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Full text of "Craddock, Kinder, Rogers, and Sheldon families"

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Donated to the Family 


History 


Library 


by 


Shel don 


F Craddock 




PO Box 


3189 








Incl ine 


Vilj 


age 


NV 


89450 







31815 8/88 Printed in USA 



0380502 



CRABBOCK, K1NBER, ROGERS, ANB 
SHELDON FAMILIES 



PRINCIPALLY IN NEW ENGLAND, NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, 

CALIFORNIA, AND OREGON 



SHELDON FORBES CRADDOCK 



DATE MICROFILMED 
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PROJECT and G. S 

ROLL # CALL # 

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FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
35 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84150 



Copyright© 1999 by 
Sheldon Forbes Craddock 
PO Box 3189 
Incline Village, Nevada 89450 



Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 99-70622 
Printed by Wylie's Copy Center, Carson City, Nevada 
Binding by CAL-NA Bindery, Sacramento, California 



-rti 9&>2\°i 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction i 

Numbering Systems ii 

Abbreviations and Conventions iii 



Chart I 
Chart II 
Chart m 
Chart IV 
Chart V 
Chart VI 
Chart VH 
Chart Vm 
Chart EX 
Chart X 
Chart XI 



Map A 

MapB 

MapC 

MapD 

MapE 

Map F 

MapG 

MapH 

Appendix 1 
Appendix 2 
Appendix 3 
Appendix 4 
Appendix 5 
Appendix 6 
Appendix 7 



Sheldon Forbes Craddock 1 

Alfred G. Chauncey 28 

Louisa Elliott 66 

Joseph Rogers 82 

Lydia Carpenter 122 

Asa Parker 150 

Laura Whitney 172 

Horace Sheldon 184 

Caroline Cross 216 

Aretas Rising 226 

Lucy Maria Seymour 252 



Note: Biographies follow each of the above eleven charts. 



Appendix 8 
Appendix 9 
Appendix 10 

References 

Index of Ancestors 



Southern Portion of Maine 297 

Southern New England and Portion of New York State 298 

New England Confederation 1643-1684 300 

New France in the Early 1700s 301 

New York City Area and Portion of New Jersey 302 

Provinces and Counties of Ireland 303 

Coos Bay Area, Oregon 304 

Portion of Shasta County, California 305 

European Exploration and Settlement in the Americas 1492-1620 309 

Plymouth Colony 1620-1691 315 

Massachusetts Bay Colony 319 

First Migrations to the Connecticut River Valley 1633-1636 323 

New Haven Colony 1638-1665 327 

Nantucket Island 329 

Colonial Wars before the Revolution: 333 

Pequot War 1637 333 

King Philip's War 1675-1677 334 

French and Indian Wars 1690-1763 338 

The Scot-Irish 343 



Coos Bay Area, Oregon. 



.347 

Shasta County, California 349 

359 
381 



INTRODUCTION 



The purpose of this book is to trace 
my ancestral lines back to the immigrant 
ancestor in each line. To a large extent this 
has been accomplished. I have identified 
more than 650 individuals with sufficient 
information to prepare biographies. About 
250 more individuals have been identified by 
name only. 

I have selected the surnames of my 
four grandparents as the title for this book 
and the general location of all of my 
American ancestors as the subtitle. The 
majority of my ancestors lived in the New 
England states, with lesser numbers in 
New Jersey and New York, and a few 
lived in California and Oregon. My 
ancestry is about three-fourths English and 
one-fourth Irish, with a little Dutch thrown 
in. (See (204) Daniel 1 Cooper on Chart 
IX.) By religion, the majority of my 
ancestors were Protestants, with many 
Quakers, and even four Shakers. (See (72) 
Israel Chauncey on Chart II.) 

Many of my ancestral lines go 
back to the earliest migrations from 
England to the New England colonies in 
the period 1620-1640. The most recent 
immigrants in my ancestral lines are three 
sets of great, great grandparents, who 
came to the United States in the period 



1825-1850. Joseph Craddock and his 
wife came to this country from England in 
1825. William Kinder and Thomas 
Forbes both came to this country from 
Ireland with their wives in the 1840s. All 
six of these people are on Chart I. 

This book is composed of four 
parts: family history charts, biographies, 
maps, and appendices. There are eleven 
family history charts, each followed by 
biographies pertaining to the individuals 
on the charts. The charts are identified by 
Roman numerals, I to XI, and by the name 
of the first person on each chart. On the 
charts the husband's name is always above 
the wife's name except for the last two 
columns on Charts II to XI where (for 
space) both names are on the same line. 
The charts and accompanying biographies 
are followed by eight maps and then by 
ten appendices. 

The appendices contain brief 
histories of early events in the principal 
areas where my ancestors lived. They are 
included to place my ancestors in 
geographical and historical context. For 
New England only events prior to the 
American Revolution are treated. 



NUMBERING SYSTEMS 



Three numbering systems are used 
in this book. The first is a set of Roman 
numerals used for the family history 
charts, I through XI. 

The second is the conventional 
genealogical numbering system of Arabic 
numbers used to identify each ancestor. 
My identification number is 1. My 
father's identification number is 2 and my 
mother's is 3. This system continues 
through each preceding generation. The 
husband is always given an even number 
and the wife is always given an odd 
number, one number higher than her 
husband The number for a father is 
always twice that of his son or daughter. 
Within the body of the text these ancestor 
numbers are enclosed in parentheses. 



The third system of numbers is a 
set of superscript Arabic numbers used 
after the ancestor's given name to indicate 
the generation of that person with the same 
surname, starting with the first ancestor in 
America as number 1. When parents and 
children came to America at the same 
time, and even in the rare cases when a 
child came before the parent the first 
ancestor is always the parent. 

On the subject of numbers, in the 
first generation back there are two parents. 
In the second generation back there are 
four grandparents. In the third generation 
there are eight great grandparents and the 
total is already fourteen ancestors. 
Continuing: 



Generation 
back 

3rd 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 

10th 

11th 

12th 

13th 



Relationship 

great grandparents 
2nd great grandparents 
3rd great grandparents 
4th great grandparents 
5th great grandparents 
6th great grandparents 
7th great grandparents 
8th great grandparents 
9th great grandparents 
10th great grandparents 
1 1 th great grandparents 



Ancestors in 


Total 


that generation 


ancestors 


8 


14 


16 


30 


32 


62 


64 


126 


128 


254 


256 


510 


512 


1,022 


1,024 


2,046 


2,048 


4,094 


4,096 


8,190 


8,192 


16,382 



Most people with colonial ancestors are now in the tenth to thirteenth generation of 
descendants from the immigrant. 



ABBREVIATIONS AND CONVENTIONS 



aft 

b 

bapt 

d 

d.y 

m 

P 

PP 

v 



after 

born 

baptized 

died 

died young 

married 

page 

pages 

volume 



City, county, state 
(or country): 



Collateral ancestor: 
Double dates: 



Forebear: 

GPC: 

NEHGS: 
Superscripts: 

Underlining: 

Unknown: 

(?): 

(1252): 

(Jones): 
1645- 1705: 



If the city is well-known the county and state names may be omitted. If the 
city and county are of the same name the county name is omitted. County 
names are shown even though the county may not have been formed at the 
time. 

A relative descended from the same ancestors but not in my direct line, i.e., 
aunts, uncles and cousins. 

For example, February 8, 1672/73. In the old style calendar the year began 
in March. In the new style calendar, which we use today, the year begins in 
January. The double dates apply to years before the calendar changeover in 
1752 and are used only for dates from January 1 to March 25 in those years. 
In this book dates are given as shown in the reference source. 

This word is used interchangeably with ancestor for persons as recent as my 
great, great grandparents. 

Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, MD. 

New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA. 

The superscript number after a person's given name indicates the generation 
starting with the first ancestor of that surname in America as number one. 
Superscripts are not used where there is no ambiguity. 

Indicates the person is my direct-line ancestor. The word ancestor used by 
itself means my direct-line ancestor. Underlining is not used where there is 
no ambiguity. 

Unknown to the author at the time of publication. 
Means the preceding name is uncertain. 

A number in parentheses preceding a person's name indicates the ancestor 
number. These parentheses are not used in the index. 

A name in parentheses is a maiden name. 

Year of birth and year of death. Unknown years are left blank. 



in 



CHART I 



CHARLES 

ALFRED 3 

CRADDOCK 



WARREN 
NICHOLAS 4 
CRADDOCK 



1895-1992 



1865 - 1947 



EMMA J. 9 
ROGERS 



1869- 1911 



SHELDON 
1 FORBES 5 
CRADDOCK 
1921 - 



WALTER 
SEYMOUR 8 
SHELDON 



EDrTH 
ALLENE 9 
SHELDON 



1896- 1976 



1869- 1948 



JENNIE 3 
KINDER 



1871 - 1941 



The superscript number after each person's 
given name indicates the generation of that 
person with the same surname, starting with 
the first ancestor in America as number 1 . 

The Roman numerals at the far right show 
the continuation chart for this family line. 

Biographies follow this chart. 



JOHN 2 16 

CRADDOCK 



1831 - 1922 



1842-1934 



1834 - 1930 



DELIA M. 8 
PARKER 



1833 - 1922 



JOSEPH 
ERASTUS 7 
SHELDON 



1832-1900 



FRANCES 



1841 - 



1834-1891 



MARY 2 
FORBES 



1842 - 1924 



17 



ELOTIA 
RICH 8 18 

CHAUNCEY 



STEPHEN 
CARPENTER 8 x 
ROGERS 



21 



2? 



24 



25 



CATHERINE 7 * 
RISING 



27 



FREDERICK 2 S 
KINDER 



29 



30 



JOSEPH 1 CRADDOCK 



1805 - bef. 1840 



MARY 1 WASS 



1805- 1886 



ALFRED G. 7 CHAUNCEY rj 



1815- 1888 



LOUISA ELLIOTT 



1813 -abt 1848 



JOSEPH 7 ROGERS 



1801 - 1891 



LYDIA 6 CARPENTER 



1806-1890 



ASA 7 PARKER 



1790-1878 



LAURA 6 WHITNEY 



1797-1887 



HORACE" SHELDON 



1802-1888 



CAROLINE CROSS 



1806-1873 



ARETAS 6 RISING 



m 



IV 



VI 



vn 



vm 



IX 



1801 - 1884 



LUCY MARIA 7 SEYMOUR XI 



1809- 1882 



WILLIAM 1 KINDER 



1811-1898 



JANE 1 GORMAN 



1807- 1887 



THOMAS 1 FORBES 



1816-1860 



ELIZA 1 SLOANE 



1815- 1888 



Chart I Biographies 



1. Sheldon Forbes 5 Craddock 



Born in Atascadero, San Luis Obispo, California on May 14, 1921. 

Married Louise Holler in Los Angeles on June 17, 1950. Louise was born in Los Angeles on 

February 23, 1929. Her parents were Wesley C. Holler, Sr. and Marian Giessing. 
Louise and I have two sons: 

1 . Wesley Warren , b. November 28, 1952 in Orange, California. 

2. Dale Forbes , b. February 20, 1955 in Newport Beach, Orange, California. 
Other information: 

Although I was born in Atascadero my parents lived twelve miles north in Paso 
Robles. There was no hospital there, the closest one being in Atascadero. When I was one 
year old we moved to Ventura, California and when I was about eight we moved to Los 
Angeles. I graduated from Los Angeles High School in February 1939 and matriculated at 
UCLA. In September 1941 1 transferred to the University of California at Berkeley earning 
a bachelor's degree in June 1943. 

In August 1943 I entered the service and graduated from the Army Ordnance 
Officers' Candidate School at Aberdeen, Maryland on December 31, 1943. On D-Day 
1944 I was on a troopship of replacements enroute to England where I was assigned to an 
ordnance company. The company landed in Normandy on July 3, 1944. In November I 
transferred to the Army Engineers and served with them until I came home in July 1946, 
having spent twenty-five months with the Army in Europe during World War II. 

In September 1946 I returned to Berkeley and earned a master's degree in 
February 1948. Both of my degrees were in petroleum engineering. My professional 
career was spent with Chevron Corporation in California, starting in February 1948. 

Louise and I were married in 1950 and moved to Orange County where we lived 
for twenty-three years, the first thirteen years in Corona del Mar and then ten years in 
Tustin. In 1973 I was transferred to San Francisco and upon my retirement in 1983 we 
moved to Lake Tahoe at Incline Village, Nevada. 

2. Warren Nicholas Craddock 

Born in Bandon, Coos, Oregon on November 23, 1895. 

Died in Alhambra, Los Angeles, California on November 9, 1992. Cremains buried in Redding 

Cemetery in Redding, Shasta, California. 
Married Edith Allene 9 Sheldon in New Rochelle, Westchester, New York on May 25, 1920. 
The children of Warren and Edith are: 

1. Sheldon Forbes 5 , b. May 14, 1921 in Atascadero, San Luis Obispo, California, 
m. Louise Holler of Los Angeles on June 17, 1950. 

2. Roger Warren 5 , b. April 7, 1926 in Ventura, California, m. Iris Klorer of Beverly 
Hills, California on May 16, 1953. 

3. Marian Louise 5 , b. April 8, 1931 in Los Angeles, m. Andrew Dunlap of San 
Marino, California on October 23, 1954. 

Other information: 

About 1900 Warren moved with his family from Bandon to Redding where they 
lived on West Street across from the county courthouse. He entered the University of 
California at Berkeley in the fall of 1915 but his schooling was interrupted by World War I. 



Chart I Biographies 

He enlisted in November 1917 and went to France in January 1918 as an enlisted man in 
the Army Engineers. He was promoted to second lieutenant in June 1918 and served on 
General Pershing's staff. After the Armistice the Army sent him to the University of Lyon 
in France for a semester. He was discharged from the Army in July 1919. Upon returning 
to the University of California he graduated with a bachelor's degree in minerals (geology 
and engineering) in December 1919. 

Warren started working as a geologist for Shell Oil Company in Paso Robles and 
then was transferred to Ventura in 1922. In 1929 he accepted the position as chief 
engineer for Pacific Western Oil Corporation (later Getty Oil Company) and moved to Los 
Angeles. From 1956 to 1960 he worked for Getty in Calgary, Alberta, Canada as manager 
of drilling and production operations. He retired in Los Angeles in 1960. 

3. Edith Allene Sheldon 

Her middle name has also been spelled Alene, Aline, and Alline. 

Born in Brooklyn, New York on December 10, 1896. The family lived in the Brooklyn Heights 

area. 
Died in Los Angeles, California on January 31, 1976. Cremains at sea in Santa Monica Bay, 

California. 
Married Warren Nicholas Craddock at her parents' home in New Rochelle, Westchester, New 

York on May 25, 1920. 
Other information: 

In 1 90 1 at age four, Edith moved to Ridgewood, New Jersey with her family and 

then sometime before 1 906 the family moved to New Rochelle, New York. 

Edith and her mother, Jennie" (Kinder) Sheldon , spent part of the summer of 1917 

in Portland, Oregon at the home of Jennie's brother, James F. Kinder. While in Portland 

Edith decided to go to the University of California at Berkeley. She enrolled there in the 

fall of 1917 and that is where she met her future husband, Warren Nicholas 4 Craddock . 

She left college at the end of 1919 and they were married in May 1920. 

4. Charles Alfred 3 Craddock 

Bom in Shasta, California on March 13, 1865. 

Died in Redding Shasta, California on November 21, 1947. Buried in Redding Cemetery. 
Married first, Emma J 9 Rogers in Coos County, Oregon on September 20, 1893. 
The children of Charles and Emma, all except John born in Bandon, Coos, Oregon, were: 
1 Margaret , d.y 

Warren Nicholas 4 , b November 23, 1895, m. Edith Allene 9 Sheldon 
Allan Roger 4 , b 1899, m Kathryn Turtle She died in 1982 and he died in 1988. 
They had two sons, John and David. 
4 John Charles , b 1903 in Redding d at age twenty-one. 

Married second, Mrs Eva (Hull) Landers in Redding She died in 1935. There were no children 

from this union. 
Other information 

Charles left Shasta and moved to Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho where his aunt, Mrs. 
Martha Chauncey Coburn, lived Subsequently, he moved to Coquille, Coos, Oregon 



Chart I Biographies 

where he met Emma Rogers. After Charles and Emma were married in 1893 they lived in 
Bandon where Charles worked in a men's clothing store. About 1900 the family moved to 
Redding where Charles lived for the remainder of his life. He was a Redding trustee (city 
councilman) and he owned a men's clothing store in the Craddock Building which had been 
built by his father, John 2 Craddock . in 1902. 
References: #4, #5, U.S. census records for Idaho, and Charles' draft record. 

5. Emma J. Rogers 

Also known as Emeline Julia Rogers. 

Born in Glens Falls, Warren, New York on May 6, 1869. 

Died in Redding, Shasta, California on December 31, 1911 at age forty-two from heart failure 

indirectly caused by asthma. Buried in Redding Cemetery. 
Married Charles Alfred Craddock on September 20, 1893 at the home of her parents on the south 

fork of the Coos River in Coos County, Oregon. 
Other information: 

Emma came to Coos County with her parents when she was about one year old. 
References: #4, #5, and Emma's death record. 

6. Walter Seymour Sheldon 

Born in SufEeld, Hartford, Connecticut on February 10, 1869. 

Died in Los Angeles, California on February 25, 1948. Cremains buried with his second wife in the 

Warwick Cemetery in Warwick, Orange, New York where she was born. 
Married first, Jennie 3 Kinder in Jersey City, Hudson, New Jersey on October 4, 1892. Both Walter 

and Jennie were living in Brooklyn at the time of their marriage. See the biography for 

Walter's father-in-law, (14) Frederick 2 Kinder . 
The children of Walter and Jennie were: 

1. Anna 9 , b. March 9, 1894, d.y. 

2. Edith Allene 9 . b. December 10, 1896 in Brooklyn, New York, m. Warren 
Nicholas 4 Craddock . They had three children, Sheldon, Roger, and Marian. 

3. Marian Louise 9 , b. January 8, 1899 in Brooklyn, m. Chester T. Hubbell, Jr. of 
Albany, New York. They had two daughters, Louise and Jane. 

4. Alan Forbes 9 , b. September 6, 1901 in Ridgewood, Bergen, New Jersey, m. 
Edythe Storey of Ontario, Canada, no children. 

5. Frederic Horace 9 , b. September 18, 1910 in New Rochelle, Westchester, New 
York, m. Elaine Perry of Albany, New York. They had two children, William and 
Sandra. 

Married second, Mrs. Jane (Wisner) Clark in Los Angeles in 1942. There were no children from 
this union. 

Other information: 

Walter and Jennie first lived in the Brooklyn Heights area of Brooklyn. In his early 
career Walter was the secretary for an insurance company in New York City. By 
September 1901 the family had moved to Ridgewood, New Jersey. Sometime before 1906 
the family moved to New Rochelle, Westchester, New York where Walter was listed as 
the president of a lime company. By 1925 he was a stockbroker and bond salesman on 



Chart I Biographies 



Wall Street and suffered financial ruin in the 1929 crash of the market. After the crash of 
1929 Walter and his wife, Jennie, moved from New Rochelle to Spencertown, Columbia, 
New York where Jennie died in August 1941. After her death Walter moved to Los 
Angeles to be near his daughter, Edith Sheldon Craddock . 
References: #1, #2, #3, #186, #208, census records for 1900, 1915, 1920, and 1925, and birth 
records for Walter's children. 

7. Jennie Kinder 

Also known as Jane Kinder. 

Born in Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester, New York on June 1, 1871. 

Died in Spencertown, Columbia, New York on August 5, 1941. Buried in the Mount Hope 

Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson. 
Married Walter Seymour Sheldon in Jersey City, Hudson, New Jersey on October 4, 1892 at age 

twenty-one 
Other information: 

Jennie lived in Hastings-on-Hudson with her parents, Frederick Kinder and Mary 
Forbes , until 1 889 when the family moved to Brooklyn, New York. Jennie was eighteen at 
the time. Her father died two years later when she was twenty. 

According to the marriage record for Jennie and Walter this was Jennie's second 
marriage. However, her first marriage was unknown to any of her grandchildren and may 
have been annulled. 

Jennie and Walter were married by her uncle, Rev. William Eakins, in the 
parsonage of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church in Jersey City. According to the 
report in the Jersey City Nws family members in attendance were: 

Mrs F. Kinder Qvtrs. Frederick Kinder, Jennie's mother, Mary (Forbes) Kinder) 

James and George Kinder (Jennie's two younger brothers) 

Mr. George Forbes (relationship unknown; possibly was William Forbes, 

Jewiie's uncle, and newspaper confused name with George Kinder) 
Miss Eliza Forbes (relationship unknown) 

Mr and Mrs Sheldon of Hamburgh, New Jersey (Walter's parents) 
Miss Ella Sheldon (Walter's only sibling) 
Information in parenthesis added by author. 
References: # 1 , #2, #3, #208, and marriage certificate. 

8. John Craddock 

Born in St Louis, Missouri on November 30, 1831. 

Died in Redding, Shasta, California on December 10, 1922. Buried in Redding Cemetery. 

Married Elotia Rich 8 Chauncey at the home of her father on the east fork of Clear Creek near 

French Gulch, Shasta, California on November 12, 1861. 
The children of John and Elotia, all born in the town of Shasta, were: 

1 Ella , b 1862, d at age thirteen 

2 Charles Alfred 3 , b. March 13,1 865, m Emma J 9 Rogers . 



Chart I Biographies 

3. Edith Louisa 3 , b. 1867, m. Nathaniel Dickey at age forty-five. Lived on a ranch 
near French Gulch, California. Later they moved to Oakland, California. No 
children. 

4. Chauncey J. (Chan) 3 , b. 1869, m. Ada Bell of Eureka, Humboldt, California. 
Chauncey ran a business college in Eureka. Chauncey and Ada had two children: 
Ella and Harriet. 

5. Mary Rose , b. 1875, m. Edward Lohmeyer and lived in San Francisco. Mary 
Rose and Edward had two children: Edward and Lester. 

6. Edna Adelaide 3 , b. 1878, m. Robert Newman and lived in Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Edna and Robert had one child, Ruth, who died in 1941. 

Other information: 

By the time John was ten years old (1841) he was working in a livery stable in 
Alton, Madison, Illinois, which is across the river from St. Louis where he was born. His 
father, Joseph 1 Craddock , had died and his mother, Mary 1 Wass Craddock , was remarried 
in May 1840 to William Everingham who lived in Alton. Mary had two children by 
William: William, Jr. and Mary. 

About 1850 John, age nineteen, left the Everingham household. And in 1853 he 
joined a group of people from Alton, including a Mr. W. W. Smith, who were planning to 
go west to California. The Alton group proceeded to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where they 
joined with others and a train of 300 wagons was formed. John drove a four-horse team 
belonging to Mr. Smith. The wagon train left Council Bluffs at the end of March and 
arrived in the booming gold-rush town of Shasta on August 13, 1853. The train followed 
the Oregon-California Trail and branched off on the new Nobles Trail to reach Shasta. See 
Appendix 10 for a discussion of emigrant wagon trains coming west. 

At Shasta, John became a stage driver. Over the years his routes were from Colusa 
to Tehama, from Tehama to Shasta, from Shasta to French Gulch, from Shasta to Trinity 
Center, and from Shasta to Weaverville. In April 1866 he was promoted to station agent in 
Shasta for his company, the California and Oregon Stage Company. The company was 
dispatching stages for places as far away as Chico and Sacramento, California and 
Portland, Oregon. He was station agent at least until May 1874. 

By the mid- 1870s John was in the livery business for himself. At one time or 
another he owned one livery stable in Shasta and two in Redding. One of the stables in 
Redding had a meeting hall on the second floor where dances and other public affairs were 
held. The stable in Shasta and one of the two in Redding were destroyed by fire but in 
1902 John built the beautiful, two-story, masonry Craddock building at the northwest 
corner of Market and Butte Streets adjoining his one remaining stable in Redding. For 
many years the Craddock Building was used for stores and for the city hall. The building 
was razed in 1970 and the property is now incorporated as part of the Redding Mall. 

John commuted between Redding and his home in Shasta until 1910. Then at age 

seventy-nine he and his wife, Elotia, moved into quarters in the Craddock Building where 

they lived until he died in 1922 at age ninety-one. Elotia then moved to Oakland, 

California and lived with her daughter Edith. 

References: #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #10, #57, #165, p. 210, #316, p. 18, and #335, pp. 434, 437, 

and 598. 



Chart I Biographies 

9. Elotia Rich 8 Chauncev 

Bom in Aurora, Kane, Illinois on October 14, 1842. 

Died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Edith (Craddock) Dickey, in Oakland, California on March 
3, 1934. Elotia's cremains are buried in Redding Cemetery in Redding, Shasta, California. 

Married John : Craddock at the home of her father on the east fork of Clear Creek near French 
Gulch, Shasta, California on November 12, 1861. 

Other information: 

Elotia and her husband-to-be, John Craddock, came across the plains in separate 
wagon trains; he in 1853 and she in 1854. Elotia was twelve at the time. She came in a 
covered wagon with her father, Alfred G. 7 Chauncev , her stepmother, Eliza Houghtaling, 
and three sisters. Before she was married Elotia was a teacher in Shasta County schools. 
See Appendix 10 for a discussion of emigrant wagon trains coming west. 

References: #4, #5, #6, #9, and #57. 

10. Stephen Carpenter Rogers 

Bom in Danby, Rutland, Vermont on November 24, 1 834. 

Died at his home on the south fork of the Coos River in Coos County, Oregon in June 1930. 
Buried in Coos River Cemetery. 

Q 

Married Delia M Parker about 1859, probably in Granville, Washington, New York. 

The children of Stephen and Delia, all except Nellie bom in Glens Falls, Warren, New York, were: 

1. Herbert H , b. 1861, m. Amelia Fitzgerald. 

2. Cynthia , b. 1863, m. A.J. Sherwood. 

3. Frank , b. about 1866, m. Essie Coflfelt. 

4. Emma J 9 , b. May 6, 1 869, m. Charles Alfred 3 Craddock . 

Nellie , probably bom in Oregon in 1874, m. first, Wyatt Coflfelt, m. second, 



Ellzey. 



Other information: 

Shortly before Stephen married Delia and while he was living in Granville he 
purchased a brickyard in Glens Falls. The 1 860 census shows that Stephen and Delia had 
moved to Glens Falls They had no children at that time but there were four laborers living 
with them in their home which was a well-fumished, sixteen-room, brick house. 

In 1 865 the census for Glens Falls shows that Stephen and Delia had two children 
and that there were also six other young men in the household. Stephen and all of these six 
other men were listed as brick makers. Land records show that Stephen and Delia sold the 
brickyard in Glens Falls in 1869. In 1870 they moved to Coos County, Oregon where 
Stephen's parents and his brothers, Amos 8 Rogers and Anson 8 Rogers, were living. It is 
not known how Stephen and his family came west but they probably came by ship and 
overland at the Isthmus of Panama by rail. The railroad across the isthmus had been 
completed in 1855 

When Stephen arrived in Coos County he bought a farm on the south fork of the 
Coos River about eight miles east of Marshfield (now the town of Coos Bay) near where 
his brother, Anson, had settled Stephen soon had a kiln on his Coos River farm and was 
selling quantities of bricks to his neighbors. He also had a fine dairy herd and followed 
Anson into the cheese making business. Stephen was a very enterprising person. In 

8 



Chart I Biographies 

addition to his brick and dairy businesses he owned and operated several steam and 
gasoline-powered boats on the Coos River. These boats carried passengers, mail, and 
freight to and from the farms along the Coos River and the towns on Coos Bay. 

On November 1, 1902 the citizens of Coos River met in Marshfield to form a 
cemetery association. Stephen was one of the people present and Anson was elected 
chairman. The purpose of the association was to purchase land for the cemetery and then 
to plot, fence, and improve the property which became the Coos River Cemetery. 

Stephen had been raised in a Quaker family in Vermont but in Coos County he 
became active in the United Brethren Church. Locally, Stephen was known both as 
Captain Rogers and as Uncle Stephen. At the time of his death in 1930 he owned and lived 
on one of the finest dairy farms on the Coos River. He also owned all or part of about 
fifteen other real estate parcels in Marshfield, North Bend, and Empire. Stephen's obituary 
says he hailed from Tioga County, New York. I can find no evidence for this and I believe 
the writer confused Tioga County with the local area in Coos County known as the Tioga 
Country. 
References: #11 p. 563, #12, pp. 341 and 568, #13 pp. 166-167, #14, pp. 23-25, 54, 69-78, 

102-105, and 215-219, #57, #233, and Stephen's will and probate record on file in 

Coquille, Coos, Oregon. 

11. Delia M. 8 Parker 

Born in Granville, Washington, New York on November 24, 1833. 

Died at her home on the south fork of the Coos River in Coos County, Oregon on January 20, 
1922. Buried in Coos River Cemetery. 

o 

Married Stephen Carpenter Rogers about 1859, probably in Granville. 
References: #12, p. 568 and #57. 

12. Joseph Erastus Sheldon 

Born in Basking Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey on July 21, 1832. 

Died in Hamburg, Sussex, New Jersey on February 24, 1900. Buried in Suffield, Hartford, 

Connecticut. 
Married Frances Catherine Rising of Suffield on January 23, 1 867. 
The children of Joseph and Frances were: 

1. Walter Seymour 8 , b. February 10, 1869 in Suffield, m. Jennie 3 Kinder . 

2. Ella 8 , b. September 18, 1873, d. 1954, unmarried. 
Other information: 

The marriage license for Joseph and Frances states that Joseph was from Basking 
Ridge but that his residence in 1867 was in New York City. Reference #39 states that he 
was a hardware merchant in New York, head of the firm Sheldon, Hoyt & Co., and his 
residence was in Hamburg, New Jersey. 
References: #1, #2, #3, #17, #29, p. 66, and #39, p. 618. 

13. Frances Catherine Rising 
Born on March 9, 1841, probably in New Marlboro, Berkshire, Massachusetts. 



Chan I Biographies 

Married Joseph Erastus Sheldon on January 23, 1867. 
Other information: 

Frances moved to Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut with her parents at age four. 
She graduated from Lasell Seminary. 
References: ~ #1, #2, #3, #17, #29, pp. 66 and 100, #39, p. 618, and #63. 

14. Frederick Kinder 

Born in Ireland in 1 834, probably in Dublin. 

Died on November 9, 1891 in Brooklyn, New York. Buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, 
New York. 

Married first, Jane Forsythe on March 4, 1856 in the First Reformed church in Hastings-on- 
Hudson where she was a member. Hastings-on-Hudson is a village in the town of 
Greenburgh in Westchester County, New York. Jane Forsythe was bom in Ireland about 
1829. She died in Hastings-on-Hudson on May 10, 1868, probably in childbirth with her 
third child, Frederick, Jr. 

The children of Frederick and Jane, all born in Hastings-on-Hudson, were: 

1. Catherine 3 , b. 1858. 

2. Robert" , b. 1 862. Robert moved to New Jersey as a teen. 

3. Frederick 3 , b. 1868. 

Married second, Mary Forbes before June 25, 1870, probably in New York City. 
The children of Frederick and Mary, all born in Hastings-on-Hudson, were: 

3 8 

1. Jennie . b. June 1. 1871. m. Walter Seymour Sheldon . 

2. George , b. 1872, m. Mae Donley, no children. He died in 1938. 
James Forbes , b. 1876, m. Myrtle Marsh, no children. He died in 1939. 

Other information: 

Frederick immigrated to America from Ireland via Liverpool on the passenger ship 
Waterloo and arrived in New York on December 3, 1849. He was fifteen at the time and 
brought with him his younger siblings, William (thirteen), Jane (eleven), and Robert 
(seven) The parents, William and Jane (Gorman) Kinder , had already immigrated to 
America Frederick settled in the village of Hastings-on-Hudson with his parents and that 
is where he married Jane Forsythe in 1 856. 

Frederick was a painter in the village of Hastings-on-Hudson as early as 1850 when 
he was sixteen years of age. In 1 868 he was listed there as a "House and Sign Painter & 
Dealer in Paints and Oils " He was elected a trustee of the First Baptist Church of 
Hastings-on-Hudson when it was formed in 1 869 and he was listed as property holder in 
Hastings-on-Hudson in 1 879 when the village was incorporated. 

In June 1870 Frederick married his second wife, Mary 2 Forbes . Frederick and 
Mary lived in Hastings-on-Hudson with his three children by his first wife. The 1870 
census shows that Frederick's parents, William and Jane 1 (Gorman) Kinder, lived next 
door. The 1 880 census shows that Mary's mother, Mrs. Eliza' (Sloane) Forbes , was living 
in the household with Frederick and Mary, as was Frederick's twelve-year-old son 
Frederick, Jr by his first wife, Jane Forsythe. 

Trow"s New York City directories for 1880 to 1890 provide interesting 
information about Frederick 2 Kinder From 1880-81 to 1889-90 Frederick was listed as a 



10 



Chart I Biographies 

house painter whose place of business was at 33 West 29th Street in New York City. In 
the directories his home was shown as being in Hastings-on-Hudson. Then in 1888-89 his 
home was at 325 East 23rd Street and in 1889-90 it was in Brooklyn. 

Critical information about the move of this family to Brooklyn could have been 
found in the 1890 census. Unfortunately, all of the census records for 1890 were destroyed 
in a fire. However, the Brooklyn city directories for 1891 and 1892 provide important 
information. In 1891 Frederick Kinder, a painter, is shown living at 80 Henry Street. Also 
living at 80 Henry Street is George Kinder, a clerk. This would have been Frederick's 
nineteen-year-old son. Only the head of the family and other working members of the 
family were reported in the city directories. Then in 1892 Mary, widow of Fred, is the only 
Kinder reported as living at 80 Henry Street. The final and clinching piece of evidence that 
Frederick Kinder and his family had moved to Brooklyn is found in the marriage record 

3 8 

for his daughter, Jennie Kinder , to Walter Seymour Sheldon in Jersey City, New Jersey 
on October 4, 1892. This record gives addresses for both bride and groom as 80 Henry 
Street in Brooklyn. 

Frederick died on November 9, 1891 at age fifty-seven. This was eleven months 
before his daughter, Jennie . married Walter Seymour Sheldon . Frederick is buried at 
Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York with his first wife, Jane Forsythe, who had died 
in 1868. Frederick's parents, William 1 Kinder and Jane 1 Gorman , are also buried in another 
area at Woodlawn Cemetery. 
References: #55, v. V, p. 88, #57, #186, #276, and Westchester County census records for 
1860, 1870, and 1880, plus 1900 census records for Brooklyn. 

15. Mary Forbes 

Bom in Cavan County, Ireland on February 9, 1842. 

Died in Portland, Oregon on December 6, 1924. Her cremains are in a vault at the Portland 
Crematorium. 

Married Frederick 2 Kinder as his second wife before June 25, 1870. 

Other information: 

Mary's death record shows that she immigrated to the United States in 1854 at age 
twelve. Her parents had already immigrated to the United States from Ireland and were 
living in New York City. See (30) Thomas 1 Forbes, Mary's father, for a discussion of the 
immigration of my Forbes forebears. 

Mary's marriage record has not been located but she was probably married in New 
York City. Her husband, (14) Frederick 2 Kinder , is known to have had painting businesses 
in both New York City and in Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester, New York. 
Confirmation that Mary was married to Frederick Kinder comes from the 1880 census for 
Hastings-on-Hudson. The information from that census is as follows: 

Name Age Relationship Place of birth 

Frederick Kinder 48 Ireland 

Mary Kinder 37 wife Ireland 

Frederic Kinder* 12 son New York 

Jennie Kinder 10 daughter New York 

George Kinder 8 son New York 

11 



Chart I Biographies 



James Kinder 3 son New York 

Elizabeth Forbes** 65 mother-in-law Ireland 

*Son by prior marriage to Jane Forsythe. 
**Eliza (Sloane) Forbes 

Other useful information about Mary and her family comes from the 1900 census 
for Brooklyn, New York. 





Relationship 


Date of 
birth 


Age 




Place of birth 


Name 


Self 


Father Mother 


Walter S. Sheldon 


husband 


1/1868 


32 


NY 


CT CT 


Jennie K Sheldon* 


wife 


6/1871 


29 


NY 


Ireland Ireland 


Edith Sheldon 


daughter 


12/1896 


3 


NY 


NY NY 


Marian Sheldon 


daughter 


1/1899 


1 


NY 


NY NY 


Marv Kinder** 


mother-in-law 


2/1843 


57 


Ireland Ireland Ireland 


James Kinder 


brother-in-law 


6/1876 


23 


NY 


Ireland Ireland 




* Jennie (Kinder) Sheldon 










** Mary (Forbes) Kinder 









Mary and Frederick lived in Hastings-on-Hudson until 1 888 when they moved to 
Brooklyn, New York. After Frederick died in 1891 Mary apparently lived much of her life 

3 8 

with her daughter, Jennie (Kinder) Sheldon , and her son-in-law, Walter Seymour 
Sheldon . From the census records and city directories we know she was with them in 
Brooklyn at 455 Hancock Street in 1900 and in New Rochelle from 1906 to 1912. 
However, Mary's death record shows that she spent the last eight years of her life in 
Portland, Oregon with her son, James F. Kinder, and his wife, Myrtle (Marsh) Kinder. 

The key piece of information about Mary's Scot-Irish ancestry is her death record 

which shows her place of birth as Cavan County, Ireland. This information presented the 

opportunity to trace my Forbes and Sloane lines into Ireland. See (30) Thomas Forbes, 

(31) Eliza Sloane, and Appendix 8. 

References: #57, #186, #318, census records for Brooklyn and for Westchester County, New 

York, and Mary's death record in Portland, Oregon. 

16. Joseph Craddock 

Born in Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England in 1805 and baptized in 1806. This portion of 
Yorkshire has been a part of Humberside County since 1974. 

Died before May 1 840, probably in Alton, Madison, Illinois. 

Married Mary Wass in Holy Trinity Church in Kingston-upon-Hull on July 15, 1827. 

The children of Joseph and Mary, the first two bom in Rochester, Monroe, New York and the 
second two born in St. Louis, Missouri, were: 

Elizabeth 2 , b 1828, bapt at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Rochester on May 10, 
1829, m William Ferguson in 1849. They lived in Madison County, Illinois and 
had seven children: Mary, Charles, John, Edwin, Ella, Annie, and Franklin. 
Charles , b. 1829 Lived in Nicolaus, Sutter, California. The 1880 census shows 
that he had a wife, Margrett, and three stepchildren. Reference #4 states he 



12 



Chart I Biographies 

married a widow with one child. It also states that he was an innkeeper and was 
murdered. I have not been able to determine Charles' actual history. 

3. John , b. November 30, 1831, m. Elotia 8 Chauncey . Lived in Shasta County, 
California. 

4. Margaret , b. 1835, m. Henry Leiber. They lived in East Oakland, California and 
had three children: Will, Harry, and Kate. 

Other information: 

Joseph and his wife, Mary, left England shortly after they were married in 1 827 and 
immigrated to the United States. The marriage record shows that Joseph was a soap 
maker. They were first in Rochester, New York, where Joseph was naturalized in 
December 1828. The family moved to St. Louis about 1830. It seems probable that 
Joseph and his family then moved across the river to Alton, Illinois sometime after their 

2 1 

daughter Margaret was bom in 1835 because Joseph's widow, Mary Wass, was 
remarried in Alton in May 1 840. 

Of my sixteen great, great grandparents Joseph is the only one for whom I have 
been unable to locate a definite place and date of death. Death records were not kept in 
Illinois until about 1878. Searches in church records (sparse), cemetery records (some 
cemeteries vandalized in Alton), probate records, and obituaries have failed to disclose 
Joseph's death. Even the remote possibility that Joseph and Mary could have been 
divorced was explored but there is no record of such a divorce. It seems probable that 
Joseph died in Alton between 1836 and 1839. 

Research in English records (reference #275) shows that the parents of Joseph 
Craddock were probably John and Elizabeth Craddock , who were married in Holy Trinity 
Church in Kingston-upon-Hull on April 4, 1802. John was a sawyer. Because of damage 
to the original records Elizabeth's name is uncertain but it appears to have been Elizabeth 
Crook Collender . 

The children of John and Elizabeth Craddock were: 

1. Elizabeth, bapt. 1803. 

2. Joseph 1 , bapt. 1806, m. Mary 1 Wass . 

3. William, bapt. 1811. 

4. John, bapt. 1814. 

5 . Margaret, bapt . 1816. 

References: #4, #57, #275, #322, #334, and marriage record for Joseph and Mary. 

17. Mary 1 Wass 

Born in England in 1802, probably in Ropsley, Lincolnshire County. 

Died in Alton, Madison, Illinois on February 12, 1886. Buried in Alton City Cemetery (a.k.a. 

Grandview Cemetery) which surrounds the U.S. National Cemetery. She is buried under 

the name Mary Everingham. 
Married first, Joseph 1 Craddock in Holy Trinity Church in Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, 

England on July 15, 1827. This portion of Yorkshire has been a portion of Humberside 

County since 1974. Joseph died before May 1840. 
Married second, William Everingham, Sr. in Alton, Illinois on May 21, 1840. He died in Alton 

between 1855 and 1860. William, Sr. and Mary had two children: William, Jr. and Mary J. 



13 



Chart I Biographies 

(Jennie). William, Jr. lived in Alton for many years but later moved to Wallingford, Iowa. 
Jennie was unmarried and lived with her mother, Mary, in Alton. 
Other information: 

Mary and her first husband, Joseph 1 Craddock , immigrated to the United States 
shortly after they were married. They settled first in Rochester, Monroe, New York but 
moved to St. Louis, Missouri about 1830. Mary and her family moved to Alton sometime 
between 1 835 and 1 840. See Joseph's biography above. 

In the period 1828-1834 (and probably longer) there was a family of John Wass 
and his wife, Mary (Bedford) Wass, living in Rochester, New York. Joseph and Mary 
(Wass) Craddock also lived in Rochester from 1827 to about 1830 and there is a good 
possibility that this John Wass was Mary (Wass) Craddock's uncle. John Wass was born 
on August 5, 1776 in Ropsley, Lincolnshire, England which is about sixty miles south of 
Kingston-upon-Hull. 

The parents of Mary Wass have not been identified with certainty. However, 
research in English records (reference #275) shows that they may have been James and 
Sarah Wass who were in Ropsley in 181 1 and probably in Kingston-upon-Hull by 1815. 
References: #4, #57, #275, #322, #334, Mary's two marriage records, her obituary in the Alton 

Democrat, and the 1855, 1860, 1870, and 1880 census records for Madison 

County. 

18. Alfred G. Chauncey 

This is the same person as ( 1 8) Alfred G. 7 Chauncey on Chart JJ. 

Bom in Ghent, Columbia, New York on June 7, 1815. 

Died on May 1, 1888 He was buried first on his farm four miles north of French Gulch, Shasta, 

California. Later his remains were moved to the community cemetery at French Gulch. 

His second wife, Eliza Houghtaling, is also buried there. 
Married first, Louisa Elliott in Hooper, Broome, New York about 1833-34. Hooper no longer 

exists It is now part of the Union Center/Endwell area near Binghamton, New York. 

Louisa died in or before 1848 
The children of Alfred and Louisa, all born in Aurora, Kane, Illinois, were: 

1 Adelaide , b about 1836, m. William L. Cropper, lived in Oakland, California. 

2 Mary , b. about 1838, m. Mr. Clark, lived in Aurora, Illinois. 

Manna 8 , b. 1840, m. first, W.P. French, m. second, C.P. Coburn, lived in 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho. 
4. Elotia 8 . b October 14, 1842, m. John 2 Craddock . 
5 Jane , d y. 
Married second, Eliza Houghtaling in Aurora, Illinois on December 9, 1848. 
The children of Alfred and Eliza, all born in Shasta County, California, were: 
1 Alice 8 , b 1 857, m. William Williamson, lived in French Gulch. 

Flora , b 1 858, unmarried, drowned in the Sacramento River at age fifty-three. 

3. Mabel , b 1 860, m Hiram Westlake, lived in French Gulch. 

4. Anna , b about 1 862, unmarried, lived in Albany, Alameda, California. 
Elizabeth 8 (aka. Lydia), b 1866, m Gustaf Adolph von Kruse, lived in French 
Gulch 



14 



Chart I Biographies 

6. Alfred , b. about 1867, living in Eureka, Humboldt, California in 1945. 
Other information: 

Alfred and his first wife, Louisa Elliott , moved from Broome County, New York to 
Aurora, Illinois about 1834. Louisa died in or before 1848. 

In 1 849 Alfred left his daughters by his first wife, Louisa, with his new wife, Eliza, 
and went to California. He went first to Hangtown (Placerville), El Dorado, California. In 
the 1850 census for Placerville taken on October 26, 1850 he is shown as a thirty-six-year- 
old blacksmith who was boarding in a hotel. Significantly, in the 1850 census for Aurora, 
Illinois taken on November 13, 1850 the AG. Chauncey household shows his second wife, 
Eliza, and his three younger daughters. Adelaide was apparently not living in the Chauncey 
household at the time of the 1850 census. Alfred could not have been in both places only 
eighteen days apart in 1850. Obviously, his wife, Eliza, had provided the information for 
the 1850 census as if he were still at home in Illinois. Sometime late in 1850 he moved to 
Shasta County. 

About 1851 Alfred discovered a gold-quartz ledge just south of the location of 
Keswick, the town built later for smelter workers. To work this gold discovery Alfred built 
a gold-quartz stamping mill and with his brother Austin Chauncey and other partners 
formed the Shasta Hydraulic Quartz Mining Company, capitalized at $2,000,000. The 
hydraulic pit became the second largest mining pit in Shasta County; the pit appears as if it 
could hold a large football stadium. The Chauncey brothers also had a water-powered 
sawmill at the mouth of Spring Creek where it joins the Sacramento River. About three 
miles up Spring Creek they built a dam from which ditches and flumes carried water to run 
the sawmill and to provide necessary water flow to the company's hydraulic monitors 
(water cannons) for gold mining. The Chauncey dam site on Spring Creek is now under 
water behind Spring Creek Dam. 

Quoting from the Aha California of San Francisco for December 12, 1851 which 
was in turn quoting from the Sacramento Union: 

"There has lately been erected on Spring creek, near where the Shasta 
Valley Trail crosses, and about three miles above Shasta City, an extensive 
saw-mill, which, by the first of the ensuing year will supply that section of 
country with all kinds of lumber, &c. The Shasta Hydraulic Quartz Mining 
Company have also a mill on Spring creek, in the immediate vicinity of 
which a rich vein of auriferous quartz has recently been opened. A.G. 
Chauncey & Co. are the proprietors of the above enterprises which must 
prove exceedingly lucrative to them hereafter, if they are rewarded in 
proportion to the capital and labor already expended in these undertakings, 
which will tend so greatly to promote the prosperity and convenience of 
the residents of Shasta." 

By 1852 Alfred and his brother Austin, with two others also owned the Arcade 
building on Main Street in the town of Shasta. This enterprise was part of AG. Chauncey 
& Co. The gold ran out in the mining pit and the fire of December 1, 1852 that destroyed 
a third of the town of Shasta burned the Arcade building to the ground. This was enough 
to drive Chauncey & Co. out of business and the Spring Creek property had to be sold to 
satisfy creditors. Austin and his wife, Cynthia, (no children) appear in the 1860 census for 
Shasta County but in 1861 he was in "Silver City, Territory of Nevada." Reportedly he 
died in an accident in 1861; I have no record for Cynthia. 

15 



Chart I Biographies 

In 1854 Alfred returned to Aurora, Illinois and brought his family with him to 
Shasta County, a six-month trip by covered wagon. His family included his second wife, 
Eliza Houehtaline, and three of his four surviving daughters by his first wife, Louisa Elliott . 

Q 

The three were Adelaide (nineteen), Martha (fourteen), and Elotia (twelve) who later 
married John" Paddock . The family left from Council Bluffs, Iowa following the Oregon- 
California Trail On July 4, 1854 they stopped at Independence Rock one hundred miles 
east of South Pass, Wyoming. See note (b) in Appendix 10 for a discussion of emigrant 
wagon trains coming west. 

When he returned to California in 1854 Alfred homesteaded on a 160-acre farm at 
the junction of Clear Creek and the south fork of Clear Creek, four miles north of French 
Gulch. This town was founded by French miners in 1849 and the area became one of the 
State's richest producers during the Gold Rush. From 1856 to 1858 French Gulch was the 
trailhead for a western branch of the Oregon-California Trail. As a supply and stopping 
place it rivaled the town of Shasta. The location of Alfred's homestead is shown on Map 
H. In 1902 this property was owned by Alfred's son-in-law, Hiram Westlake. Although 
by trade Alfred was a blacksmith he engaged in gold mining and farming at French Gulch. 
He raised his second family on the farm and lived there until he died in 1888. 
References: #4, #5, #8, #9, #54, pp. 379 and 384, #165, pp. 168 and 284, #292, p. 31, #335, 

pp. 105-106, and census records for French Gulch. 

19. Louisa Elliott 

This is the same person as (19) Louisa Elliott on Chart Ht. 

Bom in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on July 29, 1813. 

Died in Aurora, Kane, Illinois in or before 1848. 

Married Alfred G. Chauncey in Hooper, Broome, New York about 1833-34. Hooper no longer 

exists. It is now part of the Union Center/Endwell area near Binghamton, New York. 
Other Information: 

Louisa Elliott moved with her family from Killingworth to Choconut, 

Susquehanna, Pennsylvania in the spring of 1 8 1 5 at age two. Her mother, Louisa 5 (Lane) 

EJliott, died in Choconut in 1817. Subsequently, the family relocated about ten miles north 

in the Union City/Endwell area of New York. 

Also of interest is the fact that Louisa fElliott) Chauncev and her husband, Alfred 

G Chauncey moved to Aurora, Illinois about 1 834 which is the same time that her brother 

William Thacher Elliott moved there. Both Alfred and William were blacksmiths. These 

families were among the very earliest settlers in Kane County. 
References #57, #59, p. 649, and #65, pp. 185-186. 

20. Joseph Rogers 

This is the same person as (20) Joseph 7 Rogers on Chart IV. 
Bom in Danby, Rutland, Vermont on March 21, 1801. 

Died in Coos County, Oregon on May 16, 1891. Buried in Coos River Cemetery. 
Married Lydia Carpenter of Granville, Washington, New York on January 17, 1827. 
The children of Joseph and Lydia, all bom in Danby, Vermont, were: 
1 Amos C 8 , b. 1 828, m. Elizabeth Noble. 



16 



Chart I Biographies 

2. Anson 8 , b. 1 829, m. Elizabeth Dillingham. 

o 

3 . Maria Dinah , b. 1 83 1 , m. William Carpenter. 

4. Cynthia 8 , b. 1833. 

5. Stephen Carpenter 8 , b. November 24, 1834, m. Delia M. 8 Parker . 

6. Lydia 8 ,b. 1835. 

7. Joseph 8 , b. 1837. 

8. Marion , b. 1846, m. Jasper Yoakam at the home of her brother Anson in 1871. 
Other information: 

This section has been expanded to cover the migration of the Rogers family 
members from Vermont and New York to Coos County in the period 1849 to 1870. 
Those who came west were Joseph and his wife, Lydia (Carpenter) Rogers , and five of 
their eight children: Amos C. , Anson , Stephen Carpenter . Maria Dinah , and Marion . 

Joseph and Lydia originally settled in Danby, Vermont where Joseph and his 
parents, Aaron and Dinah (Folger) Rogers lived. These families were all Quakers. The 
1850 census records show that Joseph and Lydia were still living in Danby with their 
children. However, by 1870 Joseph, Lydia, and five of their children had moved to Coos 

Q 

County. No record has been found to indicate that the other three children, Cynthia , 

8 8 

Lydia , and Joseph , came west. 

The first to move west was the eldest son, Amos C. Rogers. In 1849 Amos C. 
"caught the gold fever" and joined a group in Boston, Massachusetts who called 
themselves the Bunker Hill Mining and Trading Association. For $300 each, Amos C. 
and eight other young men from a nearby town, including his cousin Amos E. Rogers, 
joined the association numbering 120 men. The association bought the ship Regidas and 
left Boston on March 5, 1849. They sailed around Cape Horn and landed in San Francisco 
on September 29, 1849. In the spring of 1850 Amos C. headed for the gold country and 
panned for gold on the American, Feather, and Yuba Rivers. 

In 1851 Amos C. sent for his mother, Lydia 6 (Carpenter) Rogers . At age forty-six 
she came to booming San Francisco by herself and went to work for a banker and his wife. 
No record has been found to indicate how Lydia came to San Francisco but it must have 
been by ship. Lydia sent money home to help support her husband, Joseph Rogers , and 
their younger children. After Lydia left for San Francisco Joseph lived with his son, 
Stephen Carpenter 8 Rogers in Glens Falls, New York. Joseph, age fifty, was recovering 
from an accident (kicked in the head by a horse) and was unable to earn a living. By 1860 
he was sufficiently recovered to move to the Coos Bay area where he rejoined his wife, 
Lydia. When Joseph and Lydia were reunited in Coos County they moved to Anson 
Rogers' farm where they lived until they died, Lydia in 1890 and Joseph in 1891. 

When Lydia arrived in San Francisco in 1851 she sent a letter to her son, Amos C. 
Rogers, in the gold country and he returned to the city where he established a house raising 
and moving business. In 1854 the second son, Anson Rogers, came to San Francisco and 
joined his brother, Amos C. 8 , in the business. The records show that Anson came west by 
ship having walked across the Isthmus of Panama. The railroad across the isthmus was not 
completed until 1855. 

In 1855 Amos C. 8 Rogers met his cousin, Amos E. Rogers, in San Francisco again. 
Amos E. had gone to Coos County, Oregon where he met and married a girl from Empire. 
Upon hearing of the opportunities in the Coos Bay area Lydia and her two sons, Anson 

17 



Chart I Biographies 

and Amos C , decided that Amos C. should go there to explore the possibilities. Amos C. 
arrived in Empire by ship on June 15, 1855 with a large supply of merchandise. He 
promptly opened a store (trading post) and then expanded into a saloon and ten pin 
(bowling) alley. He also purchased a farm at the fork of the Coos River. Shortly thereafter 
his mother, Lydia, and his brother, Anson, moved from San Francisco to the farm. About 
1 869 Amos C. sold his store and saloon in Empire and moved to the farm. In 1 876 he sold 
the farm and he and his wife, Elizabeth, moved to Berkeley, California. She died in 1903 
and he died in 1920. 

In 1858 Anson 8 had purchased a 320-acre farm on the south fork of the Coos 
River. In 1869 he returned to Granville, New York where he married Elizabeth 
Dillingham. Anson was in the stock raising and dairy businesses and the farm had taken on 
a semblance of prosperity and comfort. Ultimately, he made it into one of the finest farms 
in Coos County. Anson became a prominent citizen and the bridge across the Coos River 

g .9*99 

was named for him. Anson and his wife had four children, Dillingham , Elizabeth , Alice 

Q 

and Anson Otis Rogers. 

There are many families with the surname Rogers in the Coos Bay area but Otis 
Dillingham Rogers, son of Anson Otis Rogers and grandson of Anson Rogers , is the 
only descendant of Joseph Rogers with the surname Rogers now living there. 
References: #11, pp. 255-256 and 563, #13, p. 79, #14, pp. 215-219 and 246-253, #15, p. 90, 

#16, pp. 237-238, #159, #233, and #351, p. 461. Reference #159 includes the 

marriage record for Joseph and Lydia from the Quaker monthly meetings in 

Granville. Danby and Granville are fifteen miles apart. 

21. Lydia Carpenter 

This is the same person as (2 1 ) Lydia 6 Carpenter on Chart V. 

Born in Granville, Washington, New York on March 2, 1806. 

Died in Coos County, Oregon on July 25, 1 890. Buried in Coos River Cemetery. 

Married Joseph Rogers on January 17, 1827. 

Other information 

Lydia's story is told above with that of her husband, Joseph 7 Rogers . 
References: #1 1, p. 563, #14, pp. 109 and 218, #61, #159, and #233. 

22. Asa Parker 

This is the same person as (22) Asa 7 Parker on Chart VI. 

Born in Middle Granville, Washington, New York on November 18, 1790. 

Died in South Granville on November 24, 1878. Buried in the Lee-Oatman Cemetery in South 

Granville. 
Married Laura 6 Whitney of Granville about 1819-20. 
Asa and Laura had ten children but the names of five are unknown. The known, named children of 

Asa and Laura were: 

1. Nathaniel 8 , b 1825 

2. George 8 , b 1832 Served in the Civil War 1862-1865 

Pefa M - b. November 24, 1833 in Granville, m. Stephen Carpenter 8 Rogers . 
4. Franklin 8 , b 1836. 

18 



Chart I Biographies 

5. Eliud 8 ,b. about 1839. 
Other information: 

Asa Parker was a farmer with substantial holdings in real estate. 
References: #57, #58, p. 198, #61, #188, and 1850 census. 

23. Laura Whitney 

This is the same person as (23) Laura Whitney on Chart \TI. 

Born in Granville, Washington, New York on March 17, 1797. 

Died in South Granville on August 21, 1887. Buried in the Lee-Oatman Cemetery in South 

Granville. 
Married Asa Parker of Granville about 1819-20. 
References: #57 and #1 88. 

24. Horace Sheldon 

This is the same person as (24) Horace Sheldon on Chart Vm. 

Born in West Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 21, 1802. 

Died in Suffield, Connecticut on January 19, 1888. 

Married Caroline 4 Cross in Liberty Corner, Somerset, New Jersey on September 21, 1830. 

The children of Horace and Caroline were: 

1. Joseph Erastus 7 , b. July 21, 1832 in Basking Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey, m. 
Frances Catherine Rising . 

2. Harriet Caroline 7 , b. 1839, d. 1907. 

3 . Mary Clarissa 7 , b. 1 840, d. 1 880? 

4. Francis Horace 7 , b. 1 846, d. 1871. 
Other information: 

Horace went to New Jersey in April 1824 and remained there until September 
1840 when he returned to Suffield. He lived in Suffield for the rest of his life. 
References: #1, #2, #3, and #1 7. 

25. Caroline Cross 

This is the same person as (25) Caroline Cross on Chart DC. 

Born in Basking Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey on September 1, 1806. 

Died in Suffield, Connecticut on December 3, 1873. 

Married Horace 6 Sheldon on September 21, 1830. 

Other information: 

Caroline's father, Joseph 3 Cross , died in 1809 when Caroline was only three years 
old. Her mother, Mary, remarried John Annin but then she died in 1817 leaving Caroline 
an orphan when she was eleven. Thereafter, Caroline and her two older brothers and one 
older sister were raised by their uncle, James 3 Cross, who was the younger brother of 
Joseph Cross . 

References: #1, #2, #3, #17, #57, and #77. 



19 



Chan I Biographies 



26. Aretas Rising 
This is the same person as (26) .Aretas Rising on Chart X. 



Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on December 15, 1801. 

Died in Suffield on March 27, 1884. 

Married Lucy Maria 7 Seymour of Otis, Berkshire, Massachusetts on November 12, 1829. 

The children of Aretas and Lucy were: 

1. Henry 7 , b. 1830. 

2. John, b. 1832, d.y. 

3. Eliza Maria 7 , b. 1834. 

4. Alfred 7 , b. 1838, d.y. 

5. Frances Catherine 7 , b. March 9, 1841, probably in New Marlboro, Berkshire, 
Massachusetts, m. Joseph Erastus Sheldon . 

Other information: 

Aretas graduated from Berkshire Medical School in Sheffield, Berkshire, 
Massachusetts in 1826. He practiced medicine first in Florida, Orange, New York until 
1828 and then in New Marlboro, Berkshire, Massachusetts until 1840. From New 
Marlboro he moved back to Sheffield and in 1845 he returned to Suffield and continued 
practicing medicine until 1871. During his lifetime he was also a member of both the 
Massachusetts and Connecticut state legislatures. 

References: #1, #2, #3, #29, pp. 51 and 64-66, #39, pp. 617-618, and #63. 

27. Lucy Maria Seymour 

This is the same person as (27) Lucy Maria 7 Seymour on Chart XI. 

Bom in Granby, Hartford, Connecticut on November 2, 1809. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 10, 1882. 

Married Dr Aretas Rising in Otis, Berkshire, Massachusetts on November 12, 1829. 

Other information 

Lucy Maria was raised in Otis and graduated in 1828 from Pittsfield Seminary in 

Berkshire County. She taught school in New Marlboro, Berkshire County for a short time 

until her marriage to Dr. Rising. 
References: #1, #2, #3, #28, #29, pp. 64-65, and #39, pp. 617-618. 

28. William' Kinder 

Bom in Dublin, Ireland in 1811. 

Died in Yonkers, Westchester, New York on February 2, 1898. Buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in 

Bronx, New York. 
Married Ja ne Gorman about 1832, probably in Dublin. 
The children of William and Jane, all bom in Ireland, were: 

1 Frederick 2 , b 1 834, m Mary 2 Forbes as his second wife. 

William Matthew 2 , b. January 1 1, 1836. Served as second lieutenant in New York 
Volunteers in the Civil War. Discharged in Savannah, Georgia because of a severe 
gunshot wound in the leg. Returned to Brooklyn, New York. 



20 



Chart I Biographies 

3. Jane , b. 1837, m. Charles Scriven. Jane d. 1915 in Yonkers, Westchester, New 
York. 

4. Isabella 2 , b. 1840, m. Joseph Prote. Isabella d. 1910 in Yonkers. 

5. Robert 2 , b. 1842. 

The following information confirms the above list of children: 

1. The 1850 census for Greenburgh, Westchester, New York shows the Kinders and 
their ages: William (thirty-nine), Jane (thirty-six), Frederick (sixteen), William 
(fourteen), Jane (twelve), Isabella (ten), and Robert (eight). All are shown as 
having been born in Ireland. The senior William was a carpenter and Frederick was 
a painter. 

2. Reference #55, The Famine Immigrants shows the Kinders who arrived from 
Liverpool, England on the Waterloo on December 3, 1849: 

Frederick, age seventeen, hence born in 1832 

(I believe that the 1850 census is correct that Frederick was born in 1834, 

not in 1832.) 

William, age thirteen, hence born in 1836 

Jane, age eleven, hence born in 1838 

Robert, age seven, hence born in 1 842. 

3. In 1904 in a "general affidavit" Robert Kinder, age sixty-two, hence born in 1842, 
declared that he was a brother of William M. Kinder who was bom on January 1 1, 
1836. 

Other information: 

William immigrated to America from Ireland, probably between 1843 and 1849. 
His wife, Jane Gorman , and one daughter, Isabella, followed in August 1849 on the 
Waterloo. Then in December 1 849 their other four young children came to America on 
another crossing of the same ship. 

William was a carpenter and he and his family may have left Ireland because of 
economic hard times resulting from the Great Famine of 1845-1847. During that time the 
population of most Irish counties declined. However, the population of Dublin County 
grew because of migration from the poorer rural counties that were so badly affected by 
the famine. 

From 1846 to 1851 over a million men, women, and children emigrated from 
Ireland to the United States and Canada. The majority of those coming across the Atlantic 
sailed from Liverpool to New York. Liverpool provided faster and better ships than any of 
the Irish ports and the passage across the Irish Sea was cheap. Incidentally, this mass Irish 
migration was the last to be carried on sailing ships. The great migrations from southern 
and eastern Europe in the last quarter of the nineteenth century were carried on steamships. 

William 1 and his family settled in Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester, New York. 
Hastings-on-Hudson is an incorporated village in the town of Greenburgh. In New York a 
town is not a village or a community but is a political entity that is smaller than a county but 
bigger than most villages and cities. William and his wife, Jane, were living next door to 
their son Frederick 2 Kinder and his wife, Mary 2 Forbes , in Hastings-on-Hudson when the 
census was taken on June 25, 1870. Jane died on March 3, 1887 and apparently after that 
William moved to Yonkers where his widowed daughter, Jane (Kinder) Scriven lived. 



21 



Chart I Biographies 

The history of William's daughter, Jane 2 Kinder, is useful in tracing my Kinder 
ancestry. Jane married Charles Scriven in the Reformed Church in Hastings-on-Hudson in 
1855. She died in Yonkers, New York in 1915 and was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery 
in Bronx. The significant information is that Jane purchased a cemetery plot for her 
husband, Charles Scriven, in Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx when he died in 1868 at age 

2 1 

thirty-eight. And that plot is where her parents (and those of Frederick Kinder ), William 
Kinder and Jane Gorman , are buried. 

The death record for William 1 Kinder contains very useful information. It confirms 
that he was a carpenter, but more importantly, it shows that he was born in Dublin, Ireland 
and that his parents were Matthew Kinder and Jane Sindass . both born in London. 

Records at the Mormon Family History Library in Salt Lake City have been 
examined (reference #283) to find further information about Matthew Kinder and Jane 
Sindass . Nothing was found for Matthew and Jane but the following was found out about 
William . From the Dublin city directories William first shows up in 1837 at age twenty- 
six as part of the firm of Kinder and Hart, carpenters and builders. By 1850 he is no longer 
found in the directories because he had already immigrated to the United States. This same 
study (reference #283) also found that William's father-in-law, James Gorman , was 
probably a Dublin grocer and wine merchant. Research in London and Dublin would 
probably provide additional information about my Kinder and Gorman ancestors but this is 
beyond the scope of this present book. 
References: #55, v. V, p. 88, #56, pp. 95-99, #57, #186, #283, #327, p. 225, death record for 

William Kinder , and pension record for his son, William M. Kinder. 

29. Jane Gorman 

Surname also spelled Gorvman. 

Born in Ireland in 1 807 according to her death record, probably in Dublin. 

Died in Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester, New York on March 3, 1887. Buried in Woodlawn 
Cemetery in Broax, New York. 

Married William Kinder about 1 832, probably in Dublin. 

Other information 

Jane was a member of the Presbyterian Church of Ireland which indicates she may 
have been of Scot-Irish descent. See Appendix 8 for a discussion of the Scot-Irish. On 
Jane's death record her father is shown as James Gorman , born in Ireland. Her mother is 
shown only as Jyjja with place of birth left blank. The question "how long in the United 
States" is also left blank. Jane immigrated to America from Ireland via Liverpool on the 
passenger ship Waterloo and arrived in New York on August 10, 1849. She brought with 
her one daughter, Isabella, age nine. This ship, the Waterloo, was the same ship that 
brought their other four children on December 3, 1849. 

References: #55, v IV, p. 468, #57, #186, and #283. 

30. Thomas' Forbes 

Born in Ireland in 1816, probably in Cavan County. 

Died in New York City on April 26, 1860. Buried in Evergreens Cemetery in Brooklyn, New 
York 



22 



Chart I Biographies 

Married Eliza Sloane in Ireland about 1840, probably in Cavan County. 
The children of Thomas and Eliza were: 

1. Margaret (Maggie), b. about 1841 in Ireland, m. David Keyes in New York City 
in 1 868. Mary Forbes was a witness at the wedding. 

2. Mary , b. February 9, 1842 in Cavan County, Ireland, m. Frederick 2 Kinder in 
1870 as his second wife. 

3. James , b. 1844, probably in New York City. 

4. Eliza 2 , b. November 10, 1848 in New York City, m. Rev. William Eakins in New 
York City on March 28, 1872. Rev. Eakins was born on April 21, 1845 in 
Longford County, Ireland. Eliza 2 died in September 1938. 

5. William H. 2 , b. December 23, 1857 in New York City, d. 1943 in Hastings-on- 
Hudson, Westchester, New York. William had been married to Sarah Breese but 
she died before 1900. He is buried in a single grave in the government cemetery at 
Pinelawn Park in Farmingdale, Nassau, New York. 

The birth year for Margaret is from her marriage record. The birth dates for 

2 2 2 

Mary . Eliza , and William H. are from their death records. 
Other information: 

There is a naturalization record for a Thomas Forbes in New York City in 1848. 
Five years residency was required for citizenship making 1843 the probable year of 
immigration. Unfortunately, most of the spaces on the naturalization form were left blank 
so this document alone does not prove that this man was my forebear Thomas Forbes . 

New York City police records show that Thomas Forbes was appointed to the 
force on July 5, 1853. He died of natural causes in 1860 at age forty-four leaving his wife, 
Eliza Sloane . and five children ages three to nineteen. His death record on file at the New 
York City municipal archives shows that he was born in Ireland in 1816 and was a resident 
at 115 Avenue C in New York City at the time of his death on April 26, 1860. His 
obituary in the New York Herald for April 27, 1 860 invited friends of the family and the 
Masonic Order in general to attend his funeral at 1 15 Avenue C. 

Much of the information about Thomas Forbes and his family comes from three 
census records for New York City (Manhattan). These records are for the years 1850, 
1855, and 1860. The information is discussed in the following four paragraphs. However, 
as you will see some of the information is conflicting. (There are no census records 
available for New York City for 1845 and 1865 to help solve the problem.) 

In the 1 850 federal census Thomas Forbes is listed as a seaman, thirty-five years of 
age, hence born in 1815. His wife, Eliza Sloane , is thirty years old, hence born in 1820. 
There were two children in the household, James Forbes, age nine, and Eliza Forbes, age 
three. The parents, Thomas and Eliza, are shown as being born in Ireland. The children, 
James and Eliza, are shown as being born in New York. Thomas was actually born in 
1816, hence thirty-four years old in 1850. And Eliza was actually born in 1815, hence 
thirty-five years old in 1850. 

The information from the 1855 state census is as follows: 



23 



Chan I Biographies 













Years 




Name 


Age 


Sex 


Relationship 


Bom 


resident 


Occupation 


Thomas Forbes 


30 


M 




Ireland 


12 


police officer 


Eliza Forbes* 


40 


F 


wife 


Ireland 


12 




Margaret Forbes 


17 


F 


child 


Ireland 


12 


milliner 


Mary Forbes 


14 


F 


child 


Ireland 


12 




James Forbes 


11 


M 


child 


Ireland 


12 




Eliza Forbes 


9 


F 


child 


New York 9 






4 


Eliza 1 (SI 


oane) Forbes 









There are obvious errors in the 1855 census. First, Thomas was older than thirty; 
this age was carried down from the previous man on the census record. Second, James 
Forbes could not have been a resident of New York for twelve years if he was only eleven 
years old In fact, all of the "years resident" are questionable. For another example, Eliza 
Forbes was born in 1 848 and would have been a resident for seven years, not nine. 

In the 1 860 federal census Eliza 1 (Sloane) Forbes is shown as the forty-eight-year- 
old head of household. Her husband, Thomas Forbes had died on April 26, 1860. The 
age of forty-eight would indicate Eliza was bom in 1812, however, as discussed in her text 
she was actually bom in 1815. In the 1860 census two of her children are listed, Eliza, age 
thirteen, and William H., age three. This census also shows that Eliza (Sloane) Forbes was 
bom in Ireland and her two younger children, Eliza and William H. Forbes, were bom in 
New York City. 

It seems fairly certain that Thomas Forbes emigrated from Ireland to the United 
States in 1843. But there is conflicting evidence as to when his wife, Eliza Sloane . and 
their children came to the United States. Eliza's death record shows she came in 1845. 
However, the 1855 census indicates she came with her husband in 1843. It seems most 
likely that Eliza came with her husband Thomas in 1 843 and that their son James was bom 
in New York City. This still leaves the question as to when the other two children, 
Margaret" and Mary 2 , came to the United States. 

The 1850 census indicates that Margaret and Mary had not yet come to the 
United States. They had probably been left with relatives in Ireland. From the 1855 census 
it is clear that both were in New York City by 1855. The other piece of information is 
Mary's death record which shows that she came over in 1854. I believe that Margaret, age 
thirteen, and Mary , age twelve, came over in 1854. However, I have no record as to how 
they survived during the Great Famine of 1845-47. 

One of the real keys in determining the history of the Forbes family is the record of 
the marriage of my grandparents, Walter Seymour 8 Sheldon and Jennie 3 Kinder , in Jersey 
City, New Jersey on October 4, 1 892. The Jersey City News reported their wedding in the 
October 5, 1892 issue as follows: 

Jennie and Walter were married by her uncle, the Rev. William Eakins, in the 
parsonage of St Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church in Jersey City. Family members in 
attendance were: 



24 



Chart I Biographies 

Mrs. F. Kinder (Mrs. Frederick Kinder, Jennie's mother, Mary Forbes Kinder) 

James and George Kinder (Jennie's two younger brothers) 

Mr. George Forbes (relationship unknown; possibly was one of Jennie 's uncles, 

James Forbes or William H. 2 Forbes, and newspaper confused name with 

George Kinder) 

Miss Eliza Forbes (relationship unknown) 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon of Hamburgh, New Jersey (Walter's parents) 

Miss Ella Sheldon (Walter's only sibling) Information in italics added. 

I have concluded that Rev. William Eakins, who was born in Longford County, 
Ireland, was the uncle of Jennie Kinder by marriage. Rev. Eakins was married to Eliza 
Forbes who was a sister of Mary Forbes . Thus, Eliza Forbes was an aunt of Jennie 
Kinder , making Rev. Eakins her uncle by marriage. Fortunately, Rev. Eakins and his wife, 
Eliza Forbes, were prominent enough that the parents of Eliza Forbes and, consequently, 
those of Mary Forbes have been identified as Thomas Forbes and Eliza (Sloane) Forbes 
as shown in the following paragraphs. 

From the "Memoirs of Rev. William Eakins," in the minutes of the fifty-ninth 
session of the Newark Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1916 it is shown 
that the wife of Rev. Eakins was Eliza Forbes of New York City. The record of her death 
in Monmouth County, New Jersey on September 18, 1938 shows that she was bom in the 
United States on November 10, 1848, that her father was Thomas Forbes , bom in the 
United States and her mother was Eliza Sloane . bom in Ireland. Although the death 

2 1 

record for Elizabeth (Forbes) Eakins indicates that her father, Thomas Forbes , was bom 
in the United States this is an error; he was actually bom in Ireland. This is shown by the 
death record for Thomas and in several census records. 

Next, from the obituary for Elizabeth (Forbes) Eakins in the September 19, 1938 
issue of the Evening News of Asbury Park, New Jersey it is seen that she was the widow of 
Rev. Eakins and a sister of William Forbes of Hastings-on-Hudson. This identification of 
her brother William in Hastings-on-Hudson is significant. As shown in the text on (31) 
Eliza 1 Sloane it places Eliza in the same village as two of her children, William, a widower 

1 1 

and Mary Forbes who married Frederick Kinder . 

The 1900 census for Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester, New York provides 
additional information about the family of Thomas Forbes. (All of the 1890 census records 
were lost in a fire.) The 1900 census shows William H. Forbes, a house painter, living as a 
boarder in the household of a Mr. Bevers. This record shows William was bom in New 
York in December 1857 and his father was Thomas Forbes. The death record for William, 
bom 1857, shows that his parents were Thomas Forbes and Eliza Sloane, both bom in 
Ireland. The 1920 census for Hastings-on-Hudson shows William, bom 1857, still living at 
the same place and still painting. When his sister Eliza (Forbes) Eakins died in 1938 her 
obituary stated that she had a brother living in Hastings-on-Hudson. 
References: #186, #208, #273, #274, #276, and #318. 



31. Eliza 1 Sloane 



Also known as Elizabeth. 



25 



Chart I Biographies 

Born in Ireland about 1815, probably in Cavan County. 

Died at 325 East 23rd Street in New York City on March 20, 1888. Buried with her husband in 

Evergreens Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. 
Married Thomas' Forbes in Ireland about 1840, probably in Cavan County. 
Other information: 

There is evidence, although not conclusive, that Eliza was born in Gowna, which is 
the name for both a small village and a parish in the southwestern part of Cavan County 
adjoining Longford County. (Both the village and the parish are also known as Scrabby.) 
The evidence is in the Baptisms for the Dead and the International Genealogical Index 
(both at the Mormon Family History Library in Salt Lake City). These records show Eliza 
Sloan bom in Gowna about 1811. 

The computer database at the Cavan County Genealogical Research Centre was 
examined in 1998 for additional information on both my Sloane and Forbes lines. The 
results were negative. However, expansion of this database is an ongoing project that will 
take a number of years. Perhaps sometime in the future more information will be found for 
my Sloane and Forbes lines in Ireland. 

Three different birth years can be calculated for Eliza Sloane from census records 
and her death record. In the 1850 census for New York City she is shown as the thirty- 
year-old wife of Thomas Forbes ; hence bom in 1820. In the 1860 census for New York 
City she is the forty-eight-year-old head of household; hence bom in 1812. In the 1880 
census for Hastings-on-Hudson she is shown as the sixty-five-year-old mother-in-law of 
Frederick'' Kinder ; hence bom in 1815. Her death record shows she was seventh-three 
years old at the time of her death in 1888, hence bom in 1815. 

Eliza probably immigrated to the United States from Ireland with her husband, 
(30) Thomas Forbes in 1843. See the biography for Thomas for a discussion of the 
immigration of my Forbes forbears in the 1840s and 1850s. 

Trow's New York City directories (reference #276) provide important information 
about Thomas Forbes and his wife, Eliza Sloane. By 1855-56 Thomas had become a New 
York City policeman and was living at 103 Avenue D. In 1858-59 he was still a policeman 
but was living at 1 15 Avenue C. Trow's directory for 1860 shows Eliza Forbes, widow of 
Thomas, still living at 1 1 5 Avenue C. These directories chronicle her moves to various 
residences in New York City after his death in 1 860 as follows: 
1 862-63: Eliza, widow Thomas h 658 6 th Ave. 
1864-65: Eliza, widow Thomas h 204 E. 21 st St. 
1866-67: Forbes, Eliza, widow Thomas h 216 E. 36* St. 
1868-69: Forbes, Eliza, widow Thomas h 216 E. 26 th 

The 1880 census for Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester, New York shows that 
Eliza had moved there and was living in the household of her son-in-law, Frederick 2 
Kinder Trow's directories show that Frederick moved to 325 East 23rd Street in New 
York City in 1888-89 but had moved to Brooklyn in 1889-90. Eliza accompanied 
Frederick and his family back to New York City where she died in 1888. 

Eliza's death record on file at the New York City archives shows that her parents 
were James Sloane and Margaret Young both bom in Ireland. Besides Eliza and her 
husband, Thomas Forbes , there is one other person buried in the same plot at Evergreens 



26 



Chart I Biographies 

Cemetery. That person is Young Sloane who was born in Gowna in 1819 and was 
probably Eliza's cousin. He died in Rhode Island in 1889. 
References: #57, #186, #276, and #318. Also see text for (30) Thomas 1 Forbes . 



27 



CHART II - Alfred G. 7 Chauncey 





ISRAEL 5 
CHAl'NCEY 


144 


CHARLES 4 
CHAUNCEY 


288 


ISAAC 3 

CHAUNCEY 


576 ISRAEL 2 CHAUNCEY 








1670-1745 

SARAH 
RI ACK1 EACH 


577 MARY 3 NICHOLS 








1712-1785 

SARAH 
INGRAM 


289 
290 


578 RICHARD BLACKLEACH 








1682-1720 

NATHANIEL 
INGRAM 


579 Abigail Hudson 


72 




1744- 1785 

ELIZABETH 4 
PETTY 


145 
146 


580 JOHN INGRAM 








1674- 

Esther 

Smith 


581 Elizabeth 2 Gardner 








1717-1745 

JOHN 3 
PETTY 


291 
292 


582 Unknown 








1674- 

JOHN 2 
PETTY 


583 Unknown 


it 


RUSSELL 6 
CHAUNCEY 




1774- 1859 

73 


584 JOHN 1 PETTY 








1666-1723 

MARY 2 
TAYLOR 


585 Ann Canning 








1701 - 1748 
Margaret 




586 JAMES 1 TAYLOR 








293 
294 


1671 - 
Unknown 


587 MARY TAYLOR 








1744- 1826 


147 


588 








Unknown 


589 










295 


590 










591 


fTjpn n 7 





18 



CHAUNCEY .Alfred m. Louisa Elliott (Chart III). 



1815- 


1888 


148 


NEHEMIAH 5 
PORTER. JR. 




NEHEMIAH 4 
PORTER, SR. 


592 JOHN 3 PORTER 




I/-.lTVt£ 








1692-1784 

Hannah 3 
Smith 


593 Lvdia 3 Herrick 








1720-1820 

REBECCA 4 
CHTPMAN 


297 
298 


594 HAZADIAH 2 SMITH 








JOHN 3 

CHTPMAN 


595 Hannah 3 Grover 




74 


PORTER 






MABEL 7 
PORTER 


1754- 

MEHITABLE 4 
FLOWER 


149 
150 


596 SAMUEL 2 CHTPMAN 








1690/91- 1775 

REBECCA 4 
HALE 


597 Sarah 2 Cobb 








1728-1763 

LAMROCK 3 
FLOWER. Ul 




598 ROBERT 3 HALE 








300 


1701-1751 

LAMROCK 2 
FLOWER. JR. 


599 Elizabeth Clark 


37 




1779- 1864 


600 LAMROCK 1 FLOWER, SR. 










1689-1771 

Ann 3 
Watson 


601 Lvdia Smith 








1719- 1815 

Mehitable 5 
Goodwin 


301 
302 


602 JOHN 2 WATSON. JR. 








1688- 

ISAAC 4 

GOODWIN 


603 Sarah 


75 






151 


604 NATHANIEL 3 GOODWIN 


(a) Not the same Samuel 2 Porter. 




(b) Not the same John ' Porter. 




1695- 1766 

Hannah 
Morgan 


605 MEHITABLE 3 PORTER 






A name in capitals indicates that a 




303 


606 THOMAS MORGAN 


biography is included for that 




individual The biographies follow 


1703- 


607 RACHEL MERRY 





this chart 



28 



CHART II - Alfred G. 7 Chauncey 



1152 CHARLES' CHAUNCEY 


2304 


GEORGE CHAUNCEY 


2305 


Agnes Welsh 


Seerefs. #54 


1153 CATHARINE 1 EYRE 


2306 


Robert Eyre 
FRANCIS" 1 NICHOLS 


2307 


Agnes Still 


and #164 for 


1154 ISAAC 2 NICHOLS 


2308 


2309 


Unknown 


Chauncey 


1155 Margery Washboume 


2310 
2312 


Unknown 


2311 
2313 


Unknown 


English ancestry. 


1156 Unknown 




1157 Unknown 


2314 




2315 






1158 JOHN HUDSON 

1159 Abigail' Turner 


2316 


LInknown 


2317 Unknown 




2318 
2320 


NATHANIEL 1 TURNER 


2319 
2321 


Elizabeth 




1160 Unknown 






1161 Unknown 


2322 




2323 






1162 SAMUEL 1 GARDNER 


2324 


Unknown 


2325 


Unknown 




1163 Elizabeth 


2326 


Unknown 


2327 


Unknown 




1164 


2328 




2329 






1165 


2330 




2331 






1166 


2332 




2333 






1167 


2334 




2335 






1168 Unknown 


2336 




2337 






1169 Unknown 


2338 




2339 






1170 Unknown 


2340 




2341 






1171 Unknown 


2342 




2343 






1172 Unknown 


2344 




2345 






1173 Unknown 


2346 




2347 






1174 JONATHAN TAYLOR SR. 


2348 


Unknown 


2349 


Unknown 




1175 Mary Wright 


2350 


Unknown 


2351 


Unknown 




1176 


2352 




2353 






1177 


2354 




2355 






1178 


2356 




2357 






1179 


2358 




2359 






1180 


2360 




2361 






1181 


2362 




2363 






1182 


2364 




2365 






1183 


2366 




2367 







1184 SAMUEL 2 PORTER (a) 

1185 Hannah- Dodge 

1186 HENRY 2 HERRICK 

1187 Lydia(?) Woodbury 

1188 JAMES 1 SMITH 

1189 Elizabeth 

1190 JOHN 2 GROVER 

1191 Sarah 2 Barney 

1192 JOHN 1 CHTPMAN 

1193 HOPE 2 HOWLAND 

1194 HENRY 1 COBB 

1195 Sarah- Hinckley 

1196 JOHN 2 HALE 

1197 Rebecca 2 Byley 

1198 Unknown 

1199 Unknown 



2368 JOHN 1 PORTER (b) 
2370 WILLIAM 1 DODGE 
2372 HENRY 1 HERRICK 
2374 Unknown 

2376 Unknown 

2378 Unknown 

2380 EDMUMD 1 GROVER 

2382 JACOB 1 BARNEY 

2384 THOMAS CHTPMAN 
2386 JOHN 1 HOWLAND 
2388 Unknown 
2390 SAMUEL 1 HINCKLEY 

2392 ROBERT 1 HALE 
2394 HENRY 1 BYLEY 
2396 
2398 



2369 Mary(?) Gardner 

2371 Elizabeth 

2373 EDITH 2 LASKEN 
2375 Unknown 

2377 Unknown 
2379 Unknown 
2381 Unknown 
2383 Anna 



Seeref. #142 for 

Herrick 
English ancestry. 



2385 Unknown 

2387 ELIZABETH 2 TTLLEY 

2389 Unknown 

2391 Sarah 1 Soule 

2393 Joanna (?) Cutter 
2395 REBECCA 1 SWAYNE 
2397 
2399 



1200 Unknown 

1201 Unknown 

1202 JOSEPH SMITH 

1203 Lydia 2 Hewett 

1204 JOHN 1 WATSON, SR. 

1205 MARGARET 1 SMITH 

1206 Unknown 

1207 Unknown 

1208 WILLIAM 2 GOODWIN 

1209 Susanna Fruen 

1210 SAMUEL 2 PORTER (a) 

1211 Hannah 2 Stanley 

1212 Unknown 

1213 Unknown 

1214 CORNELIUS MERRY 

1215 Rachel Ballard 



2400 

2402 

2404 Unknown 

2406 EPHRAJM 1 HEWETT 

2408 Unknown 
2410 Unknown 
2412 
2414 

2416 OZIAS 1 GOODWIN 
2418 Unknown 
2420 JOHN 1 PORTER, SR. (b) 
2422 THOMAS 1 STANLEY 

2424 

2426 

2428 Unknown 

2430 Unknown 



2401 

2403 

2405 Unknown 

2407 Isabel 



2409 Unknown 
2411 Unknown 
2413 
2415 

2417 MARY WOODWARD 
2419 Unknown 
2421 Rose 1 White 
2423 BENET 1 SHEPPARD 

2425 

2427 

2429 Unknown 

2431 Unknown 



Seeref. #122 for 

Stanley 
English ancestry. 



29 



Chart II Biographies 

18. Alfred G. 7 Chauncev 
See (18) Alfred G. Chauncev on Chart I, the same person. 

36. Russell Chauncev 

Also known as Russell Rawson Graham Estabrook Chauncey and as Russell R.G.E. Chauncey. 

Born in New Lebanon (or nearby Canaan), Columbia, New York on December 7, 1774. 

Died in Maryland, Otsego, New York on June 16, 1859. Buried at McKnown Cemetery on Route 

7 in Maryland, New York. 
Married Mabel Porter in Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on September 23, 1802. 
Russell and Mabel had fifteen children, all except Edwin born in Ghent, Columbia, New York. The 

ten who survived past infancy were: 

1. John 7 , b. 1804. 

2. Mabel 7 , b. 1805. 

3. Elizabeth 7 , b. 1806. 

4. Russell 7 , b. 1810. 

5. Alfred G. 7 . b. June 7. 1815. m. Louisa Elliott . 

6. William 7 , b. 1816. 

7. Austin 7 , b. 1 8 1 7, d. in an accident in Shasta County, California in 1 86 1 . 

8. Sarah 7 , b. 1820. 

9. Israel 7 , b. 1821. 

1 0. Edwin 7 , b. 1 823 in Maryland, New York. 
Other information: 

Russell Rawson Graham Estabrook Chauncey was named for the husbands of his 
grandfather's four sisters who married ministers. Russell was accepted into the Shaker 
Society at New Lebanon, Columbia, New York in 1787 at age thirteen, but abdicated the 
society in 1796 at age twenty-two and went to Ashfield, Massachusetts. There he met and 
married Mabel 7 Porter . Russell and Mabel settled in Ghent, New York, a few miles south 
of the Shaker colony. About 1822 they moved to Maryland, New York. 
References: #54, pp. 378-379, #147, pp. 144 and 191, and #240. 

37. Mabel 7 Porter 

Bom in Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on September 26, 1779. 

Died in Maryland, Otsego, New York on May 9, 1864. Buried at McKnown Cemetery on Route 

7 in Maryland, New York. 
Married Russell 6 Chauncey in Ashfield on September 23, 1802. 
References: #54, pp. 378-379 and #147, pp. 144 and 191. 

72. Israel 5 Chauncev 

Born in East Hadley (now Amherst), Hampshire, Massachusetts in April 1744. 

Died in New Lebanon, Columbia, New York on October 15, 1785 at age forty-two. Buried in 

New Lebanon. 
Married Elizabeth 4 Petty in Sunderland, Franklin, Massachusetts on February 16, 1763. 



31 



Chan II Biographies 

The children of Israel and Elizabeth, the first five born in South Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
were: 

1. Rocksena 6 ,b. 1763. 

2. Cynthia 6 , b. 1764. 

3. Levi 6 , b. 1765. 

4. Lucinda 6 ,b. 1768. 

5. Rozzel 6 ,b 1770. 
6 Salome , b. 1772. 

Russell 6 , a.k.a. Russell Rawson Graham Estabrook 6 Chauncey and as Russell 

RGE 6 Chauncev . b. December 7, 1774, m. Mable 7 Porter . 
Other information: 

About 1770-71 Israel 5 Chauncev and his wife, Elizabeth (Petty) Chauncev , moved 
from Amherst, Massachusetts to New Lebanon, New York with their first five children, all 
under the age of seven. Israel's father, Charles Chauncey , also moved to New Lebanon at 
the same time with his second wife, Mary Gaylord. The last two children of Israel and 
Elizabeth (Petty) Chauncey, Salome and Russell , were born in New Lebanon (or nearby 
Canaan), New York. 

Sometime shortly after 1780 a number of the citizens of New Lebanon embraced 
the new Shaker faith. Among them were Israel Chauncey . his wife, Elizabeth (Petty) 
Chauncey . his father, Charles Chauncey and Charles' second wife, Mary (Gaylord) 
Chauncey. By 1 787 the first buildings of a new Shaker community were established at 
New Lebanon. Both Israel and his father, Charles , had died in 1785, however, Elizabeth 
(Petty) Chauncey moved into the new community with her children. Charles' wife, Mary 
(Gaylord) Chauncey also moved there. 

Elizabeth and Mary and all but two of Elizabeth's seven children lived the 
remainder of their lives and died at the Shaker Colony in New Lebanon. Rozzel Chauncey 
never joined the Shakers and Russell Chauncey abdicated the Shaker beliefs and left the 
colony at age twenty-two 

Israel Chauncey has sometimes been called Isaac. The name Israel, not Isaac, is 
supported by evidence on page 377 of reference #54. 
References: #54, pp. 224 and 376-377, #234, p. 286, and Sunderland vital records 1716-1873. 

73. Elizabeth 4 Petty 

Bom in Westminster, Windham, Vermont on November 19, 1744. 

Died as a widow in the Shaker Colony in New Lebanon, Columbia, New York on September 1, 
1826 

Married Israel Chauncey in Sunderland, Franklin, Massachusetts on February 16, 1763. 
Other information: 

There were two Elizabeth Pettys from Northfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, both of 
whom descended from John' Petty . My ancestor was Elizabeth 4 (John 3 , John 2 , John 1 ). 
The other was Elizabeth 4 (Joseph 3 , Joseph 2 , John 1 ). John 3 and Joseph 3 were cousins. 

The evidence that Elizabeth was the daughter of John 3 Petty and not his cousin, 
Joseph Petty, is as follows. References #235 and #236 show that Elizabeth 4 Petty, 
daughter of John 3 Petty, was born on November 19, 1744. When Elizabeth 4 Petty 

32 



Chart II Biographies 

Chauncey . signed the Shaker register in New Lebanon, New York, she gave November 19, 
1744 as her date of birth. Thus, Elizabeth 4 was the daughter of John 3 . 

The information regarding Elizabeth's date of birth and date of death was obtained 
from reference #240, the "Shaker Record" index cards. These same index cards show 
Elizabeth's place of birth as Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts. However, I believe 
this is in error and she was actually born in Westminster, Windham, Vermont. To further 
add to the confusion, reference #236 indicates that she was born in Northfield, Franklin, 
Massachusetts. The explanation for the confusion is as follows. 

Elizabeth's grandfather, John Petty , was known to be a surveyor and it is very 
likely that Elizabeth's father, John Petty , was working subdividing the Indian lands in the 
Westminster, Vermont area, at the time of Elizabeth's birth. It was not uncommon for 
families to travel with the surveying parties. Westminster is in the Connecticut River 
Valley about twenty-five miles north of Northfield. These lands in Vermont were being 
surveyed and subdivided for assignment to those who fought in the Indian wars. However, 
no one received land in the Westminster, Vermont area until about fifteen years after 
Elizabeth's birth. Obviously there were no recording clerks in the immediate Westminster 
area at the time of Elizabeth's birth and her birth was simply recorded at Northfield where 
the John Petty family lived. 

Further evidence of Westminster, Vermont (and not Westminster, Massachusetts) 
is that Elizabeth's brothers, John 4 Petty and Adam Petty, both moved to Westminster, 
Vermont. And, in 1760, Elizabeth, age sixteen, also moved with her widowed mother, 
Margaret, to Westminster, Vermont. 

Elizabeth and her husband, Israel 5 Chauncey . had settled first in East Hadley (now 
Amherst), Hampshire, Massachusetts. About 1770-71 they moved to New Lebanon, 
Columbia, New York with their first five children. About 1780 they embraced the new 
Shaker faith. Elizabeth died as a widow in the Shaker colony in 1826; her husband, Israel, 
had died in 1785. 
References: #234, p. 286, #235, p. 56, #236, pp. 31-36 and 59-60, #240, and Sunderland vital 

records 1716-1873. 

74. John 6 Porter 

Baptized in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on May 12, 1754. 

Date and place of death are unknown. 

Married Mehitable 4 Flower in Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on May 29, 1777. 

The children of John and Mehitable, all born in Ashfield, were: 

1. Mabel 7 , bapt. 1777, d.y. 

2. Mabel 7 , b. September 26, 1 779, bapt. October 31,1 779, m. Russell 6 Chauncey. 

3. Ebenezer , bapt. 1781. 

4. Rebekah 7 , bapt. 1784. 

5. Hannah 7 , bapt. 1786. 

6. John 7 , bapt. 1787. 

7. Sarah 7 , bapt. 1789. 

References: #54, p. 378, #141, p. 299, and #147, pp. 85-86 and 191. 



33 



Chart II Biographies 



75. Mehitable 4 Flower 



Also known as Mabel Flower. 

Probably bom in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married John 6 Porter in Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on May 29, 1777. 

Other information: 

Unfortunately there is no birth record for Mehitable Flower in either the 
Connecticut or Massachusetts printed records. However, from reference #147, "Ashfield 
Vital Records to 1850," it appears that Mehitable and her brother, Lamrock Flower, rv, 
(and perhaps other siblings) moved from Hartford to Ashfield with their father, Lamrock 
Flower. III . 

Reference: #147, pp. 158 and 191. 

144. Charles Chauncey 

Bom in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on June 28, 1712. 
Died in New Lebanon, Columbia, New York in November 1785. 
Married first, Sarah Ingram in Hadley on January 27, 1740. 

The children of Charles and Sarah, all bom in Amherst, Hampshire, Massachusetts, were: 
1 Catherine 5 , bapt. 1741. 

2. Dorothy 5 , bapt. 1744. 

3. Israel . b. in April 1744, m. Elizabeth 4 Petty . 
Married second, Mary Gaylord in Hadley in 1746. 

The children of Charles and Mary, both bom in Amherst, were: 

1. Eunice , bapt. 1748. 

2. David 5 , bapt. 1750. 
Other information: 

Charles and his second wife, Mary Gaylord, joined the Shaker Society in New 
Lebanon, New York about 1780. 
References: #54, pp. 224, 376, and 377 and #240. 

145. Sarah Ingram 

Bom in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on October 2, 1717. 
Died in East Hadley (now Amherst), Massachusetts in 1745. 
Married Charles Chauncey in Hadley on January 27, 1740. 
References: #24, #54, pp. 224 and 376, #170, p. 76, and #176, p. 76. 

146. John 3 Petty 

Bom in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on April 6, 1701. 
Died about 1 748, probably in Northfield, Franklin, Massachusetts. 

Married Margaret , probably in Springfield, about 1733. 

The children of John and Margaret, the first three probably bom in Springfield and the last two 
probably bom in Northfield, were: 

1. John 4 , b. 1734/35. 

2. Margaret 4 , b 1737. 

34 



Chart II Biographies 

3. Aaron 4 , b. 1738/39. 

4. Rachael 4 ,b. 1742. 

5. Elizabeth . b. November 19, 1744, m. Israel 5 Chauncey . 
Other information: 

John lived first in Springfield but moved sixty miles north to Northfield about 1739. 
His widow, Margaret, moved to Westminster, Windham, Vermont with her family about 
1760. Westminster is in the Connecticut River Valley about twenty-five miles north of 
Northfield. Elizabeth Petty was sixteen at the time. 
References: #234, p. 286, #235, p. 32, and #236, pp. 37 and 56. 

148. Rev. Nehemiah 5 Porter. Jr. 

Baptized in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on May 22, 1720. 
Died in Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on February 29, 1 820. 
Married first, Rebecca Chipman on February 14, 1749, probably in Ipswich. 
The children of Nehemiah and Rebecca, all born in Ipswich, were: 

1. Rebecca 6 , b. 1750. 

2. Hannah 6 , b. 1751. 

3. Nehemiah , b. 1753. 

4. John 6 , bapt. May 12, 1754, m. Mehitable 4 Flower . 

5. Sarah 6 , bapt. 1755. 

6. Samuel , bapt. 1757. 

7. Ebenezer 6 , bapt. 1758. 

8. Joseph 6 , bapt. 1760. 

9. Elizabeth 6 , bapt. 1761. 

Married second, Elizabeth Nowell of Boston in 1778. There were probably no children by this 
union. She died in 1814. 

Other information: 

Nehemiah graduated from Harvard in 1745 and in 1750 he was ordained as the 
minister of the church in the south parish of Ipswich. In 1767, after the death of his wife, 
Rebecca , he went to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, where he was the minister until 1771. In that 
year he left his eldest son on his farm in Yarmouth. Thereafter, for several years, 
Nehemiah moved and preached at several places, including Halifax, Nova Scotia, before 
settling in Ashfield, Massachusetts. In 1774 he was installed as the minister in Ashfield and 
preached there until about 1 8 1 5, a few years before he died, just short of one hundred years 
of age. 

References: #116, p. 167, #141, p. 299, #142, pp. 35-37, #143, v. XI, pp. 568-571, #144, p. 
17, #147, p. 257, and #149, pp. 35-36. 

149. Rebecca Chipman 

Born on July 28, 1728, probably in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts. 
Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on October 28, 1763. 
Married Rev. Nehemiah 5 Porter on February 14, 1749, probably in Ipswich. 
References: #143, pp. 568-569 and #144, p. 17. 



35 



Chart II Biographies 



150. Lamrock 3 Flower, m 



Baptized in Hartford, Connecticut on July 27, 1719. 

Died in Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on January 6, 1815 at age ninety-five. 

Married Mehitable 5 Goodwin in Hartford on May 21, 1746. She died in Ashfield after October 

1800. 
The children of Lamrock and Mehitable, all bom in Hartford, were: 

1. Hannah 4 , bapt. 1747. 

2. Bildad 4 , bapt. 1749. 

3 . Mehitable 4 , probably born about 1 75 1 , m. John Porter . 

4. Anna , bapt. 1754. 

5. Ruth 4 , bapt. 1756. 

6. Lydia 4 , bapt. 1758, d.y. 

7. Lamrock , bapt. 1761. 

8. Phineas 4 , bapt. 1763. 
Other information: 

Lamrock 3 moved from Hartford to Ashfield before September 1 774 with some of 
his children, including Mehitable . 
References: #27, p. 250, #147, pp. 158, 191, and 240, and #162, p. 164. 

288. Rev Isaac Chauncey 

Bom in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on October 5, 1670. 

Died in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on May 2, 1745. Buried in Hadley. 

Married first, Sarah Blackleach in Stratford in 1697. She died in Hadley in 1720 at age thirty-eight. 

The children of Isaac and Sarah, all bom in Hadley, were: 

1. Mary 4 , b. 1698, d.y 

2. Israel 4 , b. 1700. 

3. Abigail 4 , b. 1701. 

4. Richard 4 , b. 1703. 

5. Catherine 4 , b. 1705. 

6. Sarah 4 , b. 1707. 

7. Dorothy 4 , b. 1710. 

8. Charjgs , b. June 28, 1712, m. Sarah Ingram . 

9. Jerusha 4 , b 1714. 

10. Josiah 4 , b 1716. 

Married second Abiel Adams Metcalfe, widow of Rev. Joseph Metcalfe. There were no children 

by this union 
Other information: 

Isaac graduated from Harvard in 1693. He was ordained as the minister at Hadley, 

Massachusetts in 1696, where he served until he died in 1745 at age seventy-five. 
References: #24, #54, pp. 221-224, #1 16, p. 53, #170, p. 17, and #226, p. 42. ' 

289. Sarah Blackleach 
Bom in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut about 1682. 

36 



Chart II Biographies 



Died in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on June 29, 1720. 
Married Rev. Isaac 3 Chauncey in Stratford in 1697 as his first wife. 
References: #24, #54, pp. 221-224, 336, and 375, and #102, v. I, p. 81 . 



290. Nathaniel Ingram 

Born in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on October 8, 1674. 

Died in Hadley at an advanced age. 

Married Esther Smith in Hadley on October 20, 1696. 

The children of Nathaniel and Esther, all born in Hadley, were: 

1. Esther, b. 1697. 

2. Elizabeth, b. 1699. 

3. Abigail, b. 1700. 

4. Mercy, b. 1702. 

5. Ebenezer, b. 1703. 

6. Nathaniel, b. 1708. 

7. Hannah, b. 1711. 

8. Jonathan, b. 1713. 

9. Sarah , b. October 2, 1717, m. Charles Chauncey . 

References: #24, #88, v. H, p. 523, #151, p. 76, #169, and #170, p. 76 in the back of the book. 

292. John 2 Petty 

Bom in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on November 9, 1666. 

Died before March 11, 1723, probably in Springfield. 

Married Mary Taylor in Springfield on April 13, 1693. 

The children of John and Mary, all probably born in Springfield, were: 

1. Mary 3 , b. 1695. 

2. John 3 , b. April 6, 1701, m. Margaret . 

3. Joseph 3 , b. 1704, d.y. 

4. Ebenezer 3 , b. about 1707. 

5. Abigail 3 , b. 1713. 

References: #24, #235, p. 37, #236, pp. 31-32, and #310, pp. 620-621. 

293. Mary 2 Taylor 

Born in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on December 28, 1671. 
Married John Petty in Springfield on April 13, 1693. 
References: #24, #235, p. 37, and #236, p. 3 1 . 

296. Nehemiah 4 Porter. Sr. 

Born in Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts in 1692. 

Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts in 1784. 

Married Hannah Smith on January 3, 1716/17. 

The children of Nehemiah and Hannah, all born in Ipswich, were: 

1 . Nehemiah 5 . b. March 22, 1 720, m. Rebecca 3 Chipman. 



37 



Chan II Biographies 

2. Samuel 5 , b. 1722. 

3. Hannah 5 , b. 1724. 

4. Sarah 5 , b. 1726. 

5. Lidia 5 , b. 1728. 

6. Ebenezer , twin, b. July 16, 1732. 

7. Hazadiah 5 , twin, b. July 16, 1732. 
Other information: 

Nehemiah was a weaver, living on a farm given to him by his father in the hamlet, 
Ipswich, now the town of Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts. 
References: #141, p. 299, #142, pp. 35-37, #143, v. XI, pp. 568-571, and #144, p. 17. 

298. Rev. John 3 Chipman 

Bom in Barnstable, Massachusetts on February 16, 1690/91. 
Died in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts on March 23, 1775. 
Married first, Rebecca Hale in Beverly on February 12, 1718/19. 

John and Rebecca had fifteen children. All were born in Beverly. Rebecca died on July 4, 

1751, a month after her fifteenth child was bom. My ancestor, Rebecca Chipman , was 

bom on July 28, 1728. She married Rev. Nehemiah 5 Porter . 
John married second, the widow, Mrs. Hannah Warren, in Roxbury (now part of Boston) in 

November 1751. There were no children by this second marriage. 
Other information: 

John graduated from Harvard College in 171 1. He was ordained as the minister of 

the 2nd Church in Beverly in 1715. 
References: #1 16, p. 55, #143, pp. 563-568, and #144, pp. 14-17. 

299. Rebecca 4 Hale 

Bom in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts on November 19, 1701. 

Died in Beverly on July 4, 1751. 

Married John Chipman in Beverly on February 12, 1718/19. 



References: #143, p. 564 and #144, pp. 16-17. 



2 

300. Lamrock Flower. Jr. 



Bom in Hartford, Connecticut on March 25, 1689. 

Died in Hartford on May 4, 1771. 

Married Ann 3 Watson in Hartford. 

The children of Lamrock and Ann, all bom in Hartford, were: 



1. Dinah 3 , b. 1714. 

2. Elijah 3 , b 1717. 

Lamrock 3 . Ill , bapt. July 27, 1719, m. Mehitable 5 Goodwin . 

4 Christian 3 , bapt. 1724. 

5. Lydia 3 , bapt. 1726. 

6. Possibly others. 
References: #27, pp. 249-250 and #157. 



38 



Chart II Biographies 



302. Isaac Goodwin 

Baptized in Hartford, Connecticut on November 10, 1695. 

Died in Hartford on August 15, 1766. 

Married first, Hannah Morgan in Hartford. 

The children of Isaac and Hannah, all born in Hartford, were: 

1. Sarah 5 , b. 1721. 

2. Mehitable 5 . bapt. March 30, 1723, m. Lamrock 3 Flower. HI 

3. Anne , bapt. 1725. 

4. Morgan 5 , bapt. 1728. 

5. Isaac , bapt. 1733. 

6. Uriah 5 , bapt. 1735. 

7. Ebenezer , bapt. 1737, d.y. 

8. Ebenezer , bapt. 1743. 

9. Deliverance 
Married second, Ruth Gaylord. 
Reference: #27, p. 273 and #162, p. 164. 

576. Rev. Israel Chauncey 

Born in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1644. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on March 14, 1703. 

Maimed first, Mary Nichols on January 8, 1667. 



The children of Israel and Mary, all born in Stratford, were: 

1. Charles 3 , b. 1668. 

2. Isaac 3 , b. October 5, 1670, m. Sarah Blackleach . 

3. Robert 3 , b. 1677. 

Married second, Sarah Hudson in 1684. Sarah Hudson was a sister of Abigail Hudson , who 

married (578) Richard Blackleach , on this chart. The only child of Israel and Sarah was 

Jerusha. 
Other information: 

Israel Chauncey graduated from Harvard in 1661. He probably studied medicine 

as well as theology. In 1665 he became the pastor of the church in Stratford, about fifteen 

miles from New Haven. 

Israel was a chaplain in King Philip's War. He was also a founder and trustee of 

Yale College in New Haven. He was chosen president of the college but he declined to 

serve. 
References: #26, p. 75 and #54, pp. 206-213. 

577. Marv 3 Nichols 



Born in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut in 1648. 
Chauncey on January 8, 16( 
#54, pp. 206-213. This re 
and Margery Washbourne . 



Married Israel Chauncey on January 8, 1667. 

Reference: #54, pp. 206-213. This reference shows that Mary's parents were Isaac Nichols 



39 



Chart II Biographies 

578. Richard Blackleach 

Born about 1654. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on September 4, 1731. 

Married first, Abigail Hudson of New Haven in Stratford on December 8, 1680. She died in 

Stratford in 1713. 
The children of Richard and Abigail, all probably born in Stratford, were: 

1. Sarah , b. about 1682. m. Rev. Isaac Chauncev . 

2. Richard, b. about 1683. 

3. John, died at sea in 1712. 

4. Samuel 

5. Rebecca 

6. Abigail 

7. Joseph, b. about 1695. 

8. Polly, b. about 1695, drowned at age eighteen. 

Married second, Elizabeth Herris in Stratford on August 27, 1717. She was the widow of Samuel 
Wheeler, Hugh Nesbitt and Edward Poisson. She had no children by any of her four 
husbands. She died in 1725. 

Other information: 

The ancestry of Richard is unknown. However, it is known that he was in 
Stratford, Connecticut by the fall of 1677. Richard was "one of the foremost men of 
business in the town for forty years." In May 1686 he and Daniel Shelton began careers as 
"big league shipping merchants" when they were allowed to build warehouses and wharves 
on the river, "as long as they allowed townspeople free wharfage.... By 1699, ... nobody had 
a larger estate than Richard Blackleach." He held the lease of the Stratford-Milford ferry 
for nearly thirty years. He was associated with the construction of the sloop Endeavor at 
Middletown, Connecticut, with which his second wife's father and brother, John Herris, 
were involved. In October 1686 Richard was at Barbados with Nathan Whelpley, master 
of the bark Laurel of Stratford. 

References: #24, #54, pp. 336 and 375, #102, v. I, pp. 80-81, #171, v. LR1, p. 432, #173, p. 
1155, and #226, pp. 38-44. 

580. John Ingram 

Bom about 1642, possibly in Hartford or Wethersfield, Connecticut. 

Died in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on June 22, 1722. 

Married Elizabeth 2 Gardner in Hadley on November 20, 1664. She died in Hadley in 1684. 

The children of John and Elizabeth, all bom in Hadley, were: 

1. John, b 1666. 

2. Jadiah, b. 1668. 

3. Samuel, b. 1670. 

4 Ebenezer, b 1672. 

5. Nathaniel , b October 8, 1674, m. Esther Smith . 

6 Jonathan, b 1676. He was killed by the Indians in the assault on Deerfield, 

Massachusetts on February 28, 1 704 during Queen Anne's War. 
7. Elizabeth, b 1679. 
8 Abigail, b. 1683. 

40 



Chart II Biographies 

Other information: 

John came to Hadley about 1662. 
References: #24, #88, v. JJ, p. 523, #169, #170, pp. 75-76, and #176, pp. 75-76. 

584. John' Petty 

Born in England, probably about 1635-1640. 

Died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on March 8, 1679/80. 

Married Ann Canning in Boston, Massachusetts on May 30, 1662. Her parentage and time and 

place of birth are unknown. Ann married second, Samuel Owen, in Springfield in 1681 and 

had three more children. 
The children of John and Ann, all except James born in Springfield, were: 

1. James , b. 1662/63 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 

2. John . b. November 9, 1666, m. Mary Taylor . 

3. Hannah , b. 1667, d.y. 

4. Mary 2 , b. 1670. 

5. Joseph 2 , b. 1672. 

6. Anna 2 , b. 1675. 

7. Ebenezer , b. 1678. 
Other information: 

John was probably a yeoman. His parentage and exact place of birth are unknown. 
The first record of him was in Boston in 1662 when he married Ann Canning. They 
moved shortly thereafter to Windsor, Connecticut and then to Springfield, Massachusetts 
about 1665. 
References: #23, v. II, p. 261, #24, #235, pp. 29-32, #236, pp. 5-8, and #310, v. 2, p. 620. 

586. James Taylor 

Born in England, probably about 1640. 

Died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on October 27, 1720. 
Married Mary Taylor on January 17, 1667/68, probably in Springfield. 

The children of James and Mary, the first eight born in Springfield and the last three in Suffield, 
Hartford, Connecticut, were: 

1. Rebecca 2 , b. 1668, d.y 

2. James 2 , b. 1669. 

3. Mary 2 , b. December 28, 1671, m. John 2 Petty . 

4. John 2 , b. 1673, d.y. 

5. Samuel 2 , b. 1674, d.y. 

6. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1678. 

7. Jonathan 2 , b. 1679. 

8. Ebenezer 2 , b. 1681, d.y. 

9. Thomas 2 , b. 1684. 

10. Samuel 2 , b. 1686. 

11. Rebecca 2 , b. 1689. 



Other information: 



41 



Chan II Biographies 

The ancestry of James is unknown. He is listed as a servant of Major Pynchon, 
which probably means that Pynchon paid James' passage from England and that he lived 
with Pynchon until the amount was paid in labor. James moved from Springfield to 
Suffield about 1 680, but moved back to Springfield later. None of his children appear to 
have remained in Suffield. 
References: #24, #25, p. 42, #88, v. IV, pp. 260-261, #235, p. 37, #236, p. 3 1, and #310, v. 2, 

p 643. 

587. Mary Taylor 

Bom in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on August 1, 1649. 
Died on March 18, 1700. 

Married James Taylor on January 17, 1667/68, probably in Springfield. 
References: #24, #25, p. 42, #236, p. 31, and #310, v. 2, p. 643. 

592. John 3 Porter 

Bom in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts in 1658. 
Died in Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts on March 9, 1753. 
Married Lydia Herrick in Wenham or Salem about 1680. 
The children of John and Lydia, all bom in Wenham, were: 

1. Samuel 4 , b. 1681. 

2. John 4 , b. 1683. 

3. Lydia 

4. Hannah 4 , b. 1687. 

5. Elizabeth 

6. Benjamin 

7. Nehemiah 4 , b. 1692. m. Hannah Smith . 

8. Jonathan 4 , b. 1696. 

9. Mehitable 4 , b. 1698. 

10. Mary 4 , b. 1700. 

11. Sarah 4 , b. 1706. 
Other information: 

John moved to Wenham about 1680. He was a maltster and lived on a farm, part 
of which he received from his grandfather, William 1 Dodge . 
References: #24 and #142, pp. 30-34. 

594. Hazadiah 2 Smith 

Bom in Woolwich, Maine in 1657. 
Died in 1735 

Married Hannah Grover of Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts on May 27, 1684. 
The children of Hazadiah and Hannah, all probably born in Beverly, were: 
1 Samuel 3 

2. Hazadiah 3 , b. 1686. 

3. James 



42 



Chart II Biographies 



4. Hannah . m. Nehemiah 4 Porter . 

5. Nehemiah 3 , b. 1699. 

6. Jonathan 

7. Joshua 



Other information: 

Hazadiah was captured by the Indians at Woolwich on August 13, 1676. When 
he was released he settled in Beverly. See the text for his father, (1 188) James 1 Smith on 
this chart, for details. 

Hazadiah was a carpenter and spent the rest of his life in Beverly. In 1690 he was 
a sergeant in the expedition against Crown Point. 
References: #24 and #142, pp. 70-71 . 

596. Samuel Chipman 

Born in Barnstable, Massachusetts on April 15, 1661. 
Died in Barnstable on June 17, 1723. 
Married Sarah Cobb in Barnstable on December 27, 1686. 
The children of Samuel and Sarah, all bom in Barnstable, were: 

1. Thomas 3 , b. 1687. 

2. Samuel 3 , b. 1689. 

3. John 3 , b. February 16, 1691, m. Rebecca Hale . 

4. Abigail 3 , b. 1692. 

5. Mercy , twin, b. 1694. 

6. Joseph , twin, b. 1694. 

7. Jacob 3 , b. 1695. 

8. Seth 3 ,b. 1697. 

9. Hannah 3 , b. 1699. 

10. Sarah 3 , b. 1701, d.y. 

11. Barnabas 3 , b. 1703. 
Other information: 

Samuel was a carpenter but farming was his principal business. He inherited his 
father's homestead about 1684 and greatly enlarged it. About 1705 it became the Chipman 
Tavern. From this tavern, the Boston-Barnstable Coach departed at 3:00 AM. The 
maximum capacity was seven passengers, who barely squeezed in. The first stop was at 
Sagamore for breakfast; luncheon was at Plymouth and supper in Boston after arrival, 
which sometimes that took place early in the morning, depending upon the weather. 
References: #24, #96, v. I, pp. 161-165, and #144, pp. 10-11. 

598. Dr. Robert 3 Hale 

Born in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts on November 3, 1668. 
Died in 1719, probably in Beverly. 

Married Elizabeth Clark in Beverly in February 1699/00. She married second, John Gilman. 
The children of Robert and Elizabeth are unknown except for my ancestor, Rebecca Hale, who 
was born in Beverly on November 19, 1701. Rebecca 4 married John Chipman. 

43 



Chart II Biographies 

Other information: 

Robert graduated from Harvard College in 1686. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 329, #143, p. 564, and #144, pp. 16-17. 

600. Lamrock 1 Hower. Sr. 

Bom in Whitwell, Rutlandshire, England about 1660. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut on June 19, 1716. 

Married Lydia Smith in Hartford about 1685. 

The children of Lamrock and Lydia, all born in Hartford, were: 

1. Lydia 2 , b. 1686. 

2. Lamrock 2 . Jr. . b. March 25, 1689, m. Ann 3 Watson . 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1692. 

4. John 2 , b. 1694. 

5. Mary 2 , b. 1697. 

6. Francis 2 , b. 1700. 

7. Ann 2 , b. 1703. 

8. Joseph 2 , b. 1706. 
References: #24, #27, p. 249, and #157. 

602. John 2 Watson. Jr. 

Bom in West Hartford, Connecticut in 1646. 

Died in West Hartford in 1730. 

Possibly married first, Ann (?) Nicholls. 

Married second, Sarah in Hartford about 1679. 



The children of John and Sarah, all bom in Hartford, were: 


1. 


John , b. 1680. 


2. 


Thomas 3 , b. 1682. 


3. 


Zachariah 3 , b. 1685. 


4. 


Ann . b. Mav 26, 1688, m. Lamrock Flower, Jr. 


5. 


Cyprian 3 , b. 1689. 


6. 


Sarah 3 , b. 1692. 


7. 


Caleb 3 , b 1695. 


References: 


#24 and #68, pp. 7-13. 




■3 

604. Nathaniel Goodwin 



Baptized in Hartford, Connecticut about 1660. 
Died in Hartford in November 1747. 

Married Mehitable Porter in Hartford or in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts about 1688. 
The children of Nathaniel and Mehitable, all bom in Hartford, were: 
1 Mehitable 

2. Hezekiah 4 , bapt. 1691/92. 

3. Benedicta 4 , bapt. 1693/94. 

4. Isaac . bapt. November 10, 1695, m. Hannah Morgan . 

44 



Chart II Biographies 

5. Abraham 4 , bapt. 1699. 

6. Stephen 4 , bapt. 1701. 

7. Eleazer 4 , bapt. 1703. 

8. Joanna 4 , bapt. 1705/06. 

9. Ruth 4 , bapt. 1707/08. 

10. Alice 4 , b. 1710. 

1 1 . Nathaniel 4 , bapt. 1 7 1 2, d.y. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel was a shoemaker. 
References: #24, #27, p. 270, #70, p. xv, and #161, pp. 229-230. 

605. Mehitable 3 Porter 

Born in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on September 15, 1673. 
Died on February 6, 1726, probably in Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Nathaniel Goodwin in Hartford or in Hadley about 1688. 
References: #24, #27, p. 270, and #70, p. xv. 

606. Thomas Morgan 

Died in 1725, probably in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married Rachel Merry in Hartford about 1691 . 

The children of Thomas and Rachel, all bom in Hartford, were: 

1. Thomas, bapt. 1692. 

2. Daughter, b. 1694. 

3. Sarah, bapt. 1696. 

4. Leah, b. 1701. 

5. Hannah , b. November 24, 1703, m. Isaac Goodwin . 

6. Rachel, b. 1706. 
References: #24 and #27, pp. 273 and 406. 

607. Rachel Merry 

Born in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts in 1670. 
Married Thomas Morgan in Hartford, Connecticut about 1691. 
Other information: 

Rachel's brother, Cornelius Merry, Jr. had moved from Northampton to 
Hartford sometime before 1702 and Rachel apparently moved with him. 
References: #24, #27, p. 400, and #88, v. Ill, p. 200. 

1152. Rev. Charles 1 Chauncev 

Born in 1 589 and baptized in Yardley-Bury Church, Hertfordshire, England on November 5, 1592. 
Died in Cambridge, Massachusetts on February 19, 1672. Buried in Cambridge. 
Married Catharine 1 Eyre , in England on March 17, 1630. 
The children of Charles and Catharine were: 

1 . Sarah 2 , b. 1 63 1 in Ware, England. 

45 



Chart II Biographies 

2. Isaac 2 , b. 1632 in Ware, England. 

3. Ichabod", b. 1635 in Ware, England. 

4. Barnabas", b. 1637 in England. 

5. Nathaniel", b. 1639 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

6. Elnathan 2 , b. 1639 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

7. Israel" , b. 1644 in Scituate, Massachusetts. 

8. Hannah" 
Other information: 

Charles Chauncey was educated at Trinity College in Cambridge, England and 
received his Bachelor of Divinity there in 1624. In 1627 he became vicar of Ware in 
England. He left England with his wife and four children in the latter part of 1637 and 
arrived in Plymouth Colony a few days before the great earthquake of June 1, 1638. 

Charles was a minister first at Plymouth Colony and then, starting in 1641, at the 
church in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. In November 1654 he became the second 
president of Harvard College in Cambridge, Massachusetts and continued in office until his 
death in 1672. Harvard was founded in 1636, six years after the establishment of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony and sixteen years after the landing of the Mayflower. The six 
sons of Charles and Catharine were all educated at Harvard and all became preachers. All 
six may also have studied medicine and become physicians. 
References: #26, pp. 74 and 75, #54, and #124, p. 362. 

1153. Catharine Eyre 

Born in Sarum, Wiltshire, England in 1602. 

Died in Cambridge, Massachusetts on January 23, 1667. Buried in Cambridge. 

Married Rev Charles Chauncey in England on March 17, 1630. 

Other information: 

Catharine (Eyre) Chauncey immigrated to Plymouth Colony in 1637 with her 
husband and four children. 
Reference: #54. This reference shows that Catharine's parents were Robert Eyre and Agnes 

(or Ann) Still . 

1154. Isaac Nichols 

Born in England. 

Died in 1695, probably in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut. 
Married Margery Washboume in Fairfield, Connecticut about 1647. 
The children of Isaac and Margery, all born in Stratford, were: 

1 Mary . b. February 2, 1647/48, m. Israel 2 Chauncev . 

2. Sarah 3 , b 1649. 

3. Josiah 3 , b 1651/52. 

4 Isaac 3 , b 1654. 

5 Jonathan 3 , b 1655. 

6. Ephraim 3 , b 1657. 

7. Patience 3 , b. 1659/60. 

8. Temperence 3 , b 1662. 



46 



Chart II Biographies 

9. Margery 3 , b. 1663. 

10. Benjamin 3 , b. 1665/66. 

11. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1668. 
Other information: 

Isaac was in Stratford by 1639 and was one of the first settlers there. He was a 
soapboiler and left a good estate. 
References: #24, #88, pp. 279-280, and #102, p. 435. 

1158. John Hudson 

Born about 1616. 

Died in New Haven, Connecticut in October 1690. 

Married Abigail Turner in New Haven on September 2, 1651. She died in 1 693 . 

The children of John and Abigail, all probably born in New Haven, were: 

1. Abigail , b. March 25, 1654, m. Richard Blackleach . 

2. Sarah, b. 1657. She married Israel Chauncey as his second wife. 

3. Mary, b. 1660, d.y. 

4. John, b. 1663, d.y. 

5. Samuel, b. 1664. 

6. John, b. 1667. 

7. Mary, b. 1670, d.y. 

8. Anna, b. 1671, d.y. 

9. Nathaniel 

References: #24, #54, p. 375, #88, v. U, p. 488, #171, pp. 783 and 1866, and #226, p. 40. 

1162. Samuel 1 Gardner 

Born about 1615, probably in England. 

Died in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on November 22, 1696. 

Married first, an unknown wife. 

Married second, Elizabeth in Hartford, Connecticut about 1647. She died in Hadley in 

1676. 
Samuel probably had ten children in all. The first four were apparently by the first wife. The last 

six were by his second wife, Elizabeth . My ancestor, Elizabeth Gardner , who 

married John Ingram was by the second wife, Elizabeth . 

Other information: 

Samuel was from Hartford or Wethersfield and removed to Hadley in 1663. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 230, #170, p. 55, and #176, p. 55. 

1174. Jonathan Taylor 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut in early October 1683. 

Married Mary Wright in Springfield about 1648. She died on September 9, 1683. 

The children of Jonathan and Mary, all probably born in Springfield, were: 

1. Mary , b, August 1. 1649. m. James 1 Taylor . 

2. Ann, b. 1651, d.y. 

3. Samuel, b. 1652. 

47 



Chart II Biographies 

4. Jonathan, b. 1655. 

5. Rebecca, b. 1657. 
6 Thomas, b. 1660. 

Other information: 

Jonathan came to Springfield in 1649. His ancestry is unknown. When he died in 
Suffield in 1683 he was probably visiting one of his sons, Samuel or Jonathan. 
References: #24, #25, p. 42, #85, p. 447, #88, v. IV, p. 262, and #236, p. 3 1 . 

1184. Samuel 2 Porter 

Bom in 1636, probably in England. 

Died in 1 660 at age twenty-four. 

Married Hannah Dodge in Salem Essex, Massachusetts about 1657. She married second, 

Thomas Woodbury in 1661 . 
Samuel and Hannah had one child, John 3 Porter , born in Salem in 1658. He married Lydia 

Herrick . 
Other information: 

Samuel was a mariner and owned a farm in Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts, which 

he willed one half to his wife, Hannah, and one half to his son, John . Samuel died while at 

sea while en route to Barbados. 
References: #24, #88, v. m, p. 463, and #142, pp. 30-3 1 . 

1186. Henry Herrick 

Baptized on January 1 6, 1 640, probably in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. 
Died in June 1 702, either in Salem or nearby Beverly. 
Married first, Lydia ( 9 ) Woodbury in Salem or Beverly about 1660. 
The children of Henry and Lydia, all bom in Salem or Beverly, were: 

1. Lydia , b. 1661. m. John 3 Porter . 

2. Joseph , b. 1666. 

3. Elizabeth 3 

4. Samuel 3 , b. 1670. 

5. Jonathan 3 , b. 1672. 

Married second, the widow Sarah Alcock Gddings about 1692. 
Other information: 

Henry was not prominent in public affairs and devoted himself wholly to the 
management of his estate. 
References: #24 and #142, pp. 67-68. 

1188. James' Smith 

James Smith is said to have come from Cornwall, England. He lived on a large farm in Woolwich, 
Maine on the Kennebec River which he had purchased from an Indian chief. Woolwich is 
about five miles west of Boothbay Harbor. James died in Woolwich in 1660. 

James married Elizabeth about 1647 in Woolwich. Elizabeth married second, Richard 

Hammond about 1666 and she married third, John Rawdon after 1676. 

The children of James and Elizabeth, all bom in Woolwich, were: 

48 



Chart II Biographies 

1. Hazadiah , b. 1657. m. Hannah Grover . 

2. James 

3. Walter 2 

4. Samuel , killed by the Indians in 1676 during King Philip's War. 
Other information: 

Richard Hammond and his family, sixteen persons in all, lived in a fort on the 
Kennebec River which he probably built himself. He carried on trade with the Indians, and 
they believed that he had cheated them. On the evening of August 13, 1676, a party of 
Indians appeared at Richard's house. Richard and his stepson, Samuel Smith, were killed, 
as were some of the servants. The rest of the family were carried into captivity. When 
released, the Smith brothers, Hazadiah 2 . James 2 , and Walter 2 settled in Beverly, Essex, 
Massachusetts. 
References: #24 and #142, pp. 67-70. 

1190. John 2 Grover 

Born in England about 1628. 

Died in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts in August 1716. 

Married Sarah Barney in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts on May 13, 1656. She died in November 

1662. 
The children of John and Sarah, all probably born in Salem, were: 

1. John 

2. Sarah 3 , b. 1659. 

3. Abigail 

4. Hannah 3 , d.y. 

5. Hannah 3 , b. 1662, m. Hazadiah Smith . 
Other information: 

John probably came to America in 1633, at age five, with his widowed 
father, Edmund Grover . 
References: #24, #88, v. H, p. 320, #142, p. 72, and #280, v. II, p. 825. 

1192. John 1 Chipman 

Born in Bryant's Puddle, Dorset, England in 1620. 

Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts on April 7, 1708. 

Married first, Hope 2 Howland in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1646. She died in 1683. 

The children of John and Hope, all except the first born in Barnstable, were: 

1 . Elizabeth 2 , b. 1 648 in Plymouth. 

2. Hope 2 , b. 1652. 

3. Lydia 2 , b. 1654. 

4. John 2 , b. 1656/57, d.y. 

5. Hannah 2 , b. 1658. 



6. Samuel 2 ., b. April 15, 1661, m. SarahlCobb. 



7. Ruth 2 , b. 1663. 

8. Bethia 2 , b. 1666. 



49 



Chart II Biographies 

9. Mercy 2 , b. 1668. 

10. John 2 , b. 1670. 
11 Desire 2 , b. 1673. 

Married second, Ruth Sargent in Barnstable in 1684. She was the widow of both Jonathan 

Winslow and Rev. Richard Bourne. 
Other information: 

In May 1637 at age seventeen, John came to America with his older cousin, 
Richard Derby. John apparently came as a servant, bound to Richard for several years. 

From 1637 to 1641, John worked as a carpenter, erecting homes. About 1641- 
1642, John may have returned to England to redress about his inheritance which was due 
him his father having died twenty years earlier. In any case, he returned to Plymouth and 
married Hope Howland in 1646. 

For the first three years after John and Hope were married, they probably lived in 
rented quarters in Plymouth while he plied his carpentry trade. However, in 1649 John and 
his family moved to Barnstable, Massachusetts, having that year bought an eight-acre 
homestead. 

After John's second marriage in 1684 to Ruth Sargent, he moved to Sandwich, 
Massachusetts, where he died in 1708. He is buried in the Bourne plot, Ruth in the center 
between her two husbands, John Chipman and Rev. Richard Bourne. As of 1970, John's 
grave marker was very legible. 
References: #24, #96, v. I, pp. 153-165, #144, pp. 1-8, #148, pp. 11-12, and #285. 

1193. Hope 2 Howland 

Bom in Plymouth, Massachusetts on August 30, 1629. 

Died in Barnstable, Massachusetts on January 8, 1683. She is buried there in Lothrop's Hill 

Cemetery. 
Married John Chipman in Plymouth about 1646. 
References: #24, #96, v. I, p. 157, #123, p. 311, #144, pp. 4-8, and #148. 

1194. Henry' Cobb 

Bom in England 

Died in 1679, probably in Barnstable, Massachusetts. 

Married first, Patience Hurst in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 163 1. She died in 1648. 
The children of Henry and Patience were: 
1 John ,b 1632 in Plymouth. 

2. James', b 1634 in Plymouth. 

3. Mary , b. 1637 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

4. Hannah 2 , b 1639 in Scituate. 

5 Patience 2 , b. 1641/42 in Barnstable. 

6 Gershom 2 , b 1644/45 in Barnstable. 

7 Eleazer 2 , b. 1648 in Barnstable. 

Married second, Sarah Hinckley in Plymouth on December 12, 1649. 
The children of Henry and Sarah, all bom in Barnstable, were: 
1. Mehitable 2 , b 1651, d.y. 

50 



Chart II Biographies 

2. Samuel 2 , b. 1654. 

3. Sarah 2 , b. 1658, d.y. 

4. Jonathan 2 , b. 1660. 

5. Sarah 2 , b. March 10, 1662/63, m. Samuel 2 Chipman . 

6. Henry 2 , b. 1665. 

7. Mehetabel 2 , b. 1667, d.y. 

8. Experience , b. 1671, d.y. 
Other information: 

The date of Henry's immigration to America is unknown, but he was in Plymouth 
by 1632, in Scituate by 1633 and in Barnstable by 1639. Henry was a Puritan and was 
probably a member of the Congregational Church. 
References: #24, #88, v. I, p. 413, and #96, v. I, pp. 166-172. 

1196. Rev. John 2 Hale 

Born in Charlestown (now part of Boston) on June 3, 1636. 

Died in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts on May 15, 1700. 

Married first, Rebecca Byley in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on December 15, 1664. She died 

in 1683. 
The children of John and Rebecca, both born in Beverly, were: 

1. Rebecca , b. 1666. 

2. Robert . b. November 3, 1668, m. Elizabeth Clark . 

Married second, Sarah Noyes in March 1684. John and Sarah had four children in the period 

1685-1692. She died in 1697. 
Married third, Elizabeth Somerby Clark in 1698. 
Other information: 

John graduated from Harvard College in 1657. In 1667 he was ordained as the 

first minister in Beverly. He preached against witches in 1692 until his second wife, Sarah 

Noyes, was accused of being a witch and then he wrote ably against the witchcraft 

persecutions. 
References: #24, #88, v. H, pp. 329-330, and #1 16, p. 98. 

1202. Joseph Smith 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut in 1689/90. 

Married Lydia 2 Hewett in Hartford on April 20, 1656. 

Joseph and Lydia had fifteen children, all born in Hartford, in the period 1657-1674. My ancestor, 

Lydia Smith , was the seventh child, born on February 14, 1665/66. She married Lamrock 

Flower. Sr. 
References: #24, #27, pp. 543-544, and #157. 

1204. John 1 Watson. Sr. 

Born in 1610, probably in England. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut between March and June 1650. His three children were still minors 
at the time of his death. 

FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
35 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
SALT LAKE CITY, UT/ H 84150 51 

0380502 



Chart II Biographies 

Married Margaret 1 Smith in Hartford about 1641. She died in 1683. 
The children of John and Margaret, all born in Hartford, were: 
1. John . Jr. . b. 1646. m. Sarah . 



2. Sarah* , m. (869) John' Merrill on Chart XI. 

3. Mary 2 , m. (865) John 2 Seymour on Chart XI. 
Other information: 

A tradition among the descendants of John Watson is that he was a passenger on 
the same ship from England as Margaret Smith and that he saved her from drowning when 
she had fallen overboard. Subsequently they were married in America. 
References: #24, #27, p. 639, #68, pp. 5-8, and #88, v. IV, p. 437. 

1205. Margaret 1 Smith 

This is the same person as ( 1 73 1 ) Margaret 1 Smith and ( 1 73 9) Margaret Smith , both on Chart XI. 

Probably bom in England. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut between March and September 1683. 

Married John Watson in Hai 

References: #24 and #27. 



Married John Watson in Hartford about 1641 



1208. William 2 Goodwin 

Born in 1 629 in England or in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Died in Hanford, Connecticut on October 15, 1689. 

Married Susanna Fruen about 1656, probably in Hartford. She married second, John Shepard in 

1670. She died in 1698, but nothing else is known of her. 
The children of William and Susanna were: 

1. Susanna 

2. William 3 , b. 1658. 

3. Nathaniel 3 , b. about 1660, m. Mehitable 3 Porter . 
References: #24, #27, p. 269, #70, p. xv, and #161, pp. 227-228 

1210. Samuel 2 Porter 

Born in 1626, probably in Messing, Essex, England. 

Died in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on September 6, 1689. 

Married Hannah Stanley in Hartford, Connecticut about 1659. She died in 1708. 

The children of Samuel and Hannah, all born in Hadley, were: 

1 Samuel 3 , b. 1 660. He was the first child bom in Hadley. 

2. Child 3 , b 1662, d.y. 

3 Thomas 3 , b. 1663, d.y. 

4. Hezekiah 3 , b. 1665. 

5. John 3 , b. 1666. 

6 Hannah 3 , b 1670 

Mehitable 3 . b September 15, 1673, m. Nathaniel 3 Goodwin . 
8. Experience 3 , b 1676. 



52 



Chart II Biographies 

9. Ichabod 3 , b. 1678. 

10. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1680. 

11. Thomas 3 , b. about 1683. 
Other information: 

Samuel probably came to America with his parents on the ship Susan and Ellen, 

arriving in Dorchester on July 17, 1638. The family moved to Windsor, Hartford, 

Connecticut in 1639. Samuel moved to Hadley about 1659, shortly after he married 

Hannah. 

References: #24, #70, p. 170, #88, v. IJJ, p. 463, #115, pp. 620-621, #151, pp. 111-112, and 

#170, pp. 1 1 1-1 12 of genealogies by L.M. Boltwood in the back of the book. 

1214. Cornelius Merry 

Cornelius Merry was an Irishman. 

Married Rachel Ballard in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on August 11, 1663. 

The children of Cornelius and Rachel, all probably born in Northampton, were: 

1 . John, d.y. 

2. John, b. 1665. 

3. Sarah, b. 1668. 

4. Rachel , b. 1670, m. Thomas Morgan . 

5. Cornelius 

6. Leah 

References: #24 and #88, v. TH, p. 200. 

2304. George Chauncey 

Quoting from reference #54: 

" George Chauncy . second son of Henry , and brother of John, became the representative of the 
family. He married Jane, daughter and heir of John Cornwall of Yardley, by which 
marriage he became possessed not only of the manor of Yardley, but of several other 
manors and estates in addition to those of his paternal ancestors, of New Place, Giffards, 
Netherhall, &c. By this marriage to Jane Cornwall he had several children. After Jane's 
death George married Agnes Welsh , widow of Edward Humberston, by whom he had 
George, Edward, and Charles ." 

References: #54, p. 43 and #164. These two references trace the Chauncey family line back to 
Chauncy de Chauncy, a Norman nobleman who came to England with William the 
Conqueror in 1066. 

2308. Francis' Nichols 

Born in England, probably about 1590. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut about 1650. 

Married first, unknown wife in England, probably about 1610. 

The children of Francis and his unknown first wife, all born in England, were: 

1. John 

2. Isaac 2 , m. Margery Washbourne . 

3. Daughter 

53 



Chan II Biographies 

4 Caleb 2 

Married second, Anne Wines of Southold, Long Island, New York in 1645 and had one daughter, 

Anne. 
Other information: 

Francis emigrated from England and lived in Stratford, where he died. He left only 

a small estate. 
References: #24, #88, pp. 279-280, and #102, p. 434. 

2318. Nathaniel 1 Turner 

Bom in England 
Died at sea in 1646. 

Married Eli/aheth in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts about 163 1. 

The children of Nathaniel and Elizabeth were: 
1 Mary 

2. Nathaniel 2 

3. Rebecca 

4. Abigail* , m. John Hudson . 

5. Hannah 2 , bapt. 1639. 
6 Isaac 2 , b 1640. 

Other information: 

Nathaniel 1 came to Massachusetts in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet and settled in 
Lynn. In 1637, his home was destroyed by fire and that may have been partially 
responsible for his decision to move to New Haven, Connecticut in 1638. He was an 
original settler in New Haven and, having been an experienced officer in the Pequot War in 
1636, he was made captain of the militia in the new settlement at New Haven. 

Nathaniel was also one of the purchasers of Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut in 

1640 He was always a man of great enterprise and public spirit. In January 1646 he sailed 

for London in the ill-fated ship with Capt. Lamberton and others. The ship did not arrive in 

London and all were lost at sea. 

References: #24, #76, pp 121-122, 293-298, and 537-541, #88, v. IV, p. 347, #107, p. 52, and 

#171, p. 1866. 

2368. John 1 Porter 

Bom in England about 1 596. 

Died in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts on September 6, 1676. 

Married Mary H) Gardner , probably in England about 1630. She died in 1684/85. 

The children of John and Mary, the first two probably bom in England, were: 



John 2 , b 1634 



Samuel . b 1636, m. Hannah Dodge 

3 Joseph 2 , b 1638. 

4 Benjamin 2 , b 1639. 

5 Israel 2 , b 1643. 

6. Mary 2 , b 1645. 

7. Jonathan 2 , b. 1648 



54 



Chart II Biographies 



8. Sarah 2 , b. 1649. 



Other information: 

John was first in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts by 1637. In 1643 he moved 
to Salem (Danvers). He spent his whole life acquiring land, never seeming satisfied unless 
he could buy all the land adjoining his own. At the time of his death he was the largest 
landowner in the area. 

Note: 

There were at least three John Porters who came to America in Colonial times. 
They were: (a) John Porter. Sr. . ancestor #2420 on this chart and ancestor #1556 on 
Chart VJU, the same person, who married Rose White and lived in Windsor, Connecticut; 
(b) John Porter , ancestor #2368 on this chart, who married Mary (?) Gardner and lived in 
Salem, Massachusetts; and (c) John Porter who married Margaret Odding and lived in 
Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. This latter John Porter is not my ancestor. 

References: #24, #88, v. JU, p. 461, and #142, pp. 20-30. 

2370. William 1 Dodge 

Born in England about 1604, probably in Dorsetshire. 

Died between 1685 and 1692, probably in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts. 

Married Elizabeth in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts about 1635. 

The children of William and Elizabeth, all probably born in Beverly, were: 

1. Josiah , killed by the Indians during the Pequot War in 1676. 

2. John 2 , b. 1636. 

3. William 2 , b. 1640. 

4. Hannah 2 , b. July 24, 1642, m. Samuel 2 Porter . 
Other information: 

William came to Massachusetts on the Lion's Whelpe in 1629. He was a 
husbandman and apparently acquired a substantial estate in Beverly. 
References: #24, #88, v. U, p. 57, and #142, pp. 58-59. 

2372. Henry' Herrick 

Born in Loughborough, Leicester, England in 1604. 
Died in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts in 1671. 
Married Edith Lasken in Salem about 1632. 

Henry and Edith had about fifteen children, all of whom were probably born in Salem or nearby 
Beverly. Those who survived were as follows: 

1 . Thomas 

2. Zacharie 2 , b. 1636. 

3. Ephraim , b. 1638. 

4. Henry 2 , bapt. January 16, 1640, m. Lydia . 

5. Joseph 2 , b. 1644. 

6. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1647. 

7. John 2 , b. 1650. 

8. Benjamin 
Other information: 

55 



Chart II Biographies 

The name Herrick is Scandinavian in origin but Henry's ancestors lived in England 
for many generations It is not known when Henry came to America, but it is probable that 
he first came to Virginia and from there went to Salem. Later he moved to Beverly. Soon 
after he arrived in Salem he bought large tracts of land and gave a large farm to each of his 
sons. He was a Puritan and he and his wife, Edith, were founders of the first church in 
Beverly. 
References: #24 and # 1 42, pp. 60-67. 

2373. Edith 2 Lasken 

Bom in 1614, probably in England. 
Died in Salem Essex, Massachusetts after 1671. 
Married Henry Herrick in Salem about 1632. 
Other information: 

Edith was the daughter of Hugh and Alise Lasken . Little is known of the Lasken 
family except that Hugh was one of the proprietors of Salem in 1635. 
References: #24 and # 1 42, p. 64. 

2380. Edmund Grover 

Bom in England about 1 60 1 . 

Died in Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts on June 11, 1683. 

Married first, an unknown wife in England before 1628. They had one child, John Grover . born in 
England about 1628. He married Sarah Barney in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts in 1656. 

Married second, Margaret in Salem about 1643 and had four more children. 

Other information: 

Edmund came to America in 1633, probably as a widower, and settled first in 
Salem but later moved to Beverly. He was a shoemaker. 
References: #88, v. n, p. 320 and #280. v. n, p. 826. 

2382. Jacob Barney 

Bom in England about 1600. He was probably a son of Edward Barney of Braddenham, 

Buckinghamshire, England. 
Died in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts on April 28, 1673. 

Married first, Anna , probably in England, about 163 1. She died in Salem after 1639. 

The children of Jacob^and Anna, all except the first probably bom in Salem, were: 

1. Jacob 2 , b 1632 in England. 

2. Hannah 2 , b 1634. 

3 Sarah_, b. 1636, m. John 2 Grover . 

4 John 2 , b 1639. 

Married second, Elizabeth . There is no record of any children from this union. 

Other information: 

Jacob came to America in 1634 and settled in Salem. He was a tailor and a large 
land holder He was many times a trial juror and a grand juror. He was often a selectman 
and several times was elected to the General Court. 
References #24, #142, pp 73-74, and #280, v. I, pp. 104-108. 

56 



Chart II Biographies 

2384. Thomas Chipman 

Born in the parish district of Whitechurch, Canonicorum, Dorset, England about 1583. 

Died in Bryant's Puddle, Dorset, England about 1623. 

Married an unknown wife about 1618-1619. See reference #144 for the uncertainty about his 

wife's identity. 
Thomas' children, all born in Bryant's Puddle, were: 

1 . John' , b. 1 620, m. Hope 2 Howland . 

2. Hannah 

3. Thomasine 
Other information: 

Thomas inherited from his father (name unknown) farmlands, a mill, and buildings, 
including tenements in addition to his own dwelling. When about fifteen years old he 
apparently turned this property over to his cousin for unknown reasons. Thomas and his 
wife lived in a humble cottage in Bryant's Puddle after he was "cut off' by his cousin. 
Reference: #144, p. xxv. 

2386. John 1 Howland 

Born in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England about 1 592. 

Died at the home of his son Jabez Howland in Plymouth, Massachusetts on February 23, 1672 at 

age eighty. Buried in the cemetery atop Burial Hill in Plymouth. 
Married Elizabeth 2 Tilley in Plymouth about March 25, 1623. John was thirty-one and Elizabeth 

was sixteen. 
The children of John and Elizabeth, the first six probably born in Plymouth and the last four born in 

Rocky Nook, Plymouth, Massachusetts, were: 

1. Desire , probably b. 1625. 

2. John 2 , b. 1627. 

3. Hope 2 , b. August 30, 1629, m. John' Chipman . 

4. Elizabeth 2 , b. about 163 1 . 

5. Lydia , b. about 1633. 

6. Hannah , b. about 1637. 

7. Joseph , b. about 1640. 

8. Jabez 2 , b. about 1644. 

9. Ruth 2 , b. about 1646. 

10. Isaac 2 , b. 1649. 
Other information: 

Rocky Nook was originally part of the town of Plymouth but is now a part of the 

town of Kingston. 

John 1 Howland was a son of Henrv Howland and Margaret who lived in 

Fenstanton, a town about nine miles northwest of Cambridge, England. Henry and 
Margaret had at least four other sons, Arthur, George, Henry, Jr., and Humphrey. Arthur 
and Henry came to America about 1623. They both settled in Duxbury, Plymouth, 
Massachusetts and later joined the Quakers. 



57 



Chart II Biographies 



John 1 Howland was a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620 at age twenty-eight. 

He had the dubious distinction of falling off the ship in a storm. Quoting from reference 

#146: 

"In sundry of these storms the winds were so fierce and the seas so high, as 
they could not bear a knot of sail, but were forced to hull 3 for divers days 
together And in one of them as they thus lay at hull in a mighty storm, a 
lusty 6 young man called John Howland, coming upon some occasion above 
the gratings was, with a seele c of the ship, thrown into sea; but it pleased 
God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung overboard and 
ran out at length. Yet he held his hold (though he was sundry fathoms 
under water) till he was hauled up by the same rope to the brim of the 
water, and then with a boat hook and other means got into the ship again 
and his life saved. And though he was something ill with it, yet he lived 
many years after and became a profitable member both in church and 
commonwealth." 

*To heave or lay-to under very short sail and drift with the wind, 
lively, merry; no sexual connotation. 
Tloll or pitch. 

The Mayflower first anchored at what is now Provincetown on Cape Cod on 
November 21, 1620. During the next five weeks, the passengers and crew made a number 
of landings, including three major expeditions. On the third expedition a site for a 
permanent settlement was found at what was to become the town of Plymouth. Among 
the sixteen men on this third expedition were Governor John Carver, William Bradford 
(second governor), Capt. Myles Standish, John Howland . and Edward 1 Tilley , father of 
John's future wife, Elizabeth Tilley . On December 15, the Mayflower set sail from 
Provincetown and arrived at Plymouth on December 26. The Mayflower remained 
anchored there until it left for England in April 1621. 

On the Mayflower passenger list John Howland was listed as the indentured 
manservant of Governor John Carver who died in April 1621 while he was in a field 
planting corn Thereafter, the thirty-one-year-old William Bradford was elected as the 
second governor of Plymouth Colony. John Carver and his wife, Katherine, had no living 
children but probably had two children who died young. Katherine died in the summer of 
1 62 1 and John Howland fell heir to the Carver household. Plymouth was a commune at 
that time and upon Mrs. Carver's death the church would divide their things among the 
community John Howland being the oldest man in the house became head of the 
household Other members of the household after the deaths of the Carvers were 
Elizabeth Tilley . a lad William Latham and Desire Minter, a fifteen-year-old girl who had 
come on the Mayflower in the care of the Carvers. 

John Howland was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact on the 
Mayflower anchored at Provincetown on November 21, 1620 and he became a leader of 
the colony. In 1641, 1645, 1647, and 1648 John represented Plymouth at the General 
Court. In 1641, 1644, and 1647-1651 he was one of the assessors of Plymouth. In 1652, 
1659, 1661-1668, and 1670 he was a deputy to the General Court. In 1655 and 1666 he 
was a selectman in Plymouth. 



58 



Chart II Biographies 

In 1626 John was one of the fifty-eight "Purchasers" who bought the enterprise at 
Plymouth Colony from the "London Adventurers." And in 1627 he was one of the twelve 
men called the "Undertakers" who assumed all of the debt of the colony in exchange for 
certain monopolies, such as the fur trade, granted to them by their fellow colonists. See 
Appendix 2. 

In 1628 the colonists from Plymouth established a fur-trading post at Cushnoc on 
the Kennebec River in Maine. Cushnoc is at the present site of Augusta. No visible 
evidence of this trading post remains on the surface, but in the 1980s archaeologists 
definitely located the site immediately adjacent to the Fort Western Museum and the city 
hall in Augusta. John Howland was in charge of this trading post at least in 1634 and 
perhaps longer. Some historians believe that some of John's children may have been born 
there, but the archaeological evidence shows that the trading post was small. It probably 
only accommodated two or three men, not whole families. The trading post at Cushnoc 
was apparently little used by the Plymouth colonists after about 1640 and the post was 
entirely abandoned by 1676. 

John lived in the town of Plymouth until 1638 when he and his family moved to a 
farm at Rocky Nook. There is a stone monument on Howlands Lane in Kingston marking 
the site of the farm. 

Here Stood The Home Of John Howland 

And His Wife 

Elizabeth Tilley Howland 

From 163 8 Until His Death, Feb. 23, 1672 

Both Were Passengers In The Ship "Mayflower" 

The Howland House in Plymouth is the only house left standing in Plymouth where 
the colonists actually lived. To attend church, John and Elizabeth spent part of the winters 
there. The house was owned by their son Jabez 2 Howland. After John's death in 1672 and 
a fire that destroyed their farm home Elizabeth lived with Jabez and his family in the 
Howland House. 
References: #24, #104, p. 47, #123, pp. 27, 43, 104, 179, 259, 310-312, and 419, #124, pp. 9 

and 227-229, #144, pp. 2-4, #148, #156, pp. 84-91, #163, v. I, pp. 1-8, #281, and 

#284. 

2387. Elizabeth 2 Tillev 

Baptized in Henlow, Bedfordshire, England on August 30, 1607. 

Died in Swansea, Bristol, Massachusetts on December 21, 1687 at age eighty. She is buried in the 

Little Neck Cemetery in East Providence, Rhode Island. 
Married John 1 Howland in Plymouth, Massachusetts about March 25, 1623 at age sixteen. 

Other information: 

Elizabeth was a Mayflower passenger at age thirteen. She came with her parents, 
John' and Joan 1 fHursf) Tillev . John and Joan had been married in Henlow on September 
20, 1596. Joan was the widow of Thomas Rogers with one child. Elizabeth was the fifth 
and youngest child of John 1 and Joan 1 (Hursf) Tillev . All of their five children were born in 
Henlow. 



59 



Chart II Biographies 

Elizabeth was the only one of the five children to come to America with their 
parents on the Mayflower in 1620. There is evidence that John Tilley moved at least some 
of his family ~ his wife and daughter Elizabeth - to the English Separatist settlement in 
Leyden, Holland some time before the Mayflower voyage. This was possibly as early as his 
brother Edward 1 Tilley and his wife, Ann 1 Cooper, had gone to Leyden; they were there at 
least as early as 1616. 

Both John' and Joan' (Hurst) Tilley died before the first summer at Plymouth, as 
did Edward 1 and Ann 1 (Cooper) Tilley. Thus, Elizabeth lost both of her parents and her 
aunt and uncle in Plymouth when she was only thirteen. 

John 1 Tilley and his brother Edward 1 Tilley as well as Elizabeth's future husband, 
John Howland . were among the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. 

Elizabeth lived in Plymouth with her husband and family until 1638 when they 
moved to a farm at Rocky Nook. This was originally part of the town of Plymouth but is 
now a part of the town of Kingston, Massachusetts. After her husband died in 1672 
Elizabeth moved to live with her son Jabez Howland in Plymouth. In 1680 she moved to 
live with her daughter Lydia (Howland) Brown in Swansea, Massachusetts where she died 
in 1687. 
References: #85, pp. 454-455, #124, pp. 408- 412, #144, p. 4, #154, pp. 87-88, #160, pp. 153- 

157, #163, pp. 2-3, #329, and #330, pp. 43-44. 

2390. Samuel 1 Hinckley 

Baptized in Tenterden, Kent, England on May 25, 1589. Samuel was the son of Robert and 

Elizabeth Hinckley . 
Died in Barnstable, Massachusetts on October 31, 1662. 
Married first, Sarah Soule in Hawkhurst, Kent, England on May 7, 1617. Sarah was the daughter 

of Thomas and Mary (Indenden) Soule . Sarah died in Barnstable in 1656. 
Samuel and Sarah had fifteen children. The first seven were born in England but three died before 

the family immigrated to America in 1634. One of the four who immigrated was my 

ancestor, Sarah' Hinckley . She was baptized on November 22, 1629. She married Henry' 

Cobb in 1649. 
Married second, Bridget, the widow of Robert Bodfish, in Barnstable in 1657. There were no 

children by this union. 
Other information: 

In 1634 Samuel brought his wife, Sarah, and their four children to America on the 

Hercules. They came through Boston and settled in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

There was a total of 102 passengers, all from Tenterden, England, and more than half 

settled in Scituate. In 1639, Samuel and his family moved to Barnstable where he was a 

juror, town officer, surveyor of highways, and lieutenant in the militia. 
References: #24, #96, v. IT pp. 30-33, and #150, pp. 142-143. 

2392. Robert 1 Hale 
Born in England 

Died on July 16, 1659, either in Charlestown (now part of Boston) or in Maiden, five miles north 
of Boston. 



60 



Chart II Biographies 

Married Joanna (?) Cutter in England about 1629. She married second, Richard Jacob in 

Charlestown in 1662. 
The children of Robert and Joanna, all probably born in Charlestown, were: 

1 . John 2 , b. June 3, 1636, m. Rebecca 2 Bvlev . 

2. Mary 2 , bapt. 1639. 

3. Zechary 2 ,b. 1641, d.y. 

4. Samuel 2 , b. 1644. 

5. Joanna 

6. Zechary 
Other information: 

Robert came to America with his wife, Joanna, in the Winthrop Fleet in 1630. His 
place of origin is unknown. Robert was one of the first members of the church at 
Charlestown. He was a carpenter. 
References: #24, #85, p. 207, #88, v. JJ, pp. 329-330, and #107, p. 73. 

2394. Henry 1 Bvlev 

Born in England in 1612. 

Died in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1640. 

Married Rebecca Swayne in St. Edward, Salisbury, England on January 21, 1632/33. 

It is not known how many children Henry and Rebecca had, but they had at least one, my ancestor, 

2 2 

Rebecca Byley . bora in England, probably in 1638 or 1639. Rebecca Byley married 
John Hale . 
Other information: 

Henry was a tanner and an original settler in Salisbury in 1639. He came to 
America in the Bevis in 1638 at age twenty-six with his sister, Mary, who was twenty-two. 
He had left his pregnant wife, Rebecca , in Salisbury, England. 

In a letter of October 11, 1638 from Newberry, Massachusetts, before settling in 
Salisbury, Massachusetts, Henry wrote to his wife, Rebecca, in England, as follows: He 
reported the death of his older brother but that he and his sister were well. He prays for 
Rebecca to come to America with a Mr. Dow and other friends or with a Mr. Peter Noyes 
who was preparing to go back to England to bring his own family to America. He 
expressed hope that Rebecca has safely delivered her child and is a "joyful mother of 
children." 

It is not known exactly when Rebecca 1 (Swayne) Byley and her young daughter, 
Rebecca 2 Byley, came to America and whether Henry 1 had died before they arrived. 
References: #24 and #88, v. I, p. 326 and v. H, pp. 329 and 334. 

2395. Rebecca 1 Swayne 

Bom in England. 

Died in 1695. 

Married first, Henry 1 Bvlev in St. Edward, Salisbury, England on January 21, 1632/33. Henry had 
gone to America in 1638 while Rebecca was pregnant, probably with my ancestor, 
Rebecca 2 Bvlev . Rebecca 1 Swavne Bvlev came to America sometime between 1639 and 
1641. Her husband, Henry 1 Byley, died in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1640. 

61 



Chart II Biographies 

Married second, John Hall in Salisbury, Massachusetts in April 1641. Rebecca and John had one 

son, John. The senior John Hall died before 1650. 
Married third. Rev. William Worcester in 1650. 
Married fourth, Samuel Symonds in 1663. 
References: #24 and #88, v. I, p. 326 and v. JJ, pp. 329-334. 

2406. Rev. Ephraim 1 Hewett 

Also known as Ephraim Huit or Huet. 

Bom in England in 161 1. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 4, 1644. 

Married Isabel in England about 1632. She died in 1661. 

The children of Ephraim and Isabel, not necessarily in order, were: 

1. Susanna", b. in England, d. in 1642. 

2. Nathaniel , b. in England, d. in 1642. 

3. Sarah , b. in England. 

4. Mercy , b. in England. 

5. Lydia 2 , b. in England, m. Joseph Smith of Hartford. 

6. Mary , b. in Windsor in 1640. 
Other information: 

Ephraim matriculated at St. John's College in Cambridge. He was the minister in 
Wraxall (near Kenilworth), Warwickshire, England but in 1638 he was proceeded against 
for "neglect of ceremonies." The next year Ephraim and his wife and five children 
immigrated to America. They came through Boston and went to Windsor, Connecticut, 
where Ephraim was a colleague of my ancestor, (1790) Rev John Warham on Chart XI. 
References: #24, p. 367, #27, p. 330, #88, v. U, p. 490, #115, p. 415, #1 16, p. 105, and #194, 

p. 8. 

2416. Qzias Goodwin 

Bom in 1 596, probably in Essex County, England. 
Died in Hartford, Connecticut about April 1683. 
Married Mary Woodward in England, probably about 1627. 
The children of Ozias and Mary were: 

1. William . b. 1629, m. Susanna Fruen . 

2. Nathaniel 2 , b. 1637. 
3 Hannah 2 , b. 1639. 

Other information: 

It is not known exactly when Ozias and Mary came to America, but they were in 

Cambridge, Massachusetts by 1632. Ozias moved to Hartford in 1635 or 1636 and was an 

original settler there. 
References: #24, #27, pp. 268-269, #53, pp. 240-241, #70, pp. vii and xv, and #161, p. 227. 



2417. Mary Woodward 



Bom in Braintree, Essex, England. 



62 



Chart II Biographies 

Probably died in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married Ozias Goodwin in England, probably about 1627. 

Other information: 

Mary was the daughter of Robert Woodward of Braintree. 
References: #24 and #27, p. 268. 

2420. John 1 Porter. Sr. 

This is the same person as (1 556) John 1 Porter. Sr. on Chart VJJI. 

Born in 1594, probably in Messing, Essex, England. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on April 21, 1648. 

Married Rose 1 White in Messing on October 18, 1620. She was born in England in 1600 and died 

in Windsor in May 1648. 
The children of John and Rose, the first nine born in England, were: 

1. John 2 , b. 1621. m. Mary 2 Stanley . 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1622. 

3. Anna 2 , b. 1624. 

4. Samuel . b. 1626, m. Hannah Stanley . 

5. Rebecca 2 , b. 1628. 

6. Mary 2 , b. 1630. 

7. Rose 2 , b. 1632. 

8. Joseph 2 , b. 1634. 

9. James 2 , b. 1638. 

10. Nathaniel 2 , b. 1640 in Windsor. 

1 1 . Hannah 2 , b. 1 642 in Windsor. 
Other information: 

John 1 , his wife, Rose, and their first nine children probably came to America in the 
Susan and Ellen, arriving in Dorchester (now part of Boston) on July 17, 1638. John's 
brother-in-law, Joseph 1 Loomis . was also on this ship with his wife and eight children. 
Both families moved to Windsor in 1639. John was a man of considerable wealth for that 
period of time in America. 
Note: 

There were at least three John Porters who came to America in Colonial times. 
They were: (a) John 1 Porter. Sr. , ancestor #2420 on this chart and ancestor #1556 on 
Chart VTTT, the same person, who married Rose 1 White and lived in Windsor, Connecticut; 
(b) John 1 Porter , ancestor #2368 on this chart, who married Mary (?) Gardner and lived in 
Salem, Massachusetts; and (c) John Porter who married Margaret Odding and lived in 
Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. This latter John Porter is not my ancestor. 
References: #24, #70, p. 170, #88, v. m, pp. 460-461, #1 15, pp. 432-433 and 620-621, #120, 
and #142, p. 20. 

2422. Thomas' Stanley 

This is the same person as (1 558) Thomas' Stanley on Chart VJJI. 
Bom in England in 1 597. 



63 



Chart II Biographies 

Died in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts on January 31, 1663. 

Married Benet Shepard in Ashford, Kent, England on August 3, 1630. She married second, 
Gregory Wolterton as his second wife in Hadley in 1663. She died in 1664 at age fifty-five. 
The children of Thomas and Benet, all born in Hartford, Connecticut, were: 

1. Nathaniel 2 , b. about 1638. 

2. Hannah 2 , m. (1210) Samuel 2 Porter on this chart. 

3 . Mary 2 , m. (778) John 2 Porter. Jr. on Chart VJTJ. 

4. Sarah" 
Other information: 

Thomas came from England on the ship Planter in 1635. He came with his 
brother, Timothy, and the orphaned children of their brother, John. They settled first in 
Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts. In June 1636, Thomas moved to Hartford where he was an 
original proprietor. In 1659, Thomas and his family, with some others, removed from 
Hartford and established a new settlement at Hadley, Massachusetts. 
References: #24, #27, pp. 566-567, #53, p. 260, #88, v. IV, p. 165, #120, #122, pp. 285-289, 

and #151, p. 140. 

2423. Benet 1 Shepard 

This is the same person as ( 1 559) Benet' Shepard on Chart Vm. 

Bom in England on August 1, 1609. 

Died in January 1664/65 and is buried in Center Church in Hartford, Connecticut. Although she 

had moved to Hadley, Massachusetts with her husband, Thomas, in 1659, her son, 

Nathaniel, moved back to Hartford and that is probably the reason she was buried in 

Hartford. 
Married first, Thomas' Stanley in Ashford, Kent, England on August 3, 1630. 
Married second, Gregory Wolterton, in Hadley, as his second wife, in 1663. 
Other information: 

Benet was the daughter of John Shepard and Rebecca Waller . John Shepard was 

the son of Thomas Shepard and Benedicta Day . 
References: #24, #27, p. 566, #88, v. IV, p. 165, #122, pp. 287-289, and #151, p. 140. 



64 



CHART III - Louisa Elliott 



H 





76 


WILLIAM 
ELLIOTT, SR 


152 


Unknown 




608 




304 










609 








L'nknown 




610 








305 




611 




306 






ABIGAIL 
JOHNSON 


153 

154 


612 












613 








Unknown 


307 


614 










615 


WILLIAM 
ELLIOTT. JR. 






1779- 


77 


616 












617 




Unknown 


309 


618 








619 








155 


620 


310 








621 






311 


622 






623 


t<;a 







19 ELLIOTT Louisa m. .Alfred G. 7 Chauncev (Chart II). 

1813 -abL 1848 



V, 



156 



NATHAN 3 
LANE 



312 



71 



LOUISA 5 
LANE 



1772- 1817 



79 L 



THACHER 4 
LANE (a) 



1743 ■ 



157 



1717- 



ANNA 4 
THACHER 



313 



314 



JONATHAN 2 
LANEfbl 



1685- 1759 

MERCY 3 
WELLMAN 



624 ROBERT 1 LANE 



625 SARAH 2 PICKETT 



1692-1727 

THOMAS 3 
THACHER 



626 WILLIAM 2 WELLMAN, JR. 



627 Elizabeth Jov 



1720- 



158 



Rachael 6 
Hurdja) 



(a) - second cousins 

(b) - brother and sisler 

A name in capitals indicates that a 
biography is included for that 
individual The biographies follow 
this chart. 



159 



DANIEL 5 

HUBD 



315 



316 



1670- 

MARY 3 

DEAN 



628 RALPH 2 THACHER 



629 Ruth 2 Partridge 



1680- 



EBENEZER 4 
HURD 



630 JAMES 2 DEAN 



631 Sarah 2 Tisdale 



1696- 1768 



Rachael 
Smith 



317 



318 



1668- 

Sarah- 
Lane(b) 



632 JOHN 3 HURD 



633 Ann Turtle 



1667- 



Unknown 



634 ROBERT' LANE 



635 SARAH- PICKETT 



319 



636 
637 



Unknown 



638 



639 



66 



CHART III - Louisa Elliott 



1216 
1217 
1218 
1219 

1220 
1221 
1222 
1223 

1224 
1225 
1226 
1227 

1228 
1229 
1230 
1231 



2432 
2434 
2436 
2438 

2440 
2442 
2444 
2446 

2448 
2450 
2452 
2454 

2456 
2458 
2460 
2462 



2433 
2435 
2437 
2439 

2441 
2443 
2445 
2447 

2449 
2451 
2453 
2455 

2457 
2459 
2461 
2463 



1232 
1233 
1234 
1235 

1236 
1237 
1238 
1239 

1240 
1241 
1242 
1243 



2464 
2466 
2468 
2470 

2472 
2474 
2476 
2478 

2480 
2482 
2484 
2486 



2465 
2467 
2469 
2471 

2473 
2475 
2477 
2479 

2481 
2483 
2485 
2487 



1244 
1245 
1246 
1247 



2488 
2490 
2492 
2494 



2489 
2491 
2493 
2495 



1248 Unknown 

1249 Unknown 

1250 JOHN 1 PICKETT 

1251 Margaret 



1252 WILLIAM 1 WELLMAN, SR. 

1253 ELIZABETH 2 SPENCER 

1254 Unknown 

1255 Unknown 

1256 THOMAS 1 THACHER 

1257 ELIZABETH 2 PARTRIDGE 

1258 GEORGE 1 PARTRIDGE 

1259 Sarah 2 Tracy 

1260 WALTER 1 DEAN 

1261 ELEANOR 1 STRONG 

1262 JOHN 1 TISDALE 

1263 SARAH 1 WALKER 



24% 

2498 

2500 Unknown 

2502 Unknown 

2504 Unknown 

2506 WILLIAM 1 SPENCER 

2508 

2510 

2512 PETER THACHER 
2514 RALPH 1 PARTRIDGE 
2516 Unknown 
2518 STEPHEN 1 TRACY 

2520 William Dean 
2522 Richard Strong 
2524 Thomas Tisdale 
2526 Unknown 



2497 

2499 

2501 Unknown 

2503 Unknown 

2505 Unknown 

2507 Agnes 

2509 
2511 

2513 Ann Allwood 

2515 Patience 

2517 Unknown 

2519 Tryphosa 1 

2521 Unknown 

2523 Unknown 

2525 Ruth 

2527 Unknown 



See refs. #67, #79 

and #225 for 

Spencer 

English ancestry. 



Lee 



See refs. #254 and 

#255 for 

Dean 

English ancestry. 



1264 ADAM 2 HURD 

1265 Hannah Barbraum 

1266 Unknown 

1267 Unknown 


2528 
2530 
2532 
2534 


JOHN 1 HURD 
Unknown 


1268 
1269 
1270 
1271 


Unknown 
Unknown 
JOHN 1 PICKETT 
Margaret 


2536 
2538 
2540 
2542 


Unknown 
Unknown 


1272 
1273 
1274 
1275 




2544 
2546 
2548 
2550 




1276 
1277 
1278 
1279 




2552 
2554 
2556 
2558 





2529 Unknown 
2531 Unknown 
2533 
2535 

2537 

2539 

2541 Unknown 

2543 Unknown 

2545 
2547 
2549 
2551 

2553 
2555 
2557 
2559 



67 



Chart in Biographies 

19. Louisa Elliott 
See (19) Louisa Elliott on Chart L the same person. 

38. William Elliott. Jr. 

Born in Sturbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts on July 16, 1779. 

Married Louisa 5 Lane on March 5, 1800, probably in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut. 

The children of William, Jr. and Louisa, all born in Killingworth, were: 

1. Abigail, b. 1802, d.y. of burns. 

2. Mary Ann, b. 1804. 

3 . Austin, b. 1 805, drowned in 1 8 1 9. 

4. Rachael Cornelia, b. 1807. 

5. William Thacher, b. 1810. 

6. Elmina,b. 1812. 

7. Louisa , b. July 29, 1813, m. Alfred G. 7 Chauncev . 
Other Information: 

William, Jr. was a blacksmith. He and his family lived in Killingworth until the 

spring of 1815 when they moved to Choconut, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. His wife, 

Louisa, died there on January 22, 1817. In 1818, William and his children relocated about 

ten miles north to the Union Center/Endwell area near Binghamton, Broome, New York. 

References: #57, #59, p. 649, #65, pp. 185-186, #66, p. 46, and #95, p. 32. Also 1810 census 

for Killingworth. 

39. Louisa 5 Lane 

Bom in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on November 29, 1772. 
Died in Choconut, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania on January 22, 1817. 
Married William Elliott. Jr. on March 5, 1 800, probably in Killingworth. 
References: #57, #59, p. 649, and #65, p. 185. 

76. William Elliott. Sr. 

The record for William Elliott, Sr. is sketchy. Reference #65, "Lane Genealogies," shows 
that my William Elliott. Sr. lived in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut and had a son, William 
Elliott. Jr. . by Abigail Johnson in Sturbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts on July 16, 1779. This 
appears to have been from an out-of-wedlock relationship. See (77) Abigail Johnson. 

On July 23, 1 990 I examined the vital records in the town clerk's office in Killingworth but 

could find no information on William Elliott, Sr. or Jr., nor on Abigail Johnson. Nor is there any 

information in Sturbridge vital records (references #66 and #95) except the birth of William Elliott, 

Jr. in 1779. Other items of information located in my attempt to identify William Elliott, Sr. were: 

1 Reference #313, "Connecticut Men in the Military and Naval Service in the War of 

the Revolution," shows a Lt. William Elliott in the company that was on guard at 

Killingworth in 1779. 5 4 

2. References #3 14 and #3 17 show a line of Elliotts as follows: William , Aaron , 

Jared 3 Joseph 2 John 1 . William 5 was bom in Killingworth on June 26, 1755. He 

was an A.B. graduate of Yale in 1774 and became a doctor. He removed from 

69 



Chart III Biographies 

Killingworth to Goshen, Orange, New York in 1801. He married about 1786 and 

had six children of record. It is possible that before he was married he had fathered 

William Elliott, Jr. by Abigail Johnson . 
None of this information is adequate to properly identify William Elliott. Sr. without 
corroborating evidence. Therefore, I have shown his parents as unknown. 
References: " #65, p. 185, #66, p. 46, #95, p. 32, #313, #314, pp. 52-55 and 88-89, and #317, 

pp. 69-71 and 85-86. 

77. Abigail Johnson 

The only records for Abigail Johnson are the birth records for her son, William Elliott, Jr. in 
Sturbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts on July 16, 1779. 

a.) Page 649 of reference #59, "Biographical and Historical Record of Kane County, 
Illinois," shows that William Elliott, Jr. was born in Sturbridge, Worcester, 
Massachusetts on July 16, 1779. 
b.) Page 46 of reference #66, "Vital Records of Sturbridge," shows William Ellet, son 

of Abigail Johnson, was born in Sturbridge on July 16, 1779. 
c.) Page 32 of reference #95, "Births, Marriages and Deaths of the Town of 
Sturbridge," shows William Johnson, son of _ _ Abigail, was born in 

Sturbridge on July 16, 1779. 
From the above, it is concluded that my ancestor, William Elliott, Jr., was born from an 
out-of-wedlock relationship between William Elliott, Sr. and Abigail Johnson, and no marriage for 
them has been found in either the Sturbridge or Killingworth vital records. Abigail probably lived 
in Killingworth and "visited" a relative in Sturbridge to give birth to William Elliott, Jr. There was, 
in fact, an Abigail Johnson in Sturbridge who was bom in 1737 and married Malachi Partridge in 
1758. This Abigail Johnson Partridge was forty-two years old at the time William Elliott, Jr. was 
bom and was probably my Abigail Johnson's aunt. 
References: #59, #65, p. 1 85, #66, and #95, pp. 32, 76, and 247. 

78. Thacher Lane 

Bom in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on April 29, 1743. 
Married Rachel Hurd . his second cousin. 
The children of Thacher and Rachel, all bom in Killingworth, were: 
1 Lucinda , unmarried and insane. 

2. Nathan 5 , b. 1765, m. 1794. 

3. Elizabeth 5 , m. 1792. 

4. Louisa 5 , b. November 29, 1772, m. William Elliott. Jr. 

5. Mary 5 , d.y. 

6 Patience , d.y 

7. Partridge Thacher 5 , d.y. 

8 Partridge Thacher 5 , b. 1777. 

Reference: #65, p. 159. 

156. Nathan Lane 
Bom in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on July 22, 1717. 

70 



Chart III Biographies 



Married Anna Thacher in Killingworth on March 2, 1742. 
The children of Nathan and Anna, all born in Killingworth, were: 

1. Thacher 4 . b. April 29, 1743, m. Rachael 6 Hurd . 

2. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1746. 

3. Zeruiah 4 ,b. 1748. 
Other Information: 

Captain Nathan Lane was the master and part owner of the sloop, Rebecca. 
Reference: #65, p. 143. 

157. Anna 4 Thacher 



Born in Lebanon, New London, Connecticut on March 29, 1720. 
Married Nathan Lane in Kil 
Reference: #65, p. 143. 



Married Nathan Lane in Killingworth, Mddlesex, Connecticut on March 2, 1742. 



158. Daniel 5 Hurd 

Born in Woodbury, Litchfield, Connecticut and baptized in 1696. 

Died in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on January 21, 1768. 

Married Rachael Smith , possibly in Roxbury, Litchfield, Connecticut. 

One of the eight children of Daniel and Rachael was my ancestor, Rachael Hurd , who married 
Thacher Lane . 

Other Information: 

The evidence that Rachael 6 Hurd, daughter of Daniel 5 Hurd, is my ancestor is 
somewhat indirect. Daniel was one of four brothers but he was the only one with a 
daughter named Rachael. The key piece of information is on page 159 of reference #65. It 
states that Rachael 6 Hurd and Thacher Lane were second cousins. 

References: #65, p. 159 and #94, pp. 33 and 36. 

312. Jonathan Lane 

Bom in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on October 16, 1685. 

Died in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on November 7, 1759. 

Married first, Mercy 3 Wellman in Killingworth on February 1,1710/11. 

Married second, Patience Strong on September 17, 1730. They had two sons, Jonathan and Noah. 

The children of Jonathan and Mercy, all born in Killingworth, were: 

1. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1712. 

2. Nathan 3 , b. July 22, 1717, m. Anna 4 Thacher 

3. Zeruiah 3 ,b. 1723. 
Other Information: 

In 1695, Jonathan moved with his parents from Stratford to Killingworth. 

Jonathan was a captain in the militia. 
Reference: #65, pp. 137-138. 

313. Mercv 3 Wellman 

Born in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on March 26, 1692. 

71 



Chart III Biographies 

Died in Killingworth on November 13, 1727 at age thirty-five. 
Married Jonathan* Lane in Killingworth on February 1, 1710/11. 
References: #65, pp. 137-138 and #70, p. 325. 

314. Thomas 3 Thacher 

Born in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts on October 9, 1670. 

Married Mary 3 Dean in Lebanon, New London, Connecticut on November 16, 1704. 

References: #65, p. 143, #255, p. 44, and #256, p. 332. 

315. Mary 3 Dean 

Born in Stonington, New London, Connecticut on March 28, 1680. 

Married Thomas 3 Thacher in Lebanon, New London, Connecticut on November 16, 1704. 

References: #65, p. 143 and #251, p. 8. 

A 

316. Ebenezer Hurd 

Born on November 9, 1668, probably in Woodbury, Litchfield, Connecticut. 
Died probably in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut. 
Married Sarah* Lane in Woodbury about 1693. 
The children of Ebenezer and Sarah were: 

1. Robert 5 , bapt. 1695. 

2. Daniel . bapt. 1696, m. Rachael Smith . 

3. Ruth 5 , bapt. 1697. 

4. Elnathan 5 ,b 1699. 

5. Josiah 5 , b. 1701. 

6 Rebecca 5 , b. 1703. 

7. Abigail 5 , b. 1705. 

8 Hannah 5 , b. 1707, d.y. 

9. Hannah 5 , b. 1709. 
Other Information: 

Sometime before 1699 Ebenezer and his family moved to Killingworth where he 

was a farmer. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 505, and #94, pp. 29 and 33. 

624. Robert Lane 

Born about 1639, probably in Derbyshire, England. 

Died in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on April 12, 1718. 

Married Sarah Pickett in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on December 19, 1665. 

The children of Robert and Sarah, all bom in Stratford, were: 

1 Sarah 2 , b. February 24, 1666/67, m. Ebenezer 4 Hurd . 



2. 


Hannah 2 , b 1668. 


3 


Daniel 2 , b 1671, dy. 


4. 


Robert 2 , b 1672, d.y. 



72 



Chart HI Biographies 

5. John 2 , b. 1674. 

6. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1676/77. 

7. Margaret 2 , b. 1679. 

8. Rebecca 2 , b. 1682. 

9. Jonathan 2 , b. October 16, 1685, m. Mercy 3 Wellman . 

10. Mary 2 , b. 1688. 
Other Information: 

Stratford began to be settled in 1639 and became a plantation in 1640. The town 

records commence about 1650. Robert Lane was among the early settlers of Stratford, but 

his date of arrival from England is not known. The first record of him in Stratford is in 

1660. In 1695 Robert and his family moved to Killingworth. 

References: #24, #65, pp. 133-135, #88, v. HI, p. 424, #102, v. I, pp. 372-373, and #140, pp. 

9-11. 

625. Sarah 2 Pickett 

Baptized in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts in November 1648. 

Died in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on March 1 1, 1725. 

Married Robert Lane in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on December 19, 1665. 

Other Information: 

In 1660 Sarah moved from Salem to Stratford with her parents. In 1695 she 
moved to Killingworth with her husband and family. 
References: #24, #65, pp. 133-135, #88, v. HI, p. 424, and #140, p. 1 1. 

626. William 2 Wellman. Jr. 

Bom in New London, Connecticut in 1661 . 

Died on August 23, 1736, probably in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut. 

Married first, Elizabeth Joy about 1691, probably in Killingworth. 

The children of William and Elizabeth, all probably born in Killingworth, were: 

1 . Mercy 3 (possibly Mary), b. March 26, 1692, m. Jonathan 2 Lane . 

2. William 3 , b. 1694. 

3. Gideon 3 , b. 1696. 

4. Benjamin 3 , b. 1697. 

Married second, Elizabeth Griswold, widow of Isaac Griswold, in 1730. There were no children 

by this union. 
References: #24, #65, pp. 135-138, and #70, pp. 324 and 325. 

628. Rev Ralph 2 Thacher 

Also known as Rodolphus Thacher. 

Born in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1647. 

Died in Lebanon, New London, Connecticut after 1715. 

Married Ruth 2 Partridge in Duxbury on January 5, 1669. 

One of the children of Ralph and Ruth was my ancestor, Thomas Thacher. 

Other Information: 

73 



Chan III Biographies 

Ralph 2 Thacher was the first minister at Chilmark on Martha's Vineyard from 
1697-1714. 
References: #24, #65, p. 143, #80, and #1 16, p. 202. 

630. James 2 Dean 

Bom in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts in 1648. 
Died in Plainfield, Windham Connecticut on May 29, 1725. 
Married Sarah' Tisdale in Taunton about 1673. 

The children of James and Sarah, all except the first bom in Stonington, New London, 
Connecticut, were: 

1 . James 3 , b. 1 674 in Taunton or in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

2. Sarah 3 , b. 1676. 

3. John 3 , b. 1678. 

4. Mary 3 , twin, b. March 28, 1680, m. Thomas 3 Thacher . 

5. Onecephorus 3 , twin, b. March 28, 1680, d.y. 

6. Francis , b. 1682, d.y. 

7. William 3 , b. 1684, d.y. 

8. Hannah 3 , b. 1686. 

9. William 3 , b. 1689. 

10. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1693. 

11. Jonathan 3 , b 1694. 
Other information: 

James was a blacksmith, which was a trade very much in demand. He was in 
Scituate, Massachusetts for a short period, but in 1675 came to Stonington, Connecticut at 
the request of the townspeople. They agreed to grant him land and to assist him with 
money and material to build a dwelling house and smith shop in return for him doing the 
smith work. By 1682, the townspeople agreed that he had fulfilled his obligation to them. 
James became a prominent man in the affairs of the town, but in 1698 he joined with 
several others in the settlement of a new town at Plainfield, Connecticut, where he died in 
1725. 

In 1863, a descendant, James Dean Fish, had the remains of James Dean and his 

wife, Sarah Tisdale, removed from Plainfield to the White Hill Cemetery located between 

Stonington and Mystic, New London, Connecticut. Mr. Fish had a monument erected at 

this new grave. 

References #24, #65, p. 143, #88, v. II, p. 29, #1 17, p. 208, #251, p. 8, #253, p. 59, #254, p. 

388-390, #255, pp. 38-45, and #256, pp. 331-332. 

632. John 3 Hurd 

Bom in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Died in 1683, probably in Woodbury, Litchfield, Connecticut. 

Married Ann Tuttle . widow of Joshua Judson, on December 10, 1662 in Stratford. Ann was also 

known as Johanna. Ann and Joshua had three children before he died in 1661. 
The children of John and Ann were: 

1. Judson , twin, b. 1663, d.y. 

74 



Chart HI Biographies 



2. Sarah 4 , twin, b. 1663. 

3. Joseph , b. 1665. 

4. Benjamin , b. 1666. 

5. Ebenezer . b. November 9, 1668, m. Sarah 2 Lane . 

6. Ruth 4 , b. 1670. 

7. John 4 , b. 1673. 
Other Information: 

John moved from Stratford to Woodbury but the time of his move is unknown. 
John was a miller. He purchased two millstones, twenty-four inches in diameter and six 
inches thick, at Stratford and carried them on horseback twenty-five miles to Woodbury 
where he built the first mill to grind corn. As of 1910 these millstones had been preserved. 
One was at the foot of a monument in the center of Woodbury and one was in the Capitol 
at Hartford. John learned to grind corn at Stratford from his uncle, John Hurd, who had 
built the first mill in Connecticut in 1653. 
References: #24, #88, v. H, p. 505, #94, pp. 28-32, and #102, v. I, pp. 313-314. 

634. Robert 1 Lane 

See (624) Robert Lane on this chart, the same person. 

635. Sarah 2 Pickett 

See (625) Sarah 2 Pickett on this chart, the same person. 

1250. John 1 Pickett 

Probably born in England. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on April 11, 1684. 

Married Margaret about 1639, probably in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. She died in 

1683. 
The children of John and Margaret, all born in Salem, were: 

1. John 

2. James 

3. Thomas 2 , m. Abigail Seymour of Norwalk. 

4. Sarah 2 , bapt. in Salem in November 1 648, m. Robert Lane . 

5. Rebecca 2 , b. 1650. 

6. Daniel 2 , b. 1652. 
Other Information: 

John, with his wife and his six children, moved from Salem to Stratford in 1660. 
References: #24, #88, v. HI, p. 424, and #140, p. 1 1 . 

1252. William 1 Wellman. Sr. 

Died in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut on August 9, 1671. 
Married Elizabeth Spencer in 1649. 



75 



Chart III Biographies 

The children of William and Elizabeth, the first four probably born in Gloucester, Essex, 
Massachusetts, were: 

1. Mary 2 , b 1650. 

2. Martha 2 , b. 1652. 

3. Benjamin", b. 1654. 

4. Elizabeth 2 , b 1657. 

5. William Jr. 2 , b. 1661 in New London, Connecticut, m. Elizabeth Joy . 

6. Sarah", b 1665 in Killingworth, d.y. 

7. Samuel 2 , b. 1667 in Killingworth, d.y. 

8. Rachael* 
Other Information: 

William Wellman, Sr. was a citizen of Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1649. He 
removed to New London, Connecticut in 1658 and to Killingworth about 1663. 
References: #24, #65, p. 138, #70, pp. 322-323, #76, p. 697, and #88, v. IV, p. 150. 

1253. Elizabeth Spencer 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, about 1631. 

Died in 1718. 

Married first, William 1 Wellman. Sr. in 1649. 

Married second, Jacob Joy of Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut in May 1672. There were four 

children from this second marriage. 
References: #24, #27, p. 556, #65, p. 138, #67, p. 12, #70, p. 310, #76, p. 697, and #88, v. IV, 
p. 150. 

1256. Rev. Thomas Thacher 

Born in Milton, Clevedon, Somersetshire, England on May 1, 1620 

Died in Boston on October 15, 1678. 

Married first, Elizabeth Partridge in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts on May 11, 1643. 

Elizabeth died in June 1664. 
The children of Thomas and Elizabeth were: 

1. Peter , b. 1651 in Salem, Massachusetts. 

2. Ralph 2 , m. Ruth Partridge . 

3. Thomas 

4. Patience 

5. Elizabeth 2 

Married second, Margaret Webb, widow of Jacob Sheaffe, in Boston about 1665. 

Other Information 

Thomas arrived in Boston on the James in April 1635 at age fourteen in company 
with his uncle, Anthony Thacher, who became the minister at Marblehead, Essex, 
Massachusetts. Although not a college graduate, Thomas was educated by Rev. Charles 1 
Chauncey , afterwards the second president of Harvard College. Note the coincidence of 
Charles Chauncey educating Thomas 1 Thacher: Alfred G. 7 Chauncey . fourth great 



76 



Chart 111 Biographies 

grandson of Charles Chauncey . married Louisa Elliott , fourth great granddaughter of 
Thomas Thacher . 

Thomas was pastor of the church at Weymouth, Massachusetts from 1 644 to 
1669. From that date until his death in October 1678, he was the pastor at the Old South 
Church in Boston (not to be confused with The Old North Church of Revolutionary 
War/Paul Revere fame). 
References: #24, #65, #80, pp. 12-13, #85, p. 449, #88, v. HI, p. 366, and #1 16, p. 202. 

1257. Elizabeth 2 Partridge 

Bom in England, probably about 1620. 

Died in June 1664. 

Married first, William Kemp in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts in January 1638/39. He died in 

1641. 
Married second, Thomas Thacher in Duxbury on May 11, 1643. 
References: #24 and #65, p. 143. 

1258. George 1 Partridge 

Bom in England, probably in Kent County. 

Died in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1695. 

Married Sarah Tracy in Duxbury on November 28, 1638. 

The children of George and Sarali, all probably bom in Duxbury, were: 

1. Sarah 2 , b. 1639. 

2. Triphosa 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1644. 

4. Ruth 2 , m. Ralph 2 Thacher . 

5. John 2 ,b. 1657. 

6. Mary 

7. Rebecca 

8. Lidia 2 

9. Mercy 

2 

10. James 
Other Information: 

George arrived in Duxbury in or sometime prior to 1636. George was either a 
private or a non-commissioned officer in Capt. Miles Standish's company. George's will 
was witnessed by two of Miles' sons, Alexander and Josiah. 

Note: George 1 Partridge and (2514) Ralph 1 Partridge both came from England at 
about the same time and settled in the same town. They may have been father and son or 
uncle and nephew, but there is no record of their relationship, if any. 
References: #24, #88, v. HI, p. 365, and #93, pp. 1-12. 

1260. Walter' Dean 

Baptized in Chard, Somersetshire, England on May 13, 1612. 
Died in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts in 1659. 

77 



Chan III Biographies 

Married Eleanor 1 Strong in Taunton, Massachusetts about 1637. He had probably known her in 

England 
The children of Walter and Eleanor, all probably born in Taunton, were: 

1 Mary 2 , b. about 1638. 

2 2 ,b. about 1641. 

3. 2 ,b. about 1644. 

4. Ezra 2 , b. 1646. 

2 2 

5. James" , b. 1648, m. Sarah Tisdale . 

6. Benjamin , b. about 1651. 
Other information: 

Walter was a son of William Dean of Chard, Somersetshire, England. Chard is 
about thirteen miles south of Taunton. Walter came to America with his brother, John, and 
six servants on the Speedwell in 1637. The ship left Weymouth, Dorsetshire, England on 
April 22 and, in addition to passengers, carried twenty tons of salt for preserving fish. 
Walter and John settled first in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts. In about 
a year they moved to Taunton, Massachusetts. Walter was a tanner by trade and was 
prominent in town affairs. 
References #24, #88, v. II, p. 31, #108, v. 17, part I, p. 49, #123, p. 67, #253, pp. 57-60, 

#254, p. 382-388, and #255, pp. 10, 21-22, and 37-43. 

1261. Eleanor Strong 

Born in Taunton, Somersetshire, England. 

Married Walter Dean in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts about 1637. 

< Kher information: 

Eleanor was the daughter of Richard Strong of Taunton, England. She probably 

came to America with her brother, John Strong, on the Hopewell in 1635. They settled in 

Taunton, Massachusetts. 
References: it 1 08, v. 1 7, part I, pp. 49 and 1 50, #254, pp. 387-388, and #255, pp. 2 1 and 42. 

1262. John' Tisdale 

Baptized in Ripon, Yorkshire, England on November 7, 1614. 
Killed by Indians in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts on June 27, 1675. 
Married S arah' Walker about 1640. 
The children of John and Sarah were: 

1 John , b 1641 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

2. James , b 1644 in Duxbury. 

3. Joshua , b. 1646 in Duxbury. 

4. S arah , b. 1650 in Taunton, m James 2 Dean . 
5 Joseph 2 , b 1656 in Taunton. 

6. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1657 in Taunton. 

7. Mary , b. 1658 in Taunton. 

8 Abigail 2 , b 1659 in Taunton. 

Other Information: 



78 



Chart III Biograpliies 

The parents of John 1 were Thomas and Ruth Tisdale . About 1636 John 1 left 
England and came to America, where he settled first on a ten-acre tract at Green Harbor, 
which is about three miles from Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts. He was in Duxbury, 
Massachusetts by about 1637 and moved to Taunton, Massachusetts in 1650. 

Jolin was killed by Indians in the attack on Taunton, Massachusetts on June 27, 
1675 during King Philip's War. His house and that of his brother-in-law, James Walker, 
were burned during the attack. 
References: #24, #85, p. 456, #88, v. IV, p. 307, #250, pp. 19-25, #251, pp. 5-8, #252, pp. 

331-332, and #253, pp. 59, 91, and 384. 

1263. Sarah 1 Walker 

Born in England about 1618. 

Died in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts in December 1676. 

Married John Tisdale about 1 640. 

Other Information: 

Sarah came to America from London on the Elizabeth in 1635 at age seventeen. 
She and her brother, James, age fifteen, came "in the care and keeping of their kinsman, 
Mr. Jolin Browne." Sarah's mother was known as the Widow Walker of Rehoboth, where 
she lived after coming to America about 1643. Sarah's father, whose given name is 
unknown, probably died in England and the Widow Walker came to America with her 
younger son, Philip. Apparently, Widow Walker settled in Rehobotli, Bristol, 
Massachusetts because John Browne had settled there. 

References: #24, #250, p. 20, #251, p. 5, #252, p. 331, #253, p. 92, and #254, pp. 402-405. 

1264. Adam 2 Hurd 

Born in Somersetshire, England in 1611. 

Married Hannah Barbraum in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut about 1640. 

Adam and Hannah had one son, John . my ancestor. 

Other Information: 

Adam came to America with his father, John , and brother, John before 1640 and 

settled in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. In 1640 they moved to Stratford where they 

were among the first settlers. 
References: #24, #88, p. 505, and #94, pp. 25-29. 

1270. John' Pickett 
See (1250) John 1 Pickett on this chart, the same person. 

2506. William 1 Spencer 

Baptized in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England on October 1 1, 1601. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut in 1640. 

Married Agnes Pratt for Tucker) in Cambridge, Massachusetts about 1632. She married second, 

William Edwards in 1645. 
The children of William and Agnes were: 

79 



Chan III Biographies 

1 . Elizabeth 2 , b about 1 633, m. William' Wellman. Sr. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1636. 

3. Samuel 2 , b. 1639. 
Other Information: 

William had two brothers who also immigrated to America and were my direct line 
ancestors. They were Gerard 1 Spencer. Jr. on Chart VI and Thomas Spencer on both 
Charts VIII and X. William was in Cambridge, Massachusetts by 1631. He was an 
original member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1634. He was also a 
lieutenant in the militia. About 1639, he and his brother, Thomas Spencer , moved from 
Cambridge to Hartford where they were original proprietors. 
References: #24, #27, p. 556, #53, pp. 259-260, #67, pp. 1 1-13, #70, p. 310, #79, pp. 161-163, 
#88, v. IV, p. 150, and #225. 

2512. Rev. Peter Thacher 

Married Ann Allwood and had nine children, one of whom was my ancestor, Thomas Thacher . 
Other Information: 

Peter was a clergyman at Salisbury, and possibly at Sarum, England. 
References: #80, pp. 3 and 12 and #1 16, p. 202. 

2514. Rev. Ralph' Partridge 

Bom in England. 

Died in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1658. 

Married Patience in England about 1614. 

The youngest daughter of Ralph and Patience was my ancestor, Elizabeth 2 Partridge , who married 
Thomas Thacher . Elizabeth was born in England, probably about 1620. 

Other Information: 

Ralph had been a minister of the Established Church in Sutton-near-Dover in the 
county of Kent, England He was driven out through the severity of his bishop and arrived 
at Boston in 1635 or 1636 after a stormy trip of eighteen weeks. He settled in Duxbury 
where he was the first minister 

Note: Ralph Partridge and ( 1 258) George' Partridge both came from England at 
about the same time and settled in the same town. They may have been father and son or 
uncle and nephew, but there is no record of their relationship, if any. 

References: #24, #65, p. 143, #88, v. Ill, p. 366, and #93, pp. 9-12. 

2518. Stephen Tracy 

Baptized in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England on December 25, 1596. He was the son of 

Stephen and A«nes Tracy 
Died after 1655, probably in Great Yarmouth. 
Married Tryphosa Lee in Leyden, Holland on January 11, 1621. Tryphosa was a spinster from 

England 
The children of Stephen and Tryphosa, all except Sarah born in America, were: 

I Sarah . b about 1 622, m George' Partridge . 



80 



Chart III Biograpliies 



2. Rebecca , b. before 1627. 

3. Ruth 2 

4. Mary 2 

5. John 2 , b. 1633. 
Other Information: 

Stephen had been a say-weaver among the Separatists at Leyden. He came to 
Plymouth Colony on the ship Aime in July 1623. His wife, Tryphosa, and daughter, Sarah, 
followed, probably on the Jacob in 1625. By 1645 the family had moved to Duxbury, 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. In early 1655 Stephen returned to England, probably to Great 
Yarmouth. His will, which was made in London, gave all of his property to his five 
children. Presumably his wife, Tryphosa, pre-deceased him. It is probable that none of the 
five children went back to England. 
References: #24, #65, p. 143, #85, p. 460, #88, v. IV, pp. 320-321, #93, p. 4, #123, pp. 363- 

364, #154, p. 164, and #158, p. 1 12. 

2528. John 1 Hurd 

Born in Somersetshire, England. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on February 4, 1681. 

Other Information: 

John immigrated to New England with his two sons, Adam and John , before 
1640 and settled in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. His wife is unknown, hi 1640 John 
sold his land and moved to Stratford, where he and his two sons were among the first 
settlers. 

References: #88, v. II, p. 505 and #94, pp. 25-29. 



CHART IV - Joseph 7 Rogers 



160 



JOHN* 
ROGERS 



320 



THOMAS' 
ROGERS 



Sit 



STEPHEN 3 
ROGERS 



40 



AARON 6 

It (MILKS 



1776- 1866 



1748 49- 1826 



161 



1714- 1791 



Sarah 3 
Wing 



321 



322 



1659-1745/46 

BETHJAH 3 
EWE1-L 



640 JOHN 2 ROGERS 



641 RHODA 2 KINO 



1682/83- 1756 

EBENEZER 2 
WING 



642 GERSHOM 2 EWELL 



643 Mary 



1708-1790 



323 



1671 - 1738 

Elizabeth 
Backhouse 



644 STEPHEN 1 WING 



645 SARAH 2 BRIOOS 



162 



JOSHUA' 
LAPHAM 



324 



-1758 



JOHN 2 
I.APHAM, JR. 



646 FRANCIS BACKHOUSE 



647 Elizabeth Cross 



648 JOHN' LAPHAM, SR. 



I.VniA 1 
I.APHAM 



1752- 1832 



163 



1722-1799 



HANNAH 4 
SHERMAN 



325 



326 



1677 - aft. 1758 



MARY' 
RUSSELL 



649 Mary 2 Mann 



1683- 1752 

DAVID 3 
SHERMAN 



650 JOSEPH' RUSSELL 



651 Elizabeth' Fobes 



1727-1797 



327 



1680-1755 

Abigail 4 
1 lalliaway 



652 EDMUND 2 SHERMAN 



653 Dorcas Hicks 



JOSEPH 1 

20 ROGERS Joseph in I .ydia 6 Carpenter (Chart V). 



654 JOHN 3 HATHAWAY, JR. 



655 Hannah 2 Burt 



1801 - 1891 


164 

DANIEL 6 
OI.GER. JR. 


328 
DANIEL 5 

FOI.GER, SR. Oil 


PETER 4 
FOLGER 


656 ELEAZER 3 FOLGER (a) 










1674-1707 

JUDITH 3 
COFFIN 


657 Sarah 3 Gardner fbl 








1701/02- 1744 

ABIGAIL 4 

FOLGER (h) 


329 
330 


658 STEPHEN 2 COFFIN 








abl. 1677-1760 

JOHN 3 

FOI.GER (a) 


659 MARY 2 BUNKER fc) 




82 

DINAH 7 
FOI.GER 


f 






1735/36- 

165 

166 

rra 3 

W< >RTH 


660 PETER 2 FOLGER 








1659- 1732 

Mary 3 
Barnard 


661 Marv Morrill 








1703- 1787 

CHRISTOPHER 
WORTH 


331 
4 332 


662 NATHANIEL 2 BARNARD (e) 








1667- 

JONATHAN 3 
WORTH 


663 Mary 2 Barnard re) 


41 




1782-1860 


664 JOHN 2 WORTH 








1685- 1719 

Mary 3 
Hussey 


665 Miriam 3 Gardner (b) 


brothers 




(b) - sisters 

(c) - sisters and brother 


1717- 1804 

Dinah 4 
Paddack 


333 
334 


666 STEPHEN 2 HUSSEY 




nlcrs 


NATHANIEL 3 
PADDACK 


667 MARTHA 2 nilNKER (c) 


(e) - sislcrs %$ 
brothen 






1739- 1815 

167 


668 ZACHARIAH 2 PADDACK 


(g) ~ first cousins 




(n) - first cousins, once removed 


1677- 1756 

Ann 3 
Bunker 


669 Deborah 2 Sears 


A name in capitals indicates that ; 




biography is included for lhal 


1720- 


335 


670 WILLIAM 2 BUNKER (c) 


individual. The biographies follow 






671 MARY 2 MACY fd) 


(his chart. 





82 



CHART IV - Joseph 7 Rogers 



1280 JOHN 1 ROGERS 

1281 FRANCES WATSON 

1282 THOMAS 1 KING 

1283 Susan 1 

1284 HENRY 1 EWELL 

1285 SARAH 2 ANNABLE 

1286 Unknown 

1287 Unknown 

1288 JOHN WING 

1289 DEBORAH 2 BATCHELDER (e) 

1290 JOHN 1 BRIGGS 

1291 Katherine 



1292 Unknown 

1293 Unknown 

1294 John Cross 

1295 Unknown 



1296 Unknown 

1297 Unknown 

1298 WILLIAM 1 MANN 

1299 FRANCES 1 HOPKINS 

1300 JOHN 1 RUSSELL 

1301 Dorothy 

1302 JOHN 1 FOBES 



1303 Constant Mitchell 

1304 PHILIP 1 SHERMAN 

1305 Sarah Odding 

1306 Unknown 

1307 Unknown 

1308 JOHN 2 HATHAWAY, SR. 

1309 Martha 

1310 JAMES 1 BURT 

1311 Anna 



1312 PETER 2 FOLGER 

1313 Mary Morrill 

1314 RICHARD 2 GARDNER 

1315 Sarah 2 Shattuck 

1316 TRISTRAM 1 COFFIN 

1317 DIONIS 1 STEVENS 

1318 GEORGE 1 BUNKER 

1319 JANE 1 GODFREY 

1320 JOHN 1 FOLGER, JR. 

1321 MEREBAH 1 GIBBS 

1322 Unknown 

1323 Unknown 

1324 THOMAS 1 BARNARD (f) 

1325 Eleanor 

1326 ROBERT 1 BARNARD (f) 

1327 Joanna Harvey 



1328 WILLIAM 1 WORTH 

1329 SARAH 2 MACY (d) 

1330 RICHARD 2 GARDNER 

1331 Sarah 2 Shattuck 

1332 CHRISTOPHER 1 HUSSEY 

1333 Theodate 2 Batchelder (e) 

1334 GEORGE 1 BUNKER 

1335 JANE 1 GODFREY 

1336 ROBERT 1 PADDACK 

1337 Unknown 

1338 RICHARD 1 SEARS 

1339 Dorothy Jones 

1340 GEORGE 1 BUNKER 

1341 JANE 1 GODFREY 

1342 THOMAS 1 MAO' 

1343 SARAH 1 HOPCOTT 



2560 Unknown 
2562 Unknown 
2564 Unknown 
2566 Unknown 

2568 Unknown 

2570 ANTHONY 1 ANNABLE 

2572 

2574 

2576 MATTHEW WING 
2578 STEPHEN 1 BATCHELDER 
2580 Unknown 
2582 Unknown 

2584 

2586 

2588 Unknown 

2590 



2592 

2594 

2596 Unknown 

2598 William Hopkins 

2600 Unknown 

2602 LInknown 

2604 Unknown 

2606 Unknown 

2608 Unknown 

2610 Unknown 
2612 
2614 

2616 NICHOLAS 1 HATHAWAY 

2618 Unknown 

2620 Unknown 

2622 Unknown 



2624 JOHN 1 FOLGER, JR. 
2626 Unknown 
2628 THOMAS 1 GARDNER 
2630 SAMUEL 1 SHATTUCK 

2632 PETER COFFIN 
2634 ROBERT STEVENS 
2636 WILLIAM BUNKER 
2638 Richard Godfrey 

2640 John Folger, Sr. 
2642 John Gibbs 
2644 
2646 

2648 Unknown 
2650 Unknown 
2652 Unknown 
2654 Unknown 



2656 John Worth 
2658 THOMAS 1 MACY 
2660 THOMAS 1 GARDNER 
2662 SAMUEL 1 SHATTUCK 

2664 John Hrssey 
2666 STEPHEN 1 BATCHELDER 
2668 WILLIAM BUNKER 
2670 Unknown 

2672 Unknown 

2674 

2676 Unknown 

2678 Unknown 

2680 WILLIAM BUNKER 
2682 Richard Godfrey 
2684 Unknown 
2686 Unknown 



2561 
2563 
2565 
2567 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2569 
2571 
2573 
2575 


Unknown 

Jane 1 Moumford 


2577 
2579 
2581 
2583 


Unknown 
Deborah Bate 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2585 

2587 

2589 Unknown 

2591 


2593 
2595 
2597 
2599 


Unknown 
Joan Arnold 


2601 
2603 
2605 
2607 


Unknown 
Unknown 
LInknown 
Unknown 


2609 
2611 
2613 
2615 


Unknown 
Unknown 


2617 
2619 
2621 
2623 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
LInknown 


2625 
2627 
2629 
2631 


MAREBAH 1 GIBBS 
Unknown 
Margaret 1 Fryer 
Daniaris 1 



Seeref. #167 for 

Batchelder 
English ancestry. 



Seeref. #301 for 

Gardner 
English ancestry. 



2633 JOANNA 1 THEMBER 

2635 Diones 

2637 Unknown 
2639 Jane Turner 



Seerefs. #31 

and #196 for 

Coffin 

English ancestry. 



2641 


Elizabetfi 


2643 


Alice 


2645 




2647 




2649 


Unknown 


2651 


Unknown 


2653 


Unknown 


2655 


Unknown 


2657 


Unknown 


2659 


SARAH 1 HOPCOTT 


2661 


Margaret 1 Fryer 


2663 


Damaris 1 


2665 


Mary Wood 


2667 


Deborah Bale 


2669 


Unknown 


2671 


LInknown 


2673 


LInknown 


2675 




2677 


LInknown 


2679 


LInknown 


2681 


LInknown 


2683 


Jane Turner 


2685 


Unknown 


2687 


Unknown 



Seeref. #105 for 

Folger 
English ancestry. 



83 



Chart IV Biographies 
20. Joseph Rogers 

■7 

See (20) Joseph Rogers on Chart I, the same person. 

40. Aaron Rogers 

Born in Danby, Rutland, Vermont on May 6, 1776. 

Died on December 30, 1866 in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts. Buried in the Quaker 

(Staples) Cemetery near the Dillingham farm in Danby. 
Married Dinah Folger on March 22, 1798. 
The children of Aaron and Dinah, all born in Danby, were: 

1. Sarah 7 , b. 1799, d.y. 

7 6 

2. Joseph , b. March 21. 1801. m. Lydia Carpenter . 

3. Moses Folger , b. 1803. 

4. David , b. 1 804, m. Hannah Dillingham. 

5. Aaron 7 , b. 1805. 

6. Lydia , b. 1807, m. Abraham Dillingham of Granville. 

7. Judith 7 , b. 1809. 

8. George Dillwyn 7 , b. 1811. 

9. Elisha Folger 7 , b. 1813. 

1 0. Hepsibah Folger 7 , b 1815, d y. 

11. Anson 7 , b. 1817, d.y. 

12. Eunice Vail 7 , b. 1819. 

13. Seth 7 ,b. 1823. 
Other information: 

Aaron 6 was the second male child born in Danby. He was involved in farming and 
lived in Danby for eighty-five years before moving to Lynn where he died. He was a 
Quaker. 

The existence of David 7 Rogers, b. 1804, was provided by Otis Dillingham Rogers 
of Coos Bay, Oregon. 
References: #15, p. 90, #16, p. 237, #87, p. 185, #159, and Aaron's gravestone. 

41. Dinah Folger 

Bom in Easton, Albany (now Washington County), New York on January 5, 1782. 

Died on January 16, 1860 in Worcester, Massachusetts. Buried in the Quaker (Staples) Cemetery 

near the Dillingham farm in Danby, Rutland, Vermont. 
Married Aaron Rogers on March 22, 1798. 
References: #1 5, p. 90, #3 1 , p. 754, #8 7, p. 1 85, and Dinah's gravestone. 

80. Stephen 5 Rogers 

Born in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts on February 7, 1748/49. 

Died in Danby, Rutland, Vermont on March 17, 1826. Buried in the Quaker (Staples) Cemetery 

near the Dillingham farm. 
Married Lydia 4 Lapham in Marshfield, or nearby Scituate, on June 25, 1772. 

85 



Chart IV Biographies 

The children of Stephen and Lydia, the first two bom in Marshfield and the others in Danby, were: 
1 Joseph 6 , b. 1773. 

2. Asa 6 , b. 1774, d.y. 

3. Aaron!, b. May 6, 1776, m. Dinah Folger . 

4 Sarah 6 , b. 1779. 

5. John 6 , b. 1781. 

6. Hannah 6 , b 1782. 

7. Stephen 6 , b. 1784. 

8. Ruth 6 , b 1787. 

9. Elizabeth 6 , b. 1789. 

10. Sylvia 6 , b. 1791. 
Other information: 

Stephen and his family were Quakers. About 1775 they moved from Marshfield to 
Danby, where Stephen was a large landholder. 
References: #15, pp. 57-58, #16, pp. 236-237, #87, pp. 184-185, #159, #188, #241, pp. 578, 
586, and 910, and Stephen's death record and gravestone. 

81. Lydia Lapham 

Also known as Elizabeth Lydia Lapham. 

Born in Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island on May 28, 1752. 

Died in Danby, Rutland, Vermont on March 3, 1 832. Buried in the Quaker (Staples) Cemetery 

near the Dillingham farm. 
Married Stephen 5 Rogers on June 25, 1772. 
Other information: 

Lydia and Stephen apparently lived in Marslifield, Plymouth, Massachusetts for 

about three years after they were married and then moved to Danby. 
References: #88, p. 1 84, #1 59, and Lydia's death record and gravestone. 

82. Daniel Folger. Jr. 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on January 14, 1735/36. 
Died in Easton, Albany (now Washington County), New York. 
Married Judith 5 Worth on the Island on February 2, 1758. 
The children of Daniel and Judith, all but Dinah born on the Island, were: 

1. Elisha 7 , b 1760. 

2. Clarinda 7 , b 1762. 

3. Abigail 7 , b 1766. 

4. Judith 7 , b 1768. 

5 Moses 7 , b. 1772. 
6. Aaron 7 , b 1774. 

7 Dinah , b January 5, 1 782 in Easton, m. Aaron 6 Rogers . 
Other information: 

On February 27, 1 775 Daniel and Judith left the Island with their first six 
children Daniel was captain of a whaling vessel. He and seven other Nantucket 



86 



Chart IV Biographies 



whalers were driven from the sea by the approaching revolution and moved to 
Easton. Daniel was a Quaker. 
References: #15, p. 90, #31, p. 754, and #58, p. 292. 

83. Judith 5 Worth 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on July 25, 1739. 
Died on the Island in 1815. 

Married Daniel Folger. Jr. on the Island on February 2, 1758. 
References: #1 5, p. 90 and #3 1, p. 829. 

160. John Rogers 

Bom in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts on December 19, 1714. 
Died on September 5, 1791, probably in Marshfield. 
Married Sarah Wing on December 29, 1 737. 



The children of John and Sarah, all bom in Marshfield, were: 


1. 


John,b. 1738. 


2. 


Wing 5 , b. 1740. 


3. 


Joseph 5 , b. 1742/43. 


4. 


Elizabeth 5 , b. 1746. 


5. 


Stephen 5 , b. February 7. 1748/49. m. Lvdia Lapham 


References: 


#15, pp. 35-36, #202, and #230, p. 667. 




162. Joshua Lapham 



Bom in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on March 9, 1722. 

Died in Adams, Berkshire, Massachusetts on November 12, 1799. His death was shown in the 

records of the East Hoosick monthly meetings of the Quakers. See ancestor number 42 on 

Chart V regarding these Quaker meetings. 
Married Hannah 4 Sherman in Dartmouth on April 3, 1747. 
The children of Joshua and Hannah were: 

1 . Ruth 4 , b. 1 748 in Dartmouth. 

2. Daniel 4 , b. 1 749 in Dartmouth. 

3. Lvdia 4 , b. May 28, 1751 in Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island, m. Stephen 
Rogers . 

4. David 4 , b. 1 753 in Smithfield. 

5. Abraham 4 , b. 1 754 in Smithfield. 

6. Phebe 4 , b. 1 759 in Smithfield. 

7. Nathan 4 , b. 1761 in Smithfield. 

8. Asa 4 , b. 1764 in Smithfield. 

9. Nehemiah 4 , b. 1766 in Smithfield, d.y. 

1 0. Hannah 4 , b. 1 773 in Adams. 
Other information: 



87 



Chart IV Biographies 

Joshua moved to Smithfield, Rhode Island about 1750 and then to Adams in 
western Massachusetts about 1 770. He and his family owned a great deal of land in and 
around Adams. They were Quakers. Susan B. Anthony was one of his descendants. 
Reference: #87, pp. 3 and 1 83-185. 

163. Hannah 4 Sherman 

Born in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on June 7, 1727. 
Died in Adams, Berkshire, Massachusetts on November 17, 1797. 
Married J oshua Lapham in Dartmouth on April 3, 1747. 
References. #87, p. 183 and #90, p. 295. 

164. Daniel Folger. Sr. 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on January 13, 1701/02. 

Lost at sea in 1744. 

Married Abigail Folger on the Island on August 31, 1720. 

The children of Daniel, Sr. and Abigail, all bom on the Island, were: 

1 Elisha", b. 1721/22, lost at sea in 1740. 

2 Kezia 6 ,b. 1723. 

3. Peter 6 , b 1 726, lost at sea in 1 744. 

4. Judith 6 , b. 1728/29. 
5 Abigail 6 , b. 1731. 

6. Mary 6 , b 1733. 

7. Daniel 6 , b. January 14, 1735/36, m. Judith 5 Worth . 
Other information: 

Daniel and his wife, Abigail , were first cousins, once removed. Daniel 5 was lost 
at sea in 1 744 with his son Peter 6 . 
Reference: #3 1 , pp. 748 and 749. 



!l4 



165. Abigail Folger 

Bom on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on April 8, 1703. 
Died in 1787. 

Married first Daniel Folger on the Island on June 30, 1721. Abigail 4 and Daniel 5 were first 

cousins, once removed. 
Married second Daniel Pinkham on August 20, 1748. 
Reference: #3 1 , pp. 74 1 and 742. 

166. Christopher Worth 

Bom on Nantucket Island on September 24, 1717. 

Died on December 2 1 , 1804, probably on the Island. 

Married Dinah 4 Paddack on the Island on October 25, 1738. 

The children of Christopher and Dinah, all bom on the Island, were 



1 



J udith 5 , b July 25, 1739, m. Daniel 6 Folger . 



88 



Cliart IV Biogiapliics 



2. 


Andrew 5 , b. 1741. 


3. 


Phebe 5 , b. 1743. 


4. 


Elizabeth 5 , b. 1746. 


5. 


Dinah 5 , b. 1748. 


6. 


Christopher 5 , b. 1750. 


7. 


Uriah 5 , b. 1755. 


References: 


#31, p. 829 and #187, p. 300. 




320. Thomas 3 Rogers 



This is the same person as (348) Thomas 3 Rogers on Chart V. 

Born in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts on December 25, 1659. 

Died on March 6, 1 745/46, probably in Marshfield. 

Married Bethiah Ewell on June 6, 1712. 

The children of Thomas and Bethiah, all born in Marshfield, were: 

1. Rhoda 4 ,b. 1713. 

2. John . b. December 19, 1714, m. Sarah Wing . 

3. Thomas . b. October 28, 1716, m. Deborah 5 Otis . Thomas 4 and Deborah 5 are on 
Chart V. They are ancestors number 174 and 175. 

4. Bethiah 4 , b. 1718. 
Other information: 

Thomas was a Quaker. 
References: # 1 5, pp. 1 8-19 and 36, #82, #202, and #230, p. 667. 

321. Bethiah 3 EweU 

This is the same person as (349) Bethiah EweU on Chart V. 

Bom on March 3, 1682/83. 

Died on January 23, 1 756. 

Married Thomas Rogers on June 6, 1712. 

Reference: #15, pp. 18-19. 



322. Ebenezer 2 Wing 

Born in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts on November 5, 1671. 

Died on December 24, 1738, probably in Sandwich. 

Married Elizabeth Backhouse in Sandwich on February 23, 1698/99. She died in 1758. 

The cliildren of Ebenezer and Elizabetli, all bom in Sandwich, were: 

1. Stephen 3 , b. 1700. 

2. Rebecca 3 , b. 1702. 

3. Samuel 3 , b. 1703. 

4. Joseph 3 , b. 1704. 

5. Joshua 3 , b. 1706. 



6. Sarah , b. 1708, m. John Rogers . 

7. John 
Other information: 

89 



Chart IV Biographies 

Ebenezer was a Quaker 
References: #15, p. 35, #24, #86, pp. 66-67, #202, and #216, pp. 216-217. 

324. John 2 Lapham. Jr. 

Born in Newport, Rhode Island on December 13, 1677. 

Died after 1758, probably in Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Married first, Mary Russell in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on April 3, 1700. She died in 

1752. 
John and Mary had fourteen children, five sons and nine daughters, in the period 1701-1731. All 

were born in Dartmouth. My ancestor, Joshua Lapham , was born there on March 9, 

1 722. He married Hannah Sherman . 
Probably married second, widow Elizabeth Buxton in Smithfield in 1756. 
Other information: 

All five of John's sons left Dartmouth and lived for a time in Smithfield. Two sons, 

Benjamin and Joshua . were early settlers in Adams, Berkshire, Massachusetts. John was 

a Quaker 
References: #24 and #87, pp. 7 and 9- 1 1 . 

325. Mary" Russell 

Born in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on July 10, 1683. 
Died in Dartmouth in May 1752. 
Married John' Lapham in Dartmouth on April 3, 1700. 
References: #24 and #87, p. 7. 

326. David" Sherman 

Bom in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on January 1, 1680. 

Died in Dartmouth in 1755 or 1761. 

Married Abigail Hathaw ay in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts on December 27, 1710. 

The children of David and Abigail, all born in Dartmouth, were: 

1. Margaret 4 , b. 1711. 

2 Jacob 4 , b. 1713. 

3. David 4 , b. 1716. 

4. Edmund 4 , b. 1718. 

5. John 4 , b 1720. 

6. Nehemiah 4 , b 1 722. 

7. Abigail 4 , b 1724. 

8. Hannah 4 , b June 7, 1 727, m. Joshua 3 Lapham . 

9. Lydia 4 , b. 1729. 
10 Judith 4 , b 1732 

Other information: 

David was a farmer in Dartmouth. 
References: #90, p 295 and #91 , p. 44. 



90 



Cliait IV Biographies 



328. Peter 4 Folger 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on August 28, 1674. 

Died on the Island, probably in June 1707. 

Married Judith Coffin on the Island about 1698. 

The children of Peter and Judith, all born on the Island, were: 

1. Keziali 5 , b. 1699/00. 

2. Daniel 5 , b. January 13, 1701/02, m. Abigail 4 Folger . 

3. Anna 5 , b. 1703. 

4. Mary 5 , b. 1705. 
References: #24 and #3 1 , p. 743 . 



329. Judith 3 Coffin 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, probably about 1677. 

Died on the Island on December 2, 1760. 

Married first, Peter Folger on the Island about 1698. 

Married second, Nathaniel Barnard. 

Married third, Stephen Wilcox in 1 722. 

References: #24 and #3 1 , p. 702. 

330. John Folger 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1659. 

Died on the Island in 1732. 

Married Mary Barnard on the Island about 1688. 

The children of John and Mary, all born on the Island, were: 

1. Jethro 4 , b. 1689. 

2. Nathaniel 4 , b. 1694. 

3. Jonathan , b. 1696. 

4. Richard 4 , b. 1698. 

5. Shubael 4 ,b. 1700. 

6. Abigail 4 , b. April 8, 1 703, m. Daniel 5 Folger. Sr . 

7. Zaccheus , b. 1706. 

8. Hannah 4 , b. 1708. 
References: #24 and #3 1 , pp. 74 1 -742. 

332. Jonathan 3 Worth 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on October 31, 1685. 

Died on the Island on July 26, 1719. 

Married Mary 3 Hussey on the Island on April 16, 1707. 

The children of Jonathan and Mary, all born on the Island, were: 

1. Miriam 4 , b. 1710. 

2. John 4 , b. 1713. 

3 . Christopher 4 , b. September 24, 1 7 1 7, m. Dinah 4 Paddack . 



91 



Chart IV Biographies 

4. Ezekiel 4 ,b. 1719. 
Reference: #31, p. 826. 



334. Nathaniel 3 Paddack 



Surname also spelled Paddock. 

Bom in Yarmouth (Dennis), Barnstable, Massachusetts on September 22, 1677. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on August 8, 1 756. 

Married Ann 3 Bunker on Nantucket Island on October 15, 1706. She was born on September 3, 

1686 and died on January 18, 1767. 
The children of Nathaniel and Ann, all probably born on Nantucket Island, were: 

1. Daniel 4 , b. 1707 

2. Deborah 4 , b. 1709 

3. Love 4 , b. 1711 

4. Lydia 4 , b. 1713 

5. Paul 4 , b 1714, m. Ann Coffin. 

6. Mary 4 , b. 1718 

7. Dinah 4 , b. October 27, 1 720, m. Christopher 4 Worth . 

8. Priscilla 4 , b. 1 722, m. William Coffin. 

9. Anna 4 , b. 1724 

10. Daniel 4 

1 1 Elizabeth 4 

1 2. Stephen , m. Eunice Coffin. 

13 Susanna , m. Matthew Gardner. 

14 Eunice , m. Joseph Coffin. 

1 5. Deborah , m. George Hussey. 

16. Barnabas , m. Abigail Gardner. 

1 7. Nathaniel 
Other information: 

Nathaniel was not an original settler on Nantucket Island; the time of his move 
from Yarmouth to Nantucket is unknown. The limited selection of marriage partners and 
resulting intermarriages on Nantucket Island are illustrated by the marriages of Nathaniel's 
children. One married a Worth, another married a Hussey, two married Gardners, and four 
married Coffins All these surnames were among my ancestors' names and were among 
the earliest settlers on the Island. 
Reference: #187, pp. 199 and 299-300 and #304. pp. 35-37. 

640. John Rogers 

This is the same person as (696) John 2 Rogers on Chart V. 

Born about 1632, probably in England. 

Died on May 7, 1717 

Married first, Rhoda 2 King on October 8, 1 656. She died about 1662, possibly with her third child, 

Rhoda. 
The children of John and Rhoda were: 



92 



Cliart IV Biograpliies 

1. John 3 , bapt. 1657. 

2. Thomas 3 , b. December 25, 1659, m. Bethiah 3 Ewell . 

3. Rhoda 3 , bapt. 1662, d.y. 

Married second, Elizabeth in 1662/63, probably in Marshfield, Plymouth, 

Massachusetts. She died in 1692. There were four children bom from this union in the 
period 1663 to 1669. 

Married third, Elizabeth in Marshfield after 1692. She died in 1705. 

Other information: 

John joined the Quakers in 1660. 

References: #15, pp. 8-10, #24, #82, #85, p. 390, and #88, p. 562. 

641. Rhoda 2 King 

This is the same person as (697) Rhoda King on Chart V. 

Born in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on October 11, 1639. 

Died about 1662. 

Married Jolin Rogers on October 8, 1656. 

References: #15, pp. 8-10, #24, and #85. p. 270. 

642. Gershom Ewell 

This is the same person as (698) Gershom Ewell on Chart V. 
Born in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on November 14, 1650. 
Died in 1718. 

Married Mary in Scituate about 1682. 

The children of Gershom and Mary, all born in Scituate, were: 



1. 


Bethiah 3 . b. March 3. 1682/83. m. Thomas 3 Roeers 


2. 


Mary 3 , b. 1685. 


3. 


Sarah 3 , b. 1687/88. 


4. 


Rebecca 3 , b. 1690. 


5. 


Gershom 3 , b. 1691/92. 


6. 


Hannah 3 , b. 1694/95. 


7. 


Penelope 3 , b. 1697. 


8. 


John 3 , b. 1699. 


;es: 


#24, #81, and #82. 




644. Stephen 1 Wing 



Born in 1621, probably in Flushing, Zealand, Holland. 

Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts on April 24, 1710. 

Married first, Oseali Dillingham in Sandwich about 1646. She died in April 1654. 

The children of Stephen and Oseali, all born in Sandwich, were: 

1 . Nathaniel 2 , b. about 1 646/47. 

2. Elisha 2 , b. about 1647/48. 

3. Ephraim 2 , b. 1649, d.y. 

4. Mercy 2 , b. 1650. 



93 



Chan IV Biographies 

Married second, Sarah" Briggs in Sandwich on January 7, 1655. She died in 1689. 
The children of Stephen and Sarah, all born in Sandwich, were: 

1 . Stephen 2 , b. 1 656, killed in King Philip's War. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1657/58. 

3. John 2 , b. 1661. 

4. Abigail 2 , b. 1664. 

5. Elisha 2 , b. 1669/70. 

6. Ebenezer . b. November 5, 1671, m. Elizabeth Backhouse . 

7. Matthew 2 , b. 1673/74. 
8 Joseph 2 , b. 1677. 

9. Benjamin 2 , b. 1678. 
Other information: 

Stephen came to America with his widowed mother and his three brothers in 
1632. The family settled first in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts, but then moved to 
Sandwich shortly after that town was settled in 1637. 

In 1657 the Quakers made their first appearance in Sandwich and by 1660 almost 
the entire town adhered to their beliefs. Stephen and his family became converts to this 
new Protestant sect. 
References: #15, p. 35, #24, #86, pp. 41, 44, and 53-56, #89, p. 1, #167, pp. 82-94, #202, 

#216, pp. 216-217, and #282, pp. 348-350. 

645. Sarah 2 Briggs 

Born in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts about 1640. 

Died in Sandwich in 1689. 

Married Step hen Wing , as his second wife, in Sandwich on January 7, 1655. 

Other information: 

Sarah's father, James Bri g gs . died in 1641 . It is not known when her mother died, 

but Sarah was a fifteen-year-old orphan when she married Stephen 1 Win g in 1655. Both 

Stephen and Sarah joined the Quakers about 1660. 
References: #24, #86, p. 55, #89, p. 1, #167, p. 94, and #230, p. 823. 

646. Francis Backhouse 

Surname also spelled Backus. 

Died sometime before 1719, probably in Saco, York, Maine. 

Married first, Elizabeth ( possibly Rebecca^ Cross in Wells, York, Maine in 1672. She was the 

daughter of John Cross : mother unknown. Elizabeth died before 1683. 
Married second, Dorcas Seely Gibbins, widow of James Gibbins, in Saco about 1683. 
Francis' children were: 

I Elizabeth , m. Ebenezer 2 Wing . 

2. Nathaniel 

3. Joshua 
4 1 lannah 

5. Daniel, b. 1691. 



94 



Chart IV Biograpliies 

It is fairly certain that my ancestor, Elizabeth Backhouse , was the daughter by Francis' first wife, 
Elizabeth Cross . The younger children were by his second wife, Dorcas. 

Other information: 

Francis first appeared in Ogunquit, York, Maine in 1668. In 1671 he sold out and 
moved to Wells and then about 1681 he moved to Saco. Sometime after 1688 Francis 
escaped from Indian attacks on Saco and made his way to Plymouth Colony. Because 
Maine was on the frontier its towns were repeatedly attacked by Indians, however, their 
strength was broken during Queen Anne's War (1702-1713). Maine recovered quickly 
and Francis returned to Saco. 

There is a William' Backus/Backhouse (ancestor #724) on Chart VI and there is a 
good possibility that he was related to Francis Backhouse , but proof is lacking. This is 
discussed on pages 4 and 1 16 of reference #213. 

References: #24, #92, p. 72, #21 1, #212, p. 60, #213, pp. 4 and 1 16-1 17, and #299, p. 1200. 

648. John Lapham. Sr. 

Bom in 1635, probably in Devonshire, England. 

Died in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts in 1710. 

Married Mary Mann in Providence, Rhode Island on April 6, 1673. She died in Dartmouth after 

1710. 
The children of John and Mary were: 

1. Mary , b. 1674 in Providence, d.y. 

2. John , b. December 13, 1677 in Newport, Rhode Island, m. Mary Russell . 

3. William 2 , b. 1679 in Newport. 

4. Thomas , b. 1682 in Dartmouth. 

5. Mary 2 , b. 1686 in Dartmouth. 

6. Nicholas 2 , b. 1689 in Dartmouth. 
Other information: 

John was a weaver by trade. The exact time of his arrival in America is unknown, 
but he settled in Providence about 1660 and married Mary Mann there in 1673. At the 
outbreak of King Philip's War in 1675 Providence was burned by Indians and John and 
Mary lost their house. They fled to Newport along with most of the residents of 
Providence. In 1682 they moved to Dartmouth. John was an ardent Quaker. 
References: #24 and #87, pp. 1-6. 

650. Joseph 2 Russell 

Born in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts on May 6, 1650. 
Died in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on December 11, 1739. 
Married Elizabeth 2 Fobes in Dartmouth about 1678. She died there in 1737. 
The children of Joseph and Elizabeth, all born in Dartmouth, were: 

1. Joseph , twin, b. 1679. 

2. John 3 , twin, b. 1679. 

3. William 3 , b. 1681. 



4. Mary . b. July 10, 1683, m. John Lapham . 



5. Joshua 3 , b. 1686, d.y. 



95 



Chart IV Biographies 



6. Rebecca 3 , b. 1688. 



7. Benjamin , b. 1691. 

8. Seth 3 ,b. 1696. 
References: #24 and #87, p. 8. 



652. Edmund 2 Sherman 



Born in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island in April 1641. 

Died in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts in 1719. 

Married Dorcas Hicks about 1673. 

The children of Edmund and Dorcas, all born in Dartmouth, were: 

1. David 3 , b. 1674, d.y. 

2. Dayjrf , h May 1, 1676. m. Abigail Hathaway . 



3. 
4 


Nathan', b. 1678/79. 
Nathaniel 3 , b. 1680/81. 


5. 
6. 


Lydia 3 ,b. 1682/83. 
Elkanah 3 ,b. 1686. 


7. 
8. 


Joseph , b. 1694. 
Elnathan 3 ,b. 1698. 


Other information: 

Edmund was a farmer in Dartmouth 
References: #24 and #90, pp. 293-4. 



654. John 3 Hathaway. Jr. 

Bom in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts on August 16, 1650. 

Died in June 1 730, either in Freetown or Dighton, Bristol, Massachusetts. 

Married first, Hannah 2 Burt in Taunton about 1676. She died after 1705. 

John and Hannah had ten children, all probably born in Freetown. My ancestor, Abigail 

Hathaway, married David Sherman . 
Married second, Christian Maxfield 
Other information: 

John had a shipyard that made ocean-going sailing ships. 
References: #24, #91, pp. 43-44, and #118, pp. 500-502. 

656. Eleazer Folger 

Bom in Edgarton, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts in 1648. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1716. 

Married Sarah Gardner on Nantucket Island in 1671 . 

The children of Eleazer and Sarah, all born on the Island, were: 

1 Eleazer 4 , b 1672 

2. Peter 4 , b. August 28, 1 674, m. Judith 3 Coffin . 

,4 



3. Sarah", b. 1676 

4. Nathan 4 , b. 167! 

5. Mary 4 , b. 1684. 



96 



Chart IV Biograpliics 



6. Daniel , d.y. 

7. Elisha , d.y. 
Other information: 

Eleazer was a shoemaker and blacksmith and he was granted a "half share" on 
Nantucket Island for his services. 

See (1326) Robert Barnard on this chart concerning the drowning of a daughter 
of Peter Folger . Eleazer was the only person who survived this tragedy in which four 
people drowned. 
References: #24 and #3 1 , p. 74 1 . 

658. Stephen 2 Coffin 

Born in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts on May 11, 1652. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on November 14, 1734. 
Married Mary Bunker on the Island in 1 669. 
The cliildren of Stephen and Maty, all bom on the Island, were: 

1 . Daniel 3 , b. 1 670, lost at sea in 1 724. 

2. Dionis 3 ,b. 1671. 

3. Peter 3 , b. 1673. 

4. Stephen 3 , b. 1675/76. 

5. Judith 3 , b. 1678, m. Peter 3 Folger . 

6. Susanna , b. 1680. 

7. Mehitable 3 , b. 1682. 

8. Anna 3 , b. 1685. 

9. Hephzibah 3 , b. 1690. 

1 0. Paul 3 , b. 1 695, lost at sea in 1 729. 
Other information: 

Stephen moved to Nantucket Island with his parents when he was about eight 
years old. He joined the Quakers in 1708. Stephen and Mary may also have had a son, 
Nathaniel, who drowned in 1704 
References: #24, #3 1 , p. 702, and #239, pp. 1 -4. 

659. Mary 2 Bunker 

Born in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts about 1652. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1 724. 

Married Stephen Coffin on the Island in 1669. 

Other information: 

Mary moved to Nantucket Island with her family in 1659 at about age seven. The 
family included her mother, Jane, her new stepfather, Richard Swain, and Mary's four 
siblings, including my ancestors, William Bunker and Martha Bunker . 

References: #24 and #3 1 , p. 684. 

660. Peter 2 Folger 
This is the same person as (13 12) Peter 2 Folger , on this chart. 

97 



were drowned in June 1669. 
3 



John . b. 1659, m. Mary Barnard . 



9. Abiah" , b. on Nantucket Island in 1667. 



Chart IV Biographies 

Bom in Diss, Norfolk, England in 1617 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1690. 
Married Mary Morrill in 1644. 

The children of Peter and Mary, all except the last probably bom in Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, 
Massachusetts, were: 
1 Joanna 

Bethiah 3 , m John Barnard, son of (1326) Robert 1 Barnard . Bethiah" and John 
were dn 

3. Dorcas" 

4. Eleazer , b. 1648. m. Sarah Gardner . 

5. Bethsheba 

6. Patience 

7. John 3 , b. 

8. Experience" 

9. Al 
Other information: 

Peter immigrated to America with his father, John Folger . in 1635 on the ship 
Abigail They first settled in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, but soon moved to 
Watertown, three miles from Boston. About 1642, as a single man, Peter moved to 
Martha's Vineyard with Thomas Mayhew, Jr., whose father, Thomas Mayhew, Sr., was the 
owner of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island. For almost twenty years, Peter served 
as the general agent and overseer for the Mayhews on Martha's Vineyard. Peter probably 
preceded his parents, John Folger and Merebah Gibbs . who also moved to Martha's 
Vineyard about 1642. 

When Peter married Mary Morrill in 1644 he had purchased her from Rev. Hugh 
Peters, to whom she owed service. Peter declared that Mary was the best money he ever 
spent 

On Martha's Vineyard Peter was a miller and a blacksmith. He also became very 
proficient in the Indian language. When Thomas Mayhew, Sr. sold Nantucket Island to the 
"first purchasers," it was arranged that Peter should accompany the purchasers and assist in 
managing the Indians. Peter had first gone to Nantucket Island about 1659 as the 
interpreter for Tristram Coffin and he moved there about 1663. Peter was granted a "half 
share" on Nantucket Island for assisting the settlers as interpreter, miller, and blacksmith. 

Peter and Mary would become the grandparents of Benjamin Franklin through 
their daughter, Abiah, who married Josiah Franklin in 1689. Benjamin Franklin referred to 
Peter Folger as his "Quaker grandfather." Peter Folger's house on Nantucket Island may 
be readily identified by a monument erected on the site by the Daughters of the American 
Revolution in honor of his daughter, Abiah. 
References: #24, #3 1 , pp. 740-74 1 , #88, v. IT, p . 1 77, # 1 05, pp. 22-26, and # 1 66, pp. 14-34. 

662. Nathaniel Barnard 

Bom on November 1 5, 1642, probably in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on April 3, 1718. 

Married Mary Barnard on the Island about 1666. Nathaniel 2 and Mary 2 were first cousins. 



98 



Chart IV Biograpliies 



The children of Nathaniel and Mary were: 

1 . Mary 3 , b. February 24, 1 667, m. John 2 Folger . 



2. Hannah 3 , b. 1669. 

3. John 3 , b. 1670. 

4. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1672. 

5. Stephen 3 , b. 1674. 

6. Sarah 3 , b. 1677. 

7. Eleanor 3 , b. 1679. 

8. Benjamin 

9. Ebenezer 3 ,b. 1691. 

10. Abigail 3 



Other information: 

Nathaniel's father, Thomas' Barnard , was one of the "first purchasers" of land on 
Nantucket Island. Thomas never moved to Nantucket, but his son, Nathaniel 2 , acquired 
one half of his father's share. The other half was acquired by Thomas' brother, Robert 1 
Barnard . 

References: #24, #3 1, pp. 660, 661 and 670-671, and #85, p. 33. 

664. John 2 Worth 

Born on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on May 19, 1666. 

Died in Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts in 1732. 

Married Miriam Gardner on Nantucket Island on September 22, 1684. She died in 1702. 

The children of John and Miriam, all bom on the Island, were: 

1 . Jonathan , b. October 31, 1 685, m. Mary Hussey . 

2. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1687. 

3. Judith 3 , b. 1689. 

4. Richard 3 , b. 1692. 

5. William 3 , b. 1694. 

6. Joseph 3 , b. 1696. 

7. Mary , b. about 1696. 
Other information: 

After his wife, Miriam, died in 1702 John moved to Martha's Vineyard, 
Massachusetts, where he married twice more. There may have been three children by his 
second marriage. All his children by Miriam except Nathaniel settled on Nantucket Island. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 825 and 826, #166, pp. 78-79, and Nantucket vital records. 

666. Stephen 2 Hussey 

Born in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts about 1633. Stephen was the second child bom in 

Lynn. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on April 2, 1718. Buried in the first Quaker burial 

ground on the Island. 
Married Martha 2 Bunker on Nantucket Island on October 8, 1676. She was twenty years old at 

the time and he was about forty-three. She died in 1744. 

99 



Chan IV Biographies 

The children of Stephen and Martha, all born on the Island, were: 

1. Puella 3 , b 1677. 

2. Abigail 3 , b. 1679. 

3. Sylvanus 3 , b. 1682. 

4. Bachelor 3 , b 1684/85. 

5. Daniel 3 ,!). 1687. 

6. Mary 3 , b. March 24, 1689, m. Jonathan 3 Worth . 

7. George 3 , b. 1694. 

8. Theodate 3 , b. 1700. 
Other information: 

Stephen moved with his family to Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire when 
he was about five years old. Later he moved to Nantucket Island, but the date is unknown. 
Stephen was the only one of the Christopher 1 Hussey family to move to the Island. 

It is not known if Stephen was an admitted attorney, but from the date when court 
records began on Nantucket Island, there was seldom a session when he was not either a 
party to the litigation or an attorney. He was the largest land owner on the Island at that 
time. 

Stephen was also a master mariner and sailed between Nantucket, Boston, and 
New York. He was an early member of the Quakers, but was disowned in 1717. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 661, 662, and 779-780, #88, v. U, p. 508, #166, p. 70, #167, p. 78, 

and #187, pp. 53-54. 

667. Martha Bunker 

Born in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts about 1656. 

Married Stephen Hussey on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on October 8, 1676. 

Other information: 

In 1659, at about age three, Martha moved to Nantucket Island with her family. 
The family included her mother, Jane, her new stepfather, Richard Swain, and Martha's 
four siblings, including my ancestors, William 2 Bunker and Mary 2 Bunker . 

References: #24 and #3 1 , p. 684. 

668. Zachariah Paddack 

Surname also spelled Paddock. 
H< >m in Plymouth, Massachusetts on March 20, 1636. 
Died in Yarmouth (Dennis), Barnstable, Massachusetts on May 1 , 1 727. 

Married D eborah Sears in Yarmouth in 1659. She was bom in September 1639 and died in 1732. 
The children of Zachariah and Deborah, all probably born in Yarmouth, were: 
1 Ichabod 3 , b 1661 

2. Zachariah , b. 1664. 

3. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1666. 
4 John 3 , b 1668 



5. Robert 3 , b. 1670. 

6. Joseph 3 , b 1674. 



L00 



Chart IV Biographies 

7. Nathaniel 3 , b. September 22, 1677, m. Ann 3 Bunker . 

8. Judah 3 , b. 1681. 

References: #24, #88, v. m, p. 328, #187, pp. 199 and 204, #227, pp. 33-35, and #304, pp. 27- 
29. 

670. William 2 Bunker 

Baptized in Tingrith, Bedfordshire, England on June 17, 1648. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on June 6, 1712. 
Married Mary Macy on the Island on April 1 1, 1669. 
The children of William and Mary, all born on the Island, were: 

1 . George" , b. 1 67 1 , m. Deborah Coffin. 

2. John , b. 1673, unmarried 

3. Jonathan , b. 1675, m. Elizabeth Coffin. 

4. Peleg , b. 1676, m. Susanna Coffin. 

5. Jabez", b. 1678, m. Hannah Gardner. 

6. Thomas , b. 1680, m. Priscilla Arthur. 

7. Benjamin , b. 1683, m. Deborah Paddack. 

8. Mary 3 , b. 1685, m. Tristram 3 Coffin. 

9. Ann . b. September 3, 1686, m. Nathaniel Paddack . 

10. Daniel 3 , b. 1688, d.y. 

1 1 . Abigail 3 , b. 1689, m. Shubael Pinkham. 

12. Christian 3 , b. 1692, d.y. 

13. Jane , b. 1694, m. (1) Robert Watson, m. (2) Isaac Coleman. 
Other information: 

William came to Massachusetts with his parents in 1650. He moved to Nantucket 
Island in 1659 at age eleven with his mother, Jane, his new stepfather, Richard Swain, and 

2 2 

William's four siblings, including my ancestors, Mary Bunker and Martha Bunker . 

William's first houselot on the Island was included in that of his stepfather, as he 
was a minor at the time of the allotment. A few years later he was allotted ten acres. 
However, this houselot was somewhat isolated and one night Frenchmen from a ship of 
war came ashore and attacked his home. They stole food, bedding, and clothing and 
abducted William to act as a pilot in Vineyard Sound. He was released safely a few days 
later. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 659, 660, and 684-685, #166, pp. 63 and 303, #196, pp. 470-471, 

and #303, p. 67. 

671. Mary 2 Macv 

Bom in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts on December 4, 1648. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1729. 
Married William 2 Bunker on the Island on April 11, 1669. 
Other information: 

Mary moved to Nantucket Island with her family in 1659 when she was eleven 
years old. They were the first English settlers on the Island. 



101 



Chart IV Biographies 

References: #24 and #3 1 , pp. 654, 684, and 787-788. 

1280. John 1 Rogers 

This is the same person as (1392) John' Rogers on Chart V. 
Born in England about 1601. 

Died in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts about May 1661. 
Married F rances Watson about 1631. 

The children of John and Frances, some probably born in England and the others in Scituate, 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, were: 
1. 



John" , b. about 1632, m. Rhoda King . 

Joseph 

Timothy 

Ann" 

Mary 

Abigail , b. about 1645. 



Other information: 

Neither the date or the place of John's birth in England, nor the exact time he came 
to America has been ascertained. John lived in Scituate until about 1647 when he moved 
to Marshfield, which had been settled in 1642. 

There has been uncertainty about the identification of John Rogers. This is 
discussed in detail in a paper by Mr. Drummond which was read before the Maine 
Historical Society on December 19, 1895. A copy of this twenty-seven-page paper is 
included at the end of reference #15, which is Mr. Drummond's book, John Rogers of 
Marshfield. 

References: # 1 5, pp. 5-8, #24, #85, p. 390, and #88, p. 56 1 . 

1281. Frances Watson 

This is the same person as ( 1 393) Frances Watson on Chart V. 

Probably born in England 

Died in 1687, probably in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

Married first, J ohn 1 Rogers about 1631. 

Married second, Walter Briggs of Scituate about 1661. 

Other information: 

Frances may have been a daughter of Robert Watson and his wife Elizabeth, who 
came to Plymouth early but later settled in Connecticut. 
References: #15 and #24. 

1282. Thomas' King 

This is the same person as (1 394) Thomas' King on Chart V. 

Bom in England, probably in 1604. 

Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on September 24, 1691. 

Married Brat, Susan' in England about 1634. She died in Scituate on June 6, 1652. 

The children of Thomas and Susan, all bom in Scituate, were: 



102 



Cliarl IV Biograpliies 



1 . Rhoda . b. October 1 1 , 1 639, m. John 2 Rogers. 

2. George 2 , b. 1642. 

3. Thomas 2 , b. 1645. 

4. Daniel 2 , b. 1647. 

5. Sarah 2 , b. 1650. 

6. John 2 (twin), b. 1652. d.y. 

7. Ann 2 (twin), b. 1652, d.y. 

Married second, Jane, the widow of William Hatch, in Scituate in March 1653. She died in 

October of the same year. 
Married third, Anne SutlefFe in Scituate after 1653. She died after 1691 . There is no record of any 

children from this union. 
Other information: 

Thomas and his wife, Susan, came to America on the Blessing in July 1635 and 

settled in Scituate. In his will, Thomas set his negro servant, Roben, free and gave him his 

bed and five pounds in money. 
References: #15, pp. 8-10, #24, and #85, pp. 270-271 . 

1284. Henry 1 Ewell 

This is the same person as (1396) Henry Ewell on Chart V. 
Bom in Sandwich, Kent, England, probably about 1615. 
Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1681. 
Married Sarah Annable in Scituate on November 23, 1638. 
The children of Henry and Sarah were: 

1. John , b. 1639/40 in Barnstable, Massachusetts. 

2. Ebenezer , b. 1643 in Barnstable. 

3. Sarah , b. 1645 in Barnstable. 

4. Hannah 2 , b. 1649 in Scituate. 

5. Gersham 2 , b. November 14, 1650 in Scituate, m. Mary 

6. Bethia 2 , b. 1653 in Scituate. 

7. Ichabod 2 , b. 1659 in Scituate. 

8. Deborah 2 , b. 1663 in Scituate. 

9. Eunice 
Other information: 

Henry was a shoemaker and came to New England on the ship Hercules in March 
1634/35 with Rev. William Witherell. Henry settled first in Scituate but moved to 
Barnstable and then back to Scituate in 1646. 

Henry volunteered and was a soldier in the Pequot War in 1637. In 1676 liis house 
and barn in Scituate were burned by Indians during King Philip's War. 
References: #15, p. 19, #24, #81, #82, #88, p. 132, #96, p. 359, and #104, p. 1 16. 

1285. Sarah 2 Annable 

This is the same person as (1397) Sarah 2 Annable on Chart V. 
Born in England in 1622. 

103 



Chart IV Biograpliies 

Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1687. 
Married Henry 1 Ewell in Scituate on November 23, 1638. 
Other information: 

Sarah came to Plymouth Colony in 1623 on the ship Ann with her parents when 
she was about one year old. 
References: #15, p. 19, #24, #82, and #96, p. 17. 

1288. Rev. John Wing 

Christened in Banbury, Oxford, England on January 12, 1584. 

Died in London, England in 1630. 

Married Deborah 2 Batchelder in the Church of Holy Cross and St. Peter in Wherwell, Hampshire, 

England in 1609/10. 
The children of John and Deborah were: 

1 . Deborah, b. 1611, married and remained in England. 

2. John'.b. about 1613. 

3. Stephen . b. 1621. m. Sarah Briggs . 

4. Daniel 

5. Matthew, returned to England. 
Other information: 

John resided first in Sandwich, England and then in Hanbury, England. He 
removed to Flushing, Zealand, Holland, where he was the resident pastor of the English 
Puritan Church. Later, he moved to the Hague and finally returned to London after 
eighteen years in Holland. He died in London in 1630 at age forty-six, just as the family 
was preparing to come to America with his father-in-law, Rev. Stephen Batchelder . 

Some references have stated that Rev. John Wing , who married Deborah 
Batchelder . came to America. However, the fact that John Wing did not come to America 
is conclusively demonstrated in reference #200. 
References: #24, #85, p. 506, #86, pp. 26-58, #88, v. IV, p. 594, #167, pp. 82-94, #200, and 

#201, pp. 1330-1342. 

1289. Deborah 2 Batchelder 

Bom in Wherwell, Hampshire, England in 1592. 

Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts in January 1692. 

Married Rev. John Wing in the Church of Holy Cross and St. Peter in Wherwell in 1609/10. 

Other information: 

In 1 624 Deborah moved from England to Flushing, Zealand, Holland and joined 
her husband, Rev. John Wing . The family returned to England where Rev. John Wing died 
in 1630 After that Deborah probably returned to her home in Flolland for a year or two 
before coming to America. 

She came to America with her four young sons, John, Stephen' . Daniel and 
Matthew The information is conflicting as to when they came over, but they may have 
come on the William and Francis with her father, Rev. Stephen' Batchelder . in 1632. The 
families first settled in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts, but by about 1637 Deborah 
and her sons had removed to Sandwich, where they converted to Quakerism. 

104 



Chart IV Biograpliies 

References: #167, pp. 82-94, #198, #200, and #201, pp. 1334-1342. 

1290. John 1 Brig gs 

Born in 1615, probably in England. 

Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1641. 

Married Katherine in Sandwich about 1637. 

The children of John and Katherine, both bom in Sandwich, were: 

1 . Samuel 

2. Sarah 2 , m. Stephen 1 Wing . 
Other information: 

Jofin probably came to America at age twenty on The Blessing in 1635. He settled 
first in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts and then moved to Sandwich before 1637. 
He died when his two children were less than four years old. It is unknown how they were 
raised. 
References: #15, p. 35, #24, #85, p. 69, #86, p. 55, #88, v. I, p. 251, #89, p. 1, and #167, p. 94. 

1298. William' Mann 

Probably born in Yeovilton or Hchester, Somerset, England. 
Died in Providence, Rhode Island about 1650. 
Married Frances Hopkins in England in or before 1635. 
The children of William and Frances were: 

1. Abraham , d. 1695, unmarried. 

1 1 

2. Mary , b. 1640, probably in Providence, m. Jolin Lapham . 
Other information: 

William came to New England with his wife, Frances Hopkins, in 1635. William 
was a Quaker. 
Reference: #87, p. 5. 

1299. Frances 1 Hopkins 

Bom in Yeovilton, Somerset, England on May 28, 1614. 

Died in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts at the home of her son-in-law, John Lapham, Sr., on 

February 26, 1700. 
Married William 1 Mann in England in or before 1635. 
Other information: 

Frances was the daughter of William and Joan (Arnold) Hopkins . She came to 

New England with her husband, William 1 Mann, her brother, Thomas, and her uncle, 

William Arnold. Before coming to New England the Arnold, Hopkins and Mann families 

were neighbors in Yeovilton and Hchester, England. 
Reference: #87, p. 5. 

1300. John 1 Russell 

Bom about 1608, probably in England. 

Died in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts on February 13, 1694/95. 

105 



Chart IV Biographies 

Married Dorothy in Marshfleld, Plymouth, Massachusetts about 1644. She died in 

Dartmouth in 1687. 
The children of John and Dorothy, probably all bom in Marshfleld, were: 

1. Mary 2 , b. 1645. 

2. Joseph 2 , b. May 6, 1650, m. Elizabeth 2 Fobes . 

3. John 2 , b. 1653. 

4. Jonathan 2 , b about 1655. 

5. Dorothy 
Other information: 

John and Dorothy were in Marshfleld as early as 1642/43. About 1661 they 
moved to Dartmouth. 
References: #24 and #87, pp. 7-8. 

1302. John' Fobes 

Probably born in Scotland. 

Died in Bridgewater, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1661/62. 

Married Constant Mitchell about 1640, probably in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts. She 

married second, John Briggs in Portsmouth, Rhode Island about 1662. 
The children of John and Constant were: 

1. John 2 , d. 1661. 

2. Edward , m. 1676. 

3. Mary 

4. Caleb 2 , m. 1681. 

5. William 2 , b. 1649. 

6. Joshua 

7. Elizabeth . b. before 1662. m. Joseph 2 Russell . 
Other information: 

John was in Duxbury by 1636. At some time he moved to Bridgewater, where he 
was an original proprietor. 



References: #24 and #87, p. 7. 



1304. Philip' Sherman 



Baptized in Dedham, Essex, England on February 5, 1610. 

Died in 1687, probably in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island. 

Married Sarah Odding in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1633. 

In the period 1634 to 1652 Philip and Sarah had thirteen children, the first two born in Roxbury, 

the last eleven born in Portsmouth. My ancestor, Edmund 2 Sherman , was the fifth child, 

bomin April 1641 He married Dorcas Hicks . 
Other information: 

Philip came to America as a single man in 1633. In 1637 he was banished from the 
church and the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Philip, with others who had been banished, 
consulted with Roger Williams in Providence, Rhode Island. Upon his advice they 
purchased the island of Aquidnech in Narragansett Bay from the Indians in 1639. Philip 
was the first secretary of the colony of Rhode Island in 1648 and a representative in 1656. 

106 



Cluut IV Biograpliies 



References: #24, #85, p. 4 1 3, #88, v. IV, p. 83, and #90, pp. 24-28. 

1308. John 2 Hathawav. Sr. 

Born in England, probably about 1629. 

Died in 1705, probably in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts. 

Married first, Martha about 1649. She died between 1683 and 1692. 

John and Martha had eight cliildren. My ancestor, John 3 Hathawav. Jr. . was the oldest, born 

August 16, 1650. He married Hannah 2 Burt . 
Married second, Ruth Dyer, widow of Christian Dyer, in Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts on 

October 10, 1692. 
References: #24 and #91, p. 43. 

1310. James' Burt 

Bom in England. 

Died in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts, probably in 1681. 

Married Anna in Taunton about 1654. She died on August 17, 1665. 

The children of James and Anna, all probably born in Taunton (but the order of birth is unknown), 
were: 

2 3 

1. Hannah , m. Jolui Hathaway . 

2. Rachell 2 

3. James , b. about 1659. 

4. Thomas 
Other information: 

James probably arrived in Taunton in the early 1640s, but there is no good 
evidence of the exact date except that he was in Taunton by 1645. A James Burt sailed 
from London for the Barbados on the Falcon on April 14, 1635. Many New England 
immigrants came from England by way of Barbados. If this was my ancestor, he would 
have been bom in 1622 and thirty-two years of age when he married Anna in 1654. 
References: #24, #91, pp. 43-44, and #118, pp. 499-503. 

1312. Peter 2 Folger 
See (660) Peter 2 Folger on this chart, the same person. 

1314. Richard 2 Gardner 

Bom in Dorsetshire, England about 1622. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1688. 

Married Sarah 2 Shattuck in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts about 1651. She died in 1724. 

The children of Richard and Sarah were: 

1 . Joseph 3 , b. about 1652 in Salem. 

2. Richard 3 , b. 1653 in Salem. 

3. Sarah 3 , b. about 1655 in Salem, m. Eleazer Folger . 

3 



4. Deborah , b. 1658 in Salem. 



107 



Cliart IV Biograpliies 

5. Damaris", b. 1662 in Salem, d.y. 

6. James , b. 1664 in Salem. 

7. Miriam 3 , b. 1664 or 1665 in Salem, m. John 2 Worth . 

8. Nathaniel , twin, b. 1665 on Nantucket Island. 

9. Hope 3 , twin, b. 1665 on Nantucket Island. 

1 0. Love 3 , b. 1672 on Nantucket Island. 
Other information: 

Richard" came to America at age two on the Zouch Phenix with his parents and 
two brothers in the spring of 1624. The family first settled at Cape Ann (Gloucester), 
Essex, Massachusetts. About 1626 they moved to Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. Richard 
and his brother, John", were both seamen, and they both moved to Nantucket Island as 
half-share men by agreeing to carry on their trade for at least three years. Richard came to 
the Island about 1665. John" probably came later. 

Richard and his wife, Sarah, had been excommunicated from their church in Salem 
for attending Quaker meetings. Soon after moving to Nantucket Island they became 
devout and influential Quakers. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 756-757, #88, v. II, p. 229, #104, p. 58, #166, pp. 14-18, 60, and 68, 

#187, pp. 79-85, #196, pp. 476-477, #280, p. 734, #301, pp. 27-28, and Nantucket 

vital records. 

1316. Tristram Coffin 

Bom in Brixton, Devonshire, England in 1605. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on October 2, 1681. 
Married Dionis 1 Stevens in Brixton about 1629. She died in 1676. 
The children of Tristram and Dionis, the first five born in England, were: 

1. Peter 2 , b 1631. 

2. Tristram 2 , b. 1632. 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1635. 

4 John 2 ,b 1638, d.y 

5 James 2 , b. 1640. 

6. Deborah", b. 1642 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts, d.y. 

7. Mary", b. 1645 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts. 

8. John 2 , b. 1647 in Haverhill. 

S tephen . b May 11, 1652 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, m. Mary 2 Bunker . 
Other information: 

Tristram and his wife, Dionis, and four children came to America in 1642. His 
mother, Joanna, and two unmarried sisters also accompanied the family. At various times 
the family lived in Salisbury, Haverhill, and Newbury, Massachusetts. 

In 1659 Tristram and two companions sailed to Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket 
Island looking for a better place to settle. Both islands were owned by Thomas Mayhew, 
Sr , who they found was willing to sell Nantucket. Upon their return to Essex County, a 
group often "first purchasers" was formed to buy this island. Tristram was the pioneer and 
apparently the most influential person in this group. The purchase was made in 1659. 



108 



Cliart IV Biographies 

In 1659 my ancestor, (1342) Thomas' Macy . and his family became the first 
permanent white residents on the Island. In 1660 Tristram and his family joined the Macys 
on the Island. Several other families also moved to the Island in 1660. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 654-656 and 697-699, #88, v. I, pp. 418-420, #187, pp. 24-40, and 

#196, pp. 457-459. 

1317. Dionis Stevens 

Baptized in Plymouth, Devonshire, England on March 4, 1610. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on October 16, 1676. 
Married Tristram Coffin in Brixton, Devonshire, England about 1629. 
Other information: 

Dionis came to America in 1642 with her husband, Tristram 1 , and four children. 
Reference: #196, pp. 457 and 466. 

1318. George Bunker 

This is the same person as ( 1 340) George 1 Bunker on this chart. 

Born in England about 1 620. 

Died in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts on May 26, 1658, leaving his five small children ranging in 

age from two to twelve years. 
Married Jane Godfrey in Maulden, Bedfordshire, England on July 5, 1644. 
The children of George and Jane were: 

1. Elizabeth 2 , b. about 1646. 

2. William 2 , b. 1648, m. Mary 2 Macy . 

2 2 

3. Mary . b. about 1652, m. Stephen Coffin . 

4. Ann , b. about 1654. 

2 2 

5. Martha , b. about 1656, m. Stephen Hussey . 
Other information: 

In 1650 George and his wife and their first two cliildren immigrated to 
Massachusetts, first to Ipswich in Essex County and then to Topsfield. He had a farm in 
Topsfield and was not a settler on Nantucket Island. George and his horse drowned on 
May 26, 1658 while crossing a stream, but his ten year old son, William . managed to reach 
shore. 

In 1658 George's widow, Jane, married Richard Swain, who was fifty-seven years 

old at the time. Richard was a "first purchaser" of Nantucket Island. About 1659 all five 

of George's children moved to the Island with their mother and stepfather, Richard. Three 

of these children, William 2 , Mary 2 , and Martha 2 , are my ancestors. 

References: #24, #31, p. 684, #88, v. I, p. 299, #166, p. 63, #187, pp. 205 and 237, and #196, 

pp. 469-470. 

1319. Jane 1 Godfrey 

This is the same person as ( 1 34 1 ) Jane 1 Godfrey on this chart. 
Born in England about 1622. 



109 



Chart IV Biograpliics 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts on October 31, 1662, being the first recorded death in 

the town records. 
Married first, George 1 Bunker in Maulden, Bedfordshire, England on July 5, 1644. 
Married second, Richard Swain of Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on September 15, 1658. 
Other information: 

Jane was the daughter of Richard and Jane (Turner) Godfrey . 

Jane's first husband, George 1 Bunker , died on May 26, 1658 and four months later 

she married the widower, Richard Swain. Richard was fifty-seven years old at that time. 

Soon thereafter, Jane and her new husband and her five young children by George Bunker 

moved to Nantucket Island. 

Richard Swain had come to America in 1635 with his wife and four children. The 

history of Richard's first wife and the four children is unknown except that one son, John, 

came to Nantucket Island with the family. Richard and his son, John, were both "first 

purchasers" of the Island. Richard was not an educated man; he worked for the town 

tending sheep and cattle. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 658, 659, 684, and 813, #196, p. 469, and #306, p. 7. 

1320. John' Folger. Jr. 

Bom in Diss, Norfolk, England in 1 594. His parents were John and Elizabeth Folger . 

Died on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts in 1662. He is buried on Tower Hill, Great Harbor, 

Martha's Vineyard alongside his wife, Merebah, who died in 1664. 
Married Merebah Gibbs in Frenze Hall, Norfolk, England in 1615. Frenze Hall is two miles from 

Diss. 
The children of John and Merebah, both born in Diss, were: 

1 Peter 2 , b. 1617, m. Mary Morrill . 

2 Mary 2 , b. after 1617. 
Other information: 

John and his son, Peter , sailed for America in 1635 on the Abigail and landed in 
Boston on October 6 Peter was unmarried at the time. John's wife, Merebah, and 
daughter, Mary, were not on the passenger list. They may have simply been unlisted or 
come over on another ship. 

In America, John first lived in the frontier community of Dedham, Norfolk, 
Massachusetts. The family soon moved to the prosperous town of Watertown, three miles 
from Boston. About 1642 the family left a large house on six acres in Watertown to help 
settle Martha's Vineyard. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 177, #105, pp. 22-26, and #189, p. 1 15. 

1321. Merebah' Gibbs 

Bom in Frenze Hall, Norfolk, England about 1 599. Her parents were John and, possibly, Alice 

Gibbs. 
Died in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts in 1664. 
Married John 1 Foluer. Jr. in Frenze Hall in 1615. 
References: #24 and #105, pp. 22-26. 



110 



Cliart IV Biogiapliies 

1324. Thomas 1 Barnard 

Probably born in England. 

Killed by Indians about 1677 during King Philip's War, probably in or near Amesbury, Essex, 

Massachusetts. 
Married Eleanor about 1640. It is uncertain whether they were married in England or 

America. 
The children of Thomas and Eleanor were: 

1. Thomas 2 , b. 1641. 

2. Nathaniel , b. November 15, 1642, m. Mary 2 Barnard , his first cousin. 

3. Martha , twin, b. 1645. 

4. Mary , twin, b. 1645. 

5. Sarah 2 , b. 1647. 

6. Hannah 2 , b. 1649. 

7. Ruth , b. 1654 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts. 

8. John 2 

9. Abigail 2 , b. 1656. 
Other information: 

The time of Thomas' arrival in America is uncertain. However, he was in 
Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts by 1642 and he was one of the founders of the new, 
nearby town of Amesbury about 1654. Thomas was one of the "first purchasers" of 
Nantucket Island. However, he never moved to Nantucket. He sold one half share to his 
brother, Robert . and his son, Nathaniel . acquired the other half share. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 660, 661, and 670, #85, p. 33, #166, p. 61, and Salisbury vital 

records. 

1326. Robert' Barnard 

Probably born in England. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1682. 

Married Joanna Harvey about 1641. It is uncertain whether they were married in England or 

America. She died on Nantucket Island in 1705. 
The children of Robert and Joanna were: 

1 . Hannah 

2. John 2 , b. March 2, 1642 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts. 

3. Stephen 

4. Mary 2 , b. April 18, 1648 in Andover, Essex, Massachusetts, m. Nathaniel 
Barnard , her first cousin. 

Other information: 

The time of Robert's arrival in America is uncertain. However, he was in Salisbury 
by 1642 and Andover by 1644. By 1663 Robert 1 and his family had moved to Nantucket 
onto property he had purchased from his brother, Thomas . who remained in Amesbury, 
Essex, Massachusetts. 

Robert's and Joanna's son, John 2 Barnard, married Bethiah 2 Folger, daughter of 
Peter 1 Folger . in February 1668. Tragically, on the night of June 6, 1669 John and Bethiah 



111 



Chart IV Biograpliics 

were drowned while returning to Nantucket from Martha's Vineyard in a canoe after 
shopping for furniture on Martha's Vineyard. Also drowned in the same canoe accident 
were Isaac Coleman and an Indian. The fifth person in the canoe returning from Martha's 
Vineyard was Bethiah's brother, (656) Eleazer Folger . my ancestor, who survived. 
Eleazer was unmarried at the time. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 661 and 670, #85, p. 33, and #166, p. 61. 

1328. William' Worth 

Born in England about 1 640. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1 724. 

Married first, Sarah Macy on the Island on April 11, 1665. She died in 1701. 

William and Sarah had only one child, John . my ancestor, who was born on the Island on May 19, 
1666. He married Miriam Gardner 

William married twice again but there were no children from these two marriages. 

Other information: 

William was the son of John Worth : mother unknown. He was a mariner from 
Devonshire, England. The time of his arrival in America is unknown, but he went first to 
Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts. In 1662 he came to Nantucket Island as a "half share" 
man to pursue his occupation as a sailor. 

On the Island William was five times selectman, three times assistant magistrate, 
four times assessor, and for many years, clerk of the court. The earliest vital records of 
Nantucket Island are in his handwriting. And, a large number of marriages were 
solemnized by him, the marriage service for many years being a civil and not a religious 
contract 

References: #24, #3 1, p. 825, #88, v. IV, p. 653, #166, p. 78, and #303, p. 67. 

1329. Sarah 2 Macv 

Bom in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts on August 1, 1646. 
Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1701. 
Married William Worth on the Island on April 11, 1665. 
Other information 

Sarah moved to Nantucket Island with her family in 1659 when she was thirteen 
years old They were the first white settlers on the Island. 
References: #24 and #3 1 , pp. 654 and 787-788. 

1330. Richard Gardner 
See (1314) Richard" Gardner on this chart, the same person. 

1332. Christopher Hussey 

Baptized in Dorking, Surrey, England on February 18, 1599. Dorking is about twenty-five miles 

from London. 
Died on March 6, 1 686, probably in 1 lampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire. 
Married first, Theodate 2 Batchelder in England about 1628. She died in October 1646. 

112 



Cliart IV Biographies 

The children of Christopher and Theodate were: 

1. Stephen , b. in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts about 1633, m. Martha 2 
Bunker . Stephen was the only one of the family to move to Nantucket Island. 

2. John , b. in Lynn (Saugus) about 1635. 

3. Joseph 

4. Huldah 2 

5. Mary , b. in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1637. 

6. Theodate 2 , b. in 1640. 

Married second, widow Ann Mingay in Hampton in December 1658. She died in 1680. 

Other information: 

Christopher was the son of John and Mary (Wood) Hussey . As a young man, he 
spent some time in Holland, where he met Theodate 2 Batchelder . whom he desired to 
marry. Her father, Rev. Stephen Batchelder . gave his consent contingent upon the young 
couple going to America with him. The couple did come to America and settled first in 
Lynn (Saugus), Massachusetts. Christopher's widowed mother also came with them. 
Information concerning the time of their arrival is uncertain. They may have come on the 
William a/id Francis with Rev. Stephen Batchelder, arriving on June 5, 1632. Other 
information indicates that they may have come on an earlier voyage of the same ship, 
arriving on July 23, 1630. 

About 1636 Christopher and his family moved to Newbuiy, Massachusetts and 
then in 1638 they moved to Hampton, New Hampshire with Rev. Stephen Batchelder. 
Christopher was also a "first purchaser" of Nantucket Island, but he never lived there. 
Stephen had his father's interest in the Island. 

References: #24, #31, pp. 661, 662, and 779, #85, p. 249, #88, v. O, p. 507, #104, pp. 96-97, 
#166, p. 69, #167, pp. 77-78, #187, pp. 50-54, and #201, pp. 1331-1342. 

1334. George Bunker 
See (1318) George 1 Bunker on this chart, the same person. 

1335. Jane' Godfrey 
See (13 19) Jane 1 Godfrey on this chart, the same person. 

1336. Robert 1 Paddack 

Surname also spelled Paddock. 

Died in Plymouth, Massachusetts on July 25, 1650. 

Married first, an unknown wife in Plymouth, probably about 1630 or 163 1 . 

Robert's cliildren, all bom in Plymouth, were: 

1. Robert 2 , Jr., b. 1634. 

2. Zachariah 2 , b. March 20, 1636, m. Deborah 2 Sears . 

3. Mary 2 , b. 1638. 

4. Alice 2 , b. 1640. 

5. John 2 , b. 1643. 

6. Susanna 2 , b. 1 649 (daughter of second wife). 

113 



Chan IV Biographies 

Married second, Mary , widow of William Palmer, in Plymouth between 1644 and 

1646 William had died between December 4, 1637 and March 5, 1638. 
Other information 

Robert probably emigrated from the English parish of Ham, High. He settled in 
Plymouth Colony by 1630. My ancestor, Zachariah Paddack , was Robert's son by his 
unknown first wife. 

Plymouth records (reference #305) show that Robert had two other children before 
Robert, Jr was bom in 1634. Earlier records for Plymouth were lost by decay of the 
original volume in which they were recorded. 
References: #24, #85, p 338, #88, v. ITT, pp. 328 and 340-343, #123, p. 335, #187, p. 238, 
#189, p 142, #304, pp. 23-26, and #305, p. 25. 

1338. Richard' Sears 

Surname also spelled Saeres or Sares. 
Bom in 1590 

! in Dennis, Barnstable, Massachusetts in August 1676. His ashes are buried nearby in the old 
churchyard at Yarmouth, Massachusetts, where a costly monument was erected to his 
memory 
Married Dorothy Jones in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1632. She died in 1678/79. 
The children of Richard and Dorothy were: 
1 Paul 2 , b 1638. 

2. Silas', b 1639, probably twin to Deborah . 

IK-borah", I 1 September 1639 in Yarmouth, m Zachariah Paddack . 
Other information 

There has been confusion regarding Richard caused by a rather mythical genealogy 

written by Edmund H Sears (reference #205) in 1857. Another genealogy written by 

Samuel P. May (reference #227) in 1890 points out the errors in the 1857 book. Some 

facts about Richard are well established. He was certainly in Plymouth Colony before 

Soon after he moved to Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts. Then in 1639 he 

moved to Yarmouth, Massachusetts. 

References: #24, #85, pp. 406 and 449, #88, v. IV, p. 46, #187, pp. 172 and 200, #205, pp. 

275-323 and pp. 13-18 in genealogies, #227, pp. 1-40, and #304, pp. 27-28. 

1340. George 1 Bunker 
See ( 1 3 1 8) George Bunker on this chart, the same person. 

1341. Jane Godfrey 

See ( 1 3 1 9) Jane Godfrey on this chart, the same person. 

1342. Thomas Macy 

Bom in Chilmark, Wiltshire, England in 1608. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1682. 

Married Sarah Hopcott in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1643. 

114 



Cliart IV Biograpliies 



The children of Thomas and Sarali, all bom in Salisbury, were: 

1. Sarah 2 , b. 1644, d.y. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. August 1, 1646, m. William' Worth . 

1 2 

3. Mary , b. December 4, 1648, m. William Bunker , brother of my ancestors (659) 

1 2 

Mary Bunker and (667) Martha Bunker . 

4. Bethiah , b. 1650, m. Joseph Gardner. 

5. Thomas 2 , b. 1653. 

6. John , b. 1655, m. Deborah Gardner. 

7. Francis , b. 1657, d.y. 
Other information: 

Thomas was in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts before 1639 and sometime before 
1643 he moved to Salisbury as one of the original settlers. He was a clothier and merchant. 

In 1659 Thomas became one of the ten "first purchasers" of Nantucket Island and 
in that same year he and his family became the first white settlers on the Island. Thomas 
was a Baptist; and the Baptists were persecuted in New England just like the Quakers. 
Thomas had been punished for harboring Quakers during a storm, and this seems to be one 
of the principal reasons he moved to Nantucket Island. 

Thomas and his family apparently passed the first winter with few, if any, white 
associates; the Island was inhabited by Indians. The first known English associates of the 
Macy family on the Island were members of Tristram Coffin 's family, who moved there in 
1660. All five of Thomas' surviving children lived their entire adult lives on the Island. It 
is also of note that he was a cousin of Thomas Mayhew, from whom the first purchasers 
bought Nantucket Island. Thomas Macy left an estate of seventy-one pounds, but the 
claims against it were so large as to leave the estate insolvent. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 653, 654, and 787-788, #88, v. in, p. 142, #166, p. 71, #187, pp. 14- 

23, #196, pp. 473-474, and #303, p. 67. 

1343. Sarah' Hopcott 

Bom in Cliilmark, Witshire, England in 1612. 

Died on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in 1706. 

Married Thomas' Macy in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1643. 

Other information: 

Sarah probably came to America as a servant of a family. 
References: #24, #3 1 , p. 654, #88, v. Ill, p. 142, #196, p. 473, and #303, p. 67. 

2570. Anthony' Annable 

This is the same person as (2794) Anthony' Annable on Chart V. 

Bom about 1 599, probably in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England. 

Died in 1674, probably in Barnstable, Massachusetts. 

Married first, Jane' Moumford at All Saints Church in Cambridge on April 26, 1619. She died in 

Barnstable on December 13, 1643. 
The children of Anthony and Jane were: 

1 . Sarah 2 , b. 1 622 in England, m. Henry 1 Ewell . 



115 



Chart IV Biographies 

2 Hannah 2 , b. about 1625 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. She was one of the first 

children born in Plymouth colony. 

3. Susannah", b about 1630 in Plymouth. 

4 Daughter 2 , b. 1635 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, d.y. 

5 Deborah", b 1637 in Scintate. 

Married second, Ann Clark in Barnstable in 1644/45 and had two children. She died in 1651. 

Married third, Hannah Barker in Barnstable about 1652 and had one child. She died in 1658. 

Other information: 

Anthony arrived at Plymouth Colony about July 10, 1623 on the ship^4//«e with his 
wife, Jane, and one-year-old daughter, Sarah . They had come from Cambridge, England. 
They settled first in Plymouth, then moved to Scituate in 1634 where he was one of the 
founders of the town and church. In 1638 several letters to the governor were signed by 
Anthony Annable and others on behalf of themselves and other members of the church 
asking to be allowed to move to some other part of the colony. In October 1639 the 
majority of the church moved from Scituate to Barnstable and Anthony and his family 
followed a few months later 

Anthony was very active in public affairs. He was a member of the General Court 
for thirteen years He was a Puritan but an opponent of the harsh laws and measures 
enacted and enforced against the Quakers in Massachusetts Colony. Such laws were 
adopted in Plymouth Colony in 1653 but never enforced in Barnstable. 

References: #15, p. 19, #24, #82, #85, pp. 18-19, #88, v. I, pp. 58-59, #96, pp. 13-18, #104, 
pp 52-53, #123, p. 235, and #154, pp. 135-137. 

2576. Matthew Wing 

Surname also spelled Wynge. 

Bom in 1555 

Died between August 9 and November 15, 1614. 

Matthew had the following five children by an unknown wife: 

1 Falk 

2. Thomas 

John , b 1 584, m. Deborah 2 Batchelder . 

4. Johanne 

5. James 
Other information: 

Matthew was a tailor who lived in Banbury, Oxfordshire, England. His father was 
Rev. Gotfre dus Wyn gg, who was bom in Liege, Belgium and died in London, England on 
September 30, 1 599. Matthew's mother was Lorina Matthew , who died in Banbury in 
1614 Gotfredus and Lorina had four children: Matthew . Falk, Thomas, and Joanna. 
References # 1 98, #200, and #202. 

2578. Rev. Stephen' Batchelder 
Surname also spelled Bachiler 

Bom in England in 1 56 1 I lis parentage has never been definitely settled. 
Died at Hackney near London, England on October 31, 1656. 

116 



Clrart IV Biograpliies 

Married first, Deborah Bate in England about 1 588 at age twenty-seven. 

The children of Stephen and Deborah, all born in England, were: 

1. Nathaniel , b. 1590, settled in Hampton, New Hampshire. 

2. Deborah 2 , b. 1592, m. John Win g in England about 1610. 

3. Stephen, b. 1594, remained in London. 

4. Theodate . b. 1596, m. Christopher Hussey in England about 1628. 

5. Ann, b. 1601, m. John Sanborn. 

Married second, at age sixty-two, Christian Weare in England in 1623/24. 
Married third, at age sixty-six, Helen Mason in England in 1627. She died in 1635 at age sixty. 
Married fourth, at age eighty-seven, Mary Beedle, liis housekeeper, in Hampton, Rockingham, 
New Hampshire in 1650. They separated the first year and both of them petitioned for 
divorce. She was convicted of adultery and she and her paramour were whipped in public 
and branded with the letter "A." 
Other information: 

Stephen graduated from St. John's College, Oxford, England in November 1585. 
In January 1587 he became the vicar of the church of the Holy Cross and St. Peter in the 
village of Wherwell, Hampshire, England. He espoused the teacliings of the Puritans and 
preached their doctrine from the pulpit at Wherwell. In 1604 King James came to the 
throne and threatened all nonconformist preachers occupying the pulpits of the Established 
Church. In 1605, after eighteen years of continuous service, Rev. Stephen Batchelder was 
removed as vicar of his church. 

In 1632 Stephen left for America at age seventy-one. The record of Stephen's life 
from 1605 to 1632 is fragmentary, but he is known to have been in Holland for a time. It is 
probable that he was there at least sometime between 1607 and 1620 in Flushing and/or 
Middleburgh, both of which are close together on the island of Walcheren in Zealand, 
Holland. Stephen also had a home in Newton Stacy, Hants, England, from whence he left 
for America. 

The information is conflicting as to which of Stephen's family accompanied him to 
America. He sailed on the William and Francis, which arrived in Boston on June 5, 1632. 
He was accompanied by his third wife, Helen, and three grandsons by his daughter, Ann 
Batchelder Sanborn. Ann was widowed and it is not known why she did not come to 
America. Stephen 1 may or may not have also been accompanied by his widowed daughter, 
Deborah Batchelder Wing , and her children, and by liis daughter, Theodate Batchelder 
Hussey . and her family. 

Stephen settled first in Lynn (Saugus), Essex, Massachusetts, where he established 
a church. He remained there for four years. In February 1636 he moved to Ipswicli, 
Essex, Massachusetts, the home of Governor Winthrop. In the spring of 1638 he removed 
to Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, where his son-in-law, Christopher Hussey . lived with 
his family. Then in 1639 at age seventy-eight Stephen became one of the founders of 
Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire, where he was also the pastor. 

About 1654, accompanied by his grandson, Stephen Sanborn, Rev. Stephen 
Batchelder left New England to end his days quietly in old England. He died in Hackney 
near London on October 31, 1656 at age ninety-five. He was buried in the parish of All 
Hallows Staining in London. 



117 



Chan IV Biographies 

References: #24, #85, p. 26, #86, pp. 20-25, #88, v. I, pp 88-89, #96, pp. 39-44, #104, pp. 96- 
97, #167, pp. 75-1 15, and #201, pp. 1331-1342. 

2616. Nicholas 1 Hathaway 

Born about 1595, probably in Kingscote, Gloucestershire, England and probably the son of 

Thomas and Margaret Hathaway . 
His death record has never been found, either in England or New England. 
He may have had several children including Jacob and Joseph, but certainly my ancestor, John 

Hathaway . 
Other information 

Nicholas arrived in New England before February 24, 1638/39 and lived in 

Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts. He may have returned to England and died there. 
Reference: #91, p. 43. 

2624. John' Folger. Jr. 

See (1320) John Folger, Jr. on this chart, the same person. 

2625. Merebah' Gibbs 

See (1321) Merebah Gibbs on this chart, the same person. 

2628. Thomas Gardner 

Bom in I hirst, Martick, Dorsetshire, England in 1592. 

Died in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts on December 29, 1674. 

Married first, Mar garet' Fryer in England about 1618. She died sometime after 1636. 

The children of Thomas and Margaret were: 

I I homas , b perhaps 1618 in Dorsetshire, England. 

George , b. about 1619 in Dorsetshire, m. Hannah Shattuck. 

3. Richard* , b. about 1622 in Dorsetshire, m. Sarah 2 Shattuck . 

4 John*, b 1 624 in Salem, Massachusetts. 

Samuel! , b about 1627 at Cape Ann (Gloucester), Essex, Massachusetts. 

6. Joseph*, b about 1 629 at Cape Ann. 

7 Sarah , b about 1 63 1 at Cape Ann. 

8. Miriam , b about 1634 at Cape Ann. 

9 Seeth (daughter), b. 1 636 in Salem, Massachusetts. 

Married second, Damaris' , widow of Samuel' Shattuck . in Salem, Massachusetts 

about 1659. There were no children by this union. 
Other Information 

The passenger list of the ship Zouch Phenix shows that Thomas' Gardner , with his 
wife and three sons, arrived in America in the spring of 1624. It is believed that the ship 
sailed from Weymouth, England The fifteen passengers from this ship settled first at Cape 
Ann (Gloucester), Essex, Massachusetts. Thomas was the overseer of the Cape Ann 
Plantation having thirteen men under him. The group had been sent out by the Western 



118 



Chart IV Biograpliies 

Adventures of Dorchester, England to provide a base for fishermen to winter there, make 
their catch early in the spring, and then return to England. The fisheries proved to be a 
failure and many of the fishermen turned to farming. The soil was rocky and infertile and 
farming also proved to be unsuccessful. The undertaking was abandoned after about two 
years. Thomas then moved to Salem, but apparently returned to Cape Ann for a few years 
before finally settling in Salem. 

Two of Thomas' sons had married daughters of his second wife, Damans 1 , before 
Thomas and Damans were married. See (2630) Samuel Shattuck on this chart. 
References: #24, #31, pp. 756-757, #85, p. 182, #88, v. IL pp. 226-231, #104, p. 58, #166, p. 

68, #168, p. 151, #187, pp. 79-85, #196, pp. 475-478, and #301, pp. 9-31. 

2630. Samuel 1 Sliattuck 

This is the same person as (2662) Samuel Shattuck , on this chart. 
Probably bom in England but nothing is known of his ancestry. 

Married Damaris in England about 1619. 

The children of Samuel and Damaris were: 

1 . Samuel , b. about 1620 in England. 

2. Damaris 2 (?) 

3. Mary 2 (?) 

2 2 

4. Hannah , m. George Gardner about 1643. 

2 2 

5. Sarah , b. 1632 either bi England or in Salem, Massachusetts, m. Richard Gardner 
about 1651. 

Other Information: 

Samuel came to America with his wife, Damaris, and their children, probably about 
1632, and settled in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. He may have died shortly thereafter, or 
by some accounts, on the trip from England. 

Damaris married second, Thomas' Gardner , as his second wife in Salem about 
1659. There were no children from this union. However, two of her daughters had 

1 • 2 

already married two of Thomas' sons, George and Richard . 
References: #24, #85, p. 409, #88, v. IV, p. 62, #187, pp. 86-95, and #196, p. 481. 

2632. Peter Coffin 

Born in Brixton, Devonshire, England about 1580. 

Died in January 1628 in Brixton, shortly after his last child was born. 

Married Joanna 1 Thember about 1604. 

Peter and Joanna had ten children, all born in England. The oldest was Tristram Coffin , who was 

bom in Brixton, England in 1605. He married Dionis Stevens . 
Other Information: 

Peter did not come to America but his wife, Joanna Thember , did, with their two 

unmarried daughters and their son, Tristram , and his family. 
References: #31, pp. 654-656 and 697-699 and #196, p. 457. 



119 



Chart IV Biographies 

2633. Joanna' Thember 

Name also spelled Johan Kember. 

Bom about 1584, probably in Brixton, Devonshire, England. She was the daughter of Robert 

Thember . 
Died in Boston, Massachusetts on May 30, 1661. 
Married Peter Coffin in Brixton about 1604. 
Other Information: 

Joanna came to Massachusetts in 1642 with her two unmarried daughters and her 

son, Tristram 1 Coffin , and his family. Joanna's husband, Peter Coffin , had died in 1628. 
Reference: #196, pp. 457. 

2634. Robert Stevens 

Bom in Brixton, Devonshire, England about 1 564. 

Died in Ford, Devonshire, England about 1628. 

Married first, an unknown wife and had four children, all bom in Ford, England. 

Married second, Diones in Ford. She died in Ford in 1647. 

The children of Robert and Diones, all probably bom in Ford, were: 

1 Robert, b. about 1600. 

2 llizabeth, b about 1605. 

Dionis . baptized March 4, 1610 in Plymouth, Devonshire, England, m. Tristram 
Coffin . 

4 William, b. about 161 1, m. Deborah Coffin. 

5 Lydia, b 1613 
6. Grace 

Reference: # 1 96, pp. 466-467. 

2636. William Bunker 

William was apparently a French Huguenot who fled from Nantes, France to England in the early 
1600s His name was originally Guilliaum Boncoeur, which he anglicized to William 
Bunker His wife's name is unknown, but he had at least one son, my ancestor, George 1 
Hunker, who came to America in 1650 and settled in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts. 

References #88, v. I, p. 299 and #196, pp. 469. 

2658. Thomas' Macy 

See ( 1 342) Thomas Macy on this chart, the same person. 

2659. Sarah' Hopcott 

See ( 1 343) Sarah Hopcott on this chart, the same person. 

2660. Thomas Gardner 
See (2628) Thomas Gardner on this chart, the same person. 



120 



Chart IV Biograpliies 



2662. Samuel Shattuck 
See (2630) Samuel Shattuck on this chart, the same person. 

2666. Stephen' Batchelder 
See (2578) Stephen Batchelder on this chart, the same person. 



2668. William Bunker 
See (2636) William Bunker on this chart, the same person. 

2680. William Bunker 
See (2636) William Bunker on this chart, the same person. 



121 



CHART V - Lydia 6 Carpenter 





JOSEPH 4 

CARPENTER 


168 


336 
SILAS 3 
CARPENTER (c) 


silas 2 

CARPENTER (b) 


672 WILLIAM 1 CARPENTER 








1650- 1695 

Sarah 3 
Arnold (b) 


673 ELIZABETH 2 ARNOLD (a) 








at*. 1681- 1751 

337 

. 338 
Sarah 4 

Arnold (c) 


674 STEPHEN 2 ARNOLD (a) 








1665- 1701 

ISRAEL 3 
ARNOLD 


675 Sarah Smith 


84 




Jemima 
Wheaton 


169 
170 


676 STEPHEN 2 ARNOLD (a) 








1649-1717 

Mary 2 
Barker 


677 Sarah Smith 








abt. 1689 - 1727 

339 

340 
JOHN 

WHEATON 


678 JAMES 1 BARKER 








1<U9-1713 
L'nknown 


679 Barbara 1 Diingan 




AMOS 5 
CARPENTFR 






1762- 1827 

IS 


680 








Unknown 


681 








-1758 

341 

Jeniina 4 
King 


682 








JOHN 3 
KING 


683 










171 


684 CLEMENT 2 KING 








abl. 1680- 1723 
Elizabeth 


685 Elizabeth 








343 


686 Unknown 










687 Llnknown 







I YOI A* 

rrER I \diam Joseph 7 Rogers (Chart IV). 



1106- 1890 


JOSHUA 5 

Oil 1 INGHAM 


172 


Ml 1 A UAH 4 
DILLINGHAM 




JOHN 3 
DILLINGHAM 


688 HENRY 2 DILLINGHAM 




86 

DEBORAH 6 

DM 1 INGHAM 








1658 -bef. 1733 

Lydia 3 
Hatch 


689 Hannah Perry 








abl. 1 71X1 - 1786 

Maria 3 
GiU/ord 


345 
346 


690 JEREMIAH 2 HATCH 








JONATHAN 2 
GIFFORD 


691 Mary- Hewes 








1741-1828 

HANNAH 3 
ROGERS 


173 
174 


692 WILLIAM 1 GIFFORD 








1684- 1734/35 

Lydia 
Abbott 


693 Mary Mills 








- 1784 

THOMAS 4 
ROGERS 


347 


694 Unknown 








THOMAS 3 
ROGERS 


695 Unknown 


43 






1775-1861 


696 JOHN 2 ROGERS 










1659- 1745/46 

BETHIAH 3 
EWELL 


697 RHODA 2 KING 








1716- 1810 

DEBORAH 3 

OTIS 


349 
350 


698 GERSHOM 2 EWELL 






it) bfolhcr and sister 

(b) - cousins 

(c) - second coii 


1682/83-1756 

ISAAC' 
OTIS 


699 Mary 




1747- 1826 

lal a 
low 


175 


700 STEPHEN 3 OTIS 






A name in capitals indicates 1 


1699-1777 

Deborah 4 
Jacob 


701 Hannah Ensign 


biography is included for thai 
mlmdual The biographies To 




1723- 1807 


351 


702 DAVID 3 JACOB 


this chart 




1698- 


703 Sarah 3 Cushing 







122 



CHART V - Lydia 6 Carpenter 



1344 Richard Carpenter 

1345 Unknown 

1346 WILLIAM 1 ARNOLD 

1347 Christiana' Peak 

1348 WILLIAM 1 ARNOLD 

1349 Christiana 1 Peak 

1350 Edward Smith 

1351 Unknown 

1352 WILLIAM 1 ARNOLD 

1353 Christiana 1 Peak 

1354 Edward Smith 

1355 Unknown 



1356 James Barker, Sr. 

1357 Unknown 

1358 WILLIAM DUNGAN 

1359 FRANCES 1 LATHAM 


1360 
1361 
1362 
1363 






1364 
1365 
1366 
1367 






1368 
1369 
1370 
1371 


CLEMENT 
Susaiuia 
Unknown 
Unknown 


KING 


1372 
1373 
1374 
1375 






1376 EDWARD 1 DILLINGHAM 

1377 Ursula Carter 

1378 Unknown 

1379 Unknown 



1380 THOMAS 1 HATCH 

1381 Lydia 

1382 JOHN 1 HE WES 

1383 Joanna 



1384 


I'nknown 




1385 


Unknown 




1386 


John Mills 




1387 


Sarah 




1388 






1389 






1390 






1391 






1392 


JOHN 1 ROGERS 


1393 


FRANCES 


WATSON 


1394 


THOMAS 1 


KING 


1395 


Susan 





1396 HENRY 1 EWELL 

1397 SARAH 2 ANNABLE 

1398 Unknown 

1399 Unknown 

1400 JOHN 2 OTIS 

1401 Mary 2 Jacob (a) 

1402 JOHN ENSIGN 

1403 Unknown 

1404 JOHN 2 JACOB (a) 

1405 Mary 2 Russell 

1406 JOHN 2 CUSHING 

1407 Sarah 2 Hawke 



2688 Unknown 

2690 

2692 NICHOLAS ARNOLD 

2694 Thomas Peak 

2696 NICHOLAS ARNOLD 
2698 Thomas Peak 
2700 Unknown 
2702 

2704 NICHOLAS ARNOLD 
2706 Thomas Peak 
2708 Unknown 
2710 

2712 Unknown 

2714 

2716 Unknown 

2718 Unknown 



2720 
2722 
2724 
2726 

2728 
2730 
2732 
2734 

2736 Unknown 
2738 Unknown 
2740 
2742 



2744 
2746 
2748 
2750 



2752 HENRY DILLINGHAM 

2754 Unknown 

2756 

2758 

2760 WILLIAM HATCH 
2762 Unknown 
2764 Unknown 
2766 Unknown 

2768 

2770 

2772 Unknown 

2774 Unknown 

2776 
2778 
2780 
2782 



2784 Unknown 
2786 LInknown 
2788 Unknown 
2790 Unknown 

2792 Unknown 

2794 ANTHONY 1 ANNABLE 

2796 

2798 

2800 JOHN 1 OTIS 
2802 NICHOLAS 1 JACOB 
2804 THOMAS ENSIGN 
2806 

2808 NICHOLAS 1 JACOB 
2810 GEORGE 1 RUSSELL 
2812 MATTHEW 1 CUSHING 
2814 MATTHEW 1 HAWKE 



2689 Unknown 

2691 

2693 Alice Gulley 

2695 Unknown 


2697 Alice Gulley 
2699 Unknown 
2701 Unknown 
2703 


2705 Alice Gulley 
2707 Unknown 
2709 Unknown 
2711 


2713 

2715 
2717 
2719 


Unknown 

Unknown 
Unknown 


2721 
2723 
2725 
2727 




2729 
2731 
2733 
2735 




2737 
2739 
2741 
2743 


Unknown 
Unknown 


2745 
2747 
2749 
2751 




2753 
2755 
2757 
2759 


Oseth 
Unknown 


2761 
2763 

2765 
2767 


Anne 
Unknown 
LInknown 
Unknown 


2769 
2771 
2773 
2775 


Unknown 
Unknown 


2777 
2779 
2781 
2783 




2785 
2787 
2789 
2791 


LInknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2793 
2795 
2797 
2799 


Unknown 

Jane 1 Moumford 


2801 


Margaret 1 


2803 Mary 1 Gilman 
2805 Elizabeth Wilder 
2807 


2809 
2811 
2813 
2815 


Mary 1 Gilman 

Jane 

Nazareth Pitcher 

Margaret (?) Towle 



Seeref. #266 

for Carpenter 

English ancestry 



Seeref. #278 

for Arnold 

English ancestry 



Seeref. #243 
for Dillingham 
English ancestry 



Seeref. #245 

for Hatch 

English ancestry 



Seeref. #195 

for Otis 

English ancestry 



123 



Chait V Biograpliies 

21. Lvdia Carpenter 
See (2 1 ) Lvdia Carpenter on Chart I, the same person. 

42. Amos Carpenter 

Born in Coventry, Kent, Rhode Island on April 12, 1762. 

Died in Granville, Washington, New York on September 6, 1 827. Originally buried in the Bishop 
Burying Ground in Granville. Sometime before 1900 all of the remains and stones from 
this cemetery were moved to the Mettowee Valley Cemetery in Granville. 

Married first, Hannah Bishop on March 19, 1790. Hannah was born in Cold Springs, Nine 
Partners, Berkshire, Massachusetts on June 1, 1769. 

The children of Amos and Hannah, all bom in Adams, Rensselear, Massachusetts, were: 

1. Hannah 6 , b. 1791. 

2. John 6 , b. 1793. 

3. Lydia 6 ,b. 1795, d.y. 

4. Amos 6 , b. 1797. 

5. Martha 6 , b. 1799. 

Married second, Deborah Dillingham on June 27, 1805. 

The children of Amos and Deborah, all bom in Granville, were: 

1. Lydia , b. March 2, 1806, m. Joseph Rogers . 

2. Stephen 6 , b. 1810. 

3. Cynthia 6 , b. 1811. 

4. Amy 6 , b. 1814. 
Other information: 

Amos probably moved from Coventry, Rhode Island to Dutchess County, New 
York with his father, Joseph 4 Carpenter , before 1774. However, in 1784 as a single man, 
age twenty-two, Amos 5 joined the Quakers in East Hoosick. East Hoosick is not really a 
place but is the name of Quaker monthly meetings. The town of Hoosick is in Rensselear 
County, New York, near where New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont meet at a 
common point. The East Hoosick monthly meetings may actually have been held in 
Adams, Massachusetts. Hoosick and Adams are about twenty miles apart. 

In 1790, Amos 5 manned his first wife, Hannah Bishop. Amos and Hannah lived in 
Adams and had their children there. In 1800 Amos and Hannah moved to Granville, New 
York. Their marriage and the births of their children are reported in the Quaker monthly 
meetings for Granville as well as in the East Hoosick meetings. Hannah died in Granville in 
1802. 

In 1805 Amos 5 married Deborah 6 Dillingham as his second wife. This marriage is 
recorded in the Quaker montlily meeting records for Easton, Washington, New York. The 
fact that Deborah was the wife of Amos 5 and the births of their four children are reported 
in the Granville, New York Quaker monthly meetings. Granville and Easton are about 
thirty-five miles apart. 

There are two coincidences in the history of the Carpenter family that are reported 
for the use of anyone who might wish to do further research. First, the Amos Carpenter 
(1762-1827) who was my third great grandfather was born in 1762 in Coventry, Kent, 



125 



Clian V Biographies 

Rhode Island and was a descendant of the Providence, Pdiode Island branch of the 
Carpenters There was another Amos Carpenter who was born in Coventry, Tolland, 
Connecticut in 1755 and was probably a descendant of the Rehoboth, Bristol, 
Massachusetts branch of the Carpenters. This man also had a wife named Hannah. At one 
time, both men were members of the Quakers at the East Hoosick meetings. 

Second, my ancestor, Amos 5 Carpenter (1762-1827), had nine children, including a 
daughter, Lydia 6 . who was bom on March 2, 1806. She married Joseph Rogers and was 
my second great grandmother. There was a Stephen Carpenter (1764- ) of Ferrisburg, 
Addison, Vermont, who was a son of a William Carpenter and Sarah Seaman of 
Westchester County, New York. This Stephen Carpenter married a Hannah, like Amos 
Carpenter did, and had eight children, including a daughter, Lydia, who was born on March 
16, 1 805, a year before my Lydia Carpenter . 
References: #61, #159, #188, p. 3, #190, pp. 46, 52, and 159, #193, #206, and #271. 



43. Deborah Dillingham 

Born in Hanover, Plymouth, Massachusetts on June 11, 1775. 

Died in Granville, Washington, New York on March 8, 1861. She is buried in the Quaker 

Cemetery, which is next to the Episcopal church on Quaker Street in Granville. 
Married Amos Carpenter of Granville, as his second wife, on June 27, 1805. 
Other information: 

In 1793 Deborah moved with her family to Easton, Washingon, New York, which 

is about thirty-five miles from Granville. 
References: #15, p. 58, #188, #190, p. 159, and #243, p. 55. 

84. Joseph Carpenter 

Born in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island on March 3, 1720/21. This town is not to be 

confused with the present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
M.irried Jemima Wheaton about 1750. 
The children of Joseph and Jemima were: 

I Silas , b 1751 in Cranston, Providence, Rhode Island. 

2. Joseph , b 1756 in Cranston 

Amos 5 ., b. April 12, 1762 in Coventry, Kent, Rhode Island, m. Deborah 6 
Dillingham . 

4. Possibly others 
Other information: 

About 1761 Joseph moved from Cranston, Rhode Island to Coventry, Rhode 
Island. He was there at least as late as 1765. His wife, Jemima, may have died between 
1762 and 1765. By 1774 Joseph 4 had moved to Charlotte Precinct in Dutchess County, 
New York with his children and his wife, if she was still alive. 

Reference #266, p. 324, shows Joseph 4 as having been a farmer in Smithfield, 
Providence, Rhode Island. This is apparently in error; Joseph 4 Carpenter was never known 
to have lived in Smithfield. Land records in Smithfield show that there was a Joseph 
Carpenter in Smithfield in the mid 1700s who was married to an Elizabeth Rhodes. 
I lowever, land records in Providence show that a Joseph Carpenter of Providence had sold 

126 



Cliait V Biographies 



land in Pawtuxet in 1728, making it impossible for this Joseph Carpenter to have been 
Joseph Carpenter , born in 1721. This other Joseph Carpenter, born in 1690, was a first 
cousin, once removed, of Joseph Carpenter . 
References: #159, #193, #247, v. 2, part I, p. 216, and #266, p. 324. 

86. Joshua Dillingham 

Bom in Hanover, Plymouth, Massachusetts on March 21, 1743. 

Died in Easton, Washington, New York on May 15, 1828. 

Married Hannah Rogers on July 6, 1773, either in Hanover or in Marshfield, Plymouth, 

Massachusetts. These two towns are three miles apart. 
The children of Joshua and Hannah, all born in Hanover, were: 

1. Stephen 6 , b. 1774. 

2. Deborah . b. June 11, 1775, m. Amos Carpenter . 

3. Otis 6 , b. 1777. 

4. Joshua 6 , b. 1778, d.y. 

5. Lydia 6 , b. 1779. 

6. Joshua 6 , b. 1781. 

7. Hannah 6 , b. 1783. 

8. Sarah 6 , b. 1784. 

9. Rhoda 6 ,b. 1787. 
Other information: 

Joshua 5 was blacksmith by trade. He joined the Quakers in 1768. In 1793 he 
moved to Easton with his wife and eight living children. The Quaker meeting was 
originally called Saratoga but later changed to Easton. 
References: #15, p. 58, #188, #190, p. 159, #202, and #243, pp. 54-55. 

87. Hannah 5 Rogers 

Born in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts on October 4, 1 747. 

Died in Easton, Washington, New York on March 10, 1826. 

Married Joshua 5 Dillingham on July 6, 1773, either in Marshfield or in Hanover, Plymouth, 

Massachusetts. These two towns are three miles apart. 
Other information: 

Hannah moved to Easton with her husband, Joshua Dillingham, and their children 

in 1793. 
References: # 1 5, p. 58, # 1 88, and #202. 

168. Silas 3 Carpenter 

Bom in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island about 1681. This town is not to be confused with the 

present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
Died in Pawtuxet on June 13, 1751. 
Married first, Sarah 4 Arnold , his second cousin, in Pawtuxet on December 21, 1708. Sarah was 

bom about 1689 and died in 1727. 
The cliildren of Silas and Sarah, all probably bom in Pawtuxet, were: 

127 



Chart V Biographies 

1. Silas 4 , b 1709. 

2. William 4 , b. 1711. 

3. Sarah 4 , b .1712, d.y. 

4. Mary 4 , b. 1714. 

5. Ephraim , b 1716. 

6. Israel 4 , b. 1717, d.y. 

7. Phebe 4 ,b. 1719. 

8. Joseph 4 , b. March 3, 1720/21, m. Jemima Wheaton . 

9. Israel 4 , b. 1722 

10. Stephen 4 , b. 1724, d.y. 

11. Jacob 4 , b. 1725. 

Married second, Christian Low and had a son, Anthony , bom about 1 742. 

References: #193, #247, pp. 37 and 216, #249, p. 1 56, #266, pp. 323-324, and #278, p. 95. 

170. John Wheaton 

Place and date of birth unknown. 
Died in Cranston, Providence, Rhode Island in 1758. 

Married first, J emima Kin g in Providence, Rhode Island on November 30, 1724. 
The only child of John and Jemima was my ancestor, Jemima Wheaton , who married Joseph 
Ca rpenter about 1750. 

Married second, Abigail . 

Other information 

Key sources of information on John Wheaton are as follows: 

1 Queries in the Boston Evening Transcript for November 14, 1928: 

"Deed of John Wheaton and late wife Jemima Wheaton daughter of John 
and Elizabeth King, 1785 (sic). By the King Genealogy they were married 
in 1724. What relation were they to John and Abigail Wheaton?" 

"Can anyone interested in Rhode Island lines give me information about 
these Wheatons mentioned in Cranston deeds? Feb. 12, 1761, deed from 
Joseph Carpenter, Jr and Jemima Wheaton Carpenter, his wife, daughter 
of John Wheaton, deceased. Also deed from Abigail Wheaton, wife of 
John Wheaton, deceased, same date. Reference was made to graves on the 
land which were to remain accessible to the family. The land was between 
that of William Harris and John King. Can anyone give the location of this 
land?" 

A deed to John Andrews in 1761 recorded in Cranston records: 

"To all People to whom these Presents Shall come Greeting Know Ye that 
We Joseph Carpenter Jun of Cranston in the County of Providence in the 
Colony of Rhode Island Yeoman and Jemima Carpenter his Wife which 



128 



Cliart V Biograpliies 



Comment: 



said Jemima late when Sole was named Jemima Wheaton Daughter of John 
Wheaton Deceased For and in Consideration of that sum of Six Thousand 
Pounds Old Tenor to us in Hand paid by John Andrews of Providence in 
that County County [sic] and Colony..." 

The fact that the ancestral Joseph Carpenter was called "junior" in the 1761 
deed to John Andrews does not necessarily mean that he was the son of 
another Joseph Carpenter, but merely that there was an older Joseph 
Carpenter, perhaps and uncle or cousin, resident in the area in 1761 from 
whom the husband of Jemima needed to be distinguished. 



3. Jolin Wheaton's will and probate, reported in the Rhode Island Genealogical 

Register, January 3 , 1981. 

Comment: When the actual will was consulted, it appeared that John Wheaton's wife 
at the time of his death was not the mother of his daughter, Jemima. After 
providing for liis wife, Abigail, John Wheaton left everytliing else to his 
daughter, Jemima, and made her executrix of his estate. Jemima Wheaton 
was already married to Joseph Carpenter at the time of John Wheaton's 
death and Jemima was the only child mentioned in his will. 

References: #193, #247, p. 196, and #249, p. 238. 

172. Melatiah 4 Dillingham 

Born in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts about 1 700. 

Died in Hanover, Plymouth, Massachusetts on January 25, 1 786. 

Married first, Mary Curtis in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1723. Melatiah and Mary had 

three children. She died in 1728. 
Married second, Phebe Hatch in Hanover in 1 730/3 1 . She died in 1 73 1/32 as did their only child. 
Married third, Maria 3 Gifibrd in Hanover on January 31, 1734/35. She died in Hanover in 1784. 
The children of Melatiah and Maria, all born in Hanover, were: 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



Lydia J ,b. 1734/35. 
Hannah , b 



Content 
Thomas 

5 



1737/38. 
b. 1739. 
b. 1741. 



Joshua , b. March 21, 1743, m. Hannah Rogers . 



Meribah 
William" , 



,b. 1745. 

b. 1747. 
Anna 5 , b. 1749. 
Phebe 5 , b. 1751. 



Other information: 

Melatiah was a Quaker and a blacksmith by trade. He was also engaged in the 

shipbuilding industry on the North River between Hanover and Marshfield, Plymouth, 

Massachusetts. Hanover and Marshfield are six miles apart. 
References: # 1 5, p. 58, #202, #243, pp. 38-40 and 54, and #246, v. 129, p. 33. 



129 



Chan V Biographies 



174. Thomas 4 Rogers 



Born in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts on October 28, 1716. 

Died in Marshfield on December 6, 1810. 

Married Deborah s Otis in Marshfield on September 8, 1744. 

The children of Thomas and Deborah, all born in Marshfield, were: 



1 


Bethiah 5 , b. 1745/46. 


2 


Hannah 5 , b. October 4, 1747, m. Joshua 5 Dillingham 


3. 


Thomas 5 , b. 1748/49, d.y. 


4. 


Deborah 5 , b. 1751. 


5. 


Priscilla 5 , b. 1754. 


6. 


James , b. 1756. 


7. 


Abigail 5 , b. 1758. 


8. 


Huldah 5 , b 1760. 


9. 


Rhoda 5 ,b. 1762. 


10. 


Lucy 5 , b 1765. 


Reference: 


#15, p. 36. 




175. Deborah 5 Otis 



Born in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on October 16, 1723. 
Died on December 8, 1 807, probably in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 
Married Thomas Rogers in Marshfield on September 8, 1744. 
References: # 1 5, p. 36 and # 1 95, p. 1 07. 

336. Silas Carpenter 

Bom in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island in 1650. This town is not to be confused with the 

present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
Died in Pawtuxet on December 25, 1695. 
Married Sarah Arnol d, his first cousin, in Pawtuxet about 1679. Sarah was born in 1665, a 

daughter of Stephen 2 Arnold . She died in 1 701 . 
The children of Silas and Sarah, all probably born in Pawtuxet, were: 

1 Silas' T b. about 1 68 1 , m. Sarah Arno ld, his second cousin. She was a daughter of 
Israel Arnold . 

2 William 3 

3 Phoebe 

4 Sarah 

References: #24, # 1 93, #266, pp. 322-323, #267, p. 75, and #278, p. 87. 

338. Israel 3 Arnold 

Bom in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island on October 30, 1649. This town is not to be 

confused with the present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
Died in Warwick, Kent, Rhode Island on September 15, 1717. 



130 



Cliart V Biographies 

Married Mary Barker in Providence, Rhode Island on April 16, 1677. She was bom in 1649 and 
died in 1723. Mary was the widow of Elisha Smith, who died in 1676. She had no 
children by Elisha. 

The children of Israel and Mary were: 

1. Israel 4 , b. 1678. 

2. William 4 , b. between 1681 and 1687. 

3. Elisha 4 , b. about 1683. 

4. Stephen 

5. James 4 , b. 1689. 

6. Sarah . b. about 1689, m. Silas Carpenter . 

7. Joseph 

8. Josiah 4 , b. 1694. 

9. Mary 

10. Barbara 
Other information: 

Israel moved to Warwick, Rhode Island before 168 1 . The record is not clear as to 
where all of his cliildren were bom because the dates of birth are not all known. 
References: #24, #88, v. I, p. 65, #193, #266, p. 323, #268, p. 12, #277, p. 14, and #278, pp. 
78-79. 

342. John 3 King 

Bom in Marslifield, Plymouth, Massachusetts about 1680. 
Died in Providence, Rhode Island on September 18, 1723. 

Married first, Hannah in Providence about 1 700. There were no known children. 

Married second, Elizabeth about 1701, probably in Providence. She died in 1754. 

The children of John and Elizabeth, all bom in Providence, were: 



1. 


Sarah 4 , b. 1703, d.y. 


2. 


John 4 ,b. 1705. 


3. 


Hannah 4 , b. 1706. 


4. 


Jemima 4 , b. about 1707. m. Jolin Wheaton 


5. 


Obadiah 4 , b. about 1708. 


6. 


Fearnof , b. about 1710. 


7. 


Isaac , b. about 1711. 


8. 


Sarah 4 , b. about 1714. 


9. 


Josiah , b. 1716. 


10. 


William 


Other information: 




John* was a weaver. 


References: 


#24, p. 439, #279, pp. 9-12, #319, and #320. 




344. John 3 Dillingham 



Born in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts on February 24, 1658. 
Died in Sandwich prior to May 1733. 



131 



Hurt V Biographies 

Married Lydia 3 Hatch about 1694, possibly in Harwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts. 
The children of John and Lydia, all probably born in Sandwich, were: 

1. John 4 , b. about 1695. 

2 Jeremiah , b about 1696. 

3. Melatiah 4 . b. about 1 700, m. Maria 3 Gifford . 

4. Patience 

5. Mary 

6. Edward 

7. possibly other children. 
Other information: 

John 3 was a Quaker and information about him is sparse because early town 
records were sometimes "exclusive of Quakers." 
References: #24 and #243, pp. 31-32. 

346. Jonathan Gifford 

Bom in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts on May 4, 1684. 

Died in Sandwich on February 10, 1734/35. 

Married Lydia Abbott in Sandwich on August 3, 1708. 

The children of Jonathan and Lydia, all born in Sandwich, were: 

1 . Maria . b. October 16, 1 709, m. Melatiah 4 Dillingham as his third wife. 

2 Peleg 3 ,b. 1711 

3. Rebecca 3 , b. 1713. 

4. Bethiah 3 ,b. 1715 

5. Silas 3 , b. 1716/17. 

6. Hannah 3 , b. 1719. 

7. Anne 3 , b. 1721. 
Other information: 

Little is known about Jonathan except that he was a Quaker and a farmer. 
Reference: #246, v. 128, p. 250 and v. 129, pp. 33-34. 

348. Thomas Rogers 
See (320) Thomas Rogers on Chart IV, the same person. 

349. Bethiah 3 Ewell 

See (32 1 ) Bethiah Ewell on Chart IV, the same person. 

350. Dr. Isaac* Otis 

Bom in 1699, probably in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 
Died on November 11,1 777 
Married Debora h 4 Jacob on May 25, 171 9. 

The children of Isaac and Deborah, all probably born in Scituate, were: 
1 Josiah 5 , b 1719, d.y. 



132 



Chart V Biograpliies 



2. Isaac 5 , b. 1721. 

3. Joshua 5 , b. 1722, d.y. 

4. Deborah . b. October 16, 1723, m. Thomas 4 Rogers . 

5. Josiah 5 , b. 1725. 

6. William 5 , b. 1726. 

7. Stephen 5 , b. 1728. 

8. Hannah 5 , b. 1730. 

9. James 5 , b. 1733, d.y. 

10. James 5 , b. 1734. 

11. Thomas , b. 1736, d.y. 

12. Thomas 5 , b. 1738, d.y. 

13. Nabby 5 , b. 1739, d.y. 
Other information: 

Isaac was the first "regularly educated physician" who settled in Scituate. He 
began practice there in 1719 when the town voted a settlement of 100 pounds to keep him 
there. 
References: #15, p. 36 and #195, pp. 85 and 107-108. 

672. William Carpenter 

Bom in Amesbury, Wiltsliire, England about 1610. Amesbury is about seventy-eight miles west of 

London. 
Died in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island on September 7, 1685. This town is not to be 

confused with the present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
Married Elizabeth Arnold in England about 1634. 
The children of William and Elizabeth, all except the first born in Pawtuxet, were: 

1. Joseph , b. in England about 1635. 

2. Lydia 2 , b. about 1638. 

3. Ephraim 2 , b. about 1640. 

4. Priscilla 2 , b. about 1643. 

5. William 2 , b. about 1645. 

6. Timothy 2 , b. about 1648. 

7. Silas 2 , b. 1650, m. Sarah 3 Arnold , his first cousin. 

8. Benjamin , b. about 1653. 
Other information: 

The descendants of William 1 Carpenter in the Pawtuxet/Providence area are known 
as the Providence branch of the Carpenters. There was another Carpenter branch of early 
settlers in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts who descended from another William 
Carpenter who was probably a cousin of the Providence William Carpenter - 
William' Carpenter , his wife, Elizabeth 2 Arnold , and their infant child, Joseph, 
came to America in 1635 in the company led by her father, William Arnold . As discussed 
in the text on William 1 Arnold , the group settled first in Hingham, Plymouth, 
Massachusetts before moving on to Providence, Rhode Island in 1636. 



133 



Quirt V Biographies 

Providence was founded by Roger Williams, who had purchased the area from the 
Indians in 1636 Roger was a minister in Salem, Massachusetts who held non-conformist 
\iews and left Massachusetts to avoid being sent back to England by officials of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony. William 1 Carpenter and his father-in-law, William Arnold , 
joined with ten other men to become the original proprietors under the "Initial Deed" from 
Roger Williams in 1638. The "First Baptist Church in America" was founded in 
Providence in 1638 by Roger Williams, William Carpenter , and nine of the eleven other 
men who were the original proprietors under the "Initial Deed." 

Hie Carpenters and the Arnolds were the largest land owners and chief taxpayers 
in the area for half a century. William Carpenter was a member of the General Court from 
1658 to 1663. 

The years of 1675 and 1676 were years of terror for the Providence area because 
of King Philip's War. Many houses were burned by the Indians and on January 27, 1676, a 
band of 300 attacked William Carpenter's house. The house was set on fire and two of his 
household, including his son, William , were killed. The house was saved but the Indians 
drove off 200 sheep, 50 cattle and 15 horses. 
References: #24, #88, v. I, pp. 337-338, #193, #266, pp. 8-29, #267, p. 75, and #278, p. 52. 

673. Elizabeth Arnold 

Elizabeth was the sister of Stephen Arnold , below. 

Born in Ilchester, Somerset, England on November 23, 1611. 

Died in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island about 1683. This town is not to be confused with the 

present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
Married William Carpenter in England about 1634. 
Other information: 

Reference #268 apparently has an error, naming a Thomas Hopkins as the husband 

of Elizabeth 2 Arno ld. 
References: #24, #193, #248, v. IV, pp. 2031-2032, #266, p. 8, #268, and #278, p. 52. 

674. Stephen Arnold 

This is the same person as (676) Stephen 2 Arnold on this chart. Stephen was the brother of 

Elizabeth Arnold above. 
Born in Ilchester, Somerset, England on December 22, 1622. 
Died in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island on November 15, 1699. 
Married Sarah Smith in Providence, Rhode Island on November 24, 1646. Sarah was the daughter 

of Edward Smith of Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts and Newport, Rhode Island. She 

was bom in 1 629 and died in 1713. 
I he children of Stephen and Sarah, all probably bom in Pawtuxet, were: 
I Esther 3 , b 1647. 

Israel 3 , b October 30, 1649, m. Mary Barker . 

3. Stephen 3 , b. 1654. 

•1 Elizabeth 3 , b. 1659. 

5 Elisha 3 , b 1662. 

6 b June 26, 1665, m. Silas 2 Carpenter , her first cousin. 

134 



Chart V Biograpliies 



7. Phoebe 3 , b. 1671. 



Other information: 

Stephen came to Providence, Rhode Island with his father, William 1 Arnold , about 
1636 at age fourteen. Later, the family moved to Pawtuxet, Rliode Island. Stephen was 
prominent in public affairs, including being deputy governor of Rhode Island in 1664. 

References: #24, #88, v. IV, p. 1 12, #193, #266, p. 322, #268, #269, and #278, pp. 57-58. 

676. Stephen Arnold 
See (674) Stephen Arnold on this chart, the same person. 

678. James Barker 

Born in 1623, probably in Harwich, Essex, England. 

Died in 1 702, probably in Newport, Rhode Island. 

Married Barbara Dungan in Newport about 1643. 

The children of James and Barbara, all born in Newport, were: 

1 . Elizabeth 

2. James 2 , b. 1648 

3. Mary . b. 1649, m. Israel Arnold . 

4. Sarah 2 

5. Joseph 

6. Peter 2 

7. Christiana 

8. William 2 
Other information: 

James embarked from England with his father, James Barker , who died during the 
crossing to America. The father directed that young James should be in the care of his 
aunt, Christiana, who was then the wife of Thomas Beecher. James probably remained 
with his aunt in Charlestown (now part of Boston) until her marriage to Nicholas Easton 
brought her to Newport, Rhode Island in 1639. 

From 1663 to 1686 James 1 was almost always a member of the general court and 
in 1678 he was deputy governor of Rhode Island. 
References: #24, #266, p. 323, #277, p. 14, and #278, p. 78. 

684. Clement 2 King 

Born in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 
Died in Providence, Rhode Island about 1694. 

Married Elizabeth . She married second Thomas Barnes in November 1694. Elizabeth 

died in 1708. 
The children of Clement and Elizabeth, all except Thomas born in Marshfield, were: 

1. Joanna , b. 1674. 

2. Elizabeth 3 , b. about 1676, m. Richard Harris in Providence about 1696 (reference 
#24, p. 346). 

3. Ebenezer 3 , b. about 1677, m. Hannah Manning about 1698 (reference #24, p. 439). 

135 



Chan V Biographies 

4. John 3 , b. about 1680, m. Elizabeth . 

5. James 

6. Thomas" , b. 1691 in Providence. 
Other information: 

Clement moved from Marshfield to Providence in 1687. 
References: #24, #279, pp. 7-9, #3 19, and #320. 

688. Henry 2 Dillingham 

Baptized in Cottesbach, Leicestshire, England on October 13, 1624. 
Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts on July 20, 1 705. 
Married I lannah Perry in Sandwich on June 24, 1652. She died in 1673. 
The children of Henry and Hannah, all born in Sandwich, were: 
1 Mary , b. 1653, m. John Wing. 

2. John 3 , b. February 24, 1658, m. Lvdia 3 Hatch . 

3. Deborah , b 1660, m. Daniel Wing. 
I Dorcas 3 , b. 1662. 

5. Edward 3 , b 1665. 
Other information: 

1 lenry came to America with his father, Edward Dillingham , and the family on the 
William and Francis in 1632. They settled first in Saugus (Lynn), Essex, Massachusetts 
but moved to Sandwich on Cape Cod in 1637. 

Henry and his wife, Hannah, early adopted the Quaker faith and suffered 
persecution in common with others of that sect. The trouble seems to have started about 
1656. However, in 1661 King Charles issued a royal decree which effectively put an end 
to the Quaker persecution and in 1689 Henry was admitted as a freeman, which meant 
meeting both civil and religious requirements. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 50, and #243, pp. 22-26. 

690. Jeremiah 2 Hatch 

Baptized in Wye, Kent, England on July 23, 1626. 
Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts about 1712. 

Married Mary Hewes in Scituate on December 29, 1657. She died in Scituate in 1716. 
The children of Jeremiah and Mary, all born in Scituate, were: 
1 Mary 3 , b 1658. 

2. Jeremiah , b. 1660. 

3. Joannah 3 , b. 1662. 

4. Marcy 3 , b. 1665. 
5 John 3 , b 1666. 

6. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1668. 

Lvdia 3 ., b. December 5, 1669, m. John 3 Dillingham . 

8 Febe 3 ,b. 1671 

9 Thomas 3 , b. 1672 
10. James 3 , b 1674. 



136 



Chait V Biographies 



11. Anna 3 , b. 1677. 

12. Deborah 3 , b. 1678. 
Other information: 

Jeremiah probably came to America on the Castle in 1638 with his parents and 
brothers and sisters. The family settled in Scituate, Massachusetts. Jeremiah was a partner 
with liis cousin, Walter Hatch, in the shipbuilding business. 
References: #24, #88, v. JJ, pp. 375-376, #243, p. 31, #244, #245, p. 1 15, and #293, v. I, pp. 
171-178 and v. II, p. 142. 

692. William' Gifford 

Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1687. 

Married first, an unknown wife in England, probably about 1641. See "Other Information" for a 

discussion of William's children and possible second wife. 
Married second or tliird, Mary Mills in Sandwich on May 16, 1683. Mary was the daughter of 

John and Sarah Mills of Blackpoint, Massachusetts (now Scarborough, Maine). William 

was probably in his sixties at the time but Mary was much younger. She was still living in 

1734. 
The children of William and Mary, both bom in Sandwich, were: 

1. Jonathan 2 , b. May 4, 1684, m. Lydia Abbott . 

2. James 2 , b. March 10, 1685/86. 
Other information: 

William had seven children before he married Mary Mills in 1683. They were: 
John, b. 1642, Patience, b. 1644, Hannaniah, b. 1646, William, b. 1654, Robert, b. 1656, 
Christopher, b. 1658 (birth date approximate), and Mary (birth date unknown). The first 
three children were by his unknown first wife and came to America with their father. The 
next four children may have been by an unknown second wife and were bom in America. 
The exact date that William came to America is unknown but he was in Sandwich by 
December 1647. 

William was one of the early settlers in Sandwich, Massachusetts. By trade he was 
a tailor. He was financially very successful either because he worked hard and had a flair 
for business or he may have had an inheritance from England. 

When the first Quaker missionaries arrived in New England, William became an 
active member of the society. In 1658 and again in 1660 he refused to take the oath of 
fidelity to "the government and to the State of England" because of his Quaker beliefs. He 
was heavily fined for this and for attending Quaker meetings. There is strong evidence that 
he moved from Sandwich to New Jersey for a few years to avoid further persecution. 
However, in 1661 King Charles issued a royal decree which effectively put an end to the 
Quaker persecution and before 1668 William had returned to Sandwich. 
Reference: #24 and #246, v. 128, pp. 241-248 and v. 129, pp. 33-34. 

696. John 2 Rogers 
See (640) John 2 Rogers on Chart IV, the same person. 



137 



Chart V Biographies 

697. Rhoda 2 King 
See (64 1 ) Rhoda 2 King on Chart IV, the same person. 

698. Gershom 2 Ewell 
See (642) Gershom 2 Ewell on Chart IV, the same person. 

700. Capt. Stephen 3 Otis 

Born in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1661. 

Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on August 26, 1733. 

Married Hannah Ensign in Scituate on June 16, 1685. 

The children of Stephen and Hannah, all probably born in Scituate, were: 

1. Hannah 4 , b. 1686. 

2. Mary 4 , b. 1689. 

3. Ensign 4 , b. 1691. 

4. John 4 , b 1694. 

5. Isaac 4 , b. 1699, m. Deborah 4 Jacob. 

6. Stephen 4 , b. 1707. 

7. Joseph 4 , b 1709. 

8 Joshua 4 , b 1711. 
Other information: 

Ste phen was a tanner. In 1689 he was commander of the militia in Scituate. 
References: #24 and #195, pp. 71 and 84-85. 

702. David 3 Jacob 

Born in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts on June 20, 1664. 

Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on February 10, 1748. 

Married S arah Cushing in Scituate on December 20, 1689. She was born in 1671 and died in 

1721 
The children of David and Sarah, all bom in Scituate, were: 

1 David 4 , b. 1690. 

2. Mary 4 ,b 1692. 

I Sarah 4 , b 1694. 

4. Elisha 4 ,b 1696,d.y. 

5 Deborah 4 , b. April 22, 1 698, m. Isaac 4 Otis . 

6. Lydia 4 ,b. 1700. 

7 Joshua 4 , b. 1702. 

8. Hannah 4 , b 1704. 

9 Joseph 4 , b. 1707. 
10. Benjamin 4 , b. 1709. 

II Elisha 4 , b. 1711. 

References: #24, #88, v II, pp. 532-533, and #195. 



138 



Cliart V Biograpliies 



1346. William 1 Arnold 



This is the same person as (1348) William Arnold and (1352) William' Arnold on this chart. 

Bom in Ilchester, Somerset, England on June 24, 1587. 

Died in Pawtuxet, Providence, Rhode Island about 1676. This town is not to be confused with the 

present-day town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 
Married Christiana Peak , daughter of Thomas Peak in England about 1610. 
The children of William and Christiana, all born in Ilchester, England, were: 

1 . Elizabeth 2 , b. November 23, 1 6 1 1 , m. William' Carpenter . 

2. Benedict 2 , b. 1615. 

3. Joanna , b. 1617. 

4. Stephen 2 , b. December 22, 1 622, m. Sarah Smith . 
Other information: 

On May 1, 1635 William Arnold sailed from England with a group of neighbors, 
nearly all related by blood or marriage. The party arrived in Massachusetts Bay on June 
24, 1635 and settled first in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. All but one in the party, 
William Carpenter , husband of Elizabeth 2 Arnold , had come from within about five miles 
of Ilchester, England. The leader of the party was William Arnold, who was forty-eight at 
the time and brought his wife and family with him. 

In the fall and winter of 1635 William Arnold and several others, including his son- 
in-law, William Carpenter, met with Roger Williams and his friends who were planning a 
new settlement in Rhode Island. As a result, William Arnold and William Carpenter 
joined the Roger Williams group and moved to Providence, Rhode Island in 1636, where 
they were among the first settlers and proprietors. Both William Arnold and William' 
Carpenter , were among the twelve men who received the initial deed signed by Roger 
Williams, dividing among them the land he had purchased from the Indians in 1635/36. 

In 1638 William 1 Arnold moved to Pawtuxet, Rhode Island, which is only a few 
miles from Providence; Pawtuxet is sometimes referred to as Providence in early records. 
References: #24, #193, #248, v. IV, pp. 2031-2032, #266, p. 8, #268, #269, and #278, pp. 9- 

11, 21-22, and 43-51. 

1348. William' Arnold 
See (1346) William' Arnold on this chart, the same person. 

1352. William' Arnold 
See (1346) William' Arnold on this chart, the same person. 

1358. William Dungan 

Died in England in 1636. 

Married Frances' Latham , who was the widow of Lord Weston. 

The children of William and Frances, all probably born in London, England, were: 

1. Barbara' , b. about 1628. m. James Barker . 

2. William' 



139 



Chart V Biographies 



3. Frances , b. about 1630. 
4 Thomas 



Other information: 

William was a perfumer. He never came to America; however, his widow, Francis 1 
Latham , since remarried, and his four children came over in 1638. 
References: #24, #277, p. 67, and #278, p. 78. 

1359. Frances 1 Latham 

Bom in England in 1611. 

Died in 1677, probably in Newport, Rhode Island. 

Married first, Lord Weston. There were probably no children from this marriage. 

Married second, William Dungan and had four children in England, including my ancestor, 
Barbara Dungan . 

Married third, Jeremiah Clarke about 1637 and had five sons. 

Married fourth, William Vaughn. There were no children from this marriage. 

Other information: 

After William Dungan died in 1636, Frances married Jeremiah Clarke. Frances and 
Jeremiah came to America in 1638 with her four children and settled in Newport, Rhode 
Island, where they had five sons. After Jeremiah died in 1652, Frances married William 
Vaughn in Newport about 1654. He died in 1677 at about the time Frances died. 

References: #24, #277, pp. 44 and 67, and #278, p. 78. 

1368. Clement King 

Died in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

Married Susanna in Marshfield about 1654. She died there on June 19, 1699 (references 

#24, p. 438 and #308, p. 427). 
The children of Clement and Susanna, all born in Marshfield, were: 

1 Joanna 2 , b. September 28, 1 655 (reference #308, p. 8). 

2 Clement , m. Elizabeth . 

3 Susanna 
Other information 

I he ancestry of Clement is unknown and the references covering his descendants 
have inconsistencies However, it is clear that my ancestor, (342) John 3 King, was the son 
of (684) Cle menr King of Providence and the grandson of Clement' King of Marshfield. 
References #24, #279, pp. 7- 1 2 (this reference confuses Clement 2 with Clement 1 ), #308, #319, 
and #320. 

1376. Edward Dillingham 

Baptized in Cotteshach, I .eicestshire, England on December 6, 1595. 
Died in Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1666. 

Married U rsula Cart er in Cottesbach on February 14, 1614. She died in Sandwich in 1656. 
The children of Edward and Ursula, all baptized in Cottesbach, were: 
I Elizabeth, bapt 1616. 



140 



Chart V Biograpliies 



2. Marie, bapt. 1618, probably d.y. 

3. Oseth 2 , bapt. 1621/22. 

4. Henry . bapt. October 13, 1624, m. Hannah Perry . 

5. Sarah, bapt. 1627. 

6. Jolin, bapt. 1629, d.y. 

7. John ,b. about 1630. 
Other information: 

Edward canie to America on the William and Francis, arriving in Boston in 1632. 
His brother, John, had come over two years earlier. Edward brought with him his wife, 

11 1 

Ursula, sons, Henry and John , and daughter, Oseth . The family settled first in Saugus 
(Lynn), Essex, Massachusetts. Henry was apparently a man of education and considerable 
property for the time. 

On April 3, 1637 Edward was one often men of Saugus to receive a large grant of 
land on Cape Cod. In the same year he moved there and assisted in founding the town of 
Sandwich. Edward held many public offices, including deputy from Sandwich to the 
general court at Plymouth. He appeared to be a man of independent thought and action, 
for in 1657 he was arrested and admonished for showing sympathy to the Quakers. At one 
time Edward was also engaged in the cattle business with (3578) Emanuel Downing . 
Chart XI. 
References: #24, #202, and #243, pp. 1 8a-2 1 . 

1380. Thomas' Hatch 

Probably bom in Tenterden, Kent, England. 

Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts before June 1646. 

Married Lydia in England about 1622. She married second, John Spring before 1654. 

The children of Thomas and Lydia were: 

1. William 2 

2. Jeremiah 2 , bapt. July 23, 1626 in Wye, Kent, England, m. Mary Hewes . 

3. Thomas 2 , bapt. 1628 in Wye. 

4. Mary 2 

5. Alice , bapt. 1636 in Tenterden, England. 

6. Hannah 2 , bapt. 1 646 in Scituate, Massachusetts. 
Other information: 

Thomas' probably sailed for New England with his wife and five children on the 
Castle in 1638 in company with his brother, William. Thomas settled in Scituate, 
Massachusetts and lived there until he died in 1646. 
References: #24, #244, and #245, pp. 1 1 5-1 16. 

1382. Jolin 1 Hewes 

Probably born in Wales because he was known as a Welshman. 
Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1674. 

Married Joanna in Scituate in 1633. She died after 1674. 

John and Joanna had at least two children, a son, James or John, and a daughter, Mary Hewes, 
who married Jeremiah 2 Hatch in Scituate on December 29, 1657. 

141 



Chan V Biographies 

Other information: 

John 1 was in Scituate, Massachusetts by 1632 and may have been in Plymouth, 

Massachusetts, before that. 
References #24, #85, p. 228, #88, v. II, p. 407, and #245, p. 1 15. 

1392. John' Rogers 
See (1280) John' Rogers on Chart IV, the same person. 

1393. Frances Watson 
See ( 1 28 1 ) Frances Watson on Chart rv, the same person. 

1394. Thomas' King 
See (1282) Thomas' King on Chart IV, the same person. 

1396. Henry' Ewell 
See ( 1 284) Henry' Ewell on Chart IV, the same person. 

1397. Sarah 2 Annable 
See (1285) Sarah 2 Annable on Chart rv, the same person. 

1400. John 2 Otis 

Born in Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England and baptized on January 14, 1621. 
Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on January 16, 1684. 
Married Mary" Jacob in May 1649 in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 
The children of John and Mary were: 

1 Mary , b 1 653 in Hingham. 

2. John , b. 1657 in Hingham 

3. I lannah , b 1659 in Hingham. 

4. Stephen . b. 1661 in Hingham, m. Hannah Ensign . 

5. James , b. 1663 in Scituate. 

6. Joseph , b. 1 665 in Scituate 
7 Job , b 1667 in Scituate. 

Other information: 

When John was about ten his family immigrated to America and settled in 
Hingham, Massachusetts on "Otis Hill." He moved to Scituate about 1662. He was in 
I Imgham again about 1678 but returned to Scituate where he died in 1684. 

John seems to have been of a rather pugnacious nature and not easily amenable to 
the strict laws of the Puritans. There are frequent references in the records to his various 
legal troubles 
References: #24 and #195, pp. 55-56 and 70-72. 



142 



Cliart V Biographies 

1402. John Ensign 

Died on March 26, 1676. 

Married an unknown wife in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts about 1668. She died before him, 

probably in child birth with their only child, Hannah , who was bom in 1669. Hannah 

married Stephen Otis . 
Other information: 

John was killed by Indians at the Rehoboth fight on March 26, 1676 during King 

Pliilip's War. He had made his will only a few days before. Since there was only a 

daughter, this male line became extinct. 
References: #24 and #88, v. II, p. 125. 

1404. John 2 Jacob 

Bom in England in 1629. 

Died in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1693. 

Married first, Margery Eames in Hingham on October 20, 1653. Jolin and Margery had three 

children in the period 1654-1659. She died in 1659. 
Married second, Mary 2 Russell in Hingham on October 3, 1661. Mary was bom in 1641 and died 

in 1691. 
The children of John and Mary, all bom in Hingham, were: 

1. Jael 3 ,b. 1662. 

2. David 3 , b. June 20, 1664, m. Sarah 3 Cushing . 

3. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1666. 

4. Peter 3 , b. 1668. 

5. Hannah 3 , b. 1669. 

6. Samuel 3 , b. 1671. 

7. Deborah 3 , b. 1674, d.y. 

8. Deborah 3 , b. 1677. 

9. John 3 , b. 1679. 

10. Lydia 3 ,b. 1681. 

11. Abigail 3 , b. 1683. 
Other information: 

John 2 came to America with his parents in 1633 at age four. The family settled first 
in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts but moved to Hingham in 1635. 
References: #24 and #88, v. II, p. 533 . 

1406. John 2 Cushing 

Baptized in 1627, either in Hingham, Norfolk, England or in a neighboring parish. 

Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts on March 31, 1708. 

Married Sarah 2 Hawke in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts on January 20, 1657/58. She died in 

1679. 
The children of John and Sarah were: 

1. John 3 , b. 1662. 

2. Thomas 3 , b. 1663. 

143 



Chart V Biographies 

3. Matthew 3 , b. 1665. 

4. Jeremiah", b. 1666. 

5. James , b 1668. 

6. Joshua 3 , b. 1670. 

7. Sarah 3 , b. August 26, 1671, m. David 3 Jacob . 

8. Caleb 3 , b. 1673. 

9. Deborah 3 , twin, b. 1674. 

10. Mary 3 , twin, b. 1674. 
11 Joseph 3 , b 1677. 

Other information: 

John came to America with his family in 1638 at age eleven. They settled first in 
1 lingham. A few years after he was married, John and his wife, Sarah, moved to Scituate. 
References: #24 and #88, v. I, pp. 489-490. 

2692. Nicholas Arnold 

This is the same person as (2696) Nicholas Arnold and (2704) Nicholas Arnold on this chart. 

Born about 1550, probably in Northover, Somerset, England. 

Died in Ilchester, Somerset, England in 1622. 

Married first, Alice Gulley before 1571. She was born in 1553, the daughter of John and Alice 

Gulley . 
The children of Nicholas and Alice, all except the first born in Ilchester, were: 

1. Thomasine, b. 1571 in Northover. 

2. Joan, b. 1577, m. William Hopkins and had three children who came to America 
with their uncle, William Arnold . 

3. Margery, b. 1581. 

4 William' , b. June 24, 1 587, m. Christiana 1 Peak . 

5. Robert, b 1593. 

6 Elizabeth, b 1 596, d.y. with her mother. 

Married second, Grace and had three more children. 

Other information: 

Nicholas was a merchant tailor. About 1575 he moved half a mile from Northover 

to the larger town of Ilchester. 

Reference #268 shows a Thomas Arnold of Melcombe and Cheselbourne as being 

the husband of Alice Gulley and the father of William' Arnold . Reference #278, which is 

well documented, shows on pages 27-28 that Nicholas Arnold is the correct person, not 

Thomas Arnold. 
References: #268 and #278, pp. 9-21 and 43. 

2696. Nicholas Arnold 
See (2692) Nicholas Arnold on this chart, the same person. 

2704. Nicholas Arnold 
See (2692) Nicholas Arnold on this chart, the same person. 



144 



Cliart V Biograpliies 



2752. Rev. Henry Dillingham 



Born in Cottesbach, Leicestshire, England about 1568. 
Died in Cottesbach in 1625. 

Married first, Oseth in Cottesbach. She died in there in 1609. 

The children of Henry and Oseth, all baptized in Cottesbach, were: 

1. John, bapt. 1592, d.y. 

2. Henry, bapt. 1593, d. 1609. 

3. Edward . bapt December 6, 1 595, m. Ursula Carter and went to New England. 

4. Gilbert, bapt. 1597, d. 1609. 

5. Mary, bapt. 1600, d. 1609. 

6. Martha, bapt. 1602, d. 1609. 

7. Oseth, bapt. 1603. 

8. John , bapt. 1606, went to New England. 

Married second, Margaret who survived him. 

Other information: 

Henry was the second son of William Dillingham of Cottesbach. Henry was the 
rector there from 1601 until his death in 1625. Note that Henry's wife, Oseth, and four of 
their children all died in 1609. Then, five years after Henry's death in 1625, the son, John, 
emigrated to America, followed by the son, Edward . two years later in 1632. 
Reference: #243, pp. 12-16. 

2760. William Hatch 

Baptized in Tenterden, Kent, England on December 9, 1563. 
Died in England between 1613 and 1627/28. 

Married first, Anne probably in Tenterden about 1593. 

The children of William and Anne, all probably born in Tenterden, were: 



1. 


John 


2. 


Thomas . m. Lvdia 


3. 


William 


4. 


Elizabeth 


5. 


Judith 


6. 


Margaret 


7. 


Mary, b. about 1606. 


8. 


A son, d.y. 


9. 


Anne, b. about 1613. 


Reference: 


#245, pp. 114-116. 



2794. Anthony 1 Annable 



See (2570) Anthony' Annable on Chart IV, the same person. 



2800. John Otis 



Born in Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England in 1581. 

Died in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts on May 31, 1657. 



145 



Clurt V Biographies 

Married first, Margaret' in England about 1603. She died in 1653. 

The children of John and Margaret, all born in England, were: 
1 Alicia 2 , bapt. 1604. 

2. Joan 2 , bapt. 1610, d.y. 
Anne*, bapt. 1612. 

4. Elizabeth 2 , bapt. 1614, d.y. 

5. Richard", bapt 1616, d.y. 

6. Hannah 2 , bapt. 1618. 

7. Margaret , bapt. 1619. 

8. John', bapt. January 14. 1621. m. Mary Jacob . 

Married second, Elizabeth Whitman, the widow of Thomas Streame, sometime after 1653. She 
died in 1676. 

Other information. 

John and his family lived for a time in Hingham, Norfolk, England before coming 
to America The family probably came to America late in 1630. They settled in Hingham, 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. Shortly after John's first wife, Margaret, died in 1653 he moved 
to Weymouth, Massachusetts where he died in 1657. 

There is a seven-foot-tall granite monument in the Ancient Cemetery on Meeting 
House Lane in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts inscribed as follows: "In Memory of 
John Otis, Bom in the year 1581 at Barnstable, England, his son John Otis and their 
descendants Stephen Otis, Isaac Otis, Stephen Otis, William Otis." This was probably 
erected about 1908. 

Subsequently, it has been shown that John Otis was born in Glastonbury, England, 
not in Barnstable, England. John Otis died in Weymouth and his son, John Otis died in 
Scituate It is not known if John was originally buried in Scituate or if his remains were 
moved from Weymouth to Scituate. 

References: #24 and #195, pp. 39-43 and 55. 

2802. Nicholas' Jacob 

This is the same person as (2808) Nicholas' Jacob on this chart. 

Bom in England 

Died in I lingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts on June 5, 1657. 

Married first, an unknown wife in Norwich, England. 

Married second, Mary Gilman in England about 1628. She married second John Beal in Hingham 

in 1659 She died in 1681 or 1684. 
The children of Nicholas and Mary were: 

1 John . b. 1629 in England, m. Mary 2 Russell . 

Elizabeth 2 , b in England. 

3. Hannah 2 , bapt. 1640. 

4. Josiah 2 , b 1642, d.y. 

5. Deborah 2 , b 1643. 

6. Joseph 2 , b. 1646 

7. Mary , b 1 63 7 in 1 lingham, m. John 2 Otis . 

8. Sarah 

146 



Cliart V Biographies 

Other information. 

Nicholas came to Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts in 1633 with his wife, 

Mary, and their first two children, John 2 and Elizabeth 2 . In 1635 they moved to the new 

settlement in Hingham. 
References: #24, #88, v. H, pp. 533-534, and #195, p. 55. 

2804. Thomas Ensign 

Died in 1663. 

Married Elizabeth Wilder of Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts on January 17, 1638/39. She 

died after 1676. 
The children of Thomas and Elizabeth were: 

1. Hannah, bapt. 1640. 

2. Elizabeth 

3. John , m. an unknown wife in Scituate. 
Other information: 

Thomas lived at various times in Hingham, Scituate and Duxbury, all in Plymouth 
County, Massachusetts. 
References: #24 and #88, v. II, p. 125. 

2808. Nicholas' Jacob 
See (2802) Nicholas Jacob on this chart, the same person. 

2810. George 1 Russell 

Probably born in Hawkhurst, Kent, England in 1 596. 

Died in Hingham, Plymoutli, Massachusetts on May 26, 1694. 

Married first, an unknown wife in Hingham about 1624 and had two sons, George and Samuel . 

Married second, Jane , the widow of Philip James, in Hingham on February 14, 1639/40. 

She was born in 1605 and died in 1688. 
The cliildren of George and Jane, all probably born in Hingham, were: 

1. Mary . bapt. April 1, 1641. m. John Jacob . 

2. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1642. 

3. Martha 2 , b. 1645. 

4. Patience 
Other information: 

George came to America from London on the Elizabeth as an unmarried man on 
April 9, 1635. He settled first in Hingham but moved to Scituate, Plymouth, 
Massachusetts in 1646. Later he returned to Hingham where he died in 1694. George was 
a miller. 
References: #24, #85, p. 395, and #88, v. Ill, p. 590. 

2812. Matthew' Cushing 

Born in Hingham, Norfolk, England in 1588, the year of the Spanish Armada. He was the son of 
Peter Cushing . 

147 



Chart V Biographies 

Died in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts on December 30, 1660. 

Married Nazareth Pitcher in England on August 5, 1613. She died in Hingham, Massachusetts in 

1681. 
The children of Matthew and Nazareth, all bom in England, were: 

1. Daniel 2 , bapt. 1619. 

2. Jeremiah", bapt. 1621. 

3. Matthew*, bapt. 1623. 

4. Deborah 2 , bapt. 1625. 

5. John 2 , bapt. 1627, m. Sarah'' Hawke . 
Other information: 

Matthew' and his family sailed from London, England on the Diligent on April 26 
and landed at Boston on August 10, 1638. They were on the same ship with Matthew 
Hawke . Both families settled in Hingham, Massachusetts. 
References: #24 and #88, v. I, p. 490. 

2814. Matthew 1 Hawke 

Bom in 1610, probably in Cambridge, England 

Died in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts on December 11, 1684. 

Married Margaret (?) Towle in England about 1638. 

Hie children of Matthew and Margaret, all bom in Hingham, were: 

1 Elizabeth 2 , b. 1639. 

2 Sarah . bapt. August 1, 1641, m. John Gushin g. 
I Bethia 2 , b. 1643. 

-4 Mary , b. 1646. 

5 James , b. 1649. 

6. Deborah 2 , b. 1652. 
7 Hannah 2 , b 1655. 

( Kher information: 

Matthew and his wife sailed from London with one servant on the Diligent and 

landed in Boston on August 10, 1638. They were on the same ship with Matthew 

Gushing Botli families settled in 1 lingham. 
References: #24 and #88, v. II, p 381. 



148 



CHART VI - Asa 7 Parker 





□ iph u i r 3 

PARKER, JR. 




352 


JOHN 3 
PARKER 


704 EDWARD 2 PARKER 








1648-1711 

HANNAH 2 
BASSETT 


705 ELIZABETH WOODS 




176 


PARKER, SR. (a) 








1687-1758 

HANNAH 3 
BEACH 


353 
354 


706 WILLIAM 1 BASSETT 








1650-1726 

JOHN 2 
BEACH 


707 HANNAH DICKERMAN 








1721- 1760 

ihankfui ' 
mtchcock 


177 


708 THOMAS 1 BEACH 








1655-1709 

MARY 3 

ROYCE 


709 SARAH 2 PLATT 








1683 84- 1729 


355 
356 


710 JONATHAN 2 ROYCE 




MATTHIAS 3 






at*. 1658 - 

JOHN 2 
HITCHCOCK 


711 Mary 2 Spinning 


NATHANIEL' 

P\RKFR 




1750- 1812 

89 


712 MATTHIAS 1 HITCHCOCK 




abc. 1645- 1716 

ABIGAIL 2 
MERRIMAN 


713 EIJZABETH PERRY 


178 


HITCHCOCK 




1688- 1763 

THANKFUL 4 

ANDREWS 


357 
358 


714 NATHANIEL ' MERRIMAN 




1654- 

WILUAM 3 
ANDREWS 


715 Joan 




1725- 1763 




716 SAMUEL 2 ANDREWS 




1664-1726 

HANNAH 4 
PARKER (a) 


717 Elizabeth 2 Peck 






1693-1746 


359 


718 JOHN 3 PARKER 






1671 - 


719 HANNAH 2 BASSETT 





22 PARKFR Am m l.»ura Whitney (Chart VII) 



I rvu- mi 8 


180 


WII LI AM 
BAKER 


360 


Unknown 


720 




RFNIAMIN 






Unknown 


721 








- 1750 

Rebecca 3 
Backus 


361 
362 


722 








STEPHEN 2 
BACKUS 


723 




90 

TAM 

BAKER 


BAKER 






1720- 1798 

IERUSHA 3 

PARISH 


181 
182 


724 WILLIAM 1 BACKUS 








abl. 1642-1707 

Sarah 2 
Spencer 


725 Unknown 








BENJAMIN 2 
PARISH 


363 


726 GERARD 1 SPENCER, JR. 








JOHN 1 
PARISH 


727 Hannah 


45 




1762- 1834 


728 Unknown 










- 1715 

Hannah 

Jewell 


729 Unknown 








abt. 1670- 

Mary 3 
Tracy 


365 
366 


730 THOMAS JEWELL 








JONATHAN 2 
TRACY 


731 Orizzell Fletcher 


91 

r.>ther and 




1722- 1799 


183 


732 THOMAS 1 TRACY 






A name in capitals indicates that a 
btograph\ is included for that 
uitli\ idual I he biographies follow 




1646- 1709 

MARY 3 
ORIS WOLD 


733 Unknown 




1682- 


367 


734 FRANCIS 2 ORIS WOLD 




this chart 


1656- 1711 


735 Mary 







150 



CHART VI - Asa 7 Parker 



1408 WILLIAM 1 PARKER 

1409 Unknown 

1410 Unknown 

1411 Unknown 

1412 Unknown 

1413 Unknown 

1414 Unknown 

1415 Unknown 

1416 Unknown 

1417 Unknown 

1418 RICHARD 1 PLATT 

1419 Mary Wood 

1420 ROBERT 1 ROYCE 

1421 Mary 

1422 HUMPHREY 1 SPINNING 

1423 Unknown 



1424 Unknown 

1425 Unknown 

1426 Unknown 

1427 Unknown 

1428 Unknown 

1429 Unknown 

1430 Unknown 
1431 

1432 WILLIAM 1 ANDREWS 

1433 Unknown 

1434 WILLIAM 1 PECK 

1435 Elizabeth 

1436 EDWARD 2 PARKER 

1437 ELIZABETH WOODS 

1438 WILLIAM 1 BASSETT 

1439 HANNAH DICKERMAN 



1440 
1441 
1442 
1443 

1444 
1445 
1446 
1447 

1448 Unknown 

1449 Unknown 
1450 

1451 

1452 GERARD SPENCER, SR. 

1453 Alice Whitbred 

1454 Unknown 

1455 Unknown 



1456 
1457 
1458 
1459 

1460 Unknown 

1461 Unknown 

1462 Unknown 

1463 Unknown 

1464 Unknown 

1465 Unknown 

1466 Unknown 

1467 Unknown 

1468 EDWARD 1 ORIS WOLD 

1469 Margaret 

1470 Unknown 

1471 Unknown 



2816 Unknown 

2818 

2820 

2822 


2824 
2826 
2828 
2830 




2832 

2834 

2836 Unknown 

2838 Unknown 


2840 Unknown 
2842 Unknown 
2844 Unknown 
2846 


2848 
2850 
2852 
2854 




2856 
2858 
2860 
2862 




2864 
2866 
2868 
2870 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2872 
2874 
2876 
2878 


WILLIAM 1 PARKER 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2880 
2882 
2884 
2886 




2888 
2890 
2892 
2894 




2896 
2898 
2900 
2902 




2904 MICHAEL SPENCER 

2906 Unknown 

2908 

2910 


2912 
2914 
2916 
2918 




2920 
2922 
2924 
2926 




2928 
2930 
2932 
2934 




2936 
2938 
2940 
2942 


GEORGE GRISWOLD 
Unknown 



2817 Unknown 

2819 

2821 

2823 


2825 
2827 
2829 
2831 




2833 
2835 
2837 
2839 


Unknown 
Unknown 


2841 
2843 
2845 
2847 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2849 
2851 
2853 
2855 




2857 
2859 
2861 
2863 




2865 
2867 
2869 
2871 


Unknown 

Unknown 
Unknown 


2873 
2875 
2877 
2879 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


2881 
2883 
2885 
2887 




2889 
2891 
2893 
2895 




2897 
2899 
2901 
2903 




2905 
2907 
2909 
2911 


Elizabeth 
Unknown 


2913 
2915 
2917 
2919 




2921 
2923 
2925 
2927 




2929 
2931 
2933 
2935 




2937 
2939 
2941 
2943 


Dousabel 
Unknown 



See refs. 

#67, #79 and #225 

for Spencer 
English ancestry. 



See refs. 

#33 and #218 

for Tracy 

English ancestry 



See refs. 

#115 and #217 

for Griswold 

English ancestry 



151 



Chart VI Biographies 

22. Asa Parker 
See (22) Asa Parker on Chart I, the same person. 

44. Nathaniel Parker 

Bom in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on October 29, 1750. 

Died in Granville, Washington, New York on July 29, 1812. Buried in Old Yard Cemetery in 

Middle Granville. 
Married Tamson Baker in Granville about 1780. 
The children of Nathaniel and Tamson, all born in Granville, were: 

1 . Cynthia 

2. Susan 

3. Nathaniel 7 , b. 1783/84. 

4. Asa 7 , b. 1790, m. Laura 6 Whitney . 

5. Tamson 

6. Eliud 7 ,b. 1793. 

7. Mathias 

8. Eliel 7 ,b. 1796, d.y. 

9. Emily 7 , b. 1798/99. 

1 0. Delia Maria 7 , b. 1 806, d.y. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel moved from Wallingford sometime between 1775 and 1777 as a single 
man and settled in Granville. His two younger brothers, Eliphalet and Michael, also settled 
there. The first settlement of this town was probably as early as 1770, but the progress of 
settlement was slow because of the Revolutionary War. Soon after the war, the area filled 
rapidly. 

Nathaniel had been in the Revolutionary War under General Benedict Arnold in the 
expedition against Quebec. He was also at the taking of Fort Ticonderoga by Ethan Allen 
and the battle of Bennington under General Stark. Nathaniel was probably the first of his 
family to leave Connecticut. Almost all of his ancestors for four or five generations back 
lived in Connecticut, principally in New Haven and Wallingford. 
References: #57, #58, pp. 198 and 494, #61, #72, pp. 405-409, #177, v. VI, p. 1370, #190, pp. 

xiii and 2, and #347. 

45. Tamson Baker 

Born in 1762. Christened in Amenia, Dutchess, New York on October 20, 1765. 

Died in Granville, Washington, New York on May 28, 1834. Buried in Old Yard Cemetery in 

Middle Granville. 
Married Nathaniel 6 Parker in Granville about 1780. 
Other information: 

It is not known whether Tamson was born in Canterbury, Windham, Connecticut 

or in Amenia, New York. Her parents moved from Canterbury to Amenia sometime 

between 1760 and 1765. 



153 



Chan VI Biographies 

References: #57, #58, p. 494, #61, #190, p. 2, #346, and Tamson's christening record in 
Amenia. 

88. Fli phalet 5 Parker. Jr. 

Bom in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on January 19, 1721. 
Died in Wallingford on May 19, 1760. 
Married Thankful 4 Hitchcock in Wallingford on May 21, 1745. 
The children of Eliphalet and Thankful, all born in Wallingford, were: 

1. Valentine , b. about 1746. 

2. Matthias 6 , b. 1747. 

3. Nathaniel 6 , b. October 29, 1750, m. Tamson Baker . 

4. Eliphalet 6 , b. 1754. 

5. Thankful 6 , b. 1756. 

6. Michael 6 , b. 1758. 

References: #57, #58, #61, and #177, v. VI, p. 1370. 

89. Thankful 4 Hitchcock 

Bom in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on March 29, 1725. 
Died on November 28, 1763. 

Married Eliphalet Parker. Jr. in Wallingford on May 21, 1745. 
References: #57, #61, and #177, v. VI, p. 1370. 

90. Benjamin Baker 

Bom in Canterbury, Windham, Connecticut on July 1 1, 1720. 

Died in Granville, Washington, New York on November 4, 1798. Buried in Old Yard Cemetery in 

Middle Granville. 
Married Jerusha Parish in Canterbury on June 12, 1744. 
The children of Benjamin and Jerusha, the first four bom in Canterbury, were: 
1 Benjamin, b. 1745. 

2. Jerushad, b. 1750. 

3. Solomon, b. 1755. 

4. Jacob, b. 1758. 

Tamson . b. 1762, bapt. in Amenia, Dutchess, New York on October 20, 1765, m. 
Nathaniel Parker . 
Other information: 

Benjamin moved from Canterbury, Connecticut to Amenia, New York sometime 

between 1 760 and 1 765 Sometime later he moved to Granville, New York, where he died 

in 1798 at age seventy-eight. Two of his sons, Benjamin and Solomon, and his daughter, 

Tamson . also moved to Granville. 

References: #57, #58, pp. 196-197, 201, and 204, #190, pp. 2 and 10, #219, #346, Canterbury 

vital records, and Tamson's christening record in Amenia. 



154 



Chart VI Biographies 



91. Jerusha Parish 

Born in Preston, New London, Connecticut on June 30, 1722. 

Died in Granville, Washington, New York on April 6, 1799. Buried in Old Yard Cemetery in 

Middle Granville. 
Married Benjamin Baker in Canterbury, Windham, Connecticut on June 12, 1744. 
References: #190, p. 2 and #199, p. 17. 

176. Eliphalet Parker. Sr. 

Bom in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut in 1687. 

Died in Wallingford in 1758. 

Married first, Hannah Beach in Wallingford on August 5, 1708. 

The children of Eliphalet and Hannah, all bom in Wallingford, were: 

1. Eliada 5 ,b. 1710, d.y. 

2. Eliada 5 ,b. 1712. 

3. Chestena 5 ,b. 1714. 

4. Aaron , b. 1716. 

5. Gamaliel 5 , b. 1718. 

6. Didymus 5 ,b. 1720. 

7. Eliphalet 5 . b. January 19. 1721. m. Thankful 4 Hitchcock . 

8. Joanna 5 , b. 1723. 

9. Thankful 5 , b. 1725. 

10. Bethuel 5 , b. 1727. 

11. Benjamin 5 , b. 1729. 
Married second, Damaris Atwater in 1 75 1 . 
Other information: 

Eliphalet 4 Parker was a younger brother of (359) Hannah Parker , who married 
(358) William 3 Andrews . 
References: #57, #61, and #177, v. VL pp. 1363 and 1368-70. 

177. Hannah 3 Beach 

Bom in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on March 17, 1683/84. 
Died on December 21, 1729, probably in childbirth. 
Married Eliphalet 4 Parker. Sr. in Wallingford on August 5, 1708. 
References: #57, #61, #74, and #177, v. VI, p. 1363. 

178. Matthias 3 Hitchcock 

Bom in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on May 26, 1688. 

Died in 1763, probably in Wallingford. 

Married first, Thankful 4 Andrews in Wallingford on December 27, 1710. 

Matthias and Thankful had fourteen children, all bom in Wallingford in the period 1711- 

1737. My ancestor, Thankful 4 Hitchcock , the seventh child, was bom on March 29, 1725. 

She married Eliphalet 5 Parker. Jr. 

155 



Chart \1 Biographies 

Married second, a widow, Deborah Barnes. 

Married third, a widow, Sarah Mitchell. 

References: #57, #61, #78, p. 187, and #177, v. m, pp. 750 and 759-760. 

179. Thankful 4 Andrews 

Bom in 1693, probably in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. 
Died in August 1746 

Married Matthias 3 Hitchcock in Wallingford on December 27, 1710. 
References: #57, #78, and #177, v. m, p. 750. 

180. William Baker 

Died in Canterbury, Windham Connecticut on August 2, 1750. 
Married first, Rebecca 3 Backus in Canterbury on June 13, 1706. 
The children of William and Rebecca, all bom in Canterbury, were: 

1. Elizabeth, b. 1707. 

2. William, b. 1708/09. 

3. Stephen 

4. Daniel, b. 1713. 

5. Bial, b. 1716. 

6. Abial, b. 1718. 

7. Benjamin , b. July 11, 1720, m. Jerusha Parish . 

8. Isaac, bapt. August 12, 1722. 

Married second, Elizabeth . Reference #219 shows that this second marriage took 

place about 1721, in which case the eighth child, Isaac, would have been by the second 
wife, Elizabeth. 

Other information: 

The origins of William have not been established. His first appearance in 

-a 

Canterbury, Connecticut is noted in 1706 when he bought land and married Rebecca 
Backus William could have been a son of John Baker and Susanna Martin of Woburn, 
Middlesex, Massachusetts or a descendant of Alexander Baker, who came to Boston in 
1635 Neither ancestry has been proven and the Baker families have been given scant 
treatment by researchers A search of the manuscript section in the Connecticut Historical 
Society provided only the additional information that William died in Canterbury on 
August 2, 1750. 
References: #88, v. I, p. 95, #2 1 3, p. 1 3, #2 1 9, #346, and Canterbury vital records. 

182. Benjamin Parish 

Probably bom in Mendon, Worcester, Massachusetts about 1670. 
Died in Preston, New London, Connecticut. 

Married Mary' Tracv of Preston on April 18, 1705. She was bom on September 7, 1682. 
The children of Benjamin and Mary, all probably bom in Preston, were: 
1 Benjamin 3 , b. 1 706. 

2. Joseph 3 , b 1708 

3. Mary 3 , b. 1709. 



156 



Chart VI Biographies 



4. Hannah 3 , b. 1711. 

5. Azariah 3 ,b. 1713. 

6. Tamson , b. 1715. 

7. Deborah 3 , b. 1718. 

8. Danielle 3 , b. 1720. 

9. Jerusha . b. June 30, 1722, m. Benjamin Baker . 

10. Abigail 3 , b. 1725. 



References: #199, p. 17. 



352. John 3 Parker 



-3 

This is the same person as (71 8) John Parker on this chart. 
Baptized in New Haven, Connecticut on October 8, 1648. 
Died in 1711. 

Married Hannah Bassett in New Haven on November 18, 1670. 
The children of John and Hannah were: 

1. Hannah . b. August 20, 1671 in New Haven, m. William Andrews . 

2. Elizabeth , b. 1673 in New Haven. 

3. John , b. 1675 in New Haven. 

4. Abiah , b. 1677 in New Haven. 

5. Rachel 4 , b. 1 680 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. 

6. Joseph 4 , b. 1 682 in Wallingford. 

7. Mary 4 , b. 1685 in Wallingford. 

8. Eliphalet 4 . b. 1687 in Wallingford, m. Hannah 3 Beach . 

9. Samuel 4 , b. 1690 in Wallingford. 

10. Edward 4 , b. 1 692 in Wallingford. 

1 1 . Abigail 4 , b. 1 694 in Wallingford. 
Other information: 

John 3 moved from New Haven ten miles to Wallingford between 1677 and 1680 
and was among the early settlers in Wallingford. 
References: #24, #57, #61, #78, and #177, v. VT, pp. 1362-1363. 

353. Hannah 2 Bassett 

This is the same person as (719) Hannah Bassett on this chart. 
Bom in New Haven, Connecticut on September 13, 1650. 
Died in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on June 7, 1726. 
Married John Parker in New Haven on November 18, 1670. 
References: #24, #57, and #6 1 . 

354. John 2 Beach 

Born in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut on October 19, 1655. 

Died in April 1709. 

Married Mary 3 Rovce in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut in December 1678. 

157 



Chart VI Biographies 

The children of John and Mary, all born in Wallingford, were: 

1. Lettice 3 , b. 1679. 

2. Mary 3 , b. 1681 

3. Hannah 3 , b. March 17, 1683/84, m. Eli phalet 4 Parker . 

4. Thomas 3 , b. 1686. 

5. John 3 , b. 1690. 

6. Samuel 3 , b. 1696. 

7. Caleb 3 , b. 1699. 
Other information: 

John was left as an orphan at age fifteen and was then brought up by a cousin, John 
Moss of Wallingford. 
References: #24, #57, #61, #74, #75, #78, p. 43, and #192. 

355. Mary Royce 

Born about 1658, probably in New London, Connecticut. See (710) Jonathan Royce . 

Married first John' Beach in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut in December 1678. 

Married second John Atwater in 1718. 

Other information: 

Mary's mother, Mary Spinning Royce . apparently died in childbirth or shortly 
thereafter. Mary's father, Jonathan Royce moved from New London to Norwich, New 
London, Connecticut and remarried. It is postulated in reference #75 that Mary Royce 
was brought up by a childless aunt, Mrs. Lettice Macock, in Guilford, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

References: #24, #57, #61, #74, #75, #177, v. VJJ, p. 1549, and #192. 

356. John Hitchcock 

Born in New Haven, Connecticut about 1645. 

Died in New Haven on July 6, 1716. 

Married first, Abigail' Merriman in New Haven on January 18, 1670. 

John and Abigail had twelve children. The first three were born in the period 1671-1674 in New 
Haven The last nine were born in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut in the period 
1676-1696 My ancestor, Matthias 3 Hitchcock , the ninth child, was born on May 26, 
1 688 He married Thankful 4 Andrews . 

Married second, a widow, Mary Thompson. 

References: #57, #61, #78, p. 186, and #177, v. JU, p. 750. 

357. Abigail Merriman 
Bom on April 18, 1654. 

2 

Married John" Hitchcock in New Haven on January 18, 1670. 
References: #57, #78, and #177, v. JJI, p. 750. 



158 



Chart VI Biographies 



358. William Andrews 



Born on February 9, 1664, probably in New Haven, Connecticut. 

Died on July 8, 1726, probably in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. 

Married Hannah Parker on January 12, 1692, probably in Wallingford. 

The children of William and Hannah are unknown except for my ancestor, Thankful . who married 

Matthias Hitchcock . 
Other information: 

William probably moved with his family from New Haven to Wallingford when he 

was about five years old. 
References: #24, #57, #78, and #177, v. VI, p. 1362. 

359. Hannah Parker 

Born in New Haven, Connecticut on August 20, 1671. 

Married first, William Andrews on January 12, 1692, probably in Wallingford, New Haven, 

Connecticut. 
Married second, Bartholomew Foster. 
Other information: 

Hannah was an older sister of (176) Eliphalet Parker . 
References: #24, #57, and #177, v. VI, pp. 1362-63. 

362. Stephen 2 Backus 

Born in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut about 1642. 

Died in Canterbury, Windham, Connecticut on May 1, 1707. 

Married Sarah 2 Spencer in Norwich, New London, Connecticut in December 1666. 

The children of Stephen and Sarah, all born in Norwich, were: 

1. Sarah 3 , b. 1668. 

2. Stephen 3 , b. 1670. 

3. Mary 3 , b. 1672. 

4. Ruth 3 , b. 1674. 

5. Lydia 3 , b. 1677, d.y. 

6. Timothy 3 , b. 1682. 

7. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1682. 

8. Rebecca 3 , m. William Baker . 
Other information: 

Stephen 2 moved with his parents from Saybrook to Norwich in 1660. Stephen was 
counted as one of the original settlers in Norwich. In 1692 he moved to the new settlement 
in Canterbury, Connecticut, where he was again one of the original settlers. 
References: #24, #213, pp. 12-13, #219, and #220, pp. 7-8. 

364. John 1 Parish 

Died in Preston, New London, Connecticut in 1715. 

Married first, Hannah Jewell in Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts on June 30, 1664. 



159 



Chan M Biographies 

The children of John and Hannah were: 

1 Hannah*, b 1665 in Braintree. 

2. Samuel 2 , b. probably in Mendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

3. Benjamin 2 , b. probably in Mendon about 1670, m. Mary Tracy . 

4. John 

Married second, Mary Wattell on December 29, 1685, probably in Groton, Middlesex, 
Massachusetts. John and Mary had ten children in the period from 1687 to about 1712. 

Other information: 

John 1 first appeared in Braintree, Massachusetts, where he married Hannah Jewell 
in 1664. Within a few years they moved to Mendon and then to Groton. By 1692 John 
and his second wife, Mary Wattell, had moved to Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts and they 
finally moved to Preston, Connecticut about 1700. 

References: #24 and #199, pp. 15-16. 

366. Jonathan Tracy 

Bom in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut in 1646. 

Died in 1 709, probably in Preston, New London, Connecticut. 

Married first, Mary Griswold in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on July 11, 1672. 

The children of Jonathan and Mary, the first four bom in Norwich and the others in Preston, were: 

1. Jonathan 3 , b. 1674/75. 

2. Hannah 3 , b. 1677. 

3. Christopher 3 , b. 1680. 

3 2 

4. Mary , b. September 7, 1682, m. Benjamin Parish . 

5. Maryam 3 , b. 1685. 

6. David 3 , b. 1687. 

7. Francis 3 , b. 1690. 

8 Sarah 3 , b. 1692, d.y. 

9. Samuel 3 , b. 1697. 
Married second, Mary Richards in August 1711. 
Other information: 

Jonathan* was one of the fifteen persons named in the Act of 1686 creating the 
town of Preston, Connecticut. He was the first town clerk for eighteen years and he was a 
first lieutenant in the militia. 
References: #24, #2 1 7, p. 26, and #2 1 8, pp. 697-698. 

367. Mary Griswold 

Bom in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut on August 26, 1656. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on April 14, 171 1. 

Married Jonathan Tracv in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on July 11, 1672. 

References: #24, #1 15, p. 351, and #217, p. 26. 

704. Edward 2 Parker 
This is the same person as (1436) Edward 2 Parker on this chart. 

160 



Chart VI Biographies 

Born about 1622, probably in England. 

Died in New Haven, Connecticut in 1662. 

Married Elizabeth Woods , the widow of John Potter, in New Haven in July 1646. 

The children of Edward and Elizabeth, all born in New Haven, were: 

1. Mary 3 , bapt. 1648. 

2. John 3 , bapt. October 8, 1648, m. Hannah 2 Bassett . 

3. Hope 3 , b. 1650. 

4. Lydia 3 , b. 1652. 

5. Joseph , b. about 1654. 
Other information: 

Edward moved to the town of New Haven before July 1646. Reference #78 calls 
him John but other evidence points to the name Edward. 
References: #24, #57, #61, #73, #78, and #177, v. VI, p. 1362. 

705. Elizabeth Woods 

This is the same person as (1437) Elizabeth Woods on this chart. 

Bom 1626 or earlier, probably in England. 

Died in New Haven, Connecticut on July 28, 1677. 

Married first, John Potter in New Haven. He died in 1643. 

Married second, Edward Parker in New Haven in July 1646. He died in 1662. 

Married third, Robert Rose about 1664. 

Other information: 

For an unknown reason the elders of the church did not approve of Edward Parker 
and requested Elizabeth (John Potter's widow) "not to receive Edward's attentions." 
Elizabeth would not give up Edward and she was excommunicated. 

References: #24, #57, #61, and #73. 

706. William 1 Bassett 

This is the same person as (1438) William 1 Bassett on this chart. 

Died in New Haven, Connecticut on August 29, 1684. 

Married Hannah Dickermaa the widow of William Ives, in New Haven on November 7, 1648. 

The children of William and Hannah, all born in New Haven, were: 

1. Hannah 2 , b. September 13, 1650, m. John 3 Parker . 

2. John 2 , b. 1652. 

3. Samuel 2 , b. 1654. 

4. Abiah 2 , b. 1657. 
Other information: 

Reference #88 indicates that William's father might have been a John Bassett who 
died in New Haven in 1653, but there is no evidence for this. Therefore, William has been 
shown as the first of the Bassett line and his parents as unknown. 
References: #24, #57, #61, #88, v. I, p. 136, and #177, v. I, pp. 134-135. 



161 



Chart VI Biographies 



707. Hannah Dickerman 



This is the same person as (1439) Hannah Dickerman on this chart. 

Married first, William Ives in New Haven, Connecticut about 1641. William and Hannah had two 

children. William died in 1647/48. 
Married second William 1 Bassett in New Haven on November 7, 1648. 
References: #24, #57, #61, and #88, v. U, pp. 525-526. 

708. Thomas' Beach 

Bom in England about 1628. 

Died in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut in 1662. 

Married Sarah' Piatt in Milford on September 25, 1652. 

The children of Thomas and Sarah, all probably born in Milford, were: 

1. Sarah 2 , b. 1654. 

2. John 2 , b. October 19. 1655. m. Marv 3 Rovce . 

3. Mary 2 , b. 1657. 

4. Samuel 2 , b 1660. 

5. Tophar , b. 1662. 

6. Thomas 

References: #24, #57, #61, #74, pp. 1-6, #75, #177, v. I, pp. 148-149, and #192, p. 1 1 1. 

709. Sarah 2 Piatt 

Baptized in New Haven, Connecticut on September 1 1, 1636. 

Died in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut on March 16, 1670. 

Married first, Thomas Beach in Milford on September 25, 1652. 

Married second, Miles Merwin in Milford about 1665. Sarah and Miles had four daughters. 

References: #24, #57, #61, #74, p. 3, #75, and #177, v. I, p. 148. 

710. Jonathan Royce 

Born about 1637. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut in 1690. 

Married first, Mary Spinning probably in late 1656 and probably while Jonathan was still a 
resident of Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut. Mary died about 1658. Jonathan and Mary 
had one child, Mary Royce . who married John 2 Beach of Wallingford. 

Married second, Deborah Caulkins in Norwich in 1660. Jonathan and Deborah had ten children. 

Other information: 

The birth of the daughter, Mary 3 Royce . and the death of the wife, Mary 2 Spinning , 
probably occurred shortly after the family moved to New London, Connecticut. Later 
Jonathan moved to Norwich and married Deborah Caulkins as his second wife. 
References #24, #75, #177, v. VU, pp. 1549-50, and #192. 

712. Matthias' Hitchcock 
Born in England about 1610. 

162 



Chart VI Biographies 



Died in New Haven, Connecticut on November 16, 1669. 

Married Elizabeth Perry in New Haven about 1639. 

The children of Matthias and Elizabeth, all born in New Haven, were: 

1. Eliakim , b. about 1640. 

2. Nathaniel 2 , b. about 1642. 

2 2 

3. John , b. about 1645. m. Abigail Merriman . 

4. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1651. 

References: #57, #61, and #177, v. HJ, pp. 749-750. 

713. Elizabeth Perry 

Born in England about 1615. 

Died in New Haven, Connecticut in 1676. 

Married Matthias Hitchcock in New Haven about 1639. 

References: #57 and # 1 77, v. m, p. 749. 

714. Nathaniel Merriman 

Born about 1613, probably in England. 

Died in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on February 13, 1693. 

Married Joan . 

Nathaniel and Joan had nine children in the period 1651-1669. My ancestor, Abigail Merriman . 

the third child, was born on April 18, 1654. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel probably came from England, but his time of arrival in America is 

unknown. He was one of the original settlers in Wallingford in 1670. 
References: #57 and #78. 

716. Samuel 2 Andrews 

Born in England in 1632. 

Died in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut on October 6, 1704. 

Married Elizabeth 2 Peck , daughter of William 1 Peck of New Haven, Connecticut. 

Samuel and Elizabeth had thirteen children in the period 1658-1684. At least four died young. My 

ancestor, William 3 Andrews , the fourth child, was born on February 9, 1664, probably in 

New Haven. He married Hannah Parker . 
Other information: 

Samuel was one of the early settlers in Wallingford in 1670. 
References: #24, #78, pp. 9-10, and #177, v. I, p. 1385. 

718. John 3 Parker 
See (352) John 3 Parker on this chart, the same person. 

719. Hannah 2 Bassett 
See (353) Hannah 2 Bassett on this chart, the same person. 

163 



Chart VI Biographies 



724. William 1 Backus 



Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut in June 1664. 
Married first, an unknown wife about 1634. 
William's children by his first wife were: 

1. William 2 

2. Sarah' 

3. Mary* 

4. Lydia 2 

5. Stephen 2 , b. about 1642 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut, m. Sarah Spencer . 

6. Samuel , d.y. 

Married second, Anne Stetson, the widow of Thomas Bingham in Saybrook, Connecticut about 

1659. She died in Norwich, Connecticut in 1670. 
Other information: 

William is usually said to have been born in Norwich, England, but clear proof is 
lacking. The first positive record of William is in Saybrook, Connecticut in 1637. This 
was shortly after the founding of the settlement in 1635. 

It is not known where or when William married his first wife. The order, place, 
and dates of birth of all their six children are also unknown. However, my ancestor, 
Stephen Backus was undoubtedly born in Saybrook. 

In 1659 a group of Saybrook inhabitants bought land from the Indians at a site that 
became Norwich, Connecticut. William moved there in 1660. It is said that the new town 
was named Norwich in honor of William, who was the oldest of the first proprietors and 
presumably was bom in Norwich, England. William was accompanied in the move from 
Saybrook to Norwich by his second wife, his sons, Stephen and William , and his 
daughter, Sarah* Backus Reynolds. William 1 died in Norwich in 1664. 

There is a Francis Backhouse /Backus (ancestor #646) on Chart IV and there is a 
good possibility that he was related to William 1 Backus , but proof is lacking. This is 
discussed on pages 4 and 116 of reference #213. 
References: #24, #76, p. 698a, #88, v. I, p. 89, #213, pp. 4-13, and #220, pp. 1-8. 

726. Gerard Spencer. Jr. 

Baptized in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England on April 25, 1614. 
Died in Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut in 1685. 

Married first, Hannah about 1637. 

Gerard and Hannah had thirteen children in the period 1636-1660. Their fifth child was my 

ancestor, Sarah Spencer , who was born about 1644 and married Stephen 2 Backus . 
Probably married second, Rebecca Porter Clark after 1677. She died in 1682/83. 
Other information: 

Gerard was in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts in 1634 but moved to Lynn, 
Essex, Massachusetts shortly thereafter. In 1662 he moved to Haddam, Connecticut, 
where he was one of the first twenty-eight settlers. The dates and places of birth of the 
children of Gerard and Hannah are unknown. 



164 



Chart VI Biographies 

Gerard had two brothers who also immigrated to America and were my direct line 
ancestors. They were (2506) William 1 Spencer on Chart HI and Thomas 1 Spencer who is 
ancestor number 1574 on Chart VHI and ancestor number 1696 on Chart X. 
References: #24, #67, pp. 10-11, #79, pp. 164-165, #88, v. IV, p. 147, #225, and #264, p. 75. 

730. Thomas Jewell 

Died in Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts in 1654. 

Married first, an unknown wife in Braintree about 1639. 

Married second, Grizzell Fletcher in Braintree about 1641. His widow, Grizzell, married second, 

Humphrey Griggs in 1655, third, Henry Kibby in 1657, fourth, John Gurney in 1661, and 

fifth, John Burge in 1667, all in Braintree. 
The children of Thomas and Grizzell, all born in Braintree, were: 

1. Joseph, b. 1642. 

2. Thomas, twin, b. December 27, 1643. 

3. Hannah , twin, b. December 27, 1643, m. John Parish . 

4. Nathaniel, b. 1648. 

5. Grizzell, b. 1651. 

6. Mercy, b. 1653. 
Other information: 

Thomas was a miller. He came to America on the Planter in April 1635 and 
settled in Braintree. 
References: #24, #85, p. 258, #88, v. 13, p. 548, and #199, p. 15. 

732. Lt. Thomas' Tracy 

Born in England about 1610. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on November 7, 1685. 

Married first, an unknown wife in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut about 1641. 

The children of Thomas and his first wife were: 

1. John 2 , b. 1642. 

2. Thomas 2 , b. 1644. 

3. Jonathan . b. 1646 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut, m. Mary Griswold . 

4. Miriam 2 , b. 1649/50. 

5. Solomon 2 , b. 1650/51. 

6. Daniel 2 , b. 1652. 

7. Samuel 2 , b. 1654. 

Married second, Martha Bourne Bradford, the widow of John Bradford, in Wethersfield about 

1679/80. 
Married third, Mary Foote Goodrich, the widow of John Goodrich, in Norwich in 1683. 
Other information: 

The ancestry of Thomas 1 is uncertain and has been the subject of much debate. 
For discussion of this see reference #33 by Stiles and reference #218 by Waterman and 
Jacobus. 

Thomas 1 was first in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts about 1636. He was a ship- 
carpenter. By about 1637 he had moved to Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, but there 

165 



Chart VI Biographies 

is conflicting evidence as to his moves after that. When Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut 
was settled in 1638, he was one of the "principal planters." About 1641 he married his first 
wife in Wethersfield and later he was one of the men who purchased the new plantation at 
Norwich, Connecticut. However, he was probably in Saybrook for much of his adult life. 

Thomas 1 was active in King Philip's War and served as quarter-master to the 
expedition that invaded the Narragansett country. 
References: #24, #33, pp. 706-709, #88, v. IV, p. 321, #204, #217, p. 26, and #218. 

734. Francis Griswold 

Bom in Kenil worth, Warwickshire, England about 1629. 
Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut in October 1671. 

Married Mary in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut about 1652. She was probably 

Mary Post. 
The children of Francis and Mary were: 

1. Sarah , b. 1653 in Saybrook. 

2. Joseph , b. 1655 in Saybrook, d.y. 

3. Mary . b. August 26, 1656 in Saybrook, m. Johnathan Tracy . 

4. Hannah", b. 1658 in Saybrook. 

5. Deborah , b. 1661 in Norwich. 

6. Lydia , b. 1663 in Norwich, d.y. 

7. Samuel" , b. 1665 in Norwich. 

8 Margaret 3 , b. 1668 in Norwich. 

9. Lydia , b. 1671 in Norwich. 
Other information: 

Francis came to America with his parents in 1639 and settled first in Windsor, 

Hartford, Connecticut. He moved to Saybrook before 1652 and then to Norwich in 1660. 
References: #24, #88, v. n, p. 317, #106, p. 530, #1 15, p. 351, and #217, pp. 15-16. 

1408. William' Parker 

This is the same person as (2872) William' Parker on this chart. 
Born about 1 582, probably in England. 
Married about 1617, probably in England, wife unknown. 
The children of William, all probably born in England, were: 
1 William 2 , b. about 1618. 

2. Ralph 2 , b. about 1620. 

3. Edward 2 , b. about 1622, m. Elizabeth Woods . 
Other information: 

William 's origin and his time of arrival in America are unknown. Another problem 
about William's history is that reference #78 says his third son was John, not Edward, but 
other evidence points to the name Edward. 
References: #24, #57, and #78, p. 266. 



166 



Chart VI Biographies 

1418. Richard 1 Piatt 

Little is known about Richard except that he came from New Haven, Connecticut and was in 
Milford, New Haven, Connecticut by 1646. He was the husband of Mary Wood . Their 
daughter was Sarah Piatt , who was baptized in New Haven on September 1 1, 1636 and 
married Thomas Beach . 

References: #57, #74, and #76, p. 639. 

1420. Robert' Rovce 

Born in England, probably about 1610. 
Died in New London, Connecticut in 1676. 

Married Mary . She was probably Mary Sims of Long Sutton, Somersetshire, England. 

The children of Robert and Mary were: 

1. Sarah 2 , b. about 1635. 

2. Nehemiah , b. about 1636. 

2 2 

3. Jonathan , b. about 1637. m. Mary Spinning . 

4. Samuel 

5. Nathaniel 2 , b. 1639 

6. Isaac 

7. Ruth 2 
Other information: 

Robert and his family were in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut probably as early as 
1644. By 1647 they had moved from Stratford to New London, where Robert died in 
1676. About 1688 Mary moved to Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut, probably with 
her son, Samuel, and died there on July 14, 1697. 
References: #24, #75, #78, p. 284, #125, #177, v. VJJ, pp. 1549-50, and #192. 

1422. Humphrey 1 Spinning 

The information on Humphrey is incomplete. He was in New Haven, Connecticut, at least 
temporarily, as early as December 1639. His place of origin is unknown, but it was 
probably England. He apparently also lived in Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut and 
possibly in Elizabeth, New Jersey at some time. His first wife, who was the mother of my 
ancestor, Mary 2 Spinning , died and he remarried. Humphrey had lands in Delaware Bay at 
the time of his death in 1656. 

References: #75 and # 1 77, v. VTI, p. 1 697. 

1432. William 1 Andrews 

Born in England, probably between 1600 and 1610. 
Died in East Haven, New Haven, Connecticut on March 4, 1676. 
Married first, an unknown wife. She died in 1663. 
The children of William and his first wife were: 
1 . William 2 , b. in England. 



2. Samuel . b. 1 632 in England, m. Elizabeth Peck . 



3. Nathan 2 , b. 1638. 



167 



Chart VI Biographies 

4-6. Probably three daughters. 

Married second, Anna Gibbands in 1665. 

Other information: 

William 1 was a carpenter in Hampsworth, England. He was one of fifty-three men 
who snipped out of Hampton, fifteen miles from London, in April 1635 on board the 
James of London, which landed in Boston. Several of the fifty-three men had their wives 
and children with them but no record of their names was kept. William was one of the 
early settlers in New Haven and he built the first meeting house there in 1644. 

References: #78 and # 1 77, v. I, pp. 40-4 1 . 

1434. William 1 Peck 

Bom about 1604. 

Died in New Haven, Connecticut on October 14, 1694. 

Married first, Elizabeth in England, possibly as early as 1621. She died in 1683. 

The children of William and Elizabeth all probably bom in New Haven, were: 

1 . Jeremiah 

2. John 2 , b. about 1638. 

3. Joseph", bapt. 1640. 

4. Elizabeth , bapt. May 6, 1643, m. Samuel Andrews . 

Married second, Sarah , the widow of William Holt. 

References: #24, #78, p. 9, #177, v. VI, pp. 1383-1385, and #191. 

1436. Edward 2 Parker 

See (704) Edward Parker on this chart, the same person. 

1437. Elizabeth Woods 

See (705) Elizabeth Woods on this chart, the same person. 

1438. William 1 Bassett 

See (706) William Bassett on this chart, the same person. 

1439. Hannah Dickerman 
See (707) Hannah Dickerman on this chart, the same person. 

1452. Gerard Spencer. Sr. 

Also known as Gerald and Jarrard Spencer. This is the same person as (3 148) Gerard Spencer. Sr. 

on Chart VIII and (3392) Gerard Spencer. Sr on Chart X. 
Baptized in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England on May 20, 1576. 

Married Alice Whitbred in Upper Gravenhurst, Bedford, England on November 10, 1600. 
The children of Gerard and Alice, all bom in Stotfold, England, were: 

1 William', bapt October 1 1 , 1 60 1 , m. Agnes Pratt for Tucker) . 

2 Elizabeth, bapt. 1602. 

168 



Chart VI Biographies 

3. John, bapt. 1603/04, d.y. 

4. Henry, bapt. 1605, d.y. 

5. Thomas . bapt. March 29, 1607, m. first, Ann Derifield , m. second, Sarah 2 
Bearding . 

6. Richard, bapt. 1608, d.y. 

7. A son, b. 1609/10, d.y. 

8. Michael, bapt. 1611. 

9. Gerard . bapt. April 25, 1614, m. Hannah . 

Other information: 

Four of Gerard's sons immigrated to America. They were William, Thomas, 
Michael, and Gerard, Jr. The following three were my direct line ancestors: 
William 1 , number 2506 on Chart UJ. 

Thomas 1 , number 1574 on Chart VJJJ and number 1696 on Chart X. 
Gerard , number 726 on this chart. 
References: #27, pp. 555-557, #67, pp. 5-8, #79, pp. 79-87, and #225. 

1468. Edward' Griswold 

Baptized in Wooten Wawen, Warwickshire, England on July 26, 1607. 

Died in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut in 1690. Killingworth is now Clinton. 

Married first, Margaret in England about 1628. She was probably Margaret Hicks 

who died in 1670. Her gravestone, marked "M.G. 1670," is the oldest stone in the 

cemetery behind the Congregational Church in Clinton. 
The children of Edward and Margaret were: 

1. Francis 2 , b. about 1629 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire,England, m. Mary . 

2. Sarah 2 , bapt. 1 63 1/32 in Kenilworth. 

3. George , bapt. 1633 in Kenilworth. 

4. John 2 , bapt. 1635/36 in Kenilworth, d. 1642 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 

5. Lydia , bapt. 1637 in Kenilworth, d.y. 

6. Ann 2 , bapt. 1642 in Windsor. 

7. Mary 2 , bapt. 1644 in Windsor. 

8. Deborah 2 , bapt. 1646 in Windsor. 

9. Joseph 2 , bapt. 1647/48 in Windsor. 

1 0. Samuel 2 , bapt. 1 649 in Windsor. 
Married second, Sarah, the widow of James Bemis, in 1672. 
Other information: 

Edward and his brother, Matthew, came to America in 1639 with Rev. Huit's party 
and settled in Windsor, Connecticut. Edward was thirty-two at that time and he brought 
his wife and children, Francis 2 . Sarah 2 , George 2 , and John 2 . Matthew was unmarried at 
that time and soon moved to Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut. Both brothers were 
referred to as "Mr." which distinguished them from yeomen or tradesmen and indicated 
that they were men of education and property. 

About 1663 Edward moved to a new settlement, Killingworth, Connecticut, of 

which he was the principal promoter. 



169 



Chan VI Biographies 

References: #24, #88, v. U, p. 316, #106, p. 530, #115, pp. 346-351, #155, pp. 157-158, and 
#217, pp. 11-14. 

2872. William 1 Parker 
See (1408) William' Parker on this chart, the same person. 

2904. Michael Spencer 

Bom between 1530 and 1535, probably in Edworth, Bedfordshire, England. 
Living in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England, in 1599. 

Married first, Agnes Limer in Edworth on January 20, 1555/56. She died in 1562. 
The children of Michael and Agnes, all bom in Edworth, were: 

1. John, bapt. 1557. 

2. Michael, bapt. 1558. 

3. Anne, bapt. 1560. 

Married second, Elizabeth about 1563. She died in Stotfold in 1599. 

The children of Michael and Elizabeth, the first four bom in Edworth and the last two bom in 
Stotfold, were: 

1. Joan, bapt. 1564. 

2. Alice, bapt. 1 566. 

3. Catherine 

4. Thomas, bapt. 1571. 

5. Gerard , bapt. May 20, 1 576, m. Alice Whitbred . 

6. Richard, bapt. 1580. 
References: #79, pp. 81-82 and #225. 

2936. George Griswold 

Baptized in Wooten Wawen, Warwickshire, England on November 6, 1574. 
Died after 1622 

Married first, DousabeJ . She died in August 1615. 

George and Dousabel had one child, my ancestor, Edward 1 Griswold , baptized in Wooten Wawen 

on July 26, 1607 
Married second, an unknown wife about 1616. They lived in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England 

and had two children, Mathew, bom about 1620 and Thomas, bom about 1622. 
Reference: #217, pp. 10-11. 



170 



CHART VII - Laura 6 Whitney 





CORNELIUS' 

WHITNEY 


92 


JOSHUA 4 
WHITNEY 




JOSHUA 2 
WHITNEY 


736 JOHN 1 WHITNEY 






184 




737 Elinor 






CORNELIUS 3 

WHITNEY 


1635-1719 

Abigail- 
Tarbell 






738 THOMAS 1 TARBELL 






it*. 1680 -abt 1757 






739 Marv 






Sarah 
Shepherd 


Unknown 






740 






1724- 1814 
Unknown 


185 






741 






Unknown 






742 












371 

372 


743 










If 


744 






1761 -aft. 1820 
*A« 


93 






745 
















746 






186 


373 
374 






747 












748 














749 












750 














375 


751 










u 







23 WHITNEY Laura m. Asa 7 Parker (Chart VI). 





JOSEPH 2 
CADY 


376 


NICHOLAS 1 
CADY 


752 Unknown 




188 

BENJAMIN 3 






Judith 2 
Knapp 


753 Unknown 








1666- 1742 

Sarah 3 

Davis 


377 
378 


754 WILLIAM 1 KNAPP 








SAMUEL 2 

r»Avis 


755 Meve 






CADY 






SARAH 4 
CADY 


at* 1707- 1788 

189 

190 

ELIZABETH 4 
CHURCH 


756 BARNABAS 1 DAVIS 








1636- 1699 

MARY 2 

WATERS 


757 Patience 








1667- 

DAVID 3 
CHURCH 


379 
380 


758 LAWRENCE 1 WATERS 








1638- 1713 

DAVID 2 
CHURCH 


759 Anne- Linton 


47 




1759- 


760 GARRETT 1 CHURCH 








1657- 
Mary 


761 Sarah 








Unknown 


381 
382 


762 Unknown 






95 




763 Unknown 


1713-1788 


764 






A name in capitals indicates that a 




765 


biography is included for that 191 




individual The biographies follow 




383 


766 


this chart. 








767 







172 



1472 
1473 
1474 
1475 


Thomas Whitney 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


1476 
1477 
1478 
1479 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


1480 
1481 
1482 
1483 




1484 
1485 
1486 
1487 




1488 
1489 
1490 
1491 




1492 
1493 
1494 
1495 




1496 
1497 
1498 
1499 




1500 
1501 
1502 
1503 




1504 
1505 
1506 
1507 




1508 
1509 
1510 
1511 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


1512 James Davis 

1513 Unknown 

1514 Unknown 

1515 Unknown 



CHART VII - Laura 6 Whitney 



2944 Unknown 2945 Unknown 

2946 2947 

2948 2949 

2950 2951 

2952 2953 

2954 2955 

2956 2957 

2958 2959 

2960 2961 

2962 2963 

2964 2965 

2966 2967 

2968 2969 

2970 2971 

2972 2973 

2974 2975 



2976 2977 

2978 2979 

2980 2981 

2982 2983 

2984 2985 

2986 2987 

2988 2989 

2990 2991 

2992 2993 

2994 2995 

2996 2997 

2998 2999 

3000 3001 

3002 3003 

3004 3005 

3006 3007 



3008 3009 

3010 3011 

3012 3013 

3014 3015 

3016 3017 

3018 3019 

3020 3021 

3022 3023 

3024 Unknown 3025 Unknown 

3026 3027 

3028 3029 

3030 3031 



1516 Unknown 3032 3033 

1517 Unknown 3034 3035 

1518 RICHARD 1 LINTON 3036 Unknown 3037 Unknown 

1519 Elizabeth 3038 Unknown 3039 Unknown 



1520 Unknown 3040 3041 

1521 Unknown 3042 3043 

1522 3044 3045 

1523 3046 3047 

1524 3048 3049 

1525 3050 3051 

1526 3052 3053 

1527 3054 3055 

1528 3056 3057 

1529 3058 3059 

1530 3060 3061 

1531 3062 3063 

1532 3064 3065 

1533 3066 3067 

1534 3068 3069 

1535 3070 3071 



173 



Chart VII Biographies 

23. Laura Whitney 
See (23) Laura Whitney on Chart L the same person. 

46. Cornelius Whitney 

Born in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut in 1761. 

Died in Ontario, Wayne, New York after 1820. 

Married Sarah Cady on October 19, 1785 either in Killingly or in Granville, Washington, New 

York. 
The children of Cornelius and Sarah, all probably born in Granville, were: 

1. Matilda 6 , b. 1786. 

2. Benjamin 6 , b. 1788. 

3. Lametine 6 , b. 1790. 



4. Laura . b. March 17, 1797, m. Asa Parker . 

5. Loren 6 ,b. 1799. 

6. Sidney 6 , b. 1801. 
Other information: 

Cornelius settled early in Granville, Washington, New York with his father and 
brothers. Cornelius built the hotel in Middle Granville but Roger Wing purchased it before 
it was completed in 1804. The 1820 census shows that Cornelius was still in Granville but 
sometime after that he moved to Wayne County, New York, where he died. 
References: #57, #58, pp. 198 and 200, #135, p. 76, and #188 

47. Sarah Cady 

Born in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut on December 8, 1759. 

Married Cornelius 5 Whitney on October 19, 1785 either in Killingly or in Granville, Washington, 

New York. 
Reference: #135, p. 76. 

92. Joshua 4 Whitney 

Born in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut on December 1, 1724. 

Died in 1814, probably in Killingly but possibly in Hancock, Berkshire, Massachusetts. 

Married an unknown wife, probably about 1751. 

Joshua's children, all probably born in Killingly, were: 



1. 


Joseph 5 , b. 1753. 


2. 


Matthias 5 , b. 1757. 


3. 


Cornelius 5 , b. 1761. m. Sarah 4 Cadv. 


4. 


Isaac 


5. 


Rufiis 5 


6. 


Joshua 5 , b. 1769. 


7. 


Joanna 


Other information: 



175 



Chart VII Biographies 

Extensive research in Salt Lake City (reference #228) has failed to determine the 
name or ancestry of Joshua 's wife. 
References: #135, p. 43, #175, p. 59, and #228. 

94. Benjamin Cady 

Bom in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut about 1 707. 

Died in Killingly on November 1, 1788. 

Married Elizabeth 4 Church in Killingly on November 24, 1733. 

The children of Benjamin and Elizabeth, all bom in Killingly, were: 

1. Zerviah 4 , b. 1734. 

2. John 4 , b. 1736. 

3. Benjamin , b. 1738. 

4. Damans , b. 1740. 

5. Joseph 4 , b 1743. 

6. Penuel 4 ,b. 1745. 

7. Rebecca 4 , b. 1748. 

8. Nedabiah 4 ,b. 1750. 

9. Perley 4 , b 1754. 

10. Sarah 4 , b. December 8, 1759, m. Cornelius 5 Whitney . 
Reference: #135, p. 43. 

95. Elizabeth 4 Church 

Bom in 1713. 

Died on July 6, 1788. 

Married Benjamin Cady in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut on November 24, 1733. 

Other Information: 

i 3 9 

Elizabeth Church was the daughter of David Church . See (380), David Church , 
for a discussion of the probable ancestry of Elizabeth and her father, David . 
References: #135, p. 43 and #139, p. 394. 

184. Cornelius 3 Whitney 

Bom in Groton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, probably about 1 680. 
Died in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut, probably about 1757. 
Married Sarah Shepherd in Groton, probably about 1713. 
The children of Cornelius and Sarah were: 

1. Sarah 4 , b 1715. 

2. Abigail 4 , b. 1717. 

3. Matthias 4 , b. 1720. 

4. Mary 4 , b 1722. 

Joshua . b December 1, 1724 in Killingly. The name of his wife is unknown. 

6. Lydia 4 , b 1729. 

7. Sarah 4 , b. 1731. 



176 



Chart VII Biographies 



8. Susanna 4 , bapt. 1734. 



Other information: 

Cornelius lived in Groton until 1707 when he moved elsewhere on account of 
Indian hostilities. Cornelius was a soldier in Queen Anne's War. Sometime after that he 
returned to Groton, where he married Sarah Shepherd. Cornelius lived in Groton but 
moved to Killingly, Connecticut in 1737. 

Extensive research by in Salt Lake City (reference #228) has failed to determine 
the ancestry of Cornelius' wife, Sarah Shepherd. All that is known is that she probably died 
in Groton or shortly after the family moved to Killingly in 1737. 
References: #175, p. 36, #178, and #228. 

188. Capt. Joseph 2 Cadv 

Born in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts on May 28, 1666. Watertown is five miles west of 

Boston. 
Died in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut on December 29, 1742. 
Married Sarah 3 Davis in Groton, Middlesex, Massachusetts in 1689. She was bom in Groton on 

June 12, 1667. 
The children of Joseph and Sarah, all except the last three born in Groton, were: 

1. Joseph 3 , b. 1690. 

2. William 3 , b. 1692. 

3. James 3 , b. 1694. 

4. Isaac 3 , b. 1696/97. 

5. Abigail 3 , b. 1699. 

6. Stephen 3 , b. 1701. 

7. David 3 , b. 1 703 in Killingly. 

8. Jonathan 3 , b. about 1705 in Killingly. 

9. Benjamin 3 , b. about 1 707 in Killingly, m. Elizabeth Church . 
Other information: 

In 1668 Joseph 2 moved with his family from Watertown to Groton; he was about 

two years old. During the Indian attack of March 1676 in King Philip's War he and the 

rest of the townspeople were rescued and removed to Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts. 

In 1691-92 during King William's War he was in service with his brothers, John, Daniel, 

and Nicholas in defense of Groton. 

Joseph was an innkeeper from 1699 to 1701. In 1702 he disposed of his real estate 
and moved his family to Killingly, Connecticut, where he spent the rest of his life. 
References: #24, #88, v. I, p. 327, and #135, pp. 22-25. 

190. David 3 Church 

There is no direct evidence for David 3 Church . See (380) David 2 Church for a discussion of the 
probable ancestry of David . 



177 



Chart VII Biographies 

368. Joshua 2 Whitney 

Bom in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts on July 5, 1635. He was the first of the family bom 

in America and his mother was carrying him when the family emigrated from London to 

America in April 1635. 
Died in Groton, Mddlesex, Massachusetts on August 7, 1719. He is buried in the old burying 

ground in Groton. 
Married first, Lydia in Groton about 1665. She probably died in October 1668 in 

childbirth. 
The children of Joshua and Lydia, both bom in Groton, were: 

1. Joshua", b. 1666. 

2. Sarah 3 , b. 1668. 

Married second, Mary in Watertown about 1670 or 1671. She died in Groton on 

March 1 7, 1672. There were probably no children by this union. 
Married third, Abigail* Tarbell in Watertown on September 30, 1672. 
The children of Joshua and Abigail were: 

1. Abigail 3 , b. 1673. 

2. Mary 3 , b. 1675. 

3. William 3 , b. 1678. 

4. Cornelius . b probably about 1680 in Groton, m. Sarah Shepherd . 

5. David 3 , b. 1682. 

6. Martha 3 

7. Elizabeth 3 
8 Alice 3 

9. Hannah 

10. Eleanor 3 

The dates and places of birth of many of Joshua's and Abigail's children are unknown. 

Other information: 

The record of Joshua's moves between Groton and Watertown is uncertain. 
However, he was one of the earliest settlers and original proprietors of Groton. He 
probably lived there until it was burned by the Indians during King Philip's War in the 
spring of 1 676. He returned to Watertown for a few years and then went back to Groton. 

References: #24 and #1 75, pp. 24-26. 

376. Nicholas Cady 

Bom in England 

Probably died in Groton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, date unknown. 
Married Judith Knapp in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts about 1649. 
The children of Nicholas and Judith, all bom in Watertown, were: 

1. John 2 , b. 1650/51. 

2. Judy 2 , b. 1653. 

3. James 2 , b. 1655. 

4. Nicholas 2 , b. 1657, d.y. 

5. Daniel 2 , b. 1659. 



178 



Chart VII Biographies 

6. Ezekiel 2 , b. 1662, d.y. 

7. Nicholas 2 , b. 1663/64. 

8. Joseph 2 , b. May 28, 1666, m. Sarah 3 Davis . 
Other information: 

The date of birth and place of origin in England for Nicholas 1 is unknown. 
Nicholas was a carpenter and he was closely associated with the Knapp family. In 1645 
he was in a partnership with his future brother-in-law, John Knapp. Nicholas may have 
come to America in 1630 as an apprentice with his future father-in-law, William Knapp . 
Possibly they all came from Suffolk County in England and settled in Watertown. 

In 1668 Nicholas sold his estate and moved to Groton. Then in March 1676, 
during King Philip's War, Groton was assaulted and burned by the Indians. A force was 
sent to rescue the inhabitants and they sought shelter in Concord, Middlesex, 
Massachusetts. Nicholas returned to Groton in 1683. 
References: #24, #85, p. 87, #88, v. I, p. 327, #135, pp. 13-18, and #174, pp. 282 and 1107. 

378. Samuel 2 Davis 

Born in Charlestown (now part of Boston), Massachusetts in 1636. 

Died in Groton, Mddlesex, Massachusetts on December 28, 1699. 

Married Mary Waters in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts on March 20, 1656. 

The children of Samuel and Mary, all probably born in Groton, were: 

1. Daughter 3 , b. 1662. 

2. John 3 , b. 1664. 

3. Sarah 3 , b. June 12. 1667 in Groton. m. Joseph Cadv . 

4. Samuel 3 , b. 1669. 

5. Barnabas 3 , b. 1672. 

6. Daughter 3 , b. 1674. 

References: #24, #88, v. U, p. 21, #135, p. 23, and #209. The marriage of Samuel and Mary is 
from page 20 of the Lancaster vital records. The birth of Sarah in 1667 is from 
page 64 of the Groton vital records. 

379. Mary 2 Waters 

Born in 1638. 

Died in 1713, probably in Groton, Middlesex, Massachusetts. 

Married Samuel 2 Davis in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts on March 20, 1656. 

References: #24, #88, v. H, p. 21, and #135, p. 23. 

380. David 2 Church 

Born in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts on September 1, 1657. 

Married Mary in Watertown about 1685. 

Two children were born to David and Mary in Watertown. They were: 

1. John 3 , bapt. November 6, 1687. 

2. Sarah 3 , bapt. October 6, 1689. 
Other information: 

179 



Chart VII Biographies 

David 2 was an innkeeper in Watertown. He may also have been briefly in 
Marlborough, Middlesex, Massachusetts, but about 1708 he moved to Killingly, Windham, 
Connecticut. 

David 2 must have had other children besides the two born in Watertown because 
(95) Elizabeth 4 Church , daughter of a David Church, married (94) Benjamin Cady in 
Killingly in 1733. She was born in 1713. If Elizabeth 4 Church was the daughter of David 2 
Church , she would have been born when he was fifty-six years old and twenty-four years 
after David's daughter, Sarah, was born in Watertown. 

It seems more likely that David" Church had another son, David Church , and that 
(95) Elizabeth 4 Church was the daughter of this David . The cessation of children after 
Sarah has led to the supposition that David lost his wife and that he married again, another 

Mary . She then would have been the mother of David . There is no direct 

evidence for this David but I have assumed that he existed and have shown him on Chart 

vn. 

References: #24, #88, v. I, pp. 382-390, #135, p. 43, #139, and #183, pp. 3-4. 

736. John' Whitney 

Bom in England in 1 589. His father was Thomas Whitney . 
Died in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts on June 1, 1673. 

Married first, Elinor in England. She died in Watertown in May 1659. 

The children of John and Elinor, the first six bom in England and the last three bom in Watertown, 

were: 

1 Mary 2 , bapt. 1619, d.y. 

2. John 2 , b. 1620. 

3. Richard 2 , b. 1625. 

4. Nathaniel 2 , b. 1627. 

5. Thomas 2 , b. 1629. 

6. Jonathan 2 , b. 1634. 

7. Joshua 2 , b July 5, 1635, m. Abigail 2 Tarbell . 

8. Caleb 2 , b. 1640, d.y. 

9. Benjamin, b. 1643. 

Married second, Judith Clement in Watertown in September 1659. She died before John. There 

were no children by this union. 
Other information: 

John and his wife, Elinor, emigrated from London to America with their first five 
surviving children on the Elizabeth and Ann in April 1635. They settled and lived in 
Watertown, which is now a suburb of Boston. John 1 was a tailor. 
References: #85, p. 495 and #175, p. 22. 

738. Thomas' Tarbell 

Bom about 1618, probably in England. 

Died in Charlestown (now part of Boston) on June 11, 1678. 



180 



Chart VII Biographies 

Married first, Mary in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts about 1644. She died in 

1674. 
Thomas and Mary had two sons and two daughters, one of whom was Abigail 2 Tarbell . who 

married Joshua Whitney. 
Married second, Susanna Lawrence, a widow, in Charlestown about 1676. 
Other information: 

In 1662 Thomas and Mary moved from Watertown to Groton, Middlesex, 

Massachusetts where he erected a flour mill. 
References: #24 and #85, p. 446. 

754. William 1 Knapp 

Born in England in 1578. 

Died in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts on August 30, 1658. 

Married first, Meye in England about 1609. 

The children of William and Meye, all born in England, were: 

1. William 2 

2. John 2 , b. 1624. 

3. James , b. 1627. 

4. Mary 

5. Judith . m. Nicholas Cady . 

6. Anne 

7. Elizabeth 

Married second, the widow Priscilla Akers about 1655. There were no children by this union. 
Other information: 

William was a carpenter. He came to America in 1630 in the Winthrop fleet with 
Sir Richard Saltonstall and was one of the first settlers in Watertown. The order of birth of 
William's children is uncertain. He brought all except Elizabeth to America with him. 
References: #24, #85, p. 273, #88, v. TU, p. 34, #107, p. 78, #135, pp. 14-15, and #176, pp. 5- 
7. 

756. Barnabas' Davis 

Born in Tewksbury, England in 1 599. His father was James Davis . 

Died in Charlestown (now part of Boston), Massachusetts on November 27, 1685. 

Married Patience in Charlestown about 1636. 

One of the children of Barnabas and Patience was Samuel Davis , who married Mary Waters. 
Other information: 

Barnabas came to America on the Blessing in July 1635 at age thirty-six. He 
settled in Charlestown. 
References: #24, #85, p. 13 1, #88, v. JJ, p. 15, and #209. 

758. Lawrence 1 Waters 

Born in England in 1602. 

Died in Charlestown (now part of Boston), Massachusetts on December 9, 1687. 



181 



Chart VU Biographies 

Married .Anne 2 Linton in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts about 1633. 
The children of Lawrence and Anne, the first six born in Watertown and the last six born in 
Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts, were: 

1. Lawrence', b. 1634. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1636. 

3. Mary 2 , b. January 27, 1637/38, m. Samuel 2 Davis . 

4. Rebecca 2 , b. 1639, d.y. 

5. Daniel 2 , b. 1641. 

6. Stephen 2 , b. 1642. 

7. Joseph 2 , b. 1647. 

8. Jacob 2 , b. 1649. 

9. Rachael 2 , b. 1649, d.y. 

10. Samuel 2 , b 1651. 

11. Johannarf, b. 1652, d.y. 

12. Ephraim 2 , b 1655, d.y. 
Other information: 

Lawrence was a carpenter. He was in Watertown, Massachusetts by about 1633. 

In 1 643 he was one of three men in Watertown who were employed to go thirty miles 

west to build new houses as the beginning of a new settlement in Lancaster, Worcester, 

Massachusetts The other two were his father-in-law, Richard Linton , and John Ball. By 

the spring of 1653 there were nine families established in Lancaster. 

Lawrence became a prominent citizen in Lancaster, but he moved to Charlestown, 
Massachusetts in 1675. He probably moved as a result of Indian hostilities during King 
Philip's war. On August 22, 1675 eight persons were killed in Lancaster. Then, on 
February 22, 1676 when the most severe Indian attack occurred most of the buildings in 
Lancaster were burned and forty persons of the total 300 population were either killed on 
the spot or carried into captivity. 
References: #24, #85, p. 481, #88, v. IV, p. 434, #209, and #210, pp. 38-42 and 61. 

760. Garrett' Church 

Born in 1611, probably in England. 

Married Sarah about 1636, probably in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts. 

The children of Garrett and Sarah, all bom in Watertown, were: 

1. John 2 , b. 1638. 

2. Samuel 2 , b. 1640 

3. Sarah 2 , b 1643. 

4. Mary 2 , b. 1644. 

5. Jonathan 2 , b 1646. 

6. David' , b September 1, 1657, m. Mary 



References: #24, #85, p. 99, #88, v. I, p. 382-390, and #183, pp. 3-4. 

1518. Richard' Linton 
Born in Somersetshire, England. 



182 



Chart VTJ Biographies 

Died in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts on March 30, 1665. 

Married Elizabeth in England about 1612. 

One of the children of Richard and Elizabeth was Anne 2 Linton , who married Lawrence 1 Waters . 

Other information: 

Richard was probably at Governor Cradock's plantation in Medford, Middlesex, 
Massachusetts by 1630 and in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts by 1638. In 1643 
Richard was one of three men from Watertown who were employed to go thirty miles west 
to build houses as the beginning of a new settlement in Lancaster, Massachusetts. The 
other two were his son-in-law, Lawrence Walters , and John Ball. By the spring of 1653 
there were nine families established in Lancaster. Very little is known of Richard and his 
estate was very small when he died in 1665. 

References: #24, #85, p. 287, #88, v. UL p. 97, #209, and #210, pp. 38-42 and 61. 



183 



CHART VIII - Horace 6 Sheldon 





96 

ARASTUS 5 
SHELDON 


192 

JONATHAN 4 
SHELDON. HI. 


JONATHAN 3 
SHELDON. JR. 




JONATHAN 2 

SHELDON. SR 


768 ISAAC 1 SHELDON 










1687- 1769 

MARY 

SOUTHWELL 


769 MEHTTABLE- GUNN 








1711- 1761 

Sarah 5 
Kent 


385 
386 


770 WILLIAM SOUTHWELL 








1688- 1768 

SAMUEL 4 
KENT. DJ 


771 Sarah 3 Stebbins 








1737- 1814 

193 

194 

Abigail 5 
Loomis 


772 SAMUEL 3 KENT, JR 








1685-1763 

Esther 3 
Phelps 


773 Priscilla Hunter 








1715 -1807 

ODIAH 4 
LOOMIS 


387 


774 JOSEPH 2 PHELPS 








1691- 

TTMOTHY 3 
LOOMIS 


775 ESTHER 3 HOSFORD 








1770- 1840 

97 
ACE 6 


776 JOHN 2 LOOMIS 










1661 - 1710 

Rebecca 3 
Porter 


777 Elizabeth 2 Scott 








1705-1794 

JANE 

ALLYN 


389 
390 


778 JOHN 2 PORTER JR. 








-1750 
Unknown 


779 Marv 2 Stanley 








1740- 

195 


780 








Unknown 


781 








1716- 1805 


391 


782 










783 


m 





Horace m. Caroline 4 Cross (Chart IX). 
1802- 1888 







DAN 5 

KING 


196 


NATHANIEL 4 
KING 


392 


JAMES 3 
KING. JR. 


784 JAMES 2 KING. SR. 










1675-1757 

Elizabeth 
Huxlev 


785 ELIZABETH 2 FULLER 








1712- 1802 

Anne 4 

Trumbull 


393 
394 


786 THOMAS HUXLEY 








-1745 

JOSEPH 3 
TRUMBULL 


787 Sarah 2 Spencer 




98 








EUNICE* 
KJNG 




1739- 1816 

HANNAH 5 

HARMON 


197 
198 


788 JUDAH 2 TRUMBULL 








1676- 1713 

Ann 
Towslev 


789 Marv Pritchard 








1710- 

BENJAMIN 4 
HARMON 


395 


790 MICHAEL TOWS! FY 








1683- 

NATHANIEL 3 
H.ARMON 


791 \L\RY HUSSEY 








1773- 1830 


792 JOHN 2 HARMON 










1653/54- 1712 

MARY 3 

SKINNER 


793 Elizabeth 








1711-1795 

HANNAH 3 
JAOUES 




794 JOSEPH 2 SKINNER 








39T 


1667- 1730 

DANIEL 2 
JAOUES 


795 MARY 2 FILLEY 


99 








1746- 1843 
1 


199 


796 HENRY 1 JAQUES 






A name in capitals indicates that f 




1666-67- 
Unknown 


797 Anna Knight 


biography is included for thai 
individual. The biographies follow 




1716- 1800 




798 












799 







184 



CHART VIII - Horace 6 Sheldon 



1536 RALPH SHELDON 

1 537 Barbara Stone 

1538 THOMAS' GUNN 

1539 Unknown 

1540 LInknown 

1541 Unknown 

1542 JOHN 2 STEBBINS 

1543 Abigail Bartlett 

1544 SAMUEL 2 KENT, SR. 

1545 FRANCES 2 WOODALL 

1546 William Hunter 

1547 Unknown 

1548 GEORGE ' PHELPS 

1549 Phillurv 2 Randall 

1550 JOHN r HOSFORD 

1551 Phillipa 2 Thrall 



3072 ARTHUR SHELDON 
3074 Unknown 
3076 Unknown 
3078 

3080 

3082 

3084 ROWLAND' STEBBINS 

3086 Unknown 

3088 THOMAS' KENT 
3090 Edward 1 Woodall 
3092 Unknown 
3094 

3096 Unknown 
3098 PHILIP' RANDALL 
3100 WILLIAM' HOSFORD 
3102 WILLIAM' THRALL 



3073 Unknown 
3075 Unknown 
3077 Unknown 
3079 

3081 

3083 

3085 Sarah' Whiting 

3087 Unknown 



Seeref. #21 for 

Sheldon 
English ancestry. 



3089 

3091 Mary 

3093 Unknown 
3095 

3097 Unknown 
3099 Unknown 
3101 Unknown 
3103 Unknown 



Noyes 



1552 JOSEPH' LOOMIS 

1553 M-VRY 1 WHITE 



1554 THOMAS 

1555 Ann 



SCOTT 



1556 JOHN' PORTER, SR. 

1557 Rose 1 White 

1558 THOMAS' STANLEY 

1559 BENET' SHEPARD 

1560 
1561 
1562 
1563 



3104 John Loomis 

3106 Robert White 

3108 Unknown 

3110 Unknown 

3112 Unknown 

3114 Robert White 

3116 Unknown 

3118 John Shepard 

3120 
3122 
3124 
3126 



3105 Agnes Lyngwood 
3107 Bridgett Allgar 
3109 Unknown 
3111 Unknown 

3113 Unknown 
3115 Bridgett Allgar 
3117 Unknown 
3119 Rebecca Waller 

3121 
3123 
3125 
3127 



Seeref. #30 for 

Loomis 
English ancestry. 



Seeref. #120 for 

Porter 
English ancestry. 



1564 
1565 
1566 
1567 



3128 
3130 
3132 
3134 



3129 
3131 
3133 
3135 



1568 WILIJAM' KING 

1569 Agnes Elwill 

1570 JOHN' FULLER 

1571 Elizabeth- Emerson 



3136 William King 

3138 Unknown 

3140 Unknown 

3142 THOMAS' EMERSON 



1572 Unknown 

1573 Unknown 

1574 THOMAS 1 SPENCER 

1575 Sarah* Bearding 


3144 

3146 

3148 GERARD SPENCEF 

3150 NATHANIEL' B£A 


1576 JOHN' TRUMBULL 

1577 Elinor 1 Chandler 

1578 William Pritchard 

1579 Unknown 


3152 Unknown 
3154 Unknown 
3156 Unknown 
3158 


1580 Unknown 

1581 Unknown 

1582 Unknown 

1583 Unknown 




3160 
3162 
3164 
3166 


1584 FRANCIS' 

1585 Unknown 

1586 Unknown 

1587 Unknown 


HARMON 


3168 Unknown 

3170 

3172 

3174 


1588 JOHN' SKINNER 

1589 MARY 2 LOOMIS 

1590 WILLIAM 1 FILLEY 

1591 Margaret 


3176 Unknown 

3178 JOSEPH' LOOMIS 

3180 Unknown 

3182 Unknown 


1592 Unknown 

1593 Unknown 

1594 Unknown 

1595 Unknown 




3184 
3186 
3188 
3190 


15% 
1597 
1598 
1599 




3192 
3194 
3196 
3198 



3137 Christina Lapp 

3139 Unknown 

3141 Unknown 

3143 ELIZABETH BREWSTER 

3145 

3147 

3149 Alice Whitbred 

3151 Unknown 

3153 Unknown 
3155 Unknown 
3157 Unknown 
3159 

3161 
3163 
3165 
3167 



3169 Unknown 

3171 

3173 

3175 

3177 Unknown 
3179 MARY 1 WHITE 
3181 Unknown 
3183 Unknown 

3185 
3187 
3189 
3191 

3193 
3195 
3197 
3199 



See ref. #44 for 

King 
English ancestry. 



See refs. #67, 
#79 and #225 for 

Spencer 
English ancestry. 



185 



Chart Vm Biographies 

24. Horace 6 Sheldon 
See (24) Horace Sheldon on Chart I, the same person. 

48. Arastus 5 Sheldon 

Born in West Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on October 29, 1770. 

Died in West Suffield on March 27, 1840. 

Married Eunice King in Suffield on November 16, 1796. 

The children of Arastus and Eunice, all born in West Suffield, were: 

1. James 6 , b. 1798. 

2. OdiahL 6 ,b. 1800. 

3. Horace . b. September 21, 1802, m. Caroline 4 Cross . 

4. Jairus 6 ,b. 1804, d. 1833. 

5. Gad 6 , b. 1806. 

6. Francis 6 , b. 1809. 

7. Julia C 6 ,b. 1811. 

8. Alfred J. 6 , b. 1813, d. 1840. 

9. Eliza Ann 6 , b. 1816. 

References: #1, #2, #3, and #17, p. 5. Also his death notice in The Connecticut Courant 
(Hartford), April 18, 1840. 

49. Eunice King 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 14, 1773. 
Died on November 20, 1830. 
Married Arastus Sheldon on November 1 6, 1 796. 
References: #1, #2, #3, and #44, p. 148. 

96. Jonathan 4 Sheldon, m 

Born in West Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on December 28, 1737. 
Died in Suffield on February 10, 1814. 

Married Abigail 5 Loomis of Windsor, Connecticut on November 25, 1762. 
The children of Jonathan and Abigail were: 

1. Jonathan ,b. 1763. 

2. Gad 5 , b. 1765. 

3. Odiah 5 ,b. 1766. 

4. Jane 5 , b. 1768. 

5. Arastus 5 . b. October 29, 1 770, m. Eunice 6 King . 

•i5 



6. Abigail J ,b. 1772 



7. Ruth 5 



Other information: 

Jonathan is believed to have been a captain in the Revolutionary War. 
References: #1, #17, p. 4, #19, p. 16, and #30, p. 147. 



187 



Chart VIII Biographies 



98. Dan 5 King 



Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on February 8, 1739. 

Died in Suffield on July 21,1816. 

Married first, Rebecca Austin in Suffield on August 24, 1761. She died on June 13, 1762, seven 

days after the birth of her only child, Dan. 
Married second, Hannah 5 Harmon in Suffield on August 24, 1764. 
The children of Dan and Hannah, all bom in Suffield, were: 

1. Aaron 6 , b. 1769 

2. Hannah 6 , b. 1771 

3. Eunice 6 , b. September 14, 1773, m. Arastus Sheldon 

4. John Addison , b. 1777 

5. Anna 6 , b. 1779 

6. Esther 6 , b. 1783 

7. Richard 6 , b. 1785 

8. Rhoda 6 ,b. 1787 
Other information: 

Dan was a Revolutionary War soldier and responded to the Lexington alarm. 
References: #44, p. 148 and #62, p. 165. 

99. Hannah Harmon 

Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 24, 1746. 
Died in Suffield on May 20, 1843. 
Married Dan King in Suffield on August 24, 1764. 
References: #44, p. 148 and #62, p. 165. 

192. Jonathan 3 Sheldon. Jr. 

Bom in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on April 13, 1711. 
Died in West Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on February 3, 1761. 
Married Sarah Kent on September 12, 1734. She died on February 6, 1807. 
The children of Jonathan and Sarah were: 

1. Sarah 4 , b. 1735. 

2. Jonathan 4 , b. December 28, 1 737, m. Abigail 5 Loomis . 

3. Gad 4 , b. 1 739, graduated from Yale and d. 1 760. 

4. Abigail 4 , b. 1741. 

5. Rufus 4 , b. 1744. 

6. Achsah 4 , b. 1748, d. 1751. 

7. Rebecca 4 , b. 1750, d. 1751 

4 



8. Sela\b. 1751, d. 1751. 



■i 



9. Anna, b. 1756, d. 1760. 

10. Lament 4 , b 1 761 after her father's death. 



Other information: 



188 



Chart Vm Biographies 

Jonathan Sheldon, Jr. came to West Suffield with his father, Jonathan 2 Sheldon, 
Sr., and family in 1723. They were not among the original settlers in Suffield and West 
Suffield who moved there in the period 1670-1682. 
References: #1, #17, p. 2, #19, p. 16, and #25, pp. 25-28. 

194. Odiah 4 Loomis 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on August 4, 1705. 
Died in Windsor on February 1 5, 1 794. 
Married Jane Allyn in Windsor on November 1, 1739. 
The children of Odiah and Jane, all born in Windsor, were: 

1 . Abigail 5 , b. October 20, 1 740, m. Jonathan 4 Sheldoa ITJ . 

2. Odiah 5 , b. 1741/42. 

3. Ozias 5 ,b. 1743, d.y. 

4. Ozias 5 ,b. 1745/46. 

5. Rebecca 5 , b. 1750. 

6. Jane 5 , b. 1755. 

References: #30, p. 147 and #1 1 5, v. II, p. 438. 

195. Jane Allyn 

Born in 1716. 

Died in 1805. 

Married Odiah 4 Loomis in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on November 1, 1739. 

Other information: 

The genealogical literature is replete with references to Allyns. None, however, 

identifies my Jane Allyn. Nor do any wills or probates identify her. The most likely 

connection is that Jane was the granddaughter of Matthew Allyn (1605-1671) of Hartford 

and Windsor. However, Jane's parents are shown as unknown. 

References: #24, #25, pp. 29-30, #27, pp. 6-8, #30, p. 147, #45, pp. 447-452, #84, p. 267, #96, 

pp. 5-12, #115, v. H, pp. 27-32 and 438, #155, v. I, p. 150, #237, pp. 639-640, and 

#238, pp. 13-16. 

196. Nathaniel 4 King 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on February 2, 1712. 
Died in Suffield on March 15, 1802. 
Married first, Anne 4 Trumbull in Suffield on April 20, 173 1 . 
The children of Nathaniel and Anne, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Anne 5 , b. 1732. 

2. Nathaniel 5 , b. 1734, d.y. 

3. Elizabeth 5 , b. 1736. 

4. Dan 5 ., b. February 8, 1 739, m. Hannah 5 Harmon . 

5. Asher 5 ,b. 1741. 

6. Phillis 5 , b. 1744. 

7. Nathaniel 5 , b. 1746, d.y. 



189 



Chart VIII Biographies 

Married second, Mary Talmar. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel was a farmer. 
References: #44, p. 1 13 and #197, p. 367. 

198. Benjamin 4 Harmon 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 17, 1711. 

Died in Suffield on December 3, 1795. 

Married Hannah Jaques in Suffield on August 9, 1739. 

The children of Benjamin and Hannah, all bom in Suffield, were: 

1. Hannah 5 , b. 1740, d.y. 

2. Benjamin , b. 1741. 

3. Amos 5 , b. 1744. 

4. Hannah 5 , b. July 24, 1 746, m. Dan 5 King . 

5. Seth 5 , b. 1751/52. 

6. Jaques , b. 1754. 

7. Phoebe 5 , b. 1756. 
Other information: 

Two of the sons, Seth and Jaques, served in the Revolutionary War. 
References: #62, pp. 1 60- 1 65 and # 1 3 3 . 

199. Hannah Jaques 

Born in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts on May 1, 1716 or 1717. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on November 16, 1800. 
Married Benjamin Harmon in Suffield on August 9, 1739. 
Other information: 

The key to the ancestry of Hannah Jaques is a genealogical inquiry in the Boston 
Evening Transaction for October 24, 1922: 

"JAQUES, HARMON. Hannah Jaques bom in Haverhill, England, March 
1, 1716; married in Suffield, Connecticut, August 9, 1739, Benjamin (4) 
Harmon (Nathaniel 3, John 2, Francis 1). Who were her parents?" 
We know from references #25 and #62 that the ancestry of Benjamin 4 Harmon of 
Suffield was as follows: Nathaniel 3 . John 2 , Francis 1 . We know from references #62 and 
#133 that Hannah Jaques married Nathaniel Harmon in Suffield on August 9, 1739. 

Reference #138 shows the family of Daniel Jaques living in Newbury, Essex, 
Massachusetts and then moving to Bradford, Essex, Massachusetts about 1697. Daniel's 
last child was Hannah Jaques, bom in Bradford on May 1, 1716 or 1717. Note that 
Bradford and Haverhill are only about two miles apart. Therefore, I conclude that Hannah 
was actually bom in Massachusetts and not England as the above-quoted inquiry shows. I 
have assumed that the birth date of March 1, 1716 for Hannah (in the inquiry) was actually 
May 1, 1716 or 1717as shown in reference #138. It seems probable that the person who 
submitted the inquiry to the Boston paper in 1922 was working from the Suffield vital 
records, reference #133, which shows that Hannah was bom on March 1, 1716. However, 
this record does not necessarily mean that Hannah was bom in Suffield. 

190 



Chart VIIT Biographies 

Then from the birth date and marriage date, I conclude that Hannah Jaques, 
daughter of Daniel 2 Jaques of Bradford, Massachusetts, was the Hannah Jaques who 
married Benjamin 4 Harmon in Suffield, Connecticut in 1739. 
References: #25, p. 33, #62, pp. 164-165, #133, and #138, p. 231. 

384. Capt. Jonathan 2 Sheldon. Sr. 

Born in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on May 29, 1687. 

Died in West Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on April 1 1, 1769 and buried there. 

Married Mary Southwell in Northampton on December 30, 1708. 

The children of Jonathan and Mary, all except Gershom and Mary born in Northampton, were: 

1. Mehitable 3 , b. 1709. 

2. Jonathan^ h April 13, 1711, m. Sarah 5 Kent . 

3. Rebecca 3 , b. 1714. 

4. Daniel 3 , b. 1715. 

5. Phineas 3 ,b. 1717. 

6. Elijah 3 , b. 1719. 

7. Silence 3 , b. 1721. 

8. Asa 3 , b. 1722. 

9. Gershom 3 , b. 1724 in West Suffield, Connecticut. 

1 0. Mary 3 , b. 1 725 in West Suffield, Connecticut. 

Other information: 

Jonathan 2 Sheldon and his family moved to West Suffield in 1723. The records 
indicate he was prominent in town affairs and possessed of some wealth. He bought a 
large amount of land in West Suffield and settled each of his sons on his own farm with a 
house and barn. Jonathan 2 was a captain in the militia. 

References: #l,#17,p. 1, #18, p. 11, and #19, pp. 14-15. 

385. Marv Southwell 

Bom in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on February 25, 1688. 
Died in West Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 1 1, 1768 and buried there. 
Married Jonathan 2 Sheldon. Sr. in Northampton on December 30, 1 708. 
References: #17, p. 1, #18, p. 1 1, and #19, pp. 14-15. 

386. Samuel 4 Kent. HI 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on December 6, 1685. 
Died in Suffield on December 24, 1763. 
Married Esther 3 Phelps in Suffield on December 10, 1710. 
The children of Samuel and Esther, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Silas 5 , b. 1711. 

2. Amos 5 , b. 1713. 

3. Sarah 5 , b. December 19, 1715, m. Jonathan Sheldon, Jr. 

4. Dinah 5 , b. 1717. 



5. Esther 5 , b. 1719. 



191 



Chart VIII Biograpliies 



6. 


Abigail 5 , b. 1720. 


7. 


Alice 5 , b. 1722. 


8. 


Samuel , b. 1 724. 


9. 


Anne , b. 1726. 


10. 


Priscilla 5 , b. 1728, d.y. 


ces: 


#126 and #129. 




388. Timothv 3 Loomis 



Bom in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on July 27, 1661. 

Died in Windsor on May 19, 1710. 

Married Rebecca 3 Porter in Windsor on March 20, 1689/90. She died in 1750. 

The children of Timothy and Rebecca, all bom in Windsor, were: 

1. Timothy 4 , b. 1691/92. 

2. Ichabod 4 ,b. 1692/93. 

3. Lois 4 , b. 1695, d.y. 

4. Ann 4 , b. 1698. 

5. Rebecca 4 , b. 1700. 

6. Uriah 4 , b. 1703. 

7. Odiah 4 . b. August 4, 1 705, m. Jane Allvn . 
References: #24, #30, pp. 136-137, #115, v. II, p. 435, and #120. 

392. James King. Jr. 

Bom in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on March 14, 1675. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 15, 1757. 

Married Elizabeth Huxley in Suffield on June 23, 1698. She died there in 1745. 

The children of James and Elizabeth, all bom in Suffield, were: 

1. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1699. 

2. James 4 , b. 1701. 

3. Thomas 4 , b. 1703. 

4. John 4 , b. 1705. 

5. Ebenezer 4 , b. 1706. 

6. Joseph 4 , b 1709. 

7. Nathaniel 4 , b. February 2, 1 7 1 2, m. Anne 4 Trumbull . 
8 Amos 4 , b. 1715. 

9. Sarah 4 , b 1720. 
Other information: 

James" King, Jr. was a prominent citizen and held many offices of trust in Suffield. 
References: #24, #44, pp. 82-84, #88, v. II, p. 514, and #197. 

394. Joseph 3 Trumbull 

Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 3, 1676. 
Died on April 23, 1713, probably in Suffield. 



192 



Chart Vm Biographies 

Married Ann Towsley in Suffield on January 2, 1706/07. She married second James Lawrence in 

1723/24. 
The children of Joseph and Ann, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Joseph 4 , b. 1707, d.y. 

2. Mary 4 , b. 1709. 

3. Anne . b. November 16, 1710, m. Nathaniel 4 King . 

4. Joseph 4 , b. 1712/13. 
Reference: #43, p. 14. 

396. Nathaniel Harmon 

This is the same person as (856) Nathaniel Harmon on Chart X. 
Born in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on March 13, 1653/54. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 2, 1712. 
Married Mary Skinner in Suffield on November 19, 1685. 
The children of Nathaniel and Mary, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Nathaniel 4 , b. January 15, 1686/87, m. Esther 3 Austin . 

2. Ebenezer 4 , b. 1688, d.y. 

3. Mary 4 , b. 1692. 

4. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1694. 

5. Ann 4 , b. 1697. 

6. Samuel 4 , b. 1699. 

7. Sarah 4 , b. 1702. 

8. Ruth 4 , b. 1704. 

9. John 4 , b. 1708. 

10. Benjamin 4 , b. May 17. 171 1. m. Hannah 3 Jaaues . 
Other information: 

Nathaniel 3 Harmon and his two brothers, Samuel and Joseph , were pioneers in 
Suffield. In 1660, ten years before the settlement of the town began, the three Harmons 
endeavored to procure a grant for a new town. They were great hunters and trappers as 
the number of beaver skins and other furs sold by them indicates. They were probably 
more familiar with the topography of the town, which was a dense wilderness, than any 
other white men. Suffield was abandoned in 1675 during King Philip's War. It was 
resettled in 1677. 
References: #24, #25, pp. 33-34, #62, pp. 159-161, #137, p. 10, and #215, p. 1 1. 

397. Mary 3 Skinner 

This is the same person as (857) Marv 3 Skinner on Chart X. 

Bom in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 22, 1667. 

Died on September 7, 1730 

Married first, Nathaniel 3 Harmon in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on November 19, 1685. 

Married second, John Hanchett in 1713. 

References: #24, #62, p. 1 59, and # 1 37, p. 1 0. 



193 



Chan V11I Biographies 



398. Daniel 2 Jaques 



Bom in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts on February 20, 1666/67. 

Probably died in Bradford, Essex, Massachusetts, date unknown. 

Daniel married twice but there is a conflict between references #24 and #138 as to the wives' 
names. By his first wife Daniel had a son, Daniel, Jr., bom in Newbury in 1693. This first 

wife apparently died early. By his second wife, probably Susanna , Daniel had 

the following children, all except the first bom in Bradford: 

1 . Richard 3 , b. 1 695/96 in Newbury. 

2. John 3 , b. 1698. 

3. Abigail 3 , b. 1703. 

4. Susanna 3 , b. 1704/05. 

5. Ruth 3 , b. 1709. 

6. Moses 3 , b. 1711. 

7. Hannah 3 , b. May 1. 1716 or 1717. m. Benjamin 4 Harmon . 

References: #24, #62, p. 161, and #138, p. 231. Also see (199) Hannah 3 Jaques on this chart. 

768. Isaac Sheldon 

Bom in Ashford, Derbyshire, England in 1629. Baptized there in the Holy Trinity Church. 

Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on July 27, 1708. Buried in the Bridge Street 

Cemetery. 
Married first, Mary Woodford of Hartford, Connecticut in 1653. She died in 1684. 
The children of Isaac and Mary, all except the first bom in Northampton, were: 

1 . Mary , b. 1654 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 

2. Isaac 2 , b. 1656. 

John , b. 1658. This is the John Sheldon who was involved in the Tragedy at 
Deerfield in 1 703- 1 704 during the French and Indian Wars. See Appendix 7. 

4. Thomas , b. 1661. 

5. Ruth 2 , twin, b. 1663. 

6. Thankful 2 , twin, b. 1663. 

7. Mindwell 2 , b. 1666. 

8. Joseph 2 , b. 1668. 

9. Hannah 2 , b. 1670. 

10. £16326^,^1672^.^ 

11 Samuel 2 , b. 1675. 

12 Ebenezer 2 , b. 1677. 
13. Mercy 2 , b. 1681, d.y. 

Married second, Mehitable 2 Gunn. the divorced wife of David Ensign, in Northampton in 1686 at 

age fifty-seven. 
Isaac and Mehitable had one child, my ancestor Jonathan 2 Sheldon. Sr. . bom on May 29, 1687 in 

Northampton Jonathan married Mary Southwell . 
Other information: 

The first documented record of Isaac 1 in America is in 1651 when he bought a 
house and lot in Windsor, Connecticut. Reference #130 states that Isaac came from 

194 



Chart VIII Biographies 

England to Windsor, Connecticut with Rev. Ephraim Hewit in 1639. Isaac would have 
been about ten years old at the time. He may have been unschooled because his will in 
1708 was signed only with his mark. 

In 1654 Isaac sold his house in Windsor and moved to Northampton. He was one 
of the founders and first settlers in Northampton and a leading man in town affairs. In 
March 1676 during King Philip's War a force of about 500 Indians attacked Northampton 
but was driven off. There is no record that anyone in Isaac Sheldon's family was harmed 
during the attack. See Appendix 7. 

Over the years there has been controversy about the ancestry of Isaac Sheldon but 
in 1991 Mrs. Shirley Sheldon Rider laid the matter to rest in reference #324. My Isaac 
Sheldon is the man from Windsor and Northampton. 
References: #17, p. 1, #18, pp. 3-7, #19, pp. 11-12, #20, #21, #22, #23, v. U, pp. 291-293, 

#24, #130, #132, pp. 403-406, #309, p. 6, and #324. 

769. Mehitable 2 Gunn 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on July 28, 1644. 

Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on January 30, 1720. 

Married first, David Ensign in Hartford in 1663. They had five children in the period 1664-1675. 

Mehitable divorced David in 1682 for adultery with Sarah Long, the wife of Thomas Long. 

Later David and Sarah were married. 
Married second, Isaac 1 Sheldon in Northampton in 1686 at age forty-two. She had probably 

moved to Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts to rejoin her parents, the Gunn family, 

before she met and married Isaac. 
References: #19, p. 12, #24, #27, p. 238, and #88, pp. 124, 323, and 324. 

770. William Southwell 

Married Sarah 3 Stebbins in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on February 24, 1686/87. 
The children of William and Sarah, all born in Northampton, were: 

1 . Mary , b. February 24, 1 688, m. Jonathan 2 Sheldoa Sr. 

2. Enoch, b. 1689, d.y. 

3. Sarah, b. 1690. 

4. Ebenezer, b. 1694. 

5. Abigail, b. 1696, d.y. 

6. Hanah, b. 1698. 

7. Enoch, b. 1700. 

8. John, b. 1703, d.y. 
Other information: 

William was made a freeman in 1690 in Northampton. Nothing else is known 
about him except that he probably came from England. 
References: #24, #88, v. IV, p. 142, and #131, p. 128. 

772. Samuel 3 Kent. Jr. 

Bom in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts on October 26, 1661. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 31, 1740. 

195 



Chart VUI Biographies 

Married first, Priscilla Hunter in Suffield on October 22, 1683. She was born in 1665 and died in 

1695. Her father was William Hunter . 
The children of Samuel and Priscilla, all born in SufEeld, were: 

1. Samuel 4 , b. 1684, d.y. 

2. SamueL III 4 , b. December 6, 1685, m. Esther 3 Phelps . 

3. Thomas 4 , b. 1688. 

4. John 4 , b. 1690, d.y. 

5. Josiah 4 , b. 1692. 

6. Priscilla 4 , b. 1694/95, d.y. 

Married second, Martha Allen in Suffield on July 28, 1696. Samuel and Martha had one child born 
on February 16, 1697. Martha and her child both died within about a week of the birth. 

Married third, Esther (Hosford) Phelps in Suffield on May 1, 1700. She was the widow of 
Joseph Phelps . 

The children of Samuel and Esther, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Martha 4 , b. 1702/03, d.y. 

2. Daniel 4 , twin, b. 1704. 

3. Mary , twin, b. 1704. 

4. Possibly Benjamin . 

5. Possibly Priscilla . 

References: #24, #25, p. 36, #88, v. Ill, p. 13, #126, #127, p. 162, and #129. 

774. Capt. Joseph 2 Phelps 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on June 24, 1647. 

Died in Windsor in 1695. 

Married first, Mary Porter in Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on June 26, 1673. She died in 

Windsor in 1682 at age twenty-nine. 
The children of Joseph and Mary, all except Mary born in East Windsor, were: 
1. Mary 3 , b. 1674 in Westfield. 

2 Sarah 3 , b. 1676. 

3. Joseph 3 , b. 1678. 

4. Hannah 3 , b. 1680. 

5. Mindwell 3 , b. 1682. 

Married second, Esther 3 Hosford in Windsor about 1688. 

The children of Joseph and Esther, all born in East Windsor, were: 

1. Daniel 3 , b 1690, d.y. 

2. Esther 3 , b. February 1 6, 1 69 1 , m. Samuel 4 Kent. HI . 

3. Abigail 3 , b. 1693. 

4 Benoni 3 , b. 1695, d. 1709/10. 

Other Information: 

Joseph moved from Windsor to Westfield with his family in 1670 and married 
Mary Porter in 1673. Joseph and Mary had their first child in Westfield and then moved 
back to Windsor about 1675. After Mary died in 1682 Joseph married Esther 3 Hosford in 



196 



Chart VIIT Biographies 

Windsor about 1688 and had four more children, including my ancestor, Esther Phelps , 
who married Samuel Kent. III . 
References: #24, #115, v. H, p. 594, #126, and #128, pp. 1271-1273. 

775. Esther 3 Hosford 

Also known as Hester Hosford. 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on May 27, 1664. 

Died on January 18, 1760, probably in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married first, Joseph 2 Phelps in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut about 1688. Esther and Joseph 

had four children in the period 1690 to 1695, including my ancestor Esther Phelps , who 

married Samuel Kent. IJJ . 
Married second, Samuel 3 Kent. Jr. in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 1, 1700. He died in 

1740. 
Other Information: 

There has been some confusion about an Esther Phelps marrying a Samuel Kent. 

The widow, Esther 3 (Hosford) Phelps (1664-1760), married the widower, Samuel Kent. 

JL (1661-1740) in 1700. But Esther's daughter, Esther 3 Phelps (1691- ) married 

Samuel's son, Samuel 4 Kent, m (1685-1763) on December 28, 1710. Thus, the confusion 

of names in interpreting the records for Phelps and Kent. 
References: #24, #1 15, v. II, p. 403, #126, #127, p. 162, #128, p. 1271, and #129. 

776. John 2 Loomis 

Born in Essex County, England in 1 622. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 1, 1688. 

Married Elizabeth 2 Scott in Windsor on February 3, 1 648/49. She died in 1696. 

The children of John and Elizabeth, all except four born in Windsor, were: 

1. John 3 , b. 1649. 

2. Joseph 3 , b. 1651 



3. Thomas 3 , b. 1653 in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut. 

4. Samuel 3 , b. 1655 in Farmington, d.y. 

5. Daniel 3 , b. 1657 in Farmington. 

6. James 3 , b. 1659 in Farmington. 

7. Timothy 3 , b. July 27, 1661, m. Rebecca 3 Porter. 

8. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1663. 

9. David 3 , b. 1665. 

10. Samuel 3 , b. 1666. 

11. Isaac 3 , b. 1668, d.y. 

12. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1671. 

13. Mary 3 , b. 1673, d.y. 
Other Information: 

The wife of John 2 , Elizabeth 2 Scott is said to have come from England on the ship 

Elizabeth in 1634 at age nine. 



197 



Chart VIII Biographies 

John 2 was in Windsor by 1640. He resided in Farmington from 1652 to 1660 
when he returned to Windsor. 
References: #24, #30, pp. 129-130, and #1 15, v. II, p. 433. 

778. John 2 Porter. Jr. 

Born in 1621, probably in Messing, Essex, England. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on August 2, 1688. 

Married Mary Stanley in Windsor about 1650. 

The children of John and Mary, all born in Windsor, were: 

1. John 3 , b. 1651. 

2. Mary 3 , b. 1653, d. 1682. 

3. Sarah 3 , b. 1655. 

4. James , b. 1657. 

5. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1660. 

6. Hannah 3 , b. 1662. 

7. Samuel", b. 1664. 

8. Rebecca . b. March 8, 1666, m. Timothy Loomis . 

9. Hester 3 , b. 1669. 

10. Ruth 3 , b. 1671. 



11. Hezekiah 3 ,b. 1673. 

12. Joseph 3 , b. 1675. 
Other Information: 

John came to America with his parents on the ship Susan and Ellen, arriving in 
Dorchester (now part of Boston) on July 17, 1638. The family moved to Windsor in 1639. 

The daughter, Mary 3 Porter (1653-1682), married my ancestor, (774) Joseph 2 

Phelps and had five children by him before she died. None of these children was my 

ancestor. Joseph then married (775) Esther 3 Hosford . who had four children by him, one 

being my ancestor, Esther 3 Phelps , who married Samuel 4 Kent. III . 

References: #24, #88, v. Ill, p. 461, #115, v. II, pp. 620-621, #120, #122, pp. 290-291, and 

#128, pp. 1271-1273. 

784. James 2 King. Sr. 

This is the same person as (842) James 2 King. Sr. on Chart X. 

Born in Ugborough, Devonshire, England, bapt. November 7, 1647. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 13, 1722. 

Married first, Elizabeth 2 Fuller in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on March 23, 1674. She died in 

Suffield on June 30, 1715. 
The children of James and Elizabeth, all except James born in Suffield, were: 

1 James , b. March 14, 1675 in Ipswich, Massachusetts, m. Elizabeth Huxley . 

2. William 3 , b. 1679, d.y. 

3. Agnes 3 ,, b. July 15, 1681, m. John 3 Austin . 

4. Benoni 3 , b 1685, d.y. 

5. Joseph 3 , b 1687, d.y. 

198 



Chart V1TI Biographies 

6. Joseph 3 , b. 1689 

7. Benjamin 3 , b. 1690. 

8. Mary 3 , b. 1692 

9. William 3 , b. 1695 

Married second, Hannah Loomis, widow of Samuel Loomis of Westfield, Massachusetts on 
February 27, 1716. There were no children from this union. She died in Suffield in 1720. 

Other information: 

James King, Sr. was the founder of the King family of Suffield. He probably came 
to America shortly after the death of his mother in 1662 and was placed at Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, although there is no record of his father, William , or his brother, William , 
being there. James was about fifteen years old and probably began to learn the trade of a 
cooper at that time. 

James moved to Suffield in 1678 and was one of the original proprietors of the 
town. The first grant of land to him was made on October 30, 1678. The first town 
meeting was held on March 9, 1682. Although there were about 300 inhabitants, there 
were only thirty-four qualified voters because of the considerable property qualification. 
James was one of these. He was prominent in the public affairs of the town and held many 
important offices. 

References: #24, #25, p. 36, #44, pp. 68-81, and #197. 

785. Elizabeth 2 Fuller 

This is the same person as (843) Elizabeth Fuller on Chart X. 

Born in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on May 31, 1652. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on June 30, 1715. 

Married James King in Ipswich on March 23, 1674. 

Other information. 

At the time Elizabeth Fuller was raised, there were no school facilities for the 
education of females. There were scarcely any women of her generation who could write 
their names. She was one of nine children, seven boys and two girls, and home duties in 
those days scarcely permitted school instruction. Both her father and mother were well- 
educated and wrote well, and two of her uncles were ministers, one being a graduate of 
Harvard. 

References: #24, #25, and #44, pp. 70 and 78. 

786. Thomas Huxley 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 21, 1721. 
Married Sarah 2 Spencer in Hartford, Connecticut. 

The children of Thomas and Sarah, the first five born in Hartford and the last four born in Suffield, 
were: 

1. Thomas, b. 1668. 

2. John 

3. Sarah 

4. Mary 

5. Elizabeth , m. James 3 King . 

199 



Chart VIII Biographies 



6. 


Jared,b. 1680. 


7. 


Hannah, b 1682. 


8. 


Nathaniel, b. 1683, d.y 


9. 


William, b. 1687. 



Other information: 

Thomas moved from Hartford to Suffield about 1679. 
References: #24, #27, p. 333, #88, v. n, p. 514, and #197. 

788. Judah 2 Trumbull 

Bom in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on April 3, 1643. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on April 1, 1692. 
Married Mary Pritchard in Suffield on September 19, 1672. Her father was William Prit chard . She 

married second, Victory Sikes in Suffield on December 22, 1692. She died in Suffield in 

1722. 
The children of Judah and Mary, all except the first two born in Suffield, were: 

1 John , b. 1 674 in Rowley. 

2. Ebenezer , b. 1675 in Rowley, d.y. 

3. Joseph . b. January 3, 1676, m. Ann Towsley . 

4. Judah 3 , b. 1678. 

5. Mary 3 , b. 1681. 

6. William 3 , b. 1683. 

7. Samuel 3 , b. 1685. 

8. Ephraim 3 ,b. 1688. 
Other information: 

Judah moved from Rowley to Suffield in 1675. 
References: #24, #25, p. 43, #43, p. 4, #49, and #142, p. 76. 

790. Michael Towsley 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on November 3, 1712. 

Married Mary Hussey in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts on June 4, 1678. She married second, 

Jonathan Winchell. She died in 1729. 
The children of Michael and Mary, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Mary, b 1681. 

2. Ann, b. July 12, 1683, m. Joseph 3 Trumbull . 

3. Michael, b 1684. 

4. Margaret, b. 1687, d.y. 

5. Matthew, b. 1690. 

6. Nathan, b. 1697, d.y. 

7. Joseph, b. 1698. 
Other information: 

The origins of Michael are unknown. He was from Salisbury, Massachusetts and 
was in King Philip's War as a soldier from Hampton, New Hampshire. In 1680 he moved 
to Suffield, Connecticut. 
References: #24, #25, p. 43, and #88, v. IV, p. 320. 

200 



Chart VTII Biographies 

791. Mary Hussey 

Mary Hussey's ancestry is shown as unknown on Chart VIE but there is an interesting set of 
circumstantial evidence that shows she may have been a daughter or granddaughter of 
(1332) Christopher' Hussev on Chart IV. Mary's husband, Michael Towslev . was in King 
Philip's War as a soldier from Hampton, New Hampshire. Christopher Hussey, who had a 
daughter, Mary, moved to Hampton in 1638. However, the possible relationship between 
Mary and Christopher Hussey is unproven. 

Reference: #88, v. IV, p. 320. 

792. John 2 Harmon 

This is the same person as (1712) John 2 Harmon on Chart X. 

Born in England in 1617. 

Died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on March 3, 1661. 

Married Elizabeth in 1640. She married second, Anthony Dorchester in Springfield 

after 1662. She died there on May 16, 1699. 
The children of John and Elizabeth, all except the first two born in Springfield, were: 

1. John , b. 1641 in Plymouth Colony. 

2. Samuel 3 , b. 1643 in Plymouth Colony. 

3. Sarah 3 , b. 1644. 

4. Joseph 3 , b. 1646. 

5. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1649, d.y. 

6. Mary 3 , b. 1651. 

7. Nathaniel 3 , b. March 13, 1653/54, m. Mary 3 Skinner . 

8. Ebenezer 3 , b. 1657, d.y. 
Other information: 

John 2 arrived in Boston on July 13, 1635 at age seventeen on the ship Love. He 
came with his father, Francis' , and sister, Sarah 2 , age twelve. John married Elizabeth 
somewhere in Plymouth Colony in 1640 and had two sons, John and Samuel . In 1644 he 
moved to Springfield with his wife and two sons. He was a first settler in Springfield and 
had six more children there. 
References: #24, #25, p. 33, #62, pp. 4 and 159, #85, p. 213, #136, pp. 3-4, and #310, v. 2, p. 
587. 

794. Joseph 2 Skinner 

This is the same person as (1 714) Joseph 2 Skinner on Chart X. 

Born in 1643, probably in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on May 31, 1724. 

Married Mary 2 Filley in Windsor on April 5, 1666. 

The children of Joseph and Mary were: 

1 . Mary 3 , b. in Windsor on September 22, 1 667, m. Nathaniel Harmon. 

2. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1669. 

3. Joseph , b. 1671. 

4. Richard 

201 



Chart VIII Biographies 

5. John 3 

6. Thomas", b. 1677. 

7. Anne 3 , b. 1684. 

8. Isaac 3 , b. 1691. 
Other information: 

Joseph 2 and Mary settled in Windsor and had their first two children there. In 1670 
they moved to Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut where they had their next five children. 
About 1690 they moved back to Windsor where they had their last child. 
References: #24, #27, p. 533, #88, v. IV, p. 105, #115, v. IL p. 687, and #137, pp. 8-10. 

795. Marv 2 Fillev 

This is the same person as ( 1 7 1 5) Mary Filley on Chart X. 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut in 1647. 

Died in Windsor on August 26, 1734. 

Married Joseph Skinner in Windsor on April 5, 1666. 

References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 159, and #137, pp. 9-10. 

796. Henry Jaques 

Born in England about 1619. 

Died in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts in February 1686/87. 

Married Anna Knight in Newbury on October 8, 1648. She died in February 1704/05. 
The children of Henry and Anna, all born in Newbury, were: 
1 Henry 2 , b. 1649. 

2. Mary 2 , b. 1651, d.y 

3. Mary 2 , b. 1653. 

4. Richard 2 

5. Hannah 

6. Stephen 2 , b. 1661. 

7. Sarah 2 , b. 1663. 

8. Daniel 2 , b. February 20, 1666/67, m. Susanna . 

9. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1669. 

10. Ruth 2 , b. 1672. 

11. Abigail 2 , b. 1673/74. 
Other information: 

Henry was first in Andover, Essex, Massachusetts but soon permanently settled in 
Newbury where he was a house builder (carpenter/contractor) of wide reputation. In 1665 
a group of Newbury men joined to purchase and settle a town in New Jersey along the 
Rahway Creek to be known as Woodbridge. Henry 1 was among the nine original grantees 
but did not move there However, he did settle his son, Henry 2 , there. 
References: #24, # 1 38, p. 227-23 1 , and Newbury vital records. 

1536. Ralph Sheldon 
Born in Ashford, Derbyshire, England about 1605. 

202 



Chart VITI Biographies 

Probably died at sea in 1 65 1 . 

Married Barbara Stone on April 27, 1629, probably in Ashford. 

The children of Ralph and Barbara, all probably born in Ashford, were: 

1. Isaac . b. 1629, m. first, Mary Woodford, m. second, Mehitable 2 Gunn . 

2. Samuel, b. about 1632. 

3. Solomon, b. about 1634. 
Other information: 

As to the probable death of Ralph at sea in 1651 the following is quoted from 
reference #21. 

"On 10 Jan. 1650/1 a license was issued to Ralph Sheldon to pass beyond 
the seas.... The last mention found of him is in the will of his father, dated 
10 June 1651, in which he and his wife Barbara were given legacies of 2s. 
6d. each. This will also provides for three grandchildren, Isaac, Samuel, 
and Solomon Sheldon... and gives the bulk of the estate to two daughters.... 
From the terms of this will and the issue of the emigration license it seems 
likely that Ralph Sheldon had already received his share of the paternal 
estate and therefore he and his wife were given merely nominal bequests, 
and that he had emigrated from England in the spring of 1651, leaving 
temporarily his three sons in the care of their grandfather, until he should 
send for them. In the emigration licenses at that period a destination on the 
Continent of Europe, such as Spain, France, Holland, etc., is thus 
specifically named, while the term "beyond the seas" generally refers to 
America. If Ralph Sheldon started in the spring of 1651 for New England, 
it is probable that he never arrived there, but either died on the voyage or 
was lost at sea; at least, no mention of him has been found in New England, 
nor did he return to Derbyshire..." 
References: #21 and #324. 

1538. Thomas 1 Gunn 

Probably bom in England. 

Died in Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on February 26, 1681. 

Married an unknown wife in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut about 1639. She died in Westfield in 

1678. 
Thomas' children, all probably born in Windsor, were: 

1. Elizabeth , d.y. 

2. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1640, d.y. 

3. Deborah 2 , b. 1642. 

4. Mehitable 2 . b. July 28, 1 644, m. Isaac 1 Sheldon . 

5. John 2 , b. 1647. 
Other Information: 

Thomas was in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts by 1634. He 
moved to Windsor before 1639 and sometime later, probably about 1660, he moved to 
Westfield. 
References: #24, #27, p. 238, #85, p. 204, and #88, v. E, pp. 323-324. 



203 



Chart VIII Biographies 



1542. John 2 Stebbins 



Bom in England in 1626. 

Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on March 7, 1678. 

Married first, Ann Munson in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on May 14, 1646. She died 

there in 1 656. 
John and Ann had five children in the period 1647 to 1655, all bom in Springfield. 
Married second, Abigail Bartlett in Northampton on December 17, 1657. She married second, 

Jedediah Strong in 1681. 
The children of John and Abigail, all bom in Northampton, were: 

1. Samuel 3 , b. 1658. 

2. Abigail 3 , b. 1660. 

3. Thomas , b. 1662. 

-j 9 2 

4. Hannah", b 1664, m. John Sheldon. John Sheldon is famous for his part in the 
redemption of captives following the Tragedy at Deerfield during the French and 
Indian Wars (see Appendix 7). John Sheldon was a half-brother of my ancestor 
Jonathan Sheldon . 

5. Mary 3 , b. 1666. 

6. Sarah , b. June 4, 1668, m. William Southwell . 

7. Joseph 3 , b. 1669. 

8. Deborah 3 , b. 1671. 

9. Rebecca 3 , b. 1676. 

10. Thankful 3 , b. 1678. 
Other Information: 

It is not known where John came from in England nor when he arrived in 
America. He may have come with his parents and siblings in 1634 at age eight. 
References: #24 and U 1 3 1 , pp. 74, 75, and 1 28. 

1544. Samuel 2 Kent. Sr. 

Bom in England about 1636. 

Died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts on February 2, 1690/91 but is probably buried in 

Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married first, Frances Woodall in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts on January 17, 1654. 
The children of Samuel and Frances, all bom in Gloucester, were: 

1. Sarah 3 , b. 1657. 

2. Mary 3 , b. 1658. 

3. Samuel 3 , b. October 26, 1661, m. Priscilla Hunter . 
4 John 3 , b. 1664. 

Married second, Mary in Suffield about 1684. 

Other information: 

Samuel immigrated to Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts with his family prior to 
1643 Samuel was a sergeant in King Philip's War. He moved to Brookfield, Worcester, 
Massachusetts in 1671, probably with his wife and four children. Brookfield is about seven 
miles north of Sturbridge. When the Indians destroyed Brookfield in 1676 during King 

204 



Chart Vm Biographies 

Philip's War Samuel and his family moved to Suffield. His house lot is now the site of the 
Kent Memorial Library in Suffield. 
References: #24, #25, p. 36, #88, v. m, pp. 12-13, and #127, pp. 160-161. 

1545. Frances Woodall 

Born in Thedford, Northampton, England, probably about 1634. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut in 1683. 

Married Samuel Kent. Sr. . as his first wife, in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts on January 17, 

1654. 
Other information: 

Frances immigrated to Massachusetts in 1648, probably with her parents, Edward 

and Mary Woodall . 
References: #24 and # 1 29. 



1548. George' Phelps 

Born in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England about 1606. 

Died in Westfield, Hampshire (now Hampden County), Massachusetts on May 8, 1687. 

Married first, Phillury 2 Randall in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut in 1637. She died in Windsor on 

April 29, 1648. 
The children of George and Phillury, all bom in Windsor, were: 

1. Isaac , b. 1638. 

2. Child 2 , d.y. 

3. Abraham 2 , b. 1641. 

4. Child 2 , d.y. 

5. Abigail , d.y. 

6. Joseph 2 , b. June 24, 1647, m. first, Mary 3 Porter and second, Esther 3 Hosford . 
Married second, the widow Frances Dewey in Windsor in November 1648. George was Frances' 

third husband. George and Frances had three children. Frances died in Westfield in 1690. 
Other information: 

On March 20, 1630 George, as yet unmarried, sailed from Plymouth, England on 
the Mary and John with about 140 other passengers, including his older brother William 
and his family. They landed in Hull, Plymouth, Massachusetts on May 30, 1630 and settled 
in Dorchester (now part of Boston) with others of Rev. Warham's church. 

In 1636 George, with about sixty others of Rev. Warham's church, removed to the 
founding of Windsor, Connecticut. In 1670 George, with part of his family and the 
children of Frances by her second husband, moved to the settlement of Westfield, 
Massachusetts. George's son, my ancestor (774) Joseph 2 Phelps, apparently moved to 
Westfield with the family because that is where he married Mary Porter in 1673. 

George' Phelps was a brother of (3440) William' Phelps on Chart X. George and 
William were probably sons of William Phelps of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England 
but there is conflicting information in the references. Therefore, the parents of George are 
shown as unknown on Chart VUI. See reference #108 for a discussion of this problem. 



205 



Cliart VIII Biographies 

References: #24, #85, pp. 356 and 378, #88, v. m, pp. 405 and 506, #107, p. 104, #108, v. 7, 
pp. 99-100, #1 15, v. n, pp. 589-595, #1 17, p. 63, #128, pp. 1259-1268, and #203, 
p. 157. 

1550. John 2 Hosford 

Bom in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts. 
Died on August 7, 1683, probably in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Phillipa 2 Thrall in Windsor on November 5, 1657. She died in 1683. 
The children of John and Phillipa, all probably bom in Windsor, were: 

1. William 3 , b. 1658. 

2. John 3 , b. 1660. 

3. Timothy 3 , b. 1662. 

4. Esther 3 , b. May 27, 1664, m. first, (774) Joseph 2 Phelps and second, (772) 
Samuel Kent. Jr. Both Joseph and Samuel are on this chart. 

5. Sarah", b 1666. 

6. Samuel 3 , b. 1669. 

7. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1671. 

8. Mary 3 , b. 1674. 

9. Obadiah 3 , b. 1677. 

References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 465, #115, v. II, p. 403, and #128, p. 1271. 

1552. Joseph Loomis 

This is the same person as (3178) Joseph' Loomis on this chart and (3508) Joseph 1 Loomis on 

Chart XI. 
Bom about 1 590, probably in Thaxted, Essex, England. His parents were John Loomis and Agnes 

Lyngwood 
Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on November 25, 1658. 
Married Mary White in Messing/Shalford, Essex, England on June 30, 1614. 
The children of Joseph and Mary, all bom in England, were: 

1 Joseph 2 , b. 1615. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1617. 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1619. 

4. Mary 2 , b about 1620, m. (1588) John' Skinner on this chart. 

5. John 2 , b. 1622, m. (777) Elizabeth 2 Scott on this chart. 

6. Thomas 2 , b. 1624. 

Nathaniel 2 , b. 1626, m. (1755) Elizabeth 3 Moore on Chart XI. 
8. Samuel 2 , b. 1628. 
Other information. 

Joseph was a woolen draper in Braintree, Essex, England. He sailed from London 
on April 11, 1638 in the Susan arid Ellen and arrived at Dorchester (now part of Boston) 
on July 17, 1638 He brought with him his wife and all of their eight children. The family 
moved to Windsor in 1639. 



206 



Chart Vm Biographies 

References: #24, #30, pp. 1 15-122 and 126-128, #71, p. 70, #84, pp. 278-279, and #1 15, v. II, 
pp. 432-433 and 620-621. 

1553. Mary' White 

This is the same person as (3 179) Mary' White on this chart and (3509) Mary 1 White on Chart XI. 

Baptized in Shalford, Essex, England on August 24, 1590. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on August 23, 1652. 

Married Joseph Loomis in Messing/Shalford, Essex, England on June 30, 1614. 

Other information: 

Mary was the daughter of Robert White and Bridgett Allgar who were married in 

Shalford in 1585. Bridgett was the daughter of William Allgar . who was baptized in 

Shalford in 1562. 
References: #24, #30, p. 121, #71, p. 70, and #84, pp. 278-279. 

1554. Thomas 1 Scott 

Born in England about 1 594. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut on November 6, 1643. 

Married Ann in England about 1616. She married second, Thomas Ford in Hartford in 

1644. 
The children of Thomas and Ann, all bom in England, were: 

1. Mary 2 

2. Sarah 2 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. about 1625, m. John 2 Loomis . 

4. Thomas , b. about 1628. 
Other information: 

Thomas 1 and his wife embarked from Ipswich, England in the Elizabeth in April 
1634 with their three daughters. The references make no mention of Thomas coming to 
America with the family. This may have been an oversight or perhaps he came over later 
because he did come to America. And some references confuse Thomas' wife, Ann, with 
the name Elizabeth. 

Thomas 1 and Ann may have had another daughter, Abigail. The references are in 
disagreement about this and about the dates of birth of the children. However, some things 
are clear. Their daughter, my ancestor, Elizabeth 2 , was born about 1625; she did come to 
America in 1634; and she did marry John Loomis . 

Thomas 1 and his family were probably first in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts but 
moved to Hartford with the first settlers in 1636. Thomas 1 died in Hartford on November 
6, 1643 as a result of an accident caused by John Ewe. For this Ewe was fined five pounds 
to go to the colony and ten pounds to go to Thomas' widow, Ann. 
References: #24, #27, p. 495, #53, p. 257, #88, v. IV, p. 39, and #115, v. II, p. 433. 

1556. John 1 Porter. Sr. 
See (2420) John' Porter. Sr. on Chart U, the same person. 



207 



Chart VIII Biographies 

Note: There were at least three John Porters who came to America in Colonial times. They were 
as follows: 

(a) John' Porter. Sr.. ancestor #1556 and John' Porter. Sr. . ancestor #2420 on 
Chart II, the same person. This John Porter married Rose White and lived in 
Windsor, Connecticut. 

(b) John' Porter. Sr. . ancestor #2368 on Chart II. This John Porter married Mary 
(?) Gardner and lived in Salem, Massachusetts. 

(c) John Porter who married Margaret Odding and lived in Hingham, Plymouth, 
Massachusetts. This latter John Porter is not my ancestor. 

1558. Thomas' Stanley 

See (2422) Thomas' Stanley on Chart II, the same person. 

1559. Benet' Shepard 

See (2423) Benet' Shepard on Chart II, the same person. 

1568. William' King 

This is the same person as (1684) William King on Chart X. 

Born in Ugborough, Devonshire, England about 1622. His parents were William King and 

Christina Lapp . 
Died probably on May 28, 1664. 
Married Agnes Elwill in Ugborough on October 16, 1642. She died in 1662 and was buried in 

Ugborough. 
The children of William and Agnes, both born in Ugborough, were: 

1. William 2 , bapt. 1643. 

2. James . bapt. November 7, 1647, m. Elizabeth 2 Fuller . 
Other information: 

William probably brought or sent his two children to America soon after the death 
of his wife, Agnes, in 1662. However, neither the date of his nor their arrival in New 
England can be fixed with certainty. William became interested in the fisheries on the New 
England coast and was engaged in that business at the time of his death. Upon his last 
voyage he was cast away and drowned on the Banks of Newfoundland, probably on May 
28, 1664. 

From reference #44 written in 1908 I quote the basis for describing William' King 
as my first King ancestor in America: 

"Though we closed our English Ancestry with his name and there 
is no evidence that he ever abandoned his residence at Ugborough, or 
acquired one in America, yet as the constant practice of the family, and 
those writing on the genealogy of the King Family of Suffield, has been to 
begin with him as the first, or immigrant, ancestor in tracing down our 
American line, we may be permitted, in order to avoid possible confusion 
of enumeration, to follow this precedent; and indeed, as he lost his life on 
the American coast and was at that time interested in American fisheries, he 



208 



Chart Vm Biographies 



may perhaps not inappropriately be placed as the first in our American line 
of ancestry and thus form a connecting link between our English and 
American lines." 
References: #44, pp. 52-53 and 65-67 and #197. 

1570. John 1 Fuller 

This is the same person as (1686) John 1 Fuller on Chart X. 

Born about 1621, probably in Redenhall, Norfolk, England. 

Died in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts on June 4, 1666. 

Married Elizabeth Emerson in Ipswich or Salisbury, both in Essex County, Massachusetts. 

John and Elizabeth had nine children, including my ancestor, Elizabeth Fuller , born on May 3 1 , 

g 2 

1 652 in Ipswich. She married James King . 
Other information: 

John came to America on the Abigail in May 1635 at age fifteen with William F. 

Fuller who was probably his brother. 
References: #24, #44, pp. 70-71, and #85, p. 178. 

1574. Thomas Spencer 

This is the same person as (1 696) Thomas Spencer on Chart X. 

Baptized in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England on March 29, 1607. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut on September 1 1, 1687. 

Married first, Ann Derifield . either in Hartford or in Cambridge, Massachusetts about 1637. She 

died in 1644. 
The children of Thomas and Ann, all probably born in Hartford, were: 

1. Obadiah 2 ,b. about 1639. 

2. Thomas 2 , b. about 1641, m. Esther Andrews . Thomas 2 is ancestor #848 on Chart 
X 

3. Samuel 2 , b. about 1643. 

Married second, Sarah 2 Bearding in Hartford on September 11, 1645. She died before 1674. 
The children of Thomas and Sarah, all probably born in Hartford, were: 

1 . Sarah 2 , b. about 1 646, m. Thomas Huxley . Sarah 2 is ancestor #787 on this chart. 

2. Elizabeth 2 , bapt. 1648. 

3. Jared 2 (Gerard), b. 1650/51. 

4. Hannah 2 , b. 1653. 

5. Mary 2 , b. 1655. 

6. Martha 2 , b. 1658. 
Other information: 

Thomas 1 probably came from the vicinity of Braintree, Essex, England in the 
company of Rev. Thomas Hooker in 1632. Thomas' Spencer was first in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. In 1637 he was a soldier in the Pequot War. About 1639, he moved to 
Hartford, where he was one of the original proprietors. His move to Hartford may also 
have been in connection with Rev. Thomas Hooker. 



209 



Chan VIII Biographies 

Thomas' had two brothers who also immigrated to America and were my direct 
line ancestors They were (2506) William 1 Spencer on Chart III and (726) Gerard' 
Spencer on Chart VI. 
References: #24, #25, p. 40, #27, pp. 45 and 556-557, #53, p. 259, #67, pp. 13-20, #79, pp. 
161-163, #88. v. IV, p. 149, #197, p. 367, #225, and #282, p. 466. 

1576. John 1 Trumbull 

This is the same person as (1704) John' Trumbull on Chart X and (1776) John' Trumbull on Chart 

XL 
Bom in Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland, England. 
Died in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on March 16, 1657. 
Married first, Elinor' Chandler in Newcastle-on-Tyne on July 7, 1635. She died in Rowley in 

1648/49. 
The children of John and Elinor, all except the first two born in Rowley, were: 

1. Beriah,b. 1637, d.y. 

2. John , bapt. in 1639 in Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

3. Hannah 2 , b. 1640. 

4. Judah . b. April 3. 1643. m. Mary Pritchard . 

5. Ruth 2 , b. 1645. 

6. Joseph . b. March 19, 1647, m. Hannah Smith . Both are on Chart XI. 

Married second, Ann Hopkinson (widow of Michael Hopkinson) in 1650 and had two more 
children. 

Other information: 

John was a cooper. He came to America in 1639 with his wife and their son, 
John . They were first in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts but moved to 
Rowley, Massachusetts in 1640. In Rowley he was also a teacher and the town clerk. 

References: #24, #43, p. 3, #49, #142, pp. 75-77, and #242. 

1584. Francis Harmon 

This is the same person as (3424) Francis' Harmon on Chart X 

Francis was born in England in 1592. He arrived in Boston on July 13, 1635 on the ship Love with 
his son, John . age seventeen, and his daughter, Sarah , age twelve. Francis must have 
been a widower at the time but nothing more is known of him. John 2 , b. 1617, m. 
Elizabeth . 

References: #25, p. 33, #62, pp. 4 and 159, and #136, p. 3. 

1588. John Skinner 

This is the same person as (3428) John' Skinner on Chart X. 
Born in Braintree, Essex, England 
Died in 1650, probably in Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Mary Loomis in Hartford about 1637. 



The children of John and Mary, all probably born in Hartford, were: 
1 Mary 2 , b. 1637. 



210 



Chart VITI Biographies 



2. Ann 2 , b. 1639. 

3. John 2 , b. 1641. 

4. Joseph 2 , b. 1643, m. Mary 2 Fillev . 

5. Richard 2 , b. 1646/47. 
Other information: 

John was a member of Rev. Thomas Hooker's company that came to America in 
1635 and settled in Hartford. John was one of the original proprietors of the settlement in 
1636. 
References: #24, #27, p. 533, #30, pp. 127-128, #53, pp. 258-259, and #137. 

1589. Mary Loomis 

This is the same person as (3429) Mary Loomis on Chart X. 

Born in England about 1620. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on August 19, 1680. 

Married first, John 1 Skinner in Hartford, Connecticut about 1637. He died in 1650. 

Married second, Owen Tudor from Wales in Windsor in 1651. There were probably five children 

by this union. 
References: #24, #27, p. 533, #30, pp. 127-128, #53, pp. 258-259, #115, v. JJ, p. 433, and 
#137. 

1590. William' Fillev 

This is the same person as (3430) William 1 Fillev on Chart X. 
Bom about 1620, probably in England. 

Married Margaret in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 2, 1642. 

The children of William and Margaret, all born in Windsor, were: 

1. Samuel 2 , b. 1643. 

2. John 2 , b. 1645. 

3. Marx, h 1647 t m Joseph 2 Skinner . 

4. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1650. 

5. Abigail 2 , b. 1658. 

6. Deborah 2 , b. 1661. 

7. William 2 , b. 1665. 
Other information: 

William 1 was in Windsor in 1640 or earlier. Nothing is known of his ancestry. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 159, #115, v. II, p. 250, and #137, pp. 9-10. 

3072. Arthur Sheldon 

Born in Ashford, Derbyshire, England about 1575. 
Died in Ashford in 165 1 and buried there. 
Married an unknown wife about 1600. 
Arthur's children were: 

1. Jane,b. about 1600. 

2. Mary,b. about 1602. 

211 



Chart Vlll Biographies 

3. Ralph b. about 1605, m. Barbara Stone . 

4. Arthur, b. about 1607. 

5. John, b. about 1610. 

6. Anne, b. about 1612. 

7. Elizabeth, b. about 1615. 
References: #21 and #324. 

3084. Rowland' Stebbins 

Bom in England in 1594. 

Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on December 14, 1671. 

Married Sarah' Whiting in Bocking, England on November 30, 1618. She was born in England in 

1591 and died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts in April 1649. 
The children of Rowland and Sarah, all born in England, were: 

1. Thomas 2 , b. 1620. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1623. 

3. John 2 , b. 1626, m. Abigail Bartlett . 

4. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1628. 
Other Information: 

Rowland and his wife sailed for New England on the Francis on April 30, 1634. It 
is not known when their four children came to America. The family settled in Springfield, 
Hampden, Massachusetts. After his wife's death in 1649 Rowland moved to Northampton. 
References: #24, # 1 3 1 , p. 5 1 , and #3 1 0, v. 2, p. 639. 

3088. Thomas' Kent 

Born in England. 

Died in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts on April 1, 1658. 

Married Noyes in England. 

Thomas' children, all born in England, were: 

1. Thomas 2 , b. 1634. 

2 1 

2. Samuel . m. Frances Woodall . 

3. Josiah 
Other information: 

Thomas and his family immigrated to Gloucester prior to 1643. He was one of 
the proprietors of Gloucester. 

Reference #129 states that Thomas' wife was Mowit Noyes, daughter of William 
Noyes and Anna Parker. However, reference #272 (pages 118 and 120) shows that 
Thomas' wife was not Mowit. His wife must have been from another of the Noyes families 
in England. 
References: #24, #85, p. 267, #88, p. 13, #127, p. 159, #129, and #272. 

3098. Philip' Randall 

Philip immigrated to America in 1630 and settled first in Dorchester (now part of Boston). Philip 
moved to Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut in 1635. His daughter, Phillury 2 Randall , who 



212 



Chart VIII Biographies 

was born in England, accompanied him to Dorchester and then to Windsor, where she 

married George 1 Phelps in 1637. 
The name of Philip's wife and whether she accompanied him to America is unknown. However, it 

is known that he had a son, Abraham , who came to America. 
References: #24 and # 1 1 5, v. n, pp. 589 and 632. 

3100. William 1 Hosford 

Married first, an unknown wife in England about 1625. She died in Windsor, Hartford, 

Connecticut in 1641. 
William's children, both born in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts, were: 

1. Sarah 

2. John 2 , m. Phillipa 2 Thrall . 

Married second, the widow Jane Fookes in Windsor on July 23, 1655. 

Other information: 

William came to America on the Mary and John in 1630 and settled in Dorchester. 
He moved to Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut with wife and two children about 1635. He 
moved to Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts and preached there from October 1652 to 
October 1654. After several years he gave his land in Windsor to his two children and 
went back to England. It is not known if his second wife, Jane Fookes, went to England 
with him. She died about 1671 . 

References: #24, #88, p. 465, #115, v. JJ, p. 403, and #128, p. 1271. 

3102. William 1 Thrall 

Born about 1607, probably in England. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on August 3, 1679. 

Married Goode (?) in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut about 1638. She died in 1676. 

William's children, both born in Windsor, were: 

1. Phillipa 2 . m. John 2 Hosford . 

2. Timothy 2 , b. 1641. 
Other information: 

William was one of the first settlers in Windsor but it is not certain that he came 
with the other settlers from Dorchester, Massachusetts. William served in the Pequot War. 
References: #24 and #88, v. rV, pp. 293-294. 

3142. Thomas 1 Emerson 

This is the same person as (3374) Thomas' Emerson on Chart X. 

Baptized in Bishops Stortford, Herts, England on July 26, 1584. 

Died in Ipswich, Massachusetts on May 1, 1666. 

Married Elizabeth Brewster in Bishops Stortford on July 1, 161 1. 

The children of Thomas and Elizabeth all probably born in England, were: 

1 . Elizabeth 2 , baptized at Bishops Stortford on June 14, 1623, m. John Fuller. 



2. Joseph 



2 



John 



213 



Chan VIII Biographies 

4. Nathaniel 

5. James 

6. Susanna 
Other information: 

Thomas was in Ipswich by 1638. He was a baker and he also had a farm. He left a 
considerable estate at his death. 
References: #24, #44, p. 7 1 , #85, p. 1 56, and #88, v. II, p. 1 1 8. 

3143. Elizabeth Brewster 

This is the same person as (3375) Elizabeth Brewster on Chart X. 

Married Thomas' Emerson in Bishops Stortford, Herts, England on July 1, 161 1. 

Other information: 

On page 71 of reference #44, "The King Family of Suffield," the statement is made 
that Elizabeth was probably a daughter of William Brewster, the famous elder of Plymouth 
Colony. However, I have examined the following five references and I can find no 
evidence that William Brewster even had a daughter named Elizabeth: #85 (Pope), #88 
(Savage), #125 (Stratton), #124 (Bradford), and #156 (Roser). 

Reference: #44, p. 71 . 

3148. Gerard Spencer. Sr. 
See (1452) Gerard Spencer. Sr. on Chart VI, the same person. 

3150. Nathaniel Bearding 

Surname also spelled Barding. 

Born in 1 591, probably in England. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut in September 1 674. 

Married first, an unknown wife about 1624 and had only one child, my ancestor, Sarah Bearding . 

who married Sgt. Thomas Spencer . 
Married second, Abigail (Graves) Andrews, the widow of William Andrews, in Hartford. There 

were no children from this union. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel was in Hartford by 1636, but he was not an original proprietor. 
References: #24, #27, p. 45, #67, p. 17, #88, v. I, p. 1 14, and #197, p. 367. 

3178. Joseph Loomis 
See (1552) Joseph Loomis on this chart, the same person. 

3179. Mary' White 
See (1553) Mary White on this chart, the same person. 



214 



CHART IX - Caroline 4 Cross 



200 



JOHN 1 
CROSS 



400 



Unknown 



100 



ROBERT 2 
CROSS 



SO 



JOSEPH 3 
CROSS 



1773- 1809 



101 



abt. 1732- 1798 



201 



abt 1695 -abL 1748 



Deborah 

Oldfield 



401 



402 



800 



801 



Unknown 



802 



803 



RICHARD 
OLDFIELD 



abt. 1710- 



403 



1667- 1727 

Jane' 
Thurston 



804 JOHN OLDFIELD 



805 Sarah Post 



806 JOSEPH 2 THURSTON 



807 Anne 



202 



BRYAN 
LEFFERTY 



404 



Unknown 



Mary 

Leflerty 



abt. 1734-1802 



203 



405 



406 



808 



809 



Unknown 



810 



811 



Unknown 



812 



813 



CAROLINE 4 
25 CROSS Caroline m. Horace 5 Sheldon (Chart VIII). 

1806-1873 



814 



815 





204 


DANIEL 1 
COOPER 


408 


Unknown 


816 










Unknown 


817 








1695- 1795 

Grace 
Runvon 


409 
410 


818 








Unknown 


819 




102 

MARY 3 

COOPER 


C(X)PF.R 






1741-1794 
Mary 


205 
206 


820 








Unknown 


821 








abt. 1706- 1755 
Unknown 


411 
412 


822 










823 


51 




1780- 1817 


824 










825 








Unknown 


413 
414 


826 










827 


103 






207 


828 






A name in capitals indicates that a 
biography is included for that 
individual. The biographies follow 




829 






415 


830 




this chart. 




831 







216 





CHART IX - Caroline" 


Cross 


1600 
1601 
1602 
1603 


3200 
3202 
3204 
3206 


3201 
3203 
3205 
3207 


1604 
1605 
1606 
1607 


3208 
3210 
3212 
3214 


3209 
3211 
3213 
3215 


1608 Unknown 

1609 Unknown 

1610 Unknown 

1611 Unknown 


3216 
3218 
3220 
3222 


3217 
3219 
3221 
3223 


1612 JOHN 1 THURSTON 

1613 Margaret 

1614 Unknown 

1615 Unknown 


3224 THOMAS THURSTON 

3226 Unknown 

3228 

3230 


3225 Grace Nutting 
3227 Unknown 
3229 
3231 


1616 
1617 
1618 
1619 


3232 
3234 
3236 
3238 


3233 
3235 
3237 
3239 


1620 
1621 
1622 
1623 


3240 
3242 
3244 
3246 


3241 

3243 
3245 
3247 


1624 

1625 
1626 
1627 


3248 
3250 
3252 
3254 


3249 
3251 
3253 
3255 


1628 
1629 
1630 
1631 


3256 
3258 
3260 
3262 


3257 
3259 
3261 
3263 


1632 
1633 
1634 
1635 


3264 
3266 
3268 
3270 


3265 
3267 
3269 
3271 


1636 
1637 
1638 
1639 


3272 
3274 
3276 
3278 


3273 
3275 
3277 
3279 


1640 
1641 
1642 
1643 


3280 
3282 
3284 
3286 


3281 
3283 
3285 
3287 


1644 
1645 
1646 
1647 


3288 
3290 
3292 
3294 


3289 
3291 
3293 
3295 


1648 
1649 
1650 
1651 


3296 
3298 
3300 
3302 


3297 
3299 
3301 
3303 


1652 
1653 
1654 
1655 


3304 
3306 
3308 
3310 


3305 
3307 
3309 
3311 


1656 
1657 
1658 
1659 


3312 
3314 
3316 
3318 


3313 
3315 
3317 
3319 


1660 
1661 
1662 
1663 


3320 
3322 
3324 
3326 


3321 
3323 
3325 
3327 



217 



Chart DC Biographies 

25. Caroline Cross 
See (25) Caroline Cross on Chart I, the same person. 

50. Joseph Cross 

Born on his father's plantation near Basking Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey on December 6, 1773. 
Died on February 10, 1809 at age thirty-five. Buried in the Basking Ridge Presbyterian 

churchyard. 
Married Mary Cooper in Basking Ridge on March 13,1 800. 
The children of Joseph and Mary, all born in Basking Ridge, were: 

1. John 4 , bapt. 1802. 

2. James 4 , bapt. 1803. 

3. Harriett 4 , bapt. 1804. 

4. Caroline . b. September 1, 1806, m. Horace Sheldon . 
Other information: 

In his will dated December 25, 1 808 Joseph Cross mentions his wife, Mary (Polly), 
and all of his four "dear little children." From the inventory of his estate he was apparently 
wealthy. His estate even included six Negro slaves with a stated dollar value for each. 
References: # 1 , #57, and #77. 

51. Mary Cooper 

Also known as Polly Cooper. 

Born on March 6, 1780. 

Died on August 20, 1817 at age thirty-seven. Buried in the Basking Ridge Presbyterian 
churchyard in Somerset County, New Jersey. 

Married first, Joseph 3 Cross in Basking Ridge on March 13, 1800. He died in 1809. 

Married second, John Annin, as his second wife. 

Other information: 

When Mary died in 1817 she left four orphans, her four children by her first 
husband, Joseph 3 Cross. These four orphans included my ancestor, Caroline Cross , who 
was the youngest child and ten years old at the time. After Mary's death the four orphans 
were cared for by James 3 Cross who was the younger brother of Joseph Cross. 

References: #1 , #57, and #77. 

100. Robert 2 Cross 

Born about 1732, probably in Hopewe'l which is in New Jersey twenty-five miles south, southwest 

of Basking Ridge. 
Died in Basking Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey on April 26, 1798. 
Married Mary Lefferty about 1755. She died about 1802. 
The children of Robert and Mary, all probably born in Basking Ridge, were: 

1. Bryan, b. about 1756. 

2. William 3 , b. about 1757. 

3. Catherine 3 , b. 1759. 

4. John 3 , b. 1760. 

219 



Chart EX Biographies 

5. Martha 3 , b. about 1762. 

6. Robert 3 , b. 1763. 

7. Mary 3 , b. 1765. 

8. John Lefferty 3 , b. about 1 769. 

9. Joseph 3 , b. December 6, 1773, m. Mary 3 Cooper . 

10. James", b. about 1775. 
Other information: 

Robert and Mary and their children are all buried in the Basking Ridge Presbyterian 
churchyard. 
References: # 1 , #57, and #77. 

102. Benjamin Cooper 

Born on his father's farm at Long Hill near Morristown, Morris, New Jersey on December 13, 

1741. 
Died near Pottersville, New Jersey in December 1794. Pottersville is ten miles west of Basking 

Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey. He predeceased his father, Daniel, by four months. 
Married first, Charity Hoff. She died at age seventeen in childbirth with their first son who also 

died. 
Married second, an unknown wife and had one child, John. 

Married third, Mary . 

The children of Benjamin and Mary were: 

1 . Mary' (a.k.a. Polly) , b. March 6, 1780, m. Joseph Cross . 

2. Catharine 3 , b. 1783. 
Married fourth, Anna Brown in 1788. 
Other information: 

In March 1 769 at age twenty-seven Benjamin and his partner, William, the Earl of 
Stirling, purchased the Hibernia Iron Mines and Furnace in Morris County from Samuel 
Ford. 

In 1773 a great number of forged bills began to circulate in Morris County. This 
led to the arrest and conviction of Benjamin and three others. They had confessed to 
having received the bills from the same Samuel Ford, a clever counterfeiter. Ford managed 
to escape but the other four including my ancestor, Benjamin Cooper, were sentenced to 
be hanged for the crime. Ironically, Benjamin's father, (204) Daniel Cooper , was one of 
the three magistrates who heard the case and sentenced the four to death. 

In 1 768 Benjamin had learned about a robbery of the state treasury in Perth 
Amboy, New Jersey committed by the same Samuel Ford and two soldiers at the Perth 
Amboy garrison. The following four direct quotations from newspapers tell how Benjamin 
escaped the gallows on the 1 773 counterfeiting charge. 
The New-York Gazetteer . August 30, 1773: 

"Upon these facts the following (who were only concerned as passers of the 
money, except Reynolds, who procured some types for Ford) to wit, Benjamin Cooper, 
Esq., Doctor Bern Budd Samuel Haynes and David Reynolds, were indicted and plead 
guilty to their several indictments, and on the nineteenth they received sentence of death, 
to be executed the J 7th of September next. Few scenes ever were more truly affecting 
than the one in the court-house, at the time of sentence passing- These four persons are 

220 



Chart DC Biographies 

remarkably handsome fine looking men, three of them about thirty, the other 40, they are 
all married and have children. All are descendants from the first families in the province, 
and all ha\>e parents living, and numerous relations— the attendance of their family and 
friends added much to the solemnity of it; so much that it is better conceived than 
described— among a thousand people there was scarce a dry eye. The spectators were 
more sensibly affected for those unhappy persons, as it appeared they had been drawn 
into it by the art, cunning and perswasion (sic) of that VILLAIN FORD. " 
The New-York Gazette and The Weekly Mercury . September 27, 1773: 

"Their Execution was ordered to be on the 1 7th Instant; before the Time, Budd 
and Haynes were respited for a Month, but Reynolds and Cooper were ordered to prepare 
for Execution at the Time appointed A few Minutes before the Time, Cooper confessed 
himself privy to the Robbery of the Treasury at Amboy, and that he received Three 
Hundred Pounds of the Money; on which he also was respited till he should make further 
Discoveries. Reynolds was therefore ordered for Execution alone, at which he seemed 
much affected and burst into Tears, but thro' the Assistance of a Minister who attended 
him, he grew Calm, and resigned to his Fate. " 
The Pennsylvania Gazette , March 2, 1774: 

"The morning of the execution Cooper was long and carefidly examined He was 
informed that they knew he was acquainted with Ford's robbery of the Treasury; that if he 
wotdd confess the truth, they were impoM'ered from government to pardon him; but if he 
did not, he must die. He then replied, in the most solemn manner, "If I must die, I must 
prepare for it in the best manner I can; for I do not know anything about it. " He was 
returned to the prison, and everything was conducted as if he was to be executed His 
irons were taken off, and his arms pinioned Reynolds being turned off, the sheriff, with 
part of the guard and the executioner, returned, and brought Cooper out of the prison 
into the passage, from whence he could behold his companion hanging; and before 
putting the rope round his neck, he was again addressed by the person who had so much 
laboured to extort the confession of his knowledge of Ford's robbing the Treasury: "You 
ha\>e now but ten minutes to live, if you do not confess. " He hiew what they meant by 
confessing, and accordingly said, "I will confess. " And who that hiew his character 
would think he would not confess anything to sa\>e his life? For, in reality, it was that 
confession he was given to understand he must make, as the only condition upon which a 
pardon coidd be obtained 

"On this the respite was immediately produced and the convict unpinioned The 
next day his examination was taken, when he declared that Ford had told him every 
circumstance relating to the robbery, and that Ford, with two soldiers, had committed it; 
although he had so repeatedly, under oath, declared he had never been told atrything 
about it. " 
The New York Gazette and The Weekly Mercury , December 13, 1774: 

"His Excellency Governor Franklin, of New-Jersey, has been pleased, with the 
Advice of his Privy Council, to grcmt a Pardon, for Joseph Haines, Dr. Bant Budd and 
Benjamin Cooper, confined in Goal (sic) in the County of Morris, as Associates with Ford 
and Reynolds, &c. in counterfeiting and passing several Sorts of bad Money, as has been 
already mentioned in the Papers. " 

Despite his trouble with the law, the last known references to Benjamin were in 
regard to church affiliation. On November 7, 1793 he is recorded as donating money to 

221 



Chart IX Biographies 

the Lamington Presbyterian Church in nearby Somerset County and giving toward the 
graveyard of the Bethlehem Presbyterian Church where he is probably buried. 
References: #77, #97, p. 90, #98, pp. 574-575, #99, pp. 155-156, and #101, pp. 17-18, 28, 33, 
141, and 277-278. 

200. John 1 Cross 

Born about 1695, probably near Ballykelly, Ireland. 

Died about 1 748 in Basking Ridge, Somerset, New Jersey. 

Married Deborah Oldfield of Jamaica, Queens, New York. They were probably married about 
1730 during the period when John was the minister of the Presbyterian Church in Hopewell 
which is in New Jersey twenty-five miles south, southwest of Basking Ridge. Long after 
John's death in 1748, Deborah married Henry Simson in 1774. 

The known children of John and Deborah were: 

1. Robert 2 , b. about 1732. m. Mary Lefferty . 

2. Ann/Nancy , m. Daniel Cooper, Jr. 

3. Perhaps William . 

4. Perhaps Mary . 
Other information: 

The difficulty in identifying the children of John and Deborah arises from the fact 
that church registers of both the Hopewell and Basking Ridge Presbyterian Churches for 
this period have been lost. 

John's probable place of birth in Ireland has been deduced from the fact that his 
brother, Robert, was born there. The other brothers in this family were Hugh, William, and 
Nathaniel. Aside from this nothing further is known about John's origin and family. 

John was the first minister of the Presbyterian Church in Basking Ridge. The town 
was settled by Scottish Presbyterians and a log church was built about 1 700. John was a 
very inspiring preacher as he is reported to have converted about 300 people at one revival 
meeting However, John was a very colorful figure who followed his own course without 
much regard to ecclesiastical law and order. In addition, he was accused of adultery with 
Catherine Love in 1735 and later with Mary Moore. As a result he was suspended from 
his ministry in 1741 although he continued to live in Basking Ridge until his death about 
1 748 at age fifty-three. 
References: #1, #57, #77, and #257, p. 326. 

202. Bryan Lefferty 

Direct evidence for this ancestor is lacking. However, his existence has been deduced from the 
following: 

1 Two of the sons of (204) Daniel Cooper were Benjamin and George . George 

married Margaret Lefferty, who was the daughter of Bryan Lefferty of Somerset 
County, New Jersey. George is not my ancestor but this establishes that there was 
a Bryan Lefferty in Somerset County. Margaret Lefferty and my ancestor, Mary 
Lefferty . would have been sisters. 



222 



Chart DC Biographies 

2. The first child of my ancestors, Robert 2 Cross and his wife, Mary Leflferty . was 
named Bryan Cross. Another child of this couple was named John LefFerty 3 
Cross. 

3 . Robert Cross was an executor of the estate of Bryan Lefferty . 



Reference: #77. 



204. Daniel 1 Cooper 



Also known as Daniel Kuper and Daniel Korpur. 

Bom in Holland or at sea on the way from Holland on May 1, 1695. 

Died in Long Hill, Morris, New Jersey on May 2, 1795 at age 100. Buried beside his first wife in 

the Basking Ridge Presbyterian churchyard in Somerset County, New Jersey. 
Married first, Grace Runyon (a.k.a. Creesje Runjen) in Piscataway, Middlesex, New Jersey on 

April 17, 1726. She died in 1755 at age forty-nine. 
The children of Daniel and Grace were: 

1. Catherine 2 , b. 1727. 

2. Daniel 2 , b. 1729. 

3. Agnes (a.k.a. Agnietje), b. 1732, d.y. 

4. Peter 2 , b. 1735. 

5. John 2 , b. 1738. 

6. Benjamin , b. December 13, 1 74 1 , m. Mary . 

7. Rosannah , b. 1743. 

8. George 2 , b. 1745. 

9. Providence 2 , b. 1748. 

10. Anne 2 , b. 1750. 

After Grace died Daniel married five times more. All except the last wife, Hannah, predeceased 

him. There were no children by any of the last five wives. 
Other information: 

Daniel's parents (names unknown) emigrated from Holland to New York in the 
year 1695 but his father apparently died at sea while coming to America. Daniel lived in 
Piscataway, Middlesex, New Jersey but moved to Passaic Valley, Morris, New Jersey in 
1732. 

One theory holds that Daniel's parents were English because many Englishmen 
went to Holland during the reigns of Kings Charles I and JJ to escape persecution. 
However, from the alternate spellings of his name, Daniel Kuper or Korpur, and from his 
association with people of Dutch descent including his first wife, Grace Runyon (a.k.a. 
Creesje Runjen), it is likely that Daniel was of Dutch descent. 

Daniel was a farmer and large land owner. He also sat on the bench as a magistrate 

in the Morris County courts for many years and had the unhappy experience of sentencing 

his own son, (102) Ben jamin 2 Cooper , my ancestor, to be hanged. However, Benjamin 

was pardoned by the governor. 

References: #77, #97, pp. 90-92, #98, pp. 574-575, #99, pp. 155-156, and #100, pp. 63 and 

88. 



223 



Chart IX Biograpliies 



402. Richard Oldfield 



Bom in Jamaica, Queens, New York in 1667. 

Died in Jamaica in 1727. 

Married Jane 3 Thurston in Jamaica in 1690, probably in the Presbyterian Church. 

The children of Richard and Jane, all probably born in Jamaica, were: 

1. Jane, b. 1704. 

2. Hannah 

3. Mary 

4. Deborah , b. about 1710, m. John 1 Cross . 

5. Susannah, m. William Bloodgood in 1735. 

6. Kesiah 

References: #61 and #257, pp. 29, 3 17-326, 344-346, and 422-423. 

804. John Oldfield 

Died in Jamaica, Queens, New York in or before 1691. 

Married Sarah Post . She apparently married William Brinkley of Jamaica as her second husband 

because Richard and William Oldfield were stepsons of William Brinkley. 
The children of John and Sarah have not been fully identified but there were at least three sons, all 

probably bom in Jamaica, New York: 

1. Richard , b. 1667, m. Jane Thurston . 

2. Joseph 

3. William 
Other information: 

John's ancestry is unknown. He was a tanner by trade. He was in Lynn, Essex, 
Massachusetts by 1640 and he was among the early settlers of Southampton, Hampshire, 
Massachusetts in 1 65 1 . By 1 660 he had moved to Jamaica. 
References: #61, #257, pp. 29, 344-346, and 422, #259, pp. 164-165, and #260. 

806. Joseph Thurston 

Bom about 1638, probably in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts and baptized there in 1640. 
Died in Jamaica, Queens, New York on July 9, 1688. 

Married Anne , probably in Dedham about 1664. She died in 1721. 

The children of Joseph and Anne, all probably bom in Jamaica, were: 

1 . Benjamin 

2. Mary 3 

3. Jane , m. Richard Oldfield . 

4. Hannah 

5. Joseph 

6. Daniel 3 

7. Samuel" 

8. Thomas 
Other information: 



224 



Chart IX Biographies 

Joseph was a farmer and a member of the Presbyterian Church in Jamaica. It is 
not known when he moved from Dedham to Jamaica. 
References: #24, #88, v. IV, pp. 296-297, #258, p. 361, #262, pp. 289-290, and "Abstracts of 
Early Wills of Queens County, New York." 

1612. John' Thurston 

Baptized in Wrentham, Suffolk, England on January 13, 1610/11. 

Died in Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts on November 1, 1685. Medfield was set off from 

Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts in 1651. 
Married Margaret in England about 1632. She was born in 1605 and died in 1662. 

Her surname may have been Buck. See page 791 of reference #262. 
The children of John and Margaret were: 

1 . Thomas , b. 1632 in England. 

2. John , b. 1635 in England. 

2 

3. Joseph , b. about 1638, probably in Dedham, Massachusetts, m. Anne . 

2 

4. Benjamin , b. 1640 in Dedham. 

5. Mary , b. 1643 in Dedham. 

6. Daniel , b. 1647 in Dedham. 

7. Judith 2 , b. 1 648 in Dedham. 

8. Hannah 2 , b. 1651 in Medfield, Massachusetts. 
Other information: 

John 1 was a carpenter. He and his wife, Margaret, came to America on the Mary 
Ann with their first two children in 1637. 

John 1 is thought to have been named Thomas by his parents when he was baptized 
but to have changed his name to John when he migrated to America. Some emigrants are 
known to have assumed aliases to evade authorities when they left England. Evidently 
John made such a switch but unlike others retained his new alias even after he had crossed 
the Atlantic. See pages 1 76- 1 77 of reference #26 1 . 
References: #24, #88, v. IV, pp. 296-297, #258, p. 361, #261, pp. 176-177, and #262, pp. 788-791. 

3224. Thomas Thurston 

Born about 1580, probably in Wrentham, Suffolk, England. 

Died in Wrentham in March 1626. 

Married Grace Utting in Wrentham on October 8, 1607. She died there in February 1638/39. 

The children of Thomas and Grace, all born in Wrentham, were: 

1. Margaret, b. 1608/09. 

2. John 1 , baptized January 13, 1610/11, m. Margaret' . 

3. Frances, b. 1613. 

4. Mary, b. 1616, d.y. 

5. John, b. 1619/20. 

6. Samuel, b. 1622/23. 
Other information: 

Regarding two children named John see (1612) John Thurston. 
References: #24, #261, pp. 176-177, and #262, pp. 788-791 . 

225 



CHART X - Aretas 6 Rising 





208 


JOHN 3 
RISING, JR. 


416 


JOHN 2 
RISING. SR. 


832 JAMES 1 RISING 








1660- 1719 

Sarah 3 
Hale 


833 Elizabeth 2 Hinsdale 








1692- 1770 

Mary 

[Iambi in 


417 
418 


834 TIMOTHY 2 HALE 






NATHANIEL 4 


1665- 1698 

NATHANIEL 
HAMBLIN 


835 Sarah 2 Barber 


104 


RISING, SR. 




1743- 1828 

ANNE 5 
AUSTIN 


209 
210 


836 WILLIAM HAMBLTN 








1671- 1738 

Mary 
Pierce 


837 Marv Richardson 








1700- 

WTLUAM 4 

AUSTIN 


419 
420 


838 RICHARD PIERCE 








JOHN 3 

AUSTIN 


839 Elizabeth 2 Brown 


52 


NATHANIEL 5 
RISING, JR. 




1765- 1835 

105 


840 ANTHONY 2 AUSTIN 








1672-1737 

Agnes 3 
King 


841 ESTHER 2 HUGGINS 








1712-1787 

ANNE 5 
HALL 


421 

422 


842 JAMF.S 2 KING. SR. 








1682- 1733 

NATHANIEL 4 
HALL 


843 ELIZABETH 2 Fl IT 1 PR 








1739- 1786 


211 


844 SAMUEL 3 HALL, JR. 










1695- 

Mabel 4 
Winehell 


845 Elizabeth Bourne 








1720- 1795 


423 


846 THOMAS 3 WINCHELL 










847 Sarah Moore 


BT 


fAS 6 





Aretas m. I.ucy Maria 7 Seymour (Chart XI). 
1801- 1884 



J3 



212 



THOMAS 4 
SPENCER 



424 



!<►, 



LYDIA* 
SPENCER 



1771 - 1848 



fa) = brothers 



107 



THOMAS 5 
SPF.NCER 



1736- 1788 



213 



1701/02- 1754 



425 



SAMUEL 3 
SPENCER 



848 THOMAS 2 SPENCER, JR. 



1674- 1743 



ELIZABETH 
MASCRAFT 



849 Esther 2 Andrews 



Mary 4 
Trumbull 



426 



1669- 

JOHN 3 

TRUMBULL 



850 DANIEL MASCRAFT 



851 Marv Gorton 



1701 



214 



REBECCA 6 
HARMON 



1744/45- 1833 



A name in capitals indicates 
that a biography is included 
for that individual. The biographies 
follow this chart. 

Note: About half of the people on this 
chart lived in SufTield, Connecticut. 



215 



JOEL 5 

HARMON 



427 



428 



1670- 1751/52 

ELIZABETH 3 
WINCHELL 



852 JOSEPH 2 TRUMBULL 



853 HANNAH SMITH 



1675 - 



854 DAVID 2 WINCHELL (a) 



855 MARY GRIFFIN 



1719- 1818 



REBECCA 5 
PHELPS 



429 



NATHANIEL 4 
HARMON 



1686/87-1763 

ESTHER 3 
AUSTIN 



856 NATHANIEL 3 HARMON 



857 MARY 3 SKINNER 



430 



1686/87- 1761 

JOSEPH 4 
PHELPS 



858 ANTHONY 2 AUSTIN 



859 ESTHER 2 HUGGINS 



1724- 1761 



431 



1684- 1763 

Rebecca 
North 



860 JOSEPH 3 PHELPS 



861 Marv Collier 



-1732 



862 Unknown 



863 Unknown 



226 



CHART X - Aretas 6 Rising 



1664 Unknown 

1665 Unknown 

1666 ROBERT 1 HINSDALE 

1667 Ann 

1668 Unknown 

1669 Unknown 

1670 THOMAS 1 BARBER 

1671 Jane Bancroft 

1672 Unknown 

1673 Unknown 

1674 Unknown 

1675 Unknown 

1676 Unknown 

1677 Unknown 

1678 JOHN 1 BROWN 

1679 Margaret Hayward 



1680 RICHARD 1 AUSTIN 

1681 Elizabeth 

John 1 



1682 John 1 Muggins 

1683 Bridget 1 Green 

1684 WTLIJAM 1 KING 

1685 Agnes Elwill 

1686 JOHN 1 FULLER 

1687 Elizabeth 2 Emerson 

1688 SAMUEL 2 HALL, SR. 

1689 Elizabeth White 

1690 Unknown 

1691 Unknown 

1692 NATHANIEL 2 WINCHEIl (a) 

1693 Sarah 2 Porter 

1694 Unknown 

1695 Unknown 



3328 

3330 

3332 Unknown 

3334 Unknown 

3336 

3338 

3340 Unknown 

3342 Unknown 

3344 
3346 
3348 
3350 

3352 

3354 

3356 Unknown 

3358 Unknown 



3360 Unknown 
3362 Unknown 
3364 Unknown 
3366 Unknown 

3368 William King 

3370 Unknown 

3372 Unknown 

3374 THOMAS 1 EMERSON 

3376 GEORGE 1 HALL 
3378 Unknown 
3380 
3382 

3384 ROBERT 1 WINCHELL 
3386 THOMAS 1 PORTER 
3388 
3390 



3333 
3335 


Unknown 
Unknown 


3337 
3339 
3341 
3343 


Unknown 
Unknown 


3345 
3347 
3349 
3351 




3353 
3355 
3357 
3359 


Unknown 
Unknown 


3361 
3363 
3365 
3367 


Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


3369 Christina Lapp 

3371 Unknown 

3373 Unknown 

3375 ELIZABETH BREWSTER 



See ref. #44 for 

King 
English ancestry. 



3377 Mary 

3379 Unknown 

3381 

3383 

3385 Unknown 
3387 SARAH 2 HART 
3389 
3391 



1696 THOMAS 1 SPENCER 

1697 AnnDerifield 

1698 WILLIAM 1 ANDREWS 

1699 Abigail Graves 

1700 Unknown 

1701 Unknown 

1702 JOHN GORTON 

1703 Mary 



1704 JOHN 1 TRUMBULL 

1705 Elinor 1 Chandler 

1706 Unknown 

1707 Unknown 

1708 ROBERT 1 WINCHELL 

1709 Unknown 

1710 JOHN GRIFFIN 

1711 Hannah Bancroft 



3392 GERARD SPENCER, SR. 

3394 

3396 Unknown 

3398 

3400 

3402 

3404 Unknown 

3406 Unknown 

3408 Unknown 
3410 Unknown 
3412 
3414 

3416 Unknown 

3418 

3420 Unknown 

3422 Unknown 



3393 Alice Whitbred 

3395 

3397 Unknown 

3399 

3401 

3403 

3405 Unknown 

3407 Unknown 

3409 Unknown 
3411 Unknown 
3413 
3415 

3417 Unknown 

3419 

3421 Unknown 

3423 Unknown 



See refs. #67, 
#79 and #225 for 

Spencer 
English ancestry. 



1712 JOHN 2 HARMON 

1713 Elizabeth 

1714 JOSEPH 2 SKINNER 

1715 MARY 2 FHXEY 

1716 RICHARD 1 AUSTIN 

1717 Elizabeth 



1718 John 1 Huggins 

1719 Bridget 1 Green 

1720 JOSEPH 2 PHEIJS 

1721 Hannah Newton 

1722 JOSEPH COLLIER 

1723 Elizabeth Sanford 

1724 
1725 
1726 
1727 



3424 FRANCIS 1 HARMON 
3426 Unknown 
3428 JOHN 1 SKINNER 
3430 WILLIAM 1 FILLEY 

3432 Unknown 

3434 Unknown 

3436 Unknown 

3438 Unknown 

3440 WILLIAM 1 PHELPS 
3442 Roger Newton 
3444 Unknown 
3446 ROBERT SANFORD 

3448 
3450 
3452 
3454 



3425 Unknown 

3427 Unknown 

3429 MARY 2 LOOMIS 

3431 Margaret 

3433 Unknown 
3435 Unknown 
3437 Unknown 
3439 Unknown 

3441 Elizabeth 1 

3443 Unknown 
3445 Unknown 
3447 Ann Adams 

3449 
3451 
3453 
3455 



227 



Chart X Biographies 

26. Aretas Rising 
See (26) Aretas Rising on Chart I, the same person. 

52. Nathaniel Rising. Jr. 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on February 28, 1765. 

Died in Suffield on May 30, 1835. 

Married Lydia Spencer in Suffield on June 9, 1789. 

The children of Nathaniel and Lydia, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Lydia 6 , b. 1789. 

2. Polly 6 , b. 1792. 

3. Silas 6 , b. 1794. 

4. Lucy 6 , b. 1796. 

5. Alfred 6 , b. 1799. 

6. Aretas_, b. December 15, 1801. m. Lucy Maria Seymour . 

7. Henry 6 , twin, b. 1804. 

8. Fanny 6 , twin, b. 1804. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel was the postmaster in Suffield and a member of the state legislature. 
References: #1, #2, #29, pp. 50-51, #63, p. 8, and #225. 

53. Lydia Spencer 

Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut about 1771. 
Died in Suffield on June 20, 1848. 
Married Nathaniel Rising in Suffield on June 9, 1789. 
References: #1, #2, #29, pp. 50-51, #63, and #225. 

104. Nathaniel 4 Rising. Sr. 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 22, 1743. 

Died in Suffield on January 21, 1828. 

Married first, Anne Austin on June 6, 1763. 

The children of Nathaniel and Anne, all born in Suffield, were: 

1 . Nathaniel 5 , b. February 28, 1 765, m. Lvdia 6 Spencer . 

2. Phyllis 5 , b. 1766. 

3. Sarah 5 , b. 1770. 

4. Lucy 5 , b. 1772. 

5. Candis 5 ,b. 1774. 

6. David 5 , b. 1776. 

7. Julius 5 , b. 1780. 

Married second, Phebe Munsell on January 17, 1787. Nathaniel and Phebe had three children in 

the period 1788-1793. 
Other information: 



229 



Chart X Biographies 

Nathaniel 4 served as a private in the Revolutionary War in Capt. Eliha Kent's 
company for nine days in April 1775 during the Lexington Alarm. 
References: #29, pp. 36-39 and #63. 

105. Anne 5 Austin 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on June 23, 1739. 
Died in Suffield on May 21, 1786. 
Married Nathaniel Rising on June 6, 1763. 
References: #29, p. 36 and #215, p. 33. 

106. Thomas Spencer 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on October 31, 1736. 
Died in Suffield in 1788. 

Married Rebecca Harmon in Suffield on December 5, 1764. 
The children of Thomas and Rebecca, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Rebecca 6 , b. 1765. 

2. Thomas 6 , b. 1767. 

3. Lydia . b. about 1771. m. Nathaniel Rising. Jr. 

4. Sybil 6 

References: #29, p. 50, #62, p. 170, #214, p. 124, and #225. 

107. Rebecca Harmon 

Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on March 20, 1744/45. 
Died in Suffield on March 21, 1833. 
Married Thomas Spencer in Suffield on December 5, 1764. 
References: #62, p. 170, #214, p. 124, and #225. 

208. John 3 Rising. Jr. 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on February 20, 1692. 

Died in Suffield on September 10, 1770. 

Married first, Mary Smith on April 18, 1716. She died on March 21, 1717. They had one child 

who died young. 
Married second, Elizabeth Trumbull on February 12, 1719. She died on September 13, 1719. 

There were no children. 
Married third, Mary Hamblin on January 4, 1721/22. 
The children of John and Mary were: 

1. Sarah 4 , b. 1722. 

2. John 4 , b. 1724, m. Mabel 5 Hall. 

3. Mary 4 , b. 1725. 

4. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1727, d.y. 

5. Josiah 4 , b. 1729, d.y. 

6. Ann 4 , b. 1732. 



230 



Chart X Biographies 



7. Josiah 4 ,b. 1734. 

8. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1736. 

9. Hannah 4 , b. 1740. 

10. Nathaniel 4 , b. July 22, 1743, m. Anne 5 Austin . 

11. Ruth 4 , b. 1746. 
References: #29, pp. 29-33 and #63, p. 4. 

210. William 4 Austin 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on March 15, 1712. 
Died in Barkhamsted, Litchfield, Connecticut on January 3, 1787. 
Married Anne 5 Hall in Suffield on July 20, 1738. 
The children of William and Anne, all born in Suffield, were: 

1 . Anne . b. June 23, 1 739, m. Nathaniel 4 Rising. Sr. 



2. 


Mabel 5 , b. 1742. 


3. 


Bethia 5 ,b. 1744. 


4. 


William 5 , b. 1747. 


5. 


Agnes , b. 1749. 


6. 


James , b. 1752. 


7. 


Candace 5 ,b. 1754. 


8. 


John 5 ,b. 1757. 


9. 


Tahpanes , b. 1759, d.y. 


10. 


Tahpanas , b. 1761. 


Reference: 


#215, p. 33. 




211. Anne 5 Hall 



Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on April 16, 1720. 
Died in Barkhamsted, Litchfield, Connecticut on October 21, 1795. 
Married William Austin in Suffield on July 20, 1738. 
Reference: #215, p. 33. 

212. Thomas 4 Spencer 

Bom in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 13, 1701/02. 
Died in Suffield on February 4, 1754. 
Married Mary 4 Trumbull in Suffield on December 15, 1720. 
The children of Thomas and Mary, all bom in Suffield, were: 

1. Elizabeth 5 , b. 1721. 

2. Thomas 5 , b. 1722/23, d.y. 

3. Mercy 5 , b. 1724. 

4. Sabra 5 ,b. 1726. 

5. Hannah 5 , b. 1728. 

6. Mary 5 , b. 1730, d.y. 

7. Mary 5 , b. 1732. 



231 



Chart X Biograpl 


lies 


8. 


Sybil 5 , b. 1734/35. 


9. 


Thomas 5 , b October 31, 1736, m. Rebecca 6 Harmon 


10. 


Eliphalet 5 , b. 1738. 


11. 


Hezekiah 5 ,b. 1740. 


References: 


#214, pp. 123-124 and #225. 




214. Joel 5 Harmon 



Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on August 12, 1719. 

Died in Suffield on February 28, 1818. 

Married first, Rebecca 5 Phelps in Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut on June 8, 1744. 

The children of Joel and Rebecca, all except Joel and Rachel born in Suffield, were: 

1. Rebecca 6 , b. March 20, 1744/45, m. Thomas Spencer . 

2. Joel , b. 1746/47 in Simsbury. 

3. Rachel 6 , b. 1 748/49 in Simsbury. 

4. Paul 6 , twin, b. 1749/50. 

5. Silas 6 , twin, b. 1749/50. 

6. Ruth 6 , b. 1751. 

7. Lydia 6 ,b. 1753. 

8. Cephas 6 , b. 1755. 

Married second, Sarah Granger in Suffield in 1762. There were no children from this union. 
Reference: #62, pp. 163 and 170. 

215. Rebecca Phelps 

Bom in Turkey Hills, Hartford, Connecticut on January 22, 1724. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on March 2, 1761 at age thirty-six. 
Married Joel Harmon in Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut on June 8, 1744. 
References: #62, p. 163 and #115, p. 570. 

416. John 2 Rising. Sr. 

Born in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts on April 14, 1660. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on December 11, 1719. 

Married first, Sarah 3 Hale in Suffield on November 27, 1684. She died there on October 11, 1698. 

The children of John and Sarah, all born in Suffield, were: 

1 Sarah , b. 1685, m. Samuel 3 Hall. Jr. as his second wife. 

2. Hannah 3 , b. 1687, d.y. 

3. Eunice 3 , b. 1688, d.y. 

4. Hannah 3 , b. 1690. 



John 3 (twin), b. February 20, 1692, m. Mary Hamblin . 

6. James 3 (twin), b. February 20, 1692. 

7. Josiah 3 , b. 1694. 

8 Jonathan 3 , b. 1696, d.y. 
9. Joseph 3 , b. 1697-8, d.y. 



232 



Chart X Biographies 

Married second, Mary McLaflin on September 22, 1699. John and Mary had nine children in the 

period 1700-1719. 
References: #24, #29, pp. 19-28, #45, p. 275, #63, p. 3, and #134, pp. 247-248. 

418. Nathaniel Hamblin 

Bom in Boston on March 27, 1671. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 18, 1738. 

Married Mary Pierce in Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts on April 10, 1695. 

The children of Nathaniel and Mary were: 

1. Elizabeth, b. 1696. 

2. Nathaniel, b. 1698. 

3. Marv . b. April 7, 1700, m. John 3 Rising . 

4. William, b. 1702/03. 

5. Miriam, b. 1705/06. 

6. Sarah, b. 1708/09. 

7. John, b. 1711. 
Other information: 

There is no direct proof of Nathaniel's parentage, but reference #134 indicates that 
the parentage shown on this chart is probably correct. 

Nathaniel and his family moved to Suffield, Connecticut but the date is unknown. 
All of the births of the children of Nathaniel and Mary are recorded in Suffield but the 
children were not necessarily born there. 
References: #24 and # 1 34, p. 1 44. 

420. John 3 Austin 

Born in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on October 22, 1672. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 18, 1737. Buried in the Old Center Cemetery. 
Married Agnes 3 King in Suffield on October 5, 1699. She died in Suffield on June 7, 1733. 
The children of John and Agnes, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Agnes 4 , b. 1701. 

2. John 4 , b. 1702, d.y. 

3. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1703. 

4. John 4 , b. 1706. 

5. Mary 4 , b. 1708. 

6. James 4 , b. 1710. 

7. William 4 , twin, b. March 15, 1712, m. AnpelHaJl. 



8. Margaret 4 , twin, b. March 15, 1712. 

9. Bertha 4 , b. 1718. 
References: #24 and #2 1 5, p. 1 6. 

422. Nathaniel 4 Hall 

Born in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts on May 18, 1695. 
Married Mabel Winchell about 1716. 



233 



Chart X Biographies 

One of the children of Nathaniel and Mabel was my ancestor Anne Hall , who was born in Suffield, 

Hartford, Connecticut on April 16, 1720. She married William Austin . 
References: #29, p. 35, #215, p. 33, and #229, p. 31 1. 

424. Samuel 3 Spencer 

Bom in Hartford, Connecticut about 1674. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on November 23, 1743. 

Married Elizabeth Mascraft in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts on March 18, 1700. 

The children of Samuel and Elizabeth, both born in Suffield, were: 

1. Thomas . b. January 13. 1701/02. m. Mary Trumbull . 

2. Daniel 4 , b. 1704. 

References: #24, #25, p. 40, #79, p. 174, and #225. 

425. Elizabeth Mascraft 

Bom in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts on February 1, 1669. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married Samuel" Spencer in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts on March 18, 1700. 

References: #24, #25, p. 40, #79, p. 174, #225, and Sudbury vital records. 

426. Rev. John 3 Trumbull. Sr. 

This is the same person as (444) John 3 Trumbull on Chart XI. 
Baptized in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on November 27, 1670. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 3, 1751/52. 
Married Elizabeth 3 Winchell in Suffield on September 3, 1696. 
The children of John and Elizabeth, all bom in Suffield, were: 

1. Hannah 4 , b. 1697. 

2. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1699. 

3. Mary_, b. 1701, m. Thomas 4 Spencer . 

4. Joseph , d.y. 

5. Abigail 4 , b. 1706. 

6. Joseph 4 , b. 1708. 

7. Mercy , d.y. 

8. John 4 , bapt. April 23, 1715, m. Sarah 4 Whitman , both on Chart XI. 
References: #25, pp. 42 and 43, #43, p. 6, #45, p. 744, #49, #50, #5 1 , and #64, p. 77. 

427. Elizabeth 3 Winchell 

This is the same person as (445) Elizabeth 3 Winchell on Chart XI. 

Bom in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on December 7, 1675. 

Married John Trumbull in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 3, 1696. 

References: #24, #25, p. 43, #43, #49, #50, and #64, p. 77. 



234 



Chart X Biographies 

428. Nathaniel 4 Harmon 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 15, 1686/87. 

Died in Suffield on October 16, 1763. 

Married Esther 3 Austin in Suffield August 24, 1710. 

The children of Nathaniel and Esther, all born in Suffield, were: 

1. Joel 5 , b. 1711, d.y. 

2. Nathaniel 5 , b. 1713. 

3. Reuben 5 , b. 1714/15. 

4. Mary 5 , b. 1717. 

5. Joel . b. August 12, 1719. m. Rebecca 5 Phelps . 

6. Simeon 5 , b. 1721. 

7. Ruth 5 , b. 1723, d.y. 

8. Asahel 5 ,b. 1726. 

9. Nehemiah 5 ,b. 1728. 

References: #62, pp. 160 and 162-163 and #315, p. 1 1. 

429. Esther 3 Austin 

Born in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 1 1, 1686/87. 
Died in Suffield on May 20, 1761. 

Married Nathaniel Harmon in Suffield on August 24, 1710. 
References: #62, p. 160 and #215, p. 1 1. 

430. Joseph Phelps 

Born in Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut on October 9, 1689. 

Died on June 18, 1763. 

Married first, Rebecca North of Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut in Simsbury on January 7, 

1713/14. She died in 1732 at age thirty-nine. 
The children of Joseph and Rebecca, all born in Turkey Hills, Connecticut, were: 

1. Hannah 5 , b. 1714, d.y. 

2. Joseph 5 , b. 1716. 

3. Hannah 5 , b. 1718. 

4. Elijah 5 , b. 1720. 

5. Ezekiel 5 ,b. 1723. 

6. Rebecca 5 , b. January 22, 1724, m. Joel 5 Harmon . 

7. Elizabeth 5 , b. 1726. 

8. Lydia 5 ,b. 1728. 

9. Abel 5 , b. 1730. 

10. Hezekiah 5 , twin, b. 1732. 

11. Keziah 5 , twin, b. 1732. 

Married second, Hannah Clark of Hartford in 1735. She died in 1765. 
Other information: 



235 



Chart X Biographies 

Joseph 4 settled at Turkey Hills, Connecticut where all of his children were born. 
The location of Turkey Hills cannot be identified on the road maps of today nor in the 
Geographical Dictionary of Connecticut but it was probably part of or near Windsor, 
Hartford, Connecticut. 
Reference: #64, p. 69 and #1 15, p. 570. 

832. James 1 Rising 

Born in Ketelsthorp, Norfolk, England about 1617. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 1 1, 1688. 

Married first, Elizabeth 2 Hinsdale in Boston on July 7, 1657. Their marriage ceremony was 
performed by the colonial governor, John Endicott. Elizabeth was from Medfield, Norfolk, 
Massachusetts. She died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut in 1669. 

The children of James and Elizabeth, all born in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, were: 

1. James 2 , b. 1658. 

2. John 2 , b. April 14, 1660, m. Sarah 3 Hale . 

3. Hannah 2 , b. 1662. 

4. Moses , b. 1663. 

5. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1665. 

Married second, the widow Martha Bartlett in Windsor in 1673. She was twenty-five at the time. 
She died in 1674. 

Other information: 

On September 13, 1635, at age eighteen, James left England on the Dorset bound 
for Bermuda. The record of James' travels is incomplete but sometime after he married 
Elizabeth Hinsdale in Boston in 1657 they went back to Bermuda for an unknown length 
of time. By 1658 they were probably back in Salem Essex, Massachusetts where their 
children were born In 1 668 the family moved to Windsor, Connecticut where James ran a 
ferry In 1679, after his second wife died, James moved to Suffield where he died in 1688. 

References: #24, #25, p. 39, #29, pp. 1-5, #63, p. 3, #112, p. 167, and #134, pp. 248-249. 

834. Timothy 2 Hale 

Surname also spelled Hall 
Bom about 1642. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 26, 1689. 

Married Sarah Barber in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on November 26, 1663. 
The children of Timothy and Sarah, all except the youngest born in Windsor, were: 
1 Sarah 3 ., b April 9, 1665, m. John 2 Rising. Sr. 

2. Timothy 3 , b. 1667. 

3. John 3 , b. 1670. 

4 Thomas 3 , b. 1672. 

5. Samuel 3 , b 1673/74. 

6. Daughter 3 , b 1675, d.y. 

7 Josiah 3 , b 1678. 

8 Hi 
Other information 

236 



Hannah 3 , b 1680 in Suffield 



Chart X Biographies 

Timothy brought his wife and seven children to Suffield about 1679, ten years 
before he died. 

Timothy's parents are shown as unknown on Chart X. He could have been the son 
of Thomas Hale of Hartford, Norwalk, and Charlestown who had a son, Timothy, or the 
son of John Hale of Concord who also had a son, Timothy. This problem is discussed in 
references #29 and #45. 
References: #1, #24, #25, p. 34, #29, p. 19, #45, pp. 273-275, and #133. 

836. William Hamblin 

Also known as William Hambleton. 

William's parentage and the dates and places of his birth and death are unknown. However, he was 

in Boston about 1650 and married Mary Richardson there on August 7, 1654. 
The children of William and Mary were: 

1. William, b. 1667. 

2. Mary, b. 1668/9. 

3. Nathaniel , b. March 27, 1671 in Boston, m. Marv Pierce . 
References: #24 and #134, p. 145. 

838. Richard Pierce 

Richard's parentage and the dates and places of his birth and death are unknown. He was a 
carpenter in Muscongus or Pemaquid, Maine about ten miles east of Boothbay Harbor. In 1729 
descendants recorded an Indian deed to Richard Pierce from John Summersett on January 9, 1641 
for land between Round Pond and Pemaquid Point. 

About 1646 Richard married Elizabeth 2 Brown in Pemaquid. Richard and Elizabeth had 
eight children in the period 1647 to about 1670. My ancestor, Mary Pierce , who married Nathaniel 
Hamblin was the youngest but the place and date of her birth are unknown. 

Reference #134 states that about 1732 Nathaniel Hamblin and his wife, Mary Pierce, 
deeded to others "all lands from their great-grandfather, Richard Pierce, at the place known by the 
name of Miscongus (sic), Maine." 
References: #24 and #1 34, pp. 144 and 225-226. 

840. Anthony 2 Austin 

This is the same person as (858) Anthony 2 Austin on this chart. 
Bom about 1636, probably in Bishopstoke, Hampshire, England. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on August 22, 1708. 
Married Esther 2 Hueeins in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on October 19, 1664. 
The children of Anthony and Esther, the first three born in Rowley and the last four born in 
Suffield, were: 

1. Richard 3 , b. 1666. 

2. Anthony 3 , b. 1668. 

3. John 3 , b. October 22, 1672, m. Agnes 3 King. 

4. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1678. 

5. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1681, d.y. 



237 



Chart X Biograpliies 

6. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1684, d.y. 

7. Esther 3 , b. January 1 1, 1686/87, m. Nathaniel 4 Harmon . 
Other information: 

Anthony 2 came to America in the Bevis in 1638 with his parents and his brother, 
Richard 2 . The family settled in Charlestown, Middlesex, Massachusetts. The father, 
Richard Austin died soon thereafter. 

About 1664 Anthony moved to Rowley, Massachusetts and in 1674 he moved to 
Suffield, Connecticut where he was an original proprietor. He was a lieutenant of the 
militia in 1681 and a captain in 1697. He was the first town clerk in Suffield for twenty- 
seven years and was the schoolmaster from 1696 to 1707. 
References: #24, #25, p. 29, #62, p. 160, and #215, pp. 10-11. 

841. Esther Huggins 

This is the same person as (859) Esther Huggins on this chart. 

Born in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire in 1642/43. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on March 7, 1697/98. 

Married Anthony Austin in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on October 19, 1664. 

Other information: 

Esther's parents were John Huggins and Bridget Green of Hampton. 
References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 49 1 , and #2 1 5, p. 1 0. 

842. James 2 King. Sr. 

See (784) James King Sr. on Chart VIII, the same person. 

843. Elizabeth 2 Fuller 

See (785) Elizabeth 2 Fuller on Chart VIII, the same person. 

844. Samuel 3 Hall. Jr. 

Born in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts on December 1 1, 1664. 

Died in Enfield, Hartford, Connecticut on May 7, 1733. His widow, Sarah, was living in Somers, 

Tolland, Connecticut in 1737. 
Married first, Elizabeth Bourne in Taunton on April 7, 1686. She died before 1707. This is not the 

same person as ( 1 745) Elizabeth' Bourne on Chart XI. 
The children of Samuel and Elizabeth, all born in Taunton, were: 
1 Elizabeth 4 , b 1687. 



2. Remember 4 , b 1689. 

3. Nicholas 4 , b. 1690. 
4 Mary 4 , b. 1692. 

Nathaniel 4 , b. May 18, 1695, m. Mabel 4 Winchell . 

6. Mehitabel 4 , b 1697. 

7. Enoch 4 , b. 1699. 

8. IchabcKT 



238 



Chart X Biographies 

3 2 

Married second, Sarah Rising, daughter of John Rising. St. . in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut 
about 1708. Samuel and Sarah had seven children in the period 1709-1719. None of these 
seven children are my ancestors. 

Other information: 

Samuel came to Suffield as a widower in 1707 with his eight children. In 1719 he 
moved with his second wife, Sarah, and their children to Stafford, Tolland, Connecticut. 

References: #24, #29, p. 27, and #229, p. 3 1 1 . 

846. Thomas 3 Winchell 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on May 25, 1669. 

Died in August 1697, probably in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married Sarah Moore in Windsor on April 26, 1690. She married second, Benjamin Winchell in 

Suffield on July 1 8, 1 700. Benjamin was Thomas' cousin. 
The children of Thomas and Sarah were: 

1 . Samuel 4 , b. 1 690 in Windsor. 

2. Hannah 4 , b. 1693 in Windsor. 

3. Sarah 4 , b. 1695. 

4. Mabel . m. Nathaniel Hall . 
Other information: 

It appears that Thomas moved from Windsor to Suffield about 1695. Reference 
#115 (History of Windsor) shows the births of only the first two children, Samuel and 
Hannah. 
References: #24, #64, pp. 65, 70, and 76, #88, v. IV, p. 591, #115, pp. 796-797, and #229, p. 

311. 

848. Thomas 2 Spencer. Jr. 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut about 1641. 

Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 23, 1689. 

Married Esther 2 Andrews in Hartford about 1669. She died in Suffield on March 1697/98. 

The children of Thomas and Esther, all but the last one born in Hartford, were: 

1. Esther , b. about 1666. 

2. Elizabeth 3 , b. about 1668. 

3. Thomas , b. about 1670. 

4. Samuel 3 , b. about 1674, m. Elizabeth Mascraft . 

5. William 3 , b. about 1677. 

6. Anna 3 , b. about 1680 in Suffield. 

Note: The references all use the word say when reporting the marriage year for Thomas 
and Esther 2 and the years for the births of their children. Therefore, these dates are 
speculative. 

Other information: 

Thomas and his family moved from Hartford to Suffield before 1680. 

References: #24, #25, p. 40, #79, pp. 166-167, #88, v. IV, p. 149, and #225. 



239 



Chart X Biograpliies 



850. Daniel Mascraft 



Surname also spelled Mascroft and Marshcroft. 

Died before 1 703, probably in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts. 
Married Mary Gorton in Roxbury on May 23, 1665. She died in 1703. 

The children of Daniel and Mary, bom either in Roxbury or Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, 
were: 

1. Mary, bapt. 1666/67. 

2. Daniel, bapt. 1667. 

3. Elizabeth , b. February 1, 1669 in Sudbury, m. Samuel Spencer . 

4. Hannah, b. 1677. 

5 Mehitable, bapt. 1683/84. 
6. Samuel, bapt. 1684. 

Other information: 

The ancestry of Daniel is unknown. And, except for Elizabeth, the places of birth 
of his children are uncertain. He was in both Roxbury and Sudbury at one time or another. 
References: #24, #79, p. 174, #88, v. HI, p. 159, and Roxbury and Sudbury vital records. 

852. Joseph 2 Trumbull 

This is the same person as (888) Joseph Trumbull on Chart XI. 
Born in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on March 19, 1647. 
Died in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on August 15, 1684. 
Married Hannah Smith in Rowley on May 6, 1669. 
The children of Joseph and Hannah were: 

1 . Hannah , b. in Rowley. 

2. John . bapt on November 27, 1670 in Rowley, m. Elizabeth Winchell . 

3. Mary , bapt. 1675 in Rowley. 

4. Joseph 1 , b 1678 in Suffield. 

5. Ammi , b. 1681 in Suffield. 

6 Benoni 3 , b 1684 in Suffield. 
Other information: 

Joseph was a farmer. About 1675 the family moved from Rowley to Suffield. 
The move was probably just before King Philip's War which started in June 1675. Joseph 
died in Suffield five days after his son Benoni was born. 

One of Joseph's grandsons, Jonathan Trumbull, was governor of Connecticut from 
1 769 to 1 784 and one of his great grandsons, also Jonathan Trumbull, was governor of 
Connecticut for another eleven years. 
References: #24, #25, pp. 42 and 43, #43, p. 4, #45, p. 744, #49, #1 15, p. 766, and #142, p. 

77. 

853. Hannah Smith 

This is the same person as (889) Hannah Smith on Chart XI. 
Born in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts on January 24, 1647. 
Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, probably after 1697/98. 
Married first, Joseph Trumbull in Rowley on May 6, 1669. 

240 



Chart X Biographies 



Married second, John Strong, Jr. of Windsor in 1686. 
References: #25, pp. 42 and 43, #43, p. 4, and #49. 

854. David 2 Winchell 

This is the same person as (890) David Winchell on Chart XI. 

Baptized in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on October 22, 1643. 

Died on December 29, 1723, probably in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married first, Elizabeth Filley in Windsor on November 17, 1669. They had one son, Joseph, b. 

1670. Elizabeth apparently died in childbirth or shortly thereafter. 
Married second, Mary Griffin in Windsor on May 1, 1672. 
The children of David and Mary, the first two bom in Windsor and the last six bom in Suffield, 

were: 

1. Christian 3 , b. 1673. 

2. Elizabeth 3 , b. December 7, 1675, m. John Trumbull . 

3. Martin 

4. David 3 , b. 1682. 

5. Mary 3 , b. 1685. 

6. Jedediah 3 , b. 1688, d.y. 

7. Jedediah 3 , b. 1690. 

8. Samuel 3 , b. 1693. 
Other information: 

David 2 and his family moved from Windsor to Suffield, probably after King Philip's 
War. David was the seventh grantee of land in Suffield in May 1671 . He was a surveyor 
in Suffield for twenty-five years, surveying over 9,000 acres. 
References: #24, #25, p. 43, #64, p. 68, and #1 15, p. 797. 

855. Marv Griffin 

This is the same person as (891) Mary Griffin on Chart XI. 
Bom in Simsbury (or Windsor), Hartford, Connecticut in 1646. 
Died June 23, 1728, probably in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married David Winchell in Windsor on May 1, 1672. 
References: #24 and #64, p. 68. 

856. Nathaniel 3 Harmon 
See (396) Nathaniel 3 Harmon on Chart Vm, the same person. 

857. Marv 3 Skinner 
See (397) Marv 3 Skinner on Chart VITI, the same person. 

858. Anthony 2 Austin 
See (840) Anthony 2 Austin on this chart, the same person. 



241 



Chart X Biograplues 



859. Esther 2 Hut 



See (84 1 ) Esther 2 Hueeins on this chart, the same person. 

860. Joseph 3 Phelps 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on August 2, 1667. 
Died in Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut on January 20, 1750. 
Married first, Mary Collier in Simsbury in 1688. She died in 1697. 
The children of Joseph and Mary, all born in Simsbury, were: 

1 . Joseph 4 , b. October 9, 1 689, m. Rebecca North . 

2. Hannah 4 , b. 1693. 

3. Mary 4 , b. 1696. 

Married second, Sarah Case in Simsbury about 1705. There were four children from this union. 

She died in 1757. 
References: #24 and # 1 1 5, p. 567. 

1666. Robert' Hinsdale 

Born about 1617, probably in Dedham, Essex, England. 

Killed by Indians at Deerfield, Franklin, Massachusetts on September 18, 1675. 

Married first, Ann , probably in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, about 1638. She died 

in 1666. 
The children of Robert and Ann, all born in Dedham, were: 
1 Elizabeth 2 , b. about 1638, m James Rising . 

2 



2. 
3. 


Barnabas , b. 1639. 
Samuel 2 , b. 1641/42. 


4. 


Gamaliel 2 , b 1642/43. 


5. 
6 
7. 


Mary , b. 1644. 
Experience , b. 1646. 
John 2 , b. 1647/48. 


8 Ephraim 2 , b. 1650. 
ied second, Elizabeth _, 



_, widow of John Hawkes, about 1667. Robert and 
Elizabeth had one son, Strife. Robert and Elizabeth parted in 1674. 
Other information: 

Robert's date and place of birth are unknown. He immigrated to America about 
1637 and settled in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts. About 1652 his family and twelve 
other families moved ten miles southwest and founded the town of Medfield, Norfolk, 
Massachusetts Then about 1 672 the family moved to Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts. 

Sometime later they moved again, this time to Deerfield, Massachusetts, and that is 
where he and his sons, Barnabas, John, and Samuel, were all killed by Indians in the Bloody 
Brook Massacre on September 18, 1675 during King Philip's War. This massacre was 
twenty-nine years before the Tragedy at Deerfield during Queen Anne's War. See 
Appendix 7. 



242 



Chart X Biographies 

References: #23, v. I, pp. 100-1 1 1 and v. II, pp. 201-202, #24, #29, pp. 1-4, #63, p. 3, #134, 
pp. 159-160, #151, p. 69, #170, p. 69 of genealogies, #282, pp. 135-137, and 
#343, p. 159. 

1670. Thomas' Barber 

Also known as Thomas Barberon. 

Born in England about 1614, probably in Bedfordshire. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 1 1, 1662. 

Married Jane Bancroft in Windsor on October 7, 1 640. She may have been a widow. 

The children of Thomas and Jane, all born in Windsor, were: 

1. John 2 , b. 1642. 

2. Thomas 2 , b. 1644. 

3 . Sarah 2 , b. July 1 9, 1 646, m. Timothy 2 Hale . 

4. Samuel 2 , b. 1648. 

5. Mary 2 , b. 1651. 

6. Josiah , b. 1654. 
Other information: 

Thomas came to America on the Christian in 1635 at age twenty-one. He was 
probably first in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts but in the same year he 
moved to Windsor, Connecticut. Thomas was a carpenter by trade. He was also a 
sergeant in the militia and distinguished himself in the Pequot War. 
References: #24, #25, p. 30, #29, p. 19, #88, pp. 1 13-1 14, #1 15, p. 50, and #298, pp. 15-19. 

1678. John 1 Brown 

Probably born in Barton Regis, Gloucester, England, date unknown. 

Married Margaret Hayward in England about 1625. Their children are unknown except for my 
ancestor Elizabeth 2 Brown who married Richard Pierce . 

Other information: 

John and Margaret immigrated to America but the date and place are unknown. 
However, in 1639 they settled in Pemaquid, Lincoln, Maine. In 1665 the family moved 
about eight miles onto land that the son-in-law, Richard Pierce , had purchased. At the time 
of King Philip's War (1675) the family moved to Boston and it is not known if John 
returned to Maine or died in Boston. 

References: #24 and # 1 34, p. 79. 

1680. Richard' Austin 

Born in England in 1 598. 

Died in 1638 and buried in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts. 

Married Elizabeth in England about 1 63 1 . 

The children of Richard and Elizabeth, both probably born in Bishopstoke, Hampshire, England, 
were: 

1. Richard 2 , b. about 1632. 

2. Anthony 2 , b. about 1636, m. Esther 2 Hueeins . 



243 



Chart X Biographies 

Other information: 

Richard 1 came to America from Southampton on the Bevis in 1638 with his wife 

and two children. He was forty years old at the time and had been a tailor in Bishopstoke. 

He settled in Charlestown, Middlesex, Massachusetts but died shortly thereafter. 
References: #24, #25, p. 29, #88, v. I, p. 8 1 , and #2 1 5, p. 9. 

1684. William' King 
See ( 1 568) William' King on Chart VIII, the same person. 

1686. John' Fuller 
See (1 570) John 1 Fuller on Chart VIII, the same person. 

1688. Samuel 2 Hall. Sr. 

Born in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts in 1644. 

Died in Taunton in 1 690. 

Married Elizabeth White in Taunton about 1663. She married second, Jonathan Pratt as his second 

wife in Taunton in 1690. She died in 1707. 
The children of Samuel and Elizabeth, all born in Taunton, were: 

1 Samuel . b. December 1 1, 1664, m. Elizabeth Bourne as his first wife. 

2. John 3 , b. 1666. 

3. Nicholas 3 , b. 1670. 

4. Mary 3 , b. 1672. 

5. Sarah 3 , b. 1674, d.y. 

6. Ebenezer", b. 1677. 

7. Sarah 3 , b. 1679. 

8. George 3 , b. 1681. 

References: #24, #88, v. II, p. 338, #115, v. II, p. 363, and #229, p. 311. 

1692. Nathaniel 2 Winchell 

Bom about 1633, either in England or in Massachusetts and brought to Windsor, Hartford, 

Connecticut as a baby. 
Died in Windsor on March 8, 1700. 

Married Sarah Porter in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut on April 8, 1664. She died in 1725. 
The children of Nathaniel and Sarah, all bom in Windsor, were: 

1. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1665. 

2. Thomas 3 , b. May 25, 1669, m. Sarah Moore . 

3. Sarah 3 , b. 1674. 

4 Stephen 3 , b. 1677. 

5. John 3 , b. 1680. 

6. Mary 3 , b. 1683. 

References: #24, #27, p. 460, #64, pp. 65-67, and #88, v. Ill, p. 464 and v. IV, p. 591 . 



244 



Chart X Biographies 



1696. Thomas Spencer 



See (1 574) Thomas' Spencer on Chart VHI, the same person. 

1698. William' Andrews 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut in 1659. 

Married first, Mary . Time and place of this marriage are unknown. She died in 

Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts in January 1639/40. 
Married second, Abigail Graves in Hartford, Connecticut. 
William's children were: 

1 . Elizabeth 

2. John 2 

3. Thomas 

4. Abigail 

2 2 

5. Esther . b. September 16, 1641, m. Thomas Spencer . 
2. Samuel 2 , b. 1645. 

Other information: 

The dates, place and order of birth of William's children are uncertain. However, 

2 2 

one thing is known. Abigail was the mother of Samuel and my ancestor Esther Andrews. 
William's origins are unknown; however, he was in Cambridge, Massachusetts by 
1634. He moved to Hartford about 1639 and was an original proprietor there. He was the 
first schoolmaster in Hartford, teaching from 1643 to 1656. He was also the town clerk 
from 1651 to 1658. 
References: #24, #27, pp. 9-10, #53, p. 228, and #88, v. I, p. 56. 

1702. John Gorton 

Died in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts in 1676. 

Married Mary in Roxbury about 1635. 

The children of John and Mary, all born in Roxbury, were: 

1. Mary, b. about 1636, d.y. 

2. Mary, b. 1641, d.y. 

3. Sarah, bapt. 1643. 

4. Hannah, b. 1646, d.y. 

5. Mary , bapt. July 1, 1648, m. Daniel Mascraft . 

6. Alice, bapt. 1652. 

7. Elizabeth, b. 1654, d.y. 

8. John, b. 1655. 

9. Abraham, bapt. 1659. 
Other information: 

John's ancestry is unknown. 
References: #24, #85, p. 194, #88, v. IT, p. 282, and Roxbury vital records. 

1704. John' Trumbull 
See (1 576) John' Trumbull on Chart VUI, the same person. 

245 



Chart X Biograpliics 



1708. Robert 1 Winchell 



This is the same person as (3384) Robert' Winchell on this chart and (1780) Robert Winchell on 

Chart XI. 
Probably born in Wales. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on January 21, 1667/68. 
His wife's name is unknown but she died in Windsor on July 10, 1655. 
Robert's children were: 

1. Nathaniel 2 , b. about 1633, either in England or Massachusetts, m. Sarah Porter . 

2. Jonathan 2 , b. about 1634 in Dorcester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts. 

3. Phebe 2 , bapt. 1638 in Windsor. 

4. Mary , bapt. 1641 in Windsor. 

5. David 2 , bapt. October 22, 1643 in Windsor, m. Mary Griffin . 

6. Joseph , bapt. 1645 in Windsor. 

7. Martha 2 , bapt. 1648 in Windsor, d.y. 

8. Benjamin , bapt. 1652 in Windsor. 
Other information: 

Robert was in Dorcester, Massachusetts at least as early as 1634. In 1635 he 

2 2 

moved to Windsor with his wife and two sons, Nathaniel and Jonathan . 
References: #64, pp. 6 1 -64 and # 1 1 5, p. 796. 

1710. John Griffin 

This is the same person as ( 1 782) John Griffin on Chart XI. 

Died in 1681. 

Married Hannah Bancroft on May 13, 1647. 

John and Hannah had ten children, one of whom was my ancestor, Mary Griffin who married 

David Winchell . 
Other information: 

John was one of the first settlers of Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut where he had 

a grant of land as a reward for the introduction of the manufacture of pitch and tar. He 

was a state representative for some years. John moved from Simsbury to Windsor, 

Hartford, Connecticut, date unknown. 
References: #24 and #64, p. 68. 

1712. John Harmon 
See (792) John Harmon on Chart VIII, the same person. 

1714. Joseph 2 Skinner 
See (794) Joseph Skinner on Chart VIII, the same person. 

1715. Mary 2 Fillev 
See (795) Mary 2 Fillev on Chart VIII, the same person. 



246 



Chart X Biographies 

1716. Richard 1 Austin 
See (1680) Richard Austin on this chart, the same person. 

1720. Joseph 2 Phelps 

Born in England about 1 629. 

Died in Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut in 1684. 

Married first, Hannah Newton in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 20, 1660. 

The children of Joseph and Hannah were: 

1. Joseph . b. August 2, 1667 in Windsor, m. Mary Collier . 

2. Hannah 3 , b. 1668, d.y. 

3. Timothy , b. 1671 in Simsbury. 

4. Sarah , b. 1672 in Simsbury. 

5. William , b. 1674 in Simsbury. 

Married second, Mary Salmon, the widow of Thomas Salmon, in Simsbury in 1676. There were 
no children from this union. 

Other information: 

Joseph came to America on the Mary and John in 1630 at age one with his 
parents and older siblings. The family settled first in Dorchester (now part of Boston), 
Massachusetts. Joseph's mother, Elizabeth 1 , died in 1635 and in 1636 his widowed father, 
William 1 Phelps , moved the family to Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. In 1668 Joseph 
moved to Simsbury, Connecticut, where his first wife, Hannah, died in 1675. 

References: #24 and #1 1 5, pp. 563-565. 

1722. Joseph Collier 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut on November 16, 1691. 

Married first, an unknown wife. They probably had one child, Mary, who was born in 1662 and 

died young. 
Married second, Elizabeth Sanford about 1667, probably in Hartford. 
The children of Joseph and Elizabeth, all probably born in Hartford, were: 

1. Joseph, b. 1668. 

2. Mary , b. 1669, m. Joseph 3 Phelps . 

3. Sarah, b. 1673. 

4. Elizabeth, b. 1675. 

5. Abel, b. 1677, d.y. 

6. John, b. 1679. 

7. Abigail, b. 1682. 

8. Susanna, b. 1684. 

9. Ann, b. 1687. 
Other information: 

Joseph came to Hartford from Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1666. He 
may also have lived in Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut at one time. 
References: #24, #27, pp. 188-189, and #88, v. I, p. 433. 



247 



Chart X Biograpliics 

3374. Thomas 1 Emerson 

See (3 142) Thomas' Emerson on Chart Vm, the same person. 

3375. Elizabeth Brewster 

See (3 143) Elizabeth Brewster on Chart VTJI, the same person. 

3376. George 1 Hall 

Died in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts on October 30, 1669. 

Married Mary in Taunton about 1639. 

The children of George and Mary, all born in Taunton, were: 

1. John 2 

2. Joseph 

3. Samuel 2 , b 1644, m. Elizabeth White . 

4. Charity 

5. Sarah 
Other information: 

George and his wife, Mary, are said to have emigrated from Devon County in 

England to Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1637. He was one of the forty-six 

original purchasers of lands in Taunton, Massachusetts and a founder of that town in 1639. 

1 le was a man of large property and influence. He was involved in "iron works," as were 

many of his descendants. 

Except for Samuel . his third son, the order of birth and dates of birth of George's 
children are unknown. 
References: #24, #85, p. 208, #88, v. II, p. 333, #1 15, v. II, p. 363, and #229, p. 311. 

3384. Robert 1 Winchell 
See ( 1 708) Robert Winchell on this chart, the same person. 

3386. Thomas Porter 

Died in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut in 1697. 

Married Sarah Hart in Hartford, Connecticut on November 20, 1644. 

The children of Thomas and Sarah, all except the first three bom in Farmington, were: 

1 Sarah . b 1 646 in Hartford, m. Nathaniel 2 Winchell . 

2 Thomas , b. 1648 in Hartford. 

3. Joanna 2 , b 1652 in Hartford. 

4. Dorothy 2 , b. 1654. 

5. Samuel 

6. Rachel 2 , b. 1658. 

7. Martha 
8 Ruth 2 
9. Mary 2 

Other information: 

248 



Chart X Biographies 

The ancestry of Thomas is unknown but he was in Hartford by January 1639/40. 
He moved to Farmington in 1653. 
References: #24, #27, p. 460, #84, pp. 258 and 270-271, and #88, v. m, p. 464. 

3387. Sarah 2 Hart 

Born in England, probably about 1628. 

Probably died in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married Thomas Porter in Hartford, Connecticut on November 20, 1644. 

Other information: 

Sarah was the eldest of six children of Stephen Hart and an unknown first wife 
whom he married in England about 1627. Stephen was baptized in Ipswich, England on 
January 25, 1602/03 and died in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut in 1682/83. 

Stephen was in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts by 1632. In 1636 he went 
with Rev. Hooker to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was an original proprietor. About 
1640, he moved to Farmington, Connecticut where he was again an original proprietor. 
Stephen was the first representative from Farmington to the General Court. He was a 
farmer and land owner and served in the Pequot War. 

References: #24, #27, p. 294, #84, pp. 258-259 and 270-271, and #88, v. II, p. 368. 

3392. Gerard Spencer. Sr. 
See (1452) Gerard Spencer. Sr. on Chart VI, the same person. 

3424. Francis 1 Harmon 
See (1 584) Francis 1 Harmon on Chart VTJI, the same person. 

3428. John 1 Skinner 

See (1588) John 1 Skinner on Chart VJJI, the same person. 

3429. Mary 2 Loomis 

See (1 589) Mary 2 Loomis on Chart VIII, the same person. 

3430. William' Fillev 

See (1 590) William' Fillev on Chart VUI, the same person. 

3440. William' Phelps 

Baptized in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England on August 19, 1599. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on July 14, 1672. 

Married first, Elizabeth 1 in England about 1619. She died in Dorchester (now part of 

Boston), Massachusetts in 1635. 
The children of William and Elizabeth, all born in England, were: 

1. William 2 , b. about 1620. 

249 



Chan X Biographies 

2. Sarah 2 , b. about 1623. 

3. Samuel , b about 1625. 

4. Nathaniel , b. about 1627. 

5. Joseph 2 , b. about 1629, m. Hannah Newton . 

Married second, Mary Dover in Windsor about 1638. William and Mary had two children, both 

bom in Windsor. 
Other information: 

In 1630 William 1 and Elizabeth came to America on the Mary and John bringing 
with them their five children. William's younger brother, (1548) George Phelps on Chart 
VIII, also came on the same ship. 

William and his family settled in Dorchester where they were members of (1790) 
Rev. John 1 Warham's church. William's wife, Elizabeth, died in 1635 and in 1636 William 
and his children moved to Windsor, Connecticut. His brother, George, had preceded him 
in the first emigration of Rev. Warham's church in the fall of 1635. 

In Windsor as in Dorchester, William ranked as an honored and active citizen. He 
was a member of the Court of Magistrates in 1637 which declared war against the Pequots. 
He was foreman of the first grand jury in 1643 and he was a member of the General Court 
for twelve sessions. 

William Phelps and his brother (1548) George Phelps were probably sons of 

William Phelps of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England. However, there is conflicting 

information in the references and the parentage of William and George is shown as 

unknown. See reference #108 for a discussion of this problem. 

References: #24, #85, p. 356, #88, v. Ill, p. 407, #107, p. 104, #108, v. 7, pp. 99-100, #115, 

pp. 563-564, #117, pp. 62-63, and #203, p. 154. 

3446. Robert Sanford 

Born in 1615, probably in England. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut in June 1676. 

Married Ann Adams about 1643, probably in Hartford. She died in 1682. 

The children of Robert and Ann, all born in Hartford, were: 

1. Zachary, b. about 1644. 

2 Elizabeth , b. February 19, 1645/46, m. Joseph Collier . 

3. Ezekiel, b. 1647/48. 

4. Mary, b. 1650. 

5. Sarah 

6. Robert, b. 1656. 
7 Hannah 

8. Abigail 
References: #24 and #27, p. 492. 



250 



CHART XI - Lucy Maria 7 Seymour 





108 

BEVTL 6 

SEYMOUR 


ASHBEL 5 
SEYMOUR 


216 


BEVTL 4 

SEYMOUR 


432 


THOMAS 3 
SEYMOUR 


864 JOHN 2 SEYMOUR 








1668/69- 1740 

MARY 

WATERS 


865 Mary 2 Watson (b) 








1712/23- 1774 

THANKFUL 4 
MERRILL 


433 
434 


866 BEVTL WATERS 








1677-1746 

ABEL 3 

MERRILL 


867 Sarah 








1748- 1814 

ABIGAIL 6 
WFJJ.ES 


217 

218 


868 JOHN 2 MERRILL 








1679/80-1759 

MABEL 3 
EASTON 


869 Sarah 2 Watson (b) 








1712- 1801 

ROBERT 5 
WELLES, III (e) 


435 
436 


870 JOHN 2 EASTON 








1683/84- 

ROBERT 4 

WELLES, JR. 


871 Elizabeth 


<4 




1782 - 1852 

109 


872 ROBERT 3 WELLES, SR. 








1684-1738 

Sarah 4 
Wolcott (a) 


873 Elizabeth 2 Goodrich 








1710- 1786 

ABIGAIL 4 
BURNHAM (e) 


437 
438 


874 SAMUEL 3 WOLCOTT 








1686- 

WILUAM 3 
BURNHAM JR. 


875 Judith 3 Appleton 








1749- 1786 


219 


876 WILLIAM 2 BURNHAM, SR. 




877 Elizabeth Loomis 




1684- 1750 

Hannah 4 
Wolcott (a) 








1713-1794 


439 


878 SAMUEL 3 WOLCOTT 




879 Judith 3 Appleton 




1684- 


1 1 





n 



MARIA' 
SEYMOUR 



Lucym. Aretas 6 Rising (Chart X). 



1809 


1882 


1H> 


220 

CALEB 5 
PERKINS 


JOSEPH 4 
PERKINS, JR. 




JOSEPH 3 
PERKINS. SR. 


880 JACOB 2 PERKINS 




LUCY 6 
PERKINS 








1674-1726 

Martha 3 
Morgan 


881 Elizabeth 2 Whipple 








1704- 1794 

MARY 5 

BUSHNEIX 


441 
442 


882 JOSEPH 2 MORGAN 








1681- 

CALEB 4 
BUSHNELL (0 


883 Dorothy 3 Parke 








1749- 

221 

222 

SARAH 5 
TRUMBULL 


884 RICHARD 3 BUSHNELL (c) 








1679-1724/25 

Anne 3 
LefTingwell (f) 


885 Elizabeth 2 Adsate 








1707/08- 1795 

JOHN 4 
TRUMBULL. JR 


443 


886 THOMAS 2 LF.FFINGWELL, 








1680- 

JOHN 3 
TRUMBULL. SR. 


887 Mary 3 Bushnell (c) 


55 




1783- 1820 


111 

test 
that 
csfc 


888 JOSEPH 2 TRUMBULL 










1670- 1751/52 

ELIZABETH 3 

WINCHELL 


889 HANNAH SMITH 


(») " sisters 




(b) - sisters 

(c) ■ brother and sister 


1715- 1787 

SARAH 4 

WHITMAN 


445 

446 


890 DAVID 2 WINCHELL 


(d) - sisters 
(c) - cousins 




1675- 

SAMUEL 3 
WHITMAN 


891 MARY GRIFFIN 




(0 ~ cousins 

(a) ■ probably cousins 


1745- 1827 

hat a 

223 

iiow 


892 ZECHAR1AH 2 WHITMAN 






A name in capitals indica 


abl. 1676-1751 

SARAH 3 
STODDARD 


893 Sarah 3 AJcock 




biography is included for 
individual. The biographi 


1718- 1808 


447 


894 SOLOMON 2 STODDARD 




this chart 


1680- 1758 


895 ESTHER 2 WARHAM 







252 



CHART XI - Lucy Maria 7 Seymour 



1728 RICHARD 1 SEYMOUR 

1729 MERCY 1 RUSCOE 

1730 JOHN 1 WATSON, SR. 

1731 MARGARET 1 SMITH 

1732 Unknown 

1733 Unknown 

1734 Unknown 

1735 Unknown 

1736 NATHANIEL 1 MERRILL, JR. 

1737 Susanna Willerton 

1738 JOHN 1 WATSON, SR. 

1739 MARGARET 1 SMITH 

1740 JOSEPH 1 EASTON 

1741 Unknown 

1742 Unknown 

1743 Unknown 

1744 JOHN 2 WELLES 

1745 Elizabeth 1 Bourne 

1746 WILLIAM 1 GOODRICH 

1747 SARAH 2 MARVIN (d) 



1748 HENRY 2 WOLCOTT, JR. 

1749 Sarah 2 Newberry 

1750 SAMUEL 2 APPLETON, JR. 

1751 Hannah 2 Paine 

1752 THOMAS 1 BURNHAM 

1753 ANNA WRIGHT 

1754 NATHANIEL 2 LOOMIS 

1755 ELIZABETH 3 MOORE 

1756 HENRY 2 WOLCOTT, JR. 

1757 Sarah 2 Newberry 

1758 SAMUEL 2 APPLETON, JR. 

1759 Hannah- Paine 



3456 Robert Seymour 
3458 Roger Ruscoe 
3460 Unknown 
3462 Unknown 


3457 Elizabeth Waller 
3459 Sarah 
3461 Unknown 
3463 Unknown 


3464 
3466 
3468 
3470 


3465 
3467 
3469 
3471 




3472 NATHANIEL MERRILL, SR. 
3474 Unknown 
3476 Unknown 
3478 Unknown 


3473 
3475 
3477 
3479 


Mary Blacksoll 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 


3480 Unknown 

3482 

3484 

3486 


3481 
3483 
3485 
3487 


Unknown 



3488 THOMAS 1 WELLES 
3490 Unknown 
3492 JOHN GOODRICH 
3494 MATTHEW 1 MARVIN 



3496 HENRY 1 WALCOTT, SR. 
3498 THOMAS 1 NEWBERRY 
3500 SAMUEL 1 APPLETON, SR. 
3502 WILLIAM 1 PAINE, JR. 

3504 Unknown 

3506 Unknown 

3508 JOSEPH 1 LOOMIS 

3510 JOHN 2 MOORE 

3512 HENRY 1 WALCOTT, SR. 
3514 THOMAS 1 NEWBERRY 
3516 SAMUEL 1 APPLETON, SR. 
3518 WILLIAM 1 PAINE, JR. 



3489 Alice 1 Tomes 

3491 Unknown 

3493 Margery How 

3495 Elizabeth 1 



See refs. #28, #42, 

& #69 for 

Seymour and Ruscoe 

English ancestry. 



Seeref. #83 for 

Merrill 
English ancestry. 



See refs. #45 & #223 for 

Tomes 

English ancestry. 



3497 ELIZABETH 1 SAUNDERS 
3499JOANE DABINOTT (g) 
3501 JUDITH 1 EVERARD 
3503 Hannah 1 

3505 Unknown 
3507 Unknown 
3509 MARY 1 WHITE 
3511 Unknown 

3513 ELIZABETH 1 SAUNDERS 
3515 JOANE DABINOTT 
3517 JUDITH 1 EVERARD 
3519 Hannah 1 



Seeref. #103 for 

Marvin 
English ancestry. 



Seeref. #26 for 

Newberry 
English ancestry. 



See refs. #26 & #49 for 

Appleton 

English ancestry. 



Seeref. #30 for 

Loo mis 
English ancestry. 



1760 JOHN 1 PERKINS 

1761 Judith 1 Gator 

1762 Matthew 1 Whipple 

1763 Anna' Hawkins 

1764 JAMES 1 MORGAN 

1765 Margery Hill 

1766 THOMAS 2 PARKE 

1767 DOROTHY 1 THOMPSON 

1768 RICHARD 2 BUSHNEIX 

1769 MARY 2 MARVIN (d) 

1770 THOMAS 1 ADGATE 

1771 Unknown 

1772 THOMAS 1 LEFFTNGWELL, SR. 

1773 Mary White 

1774 RICHARD 2 BUSHNELL 

1775 MARY 2 MARVIN 



3520 Unknown 
3522 Unknown 
3524 Unknown 
3526 Unknown 

3528 Unknown 

3530 Unknown 

3532 ROBERT 1 PARKE 

3534 JOHN THOMPSON 

3536 FRANCIS 1 BUSHNELL 
3538 MATTHEW 1 MARVIN 
3540 Unknown 
3542 

3544 Unknown 

3546 Unknown 

3548 FRANCIS 1 BUSHNELL 

3550 MATTHEW 1 MARVIN 



3521 Unknown 
3523 Unknown 
3525 Unknown 
3527 Unknown 

3529 Unknown 

3531 Unknown 

3533 MARTHA 1 CHAPLIN 

3535 ALICE 1 FREEMAN 

3537 FERRIS QUENELL 

3539 Elizabeth 1 

3541 Unknown 
3543 

3545 Unknown 

3547 Unknown 

3549 FERRIS QUENELL 

3551 Elizabeth 1 



Seeref. #36 for 

Bushnell 
English ancestry. 



1776 JOHN 1 TRUMBULL 

1777 Elinor 1 Chandler 

1778 Hugh Smith 

1779 Mary 



1780 ROBERT 1 WTNCHELL 

1781 Unknown 

1782 JOHN GRIFFIN 

1783 Hannah Bancroft 

1784 JOHN 1 WHITMAN 

1785 Ruth 

1786 JOHN 2 ALCOCK 

1787 Sarah 2 Palgrave 

1788 ANTHONY 1 STODDARD 

1789 Mary 2 Downing 

1790 JOHN 1 WARHAM 

1791 JANE 1 DABINOTT (g) 



3552 Unknown 
3554 Unknown 
3556 Unknown 
3558 Unknown 

3560 Unknown 

3562 

3564 Unknown 

3566 Unknown 

3568 Unknown 

3570 Unknown 

3572 GEORGE 1 ALCOCK 

3574 RICHARD 1 PALGRAVE 

3576 Unknown 

3578 EMANUEL 1 DOWNING 

3580 RICHARD WARHAM 

3582 John Dabinott 



3553 Unknown 
3555 Unknown 
3557 Unknown 
3559 Unknown 

3561 Unknown 

3563 

3565 Unknown 

3567 Unknown 

3569 Unknown 

3571 Unknown 

3573 ANNE 1 HOOKER 

3575 Anne 1 



3577 Unknown 

3579 LUCY 1 WTNTHROP 

3581 Agnes Cook 

3583 Johane Collins 



See refs. #26 & #349 for 

Palgrave 

English ancestry. 



Seeref. #108 for 

Warhham 
English ancestry. 



253 



Chart XI Biographies 



27. Lucy Maria Seymour 



See (27) Lucy Maria Seymour on Chart I, the same person. 

54. Bevil Seymour 

Bom in Newington, Hartford, Connecticut on September 4, 1782. 

Died in Otis, Berkshire, Massachusetts on October 20, 1852. 

Married first, Lucy Perkins in West Hartford, Connecticut on June 21, 1807. 

The children of Bevil and Lucy, all probably born in Otis, were: 

1. Caleb Perkins , b. 1808. 

7 f% 

2. Lucy Maria , b. November 2, 1809, m. Dr. Aretas Rising . 

3. Frederick Wales 7 , b. 1811. 

4. Henry 7 , b. 1813. 

5. Leverett Ashbel 7 , b. 1 8 1 6. 

Married second, Statira Curtiss in West Granville, Hampshire, Massachusetts in November 1821. 

There was one child by this union. 
Other information: 

Bevil and Lucy moved from Connecticut to Otis, Massachusetts shortly after they 

were married. Bevil was a merchant, hotelkeeper, justice of the peace, and postmaster. 
References: #1 , #28, #29, p. 64, #34, part IJJ, pp. 62 and 95, and #39, p. 61 7. 

55. Lucy Perkins 

Born in West Hartford, Connecticut on November 2, 1783. 
Died in Otis, Berkshire, Massachusetts on May 30, 1820. 
Married Bevil Seymour in West Hartford on June 21, 1807. 

References: #1, #28, p. 275, #29, p. 64, #34, part HI, pp. 62 and 95, #37, pp. 105 and 1 18, and 
#39, p. 617. 

108. Ashbel 5 Seymour 

Born in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 25, 1748. 

Died in West Hartford, Connecticut on July 31, 1814. 

Married first, Abigail 6 Welles in Newington, Hartford, Connecticut on February 13, 1777. She 

died in 1786. 
The children of Ashbel and Abigail, all born in Newington, were: 

1. Ashbel 6 , b. 1777. 

2. Erastus 6 ,b. 1779. 

3. Bevil 6 . b. September 4, 1782, m. Lucv 6 Perkins . 

Married second, Honor Willard on September 11, 1788. Ashbel and Honor had two children. 

Other information: 

Ashbel 5 responded to the Lexington Alarm in a militia company from Wethersfield. 
Later in 1775 and again in 1776 he was a sergeant in Captain H. Welles' Co., 2nd Regt., 
When he was a young, unmarried soldier in the early days of the Revolutionary War he 
wrote the following letter* to Josiah Willard in Newington: 



255 



Chart XI Biographies 

"Cambridg June 19 1775 

"I have now an opportunity to Right to you to inform you that throu the 
Goodness of God I am alive & well Notwith Standing the many hazards I have bin 
in of Late Last Satterday was a day wich New england Never beheld the Scene 
before Cannons Roaring drums Beating Bells Ringing to Alarm her sons to go 
fourth in her defense & to spill their Precious Blood to save her from Ruing & 
misery Last Satterday the Battel began about 2 Clock in the afternoon & Lasted 
near 3 hours Grape Shot & musket balls as thick as Hail had not the Lord been on 
our side thousands must have fell but our lives wear spared so that we hope that 50 
is the moste that are dead. Aboute as many more wounded their is 4 of our 
Company missing we suppose one dead 3 wounded Not mortally Wilson 
Roulinson, Roger Fox, Larance Sullivan Garshum Smith Dead newington people 
are well excep Daniel Demuns finger Shot of 

"In battel Some Shot throu their cloaths A remarcable providence that we 

were preserved For the Regulars stormed our entrenchment we was obliged to 

Retreat they firing upon us A mile their was above 4000 of the enimy tis supposed. 

It was thought we took an imprudent step by going so near the mouth of their 

cannon to entrench For they played upon us on three Sides with cannon. 

"Charlestown is all burnt down they intend to burn Cambrig. 

"Received yours dated June 12 which informs me that you are well & all your 
fathers family I remember my Love to them all & to all Enquirers "I subscribe my 
name 

"Ashbel Seymoure." 
♦From Jhe Revolutionary War Letters of Captain Roger Welles, Hartford, 1932, 
pp. 34-35. 
References: #1, #28, pp. 167-168, and #33, p. 621. 

109. Abigail 6 Welles 

Bom in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on April 6, 1749. 
Died in Newington, Hartford, Connecticut on December 4, 1786. 
Married Ashbel Seymour in Newington on February 13, 1777. 
References: #28, p 167 and #33, pp. 621 and 767. 

110. Dr. Caleb 5 Perkins 

Born in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on January 25, 1749. 

Died in Meadville, Crawford, Pennsylvania. 

Married Sarah 5 Trumbull in 1 774. 

The children of Caleb and Sarah, all probably born in West Hartford, Connecticut, were: 

1. Sarah 

2. John 6 

3. Elizabeth 

4 Lucy 6 , b November 2, 1 783, m. Bevil 6 Seymour . 

5. Caleb 

6. Sophia 



256 



Chart XI Biographies 

Other information: 

Caleb was a physician in West Hartford. In later years his health failed and he 
moved to Meadville where he died. 
References: #1, #28, p. 275, #29, p. 64, #34, part m, p. 32, #35, and #37, pp. 105 and 1 18. 

111. Sarah Trumbull 

Born in Hartford County, Connecticut on June 21, 1745. 
Died on February 26, 1827. 
Married Caleb Perkins in 1774. 
Other information: 

The John Trumbull who wrote the famous poem, McFinigal, was Sarah's brother. 
McFinigal constitutes a review of the blunders of the British leaders in the Revolution. 
References: #1, #34, part JTI, p. 32, #37, pp. 105 and 1 18, and #49. 

216. Bevil Seymour 

Baptized in Hartford, Connecticut on January 11, 1712/13. 
Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on November 17, 1774. 
Married first, Lydia Dodd. There were three children by this marriage. 
Married second, Thankful 4 Merrill in West Hartford on April 23, 1740. 
The children of Bevil and Thankful, all born in Wethersfield, were: 

1. Abel 5 , b. 1741. 

2. George 5 , b. 1742. 

3. Mabel 5 , b. 1744. 

4. Elias 5 ,b. 1746. 

5. Ashbel 5 . b. January 25, 1748, m. Abigail 6 Welles . 

6. Thankful 5 , b. 1750. 

7. Roswell 5 ,b. 1752. 

8. Lois 5 , b. 1754. 
Other information: 

Bevil settled in Newington Parish, Wethersfield, where all of his children were born 
and he and most of his family are buried. He was a lieutenant in the militia. 
References: #1, #27, p. 518, #28 pp. 85-86, and #33, p. 620. 

217. Thankful 4 Merrill 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on March 25, 1712. 

Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 24, 1801. 

Married Bevil 4 Seymour , as his second wife, in West Hartford on April 23, 1740. 

References: #27, p. 518, #28, p. 85, and #83, p. 184. 

218. Ca pt. Robert 5 Welles. Ill 

Born in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on September 7, 1710. 
Died on February 3, 1786, probably in Newington, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Abigail 4 Burnham . his cousin, on November 17, 1735. 

257 



Chart XI Biograptiics 

The children of Robert and Abigail, all probably born in Wethersfield, were: 

1. Abigail 6 , b. 1736. 

2. Sarah 6 , b. 1738. 

3. Robert 6 , b. 1740. 

4. Hannah 6 , b. 1742. 

5. Asa 6 , b. 1744. 

6. Chloe 6 ,b. 1746. 

7. Abigail 6 , b. April 6, 1 749, m. Ashbel 5 Seymour . 
Oilier information: 

Robert 5 was appointed Captain of the 10th Company in the 6th Regiment in 1748. 

He lived in Wethersfield but later moved to Newington on land willed to him by his father. 

Speaking of the Welles family in general, reference #33 states, "They were not ambitious 

and were more disposed to a hearty out-of-door life, and to hunting and fishing than any 

other; a hospitable folk, living generously and easily." 

References: #28, p. 167, #33, pp. 765-767, and #70, pp. 72-73. 

219. Abigail 4 Burnham 



Born on September 14, 1713, probably in Kensington, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Died on October 9, 1 794, probably in Newin 
Married Capt. Robert Welles. Ill , her cousir 
References: #28, p. 167 and #33, p. 767. 



Died on October 9, 1 794, probably in Newington, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Capt. Robert Welles. Ill , her cousin, on November 17, 1735. 



220. Dr. Joseph Perkins. Jr. 

Born in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on October 25, 1704. 

Died on July 7, 1 794, probably in Norwich. 

Married first, Lydia Pierce in 1728. She died on January 7, 1730, probably in childbirth with a 

daughter, Lydia. 
Married second, Mary Bushnell on July 23, 1730. 
The children of Joseph and Mary, probably all born in Norwich, were: 

1. Joseph 5 , b. 1733. 

2. Mary 5 , b. 1735. 

3. Simon 5 , b 1737. 

4. Elisha 5 , b. 1741. 

5. Andrew , b. 1743. 

6. Solomon 5 , b 1745. 

7. Caleb 5 , b January 25, 1 749, m. Sarah 5 Trumbull . 
Other information: 

Joseph was a graduate of Yale College in 1727. He studied medicine and 
practiced his profession in his native town where he became eminent in both medicine and 
surgery. 
References: #1, #34, part III, pp. 18-19, #35, and #36. 



258 



Chart XI Biographies 

221. Mary 5 Bushnell 

Bom in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on January 27, 1707/08. 
Died in 1795. 

Married Joseph Perkins as his second wife on July 23, 1730. 
Other information: 

Mary was the grandmother of Sarah Perkins, the artist who did the pastel portraits 

of Mary Bushnell . Caleb Perkins . Sarah Trumbull , and Lucy Perkins shown in reference 

#37. 
References: #1, #34, part HI, pp. 18-19, and #37, pp. 104-1 17. 

222. Rev. John 4 Trumbull Jr. 

Baptized in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut on April 23, 1715. 

Died on December 13, 1787, probably in Westbury (now Watertown), Litchfield, Connecticut. 
Married Sarah Whitman on July 4, 1 744, probably in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut. 
The children of John and Sarah were: 

1. Sarah 5 , b. June 21. 1745. m. Caleb 5 Perkins . 

2. Son 5 , d.y. 

3. Elizabeth , d.y. 

4. John 5 , b. 1 750 (A judge and the author of McFinigaf). 

5. Samuel , d.y. 

6. Elizabeth 5 , b. 1755. 

7. Lucy 5 , b. 1758. 

8. Daughter , d.y. 
Other information: 

John 4 was a cousin of Governor Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785), who was the 
Revolutionary War Governor of Connecticut. The John Trumbull who painted the four 
large murals of Revolutionary War subjects in the rotunda of the Capitol in Washington 
D.C. was the son of Governor Jonathan Trumbull. John 4 was a theology graduate from 
Yale and a minister. 
References: #38, #39, #43, #45, p. 744, #49, #50, and #5 1 . 

223. Sarah 4 Whitman 

Born in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut on March 12, 1718. 

Died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Sarah 5 (Trumbulll Perkins , in West Hartford, Connecticut 

on March 24, 1808. 
Married Rev. John 4 Trumbull. Jr. on July 4, 1 744, probably in Farmington. 
References: #38, #39, #45, p. 744, and #50. 

432. Thomas 3 Seymour 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on March 12, 1668/69. 

Died in Hartford on August 30, 1740. Buried at Center Church. 



259 



Cliart XI Biogiapliies 

Married first, Ruth Norton in February 1700. There were three children by this union. Ruth died 

in 1710. 
Married second, Mary Waters in Hartford on June 21, 1711. 
The children of Thomas and Mary, all baptized in Hartford, were: 

1. Bevir 1 bapt January 11 1712/13. m. Thankful 4 Merrill . 

2. Sarah 4 , bapt 1714. 

3. Jared 4 , bapt. 1715. 

4. Alice 4 , bapt. 1718/19. 

5. Josiah , bapt. 1721. 

6. Jerusah , bapt. 1723. 
Other information: 

Thomas was a captain in the militia. He was one of the prominent men of his day 
in 1 lartford and owned large tracts of land in and around Hartford. 
References: #24, #27, p. 503, #28, pp. 52-54, and #69, p. 89. 

433. Mary Waters 

Born in 1677, probably in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Died in Hartford on April 1 8, 1 746. Buried at Center Church. 

Married Thomas Seymour in Hartford on June 21, 1711 as his second wife. 

References: #27, p. 503, #28, pp. 52-54, and #32, p. 304. 

434. Abel 3 Merrill 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on January 25, 1679/80. 
Died in West Hartford on August 1 8, 1 759. 
Married Mabel Easton in Hartford on March 5, 1710/11. 
The children of Abel and Mabel, all born in Hartford or West Hartford, were: 
1 Tjiankfuj 4 ,, b. March 25, 1712. m. Bevil 4 Seymour . 

2. Mary 4 , b. 1713. 

3. Thomas 4 , b. 1715. 

4. Abel 4 , b. 1717/18. 

5. Elijah 4 , b. 1720. 

6 Susannah 4 , b. 1722. 

7 Nehemiah 4 , b. 1724. 
References: #27, #28, p. 85, #68, p. 8, and #83. 

435. Mabel Easton 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on January 17, 1683/84. 
Married Abel Merrill in Hartford on March 5, 1710/11. 
References: #27, #28, p. 85, and #68, p. 8.' 

436. Capt. Robert 4 Welles. Jr 
Born in Wethersfiekl. Hartford, Connecticut in 1684. 



260 



Chart XI Biographies 

Died in Wethersfield about 1738. 

Married Sarah 4 Wolcott in Wethersfield on December 12, 1706. 

The children of Robert and Sarah, all born in Wethersfield, were: 



1. 


Sarah 5 , b. 1708/09. 


2. 


Robert 5 . HI. b. September 7. 1710. m. Abigail 4 Bumham. 


3. 


Appleton 5 ,b. 1711/12. 


4. 


Abigail 5 , b. 1715. 


5. 


Elizabeth 5 , b. 1716/17. 


6. 


Mary 5 ,b. 1719. 


7. 


Josiah 5 ,b. 1720/21. 


8. 


Christopher 5 , b. 1724. 


9. 


Hezekiah 5 ,b. 1725. 


10. 


Martha 5 , b. 1729. 


11. 


Judith 5 , b. 1730/31. 


Other information: 



Robert was one of Wethersfield's foremost citizens in all town, church, and school 
affairs. 
Reference: #33, v. II, pp. 765-766 and 842. 

438. Rev. William 3 Burnharq Jr. 

Born in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 17, 1684. 
Died in Kensington, Hartford, Connecticut on September 23, 1750. 
Married first, Hannah 4 Wolcott . on May 18, 1704, probably in Wethersfield. 
The children of William and Hannah, the first five born in Wethersfield and the last four probably 
born in Kensington were: 

1. William 4 , b. 1705. 

2. Samuel 4 , b. 1707. 

3. Hannah 4 , b. 1708. 

4. Josiah 4 ,b. 1710. 

5. Lucy 4 , b. 1711. 

6. Abigail 4 , b. September 14, 1713, m. Ca pt. Robert 5 Welles. DT . 

7. Sarah 4 , b. 1719, d.y. 

8. Mary 4 , b. 1721/22. 

9. Appleton 4 ,b. 1724. 

Married second, the widow Anne Buckingham of Hartford sometime after 1747/48 when he was 

sixty-three years old. 
Other information: 

William 3 graduated from Harvard College in 1702. He became the first pastor in 

Kensington and served there until his death in the 38th year of his ministry. He was a 

gentleman of great wealth at his death. 
References: #33, pp. 166-167, #84, p. 165, #1 16, p. 47, and #1 17, pp. 201-202. 



261 



Chart XI Biographies 

440. Jose ph 3 Perkins. Sr. 

Born in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on June 21, 1674. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on September 6, 1726. 

Married Martha 3 Morgan of Preston, New London, Connecticut on May 22, 1700. 

The children of Joseph and Martha, all born in Norwich, were: 

1. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1701. 

2. Mary 4 , b. 1703. 

3 . Joseph 4 , b. October 25, 1 704, m. Mary 5 Bushnell . 

4. Martha 4 , b. 1705. 

5. John 4 , b. 1709. 

6. Jerusha , b 171 1. 

7. Matthew 4 , b. 1713. 

8. Deborah 4 , twin, b. 1715. 

9. Ann 4 , twin, b. 1715. 

10. Hannah 4 , b 1717. 
11 Simon 4 , b. 1720. 
12. William 4 , b. 1722. 

Other information: 

Joseph' moved from Ipswich to Norwich early in life. 
References: #24, #34, part III, pp. 12-13, and #35. 

442. Dr. Caleb 4 Bushnell 

Bom in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on May 26, 1679. 
Died in Norwich on February 12, 1724/25. 

Married Anne' Leffingwell . his first cousin, in Norwich on January 9, 1699/1700. 
The children of Caleb and Anne, all born in Norwich, were: 
I Anne 5 , b. 1705. 

2. Mary 5 , b. January 27, 1 707/08, m. Joseph 4 Perkins . 

3. Richard 5 , b. 1710. 
4 Elizabeth 5 , b. 1715. 

5. Abigail 

6. Zipporah 
Other information: 

Caleb was a prominent physician in Norwich and had a large practice. He 
accumulated a very substantial property for that period and was "granted a convenient 
place for building vessels on the west side of the river opposite the landing place." 
References: #24 and #221. 

444. Rev. John 3 Trumbull. Sr. 
See (426) Rev. John 3 Trumbull. Sr. on Chart X, the same person. 



262 



Chart XI Biographies 

445. Elizabeth 3 Winchell 
See (427) Elizabeth Winchell on Chart X, the same person. 

446. Rev. Samuel 3 Whitman 

Born in Hull, Massachusetts about 1676. Hull is on a peninsula about seven miles southeast of 

Boston. 
Died in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut on July 31, 1751. 
Married Sarah 3 Stoddard in Massachusetts on March 19, 1706/07. 
The children of Samuel and Sarah, all bom in Farmington, were: 

1. Elnathan 4 ,b. 1708/09. 

2. Solomon 4 , b. 1710. 

3. Eunice 4 , b. 1711/12. 

4. John 4 , b. 1713. 

5. Samuel 4 , b. 1715/16. 

6. Sarah 4 , b. March 12. 1718. m. Rev. John 4 Trumbull. Jr. 

7. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1720/21. 
Other information: 

Samuel 3 was a 1696 graduate of Harvard College. He was the minister at 
Farmington until his death and a trustee of Yale College from 1724 to 1746. 
References: #38, pp. 25-26, #39, pp. 41-64, #40, p. 116, and #45, p. 744. 

447. Sarah 3 Stoddard 

Born in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on April 1, 1680. 
Died in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut on September 10, 1758. 
Married Rev. Samuel 3 Whitman in Massachusetts on March 19, 1706/07. 
References: #40, p. 1 16 and #45, p. 744. 

864. John 2 Seymour 

Born about 1639, probably in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Died in Hartford between December 10, 1712 and August 3, 1713. 

Married Mary Watson . 



The children of John and Mary, all born in Hartford, were: 



1. John 3 , b. 1666. 

2. Thomas 3 , b. March 1 2, 1 668/69, m. Mary Waters . 

3. Mary 3 , b. 1670. 

4. Zachary 3 , b. 1672, d.y. 

5. Margaret 3 , b. 1674/75. 

6. Richard 3 , b. 1676/77. 

7. Jonathan 3 , b. 1678/79, d.y. 

8. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1680, d.y. 

9. Zachariah 3 , b. 1684/85. 
Other information: 

263 



Cliart XI Biograpliies 

John 2 moved from Hartford to Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut with his parents, 
Richard and Mercy, in 1651 when he was about twelve. When John was sixteen his father 
died and a year later his mother married John Steele. John moved to Farmington, 
Hartford, Connecticut with them and stayed there a few years before moving back to 
Hartford 
References: #27, p. 502, #28, pp. 33-39, #32, #42, #68, pp. 8-11, and #69. 

866. Bevil Waters 

Bom in 1633, place unknown. 

Died in Hartford, Connecticut on February 14, 1729/30. Buried at Center Church. 

Married first, Sarah in Hartford in 1677. 

The children of Bevil and Sarah , all probably born in Hartford, were: 

1 Mary, b. 1677, m. Thomas" Seymour . 

2. Thomas 

3. Sarah 

4. Hannah 

Married second, Sarah (Webster) Mygatt in Hartford in 1 722. There were no children from this 

union. 
Other information: 

Bevil was a carpenter apprentice to Thomas Watts from 1661 to 1667. 
References: #24, #27, #28, and #70, p. 245. 

868. Jolin 2 Merrill 

Born in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts about 1640. 
Died in Hartford, Connecticut on July 18, 1712. 
Married Sarah Watson in Hartford on September 23, 1663. 
The children of John and Sarah, all bom in Hartford, were: 

1. Sarah', b 1664. 

2. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1666/67. 

3. John 3 , b. 1669. 

4. Abraham 3 , b. 1670. 

5. Daniel 3 , b. 1673. 

6. Wilterton 3 , b. 1675. 

7. Susana 3 , b. 1677. 

8. Abel 3 , b. January 25, 1 679/80, m. Mabel 3 Easton . 

9. Isaac 3 , b. 1681/82. 
10 Jacob 3 , b. 1686. 

Other information: 

About 1657 John left Newbury and went to Hartford where he moved into the 
household of Gregory Wilterton who was one of the original proprietors of Hartford. John 
was probably a nephew of Gregory. Gregory was a tanner and John followed the same 
trade. Gregory was married three times without having any children and when he died he 
left the larger portion of his estate to John. 
References: #24, #27, #28, p. 85, #53, #68, and #83. 

264 



Chart XI Biographies 

870. John 2 Easton 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut in 1646. 
Died in Hartford on November 2, 1716. 

Married Elizabeth in Hartford about 1669. She died there on June 10, 1710. 

The children of John and Elizabeth, all born in Hartford, were: 

1. Sarah 3 , b. 1670, d.y. 

2. Mary 3 , b. 1672, d.y. 

3. Sarah 3 , b. 1675. 

4. John 3 , b. 1678/79, d.y. 

5. Mary 3 , b. 1681. 

6. Mehitabel (MabeH 3 , b. January 1 7, 1 683/84, m. Abel 3 Merrill . 

7. Abigail 3 , b. 1687. 

8. John 3 , b. 1689. 

References: #24, #27, #53, p. 237, and #119, pp. 4-6. 

872. Capt. Robert 3 Welles. Sr. 

Born in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut in 1651. 
Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on June 22, 1714. 
Married first, Elizabeth Goodrich in Wethersfield on June 9, 1675. 
The children of Robert and Elizabeth, all born in Wethersfield, were: 

1. Thomas , b. 1676. 

2. John 4 , b. 1678. 

3. Joseph 4 , b. 1680. 

4. Prudence 

5. Robert 4 Jr. . b. 1684, m. Sarah 4 Wolcott . 

6. Gideon 4 , b. 1686. 

Married second, Mary Stoddard in Boston in 1698. There were no children from this union. 
References: #24, #33, v. JJ, pp. 763-764, #45, p. 783, and #88, v. IV, p. 477. 

874. Samuel 3 Wolcott 

This is the same person as (878) Samuel 3 Wolcott on this chart. 

Born in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on April 16, 1656. 

Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on June 14, 1695. 

Married Judith 3 Appleton of Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on March 6, 1678, probably in 

Windsor. She died in 1740/41. 
The children of Samuel and Judith were: 

1. Samuel 4 , b. 1679. 

2. Gershom 4 , b. 1680, d.y. 

3. Josiah 4 , b. 1682. 

4. Hannah 4 , b. March 19, 1684, m. Kpv William 3 Burnham Jr. 

5. Sarah 4 , b. August 14, 1686, m. Ca pt Robert 4 Welles. Jr. 



6. Lucy 4 , b. 1688. 



265 



Chan XI Biograpliics 

7. Abigail 4 , b. 1690. 

8. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1692. 

9. Mary 4 , b. 1694. 
Other information: 

Samuel 3 was a merchant in Windsor and later moved to Wethersfield. 
References: #24, #33, pp. 841-842, #52, pp. 111-114, #84, p. 194, #88, p. 623, #109, and 
#115, p. 802. 

876. William 2 Burnham. Sr. 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut in 1652. 

Died on December 12, 1730, probably in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married first, Elizabeth Loomis in Wethersfield on June 28, 1671. She died in 1717. 
The children of William and Elizabeth, all born in Wethersfield, were: 

1. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1682. 

2. William 3 , b. July 17. 1684. m. Hannah 4 Wolcott . 

3. Joseph 3 , b. 1687. 

4. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1690. 

5. Jonathan 3 , b. 1692. 

6. Mary 3 , b. 1694. 

7. Abigail 3 , b. 1696. 
8 David 3 , b. 1698. 

Married second, the widow Martha (Thompson) Gaylord. There were no children by this union. 
References: #24, #30, p. 131, #33, p. 166, and #84, p. 193. 

878. Samuel 3 Wolcott 
See (874) Samuel Wolcott on this chart, the same person. 

880. Jacob 2 Perkins 

Born in England in 1624, probably in Newent, Gloucestshire. 

Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts on January 27, 1699/1700. 

Married first, Elizabeth 2 Whip ple about 1648. She died on February 12, 1685. Her parents were 

Matthew Whipp le and Anna 1 Hawkins of Bucking, England. 
The children of Jacob and Elizabeth, all bom in Ipswich, were: 
1 Elizabeth 3 , b. 1649. 

2. John 3 , b. 1652. 

3. Judith 3 , b 1655. 
4 Mary 3 , b 1658. 

5. Jacob 3 , b. 1662. 

6. Matthew 3 , b. 1665. 

7 Hannah 3 , b 1670. 

8 Joseph 3 , b. June 21,1 674, m. Martha 3 Morgan . 
9. Jabez 3 , b. 1677 



266 



Chart XI Biographies 

Married second, Damaris Robinson of Boston, the widow of Nathaniel Robinson. There were no 

children by this union. 
Other information: 

Jacob sailed with his family from England to Boston when he was about seven 

years old and then moved with his family to Ipswich when he was nine. He was a farmer in 

Ipswich. He was known as Sergeant Jacob because he was chosen sergeant of the military 

company in Ipswich in 1664. 
References: #34, part IB, pp. 1-7 and #88, v. IV, p. 506. 

882. Joseph Morgan 

Born in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts on November 29, 1646. 
Died in Preston, New London, Connecticut on April 5, 1704. 
Married Dorothy Parke in New London, Connecticut on April 26, 1670. 
The children of Joseph and Dorothy were: 

1. Joseph 3 , b. 1671. 

2. Dorothy 3 , b. 1673, d.y. 

3. Dorothy 3 , b. 1676. 

4. Anna 3 , b. 1679. 

5. Martha 3 , b. March 20, 1 68 1 , m. Joseph 3 Perkins . 

6. Hannah 3 , b. 1683, d.y. 

7. Margery 3 , b. 1685. 

8. Abigail 3 , b. 1689. 

9. Deborah 3 , b. 1694. 

10. Hannah 3 , b. 1697. 
Other information: 

Joseph 2 moved with his family from Roxbury to New London, Connecticut when 
he was about four years old. He was a farmer and was one of the first settlers of Preston, 
then a part of Norwich. 
References: #24, #179, pp. 26-27, and #180, pp. 30-32. 

884. Richard 3 Bushnell 

Born in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut in September 1652. 
Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on August 27, 1728. 
Married Elizabeth 2 Adgate , his stepsister, in Norwich on December 7, 1672. 
The children of Richard and Elizabeth, all bom in Norwich, were: 
1. Anne 4 , b. 1674. 



2. Caleb 4 , b. May 26, 1 679, m. Anne 3 Leffingwell . 

3. Benajah 4 ,b. 1681. 

4. Elizabeth 4 , b. 1685. 
Other information: 

Richard moved from Saybrook to Norwich in 1660 at age eight with his mother 
and his new stepfather, Thomas 1 Adgate . Richard was always very active in public service 
in Norwich. He was at one time or another constable, town clerk, schoolmaster, justice of 



267 



Chart XI Biographies 

the peace, town surveyor, and town agent. He was also judge of the New London County 
Court, Speaker of the House from 1712 to 1720, and a captain in the militia. 

On December 20, 1708 Richard was a legatee in the will of Owenoco, chief of the 
Mohigan Indians, who gave him 400 acres of land, "in consideration of the kind and free 
entertainment I have had for many years received of my loving friend Richard Bushnell of 
Norwick (sic)." 
References: #24 and #36, pp. 56-58. 

886. Thomas 2 Leffingwell. Jr. 

Bom in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut on August 27, 1649. 
Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on March 5, 1 723/24. 
Married Mary" Bushnell in Norwich in September 1672. 
The children of Thomas and Mary, all born in Norwich, were: 
1 Thomas , b. 1674. 

2. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1676. 

3. Anne . b. January 25, 1680, m. Caleb Bushnell . 

4. Mary 3 , b. 1682. 

5. Zerviah", b. 1686, m. Benajah Bushnell. 

6. John 3 , b. 1688/89. 

7. Abigail 3 , b. 1691. 
8 Benajah 3 , b. 1693. 

9. Hezekiah 3 , b 1695, d.y. 

Other information: 

About 1660, at age eleven, Thomas moved with his family from Saybrook to 
Norwich. Thomas became a large landowner, an enterprising businessman, and probably 
one of the most successful men in town. Thomas was a sergeant in the militia. 

References: #24, #36, p. 39, #71, p. 143, and #222, pp. 31-33. 

888. Joseph Trumbull 
See (852) Joseph Trumbull on Chart X, the same person. 

889. Hannah Smith 
See (853) Hannah Smith on Chart X, the same person. 

890. David 2 Winchell 
See (854) David 2 Winchell on Chart X, the same person. 

891. Mary Griffin 
See (855) Mary Griffin on Chart X the same person. 



268 



Chart XI Biographies 

892. Rev. Zechariah 2 Whitman 

Born in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts in 1644. 

Died in Hull, Plymouth, Massachusetts on November 5, 1726. 

Married Sarah Alcock in Hull about November 1670. 

Zechariah and Sarah had four sons and five daughters, all born in Hull. My ancestor, Samuel 3 

Whitman was born about 1676 and married Sarah 3 Stoddard . 
Other information: 

Zechariah graduated from Harvard College in 1668 and in September 1670 was 

ordained as the minister in Hull. He and Sarah were married there shortly thereafter. 

Zechariah inherited his uncle's property in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut in 

1666. His wife, Sarah, also had a good inheritance from her father, John Alcock . These 

made Zechariah and Sarah independent during their lifetimes and enabled them to provide 

handsomely for their children. 
References: #24, #38, pp. 17-19, #39, pp. 16-17, and #88, p. 525. 

894. Rev. Solomon 2 Stoddard 

Born in Boston on October 4, 1643. 

Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on February 10, 1728/29. 

Married Esther 2 Warham in Northampton on March 13, 1670. She was the widow of Rev. 

Eleazer Mather (a 1656 graduate of Harvard College), who had died in Northampton in 

1669 at age thirty-two. 
The children of Solomon and Esther, all born in Northampton, were: 

1. Mary 3 , b. 1671. 

2. Esther 3 , b. 1672. 

3. Solomon , b. 1673, d.y. 

4. Samuel 3 , b. 1674, d.y. 

5. Anthony 3 , b. 1675, d.y. 

6. Aaron , twin, b. 1676, d.y. 

7. Christian 3 , twin, b. 1676. 

8. Anthony 3 , b. 1678, graduated from Harvard College. 

9. Sarah 3 h April 1 1680 m Samuel 3 Whitman . 

1 0. John 3 , b. 1 682, graduated from Harvard College. 

1 1 . Israel 3 , b. 1 684, d. of fever in a prison in Brest, France in 1 703 . 



12. Rebecca 3 , b. 1686. 

13. Hannah 3 , b. 1688. 
Other information. 

All five of the daughters married ministers. Solomon was a graduate of Harvard 
College and was selected to be the minister at Northampton following the death of Rev. 
Eleazer Mather. That is where Solomon met and married Rev. Mather's widow, Esther 
Warham . Solomon was a minister at Northampton for almost sixty years. 
References: #24, #40, v. II, pp. 1 10-122, #45, pp. 741-746, #46, p. 71, and #88, p. 201. 



269 



Chart XI Biograpliics 



895. Esther 2 Warham 



Baptized in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on December 8, 1644. 

Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts on February 10, 1736 at age ninety-one. 

Married first, Rev Eleazer Mather in Windsor on September 29, 1659. He died in Northampton in 

1669. 
The children of Eleazer and Esther were: 

1 Eunice 3 , b. 1664, m. Rev. John Williams. 

2. Warham 3 , b. 1666, graduated from Harvard College. 

3. Eliakim 3 ,b. 1668, d.y. 

Married second, Rev. Solomon 2 Stoddard in Northampton on March 13, 1670 and had thirteen 
more children including my ancestor, Sarah 3 Stoddard , who married Samuel' Whitman . 

Other information: 

Eleazer and Esther moved to Deerfield, Franklin, Massachusetts and then to 
Northampton. However, their daughter, Eunice, who married Rev. John Williams, lived in 
Deerfield at the time of the infamous attack by the French and their Indian allies on 
February 29, 1704. (See Appendix 7.) Two of their younger children were killed during 
the attack and Eunice was killed on the second day of the march back to Canada. Her 
husband and five of their six living children were taken as captives into Canada. 

References: #23, v. II, pp. 377-379, #24, #40, p. 1 16, #46, p. 71, #85, p. 479, and #88, v. IJJ, 
p. 172. 

1728. Richard Seymour 

Baptized in Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, England on January 27, 1604/05. 
Died in Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut before October 10, 1655. 
Married Mercy Ruscoe in Sawbridgeworth on April 18, 1631. 
The children of Richard and Mercy were: 

1. Thomas , bapt. 1632. 

2. Mary 2 , bapt. 1634/35. 

3. Mercy , bapt. 1636, d.y. 

4. John_, b about 1639, m. Mary 2 Watson . 

5. Zachariah , b. about 1642 

6. Richard 2 , b about 1645 

The first three children were bom in Sawbridgeworth, England and the last two were born 
in Hartford, Connecticut. The birthplace of John 2 is uncertain but it was probably 
Hartford, Connecticut. 
Other information: 

Richard was the son of Robert Seymour and Elizabeth Waller . Richard came to 
America in the spring of 1638, bringing with him his wife, Mercy' Ruscoe . and their 
children. They settled in Hartford, Connecticut, although he was not an original settler he 
received an allotment of land by "courtesy of the town." This meant he was an acceptable 
addition to the group of settlers forming the original proprietors, but his status was not 
equal to theirs inasmuch as they were entitled, as he was not, to their proportional shares of 
the extensive areas of land held in common. Thus, every original proprietor might hope to 
secure, as a right, farmland for his sons. No such opportunity was open to settlers who 

270 



Chart XI Biographies 

were landholders by "courtesy of the town." This situation may account for Richard's 
decision to move to Norwalk, Connecticut. 

Whatever the reason, Richard and his former Sawbridgeworth neighbors, the 
Ruscoes, removed to Norwalk, Connecticut in 1651 where he had the status of an original 
proprietor of the new town, in the allotment of which he had a most favorable location. On 
March 29, 1655 he was elected selectman in Norwalk. But Richard did not live to hold 
this office long. In his will, which he executed July 29, 1655, he is described as "very week 
& sike." He died before October 10, 1655. 

There has been controversy over the origin and ancestry of Richard . This was 
addressed in reference #42 which was prepared by George D. Seymour and published in 
the New England Historical and Genealogical Register in 1917. Although the author was 
Mr. Seymour the research work was actually done by J. Gardner Bartlett. 
Quoting from reference #42: 

"Mr. Bartlett's investigations present the emigrant first at home in 
Sawbridgeworth, co. Herts, on the border of co. Essex, with his family and 
kinsfolk, then in the same company at Hartford, Conn., and finally at Norwalk, 
Conn., where he died and is buried. These researches, as thus far prosecuted, show 
no connection between the family of the emigrant to New England and the historic 
English family of Seymour. 

"Between 1630 and 1637 the records of his marriage to Mercy Ruscoe, the 
baptisms of three of his children, and the burial of one of these children appear in 
the parish registers of Sawbridgeworth; but after 1637 no trace of him is to be 
found there or in any of the neighboring parishes. His father was buried 23 Aug. 
1637; and as the spring was the usual time for emigration to New England, it may 
be concluded that he soon settled the affairs of his father's estate and in the spring 
of 1638 left England for New England, where he appears in 1639 as a proprietor 
and inhabitant of Hartford, Conn." 
References: #27, pp. 501-502, #28, pp. 16-24, #32, #42, #53, p. 258, #69, #76, p. 681, 
#84, pp. 236-237, and #102, v. I, p. 536. 

1729. Mercy 1 Ruscoe 

Born in Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, England about 1610. 

Married first, Richard' Seymour in Sawbridgeworth, England on April 18, 1631. 

Married second, John Steele of Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut on November 22, 1656 as his 
second wife. 

Other information: 

Mercy was the daughter of Ro ger Ruscoe and Sarah of Sawbridgeworth. 

Mercy came with her husband, Richard' Seymour , and family to Hartford, Connecticut in 
the spring of 1638. In 1651 the family moved to Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut. Mercy's 
husband, Richard, died when their children were young; all except their first son, Thomas, 
were still minors. Mercy married John Steele about a year after Richard died and moved 
from Norwalk to Farmington with her younger children, including my ancestor John 

Seymour . 
References: #28, pp. 16-21, #32, #42, #69, #76, p. 681, and #84, pp. 236-237. 



271 



2 



Chart XI Biograpliics 

1730. John' Watson. Sr. 
See ( 1 204) John 1 Watson. Sr. on Chart II, the same person. 

1731. Margaret' Smith 
See (1205) Margaret 1 Smith on Chart II, the same person. 

1736. Nathaniel 1 MerrilL Jr. 

Baptized in Wherstead, England on May 4, 1601. Wherstead is three miles south of Ipswich, 

England, which in turn is about seventy miles northeast of London. 
Died in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts on March 16, 1654/55. 

Married Susanna Wilterton in Newbury on March 16, 1635. She married second, Stephen Jordan. 
The children of Nathaniel and Susanna, probably all born in Newbury, were: 

1 . Susanna 

2. Nathaniel 2 , b. 1638. 

3. John 2 , b, about 1640, m. Sarah 2 Watson . 

4. Abraham 

5. Daniel 2 , b. 1642. 

6. Abel 2 , b. 1643. 
Other information: 

Newbury was settled by a company of about 100 Englishmen, largely from 
Wiltshire, who arrived in Boston on the sliip Mary and John in May 1634. They spent 
about a year in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts which had been settled the year before. In 
the spring of 1635 they moved about seven miles north by boat and established a new 
settlement on the Parker River which they named Newbury. 

Nathaniel and his brother John immigrated to America about 1633, possibly on 
the ship Hector They were not in the first group of settlers in Newbury but they were 
probably both there by 1636. 
References: #24, #27, pp. 390-391, #28, p. 85, #83, #85, p. 312, and #88, p. 199. 

1738. John 1 Watson. Sr. 
See (1204) John Watson. Sr. on Chart II, the same person. 

1739. Margaret Smith 
See ( 1 205) Margaret Smith on Chart II, the same person. 

1740. Joseph 1 East on 

Born in England about 1 602. 
Died in Hartford, Connecticut on August 19, 1688. 
Joseph's wife is unknown, but they were married in Hartford about 1644. 
Joseph's children, all born in Hartford, were: 
1. Joseph 2 , b. 1645. 



272 



Chart XI Biographies 



2. John 2 , b. 1 646, m. Elizabeth . 

3. Mary 2 

4. Sarah 2 
Other information: 

Joseph was in Newtowne, now Cambridge, Massachusetts by 1634. In 1636 he 
was one of the colony under the leadership of Rev. Thomas Hooker that removed from 
Cambridge and founded the town of Hartford. 
References: #24, #27, #53, p. 237, and #1 19, pp. 1-4. 

1744. John 2 Welles 

Born in England about 1622. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut on August 7, 1659. 

Married Elizabeth Bourne in Stratford in 1647. This is not the same person as (845) Elizabeth 

Bourne on Chart X. 
The children of John and Elizabeth, all born in Stratford, were: 

1. John 3 , b. 1648. 

2. Thomas , twin, b. 1651. 

3 2 

3. Robert . twin, b. 1651. m. Elizabeth Goodrich . 

4. Temperance , b. 1654. 



5. Samuel 3 , b. 1656. 



6. Sarah 3 , b. 1659, possibly after the death of her father. 

Other information: 

John came to America with his father, Thomas Welles , and the family in 1635 or 
1636. The family was first in Boston or Cambridge, Massachusetts. John moved to 
Stratford, Connecticut in 1647. John was elected the magistrate in May 1658 when his 
father was elected governor of Connecticut. 

Little is known of John's wife, Elizabeth 1 Bourne , except that she came to America 
under the care of relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Tomlinson. See reference #102. Elizabeth 
survived John and married second, John Wilcockson in 1662 or 1663. 

References: #24, #33, p. 762, #88, v. IV, p. 475, #102, v. I, p. 91, and #224. 

1746. William' Goodrich 

Baptized in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England on February 13, 1621/22. 
Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut in 1676. 
Married Sarah 2 Marvin in Hartford, Connecticut on October 4, 1648. 
The children of William and Sarah, all born in Wethersfield, were: 

1 . William 2 , twin, b. 1 649, d.y. 

2. Sarah 2 , twin, b. 1649. 

3. Mary 2 , b. 1651. 

4. John 2 , b. 1653. 

5. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1 658, m. Robert 3 Welles . 

6. William 2 , b. 1661. 

7. Abigail 2 , b. 1662. 

273 



Chart XI Biograplues 

8. Ephrain 2 , b. 1663. 

9. David 2 , b. 1667. 
Other information: 

William 1 was first in Watertown (now Cambridge), Middlesex, Massachusetts but 
was among the early settlers of Wethersfield, probably about 1644. 
References: #24, #33, pp. 370-373, and #103, pp. 306-308. 

1747. Sarah 2 Marvin 

Baptized in St. Mary's Church in Great Bentley, Essex, England on December 27, 1631. 

Died in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut in 1702. 

Married first, William' Goodrich in Hartford, Connecticut on October 4, 1648. 

Married second, William Curtis in Stratford about 1680. There were no children from this union. 

References: #24, #33, p. 372, and #103, pp. 306-308. 

1748. Henry 2 Wolcott. Jr. 

This is the same person as ( 1 756) Henry Wolcott, Jr. on this chart. 

Born on January 21, 1610/11, probably in Tolland, Somersetshire, England. 

Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on July 12, 1680. 

Married Sarah Newberry in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on November 18, 1641. She died in 

1684. 
The children of Henry and Sarah, all bom in Windsor, were: 

1. Henry 3 , b. 1642. 

2. John 3 , b. 1644. 

3. Samuel , b. 1647, d.y. 

4. Sarah 3 , b. 1649. 

5. Mary 3 , b. 1651. 

6. Hannah 3 , b. 1653. 

7. Samuel . b. April 16, 1656, m. Judith 3 Appleton . 

8. Josiah 3 , b. 1658. 
Other information: 

Henry came to America on the Mary and John with his parents, Henry 1 and 
Elizabeth Wolcott . in 1630 at age twenty. Henry 2 was in Boston and then Dorchester, 
Massachusetts. He moved to Windsor in 1636 and later to Wethersfield. He is mentioned 
as one of the nineteen prominent men in the Royal Charter of Connecticut. He was a 
member of the House of Deputies in 1660 and House of Magistrates in 1662 and annually 
re-elected until his death in 1680. Upon his father's death he inherited Glandon Manor in 
Tolland, England. 
References: #24, #84, p. 241, #108, v. 9, p. 79, and #1 15, p. 800. 

1750. Maj. Samuel Appleton. Jr. 

Baptized in Little Waldingfield, Suffolk, England on February 2, 1624/25. 
Died on May 15, 1696, probably in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. 



274 



Chart XI Biographies 

Married first, Hannah Paine in Ipswich on April 2, 1651. She was bom in 1629/30 and died about 

1656. 
The children of Samuel and Hannah, all probably born in Ipswich, were: 

1. Hannah 

2. Judith 3 , b. about 1652, m. Samuel 3 Wolcott . 

3. Samuel , b. 1654. 

Married second, Mary Oliver of Newbury, Massachusetts in December 1656. She was sixteen at 
the time. Samuel and Mary had four children. 

Other information: 

Samuel came to America in 1635 at age eleven with his parents. From about 
September to November 1675, as a captain, he was Commander-in-Chief of the 
Massachusetts forces of 100 men in the west against King Philip and for the defense of the 
frontier towns in the Connecticut River Valley against the Indians. When Hatfield was 
attacked on October 19, 1675 a bullet passed through his hair and a sergeant was killed at 
his side. 

On December 9, 1675 he was given command of the Massachusetts forces fitting 
out for the Narragansett country. This command consisted of six companies of foot 
soldiers and a troop of horse soldiers totaling 527 men. They were joined by Plymouth and 
Connecticut troops making a force of 1,000 men. In a bloody action on December 19, 
1675 they captured the Narragansett fort but the Massachusetts forces lost 1 10 men killed 
and wounded. After that, when the Massachusetts troops returned to Boston, Maj. 
Appleton left the service. In 1687 he was imprisoned for three months for his opposition 
to taxation by the British. 

References: #24, #49, p. 77, #84, pp. 76-86 and 242-243, #121, pp. 16-22 and 96-148, #282, 
pp. 142-158, and #286, pp. 6-7. 

1752. Thomas' Burnham 

Born in England in 1617. 

Died on June 28, 1688, probably in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Anna Wright in Hartford, Connecticut about 1639. 
The children of Thomas and Anna, all born in Hartford, were: 

1 . Elizabeth 2 , b. about 1640. 

2. Mary 2 , b. about 1642. 

3. Anna 2 , b. about 1644. 

4. Thomas , b. about 1646. 

5. John 2 ,b. about 1648. 

6. Samuel", b. about 1650. 

7. William 2 , b. in 1652. m. Elizabeth 3 Loomis . 

8. Richard 2 , b. about 1654. 

9. Rebecca , b. about 1656. 
Other information: 

Thomas 1 came from England, probably Hertfordshire, to Hartford about 
1647. By 1669 he had moved from Hartford to Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 



275 



Chart XI Biographies 

1 le was an educated man and a lawyer. He was a large landholder and speculator, 
buying land from the Indians. 
References: #24, #27, p. 121, #84, pp. 239-240, #88, p. 305, #115, p. 128, and #1 17, pp. 199- 
200. 

1753. AnnaWrieht 

Born in England. 

Died on August 5, 1703, probably in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Married Thomas' Burnham in Hartford, Connecticut about 1639. 
References: #24, #84, pp. 239-240, and # 1 1 5, p. 1 28. 

1754. Nathaniel 2 Loomis 

Bom in Essex County, England in 1626. 

Died on August 19, 1688, probably in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Married Elizabeth Moore in Windsor on November 24, 1653. 

Nathaniel and Elizabeth had twelve children in the period 1655-1682. All were bom in Windsor. 

The first child was my ancestor, Elizabeth Loomis . who was bom on August 7, 1655. She 

married William Burnham Sr. 
Other information: 

Nathaniel came to Dorchester, Massachusetts with his family on the Susan coid 

Ellen in 1638 In 1639 the family moved to Windsor. He was a member of the Windsor 

Troop of Horse in King Philip's War. 
References: #24, #30, p. 1 3 1 , #84, p. 240, and #282, pp. 466-467. 

1755. Elizabeth Moore 

Bom in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts about 1636. 

Died on July 23, 1728, probably in Windsor or Simsbury, both in Hartford County, Connecticut. 

Married first, Nathaniel Loomis in Windsor on November 24, 1653. 

Married second, John Case of Simsbury about 1691 . There were no children by this union. 

References: #24, #30, p. 1 3 1 , and #84, pp. 240-24 1 and 279-280. 

1756. Henry 2 Wolcott. Jr. 
See ( 1 748) Henry Wolcott. Jr. on this chart, the same person. 

1758. Maj. Samuel Appleton. Jr. 
See ( 1 750) Mai Samuel Applet oa Jr. on this chart, the same person. 

1760. John Perkins 

Bom about 1 590, probably in Newent, Gloucestershire, England. 

Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts in 1654. 

Married Judith Gator England about 1613. 

The children of John and Judith, all except Lydia bom in England, were: 

276 



Chart XI Biographies 



1. John 2 , b. 1614. 

2. Thomas 2 , b. 1616. 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1618. 

4. Mary 2 , b. 1620. 

5. Jacob 2 , b. 1624, m. Elizabeth . 

6. Lydia 2 , b. 1632. 
Other information: 

Perkins family tradition says that John came from the town of Newent in England. 
This is supported by association of the name Newent in England with Newent in 
Connecticut where some of John's grandchildren settled; presumably they gave this name 
to the new settlement. However, this is not conclusive evidence because there were 
numerous Perkins families in and around Newent, England and six or seven Perkins 
families were early immigrants to the colonies. 

John 1 sailed from Bristol, England on December 1, 1630 on the ship Lion, taking 
with him his entire family consisting of his wife and five children. There were twenty 
passengers in all including the afterward-famous Rev. Roger Williams. After a stormy 
passage of sixty-seven days, they arrived at Nantasket, Massachusetts on February 5, 
1630/3 1 and then the following day they anchored at Boston. 

For about two years after their arrival in America the John Perkins family lived in 
Boston. The youngest child, Lydia 2 , was born there in 1632. In 1633 the family moved to 
the colony of Ipswich which was newly founded by John Winthrop and others. John 
Perkins was engaged in farming in Ipswich. 
References: #24 and #34, pp. iii and 1-7. 

1764. James 1 Morgan 

Born in Wales in 1607, probably in Glamorgan County. 

Died in Groton, New London, Connecticut in 1685. 

Married Margery Hill of Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts on August 6, 1640. 

The children of James and Margery, all probably born in Roxbury, were: 

1. Hannah 2 , b. 1642. 

2. James 2 , b. 1644. 

3. John 2 , b. 1645. 

4. Joseph 2 , b. November 29, 1946, m. Dorothy 3 Parke . 

5. Abraham 2 , b. 1648, d.y. 

6. Daughter 2 , b. 1650, d.y. 
Other information: 

In March 1636 James 1 and his two younger brothers, John and Miles , sailed from 
Bristol, England and arrived in Boston in April. James was first in Roxbury but in 1650 he 
moved to New London, Connecticut. And then in 1657 he moved across the river to what 
was to become Groton. 

James 1 was a large landowner and dealer in lands. He was one of the selectmen of 
New London and ten times a member of the General Court in Hartford. 
References: #24, #88, v. IB, p. 232, and #1 79, pp. 17-22. 



277 



Chart XI Biograpliies 



1766. Thomas 2 Parke 

Bom in Semer (or Hitcham), Suffolk, England in 1607. 

Died on July 30, 1709, probably in Preston, New London, Connecticut. He is buried there in 

Avery Cemetery. 
Married Dorothy' Thompson in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut in 1645. 
The children of Thomas and Dorothy were: 

1. Martha 3 , b. 1646. 

2. Thomas 3 , b. 1648. 

3. Robert 3 , b. 1650. 

4. Nathaniel 3 , b. 1651. 

5. Dorothy 3 , b. March 6, 1652, m. Joseph 2 Morgan . 

6. William 3 , b. 1654. 

7. Joluv 3 , b. 1656. 

8. Alice 3 , b. 1658. 
Other information: 

Thomas came to America with his parents on the Arabella in 1630. The family 
settled first in Roxbury, (now part of Boston). Thomas moved to Wethersfield with his 
father, Robert , in 1639. About 1650 they moved to New London, Connecticut and six 
years later they moved to Mystic, New London, Connecticut. By 1680 Thomas lived in 
Preston where his father had given him 1,000 acres of land purchased from Winthrop. 
References: #24, #180, pp. 30-32, #182, pp. 24-26, and #185, pp. 10-12. 

1767. Dorothy Thompson 

Born in Preston, Northampton, England in 1624. 

Died in Preston, New London, Connecticut in 1709. 

Married Thomas Parke in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut in 1645. 

Other information: 

Dorothy came to America with her widowed mother, (3535) Alice 1 (Freeman) 
Thompson . 
References: #24, #47, pp. 14 and 30, #180, pp. 30-32, and #182, pp. 24 and 106. 

1768. Richard 2 Bushnell 

This is the same person as ( 1 774) Richard 2 Bushnell on this chart. 
Baptized in Horsham, Sussex, England on April 20, 1623. 

Died either in Saybrook, Middlesex Connecticut or Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut in 1659 or 
1660. 

Married Mary Marvin in Hartford, Connecticut on October 11, 1648. She married second, 

Thomas' Adgate in Saybrook in 1660. 
The children of Richard and Mary, all born in Saybrook, were: 

1 Joseph , b. 1 65 1 , m. Mary Leffingwell. 

2. Richard . b September 1652, m. Elizabeth 2 Adgate . his stepsister. 

3. Mary 3 , b January 1654, m. Thomas 2 Leffinewell. Jr. 

4. Marcie 3 ,b. 1657. 

278 



Chart XI Biographies 

Other information: 

Richard came to America in 1635 at age twelve with his four living brothers. The 
eldest was Edmond who was twenty-nine. Richard probably resided first in Salem, Essex, 
Massachusetts with one of his brothers but later they moved to Guilford, New Haven, 
Connecticut where their father, Francis Bushnell had settled after emigrating from 
England in 1639. Richard and his family lived in Saybrook where their children were bom 
but he may have moved to Norwalk, Connecticut about 1656 for a short period of time, 
perhaps until his death in 1659 or 1660. 

References: #24, #36, pp. 38-39, #88, v. IV, p. 318, #103, pp. 302-305 and 581, and #221. 

1769. Mary Marvin 

This is the same person as (1 775) Mary Marvin on this chart. 

Also known as Marcy and Marie. 

Baptized in Great Bentley, England on December 16, 1628. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on March 29, 1713. 

Married first, Richard 2 Bushnell of Saybrook in Hartford, Connecticut on October 11, 1648. 

Married second, (1770) Thomas 1 Adgate as his second wife in 1660 and moved with him shortly 

thereafter to Norwich. Mary and Thomas had four children, all born in Norwich. 
Other information: 

Mary came to America with her father, Matthew Marvin , in 1635 at age seven. 
References: #24, #36, p. 38, #102, v. I, p. 403, #103, pp. 302-303, and #221, p. 266. 

1770. Thomas' Adgate 

Surname also spelled Adgjt. 

Born in England about 1 620. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut on July 21, 1707. 

Married first, an unknown wife in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut about 1650. 

Thomas' children by his first wife, both born in Saybrook, were: 

1 . Elizabeth 2 , b. October 10, 1 65 1 , m. Richard 3 Bushnell . her stepbrother. 

2. Hannah 2 , b. 1653. 

Married second, Mary 2 Marvin , the widow of Richard 2 Bushnell , in Saybrook in 1660. 
The children of Thomas and Mary, all born in Norwich, were: 

1. Abigail 2 , b. 1661. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. 1663. 

3. Rebecca ,b. 1666. 

4. Thomas 2 , b. 1670. 
Other information: 

The origins of Thomas' are unknown but he was one of the earliest proprietors of 
Saybrook. Shortly after they were married in 1660 Thomas and his second wife, Mary 
Marvin , moved from Saybrook to Norwich with his two children and her four children 
from her previous marriage to Richard Bushnell . 
References: #24, #36, p. 39, #88, v. I, p. 18, and #103, p. 303. 



279 



Chart XI Biographies 

1772. Lt. Thomas' Leffinewell Sr. 

Born about 1 622, probably in England. 

Died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut in 1714. 

Married Mary White in Saybrook, Connecticut about 1648. She died in 171 1. 

The children of Thomas and Mary, all bom in Saybrook, were: 

1. Rachel 2 , b. 1648. 

2. Thomas 2 , b. August 27, 1649, m. Marv 3 Bushnell . 

3. Jonathan 2 , b. 1650. 

4. Joseph 2 , b. 1652. 

5. Mary 2 , b. 1656. 

6. Nathaniel 2 , b 1656. 

7. Samuel 
Other information: 

The origins of Thomas are not known. However, he was well acquainted with the 
Mohegan Indians, particularly with their young chief, Uncas. It is possible that he even 
lived among them for a period, acquiring their language. Reference #222 presents a story 
that in 1645 Thomas helped Uncas and a band of his Mohegan Indians escape a siege by 
their foes, the Narragansett Indians. For this act Uncas granted to Thomas the area that 
became the town of Norwich, Connecticut. 

Thomas was in Saybrook, Connecticut as early as 1637 and about 1660 he moved 
with his family to the new settlement of Norwich. He was a lieutenant in King Philip's 
War. 
References: #24, #36, p. 39, #71, p. 43, #76, v. 2, p. 698e, and #222, pp. 9-26. 

1774. Richard 2 Bushnell 
See ( 1 768) Richard Bushnell on this chart, the same person. 

1775. Mary Marvin 
See ( 1 769) Mary Marvin on this chart, the same person. 

1776. John' Trumbull 
See ( 1 576) John Trumbull on Chart VIII, the same person. 

1780. Robert' Winchell 
See ( 1 708) Robert' Winchell on Chart X, the same person. 

1782. John Griffin 
See ( 1 7 1 0) John Griffin on Chart X, the same person. 

1784. John' Whitman 
Born in England about 1602, possibly in Holt in the county of Norfolk. 

280 



Chart XI Biographies 

Died in 1692, probably in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts. Weymouth is about ten miles 

southeast of Boston. 

Married Ruth in England about 1628. 

John and Ruth had four sons and five daughters. One son, Thomas, is known to have been born in 

England in 1629. Another son, my ancestor, Zechariah , was born in Weymouth in 1644. 

He married Sarah Alcock . The birthplace of the other seven children is unknown. Some 

were born in England and some in America. 
Other information: 

John immigrated to Weymouth without his family probably several years prior to 

December 1638. His wife and children emigrated from England and joined him in 

Weymouth in 1641. 
References: #24, #38, pp. 1-10, #39, pp. 2-11, and #88, p. 523. 

1786. Dr. John 2 Alcock 

Born in England about January 1, 1626/27. 

Died in Boston on March 27, 1667. Buried in the Eustis Street Burying Ground in Roxbury, 

Massachusetts. Roxbury is now part of Boston. 
Married Sarah 2 Palgrave at Roxbury in 1648. She died in 1665 at age forty-four. 
The children of John and Sarah, all bom in Roxbury, were: 

1. Joanna , b. 1649, d.y. 

2. Anna 3 , twin, bapt. May 26, 1650. 

3. Sarah 3 , twin, bapt. May 26, 1650, m. Zechariah 2 Whitman . 

4. Mary 3 , b. 1652. 

5. George , b. 1655. 

6. John 3 , b. 1656/57. 

7. Elizabeth 3 , b. 1659. 

8. Joanna 3 , b. 1660. 

9. Palgrave 3 , b. 1662. 
Other information: 

John 2 graduated from Harvard College at the head of his class in 1646. He taught 
school in Hartford, Connecticut in 1647-1648. He then returned to Roxbury where he 
married Sarah Palgrave. 

John was a large investor in lands in various parts of the colony. In 1660 he was 
the prime mover in the purchase of Block Island off the coast of Rhode Island from John 
Endicott and three other men. In that year twelve persons from Braintree and Roxbury 
met at his house in Roxbury and agreed upon the purchase and settlement of Block Island, 
Dr. Alcock's share of the island being one-sixth although he never moved there. In 1667 
his estate was divided among his eight living children. 
References: #24, #26, p. 2 1 , and #4 1 , pp. 1 2- 1 4. 

1788. Anthony' Stoddard 

Born about 1614, probably in London, England. 
Died in Boston on March 16, 1686/87. 



281 



Chart XI Biograpliics 

Married first, Mary 2 Downing in Boston about 1639. She was born about 1620 and died on June 

16, 1647 in Boston. 
The children of Anthony and Mary, all born in Boston, were: 

1. Benjamin , b. 1640, d.y. 

2. Solomon 2 , b. on October 4, 1643, m. Esther 2 Warham . 

3. Samson , b. 1645. 

Married second, Barbara (Clapp) Weld, widow of Joseph Weld, in Boston on August 24, 1647. 

She died on April 15, 1655. Anthony and Barbara had five children in the period 1648- 

1653 
Married third. Christian Eyre in Boston in 1655. Anthony and Christian had nine children in the 

period 1656-1669. 
Married fourth, Mary (Symmes) Savage, widow of Thomas Savage, in Boston about 1684. There 

were no children by this marriage. 
Other information: 

Anthony was a linen draper in Boston. He served as a deputy to the General Court 

at more sessions than any other man. Upon his death in 1686/87 he was called the 

"ancientest shop-keeper in town." 
References: #24, #40, pp. 111-112, #45, pp. 734-741, #46, p. 72, #85, p. 436, and #88, v. H, 
pp. 65-66 and v. IV, pp. 199-200. 

1790. Rev. John 1 Warham 

Baptized in Crewkerne, Somerset, England on October 9, 1595. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on April 1, 1670, leaving a large estate. 

Married first, Cecelia Hatche in England. John and Cecelia had one surviving child, Samuel. 

Cecelia and Samuel came to America with John in 1630. Cecelia died in Dorchester (now 

part of Boston), Massachusetts in 1634. Samuel Warham died in Windsor, Hartford, 

Connecticut in 1647, apparently unmarried. 
Married second, Jane (Dabinott) Newberry , widow of (3498) Thomas 1 Newberry , in Windsor 

about 1637. She died in 1655. 
The children of John and Jane, all born in Windsor, Connecticut, were: 

1 Abigail 2 , b. 1638. 

2. Hepzibah 2 , b. 1640, d.y. 

3. Sarah 2 , b. 1642. 

4 Esther 2 , bapt. on December 8, 1644, m. Rev. Solomon 2 Stoddard . 

Married tliird, Abigail (Searle) Branker, widow of John Branker, in Windsor in 1662. There were 
no children by this marriage. 

Other information 

John graduated from Oxford University in 1618. He became minister at 
Crewkerne before his Puritanism caused the bishops to force his resignation. He 
immigrated to New England in the spring of 1630 on the Mary and John as one of the two 
ministers who founded Dorchester. This town was a theocracy at first. All of the town 
orders from January 1632 through June 1634 were signed by Rev. John Warham, the other 
minister Rev. Maverick, and two other men. Dorchester no longer exists. It was south of 
the original Boston and was incorporated into present-day Boston. 



282 



Chart XI Biographies 

In 1636 Rev. John Warham moved to Windsor, Connecticut with about one-half of 

the Dorchester congregation, comprising twenty-three families. He was one of the 

principal founders of Windsor and served as pastor for thirty-four years until his death there 

in 1670. 

References: #24, #46, p. 73, #84, pp. 268-269, #85, p. 479, #88, v. IV, pp. 417-418, #107, pp. 

100-105, #108, v. 9, pp. 45-46 and v. 12, pp. 1-24, #115, p. 775, #194, pp. 8-11, 

#203, p. 161, and #348. 

1791. Jane 1 Dabinott 

Probably the daughter of John and Johane (Collins) Dabinott of Chardstock, Dorset, England. 

Baptized in Chardstock on June 12, 161 1. 

Died in Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut at the house of her daughter, Hannah Newberry, on April 

23, 1655. 
Married first, (3498) Thomas 1 Newberry on this chart, in England about 1630. He died in 

Massachusetts in 1636. 
Married second, Rev. John 1 Warham in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut about 1637. 
Other information: 

Thomas Newberry had first married (3499) Joane Dabinott on this chart, who was 

probably a cousin of Jane 1 Dabinott . Joane died about 1629 in England. Joane is 

underlined because she is also my direct ancestor, being the mother of (1757) Sarah 

Newberry on this chart. 

Jane 1 Dabinott came to America with her husband, Thomas Newberry , in 1634. 

Thomas died in 1636 and Jane then married (1790) John 1 Warham as his second wife 

about 1637. 
References: #24, #84, pp. 268, 269, 281, and 282, #194, pp. 8-1 1, and #348. 

3472. Nathaniel Merrill. Sr. 

Married Mary Blacksoll in Blemstead, England on February 27, 1592/93. He was buried in 
Wherstead, England on March 17, 1626/27. She was buried in Wherstead on May 1, 
1624. 

The children of Nathaniel and Mary, all born in England, were: 

1. Daughter, d.y. 

2. Mary, b. 1594/95. 

3. Martha (?) 

4. France, b. 1598, d.y. 

5. John, b. 1599. 

6. Nathaniel 1 , bapt. May 4, 1601 in Wherstead, m. Susanna Wilterton . 

7. Michael, b. 1603. 
Reference: #83, pp. 40-4 1 . 

3488. Gov Thomas 1 Welles 

Born probably in Essex County, England about 1590. 

Died in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut on January 14, 1660. 

Married first, Alice 1 Tomes in England about July 5, 1615. 

283 



Cliart X] Biograpliics 

The children of Thomas and Alice, all bom in England, were: 

1. Mary 2 , b. about 1618. 

2. Ann 2 , b. about 1620. 

3. John 2 , b about 1622, m. Elizabeth' Bourne . 

4. Thomas , b. about 1624. 

5. Samuel 2 , b. about 1629. 

6. Sarah 2 , b. 1631. 

Married second, Elizabeth (Deming) Foote, the widow of Nathaniel Foote, in Wethersfield about 

1646. 
Other information: 

The origins of Thomas' are unknown, but reference #224 presents a lengthy 
discussion of his possible ancestry. He came to America from England sometime in 1635 
or 1636 and it is quite certain that he brought his wife, Alice, and all of their children with 
him. The family settled first in Boston, Massachusetts or vicinity. Thomas was in 
Hartford, Connecticut before March 1637 and then moved to Wethersfield, Connecticut in 
1646 He was an original proprietor in both towns. 

Thomas' became a member of the Court of Magistrates on March 28, 1637 and 
continued as a magistrate until he was chosen deputy-governor on May 18, 1654. He was 
chosen again in 1656, 1657, and 1659. He was the first treasurer 1639 and secretary of the 
colony from 1640 to 1649. In 1649 he became a commissioner of the United Colonies and 
he was chosen governor in 1655 and again in 1658. 

Thomas was the ancestor of three distinct lines of the Welles family in colonial 
Connecticut: 

1 By his eldest son, Jolin . the Stratford-Wethersfield family. 

2. By his second son, Thomas , the Hartford family. 

3. By his third son, Samuel , the Glastonbury family. 

References: #24, #27, pp. 656-657, #33, pp. 760-761, #45, pp. 777-779, #53, pp. 267-268, 
#84, pp. 290-291, #88, v. IV, p. 478, #102, v. I, p. 655, and #224. 

3492. John Goodrich 

Born about 1575, probably in Suffolk County, England. 

Died in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England on April 21, 1632. 

Married Margery How in Bury St. Edmunds on August 7, 1615. She also died in 1632. 

The children of John and Margery, all born in Bury St. Edmunds, were: 

1 John, b about 1616. 

2. William, b. about 1617. 

3 Henry, bapt. 1619, dy. 

4 William' , bapt. February 13, 1621/22, m. Sarah 2 Marvin . 
5. Jeremy, bapt. 1627, dy. 

Other information 

John had two sons named William. William "the elder" married and remained in 
England. William came to America and married Sarah 2 Marvin in Hartford, Connecticut. 
Reference: #45, pp. 55 1 -552. 



284 



Chart XI Biographies 



3494. Matthew 1 Marvin 



This is the same person as (3538) Matthew 1 Marvin and (3550) Matthew 1 Marvin , both on this 

chart. 
Baptized in St. Mary's Church in Great Bentley, Essex, England on March 26, 1600. 
Died in Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut early in 1680. 
Married first, Elizabeth 1 in England about 1622. She came to America with Matthew 

and died in Hartford, Connecticut about 1640. 
The children of Matthew and Elizabeth, the first five born in Great Bentley, England, were: 

1. Elizabeth 2 , bapt. 1622. 

2. Matthew 2 , bapt. 1626. 

3. Mary 2 , bapt. December 16, 1628, m. Richard 2 Bushnell . 

4. Sarah 2 , bapt. December 27, 1 63 1 , m. William 1 Goodrich . 

5. Hannah 2 , bapt. 1634. 

6. Abigail 2 , b. 1637/38 in Hartford, Connecticut. 

7. Rebecca 2 , b. 1639 in Hartford. 

8. Rachael 2 , bapt. 1640 in Hartford. 

Married second, Alice Bouton, widow of John Bouton, about 1647. 

Other information: 

Matthew 1 sailed from London on the Increase in April 1635. His wife, Elizabeth, 
and their five children accompanied him. Matthew contemplated settling in Farmington, 
Hartford, Connecticut where his brother, Reinold, had settled. Farmington is about seven 
miles west of the city of Hartford. However, Matthew decided to settle in Hartford where 
he was one of the original proprietors. In 1650 Matthew moved to Norwalk, Connecticut, 
where he was again one of the original proprietors. 

References: #24, #27, pp. 387-388, #53, p. 251, #69, pp. 44-45, #76, p. 680, #102, v. I, pp. 
402-403, and #103, pp. 287-316. 



3496. Henrv' Wolcott. Sr 



This is the same person as (3512) Henrv Wolcott. Sr. on this chart. 

Born in Tolland, near Taunton in Somersetshire, England in 1578. 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on May 30, 1655. 

Married Elizabeth 1 Saunders in Lydiard St. Lawrence, Somersetshire, England on January 19, 

1606. Both Henry 1 and Elizabeth 1 are buried in one tomb in Windsor. 
The children of Henry and Elizabeth, all born in England, were: 

1 . John, b. 1 607. Did not come to America. 

2. Henry 2 , b. January 21, 1610/1 1, m. Sarah 2 Newberry. 

3. George 

4. Christopher 

5. Anna 2 , b. 1620. 

6. Mary 

7. Simon 2 , b. 1624. 
Other information: 



285 



Chart XI Biograpliies 

Henry' was the second son of John Wolcott of Galdon Manor in Tolland. Henry 1 
immigrated to America in 1630 on the Mary cauiJotm at age fifty-two in the party with 
( 1 790) Rev. John' Warham . Henry 1 brought his wife and three sons, Henry 2 . George, and 
Christopher. The other three children, Anna, Mary, and Simon, came over sometime 
between 163 1 and 1641 after the family was settled in America. By the intestate death of 
his elder brother Henry 1 inherited the English family estate after he came to America. 

Henry 1 had followed the teachings of Rev. John Elton and became deeply involved 
with the Puritan movement during the religious and political upheaval in England. Henry 
was first in Boston and then Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts but moved 
to Windsor in 1635, again in the party with Rev. John Warham. 
References: #33, pp. 838-839, #52, p. 32, #84, p. 280, #107, p. 105, #108, v. 9, pp. 79-90, 

#109, pp. 568-569, and #1 15, pp. 798-800. 

3497. Elizabeth' Saunders 

Bom in Lydiard St. Lawrence, Somersetshire, England in 1582. 
Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on July 7, 1655. 
Married Henry Wolcott in Lydiard on January 19, 1606. 
Other information: 

Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas and Anne Saunders . 
References: #52, p. 32, #84, pp. 280-28 1 , and # 1 1 5, p. 799. 

3498. Thomas Newberry 

This is the same person as (35 14) Thomas' Newberry on this chart. 
Baptized in Yarcombe, Devon, England on November 10, 1594. 
Died in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts about December 1636. 
Married first, Joane Dabinott about 1619. She died in England about 1629. 
The children of Thomas and Joane were: 

1 Joseph , b. about 1620, returned to England. 

2 Sarah 2 ,, b about 1622, m. Henry 2 Wolcott. Jr. 

3. Benjamin 2 , b. about 1624. 

4. Mary , bapt. in Dorset County, England in 1626. 

5. John , bapt. in Dorset County in 1628/29. 

Married second, ( 1 794) Jane' Dabinott on this chart, in England about 1630. 
The children of Thomas and Jane were: 
1 Rebecca 

2. Hannah 

3. Daughter , d.y. 
Other information: 

Joane and Jane' were probably cousins. Jane 1 married (1790) Rev. John' Warham 
as her second husband. 

Thomas was the son of Richard and Grace Matthew) Newberrv . He had an 
excellent education and was engaged in legal study in England. He embraced the Puritan 
doctrines as a young man and sailed for New England in April 1634 with his second wife, 

286 



Chart XI Biographies 

Jane Dabinott, and probably his children. He settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts, where 
he was a merchant. He was one of the richest men among the colonists and he was an 
active leader in the settlement of Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut but died before its 
accomplishment. His widow, Jane (Dabinott) Newberry , and his children went there after 
his death. That is where Jane married Rev. John Warham . 
References: #24, #84, pp. 281-282, and #1 15, pp. 517-518. 

3499. Joane Dabinott 

This is the same person as (3515) Joane Dabinott on this chart. 
Bom in Yarcombe, Devon, England about 1600. 
Died in England about 1629 leaving a very large estate. 
Married Thomas Newberry about 1619. 
Other information: 

Joane was the daughter of Christopher Dabinott . She was probably a cousin of 
Jane 1 Dabinott , who was the second wife of Thomas Newberry . 
References: #24 and #84, pp. 281-282. Also see (1791) Jane 1 Dabinott on this chart.. 

3500. Samuel 1 Appletoa Sr. 

This is the same person as (3516) Samuel 1 Appleton. Sr. on this chart. 

Baptized in Little Waldingfield, Suffolk, England on August 13, 1586. 

Died in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts in June 1670 at the home of one of his daughters. 

Married Judith 1 Everard in Preston, England on January 24, 1615/16. 

The children of Samuel and Judith, all born in England, were: 

1. Mary 2 , b. 1616. 

2. Judith 2 , b. 1618. 

3. Martha 2 , b. 1620. 

4. John 2 , b. 1622. 

,2 



,1 



5. Samuel 2 , bapt. February 2, 1624/25, m. Hannah Paine. 

6. Sarah 2 , b. 1629. 
Other information: 

The parents of Samuel 1 were Thomas and Marv (Isaac) Appleton . Samuel moved 
to Reydon, Suffolk, England in 1628 and then immigrated to Ipswich, Massachusetts with 
his wife, Judith, and children in 1635. 
References: #24, #49, pp. 61-77, #84, p. 282, #85, p. 20, #121, pp. 7-13, and #286, pp. 6-7. 

3501. Judith 1 Everard 

This is the same person as (3517) Judith 1 Everard on this chart. 
Born about 1587. 

Married Samuel' Appleton in Preston, England on January 24, 1615/16. 

Other information: ! 

Judith 1 was the daughter of John_and Tnriith (Bourne) Everard of London. Judith 
and Samuel immigrated to Ipswich, Massachusetts with their children in 1635. 
References: #24, #26, p. 21 5, and #84, pp. 282-283. 

287 



Cliart XI Biograpliics 



3502. William' Paine. Jr. 



Baptized in Lavenham, Suffolk, England on February 20, 1596/97. 
Died in Boston, Massachusetts on October 10, 1660. 

Married Hannah in England about 1623. 

The children of William and Hannah, all born in England, were: 



1. William 2 , b. 1624. 

2. Anna 2 , b. 1626, d.y. 



3. Hannah/;, hapt February 1 1, 1629/30. m. Samuel Appleton, Jr. 

4. John 2 , b. 1632. 

5. Daniel 2 , b. 1634/35. 
Other information: 

William 1 was the son of William Paine. Sr. William and Hannah came to America 
with their five cliildren on the Increase in 1635. They first settled in Watertown, 
Massachusetts but moved to Ipswich, Massachusetts about 1638. William was a man of 
great enterprise and wealth. Among his interests were the Braintree, Lynn, and New 
Haven iron works, along with the Sturbridge Black Lead mines. He was also a merchant 
ship owner and an extensive landowner. About 1656 he moved to Boston where he died in 
1 660, leaving a large estate and a legacy to Harvard College. 
References: #24 and #84, pp. 283-284. 

3508. Joseph Loomis 
See (1552) Joseph Loomis and (3 1 78) Joseph Loomis . both on Chart VE1, the same person. 

3509. Mary 1 White 

See ( 1 553) Mary' White and (3 1 79) Mary' White , both on Chart VJU, the same person. 

3510. John Moore 

Born in England 

Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut on September 18, 1677. 
Married an unknown wife either in England or soon after his arrival in America. 
John's children, the first three born in Dorchester (now part of Boston), Massachusetts and the last 
three born in Windsor, were: 

1 I lannah 

2 Thomas' , probably died before his father. 

3. Elizabeth 3 , b. about 1636, m. Nathaniel 2 Loomis . 

4. Abigail 3 , b February 14, 1639/40. She was the first child born in Windsor. 

5. Mindwell 3 , b 1643. 
6 John 3 , b 1645. 

Other information: 

John probably came to Dorchester on the Mary and John with his father, 
Thomas , in 1630. Thomas 1 and John 2 , along with Rev. John 1 Warham . Roger Williams, 



288 



Chart XI Biographies 

and others were made freemen of Massachusetts on May 18, 1631. John 2 and his father 
went with Rev. Warham and others to Windsor in 1635 or 1636. Thomas 1 died in 1645. 
References: #84, pp. 279-280 and 302. 

3512. Henry' Wolcott. Sr. 

See (3496) Henry 1 Wolcott. Sr. on this chart, the same person. 

3513. Elizabeth Saunders 

See (3497) Elizabeth Saunders on this chart, the same person. 

3514. Thomas Newberry 

See (3498) Thomas Newberry on this chart, the same person. 

3515. Joane Dabinott 
See (3499) Joane Dabinott on this chart, the same person. 

3516. Samuel Appleton. Sr. 
See (3500) Samuel 1 Appleton. Sr. on this chart, the same person. 

3517. Judith 1 Everard 
See (3501) Judith 1 Everard on this chart, the same person. 

3518. William 1 Paine. Jr. 
See (3502) William 1 Paine. Jr. on this chart, the same person. 

3532. Robert' Parke 

Born in Preston, England about 1 580. There are at least two Prestons in England, one in Suffolk 
County and one in Lancashire County. There has been considerable uncertainty about 
which Preston was Robert's home, however, it appears more likely that he was from 
Suffolk County. This is discussed in reference #1 80. 

Died in Mystic, New London, Connecticut on March 14, 1664/65. Buried there in the White Hall 
Cemetery. 

Married first, Martha' Chaplin in Semer, Suffolk, England in February 1601/02. 

The children of Robert and Martha were: 

1 . Martha 2 , bapt. 1603 in Semer, England. 

2. Robert 2 , bapt. 1605 in Semer. 

3. William 2 , bapt. 1607 in Semer. 

4. Thomas 2 , b. in England. 

5. Samuel , b. in England. 

6. Anne , b. in England. 

289 



Chart XI Biograpliies 

Married second, (3535) Mrs. Alice' (Freeman) Thompson in Roxbury (now part of Boston) about 
May 30, 1644. Robert had moved to Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut by that time and 
it is not known how he happened to be in Roxbury. Alice was the widow of John 
Thompson of Preston England and the mother of Dorothy Thompson , who became the 
wife of Thomas Parke . 

Other information: 

Robert 1 was a personal friend of Governor John Winthrop and came to America 
with him on the Arabella, which was the flagship of the Winthrop fleet. The Arabella 
sailed from the Isle of Wight with seventy-six passengers on March 29, 1630 and landed in 
Boston on June 17, 1630. Also on board were Robert's wife, Martha Chaplin , their son, 
Thomas , and tliree other, unnamed children. Robert was apparently a man of some 
means. He did not come to America out of dire necessity, but rather tlirough a desire to 
have more religious liberty. 

The family settled first in Roxbury. In 1639 Robert and his son Thomas went 
through the wilderness to Wethersfield, Connecticut; they were among the first settlers. In 
1 649 Robert moved to New London, Connecticut. Six years later he moved to lands he 
owned in Mystic where he died in 1664/65. 

References: #24, #33, pp. 526-527, #47, pp. 14, 31, and 32, #104, p. 78, #107, p. 84, #180, pp. 
17-28, #181, pp. 6-9, #182, p. 21, and #185, pp. 7-8. 

3533. Martha' Chaplin 

Baptized in Semer, Suffolk, England in February 1583/84. 
Married Robert Parke in Semer in February 1601/02. 
Other information: 

Martha was a daughter of William Chaplin . She came to America with her 

husband and children on the Arabella in 1630. The date and place of her death are 

unknown. 
References: #24, #107, p. 84, #180, p. 27, #181, p. 6, and #185, pp. 7-8. 

3534. John Thompson 

Born between 1 580 and 1 590, probably in Little Preston, Northampton, England. 
Died in London on November 6, 1626. 
Married Alice Freeman as his second wife about 1615. 
The children of John and Alice were: 
1 Mary, b. 1619. 

2. Bridget, b 1622. 

3. Dorothy' , b. 1624, m. Thomas 2 Parke . 
4 Probably others. 

Other information: 

John was the son of Thomas Thompson . 
References: #24, #33, p. 526, and #47, p. 32. 



290 



Chart XI Biographies 



3535. Alice Freeman 



Probably born in Cranford, Northampton, England. 

Died in New London, Connecticut on February 11, 1664/65. 

Married first, John Thompson in England about 1615. He died in London in 1626. 

1 1 

Married second, Robert Parke , the father of Thomas Parke , in Roxbury (now part of Boston), 
Massachusetts on about May 30, 1644. There were probably no children by this union. 

Other information: 

Alice was the daughter of Henry and Margaret (Edwards) Freeman . She 
immigrated to Roxbury before 1640 as a widow, supposedly with five daughters and one 
son. However, only three daughters have been identified. See (3434) John Thompson , her 
first husband. 

References: #24, #26, p. 35, #33, p. 526, #47, pp. 14 and 32, and #182, pp. 24 and 106. 

3536. Francis Bushnell 

This is the same person as (3548) Francis Bushnell on this chart. 

Born in Thatcham, Berkshire, England about 1580. 

Died in Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut about 1646. 

Married first, Ferris Ouenell in Horsham, Sussex, England on May 13, 1605. She died there in 

1627/28. 
The children of Francis and Ferris, all bom in Horsham, were: 

1. Edmond , bapt. 1606. 

2. Francis 2 , bapt. 1608/09. 

3. William 2 , bapt. 1610/11. 

4. Stephen 2 , bapt. 1612/13, d.y. 

5. John 2 , bapt. 1615. 

6. Thomas , bapt. 1617, d.y. 

7. Mary 2 , bapt. 1618, d.y. 

8 . Rebecca , bapt . 1621. 

9. Richard 2 , bapt. April 20, 1623, m. Mary 2 Marvin . 

10. Sarah 2 , bapt. 1625. 

11. Elizabeth 2 , b. 1627/28, d.y. 

Married second, Joan Kinward in Horsham on June 2, 1629. She died there in 163 1 . 

Other information: 

Francis 1 first appeared in the records in Horsham, England on the date of his first 
marriage in 1605 and all of his eleven children were born there. In 1635 his five living sons 
left for America. Four years later he followed with his two daughters, Sarah and Rebecca, 
in the company of Rev. Henry Whitfield, aboard the St. John. After they had been at sea 
about ten days, the company formulated a covenant, sometimes called the Guilford 
Covenant or 77»e Plantation Covenant, upon which his name appears third. The company 
landed at Fair Haven, New Haven, Connecticut between the 10th and 15th of July 1639 
and two months later the deed was signed for their new settlement at Menunkatuck, 
purchased from the Quinipiac Indians. The settlers named the new settlement Guilford 
after the town in Sussex County, England from which some of the immigrants had come. 

References: #24, #36, pp. 25-26, #76, v. 2, pp. 628 and 698a, and #88, v. IV, pp. 3 1 7-3 1 8. 

291 



Chart XI Biograptiies 

3537. Ferris Ouenell 

Baptized in Horsham, Sussex, England on April 17, 1587. 

Died in Horsham in childbirth with her daughter, Elizabeth, and buried there on March 10, 

1627/28. 
Married Francis' Bushnell in Horsham on May 13, 1605. 
Other information: 

Ferris was the daughter of Henry and Beatrix (Carter) Ouenell . who were married 

in Horsham on January 30, 1585/86. 
References: #24 and #36, p. 25. 

3538. Matthew' Marvin 
See (3494) Matthew 1 Marvin on this chart, the same person. 

3548. Francis Bushnell 
See (3536) Francis 1 Bushnell on this chart, the same person. 

3549. Ferris Ouenell 
See (3537) Ferris Ouenell on this chart, the same person. 

3550. Matthew' Marvin 
See (3494) Matthew Marvin on this chart, the same person. 

3572. Dr. George Alcock 

Born in England about 1604. 

Died in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Massachusetts in December 1640. 

Married first, Anne Hooker in England about 1626. George and Anne had one child, my 
ancestor, John Alcock . who was born about January 1, 1626/27. 

Married second, Elizabeth in England about 1632. George and Elizabeth had one 

child, Samuel , born in Roxbury. Elizabeth remarried in 1641 but died within a year. 

Other information: 

George graduated from Oxford College in England. In 1630 he and his wife, 
Anne Hooker immigrated to Roxbury with the Winthrop fleet. They had left their only 
child, John . in England. Anne died in the first winter, 1630, in Roxbury. 

George made two trips back to England and brought back with him his new wife, 

Elizabeth , and his son, John 2 . From George's will it appears that his brother, 

Thomas, and/or his brother-in-law, Rev. Thomas Hooker, were probably responsible for 
the upbringing of the sons, John 2 and Samuel 2 , after George's death in 1640. 

References: #24, #4 1 , pp. 1 0- 1 2, #85, p. 1 2, and #88, v. 1 , p. 2 1 . 

3573. Anne Hooker 
Probably born in Marfield, Leicestershire, England. 

292 



Chart XI Biographies 

Died in Roxbury, (now part of Boston), Massachusetts in 1630. 
Married Dr. George Alcock in England about 1626. 
Other information: 

Anne was the daughter of Thomas Hooker, Sr. and the sister of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Jr., 
who led the party of about 100 people from Cambridge (formerly Newtown), Massachusetts to 
Hartford, Connecticut in 1636. 

In 1630 Anne and her husband immigrated to Roxbury with the Winthrop fleet. They had 
left their only child, John Alcock . in England. John was brought to America by his father during 
one of his trips back to England. 

References: #24, #27, pp. 310-31 1 and 704, #41, pp. 10-1 1, #69, pp. 65-67, #107, p. 58, and 
#117, p. 38. 

3574. Dr. Richard' Palgrave 

Born in England about 1585, possibly in London. 

Died in October 1651, probably in Charleston, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Charleston adjoins 
Cambridge on the west. 

Married Anne in England about 1619. 

The surviving children of Richard and Anne, the last four bom in Boston, Massachusetts, were: 

1 . Mary 2 , b. about 1 6 1 9 in England. 

2. Sarah 2 , b. about 1621 in England, m. John 2 Alcock . 

3. Elizabeth 2 , b. about 1625 in England. 

4. Rebecca , b. 1631. 

5. John 2 , b. 1634. 

6. Lydia 2 ,b. 1636. 

7. Bethia 2 ,b. 1638, d.y. 
Other information: 

Richard, a physician, came to America from Stepney, Middlesex, England in 1630 
in the Winthrop fleet. He brought with him his wife and first three children. They settled in 
Charleston (now part of Boston), Massachusetts. 

After Richard died in 1651 his widow, Anne, moved to Roxbury (now part of 
Boston), Massachusetts where she lived with her daughter, Sarah , and son-in-law, Dr 
John Alcock. Anne died in 1669 at age seventy-five. Sarah 2 had died in 1665 at age forty- 
five. 
References: #24, #26, p. 21, #88, v. m, pp. 339-340, #104, p. 78, and #349. 

3578. Emanuel 1 Downing 

Baptized in Ipswich, Suffolk, England on August 12, 1585. 

Died after 1660 while living in Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Married first, Anne Ware in 1614. She died about 1622. There is no record of any children from 

this marriage. 
Married second, Lucv 1 Winthrop in Groton, Suffolk, England on April 10, 1622. 
The children of Emanuel and Lucy were: 



293 



Chart XI Biograplues 

1 . Mary 2 , b. about 1622 in England, came to America in May 1633 on the Mary and 
Jane with Governor Coddington. She married Anthony Stoddard in Boston 
about 1639. 

2. George 2 , b. about 1623 in England. 

3. James 2 , brought to America in 1630 in the Arabella by his uncle, Governor 
Winthrop. 

4. Susan , came to America in May 1633 with Mary. 

5. Ann 

6. Lucy 

7. John 2 , b. 1 640 in America. 

8. Dorcas , b. 1640 in America. 

9. Theopliilus , b. 1644 in America. 
Other information: 

Emanuel was a lawyer in London until he and his wife came to Salem, Essex, 
Massachusetts in 1638. 
References: #24, #46, pp. 72-74, #85, p. 144, and #88, v. II, pp. 65-66. 

3579. Lucy' Winthrop 

Baptized in Groton, Suffolk, England on January 27, 1601. 

Died sometime after 1656. 

Married Emanuel Downing in Groton on April 10, 1622. 

Other information: 

Lucy was the daughter of Adam and Ann (Brown) Winthrop of Groton. She was 
the only sister of John Winthrop who was the leader of the famous Winthrop fleet in 1630 
and was also governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony. Lucy and Emanuel came to America 
in 1638. 

References: #24, #85, p. 144, #88, v. II, pp. 65-66, and #107, pp. 19-21 and 98. 

3580. Richard Warham 

Baptized in Maiden Newton, Dorset, England on December 8, 1565. 
Died in Crewkerne, Somerset, England in 1623. 

Married Agnes Cook (alias Hooper) in Crewkerne on December 14, 1588. 
The children of Richard and Agnes, all born in Crewkerne, were: 
1 Johane, b about 1592. 

2. Richard, bapt. 1594. 

3. John' , bapt. October 9, 1 595, m. Jane' Dabinott . 

4. Magdalene, b. about 1596. 
Other information: 

Agnes was a daughter of John Hooper (alias Cook) of Crewkerne. His ancestry is 
discussed in reference #108, v. 17. The reason for the alias is unknown. 
Reference: #108, v. 12, pp. 2, 5, and 6 and v. 17, pp. 169-171 and #348. 



294 



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INTO MASSACHUSETTS BAY COLONY IN 1691 

iSKEEH HAZao*. 

V/OENt 

TOWH 




SCALE IN MILES 



5 5 10 15 20 2? 



MAPB 
SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND AND PORTION OF NEW YORK STATE 



299 




LONG ISLAND 



Source: Ref 294, v.l3,p.l77 



MAPC 
NEW ENGLAND CONFEDERATION 1643-1684 



300 



._„.... 




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NORTH 
AMERICA. 



NEW FRANCE 



( 



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■ (ACADIA) 




A TLANTIC 
OCEAN 



Source. Ref 295, p 19 



New France is the name given to the former French possessions in North 
America. Tfiis map shows the maximum extent of New France in the early 1 700s. 



MAPD 
NEW FRANCE IN THE EARLY 1700s 



301 



o 



HAMBJfLG 



O 



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O K.IOGE 

Ll&EZTY 
O CORNER. 



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PER.TH AM BOY 



THE FIVE BOROUGHS OF NEW YORK C/TY 
ARE SHOWN IN OUTLINE FORM. OTHER 
CITIES AND VILLAGES ARE SHOWN ONLY 
IF THEY ARE MENTIONED IN THIS BOOK. 

PRESENT PAY POFULAT/OM 
100,000 AND OVER. Q UNDER 100,000 



SCALE IN MILES 



MAPE 

NEW YORK CITY AREA AND PORTION OF NEW JERSEY 



302 



NORTHERN IRELAND INCLUDES THE SAME AREA 
AS WE PROVINCE OF ULSTER EXCEPT FOR THE 
COUNTIES OF DONEGAL , MONAG-HAN AND CAVAN 
WHICH ARE FART OF THE REPUBLIC OF IRELAND 




PROVINCIAL BOUNDARIES 



MAPF 
PROVINCES AND COUNTIES OF IRELAND 



303 




MAPG 
COOS BAY AREA, OREGON 



304 



auMHir 




Note: Tfie rivers and creeks are shown as they existed before the dams were completed in the 
1940- 1960 era. Tfie reservoirs behind the dams are shown with dotted fines. Only creeks 
that are mentioned in this book are shown. 

MAPH 
PORTION OF SHASTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 



305 



APPENDIX 1 
EUROPEAN EXPLORATION AND SETTLEMENT IN THE AMERICAS 

1492-1620 



The purpose of this appendix is to 
place the first English settlements in North 
America in historical context and to show 
that America was not an unknown land 
when the Mayflower arrived at Plymouth in 
1620. 

European exploration and settle- 
ment in the Americas began with the four 
voyages of Christopher Columbus in the 
period 1492-1504. Columbus discovered 
the major and many lesser islands in the 
West Indies, but he never set foot in North 
America. Following Columbus' bold lead, 
the Spanish (and, to a lesser extent, the 
Portuguese) began a century of explora- 
tion, colonization, and subjugation 
throughout Latin America with the aim of 
providing more wealth for the mother 
countries. They also hoped to convert the 
native population to Christianity. Al- 
though the Spanish dominated the New 
World for almost a century before English 
settlers arrived in Jamestown in 1607, the 
Spanish were eventually supplanted in 
North America, north of Mexico, by the 
English and the French. 

Juan Ponce de Leon, a Spanish ad- 
venturer, was the first European to set foot 
in what would become the United States. 
He found and named Florida in 1513 and 
discovered Mexico on the same trip. A 
half century later in 1565 St. Augustine, 
Florida was established by Spain as the first 
permanent European settlement north of 
Mexico. In 1562 and 1564 the French at- 
tempted to establish settlements in Florida 
and they built Fort Caroline in 1564. 
However, most of the French settlers were 
killed by the Spaniards; thus Spain's hold 
on Florida continued for almost 200 years. 



In the north, the French were more 
successful. In 1524 Francis I of France en- 
gaged Giovanni da Verrazano, an Italian 
navigator, to explore the East Coast from 
Canada to the Carolinas and to look for a 
northwest passage. Verrazano entered New 
York harbor on the same trip. Ten years 
later Francis I sent Jacques Cartier, a French 
explorer, to Canada. Cartier discovered the 
Gulf of Saint Lawrence and claimed the sur- 
rounding area for France. On a second trip 
he sailed up the Saint Lawrence River to the 
island where the city of Montreal now stands. 
On his third trip in 1541 Cartier made an un- 
successful attempt to establish a colony. 
France paid little attention to Canada during 
the rest of the 1500s. 

Then in 1603 Samuel de Champlain, 
the French explorer and pioneer, sailed up the 
Saint Lawrence River. In 1605 he helped 
found Port Royal, now Annapolis Royal, on 
the east coast of the Bay of Fundy in Nova 
Scotia. And in 1608 he established the City 
of Quebec on the site where Cartier had 
spent the winter of 1541-42. Quebec grew 
very slowly; even as late as 1627 the popula- 
tion was only sixty-five persons. The French 
were more interested in the fur trading busi- 
ness than in establishing colonies. In 1615 
Champlain explored farther west into the 
province of Ontario and the Great Lakes area 
and more firmly established the French pres- 
ence in North America. 

The Dutch were also interested in 
North America in the period before 1620. 
Henry Hudson, a British navigator, made 
four voyages to the New World between 
1607 and 161 1. The first two were for the 
English in unsuccessful attempts to find a 
passage to the Far East. His third and most 



309 



Appendix 1 



famous voyage was in the service of the 
Dutch East India Company. In 1609 he de- 
parted from Amsterdam in his ship the Half 
Moan. He sailed down the east coast of 
North America to North Carolina and, after 
turning north, entered Chesapeake Bay. He 
was the first European to explore the Hudson 
River, going as far north as present-day Al- 
bany, New York. On this voyage Hudson 
claimed the New York and Pennsylvania re- 
gions for the Dutch. On his last voyage for 
the English on the ship Discovery in 1610-11 
he discovered Hudson Bay. His crew muti- 
nied after spending the winter ashore and put 
Hudson, his son, and seven loyal sailors adrift 
in a small boat. They were never heard from 
again. 

It was the English who made the 
greatest impact on the ultimate settlement of 
the east coast of North America. In 1 497-98 
King Henry VII sent John Cabot, an Italian 
navigator, to explore the New World. Cabot 
put ashore only once, but no one knows for 
sure where. It was probably in Canada, ei- 
ther at Newfoundland or Cape Breton Island. 
However, Cabot mapped some of the New 
England coastline and made a globe showing 
that the land he had seen lay far to the north 
of the islands discovered by Columbus. 
Cabot's voyage gave England its claim to the 
area and his disclosure of the fishing potential 
in the northern waters probably helped start 
the fishing industry in the shallow water of 
the Grand Banks oft" the southeast coast of 
Newfoundland Starting in the early 1500s 
fishing ships would come from Spain, Portu- 
gal, France, and England to fish from March 
to September. About 1520 the English in 
particular based themselves on land, living in 
wooden houses while they dried their catch, 
and historians believe that some may have 
spent winters here. 

The first English attempt to establish 
a permanent colony in the present-day United 



States was made by Walter Raleigh in 1585, 
about eighty years after the Spanish con- 
quests and settlement in the New World had 
begun. In fact, the Spanish empire was al- 
ready in decline. This decline was acceler- 
ated by the defeat of the Spanish Armada of 
130 ships in 1588 when King Philip of Spain 
attempted to conquer England. In 1584 
Walter Raleigh had been given a charter by 
Queen Elizabeth I to establish a colony in the 
New World. In 1585 and again in 1586 he 
sent groups of colonists to Roanoke Island 
off the coast of North Carolina, but the col- 
ony was abandoned and all 103 surviving 
colonists were brought home. Finally, in 
May 1587 Sir Walter Raleigh, recently 
knighted by Queen Elizabeth I, sent out three 
more ships to Roanoke Island with 1 1 7 pro- 
spective colonists including 28 women and 
children. Two of the three ships sailed back 
to England. By the end of August the sup- 
plies were exhausted and the leader of the 
colony, John White, returned to England with 
the one remaining ship leaving the colonists 
behind. Unfortunately, he reached England a 
few months before the attack by the Spanish 
Armada and it was not until 1 590 that Wliite 
was able to return to Roanoke Island. He 
found the island deserted and the fort in ru- 
ins. From then on the Roanoke settlement 
was referred to as the Lost Colony and the 
fate of the colonists was never known. 

By 1600 it was common knowledge 
in England that Spain and France had made 
large profits from their American posses- 
sions. Therefore, establishing English colo- 
nies in the New World appealed to English 
merchants and other wealthy people as po- 
tentially profitable commercial ventures. At 
that time the King of England, James I, could 
provide no money to support settlements in 
the New World. His treasury had been emp- 
tied by twenty years of war with Spain. Only 
merchants and the well-to-do had money for 
expensive and risky investments. Sir 



310 



European Exploration and Settlement in the Americas 1492-1620 



Fernando Gorges, an English landowner, and 
his powerful friend, Lord Chief Justice John 
Popham, organized friends and relatives in 
southwestern England and in London to pre- 
vail upon James I to grant them rights to 
colonize the portion of the New World 
claimed by England. In April 1606 the King 
granted a charter covering all the land from 
the Spanish area on the south to the French 
area on the north, essentially from South 
Carolina to Maine. Two companies were 
created, each to found one colony. One was 
the South Virginia Company of London and 
the other was the North Virginia Company of 
Plymouth. Merchants and well-to-do ad- 
venturers from London, Plymouth, and 
Bristol accepted invitations to join the com- 
panies and share the royal grant and pour in 
money, ships, and organizing skills. 

Late in 1606, 104 colonists in three 
small ships, the Susan Constant, the God- 
speed, and the Discovery, were dispatched to 
the New World by the South Virginia Com- 
pany. The purpose of this venture was to 
make lumber, glass, soap, and other items 
profitable for sale in England. The three 
ships sailed over the long route south through 
the West Indies and first sighted the land of 
Virginia on April 26, 1607. After exploration 
in the Chesapeake Bay and along the James 
River the colonists settled at Jamestown, 
about thirty-five miles up the James River on 
May 14. This was to become the first per- 
manent English settlement in the New World. 
Several supply ships reached Jamestown in 
1608 and 1609 bringing additional settlers, 
and the population grew to about 500. 
However, in the winter of 1609-10 the 
population shrank to about sixty as a result of 
malnutrition, disease, and Indian attacks. 
The colony was almost abandoned in June 
1610 when a supply ship with 150 more 
colonists arrived. And in 1619 the first cargo 
of slaves to come to America arrived at 
Jamestown. The town survived and was the 



capital of Virginia Colony for almost a cen- 
tury before declining into obscurity. The few 
remaining relics of the settlement at 
Jamestown are now part of the Colonial Na- 
tional Historical Park. 

Turning to the exploration of the 
New England coast in the period between 
1602 and 1619, the significance of this period 
is that it was the precursor to later English 
settlement of New England. Although not 
geographically correct, New England is de- 
fined herein as extending as far north as Cape 
Breton Island in Canada. During this period 
there were twenty known voyages to the 
New England coast. The voyages of Gos- 
nold (1602), Pring (1603), Weymouth 
(1605), Gilbert and Popham (1607), Smith 
(1614), and Gorges (1616) are the best 
known and probably the most significant of 
the twenty. 

On March 26, 1602 Bartholomew 
Gosnold sailed from England on the Con- 
cord. On board were thirty-two persons in- 
cluding eight sailors. They sighted land on 
May 15 and made a large catch of codfish. 
They named the place Cape Cod. Sailing on, 
the explorers found an island with bushes full 
of edible berries. They named this island 
Martha's Vineyard. Gosnold next came to a 
chain of islands at the entrance to Buzzard's 
Bay, Massachusetts. He decided to settle the 
colony on the outermost of these islands, 
now called Cuttyhunk. By June the stockade 
was completed and with early provisions 
made for every need the summer looked 
bright. Nevertheless, the division of supplies, 
part for the returning crew and part for the 
remaining settlers, caused dissension. One by 
one the settlers decided not to be left behind 
and the ship set sail on June 17 to return to 
England with all the settlers. Perhaps if there 
had been more forceful leadership New Eng- 
land might have been permanently settled 
before Virginia. 



311 



Appendix 1 



On April 10, 1603 Martin Pring set 
sail for America with two ships, the Speed- 
well and the Discoverer, with a total of forty- 
three persons on board including the sailors. 
The voyage had been financed by merchants 
from Bristol, England One of the main 
commodities they were seeking was sassafras 
which was used for medicinal purposes. 
Pring arrived first at Penobscot, Hancock, 
Maine, but finding no sassafras he sailed 
south and followed the north side of Massa- 
chusetts Bay past the sites of present-day 
Salem, Marblehead, and Lynn. Finally, Pring 
settled at the site of what became Plymouth, 
Massachusetts where the Mayflower landed 
in 1620. At the end of July 1603 the Discov- 
erer, laden with sassafras, was sent home. 
Subsequently, there were problems with the 
Indians. Pring became alarmed and decided 
to return to England in the S/wechell thus 
ending another attempt to colonize North 
America. 

In 1605 Sir Fernando Gorges and 
others sent Captain George Weymouth in the 
Archangel to explore the coast of Maine. 
Weymouth reached Nantucket Island, Mas- 
sachusetts on May 14 and sailed northward, 
reaching Monhegan Island in the Muscongus 
Bay of Knox County, Maine on May 18. He 
spent a month exploring the area and sailed 
for home on June 18. The enthusiasm about 
the region generated by Weymouth's voyage 
apparently led forty-year-old Gorges to join 
with seventy-five-year-old Lord Chief Justice 
John Popham to petition King James I in 
1605 to grant them rights to colonize this 
area of the New World. 

In June 1607 a group of about 100 
colonists was dispatched to the Maine coast 
in the Gift of God and the Mary and John by 
the North Virginia Company of Plymouth. 
The ships were under the command of Ral- 
eigh Gilbert, a nephew of Sir Walter Raleigh, 
and the colony was led by George Popham, a 



nephew of Lord Chief Justice John Popham. 
The colonists first arrived at Monhegan Is- 
land and then sailed twelve miles west to the 
Pemaquid Peninsula, both in Muscongus 
Bay. The colonists finally settled fifteen miles 
farther southwest near the mouth of the Ken- 
nebec River and the settlement became 
known as Popham's Colony. By February 
1608 George Popham had died. In May 
1608 a supply ship arrived with news that 
Lord Chief Justice John Popham, their chief 
financial support, had also died. In Septem- 
ber another supply ship brought news that 
Raleigh Glbert was to inherit a large portion 
of land and he decided to return to England. 
Without a leader and not wishing to face an- 
other Maine winter the colonists decided to 
leave too. Back in England the investors, 
indignant at the return of the colonists, termi- 
nated the project. But the Maine coast was 
not abandoned. Every summer fishing ves- 
sels by the score worked around Monhegan 
Island. Crews dried their catches there and 
on Pemaquid's shores and eventually built 
shacks to live in through the winter. Some 
historians believe that there may actually have 
been a year-round settlement there before the 
Mayflower landed at Plymouth in 1620. 
Monhegan-Pemaquid became as well-known 
to the owners of the North Virginia Com- 
pany as Jamestown did to the owners of the 
South Virginia Company. 

Captain John Smith was an English 
soldier and adventurer who played a vital role 
in the founding of Virginia and New England. 
He sailed with the three ships that established 
the first permanent English colony at James- 
town, Virginia in 1607. He was president of 
that colony from 1608 to 1609. This is the 
John Smith who, legend says, was saved 
from death at the hands of the Indians by the 
young princess Pocahontas. In 1609 he re- 
turned to England but in 1614 he sailed again 
for America. He spent the summer of 1614 
headquartered on Monhegan Island from 



312 



European Exploration and Settlement in the Americas 1492-1620 



where he explored and mapped the coast as 
far south as Cape Cod. His map and narra- 
tive promoted exploration and colonization 
for years to come. 

In 1616 Sir Fernando Gorges sent 
out a party to spend the winter months at 
Saco, York, Maine. The objective was not 
to establish a permanent colony but rather to 
show that the climate of Northern Virginia, 
as it was then called, was habitable by Eng- 
lishmen. When the party came back to Eng- 
land in the spring Gorges' belief had been 
proven correct. 

References: #107, pp. 3-9, #111, pp. 1-16, #113, pp. 9-114, #168, pp. 17-36, #184, v. 1, pp. 
20-23, #294, and #3 12. 



The most renowned event in the 
European settlement of North America was, 
of course, the landing of the Mayflower at 
Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620. As shown 
by the preceding, the Mayflower passengers 
did not come to a totally unexplored area as 
commonly believed. The Spanish were in 
Florida, the French were at Quebec and Port 
Royal, the English were at Jamestown, and 
there was commercial fishing activity along 
the Atlantic coastline. 



313 



APPENDIX 2 
PLYMOUTH COLONY 

1620-1691 



When the Mayflower sailed from 
Southampton, England on September 16, 
1 620 bound for the New World she carried 
102 passengers, adults and children, plus a 
crew of about 50 men. The ship, owned by 
Christopher Jones, her master, and three 
other men, was chartered by the Merchant 
Adventurers of London for this famous 
voyage. The Merchant Adventurers were a 
group of about seventy businessmen who 
invested in this venture in the hope of profit. 
The Adventurers received one share in the 
company for every ten pounds they invested 
to transport and supply the settlers and the 
settlers received one share in the company 
for each man and woman over the age of 
sixteen. The Adventurers had obtained a 
patent to colonize the northern part of the 
Virginia territory and the planned site for 
the new colony was in the vicinity of Man- 
hattan Island, now New York City. 

Of the 1 02 passengers on the May- 
flower about half were Separatists who had 
fled from England in the period between 
1608 and 1610 and settled in Leyden, Hol- 
land. The colony of Separatists in Leyden 
numbered about 300 people. The Separa- 
tists were a radical group who wished to 
separate from the Church of England (An- 
glican Church) whereas the Puritans wished 
only to purify the church, specifically, to 
eliminate popery, priestly vestments, and 
elaborate ceremonies. The other half of the 
passengers were called Strangers, most of 
whom were still faithful to the Church of 
England. The Strangers were principally 
from the London area and were included in 
the group going to the New World on the 
Mayflower because the Merchant Adven- 
turers thought there were too few Separa- 
tists to establish a profitable colony. Evi- 



dence shows that many of the Adventurers 
were sympathetic to the Separatists and 
their beliefs. 

On November 21, 1620 the May- 
flower anchored at Provincetown Harbor in 
Cape Cod Bay. The question of why the 
ship came to Cape Cod Bay rather than the 
New York area has never been answered. 
However, historical records indicate that 
they knew where they were; they knew that 
they were at Cape Cod. Captain John 
Smith, who was at Jamestown, Virginia, 
had explored farther north and had made a 
detailed map of the New England coast in 
1614. Most likely, a replica of his map was 
on the Mayflower. Knowing that they had 
not gone to Virginia territory as planned 
and were, therefore, outside any jurisdic- 
tion, several of the group of Strangers said 
they would take orders from no one. This 
led to the famous Mayflower Compact, 
signed by the forty-one free males of legal 
age on the Mayflower while the ship was 
still at anchor at Provincetown. My ances- 
tors John 1 Howland and John 1 Tilley were 
among the signers. Essentially, the compact 
stated that each individual would agree to 
governance by majority rule. After the 
signing John Carver was confirmed as gov- 
ernor for one year. However, he died in the 
spring of 1621 and was succeeded by thirty- 
one-year-old William Bradford as governor 
of Plymouth Colony. 

After about five weeks at 
Provincetown Harbor exploring the Cape 
Cod Bay area the colonists made the deci- 
sion to settle at Plymouth, site of an aban- 
doned Indian village. The Mayflower an- 
chored there on December 26, 1620 with 
ninety-nine passengers. One adult had died 



315 



Appendix 2 



at sea, one child had been born at sea, an- 
other was born at Provincetown, and four 
adults had died at Provincetown. The first 
European known to have visited the site of 
Plymouth was Martin Pring. In 1603 he 
spent six weeks exploring the Massachu- 
setts Bay area. See Appendix 1. 

November was a very bad time of 
year for the Mayflower colonists to arrive in 
New England. However, their plight was 
made easier by their friendly association 
with the local Indians, including their Sa- 
chem (chief) whose name was Massasoit. 
Several of the Indians who had been in 
contact with English fishermen could speak 
English. The winter of 1620-1621 was 
nonetheless devastating for the colonists. 
Almost half of them died that winter from 
the "general sickness," probably, in part, 
scurvy. The Mayflower spent the winter at 
anchor at Plymouth and about half the crew 
also died before the ship sailed for England 
on April 5, 1621. 

Three other ships bringing settlers to 
Plymouth Colony arrived by 1623. The first 
of the three, the Fortune of London, arrived 
on November 9, 1621 with thirty-five set- 
tlers, all from the London area. The next 
two ships with passengers intended for 
Plymouth Colony, the Anne and the Little 
James, arrived in July 1623 bringing about 
seventy-five more settlers. Thus, by 1624 
there were over 180 people living in 32 
houses in Plymouth. 

Plymouth Colony was not com- 
pletely isolated during the early years. 
Ships engaged in other colonizing ventures 
came to the colony from time to time. In 
the summer of 1622 a group of about sixty 
men came to Plymouth on their way to a 
planned new settlement at Weymouth, Mas- 
sachusetts. And there were many English 
fishing vessels working along the New 



England coast. For example, in the summer 
of 1624, there were as many as fifty such 
vessels. 

After 1624 other ships brought a 
few new settlers to Plymouth Colony each 
year but by then the colonists' relationship 
with the Adventurers had become strained. 
The colony's indebtedness seemed to grow 
rather than decrease in spite of good ship- 
ments of furs to London and many of the 
Adventurers became reluctant to finance 
more settlers. This slowed immigration to 
the colony and also stranded in Leyden 
other Separatists who wished to join family 
or friends in the New World. By 1630 Ply- 
mouth Colony had grown to only about 300 
people. Over the years some of the settlers 
decided to move to outlying areas that were 
less crowded and had better lands. They 
established the towns of Duxbury, Scituate, 
Sandwich, Taunton, Yarmouth, Barnstable, 
Marshfield, Rehoboth, and Eastham in Ply- 
mouth Colony. By 1640 the colony num- 
bered 2,500 people. Other towns were es- 
tablished in the colony in the 1640s and 
later. 

During the early years Plymouth 
functioned as a self-governing, communal 
colony with only a patent granted by the 
Council for New England in 1621. By 
agreement with the Adventurers, the settlers 
at Plymouth Colony were to share every- 
thing in common during the first seven years 
and then divide all assets equally between 
the Adventurers and the settlers. However, 
by 1623 the industrious ones were com- 
plaining that they were supporting the lazy 
ones. As a result, the settlers decided to 
give each man, woman, and child one acre 
of land to raise crops. At the same time, 
they would all cultivate the larger common 
lands for the company. Known as the Divi- 
sion of Land, this agreement was made 
among all of the passengers of the May- 



316 



Plymouth Colony 1620-1691 



flower, Fortune, Anne, and Little James 
who were still living in the town of Ply- 
mouth. 

In 1626 a group of fifty-eight men, 
mostly colonists, known as the Purchasers, 
bought from the Adventurers all of the "said 
stocks, shares, lands, merchandise and 
chatles" which had belonged to the Adven- 
turers. Among the Purchasers were my an- 
cestors John Howland . Stephen 1 Tracy , 
and Anthony Annable . Then in 1627 the 
fifty-eight Purchasers assigned the shares of 
the company and the debt to a group of 
twelve men known as the Undertakers in 
exchange for certain monopolies granted to 
them by their fellow colonists, such as the 
fur trade and other considerations. Eight of 
the twelve Undertakers were Plymouth 
Colony's leading men and four were among 
the original Adventurers who wished to re- 
main associated with the Plymouth Colony 
enterprise. John Howland was one of the 
Undertakers. The debt of the Undertakers 
was finally paid off in 1648. 

In 1627, probably in connection 
with the assignment to the Undertakers, the 
colonists made a "division of cattle and 
other things." These changes led to a 
democratic form of governance in the col- 
ony based on the principles in the May- 
flower Compact, One of the exacerbating 
factors in the problem with the communal 
state was that the non-Separatists did not 
want to share in the cost of bringing other 
Separatist families and friends from Leyden 
to Plymouth Colony. 

The colonists at Plymouth did not 
confine themselves to the Plymouth area 
alone. They established at least two trading 
posts to obtain furs from the Indians. One 
trading post was on the Kennebec River at 
the site of present-day Augusta, Maine. 
This trading post existed from 1628 to 



about 1676 and John Howland was in 
charge there for some of the time. The 
other trading post was established in 1633 
on the Connecticut River at the site of pres- 
ent-day Windsor. However, the much- 
larger group of settlers that came from 
Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1636 essen- 
tially forced the Plymouth people out of the 
Windsor area. 

The choice of the place of settle- 
ment for Plymouth Town on the shore of 
the shallow Plymouth Bay precluded the 
colony from ever becoming as important as 
Massachusetts Bay Colony. On October 7, 
1691 a new charter for Massachusetts Bay 
Colony which included all of the Plymouth 
Colony area was approved in England, thus 
ending the life of Plymouth Colony as a 
separate political entity. The towns of the 
former Plymouth Colony remained part of 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony until the 
American Revolution eighty-five years later 
when all of the colony became part of the 
state of Massachusetts. 

Plymouth Colony holds an impor- 
tant place in history because it was the sec- 
ond permanent English settlement in the 
area that was to become the United States. 
But perhaps more significantly, the people 
of Plymouth colony left two important lega- 
cies. The first is the knowledge that a 
communal form of government does not 
work well for a society of free people. 
There are exceptions among religious 
groups, but strictly speaking their members 
are not always free; they are often con- 
trolled by their religious beliefs. The sec- 
ond legacy is the concept of a democratic 
form of government with majority rule, as 
contained in the Mayflower Compact. This 
idea was extended into the representative 
form of democracy in our Constitution. 



317 



Appendix 2 

Ten of my ancestors had arrived in 
Plymouth Colony by 1624. They were: 

(2386) John' Howland on Chart II 
came on the Mayflower and mar- 
ried (2387) Elizabeth 2 Tillev in 
Plymouth in 1623. 

John Tillev and his wife, Joan 
Hurst , beyond Chart II, came on 
the Mayflower. They brought with 
them their thirteen-year-old 
daughter, Elizabeth Tillev . who 
married John Howland . 

(2518) Stephen Tracy and his 
wife, (2519) Tryphosa Lee , on 
Chart III came on the Anne in 
1623. They brought with them 
their infant daughter, (1259) Sarah 
Tracy . 

(2570) Anthony Annable and his 
wife, (2571) Jane Moumford . on 
Charts IV and V came on the Anne 
in 1623. They brought with them 
their infant daughter, (1285) Sarah 2 
Annable . 

Two of these ten ancestors, John 1 
Tillev and his wife, Joan Hurst , died in the 
first winter but the other eight lived normal 
lifespans. 



You will notice that I have not used 
the word "Pilgrim." Actually, there is no 
universally accepted definition for this 
word. Some historians define the Pilgrims 
narrowly as only the Separatists on the 
Mayflower. Others define the Pilgrims 
broadly as all those persons who came to 
Plymouth Colony by 1624. Stephen Tracy 
and his wife, Tryphosa Lee , are known to 
have been Separatists. Two others, John 
Tillev and his wife, Joan Hurst , may also 
have been Separatists. 

Note: The early history of Ply- 
mouth Colony is based principally on Gov- 
ernor William Bradford's history of the col- 
ony. Bradford's writings started in 1620 
and continued until 1647. During most of 
this time he served as governor of the col- 
ony. The problems with Bradford's original 
work are the old English style of writing, 
his abbreviations, and his punctuation. 
Over the years many transcriptions have 
been made of his work. Three of the best 
are those by Davis (reference #124), Ford 
(reference #145), and Morison (reference 
#146). However, reference #123 by Strat- 
ton, published in 1986, is a more readily 
available book and is recommended for ad- 
ditional reading on Plymouth Colony. 



References: #104, pp. 3-55, #123, pp. 17-138, #124, #145, #146, and #154, pp. 1-22. 



318 



APPENDIX 3 
MASSACHUSETTS BAY COLONY 



The third permanent English set- 
tlement in America was Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, established by the New England 
Company in 1628, eight years after Ply- 
mouth Colony was founded. At that time 
little was known in England about the ac- 
complishments of the settlers in the Vir- 
ginia and Plymouth colonies. These colo- 
nies were seldom mentioned in the daily 
life and conversation of the common peo- 
ple of England. Most of the information 
known about America came through the 
clergy. 

Earliest settlement of Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony began when the first gov- 
ernor, John Endicott, along with about 
sixty colonists sailed for America in June 
1628 and established a town at Salem. 
More ships came in the next two years and 
the towns of Charlestown, Boston, Dor- 
chester, Roxbury, Newtown (later Cam- 
bridge), and Watertown were established. 



Charlestown, Dorchester, and Roxbury 
were all ultimately absorbed into Boston. 

Major settlement of Massachusetts 
Bay Colony started in 1630. That year has 
been called the beginning of the Great Mi- 
gration. The end of this major migration 
was in 1640. During that ten-year period 
at least 300 ships are known to have ar- 
rived in America. Those ships brought 
over 20,000 immigrants, the majority Eng- 
lish Puritans who settled initially in Massa- 
chusetts Bay Colony. After the Great Mi- 
gration immigration to America dropped 
sharply because of the English Civil War 
and changed economic conditions in Eng- 
land. 

The graph below shows the immi- 
gration rate from the arrival of the May- 
flower in 1620 to the end of the Great Mi- 
gration in 1640. 



3500 



3000 



% 2500 

UJ 

> 

{£ 2000 

UJ 

O 1500 

z 

UJ 

^ 1000 - 



500 



H 1 h 



t-t-t 




1615 



1620 1625 1630 1635 

ANNUAL RATE OF MIGRATION TO NEW ENGLAND 

1620-1640 



1640 



319 



Appendix 3 



The two most renowned events dur- 
ing the Great Migration were the sailing of 
the Maty and Jolui on March 20, 1630 and 
the sailing of the eleven ships of the Wintfirop 
Fleet shortly thereafter. The Mary caidJofui 
brought about 140 immigrants who settled at 
Dorchester. In 1636 about half of the Dor- 
chester group moved on to a new settlement 
at Windsor in Connecticut Colony. 

John Winthrop assumed leadership of 
the enterprise that sailed in the Winthrop 
Fleet. Winthrop brought the charter for the 
enterprise and about 1,000 people. There 
were four classes of immigrants: (1) those 
who paid for their passage, (2) those who 
had some trade or profession and were to be 
remunerated in money or grants of land, (3) 
those who were to labor after arrival in re- 
payment, and (4) indentured servants who 
were carried at the expense of their masters. 

The first five ships of the Winthrop 
Fleet sailed on April 8, 1630. The flagship 
Arabella carried Winthrop who would take 
over from John Endicott as governor of Mas- 
sachusetts Bay Colony. The other half of the 
fleet sailed in May and arrived at various 
times in July Like the Mayflower passengers 
of 1620, immigrants in the Winthrop Fleet 
suffered from a high mortality rate. About 
one-third died during the first year. 

Most of the new arrivals established 
towns near one another in Massachusetts Bay 
Colony Early towns were governed as the- 
ocracies The ministers were the leaders and 
came with the original settlers. Although 
these settlers were essentially all Puritans 
who wished to enjoy religious freedom, eco- 
nomic considerations also played an impor- 
tant role in their decisions to migrate. The 
Puritans did not wish to extend religious 
freedom to anyone else and banished those 
whose beliefs differed. In particular, they 
were intolerant of the Quakers. Quakers and 



their sympathizers were sometimes flogged 
and in the late 1650s the General Court actu- 
ally approved and sometimes carried out the 
death penalty for Quakers. 

During colonial times, Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony was clearly the most 
populous and pre-eminent of the six colo- 
nies in New England. The other five colo- 
nies were Connecticut, New Hampshire, 
New Haven, Plymouth, and Rhode Island. 
New Haven Colony was absorbed into 
Connecticut in 1665 and Plymouth Colony 
was absorbed into Massachusetts Bay Col- 
ony in 1691 leaving Connecticut, Massa- 
chusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Is- 
land as the only New England colonies 
among the thirteen colonies at the time of 
the American Revolution. Maine and 
Vermont had remained frontier areas allied 
with Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

Nine of my ancestors came to Amer- 
ica on the Mary and John in 1630. They 
were: 

(1548) George' Phelps on Chart 
VIII, an unmarried man. George 1 
was a brother of William . below. 

(3440) William 1 Phelps and his 

wife (3441) Elizabeth 1 , on 

Chart X, with their five children 
including my ancestor (1720) Jor 
seph Phelps . 

(1790) Rev. John 1 Warham . on 
Chart XI, was one of the two 
spiritual leaders of the group of 
settlers on the ship. He came with 
his first wife and a son. He mar- 
ried second, (1791) Jane 1 (Dabi- 
nott) Newberry about 1637. 



320 



(3496) Henry Wolcott and his 
wife (3497) Elizabeth 1 Saunders , 
on Chart XI, with three of their 
children including my ancestor 
(17481 Henry 2 Wolcott . 

Thirteen of my ancestors came to America 
with the Winthrop Fleet in 1630. They were: 

(3572) George Alcock and his 
wife (3573) Anne Hooker, on 
Chart XI. 



(2392) Robert Hale and his wife 



(2393) Joanna' 
II. 



Cutter , on Chart 



Massachusetts Bay Colony 



(754) William Knapp and his wife 

(755) Meve' , on Chart 

VII, with their six children includ- 



ing my 
Knapp . 



ancestor (377) Judith 



(3574) Richard 1 Palgrave and his 

wife (3575) Anne , on Chart 

XI, with their first two children in- 
eluding my ancestor (1787) Sarah 
Palgrave . 

(3532) Robert 1 Parke and his wife 

(3533) Martha' Chaplin , on Chart 
XI, with their son, (1766) Tho- 
mas Parke and three other chil- 
dren. 



References: #104, pp. 24 and 47-205, #107, pp. 15-32 and 100-105, #108, v. 14, p. Hi, #194, 
pp. 1-15, #203, pp. 148-159, #232, p. 20, #265, pp. 1-21, and #294. 



321 



APPENDIX 4 
FIRST MIGRATIONS TO THE CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY 

1633-1636 



Migrations within New England 
began almost immediately after the first 
settlements in Plymouth and Massachusetts 
Bay colonies. The first and most signifi- 
cant of these early migrations was to the 
Connecticut River Valley where three 
towns, Hartford, Wethersfield, and Wind- 
sor, were settled by the English colonists in 
the period 1633 to 1636. Saybrook, at the 
mouth of the Connecticut River, and 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in the Con- 
necticut River Valley, were also settled by 
English colonists by 1636. The principal 
reasons for these migrations were religious 
and economic. 

Following a voyage up the Con- 
necticut River by Adriaen Block in 1614, 
the Dutch claimed the Connecticut River 
Valley area. They established several fur- 
trading posts along the river and in 1633 
built a small fort at present-day Hartford. 
However, men from Plymouth Colony 
made the first permanent, white settlement 
in the valley at Windsor in 1633. The 
Dutch made a show of force against the 
Plymouth men but left without actual 
armed conflict. In turn, the Plymouth Col- 
ony settlers lost control of the area in 1636 
to larger groups of English colonists from 
Dorchester in Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

The Dutch had purchased their 
right to land at Hartford from the Pequot 
Indians who had driven other Indians from 
their homes along the river. The Pequots, 
a powerful and savage tribe, had come to 
the Connecticut River Valley from the up- 
per New York state area controlled by the 
Mohawks. The English had purchased 
their right to the land at Windsor from the 
original Indian settlers of the area. There- 



fore, the English claimed the stronger title 
because the Pequots had usurped by force 
the land they sold to the Dutch. 

In the summer of 1635 a small group 
of people from Dorchester (now part of 
Boston) traveled overland and settled at 
Windsor. Sixty additional settlers arrived in 
November. The group encountered a very 
harsh winter in 1635-1636. As a result, a 
number of families, including seventy men, 
women, and children, left in the first week of 
December heading down river in the hope of 
finding at Saybrook the long-expected and 
greatly needed supplies that were to come 
from Boston. The provision ship did not ar- 
rive so the settlers went aboard the Rebecca, 
which carried them back to Boston. Those 
who remained behind at Windsor suffered but 
survived. 

In the spring of 1636 my ancestor 
(1790) Rev. John 1 Warham . on Chart XI, 
arrived at Windsor with other settlers from 
Dorchester. By the end of 1636 nearly half 
the population of Dorchester had moved to 
Windsor. The Dorchester settlers had origi- 
nally come to Massachusetts from Devon- 
shire and nearby counties in southwestern 
England in 1630 on the Mary and John. 
Rev. Warham of Exeter and Rev. John Mav- 
erick of Devon were selected as spiritual 
leaders before the ship left England. Rev. 
Warham was one of the driving forces and 
the leader in the move to Windsor, but eld- 
erly Rev. Maverick remained at Dorchester. 

Another epic migration from Massa- 
chusetts Bay Colony to the Connecticut 
River Valley occurred in June 1636 when 
Rev. Thomas Hooker's group departed 
overland from Newtown (now Cambridge), 



323 



Appendix 4 



Massachusetts for Hartford. The party in- 
cluded about 1 00 men, women, and children, 
plus 160 head of cattle, goats, and pigs. The 
100-mile journey took about two weeks. A 
few Dutch still remained in the area, along 
with the remnants of a small group from 
Newtown who had endured the harsh winter 
of 1635-1636 there. 

In the fall of 1634 John Oldham led a 
party of eight adventurous men to the area of 
Wethersfield where they planted grain and 
spent the winter in temporary houses. The 
next spring Oldham returned to Massachu- 
setts Bay and brought a band of fifteen to 
twenty settlers from Watertown, Massachu- 
setts to Wethersfield. The thirty or so Wa- 
tertown families who migrated to Wethers- 
field in the period 1635-1636 were soon 
joined by settlers from other places, including 
some who came directly from England. 
Wethersfield was, therefore, founded by indi- 
viduals whose connection with Massachu- 
setts was tenuous. Windsor and Hartford, on 
the other hand, were settled by large church 
groups who had come first to Massachusetts 
Bay Colony as units. 

The two other early settlements in the 
Connecticut River Valley were at Saybrook, 
Connecticut and Springfield, Massachusetts. 
In 1631 the English Earl of Warwick ob- 
tained from the Plymouth Company a patent 
to the lands "extending from the Narragansett 
River to the Pacific Ocean" including the 
lower valley of the Connecticut River and, 
consequently, the site of Saybrook. In 1631- 
1632 Warwick transferred the title to several 
Englishmen of high position. On July 7, 
1635 the company composed of Englishmen 
to whom Warwick had made the grant ap- 
pointed John Winthrop, Jr., son of Governor 
Winthrop of Massachusetts, as Governor of 
the "Connecticut River Harbor and places 
adjoining ." The younger Winthrop was ap- 
pointed for one year and on his part, he 



agreed to build a fort and create a settlement 
of houses for "men of quality." He was di- 
rected to reserve 1,000 or 1,500 acres offer- 
tile land for the maintenance of the fort and 
its garrison. 

Winthrop arrived in Boston in Octo- 
ber 1635 and sent a vessel with twenty men 
to the mouth of the Connecticut River where 
they arrived on November 24. The Dutch, 
who already had possession up the river at 
the site of Hartford, intended to take posses- 
sion of the mouth of the river but the arrival 
of Winthrop's ship and men prevented it. 
That the titled English proprietors intended 
their American possessions at Saybrook to be 
in keeping with their high estate is shown by 
the employment of Lion Gardiner, a skilled 
English engineer, to take charge of building 
the fort and laying out the town. And then 
later in 1636, 300 men were to come from 
the England: 200 to garrison the fortifica- 
tions, 50 to produce food for the community, 
and 50 to build houses. 

The initial settlers at Saybrook faced 
the intensely cold winter of 1635-1636 and in 
the first week of December 1635 the seventy 
refugees from Windsor arrived hoping to find 
the provisions that were to come for them 
from Boston. Before the twenty men com- 
posing the garrison of the Saybrook fort had 
been there a year the Pequot War was upon 
them. Some members of the garrison were 
killed instantly while others were tortured to 
death by the Indians. Saybrook was only a 
fort and only one of the original English 
owners ever settled there. In 1644 he sold 
the fort to the Hartford Colony. Saybrook 
did not become a significant settlement until 
later. 

Springfield was founded in 1636 by 
William Pynchon, one of eight men from 
Massachusetts Bay who signed an agreement 
to settle there. Pynchon, a landed proprietor 



324 



First Migrations to the Connecticut River Valley 1633-1636 



of Essex County, England, was one of 
twenty-seven patentees of the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony Charter, a member of Governor 
Winthrop's party that came to America in 
1630, and a settler of Roxbury (now part of 
Boston). After five years in Roxbury some 
settlers wished to move on. In April 1636 
their possessions were sent by water, in a 
ship belonging to Governor Winthrop, to the 
site of their new settlement at Springfield. 
Initial settlers traveled overland to their new 
home where they were welcomed by the In- 
dians who were disposed to be on friendly 
terms with the English. Early settlement at 
Springfield was ultimately about forty or fifty 
families. Pynchon returned to England in 
1652 and died there. 

Except for the Pequots, the Indians 
of the Connecticut River Valley generally 
cooperated with the white settlers, sold land 
to them, and lived close to them in peace. A 
partial explanation of their behavior lay in 
their great fear of the Mohawks to the west 
which made the Connecticut Indians ex- 
tremely eager to have English friendship, 
their only hope for security. The hostility of 
the Pequots threatened the viability of the 
new white settlements. After a series of at- 
tacks by the Pequots the English colonists 
attacked the Pequots in 1637 and almost 
completely annihilated the tribe. See Pequot 
War in Appendix 7. The defeat and decima- 
tion of the Pequots ended the major Indian 
threat to Connecticut's orderly expansion. 
Settlers and Indians coexisted in relative 
peace and harmony for thirty-eight years until 
the outbreak of King Philip's War in 1675. 

Seventeen of my ancestors were 
original proprietors or early settlers (before 
1650) in Windsor. They were: 

(1670) Thomas' Barber on Chart X. 
(1590) William 1 Fillev on Chart VTH. 
(1468) Edward 1 Griswold on Chart VI. 



(1538) Thomas Gunn on Chart WI. 

(3100) William Hosford on Chart Vm. 

(2528) John 1 Hurd on Chart ffl. 

(776) John 2 Loomis on Chart Vm. 

(1552) Joseph 1 Loomis on Chart VUI. 

(3498) Thomas' Newberry on Chart XI. 

(1548) George 1 Phelps on Chart VUI. 

(3440) William' Phelps on Chart X. 

(1556) John 1 Porter on Chart VUI. 

(3098) Philip 1 Randall on Chart VUI. 

(3 102) William' Thrall on Chart VET 

(1790) Rev. John 1 Warham on Chart XI, 
mentioned above as the leader of the 
move from Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts to Windsor, Connecticut. 

(1708) Robert 1 Winchell on Chart X 

(3496) Henry 1 Wolcott on Chart XI. 

Thirteen of my ancestors were origi- 
nal proprietors or early settlers (before 1650) 
in Hartford. They were: 

(1698) William 1 Andrews on Chart X. 
(3 1 50) Nathaniel 1 Bearding on Chart VHJ. 
(1740) Joseph 1 Easton on Chart XI. 
(1 162) Samuel 1 Gardner on Chart H 
(2416) Ozias 1 Goodwin on Chart U. 
(3494) Matthew' Marvin on Chart XI. 
(3386) Thomas' Porter on Chart X. 
(1554) Thomas' Scott on Chart VDI. 
(1728) Richard' Seymour on Chart XI. 
(1 574) Thomas' Spencer on Chart VUI. 
(2506) William' Spencer on Chart m. 
(2422) Thomas' Stanley on Chart JJ. 
(3488) Gov. Thomas' Welles on Chart XI. 



Note: The status of original proprietors and set- 
tlers was not equal. Original proprietors were 
entitled to their proportional share of the extensive 
areas of land held in common by the town. Other 
settlers were also landholders, usually of land 
granted "by courtesy of the town," but they did 
not share ownership of the common areas. 



325 



Appendix 4 



Four of my ancestors were original 
proprietors or early settlers (before 1650) in 
Wethersfield. They were: 

(1746) William' Goodrich on Chart XI. 

(3532) Robert' Parke on Chart XI. 

(732) Thomas' Tracy on Chart VI. 

(3488) Gov. Thomas' Welles on Chart XI. 
Thomas was in Hartford by 1637, 
but moved to Wethersfield in 1646. 



Three of my ancestors were original 
proprietors or early settlers (before 1650) in 
Springfield. They were: 

(792) John 2 Harmon on Chart VIP. 
(3084) Rowland' Stebbins on Chart Vm. 
( 586) James Taylor on Chart II. 



References: #33, pp. 867-873, #53, #155, pp. 17-80 and 149-171, #232, pp. 19-25 and 31-40, 
and #264, pp. 18-25 and 283-307. 



326 



APPENDIX 5 

NEW HAVEN COLONY 

1638-1665 



In May 1637 a large group of Puri- 
tans sailed for New England on the Hector 
and another ship whose name has been lost 
to history. The leaders of the group were 
the Reverend John Davenport and London 
merchant Theophilus Eaton. The group 
numbered about 250 men, women, and 
children, including servants. Financing of 
the Davenport-Eaton company came from 
some of the settlers themselves and from 
London businessmen. As planned, the 
company spent the first winter in Boston. It 
was intended that the settlers on the Hector 
and her sister ship remain together and es- 
tablish the new colony as a group. In fact, 
when the site was selected at New Haven in 
the fall of 1637 and settled in the summer of 
1638 a number of other colonists from the 
Massachusetts Bay area had joined the set- 
tlers going to New Haven. Five other 
towns were soon established as part of New 
Haven Colony. They were Guilford, Mil- 
ford, Branford, and Stamford in Connecti- 
cut, and Southold on Long Island. 

In 1643 a confederation was formed 
by Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, Connecti- 
cut, and New Haven Colonies to help solve 
boundary problems and to meet increased 
danger of attacks by the Dutch, French, and 
Indians. It was called the New England 
Confederation. Maine, New Hampshire, 
and Rhode Island were excluded from 
membership for political and religious rea- 
sons. The confederation had great power in 
theory but in practice it could only advise. 



Although the confederation was dissolved 
in 1684 it had helped the smaller colonies 
develop without domination by Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony. 

Map C of the New England Confed- 
eration shows the extent of the early settle- 
ment in New Haven Colony and in the other 
colonies of the confederation. 

Ten of my ancestors were in New 
Haven Colony before 1650. They were: 

(1432) William Andrews , of New Haven, 
on Chart VI. 

( 706) William' Bassett . of New Haven, 
on Chart VI. 

( 708) Thomas 1 Beach , of Milford, on 
Chart VI. 

(3536) Francis 1 Bushnell , of Guilford, on 
Chart XI. 

(1768) Richard 2 Bushnell . of Guilford, on 
Chart XI 

(712) Matthias 1 Hitchcock , of New Ha- 
ven, on Chart VI. 

( 704) Edward 2 Parker , of New Haven, 
on Chart VI. 

(1434) William 1 Peck , of New Haven, on 
Chart VI. 

(1418) Richard 1 Piatt , of New Haven and 
Milford, on Chart VI. 

(1422) Humphrey 1 Spinning , of New Ha- 
ven, on Chart VI. 



References: #76, pp. 28-91 and 628, #105, pp. 4-9, #232, pp. 40-74, and #294, v. 13, p. 177. 



327 



APPENDIX 6 
NANTUCKET ISLAND 



The first European on record to 
sight Nantucket Island was the Englishman 
Bartholomew Gosnold, during his voyage 
of exploration in 1602. Gosnold did not 
visit Nantucket Island, but he did land at 
Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. For 
several decades after Gosnold' s voyage 
there was no European attempt to settle 
Nantucket Island, Martha's Vineyard, or 
any of the nearby Elizabeth Islands. In 
1635 King Charles I conveyed to William, 
Earl of Sterling, Secretary of the Kingdom 
of Scotland, "...Pemaquid and its depend- 
encies on the coast of Maine, together with 
Long Island, and the adjacent islands...." 
In 1641 Lord Sterling sold Martha's Vine- 
yard and Nantucket Island to Thomas 
Mayhew, a merchant of Watertown, Mas- 
sachusetts, and his son, Thomas, Jr., for 
£40. Mayhew settled Martha's Vineyard 
about 1 642 but he made no attempt to set- 
tle Nantucket Island. 

In the summer of 1659 my ancestor 
(13 16) Tristram 1 Coffin , on Chart IV, made a 
voyage to Martha's Vineyard looking for a 
better place for his family and friends to set- 
tle. These families lived in the vicinity of 
Salisbury, Massachusetts in the northeastern 
comer of Massachusetts near the Merrimac 
River. Tristram was accompanied on this 
voyage by Edward Starbuck and Isaac Cole- 
man, age twelve. Finding that Mayhew was 
willing to sell Nantucket Island, Tristram and 
his companions sailed over to see if this is- 
land was suitable for settlement. They also 
took my ancestor (660) Peter Folger , on 
Chart IV, with them as interpreter. Peter, 
who had become very influential with the 
Indians, had first gone to Martha's Vineyard 
with Thomas Mayhew, Jr. about 1642. 



When Tristram returned home to 
Salisbury, a group of 'ten first purchasers was 
formed to buy Nantucket Island. Each of the 
ten was then allowed to invite a partner into 
the enterprise, making a total of twenty pur- 
chasers. When these new owners were 
making initial plans to move to Nantucket 
Island it became apparent that they also 
needed the assistance of tradesmen and oth- 
ers with special skills to make the enterprise 
successful. Thus, another group of ten men, 
known as half -share men, was invited to join 
the group of twenty purchasers. These half- 
share men were obligated to spend at least 
three years on the Island, working at their 
trade to obtain full title to their half shares. 
The settlement of Nantucket Island was, 
therefore, organized as a business venture for 
the purchasers and the partners they selected. 

Notwithstanding the purchase of the 
English rights to Nantucket Island from 
Thomas Mayhew and his son in July 1659 the 
first purchasers also paid the Indians for their 
prior rights to the Island. This was in accor- 
dance with precedents set in Massachusetts 
Bay Colony as well as with the settlers' sense 
of honor and justice. When the settlers first 
arrived in 1659 there were approximately 
1,500 Indians on the Island. Although the 
settlers and Indians always coexisted in peace 
on the Island, less than two centuries later 
not one Indian remained; rum and disease 
had taken their toll. 

Much of the lore of Nantucket Island 
relates to the history of the whaling industry 
and to the history of Quakerism. Bythemid- 
1600s near-shore whaling was established in 
North America. The center of the industry 
was first on Long Island and Cape Cod. 
Then it shifted to Nantucket Island and 
eventually to New Bedford, Massachusetts, 



329 



Appendix 6 



which was regarded as the greatest whaling 
port in the world until the decline of the in- 
dustry began about 1 850. When the settlers 
moved to Nantucket Island, starting in 1 659, 
farming and raising sheep were their principal 
occupations. However, by the early 1700s 
the shallow soil of the Island had been seri- 
ously depleted, reducing crop yields. And at 
the same time British laws restricted the trade 
of wool. As a result the Islanders turned to 
whaling. The earliest near-shore whaling was 
mainly for the species known as the right 
whale, then abundant along the shores of 
New England. A few whales had been taken 
at Nantucket Island as early as 1672. In 
1712 Christopher Hussey, a Nantucket fish- 
erman, took a sperm whale, changing the 
course of the whaling industry forever. The 
superior qualities of the sperm oil were im- 
mediately recognized and the whalers then 
began fishing farther south in search of the 
more valuable sperm whales. 

After the catch of the first sperm 
whale in 1712 Nantucket developed rapidly 
as an offshore whaling center. The small 
farming community eventually grew into a 
town of nearly 10,000 people. However, 
during the period of the American Revolu- 
tion, 1775-1783, the entire American fishery 
declined to almost nothing. Nantucketers 
hoped to remain neutral during the conflict, 
and Nantucket was the only port where an 
attempt was made to continue fishing; but the 
Nantucket fleet was almost decimated. By 
the end of the war 134 vessels had fallen into 
British hands, 1 5 more were lost at sea, and 
approximately 1,200 Nantucket seafaring 
men were captured or killed. After the war 
whaling ships moved into the South Atlantic, 
and in 1791 the first American ships rounded 
Cape Horn to fish in the South Pacific. 
Eventually the Pacific Ocean became the area 
most frequented by whalers and the whaling 
ships were often gone for two or three years 
at a time from their home ports in New Eng- 



land. Whaling at Nantucket reached its peak 
in the early 1800s before finally yielding to 
New Bedford as the major whaling port. 
Among the family names associated with 
Nantucket's whaling history are the Coffins, 
Gardners, Folgers, Husseys, Swains, and 
Paddacks. Except the Swains, most were 
descendants of my earliest ancestors on the 
Island. Today, Nantucket Island is princi- 
pally a summer resort and artists' colony. 

The Quaker religion came to Nan- 
tucket in the very early 1 700s under the lead- 
ership of Mary Coffin Starbuck and her son 
Nathaniel Starbuck, Jr. Mary was a daughter 
of my ancestor (1316) Tristram Coffin and a 
sister of my ancestor (658) Stephen Coffin , 
both on Chart IV. The Quaker religion, a 
Protestant sect, was the first religious move- 
ment on the Island and it became a powerful 
factor in all affairs of the Island. Eventually 
fifty to seventy percent of the population em- 
braced this new religion. 

Most New England communities 
were organized on a village system. On the 
green in the center of the village stood the 
meeting house where the municipal activities 
were conducted and where the religious 
services were held. Nantucket Island, how- 
ever, was an exception; there was no meeting 
house or minister on the Island for the first 
half century after the settlement in the early 
1660s. It might seem strange that families 
would leave Massachusetts Bay, where all 
activities centered on the meeting house, to 
found a community where minister and 
meeting house were non-existent. But there 
were reasons for this. For the first three dec- 
ades after settlement Nantucket Island was 
part of New York; in 1692 it was annexed to 
Massachusetts. Under New York law obser- 
vance of religion was not required and the 
public treasury did not support ministers or 
meeting houses. Residency and ownership of 
land were the only qualifications required for 



330 



Nantucket Island 



citizenship; church membership was not a 
requirement as in the New England colonies. 
Under these conditions and without public 
support no minister would care to settle in an 
area many miles at sea and surrounded by 
Indians. 

The Quaker movement began in 
England about 1644, originally the work of 
one man, George Fox. He was troubled by 
the selfish attitudes of the leaders of the 
country. These men, usually associated with 
the Church of England and closely connected 
to the Crown, were powerful and invariably 
wealthy. Their chief concern was furthering 
their own personal interests and, as a result, 
religion and government were almost indis- 
tinguishable. Fox conceived the idea of an 
inner light which he said guides the faith and 
actions of each individual; this concept is the 
heart of Quakerism. He preached that since 
there was "that of God in every man" a for- 
mal church structure and educated ministry 
were unnecessary; no longer were paid lead- 
ers needed for guidance. This idea, of 
course, was in direct conflict with the Church 
of England. 

The Quaker movement followed the 
rise of Puritanism in England. There was no 
theological or ideological relationship be- 
tween the two although both arose from a 
common desire of many Englishmen to free 
themselves from the state-supported Church 
of England. In Massachusetts it was illegal 
to participate in any faith other than the le- 
gally established Congregationalism of the 
Puritan founders of the colony. The Quakers 
had been confronted with persecutions in 
Great Britain and on the Continent. Now, in 
Puritan America, the persecutions continued; 
some Quakers were whipped and even put to 
death. The constant refusals by the Quakers 
to bow to officials, to use titles of address, 
and to take oaths were interpreted as signs of 
arrogance. On religious matters they were 



stubborn and insensitive to others. Often 
shrewd and wealthy businessmen, they were 
not generally liked by others. However, their 
honesty in personal and business dealings was 
renowned. The persecution of the Quakers 
by the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay Colony 
was a major factor in the move of the settlers 
to Nantucket Island. 

Of the twenty purchasers of Nan- 
tucket Island and the ten half-share men, nine 
were my ancestors. The ten first purchasers 
in 1659 are shown below. The ancestor 
numbers and underlining indicate individuals 
that are my direct-line ancestors; all are on 
Chart IV. 

(1324) Thomas 1 Barnard (a) 

Peter 2 Coffin 
(1316) Tristram 1 Coffin 

Stephen Greenleaf 
(1332) Christopher 1 Hussev (a) 
(1342) Thomas' Macv (b) 

Thomas Mayhew, Sr. (c) 

William Pile 

John Swain 

Richard Swain (d) 



(a) 
(b) 



(c) 



(d) 



Did not move to the Island. 
Thomas Macy and his family were 
the first white settlers on the Is- 
land. 

Although Thomas Mayhew, Sr. 
was the seller of the Island he also 
retained an interest along with the 
other nine men. 

In 1658 Richard Swain had mar- 
ried (1319) Jane 1 (Godfrey*) Bun- 
ker , the widow of (1318) George 
Bunker . His son, (670) William 2 
Bunker , was a minor when the 
Swain family came to the Island 
but in some references William is 
included as a purchaser when he 
became of age. 



331 



Appendix 6 

The following ten individuals were 
those invited by the ten first purchasers to 
join the Nantucket Island enterprises as pur- 
chasers: 

(1326) Robert' Barnard 
James Coffin 
Tristram Coffin 
Thomas Coleman 
Thomas Look 
Thomas Mayhew, Jr. 
Robert Pike 
John Smith 
Edward Starbuck 
Nathaniel Starbuck 



Of the ten half-share men who came 
to the Island nine have been identified. They 
were: 



(656) 



Joseph Coleman, seaman 

_3 



(660) 



Eleazer Folger . 

shoemaker and blacksmith 
Peter Folger . interpreter, 

miller, and blacksmith 
John Gardner, seaman 
Joseph Gardner, 

shoemaker 
(1314) Richard Gardner , seaman 
Nathaniel Holland, seaman 
Samuel Streeter, tailor 
(1328) William 1 Worth , seaman 



References: #31, pp. 12-40, 350-402 and 667, #166, pp. 5-12 and 53-61, #187, pp. 1-18 and 
1 18, #296, pp. 17-20, #299, p. 2136, #300, pp. 36-37, #302, #303, pp. 63-66, and 
#307, p. 177. 



332 



APPENDIX 7 
COLONIAL WARS BEFORE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



In the period 1637-1763 there were 
six wars in the New England colonies. 
They were: 

1. The Pequot War 1637: 

The settlers versus the Pequot Indians 
in Connecticut. 

2. King Philip's War 1675-1677: 

A general uprising of the Indians 
throughout New England. 

3. King William's War 1689-1697. 

4. Queen Anne's War 1702-1713. 

5. King George's War 1744-1748. 

6. The French and Indian War 1754-1763. 
In North America, the last four are 
known, collectively, as the French and 
Indian Wars. 

The Pequot War 1637 

In the 1630s there were sixteen lo- 
cal Indian tribes living in Connecticut with 
a total population of 6,000-7,000 men, 
women, and children. They all belonged to 
the Algonkin Confederation. Most of 
these tribes were clustered along the 
coastal region and in the Connecticut River 
Valley with none in the western and 
northwestern parts of the state. The Pe- 
quot tribe, probably the largest, included 
about 500 warriors; they were originally 
united with the Mohegan (Mohican) tribe 
but broke off early in the 1600s as a sepa- 
rate tribe. Most important, the Pequots 
were very warlike, presenting a constant 
threat to the other tribes and to the new 
English settlements along the Connecticut 
River at Hartford, Wethersfield, and Wind- 
sor. In fact, the Pequots apparently hoped 
to exterminate all of the colonists in Con- 
necticut and they conducted an almost 
continuous siege of the English fort at 



Saybrook at the mouth of the Connecticut 
River. 

In 1633 there was a violent en- 
counter between the Pequots and a small 
group of English traders from Virginia 
Colony who had stopped near the mouth of 
the Connecticut River. The Virginians 
were wiped out by the Pequots. Following 
this the Pequots became fearful of reprisal 
by the English and by the Narragansett In- 
dians who were their traditional enemies. 
In 1634 the Pequots sent two peace mis- 
sions to Boston and reached an agreement 
with the English to: (1) deliver those Indi- 
ans responsible for the slaughter of the 
Virginia party in 1633, (2) allow the Eng- 
lish to settle in the Connecticut River Val- 
ley, and (3) carry on a friendly trade with 
the English. 

After peaceful years in 1634 and 
1635 the Pequots struck again in 1636 and 
1637. John Oldham was on a trading ex- 
pedition to Long Island Sound and when 
he was close to Block Island the Pequots 
swarmed over his boat and brutally mur- 
dered him. (This is the same John Oldham 
who was an original settler at Wethersfield, 
Connecticut. See Appendix 4.) And then 
in April 1637 a large party of Pequots at- 
tacked a small group of settlers working in 
a meadow near Wethersfield. At least six 
men and three women were killed while 
two young women were carried away. On 
May 1, 1637 the General Court at Hartford 
ordered an offensive war against the Pe- 
quots. By the start of the war at least 
thirty colonists had been killed by the Pe- 
quots. 

On May 15 an expedition of ninety 
men from Hartford, Wethersfield, and 



333 



Appendix 7 



Windsor, joined by eighty Mohegan warri- 
ors, all under the leadership of Capt. John 
Mason, started down the Connecticut 
River by boat toward the English fort at 
Saybrook. The expedition was reinforced 
by nineteen Massachusetts men from the 
fort. The stronghold of the Pequots was 
about twenty miles east of Saybrook at 
Mystic where they had two forts. The 
English and their Mohegan Indian allies 
surprised the Pequots by sailing past the 
forts at Mystic and on to Narragansett Bay 
in Rhode Island. The expedition then re- 
turned on foot several days later and at- 
tacked the first Pequot fort at night. They 
set the fort on fire and in a little over an 
hour killed about 600-700 Pequots with 
only two of the English soldiers killed. 
Seven Pequots were taken captive and 
seven others escaped. Three hundred Pe- 
quots from the other fort approached the 
English/Mohegan force but retreated. The 
first and decisive phase of the Pequot War 
had ended. The English/Mohegan force 
returned to the fort at Saybrook and then 
to their homes in Hartford, Wethersfield, 
and Windsor. 

After their defeat at Mystic the re- 
maining Pequots began a panicky trek 
westward toward the Hudson River. 
About two weeks later several ships 
brought 120 men from Massachusetts and 
an agreement was reached to pursue the 
Pequots by a joint land and water expedi- 
tion. The Pequots were overtaken and sur- 
rounded at Fairfield, Connecticut. Just 
before dark Thomas Stanton, a colonist 
who could speak the Pequot language, 
volunteered to enter the Pequot-held area 
at Fairfield to parley with them. In about 
an hour he returned with 200 Pequots, old 
men, women, and children. In the battle 
the next day sixty or seventy Pequots es- 
caped, 180 were captured, and all the rest 
were killed. Most of those who escaped 



were later killed by other Indian tribes and 
the heads of many were sent to the English 
colonists. Except for a small skirmish 
where the Pequots showed no spirit to 
challenge the colonists the battle at 
Fairfield ended the Pequot War. The tribe 
which had originally numbered up to 3,000 
members had been decimated. 

Most of the surviving Pequots were 
made slaves of the other Indian tribes and 
the name was supposedly extinguished. 
However, in 1655 the colonial government 
settled the remnants of the tribe near Mys- 
tic. Today over 300 descendants of these 
few Pequot Indians (only 1/16 Pequot 
blood is required for tribal membership) 
have emerged as the proprietors of a large 
gaming and resort complex at Ledyard, 
Connecticut, about five miles northwest of 
Mystic. This enterprise includes the largest 
and most successful gaming casino in the 
Western Hemisphere. 

The Pequot War was concluded in 
1637, just seventeen years after the May- 
flower had arrived. The New England 
colonists then lived at peace with the Indi- 
ans for thirty-eight years until the outbreak 
of King Philip's War in 1675. 

There is no complete record of the 
soldiers who served in the Pequot War but 
at least three were my ancestors. They 
were: (1284) Henry' Ewell on Chart IV, 
(1574) Thomas Spencer on Chart VI, and 
(1670) Thomas Barber on Chart X. 

References: #231, pp. 47-69 and #232, pp. 
31-40. 

King Philip's War 1675-1677 

When the first English colonists 
arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in De- 
cember 1620 they established an amicable 



334 



Colonial Wars Before the American Revolution 



relationship with the Wampanoag Indian 
tribe. The sachem (chief) of this tribe, an 
Indian named Massasoit, had several chil- 
dren. Three of them are known by name: 
Wamsutta and Metacom, who came to 
Plymouth about 1656 and at their own re- 
quest received English names from the 
Governor who christened them Alexander 
and Philip, and a sister of these, who was 
called Amie by the English. Metacom, 
who became sachem in 1 662, later became 
known as King Philip for whom the war of 
1675-1677 was named. 

Massasoit had always maintained a 
cordial and firm friendship with the Eng- 
lish; and it would seem that his older son, 
Alexander, shared his father's nature and 
disposition. The moment, however, when 
Philip rose to power signaled a far different 
course of conduct on the part of the new 
Wampanoag sachem. The extent of his 
father's olden territory had been greatly 
reduced before Philip came to power. The 
English had purchased and otherwise ab- 
sorbed a large proportion of Indian lands. 
Philip kept on selling and surrendering until 
at last about 1670 he began to feel the 
pressure of English expansion upon Indian 
hunting and fishing grounds as well as on 
cornfields. The Court at Plymouth had 
interfered and forbidden the transfer of 
certain parts of the Wampanoag territories. 
This act undoubtedly saved the homelands 
of Indians in various tribes and the heredi- 
tary home of King Philip at Mt. Hope, now 
part of Bristol, Rhode Island, was saved. 

The causes of King Philip's War 
were many. The English had assumed the 
government of the country and followed 
their course of settlement with small regard 
to the rights of the natives. In some areas 
settlers purchased their lands from the In- 
dians as a matter of precaution. The set- 
tlers sought a title in case any other claim 



should be set up in opposition to theirs. 
They also wanted to conciliate the Indians 
whose hostility they feared and whose 
friendship was profitable in the trade of 
furs and other products of the hunt. The 
Indians were always at a disadvantage with 
the English in all the ways of European life. 
For example, Indians did not understand 
ownership of land in the European sense. 
The English paid no heed to Indian laws, 
customs, or traditions and ruthlessly im- 
posed their own laws, customs, and relig- 
ious ideas with no apparent thought of 
their intolerance and injustice. They made 
treaties with the Indians on the same terms 
they would have used had they been deal- 
ing with a European nation. They made 
out deeds in language which only the fram- 
ers themselves could understand. The 
English colonists looked upon the Indians 
as heathens and there was nothing the 
leaders of the Indians resented more, nor 
complained of more frequently, than the 
frequent attempts of the Christians to con- 
vert their people. 

It was only when they felt the pres- 
sures of actual privation or persecution 
that the Indians began to think of opposi- 
tion or revenge. Their chiefs had been 
summoned frequently before the English 
courts to answer for some breach of law by 
their subjects. Several times the English 
had demanded that whole tribes give up 
their arms because of the fault of one or a 
few. The Indians lived mostly by hunting 
and fishing and by the time of the King 
Philip's War they used firearms almost ex- 
clusively. They had learned their use and 
then bought the arms from the English, 
nearly always at exorbitant prices. The 
Indians were expert in the use of their guns 
and held them as the most precious of their 
possessions. They regarded the order to 
give their arms and ammunition over to the 
English as robbery. Indeed in most cases it 



335 



Appendix 7 



was, as they seldom regained their arms 
once given up. From the Indian standpoint 
there were grievances enough to drive 
them to rebellion. 

Three Indian tribes were the princi- 
pal adversaries of the English colonists in 
King Philip's War. These tribes were: (1) 
the Wampanoags who inhabited the Narra- 
gansett Bay area east through Massachu- 
setts to Plymouth as well as western Cape 
Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket 
Island, (2) the Narragansetts who inhabited 
most of Rhode Island and Connecticut east 
of the Thames River (New London), and 
(3) the Nipmucks who inhabited central 
Massachusetts, principally in Worcester 
County and the eastern half of Hampshire 
County. Although Philip himself was a 
Wampanoag, about half of the hostile Indi- 
ans in the war were from the Nipmuck 
tribe. 

The first attack by the Indians in 
King Philip's War was on June 20, 1675 
near Swansea, Massachusetts, about seven 
or eight miles from Mount Hope where 
King Philip lived. In this attack the Indians 
burned and looted the houses south of the 
town Troops from Plymouth Colony 
marched to relieve Swansea but on June 23 
Indians set a dozen more houses on fire. 
And on June 25 nine colonists at Swansea 
were slain by the Indians. A force dis- 
patched from the Massachusetts Bay Col- 
ony joined the Plymouth troops but they 
were not able to punish the Indians. 

Another attack on the settlers by 
the Indians occurred at Taunton, Massa- 
chusetts on June 24, 1675 where one set- 
tler was killed. Taunton had been desig- 
nated as a place of rendezvous for the 
troops from the different towns on the way 
to Plymouth. On June 28 all of the troops 
were ordered to report to Taunton under 



the command of Captain Bradford of Ply- 
mouth. They pursued the Indians back to 
Mount Hope and thirty Indians were killed, 
but King Philip escaped to central Massa- 
chusetts. 

At the outset of King Philip's War 
the Indian threat did not appear grave. 
The whites, who numbered perhaps 80,000 
in New England, could assemble about 
16,000 men of military age. All of the In- 
dian tribes in New England had a total of 
about 3,500 warriors. However, it soon 
became apparent that the Indian threat was 
very serious and on September 9, 1675 the 
New England Confederation of Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony, Plymouth Colony, and 
Connecticut Colony met in Boston and 
signed a declaration of war against the In- 
dians. Thus, all three colonies were united 
in a common effort to fight the Indians and 
the war spread throughout the colonies. 

All told about 600 white men, 
women, and children lost their lives during 
the war and about 2,300 others suffered 
severe losses. Proportionately, the English 
casualties throughout New England in 
King Philip's War were greater than the 
American casualties in World War II. In 
addition many of the Indian allies of the 
English settlers lost their lives. About half 
the towns in New England suffered dam- 
age and twelve or thirteen towns were en- 
tirely destroyed. Some of the worst depre- 
dations during the war were in the Con- 
necticut River Valley from north of Hart- 
ford to the Canadian border. The towns of 
Suffield, Sunderland, Deerfield, and 
Northfield were abandoned to King 
Philip's Indians and burned. Simsbury and 
Springfield were also burned. In the Con- 
necticut River Valley about 250 settlers 
were killed. 



336 



Colonial Wars Before the American Revolution 



Philip's cause began to decline 
when he made a long journey in an unsuc- 
cessful attempt to secure aid from the Mo- 
hawk tribe in New York. Other factors 
contributing to the defeat of the Indians 
were lack of unity, organization, planning, 
and strong leadership. In 1676 the Narra- 
gansetts were completely defeated, and 
their chief was killed in April of that year; 
the Wampanoags and Nipmucks were 
gradually subdued. Philip's wife and son 
were captured and Philip was killed on 
August 12, 1676 by an Indian in the service 
of the English colonists after his hiding 
place at Mt. Hope was discovered. His 
body was drawn and quartered and his 
head exposed on a pole at Plymouth. 
Upon the death of King Philip there was no 
actual armistice or surrender by the Indians 
to officially end the war. Instead, the Indi- 
ans were simply decimated and dispersed 
and the fighting stopped. The war, while 
extremely costly to the colonists in men 
and money, resulted in the practical exter- 
mination of tribal Indian life in southern 
New England and the disappearance of the 
fur trade. 

Thirteen months after Philip's death 
some forty to fifty Indians made an unex- 
pected attack on Hatfield, Massachusetts. 
Twelve of the settlers were killed, four 
were wounded, and seventeen were taken 
captive. The captives were taken north 
into French territory in Canada but were 
later ransomed and returned. Needless to 
say, this attack on Hatfield greatly alarmed 
all of the New England colonists; but there 
were no further Indian attacks until King 
William's War which started thirteen years 
later in 1689 and was the first of the four 
French and Indian Wars. 

It is beyond the scope of this book 
to discuss all of the battles and all of the 
fierce Indian attacks on settlers during 



King Philip's War. However, interesting 
information about my ancestors in this war 
follows: 

(1) On June 27, 1675, seven days 
after the start of King Philip's War, my an- 
cestor (1262) John 1 Tisdale . on Chart III, 
was killed at his home during the Indian 
attack on Taunton, Massachusetts. 

(2) In September 1675 it was de- 
cided to move the large supply of wheat at 
Deerfield, Massachusetts ten miles south to 
Hatfield to protect the grain in case of an 
Indian attack on Deerfield, a frontier town 
and difficult to defend. On the morning of 
September 1 8 a train of carts loaded with 
wheat carried in sacks set out from 
Deerfield for Hatfield. Seventeen team- 
sters from Deerfield were handling the 
carts and a company of about eighty sol- 
diers from Essex County in northeastern 
Massachusetts was providing escort pro- 
tection. When the column reached a place 
called Muddy Brook the teamsters and 
soldiers were ambushed by a force of be- 
tween 500 and 1,000 Indians. In the en- 
suing battle all seventeen of the teamsters 
and forty-seven soldiers lost their lives. 
Two other companies of soldiers, totaling 
about 160 men, heard the shooting and 
reached the scene of the massacre in a few 
hours. However, when the rescuers ar- 
rived to drive off the Indians the soldiers 
found a gruesome sight: the Indians had 
already stripped the bodies of the dead and 
slashed the bags of wheat. The next day 
the soldiers returned to Muddy Brook and 
buried all of the sixty-four dead in one 
common grave. Since that fateful day in 
September 1675 Muddy Brook has often 
been called Bloody Brook. My ancestor 
(1666) Robert 1 Hinsdale , on Chart X, and 
three of his sons were among the seventeen 
teamsters from Deerfield who were slain by 
Indians at Bloody Brook. 



337 



Appendix 7 



(3) On January 27, 1676 the town 
of Pawtuxet, Rhode Island, about four 
miles south of Providence, was attacked by 
a band of about 300 Indians and many 
houses were burned. The house of my an- 
cestor (672) William 1 Carpenter , on Chart 
V, was set on fire and two of his house- 
hold, including his son William , were 
killed. The house was saved but the Indi- 
ans drove off 200 sheep, 50 cattle, and 15 
horses. 

(4) On March 13, 1676 a force of 
about 500 Indians attacked Northampton, 
Massachusetts and broke through the pali- 
sade that protected the town. My ancestor 
(768) Isaac' Sheldon , on Chart VIII, who 
was forty-seven years old at the time of the 
attack lived there with his first wife and 
eleven children. The town was guarded by 
a garrison of seventy-eight men and the 
Indians were soon driven off. Four set- 
tlers, a girl, and about fifteen or twenty 
Indians were killed during the brief en- 
counter However, there is no record that 
anyone in Isaac Sheldon's family was 
harmed. 

(5) In March 1676 my ancestor 
(376) Nicholas' Cadv . on Chart VII, was 
living with his family, including his ten- 
year-old son (188) Joseph 2 Cadv . in 
Groton, Massachusetts when the town was 
attacked by Indians and burned. A force 
was sent to rescue the people of Groton 
and they were all moved to safety at Con- 
cord, Massachusetts. 

(6) In March 1676 Stephen 2 Wing 
of Sandwich, Massachusetts, son of my 
ancestor (644) Stephen' Wing , on Chart 
IV, was among fifty-two English militia- 
men killed in a battle with King Philip's 
forces at Seekonk, Massachusetts. 



(7) My ancestor (1754) Nathaniel 
Loomis . on Chart XI, was a member of the 
Windsor Troop of Horses which was com- 
prised of thirty-seven soldiers. 

(8) My ancestor (1750) Mai. Sam- 
uel Appleton . on Chart XI, played an im- 
portant part in King Philip's War. As a 
captain he was in command of the Massa- 
chusetts forces of 100 men defending Con- 
necticut River Valley towns in Massachu- 
setts in October and November 1675. On 
December 9, 1675, as a major, he was 
placed in command of Massachusetts 
forces of 527 men in the Narragansett area 
of Rhode Island and was involved in the 
important capture of the Indians in the 
Narragansett fort on December 19, 1675. 

References: #23, v. I, pp. 99-111, #25, pp. 
14-15, #123, pp. 107-122, #170, pp. 114- 
184, #232, pp. 75-82, #253, pp. 383-385, 
#282, pp. 24-43 and 135-137, and #309, 
p. 6. 

The French and Indian Wars 1689-1763 

The four French and Indian Wars 
between Great Britain and France in North 
America were fought intermittently for al- 
most three quarters of a century, 1689 to 
1 763 . These wars were: 

King William's War 1689-1697 
Queen Anne's War 1702-1713 
King George's War 1744-1748 
The French and Indian War 1754-1763 

Actual conflict between the two 
countries and their Indian allies lasted 
about thirty-two years during the period. 
These wars were really campaigns in the 
world-wide struggle for empire and were 
roughly linked to the wars between the 
European powers. At the time, the wars in 



338 



Colonial Wars Before the American Revolution 



North America were viewed in Europe as 
only an unimportant aspect of the struggle 
and although the stakes were domination 
of eastern North America and the West 
Indies the fortunes of war in Europe had 
more effect in determining the winner than 
the fighting in the disputed territory itself. 

To the settlers in America, how- 
ever, the rivalry of the two powers was of 
immediate concern for the fighting meant 
not only raids by the French or the British 
but also the horrors of Indian warfare. The 
conflict may be looked on, from the 
American viewpoint, as a single war with 
interruptions. The tactics of these wars 
included capture of seaboard strongholds 
and attacks on frontier settlements, notably 
in the Connecticut River Valley. Women 
and children were often captured and taken 
to Canada or killed; the wars were not 
simply between soldiers. 

The settlers along the Atlantic 
coast were primarily English, Dutch, or 
German, living in colonies ruled by the 
British government which claimed all of 
the territory that stretched inland from the 
colonies along the coast. French settle- 
ments lay north of the English colonies 
along the Saint Lawrence River and the 
Great Lakes and eventually spread south 
and west along the Mississippi, Missouri, 
and Ohio Rivers. The maximum extent of 
French possessions (New France) in the 
early 1700s is shown on Map D. 

The French settlements were not as 
fully developed as the English settlements 
because the French were interested in the 
fur trade in contrast to the English who 
were interested in establishing permanent 
colonies. The French who had lived, 
worked, and intermarried with the Indians 
for many generations had successfully ce- 
mented alliances with the powerful tribes. 



Many of the Indian leaders, believing that 
the French meant to keep the forests and 
prairies in their natural state while the 
English colonists would clear them and 
plow the ground to plant crops, fought on 
the side of the French. However, the Eng- 
lish also had allies among the Indians and 
both the French and the English had the 
support of regular troops from their home 
countries. 

The last and by far the most im- 
portant of the four French and Indian Wars 
is called the French and Indian War, 1754- 
1763. In Europe it was known as the 
Seven Years' War. The defining event of 
this war was the Battle of Quebec in 1759. 
The British army under General James 
Wolfe advanced upon the city of Quebec 
which was defended by 15,000 French 
troops led by General Montcalm. After a 
three-month siege the British defeated the 
French in a twenty-minute battle on the 
nearby Plains of Abraham which had been 
fortified by the French. In 1760 Montreal 
also fell and the war was essentially over. 
The Treaty of Paris, signed in 1763, gave 
Great Britain almost all of what is now 
Canada and all French-held land east of the 
Mississippi with the exception of New Or- 
leans. Florida, held by France's ally Spain, 
was also given to Britain. France then 
ceded New Orleans to Spain, along with all 
the land west of the Mississippi. Of its 
great colonial empire France kept only two 
small islands, St. Pierre and Miguelon, near 
Newfoundland to use as fishing stations. 
Today New France is simply a name on old 
maps and in history books. ' 



'it seems surprising that France would surrender 
such a vast area as New France without more re- 
sistance than the Battle of Quebec. However, after 
150 years of occupation New France had become 
an economic drain on the mother country. And 
the area was sparsely settled. For example, in 
1759 only 70,000 people were living in the most 



339 



Appendix 7 



It is beyond the scope of this book 
to discuss the details or even the broad 
strategy of the four French and Indian 
Wars. And there are no complete records 
of all those who fought in these wars. 
There are, however, poignant stories of 
some of my collateral ancestors in the 
Tragedy at Deer field during Queen Anne's 
War, 1702-1713. This tragedy (attack) is 
often mentioned in history books as one of 
the most infamous events in all of the four 
French and Indian Wars. 



leaving twenty-four standing. The surviv- 
ing women and children were evacuated to 
Northampton, Hadley, and Hatfield. The 
French and Indians departed quickly with 
their captives because they knew that re- 
inforcements would be coming from nearby 
English settlements. The captives were 
forced to march back to Canada through 
the snow and ice and many perished. 
Later, most of the surviving captives were 
redeemed by the English and returned to 
their homes. 



The French and Indians had already 
made sporadic attacks on the English out- 
post town of Deerfield, Massachusetts sev- 
eral times during the period of King Wil- 
liam's War, 1689-1697, but each time the 
attackers had been repulsed. However, in 
the winter of 1703-1704 the French and 
Indians made a major attack on Deerfield. 
The attack, which became a massacre, was 
apparently premeditated and well-planned. 
A party of 200 French and 142 Indian allies 
traveled 300 miles south through snow and 
ice to attack Deerfield on February 29, 
1704. During the battle fifty-three English 
colonists, men, women, and children, were 
slain, ninety-five were captured, and 137 
survived. The town was plundered and 
burned; seventeen houses were destroyed, 



populous area of New France, Ihc St. Lawrence 
Valley- - Quebec to Montreal. By comparison, the 
population of the English colonics in America had 
grown to one and one-half million by that time. 

2 Thc area of New France that was ceded to Spain 
by France in the 1763 Treaty of Paris was called 
the Louisiana Territory - that area extending from 
the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian border and 
from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Moun- 
tains In 1800 in a broader agreement between the 
two powers, ownership of the Louisiana Territory 
was transferred back to France. And then in 1803 
in the Louisiana Purchase the United States 
bought this territory from France. Eventually all 
or parts of fifteen states were formed out of the 
region. 



Ensign John Sheldon, a half 
brother of my ancestor (384) Capt. Jona- 
than Sheldon. Sr. of Suffield, Connecticut, 
on Chart VIII, is one of the best-known 
survivors of the Tragedy at Deerfield. 
John was forty-six years old at the time, 
second in command of the militia, and liv- 
ing with his wife and five young children in 
a strongly fortified house/tavern. His old- 
est son John and his wife, Hannah, were 
also living in the house at the time. 

The Indians attacked the house of 
John but were at first unable to force the 
doors, so they hacked a hole in the front 
door and fired a shot that killed John's 
wife. Finally, the Indians gained entry, 
killed John's infant child, and carried off 
four of his children. John himself and one 
child survived the attack. 

John" and his wife, Hannah, es- 
caped from a second-story window but she 
was injured in the jump and urged John to 
hurry to Hatfield to summon help which he 
did. Hannah was carried off to Canada as 
a captive. 

John Sheldon is perhaps best 
known for the three expeditions he led to 
Quebec to redeem the captives from the 
French and Indians. In 1705 he marched 



340 



Colonial Wars Before the American Revolution 



north with two other men and secured the 
release of Hannah, the wife of John 3 
Sheldon, and four other Deerfield prison- 
ers, including a child of John 3 . In 1706 an 
exchange of prisoners was arranged be- 
tween the warring French and British and 
John Sheldon again marched north to 
Quebec. This time he brought forty-four 
English captives back to Boston by ship, 
including three of his own children. Fifty- 
seven more English captives were also re- 
turned to Boston by ship in 1 706. Then in 
1707 John Sheldon made his last march 
into Canada and brought back seven more 
captives, making a total of 1 1 3 that he re- 
covered from the French and Indians in 
Canada. 

Eunice Mather, a daughter of my 
ancestor (895) Esther Warham . on Chart 
XI, lived in Deerfield with her husband, 
Rev. John Williams, and their eight chil- 
dren at the time of the attack in 1704. 
Two of the children, one an infant and one 
age seven, were killed and one escaped to 
Hadley. Eunice and her husband, along 
with their other five children, were forced 



to start marching the 300 miles back to 
Canada with their captors. Eunice was 
killed on the second day of the march back 
to Canada and in 1 886 a granite monument 
was erected on the spot where she was 
killed. Rev. John Williams and four of his 
children were redeemed, apparently by 
John Sheldon. One daughter chose to re- 
main with the Indians in Canada. 

Joseph Petty, age thirty-one, a 
brother of my ancestor (292) John Petty , 
on Chart IT, was captured along with his 
wife and both were forced to march back 
to Canada with their captors. Joseph 
escaped with three others and made his 
way back to Deerfield, more dead than 
alive. Joseph's wife was redeemed from 
captivity by John Sheldon and returned to 
Deerfield. 

References: #18, pp. 7-11 of the 1913 
paper and pp. 3-5 of the 1957 supplement, 
#23, v. I, pp. 293-351 and v. U, genealogies, 
pp. 261, 293-295, and 377, #235, pp. 27-31, 
#294, #295, pp. 18-20, #310, v. 1, pp. 129- 
134, and #311, pp. 80 and 1 14-1 19. 



341 



APPENDIX 8 
THE SCOT-IRISH 



Scot-Irish (often called Scotch- 
Irish) is the name applied to those people 
of Scottish descent who emigrated from 
Scotland to Ireland. The majority were 
Presbyterians but their ranks included 
Methodists, Episcopalians, and others who 
took the name Scot-Irish. By doing this 
those who came to the United States dis- 
tinguished themselves from the Catholic 
Irish and thereby avoided the anti-Catholic 
prejudice that existed in this country. 

Three of my immigrant forebears 
were Scot-Irish. They were my great, 
great grandparents, (30) Thomas Forbes 
and (31) Eliza Sloane and their daughter, 
my great grandmother (15) Mary Forbes . 
See the biography for Thomas for a discus- 
sion of the emigration of my Forbes for- 
bears from Ireland to the United States in 
the 1840s and 1850s. The following is a 
brief history of Ireland with emphasis on 
Cavan County from whence the family 
came. 

Until 1921 all of Ireland was part of 
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland. In that year twenty-six of the 
thirty-two Irish counties became a domin- 
ion of Great Britain, the Irish Free State, 
which in 1 949 became the independent Re- 
public of Ireland. The republic is over- 
whelmingly Catholic. Six of the northern 
counties, Antrim, Armagh, Down, Ferman- 
agh, Londonderry, and Tyronne remained 
(and remain to this day) part of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. These six counties are part of the 
province of Ulster. Three other Ulster 
counties, Cavan, Donegal, and Monoghan 
are now part of the republic. See Map F. 



In the very early 1600s, more than 
300 years before the partition of Ireland in 
1921, English kings began seizing Irish 
lands. These lands were granted to Scots 
and others who would resettle in Ireland 
and remain loyal to England. This was 
called the plantation of Ireland, most of 
the seized land was in Ulster. 

The Scot-Irish of Ireland remained, 
for the most part, ethnically pure Scot for 
two reasons. First, there was the strong 
religious difference between the Catholic 
Irish and the Protestant Scots. Second, 
there was an historic animosity between 
the Irish and Scots because so many of the 
Catholic Irish were driven from their 
homelands during the plantation of Ireland. 

The catastrophe of the Great 
Famine of 1845-47 caused Irish by the 
thousands to leave for the United States. 
These immigrants were predominantly 
Catholic but there were also many Scot- 
Irish. The population of all of Ireland 
which was about eight or nine million in 
1845 had declined to about six and one- 
half million by 1851. The province of Ul- 
ster was much more industrialized than the 
south and suffered less during and after the 
famine. The famine was caused by the 
potato blight, a type of fungus which 
spread quickly, rendering the entire potato 
crop inedible. By 1847 starvation and dis- 
ease were everywhere; as a result about 
one million Irish died. 

Cavan County is one of the three 
counties of the historic province of Ulster 
that did not become part of Northern Ire- 
land in the partition of 1921. In 1861 
when the first census was taken the re- 
spective proportions of Catholics, Presby- 



343 



Appendix 8 



terians, and Episcopalians in Cavan County 
were eighty-one, four, and fifteen percent. 
From this one can conclude that the rela- 
tive proportions of people of Irish, Scot- 
tish, and English extraction were the same. 
My forebears in Cavan County, the Forbes 
and Sloane families, were part of the mi- 
nority group in the county, the Scot-Irish. 

Cavan County is a hilly region of 
lakes and bogs. The climate is very damp 
and cool. Agriculture is the chief occupa- 
tion but less than a third of the area is un- 
der cultivation, mostly in small farms. 
Manufacturing is negligible. The popula- 
tion of the county is now only about 
55,000. In 1841 it had been 243,000 but 
then the county was badly affected by the 
Great Famine and by 1851 the population 
had fallen to 174,000. About 25,000 peo- 
ple died of starvation and disease between 
1845 and 1850 and thousands migrated to 
the cities or emigrated. Thomas Forbes 
and his wife, Eliza Sloane . emigrated from 
Ireland to the United States, probably in 
1843. There is no clear record as to when 
their daughter Mary Forbes left Ireland for 
the United States but it was probably in 
1854. 

The specific location of the Forbes 
and Sloane families in Cavan County was 
probably Gowna. The International Ge- 
nealogical Index (reference #61) shows 
that Eliza Sloane lived in Gowna which is 
a very small village and a parish in south- 
western Cavan County where Cavan 
County adjoins Longford County. The 
significance of Longford County is two- 
fold. First, it was the ancestral home of a 
large number of Forbes families going back 
as far as the early 1600s. Second, it was 
the county of birth of Rev. William Eakins, 
a Methodist Episcopal minister of Jersey 
City, New Jersey who was a brother-in-law 
of Mary Forbes and who performed the 



marriage ceremony for Mary's daughter, 
Jennie Kinder . 

I have no record as to when the 
Forbes and Sloane families came from 
Scotland to Ireland and it is beyond the 
scope of the present book to trace my an- 
cestry into European countries. However, 
there are some interesting clues for possi- 
ble future research in Scotland. First, the 
Forbes clan was prominent in Scotland. 
Their area was in Aberdeen County. Sec- 
ond, there is a family tradition that says 
Mary Forbes was of Scottish descent. 
And, interestingly, the International Ge- 
nealogical Index shows a family of Allan 
Forbes and Mary Young in Dunfermline, 
Fife, Scotland (across the bay from Edin- 
burgh) with nine children including a 
daughter, Mary Forbes, born on July 5, 
1845. This is three years later than the 
birth of my Mary Forbes . There was also 
a son in this family named Allan Forbes. 
These were the given names of the first son 
of Jennie Kinder , who was the daughter of 
Mary Forbes . It may be only coincidental 
but perhaps Allan Forbes in Dunfermline, 
Scotland was an uncle of Mary Forbes . 

Another interesting bit of informa- 
tion about the Scot-Irish ancestry of the 
Forbes family comes from reference #342, 
Irish Families, Their Names, Arms and 
Origins. 

"FORBES. The Forbeses of Castle 
Forbes, Co. Longford (Earls of 
Granard) settled there in 1620. 
They were a very important family 
in Scotland. The majority of the 
people of the name in Ireland today 
are of Scottish stock. . . ." 

Note the connection into Longford 
County through the marriage of Eliza 



344 



The Scot-Irish 



Forbes to Rev. William Eakins of Longford connection into Longford County is 

County. Eliza was a sister of my forbear discussed in his biography. 

(15) Mary Forbes . Both were daughters 
of (30) Thomas 1 Forbes and this 

References: #294, v. 9, pp. 338-339 and 343, #318, #327, pp. 40-42 and 95, #341, pp. 1-23, 
and #342. 



345 



APPENDIX 9 
COOS BAY AREA, OREGON 



Coos Bay is both a city and a bay in 
Coos County on the south coast of Ore- 
gon. The area is shown on Map G. 

Prior to the arrival of white men the 
docile Coos Bay Indian tribe inhabited the 
area. The first white men in the area were 
trappers from the Hudson's Bay Company 
who entered the area about 1826. Fur- 
bearing animals were not plentiful and the 
trappers stayed only a year or two. In 
1853 the first permanent white settlement 
in the Coos Bay area was established at 
Empire. In December of that year the Ter- 
ritorial Legislature created Coos County 
and made Empire the county seat. In the 
same year one or two families settled in 
what were to become the cities of North 
Bend and Marshfield (now the city called 
Coos Bay - name changed in 1974). For 
about fifteen years Empire was the most 
important point in the Coos Bay area. It 
declined and was annexed to Coos Bay in 
1965. 

From 1854 to 1867 Marshfield was 
little more than a boat landing, a store in a 
log house, and a trading post. In 1867 a 
sawmill and a shipyard were established 
there and the place soon became the center 
of activity for all the coast of southern 
Oregon. Marshfield built up and grew. In 
1874 it became the first community in 
Coos County to become an incorporated 
city. It was the center of all shipping be- 
tween Coos County and San Francisco. 
The two leading coal mines, Libby and 
Beaver Hill, had their bunkers at 
Marshfield. All freight and passenger 
steamers and gasoline-powered boats of 
the Coos Bay area operated to and from 
Marshfield. In 1893 the place became the 



terminus of the railroad connecting the 
Coos Bay region with the Coquille Valley. 

North Bend was incorporated in 
1903 and became the first real competitor 
to Marshfield, which had been the principal 
industrial and commercial center on the 
south coast of Oregon. North Bend is still 
a thriving town but it has never matched 
the prominence of Marshfield (Coos Bay). 

In the early days of the Coos Bay 
area logging, coal mining, and salmon 
fishing were the principal enterprises. 
Later, agriculture and dairies became im- 
portant. Today commercial fishing, agri- 
culture, and wood products are still im- 
portant industries and the Port of Coos 
Bay, which is the second-largest deep- 
water port on the Oregon coast, is an in- 
ternational shipping center for logs, lum- 
ber, and other wood products. 

My forebears, the Rogers family 
members, were prominent early settlers in 
Coos River Valley which extends inland 
from Coos Bay along the Coos River. 
From the late 1850s to the 1880s timber 
was harvested from the hillsides and the 
swamps were cleared and drained. The 
earliest settlers came up the river by row- 
boat; steamboats came to the river between 
1884 and 1900. After the turn of the cen- 
tury gasoline-powered boats came to the 
river. The dairy business thrived and a 
community creamery was formed. Dairy 
products and farm produce were shipped 
down the river to Marshfield and then on 
to the San Francisco market by ocean- 
going vessels. Good roads came to the 
valley about 1930 and river traffic stopped 
altogether in the mid- 1940s. Reference 
#14, Coos River Echoes, is an excellent 



347 



Appendix 9 

portrayal of the life of the settlers in the 
Coos River Valley. 

My forebears in Coos County, all 
on Chart I, were: 

(21) Lydia 6 (Carpenter) Rogers , my 
great, great grandmother, was the 
first of my direct-line ancestors to 
come west from Vermont and New 

B 

York. Her eldest son, Amos C. 
Rogers, had come around Cape 
Horn to San Francisco in 1849. 
Lydia followed to San Francisco in 
1851 by herself at age forty-six. 
Her husband, (20) Joseph Rogers , 
was incapacitated and did not come 
west until 1860. In 1854 another 
son, Anson Rogers, came to San 
Francisco and then in 1855 Lydia 
and her two sons, Amos and An- 
son, moved to the Coos Bay area. 

o 

(10) Stephen Carpenter Rogers , 
my great grandfather, came to the 



References: #12, pp. 98-1 10, #14, pp. 1, 65, and 103-104, and #233. 



Coos Bay area from Glens Falls, 
New York in 1870 with his wife, 

D 

(11) Delia M. Parker , and their 
first four children including my 

Q 

grandmother, (5) Emma J. Rogers , 
who was about one at the time. 
They, too, came by ship, probably 
via San Francisco. 

(4) Charles Alfred Craddock . my 
grandfather, was born and raised in 
Shasta County, California but lived 
for a few years as an adult in Coos 
County where he met and married 



(5) Emma J. 



my grandmother, 
Rogers , in 1893. 



(2) Warren Nicholas Craddock . 
my father, was born in Bandon, 
Coos, Oregon in 1895. About 
1900 he moved with his parents to 
Redding, Shasta, California. 



348 



APPENDIX 10 
SHASTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 



This is the story of the early days in 
Shasta County and the two towns where my 
forebears lived, Redding and Shasta. The 
area is shown on Map H. The town of 
Redding was founded by the railroad in 
1 872 and has grown to be a thriving city of 
70,000. The town of Shasta started as a 
mining camp in the Gold Rush year of 1 849. 
It soon became the most important town in 
Shasta County. However, by 1872 its days 
of glory were over and it has now declined 
almost to obscurity. The town of Shasta is 
not to be confused with the present-day 
town of Mt. Shasta in Siskiyou County, 
fifty-five miles north of Redding. 

There is evidence that Indians may 
have inhabited the area that was to become 
Shasta County for as long as 12,500 years 
before white men first appeared there. 
Written history of Shasta County begins 
with the renowned explorer and trapper 
Jedediah Smith who was reportedly the first 
American to set foot in the county. Smith 
and his party were the first Americans to 
come overland to California, arriving at the 
San Gabriel mission late in 1826. On April 
11, 1828 on his way north to Hudson's Bay 
Company at Fort Vancouver on the Colum- 
bia River in Oregon Country* Smith entered 
what was to become Shasta County. How- 
ever, it was rumored that "foreign hunters 
were present in the North country" about 
1820-21. Lewis and Clark had reached the 
mouth of the Columbia River in 1 805 and 
Hudson's Bay Company established its 
headquarters there in 1825. The foreign 



'Before 1846 the Oregon Country, occupied jointly 
by the United States and Britain, included the area 
south of Alaska, north of California, and west of the 
Rocky Mountains. Fort Vancouver (now Vancou- 
ver) is in Washington State, across the Columbia 
River from Portland. 



hunters were probably people from Oregon 
Country. 

Up to the late 1840s trappers and 
explorers crossed through the Shasta area 
regularly. They came to trap beaver, otter, 
and muskrat but trapping ended in the late 
1 840s due to decimation of the population 
of these fur-bearing animals. These trap- 
pers established and mapped the first trails 
into, around, and through what is now 
Shasta County. Some of the trails became 
fairly well established and were developed 
into early roads. Unfortunately, only a few 
journals survived from these early men. 
One trapping party did leave a terrible leg- 
acy. They brought a lethal sickness to the 
Indians, believed to have been either malaria 
or influenza. Reaching epidemic propor- 
tions in 1833 it greatly reduced the Indian 
population in the Central Valley of Califor- 
nia. This, in turn, made gold mining and 
settlement by whites easier to accomplish. 

Shasta County was formed at the 
first California Constitutional Convention in 
1848 as one of the twenty-seven original 
counties. Shasta County originally ex- 
tended north to the Oregon border and east 
to the Nevada state line. Prior to 1822 
California was under Spanish rule and from 
that year until 1848 it was under nominal 
Mexican rule. However, there is no evi- 
dence that Spaniards ever reached the 
Shasta County area and only a ring and a 
Mexican coin reportedly found in an Indian 
site in Redding indicate that Mexicans ever 
reached the area. 

In 1844 Pierson B. Reading was al- 
lotted a Mexican land grant of 26,632 acres 
in Shasta County. [See note (a) in the back 
of this appendix for a discussion of the 



349 



Appendix 10 



Mexican period in California and Mexican 
land grants] To qualify for this grant, 
which he called the Rancho Buena Ventura, 
Reading became a Mexican citizen. His 
rancho extended for nineteen miles along 
the west bank of the Sacramento River in a 
swath about three miles wide and included 
the sites of the future towns of Redding and 
Anderson. Confusion continues to this day 
over the similarity of "Redding" and 
"Reading." The town was created after 
Reading's death by the Central Pacific Rail- 
road (later Southern Pacific Railroad) and 
named for their land agent B.B. Redding. 
Reading took up residence on his rancho in 
1847 after serving in the California Battal- 
ion under Fremont in the Mexican War. He 
thus became the first permanent white set- 
tler in Shasta County. In 1850 the first 
county seat was designated to be Reading's 
home but much to his relief it was promptly 
transferred to the settlement of Shasta at 
Reading's Springs. 

In January 1848 gold was discov- 
ered in the tailrace of John Sutter's sawmill 
on the American River at Colma near Sac- 
ramento. In May 1848 Reading discovered 
gold on Clear Creek in Shasta County at a 
place that was to become known as Read- 
ing's Bar. This was the second major gold 
discovery in California Near this discovery 
a settlement known as Horsetown sprang 
up. And then in the spring and summer of 
1849 another area of gold deposits was dis- 
covered seven miles north of Reading's 
Bar/Horsetown. The new area of gold dis- 
coveries embraced Salt Creek, Middle 
Creek, Rock Creek, and Spring Creek, 
centered around Reading's Upper Springs, 
later named Shasta. Horsetown soon faded 
into obscurity when the gold was mined out 
but Shasta grew into a thriving town. 

By 1849 the Gold Rush was in full 
swing. The gold discoveries brought gold- 



seekers from every direction. They arrived 
there any way they could. Many took pas- 
sage on ships to San Francisco and passen- 
gers, crew, and captain alike headed for 
Sacramento or Marysville and beyond by 
boat, horse, or mule if they could find such; 
otherwise on foot. Some walked overland 
from Humboldt Bay and Oregon, others 
came from the Midwest on foot, on horse- 
back, or with wagons pulled by horses, 
mules, or oxen. Stagecoaches ran out of 
Sacramento to the gold districts but did not 
reach Shasta until late 1851. 

Prospectors soon overran the entire 
area around Horsetown and Reading's Up- 
per Springs. Living conditions were de- 
plorable; at first, the prospectors existed in 
tents and crude log shelters. The thousands 
of miners polluted the streams and took 
over the Indians' hunting grounds. Indis- 
criminate killing of Indians began to occur 
as well as destruction of their homes, be- 
longings, supplies, and food caches. In 
1 862 the Homestead Act provided any citi- 
zen or first paper alien (except Indians) the 
right to claim 160 acres for $10 on the con- 
dition he or she lived on the land for five 
years. As more and more land was taken up 
by homesteaders pressure on the Indians 
increased and by about 1864 most had ei- 
ther been killed or had adapted to the white 
man's society and become laborers. 

By June 1850 the busy village at 
Reading's Upper Springs was growing into 
a town and was renamed Shasta. There 
were about 500 to 600 people living there 
at the time. Runaway prosperity started and 
continued throughout most of the 1850s. 
The primary reason for this prosperity was 
that all roads from San Francisco and Sac- 
ramento terminated at Shasta. Beyond this 
point only rough trails led west and north to 
camps and gold diggings in Shasta, Trinity, 
and Siskiyou counties and in Oregon Ter- 



350 



Shasta County, California 



ritory. In Shasta merchandise was un- 
loaded, warehoused, and eventually trans- 
ported into the mountains on strings of pack 
mule trains that consisted of a few or as 
many as 200 animals. At times piles of 
freight snarled both foot and wagon traffic 
in Shasta. Stagecoaches and wagons drawn 
by teams of horses, mules, and oxen were 
continually arriving in town to deliver 
freight, mail, and passengers. At the same 
time miners came to town to exchange their 
gold for supplies and to pick up mail, buy a 
newspaper, and enjoy the luxuries of civili- 
zation (such as hot baths) amidst the mule- 
skinners who brought their pack trains in to 
load up the many tons of food and other 
merchandise to be carried back up into the 
mountains. During its heyday, 1849 to 
1857, Shasta was the major distribution 
point and commercial center for the sur- 
rounding area. It had a monopoly on sup- 
plies and services for the miners. It was the 
diversion point for shipment by pack train 
west over Trinity Mountain into Trinity 
County and north over the Scott Mountains 
to Yreka. 

On December 1, 1852 a fire de- 
stroyed about one-third of the buildings in 
Shasta. This was generally looked upon as 
only a temporary setback and the town was 
quickly rebuilt. (However, this fire was 
enough to put my great, great grandfather, 
Alfred G. 7 Chauncey out of business.) On 
June 14, 1853 at about four o'clock in the 
afternoon another even more disastrous fire 
broke out and in just thirty-three minutes 
destroyed the entire commercial center of 
town, seventy buildings in all. Despite even 
this very serious setback residents once 
again set about rebuilding the town. This 
time, however, they required all commercial 
buildings on Main Street to be built in such 
a way as to make them fireproof. As a re- 
sult twenty-eight new, brick-walled, iron- 
shuttered buildings replaced the burned-out 



wooden structures along Main Street, 
forming the longest row of brick buildings 
in the state. The street was also widened to 
1 10 feet and graded for drainage. 

When Shasta was at its peak of 
prosperity there were five hotels, five stage 
companies, one horse market and livery sta- 
ble, one blacksmith shop, two drugstores, 
three doctors, four attorneys, one public 
bathhouse, three book stores, seven general 
merchandise stores, three furniture builders, 
and a number of other establishments in- 
cluding restaurants, clothing stores, a jew- 
eler, a bowling alley, and various saloons. 
Available supplies included all the necessi- 
ties of life and many luxuries; fine food and 
excellent wine were served in the better 
restaurants. Fine fabrics and stylish clothing 
could be purchased in any one of several 
stores on Main Street. Shasta was referred 
to as the Queen City of the North although 
it is probable that it never had a resident 
population of more than 2,500 people. 

Much of the growth of Shasta (town 
and county) can be attributed to the com- 
pletion of the Nobles Trail. In 1852 Wil- 
liam H. Nobles found a shortcut route to 
Shasta branching off from the California 
emigrant trail. Nobles went to the mer- 
chants of Shasta who paid him $2,000 to 
show them the route because they wanted 
to attract emigrants to Shasta. The new 
route was as easy as Nobles had said and in 
early summer 1852 emigrants started to ar- 
rive from the Midwest via this new route. 
In 1854 Nobles made a speech before Con- 
gress and obtained a grant of $300,000 to 
have his route improved. [See note (b) in 
the back of this appendix for a discussion of 
the emigrant trails and wagon trains.] 

In the march of progress, a good 
wagon road was built across the Trinity 
Mountains forty miles to Weaverville which 



351 



Appendix 10 



was a great mining center and the county 
seat of Trinity County. Branching off at 
Tower House, west of Shasta, another 
wagon road was built north through French 
Gulch and over the Trinity Mountains and 
on to Yreka which, too, was a flourishing 
Gold Rush town and the county seat of 
Siskiyou County. Another good wagon 
road was constructed going north through 
the rugged Sacramento River Canyon and 
terminating at Yreka. Even before that 
system of mountain roads was completed 
Shasta's days of glory as a commercial 
center were waning. As early as 1857 many 
of the businesses were in decline because of 
the fading gold mining activity. 

However, until 1872 Shasta was still 
the most important city in the "North coun- 
try." In 1872 the California and Oregon 
Railroad (later Central Pacific Railroad) line 
had been completed as far north as Poverty 
Flat on the Sacramento River. The Shasta 
merchants had been led to believe that the 
railroad would be built to Shasta and when 
it avoided the hilly terrain around Shasta 
and was routed through flatter land three 
miles east of Shasta there was great disap- 
pointment. Railroad construction stopped 
at Poverty Flat and the railroad company 
established the town of Redding at this site. 
Work on the railroad was halted for ten 
years. It was then resumed and completed 
five years later at Ashland, Oregon in 1887. 
At this point the rail line connected with the 
line coming south from Portland. 

In 1872 the railroad also laid out the 
town of Anderson in the south part of the 
Reading grant in addition to the town of 
Redding in the north part. Each town was a 
half-mile square and the original outer 
streets were named North, South, East and 
West. In Redding the inner east/west 
streets were named for the counties where 
tracks had already been laid on the way to 



Redding: Sacramento, Placer, Yuba, Butte, 
Tehama, and Shasta. Within a month one 
hundred lots had been sold in Redding and 
twenty-three buildings were under con- 
struction. Redding quickly became the 
busiest and most important town in Shasta 
County. In 1 887 Redding became an incor- 
porated city and in 1888 it replaced the 
town of Shasta as the county seat. Shasta 
continued to decline; its business district 
was essentially abandoned as its merchants 
moved to Redding. Today Shasta is a small 
residential area, a state historic park with 
the remnants of some of the brick buildings, 
and a museum. Now motorists travel 
through the park along old Main Street, 
westbound on Highway 299 towards 
Weaverville and the coast. 

Redding has grown and prospered 
until it now has a population of about 
70,000 and has spread far beyond the origi- 
nal half-mile square. After the Gold Rush 
two periods of prosperity for Redding and 
Shasta County stand out. One was the 
copper mining boom (1890-1920) and the 
other was the construction of Shasta Dam 
(1938-1945). 

The copper mining region of 1890- 
1920 was a crescent-shaped area reaching 
five to twenty miles north, east, and west 
from Redding centered on the town of Ken- 
nett which is now under 450 feet of water in 
Shasta Lake. A side effect of the copper 
mining was the devastation of vegetation 
from smelter fumes which nearly put Shasta 
County's prime agricultural regions out of 
business. Not just crops but whole or- 
chards were destroyed. The sulfurous 
fumes were toxic only to plants and not 
people; the effect on people was unpleasant, 
but seldom fatal. The declining price of 
copper after World War I led to the demise 
of the copper industry in Shasta County but 



352 



Shasta County, California 



most of the smelters were actually shut 
down by court order because of the fumes. 

The construction of Shasta Dam 
was a great economic boon to Redding and 
Shasta County in the period 1938-1945 and 
the resulting creation of Shasta Lake has 
since contributed to the prosperity of the 
area through recreational use of the lake. 

My forebears in the Shasta and 
Redding area, all on Chart I, were: 

(18) Alfred G. 7 Chauncev . my 
great, great grandfather, came west 
from Illinois during the Gold Rush 
in 1 849 without his family. He was 
first in Placerville, California but 
soon moved to Shasta County. In 
1854 he returned to Illinois and 
brought his new wife, Eliza 
Houghtaling, and his children by his 
former wife, Louisa Elliott , with 
him to Shasta County. Most likely 
they followed the Nobles Trail to 
Shasta. 



(9) Elotia Rich Chauncev . my 
great grandmother, came west with 
the family in 1854 at age twelve. 

(8) John Craddock . my great 
grandfather, came west to Shasta, 
California from Illinois in 1853 via 
the Nobles Trail. At Shasta he was 
a stagecoach driver and then station 
agent. In the mid- 1870s he went 
into the livery stable business for 
himself. He met Elotia Chauncey 
in Shasta and married her in 1861. 

(4) Charles Alfred Craddock . my 
grandfather, was born in Shasta in 
1865 and was raised there. He 
lived for a time in Coos County, 
Oregon where he met and married 
my grandmother, (5) Emma J. 
Rogers , in 1893. 

(2) Warren Nicholas Craddock . 
my father, was born in Bandon, 
Coos, Oregon in 1895. About 
1900 the family moved from Ban- 
don to Redding where Warren lived 
until he went off to college in 1915. 



Note (a) 

This is a brief summary of California history under Mexican rule from 1822, when Mexico 
gained its independence from Spain and thereby controlled California, until 1848 when, as a result of 
the treaty ending the Mexican War, Mexico ceded California and other western states to the United 
States. 

Mexico's fight for independence from Spain began with the Grito de Dolores on September 
16, 1810 when a priest in the village of Dolores (now Dolores Hidalgo) started the movement. He and 
others organized tens of thousands of followers into poorly organized armies that confronted Royalist 
army units of colonial Mexico. After a decade of battles and setbacks the victorious rebel forces en- 
tered Mexico City in September 1821. The last Spanish viceroy signed the surrender agreement and 
virtually all of the Spanish troops left Mexico within a few months. On October 4, 1824 the Mexican 
congress adopted a constitution that made Mexico a republic with nineteen states and five territories. 
Sparsely settled California, with fewer than 4,000 non-Indian residents at that time, was one of the ter- 
ritories. 

As a territory of Mexico, California was ruled by governors appointed in Mexico City. These 
governors, usually military officers from the central part of the republic, were considered outsiders by 



353 



Appendix 10 



the Californios (California residents of Spanish-Mexican ancestry), who wished to have one of their 
own as governor. There were several revolts against the military governors, some of whom were 
forced to return to mainland Mexico. A measure of local autonomy was finally gained, but intermittent 
military actions continued. One point of dispute was the location of the capital - Monterey versus Los 
Angeles - which pitted those in the northern area against the southerners. This internal strife in Cali- 
fornia, and the weakness of the Mexican government, caused leaders of several nations to consider in- 
tervention and possible conquest, but none took action. 

However, in 1 846 troubles between Mexico and the United States, including unpaid claims and 
a dispute over the Rio Grande border, led to the Mexican War. Beginning in May of that year Ameri- 
can armies moved south from Texas and west toward New Mexico and California while American na- 
val forces took over major Mexican ports. The major battles were fought in northern and central 
Mexico culminating with an American army actually occupying Mexico City. Meanwhile, there were 
skirmishes and battles in California that led to the conquest of California by the United States prior to 
the end of the Mexican War. 

The conquest of California was accomplished in two phases. The first phase was from July 7 
to August 13, 1846. On July 7 Commodore Sloat, commander of the American fleet in the Pacific, 
sent 140 sailors and 85 marines ashore at the capital of Monterey to lower the Mexican flag over the 
Custom House and raise the American flag in its place. This action was not resisted by the Cali- 
fornios. Within a few days the American flag had also been raised over Yerba Buena (now San Fran- 
cisco), Sonoma, and New Helvetia (now Sacramento) and the conquest of central California was com- 
plete. 

On August 7, 1 846 Commodore Stockton, who had succeeded Sloat, arrived at San Pedro with 
a force of 360 men. Meanwhile, Colonel John C. Fremont had arrived at San Diego with a battalion of 
Americans. Both Stockton and Fremont had sailed from Monterey. Fremont took possession of San 
Diego on July 29 and then marched north to join with Stockton in taking possession of Los Angeles on 
August 13, 1846. 

The second phase of the conquest of California by the United States was from September 22, 
1846 to January 13, 1847. On September 22 the Californios laid siege to the small American garrison 
in Los Angeles and forced their retreat. Thereafter there were several battles in southern California 
including an historic one that started on December 6, 1846 at San Pasqual about forty miles northeast 
of San Diego. American forces that had come overland under General Stephen W. Kearny attacked 
Californio forces under Major Andres Pico. The next day, after a short skirmish, the Californios sur- 
rounded Kearney's men on a low hill and held them there for three days until American naval forces 
arrived from San Diego. 

Both sides claimed victory at San Pasqual but the casualties were high. The Californios suf- 
fered six dead and twelve wounded. The Americans suffered twenty-one dead and seventeen wounded, 
which was more American casualties than in all other encounters during the conquest of California. 

On December 29, 1 846 a force of some 600 Americans left San Diego overland for Los Ange- 
les. On January 8 and 9, 1847 the Californios made their last stand on the banks of the San Gabriel 
and Los Angeles rivers. Although the battle lasted two days the casualties were light; each side had 
twelve men wounded and three killed. Meanwhile, in the north Fremont's battalion fought a battle with 
the Californios in the Salinas Valley with a loss of five lives on each side. The battalion then marched 
south, slowed by rain and mud, arriving at San Fernando on January 10, 1847. The remnants of the 

354 



Shasta County, California 

Califomio forces under Andres Pico capitulated to Fremont at the north end of Cahuenga Pass and a 
treaty of peace was signed there on January 13, 1847, thus completing the American conquest of Cali- 
fornia. The treaty site is now a memorial park, Campo de Cahuenga, at 3919 Lankershim Boulevard 
in North Hollywood. 

The Mexican War ended with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (named for a village near 
Mexico City), which was signed on February 2, 1848, a year after the capitulation of the Califomios 
at Cahuenga Pass. By the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo the United States acquired from Mexico the 
regions of California, Nevada, Utah, most of Arizona, and parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyo- 
ming. 

When the revolutionary Mexican government took over California in 1822 an important goal 
was to dissipate the power of the Catholic Church. To accomplish this the Mexican government secu- 
larized the twenty-one California missions that had been established by Franciscan friars under Spanish 
rule. The first proclamation for division of mission lands was issued by Mexican Governor Echeandia 
in 1831 and by 1845 all of the mission property was in private hands. The Indian converts to Christi- 
anity were scattered and many mission buildings were left to decay. Between 1834 and 1846 the 
Mexican 2 government made 553 private grants of California lands (minimum size 4,500 acres) totaling 
approximately eight and one-half million acres. This is equal to a square 115 miles on each side and is 
eight and one-half percent of the total area of California. Most of the grants were former mission lands 
in the coastal area from San Diego to the San Francisco Bay area. However, the northernmost of these 
grants was the 26,632-acre Reading grant of non-mission land in Shasta County. 

Note (b) 

Wagon trains coming west usually started from Independence or St. Joseph, Missouri or from 
the area around Council Bluffs, Iowa. All routes joined at Fort Kearny in south-central Nebraska. 
From there the wagons followed the Oregon-California Trail along the south side of the Platte River, 
crossed the Continental Divide at South Pass, Wyoming, and then went north of Great Salt Lake. At 
that point the trail bifurcated into the Oregon Trail and the California Trail which followed the Hum- 
boldt River through Nevada. Approaching the mountains along the Nevada-California border, the 
California Trail divided into about ten trails going over various passes in the mountains. The Nobles 
Trail was one of them. 

The emigrants did not follow any single, narrow route and the concept of the Oregon- 
California Trail as a double band of wagon tracks across the continent is misleading. In open country 
the different trains might spread out over a large area only to converge again for river crossings, 
mountain passes, and other natural obstacles. In time many cutoffs and alternate routes also devel- 
oped. About forty miles southwest of Winnemucca, Nevada the Nobles Trail left the Humboldt River 
route and headed three hundred miles due west, passing just north of Lassen Peak and terminating in 
the town of Shasta. 

For an interesting and informative account of the emigrant journeys to California see reference 
#323, The California Trail. The migration started with small groups of emigrants in 1841. This was 
221 years after the Mayflower had landed and while California was still under Mexican rule. The 
winter of 1846-47 is remembered for the ill-fated Donner Party. In 1850 the wagon-train migration to 



'Although popularly referred to as Spanish land grants the grants were only made during the Mexican period 
Under Spanish rule some twenty-five concessions were made which permitted settlement and use of a specified 
tract of land, but title remained with the crown. The Spanish concessions were little more than grazing per- 
mits although many were later patented under Mexican law. 



355 



Appendix 10 

California reached a peak of about 45,000 people (reference #323, pp. 232 and 296). By the end of 
1857 (the last year for which statistics are available) about 165,000 people had come to California by 
wagon train (reference #323, p. 319). By then passage by ship had become common and in 1869 the 
transcontinental railroad was completed. The rail connection to Shasta County, however, was not 
completed until 1872. 



References: #165, #287, pp. ix-xiv and 38, #288, #289, #290, #291, #299, p. 298, #326, 
pp. 30-42, #331, and #336. 

References for note (a): #294 (1960), v. 3, pp. 50-51 and v. 12, pp. 369-371 and 385-386, 

#332, pp. 38-42, 49, and 534, #333, p. 4, #337, pp. 237-257, #338, 
pp. 24-25 and 47-48, #339, pp. 1-25, #340, pp. 25-44, #344, pp. 
331-346, #345, pp. 161-162, #350, pp. 26-27, and #353, p. 371. 

References for note (b): #287, p. 112, #299, p. 1450, #315, #321, #323, #331, and #336. 



356 



REFERENCES 

1. Sheldon, Walter Seymour: Cross, Perkins, Rising, Seymour, Sheldon, Trumbull and 
Whitman Family Histories. This is an unpublished, handwritten document in a notebook dated 
1912. In 1988 it was transcribed verbatim into a thirteen-page typewritten format. Walter 
was my grandfather. 

2. Sheldon, Ella: Cross, Perkins, Rising, Seymour, Sheldon, Trumbidl and Whitman Family 
Histories. This is an unpublished, handwritten document. There are thirty-three numbered 
pages but others have been inserted. There are entries as late as 1931. Much of this work of 
Ella Sheldon was incorporated by Walter Sheldon in reference #1 above. Ella was Walter's 
only sibling. 

3. Craddock, Edith Sheldon: Family History. This is an unpublished, eighteen-page, typewritten 
family history that was prepared in 1958. This document was largely transcribed from 
reference # 1 , above with updating to 1956. Edith was my mother. 

4. Newman, Edna A.: Record of the Craddocks. This is an unpublished, eight-page typewritten 
report that was prepared in 1961. Edna was a sister of my grandfather, Charles A. Craddock. 

5. Newman, Edna Craddock: The Craddock Family. This is a twenty-six-page collection of 
unpublished, typewritten papers dated 1962 and 1963. 

6. Vergnes, Rosalie: "My Grand-Uncle, the Late John Craddock." The Covered Wagon, Shasta 
Historical Society, May-June-July 1944, pp. 9-10. 

7. Smith, Harry: "Reminiscences of a Pioneer." The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical Society, 
1982, pp. 31-35. 

8. Shurtleff, Charles A.: "The Late John Craddock - Stage Driver of the Fifties." Quarterly of 
the Society of California Pioneers, June 1930, pp. 123-126. 

9. Shurtleff, Charles A.: "Mrs. Elotia R. Craddock." Quarterly of the Society of California 
Pioneers, 1933, pp. 53-56. 

10. Frisbie and Beauchamp: Shasta: The Queen City. California Historical Society, 1973. 

1 1 . Anonymous: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon. Chapman Publishing 
Company, Chicago, 1904. This book is commonly referred to as The Chapman Book. 

12. Peterson and Powers: A Century of Coos and Curry - History of Southwest Oregon. Coos- 
Curry Pioneer and Historical Association, 1977. Caxton Printers, Caldwel, ID. 

13. Dodge, Orvil: Pioneer History of Coos and Curry Counties. Coos-Curry Pioneer and 
Historical Association, 1969. Western World Publishers, Bandon, OR. 

14. Mahaffy, Charlotte L.: Coos River Echoes. Interstate Press, Portland, OR 1965. 

15. Drummond, Josiah H.: John Rogers ofMarshfleld and Some of His Descendants. Published 
by Rhoda B. Ellis, West Hanover, MA, 1898. Photoduplicated by NEHGS. 

16. Williams, J.C.: The History and Map of Danby, VT . McLean and Roberts, Rutland, VT, 
1869, pp. 236-239. Photocopies obtained from Vermont Historical Society and Library, 
Montpellier, VT. 



Note: Originals of references 1-5 are in my possession. Other family members have copies. SFC 

359 



References 



17. Sheldon, Charles Chandler: Genealogical Record of the Descendants of Captain Jonathan 
Sheldon Bom at Northampton. MA, May 29, 1687. This is a nine-page typewritten 
manuscript prepared in 1908. Located in the manuscript section of the Kent Library, Suffield, 
CT. 

18. Sheldon, Harry W.: Historical Sketch of the Sheldon Family. This is a twenty-page paper 
that was prepared by Mr. Sheldon and read at the second annual Sheldon Family Reunion in 
Rupert, VT in August 1912. Published by Roy F. Sheldon of Schenectady, NY in 1913. 
Located at NEHGS. This reference number also includes a twenty-one-page typewritten 
supplement with additions to Mr. Sheldon's original paper. This second paper was prepared 
by Mr. Reginald H Sheldon of Brockton, MA in 1957. Located at Kent Library, Suffield, 
CT. 

19. Sheldon, Hczckiah Spencer: The Genealogy ofCapt. Jonathan Sheldon and His Descendants. 
This is a nineteen-page booklet published in 1893 by the Press of the Case, Lockwood & 
Brainard Company, Hartford, CT. Located in the manuscript section of the Kent Library, 
Suffield, CT. 

20. Sheldon, Hortense E.: Sheldons Prior to J 700. This is a fifty-two-page report published in 
1961 . Located in the manuscript section of the Kent Library, Suffield, CT. 

21. Bartlett, J. Gardner: The Sheldons of Bakewell, Derbyshire, England and Isaac Sheldon of 
New England. This article was reprinted from the 1926 New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register. See pages 182-207 of English Origins of New England Families - 
Second Series, v. Ill, GPC, 1985. 

22. Hunt, Charlotte Ailing: "Isaac Sheldon of Windsor, CT." This article was reprinted from the 
1963 New England Historical and Genealogical Register. See pages 376-383 of 
Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. Ill, GPC, 1983. 

23. Sheldon, George: A History of Deerfield, Massachusetts, vols. I & II. These are 1983 
reproductions of 1895-96 editions by the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, Deerfield, 
MA.: pp. 291-301. Theindcxforthisbookisinv.il. Also see Family Genealogies starting 
after page 924. 

24. Torrcy, Charles Almon: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. GPC, 1985. 

Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer: History of Suffield in the Colony and Province of Massachusetts 
Bay. 1660-1749. This is a photo-duplication by NEHGS of an 1879 book. Note: Suffield is 
now a part of Connecticut. 

26. Wcis, Frederick Lewis: Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England 
Between 1623 and 1650, sixth edition, GPC, 1988. 

Barbour, Lucius Barnes: Families of Early Hartford, CT. Connecticut Society of 
Genealogists, GPC, 1982. This book is not fully indexed but the male surnames are arranged 
alphabetically in the text. 

28. Jacobus and Seymour: A History of the Seymour Family - Descendants of Richard Seymour 
of Hartford, CT for Six Generations. Published in New Haven, CT, 1939. Located at 
NEHGS. 

29. Bunncr, Gale J.: Rising Genealogy - Descendants of John Rising of Suffield, CT. Printed 
for the Rising Family Association by Copley Business Services, Randolph, MA, 1996. This is 
one of a set of four volumes tracing the descendants of James 1 Rising who was born in 
England in 1617. 



360 



References 

30. Loomis, Elisha S.: The Loomis Family in America. Originally published in 1909. 
Republished for John E. Loomis by Book Publishers, Inc., Fresno, CA, 1981. 

3 1 . Starbuck, Alexander: The History of Nantucket. Tuttle Company, Rutland, VT, 1986. 

32. Morris, Seymour: "Richard Seymour of Hartford and Norwalk, CT, and Some of His 
Descendants." This article was reprinted from the 1918 and 1919 New England Historical 
and Genealogical Register. See pages 296-332 of Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. 
Ill, GPC, 1983. 

33. Stiles, Henry R.: The History of Ancient Wethersfleld, v. II. Published by the New England 
History Press in collaboration with the Wethersfleld Historical Society, 1987. This is a reprint 
of the 1904 edition. 

34. Perkins, George A.: The Family of John Perkins of Ipswich, MA . Printed for the author by 
The Salem Press Publishing and Printing Co., 1889. 

35. Perkins, Fred B.: "Perkins Family of Connecticut." This article was reprinted from the 1860 
New England Historical and Genealogical Register. See pages 109-1 17 of Genealogies of 
Connecticut Families, v. Ill, GPC, 1983. 

36. Bushnell, George Eleazer: Bushnell Family Genealogy - Ancestry and Posterity of Francis 
Bushnell of Horsham, England and Guilford, CT. Compiled and written by George Eleazer 
Bushnell, Nashville, TN, 1945. 

37. Warren, William Lamson: "Connecticut Pastels." Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin, 
October 1959. 

38. Whitman, Ezekiel: Memoir of John Whitman and His Descendants. Charles Day & Co., 
Portland, ME, 1832. 

39. Farnam, Charles H.: History of the Descendants of John Whitman of Weymouth, MA. Tuttle, 
Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, New Haven, 1889. 

40. Sibley, John Langdon: Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University. 
University Bookstore, Cambridge, MA, 1881. 

41. Moriarity, G. Andrews: "The Alcocks of Roxbury, MA." New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, v. XCVII, 1943. 

42. Seymour, George D.: "The English Home and Ancestry of Richard Seamer or Semer of 
Hartford, CT." This article was reprinted from the 1917 New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register. See pages 122-130 of English Origins of New England Families, 
second series, v. Ill, GPC, 1985. 

43. Tiedgen & Heyward: "Some Connecticut Trumbull Data." The Detroit Society for 
Genealogical Research Magazine, October 1951. 

44. King, Cameron Haight: The King Family ofSuffield, Connecticut, Its English Ancestry and 
American Descendants. Compiled by the author in San Francisco in 1908. Located in Allen 
County Library, Fort Wayne, IN. 

45. Jacobus and Waterman: Hale, House and Related Families. GPC, 1978. 

46. McCracken, George E.: "Who was Aaron Burr?" The American Genealogist, v. 40, no. 2, 
April 1964. 

47. Roberts and Reitwiesner: American Ancestors and Cousins of the Princess of Wales. GPC, 
1984. 

361 



References 

48. Davis, Walter Goodwin: The Ancestry of Phoebe Tilton, 1775-1847, Wife of Capt. Abel Lunt 
ofNewsburyport, MA. Anthoensen Press, Portland, ME, 1947. 

49. Lea, James Henry: A Genealogy of the Ancestors and Descendants of George Augustus and 
Louisa (Clap) Trumbull of Trumbull Square, Worcester, Mass. Printed for the family in 
1886. This is a genealogical chart. Also see A Genealogical Chart of Some Descendants of 
John Trumbull of Newcastle-on-Tyne, England and Rowley, Massachusetts. A copy of this 
chart was purchased from Turtle Antiquarian Books, Rutland, VT, 1990. The chart, which 
was in a badly worn binder, was torn at most of the folds. There was no indication of the 
author, but the binder had a label inside stating that Gaylord Bros, of Syracuse, New York was 
the maker. The chart was patented in 1908. Copy available at NEHGS. 

50. Dexter, Franklin Bowditch: Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College with 
Annals of the College History - October, 1 701 to May, 1 745. Henry Holt and Company, New 
York, 1885. See John Trumbull on pages 544 and 545. 

51. Malone, Dumas: Dictionary of American Biography. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 
1936. See John Trumbull, v' XIX, pp. 10-15. 

52. Griffen and AJcgre: Wolcott Genealogy. The Society of Descendants of Henry Wolcott. 

53. Talcott, Mary K.: The Original Proprietors. Society' of the Descendants of the Founders of 
Hartford, Inc. This material was first published in 1886 in The Memorial History of Hartford 
County, Connecticut, which was edited by J. Hammond Trumbull. The Original Proprietors 
by Miss Talcott is a 50-page paperback reprint from v. 1 of the original 1886 book. Located 
at Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, CT. 

54. Fowler, William Chauncey: Memorials of the Chaunceys, Including President Chauncy, His 
Ancestors and Descendants. Originally published in 1858. In 1981 the book was republished 
by Cook-McDowell Publications in Owensboro, KY with an important and useful supplement 
by Stanley T. Dunn. Mr. Dunn was an historian for the Chauncey Family Association. 
Microfilm copy located at the Mormon Family History Library, Salt Lake City. US/CAN 
929.273, C395 f 1981. 

55. Glazier and Tepper: The Famine Immigrants - Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port 
of New York, 1846 - 1851. GPC. There are seven volumes of this book. 

56. Tepper, Michael: American Passenger Arrival Records. GPC, 1988. 

Wold, Athelinc B.: This reference covers unpublished reports prepared for me by Miss Wold 
on the following family lines: Baker, Cady, Craddock, Cross, Elliott, Hitchcock, Kinder, 
Parker, Rogers, Wass, and Whitney. Miss Wold is a professional genealogist in Salt Lake 
City. 

58. Anonymous: History of Washington County, New York, pp. 194-205, 210, 220-223, 467-468 
and 493-494. Everts & Ensign, Philadelphia, 1878. Republished by Heart of the Lakes 
Publishing, Intcrlakcn, NY, 1991 with the assistance of the Washington County Historical 
Society, Fort Edward, NY. 

59. Anonymous: Biographical and Historical Record of Kane County, Illinois. Beers, Leggett 
and Co., Chicago, 1888. See William Thatcher Elliott on pages 649 and 650. 

60. Batcman, Sclby and Wilcox: Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Kane County, 
p. 779. 

6 1 . International Genealogical Index of the Genealogical Society of Utah. 



362 



References 

62. Harmon, Aretmas C: The Harmon Genealogy - Comprising All Branches in New England. 
Gibson Bros., Inc., Washington, D.C., 1920. 

63. Dewey, Louis Marinus: "James Rising of Suffield, Connecticut and Some of His 
Descendants." An eleven-page pamphlet reprinted from The New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, October 1909. 

64. Winchell and Winchell: The Winchell Genealogy - The Ancestry and Children of Those Born 
to the Winchell Name in America since J 635, second edition. Published by Horace Winchell 
in 1917. 

65. Fitts, James Hill: Lane Genealogies, vll. The News-Letter Press, Exeter, NH, 1897. 

66. Woods, Henry Ernest: Vital Records of Sturbridge, Massachusetts to the year 1850. 
NEHGS, 1906. 

67. Starr, Frank Farnsworth: The Thomas Spencer Family of Hartford, Connecticut in the Line 
of Samuel Spencer. Prepared for James J. Goodwin, published by University Press, 
Cambridge, 1896. 

68. Watson, Thomas: John Watson, of Hartford, Connecticut, and His Descendants - A 
Genealogy. Printed for the U.Q. Club, 1865. This book was located in the library of The 
Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford. 

69. Seymour, Malcolm: Puritan Migration to Connecticut - The Saga of the Seymour Family 
1 1 29-1 746. Phoenix Publishing, Canaan, New Hampshire, 1982. This book was located in 
the library of the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford. 

70. Goodwin, Nathaniel: Genealogical Notes or Contributions to the Family History of Some of 
the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts . Originally published in 1856. Reprinted 
byGPC, 1987. 

71. Andrews, Herbert Cornelius: Hinsdale Genealogy - Descendants of Robert Hinsdale. Edited 
by Alfred L. Holman. Printed for Alfred Hinsdale Andrews in Lombard, Illinois, 1906. 

72. Stone, William L.: Washington County, New York, to the Close of the Nineteenth Century. 
The New York History Company, 1901. 

73. Shepard, James: "The New Haven (Conn.) Potters, 1639." This article was reprinted from the 
1900 New England Historical and Genealogical Register. See pages 150-156 of 
Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. Ill, GPC, 1983. 

74. Beach, Mary E: The Descendants of Thomas Beach of Milford, Connecticut. Privately 
printed in Hartford, Connecticut, 1912. Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Rutland, VT. 

75. Smyth and Steiner: "Humphrey Spinning of Guilford, Conn., and Elizabeth N.J., and His 
Descendants." This article was reprinted from the 1905 New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register. See pages 421-424 of Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. Ill, 
GPC, 1983. This reference also contains important information by Donald Lines Jacobus. In 
addition, Jacobus' work refers to his previous work on pages 109-1 1 1 in v. I of Genealogies of 
Connecticut Families. 

76. Atwater, Edward E.: History of the Colony of New Haven to Its Absorption into Connecticut, 
vols. 1 and 2. A facsimile reprint by Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1989. 

77. Sisser, Fred III: This reference is for two unpublished reports on the Cross and Cooper 
families in New Jersey. These reports were prepared for me in 1991 by Mr. Sisser who is a 
professional genealogist in Bridgewater, New Jersey and editor of the Somerset County 

363 



References 



Genealogical Quarterly. In preparing this report Mr. Sisser utilized his own personal 
genealogical library' plus resources of the New Jersey State Archives, the New Jersey 
Historical Society Library, the Morristown Public Library, and the Hunterdon County 
Historical Society Library. 

78. Davis, Charles Henry Stanley: Early Families of Wallingford, Connecticut. GPC, 1979. 

79. Jacobus, Donald Lines: The Four Spencer Brothers - Their Ancestors and Descendants. The 
American Genealogist, v. XXVII, 1951. Also see reference #214. 

80. Briggs, Samuel: "Peter Thatcher of Cleveland, Ohio." The New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, January 1883. 

81. Foster, F. Apthorp: Vital Records of Scituate, Massachusetts to the Year J 850. NEHGS, 
1909. 

82. Welch, Hamilton Wilson: Early Families of Scituate and Neighboring Towns. This is a 
handwritten, loose-leaf notebook that was located in the NEHGS manuscript section. 

83. Merrill, Samuel: A Merrill Memorial - An Account of the Descendants of Nathaniel Merrill, 
vols. I and II. Privately published, 1917-1928. Reprinted in 1983 under the auspices of 
Parker River Researchers, P.O. Box 86, Newburyport, MA 01950. 

84. Flagg, Ernest: Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England. Originally published in 
1926. Republished for Clearfield Company by GPC, 1990. 

85. Pope, Charles Henry: The Pioneers of Massachusetts. Originally published in 1900. 
Reprinted by GPC. 

86. Wing, Conway P.: Historical and Genealogical Register of John Wing of Sandwich, 
Massachusetts and His Descendants, second edition, 1632-1888. Published by De Vinne 
Press, New York, 1888. 

87. Peckham, Mary W.: "The John Lapham Family." The American Genealogist, Volume XXIV, 
January 1948. 

88. Savage, James: A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England. Originally 
published in Boston 1860-1862. Reprinted by GPC, 1990. 

89. Hannibal, Edna Anne: John Briggs of Sandwich, Massachusetts and His Descendants. 
Copyrighted by the author in 1962. Published privately. Located at NEHGS. 

90. Sherman, Roy V: Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, the First Secretary of Rhode 
Island. Located at NEHGS. 

91. Versailles, Elizabeth Starr: Hathaways of America, 1970 edition. Sponsored by the 
Hathaway Familv Association. Printed by the Gazette Publishing Company, Northampton, 
MA. 

92. Noyes, Libby and Davis: Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. GPC, 
1976. 

93. Partridge, George Henry: Partridge Genealogy - Descendants of George Partridge of 
Duxbury, Massachusetts . Privately printed, 1915. Located at NEHGS. 

94. Hurd, Dena D : A History and Genealogy of the Family of Hurd in the United States. 
Privately published, New York, 1910. Located at NEHGS. 

95. Whitaker, George M.: Births, Marriages and Deaths of the Town of Sturb ridge from the 
Settlement of the Town to 1816. Published in Southbridge, MA, 1879. 

364 



References 

96. Otis, Amos: Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families. A reprint of the Amos Otis Papers. 
F.B. & F.P. Goss Publishers and Printers (The Patriot Press), Barnstable, MA, 1888. 
Reprinted by GPC, 1991. 

97. Littell, John: Family Records or Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley Above 
Chatham. Published in 1852. 

98. Mellick, Andrew D., Jr.: The Story of an Old Farm or Life in New Jersey in the Eighteenth 
Century. The Unionist-Gazette, Somerville, NJ, 1889. 

99. Honeyman, A. Van Doren, Editor: Somerset County Historical Quarterly, v. I, 1912. 
Somerset County Historical Society, Somerville, NJ. 

100. Anonymous: The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, v. 15, no. 1, January 1940. 

101. Nelson and Honeyman, Editors: Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of 
New Jersey. Being the 10th Volume of Extracts from American Newspapers Relating to New 
Jersey, 1773-1774. Call Printing and Publishing Company, Patterson, NJ, 1917. 

102. Jacobus, Donald Lines: History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield. Originally 
published in Fairfield, CT, 1930-1932. Reprinted (two volumes in three) by GPC, 1976 and 
1991, with additions and corrections. 

103. Marvin and Marvin: Descendants of Reinold and Matthew Marvin. T.R. Marvin and Sons, 
Boston, 1904. Photoduplicated by NEHGS. 

104. Banks, Charles Edward: The Planters of the Commonwealth, 1620-1640. Published in 
Boston in 1930. Reprinted by GPC in 1961, 1967, 1972, 1975, 1979, 1984 and 1991. 

105. Jacobson, Judy: Southold Connections - Historical and Biographical Sketches of 
Northeastern Long Island. Printed for Clearfield Company by GPC, 1991 . 

106. Talcott, Alvan: Families of Early Guilford, Connecticut. GPC, 1984. 

107. Banks, Charles Edward: The Winthrop Fleet of 1630. GPC, 1989. 

108. Spear, Burton W.: Search for the Passengers of the Mary & John - 1630. This is a twenty- 
five volume series published, one volume at a time, from 1985 to 1997. The publisher, Burton 
W. Spear (Mary and John Clearing House), is at 5602 - 305th Street, Toledo, OH 4361 1. 

109. Woodruff, George C: "Wolcott Genealogy." From the papers of Hon. Frederick Wolcott of 
Litchfield, CT. This article was reprinted from the 1847 and 1848 New England Historical 
and Genealogical Register. See pages 568-573 of Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. 
Ill, GPC, 1983. 

1 10. Cates, Edwin H.: The English in America. Lerner Publications Company, 241 First Avenue 
North, Minneapolis, MN 55401. 

111. Hatch, Charles E., Jr.: The First Seventeen Years - Virginia, 1607-1624. The University 
Press of Virginia, Charlottesville. 

112. Coldham, Peter Wilson: The Complete Book of Emigrants, 1607-1660. GPC, 1988. 

1 13. Snell, Tee Loftin: America's Beginnings. The National Geographic Society, 1974. 

114. Anderson, Charles Robert, editor: Great Migration Newsletter. Now being published 
quarterly by the Great Migration Study Project of NEHGS. 

115. Stiles, Henry R.: The History of Ancient Windsor, v. II. A facsimile of the 1893 edition 
published by Picton Press, Camden, ME, 1992. 

365 



References 

1 16. Weis, Frederick Lewis: The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England. 
Originally published in 1936. Reprinted for Clearfield Company by GPC, 1991. 

117. Hinman, R.R.: A Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of 
Connecticut. Originally published in 1846. Reprinted for Clearfield Company by GPC, 1990. 

118. Burt, Henry M. and Silas, W.: Henry Burt of Springfield, plus Mention of James and 
Richard Burt of Taunton, MA. A photoduplication by NEHGS of the book originally 
published in Springfield, MA, 1893. 

119. Easton, William Starr: Descendants of Joseph Easton of Hartford, CT. Printed in St. Paul, 
MN, 1899. Photoduplicated by Higginson Book Co., Salem, MA. 

120. Andrews, Henry Porter: The Descendants of John Porter of Windsor, CT, J 635-9, v. 1. 
GW. Ball Book and Job Printers, 1893. 

121. Jcwctt, Isaac Appleton: Memorial of Samuel Appleton of Ipswich, MA. Originally published 
in 1 850. Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Rutland, VT. 

122. Warren, Israel P.: The Stanley Families of America. B. Thurston & Co., Portland, ME, 
1887. Located at NEHGS. 

123. Stratton, Eugene Aubrey: Plymouth Colony, Its History and People, J 620-1 691 . Ancestry 
Publishing Company, Salt Lake City, 1986. 

124. Davis, William T., Editor: Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation, 1606-1646. Charles 
Scribncr's Sons, New York, 1908. Note: The general editor after the death of Mr. Davis was 
J. Franklin Jameson. 

125. Hewitt, Charles Leslie, Jr.: Some Light on the Marriage of Robert and Mary Royce of 
Connecticut . Reprinted from the 1968 The New England Historical and Genealogical 
Register. See pages 42-45 of English Origins of New England Families, second series, v. III. 

126. Loomis, William L.: Suffi eld Vital Record Book. Compiled by Mr. Loomis in 1928. Located 
in the Kent Memorial Library, Sufficld, CT. 

127. Briggs, L. Vernon: Genealogies of Different Families Bearing the Name of Kent in the U.S. 
Rockwell and Church Press, Boston, 1898. 

128. Phelps and Scrvin: The Phelps Family of America and Their English Ancestors, v. II. Eagle 
Publishing Co., Pittsficld, MA, 1899. 

129. Kent, Lois N.: Genealogical Research on the Family of Thomas Kent. This is a typewritten 
report prepared by Mrs. Kent in February 1987. Located in the Kent Memorial Library, 
Sufficld, CT. 

130. Corbin Collection - Northampton Early Families, v. II, part II. Located at NEHGS. 

131. Greenlee and Greenlee: The Stebbins Genealogy, v. I. Privately printed in Chicago in 1904. 
Located at NEHGS. 

132. Holman, Mary Lovcring: Ancestry of Col. John H. Stevens and his wife Frances Miller. 
Published in 1948, apparently privately. Located at NEHGS. 

133. Anonymous: Vital Records ofSujfield, Hartford, CT. Located at NEHGS. 

134. Ancestry of Thomas Chalmers Brainerd. Published in Montreal, 1948. Located at NEHGS. 

135. Allen, Orrin Peer: Descendants of Nicholas Cady of Watertown, MA 1645 -1910. Published 
by the author. Press of C.B. Fiskc & Co., Palmer, MA, 1910. 



366 



References 

136. Clemens, William M., publisher: The Harmons in the Revolution. Published in New York, 
1913. 

137. Fernald, Mrs. Natalie R.: The Skinner Kinsmen. Pioneer Press, 6908 Fourth Street, NW, 
Washington DC. Located at NEHGS. 

138. Davis, Walter Goodwin: The Ancestry of Phoebe Tilton, 1775-1847, of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts. Anthoensen Press, Portland, ME, 1947. 

139. Search, Robert M. and Helen C: "John Church of Killingly, CT." This is an undated article 
on page 394 of Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. I. 

140. Lane and Beckwith: Genealogical Notes of Daniel Lane, 2D and Mary Griswold Lane. 
Independent Press, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, 1899. Photocopy by Tuttle Antiquarian Books, 
Rutland, VT. 

141. Vital Records of Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts . Essex Institute, Salem, MA, 1910. Located 
at NEHGS. 

142. Porter, Juliet: A Porter Pedigree - Ancestry and Descendants of Samuel and Martha (Perley) 
Porter of Chester, NH. Compiled by Juliet Porter, Worcester, MA, 1907. 

143. Shipton, Clifford K.: "Biographical Sketches of Those Who Attended Harvard College," 
Sibley's Harvard Graduates, v. V, 1701-1712. Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, 
1937. 

144. Chipman, John Hale, III: A Chipman Genealogy. Chipman Histories, Norwell, MA, 1970. 

145. Ford, Worthington C, Editor: William Bradford - History of Plymouth Plantation, 1620- 
1647. Massachusetts Historical Society, 1912. 

146. Morison, Samuel Eliot, Editor: William Bradford - Of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647. 
Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1952. Reprinted in 1976. 

147. Vital Records ofAshfleld, MA to the Year 1850. NEHGS, 1942. 

148. Shaw, Hubert Kinney: Families of the Pilgrims - John Howland. Massachusetts Society of 
the Mayflower Descendants, Boston, MA, 1979. 

149. Howes, Frederick G.: History of the Town ofAshfleld, Massachusetts 1742-1910. Published 
by the town. 

150. Preston, Belle: Bassett-Preston Ancestors. Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Co., New Haven, 
CT, 1930. 

151. Boltwood, Lucius M.: Genealogies of Hadley Families. Published in 1862. See back of 
reference #170 for a 1993 reprint. 

152. McCracken, George E.: "Thomas Holcombe's Earlier Posterity." The American Genealogist, 
v. 57, April 1981. 

153. Jacobus, Donald Lines: An American Family, Botsford-Marble Ancestral Lines. Compiled 
for Otis Marble Botsford, Winona, MN, 1933. 

154. Banks, Charles Edward: The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers. Published 
in 1929. Reprinted by GPC, 1989. 

155. Stiles, Henry R.: The History of Ancient Windsor, v. I. A facsimile of the 1892 edition 
published by the New Hampshire Publishing Company, Somersworth, NH, 1976. 

156. Roser, Susan E.: Mayflower Increasings . GPC, 1989. 

367 



References 

157. Merry, Irvvin L. and Isabella G.: Descendants of Cornelius Merry. Gathered, edited and 
published by Irwin Lewis Merry, 1968. 

158. Plooji (of Leyden) and Harris (of Manchester): Leyden Documents Relating to the Pilgrim 
Fathers. E.J. Brill Ltd., Leyden, Holland, 1920 under the auspices of the Netherlands America 
Institute. Located at the Pilgrim Museum in Leyden. 

159. Eichholz, Alice: This reference is unpublished work on the Carpenter and Rogers lines 
prepared for me by Mrs. Eichholz in 1992. She is a professional genealogist and proprietor of 
"New Trails" in Montpelier, VT. 

160. Stoddard, Francis R.: The Truth About the Pilgrims. Published 1952. Reprinted with 
corrections by permission of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants, GPC for the 
Clearfield Company, Baltimore, 1992. 

161. Watson, Ralph Arthur: Ancestors and Descendants of John and Hannah (Goodwin) Watson 
of Hartford. CT and Associated Families . Gateway Press, Baltimore, MD, 1985. 

162. Goodwin, James J.: The Goodwins of Hartford, CT, Descendants of William and Ozias 
Goodwin. Compiled for James J. Goodwin by various genealogists, including Frank F. Starr. 
Brown and Gross, Hartford, 1891. 

163. White, Elizabeth Pearson: John Howland of the Mayflower; Volume I - Descendants of 
Desire 2 How land. Picton Press, Camden, ME, 1990. 

164. Hunt, John C: Notes on the Pedigree of Chauncy. See pages 456-462 in English Origins of 
New England Families - Second Series, v I. 

165. Giles, Rosena A.: Shasta County, California -A History. Biobooks, Oakland, CA, 1949. 

166. Worth, Henry Barnard: Nantucket Ixinds and Land Owners. Reprinted by Heritage Books, 
Bowie, MD, 1992 in cooperation with Nantucket Historical Association. Originally published 
in 1901. 

167. Pierce, Frederick Clifton: Batchelder, Batcheller Genealogy. Published by the author, 1898. 
Reprinted 1992, Heritage Books, Bowie, MD. 

168. Bolton, Charles Knowlcs: The Real Founders of New England. Originally published in 1929. 

Reprinted GPC, 1974. 

169. Corbin Collection - Hadley, Hampshire Countv, Massachusetts. Located in the library of 
NEHGS. 

170. Judd, Sylvester: History of Hadley. Also Family Genealogies by Lucius M. Boltwood in the 
same book. H.R. Huntington & Company, Springfield, MA, 1905. Reprinted by Picton Press, 
Camden, ME, 1993. The genealogies by Boltwood have also been published separately. See 
reference #151. 

171. Jacobus, Donald Lines: Families of Ancient New Haven. GPC, 1974. 

172. Barbour Collection in Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT, 1925. 

173. Orcutt, Samuel: A History of the Old Town of Stratford and the City of Bridgeport, CT. 
Published under the auspices of the Fairfield County Historical Society, 1886. 

174. Anonymous: Toland and Windham Counties, CT - Commemorative and Biographical 
Record. Published in 1903. 

175. Pierce, Frederick Clifton. The Descendants of John Whitney. Published by the author. Press 
of W.B. Conkey Company, Chicago, 1895. 

368 



References 

176. Knapp, Arthur Mason: The Knapp Family in America. Originally published in Boston, MA 
in 1909. Reproduced by Higginson Book Company, Salem, MA, 1993. 

177. Jacobus, Donald: Families of Ancient New Haven. Originally published as the New Haven 
Genealogical Magazine, vols. I-VIII, Rome, NY and New Haven, CT, 1922-1932. Reprinted 
in three volumes by GPC in 1974. 

178. Essex Institute: Vital Records of Groton, MA. Published in Salem, MA, 1926. 

179. Morgan, Nathaniel H.: A History of James Morgan of New London, CT. Originally 
published in Hartford, 1869. Reprinted by Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1992. 

180. Parks, Frank Sylvester: Genealogy of the Parke Family of Connecticut. Privately printed in 
Washington D.C., 1906. Reproduced by NEHGS. 

181. Anderson, Ruby Parke: The Parke Scrapbook - Number 1 . Port City Press, Inc., Baltimore, 
MD, 1965. 

182. Anderson, Ruby Parke: The Parke Scrapbook - Number 2. Port City Press, Inc., Baltimore, 
MD, 1966. 

183. Church, John A.: Descendants of Richard Church of Plymouth, MA. Turtle Company, 
Rutland, VT, 1913. 

184. Levermore, Charles Herbert: Forerunners and Competitors of the Pilgrims and Puritans. 
Published by New England Society of Brooklyn, NY, 1912. Reprinted by Heritage Books, 
Bowie, MD, 1989. 

185. Park, Edwin H.: The Park Record. Printed by Bartow and Ray, Denver, CO, 1902. 

186. Massena, Elaine: This reference is unpublished work on the Forbes, Gorman, Kinder and 
Sloane lines prepared for me by Mrs. Massena in 1993, 1994 and 1995. She is a professional 
archivist/genealogist in White Plains, Westchester, NY. 

187. Hinchman, Lydia: The Early Settlers of Nantucket. First edition 1896; third edition 1926. 
Third edition reprinted for Clearfield Company, 1993. 

188. Livingston, Darby G.: This reference is unpublished work on the Baker, Carpenter, 
Dillingham, and Parker lines prepared for me by Mr. Livingston in 1993. He is a professional 
genealogist in Cambridge, NY. 

189. Banks, Charles Edward: Topical Dictionary of English Emigrants to New England, 1620- 
1650. Originally published in 1937. Republished by GPC, 1969. 

190. Jenks, Margaret R.: Granville, Washington County, New York Cemetery Inscriptions. 
Privately printed. Tombstone Publications, 901 W. Liberty Rd., Sykesville, MD 21784-9318, 
1993. 

191. Jacobus, Donald Lines: "The Henry Peck Family of New Haven, Connecticut." See 
Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. Ill, p. 68. Published by GPC, 1983. 

192. Jacobus, Donald Lines: "Parentage of Mary, Wife of John 2 Beach of Wallingford." See 
Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. I, pp. 109-1 11. Published by GPC, 1983. 

193. Remington, Gordon L.: This reference is unpublished work on the Arnold, Carpenter, 
Dillingham' and Wheaton lines prepared for me by Mr. Remington in 1993-1995. He is a 
professional genealogist in Salt Lake City. 

194. Kuhn's, Maude Pinney: The Mary and John - A Story of the Founding of Dorchester, MA, 
1630. Charles E. Turtle Co., Rutland, VT, 1976. First published by Turtle, 1943. 

369 



References 

195. Otis, William A.: A Genealogical and Historical Memoir of the Otis Family in America. 
Published in Chicago, 1924. Photoduplicatcd by Higginson Book Company, Salem, MA. 

196. Lamson, Daryl B.: The Lamson Family ofJonesport, ME. Gateway Press, Baltimore, 1978. 

197. Cleveland, Edmund Janes: "The King Family of Suffield, CT." See Genealogies of 
Connecticut Families, v. II, pp. 366-370. Published by GPC, 1983. 

198. Otis, Nancy H : This reference is personal correspondence from Mrs. Otis regarding our Otis 
and Wing family lines. Mrs. Otis lives in Manchester, VT and is the author of History of 
Manchester, VT. 

199. Parish, Rosvvell, Jr.: "John Parish of Groton, MA and Some of His Descendants." See 
Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. HI, pp. 15-24. GPC, 1983. 

200. Waters: "Genealogical Gleanings in England." New England Historical and Genealogical 
Register, v. XLV, pp. 236-237, 1891. 

201. Wing, George W.: "The Wing Family of America." The Owl, June 1914. The Owl is a 
publication of the Wing Family Association. 

202. Bardcn, Ebenczer and Elizabeth: Vermont Once No Man's Land. Located at Vermont 
Historical Society, Montpelier, VT. 

203. Anderson, Robert Charles: "The Mary & John, Developing Objective Criteria for a Synthetic 
Passenger List." Published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register by 
NEHGS, April 1993, pp. 148-161. 

204. Tracy, Dwight: "Tracy, Mason." See Genealogies of Connecticut Families, v. Ill, p. 502. 
GPC, 1983. 

205. Scars, Edmund H.: Pictures of the Olden Time as Shown in the Fortunes of a Family of 
Pilgrims. Crosby, Nichols and Company, Boston, 1857. Photoduplicated by NEHGS. 

206. Carpenter, Amos B.: A Genealogical History of the Rehoboth Branch of the Carpenter 
Family in America. Press of Carpenter & Morehouse, Amherst, MA, 1898. 

207. Arnold, James N.: Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850; First Series, Births, 
Marriages and Deaths, v. I, part IV, Coventry. Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 
Providence, RI, 1891. 

208. Sisscr, Fred, III: This reference is unpublished work on the Kinder and Forbes lines prepared 
for me by Mr. Sisscr in 1993 and 1994. He is a professional genealogist in Bridgewater, NJ. 

209. Ancestral File in the Mormon Family History Library, Salt Lake City. 

210. Marvin, Abijah: History of the Town of Lancaster, MA. Published bv the Town of Lancaster, 
1879. 

211 Banks, Charles E.: "York County, ME Deeds." The New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, 1 895, v. XLIX, p. 209. 

212. Davis, Walter Goodwin, Jr.: The Ancestry of Charity Haley. Originally published by the 
Stanbope Press, Boston, MA, 1916. Reprinted in 1988 under the auspices of the Parker River 
Researchers, Newburyport, MA. 

213. Backus, Reno Warburton: The Backus Families of Early New England. Privately published 
in 1966. Located at NEHGS. 



370 



References 

214. Clark, Mrs. William C. and Jacobus, Donald L.: "The Four Spencer Brothers - Their 
Ancestors and Descendants." The American Genealogist, v. XXVIII. Also see reference #79. 

215. Moore, Edith Austin and Day, William Allen: The Descendants of Richard Austin of 
Charlestown, MA. Located at NEHGS. 

216. Sinnott, Mary Elizabeth: Annals of the Sinnott, Rogers, Coffin, Corlics, Reeves, Bodine and 
Allied Families. Printed for private circulation by J.B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia, 
MDCCCV. 

217. French, Esther Griswold and Lewis, Robert: The Griswold Family - The First Five 
Generations in America. Published by the Griswold Family Association, 116 Garden Street, 
Wethersfield, CT, 1990. 

218. Waterman, Edgar Francis and Jacobus, Donald Lines: The Waterman Family, Volume I, 
Descendants of Robert Waterman. Published by Edgar F. Waterman, New Haven, CT, 1939. 
Located at NEHGS. 

219. Chamberlain, George W.: Notes on the Baker Family of Canterbury, CT. This is a thirteen- 
page handwritten document. It was donated to NEHGS by Mr. Chamberlain in 1932. It is 
located in the manuscript section of the society. 

220. Backus, Mary E. N.: The New England Ancestry of Dana Converse Backus. This undated 
report was printed for private distribution. Located at NEHGS. 

221. Smyth and Steiner: "Francis Bushnell of Guilford, CT and His Descendants." Genealogies of 
Connecticut Families, v. I, pp. 265-272. GPC, 1983. 

222. Leffingwell, Albert and Charles Wesley: The Leffingwell Record - A Genealogy of the 
Descendants of Lieut. Thomas Leffingwell. Leffingwell Publishing Co., Aurora, NY, 1897. 

223. Welles, Lemuel Aiken: "Ancestry of Alice Tomes Wife of Gov. Thomas Welles of 
Connecticut." See pages 502-506 of second series, v. Ill of English Origins of New England 
Families. GPC, 1985. 

224. Welles, Lemuel Aiken: "The English Ancestry of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut." See 
pages 623-653 of second series, v. Ill of English Origins of New England Families. GPC, 
1985. 

225. Clark, Flora S. (Mrs. William): Genealogy of the Four Spencer Brothers, v. 4, part 2. Edited 
and indexed by Rowena Spencer, M.D. This was a 1500-page manuscript that was dated 
1962 but the work was not published until it was rearranged and indexed by Dr. Spencer in 
1987. Located at NEHGS. In 1987 additional copies could be obtained from the Spencer 
Family Association at 1516 Soniat Street, New Orleans, LA 701 15. 

226. Harris, Gale Ion: "John Blackleach, Merchant of London and New England." The New 
England Historical and Genealogical Register, January 1994. 

227. May, Samuel P.: The Descendants of Richard Sares (Sears) of Yarmouth, MA 1638-1888. 
Joel Munsell's Sons, Albany, NY, 1890. Photoduplicated by NEHGS. 

228. Sittner, Kathi: This reference is unpublished work on the Whitney family prepared for me by 
Mrs. Sittner in April 1994. She is a professional genealogist with Ancestry in Salt Lake City. 

229. Loomis, William L.: Suffield Vital Records -Town Cemetery, Family and Miscellaneous 
Records. This unpublished record was compiled by Mr. Loomis sometime prior to 1896. 
Located in the Kent Memorial Library, Suffield, CT. 



371 



References 

230. Anonymous: This reference is from The Owl for March 1908. The Owl is a publication of the 
Wing Family Association. The reference has information about the Briggs, Rogers and Wing 
families of Plymouth Colony. 

231. Trumbull, Benjamin: A Complete History of Connecticut-Civil and Ecclesiastical. H.D. 
Utley, New London, CT, 1898. 

232. Van Duscn, Albert E.: Connecticut. Random House, New York, 1961. Mr. Van Dusen was 
the Connecticut State Historian at the time he wrote this book. 

233. Rogers, Amos C: This reference includes an eleven-page, unpublished memoir prepared by 
Amos and three letters he wrote to his children in his later years. This information was 
provided by Madelyn and Otis Dillingham Rogers of Coos Bay, OR in May 1994. Mr. Rogers 
is the grandson of Anson Rogers who was a brother of Amos C. Rogers and Stephen 
Carpenter Rogers , my great grandfather. 

234. Smith, John Montague: History of the Town of Sunderland, MA, with genealogies prepared 
by Henry W. Taft and Abbie T. Montague. Press of E.A. Hall and Co., Greenfield, MA, 
1899. Copy obtained from NEHGS. 

235. Pettys, Norman W., Sr.: Descendants of John Petty ( -1680) and Ann (Canning) Petty of 
Springfield, MA. Last revised March 10, 1978. Typewritten copy obtained from NEHGS. 

236. Curfman, Robert Joseph: The Petty-Pettis Genealogy: Descendants of John Petty of 
Springfield, MA. Compiled at Kansas City, MO, 1974. Typewritten copy obtained from 
NEHGS. 

237. Orcutt, S.: Allen Family of Torrington, CT. Published in 1878. 

238. Jacobus and Brainerd: Ancestry of Thomas Chalmers Brainerd. Published in Montreal, 
1948. 

239. Coffin, David P.: "Stephen Coffin." Coffin Family Newsletter, May 1994. 

240. Anonymous: Shaker Records. This is a set of index cards on file at the United Society of 
Shakers in the village of Sabbathday Lake, ME. This village is twenty miles north of Portland, 
ME on Route 26. The colony of Shakers at Sabbathday Lake is the last active colony of this 
faith and in 1995 had only seven members. 

241 Smith, HP. and Rann, W.S.: History of Rutland County, VT. D. Mason & Co., Syracuse, 
NY, 1886. Reprinted by Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1993. 

242. Lea, J. Henry: "Contributions to a Trumbull Genealogy." English Origins of New England 
Families, second scries, v. Ill, pp. 522-547. Excerpted and reprinted from The New England 
Historical and Genealogical Register by GPC, 1985. Also see reference #49. 

243. Alexander, Winthrop: A Genealogy of the Dillingham Family of New England. This is a 
typewritten manuscript that was prepared by Mr. Alexander in 1923 and corrected by him on 
July 1, 1924. Copy obtained from NEHGS. 

244. Holman, Winifred Lovering: "Hatch Wills, Scituate, MA." American Genealogist, January 
1959, pp. 9-11. 



Note: Originals of reference #233 are in my possession. Other family members have copies. SFC 



372 



References 

245. Davis, Walter Goodwin: The Ancestry of Joseph Neal, 1769-c. 1835, of Litchfield, ME. 
Southworth-Anthoensen Press, Portland, ME, 1945. Located at NEHGS. Also see Mrs. J. 
Gardner Bartlett's work in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 70:245 
from which Mr. Davis' information on the Hatch family was abstracted. 

246. Daniels and McLean: "William Gifford of Sandwich, MA." The New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, v. 128 (October 1974) and v. 129 (January 1975). 

247. Arnold, James N.: Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, first series, Births, Marriages 
and Deaths, v. 2, part I, Providence. Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 
Providence, RI, 1892. 

248. Cutter, William Richard: New England Families. Originally published 1913. Reprinted for 
Clearfield Company by GPC, 1994. 

249. Anonymous: Rhode Island Genealogical Register, January 1981. 

250. Tisdale, Edith Francena: Genealogy of Col. Israel Tisdale and His Descendants. Published 
in Boston, MA, 1909. Located at NEHGS. 

251. Tisdale, Robert L.: The Descendants of John Tisdale (1614-1675) - Colonial MA. Printed by 
Robert Lee Tisdale, copyrighted 1 98 1 . Located at NEHGS. 

252. Jacobus, Donald Lines: The Granberry Family and Related Families. Edgar F. Waterman, 
Hartford, CT, 1945. Located at NEHGS. 

253. Emery, Samuel Hopkins: History of Taunton, Massachusetts. D. Mason and Co., Syracuse, 
NY, 1893. Located at NEHGS. 

254. Snow, Nora E.: The Snow-Estes Ancestry - Volume One, The Snow Family. Published by 
Nora E. Snow, Hillburn, NY, 1939. Located at NEHGS. 

255. Dean, Arthur D.: Genealogy of the Dean Family. F.H. Gerlock and Co., Scranton, PA, 1903. 

Located at NEHGS. 

256. Wheeler, Richard Anson: History of the Town of Stonington . Press of the Day Publishing 
Co., New London, CT, 1900. Located at NEHGS. 

257. Frost, Josephine C: Records of the Town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York 1656-1751, v. 
1. Long Island Historical Society, MCMXIV. Located at NEHGS. 

258. Thurston, Brown: Thurston Genealogies 1635-1892. Published in 1892. Located at 
NEHGS. 

259. Bergen, Teunis G.: The Bergen Family or the Descendants of Hans Hansen Bergen, One of 
the Early Settlers of New York and Brooklyn, Long Island. Published in 1866 or 1876. 
Located at NEHGS. 

260. Canfield, Amos: "Abstracts of Early Wills of Queens County, New York." See page 140 of 
"Long Island Source Records" selected by Henry B. Hoff from The New York Genealogical 
and Biographical Record. Published by GPC, 1987. 

261. Richardson, Douglas: English Origins of the Thurston Family ofDedham. The American 
Genealogist, v. 54, no. 1, January 1978. 

262. Guilford, Joan S.: The Ancestry of Dr. J.P. Guilford, v. 1. See section titled "John Thurston 
of Medfield, MA." Located at NEHGS. 

263. Anonymous: Abstracts of Early Wills of Queens County, New York. The New York 
Genealogical and Biographical Record, v. LXV, 1934. Located at NEHGS. 

373 



References 

264. Roberts, George S.: Historic Towns of the Connecticut River Valley. First published about 
1905. Reprinted by Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1992. 

265. Jacobson, Judy: Massachusetts Bay Connections. Printed in 1992 for Clearfield Co. by GPC. 

266. Carpenter, Daniel Hoogland: Carpenter Family in America, From the Settlement at 
Providence, R.I.. 1637-1901. Marion Press, Jamaica, NY, 1901. Located at NEHGS. 

267. Chamberlain, Mildred Moshcr: "Early Rhode Island Settlers." Rhode Island Roots, Rhode 
Island Genealogical Society, December 1987. 

268. Drovvne, Henry T.: "Mr. Somerby's Genealogy of the Arnold Family." Genealogies of Rhode 
Island Families, v. I, pp. 7-13. GPC, 1989. The date of Mr. Drowne's article was not 
reported. 

269. Peckham, Mary W.: "The Probable Identity of Penelope, Wife of Nicholas Sheldon of 
Cranston, Rhode Island." Genealogies of Rltode Island Families, v. II, pp. 171-175. GPC, 
1989. The date of Miss Peckham's article was not reported. 

270. Anonymous: Quaker Meeting Records for East Hoosuck (sic). Originals in the Berkshire 
Athenaeum, Pittsfield, MA. Located at Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA. 

271. Anonymous: Quaker Meeting Records for Danby, VT, Ferrisburgh, VT and Granville, NY. 
Located on microfilm at the Vermont Public Records Division, Montpelier, VT. The original 
collection is at Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA. 

272. Smith and Reed: "Four Generations of English Ancestry for the Noyes Families of New 
England." New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April 1995, pp. 105-121. 

273. Lustcnberger, Anita A.: This reference is unpublished work on the Forbes family prepared for 
me by Ms. Lustcnberger in 1995. She is a professional genealogist in Irvington, NY. Her 
sources were the NY Genealogical and Biographical Society and the New York City Municipal 
Archives. 

274. McVetty, Suzanne: This reference is unpublished work on the Forbes family prepared for me 
by Ms. McVetty in 1995. She is a professional genealogist in Carle Place, NY. Her sources 
were the National Archives in NYC and the New York Public Library. 

275. Sittner, Kathi: This reference is unpublished work on the English ancestry of the Craddock 
and Wass families prepared for me by Mrs. Sittner in 1995. She is a professional genealogist 
with Ancestry in Salt Lake City. 

276. Trow, John F.: Trow 's New York City Directories. This is a series of directories that were 
published annually by Mr. Trow. 

277. Austin, John Osborne: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island. Joel Munsell's Sons, 
Albany, NY, 1887. Reproduced by Higginson Book Co., Salem, MA, 1995. 

278. Arnold, Stephen Elisha: The Arnold Memorial - William Arnold of Providence and Pawtuxet, 
1587-1675. The Tuttle Publishing Co., Rutland, VT, 1935. Reproduced by Higginson Book 
Co, Salem, MA, 1995. 

279. Morrison, George Austin, Jr.: King Genealogy - Clement King of Marshfield, MA, 1668. 
Joel Munsell's Sons, Albany, NY, 1898. Copy obtained from the Rhode Island Historical 
Society, Providence, RI. 

280. Anderson, Robert Charles: The Great Migration Begins - Immigrants to New England 1620- 
1633. Published by NEHGS, 1995. 



374 



References 

281. Cranmer, Leon E.: Cushnoc: The History and Archaeology of Plymouth Colony Traders on 
the Kennebec. This is an Occasional Publication in Maine Archaeology Number Seven, a 
joint publication of the Maine Archaeological Society, the Fort Western Museum, and the 
Maine Historical Preservation Commission (55 Capitol Street, Augusta, ME 04333), 1970. 

282. Bodge, George Madison: Soldiers in King Philip 's War. Originally published in Boston, MA, 
1906. Reprinted for Clearfield Company by GPC, Baltimore, MD, 1991. 

283. Sittner, Kathi: This reference is unpublished work on the Irish ancestry of the Kinder and 
Gorman families prepared for me by Mrs. Sittner in 1995. She is a professional genealogist 
with Ancestry in Salt Lake City. 

284. Knowles, Sellew and Christensen: "The Kennebec River Trading House." Howland Quarterly, 
The Pilgrim John Howland Society, Plymouth, MA, January-April 1971, pp. 2-7. 

285. White, Elizabeth Pearson: "Hope Howland and Her Husband, Elder John Chipman." Howland 
Quarterly, The Pilgrim John Howland Society, Plymouth, MA, June 1995, pp. 8-13. 

286. Anonymous: Monumental Memorials of the Apple ton Family. Located at Connecticut 
Historical Society Library, Hartford, CT. 

287. Smith, Dottie: The Dictionary of Early Shasta County History. This is a 160-page, spiral- 
bound book published in 1991 by Mrs. Smith. Copy obtained from the California State Park 
in Shasta, CA. 

288. Hunt, Ann: "Trappers in Shasta County." The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical Society, 
1967, pp. 17-30. 

289. Ross, Judge Albert F.: "Whiskeytown." The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical Society, 
1982, pp. 36-56. 

290. Shurtleff, Benjamin: "Shasta." The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical Society, 1957, pp. 5- 
12. Originally published in the Overland Monthly about 1900. 

291. Anonymous: Shasta State Historic Park - Brief History and Tour Guide. Prepared in 1985 
by the State of California Department of Parks & Recreation (P.O. Box 2390, Sacramento, 
CA 9581 1) in cooperation with the Town of Shasta Interpretive Association. 

292. Prehn, Nettie Grotefend: The Diary of Augustus Grotefend and Family History. The 
Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical Society, 1993. 

293. Anonymous: Vital Records ofScituate, MA to the Year 1850. NEHGS, 1909. 

294. Anonymous: The World Book Encyclopedia, 1960. 

295. Kunz, Virginia Brainard: The French in America. Lerner Publications Company, Minneapolis, 
MN, 1990. 

296. Berry, Ellen Thomas and David Allen: Our Quaker Ancestors. GPC, 1990. 

297. Mitchell, Brian: A New Genealogical Atlas of Ireland. GPC, 1986. 

298. White, John Barber: Descendants of Thomas Barber of Windsor, CT. Originally published in 
1909. Republished by Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1994. 

299. Bridgwater, William and Sherwood, Elizabeth, editors: The Columbia Encyclopedia. Second 
edition, Columbia University Press, 1950. 



375 



References 



300. Worth, Henry B : "The Colonial Church and Nantucket." Originally published in the 1906 
"Proceedings" of the Nantucket Historical Association. Reprinted in the summer 1994 issue 
of the association's Historic Nantucket. 

301. Gardner, Frank Augustine: Gardner Memorial. Salem, MA, 1933. Copy obtained from 
Nantucket Historical Association. 

302. Baldwin, Ada Harriet: "His Mother's Kindred." American, October 1941, pp. 673-702. This 
is a publication of The American Historical Company, Somerville, NJ. Copy obtained from 
Nantucket Historical Association. 

303. Macy, Silvanus J.: The Macy Family. Joel Munsell, Albany, NY, 1868. Copy obtained from 
Nantucket Historical Association. 

304. Curfman, R.: Paddock Genealogy. Privately published in Fort Collins, CO, 1977. Copy 
obtained from Nantucket Historical Association. 

305. Shurtleff, Nathaniel B.: Records of Plymouth Colony. Originally published in Boston, 1857. 
Reprinted by GPC, 1991. 

306. Swain, Robert H.: Swains of Nantucket. Copy obtained from Nantucket Historical 
Association. 

307. Starbuck, Alexander: History of the American Whale Fishery. Argosy-Antiquarian, Ltd., 
New York, 1964. Copy obtained from University of Nevada, Reno. 

308. Sherman, Robert and Ruth: Vital Records of Mars hfi eld, MA to the Year 1850. Society of 
Mayflower Descendants in the State of Rhode Island, 1970. 

309. Newton, Rose Sheldon and Rider, Shirley Sheldon: S-5, Isaac Sheldon of Windsor, CT. This 
is a thirty-page booklet published by the Sheldon Family Association, 1991. 

310. Burt, Henry M.: History of Springfield. Originally published by the author in Springfield, 
MA, 1898. PhotoduplicatedbyNEHGS. 

311. LaPicrre, Lauricr L.: 1759 - The Battle for Canada. McClelland & Stewart, Inc., 481 
University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2E9, Canada, 1990. 

312. Grant, Lorrie: "Slave Ship's Remains Stir Strong Emotions." San Francisco Chronicle, 
November 29, 1996, p. A 14. 

313. Johnston, Henry P.: Connecticut Men in the Military & Naval Service in the War of the 
Revolution. Published in Hartford, CT, 1889. Copy obtained from Southern California 
Genealogical Society, Burbank, CA. 

314. Emerson, Wilimcna H. (Eliot): Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot. Turtle, 
Morehouse & Taylor Press, New Haven, CT, 1905. 

315. Swartzlow, Mrs. Carl: "The Noble (sic) Trail." The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical 
Society, 1957, pp. 20-22. 

316. Frisbie, Mabel: "Redding Pictorial, 1872-1972." The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical 
Society, 1972, pp. 1-31. 

317. Eliot and Porter: Genealogy of the Eliot Family. George B. Bassett & Co., New Haven, CT, 
1854 

318. Hcnncssy, James: This reference is unpublished work on the Forbes and Sloane lines prepared 
for me by Mr. Henncssy in 1996. He is a professional genealogist in Salt Lake City 
specializing in Irish research. 

376 



References 

319. Anonymous: This is an undated, typewritten record of the King family obtained from the 
Rhode Island Historical Society in 1995. 

320. Anonymous: This is an unidentified and undated newspaper article obtained from Rhode 
Island Historical Society in 1995. 

321. Bier, James A., Cartographer: Western Emigrant Trails, 1830-1870. This is a map published 
in 1991 by the Oregon-California Trails Association, P.O. Box 1019, Independence, MO 
64051-0519. 

322. Nordmann, Christopher A.: This reference is unpublished work on the history of Joseph 
Craddock and his wife, Mary Wass, prepared for me by Mr. Nordmann in 1991. Mr. 
Nordmann is a professional genealogist in St. Louis, MO. His research was in St. Louis and 
in Madison County, IL records. 

323. Stewart, George R.: The California Trail. This is a reprint by the University of Nebraska 
Press. Originally published in 1962 by McGraw-Hill in New York. Copy obtained from the 
Oregon-California Trails Association, P.O. Box 1019, Independence, MO 64051-0519. 

324. Rider, Shirley Sheldon: In Defense of J. Gardner Bartlett. This is a seven-page paper 
prepared by Mrs. Rider for the Sheldon Family Association in 1991. Mr. Bartlett's paper is 
reference #21 and Mrs. Rider's paper resolves confusion in other printed records regarding the 
ancestry of Isaac Sheldon . Copy obtained from Sheldon Family Association. 

325. Swasey & Cooper, Publishers: "Redding Reduced by Fire." The Redding Independent, 
August 1881. Reprinted in The Covered Wagon, Shasta Historical Society, 1964, pp. 23-25. 
Also see page 41 of the 1995 issue. 

326. Petersen, Edward: Redding - The First Hundred Years. This is a fifty-six-page pamphlet 
prepared under the auspices of the Redding Centennial Committee in 1972. Copy obtained 
from Shasta Historical Society. 

327. Ryan, James G.: Irish Records - Sources for Family & Local History. Ancestry Publishing, 
Salt Lake City, 1997. 

328. Lewis, Samuel: Topographical Dictionary of Ireland. Originally published in London in 
1837. Reprinted by GPC, 1995. 

329. Millard, Barbara Shelley: "Hi! I'm Elizabeth Tilley." The Howland Quarterly, The Pilgrim 
John Howland Society, Plymouth, MA, September 1995. 

330. Jones-Baker, Doris: "The Rest Left No Posterity Here in Plymouth Colony." Genealogists ' 
Magazine, Society of Genealogists, London, September 1994. Reprinted in 77?*? Mayflower 
Quarterly, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, Plymouth, MA, February 1997. 

331. Walsh, Madge R.: This reference is unpublished work on Shasta County history prepared for 
me by Mrs. Walsh in 1997. She is an historian associated with the Shasta County Historical 
Society. She used resources of the society and information in Shasta County records. 

332. Watkins, T.H.: California an Illustrated History. American Legacy Press, New York, 1983. 

333. Crandall, Ralph J.: New Englanders in California. Dr. Crandall is director of NEHGS. This 
is a sixteen-page, typewritten paper he presented in Berkeley, California in March 1989. 

334. Wasser, Elsie M. This reference is unpublished work on the history of Joseph Craddock and 
his wife, Mary Wass, prepared for me in 1997. Mrs. Wasser is a professional genealogist in 
Alton, IL. Her research was in Madison County, IL record. 



377 



References 

335. Boggs, Mae Helene Bacon: My Playhouse was a Concord Coach. Privately printed by 
Howell-North Press, Oakland, CA, 1942. No copies sold; all copies were gifts or donated. 
Located at Shasta Historical Society, Redding, CA. 

336. Amesbury, Robert: Nobles ' Emigrant Trail. This is a thirty-seven page booklet printed by 
Lassen Litho, Susanville, CA, 1967. Located at Shasta Historical Society. 

337. Gray, A.A.: History of California. D.C. Heath and Company, 1934. 

338. Beck, Warren A. and Haase, Ynes D.: Historical Atlas of California. University of 
Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK, 1974. 

339. Pitt, Leonard: The Decline of the Californios. University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, 
1966. 

340. Holliday, J.S.: The World Rushed In. Simon and Sinister, 1981. 

341 Collins, E.J.: Irish Family Research Made Simple. Summit Publications, Box 222, Munroe 
Falls, OH 44262, 1993. 

342. MacLysaght, Edward: Irish Families, Their Names, Arms and Origins. 

343. Anderson, Robert Charles: "The English Origin of Robert Hinsdale of Dedham, Medfield, 
Hadlcy and Deerfield, Massachusetts." The American Genealogist, July 1993. 

344. Gutierrez, Ramon A. and Orsi, Richard J., editors: Contested Eden - California Before the 
Gold Rush. University of California Press in Association with the California Historical 
Society, 1998. 

345. Kyle, Douglas E., editor: Historic Spots in California. Stanford University Press, 1990. 

346. Pierce, Andrew R.: This reference is unpublished work on the Baker line prepared for me by 
Mr. Pierce in 1994. Mr. Pierce is a professional genealogist at NEHGS. 

347. Anonymous: DAR Patriot Index - New Ancestor List, v. II, p. 161. National Society of the 

dar' 

348. Searlc, Andrew B.: Esther and Her Daughters. NEHGS/NEXUS, v. XV, nos. 3 and 4, May- 
August 1998. 

349. Moriarity, G. Andrews: "The Parentage and Ancestry of Dr. Richard Palgrave of Charlestown, 
MA." New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April 1948, pp. 87-98. 

350. Miller, Robert Ryal: Juan Alvarado: Governor of California, 1836-1842. University of 
Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK, 1998. 

351. Haskins, Charles Warren: The Argonauts of California. Fords, Howard and Hulbcrt, New 
York, 1 890. Located at San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park. 

352. Walsh, Madge R.: "A Tour of Some Historic Sites in Shasta County." The Covered Wagon. 
Shasta Historical Society, 1999. 

353. Frazicr, Donald S., editor: The United States and Mexico at War. Simon and Schuster/ 
Macmillan, New York, 1998. 



378 



INDEX OF ANCESTORS 



INDEX OF ANCESTORS 



ABBOTT 

347 LydiaV 122 
ADAMS 

3447 AnnX 227 
ADGATE 

885 Elizabeth 2 XI 252 
1770 Thomas' XI 253, 279 
ALCOCK 
3572 Dr. George 1 XI 253, 292, 321 
1786 Dr. John 2 XI 253, 281 
893 Sarah 3 XI 252 
ALLGAR 
3107 BridgettVm 185 
3115 BridgettVm 185 
ALLWOOD 

2513 Ann m 67 
ALLYN 

195 JaneVm 184, 189 
ANDREWS 

849 Esther 2 X 226 
716 Samuel 2 VI 150. 163 
179 Thankful 4 VI 150, 179 
1698 William 1 X 227, 245, 325 
1432 William 1 VI 151, 167, 327 
358 William 3 VI 750, 159 
ANN ABLE 
2570 Anthony 1 IV 83, 115, 317, 318 
2794 Anthony 1 V 123, 145 
1285 Sarah 2 IV 83. 103, 318 
1397 Sarah 2 V 123, 142, 318 
APPLETON 

875 Judith 3 XI 252 
879 Judith 3 XI 252 
3500 Samuel 1 Sr. XI 253, 287 
3516 Samuel 1 Sr. XI 253,289 
1750 Maj. Samuel 2 Jr. XI 253, 274, 338 
1758 Maj. Samuel 2 Jr. XI 253, 276 
ARNOLD 

673 Elizabeth 2 V 122, 134 
338 Israel 3 V 122, 130 
2599 Joan IV 83 
2692 Nicholas V 123, 144 
2696 Nicholas V 123, 144 
2704 Nicholas V 123, 144 
169 Sarah 4 V 122 
337 Sarah 3 V 122 
61 A Stephen 2 V 122, 134 
676 Stephen 2 V 122, 135 
1346 William 1 V 123, 139 
1348 William 1 V 123, 139 
1352 William 1 V 123, 139 



AUSTIN 

105 Anne 5 X 226, 230 

840 Anthony 2 X 226, 237 

858 Anthony 2 X 226, 241 

429 Esther 3 X 226, 235 

420 John 3 X 226,233 
1680 Richard 1 X 227, 243 
1716 Richard 1 X 227,247 

210 William 4 X 226, 231 
BACKHOUSE 

323 Elizabeth IV 82 

646 Francis IV 82, 94 
BACKUS 

181 Rebecca 3 VI 150 

362 Stephen 2 VI 750, 750 

724 William 1 VI 750, 164 
BAKER 

90 Benjamin VI 750, 154 
45 Tamson VI 750, 753 

180 William VI 750, 756 
BALLARD 

1215 Rachel n 29 
BANCROFT 

1711 Hannah X 227 

1783 Hannah XI 253 

1671 JaneX 227 
BARBER 

835 Sarah 2 X 226 

1670 Thomas' X 227, 243, 325, 334 
BARKER 

678 James 1 V 122, 135 

1356 James, Sr. V 725 

339 MaVV 722 
BARBRAUM 

1265 Hannah m 67 
BARNARD 

331 Mary 3 IV 82 

663 Mary 2 IV 82 

662 Nathaniel 2 IV 82, 98 

1326 Robert 1 IV 83, 111,332 

1324 Thomas 1 IV 83, 111, 331 
BARNEY 

2382 Jacob 1 II 29, 56 

1191 Sarah 2 n 29 
BARTLETT 

1543 Abigail Vm 185 
BASSETT 

353 Hannah 2 VI 750, 757 

719 Hannah 2 VI 750, 163 

706 William 1 VI 750, 7<57, 327 

1438 William 1 VI 757, 768 



Arabic number preceding the name is the ancestor number in this book. 
Roman numeral following the name is the chart number in this book. 



381 



Index of Ancestors 



BATCHELDER 

1289 Deborah 2 IV 83. 104 

2578 Rev. Stephen 1 IV 83. 116 

2666 Rev. Stephen 1 IV 83, 121 

1333 Theodate 2 IV 83 
BATE 

2579 Deborah IV 83 

2667 Deborah IV 83 
BEACH 

177 Hannah 3 VI 150, 155 
354 John 2 VI 150. 157 
708 Thomas' VI 1 50, 162, 327 
BEARDING 
3150 Nathaniel 1 Vm 185.214,325 
1575 Sarah 2 VIII 185 
BLACKLEACH 

578 Richard II 28. 40 
289 Sarah II 28, 36 
BLACKSOLL 

3473 Mary XI 253 
BOURNE 

845 Elizabeth X 226 
1745 Elizabeth 1 XI 253 
BREWSTER 
3143 Elizabeth VIII 185. 214 
3375 Elizabeth X 227. 248 
BR1GGS 

1290 John 1 IV 83, 105 
645 Sarah 2 IV 82, 94 

BROWN 

839 Elizabeth 2 X 226 
1678 John 1 X 227, 243 
BUNKER 

335 Ann 3 IV 82 
1318 George 1 IV 83, 109, 331 

1334 George 1 IV 83, 113 
1340 George 1 IV 83, 114 

667 Martha 2 IV 82, 100 
659 Mary" 2 IV 82, 97 
2636 William IV 83, 120 

2668 William IV 83, 121 
2680 William IV 83, 121 

670 William 2 IV 82, 101, 331 
BURNHAM 

219 Abigail" XI 252,258 
1752 Thomas' XI 253, 275 

876 William 2 , Sr. XI 252, 266 

438 Rev. William 3 , Jr. XI 252, 261 
BURT 

655 Hannah 2 IV 82 
1310 James 1 IV 83, 107 
BUSHNELL 

442 Dr. Caleb 4 XI 252, 262 



3536 Francis' XI 253, 291, 327 
3548 Francis' XI 253, 292 
221 Mary 5 XI 252, 259 
887 Mary 3 XI 252 
1768 Richard 2 XI 253, 278, 327 
Ml A Richard 2 XI 253, 280 
884 Richard 3 XI 252. 267 
BYLEY 
2394 Henry 1 II 29, 61 
1197 Rebecca 2 II 29 
CADY 

94 Benjamin 3 VII 172, 176 
188 Capt. Joseph 2 VII 172, 177, 338 
376 Nicholas' VII 172, 178, 338 
47 Sarah 4 VII 172, 175 
CANNING 

585 AnnD 28 
CARPENTER 

42 Amos 5 V 122, 125 
84 Joseph 4 V 122, 126 
21 Lydia 6 I 1, 18,348 
21 Lydia 6 V 122, 125 
1344 Richard V 123 
336 Silas 2 V 122, 130 
168 Silas 3 V 122, 127 
672 William 1 V 122, 133, 338 
CARTER 

1377 Ursula V 123 
CHANDLER 
1577 Elinor 1 VIII 185 
1705 Elinor 1 X 227 
1777 Elinor' XI 253 
CHAPLIN 

3533 Martha' XI 253, 290, 321 
CHAUNCEY 

18 Alfred G 7 1 1, 14,351,353 
18 Alfred G. 7 II 28,31 
1152 Rev. Charles' II 29. 45 
144 Charles 4 D 28,34 
9 ElotiaRich 8 I 1,8.353 
2304 George II 29. 53 
288 Rev. Isaac 3 II 28, 36 
576 Rev. Israel 2 II 28, 39 
72 Israel 5 II 28,31 
36 Russell 6 II 28, 31 
CHIPMAN 
1192 John' II 29, 49 
298 Rev. John 3 II 28, 38 
149 Rebecca 4 II 28,35 
596 Samuel 2 II 28, 43 
2384 Thomas II 29, 57 
CHURCH 

380 David 2 VII 172, 179 



382 



Index of Ancestors 



190 David 3 VII 172, 177 
95 Elizabeth 4 Vn 172, 176 
760 Garrett 1 Vn 172, 182 
CLARK 

599 Elizabeth n 28 
COBB 
1194 Henry 1 n 29, 50 
597 Sarah 2 H 28 
COFFIN 

329 Judith 3 IV 82,91 
2632 Peter IV 83, 119 
658 Stephen 2 IV 82, 97, 330 
1316 Tristram 1 IV 83, 108, 329. 330, 331 
COLLIER 
1722 Joseph X 227, 247 
861 MaryX 226 
COLLINS 

3583 JohaneXI 253 
COOK 

3581 Agnes XI 253 
COOPER 

102 Benjamin 2 IX 216, 220 
204 Daniel 1 K 216. 223 
51 Mary 3 IX 216, 219 
CRADDOCK 

4 Charles Alfred 3 1 1. 4, 348, 353 
8 John 2 1 1, 6, 353 
16 Joseph 1 1 1, 12 

1 Sheldon Forbes 5 1 1, 3 

2 Warren Nicholas 4 1 /, 3, 348, 353 
CROSS 

25 Caroline 4 1 1, 19 
25 Caroline 4 IX 216, 219 
647 Elizabeth IV 82 
1294 John IV 83 
200 John 1 IX 216, 222 
50 Joseph 3 Dt 216, 219 
100 Robert 2 DC 216, 219 
CUTTER 

2393 Joanna II 29, 321 
CUSHING 

1406 John 2 V 123, 143 
2812 Matthew 1 V 123, 147 
703 Sarah 3 V 122 
DABINOTT 
1791 Jane 1 XI 253,283,320 
3499 Joane XI 253. 287 
3515 Joane XI 253, 289 

3582 John XI 253 
DAVIS 

756 Barnabas' VD 172, 181 
1512 JamesVn 173 
378 Samuel 2 VH 172, 179 



189 Sarah 3 VH 172 
DEAN 

630 James 2 m 66, 74 
315 Mary 3 HI 66, 72 
1260 Walter 1 m 67, 77 
2520 William m 67 
DERIFTELD 

1697 AnnX 227 
DICKERMAN 

707 Hannah VI 150, 162 
1439 Hannah VI 151, 168 
DILLINGHAM 

43 Deborah 6 V 122. 126 
1376 Edward 1 V 123, 140 
688 Henry 2 V 122, 136 
2752 Henry V 123, 145 
344 John 3 V 122, 131 
86 Joshua 5 V 122, 127 
172 Melethiah 4 V 122, 129 
DODGE 
1185 Hannah 2 II 29 
2370 William 1 n 29, 55 
DOWNING 
3578 Emanuel 1 XI 253, 293 
1789 Mary 2 XI 253 
DUNGAN 

679 Barbara 1 V 122 
1358 William V 123, 139 
EASTON 

870 John 2 XI 252, 265 
1740 Joseph 1 XI 253, 272, 325 
435 Mabel 3 XI 252,260 
ELLIOTT 

19 Louisa I 1, 16, 353 
19 Louisa m 66, 69 
38 William, Jr. ffl 66, 69 
76 William, Sr. m 66, 69 
EL WILL 

1569 Agnes Vm 185 
1685 Agnes X 227 
EMERSON 
1571 Elizabeth 2 Vm 185 
1687 Elizabeth 2 X 227 
3142 Thomas' Vm 185,213 
3374 Thomas 1 X 227, 248 
ENSIGN 

1402 John V 123, 143 
701 Hannah V 122 
2804 Thomas V 123, 147 
EVERARD 
3501 Judith 1 XI 253, 287 
3517 Judith 1 XI 253,289 



Arabic number preceding the name is the ancestor number in this book. 
Roman numeral following the name is the chart number in this book. 



383 



Index of Ancestors 



EWELL 

321 Bcthiah 3 IV 82,89 
349 Bclhiah 3 V 122, 132 
642 Gershom 2 IV 82. 93 
698 Gershonr V 122, 138 
1284 Henry 1 IV 83, 103, 334 
13% Heruy 1 V 123, 142 
EYRE 
1153 Catharine 1 II 29. 46 
2306 Robert II 29 
FILLEY 

795 Mary 2 VIII 184. 202 
1715 Mary 2 X 227. 246 
1590 William 1 VIII 185,211,325 
3430 William 1 X 227, 249 
FLETCHER 

731 GrizzellVI 150 
FLOWER 

600 Lamrock 1 , Sr. II 28. 44 
300 Lamrock 2 , Jr. II 28, 38 
150 Lamrock 3 , III U 28. 36 
75 Mehitable" II 28, 34 
FOBES 

651 Elizabeth 2 IV 82 
1302 John 1 IV 83, 106 
FOLGER 

165 Abigail" IV 82.88 
164 Daniel 5 , Sr. IV 82, 88 
82 Daniel 6 , Jr. IV 82, 86 
4 1 Dinah 7 IV 82, 85 
656 Eleazer 3 IV 82, 96, 332 
2640 John, Sr. IV 83 
1320 John 1 , Jr. IV 83, 110 
2624 John 1 , Jr. IV 83, 118 
330 John 3 IV 82. 91 
660 Peter 2 IV 82. 97, 329. 332 
1312 Peter 2 IV 83. 107 
328 Peter 4 IV 82. 91 
FORBES 

15 Man- 2 1 /, 11,343,344,345 
30 Thomas' I /, 22, 343, 344, 345 
FREEMAN 

3535 Alice 1 XI 253. 291 
FRUEN 

1209 Susanna II 29 
FRYER 
2629 Margaret IV 83 
2661 Margaret IV 83 
FULLER 

785 Elizabeth 2 VIII 184. 199 
843 Elizabeth 2 X 226, 238 
1570 John 1 VIII 185, 209 
1686 John 1 X 227, 244 

384 



GARDNER 

581 Elizabeth 2 II 28 
2369 MaryD 29 
665 Miriam 3 IV 82 
1314 Richard 2 IV 83, 107, 332 
1330 Richard 2 IV 83, 112 
1162 Samuel 1 D 29, 47, 325 
657 Sarah 3 IV 82 
2628 Thomas' IV 83, 118 
2660 Thomas' IV 83, 120 
GATOR 

1761 Judith 1 XI 253 
GIBBS 
2642 John IV 83 
1321 Merebah 1 IV 83, 110 
2625 Merebah 1 IV 83, 118 
GIFFORD 

173 Maria 3 V 122 
346 Jonathan 2 V 122, 132 
692 William 1 V 122, 137 
GILMAN 
2803 Mary 1 V 123 
2809 Mary 1 V 123 
GODFREY 
1319 Jane'lV 83, 109,331 
1335 Jane'lV 83, 113 
1341 Jane'lV 83, 114 
2638 Richard IV 83 
2682 Richard IV 83 
GOODRICH 

873 Elizabeth 2 XI 252 
3492 John XI 253, 284 
1746 William' XI 253, 273, 326 
GOODWIN 

302 Isaac" II 28. 39 
151 Mchitable 5 D 28 
604 Nathaniel 3 H 28. 44 
2416 Ozias'll 29, 62,325 
1208 William 2 II 29, 52 
GORMAN 

29 Jane 1 1 /, 22 
GORTON 
1702 JohnX 227, 245 
851 MaryX 226 
GRAVES 

1699 Abigail X 227 
GREEN 
1683 Bridget 1 X 227 
1719 Bridget 1 X 227 
GRIFFIN 

1710 JohnX 227,246 

1782 John XI 253, 280 

855 Mary X 226, 241 



Index of Ancestors 



891 Mary XI 252, 268 
GRISWOLD 

1468 Edward' VI 151, 169, 325 

734 Francis 2 VI 150, 166 

2936 George VI 151, 170 

367 Mary 3 VI 150, 160 
GROVER 

2380 Edmund 1 II 29, 56 

595 Hannah 3 H 28 

1190 John 2 II 29, 49 
GULLEY 

2693 Alice V 123 

2697 Alice V 123 

2705 Alice V 123 
GUNN 

769 Mehitable 2 Vm 184, 195 

1538 Thomas 1 Vm 185, 203, 325 
HALE 

1196 Rev. John 2 II 29, 51 

299 Rebecca 4 II 28, 38 

2392 Robert 1 II 29, 60. 321 

598 Robert 3 II 28, 48 

417 Sarah 3 X 226 

834 Timothy 2 X 226, 236 
HALL 

211 Anne 5 X 226,231 

3376 George 1 X 227, 248 

All Nathaniel 4 X 226. 233 

1688 Samuel 2 , Sr. X 227, 244 

844 Samuel 3 , Jr. X 226, 238 
HAMBLIN 

209 MaryX 226 

418 Nathaniel X 226.233 
836 William X 226. 237 

HARMON 

198 Benjamin 4 VTO 184. 190 

1584 Francis 1 Vffl 185. 210 

3424 Francis 1 X 227, 249 

99 Hannah 5 Vffl 184, 188 

214 Joel 5 X 226. 232 

792 John 2 VOI 184, 201, 326 

1712 John 2 X 227,246 

396 Nathaniel 3 Vffl 184, 193 

856 Nathaniel 3 X 226, 241 

428 Nathaniel 4 X 226, 235 

107 Rebecca X 226, 230 
HART 

3387 Sarah 2 X 227, 249 
HARVEY 

1327 Joanna IV 83 
HATCH 

690 Jeremiah 2 V 122, 136 

345 Lydia 3 V 122 



1380 Thomas' V 123, 141 
2760 William V 123. 145 
HATHAWAY 

327 Abigail 4 IV 82 
1308 John 2 , Sr. IV 83, 107 
654 John 3 , Jr. IV 82, 96 
2616 Nicholas 1 IV 83, 118 
HAWKE 
2814 Matthew' V 123, 148 
1407 Sarah 2 V 123 
HAWKINS 

1763 Anna 1 XI 253 
HAYWARD 

1679 Margaret X 227 
HERRICK 
2372 Henry 1 U 29, 55 
1186 Henry 2 n 29, 48 
593 Lydia 3 U 28 
HE WES 

1382 John 1 V 123, 141 
691 Mary^V 122 
HEWETT 
2406 Rev. Ephraim' II 29. 62 
1203 Lydia 2 D 29 
HICKS 

653 Dorcas IV 82 
HILL 

1765 Margery XI 253 
HINCKLEY 
2390 Samuel' II 29. 60 
1195 Sarah 2 n 29 
HINSDALE 

833 Elizabeth 2 X 226 
1666 Robert' X 227. 242, 337 
HITCHCOCK 

356 John 2 VI 150, 158 
111 Matthias' VI 150, 162, 327 
178 Matthias 3 VI 750, 155 
89 Thankful 4 VI 150, 154 
HOOKER 

3573 Anne 1 XI 253, 292, 321 
HOPCOTT 
1343 Sarah 1 IV 83, 115 
2659 Sarah' IV 83, 120 
HOPKINS 
1299 Frances' IV 83, 105 
2598 William IV 83 
HOSFORD 

775 Esther 3 Vffl 184, 197 
1550 John 2 Vm 185, 206 
3100 William' Vm 185,213,325 
HOW 
3493 Margery XI 253 



Arabic number preceding the name is the ancestor number in this book. 
Roman numeral following the name is the chart number in this book. 



385 



Index of Ancestors 



HOWLAND 

1193 Hope 2 n 29.50 

2386 John 1 II 29, 57, 315, 317, 318 
HUDSON 

579 Abigail II 28 
1158 John II 29, 47 

HUGGINS 

841 Esther 2 X 226.238 
859 Esther 2 X 226. 242 
1682 John 1 X 227 
1718 John'X 227 
HUNTER 

773 PriscillaVUI 184 
1546 William VIII 185 
HURD 
1264 Adam 2 III 67, 79 
158 Daniel 5 III 66. 71 
316 Ebenezcr"ffl 66, 72 
2528 John 1 III 67, 81. 325 
632 John 3 III 66, 74 
79 Rachel* III 66 
HUSSEY 
1332 Christopher 1 IV 83. 112. 331 
2664 John IV 83 
333 Mary 3 IV 82 
791 Mary VIII 184. 201 
666 Stephen 2 IV 82. 99 
HUXLEY 

393 Elizabeth VIII 184 
786 Thomas VIII 184, 199 
INGRAM 

580 John II 28, 40 
290 Nathaniel II 28. 37 
145 Sarah II 28. 34 

JACOB 

702 David 3 V 122. 138 
351 Deborah 4 V 122 
1404 John 2 V 123. 143 
1401 Mary^V 123 
2802 Nicholas 1 V 123, 146 
2808 Nicholas 1 V 123. 147 
JAQUES 

398 Daniel 2 VIII 184. 194 
199 Hannah 3 VIII 184, 190 
796 Henry 1 VIII 184, 202 
JEWELL 

365 Hannah VI 150 
730 Thomas VI 150. 165 
JOHNSON 

77 Abigail III 66, 70 
JONES 
1339 Dorothy IV 83 



JOY 

627 Elizabeth III 66 
KENT 

1544 Samuel 2 , Sr. Vffl 785, 204 

772 Samuel 3 , Jr. Vm 184, 195 

386 Samuel" Vffl 184, 191 

193 Sarah 5 Vffl 184 

3088 Thomas' Vffl 185, 212 
KINDER 

14 Frederick 2 1 1, 10 

1 Jennie 3 1 1, 6, 344 

28 William 1 1 1, 20 
KING 

421 Agnes 3 X 226 

1368 Clement 1 V 123, 140 

684 Clement 2 V 122, 135 

98 Dan 5 Vffl 184. 188 

49 Eunice 6 Vffl 184, 187 

784 James 2 , Sr. Vffl 184, 198 

842 James 2 , Sr. X 226, 238 

392 James 3 , Jr. VIII 184, 192 

171 Jemima" V 122 

342 John 3 V 122, 131 

196 Nathaniel" VHI 184, 189 

641 Rhoda 2 IV 82,93 

697 Rhoda 2 V 122, 138 

1282 Thomas' IV 83, 102 

1394 Thomas' V 123, 142 

1568 William' Vffl 185, 208 

1684 William' X 227, 244 

3136 William Vffl 185 

3368 William X 227 
KNAPP 

377 Judith 2 VH 172,321 

754 William' VH 172,181,321 
KNIGHT 

797 Anna Vffl 184 
LANE 

312 Jonathan 2 III 66, 71 

39 Louisa 5 III 66, 69 

156 Nathan 3 III 66, 70 

624 Robert' III 66, 72 

634 Robert' III 66, 75 

317 Sarah 2 III 66 

78 Thacher" III 66, 70 
LAPHAM 

648 John', Sr. IV 82, 95 

324 John 2 , Jr. IV 82, 90 

162 Joshua 3 IV 82,87 

81 Lydia"lV 82,86 
LAPP 

3137 Christina Vffl 785 

3369 Christina X 227 



386 



Index of Ancestors 



LASKEN 

2373 Edith 2 II 29, 56 
LATHAM 

1359 Frances 1 V 123, 140 
LEE 

2519 Tryphosa 1 III 67, 318 
LEFFERTY 

202 Bryan IX 216, 222 
101 Mary IX 216 
LEFFINGWELL 

443 Anne 3 XI 252 
1772 Lt. Thomas 1 , Sr. XI 253, 280 
886 Thomas 2 , Jr. XI 252, 268 
LINTON 

759 Anne 2 Vn 172 
1518 Richard 1 VD 173, 182 
LOOMIS 

97 Abigail 5 Vm 184 

877 Elizabeth 3 XI 252 

3429 Mary 2 X 227, 249 

776 John 2 Vm 184, 197, 325 
3104 JohnVm 185 
1552 Joseph 1 Vm 185,206,325 
3178 Joseph 1 Vm 185, 214 
3508 Joseph 1 XI 253, 288 
1589 Mary 2 VIII 185,211 
1754 Nathaniel 2 XI 253, 276. 338 
194 Odiah 4 VIII 184, 189 
388 Timothy 3 VIII 184, 192 
LYNGWOOD 

3104 Agnes Vm 185 
MACY 

671 Mary 2 IV 82, 101 
1329 Sarah 2 IV 83, 112 
1342 Thomas 1 IV 83, 114, 331 
2658 Thomas' IV 83, 120 
MANN 

649 Mary 2 IV 82 
1298 William 1 IV 83, 105 
MARVIN 
1769 Mary 2 XI 253, 279 
1775 Mary 2 XI 253, 280 
3494 Matthew 1 XI 253, 285. 325 
3538 Matthew 1 XI 253, 292 
3550 Matthew 1 XI 253. 292 
1747 Sarah 2 XI 253. 274 
MASCRAFT 

850 Daniel X 226. 240 
425 Elizabeth X 226. 234 
MERRILL 

434 Abel 3 XI 252. 260 
868 John 2 XI 252. 264 
1736 Nathaniel", Jr. XI 253,272 



3472 Nathaniel, Sr. XI 253, 283 
111 Thankful 4 XI 252. 257 
MERRIMAN 

357 Abigail 2 VI 150, 158 
714 Nathaniel 1 VI 150, 163 
MERRY 
1214 Cornelius II 29. 53 
607 Rachel II 28, 45 
MILLS 

693 MaryV 122 
1386 JohnV 123 
MITCHELL 

1303 Constant IV 83 
MOORE 
1755 Elizabeth 3 XI 253, 276 
3510 John 2 XI 253, 288 
847 Sarah X 226 
MORGAN 

303 Hannah n 28 
1764 James 1 XI 253, 277 
882 Joseph 2 XI 252. 267 
441 Martha 3 XI 252 
606 Thomas II 28. 45 
MORRILL 

661 MarylV 82 
1313 Mary IV 83 
MOUMFORD 
2571 Jane 1 IV 83. 318 
2795 Jane 1 V 123. 318 
NEWBERRY 

1749 Sarah 2 XI 253 
1757 Sarah 2 XI 253 
3498 Thomas 1 XI 253. 286. 325 
3514 Thomas 1 XI 253,289 
NEWTON 
1721 Hannah X 227 
3442 Roger X 227 
NICHOLS 
2308 Francis 1 II 29, 53 
1154 Isaac 2 H 29, 46 
577 Mary 3 II 28,39 
NORTH 

431 Rebecca X 226" 
NUTTING 

3225 Grace EX 217 
ODDING 

1305 Sarah IV 83 
OLDFIELD 

201 Deborah EX 216 
804 John EX 216, 224 
402 Richard EX 216, 224 
OTIS 

175 Deborah 5 V 722, 130 



Arabic number preceding the name is the ancestor number in this book. 
Roman numeral following the name is the chart number in this book. 



387 



Index of Ancestors 



350 Dr. Isaac 4 V 722. 132 

2800 John 1 V 123, 145 

1400 John 2 V 123, 142 

700 Capt. Stephen 3 V 122, 138 
PADDACK 

167 Dinah 4 IV 82 

334 Nathaniel 3 IV 82, 92 

1336 Robert 1 IV 83, 113 

668 Zachariah 2 IV 82, 100 
PAINE 

1751 Hannah 2 XI 253 

1759 Hannah 2 XI 253 

3502 William 1 , Jr. XI 253, 288 

3518 William 1 , Jr. XI 253, 289 
PALGRAVE 

1787 Sarah 2 XI 253, 321 

3574 Dr. Richard 1 XI 253. 293, 321 
PARISH 

182 Benjamin 2 VI 150. 156 

91 Jerusha 3 Vl 150. 155 

364 John 1 VI 150, 159 
PARKE 

883 Dorothy 3 XI 252 

3532 Robert 1 XI 253, 289, 321. 326 

1766 Thomas 2 XI 253.278.321 
PARKER 

22 Asa 7 1 1, 18 

22 Asa 7 VI 150. 153 

1 1 Delia M. 8 1 1. 9. 348 

1436 Edward 2 VI 151. 168 

704 Edward 2 VI 150, 160, 327 

176 Eliphakt 4 , Sr. VI 150, 155 

88 Eliphalct 5 , Jr. VI 750. 154 

359 Hannah 4 VI 750, 759 

352 John 3 VI 750, 757 

718 John 3 VI 750, 163 

44 Nathaniel 6 VI 750, 753 

1408 William 1 VI 757, 766 

2872 William 1 VI 757, 770 
PARTRIDGE 

1257 Elizabeth 2 III 67, 77 

1258 George 1 III 67, 77 
2514 Ralph 1 III 67,80 

629 Ruth 2 III 66 
PEAK 

1347 Christiana 1 V 723 

1349 Christiana 1 V 123 

1353 Christiana 1 V 723 

2694 Thomas V 723 

2698 Thomas V 723 

2706 Thomas V 723 
PECK 

717 Elizabeth VI 750 



1434 William 1 VI 757, 768, 327 
PERKINS 

110 Dr. Caleb 5 XI 252,256 
880 Jacob 2 XI 252, 266 
1760 John 1 XI 253, 276 
440 Joseph 3 XI 252, 262 
220 Dr. Joseph 4 , Jr. XI 252, 258 
55 Lucy 6 XI 252, 255 
PERRY 

713 Elizabeth VI 750, 763 
689 Hannah V 722 
PETTY 

73 Elizabeth 4 II 28,32 
584 John 1 U 28, 41 

292 John 2 D 28, 37, 341 

146 John 3 n 28,34 
PHELPS 

387 Esther 3 VIII 184 
1548 George 1 VIII 785, 205, 320, 325 

774 Capt. Joseph 2 VIII 184, 196 
1720 Joseph 2 X 227, 247, 320 

860 Joseph 3 X 226, 242 

430 Joseph 4 X 226, 235 

215 Rebecca 5 X 226, 232 
3440 William 1 X 227, 249, 320, 325 
PICKETT 

1250 John 1 m 67, 75 
1270 John 1 III 67, 79 

625 Sarah 2 III 66, 73 

635 Sarah 2 III 66, 75 
PIERCE 

419 MaryX 226 

838 Richard X 226, 237 
PITCHER 

2813 Nazareth V 723 
PLATT 
1418 Richard 1 VI 151,167,327 

709 Sarah 2 VI 750, 762 
PORTER 

1556 John 1 , Sr. VIII 785, 207, 325 
2368 John 1 II 29, 54 
2420 John 1 , Sr. II 29, 63 

778 John 2 , Jr. VIII 184, 198 

592 John 3 II 28, 42 

74 John 6 II 28, 33 
37 Mabel 7 II 28, 31 

605 Mehitable 3 II 28, 45 
296 Nehemiah 4 , Sr. II 28,37 
148 Rev. Nehemiah 5 , Jr. II 28, 35 
389 Rebecca 3 VIII 184 

1184 Samuel 2 II 29, 48 

1210 Samuel 2 II 29,52 

1693 Sarah 2 X 227 



388 



Index of Ancestors 



3386 Thomas 1 X 227, 248, 325 
POST 

805 Sarah IX 216 
PRITCHARD 

789 MaryVm 184 
1578 William Vm 785 
QUENELL 
3537 Ferris XI 253, 292 
3549 Ferris XI 253, 292 
RANDALL 
3098 Philip 1 VIII 185, 212, 325 
1549 PhilluryVin 185 
RICHARDSON 

837 MaryX 226 
RISING 

26 Aretas 6 I /, 20 
26 Aretas 6 X 226, 229 
13 Frances Catherine 7 1 1,9 
832 James 1 X 226, 236 
416 John 2 , Sr. X 226, 232 
208 John 3 , Jr. X 226, 230 
104 Nathaniel 4 , Sr. X 226, 229 
52 Nathaniel 5 , Jr. X 226. 229 
ROGERS 

40 Aaron 6 IV 82,85 
5 Emma J. 9 1 1.5.348,353 
87 Hannah 5 V 122. 127 
1280 John 1 IV 83. 102 
1392 John'V 123. 142 
640 John 2 IV 82. 92 
696 John 2 V 122. 137 
160 John' IV 82.87 
20 Joseph 7 1 1. 16, 348 
20 Joseph 7 IV 82, 85 
80 Stephen 5 IV 82, 85 
10 Stephen Carpenter 8 1 1, 8, 348 
320 Thomas 3 IV 82, 89 
348 Thomas 3 V 122, 132 
174 Thomas 4 V 122, 130 
ROYCE 

710 Jonathan 2 VI 150, 162 
355 Mary 3 VI 150, 158 
1420 Robert 1 VI 151, 167 
RUNYON 

205 Grace IX 216 
RUSCOE 
1729 Mercy 1 XI 253, 271 
3458 Roger XI 253 
RUSSELL 
2810 George 1 V 123, 147 
1300 John 1 IV 83, 105 
650 Joseph 2 IV 82, 95 
325 Mary 3 IV 82, 90 



1405 Mary^V 123 
SANFORD 
1723 Elizabeth X 227 
3446 Robert X 227, 250 
SAUNDERS 
3497 Elizabeth 1 XI 253, 286, 321 
3513 Elizabeth 1 XI 253. 289 
SCOTT 

777 Elizabeth 2 Vm 184 
1554 Thomas' Vm 185, 207, 325 
SEARS 

669 Deborah 2 IV 82 
1338 Richard 1 IV 83, 114 
SEYMOUR 

108 Ashbel 5 XI 252,255 
216 Bevil 4 XI 252, 257 
54 Bevil 6 XI 252, 255 
864 John 2 XI 252, 263 
27 Lucy Maria 7 1 1, 20 
27 Lucy Maria 7 XI 252,255 
1728 Richard 1 XI 253, 270, 325 
3456 Robert XI 253 
432 Thomas 3 XI 252, 259 
SHATTUCK 
2630 Samuel 1 IV 83, 119 
2662 Samuel 1 IV 83, 121 
1315 Sarah 2 IV 83 
1331 Sarah 2 IV 83 
SHELDON 
3072 Arthur Vm 785. 277 
3 EdithAllene 9 I 1,4 
48 Arastus 5 Vm 184, 187 
24 Horace 6 1 7, 19 
24 Horace 6 Vm 784, 787 
768 Isaac 1 Vm 184, 194, 338 
384 Capt. Jonathan 2 , Sr. Vm 184, 191, 340 
192 Jonathan 3 , Jr. Vm 184, 188 
96 Jonathan 4 , III VHI 184, 187 
12 Joseph Erastus 7 1 7, 9 
1536 Ralph Vm 785, 202 
6 Walter Seymour 8 1 7, 5 
SHEPARD 
1559 Benet'vm 185,208 
2423 Benet 1 II 29, 64 
3118 JohnVm 785 
SHEPHERD 

185 Sarah VH 772 
SHERMAN 

326 David 3 IV 82,90 
652 Edmund 2 IV 82, 96 
163 Hannah 4 IV 82. 88 
1304 Philip 1 IV 83, 106 



Arabic number preceding the name is the ancestor number in this book. 
Roman numeral following the name is the chart number in this book. 



389 



Index of Ancestors 



SKINNER 

1588 John 1 VIII 755, 210 

3428 John 1 X 227, 249 

794 Joseph 2 VIII 184, 201 

1714 Joseph 2 X 227, 246 

397 Mary 3 VIII 184, 193 

857 Mar^X 226,241 
SLOANE 

31 Eliza 1 1 1, 25, 343.344 
SMITH 

1350 Edward V 123 

1354 Edward V 123 

291 Esther II 28 

297 Hannah 3 II 28 

853 Hannah X 226, 240 

889 Hannah XI 252, 268 

594 Hazadiah 2 II 28. 42 

1778 Hugh XI 253 

1188 James 1 II 29, 48 

1202 Joseph II 29, 51 

601 Lydia II 28 

1205 Margaret 1 II 29, 52 

1731 Margaret 1 XI 253, 272 

1739 Margaret 1 XI 253, 272 

159 Rachel ffl 66 

675 Sarah V 122 

677 Sarah V 122 
SOULE 

2391 Sarah 1 II 29 
SOUTHWELL 

385 Mary VIII 184, 191 

770 William VIII 184. 195 
SPENCER 

1253 Elizabeth 2 HI 67, 76 

1452 Gerard, Sr. VI 151, 168 

3148 Gerard, Sr. VIII 185. 214 

3392 Gerard, Sr. X 227. 249 

726 Gerard", Jr. VI 150. 164 

53 Lydia 6 X 226. 229 

2904 Michael VI 151. 170 

424 Samuel 3 X 226, 234 

363 Sarah 2 VI 150 

787 Sarah 2 VIII 184 

1574 Thomas' VIII 185,209.325,334 

1696 Thomas' X 227, 245 

848 Thomas 2 , Jr. X 226, 239 

212 Thomas 4 X 226. 231 

106 Thomas 5 X 226, 230 

2506 William' III 67, 79, 325 
SPINNING 

1422 Humphrey 1 VI 151, 167, 327 

711 Mary 2 VI 150 



STANLEY 
1211 Hannah 2 n 29 
779 Mary 2 VIII 184 
1558 Thomas' Vffl 755, 208 
2422 Thomas' II 29, 63, 325 
STEBBINS 
1542 John 2 VIII 755, 204 
3084 Rowland 1 VH1 755, 212, 326 
111 Sarah 3 VIH 184 
STEVENS 
1317 Diorus'lV 55, 709 
2634 Robert IV 55, 120 
STILL 

2307 Agnes n 29 
STODDARD 
1788 Anthony 1 XI 253, 281 
447 Sarah 3 XI 252,263 
894 Rev. Solomon 2 XI 252, 269 
STONE 

1537 Barbara Vffl 755 
STRONG 
1261 Eleanor' ffl 67, 78 
2522 Richard III 67 
SWAYNE 

2395 Rebecca 1 II 29, 61 
TARBELL 

369 Abigail 2 VH 772 
738 Thomas 1 VU 172, 180 
TAYLOR 

586 James 1 II 28, 41, 326 
1174 Jonathan II 29, 47 

587 Mary II 28, 42 
293 Mary 2 II 28, 37 

THACHER 

157 Anna 4 III 66, 71 
2512 Rev. Peter III 67,50 
628 Rev. Ralph 2 III 66. 73 
1256 Rev. Thomas' III 67. 76 
314 Thomas 3 ffl 66. 72 
THEMBER 

2633 Joanna 1 IV 55, 120 
THOMPSON 

1767 Dorothy 1 XI 253, 278 
3534 John XI 253, 290 
THRALL 

1551 Phillipa 2 VIH 755 
3102 William 1 Vffl 185,213,325 
THURSTON 

403 Jane 3 IX 216 
1612 John 1 IX 277, 225 
806 Joseph 2 IX 276, 224 
3224 Thomas IX 277, 225 



390 



Index of Ancestors 



TILLEY 

2387 Elizabeth 2 U 29,59,318 

4774 John 1 II 59, 315, 318 
TISDALE 

1262 John 1 ID 67, 78, 337 
631 Sarah 2 HI 66 

2524 Thomas m 67 
TOMES 

3489 Alice 1 XI 253 
TOWLE 

2815 Margaret (?)V 123 
TOWSLEY 

395 AnnVm 184 
790 Michael Vm 184, 200 
TRACY 

366 Jonathan 2 VI 150, 160 
183 Mary 3 VI 150 
1259 Sarah 2 m 67, 318 
2518 Stephen 1 HI 67, 80, 317, 318 
732 Lt. Thomas 1 VI 150, 165, 326 
TRUMBULL 

197 Anne 4 VHI 184 
1576 John 1 VTO 185, 210 
1704 Johii'X 227,245 
1176 John 1 XI 253, 280 
426 Rev. John 3 , Sr. X 226, 234 
444 Rev. John 3 , Sr. XI 252, 262 
222 Rev. John 4 , Jr. XI 252, 259 
852 Joseph 2 X 226, 240 
888 Joseph 2 XI 252, 268 
394 Joseph 3 Vffl 184, 192 
788 Judah 2 Vffl 184, 200 
213 Mary 4 X 226 
111 Sarah 5 XI 252, 257 
TURNER 
1159 Abigail n 29 
2639 JanelV 83 
2683 JanelV 83 
2318 Nathaniel 1 n 29, 54 
TUTTLE 

633 Ann in 66 
WALKER 

1263 Sarah 1 ni 67, 79 
WALLER 

3457 Elizabeth XI 253 

3119 Rebecca Vm 185 
WARHAM 

895 Esther 2 XI 252, 270, 341 

1790 Rev. John 1 XI 253, 282. 320, 323, 325 

3580 Richard XI 253, 294 
WASHBOURNE 

1155 Margery H 29 



WASS 

17 Mary 1 1 /, 13 
WATERS 

866 Bevil XI 252, 264 
758 Lawrence 1 Vn 172, 181 
433 Mary XI 252, 260 
379 Mary 2 VII 172, 179 
WATSON 

301 Ann 3 n 28 
1281 Frances IV 83, 102 
1393 Frances V 123. 142 
1204 John 1 , Sr. U 29, 51 
1730 John 1 , Sr. XI 253, 272 
1738 John 1 , Sr. XI 253, 272 
602 John 2 , Jr. U 253, 272 
865 Mary 2 XI 252 
869 Sarah 2 XI 252 
WELLES 

109 Abigail 6 XI 252, 256 
1744 John 2 XI 253, 273 
872 Capt. Robert 3 , Sr. XI 252, 265 
436 Capt. Robert 4 , Jr. XI 252, 260 
218 Capt. Robert 5 , III XI 252, 257 
3488 Gov. Thomas' XI 253, 283, 325, 326 
WELLMAN 

313 Mercy 3 ni 66, 71 
1252 William 1 , Sr. IH 67, 75 
626 William 2 , Jr. m 66, 73 
WELSH 

2305 Agnes n 29 
WHEATON 

85 Jemima V 122 
170 John V 122, 128 
WHIPPLE 

881 Elizabeth 2 XI 252 
1762 Matthew 1 XI 253 
WHJTBRED 
1453 Alice VI 151 
3149 Alice VTO 185 
3393 Alice X 227 
WHITE 
1689 Elizabeth X 227 
1553 Mary'vm 185, 207 
1773 Mary XI 253 
3179 Mary 1 Vm 185,214 
3509 Mary 1 XI 253, 288 
3106 Robert Vffl 755 
3114 Robert Vm 185 
1557 Rose 1 Vffl 185 
2421 Rose 1 n 29 
WHITING 
3085 Sarah 1 VIH 185 



Arabic number preceding the name is the ancestor number in this book. 
Roman numeral following the name is the chart number in this book. 



391 



Index of Ancestors 



WHITMAN 
1784 John 1 XI 253, 280 
446 Rev. Samuel 3 XI 252,263 
223 Sarah 4 XI 252, 259 
892 Rev. Zcchariah 2 XI 252, 269 
WHITNEY 

184 Cornelius 3 VII 172, 176 
46 Cornelius- VII 172, 175 
736 John 1 VII 172, 180 
368 Joshua 2 VII 172, 178 
92 Joshua" VII 172. 175 
23 Laura 6 1 /, 19 
23 Laura 6 VII 172, 175 
1472 Thomas VII 173 
WILDER 

2805 Elizabeth V 123 
WILERTON 

1737 Susanna XI 253 
WINCHELL 

854 David 2 X 226, 241 
890 David 2 XI 252, 268 
421 Elizabeth 3 X 226, 234 
445 Elizabeth 3 XI 252. 263 
423 Mabel" X 226 
1692 Nathaniel 2 X 227, 244 
1708 Robert 1 X 227, 246, 325 
1780 Robert 1 XI 253, 280 
3384 Robert 1 X 227, 248 
846 Thomas 3 X 226, 239 
WING 

322 Ebcnezer 2 IV 82, 89 
1288 Rev. John IV 83. 104 
2576 Matthew IV 83. 116 
161 Sarah 3 IV 82 
644 Stephen 1 IV 82. 93, 338 
WINTHROP 

3579 Lucy 1 XI 253. 294 
WOLCOTT 

439 Hannah" XI 252 
3496 Henry 1 , Sr. XI 253. 285. 321, 325 
3512 Henry 1 , Sr. XI 253. 289 
1748 Henry 2 , Jr. XI 253, 274, 321 
1756 Henry 2 , Jr. XI 253,276 
874 Samuel 3 XI 252, 265 
878 Samuel 3 XI 252, 266 
437 Sarah" XI 252 
WOOD 
1419 Mary VI 151 
2665 Mary IV 83 
WOODALL 
3090 Edward 1 VIII 185 
1545 Frances 2 VIII 185, 205 



WOODBURY 

1187 LydiaD 29 
WOODS 

705 Elizabeth VI 150, 161 
1437 Elizabeth VI 151, 168 
WOODWARD 

2417 Mary 1 U 29, 62 
WORTH 

166 Christopher" IV 82, 88 
664 John 2 IV 82, 99 
2656 John IV 83 
332 Jonathan 3 IV 82, 91 

83 Judith 5 IV 82,87 
1328 William 1 IV 83, 112, 332 
WRIGHT 
1753 Anna XI 253, 276 
1175 Mary II 29 



392