. 

Mr. Bicek was married May 2, 1910, to Miss Sylvia M. Beranek 
of Chicago, and they have one daughter, Clara. Mrs. Bicek is an 
accomplished pianist. Their home is at 2526 Ridgeway Avenue, 
while Mr. Bicek has his office in the Reaper Block. 

JUDGE MONROE C. CRAWFORD. Most of the lawyers who were 
admitted to the bar prior to the Civil war have long since laid down 
their brief and have little concern with the temporal affairs of the 
world. A distinguished exception to this rule is Judge Monroe C. 
Crawford, of Jonesboro, who was admitted to the bar nearly sixty 
years ago, and has been identified with practice in the courts and 
with service on the bench in Union County for more than half a 
century. 

Judge Monroe C. Crawford was born in Franklin County, Illi- 
nois, May 26, 1835, a son of John and Elizabeth (Randolph) Craw- 
ford. His father was a native of Virginia and his mother of Ten- 
nessee. John Crawford was brought to Illinois as a child, while 
his mother came to the state in 1832. John Crawford settled in 



936 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Franklin County at what is known as Crawford Prairie, and spent 
all his life there as a farmer. The mother died in 1840, at the age 
of twenty-seven, and Judge Crawford, who was second in a family 
of five children, was left an orphan when a boy. He attended school 
in Franklin County, was graduated from McKendree College at 
Lebanon in 1851 and pursued his law studies in the University of 
Kentucky at Louisville until graduating LL. B. in 1854. In 1856 
Judge Crawford began practice at Benton in Franklin County, and 
lived there until 1859, when he moved to Jonesboro in Union County. 

Judge Crawford has been again and again honored with public 
office. He was elected judge of the County Court in 1886. In 1867 
he was elected to the circuit bench and re-elected in 1873, serving 
for twelve years in that office. For two terms he held the office 
of state's attorney, and in that as in his judicial capacity showed 
an efficiency and thoroughness of knowledge which made his con- 
duct of court affairs almost model. Judge Crawford also saw 
active service during the Civil war, as a member of the One Hundred 
and Tenth Regiment of Illinois Infantry. He was with his regi- 
ment in all its service through Kentucky and Tennessee, and was 
present at the battle of Stone River, where he received an injury 
which resulted in his honorable discharge. 

Judge Crawford has stood high in fraternal organizations, has 
been grand master of the Grand Lodge in Masonry in Illinois for 
two terms, and grand high priest of the Royal Arch Chapter one 
term, and also has been noble grand in the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

On November i, 1858, Judge Crawford married Miss Sarah 
Wilbank, who died in September, 1905. She was the daughter of 
A. D. Wilbank, a pioneer settler in Illinois. Of the children, two 
sons, William and Walter Crawford, are now deceased. John Craw- 
ford is now postmaster at Jonesboro ; Charles is a lawyer at Jones- 
boro ; and George is also in active practice of the law at Jonesboro. 

WILLIAM S. HOLMES. One of the oldest members of the Effing- 
ham County Bar is William S. Holmes, who began practice there 
thirty-five years ago, and after a hard struggle in young manhood for 
entrance to the law has since enjoyed all the more substantial 
rewards of the able lawyer and active citizen. 

William S. Holmes was born at Georgetown, Illinois, September 
16, 1852, a son of William B. and Eliza Holmes. Both parents were 
natives of England, were married there and after coming to Amer- 
ica settled in Wisconsin and finally moved to the vicinity of George- 
town, Illinois, where the father was a prosperous farmer. He died 
in Ford County near Malvern, in 1897, & t the age of seventy-seven. 
The mother died in 1904 at the age of seventy. 

William S. Holmes was the fourth in a family of ten children, 
three of whom are still living. As a boy he attended the public 
schools of Georgetown, later took a course of one year in the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 937 

Valparaiso University in Indiana, and being dependent on his own 
resources had to earn his way while a student. He read law in the 
office of Wyman of Chatsworth, Illinois, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1879 an d in the same year began practice at Altamont, Effing- 
ham County. In 1890 Mr. Holmes moved to Effingham and has 
since been one of the leading lawyers of that city. He has served 
as a member of the board of education and in the city council, is a 
democrat in politics, and a member of the State Bar Association. 

In 1881 Mr. Holmes was married to Lena Hagenstein of Effing- 
ham, daughter of Charles Hagenstein. They are the parents of three 
children: Mrs. Edith Ludson, a resident at Robinson, Illinois; 
Mrs. Elizabeth Caldwell who lives in McMinnville, Tennessee; and 
William Holmes, a salesman living in New York City. 

ARTHUR ROE. In the upper ranks of the lawyers of Fayette 
County stands Arthur Roe, who for more than a dozen years has 
held a place of usefulness in Vandalia in his profession, and is a 
lawyer of substantial attainments, thorough training and broad 
experience. 

Arthur Roe was born on a farm in Fayette County, Illinois, July 
1 8, 1878, a son of Hezekiah and Nancy J. (Browning) Roe. Both 
parents were born in Illinois, and the father, who was born in 1851, 
has followed farming until his recent retirement. The mother died 
in February, 1914, at the age of sixty-four. 

The second of seven children, Arthur Roe attended district 
schools in Fayette County, finished in the Vandalia city schools, 
and then entered the 'University of Illinois and was graduated from 
the law department in 1901. Admitted to the bar in October, 1901, 
he began practice at Vandalia and that city has been the scene of his 
rising prestige as a lawyer and many substantial successes. For four 
years he held the office of master in chancery, was city attorney 
two years, and for two sessions has done much valuable work in 
the Illinois Legislature, having been elected to the forty-eighth and 
forty-ninth sessions. Mr. Roe is affiliated with the Masonic Order 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

He was married in June, 1905, at Greenville, Illinois, to Miss 
Claribel Grigg, who died April 27, 1911, at Belvidere, Illinois. Her 
father, Daniel R. Grigg, is still living in Greenville. 

H. G. WEBER. Since he took up practice at Carlyle in 1904, 
Mr. Weber has been much identified with public affairs, served for 
two terms as city attorney of Carlyle, and is now a member of the 
State Board of Equalization. He has been twice elected to this lat- 
ter office, for a term of four years each. All his professional work 
has commanded respect and confidence, and he is well known 
throughout the state. 

H. G. Weber was born in Carlyle, Illinois, March 24, 1868, a 
son of Eli and Mary Elizabeth (Von Bokel) Weber. Both parents 



938 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

were natives of Germany, and when the father came to this country 
he located for a time at Oyster Bay, New York, and later moved 
to Clinton County, Illinois, where for a number of years he was 
engaged in the manufacture of brick at Carlyle. His death occurred 
at Carlyle in 1890 at the age of sixty-four. The mother died in 
1897 aged sixty-seven. 

H. G. Weber was the third of their four children, having his 
early schooling in Carlyle, and was identified with different lines 
of work until entering the law. He was educated in the Illinois 
State Normal School at Normal, spent a time in the University of 
Michigan Law Department, and finished his studies with a law 
firm at Carlyle. Mr. Weber was admitted to the bar in 1904. He 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Church and 
in politics is a democrat. 

JAMES A. LYNN. An Alton lawyer who has held a number of 
positions in Madison County in line with his profession, James A. 
Lynn is now giving a capable administration in his home city as 
chief of police. 

James A. Lynn was born in St. Clair County, Illinois, October 30, 
1864, a son of William and Sarah A. (Ashton) Lynn. His father 
was born near Lancaster and his mother near Liverpool, England, 
and the former came to the United States in 1848 and the mother 
in 1854. They were married near Lebanon, Illinois, where the 
father was engaged in farming. He was born in 1828, and from 
1853 until 1857 was m tne Mississippi River service, traveling on 
steamboats between St. Louis and New Orleans. He followed the 
career of farmer in St. Clair County until his death on March 18, 
1903. He and his wife were married in 1860, and she is still living 
at Lebanon at the age of seventy-two. They were the parents of 
six children, four sons and two daughters. 

James A. Lynn, the second child, grew up on a farm, attended 
the public schools, spent two years at Whittlesley Commercial 
School, also attended McKendree College, and read law under H. H. 
Homer, dean of the law department of McKendree. Admitted to 
the bar in 1891, Mr. Lynn has since been identified either with pri- 
vate practice or with official affairs. During 1888-89, while still 
struggling to gain an education, he was an employe in the mail 
service. He has made his own way since boyhood, and not only 
provided for his own support and education, but helped to educate 
his sisters. For five years he was in active practice at Lebanon in 
partnership with Judge H. H. Homer, and in July, 1897, came to 
Alton and was first engaged in assisting to build the electric railway 
from East St. Louis to Alton. In 1898 he resumed the practice of 
law. Mr. Lynn served as assistant state's attorney of Madison 
County from 1900 to 1904, was city attorney of Alton, being elected 
in 1901, 1903, 1905 and 1907, and for five years was master in 
chancery and at the same time served as assistant supervisor. In 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 939 

May, 1911, he was elected chief of police, and the duties of this 
office have kept him out of the law to a large extent. Mr. Lynn is 
a member of the County Bar Association, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Order of Yeomen. 
On July 6, 1897, at Shipman, Illinois, Mr. Lynn married Miss 
Clementine W T hiting, daughter of Wayne County people, her father 
having died when she was three years of age. They are the parents 
of two children: Anna Lynn, born at Alton in 1898 and now in 
high school, and Virginia Lynn, born in 1908, and just entering 
school. 

WILLIAM Y. BAKER. A well known attorney of Mount Sterling, 
where he has been in active practice for over twenty years, William 
Y. Baker has recently completed two terms of service as county 
judge of Brown County. His associates recognize him as one of the 
ablest lawyers in that section of the state. 

William Y. Baker was born in Pike County, Illinois, August 30, 
1861, the sixth in a family of nine children born to James and 
Margaret (Newport) Baker. His father was born in Kentucky 
and his mother in Ohio, they married in the latter state, and in 1853 
located on a farm in Pike County, where the father was a substantial 
agriculturist until his death in 1891 at the age of seventy years. The 
mother who was born July 9, 1826, is still living at this writing. 

Judge Baker acquired his early education in the public schools 
of Pike County, attended the Whipple Academy at Jacksonville 
and also the Illinois College at that city, and in 1894 was graduated 
LL. B. from the law department of the Illinois Wesleyan University 
at Bloomington. Admitted to the bar the same year of his gradua- 
tion he opened a law office at Mount Sterling and has since looked 
after a general practice. He was elected county judge of Brown 
County in 1906, and re-elected in 1910. The first public office Judge 
Baker held was that of assessor of Newberg Township in Pike 
County. 

Judge Baker is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and is a 
member of the Christian Church. June i, 1898, at Mount Sterling 
he married Miss Clara B. Henry, daughter of Jesse W. and Almira 
Henry of Mount Sterling. They have two children: Lucile J., 
born June 12, 1899, and now in the Mount Sterling High School; 
and Glenn Thomas Baker, born March 26, 1903. 

HON. JOHN C. BOEVERS. The bench and bar of Jo Daviess 
County have long commanded respect from other sections of the 
state, and within the jurisdiction of the courts of this county have 
been settled some exceedingly important litigation and cases, that 
for legal complexities have scarcely been equaled anywhere. As 
state's attorney and as county judge, Hon. John C. Boevers has 
made a personal reputation that is more than creditable to himself 
and is worthy of the professional body to which he proudly belongs. 



940 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

John C. Boevers, who is now engaged in private practice at 
Galena, was born at Petersburg, Illinois, November 22, 1866, and 
is a son of Frederick C. and Caroline (Winkelhake) Boevers. They 
were born in Germany and came to the United States in youth. 

After acquiring a common school education, John C. Boevers 
became a student, through four years, in the German-English Col- 
lege, then located at Galena, but now situated at Charles City, Iowa, 
and from that well conducted institution he was graduated in 1888, 
with the degree of .B. S. In the fall of 1889 he entered the law 
department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where he 
was graduated with the degree of LL. B., in the summer of 1891, 
and in August of that year he began practice of his profession at 
Galena. With his education and his legal ability it was not a very 
difficult matter to build up a substantial practice, although Judge 
Boevers has been very discriminating. In 1896 he was first elected 
state's attorney, to which office he was twice subsequently re-elected 
and served full three terms, covering twelve years. His administra- 
tion of that office is a matter of public record and one of which 
Judge Boevers has just reason to feel proud. In November, 1910, 
he was elected county judge, an excellent judiciary selection in the 
opinion of broad and even-minded men in the county, and his term 
of four years on the bench but added to the respect and confidence 
his fellow citizens have long reposed in him. Refusing a renomina- 
tion, Judge Boevers retired from a position he had dignified and 
resumed the private practice of law at Galena. Formerly he was 
attorney for the Galena National Bank and for other important 
business houses, but when he went on the bench he no longer kept 
up his professional relations with these. 

Judge Boevers has been active in the ranks of the republican 
party for many years and has loyally supported the regular candi- 
dates, and during the candidacy of former Governor Yates was 
particularly zealous. He has been a delegate to numerous party 
conventions and, as in other activities of life, has always proved 
reliable and dependable. He always finds time in his busy life to 
keep in touch with local matters that affect the general welfare and 
at present is serving usefully as a member of the school board. 

Judge Boevers was united in marriage on September 23, 1898, 
to Miss Jessie A. Crooks, who is a daughter of Jesse Grant and 
Martha (Clark) Crooks, old residents of Galena. They have three 
children: Helen Marie, Charles J. and Frederick Jesse, the two 
older children being students in the Galena High School. Mrs. 
Boevers is interested in various charitable, club and church organ- 
izations. Judge Boevers is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Shriner 
and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

WILLIAM REID CURRAN. A former president of the Illinois 
State Bar Association and in active practice for nearly forty years, 
Judge Curran has long held a position among the eminent lawyers 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 941 

of Central Illinois. Either through his profession or as a business 
man, his services have had a broad scope of usefulness, and few 
men have the ambition to accomplish a more substantial position 
than this veteran lawyer of Pekin. 

Born at Patterson, Ohio, December 3, 1854, he is a son of 
Thomas S. and Margaret E. (Reid) Curran. When he was a child 
his parents came to Illinois, and he grew up and was educated in 
this state, graduating from the Chatsworth High School and study- 
ing law in Livingston County. He was admitted to the bar July 4, 
1876, and later admitted to practice in the United States District 
courts and the Supreme Court of the United States. 

Since beginning practice in Pekin, Mr. Curran has for many years 
taken a prominent part in public affairs in Tazewell County. For 
eight years he was master in chancery, served four years as county 
judge, and is now in his twenty-seventh year of service as president 
of the Pekin Loan & Homestead Association. Judge Curran is a 
member of the American Bar Association, in 1904 was chosen a 
delegate to attend the Universal Congress of Lawyers and Jurists 
held at St. Louis, and it was in 1911 that the Illinois State Bar 
Association paid him the distinguished honor of electing him its 
president. 

Many have acknowledged the spell of Judge Curran's oratory. 
All his life he has been a student and thinker, and he possesses not 
only the technical ability to analyize facts and to formulate 'his de- 
ductions in concise and logical language, but has a still more happy 
faculty of construing facts and events in their spiritual significance, 
and in clothing his speech with the attractive qualities of poetic 
prose. As an orator Judge Curran is credited with some masterly 
efforts. Probably his most notable production, certainly the one 
which received the widest notice and appreciation, was his memorial 
address on Abraham Lincoln delivered at Pekin February 12, 1909, 
at the centennial anniversary of Mr. Lincoln's birth. A notice of 
this address is incorporated in the bibliography of the Lincoln Cen- 
tennial. A more recent speech, which revealed his lofty patriotism 
and his ability as a philosophical interpreter of modern history and 
economic tendencies, was his eloquent address delivered at Pekin 
on Memorial Day of 1915. 

Outside of the law much of his time has been devoted to the 
development of the farming land area in this section of Illinois. 
Judge Curran is now identified with the development of Banner 
Special Drainage and Levee District, located in Peoria and Fulton 
counties, comprising forty-six hundred acres of land. He is one of 
the chief owners of this tract. Judge Curran believes that the man 
who takes an acre of swamp land and improves it for profitable 
cultivation has not lived in vain. During thirty-nine years as a 
lawyer, Judge Curran's activities in business have extended over the 
counties of Central Illinois, and for the past thirty years he has 



942 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

been engaged in most of the important litigation on one side or the 
other. 

His is one of the most attractive homes in the City of Pekin. 
It is one of the old fashioned houses significant of comfort rather 
than luxury or grandeur, has wide porches, broad lawns planted 
with great trees, and the judge's principal interest centers in the fine 
flower and vegetable garden in the rear, where a handsome pergola 
is the background against which he passes many pleasant hours. 
On December 28, 1876, Mr. Curran married Mary C. Burgess. 
They have two children : Bessie M. is the wife of Dr. A. G. Smith 
of Peoria, son of William Hawley Smith, the noted lecturer and 
author; and the second daughter is Bertha M. 

HON. FRANCIS E. WILLIAMSON. Prominent in public affairs in 
Illinois and distinguished as a member of the Champaign County 
Bar, Hon. Francis E. Williamson, a member of the State Legis- 
lature, is accounted a leading and representative citizen of Urbana, 
where he has made his home for the past nine years. 

Francis E. Williamson was born at Mount Summit, Indiana, 
February 17, 1872, and is a son of Joseph S. and Rebecca (Ice) 
Williamson. The father of Mr. Williamson was born at Muncie, 
Indiana, and during a part of his life was a merchant and later 
became interested in farming. Francis E. attended the public 
schools, and from the high school entered a normal school which 
prepared him for the profession of teaching, which he followed for 
five years, in the meanwhile devoting some attention to the study 
of law, and completed his law course at Georgetown University, 
District of Columbia. In 1903 he was admitted to the bar at Wash- 
ington and for a short time engaged in the practice of law at the 
capital, but in 1904 came to Champaign County, Illinois, and in 1905 
removed to Urbana, and in September, 1910, formed his present 
partnership with Hon. Olin L. Browder, the present mayor of 
Urbana. The firm of Williamson & Browder, with offices at No. 
in West Main Street, Urbana, is one of high standing in the county 
and at times has been connected with very important litigation. 

Mr. Williamson was united in marriage with Miss Etta Creamer, 
who is a daughter of E. C. Creamer of Tolono, Illinois, and they 
have three children. Mr. Williamson and family are members of 
the Presbyterian Church. By inheritance and conviction, Mr. Wil- 
liamson has always been a democrat and as a public-spirited and 
broad-minded man has been active in party affairs as seemed best 
to him and thus became a prominent factor and was elected to the 
Legislature, first in 1912 and again in 1914. His activities at Spring- 
field have all been beneficial to his constituents and the people of 
Champaign County have confidence in his ability and judgment. 
His life has been a very busy one and he takes but little recreation, 
enjoying, however, membership in the Order of Knights of Pythias. 
He is a valued member of the Champaign County Bar Association. 



943 

EARL C. HALES. A member of the Chicago bar since 1903, Earl 
C. Hales, in addition to a growing general practice, has become well 
known in the city through his active work in behalf of good city 
government. He is a popular resident of the Thirty-first Ward, 
where his affiliations and influence have been with the honest and 
progressive movements in municipal policy. 

Mr. Hales was born at Henrietta, Lorain County, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 30, 1871, and is a son of Ansel and Emma A. (Stedman) Hales, 
who are now residents of Chicago, where they established their 
home in November, 1886. His father had been a successful farmer 
and in later years has been identified with manufacturing and other 
lines of business enterprise. Earl C. Hales was educated in the 
public schools of his native state and Nebraska and was about fif- 
teen years of age at the time of the family removal to Englewood, 
Chicago. After his graduation from the Englewood High School, 
he obtained employment as office boy in the office of James R. Mann 
and George W. Miller. He left their employment to enter the 
University of Chicago and in 1895-6 was associated with his father 
in the bicycle business. He then taught for one year in Cook 
County, after which he returned to the University of Chicago, grad- 
uating with the class of 1900 with the degree Bachelor of 
Philosophy. In 1903, he graduated L. L. B. from Harvard Law 
School and in October of that year was admitted to the Illinois bar, 
since then having been actively identified with the work of his pro- 
fession. He was law clerk for Henry S. Robbins, Esquire, promi- 
nent Chicago lawyer, from 1903 to 1905 and gave one year of service 
as investigator for the Citizens' Association of Chicago. In 1906-7 
Mr. Hales was assistant secretary of the Legislative Voters' League, 
which he represented during the general assembly of the State 
Legislature in the session of 1907. While thus engaged at the capi- 
tol city he had charge of the legislative reference bureau main- 
tained by the league and drew a number of bills, besides preparing 
many briefs for members of the Legislature. In April, 1914, he was 
a candidate for the office of alderman from the Thirty-first Ward, 
within whose boundaries, in Englewood, he has resided for a quar- 
ter of a century, but was defeated by three votes. His candidacy 
was supported by the Municipal Voters' League, which in its report 
of March 31, 1914, said: "Thirty-first ward vote for Hales. 
Unusually qualified by experience, judgment, training and char- 
acter to represent this ward." 

In politics Mr. Hales is a republican. He resides with his 
parents at 439 West Sixty-second Street, his law offices being in 
the Association Building, at 19 South La Salle Street. He is iden- 
tified with the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar 
Association, holds membership in the Hamilton and City clubs and 
is affiliated with the Phi Delta Theta College fraternity. 



944 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

LLOYD F. HAMILTON. An active membership in the Springfield 
Bar of forty-eight years has made Mr. Hamilton one of the seniors 
in the profession, while the prestige and honors associated with his 
name are in proportion to the length of his practice. The Bar of 
Illinois readily acknowledges him as one of its ablest members, a 
man of cultivated intellect, broad experience and of the highest 
professional standard. 

Lloyd F. Hamilton was born at Brandenburg, Meade County, 
Kentucky, April 25, 1844, a son of Felix J. and Jane (Wathen) 
Hamilton. His father died in October, 1844, and the mother then 
moved to Tazewell County, Illinois, where her parents had settled in 
1835. She died in Springfield about 1877. 

Mr. Hamilton gained his education in the common schools and 
at Eureka College, which he attended from 1860 to 1864. One year 
was spent as a student in the law department of the University of 
Michigan, and vacations in the reading of law under the direction 
of Judge Schofield of Marshall, Illinois. In 1865 he entered the 
Union College of Law at Chicago, and graduated with honor in 
the class of 1866. Admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of 
Illinois in the same year, he opened a law office in Springfield, and 
has practiced his profession there lacking only two years of half 
a century. During his long career as a Springfield lawyer Mr. Ham- 
ilton has been associated in partnership with Paren England, with 
Thomas G. Prickett, with Robert L. McGuire, among his early 
associations; from February, 1882, to May, 1902, was with James W. 
Patton, under the firm name of Patton & Hamilton, and a portion 
of the time the firm was Patton, Hamilton & Patton, which dissolved 
in May, 1902. That was one of the strongest combinations of legal 
talent in Springfield, and handled many cases of importance and 
won many notable victories. From May, 1902, until 1911 Mr. 
Hamilton had associated with him B. L. Catron, under the name 
Hamilton & Catron, and then after an interval of individual practice 
Mr. Hamilton, in the spring of 1913, took as junior partner C. J. 
Christopher. Mr. Hamilton retired from practice March i, 1915. 

Early in his legal career Mr. Hamilton served two terms as city 
attorney of Springfield, and on retiring from that office was elected 
state's attorney and served in that capacity until January, 1877, a 
period of four years. The fearlessness and impartiality with which 
he discharged his duties at that time have been permanent attributes 
of his career as a lawyer in all its relations. In 1882 Mr. Hamilton 
was elected to represent his district in the State Senate for one 
term of four years. In politics he was a democrat, and still adheres 
to the old Jeffersonian principles of the party, but since the advent 
of Bryanism and free silver he has acted independently in politics. 
In addition to a keen intellect, logical powers of reasoning and cor- 
rect deduction, Mr. Hamilton has a gift of oratory, and has always 
been a formidable opponent in any case before judge or jury. As 
a citizen of Springfield he has done much to stimulate and mold 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 945 

public opinion, and has interested himself in every public movement 
of importance at the capital since he began practice of law there. 
He is a member of the Sangamon County Bar Association. Mr. 
Hamilton was married May 16, 1866, to Miss Lucy Fletcher. They 
have two children : Walthem Hamilton and Macie Hamilton. The 
family reside at 512 North Seventh Street. 

CORNELIUS J. CHRISTOPHER, Junior member of the firm of 
Hamilton & Christopher, Mr. Christopher has brought to the prestige 
and experience of the old lawyer an individual ability of his own, 
and a successful record since admitted to the bar eight years ago. 

Cornelius J. Christopher was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, 
in 1876, a son of Joseph and Margaret (Utt) Christopher, substan- 
tial farming people. He was educated in the Northern Illinois Col- 
lege at Dixon, taking both the literary and the law courses and 
graduating LL. B. in 1904. This was followed by a course in the 
Bloomington Law School of Illinois Wesleyan University, where he 
took his law degree in 1905. After a half year in study in the office 
of Orendorf & Patton at Springfield, Mr. Christopher was admitted 
to the bar in the spring of 1906, and until 1913 worked along and 
built up a good practice as a general lawyer. Since then he has 
been associated with Lloyd F. Hamilton under the firm name of 
Hamilton & Christopher. 

On March I, 1915, Mr. Lloyd F. Hamilton retired from law 
practice, and Mr. Christopher moved with his family to Wenatchee, 
Washington, where he is connected with Mr. Fred Reeves, a lead- 
ing lawyer of the Wenatchee Bar. By his marriage in June, 1907, 
to Miss Lydia Tripp, daughter of David Tripp of Farmingdale, 
Illinois, a farmer and for many years a lumber merchant, he has 
one daughter, Margaret. His residence is at 233 North Miller 
Street, Wenatchee, Washington. 

ABNER G. MURRAY. While a member of the Springfield Bar for 
thirty years, and at different times a member of the Legislature and 
in other official positions, Mr. Murray is best known to the Illinois 
profession as a specialist in insurance law. His successful handling 
of "Bolles vs. The Mutual Reserve Life Insurance Company of 
New York," since generally quoted in insurance litigation, es- 
tablished his reputation as an authority in this field, and much of 
his practice is now confined to those lines. 

Abner G. Murray was born in Dayton, Ohio, September 7, 1857, 
a son of David and Elizabeth (Grove) Murray. His father was a 
native of Pennsylvania of Scotch extraction and a minister of the 
Baptist Church. Mr. Murray was educated in the Western Ohio 
Seminary at Lewisburg, Ohio, and besides his literary studies took a 
partial law course. His legal education was finished in the office 
of Jordan & Linden at Dayton, where he was admitted to the bar 
by examination in 1880. Mr. Murray began practice at Dayton in 



946 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

1880, and remained there until. 1882, when he came to Springfield, 
and has practiced in that city for the past thirty-two years. He 
early established a reputation for broad general ability, and has 
always enjoyed a generous share of the high-class practice at the 
state capital. 

Mr. Murray was elected in 1896 as a member of the House of 
Representatives, serving in the Fortieth General Assembly, 1897- 
1898, and was chairman of the committee on general education, and 
a member of the judiciary and other committees. In 1902 he was 
again elected to the House of Representatives for the session of 
1903-04, and from the close of that term until 1906 was corporation 
counsel for the City of Springfield. For more than five years Mr. 
Murray was the general counsel of the Cosmopolitan Life Insur- 
ance Company, and for the past fifteen years has made a specialty 
of insurance practice. It was as attorney for the plaintiff that Mr. 
Murray made his successful contest in the case of Bolles vs; The 
Mutual Reserve Life Insurance Company of New York. That was 
v the first case taken to the Supreme Court construing the assessment 
act with reference to the reinsurance or merger of insurance com- 
panies. His contention was sustained, and the case has since been 
cited as a standard in similar litigation. 

Mr. Murray was instrumental in the organization of the Spring- 
field Bar into the Sangamon County Bar Association, and was the 
first secretary of the latter. He is also a member of the Illinois 
and the American Bar associations. In 1880 he married Miss Flo 
S. Rodeffer, daughter of Samuel Rodeffer of Farmsville, Mont- 
gomery County, Ohio, where he was prominent as a stone contractor 
and bridge builder. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Murray were 
born three sons and one daughter, one son now deceased. The fam- 
ily home is at 1007 North Ninth Street in Springfield. 

JOHN G. FRIEDMEYER. On the record of cases successfully han- 
dled and the volume of litigation placed at his disposal, Mr. Fried- 
meyer may properly be ranked as one of the ablest trial lawyers of 
the present Illinois Bar. While his success has been most conspicu- 
ous in criminal cases, his services are in great demand in both the 
civil and criminal branches. His resources consist in a thorough 
knowledge of the law, unusual mental attainments, and powers as 
a fluent, forcible orator. 

John G. Friedmeyer of the firm of Smith & Friedmeyer, lawyers. 
Marine Bank Building at Springfield, was born in Montgomery 
County, Illinois, September 28, 1867, a son of Henry and Sophia 
(Welge) Friedmeyer. The father was a Montgomery County 
farmer. With an education acquired in the public schools and in 
the old Hillsboro Academy, supplemented by a college career in 
the University of Michigan, where he graduated in the literary and 
'law courses in 1892 with the degrees B. S. and LL. B., John G. 
Friedmeyer was admitted to the bar in June, 1892, in both Michigan 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 947 

and Illinois. His practice began at Springfield in the fall of 1892. 
The first four years were spent in individual practice, and in 1896 
he became assistant state's attorney under Elbert S. Smith and held 
that office until 1900. He and Mr. Smith then formed the firm of 
Smith & Friedmeyer in the general practice of law. Mr. Fried- 
meyer has become best known through his successful handling of 
criminal cases. In April, 1914, he finished his fifteenth homicidal 
case, and has secured acquittals in fully two-thirds of these cases. 

Mr. Friedmeyer is a member of the Illinois State Bar Associa- 
tion and the Sangamon County Bar Association, and for a number 
of years has has been prominent in Springfield municipal affairs. He 
served as a member of the Park Commission of Springfield, and 
from 1902 to 1904 was a member of the city council. His fraternal 
affiliations are with the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Improved Order of Red Men. Mr. Friedmeyer was married in 
1896 to Miss Anna M. Schuppe, daughter of August and Catherine 
Schuppe of Springfield. They have a family of five children, two 
sons and three daughters. The family residence is at 848 North 
Sixth Street in Springfield. 

HON. GEORGE W. MURRAY is a substantial and honorable prac- 
titioner, and for sixteen years served in the capacity of county judge 
of Sangamon County. In the field of practical moral reforms, as 
relates to the improvement of juvenile lives and conditions, he has 
a wide reputation, not only throughout the state, but in the West, 
for zealous and effective work, and he has been frequently referred 
to by Judge Ben B. Lindsey, of Denver, Colorado, as one of the best 
juvenile judges in the United States. He was born at Covington, 
Miami County, Ohio, July 7, 1839, and is a son of David and Eliza- 
beth (Mikesell) Murray. 

The Murray family is of Irish descent, Andrew Murray, the 
grandfather of the judge, having come to the United States from 
Ireland and settled in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, later remov- 
ing to the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio, where he located as a pioneer. 
The remaining years of his life were passed as a farmer. David 
Murray was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, and was a 
mere lad when he accompanied his parents to Ohio, there engaging 
in farming and subsequently becoming a minister of the German 
Baptist faith. He died at Phillipsburg, Ohio, in 1884, while the 
mother of the judge died in 1854. Her parents had also come to 
Ohio from Pennsylvania, both dying near Pleasant Hill, Miami 
Countv. 

George W. Murray began his education in the public schools and 
the Dayton High School, and his boyhood and youth were passed 
on the home farm. In 1859, when twenty years of age, Judge Mur- 
ray began teaching in the schools of Bond County, Illinois, but in 
1860 returned to Dayton, where he continued as an educator for 
four years. While thus engaged he became a law student in the 



948 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

office and under the personal preceptorship of Gen. Moses B. 
Walker, a lawyer of great ability, and in March, 1871, was admitted 
to the bar. He at once began the practice of his profession at Day- 
ton, and commenced to take an active part in public affairs, in April, 
1886, being elected to represent his ward in the Dayton City Council, 
serving efficiently therein and being active in the procurement and 
erection of the present water works of Dayton. In 1874 he came to 
Sangamon County, Illinois, and for two years practiced his profes- 
sion at Auburn, at the end of that time coming to Springfield, which 
has since been his home and the scene of his labors and successes. 
In 1888 Judge Murray was elected to represent Sangamon County 
in the Legislature, and in 1890 came his first election as county 
judge. At the end of his term he was again made the candidate of 
his party, but was defeated by Judge Charles P. Kane, the entire 
republican ticket being elected. However, in 1898, four years later, 
he again took his place on the bench, and received successive re- 
elections in 1902 and 1906. Few men have devoted themselves more 
assiduously to the interests of children than has Judge Murray. 
So wide has his reputation grown in this direction that he is fre- 
quently called upon to address and advise bodies formed for the 
purpose of championing juvenile court bills and similar measures. 
Several years ago he was induced to go to the State of Texas, where 
he delivered a speech before the Legislature of that state on juvenile 
court work and aided greatly on that occasion in procuring the pass- 
age of the Juvenile Court Law then before that body, for which he 
afterwards received the thanks of the Texas House of Representa- 
tives. The large oil painting which now hangs in his office, was 
modeled by himself and painted by eminent artists, and shows the 
"Two Ways of Life" to the children, a picture which has attracted 
widespread attention all over the country. Since his retirement from 
the bench, Judge Murray has been engaged in a large private practice 
at Springfield, where he has offices at No. 217^ South Sixth 
Street. 

On October 2, 1860, Judge Murray was married at Dayton, Ohio, 
to Miss Emma Niebert, daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Coffman) 
Niebert, who were born, respectively, at Hagerstown, Maryland, 
and in Rockingham County, Virginia. Six children have been born 
to Judge and Mrs. Murray, namely : William W. ; Ida May, who 
is the wife of Samuel J. Hanes, of Springfield ; Katie Lee, the wife 
of Frederick Latimer ; George Walter ; Jacob Frederick, and Jennie, 
who died at Dayton, Ohio, at the age of two years. 

GEORGE B. GILLESPIE. The development of Illinois jurisprud- 
ence in recent years has to an important degree been influenced by 
the work of George B. Gillespie, whom all members of the Illinois 
Bar know as one of the ablest constitutional lawyers of the state. 
As assistant attorney-general of Illinois from 1901 to 1907 Mr. Gil- 
lespie upheld many important points in the constitutional authority 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 949 

and statutes, and since then his practice has largely been concerned 
with major cases involving fundamental principles of state law. Mr. 
Gillespie is now senior member of the firm of Gillespie & Fitzgerald, 
with offices in the Reisch Building at Springfield. 

Born June 3, 1863, at Vienna, Illinois, his parents were James B. 
and Mary (Enloe) Gillespie, the former a native of North Carolina 
and the latter of Kentucky. His father was a merchant and farmer 
in Johnson County, Illinois, and for three years during the Civil 
war was a soldier and captain of Company I of the One Hundred 
and Twentieth Illinois Infantry. For eighteen years he was in the 
Federal Revenue Service. 

George B. Gillespie acquired his education in the district schools 
and by self study. When seventeen years of age, in 1882, he was 
appointed deputy county clerk of Johnson County, an office he held 
until 1884. A vacancy occurred at that time and he was appointed 
county clerk, and administered that office until a special election 
could be held to fill the vacancy. Admitted to the bar in 1885 ne 
began practice as partner of Alonzo K. Vickers, at present one of 
the justices of the Illinois Supreme Court. They practiced under 
the firm name of Vickers & Gillespie at Vienna until Mr. Gillespie 
left to attend law school in the Wesleyan University at Blooming- 
ton, where he was graduated in 1887. On July ist of that year 
he resumed partnership in the firm of Vickers & Gillespie and con- 
tinued until 1890. In that year the firm of Whitnel & Gillespie was 
established at Vienna with L. O. Whitnel as partner, and in that 
association Mr. Gillespie continued until 1901. In 1888 he was 
appointed master in chancery of Johnson County, held that office 
for four years, and in 1892 was elected state's attorney for Johnson 
County, an office held by him until 1900. 

Resigning his practice at Vienna as a member of the firm of 
Whitnel & Gillespie in 1901, he came to Springfield as assistant 
attorney-general under Attorney-General Hamlin, and served in that 
office until January i, 1907. He then formed a partnership with 
H. J. Hamlin in Springfield under the firm name of Hamlin & Gil- 
lespie, and in 1909 the firm became Hamlin, Gillespie & Fitzgerald, 
with Arthur M. Fitzgerald as the junior partner. Mr. Hamlin's 
death in 1911 left his firm in its present form as Gillespie & Fitz- 
gerald. While their practice is general it is to a large extent con- 
cerned with corporation law. Since 1909 Mr. Gillespie has been 
district attorney for the Big Four Railroad Company. 

During the six years of his service as assistant attorney-general 
Mr. Gillespie's work was of a varied nature, but included the han- 
dling of many important cases for the state. In that capacity he 
made the fight for the constitutionality of the anti-trust laws of 
Illinois, and was successful in the face of a vigorous attack by the 
corporations. His success was the more notable from the fact that 
only a short time previously a certain provision in one of the acts 
had been decided by the Supreme Court of the United States as 



950 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

vitiating the entire act. Mr. Gillespie also successfully handled the 
case involving the constitutionality of the "Civil Service Law," the 
"Miners Qualification Law," the "Wash House Law for all Em- 
ployes in Mines and Factories," and in these cases proved himself 
an expert in constitutional law. Since resuming private practice 
Mr. Gillespie has had much practice in cases that involve constitu- 
tional questions. 

Mr. Gillespie is a member of the Sangamon County Bar Associa- 
tion and of the Illinois State Bar Association, is a member of the 
Sangamon Club of Springfield, and a non-resident of the Hamilton 
Club of Chicago. In Masonry he has taken both the York and Scot- 
tish rites, thirty-two degrees in the latter, and is past master of 
Vienna Lodge No. 150, A. F. & A. M., and a member of the Mystic 
Shrine. In 1890 Mr. Gillespie married Miss Mary J. Oliver, daugh- 
ter of James F. Oliver of Johnson County, Illinois. Their three 
sons are : Alfred, in a banking house at Springfield ; George Marion, 
a student of law; and Louis Frank, now in school. The family 
reside at 1365 Lowell Avenue in Springfield. 

CHARLES WALLACE. Many times has membership on the Coles 
County Bar been a stepping stone to judicial position, a case in point 
being that of Charles Wallace, who has been very successful in law 
practice at Charleston for the past seven years, and who is a leading 
factor in democratic politics in the county. A master of his pro- 
fession and formerly a well known educator, Mr. Wallace is well 
qualified for the office of county judge. 

Charles Wallace was born on his father's farm in Illinois August 
20, 1875, and is a son of Joseph and Katy (Harness) Wallace. Jos- 
eph Wallace was born in Tennessee and all his life was a farmer. 
Of his five children, four survive. In the public schools Charles 
Wallace spent a large part of his boyhood days, when not engaged 
in assisting his father on the home farm, later entered the Illinois 
State Normal School, and taught school for two years. He came to 
Charleston in young manhood, as a student entering the office of 
Attorney J. H. Marshall, a prominent law practitioner here. He 
later attended the Illinois Law School and in December, 1906, was 
admitted to the bar, establishing his own office in the following year. 
He is a member of the Coles County Bar Association and his rela- 
tions with both bench and bar have always been most cordial. His 
fraternal connections are with the Knights of Pythias and Modern 
Woodmen of America. Mr. Wallace has always been a loyal party 
man and has asked few favors. He resides at No. 1122 Fourth 
Street, Charleston. 

JOHN W. THOMASON. For fifteen years identified with the Clay 
County Bar, John W. Thomason is one of the leading lawyers of 
Louisville, and in November, 1914, was elected one of the three 
representatives from the Forty-second Legislative District. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 951 

John W. Thomason was born in Clay County, Illinois, July 5, 
1874, a son of William B. and Caroline (Callums) Thomason. Both 
parents were born in Illinois, and his father was a Clay County 
farmer and died in 1878 at the age of forty-five. The mother died 
in 1899. John W. Thomason was the older of two children, was 
educated in the schools at Louisville, in the Orchard City College 
and later in the Kent College of Law in Chicago. He studied law 
in the office of his uncle at Aledo, Illinois, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1899. Since that time he has been in practice at Louisville. 
In 1900 Mr. Thomason was elected state's attorney of Clay County 
and gave a capable administration of that office for four years. He 
has been active in democratic politics and his name was on the demo- 
cratic ticket as presidential elector. He is a member of the Clay 
County Bar Association and is affiliated with the Masonic order and 
the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Thomason was married, March 28, 
1901, to Margaret Downing of Mercer County, Illinois, daughter of 
John Downing. To their marriage have been born three children : 
Corinne, Helen and John D., all of whom were born in Louisville. 

HON. MORTON W. THOMPSON, circuit judge of Vermilion 
County, has been a member of the Bar of Danville since 1883. He 
was born on a farm in Oakwood Township, this county, May 23, 
1858, his parents being John R. and Elizabeth A. (Wright) Thomp- 
son. The father was born in Greene County, Pennsylvania, April 
12, 1830, and in 1850 came to Illinois, driving 3,000 sheep. From 
that time until his death he continued to make his home in Vermilion 
County, where on the 27th of November, 1856, he married Miss 
Wright, who was born in the county, December 26, 1837. She was 
of German descent and Mr. Thompson was of Scotch-Irish lineage. 
He carried on agricultural pursuits throughout his business career, 
and died in Fithian, Vermilion County, September 3, 1893. 

Judge Thompson acquired his elementary education in the coun- 
try schools, supplemented by a four-years course in the Danville 
High School, where he was graduated in the class of 1879. He then 
engaged in teaching for two years, and in iSSi entered the law 
department of the University of Michigan, in which institution he 
was graduated with the degree of LL. B. in 1883. He then opened 
an office in Danville, and continued in the active practice until ele- 
vated to the bench. He was always alone in business with the 
exception of the years 1888, 1889 and 1890, when he was associated 
in a law partnership with Hon. W. J. Calhoun, the present interstate 
commerce commissioner, under the firm name of Calhoun & Thomp- 
son. On the 27th of July, 1897, he was elected county judge, and 
was the successful republican nominee for re-election in November, 
1898. He so ably discharged the duties of the office and was so 
popular in the county that the democrats placed no opposing candi- 
date in the field, knowing that his nomination was equivalent to an 
election. For some years he has been an active factor in politics in 



952 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Vermilion County, and has served as secretary of the county com- 
mittee for ten years, his capable management, sagacity and execu- 
tive ability contributing not a little to the party successes which 
have been registered. In 1890 he was special agent of the census 
department for taking the mortgage indebtedness of Utah. 

Judge Thompson resigned his position as county judge to accept 
the appointment for the unexpired term of circuit judge occasioned 
by the death of Judge Ferdinand Bookwalter, and was later elected 
and is still rilling the office as circuit judge. He also served one term 
on the appellate bench one year, 1913. 

Judge Thompson was married in Danville, Illinois, November 
30, 1887, to Miss Mary W. Steen. He belongs to Olive Branch 
Lodge No. 38, A. F. & A. M., with which he has been connected 
over five years, and is past master. He also holds membership in 
Vermilion Chapter, No. 37 ; in the Council ; in Athelstan Command- 
ery, No. 45, Knights Templar, and in Danville Lodge, No. 332, 
B. P. O. E. 

EVERETT JENNINGS. The state of Kentucky has given many of 
her sons to the legal profession with the passing years and among 
those who have made the City of Chicago the center of their pro- 
fessional activities Everett Jennings has gained a prominent place. 
He had his early training in the law in his native state, coming here 
in 1908, and he is now a member of the firm of Jennings & Fifer, 
with offices in the City Hall Square Building. 

Mr. Jennings was born at Providence in Webster County, Ken- 
tucky, on the 7th of September, 1874, and he is a son of Benjamin 
Franklin Jennings and Mary (Price) Jennings. The father was 
a substantial farmer in Webster County and he was reckoned among 
the progressive men of the state. Various enterprises claimed his 
attention during his lifetime, among them the drug business. He 
died in 1903 and his widow still survives him in the old home. 
Everett Jennings had his early education in the public schools of his 
native place and when he was ready for the higher training entered 
Centre College at Danville, Kentucky. In 1896 he was graduated 
from this institution, now known as Central University, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. While a student there he attended a 
course of lectures in the law department of the college, and he after- 
wards carried on his legal studies in the offices of Francis Marion 
Baker, a representative lawyer of Dixon, the county seat of Webster 
County. Mr. Jennings was admitted to the bar in 1896 and there- 
after was engaged in the practice of his profession in the cities of 
Dixon and Madisonville, the latter the county seat of Hopkins 
County, until 1908, in which year he came to Chicago. Here he has 
since been engaged in general practice and his success in his chosen 
profession has been one that is well worthy of mention. 

On the first day of February, 1914, Mr. Jennings was appointed 
general counsel of the Illinois State Public Utilities Commission and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 953 

he maintains an office at Springfield in the prosecution of his duties 
in this capacity. He served one year as assistant state's attorney of 
Cook County and during that time he prosecuted the noteworthy 
arson cases that came up. He also gained some prominence as the 
representative of Miss Esther Mercy, a student at the University of 
Chicago, in her case against the university authorities. This case, 
though having its origin in a seemingly trivial matter, attracted wide 
attention and Mr. Jennings secured a verdict in favor of his client. 
It should also be mentioned that he was for one year president and 
a member of the faculty of the Webster Law School in Chicago. 

A democrat, he was in his native state an active worker in the 
party and he represented his district as a presidential elector in 1904. 
He has been a delegate to the national convention at St. Louis and 
a delegate to a number of state conventions. Mr. Jennings is a 
member of the Chicago Bar Association and the American Bar 
Association. He is fraternally identified with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and is a member of the Calumet Club of 
Chicago, where he maintains his bachelor residence. 

JUDGE AARON A. WOLFENSPERGER. One of the senior members 
of the Whiteside County Bar, Judge Aaron A. Wolfensperger has 
been in active practice at Sterling more than thirty-five years, has 
enjoyed a large and valuable practice the first years of his connec- 
tion with the bar, and served one term as county judge. Judge 
Wolfensperger has the finest offices and best law library in Sterling, 
and as a lawyer ranks with the best attorneys in his section of the 
state. 

Aaron A. Wolfensperger was born in Sterling March 22, 1856, 
a son of John and Lydia (Capp) Wolfensperger. Both his parents, 
now deceased, were born in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, and the 
Wolfensperger ancestors came from Switzerland and settled in 
Pennsylvania before the Revolutionary war, in which struggle for 
independence one or more of the family took part on the American 
side. John Wolfensperger came West and settled in Whiteside 
County, Illinois, 1849. 

The youngest in a family of six children, Aaron A. Wolfen- 
sperger acquired his early education in country schools, his father 
being a farmer. At the age of sixteen he entered Carthage College 
at Carthage, Illinois, in 1872, and remained until graduating Bachelor 
of Science in 1876. His decision to become a lawyer was made at 
the age of twenty and in the fall of 1877 he entered the Union Col- 
lege of Law in Chicago, and was admitted to the bar in Chicago in 
1879. During his vacations in 1876, 1877 and 1878 he carried on 
the study of law in the office of J. E. McPherron at Sterling. 

The career of Mr. Wolfensperger as a lawyer at Sterling began 
in August, 1879, and there has been no important interruption to his 
continued activities as an increasingly successful member of the bar. 

From 1883 to 1890 for seven consecutive years he served as 



954 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

city attorney and in 1890 was elected county judge of Whiteside 
County, giving a capable administration of -that office for a term of 
four years. At several times he was a delegate to democratic state 
conventions, but has not been an active factor in politics since 1890, 
preferring to give his undivided time and attention to his law prac- 
tice. Among other interests Mr. Wolfensperger is local attorney 
for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway and for the Sterling 
National Bank and other corporations. 

November 4, 1880, Judge Wolfensperger married Anna H. Hend- 
ricks. Her father, Jacob Hendricks, is a retired farmer of Sterling. 
They have two children : Alelia, who lives at home with her par- 
ents, was educated in the Sterling public schools, in the Mrs. Liggett 
Private School for Girls at Detroit, and subsequently graduated from 
Vassar College. The son, John J., who from the Sterling public 
schools entered Cornell University, spending four years there and 
taking post-graduate work in mine engineering at New York, is 
now a mining engineer and married Ella Eberling of Evanston, 
Illinois. 

Judge Wolfensperger is a Knight Templar Mason and also affili- 
ated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. His church is the Presbyterian. His 
office is in the Sterling National Bank Building and his home at 
708 West Third Street, Sterling. 

CHARLES H. WOODBURN. This successful and well known attor- 
ney of Whiteside County was formerly for a number of years an 
official court reporter and that was one of the principal sources of 
his legal training and education. Mr. Woodburn has been in prac- 
tice at Sterling since 1897, having been admitted to the bar at 
Ottawa November 4th of that year. In January, 1904, Judge Ram- 
sey appointed him master in chancery of the Circuit Court of White- 
side County, and he has now discharged the duties of that position 
more than ten years. 

Charles H. Woodburn was born at Sterling, November 5, 1861, 
a son of James H. and Susan A. (Farrar) Woodburn. The W 7 ood- 
burn family have been prominent in Whiteside County, Illinois, since 
1839, and a great-uncle, James C. Woodburn, was the first sheriff 
of that county. James H. Woodburn was born in Cumberland 
County, Pennsylvania, and was brought to Illinois when a child. His 
wife was born at Manchester, New Hampshire. Both are now 
deceased. 

The younger of two children, Charles H. Woodburn acquired his 
early education in the Sterling public schools, concluding with the 
high school course, and during two years in the Sterling Business 
College learned shorthand and typewriting. This proved the means 
for his introduction to the business of court reporting, and for a 
number of years he held the office of official court reporter in the 
old Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, composed of Whiteside, Lee, Car- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 955 

roll, Ogle, Stephenson, Winnebago and Jo Daviess counties. He kept 
up his law studies at the same time. He first served as official 
reporter under appointment of Judge John D. Crabtree of Dixon, 
until Mr. Crabtree was appointed to the appellate bench, and then 
continued under Judge Ramsey and Judge Carver, altogether for 
about ten years. 

Mr. Woodburn was married February n, 1885, to Miss Mary J. 
Clatworthy, daughter of Rev. W. H. Clatworthy of Lee County, 
Illinois. They have one daughter, Kathryn E., born October 12, 
1902, and now attending the public schools at Sterling. Mrs. Wood- 
burn is prominent in club and social circles, being a member of the 
Eastern Star and of the Sterling Woman's Club. Mr. Woodburn is 
affiliated with the Masonic Order, being a Knight Templar, with the 
Knights of Pythias and is a member of the Sterling Commercial 
Club and the Sterling Club. His political affiliation is republican, 
and he has at different times served as delegate to state conventions 
of that party. His church is the Methodist. Mr. Woodburn has 
his offices in the Lawrence Building and his home at 1211 West 
Third Street. 

WARREN 'McNEFF. A young lawyer who has already demon- 
strated his fitness to be classed among the leaders of the Brown 
County Bar, Warren McNeff is now serving as state's attorney for 
his home county, and the vigorous manner in which he has prose- 
cuted his duties has served not only as a fine training for a young 
lawyer but gives ample promise of a successful future. 

Warren McNeff was born on a farm in Brown County, Illinois, 
September 14, 1884, a son of Michael and Ary Ann (Orr) McNeff. 
His father was a native of Ohio and his mother of Pike County, 
Illinois, and both are still living, the father at the age of sixty-five 
and the mother at the age of fifty-six. The father came to Illinois 
when a young man and has spent his active career as a Brown 
County farmer. 

The third of seven children, Warren McNeff grew up on a farm, 
attended district schools, and after a course in the Valparaiso Uni- 
versity of Indiana spent three years as a teacher in his home county. 
He gave up teaching to enter the law department of the Blooming- 
ton Law School at Bloomington, Illinois, where he was graduated 
in 1911 LL. B. He successfully passed the bar examination on June 
28, 1911, and has since been engaged in practice at Mount Sterling. 
Mr. McNeff was nominated and elected to the office of state's attor- 
ney in 1912. 

He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
On October n, 1913, Mr. McNeff married Eva Mae Kraft, of 
Bloomington, Illinois, daughter of D. W. Kraft, a well known farmer 
near Bloomington. 



956 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

J. PAUL CARTER. Continuously since his first election in 1904, 
J. Paul Carter has served as state's attorney of Washington County, 
and in 1913 was honored by election to the office of president of 
the State's Attorneys Association of Illinois. Mr. Carter is an able 
lawyer, and has made a splendid record of efficiency and aggressive 
work in behalf of the people during his administration as state's 
attorney. 

J. Paul Carter was born in Nashville, Washington County, Illi- 
nois, February 8, 1876, a son of William D. and Laura (Le Compte) 
Carter. His mother's ancestors came from France and settled in 
Maryland in 1656. On the father's side the ancestry is English. 
William D. Carter was born in Illinois, and became prominent as a 
physician. During the Civil war he served as surgeon in the Forty- 
fourth Illinois Infantry, and since the war has practiced at Nash- 
ville, being now seventy-seven years of age. The mother died in 
1883 at the a g e f thirty-six. 

J. Paul Carter, the older of two children, was educated in the 
public schools of Nashville, graduated in 1896 in the classical course 
from McKen'dree College at Lebanon, took post-graduate work in 
the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, and in 1899 graduated 
from the law department of Washington University, and took active 
practice at Nashville in 1900. After four years of practice in which 
he had gained recognition as a young and successful lawyer, Mr. 
Carter was elected state's attorney in 1904, was re-elected in 1908 
and again in 1912. 

Mr. Carter is a republican, a member of the County Bar Associa- 
tion, is a Chapter Mason, an Odd Fellow, and also affiliated with 
the Modern Woodmen of America. In 1903 at Lebanon he married 
Miss Nellie Zerweck, daughter of Louis Zerweck. The one child 
born to their union, William Lewis Carter, died at the age of one 
year. 

ERASTUS DALSON TELFORD. When Mr. Telford began the prac- 
tice of law at Salem in 1906, he had a varied and thorough experi- 
ence in business affairs, and from observation and study, having 
spent several years in one of the departments at Washington, where 
he studied law. He is now regarded as one of the most successful 
members of the Marion County Bar. 

E. D. Telford was born at Salem April 23, 1874, the second 
among seven children of James D. and Sarah A. (Wyatt) Telford. 
His mother was born near Fayetteville, Tennessee, in 1850, and came 
to Illinois when a child. The father was born in Marion County in 
1848, and has long been prosperous as a farmer, real estate and loan 
man, and is still living at Salem. The other children in the family 
are: Dr. A. T. Telford of Olney, Illinois; Omer F., of Salem; 
Oran E., of Salem; J. D., Jr., of Salem; Miss Ula M., a resident of 
New York City ; and Erma, of Salem. 

Mr. E. D. Telford attended the public schools of Salem, the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 957 

McKendree College at Lebanon, and subsequently was appointed 
to a position in the United States Treasury Department at Wash- 
ington. While carrying on his work which provided him with a 
living, he took up the study of law in Georgetown University at 
Washington and received his law degree from that institution. Mr. 
Telford resigned from the Government service, returned to Salem, 
and took up the practice of law April i, 1906. Much of his time 
has been devoted to the duties and responsibilities of public office. 
He served in 1907-09 as city attorney, and in 1910 was elected from 
the Forty-second District as state senator, serving during the ses- 
sions of 1911 and 1913. As elector at large on the republican ticket, 
Mr. Telford received the largest number of votes given to any elector 
in 1912. He is a member of the County Bar Association, has an 
interest in the Marion County Building & Loan Association, is a 
Chapter, Council and Commandery Mason, and also affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On November i, 1900, at Litchfield, Illinois, Mr. Telford mar- 
ried Miss Coral B. Wright, daughter of William Wright, now de- 
ceased, while her mother lives in Lincoln, Nebraska. There are 
three children: Elbridge W., born September 29, 1901, at Wash- 
ton, and now a student in the Salem schools; Dorothy M., born 
August 18, 1905, at Washington; and Evelyn A., born October 18, 
1908, at Salem. 

EMERY ANDREWS. July 22, 1915, marks the close of a quarter 
of a century in which Emery Andrews, at present senior member of 
the well known law firm of Andrews and Real, at Mattoon, has been 
engaged in the practice of his profession in this city, and during this 
time has been prominently identified with some of the most important 
litigation that has ever come before the courts of the state. 

Emery Andrews was born in a log cabin at Rose Hill, Jasper 
County, Illinois, April 3, 1868, and is a son of William T. and Har- 
riet E. (Harding) Andrews. He jocularly says of his birth place 
that the soil was so poor they could not raise anything but lawyers 
and cites as proof of the fact that the neighborhood where he was 
born and grew up produced no less than fifteen lawyers, notable 
among them being, Hon. John P. Harrah of Charleston, Illinois ; 
Hon. Rufus C. Harrah, Effingham, Illinois; Hon. B. F. Harrah, 
Washington, D. C. ; Hon. O. W. Smith, Decatur, Illinois ; Hon. Lee 
Eagelton, Peoria, Illinois; and the Hon L. Y. Sherman of Spring- 
field, Illinois. His paternal grandparents, William P. and Catherine 
(Lee) Andrews, and his paternal great-grandfather, Samuel 
Andrews, were born in Virginia, while on the maternal side, Aaron 
Harding, the great-grandfather, and Abram and Lydia (Hardin) 
Harding, were natives of Kentucky. William T. Andrews, the 
father, was born in Fayette County, and the mother in Hendricks 
County, Indiana. Emery Andrews passed boyhood and early youth 
on his father's little farm and attended the country schools, apply- 



958 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ing himself so closely to his studies that he was able to qualify as 
a teacher before he reached his majority. While teaching school he 
began the study of law under the supervision of Gibson & Johnson, 
a reputable firm at Newton, Illinois, and continued under Attorney 
Horace S. Clark, of Mattoon. In May, 1890, he was admitted to 
the bar and entered into practice at Mattoon, to which city he has 
been loyal ever since, making it his home and building up a profes- 
sional reputation which reflects credit upon his community. Mr. 
Andrews has always been a hard worker and his perseverance and 
diligence have been frequently recognized when he has been called 
in as an attorney where only the closest and most accurate investi- 
gation and sifting of testimony could be acceptable. In a case of 
this kind his labor has been unceasing and his patience unlimited, 
while his thorough knowledge of every point involved have made 
his services almost indispensable. In November, 1896, Mr. Andrews 
was elected to the office of states attorney of Coles County and for 
four years he continued in that responsible office, performing his 
duties with such ability as to win public approbation and judicial 
commendation. 

From May, 1905, to January, 1913, Mr. Andrews was connected 
with the attorney general's office of Illinois, under Hon. W. H. 
Stead, doing special work for the office, the most important of 
which was the Kaskaskia Commons litigation, which was a very 
intricate case, which twice went to the Supreme Court, Mr. Andrews' 
contention being sustained both times. In 1913 he was elected presi- 
dent of the Upper Mississippi River Levee and Drainage Associa- 
tion, an organization seeking to better protect the overflowed lands 
along the Mississippi River from Cape Girardeau, Missouri, and 
Rock Island, Illinois, and represented this association before Con- 
gress. In February, 1914, Mr. Andrews was also employed by the 
Kankakee River Improvement Association of Indiana, to do the 
legal work necessary to help them organize a special sanitary and 
levee district, by a joint act of the legislatures of Indiana and Illi- 
nois, for the purpose of deepening, widening and strengthening the 
Kankakee River in those states. This is a vast undertaking and will 
be one of the largest drainage propositions ever projected in either 
state, and the legal business in this connection will be in the capable 
hands of Mr. Andrews. For thirteen years Mr. Andrews was asso- 
ciated in law practice with James Vause, Jr., forming his present 
partnership with Raymond G. Real, on January i, 1912. 

Mr. Andrews was married July 4, 1890, to Miss Melvina Crum, 
who was born at Cook's Mills, Coles County, Illinois. They have 
six children: Harriet B., Roscoe C., Martha Louise, Genevieve, Lola 
and Dorothy Lee. As a republican, Mr. Andrews has been influen- 
tial in his county, but his profession has always claimed his first at- 
tention rather than politics. His fraternal connections are important 
and significant, his membership being with the Masons, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Odd Fellows, Elks and the Modern Woodmen of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 959 

America. He is a man of generous impulses and through his prompt, 
practical generosity often shows the sympathy that many others have 
merely talked about. Considerable travel and association with men 
of all degrees, have broadened Mr. Andrews' outlook as well as 
added to his knowledge and Coles County has every reason to feel 
proud of this able and enlightened member of her bar. 

RAYMOND G. REAL, junior member of the law firm of Andrews 
& Real, at Mattoon, was born at Sterling, Illinois, February 4, 1888, 
and is a son of Michael and Catherine (Brogen) Real. The father 
of Mr. Real is a locomotive engineer. 

In the public schools of his native place, Mr. Real was educated, 
completing the high school course in that city, subsequently studying 
law, and in the spring of 1912, graduated from the law school of 
the University of Illinois. In July, 1912, he was admitted to the 
bar and is a member of the Coles County Bar Association. He be- 
longs also to the Knights of Columbus and the Elks. His political 
affiliation is with the republican party. Mr. Real married Miss 
Myrtle Bowers, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William W. Bowers, 
of Urbana, Illinois, in the spring of 1914. 

JOHN J. ARNEY. Among the members of the Clark County Bar 
is John J. Arney, who, for a number of years has been a citizen of 
Casey, active and interested in all her civic movements. Mr. Arney 
was born in Ohio, August 13, 1856, and is a son of John Jacob and 
Katherine (Bussinger) Arney. They were natives of Switzerland 
and early settlers in Ohio. The father, now deceased, was a farmer. 
The surname was originally spelled "Erni." 

John J. Arney, one of a family of four children, grew to man- 
hood on the home farm and attended the public schools. He also 
taught school in his native state, but subsequently took up the study 
of law and entered the Union College of Law, of Chicago, and in 
1885 \va* graduated therefrom and admitted to the bar. He located 
in the City of Chicago and practiced his profession there until 1901 
when, on account of failing health, he removed from that city and 
came to Casey, Illinois, where he has since continued in practice. 
He is a member of the Clark County Bar Association and the Illi- 
nois State Bar Association and his acquaintance with professional 
men is wide. 

WALTER BREWER. There are a few names more closely asso- 
ciated with the legal fraternity and the general good citizenship of 
Cumberland County, Illinois, than that of Brewer, a name promi- 
nent in politics, in law, in public affairs, and in the everyday life of 
the community. A worthy bearer of this honored name is Walter 
Brewer, ex-state's attorney for Cumberland County, and a foremost 
citizen of Toledo. Mr. Brewer was born in Cumberland County, 
Illinois, October 3, 1880, and is a son of Thomas and Mary Brewer. 



960 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Thomas Brewer, for thirty years was a leader in the political life 
of Illinois, and was closely associated with Hon. Stephen A. Douglas. 
He was born in Wayne County, Indiana, in 1819, and died in Illi- 
nois, in November, 1886. His parents had come to Indiana as pio- 
neers from North Carolina, and in 1838 settled in what is now 
Cumberland County, Illinois. Overcoming almost insurmountable 
obstacles, Thomas Brewer became a brilliant lawyer and his name 
in this connection is mentioned with other great lawyers and orators 
of his era in Illinois. He served with distinction in many public 
capacities, county coroner, associate judge, county sheriff and in both 
houses of the State Legislature. He was thrice married, first to 
Mary Hutton, second to her sister, Sarah E., then a widow, and 
third to Mrs. Mary (Bloxom) Smith, to which union four children 
were born : an infant that died unnamed ; Belle, who is deceased ; 
and Lucretia and Walter. To his first marriage nine children were 
born, the second marriage being without issue. 

After completing the high school course, Walter Brewer entered 
upon the study of law in the office of Green & Woods, two of the 
oldest attorneys of the Toledo Bar, and afterward became a student 
in the Illinois College of Law, where he was graduated and was 
admitted to the bar in 1901. Quickly were his legal talents recog- 
nized and in 1904 he was elected to the office of state's attorney in 
Cumberland County, on the republican ticket, was not a candidate 
irk 1908, but was re-elected to the same office in 1912; in the demo- 
cratic county of Cumberland, in which but one other man in the 
history of the county has been elected as state's attorney on the 
republican ticket and that about forty years ago. In private practice 
he is associated with his brother, Levi N. Brewer, master in chan- 
cery, under the firm name of Brewer & Brewer, and there is very 
little important litigation in the Cumberland County courts in which 
this firm is not represented on one side or the other. Mr. Brewer 
in his official position has made a fine record. As a prosecutor he 
has been fearless, but at all times just, and no one can say of him 
that he has ever been influenced by prejudice or actuated by any but 
the highest motives and for the public good. His entire career as 
state's attorney has been above the shadow of reproach, although he 
entered upon the duties of this highly responsible office when un- 
usually young for such liabilities. He is a republican in his political 
affiliation and has served as chairman of the republican county com- 
mittee, is a member of the congressional committee and also served 
as a member of the school board. 

Mr. Brewer was united in marriage with Miss Margaret C. Lar- 
son, of Cedar Falls, Iowa, and they have three children : Walter 
R., Mildred M. and Miriam M. Mr. Brewer and family are mem- 
bers of the United Brethren Church. His fraternal connections 
include membership in the Masonic order, and the Knights of 
Pythias. 

He was elected circuit judge of the Fifth Judicial District of 
Illinois on June 7, 1915, for a term of six years. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 961 

MORRIS KOMPEL. A member of the former firm of Shaeffer & 
Kompel, one of the prominent law firms with offices in the Ashland 
Block in Chicago, Morris Kompel has been actively identified with 
his profession in that city for more than twelve years. After his 
admission to the bar in 1903 he was associated with Jacob G. Gross- 
berg, and was taken in as a partner of the firm in 1907, under the 
name Grossberg, Shaeffer & Kompel. In 1911 the firm was changed 
to Shaeffer & Kompel. 

Morris Kompel was born at Leipzig, Germany, May 30, 1879, 
a son of Herman and Charlotte Kompel. In 1886 the family came 
to America, locating in Chicago, where Herman Kompel was en- 
gaged in mercantile lines. Morris Kompel received his early educa- 
tion in the Chicago public schools, and is a graduate of West Division 
High School. He took his literary course in Northwestern Univer- 
sity, and in 1903 graduated from the law department with the 
degree LL. B. Mr. Kompel is a member of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Illinois Bar Association and the American Bar Associa- 
tion, and has been favored with a profitable clientele in general 
practice. During 1912 he was associated with the eminent lawyer 
C. Darrow, before the Supreme Court in connection with some 
important revenue cases. 

Mr. Kompel is a republican, belongs to the Lawndale Club, B'Nai 
Brith, to Chicago Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and York Chapter of the 
Royal Arch Masons. He is also connected with a number of chari- 
table organizations. On May 2, 1914, he married May Stayer. 
Their home is at 102 South Hamlin Avenue. 

JUDGE WILLIAM M. FARMER. Since 1907 the learning and broad 
experience of Judge Farmer have been read into many of the de- 
cisions of the Illinois Supreme Court. Judge Farmer has been iden- 
tified with the Illinois bench and bar upwards of forty years, and 
was judge of the circuit bench before his election to the Supreme 
Court. Judge Farmer's well known legal attainments, coupled with 
his long service as a lawyer, his fairness and his conservative habits 
eminently qualify him for his high position. 

William M. Farmer was born in Fayette County, Illinois, June 5, 
1853, a son of William and Margaret (Wright) Farmer. His father 
was a native of Kentucky and his mother of Georgia. His father 
came to Fayette County, Illinois, in 1829, saw active service in the 
Black Hawk Indian war, and spent his life as a practical farmer in 
Fayette County, where he died in 1888 at the age of eighty. The 
mother died in 1866. 

Judge Farmer is the youngest of three children, was educated in 
country schools, at McKendree College in Lebanon, and in 1876 
graduated from Union College of Law, now the Northwestern Law 
School, at Chicago. Returning to Vandalia, he began practice, was 
elected to the office of state's attorney in 1880, served four years, 
and was a member of the lower house of the Legislature in 1888- 



962 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

90, and of the State Senate for four years from 1890. In 1896 he 
was elected judge of the Circuit Court, was re-elected in 1902, and 
all the members of the bar in the Fourth District have reason to 
recall his excellent services as district judge. In 1906 Judge Farmer 
was elected a justice of the Supreme Court for the term ending in 
1915, and during 1909-10 served as chief justice of the court. He 
was re-elected in June, 1915, for another full term, and is the 
present chief justice. 

Judge Farmer has his residence in Vandalia, where he began 
the practice of law nearly forty years ago. He is a democrat, and 
is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights 
of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. ' On 
December 23, 1875, Judge Farmer married Miss Illinois Virginia 
Henninger, of Hagerstown, Illinois. They have two daughters : 
Virginia and Gwendolyn. 

JOSEPH E. DYAS. In September, 1915, an even half century 
had passed since Joseph E. Dyas was admitted to the Illinois Bar. 
His long and active service as a lawyer gives him an exceptional 
record in the Illinois Bar, and he is now the dean of the Edgar 
County Bar, and has earned many of the better distinctions of the 
profession. 

Joseph E. Dyas was born in Ireland, September 23, 1844, near 
the City of Dublin, a son of William Godfrey and Georgia L. 
(Keating) Dyas. His father was a practicing physician in the City 
of Dublin and also professor of anatomy in the Royal College of 
Surgeons. In 1857 the family moved to the United States, first 
locating at Wheeling, West Virginia, or Virginia, as it was then, 
and afterwards in Chicago. 

Joseph E. Dyas was about thirteen years of age when the family 
came to America, and was then sent to a collegiate academy in Onta- 
rio, Canada, and given a thorough training in the classics. On re- 
turning to Chicago in 1860, he spent three years in teaching Latin 
and Greek in an academy. During the latter part of that time he 
entered upon the study of the law in the law school of the old Uni- 
versity of Chicago, from which he was graduated in June, 1865. 

In September, 1865, at Ottawa, Mr. Dyas was admitted to the 
bar by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and in the following year 
opened his office at Paris, Illinois, and in the course of his active 
practice has seen two generations of lawyers come and go. His posi- 
tion in the bar and his ability as a lawyer are as distinctive as the 
length of his professional career. For eight years Mr. Dyas served 
as master in chancery. 

In politics he has always been a consistent republican, though not 
hesitating to condemn whatever he conceives to be the mistakes of 
the party. In Masonry he has been a grand commander of Knight 
Templar in Illinois, and presiding officer of the General Grand Chap- 
ter of Royal Arch Masons in the United States. His church is the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 963 

Episcopalian. At Paris, Illinois, June 20, 1872, Mr. Dyas married 
Laura Ella Sandford. They are the parents of three sons and one 
daughter. 

Hox. OLIN L. BROWDER. One of the leading law firms of Urbana 
is that of Williamson & Browder, the junior member of which, 
Olin L. Browder, has not only proved able as an attorney at law but 
has achieved distinction along other lines, and since May, 1913, has 
served in the highest municipal office and has occupied the mayor's 
chair with dignity and efficiency. He was first elected mayor in 1913, 
and was re-elected in 1915 by the largest majority of any previous 
mayor. The same qualifications that advanced him professionally 
have fitted him equally to meet and settle the public problems that 
always mean progress or retrogression in a community, and the bene- 
ficial effects of such endowment, in the case of Mayor Browder, have 
been so manifest in his administration that he finds his hands upheld 
by the best class of people on every hand, irrespective of party lines. 

Olin L. Browder was born at McLeansboro, Illinois, September 4, 
1879, and is a son of William A. and Harriet A. (Henry) Browder. 
An only child, he was afforded many advantages, and after complet- 
ing the high school course, entered the University of Illinois, where 
he was graduated in 1904, with his degree of B. A., two years later 
winning his LL. B. degree. In the same year he was admitted to the 
bar and entered into practice at Urbana. In September, 1910, he en- 
tered into partnership with Francis E. Williamson, under the firm 
name of Williamson & Browder, a sketch of Mr. Williamson appear- 
ing in this work. The firm has a very substantial reputation, the 
ability of its members being universally recognized and its honorable 
methods equally acknowledged. 

Mr. Browder was united in marriage with Miss Nellie S. Taylor, 
who is a daughter of Charles B. Taylor, and they have one son, who 
bears his father's name. Mayor Browder and family are members 
of the First' Methodist Episcopal Church at Urbana. In politics he 
has always been identified with the republican party and a loyal sup- 
porter of its principles and candidates, and it was on the republican 
ticket that he was elected to his present office and entered upon a 
period of great public usefulness. He values his membership in 
the county bar association, of which he has been vice president, as 
he does his fraternal relationship with the Knights of Pythias. 

GEORGE A. LAWRENCE. One of the oldest established relation- 
ships between attorneys practicing in. the State of Illinois is that 
which has existed between Judge Williams and George A. Law- 
rence at Galesburg. Their association as partners began March 7, 
1878, and for more than thirty-five years they have worked to- 
gether, with mutual esteem and benefit, and by their long continued 
success and high legal attainments justly rank among the leading 
lawyers of Illinois. 



964 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Second member of the firm of Williams, Lawrence, Welsh & 
Green, George A. Lawrence was born at Littleton, Massachusetts, 
July 24, 1854, a son of Richard Austin and Edna (Miller) Law- 
rence. Up to about sixteen years of age George A. Lawrence at- 
tended the public schools at Galesburg, Illinois. He then entered 
Knox College at Galesburg, and was graduated in 1875 with the de- 
gree A. B. September i of the same year he began the study of law 
in the office of E. P. Williams and was admitted at Ottawa in Sep- 
tember, 1877. A few months later he began his partnership associ- 
ation with Mr. Williams as already mentioned, and this is certainly 
one of the oldest if not the oldest continuous legal partnership still 
existing in the state. At different times other members have been 
admitted to the firm, including Edgar A. Bancroft, now of Chicago, 
Judge J. D. Welsh, who is still with them, also two sons of Judge 
Williams since deceased, and the late Fred. O. McFarland. The 
junior member of the present firm is Alvah S. Green. This is one 
of the best known and strongest firms in the state. 

Mr. Lawrence has never participated in public life as an office 
holder, yet many positions of trust have been given him, and his 
fidelity in the discharge of such obligations is an additional reason 
for the high esteem in which he stands as a Galesburg citizen. He 
has also been liberal of time and means for the benefit of various 
philanthropies and institutions. For a quarter of a century he has 
been a trustee of Knox College, and in 1911 received from that 
institution the honorary degree LL. D. As an avocation he has 
become deeply versed in historical studies and investigations, and 
not long ago he delivered an address before the State Historical 
Society of Springfield which brought him many letters of com- 
mendation from prominent men including President Woodrow 
Wilson. It is doubtful if any one in the state has a larger and 
better selected private library than Mr. Lawrence. For twenty 
years he has been engaged in collecting books, and his library now 
contains about twenty thousand volumes, including many rare 
editions and beautiful binding. 

The firm of Williams, Lawrence, Welsh & Green have an ex- 
tensive and varied practice. They have been attorneys for the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad for the past thirty-eight 
years, and have also represented the Santa Fe Railroad since the 
Hnes of that system reached Galesburg. They act as attorneys for 
a number of banks and Mr. Lawrence is vice president of the First 
National Bank of Galesburg and stockholder in others. He is a 
large land owner and for several years has spent much of his time 
in the directing of his country estate of several thousand acres with 
special reference to the preservation of soil fertility and the com- 
fort of tenants by the most approved methods. Mr. Lawrence is 
a member of the Masonic order, of the Illinois State, and American 
Bar associations, and in politics is a republican. 

On October 18, 1882, he married Miss Ella L. Park, of Mag- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 965 

nolia, Illinois. Their daughter Rebecca is a graduate of Vassar 
College and is now taking post-graduate work at Radcliff. Mrs. 
Lawrence is prominent in club and philanthropic work and for 
three years was State Regent of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. The family reside at 590 North Prairie Avenue, and 
the law offices of Mr. Lawrence are in the First National Bank 
Building. 

JOHN M. SMOOT. In length and extent of practice, character 
of clientage, and observance of the best standards of his profes- 
sion, John M. Smoot is regarded as one of the leading lawyers of 
Petersburg, Illinois. He was born a few miles northeast of Peters- 
burg, on the farm, on May 14, 1860. His parents were William C. 
and Catharine (Engle) Smoot. His father, who was born in Ken- 
tucky in 1829, was brought to Illinois, in pioneer days, by his 
father, Coleman Smoot, when one year of age, arriving in 1830, 
which year is memorable as "the winter of the deep snow." 
William C. Smoot became a prominent citizen, was a farmer, stock- 
raiser and banker, served as county commissioner of Menard 
County, and also as sheriff during the Civil war. His death, as 
well as that of his wife, occurred in 1905. 

John M. Smoot attended the public schools of Menard County, 
and later graduated from Eureka College. He studied law in the 
offices of Hon. N. W. Branson, now deceased, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1885, taking the examination at Mt. Vernon, Illinois. 
He removed to Kansas after his admission to the bar, where he 
practiced for eight years, returning to Illinois in 1894. Since that 
time he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. 
Mr. Smoot served two terms as state's attorney of Menard County, 
being elected in 1896, and again in 1904. He is a member of the 
Menard County Bar Association, is a Mason, and also holds mem- 
bership in the A. O. U. W. in the jurisdiction of Kansas. He is 
a member of the Christian Church, and teaches the men's class in 
its Sunday school. 

On December 6, 1882, he was united in marriage to Minnie F. 
Brooks of McLean County, Illinois, and three children, born of 
this union, survive, namely, Mabel Laning, Catherine DuQuoin and 
Harold L. Smoot. By inheritance, supplemented by untiring in- 
dustry, Mr. Smoot has come into possession of considerable prop- 
erty. He is director in the First National Bank of Petersburg, and 
owns both residence and business property in the city, in addition 
to farming lands in Illinois and other states. On the walls of Mr. 
Smoot's office hangs a card with this inscription: "Come in with- 
out knocking. Remain on the same condition." He invariably 
advises his clients to avoid litigation if reasonably possible. These 
traits perhaps account for whatever measure of success he has 
attained in his profession. 



966 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

HON. ISAAC B. CRAIG. For many years not only an active 
factor in the honorable and effective enforcement of the law, Isaac 
B. Craig, a representative and influential citizen of Mattoon, has 
been instrumental in framing the same. Through his many activ- 
ities he has become widely and favorably known over his native 
state, his career as lawyer, statesman and private citizen earning 
him the high esteem in which he is held. 

Isaac B. Craig was born near Charleston, Coles County, Illinois, 
in 1854, and is a son of Isaac N. and Elizabeth (Bloyer) Craig. 
The family is of Scotch-Irish extraction. His great-grandfather, 
William Craig, was born in 1731 and became a military hero, serv- 
ing in the Revolutionary war as a member of the Seventh Regiment, 
under Capt. Uriah Springer, and afterward in the Indian troubles 
in Kentucky, his death occurring in old age in Illinois. Isaac N. 
Craig, father of Hon. Isaac B., was born in 1810, in Montgomery 
County, Kentucky. In 1828 he came to Illinois and for many years 
afterward was identified with the material and educational devel- 
opment that took place so rapidly in Clark, Edgar and Coles coun- 
ties. He lived to the age of eighty-two years and passed away in 
honored old age, in Coles County. In 1841 he married Elizabeth 
Bloyer, who was born at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and died in 
Coles County. They were people of quiet life and homely virtues 
whose memory is tenderly cherished by their descendants. 

There is never a great deal of romance connected with the prac- 
tical duties pertaining to life on a farm and to a youth with ambi- 
tions for a wider field, they may prove very irksome, as was the 
case with Isaac B. Craig. He had the ordinary opportunities for 
securing an education in the common schools but these did not 
satisfy him and at the age of eighteen years he started out in search 
of work that would, through industry, make possible the study of 
the law, which was then the goal of his ambition. His efforts met 
with success and in the course of time he was graduated from the 
law school, at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and immediately was admit- 
ted to the bar. In January, 1878, he opened his law office at Mat- 
toon, Illinois, and this city has remained his home ever since. Here 
he has built up so large a practice that further achievement would 
not have been necessary to bring his name and talent to the favor- 
able consideration of his fellow citizens, but, in quite another field 
Mr. Craig has shown equal ability. Reared in the democratic party 
he has always espoused its principles and for many years has been 
active in its councils. In 1888 he was elected a member of the 
General Assembly and was reelected in 1891 to the lower house, in 
1893 was elected to the Senate and in 1896 was again returned to 
the house, a somewhat remarkable record of public approbation 
considering that his district is normally republican. During all his 
years of public service he displayed statesmanlike qualities and 
faithfully performed every duty demanded by public responsibility. 
He served on many of the most important committeee and in 1896 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 967 

was his party's nominee for speaker of the House of Represent- 
atives. 

Mr. Craig was married October 22, 1879, at Mattoon, to Miss 
Helen Hasbrouck, who is a daughter of Abraham and Gertrude 
Louise (Smith) Hasbrouck. The father of Mrs. Craig was born 
in Ulster County, New York, in 1825, and her mother in 1828, at 
Middlebury, Vermont. Mr. and Mrs. Craig have four children: 
Helen Louise, who married Herman E. Neal, manager of The Hul- 
man Wholesale Grocery Company of Mattoon, on June 24, 1914; 
Florence Gertrude, Kathryn and Elizabeth. For many years he 
has sustained membership relations with the Masonic and Knights 
of Pythias fraternities. His recreations are those that appeal to 
the intellectual man and many of his associates both in professional 
and public life are closely bound to him by ties of warmest personal 
esteem. 

JOHN MARSHALL BOYLE. Possessing the practical traits neces- 
sary for everyday success in business, John Marshall Boyle, one of 
Danville's leading lawyers, also has high ideals of the legal profes- 
sion and his name has always, since entering into practice, been 
honorably associated in the large amount of litigation with which 
he has been professionally connected. In December, 1908, he be- 
came associated in partnership with Ray F. Barnett, under the firm 
style of Barnett & Boyle, with offices in the Temple Building, Dan- 
ville. This partnership was subsequently dissolved, and on October 
i, 1914, Mr. Boyle became professionally associated with Charles 
M. Cray ton. 

John Marshall Boyle was born at Roberts, Ford County, Illinois, 
September 20, 1879, a son of John and Anna (Plunkett) Boyle. On 
both sides the ancestry is Irish. The mother was born in New 
Jersey and died in Illinois May 30, 1909. The father was born in 
LaSalle County, Illinois, and his business has always been along 
agricultural lines. John Marshall Boyle attended school at Roberts 
until 1895, leaving at that time in order to accept a position in the 
postoffice at Roberts, and he continued in the Government service 
until September i, 1899, when he became a student in the Univer- 
sity of Illinois Academy, eighteen months later entering the College 
of Literature and Arts, and in 1906 was graduated from the law 
department of the university. To his credit be it said he earned 
his way through college, acting as postmaster at the university and 
also as editor of the college paper, copies of which show that it was 
a very creditable journal. He also added in other ways to his in- 
come, despising no honorable employment in order to further his 
ambition, and at present, when he hears young men deplore the 
lack of opportunity, he naturally recalls his own methods to secure 
the same, frequently working from 6 o'clock in the morning until 
midnight, and being glad for the chance. Mr. Boyle secured the 
position of city editor of the Champaign Daily News after gradua- 



968 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

tion, one he acceptably filled from 1906 until September, 1907, 
when he came to Danville and in a clerical capacity entered the 
states attorney's office and continued until 1912, when the volume 
of his private practice demanded that he give his entire attention 
to it as a member of the law firm of Barnett & Boyle. The success 
which has attended his efforts has been marked and he stands high 
in public regard and in professional circles. He is a member of 
the Vermilion County Bar Association. 

Mr. Boyle bears a name long honored in the history of Amer- 
ican jurisprudence, and there is no reason to question his ability or 
intention to so progress in his profession as to be entirely worthy 
of such connection. Careful and thorough in the preparation of 
his cases, guarding every point with the authority of precedent and 
capable of making logical deductions, he leaves no stone unturned 
when he is acting in the interest of his clients. He devotes himself 
closely to his profession, although, as an educated and public spir- 
ited man, he is awake to all matters of world-wide interest and 
takes cognizance, whenever good citizenship requires, of civic 
movements where his influence will prove beneficial. To some 
extent he is active in the councils of the republican party. 

Mr. Boyle was reared in the Roman Catholic faith. He is prom- 
inently identified with a number of fraternal organizations, being a 
member of Northcutt Camp of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
the Elks, the Eagles, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Knights of 
Columbus and the Mutual Protective League, of which he was 
president in 1909. He resides at No. 208 Virginia Avenue, 
Danville, where his personal friends are frequently hospitably 
entertained. 

CLYDE SMITH. Admitted to the bar at Springfield in January, 

1889, Clyde Smith has practiced law in Illinois for more than 
twenty-five years, and has been in practice at Dixon since March, 

1890. He had an individual practice for about ten years, and in 
September, 1901, formed a partnership with* A. K. Trusdell, under 
the name of Trusdell & Smith. In 1908 Mr. Leech became con- 
nected with the firm and since then the firm of Trusdell, Smith & 
Leech has had offices both at Dixon and Amboy. Mr. Smith is 
prominent both as a lawyer and citizen of Dixon. 

Clyde Smith was born at Paw Paw, Illinois, May 30, 1864, a 
son of Robert and Harriet (Baisley) Smith. His father came with 
his parents from Scotland, and in 1837 the family located in Lee 
County, Illinois, settling at what has since been known as Smith's 
Grove. Mr. Smith attended the district schools in Lee County, 
also the East Paw Paw Classical Seminary and in 1881 entered the 
preparatory department of the Chicago College, which later became 
the University of Chicago. In February, 1883, he became a student 
in the University of Michigan, pursuing the classical course, and 
was graduated Bachelor of Arts in 1886. Mr. Smith studied law 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 969 

for two years with the firm of Mayo & Widmer at Ottawa, where 
he passed the examination for admission to the bar, as above stated. 
Since then he has been identified with much important litigation, 
including the case of Stitzel vs. Miller, 250 111. Supreme Court 
Reports, P. 72; 95 N. E. 53; Ann. Cas. 1912 B, 412; 34 L. R. A. 
(N. S.) 1004. He was successful in the latter case in imposing an 
exception upon the rule which forbids the proof of handwriting 
by comparison, which had never before been decided by any court 
of last resort. Also in the case of the Sandusky Portland Cement 
Company vs. Dixon Pure Ice Company, 221 Fed. Rep. 200, decided 
by the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, 7th circuit in 1915 
(certiorari denied May I7th) he procured the court to hold that 
the destruction of ice by the discharge of hot water from condens- 
ing engines was an unreasonable exercise of defendant's riparian 
rights. Both were pioneer cases. 

Primarily a lawyer, has been normally active in politics, was a 
delegate to the State Republican Convention in 1896, and is now 
allied with the progressives and was a member of the state conven- 
tion of that party in 1912. Mr. Smith is unmarried. He is a past 
exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, a 
member of the Psi Upsilon college fraternity, belongs to the State 
Bar Association and the Business Men's Association of Dixon, and 
he has a fine law library of about 3,000 volumes. His offices are 
in the Dixon National Bank Building. 

ROSCOE D. WYATT when a young man decided to carve his own 
destiny in life, and went through college and the preliminary 
stages of his professional career by dint of hard work. He taught 
school, and paid his way partly "through university by conduct- 
ing an athletic store, was also commissary in the fraternity of 
which he was a member, sang in a church choir and the Univer- 
sity of Illinois Glee Club, and in spite of the exactions of study 
and the outside duties required for his self-support took an active 
part in athletics and in 1906-1907 played guard and tackle on the 
university foot ball team. 

Roscoe D. Wyatt was born in Marion County, Illinois, March 
n, 1883, a son of Robert A. and Laura Wyatt. His father was 
born at Fayetteville, Tennessee, located in Marion County many 
years ago, and followed farming until his retirement. He was born 
July 4, 1852, while his wife was born three years later and is a 
native of Illinois. The two daughters of the family are Myrtle 
Anna and Elsie Agnes. 

Roscoe D. Wyatt attended the public schools of Marion County, 
took the State Normal University course at Carbondale, graduating 
in 1903, and for two years was principal of the high school at 
Newton, Illinois. After two years of study in the law department 
of the State University he returned to teaching, was principal of 
the high school in Salem in 1907-08, and in 1909 finished both the 



970 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

literary and the law courses at the University of Illinois, receiving 
the degrees of A. B. and LL. B. April 7, 1909, Mr. Wyatt was 
admitted to the bar, but for several years gave his time to the 
United States Government service. He was a law clerk detailed 
with duties of special agent of the General Land Office, at Little 
Rock, Arkansas, remained there until May 26, 1910, and then at 
his own request was transferred to Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 
was employed in a similar capacity with the United States Forest 
Service. On June 3, 1911, he was transferred to Denver, Colorado, 
and was acting assistant district forester until October 16, 1912. 
Mr. Wyatt resigned to enter private practice, returned to Salem, 
and until 1913 was associated with Senator E. D. Telford in the 
practice of law, and since then has enjoyed a profitable practice 
alone. 

In May, 1913, Mr. Wyatt became mayor of Salem. He is a 
member of the County Bar Association, affiliates with the lodge, 
chapter and council of Masonry, is a Past Chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias, and belongs to the Phi Alpha Delta Law 
Fraternity at the University of Illinois. Mr. Wyatt is a director, 
secretary and treasurer of the Salem Ice Company, and is a director 
of the Salem Commercial Club. 

At Carbondale June n, 1908, Mr. Wyatt married Miss Lillian 
Ethel Toler. Her father, Capt. John W. Toler, who is living at 
Carbondale, is a veteran of the Civil war. They have one child, 
Francis D. Wyatt, born at Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 
26, 1910. 

LEE COHN. One of the younger members of the Chicago bar, 
Lee Cohn has had high and influential connections and is making a 
favorable success in his special lines of practice, in the civil and real 
estate law. 

Lee Cohn was born at Beloit, Wisconsin, July 17, 1883, a son of 
Abraham and Josephine Cohn, and a brother of Edwin A. Cohn, 
M. D. Mr. Cohn received his early education in the Beloit public 
schools, graduating from the high school in 1900, and since 1903 has 
lived in Chicago. He pursued his law studies in the Chicago Kent 
College of Law, graduating in 1907 and being admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar April 24th of the same year. 

Mr. Cohn began practice in the office of John C. Farwell, and 
handled a part of the large volume of important litigation of that 
office until 1912. In January of the latter year he became con- 
nected with the Chicago Bar Association. He resigned his position 
there in September, 1914, in order to continue private practice, and 
is now once more in the office of Mr. John C. Farwell. 

Mr. Cohn is a republican, is affiliated with Ancient Craft Lodge 
No. 907, A. F. & A. M., and with Lafayette Chapter No. 2, R. A. M. 
He is also associated with the Independent Order Free Sons of 
Israel and B'Nai Brith. He lives with his mother at 4936 Indiana 
Avenue. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 971 

DICK H. MUDGE. One of the younger members of the Madison 
County Bar, Dick H. Mudge, has practiced law since 1902 and is 
now serving as mayor of the City of Edwardsville. 

He was born in Madison County, Illinois, July 9, 1879, a son 
of E. W. and Fannie (Clark) Mudge. Both parents were natives 
of Illinois, and his father, who is now engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business at Edwardsville, has at different times been 
honored with public offices in Madison County. He is now -sixty- 
eight years of age, and his wife is sixty-seven. They are the par- 
ents of two sons and three daughters, and the other children are: 
S. H. Mudge, Mrs. F. C. Lewis, Mrs. Fanny Whitehead and Mrs. 
D. R. Overtoil. 

Dick H. Mudge attended the public schools of Edwardsville, 
took a course in a commercial college at St. Louis, and for several 
years was official court reporter at Edwardsville. He studied law 
at home, and after one year in the law department of the North- 
western University of Chicago returned to Edwardsville and was 
admitted to the bar in 1902. He has since enjoyed a large general 
practice. 

Mr. Mudge was elected mayor of Edwardsville in April, 1913, 
and still fills that office, having been re-elected in April, 1915. He is 
first vice president of the Madison County Bar Association and a 
member of the Illinois State Bar Association. In Masonry he has 
taken thirty-two degrees of the Scottish Rite and belongs to the 
Mystic Shrine and also all York Rite degrees. Mr. Mudge is a 
director of the Edwardsville Commercial Club, and belongs to the 
Delta Chi college fraternity. 

RICHARD W. ROPIEQUET. This prominent attorney at Belle- 
ville got an early start in life and in his profession, having been 
admitted to the bar before reaching his legal majority. His active 
practice has covered a period of nearly thirty years, and the bar of 
southern Illinois has few members of such wide attainments and 
high standing. 

Richard W. Ropiequet was born in Belleville, March 23, 1866, 
a son of Frederick and Anna (Wangelin) Ropiequet. His father, 
a native of Bavaria, came .to America at the age of sixteen, and 
was for many years one of the most prominent business men and 
public leaders in St. Clair County. He held the office of mayor, 
was county treasurer, and for three terms sheriff of St. Clair 
County. His death occurred at the age of sixty-one in 1904. His 
wife, who was born in Ohio, came to Illinois as a child with her 
parents, who settled in the southern part of the state. She is now 
living at Belleville at the age of seventy-three. There were eight 
children, Richard being the fourth, and the others are named: 
Otto W., Hugo J., Bertha E., Lulu E., Clara, Erna and Laura. 

Richard W. Ropiequet graduated in 1884 from the literary de- 
partment of Smith's Academy at St. Louis, then read law with 



972 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Hon. C. W. Thomas of Belleville, and was admitted to the bar in 
1886, when twenty years of age. His first practice was in associa- 
tion with R. A. Halbert, and after the latter's death, he became 
associated with Knispi, also of Belleville. After Mr. Knispi's 
death, Mr. Ropiequet entered a partnership with Frank Perrin and 
Martin D. Baker, and the firm subsequently became Ropiequet, 
Perrin & Baker. 

At the beginning of hostilities in the war between the United 
States and Spain in 1898, Mr. Robiequet abandoned his practice 
and enlisted in Company D of the Illinois Infantry. He was later 
made lieutenant of Company E in that regiment. After his dis- 
charge he returned to Belleville, and his rank is now second to 
none in the St. Clair County Bar. 

Of late years he has specialized in Interstate Commerce litiga- 
tion and as such has gained an enviable reputation in all parts of 
the country, having taken part in some of the leading Interstate 
Commerce cases. 

Mr. Ropiequet is a republican, has membership in the County 
and State Bar associations, and is affiliated with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

He has been active in Sunday school and religious work, and is 
a leader amongst the laymen of the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Southern Illinois. 

In 1888 he married Miss Mamie Crouch of Belleville, daughter 
of W. T. Crouch. Mrs. Ropiequet died in January, 1898, leaving 
one son, Wilfred, who was born at Belleville in 1892 and was grad- 
uated in the University of Illinois in 1914. Mr. Ropiequet in 1901 
married Miss Florence Wagner, of Flagler, Iowa. Her father 
was M. F. Wagner, formerly of Belleville. Mr. Ropiequet has 
four children by his second marriage : Harold, born at Belleville 
in 1903 and a pupil in the public schools Mildred, born in 1908; 
Marion, born in 1911, and Arthur, born in 1915. 

JOHN H. FORNOFF. For the past score of years Judge Fornoff 
has been engaged in the practice of his profession at Pana, and he 
is numbered among the representative members of the bar of 
Christian County, is now serving on the bench of the city court of 
Pana and is known as one of the loyal progressive citizens of 
Christian County. 

Mr. Fornoff was born in Lawrence County, Illinois, on the 
23d of January, 1868, and is a son of August and Elizabeth A. 
(Scherer) Fornoff, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania 
and the latter in Illinois. August Fornoff was a child of two years 
at the time of his parents' removal from the old Keystone State to 
Illinois, and settlement was made in Wabash County, where his 
father engaged in farming, as one of the sturdy pioneers of that 
section of the state, where he continued to reside until his death. 
August Fornoff was reared to maturity under the conditions and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 973 

influences of the pioneer farm and acquired a common-school edu- 
cation. During his independent career he never abated his allegi- 
ance to the basic industry of agriculture, and he was a successful 
farmer of Lawrence County ot the time of his death, in 1879, 
when he was but thirty-nine years of age. His wife survived him 
by many years and was called to eternal rest in 1905, at the age of 
sixty years. Of the five children John H., of this sketch, was the 
second in order of birth. 

John H. Fornoff was less than eleven years old at the time of 
the death of his father, and he was reared to adult age in Lawrence 
County, where he made proper utilization of the advantages 
afforded him in the public schools, as is shown by the fact that he 
became a successful and popular representative of the pedagogic 
profession. While teaching in the schools of Lawrence and 
McLean counties he began the reading of law. Later he continued 
his technical course of study in Wesleyan University and also in 
the City of Danville, his law preceptors in Lawrenceville having 
been the members of the firm of Gee & Barnes. Mr. Fornoff was 
admitted to the bar in 1892, and after being engaged in professional 
work in the City of Bloomington about one year, he removed to 
Pana, Christian County, where he has since been active in the work 
of his profession and where he has won secure prestige as one of 
the prominent and valued members of the bar of Christian County. 
He is giving most efficient service in the office of judge of the city 
court and his success in his chosen vocation has been on a parity 
with his ability and earnest application. Judge Fornoff is a repub- 
lican in his political proclivities and is in active affiliation with the 
Illinois State Bar Association. 

On the I4th of August, 1892, was solemnized the marriage of 
Judge Fornoff to Miss Grace Wright, of Lawrence County, her 
father, the late Rev. James B. Wright, having been a prominent 
clergyman of the Christian Church and having died in 1904. Judge 
and Mrs. Fornoff have one son, Charles W., who is in the Pana 
High School. 

CLIFFORD E. BEACH, lawyer and author, is one of the most 
scholarly and accomplished members of the Ford County bar. In 
the field of criminal law he has built up a well-merited reputation, 
and as an author and student is equally well known. Since 1894 
he has been engaged in practice at Paxton, and the demonstration 
of the possession of great talent has attracted to him a large and 
representative professional business, while at the same time he has 
found time to attend to good works, both of a public and private 
character. 

He is a native son of Illinois, born May 16, 1866, one of the 
ten children born to Freedus P. and Nancy (Lewis) Beach. His 
father, a pioneer settler of Illinois, was one v of Iroquois County's 
strong characters, was a farmer, brick manufacturer and grain 



974 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

merchant, but had retired from active business some years prior to 
the time of his death, July i, 1912. Clifford E. Beach was granted 
excellent educational advantages in his youth, attending first the 
public schools, later enrolling as a student at a seminary, and finally 
entering the Bloomington Law School, from which institution he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Laws, June n, 1894. Prior to 
this, on May 3d, he had been admitted to the bar, and on July i6tli 
of the same year he located at Paxton, where he has since been 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession and the manifold 
duties of good citizenship. While his practice for a long time was 
broad and general in character, of late years circumstance and op- 
portunity have brought him prominently into the criminal field, in 
which he has established a name for himself. In the line of his 
profession he has also become known as a writer of force and dis- 
tinction, having written several forceful articles for law journals 
and legal publications that have stood the test of public criticism. 
He is inclined to be independent in his political views, and has 
served Paxton capably as city attorney and mayor. His profes- 
sional connections include membership in the Ford County Bar 
Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, in addition to 
which he is a member of the Modern Woodmen, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Masons. 

Mr. Beach married Miss Lizzie Lindsey, who is a daughter of 
Thomas Lindsey, and to this union there have been born two 
daughters : Nita and Leola. Mr. Beach is an agnostic but the other 
members of the family are members of the Congregational Church, 
in the work of which they are active. The family residence is 
No. 348 West Patton Street. 

GEORGE W. GROSSMAN has been in practice as a member of the 
Madison County bar at Edwardsville since 1907. He served as 
city attorney of Edwardsville from 1909 to 1911, and since 1913 
has been corporation counsel. He stands high in local legal circles, 
is secretary of the Madison County Bar Association, and is well 
started on a successful career. 

George W. Grossman was born at Edwardsville February 12, 
1883, son of William R. and Julia (Bickelhaupt) Grossman. His 
father was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, and his mother in 
Madison County, Illinois. William R. Grossman has spent prac- 
tically all his life in the printing and newspaper business and is 
now connected with the Edwardsville Republican, and has also 
done some political service. He is now sixty-one years of age and 
his wife is fifty-eight. George W. was the first of three children, 
and he has a brother Samuel V. Grossman, of Edwardsville, and a 
sister, Mrs. B. P. Williams, of East St. Louis. 

Mr. Grossman grew up in Edwardsville, attended the local 
schools, and after finishing the high school went to work to pay 
his own way. For a time he was assistant postmaster at Edwards- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 975 

ville. Mr. Grossman is a graduate of the law department of the 
Northwestern University at Chicago in 1907 and was admitted to 
the bar at Edwardsville in the same year. In college was a mem- 
ber of the Delta Chi fraternity, and is affiliated with the Masonic 
Lodge and the Knight Templar Commandery. Mr. Grossman is 
unmarried and lives with his parents in Edwardsville. 

THEODORE F. DOVE. The late Theodore Franklin Dove, who 
died at his home in the City of Shelby ville, on July 27, 1908, at 
the age of sixty-two years, was not only one of the representative 
lawyers of Shelby County but was also a successful business man 
and a citizen of distinctive loyalty and progressiveness. He was a 
man of fine scholastic and professional ability and through his 
character and achievement he honored the profession of his choice, 
and as a worthy exponent of the same he merits a memorial tribute 
in this publication. In a prefatory way it may be stated also that 
his two sons are members of the Shelby County bar and are well 
upholding the professional prestige of the name. 

Theodore F. Dove was reared and educated in his native State 
of Ohio, and was a scion of a German family that was early 
founded in Pennsylvania. He was afforded the advantages of the 
Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, and as a young man he 
came with his wife to Shelby County, Illinois, where for several 
years he was principal of the Shelbyville High School. He pre- 
pared himself well for the legal profession and was for many years 
one of its prominent representatives in Shelby County, though his 
various business and capitalistic interests demanded much of his 
attention and curtailed somewhat his activities in the practice of 
law. In a chapter devoted to anecdotes concerning the Shelby 
County bar and published in the history of the Bench and Bar of 
Illinois issued under editorial supervision of the late Gen. John M. 
Palmer, special reference was made to Mr. Dove, who was at that 
time still active in the work of his profession, and the following 
extracts are well entitled to reproduction in this work: "In prac- 
tice as a lawyer Mr. Dove was associated with William J. Henry 
for several years, and got a good financial start out of some bank- 
ruptcy cases. He is a hustler outside of the legal profession and 
never hesitates about making a trade in lands or commercial paper. 
He owns farm after farm and, curiously enough to others not so 
successful, he makes them pay. He mixes brains with his farming, 
as with his other business interests. With all of his extraneous 
business activities he was seldom away from his office a half day 
at a time. He is credited with making more money than any two 
other lawyers. He has a spacious house, on Main Street, and until 
the death of his wife, no home was more pleasant or more hospit- 
able. He was a liberal entertainer, and more than one bishop of 
the Methodist Episcopal church has spread his legs under Dove's 
mahogany. He is a 'fluted pillar' in the Methodist Episcopal 



976 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Church, with a coin capital, and as the church never takes money 
without adequate compensation, it stands by him. He is a genial, 
jolly, progressive business man, and well fortified in the theoretical 
and practical knowledge of law." 

In Ohio was born Miss Alta Clark, whose father was an able 
physician of that state, and shortly after her marriage to Theodore 
F. Dove she accompanied him on his removal to Shelby County, 
Illinois, where she passed the remainder of her life and was a 
prominent and loved factor in the social activities of the City of 
Shelby ville. Mrs. Dove was summoned to eternal rest on May 24, 
1896, at the age of forty-two years. The two sons survive the 
honored parents and concerning them individual mention is made 
in the following paragraphs. 

THEODORE C. DOVE, the elder of the two sons, was born at 
Shelbyville on the 29th of October, 1878, and after he had made 
proper absorption of the knowledge acquired in the public schools 
he pursued higher academic studies in his father's alma mater, 
Ohio Wesleyan University. Later he attended for two years the 
law department of Northwestern University, this department being 
established in the City of Chicago, and the discipline here gained 
was supplemented by effective study under private preceptorship, 
with the result that in 1904 Mr. Dove passed the required examina- 
tion and was admitted to the bar of his native state. He forthwith 
became associated in practice with his father, under the firm name 
of Dove & Dove, and since the death of his father he has continued 
in successful general practice at Shelbyville, where he now has as 
his professional associate and coadjutor his younger and only 
brother. Mr. Dove is unfaltering in his allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party, is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Spanish-American War Veterans' Association, and 
both he and his wife hold membership Jn the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Dove is a member of the board of directors of the 
Shelbyville public library and is a director also of the Shelby 
County State Bank. 

Mr. Dove was a student in the Ohio Wesleyan University, at 
Delaware, at the inception of the Spanish-American war, and he 
enlisted in Company K, Fourteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with 
which command he did active and efficient service in the Porto Rico 
campaign, making a record as a loyal and valiant young soldier 
and having received his honorable discharge in December, 1898, at 
Delaware, Ohio. 

On the 3ist of August, 1904, Mr. Dove wedded Miss Juanita 
Yantis, daughter of John W. Yantis, a prominent and representa- 
tive citizen of Shelbyville, and the three children of this union are 
Alta Jane, born in 1907; Juanita, born in 1909; and Helen, born 
in 1911. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 977 

FRANKLIN ROY DOVE, the younger son of the late Theodore 
Franklin Dove, was born at Shelbyville on the 25th of February, 
1882, and the public schools of his native city afforded him his pre- 
liminary educational advantages, which were supplemented by a 
course of study in the Ohio Wesleyan University, where he gradu- 
ated in 1902. In preparation for the work of his chosen profession 
he entered the law department of the great University of Michigan, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1904 and 
from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He be- 
came associated in practice with his father and since the death of 
the latter he and his brother have maintained a most effective pro- 
fessional alliance and control a substantial and representative law 
business, including much of that which had been built up by their 
honored father. Though never imbued with ambition for political 
office, Mr. Dove is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the 
principles of the democratic party; he is an active member of the 
Illinois State Bar Association; he is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and 
both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Dove is one of the successful .and prominent young 
lawyers of his native county and both he and his brother are influ- 
ential and progressive citizens who are held in unequivocal esteem 
in the community that has ever been their home. 

On the 26th of November, 1903, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Dove to Miss Augusta Ireland, daughter of Dr. William E. 
Ireland, who is still engaged in the active practice of his profession 
and who is a representative physician and surgeon of Washington 
Court House, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Dove have four children, whose 
names and respective dates of birth are here designated: Virginia, 
December 13, 1904; Robert, April 2, 1906; Barbara, August 13, 
1913; and Augusta, May i, 1915. 

CHARLES M. PEIRCE. The McLean County bar occupies a high 
position as a representative professional body in the State of Illinois 
and one of its able and well known members is Charles M. Pierce, 
attorney and counselor at law, who, for more than a quarter of a 
century, has resided and carried on his professional work at Bloom- 
ington. Mr. Peirce was born in the eastern part of Tennessee, in 
November, 1860, and is a son of John B. and Mary (Bell) Peirce. 
John B. Peirce removed with his family to McLean County, 
Illinois, in 1864, and throughout his active li'fe followed the machin- 
ist trade and farming. His family contained eleven children, 
Charles M. being one of the older members. 

As he was but four years old when the family came to Illinois, 
Charles M. Peirce may almost claim this as his native state, for he 
grew to manhood on a farm in McLean County, and under its 
laws he has enjoyed its many privileges including attendance upon 
noted educational institutions and later a generous appreciation of 



978 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

his professional ability. After taking a literary course at the 
Wesleyan University at Bloomington, he completed a commercial 
course, and for a short time took special studies in Transveliana 
College, Lexington, Kentucky, and then entered Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, where he completed his course in law in 1888, being admit- 
ted to the bar in the same year and immediately established himself 
at Bloomington. The substantial practice he has built up testifies 
to his professional ability, and the reputation he bears as a stable 
and representative citizen, places him with the leading men of 
Bloomington. He has always been very energetic, and by careful 
investments has acquired substantial holdings in Illinois land. 

Mr. Peirce was united in marriage with Miss Ella Bane, who is 
a daughter of Samuel T. Bane, and they have four children. Mr. 
Peirce and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
As an active and interested member of the McLean County Bar 
Association, he keeps abreast of the times in all that pertains to 
litigation in the state, and his comprehensive library includes the 
works of the best authors on past litigation in every line of juris- 
prudence. He has settled convictions concerning public questions, 
but prefers to be an independent voter in the present state of polit- 
ical agitation. As busy. a man as he finds but little time for what 
is usually termed recreation, but he enjoys the social companion- 
ship of his fellow members in the Masonic bodies and the local 
lodges of the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 

EDWARD GOODE WOODS. Before beginning practice in Chicago 
in 1909, and while a student of law, Mr. Woods was a newspaper 
man, a profession followed by his father and in which he had train- 
ing almost from early youth. Mr. Woods since his admission to 
the bar has been associated in practice with Roy D. Keehn, with 
offices in the Otis Building. Mr. Woods has been successful and 
gained considerable prominence in the Chicago bar through his 
special ability in briefing and pleading. 

Edward Goode Woods was born at Stanberry, Missouri, Jan- 
uary 15, 1883, a son of William F. and Margaret (Goode) Woods. 
His father, a newspaper man, at one time conducted a newspaper 
at what is now Bellingham, Washington, and later was managing 
editor of the Tacoma Globe. 

Edward G. Woods acquired his early education in public schools, 
and in line with his early ambition took a course in the Armour 
Institute of Technology at Chicago. Changing his plans for the 
future, he spent three years in the Princeton- Yale Preparatory 
School, and then entered the University of Chicago, spending three 
years in that institution. A young man of limited means, he had 
to earn his way through college, and for that purpose his previous 
training in newspaper work enabled him to find a position with 
the old Chicago Chronicle. He did reporting and other newspaper 
duties in the day, and attended the night classes in the John Marshall 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 979 

Law School for three years, graduating LL, B. in 1907. In June of 
that year he took the examination and was admitted to the bar in 
October. In 1909 he began his private practice. 

Mr. Woods is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, of the 
Kenwood Club, and the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. He resides at 
419 East 48th Street. 

WILLIAM L. LEECH has been actively identified with the bar of 
Central Illinois for over ten years, having been admitted at Ottawa 
April 6, 1904. He began practice at Dixon, having an office to 
himself for several years, and in September, 1908, became member 
of the firm of Trusdell & Smith. He now has charge of the Amboy 
office of the firm of Trusdell, Smith & Leech, and handles most of 
the practice originating in that part of the county for this well 
known and successful law firm. Mr. Leech is now serving his third 
term as city attorney of Amboy, is a member and president of the 
board of education, and on November 3, 1914, was elected on the 
republican ticket as representative to the forty-ninth general as- 
sembly. 

William L. Leech is a native of Illinois, born at the old Town 
of Hennepin June n, 1879, a son f Leonard T. and Elizabeth A. 
(Davis) Leech. Both his parents were natives of Ohio, and their 
two children were Charles A. and William L. 

William L. Leech acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Hennepin, graduating from the high school there in 
1897. His law studies were first carried on under former states 
attorney, James E. Taylor, but after one year he entered in 1900 
the Northern Illinois College of Law at Dixon, and was graduated 
May 8, 1902. Among other professional connections Mr. Leech is 
local attorney for the Lee County Fair Association, for the Amboy 
State Bank and the Amboy Products Company. He was elected 
to the Legislature, a representative of the forty-ninth general as- 
sembly, November 3, 1914, and served on the following committees : 
appropriations, judiciary, judicial apportionment and industrial 
affairs. He was also chairman of the sub-committee on industrial 
affairs, investigating labor conditions in the State of Illinois and 
Wisconsin. Politically he acts with the republican party, is affili- 
ated with the Congregational Church, and has fraternal affiliations 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and the Modern Woodmen of America. On May 27, 1903, 
he married Miss Jessie Hake, of Platteville, Wisconsin. Their one 
daughter, Ruth Elizabeth, was born April 27, 1904. Mr. Leech 
has his office at Amboy in the Greene building and his home is on 
Main Street. 

MILES FREDERICK GILBERT. For a period of forty-five years 
Mr. Gilbert has practiced his profession at Cairo, is one of the oldest 
members of the bar in Alexander County, and has enjoyed many of 
the best distinctions that come into the life of an able lawyer. 



980 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Miles Frederick Gilbert was born September u, 1846, at Alton, 
Madison County, Illinois, a son of Judge Miles A. and Ann E. 
Gilbert. His family was founded in America during the colonial 
times by five brothers, one of whom settled in Virginia, one in Mas- 
sachusetts and three in Connecticut. Judge Miles A. Gilbert be- 
longed to the New Haven branch of the family and was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut. He became a resident of Kaskaskia, Illi- 
nois, and later entered the land on which the City of Cairo now 
stands. From Illinois he moved to Missouri, and for sixteen years 
served as judge of the County Court of St. Genevieve County. He 
lived to a splendid old age. 

Miles Frederick Gilbert was educated in the Alton public schools, 
and his collegiate career at Washington University in St. Louis was 
interrupted on account of illness. He completed his literary educa- 
tion in the Pennsylvania Military College at Chester, for two years 
read law in the office of Haynie, Marshall & Gilbert at Cairo, from 
1866 until 1868, at the end of which time he was admitted to the 
bar. He entered the Harvard Law School and was graduated 
LL. B. in June, 1869. Returning to Cairo, Mr. Gilbert began prac- 
tice in January, 1870, as a member of the firm of Green & Gilbert. 
He was licensed to practice in the Circuit and District Federal 
courts in 1875, and in 1892 admitted to the Supreme Court of the 
United States. His long career as a lawyer has connected him with 
much important litigation, particularly in corporation practice. Fol- 
lowing a well recognized tendency among American lawyers, he has 
combined his profession with business, and during the past forty 
years has been identified with a number of important concerns at 
Cairo and elsewhere. 

Mr. Gilbert is a democrat, has taken much interest in party 
affairs, though seldom permitting' his name to go before the public 
as a candidate for public office. In 1914 he accepted a place on the 
democratic ticket as candidate for the office of county judge. Per- 
haps his chief service outside of his profession has been for his 
church and the cause of public education. For nineteen years he 
was a member of the Cairo Board of Education and its president. 
In the Episcopal Church he has long been one of the most prominent 
laymen in Southern Illinois, served a number of years as a dele- 
gate to the general convention, has been a trustee and was one of 
the incorporators of the Western Theological Seminary at Chicago, 
for many years has been chancellor of the diocese, and for twelve' 
years has been one of the judges of the Eccelesiastical Court of 
Review, Department of the Mid West. Mr. Gilbert was married 
October 18, 1871, in -Alton to Miss Addie Louise Barry, daughter 
of Amasa S. Barry. Their two children are: Mrs. Nellie Gilbert 
Halliday and Edward Leigh Gilbert. 

HON. GEORGE W. PILLOW. A prominent attorney of William- 
son County and a leader of the bar at Marion, is George W. Pillow, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 981 

who also is well known in state politics and stands high personally 
both in professional and public life. He was born at Metropolis, 
Massac County, Illinois, May 15, 1850, and is a son of P. B. and 
Elizabeth (Eraser) Pillow, the father a native of Tennessee and 
the mother of Illinois. The father followed agricultural pursuits 
and was also the holder of a commission as captain of an organiza- 
tion utilized by the governor of Illinois to suppress concerted viola- 
tions of the law. In 1852 he removed with his family to Gallatin 
County and there resided until his death which occurred in 1883. 
The mother of George W. Pillow survived many years, her death 
taking place in 1912, at Evansville, Indiana, when aged eighty-one 
years. She was an admirable woman in every relation of life and 
was the devoted and beloved mother of eight children, the eldest of 
these being George W. 

When George W. Pillow was two years old his parents moved 
on a farm in Gallatin County, Illinois, and during boyhood he 
attended the country schools, the only educational institutions that 
ever contributed to his wealth of knowledge. When, according 
to his father's practical ideas, the youth had reached the proper age 
to learn a self-supporting trade, he was apprenticed to a firm by 
the name of Karcher & Scanlon, with which firm he remained for 
three years as an apprentice and afterwards followed his trade four- 
teen years. It was during the closing years of this long period that 
he entered seriously upon the study of law, for which he had a 
decided inclination, for this purpose purchasing law books which he 
studied by himself, on many occasions spending whole nights over 
his books after days of physical labor. Such persistency and reso- 
lution could not fail of success and in the course of time he passed 
his examinations and in 1882 was admitted to the bar. As an attor- 
ney he has adorned his profession, displaying a wide range of knowl- 
edge, both general and professional and thereby built up a large 
practice. Perhaps no attorney in the state is equally recognized as 
a criminal lawyer, and at a rough estimate has handled 109 murder 
cases successfully, either as defendant or prosecutor. He is a man 
of brilliant eloquence and thoroughly understands all that applies 
to human life and human motives, and this knowledge he is able 
to place before a jury with persuasion and clearness and his clients 
thus receive every advantage that a lawyer can give them. 

Not only is Mr. Pillow a very able lawyer but he has long been 
interested in politics and a strong adherent of republican principles 
for many years. In 1890 he was the nominee of the republican 
party for Congress from the old Nineteenth District, which, nor- 
mally is overwhelmingly democratic. Nevertheless his personal 
popularity overcame a large majority but not sufficient to elect. He 
still is an important factor in party councils but on account of heavy 
professional duties is no longer a candidate for office. 

In 1871 Mr. Pillow was united in marriage with Miss Mary A. 
Slater, who was born at Ottawa, Illinois, and died in 1892. Her 



982 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

parents were Alfred and Mary (Kirkpatrick) Slater, well known 
early settlers in the vicinity of Urbana, Illinois. Six children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Pillow : Eugene R., whoi is a traveling sales- 
man, representing a well known business house of the state ; Gordon, 
who is a foremost member of the Williamson County Bar; Mrs. 
Eva Sweeney, who is a resident of Ridgeway, Illinois ; Mrs. Winona 
Hudson, who resides at Marion ; C. J., who is a resident of Madison, 
Illinois; and Earl, who lives at Marion. In 1894 Mr. Pillow was 
married to Miss Mary Belt, of Elizabethtown, Illinois, a daughter of 
Henry and Mary (Moon) Belt, formerly well known and respected 
residents of the state, both now deceased. 

Mr. Pillow is a valued member of the State Bar Association, and 
fraternally is identified with Monarch Lodge No. 238, Knights of 
Pythias, and with the Elks, both at Marion. Mr. Pillow owns a 
beautiful private residence at Marion and other valuable property. 
Formerly he practiced alone but at present has associated with him 
George R. Stone, an able young attorney of Williamson County. 

CHARLES SUMNER MILLER. From the time of his admission to 
the bar in 1903, Mr. Miller was identified with his profession in 
the City of Chicago until 1908, and has since enjoyed the substan- 
tial rewards of the able lawyer in Mound City. 

Charles Sumner Miller was born in Pulaski County, Illinois, 
October 6, 1878, and with the exception of his residence in Chicago 
has been identified with the county practically all his life. He was 
the youngest in a family of nine children born to Jasper N. and 
Margaret (Albin) Miller. His parents were both natives of Ohio, 
came to Illinois after their marriage, and located on a farm near 
Villa Ridge in Pulaski County. His father died in 1908 at the age 
of seventy-four, and his mother in September, 1912, at the age of 
seventy-six. The father during the war was a corporal in Company 
E of the One Hundred and Fifty-third Ohio Infantry, and was 
twice wounded during his service. Charles S. Miller had the 
associations and influences of the average farmer boy, attended the 
local schools and the high school in Pulaski County, and after taking 
a course in the Southern Collegiate Institute at Albion spent two 
years as a teacher. Largely with the means acquired through this 
work he entered the John Marshall Law School at Chicago, and 
was graduated in 1903. During the following five years he ac- 
quired some profitable connections with his profession in Chicago, 
but in 1908 returned to Mound City and has since practiced law 
and been busied with the duties of public office. Mr. Miller has 
served as public administrator and guardian of Pulaski County, 
and in November, 1912, was elected to his present office as states 
attorney. He has shown himself a vigorous prosecutor, and the 
general level of law enforcement and observance has been raised 
considerably since he began his administration. 

Mr. Miller is a member of the State Bar Association and is 
affiliated with the Masonic and Knights of Pythias orders. He was 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 983 

married in 1905 at Stillwater, Oklahoma, to Lottie Austin, daughter 
of Miles Austin, now a resident of Oklahoma, but formerly of 
Pulaski County, Illinois. They are the parents of three children: 
Gladys Ruth, born in 1907 at Chicago and attending school in 
Mound City; Donald Austin, born in 1909 at Mound City; and 
Margaret C, born in March, 1912. 

FRED HOOD has practiced law at Mound City since 1901. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in that year, he entered his profession with many 
assurances of success, which his subsequent career has well justi- 
fied. Mr. Hood has long enjoyed high standing in the Pulaski 
County bar, has served as states attorney, and in 1914 was elected 
by the republicans for the office of county judge. 

Fred Hood was born in Johnson County, Illinois, March 31, 
1879. A son of J. W. and Victoria E. (Maxey) Hood, his father a 
native of Alabama and his mother of Tennessee. His father was 
for a number of years engaged in general merchandising in Pulaski 
County, and died in 1912 at the age of seventy-two, while the 
mother is still living in that county at the age of fifty-five. Of the 
children Fred Hood has a brother Harry, who is a successful 
lawyer at Cairo. 

Fred Hood attended the public schools of Pulaski County, took 
the teacher's course at the Southern Illinois Normal in Carbondale, 
and began his career in the schoolroom, his work there being a 
stepping stone to his present profession. Mr. Hood was graduated 
in 1900 from the law department of Dixon College, was admitted 
to the bar in 1901, and at once began practice at Mound City. His 
public service has been as city attorney, as master in chancery of 
Pulaski County, and one term as states attorney. 

Mr. Hood is affiliated with the Masonic Order and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. At Mound City in September, 1909, Mr. 
Hood married Miss Blanche Boyd, daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
Boyd, who are now living in Mound City. They have one child, 
Frederick Boyd Hood, born at Mound City in 1910. 

BERT E. MCLAUGHLIN, of the Galesburg Bar, was born in 
Henry County, Illinois, and is the son of Silas S. and Addie 
(Drown) McLaughlin. He has one brother, Elmer B., who is a 
farmer and resides near Pella, Iowa. His father, who is now de- 
ceased, was a native of Pennsylvania and during his life was a 
farmer. Hts mother, who survives, was born in Ohio. 

Mr. McLaughlin was reared on his father's farm and attended 
the district school, after which he was a student and graduated 
from the New Windsor, Illinois, High School, subsequently spend- 
ing one year in the Tri City College at Davenport, Iowa. In 1897 
he entered the law department of the University of Michigan at 
Ann Arbor, where he graduated in 1900. The following year, he 
was admitted to the bar in Chicago. He came at once to Galesburg, 



984 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Illinois, and became associated with the law firm of Shumway & 
Rice for one year, then with R. C. Rice, until he was elected county 
judge of Knox County, Illinios, and at the present time, is associ- 
ated in the practice of law with the Hon. E. J. King. 

Mr. McLaughlin is identified with the leading fraternal organi- 
zations, including the Masons, Elks and Protective Legion, also the 
Galesburg Business Men's Club. 

ISAAC A. BUCKINGHAM. One of the veteran lawyers of Central 
Illinois is Isaac A. Buckingham, of the bar at Decatur. 

Isaac A. Buckingham was born on a farm in Hamilton County, 
Ohio, July 25, 1840, spent his boyhood days on the farm, acquired 
his early education at the Wilford High School and later at Farm- 
ers College six miles north of Cincinnati, and in April, 1863, was 
graduated from the Cincinnati Law School and admitted to the bar 
there. In September of the same year he located at Decatur, and 
that city has been his home and the scene of his professional 
successes. 

He has always enjoyed a liberal clientage, and has filled some 
public offices. He was city attorney for the City of Decatur from 
1872 to 1879, and states attorney from 1876 to 1880. His first law 
partner was Capt. Joel S. Post, which firm was dissolved in 1870. 
From 1870 to 1889 he practiced alone. From 1889 to 1896 he was 
associated with Charles E. Schroll. After the firm of Buckingham 
& Schroll dissolved in 1896 Mr. Buckingham practiced alone until 
1905 when he formed a partnership with the late Hon. J. M. Gray, 
which partnership continued until Mr. Gray's death in June, 1912. 
After Mr. Gray's death and in the same year Mr. Buckingham 
formed a partnership with Horace W. McDavid under the firm 
name of Buckingham & McDavid. In May, 1915, Mr. Ralph J. 
Monroe became a partner in the firm under the name of Bucking- 
ham, McDavid & Monroe. 

While taking no active part in politics as a seeker for office, he 
has always been an active worker in politics and has always mani- 
fested a spirited willingness to help in movements for local better- 
ment and has always used his knowledge and experience to educate 
and mould public sentiment and opinion on all matters of import- 
ance touching the public welfare and prosperity of his community. 
Mr. Buckingham was married in 1862 to Miss Martha Simkins of 
Ohio. Two children were born to their marriage, viz. : Miss Maria 
L. Buckingham and Mrs. Donna B. Barnes, wife of Dr. Lynn M. 
Barnes, of Decatur, Illinois. 

CHARLES BENJAMIN THOMAS. For more than "twenty years 
Charles B. Thomas has been a member of the Illinois bar, and is 
now one of the leading attorneys of East St. Louis. His work as 
a lawyer has brought him many substantial rewards, and his prom- 
inence in politics has made him one of the best known leaders in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 985 

the democratic party. In 1914 Mr. Thomas was a candidate for 
state senator from the Forty-ninth district. 

Mr. Thomas, who was born in Hamilton County, Illinois, 
February 4, 1870, was named in honor of an ancestor, Charles 
Benjamin Thomas, a noted soldier and early statesman. His par- 
ents were Hosa M. and Mirinda (Jamerson) Thomas, both also 
natives of Hamilton County. His father, who was for many years 
engaged in merchandising, subsequently lived on a Hamilton County 
farm. During the Civil war he was ,an Illinois volunteer, and 
though present in many battles was never wounded. His death 
occurred in 1876 at the age of thirty-two. His wife died in 1913 at 
the age of sixty-eight. There were six children, three sons and 
three daughters. Charles Benjamin Thomas, the third of the 
family, was educated in the public schools of Hamilton County, 
but at the age of thirteen became dependent upon his own efforts, 
earned money to take a course in the Enfield Normal College, and 
taught school, attended school and took every advantage in his 
power in order to prepare himself for his chosen profession as a 
lawyer. Besides three years in the Enfield Normal he was in school 
at McLeansboro and for six years was a student in the intervals of 
his other work in a law office. Mr. Thomas was admitted to the 
bar in 1892, and began practice at McLeansboro. It was in that 
city that his reputation was established as a hard-working and 
successful lawyer, and he brought with him to East St. Louis in 
1911 a well sustained record and has since advanced his position 
among the leading lawyers of the state. At different times in the 
past twenty years he has appeared on one side or the other in a 
number of important cases, and was recently an attorney for the 
defense in the celebrated railroad bond case, which went from the 
state courts to the Federal Supreme courts. 

Mr. Thomas is a member of the State and American Bar associ- 
ations, is a master Mason, also affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. During his residence in Hamilton 
County he served two terms as county judge, and has for a number 
of years been active in the democratic party. He was a delegate to 
the Denver convention. 

On June 19, 1898, Mr. Thomas married Elizabeth White, of 
Hamilton County, daughter of George W. White, a well known 
and wealthy farmer of that county, now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas are the parents of four children : Edith, Melvin H., Venita 
and Frieda. All were born in Hamilton County and the two 
youngest are still in school. 

ALBERT CONRAD BOLLINGER. During the greater part of his 
twenty years' membership in the Illinois bar, Judge Bellinger has 
been identified with public offices, is a former state senator, was 
county judge of Monroe County, and now in connection with his 



Vol. Ill 10 



986 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

large private practice is serving as master of chancery at Waterloo. 

Albert Conrad Bellinger was born in Randolph County, Illinois, 
November 22, 1870, a son of Henry and Emelia (Giesemann) 
Bollinger. His father, who was born in Switzerland, came to this 
country as a young man, brought with him a skill acquired in the 
old country as watchmaker, located at Steelville, Illinois, followed 
his trade there until failing eyesight compelled him to give up his 
profession, and he was engaged in the hotel and saloon business 
for a number of years and died at the age seventy-nine. During 
the Civil war he went out as a member of Company B in the 
Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment of Infantry, participated in 
several of the great campaigns of the war, was wounded at the 
battle of Chickamauga (and on recovering returned home and took 
up the quiet pursuits of civil life). He was married in St. Louis, 
and his widow, who is now sixty-eight years of age, was born in 
that city of German parents. They had a family of six children. 
Herman lives in St. Louis; Mrs. George Schultz is the wife of a 
minister at Steelville, Illinois; Henry S. is connected with Carson, 
Pirie, Scott & Company in Chicago; Dr. Edward is a physician at 
Dupo ; and Dr. Oscar is a dentist at Columbia, Illinois. 

Judge Bollinger, who was the third in age among these children, 
had his preliminary education in the public schools at Steelville, 
was also in a normal school in this state and at St. Charles, Mis- 
souri, and finally entered the office of Hartzell & Sprigg, prominent 
attorneys of Chester, Illinois. After a thorough course of reading, 
Mr. Bollinger was admitted to the bar in 1893. Throughout his 
youth he had depended upon his own efforts to advance him and 
has won his high standing in the profession entirely as a result of 
individual ability and industry. Since his admission to the bar he 
has practiced at Waterloo, and for a number of years has been 
regarded as one of the most competent members of the local bar. 
In 1902 he was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of 
the United States, and among other important cases handled by 
him has been one of considerable note, known as the Renault-Grant 
case, which he argued before the highest court of the nation. 

Judge Bollinger was elected to the State Senate in 1896 and 
served for four years, and in 1900 was appointed county judge of 
Monroe County and filled that position with admirable efficiency. 
Since leaving the bench he has been master in chancery. Judge 
Bollinger is also a prominent business man of Waterloo, is presi- 
dent of the First National Bank of that city, and is a partner in 
the Farmers Bank of Valmeyer, Illinois. He has membership in 
the State Bar Association, the County Bar Association, the Sons 
of Veterans, is a republican and a member of the Protestant 
Church. At Waterloo in 1894 occurred his marriage to Miss 
Minnie D. Kuenster, daughter of Hubert Kuenster. Their one 
daughter, Miss Dorothy A. Bollinger, born at Waterloo in 1896, 
is now a student in the Sacred Heart Academy of St. Louis. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 987 

ALVA R. DRY. A Pinckneyville attorney whose work since 
coming to the bar about ten years ago has brought him the com- 
mendation of his associates and has secured his position of leader- 
ship in the Perry County bar, A. R. Dry is a native Illinoisan and 
has won his place in his profession as a result of hard work and 
solid ability. 

Alva R. Dry was born in Perry County, Illinois, June 8, 1878. 
The oldest of four children born to Jordan J. and Margaret 
(Naward) Dry. His father was a native of Illinois and a son of 
South Carolina people who were early settlers in this state. Jordan 
J. Dry has long been an active farmer in Perry County, where he 
is still living at the age of sixty-four. His wife, who was born in 
Ohio and was brought to Illinois at the age of six years, died in 
1908 at the age of fifty-eight. 

Alva R. Dry was educated in the country schools, attended the 
Pinckneyville High School, and took his law studies in the Univer- 
sity of Valparaiso, where he was graduated in 1903 and admitted 
to the bar of Indiana in the same year. In the following year Mr. 
Dry was admitted to practice in the Illinois courts, and has since 
been actively engaged in his profession at Pinckneyville. The 
greater part of his career as a lawyer has been taken up with his 
duties as states attorney of Perry County, an office in which he 
served with admirable efficiency from 1904 to 1912. At the present 
time Mr. Dry is city attorney of Pinckneyville. He has member- 
ship in the Illinois Bar Association, is past master of his Masonic 
Lodge and past grand in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Mr. Dry is also a member of the Pinckneyville school board. On 
June 20, 1903, at Valparaiso, Indiana, he married Miss Carrie A. 
Brown, daughter of John A. Brown, who is still living in his old 
home county of Tuscarawas in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Dry have two 
children: Vaille, born in 1905 and attending school; and Exime, 
born in 1911. 

NELSON B. LAYMAN. This is a name which for many years has 
had prominent associations with the bench and bar of Southern 
Illinois, and Nelson B. Layman of DuQuoin is a nephew of Judge 
M. T. Layman, one of the foremost lawyers and jurists of Jackson- 
ville and also a nephew of the late Judge T. J. Layman and Judge 
C. H. Layman of Benton. Nelson B. Layman has been in practice 
since 1907, and is already successfully situated in his profession. 

Nelson B. Layman was born at Tamaroa in Perry County, Illi- 
nois, December 12, 1880, a son of Dr. S. J. and Adelia (Ross) Lay- 
man. Both parents were natives of Illinois, and his father, a 
prominent physician, served as a surgeon during the War of the 
Rebellion, having gone out in Company C of the Eighteenth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. For many years he practiced in Perry County 
and died at the age of seventy-three in 1910. The mother is still 
living at the age of seventy. Judge G. C. Ross, assistant attorney- 



988 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

general for the Interior Department, Washington, is a brother of 
Mrs. Layman. They were the parents of a family of fourteen 
children, twelve of whom are still living, and Nelson was the ninth 
in order of birth. 

His early education was acquired in Perry County, after which 
he attended the Southern Illinois Normal University, read law with 
his uncle, Judge Layman, at Jacksonville for a time, then entered 
the Northwestern University of Chicago and was admitted to the 
bar in 1907. After his admission he took up practice at DuQuoin, 
and has devoted himself assiduously to his profession, with no aspi- 
rations for public office. 

Mr. Layman is a member of the County Bar Association, is a 
Royal Arch Mason and also affiliated with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. In June, 1911, at McLeansboro Mr. Layman 
married Miss Julia C. Hall, daughter of Judge John C. Hall. Both 
her parents are still living at McLeansboro, and her grandfather, 
Col. Wesley Hall, who was a veteran of both the Mexican and Civil 
wars, is also living at the venerable age of ninety years. Mr. Lay- 
man and wife have one child, Nelson Hall Layman, born in 1913. 

Louis R. KELLY. A graduate in law from the University of 
Illinois, Mr. Kelly was admitted to the Illinois Bar in 1909, but for 
the first two years was in the service of the Federal Government 
as deputy revenue collector. Since then he has been engaged in 
practice at DuQuoin, and is now one of the leading younger lawyers 
of the Perry County Bar. Mr. Kelly was elected in 1913 to the 
office of city attorney, and his excellent record in that office made 
him the prominent candidate for the office of county judge on the 
republican ticket, and he was elected to that office in November, 
1914. 

Louis R. Kelly was born at DuQuoin, Illinois, February 2, 1883, 
the fifth in a family of eight children born to Thomas B. and Nannie 
Bell (Fleming) Kelly. Both parents were natives of Ohio. Thomas 
B. Kelly came to Illinois just prior to the Civil war, enlisted at the 
beginning of that struggle in Company K of the Eighteenth Illinois 
Regiment, was promoted to captain of the Signal Corps, and served 
throughout the war. Later he was in the insurance business and 
died at DuQuoin in 1893, after a long and active career. He was 
born in 1839, and his wife was born in 1849 and is still living. Of 
the eight children the others are mentioned briefly as follows : Wil- 
liam A., a banker at Frankfort, Illinois ; C. F., L. B. and R. A., all 
engaged in the laundry business at North Yakima, Washington; 
H. P. Kelly, a grocer at Harrisburg, Illinois ; Thomas B., a graduate 
physician, of St. Anthony's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky ; and Miss 
Louise, who lives in DuQuoin. 

Louis R. Kelly was educated in the public schools of DuQuoin, 
and then entered the University of Illinois, where he was graduated 
LL. B. in the law 'department In 1909. Mr. Kelly is a member of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 989 

the County Bar Association, is affiliated with the Masonic Order in 
the different degrees, and has recently been taken into the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and during his college career was a member of the 
Phi Delta Phi, the legal fraternity, and also the Beta Theta Pi. 
Mr. Kelly is unmarried and lives with his mother in DuQuoin. 

MARION C. COOK. This prominent lawyer of DuQuoin and 
county judge of Perry County has made a notable record in the legal 
profession, and in this connection it is a matter of interest to note 
that his course was changed from one of industry to the legal pro- 
fession as, a result of an accident, which impaired his ability in one 
direction but proved no permanent handicap to his successful career. 
Mr. Cook is an able lawyer, and one of the most popular men in 
Perry County. 

Marion C. Cook was born at St. John, Illinois, March 7, 1877, 
a son of B. O. and Nancy (Phillips) Cook. Both parents were born 
in Illinois, and the mother died in 1911 at the age of sixty. The 
father, who is still living at DuQuoin at the age of sixty-four, has 
for many years been identified with the cooperage business. There 
were nine children, six sons and three daughters, all of whom are 
living. 

Marion C., the fourth in the family, was educated in the schools 
of DuQuoin, and in his early youth had some experience in the min- 
ing industry, and for five years worked at the cooper's trade under 
his father's direction. It was while engaged in mining work that 
the serious accident occurred which abridged his further activities 
along that line, and turned him to the study of law. Judge Cook read 
law in the office of Judge I. R. Spillman, and after his admission 
to the bar began practice at DuQuoin. In 1906 he was elected county 
judge, and has held that office by re-election and has made an admir- 
able record of efficiency in administering its responsibilities down 
to the present time. Judge Cook also served as city attorney for 
eight years, is a member of the board of public improvements, and 
represents as attorney the M. & O. Railway Company. Judge Cook 
is attorney for the County Bar Association and is prominent in 
fraternal affairs, being affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Moose, 
the Improved Order of Red Men, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
the Modern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor. 

On February 12, 1901, at DuQuoin Mr. Cook married Lulu M. 
Parker, daughter of I. G. and Rosette (Wiswell) Parker. Judge 
Cook and wife have one adopted child, Celeste N. Cook, now attend- 
ing school at DuQuoin. 

MARK C. KELLER. The Lee County Bar has no abler member 
than Mark C. Keller, at present master in chancery and city attor- 
ney of the City of Dixon, who, in a comparatively short time, 



990 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

through sound legal knowledge, natural ability and adherence to the 
honorable ethics of his profession, has advanced to deserved public 
position. In his case may be noted the elements which usually bring 
success in any vocation patience, industry, resolution and hope. 

Mark C. Keller was born in Lee County, Illinois, February 24, 
1873, and is a son of John and Amy (Brett) Keller. The father was 
a native of Canada and the mother of Liverpool, England. Both 
are now deceased. Of their thirteen children, Mark C. was the 
tenth in order of birth. Two of the sons, Mark C. and Ralph, be- 
came lawyers. 

Assisting on the home farm and attending the district schools 
during the winter sessions, fairly represented Mark C. Keller's 
activities during the first eighteen years of his life. He then made 
his way to Chicago, where he secured a position that enabled him 
to provide for his own necessities and remained two years, during 
one year of this time attending the Chicago Business College. Re- 
turning home he remained on the farm for eight months and then, 
for two years was mainly engaged in teaching school, during all this 
time cherishing an ambition for a legal career. During the next 
two years he was both a student and a teacher in the Dixon College, 
paying particular attention to the study of the classics. He then 
entered the office of Hon. A. C. Bardwell as a student of law and 
continued under his direction for three years, on October 20, 1900, 
being admitted to the bar at Springfield. 

In selecting a field of practice, Mr. Keller chose Chicago and a 
year of valuable experience followed, but, desiring to locate per- 
manently, Mr. Keller decided on Dixon as offering not only a better 
professional field for a young lawyer than the crowded and con- 
gested metropolis, but the educational and social environment that 
is congenial to a man of cultivated tastes. Mr. Keller opened his 
office at Dixon in September, 1901, and has here built up both prac- 
tice and reputation. In April, 1909, he was first elected city attorney 
and through re-election has served ever since, has been a justice of 
the peace for six years, and in September, 1914, was appointed 
master in chancery, by Judge Ferrand. 

Mr. Keller was united in marriage on June 8, 1904, to Miss May 
Richardson, of Dixon, and they have two children: Mildred A., 
who was born May 27, 1906 ; and Mark C., Jr., who was born March 
22, 1908. Mrs. Keller was educated liberally, first in the Dixon 
schools and later at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. She is 
somewhat prominent in fraternal life, being an officer in the Eastern 
Star and Chapter A. C. of the P. E. O. Her social activities are 
many as are her interests in various clubs. The hospitable family 
home is a beautiful residence at No. 603 Peoria Avenue, Dixon. 

While professional duties have largely claimed Mr. Keller's time 
and attention for many years, yet he has not been unmindful of his 
duties and responsibilities as a citizen and has ever worked for the 
public welfare. From early manhood he has been identified with 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 991 

the republican party and his interest and loyalty have been many 
times recognized. For four years he has been secretary of the 
Republican County Central Committee and has served as a delegate 
to congressional conventions. His fraternal connections include 
membership with the Masons, the Elks and the Woodmen. His 
office is maintained at No. 120 East First Street, Dixon. 

RUFUS M. POTTS was born in Christian County, Illinois, Septem- 
ber 3, 1870, a son of George D. and Lenora (Langley) Potts, also 
natives of Christian County. During his life on a Christian County 
farm Mr. Potts attended the district schools, was for two terms a 
student in the city schools of Taylorville, and on leaving the farm 
taught two years in the country. He began the study of law with 
Drennan & Hogan at Taylorville, was admitted to the bar in August, 
1892, and during the following year was a law clerk in the office 
of Palmer, Shutt & Drennan at Springfield. In 1894 he returned to 
Taylorville to take up active practice, and quickly gained a high rank 
as a skilled and profound lawyer, especially strong as a trial advocate 
before juries. 

Mr. Potts has long been prominent in democratic politics, and in 
November, 1898, was elected county judge, and at that time was 
the youngest county judge in Illinois. He was subsequently elected 
president of the Illinois County and Probate Judges Association. 
During the Spanish-American war he assisted in organizing Colonel 
Wilson's Provisional Regiment, which became the Tenth Illinois, 
and was major of its first battalion. 

Mr. Potts was married October 16, 1895, to Miss Wilhelmina R. 
Grunwalt, of Springfield, Illinois. They have two children, Wilhel- 
mina Madonna and Cyrus Albert Potts. 

In 1906 Mr. Potts moved to Springfield, Illinois, where he be- 
came general counsel for the Reisch Indemnity Company, having 
charge of the entire legal business of this company, and later re- 
signed his position to accept the position of insurance superintendent. 
He was appointed insurance superintendent August n, 1913, which 
position he now holds. Immediately after his appointment he began 
a vigorous and successful assault upon all illegitimately conducted 
insurance organizations operating in this state, with a view of legiti- 
matizing the business of insurance. He then turned his attention to 
curbing what he termed as the "nation-wide fire insurance 'trust/ " 
and has inaugurated some very pronounced reforms in all lines of 
the insurance business. 

With Mr. Potts there is no such thing as fiction. Everything is 
real; his ideas are original, and his plans are always constructive 
and progressive. He believes in the utmost sincerity in all his doc- 
trines and is forceful, able and fearless in following the line of what 
he believes to be his duty. In his career, both as a lawyer and as a 
public official, he never shifts a responsibility, and has maintained 
the highest standard of service. 



992 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

SAMUEL S. Du HAMEL. The Tuscola Bar probably represents 
the best legal talent in Douglas County, and it may be safely pre- 
dicted that some of the names now well known on this body, will, 
in the future, be equally well known on the bench. It is the laudable 
ambition of every lawyer who is interested in his profession, to so 
advance that judicial honors may come within his grasp, and, if 
profound knowledge of the law, a wide range of general informa- 
tion, clear reasoning, poise, tact, courage, and a judicial cast of mind 
are requisites, there are many young law practitioners working over 
cases to prepare them for court presentation with little expectation 
of special recognition, but faithful to their clients, who possess 
every one of the above qualities. A representative member of the 
Tuscola Bar is Samuel S. Du Hamel, who has been in active prac- 
tice here for the past ten years. 

Samuel S. Du Hamel was born March 22, 1879, and is a son 
of John W. and Elizabeth (Greenwood) Du Hamel. There were 
six children in the family, four of whom survive. Samuel S. was 
reared on his father's farm and attended the public schools, after 
completing his high school course entering Austin College, where 
he was graduated. He began the study of law under the supervision 
of Attorney Jacob Zimmerman, with whom he remained for one 
year, after which he spent one year in the Indianapolis Law School, 
and in October, 1903, was admitted to the bar. His whole pro- 
fessional life has been spent at Tuscola and appreciation has here 
been shown his legal ability, his clientage being solid and satisfactory 
and public office, when he desires it, not outside his reach. From 
1907 to 1913 he served with the greatest efficiency as city attorney of 
Tuscola. 

Mr. Du Hamel was united in marriage with Miss Florence E. 
Maris, who is a daughter of Abram L. Maris, of Tuscola, and they 
have one son, Harold S. The family belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. A man of progressive ideas in every line, Mr. 
Du Hamel is an independent in politics, voting rather for the man 
than the party. He belongs fraternally to the I. O. R. M. and to- 
the Odd Fellows. 

WILLIAM C. MAGUIRE. While the law offers no easy path to- 
eminence, it is a profession in which opportunity is given for the 
exercise of mental gifts that might remain inert in another vocation. 
Many times it is the foundation that inspires the building up of 
signally useful careers, not alone in the law, but in other wide fields 
of endeavor, for every young lawyer, with a sound legal education 
in his possession, finds himself anxious to emulate the achievements 
of his predecessors. Endowed, with marked legal ability and well 
equipped through educational advantages, William C. Maguire is 
rapidly advancing to the front rank among the lawyers of the 
Urbana Bar. 

William C. Maguire was born at Urbana, Illinois, November 4,. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 993 

1885, and is the only son of his parents, William T. and Anna (Ray) 
Maguire, the former of whom is a well known contractor in this 
city. In its public schools Urbana affords a liberal education, and 
in 1904, William C. Maguire was creditably graduated from the 
high school, subsequently entering the University of Illinois, where 
he pursued his law studies and was graduated from that institution 
in 1910, and in February of that year was admitted to the bar, de- 
laying, however, to enter into practice until just one year later. 

Mr. Maguire was united in marriage with Miss Gallic Tyson, 
who is a daughter of Mrs. Lulu Tyson, a well known resident of 
Jackson, Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. Maguire are members of the 
Presbyterian Church. Mr. Maguire is identified with the county 
bar association and belongs to the Masons, the Elks, of which he 
is exalted ruler, and the Knights of Pythias. He continues his in- 
terest and membership in his college fraternities, the Theta Delta 
Chi and Theta Nu Epsilon. Mr. Maguire has many friends in all 
the above organizations as also in the Champaign County Country 
Club, to which he has belonged for some years. In politics he is a 
republican and enjoys the confidence of the party leaders and has 
been elected city attorney of Urbana. Mr. Maguire maintains his 
office in the Masonic Building, Urbana. 

HON. CHESTER W. RICHARDS. Among the able members of the 
bar of Champaign County, Chester W. Richards, master in chan- 
cery, occupies a prominent position, although he is one of the 
younger members of his profession, his entire period of practice 
being covered by eight years. Nevertheless, Mr. Richards in these 
few years has made his way to the front rank and has displayed 
unusual legal ability in several exceedingly responsible positions. 
He was born in Champaign County, Illinois, July 28, 1883, and is 
a son of Patrick and Amelia I. (Morgan) Richards, who had a 
family of three children. Patrick Richards was long one of the 
prominent business men of the county and widely known as a 
financier through the state, and at the time of his death, in 1901, 
was president of the First National Bank of Urbana. 

Chester W. Richards appreciated the social and educational 
advantages to which he was born and, early in school life, decided 
on the law as his future career. In the public schools and the 
Urbana High School he prepared for college, and in 1906 he was 
graduated from the University of Illinois, in the same year being 
admitted to the bar. He entered into practice at Urbana and has 
continued in this city, where he has property and family interests. 
In May, 1909, Mr. Richards became corporation counsel for 
Urbana and continued as such until May, 1911, his administration 
of the office having been most advantageous to the city and credit- 
able to himself. On October 2, 1911, Mr. Richards was appointed 
master in chancery, to which office he was reappointed on October 
2, 1913, his services in this connection also being rendered according 



994 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

to the exact letter of the law. He is a valued member of both 
County and State Bar associations and he keeps fully abreast with 
the progressive lines of discussion in these representative bodies. 
Mr. Richards was united in marriage with Miss Angie Casey, 
who is a daughter of Charles E. Casey, and they have two children, 
Chester W. and Elizabeth, the former being affectionately called in 
the family circle "Billy." Mr. Richards and wife are members of 
the Baptist Church. In his political affiliation he is a republican, 
and fraternally his identification is with the Masons and the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Louis A. BUSCH. Civilization demands that the administration 
of the law should be accessible to all, not only in name, but also in 
deed, and it is necessary for peace and protection that transgression 
of the law should bring adequate punishment. The local courts in 
the various communities which make up the counties and states of 
the country, have their approved methods of dealing with the petty 
offenders, but into the hands of the states attorney come the matters 
of graver character, and he it is who must prosecute actions in which 
the people of the state or county may be interested, this official 
necessity covering a very wide field of criminal jurisprudence. To 
efficiently perform the duties of so responsible a position, a man 
must have many qualifications and these not only include a thorough 
mastery of the law and an intimate understanding of men and their 
possible environment and motives, but also the possession of moral 
as well as physical courage and a sense of justice that is no less a 
matter of conscience than the impartiality of the judge on the bench. 
To this office Champaign County, in November, 1912, elected a 
young attorney, whose legal ability had been previously tested in 
private practice and in official position, and the administration of 
Louis A. Busch from that time to the present, has been of great 
benefit to the county. 

Louis A. Busch was born at Urbana, Illinois, in the family resi- 
dence standing just four blocks from his present office in the court- 
house, June 4, 1886, and is a son of Carl T. and Carrie E. (Hank) 
Busch. For a number of years the father was a merchant at 
Urbana and continued in business until his death, in 1896. 

In the democratic surroundings of the public schools, Louis A. 
Busch obtained his early educational training and later entered the 
University of Illinois, subsequently taking a special course in law, 
and in July, 1908, was admitted to practice and has ever since con- 
tinued a member of the Urbana Bar. Prior to his election as state's 
attorney, he served efficiently in the office of assistant county prose- 
cutor, but otherwise carried on a private practice which he built up 
to satisfactory proportions. He is an active and interested member 
of both county and state bar associations, taking part in many of 
the discussions that make for progress in these bodies. 

Mr. Busch was united in marriage with Miss Laura Wascher, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 995 

who is a daughter of Frederick M. Wascher, and they have two 
sons, Lawrence A. and Robert F. Mr. Busch and family are mem- 
bers of the English Lutheran Church, and he has long been officially 
connected with the Sunday school, his class numbering thirty-eight 
members. In politics he is a democrat and is somewhat active in 
party councils, while fraternally he belongs to the Masons, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Elks. 

JOHN J. REA. Among the representative members of the Cham- 
paign County Bar at Urbana, is John J. Rea, who has been in active 
practice in this city for thirty-five years, during which time he has 
been connected with many important cases and now commands a 
large and lucrative practice. As a lawyer his standing is high and 
his well known position as to honorable professional ethics, gives 
no invitation to clients of questionable character or claims. 

John J. Rea was born in Champaign County, Illinois, October 
n, 1852, and is a son of John J. and Sarah P. (Henderson) Rea. 
The parents of Mr. Rea were born in Kentucky and were early set- 
tlers in Champaign County, where the father prospered as an agri- 
culturist, and where they reared a family of eight children. 

In the public schools, John J. Rea secured his general education, 
in the meanwhile assisting on the home farm. When prepared to 
enter upon the study of law he became a student in the firm of 
Somers & Wright, and upon the dissolution of that firm he continued 
his studies under Judge Francis M. W right, now of the Federal 
Court, and on June 4, 1880, was admitted to the bar. He now 
largely confines his professional activities to office practice, and in 
a consultation his judgment is as valuable as is that of any member 
of the county bar, many young lawyers coming to him for counsel. 
In addition to attending to his professional matters, Mr. Rea is con- 
cerned in the management of 360 acres of some of the best farm 
land in Champaign County. 

Mr. Rea was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Fugate, who 
is a daughter of Dr. John T. Fugate, and they have had two children, 
Thurston W. and John C., the latter of whom is now decease^!. Mr. 
Rea is a member of the Baptist Church. While making no display 
of beneficence, Mr. Rea is a man of generous impulses and his chari- 
ties have been many. 

In politics Mr. Rea is a democrat and when party issues are 
properly at stake, is active in promoting its interests, but in the real 
sense has never been an office seeker. Nevertheless his friends have 
exerted themselves at times and during the administration of Presi- 
dent Cleveland that chief executive tendered several federal appoint- 
ments to Mr. Rea, which the latter declined. He served several 
terms as supervisor of the township in which his home is situated, 
and also, for five terms was city attorney of Urbana, but his pre- 
ference has always been for the private practice of his profession, 
in which the emoluments have ever been satisfactory. In addition 



996 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

to membership in state and county bar associations, he belongs to 
the Masons, the Elks and the Modern Woodmen. 

EDWIN FILSON. The Champaign County Abstract Company, 
with branches located at Champaign and at Urbana, Illinois, un- 
doubtedly owns the most complete set of abstract books in Champaign 
County, and its able manager in the former city is Edwin Filson, a 
well known member of the Champaign Bar. He is a son of Thomas 
A. and Zelma (Adams) Filson. For many years before his death, 
in August, 1910, Thomas A. Filson, was a prominent member of the 
bar of Caldwell County, Missouri 

Edwin Filson attended the public schools until he completed his 
high .school course, then took a business college course and later 
entered the University of Illinois, where he was graduated in the 
College of Law, in 1907, and was admitted to the bar in Decem- 
ber, 1906. Since 1903 Mr. Filson has been identified with the 
abstract company, his offices being in the Illinois Trust and Savings 
Bank Building, at Champaign. He has made a specialty of this 
branch of the law and his knowledge concerning eVery branch of the 
title service is complete. In June, 1913, he was elected secretary of 
the Illinois Abstract Association and served in that capacity several 
years. 

Mr. Filson married Miss Lena Will, of Hamilton, Missouri, 
and they have three children. With his family he belongs to the 
Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Filson entertains independent 
views, along progressive lines. He belongs to the County Bar Asso- 
ciation and is identified, fraternally, with the Masons, the Odd Fel- 
lows and the Knights of Pythias. In 1915 he was master of Western 
Star Lodge, No. 240, A. F. & A. M., at Champaign. He also served 
on the city council of Champaign four years. 

ARTHUR J. STEIDLEY. When the qualified electors of Shelby 
County by their ballots in the election of November, 1914, chose 
Arthur J. Steidley to the office of county judge, they gave exhibition 
of their high regard for him as an able lawyer and as a citizen of 
utmost loyalty and public spirit. The preferment is the more in- 
teresting to note by reason of the fact that Judge Steidley is a native 
of the county, and that he has here won professional success and 
prestige through his own efforts, as he depended almost entirely upon 
his own resources in reaching the goal of his ambition and preparing 
himself for the exacting profession of his choice. He is known as 
one of the alert, vigorous and resourceful younger members of the 
Shelby County Bar and his character and achievement fully entitle 
him to representation in this inclusive record concerning the Courts 
and Lawyers of Illinois. 

Judge Steidley was born on a farm in Shelby County, on the 
2Oth of February, 1880, and is a son of Thomas and Ada (Cather- 
wood) Steidley, the latter of whom was born in Shelby County and 



997 

the former in Macoupin County, this state. Thomas Steidley has 
long been numbered among the representative farmers and substan- 
tial citizens of Shelby County, where he established his residence 
when a young man and where his marriage was solemnized, his 
wife being a representative of a sterling pioneer family of this 
county. Mr. Steidley has attained to the age of sixty years, and 
his wife is about two years his junior. They became the parents 
of eight children, of whom Judge Steidley of this review was the 
third in order of birth. 

Like many another youth his boyhood days were compassed by 
the conditions and influences of the farm, Judge Steidley early felt 
the quickening of ambitious purpose and after having made good 
use of the advantages afforded him in the public schools of his 
native county he entered the law office of the firm of Hamlin & 
Kelley, of Shelbyville, where he began reading law under most 
excellent preceptorship. In furtherance of his broader familiarity 
with the science of jurisprudence Mr. Steidley finally entered the 
law department of the University of Illinois, where he was a student 
in 1903-04. In 1905 he proved himself thoroughly eligible for and 
was admitted to the bar of his native state, and he forthwith entered 
upon his professional novitiate by establishing himself in practice 
in the City of Shelbyville. He has ever been an earnest worker and 
his close application, proved ability and personal popularity soon 
gained to him a good clientage, the while he made excellent account 
of himself in connection with the various litigations with which he 
became identified. He served as city attorney in 1907-08, and in 
1911 he formed a professional alliance with John E. Crockett, who 
proved a most effective and valued coadjutor in the control of their 
large and substantial law business. 

In the primary election of 1914 Mr. Steidley was the democratic 
nominee for the office of judge of the county court, and he received 
in the primaries more than one-half of the entire number of votes 
cast, having gained 1,503 out of a total of 3,000 votes, and having 
had two opposing candidates. In the ensuing election, in November, 
he was victorious by a gratifying majority, and he is certain to 
justify this popular estimate by his efficient and circumspect admin- 
istration during his term of office on the bench. His special fitness 
for this judicial position was made more evident through his 
previous excellent service as city attorney, a position in which he 
received but eleven reversals out of a total of 403 cases tried by 
him in his official capacity. .In preparing himself for the legal 
profession Judge Steidley worked early and late, and in the pursu- 
ance of his studies his incidental expenses were paid largely through 
funds which he had acquired by teaching in the schools of his home 
county, his identification with the pedagogic profession having con- 
tinued about seven years. 

Though he has manifested no desire for public office save of 
an order germane to his profession, Judge Steidley is known as a 



998 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

liberal and progressive citizen, and is a stanch supporter of the 
cause of the democratic party. He is affiliated with the local lodge 
and chapter of the Masonic fraternity, with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and with the Improved Order of Red Men, in 
which last he has held various official preferments, including that 
of great senior sagamore, an office in which the order has only four 
incumbents in Illinois at a given time. 

In the year 1903 was solemnized the marriage of Judge Steidley 
to Miss Gertrude Jackson, daughter of Samuel Jackson, a well 
known citizen of Shelbyville, and the one child of this union is 
Arthur, who was born on the 24th of June, 1906. 

MILTON H. CLOUD. One of the oldest and most highly honored 
members of the Illinois Bar, Hon. Milton H. Cloud, has devoted 
nearly a half century to the practice of law. He has been a resident 
of Paxton since 1869. As senior member of the firm of Cloud & 
Thompson he occupies an established position among Illinois 
lawyers. 

Mr. Cloud was born July 24, 1842, in Hamilton County, Ohio, 
and is one of a family of twelve children, of whom four grew to 
maturity, his parents being Vivian and Sarah E. (Gibson) Cloud. 
His father, a native of Indiana, moved from that state to Ohio, 
and in 1850 came to Illinois, settling in Tazewell County, where he 
continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1867. He 
died in 1909. The early education of Milton H. Cloud was secured 
in the public schools of Tazewell County, Illinois, and he prosecuted 
his legal studies under the preceptorship and in the office of Harper 
& Castle, following which he took a course at the Chicago Law 
School. Being admitted to the bar in April, 1867, he at once 
began practice at El Paso, Woodford County, Illinois, and remained 
there until 1869, in which year he took up his residence and work 
at Paxton. He has been for some years associated with F. M. 
Thompson, under the firm style of Cloud & Thompson, a legal com- 
bination that has figured in some of the leading litigation tried in 
the courts of this part of the state. 

When the Civil war came on, Judge Cloud enlisted in Company 
G, Eighty-sixth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was 
wounded at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, June 27, 1864, and 
was honorably discharged June 6, 1865, with his regiment. His 
military record is an excellent one, and he has never lost interest in 
his old army comrades, being at this time a member of the local 
post of the Grand Army of the Republic. A republican in his 
politics, he has served at various times in public office, having 
been city attorney of Paxton for one term, mayor for one term and 
master in chancery for a like period. From 1890 until 1894 he was 
county judge of Ford County. He belongs to the Ford County Bar 
Association and the Illinois State Bar Association. 

Judge Cloud married in 1871 Miss Alice A. Polhensus, a daugh- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 999 

ter of Michael T. Polhensus, and two daughters were born to them. 
They are members of the Congregational Church and are well 
known in social circles of Paxton. 

TRUMAN PLANTZ. More than twenty years of practice as a 
lawyer at Warsaw has brought Mr. Plantz valuable and influential 
relations with the profession, and in the character and extent of 
his practice he now ranks as one of the leading attorneys of Central 
Illinois. 

Truman Plantz, senior member of the firm of Plantz & Lamet, 
at Warsaw, was born November 17, 1860, in Fulton County, New 
York. Six years later, his parents, Peter W. and Jeanette (Higbee) 
Plantz, moved to Warsaw, and the family have been identified with 
this section of Hancock County ever since. Peter W. Plantz was 
prepared for the bar in New York, practiced successfully there for 
some years, but after coming to Illinois gave his chief attention 
to civil engineering. He died at Warsaw in 1896 at the age of 
seventy-eight, while his widow survived until 1901, and was at 
that time seventy-seven years of age. In their family were five 
children, Truman being the youngest. 

His early education was acquired in the public schools of War- 
saw, but when still a youth he left school and spent eleven years 
as a railroad man. He was telegraph operator, baggage man, brake- 
man, and for seven years was conductor on the Toledo, Peoria & 
Western Railroad. Having reached about the limit of possibilities in 
the railway service, and being dissatisfied, Mr. Plantz had already 
determined to prepare for the law, and for several years before the 
close of his work as conductor employed his spare time in study, 
and for six months his reading was supervised by D. F. Miller, Jr., 
of Keokuk, Iowa. In 1890 Mr. Plantz permanently severed his con- 
nection with railroading, and in 1891 was admitted to the bar at 
Springfield. He at once took up active practice at Warsaw, and 
for a time was a member of the firm of Plantz & Hartzell, after- 
wards in Hooker, Plantz & Hartzel, and now is head of the firm of 
Plantz '& Lamet, who control the largest law business at Warsaw. 

Mr. Plantz, in 1903, was elected general attorney for the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the largest fraternal benevolent society in 
the state, and he now gives a large part of his time to the duties 
connected with his office. Mr. Plantz for several years served as 
an alderman in Warsaw, and has been mayor of that city three 
terms. He has been more or less influentially identified with demo- 
cratic politics since taking up the profession of law, and in 1892 
and 1894 was democratic candidate for Congress and has also been 
a member of the democratic state committee. Other service has 
been as president of the board of education at Warsaw. On August 
18, 1890, Mr. Plantz married Miss Helen Dallam, daughter of 
Francis and Anna Dallam. Mrs. Plantz died November 15, 1904, 
leaving a son, Truman, Jr. 



1000 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

MATTHEW JAMES McENiRY. There are few law firms in West- 
ern Illinois that enjoy more of the substantial rewards of the pro- 
fession and have more of the dignity of civic achievement asso- 
ciated with the individual members than that of McEniry & Mc- 
Eniry at Rock Island. 

The junior member of this firm, Matthew James McEniry, was 
born in Zuma Township of Rock Island County, a son of William 
and Elizabeth (Coughlin) McEniry. Both parents were natives of 
Cork, Ireland, where his father was born in 1817, and his mother 
in 1819, and he died in 1874, while the mother passed away on 
Decoration Day in 1907. William McEniry is remembered as the 
first brick manufacturer at the City of Moline, having established 
and begun the operation of a brick yard there in 1842. The site 
of that old plant is now almost in the heart of the city. 

Matthew J. McEniry acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Zuma and later was a student in the Notre Dame Uni- 
versity of Indiana, where he graduated with the highest honors of 
his class after a four years' course in 1881, with the degree Bachelor 
of Science. Several years later he entered the law department of 
the University of Michigan, and was given the degree LL. B. in 
1888. After his admission to the Illinois Bar he began active 
practice at Rock Island in partnership with his brother William 
under the firm name of McEniry & McEniry, and these brothers 
have long been associated in the profession and maintain offices 
both in Rock Island and Moline. 

In addition to his large business as a lawyer Mr. McEniry has 
been active in public affairs of varied scope. He was a charter 
member of the Illinois Naval Militia and became an ensign in that 
organization. In the early days he served as supervisor from Zuma 
Township, and was a member and secretary of the board that built 
the new Carnegie Library. In 1894 President Cleveland appointed 
him postmaster of Rock Island, and he held that office three and a 
half years. For twenty years past he has been a member of the 
executive committee of the Old Settlers Association. He is a char- 
ter member of the Moline Club, has served as director, vice presi- 
dent and on various committees, and fraternally is affiliated with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Improved Order of Red Men 
and the North Star Order. For many years he has been active in 
advocating the drainage of farm lands in his section of the state, 
and at the present writing is serving as president of a drainage 
district which is carrying on the work of reclamation of a large 
area of the Rock River bottoms. Good roads has been another of 
his hobbies, and he has been instrumental in securing the passage of 
laws affecting this improvement and has otherwise used his influ- 
ence for an adequate highway system. 

JUDGE OSCAR E. HEARD. Among the circuit judges who were 
retained in the service by the judicial election in June, 1913, is 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1001 

Oscar E. Heard of the Fifteenth District. Judge Heard is one of 
the oldest of the Freeport lawyers, having been in practice there 
more than a generation ago and is now in his third successive term 
on the bench. 

Born in Stephenson County, Illinois, June 26, 1856, Judge Heard 
is a son of William and Sarah A. (Swanzey) Heard. His father 
was a Stephenson County farmer and also a merchant and died in 
1871. Judge Heard acquired his early education in the public 
schools, graduated from high school, spent two years in the regular 
collegiate department of Northwestern University, and read law 
under the direction of J. S. Cochran. Admitted to the bar in 1878, 
he has since been in practice at Freeport. His first public office was 
that of justice of the peace, which he held from 1881 to 1884. In 
the latter year he was chosen states attorney of Stephenson County 
and added to his reputation in the profession by four terms of 
capable service. For five years he was a member of the Freeport 
Board of Education and a member of the library board nine years, 
and it was largely owing to his efforts that Andrew Carnegie donated 
the funds for a public library at Freeport. 

Judge Heard was first elected to the Circuit Court in the Fif- 
teenth District of Illinois in 1903, and was re-elected in 1909 and 
again in 1913. The highest honors of the Masonic order have been 
paid Judge Heard, and he is a thirty-third degree Scottish Rite 
Mason. He is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is a 
member of the Freeport Club. On December 25, 1879, he married 
Miss Mary J. Peters. Their daughter Emily is the wife of Archi- 
bald Young of Freeport, and the son is Oscar E., Jr. 

JUDGE RICHARD S. FARRAND. While it is not unusual to find 
the judicial office associated with one man for a long term of 
years, there are few Illinois judges whose continuous service on 
the bench covers a greater period of time than that of Judge Richard 
S. Farrand, who is now serving his third term as circuit judge in 
the district including his home city of Dixon, and who prior to his 
elevation to the circuit bench was for five successive terms judge of 
the county court of Lee County. 

A self-made attorney and a judge whose record has been one 
of marked integrity and honor, Richard S. Farrand was born in 
Allen County, Indiana, October i, 1852, a son of R. S. and Delilah 
(Cook) Farrand, who were natives of Oneida County, New York. 
Judge Farrand at the age of eleven years left home to make his own 
way in the world. Then followed a gallant contest with the obstacles 
that stand in the path of a poor boy in his progress toward success. 
He found employment as a farm hand and did other work, and at 
the age of fifteen arrived in Lee County, Illinois, where he con- 
tinued to support himself by various kinds of labor while continuing 

his education. His first important elevation in local affairs came at 
vol. m 11 



1002 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the age of twenty-five when he was made deputy sheriff, and during 
that service he definitely determined that his future career should 
be that of a lawyer. He had the advice of A. C. Bardwell, of 
Dixon, during his law studies, and in 1879 was admitted to the 
bar and became associated with his former preceptor under the 
name Bardwell & Farrand. The firm continued for three years, at 
the end of which time. Judge Farrand took up the responsibilities of 
judicial office, and from that day to this has never been entirely 
disengaged therefrom. In 1882 he was elected judge of the county 
court for the regular term of four years, and re-elections came to 
this office in 1886, 1890, 1894, and 1898. Retiring from the county 
judgeship in 1902, in July of the same year he was elected judge of 
the Circuit Court to fill the unexpired term of Judge Crabtree. In 
1903 he was elected for the regular term of six years and in 1909 
was again chosen to this judicial office, his present term expiring 
in 1916. 

Judge Farrand was married January 30, 1873, to Miss Catherine 
J. Marsh. Two sons were born to their union : Ernest W., and 
Wilbur A., who died at the age of ten years. Judge Farrand is a 
Royal Arch Mason. 

WILLIAM R. MOORE began the practice of law in Moline more 
than forty years ago, and his substantial work as a lawyer has 
been varied by public service and by important participation in 
the business life of that city. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, son of John and Catherine Moore, he came with his pa-rents 
to Moline when a small boy, and gained all his education in the 
Moline public schools. He later attended the Davenport Business 
College, read law in the office of Mr. Browning, and was admitted 
to the bar in September, 1873. He at once took up the active prac- 
tice of law and his name is now one of the oldest in the Moline 
Bar. 

In the early days he served as town clerk of Moline one term 
and by election served as city attorney one term and two terms 
by appointment, and was also corporation counsel for the city. At 
one time he was democratic candidate for circuit judge, being de- 
feated by the normal republican majority. While serving as city 
attorney he gained a great deal of credit for securing the construc- 
tion of a bridge across the Rock River. He was secretary and 
later became president of the Fifteenth Street Electric Railway at 
Moline, this being the second electric line built in the State of Illi- 
nois. He is also one of the charter members of the Moline Club, 
and has filled the office of vice president. 

WILLIAM A. MEESE. The opportunities for varied service and 
attainments that come to the lawyer are perhaps nowhere better 
illustrated in individual character than in the person of William A. 
Meese, one of the oldest active members of the Moline Bar. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1003 

Born in the State of Wisconsin February i, 1857, he was 
brought in infancy to Moline by his parents, Henry D. and Johanna 
(Von Thiel) Meese. After attending the public schools he was a 
student in Griswold College at Davenport, the Rock River Seminary 
at Mount Morris, Illinois, and in the fall of 1876 entered the law 
department of the University of Iowa, where he was graduated 
LL. B. in 1877. Admitted to the bar in 1878 at Ottawa, he soon 
afterwards was enrolled among the attorneys of Moline, and has 
been in continuous practice now for more than thirty-five years. 
Mr. Pease is local attorney for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railroad Company, for the Peoples Savings Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, of Moline, the Tri-City Manufacturers Association and other 
corporations. 

He has just given much important though unremunerative serv- 
ice to his home city. He has been a member of the municipal ceme- 
tery and library boards and was on the latter when it acquired and 
constructed the present Carnegie-Moline Library Building. He 
was president of the Business Men's Association when it was a 
patent force in securing a lock in the Mississippi River, thus insur- 
ing a harbor at Moline for Mississippi boats, and also when the 
citizens made possible a new and modern opera house. He served 
the State of Illinois as trustee of the Northern Illinois State Normal 
School at DeKalb, and as attorney for the Illinois & Michigan Canal 
Commission. He is a member of the Illinois State Bar and the 
American Bar associations. Mr. Meese is not only a lawyer of high 
attainments, but a scholar, and in the course of many years of 
laborious and patient search has gathered what is considered to be 
the most complete collection of books and papers of pioneer times in 
Illinois. The distinguishing feature of this collection is the story 
of Abraham Lincoln, his life and works and associations as reflected 
in the writings of contemporaries with the various periods in the life 
of the martyr president. 

HON. DOUGLAS PATTISON. During his career of twenty years 
as member of the Freeport Bar, Douglas Pattison has earned distinc- 
tion in his profession and many of the substantial honors of public 
life. He comes of a notable family of public men. One of his 
uncles was the late Governor Robert E. Pattison, of Pennsylvania, 
who died in 1904 and was the only democrat who ever achieved the 
honor of being elected for two terms to the gubernatorial chair of 
the Keystone State. He is also a relative of former Governor John 
M. Pattison of Ohio, who died in 1906. His father Jeremiah Patti- 
son was a pioneer manufacturer in Illinois. His mother, whose 
maiden name was Eliza Manny, was a daughter of Pells Manny, 
who is remembered as the inventor of the Manny Reaper, which 
effected a great advance in harvesting machinery. 

Douglas Pattison was born in Freeport, Illinois, December n, 
1870, acquired his early education in the public schools, and after 



3004 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

graduating from high school entered the University of Michigan, 
where he pursued both the literary and law courses. In 1895 ne 
was admitted to the Illinois Bar, and has since been in active practice 
in Freeport. He served as city attorney, and in 1898 was made 
corporation counsel of the city and filled that office until elected to 
the Legislature in 1902. His record in the Legislature was that of 
a capable and high minded public servant. During his last term he 
was unanimously chosen democratic leader of the house. 

On April 18, 1900, Mr. Pattison married Miss Ethel G. Grain of 
Freeport. They have one daughter, Nancy. Mr. Pattison is a 
thirty-second degree Mason and affiliates with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Woodmen of the World, the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, the American Stars of Equity and other 
fraternal organizations. He is a director in the Stephenson County 
Telephone Company and in the German Building & Loan Asso- 
ciation. 

WILLIAM JACKSON. Senior member of the Rock Island law 
firm of Jackson, Hurst & Stafford, William Jackson is one of the 
veteran attorneys of Western Illinois, a citizen of the highest stand- 
ing, and one of the few Illinois lawyers still in practice who were 
admitted to the bar before the Civil war. 

Born at Liverpool, England, August 14, 1834, he was educated 
in the Liverpool schools, and in the Liverpool Collegiate Institute, 
and soon afterward was employed as a grocer's apprentice. He 
became dissatisfied with the prospects of a business career in Eng- 
land, and accordingly set out for the United States, arriving in New 
York July 2, 1851, with very little money and without friends. 
From New York he came on to Rock Island County and for sev- 
eral years earned his living by employment in the mills in Moline. 
His study of law began in 1858, and he applied himself indus- 
triously to the preparation for his profession until admitted to the 
bar in 1860. He was first in partnership with James Chapman, in 
Moline, but three years later Mr. Jackson came to Rock Island, and 
in 1864 entered the partnership of Sweeney & Jackson. In 1876 
Mr. C. L. Walker was admitted as a partner, making the firm 
Sweeney, Jackson & Walker. In 1883 Mr. Jackson retired on 
account of failing health, but was back in practice in 1885, and in 
1888 became associated with E. W. Hurst under the firm name 
Jackson & Hurst. In 1903 a change was made when Elmore H. 
Stafford joined the older lawyers, making the firm Jackson, Hurst 
& Stafford, and as such it still remains. For a number of years 
this firm has represented the local interests of the Rock Island 
Railroad. 

Mr. Jackson's civic services have long been appreciated in 
Rock Island. He was postmaster of that city from 1873 t 1876 
and from 1897 to 1901, was a member of the board of managers of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1005 

the Illinois Reformatory. Perhaps his most important work was 
done while president of the Board of Park Commissioners of Rock 
Island. Spencer Square was laid out under his direction, and 
as president of the board he has charge of the improvement known 
as Long View Park. 

Mr. Jackson was married May 21, 1863, to Miss Jennie E. 
Sammis, who was born in New York City. There are two living 
children, Mrs. Carrie A. Earth and Mrs. Hattie J. Babcock. 

JOHN FRANKLIN GILLHAM. Among the new circuit judges 
chosen at the judicial elections in June, 1915, the only one in the 
Third District is John Franklin Gillham, lawyer of Edwardsville, 
where he has practiced with growing success and prestige for 
twenty years. Judge Gillham was reared on a farm, began his 
struggles for position and success without the aid of wealth or influ- 
ence, and has since attained many of the rewards which are the 
ambition of every ambitious lawyer. 

He was born at Wanda, Illinois, March 4, 1870, a son of R. C. 
and Emma P. (Springer) Gillham, both natives of Illinois. His 
father was a Madison County farmer and died March 23, 1910, at 
the age of seventy-three, and the mother is still living at the age 
of seventy-nine. 

One of five children, Judge Gillham acquired his early school- 
ing in Madison County, is a graduate of old Shurtleff College at 
Alton, took his law course at Washington University, and on being 
admitted to the bar in 1894 established himself at Edwardsville. 
He served as states attorney at Madison County for two terms, from 
1904 to 1912. He is a republican, a member of the County Bar 
Association, a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, 
affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Moose. He is unmarried. 

JOSEPH VAN EATON MARSH of Alton, where he has practiced 
law for the past fifteen years, has what is probably the best practice 
in commercial and general law in Madison County, and is one of 
the most representative lawyers of the state. 

Joseph Van Eaton Marsh was born at Alton April 6, 1868, and 
represents one of the oldest and best families of that city. His 
parents were Ebenezer and Kate P. (Foote) Marsh. His father 
was the second white child born in Alton in 1833, and died after 
a long and distinguished career in 1911. In business he was known 
as founder of the Marsh Drug Company of Alton, but was equally 
well known for his scholarship, was a professor in Shurtleff Col- 
lege, an expert chemist and geologist, and in his younger days had 
graduated from both Heidelberg and Harvard universities. His 
widow is still living at Alton at the age of seventy-seven, and there 
were eight children in the family. 

The Alton lawyer, who was the fifth child, attended school at 



1006 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Shurtleff College, graduated from the law department of Washing- 
ton University at St. Louis, and began his practice in that city, 
remaining there for eight months during 1897-98. Early in the 
war against Spain he enlisted at Cheyenne, Wyoming, in a com- 
pany of Rough Riders, and remained in service until mustered out 
at Jacksonville, Florida. After the war he was again in Cheyenne, 
Wyoming, for a time, and in the spring of 1899 opened his law 
offices at Alton. He has since served as master in chancery one 
term, and among other important business matters handled by him 
was the receivership of the A. J. & P. Railroad. Mr. Marsh is a 
member of the County and State Bar Associations, served as presi- 
dent of the county association, is attorney for the Alton Bank & 
Trust Company and the First Trust & Savings Bank, is past 
exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On 
January 5, 1909, Mr. Marsh was married at St. Louis to Miss Anne 
Judd, who was born at Mt. Vernon, Illinois, a daughter of Charles 
H. Judd. 

HON. ROY C. FREEMAN. It was Socrates who declared, in the 
days of his wisest philosophy, that "four things belong to a judge : 
to hear courteously, to answer wisely, to consider soberly, and to 
decide impartially." The twentieth century demands little more, 
perhaps, but so much is included in the summing up of the great 
Athenian, that there are but a comparatively small number of men 
who come up to the full measure. It is no light honor to be elected 
to the bench in the United States, and when such recognition of 
efficiency comes, whether after years of legal experience, or in the 
early days of professional achievement, it means a great deal. Atten- 
tion may thus be called to Hon. Roy C. Freeman, who is one of the 
youngest county judges in Central Illinois, a man of high legal 
attainments and one who dignifies the bench of Champaign County. 

Roy C. Freeman was born in Champaign County, Illinois, July 
13, 1880, and is a son of John T. and Jennie B. (Silkey) Freeman. 
An only child, he was reared on his father's farm and was given 
both social and educational advantages. After completing the high 
school course he engaged in the study of law and completed his 
course in law in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in 1903, 
and in the same year was admitted to practice both in Michigan and 
in Illinois. He established himself in his profession in his native 
county, rapidly rising to professional prominence. As assistant 
state's attorney for four years, he enjoyed an exceptional prepara- 
tion for his present position as county judge, to which office he was 
elected in November, 1914. His sound knowledge of law and quick 
understanding of legal complexities have been a marked feature 
of his career ever since he entered professional life. He is one of 
the most valued members of the County Bar Association. 

Judge Freeman was united in marriage to Miss Lillian Burdick, 
who is a daughter of Ezra W. Burdick, a prominent resident of this 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1007 

county, and they have two children, Gladys I. and Hazel B. With 
his family, Judge Freeman belongs to the Presbyterian Church. In 
politics he has always been a republican and has given loyal support 
to party policies. He has long been identified fraternally with the 
Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 

HON. HERMAN R. HEIMBERGER. St. Clair County esteemed Her- 
man R. Heimberger as one of its ablest lawyers, a man of sound 
learning and measuring up to the best traditions of the profession. 
During a practice of twenty years at Belleville, Mr. Heimberger was 
frequently honored by public office, and has represented his district 
in the State Legislature. 

Herman R. Heimberger was born in St. Clair County at Belle- 
ville November 2, 1870, a son of R. U. and Anna (Herman) Heim- 
berger. His father was born in Illinois and his mother in Germany, 
coming to America in childhood, and reared and educated in Illi- 
nois, where she married R. U. Heimberger. The latter was for many 
years engaged in the mercantile business at Belleville, and was also 
a popular traveling salesman. During the Civil war he saw thirty- 
nine months of service as color bearer in Companies E and F of 
the Ninth Illinois Regiment. His first colonel was Judge Jesse J. 
Phillips, and later Augustus Mersey commanded the regiment. R. U. 
Heimberger is still a resident of Illinois at Fayetteville in St. Clair 
County, at the age of seventy-five, and the mother is now sixty-nine 
years old. They were the parents of four children. 

The youngest of the children, Herman R. Heimberger, attended 
the public schools of Belleville, and after leaving school began the 
study of law under General William C. Kueffner, who was distin- 
guished as a lawyer and also made a record during the Civil war, 
reaching the rank of brigadier-general. After three years of study 
under General Kueffner, Mr. Heimberger finished his training under 
Attorney C. W. Rebhan, and after his admission to the bar on Feb- 
' ruary 28, 1894, remained in Mr. Rebhan's office for some time. 
Mr. Heimberger quickly gained the early victories of his professional 
career and was in practice at Belleville for twenty years. Until 
recently he was associated with Charles A. Karsh, who is now dis- 
trict attorney. Mr. Heimberger served as city attorney of Belleville 
from 1905 to 1907, was a member of the lower house of the Legis- 
lature in the Forty-first General Assembly, and by appointment 
from Governor Yates served as public administrator for St. Clair 
County. Mr. Heimberger was secretary of the board of education 
of Belleville for twelve years, a member of the Belleville Bar Asso- 
ciation, and affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On June 22, 1898, he married at Belleville Miss Diana Schloerer, 
daughter of Johann Adams and Elizabeth Schloerer, of Belleville. 
The one son born to their union on November 15, 1899, 1S named 
William McKinley Heimberger, and is now a student in the high 



1008 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

school. Mr. Heimberger was the architect of his own fortunes, paid 
his own way while studying law, and both the profession and the 
general public recognized his superior qualities as a lawyer. He 
died September 24, 1914. 

JAMES M. TAYLOR. There is marked consistency in according 
in this history a brief record concerning the career of Mr. Taylor, 
for he has been engaged in the practice of law at Taylorville, judicial 
center of Christian County, for nearly half a century, and has long 
maintained secure prestige as one of the able and honored members 
of the bar of this section of the state. Mr. Taylor came from Scot- 
land to America when a lad of fourteen years, and during the long 
intervening period Illinois has represented his home and been the 
stage of his activities, save for the period during which he honored 
his adopted land and home state by serving as a gallant young soldier 
of the Union in the Civil war. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, on the 2d of 
December, 1839, and is a son of Samuel and Isabella (Lawrence) 
Taylor, both of whom passed their entire lives in their native land, 
where the father died in 1857, at the age of sixty-eight years, his 
devoted wife having passed to the "land of the leal" in 1845. Of 
the nine children five sons and four daughters James M. of this 
sketch was the sixth in order of birth. Mr. Taylor acquired his 
fundamental educational discipline in the land of his nativity, and 
at the age of fourteen years, in 1854, he immigrated to the United 
States and settled in Lake County, Illinois, where he continued to 
attend school when opportunity afforded and where he followed 
various lines of productive occupation, his every effort being guided 
and prompted by worthy ambition and by that inflexible integrity of 
purpose that has significantly characterized his entire career. 

When the Civil war was precipitated upon the nation Mr. Taylor 
signalized his intrinsic loyalty by promptly tendering his aid in de- 
fense of the Union. He enlisted as a private in Company C, Ninety- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in which he was promoted from 
the ranks to the office of second sergeant. He was with his command 
in the various engagements in which it took part and in the battle st 
Rocky Face Ridge, Georgia, in the early part of the year 1864, 
Mr. Taylor was severely wounded by a rifle bullet, his injuries being 
so severe as to necessitate the amputation of his right arm, his hon- 
orable discharge being thus accorded on the score of ineligibility for 
further active service. The more gracious memories of his military 
career are vitalized through Mr. Taylor's affiliations with the Grand 
Army of the Republic. 

After the close of the war Mr. Taylor began, in 1866, the study 
of law under effective private preceptorship, and that he made sub- 
stantial progress in his assimilation of the science of jurisprudence is 
assured by that fact that in 1868 he proved himself eligible for and 
was admitted to the Illinois Bar. In the same year he engaged in the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1009 

practice of his profession at Taylorville, where he has since con- 
tinued to maintain his home and give close and effective attention to 
the large and substantial law business which has been long controlled 
by him and which marks him as one of the strong lawyers and 
highly esteemed citizens of this section of the state. Though he 
has been unfaltering in his allegiance to the republican party and 
has well fortified opinions concerning matters of economic and gov- 
ernmental polity, Mr. Taylor has manifested no predilection for 
political office but has considered his profession worthy of his undi- 
vided fealty. He has been a member of the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation from the second year after it was organized, and he has 
been a member of the board of trustees of Shurtleff College since 
1896. The record of the professional career of Mr. Taylor gives 
evidence of his identification with a large number of important liti- 
gated cases, and his success in his profession establishes conclusively 
his possession of the personal and technical attributes without which 
success is impossible in this exacting vocation. One of the now 
venerable members of the Illinois bar, Mr. Taylor has dignified his 
profession by his character and services, and as a citizen he com- 
mands high place in popular confidence and esteem. 

On the 26th of November, 1868, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Taylor to Miss Adelia A. Stewart, of Waukegan, Lake 
County, this state, where her parents were pioneer settlers after their 
emigration to the West from the State of New York. In con- 
clusion is entered brief record concerning the children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Taylor: Samuel Stewart is a successful merchant at Taylor- 
ville, is married but has no children ; Mary F., Mabel Genevieve 
and Leslie J., remain at the parental home, and the last mentioned 
is engaged in the practice of law ; John W. is engaged in the abstract 
business at Taylorville ; George G. is teacher of mathematics in the 
high school at Highland Park, one of the fine suburbs of the city 
of Chicago; and Clara is now industrial and extension secretary of 
the Young Women's Christian Association of North Central Field, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

HILMAR C. LINDAUER. One of the young attorneys of the Belle- 
ville Bar, Hilmar C. Lindauer was born near New Athens, St. Clair 
County, March 15, 1888, a son of Charles and Minnie (Horn) Lind- 
auer. His father was a native of Germany and his mother of Illi- 
nois, and they are now living on a farm near New Athens. Mr. 
Lindauer was the fourth in a family of five sons and one 
daughter, all of whom are well established in business or other 
professions. Mr. Lindauer was educated in the public schools, 
attended the Central Wesleyan College at Warrenton, Missouri, two 
years, was a teacher in St. Clair County for three years, and in June, 
1913, graduated from the law department of St. Louis University. 
He graduated with the highest honors, and has since been in the 
active practice of his profession. Mr. Lindauer is now associated 



1010 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

in the practice with P. C. Otwell, under the firm name of Otwell 
& Lindauer. 

PRESTON K. JOHNSON. One of the younger members of the bar 
of Illinois, Preston K. Johnson has been in practice at Belleville 
since 1909, gained valuable experience in the state's attorney office 
of St. Clair County, and is now member of a firm which has a fair 
share of the legal business in his county. 

Preston K. Johnson was born at Altamont, Illinois, March i. 
1885, a son of Preston K. and Belle (Chance) Johnson. His father 
was a native of Indiana, came as a young man to Illinois, settling 
near Salem, in Marion County, and after gaining admittance to 
the bar practiced as an attorney at Salem until his death in 1887 
at the age of thirty-three. He was honored with the office of post- 
master at Altamont, was city attorney of Salem, and one time was 
chairman of the republican county committee. His wife, who is 
still living at Salem at the age of fifty-seven, was born in Illinois and 
reared and educated in this state. They were the parents of two 
sons. 

Preston K. Johnson spent his boyhood at Salem, attended the 
high school of that town, graduated from the College of Law of the 
University of Illinois, and in 1909 was admitted to the bar. Coming 
to Belleville, Mr. Johnson was for four years assistant states attor- 
ney, from 1909 to 1912, and on resigning the office became associated 
in practice with H. E. Schaumleffel, an association which still con- 
tinues and represents one of the leading law partnerships of St. 
Clair County. Mr. Johnson is a member of the Belleville Bar Asso- 
ciation, is a Royal Arch Mason and affiliated with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is a director in the Belleville Advocate 
Printing Company. In July, 1912, Mr. Johnson married Miss Celia 
Alexander, daughter of James P. and Anna A. Alexander, a well- 
known family of St. Clair County. They have two children : Mil- 
dred Johnson, born at Belleville in 1913, and Preston King Johnson 
III, born at Belleville in 1915. 

R. D. W. HOLDER. Among the veteran lawyers of Southern 
Illinois, none holds a higher position in regard of the profession and 
the laity than Judge Holder, who has been actively connected with 
his profession for forty years, most of the time at Belleville, and in 
the culmination of his public services as judge of his circuit he stood 
for and maintained the best traditions of the Illinois bench, and his 
familiar title of judge is an appropriate distinction of his place and 
position in the community. 

R. D. W. Holder was born in Jefferson County, Illinois, February 
22, 1847. The circumstances of his early childhood and youth were 
such that he was thrown upon his own resources at a time when most 
boys are unconscious of the struggle for existence outside of their 
home, and his early career was a conquering of many successive 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1011 

difficulties and handicaps. His parents were Willis and Phariba 
(Cook) Holder. His father was a native of Georgia and his mother 
of Tennessee, and both were brought to Illinois when children. 
Willis Holder was a Jefferson County farmer, and after the out- 
break of the hostilities with Mexico during the '405 enlisted for 
service, and went out as first lieutenant of a company in the Second 
Illinois Infantry under Captain Bowman of Mount Vernon. He went 
south with the troops in June, 1847, an d died in camp, succumbing to 
a fever which was quite prevalent amongst the soldiers. His remains 
were buried in Mexico. His widow was left with a family of eight 
children, among whom Judge Holder was the youngest. She subse- 
quently married a Mr. Sharp, who removed to St. Clair County, 
and her death occurred at Murphysboro in Jackson County in 1887. 

Judge Holder while living at home attended the schools of 
Mascoutah, in St. Clair County, but as his stepfather was in com- 
paratively modest circumstances, the necessity for self support was 
more pressing than schooling, and Judge Holder at the age of fifteen 
found work in a store, and after the first year engaged in farm labor 
for a period of four years. He had a definite aim, saved his earn- 
ings, and paid his tuition as a student in McKendree College. At 
the conclusion of his college work, Judge Holder took up teaching, 
and followed that during the winter months for several terms, and 
eventually acquired the means to pay for his legal training. Judge 
Holder is a graduate from the University of Michigan in the law 
department in 1874, and was admitted to the Illinois Bar the same 
year. During the first two years he practiced at Mascoutah, and in 
1876 located at Belleville. The first case which was intrusted to him 
proved one of the famous cases of Illinois courts. It was Barth vs. 
Lines, a litigation which was dragged through the courts from 1876 
until 1885. Judge Holder prepared the first papers in this case. 

Judge Holder became associated in practice with Mr. Turner at 
Belleville in 1882, and this partnership has continued with mutual 
satisfaction and profit ever since, with the exception of the six 
years from 1903 to 1909, during which Judge Holder sat on the 
bench of the Circuit Court. From 1880 to 1888 Judge Holder 
served as states attorney of St. Clair County, and was master in 
chancery in 1900-02. 

Judge Holder is a member of the County, State and American 
Bar associations, and has fraternal affiliations with the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is 
a director of the St. Clair County Gas & Electric Company. In 
August, 1877, he married Miss Anna E. Barth, of St. Clair County, 
daughter of John Barth. They have a daughter, Miss Jessie M., 
who is a graduate of the Belleville high school and now the wife of 
T. J. Council, district passenger agent of the Southern Railway 
Company, with headquarters at St. Louis, Mo. 



1012 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ROBERT V. GUSTIN. Engaged in the practice of his profession 
in the City of East St. Louis, Mr. Gustin is, with all consistency, to 
be designated as one of the leading members of the bar of St. Clair 
County, of which he is serving as assistant states attorney. 

Mr. Gustin was born in Franklin County, Indiana, on the ist of 
November, 1874, and is a son of Rev. Morris Gustin and Elise 
(Pond) Gustin, both natives of Ohio, but long residents of Indiana, 
where their marriage was solemnized and where the father gave 
long years of able and consecrated service in the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He now resides at Anderson, In- 
diana, where, at the venerable age of eighty-four years, he is living 
retired, with secure place in the reverent esteem of all who have 
come within the compass of his benignant influence. His devoted 
wife was summoned to the life eternal in 1910, at the age of sixty 
years. Of the four children the eldest is the subject of this review. 

Robert V. Gustin was afforded the advantages of the public 
schools at Lebanon, Ohio, and there also he pursued higher academic 
studies in the normal school. In furtherance of his decisive am- 
bition to prepare himself for the legal profession, Mr. Gustin 
entered the law department of McKendree College, in Illinois, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895 and with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar in 
the same year, but for a period of four years thereafter he con- 
sulted expediency by devoting himself to successful work in the 
pedagogic profession, as a representative of which he taught in 
the public schools at Summerfield, St. Clair County. In 1899 Mr. 
Gustin established his residence in the thriving and important indus- 
trial and commercial city of East St. Louis, which is virtually an 
integral part of the City of St. Louis, Missouri, and here he has 
since continued in the practice of his profession, in which his success 
is shown by his substantial clientage and by his incumbency of the 
office of assistant states attorney. He is an appreciative and popular 
member of the East St. Louis Bar Association, is a stalwart advocate 
of the principles and policies of the democratic party, and is affili- 
ated with the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

In the year 1899 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gustin to 
Miss Anna Lewis, daughter of Rev. Edwin Lewis, who was at that 
time pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Lebanon, Illinois. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gustin have no children. 

GEO. A. SENTEL. During the nineteen years that Geo. A. Sentel 
has been a practitioner of law at Sullivan, Illinois, many changes 
have come about in the personnel of the Moultrie County Bar, but 
his practice has been continuous, and through his professional quali- 
fications he has advanced himself to a foremost place. He is a self- 
made man, providing for his higher education by teaching school, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1013 

and this knowledge of acquired independence has been beneficial to 
him many times in considering the claims, weaknesses and rights of 
his clients. 

Geo. A. Sentel was born in Moultrie County March 3, 1873, and 
is a son of Benjamin F. and Lucy (Lee) Sentel, the former of 
whom was a merchant. They had five children, of whom Geo. A. 
Sentel is the youngest son. In the public schools, which included 
graduation from a high school, Mr. Sentel secured his education 
that prepared him for teaching school, which he engaged in for 
some time and during that period applied himself to the study of 
law, at different times being under the instruction of Attorneys 
Spitler and J. E. Jennings, Judge Hudson and the late Hon. John 
R. Eden. After admission to the bar in 1896, Mr. Sentel entered 
the practice of law at Sullivan, where he has resided ever since. 
His legal talent was soon recognized and his professional standing 
established; in 1895 he was appointed master in chancery, the 
duties of which demanded a large part of his professional time. In 
June, 1915, the man and his work and standing as a lawyer were 
given a high tribute when he was promoted to the dignified respon- 
sibilities of the judiciary, in his election as circuit judge of the Sixth 
Judicial District. 

In politics Mr. Sentel has always been a republican. He is 
widely known in Central Illinois in the Masonic fraternity. As a 
citizen and as a professional man, Mr. Sentel commands high respect 
and esteem. 

He is a big, broad minded man, chucked full of that well known 
quality known as "good, common sense," thoroughly honest, frank 
in all his dealings and has a keen sense of humor which permeates 
all his acts and is patient and sympathetic with all in their sorrows 
and woes. 

His interest in all that concerns Sullivan and his district is genuine 
and practical, he ever being ready to lend influence to promote justi- 
fiable public spirited movements. 

JOHN P. PALLISSARD. A resident of Watseka, Iroquois County, 
since 1901, Mr. Palissard is fully justified to designation as one of 
the representative members of the bar of this section of his native 
state and as a citizen of the utmost loyalty and progressiveness. He 
is a scion of a family founded in Illinois in the pioneer days and his 
lineage traces back to the most patrician of French origin, his parents 
and his grandparents, both paternal and maternal, having been 
representatives of the fine French colony early founded in Kankakee 
County, Illinois, with St. Anne as its virtual center, this place being 
now a most thriving and attractive little city. 

Paulin Narcisse Pallissard, grandfather of him whose name intro- 
duces this review and founder of the family branch in Illinois, be- 
came an extensive landholder and a dealer in firearms in Kankakee 
County, where both he and his wife continued to reside until their 



1014 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 
/ 

deaths, in the year 1891. From an epitomized genealogical record 
are taken the following pertinent quotations, which are well worthy 
of perpetuation : 

"The Pallissard family is descended from a long line of noble 
and distinguished ancestry, the American branch being now the sole 
representatives of a once prominent and powerful French line, the 
genealogy being traced back over a period of more than six cen- 
turies. Representatives of the name in earlier generations were 
noted for their loyalty to the kings of France, and for hundreds of 
years members of this ancient family were found occupying posi- 
tions of honor and holding the high regard of the reigning monarchs. 
From 1360 to the revolution of 1789 they were represented in con- 
tinuous succession by thirteen councilors of the king and royal 
judges. One of this family, Jean de Pallissard, was appointed a 
judge of the mosquitaires of the queen, by Louis XIV. This was 
a title conferred upon an order of the nobility whose duties were 
to act as a royal guard of the king or queen. This guard was com- 
posed of the elite of the nobles, upon whose escutcheon appeared 
no stain and whose characters were above reproach. The reputation 
of this distinguished corps transcended the limitations of France 
and to be nominated a Mosquitaire was considered a high mark of 
preferment." 

Paulin Narcisse Pallissard was born at Marseilles, France, in 
September, 1804, and was a son of Jean Pierre and Jul'2 (Bourbens) 
Pallissard. In his native land, in January, 1835, was solemnized 
his marriage to Mademoiselle Solina Roger, and they became the 
parents of six children: Jean Cecile Edouard, Joseph, Armand, 
Alfred, Alexine, and Leonie, all of whom became residents of Illi- 
nois, where the first two sons became prosperous farmers ; Armand 
was first lieutenant of Company E, Fifty-third Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, in the Civil war and lost his life in the battle at Big 
Hatchie, Tennessee ; Alfred became a successful merchant at Fow- 
ler, Indiana; Alexine wedded John Rondy; and Leonie became the 
wife of Joseph Lecour. Upon his immigration to America Paulin 
N. Pallissard was fortified with a capital of $18,000 in gold, besides 
other property. He settled in Kankakee County, Illinois, in 1855, 
and eventually became the owner of large tracts of land as well 
as city property. He was a man of fine mind and generous soul, 
true and steadfast in character, and commanded the high regard of 
all who knew him, the names of both he and his wife meriting 
enduring places on the roll of the honored pioneers of Kankakee 
County. 

Jean Cecile Edouard Pallissard, who became more familiarly 
known in the United States by the name of Edward Pallissard, was 
born at LTsle-en-Dodon, a town situated on a small island in the 
River Save, Haute-Garonne, France, and the date of his nativity 
was January 20, 1836. He was afforded the advantages of the best 
schools of his native land, and was there graduated in the Lycee 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1015 

of Toulouse when nineteen years of age, this celebrated institution 
having conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Letters. He 
did not come to America until 1856, about one year after the immi- 
gration of his parents to this country, and he soon became an ex- 
ponent of the agricultural industry in Kankakee County, Illinois, 
where he eventually developed a fine landed estate of about 400 
acres, and where he commanded the inviolable esteem of all who 
came within the sphere of his influence. He was one of the ven- 
erable and revered pioneer citizens of Kankakee County at the time 
of his death, on the loth of April, 1911, and his devoted wife did 
not long survive him, as she was summoned to eternal rest on the 
1 5th of November, 1912. One who knew Mr. Pallissard for many 
years has given the following estimate of his personality : "He was 
a true gentleman in every sense of the word, possessing a tempera- 
ment more of the sturdy English type and manifesting the hospi- 
tality and politeness for which the natives of France are noted the 
world over." 

At Kankakee, in the year 1869, was solemnized the marriage of 
Jean Cecile Edouard Pallissard to Miss Herminie Lemoine, and they 
became the parents of seven children, namely: John P., Armand, 
Henry, Cecile, Leonie, Alexine and Lia. All of the children survive 
the parents and of the number the eldest is he to whom this sketch 
is dedicated. 

John P. Pallissard was born on the old homestead farm, near 
St. Anne, Kankakee County, on the 3d of January, 1871, and after 
availing himself of the advantages of the public schools he finally 
entered St. Viateur College, at Bourbonnais, Kankakee County, 
where he prosecuted higher academic studies. Thereafter he at- 
tended the institution now known as Valparaiso University, at Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, and in preparing himself for the profession of his 
choice he entered the law department of the Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, at Bloomington, in which he was graduated in 1898, and 
from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He had 
previously fortified himself in a preliminary way by studying law 
under the effective preceptorship of William G. Brooks, of St. Anne, 
and the firm of Paddock & Cooper, of Kankakee. At the age of 
twenty-one years Mr. Pallissard engaged in teaching in the district 
schools and thereafter he was a successful teacher in the public 
schools at St. Anne, prior to entering college. In 1899, the year 
following that of his graduation in the law school, he became one 
of the organizers of the First National Bank of St. Anne, of which 
he served as cashier for two years. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1900, and in the autumn of the following year he established his 
residence at Watseka, where he has since been engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession, which he has honored alike by his character 
and his achievement. On the ist of January, 1902, he formed a law 
partnership with Stephen C. Malo, this alliance continuing until he 
was elected states attorney of Iroquois County, in 1904. At the 



1016 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

expiration of his first term in this office he was re-elected, in 1908, 
and at the conclusion of his second term of able and acceptable 
service he resumed the private practice of his profession, as a 
member of the firm of Pallissard & Perrigo, in which his coadjutor 
was Lyle D. Perrigo. In 1912 he formed a partnership with Fred 
P. Benjamin, under the title of Pallissard & Benjamin, and this 
effective alliance has since continued, the firm controlling a large 
and important law business, with a clientage of representative 
character. 

Mr. Pallissard is a stanch republican in his political allegiance, 
is a member of the directorate of the First National Bank of Cres- 
cent, Iroquois County, of which he was one of the organizers, and 
Masonic affiliations are as here noted: Watseka Lodge, No. 446, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Watseka Chapter, No. 114, 
Royal Arch Masons ; and Mary Commandery, No. 67, Knights 
Templars. In the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he holds 
membership in Iroquois Lodge, No. 74, and Iroquois Encampment 
No. Si, in his home city, and Canton, No. n, at Danville. Mr. 
Pallissard is the owner of one of the most attractive homes in 
Watseka, the modern and spacious residence being surrounded with 
handsome grounds of two acres' area, and the owner taking special 
pride in his gardens, in which he is specially adept in floriculture 
and in which he finds pleasing recreation. 

February 17, 1898, recorded the marriage of Mr. Pallissard to 
Miss Leda Durand, and the two daughters of this union are Annette 
and Rosella. On the 24th of December, 1912, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Pallissard to Miss Marie E. Johnson, a representa- 
tive of fine old colonial families that found certain of its members 
numbered among the pioneer settlers of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pallissard have one daughter, Lucy Anna. 

JAMES W. KERN. Now serving his third, though not consecu- 
tive, term in the important office of states attorney of Iroquois 
County, Mr. Kern is, as the preferment indicates, one of the able 
and popular members of the bar of this section of the state, and he 
has been engaged in practice at Watseka, judicial center of Iroquois 
County, since 1890, with excellent vantage-ground in the confidence 
and esteem of the community at large. 

Mr. Kern was born on a farm near Bedford, Lawrence County, 
Indiana, on the 24th of September, 1865, and is the eldest of the 
four children born to Alvin G. and Elizabeth E. (Boyd) Kern, both 
likewise natives of Lawrence County and representatives of sterling 
pioneer families of that section of the Hoosier state. Alvin G. Kern 
continued to be actively identified with agricultural pursuits in 
Indiana until 1886, when he removed to Nebraska, where he has 
since been identified with the same line of enterprise, he and his 
wife being honored citizens of Lancaster County, that state. He 
whose name introduces this article acquired his early education in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1017 

the public schools of Indiana and there was graduated in Eureka 
College as a member of the class of 1887. In preparation for the 
work of his chosen profession he entered the law department of 
the -celebrated University of Michigan, in which he was graduated 
in 1890, and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws, with concomitant admission to the Michigan Bar. Soon after 
his graduation Mr. Kern gained admission to the bar of Illinois and 
established himself in practice at Watseka, which has since con- 
tinued to be his home and in which he is known as a loyal and public- 
spirited citizen as well as a lawyer whose ability and sterling char- 
acter have enabled him to gain professional success of unequivocal 
order. He served one term as city attorney, and in 1896 was 
elected states attorney for the county, a position of which he con- 
tinued the incumbent eight years, as he was re-elected at the expira- 
tion of his first term. The popular estimate placed upon his admin- 
istration in this office was shown when he was again called to the 
same in the election of 1912, and he is now serving his third term, 
with a record of admirable achievement as public prosecutor. 

In politics Mr. Kern has ever given unqualified allegiance to the 
republican party and he has given effective assistance in the promo- 
tion of its cause, though he has sought no official preferment save 
along the direct line of his profession. In the Masonic fraternity 
he is affiliated with Watseka Lodge, No. 446, Ancient Free & Ac- 
cepted Masons ; Watseka Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; and Mary 
Commandery, No. 67, Knights Templar. 

On the 30th of June, 1887, Mr. Kern wedded Miss Caddie A. 
Davidson, who was born at Eureka, Illinois, and they have two 
children, Murel A., and Lowell D. 

FREEMAN P. MORRIS. One of the native sons of Illinois who 
has here attained to distinctive success and prestige not alone in 
the general practice of law, but also as a forceful factor in the 
councils and activities of the democratic party, as well as a legisla- 
tor, Mr. Morris has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
at Watseka, judicial center of Iroquois County, for fully forty 
years, and few have been the cases of importance tried in the courts 
of this country within that period that have not found him re- 
tained as representative of either complainant or defense. Named 
in honor of his maternal grandfather, Freeman Thomas, who had 
the distinction of discovering and developing the first anthracite coal 
mine in Pennsylvania, Freeman P. Morris was born on a farm in 
Cook County, Illinois, on the I9th of March, 1854, and is a son of 
Charles and Sarah (Thomas) Morris, whose marriage was solem- 
nized in Wilkesbarre, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, of which state 
they were natives. Of the five children the youngest is he whose 
name introduces this paragraph. 

Charles Morris came to Illinois in the early '505 and became 
one of the successful pioneer farmers of Cook County. In 1866 he 



Vol. Ill 12 



1018 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

retired from active association with agricultural pursuits and re- 
moved to the City of Chicago, where he died at the age of sixty- 
three years, his widow having lived to the exceptionally venerable 
age of ninety-four years. In politics the father was a republican. 

Freeman P. Morris was afforded the advantages of the public 
schools of Chicago, and the Cook County Normal School, as well 
as of the old Douglas University and the Northwestern University, 
in which latter he pursued a higher classical course. In 1871 he 
was graduated in the Union College of Law in the City of Chicago, 
his age at the time having been but nineteen years, so that he did 
not gain admission to the bar of his native state until November, 
1874, at Ottawa, where he appeared for examination before the 
Supreme Court. He forthwith established his residence at Wat- 
seka, where he has been continuously engaged in the general prac- 
tice of law during the long intervening years and where he main- 
tained a professional partnership with Robert Doyle until 1887, 
after which he was in a similar alliance with Judge Frank L. Hooper 
until the latter was elected to the bench of the Circuit Court. He 
has been retained as attorney for all of the railroads that traverse 
Iroquois County and has been identified with a large number of im- 
portant litigations in the various courts of this section of the state, 
besides carrying a number of cases to the Illinois Supreme Court and 
the Supreme Court of the United States, his high reputation in his 
profession being based on results achieved and on his recognized 
integrity of purpose in all of the relations of life. He was con- 
cerned prominently with the Reynold Sumner will case, involving 
the control of about 25,000 acres of land; the Sayler, Miller and 
Grunden murder case, at Crescent City, this trial being one of such 
celebrity that it was reported in the leading papers of the various 
metropolitan centers of the United States, including the Washington 
Post, the Boston Times, and the important papers in New York City, 
Chicago, Cincinnati and other cities. 

In politics Mr. Morris has long been recognized as one of the 
influential representatives of the democratic party in his native com- 
monwealth, and in 1884 he was first elected representative of Iro- 
quois County in the lower house of the State Legislature, in which 
he served six terms and in which, it has consistently been said, 
"he left the impress of his strong individuality and clear mind upon 
the legislation of that period." In the campaign of 1889 he made 
a vigorous campaign in support of the candidacy of the late Gen. 
John M. Palmer for the United States Senate, and in 1892 he was 
appointed a member of the military staff of Gov. John P. Altgeld, 
with the rank of colonel. Mr. Morris served as a delegate to the 
democratic national conventions of 1896, 1900, 1904, 1908 and 1912, 
and in the last mentioned was a delegate at large. He was presi- 
dent of the Watseka board of education from 1890 to 1894, and has 
served since 1902 as president of the board of trustees of the 
public library of his home city, where also he is a director of the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1019 

First Trust & Savings Bank. In the Masonic fraternity Mr. Morris 
is affiliated with Watseka Lodge, No. 446, Ancient Free & Accepted 
Masons ; Kankakee Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; and Mary Com- 
mandery, No. 67, Knights Templars ; besides which he has served 
as deputy grand chancellor commander of the Illinois grand lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias. 

In the State of Colorado, on the I3th of June, 1884, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Morris to Miss Minnie A. Lott, who was 
born at Ottawa, Illinois, and whose death occurred on the 2d of 
July, 1908. The one child of this union is Eugene P., who was born 
on the nth day of July, 1888, who was graduated in the law school 
of the Northwestern University, and who is now serving as assist- 
ant attorney general of Illinois. 

CLYDE P. JOHNSON. One of the younger members of the 
Hancock County bar, Clyde P. Johnson has already shown excep- 
tional talent and capabilities and almost continuously since his 
admission to the bar has rendered a vigorous, fearless and faithful 
service as state's attorney. 

Born near St. Marys, Illinois, February 7, 1881, he is a son of 
Nelson and Virginia (Eberhart) Johnson, who are substantial farm- 
ing people and still living in Hancock County. The district schools 
near the old home farm supplied Clyde P. Johnson with his intel- 
lectual training until he was fifteen years of age. He knows what 
the life of a farmer's boy is, though since the age of fifteen he has 
lived in towns and cities and has been identified with schools and 
active professional work. He spent two years in the Carthage High 
School and in 1900 entered Carthage College from which he was 
graduated Bachelor of Science in 1904. In 1905 Mr. Johnson 
entered the Northwestern University at Chicago, and remained in 
the legal department until graduating LL. B. in 1908. 

Almost immediately after his return to Hancock County he 
became a candidate for state's attorney, and prosecuted the canvass 
so vigorously and showed such evident qualifications for the posi- 
tion that he was elected, and at once established his home in the 
county seat of Carthage. In November, 1912, he was re-elected 
state's attorney. He is a member of the County and State Bar 
associations, in Masonry has attained the Knight Templar degree, 
and is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In politics he is a democrat. 

On May 5, 1909, Mr. Johnson married Miss Irma Jewell, 
daughter of Henry Jewell of Monmouth. She was educated in the 
public schools and finished her training at a college in Burlington, 
Iowa. She takes a prominent part in club and social affairs at 
Carthage. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of the Methodist 
Church and their home is at 522 North Madison street, Carthage. 



1020 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

HON. WILLIAM ALLEN NORTHCOTT. One of the leading mem- 
bers of the Illinois bar, William Allen Northcott, ex-United States 
district attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, has also taken 
a prominent part for some years in the business life of Springfield, 
where he is president of the Inter-Ocean Life and Casualty Com- 
pany. He was born at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, January 28, 1854, 
and is a son of the late Robert S. and Mary C. (Cunningham) North- 
cott, his father being lieutenant-colonel (afterwards breveted gen- 
eral) of the Twelfth Regiment, West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. 

William A. Northcott attended the public schools of Clarksburg, 
West Virginia, until he was fifteen years of age, at which time he 
entered the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, 
and there continued for four years. He then began the study of law 
and was admitted to the West Virginia bar at Clarksburg, in July, 
1877. Even prior to this time he had become interested in public 
affairs, frequently appearing as a speaker, and in his early years 
secured a training in this way that prepared him for the experiences 
which a widening horizon and a more intimate connection with 
public affairs were to bring. Having come to Illinois, in 1880 he 
was appointed supervisor of census for the Seventh Illinois District, 
and in 1882 was elected state's attorney of Bond County, a position 
in which he continued to remain during the next ten years. Mr. 
Northcott became a prominent figure in public life in 1896, when he 
was elected lieutenant-governor of his adopted state and remained 
in that position until May, 1905, when he was appointed United 
States district attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, a 
capacity in which he acted until 1914. His public services were 
characterized by courage and efficiency which did much to estab- 
lish him in public confidence. 

In January, 1904, was established the firm of Northcott & Orr, 
and in the following year Mr. Northcott took up his residence at 
Springfield, where he has continued to live, his home being at No. 
729 North Sixth Street. The firm of Northcott & Orr has been 
succeeded by that of Northcott & Converse, Mr. Northcott's partner 
being Henry A. Converse, who was assistant United States district 
attorney during Mr. Northcott's term of office. Ever since coming 
to Springfield Mr. Northcott has taken a helpful and stirring part 
in the public and business life of the city. He is president of the 
Inter-Ocean Life & Casualty Company, which was organized in 
1907, and which is now in a very prosperous condition, due to his 
able management of its affairs, furnishing life, health and accident 
insurance to 21,000 policy holders. He is president of the Spring- 
field Commercial Association, and may be found in the leading ranks 
of whatever movement promises for the welfare of the city. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of 
America, arid from 1890 until 1903 was head consul of the last- 
named order. He is a member of the Sangamon Club, of the Illini 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1021 

Country Club, of which he is a director, and of the Hamilton Club, 
of Chicago. With his family, he attends the Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Northcott was married at Marine, Madison County, Illinois, 
September n, 1882, to Miss Ada R. Stoutzenberg, and they have 
two children : Nathaniel D., aged thirty-one years ; and Mrs. Amy 
Allen Alpaugh; also one granddaughter, Ada Estelle Alpaugh. 

RALPH E. SPRIGG. With more than thirty years of successful 
experience behind him, Ralph E. Sprigg stands at the head of his 
profession in Chester, and has practiced in that city since his admis- 
sion to the bar. As a lawyer Mr. Sprigg has a reputation beyond 
the limits of his own county, and has appeared professionally in 
many of the courts of Southern Illinois. 

Ralph E. Sprigg was born at Prairie du Rocher, Illinois, October 
9, 1859, a son of James D. and Amanda (Mudd) Sprigg. His 
father, who was a merchant at Prairie du Rocher, was born in 
Maryland and belonged to one of the old families of that state. He 
came out to Illinois, and died at Prairie du Rocher in 1872 at the 
age of forty-four. The mother, who was born in Kentucky, died 
in 1897 at the age of sixty-five. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, of whom the Chester lawyer was the youngest. 

His early education was acquired in the public schools of Ran- 
dolph County, and he attended college at Georgetown University 
and took his law course at the University of Michigan, where he 
graduated in 1879. The following year Mr. Sprigg began practice 
at Chester, and has since enjoyed a large business in the general 
practice of law, and has been frequently honored with public office. 

Mr. Sprigg served as state's attorney from 1884 to 1888, and was 
elected city attorney in 1880, and was mayor of his city from 1890 
to 1896. Mr. Sprigg is a member of the executive committee of 
the County Bar Association, and also a member of the State Bar 
Association. His fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Sprigg was married in 1880 at Chester to Elizabeth F. Lind- 
sey, daughter of Judge J. H. Lindsey, a prominent lawyer of 
Chester. They have one child, Mrs. Nora Gilster, whose husband 
is a prominent lawyer in Chester. There is one child, John Sprigg 
Gilster. 

A. G. GORDON. In practice at Chester for forty years, A. G. 
Gordon is one of the prominent attorneys of Southern Illinois, and 
his success has been in proportion to his years of activity. Mr. Gor- 
don is also prominent in local business affairs. 

A. G. Gordon was born in Randolph County, Illinois, November 
6, 1849, a son of H. S. and Nancy (Gooding) Gordon, his father a 
native of Missouri and his mother of Illinois. His father was a 
prominent Baptist minister, and had charge of a church in Randolph 
County. He died in 1902 at the age of eighty-two. The mother 



1022 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

died in 1904 aged eighty-three, and there were nine children in the 
family. 

A. G. Gordon was reared in Randolph County, acquired his 
early schooling there, and graduated in 1871 from McKendree Col- 
lege in both the literary and law departments. After being admitted 
to the bar he began practice at Steelville, and since 1873 nas enjoyed 
a growing prestige and business at Chester. Mr. Gordon has never 
sought office, and has given all his time to his professional and 
private interests. He is director and president of the Gordon Tele- 
phone Company. In the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he has 
filled all the chairs and has been a delegate to the grand lodge. 

Mr. Gordon was married at Steelville, Illinois, November 6, 
1873, to Miss Clara J. Short, daughter of R. J. Short. Their three 
children are: Eugene R. Gordon, who is married and is manager 
of the telephone company at Chester and has three children; Mrs. 
Clarice Meredith, who lives at Chester and has three children; Mrs. 
Florence McCloud, who lives at St. Louis and is the mother of one 
child. 

HON. MORTIMER MILLARD. The oldest practicing member of 
the East St. Louis bar is Mortimer Millard, who located in that 
city and began professional work toward the close of the Civil war, 
in which he had given service as a Union soldier. His career has 
been one distinguished not only for length but for successful accom- 
plishment and honorable position in his community. 

Mortimer Millard was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1838, a son 
of Mordica and Martha Millard, his father a native of Pennsylvania 
and his mother of England. His father was a Canadian farmer, 
and the son grew up on a farm, but acquired most of his education 
in the public schools of New York State. Later at Pontiac, Michi- 
gan, he read law under a Mr. Thatcher, and being admitted to the 
Illinois bar in 1865 opened his office in East St. Louis, and will soon 
have completed half a century of active connection with the 
local bar. 

Mr. Millard was elected city clerk of East St. Louis in 1866, 
serving three terms of one year each, was chosen in 1869 as city 
attorney for two terms, and was judge of city court for one term 
of four years. He is an honored member of the East St. Louis Bar 
Association, affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and the Grand Army of the Republic. 
His war record began in 1861 with his enlistment in the Third 
Michigan Infantry, and he was with his regiment in the Army of 
the Potomac for three years, being mustered out as corporal. He 
was present at the first battle of Bull Run, was at the Wilderness, 
where he was wounded and in the hospital for three months, and 
in many other of the historic engagements of the war. 

Mr. Millard was married September 12, 1864, to Mrs. Virginia 
S. White. Their two living children are : Miss Cloe, who lives 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1023 

with her parents at East St. Louis; and Edward Millard, who is 
married and a business man in East St. Louis. 

JUDGE WILLIAM SABIN DEWEY. For five consecutive terms the 
people of Alexander County have elected William S. Dewey to the 
office of county judge. Judge Dewey was admitted to the bar and 
began practice in Southern Illinois more than twenty years ago, and 
has given most of his time to the duties of one office. 

William Sabin Dewey was born at Irvington, Washington 
County, Illinois, August 25, 1869, a son of Edmund S. and Maria 
Jane (French) Dewey. His father came to Illinois from Massa- 
chusetts in 1853, settling first at Aurora in Kane County, where he 
taught school a number of years, and later moved to Alexander 
County, and for sixteen years was clerk of the Circuit Court. He 
was one of the prominent citizens in that section of the state, and 
died in 1906 at the age of seventy. During the Civil war he enlisted 
with the One Hundred and Seventieth Regiment of Illinois Infantry, 
served as captain of a company and as adjutant, and was wounded 
in one of the engagements about Vicksburg. He subsequently 
re-enlisted as a veteran and was honorably discharged at the close 
of the war. His wife, who was reared at Keene, New Hampshire, 
came to Illinois in 1855, locating with her parents in Jersey County. 
She died in 1889 at the age of forty-two. 

The oldest of seven children, Judge Dewey early began to fight 
his own battle with the world, and has educated himself and won 
his promotion in his profession largely through his own ability and 
energy. He was a student in the Cairo public schools, and in 1889 
graduated from the literary department of the University at Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota. Returning to Cairo, he studied law under 
Hon. Walter Warder, and was admitted to the bar in 1892. He then 
began the practice of his profession, but in a short time was called 
to the office of county judge, his first election coming in 1894. He 
was re-elected and kept in that office continuously for five terms of 
four years each, when he declined further nomination. He is now 
engaged in the practice of his profession and is corporation counsel 
of the City of Cairo. 

Judge Dewey is a member of the State Bar Association, is 
affiliated with Cairo Lodge No. 237, A. F. & A. M., with Cairo 
Chapter No. 271, R. A. M., and with the Knights Templar Com- 
mandery No. 13. He is also a member of Ascalon Lodge No. 51 of 
the Knights of Pythias. Judge Dewey is prominent in business 
affairs, is a director in the Cairo & Thebes Railway Company, a 
director and president of the Citizens Company of Cairo, and an 
active member of the Cairo Association of Commerce. Judge 
Dewey is a republican in politics, and has been active in Y. M. C. A. 
work in Illinois. On June 14, 1904, he married Miss Katherine 
Kleir of Cairo, daughter of Francis Kleir. They have one child, 
Mary Katherine Dewey, born March 9, 1914. ' 



1024 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

HON. WESLEY M. OWEN. Even in a community which has 
never lacked for able and distinguished members of the legal pro- 
fession, some of whom have attained to national eminence, few 
while so young in years have equalled the accomplishments of Jus- 
tice Wesley M. Owen, of Bloomington. Ex-legislator, ex-judge of 
trie Circuit Court, ex-justice of the Supreme Court and ex-member 
of the Canal Zone judiciary, his entire career, both as member of the 
bench and bar, has been one which reflects upon him the greatest 
credit, as well as upon the community in which he has resided 
throughout his life. 

Justice Owen was born at Covell, McLean County, Illinois, 
August 17, 1869, and is a son of M. J. and Sarah Owen, prominent 
people of the central part of Illinois. His boyhood days were passed 
at his home, and when but little more than a lad he was engaged 
for several years in teaching in the schools of McLean County. 
Desiring further training, he entered the Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, at Bloomington, where he was graduated in law in 1894, and 
in that same year was admitted to the bar and began practice at 
Leroy. A stanch and working republican, in 1902 Judge Owen 
became chairman of the republican county convention, after a 
spirited fight, and in 1904 was sent to the Legislature as the youngest 
man who ever represented his district, and in that body made a 
splendid record for efficiency and faithful service to the interests 
of his people and his community. He was chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Civil Service, and as a member of the Committee on 
Appropriations was mainly instrumental in securing $25,000 for the 
erection of new cottages at the Soldiers' Orphans Home, at Normal, 
in his district, and that notwithstanding the amount was twice 
stricken from the appropriation bill by the opposition. Greatly to 
the regret of his constituents, he was forced by an increasing law 
practice to decline a renomination which would have been prac- 
tically a re-election. He was for many terms city attorney of Leroy, 
and often represented the county attorney in cases in the vicinity of 
that place. When the Spanish-American war came on, in 1898, 
Judge Owen was one of the first to offer his services, promptly 
raising a company of which he was elected captain and being com- 
missioned by the governor. The war, however, did not last long 
enough to give him active service, but his courage, willingness and 
readiness were fully demonstrated. 

In 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt selected Judge Owen as 
a member of the Canal Zone judiciary. The position was one of the 
greatest responsibility, and for this reason a man of broad legal 
knowledge and experience was desired and found. Judge Owen, 
upon his arrival at his field of labor, was appointed judge of the 
Circuit Court at Empire, one of the most important judicial dis- 
tricts on the Isthmus, the Second, and not only did he discharge the 
duties of that office, but under the administrative form of govern- 
ment existing in the Zone, was also a member of the Supreme Court 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1025 

and as associate justice of that body presided in a number of 
important cases. As judge of the Circuit Court he presided over 
much of the most important litigation connected with the Circuit 
Court work, and his impartial opinions and able decisions will stand 
as a monument to his efficient labors. Owing to important business 
interests at home, Justice Owen felt that duty called upon him to re- 
turn, and in March, 1911, after three years of attentive and highly 
efficient service, he tendered his resignation to the president. .While 
on the Isthmus, the Judge and his family occupied one of the large 
and attractive homes on Ancon Hill, at Ancon. 

Judge Owen is a Mason, and a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is past noble grand, Modern 
Woodmen of America, and Knights of Pythias, of which he is past 
chancellor commander and has been many times a state representa- 
tive and district deputy of the Illinois Knights of Pythias. Although 
he is interested in fraternal work and is fond of the companionship 
of his fellows, Judge Owen finds his real pleasure in his beautiful 
home, surrounded by his children. On January 7, 1904, he was 
married to the beautiful and talented Miss Ora M. Augustine, of 
Normal, Illinois, a graduate of the State Normal University, the 
Illinois Wesleyan College of Music and the Moody Bible Institute 
of Chicago. She is widely and popularly known in Central Illinois, 
particularly as a decidedly gifted musician. Three children have 
been born to Judge and Mrs. Owen : James Wesley, who is ten 
years of age; Blanche, who has passed her sixth year; and Tom H., 
who is aged three. 

CHARLES C. LE FORGEE. To secure prominence at the bar in 
communities where the wisest and ablest men are successful practi- 
tioners, is a test of ability that many young lawyers are compelled to 
face and when success crowns their efforts they have really accom- 
plished something. Among the present foremost members of the 
Decatur bar, whose advance in his profession was rapid and con- 
tinues substantial, is Charles C. Le Forgee. Mr. Le Forgee was 
born at Decatur, in 1867, and is a son of Jesse and Julia A. E. 
(Small wood) Le Forgee. On the paternal side the ancestry is 
French, the grandfather, Abraham Le Forgee, settling at Bluelick 
Springs, Kentucky, after emigrating from France. On the maternal 
side the ancestry concerns Kentucky for the Smallwoods seem to 
have been among the earliest settlers and the family for genera- 
tions has been one of prominence. 

Charles C. Le Forgee was a student in the public schools of 
Decatur until sixteen years of age and then entered his father's office 
with the object of learning the real estate business and continued to 
examine land, collect rents and make out leases until he was twenty- 
one years old, during this period making up his mind to enter upon 
the study of law as soon as he became the master of his own time. 
Therefore he pursued a course of reading in the office of Judge 



1026 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

William E. Nelson, and after proper preparation entered the law 
department of the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, 
and was there graduated with the class of 1889, in the same year 
returning to his native city where he has ever since continued. In 
1890 he was admitted to the Decatur bar, and two years later 
entered into a law partnership with J. C. Lee, under the firm style 
of Le Forgee & Lee. In 1905 a partnership was formed with Robert 
P. Vail and Philip L. Miller, the firm name being Le Forgee, Vail 
& Miller, with offices on the fourth floor of the Citizens Title and 
Trust Building. This partnership terminated January i, 1915. The 
business being now conducted under the sole name of Charles C. 
Le Forgee. There is now associated with Mr. Le Forgee, Mr. 
Thomas W. Samuels and Stanley W. Pogue. During these years 
of active connection with the Macon County bar, Mr. Le Forgee 
has won his way to the front through ability and has been retained 
in some of the most important cases of litigation brought before 
the Illinois courts. He has always been a hard worker and per- 
sistent along chosen lines, exhibiting traits which had much to do 
with his entrance upon his present life career. His clients benefit 
by this firmness and steadiness and many of his legal victories have 
been won because of this element in his character. He practices in 
both the civil and criminal courts. 

Mr. Le Forgee married Miss Isabel Vennigerholz, who is a 
daughter of Julius H. and Isabel Vennigerholz. Mr. and Mrs. Le 
Forgee have two children, Vallette and Charles G. As a citizen Mr. 
Le Forgee is active and earnest, always being ready to associate 
himself with others and cooperate in public movements that give 
promise of being generally beneficial, and he is never unmindful of 
the calls of charity, often giving legal advice to those who can not 
pay that under other circumstances would well remunerate him for 
his time. He has an honorable record as a lawyer and as a man. 

E. W. HERSH. For many years Mr. Hersh has been success- 
fully identified with the practice of law and with banking at New- 
ton, but has never gone aside from the strict lines of his profession 
into politics. He is one of the hard working men who has won his 
position through his individual resources and ability, and is one of 
the best known lawyers and business men in Jasper County. 

Elijah W. Hersh was born at Mount Vernon, Ohio, in January, 
1866, a son of John and Nancy (Douds) Hersh. Both parents were 
natives of Ohio, and his father was a well-known physician who 
died at Continental, Ohio, in 1902 at the age of fifty-eight. 

Elijah W. Hersh was the fourth in a family of six children, grew 
up in Ohio, attended the public schools at Defiance and later took 
the literary course in the Chautauqua School. Mr. Hersh came to 
Newton a number of years ago as stenographer for the law firm of 
Gibson & Johnson, and while earning his way read law and was 
admitted to the bar in 1890. He began work with the same firm 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1027 

with which he had read law, and after several years took up private 
practice. Mr. Hersh has never sought any public office, and has con- 
fined himself to the law and business affairs. He is a member of 
the State Bar Association. 

In 1901 Mr. Hersh organized the First National Bank at New- 
ton, and is now its president. He is also connected with the Bank 
of Commerce at Wheeler, Illinois, and the Bank of Rose Hill. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic order and with the 
Knights of Pythias and in politics is a republican. 

In May, 1891, at Newton Mr. Hersh married Miss Flora Shup, 
daughter of George H. Shup. Of the two children born to their 
marriage one died in infancy and the. one surviving is Marjorie 
Hersh, born in 1899 and now attending school. 

HON. NORMAN L. JONES, elected to the circuit bench of the 
Seventh judicial district, in May, 1914, and re-elected June 5, 1915, 
is an able and virile product of the state which he has honored as 
a capable and thorough lawyer, sound jurist and progressive citizen. 
He was born at the Town of Patterson, in Greene County, Illinois, 
September 19, 1869, and is one of a family of five children born to 
John and Minerva E. (Patterson) Jones. John Jones, the father, 
has passed his entire life in Greene County, where he has attained 
prominence in various fields of endeavor. From young manhood he 
has been interested in democratic politics, has been influential in 
party circles, and has frequently been called upon to hold offices of 
importance within the gift of the people. 

As a youth, Norman L. Jones was granted excellent educational 
advantages, first attending the graded and high schools of Carroll- 
ton and then being sent to West Point Military Academy. Showing 
an inclination for the law, he next entered the office of H. C. With- 
ers, under whose able preceptorship he advanced rapidly, and in 
May, 1896, took the state bar examination and was admitted to 
practice. His professional career ' was commenced at Carrollton, 
Greene County. He early entered public life, being elected to the 
Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth General Assemblies of Illinois and 
was the youngest member of both sessions. After his admission to 
the bar he was elected to the office of city attorney of Carrollton 
and he capably served in that position for a period of ten years. In 
January, 1912, he was elected state's attorney of his county, and in 
that capacity acted until May, 1914, when he resigned to ascend the 
bench of the Circuit Court of the Seventh judicial district. During 
his private practice, Judge Jones had formed a law partnership with 
Congressman Henry T. Rainey, but this was mutually dissolved 
when Judge Jones took up his judicial duties. The strong, balanced 
and substantial traits which he displayed as a lawyer, have been dis- 
played also in his services as a jurist, and he has fully sustained his 
high standing among the members of his profession. He is a valued 



1028 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

member of the Greene County Bar Association, the Illinois State 
Bar Association and the American Bar Association. 

Judge Jones was married to Miss Meda Pegram, and to this 
union there has come one son : Norman P. The family residence is 
at Carrollton. 

HERMAN J. C. BECKEMEYER. While the name Beckemeyer has 
long been identified with industrial and business affairs in Clinton 
County, its association with the profession of law has been due to 
the activities of Herman J. C. Beckemeyer during the past ten 
years. Mr. Beckemeyer is one of the prominent attorneys of Car- 
lyle, has served in the State Legislature three sessions, and has large 
business holdings in the county. 

Herman J. C. Beckemeyer was born at Carlyle January 21, 1877, 
a son of Augustus and Elizabeth (Jacobs) Beckemeyer. His father, 
a native of Germany, was brought to Illinois at the age of six years, 
grew up in Clinton County, and is living on a farm at the age of 
sixty-five. He was the founder of the prosperous Town of Becke- 
meyer, nine miles west of Carlyle on the Baltimore & Ohio South- 
western Railroad. The mother died at Carlyle in 1913 at the age 
of fifty-three. There were eleven children, of whom the Carlyle 
lawyer was the oldest. 

Mr. Beckemeyer attended the public schools of Carlyle, and 
early made up his mind as to his profession, studied privately, and 
in 1905 was graduated from the University of Illinois in the law 
department. He had been admitted to the bar in 1904, and for the 
past ten years has been in active general practice at Carlyle. He is 
a member of the State Bar Association, and is proprietor of the 
Carlyle Automobile Garage and has valuable real estate in the 
county. Mr. Beckemeyer is especially well remembered for his 
service for three terms in the forty-fourth, the forty-fifth and forty- 
sixth sessions of the Illinois Legislature. He has also served on the 
township board and in city offices. 

Mr. Beckemeyer was married in 1906 at Greenville, Illinois, to 
Miss Madie Sieber, daughter of Louis Sieber. They have two 
children : Clyde, born at Carlyle in 1908 ; and Edgar, born in 1909. 

Louis E. WANGELIN. This Belleville attorney has had a place 
in the bar of St. Clair County for over fifteen years, tried his first 
cases in the local courts, has had a growing esteem and reputation 
as a straightforward and able lawyer, and is also prominent in local 
affairs. 

Louis E. Wangelin was born at Belleville September 7, 1877, a 
son of Richard and Sophie (Evans) Wangelin. His father was a 
native of St. Clair County and his mother of DuPage County. His 
father, who served as first sergeant in the One Hundred and Forty- 
second Regiment of Illinois Infantry during the Civil war, died at 
Belleville October 4, 1911, at the age of sixty-seven, and left one 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1029 

of the most honored names in St. Clair County. He had been for 
forty-five years at the time of his death cashier of the Belleville 
Savings Bank. The mother is still living at Belleville at the age of 
sixty-nine. 

Of their seven children Louis was the sixth, grew up at- Belle- 
ville, attended the public school, finished the course in the Manual 
Training School at St. Louis in 1895, then read law under Judge 
Holder of Belleville, and was admitted to the bar in November, 
1897. Since 1899 Mr. Wangelin has served as justice of the peace, 
and at the same time has carried on a general practice in all of the 
courts. He was president of the board of education in 1903-5, and 
is chairman of the grievance committee of the Belleville Bar Asso- 
ciation. During the Spanish-American war Mr. Wangelin was 
corporal in Company D of the First Illinois Volunteers, and was 
among the troops that occupied Havana, and continued with the 
army until mustered out in May, 1899. Among other business 
interests he is connected with the Citizens Building & Loan Asso- 
ciation. 

On August 15, 1904, at Belleville he married Miss Tillie Rhein, 
daughter of Phillip and Wilhelmina (Oster) Rhein. Her father was 
well known in official affairs of Belleville, where he died in 1901, 
while her mother is still living. To their marriage have been born 
two children : Hugo, born in 1902 and now a student in the public 
schools ; and Ruth, born in 1907. 

AUGUST BARTHEL. A Belleville lawyer who has had many of 
the better distinctions and successes of the profession, August 
Barthel has been a member of the bar since 1886. 

His birth occurred at Freeburg, Illinois, November 3, 1861. His 
parents were Henry and Maria (Bump) Barthel, both of whom 
were born in Germany, and were brought to America when children 
with their parents. His father was engaged in the saddlery business, 
subsequently as a merchant, and under the old system of local gov- 
ernment was one of the county judges at Belleville. The Town of 
Freeburg also honored him with several positions of trust. His 
death occurred May 27, 1906, at the age of seventy-nine years. He 
was one of the youthful soldiers who went out from Illinois during 
the Mexican war, serving in the quartermaster's department. His 
second wife and the mother of the Belleville lawyer died in 1872 at 
the age of thirty-eight. 

August Barthel was educated in the public schools of Freeburg, 
in the Christian Brothers School at St. Louis, graduating from the 
literary department in 1883, and finished his course in law at Wash- 
ington University in St. Louis in 1886. Immediately on his admis- 
sion to the bar he began practice at Belleville. James M. Hay was 
his partner up to 1888, in which year he went out to Kansas, but 
returned to Belleville in 1889. Mr. Jas. A. Farmer became asso- 
ciated with him in practice in 1891 and from 1896 until 1904 he was 



1030 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

again in partnership with Mr. Farmer, having in the meantime prac- 
ticed with his former partner, Mr. Hay. In 1911 the firm became 
Barthel, Farmer & Klingel. 

Mr. Barthel has served as city attorney, as supervisor, is a direc- 
tor in the Belleville Bank & Trust Company, and is regarded as one 
of the ablest attorneys in this section of the state. Mr. Barthel is 
unmarried, is independent in politics, a member of the Belleville 
Bar Association, affiliates with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Knights of Columbus and his church is the Catholic. 

CHARLES MORRISON began practice more than thirty-five years 
ago. Outside of his public service, he has always enjoyed a secure 
position as a lawyer, and is one of the oldest and best esteemed 
members of the Monroe County bar. Born at Waterloo July 22, 
1851, Charles Morrison is a son of John and Eliza (Ditch) Morri- 
son. His father, who was born at old Kaskaskia in 1800, was a 
merchant at Hecker a number of years, and for twenty-three years 
capably filled the office of county judge of Monroe County, and 
was also honored with such offices as sheriff and county superin- 
tendent of schools. His death occurred at Waterloo December 23, 
1872. His wife was a native of Illinois, and died in 1875. 

Charles Morrison, the seventh in a family of ten children, had 
the advantage of good family position, but from an early age was 
dependent largely on his own resources, and earned the money 
which took him through college and prepared him for his profes- 
sion. He attended the public schools of Monroe County, finished 
his education in McKendree College, and read law in the office of a 
brother, until admitted to practice in 1878. Since then he has been 
identified with the Waterloo bar. Mr. Morrison served four years 
as master in chancery, was city attorney at Waterloo one term, and 
has always affiliated with the democratic party. His church is the 
Methodist. 

Mr. Morrison was married January 7, 1886, at Waterloo to 
Josephine Brey, daughter of Judge Paul C. Brey of Waterloo. To 
their marriage have been born four children : Carlisle B. Morrison, 
who is now a student of law in his father's office; William Ray- 
mond, who was admitted to the bar in 1913, but is continuing his 
studies in the University of Illinois ; Lethe Eleanora, a graduate of 
the Waterloo High School and now attending the University of 
Illinois; and Louise, who graduated from the Waterloo High 
School in 1914. 

CHARLES B. CAMPBELL. The elements of character, the mental 
attributes, the intellectual and technical training that make for high 
achievement in the legal profession were possessed in an unmistak- 
able way by Judge Charles B. Campbell, of Kankakee, who was serv- 
ing on the bench of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit of the state at the 
time of his death, which occurred on the morning of Wednesday, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1031 

April i, 1914, as the sequel of an operation for calculus, said opera- 
tion having been performed on the 6th of the preceding month and 
his death having occurred at Mercy Hospital, Kankakee. He was a 
man of indomitable energy, spared himself neither time nor labor in 
his work on the bench, and the heavy burden he bore in his official 
capacity combined with the physical ailment served to bring his sys- 
tem to so low an ebb that he was unable to rally from the shock of 
the operation and passed away in the very zenith of his strong and 
useful manhood, one of the really representative legists and jurists 
of his native state. From an article appearing in the Kankakee Even- 
ing Democrat on the day of his demise are taken the following 
extracts, well worthy of perpetuation in this more enduring form : 

"Judge Campbell was possessed of remarkable characteristics 
as a man, a citizen, a lawyer and a judge. His presence was hand- 
some, his manners gracious, his character upright. He was an ideal 
son, an ideal husband, and an ideal father. He was distinguished 
above the average of men for his kindly nature and his courtesy. 
As a judge he was particularly considerate of members of the bar, 
of litigants, of witnesses, of jurors, of court officers. He was very 
indulgent of young lawyers, and every young lawyer who appeared 
before him remembers with gratefulness his kindly treatment. As 
a citizen and jurist no man in Kankakee county had so many warm 
friends and admirers as Judge Campbell. 

"He was a successful lawyer, and showed marked ability as a 
judge. His most striking characteristic on the bench was his evi- 
dent desire to render exact justice between litigants. This trait had 
its drawbacks, in that it led him to take too many matters under 
advisement, with the result that he overworked himself. Judge 
Campbell was but forty-five years old. He was in his prime and 
had many years of usefulness before him, and many years in which 
to distinguish himself. If he had desired it, he could undoubtedly 
have been re-elected a judge of this circuit, which in time would 
have placed him either on the supreme or federal bench. 

"Judge Campbell was elected a judge of the Twelfth circuit 
with Judge Dibell, of Joliet, and Judge Hooper, of Watseka, in 
June, 1909. This was considered a strong triumvirate, one of 
the strongest in the State. At the Wigmore banquet given in Jan- 
uary, in Chicago, Judge Campbell was the recipient of extraordi- 
nary praise from Judge Carter of the supreme bench, who char- 
acterized him as 'Our Exhibit A,' in allusion to the honor Judge 
Campbell had brought to the law college of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity, of which he was a graduate." 

Charles Bishop Campbell was born in Sumner Township, Kan- 
kakee County, Illinois, on the ist of March, 1869, and was a son 
of Winfield S. Campbell. In the agnatic line his genealogy traces 
back to King Robert Bruce of Scotland. His paternal grandfather, 
James Campbell, and also his father served with distinction as vali- 
ant soldiers of the Union in the Civil war, both having been mem- 



1032 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

bers of the Seventy-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and both hav- 
ing taken part in many engagements, including the memorable siege 
of Vicksburg. Winfield S. Campbell continued his residence in 
Kankakee County for many years and finally removed to Twin 
Falls, Idaho, where he still resides, his wife being deceased. The 
judge is survived also -by one sister, Mrs. Archibald Mann, of Twin 
Falls, Idaho. The mother, whose maiden name was Sarah E. 
Whipple, died in 1907, in Kankakee. 

Judge Campbell was afforded the advantages of the public 
schools of the Village of Manteno, Kankakee County, and there- 
after continued his studies of higher order in Grand Prairie Semi- 
nary, at Onarga, 1885-87. Thereafter he taught school in his native 
township, and in September, 1889, he entered the preparatory de- 
partment of DePauw University at Greencastle, Indiana, in which 
school he was graduated in 1890, after which he was a student for 
two years in the regular academic or literary department of the 
same university. He then entered Northwestern University, at 
Evanston, Illinois, in which he was graduated with high honors, as 
a member of the class of 1894, and from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He was tendered a position in that 
institution, as an instructor in Greek and Latin, but declined the 
overture, in order to follow along the line of his ambition and well 
formulated plans. He went to Chicago and entered the law school 
of Northwestern University, his alma mater, and in June, 1897, 
was there graduated with the degree 'of Bachelor of Laws. He was 
forthwith admitted to the bar of his native state, and in March, 
1898, he engaged in the general practice of his profession in the 
City of Kankakee, where he built up a substantial and representa- 
tive law business, the demands of which engrossed his attention 
until his election to the bench of the Circuit Court, in 1909, as pre- 
viously noted in this context. 

Judge Campbell was a republican in his political allegiance, was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, had received the 
Knights Templars degrees in the Masonic fraternity, was affiliated 
also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks, besides holding membership in the 
Phi Delta Theta, the Delta Chi, and the Phi Beta Kappa College 
fraternities. 

On the 1 2th of June, 1906, was solemnized the marriage of 
Judge Campbell to Miss Nina Bond, of Indianapolis, Indiana, and 
she survives him, as do also their two children, Charles Bond and 
Pleasant Whipple. 

CAPT. WILLIAM E. ADAMS. For many years a prominent mem- 
ber of the legal profession at Charleston, was the late William E. 
Adams, who is recalled with feelings of respect, esteem and admira- 
tion, for he was a man of noble character, of eminent talent and 
of proved loyalty. For four years he sat upon the county bench 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1033 

and proved one of the most conscientious and faithful jurists of 
Coles County, and with equal efficiency filled other peaceful offices, 
while his war record is a creditable page in the military history of 
this section. 

William E. Adams was born in Bedford County, Tennessee, 
October 15, 1830, and his death occurred September 21, 1884. His 
parents, John J. and Martha (Gammel) Adams, were natives of 
Tennessee, who were pioneers in Coles County, Illinois, settling in 
Pleasant Grove Township in the winter of 1830, and thereafter the 
family was identified with that section as important developing 
factors. In the inadequate country schools, William E. Adams re- 
ceived instruction in boyhood but after his fifteenth year had better 
opportunities in other sections and felt justified later in entertaining 
thoughts and hopes of a legal career. At first he studied alone, 
probably by the light of the fireplace as have other illustrious men, 
but finally found opportunity to take a course of study in a law 
school, at Madison, Wisconsin, and in 1857 was admitted to the 
bar, immediately entering into practice at Mattoon, Illinois. In the 
meanwhile he became interested in politics and the great questions 
involved in the war which soon was precipitated between the states, 
probably cemented his attachment to the young republican party, 
with which he ever after was identified. In August, 1862, he closed 
his law office and enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Twenty- 
third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, of which he was elected captain, 
and continued in the service until July, 1865, when he was honor- 
ably discharged. 

Captain Adams returned then to Coles County to resume the 
practice of his profession, but was soon afterward elected county 
clerk and served as such for two terms, and in 1873 was elected 
county judge, the responsible duties of which office he performed 
ably and honestly through four years. For a long period he was 
active and influential in party affairs in the Fifth Judicial District 
of Illinois, where his services were valuable and valued, and his 
judgment and advice were also given and accepted in matters per- 
taining to the welfare of his community. When elected to public 
office he had removed to Charleston and served as a member of the 
city council for three years and also on the board of education. In 
his knowledge of the law Judge Adams covered a wide range of 
topics and was looked on as an authority on whatever subject he 
was willing to give an opinion. In his private life and in the social 
circle his many estimable traits of character were best shown and 
his memory is tenderly and proudly preserved. 

In August, 1858, William E. Adams was united in marriage 
with Olive A. Holton, who survives. She is a daughter of David 
and Olive (Green) Holton, natives of Vermont, who moved to 
Wisconsin in 1853. Of the children born to Captain and Mrs. 
Adams, the following survive: Jennie M., who is the wife of W. 
V. Miles; Sarah S., who is the widow of Samuel M. Leitch; Wil- 

Vol. Ill 13 



1034 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Ham E., who is a prominent citizen of Charleston ; and Helen, who 
is the wife of I. H. Johnston, Jr. For many years prior to his 
death, Captain Adams served as an elder in the Presbyterian 
Church. He took an old veteran's interest in the Grand Army of 
the Republic and was a valued member of Charleston Post, No. 
271. 

William E. Adams, the only surviving son of Captain Adams, 
was born November 30, 1864, and was reared in Illinois. In 1893 
he was admitted to the bar and is engaged in practice at Charles- 
ton and is secretary of the Adair Abstract Company. He married 
Miss Elizabeth Endsley, a daughter of Thomas L. Endsley, and they 
have one daughter, Isabelle, who was born September 23, 1901. 
Mr. Adams and family are members of the Presbyterian Church-. 
In politics he is a republican and he belongs to both county and 
state bar associations. 

JAMES K. LAUHER. As senior member of the well known Paris 
law firm of Lauher & Lauher, one of the best combinations of legal 
talent in that city, James K. Lauher has been in active practice 
for the past ten years, and he and his younger brother now control 
more than a representative share of business in Edgar County. 

James K. Lauher was born in Coles County, Illinois, September 
25, 1867, one of the three surviving of the six children born to Evan 
and Cynthia (Lane) Lauher. Evan Lauher, for many years iden- 
tified with farming in Edgar County, now lives retired, enjoying 
the fruits of a well-spent and active life. 

James K. Lauher was educated in the grade and the high schools 
of his native county, is a graduate of DePauw University at Green- 
castle, Indiana, was a student of law under the late Henry E. 
Tanner, and in 1904 was graduated at the law department of the 
University of Michigan. Mr. Lauher was admitted to practice at 
the Illinois bar at Ottawa in 1903, and since 1904 has devoted 
practically all his time and energies to his profession. While a 
democrat, and a man of considerable influence in his county, Mr. 
Lauher has never sought any of the offices that usually come to 
members of the legal profession, but has preferred to give his un- 
divided attention to the law. He is a member of the county, state 
and American bar associations. 

Paul B. Lauher, the junior member of the firm of Lauher & 
Lauher, was born in Coles County, Illinois, November 13, 1887. 
His education, begun in the public schools, was completed by grad- 
uation from the University of Illinois in 1912, and he was admitted 
to the bar in July of the same year. Since his admission Mr. Lauher 
has been associated with his brother, and has brought a thorough 
training and wide reading in law and youthful energy to supple- 
ment his brother's experience and established position. Their office 
is on the west side of the public square in Paris. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1035 

PAUL WILLIAMS. Judge Williams began the practice of his 
profession at Newton about thirteen years ago, and has since given 
active service as judge of the County Court and as master in chan- 
cery, and his professional relations have been those of the lawyer 
of increasing ability and position. 

Paul Williams was born at Newton September 9, 1876, a son 
of William G. and Mary A. (Capps) Williams. His father was a 
native of Ohio and his mother of Vandalia, Illinois. His father 
came to Illinois when a young man, settled near Vandalia, and in 
1875 moved to Jasper County, where he became well known in 
public affairs, serving for some time as circuit clerk. He studied 
dentistry and is now and has been for some years engaged in prac- 
tice at Newton. William G. Williams was born in 1840, and his 
wife was born in 1845. Of their two children the daughter Claudia, 
born at' Newton, married Claude Ryman, of Effingham, Illinois. 

Paul Williams attended the public schools of Newton, and re- 
ceived an appointment to a cadetship in the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, and was also, for a time in the Naval Acad- 
emy at Annapolis. He left before graduating and his career was 
turned from that of military or navy into civil affairs. He taught 
school two terms, read law, and for several years was in the Gov- 
ernment service in one of the departments at Washington. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1901 Mr. Williams began practice at Newton, 
and in 1906 was elected to the office of county judge, in which he 
gave an efficient administration during the following four years. 
In 1910 he became master in chancery, and still holdsj that position. 

Mr. Williams is a member of the Jasper County Bar Associa- 
tion, and is affiliated with the Court of Honor and the Tribe of 
Ben Hur. In politics he is a democrat. In 1901 Mr. Williams 
married Winifred E. Wortman, of Effingham, daughter of W. E. 
Wortman, now deceased. Her mother is now living at Jackson, 
Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have one child, Paul Jr., born 
in 1904 at Newton and now attending school. 

EDWIN H. SCHAEFFER. Admitted to the Illinois bar more than 
twenty years ago, Edwin H. Schaeffer has practiced most of the 
intervening period outside the state, but is now located at Salem, 
where for so many years his father, Michael Schaeffer, was promi- 
nent in the law, as a jurist and leader in public affairs. 

Edwin H. Schaeffer was born at Salem January i, 1871, a son of 
Michael and Henrietta (Hill) Schaeffer, both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. They came to Illinois in 1858 settling at Salem in Marion 
County. Michael Schaeffer served as chief justice of the territory 
of Utah during General Grant's terms as President, and for four 
years lived in Salt Lake City. After his return to Salem he was 
associated for six years in law partnership with the father of Wil- 
liam Jennings Bryan, under the firm name of Bryan & Schaeffer. 
Mr. Bryan was finally appointed a member of the Supreme Court 



1036 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

and after that Mr. Schaeffer practiced alone. Governor Oglesby 
appointed him a member of the committee to revise the Illinois 
practice act, and he held many other distinctive positions of trust 
and responsibility. In politics he was a republican. His death oc- 
curred at Salem in 1892 at the age of seventy-one, and he had been 
in active practice almost up to the time of his death. The mother 
died at Salem in 1888 at the age of sixty-three. Of their two chil- 
dren, one was Charles M. Schaeffer, now deceased. 

Edwin H. Schaeffer graduated from the Salem High School, 
and took his collegiate and law courses in the University of Minne- 
sota, where he was graduated in 1891. By examination he was ad- 
mitted to the Illinois Bar in May, 1892, but soon moved out to San 
Bernardino, California, practiced there two years, and then returned 
east and became connected with the legal department of the Wabash 
Railway Company, with offices in St. Louis. On May I, 1914, Mr. 
Schaeffer returned to Salem, and has since been actively identified 
with the bar as a partner of Mr. Merritt. 

Mr. Schaeffer is a Presbyterian, a republican, and enjoys a high 
standing among the citizens of his native town. December 7, 1891, 
at Salem he married Miss Harriet Maude Pace, daughter of G. R. 
Pace, a pioneer family in Marion County. There were three chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy, while Marietta Maude died in 
California at the age of seven. 

CLYDE D. MILLER. Of the younger attorneys in practice at East 
St. Louis, perhaps none has made a more distinctive record in the 
past few years than Clyde D. Miller, who has been connected with 
much important litigation, both in civil practice and in public affairs, 
and has already made a name and reputation for himself. Mr. 
Miller's father is one of the best known members of the bar at 
Belleville. 

Clyde D. Miller was born July 14, 1887, at Belleville, and is a 
son of James O. Miller. The latter was born in St. Clair County, 
Illinois, in June, 1861, a son of David D. and Sarah (Burnett) 
Miller, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Tennessee. 
David D. Miller was a substantial farmer in Illinois and died at 
the age of seventy in 1889. His wife died in 1863 at the age of 
thirty-two. James O. Miller, the younger of their two sons, was 
reared in St. Clair County, attended the public schools and also the 
McKendree College, and graduated in law from the University of 
Missouri in 1885. The following twelve years were spent in the 
double vocation of school teacher and farmer, and since 1897 he 
has been well established as a member of the Belleville bar. In 
public affairs he has served as a member of the Legislature in 1903, 
in the city council of Belleville, and is one of the leading democrats 
of Southern Illinois. He has membership in the state bar associa- 
tion and is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. James O. Miller was 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1037 

married at Fredonia, Kansas, in 1884 to Lizzie Smith, whose father, 
Samuel Smith, died at East St. Louis in 1913. The seven children 
of James O. Miller and wife are : Clyde D. ; Adele Later, who lives 
in East St. Louis and has one daughter, Eugenia; Grace Miller, 
a teacher in the public schools of Chicago ; Sibyl Miller, a graduate 
of the Belleville High School in 1914; Avis, Cora and Harold, all 
living at home and attending school. 

Clyde D. Miller grew up at Belleville, had an education in the 
public schools of that city and was a student in the State University 
of Indiana at Bloomington, being graduated both from the literary 
and law departments in 1909 with the degrees B. A. and LL. B. 
His active practice began in Belleville, but after one year in order 
to have a wider field, he moved to East St. Louis, where his services 
have been almost constantly engaged in a law business that greatly 
excels that of the average young attorney. He has been one of 
the leading attorneys engaged in the fight to set aside the franchise 
granted to the water company, this case being one that has excited 
a great deal of attention and public indignation in St. Louis, since 
the claim is that the franchise was granted illegally. At the present 
time Mr. Miller is a candidate before the democratic primaries for 
nomination as probate judge. 

He is a member of the county and state bar associations, and 
has affiliations with the Masonic Order and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He stands high socially as well as pro- 
fessionally, and has a host of loyal friends in and about East St. 
Louis. On October 14, 1913, he married at Carlinville, Illinois, 
Miss Goldie Evans, daughter of W. H. Evans, of Kirksville, Mis- 
souri. 

JOSEPH L. SHAW. One of the best known lawyers of Geneseo 
is Joseph L. Shaw, who recently completed his third term as city 
attorney, and has many influential professional connections. His 
father before him was a lawyer, and for many years the name has 
been successfully identified with the profession in Geneseo. 

Joseph L. Shaw was born at Geneseo, Illinois, March 8, 1877, 
the youngest of six children of George W. and Lucy (Andrews) 
Shaw. His father was born at Providence, Rhode Island, and was 
descended from ancestors who came from England and settled in 
Rhode Island in the early days, Roger Williams having been one 
of the ancestral line. The mother was born in Hartford, Ohio. 
The parents died in 1912. 

Joseph L. Shaw acquired his early education in the Geneseo 
public schools, but at the age of fourteen was placed as a student in 
the Geneseo Collegiate Institute and graduated in 1895. In the fall 
of 1895 he became a student in the University of Wisconsin and 
pursued the regular literary course there until graduating A. B. in 
1899. During 1899-90 Mr. Shaw read law in his father's office, and 
in the following year took post-graduate work in the University of 



1038 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Wisconsin and was awarded the degree Master of Arts. Mr. Shaw 
is one of the most scholarly members of the Geneseo bar. With 
such knowledge of law as he had picked up by private reading, he 
entered the Northwestern Law School in the fall of 1901 and was 
graduated LL. B. in 1903 and admitted to the bar in the spring of 
that year at Chicago. 

Mr. Shaw began his practice in Helena, Arkansas, remained 
there a year and a half, but in 1905 returned to Geneseo and became 
associated with his father under the firm name of George W. and 
Joseph L. Shaw. This relationship was continued until the death 
of the senior member in 1912, and since that time the son has been 
in active individual practice. 

The late George W. Shaw was one of the leaders and most ardent 
advocates. of the prohibition cause in politics. He did much to in- 
fluence and educate public opinion in behalf of prohibition, but 
otherwise was never in practical politics to any extent. The son 
Joseph L. Shaw is likewise a strong prohibitionist, and in 1912 was 
a delegate to the national convention in Atlantic City. 

CHARLES W. TERRY, of Edwardsville, is both a lawyer and busi- 
ness man, and much of his work as a lawyer has been in connec- 
tion with the various important local corporations in which he has 
interests as stockholder and official. 

Charles W. Terry was born in Edwardsville October 14, 1868, 
a son of J. W. and Martha Price (O'Hara) Terry. His father was 
a native of Kentucky and his mother of Philadelphia, and both came 
to Illinois when children. J. W. Terry was for a number of years 
principal of the Edwardsville public schools, was county school su- 
perintendent, and was later a well known merchant, passing away 
in Edwardsville in 1902 at the age of seventy-nine. The mother 
is still living at the age of seventy-two. 

Their only surviving child, Charles W. Terry, spent his early 
life in various forms of work and in the meantime acquired a liberal 
education in several professions. He attended the Edwardsville 
public schools, and graduated at the University of Missouri taking 
in addition to the literary, courses in engineering, medicine and 
law, and finished his study of law at Edwardsville and was admitted 
to the bar in 1900. His first practice was as member of the firm 
of Dale, Bradshaw & Terry, later as Terry & Williamson, then as 
Terry & Guettig, and at the present time the firm name is Terry, 
Guettig & Powell. Mr. Terry was secretary to Judge Jesse J. 
Phillips, and succeeded his father in the position of trustee of the 
Southern Illinois Normal University, and held the office three years. 

Mr. Terry is a democrat, has served as president of the county 
bar association, is a member of the state bar association, and 
affiliates with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and 
the college fraternity Beta Theta. Mr. Terry is a director and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1039 

president of the Citizens State & Trust Bank of Edwardsville, for- 
merly a director of the Bank of Edwardsville, and has been largely 
interested in numerous street railway, coal, water and other com- 
panies, and has a number of other important business and profes- 
sional connections. 

THOMAS E. GILLESPIE. Admitted to the bar in 1904, and since 
1910 with offices in East St. Louis, Thomas E. Gillespie was for 
some time in partnership with Mr. L. O. Whitnel. He has a large 
business as a lawyer, and is now serving as attorney for the East 
Side Levee and Sanitary District. As the legal representative for 
the sanitary district he successfully handled a suit involving $325,- 
ooo, and secured a satisfactory compromise that avoided a great 
expense to the district and the public. 

Mr. Gillespie is a successful Illinois lawyer who began making 
his Own way when a boy, and has reached a secure place in his 
profession with no aid except that supplied by his own energy and 
industry. Thomas E. Gillespie was born in Johnson County, Illi- 
nois, December 29, 1880, the youngest of seven children born to 
James B. and Mary (Enloe) Gillespie. His father, who was a 
native of Tennessee and settled in Illinois in Johnson County when 
a young man, was a farmer, served as assessor and treasurer of 
Johnson County, went through the Civil war as captain of a com- 
pany and was at one time a prisoner of war, was for a number 
of years collector of internal revenue in the Third District, and is 
now living at the age of seventy-six in Signal Hill, Illinois. His 
wife is now seventy-three years of age. 

Thomas E. Gillespie attended the public schools of Johnson 
County, graduating from the high school at Vienna in 1899, taught 
school in his native county, began the study of law in the office of 
Mr. Whitnel, graduated from the law department of the Illinois 
Wesleyan University in 1904, and spent his first five years in prac- 
tice at Vienna. Since moving to East St. Louis in 1910 Mr. Gilles- 
pie has devoted all his time to his private practice and his work as 
attorney for the Sanitary District. While in Johnson County he 
was master in chancery from 1907 to 1910. 

Mr. Gillespie has membership in the Illinois Bar Association, 
is prominent in Masonry, having passed all the chairs in the lodge, 
also served as an official in the Royal Arch Chapter and is now 
potentate of the Mystic Shrine at East St. Louis. He also belongs 
to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the college fra- 
ternity Sigma Chi. At Vienna in September, 1907, he married Miss 
Georgia Blanchfil, daughter of James B. and Etta M. Blanchfil, who 
came from Indiana to Illinois and are now deceased. To their 
marriage has been born one child, Alice Gillespie, in 1908 at Vienna. 

FRED B. MERRILLS. It was in 1890 that Fred B. Merrills was 
admitted to the bar and took up his career as a lawyer in St. Clair 



1040 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

County. As a lawyer he has been known for his practical successes 
in the trial of many cases in both the criminal and civil jurisdic- 
tions, and also as one of the most finished students of general and 
Illinois law in the southern part of the state. It was on the basis 
of these and many other qualifications that his friends presented 
his name as candidate before the democratic primaries for the office 
of justice of the Supreme Court from the First Judicial District in 
1914. 

Fred B. Merrills was born on a farm in St. Clair County, August 
20, 1864, a son of Fred and Catherine (Boyakin) Merrills. His 
father was a native of Illinois and his mother of Tennessee, and the 
former was a St. Clair County farmer until his death in 1885 at the 
age of sixty-eight, while the mother passed away in 1889 at the age 
of sixty-six. 

Mr. Merrills, an only child, attended the country schools, also 
the Belleville High School, for two years was a student in the South- 
ern Illinois Normal School at Carbondale, and during six years was 
a teacher. He pursued his study of law in private offices. Admitted 
to the bar in 1890 he has been continuously engaged in the practice 
of law up to the present time. He is a member of the State Bar 
Association, the Belleville Bar Association, the St. Louis Law 
Library Association, and was president of the Belleville Association 
in 1911. With the exception of his service as master in chancery 
during an unexpired term in 1903, Mr. Merrills has confined his 
attention to private practice and has never been an aspirant for office 
until his candidacy in 1914 for justice of the Supreme Court. He 
is an active democrat, is a Knight Templar and Scottish Rite Mason, 
and in 1907 was grand master of the Grand Lodge of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. It is said that Mr. Merrills during 
the first fifteen years after his admission to the bar made it a rule 
to read every opinion handed down by the Illinois Supreme Court, 
and as a result there are few attorneys in the state so thoroughly 
informed on Illinois law and procedure, and his briefs have illus- 
trated in their conciseness and fluency the value of such a rigorous 
training. Mr. Merrills has never figured as a corporation lawyer. 
He has employed most of his time in the ordinary cases of the 
courts and in office practice. By his work he has made a reputa- 
tion that extends all over the southern half of the state. 

In 1887 Mr. Merrills married Miss Virginia Badgley, daughter 
of Peter Badgley, of St. Clair County. Their four children are: 
Fred, now engaged in practice as an attorney at Belleville; Mar- 
shall; Virginia; and Wayne. 

WILLIAM E. STONE. An able member of the bar of Mason 
County, with residence at Mason City, William E. Stone has lived 
a life consistent with what is evidently his belief, that every man is 
the hewer of his own destiny and that the horizon of his achieve- 
ments is fixed by his own character and capabilities. With only 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1041 

a high school education and with no legal training outside of that 
acquired by dint of persevering and toilsome self instruction and in 
the school of experience, he has attained a standing in one of the 
most difficult and exacting of professions. 

Born at Mason City May 22, 1873, a son of Claude L. and Mary 
G. (Marop) Stone, he was the oldest of six children. His father, 
who was a native of Illinois, was for a number of years engaged 
in merchandising and later in farming, subsequently became post- 
master at Mason City for four years, and is now living retired at 
the age of sixty-nine. The mother, who was born in Ohio of 
Quaker parentage, and was brought to Illinois when a child, was 
married in this state and died at Mason City in 1884 at tne a g e f 
thirty-five. 

William E. Stone attended school at Mason City, and Lincoln, 
Illinois, but his eagerness to get a station in life and to put himself 
beyond the commonplace, caused him to leave home and make his 
own way. According to Mr. Stone's own confession, as a boy he 
had a very high regard for his capabilities, and his first ambition 
was to become president of a bank. When he found that he was 
not qualified for such an exalted position, he gradually came down 
the scale of officials, and eventually had to suffer the disappoint- 
ment of being unable to get a job even as office boy. His pride kept 
him from asking assistance from his parents, and to pay his way he 
found work as a laborer with a section gang, and on a brick yard 
and then got a humble position at the Institute for the Feeble 
Minded at Lincoln, Illinois, but subsequently was made supervisor 
and remained there about five years. ; In the meantime he was study- 
ing in the public schools and at night, and his next line of work 
was selling insurance, representing several different companies, and 
in the meantime studying law. He devoted all his leisure time to 
this pursuit, and his spare money was invested in law books. 
Through the vicissitudes of such an experience Mr. Stone finally 
successfully passed the examination before the state bar examiners 
and was admitted to practice in 1905. Since then he has gained rank 
as one of the successful attorneys in his section of the state, and has 
handled a large amount of important litigation. Mr. Stone is the 
owner of considerable real estate in the county, and all these mate- 
rial evidences of success are the product of a career which began 
with the limitations of youth and lack of capital and has been a 
sturdy and steady fight for independence. After about a year in 
practice in a small town Mr. Stone moved to Mason City in the 
fall of 1906, and he is now serving his second term as city attorney. 

Mr. Stone is Great Sachem for the State of Illinois in the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and also affiliates with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He is a member 
of the county bar association and a director of the public library in 
Mason City. 

In July, 1894, was celebrated his marriage to Effie M. Parr, of 



1042 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Springfield, daughter of Oliver and Mary (Donaldson) Parr, now 
deceased, who formerly lived in Cedar County, Missouri. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stone have two children : Clyde Leslie, born in 1901 at Bloom- 
ington, and now a high school student, and Thelma, born in 1903 at 
Bloomington and in the grade schools. 

JAMES ED THOMAS. The bar of Vermilion County has one of 
its ablest younger members in James Ed Thomas, who has practiced 
at Westville for nearly ten years, and has made a record of special 
efficiency both in private cases and in public duties. 

James Ed Thomas was born August 26, 1880, in Union County, 
Illinois, one of a family of four children born to James W. and 
Susan Ann (Lumpkins) Thomas. His father, who was born in 
Manchester, England, January 23, 1838, was a thoroughly trained 
and expert horticulturist. The mother was born August 25, 1847. 

Reared in Union County, educated in the public schools, and 
from the high school entering the Southern Seminary, James Ed 
Thomas was prepared for the law in the University of Michigan 
Law School at Ann Arbor, where he graduated in 1904. Admitted 
to the Illinois Bar January 2, 1905, Mr. Thomas at once took up 
practice at Westville. Besides the clientage which he has served 
as an attorney and counsel, Mr. Thomas has been village attorney 
at Westville and also in Hemrod, Grape Creek and Brookland, and 
was attorney for the Town of Georgetown. 

Mr. Thomas is a member of the Vermilion County Bar Associa- 
tion, and while his offices are in Westville, his home is at Coal 
Grove, Danville. His affiliations are with the Masons, Knights of 
Pythias, Modern Woodmen of America, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and Eastern Star. Mrs. Thomas was before her 
marriage Miss Edna Thornton, a daughter of Dr. Christopher May 
and Adda (Osborne) Thornton. They are the parents of two chil- 
dren : Buford T. and William Ed. 

EDWARD J. VAUGHN. The thriving industrial and commercial 
City of Granite City, Madison County, claims the subject of this 
sketch as one of the representative members of its bar. Mr. Vaughn 
is a native of the State of Illinois. He was born in Jersey County, 
January 5, 1870, and is the youngest child of Josiah and Mary 
(Pruitt) Vaughn, who settled in Jersey County at an early day, 
coming from Madison County where their families were early 
pioneers. Mrs. Mary (Pruitt) Vaughn died in 1874, and Josiah 
Vaughn in 1900. 

Edward J. Vaughn graduated from the Jerseyville High School 
in 1888 and at once began the study of law under the able preceptor- 
ship of the late State Senator Theodore S. Chapman of Jerseyville, 
and in January, 1891, proved himself eligible for, and was admitted 
to the bar of his native state. For twenty years thereafter he was 
engaged in the active practice of his profession at Jerseyville, where 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1043 

he was concerned in many important cases, perhaps the most cele- 
brated being the litigation concerning the large estate of the late 
Judge Prentiss D. Cheney. 

In 1911, Mr. Vaughn removed to Granite City in Madison 
County, where he has since continued in the practice of his profes- 
sion. He is a member of the Madison County Bar Association, a 
Knight Templar Mason, and is affiliated with fraternal insurance 
orders. 

In November, 1893, Mr. Vaughn was married to Miss Sarah J. 
McNabb, daughter of John and Mary McNabb of Calhoun County, 
Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn have three children, Rexford E., 
born in 1894; Holland P., born in 1896; and Donald T., born in 
1898. 

MARK MEYERSTEIN, JR. As one generation has followed another 
on to the stage of life the bar of Madison County, Illinois, has not 
failed to maintain a high standard, and among those who are today 
contributing materially to its prestige is Mr. Meyerstein, who is 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Granite City and whose 
father has been a representative member of the Illinois bar for 
nearly half a century. 

Mr. Meyerstein was born at Whitehall, Greene County, Illinois, 
on the loth of June, 1875, and is a son of Mark and Mary (Hettick) 
Meyerstein, the former of whom was born in Germany, in 1836, and 
the latter of whom was born in Illinois, a representative of a pioneer 
family of this state. Mark Meyerstein, Sr., was afforded the ad- 
vantages of the excellent schools of his native land and was fifteen 
years of age at the time when he came to America and established 
his home in Illinois, where he was reared to maturity and acquired 
a liberal academic and professional education. He was admitted 
to the bar of this state in 1869, and during the long intervening 
period of more than forty years he has been continuously engaged in 
the active practice of law at Whitehall, Greene County, and where 
he has long held precedence as one of the leading members of the 
bar of that section of the state. His wife, who was born in Macoupin 
County, Illinois, has attained to the age of seventy years, and though 
he himself is nearly eighty years of age he has not abated his activi- 
ties in his profession and is one of the influential and honored 
citizens of Greene County. They became the parents of two sons 
and two daughters, and the youngest of the number is he whose 
name introduces this article. 

Mark Meyerstein, Jr., is indebted to the excellent public schools 
of his native place for his early educational advantages and was 
there graduated in the high school when he was seventeen years of 
age. For five years thereafter he was found aligned as a successful 
and popular teacher in the public schools of Greene County, but he 
looked upon this vocation as a means to an end, as he early de- 
termined to enter the profession that had been signallv dignified 



1044 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

by the character and services of his honored father. While still a 
representative of the pedagogic profession Mr. Meyerstein attended 
a normal school and during his vacation seasons he devoted close 
attention to the study of law, under the able and solicitous pre- 
ceptorship of his father, for whom he served also as stenographer 
for several years prior to his admission to the bar, in 1899. He was 
thereafter associated with his father in practice, at Whitehall, until 
1902, in the meanwhile having served as city attorney, from 1900 
to 1902. In the latter year he removed to Roodhouse, Greene 
County, where he built up a substantial practice and where he served 
as city attorney from 1904 to 1908. He was then elected state's 
attorney of Greene County, of which office he continued the efficient 
incumbent until 1912, in December of which year he established his 
home at Granite City, Madison County, where he is associated in 
practice with Ed J. Vaughn, under the firm name of Vaughn & 
Meyerstein and in the control of an excellent law business of repre- 
sentative order. 

The principles and policies of the democratic party find in Mr. 
Meyerstein a stalwart advocate, and as a citizen he is distinctively 
loyal, progressive and public-spirited. He is affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Improved Order of Red Men, and both he and his wife are popular 
factors jn the social activities of their home community. Mr. Meyer- 
stein is an active and valued member of the Madison County Bar 
Association and is inflexible in his allegiance to his profession. 

On the 28th of June, 1913, Mr. Meyerstein. wedded Miss Eliza- 
beth Field, daughter of George W. Field, a prominent citizen of 
Whitehall, Illinois. 

GEORGE W. FITHIAN. During a career of nearly forty years 
George W. Fithian has exemplified all the success and important 
public service of a representative lawyer, and is now one of the 
oldest members of the Jasper County bar. Along with work that 
has been strictly professional, he has enjoyed some of the larger 
distinctions of public life. 

George W. Fithian was born at Newton in Jasper County, Illi- 
nois, July 4, 1854, a son of Glover and Mary (Catt) Fithian. His 
father was born in New Jersey and his mother in Kentucky. The 
parents died in Jasper County, and of their nine children, four sons 
and five daughters, George W. was the sixth. 

He grew up on a farm, attended the district schools of Jasper 
County, and got part of his early training while learning the printer's 
trade. He read law and was admitted to the bar July 4, 1875, and 
has ever since been actively identified with practice at Newton. Mr. 
Fithian has served as master in chancery, as state's attorney, was 
elected to Congress, and has also served on the railroad and ware- 
house commission of Illinois. He has been mayor of Newton, and 
is president of the Fithian Land Company. Mr. Fithian was mar- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1045 

ried in 1876 at Newton to Miss Mary A. Martin, daughter of Thomas 
J. and Mary C. Martin, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Fithian 
were the parents of three children, and the two now living are: 
Sidney B., born in 1880 and an attorney practicing law at Newton; 
and Dr. George R., born in 1882, a practicing physician at Newton. 

CLARENCE EUGENE HOILES. Well known in the legal fraternity 
through Southern Illinois, Clarence Eugene Hoiles is also promi- 
nently identified with important interests at Greenville and heavy 
realty interests in Bond County. He was born at Greenville, Bond 
County, Illinois, August 17, 1875, and is a son of Stephen M. and 
Wilma C. (Stoutzenberg) Hoiles, and a grandson of one of the 
pioneer settlers of Greenville who brought capital to this section and 
in 1869 established the banking house which was then known as the 
Hoiles Bank of Greenville, and which has remained a family institu- 
tion to the present day, the style now being the State Bank of Hoiles 
& Sons. Stephen M. Hoiles was born, passed his life and died at 
Greenville, and was continuously associated with his father and 
brother in the banking business until his death, on January 2, 1901, 
at the age of forty-seven years. The institution was then incor- 
porated, and the name was changed to the State Bank of Hoiles & 
Sons, Clarence Eugene Hoiles becoming vice president. Stephen 
M. Hoiles married Wilma C. Stoutzenberg who was born and edu- 
cated in Illinois, and died April 22, 1902, at the age of forty-six 
years. 

Clarence Eugene Hoiles was the second born in his parents' 
family. He was given liberal educational advantages, attending the 
public schools of Greenville until his graduation from the high 
school in 1891, following which he entered Greenville College and 
subsequently was graduated from the business department. He was 
thus well equipped for every day business life before he started 
upon the study of law, for which profession he had a natural inclina- 
tion. He carried on his law studies in the office of Northcott and 
Fritz, well known attorneys at Greenville, for several years and in 
August, 1896, was admitted to the Illinois bar. Shortly afterward 
he became a member of the firm, which was then Northcott, Fritz 
& Hoiles, and this partnership continued until Mr. Northcott with- 
drew when elected lieutenant governor of the state. Mr. Hoiles and 
Mr. Fritz continued the business as an equal partnership until the 
death of the latter in April, 1911, since which time Mr. Hoiles has 
been alone in practice and has built up a professional reputation 
which has made his name familiar in many sections. Although 
somewhat active in democratic politics and frequently invited into 
party councils, Mr. Hoiles has never sought political office. He 
served as master in chancery, filling out an unexpired term of his 
late partner, Mr. Fritz, and is a member of the Bond County Bar 
Association and is an occasional contributor to legal literature. 
While his professional duties absorb the larger part of his time, 



1046 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

he also gives attention to the affairs of the State Bank of Hoiles & 
Sons and to looking after his valuable investments in county and 
city property. 

Mr. Hoiles was united in marriage with Miss Lena Ethel Moss, 
at Greenville, Illinois, October 20, 1897. She is a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. James H. Moss, the latter of whom lives at Greenville. 
The former was born February n, 1833, and died June 17, 1906. 
He was a pioneer in Madison County, Illinois, but removed to 
Bond County in an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Hoiles have had three 
children born to them : Dorothy Elizabeth Hoiles, born March 24, 
1904, died October 23, 1908; James Moss- Hoiles, born January 6, 
1911; and Clarence Eugene Hoiles, born November 13, 1912. Mr. 
Hoiles belongs to several fraternal organizations, including Masons, 
the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias, often 
serves on civic bodies when movements for public benevolence are 
considered and fully comes up to what is expected of a prominent 
man and representative and popular citizen. 

MAJ. JAMES A. CONNOLLY. Distinguished alike as an intrepid 
soldier, as a member of the legal profession of Illinois, as an able 
and astute politician and as an energetic and eminent public servant, 
the late Maj. James A. Connolly, rounded out a career that for use- 
fulness in its varied activities, for the faithful meeting of obliga- 
tions, and for the discharging with manly fidelity of the duties in- 
cumbent upon him in the various relations of life, is eminently 
deserving of a place in the history of the state. 

Major Connolly, like many others who have risen to distinction 
in this state, was a product of the farm, being born at Newark, New 
Jersey, March 8, 1842, a son of William and Margaret (McGuire) 
Connolly, who moved not long thereafter to Morrow County, Ohio, 
where the youth attended the public schools. Subsequently, he went 
to Selby Academy, at Chesterville, Ohio, and then to the college at 
Mount Gilead, in the same state, and upon his admission to the Ohio 
bar, in 1859, began the practice of his chosen profession in partner- 
ship with his former preceptor, Judge Dunn, of that city. In 1860 
he removed to Charleston, Illinois, and opened an office of his own. 
The outbreak of the Civil war .attracted the young attorney's sym- 
pathies to the cause of the North, and in 1862 he assisted in raising 
a company of men, of which he was elected captain, and which was 
attached to the One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment, Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, when he was chosen major. His command 
joined the Army of the Cumberland and participated actively in the 
campaign which closed with the battle of Chattanooga, and Major 
Connolly was then assigned to duty as division inspector of the 
Fourteenth Army Corps. He was still later attached to General 
Sherman's army, and participated in the famous march to the sea, 
closing his military career by taking part in the grand review at 
Washington, D. C. At the close of the war his brave and efficient 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1047 

services were recognized by his appointment to the rank of lieu- 
tenant-colonel. 

Returning to Charleston, Major Connolly resumed his law prac- 
tice and continued as a private practitioner until March, 1876, when 
he was appointed United States district attorney for the southern 
district of Illinois, an office in which he remained until June, 1885, 
retiring because of a change in the administration. He was reap- 
pointed to the office by President Harrison, July i, 1889, and con- 
tinued to serve four years more, and in the meantime had become 
a decidedly forceful figure in state politics, having been twice elected 
to the State Legislature and there serving on the committees of 
judiciary, library and railways. He became the candidate of the 
republican party for Congress, in 1886, and in the campaign that 
followed, although he met with defeat, he carried both his own and 
Morgan counties and reduced the normal democratic majority from 
4,000 to 900. He refused a second nomination for Congress in 
1888, and in 1894, when appointed solicitor of the treasury by 
President Arthur, an appointment confirmed by the United States 
Senate, he again declined. In 1888 he was a candidate before the 
Republican State Convention for the governorship and received a 
very flattering vote. 

In 1886 Major Connolly had formed a partnership in law with 
Thomas C. Mather, and this association continued until Mr. Mather's 
death, when Major Connolly entered partnership with Carey E. 
Barnes, the firm maintaining offices at 225^ South Sixth Street until 
the death of the major, which occurred at his home, 717^ East 
Capitol Avenue, Springfield. Fraternally, Major Connolly was 
identified with the Masons and the Elks, and he also held member- 
ship in the Loyal Legion and the Grand Army of the Republic, hav- 
ing been department commander of the latter during 1910 and 1911. 
For many years he and Mrs. Connolly attended services at the First 
Presbyterian Church of Springfield. 

Major Connolly was married February 9, 1863, at Gambler, Ohio, 
to Miss Mary Dunn, daughter of Jacob Dunn, and sister of his 
former preceptor and law partner, Judge Dunn. 

REUBEN JULIUS GODDARD. Few men are able to continue the 
period of their active work for half a century, and the lawyer who 
has been fighting cases in court and acting as counsel for the people 
and various interests for such a time has a distinction quite apart 
from the value and success of his services. Just fifty years ago, 
before the close of the Civil war, Reuben Julius Goddard was ad- 
mitted to the Illinois bar and began practice at Sparta in Randolph 
County. He has held many official honors, has enjoyed a large 
clientage as an attorney, and still looks after a profitable law busi- 
ness. Mr. Goddard is one of the oldest and one of the best known 
attorneys in Southern Illinois. 

Randolph County was his birthplace, and he was born June 21, 



1048 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

1842, a son of William B. and Elizabeth (Hawthorn) Goddard. On 
both sides the ancestry was represented on the American side during 
the Revolutionary war. The paternal grandparents were Reuben 
and Sarah (Brown) Goddard, who came from Kentucky to St. 
Clair County in Illinois and settled near the historic old Town of 
Cahokia. William Brown Goddard was born near Maysville, Ken- 
tucky, November 23, 1817, and in 1837 married Elizabeth Hawthorn, 
who was of a prominent family of pioneers, a daughter of James 
Hawthorn, for many years recorder of Randolph County, Illi- 
nois, and a granddaughter of David Hawthorn, who settled in 
Illinois during the territorial period. William B. Goddard was in 
early life a farmer, later a contractor and architect, and was honored 
many times with public office, having served as justice of Recorders' 
Court, of Sparta, Illinois, for twenty years and acted as justice of 
the peace for a long time. He was a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church, and one of the founders of the Presbyterian Union 
Academy at Sparta. William B. Goddard died at Evans, Colorado, 
April 17, 1873, and his wife passed away in Sparta, Randolph 
County, Illinois, October 8, 1863. 

Reuben Julius Goddard at the age of sixteen, having completed 
the course in the common schools, took up commercial study in the 
Union Academy, a religious institution of considerable note, and 
subsequently became a student in both the literary and law courses 
at the University of Michigan and was graduated in 1864. The same 
year saw his admittance to the Illinois bar and the beginning of his 
career as a lawyer at Sparta, where his home has been for fifty 
years. 

Mr. Goddard has had an enviable record so far as his political 
activities are concerned, since he was never defeated in his candidacy 
for any office. In 1870 he was appointed prosecuting attorney for 
the old court of common pleas. In 1872 he was elected state's 
attorney of Randolph County and served until 1880, two terms, and 
from 1892 to 1900 served two terms more. For eight terms he was 
city attorney at Sparta. He has handled a large amount of litiga- 
tion for individuals and corporations, and for a number of years 
has served as attorney for the Illinois Southern Railway, and for 
the M. & O. Railway. 

On November 30, 1876, Mr. Goddard married Miss Emma Kerr, 
who was born in Chautauqua County, New York, and graduated 
from the Batavia Academy. One son, William B. Goddard, II, was 
born to this marriage, and he is a partner of his father in his legal 
business, under the name Goddard & Goddard, at Sparta, Illinois. 

HON. STEPHEN A. FOLEY was born in Logan County, Illinois, 
August 27, 1840, one of the three children born to William and 
Sarah J. (Downey) Foley. His father, a native of the Buckeye 
State, journeyed to Illinois as a young man, arid settled in Logan 
County, where during the remainder of his life he was engaged in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1049 



successful agricultural pursuits, his death occurring in 1847. 
mother survived him until 1857. After securing his early education 
in the public schools in the vicinity of his birth, Stephen A. Foley 
became a student of the University of Albany, New York, from 
which he was duly graduated with his degree. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1866, and in 1867 began the practice of his profession in 
Logan County, where he soon secured a foothold and subsequently 
established himself as a capable and learned lawyer. Business of 
the most desirable kind came to him, and he rose rapidly in his call- 
ing, moving his headquarters to Lincoln in 1861, which has since 
continued to be his home. He was engaged actively in the practice 
of law until 1905, when he decided to turn over his large practice to 
younger hands and to devote all his time to his own business. 

Mr. Foley first became interested in financial affairs July i, 1877, 
when he organized and became president of the Lincoln Savings 
Loan and Trust Bank, which in 1885 was merged into the Lincoln 
National Bank and he has been at the head of this institution to 
the present time, and it has grown and developed into one of the 
important banks of this part of the state. The present officers are : 
Stephen A. Foley, president ; H. C. Quisenberry, vice president ; P. 
E. Kuhl, 'cashier, and E. H. Sanford, assistant cashier, while the 
board of directors is made up of S. A. Foley, H. C. Quisenberry, 
P. E. Kuhl, H. B. Brown, Joseph Hodnett, Frank Atlass and A. M. 
Sargent. These are all representative business men of Lincoln 
whose substantiality and worth have done much to inspire confidence 
in the minds of depositors. This is a member of the Federal Reserve 
Bank, and its condensed statement issued Thursday, June 23, 1915, 
shows the following figures : Resources, loans and discounts, 
$1,042,206.74; bonds, securities, etc., $75,098.47; United States 
bonds, $i 10,000 ; stock in Federal Reserve Bank, $8,250 ; real estate, 
$3,606,455; overdrafts, none; cash and cash exchange, $267,828.23; 
total, $1,509,828.23. Liabilities: Capital stock paid in, $100,000; 
surplus fund, $175,000; undivided profits, $22,626.60; reserved for 
taxes, $3,200; circulation, $97,100; deposits, $111,535.06; total, 
$1,492,381.78. 

Mr. Foley was united in marriage with Miss Hannah J. Hahn, a 
daughter of William B. Hahn, and to this union there have been 
born three children : William, who is now identified with the bank- 
ing business in Geneva, Switzerland, with the well-known banking 
firm of N. W. Halsey & Company, of New York City; and the 
Misses Florence and Edna. Mr. Foley and his family are members 
of the Episcopal Church, to which they have been liberal con- 
tributors. He has been active in supporting the various movements 
for civic betterment at Lincoln since his arrival here, and since May 
20, 1874, has been president and a director of the Lincoln Public 
Library, a service of more than forty continuous years. Politically 
a democrat, his only fraternal connection is with the Knight 
Templars. Although not now engaged in active practice, he still 



Vol. Ill 14 



1050 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

maintains an interest in the progress of the law, and keeps up his 
membership in the Logan County and Illinois State Bar associations. 

HON. FRANKLIN H. BOGGS. The assignment of Judge Boggs to 
the Illinois Appellate Court of the fourth district not only brought 
new strength and ability to one of the most important branches of 
the state judiciary but was also a grateful recognition to the services 
and attainments of a man who for many years has been an honored 
resident and a foremost member of the bar at Urbana, and both 
in the law and in politics is well known over the state. Mr. Boggs 
came to the bench in 1914 as circuit judge of the sixth judicial 
district. 

Born in Champaign County, Illinois, December 30, 1865, Judge 
Boggs is a son of Benjamin F. and Mary J. (Armstrong) Boggs. 
His father, a prosperous agriculturist who spent the greater part of 
his life on his farm died in 1903. His mother is still living, her 
declining years being made comfortable by every attention her chil- 
dren can show. Of the ten children of the family, nine survive. 

After a thorough course in the public schools and about a year in 
the University of Illinois, Franklin H. Boggs entered the North- 
western Law School, from which institution he was graduated in 
1890, and his admission to the bar followed in the same year. In 
1891 he entered into practice at Tuscola but removed from there 
in 1892 to Champaign, where he was associated for one year in 
partnership with J. L. Ray. He came then to Urbana and entered 
into partnership with Hon. J. O. Cunningham, now retired, and this 
connection continued for twelve years, being followed by a partner- 
ship under the firm style of Boggs & Little, which was dissolved in 
July, 1914, when the senior partner was elected to the circuit bench. 
At a special election, Judge Boggs succeeded to the vacancy caused 
by the death of the late Judge Solon Philbrick. At the June election 
of 1915 he was elected for the full term of six years as circuit judge. 
Following his election in June, the Supreme Court appointed him 
to the Appellate Court of the state for the fourth district. It is a 
matter of congratulation that so competent a lawyer and so sterling 
a man should have been chosen for this high office. Judge Boggs 
has not yet reached the meridian of his years, but his broad and 
successful experience as a lawyer, his mature judgment, intellect 
and integrity are qualifications that may be counted upon to maintain 
and advance the high standards of the Illinois Appellate bench. 

Judge Boggs was married on August 2, 1892, to Miss Bell Gibbs, 
whose father Joseph W. Gibbs is a prominent resident of Worth- 
ington, Illinois. They have had two children: Elizabeth F. and 
Franklin G. The latter was born February 16, 1908, and died 
December 2, 1912. Judge Boggs and family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

For many years Judge Boggs has been active and useful in public 
affairs and has always given his political support to the republican 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1051 

party. He served one term as mayor of Urbana, his administration 
being productive of many reforms in the city government. His 
fraternal connections are with the Masons, the Elks and the Knights 
of Pythias. Approachable in many ways, Judge Boggs, however, 
is never willing to discuss his charities but his fellow citizens know 
they are many and that his benevolence is widely extended. 

HUGH W. HOUSUM. The bar of Macon County is a body verj 
generally recognized throughout the state, that is made up of men 
of more than usual ability, and Decatur is the home of some of its 
most able members. One of these, who stands high in professional 
esteem is Hugh W. Housum, who has been in active practice since 
1902 and since 1913 has been a law partner of Judge Hugh Crea. 

Hugh W. Housum was born at Decatur, Illinois, March 25, 1878, 
and is a son of Charles P. and Eliza J. (King) Housum. The 
father was born in Ohio and the mother in Mississippi. For many 
years the family has been a substantial one in Decatur. After com- 
pleting the public school course, graduating in 1895 from the high 
school at Decatur, Hugh W. Housum took a. commercial course in 
Brown's Business College, where he was graduated in 1896. This 
was merely preparatory training for already had Mr. Housum de- 
cided upon the law as a future career, after leaving the commercial 
school entering the office of the late Judge William C. Johns as a 
stenographer and also as a student of law. One year later his 
brother, Joseph Housum, became associated with Judge Johns in a 
partnership that continued for two years, Hugh W., in the mean- 
while remaining in the office, where he attended to his stenographic 
duties and pursued his studies until 1900. In that year he entered 
the office of Judge Hugh Crea, where he continued his studies and 
served also as law clerk, subsequently passing his examinations and 
securing admission to the bar on December 9, 1902. He had already 
gained valuable knowledge concerning the practical workings of the 
courts, through a service of two terms as a court reporter and as 
law clerk under Judge Edward P. Vail. Mr. Housum has been 
admitted to practice in the United States District and Circuit courts 
and on September i, 1913, formed a law partnership with Judge 
Hugh Crea, with whom he has been continuously associated since 
admission to the bar. Through industry, persistence and energy he 
has made his way forward and now occupies a very prominent place 
on the Decatur bar, commands a reliable clientage and the court 
records show that he has been victorious in many strongly contested 
cases when his legal ability has been pitted against that of older 
and more experienced adversaries. He is an earnest member of the 
County, State and American Bar associations. 

On September 5, 1900, Mr. Housum was united in marriage 
with Miss Pauline Reinstorf, a resident of Decatur, and they have 
children. With his family, Mr. Housum belongs to the Episcopal 
Church. In politics he has always been identified with the republican 



1052 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

party but has put forward no claims for political rewards. His 
fraternal and social affiliations give indication of his personal stand- 
ing, belonging as he does to Macon Lodge No. 8, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Decatur Club and the Country Club. 

LOTT R. HERRICK. One of the most honored names in the 
DeWitt County bar is that of Herrick which has been borne by 
members of two successive generations and always with the dis- 
tinction belonging to fine legal attainments, industry and personal 
integrity. 

At the present time the firm of Herrick & Herrick is composed 
of two brothers, Lott R. and Wirt Herrick, who* have their prin- 
cipal office in the old First National Bank Building at Farmer City, 
and have a branch office at Clinton, Illinois. Lyle G. Herrick, an- 
other brother, is also connected with the office. These brothers are 
sons of the late Hon. George W. and Dora O. (Knight) Her- 
rick. George W. Herrick was one of the able and well known prac- 
titioners of law in DeWitt County, Illinois, up to the time of his 
death on July 20, 1904. 

One of a family of eight children, Lott R. Herrick was born in 
DeWitt County, Illinois, December 8, 1871, was educated in the 
common and high schools of DeWitt County, and was granted the 
advantages of a university training. He was graduated in the 
literary course from the University of Illinois in 1892 and in 
1894 took his law : degree from the University of Michigan. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in that year, he soon became associated with his 
father in practice at Farmer City, and for nearly twenty years has 
been one of the leading lawyers of DeWitt County. He was elected 
and served two years as county judge, and the death of his father 
threw upon him increasing duties connected with the large practice 
of the firm. 

Mr. Herrick is a member of the DeWitt County Bar Association, 
of the Illinois State Bar Association, the Masonic Order and in 
politics is a staunch democrat. 

Mr. L. R. Herrick married Miss Harriet N. Swigart, a daughter 
of Jacob Swigart. They have two children : Mildred C. and Helen 
H. Mr. Herrick and family are affiliated with the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

HON. J. OTIS HUMPHREY. High on the roll of the judiciary of 
Illinois is found the name of Hon. J. Otis Humphrey, who since 
1901 has served in the capacity of judge of the United States District 
Court. He is a member of an old and distinguished family which 
originated in England, and was born in Morgan County, Illinois, 
December 30, 1850, one of the ten children of William and Sarah 
(Stocker) Humphrey, natives of Ohio who came to Illinois in 1855. 

The early environment of Judge Humphrey was that of the farm, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1053 

for he was brought up on his father's homestead in Auburn Town- 
ship, Sangamon County, and his early school attendance was inter- 
spersed by activities upon the home property. Later he secured the 
advantages of attendance at the high school at Virden, Macoupin 
County, and after two years there went to Shurtleff College, there 
spending five years. His education for the time being completed, he 
secured a position as a teacher in the country schools, and while 
thus engaged began his studies in the field of law, eventually enter- 
ing the offices of Robinson, Knapp & Shutt, at Springfield. Admitted 
to the bar in 1880, during that year Judge Humphrey worked in the 
office of the supervisor of census, under Hon. John A. Chestnut, 
for the eighth district of Illinois, and for the next two years he 
was clerk in the offices of the Illinois Railroad and Warehouse Com- 
mission. In January, 1883, he formed a partnership with Hon. H. 
S. Greene, and his association with this distinguished attorney of 
the West continued until the year 1899. 

Judge Humphrey first entered the field of politics in 1876, when 
Hon. Shelby M. Cullom was elected governor of Illinois, it being 
under that statesman's preceptorship that he received his first train- 
ing as a politician. He became a presidential elector on the Elaine 
ticket in 1884, was later chairman of the Republican County Central 
Committee for four years, and in 1896 was sent as a delegate to the 
Republican National Convention, which was held that year at St. 
Louis. He was appointed by President McKinley, July i, 1897, as 
United States district attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, 
and continued in that capacity until 1901, when he received the 
appointment to his present office, that of United States district judge. 
Judge Humphrey's record on the bench is one of dignified, dis- 
tinguished and impartial service. Possessed of the judicial mind 
and temperament, and withal a close student of human nature, his 
decisions have seldom been appealed, and no jurist had gained in 
greater degree the universal esteem and regard of bench and bar 
and the confidence of the general public. He finds his recreation 
from his arduous judicial duties in literary work, and articles from 
his pen are in demand by a number of publications, he being a 
finished and polished writer. 

In 1879 Judge Humphrey was married to Miss Mary E. Scott, 
who was born in Illinois, a daughter of the Rev. A. H. Scott, and 
to this union there have come five children: Mary, Maud, Grace, 
Scott and Ruth. The family home is at No. 725 South Seventh 
Street, Springfield. 

HON. CHAUNCEY HOBART JENKINS. Among the men who have 
brought dignity, ability and distinguished talents to the Sangamon 
County bench, few have attained to a greater degree of public favor 
than has Hon. Chauncey Hobart Jenkins, judge of the Probate 
Court, a capacity in which he is now serving his second term. His 
record as an attorney of the Springfield bar was one which demon- 



1054 COURTS -AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

strated that he was especially qualified by nature and training for 
judicial duties, and his services on the bench have shown that the 
people made no mistake in electing him to this high office. 

Judge Jenkins was born on a farm near Cuba, Fulton County, 
Illinois, and is a son of David Milton and Mary Jane (Peterson) 
Jenkins, the former a native of Jefferson County, Illinois, and the 
latter of the State of New Jersey. The grandparents of Judge 
Jenkins located in Jefferson County, Illinois, as early as 1826 and 
there their son, David Milton, was born six years later, but in 1834 
they removed to Waterford Township, Fulton County, Illinois, 
where they passed the remaining years of their lives in pastoral 
pursuits. David M. Jenkins grew to manhood in Fulton County, 
and in 1852, when twenty years of age, left his home and made the 
long and arduous trip to California, starting from Pekin, Illinois, 
and safely arriving at Sacramento. He remained in the gold fields 
of that region for three years, and at the end of that period returned 
to his native state, again locating in Fulton County, where, in 1859, 
he was united in marriage with Mary Jane Peterson. At the 
organization of Company I, One Hundred and Third Regiment, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Mr. Jenkins enlisted as a private, under 
Captain Wright, and continued to serve with that organization until 
it was mustered out of the Union service. He participated in a 
number of important engagements, and was twice wounded, first at 
the battle of Missionary Ridge, in November, 1863, and again at 
Resaca, Georgia, in 1864. His military service completed, he re- 
turned to the occupations of peace, and continued to be engaged in 
agricultural pursuits until his retirement in advanced years. David 
M. and Mary J. Jenkins are the parents of seven children. 

Chauncey Hobart Jenkins received his early education in the 
graded and high schools of Cuba, Illinois, which he attended during 
the winter months, his summer seasons being passed in assisting 
his father in the duties of the home farm. Later he entered the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where he took both the 
literary and law courses, and was graduated from the latter depart- 
ment in 1907, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Not long there- 
after he was admitted to the bar and took up his residence in the 
City of Springfield, where he has since continued, his present home 
being located at No. 1016 South Fourth Street. The young attorney 
soon attracted to himself a practice of a representative and lucrative 
character, and at the same time entered actively into republican 
politics. In 1908 he was chosen as a justice of the peace, and in 
1910 his name appeared as the candidate of his party for the office 
of probate judge of Sangamon County, to which he was elected at 
the polls in that fall. The able manner in which he discharged the 
duties of his office made him the logical candidate for re-election in 
1914, when the people demonstrated their satisfaction with his ad- 
ministration and their appreciation of his faithful judicial services. 
He has taken an active part in all affairs and movements that have 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1055 

made for advancement in Springfield, and is well known in fraternal 
and social circles of the capital. 

Judge Jenkins was married April 27, 191 1, to Miss Ella 
McRoberts, who was born at Sherman, Sangamon County. 

HON. JAMES A. CREIGHTON. Holding a position on the bench 
for thirty continuous years, Hon. James A. Creighton, of Spring- 
field, holds the distinction also of being the dean of the Circuit Court 
judges of Illinois. Throughout this long period his services on the 
bench have been of a nature to place his name high on the roll of 
the jurists of his state, and there is probably none who holds in 
greater degree the respect and admiration of both bench and bar. 

Hon. James A. Creighton was born on a farm in White County, 
Illinois, March 7, 1846, and is one of the nine children born to 
John McClure and Mary Ann (Crews) Creighton. When he was 
still a child, his parents removed to another farm, in Wayne County, 
Illinois, and there he passed his boyhood and youth much the same 
as other Illinois farmers' sons, dividing his time between attendance 
at the district schools and work on the homestead property. Sub- 
sequently he attended the graded and high schools of Fairfield, and 
later became a student at the Southern Illinois College, Salem, where 
he was graduated in the class of 1868. Immediately thereafter he 
secured a teacher's certificate and began teaching in the country 
schools, and while thus engaged assiduously employed his leisure 
time to the study of his chosen profession, the law. He took the 
state examination in 1870, and when admitted to the bar opened 
an office at Fairfield, where he soon attracted to himself a very 
desirable practice. In 1877, seeking a wider field for the display 
of his abilities, he came to Springfield, and the capital has con- 
tinued to be his home and the scene of his activities and success. 

In 1877 Judge Creighton formed a partnership with the late 
Alfred Orendorff, an association which immediately sprang into 
prominence as a strong combination, and which continued until 1885, 
when Judge Creighton was first elected to the judicial office of judge 
of the Seventh Judicial District of the Circuit Court. In this office 
he has continued to serve to the present time, having received re- 
elections in 1891, 1897, 1903 and 1909. When he ascended the bench 
he succeeded Judge William L. Gross. During the long period that 
Judge Creighton has administered justice, many trials of great 
importance have come before his court, in which his decisions have 
met, without exception, the approval of the people. His connection 
with the Illinois State Bar Association has continued since its organi- 
zation, when he was chosen as one of the delegates to represent his 
district and to found an association which has grown and developed 
into one of the greatest law bodies in the country. In the private 
relations of life, Judge Creighton has at all times commanded and 
received the regard and esteem of those with whom he has been 
thrown into contact, and as a stirring and public-spirited citizen of 



1056 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Springfield he has allied himself with every movement which has 
made for better citizenship and better government. His only fra- 
ternal connection is with the Masonic order. Judge Creighton is a 
man of intellectual attainments, is a scholar and great reader, and 
holds the degree of Doctor of Laws, which was conferred upon him 
by McKendree College. 



THOMAS M. MEEK. For a number of years engaged in practice 
at Chicago, and later connected with the coal mining interests of 
Southern Illinois, Mr. Meek has since resumed active practice of the 
law at Marissa in St. Clair County, and is one of the leading lawyers 
of that section. 

Thomas M. Meek was born in Randolph County, Illinois, Novem- 
ber i, 1866, son of A. J. and Mary (Rutherford) Meek, both of 
whom were natives of Illinois. His father, who is now living at the 
age of seventy-five in Marissa, has been in the flour milling industry 
in that town for many years, and is prominently known among 
millers, having served for twenty-five years as president of the 
Southern Illinois Millers Association. His wife died in 1870 at the 
age of twenty-three. 

Thomas M. Meek, the younger of two children, attended the 
public schools, the academy at Marissa, the state normal school at 
Monmouth, Illinois, and then entered the Chicago College of Law, 
where he graduated in June, 1892. Admitted to the bar the same 
year, he began practice at Chicago, and for fifteen years had in- 
fluential relations and a large business in that city. In April 1903, 
Mr. Meek returned to Marissa, and gave his active attention to the 
operation of coal mines for eight or nine years, but since selling out 
his interests has resumed the practice of his profession. Mr. Meek 
was married at Marissa in 1896 to Miss Leonora Thompson. Their 
children are : Fred J., attending high school at Marissa ; Marguerite 
E., also in the Marissa High School; Gertrude D., in the public 
schools ; and Elizabeth L. All but the youngest child were born in 
Chicago. 

WILLIAM R. MC!LWAIN entered the legal profession after a 
long and successful experience in business affairs. His ambition 
was early set upon the law, but the necessities of self support and 
the growing responsibilities of business kept him out of the law until 
about twenty years ago, since which time he has been one of the 
leading members of the bar at Sparta. 

William R. Mcllwain was born in Randolph County, Illinois, 
January 20, 1847, a son f Andrew and Emma (Boders) Mcllwain. 
His father was a native of South Carolina and after a career as a 
farmer in Southern Illinois died in 1869 at the age of fifty. The 
mother, who died in 1899 at the age of sixty-nine, was a daughter 
of Andrew Boders and of a prominent pioneer family in Illinois. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1057 

There were ten children in the family, among whom William R. 
was the oldest. 

As the first in this large family he had to become self supporting 
at an age when many boys were still attending school, and as a young 
man he made his first independent venture in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Nashville. He built up a prosperous trade, then engaged in 
the abstract business in the same place, and from there went to 
Coulterville, Illinois, which was then a village. He and his brother 
opened the first coal mine there, and at the same time conducted a 
merchandise business, and while there laid the foundation of a valu- 
able business. After selling out at Coulterville, Mr. Mcllwain moved 
to Sparta and continued merchandising there with several branch 
stores in outlying villages, until the panic of 1893. After the period 
of hard times he settled up his affairs, and then entered upon active 
practice as a lawyer. 

Mr. Mcllwain read law in the office of R. J. Goddard of Sparta, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1889, but did not begin practice until 
several years later. Mr. Mcllwain is the owner of a number of large 
farms in this part of Illinois, and of some fine town property. Pro- 
fessionally he has served as city attorney of Sparta, and has repre- 
sented many important interests. He is also president and attorney 
for the Southern Illinois Improvement and Loan Association. In 
politics he is a democrat, and is affiliated with the Masonic Order. 

Mr. Mcllwain was married at Marissa, Illinois, in 1874, to Miss 
Anna Gray, who died July 21, 1912. Her father was John Gray, 
who came to Illinois from Canada. 

AUGUSTUS H. FRIEDRICHS. Few lawyers accomplish more in 
the first five years of their practice than Augustus H. Friedrichs, 
who in that time has gained a large and varied practice at East St. 
Louis and is prominently identified with civic affairs. 

Augustus H. Friedrichs was born at Waterloo, Illinois, February 
15, 1883, a son of William C. and Catherine (Herring) Friedrichs. 
His father was a native of Illinois and his mother of Germany, 
having come to this country when a child, and being now fifty years 
of age. The father who is now sixty-four has spent nearly sixty 
years of his life on one farm near Waterloo, and is prominent as a 
farmer and stock raiser. Augustus, the oldest of the seven children 
by his father's second marriage, spent his boyhood in Monroe 
County, attended the public schools at Waterloo, and after grad- 
uating in 1902 had to earn the money needed to further him towards 
his professional career. He accordingly spent four years in the 
schoolroom as a teacher, then entered the law department of the 
University of Illinois, graduating in 1909, and took up practice at 
East St. Louis on November ist of that year. Mr. Friedrichs is 
assistant city attorney, and president and secretary of the East St. 
Louis Bar Association. He is president and a director of the East 
St. Louis Humane Society, an organization comprising the leading 



1058 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

citizens of East St. Louis, the object of which is the protection of 
the children of the city. Mr. Friedrichs is a republican in politics, 
is affiliated with the Masonic Order, the Woodmen of the World and 
the Order of Yeomen. 

At Columbia, Illinois, on July 29, 1908, he married Anna M. 
Reither. Her father, the late John Reither, was a brewer in St. 
Louis and at Columbia, Illinois. Mr. Friedrichs and wife are the 
parents of one son, Augustus H., born at Columbia, Illinois, Septem- 
ber 20, 1909. 

C. H. G. HEINFELDEN. One of the best educated and one of 
the most talented members of the Belleville bar, C. H. G. Heinfelden 
has been favored with a large practice since opening his office at 
Belleville in 1907, and at the same time has identified himself with 
a number of other movements which are the outgrowth of a thorough 
public spirit and mean much for community welfare. 

C. H. G. Heinfelden was born in Belleville, Illinois, November 
21, 1881, a son of Curt von Heinfelden and Louise W. (Weber) 
Heinfelden. His father was one of the distinguished .men of 
Southern Illinois. Born in Aix La Chapelle, Germany, educated in 
the University of Bonn, served as a captain of the White Hussars in 
the Franco-Prussian war, and for his gallant conduct on the field of 
battle was given the iron cross by Emperor William I himself. Emi- 
grating to America after the war, he was connected with the edi- 
torial staff of the New York Zeitung and the Chicago Zeitung, and 
in 1873 located at Belleville and became owner and editor of the 
Belleville Zeitung and the News Democrat. He continued to be 
identified with the newspaper profession until 1885, when failing 
health intervened, and after that he lived in partial retirement until 
his death in July, 1897, at the age of fifty years. His widow, who is 
still living, was born in 1858, and married Curt von Heinfelden at 
Belleville, November 9, 1880. Her father, Herman G. Weber, was 
for many years one of the democratic leaders in St. Clair County. 

C. H. G. Heinfelden, the only son, graduated from the Belleville 
High School in 1898, from Smith Academy at St. Louis in 1899, 
then entered Harvard University, where he finished the classical 
course and received the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1903, and was a 
student of Harvard Law School until graduating LL. B. in 1906. 
Mr. Heinfelden engaged in practice at Belleville in 1907, and while 
still keeping his residence in that city in 1908 became affiliated with 
the firm of Kramer, Kramer & Campbell of East St. Louis. He dis- 
solved that connection in May, 1913, and has since resumed his prac- 
tice at Belleville. He is a member of the East St. Louis Bar Asso- 
ciation, the St. Clair County Bar Association and the State Bar 
Association. From 1910 to 1912 he was lecturer on pleading in the 
City College of Law and Finance at St. Louis. 

Mr. Heinfelden served from 1909 until 1913 as president of the 
library board of Belleville, and it was through his direct initiative 



1059 

and efforts that Belleville secured a gift of $45,000 from Andrew 
Carnegie for the erection of a free library building in the city. 
From 1909 to 1912 Mr. Heinfelden was a member of the board 
of education for the Belleville District. He was responsible for the 
founding of the free night school at Belleville, as a result of which 
several hundred students, otherwise unable to take advantage of 
schools, have received instruction free of charge in the night courses, 
and Mr. Heinfelden himself has served as a teacher and exercised 
general supervision over the work. While a democrat, Mr. Hein- 
felden has never aspired to office, but has done his part as a citizen 
through movements outside practical politics. In 1910 he was chair- 
man of the Democratic County Central Committee and also of the 
Congressional Committee of the district. He was a candidate for 
the office of judge of the Circuit Court in 1915, and though defeated 
ran well ahead of the ticket. 

Mr. Heinfelden is affiliated with St. Clair Lodge No. 24, A. F. 
& A. M.; with the Mississippi Valley Consistory of the Scottish 
Rite ; with the Loyal Order of Moose ; with the Improved Order of 
Red Men, and has been exalted ruler of the Belleville Lodge of 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a member of the 
St. Clair Country Club, of the Harvard Club of St. Louis, and has 
been active in the musical organizations of Belleville. Mr. Hein- 
felden was married in 1913 to MissAdele Brunaugh. Her grand- 
father, Edward Abend, was the organizer and for fifty years presi- 
dent of the Belleville Savings Bank. 

WILLIAM WINKELMANN. Still hale, vigorous and energetic, 
and keeping up the intense activity which has characterized him 
through all his years, although now past the age of four score, 
standing high in the confidence and regard of the people among 
whom he has lived and labored for more than fifty years, with a 
high rank in his profession, William Winkelmann is one of the 
oldest members of the bar of -Southern Illinois, and has practiced 
at Belleville for more than half a century. He has had a career 
of long and varied experience. 

Born in Prussia, Germany, February 8, 1829, he was the second 
in a family of seven children born to Christian and Wilhelmina 
(Sweetman) Winkelmann. His father was a lawyer and farmer 
and died in Germany in 1851, and the mother passed away in the 
same country in 1872. 

William Winkelmann grew up in Prussia, attended the common 
schools, was employed by his father, and at the age of eighteen set 
out for America, about the time of the great exodus of German 
citizens from the Fatherland to the New World. He landed in New 
Orleans, came up to St. Louis, was employed two years there in a 
sawmill, then went to Jefferson City, Missouri, and continued in the 
same line of work for a year, and his next scene of labor was in 
Southern Missouri at Farmington, where he was engaged in hauling 



1060 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

iron ore from the Iron Mountains to St. Genevieve. That was his 
work until 1855, in which year he moved to Monroe County, Illinois. 
While following farming and business pursuits, Mr. Winkelmann 
took up the study of law, held the office of justice of the peace, and 
in 1863 left Monroe County and established his permanent home at 
Belleville. In October of the same year he was admitted to the 
bar, and began the practice which has brought him into relations 
with a large share of litigation in the local courts for a period of 
half a century. In all his time Mr. Winkelmann has never sought 
office, and has been content to employ his time with a general law 
practice. 

Mr. Winkelmann is a member of the St. Clair County and State 
Bar associations. For many years he has been affiliated with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a member of the 
Leiderkranz Society and of the Belleville Commercial Club. 

At Potosi, Missouri, in 1855, Mr. Winkelmann married Elizabeth 
Henkel, who died at Belleville in 1882. Their one child, William, 
died at the age of twenty-seven. On December 5, 1885, Mr. Winkel- 
mann married Lucretia A. Shook, who died July 2, 1907. Mr. 
Winkelmann's present wife, whom he married June 12, 1912, in the 
Southern Hotel at St. Louis, was Miss Louise Wolf. 

A. B. SIMPSON. The long career of A. B. Simpson as a member 
of the bar at Chester has brought him unusual success and distinc- 
tion in the law, and from a beginning as a poor boy, through the 
struggles necessary to acquire an education and fit himself for his 
chosen work, he has been regarded as one of the leading citizens 
of Randolph County. 

A. B. Simpson was born in Randolph County, a son of Henry D. 
and Helen (Cissell) Simpson. His father was a native of Kentucky, 
and was for a number of years in educational work, but later took 
up contracting and served as justice of the peace in Randolph 
County. His death occurred in December, 1874. The mother, who 
was born in Perry County, Missouri, died July 2, 1904. 

A. B. Simpson attended the public schools of Randolph County, 
and in early life qualified for work as a teacher and followed that 
profession for eight years. In the meantime he had taken up the 
study of law, and for a time was a student under his uncle, John C. 
Simpson. Mr. Simpson was admitted to the bar in 1873 and began 
practice at Redbud, Illinois, but was out of practice for several years 
and finally resumed it in 1877, and has since been an active member 
of the Chester bar. 

Mr. Simpson has served as state's attorney of his county, as 
justice of the peace, and at the present time is city attorney of 
Chester. 

JOSEPH E. BARNES. Among the prominent members of the 
Mason County bar is Joseph E. Barnes, formerly county surveyor, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1061 

and one of the foremost citizens of Havana. He has spent the 
greater part of his life in Mason County, where he was born, and 
his busy career from boyhood on a farm, through successful efforts 
to secure educational advantages and on to prominence as an- edu- 
cator himself and later to eminence at the bar, is a story full of 
interest, because it illustrates the fact that in America the path is 
open, with rewards at the end, for a young man who chooses to be 
industrious and moral, even when entirely dependent upon his own 
efforts. Mr. Barnes is of New England ancestry and of pioneer 
stock in Illinois. His father, George E. Barnes, was born in New 
Hampshire, and his mother, Clarissa H. (Hovey) Barnes, is a native 
of Massachusetts. Her people settled in Mason County in 1835, 
one of the early families in this section and closely identified with 
its best development. George E. Barnes came early to Illinois, set- 
tling first in Macoupin County and in Mason County in 1853, and, 
although now in his eighty-second year, still continues his oversight 
of his farm. Their family consists of one son, Joseph E., and three 
daughters. 

In the country schools of Mason County, Joseph E. Barnes 
began his educational training. An only son, his father doubtless 
would have chosen the life of an agriculturist for him, but his 
ambition was early centered in a professional career and this hope 
he never lost while diligently applying himself to earn it. After a 
high school course he taught school and subsequently entered a col- 
lege at Charleston, Illinois, where he was graduated in 1888, with the 
degree of A. M., after which he went to Kansas and taught school 
there for a season. After returning to Illinois he became principal 
of the public schools at Kilbourne, Mason County, where he con- 
tinued for five years, in the meanwhile devoting his spare time to the 
study of law and in 1900 he was admitted to the bar. Since then he 
has been engaged in practice at Havana and is numbered with the 
ablest members of her bar. In addition to the study of law, Mr. 
Barnes interested himself in acquiring such a thorough knowledge 
of surveying and civil engineering that in 1908 he was considered 
so competent that he was elected county surveyor of Mason County 
and served with the utmost efficiency for the succeeding four years, 
retiring from the office in 1912. In his political affiliation he has 
always been a republican and on several occasions has been elected 
to responsible offices at Havana, serving one term as police magis- 
trate and one term as president of the village board. His qualifica- 
tions for almost any office could scarcely be questioned, but he finds 
little time for outside interests on account of the demands* made by 
his profession. He carries on a general practice and among his 
clients numbers those who resort to the law when their rights must 
be determined and preserved and desire an honorable advocate to 
represent them. 

Mr. Barnes was married September 4, 1889, to Miss Nellie Allen, 
who was born in Park County, Illinois, a daughter of the late 



1062 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Prof. S. B. Allen, a well known educator. The mother of Mrs. 
Barnes survives. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes have one son, Maurice E., 
who was born at Havana, Illinois, in 1894. He is a student of law 
in the Wesleyan University, having spent one year in the Illinois 
State University. Mr. Barnes belongs to the Masonic fraternity, 
but club activities, as a method of recreation, have never appealed to 
him. As a private citizen of Havana he is representative of its best 
class. 

HERMAN R. NORTRUP. One of the best known attorneys of 
Mason County bears the name of Herman R. Nortrup, who has 
been engaged in the practice of law at Havana since 1878. Not 
only does he possess the respect and confidence of the bench and bar 
of Mason County, but unqualified regard of a numerous clientage, 
whose interests he has faithfully struggled to protect and whose 
rights no other honorable advocate could have better preserved. 
Mr. Nortrup was born in Hanover, Germany, April 6, 1852, and is 
a son of Deitrich and Anna (Harighorst) Nortrup. Both parents 
died in Germany, where, in his own neighborhood, the father was a 
well known farmer and general contractor. Of their two children, 
Herman R. was the second born. 

Herman R. Nortrup came to the United States in 1865. In 
Hanover he had attended an excellent German school and was there 
trained in the mercantile line and for some time after leaving his 
own land was connected with a mercantile house. After coming 
to Illinois he attended school and later took a course at Lincoln Uni- 
versity, in the meanwhile studying law, and in 1878 was graduated 
from the Albany Law School, at Albany, New York, immediately 
afterward locating at Havana, Illinois. He early identified himself 
with the democratic party and for some time served as deputy county 
clerk in Mason county. Mr. Nortrup's success in his profession 
has been remarkable considering all the handicaps with which he 
had to contend, not the least of these being no kno wedge of the 
language. Naturally gifted with a fine mind capable of intellectual 
development, he possessed the persistent industry and persevering 
determination that enabled him to overcome almost unsurmountable 
difficulties. He is a valued member of the Illinois State Bar Associ- 
ation. 

Mr. Nortrup was united in marriage January 5, 1882, with 
Miss Anna Strickle, who is a daughter of the late Benjamin Strickle 
and wife, who were early and respected residents of Bloomington, 
Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Nortrup have two children : Scott S. and 
Mabel B., both residents of Havana and well known in social circles. 
Scott S. Nortrup is associated with his father in the practice of 
law. He graduated from the Northwestern University in the class of 
1905, and from the Harvard Law School in 1909. The family 
attends the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Nortrup is president of the 
local Carnegie Library. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1063 

FREEMAN O. R. BAKER made his modest beginning as a lawyer 
in 1901, and his work as a member of the Menard County bar since 
that time has brought him in the front rank with the ablest and most 
successful attorneys of Petersburg. 

Freeman O. R. Baker was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, 
January 26, 1875, the youngest of seven children of Ward and Polly 
Ann (Duncan) Baker. His mother was born in Illinois, while his 
father came from Virginia first to Ohio and later to Illinois, was 
married in Sangamon County, and was a farmer, miller and merchant 
there, served three terms as county treasurer, and died in 1884 at the 
age of fifty-three. The mother died in 1912 at the age of seventy- 
six. 

With an early education acquired in the public schools of Salis- 
bury, Sangamon County, Mr. Baker was a teacher in Sangamon and 
Menard counties three years, and before he took up practice was 
known at Petersburg as principal of the schools. His law studies were 
carried on at the same time, and for five years he was in the office 
of Orondorf & Patent, and was admitted to the bar in 1900, begin- 
ning practice at Petersburg in 1901. Mr. Baker served two terms 
as prosecuting attorney of Menard County and one term as master 
in chancery. He has membership in the County Bar Association, 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and the Improved Order of Red Men. He is a democrat and a 
Presbyterian. In 1898 at Springfield he married Laura May Trimm, 
daughter of Carlin Trimm, now deceased. They have two children : 
Carlin Baker born at Petersburg in 1902 and attending school ; and 
Margery P. Baker, born in 1905, and also in school. 

SILAS COOK. Responding to the spur of ambition and setting to 
himself a high standard, Judge Cook overcame opposing forces and 
wrested victory from the hands of fate when a young man, as he 
depended upon his own powers and exertions in preparing himself 
for the exacting profession of which he is a representative and hon- 
ored exponent in his native state. He is engaged in the active practice 
of law at East St. Louis, with a large and important clientage, and 
no citizen of St. Clair County has more secure place in popular confi- 
dence and esteem. He has not only served with distinction on the 
bench of the Circuit Court of this district but he also retained for 
four successive terms the office of mayor of the City -of East St. 
Louis, his administration as chief executive of the municipal govern- 
ment having been signally effective and progressive and having 
resulted in marked advancement along civic and material lines. 

Judge Cook was born on a farm in White County, Illinois, on 
the 2Oth of February, 1854, and is a representative of an honored 
pioneer family of that section of the state, where his father was for 
many years a successful agriculturist and a citizen of no little 
influence in his community. Judge Cook is a son of Charles and 
Nancy J. (Hedges) Cook, both likewise natives of Illinois, where 



1064 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the respective families settled in the early pioneer days. The parents 
were reared and educated in this state and here their marriage was 
solemnized. It was given to Charles Cook to accord valiant service 
as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war, and his military career 
covered a period of five years the entire compass of the great 
conflict through which the integrity of the nation was preserved. 
He was a member of Company G, of the Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and with this gallant command he participated in many engage- 
ments, including a number of the most important battles of the war. 
He died in 1913, at the venerable age of eighty-four years, and his 
widow, who celebrated her eighty-third birthday anniversary in 
1914, now resides in East St. Louis, as one of the revered pioneer 
women of her native state. Of the six children four sons and two 
daughters Judge Cook was the firstborn. 

Reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm, Judge Cook acquired 
his early education in the public schools of White and Gallatin 
counties, and within a short time after leaving school he was elected 
county clerk of Gallatin County, a position of which he continued 
the incumbent for three successive terms, so that he thus early initi- 
ated his career as a public official. While thus serving he gave close 
attention to the study of law, and in 1892 he was admitted to the 
bar. He forthwith initiated the general practice of his profession at 
Shawneetown, judicial center of Gallatin County, and his energy, 
ability and personal popularity soon enabled him to build up a sub- 
stantial law business. In 1895 he removed to the City of East St. 
Louis, and in this broader field his professional success has been of 
unequivocal order and given him place as one of the leading mem- 
bers of the bar of St. Clair County. He here continued in general 
practice until 1898, when he was elected to the bench of the Circuit 
Court, and he continued his earnest and efficient service in this impor- 
tant judicial office for a period of five years, at the expiration of 
which he resigned, to resume the private practice of law and give 
attention to his duties as mayor of East St. Louis, to which position 
he was first elected in 1903 and in which he served three successive 
terms, his retirement occurring in 1911, after he had given to the 
city one of the best administrations in its entire history. 

Judge Cook is one of the honored and influential members of the 
East St. Louis Bar Association and is identified also with the Illinois 
State Bar Association. He is a member of the directorate of the 
Union Trust & Savings Bank of East St. Louis, is a republican in 
his political allegiance, and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias. 

In the year 1878 was solemnized the marriage of Judge Cook to 
Miss Ceriel Kinsella, daughter of the late Benjamin Kinsella, of 
Shawneetown, and concerning the children of this union brief data 
are here entered : Lillie is the wife of a Mr. Hockaday, of East St. 
Louis, and they have four children ; Eula is the wife of Mr. McBrien, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1065 

of the same city, and they likewise have four children; Miss Zella 
remains at the parental home; Ralph, who was graduated in the 
Benton Law School, in the City of St. Louis, Missouri, is engaged 
in the practice of his profession in East St. Louis ; and Misses Lutha 
and Mabel remain with their parents. 

HON. BARRATT O'HARA, lieutenant-governor of the State of 
Illinois, although still a young man, has had an eventful career, in 
which have been included activities as soldier, lawyer, journalist and 
public servant, and from early manhood has taken a stirring and 
helpful part in civic affairs. Born in the City of Saint Joe, Michigan, 
April 28, 1882, he is one of the three children born to his parents, 
Thomas and Mary (Barratt) O'Hara. He comes honestly by his 
predilection for the law, being the third of a line of American law- 
yers, his grandfather, John O'Hara, having for many years been a 
legal practitioner in Wisconsin, while his father, Hon. Thomas 
O'Hara, is now serving as circuit judge of the Second Judicial Dis- 
trict of Michigan, after a long and successful career as an attorney. 
It is an odd circumstance that the future lieutenant-governor was 
admitted to the bar upon the day of his grandfather's death. 

The boyhood of Barratt O'Hara was spent at St. Joe, where he 
attended the graded and high schools, and subsequently he entered 
the Benton Harbor High School, from which he was graduated. He 
was but sixteen years of age when he was accepted as a private in 
Company I, Thirty-third Regiment, Michigan Volunteer Infantry, 
for service during the Spanish-American war, and went with that 
regiment to Cuba, where he saw much active service and, at Agna- 
dores, was promoted to the rank of corporal, this despite his youth. 
He subsequently rendered valuable service as interpreter for the 
expedition which effected the exchange of Captain Hobson, and later 
was employed as clerk in the United States Consulate at San Juan 
Del Norte, Nicaragua. On his return to the United States he en- 
gaged in newspaper work, being a reporter on the St. Louis Chronicle 
and city editor of the Benton Harbor News, and for eight years was 
on the editorial staff of several Chicago newspapers, in 1910 becom- 
ing the founder of the Chicago Magazine, which has since attained 
a wide circulation. 

In the meantime Mr. O'Hara had turned his attention to the legal 
profession, attending the Missouri State University and the Chicago 
Kent College of Law, from which latter institution he was grad- 
uated with his degree in 1911 and began his practice in Chicago. 
From early manhood he had been interested in democratic politics, 
and in 1912 became the running mate of Hon. Edward F. Dunne, 
governor of Illinois, and secured a handsome majority at the polls. 
His service in the capacity of lieutenant-governor has shown him a 
man of sterling ability and signal usefulness, and various public 
movements have been entrusted to him, notably the White Slave 
Traffic Investigation Commission of 1913, of which he was the 



Vol. Ill 15 



1066 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

chairman. Lieutenant-Governor O'Hara is a member of the Spanish- 
American War Veterans, and in April, 1914, was elected lieutenant- 
colonel of the First Provisional Regiment of the Illinois Volunteers. 
He belongs to various fraternal organizations and is well known in 
social circles in Chicago, where he belongs to the Iroquois, Irish 
Fellowship and Chicago Press clubs. 

On February 28, 1906, Mr. O'Hara was united in marriage with 
Miss Florence Hoffman, a daughter of Elisha A. Hoffman, and three 
children have been born to this union : Barratt II, Lorence Hoffman 
and Howard. ' 

J. L. FOWLER. Although he has been a member of the Illinois 
bar for only two years, J. L. Fowler has already gained a reputation 
as one of the forceful members of his calling at Marion. His keen 
analytical mind has afforded him unusual facility in working out the 
details of his cases, and it has been said of him that before he enters 
the courtroom he must know that he is thoroughly prepared for 
every development that may arise during the trial. His contempo- 
raries have been quick to recognize his speciaj abilities and to account 
him one of the energetic and able young lawyers of this part of 
the state. 

Mr. Fowler has passed his entire career within the borders of 
Marion, having been born here December 7, 1885, a son of Dr. J. M. 
and Sydney (Hendrickson) Fowler, both natives of the Prairie 
State. The father, a physician and surgeon, who practiced for 
many years and was known as one of the eminent men of his pro- 
fession in Williamson County, died July n, 1911, at the age of 
sixty-three years, while the mother still survives and has reached 
the age of sixty-one years. Both were reared and educated in 
Marion, and the family has long been one the members of which 
have been held in the highest esteem and have held positions of 
trust and responsibility in their community. There were five chil- 
dren in the family of Doctor and Mrs. Fowler, namely: Doctor 
Lorin, who has followed in the footsteps of his father and is now 
engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Marion; Matt, 
who is an attorney and stands high in his profession at Silver City, 
New Mexico ; J. L., of this review ; and W. H. and C. H., who are 
both residents of Marion. 

The public schools of Williamson County, Illinois, furnished J. 
L. Fowler with his early education, following which he entered Val- 
paraiso University, in which he took a scientific course. Having 
decided upon the law as his life's vocation, Mr. Fowler next entered 
the Chicago Law School, and in June, 1911, was graduated there- 
from with his degree. He did not actively enter practice, however, 
until July, 1912, when he opened an office at Marion, and here has 
continued in the enjoyment of an excellent professional business, 
attracted to him by his acknowledged talent. He has been con- 
nected with a number of important cases, in which his skill and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1067 

thorough knowledge of the intricacies of his calling have enabled 
him to be unusually successful, and is a well known figure in the 
courts of the county. Mr. Fowler is a member of the various or- 
ganizations of his profession, county, state and national, and has the 
reputation among his fellow-practitioners of being a lawyer with 
the highest regard for professional ethics. Politically a republican, 
he has found little time and has had no inclination for public office, 
preferring to devote himself exclusively to the practice of the law. 
Mr. Fowler is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and of the Phi Alpha Delta College Fraternity. He is un- 
married and makes his home with his mother, at Marion. 

WALTER WILLIAM SKAGGS. Few members of the Illinois bar 
have been in greater degree the architects of their own fortunes 
than has Walter William Skaggs, now recognized as one of the lead- 
ing young attorneys of Williamson County, practicing at Marion. 
His success is accounted by the union of excellent business judg- 
ment with a keen legal insight into the most involved complications, 
and added to these have been untiring perseverance that has carried 
him over all obstacles and a sincere devotion to the best ethics of 
the profession which he has adopted as his life work. 

Walter W. Skaggs was born at Marion, Illinois, May 23, 1879, 
and is a son of William T. and Amanda J. (Oglesby) Skaggs His 
father was born September 18, 1850, in Tennessee, and was a lad 
of six years when he accompanied his parents to Illinois, the family 
settling at Marion. In young manhood Mr. Skaggs became a school- 
teacher, and for many years had various charges in the country dis- 
tricts, where he was widely known and very popular as an educator. 
Later in life he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, and his 
death occurred on his Williamson County homestead, February 6, 
1911. Mrs. Skaggs, who was born in August, 1856, in Illinois, sur- 
vived her husband only ten days, dying February 16, 1911. They 
were the parents of four children, of whom Walter W. was the first 
in order of birth. 

Walter William Skaggs received his early education in the public 
schools, this being subsequently supplemented by a course in the 
Southern Illinois Normal School, at Carbondale, from which he 
was graduated in 1901. Later he attended summer schools at Cham- 
paign, Illinois, and finally, having chosen the law as the field in which 
to work out his success, secured a position in the law offices of 
Andrews & Voss, at Mattoon, Illinois. There he applied himself 
assiduously to his profession until 1906, when he was admitted to 
the bar. Mr. Skaggs did not feel himself financially equipped, how- 
ever, to enter regular practice, and accordingly accepted a position 
in the office of the Big Four Railroad, so that it was not until 1908 
that he began the duties of his calling. Until then he had resided 
at Mattoon, but in that year came to Marion, where he has con- 
tinued in successful practice. He is a republican in his political 



1068 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

views, and at the present time is serving efficiently in the capacity of 
city attorney of Marion. Mr. Skaggs is a Master Mason and a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. All move- 
ments which promise to be of benefit to Marion in every way receive 
his hearty support, and he can be depended upon as a friend of 
education, good citizenship and morality. 

Mr. Skaggs was married at Marion, Illinois, November 16, 1910, 
to Miss Laura Bell Casey, daughter of Samuel Casey, of Marion, 
who is still engaged in the publishing business here. One child has 
come to this union: Helen Casey, who was born at Marion, in 
1912. 

GEORGE W. SPILLER. A member of the Illinois legal profession 
for a period of twenty-two years, George W. Spiller has prosecuted 
his professional labors at Marion, and has steadily risen in reputa- 
tion and the emoluments which accompany achievement. It has been 
his fortune and privilege to have been connected with some of the 
important cases tried in Williamson County, and his consistent suc- 
cess has added to the regard and appreciation in which he is held by 
the members of his profession and the public generally. While he 
has not been an office seeker, he has discharged the duties of citizen- 
ship in a most acceptable manner, and in several minor offices has 
displayed executive ability and an earnest desire to forward the best 
interests of his community. 

Mr. Spiller has been a resident of Southern Illinois throughout 
his career, having been born in Jackson County, this state, Septem- 
ber 28, 1865, a son of Elijah and Praseta (Roberts) Spiller. The 
family is a well known one in this part of the state, and Spillertown, 
in Williamson County, is named after one of its members. Elijah 
Spiller was born in Illinois, and as a young man was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in Jackson County, but after a successful career 
therein turned his attention to mercantile lines, and for some years 
was a well-known clothing merchant at Carbondale. He died in 
May, 1900, at the age of sixty-five years. Mrs. Spiller, who was a 
native of Tennessee, survived her husband for some time, dying in 
July, 1914, at the age of seventy-one years. They were the parents 
of two children, of whom George W. is the younger. 

After attending the public schools of Jackson County, George W, 
Spiller pursued a scientific course in Valparaiso University and 
then, turning his attention to his vocation, began the study of law 
in the office of Judge Duncan, at Marion. So assiduously did he 
devote himself to his books, that in May, 1892, he was able to pass 
the examination, and was admitted to the bar, at once opening an 
office at Marion, where he has since continued in the enjoyment of 
a constantly increasing professional business. In his long and uni- 
formly successful career, Mr. Spiller has demonstrated the posses- 
sion of several noticeable personal traits, among which is versatility 
of talents combined with thoroughness of preparation and soundness 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1069 

of legal knowledge. He is a member of the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation, and his fraternal connections include membership in the 
Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. Polit- 
ically a democrat, he has served as city attorney of Marion and in 
other minor offices. During his long residence at Marion, he has 
formed an extensive acquaintance, in which he numbers many 
warm personal friends. 

Mr. Spiller was married at Marion, Illinois, in 1890, to Miss 
Nettie A. Edwards, daughter of C. M. and Julia B. Edwards, the 
former of whom is deceased. 

BENJAMIN VOGEL BECKER.* Mr. Becker is associated with S. O. 
Levinson, Chester E. Cleveland and Arthur L. Schwartz, in the 
present firm of Levinson, Becker, Cleveland & Schwartz. He was 
born in Warsaw, Indiana, June 20, 1871, the son of Leopold and 
Caroline Vogel Becker. He was educated in the public schools at 
Warsaw and Fort Wayne, came to Chicago in 1887, and in 1890 
began the study of law in the office of Jacob Newman and was 
admitted to the Illinois bar in 1892, and to the Supreme Court of 
the United States in 1900. In 1898 he became a partner of the firm 
of Newman, Northrup, Levinson & Becker, and continued in that 
firm or its successors until his present firm was formed. 

He is a director in the National Bank of the Republic of Chicago, 
the Union Switch and Signal Company of Pittsburgh, and of several 
other corporations. He is a member of the Chicago, Illinois State 
and American Bar associations, the Chicago Historical Society and 
several clubs. 

He was married at Jackson, Michigan, June 20, 1900, to Elizabeth 
Loeb. They have one son, John Leonard. 

Mr. Levinson and Mr. Becker are singularly well adapted for 
professional co-operation. Mr. Becker is a close student of human 
nature, most sympathetic and considerate of others and has the rare 
faculty of getting the best out of other people, a quality of great 
service to both. He has a mind of great clearness and penetration. 
He seems to be able to see things as they are, without those errors 
of refraction due to professional bias or blindness, occasioned by 
looking at one side or aspect of a complicated matter. He also has 
natural aptitude for looking deeply into an intricate situation and 
far enough ahead to avoid taking a narrow and superficial view. 
His judgment therefore (in large and complex matters) where strong 
interests are arrayed against each other, is of great value and his 
influence with both clients and others in negotiations and confer- 
ences is necessarily very great. Like Mr. Levinson, he seldom 
appears in court. In fact with the able men of the profession in 
the large centers, this seems to be more and more the rule. Probably 
many of them feel that they are unwilling, even if they had the time, 
to spend it in the petty and tedious wrangles which so often mark 

* Sketch and editorial estimate by Stephen S. Gregory. 



1070 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the progress of litigation and indeed are a standing reproach to the 
modern administration of justice. In fact, it cannot be denied that 
most great financial controversies are now adjusted out of court. 
Litigations, except those between public authority and large interest, 
like either public service corporations or alleged unlawful combina- 
tions, are comparatively infrequent. The truth about it is that the 
average intelligent man of business and affairs feels unwilling to 
trust matters of large moment to the arbitrament of the law, in view 
of the publicity, expense, annoyance, delay and uncertainty attend- 
ant upon the administration of justice. In all such adjustments (of 
large and difficult pecuniary matters) Mr. Becker's services are in- 
valuable. He is a man of great diligence, always loyal and devoted 
to his clients, yet of sufficient character to give them the full benefit 
of his independent opinions. 

He makes many friends and few enemies and realizes, more than 
some men do, the importance not only of dealing justly with those 
with whom you are in disagreement but of satisfying them that this 
is your purpose. He is a very genial agreeable companion, chari- 
table, generous and liberal, and almost universally popular, espe- 
cially with those who know him best. 

While he must still be regarded as a young man in the profes- 
sion, in a large and important field he stands among the leaders with 
a future promising a success of which what he has already accom- 
plished is the best assurance. 

His favorite recreation is golf, and he is a member of the Ravis- 
loe Country Club and the Lake Shore Country Club. 

DELOS LEON DUTY. To the majority of men active participa- 
tion in any one profession or business appears adequate to command 
their attention, but there is occasionally found an individual whose 
restless energy and ambition demands further outlet for surplus 
enterprise, and who has the versatility necessary for engagement in 
widely diversified occupations. In this latter class stands Delos 
Leon Duty, who for years has been well known at Marion as the 
proprietor of a successful drug business, and who has recently en- 
tered the field of law, in which he has already made a name and 
reputation for himself by reason of his achievements. 

Mr. Duty is a product of the farm, having been born on his 
father's homestead in Williamson County, Illinois, October 5, 1883, 
a son of Hiram B. and Paradine (Parks) Duty. Both the Parks and 
Duty families are well known in Williamson County, where their 
members have resided for many years and have occupied positions 
of responsibility and importance. Hiram B. Duty was born, reared 
and educated in this county, and here as a young man entered upon 
a career in agriculture, making this his life work, a vocation in 
which he was enabled to succeed by his industry, perseverance and 
good business management. He was known as a man of the highest 
integrity, and when he died, in July, 1909, at the age of fifty-six 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1071 

years, his community lost one of its able and public-spirited citizens. 
Mrs. Duty, who was also born in this county and here educated, 
still survives her husband, and has reached the age of sixty years. 
There were seven children in the family, of whom Delos Leon is 
the third in order of birth. 

Delos L. Duty was reared on his father's farm, and until reach- 
ing the age of twelve years was student in the public schools of his 
native community. At that time he entered Crab Orchard Academy, 
where he continued as a pupil four years, and after his graduation 
from that institution, adopted the profession of educator. In this 
manner he earned the means with which to pursue a course in the 
pharmaceutical department of Valparaiso University, being grad- 
uated therefrom in the class of 1905, at that time coming to Marion 
and establishing himself in business as proprietor of the Duty 
Drug Company. He still owns this enterprise, and through good 
management and business integrity has made it one of the most 
popular and successful pharmacies in the city. During his leisure 
hours while attending to his store business, Mr. Duty began to read 
law, and after some years of preparation took the state examination, 
with the result that in February, 1914, he was admitted to the bar, 
and since that time has been engaged in practice. He is at present 
in a professional partnership with Mr. Fowler, and this is considered 
a strong and capable combination. While a newcomer to the ranks 
of Williamson County legists, Mr. Duty has shown that he possesses 
a profound knowledge of the law, and that he has a number of per- 
sonal traits so necessary to success in his chosen calling. 

Mr. Duty is still single and makes his home with his mother at 
Marion. His fraternal affiliation is with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

HON. GEORGE W. YOUNG. A record of forty-four years as lead- 
ing lawyer, dignified jurist and public-spirited citizen has placed 
Hon. George W. Young in a high position in the confidence of the 
people of Williamson County, and particularly at Marion, where the 
greater part of his labors have been performed. Judge Young's 
knowledge of the law is acknowledged to be comprehensive and 
accurate, and in its application he has been logical, forceful and 
earnest, and this may be said to account, in large measure, for his 
high professional standing. Like the majority of leading and 
honored citizens of Marion, Judge Young is a native of the State 
of Illinois, having been born on a farm in Williamson County, De- 
cember i, 1844, a son f Henry and Rachel Young, well-known 
agricultural people who passed their entire lives in this community. 

George W. Young secured his early education in the public 
schools of Williamson County, and as a youth assisted his father 
in the labors of the homestead farm. His studies, however, were 
interrupted by the outbreak of the Civil war, in which he enlisted as 
a member of the Eighth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, 



1072 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

although he was subsequently transferred to the Thirtieth Regiment, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He established a record for bravery 
and faithful discharge of duty that won him promotion to the rank 
of captain, and received his honorable discharge in 1865, after three 
years of service, having escaped capture and wounds. 

On his return from the war, Judge Young resumed his studies, 
turning his attention to the field of law. After some preparation, 
he entered the law department of the University of Chicago, and 
subsequently became a student in Benton Law Institute, from which 
latter institution he was graduated with his degree in 1869. Ad- 
mitted to the bar March 3, 1869, he did not enter into active practice 
at Marion until July I, 1870, since which time he has become a 
familiar figure in the courts of the state. For many years Judge 
Young has served in various offices of public trust and responsi- 
bility, elected thereto by his appreciative fellow-citizens who have 
recognized his ability and high character. For eight years he served 
as justice of the peace at Marion, was county judge of Williamson 
County for five years and circuit judge for four years, while for 
twelve years he did much to aid the cause of education here as a 
member of the school board. He joined the republican party in 
1865, when he attained his majority, and for many years was one 
of its most active members in the county, but with the organization 
of the progressive party, in 1912, he transferred his membership to 
that organization. He is a popular comrade of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, and for forty-six years has been a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Marion. 

Judge Young was married September 24, 1871, to Miss Martha 
A. Spiller,- of Marion, Illinois, daughter of Elijah and Praseta 
(Roberts) Spiller. Three children have been born to this union: 
Mrs. Olie Y. Treber, who has two children ; Mrs. Ida Rochester, 
who is deceased ; and Miss Etta, who is official court reporter. Judge 
Young's residence is one of the finest in Marion, and here he is 
spending the evening of life, content in the knowledge that his 
career has been a useful and helpful one, and that his record is free 
from stain or blemish of any kind. 

MILES S. GILBERT. For more than half a century the name 
Gilbert has been successfully identified with the practice of law in 
Illinois. Miles S. Gilbert is a Cairo lawyer, in practice there for 
the past twenty years, while his father William B. Gilbert is one of 
the most venerable lawyers in Southern Illinois, and has long been 
well known in public life. 

Miles S. Gilbert was born at Cairo, Illinois, September 2, 1868, 
son of William B. and Kate (Barrett) Gilbert. His father was 
born at old Kaskaskia, Illinois, September 24, 1837, and began prac- 
tice at a time which made him contemporary with many of the ablest 
and best known lawyers and public men of the state. He was a close 
friend of the late Chief Justice Fuller. The mother was born in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1073 

Alton, Illinois, September i, 1845, ar >d died at Champaign. Of the 
three children, William C. Gilbert is a successful lawyer in Chicago, 
while Prof. Barry Gilbert is a graduate of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity and is now located at Berkeley, California. 

Miles S. Gilbert was educated at Racine, and also in the Harvard 
Law School, graduating in 1893. From 1893 to 1897 he practiced 
in Chicago, and in April of the latter year moved to Cairo. Besides 
a large general practice he has served for twelve years as public 
administrator and public guardian for Alexander County. Mr. Gil- 
bert is a member of the Episcopal Church. On October 4, 1899, he 
married Helen Elizabeth Judson, now deceased. Their children are : 
Judson Gilbert, born February 22, 1900; Helen Gilbert, born Novem- 
ber n, 1901 ; and William B., Jr., born May 24, 1907. Mr. Gilbert 
was married December 30, 1911, to Miss Louise M. Helbig, daughter 
of Dr. Oscar H. Helbig, formerly a well known physician of St. 
Louis, but now retired. 

WALTER B. WARDER, JR. In the legal profession and in public 
affairs in Southern Illinois the name Warder has been conspicuous 
for many years. Walter B. Warder, Jr., is the son of a distinguished 
lawyer, and since 1908 has been successfully identified with the bar 
at Cairo. 

Walter B. Warder, Jr., was born in Johnson County, Illinois. 
December 19, 1882, second of three children born to Walter and 
Cora (Bain) Warder. His father had for many years lived in Cairo, 
and for the past twenty-five years has been master in chancery. 
During the Spanish-American war he served with the rank of major, 
was for four years a member of the state senate, and for three 
sessions in the house of representatives, and at one time was presi- 
dent pro tem of the senate and acting governor of the state for two 
months. For ten years he was recognized as the head of the local 
republican party. 

Walter B. Warder, Jr., attended school at Cairo, and then entered 
the University of Illinois, graduating from the academic department 
in 1906, and took his law degree in 1908. He has since practiced 
at Cairo, and is a member of the Bar Association. In college he 
was affiliated with the Phi Delta Phi Fraternity. He is a vestryman 
in the Episcopal Church and in politics a republican. 

LESLIE WILBURN. A rising young attorney of Cairo, Leslie 
Wilburn is a graduate of the University of Illinois, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1911. 

He was born at Olive Branch in Alexander County, Illinois, 
November 15, 1888. His parents are W. W. and Julia (Copley) 
Wilburn, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Illinois. 
The father has lived in Alexander County since early manhood, and 
is a merchant at Olive Branch. He is fifty-five, while his wife is 
fifty-four years of age. Their five children were: Walter, Leslie, 
Asa, Willie and Ada. 



1074 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Leslie Wilburn was educated in the public schools at Cairo and 
after finishing the high school entered Christian Brothers College 
at St. Louis, took the literary course there and was graduated from 
the Jackson Military Academy at Jackson, Missouri, in 1908. He 
then entered the law department of the University of Illinois, and is 
graduated LL. B. in 191 1, and has since been in practice at Cairo. At 
the present time Mr. Wilburn is a candidate on the republican ticket 
for the office of county judge. He belongs to the Phi Alpha Delta 
Fraternity of the University of Illinois. 

W. B. McBRiDE. The name borne by the subject of this brief 
review has been for nearly half a century one of prominence in con- 
nection with the history of jurisprudence in Christian County, and 
he whose career is here briefly taken under review has not stood in 
the shadow of paternal greatness in making worthy achievement in 
his chosen profession, though his father is one of the prominent 
lawyers and jurists of this section of the state, where he is now 
serving with distinction on the bench of the circuit court. 

W. B. McBride was born at Taylorville, judicial center of Chris- 
tian County, Illinois, on the 9th of September, 1872, and is a son 
of James C. and Mattie (Wheeler) McBride, the former of whom 
was born near Palmyra, Macoupin County, this state, on the i6th 
of July, 1845, an d the latter of whom was born in Indiana, on the 
8th of November, 1851, she having been a mere child at the time of 
the family removal to Logan County, Illinois, where she was reared 
and educated. 

James Carroll McBride is a son of Thomas W. and Margaret A. 
(Wiggins) McBride, the former of whom was born in Tennessee 
and the latter in Kentucky. Judge James C. McBride was afforded 
the advantages of Earlham College, at Richmond, Indiana, and of 
Lincoln University, in which Illinois institution he was graduated in 
1869. He studied law under the direction of Judge William R. 
Welch, of Carlinville, was admitted to the bar in January, 1871, and 
shortly afterward he engaged in the practice of his profession at 
Taylorville, Christian County, where he has since maintained his 
home. In the early period of his professional career he served as 
justice of the peace, and he has also been called upon to serve as 
master in chancery and as city attorney. He is now serving on the 
bench of the judicial circuit and has given a most admirable adminis- 
tration of the duties of this exacting and responsible office. His 
political support is given to the democratic party and he is honored 
as one of the prominent legists and jurists of the central part of 
his native state. He and his wife became the parents of four chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom is W. B., to whom this article is dedicated. 

W. B. McBride made good use of the advantages afforded in the 
public schools of Taylorville and thereafter took an engineering 
course in the University of Illinois. In 1895 he was graduated in 
the Ohio Normal University, and he then returned to Taylorville, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1075 

where he began the study of law under the effective preceptorship 
of his father. He was admitted to the bar in September, 1898, and 
thereafter was associated in practice with his father until the eleva- 
tion of the latter to his present judicial position. Mr. McBride con- 
trols a substantial and important law business, is an able and 
sagacious advocate and well fortified counselor, and he has gained 
high standing in the ranks of his profession. He is an appreciative 
and active member of the Illinois State Bar Association, is an effect- 
ive and loyal advocate of the principles of the democratic party, 
is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the 
Masonic Fraternity he has received the thirty-second degree of the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. He is a director of the Farmers 
National Bank of Taylorville and also of the Christian County Tele- 
phone Company. 

In the year 1894 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. McBride to 
Miss Rose Schultz, daughter of Frederick Schultz, of Taylorville, 
and Mrs. McBride was summoned to the life eternal on the 27th of 
October, 1910, being survived by one child, Katherine, who was born 
October 12, 1896, and who is a student in St. Mary's Academy, at 
South Bend, Indiana. 

JOHN B. COLEGROVE. In according recognition in this publication 
to those who have gained representative status at the bar of the 
central part of the State of Illinois, special attention must con- 
sistently be given to Mr. Colegrove, who is one of the leading lawyers 
of Christian County, where he has been engaged in active and suc- 
cessful practice for a quarter of a century, with residence and pro- 
fessional headquarters at Taylorville, the county seat. He is also 
known as a progressive and enterprising business man, and in his 
home city he is the executive head of the substantial and popular 
private bank conducted under the title of John B. Colegrove & Com- 
pany, he having been the organizer of this firm and having been the 
dominating force in the development of the excellent business con- 
ducted by this conservative institution. 

Mr. Colegrove was born at Alta, Christian County, Illinois, on 
the 2/th of February, 1865, and is a son of John G. and Alice 
(Mason) Colegrove, both of whom were born and reared in Con- 
necticut, where their marriage was solemnized and whence they 
came to Illinois in 1856, becoming early settlers of Christian County, 
where the father was long a prosperous farmer and merchant and 
an honored and influential citizen. After the death of his devoted 
wife he finally returned to his native state, and he is now maintaining 
his residence at New London, Connecticut, his eighty-sixth birthday 
anniversary having been celebrated in 1914. Mrs. Colegrove was a 
gracious and gentle woman whose memory is revered in the county 
that was her home for many years, her death having occurred at 
Taylorville in 1908, at which time she was seventy-five years of age. 

John B. Colegrove, the fourth in order of birth of eight chil- 



1076 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

dren, was afforded the advantages of the common schools of Chris- 
tian County and a well ordered private school at Taylorville. As a 
youth he went to the City of Springfield and began the study of law 
in the office of Frank P. Denfnan, who was one of the leading 
lawyers of the capital city at that time. Mr. Colegrove was admitted 
to the bar in 1889, and from that year to the present time he has 
continued in the practice of law at Taylorville, his success having 
been unequivocal and his reputation being secure through high ad- 
mirable achievement as an honest, careful and able representative 
of the legal profession. Mr. Colegrove is an appreciative member 
of the Illinois State Bar Association, is a republican in his political 
adherency, and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Loyal Order of Moose. 

In the year 1889 Mr. Colegrove wedded Miss Cornelia E. Lewis, 
of Taylorville, a daughter of the late Alfred Lewis, and she passed 
to the life eternal in the year 1901. Of the three children of this 
union the eldest is Louis G., who was born in 1891, and who is a 
student (1914-15) in Eureka College; Loren B., born in 1894, is 
attending the public schools of Taylorville, as is also Florence, the 
only daughter, the year of her nativity having been 1897. 

On the 26th of October, 1911, Mr. Colegrove contracted a second 
marriage, by his union with Miss Anna L. Barbre, daughter of 
James A. Barbre, of Taylorville. Mrs. Colegrove is a woman of 
distinctive culture and high ideals, and for twelve years prior to 
her marriage she had been the efficient and popular county superin- 
tendent of the schools of Christian County. 

HON. LOGAN HAY. One of the leading members of the Sanga- 
mon County bar, who has also served acceptably in positions of 
public trust, Hon. Logan Hay is a member of a family whose 
members have been prominent in legal circles of Springfield since 
1832. He was born in this city, February 17, 1871, and is a son of 
the late Honorable Milton and Mary (Logan) Hay. 

Milton Hay was born in Fayette County, Kentucky, July 3, 1817, 
and was a resident of Springfield from his fifteenth year until the 
date of his death, September 17, 1893. As a young man he chose 
the law as his life's vocation, and after a period of study in the 
office of Stuart and Lincoln was admitted to the bar in 1840, and 
from that time until his retirement from active practice, in 1881, 
continued as one of the able and distinguished jurists of the capital. 
During this long period he formed partnerships and was associated 
with such leading lawyers as the Hon. Shelby M. Cullom, Gen. 
John M. Palmer, H. S. Green and D. T. Little, and came so promi- 
nently before the public that he was at various times chosen for high 
public honors. He served as chairman of the court on revenue, and 
in 1881 was a member of the lower branch of the Twenty-eighth 
General Assembly, in which body he served as a member of the com- 
mittee on judiciary. For many years a member of the Sangamon 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1077 

County Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, he 
was held in the highest regard by his fellow-practitioners, while his 
private character was spotless and unimpeachable, his home life was 
beautiful and his friends were numbered by the score. Mrs. Hay 
was a daughter of the late Stephen Trigg Logan, one of Illinois' 
most noted members of the bar. 

Logan Hay received his primary education in the schools of his 
native city, following which he entered Yale University and was 
graduated therefrom with the class of 1893 and the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He then entered Harvard Law School, from 
which noted institution he was graduated in 1897, and during that 
same year was admitted to the Sangamon County bar and became 
a member of the firm of Brown, Wheeler, Brown & Hay, of which 
he and his brother-in-law, Stuart Brown, are the surviving members, 
the late C. C. Brown and S. P. Wheeler, the senior members of the 
firm, having passed away. Having enjoyed superior opportunities 
in his youth and inheriting rare abilities from both his father and 
his maternal grandfather, Mr. Hay has established himself in a high 
position in his chosen profession, but this has not come without a 
full measure of persistent and assiduous labor. That he also has a 
high reputation among his fellow-citizens is shown by the public 
offices to which he has been called, the first being of an aldermanic 
nature, in 1903. In 1906 he was the choice of the voters of the 
Springfield District for a seat in the Senate, and in 1910 received the 
re-election to that body. There, as elsewhere, he depended upon 
actual accomplishments rather than upon self-advertising, for, like 
his late father, he is of a rather quiet, unostentatious manner. 

Mr. Hay was married to Miss Lucy L. Bowen, and they have 
had two children : Mary Douglass and Alice Houghton. Mr. Hay 
has given the majority of his time and labors to his profession, but 
also has a number of business interests, and at this time is a director 
in the Illinois National Bank. 

GEORGE A. CROW. Judge Crow's position as a judge of the 
Third Judicial District has made him one of the best known figures 
in the bench and bar of Southern Illinois, and during the twenty 
years since his admission to the bar he has won success whether 
as a private practitioner or in the handling of various official re- 
sponsibilities entrusted to him. 

He was born in Massac County, Illinois, July 17, 1870, a son of 
Jacob and Kezia H. (Sherwood) Crow, both of whom were natives 
of Illinois. His father died in 1904 at the age of sixty-six, and his 
mother in 1908, at the age of sixty-eight. The oldest of three chil- 
dren, Judge Crow was a student in the country schools when a boy, 
early became dependent upon his own resources, and paid his own 
way while preparing for his profession. Five terms were spent as a 
teacher in Polk County, and after getting a knowledge of the law 
through private study and in the offices of practicing lawyers he set 



1078 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

up an office in East St. Louis in 1895, and was engaged in practice 
there until his election to the circuit bench in 1909. In 1893 he was 
elected county judge of Polk County, but resigned on his removal to 
East St. Louis. For six years he served as assistant United States 
attorney, resigning to take his present position. In June, 1915, he 
was re-elected to the circuit bench for a second term of six years, 

Judge Crow is a republican, has membership in the County, State 
and American Bar associations, is a Mason with affiliations in the 
Blue Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter and Council, and also belongs to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On June 30, 1905, at 
Danville, Illinois, Judge Crow married Miss Ada Hamilton, daughter 
of the late Judge Hamilton of Danville. 

CHARLES WEBB. An able lawyer, with position fortified through 
twenty years of active relations to the bar of Southern Illinois, 
Charles Webb is now serving as state's attorney of St. Clair County. 

Born in Franklin County, Illinois, December i, 1869, he was the 
fourth of ten children whose parents were William R. and Rebecca 
(Monehan) Webb, both natives of Illinois. His father was well 
known in Franklin County as a farmer and stock dealer, and died in 
July, 1899, at the age of fifty-nine, while the mother is still living 
at the age of seventy-two. 

Charles Webb grew up in the country, with an education from 
the local schools, finished the Benton High School course, was grad- 
uated in the literary department from Ewing College, and pursued 
the study of law in the office of Webb & Webb at Mount Vernon. 
Admitted to the bar in 1893, he began his practice at Belleville, and 
is now one of the older attorneys practicing in that city. His elec- 
tion to his present office of state's attorney came in 1912, and it has 
been with unusual efficiency and diligence that he has handled 
the business of his office. Mr. Webb is a democrat, a member of the 
County Bar Association, is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He was married in 1900 at St. Charles, Missouri, 
to Miss Hester Elizabeth Bailey, whose father, Gustave Bailey, is 
deceased. 

ROY E. GAUEN has practiced law at Waterloo for ten years. 
The day before his admission to the bar in 1904 he was elected to 
the office of state's attorney of Monroe County, a distinction that 
his subsequent record in the office well merited. Mr. Gauen was 
re-elected in 1908 and gave eight years of capable service to the 
county. For the past ten years, in connection with a large and grow- 
ing general practice, he has served as city attorney of Waterloo. 

Roy E. Gauen was born in Waterloo August 19, 1882, a son of 
Joseph and Mary Ann (Burke) Gauen, both of whom were natives 
of Monroe County. His father has long been prominent in business 
affairs at Waterloo, and at the age of fifty-eight is still active, being 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1079 

vice president of the Gauen Mercantile & Lumber Company of Wa- 
terloo. The mother is now fifty-nine years of age. They have three 
children, and the son, Pierre E. Gaue.n, lives in Millstadt, Illinois. 

Roy E. Gauen was educated in the public schools at Waterloo, 
graduating from the high school in 1902, took up the study of law 
in the office of Judge A. C. Bellinger at Waterloo, and was admitted 
to practice in 1904. Mr. Gauen is a member of the County Bar 
Association. He has served as deputy grand knight and is first grand 
knight of the Knights of Columbus, is president of St. Vincent's 
Benevolent Society and a member of the Catholic Church. 

On June 5, 1907, at Chicago, Mr. Gauen married Miss Ella 
Horine, whose parents are still living in that city, where her father 
is in the brokerage business. To their marriage have been born two 
children: Genevieve, in 1908, and Marjorie, in 1912. 

i 

WILLIAM O. EDWARDS. At Pinckneyville the name Edwards has 
been associated with the legal profession for many years, having 
been borne by both father and son. William O. Edwards is the son 
of the late Mortimer C. Edwards, for many years in practice in 
Perry County, and the family has long been known in that vicinity. 

William O. Edwards was born at Pinckneyville, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 28, 1869, a son of Mortimor C. and Harriet N. (Edwards) 
Edwards, both natives of Perry County, Illinois. Mortimor C. Ed- 
wards was born in 1838, during the Civil war served as captain of 
Company C of the Eighty-first Illinois Infantry, and was out three 
years. He read law in the office of Judge Emmett, went out to 
Kansas and practiced as a lawyer there, and was state's attorney 
of Haskell County for four years, returned to Pinckneyville and was 
prominent in the law for many years until his death on January 21, 
1905. His widow is still living at the age of seventy-five, and there 
were two children. 

William O. Edwards, the younger of the children, was educated 
at Pinckneyville, attended the public schools, and was graduated in 
both the law and classical courses at McKendree College in 1893. 
For several years he was associated with his father, and in 1896 
took up active practice on his own account. Mr. Edwards served 
as city attorney one term. He is a member of the State Bar Asso- 
ciation and belongs to the Masonic order. 

Mr. Edwards was married at Lebanon, Illinois, June 8, 1898, to 
Etta L. Root, daughter of Edmond and Mary A. Root. Her father 
was a minister and a member of the Southern Illinois Conference. 
Mr. Edwards and wife have two children: Margaret C., born in 
1900 and attending the Pinckneyville public schools ; Gilbert Harold, 
born in 1904 and also in school. 

JOHN W. TWEED. This well-known lawyer of Sparta has also 
been in the newspaper business, and since taking up active practice 
has filled both the offices of city and state's attorney. 



1080 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

John W. Tweed was born in Randolph County, Illinois, August 
19, 1870, a son t)f David John and Eleanora Jane (Alexander) 
'i weed, both natives of Sparta. Grandfather Tweed came to Illinois 
in 1818 and was of Scotch-Irish parentage. David J. Tweed is still 
living in Sparta at the age of seventy-four, and for many years has 
been in the agricultural and machinery implement business. The 
mother is still living at the age of seventy-four. There were four 
children, of whom the Sparta lawyer was the second. 

His early education was acquired in the public schools of Sparta, 
he studied law for a time in his uncle's office, was graduated from 
the law department of Washington University at St. Louis in 1905, 
and had been admitted to the Illinois bar the previous year. Shortly 
after beginning practice at Sparta Mr. Tweed founded the Sparta 
News, a paper which he conducted with considerable success for 
some time and finally sold. Since then he has given his primary 
attention to his work as a lawyer and besides looking after his own 
practice has served as state's attorney from 1908 to 1912 and has 
been city attorney for a number of years. 

Mr. Tweed is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and belongs 
to the Country Club and the State Bar Association. In 1909, at 
Greenville, Illinois, he married Miss Jessie B. Allen, daughter of the 
late Dr. William A. Allen. 

BRUCE A. CAMPBELL. An East St. Louis lawyer whose name is 
known through his profession and in politics over Southern Illinois, 
Bruce A. Campbell is the son of a distinguished attorney and has 
himself been in practice for the past thirteen years, first at Albion 
and since 1906 at East St. Louis. 

Bruce A. Campbell was born at Albion, Illinois, October 28, 1879, 
a son of Joseph M. and Annabel (Thompson) Campbell. Both his 
father and mother were natives of Illinois, the former now seventy- 
seven years of age and the latter fifty-eight. Joseph M. Campbell 
is now the oldest attorney in years of practice at Albion, having been 
a member of the bar in good standing for the past fifty years. He 
served as county judge from 1873 to 1886 and for the past thirty 
years has been master in chancery. During the Civil war he was 
a lieutenant in the Eighteenth Illinois Infantry for one year. 

Bruce A. Campbell, the oldest of eight children, was educated in 
the public schools at Albion, graduating from the high school in 
1894, continued in the Southern Collegiate Institute at Albion until 
1897, and was graduated A. B. from the University of Illinois in 
1900. His law studies were pursued chiefly under the direction of 
his father, and with his admission to the bar in 1901 he took up 
practice at Albion. He remained there until 1905, and has since 
enjoyed distinction in the larger field of East St. Louis. In June, 
1906, he became law partner of Judge Edward C. Kramer. Mr. 
Campbell has been connected with a number of the important cases 
originating in and tried at the courts of East St. Louis in recent 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1081 

years. He has served as a committeeman in the State Bar Association 
and was president of the East St. Louis Bar Association in 1912. 
His fraternities are the Masonic Order, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of American, and the 
Knights of Pythias, and also the honorary scholarship fraternity Phi 
Epsilon. 

Mr. Campbell is regarded as one of the most influential democrats 
in the Twenty-second Congressional District. During his university 
career he was for two years president of the University Democratic 
Club, served as city attorney of Albion from 1903 to 1905, and in 
1904 was elected a member of the General Assembly. In 1910 he 
was democratic nominee for Congress, and has served as a member 
of the St. Clair County Central Committee and has given his serv- 
ices to the party as a speaker in nearly every campaign since 1900. 
Mr. Campbell is now a member of the law firm of Kramer, Kramer 
& Campbell. 

In 1906 at Marissa, St. Clair County, Mr. Campbell married Miss 
Beulah W. Campbell, daughter of Dr. J. M. and Rose M. Campbell. 
Her father was a former coroner and acting sheriff of St. Clair 
County. They have one child, Joseph Bruce Campbell, born in 1907. 

JUDGE M. W. SCHAEFER. The position of Judge M. W. Schaefer 
of Belleville among the courts and lawyers of Illinois is fortified by 
more than thirty years of practice as a lawyer and in public affairs, 
by about six years of service on the circuit bench, and by influential 
connections as legal representative of some of the large transporta- 
tion interests centering at East St. Louis. 

M. W. Schaefer was born in Madison County, Illinois, March 
20, 1857, a son of Jacob and Margaret (Noll) Schaefer, both of 
whom were born in Germany, came to America and located first in 
St. Louis and afterwards in Madison County, Illinois, where the 
father was a tailor. In 1859 he moved to Lebanon, and is now 
seventy-nine years of age, while his wife was aged eighty when she 
died in February, 1915. 

The second among seven children, Judge Schaefer grew up at 
Lebanon, attended the public schools, graduated from the literary 
department of McKendree College in 1876, was for three years a 
teacher, and at the same time a student of law, and in 1879 finished 
his course in law at McKendree College, being admitted to the bar 
in the same year. After about one year of service in a bank at 
Lebanon, he came to Belleville in 1881, and soon was noted as one 
of the rising young attorneys of St. Clair County. In 1883 he was 
elected city attorney of Belleville, serving three terms of two years 
each, and in the fall of 1888 was elected state's attorney and re- 
elected in 1892, filling that office until 1896. While state's attorney 
he was a partner with James M. Dill. This relationship was dis- 
solved at the time of Judge Schaefer's election as circuit judge in 

1897, and he remained on the bench administering justice with im- 
voi. in is 



1082 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

partiality and with his characteristic dignity and ability until March 
4, 1903. He resigned from the bench to become attorney for the 
East St. Louis & Suburban Railroad Company. Judge Schaefer 
is now general counsel for the Alton & Granite and St. Louis Trac- 
tion Company, the East St. Louis & Suburban Railroad Company, 
and also the Affiliated Lines. Besides these connections he also car- 
ries on a general law practice. 

Judge Schaefer is a member of the State Bar Association, and 
has served as grand master of the state in the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and as exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. In 1879 at Lebanon he married Miss Louisa Weigel, 
whose father, John Weigel, was one of the well-known and early 
settlers of Lebanon. To their marriage have been born six children : 
Mrs. Edna Harris and Mrs. Leota Tarlton, whose husbands are in 
the real estate business at East St. Louis ; Elmer, deceased ; Edwin 
M., chief chemist for the Nelson Morris Packing Company of East 
St. Louis ; Dr. Otho E., a dentist at East St. Louis ; and Corinne, 
who lives with the family at Belleville. 

VICTOR E. ADAMI. Now in active practice of the law at Coulter- 
ville, Mr. Adami was for many years identified with business affairs 
in that town. 

Victor E. Adami was born at St. Louis, Missouri, July 4, 1853, 
son of Michael and Catherine (Boni) Adami. Both parents were 
natives of France. His father came to St. Louis many years ago, 
became known as a river captain and also as a coal dealer, and estab- 
lished one of the old hotels of St. Louis, which he conducted many 
years. He died at Mobile, Alabama, at the age of seventy-eight, in 
1898. The mother died in 1897, aged seventy-seven. 

Victor E. Adami, the third of four children, was graduated from 
the classical department of St. Louis University, and subsequently 
studied public accounting. He was in early life in the employ of the 
Westlake Novelty Works at St. Louis and later in 1877 came to 
Coulterville and established the Adami Hotel, which under his man- 
agement became one of the best-known hostelries in Southern Illi- 
nois. Mr. Adami studies law at home, and since admission to the 
bar in 1900 has been in active practice. He is a member of the State 
Bar Association. 

Mr. Adami married July 22, 1873, at St. Louis, Miss Anna 
Hechtel. Their children are : Victor H. Adami, who is married and 
lives at Webster Grove, Missouri, and Blanche, whose home is in 
Savannah, Georgia. 

JAMES W. CLIFFE. Associated with his brothers, Thomas M. 
and Adam C., as a member of the prominent law firm of Cliffe & 
Cliffe, of Sycamore, DeKalb County, he whose name introduces this 
paragraph was born in this thriving city when it was a village with 
very few metropolitan claims, the date of his nativity having been 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1083 

November 25, 1857. He is a son of Thomas and Mary A. (Collins) 
Cliffe, concerning whom more specific mention is made in the sketch 
of their younger son, Thomas M., on other pages of this work, so 
that a repetition of the family data is not demanded at this juncture. 

James W. Cliffe is indebted to the public schools of his native 
place for his early educational advantages, which included those of 
the high school, and in his earlier manhood he was identified with 
various lines of business activity. He finally began the study of 
law under the preceptorship of his brother, Thomas M., and in 1894, 
upon his admission to the bar, the two became associated in practice 
under the title of Cliffe Brothers. This obtained until 1896, when 
the younger brother, Adam C, was admitted to the firm, since which 
time the alliance has continued under the title of Cliffe & Cliffe. 
James W. Cliffe has deemed his profession worthy of his unwaver- 
ing allegiance and fealty and thus, though a staunch and effective 
advocate of the cause of the republican party, he has manifested 
naught of ambition for public office. 

In 1899 Mr. Cliffe wedded Miss Helen Parkin, who likewise is a 
native of DeKalb County, and they have six children, namely: Bes- 
sie E., Lillie M., Isabella, James W., Jr., Mary Helen and Mar- 
guerite B. 

Mr. Cliffe has proved a careful and conscientious representative 
of his profession in his native county and both as a lawyer and as a 
loyal and progressive citizen he is held in high esteem in the com- 
munity in which he has lived from the time of his birth. 

ADAM C. CLIFFE. The youngest of the three brothers compris- 
ing the substantial and representative law firm of Cliffe & Cliffe, of 
Sycamore, DeKalb County, Adam C. Cliffe has done well his part in 
upholding the civic and professional prestige of the family name in 
his native county, and adequate information concerning his parents 
appears in connection with the sketches, on other pages of this work, 
touching the careers of his fraternal and professional associates, 
James W. and Thomas M. Cliffe. 

Adam C. Cliffe was born at Sycamore on the 25th of June, 1869, 
and after completing the curriculum of the public schools, including 
that of the Sycamore High School, he availed himself of the advan- 
tages of the law school of Northwestern University, this department 
being established in the City of Chicago. In this excellent institution 
he was graduated as a member of the class of 1896, and concurrent 
with his reception of the degree of Bachelor of Laws came his admis- 
sion to the bar of Illinois and his reception into the law firm of which 
his two brothers were then the interested principals. This effective 
alliance has since continued under most grateful and productive con- 
ditions, and each of the brothers has high vantage-ground as a 
strong and resourceful member of the DeKalb County bar. Adam 
C. Cliffe served twelve years as a member of the board of edu- 
cation of his native city, and of the three brothers constituting 



1084 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the law firm of Cliff e & Cliff e he is the only one who has aspired to 
public office along political lines. He is unwavering in his advocacy 
of the principles and policies for which the republican party has ever 
stood sponsor in a basic way, and as candidate on its ticket was 
elected representative of DeKalb County in the lower house of the 
State Legislature, in which he served one term, and took an active 
and consistent part in the deliberations and work of the Forty-sixth 
General Assembly. Mr. Cliffe holds membership in the Illinois 
State Bar Association and the DeKalb County Bar Association ; in 
the Masonic York Rite he is affiliated with the lodge, chapter and 
commandery bodies in his home city, besides holding membership in 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in the Hamilton Club 
of Chicago, one of the representative civic organizations of the 
great western metropolis and one that wields marked influence in 
connection with the interests of the republican party. 

On the I2th of September, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Cliffe to Miss Edna Sitts, who was born at Franklin Grove, Lee 
County, Illinois, and the two children of this union are Thomas 
Sitts and Edna May. 

JOSIAH T. BULLINGTON has given excellent account of himself 
during his years of active practice of law and he is now numbered 
among the successful and representative members of the bar of Hills- 
boro, the judicial center of Montgomery County. 

Josiah Thomas Bullington was born at Vandalia, Fayette County, 
Illinois, on the 3Oth of April, 1876, and is a son of John and Ailcy 
(Dalton) Bullington, both of whom were born and reared in Pitt- 
sylvania County, Virginia, whence they came to Illinois after the 
close of the Civil war and settled in Fayette County, where they still 
maintain their residence on the fine homestead farm and where John 
Bullington has gained success in connection with the basic industry 
of agriculture. He was a gallant soldier of the Confederacy in the 
war between the North and the South, and was in the command of 
Gen. Robert E. Lee, besides having been colorbearer for his com- 
mand in the historic battle of Gettysburg. John Bullington is a 
sterling and popular citizen of Fayette County, celebrated his seven- 
ty-third birthday anniversary in 1914 and his wife her sixty-ninth 
anniversary. They became the parents of thirteen children and of the 
number Josiah T. was the eighth in order of birth. 

Josiah T. Bullington passed the days of his childhood and youth 
on the home farm, in Vandalia Township, Fayette County, and after 
profiting fully by the advantages afforded in the public schools he 
taught in a district school. He prosecuted his law studies under 
the direction of Judge Farmer and Judge Brown, of Van- 
dalia. He was admitted to the bar on the 5th of June, 1901, 
and he initiated the practice of his profession at Vandalia, 
where he became law partner of Judge Brown, his preceptor, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1085 

Judge Farmer, having been elected to the bench of the Circuit Court. 
Mr. Bullington continued in the practice of law at Vandalia until 
1906, and thereafter held the position of secretary to Judge. Farmer 
until 1909, when he resigned this position to resume the private 
practice of his profession. At this time he established his residence 
at Hillsboro, where he is now associated with L. V. Hill in the 
control of a substantial and important law business of general order. 
He is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association, is a staunch 
supporter of the principles of the democratic party, and is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 2d of April, 1913, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Bullington to Miss Mary Theresa Thompson, daughter of Thomas 
S. Thompson, a well-known citizen and business man of Carbondale, 
Jackson County, and Mrs. Bullington is a popular factor in the social 
activities of Hillsboro. The first wife of Mr. Bullington bore the 
maiden name of Edna Hoar, and their marriage was contracted on 
the ist of October, 1906; she was a daughter of Lucius K. Hoar of 
Vandalia, and her death occurred July 12, 1910, the only child of this 
union having died in infancy. 

JOHN J. BULLINGTON. Christian County claims as one of its 
prominent and representative lawyers of the younger generation the 
well-known and popular citizen whose name initiates this paragraph. 
Mr. Bullington is engaged in the general practice of his profession 
at Taylorville, the judicial center of Christian County, where he is 
associated in his legal service with James L. Drennan, and where he 
is rapidly gaining prestige that is destined to rank him among the 
leading members of the bar of this section of the state. 

John J. Bullington was born in Fayette County, Illinois, on the 
1 2th of July, 1879, and is a son of John and Ailcy (Dalton) Bulling- 
ton, who were born in the historic old State of Virginia, where their 
marriage was solemnized and whence they came to Illinois after the 
close of the Civil war. In this great conflict John Bullington served 
as a loyal and valiant soldier of the Confederacy, having been a 
member of Company K, Thirty-eighth Virginia Infantry, and having 
served in the positions of colorbearer and sergeant of his regiment. 
After the war he established his residence in Fayette County, Illinois, 
where he and his wife still reside and where he has achieved success 
and independence through his identification with agriculture and 
stockraising. He owns a valuable landed estate, is still active in the 
supervision of his farm and has passed the psalmist's span of three- 
score years and ten, the date of his nativity having been July 12, 
1841, and his wife being about four years his junior. They became 
the parents of thirteen children, of whom eleven are living, John J. 
having been the ninth in order of birth. 

Passing his boyhood on the old homestead farm, John J. Bulling- 



1086 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ton attended the public schools of his native county, and thereafter 
completed a course in the commercial department of Austin College, 
at Effingham, this state. After his graduation in this institution he 
completed a two-year literary course in the Indiana State Normal 
School at Terre Haute, and in preparation for the work of his 
chosen profession he began the study of law in the office of the firm 
of Brown & Burnside, of Vandalia, the county seat of his native 
county. He was admitted to the bar in 1909. He was immediately 
elected city attorney of Vandalia, and in that place he continued in 
the general practice of law until June, 1913, save for the time 
devoted to official service. In October, 1909, he received appoint- 
ment to the position of stenographer for the Illinois Supreme Court, 
in June of the following year he assumed the position of secretary 
to Judge William Farmer, of the Supreme Court, and in June, 1913, 
he established himself in the practice of his profession at Taylorville, 
where he maintained a partnership association with Francis S. Gray 
until November of that year, since which time he has been the pro- 
fessional coadjutor of James L. Drennan, with whom he is associated 
in the control of a substantial and important law business. Mr. 
Bullington has been prominently identified with the affairs of the 
Illinois National Guard, and he served as captain of Company I, 
Fourth Illinois Regiment, from 1907 until January, 1914, since which 
time he has held the office of captain and commissary of this fine 
regiment of the Illinois National Guard. He is affiliated also with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Knights of Pythias, Loyal Order of Moose, and is now 
grand paramount ruler of the Mutual Protective Order of Caribou. 
Mr. Bullington is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association and 
in politics is found arrayed as a loyal advocate of the cause of the 
democratic party. 

On the 23d of August, 1908, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Bullington to Miss Edna L. Easterday, daughter of Luther and Ann 
Easterday, of Vandalia, where her father died in October, 1914, and 
where her mother still resides. Mr. Bullington, by reason of his 
official position in the National Guard, is familiarly known by his 
title of captain, and he has a wide circle of friends in this part of his 
native state. He and his wife are the parents of two children- 1 
Bernadine, born May 3, 191 1 ; and Winston Edward, born January 
21, 1913. 

JAMES CHANDLER WOODBURY, for nineteen years a member of 
the Danville Bar, was born. at Danville, January 31, 1870, a son of 
James Hazard and Sarah Jane (Chandler) Woodbury. His mother 
died February 7, 1870, and his father, who was born in Ripley 
County, Indiana, June 8, 1832, died at Danville January 28, 
1885. Mr. Woodbury gained his early education in the Danville 
public schools, at the Rose Polytechnic Institute at Terre Haute, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1087 

studied law under Judge Kimbrough at Danville, and was ad- 
mitted to the Illinois Bar in 1895. He is a member of the Ver- 
milion County Bar Association, and his law offices are in the 
Temple Building at Danville. 

March 18, 1891, he married Miss Mertie L. Foster, daughter of 
John A. and Adelia (Bicknell) Foster, who were early settlers of 
Moultrie County, where Mrs. Woodbury was born. They have one 
son, Bicknell J., born at Danville in 1892. Mr. Woodbury is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
and in politics has usually been an independent voter, with pro- 
gressive tendencies. 

HON. F. E. BLANK. This is a name which has been distinguished 
by the ability and character of two generations of lawyers in Menard 
County, where the Blane family has been resident since pioneer times. 

Judge Frank E. Blane was born in Menard County, Illinois, 
October 16, 1866, a son of S. H. and Mary J. (Spear) Blane. Both 
parents were natives of Illinois, and his father stood among the first 
as a lawyer and practiced from 1870 until his death on June 17, 1904, 
at the age of sixty-four. He had the distinction of being the first 
republican elected to the office of state's attorney in Menard County 
since the Civil war. The mother died February 21, 1913, at the age 
of seventy-two. 

Judge Blane, the eldest of four children and the only son, gained 
his education in the public schools of Petersburg, graduated at 
Knox College at Galesburg in 1888, read law in his father's office 
and was admitted to the bar in January, 1891. He was in active 
practice at Petersburg until 1909, and is now retired from the law 
and gives his attention to his private interests. Mr. Blane served 
as city attorney for two terms and was elected county judge in 1898, 
resigning in 1901 to resume private practice. He is a Knights 
Templar and a Shriner. 

On November 27, 1907, Judge Blane married Miss Floss Shep- 
herd, daughter of M. T. and Maria J. Shepherd. Her mother is 
still living. They have two daughters : Mary Genevieve, born No- 
vember 10, 1908, and Frances Lenore, born March 10, 1914. 

EDWARD W. BURKE. The bench as well as the bar of Illinois 
has for many years been honored by the presence of Judge E. W. 
Burke, who has several distinctions which take him from the plane 
of commonplace success and invest his career with an interest to 
the members of his profession throughout the state. 

Edmund Whitney Burke started life with an exceptional native 
endowment of intellect, had handicap neither of wealth nor of 
extreme poverty. Born at Byron, Illinois, September 22, 1850, 
a son of Patrick and Nancy (Whitney) Burke, he finished a course 
in the high school at Rockford, Illinois, in 1863, when only thirteen 
years of age, was graduated from the Mount Morris Academy in 



1088 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

1864, and Northwestern University conferred upon him the degree 
of Master of Arts in 1869. When he was twenty-one years of age 
he was graduated LL. B. from the University of Michigan in 1871, 
and after a varied experience in the preliminary routine of the law 
engaged in practice at Chicago in 1876. He has been a member 
of the Chicago Bar now for nearly forty years, and his practice 
has been continuous except for the years spent on the bench. For 
nine years Judge Burke was judge of the Circuit Court of Cook 
County, and for one year was judge of the Appellate Court for the 
First District. His judicial career covered the years 1893 to 1904. 
He is now at the head of the firm Burke, Jackson & Burke, with 
offices in the Hartford Building. 

His long and varied experience as a lawyer and as a jurist has 
brought Judge Burke exceptional qualifications in legal learning, and 
his mastery of equity law has probably no superior in the state. 
For a number of years he has served as lecturer on equity juris- 
prudence and procedure in the Chicago-Kent College of Law, and 
in 1904 succeeded the late Judge Moran as dean of the college. He 
has written a number of encyclopedic articles on equity. Judge 
Burke is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois Bar 
Association and the American Bar Association. He is a director 
of the National Earth Company and of several other business cor- 
porations. In politics he is republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, former president of the Methodist Social Union of Chicago, 
and has membership in the Union League and the Illinois Club. 

On December 5, 1878, Judge Burke married Myra Webster. 
Their children are Harold Webster and Ralph Haney. 

J. BERT. MILLER. Of the many native sons of Illinois now rep- 
resentative members of the bar, one who has achieved definite 
success and prestige in the profession is J. Bert. Miller, who has 
practiced in the City of Kankakee since 1895. As a lawyer he is 
known for his ability, close application to his work and personal 
popularity, and now controls a substantial law business, has served 
as state's attorney of Kankakee County and as master in chancery 
of the Circuit Court. In his home county his reputation is now so 
well established that the words "Miller the lawyer" are all that is 
necessary to his complete identity in that community. 

Born in the City of Bloomington, McLean County, Illinois, July 
4, 1873, he began life on a historic date and has kept his civic 
loyalty consistent with his birthday. His parents were Lewis H. and 
Sarah J. (Ewing) Miller, and he was the third in their family of 
six children, four of whom are still living. His father was born at 
Dauphin, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, October 30, 1844, anc ' 
the mother was born at Newton Hamilton, Miffiin County, in the 
same state, July 14, 1841. Lewis H. Miller for many years held the 
position of master mechanic and general superintendent of the old 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railway, now part of the New York Cen- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1089 

tral Railroad. He enjoyed high esteem as a citizen, was a republican 
in politics, and for many years a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
He died at Bloomington October 28, 1906, and his wife passed away 
at her home in the same city January 10, 1915. 

J. Bert. Miller acquired his early education in the public schools 
of Bloomington, and was graduated from the Kankakee High School 
in 1892. His law studies were pursued in the Bloomington Law 
School, from which he graduated LL. B. June n, 1895, and was 
admitted to the Illinois Bar the day following his graduation. He 
had also studied law under Hon. Hamilton K. Wheeler of Kanka- 
kee, who is mentioned on other pages of this publication. 

Beginning practice at Kankakee, he was soon recognized as a 
diligent, conscientious and able member of the bar. For a number 
of years his practice has been up to the limit of his time and energy. 
In 1899 he was appointed master in chancery of the Circuit Court 
of. Kankakee County, and held that position six years. In 1904 he 
was elected state's attorney of the county and the popular estimate 
of his services was shown by his re-election in 1908. His work in 
the office was exceedingly creditable and added much to his pro- 
fessional reputation, but he declined to become a candidate for a 
third term in order to give his undivided attention to his private 
practice. His offices are in the Bank Building at Kankakee. In 
1906 Mr. Miller was elected president of the Illinois State's Attor- 
neys' Association, serving one term in that office, has also served 
as president of the Kankakee County Bar Association and during 
the past twenty years has frequently been an important factor in 
republican party politics. He was a delegate to the famous "dead- 
lock" convention of 1904, and was also a delegate to the state con- 
vention at Springfield in 1914. 

In the Masonic fraternity his prominent affiliations are as fol- 
lows : Kankakee Lodge No. 389, A. F. & A. M. ; Kankakee Chap- 
ter No. 78, R. A. M. ; Ivanhoe Commandery No. 33, Knights 
Templar; Oriental Consistory of the Scottish Rite at Chicago, in 
which he has taken the thirty-second degree; Medinah Temple of 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine in Chicago, and he is also affiliated 
with Kankakee Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias, 
and with the Phi Delta Phi college fraternity. On May 22, 1901, 
Mr. Miller married Miss Lillian Mae Bradley. She was born and 
reared at Mechanicsburg, in Sangamon County, Illinois. They have 
one son, John Bertram Bradley Miller. 

FRANK W. JOSLYN. In his native City of Elgin Mr. Joslyn has 
been engaged in the active practice of law for more than thirty years, 
within which he has appeared in many celebrated cases and has won 
precedence as one of the leading criminal lawyers of the northern 
part of the state, his reputation in this domain of practice having 
far transcended local limitations. Mr. Joslyn is a scion of the third 



1090 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

generation of the family in Illinois, with the history of which com- 
monwealth the name Joslyn has been prominently and worthily 
identified since the early pioneer days. His father was known as 
one of the most prominent members of the bar of Northern Illinois 
for many years, and concerning him the following estimate is given 
in the History of the Bench and Bar of Illinois that was edited by 
the late Gen. John M. Palmer and that was published in 1899: 
"Colonel Edward S. Joslyn was one of the ablest lawyers and readi- 
est and most eloquent speakers who ever practiced in the courts of 
Kane county. He acquired a national reputation, and some of the 
best of his life work was done in the service of the Government in 
Utah Territory. He was one of the first to volunteer upon the 
breaking out of the war of the Rebellion, and served with distinc- 
tion while in the army. At his death, which occurred in 1885, he 
was mourned by the Illinois bar as one of its most gifted members." 
Appreciative and proud of the service of his distinguished father, 
Frank W. Joslyn has not permitted himself to bask in the reflected 
light of paternal greatness, but has marked the passing years with 
large and worthy achievement in his profession and as a citizen of 
intrinsic loyalty and public spirit. The family lineage is of English 
origin and representatives of the name immigrated to America in 
the early colonial era of our national history, and members of the 
family were found arrayed as patriot soldiers in the war of the 
Revolution and the War of 1812. Lindsay Joslyn, grandfather of 
him whose name initiates this review, was born in Vermont, whence 
he removed to the State of New York, where he continued his 
residence until 1836, when he numbered himself among the sturdy 
pioneers of Northern Illinois, where he passed the residue of his life 
and where he was a citizen of prominence and influence in the 
pioneer community. 

Frank Wilber Joslyn was born at Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, 
on the 27th of April, 1860, and is a son of Col. Edward S. and Jane 
P. (Padelford) Joslyn, the former of whom was born near Mount 
Morris, Livingston County, New York, in 1827, and the latter of 
whom was born at Buffalo, that state, in 1833, their marriage having 
been solemnized at Elgin, Illinois, and of their ten children only 
four are now living, Frank W. having been the third in order 
of birth. Colonel Joslyn was a resident of Elgin at the time 
of his death, in 1885, and here his widow continued to maintain 
her home until she, too, passed to the life eternal, in 1912, shortly 
before her eightieth birthday anniversary. 

Col. Edward S. Joslyn was a lad of about ten years at the time 
of the family removal to the virtual wilds of Northern Illinois, where 
he was reared to manhood under the conditions and influences of 
the pioneer days. He attended the schools of McHenry County and 
prosecuted higher studies in Elgin Academy, his fine mentality and 
ambitious energy enabling him to make rapid and substantial prog- 
ress when he began the study of law under private preceptorship, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1091 

this representing at that time virtually the only approved method of 
acquiring such technical training. He was admitted to the bar in 
1852, at Woodstock, McHenry County, and shortly afterward he 
established his home at Elgin, which continued to be his place of 
residence during practically his entire life thereafter and to the civic 
and material development and upbuilding of which he contributed 
his quota. His exceptional ability soon gained him prominence and 
success in his profession and he was a member of that fine coterie 
of lawyers that made the bar of Illinois at that early day one 
of remarkable brilliancy. Incidentally it may be noted that he was 
an intimate friend of Judge Sidney Breese, who served with dis- 
tinction on the bench of the Illinois Supreme Court and who had 
previously been the first reporter of the decisions of that tribunal. 
He was identified with much of the important litigation in the courts 
of the northern part of Illinois, and one of his most celebrated cases 
was that in which he appeared for the Chisholm family in the 
Emma Mine litigation, involving two or more millions of dollars, 
and in which he won a decisive victory. He served several terms 
as district attorney, and he also handled important Government 
affairs in the Territory of Utah, as previously intimated in this con- 
text. He united with the republican party at the time of its organ- 
ization and was one of the ardent supporters of its first presidential 
candidate, Gen. John C. Fremont, in whose behalf he made a most 
luminous and effective canvass of Illinois, as well as certain parts 
of Missouri. As the dark cloud of Civil war began to loom with 
menace on the national horizon, Colonel Joslyn became convinced 
that through the interposition of Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, the 
democratic candidate for President, the integrity of the Union 
might be preserved without recourse to war, and in 1860 he vig- 
orously lent his fine powers to advocating the election of Douglas, 
of whom he ever continued a great admirer. He held for many 
years precedence not only as one of the leading lawyers, but also 
as one of the most brilliant orators of Illinois, and his character 
was the positive expression of a strong, noble and loyal nature. 

Colonel Joslyn became captain and drillmaster of a company 
of the Washington Colonial Regiment that was organized by Colonel 
Ellsworth, who became the head of the celebrated Ellsworth Zouaves 
in the Civil war. In addition to being captain of the company 
formed at Elgin, he served also as drillmaster of the entire regi- 
ment, and with his command he promptly entered the Union service 
when the Civil war was precipitated. He went with his regiment 
to Springfield, and on the 6th of April, 1861, turned the well- 
disciplined force over to the command of General Grant, this valiant 
regiment being mustered in as the Seventh Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry. Colonel Joslyn proceeded to the front with this regiment, 
and in 1862 he was made colonel of the Thirty-sixth Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry. He commanded the latter at the battle of Pea Ridge, 
Tennessee, in April, 1862, and in this engagement his horse was shot 



1092 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

from under him, the injuries which he incidentally received inca- 
pacitating- him for further field service, with the result that he 
was given his honorable discharge. The name of Colonel Joslyn 
merits place on the list of the really great lawyers who have upheld 
the high prestige of the Illinois Bar. 

Frank W. Joslyn is indebted to the public schools of Elgin for 
his early educational discipline, and here also he attended Elgin 
Academy, in which his father had been a student many years 
previously. He studied law under the preceptorship of his father 
and later under the direction of Judge Henry B. Willis, of Elgin, in 
the meanwhile having devoted a portion of his time to teaching 
school, his career in the pedagogic profession having covered a 
period of about three years. Mr. Joslyn was admitted to the bar 
in 1884, the year prior to the death of his father, and during the 
long intervening years he has been continuously engaged in the 
practice of law, with Elgin as his residence and professional head- 
quarters. He has gained specially high reputation as a criminal 
lawyer, and while the circumscribed limitations of this article per- 
mit no details concerning the many important cases with which he 
has been identified in the various courts, it may consistently be 
noted that he prosecuted in Kane County the case against the 
notorious "Vera Ava Dis De Bar," known as the hypnotic queen 
and as the high priestess of a nominally religious cult founded by 
herself. This celebrated case was tried in 1895, and though the 
woman had been previously prosecuted many times, never had her 
conviction been gained until Mr. Joslyn appeared as her prosecutor. 
Later this woman instituted suit for damages for slander, in the 
amount of $1,000,000, against the City of New York, but 
she dropped the case when her record in the Kane County courts 
of Illinois transpired. She later went to England, and there she was 
arrested by the government on a charge of white slavery, conviction 
resulting and her career there finding its sequel in a term in jail. 
Mr. Joslyn also brought about the conviction of P. Gram, of Chicago, 
on the charge of criminal adultery with Lillian Brown Stiles, this 
likewise being another of the many celebrated victories won by 
him in important criminal cases. In fact, there has been within 
later years virtually no criminal cases tried in Kane and adjoining 
counties in which his services have not been enlisted either in 
the prosecution or by the defense. Among the most recent of these 
causes was the case against young Petras, of Aurora, for the murder 
of the Hollanden girl, which, after a disagreement of the jury at 
the first trial, resulted, in the second trial, in the acquittal of the 
defendant. In his various activities as a criimnal lawyer Mr. Joslyn 
has been, on various occasions, associated with such eminent crim- 
inal lawyers as the late Luther Laflin Mills, of Chicago, and Francis 
W. Walker, of the same city. 

In politics Mr. Joslyn is a staunch and effective advocate of the 
principles and policies of the republican party, though he has never 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1093 

sought official preferment aside from the line of his profession. In 
April, 1885, he was elected city attorney of Elgin, of which position 
he continued the incumbent two successive terms. In 1887 he was 
appointed assistant state's attorney of Kane County, and in the 
following year was elected state's attorney, in which office he served 
three terms, by re-election in 1892 and 1896. In 1904 he was 
appointed assistant attorney-general of Illinois, and of this position 
he continued in tenure until 1912, his record as a public prosecutor 
being in consonance with his admirable achievement in the private 
practice of his profession. 

Mr. Joslyn is chairman of the Soldiers' Monument Committee 
of Kane County, the same having charge of the erection of the 
splendid monument erected, at Elgin, to the memory of the soldiers 
and sailors of Kane County, this monument having been unveiled 
on the 1 5th of October, 1914. He is a scion of patriotic stock, his 
father, as already shown, having been a distinguished officer in the 
Civil war, and ancestors on both the paternal and maternal side 
having been patriot soldiers in the War of the Revolution, by rea- 
son of which fact he is eligible for and is affiliated with the Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. He holds membership 
in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent & 
Protective Order of Elks, and is an active member of the Kane 
County Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association. 

On the 7th of December, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Joslyn to Miss Carrie Mead, who was born in McHenry County, 
this state, and their only child, Paul Mead, is attending Northwest- 
ern University, at Evanston. 

JAMES ELLSWORTH TAYLOR. A lawyer who long ago won and 
has since enjoyed a distinctive precedence in the Putnam County 
Bar, James Ellsworth Taylor began practice at Hennepin more than 
a quarter of a century ago, and from almost the beginning of his 
practice until he retired two years ago was continuously in office of 
state's attorney. In few counties of the state has his record of 
long continuance in this responsible office been exceeded, and more 
than any other one man he has been responsible for the guaranty 
of the laws and the preservation of person and property rights in 
that county. 

James Ellsworth Taylor was born in Ross Township of Jefferson 
County, Ohio, April 28, 1862. His parents, Richard W. and Harriet 
(McCutchon) Taylor, were both natives of the same county, and 
his father was for many years actively identified with farming in 
that section of Ohio and is now living retired. The mother died 
February 4, 1906. 

James E. Taylor was the second in a family of eight children, 
grew upon a farm in Jefferson County, attended the common 
schools, and in 1884 graduated from Mount Pleasant College, Ohio. 
The following year was spent in the study of law and in teaching 



1094 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

school, -and in 1885 he moved to Illinois, and from that year until 
1888 was employed as a teacher at Mount Palatine, in Putnam 
County. At the same time he vigorously prosecuted his studies in 
law with W. H. Casson at Hennepin, and was admitted to the bar 
on September 18, 1888. 

Even before his admission Mr. Taylor had become a candidate 
for the office of state's attorney, and his popularity and recognized 
qualifications gave him the election the following November. For 
six successive times he was elected to this office, and in all the 
sessions of the Circuit Court for twenty-four years appeared as the 
public prosecutor. For the past eight years Mr. Taylor has served 
as master in chancery, and another important service has been as 
a member of the school board for the past twenty years. 

During his long term of twenty-four years as state's attorney 
only three indictments were quashed, and he never had a criminal 
verdict set aside by Circuit, Appellate or Superior courts. His 
administration saved the county thousands of dollars through his 
rigid adherence to the policy of never bringing indictments except 
on worth-while evidence. During the past quarter of a century 
there has been very few cases of importance in which Mr. Taylor 
has. not appeared as attorney on one side or the other or in behalf 
of the state. 

Mr. Taylor is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association 
and is affiliated with Hennepin Lodge No. 118, I. O. O. F., and for 
the past eighteen years has been a member of the Grand Lodge of 
Odd Fellows. April 4, 1889, he married Josephine Henning, who 
was born in Putnam County, Illinois. Their two children are 
George H. and James Ellsworth, Jr. 

ALONZO F. GOODYEAR. In his profession the goal of large and 
worthy achievement has been attained by Mr. Goodyear within 
nearly thirty years of active practice as a member of the bar of his 
native state, and he has long controlled a large and important law 
business as one of the representative members of the bar of Iroquois 
County, and as a resident of the City of Watseka, the judicial 
center of this opulent and important Illinois county. 

Mr. Goodyear, the eldest in a family of four children, all of 
whom are living, was born in Tazewell County, Illinois, on the 
3<Dth of August, 1860, and is a son of Alonzo P. and Mary (Hum- 
phrey) Goodyear, early settlers of that county, the father having 
come to Illinois from his native State of New York and having been 
a resident of Tazewell County at the time of his death, which 
occurred when he was seventy-six years of age, his venerable widow 
being still a resident of that county. 

The spur necessity was the urge that made the ambition of 
Alonzo F. Goodyear find recourse to personal effort of productive 
order in acquiring proper education and in preparing for the work 
of the exacting profession of which he is an able representative. 



1095 

He has been dependent upon his own resources from early youth 
and his early educational discipline was acquired in the public 
schools of the little City of Washington, in his native county. That 
he made good use of the advantages thus afforded is shown by the 
fact that he became a successful and popular teacher in the schools 
of Tazewell County and that he was called upon to serve as assistant 
county superintendent of schools, as well as to act as one of the 
instructors in the county teachers' institute held annually at Wash- 
ington, this service having been given by him for three years. His 
pedagogic success did not, however, deflect him from the course 
of his well-formulated plans and specific ambition, and finally he 
entered the Union College of Law, in the City of Chicago, in which 
institution he completed the prescribed curriculum, with the result 
that he came admirably fortified when he gained admission to the 
Illinois Bar in 1886. In initiating the active practice of his profes- 
sion Mr. Goodyear established his residence at Watseka, where he 
has continued in active practice during the long intervening years, 
which have recorded large and honorable achievement on- his part 
and marked his course by numerous forensic victories of important 
order. Elected state's attorney of Iroquois County in 1888, he 
consented to serve but one term in this office, and later he served 
four years as master in chancery, to which office he was appointed 
in 1892. 

Mr. Goodyear is an appreciative and valued member of the 
Illinois State Bar Association, besides which he is an active member 
of the American Bar Association. From the time of attaining to 
his legal majority he has given unswerving allegiance to the repub- 
lican party, and in the Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with the 
various York Rite bodies in his home city, including the commandery 
of Knights Templars, and in the City of Chicago is enrolled as a 
member of Medinah Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Goodyear married Miss Stella Myers, a native of Iroquois 
County, and they have two children Robert Franklin and Law- 
rence. 

OSWALD F. MORGAN. A very appreciable number of the repre- 
sentative members of the Illinois Bar revert to the fine old Hoosier 
State as the place of their nativity, and this distinction applies to 
Mr. Morgan, whose professional experience has touched three dif- 
ferent states of the Union and who has been engaged in successful 
practice at Watseka, judicial center of Iroquois County, since 1894. 

On his father's farm in White County, Indiana, Oswald F. 
Morgan was born on the nth of September, 1859, an ^ he is a son 
of David S. and Magdalene (Layman) Morgan, the former of 
whom was born in Ohio in 1832, and the latter of whom was born 
in Indiana, a representative of a sterling pioneer family of that 
state. David S. Morgan died in 1903, at the age of seventy-one 



1096 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

years, and his widow survived him by a few years, she likewise 
having been seventy-one years of age at the time of death. Of 
the ten children, only two are now living. 

David S. Morgan was an infant at the time of his parents' 
removal from Ohio to Indiana, in 1833, and the family were num- 
bered among the early settlers of Tippecanoe County, that state, 
where David S. was reared to maturity and which county and White 
County he continued to be identified with agricultural pur- 
suits until 1879, when he sold his farm and removed to Rush County, 
Kansas, where he continued to be engaged in the same line of 
industrial enterprise until he removed to Fountain County, Indiana, 
in 1899, where he remained until the close of his long and useful 
life. In politics he was originally a whig and later a republican, 
and he was a man of broad mental ken and well fortified convictions. 

He whose name initiates this article acquired his early education 
in the public schools of his native county and was twenty years of 
age when he accompanied his parents on their immigration to Rush 
County, Kansas. There he found requisition for his services as a 
teacher in the public schools of the middle-pioneer epoch in the 
history of the Sunflower Commonwealth, and in pursuance of his 
ambitious purpose he gave careful attention to the study of law, 
his preceptors having been the members of the law firm of Pierce & 
Cline, of LaCrosse, county seat of Rush County. He was admitted 
to the Kansas Bar in 1884, and among his early professional experi- 
ences was that gained through his being retained as one of the 
attorneys in a litigation growing out of a contested election of a 
county superintendent of schools for Rush County. The suit was 
finally dropped and there was an unexpected outcome, in that the 
county commissioner appointed Mr. Morgan, the aspiring young 
lawyer and successful teacher, to fill the office of county superin- 
tendent of schools, a position of which he continued the efficient 
incumbent one term, when he retired to devote his attention to the 
practice of law. He continued one of the popular and successful 
members of the Kansas Bar until 1890, when he returned to Indiana 
and engaged in practice at Covington, Fountain County. In 1892 
he established his residence at Watseka, Illinois, and for two years 
he was engaged in the newspaper business a portion of the time 
in this place and for a time in the City of Kankakee. In 1894 he 
resumed the practice of his profession, with Watseka as his head- 
quarters and place of residence. In that year he formed a partner- 
ship with David A. Orebaugh, with whom he continued to be associ- 
ated in the control of an excellent practice for a period of about 
nine years, the alliance being severed when Mr. Orebaugh assumed 
a position with the law department of the International Harvester 
Company. Since that time Mr. Morgan has conducted a specially 
successful individual practice, and his record at the bar shows his 
identification with a large amount of important litigation in the 
courts of this section of the state. His political allegiance is given 



.COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1097 

to the democratic party, and he is affiliated with Watseka Lodge 
No. 446, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons, and Watseka Chapter 
No. 114, Royal Arch Masons. 

On the 2/th of December, 1893, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Morgan to Miss Louise V. Barnhouse, who was born and 
reared in Newton County, Indiana, and they have three children, 
Berwyn E., Harriet and Louise. 

JOHN M. RAYMOND. In no profession are the opportunities of 
effective public service more numerous than in the law, and one 
of the older Illinois lawyers who in addition to a private practice 
and interests have accepted such opportunities and given liberally 
of time and skill to the public welfare is J. M. Raymond. Mr. Ray- 
mond has practiced in Aurora twenty-five years, and has been one 
of that city's most useful and public-spirited citizens. 

His family have been identified with this section of Illinois since 
early pioneer times. Mr. Raymond was born in Bristol Township 
of Kendall County, Illinois, December 24, 1858. He attended dis- 
trict schools and was also educated under the instruction of Prof. 
F. H. Hall at Sugar Grove Normal and Industrial School, graduat- 
ing with the class of 1880. Although representing a substantial 
family, Mr. Raymond chose to become dependent upon his own 
resources at the age of fifteen years, and it was his ambition and 
energy that finally put him on the highway to success. Mr. Ray- 
mond for seven years taught school, and was principal of the schools 
at St. Charles, Illinois, for four years, and during the intervals 
of his teaching became a student in the Law Department of the 
University of Iowa, where he was graduated with the class of 
1884. The same year he was admitted to the bar, and since 1889 
has been in active practice in Aurora. In 1902 Mr. Raymond 
admitted to partnership John K. Newhall, and the firm of Raymond 
& Newhali has since enjoyed a large share of practice in the courts 
at Aurora. 

Mr. Raymond is one of the directors and is attorney for the 
First National Bank of Aurora. Much of his interest is directed 
to practical farm husbandry, and he is the owner of 510 acres of 
valuable farm lands in Kendall County, 410 acres of which adjoin 
the old homestead where his boyhood was spent. Mr. Raymond 
gives his personal supervision to his farm, and has acquired quite 
a reputation as a breeder and raiser of fine Hereford cattle. 

As a lawyer Mr. Raymond's devotion to his clients' interests 
is proverbial, and at the same time he has measured up to the 
highest ethical standards of his profession and his integrity is 
beyond question. Mr. Raymond is a member of the Illinois State 
Bar Association, and fraternally is affiliated with Aurora Lodge 
No. 254, A. F. & A. M. ; Aurora Chapter, R. A. M. ; Aurora 
Commandery No. 22, K. T., and the Medinah Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine in Chicago and the Illinois Consistory of Thirty- 



Vol. Ill 17 



1098 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS. 

second Degree Scottish Rite Masonry. He was also the first 
exalted ruler of Aurora Lodge No. 705 of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. Politically, Mr. Raymond gave his first 
presidential vote for James A. Garfield, but most of his political 
activity has been concerned with his home city, where he has 
frequently been honored through positions of public trust. He was 
elected mayor and served in that office from 1903 to 1905, and for 
the past eighteen years has been a member of the school board. 

On January 13, 1887, Mr. Raymond married Frances R. Ken- 
nedy, who was born in Kane County, Illinois, daughter of Orrin 
and Mary (Finney) Kennedy. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond have two 
children: Mary M. and Lydia B. 

John M. Raymond represents one of the old colonial families 
which was founded in America by three brothers, who came from 
England and landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1635. Mr. 
Raymond's grandfather, Lenox Martin Raymond, was a native 
of Massachusetts and for many years a farmer in that common- 
wealth. . During the War of 1812 he served his country as a 
soldier, and from the effects of exposure sustained during military 
campaigns, died in 1820. His wife was Clarissa Ryder, who 
attained the venerable age of ninety-four years. Their two sons 
were Charles H. and Granvill C. Raymond. 

Charles H. Raymond, father of the Aurora lawyer, was one 
of the pioneers of Northern Illinois. He was born at Weymouth, 
Massachusetts, October 22, 1816, and died February 28, 1904. 
He married Lydia Burrell, who was born in the same place in 
Massachusetts in 1823 and died in 1889. Their children were nine 
in number, seven of whom grew up and six are now living. 
Grandfather Raymond died when his son Charles H. was four 
years of age, and his early youth was one of considerable privation 
and much hard circumstance. He worked in a nail mill, and in 
1841 came west and settled in Kendall County, Illinois, as one of 
the pioneers. The first home was a log cabin structure, and he 
afterwards built a commodious residence and with increasing pros- 
perity his possessions were measured by the accumulation of some 
700 acres of land and a position among the leading citizens of 
Kendall County. For twenty-one years he held the office of super- 
visor, and during most of that time acted as chairman of the board. 
An interesting distinction associated with his name is that he built 
the first schoolhouse in his locality and remained a member of the 
school board for many years. 

CHARLES A. KARCH. Among the native sons of Illinois who 
have attained to marked success and prestige in the legal profession 
a place of special prominence may consistently be ascribed to 
Mr. Karch, who maintains his residence in the City of East St. 
Louis and who is one of the representative and honored members 
of the bar of St. Clair County. His high professional attainments 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1099 

and marked skill are indicated by his incumbency of the important 
office of United States district attorney in the Eastern Judicial 
District of Illinois, and his hold upon popular confidence and 
esteem has been shown through his repeated election as Representa- 
tive of the Forty-ninth Senatorial District in the General Assembly 
of his state. 

Mr. Karch was born on a farm near the City of Mascoutah, 
St. Clair County, Illinois, March 17, 1875, and his popularity in 
his native county renders impossible any incidental application to 
the scriptural aphorism that "A prophet is not without honor s.ave 
in his own country." He is a son of Charles and Mary (Heberer) 
Karch, both of whom were born in Illinois. Charles Karch devel- 
oped one of the fine farms of this section of the state the old 
homestead on which the three children were born, the subject of this 
review being the youngest of the number. Both the father and 
mother have passed the Psalmist's span of threescore years and 
ten, and are numbered among the honored citizens of St. Clair 
County, where their circle of friends is coincident with that of 
their acquaintances. 

Under the invigorating conditions and influences of the old 
homestead farm, Charles A. Karch passed the period of his child- 
hood and youth, and after availing himself of the advantages of 
the public schools, he pursued a higher academic course in the 
Illinois State Normal University near Bloomington, and for a 
period of five years was. found aligned as one of the successful 
and popular representatives of the pedagogic profession in his 
native state, his career as a teacher having been principally in 
St. Clair County. 

In preparation for his chosen profession Mr. Karch entered the 
Law Department of the Illinois Wesleyan University at Blooming- 
ton. He had previously given close attention to the reading of law 
during the five years of his service as a teacher in the public schools, 
and he came admirably fortified when he was admitted to the Illinois 
Bar in the year 1899. In the summer of 1899 tms ambitious young 
barrister displayed his professional "shingle" in East St. Louis, and 
his novitiate was of brief duration, as he soon proved his powers as 
a successful trial lawyer and well-informed counselor of much 
circumspection and judgment. He built up a substantial law 
business and also became influential in public affairs in his native 
county, as shown by the fact that he was elected a member of the 
county board of supervisors, an office of which he continued the 
incumbent for three successive terms. In 1901 he was appointed 
private secretary to Hon. Frederick A. Kern, of Belleville, who 
was at that time a representative in the United States Congress, 
and during his tenure of this position he maintained his residence 
at intervals in Belleville and in the national capital, his incumbency 
continuing until 1903. As a representative of St. Clair County dis- 
trict in the State Legislature Mr. Karch served during the Forty- 



1100 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

fourth, Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth general assemblies, his first 
election having occurred in 1904 and his last election in November, 
1912. In the House he introduced and ably championed a number 
of important bills, served on prominent committees of responsible 
functions, and has been vigorous and progressive in his sentiment 
and action. Within the period of Mr. Karch's membership in the 
Legislature have been enacted many bills of great importance, 
including the workingmen's compensation act, that providing for 
the public ownership of lighting utilities under certain conditions, 
the public utilities commission, the primary election law and the 
presidential primary law. On the 28th of April, 1914, there came 
distinguished recognition of the sterling character and high profes- 
sional ability of Mr. Karch in his appointment to the responsible 
and exacting office of United States Attorney, and in this position he 
is giving excellent account of himself and adding materially to his 
professional prestige. His finely appointed law offices are in the 
Murphy Building, in East St. Louis, and his success is the more 
gratifying to note by reason of the fact that it stands as the direct 
result of his own ability and well-ordered efforts. 

Mr. Karch is an active and valued member of the East St. Louis 
Bar Association and the St. Clair County Bar Association, besides 
being identified with the Illinois State Bar Association. He is a 
stalwart and effective advocate of the principles of the democratic 
party, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

On the 7th of June, 1906, was recorded the marriage of Mr. 
Karch to Miss Hulda Bischof, a daughter of Julius Bischof, a well- 
known citizen of St. Clair County, where he and his wife maintain 
their home at Belleville, the county seat. Mr. and Mrs. Karch 
have one child, Margaret Marie, now eight years of age. 

CHRISTIAN G. SCHROEDER. Known as a general lawyer, Chris- 
tian G. Schroeder, of El Paso, has come prominently before the 
people of Woodford County because of his connection with litiga- 
tion of an important character. He belongs also to the group 
of able citizens whose civic interest is equal to their business and 
professional enterprise, and who are devoting every energy possible 
to the perfection of municipal laws and improvement of the public 
service. 

Born in Ontario, Canada, Christian G. Schroeder is a son of 
Jacob and Katharine (Tousainte) Schroeder, natives of Alsace- 
Lorraine, France (now Germany). The parents, who were farming 
people all their lives, emigrated to the Dominion of Canada in 1850 
and there continued to reside until their deaths. Christian G. 
Schroeder received his early education in the public and parochial 
schools of Ontario, completing his literary studies in German and 
English at Concordia College, Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1879, when 
but seventeen years of age, and graduating from Concordia College, 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1101 

Springfield, Illinois, October 17, 1883. He read law under the 
preceptorship of Judge Cavan, was admitted to the bar, and then 
entered upon the practice of law at El Paso, a city which has con- 
tinued to be his home and field of practice to the present time. 
From 1905 until 1907 Mr. Schroeder served as master in chancery, 
and during the years 1909 and 1910 was city attorney of Paxton, 
Illinois, and is again elected city attorney. He at present holds a 
notary public's license. Mr. Schroeder is a member of the Wood- 
ford County Bar and he and the members of his family belong to 
the Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Schroeder married Miss Matilda K. Whitehouse, daughter 
of William H. Whitehouse, and five children have been born to 
this union. 

PHILIP EDWARD ELTING. To the people of McDonough County, 
the name of Elting stands for all that is strong, stable and worthy 
in citizenship, and in other sections of the country than Illinois, the 
name has been perpetuated for generations and is identified with 
some of the oldest landmarks in the country. To this old family 
belongs Philip Edward Elting, who is the acknowledged head of the 
Macomb bar, a lawyer of marked ability, with a reputation for 
system, patience, vigor and power, that has led to his being retained 
on one side or the other of the most important cases brought before 
the courts for over twenty years. Mr. Elting was born on a farm in 
Emmet Township, M.cDonough County, Illinois, January 23, 1862, 
and is a son of Philip H. and Margaret (McSpirrett) Elting, and a 
grandson of John and Margaret Elting. Of the twelve children born 
to Philip H. and Margaret Elting, Philip Edward was the eleventh 
in. order of birth. Of the maternal ancestral line little is known 
except that he belonged to Ireland and the mother was born at 
Enniskillen, in County Fermanagh. 

On the paternal side, however, the ancestry of Philip Edward 
Elting can be traced, with reasonable accuracy, to early in the 
seventeenth century, when Roeloff Elting and his wife Aaltjen lived 
at Swichtelaer, a dependency of Beyle, situated in the province of 
Drenthe, Holland. There their son, Jan Elting, was born July 29, 
1632. 

William Elting, son of Jan and Jacomntze (Slegt) Elting, was 
born at Kingston, New York, January 19, 1685, and died between 
1740 and 1743, father of seven children. 

Jan Elting, son of William and Janette (Lessier) Elting, was 
born at Kingston, New York, February 11, 1709, and died March 7, 
1762, the father of six children. 

James Elting, son of Jan and Rachel (Whittaker) Elting, was 
born at Kingston, New York, February 15, 1736, and left six 
children. 

Abraham Elting, son of James Elting and Marytje (Van Steen- 
berg) Elting, was born at Kingston, New York, August 21, 1757. 



1102 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

John Elting, son of Abraham and Arriaantje (Van Deusen) 
Elting was born April 14, 1791, and died March 8, 1861, at Peoria, 
Illinois. 

Philip H. Elting father of Philip Edward Elting, a son of John 
and Margaret (Jones) Elting, was born February 8, 1814, and died 
July 22, 1876. 

The first mentioned of the Eltings in the American colonies is 
in the record in one of the volumes of the transactions of the Dutch 
at Albany, New York, in a commission issued September 6, 1675, by 
authority of E. Andros, governor, constituting and appointing Jan 
Elting one of four men authorized to hold a court of sessions twice 
a year at Kingston, New York, to hear and determine all appeals and 
causes according to law. In 1680 a certificate signed by the church 
officers at Beyle Drenthe, Holland, was executed for his benefit in 
which he is commended by them to the favorable regard to whose 
knowledge its contents should be made known he having emigrated 
from Holland a considerable time prior to that date. Jan Elting 
was one of the signers of the treaty made by the Huguenots and 
Indians in the spring of 1677. On June 8, 1686, he bought a lot of 
land at Rhinebeck, which property is now the home of Hon. Levi 
P. Morton. The price paid for the land is thus described : six suits 
of stremuater (a kind of coarse cloth), six duffles, four blankets, 
five kettles, four guns, five hose, five axes, ten cases of powder, ten 
bars of lead, eight shirts, eight pairs of stockings, forty fathoms of 
wampum, two drawing knives, two adzes, ten knives, half an anker 
of rum (an anker is ten gallons), and one frying pan. The old 
Elting home residence, originally the Bevier House, is now the 
property of the sons of Jacob Elting. No attempt has been made to 
spoil it by modern improvements, and the chimney, until a few years 
ago, bore the figures 1735. This old Dutch mansion was erected 
with the accommodations then deemed necessary, having a cellar as 
to the other homesteads and additionally a sub-cellar, the latter being 
used as a storehouse for wines and liquors. Mr. Philip Edward 
Elting has in his possession an interesting picture of this old remain- 
ing landmark. The Eltings left traces of their occupancy in other 
sections. But a few years ago a prominent member of the New 
York bar, Hon. Alton B. Parker, came into the political lime light 
and the name of his chosen place of residence, Esopus, was heralded 
far and wide. The oldest brick house in that village is one that was 
built by Josiah Elting and is occupied by some of his descendants. 

In a volume published by the State of New York, in 1898, 
entitled "New York in the Revolution," may be found the names of 
40,000 soldiers from the state and among them appears Hendrick, 
John, Peter, Peter, Jr., and William Elting. There is a record 
possessed by the family, giving the birth of one Roeloff Elting as 
born October 27, 1678, and dying about 1745, survived by four 
children. Abraham Elting, the great grandfather of Philip Edward 
Elting was one of the signers of the Articles of Association, adopted 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1103 

April 29, 1775, ten days after the battle of Lexington, by the 
"Freemen, Freeholders and Inhabitants of the City and County of 
New York." The Huguenot Bank was organized February 10, 1853, 
by Edmund Elting, who was a member of its first board of directors. 
For its day it was a large financial institution, its capital stock being 
$125,000. Other names and activities of this sturdy old Dutch 
family might be mentioned, all of them showing the same quality of 
virtue, enterprise and stability. 

Philip Edward Elting passed his childhood and youth on the 
home farm situated six miles distant from Macomb, Illinois. There 
he lost his father by death when he was but fourteen years of age, 
but, being one of the younger members of the family, had brothers 
and sisters to assist his mother in directing his early education and 
later for three years he attended the Macomb Normal College, where 
he was graduated and then returned to the farm and followed agri- 
cultural pursuits until 1889. In that year he entered upon the study 
of law in the office of Sherman & TunniclifF, coming under the direct 
tutelage of Hon. L. Y. Sherman, who is one of the distinguished 
lawyers and statesmen of Illinois, and afterward entered the law 
department of the Northwestern University at Chicago, from which 
he "was graduated with the class of 1892, securing his coveted degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar in June of the 
same year and ever since has been actively engaged in the practice 
of his profession at Macomb, being the senior member of the law 
firm of Elting and Hainline, with offices in the Stocker Building. 
It is said that this firm owns one of the largest and most complete 
private libraries in the state. 

From an article of recent date in a Macomb paper it is evident 
that Mr. Elting has become the largest individual factor in the 
McDonough County oil industry. Toward the close of 1915 the 
eighth producing well was brought in on his lease near Colmar, 
Illinois, and the seven other wells were then yielding a handsome 
daily income. A paragraph at the conclusion of the article reads : 
"Ned Elting has had some ups and downs, but he now appears to 
be on the highway to fortune and soon due to be an oil magnate of 
no mean dimension. He is indeed a good fellow and everybody 
who knows him will rejoice at his good fortune, the result largely 
of staying with what he believed was a good thing." 

Mr. Elting married Miss Mary Alleyne Mclntosh, of Macomb, 
and they have one son, John Philip, who was born March 8, 1910. 
They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The family 
residence is located at No. 429 South Randolph Street. Mrs. Elting 
is devoted to the home circle and takes a modern woman's interest in 
club and social service work. In politics Mr. Elting is a zealous 
republican. He is identified fraternally with the Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, Mystic Shrine and is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, in these organizations finding the relaxation that his busy 
life needs. 



1104 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

WILBER H. HICKMAN. The present state's attorney of Edgar 
County is a young lawyer who has done much to prove his ability 
and open the way to a large and successful career both in the law 
and in public affairs. Mr. Hickman has practiced at Paris since 
1908, and has enjoyed substantial success as a lawyer and high 
standing as a citizen. 

Wilber H. Hickman was born in Edgar County on a farm, Sep- 
tember 10, 1884. His parents, Henry and Mary (Shuman) Hick- 
man, well known and prosperous farming people in Edgar County, 
were the parents of seven children. With that undeniable advantage 
of a youth spent on a farm in the rural districts, Wilber H. Hick- 
man was also fortunate in securing a liberal education as a prepa- 
ration for his serious work. From the public schools he entered 
the Illinois State Normal School, remained there three years, was 
for two years a student of science in the University of Indiana, then 
taught the sciences in the high schools of Edgar County and for one 
year at Greencastle, Indiana, and in the meantime had devoted his 
spare time and vacations to the study of law in the office of Hon. 
F. T. O'Hair, who now represents the Fifth Illinois District in 
Congress. Following this came two years of study in the law de- 
partment of the University of Illinois, and he was admitted to the 
bar and began practice in 1908. For two years Mr. Hickman was 
associated with Congressman O'Hair. He saw two years of service 
as city attorney of Paris, and in 1912 was elected to his present office 
as state's attorney on the democratic ticket. His administration of 
the office has brought him many commendations for efficiency and 
diligence, and this official experience will prove the foundation for 
a still broader career. Mr. Hickman has been admitted to practice 
in the Federal courts, and has handled considerable patent business 
in the Federal department. 

Mr. Hickman is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
member of Ansar Temple at Springfield Illinois, and also has affili- 
ations with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the 
Improved Order of Red Men. His wife before her marriage was 
Miss Elma J. Dick, daughter of Jesse N. Dick of Champaign, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Hickman is a member of the Christian Church and his 
wife a Methodist. He has membership in the Edgar County Bar 
Association. His private office is at N. S. Square, and his home at 
501 Sheriff Street in Paris. 

GEORGE M. THOMPSON. To be successful in any of the learned 
professions, demands proficiency along many lines and in the prac- 
tice of law many similar qualities are equally necessary as those 
required in higher educational work. Both professions have a 
marked influence on the moral, civil, social, and to some extent, the 
political affairs of the world. An efficient, tactful, well educated 
teacher has the way wide open to the path of the logical under- 
standing and keen perceptiveness that belong to the training of a 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1105 

-lawyer. Among the well known citizens of Bement, who is an able 
representative of both professions, is George M. Thompson, city 
attorney and formerly principal of the Bement public schools. 

George M. Thompson was born March 7, 1875, and is a son of 
George W. and Alice A. (Ramsey) Thompson, who were the parents 
of nine children. The mother yet survives, her eighty-two years 
resting lightly upon her, but the father died in 1899. Formerly he 
was a dental practitioner who was favorably known for his skill 
all over Piatt County. 

The excellent public schools and subsequently the University of 
Illinois, provided Mr. Thompson with his educational training, and 
he was graduated from the latter in 1901, qualified for admission 
to the bar. He has built up a very substantial practice at Bement 
and as a public official has administered the duties of the city at- 
torney's office with the utmost efficiency. As a teacher he has always 
been highly regarded and the best interests of the schools were con- 
scientiously considered while he was at their head. He belongs to 
both county and state bar associations, and is also identified with 
the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Thompson married Miss Lois E. Graves, who is a daughter 
of Dr. E. H. Graves, a prominent physician, and they have one 
child. Mr. Thompson and wife are members of the Christian 
Church. He has always been a supporter of the republican party. 

SAIN WELTY. The subject of this sketch was born near Somer- 
set, Ohio. His parents were Emanuel and Sarah Ann (Sain) Welty. 
Early in life, with his parents, he removed to Marshall County, Illi- 
nois, and settled on a farm near Washburn, where he grew to man- 
hood farming, attending and teaching country schools. In 1881 he 
graduated from the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, 
Illinois, and Yale Law School in 1883, where he received the Mar- 
shall Jewel prize for best examination in senior class. 

In the summer of 1883 returning to Bloomington he entered the 
law office of Fifer and Phillips, where he remained about a year. 
He then formed a law partnership with Hon. John A. Sterling, 
which continued until Mr. Welty was elected judge in June, 1915. 
W. W. Whitmore was added to the firm in 1903. Studiously and 
industriously he pursued his professional career winning many 
laurels through his knowledge of the law and his close application 
to the same; his elevation to the bench has been very generally 
approved. As senior member of the firm of Welty, Sterling & 
Whitmore, his name stood high in legal circles. 

Judge Welty served as city attorney of Bloomington, Illinois, 
for two terms and was appointed master in chancery of the McLean 
County Circuit Court by Judge C. D. Myers, in 1897 to 1901. In 
1915 he was elected Circuit Judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, 
comprising the counties of McLean, Ford, Logan, Livingston and 
Woodford. 



1106 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Judge Welty is a member of the Methodist Church and for 
twenty years has been a trustee of the Illinois Wesleyan University, 
and for two years has been president of its joint board, succeeding 
the late Judge Owen T. Reeves. He is a member of the McLean 
County Bar Association and served as president of the same from 
1908 to 1913, and belongs also to the Illinois State Bar Association. 
Busy as he has always been, he enjoys social companionship and 
is a member of the Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Bloomington Club and the Bloomington Country 
Club, and it pleases him also to keep up old college relationships as 
a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 

Judge Welty is a man of unostentation but of sincerity of bear- 
ing, and the high esteem in which he is held by bench, bar and the 
public generally is most deserving. 

HON. CHARLES A. QUACKENBUSH. Since his admission to the 
bar ten years ago Mr. Quackenbush has been one of the able attor- 
neys of the Coles County bar, and has gained a substantial reputa- 
tion both as a lawyer and citizen at Charleston. On September i, 
1914, he was elected judge of the city courts, and his subsequent 
record on the bench has shown him to possess every qualification 
necessary for the position. 

An Illinois man by birth, Judge Quackenbush was born July 3, 
1869, at Mason City in Mason County, one of two children whose 
parents were Lance and Amy J. (Ward) Quackenbush. He has 
spent most of his life in Coles County, where he gained a common 
school education, and later entered the State Normal at Carbondale, 
from which he was graduated in 1898. He spent two years as a 
student in the University of Chicago and then taught school, and 
while engaged in that work gained his preliminary knowledge of the 
law. In 1902 he entered the Illinois College of Law at Chicago, 
where he completed his law course in 1904 and in the following year 
was admitted to the bar. He has since been in practice in Coles 
County, and with office at Charleston soon built up a satisfactory 
practice. The first recognition of his ability outside of a promising 
private clientage was his election to the office of city attorney. He 
filled that position in Charleston for six years, and that record was 
the foundation for the larger sphere of professional usefulness in 
which he is now engaged. 

Judge Quackenbush is a member of the Coles County Bar Asso- 
ciation, has long been identified with the Masonic fraternity, and 
in politics is a republican. He married Miss May Keeney Hayes, 
daughter of Jay Francis Hayes of Des Moines, Iowa. Mrs. Quack- 
enbush is a cultured and highly educated lady, a graduate of Normal 
School and of the Art Institute of Chicago. Judge and Mrs. 
Quackenbush reside at First and Tyler streets in Charleston. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1107 

HARRY HOOD. An able lawyer of Cairo whose career covers 
fourteen years, Harry Hood possesses exceptional qualifications for 
his profession and has a wide professional experience. 

Harry Hood was born in Johnson County, Illinois, August 19, 
1879, a son f J- W. and Victoria Hood, the former a native of 
Georgia and the latter of Tennessee. His father came to Johnson 
County during the Civil war, was a merchant there, and died in 
Pulaski County in 1912 at the age of seventy-two, while his widow 
is still living in Pulaski County at the age of fifty-six. There were 
five children, and the oldest son, Fred, is one of the leading lawyers 
of Mound City. 

Harry Hood attended the public schools of Pulaski County, was 
graduated in law from Dixon College in 1901, and began practice 
at Mound City. Three years later he accepted a position with the 
department of the Interior in Indian affairs, and spent five years 
in Oklahoma Territory. On returning to Illinois in 1909, Mr. Hood 
located at Cairo, and has since built a large practice in all the courts 
of Southern Illinois. He is now serving his second term as city 
attorney, and is a member of the State Bar Association. Frater- 
nally he is affiliated with the Masonic Order and the Knights of 
Pythias. 

Mr. Hood was married at Mound City in 1907 to Miss Dougherty, 
whose father A. J. Dougherty, is president of the Mound City Water 
and Light Company. Mr. Hood in politics is a republican. 

EDWARD L. LYON. An Aurora lawyer who has done much suc- 
cessful work and has established influential connections almost at 
the beginning of his career, Edward L. Lyon was admitted to 
practice about six years ago and is now junior member of the firm 
of Murphy & Lyon. 

Edward L. Lyon was born in Berlin, Wisconsin, April 26, 1884, 
a son of Frank A. and Katie (Landon) Lyon, who moved to 
Aurora about thirty years ago, not long after the birth of their 
son Edward. The father was born in Ripon and the mother in 
Berlin, Wisconsin, and they and their two children including the 
daughter Gertrude, are still living. Frank A. Lyon was a number 
of years a breeder and dealer in imported horses, but in later years 
has confined his attention to dealing in this grade of stock. In 
politics he is a republican. 

Edward L. Lyon was educated in the schools of Aurora, gradu- 
ating from the West Side High School in the class of 1903 and 
continued his studies for a profession in the law department of the 
Illinois University, graduating in 1908. Admitted to the bar, Mr. 
Lyon began practice at Aurora, and in 1910 became associated 
with John C. Murphy under the firm name of Murphy & Lyon, and 
they handle a substantial general practice. 

Mr. Lyon is a member of the Kane County Bar Association and 
the Phi Delta Phi college fraternity, also of Aurora Lodge No. 



1108 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

254, A. F. & A. M. Politically he is allied with the republican party. 
On June 21, 1913 he married Irene Wilcox, who is a native of 
Aurora. 

HON. HENRY A. NEAL. As a whole, the bar of Coles County, 
Illinois, is a body of able men, and individually numbers among its 
members many whose legal talents may well place them in the 
forefront of the profession in the state, and one of these is Henry 
A. Neal, who has been established in the practice of law at Charles- 
ton since 1873. He was born at Tuftonboro, New Hampshire, 
December 13, 1846, and is a son of Nathaniel and Mary E. Neal. 
He was reared on his father's farm, attended the public schools 
of Carroll County and later had advantages in a seminary in his 
native state. His school days were scarcely over before he became 
a soldier, this being in 1864, when he enlisted in Company K, First 
New Hampshire Heavy Artillery. 

When the war closed he began to think of his future career. 
After a course in a business college at Poughkeepsie, New York, 
Mr. Neal, in 1866, came to Illinois, and he passed the first winter 
in this state as a teacher of a country school in Coles County and 
finding the profession not over crowded and reasonably congenial, 
he continued to teach, spending one year at Paris, Illinois, and 
three years at Watseka, in Iroquois County, where he was made 
school superintendent. In the meanwhile he had made up his mind 
to enter the profession of law and with this intention utilized all 
his spare time studying law books and thus prepared for and entered 
the law school of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where 
he was graduated with credit in 1873, immediately afterward locat- 
ing at Charleston. Here his reputation as an able lawyer has been 
won and his high standing as a citizen has been secured. 

It is a matter of fact that from the legal profession come many 
of the most useful and influential public men of the country, the 
trained mind and clear understanding of a lawyer particularly 
qualifying him for the responsible public duties of a statesman. 
Since coming to Coles County Mr. Neal has been an uncompromising 
republican and his party loyalty has many times been acknowledged. 
In almost every political campaign his oratorical powers have been 
noted in the discussions incident to the occasion, and he has exerted 
a wide influence throughout the state. Twice has he been elected 
to the general assembly and served with marked efficiency in the 
thirtieth and the thirty-first sessions of the state legislature. He 
has been locally honored also, serving in the office of mayor of 
Charleston from 1895 until 1897, an d during his administration the 
city made rapid progress. He has not accepted any other public 
office with the exception of that of delegate to the national repub- 
lican convention, in 1896, and as an elector in 1900, since which 
time, in large measure his time has been given to the demands of 
his large private law practice. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1109 

In June, 1873, Mr. Neal was married to Miss Lizzie Jones, a 
resident of Paris, Illinois, and they had one daughter Orra E., 
who was born in May, 1874. In April, 1888, Mr. Neal was mar- 
ried to Miss Louise Weiss, who was born at Charleston, and they 
have one son, Harry F., who was born in February, 1889. Aside 
from professional and public life, Mr. Neal is a popular man, 
whole-souled and liberal-minded, with mental vigor unimpaired 
and social qualities that make him agreeable in every circle. 

RICHARD H. HOLLEN. One of the able younger members of the 
Chicago bar, Mr. Hollen is the senior in the law firm of Hollen & 
Massen, with offices at 29 South La Salle Street. Since beginning 
his professional work in Chicago, in 1906, Mr. Hollen's associations 
and practical work have indicated the soundest professional qualifica- 
tions and the ability of leadership, and his peculiar ability rests in 
the analysis of decisions. 

Born in the City of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, October 4, 1881, Mr. 
Hollen is a son of Andrew H. and Christine (Gilberts) Hollen, 
his father a representative merchant and citizen of Eau Claire. 
After finishing the high school course in his native city, Mr. Hollen 
entered the academic department of the University of Wisconsin, 
graduating in 1903, with the degree of Bachelor of Letters. In 
1906, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was given him after com- 
pleting the regular course at Harvard University Law School. In 
October of the same year, Mr. Hollen was admitted to the Illinois 
bar, by the supreme court of the state. He was first associated with 
the well known Chicago law firm of Jones, Addington & Ames, 
later with the firm of Winston, Paine, Strawn & Shaw. 

Mr. Hollen is on one of the committees of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation. He is a member of the Harvard University Club, the Wis- 
consin University Club, and the South Shore Country Club. In 
politics he gives his support to the republican party. Mr. Hollen 
was associate editor of the law publication entitled "Illinois Notes," 
and also of the Jones and Addington "Illinois Statutes Annotated." 

On October 26, 1909, Mr. Hollen married Miss Julia Higginson, 
of Chicago, and they have one child, Richard Andrew. Mr. Hollen 
lives at 5513 Cornell Avenue. 

JOSEPH B. DAVID. Thirty years ago Joseph B. David was 
admitted to practice before the Illinois bar. Since that time he has 
continued in active professional work at 154 West Randolph Street, 
where he opened his first law office. His work has been of a high 
order, and his success has been sure, for close application coupled 
with a generous measure of native ability never fail to make for 
progress in any field of endeavor. 

Mr. David is not a native of the State of Illinois. He was born 
in Kentucky, in the City of Louisville, on October 27, 1863, and is 
a son of Theobald and Adelaide (Strauss) David, both of them now 



1110 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

deceased. Theobald David was an expect book-keeper and account- 
ant in Louisville, and was for a number of years identified with 
the teaching profession in that city. As a boy Joseph David 
attended the schools of his home town, and he was twenty years 
old when in 1883 he came to Chicago and began the study of law 
under the careful oversight of Judge Philip Stein of this city, a man 
who served with distinction on the bench of the Superior Court. 
Mr. David was a close student and when on March 20, 1885, he 
was admitted to the bar by the Appellate Court of the state, he was 
well prepared as a result of his years with Judge Stein. Straight- 
way the young lawyer opened an office at 154 West Randolph 
Street, and there he will be found today, after an intervening period 
of thirty years of law practice. Mr. David is now senior member 
of the firm of David & 'Zillman, and his practice extends into the 
various courts of the state. 

At one time Mr. David served briefly as acting assistant state's 
attorney for Cook County and he was retained for a considerable 
period in the position of acting assistant city attorney. Mr. David 
controls a large and substantial law business, based largely upon his 
well known ability as a trial lawyer and careful counsellor. 

Mr. David is a member of the Chicago, Illinois and American 
Bar associations. Socially he is identified by his membership in 
the Iroquois Club, the Illinois Athletic Club, the Royal Arcanum, 
the Royal League, the National Union and the Hebrew Institute. 
He and his family are members of Isaiah Temple and he is an active 
member of the Independent Order of B'Nai Brith. He is a demo- 
crat, and has lately been active in politics in addition to confining his 
energies to his law business. 

On August 16, 1888, Mr. David was married to Miss Emma 
Siesel, of German birth, and to them have been born four children. 
The eldest, Sigmund Walker, is a lawyer and is in practice in Chi- 
cago; Louise Seisel is a teacher of domestic science in her native 
city ; Adelaide Caroline, was formerly a student in the University of 
Chicago, and Cecil is attending the public schools. The family 
home is at 4359 Grand Boulevard. 

FREDERIC A. FISCHEL. In Chicago, his native city, where his 
father has been a merchant, Frederic A. Fischel has been an active 
member of the bar since 1905. With offices at 512 Harris Trust 
Building, he is engaged in independent general practice. 

Mr. Fischel was born in Chicago January 7, 1883, a son of Jacob 
J. and Carrie (Kohn) Fischel. He continued his studies in the 
public schools through high school and in preparation for his chosen 
profession, entered the University of Chicago, from which he was 
graduated a member of the class of 1903, with the degree Bachelor 
of Philosophy. From the law school of the same university, he 
graduated in 1905, with the degree Doctor of Jurisprudence. In 
October of the same year, he was admitted to the bar of Illinois 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1111 

and was associated with the well known Chicago law firm of New- 
man, Northrup, Levinson & Becker until 1910, since which time he 
has been engaged in the independent practice of his profession. He 
is an active member of the Chicago Bar Association. Mr. Fischel 
was married to Norah C. Sparks on August 31, 1914, and to this 
union a son, Robert F., was born May 24, 1915. The family reside 
at 6209 Drexel Avenue. 

HOWARD P. CASTLE. The Cook County legal profession is well 
represented at Barrington, Illinois, by Howard P. Castle, who is 
known as a lawyer of ability and a banker of prominence in his 
home community, and also holds membership in the Chicago firm 
of Castle, Williams, Long & Castle. His practice is somewhat gen- 
eral in character, although he has specialized to some extent in real 
estate and probate work, and thoroughly qualified by training and 
practice in the various branches of his profession, he has achieved 
reputation far beyond the ordinary. 

Mr. Castle was born at Barrington, Illinois, February 4, 1878, 
and is a son of Arthur L. and Grace E. (Wood) Castle, and a 
brother of Franz W. Castle, who is associated with him in practice. 
After attending the graded and high schools of Elgin, Illinois, Mr. 
Castle became a student in the law department of Lake Forest 
Academy, from which he was graduated in 1901, with his degree, 
and at once became associated with the firm of Cutting, Castle & 
Williams. He became a member of the firm when its style was 
changed to Castle, Williams & Smith, and continues as a member 
of the present firm of Castle, Williams, Long & Castle, which main- 
tains an office at No. 29 South La Salle Street, Chicago. Mr. Castle 
possesses an analytical, logical and inductive mind, and is able to 
readily recognize the relation of facts and to coordinate the points 
in litigation in a manner that evidences a complete mastery of the 
subject and an intellect trained in the strictest school of investiga- 
tion. By his fellow practitioners he is recognized as a valued assist- 
ant and worthy opponent, and his standing in professional circles 
is high, as he has been a close observer of the ethics of his calling. 
He is enjoying a large and representative practice, and his record 
justifies this, for he has been successful in a large number of im- 
portant cases. 

Mr. Castle is a member of the Phi Delta Phi college fraternity, 
and was formerly president of the Chicago Alumni Chapter. Pro- 
fessionally, he is identified with the Chicago Bar Association and 
the Illinois State Bar Association, and in the former was for two 
years a member of the committee on admissions. He is popularly 
known in social circles, belonging to the Hamilton Club of Chicago, 
and also holds membership in the Illinois Society, Sons of the Revo- 
lution. While the greater part of his time and attention have been 
given to his legal practice, Mr. Castle has not been unknown to 



1112 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

financial affairs, being vice president of the First State Bank of 
Harrington, and also a director of the Arlington Heights State Bank. 
He has taken an active and helpful interest in the welfare of his 
community, and has served seven years as village attorney and is 
at present secretary of the board of education. 

Mr. Castle was married September 17, 1908, to Miss Sarah E. 
Edwards, daughter of Alfred and Julia Edwards, of Adrian, Michi- 
gan, and to this union there have come two children : Grace E., who 
was born in 1909; and Caroline L., who was born in 1912. 

HON. JAMES W. CRAIG. The legal profession at Mattoon finds 
a worthy representative in Hon. James W. Craig, for six years judge 
of the Fifth Judicial Circuit, and senior member of the well known 
law firm of Craig & Craig, comprising James W., Edward C., James 
W., Jr., and Donald B. Craig. Judge Craig on the bench and in pri- 
vate practice has won admiration, respect, confidence and esteem 
and Coles County numbers him with her distinguished citizens. 

James W. Craig was born in Morgan Township, Coles County, 
June 29, 1844. His parents were Isaac N. and Elizabeth (Bloyer) 
Craig, natives of Kentucky and Pennsylvania respectively. The 
Craig family is of Scotch ancestry and the great-grandfather of 
Judge Craig served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and the 
grandfather, Robert Craig, served in the War of 1812, further mili- 
tary heroism being found in the service of the father, Isaac N. Craig, 
who took part in the Black Hawk war in Illinois. On the maternal 
side the ancestry is of Swiss extraction, and the Bloyers emigrated 
from Switzerland to the United States and settled at Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania. After the death of Grandfather Bloyer the family 
came to Coles County, Illinois. The paternal grandfather, Robert 
Craig, was born in Virginia, and in early manhood moved to Ken- 
tucky and from there, in 1828 came to Illinois and followed agricul- 
ture ever afterward in Clark County. Isaac N. Craig was a pros- 
perous farmer for many years before retirement to Charleston, where 
the comforts of life surrounded him and his family of nine children 
rendered him filial affection. Of his family James Wesley was the 
eighth in order of birth. The father, born in 1810, survived to be 
eighty-two years of age, the mother passing away at Charleston at 
the age of seventy-six years. 

In boyhood, James W. Craig, in the usual manner of country 
youths at that period, had some distance to walk before he reached 
the old log schoolhouse, where he learned his first lessons and 
mastered the rudiments, but his opportunities were better than were 
those of many others as he had access to a fine library and also had 
the ambition to learn, hence was well informed by the time he was 
twenty years of age and left home in order to enter upon the study 
of law, on July 19, 1864, becoming a student in the law office of 
Col. O. B. Ficklin. Subsequently he entered the law department 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1113 

of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where he was grad- 
uated March 27, 1867, and in the following May he formed a law 
partnership with his former preceptor, Colonel Ficklin, and entered 
into practice at Charleston. 

In May, 1868, Mr. Craig removed to Mattoon, which city has 
continued to be his home and where he has built up a reputation that 
,is by no means confined to Coles County. As a lawyer in general 
practice, he has tried nearly every kind of a case and has had charge 
of suits in all courts from that presided over by a justice of the 
peace to those which come under the jurisdiction of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, this affording a very thorough prepara- 
tion for the judicial honors that later awaited him. In 1872 he was 
elected state's attorney for Coles County, an office he held for four 
years, and in 1903 was elected to the bench and served six years 
with such marked efficiency as to arouse admiration and esteem 
throughout the entire district, irrespective of party lines. In the 
discharge of his judicial duties he displayed the certain temperament 
that is so essential to a high order of service on the bench, his rulings 
being marked by firmness, courtesy and a thorough understanding 
of the law, his knowledge of the Supreme and Appellate reports of 
the state being little short of marvelous. Having an eye to economy, 
he endeavored to keep down court expenses by expediting the work 
and this feature was commendable in every way. He was not afraid 
of work and managed to get through with as much of it in the 
course of the day as any man who has ever adorned the woolsack in 
this circuit. After retiring from the bench, Judge Craig continued 
private practice and had the gratifying experience of having his 
three sons all his partners in business. It was a strong combination. 

On June 17, 1868, Mr. Craig was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Chilton, who is a daughter of James and Lavina (Dore) 
Chilton. The father was born in Maryland and the mother in 
Maine and they were married in Scott County, Illinois. During his 
early business life Mr. Chilton was a merchant but later retired to 
his farm situated north of Charleston. Four children were born 
to Judge and Mrs. Craig, one daughter and three sons : Lizzie I., 
born June 4, 1869, who is now the wife of John Van Meter ; Edward 
C, who was born April 7, 1872; James W., who was born May 18, 
1879 ! an d Donald B., who was born May 9, 1883. The family 
belongs to the Episcopal Church. 

Politically Judge Craig is a democrat and naturally is interested 
largely in the success of his party, but above that he is a loyal Amer- 
ican and lives up to his convictions of right. His pre-eminent success 
in his profession has not been the result of any political combination 
at any time, but has been earned through his own unflagging energy 
and native abilities. He has always been interested in the moral 
and intellectual welfare of his community and by the influence of 
example has contributed thereto. As a lawyer, citizen and business 
man he ranks with the prominent and effective element of Central 



Vol. 11118 



1114 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Illinois. As a man he is genial and companionable and his unfailing 
good nature and practical common sense have always appealed to 
his associates on bench and bar and have overcome prejudice and 
won warm friendship. 

EDWARD C. CRAIG, eldest son of Hon. James W. Craig, and a 
member of the prominent law firm made up of James W., Edward- 
C., James W. Jr., and Donald B. Craig, at Mattoon, stands high in 
his profession, for which he was thoroughly prepared and which, 
it may almost be said, is a natural heritage. He has character, 
ambition, willingness to work and "bone-down" to it tirelessly, with 
unfailing enthusiasm. He was born at Mattoon, Coles County, 
Illinois, April 7, 1872, a son of James Wesley and Mary (Chilton) 
Craig, the former a native of Coles County and the latter of Scott 
County, Illinois. In 1889, Edward C. Craig was graduated from 
the Mattoon High School and pursued his studies in the University 
of Illinois, where he was graduated and secured his degree in 1893, 
and subsequently took a course in the law department of Harvard 
University. In January, 1896, he was admitted to the bar and 
entered into practice at Mattoon. He is a sound democrat in his 
political views and occasionally has accepted civic office, serving 
usefully on the board of education for some time, and for one term 
represented his ward on the city council board, during which time 
he was instrumental in securing the attention of the public through 
the board to some needed reforms. In his citizenship he has shown 
public spirit and in his profession marked ability and comprehensive 
knowledge. He has a just estimate of his fellow-men and a kindly 
feeling toward them, of the highest, purest and most unselfish kind. 

He is attorney for both the Illinois Central Railroad Company 
and the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Company and is sent 
by both companies all over their territory in the trial of causes, 
being trusted by them with some of their most important litigation. 

Mr. Craig was married November 9, 1899, to Miss Fannie lone 
Dilley, then of Dallas, Texas, but a native of Shelbyville, Illinois, 
a highly educated lady and a graduate of St. Mary's Institute, at 
St. Louis, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Craig have two children : George 
Mansfield Craig and Donald Chilton Craig. Mr. and Mrs. Craig 
are members of the Episcopal Church. Mr. Craig belongs to the 
Elks and to professional organizations and purely social bodies. 
He has a pleasant, frank manner that invites confidence and wins 
friendship, an asset in any line of endeavor, but with Mr. Craig it 
is but one indication of the manliness that makes him a true gentle- 
man as well as a dependable attorney. 

JOHN BARTON PAYNE. During the thirty-one years of his active 
connection with the Chicago bar, Judge Payne has won practically 
all the better distinctions and rewards of the prominent lawver. He 
is one of the leading members in a firm that has unquestioned priority 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1115 

in the Chicago bar, has for many years enjoyed a clientage distin- 
guished as much for quality as for extent, was for several years a 
judge of the Superior Court of Cook County, and has done much 
valuable civic work, especially in his position as president of the 
Board of South Park Commissioners. 

John Barton Payne was born at Pruntytown, Virginia, January 
26, 1855. His birthplace was in that section of Virginia now West 
Virginia, and his parents were Dr. Amos and Elizabeth (Barton) 
Payne, his father distinguished as a physician and his mother repre- 
senting one of the oldest families of West Virginia. Judge Payne's 
early education was acquired in private schools at Orleans, West 
Virginia, between 1860 and 1870, and after finishing his law studies 
he was admitted to the bar in 1876 in Taylor County, West Virginia, 
and in the following year took up active practice at Kingwood in 
that state. 

During his residence in Preston County, West Virginia, Judge 
Payne, in addition to looking after a growing practice, served as 
chairman of the democratic committee of the county from 1877 to 
1882, was a special judge of the Circuit Court of Tucker County in 
1880, and in 1882 was elected mayor of Kingwood. 

Judge Payne located at Chicago in 1883, and for ten years was 
engaged in a general law practice and in that time established the 
reputation and connections which have since made him one of the 
foremost lawyers of the city. From December i, 1893, to December 
5, 1898, he was one of the judges of the Superior Court of Cook 
County, and his decisions while on the bench have been declared 
monuments of judicial soundness and insight. For more than fifteen 
years since his retirement from the bench Judge Payne has been 
employed in general practice and in the handling of varied interests. 
Since 1903 he has been senior member of the firm of Winston, 
Payne, Strawn & Shaw, with offices in the First National Bank 
Building. 

Since 1911 Judge Payne has been president of the Board of 
South Park Commissioners. In 1889 ne was honored by election 
as president of the Chicago Law Institute. He is a democrat, and 
has membership in numerous clubs including the Metropolitan of 
Washington, the Chicago, the Union League, the Law, the Chicago 
Golf, the Caxton, the Forty, the Mid Day, the Wayfarers. On May 
i, 1913, Judge Payne married at Washington Jennie Byrd, daughter 
of the late Thomas B. Bryan. 

DANIEL VINCENT GALLERY. By birth and training a Chicagoan, 
Daniel Vincent Gallery has passed his entire career as a resident of 
this city, where through the possession of able talents and their 
steady application he has become known as a thorough master of his 
profession. Mr. Gallery was born in Chicago July 19, 1865, and is 
a son of Daniel J. and Mary (Daily) Gallery. His father, who was 
for many years a prominent and well-to-do business man, died in 



1116 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Chicago, December 24, 1904, while the mother passed away in 
May, 1888. 

Daniel V. Gallery was educated in the public schools and St. 
Ignatius (Jesuit) College. He received the degree Bachelor of Arts 
from St. Ignatius and the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Laws were later conferred upon him by the same institution. Mr. 
Gallery had his legal training in the Chicago College of Law, where 
he was graduated in 1893 with the Bachelor's degree, and in the 
same year he was admitted to practice before all the courts of Illinois 
and the federal courts as well. He began his practice in the offices 
of Moran, Kraus & Mayer, with whom he remained for four years, 
but since that time has conducted an independent practice. His 
offices are in the Chicago Title & Trust Building. Mr. Gallery has 
become a more or less familiar figure in the various courts of the 
state and in the passing years has conducted skillfully and success- 
fully a number of important cases. Among them might be men- 
tioned Horn vs. Landon Accident Company, 206, Illinois, 498 ; 
Banker vs. Chicago, 112 Appellate, 94; Parson vs. Fogg, 205, Ills. 
Supreme, 326. He was also successful in winning a number of 
other equally important cases for his clients. Mr. Gallery is a 
member of the Chicago, Illinois State and American Bar associa- 
tions, and his fraternal affiliations are with the Knights of Columbus. 
September 5, 1898, Mr. Gallery was married to Miss Mary Jose- 
phine Onahan, and six children have been born to them, as follows : 
Daniel Vincent, Jr., John Ireland, William, Mary Margaret, Philip 
Daly and Martha Nancy. The home of the family is at 1256 Macal- 
ester place. 

JOHN E. MACLEISH is engaged in the general practice of law, 
with offices in the Corn Exchange National Bank Building, Chicago, 
Illinois, and is a member of the firm of Scott, Bancroft & Stephens. 
He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State 
Bar Association, and the American Bar Association, and of several 
of the Chicago clubs. 

FREDERIC PERRY VOSE. A member of the Chicago bar since 
1893, Frederic P. Vose has specialized largely in handling the legal 
affairs and interests of electrical manufacturers and jobbers, and 
is one of the few men in the profession who give special attention 
to this department of law. He was admitted to the United Supreme 
Court in October, 1914. 

Frederic Perry Vose was born in Chicago May 4, 1870, a son 
of William Merchant Richardson and Patience E. (Watts) Vose. 
His father, who came to Chicago, in 1866, was a native of Lancaster, 
Massachusetts, and a descendant of Robert Vose, who came from 
London in 1640 and settled at Boston. His mother represented an 
old Rhode Island family. In 1873 the family moved to Evanston, 
and Frederic P. Vose received his education in the public schools of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1117 

that city, graduating from high school in 1890. He attended the 
academic department of Northwestern University and law school 
and was graduated LL. B. in June, 1894. He had been admitted to 
the bar of Illinois in December, 1893, and his first practice was as 
senior member of the firm of Vose & Poppenhusen. This was dis- 
solved a year later, and he subsequently was associated with James 
Frake, one of the older leaders of the Chicago bar. He was also 
connected with Parker & Pain four years. In 1902 Mr. Vose began 
practice with Judge Charles M. Osburn and Hubert E. Page, and 
when Judge Osburn retired about six years later the firm became 
Vose & Page, 1343-1350 Marquette Building, Chicago. Their prac- 
tice became more and more identified with corporation law, and Mr. 
Vose as counsel for a number of corporations manufacturing and 
dealing in electrical goods and supplies has taken a leading part in 
the organization of these commercial interests. Since 1896 he has 
been secretary and treasurer of the Electrical Credit Association of 
Chicago, and in 1898 drafted the constitution and by-laws of the 
Electrical Jobbers Association, and for three years was commis- 
sioner of that organization. Out of that movement have grown 
associations in the electrical manufacturing and jobbing trade that 
cover the United States and Canada. For two years he was super- 
visor or executive head of the Electrical Contractors Association of 
Chicago. Since its organization in 1898 he has been general secre- 
tary and general counsel of the National Electrical Credit Associa- 
tion, and editor of its monthly publication, The Viewpoint. Mr. 
Vose was an organizer and charter member of the Electric Club of 
Chicago, and .was its president during 1909-10, and an incorporator 
of The Jovian Order the secret society of the electrical industry 
numbering a membership of 18,000. He has been considered as an 
authority and has acted as arbitrator on complicated electrical ques- 
tions both in Chicago and throughout the country. Mr. Vose is 
serving as a director or a member of executive committees in a 
number of financial and commercial organizations. 

Mr. Vose is a member of the collegiate fraternity of Sigma Chi 
and of Phi Delta Phi law fraternity, the Chicago Bar Association, 
the Illinois Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the Com- 
mercial Law League of America, of which he has been recording 
secretary and president in 1912-13, and of the Law Club of Chicago. 
In his home city, Evanston, he has taken an active part in a number 
of movements, and was one of the charter members and a member 
of the executive committee of the Chicago and North Shore Festival 
Association, under whose auspices have been conducted several 
notable musical festivals. He has been a member and president of 
the Evanston Board of Education for ten years, and has also been 
a director and on the executive committee of the Evanston Hospital 
Association. For many years he was a director of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, and belongs to the Union League Club, the 
University Club of Chicago, the University Club of Evanston, of 



1118 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

which he was president from 1913 to 1915, and the Evanston Golf 
Club. He is fond of outdoor life and usually spends a part of each 
summer on hunting and fishing trips, having a log cabin at Trout 
Lake, Wisconsin. He is an elder in the Second Presbyterian Church 
of Evanston, and also was superintendent of the Bible School. He 
has served on committees of the Chicago Presbytery and Illinois 
Presbyterian Synod. 

Mr. Vose was married at Evanston January 30, 1900, to Miss 
Lucy B. Mason. Their home is at 1131 Ridge Avenue. 

ROBERT P. BURKH ALTER. With fifteen years of active and suc- 
cessful experience as a member of the Chicago bar, Robert P. Burk- 
halter is an Illinois man and his associations identify him with the 
leading men in his profession. 

Mr. Burkhalter was born at Maquon, Illinois, May 18, 1873, 
and is a son of James L. and Martha Adle Burkhalter. His father 
was a Galesburg banker, prominently identified with public and civic 
life in Central Illinois and died in 1909. His mother is also de- 
ceased. 

Mr. Burkhalter received his education in the Galesburg public 
schools, Knox College and the University of Chicago. For one 
year he was a student in the law school of Columbia University, 
and in 1898 graduated from the New York Law School. In 1902 
he was given a degree by the Chicago Law School. 

He has been in active practice in Chicago and has his offices in 
the Edison Building. For three years he was a partner of United 
States Senator James Hamilton Lewis. In his experience as a 
lawyer, Mr. Burkhalter has been identified with some of the most 
important matters in litigation before the courts of Illinois. 

Mr. Burkhalter is an active democrat and is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois Bar Association, the American 
Bar Association, the Press Club of Chicago, and the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

LESTER L. FALK. One of the younger members of the Chicago 
bar, Mr. Falk is a member of the law firm of Scott, Bancroft & 
Stephens, with offices at 1620 Corn Exchange Bank Building. Mr. 
Falk has been a member of the committee on municipal courts in 
the Chicago Bar Association ; he is also a member of the Illinois 
State Bar Association. Socially he is connected with the Union 
League Club, City Club and the Chicago Automobile Club. His 
home is at 4346 Grand Boulevard, his father being a Chicago mer- 
chant. 

Lester L. Falk was born in Chicago June 25, 1885, and is a son 
of Max L. and Bertha (Leopold) Falk. He attended the public 
schools until thirteen years of age, afterward taking a course in 
Armour Institute of Technology. In 1906, he was graduated from 
Brown University, at Providence, Rhode Island, Bachelor of Phil- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1119 

osophy. In 1909 he was graduated LL. B. from the law school of 
Harvard University. In the same year he was admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court of Illinois, as well as the Federal courts. 

WALTER A. BRENDECKE. Since beginning active practice in 
Chicago sixteen years ago, Mr. Brendecke has built up an individual 
clientage, and is now named among the leading younger members of 
the city bar. 

A native of Chicago, Walter A. Brendecke was born October 
27, 1877, a son of Adolph and Julie (Hechtenberg) Brendecke. 
Both parents were born in Germany, the father coming to Chicago 
in 1872, and his wife in the following year, when they were mar- 
ried. Walter A. Brendecke spent two years in a German school, 
attended the grammar schools and subsequently the Northwestern 
High School, and was also a student in the University of Chicago. 
Entering what is now the Kent College of Law, he graduated May 
27, 1897, with the degree LL. B. At that time he was less than 
twenty years of age. On December 14, 1898, after reaching his 
majority, he was regularly admitted to the Illinois bar. Mr. Bren- 
decke's scholarship while in Kent College brought him the second 
prize during his first year, and in his second year he won the first 
prize, the Callaghan prize of $100 worth of law books. 

Mr. Brendecke had his first practical experience in the law in 
the office of Simon P. Douthart, and was associated with that Chi- 
cago lawyer until 1905. Since that time Mr. Brendecke has been 
attending to his own practice, and has a large clientele in the general 
branches of law. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association and belongs to the Men's Society 
of the German Old People's Home, to the Chicago Motor Club, 
the Art Institute of Chicago, the Lawyers Association of Illinois, 
and the Chicago Law Institute. 

PHILIP SIDNEY BROWN. General practice, with perhaps special 
attention to commercial law, has claimed the attention of Philip 
Sidney Brown since he entered on the duties of his profession in 
1897. His progress since then has been ever upward and he has 
won recognition among his brother attorneys in the City of Chicago 
as a representative member of the profession. 

Philip Sidney Brown was born in Wyoming. Evanston, in 
Uinta County, Wyoming, is his birthplace, and he is a son of Clar- 
ance A. and Corinne (Stubbs) Gooding. In 1883 his mother became 
the wife of Frank E. Brown, assistant cashier of the First National 
Bank of Chicago, and young Gooding was fourteen years of age 
when in 1890 through legal adoption by his step- father he assumed 
definitely the name of Brown. He attended the schools of Chicago 
and was graduated from Hyde Park High School in 1894. In 1895-6 
he was a student in the Northwestern University Law School and 
he was graduated from the Chicago Kent College of Law in 1897 



1120 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

with the Bachelor of Laws degree. Admission to the bar of the 
state followed and he served his first days as a young lawyer as chief 
clerk in the office of Clarence S. Darrow, continuing there until 1900. 
In that year he engaged in independent practice in Chicago. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, and is 
a member of the City Club. He is known as a man who keeps close 
to his work, and such recreation as he allows himself is found in 
yachting and golf. 

Mr. Brown was married on December 22, 1906, to Miss Rose 
Swain, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and they have two sons, Frank E. 
and Philip S., Jr. The family home is at 219 Park Avenue, in Hins- 
dale. 

SIDNEY N. WARE. Although still one of the younger members 
of Chicago's legal fraternity, Sidney N. Ware has already achieved 
more than a local reputation in the field of his profession, his con- 
nection with much important legislation of a general character hav- 
ing made him well and favorably known in the various courts of the 
state. He has been in constant practice since attaining his majority, 
a period of twelve years, and is thoroughly equipped in every way 
for a successful lawyer, not only from a thorough and comprehensive 
legal training, but also from the possession of natural abilities of a 
very high order, combined with a forceful and persevering char- 
acter. 

Mr. Ware is a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and was born 
June 12, 1882, a son of Oscar W. and Clemmie (Nahm) Ware. 
His father has been for many years engaged in business in Chicago 
and is well and favorably known in insurance circles of this city. 
Sidney N. Ware was a small child when brought to Chicago by 
his parents, and here his primary educational training was secured 
in the public schools. He early had decided upon a professional 
career, and after graduating from high school entered the Chicago 
Kent College of Law, where after a very creditable period of scholar- 
ship he was graduated in October, 1903, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. At that time he secured admittance to the bar and asso- 
ciated himself with the well known legal combination of Musgrave, 
Vroman & Lee, of Chicago, with which he continued to be identified 
until 1907, and since that year has been engaged alone in a general 
practice, now maintaining offices at No. 1204-6 Marquette Building. 
His excellent abilities have attracted to him a representative and 
materially satisfying clientele, to the best interests of which he has 
continued to devote his attention. On his books may be found 
the names of some of the leading industries of the city, including 
the Central Railway Company, for which he acted in condemnation 
cases as associate counsel. Aside from his profession, Mr. Ware 
is favorably known as a business man of executive ability and 
organizing power, and at the present time is secretary and treasurer 
of the Illinois Midland Railway Company, secretary of the Poca- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1121 

hontas Coal Company, and secretary of P. Reilly & Son of Chicago. 
Mr. Ware was for some time active in the affairs of the Universal 
Club, of Chicago, of which he was treasurer and vice president. He 
also belongs to the Southern Club of Chicago, Sinai Social Center, 
and was formerly a member of Tracy Lodge No. 810, A. F. & 
A. M., in which he has held all the offices up to that of junior 
warden. He is now a member of Emblem Lodge, No. 984 A. F. & 
A. M., being one of its charter members. His professional connec- 
tion is with the Chicago Bar Association. Mr. Ware is unmarried 
and resides at No. 4537 Woodlawn Avenue. 

HARRY G. COLSON has practiced law in Chicago nearly twenty- 
five years. The bar and public have come to recognize him for 
thorough and painstaking handling of all interests entrusted to his 
care and his high standing and large practice qualify him as a repre- 
sentative Illinois lawyer. 

Harry Gilbert Colson was born in the City of Davenport, Iowa, 
January 18, 1868, and is a son of Norman Forbes Colson and Julia 
(Gilbert) Colson. His father was a talented musician and devoted 
the greater part of his active career to music as a profession. 'He 
was for a number of years a resident of Chicago, departing this life 
in 1891. His widow survives him and resides with her son 

Harry G. Colson acquired his early education principally in the 
public schools of Chicago and of Hudson, Lenawee County, Mich- 
igan. The study of law was begun in the office and under the pre- 
ceptorship of the well known Chicago firm of Flower, Smith & Mes- 
grave and in January, 1892, he was admitted to the Illinois bar. He 
has since been actively engaged in practice in Chicago, where he 
was a member of the firm of Colson & Johnson for about twelve 
years, but has since been alone. He gives special attention to cor- 
poration, real estate and probate law. He is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois Bar Association. Mr. 
Colson holds membership also in the Chicago Athletic Club, the 
Chicago Press Club and other representative social organizations. 
In the Masonic fraternity, his affiliations include membership in 
Garden City Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; Oriental Consistory, Scottish 
Rite ; and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 

On December 7, 1897, Mr. Colson married Miss Sarah Garner 

Wall. 

i 

FREDERICK J. KASPER. A graduate of the Harvard Law School, 
Frederick J. Kasper was admitted to the Illinois bar in the fall of 
1907 and has since been making a secure place for himself and his 
abilities in the Chicago bar. Mr. Kasper is junior member of the 
firm of Pain, Campbell & Kasper, with offices in the First National 
Bank. 

Frederick J. Kasper was born in Chicago September 24, 1882, a 
son of Peter J. and Mary Gund Kasper. His father has long been 



1122 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

a well known merchant of Chicago and is a member of Durand & 
Kasper Company, manufacturers and wholesale grocers. Mr. 
Rasper's grandparents on both sides came from Germany. 

His early education was acquired in Chicago parochial schools, 
and at Notre Dame University in South Bend he took both the pre- 
paratory and the collegiate courses, graduating Ph. B. in 1904. 
Entering Harvard Law School, he was a student there until grad- 
uating LL. B. in 1907, and a few months after his return from Har- 
vard was admitted to the bar and at once took active practice. Mr. 
Kasper was associated with Charles E. Pain for some time prior to 
the organization of the firm in February, 1909. This firm has a 
high standing as general lawyers and Mr. Kasper is known for his 
hard working ability as well as for a broad knowledge of the law. 
He belongs to the Chicago and Illinois Bar associations. Mr. Kasper 
is a member of the Hamilton Club and the Ridgemoor Country Club, 
and affiliates with the Knights of Columbus. April 26, 1909, he 
married Miss Josephine M. Flatley of Boston, Massachusetts. Their 
two children are Josephine Marie and Eleanor Highland. The 
family reside at 459 Briar Place. 

EDWARD S. WHITNEY. A lawyer whose name has been on the 
membership rolls of the Chicago bar more than twenty years, 
Edward S. Whitney has since April i, 1902, been associated in prac- 
tice with Judge Nathaniel C. Sears and with James F. Meagher in 
the firm of Sears, Meagher & Whitney, with offices in the First 
National Bank Building. Mr. Whitney is a New England man, was 
trained and schooled in the East, and his record as a lawyer has been 
featured by thorough scholarship and conscientious performance of 
his duty. 

Edward Samuel Whitney was born in Bennington, New Hamp- 
shire, October 12, 1867, a son of Nathan and Charlotte M. (Belcher) 
Whitney. Mr. Whitney was graduated in 1890 A. B. from Amherst 
College, and in 1893 took the degrees LL. B. and A. M. from Har- 
vard University. Admitted to the Massachusetts bar in February, 
1893, Mr. Whitney came west and was admitted to practice in 
Illinois November i, 1893. In a few years he was successfully 
placed in the profession in Chicago, and is now member of a firm 
known to all lawyers in Chicago. He is a member of the State Bar 
Association and the Chicago Bar Association. 

Mr. Whitney is a republican, a member of the Union League 
Club, the University Club and the Edgewater Golf Club. He was 
married September 14, 1898, at Cleveland, Ohio, to Grace A. Ker- 
ruish. Their children are Margaret and Miriam. 

FRANK .N. MOORE. Of proved attainment and ability as a 
lawyer, and with unusual variety of experience in private practice 
and in connection with the larger municipal and corporate interests 
of Chicago, Frank N. Moore was born, reared and educated in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1123 

Chicago, and has been a member of its bar for more than twenty 
years. 

Frank N. Moore was born in Chicago in 1866, a son of John M. 
and Catherine (Guinane) Moore. His father, who was born in 
County Limerick, Ireland, June 24, 1821, and died in Chicago April 
12, 1912, was one of the best known old-time citizens and officials, 
and among his friends and associates was known as "honest John 
Moore." He was a public official in different capacities for more 
than forty years, in 1850 he came to Chicago, was elected to the 
office of constable, later served as deputy sheriff, and at the begin- 
ning of the Civil war was again elected to the office of constable and 
held it for twelve years. For thirty years he was one of Chicago's 
justices of the peace, and held that office when it was a court of 
much importance, when the city had only two courts of record. He 
was a justice of the peace in the Town of Lake for twenty-one years. 
John M. Moore came of a family of Irish patriots, and was for 
many years actively identified with Irish affairs in Chicago, being 
an influential member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and other 
Irish societies. 

Frank N. Moore was educated in the public schools of Chicago 
and he studied law in the law department of Lake Forest University 
and was admitted to the bar in 1893. For some years before his 
admission and afterwards he was a clerk to his father, at that time 
justice of the peace. For more than fifteen years Mr. Moore has 
been actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and since 
1912 has served as assistant attorney to the sanitary district of 
Chicago. 

Mr. Moore was one of the organizers of the Lawyers Association 
of Illinois, and is now its secretary. He is affiliated with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Knights 
of the Maccabees, the Woodmen of the World, and the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians. From early manhood Mr. Moore has been 
one of the active workers in the democratic party and is a member 
of the Third Ward Democratic Club. In the September primary 
of 1914 he was democratic candidate for the nomination of judge 
of municipal court, and received 16,000 votes. Mr. Moore married 
Miss Eliza Emstein. Their home is at 3907 Michigan Avenue, and 
his office is in the Unity Building. 

GEORGE PACKARD. His individual attainments as a lawyer and 
his relations with prominent law firms in Chicago have given George 
Packard an unusually high place in the profession, and he is now 
member of a firm which easily takes foremost rank in the City of 
Chicago and in the Middle West. He has been identified with the 
Chicago bar for more than twenty years. 

George Packard was born in Providence, Rhode Island, May 27, 
1868, a son of William L. and Mary Eastern (Peckham) Packard. 
Prepared for college in the English and Classical School of Prov- 



1124 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

idence from 1876 to 1885, Mr. Packard graduated A. B. from 
Brown University in 1889, and finished the work of the Northwest- 
ern University Law School in 1891. He was admitted to the bar in 
the latter year, and was a law clerk in the office of Peckham & 
Brown and during 1892-93 was assistant attorney to the World's 
Columbian Exposition. In 1893 he returned to the firm of Peckham & 
Brown, was engaged in general practice, and in 1897 became junior 
member of the firm of Peckham, Brown & Packard. Mr. Brown 
of this firm was attorney for the park board, and during 1896-99 Mr. 
Packard was closely associated with him in establishing questions 
of riparian rights in Illinois in connection with the Lincoln Park 
of Chicago. In the summer of 1903 Mr. Brown withdrew from the 
firm after his election to the circuit court bench, and Edwin B. Smith, 
W. T. ApMadoc and Vincent I. Walsh became new associates, the 
firm style becoming Peckham, Smith, Packard & ApMadoc. After 
the death of Edwin B. Smith and the return of Judge Brown to 
private practice, the firm was Peckham, Brown, Packard & Walsh. 
Somewhat recently a combination of two old prominent firms was 
made, when John S. Miller and Merritt Starr of the old firm of 
Peck, Miller & Starr, became associated with Packard & Peck- 
ham, making the firm style Miller, Starr, Packard & Peckham. On 
October i, 1915, Judge Brown again entered the firm, the name now 
being Miller, Starr, Brown, Packard & Peckham. 

Mr. Packard is a democrat, is a member of the American, Chi- 
cago, and State Bar associations, of the Society for Ethical Culture, 
is a director of the Children's Memorial Hospital and a member of 
the Phi Beta Kappa. He was president of the Chicago Law Insti- 
tute in 1914. His clubs are the Chicago Literary, the L^niversity, 
the City, the Cliff Dwellers, the Law Club, and the Geneva Golf 
Club. Mr. Packard was married in Chicago January 23, 1893, 
to Caroline Howe. Their children are Dorothy, Frank H. and 
Mary. Mr. Packard has offices in the First National Bank Build- 
ing and his residence is at 436 Barry Avenue. 

SAMUEL TOPLIFF. A native of Chicago, a graduate of Bowdoin 
College and of the Northwestern Law School, Mr. Topliff has since 
1902 been in active practice at Chicago. For about ten years he 
represented his clientage as an individual, but is now member of 
the firm of Hamlin & Topliff with offices at 35 N. Dearborn Street. 

Samuel Topliff was born in Chicago January 14, 1877. son of 
William B. and Mary (Stan wood) Topliff. His father, who was a 
merchant, came to Chicago about 1855 and died in 1910. Samuel 
Topliff was educated in the Evanston public schools, finishing the 
high school, then entered Bowdoin College in Maine, and was grad- 
uated A. B. in 1899. His law studies were pursued in the North- 
western University law school, finishing LL. B. in 1902, was 
admitted to the bar in the same year and began an independent 
practice. He was alone until May, 1913, when he formed a part- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1125 

nership with Frank Hamlin under the firm name of Hamlin & 
Topliff. 

Mr. Topliff is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the 
Chicago Law Institute, the Alpha Delta Phi, the Phi Delta Phi, and 
the Phi Beta Kappa in the Maine Alpha Chapter. He also belongs 
to the University Club and the Union League Club, two of the most 
distinctive social organizations in Chicago, and the Evanston Club, 
the Indian Hill Golf and Country Club, the Law Club, the Masonic 
fraternity, including the Evanston Commandery. Mr. Topliff is a 
republican, his home is in Evanston. 

JOSEPH H. DEFREES. Senior member of the firm of Defrees, 
Buckingham & Eaton, of Chicago, Joseph H. Defrees is one of 
Indiana's favorite sons, and he has been actively identified with the 
Chicago bar since 1888. He has had a large corporation practice 
and is interested in business affairs. 

Joseph Holton Defrees was born at Goshen, Elkhart county, 
Indiana, April 10, 1858, a son of James McKinney and Victoria 
(Holton) Defrees. He was educated in the public schools and in 
Earlham College at Richmond, Indiana. After being admitted to 
the bar he practiced in Indiana until 1888, came to Chicago and 
first practiced as a member of the firm of Shuman & Defrees. Later 
the firm was Aldrich, Payne & Defrees, and is now Defrees, 
Buckingham & Eaton. To a large extent the firm handles corpora- 
tion matters. 

Mr. Defrees is president of the Windermere Company and a 
director of the Chicago Car Seal Company and the Farwell Trust 
Company. He is a former president and director of the Chicago 
Association of Commerce, was president of the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation in 1909-11, was vice president of the Bar Association of the 
State of Illinois and is a member of the American Bar Association 
and of the Chicago Law Club. He has served also as vice president 
of the Civic Federation, and has membership relations with the 
Chicago, the Union League, the Hamilton, the City, the Midday, 
the Midlothian and the South Shore Country clubs. 

Mr. Defrees was married at Buffalo, New York, October 4, 
1882, to Harriet McNaughton. They have one son, Donald, a grad- 
uate of Yale in 1905 and of the Harvard Law School in 1908. He 
is now a member of the law firm of Defrees, Buckingham & Eaton. 

COL. GEORGE T. BUCKINGHAM has been an active member of the 
Illinois bar for the past twenty-five years, practicing at Danville 
until 1908, since which time he has been a member of the present 
firm of Defrees, Buckingham & Eaton at the Chicago bar. He has 
had varied business interests, and has given important service on 
several state boards. 

George Tracy Buckingham was born at Delphi, Indiana, April 



1126 

21, 1864, a son of Tracy Wilson and Helen (Clark) Buckingham. 
His early education was acquired in the common schools and in the 
normal school at Ladoga, and during his early youth he took up his 
residence at Danville, Illinois, and studied .law in the office of 
W. J. Calhoun in that city. Admitted to the bar in 1890, he was a 
member successively of the Danville law firms of Wilson & Buck- 
ingham, Buckingham & Dysert, Buckingham, Dysert & Troup, and 
Buckingham & Troup. These associations were formed and existed 
between 1893 and 1908. Mr. Buckingham came to Chicago May I, 
1908, at the invitation of the surviving members of the firm of 
Defrees, Brace & Ritter, after the death of William Brace. He 
has since practiced with Defrees, Buckingham, Ritter & Campbell, 
and the firm is now Defrees, Buckingham & Eaton. 

From 1894 to 1898 Mr. Buckingham was state's attorney of 
Vermilion county. In 1907 he was a candidate for justice of the 
Supreme Court of Illinois, to succeed Justice Welkin, deceased. 
The convention balloted a hundred and fifty-five times, and he 
lacked five votes of the majority. From 1886 until 1904 he was an 
active member of the Illinois National Guard, and retired with the 
rank of Colonel. During 1897-1901 he was a trustee of the Kanka- 
kee Insane Asylum, and was president of the Joliet Prison Board 
from 1901 to 1905. He is president of the National Security 
League, is a member of the Board of Managers of the Chicago Bar 
Association, and has been a member of the Association of Com- 
merce and the Legislative Commission at Washington. Mr. Buck- 
ingham is a member of. the Vermilion County, the Chicago and the 
Illinois State Bar Associations, is a Republican, a member of the 
Methodist Church, in Masonry has taken the thirty-second degree 
and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. His clubs are the Union League and 
the Hamilton. Mr. Buckingham was married at Danville, Novem- 
ber 3, 1893, to Victoria Donlon. He has one son, Tracy. 

MARQUIS EATON. A Chicago lawyer since 1900, associated with 
Joseph H. Defrees and George T. Buckingham, Marquis Eaton has 
also taken a leading part 'in civic affairs, and has been one of the 
leaders in several prominent organizations in that city. 

Marquis Eaton was born in Van Buren County, Michigan, April 
5, 1876, a son of Charles L. and Nellie (Joiner) Eaton. He attended 
the University of Michigan, 1893-1895. For two years (1895- 
1897) he served as a department chief in the auditor general's office 
in Lansing, and from 1897 to 1900 was associate reporter of the 
Michigan Supreme Court. Mr. Eaton was admitted to the Michigan 
bar in 1897, to the Illinois bar in 1901, and to the bar of the United 
States Supreme Court in 1903. From 1903 to 1910 he was a member 
of the firm of Cody & Eaton, and in January, 1910, became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Defrees, Buckingham, Ritter & Campbell, now 
known as Defrees, Buckingham & Eaton. Mr. Eaton is a director 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1127. 

of the Chicago Savings Bank & Trust Company and of several 
business corporations. 

He was president in 1911 of the Chicago Law Institute, and is 
a member of the Chicago Law Club, the Chicago Bar Association, 
the Illinois State Bar Association, and the American Bar Associa- 
tion. During 1908-09 he was president of the Hamilton Club, in 
1910 was president of the Chicago Congregational Brotherhood, in 
1912 was president of the Michigan Society of Chicago, in 1914 
was president of the Chicago Congregational Club, and from 1908 
to 1915 was president of the Sane Fourth Association. He also 
belongs to the Union League Club, the Quadrangle Club and the 
Flossmoor Country Club, and in politics is a republican. Air. Eaton 
was married at Flint, Michigan, June 8, 1904, to Jacquette Hunter. 
Their two sons are Hunter and Norman Bridge. 

HARRY C. LEVINSON. A Chicago lawyer with offices at 29 South 
La Salle Street, Mr. Levinson gives special attention to corporation, 
real-estate and commercial practice. While in individual practice, 
he has as office associates, Judge Benjamin M. Smith and Judge 
Frederick L. Fake. Mr. Levinson is a native of Russia, but his 
home has- been in Chicago from boyhood. He has been a member 
of the Chicago bar since 1900. 

Harry Charles Levinson was born in Russia, March 12, 1879, 
and is a son of Isaac and Sophia (Seligman) Levinson, who immi- 
grated to the United States in 1884, establishing their home first in 
New York and moved to Chicago in 1890. Until he was eleven 
years old, Harry C. Levinson attended the public schools of New 
York City, afterward the Chicago public schools, including the 
Medill High School. From the law school of Lake Forest Uni- 
versity, he was graduated Bachelor of Laws, a member of the class 
of 1900. After admission to the Illinois bar, he began practice 
and was associated with Frank L. Shepard. From 1902 to 1903, 
he was with the firm of Barker, Church & Shepard and in the latter 
year formed a partnership with Zacharias Hofheimer, Hofheimer 
& Levinson. This partnership continued for two and one-half years. 
From 1906 until 1911, Mr. Levinson conducted an independent law 
business and then became a member of the firm of Sabath & Levin- 
son. One year later, Charles B. Stafford was admitted. The firm 
of Sabath, Levinson & Stafford was dissolved in January, 1914, and 
since that time Mr. Levinson has again conducted an independent 
practice. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Chicago Law Institute, the Illinois State Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. 

In a social way, Mr. Levinson is identified with the Idlewild 
Country Club and the Chicago Equestrian Club. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Association of Commerce. Mr. Levinson is 
senior warden, in 1914, of Washington Park Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 
and is affiliated also with Oriental Consistory, Scottish Rite and with 



1128 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also fraternally asso- 
ciated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Royal 
Arcanum, in which he is past regent, and the Knights of Pythias, 
of which he is a past chancellor. He and his wife are members of 
Congregation B'Nai Sholem Temple Israel, of which he is a trustee. 

On December 17, 1902, Mr. Levinson married Miss Fannie Cohn, 
of Chicago, and they reside at 918 Hyde Park Boulevard. 



DANIEL F. FLANNERY. For thirty-seven years Daniel F. Flan- 
nery has been a member of the Chicago bar. 

Mr. Flannery was born at New London, Ohio, January 18, 1855, 
and is a son of John and Mary (Corwin) Flannery. His father was 
a tailor by occupation and the youth was sent to the public schools 
of his native place, following which he prepared for college in the 
Chamberlain Institute of New York, and then entered Cornell, 
being graduated in the class of 1876. At that time Mr. Flannery 
came to Chicago and read law in the offices of Forrester & Been, and 
January 10, 1879, was admitted to the bar. Mr. Flannery has been 
associated in several partnerships since beginning practice, but the 
greater part of the time has practiced alone. His offices are now 
located at No. 1200 Westminster Building, and he commands a large 
and representative professional business, his practice being of a 
general character, although he also specializes in insurance and 
probate law. While his private practice has been of a nature 
demanding the closest attention, Mr. Flannery has found time to 
render material public service to his city, notably in 1897 when he 
was appointed by Mayor Swift to revise and codify the city ordi- 
nances. He also rewrote the general ordinances of the city, which 
were approved by the city council and adopted as the best written to 
that date. 

Mr. Flannery is a republican and has supported-his party faith- 
fully, but has not looked for public favors at its hands. In Masonry 
he holds high rank, being past master of Cleveland Lodge No. 211, 
F. & A. M., and has reached the thirty-second degree and is a 
Shriner. His social connections are with the Union League, the 
Edgewater Golf Club and the Edgewater Country Club, and his 
home is located in one of the city's most delightful suburbs Edge- 
water. 

Mr. Flannery was married in 1882, in Chicago, to Miss Matie 
Coan, a resident of this city. 

JAMES F. BISHOP. A Chicago lawyer since 1901, James F. 
Bishop besides a general practice which places him among the suc- 
cessful lawyers of that city, is now serving as public administrator 
for Cook County, having received this appointment from Governor 
Edward F. Dunne. 

James F. Bishop was born near Leroy, Illinois, November 19, 
1871, a son of John A. and Mary (Wiley) Bishop. His father was 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1129 

a farmer and stock raiser and the son grew up on a farm, acquired 
a district school education and supplemented that by attendance at 
Normal School, the University of Illinois and special work in the 
Northwestern University, and studied law in the Northwestern 
Law School, though not a graduate of that institution. Mr. Bishop 
was admitted to the bar by examination in 1901 and since that time 
has been steadily progressing to larger success in his profession at 
Chicago. He has a general practice. Mr. Bishop is affiliated with 
Leroy Lodge No. 221, A. F. & A. M., and with the K. of P. He is 
a democrat in politics, was chairman of the committee on perma- 
nent organization at the Peoria convention in 1912, and came to his 
office as public administrator during the present state administration. 
He is a member of the Press Club of Chicago, the Illinois Athletic 
Club, the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. 

WALLACE STREETER, member of the Chicago bar and of the law 
firm of Lewis, Folsom & Streeter, was born at Belvidere, Boone 
County, Illinois, on November 12, 1883, and is a son of William H. 
and Ruth (Cooper) Streeter, now residents of Elgin, Illinois, where 
the father is deputy United States marshal. Mr. Streeter was 
reared and educated in his native state, with the exception of one 
year spent at the University of Michigan. His graduation from the 
home high school was followed by his entry in the university at Ann 
Arbor and after a year of work there he entered the John Marshall 
Law School in Chicago. In 1907 he was graduated from that well 
known institution, and in October following he was admitted to the 
bar of the state. Since then he has been actively engaged in the 
practice of his profession here, and is a member of one of Chicago's 
most prominent firms, Lewis, Folsom & Streeter. 

The other members of Mr. Streeter's firm are Hon. James 
Hamilton Lewis, now representing Illinois in the United States Sen- 
ate, and Richard S. Folsom, late corporation counsel of Chicago. 
During the administration of Senator Lewis in the office of corpora- 
tion counsel of Chicago, Mr. Streeter served as his secretary, and 
in May, 1913, he was appointed special assistant attorney general 
of Illinois, and was assigned to duty in connection with the sub- 
merged-land cases. Mr. Streeter, as a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association, is serving on the Committee on Selection and Retire- 
ment of Judges. 

A democrat, Mr. Streeter takes a healthy interest in the affairs 
of the party, though he is in no sense a politician. He is a member 
of the Iroquois Club, City Club, Sons of American Revolution, and 
of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Streeter was married on January 14, 1905, to Miss Anne 
Hannon of Chicago, and they have two children, Ruth and Dorothy. 



Vol. Ill 19 



1130 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

M. W. BORDERS. When M. W. Borders came to Chicago in 
1903 he had behind him a record of twelve years of activity in his 
profession in Belleville, the county seat of St. Clair County, Illinois, 
and a reputation for legal ability that won for him the position of 
general counsel for Morris & Company, packers, of this city. He 
still retains that post. 

The Borders family has been identified with the State of Illinois 
for the last half century. M. W. Borders was born in Randolph 
County, this state, on the pth of May, 1867, and he is a son of James 
and Mary A. (Ritchie) Borders. The father was one of the sub- 
stantial farming men of Randolph County and was also identified 
with the banking business at Sparta. Finishing his studies in the 
schools of his native county, young Borders entered Monmouth Col- 
lege at Monmouth, Illinois, and was duly graduated therefrom with 
the Bachelor of Science degree. His preparation for his legal career 
he gained in the law school of Columbia University in New York 
City, and in 1891 he was admitted to the bar of his native state. 
For ten years thereafter he continued in private practice of his 
profession at Belleville and there he was elected to the office of 
city attorney, in which he served during the last two years of his 
residence in Belleville. He also held the office of master in chancery 
for a term during his residence in that city. 

Aside from his connection with the Morris people Mr. Borders 
has a wide practice and he has been prominently concerned in much 
interstate commerce and other governmental litigation. In 1914 his 
firm, Borders, Walter & Burchmore, won the celebrated "tap-line" 
case in the Supreme Court of the United States, this case involving 
the question of facilities for manufacturing and other plants. In 
1913 this firm gained another decisive victory in the Shreveport 
case, which involved the power of the Federal Government to control 
state transportation rates. These are but two of many especially 
important cases which have been handled by this firm, and in all of 
them the ability of Mr. Borders as a trial lawyer has been shown 
indisputably. 

Mr. Borders is a member of the Chicago, Illinois State and 
American Bar associations. His social connections include member- 
ship in the Chicago Athletic Club, the South Shore Country Club, 
the Calumet Country Club, the Flossmore Country Club and the 
Iroquois Club, as well as affiliation with his college fraternity, the 
Phi Kappa Psi. 

On the ninth of February, 1892, Mr. Borders was married to 
Miss Alice Emma Abbey, of Kirkwood, Illinois, and they have four 
sons, James, Edward, Melville and Horatio. 

ADOLPH KURZ. With an unimpeachable standing as a Chicago 
lawyer and varied relations with the interests of business, philan- 
thropy and society, Adolph Kurz is a lawyer of over twenty-five 
years active practice, who began his Chicago career at the age of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1131 

fourteen as an office boy. Few of his associates have accomplished 
more and won higher esteem. 

Born in Weierbach, Germany, January n, 1868, a son of Isaac 
and Bena (Jacobs) Kurz, his boyhood was spent in Germany, with 
some education in the schools of that country, and at the age of 
fourteen he came with his widowed mother to Chicago and found 
work as an office boy in a law firm. He was advanced to managing 
clerk, in the meantime took up the study of law, and was graduated 
from the Chicago College of Law LL. B. in 1888. Thus by the 
time he reached his majority he had been admitted to the Illinois 
bar, and has been in active practice ever since. Mr. Kurz is re- 
garded as an expert in commercial and corporation law. Since 1894 
he has been a member of the firm of Rosenthal, Kurz & Hirschi. 
Mr. Kurz is also a director of the Hibernian Banking Association, 
is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the Chicago Law 
Institute, and belongs to the Standard City Club, the Lake Shore 
Country Club, the Ravisloe Country and the Illinois Athletic clubs. 
Mr. Kurz is president of the Jewish Home Finding Society of Chi- 
cago, and is actively identified with several other charitable institu- 
tions. He is married and lives at 855 Drexel Square. His office is 
in the Rector Building. 

CHARLES CROXALL JOHNSTON. The legal experience of Charles 
C. Johnston covers a period of more than thirty years. He was 
graduated LL. B. from the law school of the University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore in 1881, and his first practice was in Baltimore, 
where he remained three years. On first coming to Chicago Mr. 
Johnston found no satisfying opening, and soon returned East, but 
became a permanent resident of the western city in 1887. For 
several years he was connected as an attorney and examiner of titles 
with the old abstract office of Handy & Company. He has been 
somewhat of a specialist in real estate law. and that has been his 
line of practice for many years. In 1892 he entered the office of 
Lackner & Butz, and a few years later was admitted to partnership. 
This firm is now Butz, von Ammon and Johnston, handling a large 
general practice. 

Charles Croxall Johnston is a Virginian, was born at Alexandria 
September 4, 1859, a son of Reuben and Mary (Legrande) Johns- 
ton. His father was also a lawyer by profession, held an official 
place in Southern railroads in Virginia, and was a member of the 
house of delegates of Virginia at the time the roof of the capitol at 
Richmond collapsed, killing a number of prominent men. 

Charles C. Johnston was educated in private schools at Alex- 
andria, prior to entering the University of Maryland. He is a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Bar Association, and of the Chicago Press Club. 
Mr. Johnston is a bachelor, resides at 1124 N. LaSalle Street, and 
the offices of the firm are in the Title & Trust Building. 



1132 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

THOMAS B. BROWN. The record of Thomas B. Brown as a 
Chicago lawyer covers just eleven years since his admission to the 
bar. Mr. Brown is well known in both legal and social circles and 
is the second member of the firm of Haight, Brown & Haight, with 
offices in the Rookery Building. In 1914 Mr. Brown was a candidate 
for the office of judge of Municipal Court, had many strong recom- 
mendations for the office but was defeated with the balance of his 
ticket. 

Thomas B. Brown comes of an old Chicago family, and was born 
at Western Springs, a suburb of Chicago, January 28, 1882. His 
parents were Fred H. and Jennie (Dale) Brown, his father a business 
man, while his grandfather, Thomas B. Brown, is remembered as 
having been president of the Board of Police and Fire Commis- 
sioners of the City of Chicago at the time of the big fire of 1871, 
and also held the office of justice of the peace in South Town. 

Thomas B. Brown acquired his education in the grammar 
schools and the Chicago Manual Training School, and after about 
three years of experience in commercial work at the age of nineteen 
entered the Northwestern University Law School, graduating LL. B. 
in 1904. Admitted to the bar of Illinois in the fall of the same 
year, he began practice with the firm of Dent, Whitman & Eaton 
for a short time, and then was in independent practice. The firm 
of which he is now a member, Haight, Brown & Haight, was organ- 
ized February i, 1913, and has handled much important litigation in 
the course of its existence. 

Mr. Brown was secretary and a director for some time of the 
Windsor Golf Club, the Business Men's Prosperity Club and of Ken- 
wood Lodge, A. F. & A. M. July i, 1911, he married Miss Eliza- 
beth Kaufman of Marshfield, Oregon. Their one child is Claribel 
Elizabeth. Mr. Brown and family reside at 4412 Lake Park 
Avenue. 

JUDGE MICHAEL FRANCIS GIRTEN. While his reputation in the 
Chicago bar is that of the sound lawyer and able counselor, Judge 
Girten's name is well known among all classes of citizens through his 
capable service as one of the first judges of the Municipal Court and 
for his effective interests and work in behalf of certain civic move- 
ments. 

Born August 20, 1871, in Lemont, Illinois, a son of Peter and 
Anna Maria (Theis) Girten, both of whom are natives of Germany, 
Michael Francis Girten has spent practically all his life in or near 
Chicago, was a student in Notre Dame College, and gained his law 
degree from the Chicago Kent College of Law. 

With the organization of the Chicago Municipal Court in igo') 
he was elected one of the associate justices. Few members of the 
Chicago bar possessed greater practical familiarity with the polyglot 
tongues which are spoken in Chicago by its cosmopolitan population, 
and on account of these linguistic attainments the chief justice of the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1133 

court appointed him to sit in branches where cases of a foreign 
speaking people were heard. Thus much of his judicial service was 
spent in the hearing of cases where the languages of many nations 
were spoken German, Polish, Bohemian, French and English. 

At the present time Judge Girten is a member of the faculty of 
the law department of Loyola University, is a special lecturer in the 
School of Sociology, is president of the German (Aid) Society of 
Chicago, which was founded in 1854, is vice-president of the Central 
Verein, and is well known in other fraternal and social organizations, 
tie is a member of the Illinois Athletic, the Press and the Ger- 
mania clubs, and a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
State Bar Association and the Chicago Lawyers Society. His law 
offices are in the People's Gas Building on Michigan Avenue, and his 
home is at 5827 Princeton Avenue. His special interest in civic 
affairs has led in the direction of better housing facilities, and 
through his instrumentality bills providing for such social welfare 
legislation have been introduced into the State Assembly during 
1910-11, 1912-13, and 1914-15. While these bills have failed of 
passage, they have served as an advance guard of a movement which 
is constantly accumulating interest and support among the people 
and among all legislators and social students. 

CYRUS H. ADAMS, JR. In the difficult field of corporation law, 
Cyrus H. Adams, Jr., has won his way to individual success and high 
standing among Chicago legists. A native son of the western 
metropolis, his entire professional career has been passed in this 
city, where since 1911 he has been associated with the firm of Isham, 
Lincoln & Beale. Mr. Adams was born July 30, 1881, and is a son 
of Cyrus H. and Emma (Blair) Adams, his father being a well- 
known grain broker of Chicago. 

After securing his preliminary educational advantages in the 
graded schools, Mr. Adams enrolled as a student at the University 
School, on the north side, Chicago, and upon his graduation there- 
from, in 1899, entered Princeton University. There, in 1903, he was 
given the degree of Bachelor of Arts and returned to Chicago, enter- 
ing Northwestern University Law School, where he was graduated 
in 1906 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to 
the bar during the same year, and to further prepare himself for his 
profession secured a position in the office of John F. Holland, master 
in chancery. His studies were prosecuted assiduously there for 
two years, at the end of which time he began active practice in part- 
nership with Thomas Dent and Elmer E. Jackson, under the firm 
style of Dent, Jackson & Adams, this association continuing for 
about one year. For the next several months Mr. Adams was asso- 
ciated with the firm of Peckham, Brown, Packard & Walsh, but 
severed his connection with this concern to give his attention to the 
adjustment of business matters, and in June, 1911, again resumed 
active professional duties in the office of Isham, Lincoln & Beale, 



1134 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

with offices in the Edison Building. Mr. Adams has specialized in 
corporation work, in which his abilities as a business man have found 
a fruitful field for demonstration. He is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, and is widely 
and popularly known in social circles of the city, being a member of 
the Legal Club, the University Club, the Saddle and Cycle Club and 
the Onwentsia Club. He also holds membership in the Phi Beta 
Kappa and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. Mr. Adams is a director 
in the American Electric Car Company. 

Mr. Adams was married June 19, 1906 to Miss Mary S. Shum- 
way, of Chicago, and to this union there has been born one son: 
Cyrus H. III. The family residence is at No. 10 East Schiller 
Street. Mr. Adams is a republican, but his activities in politics have 
been confine_d to those which are taken by every good and public- 
spirited citizen. 

ROBERT WYNESS MILLAR was born at Falkirk, Stirlingshire, 
Scotland, on April 10, 1876, the son of Walter Robert and Dolina 
(Wyness) Millar. In 1886, the family made their home in Chicago, 
of which his father, Walter Robert Millar, had been a resident from 
1863 to 1872. In 1897, Mr. Millar graduated from the Northwestern 
University Law School, with the degree of L.L. B., and commenced 
the practice of law in the office of Johnson & Morrill. He continued 
with that firm until 1901 when he became a partner of William 
Herbert Johnson. This relation lasted until the beginning of 1910, 
from which time until September i, 1915, he practiced independently 
in office association with Donald L. Morrill. 

From 1903 to 1915, Mr. Millar was a member of the faculty of 
the John Marshall Law School, and from 1910 to 1915 a lecturer on 
Illinois law at the Northwestern University Law School. In the 
summer of 1915, he was tendered the position of professor of law 
at the last mentioned school and on September i of the same year, 
gave up his office at 1210 Title & Trust Building, to assume the 
duties of that position. 

Mr. Millar is the author of an elementary treatise on common 
law pleading, and has translated (from French and Italian) Garo- 
falo's "Criminology," published in the Modern Criminal Service 
Series, by Little, Brown & Co., of Boston. He is also the translator 
(from German) of Engelmann's "History of Continental Civil Pro- 
cedure," published in the Continental Legal History Series of the 
same firm, and has contributed to the Illinois Law Review and the 
Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. 

His membership in legal and other organizations includes the 
Chicago Law Institute, the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association, the Press Club of Chicago and the Illinois 
Saint Andrew Society. 

Mr. Millar is a bachelor, and resides with his parents at 3534 
Fulton Street, Chicago. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1135 

FREDERICK WIGHTMAN WINKLER, one of the substantial members 
of the Chicago bar, comes honestly by his predilection for his profes- 
sion, his father having for many years been one of Wisconsin's most 
eminent legal lights. During the thirteen years in which he has been 
engaged in practice in Chicago, Mr. Winkler has firmly established 
himself as a lawyer of talent and capacity, thoroughly versed in the 
many complexities of his calling and devoted absolutely to the work 
which he has chosen as his life field of activity. 

Mr. Winkler was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 22, 
1875, and is a son of Gen. Frederick C. and Frances M. (Wightman) 
Winkler. For a long period of years Frederick C. Winkler was 
one of the foremost figures at the Wisconsin bar, being a member 
of the notable legal combination of Winkler, Flanders, Bottum & 
Fawcett, which for a long time was considered one of the most 
formidable in the City of Milwaukee. Held in the highest esteem 
by his fellow-practitioners, he was repeatedly honored by them, and 
served as president of both the Wisconsin State Bar Association and 
the Milwaukee Bar Association. At the present time he is living 
a retired life. 

The primary education of Frederick W. Winkler was secured in 
the public schools of his native place, following which he took his 
preparatory course at Shattuck Military School. This was followed 
by attendance at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, New 
York, and his legal studies were prosecuted at the law school of the 
University of Michigan. Leaving Michigan he became a resident 
of Illinois and was here admitted to the bar, beginning his practice 
at the City of Pontiac. Two years later he had so favorably im- 
pressed himself upon the people of that community that he was 
elected city attorney, and after holding that office for two years 
was appointed referee in bankruptcy for Livingston and Iroquois 
counties. The latter office he resigned in 1901, when he came to 
Chicago, and this city has since been his field of practice and the 
scene of his eminent success. Mr. Winkler is now practicing alone 
and maintains offices in the Continental and Commercial Bank 
Building. He has devoted himself to a general business, and his 
abilities and undoubted talents have attracted to him a large and 
representative clientele, his activities in the various courts having 
been of a distinctly important character. His equipment in every 
way is adequate for a successful lawyer, including a thorough and 
comprehensive legal training and a forceful and persevering char- 
acter, combined with which is a devotion to his profession which 
makes his clients' interests his own. Mr. Winkler holds membership 
in the Chicago Bar Association. He is well known in club circles, 
belonging to the Beverly Country Club, of which he is a director, 
the Hamilton Club, the City Club, and the Englewood Club, and 
also holds membership in the Delta Kappa Epsilon and Phi Delta Phi 
fraternities. He is also a Mason, belonging to Normal Park Lodge, 



1136 

A. F. & A. M., and the Chapter at Pontiac. His political belief 
makes him a republican. 

JAMES HARVEY PEIRCE. With a practice of more than thirty 
years in Chicago as a patent lawyer, James H. Peirce is recognized 
as an authority in patopt and trade mark law, not only in Illinois but 
throughout the country. He began practice in Chicago in 1881 as 
senior member of the firm of Peirce & Fisher, and the firm existed 
in that form until 1908, at which time a third member was admitted, 
and has since been Peirce, Fisher & Clapp. In the circles of general 
practice and in the local and state courts this firm is little known, 
since it has been engaged exclusively in the practice of law pertain- 
ing to patents, trade marks and copyrights, which brings it into rela- 
tion with the federal courts only. In any list comprising the older 
and better known patent law firms of America, Peirce & Fisher 
would as a matter of course be mentioned. Mr. Peirce has prepared 
and presented briefs and arguments in connection with some of the 
most notable cases involving patent law in the country during the 
past quarter of a century. 

James Harvey Peirce is of old American stock and was born 
at Wilmington, Delaware, August 15, 1853, a son of William Huston 
and Mary Moore (Eldridge) Peirce. He is a descendant in the 
sixth generation from Captain Robert Peirce, who emigrated to 
America early in the seventeenth century and settled in Roger 
Williams' colony in Rhode Island. Towards the close of the century 
he moved to Delaware, and died near Wilmington in 1728. Mr. 
Peirce's grandfather and father both spent their lives in Delaware, 
and his father died at Wilmington in 1880. 

James H. Peirce was a student in the Friends School at Wil- 
mington until 1870, and in 1874 was graduated Bachelor of Science 
from Cornell University. His degree LL. B. comes from Columbian 
University of Washington, D. C., where he was graduated in 1876. 
Then followed an experience which proved of inestimable value in 
his subsequent career. He became a law clerk to the commissioner 
of patents at Washington in 1877, and for two years was principal 
examiner of patents. While in that department he became asso- 
ciated with George P. Fisher, and in 1888 these two young men 
came to Chicago and established the law firm of Peirce & Fisher. 
Mr. Peirce was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1881. 

Mr. Peirce was one of the organizers of the Patent Bar Associa- 
tion in 1884 and was president in 1892-93. He is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association, is a 
member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity, and of the University and 
the Union clubs. He also belongs to the Chicago Association of 
Commerce. While reared a democrat and usually acting with that 
party, Mr. Peirce is progressive in his ideas of governmental policy 
and has always allied himself as a supporter with movements for 
clean and efficient local, state and national government. Mr. Peirce 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1137 

is unmarried, has his offices in the Marquette Building, and his resi- 
dence at 15 East Goethe Street. 

FELIX J. STREYCKMANS. A Chicago lawyer whose official 
experience and private practice have brought him increasing prom- 
inence in freight rate matters and interstate commerce law, Felix 
J. Streyckmans began his career with a somewhat fortunate environ- 
ment and has converted his opportunities into a high position in the 
law and to a varied usefulness both in private and public life. 

Born in Chicago April 22, 1876, he is a son of Felix and Flora 
Streyckmans. Both his father and grandfather came to America 
from Belgium in 1856, and established a Belgian colony in Wis- 
consin near Green Bay. In 1862 both father and grandfather 
entered the Federal army and served in the Pioneer Corps. 

Felix J. Streyckmans attained his education in Chicago, attend- 
ing the Burr School, and for one year was a student in the 
Northwest Division High School. He learned stenography and 
prepared for the bar largely through his work as stenographer and 
court reporter. From 1896 to 1900 he was stenographer and clerk 
to Attorney-General Akin of Illinois, and from 1900 to 1904 was 
chief clerk and assistant to Attorney-General Hamlin. During 1904- 
05 he was associated with former Attorney-General Hamlin in 
law practice at Springfield. In 1905 he and Mr. Hamlin defended 
the suit of Missouri vs. Illinois to enjoin the operation of the drain- 
age canal. In the same year he also represented the shippers of 
freight rates in this State. From this experience he has more and 
more specialized in cases involving freight rates and Interstate Com- 
merce law, but is engaged in a general practice. Mr. Streyckmans 
was secretary to Governor Tanner during his campaign for the 
United States Senate against Cullom. He was also editor of the 
Court of Claims Reports of Illinois in 1905. There are few Chicago 
lawyers with a larger acquaintance both with the bench and bar of 
the state than Mr. Streyckmans. 

He served with the Fifth Illinois Infantry in the Spanish 
American War and is past department adjutant general of the 
United Spanish War Veterans. In politics he is a republican, and 
is a member of the Catholic Church. He is now serving as president 
of the Federation of Belgian-American Societies of Chicago, pres- 
ident of the Belgian-American National Alliance, and president of 
the Belgian-American Relief Association. He also belongs to the 
Hamilton Club. At Chicago on June 18, 1902, he married Maud 
Brown, daughter of John Brown. They have a son, Felix B., now 
twelve years old. 

CHARLES CLINTON BUELL. A resident of Chicago for twenty- 
eight years, and for twenty-six years a member of the bar. few 
Chicago attorneys are better or more favorably known than Charles 
Clinton Buell, of the firm of Buell & Abbey. He has given par- 



1138 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ticular attention to corporation, real estate, chancery and probate 
law, and has handled a large volume of important business in the 
last quarter century. 

Born at Sterling, Whiteside county, Illinois, February 14, 1867, 
Mr. Buell is a son of Clinton C. and Mary A. (Niles) Buell. He 
graduated from Sterling High School and then entered the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, but in his sophomore year in that institution he left his 
studies and went to Chicago in 1866, there entering the law offices 
of his uncle, Ira W. Buell, a well known attorney of that period, 
and began the study of law. In March, 1888, he passed the state 
examinations and was admitted to the bar, at once entering into a 
partnership with his uncle under the firm name of Ira W. and C. C. 
Buell, a combination that continued until 1905, when on April ist, 
C. C. Buell became associated with Chris P. Abbey under the firm 
name of Buell & Abbey. Their offices are in the Tribune Building. 
Mr. Buell's practice has been one of steady growth, and among 
Chicago lawyers he enjoys a reputation for thoroughness, fidelity to 
clients, and numerous successes in the handling of difficult matters. 
He is a member of the Chicago and Illinois State Bar associations 
and is a democrat. 

Mr. Buell stands high in Masonry. He is past master of Blaney 
Lodge No. 271, A. F. & A. M., and is a member of Oriental Con- 
sistory, S. R. M. and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is 
also a member of the Loyal Legion. He is identified with a number 
of well known clubs of the city, among them the Law Club, the 
Chicago Athletic Association, the Iroquois Club and Exmoor Coun- 
try Club. 

Mr. Buell was married on October 26, 1892, to Miss Maude 
Hoyne of this city. They have three children: Temple Hoyne, 
Charles Clinton Jr. and Frances Vedder. Mr. and Mrs. Buell are 
members of the Presbyterian Church. Their home is at present in 
Highland Park, Illinois. 

HARVEY L. CAVENDER has been an active member of the Chicago 
bar ten years, has proved himself congenial to the profession of law, 
and almost since the beginning has enjoyed a substantial general 
practice. Since January i, 1914, he has been senior member of the 
firm of Cavender & Kaiser, with offices in the Fort Dearborn 
Building. 

He was born near Joliet, Illinois, October 30, 1879, a son of 
Boyd and Helen L. (Fenton) Cavender. When he was one year old 
his parents removed to Kankakee County, and in that county he 
received his education in the public schools, graduating from the 
Chebanse High School in 1898. About that time he had determined 
upon the profession of law, and later entered the University of 
Michigan and was graduated LL. B. in 1905. In the same year he 
came to Chicago, was admitted to the Illinois bar, and has since 
devoted himself to the interests of his clientage, which has been 
growing in extent and importance steadily. 



1139 

Mr. Cavender is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
State Bar Association, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal 
League, and in politics is independent. July 27, 1909, he married 
Alice T. Mills, daughter of Thomas and Clara Mills of Peoria. 
Their children are Helen L., Constance I. and Elizabeth M. Mr. 
Cavender and family reside at River Forest, Illinois. 

Louis J. DELSON. With offices at 105 West Monroe Street, 
Chicago, Louis J. Delson is one of the large group of Chicago 
lawyers who give special attention to real estate and corporation 
law. Mr. Delson has been in general practice at Chicago for the 
past thirteen years, having been admitted to the bar October 23, 
1902. 

Louis J. Delson was born in the Russian Province of Courland, 
May 6, 1879, a son f Moritz and Lena (Snow) Delson. In 1884 
his father came to America, was connected with several New York 
banking houses, and in 1892 brought his family to Chicago. The 
son spent three years in a Catholic school in Bulgaria, and came to 
America in 1886, at the age of seven. He attended the old Allen 
Street School and the Norfolk Street School in New York City, 
and finished his grammar school course in Chicago in 1894. As a 
young man he studied law in several different Chicago offices, and 
in 1899 entered the Illinois College of Law, where he was graduated 
LL. B. in 1902 and soon afterward took up general practice. On 
February 9, 1902, Mr. Delson married Rose Falk, daughter of Sig- 
mund and Jeannette Falk. They have two children : Miriam, aged 
twelve, and Jane, aged ten. Mr. Delson and family reside at 4755 
Indiana Avenue. 

Mr. Delson in politics is a socialist and on that ticket has been 
candidate for judge of both Circuit and Municipal Court. He is a 
member of the Chicago Bar Association and the Chicago Lawyers 
Association. He has taken much interest in fraternal affairs, is 
affiliated with Golden Star Lodge No. 903, I. O. O. F., and with 
Hamlet Lodge No. 539 of the Knights of Pythias, and has repre- 
sented both these orders as delegate to grand lodge meetings, and 
was chairman of the Pythian Peace Day Committee in 1915. He 
also belongs to the Independent Western Star Order, the Protected 
Home Circle, the Independent Order B'rith Abraham, and is identi- 
fied with Jewish communal activities. 

GEORGE P. FISHER. Among the Chicago attorneys who are 
entitled by long and honorable service in their profession to the 
respect of their fellow-men. George P. Fisher is eminently worthy 
of extended mention. For more than thirty-three years a member 
of the Chicago bar, his experience has been wide and varied, and in 
his special field of patent law there are probably few who are his 
superiors. Mr. Fisher was born at Dover, Delaware, January 30, 
1856, and is a son of George P. and E. A. Fisher. His father, for 



1140 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

many years a prominent attorney, won high distinction in his profes- 
sion, and eventually reached a position on the bench of the Supreme 
Court of the Distrit of Columbia. Both parents are now deceased. 

George P. Fisher received his preparatory education in private 
schools and entered the famous Georgetown University, at Wash- 
ington, and graduated in the literary department in 1874. He next 
became a student in the law department, from which he received 
his degree in 1876, at which time he was serving as examiner in the 
United States patent office. In 1881 he was admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court of the United States, and in the same 
year came to Chicago. Here Mr. Fisher has steadfastly advanced 
to a place of prominence in his profession, achieving such a success 
in the field of patent law that at present he devotes his entire atten- 
tion to this difficult branch. His talents are recognized and appre- 
ciated by his fellow practitioners, and at various times he has been 
honored by election to positions of responsibility and trust. En- 
gaged in practice with him is his son, and the careful and able 
management of cases entrusted to them, the attention to every detail, 
and the remarkable success attending the work of the firm have 
produced a large and very remunerative practice. As a worker Mr. 
Fisher is indefatigable, his perseverance and industry knowing no 
relaxation in energy until the case or the work in hand is com- 
pleted. He belongs to the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois 
State Bar Association, the American Bar Association and the Law 
Club of Chicago, and socially is connected with the University Club, 
the Chicago Literary Club, the . Saddle and Cycle Club and the 
Onwentsia Golf Club. Politically, Mr. Fisher is a republican, but 
has had no desire for the doubtful honors and rewards of the public 
arena. 

On October 13, 1886, Mr. Fisher was married to Miss Julia W. 
Farnsworth, of Chicago, and they are the parents of two children: 
George F. and Ethel V. George F. Fisher is a rising young attorney 
of Chicago, associated with his father in practice. He is a native 
son of the city and has had a thorough legal training, being a grad- 
uate of Cornell University and the law department of Northwestern 
University. The offices of the firm are at No. 1431 Marquette 
Building. 

ALONZO M. GRIFFEN. One of the many Chicago lawyers whose 
offices are in the Ashland Block is Alonzo M. Griffen, who has been 
engaged in the general practice of law in that city for twenty years. 
Mr. Griffen is one of the older residents of Chicago, having first 
become acquainted with this city about the time of the big fire, and 
for a number of years before taking up the practice of law was a 
court reporter in this and other states. That experience gave him 
an equipment and training such as few lawyers have at the beginning 
of their careers. 

Alonzo M. Griffen was born December i, 1847, at Eden, in Erie 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1141 

County, New York, a son of Joseph and Matilda Griffen. He is 
descended from one of the earliest families of Welsh stock in this 
country. His remote ancestor Edward Griffen sailed in October, 
1635, from London with a party of colonists who located at Kent 
Island, then a part of the Virginia Colony, on the east shore of Ches- 
apeake Bay now under the jurisdiction of the State of Maryland. 
This Edward Griffen in 1656 was a resident at Gravesend, Long 
Island. Mr. Griffen's father, Joseph Griffen, was born in Washing- 
ton County, New York, was a Quaker in religion, and was a teacher 
by profession, a vocation he followed in the winter months with 
farming in the summer. 

When Alonzo M. Griffen was four years old his father died and 
his mother subsequently removed to Wayne County, New York. 
His early education came from the district schools, and at the age 
of twenty he took up his father's vocation as a teacher. He also 
studied shorthand, and thus qualified himself for the work of court 
reporter. He is one of the veterans of that art, and his first regular 
employment was at Little Rock, Arkansas, where he remained for 
two years up to 1870. He then came to Chicago and was in that 
city during the big fire. After the fire he went to Grand Rapids, 
Michigan, was employed as court reporter in that state, and in 1872 
returned to Chicago and continued his profession as a reporter up 
to 1895. In that year came his admission to the bar, and he has since 
handled an important general practice. 

Mr. Griffen is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the 
Illinois State Bar Association. Politically he is a republican, and 
his chief fraternity is the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On 
September 10, 1-876, he married Ella S. Lane, daughter of Daniel J. 
and Martha Lane, of Beloit, Wisconsin. Mr. Griffen has the follow- 
ing children: Clara, Edith, Arthur L. (also a lawyer), Esther and 
Ethel. 

BERTRAND WALKER. General counsel for The New York Cen- 
tral Railroad Company at Chicago, Bertrand Walker has been con- 
nected with the legal department of this company for the past 
eighteen years, and the greater part of his professional career has 
been taken up with the handling of legal affairs for railroads. 

Bertrand Walker was born at Indianapolis, Indiana, June 20, 
1868, a son of H. H. and Martha E. (James) Walker. His father 
is now living in Chicago. Mr. Walker was educated in the grammar 
and high schools of Indianapolis, graduated A. B. from Harvard 
University in 1890, and after one year in the Harvard Law School 
entered the law department of the University of Michigan, and was 
graduated LL. B. in 1893. Mr. Walker has been a resident of 
Chicago since June, 1893, and is regarded as one of the leading 
corporation attorneys of the city. His offices are at 536 La Salle 
Street. 

He was married in 1901 to Ida F. Drew of Chicago, daughter of 



1142 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Gen. Charles W. Drew. Mr. Walker is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association, the University Club, the Onwentsia Country Club, 
the Saddle and Cycle Club, and the Chicago Club. 

WILLIAM S. MILLER. It frequently occurs that the men in a 
family will for several generations follow the same profession or 
line of business, the younger men inheriting their predilection for 
a chosen calling from the elder. Thus, in the case of William S. 
Miller, a well known young lawyer of Chicago, is found an example, 
of this fact, for Mr. Miller is the son of a legist who came to Chicago 
as early as the year 1848 and followed his vocation during the period 
of this city's greatest development. Mr. Miller was born September 
27, 1873, at Evanston, Illinois, and is a son of Henry G. and Sarah C. 
(Mason) Miller. 

Henry G. Miller was born at Westmoreland, New York, and as 
a youth began the study of law under the preceptorship of Horatio 
Seymour, of New York. Subsequently he entered Hamilton Col- 
lege, and after his graduation therefrom, in 1848, came to Chicago, 
then little more than a straggling frontier town. Here the young 
lawyer succeeded in building up a practice among the early settlers, 
accepting such professional business as came his way and adding 
to his income by employing himself at various other occupations 
until, with the growth of the city, his practice grew to proportions 
which assured a competence. Mr. Miller continued in the active 
practice of his profession until his death in 1900, at which time he 
was known as one of the leading members of the bar. He was a 
democrat in his political views* but did not seek public preferment, 
preferring to give his entire time to his vocation and contribute to 
his community merely as a good and public-spirited citizen. Henry 
G. and Sarah C. Miller were the parents of two sons : Henry G. and 
William S., and two daughters. 

The public schools of Chicago furnished William S. Miller with 
his early education, following which he took a preparatory course 
and then entered Yale University, from which institution he was 
graduated. This training was then supplemented by a course in the 
law school of the Northwestern University, from which he was 
graduated with the famous class of 1898, and being admitted to the 
bar during that same year entered at once upon the practice of his 
calling. Mr. Miller's first connection was with the firm of Hoyne, 
Follansbee & O'Connor, following which he was associated for a 
time with Follansbee & Follansbee, but since 1900 has been attorney 
for the Northern Trust Company, specializing in banking, trust, 
probate and real estate law. At the outset of his. career Mr. Miller 
set himself a high ideal, and in a practical, common-sense way, has- 
directed every effort toward its attainment, with the result that now 
in the strength and vigor of manhood he has achieved a most gratify- 
ing success in his profession and has won the unqualified approval 
and confidence of those with whom he has come into contact. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1143 

Mr. Miller was married first to Miss Susan T. Whipple, 
August 24, 1904, who died June 9, 1911, leaving three children. 
Mr. Miller's second marriage occurred June 14, 1913, when he was 
united with Miss Mary P. Wilde, of Chicago, and they have one 
child. Mr. Miller is a member of the University and Saddle and 
Cycle clubs, and is popular with his numerous acquaintances both 
in and outside of the profession. Politically a democrat he has not 
aspired to public position, but has neglected no opportunity to assist 
the city in any way within his power. 

FREDERIC H. BENGEL, although among the younger members of 
the Chicago bar, has already met with marked success and apprecia- 
tion in his profession and has accomplished some results of interest 
and importance to the community at large. He has made a choice 
of probate and real estate law for his specialty, but possesses that 
mental grasp that makes it easy for him to discover the salient points 
in any case, and consequently has much business of a general nature. 

A native son of Illinois, Frederic H. Bengel was born in the 
city of Springfield, June 21, 1879, and is a son of A. J. and Theresa 
M. Bengel. His father, widely known in legal and journalistic 
circles of the state, has been editor of the Illinois Law Reports dur- 
ing the last thirty years, and still continues to make his home at 
Bloomington. The early education of Frederic H. Bengel was 
secured in the public schools of Springfield and Bloomington, and 
early displaying a predilection for the law he prepared himself for 
that profession in the Illinois Wesleyan University, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1901. In 1902 he came to Chicago 
and entered the legal department of the Illinois Steel Company, sub- 
sequently being associated with the firm of Castle, Williams, Long 
& Castle. In 1909 Mr. Bengel became attorney for the Northern 
Trust Company, a position which he has continued to fill to the 
present time, in addition to which he is in the enjoyment of a large 
private practice, particularly in probate and real estate law. Mr. 
Bengel is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the Legal 
Club of Chicago, and also holds membership in the City Club, the 
Wanderers Athletic Club and the Phi Gamma Delta college fra- 
ternity. In political matters a republican, Mr. Bengel has faithfully 
supported the candidates and principles of his party, but has sought 
no personal honors in public life. Among his professional brethren 
he is held in the very highest regard, for his acquirements command 
their respect and confidence, while his courteous manner under all 
circumstances, entirely devoid of ostentation, has given him a wide 
range of warm personal friends. 

Mr. Bengel was married August 25, 1911, to Miss Helen M. 
Bright, of Chicago, who, like her husband, has a wide circle of 
friends and is popular among the younger social set. 



1144 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

ARTHUR B. SCHAFFNER was born in Chicago July 2, 1874, a son 
of Herman and Rachel (Becker) Schaffner, the former a native 
of Germany and the latter of Ohio. Herman Schaffner came to 
Chicago in 1864, and for many years was identified with banking 
in that city. Arthur B. Schaffner acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Chicago, and went east for collegiate training, 
graduating A. B. in 1895 from Harvard College, and in 1898 taking 
his degree in law from the Harvard Law School. Admitted to the 
bar in 1898, Mr. Schaffner became associated with the firm of New- 
man, Northrup & Levinson, and was connected with that firm and 
its successors until 1911. From 1911 until December, 1914, he 
practiced alone, at the latter date forming with Isaac S. Rothschild 
and Hugo M. Friend the firm of Rothschild & Schaffner. 

Mr. Schaffner is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 
Illinois State Bar Association, and the American Bar Association, 
also the Chicago Law Institute. He is unmarried and resides at 
3957 Ellis Avenue. 

LEO F. WORMSER. After the best of preliminary discipline, Mr. 
Wormser engaged in the practice of his profession in his native city, 
where he is now a partner in the representative law firm of Rosen- 
thai & Hamill, in which his senior associates are Lessing Rosenthal 
and Charles H. Hamill. His work as a lawyer has been highly com- 
mended by older members of the bar and insures him a successful 
future. 

Mr. Wormser was born in Chicago, July 6, 1884, and is a son 
of the late David Wormser and Frida (Falk) Wormser. His father 
was a member of the firm of Falk, Wormser & Company, engaged 
in the hop business on an extensive scale. Mr. Wormser was edu- 
cated in the public schools and graduated from Armour Institute in 
1901. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 1904 with 
the degree Bachelor of Philosophy. He was in the law school of Har- 
vard University until 1906 and completed his law course in the law 
department of the University of Chicago, from which he received 
his degree of Doctor of Laws in 1909. In the same year he was 
admitted to practice in the Illinois Supreme Court and also at the 
bar of the Federal courts in the state. He forthwith engaged in 
the active work of his profession, becoming associated with Rosen- 
thai & Hamill, of which firm he became a partner on July i, 1911. 
At an early date he was admitted to practice in and presented a 
case to the Supreme Court of the United States. 

In the Chicago Bar Association, Mr. Wormser has served on 
important committees. He is also actively identified with the Illinois 
Bar Association and the Law Club of Chicago, and is a member of 
the Harvard Club, the City Club, Quadrangle Club, Chicago Histor- 
ical Society, Peace Society and the Standard Club. He is affiliated 
with the Phi Beta Kappa college fraternity and is a trustee of the 
K. A. M. Congregation and the Associated Jewish Charities of 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1145 

Chicago. His residence is at 4737 Kimbark Avenue and his office 
at 1400 Fort Dearborn Building. 

On the 23rd of October, 1911, he married Miss Helen E. Gold- 
smith, a daughter of A. W. Goldsmith of the law firm of Harmon, 
Colston, Goldsmith & Hoadly, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and they have 
one daughter, Elaine. 

JOHN CHARLES BURCHARD. Mr. Burchard's membership in the 
Chicago bar covers a period of almost twenty years, and his work 
as a general lawyer has made his name familiar in the courts and 
as a successful counselor. 

John Charles Burchard was born at Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, 
September 26, 1867, a son of George W. and Lucinda (Charles) 
Burchard. His father was a member of the Wisconsin bar and 
attained a high rank as lawyer, being located for many years at 
Fort Atkinson. 

John Charles Burchard grew up in his native town, attended the 
public schools, and after leaving high school learned the printer's 
trade and for a time was in the printing office of former Governor 
Hoard, founder and proprietor of Hoard's Dairyman. At the age 
of twenty-one he entered Beloit College, graduated Bachelor of 
Philosophy in 1892, and then came to Chicago and took up the 
study of law in the office of and under the. tutelage of Thomas S. 
McClelland. Mr. Burchard was admitted to the bar in 1895, and 
has since been in active practice. He is a member of the Chicago 
and Illinois State Bar associations. 

On October 18, 1899, ne married Miss Fleta Plummer, and they 
have one son, Donald Edward. Mr. Burchard is a republican, a 
member of the Congregational Church, and of the college fraternity 
Beta Theta Pi. His office is in the Otis Building and his home at 
Wilmette. 

JOSEPH WEISSENBACH. Master in chancery of the Superior 
Court of Cook County and former state's attorney of the county, 
Joseph Weissenbach was admitted to the bar eighteen years ago and 
is a member of the representative Chicago law firm of McEwen, 
Weissenbach, Shrindski & Meloan, with offices in the Tribune 
Building. 

Mr. Weissenbach, who claims Chicago as his birthplace, was 
born on the i8th of April, 1875, a son of Charles A. and Henrietta 
(Oppenheimer) Weissenbach, the former a native of Coblenz, capi- 
tal of Rhenish-Prussia, and the latter of Reichenbech, in Hesse, 
Germany. Charles A. Weissenbach came to Chicago in 1866 and 
was married here in 1870. He became a prosperous shoe merchant 
and Chicago was his home until his death, in 1889, his wife surviving 
him by several years. 

After finishing the work of the public schools of his home city, 
Joseph \Veissenbach attended the Chicago College of Law for two 



Vol. Ill 2t) 



1146 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

years, and then studied under Judge Axel Chytraus and Hon. 
Charles S. Deneen, the latter afterwards becoming governor of Illi- 
nois. He was admitted to the bar in 1896, before the Supreme Court 
of the state, and he continued to be associated with his preceptors 
until December of that year, when appointed assistant state's attor- 
ney of Cook County, under Charles S. Deneen. This position he 
resigned in 1899 to resume the active practice of his profession as a 
member of the firm of McEwen & Weissenbach. His associate was 
Judge Willard M. McEwen. This alliance continued until the eleva- 
tion of Judge McEwen to the bench, and Mr. Weissenbach then 
formed a partnership with Wade M. Meloan under the title of Weis- 
senbach & Meloan, Israel Shrindski later being admitted to the firm. 
In 1910 Judge McEwen retired from the bench and became senior 
member of the firm of McEwen, Weissenbach, Shrindski & Meloan, 
which has since controlled a large and important law business and 
has high standing at the bar of the state. Mr. Weissenbach has not 
only been especially successful in the general practice of hir pro- 
fession, but has also served since 1907 as master in chancery of the 
Superior Court of Cook County, a position to which he was ap- 
pointed by Judge Henry V. Freeman. He is actively identified with 
the Chicago, Illinois State and American Bar Associations, and has 
membership in the Western Economic Society. His social con- 
nections are with the Standard Club, the Hamilton Club, the Press 
Club, the Art Institute and the Book and Play Club, and he is a 
member of Garden City Lodge, A. F. & A. M. Mr. Weissenbach 
is a republican and has been active in local politics, at one time 
serving as chairman of the Republican Executive Committee of 
the old Sixth Ward. He is a trustee of the Jewish Associated 
Charities of Chicago, and he and his family hold membership in 
Sinai Temple. 

On February u, 1901, Mr. Weissenbach was married to Miss 
Minna Klein of Chicago. Four children were born to them, three 
of whom are living : Helen, Mary and Joseph, Jr. ; Jane Andrea is 
deceased. The family home is at 5016 Greenwood Avenue. 

HUMPHRYS H. C. MILLER. For nearly thirty-five years 
Humphrys H. C. Miller was a Chicago lawyer, and one whose 
abilities in certain departments of the profession were of a very 
high and superior quality. For many years he resided at Evanston, 
where he was prominent for his civic activity and where he was 
"a citizen whom everybody loved and honored." Mr. Miller died 
at Evanston November 15, 1910. The best estimate and tribute 
to him as a lawyer and citizen is found in an article prepared by a 
friend and legal associate, and that article with very few changes 
deserves a place with the biographies of other Illinois lawyers, 
among whom he was by no means least. 

Humphrys H. C. Miller was born in New York City October 
17, 1845, and when a child was brought by his parents to a western 



COURTS AND. LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1147 

Illinois farm. There he grew up with experience of the hardships 
common to the early settlers. He attended a country school during 
the winter and assisted in the labor of the pioneer farm. He pre- 
pared for college at Mount Carroll Seminary and in 1864 entered 
Union College at Schenectady, New York. His freshman and 
sophomore years were spent at this institution. In 1866 he entered 
as a junior the University of Michigan, from which he was grad- 
uated A. B. in 1868 and received the Master of Arts degree in 1871. 
On leaving college Mr. Miller became a teacher, and was employed 
in that work in Northern Illinois until 1876. In the meantime he 
studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1875. 

Mr. Miller removed to Chicago in 1876 and then began the prac- 
tice of his chosen profession, to which he was devoted and loyal 
to the end of his life. During his first few years at the bar his 
experience was that of most of those who start out with stout hearts 
and high courage but no practice, and in a strange community. His 
struggle for existence was a severe one, but little by little business 
came as it ever does to those who are worthy and capable. 

Mr. Miller did not care for the strenuous life of a jury trial 
lawyer, nor did he feel himself peculiarly fitted by nature for that 
work. The trend of his mind was toward peace, and where an 
honest difference arose he invariably counselled settlement. In 
the court room his presence commanded the respect of both court 
and counsel. He was ever respectful and courteous, but always 
firm in insisting upon what he believed to be right. He loved truth 
for its own sake and would not avoid following it although such 
course might seem to be against the interest of his own client. Il- 
lustrative of this trait, the following incident was related to the 
writer by a prominent member of the bar: Many years ago, while 
Mr. Miller was still new at the bar, a client who had not divulged 
all of the facts to him, agreed to arbitrate his differences with an- 
other. The arbitrators chosen were Mr. Miller and the lawyers for 
the opposite party, and they were to select a third as an umpire. 
The umpire chosen was a business man, with no training in the law. 
At the hearing it was apparent that Mr. Miller's client did not have 
a just claim. The umpire, however, immediately announced him- 
self in favor of Mr. Miller's client, principally upon the ground 
that he was a poor man, and his adversary could well afford to 
give him something. At this stage Mr. Miller moved an adjourn- 
ment, and upon meeting again, he voted against his own client, and 
the award was so made. 

In his later years Mr. Miller appeared in many important cases 
both in the State and Federal courts. His clients were many and 
it is a tribute to the character of the man that they came from all 
walks of life. The question of compensation, when applied to for 
help, never entered his mind. He gave as freely to the poor as he 
did to the rich, and he did this gladly, with the hope of no other 
reward than the happiness he derived from the service rendered. 



1148 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Mr. Miller will be longest remembered as a wise counsellor. 
He was peculiarly fitted by training, character and temperament 
for that position. He inspired trust and confidence by the integrity 
of his mind, for he was a careful, patient thinker, and never jumped 
hastily to conclusions. His mind grasped Jegal problems easily 
and firmly. He brought to the solution of many intricate problems 
of modern commercial life a rare combination of sound legal judg- 
ment and intelligent business sense. His counsel was highly valued 
by many large corporate and commercial interests, whose trusted 
legal adviser he was for many years. It was while handling trust 
estates that the most beautiful of his qualities had their fullest 
scope. It was then he was the wise counselor and the helpful and 
tender friend to the bereaved widow and the fatherless children. 
His patient, gentle intelligence was the staff of many a stricken 
woman in the first years of her readjustment to a new and bewilder- 
ing world. 

Few men had so many friends', and to each he gave of his best. 
He was always just, gentle and thoughtful for the feelings of 
others. His most dominant characteristic, perhaps, was his love 
for so many of his fellow men. He never tired of doing kindly acts, 
and the greatest pleasure which life could give him was the doing 
of something to assist his friend. 

Although Mr. Miller's professional life was an exceedingly busy 
one, and taxed his strength to the utmost, yet he devoted much time 
to public work. He early became connected with the Royal 
Arcanum, and for two years was its Supreme Regent. He was at 
one time president of the Village of Evanston and for many years 
a member of its school board. He served as trustee of Northwest- 
ern University from 1891 until his death, and as its vice president 
exerted great influence in the management of the affairs of that 
institution. His charitable .vork was unceasing, and widely ex- 
tended. He gave to his profession and the community in which he 
lived the best he had in him, and much of this consisted of service 
to his fellowmen. 

Mr. Miller was happily married December 29, 1870, to Harriet 
Scott Lewis, who is still living, with home at 1707 Hinman Avenue 
in Evanston. Mrs. Miller is a daughter of Joseph and Harriet 
Lewis of Channahon, Will County, Illinois. To their marriage were 
born five children, of whom Alta Dorothy and Donald Crandon 
are now living. Eva Isabel and Malcolm Lewis died in infancy and 
George Haven, who gained distinction in the same profession as 
his father, died February 6, 1915. 

WILLIAM A. ADAMS, A. B., LL. B., formerly assistant county 
attorney of Cook County and a well known figure in state politics, 
is also recognized as one of the most scholarly members of the 
Chicago bar. He has been in active practice in this city since 1902 
and has had a most varied experience, which has embraced activi- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1149 

ties as lawyer, instructor and public official. Mr. Adams is a native 
son of Chicago, born in 1870, but his early life was spent in New 
Hampshire, to which state his parents returned after the Chicago 
fire, and where he prepared for college. He was graduated from 
Harvard University in the class of 1898, following which for two 
years he was instructor in rhetoric at the University of Illinois. 
While at Harvard Mr. Adams began the study of law, later attended 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and completed his course 
at the Illinois College of Law, from which institution he was grad- 
uated in 1902. Admitted to the bar in that year, he opened an 
office in Chicago, and here has continued in the enjoyment of a 
large and constantly-growing practice. In 1903 Mr. Adams became 
Professor of Law in the Illinois College of Law, continuing in that 
capacity until 1907, when he resigned to devote his entire attention 
to the duties of his practice, under the firm name of Adams and 
Winnen. 

Mr. Adams was appointed assistant county attorney of Cook 
County in 1913, and in 1914 became the candidate of his party for 
the office of representative in the Illinois General Assembly, from 
the Seventh Senatorial District, but was not elected. He served 
five years as a member of the Board of Education of the Riverside- 
Brookfield High School. He is now attorney for the Village of 
Brookfield. He is a member of the Harvard Club of Chicago ; the 
Chicago Bar Association ; the Illinois State Bar Association ; I. O. 
O. F. and A. F. & A. M. He resides in Brookfield. 

GEN. JOHN I. RINAKER. General Rinaker is a survivor from 
the group of legists who were admitted to the bar prior to the 
Civil war. Of those who came to the bar during the following 
decade, most have long since laid down their briefs. Some survive 
in retirement, enjoying the ease and dignity which lives of intel- 
lectual activity have earned, while fewer still continue to partici- 
pate in the struggles which the competition of younger and more 
vigorous men make more severe and exacting. General Rinaker 
is now practically retired from the trial of cases, but still looks 
after the business of his office at Carlinville every day and enjoys 
the prestige which is associated with distinguished success in the 
law, and also long service in behalf of the public. 

In the course of half a century or more General Rinaker has 
been identified with a large share of the important litigation, both 
civil and criminal, tried in his section of the state. His practice 
has always been of the highest class, and he could name as his com- 
petitors many of the men who have given fame to Illinois juris- 
prudence during the last seventy-five years. General Rinaker has 
been attorney for the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company and the 
Illinois Traction Company, but more often has appeared in defense 
of the rights of the people in important issues. He carried to a 
successful conclusion a number of cases issuing from the county 



1150 

courthouse bonds of Macoupin County. He appeared for the people 
against the bond holders and fought the cases through the Federal 
courts. He was also attorney in various cases in connection with 
railroad bonds in the Federal courts. 

John I. Rinaker was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1830, and 
several years ago passed the age of fourscore years. He was 
thrown on his own resources by the death of his parents, and after 
1836 lived with John T. Alden in Sangamon County, Illinois, and 
in 1840 began working on a farm near Franklin in Morgan County, 
attending the common schools a part of each winter. By hard 
work he paid for practically every term of tuition he enjoyed 
whether in the district schools or in college. He was a student in 
the Illinois College at Jacksonville, in 1850 entered McKendree 
College at Lebanon, and was graduated in 1851, earning the means 
for his education by farm work and teaching. General Rinaker 
in 1852 entered the office of John M. Palmer at Carlinville and in 
1854 was admitted to the bar. That was six years ago, and he 
was engaged in practice until the Civil war interrupted his career. 
In 1862 he raised a regiment which was organized in August of 
that year at Camp Palmer in Carlinville as the One Hundred and 
Twenty-second Regiment of Illinois Infantry. He was commis- 
sioned colonel and mustered into service September 4th and served 
with the Union forces until the close of the war. He was wounded 
at the battle of Parker's Cross Roads on December 31, 1862, and 
for gallant and meritorious service in the field was appointed brig- 
adier general, by brevet, to take rank from March 13, 1865. 

With the close of the war he resumed practice and rapidly rose 
to distinction, having peculiar success as a trial lawyer, and for 
many years was regarded as one of the ablest political speakers in 
the state. 

Throughout his long career General Rinaker has been noted as 
a man true to his convictions, and while his clients have implicitly 
trusted him when their interests aroused his energetic support, the 
same qualities have distinguished his political life. Until 1858 he 
was a democrat. He believed that the party had lost its essential 
political principles and was being used as a tool for the benefit of 
the southern slave holders, and at once left the organization and 
joined the ranks of the republicans. For many years Macoupin 
County was strongly democratic, but General Rinaker again and 
again gave his services to his own party, without hope of election. 
In 1872 he was presidential elector for his district and in 1876 was 
elector at large. He made an unsuccessful race for Congress in 
1874, and in 1894 was elected representative from the Sixteenth 
Illinois District and served one term. In 1880 he had a large sup- 
port for the nomination of governor, but after a contest in the 
nominating convention the honor went to Governor Cullom, -who 
was candidate for renomination. In 1885 Governor Oglesby ap- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1151 

pointed him railroad and warehouse commissioner, and he served 
nearly four years in that capacity. 

General Rinaker was married October 16, 1855, to Miss Cla- 
rissa Keplinger of Franklin, Morgan County, Illinois. Their four 
living sons are : Thomas, who is associated with his father under 
the firm name of Rinaker & Rinaker at Carlinville; Samuel, who 
is a prominent attorney in Nebraska; John I. Jr., an architect at 
Springfield; and Lewis, now a lawyer at Chicago, and former 
county judge of Cook County. The sons all were educated in 
Blackburn University, Samuel was a student in the law department 
of Yale University, John took his course as an architect in the 
University of Illinois, and Thomas and Lewis are both graduates 
of the law department of the University of Michigan. 

ELAM LEWIS CLARKE. The qualities of real leadership are as- 
sociated with the career of Elam Lewis Clarke in his position as a 
lawyer and citizen at Waukegan. Mr. Clarke has been in practice 
for more than a quarter of a century, and has been identified with 
the bar of both his home city and of Chicago, and his work and 
talents have landed him at the top of his profession and he is well 
known both as a lawyer and man of affairs. 

Elam Lewis Clarke was born in Lake County at the City of 
Waukegan October 7, 1861, was educated in common schools and 
prepared for college in a Vermont academy and took his college 
degree from Brown University at Providence, Rhode Island, in 
1885. On graduating he returned to Waukegan, studied law with 
his uncle Francis E. Clarke, and also in several law offices in Chi- 
cago, and was admitted to the bar in 1888. Mr. Clarke practiced 
in Chicago from 1888 until 1896, and then returned to Waukegan 
and was associated with his uncle until the latter's death in July, 
1899. Mr. Clarke has been especially successful and confined his 
attention largely to chancery, probate and real estate law. He 
served as master in chancery from 1903 to 1910. 

Outside of his profession Mr. Clarke is a director of the First 
National Bank, served ten years as president of the Waukegan 
Public Library, and was for two years probation officer of Lake 
County. He was president of the Glen Flora Country Club, is a 
member of the University Club of Waukegan and of the University 
Club of Chicago, also of the Chicago Hamilton Club. Belongs to 
the Navy League of the United States, the Geographical Society, 
the Y. M. C. A., the State Probation Officers Association of Illi- 
nois and the Loyal Legion, and affiliates with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. In the lines of his profession he is 
associated with the Lake County and the Illinois State Bar asso- 
ciations. 

Mr. Clarke married on the 24th of June, 1903, Georgia S. 
Douglas, of Waukegan, and to them have been born two children 
Lewis D. and Sylvia, aged nine and seven years. 



1152 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

JUDGE M. M. GRIDLEY. Now one of the justices of the Illinois 
Appellate Court, First District, acting as such by assignment from 
the Superior bench of Cook County, Judge Gridley was elected as 
one of the judges of the Superior Court in November, 1910, for 
the term of six years. After hearing chancery cases for eight 
months and criminal cases for four months, in December, 1911, 
the Supreme Court assigned him to duty in the Appellate Court of 
Illinois for the First District. 

Martin Medbery Gridley was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
May 16, 1863, but since 1872 his home has been in Evanston, Illi- 
nois, where he attended the grammar schools and high school. In 
1879 he entered the Northwestern University of Evanston, grad- 
uating from the literary and art departments in 1883, and at gradua- 
tion was elected a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Sub- 
sequently he attended the Union College of Law, now known as 
the Northwestern University College of Law of Chicago, and after 
graduation was admitted to the Illinois bar in June, 1885. While 
attending law school Judge Gridley did work as a reporter on the 
Chicago Times, then a well known democratic newspaper. From 
the fall of 1885 until. his elevation to the bench Judge Gridley was 
in the active practice of law in Chicago. For ten years he was a 
member of the law firm of Paden & Gridley, and for nine years was 
senior member of the firm of Gridley, Culver & King. 

For thirty years Judge Gridley has taken an active interest in 
political affairs, county, state and national. He is a democrat, 
and from 1886 to 1892 was the Evanston representative on the 
Democratic Central Committee for Cook County. At the presi- 
dential election of 1900 he was democratic candidate for probate 
judge of Cook County, being defeated by Judge Charles S. Cutting. 
He has been active in the affairs of his home city, and from 1901 
to 1909, served as democratic member of the Civil Service Commis- 
sion of Evanston, and for two years was president of the com- 
mission. In June, 1913, he was elected a member of the board of 
trustees of the Northwestern University, and is on the executive 
committee of that board. 

His professional and social relations are with the Chicago, the 
Illinois State and American Bar associations ; with the University, 
the Union League and the Iroquois clubs of Chicago; with the 
Glen View Golf Club, the University, the Evanston and the Coun- 
try clubs of Evanston, and with the Illinois Chapter of the Society 
of Mayflower Descendants. Judge Gridley was president of the 
Evanston Club during 1911-12. 

In 1896 Judge Gridley married Miss Ruth L. Farwell, and they 
are the parents of two children. Mrs. Gridley. is the daughter of 
Simeon Farwell, who prior to his death was president of the John 
V. Farwell Company of Chicago. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1153 

JUDGE JOHN J. SULLIVAN. By his diligent and high-minded 
service on the Municipal Court Bench of Chicago since 1912 Judge 
Sullivan has sustained the high standards of that branch of the 
judiciary and has made his own career notable among the lawyers 
of Chicago. 

Judge Sullivan was born in Chicago thirty-five years ago, De- 
cember 20, 1880, a son of James and Anne (Doheny) Sullivan. 
He is a man of liberal education both in the law and in general 
branches of knowledge. His higher education and his preparation 
for the bar came largely as a result of his own ambition and his 
earnings as a teacher. Judge Sullivan finished the course in the 
Mark Sheridan public school in 1894 and graduated from the South 
Division High School in 1898. In 1899, after completing his course 
in the Chicago Normal School, he took up teaching, and was one 
of the instructors in the Chicago public schools from 1899 until 
1905. In the meantime he had carried on studies in the law de- 
partment of Lake Forest University and was graduated LL. B. 
in 1905. In a few years he had made his ability known as a young 
and promising lawyer, and in December, 1911, was appointed Mas- 
ter in Chancery to the Superior Court by Judge Clarence N. Good- 
win. He resigned this position when elected a judge of the Munici- 
pal Court in November, 1912, for the regular six years term. He 
is a member of the Chicago bar, the Chicago Bar Association and 
has been a delegate to state conventions. 

Judge Sullivan is a democrat, and has affiliations with the 
Knights of Columbus and the Royal Arcanum. June 25, 1913, 
at Chicago, he married Katherine F. Britain, a daughter of James 
and Josephine Britain. They have one son, John J., Jr. 

JUDGE THOMAS TAYLOR, JR. Of new judges chosen to the Cook 
County Circuit Court in June, 1915, none had a higher endorse- 
ment from the Bar Association and from all classes of citizens and 
none was better fitted for his duties by training, ability and pre- 
vious experience than Thomas Taylor, Jr., whose position in the 
esteem and confidence of the public rests securely upon more than 
twenty years of capable service as Master in Chancery. In the 
Chicago Bar Association primaries he was given the highest vote 
ever accorded a candidate who was not then a sitting judge, and 
received even a larger vote than some of the judges who were at 
that time candidates for re-election. This was largely due to the 
fact that he had been for so many years an important factor in the 
judicial machinery and exercised functions of only less dignity 
and not of less importance than those associated with the judicial 
office proper. In his twenty years as Master in Chancery he had 
reported in more than a thousand contested cases, and with such 
soundness of learning and eminent fairness as to secure for him 
the confidence of all attorneys concerned and proving beyond ques- 
tion his splendid qualifications for the office to which he success- 
fully aspired. 



1154 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

A native of England, Thomas Taylor, Jr., was born at Smeth- 
wick November 18, 1859, a son of Thomas and Jane (Holloway) 
Taylor, who brought him to the United States when he was about 
eight years of age. He was educated largely in Illinois, graduated 
Bachelor of Science from Knox College in 1882, and in 1885 re- 
ceived his law degree from Harvard University. For several 
months after his graduation he studied civil law in the Universities 
of Berlin and Vienna, was admitted to the bar in Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts, and for one year practiced law in Boston. Judge 
Taylor has resided permanently in Chicago since 1887, and after 
several years of private practice was appointed Master in Chan- 
cery of the Circuit Court in 1893. 

During 1894-97 Judge Taylor was treasurer of the Chicago 
Bar Association, and is also a member of the Illinois and Ameri- 
can Bar associations. In 1906 Governor Deneen appointed him 
a delegate to the National Congress on Uniform Law. For a num- 
ber of years he has been counsel for the Illinois Humane Society. 
He is a former president of the Harvard Club of Chicago r and a 
member of the Chicago, University Law, City and Hamilton Clubs, 
and of the Chicago Historical Society. 

Judge Taylor resides at Winnetka. He was married in 1891 
to Florence Clarkson, daughter of John Thorne Clarkson. Their 
two sons, Thorne Clarkson and Wilberforce, are now attending 
college. 

GEORGE W. FIELD. The profes'sional career of George W. 
Field has been one of more than ordinary success and experiences, 
and in the eighteen years since his admission to the bar in 1896 he 
has established himself securely in his profession and in the esteem 
of his fellow attorneys in the Lake County bar. Mr. Field for a 
number of years has practiced with offices in Waukegan. 

George W. Field was born in Woodstock, Illinois, January 18, 
1871, was educated in the public schools, and from early boyhood 
manifested a special delight in the reading of historical works and 
literature of a. serious nature. He studied law for two years in 
private offices, and then entered the Chicago College of Law and 
graduated LL. B. in 1896. Following his graduation Mr. Field 
took up general practice and in 1899 was appointed Master in 
Chancery, an office he resigned in 1904. Then for two years he 
was a member of the board of pension appeals at Washington, 
District of Columbia, resigned that office, and returning to Illinois 
established an office for the general practice of law at Waukegan, 
where he has since remained. Mr. Field was president of the 
Lake County Bar Association, an honor that is significant of his 
standing in the profession in that county. Three years he acted as 
attorney for Zion City. 

He was married October 27, 1891, to Katherine F. Murphy, of 
Woodstock. They have one son, Edward Albert. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1155 

WILLIAM H. BECKMAN. About twenty years ago an Illinois 
farmer boy came to Chicago to study law in the Kent College. 
He graduated in 1897, and in a short time was admitted to the 
bar and set out bravely to win the confidence of the public and to 
make a reputation in the face of a competition such as few young 
lawyers have to meet anywhere in the country. 

Since then William H. Beckman has won his way to a real suc- 
cess, especially in the field of corporation, real estate and chancery 
law. With eighteen years of practice, and now senior member of 
the firm of Beckman, Cottrell & Phillips, he has little to fear in 
competition with the finest ability and experience of the Chicago 
bar. Mr. Beckman also owes much of his success to his thorough 
understanding of commercial and industrial methods and principles. 
A native of Illinois, William H. Beckman was born at Arthur 
in Douglas County May 15, 1872. His parents, William and Re- 
becca (Stoughton) Beckman, were early settlers in Illinois, having 
come from the vicinity of Oil City, Pennsylvania, about 1866 and 
locating in Douglas County. 

The early life of William H. Beckman was spent largely in rural 
surroundings. He has a thorough appreciation of the wholesome- 
ness of country life, and he derived a great deal of good both 
physically and mentally from the years he spent on a farm and in 
a small village. He graduated from the Arthur High School, after 
which he entered the Wesleyan University at Bloomington, of 
which institution he is an alumnus. 

Mr. Beckman graduated from the Kent College of Law at Chi- 
cago in 1897. He was one of twenty-eight to volunteer from the 
College of Law, joining Company A of the First Illinois Infantry 
under Colonel Turner. Mr. Beckman was one of the few volun- 
teers who actually got to the front in that brief war, and he was 
in the campaign which terminated with the battle of Santiago, and 
saw much of the active fighting around that city. Soon after his 
discharge from the army he resumed practice. While in college 
Mr. Beckman took a leading part in student affairs, and was presi- 
dent of the Literary Society and editor of the official college paper, 
The Illini. 

For a number of years Mr. Beckman practiced individually, but 
in May, 1914, formed a partnership with William M. Cottrell and 
Edgar J. Phillips, under the firm name of Beckman, Cottrell & 
Phillips, with offices at 69 West Washington Street. This is un- 
doubtedly one of the strongest combinations in corporation, real 
estate and chancery law in the city. Mr. Beckman is a director 
of the Citizens State Bank of Lake View. He has many associa- 
tions in professional and social affairs, is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association, the Illinois Athletic Association, is past master 
of Blaney Lodge No. 271, A. F. & A. M., is affiliated with Columbia 
Chapter No. 202, R. A. M., with Lincoln Park Commandery No. 
84, K. T., with Oriental Consistory of the Scottish Rite, and with 



1156 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. On June 28, 1905, Mr. 
Beckman married Miss Addie Leroy of Jamestown, -New York. 

MALCOLM B. STERRETT. A member of the Chicago bar for 
more than a decade, Mr. Sterrett is a capable and thoroughly ex- 
perienced lawyer and has served as assistant state's attorney of 
Cook County. He has shown exceptional skill and versatility as a 
public prosecutor. 

A native of Pennsylvania and of Scotch-Irish ancestry, Mal- 
colm B. Sterrett was born at Smethport, McKean County, Febru- 
ary 26, 1878, the fifth in a family of seven children. The original 
progenitors of the Sterrett family in America emigrated from the 
north of Ireland in the early part of the eighteenth century, and 
settlement was made in Eastern Pennsylvania in 1709, two repre- 
sentatives of the family having been enrolled as soldiers of the 
Continental line in the War of the Revolution. David Sterrett, 
father of the Chicago lawyer, was one of the first graduates of 
Northwestern University, at Evanston, Illinois, and became a dis- 
tinguished member of the Pennsylvania bar and was a cousin of 
the late Judge James P. Sterrett, who served twenty-one years as 
chief justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. 

Malcolm B. Sterrett, after his preliminary education in the 
public schools, took a preparatory course at Washington & Jeffer- 
son College, in Pennsylvania. He graduated from Dickinson Col- 
lege, at Carlisle, his native state, in 1900, with the degree of Ph. B., 
and from the Dickinson School of Law in 1902 with the degree 
LL. B. Coming soon afterward to Illinois, he was admitted to 
practice in this state -in 1903, by the Supreme Court. During the 
ensuing ten years he was engaged in the active general practice of 
his profession in Chicago and his success as a trial lawyer led to 
his appointment to his present office. 

Mr. Sterrett is actively identified with the Chicago Bar Associa- 
tion and the Illinois Bar Association, besides which he has been 
officially connected with many religious, civil and political organiza- 
tions. He is a member of Illinois Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution, of the Pennsylvania Society, and of the Presbyterian 
Church. In politics, a democrat, Mr. Sterrett has worked as a 
campaign organizer and speaker in various national and local cam- 
paigns. In 1910 he was the unanimous choice of his party in his 
home city of Evanston for representative of the Tenth Congres- 
sional District in Congress, but the demands of his professional 
and other business interests caused him to decline nomination. In 
1914 he was a candidate in that district for the democratic nomina- 
tion for Congress and was defeated by sixty-eight votes. With his 
wife and their two children, he resides at Evanston. 

JUDGE JOSEPH H. FITCH has had a long and active career in the 
Chicago bar, covering a period of about thirty years. He was first 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1157 

elected to the bench in November, 1910, as judge of the Superior 
Court of Cook County to fill out the unexpired term of Judge W. 
M. McEwen, who had resigned. Since that time Judge Fitch has 
been a member of the Cook County bench, and by assignment of 
the Supreme Court served for nearly four years in the Appellate 
Court of the First District. 

Joseph Harratt Fitch was born in Bristol, Maine, January 16, 
1859, a son of Joseph B. and Frances E. (Geyer) Fitch. The 
family came to Chicago when he was a child, and his education was 
received in the grammar and high schools and in the old University 
of Chicago. Judge Fitch took his law degree from the Union Col- 
lege of Law at Chicago and was admitted to the Illinois bar in 
1881. During 1881-82 he practiced at Silver City, New Mexico. 
From 1882 to 1888 he was clerk of the County Court of Cook 
County. In his private practice Judge Fitch made a specialty of 
special assessment cases. He served as Master in Chancery of the 
Superior Court in 1892-93. Judge Fitch assisted in organizing the 
Village of West Ridge and was its attorney from 1888 to 1892, 
when it was incorporated in the City of Chicago. He is a democrat, 
and belongs to the Iroquois Club. He is also a member of the Chi- 
cago and State Bar associations and of the University and City 
clubs. Judge Fitch was married November 16, 1884, to Elizabeth 
Geohegan. Their children are Joseph, Edna, Sarah, Clara and 
Gerald and Dorothy, twins. 

HENRY GARDNER FERNCASE. Among Chicago attorneys Henry 
G. Ferncase has gained well merited distinction for his skillful 
handling of real estate and chancery litigation affecting titles. He 
has since beginning practice about ten years ago made a specialty 
of examination of real estate titles, real estate litigation and public 
utility work. 

Henry Gardner Ferncase was born December 12, 1884, at In- 
dianapolis, Indiana, a son of Henry and Amelia (Bodemer) Fern- 
case, his father having been for a number of years in the cut stone 
business. When he was seven years of age his parents removed to 
Chicago, where he acquired his early education in the parochial 
schools. Mr. Ferncase was graduated from the John Marshall Law 
School LL. B. in 1904, and in the same year was admitted to the 
Illinois bar. For four years he was in individual practice. He 
was attorney and examiner of titles for the Chicago Title & Trust 
Company in 1910-11, and since that time has been connected with 
the well known law firm of Mayer, Meyer, Austrian & Platt, giv- 
ing his special skill and experience as a real estate lawyer to this 
high-class firm of general practitioners. Mr. Ferncase has been a 
member of the faculty of the Webster College of Law of Chicago 
since its foundation. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and 
the National Union. May 15, 1912, Mr. Ferncase married Miss 



1158 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Nellie Joyer, of Chicago. Their one child is named Jean. The 
family reside at Downer's Grove, Illinois, and Mr. Ferncase has 
his offices in the Continental-Commercial National Bank Building. 

IVOR JEFFREYS. With a large practice and ranking among the 
prominent younger members of the Chicago bar, Ivor Jeffreys 
has been active in his profession since admitted to practice in Octo- 
ber, 1902. Mr. Jeffreys had his first active experience in the office 
of Holt, Cutting & Sidley, and has always occupied offices with that 
firm. He looks after a general practice in all the courts. Mr. Jef- 
freys is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, of the Hamilton 
Club, of the Order of Coif, and of the Ohio Society. 

Ivor Jeffreys was born at Hubbard, Ohio, December 14, 1873, 
a son of William and Elizabeth (Reese) Jeffreys. His father was 
a business man. He acquired his early education in the high school 
at Hubbard, was graduated in 1894 from the Oberlin Academy and 
took his degree Bachelor of Arts at Oberlin College in 1898. Com- 
ing to Chicago Mr. Jeffreys finished his law course with the degree 
LL. B. at the Northwestern University in 1902. He is unmarried. 
His offices are in the Tacoma Building. 

JAMES F. BURNS. A Chicago lawyer whose capabilities have 
brought him rapidly to distinction and success, James F. Burns 
since graduating from the law department of Northwestern Uni- 
versity in 1907 has built up a substantial general practice as a lawyer. 
He represented the Twenty-ninth Senatorial District in the Forty- 
seventh Illinois Assembly, where he introduced and had passed a 
bill given to cities the power to acquire land desirable for bathing 
beaches and recreation piers. He also introduced the Chicago Outer 
Harbor bill and was the house floor leader in obtaining its passage 
and was one of the floor advocates for the passage of the bill author- 
izing the condemnation of riparian rights for park purposes. He 
was a member of the Chicago city council as alderman from the 
Twenty-first Ward from 1912 to 1914, and while in the city council 
he served on the gas, oil and electric light committee which revised 
the telephone and electric light rates. Also was a member of the 
special vice committee and chairman of the sub-committee that pre- 
pared the report of the committee which was afterward approved 
by the council and was a member of the committees on streets and 
alleys, schools, fire, police and civil service, bathing beaches and 
recreation piers. During 1909-11 Mr. Burns was assistant corpo- 
ration counsel. 

Mr. Burns was born in Chicago, June 13, 1878, a son of John 
M. and Anna (McGrath) Burns. His father is now deceased and 
for a number of years was an elevator constructor. James F. Burns 
graduated from the Chicago public schools and took his law course 
in Northwestern University. He is a Republican in politics, has 
been a delegate to the republican, state and county conventions 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1159 

since 1908 and to the last Supreme Court judicial convention and is 
a member to the Knights of Columbus and the Royal League, also 
the Catholic Order of Foresters. He is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association and the American Bar Association. On April 18, 
1901, Mr. Burns married Anastasia E. Furlong of Chicago. His 
offices are at 69 West Washington Street. 

FRANK L. DELAY. Since his admission to the bar in 1904, Mr. 
DeLay has represented many important cases in the Chicago courts, 
and having practiced independently has built up a large general 
clientele which entitles him to a position among the representative 
lawyers of that city. 

Frank L. DeLay was bom at South Charleston, Ohio, August 
n, 1873, a son of David W. and Cynthia (Rowley) DeLay. His 
father, who was engaged in educational work, moved to Kansas in 
1884, and for a number of years was superintendent of schools at 
Marion in that state. Frank L. DeLay acquired most of his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Marion, Kansas, graduating from the 
high school in 1889. Two years were spent as a student in the 
Southwest Kansas College at Winfield, one year in the regular aca- 
demic work of Norwestern University at Evanston, after which he 
entered the Chicago Kent College of Law and took his LL.B. degree 
in 1904. Since his admission to the bar in the same year he has 
practiced in Chicago, and has his offices in the Unity Building. Mr. 
DeLay is president of the Manhattan Distributing Corporation. He 
belongs to the Chicago Bar Association, the Lawyers Association 
of Illinois, the City Club and the Delta Chi legal fraternity. Mr. 
DeLay was married in 1894 to Miss Nellie Pancost of Perry, Okla- 
homa. They have a son, Frank C. Mr. DeLay resides in Norwood 
Park, Chicago. 

ROBERT E. TURNEY. In June, 1915, Mr. Turney was elected 
judge of the Superior Court of Cook County to fill, the vacancy in 
that court. His election has brought to the Cook County judiciary 
one of the sound and able lawyers, and a man whose record in pri- 
vate practice has been re-enforced by capable service in various 
public offices. 

Born in Chicago forty-two years ago, Robert E. Turney was 
graduated from the Lake View High School in 1892 and began the 
study of law in the office of David Fales. He subsequently gradu- 
ated from the Kent College of Law and was admitted to the bar in 
1896. In a few years he was enjoying a comfortable private prac- 
tice, and the first call he accepted for public service was in 1902 
when appointed assistant city attorney by John F. Smulski. Three 
years later he left the city attorney's office to take a position on 
the staff of State's Attorney John J. Healy, who delegated to him 
many of the trial responsibilities, and during Mr. Healy's admin- 
istration he handled a number of important criminal cases. From 



1160 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

that office he accepted a call by Jyidge Lewis Rinaker as assistant 
county judge. From -1910 until his recent election Judge Turney 
devoted all his time to the general practice of law, with offices in 
the First National Bank Building. 

Judge Turney is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, of 
the Chicago Law Institute, of the Hamilton Club. He is a Mason 
and is a member of Wright's Grove Lodge No. 279, A. F. & A. M., 
of Loyal Chapter No. 233, R. A. M. and of the K. T. ; also of the 
Royal League. Judge Turney is married and his home is at 1353 
Wilson Avenue. 

j 

HAYES McKiNNEY. When Mr. McKinney was admitted to the 
Illinois bar in 1903 he began practice with the firm of Lyman, 
Busby & Lyman in Chicago, and subsequently for a time was with 
the firm of Shope, Zane, Busby & Weber. For about four years 
he practiced as an individual, and has since been a member of the 
firm of Zane, Morse & McKinney with present offices in the Har- 
ris Trust Building. Mr. McKinney is a lawyer of marked attain- 
ments, is a safe counselor and has made his individuality felt in 
a number of important cases with which he has been concerned. 

Hayes McKinney was born in Lewistown, Illinois, July 8. 1877, 
a son of Winfield Scott and Mary M. (Tompkins) McKinney. 
His- father is a well known educator, has filled positions in a num- 
ber of places, and is now connected with one of the Chicago high 
schools. Hayes McKinney was educated in the public schools of 
the state and in Chicago and also under private instruction. In 1903 
he graduated with the degree of LL. B. from the Northwestern 
University Law School and was admitted to the Illinois bar in June 
of the same year. Mr. McKinney is a member of the Chicago Bar 
Association, the Illinois State Bar Association and the American 
Bar Association, the Chicago Law Institute, the City Club, the 
Iroquois Club, the Delta Chi law fraternity, the Masonic Order and 
the Order of the Coif. March 22, 1907, he married Miss Alice 
Smalley, of Chicago. Their residence is in Wilmette. 

FRANK J. SNITE. The very discipline and experience that in- 
sure the prestige of the successful lawyer admirably qualify him 
for service in connection with governmental affairs in state and 
nation, and that the eligibility for official preferment on the part 
of Mr. Snite has not failed of recognition is shown by the fact that 
he is one of the representatives of Cook County in the lower house 
of the State Legislature, to which he was elected in November, 
1912, and in which he made an excellent record in the Forty-eighth 
General Assembly. Mr. Snite has built up a substantial and rep- 
resentative law business in Chicago, where he maintains his offices 
at 1600 Westminster Building, no South Dearborn Street, his 
practice being of individual or indeoendent order. 

Hon. Frank J. Snite was born in Chicago, on the i6th of Au- 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1161 

gust, 1877, an d is a son of Albert and Josephine (Goss) Snite, who 
still reside in this city, where the father is now living virtually re- 
tired, after a long and successful business career. Mr. Snite was 
afforded the advantages of the King Grammar School and the 
West Division High School of Chicago, and thereafter attended 
the University of Chicago one year, 1894-5. He then entered his- 
toric Harvard University, in which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1899 and from which he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He forthwith entered the law school of the same 
university, and in the same was graduated in 1901, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. In view of the fact that he still takes vital 
interest and active part in aquatic sports, it may be stated that at 
Harvard Mr. Snite was a member of the 'Varsity Crew squad in 
rowing, besides which he was there affiliated with the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon fraternity. 

Mr. Snite was admitted to the Illinois bar in October, 1901, and 
his professional novitiate was compassed by adventitious condi- 
tions, since he became associated in practice with. Hon. Joel M. 
Longenecker, with whom he continued to be thus allied for two 
years. He then associated himself with Thomas C. Clajk, who is 
now serving on the bench of the Appellate Court 'of Cook County, ' 
and this firm built up a substantial and flourishing practice. In May, 
1907, Mr. Snite was appointed assistant corporation counsel of 
Chicago, under Edward J. Brundage, and in April of the follow- 
ing year he was assigned to trial work in connection with the office 
of the city attorney, a position of which he continued the incumbent 
until the election of Mayor Harrison, in 1911, since which time he 
has given his attention to his excellent private practice. 

In November, 1912, as a candidate on the republican ticket, Mr. 
Snite was elected to represent the Second District in the lower 
house of the State Legislature, and he proved a most zealous, faith- 
ful and progressive worker in the Forty-eighth General Assembly, 
where he was active in the deliberation on the floor of the House 
and in the councils of the committee room. He introduced and ably 
championed a number of important bills, and he was assigned to 
membership on the following named committees : Chicago charter, 
contingent expenses, drainage and waterways, insurance, judiciary, 
judicial department and practice, license, miscellaneous subjects, 
and senatorial appointment. 

He is a popular member of the Chicago Bar Association and is 
otherwise prominent in representative civic organizations in his 
native city. He is a member of the Hamilton Club, the Chicago 
Yacht Club and the Central Department of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, besides other social bodies. He is a past chancel- 
lor of Garden City Lodge, No. 145, Knights of Pythias, and in the 
adjunct Pythian organization, Chicago Temple, No. 128, Dramatic 
Order Knights of Khorassan. he is past royal vizier and past impe- 
rial prince. 

Vol. Ill 21 



1162 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Mr. Snite is an enthusiastic devotee of yachting and is one of 
the leading exponents of this fine line of sportsmanship in Chicago. 
Every year since 1904 he has sailed the Chicago Yacht Club long- 
distance race from Chicago to Mackinac Island, and his experiences 
in this connection include one shipwreck and once being washed 
overboard. In 1912, on the Michicago, he was an active partici- 
pant in the international races between the Chicago Yacht Club 
and the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, of Toronto, Canada, and in 
1914, as owner, he entered the sloop yacht Olympian, Class P, in 
the elimination races for the privilege of representing the Chicago 
Yacht Club in the contest, at Toronto, for the International Trophy, 
then in the possession of the Toronto Club. Mr. Snite is a bachelor 
and resides at 2072 Ogden Avenue, the parental home being in the 
suburb of Elmhurst. 

JOHN EDWARD OWENS. As a result of his capable public serv- 
ice perhaps no member of the Chicago bar is better known among 
all classes of the people of that city than former County Judge 
John E. Owens. He has been a member of the Chicago bar nearly 
twenty years. 

Born on the northwest side of Chicago June 22, 1875, his home 
for many years has been in the thirteenth ward on the west side, 
and he is unmarried and lives with his mother, his two sisters and 
two brothers. As a boy he attended the St. Stephen's parochial 
school and St. Patrick's Academy, Christian Brothers. He studied 
law in the office of his brother Thomas H. Owens, deceased, and 
was finally graduated LL. B. from the Lake Forest University Law 
School. Admitted to the Illinois bar May i, 1896, he soon won his 
way to public favor, and in February, 1898, was appointed assistant 
city prosecutor and in 1900 was made chief assistant city .prosecu- 
tor. Following this he was elected city attorney of Chicago and 
was the youngest man to hold that important position. He served 
as city attorney from 1901 to 1903, and perhaps his most notable 
achievement while in office was in breaking up the combination 
which through personal injury damage suits had mulcted the city 
of hundreds of thousands of dollars. On December I, 1904, he 
was appointed master in chancery in the Circuit Court of Cook 
County. In November, 1910, he was elected judge of the Cook 
County Court for a four-year term. His administration was a most 
creditable one and his office was conducted for the benefit of all 
classes and with a fair and impartial regard for the rights of parties 
and individuals. He was especially commended for his work in 
connection with the election commissioners office, and is also given 
much credit for his stand in behalf of the movement to grant the 
women of Chicago the right to vote. During his four years in the 
office he was first vice president of the County and Probate Judges 
Association of the state. 

Judge Owens is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1163 

Illinois Bar Association, the Knights of Columbus, the Foresters, 
the Loyal Order of Moose, Ancient Order of Hibernians, Irish Fel- 
lowship Club, Iroquois Club, Chicago Yacht Club, Pistakee Club, 
Gaelic League, United Irish Societies. For a number of years he 
has been one of the leaders in the democratic party of Cook County 
and of the state. 

HENRY CLAY BEITLER. One of the senior members of the Chi- 
cago bar, Henry C. Beitler has been in practice in that city a quarter 
of a century, and outside of his profession has become known over 
the city and the state through his services as a member of the Leg- 
islature and as judge of the Municipal Court. 

Henry Clay Beitler was born near Hagerstown, Maryland, July 
i, 1866, a son of Samuel J. and Catherine Beitler. He acquired 
his early education in the Washington County High School at 
Hagerstown, and in 1888 graduated LL. B. from the University of 
Michigan Law School. Admitted to the bar in. May, 1888, Judge 
Beitler practiced at Hagerstown, Maryland, for eighteen months, 
and has been a resident of Chicago since the spring of 1890. He is 
a republican, has been active in that party, and was elected on the 
republican ticket to the Illinois House of Representatives for sev- 
eral terms, beginning in 1898. He was elected and finished his first 
term as judge of the Municipal Court of Chicago in 1908 and his 
second in 1914, and while on the bench did much to strengthen and 
uphold the usefulness of the Municipal Court as a distinctive insti- 
tution of Chicago. He was Cook County civil service commissioner 
from 1904 to 1906. 

Judge Beitler was a member of the Illinois Commission to the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis in 1904. Judge Beitler 
is unmarried and his home is at 2122 Lincoln Park West. 



HARRY M. FISHER. A member of the Chicago bar for the past 
ten years, and now serving as a judge of the Municipal Court, 
Harry M. Fisher's activities and interests have led him largely into 
the field of social welfare work, and he is probably as well known 
through his official connections with various philanthropic organiza- 
tions as in his own profession. 

Harry Michael Fisher was born on a farm in the Province of 
Kovno, Russia, January i, 1882, a son of Moses and Anna Fannie 
(Kaufman) Fisher. His father was a carpenter by trade, and the 
family came to the United States and located in Chicago when Judge 
Fisher was a boy. While trying to gain an education in public and 
other schools, he paid his way partly as a newsboy, and for some time 
was employed as a cap maker. In 1902 he became a law clerk, and 
two years later, in June, 1904, was graduated LL. B. from the Lake 
Forest University Law Department, the Chicago Kent College of 
Law. He has been in practice as a lawyer since 1904, and on No- 
vember 5, 1912, was elected a judge of the Municipal Court of 
Chicago. 



1164 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

Judge Fisher was at one time attorney for the Illinois Children's 
Home and Aid Society. He assisted in the framing of the Juvenile 
Court Act and also in securing the adoption of the Children Act. 
He framed the Pandering Act. Judge Fisher was formerly presi- 
dent of the Juvenile Protective League in the First District; and is 
an ex-president of the Lawndale Club, of the Maimonides Hospi- 
tal, ex-secretary of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, and is a director 
of the Federated Orthodox Jewish Charities. At one time he was 
a member of the Seventh Regiment Illinois National Guard. Judge 
Fisher is a democrat, is a member of the Iroquois, Lawndale and 
Press clubs, and fraternally is affiliated with the Masons, the Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. His church is the Orthodox 
Jewish. 

On June 25, 1905, he married Esther Rhoda Soboroff and in 
their married relations she has proved a devoted wife and mother. 
Their three children are named: Beatrice, born September 15, 
1906; David, born July 29, 1908; Deverra, born January i.i, 1911. 

JOHN E. ERWIN. Among the lawyers of the present generation 
practicing in North Central Illinois, one whose sound legal learn- 
ing, successful ability as an advocate, and distinctive qualifications 
as a public leader give him especially high rank is John E. Erwin, 
of Dixon. Mr. Erwin has been a member of the Illinois bar nearly 
twenty years, and has been successful both in the law and in busi- 
ness. 

He was born at Dixon, June 22, 1871, a son of John and Eleanor 
(Kinney) Erwin. Both parents were born in Ireland. Mr. Envin 
was next to the youngest in a family of six children, received his 
early education in the public schools at Dixon, graduating from the 
high school June, 1889, and after a course in a business college went 
to Chicago in 1894 and took up the study of law. He was admitted 
to the bar in August, 1896, and following that took post-graduate 
studies in the Chicago College of Law. Mr. Erwin had five years 
experience as a lawyer in Chicago. In 1900 he returned to his old 
home city and opened an office, and for fifteen years has merited 
and received recognition as an able advocate and counsellor. He 
is president of the Morning Leader, the principal daily paper of 
Dixon, and is a stockholder in the City National Bank and takes 
pride in the personal management of his large dairy and farming 
interests as well as commercial and city property interests. Mr. 
Erwin was for three years a captain in the Illinois National Guards. 
He is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Knights of Columbus, Mystic Workers, Royal Arcanum, Mod- 
ern Woodmen, and Loyal Order of Moose. 

Mr. Erwin is married, and the family consists of Mrs. Julia 
and son, Thomas P., born March 7, 1908. Their home is situated 
in the same block where Mr. Erwin was born and reared. He has a 
fine library and fjne offices. The family are members of the Catholic 
Church. 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1165 

ANDREW J. MILLER. The Champaign County bar is probably as 
able and representative a body of professional men as can be found 
in the state, and Urbana, the county seat, is the home of a number 
of lawyers who may justly be called eminent in the law. - One of 
these able members of the Urbana bar is Andrew J. Miller, who, 
both in private practice and as a public official, has won deserved 
reputation as an exponent of the law and also, through honorable 
methods, has been able to secure and retain the respect and con- 
fidence of his associates. 

Andrew J. Miller was born in Champaign County, Illinois, May 
30, 1863, and is a son of Isaac J. and Elizabeth (Rock) Miller. 
Isaac J. Miller was born in Ohio, in 1813, and was granted a long 
life, surviving until April, 1902. He became a substantial farmer. 
Of his nine children there are seven survivors. 

In the public schools Andrew J. Miller secured his early educa- 
tional training, subsequently enjoying advantages in the University 
of Illinois and at Yale College. His special preparation for the law 
was made under the supervision of J. O. Cunningham, a well known 
attorney, and Hon. F. M. Wright, of Urbana, who is a judge of the 
Federal Court. Mr. Miller was admitted to the bar on May 30, 
1863, and for twenty-nine years has been active in the practice of 
his profession at Urbana. He soon demonstrated the exactness and 
clearness of his mind, as well as his sound legal learning, and with 
the recognition of his qualifications came his election to the office of 
state's attorney, in which position he served ably for eight years. 
From 1896 until 1904 he was associated with the office of attorney 
general of the state, where his extraordinarily retentive memory, 
quickness of perception and tenacity of purpose, as shown during 
his former official life, made him a valuable assistant. Since retir- 
ing from public office he has devoted his time and attention to a large 
practice, which has connected him with many important cases of 
litigation in this section. 

Mr. Miller was united in marriage with Miss Helen F. Leaf, a 
daughter of William Leaf, and they have one son, Roy C. Mrs. 
Miller was reared in the Episcopal Church, while Mr. Miller attends 
the Universalist Church. 

In politics he is a republican, and as far as intelligent and re- 
sponsible citizenship demands, is active in public affairs. He belongs 
to both state and county bar associations, and belongs to the Masons, 
Elks and Knights of Pythias. Although his profession claims much 
of his time, Mr. Miller engages in considerable literary effort, for 
many years having been a welcomed contributor to magazines and 
newspapers, under the nom de plume of "Athos? 

PATRICK B. FLANAGAN. The character, experience and legal 
attainments of such a lawyer as Patrick B. Flanagan have been 
esteemed an important addition to the personnel of the Municipal 
Court of Chicago. Judge Flanagan was elevated to this bench in 



1166 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

1914. He has been a successful member of the Chicago bar for 
twenty years, and came to the judicial office with a record of un- 
usual success in his private practice. 

It was in January, 1883, that Judge Flanagan first arrived in 
Chicago from Newark, New Jersey. A young Irishman, with the 
equivalent of a liberal education, strong in his determination to 
achieve something that would make his name distinctive among his 
fellows, he has gradually risen from the ranks of humble toilers to 
one of the most' dignified positions in the city government. Patrick 
B. Flanagan was born in Ireland October 4, 1858, a son of Bryan 
and Mary Flanagan. His education came from the national schools 
of Ireland and was concluded at St. Patrick's College at Castlerea. 
He was still young when he came to America, and for several years 
was a clerk in Newark, New Jersey. His first position in Chicago 
was as street car conductor with the Chicago City Railway Com- 
pany. He took this work partly as a means of physical recuperation. 
During his five years of street car life he acquired good health and 
then embarked his modest capital in a grocery business, but was 
a merchant only a short time. Mayor Cregier after his election 
appointed Mr. Flanagan clerk in the special assessment department, 
and in that capacity he remained to the end of the mayor's term. 
He then became personal bailiff with Judge Frank Baker, now one 
of the judges of the Appellate Court of Illinois. It was while in this 
office that he found the means of entering the profession of his 
choice. He entered Kent College of Law and received his degree 
LL. B. from that institution in 1895. In the same year he opened 
his office in the Ashland Block, and looked after his growing and 
important private practice there until elected judge of the Municipal 
Court in 1914 on the democratic ticket. 

Judge Flanagan is a member of the Royal League, the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Knights 
of Columbus and the Catholic Total Abstinence Union of America. 
He was twice elected president of the last named organization, and 
all his life has been a total abstainer and for more than twenty-five 
years an active worker in the temperance cause. 

Judge Flanagan has had a happy domestic career. He was mar- 
ried in Chicago in 1886 to Annie G. Martin, of Paris, Wisconsin. 
She had six half-brothers in the Union army, two of whom were 
killed. Her father was a large farmer in Wisconsin, and Mrs. 
Flanagan was a child of his second marriage. The five children of 
Judge Flanagan are: Mary, wife of Emmet E. Evans; John M. ; 
Bernard J. ; Kathleen M. ; and Joseph T. Judge Flanagan resides 
in property he owns at 2301 West Garfield Boulevard. 

Early in his career he realized that a property owner was 
regarded as a better type of citizen than one who did not possess 
that tie of good citizenship. It was in 1889 that he and his wife 
determined upon a plan for acquiring a home. From that time to 
the present he has gradually increased his real estate holdings in 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1167 

various parts of the city. It was largely his interest as a property 
holder that enabled him to rent an office and begin his individual 
practice of the law immediately after his admission to the bar. In 
a short time he had passed beyond the struggling period of the 
average young lawyer, but in the meantime had been engaged in pay- 
ing for a home and rearing his family of five children. All these 
facts are suggestive and indicate the fine type of citizen who was 
so recently elected a member of the Municipal Court. 

EDMUND K. JARECKI. Professional success has by no means 
been the limit of achievement in the case of one of Chicago's well 
known citizens, Edmund K. Jarecki, now serving on the Municipal 
bench, politics and public affairs having largely engaged his atten- 
tion for some years. Judge Jarecki was born in Posen, German 
Poland, October 21, 1879. 

In 1884 the parents of Judge Jarecki came to the United States 
and the family located in the City of Chicago. Here the lad grew 
to boyhood, attending the public and parochial schools, and later 
became a student in Saint Stanislaus College, and subsequently the 
Chicago Manual Training School, from which he was graduated in 
1898. At that time this school was located at Michigan Avenue and 
Twelfth Street, but is now a part of the Chicago University and 
known as the University High. Developing aptness in certain direc- 
tions, Mr. Jarecki worked as a machine designer and mechanical 
draughtsman for a number of years before he entered upon the 
serious study of law, in 1905, at the Northwestern University Law 
School, where he was graduated in 1908. In the same year he was 
admitted to the bar and has been engaged in a general law practice 
ever since. He is a member of the Chicago and State Bar associa- 
tions and of the Lawyers Club. His interest in public matters 
brought about his election in 1911, as alderman of the Sixteenth 
Ward, on the democratic ticket, and his energy and public spirit in 
this capacity are matters of public record. 

In October, 1913, Governor Dunne appointed Mr. Jarecki at- 
torney for the State Pure Food Commission, and in May, 1914, the 
governor further honored him by appointing him to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Judge Fake from the Municipal bench. 
He maintains an office in the city hall, Chicago, and resides 'at No. 
1946 Armitage Avenue. 

CLARK SCAMMON REED, member of the Chicago bar and one of 
the well known barristers of the younger set in this city, is of South 
Carolina birth. Ladies Island, Beaufort County, that state, was 
the place of his nativity, and his birth occurred on February 14, 
1878. He is the son of Joseph S. and Florence Ann Dearborn 
(Scammon) Reed, the latter a native daughter of Chicago and 
daughter of the late Hon. J. Young Scammon. 

J. Young Scammon was a pioneer member of the Chicago bar. 



1168 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

He served at one time as reporter of the Illinois Supreme Court, 
and he was also prominent in banking and other circles. 

Clark S. Reed had his early education in the private and public 
schools of his native state, where his father is a well known business 
man. He spent one year in South Carolina College and in 1895, 
when he was seventeen years, he came to Chicago and in 1897 
entered the University of Chicago. In 1900 he was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. In preparation for his pro- 
fession he entered the Northwestern University School of Law, 
and in 1902 he finished his studies there, winning his law degree 
and admission to the Illinois bar at that time. His next step was 
to further his training by actual association with men of experience 
and he entered the offices of the firm of Holt, Wheeler and Sidley, 
wherein he continued for a year. Since 1903, save for a brief 
period, he has been engaged in independent practice in Chicago his 
business being of a general order, though he may be said to give 
especial attention to real estate law. In 1910 he was appointed 
assistant attorney of the Sanitary District of Chicago, in which he 
continued until the end of 1912. Mr. Reed has his offices at 511 
Portland Building. 

Mr. Reed has membership in the Chicago and Illinois State Bar 
associations and the Chicago Law Institute. He is a member of 
various social organizations, among them being the University Club, 
the Hamilton Club, the Chicago Art Institute and the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons. 

On June 21, 1895, Mr. Reed was married to Miss Mabel Arvilla 
Lewis, of Chicago, and they have their home at 547 Surf Street, 
Chicago. They have one son, Clark Lewis Reed. 

JOHN A. BROWN. In the general practice, many matters of vital 
importance to the interest of the community and its citizens pass 
through the hands of the experienced lawyer. 

Many times little or nothing is known of them to the outside 
world, and again, at other times, matters of really slight importance 
to the public occupy a large share of the space allotted by the daily 
press. 

Many suits are commenced and before the matter is finally ready 
for trial, settlements and adjustments are made and entered of 
record, without any publicity being given to them. Of course, 
such litigation and claim fail to appear in the general reports of 
causes; consequently, the skill and ability displayed by an attor- 
ney in securing the settlements of his clients' interests are .stowed 
away in the musty, records of court, without ariy comment or other 
or further credit to his account. Then, again, there are more who 
seek to specialize in the various branches of the law, and a man 
may be a splendid common law pleader and trial lawyer, and have 
no idea of the criminal, chancery or probate pleadings, and it is 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1169 

that fact that makes specialists in the various departments of the 
law. 

Not so with the subject of this sketch. His practice has em- 
braced every feature, with perhaps the exception of the patent 
law, which is a specialty by itself, and it is doubtful if any one 
at the local bar, of at least his years, has had the amount of prac- 
tice under all the different divisions as his appears to have been 
from the reports of causes by him, handled in the courts of appeals, 
and both state and federal. 

If the word "specialty" might be applied to his practice in any 
particular, it would undoubtedly in the brokerage cases and liti- 
gation involving claims arising out of board of trade and stock 
exchange transactions. 

His name appears in the litigation over the board of trade quo- 
tations as well as in suits by and against brokers, in practically 
every case in which the same were involved, and these decisions are 
scattered not alone through the Illinois Reports but through those 
of the surrounding states and even in the Supreme Court of the 
United States. 

In local cases handled, perhaps the -leading one is Klein against 
Independent Brewing Association, 231 111. 594, which settled the 
rights of minority stockholders in Illinois corporations. 

He handled Pinkerton vs. Grand Pacific Hotel Company, 217 
111. 61, which is perhaps one of the milestones in Illinois decisions 
on the question of practice. 

In Kipley vs. People, 315 111. 358, are settled questions of crimi- 
nal law. 

In Board of Trade vs. Kinzie, 198 U. S. 236, are settled the 
questions of the rights of the public in board of trade quotations. 

In Bendinger vs. Stock Exchange, 109 Fed. 926, is involved liti- 
gation covering years, regarding the rights of brokerage customers. 

In United States vs. McHie, 194 Fed. 894, is settled once for 
all the right of the Federal authorities to make searches and seizures 
without due process of law. 

In Gray vs. Grand Trunk Railway Company, 156 Fed. 736, 
are settled questions of common law pleadings that are followed 
in practice today, without doubt that they should always have been 
the law of practice. 

In Board of Trade vs. Stock Exchange of Hammond, 126 Fed. 
, is settled the question of the right of a corporation to con- 
trol the actions of its officers and directors. 

In Ellis vs. Venderveen, Vol. 19, 969, Detroit Legal News, 
Michigan Supreme Court, is settled the question of the right of a 
customer to claim damages from a broker. 

In People vs. Fippinger, 184 App. 58, are settled the ques- 
tion of the right of village boards and their duties under contracts 
made by them. 



1170 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

In Giftord vs. Culver, 261 111. 530, is settled the question of the 
constitutionality of the Municipal Court. 

In Huey vs. Frank, 182 App. 431, is involved the status be- 
tween landlord and tenant as to the power and authority of an agent 
to sign a lease. 

While the enumeration may stop with these, it is only fair to 
say that the cases handled by him reaching the Courts of Appeal, 
for one side or the other, have run well past the hundred mark. 

Referring again to the cases that are settled and of which no 
report appears in the published volumes, mention might be made 
of the fight in the habeas corpus proceedings in Springfield and 
Chicago by James W. Brooks for the custody and possession of his 
daughter. As, also, the case of Robinson vs. Robinson, in the 
Superior Court, which was also a fight for the possession and 
custody of a daughter by the father. 

In the recent litigation which forced the through routing of 
cars on the elevated roads with one fare and universal transfer, 
might be cited another case of great public importance that was 
settled in the lower courts, whereby these three conditions were 
settled in favor of the public, although the Supreme Court of the 
State of Illinois, about three months afterwards, held that the ele- 
vated railways did not have to comply with the conditions that he 
had forced upon them. 

In the brokerage cases in Detroit, which put an end to prosecu- 
tions under the brokerage law, after a trial of weeks the jury dis- 
agreed, but the holes that had been torn in the law by him made the 
State of Michigan drop all further proceedings therein and over 
two dozen indictments were nolled. 

In United States vs. Naldiett et al., in the United States District 
Court of Michigan, involving the title to Government lands, the 
final decree in favor of his clients has just been settled. 

In the Estate of M. C. McDonald the burden of removing the 
trustees and their discharge and winding up of said estate was 
planned and carried on by him. This was also true in the Sullivan 
Estate and the Delfosse estates. 

As attorney for the Pinkerton National Detective Agency he 
has had charge of their western litigation for many years. 

His general practice has also identified him to a considerable 
extent with industrial organizations and he has also been active in 
real estate circles. 

Since leaving a farm in New York State John A. Brown has 
been a resident of Chicago. He was born in Tannersville, Greene 
County, New York, June 21, 1876, a son of James and Catherine 
(Goggin) Brown, and a nephew of the late Judge James Goggin of 
the Superior Court of Cook County. His early training was under 
a private tutor, and in 1898 he graduated LL. B. from the Kent Col- 
lege of Law. The following year the Illinois College of Law, where 
he took post-graduate work, awarded him the degrees LL. B. and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1171 

LL. M. Mr. Brown gained his first knowledge of the law while 
working as a clerk in the Circuit Court of Cook County under Frank 
J. Gaulter, and was afterwards a clerk in the law office of Lackner 
& Butz. When Jacob J. Kern retired from the office of state's 
attorney in 1896 he formed a partnership with Elisha L. Bottum, 
and Mr. Brown was connected with this firm until the death of 
Mr. Bottum in 1898. Charles D. Fullen, former United States dis- 
trict attorney of Iowa, then became a partner under the name Kern 
& Fullen, with Mr. Brown as a silent partner. On the retirement of 
Mr. Fullen in 1900 the firm took the formal title of Kern & Brown, 
and it was one of the best known legal firms of the Chicago bar until 
1910. Since that time Mr. Brown has practiced alone and in addi- 
tion to a general clientage has been identified with the formation of 
several large industrial corporations. In 1907 Mr. Brown bought 
the property surrounding the lake at Glen Ellyn, subdivided it into 
residence lots, and it has since been known on the official plats as 
the John A. Brown Addition to Glen Ellyn, DuPage County. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the Phi Alpha Delta legal fraternity, 
the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association, the 
Central Y. M. C. A., and is past regent of the Illinois Council of the 
Royal Arcanum and a member of the Northwestern Council of 
the same fraternity. He is also affiliated with Banner Lodge No. 219, 
Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Press Club, the Ken- 
wood Club, the Illinois Athletic Club, Chicago Gun Club, and Prai- 
rie Club. In politics he is a democrat. In 1912 he was married to 
Miss Margaret Glessner of Chicago and resides at 7146 Paxton 
Avenue. His offices are in the Title and Trust Building. 

OTTO GUSTAF RYDEN, a member of the Chicago bar since 1905, 
is prominent in his profession, having gained a substantial reputa- 
tion as a close student of the law and a painstaking, able and strictly 
reliable lawyer. He is a native of Sweden, born at Ryssby, Septem- 
ber 6, 1874, a son of Carl and Lena (Olson) Ryden, both of whom 
are now deceased. The father, who brought his family to the 
United States in 1889, was for some years a business man in LaSalle 
County, Illinois. 

Otto G. Ryden acquired his early education in the public schools 
of his native land, and was a bright and industrious youth of four- 
teen years when he accompanied his parents to this country. His 
preparatory education was completed in the Evanston Township 
High School, and' subsequently he entered Northwestern University, 
from which he received the degrees of Bachelor of Philosophy and 
Master of Arts. Subsequently entering the law school, he was 
graduated from that department in 1905 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws, and in October of the same year was admitted to practice. 
During his collegiate career, Mr. Ryden took an active part in ath- 
letics, and was one of those who brought success to the Purple in 
many hard-fought contests on the field and track. His desire to be 



1172 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

always doing something was shown by his acting for four consecu- 
tive years as town clerk of Evanston while attending college, and 
it is stated that he was one of the most efficient and popular incum- 
bents that office has known. Since entering upon his professional 
duties in Chicago, Mr. Ryden has been successful in building up a 
large and representative clientele, his practice being general in char- 
acter. By his learning, industry, ability and absolute integrity he 
has attained a high rank in his profession, while he is no less valued 
in the community as a liberal-minded and enterprising citizen. He 
holds membership in the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State 
Bar Association and the American Bar Association, as well as in the 
Chicago Law Institute, and belongs to the Delta Theta Phi law fra- 
ternity, the Mystic Athletic Club of Chicago, and Chicago Associa- 
tion of Commerce. Mr. Ryden is prominent in fraternal circles, 
being a member of Evanston Commandery, Oriental Consistory and 
Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a valued and 
popular member of the Chicago Press Club of Chicago. 

Mr. Ryden was married to Miss Gertrude L. Gibbs, of Chicago, 
also a graduate of Northwestern University, and three children have 
been born to them: Alice Gertrude, Ruth Louise and Helen Jane. 
Although Mr. Ryden's practice is largely confined to Chicago, where 
he has offices at No. 1609-1611 Conway Building, he also has a 
large professional business in his residence locality of Evanston, 
and continues to be actively interested in its welfare. 

ELMER SCHLESINGER. Since Elmer Schlesinger finished his law 
studies in Harvard Law School and came home to Chicago with 
his degree, he has devoted himself to the practice of his profession 
as a junior member of one of the best known firms in the city, that 
of Mayer, Meyer, Austrian & Platt. 

Mr. Schlesinger was born in Chicago on November 20, i8<So, 
and is a son of Leopold and Henrietta (Mayer) Schlesinger. Fin- 
ishing his studies at home, the young man in 1897 entered Harvard 
University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1901, 
with the Bachelor of Arts degree. In 1903 he completed his studies 
in the Harvard Law School. Soon thereafter he was admitted to 
the bar of Illinois and he has been continuously with the firm pre- 
viously mentioned since that time. He is making excellent progress 
and is recognized as one of the coming men in the profession in 
this city. 

Mr. Schlesinger is a member of the Chicago, Illinois and Ameri- 
can Bar associations. He is secretary and a director of the Citizens' 
Street Cleaning Bureau, and is markedly progressive and public 
spirited. Politically, he is a republican. His social ties are with the 
Harvard Club of New York, the Longwood Cricket Club of Boston, 
and in his native city he is a member of the City Club, the Illinois 
Athletic Club, the Lake Shore Country Club and the Chicago Lit- 
erary Club. He is a close student along professional lines, and 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1173 

possesses a fine literary instinct and appreciation that prompts "wide 
and well directed reading along general themes. 

On October 30, 1911, Mr. Schlesinger was married to Miss 
Halle Schaffner, daughter of Joseph Schaffner of Chicago, and 
they have one daughter, Halle S. Schlesinger. Their home is at 
1030 East Forty-eighth Street, in the Kenwood district. 

FRED PLOTKE. Fred Plotke's position in the Chicago bar for a 
number of years has been one of definite relations with a successful 
practice and influential citizenship. 

A native of Posen, Germany, Fred Plotke was born May 6, 1869. 
His parents, Louis and Hulda (Flach) Plotke, emigrated to Amer- 
ica in 1883, locating in Chicago, where for many years the father was 
engaged in merchandising but is now retired. Fred Plotke was fifteen 
years old when the family came to America, had a primary educa- 
tion in the schools of Germany, and soon after reaching Chicago 
definitely determined upon the profession of law. He sent himself 
to school, and has won his way to success entirely through his 
own efforts. Mr. Plotke was graduated LL. B. in 1893 f rom the 
Chicago College of Law and admitted to the Illinois bar the same 
year. For a time he was clerk in the office of a north side justice 
of the peace and also in the firm of Eastman & Schwartz in the 
Unity Building. Mr. Plotke began active practice in 1895, and has 
always practiced alone, having built up a large clientele, principally 
in real estate and probate law. His offices have been in the Unity 
Building for nearly twenty years. For the past ten years Mr. Plotke 
has been attorney for the German daily, the Abendpost, and is a 
regular contributor of the legal articles which appear in that paper 
on Tuesday and Friday of each week. For many years he has 
served as attorney for the Retail Liquor Dealers Association of 
Chicago. 

Mr. Plotke is a member of the Chicago Bar Association and the 
Lawyers Association, in politics is a Republican, and for a num- 
ber of years was closely identified with political affairs in his ward, 
the 24th. Mr. Plotke resides at 4620 Hazel avenue. 

JUDGE HARRY C. MORAN. Now serving his second term as 
judge of the City Court of Canton, Judge Moran is one of the 
best known lawyers of Fulton County, and his reputation as a 
lawyer extends beyond the limits of his home district. For the 
past five years Judge Moran has frequently been appointed to hold 
court on the Superior and Circuit bench of Cook County, and is 
therefore well known to the bench and bar of Chicago. His work 
both as a lawyer and as a judge has been characterized by fidelity 
to the best ideals of the profession and an able performance of 
his responsibilities on the bench. 

He was born in Buckhart Township of Fulton County, Septem- 
ber 29, 1869, a son of R. L. and Sybil (Cummings) Moran. His 



1174 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

father was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and his mother in Mas- 
sachusetts. The former came to Illinois from Maryland in 1835, 
located seven miles southwest of Canton, was a farmer in that 
vicinity until 1884, and then moved into Canton where he died 
June 13, 1903. 

Harry C. Moran grew up on the farm, was educated in the dis- 
trict schools near his home in Buckhart Township, and at the age 
of fifteen became a resident of Canton in 1885. He was graduated 
from the high school in May, 1889, and subsequently received his 
degree in law from the University of Illinois. Besides his service 
in the office of judge Mr. Moran was for three terms elected jus- 
tice of the peace of Canton Township and from 1901 to 1905 held 
the office of clerk of the City Court of Canton. 

He is a member of the County and State Bar associations, of the 
Hamilton Club of Chicago, and is a member of the Masonic, the 
Knights of Pythias and Elks fraternities. As a republican he has 
attended a number of state conventions as a delegate. Judge 
Moran was married in 1895 to Miss Ida A. Weaver of Bryant, 
Illinois. Mrs. Moran died June 17, 1907, leaving a daughter, 
Murlea Mae Moran. Judge Moran married Miss Helen M. Sloss 
June 17, 1915, at Lawton, Oklahoma. 

ALFRED J. BROCKSCHMIDT. For thirty years one of the able 
lawyers of the Adams County bar, Mr. Brockschmidt has had 4 
career of varied and successful experience both in his profession 
and in business. He has a wide acquaintance throughout the state, 
is an accomplished, well educated and genial gentleman, and has 
many interesting reminiscences of his life as a lawyer. 

Representing one of the solid old families of Quincy, Alfred J. 
Brockschmidt was born in that city August u, 1860, as a boy was 
sent to the parochial schools, and early decided to make his own way 
rather than follow the plan of his father for a college education. His 
mother lent her encouragement to his desire to become self-support- 
ing, and he kept his plans from his father. The position of draft 
clerk was vacant in the German-American Bank, operated by H. A. 
Geise and Son, and about the beginning of a summer vacation young 
Brockschmidt applied for the place. The banker gave him an appli- 
cation blank requiring the consent of his parents. Knowing that his 
father would refuse consent, he had the paper signed by his mother 
and uncles, and it passed the scrutiny of Mr. Geise and the boy was 
put to work. About ten days later his father entered the bank for 
the purpose of purchasing several drafts and was considerably sur- 
prised at finding his son behind the counter. After his inquiry as to 
what the boy was doing, the matter was allowed to rest for some 
weeks, and at the end of two months the clerk was paid his salary of 
forty dollars per month, half of which he gave to his mother. At the 
end of the summer vacation the father decided that the boy must 
return to school. Much against his will the bank clerk was sent to 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1175 

St. Francis College at Quincy, Illinois, and put under the instruction 
of the Franciscan Fathers. He graduated from this college in 1879, 
and remained there two additional years for post-graduate work. 
He then entered Yale University, graduating in the class of 1883, and 
had two years of post-graduate work at this university. His resi- 
dence for four years in eastern cities and association with young men 
of wealth and- metropolitan manners made it difficult for him to 
return to what appeared a very small town and take up his profes- 
sion as a lawyer. His father had some legal matters abroad which 
were made an excuse for allowing the son to go to Germany, and 
one year was spent in Europe, after which he returned to Quincy 
to begin active practice. He brought back to a small city of the 
Middle West the elaborate dress and manners of the East, and 
besides equipping his office with some very modern devices, he saw 
fit to array himself in silk hat and Prince Albert coat, after the 
fashion of lawyers in the East. For several weeks he sat in his 
office without a client coming in his door. One day a learned and 
veteran judge soundly advised him to discard his pretentious rai- 
ment, dress as other ordinary people dressed, and get out and mix 
with the common people and show them that he could be serviceable 
to them and to their rights and interests. He took the advice, and 
in a short time was established in a profitable practice. 

Mr. Brockschmidt has had perhaps more than his share of 
amusing experiences as a lawyer, particularly at the beginning of 
his career. Some of his first cases were of a criminal nature. The 
court appointed him to defend one man charged with stealing two 
mules from a farmer. His able defense brought in a verdict of 
acquittal, but his client was without means to remunerate his bene-' 
factor, and told the latter confidentially that from the proceeds of 
the next pair of mules he would steal it was his firm purpose to pay 
the fee. Soon afterwards there was another similar experience in 
the case of a man charged with burglarizing a boarding house and 
stealing a pair of trousers. Again Mr. Brockschmidt was appointed 
the attorney for the defense, and as the prosecuting witness failed 
to appear at the trial, the defendant having pleaded not guilty was 
discharged by the jury. The gratified attorney had again to hear 
the humiliating confession that his client was actually wearing 
during the trial the trousers he had been charged with stealing. 
These experiences were sufficient to discourage Mr. Brockschmidt 
from criminal practice, and since that time he has concentrated his 
efforts on other branches of the law, and with business affairs. He 
has and still enjoys a large general practice in the courts of Illinois, 
Missouri and in the Federal courts. Mr. Brockschmidt now holds 
the office of president of various large commercial corporations ; he 
is also director of and attorney for numerous other successful cor- 
porations representing many phases of business enterprise and com 
mercial activity, and trustee of various charitable institutions ; he 
has risen in some instances from ordinary stockholder to that of 



1176 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

president of the companies; he is also the owner of valuable real 
estate in Illinois and in other states. Though a democrat in politics 
he has never aspired to any office, is a member of the State Bar 
Associations of Illinois, Iowa and Missouri and of the American 
Bar Association, and he has one of the largest and finest private 
libraries in the City of Quincy, his law library containing over 8,000 
volumes ; and as a Catholic he is a member of the Western Catholic 
Union and the Catholic Knights of America. On August 20, 1901, 
he married Matilda Loire, of St. Louis. Her parents were Philbert 
and Emilie Frances (Sier) Loire, her father born near Paris and 
her mother at Toulouse, France. They came to America and were 
early settlers at St. Louis. 

Mr. Brockschmidt's father was the late John Henry Brock- 
schmidt, who had a very notable career, since he came to America 
a poor boy and eventually was one of the worthy and influential 
citizens of Quincy. Landing in this country in 1848, he went to 
the home of an uncle in Cincinnati, a locksmith and general repair 
mechanic, and almost as poor as his nephew. After six months the 
former was stricken down with typhoid fever, and after a long 
illness went to Quincy, where another uncle lived. Here, after 
recovering his strength, he entered the factory of a friend and family 
acquaintance and learned the trade of hat and cap maker. To get 
larger opportunities in that line he went to St. Louis, and for two 
years was employed by the Burman Hat Company. With this thor- 
ough and' special preparation, he returned to Quincy and established 
a hat factory of his own. The enterprise was sold after several 
years and his next business was the manufacture of high wines with 
a Mr. Cramer as partner. Their distillery was established several 
years before the beginning of the Civil war, at a time when whiskey 
sold at twenty and twenty-five cents per gallon. During the war it 
became known that the government intended to impose a high rev- 
enue tax on alcoholic liquors, and the firm of Brockschmidt & 
Cramer decided to retire from the business, but in the meantime to 
make the most possible out of the existing conditions surrounding 
the industry. With all their capital, with all they could borrow, and 
by full extension of their credit, they bought immense quantities of 
corn, filling every available bin and store room, and even their office 
was required for storage purposes. This supply was converted into 
high wines, and on June 30, 1865, the fires were drawn in the plant 
and all the product was barreled and stored in the warehouse. On 
July i, 1865, the new revenue law went into force, but with the pro- 
vision that liquor distilled before that time was exempt from the tax. 
As a result of their foresight both members of the business retired 
with a profit of about seventy-five thousand dollars. Mr. Brock- 
schmidt used this capital for extensive investments and was an influ- 
ential citizen in Quincy until his death on October 24, 1897. He 
was born September 16, 1830, in Hanover, Germany. Though as 
a boy his education had been much neglected, and he had to learn 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1177 

the English language, by hard work and study he finally passed 
among his associates as a man of ample education, and it is a matter 
of record that he executed his own deeds to various tracts of land, 
wrote his own contracts, and other business papers, and as docu- 
ments they will compare with those executed by an expert lawyer, 
both in language and in writing and punctuation. He reared a fam- 
ily of six children and was exceedingly liberal in granting each one 
of them the advantages of a college education. John Henry Brock- 
schmidt, who was married at Quincy to Miss Caroline Epple, who 
was born in Quincy September 24, 1838, was reared in that city and 
died April 8, 1876. 

JUDGE ORRIN N. CARTER. Of the sitting judges who were 
re-elected to the Illinois Supreme Court in the judicial elections of 
June, 1915, the continuation of the services of Judge Carter from 
the Seventh District was regarded as particularly fortunate. His 
election practically without opposition, his candidacy having been 
endorsed by all the leading political parties, was not only in the 
nature of a triumph for the movement for the election of judges 
on a non-partisan basis, but also a testimonial to Judge Carter's 
qualities as an intelligent and upright judge and his valuable serv- 
ices to the profession and to the public, covering a period of many 
years. 

Judge Carter has been a member of the Illinois Supreme Court 
since 1906, and had resigned his place as judge of the Cook County 
Court to take his place on the Supreme Bench. He has been a 
member of the Illinois bar for thirty-five years, and came to Chi- 
cago in the winter of 1888-9. As a young man he paid his way 
through college, and earned every successive promotion on the basis 
of unquestioned ability and integrity. 

Born in Jefferson County, New York, January 22, 1854, he has 
lived in Illinois since he was ten years of age. His%father, Benajah 
Carter, was a sailor on the Great Lakes and died when Judge 
Carter was two years of age. The mother, whose maiden name 
was Isabel Cole, later married James W. Francisco, and in the fall 
of 1864 the family moved to DuPage County, Illinois. 

His family were by no means wealthy people, and Judge Car- 
ter's early life was hedged by the many limitations and privations 
of an early Illinois farm. While living in New York he attended 
district school for a few terms, but as he was old enough to be use- 
ful after the family removed to Illinois his opportunities were still 
further abbreviated. His chief asset in those years was an ambi- 
tion to gain a liberal education and fit himself for broader respon- 
sibilities than those bounded by the horizon of country life. In 
pursuance of this design he entered Wheaton College and paid his 
way by janitor service and by school teaching until he was gradu- 
ated with the A. B. degree in 1877. More than twenty years later, 
in 1899, his alma mater conferred upori him the degree LL. D. 



Vol. Ill 22 



1178 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

After leaving college he taught school for several months each 
year for several years, first in Dover Academy in Bureau County, 
Illinois, and afterward in a normal school in Morris, Grundy 
County, Illinois. In the meantime he gave all his spare moments 
to the study of law, being a student in Chicago a part of one year 
under Judge Murray F. Tuley and Gen. I. N. Stiles. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1880, while teaching at Morris. Instead of 
taking up the practice at once he served for about two years in 
1881, 1882 and 1883 as county superintendent of schools of Grundy 
County, resigning when appointed state's attorney. 

It was at Morris that Judge Carter earned his first successes 
as a lawyer. In 1883 he was appointed by the court as prosecut- 
ing attorney of Grundy County to fill a vacancy, and was regularly 
elected in 1884 for a term of four years. He filled the office very 
creditably from 1883 until 1888. He was also in active practice, 
and among others with whom he was associated was Judge S. C. 
Stough, who for many years has been circuit judge at Morris, and 
another partner of his early practice was Judge R. M. Wing. Judge 
Carter and Judge Wing came to Chicago together in 1888. 

While serving as state's attorney in Grundy County Judge Car- 
ter prosecuted a famous trial against the murderers of an express 
messenger on the Rock Island Railroad. His youthful experience 
and ability were pitted against some of the best lawyers in the 
country, but he secured the conviction of the two defendants and 
they were sent to life imprisonment. 

His reputation followed him to Chicago and he was soon in the 
enjoyment of a profitable practice in that city. From 1892 to 1894 
Judge Carter served as general attorney for the Chicago Sanitary 
District. It was during his term in that office that the great drainage 
canal project was formally instituted, and among other services he 
carried on the negotiations to secure much of the right of way for 
the canal, involving the purchase of land to the value of more than 
two million dollars. He resigned from the office of attorney for the 
district in the fall of 1894, having previously accepted the nomina- 
tion of the republican party for the office of county judge in Cook 
County. He was elected, was re-elected in November, 1898, and 
in 1902 was chosen without opposition for the office. As county 
judge he had charge of all the numerous cases concerning insanity 
and dependent children, and practically all the special assessments 
for local improvements, arising in the great City of Chicago. The 
County Court then also had jurisdiction over insolvency proceed- 
ings, a class of cases now handled in the Federal Bankruptcy Court. 
The county judgeship then, as it is now, was an intensely political 
office, the more so because the county judge has charge of all election 
matters and upon his personal integrity and impartiality greatly 
depend the integrity and fairness of local elections. The office is 
the rock on which many a promising political career might easily 
be wrecked. Nothing therefore could have been more satisfying to 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1179 

Judge Carter, with the possible exception of his recent practically 
unanimous election to the Supreme Court, than his election in 1902 
without opposition as county judge of Cook County. For eleven 
and a half years he capably performed the onerous duties connected 
with the office in the most populous county of the state. 

He resigned, in 1906 when elected a justice of the Illinois Su- 
preme Court. During the last ten years Judge Carter has written 
many of the notable opinions emanating from the Supreme bench 
of Illinois, and his own personality and character have conferred 
distinction on that tribunal. 

A number of cases in which Judge Carter has written the opin- 
ions have involved important principles of law, which by his decisions 
have been definitely settled and imbedded in the structure of Illi- 
nois jurisprudence. While these can be found in the Illinois Su- 
preme Court Reports of the last ten years, a brief reference to some 
of the more important cases and the legal questions involved can- 
not be out of place in this article. In People v. Pfanschmidt, 262 
111. 411, it was held that bloodhound testimony, so-called, was never 
admissible in the trial of any case in court ; that such evidence is 
unsafe and unreliable, and this opinion, besides a careful review of 
all the cases where bloodhounds were used, also contains an illumi- 
nating discussion as to the proper rules under which confessions of 
the accused can be received in court. People v. Jennings, 252 111. 
534, was the first decision by any court of last resort in this coun- 
try holding finger print evidence admissible as a means of identifica- 
tion. 

Besides its great importance for the financial sums involved, spe- 
cial interest attaches to the case of State v. Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, 246 111. 188, because! of the discussion of fundamentals 
incident to the main decision. This suit involved a dispute over 
fifteen million dollars taxes bet\\en the state and the railroad com- 
pany as well as the method by which its future taxes should be 
computed. In the opinion is found an exhaustive discussion of the 
rules as to stating accounts. Practice and procedure in the courts 
have recently been subject to much criticism on the part of the 
public. Judge Carter's views of this important subject are stated in 
this opinion as follows : "Rules of pleading should facilitate get- 
ting at the real facts of an action in a legal, orderly manner, but 
should not place practically insurmountable obstacles in the way of 
investigating such facts. Such rules should promote and not im- 
pede the administration of justice." The layman as well as the 
lawyer has had an interest in the discussion, found in this opinion, 
on the proper relations between public authorities and corporations, 
especially in the following words : "It is frequently charged that 
'corporations have no souls.' While this may be true as to the cor- 
porate entities themselves it should not be true as to the men who 
manage and control them. In this day, when a large part of the 
business of the country and the world is owned and carried on by 



1180 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

corporations, the highest interests of corporations require on the 
part of their officials every effort to convince the public that the 
corporations are obeying the law and keeping within their charter 
powers." 

Some of the other opinions written by Judge Carter and involv- 
ing important questions of law are : C., R. I. & P. Railway Com- 
pany v. People, 222 111. 427, discussing the rights of railroad cor- 
porations in the streets of municipalities. City of Peoria v. Central 
National Bank, 224 111. 43, in which are considered exhaustively the 
riparian rights along the Illinois River. Goodwillie Co. v. Com- 
monwealth Co., 241 111. 42, containing an elaborate review of ease- 
ments and other important real estate rights. Stitzel v. Miller, 250 
111. 72, in which rules are laid down as to proper methods for com- 
paring forged signatures with those that are genuine. Sebree v. 
Board of Education, 254 111. 438, which discusses appraisement and 
arbitration and establishes methods as to revaluation of very valu- 
able property of the Board of Education of Chicago under long 
term leases. Warner v. Mettler, 260 111. 416, takes up the power 
of a Court of Chancery as to trusts and the rules that should gov- 
ern the examination of the trustee's accounting and reports. Chap- 
man v. American Surety Co., 261 111. 594, considers at some length 
the powers of equity courts in matters relating to guardian and ward. 
People v. Brady, 262 111. 578, decided important constitutional ques- 
tions as to the passage of bills by the Legislature and also other 
constitutional questions as to civil service. In Alton & Southern 
Railroad v. Vandalia Railroad Company, 268 111. 68, are found 
valuable rules as to the control by the state of the rights of railroads 
in crossing each other's right of way. 

A special honor paid Judge Carter in 1912 and illustrating his 
high standing with the Illinois bench and bar was his unanimous en- 
dorsement by the Chicago Bar Association for the then existing 
vacancy on the United States Supreme Court. In the last public 
address made by the late Justice A. K. Vickers of the Illinois Su- 
preme Court in December, 1914, in speaking of Judge Carter before 
the Chicago Bar Association, he said that no more efficient or valu- 
able member had ever sat on the Supreme Court of the State of 
Illinois. It would not be difficult to find, abundant illustration, in 
word as well as in deed, for all that has been said concerning Judge 
Carter's position as a lawyer and judge. Perhaps nowhere was the 
force of general opinion better expressed than in the convention 
in the spring of 1915 when Judge Carter was renominated for his 
present office. A brief quotation of the words of Judge Charles S. 
Cutting, who made the principal nominating speech deserves inser- 
tion here : "There was, years ago more than twenty a man 
selected for judicial position in the County of Cook. He filled that 
position so admirably that even our opponents gave him almost the 
full measure of their approval, and he was elected again and again 
without opposition. He was promoted to that great court of ours 



COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 1181 

which has no superior, save only its greater prototype at Washing- 
ton, and he has there served ably and well. The children of his 
brain, as we find them in the records of this state, are accurate, terse, 
and complete. During all the time that we have known him no man 
has ever dared to link his name with scandal or dishonor. His 
mental constitution is such that a wilful wrong would be an utter 
impossibility. So in this day, when his natural aptitude for, the 
position which he so ably fills has been ripened and enlarged by the 
experience which has come to him during the last nine years, it is 
no wonder that almost without exception the bar asks his renomina- 
tion and that the people themselves again and again have expressed 
a satisfaction with his work." 

The writer of this article cannot refrain from quoting also some 
of the words of Mr. Lessing Rosenthal, who seconded the nomina- 
tion of Judge Carter: "We are all familiar," said Mr. Rosenthal, 
"with his sober sense, his open mindedness, his fairness, his impar- 
tiality, and above all his painstaking labor, his unflagging industry 
and the assiduity with which he has always devoted himself to his 
judicial office. He has reflected great credit upon the party to 
which he happens to belong. And it is not because he happens to 
belong to that party so much as because he has faithfully discharged 
the duties of his office that we are here assembled to renominate him 
today. No greater tribute, to my notion,, can be paid to a judge than 
to have the high esteem of his fellow judges; and this Judge Carter 
has." 

Continuing Mr. Rosenthal said: "In and out of court Judge 
Carter has always devoted himself to matters that make for the wel- 
fare of the community. It was only a day or two ago that I read 
what I want to read to this convention now, a tribute that was paid 
to him by a professor of law familiar with the greatest legal minds 
not only in the United States but on the continent of Europe, a man 
who had no particular reason for saying what he did, other than 
it was merited, for he is a mfui who does not practice in the Supreme 
Court of Illinois. . . . Judge Carter has published a book en- 
titled 'The Ethics of the. Legal Profession.' John H. Wigmore, of 
the Northwestern University, a man of the highest ability, in com- 
menting on this work said : 'The present book takes a large view 
of the law as a profession, and marshals all its traditions of behavior 
in ample order. And if there is any member of the profession more 
fitted than the author, with the varied learning necessary for this 
exposition, more keenly alive to the profession's responsibilities 
today, more alert and useful, laboring in manifold ways to discharge 
this responsibility, I do not know it.' " 

The substance of one other speech at the nominating convention 
is pertinent to this brief article because of its specific reference to 
Judge Carter's term on the bench of the County Court. Mr. Otto 
Butz, in seconding the nomination, said that he first knew Judge 
Carter when the latter entered his larger public career as judge of 



1182 COURTS AND LAWYERS OF ILLINOIS 

the County Court. He said : "At that time the law relating to the 
making of public improvements and collecting therefor by special 
assessments was in a state of chaos. The reciprocal rights of the 
municipal authorities, the contractors and the lot-owners, were in 
such an uncertain condition that collections were constantly inter- 
fered with by appeals to the Supreme Court. And there was a 
time when a special assessment judgment stood a chance of one out 
of two, of being reversed in the Supreme Court because of some 
error, some uncertainty, some injustice that prevailed. It was the 
patient, calm judgment of our candidate and the influence he ob- 
tained by reason of his ability and of his convincing powers of 
eloquence with the people, at the bar and in the Legislature, by 
which our present special assessment law has become a means of 
properly protecting the rights of lot owners and the contractor, still 
enabling the city to make those public improvements that are neces- 
sary. Under the administration of that law millions of dollars are 
being expended in Cook County every year, and the reversal of 
special assessment cases is now almost unknown. . . . This 
change for the better we owe to the man whom we intend to place in 
nomination today. It was his good judgment that enabled us to 
produce these great results." 

Reference has already been made to Judge Carter's authorship 
of "Ethics of the Legal Profession;" he has written many articles 
of interest and value to the legal profession, and has also become, 
known as an orator. His style is simple, effective, interesting. His 
address on Lincoln, whom he greatly admires, is of a very high order. 
Judge Carter served as chairman of the Chicago Charter Conven- 
tion during 1905-06, was president of the American Institute of 
Criminal Law and Criminology in 1912-13, and was chairman of the 
Judicial Section, American Bar Association, in 1913-16. He is an 
active member of the Union League, Hamilton and Congregational 
clubs. Judge Carter's home is in Evanston. He was married at 
Morris, Illinois, August I, 1881, to Miss Nettie J. Steven. Their 
two children are Allan J. and Ruth G. 

ALBERT H. VEEDER, who began the practice of law in Chicago 
more than forty years ago, was born at Fonda, Montgomery county, 
New York, April i, 1844, a son of Henry and Rachel (Lansing) 
Veeder. After completing the course of the common schools he 
entered Union College at Schenectady, New. York, where he was 
graduated in 1865. Coming west soon afterwards he was superin- 
tendent of schools at Galva, Illinois, from 1866 to 1868, and at the 
same time carried on his law studies. Admitted to the bar in 1868, 
he remained at Galva in active practice until 1874, and then removed 
to Englewood, Chicago, and has been a prominent member of the 
Chicago bar ever since. 

For a number of years he has been general counsel and director 
of the St. Louis National Stock Yards Company, and is also general