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Full text of "Cranberries; : the national cranberry magazine"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



LIBRARY 



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LIBRARY 



U '^IVEk^ TV OF 

ivr-_:£f___?Tis 
amhekst, mass. 



PI ANT & soil SCIENCES Li^afiRT 




VlASSACHUS 



CAPE COD 
NEW JERSEY 
WISCONSIN 
OREGON 
WASHINGTON 



K • 



f ■' 




HARVESTING CRANBERRY CROP by new water-picking method 

in New Jersey. USDA — Soil Conservation Service Photo 



te 



40 Cents 
COOtD 'SSm *ISH13HWV 



MAY, 1966 



\ 



DIRECTORY For CRANBERRY GROWERS 



The 

CHARLES W.KARRISi 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



OVER 

43 YEARS 

OF SERVICE 



TIRES 



NO TAXES 
SATISFACTION 
GUARANTEED 



Flotation Tires For 
Soft Wet Sondy Soil 

Airplane and other flotation tires 

many different sizes - 15", 16", 

20", etc. 

1050 X 16 
NEW Smooth Tread 

Extremely Flexible - 

Rec. Air Pressure 8 lbs. 

Sponge Rubber will not $Qy.50 
hurt cranberries. 31" hi. ^' 
12" wide-Tire & Tube 
Write or Call for sizes not listed 
Send check or money order for 
25%-balance c.o.d. freight collect 
Tel. (617) 889-2035—889-2078 

Gans Surplus Tire Co. 

1000 - Dept. C - Broadway, 
Chelsea, Massachusetts 



Electricity - key to progress 



In industry as well as the home, 
electricify has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 



NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 




The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILIilAMSTOWN 
IRRIGATION 



INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc \ 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogs and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WAREHAM. MASS Tel. CY 5-2000 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Spring Tips 

For Cranberry Growers 

Issued hy Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station 

1. The early spring pests are, 
:r soon will be, showing up on 
jogs. These include cutworms, 
panworms, leafhoppers, fire- 
worms, Sparganothis fruitworm 
and weevils. The Sparganothis 
fruitworm can be detected by 
careful examination of loosestrife 
or the new cranberry tips for 
webbing. Weevils overwinter as 
adults and are active whenever 
temperatures reach 70 degrees or 
above. If these pests are con- 
trolled in May or June, particu- 
larly those that have a new or 
second brood, they very seldom 
create a problem later in the 
season. 

2. This is a good time to treat 
brush, poison ivy and brambles 
on the uplands using one of the 
brush killers, silvex or 2,4-5-T. 
These should be mixed with water 






READ 
YOUR MAGAZINE 






DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 



Carver, Mass. 



Tel. 866-4582 



rather than oil at this time of 
year because of the damage to 
turf. 

3. Stoddard solvent or stoddard- 
kerosene treatments following 
late water should be completed 
within 5 days after the flood has 
been withdrawn or within 8 days 
if kerosene is used alone. Less 
damage will occur to the vines 
if temperatures are below 65 
degrees when these oils are ap- 
plied. 

4. Casoron, alanap-3, Chloro- 
IPC and simazine should not be 
applied after withdrawal of the 
late water flood as vine and crop 
injury will result. 

5. Many bogs will benefit from 
an application of fertilizer, es- 
pecially where heavy crops are 
harvested. Some bogs that have 
had casoron treatments either 
last fall or this spring may look 
"hungry" and should be fertilized. 
Don't forget to touch up the 
thin or weak spots by going 
around with a bucket of fertilizer 
and using it. 

6. Get out and walk your hogs, 
you will be surprised at the num- 
ber of little things, both good and 
bad, that you will notice on your 
inspection trips. 



BROKER 

REAL ESTATE 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

• 

37 Years Selling 

Cranberry Properties 

• 

LISTINGS WANTED 



500 .Second-Hanil Picking 
Boxes for Sale 



THEO THOMAS 

MAIN STREET 

NORTH CARVER, MASS. 
Tel. UNion 6-3351 



.^#«S#>r^V#N#^«^4 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



Announcing our NEW LOCATION on 
LOUT POND, BILLINGTON STREET, PLYMOUTH 

AERIAL SPRAYING 

and 

FERTILIZING 

Helicopters and Airplanes 

Fast, Reliable Service 

AS ALWAYS 

n YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 
ON NEW ENGLAND BOGS 

PLYMOUTH COPTERS, Inc. 

(Formerly Aerial Sprayers, Inc.) 

THOMAS S. WEITBRECHT (Whitey) 

Phone 746-6030 



^ 



SHARON BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carrer UN 6-2234 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now Unloading . 1 Carload Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood will be at our East 
Freetown yard on and after April 1st. Complete milling 
facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

End of Cambridge Street (Off Route 44) Middleboro, Mass. 



GELSTHORPE SPEAKS 
TO CAPE COD FARM 

BUREAU AT SANDWICH 

The Spring Meeting of the 
Cape Cod Farm Bureau, held at 
South Sandwich, Mass. on April 
20, heard an address by Edward 
Gelsthorp, executive vice-presi- 
dent and general manager of 
Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. 
The meeting was preceded by a 
family-style covered dish supper. 



IMPORTANT 
NOTICE 

Effective Immediately 

CRANBERRIES 
MAGAZINE 

has a new mailing ad- 
dress to be used for all 
correspondence and re- 
mittances as follows: 

Cranberries Magazine 

Box 70 

Kingston, Mass. 

02360 

Deadline for copy will be the lOth 

Publication date will be the 15th 

of each month. 



Attention Growers ! ! 

for 

your Spring: 
weed control 

we offer 
water white 

KEROSENE 

"GRADE A" 

metered trucks 

STODDARD SOLVENT 

SUPERIOR 
FUEL COMPANY 

Wareham, Mass. 
Tel. 295-0093 



TWO 



Mass. Crapberry 
Station and Field Notes 

by IRVING E. DEAAORANVILLE 
Extension Cranberry Specialist 



We have had some very inter- 
esting people stop by and visit 
with us at the Station the past 
several weeks. Two of our friends 
from British Columbia, Norman 
Holmes and Donald May, spent 
some time with us. They report 
that the cranberry business is go- 
ing very well out there and that 
much new acreage is being 
planted. They expect the bearing 
acreage to double in the next 
three or four years. 

Another visitor from Canada, 
Orville Johnson of Ontario also 
paid us a visit. Mr. Johnson has 
several acres of bearing bog and 
is planning to build another four- 
teen acres in the near future. 

We had a very interesting and 
informative visit with two visitors 
from Africa the week of April 
25-29. The two men, Edward 



Manu-Boafo and Emmanuel 
Asante are from the country of 
Ghana. This country was formerly 
known as the Gold Coast and 
was under British rule for over 
100 years, it became independent 
in 1957. Both of these men are 
Senior Technical Officers with the 
Cocoa Research Institute in 
Ghana. They are in the United 
States for a period of three 
months under the sponsorship of 
the Agency for International De- 
velopment. The purpose of their 

visit was to observe the Agricul- 
tural Extnsion Education program 
in action so that they could 
return to Ghana and better com- 
municate ideas to the farmers. 
We gave them the grand tour 
of the industry and introduced 
them to cranberries. 



C.&L. EQUIPMENT CO 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Macliinery Sales 

PRUNERS POWER WHEELBARROWS 

RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Gall . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



The month of April averaged 
two degrees a day below normal 
in temperature. By the end of 
the month Early Blacks were 
starting to "green up" and we 
estimate that bogs are about 10 
days behind normal development. 
Temperatures were consistently 
cool throughout the month with 
the period of the 27th to the 
30th extremely cool and raw 
during the day. Rainfall totalled 
only 1.51 inches or about Vs of 
our average at the Cranberry Sta- 
tion. Nearly 75 percent of the 
months' total occurred during 
the last 9 days of the month. 

We are pleased to ref)ort an 
increase in the number of sub- 
scribrs to the frost warning ser- 
vice which is sponsored by the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers As- 
sociation. We have 214 subscrib- 
ers to date compared to 205 a 
year ago. The donations to the 
telephone answering service are 
also up over last year, which is 
very good. There are two answer- 
ing devices at the Station, both 
are hooked up on the same line 
so that when one is in use the 
other will take over and give the 
message. This save time and in 
some cases several re-dailings. 
Up until May 3rd 2 frost warn- 
ing had been issued. 




CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 

SUCTION EQUIPMENT 

ABC • UTILITY 
WRITE: 



W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-1 
451 1 E. Osborne Ave. • Tampa, Florida 

Phone: 626-1154 
1001 Dempsey Rd. • Milpitas, California 

Phone: 262-1000 



THREE 



SS=iS=S=iS=iS=^S:iS=^=SS=!i=^=iS=S&:ii::S=i& 




USED . CARS 



Repairs on all makes 

Specializing in 

Chrysler-built cars 

Chrysler - Plymouth 
Valianf and Simca 

SALES and SERVICE 



Robt. W. Savary, Inc. 

East Wareham, Mass. 
Telephone 295-3530 

READ CRANBERRIES 



'Good Faith' Purchase 
By Cranberry Growers 

Purchase of a three-acre tract 
of land adjacent to the Massa- 
chusetts Experimental Station in 
East Wareham has been an- 
nounced by the Cape Cod Cran- 
berry Growers Association, as a 
"good faith" gesture to benefit the 
industry. 

The land will eventually be 
turned over to the University of 
Massachusetts for anticipated ex- 
pansion of the Experimental 
Station complex. Growers have 
benefited from experimental work 
done at the site since 1910. 

A proposal has been introduced 
for the state to spend $100,000 to 
match available Federal funds 
for enlargement of the Experi- 
mental Station's facilities. On 
March 15, approximately 200 
growers from all areas were rep- 
resented at the State House, Bos- 
ton, for the hearing of Bill S57 
which has been filed by the Mas- 
sachusetts Farm Bureau for a con- 
stitutional amendment permitting 
the assessed value of land used 
for agriculture, to be based on 
the land's use and not its po- 
tential use. 



,C=^^=^=^=^s=^^?=^s=i»«tiw&=a=i&=c^^ 



BULLDOZERS 
CRANES 



LOADERS 
TRUCKS 



EQUIPPED TO HANDLE 
YOUR BOG NEEDS 



LOUIS LECONTE 



P & L CO. 



CARVER, MASS. 



866-4402 



1965 Best 
Season For 
Cape Cod Co-Op 



Cape Cod Cranberry Cooper- 
ative, Inc. had a sizeable gain in 
1965 crop pool earnings, making 
it the best season since the Coop- 
erative started marketing cran- 
berries in 1950. 

Members were told at the an- 
nual meeting the 1965 crop pool 
earned $16.66 per barrel up 25% 
from the previous season's pool; 
that a highly favorable market 
for all the cranberries the Co-op 
can get is well assured for '66 
and this can be expected to build 
up in the future. 

Elected directors and officers 
for the ensuing year are: R. Bruce 
Arthur of Plymouth, President; 
Harold A. C. Bumpus of Plym- 
outh, Vice-president; Orrin G. 
Colley, of Duxbury, Treasurer and 
Clerk; Charles E. Pratt, Robert 
D. Williams, and Waino E. Wainio 
all of Carver, Directors. 



June 25 is Date of 
Washington Cranberry 
Field Day 

The date of the annual Field 
Day of Coastal Washington Re- 
search and Extension Unit this 
year is set for Saturday, June 25th 
at the Station at Long Beach. The 
session opens at 10 A.M. Speakers 
will discuss a number of topics 
related to cranberry growing. 
There will be a smoke-baked sal- 
mon lunch, provided by the 4-H. 
Growers are asked to attend and 
bring their friends. 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass., 02781 
Tel. 617 824-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
Land Bank Mortgages 

OfRce — 362, Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 



I 



Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



'»^s»~»v#v»v»v»^»<»s»v#^»^^v»^^s< 



FOUR 



Issue of May 1966 -Volume 31, No. 1 

Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 
Application for re-entry at Plymouth, Mass. P.O. pending. 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 



Compiled by C. J. H 



MASSACHUSETTS 

April, although the first full 
month of spring, began on a cool 
note, with cloudy days and fre- 
quent light showers. 

Although it seemed chilly, the 
first six days of April were pre- 
fectly normal for that period of 
the year. But the period was woe- 
fully lacking in precipitation. 
What showers there were scarcely 
dampened the ground, with so 
much more precipitation badly 
needed. 

On the 8th there were April 
showers, sufficient to wet the 
ground, but still not enough to 
relieve the continuing drought or 
to fill ponds or reservoirs for 
spring frost control. 

Easter Sunday, April 9th was 
no day for the new Easter finery 
in the cranberry region. The day 
was cloudy and raw with a 
shower in the evening. 

Although spring seemed to be 
late this year, that was no hin- 
derance to spring bog work. A 
great deal of work was going 
on, including building of new 
acreage and bog rebuilding, 
mostly on a relatively small 
scale, however. 

By the 15th the deficiency in 
temperatures had reached a total 
of 21 degrees for the month. But 
of greater importance was the 
lack of precipitation. One thing, 
the raw, cloudy nights had meant 
that frost has been kept down 
or away. 

That the drought had not been 
broken in spite of slight gains 
in precipitation above normal for 
January and February, was be- 
coming evident. A few towns 



were issuing summer water con- 
servation so early in the year, 
so tight was the situation be- 
coming again. 

The latter part of the month 
started with more springlike days 
and more sun, but the dryness 
continued. By the 19th, the Mass. 
hohday of "Patriots' Day," the 
deficiency of rainfall in 1966 was 
about three inches. The burning 
index in the woods was dan- 
gerously high and on that day 
there were nearly 300 woods fires 
in the Bay State. 

On the night of 21st there oc- 
curred a fairly heavy shower 
that recorded .22 of an inch at 
Mass. Cranberry Station, enough 
to help slightly, but not really 
make much impression on the 
drought. 



The first real rain of the month 
took place on the 24th, this being 
an all-day storm of intermittent 
but soaking rain. It totalled 
rather generally about half an 
inch. 

There was rain again on the 
28th but much less than that of 
the 24th. It was a cold rain and 
there was some sleet mixed in. 

On the last day of April there 
was again rain. 

The total jor April was only 
1.53 inches as recorded at the 
Cranberry station, while the av- 
erage for April is 3.85. There 
was every sign of the Great 
Drought going into its fifth year. 
It could be a bad year for frosts 
in the state this spring season. 
Reservoirs and ponds had by 



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AGENT FOR 
WIGGINS AIRWAYS 



BOG 

SERVICE 



AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICALS 

HAND SPRAYERS - TOOLS - POWER EQUIPMENT 
AUTHORIZED BRIGGS AND STRATTON SERVICE CENTER 

R. F. MORSE fir SON, Inc. 

Cranberry Highway West Wareham, Mass. CY 5-1553 



FIVE 



Hubbard 




INSECTICIDES 



FUNGICIDES 



HERBICIDES 



AVAILABLE ON THE CAPE FROM 

R. C. Mossman 
Horticultural Sales 

West Bridgewater, Mass. 




Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. 

Northeast Regrion 
WATERBURY, CONN. 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

for frosf control 
and irrigation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manville Plastic 
Pipe and Fittings 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 



no means recovered during the 
winter from the extremes of last 
season. Growers were alarmed 
because of probable May and 
June frosts and a great number 
who could have dug extra water 
holes, even up to half an acre 
in extent. 

April had proven to be a cooler 
as well as drier month, the 30 
days ending with a minus 54, 
or almost one degree a day be- 
low the norm. This had held 
back the vine development and 
vines were still rather cold re- 
sistant into the first of May. For 
that reason no frost warning 
had been issued at all during 
April. 

This cold, however, would have 
a good effect and coupled with 
the dryness, tends to improve the 
keeping quality. 

As of the first week of May 
bogs were late in development 
by about ten days. 



OREGON 

Most of the month of April 
was above freezing. There were 
only three nights with tempera- 
tures below 32 degrees (April 28 
with 28 — April 19 with 27 and 
April 20 with 28). All of these 
would have caused injury to the 
new crop if it had not been for 
the use of sprinklers. 

Seven growers in the area are 
installing sprinklers this spring. 
These are of the automatic type. 
The growers are finding that in- 
termittent sprinkling is adequate 
for frost protection; that is, 15 
minutes on and 15 minutes off. 
This, obviously, is a means of 
conserving water supply. 

By the end of April, the buds 
were well advanced, bud set was 
good. Growers were looking for 
a good production year. 

Roy Peters of Bandon, has pur- 
chased the Ed Gunswalt property. 
This is a bog of about seven 
acres. He plans to triple the 
acreage with the next two years. 
— Ray Bates, Bandon 



MORE Weather News on Page 26 



SIX 



NEW JERSEY GROWERS REARRANGING 
BOGS FOR WATER PICKING 

by FREDERICK A. MAHN and WILLIAM H. O'DONNELL 
Soil Conservation Service, Mount Holly, New Jersey 

New Jersey cranberry growers are changing to the new water method 
of harvesting their crop. To make the change from the customary method, 
however, they have had to divide their bogs into small units. For this 
changeover, they are receiving technical help from the USDA Soil Con- 
servation Service through their local soil conservation districts. At 
present, a bog size of 4 to 5 acres seems best for the type of water 
picker used in New Jersey. With this size, a crew of 3 or 4 men can 
pick, float and remove the cranberries in one day. 



The SCS is helping New Jersey 
cranberry bog owners reorganize 
their water management at an in- 
creasing rate. SCS technicians 
discuss ideas with the more active 
growers to keep abreast of man- 



agement practices so that dike 
construction and bog layout can 
be compatable with the new 
water-picking method and other 
mechanization taking place in 
cranberry production. 



In most dike construction, a 
coro trench is dug to expose min- 
eral soil. In this way, the dike 
has a firm foundation and there 
is less chance of water seeping 
under it. Sand is trucked in and 
smoothed out by dozer to make 
the dike. 

Usually before the sand is 
trucked in, a 2-inch layer of vine 
growth is removed from the area 
that will be covered by the new 
dike. This material is laid aside. 
After the dike has been built, it 
is placed on the sides of the dike. 
In New Jersey this procedure is 
called "turfing." The turf keeps 
the sides of the dikes from wash- 
ing back into the bog. 

Dikes are normally designed to 
be 1 foot higher than winter flood 





Setting aside turf as first step in building a new dii<e. 

USDA — Soil Conservation Service Photo 



SEVEN 




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a. 
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9 § 



3 O 



2^ 

c = 

o 

u 

c 

3 
O 



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w 

JO 

a 

c 

c 

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(A 



3 



EIGHT 



elevation. They are usually de- 
signed to be 12 feet wide at the 
top. Their side slopes are designed 
to be IV2 (horizontal) to 1 (ver- 
tical). SCS men put up grade and 
width stakes so that the growers 
know when the dikes are properly 
built. 

There appears to be a little 
more sand movement and slough- 
ing of slopes of new dikes where 
the turf is placed so it overlaps 
"shingle fashion." This slough- 
ing is lessened if the turf is 
placed flat against the sides of the 
dike. 

Some dikes are built with a 
dragline. As the machine digs the 
core trench and adjacent ditches, 
it can place the surface material 
along the edge of the dike and 
thus turf by machine. The mate- 
rial for dragline-built dikes usu- 
ally comes from borrow ditches, 
which are built parrallel to the 
dike. This type of construction is 
best where one side of the dike 
will not be used as a bog. 

Turfiing around structures is 
usually lain "brick fashion" with 
and offset of 1/4 to 1/2 -inch for 
each layer as the wall is built up. 
In this way the wall of turf leans 
into the dike to lessen the danger 
of collapse. 

When new dikes are built, ad- 
ditional water-control structures 
are needed. The water control 
structures, or trunks as they are 
called are usually built of timber. 
Three construction methods are 
used: 

1. Built in place. 

2. Built next to the site, then 
Ufted into place. 

3. Built next to the site, then 
dragged into place. 

The second method appears 
easiest if a crane is available. If 
a trunk is dragged into place, the 
structure may be damaged and 
there is a chance of pulling sand 
into the trench. When this hap- 
pens, the trunk may not be low 
enough or it might be cocked and 
not level. 

The first method seems to be 
best when a crane is not avail- 
able. Only a few inches of water 
should be allowed to remain in 
the trench in which the trunk will 
be built. The water that remains 




SCS technician checks height of new dike. 

USDA — Soil Conservation Service Photo 



can be used to aid in leveling the 
bottom of the trench. At times, 
growers build the bottom of the 
trunk, lift it into place and then 
complete the trunk. 

Several years ago, SCS techni- 
cians made a trial planting of 
weeping lovegrass with a jute 
mesh protection on a dike that 
has been turfed. The grass-mesh 
cover resisted sloughing caused 
by wave action. This method 
might prove a worthwhile dike 
stabilization practice until native 
plants can get established on 
newly built but unturfed dikes. 
Weeping lovegrass cannot grow 
in drainage conditions found in 
cranberry bogs. 



A great number of growers are 
leveling their bogs before replant- 
ing them. This has been done by 
bulldozer or earthmover, depend- 
ing on how much earth has to be 
moved. SCS tchnicians use a 
fairly simple method for deter- 
mining the desired elevation of 
the bog to be leveled — an eleva- 
tion at which quantity of earth 
to be filled equals the quantity to 
be removed from high areas. 

Many of the bogs at the new 
cranberry-blueberry experimental 
tract at Lake Oswego, New Jersey 
were leveled to "pooltable" per- 
fection with a land leveler after 
a bulldozer had completed the 
rough grading. All cranberry 



NINE 



(isso) 



Kerosene 

Solvent 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 



Alnad^Tt^^ 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 




Earthmover levels land in revamped bog. 

USDA — Soil Conservation Service Photo 



growers should seriously consider 
using land levelers for 

1. Easier ground water level 
control in their bogs. 

2. More even growing and ma- 
turing berries. 

3. Ease of operating the water 
picking machines. 

Many of the new dikes are 
presently being built parrallel to 
each other. They are being placed 
200 feet apart or at multiples of 
200 feet (400 or 600 feet) so that 
additional parrallel dikes can be 
built at a future date. The indus- 
try is becoming mechanized and 
growers seem to be anticipating 
more mechanization in the future. 
Many of them feel that parallel 
diking would best fit into any 
future development in the 
industry. 

Dams for water storage reser- 
voirs are more complicated than 
the relatively low dikes that sep- 
arate bogs. Soil Conservation Ser- 
vice technicians design the dams 
so that the runoff water from a 
25-year frequency storm will 
safely pass through a pipe spill- 
way and an emergency spillway. 
The normal cranberry trunk has 
been altered so that it can be 
used as the pipe spillway. Pres- 
sure-treated creosoted wood is 
usually used. The emergency 
spillway is a specially designed 
channel around the end of the 
dam. This channel is designed to 
carry from 90 to 95% of the 
storm flow. In this way the pipe 
spillway can be made relatively 
smaller. SCS also specifies side 
slopes and height of the dam. A 
core trench is required under the 
dam to reduce settlement and 
water loss from seepage. 

It is best to seed dams with an 
adapted plant cover to prevent 
erosion. Kentucky 31 fescue, 
weeping lovegrass and sericea les- 
pedeza have been specified for 
cranberry reservoir dams. 



For Sale 

3 WESTERN PICKERS 
Gerald Brockman 
Rt. 1 , Vesper Wis. 

Phone 715-423-0368 



TEN 



Recommended for insect control on 

CRANBERRY CROPS 




Controls: 



Cutworms 
Fireworms 
Fruitworm 




MfLLER 




SEVIN 
'5 AQUA 



Japanese beetle 
Leafhoppers 



Inexpensive, effective control. 



AVAIIASIE AT YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED DEALER 



AGRICULTURAL 



CHEMICALS 



E-Z-FLO CHEMICAL COMPANY 

ROUTE #1 HANSEN ROAD, MADISON, WISCONSIN 



CI A C 



YOUR FARM CHEMICAL INFORMATION CENTER 



acse=a=i!r3£35=£:a=i!rse:iJ:=iMJrS5::St=C^^ 



GET 15% MORE CROP . . . EASIER 



IF YOU HAVE SPRINKLERS, YOUR CROSS- 
DITCHES ARE LITTLE MORE THAN A 
NUISANCE . . . 

PUT UNDERDRAINS IN THEM, FILL THEM UP, 
AND SET THEM WITH THE DITCHBANK 
VINES . . . 

NO ADDED SPRINKLING, SPRAYING OR 
DUSTING. NO UNPICKED BANKS. NO 
DITCH WEEDS ... NO NUISANCE. 

P.S. If you fill in with Caterpillars or rubber-tired equip- 
ment, you will damage more bog than you add. Do it 
with a railroad — you wouldn't know it had been there. 

For a railroad see Russell Trufant, 15 Frank Street, Middleboro 



BARK RIVER 
CULVERT and EQUIPMENT Co. 

ESCANABA, MICH.— EAU CLAIRE, WIS. — MADISON, YtlS. 
IRONWOOD, MICH. — GREEN BAY, WIS. — MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS & POWER UNITS 
CORRUGATED METAL CULVERT PIPE 

DROP INLETS AND GATES 

Galvanized — Bituminous Coated — Aluminum 



STODDARD SOLVENT 

(Available Year Round) 

WATER WHITE KEROSENE 
GASOLINE 



i 

) MOTOR OILS 

f 

j DIESEL FUELS 

j FUEL OIL 

866-4545 




Central 
Heating 

CARVER, MASS. 



'Cranberry Mardi Gras' 
Oregon Cranberry 
Festival Theme 

"Cranberry Mardi Gras" is the 
theme selected for the 1966 an- 
nual Cranberry Harvest at Ban- 
don, Oregon September 23, 24 and 
25. The winner of the "Name the 
Theme" contest was 12 year-old 
Paula Colgrove. 

The five princesses for the 
Queen contest have been selected 
and they include one entry spon- 
sored by the Southwestern Oregon 
Cranberry Club, Miss Karen 
Senter. 



BLACKHEADED FIREWORM 
APPEARS IN S.W. OREGON 

Cranberry growers of South- 
western Oregon were warned at 
the end of April of the appear- 
ance of Blackheaded fireworm on 
the bogs by Coos County Agent 
Fred Hagelstein. He said the tiny 
insect is hard to find as it works 
in the growing tips or unopened 
buds, and later webs leaves and 
buds together. Crop losses could 
be serious, he said, and recom- 
mended proper controls be ap- 
plied promptly. 



Warm temperatures immedi- 
ately after pollination are favor- 
able to good set and good size of 
blueberries, report Knight and 
Scott of the USDA, with Coville 
variety especially affected ad- 
versly by cool temperatures and 
improved by provisions for cross- 
pollination. 



The rest period of cranberries 
can be broken by temperatures 
below 45° F. for 2500 hours, re- 
port Chandler and Demoranville 
of Massachusetts, in a region 
where 3300 to 3500 hours com- 
monly prevail — and with the 
additional observation that the 
non-fruiting "umbrella bloom" 
commonly thought of as frost in- 
jury may be associated with in- 
adequate chilling. 



TWELVE 



r 



Select the pumps 
that serve your 
irrigation 
purposes best 



,!!SSSJSa»' 



COMPARE HALE AND 



^Sfe>5>^.; 






YOU'LL BUY 



40R Series. Tractor power take- 
off 4" pump for irrigation and 
general utility. There's a model 
to match PTO power with capac- 
ities of up to 800 GPM. Also 
available: 30R Series, 3" power 
take-off pumps usable in the 10 
to 40 horsepower range. All avail- 
able for 550 or 1000 RPM input. 



^ 




25FA portable pumping unit 
gives you "across-the-board" 
volumes and pressures. Pumps 
50 GPM at 95 PSI to 225 GPM 
at 10 PSI on actual 10' lift. Skid 
unit shown. Also available in 
protective wrap-around frame 
with fold-away carrying handles 
or on wheels. 



30FA irrigation pumping unit. 
Pumps up to 500 GPM; pres- 
sures up to 100 PSI. Skid 
mounted for permanent opera- 
tion or mounted on heavy-duty 
truck type wheels. 




For your irrigation requirements, there's a Hale 
pump to do the job, and do it better. Compare 
these Hale benefits: Matched Power designed to 
correctly match the power of the driving engines 
and give you all of the performance you pay for; 
Premium Materials to assure long life; Design 
Simplicity for high operating efficiency, less 
downtime, and quick, easy servicing. 

Put Hale's 50 years of experience to work 
for you. Write for free bulletins on the pumps 
that suit your needs — they'll be sent promptly. 



ROBY'S 



PROPANE GAS. INC. 

WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 







60FR irrigation pumping unit. Ex- 
tra heavy duty. Can be used for 
overhead, underground or port- 
able irrigation systems. Pumps 
up to 1600 GPM; pressures up to 
150 PSI. Skid or trailer mounted. 

SOFA irrigation pumping un 
signed for most economical oper- >^^ 
ation with large volume guns at "^ — ^ 
high pressures. Pumps up to 1000 
GPM; pressures up to 200 PSI. 
Skid or trailer mounted. 




40FW.A medium-size centrifugal 
pumping unit with a wide range 
of volumes and pressures. Pumps 
up to 600- GPM; pressures up to 
140 PSI. Skid or trailer mounted. 



THIRTEEN 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST 
PROTECTION REMEMBER 
THESE 4 IMPORTANT POINTS 
ABOUT FMC WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole crew- 
required for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 
within 3 to 5 minutes, the 
marsh is receiving effective 
frost protection. FMC machines 
have an enviable record for 
operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 




FOR SALE 

19 ACRES, 6^4 IN BOG 
Has 2 Good Sump Holes 

Apply 
Ted Boatman 

p. O. BOX 181 
BANDON, OREGON 
Tel. Bandon 347-6125 



FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA DIVISION 

FAIRWAY AVENUE. LAKELAND, FLORIDA 

□ Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 
Q Please have sales engineer contact me 




CORPORATION 



® 



NAMe_ 



_TITLE_ 



VOLTA OIL CO. 

Distributor of the Famous 

TEXACO 

WATER WHITE 

KEROSENE 

For your Bof 
STODDARD SOLVENT 

Tel. 746-1340 

Route 44, Samoset St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 



ADDRESS (RFO). 
«TY 



JONE. 



-STATE. 



PUMPS 

PLASTIC PIPE 
SPRINKLERS 

A complete line of 

WATER DISTRIBUTING 

EQUIPMENT 

AETNA 

ENGINEERING CO. 

Hanover, Mass. 
TAylor 6-2341 



FOURTEEN 



Cranberry Club Talk 

by WILLIAM E. TOMLINSON, Jr. 

(Ed. Note: Charts referred to in 
this article are printed in the 
center spread of this issue of 
Cranberries.) 

There are several changes in 
the Cranberry Insect and Disease 
Control chart this year. I am 
going to amplify on these as 
well as on some of the other 
recommendations that have not 
been changed but need stressing. 
Injury by concentrate sprays 
plagues us some every year. 
Note No. 4 indicates, I hope, that 
with concentrate sprays at certain 
times when the growth is new 
and very tender and the weather 
is hot and humid you can almost 
depend on some evidence of in- 
jury, no matter how carefully 
applied. If you realize that some 
spotting, blotching or redden- 
ing of new uprights and small 
berries can occur without ma- 
terial injury to the crop, you 
won't need to press the panic 
button so quickly. 

You will notice that gypsy moth 
caterpillars have been added to 
Note No. 8 with the same count 
as cutworms. Also in No. 8 we 
would suggest rather than taking 
50 sweeps that you take several 
sweeps of 25 and average them to 
get you counts of 50. In this 
way you can sample more bog 
more quickly, have insects in 
less battered condition for iden- 
tification and collect less debris 
to have to sort through to find 
the insects collected. In this 
same note there is the admoni- 
tion to make weevil counts when 
temperatures are at least 70 de- 
grees. Actually on most any day 
in the spring when the sun is 
bright and the wind is not blow- 
ing hard the temperature in the 
vines is 70 degrees or more and 
weevils are active if they are 
present, so don't wait for the 
temperature in the shade on the 
side of your house to reach 70 
before checking for weevils or 
it may already be later than you 
think. 

The side benefits of the insec- 
ticidal root grub applications has 
been placed in Note No. 9 rather 



than in the insects controlled by 
applications. Girdler and tip- 
worm are more cheaply and just 
as effectively controlled by other 
applications. 

A new note has been added 
this year (No. 10) which is con- 
cerned with deterioration of 
stored pesticides and disposal of 
unused pesticides and empty con- 
tainers. Many pesticides lost po- 
tency or formulations breakdown 
when stored for any length of 
the Dormant to Delayed Dormant 
time, particularly when subjected 
to extremes of temperatures, 
either hot or cold. Particularly 
suspect should be dust formula- 
tions containing malathion and 
partially used emilsifiable con- 
centrate or flowable formulations. 
When disposing of any unused 
cencentrate or dilute pesticide or 
empty containers there are defi- 
nite rules and regulations of the 
Pesticide Board that are to be 
observed. Though as farmers you 
are not required to be licensed 
to apply pesticides, you are sub- 
ject to all other rules and regu- 
lations of the Pesticide Board. 
Also of importance to remember 
is the fact that empty pesticide 
containers are not empty even 
though you may have rinsed them 
out rather carefully. There is 
always some residue left in them 
so if you discard them carelessly 
they not only are unsightly, but 
they can be dangerous and you 
are breaking the law as well. 

Every year after August is 
well under way the question al- 
ways seems to come up about 
what can be used for late fruit- 
worm or Sparganothis and not 
get into trouble with residues 
at harvest on the day after La- 
bor Day; or how long will I 
have to wait before I harvest if 
I apply X pounds of "Y" insec- 
ticide today? It's on the chart 
in Note No. 11. 

You will notice that the Dor- 
mant to Delayed Dormant insec- 
ticide and summer flood recom- 
mendations are strictly grub con- 
trol oriented in this year's chart. 
Tipworm and girdler are better 
controlled by other applications 
and cranberry scales have not 
been a problem on care for bogs 
since the general adoption of 



phosphate insecticides on the 
bogs. 

Many of you have probably 
noticed that large white grubs 
are not as well controlled as 
cranberry root grubs are by the 
aldrin or dieldrin applications. 
They can apparently tolerate 
more than the root grubs can. 
However, it does control small 
white grubs and is of value in 
retarding reinfestation by them, 
so I feel that it is a worthwhile 
recommendation. 

In the recommendations with 
the V2 inch Growth to Hook Stage 
you should notice that this ap- 
plication is recommended as a 
regular blanket control measure. 
It is aimed almost specifically at 
tipworm which you will recall I 
felt is the cause of more crop 
loss than most growers realize 
and to have consistently good 
production it must be controlled. 
Gypsy moth caterpillars have 
been added to this section be- 
cause they should be controlled 
while still small and before they 
destroy the terminal buds. 

We have added a Hook stage 
to 5% Bloom category to the 
chart this year which is aimed at 
blunt-nosed leafhopper, any in- 
sects that may have been missed 
and to get in another shot at 
tipworms before bloom becomes 
general and the temptation to 
spray overcomes your concern for 
pollinators. Remember, without 
pollinators you won't get a crop 
even of you have perfect control 
of everything from frost to fruit- 
worm. 

The fruit rot sprays at 5% 
Bloom to Mid-Bloom have not 
been changed. Remember that 
two applications are necessary 
for results and that the second 
application can be delayed and 
combined with the first fruit- 
worm application. 

In this Late Bloom stage we 
have added girdler to the list 
of insects active at that time. 
Under materials in this section 
we have put back Diazinon for 
Sparganothis control where you 
are doing your own ground 
spraying and for areas where 
parathion should not be used. 

Continued on Page 18 

FIFTEEN 



1966 Cranberry Weed Control Chart 

This scbedale Is Intended to furnUb feneral rMomme ndatlons. More detailed Information majr be obtained 
from tbe Cranberry Experiment Station, East Warebam, Ma^sacbosetts. 

NOTES 

1. rEOVTDE ADEQUATE DRAINAGE or rccommeDdfttlofM below rtc of qoestloaftblc Tmlae. 

t. APTLT THE EXACT QUANTmES ot chrnilc*lj rcoommended to meuared u>ckj and ftt the IndJcAted times. One aq. rod eqoAla 1«4 ft aq. One »ere eqo&lj IH »q. roda. 

S. WASH EQUIPMENT with •o«p uid water ImioedlJitelr alter aainc Bliiac wltb UDmoaU solatloD after oalof hormone type herblddca. 

^ BAND WEEDING la often practlc&l wltb acattcred rreen and woody weeda If roota ar« r«moTc4. 

I. MOWING of Don-woodr weeds help* to prcTCnl ahadlnc uid redac«a accd formation. 

•. LATE WATER caaaca a feoeral redaction of annual grhott. If held ontll June S. and If tcmperatnrea are blfh. imall brambles are osoallr killed. 

7. Kain most follow tba application of Iron salfate, aimastoe, Caaoron and Chloro-I7C within 4 daja, or the bof must be sprinkled wltb water to make them effeetlTe. 

t. IRON SULFATE (ferrou) in exccaa of 20 Iba. per tq. rod majr kill newlj mI Tinea or matnro Tinea when tber hare been tmadtd within IS months. If 9 paxU of Iron sulfate 

are mixed with 1 p&rt of salt, rain or sprlnklUif la imiMiwaai j 

9. SPOT TREATMENTS are often oecesaarr In subsequent jears aa a foUow^ap to these control incaasrea. 

1«. CHLOBO-IPC mar be nacd at 15 lbs. per acre before late water from mid-March lo April 10. 

CAUTIONS 
1. CHEMICALS not refistered for nse on cranberries must not be used. 
£. SIMAZINE must be sprayed evenly with contlnuoos agitation Dslnf ibe recommended amounts. An overdose may injure vines or crop. Tbin or 

weak vines and new plantlnfs one week to tbree years old are very susceptible to injury. In the spring use a pre-emergence spray. May be used 

safely in successive years. 

3. VINES SPRAYED WITH Oil. are highly Inflammable. All broadcast treatments are likely to reduce tbe crop and may Increase sensitivity lo low 
temperatures. 

4. CASORON applications by reflation must be at least 12 months apart. 

5. Herbicide use makes vines more liable to injury and crops may be reduced. 



TIMING 



WEEDS 



RECOMMENDATIONS 



February 

and 

March 



SHORES and DIKES 



2,4-D — 2,4,5-T - 1 gal. ester brush Idller (4 lbs. acid equivalent per gal.) In 
50 gals, kerosene or No. 2 fuel oil. Wet thoroughly. Will control scrub oak, 
bullbrler, poison Ivy, pitch pine, etc. 



GREEN SCUM 



COPPER SULFATE - Distribute evenly on Ice or In bog flowage 4 lbs. of 

crystals per acre-foot of water. May kill flsh. 



Cut Grass. Manna Grass, Shore Grass, Aster, 
Flalntaln, Needle Grass, Nut Grass, DuUchlum, 
Pitchfork, Mud Rush, Haircap Moss, Royal 
Fern, Bracken Fern, Sensitive Fern, WUd 
Strawberry, Marsh St. John's Wort, Summer 
Grass, Blue Joint, Loosestrife, WUd Bean, 
Hawkweed, Wool Grass, Cotton Grass, Rag- 
weed, Fireweed, Spike Rush, Horsetail, Sorrel 



CASORON - 4*^^ granular. 100 lbs. per acre. Apply In March or early April 
to avoid high temeperatures. - May be used before late water from mid- 
March to April 10. (See Caution 4 and Note 7) 



DODDER, CORNGRASS, 

WARTY PANIC GRASS, CRAB GRASS 



CASORON - 4% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Use just before bud break. 



SUMMER GRASS 

CUT GRASS 

SOME UPLAND GRASSES ON BOG 



CHLORO-IPC - 2096 granular, 100 lbs. per acre or SIMAZINE - 4Vi lbs. 
80% WJ. In 300 gals, water per acre. Apply by May 1. (See Note 10 and 
Caution 2 and 5). 



March 
to 

Mid - May 



RAGWEED, PITCHFORKS, WARTY PANIC 
GRASS, TEAR THUMB, FIREWEED 



SIMAZINE - 3% lbs. 80* W.P. In 300 gals, water per acre. Apply only from 
mid-April through first week of May. (See Caution 2). 



HAIRCAP MOSS, SORREL, 
HAIRY PANIC GRASS 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. 
and Caution 5). 



By May 1. (See Note 10 



CORN GRASS, BARNYARD GRASS, 
CRAB GRASS, TEAR THUMB, FIREWEED 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 50 lbs. per acre on first year planting. 100 
lbs. per acre on mature vines. Late April to bud break. (See Caution 5). 



CBLORO-irc - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Use Just before bud break. 



POVERTY GRASS, CAREX SPP, 
WOOL GRASS, SPIKE RUSH 



WATER WHITE KEROSENE - 600-800 gals, per acre. 



RUSHES, ASTERS, GOLDEN ROD 



STODDARD SOLVENT 

a spot treatment. 



500 gals, per acre (3 gals, per sq. rod). Primarily 



SPHAGNUM MOSS 



IRON SULFATE - 50 lbs. per sq. rod. (See Note 8). 



NUT GRASS, CUT GRASS, MUD RUSH, 
NEEDLE GRASS, SPIKE RUSH, CORN GRASS 



ALANAP 3-4 gals, in 300 gals, water per acre or 109t granular 80 lbs. 
per acre. Do not use after first week in May. Best results where bog sur- 
face is wet before application. Blossoms may be Injured at temperatures 
under 32^ F after application. 



After 

Late Water 
(When winter flood 
is not withdrawn) 



LOOSESTRIFE, CUT GRASS 



STODDARD SOLVENT - Mix 1 part Stoddard to 1 part water white kero- 
sene, 600 gals, per acre. Apply within 5 days of withdrawal of the flood. 



WOOL GRASS, SPIKE RUSH, CAREX SPP. 



WATER WHITE KEROSENE - 800 gals, per acre. Drain late water May 25. 
Treat within 8 days when temperature Is below 65 degrees and bog is well 



Mid -May 
and 
June 



TRIPLE AWNED GRASS 



SMALL BRAMBLES ON SHORE 



WATER WHITE KEROSENE - 400 gals, per acre. Apply when temperature 
is below 65 degrees. 

SILVEX - 1 gal. ester formulation (4 lbs. acid per gal.) in 50 gals, water, 
300 gals, per acre. 



ROYAL FERN, CINNA.MON FERN 



IRON SULFATE AND SALT - 9 to I and apply small amount to each plant. 
(See Note 8). 



SENSITIVE FERN, FEATHER FERN 



IRON SULFATE - 35 lbs. per sq. rod or small amount to each plant. (See 
Note 7 and 8). 



June 
and 
July 



MARSH ST. JOHN'S WORT, 
CINQUEFOIL, ASTERS 



IRON SULFATE - 50 lbs. per sq. rod. (See Note 7 and 8). 



DITCH WEEDS 



DALAPON 85% - '/a lb. In 5 - 6 gals, water per 1000 sq. feet of ditch; will 
control cat-tatis, bur-reed, grasses, sedges, and rushes, or No. 2 FUEL OIL, 
for grassy weeds, drain ditches and wet thoroughly. 



SHORES and DIKES 



2, 4, 5-T - IVz teaspoons per gal. water or 1 Vi pints per 100 gals, water of 
low volatile ester (4 lbs. acid per gal.) will control poison ivy, wild cherry, 
maple sprouts, grapevine, and possibly other broadleaved weeds. Avoid 
drift onto bogs or DALAPON SS". - 20 lbs. In 300 gals, water per acre, for 
poverty and switch grass. 



In the Fall 

alter 

Harvest 



Cut Grass, Blur Joint, Aster, Wool Grass, Cot- 
ton Crass. Mud Rush, Marsh St. John's Wort. 
Summer Grass, Loosestrife, Needle Grass, Nut 
Grass, Ragweed, Sphagnum Moss 



CASORON - 4'S" granular 100 lbs. per acre. Do not apply until after No- 
vember 1. Avoid temperatures above 60°F. (See Caution 4) 



SL.MMER GRASS 



SIMAZINE - 5 lbs. 80'- W.P. in 300 gals, water per acre; or CHLORO-IPC 
20% granular, 50-75 lbs. per acre. Do not apply after November 1. 



SORREL 



GOLDEN ROD. WILD ROSES 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Do not apply after Nov. 1. 



STODDARD SOLVENT - 

a spot treatment. 



500 gals, per acre (3 gals, per sq. rod). Primarily 



POVERTY GRASS, SWITCH GRASS 



DALAPON 85% - 10 lbs. in 300 gals, water per acre. Will reduce following 
crop, especially on Early Black. Do not apply after November 1. 



WARNING 

"All pesticides mentioned in this publication are registered and cleared for the suggested uses in accordance with sUte and federal laws 
and regalatlon.s. Where trade names are used for Identification no product endorsement is implied nor is discrimination intended." 

MOST PESTICIDES ARE POISONOUS. READ AND FOLLOW ALL DIRECTIONS AND SAFETY PRECAITTIONS ON LABELS. HANDLE 
CAREFl'U.Y AND STORE IN ORIGINAL CONTAINERS WITH CO.'MPLETE LABELS, OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN, PETS AND 
UVESTOCK. 



iKURl bjr Uie Eltenalon Service. A. A, Spleloian. Dnn tna Dlrtclor. In furlhrr%Ti» ot Acu ot M»y 8 ind June 30 
l»H; Ualvtriltj of MuBchuntti. Unllnl StUo Depkrtuicnt of Agrlcullure. and County Extension Services cooperaUng. 



SIXTEEN 



1966 Cranberry Insect and Disease Control Chart 

This chart Is Intended to furnish general recommendations. More detailed Information may be obtained from the 
Cranberry Experiment Station, East Wareham, Massachusetts 



NOTES 



1. HOLDING WINTER WATER (1)1 May 20-25 ooncentnlca emerKenM of all 
Insects and controls false amiyworm, yeltow-headed fireworm and may 
control or reduce frDltworm. Favors catworm InfcBtatlon. 

X, BEFLOODING 

a. Aboat May IS for 10 hoan, controls false armrworm and blosaom worn. 

b. About June I and 12 for 10 boors controls {reen spanwonn, nnall bla«k- 
hcaded &reworm, spotted and black catwornu and armT-worm, but Is 
likely to INCREASE FRUIT ROTS and REDUCE THE CROP. 

c. AboDt May 12 and boldlnc U> July 15-20 kills all bueets but with the Io«a 
of the crop. 

d. Sept. 15-28. Flooding for 6 days every third year dnrlnf this period 
dlscoarafcs flrdler and blossom worm. 

3. Insecticide sprays may be applied by aircraft, Kronnd rig, or sprinkler. 

4. EMULSIFIABLE CONCENTRATES (E.C.) may Injure new growth, bloom 
and small berries, particularly In hot humid weather. Flowabte formulations 
Or those with XYLENE type solvents are preferred because they cause less 
injury. 

5. FUNGICIDE CONCENTRATES. Mix fuoKlclde with water In paU or tank 
until a smooth suspension Is obtained, then transfer suspension to *a"V 

Use Immediately. 

6. FUNGICIDES and COLOR. It may be necessary to deUy harvest up to 19 
days to obtain acceptable color when maneb Is used. 

7. SANDING and FERTILIZING. Provided blunt-nosed lea/hopper Is con- 
trolled, frequent resandlnf and fertilizing helps reclaim bogs Infected with 
false blossom. Regular uniform sanding helps check glrdler and tlpworm. 



INSECT NET. If 50 sweeps gather more than 9 cutworms, gypsy moth cater- 
pillars or weevils, 36 spanworms, or S blnnt^nosed le&fhoppen, treatment la 
necessary. Make weevil counts when temperatures are at least 70*. 

GRUB CONTROL. Rates of application. (May also control (Ipworm, gtrdlcr 
and cranberry weevil In year of application). 



Amomit per 100 ftla. 
when applied at the 
rat« of 1,000 gala, per 
a«re to ftve: 
FormulatkiD S Iba. 10 Iba. 


Amotmt of Oranolar 
Aldrin or Dleldrln to 
tire; 
Formolatlon S lbs. U Iba. 


Aldrin E. C. conlalnliv 

2 Iba. per (al. 1 gt. t qta. 

Dleldrln E. C. oonUlnbic 

IS Iba. per g^l. 1 1/3 qta. 2 2/3 qta. 


i% 100 Iba. 
10% 50 lbs. 


:•« iba 
IM Iba. 



10. Pesticides may deteriorate In storage. It b usually not advisable to use 
held-over chemicals. Always follow regulations of the Pesticide Board when 
disposing of unused chemicals and empty containers. 

11. TOXICANT per acre and Minimum Time — Last Application to Barrest 



Aldrln OiS lbs. 
Carbaryl (Sevin) 
DDT 6.0 lbs. 


3.0 iba." 


. 21 diya 

. 1 - 
. 35 " 

. 1 '• 
21 •■ 


Ferbam 6.8 Iba. 

Malalblon 2J lbs. 

M»neb IS lbs. 

Parathlon 0.8 lbs. 

1.0 lbs. 


30 dan 

3 " 

10 - 


Dl.lzinon 3.0 lbs. 
Dleldrln 1.25 lbs. 




15 - 

3t " 



Timin 



S 



Pests 



Recommendations 



Dormant 
To 

Delayed Dormant 



ROOT GRUB 
WHITE GRUB 



ROOT GRUB 
WHITE GRUB 



Apply 10 lbs. actual DIELDRIN or ALDRIN per acre. Dry 
form may be applied alone or combined with fertilizer up to 
10 days before bloom or after harvest. Apply spray as soon 
as bog is well drained and before the growth Is Yz" long or 
after harvest is completed. Apply before rain or water In 
thoroughly if possible. (See Notes 4 and 9) 



Drain bog thoroughly from early April to May 12. Reflow 
May 12-July 20. Keep well flooded. If cutworm infestation 
develops spray CARBARYL (SEVIN) 2 lbs. actual or PARA- 
THION flowable 1 lb. actual per acre or S?. CARBARYL or 
lO'?. DDT + 27. MALATHION dust 50 lbs. per acre. (See Notes 
2c, 3, 4, 8 and 10) 



New Growth 



Up to 1/2 Inch 



WEEVIL 



FIREWORMS 

CUTWORMS 

SPARGANOTHIS FRUITWORM 

GVPSV MOTH 



Spray DIELDRIN E. C. (1.5 lbs. per gal.) 1 pt. or ALDRIN 
E.,C. (2 lbs. per gal.) 1 pt. per acre; or l"/2% DIELDRIN 
DUST 25-35 lbs. per acre. ALDRIN or DIELDRIN may be 
combined with CARBARYL or PARATUION for weevil. (See 
Notes 1, 3, 4, 8 and 10) 



Spray CARBARYL (SEVIN) 2 lbs. actual or DIAZINON 3 lbs 

actual or PARATHION flowable 1 lb. actual per acre; or S'l 
CARBARYL or 10% DDT + 2'"» MALATHION dust 50 lbs. per 
acre. (Notes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 10) 



I/t Inch Growth 

To 

Hook Stage 



New Growth Insects 
GREEN SPANWORM 
TIPWORM 



Spray PARATHION flowable 1 lb. actual per acre or dust 10% 
DDT + 2"" MALATHION 50 lbs. per acre. Apply every year 
as a blanket control for all insects before bloom. - 
(Notes 1, 3,4, 7, 8 and 10) 



Hook Stage 

To 

.*^^ Bloom 



All Insects through Hook Stage 



BLUNT -NOSED LEAFHOPPER 



GIRDLER 



See appropriate control measures. 



CARBARYL or PARATHION or DDT + MALATHION as for 

New Growth Insects. 



10% DDT + 2% MALATHION dust 50 lbs. per acre. Repeat 

if necessary. (See Note 7). 



5'o Bloom 

To 
Mid - Bloom 



FRUIT ROTS -One application ineffective. 
Repeat about 2 weeks later or combine with 
first late bloom spray. 



80'"r MANEB or 761 FERBAM 9 lbs. plus suitable sticker in 
25-100 gals, water per acre by ground rig; or in 13 gals, water 
per acre by aircraft. Avoid applying insecticides during 
bloom if possible. (See Notes 2b, 5, 6 and 10) 



Late Bloom 

Repeat in 10 days 

for Fruitworms 



CRANBERRY FRUITWORM 
SPARGANOTHIS FRUITWORM 
BLACK -HEADED FIREWORM 
BLUNT -NOSED LEAFHOPPER 
WEEVIL 
GIRDLER MOTHS 



Spray PARATHION flowable 1 lb. actual or CARBARYL 2 lbs. 
actual or DIAZINON 3 lbs. actual per acre or lO"?. DDT + 2% 
MALATHION dust 50 lbs. per acre. Make egg count every 3 
or 4 days until August 10 on Early Blacks and until August 
20 on Howes. 2 unhatched and unparasitized fniitworm eggs 
to 100 berries calls for treatment. Do not wait for appearance 
of red berries. (See Notes 1. 3, 4, 8. 10 and 11) 



Altci- Fruit Set 



GIRDLER LARVAE 



10% DIELDRIN granules 10 lbs. per acre or lO^t DDT 
MALATHION dust 50 lbs. per acre. (Notes 7, 10 and 11) 



Sept. 26 

To 

Oct. 1 



GIRDLER 



Flood 6 days (with late berries on vines if necessary). 
(Notes 2d and 7) 



'■.\!I pi-slitides mentioned in this publication are registered 
and cleared for tlie .suggested uses in accordance with state 
and federal laws and regulations. Where trade names are 



used for identification no product endorsement is implied 
nor is discrimination intended." 



WARNING 



■MOST PESTICIDES ARE POISONOUS. READ AND FOLLOW ALL DIRECTIONS AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ON LABELS. HANDLE CAREFULLY 
AND STORE IN ORIGINAL CONTAINERS WITH COMPLETE LABELS, OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN, PETS AND LIVESTOCK*. Avoid drift 
cnta forage areas. Do not apply to streams or ponds. 

PARATHION b extremely danserous. Repeated exposnre to it and other phosphate trpc tnacctleldca nur, wlthoat symptoms, locreu« snsceptfhiUtr to pho«- 
pliate pobonln;. Stay of! bofs at least 48 hoars after application. Post Parathlon treated bor>- 

I.MPORTANT: Before using Parathlon obtain a supply of atropine tablets for enier|;enc7 use (obtainable only with physicians prescription). 



Issued by the Extension Service. A. A. Splelman, Dean and Director, in furtherance of Acts of May 8 and June 30, 
1914; University of Massachusetts. United States Department of Aerlculture. and County Extension Services cooperating. 



SEVENTEEN 



CRANBERRY TALK— Continued 

Under recommendations you 
should note that the suggested 
fruitworm egg count is now 2 
unhatched, unparasited eggs per 
100 berries and counts should 
continue on Early Blacks until 
August 10 and on Howes and 
other "lates" until August 20. 

This egg count reflects more 
efficient materials and methods of 
control, better prices for berries 
and the tendency in recent cool 
summers for egg laying to string 
out most of the summer with the 
result that there may never be 
a count of 3 or 4 per 100 berries 
but serious infestations develop. 

After Fruit Set is a new cate- 
gory for girdler control. This is 
aimed at the small larvae and 
either dieldrin granules or a 
DDT bearing dust may be used. 
The DDT and malathion is listed, 
but DDT alone will do the job. 

To stress the time proven prac- 
tice of a 6 day flood before Oc- 
tober 1 for girdler control, we 
have placed this on the chart as 
a regular category. This should 
be done every third year or 
so, with late varieties still on the 
vines if necessary. 

Finally, in the Warning notices 
that pesticides should be stored 
in the original containers with 
complete labels. This label in- 
formation could mean the differ- 
ence between life and death in 
an emergency. 

This past summer I kept track 
of the girdler moths caught in 
the blacklight traps at the State 
Bog and the Peterson Bog in 
East Wareham. The flight period 
was from June 8 to August 19, 
a period of 72 days. Peak flights 
were on June 30 and July on 
both bogs. However, bogs are 
susceptible to girdler attack as 
soon as the female moths have 
mated because they lay their 
eggs in the trash on the bog floor 
and if conditions are suitable, 
larvae will develop starting in 
June with the first moth and 
continue until flight ends about 
mid-August. 



Farm Bureau 
In Action 

By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 

Farm Bureau's Legislative Bill 
Number S-177 to extend the 
mileage of Farm Plates to fifty 
miles was signed into law by 
Governor Volpe. This law be- 
comes effective ninety days after 
the Governor signs the bill which 
will be July 28, 1966. The dis- 
tance that a farmer may travel 
is the fifty mile radius from his 
farm. Eacr farmer should deter- 
mine his outer limits of operation 
and maintain strict control over 
this limit. 

Your Farm Bureau Legislative 
Agent will continue to watch for 
any indications which would re- 
strict use of the Farm Plates as 
it relates to hauling Cranberries 
to the processing plant. 

Senate Bill Number S-57 which 
is the petition of the Massa- 
chusetts Farm Bureau Federation 
for an Legislative Amendment to 
to the Constitution permitting the 
assessment of "Open Lands" in- 
cluding land used for agriculture 
at a value related to its use was 
reported out of Committee with 
an "ought not to pass" report. At 
the hearing of this bill on March 
15th, more than two-hundred 
Farm Bureau members from the 
entire state packed Gardner Audi- 
torium in Boston to indicate their 
support for this legislation. As a 
result of this unfavorable report 
the Massachusetts Farm Bureau 
Board of Directors decided to de- 
lay action on this legislation until 
the next session of the General 
Court and possibly consider other 
avenues of completing this project. 

During the next several months 
all farmers should make their 
views known to legislators and 
constantly remind them of the 
practical need for this legislation 
to Masachusetts. Of course, all 
was not lost by this attempt 
since we have support of more 
legislators and focused attention 
to this problem. 



The Sales Tax Bill has passed 
and the agricultural exemptions 
requested by Farm Bureau were 
accepted as part of the law. Farm 
Bureau members have received 
all the information concerning ex- 
emptions and the changes to these 
exemptions. 

Governor Volpe's office announ- 
ced on May 5th, that Lorenzo D. 
Lambson of Southwick, Massa- 
chusetts has been appointed to 
the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts. Mr. 
Lambson, a shade tobacco farmer, 
is very active in Farm Bureau 
activities presently serving on the 
Board of Directors of the Massa- 
chusetts Farm Bureau and a 
member of the Budget Committee. 
In addition to the Commissioner 
of Agriculture, Charles McNamara, 
who serves on the Board of 
Trustees as an ex-officio member, 
Mr. Lambson is very interested 
in the educational and research 
programs which serve agriculture 
through the University of Massa- 
chusetts. 

It's very important that Farm 
Bureau work for good legislation 
at the General Court. However, 
the watchdog activities of Farm 
Bureau in preventing bad legis- 
lation from becoming law is vi- 
tally important. A very bad 
piece of legislation to agriculture 
was Senate Bill S-361 which 
would permit the taking of farm 
land including Cranberry Bogs 
by use of the law of "Eminent 
Domain" by the Conservation 
Commission. As mentioned before 
Farm Bureau is for conservation 
but they are against laws which 
would place farmers in on un- 
compromising position. 



Bowers and Thompson of USDA 
report a hormone which when 
applied to pupae of some insects 
keeps them from growing up and 
maturing — causing them "to live 
out their days as youngsters, 
without reproducing themselves" 
— another step in insect control. 



eighteeh 



really the berries for. . 








sprmkler irrigation 




BEAN. 



solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimimi gallonage. Special VA" or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
flat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 

see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply COi 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



n AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

m JOHN BEAN DIVISION 



Lansing, Michigan 



NINETEEN 



AMERICAN CRANBERRIES ON DISPLAY 

AT EUROPE'S MOST IMPORTANT FOOD FAIR 

Orrin G. Colley, President, Cranberry Institute 
In Attendance at Opening in the Netherlands 

(Special to Cranberries Magazine) 




American Ambassador William Tyler, who represents his country in 
the Netherland, samples traditional American cranberry juice at 
the U. S. Food Exhibit of the ROKA '66 International Food Fair in 
Utrecht which opened a five-day run April 25. At his right is Orrin 
Colley of South Duxbury, Massachusetts, President of the American 
Cranberry institute, who came to Holland to help boost cranberry 
imports from the U.S. 



American cranberries got spe- 
cial display at one of Europe's 
most important shows which 
opened at Utrecht, the Nether- 
lands, April 25 for an expected 
40,000 food buyers from Holland 
and neighboring North European 
countries. Cranberries were a 
feature of the U. S. Food Ex- 
hibit sponsored by the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture as 
part of the ROKA '66 Internat- 
ional Food Fair, a traditional 
Dutch show attracting the food 
trade from Great Britain, Bel- 
gium, Denmark, and Germany 
as well as Holland. 

Buyers sipped glasses of the 
sparkling red cranberry juice 
and sampled America's traditional 
cranberry sauce as they got 
acquainted with the zesty cran- 



berry flavor only recently fa- 
miliar to North Europeans. 

Somewhat similar red berries 
do grow in Northern Europe but 
are not in the popular category 
of cranberries in the United 
States. The cranberry display 
here represents a concerted 
American effort to tell the Eur- 
opeans more about the refresh- 
ing qualities and festive scarlet 
coloring of U. S. cranberries. 

The big push is on cranberry 
jelly and sauce and the new 
product — cranberry orange relish. 
Juice sales promotion, hoped for 
in the future, awaits European 
consumer reaction. 

The U.S. Exhibit, opened by 
Dutch Minister of Agriculture 
B. W. Biesheuvel, stresses cran- 
berries along with five other 



American food commodities with 
promising possibilities of in- 
creased exports from the U.S. to 
this part of Europe. Also fea- 
tured are raisins, rice, Florida 
citrus fruit, poultry and fresh 
fruits and vegetables shipped by 
jet airliner from the West Coast, 
Florida and Hawaii to the Neth- 
erlands. Cooking demonstrations 
keyed cranberries to the chicken 
and turkey on exhibit — a boost 
for the berries in view of the 
expanding market here for U.S. 
frozen poultry. 

Trans-World Airlines is spon- 
soring the exhibit of fresh fruits 
and vegetables — 29 different 
items all of the perishable type. 
Sharply lowered air freight rates 
across the Atlantic prompt the 
interest in this promotion. The 
appeal in Europe is the avail- 
ability of top quality fresh pro- 
duce all year round, taking ad- 
vantage of America's agricul- 
tural and marketing efficiency 
and its sub-tropical growing 
areas. 

Orrin Colley, of South Dux- 
bury, Massachusetts, President 
of the American Cranberry In- 
stitute, was on hand to discuss 
cranberry imports to the Eur- 
opean buyers. The Institute, al- 
ready encouraged by zooming 
cranberry juice sales in the U.S., 
notes significant boost of cran- 
berry sales here in the last 
year or two. Cranberry imports 
in Great Britain were double last 
year what they were the year 
before. They are also up con- 
siderably in Belgium. The Apr. 25 
show, with its scores of buyers 
lining up for cranberry samples, 
puts American cranberries "in 
touch with the Dutch." 



FRUIT TALK 

Insects, too, have their illnesses 
and their nutritional disturbances 
so entomologists are studying 
these weak spots (even encour- 
aging illness) and then striking 
the pest at its weakest moment. 

Bees have been induced to 
carry disease-controlling antibio- 
tics to the blossoms when they 
visit in their polinating rounds 
to aid set. 

(American Fruit Grower) 



TWENTY 




cutworms 




^j^^Y-r^r^ 



fireworms 




CARBARYL INSECTICIDE 







fruitworms 



Japanese 
beetles 



CONTROLS 

CRANBERRY 

INSECTS 




leafhoppers 



You get better, safer insect control by using 
SE VIN in your cranberry bogs. SEVIN insecticide 
destroys cutworms, fireworms, fruitworms, Japanese 
beetles and leafhoppers, including the leafhoppers 
that spread false blossom disease. And the relatively 
low toxicity of SEVIN provides fewer drift and 
residue problems to humans, livestock and fish. Order 
SEVIN today. Union Carbide Agricultural Products, 
270 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017. 



!Sk.« 



UNION 
CARBIDE 



AGRICULTURAL 
PRODUCTS 



Sevin is the registered trade mark of Union Carbide Corporation for carbaryl insecticide. 



TWENTY-ONE 



RAINBIRD SPRINKLER HEADS 
FLEX-O-SEAL IRRIGATION PIPE 

Aluminum and light weight steel irrigation pipe 
in all conventional lengths and diameters. 
Rainbird sprinkler heads for any bog setup. 

VEG-ACRE FARMS 

Forestdale, Cape Cod, Mass. 

Tel. 428-6719 

(Supplying irrigation equipment to growers since 1944) 



The Elizabeth Blueberry 

The New Jersey Cultivated 
Blueberry Council, Inc., a non- 
profit agricultural organization, 
was organized recently to pro- 
moted the development of new 
blueberry varieties. 

It has just named a variety de- 
veloped by the late Miss Eliza- 
beth White of Whitesbog. A de- 
scription of the variety follows: 

This cultivated bluebery was 
developed by Miss Elizabeth 
White, the famed pioneer of blue- 
berry culture. Hitherto known 
as the 3850-A, this variety has 
been grown successfully as a 
commercial variety at Whitesbog 
(N.J.) for several year. 



HELICOPTER PEST CONTROL 





ins ^irwaus 

NORWOOD, MASS. I 

DUSTING and SPRAYING 



RAY MORSE & SON. AGENTS 



TEL. 295-1553 



The Elizabeth blueben-y ripens 
in the mid to late season. It has 
an unusually long picking season, 
stating at about the same time 
as the Berkeley and continuing 
through most of August. It is a 
very large berry, about equal in 
size to Herbert and surpassing 
Bluecrop. It maintains its large 
size well and there are only slight 
reductions in size with each suc- 
cessive picking. The cluster is 
very loose and the scar is small. 
It is extremely easy to pick and 
no difficulty has ever been en- 
countered getting these berries 
picked by hand. 

The color of the berry is me- 
dium blue, resembling that of 
Blueray. Its dessert quality and 
flavor are excellent. It is very 
sweet and aromatic. 

The berry is a good producer, 
perhaps not as good as Bluecrop, 
but very dependable. It is a 
red-wooded variety which ap- 
pears to have the hardiness 
usually associated with such 
similar types as Rancocas and 
June. It is about as vigorous as 
Coville and has a form and 
spreading upright growth pattern 
similar to that of Coville. 



TWENTY-TWO 



The Elizabeth blueberry has 
done well is solid block plantings. 
The berries, even in late pick- 
ing, are well seeded, indicating 
that its blossoms are attractive 
to bees. 

The Elizabeth berry has not 
demonstrated any weakness in 
commercial shipments. It has 
good quality as a frozen berry. 
It is quite easy to propagate from 
hard wood cuttings. 

The Blueberry Council recom- 
mends the Elizabeth for trial 
only. This plant should not be 
planted to very sandy soils. It 
appears to thrive best on mod- 
erately peaty soils. 




Thunder Lake Reports,,, 

Thunder Lake, Wis. has just 
received several new varieties of 
cranberries from Mass., which they 
will propogate and build up in 
order to determine their value 
under Wisconsin conditions. Al- 
together, Thunder Lake has ap- 
proximately 50 varieties, which 
is the largest number of varieties 
any Wisconsin grower has, and a 
good many of them are still in 
the experimental stage. 



Many of the growers of ber- 
ries who deliver to Cranberry 
Products, Inc., Eagle River, Wis., 
have gone into the use of Chloro 
IPC for weed control, prior to 
this year had used little of it. 
They believe it has excellent pos- 
sibilities for weed control. 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



READ CRANBERRIES 



follow 

the 
leader 



Once again Buckner Sprinklers rate as the number one agricul- 
tural irrigators. When tested for uniform water disbursement, 
Buckner Sprinklers led the field with the highest Coefficient of 
Uniformity (CD). Buckner high CU means more uniform crop 
growth, greater profit per acre. And Buckner design and 
exacting production standards assure sprinklers with a long, 
trouble-free life. For only Buckner has the patented, sand-proof 
GDG Bearing for thousands of extra maintenance-free hours. 
Only Buckner gives you over fifty years of Buckner sprinkler 
manufacturing experience. Follow the leader. Irrigate with 
Buckner— world's leading sprinkler manufacturer. See your 
Buckner Dealer or write: 



Buckner, 



® INDUSTRIES, INC. 

P.O. BOX 232, FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 93708 



TWENTY-THREE 



PROVEN PESTIQDE APPLICATION BY HELICOPTER 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous Moulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 

equipment for over one quarter century, 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS — pumping units, pumps, powder units, 

sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 









Agivay offers proven pesticides 
for Complete Crop Protection 

Place Orders with — 

HARRY T. FISHER, JR. - Tel. Middleboro 947-2133 



Call: HARRY T. FISHER, JR. 

an independent distributor 
of Agway pesticides 



The best source of 

cranberry pesticide Helicopter operated by 

control materials and 
application service Plymouth Copters, Inc. 

Thomas "Whitey" Weitbrecht 

HARRY T. FISHER, JR., Middleboro, Mass. Tel. 947-2133 



* 






TWENTY-FOUR 



Frank H. Cole 

Prominent in Mass. Cranberry 
Industry 

Frank H. Cole, senior member 
of Cole family of Carver, Mass., 
prominent in Massachusetts 
cranberry growing, passed away 
April 17 at a nursing home in 
Plymouth. 

Mr. Cole was 76. His forebears 
came to America on the May- 
flower. He was the eighth gen- 
eration to head the Cole Box 
Mill operation in North Carver 
until the business was destroyed 
by fire in 1947. At that time the 
business, which consisted largely 
of the manufacture of cranberry 
containers was reputed to be the 
oldest continuous family business 
in the country, having been op- 
erated by the Cole family for 250 
years. 

As well as being a cranberry 
grower and box manufacturer, 
Mr. Cole served as Carver Select- 
man from 1928 to 1934 and was a 
Carver school committee member 
from 1947 to 1959. He also served 
as a member of the town finance 
committee. He was a parishioner 
of the First Congregational 
Church of North Carver, in which 
section he made his home on 
High Street. 

He was a life-long Republican 
and served at various times as 
chairman and treasurer of the 
Carver Republican Town Com- 
mittee. He was a long time mem- 
ber and former president of the 
Carver Old Home Day Associa- 
tion. 

Among his many charitable in- 
terests he served as fund raiser 
for the Jordan Hospital in 
Plymouth and St. Luke's Hos- 
pital in Middleboro, Boy Scouts, 
Cancer Fund and Infantile Pa- 
ralysis efforts. He also con- 
tributed to local sports organi- 
zations. 

Of late years in semi-retire- 
ment he devoted much time to 
world peace efforts. 

He leaves a widow, Mrs. Flor- 
ence J. (Shaw) of North Car- 
ver, a daughter, Helen J. of 



Washington, three sons, Theron 
M. of Holden and Springfield, 
Ohio and Bradford H. of Carver 
a newspaper reporter writing of- 
ten on cranberry subjects and 
Lawrence S., a cranberry grower 
and former director of Ocean 
Spray Cranberries, Inc., and six 
grandchildren. 



Carleton D. Hammond 

Carlton Delano Hammond, a 
prominent cranberry grower of 
Pt. Independence, Mass died on 
April 20. Mr. Hammond was 75. 
Death followed a long illness at 
Pondville Hospital in Norfolk. 

Mr. Hammond was born in 
Wareham and was a lifelong resi- 
dent of that town. He was presi- 
dent of the Smith-Hammond 
Company. He was a long-time 
member of the Cape Cod Cran- 
berry Growers' Association. He 
had attended Wareham schools 
and was a graduate of Worcester 
Academy. He attended Onset 
Community Church. 

He was the son of the late 
Irving C. Hammond, an early 
grower of the Wareham region 
and very prominent in cranberry 
affairs. He leaves a widow 
Jeannette (Hunter) Hammond, a 
son, Carleton D. Hammond, Jr. 
of Walpole, who was for many 
years interested in cranberries 
and for some years was general 
manager of the Wisconsin Cran- 
berry Sales Company of Wiscon- 
sin Rapids, Wisconsin, a brother, 
Robert C. Hammond of East 
Wareham, a much respected and 
active grower, three sisters, Mrs. 
Margaret Tatlow and Miss Ethel 
Hammond both of Pt. Indepen- 
dence and Mrs. Edmund Staples 
of New Bedford, several grand- 
children and several nieces and 
nephews. 



Antonio F. Baptist 

Antone F. Baptist of Middleboro 
Road, West Wareham, Mass, a 
cranberry grower, died April 26th 
at Tobey Hospital, Wareham. He 
was 81. 



Born in Fogo, Cape Verde Is- 
lands he had lived in Wareham 
for about 65 years. He was self- 
employed as a cranberry bog op- 
erator. He was a communicant of 
St. Anthony's Church of West 
Wareham. 

He left, besides a widow, Mrs. 
Fingincia Dos Ris Baptist two 
sons, Theodore and August, both 
c1 East Wareham and three 
daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Mattos 
of Wareham, Mrs. Mary Sox and 
Mrs. Alice Chenly, both of Prov- 
idence; 26 grandchildren and one 
great grandchild. 



HUMPHREY INVITED 
SPEAKER AT CO-OP MEETING 

Vice President Hubert H. 
Humphrey has been invited to 
address the American Institute of 
Cooperation meeting scheduled at 
Colorado State University July 
31 -Aug. 3, according to AIC 
President J. K. Stern, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Stern said there is a "strong 
possibility" that Humphrey will 
speak at the institute's final ses- 
sion on Wednesday evening, Aug. 
3. Some 3500 persons, including 
about 1000 young farmers and 
rural youth from 50 states are' 
expected to attend. Theme of the 
meeting will be "Cooperatives: 
Progress by Design." 



J. W. Hurley Co. 



• FUEL OIL 



Water White 

- KEROSENE - 

For BOGS 

(METERED TRUCKS) 



I 24-hour Fuel Oil Service I 



[ 



Telephone 295-0024 
I 341 Main St. 



WAREHAM 



TWENTY-FIVE 



Personal 

Clarence J. Hall, retiring editor 
and publisher of CRANBERRIES, 
is taking this opportunity to 
thank the many friends from 
all cranberry areas who have 
written in regarding the change, 
many to say they felt the mag- 
azine has been been of great 
value to the cranberry industry 
over the past 30 years. 

Also to those who have ex- 
pressed best wishes for its con- 
tinuance and for their willing- 
ness to send in news which 
they beUeve will be of great 
interest to others within the 
industry. 



MALATHION "BOMBS" 
USED IN INDIANA 

More than 700,000 acres of 
northwestern Indiana were 
sprayed by insecticide from four 
multi-engine airplanes late in 
April in an intensive effort to stop 
the westward spread of the cereal 
leaf beetle into the wheat pro- 
ducing heartland of the United 
States and Canada. 

The beetle, which sometimes 
destroys entire fields of grain in 
Europe, was first identified in 
the U.S. in 1962 in Michigan. It 
had spread to 47 counties of 
Michigan, Indiana and Ohio a 
year later and was reported in 
141 counties of those states last 
fall. 

The spraying with four ounces 
of malathion (a chemical well 
know to cranberry growers) per 
acre was done cooperatively by 
the Indiana Department of Natu- 
ral Resources, the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



Washington State Bog 
Uses Bees for Pollination 

Dr. Carl Johansen, Washington 
State University, who for the past 
four seasons has been studying 
bees in cranberry growing has 
reached several conclusions. 

He finds that tests on the State 
bog at Long Beach have shown 
that the pollination of cranberries 
by bees leads to considerable in- 
creases in yields. Wind as a fac- 
tor in cranberry pollination has 
been highly overated. 

Development of the use of 
honey bees on cranberries in 
Coastal Washington appears to be 
the most promising way of ob- 
taining pollination. From the 
above information it is evident 
that you can get along with 
natural pollination, but you will 
have a higher yield if you have 
bee hives at your bog during the 
blooming period 



NEW JERSEY 



Wisconsin Order 

Independent growers and 
cranberry marketing companies 
reported sales of 416,503.9 bar- 
rels, remitting $8,330.08 in as- 
sessments under cranberry mar- 
keting order provisions. 



FRESH FROM THE FIELJ)S 

Continued jrom Page 6 

WASHINGTON 

There is still plenty of water 
in the Pacific Northwest, even 
though April was drier than usual. 
Rainfall for that month was only 
2.63 inches. The total for 1966 
so far is 34.03, compared with a 
total of 40.39 for 1955. April of 
'65 registered 7.03 inches. 

Temperature for April main- 
tained a mean high of 55.77 de- 
grees, and a mean low of 42.5. 
The high for the month was 78 
on the 4th, but there were four 
days from the 15th through the' 
18th that gave some trouble with 
frost danger. The temperatures 
ranged from 23 to 28. Most of 
the growers in Washington have 
automatic sprinklers which are 
set for 34, so it is believed the 
necessary protection was achieved. 
With the first of two fertilizer 
applications going on in May 
and the process of getting fungi- 
cide applications, growers are 
busy and are hoping for good 
weather for a lot of outdoor 
work to be done. 



Although rainfall occurred on 
6 of the last 7 days of April, 
and 9 out of the last 12 days, 
the month of still must go down 
in the records as one that was 
drier than normal. The total rain- 
fall for the month was only 3.29 
inches, which is .12 of an inch 
less than normal. The rainfall 
for the first four months of 1966 
now totals 12.72 inches, which is 
.45 of an inch deficient from the 
norm. The pattern of rainfall 
during the first four months of 
1966 varies very little from that 
of 1965 and 1964, both bad 
drought years. In 1965 the quar- 
ter total was 11.87 inches and in 
1964 it was 15.34. May was ex- 
tremely dry in both of the last 
two years — only .47 of an inch 
in 1965 and .36 in 1964. So far 
in May we have received almost 
as much rainfall (.27) as oc- 
curred in the entire month of 
the two previous years. 

It was the coldest April in the 
3-year weather reporting history 
at the Laboratory. The mean av- 
erage was 47.2 degrees, which is 
4.7 below normal. The previous 
record was in 1940 when it av- 
eraged 47.5 degrees. The mini- 
mum temperature for the month 
was 24 degrees on the 1st and the 
maximum was 80 on the 21st. 
There were 7 other days in the 
20's. There were only 11 days 
during the month when the tem- 
perature rose to 60 degrees or 
above. 

The winter flood has been 
drawn from a very few bogs as of 
the end of April. Most growers 
are planning on removing water 
on May 10th. This is dictated in 
large measure by the low water 
supplies in cranberry reservoirs. 
The level of water in reservoirs 
of most bogs is below normal. 

The Frost Warning System will 
be operated as in previous years 
with headquarters at the Cran- 
berry and Blueberry Laboratory. 
Growers get the frost prediction 
for cranberry bogs through an 
answering service tape by calling 
the Laboratory phone. There will 
be daily messages about an hour 
after sunset. On days of imminent 
frost, there will also be messages 
at noon and at 6 p.m. 



TWENTY-SIX 



GUARD AGAINST 
FRUIT ROT 



Wl 



ith 



muu mmm 



Excellent Disease Control 
• Free-Flowing 

• No Nozzle Clogging 

• Ideal For Aerial Application 

• Bog-Proven By Leading Growers 



YOUR NIAGARA FIELDMAN 

DA WD W. ROBERTS 

223 Bacon Street 
Natick, Massachusetts 

653-7376 



TWENTY-SEVEN 



Spotlight on Suppliers . . 

PILGRIM SAND AND GRAVEL, INC. 



The casual driver traveling 
down Brook Street in Plympton, 
Massachusetts would probably be 
unaware that, just a few hundred 
yards off the road, lies the modern 
bustling plant of the Pilgrim Sand 
and Gravel, Inc. 

In the simple, well-appointed 
office of this progressive organiza- 
tion we spoke with Mr. Irving 
Minott, Jr., office manager, who 
explained that this young com- 
pany was fovmded on the preface 
that "service" is most important 
in their field. "There are several 
firms in this area offering sand 
and gravel" Mr. Minott was quick 
to mention, "but the service they 
offer is not always the best. We 
at Pilgrim have always strived to 
see that our customers are given 
the service they have a right to 



expect, along with quality they 
can depend on." "We always have 
at least one hundred thousand 
tons of washed sand on hand and 
plenty of equipment to load and 
deliver it to nearly any point in 
the state." 

Pilgrim Sand and Gravel, under 
the guidance and leadership of its 
young President and Treasurer 
Al Giovanella, Jr., supplies 
washed sand and aggregate to 
local contractors, concrete plants 
and asphalt plants in this area. 
Many towns use Pilgrim's service 
and the Commonwealth of Mass. 
is numbered among its customers. 
They take great pride in the fact 
that they have never knowingly 
lost a customer due to dissatis- 
faction. 



Mr. Minott explained that Pil- 
grim has been supplying bog sand 
to cranberry growers for some 
time and has convinced these 
growers that, contrary to the 
opinion of many cranberry people 
in this area, washed sand, along 
with the addition of fertilizer, if 
necessary, is more economical 
and effective to use than screened 
sand. Most important, washed 
sand does not contain weed seed 
and is more time saving to use. 

Well equipped with three dozen 
dump trucks (both ten- wheelers 
and trailers), two four-yard load- 
ers, one three-yard loader and a 
shovel, they can and will "go 
anywhere" in order to supply 
their customers with the finest 
bog sand. 




Viev\/s showing one of Pilgrim Sand's 



trailer dunnp trucks unloading delivery of 



washed sand at Atwood Bogs, Carver. 



^v,\:^^> 




.^ i»'.- 




TWENTY-EIGHT 



CAN YOUR SPRINKLERS 
TAKE CARE OF EVERY 

FROST WARNING? 

Is your sprinkler system in good shape? Is it complete? Do you need 
more sprinklers? Is everything in shape for frost warnings? 

PCA loans are helping many cranberry growers get the sprinkler 
equipment repaired or installed. Sprinkler financing is just part of the 
service PCA can give you responsible cranberry growers. PCA is inter- 
ested in providing the money you need for new equipment, sanding, bog 
expansion, operating and harvesting costs. You'll be interested in the 
low PCA interest rate, terms up to 7 years and the repayment schedule 
fitted to your income. 

With PCA money, you're "prepared for frost warnings." Phone your 
PCA office this week, and a representative will drive out to your place 
and explain the advantages and savings to you. No obligation, of course. 



PRODUCTION CREDIT 
ASSOCIATIONS 




MAUSTON 
ANTIGO 
LUCK 
MEDFORD 



WAUSAU 
TOMAH 
MARSHFIELD 
STEVENS POINT 



BARRON 

RICE LAKE 

LADYSMITH 

BLACK RIVER FALLS 





PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
For Sand and Service that Satisfy . . . Call Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 



The newest and most modern plant 
serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 



Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 



585-3377 



PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



TWENTY-NINE 



6<lJt>sJal5 



ISSUE OF MAY, 1966 
VOL. 31 -NO. 1 



k/^!^^''''^'^^ 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareiiam, Mass. 



In the last issue of CRANBERRIES, Josh Hall 
spoke of "the end of our era in cranberries," re- 
lating to the end of his thirty years as publisher 
of this magazine. 

We, the new publisher and editor, would like to 
regard it as the beginning of our era in cranberries. 

During the past thirty years this magazine has 
become the bible of the cranberry industry. This 
has been no easy task. It will be no easy task to 
progress from this point — but we're going to try! 

Our plans for the future include several innova- 
tions, some of which will be obvious — others not 
so obvious. 

You will be seeing and reading pretty much the 
same types of stories and features that have be- 
come a part of the cranberry grower's life. In 
addition, we hope to make CRANBERRIES a 
magazine of interest to the entire family by add- 
ing departments for the ladies and, eventually, 
even to include something of interest to the young 
people in the family. 

Needless to say that this can be only be accomp- 
lished with the cooperation of you — the readers 
of this magazine. The interest you show in the 
future of CRANBERRIES will greatly determine 
the extent of our forward progress. Frankly — 
we'd like nothing better than to hear from you 
regarding any idea you might have which you 
feel would add to the effectivenes of our 
publication. 

As you probably noticed in the last issue, we 
are going to attempt to get the magazine out to 
you by the 15th of each month. We feel strongly 
that his will help keep our news items and fea- 
tures more current and allow both our readers 
and advertisers to receive their copies during the 
middle part of the month of publication. For ex- 
ample, you will be receiving this issue (May) 
close to the middle of the month of May rather 
than late in the month or even, as sometimes hap- 
pens, early in the following month. This may not 
seem important, but we feel it will make for 
much better planning. 

Since this editorial was meant to simply whet 
your appetite, and since we want some of our 
plans to be a surprise (a pleasant one, we hope) 
we'll end it by repeating that we want "our" mag- 
azine to be "your" magazine. Won't you let us 
know how you feel about this — soon ? 

THIRTY 



Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 



CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 

Eagle River 

Wisconsin 



Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 



Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 



Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 



New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



How long before 

the mailman brings your 

cranberry check? 




Growers who sell to Dean's Indian Trail get an advance on their estimated 
crop at the beginning of harvest. They get a second payment when they 
ship dxiring the season, and a final payment at a later date. 

There's this, too. Dean's Indian Trail is a well-known, highly respected 
company. We have strong advertising and merchandising programs designed 
to seU cranberrry products. And we have a dedica- 
tion to making them the best. 

If you'd like to do business 
with a company like this, write us 
a note. You'U probably get an ans- 
wer before your cranberry check! 




Dean's 



hvdixmJiwuill 

p. O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 



THIRTY-ONE 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

Continued from Page 26 

WISCONSIN 

The southern half of Wiscon- 
sin was generally frost free by 
April 8, but several deep areas 
remain in the north central and 
north west parts of the State. 
The top 6 to 8 inches of soil in 
these areas is frost free but the 
next 20 to 25 inches contain frost. 
The deepest frost was 45 inches 
reported in Chippewa County, 
40 inches in Barron, ' 36 inches 
in Lincoln, 32 inches in Oneida 
and 30 inches in Douglas and 
Taylor. 

Seasonably mild weather pre- 
vailed on the last days of March 
with daytime temperatures well 
into the 40's or 50's and night time 
readings at freezing or slightly 
below. The heavy snow cover 
deposited over the northwest by 
the storm of March 22-23 melted 
in an orderly fashion leading to 
little or no flooding. Rain and 
snow mixed on March 31 and 
April 1 mostly affected the nor- 
thern half of the State with pre- 
cipitation generally less than 
three quarters of an inch. Up to 
7 inches of new snow fell in 
the extreme north central coun- 
ties. 

The first ten day of April were 
generally cloudy, windy and cold. 
Persistent snow flurry and light 
shower activity with brisk nor- 
therly winds delayed the advent 
of spring weather. Daily tem- 
peratures across the State ranged 
between lows in the middle 20's 
and highs in the low 40's on most 
days. Precipitation from the snow 
squalls amounted to less than 
one tenth of an inch at most 
points. Runoff continued slow 
without flooding due to the cold, 
cloudy weather. 

Alternate periods of cloudy and 
sunny skies prevailed during the 
week of the 24th. The weather 
was on the cool side with night- 
time temperatures near freezing 
or slightly below on most days 
throughout the state. Highest 
temperatures of about 70 degrees 
occurred on the 24th and 25th. 
Between 1/4 and V2 inch precipi- 
tation fell at most stations pri- 
marily on the 26th and 27th. Up 
to 5 inches of new snow was re- 

THIRTY-TWO 



ported in the extreme north on 
the 26th. 

Additional rain fell on the 29th 
with the weather turning sunny 
and cool over the weekend. 

Cranberry Order 
Grants $7,350 

Wisconsin's cranberry mar- 
keting order will allocate more 
than $7,000 for research and 
frost warning services, accord- 
ing to D. N. McDowell, director 
of the Wisconsin Department 
of Agriculture. 

The order will grant $5,000 
for cranberry research conducted 
by the University of Wisconsin 
horticulture department, and 
$2,350 for the frost warning serv- 
ice of the U. S. Weather Bureau. 

McDowell distributes cran- 
bery order funds upon recom- 
mendations by the order's ad- 
visory committee. 

Committee members are 
Bruce Potter of Camp Dauglas, 
Tony Jonjak, Hay ward, and 
Donald Duckart, Wisconsin Rap- 
ids; Keith Bennett, Warrens, and 
Charles Lewis of Shell Lake. 

The state's cranberry grow- 
ers adopted the market order 
in July 1965, which provides for 
two cents from each barrel of 
berries sold to be used for frost 
warning service and UW horti- 
culture department research. 



Dean Foods First 
Quarter Sales Up, 
Earnings Down 

Dean Foods Company earned 
46<' per share on sales of $37.3 
million dollars during the quarter 
ended March 31, 1966. Sam E. 
Dean, Chairman, announced the 
quarter results at the share- 
holders' meeting Thursday, April 
28, 1966, at the company head- 
quarters in Franklin Park, 111. 

Net sales were $37.3 million as 
compared with $19.5 million for 
the same period a year ago (up 
91%). Net income was $346,00.0, 
down 18% from $422,000 in 1965. 
Earnings per share also declined 
from 57(+ in 1965 to 46(J in 1966. 

Summary figures announced by 
Mr. Dean include the operations 
of Bowman Dairy from January 



20, 1966, the day after it was ac- 
quired by Dean Foods. Also, the 
figures have been restated to in- 
clude the result of operations of 
Liberty Dairy Company, the ac- 
quisition of which is a pooling of 
interest. 

In commenting on the reduced 
earnings, Mr. Dean pointed to 
significant increases during 1966 
in the cost of raw milk in the 
Chicago Area. Also, ligation over 
the announced acquisition of Bow- 
man Dairy Company continues 
and Dean consequently has been 
unable to effectively consolidate 
the two operations as planned, he 
said. Sales of Dean Foods Com- 
pany, exclusive of Bowman Dairy 
Company, however, "were higher 
for the quarter over 1965. 



CORRUGATED 
CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



SERVING THE WISCONSIN GROWERS 



FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 
for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



t DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 5 



READ CRANBERRIES 



OUR PRODUCTS 



i 



strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 



Spiced Cranberries 
Cranberry Chilli Sauce 
Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 
Cranberry Orange Relish 
Cranberry Vinegar 



Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves Cranberry Juice 



Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 
Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 



Cran-Beri 
Cran-Vari 
Cran-Puri 
Cranberry Puree 
Cran-Bake 






:: 



Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 







WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 



INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M - 22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



' 






■ M^ « 



0tl ^* 



YOU Are Reading This Ad— 
Others Will Read Yours in 

CRANBERRIES 




Companies are like runners; a quick spurt can leave you 
exhausted nnA frnilinpi ^fhf-p •* -^^llw..^»tc_r,+ the finish line. 



FRENCH 

STCCKB::iDGE 




uucaii dpidjf 




Ocean Spray is in for the long pull; its size and 
resources mean staying power. And this spells growth, 
profit and security for its grower-members. 

information about Cooperative Membership in Ocean Spray, 
contact any Director or Staff member in your growing area. 



CRANBERRIES, INC. 



ie 



% 




APE COD 

lEW JERSEY 

WISCONSIN 

OREGON 

WASHINGTON 

CANADA 



»e Weifbrecht 
Sfory — Page 7 

ie Fertilizer 
Chart -Page 16 



MR. AND MRS. THOMAS S. WEITBRECHT 



40 Cents 



JUNE, 1966 



DIRECTORY For CRANBERRY GROWERS 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



IMPORTANT 
NOTICE 

CRANBERRIES 
MAGAZINE 

has a new mailing ad- 
dress to be used for all 
correspondence and re- 
mittances as follows: 

Cranberries Magazine 
Box 70 

Kingston, Mass. 
02360 

Deadline for copy will be the lOth 
Publication date will be the 15th 



Electricity — key to progress 



in industry as well as ■j-he home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 



NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 




The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

\VIIjIjIAMSTOWN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMEUITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Maas. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogs and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WAREHAM, MASS Tel. CY 3-2000 



Ocean Spray Announces 
Executive Promotions 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. 
announces the promotion of three 
executives: Fresh Fruit Sales 
Manager, Gilbert Beaton; Stanley 
D. Benson, Sales and Traffic De- 
partment; Dale L. Johnson, Mid- 
western Sales Manager. 

Gilbert Beaton has been pro- 
moted to the new position of 
Director of Grower Services ac- 
cording to Edward Gelsthorpe, Ex- 
ecutive Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager. 

In his new post with Ocean 
Spray, Mr. Beaton will strengthen 
communications between the fast 
expanding company and its grow- 
er-members. Having been asso- 
ciated with the cranberry indus- 
try all his life, he is highly 
qualified for this position. Before 
joining the company in 1956, as 
Assistant Director of Marketing, 
Mr. Beaton was in charge of 
growing operations for the John 
J. Beaton Company; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Beaton Distributing Ag- 
ency; Eastern Manager, Eatmor 
Cranberries, Inc. 

Effective immediately Stanley 
D. Benson will assume responsi- 
biUty as Eastern Sales Manager 
for fresh fruit. Mr. Benson has 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



been with the national cranberry 
cooperative since 1957, in the 
Fresh Fruit Sales and the Traf- 
fic Department. He came to 
Ocean Spray from the New Eng- 
land Sales Company, and was 
Assistant Eastern Sales Manager 
for Eatmor. 

Dale L. Johnson, who is sta- 
tioned in the Wisconsin Rapids 
office of Ocean Spray, assumes 
responsibility as Western Sales 
Manager for fresh fruit. Mr. 
Johnson joined Ocean Spray nine 
years ago when he was appointed 
Wisconsin Area Manager. Pre- 
viously he was territory manager 
in the chemical division of Swift 
& Company and instructor in the 
Columbus, Wisconsin school 
system. 



BROKER 

REAL ESTATE 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

• 

37 Years SeUing 
Cranberry Properties 

o 

LISTINGS WANTED 



590 Second-Hand Picking 
Boxes for Sale 



THEO THOMAS 

MAIN STREET 

NORTH CARVER, MASS. 

Tel. UNion 6-3351 



CRANBERRY PERFUME AGAIN 

HOW DOES CRANBERRY 
PERFUME STRIKE YOU ? Well, 
it struck somebody ! A lab tech- 
nician from a cranberry experi- 
ment station and a Boston per- 
fume maker have joined forces to 
create a scent based on two parts 
cranberry base mixed with one 
part perfume oils. This means a 
new market for growers. If their 
product is edible, it might also 
be perfumable ! 

(Fruit-O-Scope, 
American Fruit Grower) 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



Announcing our NEW LOCATION on 
LOUT POND, BILUNGTON STREET, PLYMOUTH 

AERIAL SPRAYING 

and 

FERTILIZING 

Helicopters and Airplanes 

Fast, Reliable Service 

AS ALWAYS 

11 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 
ON NEW ENGLAND BOGS 

PLYMOUTH COPTERS, inc. 

(Formerly Aerial Sprayers, Inc.) 

THOMAS S. WEITBRECHT (Whitey) 

Phone 746-6030 



SHARON BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON. MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mas*. 
Office Phones: Sharon, SU 4-2011 Carrer UN 6-2234 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now Unloading - 1 Carload Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 



PHONE 
763-8811 — — 



947-2300 



E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 



ROUTE IS 



EAST FREETOWN. MASS. 



SAUCE PACK 
UP iN 1965 

The annual report of the Na- 
tional Canners Association, Wash- 
ington showed that the total pack 
of cranberry sauce for 1965 was 
6,383,441 actual cases. This was 
above the pack of the preceding 
year which was 5,946,729. The 
report is from a summary of all 
reports to the Association from all 
canners who packed whole and 
cranberry sauce. 

It shows that less than half of 
the 1965 crop went as sauce. 



NEW BULLETIN DESCRIBES 
CRANBERRY WEED CONTROL 

A new bulletin that discusses 
the use of CASORONr dichlobenil 
weed killer for controlling weeds 
around cranberry plants is avail- 
able from Thompson-Hayward 
Chemical Co., Kansas City, Kans. 

Printed in two colors, the bul- 
letin discusses the use of the 
company's CASORON broad spec- 
trum weed killer. It deals with 
such things as the application 
timing, application economy, the 
weeds that are controlled by this 
product, etc. 

Copies of the bulletin titled 
"CASORON For Weed Control 
In Cranberries" is available by 
writing to Thompson-Hayward 
Chemical Co., Kansas City, Kans. 
66110. 



Attention Growers ! ! 

for 
your Spring 
weed control 

we offer 
water white 

KEROSENE 

"GRADE A" 

metered trucks 

STODDARD SOLVENT 

SUPERIOR 
FUEL COMPANY 

Wareham, Mass. 
Tel. 295-0093 



TWO 



Mass. Cranberry 
Station and Field Notes 

by IRVING E. DEAAORANVILLE 
Extension Cranberry Specialist 



Personals 
Drs. Bert Zuckerman and Wes 

Miller were in Ardsley, New York 
on May 16 and 17. They were in- 
vited by Geigy Chemical Co. to 
discuss their findings on diazinon 
persistence and breakdown in 
cranberry soils and water supplies. 
Dr. Frederick Chandler, Profes- 
sor Emeritus, left on May 31 for 
Nova Scotia. Fred will be making 
a survey of the area, as a consul- 
tant for the Canadian government, 
for possible locations to establish 
cranberry bogs. He will be away 
about six weeks. 

Spring Clinics 

A series of cranberry clinics 

were held at Hanson the morning 
of May 24, at the State Bog the 
afternoon of May 24 and at 
North Harwich the afternoon of 
May 25. Prof. Tomlinson presen- 



ted a talk on spring insects and 
their control. Prof. Norton presen- 
ted information on frost protec- 
tion, irrigation and pesticide ap- 
plications using low gallonage 
sprinkler systems. Dr. Cross dis- 
cused a variety of subjects in- 
cluding weather conditions and 
keeping quality. The writer talked 
about late spring and early sum- 
mer weed control. 

Keeping Quality 

The final keeping quality fore- 
cast was released June 3 and is 
as follows: 

Weather conditions to date give 
us 9 points of a possible 16 in 
favor of good keeping quality 
cranberries. Based on this point 
system the prospect is excellent 
for very good keeping quality in 
the 1966 Massachusetts crop. Also 
favorable is the fact of very little 



C. & L. EQUIPMENT CO. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Macliinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Furllier Information Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



frost flooding to date. It would 
appear advisable, however, for 
growers to use fungicide treat- 
ments on bogs which have a ten- 
dency to produce weak fruit, or 
to use fungicides where a heavier 
than normal fertilizer program 
has been used. If June continues 
the cold temperature trend, it 
will fortify the good quality 
forecast. 

Frost 

The spring frost season has not 

been too active so far, with 9 
warnings released during May 
and one on April 26. This com- 
pares with 15 warnings for the 
same period in 1965 and 11 in 
1964. These figures include both 
afternoon and evening warnings. 
Frost damage has been extremely 
light this spring with no estimates 
of any damage as yet. The coldest 
bog temperatures occurred on the 
night of May 10 with a range of 
16 to 23 degrees and on May 15 
with a range of 22 to 27 degrees. 
With both April and May below 
normal in temperature, bogs were 
still retarded and most buds were 
in the "cabbage head" stage on 
Memorial Day. 

Weather 

Temperatures for May averaged 

out about 11/2 degrees a day be- 
Continued on Page 15 




"t^^^^- 



CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 

SUCTION EQUIPMENT 

ABC • UTILITY 
WRITE: 



W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-1 
451 1 E. Osborne Ave. • Tampa, Florida 

Phone:626-1154 
1001 Dempsey Rd. • Milpifas, California 

Phone: 262-1000 



THREE 




Come on 

up the 

ladder 

with us 



Things look pretty good for the climb. 

We've got products that are tops. A fine 

name in Dean's Indian Trail. A lot of 

ambition. And a willingness to try new 

ideas. 

To a grower this is important. With 
Dean's Indian Trail you get an ad- 
vance on your estimated crop at the 
beginning of harvest. You get a 
second payment when you ship 
during the season, and a final pay- 
ment at a later date. 

And there's this most impor- 
tant factor in our program for 
growers. It links you with a 
well-known, highly respected 
company with strong adver- 
tising and merchandising 
programs that sell cranberry 
products. And more each 
year. 

Dean's Indian Trail . . . 
the big new name in the 
cranberry business. 




Dean^ 



IrviUmXrudll 

p. O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids • Wisconsin 54494 



FOUR 



Issue of June 1966- Volume 31, No. 2 

Cranherrxes is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 
Application for re-entry at Plymouth, Mass. P.O. pending. 

Compiled by C. J. H 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 



May began with more sun than 
cloudy April, but the minimurh of 
rain continued. There was a light 
shower on the night of the 4th, 
but the drought was still a major 
worry of the growers. 

Cool with High Winds 

Although sunny, the month was 
still cool and with much high 
wind, which was a dry wind and 
added to the danger of forest 
fires, for which there was a high 
burning index. On the night of 
the 4th a warning for frost was 
sent out from the Cranberry Sta- 
tion, this being for "probably 
frost in coldef places. Minimum 
temperature 20 degrees." No 
frost developed. 

Light rain fell again on the 6th 
and the following night brought a 
frost warning of "rather danger- 
ous frost, Minimum 21 degrees." 

But clouds suddenly came in 
followed by rain. This developed 
into the best rain in a long time, 
1.81 inches being recorded at the 
State Bog. 



HOMELITE PUMPS 

for Irrigation & Frost Control 

— TRY BEFORE YOU BUY — 

also 

•Homelite CHAIN SAWS 
•BRUSH SAWS 

Halifax Power 
Mower Service 

Wood St. Halifax, Mass. 
293-6416 

ALTON B. SNELL 



May Cool 

The weather continued cool 
and unsettled, it seeming to be a 
repeat of cold April. The minus 
degrees from average on the 9th 
was a big 19, or slightly more 
than two degrees a day. 

First Real Frost Scare 

May 9th was one of the coldest 
on record for that date. On that 
night growers narrowly escaped 
a very damaging frost in view of 
the water shortage. The evening 
forecast was for "A Very Danger- 
ous Frost, if the wind dies. Mini- 
mum 16 to 17. Tolerance of Early 
Blacks at the State Bog, 21." But 
the wind fortunately did continue 
to blow until about 4:30 or 5 until 
which temperature plummetted. 
The general average was 20 to 23, 
but with two lows in cold spots 



of 17 being reported. It was con- 
cluded there was actually little 
if any loss that harrowing night. 

During the middle of the month 
there were showers and drizzle, 
more resembling April than May. 
None of these was of real conse- 
quence in relieving the lack of 
precipitation until the 19th when 
there was substantial rain. The 
temperature rose into the 60's 
briefly, but the month continued 
to be abnormally cold. On the 
20th this had reached a deficiency 
of 88 degrees for the month to 
that date. 

From about the 20th of May 
the prevailing winds got out of 
the east and ceased bringing in 
cool air from over the cold ocean. 



Continued on Page 12. -— 



AGENT FOR 
WIGGINS AIRWAYS 



BOG 
SERVICE 



AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICALS 

HAND SPRAYERS - TOOLS - POWER EQUIPMENT 
AUTHORIZED BRIGGS AND STRATTON SERVICE CENTER 

R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 

Cranberry Highway West Wareham, Mass. CY 5-1553 



FIVE 



Bog By-Products for 
Home Garden and 
Soil Building 

by F. B. CHANDLER 

Professor Emeritus 

When a cranberry bog is built 
or rebuilt there are various by- 
products from the operation 
which may be useful in or around 
the home garden, or of value in 
improving the general soil struc- 
ture. These may seem to have 
little or no monetary value at 
first, but careful consideration 
will show that there are many 
ways in which these by-prod- 
ucts may be used to good ad- 
vantage. 

Clearing Land 

Usually there are many trees 
that must be removed. If the 
area is a cedar swamp, the small 
trees may be used for bean poles, 
fence posts, etc., in gardening. 
The large trees have many uses, 
such as furniture and shingle:. 
The more common types of trees 
found in bog areas are ever- 
greens and hardwoods. If small 
evergreen trees are cut in the 



fall or early winter they may be 
sold as Christmas trees, larger 
evergreens make good box logs. 
Some of the boughs may be used 
to protect shrubs from heavy 
snow or winter injury. Small 
hardwoods can be sold as pulp- 
wood and the larger trees used 
for fireplace logs or lumber. Any 
stones that are removed may be 
used in rock gardens, stone walls, 
fireplaces, walks, terraces, etc. 

Levelling 

When levelling or grading the 
bog there may be some excess 
peat, this can be used in various 
ways either commercially or 
around the home. It can be in- 
corporated into sandy soils to 
increase the organic matter, 
used when planting shrubs, ap- 
plied to foundation plantings, 
mixed with sand or other light 
soils for potting soil, or baled 
and sold. The sod or turf may 
be cut into squares and piled 
around flumes, culverts or dikes 
to prevent soil erosion. The turf 
may also be used on steep slopes 
as a form of retaining wall. 

Bog Maintenance 

The general maintenance of the 
bog includes the periodic clean- 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

for irosf control 
and irriqafion 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manville Plosfic 
Pipe and Flffings 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 



ing of ditches. The material re- 
moved niay be peat or a mix- 
ture of sand, peat, muck and 
other decayed matter. The ditch 
cleanings may be used as land 
fill or in many of the ways de- 
scribed in the paragraph above. 
Pruning is another cultural prac- 
tice that is done on many bogs. 
The vines removed by the prun- 
ing operation may be used as a 
mulch to prevent winter dessi- 
cation or heaving in perennial 
gardens. These vines may also 
be sold for use as planting stock 
for new bogs. 

Harvesting 

After harvesting, the bog should 
be flooded. The water aids the 
vines to recover from the mech- 
anical damage caused by the har- 
vesting operation. Berries lost in 
harvesting and dead leaves and 
vines that have accumulated on 
the bog surface will float on the 
water. This debris is called 
"trash" and should be removed. 
If allowed to accumulate on the 
bog it provides an ideal location 
for insects to overwinter, causes 
surface root growth which dries 
out easily and is generally detri- 
mental to the vines. The "trash" 
may be used as a mulch or com- 
posted and used in gardens. There 
is one person in Massachusetts 
that collects this bog "trash," 
composts it and sells it in 
quantity. 

People in other sections are 
selling these By-Products to gar- 
deners to improve the soil. If 
you will write me at the Cran- 
berry Station, East Wareham, 
Mass. telling me how you are 
selling — bulk or by ton, price 
etc., I will keep a record and 
let others know about it. 



New Publication 

The following recent publication 
is available free for the writing. 
Maine Blueberry Recipes. Avail- 
able from Cooperative Extension 
Service, University of Maine, 
Orono, Maine. 



SIX 



"WHITEY" WEITBRECHT CONSIDERS HIS BOGS 
A LABOR OF LOVE 

by DONALD CHARTIER 

Thomas Stone Weitbrecht literally "flew" into the cranberry 
business. "Whitey," as he is known to most people, for many years 
operated an aerial spraying service covering the area from New Jersey 
to Canada, and using as its base the Marshfield airport which Whitey 
owned and operated for many years until he sold it in 1963. Since 
the sale of the airport, Whitey has limited his spraying activities 
to the Cape area and has been successfully servicing some of the 
leading growers, large and small, throughout this section of the 
country. 



It was through this work that 
he became interested in cran- 
berries. It was now not just a 
matter of spraying bogs for insect 
control. It was fast becoming a 
labor If love for Whitey and he 
made it a point to learn all that 



he possibly could about the in- 
dustry which he was servicing. 
After attending many meetings of 
cranberry growers and seeing 
what a "great group of people" 
they are, Whitey decided that he 
would look into the possibility of 
buying a bog of hi-^ own. 



But, first let's find out a bit 
more about Thomas "Whitey" 
Weitbrecht. Born in Montana 
some forty-six years ago, he mi- 
grated to the East at an early 
age. In 1935 he joined the United 
States Coast Guard where he be- 
came a pilot and served with this 
organization until 1947. 

In 1940, while stationed at Floyd 
Bennett Field in New York, 
Whitey married Miss Catherine 
Kohan. They are the parents of 
tv/o children, a son, Thomas Jus- 
tin, 24, who is currently employed 
as a mechanic, and a daughter, 
Lana Lee, 18, who graduates this 
month from Cambria Heights 
High School in Carrollton, Penn- 
sylvania. 

In 1963, Whitey bought a three 
acre bog from Colburn Wood, Jr., 




Section of the Weitbrecht bog showing 
sprinkler system. Note portion of the 



Weitbrecht house showing at center right of 
photo. 



SEVEN 




Weitbrecht house at left, helicopter 
hangar just visible at center and 
pump house and garage at extreme 
right of photo. Taken fro:^ oppo^i+e 
shore of Lout Pond, Plymouth, /\Aa"~.s. 



Close-up view of pump house. 





"Whitey" shown standing beside ^^^^^ 
his Bell helicopter, in front of l^i^"* 
hangar. 







EIGHT 



built a very handsome ranch 
type home nestled in a pine grove, 
overlooking Lout Pond in Plym- 
outh, Massachusetts. In addition 
to the Weitbrecht home, and lo- 
cated in the same area, are a 
garage, pump house and the 
second most important building 
on the grounds, the hangar which 
houses the specially-built Bell 
helicopter with which Whitey 
earns his livelihood, as we men- 
tioned earlier in this article, 
spraying cranberry bogs. 

Whitey told this writer that his 
yield last year was approximately 
100 barrels per acre. He added, 
"We sanded the bogs this spring 
and expect a better crop this 
year." He has a temporary 
sprinkler system on one section 
of the bogs at the present time 
and is currently making plans 
to install a permanent sprinkler 
system for the entire bog. "I'm 
a great believer in the sprinkler 
method of frost protection," he 
stated. The bogs are planted 
with Early Blacks and Howes 
and, as Whitey put it, "a few 
gone native." 

For insect control he uses para- 
thion which, needless to say, he 
sprays himself. Regarding the 
spraying of chemicals for insect 
control, he emphasized that he is 
seriously concerned about the 
problems encountered by the 
apiary men. It seems that many 
bog owners believe that it is 
necessary to place the hives as 
close as possible to the bogs for 
best results. "In doing so," 
Whitey states, "they risk the 
loss of many valuable bees and 
even, with the use of certain 
types of chemicals, the entire 
hive." He has been told by the 
people who raise bees that it 
is not necessary for the bees 
to be within a few feet of the 
bogs as they have been shown 
to travel some distance to the 
bog. Whitey mentioned that his 
hives are several hundred yards 
from the bogs and he has had 
no problem with them being 
placed that far away. Since he 
has been engaged in the areial 
spraying of bogs for some 12 
years, he knows of what he 
speaks. "Bog owners who place 



their hives close to the bogs make 
it difficult for the helicopter or 
plane to do the best possible job 
since it must "skip" the area 
closest to the hives so as not to 
spray the chemical too close to 
the hive. This leaves the bog 
area closest to the hives either 
unprotected or not well enough 
protected." 

He stated that he hopes, in the 
near future, to "meet with other 
spray men and apiary men and 
bog owners in order to try to 
arrive at a solution to this prob- 
lem, which is more serious that 
most bog owners realize." 

In addition to the installing of 
a permanent sprinkler system, 
Whitey's plans include expanding 
his acreage to ten acres as time 
goes on. This he feels, "is about 
all that can be efficiently handled 
on a part-time basis." 

Whitey is fortunate in that his 
charming wife Catherine is very 
much interested in both the cran- 
berry bogs and the aerial spray- 
ing business and is very helpful 
to him in his work. Mrs. Weit- 
brecht is also a licensed pilot 
and has a great deal of flying 
time to her credit. 

After the cranberries are put 
away for the season, Whitey 
heads south with Mrs. Weitbrecht 
to — where else? — Florida where 
he indulges in his very favorite 
pastime — deep sea fishing. 

All is not play while he is 
in Florida since he spends some 
of his time as a flying instructor 
with the Burnside-Ott Flight 
School. 

When asked about his hobbies 
he included bog work as a 
"hobby," not that he does not 
take it seriously, but rather that 
he enjoys the work so much 
that it's more like a hobby than 
a job — and it's a pleasant change 
from his regular line of endeavor. 

In summing up his feelings 
about being a new bog owner, 
Whitey remarked that he found 
"something about the bogs that 
is peaceful and tranquilizing," and 
and that he hopes to be able 
to stay in the business for "a 
long time to come." To this may 
we say — "we hope so, too, 
Whitey." 



Farm Bureau to Show 
Liquid Fertilizer 
Application on June 20 

A demonstation meeting on 
equipment and methods of ap- 
plying liquid fertilizers through 
irrigation systems will be held 
June 20 at 6:30 P. M. at David 
Mann's bog, Head-of-the-Bay 
Road, Buzzard's Bay, Massa- 
chusetts. The Mass. Farm 
Bureau is the sponsoring agency 
and will place directional signs 
for visitors unfamiliar with the 
location. 



VOLTA OIL CO. 

Distributor of the Famous 

TEXACO 

WATER WHITE 

KEROSENE 

For your Bog 
STODDARD SOLVENT 

Tel. 746-1340 

Route 44, Samoset St. 

Plymouth, Mass. 



PUMPS 
PLASTIC PIPE 

SPRINKLERS 

A complete line of 

WATER DISTRIBUTING 

EQUIPMENT 

AETNA 

ENGINEERING CO. 

Hanover, Mass. 
TAylor 6-2341 



NINE 



(isso) 



Kerosene 

Solvent 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



Cranberry Clinic Notes 

The staff of the Cranberry Ex- 
perimental Station in East Ware- 
ham, Massachusetts, held a series 
of three cranberry clinics on May 
24, and 25. 

Your publisher and editor were 
able to attend the meeting on 
May 25 at the Ocean Spray Pack- 
ing Plant in North Harwich. 

Following are a few jottings 
made at this clinic. When we 
arrived. Prof. Bill Tomlinson was 
speaking of possible trouble with 
girdler on bogs which were not 
re-sanded or on which trash was 
allowed to accumulate. He said 
he'd been asked about possible 
overdosing when using sprinklers 
to apply chemicals. The answer 
was that there has been no indi- 
cation of injury or harm and that 
there was plenty of leeway. Also 
mentioned was that anything rec- 
ommended by the USDA can be 
applied through sprinklers as long 
as proper care is taken when 
handling these chemicals. Bill 
emphasized that Malathion should 
not be used against spag . . . 



since they thrive on it. Instead 
Diazinon is good. After Bill 
had answered questions from the 
audience, "Dee" Demoranville, 
who acted as a sort of master-of- 
ceremonies for the meeting in- 
troduced Stan Norton who spoke 
on low gallonage sprinkler sys- 
tems. Stan stated that, as far as 
he has heard, most sprinkler users 
are very much satisfied with 
them. Used in time (which seems 
to be the key phrase) they offer 
good protection. Since the plants 
are now more tender, they need 
more protection. Growers must 
"stay on top" of the temperature 
situation — know the temperature 
at all times and not wait until 
the tolerance is reached before 
using sprinklers. 

Stan mentioned the importance 
of irrigation at this time of year. 
He suggested that growers not 
start too late. Take soil samples 
and moisten if necessary — no 
less than V2 inch per application. 
He said that sprinkling for one 
hour once or twice a week is not 
enough. Should apply V2 inch 
twice a week if you have a deep- 



root system. Stan made a passing 
mention of a new fertilizer being 
manufactured at the Bridgewater, 
Mass. plant of the Farm Bureau. 
It has been used on four acres of 
thi: State bog. He said we'd be 
ilea ring more about this at a 
later date. 

Asked what had the best effect 
on fungi — irrigation in the early 
morning or in the late evening, 
Stan said that, perhaps, the late 
evening irrigation was more fav- 
orable, but that it was question- 
able. 

On applying fungicides through 
.sprinkler systems Stan explained 
the following formula: In order 
to assure that you have cleaned 
the fungicides out of your system 
after spraying do the following: 
with the system operating under 
full pressure, put in Fermate for 
a few seconds and figure the 
length of time it takes to get to 
the last sprinkler head. Then, put 
fungicide into the system and, 
after the fungicide has been ap- 
plied, allow the system to run 
water for the same length of time 
it took to get to the last head. 

Irv Demoranville, Cranberry 
Specialist at the East Wareham 
Station, spoke of the control of 
weeds. He stated that new weed 
killers can not be used after late 
water, due to vine injury. He sug- 
gested oils and that owners get 
bogs drained thoroughly before 
using weed controls. After water 
has been withdrawn you have 
eight days during which to use 
kerosene. No longer than that 
and, if possible, less than eight 
days is better. 

If you use a kerosene-Stoddard 
mixture, use only up to five days 
after withdrawing water. Remem- 
ber that temperature is also a 
factor. Bogs are more sesitive to 
temperature changes after appli- 
cation. 

Oils may be used until new 
growth starts. On thin areas it is 
recommended that a light applica- 
tion of kerosene — not over 400 
gallons to the acre before V2 inch 
growth of new grass. A fine spray 
with pump can is recommended. 



TEN 



No iron sulphate should be used 
on newly-sanded bogs within 18 
months. Fuel oil should be used 
in dry ditches. Dalapon in stand- 
ing water as long as weeds show 
through the surface. This is no 
good on floating weeds, however. 
It is a good time to use Silvex 
on brambles on shore. Use one 
gallon Silvex to 100 of water 
sprayed wet at the drip stage. 
For switch grass on shore try Dal- 
apon — twenty pounds in water 
to the acre. Use Stoddard on 
grass after late water. The 
quicker it is put on after late 
water, the better the results. 

To conclude the program. Dr. 
Cross, Director of the Cranberry 
Experiment Station in East Ware- 
ham, touched on the benefits of 
the sprinkler system of frost con- 
trol and irrigation and the outlook 
for the cranberry crop in 1966. 

On sprinkler systems. Dr. Cross 
reiterated what he has said many 
times and what growers have 
been learning for themselves 
recently — that sprinklers have 
pfoven their effectiveness and are 
fast growing in popularity 
throughout the cranberry growing 
areas. Dr. Cross also explained 
that the difference between the 
1965 estimated yield of 650,000 
barrels and the actual yield of 
745,000 barrels was, at least in 
part, due to the increased use of 
sprinklers. It is estimated tha'E 
there will be possibly 5000 acres 
in Massachusetts under sprinklers 
by summer this year. 

Regarding the 1966 outlook for 
the cranberry industry, Dr. Cross 
said quite confidently, that this 
area is capable of producing an 
all-time high crop. He said that 
barring frost within the "next 
three weeks" — the yield could 
pass 900,000 barrels. 

He also stressed, as did Stan 
Norton, that the grower not wait 
until he is within 2 or 3 degrees 
above tolerance to begin sprink- 
ling. Waiting too long in order to 
save water may not allow suitable 
protection. Dr. Cross also sug- 
gested the use of smaller nozzles 

Continued on Page 23 




Cutting the ribbon to open Ocean Spray's new Cranberry House 
in the Tedeschi Shopping Center, Hanover, are, center, left to right, 
Ralph D. Tedeschi, president, Tedeschi Realty Corporation; Edwin 
T. Moffitt, Ocean Spray's Director of Retail Sales; far left, Mrs. 
Hazel Porter, assistant manager, and far right, James E. Gotham, 
Jr., manager, Hanover Cranberry House, and back row left, Mrs. 
Frances Florinda, manager of the Onset Cranberry House. The 
opening ceremony was Monday, May 23. '^ 

Cranberry House '^^^ cranberry red nbbon was cut 

Opened In 
Hanover, Mass. 

The second Cranberry House to 
be opened by Ocean Spray Cran- 
berries, Inc., within a year was 
launched oflflcially on Monday, 
May 23, in Hanover, Mass. It is 
the third in the Southeastern 
Massachusetts resort and cran- 
berry areas now being operated 
by Ocean Spray. The fourth 
Cranberry House will open in 
Falmouth in early June. 

The new Cranberry House is 
located in the Tedeschi Shopping 
Center, on Route 53, adjacent to 
the Boston-Cape Cod Expressway, 
Routes 128 and 3, and to 139, 
South Shore resort area route. 

Edwin T. Moffitt, Director of 
Retail Sales for Ocean Spray, was 
host at the opening ceremonies. 



by Ralph Tedeschi, President of 
Tedeschi Realty Corporation, 
Rockland. 

The new Cranberry House, like 
its predecessors in Onset and 
Orleans, Mass., features cranberry 
specialties in its lunch and dining 
areas, at its bakery and in its 
gift shop. The Cranberry Houses 
are proving highly effective in 
promoting new cranberry products 
and new cranberry serving ideas, 
according to Mr. Moffitt, with 
resultant benefits to both cran- 
berry growers and the cranberry 
growing area in general. 

James E. Gotham, Jr., of 
Middleboro, is the manager of the 
Hanover Cranberry House. Mrs. 
Donald F. Porter of Hanson, is 
assistant manager, and Mrs. 
Claire Haney of Whitman, is 
fountain manager. The head cook 
is Donald Berry of Weymouth. 



ELEVEN 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

Continued from Page 5 
They turned suddenly southerly, 
bringing up tropical air. Tem- 
peratures rose at times into the 
70's. But there were also humid 
days, the first of 1966. 

Good Rainfall For May 

May 28th brought the heaviest 
rain in many a moon, a good 
soaker which poured down stead- 
ily almost all day and the best 
part of this was the rain was 
heaviest where it was needed in 
New England, particularly in the 
cranberry area. A total of 2.27 
inches was recorded at the Cran- 
berry Station, East Wareham. But 
at Orleans on the Cape, more 
than three inches fell and it was 
also heavy in the Kingston-Han- 
over area. 

Total for the month as recor- 
ded at the Station was 6.20 inches. 
This was just about double the 
normal rain for May which is 3.18 
inches. 

No Spring Frost Loss 

On the night of May 30th. Dec- 
oration Day, there was a frost 
warning, but clouds hung around 



most of the night. There had 
been many nights when the fore- 
cast had figured around 30. Thero 
were no frost losses put down for 
May as was the case for April. 
There remained June to get 
through as far as frosts were 
concerned. 

However, in this cold spring 
of frequent cloudiness the crop 
development was still about two 
weeks behind. But with no frost 
loss and the excellent precipita- 
tion the month of May went down 
in the book as good for cran- 
berries. 

Bud "Terriffic" 

The bud was described as "ter- 
riffic," expectations were becoming 
sounder for a big crop this fall, 
in spite of the fact 1965 had 
brought the third largest on rec- 
ord for Massachusetts. 



NEW J E RS EY 

Record Frost Injures Most Blueberries 

The month of May was a bad 
one for blueberry growers. An 
historic frost on the night of May 
10-11 was very damaging to the 



HAIL IS ON THE WAY 
WATCH OUT, MR. GROWER 

^ Protect Yourself Against Loss 

Our neu^ policy protects the berries and vines against 
hail and fire from the time the water is off in the 
Spring until after harvest. 

Stop worrying — buy Hail Insurance 

CRANBERRY RATES ARE LOW 

For further information write or call: 

ALVIN R. REID 

INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Main Street, Hanson, Mass. 



:i93-6336 



293-6441 



early blueberries which were in 
the peak of bloom. Cool rainy 
weather during the pollinating 
period also was adverse. Tem- 
peratures in some blueberry fields 
went as low as 16 degrees un- 
officially. On the upland, at the 
Cranberry and Blueberry Labor- 
atory, a low of 26 degrees was 
recorded in the weather shelter. 
This was the lowest temperature 
ever recorded during the entire 
month of May in the 37-year re- 
cording history at this site. For- 
tunately cranberries escaped 
damage as most of the bogs had 
the winter flood on and early 
drawn bogs had sufficient water 
for flooding. 

The mean temperature for the 
month of May was 59.2 degrees, 
which is 3.6 degrees below nor- 
mal. 

Anxious Time for Cranberry Growers 

The end of the month was an 
anxious one for cranberry growers. 
There were frost calls on the 
nights of May 29th, 30th, 31st, 
June l?;t and 2nd — temperatures 
on cranberry bogs ranged from 
the lowest of 27 degrees on May 
30th to the highest of 38 degrees 
on May 29th. It is believed that 
damage from these frosts was 
very light as most growers had 
ample warning and the supply of 
water was adequate. 

Plenty of Rain 

May was a very rainy month. 
There was rain on 13 days and 
the total rainfall for the month 
was 4.79 inches, 1.02 over nornial. 
So far in 1966 the total rainfall 
adds up to 17.51 inches. This is 
considerably better than the first 
five months of the past two 
drought years; 15.70 in 1964 and 
12.89 in 1965. As a result of this 
rainfall, water supply on most 
cranberry properties appears to 
be ample although there is still 
a lot of catching up to be done 
to make up for the accumulated 
deficiency over the past three 
years. 

Bogs Behind Normal 

As of today, June 3rd, cran- 
berry growth is considerably be- 
ing the normal stage for this 
time of year. Most bogs drawn on 
May 10th have very little new 
growth of uprights. 



TWELVE 



A PROGRESS REPORT OF TRACE ELEMENT 
STUDIES ON CRANBERRIES 

by PAUL ECK, Associate Professor of Pomology 

Department of Horticulture and Forestry 
Rutgers, the State University, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Talk presented at the 95th Annual Winter Meeting of the 
American Cranberry Growers' Association, Pemberton, N. J. 



Little information on the re- 
quirements or the response of the 
cranberry to the trace elements 
iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese 
(Mn), copper (Cu), boron (B), 
or molybdenum (Mo) is available. 
Before any effort is made to de- 
termine the critical levels and re- 
quirements for these elements in 
the cranberry, it was considered 
desirable to first test for a re- 
sponse to these elements in the 
field. More detailed experiments 
in controlled sand culture studies 
would then be planned for those 
elements showing field responses. 
Experimental Procedure 

Two years age, field experi- 
ments were initiated on a com- 
mercial cranberry plantation in 
Burlington County. Six trace 
elements at two levels (none and 
added) were applied in a facto- 
rial design in the following forms: 



Table 1. Trace 


element 


source 


and amounts added to 


cranberries (1) 








ppm of 


Source 


Ibs./A. 


element 


NaFe chelate 


50 


3.0 


Na2Zn chelate 


7 


0.5 


Na2Mn chelate 


1.67 


0.1 


Na2Cu chelate 


1.54 


0.1 


Na2B4O7.10H2O 


8.8 


0.5 


Mo03 


0.32 


0.1 



(1) Zero level = no trace element 
added. 

Iron, zinc, manganese and cop- 
per were added in the form of 
commercially available chelates. 

(2) Boron and molybdenum were 
applied as oxides. The dry form 
of trace elements was mixed with 
talc and spread on the plots by 
hand. Total number of berries, 
weight of berries, cup count, 
grams per berry, and per cent 
fruit rot were recorded at harvest. 



Results and Discussion 

Effect on total nuviher of ber- 
ries harvested. Data showing a 
significant interaction between 
boron and molybdenum for total 
berries harvested for the 1963 
and 1964 seasons is shown in 
Table 2. 



(2) Courtesy of Geigy Agricul- 
tural Chemicals. 

Table 2. Cranberries harvested 
per sq. ft. for 1963 and 
1964 (Average of 16 
plots). 



Treatment 



1963 



1964 



-B-Mo 

— B + Mo 
+ B — Mo 
+ B+MO 



79 
95 
99 

85 



76 

111 

96 

93 



The smallest yields in both 
years occurred in the plots re- 
ceiving no B or Mo. Increasing 
either B or Mo while the accom- 
panying element remained at the 
low level resulted in a positive 
yield response. Increasing both B 
and Mo had a relatively smaller 
effect on yield. One possible ex- 
planation for this interaction be- 
tween B and Mo may be in the 
competition for uptake by the 
plant since both these elements 
are absorbed as anions. Data from 
the second season shows that 
added Mo had the greatest effect 
on yield when low B was present. 

The trace elements play an im- 
portant role in the enzyme sys- 
tems which are involved in en- 
ergy transformations, and assimi- 
lation processes which occur in 
the plant. Boron, for example, is 
believed to be important in pollen 
physiology and therefore may 
have a direct bearing on fruit set. 
Also, it is known that B is in- 
volved in the translocation of 



sugars in the plant and may 
therefore influence berry develop- 
ment directly. Molybdenum is 
believed to be involved in nitro- 
gen transformations within the 
plant, and therefore levels may 
become critical in areas of max- 
imum nitrogen assimilations as 
occurs in the newly pollinated 
cranberry flower. No evidence 
exists, however, of the interaction 
of these two elements within the 
plant. The present data on the 
cranberry suggests that some in- 
terrelationship as effects fruit set 
and/or berry development may 
exist between B and Mo. 

Effect on berry yield and weight. 
Significant interactions between B 
and Mo were also observed in the 
weight yield from the treatment 
plots. In addition, a significant 
interaction between Mn and Cu 
was observed (Table 3). 

Table 3. Total weight of berries 
harvested per sq. ft. for 
1963 and 1964 (Average 
of 16 plots). 



Treatment 



Grams per sq. ft. 
1963 1964 



— Mn — Cu 

— Mn + Cu 
+ Mn — Cu 
+ Mn+Cu 



70 


87 


66 


69 


61 


67 


84 


89 



A balance between Mn and Cu 
appears to be important as in- 
fluences cranberry production. 
When either Mn or Cu were in- 
creased when the other element 
was kept low, yields were de- 
pressed, however', when both Mn 
and Cu were increased, yields 
went up. 

Manganese takes part in many 
oxidation-reduction reactions 
within the plant, and is believed 
to be involved as a cofactor in 
specific enzyme systems respon- 
sible for certain energy transfor- 
mations. Copper is believed to be 
involved in the respiration proc- 
esses and related in some way to 
chlorophyll synthesis or function- 
ing. Several copper-containing 
enzymes have been found in 
plants. The existence of an im- 
portant balance between these 
two elements in the plant has 
never been demonstrated. It is 
known that toxic quanties of 



THIRTEEN 



la 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST 
PROTECTION REMEMBER 
THESE 4 IMPORTANT POINTS 
ABOUT FMC WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole crew 
required for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 
within 3 to 5 minutes, the 
marsh is receiving effective 
frost protection. FMC machines 
have an enviable record for 
operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 




FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA division 

FAIRWAY AVENUE. LAKELAND. FLORIDA 

□ Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 

□ Please have sales engineer contact me 




CORPORATION 



® 



NAME- 



-TITLE. 



either of these elements can, occur 
in plant tissue. There may bt^ a 
buffering effect by these two par- 
ticular elements upon one another 
within the plant thus preventing 
a toxic response. Another theory 
could involve an antagonism be- 
tween the two elements which 
would be manifested in the rela- 
tive uptake of the ions. 

Effect on berry weight. A 
significant interaction in the 
weight per berry was observed 
between Mn and B treatments 
(Table 4). 



Table 4. 


Weight of berry 


in gms. 




/berry 


for 1963 and 




1964 


(Average 


of 16 




plots). 






Treatment 




1963 


1964 


-Mn-B 




0.81 


0.84 


— Mn + B 




0.74 


0.81 


+ Mn — B 




0.77 


0.79 


+ Mn+B 




0.79 


0.8? 



ADDRESS (RFD). 



_ZONE- 



-STATE. 



An elemental balance between 
Mn and B appears to be the im- 
portant factor in determining the 
weight of the individual cranberry 
fruit. When both Mn and B were 
low or high, the largest fruits 
resulted. Again the possible inter- 
relationships between two trace 
elements appears to be the most 
important factor to consider. If 
we assume that field grown cran- 
berries possess low levels of the 
trace elements essential to plant 
growth — levels perhaps even at 
the critical stage — than alteration 
of the existing balance between 
the different elements may be a 
critical factor in evaluating the 
response of the cranberry to minor 
element applications. 

Conclusions 

Sufficient responses to trace 
elements have been shown to 
warrant a more detailed examina- 
tion of the reactions and inter- 
actions that have occurred. Crit- 
ical levels and optimum ranges 
and balances need to be deter- 
mined for those trace elements 
which have given field response. 
Concurrent with this type of re- 
search, a survey of commercial 
plantings for trace element con- 
tents would be valuable. 



FOURTEEN 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous AAoulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 
equipment for over one quarter century. 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS — pumping units, pumps, power imits, 
sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 
Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly WIthrow, Minnesota) 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 

low normal, with the first half of 
the month cool every day, a warm 
spell between the 20th and 25th 
and then cool again the last 3 
days. Precipitation for the month 
was a very pleasant surprise with 
a total of 6.20 inches. This is 
nearly double the 30 year average 
at the Cranberry Station. Over 
one-half of the total occurred in 
two storms, the heaviest on May 
28 with 2.27 inches and the other 
on May 19 with 1.56 inches. The 
rainfall was heaviest on Cape Cod 
and extreme southeastern Massa- 
chusetts, Boston having about 1 
inch total from both storms and 
only 2.66 inches for the entire 
month. We have to go back to 
December 27 and 28, 1964 to find 
a storm at the Cranberry Station 
with more precipitation than the 
2.27 inches recorded on May 28 
and 29 and all the way back to 
May 1963 to find a month with 
larger total precipitation. 



Insects 

Insect activity has been light 
so far due to the cool spring. A 
few blossom-worms, cut worms 
and fireworms are showing up 
and Sparganothis fruitworm and 
tip worm are just getting started. 
A few gypsy moth caterpillars 
were found on a bog in Carver 
the other day. 



1965 Production Over 
A Million Barrels 

Report of Tony Briggs, Man- 
ager of the Cranberry Market- 
ing Committee to handlers show 
that 1,399,956 barrels were 
acquired in the crop of last 
fall, and of this a total of 309,- 
013 barrels sold fresh, 1,010,- 
169 went to processing and the 
shrinkage totalled 80,774. 

The total going to processing 
has steadily increased during 
the same period. 



J. W. Hurley Co. | 

• FUEL OIL 1 

Water White | 

- KEROSENE - | 

For BOGS { 

(METERED TRUCKS) [ 

24-hour Fuel Oil Serrice I 
Telephone 295-0024 



341 Main St. 



WAREHAM 



The total on hand on May 
1 was 110,350 barrels processed 
and in freezers 314,166 barrels 
for a total of 424,516 barrels in 
the "pipe lines" for the start of 
the marketing season of 1966. 

FIFTEEN 



CRANBERRY FERTILIZER CHART 

(REVISED FEBRUARY 1964) 

This chart should be considered as a guide or a tool suid should be used only with judgment. Some bogs have 

high production without the use of fertilizer while others have low production in spite of fairly heavy appUcations of 

fertilizer. More detailed information may be obtained from the County Elxtension Service or from the Cranberry Experi- 
ment Station, ELast Wareham, Mziss. 



General Notes 



1. GOOD DRAINAGE AND IRRIGATION are essential for best re- 
sponse from fertilizer. Many bogs are operated too wet. 

2. OFF-COLOR similar to nitrogen deficiency may be caused by 
insect or disease injury. 

3. BEST QUALITY FRUIT will be obtained with a 1-2-1 ratio. 
Where vine growth is desired, a 1-1-1 ratio may be used. 

4. APPLY DRY FERTILIZER ON DRY VINES ONLY. Careful hand 
spreading gives the most selective application. Split applica- 
tions usually give better results but the benefit may not justify 
the added cost, unless it is a heavy application. 



5. UREA AND DI-AMMONIUM PHOSPHATE may be applied with 
insecticides. Urea supplies only nitrogen, therefore phosphorus 
and potash should be applied to provide a 1-2-1 ratio. For 
example, applying 200 lbs. of super phosphate and 40 lbs. of 
muriate of potash for every 40 lbs. of Urea gives a 1-2-1 ratio. 

6. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO SPRING FROST INJURY is not increased 
by fertilizer applied early in spring or in the fall. 

7. KEEPING QUALITY may be impaired by excessive use of nitro- 
gen because of resulting shading and higher moisture. 

8. Sprinkler systems may be used to apply fertilizer but unless 
distribution is uniform fertilization will not be uniform. The 
system should be checked before using it to apply fertilizer. 



Table 1. Fertilizer to replace the nutrients removed by an average crop. 



Average 

Crop in 

barrels 

per Acre 



50 
75 
100 
150 
200 



Pounds of 
Nitrogen 
removed 
per Acre 



12 
18 
23 
36 
46 



Pounds of Fertilizer per Acre to Replace Nitrogen Removed by Crop 



1-1-1 Ratio 



1-2-1 
Ratio 



1-21/2-1 

Ratio 



7-7-7 



172 
258 
330 
515 
686 



10-10-10 



120 
180 
230 
360 
460 



16-16-16 



75 
112 
144 
224 
288 



10-20-10 



120 
180 
230 
360 
460 



13-34-10 



93 
137 
176 
277 
355 



Table 2. Fertilizer Recommendations for Producing Cranberry Bogs 


Remarks 


Types of 
Vines 


When to 
apply 


How to 
apply 


Grade 


Amount 
Sq. Rod Acre 


NO NITROGEN for 








0-25-25 


1 lb. 4 oz. 


200 lbs. 


Vigorous Vines 


Uprights 




Broad- 
cast 


0-20-20 


I lb. 9 oz. 


250 lbs. 


When the new uprights are over 
2 inches long, the production 


over 
2 inches 


Prefer- 
ably in 


on 


0-14-14 


2 lbs. 3 oz. 


350 lbs. 


may be low because of excessive 


AprU 


dry 


Super 






vine growth. This fertiUzer should 
not stimulate growth of vines. 


long 




vines 


phosphate 
Normal 20' ^ 


1 lb. 9 oz. 


250 lbs. 


20 pounds of NITROGEN 


New 










per Acre for Normal use. 


uprights 
1 to 11/2 
inches 


April 




7-7-7 


1 lb. 13 oz. 


286 lbs. 


Vines with new uprights 1 to IV2 
inches usually have fair to good 
color and good production. This 


or June 
or July 


as 
above 


10-20-10 
13-34-10 


1 lb. 4 oz. 
lb. 15 oz. 


200 lbs. 
154 lbs. 


fertilizer is only to maintain the 
fertility. 


long 


or Oct. 




16-16-16 


lb. 12 oz. 


125 lbs. 


40 pounds of NITROGEN 
per Acre for Weak Vines. 

Vines with new uprights less than 


New 

uprights 

less 


Same 
as 


Same 
as 


7-7-7 
10-20-10 


3 lbs. 10 oz. 
2 lbs. 8 oz. 


572 lbs. 
400 lbs. 


1 inch usually have poor color of 
foliage and low production. Such 


than 


above 


above 


13-34-10 
16-16-16 


1 lb. 15 oz. 
1 lb. 9 oz. 


308 lbs. 
250 lbs. 


vines will respond to fertilizer. 


1 inch 











Issued by the Intension Service, A. A. Spielman, Dean and Director, in furthe^nce of Acts of May 8 and June 30, 
1914; University of Massachusetts, United States Department of Agriculture, and County Extension Services cooperating. 



Note — The above fertilizer chart is only intended as a guide as fer- 
tilizer usage is pretty much an individual practice. 

This chart and those printed in the center section of May 'Cranberries' 
are made up specifically for Massachusetts cranberry growing areas. 



SIXTEEN 



really the berries for. . 






solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special IW or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
jflat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 

see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, Inc. 
Highland, Nev; York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 






AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

JOHN BEAN DIVISION 

) Lansing^ Michigan 



SEVENTEEN 



^jg;^j_5g-j5_jg_g-2g-g-2-;8^SJ^^ r***^ 




Ibp Quality 



USED. CARS 



Repairs on all makes 

Specializing in 

Chrysler-built cars 

Chrysler - Plymouth 
Valiant and S/mco 

SALES and SERVICE 



Robt. W. Savary, Inc. 

East Wareham, Mass. 
Telephone 295-3530 

READ CRANBERRIES 



XS»>»#V»S^< 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass., 02781 
Tel. 617 824-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

OfRce — 362, Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



■ «^«^#^#^#^#^#^«^#^»^^4 



"PHIL" GIBBS TO 
PLYMOUTH COUNTY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Plymouth County Extension 
Service announced last month the 
naming of two new members to 
the County Board of Trustees. 
They are Arthur Chaffee, Jr. of 
Bridgewater, a dairyman and 
Phillip H. Gibbs of South Carver, 
a prominent cranberry grower. 
Mr. Gibbs has recently served as 
president of the Cape Cod Cran- 
berry Growers' Association and 
has been active in various cran- 
berry activities. 

He succeeds Robert Hammond, 
of East Wareham also a cranberry 
grower who has served on the 
board for the past six years. 



BULLDOZERS 
CRANES 



LOADERS 
TRUCKS 



EQUIPPED TO HANDLE 
YOUR BOG NEEDS 



LOUIS LECONTE 



P & L CO. 



CARVER, MASS. 



866-4402 



Africans to Visit 
Massachusetts Farms 

Sixteen Africans will visit with 
farm families in Massachusetts. 
They come from Kenya, Nigeria, 
Zambia and Malowi where their 
professional positions are compar- 
able to Soil Conservation workers 
and County Agricultural Agents 
in this country. 

These African guests will leave 
the University of Massachusetts 
for a three week assignment in 
different counties throughout the 
State. 

As guest of the Plymouth Coun- 
ty Extension Service will be Sutsr 
Chemweno from Kenya. Mr. 
Chemweno is a Technical Assis- 
tant to the Ministry of Agriculture 
in Nairobi and his work deals 
with Soil Conservation, animal 
husbandry, grasslands and ad- 
visory works on cash crops such 
as wheat, potato, onion and maize. 
He also is involved in 4-K Clubs 
which are comparable to our 4-H 
Youth work. 

Mr. Chemweno will be with the 
Plymouth County Extension Ser- 
vice at the Court House in Brock- 
ton from Monday, May 23rd 
through Friday, June 10th. He 
will have a busy schedule during 
this time visiting farm families to 
observe simple farm practices and 
farm skills that may be taught to 
his people back in Kenya; how- 
ever, time permitting, Mr. Chem- 
weno will be speaking to different 
service organizations. 



EIGHTEEIU 



The big co-ops are co-operating 
again. Diamond Walnut Growers, 
California Canners and Growers 
and Ocean Spray Cranberries are 
starting a co-operative warehous- 
ing and distributing system to in- 
crease efficiency, give better cus- 
tomer service, and lower over-all 
costs. Sun-Maid Raisin Growers 
and Sunsweet Growers will par- 
ticipate to some extent. Under 
investigation by Diamond Cal 
Can and Ocean Spray is the pos- 
sibility of joint marketing in cer- 
tain areas where they might be 
able to do a better job collectively. 
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NINETEEN 



Thompson-Hayward 
Adds Five Men 

Thompson-Hayward Chemical 
has added five men to its Agri- 
cultural-Chemical Division mar- 
ket development staff. They will 
be responsible for Thompson- 
Hayward's research and market 
development activities of new 
pesticide compounds in various 
parts of the country. 

"The appointment of these five 
men marks an expansion of 
Thompson-Hayward's activities in 
applied research and development 
of new pesticide compounds," 
said Harold Howard, vice presi- 
dent and general manager of the 
company. He added, "Our com- 
pany's market development efforts 
are also expanding and the recent 
introduction of CASORNr dich- 
lobenil weed and grass killer is 
a development of this new T-H 
marketing group." 

Javies Taylor 

James Taylor has been appoin- 
ted manager of research and mar- 
ket development for the south- 
eastern U. S. region. He will 
work out of Thompson-Hayward's 
Gainsville, Florida office. 

Prior to this promotion Mr. 
Taylor was a member of the 
Thompson-Hayward research and 
development group. He joined the 
company in 1963. 

A graduate of the University of 
Florida with advanced study in 
horticulture, Mr. Taylor is espe- 
cially familiar with horticulture 
crops in the southeastern U. S. 
area. Prior to joining Thompson- 
Hayward he worked with the 
extension department of the Uni- 
versity of Florida. 

Frank E. Phipps 

Frank E. Phipps has been ap- 
pointed regional market develop- 
ment representative for the north- 
western U. S. He will work out 
of Tigard, Oregon. 

Prior to joining Thompson-Hay- 
ward last year, Mr. Phipps was 
with Geigy Chemical Company 
as a sales representative and be- 
fore that was with the Oregon 



State University farm corps de- 
partment as a weed control 
technician. 

A 1959 graduate of Oregon 
State University with a B. S. de- 
gree in agronomy, Mr. Phipps 
majored in weed control science. 

John B. Plant 

Also named a regional market 
representative was John B. Plant. 
He will cover the southwestern 
area of the U. S. 

Prior to joining Thompson-Hay- 
ward, Mr. Plant was also associ- 
ated with Geigy Chemical Com- 
pany as a sales and technical rep- 
resentative. Before that he was a 
sales representative with L. H. 
Butler Chemical Company and 
California Chemical Corporation. 

Mr. Plant completed both his 
graduate and post graduate studies 
at Utah State University in Logan, 
Utah. 

Larry Livengood 

Larry Livengood has been ap- 
pointed a market development 
representative in Thompson-Hay- 
ward's Gainsville, Florida office. 

Mr. Livengood is a graduate of 
the University of Illinois and prior 
to joining Thompson-Hayward 
was with Dow Chemical Corpo- 
ration and the Florida Agricul- 
tural Supply Company in Jack- 
sonville, Florida. 

Charles Reed 

Also appointed a market devel- 
opment representative in the 
north central U. S. is Charles 
Reed. Mr. Reed is a 1960 graduate 
of Kansas State University in 
Manhattan, Kansas, and prior to 
joining Thompson-Hayward 
worked for Sommers Brothers 
Seed Company in Topeka, Kansas, 
and later the California Chemical 
Company's Ortho Division. 

He has been employed by 
Thompson-Hayward since 1962. 

Thompson-Hayward's general 
offices are located in Kansas City, 
Kansas. The company has 33 
branch offices throughout the 
country and produces and mar- 
kets a diverse line of industrial 
agricultural feed and laundry 
products. 



Final Mass. Keeping 
Quality Forcast 
Is Much Improved 

Final keeping quality forecast 
for the Massachusetts 1966 crop 
showed considerable improvement 
over the preliminary. This was 
issued by Irving G. Demoranville 
of the Cranberry Experiment 
Station June 3. It showed 9 points 
out of a possible 16 and indicated 
the prospect is excellent to very 
good. 

The report follows: 

The final keeping quality fore- 
cast was released June 3 and is 
as follows: 

Weather conditions to date give 
us 9 points of a possible 16 in 
favor of good keeping quality 
cranberries. Based on this point 
system the prospect is excellent 
for very good keeping quality in 
the 1966 Massachusetts crop. Also 
favorable is the fact of very little 
frost flooding to date. It would 
appear advisable, however, for 
growers to use fungicide treat- 
ments on bogs which have a ten- 
dency to produce weak fruit, or 
to use fungicides where a heavier 
than normal fertilizer program 
has been used. If June continues 
the cold temperature trend, it 
will fortify the good quality 
forecast. 



Washington Field Day 
June 25 

According to the Cranberry Vine 
the Coastal Washington Research 
and Extension Unit will be hold- 
ing its Annual Field Day on June 
25, 1966. The affair is scheduled 
to begin at 10:00 A.M. and will 
last throughout the day. In ad- 
dition to meeting old friends this 
will be an excellent opportunity 
to hear prominent speakers on 
many varied subjects. The 4-H's 
will be doing their part by serv- 
ing a smoked-baked salmon lunch. 
Make plans now to bring your 
family and friends and make a 
big day of it. This is a once-a- 
year opportunity. Don't miss it ! 



TWENTY 



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TWENTY-ONE 



Washington Canal May 
Still Injure Cranberries 

Optimistic report on the pro- 
posed inland waterway from II- 
waco to Olympia was given at a 
public meeting in the Long Beach 
school May 16 by E. C. Pewters, 
acting director of the Washington 
state canal commission. The pre- 
sentation was sponsored by the 
American Association of Univer- 
sity Women. 

Pcv/tcr.s expressed confidence 
the canal will be found econom- 
ically fonsible although many de- 
tails and problems are still to be 
worked out. While he did not 
foresee an industrial boom for the 
peninsul."^, he did stress the im- 
pact from the recreational use of 
the canal. 



The director admitted the canal 
could bring an end to the Willa- 
pa Bay oyster industry and was 
uncertain what would happen to 
the cranberry industry. Those suf- 
fering losses as a result of the 
project will be reimbursed and 
this is included in the estimated 
cost of the project, he added. 

Actual engineering will be done 
by the Corps of Engineers, Pew- 
ters explained, and they will work 
out designs to protect private 
interests as far as posiblc. Lin- 
ing of the canals through cran- 
berry land is being considered to 
prevent any harmful change in 
the water table. 

The Canal Commission's studies 
will be concluded in September 
and the Engineers will then spend 
from a year to 18 months deter- 



HELICOPTER PEST CONTROL 




mining costs and engineering 
feasibility. It would be possible to 
begin actual construction on one 
portion of the waterway within 
three years, Pewters said. 

The speaker showed maps of 
the /routes being considered for 
the canal. Three locations are 
being studied between the Colum- 
bia River and Willapa Bay. Cost 
of this section, including a tidal 
gate, would be about $30,000,000. 
The gate is needed because of a 
sixfoot differential between the 
river and the bay. 

Eight different routes have been 
proposed for the section between 
Willapa and Grays Harbor. No 
lock or tidal gate will be neces- 
sary and the cost is estimated at 
$28 million. A new route has been 
found, leading into Puget Sound, 
which will eliminate the need for 
many locks and reduce the cost 
to about $28 million. 

While it is proposed to have 
a 35-foot canal and channel from 
the Columbia river to Grays Har- 
bor, it is posible that the ship 
canal would be only on the nor- 
thern sector, with a 14-foot barge 
canal at the Ilwaco end. The 
deep canal would be 250 feet wide 
at the bottom and 500 feet at 
the top, while the barge canal 
would be only 250 feet at the top. 
With river navigation extended 
all the way to Lewiston by 1971. 
Pewters forecast 14 million tons 
of freight a year would move 
over the canal, which would pro- 
vide an inland waterway from 
Lewiston to Alaska, a distance of 
1900 miles. The savings in freight 
would be $1 a ton. 

Pewters answered many ques- 
tions from the audience and said 
the commission is anxious to 
know all problems and adversi- 
ties, so they may be considered 
in their studies and report. 




qqins 4iirwaus 

I I NORWOOD, MASS. ' 

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TWENTY. TWO 



CRANBERRY CLINIC NOTES 

Continued from Page 11 

on well-designed systems to cut 
down on water consumption. 
Even though the sprinkler heads 
may turn only once every four 
minutes, this is considered ade- 
quate. Twenty gallons per acre 
per minute is enough water pro- 
vided it is used in time. 

In closing the session, Dr. Cross 
made mention of the difficulties 
being encountered with the Food 
and Drug Administration in the 
clearance of the use of certain 
chemicals for cranberries. This 
is a result of the 1959 scare which 
proved so costly to the growers 
and which, indirectly, is still 
plaguing them in regard to chem- 
ical clearances for cranberries. 



K. B. Colton, 72 
Ex-Broker and Cranberry 
Grower, Dies 

Kingsley B. Colton, 72, of 1366 
N. Dearborn St., died recently in 
Passavant hospital. 

Mr. Colton was a stock broker 
in Chicago prior to and for a time 
after World War I, in which he 
was a naval lieutenant. He be- 
came a cranberry grower in Wis- 
consin after World War I and 
maintained homes in Chicago, 
Winnetka, and Springbook, Wis. 
Surviving are his widow, Dorothy 
Peacock Colton; three daughters, 
Mrs. Josephine deLoys of Win- 
netka, Mrs. Diana Goggin of 
Chicago, and Mrs. Pamelia Jef- 
fery of Baltimore, and two grand- 
children. 

Services were held at St. 
Chrysostom's Episcopal Church. 



Ocean Spray Cranberries has 
upped its ad budget from $4 mil- 
lion in 1965 to $4.5 million this 
year — mostly to test and intro- 
duce new products. The latest 
under test are preserves and 
frozen concentrates. 

— Fruit-O-Scope 




follow 

the 
leader 



Once again Buckner Sprinklers rate as the number one agricul- 
tural irrigators. When tested for uniform water disbursement, 
Buckner Sprinklers led the field with the highest Coefficient of 
Uniformity (CU). Buckner high CU means more uniform crop 
growth, greater profit per acre. And Buckner design and 
exacting production standards assure sprinklers with a long, 
trouble-free life. For only Buckner has the patented, sand-proof 
GDG Bearing for thousands of extra maintenance-free hours. 
Only Buckner gives you over fifty years of Buckner sprinkler 
manufacturing experience. Follow the leader. Irrigate with 
Buckner— world's leading sprinkler manufacturer. See your 
Buckner Dealer or write: 

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P.O. BOX 232, FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 93708 



TWENTY-THREE 



Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in 
Cranberry Marshes in Wisconsin 



By D. M. BOONE and K. R. BARKER 

Department of Plant Pathology 

University of Wisconsin 



A survey of cranberry marshes 
in Wisconsin for the presence of 
plant-parasitic nematodes was 
made during 1965. Soil samples 
were taken from the beds in 
seven marshes in April and May, 
and 50 samples were taken from 
23 marshes in ten counties in 
August. Altogether, 48 separate 
cranberry beds were sampled. 
Although there had been no re- 
ports of damage to vines that 
could be attributed to nematodes, 
the apparent importance of nema- 
todes to cranberries in Massa- 
chusetts and New Jersey pointed 
to a need for information as to 
the kinds and numbers of nema- 
todes in Wisconsin marshes that 
might be of potential importance 
to the crop. 



The soil samples were taken to 
a depth of six inches. The 
nematodes were extracted from 
the soil by a combination sieving 
and Baermann funnel technique. 
They were collected and then 
examined under microscopes to 
determine the numbers of each 
kind present. 

Plant-parasitic nematodes were 
found in 88% of the samples. 
However, most of them were of 
kinds that ordinarily do not 
cause much injury to plants. The 
most harmful ones present were 
members of the genera Hemi- 
cycloiophora, called sheath nema- 
todes, Helicotylenchus, called 
spiral nematodes, and Tricho- 
dorus, called stubby root nema- 
todes. The sheath nematodes were 



found in only nine of the 48 
cranberry beds, the spiral nema- 
todes in nine, and the stubby root 
nematodes in but two. With few 
exceptions, the number of each 
kind was usually small (1-200/qt. 
of soil) in each sample compared 
to the concentration of nematodes 
necessary to cause noticeable in- 
jury. Therefore, most beds were 
relatively free from the most 
harmful nematodes. 

Nematodes that might cause 
minor injury to the vines were 
most common. These were mem- 
bers of the genus Tylenchus. They 
were found in 39 of the 48 beds, 
but the concentration in each 
sample was relatively low. Aty- 
lenchus and Leptonchus, which 
are suspected of being plant para- 
sites, were found in a few beds 
in low numbers, also. 

In adition to the plant-parasitic 
nematodes, there were predaceous 
forms, that feed on other nema- 
todes or other microscopic animals 
or plants. These were members 
of the genera Trilohus, Monon- 



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TWENTY-FOUR 






HOW PCA MONEY 

PAYS FOR EVERYTHING FROM 

CHEMICALS TO HARVESTING 

Ordered your chemicals yet ? Most growers have. We know because PCA 
money is being used for a lot of cranberry chemicals this spring. 

Many growers are arranging for low cost PCA loans right now to cover 
their planned expenses from chemical orders right through harvesting 
costs. 

You can, too ! Stop in at your PCA office this week. Or telephone and a 
PCA fieldman will drive out to your farm. You'll be pleased with the low 
cost, convenient repayment schedules. PCA loans money only to farmers 
and specializes in knowing and understanding your problems as a grov/er. 

PCA loans can help you make money this year. 



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chus, Dorylaimus, and Prismato- 
laimus. They occurred in very 
high numbers in most of the beds 
and may have been partly respon- 
sible for the low numbers of the 
plant-parasitic forms. 

Compared to the findings of 
Zuckerman and Coughlin (1960) 
in Massachusetts and of Bird and 
Jenkins (1964) in New Jersey, 
harmful nematodes in cranberry 
marshes were much less preva- 
lent in Wisconsin than in these 
other states. In fact, the species 
Trichodorus christiei, which Zuck- 
erman (1961) and Bird and Jen- 
kins (1964) considered to be the 
most important parasitic nematode 
to cranberry, was not found in 
this survey in Wisconsin. 

There is yet the posibility that 
if samples were taken at other 
times of the year, higher popula- 
tions of the plant-parasitic types 
might be found. Zuckerman et al. 
(1964) found that populations 



fluctuated during the season in 
Massachusetts and that they were 
low in number in August. 

Although this survey has shown 
that these are plant-parasitic 
nematodes in cranberry marshes 
in Wisconsin, they do not appear 
to be prevalent enough to be of 
economic importance in most 
marshes in the state. Perhaps as 
cultural practices change, such as 
the increasing use of sprinkler 
systems in lieu of flooding, the 
populations of nematodes will be 
affected. 

At present, the only control 
measures that seem necessary are 
those regarding the prevention of 
spread of nematodes at the time 
of propagation of new beds. Here, 
vine cuttings should be taken only 
from beds where the vines appear 
vigorous and healthy, and should 
be free from trash and soil that 
might be harboring potentially 
damaging species. 



Literature Cited 

1. Bird, G. W. and W. R. Jenkins. 

1964. Occurrence, parisitism 
and pathogenicity of nema- 
todes associated with cran- 
berry. Phytopathology 54:- 
677-680. 

2. Zuckerman, B. M. 1981. Para- 

sitism and pathogenesis of 
the cultivated cranberry by 
some nematodes. Nematol- 
ogica 6:135-143. 

3. Zuckerman, B. M., and J. W. 

Coughlin. 1960. Nematodes 
associated with some crop 
plants in Massachusetts. Mass. 
Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. 526 
30 pp. 

4. Zuckerman, B. M., S. Khera, 

and A. R. Pierce. 1964. Pop- 
ulation dynamics of nematodes 
in cranberry soils. Phytopath- 
ology 54:654-659. 



TWENTY-FIVE 



6<lJt>sJal5 



ISSUE OF JUNE, 1966 
VOL. 31 -NO. 2 



Oi^^«*^''*V^ 



ABOUT BEES 

Elsewhere in this issue you will notice a 
paragraph in an article (Weitbrecht Story) 
in which a grower who is also engaged as an 
aerial sprayer, comments on the use of bees 
in regard to cranberry pollination. 

It is coincidential that, in our mail a few 
days age, we received a copy of "Cranberry 
Vine," a monthly publication of the Wash- 
ington State University and USDA Coopera- 
tive Extension Service, written by Azmi Y. 
Shawa, Extension Area Cranberry Agent, in 
which he states that Dr. Carl Johansen has 
studied pollination of cranberries for four 
seasons, especially on bumble bees. 

Since not too much has been written re- 
garding bee pollintion we take this means of 
elaborating on Dr. Johansen's findings. 

Dr. Johansen has concluded that nest 
boxes for colonization of the bumble bee pol- 
linators of cranberries were developed with 
moderate success. However, best results were 
obtained in warm sunny seasons when pol- 
lination was least critical. 

Cage tests on a bog at the Research Unit 
have shown that bee pollination of cranber- 
ries leads to considerable increases in yields. 
Wind as a factor in cranberry pollination 
has been highly overrated. 

Development of the use of honey bees on 
cranberries in Coastal Washington appears 
to be the most promising way of obtaining 
pollination. 

From the above information, it is obvious 
that you can get along with natural polhn- 
izers but you will have a higher yield if you 
have bee hives at your bog during the bloom- 
ing period. 

Dr. Johansen concludes his report by stat- 
ing that two hives per acre are required. 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 



WISCONSIN SEES SMALL CROP 

Due to the extreme cold in Wisconsin — 
the coldest in many years — a small crop 
is expected. Our old friend Vernon (Goldy) 
Goldsworthy writes, "While I doubt if any 
(berries) have frozen, it is surely going to 



Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 



CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 

Eagle River 

Wisconsin 



Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 



Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 



Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 



New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



make for a late season and a small Wisconsin 
crop, I am sure, as we just will not get 
the size." 

This seems to be the plight of the growers 
in that area. Winters in the upper midwest 
have long had a reputation for being severe 
but this year seems to have been, if not 
the coldest on record, quite close to it. 



TWENTY-SIX 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

WASHINGTON 

May weather in the cranberry 
area of Long Beach was drier 
and cooler than normal. Pre- 
cipitation for the entire month 
was only 2.67 inches as measured 
at Cranguyma Farms. A year 
ago the May total was 3.49. So 
far in 1966 rainfall has totalled 
only 33.31 inches. 

Temperatures ranged from a 
high of 72 degrees to a low of 
32 on the seventh. 



KINGSTON, MASS. GROWER 
EARNS AWARD 

The Plymouth Conservation 
District has announced that at 
its Annual Meeting in December, 
the 1965 Conservation Award 
winner was Mr. Domingo Fer- 
nandes, local cranberry grower. 



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TWENTY-SEVEN 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

Continued jrom Page 12 

WISCONSIN 



Month Cold 

The weather during the month 
of May was cold and dry and as 
of the first of June, many of the 
vines still have their winter color 
and very little growth. There 
were many cold nights in May, 
even up until the first of June 
when the temperature was down 
to about 20 degrees, but it ap- 
peared there was very little in- 
jury as the growers had plenty of 
water and the vines were not too 
far advanced. 

Cooler weather returned for the 
first week of June with average 
temperatures 5 to 9 degrees be- 
low normal. Light frost occurred 
somewhere in the state every 
morning through the first when 
the weather finally warmed up. 
Scattered light rain fell at most 
stations late on the second and 
heavy rain occurred on the third. 

The weekend was warm and 
humid with temperatures ranging 
between highs in the 80's and 
lows near 60 in most areas. Bene- 
ficial rains soaked many of the 
previously dry central and north- 
ern counties on Saturday. 

The budding was good all over 
the state, and so far there has 
been no injury from frost or 
weather conditions. The main 
worry of the growers is the late- 
ness of the season, estimated to 
be about two weeks late. 

Some planting in Wisconsin had 
to be abandoned this year because 
there was not enough help avail- 
able to do it. In fact, another 
worry of the growers at present 
is a shortage of help which be- 
comes more acute each day. 
Considerable marsh work that 
should have been done, such as 
planting and ditching has been 
curtailed because of the lack of 
help, its almost sure that the 
expansion of new acreage in Wis- 
consin will be seriously curtailed 
because of the lack of labor. 

TWENTY-EIGHT 



No Wild Blueberries This Year 
The wild blueberries were fro- 
zen almost 100% because of the 
cold weather we have been hav- 
ing, so there will be very few 
wild blueberries in Wisconsin 
again this year. There are thou- 
sands of acres of blueberries in 
Wisconsin but they usually freeze, 
and this year certainly has been 
no exception. 

Babcock Plant Nearing Completion 
The new plant of Ocean Spray's 
at Babcock is proceeding rapidly 
and it is a boom to the growers 
in that area, particularly in view 
of the labor shortage that has de- 
veloped, as the growers now do 
not have to worry about a labor 
shortage in their area, as the ber- 
ries will be taken to the receiving 
station wet in pallet boxes or in 
trucks. 



Thunder Lake Reports... 

Thunder Lake Marsh, Wise, is 
getting a small shipment of lin- 
gonberries in from Alaska for 
planting as the initial planting 
which was received from Dr. 
Dana of the University of Wiscon- 
sin has done exceptionally well. 

Mr. Norman Holmes of British 
Columbia recently visited in Wis- 
consin and took back some vines 
of the Stevens variety to British 
Columbia which will be of suf- 
ficient volume to plant several 
acres. 

Thunder Lake, also, in addition 
to selling both Ben Lears and 
Stevens to some of the Wisconsin 
growers has made a shipment to 
Charles Larocque at Drummond- 
ville, Quebec who will plant sev- 
eral acres of Stevens this spring, 
which seems to be the coming va- 
riety, as it is an excellent juice 
berry and a good whole sauce 
berry. 

Hector Carslake was also a 
recent visitor in Wisconsin and he 
manages Cascade Foods Canning 
operations in New Westminister, 
British Columbia and does con- 
siderable canning of cranberries. 



Cranberry Products 
Gift House Open 

Cranberry Products, Inc., Eagle 
River, Wise, has opened its gift 
house as of the first of June and 
the enlarged addition makes it 
possible to carry a much larger 
selection of cranberry and other 
specialty items grown in Wiscon- 
sin. The new juice equipment is 
now being installed and should 
be ready to operate shortly after 
the first of July. 



CORRUGATED 
CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



SERVING THE WISCONSIN GROWERS 



FOR SALE 



SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 

Vines 

for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 




INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 



Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



t DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING i 

STEEL S 



READ CRANBERRIES 



OUR PRODUCTS 



strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 



Spiced Cranberries 
Cranberry Chilli Sauce 
Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 
Cranberry Orange Relish 
Cranberry Vinegar 



Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 
Cran-Vari 
Cran-Puri 
Cranberry Puree 



Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 
Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves Cran-Bake 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M - 22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkms Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



Please Mention 

CRANBERRIES 

When You Answer Advertlsemenfs 



■ 






This fellow knocked them silly on the battlefield, but he's 
a total loss at a tea party. 

At Ocean Spray we eat, sleep and live cranberries; . '^^ ^ 
in short, we're Cranberry specialists. 

For information about Cooperative Membership 

in Ocean Spray, 
contact any Director or Staff member 

in your growing area. 




Ocean spray. 



CRANBERRIES, INC. 





KPE COD 

lEVtr JERSEY 

WISCONSIN 

OREGON 

WASHINGTON 

CANADA 



ini 251966 

LtMIVElipy OF 
MASiiCilsETTS 





JOHN D. ROBERTS, A Leading Wisconsin Grower 



40 Cents 






JUI 



966 



DIRECTORY For CRANBERRY GROWERS 



The 
iCHARLES W.HARRIS 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



IMPORTANT 
NOTICE 

CRANBERRIES 
MAGAZINE 

has a new mailing ad- 
dress to be used for all 
correspondence and re- 
mittances as follows: 

Cranberries Magazine 
Box 70 

Kingston, ^lass. 
02360 

Deadline for copy will be the lOth 
Publication date will be the 15th 



Electricity - key to progress 



In industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 




NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INViSTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

AVILIilAMSTOWN 

IRRIGATIOiN 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc , 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. j 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWiERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 
ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screcnhouses, Bog» and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WARBHAM. MASS Tel. CY 5-2000 



■ 



Peninsula Produces 
Tons of Cranberries 

A short feature on Cranberry 
growing appeared in the annual 
vacation issue of the Ilwaco 
Tribune, Washington on June 1. 
The article follows: 

The peninsula often called the 
"Cape Cod of the West," offers 
tourists one of the few opportun- 
ities to see cranberries growing. 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, Wis- 
consin and Oregon are the only 
other cranberry producing states. 

Approximately 300 acres are in 
production with yields varying 
from 7,500 to 25,000 pounds per 
acre, according to the bog and to 
growing conditions. Last year's 
crop totaled nearly 2,000,000 
pounds. 

Indians were harvesting cran- 
berries when Lewis and Clark 
arrived in 1805, but the crop was 
not produced commercially until 
until 1883. Most bogs are small 
(2 to 15 acres) but Cranguyma 
Farms has 120 acres in production 
at Long Beach. 

In early days cranberry harves- 
ting and a backache were vir- 
tually synomonous. Hand-operated 
rakes with long wooden teeth 
were standard equipment. Most 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



growers now use mechanical 
methods, including a lawnmower 
type machine and vacuum picking. 
Others use an "eggbeater" to 
shake the berries from the vine. 



r^^^^#S#^#V*.*^^#^»S*>'^ 



Marucci Director 
of New Cranberry 
and Blueberry Station 

Philip E. Marucci of the Cran- 
berry-Blueberry Experiment Sta- 
tion at Pemberton, New Jersey 
last month was appointed director 
of the new Cranberry and Blue- 
berry Experiment Station at Lake 
Oswego, New Jersey. This was 
announced by Dr. Leland Merrill, 
director of the New Jersey Agri- 
cultural Station. 



BROKER I 

REAL ESTATE 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

• 

37 Years Selling 
Cranberry Properties 

• 

LISTINGS WANTED 

• 

50e Second-Hand Picking 
Itoxes for Mnle 



THEO THOMAS 

MAIN STREET 

NORTH CARVER, MASS. 
Tel. UNion 6-3351 



DRY WEATHER WARNING 

Massachusetts growers are 
warned to keep a close watch on 
the moisture in their bog soils. 
This is the period of growth 
when an adequate supply of 
water is of great important to 
the cranberry plant. Conditions 
have not reached a danger point 
yet, but a few hot days without 
rain could change the picture. 
Cranberry vines require about 
one inch of water a week, from 
rain or other sources, during the 
growing season. 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



C. & L. EQUIPMENT CO 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 

PRUNING FERTILIZING 



RAKING 



WEED TRIAAAAING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS POWER WHEELBARROWS 

RAKES WEED TRIMAAERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS- Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



SHARON BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 185 6 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Maw. 
OflSce Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



Announcing our NEW LOCATION on 
LOUT POND, BJLLINGTON STREET, PLYMOUTH 

AERIAL SPRAYING 

and 

FERTILIZING 

Helicopters and Airplanes 

Fast, Reliable Service 

AS ALWAYS 

11 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 
ON NEW ENGLAND BOGS 

PLYMOUTH COPTERS, Inc. 

(Formerly Aerial Sprayers, Inc.) 

THOMAS S. WEITBRECHT (Whitey) 
Phone 746-6030 



rourrn v-ranoerry nous>e 



IB 



Opened By 
Ocean Spray 



The fourth Cranberry Honse 
operated by Ocean Spray Cran- 
berries, Inc., was opened Thurs- 
day A.M., June 16, in Falmouth, 
Massachusetts. Its location on 
Main Street and Route 58, puts 
it on a direct route from Boston 
and points West and South to the 
Falmouth and other Cape Cod re- 
sort areas, and to Martha's Vine- 
yard and Nantucket Islands. 

Edward Gelsthorpe, Executive 
Vice President and General Man- 
ger, Ocean Spray, cut the cran- 
berry-red ribbon at the opening 
ceremonies, assisted by Edwin T. 
Moffitt, Director of Retail Sales. 
Guests were Falmouth Selectmen, 
Antone Mogardo, Chairman of the 
Board; Francis L. Hankinson, 
Chairman, Board of Assessors; 
John D. Mello, Jr., Chairman, 
Board of Public Welfare, and 
Myron Madeiros, prominent bus- 
inessman of the town. 

Cranberry Juice Cocktail and 
Cranapple were served from five- 
foot champagne glasses carved in 
ice by Ocean Spray baker, Donald 
Casey, under the direction of the 
head baker, Normande H. Bar- 
rette. 

Mrs. Edna Hilliard of Falmouth 
is manager of the new Cranberry 
House. Cranberry specialities are 
featured in the red and gold 
dining room, lunch bar, gift shop, 
bakery, and frozen food section. 
The dining room seats 70 and the 
lunch bar, eighteen. Hours are 8 
to 8, seven days a week. 

Falmouth Cranberry House is 
the second opened by Ocean 
Spray in less than a month. The 
other Cranberry Houses are in 
Hanover, Orleans and Onset, 
southeastern Massachusetts. 



READ 
YOUR /MAGAZINE 



TWO 



Mass. Cranberry 
Station and Field Notes 

by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 
Extension Cranberry Specialist 



Personals 

Prof. Stan Norton attended the 
Annual Meeting of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers 
held in Amherst, Massachusetts, 
the week of June 27, He is a 
member of the Irrigation System 
Design Committee for this organ- 
ization. 

Daniel Brown, a recent gradu- 
ate of New Bedford High School 
and winner of first prize in the 
New Bedford Science Fair, will 
be working at the Cranberry 
Station this summer. Danny will 
work under the direction of 
Dr. Devlin on several projects. 

Frost 

There were a total of 13 frost 
warnings released during the 
spring of 1966 as compared to 
22 in 1965 and 18 in 1964. This 
includes afternoon and evening 
warnings. Frost damage has 




CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 

SUCTION EQUIPMENT 

ABC • UTILITY 
WRITE: 



W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-1 
451 1 E. Osborne Ave. • Taitipa, Florida 

Phone: 626-1154 
1001 DempseyRd. • Milpitas, Californio 

Phone: 262-1000 



been very light, probably one 
half percent or less of the crop. 
We wish to thank both George 
Rounsville and Kenneth Roche- 
fort for their excellent work in 
frost forecasting this sp r i n g . 
These fellows do the job night 
after night and their work is 
greatly appreciated. We are also 
indebted to the weather observ- 
ers, telephone distributors, radio 
stations and the U. S. Weather 
Bureau personnel for the part 
they play in this service which 
is sponsored by the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association. 

Annual Meeting 

The 79th Annual Meeting of 
the Cape Code Cranberry Grow- 
ers Association will be held 
Tuesday, August 23 at the Cran- 
berry Experiment Station begin- 
ning at 10:00 A.M. The program 
is largely complete at this time 
and will include machinery and 



equipment exhibits, guided tours 
of the State Bog and a chicken 
barbeque at lunch. After lunch, 
there will be a short business 
meeting, a talk by Dr. David W. 
Robinson of Ireland and the 
crop report by Mr. Byron S. 
Peterson of the Crops Reporting 
Service . 

Crop Prospects 

From all reports and obser- 
vations it appears that Massachu- 
setts has another heavy bloom. 
Most bogs are looking excellent 
and the casoron treatments have 
been quite effective generally. 
We have the potential for another 
large crop. 

We want to urge growers to 
cooperate with the New England 
Crop Reporting Service by mail- 
ing their crop estimates in Aug- 
ust to Mr. B. S. Peterson. A 
large number of reports makes a 
more accurate estimate possible 
and adds to the value of this 
service. 

Insects and Weeds 

The first fruitworm moth was 
caught in Prof. Tomlinson's 
black-light trap on the evening 
of June 12, this is later than 
last year but about the usual 
time as compared with other 
years. 

Large number of girdler moths 
(Continued on Page 6) 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now Unloading - 1 Carload Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 



763-8811 



PHONE 

— — 947-2300 



E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 



ROUTE 18 



EAST FREETOWN. MASS. 



THREE 



We'd like 

to put you 

on the map! 




We mean it. We want a map full of growers. Good growers for Dean's Indian 
Trail. Men who like the way we do business. 

Suppose you make the map at Dean's Indian Trail, then what? For one, you 
get an advance at the beginning of harvest on your estimated crop. You get a 
second payment when you ship during the season, and a final payment at a later 
date. For another, your crop will go into the finest 
cranberry products made. For a third, you'll be tied in 
with a well-known, highly respected company. 
A company with strong advertising and 
merchandising programs to sell cranberry 
products. 

Dean's Indian Trail... the big new name 
in the cranberry business. 




Deanls 



\\rvdJUmJkouill 



p. O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids • Wisconsin S4494 



FOUR 



Issue of July 1966 — Volume 31, No. 3 

Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year 
Application for re-entry at Plymouth, Mass. P.O. pending. 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 



Compiled by C J. H 



MASSACHUSETTS 

June Starts Cool 

June began with the same 
cooler-than-normal trend of April 
and May. There were also fre- 
quent and highly-localized light 
showers. But this was June and 
the temperature began to get 
warmer. At the end of the first 
week the month was a plus 7 
and no longer a minus as it had 
been all spring. 

Mid May was rather unset- 
tled and although there were a 
few hot days there were many 
chilly ones. The weather in gen- 
eral was scarcely the "perfect" 
days of June. On the 10th there 
came a deluging, drenching rain. 
The precipitation was from one 
to three inches over the cran- 
berry area but the State Bog 
recorded only 1.13 inches. This 
was a very helpful storm. 

June Frost Warning 
A cranberry frost warhingwas 
issued on the 11th, "possible frost 
with minimum 28 to 29. Toler- 
ance of Early Blacks at State 
Bog 291/2-" Not much frost de- 



HOMELITE PUMPS 

for Irrigation & Frost Control 

— TRY BEFORE YOU BUY — 

also 

•Homelite CHAIN SAWS 
•BRUSH SAWS 

Halifax Power 
Mower Service 

Wood St. Halifax, Mass. 
293-6416 

ALTON B. SNELL 



veloped although there were a 
few reports of 29. 

Development Still Behind 

Although bogs were beginning 
to "look good," some development 
was still behind schedule in this 
backward season of \1966. 

Adding to the less-than-perfect 
days of June, Hurricane Alma, 
which had been spawned a week 
before off Yucatan in the Gulf 
of Mexico, whirled through the 
Caribbean, and hit the West coast 
of Florida, went through Georgia 
and out into the Atlantic and 
proceeded north, passing over 
Cape Cod on June 13th. But by 
that time Alma, the earliest hur- 
ricane on record was no longer 
a hurricane or even a tropical 
storm and she brought only light 
rain and light winds to the 



cranberry area. But she recalled 
memories of other hurricanes 
which in the past had caused 
much havoc, including damage to 
bogs particularly in close to shore 
bogs on the Cape and in New 
Jersey. 

She added a little still-needed 
precipitation to the drought area 
and fog and some drizzle the 
following day. On that day the 
humidity reached a high degree 
and there was high heat which 
was not especially good for the 
coming crop. 

In this unsettled month of 
June, the month started colder 
than normal then became warmer 
than normal but by the 15th 
was back to cooler again by sev- 
eral degrees. This would not help 
advance development much but 



3£=teSJ=SC=fciC=SS=S:ie=iS=[e£=C5=S:S=[£5e^^ 



AGENT FOR 
WIGGINS AIRWAYS 



BOG 
SERVICE 



AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICALS 

HAND SPRAYERS - TOOLS - POWER EQUIPMENT 
AUTHORIZED BRIGGS AND STRATTON SERVICE CENTER 

R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 

Cranberry Highway West Wareham, Mass. CY 5-1553 



FIVE 



on the other hand might tend 
to improve the keeping quality. 
June Ends Warm 
During the latter part of June 
summer came with a bang and 
the month ended not far from 
normal, but slightly on the 
warm side. This began to push 
the crop development to normal 
in timing whereas all spring it 
had been retarded. 

Rainfall Off 

Rainfall, however was again 
deficient, the total for June being 
only 1.71 inches as recorded at 
Cranberry Station. Normal for 
June is 3.21 inches. 

Blossom was showing up by 
June first and by the fourth the 
vines were in full bloom, and 
this was reported as very good. 
Bumble bees were plentiful to 
aid pollination, and of course 
many growers had rented colonies 
of honeybees as well. 

July Starts With Heat Wave 

July opened very hot and hu- 
mid with a bright hot sun. A 
real heat wave. The 3rd and 4th 
of July were real scorchers, the 
humidity reaching a high un- 
comfortable degree. Then on the 
night of the fourth cold Canadian 
air spread over New England 
a^d the temperature dropped to 
a comfortable 60-70, with low 
humidity. 



Blossom Looked Fine 
So with the spring frost sea- 
son behind with no important 
damage, the bloom very good, 
prospects for a large 1966 pro- 
duction continued to be excellent. 
Only trouble was that bogs again 
were getting to be rather dry 
and more rain was definitely 
needed. 

(Continued on Page 11) 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 

have been noted on many bogs 
during June, this pest has been 
on the increase in recent years 
because of our dry summers. Bill 
Tomlinson advises that the di- 
eldrin or DDT treatments listed 
on the Insect Control Chart give 
good control of the larval or 
worm stage. These treatments 
should not be applied when the 
bog is in bloom. Bill also warns 
that growers should be alert to 
possible infestations of fruit- 
worm and Sparganothis fruit- 
worm. 

Dalapon may be used until the 
end of July for treating ditch 
weeds or poverty grass and 
switch grass on shore. Fuel 
oil is also helpful for weed con- 
trol in dry ditches. Shores and 
dikes may be sprayed with a 
solution of 2,4,5-T and water to 



^11 



IIII!HI!IIBIII1I 



iiBiiiinin&ii 



FOR SALE 

25 Acres Bog, 10 Acres run out 

House of 7 rooms, V/2 baths, Al 

Screenhouse and Sheds Al - No Equipment 



Write to 

GEORGE A. CROWELL 

p. O. BOX 186 
DUXBURY, MASS. 02332 

NO PHONE CALLS ANSWERED 



control broadleaved weeds, this 
is especially good on poison ivy. 
Weather 
June was a warm, dry month, 
with temperatures averaging 1 Vz 
degrees a day above normal. 
The first half of the month was 
cool and the last half hot. Rain- 
fall totalled only 1.71 inches at 
the Cranberry Station which is 
only slightly more than 50 per- 
cent of the average. Two-thirds 
of the total precipitation for the 
month fell on one day, the 10th. 



PUMPS 
PLASTIC PIPE 

SPRINKLERS 

A complete line of 

WATER DISTRIBUTING 

EQUIPMENT 

AETNA 

ENGINEERING CO. 

Hanover, Mass. 
TAylor 6-2341 



For Sale 



1953 
QUICK-WAY TRUCK SHOVEL 

4/10 yd. machine with two 
attachments (shovel front and 
back hoe) mounted on Walter 
Snow Fighter truck, four wheel 
drive. $1,500. 

OLIVER DIESEL ENGINE 

Completely rebuilt, never used 
since rebui'ding. Fits 88 tractor 
or usable for boats, power plant., 
etc. Bore and sleeves oversize. 
$400. 

MILTON F. CASH 

65 David Road 
No. Attleboro, Mass. 695-5976 



SIX 



MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. ROBERTS, WEARY OF 
'BIG CITY' LIFE, TAKE UP CRANBERRY GROWING 

By CLARENCE J. HALL 

Couple Have Nearly 70 Acres at Back River Falls 
Wisconsin, and Plan More. Roberrs Has Produced 
Innovations in Cranberry Growing. Both Have Been 
in Government Service. 




John Roberts, Mrs. Roberts and daughters Kay and Nina 

"We were weary of big cities, and confining indoor work," said 
Mr. and Mrs. John Daly Roberts, "and we wanted an outdoor life and 
were attracted to cranberries as a means of achieving such a life." 
Also, Mr. Roberts had "grown up" near the berry producing area of 
Wisconsin Rapids, so was not exactly unaware of the cranberry 
industry. Mr. Roberts is a forceful individual who goes after what 
he wants. 

Today, Mr. Roberts is President of the Perry Creek Cranberry 
Corporation, with 40 acres of old production and 22 in new planting; 
100 acres in all in property. At present Roberts is preparing 30 acres 
additional to be planted in 1967. 

Mr. Roberts and his lovely family live in a beautiful new white 
house which is very nicely landscaped. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts raise 
Registered American Saddle Bred horses and have 3 registered labra- 
dor dogs. Mr. Roberts may be aiming for something of the life of a 
country squire. 



An Old Property 

The Roberts marsh is one of the 
oldest of the properties in the 
State, going back to 1887, started 
by Henry Gebhardt and en- 
larged to 40 acres by Henry and 
his son Phillip, and by Fred 
Lange. Following Henry's death, 
his widow and two children, 
Phillip and AHce Gebhardt oper- 
ated the property and when 
Phillip passed away his Mother 
sold her interest to Fred and 
Gladys Lange. Fred Lange died 
in 1956 and in 1957 Mr. Roberts 
acquired the property from Alice 
Gebhardt and Gladys Lange. 

In 1951 Mr. Roberts acquired 
the Louis Wysocki marsh at Hay- 
ward, Wisconsin — a property 
then of 7 acres. In the 10 years 
he owned this marsh, he doubled 
its size, and shipped a 10 year av- 
erage production of 187 bbls. per 
acre. Mr. Roberts believes this is 
some sort of 10 year record. 

While he owned this marsh, he 
developed a new bog at Gordon, 
Wis., planting 22 acres, and scalp- 
ing 40. This is now owned by 
Tony Jonjak, a leading figure in 
Wisconsin Cranberries. 

The Hayward property is now 
owned and operated by David 
Lyman, Mr. Roberts' nephew. 

The Perry Creek Cranberry 
Corporation property, at Black 
River Falls, is planted to Howes, 
Early Blacks, McFarlins, Metallic 
Bells, Pennants, some Stevens 
and Searles. His new plantings 
are Searles and Howes. For a 
water supply he depends upon 
Perry Creek and four reservoirs. 
They vary in size from 15 to one 
hundred acres. 



Marsh All Sprinkled 

The entire marsh is under 
sprinklers, Shur Rane, with about 
600 heads. Roberts has %" Ber- 
keley pumps and three Interna- 
tional engines of 250 HP each. 
A fourth unit, with a Ford indus- 
trial Engine, powers a 5" pump 
and is used on new plantings. Be- 
tween these units he can pump 
7400 gallons of water per minute. 



SEVEN 



Roberts is a Distributor for 
Shur Rane Irrigation systems, 
John Bean Division, Food Ma- 
chinery Corporation, Lansing, 
Michigan and San Jose, Califor- 
nia. He installs systems for other 
growers, doing all his own engin- 
eering and construction layout. 
Mr. Roberts has specialized in 
frost irrigation work for cran- 
berry growers and has developed 
with John Bean Division and on 
his own, a number of new tech- 
niques and arrangements of valves 
and piping best suited for Wis- 
consin Cranberry growers sprin- 
kler problems. Possessing such a 
large system of his own, he is 
very cost conscious and endeavors 
to develop systems with these 
economics in mind. 

Some of his new plantings are 
on peat and some on sand. For 
the peat plantings he plants di- 
rectly on the raw peat, but he 
sands later as he believes in the 
use of sand. He has plenty of 
available sand on his property. 
Some of his new plantings have 
beds 1500' long, containing 6 plus 
acres per bed. 

Does His Own Bog Work 

Roberts is his own foreman and 
his own frost manager. He tends 
his horses himself; he had two at 
the time of the interview, having 
recently sold two fine mares. He 
has five employees. He harvests 
his crop wet with three Case 
picking machines, using steel har- 
vest boats, and can pick 6-7 acres 
a day. He uses a Niagara ground 
duster and John Bean sprayer, for 
fungicide work and pest control. 
Roberts is proud, as are seemingly 
so many other Wisconsin growers 
to possess a fine machine shop. 

Roberts likes to do as much of 
his own work as he can, particu- 
larly at frost time. "You have to 
watch a sprinkler system," he 
says, "just as you do any mechan- 
ical device." 

Own Frost Alarm System 

Roberts has developed a new 

type of frost alarm system, using 

three thermo couples, instead of 

thermometers. He has them pre- 




A view of the large, white Roberts Home at 
Perry Creek Cranberry Corporation. 




Roberts uses an International Engine and Pump 
to supply his complete sprinkler system 




The Roberts' warehouse on the property at Black River Falls 



EIGHT 



set at 35° any one of which ring 
a loud bell at his home when this 
temperature is reached on the 
marsh. The preset controls are 
located in the vines themselves, 
one a half mile from his home. 
"These are not expensive alarm 
devices, in my judgement, and 
place frost alarm devices within 
the reach of any grower, insofar 
as cost is concerned," he avers. 

Mr. Roberts has introduced a 
number of innovations to the cran- 
berry industry and last year de- 
veloped a berry dumping bin to 
feed cranberries without bruising 
of any nature, from trucks into 
degrassing machines and dryers. 
This unit is hydraulically powered 
and handles three tons of fruit 
at one time. Controls are all 
electric push button and the bin 
and degrassing unit and dryer are 
all operated by one woman em- 
ployee at harvest time. 

Lately he has developed a new 
type pruner and a prototype har- 
vesting machine, both of which 
show much promise for use in 
the future. 

Perry Creek Cranberry Cor- 
poration owns a good deal of 
equipment, all designed for spe- 
cific use in cranberry raising. 
There are four trucks, backhoe, 
front end loader, tour tractors, 
ditch cleaners, trimmers, mowers, 
forklift, two planters and as al- 
ready stated a complete machine 
shop. The berry packing facility 
consists of five sorting mills and 
two cellophane of polylines and 
the property can pack 750 to 1,000 
24-1 lb. packages of fresh fruit 
daily in season. 

Roberts gets about 100 bbls. per 
acre in production from his old 
acres, but for the past three years 
his crop has been curtailed by 
hail. He complained in a Law Suit 
three years ago, alleging a certain 
chemical had injured his produc- 
tion in that season. He was the 
victor in this suit as reported in 
a recent issue, being awarded 
$24,000 in damages to his crop. 
The issue is being decided by the 
Supreme Court of Wisconsin. 



His Career 
Roberts was born in Wisconsin 
in 1918, his father John Roberts, 
being a lawyer in Wisconsin 
Rapids. Mr. Roberts, Sr. is 90 
years of age and still engaged in 
the active, every day practice of 
his profession. John D. went to 
grade and high school in Wiscon- 
sin Rapids. Then he attended 
Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin. 
There he majored in Economics 
and received a BA degree. He 
also attended summer school at 
the University of Wisconsin, 
Madison, where he took some law 
courses. 

In 1941 he entered the U. S. 
Army as a private and attended 
Officers Candidate School at Fort 
Benning, Georgia. He came out of 
World War II with the rank of 
Major. He served in England, 
Scotland, Holland, Belgium and 
France. He saw much action. He 
was in the London Blitz, Battle 
of the Bulge and landed on the 
beaches of France at D day plus 
3. Later he was Commandant of 
Troops at Antwerp, Belgium. 

He holds the Purple Heart and 
Cluster, Bronze Star, French Croix 
de Guerre, Legion of Merit, Order 
of Leopold from the Belgium gov- 
ernment. He thus has compiled a 
distinguished war record. He was 
honorably discharged in Decem- 
ber 1945. 

While in service, in 1942, he 
married Miss Ruth E. Will of 
Wisconsin, the marriage having 
taken place in Washington, D. C. 
She had also attended Ripon 
College where she majored in 
Mathematics, Chemistry and 
Physics. 

The most attractive and dimin- 
utive Mrs. Roberts also had an 
unusual career in business. While 
in Washington, D. C, in 1942, she 
worked for the FBI in Crypto- 
graphy. Her duties in this de- 
partment were decoding and en- 
coding of messages and code an- 
alysis. In 1943 she transferred 
to the Applied Physics Laboratory 
of Johns Hopkins University, do- 
ing research work on the prox- 
imity VT fuse. The proximity fuse 



involved a miniature radio re- 
ceiving and sending device, moun- 
ted in the warhead of a projec- 
tile. Johns Hopkins University 
performed this work under con- 
tract with the Office of Scientific 
Resean^h and Development, 
headed by the eminent Vannevar 
Bush. For this effort Mrs. Roberts 
was honored and given the "Re- 
search and Development Award" 
by the Bureau of Ordinance, U. S. 
Navy Department. 

Following John's discharge from 
service, he worked for five years 
for the U. S. Government; for a 
time as a civilian Administrator 
for the Navy Department in 
Washington, D. C, and then four 
years as an Advisor on Veterans 
Affairs in Wisconsin. At that time 
Mr. and Mrs. Roberts were living 
in Washington, D. C. They are 
the parents of two daughters, Kay 
13, and Nina 5. 

In 1954, Roberts went to work 
for Ocean Spray and set up their 
office in Wisconsin Rapids. While 
he was in this position as State 
Manager, from 1954 to 1957 
Ocean Spray tonnage in the State 
increased from about 10,000 bbls. 
to over 150,000. 

Roberts was one of the prime 
movers in forming the Jackson 
County Association of Cranberry 
Growers and is now its President. 
The purpose of the organization 
is to promote the general interest 
and welfare of the county 
growers. This is the only County 
Association of Cranberry growers 
in Wisconsin. He is a past Direc- 
tor of Ocean Spray; from 1954 to 
1957 he was a member of the Co- 
op's Executive Committee and 
during these same three years 
was a member of the Cranberry 
Institute. He is a member of the 
Wisconsin Advisory Committee for 
Ocean Spray. 

He is a member of the local 
Lions Club, of the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, and a past member 
of the Elks. 

This aggressive younger grower 
of Black River Falls is strong for 
quality fruit and for shipping as 
much fresh as possible. Normally, 
this is about one half of his crop. 



NINE 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

for frost control 
arid irrigation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manville Plastic 
Pipe and Fittings 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 



Production Of Highbush Blueberry Pollen And Its 
Germination in Vitro As Affected By pH And 
Sucrose Concentration 

By G. W. EATON 

Division of Plant Science, The University of British Columbia 

Vancouver, British Columbia 



Merrill (2) allowed pollen from 
several highbush blueberry (Vac- 
ciniuvi corymhosmn L.) varieties 
to germinate in sucrose solutions 
of several concentrations and con- 
cluded that higher concentrations 
(up to 12%) of sucrose favored 
germination. The varieties were 
Rubel, Cabot, Adams, Pioneer, 
and Harding. Wood and Barker 
(3) obtained maximum germina- 
tion of 35% with fresh lowbush 
blueberry pollen (Vacciniuni an- 
gustifolium Ait.) after 24 hours 
on 0.5% agar and 13.5% sugar. 

Aalders and Hall (1) reported 
varying degrees of male sterility 
in clones of the lowbush blueberry 
but there seems to be no such re- 
port for the highbush blueberry. 
The present study was undertaken 
to obtain further information on 
the germination requirements of 



the highbush blueberry and to 
obtain information on tetrad 
abortion. 

The pollen used in this experi- 
ment was collected from six high- 
bush blueberry varieties. The 
proportions of abortive and nor- 
mal tetrads were determined from 
samples mounted in acetocarmine. 
Germination media were pre- 
pared containing 5%, 10%), 15%, 
and 20% sucrose. The initial pH 
of the sucrose solutions was be- 
tween 6.2 and 6.3. Some of each 
sucrose solution was then adjus- 
ted to pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 by 
addition of either HCI or NaOH 
as required. All media contained 
25 p. p.m. manganese (supplied as 
manganese sulfate) and 36 p.p.m. 
boron (supplied as bofic acid). 
The treatments were in 4 x 4 fac- 
torial arrangement with the va- 



rieties providing six complete 
blocks, and 200 normal tetrads 
being an experimental unit. Pollen 
was germinated on depression 
slides over moist filter paper in 
petri dishes at 26-28° C for 17 
hours. Tetrades which produced 
length greater than the tetrad 
at least one pollen tube with 
diameter were classified as ger- 
minated. 

Weymouth, Berkeley, and Ran- 
cocas shed noticeably less pollen 
than Jersey, Dixi, and Pemberton. 
The six varieties fell into the 
same two groups on the basis of 
tetrad abortion (Table 1). Pem- 
berton and Weymouth similarly 
fell into these groups on the basis 
of germination (Table 2). Va- 
rieties differed (P = .001) in tet- 
rad germination (Table 2). Pem- 
berton had 70.6% while Wey- 
mouth had only 5.5% germination. 
The remaining varieties were in- 
termediate in germination and did 
not differ significantly (P = .05) 
from each other. 

There were highly significant 
differences (P = .001) in tetrad 
germination among pH levels. 
Considering all six varieties to- 
gether, only pH 4.0 significantly 
(P = .05) reduced germination. 
The significant variety x pH in- 
teraction indicated that the va- 
rietes differed in their response 
to pH (Table 3). With the ex- 
ception of Weymouth there was 
much less germination at pH 4.0 
than at any higher pH. There 
were no significant differences be- 
tween pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 for the 
varieties Pemberton, Berkeley, 
and Dixi. Jersey and Rancocas 
had significantly higher germina- 
tion at pH 5.0 than at 7.0. There 
was significantly higher germina- 
tion with 15 and 20% than with 
5% sucrose (Table 4.) 

Germination of highbush blue- 
berry pollen tetrads required a 
medium somewhat similar to that 
used (3) for the lowbush blue- 
berry. Increasing the sucrose con- 
centration above the range used 
by Merrill (2) did not result in 
significantly different germinabil- 
ity. As with some lowbush blue- 
berry clones (1) highbush vari- 



TEN 



eties differ in their tetrad abor- 
tion. In germinating highbusli 
blueberry pollen one should gen- 
erally use-, a medium with pH be- 
tween pH 5 and 7 and sucrose con- 
centration above 10%. Sources of 
variation in germinability re- 
vealed here should be kept in 
mind in planning further experi- 
ments on blueberry pollen germi- 
nation and in interpreting the 
results of such experiments. 

Acknowledgements 

The author is indebted to Miss 
A. M. Jamont for technical assis- 
tance. This study was supported 
by a grant from the National 
Research Council of Canada. 



1. Aalders, L. E. and Hall, I. V. 
1963. The inheritance and 
berry. Mich. Agr. Expt. Sta. 
morphological development 
of male sterility in the com- 
mon lowbush blueberry, Vac- 
ciniuvi angustifoliura Ait. 

Can. J. Genet. iCytol 5, 380-383 

2. Merrill, T. A., 1936. Pollin- 
ation of the highbush blue- 
Tech. Bull. 15. 

3. Wood, G. W. and Barker, W. 
G. 1964. Preservation of 
blueberry pollen by the 
freeze-drying process. Can. 
J. Plant Sci. 44. 387-388. 



Table 1. Production of normal lelrads in flowers of highbush blueberry varieties 



\'ariet>- 


Jerse\- 


Dixi Pemberton 


Weymouth 


Berkeley Rancocas 


Normal tetrads {%) 94 
Standard error 2 . 4 


92 90 

2.7 3.0 


83 
3.6 


80 73 
4.0 4.4 


Table 2. Germination 


of pollen tetrads of highbush blueberr>' varieties 


Variety 


Pemberton Berkele\- Jerse\- 


Rancocas 


Dixi Weymouth 


% germination* 70.6 


39.8 37.5 


30.1 


26.9 5.5 



♦Each percentage is based upon the 3200 normal tetrads tested at four levels of pH. and four concentrations oi 
ucrose. Means underlined did not differ significantly (f = .OS) according to Duncan's new multiple range test, 
s 

Can. J. Plant Sci. Vol. 46 (1966) 

Table 3. Effect of pH on germination (^c) of highbush blueberry pollen tetrads 









pH 






Variety 


4.0 


5.0 




6.0 


7.0 


We^■mouth 


0.3a 


8.6a 




3.3a 


7.9a 


Pemberton 


0.0 


91.6a 




92.5a 


98.5a 


Berkelev 


0.0 


61.9a 




43.1a 


54.1a 


Dixi 


0.0 


29.4a 




35. 5o 


43.0a 


Jersev 


0.0 


71.1 b 




40.6a6 


38.2a 


Rancocas 


0.0 


52.0a 




41.0a 


26.5 


All varieties 












(av. of 24 counts) 


0.02 


52.8a 




42 . 7a 


44.7a 



Note: Means in the same row sharing the same letter did not differ significantly (P = .05) according to Duncan's 
new multiple range test. Each percentage is based upon the 800 normal tetrads tested at four sucrose concentrations. 



Table 4. Effect of sucrose concentration 


on the germination of highbush 
tetrads 


bl 


ueberry pollen 


% sucrose concentration 


5 


10 15 




20 


% germination* 28.8 


32.2 39.1 




40.0 









FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

Continued from Page 5 

NOVA SCOT/A 

Dr. F. B. Chandler, retired 
cranberry specialist of the Mas- 
sachusetts Cranberry Station has 
been hired by the federal gov- 
ernment of Canada and the pro- 
vincial department of agriculture 
and marketing (Province of Nova 
Scotia) to conduct an economic 
survey of the cranberry industry 
in eastern Nova Scotia. Dr. 
Chandler arrived in Canada in 
late May and has already had an 
impact on the industry. 

Mr. E. L. Eaton who was re- 
sponsible for research and ex- 
tension on the cranberry indvis- 
try up to 1961 was recently 
presented with a certificate by 
Mr. D. L. Parks, the Deputy Min- 
ister of Agriculture for Nova 
Scotia, in recognition of his long 
and faithful service to agricul- 
ture. Mr. and Mrs. Eaton are 
now living on the family farm at 
Upper Canard, Kings County, 
Nova Scotia. One of their sons, 
Dr. George Eaton, is Professor of 
Horticulture at the University of 
British Columbia* and is car- 
rying out research on cranberries 
and highbush blueberries in 
British Columbia. 

'■'Ed. Note: Cranberries is pleased 
to carry an article by Dr. Eaton 
on this subject, and found on 
page 10 of this issue. 



1111 



*Means underlined by the same line did not differ significantly (P = .05) according to Duncan's new multiple 
range test. Each percentage is based upon the 4800 normal tetrads of six varieties tested at four levels of pH. 



FOR SALE 

8 Acres of Cranberry Bog. 
5 or 6 Acres of Reservoir. 
20 Acres of Future Bog. 
IVz Acres for Flume. 
Approximately 35 Acres Total. 
Plan is Available. 
$52,000 or best offer. 

ROBERT HAYES 
Brant Rock, Mass. 834-9181 



ELEVEN 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST 
PROTECTION REMEMBER 
THESE 4 IMPORTANT POINTS 
ABOUT FMC WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole cruw 
required for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 

within 3 to 5 minutes, the 

marsh is receiving effective 

frost protection. FMC machines 

have an enviable record for 

operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
.your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 




fm 



© 



FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA division 

FAIRWAY AVENUE, LAKELAND, FLORIDA 

n Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 
n Please have sales engineer contact me 



NAME_ 



-TITLE. 



Farm Bureau 
In Action 

By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 

The following is an article writ- 
ten by Mr. S. S. Garjian, Presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts Farm 
Bureau Federation which I knew 
would be of interest to Cranberry 
growers. Mr. Garjian is a large 
poultryman with an annual pro- 
duction of over three million eggs. 
Over 90% of his production is 
sold to retail customers at the 
farm. Mr. Garjian is well versed 
on Marketing. 



ADDRESS (RFD). 
CITY 



_20NE- 



-STATE. 



Bargaining Power For Farmers 
By S. S. GARJIAN 
Farmers bargaining for the 
products they produce is the an- 
swer to higher net income. 

Several years ago the member- 
ship recognized the need for an 
expanded service program to 
strengthen the marketing and 
bargaining position of farmers 
end ranches. 

New and improved marketing 
methods are needed to secure 
higher net iiicoma for producers. 

At the American Farm Bureau 
Feredation annual meeting, dele- 
gates urged Farm Bureau to give 
marketing and bargaining pro- 
grami high priority. 

American Agricultural Market- 
ing Association and State Market- 
ing Association have been organ- 
ized to help farmers and ranchers 
determine, earn and obtain the 
full market values for farm com- 
modities, to aid in orderly mar- 
keting, to expand markets and 
promote the sale of commodities 
in domestic and foreign markets, 
and to initiate and provide special 
services for growers. 

Farm Bureau believes that mar- 
keting power can best be 
achieved thru the market price 
system. By this system the sup- 
ply and demand becomes the pri- 
mary factors in determining the 
true market value for agricul- 
tural commodities. Prices should 
relate to realistic market values. 



TWELVE 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous AAoulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 

equipment for over one quarter century. 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS - pumping units, pumps, power units, 

sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly WIthrow, Minnesota) 



At the present time 2 million 
farms produce ninety-five per 
cent of the output. The average 
farm capital investment in 1964 
was $51,000. It is estimated that 
by 1975 it will be about $75,000. 
Hit or miss marketing methods 
will not pay for or warrant huge 
investments. 

Marketing patterns will change 
more in the future. Contract pro- 
duction of agricultural products 
is growing. These people need 
representation through their own 
farm organization. 

It is very conceivable that one- 
half of our agricultural commod- 
ities will be produced under con- 
tract by 1975. 

Changes are taking place in the 
food processing organizations. 
There are fewer buyers, proces- 
sors and retailers in agricultural 
commodities. 

Consumers are more discrimin- 
ating and are buying more serv- 
ices with food dollars. Because 
of the services that the consumer 
is demanding, the difference be- 
tween what the consumer pays 



for the products and the price 
that the farmer gets is continually 
spreading and because of this the 
producer is not getting the prices 
he should be getting even though 
the prices are rising to the con- 
sumer. I want to emphasize the 
fact that this may not be true 
with all commodities. 

In concluding I might stress 
that we cannot continually ask 
for exemptions for farmers as a 
special privilege in our legisla- 
tive halls. We must appreciate 
the fact that we are a minority 
and to get exemption or special 
privileges will be more difficult 
in the future. 

Let us stand with heads high 
and bargain for the necessary 
things needed in selling agricul- 
tural products through our Farm 
Bureau affiliate the bargaining 
association. 



tured speaker at the Annual 
Meeting of the Plymouth County 
Farm Bureau, according to Mr. 
David Mann, President of the 
Plymouth County Farm Bureau. 
This is a very important meeting 
and will be held on August 25, 
1966 and is being held early to 
avoid conflict from frost dangers 
to Cranberry growers which 
would prevent them from par- 
ticipating in this Farm Bureau 
function. 



All Massachusetts Cranberry 
growers will be pleased to note 
that Mr. Charles Shuman, Presi- 
dent of the American Farm Bu- 
reau Federation will be the fea- 



Farm Credit Service \ 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass., 02781 
Tel. 617 824-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office — 362, Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



THIRTEEN 



Objective Measures 
To Determine 
Cranberry Yields 

by J. C. ST. PIERRE, Agricultural 
Statistician, New Jersey Crop 
Reporting Service, Trenton, New 
Jersey, February 10, 1966. 

A new approach to forecasting 
cranberry production is being 
studied by the New Jersey Crop 
Reporting Service, a cooperative 
effort of the New Jersey and 
United States Departments of Ag - 
riculture, under a special project 
financed by matching State and 
Federal funds provided through 
the Agricultural Marketing Act 
of 1946. This Service has conduc- 
ted surveys and made estimates 
or' cranberry production each year 
since 1900. Currently, within- 
season forecasts are made as of 
August 15, October 1 and Novem- 
ber 1 in conjunction with the 
national program of the Crop Re- 
porting Board, Statistical Repor- 
ting Service, USDA. Forecasts 
are timely guides in planning 
probable requirments for labor, 
containers, storage facihties, tran- 
portation and promotional cam- 
paigns. Crop checks at the end of 
the season are the basis for final 
reports on production, quantities 
sold fresh and processed, and 
prices. These data provide a his- 
toric series that reveal state and 
national trends important to fu- 
ture plans of the industry, along 
with "trueing up" the statistical 
model for the seasonal forecasts. 

In the past, forecasts in all 
states have been mainly based on 
voluntary reports of individual 
growers' expectations obtained by 
mailed inquiry, phone and per- 
sonal visits. These judgement re- 
ports are mostly based on the 
crop's visual appearances, which 
oftentimes can be deceiving, par- 
ticularly with cranberries. In re- 
cent years, the Statistical Repor- 
ting Service has developed sci- 
entific "objective yield" measure- 
ments for several crops including 
corn, cotton, soybeans, and some 
fruit and nut crops. Objective 
yield methods use various physical 
measurements of crops growing 
in the field. These measures are 



designed to give a supplemental 
indication of prospective yield 
that will offset the inherent er- 
rors possible with judgement es- 
timates alone. 

Investigation of objective yield 
techniques for cranberries was 
started in New Jersey in 1962 
under the direction of H. M. Wal- 
ters, now head of the Wisconsin 
Crop Reporting Service. The in- 
itial investigation was to test an 
old "rule-of-thumb" used by the 
cranberry industry that one berry 
per square foot was equal to a 
yield of one barrel per acre. Ber- 
ries were counted that fell within 
a one square foot wooden frame, 
placed in a grid pattern of ap- 
proximately 40 pace intervals 
throughout the test bogs. From 
those counts, an average number 
of berries per frame (square foot) 
was derived for each bog. The 
average number of berries per 
square foot was then compared to 
the final yield per ,^cre for the 
individual bogs. In 1963, the sur- 
vey was repeated in the same 
bogs with the percentage change 
in the average number of berries 
an additional indicator of proba- 
ble yield. 

Comparisons of either the av- 
erage number of berries per 
square foot or year to year change 
in number of berries per square 
foot and final yield per acre 
showed a poor correlation mean- 
ing that only a rough idea of 
probable yield could be obtained 
by counting berries. 

Because yield per acre is meas- 
ured on a weight basis (100 
pound barrels), it was believed 
that picking the berries and ob- 
taining an average weight per 
square foot would overcome the 
variation in berry size, the main 
problem in the counting method. 
A significant improvement in 
measuring probable yield through 
a scientific sample of weight was 
thought likely and was set up for 
testing in 1964 by W. J. Fluke, 
Statistician in Charge of the New 
Jersey Crop Reporting Office and 
project leader, J. C. St. Pierre. 

The work done the first two 
years provided background for 
understanding the problems in- 
volved and for setting up im- 
proved procedures. In 1964 and 



1965 the area of study was ex- 
panded from a few trial bogs to 
the entire producing area in New 
Jersey. A representative sample 
of all known harvested acreage 
in the state was selected. The 
frame consisted of 30 bogs in 1964 
and 36 bogs in 1965. Berries were 
picked from each of four frames 
per bog and weighed separately. 
Although four frames per bog 
may seem like a small sample, 
analysis of available data indica- 
ted that this balance of frames 
per bog and number of bogs was 
an optimum allocation of the re- 
sources available to do the job. 
Increasing either the number of 
frames per bog beyond 4 or the 
number of bogs beyond 36 would 
result in diminishing returns, in 
terms, of more reliable averages 
in relation to project costs. 

The mid-August weights, 
grouped by method of harvest, 
expanded to an acre equivalent of 
48.3 barrels per acre and 51.1 
barrels per acre in 1965. The 
sample weights compared closely 
with the estimated state average 
yields of 49.2 barrels in 1964 and 
53.0 barrels (preliminary) in 1965. 
based on traditional estimating 
methods. It is apparent, however, 
that this may not always be the 
case as sizing of berries and losses 
between observation date and 
harvest are large factors. Future 
work may establish "normal" 
values for these growth and loss 
factors. Variations from this nor- 
mal could be measured during the 
growing season to adjust the yield 
forecast at given intervals. Sample 
measurements indicated berries 
increased 57 percent in weigth 
from mid-August until harvest. 
Harvest loss samples in 1964 and 
1965 average 5.2 percent in water 
harvested bogs, 23.0 percent in 
Darlington picked bogs and 38.7 
percent in hand scooped bogs. 
Insect and disease loss may av- 
erage 15 percent or more on a 
state-wide basis. 

Additional work is needed be- 
fore an unqualified statement can 
be made concerning the accuracy 
of cranberry objective yield 
methods. However, it appears 
that objective measurements used 
in conjunction with grower re- 
ports will result in a significant 
reduction in forecasting error. 



FOURTEEN 




really the berries for. 



» H 










BEAN. 



solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special V/L" or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
flat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 

see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
4 Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, Inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 




WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 



JOHN BEAN DIVISION 



Xiansing, Michigan. 



FIFTEEN 



Ocean Spray 
Babcock, Wise. Plant 
Nears Completion 

There is an air of anticipation 
and excitement in the little town 
of Babcock, Wisconsin these days. 
It is generated by the construc- 
tion of a $495,000 cranberry 
processing plant for Ocean Spray 
Cranberries, Inc. 

Babcock now has a population 
of about 200, who feel that this 
new plant will be a valuable 
asset to their community. Though 
this is a small town, it is not 
small when speaking of cran- 
berries, since it is estimated that 
about 75 percent of the Wiscon- 
sin cranberry crop is grown 
within 65 miles of Babcock. 

Approximately 100 Wisconsin 
growers are members of the 
Ocean Spray cooperative which 
will own and operate the plant. 

It is estimated that the facility 
will employ up to 70 women and 
14 men during the season from 
mid-September to December 1. 
The full-time staff will consist 
of three men and two women. 
The annual payroll will be be- 



tween 50 and 60 thousand dol- 
lars. 

Scheduled for completion on 
August 1, the plant will re- 
ceive and screen cranberries di- 
rectly from the marshes which, 
prior to that time, was done 
by each grower in his own facili- 
ties. This will be done in a 150 
by 200 foot steel frame building 
where the cranberries will be 
sorted and stored for shipment 
to Ocean Spray processing plants 
in North Chicago, Illinois, and on 
the Pacific Coast. 

It is anticipated that about 50 
or so growers will make use of 
the new Babcock plant which 
will be ready to handle from 10 
to 15 million pounds of berries 
this season. 

Also involved in the new Bab- 
cock plant is the construction of 
a 100 by 50 foot pool, eight feet 
deep, which will be used as a 
holding tank for berries brought 
in from the marshes. 

The company offices, which are 
now located at 321 12th Avenue 
in Wisconsin Rapids, will be 
housed in a 32 by 64 foot build- 
ing to be constructed at the site 
of the new plant. 



r»rSri&=!fc35=a=S&:l£=SrlS=iM&:Sfcl&=fciS^^ 



BULLDOZERS 
CRANES 



LOADERS 
TRUCKS 



EQUIPPED TO HANDLE 
YOUR BOG NEEDS 



LOUIS LECONTE 



P & L CO 



CARVER, MASS. 



866-4402 



CORRUGATED 
CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 

Area 715 384-3121 



A Few Pesfkide 
Safety Donf's 

Don't save or re-use empty 
pesticide containers. 
Don't leave mothballs where 
children can find them. 
Don't use a pesticide in the 
home if a gas mask is required 
when using it. 

Don't use your mouth to blow 
out clogged sprayer lines or 
nozzle tips, or siphon a pesti- 
cide from a container. 
Don't smoke while handling 
pesticides. 

Don't spray or dust outdoors 
when the wind is high. 
• Don't apply pesticides near 
wells where they might con- 
taminate the drinking water. 



SIXTEEN 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



MASS. DROUGHT 
THREATENS CROPS 

The drought plagued Massa- 
chusetts growers are experiencing 
a multitude of problems this 
year. A mid-June heat wave 
(921/2° in the State bog shelter' 
on the 12th) and shortage of 
water supplies makes this a criti- 
cal period as the berries are now 
setting. Sprinkler systems have 
been installed on many bogs 
but 60% of cranberry properties 
remain without this valuable 
protection. 

One apparent optimistic note 
is seen in the fact that mammoth 
blossoms are in evidence with 
bee population being very good. 
This coupled with sprinkler pro- 
tection where available and some 
rainfall should produce a good 
crop for 1966. 



Ocean Spray Land 
Sale Completed 

The deed for the sale of 75 
acres of land in Middleboro, 
Mass. Industrial Park was signed 
in the Middleboro Town Hall by 
officials of Ocean Spray Cran- 
berries, Inc. and the Middleboro 
Board of Selectmen Thursday, 
June 30th. 

The deed-signing marked the 
culmination of activities which 
Edward Gelsthorpe, Executive 
Vice President and General Man- 
ager of Ocean Spray, said began 
18 months ago when it became 
apparent that existing facilities of 
Ocean Spray were not adequate 
to handle the increased produc- 
tion of the company. In four 
years, Ocean Spray's sales have 
jumped from $27,000,000 to over 
$50,000,000 a year. 

The plant development will 
take place in two stages. The re- 
ceiving, screening and fresh fruit 
packing facilities will be ready 
by September 1967; it is planned 
to have the processing facilities 
completed by 1969. The new 
plant in Massachusetts is part of 
a nation-wide Ocean Spray 
expansion program. 




follow 

the 
leader 



Once again Buckner Sprinklers rate as the number one agricul- 
tural irrigators. When tested for uniform water disbursement, 
Buckner Sprinklers led the field with the highest Coefficient of 
Uniformity (CU). Buckner high CU means more uniform crop 
growth, greater profit per acre. And Buckner design and 
exacting production standards assure sprinklers with a long, 
trouble-free life. For only Buckner has the patented, sand-proof 
GDG Bearing for thousands of extra maintenance-free hours. 
Only Buckner gives you over fifty years of Buckner sprinkler 
manufacturing experience. Follow the leader. Irrigate with 
Buckner— world's leading sprinkler manufacturer. See your 
Buckner Dealer or write: 

Buckner, 



® INDUSTRIES, INC. 

P.O. BOX 232, FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 93708 



SEVENTEEN 



^so) 



Kerosene 

Solvenf 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 



HALLS ON CARIBBEAN 
VACATION 

Clarence J. and Edith S. Hall, 
your former editors and pub- 
lishers have been on a Caribbean 
vacation. They flew to the re- 
cently - independent islands of 
Trinidad and Tobago, off the 
coast of Venezuela, South Amer- 
ica. They were surprised to be 
served turkey and cranberry 
sauce (from Nova Scotia) on both 
islands. The manager of their 
hotel at Tobago, a Dane, knew 
of and liked Ocean Spray Cran- 
berry Juice Cocktail. 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 



DR. CROSS INVITED TO JAPAN 

Dr. Chester E. Cross, director 
of Mass. Cranberry Experiment 
Station, East Wareham, Mass. 
has received an invitation by the 
University of Hokkaido, Japan, 
to spend spend 45 days as cran- 
berry consultant. 

►♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦ 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

I 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

t 

♦ 
♦ 



I 



DOH'l BOG DOWN NOW, 
VISIT PCA FOR YOUR 

HARVEST MONEY 

Most responsible growers want money to increase their flexibility as 
harvest comes close. With PCA money available, you can meet unforeseen 
expenses. You can sell to your own advantage. You can utilize labor to 
harvest right and clean up your fall work, make repairs and get in shape 
for next season. 

The low cost of PCA money works hard for you, too. Simple interest only 
for the number of days you actually use the money and only on the unpaid 
balance give you real operating room. See for yourself how you can profit 
through harvest with PCA Harvest Money. 



PRODUCTION CREDIT 
ASSOCIATIONS 

MAUSTON 
ANTIGO 
LUCK 
MEDFORD 




WAUSAU 


BARRON 


TOMAH 


RICE LAKE 


MARSHFIELD 


LADYSMITH 


STEVENS POINT 


BLACK RIVER FALLS 



EIGHTEEN 



SPOTLIGHT ON SUPPLIERS 



Kingston Oil & Gas., Inc. 



Just after the turn of the 
century, a young immigrant 
named Joseph Balboni arrived in 
the United States from his native 
Italy. This young man of 17 
settled in the picturesque little 
town of Kingston, Massachusetts, 
only a mile or two from Plym- 
outh Rock, the historic landing 
place of the Pilgrims nearly three 
centuries before. 

Thirteen years after coming to 
this country, this young man who 
had been working in iron found- 
ries, realizing the need for de- 
pendable fuel suppliers, estab- 
lished the Kingston Oil Company. 

In 1948 the company expanded 
to include LP-gas distribution. 
Believing that cylinder deliveries 
were important to their business, 
Leon Balboni, treasurer of the 
company, stated, "Cylinder de- 
livery will always have an im- 
portant place in our business. 
Cylinders are the only answer 
to efficient service of LP-gas to 



our customers, particularly those 
summer residents of our Cape 
Cod area." 

Two years ago Kingston Oil 
and Gas completed a new and 
modern bulk plant with the most 
up-to-date equipment obtainable. 
With the addition of this plant 
the Balbonis are able to offer the 
finest service available to the 
people of the area. This, inci- 
dentally, includes many of the 
area ci"anberry growers. 

From their offices at 62 Main 
Street, Kingston, Mass., the 
Kingston Oil and Gas Company, 
Inc., also supplies Esso solvents, 
kerosene and spraying equipment 
to the area cranberry growers. 

Since the death of their father 
in 1962, both Balboni brothers, 
Leon and Robert, who is vice 
president of the firm and spends 
most of his time on dispatching 
and field supervision, have con- 
centrated on making known to 



the local cranberry growers that 
they are in an excellent position 
to supply them efficiently and 
economically with any of their 
fuel, solvent and spraying sup- 
plies and equipment. 

Located as they are in the 
heart of the Massachusetts cran- 
berry growing industry, they are 
able to offer quick and efficient 
service to growers throughout the 
area. 

"We are gratified," said Leon 
Balboni recently, "that many 
Cape cranberry growers have 
shown enough confidence in our 
company that they have, in turn, 
told their fellow growers about 
our services. This, of course, is 
the very best kind of advertising." 

The Balbonis make an effort to 
keep up with the latest develop- 
ments in chemicals being used by 
the cranberry industry so that 
they may better serve their 
grower customers. 






W 




NINETEEN 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

Continued from Page 11 

NEW J E RS EY 



June Ends Torrid 
Although the month of June 
ended in a torrid heat wave, the 
average temperature during the 
month at the New Lisbon Weath- 
er Station was 71.0 which is just 
about normal. The seven days of 
90 degree weather which occurred 
in the latter half of the month 
were balanced out by seven days 
in the first half of the month 
when the temperature dropped 
down to the forties. 

Drought Still Serious 

The pattern of drought was re- 
sumed again during June. Only 
2.36 inches of rain fell during the 
month or about IVz inches below 
normal. The total rainfall for the 
first six months of 1966 is 19.87 
inches. Although this is only one 
inch less than normal, drought 
conditions are considered serious 
in the cranberry-blueberry area 
of New Jersey. Most of the rain 
has fallen in the non-growing 
months and the 28 inch deficiency 
carried over from the past three 



years has left water resources at 
critical levels. 

Heat Causes Concern 
An extremely severe heat wave 
during the latter half of June 
and early July is causing much 
concern to blueberry as well as 
cranberry growers. Many blue- 
berry bushes are dessicating as a 
result of the heat. Temperatures 
were well above 100 degrees in 
the fields on July 3rd, 4th and 
5th. Official readings in the 
weather shelter on these dates 
were 98, 101 and 100 degrees. 

Blossom Late 

It is too early to tell about 
cranberry crop prospects this sea- 
son. Blossoming is considerably 
later than normal and as of July 
7th the peak of bloom had not 
yet occurred on many bogs. New 
growth is more lush than normal, 
probably the result of heavy rain- 
fall in May. Black headed fire- 
worms are becoming more of a 
problem on New Jersey bogs, 
particularly those which are 
drawn early. The flight of girdler 
moths is very heavy and is caus- 
ing some concern. 



Distributor For 

Hale Irrigation Pumps 

ROBrS PROPANE GAS, 



INC. 



Carver, Mass. 
866-4545 



West Wareham, Mass. 
295-3737 



CONVERT YOUR IRRIGATION PUMPS 
TO L. P. GAS 

1. Saves on Oil 

2. No Pilferage 

3. Saves on Spark Plugs 

4. Up to Three Times the Engine Life 

5. Saves on Fuel Pumps and Carburetors 

FOR A DEMONSTRATION CALL US 
TODAY 



WASHINGTON 



June Warm 

June weather on the coast was 
exceptional in that we had a 
terrifically hot day, June 15th, a 
high of 94 degrees registered at 
the Coastal Washington Research 
and Extension Unit. There were 
higher temperatures read at pro- 
tected places and the growers 
did some thinking. Many used 
the sprinklers from 80 degrees on 
which was just about all day 
since the temperature reached 80 
degrees about 10:00 A.M. and it 
was still 90 degrees at 5:00 P.M. 
We also had two low periods 
with frost on the fourth and the 
24th. Again the growers used the 
sprinklers since the buds are very 
tender now. Due to several cir- 
cumstances some growers had 
extensive damage due to frost 
injury. Automatic sprinklers cer- 
tainly pay off when unexpected 
lows hit. 

The mean high for the month 
was 63.5 degrees and the mean 
low 47.83. The precipitation total 
was 2.28 inches for the month 
with a total for the year to date 
of 39.04 inches. The 1966 total 
through June was 44.90 inches. 

Crop Prospects Excellent 

Following a tour of the Gray- 
land, North Beach and Long 
Beach areas. Extension Agent, 
Azmi Y. Shawa feels that the 
over all prospects are for a bum- 
per crop. The fiowers are a mass 
in most all the bogs and unless 
something unexpected comes 
along, the harvest should be 
heavy. 



MANY GROWERS TURN OUT 
FOR CRANBERRY FIELD DAY 

Valuable information for cran- 
berry growers was provided 120 
people who attended the annual 
field day at the Coastal Washing- 
ton Research and Extension Unit 
in Long Beach June 25. A spe- 
cial feature was a baked-smoked 
salmon luncheon served by the 
South Bend 4-H group. 



TWENTY 




"I PAINT WHAT I LIKE." 






Agway offers proven pesticides 
for Complete Crop Protection 



\ 

\ Place Orders with- 

i 



Agway 



HARRY T. FISHER, JR. 



Tel. Micidleboro 947-2133 



I ■ 



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PROVEN PESTICIDE APPLICATION BY HELICOPTER 



Call: HARRY T. FISHER, JR. 

an independent distributor 
of Agway pesticides 




The best source of 
cranberry pesticide Helicopter operated by 

control materials and „, - -, , 

,. .. . Flymouth Lopters. Inc. 

application service - ' ' 

Thomas "Whitey" Weitbrecht 
HARRY T. FISHER, JR., Middleboro, Mass. Tel. 947-2133 

TWENTY-ONE 



fidJf^^al^ 



ISSUE OF JULY, 1966 
VOL. 31 -NO. 3 




^»aJW^C«MO«r,^5^ 



THE VERSATILE BERRY 

It seems we all like to reminisce once in 
a while. It was during one those moments 
of reminiscing a few days ago that my 
thoughts turned to cranberries, naturally, 
and I began to realize what a truly versatile 
berry we are working with. 

I won't tell you my age but I remember, 
though vaguely, when my mother would 
buy several pounds of whole fresh cran- 
berries and then spend many hours over 
a hot stove making cranberry sauce for our 
rather large, cranberry-loving family. She 
would measure and stir and measure again 
and taste and then wait for the sauce 
to cook for the necessary length of time 
so that her family could enjoy the whole- 
someness and nourishment of home-made 
cranberry sauce. 

Of course, as time has a habit of doing, 
things change. It is no longer necessarv for 
the housewife to work so hard and long to 
turn out "home-made" cranberry sauce. 
What with new processes and automatic 
equipment — and the experienced people to 
operate them — you can go to the nearest 
super market or corner store and buy, right 
off the shelf, cranberry sauce "like mother 
used to make." 

But now, in addition to cranberry sauce, 
many other cranberry products are being 
offered to the public. Some of these are 
cranberry preserves, jellies, the very popu- 
lar cranberry juice cocktail and yes, even 
cranberry ice cream plus others. 

The point I'm trying to make is — how 
many of the growers realize that there is 
a reason for this more general usage of 
cranberries? The obvious benefits of the 
increase in the number of cranberry prod- 
ucts need no elaboration. The old '^law of 
supply and demand holds forth in this 
industry as it does in any other. 

Without the "behind-the-scenes" work of 
many people, agriculturists, research scien- 
tists, chemical engineers, marketing people, 
there would not be this demand and, there- 
fore, the grower would find it difficult, if 
not impossible to get a decent price for his 
crop. 

There are those people who work tire- 
lessly to find new products and new markets 
for these products. One very fine example 
of these new products and their impact on 

TWENTY. 7WO 



Established 193 6 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 

Eagle River 

Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



the industry was touched upon in a guest 
editorial in the March, 1965 issue of CRAN- 
BERRIES, when George C. P. Olsson, Presi- 
dent of Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. stated 
"New and agressive management at Ocean 
Spray with the subsequent promotion of 
Cranberry Juice Cocktail on a national basis 
has been a giant step forward. This plus 
the introduction of new product lines has 
enabled the industry to use all the cran- 
berries harvested in 1963 and 1964." 

It should be gratifying to the grower, large 
or small, to know that someone — someone 
he doesn't even know — is working to find 
new and better markets for the cranberries 
he will harvest this fall. 




cutworms 







fire^ortns 




CARBARYL INSECTICIDE 






,v^ 



fruit^orms 




Japanese 
beetles 



CONTROLS 

CRANBERRY 

INSECTS 




leafhoppers 



You get better, safer insect control by using 
SE VIN in your cranberry bogs. SE VIN insecticide 
destroys cutworms, fireworms, fruitworms, Japanese 
beetles and leafhoppers, including the leafhoppers 
that spread false blossom disease. And the relatively 
low toxicity of SE VIN provides fewer drift and 
residue problems to humans, livestock and fish. Order 
SEVIN today. Union Carbide Agricultural Products, 
270 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017. 






UNION 
CARBIDE 



AGRICULTURAL 
PRODUCTS 



Sevin is the registered trade mark of Union Carbide Corporation for carbaryl insecticide. 



TWENTY-THREE 



FRESH FROM THE FIELDS 

WISCONSIN 



The season is about ten days 
late, but there has been some 
nice growing weather lately, and 
if the weather conditions continue 
to be good, the lateness can be 
made up by the time of harvest. 

Hail Damage Up 

First brood fireworm are now 
practically finished and the grow- 
ers have now finished dusting or 
spraying. The hail damage in the 
Tomah-Warrens area has been 
estimated at 50% on 200 acres. 
Some of the growers had as 
much as 75% while others had a 
25% loss, but the average for the 
area was around 50%. This 
would mean a loss of 10,000 
barrels figuring a yield of 100 
barrels to the acre. 

In addition, there has been 
some frost scattered throughout 
the state, and though the damage 
isn't serious, several thousand 
barrels have now been lost. 

Wisconsin had some extremely 
warm weather the last of June 
with the result that the berries 
seem to be almost normal for that 
time of year. Even in the nor- 
thern part of the state some beds 
are in full bloom which is about 
normal. 

Bumble Bees Scarce 

Most of the state finds that the 
bumble bee population is way 
down this year so the growers are 
relying more and more on honey 
bees, which they can rent for $15 
a swarm. A swarm takes care of 
two acres as a rule. 

Because of the heat and dry 
weather, considerable progress is 
being made by those growers who 
are getting ready for planting 
next year. However, the shortage 
of help is a limiting factor. 

New Marsh Development 
The Cardinal Cranberry Com- 
pany at Manitowish Waters was 
sold recently to Frederic Bartling 
and there is a new cranberry 
development going in at Fifield, 



Wisconsin that will be quite large 
and should be one of the finest 
cranberry properties in Wisconsin 
once it is developed. 

Weather 

The week of June 5th was 
mostly cloudy, cool and wet. 
Warm and humid weather with 
thunderstorms and showers per- 
sisted throughout the state into 
Monday. Much needed rain fell 
in northern and western sections. 
After the 7th the weather turned 
decidedly cooler with light frost 
or near freezing temperatures on 
the 10th. Scattered thunderstorms 
returned to the south on the 11th. 

Mostly cloudy and cool weather 
continued with average weekly 
temperatures 3 to 6 degrees below 
normal. Beneficial showers and 
thunderstorms occurred through- 
out the state on the 11th and I2th 
though rainfall amounts varied 
sharply within districts. Only 
scattered light sprinkles were re- 
ported from Monday, June 20, to 
Friday afternoon when very lo- 
calized showers again material- 
ized. A few reports of heavy 
downpours and hail were received. 

Summer arrived in earnest 
during the week of the 19th on 
the tail of southerly winds which 
brought warmth and high humid- 
ity to the state. A very persistent 
weather pattern with nearly 
cloudless but hazy skies prevailed 
during the week. Little or no 
precipitation managed to fall 
from the humid air mass. 

The hot and humid weather 
continued until the 26th, when 
slightly cooler and drier air 
moved in from the northwest. 
A few scattered showers occurred 
over the northwest on Friday, the 
24th, and in the southwest on 
Saturday evening, the 25th. 

Growers' Meeting July 28 

Mark July 28 on your calendar. 
Summer meeting of the Wiscon- 
sin State Cranberry Growers 
Association will be held at Olson 
Brothers, Warrens, Wisconsin, at 
9:00 A.M. 



Cranberry Products 
Adds New Equipmenf 

Cranberry Products, Inc., is 
installing their new juice equip- 
ment which consists primarily of 
a DeLaval Separator and are also 
putting in two Groen kettles for 
whole cranberry sauce, which 
from preliminary tests looks like 
this equipment will make a very 
superior sauce, as they are so 
constructed to handle the ber- 
ries with the minimum of rough 
treatment. 



U. S. Cranberry Growers 
Voted for Continuance 
of Marketing Order 

599 Favor— Only 67 Opposed 

Cranberry growers of the U.S. 
have voted to continue the mar- 
keting agreement and marketing 
order regulating the handling of 
cranberries. In a referendum 
conducted by USDA's marketing 
and consumer service, 500 
growers, or more than 89 per- 
cent of those voting favored this 
continuation. This accounted for 
more than 67 percent of produc- 
tion represented in the balloting. 

Sixty - seven growers voted 
against this still - controversial 
matter. Provisions of the mar- 
keting agreement and order be- 
came effective August 15, 1962 
after hearings in all areas which 
are still remembered. The pro- 
gram is designed to help stab- 
ilize cranberry prices of the 
crop grown in Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New 
Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Min- 
nesota, Oregon, Washington and 
Long Island in New York, or in 
fact anywhere in this country. 

Referendum of growers by bal- 
lot must be conducted on each 
even-numbered, or every two 
years to see if the growers wish 
the order continued or termi- 
nated. 



TWENTY-FOUR 



SERVING THE WISCONSIN GROWERS 



FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 

Vines 
for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 

INTERESTED 
IN 
PURCHASING 
WISCONSIN 
CRANBERRY 
PROPERTIES 



***4i*4i*«*4i« 



Vernon Goldlsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 

d- Si 



READ CRANBERRIES 



OUR PRODUCTS 



strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange Relish 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cran-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M - 22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 



p. O. BOX 584 
Phone : 



MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 
Area Code 608 257-1019 



Please Mention 

CRANBERRIES 



When You Answer Advertisements 






J 



■> j^.ti!-''Mssmfiuia^ j»»<«!f«es^A>'-s v^^i^^t 




NO AMATEUR 



•I 

1 



park. He's a professional, 
frive have made him best at his job. 

At Ocean Spray, our job is Cranberries; nothing else; 

we're Cranberry Professionals. 

for information about Cooperative Membership in Ocean Spray, 
contact ally Director or Staff member in your growing area. 



Ocean spray. 



CRANBERRIES, INC. 



IVIassachuset:t:s 

New Jersey 

\/\/isconsin 

Oregon 

\y\/ashingt:an 

Canada 




PLANT & SOIL SCIENCES LIBRARt 

CRANBERRY'' 



ATIOIMAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



^Hy 



Uisji 



'% 



<X%Zo. 



<-,*^-^ 







St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press Photo 



IIM 

THIS 

ISSUE 



CRANBERRY GROWING IN MINNESOTA — — Page 9 
COMPUTERS IN AGRICULTURE — — — — Page 18 
WOMAN'S PAGE — — — — — — Page 21 



AUC3U5T 
1366 






-^ DIRECTORY top cranberry Qrowers 




The 
CHARLES W.HARRISi 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



IMPORTANT 
NOTICE 

CRANBERRIES 
MAGAZINE 

has a new mailing ad- 
dress to be used for all 
correspondence and re- 
mittances as follows: 

Cranberries Magazine 

Box 70 

Kingston, Mass. 

02360 

Deadline for copy will be the lOth 
Publication date will be the 15th 



Electricity - key to progress 



In indus+ry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 





^X NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



YOUR 
^ DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLIAMSTOWN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogs and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WARBHAM. MASS Tel. CY 5-2000 



JERSEY'66 BLUES CROP 
SLIGHTLY DOWN 

Grower reports to the New 
Jersey Crop Reporting Service 
indicate the 1966 bkieberry 
crop ^^^ll total 1,917,000 trays. 
This production would be 3 
percent less than last year but 
10 percent above the 1960-64 
average. 

Acreage harvested this season 
is expected to decline about 
500 acres to 7,100. This marks 
the second consecutive year 
the long term upward trend in 
liarvested acreage has been 
i'lten-upted. Growers are re- 
planting fields that contained 
less productive varieties or 
drought damaged bushes and 
abandonment of marginal acre- 
age continues. 

Growers reports indicate an 
additional 1,000 acres of blue- 
berries that will not be harvest- 
ed in 1966 - 750 acres not yet 
of bearing age and 250 acres of 
bearing age bushes that will 
not be harvested. Yield per 
acre is expected to average 
about 270 trays this year, com- 
pared to 260 trays per acre in 
1965 and tlie five-year aver- 
age of 242 trays. 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



Temperatures in the low 
20's the nights of May 10th and 
11th damaged early varieties, 
mainly Weymouth, and delayed 
start of harvest. Damage ranged 
from fight to severe in various 
locations. Mid-season and late 
varieties such as Jersey, Coville, 
Rubel and Berkeley were not 
damaged, however, and are de- 
veloping excellent crops. 



Cranberry Labels 

Wanted as a gift or trade, 
"labels" from, Eatinor, Ocean 
Spray and independents from all 
cranherry-growing regions; with 
the exception of one label, can, 
in return, furnish all copies of 
all Wisconsin brands to any in- 
terested parties. 

Like the Silver Dollar, these 
labels are fast disappearing, and 
should be garnered for museums 
and such. 

Address 

Dr. George L. Peltier 
130 8th Street North 
Wisconsin Rapids 
Wisconsin 



BROKER 

REAL ESTATE 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

• 

37 Years SeUing 
Cranberry Properties 

• 

LISTINGS WANTED 

• 

580 Second-Hand Picking 
Boxes for Sale 



THEO THOMAS 

MAIN STREET 

NORTH CARVER, MASS. 
Tel. UNion 6-3351 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



Farm Bureau 
In Action 

By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 

Making Farm Bureau policy 
is the Tuost important task to 
be performed by Farm Bureau 
members throughout each or- 
ganized County Farm Bureau 
in the United States. 

Policies of County, State and 
National Farm Bureau are 
initiated and developed by 
Fanu Bureau members at the 
County level. Recommendations 
from commodity and other dis- 
cussion groups within the 
County Farm Bureau are the 
survey of opinion furnished to 
the County Policy Development 
Committee. This committee 



uses these recommendations as 
a guide in preparing the pro- 
posed resolutions for considera- 
tion at the County Annual 
meeting. Members have the 
privilege and obhgation to alter 
any resolution in line with 
thinking of the Farm Bureau 
members in attendance. After 
consideration a nd adoption, 
resolutions become pohcy on 
issues which apply within the 
county and are recommenda- 
tions on state and national is- 
sues. 

County recommendations on 
state and national issues are 
forwarded to the State Resolu- 
tions Committee composed 
largely of County Presidents 
and other persons selected to 
serve by the State President. 

This committee reviews all 



C. & L. EQUIPMENT CO 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS- Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



SHARON BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carrer, Mas*. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 






TWO 



recommendations and after 
careful study, it prepares a 
report for consideration by 
county delegates attending the 
state armual meeting. State 
policy is determined at the state 
meeting and recommendations 
are then made to the American 
Farm Bureau Federation on 
national policies. 

When the resolution is fully 
understood and apphed to 
problems of farmers in an or- 
ganized fashion, the solution is 
within reach and serves the 
purpose of the majority of 
Farm Bureau members. 

Annual Meeting, Thursday, August 25 

The Cranberry commodity 
committee of the Plymouth 
County Farm Bureau is going 
to make the following recom- 
mendations to the Resolutions 
Committee iis to some needs 
of cranberry growers during 
the coming year. If you cran- 
berry growers from Plymoutii 
County think these recommenda- 
tions are desirable, you should 
attend the Plymouth County 
Annual Meeting at Leach's 
Grove, Rtes. 18 and 28, Bridge- 
water, Mass. on Thursday, Aug- 
ust 25, 1966 at 6:30 P.M. to 
help determine Farm Bureau 
policy on these issues. Tickets 
for the Chicken Bar- B- Que 
dirmer are available from David 
Mann, President of the Plym- 
outh County Farm Bureau. 

The annual meeting of the 
Plymouth Coimty Fann Bureau 
is where the total membership 
will discuss, change and vote 
on these recommendations as 
follows : 
1. V(ui(lalls7n and Trespass Laws 

Due to widespread vandalism 
on fann propei-t\' resulting in 
loss of crops and personal prop- 
erty BE IT RESOLVED that 
steps be taken to increase the 
penalties for violators. 

Whereas farms having farm 
ponds and other attractive nuis- 
ances bring in unwanted ties- 
passers BE IT RESOLVED 
tliat a law be enacted to have 
the liability removed from the 
lando\\Tier should a tiespasser 
be injured in any way on the 
property. 



1 



fi 



Continued on Page 23 






Mass. 
Cranberry 
Station 
S Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist: 



Weather 



July was a hot, dry month, 
ne tempexature averaged 
ightly more than one degree 

day above normal with very 
jw cool days. Total rainfall 
)r the month was only 0.64 in- 
hes with over one-half com- 
ig on tlie 28th. This is less 
lan 25 percent of the average 
ad we are now seven inches 
elow average for the year 1966. 
t was the driest July at the 
Iranberry Station since 1952. 
Ve have had less rain during 
me and July this year than we 
id last, and to further com- 
licate matters there were 25 
lys in July when the maximum 
jmperature in the weather 
lelter exceeded 80 degrees as 
Mnpared with 16 days in 
ily, 1965. 



The crop prospect for Mass- 
achusetts was excellent on July 
1st and is stiU very good on 
August 1st, but it is starting to 
fade some. The crop will fall 
off more if we do not get some 
worthwhile rain soon. 
Reminder 

Remember that the Annual 
Meeting of tlie Cape Cod Cran- 
berry Growers Association will 
be held at the Cranberry Sta- 
tion beginning at 10 A.M. on 
August 23. This is a very en- 
joyable meeting and everyone 
has a fine time. 

Guest Columnist 

We have some thoughts on a 
most appropiate subject by Dr. 
Chester Cross. 

THE CASE FOR WATER HARVESTING 
Massachusetts, 1966 

During the twenty years 
since World War II, the U.S. 




cranberry industry has known 
more years than not when the 
market for its products was smal- 
ler than its production. To assist 
in the consumption of more 
cranberries, several programs 
were developed and imple- 
mented to raise better quaHty 
cranberries to harvest and han- 
dle the fruit more carefully for 
the preservation of quality 
and finally through market- 
preparation and in-transit stud- 
ies to leam and adopt methods 
that would assure the consumer 
of good quality cranberries 
when purchasing them at re- 
tail level throughout the coun- 
try. Despite these efforts to re- 
tain or increase the level of 
consiunption of fresh fruit cran- 
berries the percentage of the 
national crop sold fresh has 
steadily declined from about 
Continued on Page 22 



CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 

AUCTION EQUIPMENT 
ABC • UTILITY 
RITE: 



W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-1 
451 1 E. Osborne Ave. • Tampa, Florida 

Phone: 626-1154 
1001 Dempsey Rd. • Milpitos, California 

Phone: 262-1000 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now Unloading - 1 Carload Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GQODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 



ROUTE 18 



EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 



THREE 



How long before 

the mailman brings your 

cranberry check? 




Growers who sell to Dean's Indian Trail get an advance on their estimated 
crop at the beginning of harvest. They get a second payment when they 
ship dm'ing the season, and a final payment at a later date. 

There's this, too. Dean's Indian Trail is a well-known, highly respected 
company. We have strong advertising and merchandising programs designed 
to sell cranberrry products. And we have a dedica- 
tion to making them the best. 

If you'd like to do business 
with a company like this, write us 
a note. You'll probably get an ans- 
wer before your cranberry check! 




Dean's 



llrkdUjmTnaAli 

P.O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 



FOUR 




ISSUE OF AUGUST, 1966 / VOL. 31 -NO. 4 



WHAT PRICE LABOR? 
The thought uppermost in the minds of grow- 
ers when harvest time rolls around is the 
availabihty — or lack of it — of labor. 

Hopefully, the cranberry industry will not 
be as bothered by this problem as growers of 
rther crops but it seems highly unhkely that 
some areas, at least, will not have difficulty 
to some degree in hiring an adequate number 
rf capable workers. 

The most bothevsome thing about this situa- 
tion is the fact that the federal government, 
.specifically the Bureau of Employinent security 
of the U. S. Department of Labor, has in the 
past turned down formal requests by growers 
of such crops as tomatoes, sweet com, aspara- 
gus to hire off-shore or braccero laborers. The 
excuse given was that the bureau felt that not 
enough effort had been made to obtain suf- 
ficient domestic labor. Last year every criteria 
was met so as to eliminate this as a possible 
excuse. Still, Secretary of Labor Wirtz failed 
to obtain the needed supplemental labor with 
the resulting crop loss estimated at near $7 
million. 

Cases have been reported where some grow- 
ers of crops were offering experienced domes- 
tic workers as much as 40 percent above the 
regular piece rates in order to lure labor- 
ers away from the harvest of other crops. 

The Secretary of Labor's failure to furnish 
adequate labor has disturbed growers all across 
the country. Another disturbing factor has been 
the administration's stated concern over rising 
food costs. 

It seems logical to assume that, if permitted 
to function without governmental interference, 
the law of supply and demand would almost 
certainly result in an adjustment of prices. 

Governmental advice to the buying public 
to restrict purchases of food products could 
be seen to result in the curtailment of planted 
acreage. 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall .it Wareham, Mass. 

Puhlisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—583-4595 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 

Eagle River 

Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



The question seems to be — will Secretary 
Wirtz's labor force be adequate to handle the 
crops when producing acreage has been 
brought down to bare minimum and peak pric3S 
are arrived at? There is reason for serious 
doubt. 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston. Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.C0, Foreign $5.00 per year. 
Application for re-entry at Plymouth, Mass. P.O. pending. 



FIVE 



ONE CRANBERRY HERBICIDE 
DOES THE WORK OF SEVERAL 



DE-PESTER 

CASOROIN G-4 



CONTROLS ALL 
THESE WEEDS 



Broadleaf Weeds 
Controlled: 

Arrowleaved Tear Thumb 

Beggarticks 

jj Knotweed 

Loosestrife 

Marsh St. Johnswort 

Tideland clover 

Ragweed 

Sorrel 

Wild Strawberry 

Asters 

Buckbean 

Hawkweed 

Western Lilaeopsis 

Marsh Pea 

Plantain 

Smartweed (Marshpepper, 

Pennsylvania, Spotted, 

Swamp and Water) 



Important Miscellaneous 

Weeds Controlled: 

Bracken Fern 

Royal Fern 

Sensitive Fern 

Hair cap Moss 

Common Horsetail 

Water Horsetail (pipes) 

Rushes (Juncus spp.) 

Dodder 



Grass Weeds Controlled: 

Bluejoint Grass 

Rattlesnake grass 

(Manna grass) 

Summer grass 

Velvetgrass 

Bent Grass 

Little Hairgrass 

Crabgrass 
Rice cutgrass 



Sedges Controlled: 

Bunch grass 

Muskrat grass 

Nutsedga (Nutgrass) 

Short Wiregrass 

Wideieaf grass 

Stargrass 

Woolgrass 

Cotton grass 

Needlegrass 

Oniongrass 



*CASORON is a registered trademark of 
N. V. Philips-Duphar, The Netherlands 



From 



IN NEW JERSEY 

PARKHURST 



FARM & GARDEN SUPPLY 

301 N. WHITE HORSE PIKE 

HAAAAAONTON, NEW JERSEY 08037 

PHONE 609-561-0960 



SIX 



s 



m 




MASSACHUSETTS 

July Begins Hot and Humid 

Following the extreme heat 
and humidity of the Fourth of 
[uly Holiday period, July 6th 
wought an all-day drizzle to 
the cranbeny area, which was 
^ery helpful to the bogs, even 
though precipitation was slight. 
One weather man coining a 
word called the period "Drys- 
mal." By early July the pre- 
cipitation deficiency was not 
as great as in the great drought 
Df last year but still about 3 
inches short of normal, which 
coupled with the dryness of the 
past four years, made condi- 
:ions drier than desirable. 

Trouble Acute by July 13 

July continued to get hotter 
and more humid until a point 
of crisis was reached on the 
13th because of the heat and 
continued lack of rain. That 
day brought 92 degrees in the 
shelter at the State Bog and the 
rainfall for July to that date 
had been only one 12th of an 
inch. The excess of degrees in 
heat for the month had reached 
a total of 55. Growers who had 
sprinklers were keeping them 
In use, but for many, water sup- 
plies were beginning to get 
short. Of course, the sprinkling 
also was very costly. But it 
was a necessity. For the many 



acres which did not have sprink- 
lers the situation was naturally 
much worse. The Mass. blue- 
berry crop had been badly dam- 
aged by that time. 

The intense heat situation 
was reheved on the 15th, when 
cooler, Canadian air moved in- 
to New England and temper- 
atures and especially humidity 
dropped very appreciably. But 
lack of rain continued to take 
its toll. Temperatures were 
higher than normal, until the 
19th, when there came a dras- 
tic change in temperature, but 
not much in the drought situ- 
ation. On the afternoon and 
night of that day New England 
was alerted to thunderstorms 
and possible tornados, as cool 
simimer polar air moved in. 
There were no tornadoes which 
are extremely rare in the six- 
state area, but there were thun- 
derstorms and showers. But few 
of these were in the cranberry 
area, except on the western 
fringe and little in the main 
cranberry area, that is Hanson, 



the Carvers, Wareham and the 
Cape where the drought is the 
worst. Total at the Cranberry 
Station was only .004 inch. 

Drought Loss Estimated at 50,000 Bbls. 

So severe is the drought that 
on the 20th Dr. Cross of the 
Cranberry Experiment Station 
estimated the loss then as per- 
haps 50,000 baiTcls. The change 
from torrid, humid tempera- 
tures was so great that on the 
night of the 20th a report of 34 
degrees came from a Carver 
cranberry bog. The weather 
was so cool as to suddenly be 
almost too cool. 

The use of sprinklers contin- 
ued, a necessary, but costly and 
as this is the fifth year of the 
dry spell, some growers were 
running out of water. Another 
bad feature was that with the 
emphasis on sprinkling other 
work which should have been 
accomplished was perforce ne- 
glected 



i!rSesC3£asaea£:i£a£::a=l£3£55=a::St=a^^ 



HOMEUTE PUMPS 

for Irrigation & Frost Control 

— TRY BEFORE YOU BUY — 
also 

•Homelite CHAIN SAWS 
•BRUSH SAWS 

Halifax Power 
Mower Service 

Wood St. Halifax, Mass. 
293-6416 

ALTON B. SNELL 



AGENT FOR 
WIGGINS AIRWAYS 



BOG 
SERVICE 



AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICALS 

HAND SPRAYERS - TOOLS - POWER EQUIPMENT 
AUTHORIZED BRIGGS AND STRATTON SERVICE CENTER 

R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 

Cranberry Highway West Wareham, Mass. CY 5-1553 

SEVEN 



July Rain Only 64th of an Inch 

July dragged to an end \vith 
precipitation as recorded at the 
Cranberry Station as only 64tli 
of an inch of rain. Average for 
July is 3.21. Thus the long 
drought continues and that it 
is "picking cranberries" is no 
longer in doubt. Dr. Cross es- 
timates that perhaps 75,000 bar- 
rels have been lost, whicli 
would amount to about a mil- 
lion-dollar loss to Massachu- 
setts growers. Earlier estimates 
were for a Mass. crop of 850,- 
000 to 900,000 barrels for the 
Bay State, a huge production. 
Now the feeling aroimd is that 
production will not equal that 
of last year which was 715,000 
barrels. 

Month Also Hot 

The temperatures for the 
month averaged about one and 
two-third degrees above nor- 
mal. There was also a record 
breaking amount of sunshine 
hours, about 75 percent of pos- 
sible maximum. Tliis is good 
news for the crop of 1967. 
There was also a lot of wind 
through most of July which 
aided cross -pollination and also 
stimulated bee activity, both 
honey and bumble bee. There 
were also few hours of fog 
dm'ing the month. 

Size of Coming Crop 

With only about foiu- weeks 
remaining until harvest, grow- 
ers are getting cirrious as to 
how big the U. S. crop will be. 
Last year the total was 1,314,- 
500 barrels, the largest on rec- 
ord. It seemed earlier that this 
figure would be met and even 
exceeded. But the eastern 
drought is continuing into its 
fifth year. Hurt, as in Massa- 
chusetts, also are all New Jersey 
crops. There, too the lack of 
rain has been b. d. South Jersey, 
however, had a healthy precipi- 
tation on the 19th when it wis 
so badly needed. A total of 2.07 
inches was recorded at Pembn- 
ton during a severe thunder- 
storm. The only relief in Mas- 



sachusetts cranberry area oc- 
curred on the 27th. But this 
proved to be slight. This was 
the first really rainy day in 
months. However, while Boston 
and other parts of Massachu- 
setts got a good soaking, there 
was little again in the main 
cranberry area. Cranberry Sta- 
tion recorded only 3Sth of an 
inch. 

There will he a lot of cran- 
berries this fall grow7i in Mas- 
sachusetts because of favorable 
prior conditions. There was no 
winterkill and no spring frost 
loss to speak of, and the blos- 
som was "massive." The set 
started out good, but there was 
rain. Many pinheads have de- 
veloped as a result. Shoidd 
August contiuiie to be extremely 
dry the result on the crop will 
he "murder" in the words of 
Dr. Cross. Fall frosts are coming 
up with a minimum of water 
supply to fight them. 

July was a beautiful month 
for the vacationist, possibly the 
best in many summers, and as 
a result business in the tourist 
industiy boomed, and that is 
the chief industry for the Cape 
Cod area. 



NEW JERSEY 



July Weather Varied 

July was a month of extremes 
in weather. There were four- 
teen days during wliich the 
temperature rose above 90 de- 
grees, the average number of 
90 degree days in July. Two 
100 degree temperatures were 
recorded. To balance this out, 
there were several cool nights. 
There were twelve days in the 
50's and one in the 40's. The 
extremes were 101 degrees on 
the tliird of July and 48 de- 
grees on the twenty-first. The 
latter reading was only 2 de- 
grees warmer than the record 
low for July which was 46 
degrees, and occurred on July 
4 th, 1938. Rainfall for July 
totaled 3.62 which is about 
7/10 of an inch below normal. 



Nonnal rainfall from January 
through July is 25.12. In 1966 
for this period we have re- 
corded a total of 2.3.49 which 
gives us a deficit of 1.68 so 
far this year. Compared to the 
extremely bad drought of 1964 
and 1965 we are doing a little 
better in regard to rainfall. 
In 1964 the January through 
July total was 22.44 inches and 
in 1965 it was only 21.18 inches. 
The August 2nd rainfall to- 
taled only .12, but in the im- 
portant cranberry and blue- 
berry growing area around 
Chatsworth more than an inch 
of rainfall occurred. 

Rainfall Adequate 

The rainfall during July was 
quite adequate for cranberries 
and blueberries. The extremely 
warm period in the early part 
of the month caused some "burn- 
ing" of foliage in blueberries, 
but adequate rainfall in the 
latter part of the month has 
enabled these bushes to recover. 
The rainfall was timely for the 
development of newly set 
cranberries and they have re- 
cently made a new spurt of 
growth. It is still too early to 
estimate the cranberry crop in 
New Jersey. Over tliree years 
of drought has hurt cranberry 
vines on many properties and 
lowered the potential of the 
vines to produce heavy crops. 
Despite all this there continues 
to be improvement in the gen- 
eral conchtion of bogs where 
there is a plentiful supply of 
water and where water har- 
vesting is practiced. These 
properties are expected to have 
large crops again in 1966. 



If the politicians keep on 
"improving" hving conditions in 
this country it is going to reach 
the point that great men won't 
be able to find a humble be- 
ginning. 



EIGHT 



WaslGland Translormed Into 
Multi-Million Dollar Indnstrv 
with Time. Mnney and Water 



by JOHN W. SCHWEITZER 

Editor's Note: The following article was first published in a recent issue of 
the St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press, St. Paul, Minn. Although it was written for 
the general public and not specifically for cranbery growers, we felt that the content 
would be of such interest to our readers that we obtained permission to reprint it. 



With a hatful of money, 
plenty of time, just the right 
land and a proper water sup- 
ply you can get in on the 
ground floor of Minnesota's 
slowest - growing agricultural 
enterprise — cranberry cultiva- 
tion. 

In fact, the enterprise has 
been withering here rather than 
growing. But that's due for a 
change. 

The state, which exported 
wild cranberries in pioneer days, 
now has four acres of bog under 
cultivation near Aitken. It's 
owned by John Ware, Elgin, 
111., and looked after by his 
father, according to Donald M. 
Coe, director of the state agri- 
cultural department's division 
of plant industry. 

A second grower, John 
Onifer, who had 12 acres near 
Braham, has been out of busi- 
ness since 1958. Emil T. An- 
dersen, associate professor of 
horticulture at the University of 
Minnesota, said at the time 
Onifer was getting about IVz 
tons of berries an acre and sell- 
ing them for 10 cents a pound. 

In Wisconsin there are more 
than 4,000 acres of cranberry 
marshes with an average yield 
of 100 barrels (there are 100 
pounds in a barrel) and last 
year the berries sold for 14 
cents a pound, Coe said. That's 
a 5.5-million-dollar-a-year in- 
dustry. 

(In Wisconsin cranberry 
acres are called marshes; ev- 
erywhere else they're called 

30gS. ) 



Cranberry cultivation isn't for 
amateurs, backyard gardeners or 
the faint-hearted. Coe said it 
takes at least 25-30 acres of bog 
for an individual and 50-60 
acres for an absentee owner in 
order to have a paying cran- 
berry farm. 

It takes from $3,000 to $5,000 
an acre for land development, 
he said. That includes the water 
supply, diking, ditching, dams, 
machinery and so on. Annual 
maintenance is $500 to $600 an 
acre, not including interest and 
depreciation, and it takes three 
to five years before the first crop 
comes in. 

That is $80,000 to $100,000 
at a minimum. 

It can't be just any land, 
either. Cranberries require a 
fairly level peat bog with peat 
soil from 8 to 40 inches deep. 
The peat soil and the water 
supply must be strongly acidic. 

Absolute water control, in- 
cluding the water table, is 
necessary. The bogs are flood- 
ed for harvesting, frost pro- 
tection and winter protection. 
The water table has to be kept 
about a foot below the level of 
the bog. 

Coe adds tliat growers must 
be able to flood or drain the 
bog to a depth of 10 to 12 in- 
ches in a matter of hours to 
avoid killing the plants. That's 
more than a quarter million 
gallons an acre. 

Minnesota has extensive peat 
bogs and is noted for its water 
resources. 



Coe believes the best bog 
sites are probably in the east 
central part of the state, south 
of Duluth and east of Mille 
Lacs lake. High-producing Wis- 
consin bogs are aromid Hay- 
ward and Eagle River, he said. 
An older, lower producing area 
is between Wisconsin Rapids 
and Tomah. 

Coe, who started his career 
as a Wisconsin bog inspector, 
rediscovered the cranberry in- 
dushy about 18 months ago 
during a visit with some old 
friends in Wisconsin. 

They told him the cranberry 
supply would not catch up with 
the demand for 10 years or 
more and that eastern producers 
in Massachusetts and New Jer- 
sey are being squeezed out by 
industrial development. 

Coe mentioned the cranberry 
idea to his boss, Russell G. 
Schwandt, state commissioner of 
agriculture, and last Nov. 23 
the two men met with other 
state officials and several large 
growers from Wisconsin. 

At that meeting Sidney 
Frellsen, director of the conser- 
vation's division of waters, as- 
sured the growers that rights 
for water control could be 
worked out. 

"He told them that if we 
could work out water rights for 
the taconite industry we could 
work out rights to the cranberry 
growers," Coe said, "but it 
would be on a case-by-case 
basis." 



Continued on Page 16 



NINE 



Cranberry Speckling 
Can Be Controlled 



by DONALD M. BOONE and LESTER W. CARLSON 

(Associate Professor and Research Assistant, respectively, Plant 
Pathology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wise.) 



Cranberries in Wisconsin of- 
ten become speckled or spot- 
ted before harvest time(Fig.l). 

The speckles are small, less 
than one-eighth inch in diamet- 
er, and are superficial, affecting 
only the skin of the berry. They 
may be pale yellow, tan, red 
or black. The centers of the 
larger spots are often somewhat 
depressed and lighter colored 
than the margins. Although the 
speckles do not affect the keep- 
ing quality of the berries appre- 
ciably and are not detrimental 
to the quality of the fruit for 
processing, they do detract from 
the appearance of the berries 
packaged for sale as fresh 
fruit. 



The speckles begin to appear 
on the fruit in early August and 
increase in number as the sea- 
son progresses so that by har- 
vest time there may be many 
of them of various sizes or 
stages of development on each 
berry. They may appear any- 
where on the surface of the 
beiTies but are most frequently 
around the stem end. Most va- 
rieties of cranberry are affect- 
ed, but some, such as Searles 
and some selections of Natives, 
show more speckling than 
others. 

Fungicides were very ef- 
fective in controlHng speck- 
hng, which indicates that the 
speckles are mainly due to fun- 



gal infections. Table 1 showiS 
the amount of control obtained 
when maneb was apphed at j 
different times during the 
growing season. The applica- 
tions made between mid-July 
and mid-August were the most 
effective in preventing the di- 
sease. Ferbam and folpet were 
also effective in controlling the 
speckhng. 

Three fungi were found tO' 
be associated with the disease^ 
but one of them, Gihhera com- 
pacta (Pk.) Shear, is thought 
to be mainly responsible for tlie 
speckling. This fungus also 
causes spotting on the cranberry 
leaves. 

Fortunately, the times of ap- 
plication of fungicides for 
best control of speckling aie 
the same as those recommended 
in Wisconsin for control of end 
rot, the most common berry 
rot of cranberry in the state. 
Therefore, when the recom- 
mended schedule for control of 
end rot is followed, no extra ap- 
plications are necessary to pro- 
duce relatively speckle-free 
fruit. To obtain best control of 
both diseases, three applications 
of fungicides should be made 
at 10-14 day intervals beginning 
in mid-Juy. 





FIGURE 1. Cranberry fruit of the Searles variety with speckle (left) 
and free from speckle (right). 



TEN 



Table 1. Fungicidal control of speckle on cranberry fruit. 



Date of munch 
application 



Speckles per berry'' 
Marsh 1 Marsh 2 



Nonsprayed 



26.8 



73.8 



June 29; July 10, 20 

July 10, 20, 31 

July 20, 31; August 10 

July 31; August 10, 21 

August 10, 21, 31 

August 21, 31; September 11 



2.5 


31.8 


0.6 


4.3 


0.3 


0.2 


0.4 


1.4 


0.3 


7.7 




13.4 



*Average number for 75 berries, 25 berries from each of 3 
replicate plots for each series of applications. 



WILLIAM ABRAM, 
ELDERLY WASHINGTON 
GROWER, DIES 

William (Bill) Abram, 85, 
Seaview, Long Beach Penin- 
sula, Washington, passed away 
June 23rd in Ocean Beach hos- 
pital. Mr. Abram was bom 
Sept. 22, 1880 in Germany and 
came to Minnesota as a young 
man. He married his wife 
Augusta in January, 1904 at 
Crown, Minnesota and they 
established their home there. 
The Abrams came to Seaview 
in 1926 where he had a cran- 
berry bog and operated a gas 
station until his retirement. 

He is smrvived by his wife 
Augusta, a daughter, Mrs. 
Gladys Nelson, both Seaview; 
three brothers, Herman and Ray 
of Seaview and August of Zim- 
merman, Miim.; a sister Mrs. 
Joe Beier of Portland; grand- 
daughter, Mrs. Mary Ann Baker 
of Seaview, and three great 
grandchildren. 




\ 



Orders Must Be Placed by August 20 

^399°° $100 Down -Balance Due October 31 "= J,Jg° n. Ulst 



j • 2500 lb. Capacity 



! 

• 35 Picking Boxes • 35 Picking Bags { 

Platform Area: 48 x 78 inches. j 

I Engine — 4_ h.p. Briggs & Stratton with Reduction Unit. Tires — 800:6 - 10 inches wide - 18 inches | 

! diameter - 1000 lbs. capacity per tire with only 20 lbs. of air pressure. Frame— 2W' square tubing x 

I Vs" wall thickness. Axles — 1" round cold roll. Tiller — operated tricycle arrangement for ease » 

I of reversing and to minimize scuffing. j 

I Unit is shown backing up a 5' incline on one of our 16' ramps that can be erected by one man. | 

I Average load by bog operators is 25 boxes. | 

ELEVEN 



Gamma Irradiation 



J>y 



Wm J. Bramlage 



When man learned to release 
the tremendous forces of atomic 
energy his first use of that power 
was to build a bomb — the Atomic 
Bomb. But before the first bomb 
was exploded, he was already 
dreaming of harnessing these 
same atomic forces for peaceful 
uses. 

Among the forces produced 
from radioactive materials are 
gamma rays. These are highly 
penetrating rays with the ca- 
pacity to kill living cells of both 
plants and animals. Scientists 
soon learned to apply controlled 
doses of these gamma rays to kill 
unwanted or dangerous cells, and 
this is the basis for using radio- 
active materials to treat cancer 



patients. Similarly, attempts have 
been made to kill, through ir- 
radiation, the fungi and bacteria 
that cause decay of food. It is 
this aspect of irradiation that we, 
as agriculturists, are personally 
concerned. 

Much work has been done on 
food irradiation, and we fre- 
quently find articles in the news- 
papers and magazines giving 
glowing accounts of the use of 
these "magic rays" to preserve 
food indefinitely — without re- 
frigeration. Indeed, there have 
been some notable successes: 
irradiated bacon, requiring no 
refrigeration, may soon be on the 
market; irradiated potatoes, that 
won't sprout, are now being sold 
n Canada; and research continues 
to look promising for retarding 
spoilage of fresh strawberries 
through irradiation. However, 
most of the press reports have 
been unduly optimistic, for food 
irradiation is beset with severe 
problems. 

To sterilize a food product, 
that is, to kill all the bacteria 
and fungi on and in it, requires 
a massive dose of radiation. Such 
doses very often not only kill 
the microbes, but also cause se- 



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vere changes in the foods, for 
example, changes in the color, 
taste, odor, or texture of the 
food. Dreams of replacing can- 
ning and refrigeration with ir- 
radiation have been largely 
abandoned because of the failure 
to prevent these changes. A 
notable exception to this prob- 
lem, however, is bacon, which 
tolerates a sterilizing dose of 
radiation without undergoing 
change. 

When we consider irradiation 
of fresh fruits, we run into an- 
other immense problem. Unlike 
processed foods, fresh fruits are 
living organizisms, and so, they 
as well as bacteria and fungi 
can be killed by gamma rays. 
All living cells are not equally 
susceptible to these rays, so our 
only hope is that we can seri- 
ously injure or kill disease-caus- 
ing organisms without seriously 
injuring the fruits. Fortunately 
some of the most serious disease- 
causing fungi are among the 
most radiation-sensitive organ- 
isms. These are the PenicilliuTn 
species, which cause blue mold 
of apples and blue and green 
molds of citrus; Botrytis cinerea, 
which causes much of the decay 
of strawberries; and Monilinia 
fructicola, which causes Brown 
Rot of peaches and plums. These 
fungi can be injured, though not 
completely killed, by relatively 
light doses of radiation. 

But unfortunately, even such 
light doses prove to be quite 
injurious to most fruits. Al- 
though the fruits are not killed 
by such doses, they are changed. 
Most fruits are softened by the 
treatment, and sometimes, as 
with grapes and pears, very 
times affected: peaches are made 
greatly softened. Color is some- 
redder, while plums are some- 
times prevented from turning 
blue, and pears develop a mot- 
tled green-and-yellow instead of 
a yellow color. But most serious 
of all, irradiated fruits often 
fail to develop their normal flavor 
during subsequent ripening. Since 
fresh fruits are prized for their 
characteristic flavors, a loss of 
these flavors is a prohibitive ef- 
fect of a treatment. 



TWELVE 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

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TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

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sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 



Another form of injury to 
fruits is a reduction of their 
normal resistance to disease- 
causing fungi. Since light doses 
of radiation do only injure, not 
kill the fungi, this is a very 
serious problem. If irradiated 
fruits are stored for an extended 
period after treatment, they very 
often develop more decay than 
non-irradiated fruits, for in time, 
the fungi recover from the treat- 
ment while the fruits do not. 
Also, if the fruits become re- 
contaminated with fungi, their 
resistance to these organisms is 
less than that of unirradiated 
fruits. This means that radiation 
could not be used prior to a long 
storage period; its use would be 
restricted to a short time before 
the fruits would be used, such as 
for a reduction of decay during 
immediate marketing. 

Another problem is expense. 
An irradiation facility is a very 
expensive piece of equipment, 
and one that requires great skill 
and elaborate precautions for op- 



eration. Although it has been 
found that sprouting of potatoes 
can be prevented by a very light 
dose of radiation and without 
other injury to the tubers, only 
in certain situations would irradi- 
ation of potatoes be economical, 
at least at the present stage of 
technology. Such a situation now 
seems to exist in Canada. 

So it can be seen that there 
are many problems confronting 
fruit irradiation. But conspicu- 
ously missing from this list of 
problems is the one that im- 
mediately comes to mind in a 
discussion of irradiation. Irradi- 
ation does not make the fruits 
radioactive. The gamma rays are 
the product of a radioactive 
source. They are not themselves 
radioactive, nor do they make 
the objects they strike radioac- 
tive. Irradiated foods are not 
radioactive! 

Numerous experiments have 
been made on many different 
kinds of fruits under many types 



of conditions. In these experi- 
ments, only one fruit has consis- 
tently responded well to irradia- 
tion, and that is the strawberry. 
The market life of strawberries 
is usually extended 2-3 days by 
irradiation, without injury to the 
fruit. For a fruit as perishable 
as strawberries, this extension of 
market life is quite significant. 
Research is continuing on this 
crop, and it is quite possible that 
in the near future irradiated ber- 
ries will be arriving on our mar- 
kets from California. California 
offers a unique potential for this 
operation, for its largest pro- 
duction area has a harvest period 
of at least 3-4 months, with a 
fairly uniform volume of produc- 
tion during this period. This 
produces an economic situation 
that cannot be matched in the 
East. 

It is likely that the encourag- 
ing results from irradiation of 
strawberries and potatoes will 
continue to stimulate research on 



THIRTEEN 



ways to treat other fresh fruits 
and vegetables. However, the 
great sensitivity of most fresh 
produce to gamma rays will im- 
pose severe restrictions on radi- 
ation usage. In addition, the great 
expense of a radiation facility 
will impose additional economic 
restriction unless future techno- 
logical break-throughs can greatly 
reduce its cost. We can expect 
to continue reading in the popu- 
lar press, glowing accounts of 
the use of "magic rays" to pre- 
serve foods, for this is fertile 
ground for journalists, but such 
reports should be met with a 
healthy skepticism. Irradiation 
is certainly no cure-all for post- 
harvest diseases of fruits. 



and football scj[ua(l, rccrntly 
wrote an article tor the school 
newspaper stating that he felt 
the school's spirit, student gov- 
ernment and social prowess was 
far below its academic excel- 
lence, and that he was willing 
to accept the challenge to bet- 
ter this condition during his 
year as student body president. 
Lakeside is a prep school. 



Cape Cod Growers 
Meet August 23 



The 79th Annual Meeting of 
the Cape Cod Cranberry Grow- 
ers Association will be held 
Tuesday, August 23 at the Cran- 
berry Experiment Station begin- 
ning at 10:00 A.M. The program 
is largely complete at this time 
and will include machinery and 



FRANK O. GLENN'S SON 
WINS SCHOOL ELECTION 

Dick Glenn, a senior at Lake- 
side School For Boys, Seattle, 
and the son of Mr. and Mrs. 

Frank Glenn of Long Beach, equipment exhibits, guided tours 

won an election for student of the State Bog and a chicken 

body president over two other barbeque at lunch. After lunch, 

candidates recently. there will be a short business 

Frank Glenn is a leading nieeting, a talk by Dr. David W. 

Washington Cranberry Grower Robinson of Ireland and the 

and prominent in the industry, crop report by Mr. Byron S. 

Dick, who is a member of Peterson of the Crops Reporting 

tile private school's rowing crew Service . 



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1 


1 


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1 


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1 


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Fig. 1 T-MULZ, when mix- 
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ly causes an emulsion that can 
be mixed with water for appli- 
cation. 



Thompson-Hayward 
Announces Expanded 
Line of Emulsifiers 

An expanded line of emulsi- 
fiers for agricultural chemicals 
has been announced by the In- 
dustrial Division of Thompson- 
Hayward Chemical Company. 
Called T-MULZ emulsifiers, 
they are used in formulating a 
broad spectrum of insectcides 
and herbicides. 

T - MULZ emulsifiers are 
available in versatile matched 
pairs for handling the major 
part of emulsification require- 
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In addition to its brand of 
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Additional infomiation about 
the Thompson-Hayward emul- 
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Thompson-Hayuard Chemical 
Company, 52(X) Speaker Road, 
Kansas City, Kansas 66110. 



FOURTEEN 



How Cranberries 
Feed Tbeir Young 



By G. L. GRANGER 



Cranberries are a very closely 
affiliated family. The Father takes 
an active interest in the care and 
preservation of the home environ- 
ment during the pre-natal period 
of the expectant mother. He is 
, constantly on the guard against 
the invasion of the Cranberry 
Beatles. 

The cranberry Beatle is the 
natural enemy of the young new- 
born Cranberry. They land upon 
the habitat of the Cranberries, 
making many loud noises. They 
shake and tremble while making 
unusual sounds and often cause 
great trauma to the young Cran- 
berries who become frightened 
at these strange noise and violent 
shaking. The young Cranberries 
often go into shock, shrieking and 
swooning whenever the Cranberry 
Beatles attack. 

It is during these early days of 
the new born Cranberries that the 
feeding of the Cranberry is most 
important. The Mother Cranberry 
is easily irritated and it is the 
Father's duty to see that the 
Mother is not unduly upset. If 
the Mother becomes upset she re- 
fuses to nurse the young Cran- 
berries, and they soon become 
anemic. If you have ever seen 
Cranberries that were not a deep 
beautiful red but rather, a light 
sickly yellow, it was because they 
were not properly fed. This was 
probably due to the fact that their 
Mother had failed to give them 
the food they required. 

At feeding time the Mother 
Cranberry gathers her young ones 
around her. Sometimes this is 
difficult for her to do as the 
Cranberry Beatles may be at- 
tacking the home nest and the 
young Cranberries start shrieking 
and swooning so that they do not 
hear the call to dinner. 

The Mother Cranberry calls 
her young by rolling gently back 
and forth on her twig, making 
soft sounds much like that which 



a catapillar makes while crawling 
up a blade of grass. 

Only Cranberries can hear the 
sounds of the Mother Cranberry 
calling her young. Doctor I. Ben- 
had states this in his thesis. "A 
Day in Cranberry Land," that the 
song of the Mother Cranberry 
calling her yovmg to dinner is 
very much like the unfinished part 
of Schubert's "Unfinished Sym- 
phony." Someone once asked Dr. 
I. Benhad, "If only Cranberries 
can hear the song of the Mother 
Cranberry, how it was he heard 
it." He replied that in truth he 
WAS a Cranberry who had spent 
most of his life in the can. 



After the young Cranberries 
have been gathered around their 
Mother, the Father begins his 
famous and exotic dance of the 
"Balls of Fire." This dance has 
been so named because of the 
frantic motions of the Father 
who moves so gracefully and fast 
that it appears that more than 
one Cranberry is dancing. Due to 
the stress and strain of the dance 
the Father's blood pressure rises, 
giving him a deep red appear- 
ance, thus giving the illusion of 
many balls of fire. The purpose 
of the dance is to confuse the 
Cranberry Beatles. 

It is while the Father is per- 
forming his dance that the Mother 
Cranberry feeds her young. This 
is the most difficult function the 
adult female Cranberry has to 
perform. If you do not agree, you 
should find yourself an orphaned 
Cranberry and just try to feed it. 




Ronson Helicopters brings you an effective combination of 
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NAME. 



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POST OFFICE. 
I FARM 



STATE. 



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ACRES. MY PRIMARY CROPS ARE. 




FIFTEEN 



Regional News Notes — Continued 

WASHINGTON 



Month Very Mild 

The weather has been average 
for this time of the year with 
the mean high 63.77 degrees F. 
and the mean low 51.35 degrees 
F. The actual high for the 
month was 69 on the 15th and 
the 17th and the bog low was 
39 degrees on the 24th. The 
precipitation for the month was 
.54 inches, and the bog owners 
have been doing some sprink- 
ling, about 4 hours a week to 
keep the moisture up. 

Astoria Bridge Opened 

The Long Beach area be- 
came a permanent link with tlie 
Highway system with the open- 
ing of the new Astoria Bridge 
across the Columbia River at 
the mouth and it htis been a 
very busy highway for the first 
weekend. It does not officially 
open imtil August 27th but due 
to many problems with the 
ferry channel the bridge opened 



July 29th with one-way traffic 
guided through the still work- 
ing crews. Sunday 4,500+ cars 
and other vehicles went through 
the toll gate. The ferries could 
never begin to handle this 
amount, and of course many 
were just sight seeing on the 
new bridge. 



CRANBERRIES IN MINNESOTA 
Continued jrom Page 9 

Coe said he is now working 
with 8 to 10 interested persons 

— Minnesota people with boggy 
land or money and Wisconsin 
growers who want to expand. 

"There's not many people 
who want to get into it." he 
said. "And there are fewer who 
can afford to." 

It's a long-term enterprise 

— but once a bog is established 
it will last for 50 to 75 years, 
Coe said. 



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Edward Gelsthorpe | 

To Be Speaker at 
Miami Convention i 

Edward Gelsthorpe, executive' 
vice president of Ocean Spray' 
Cranberries, Inc. will be a key' 
speaker during the 2.3rd annual I 
convention of the Florida Fruit: 
and Vegetable Association in! 
Miami Beach. ' 

The convention is set for Sep- : 
tember 19-23 at the Americana 
Hotel, Bal Harbour. Gelsthorpe' 
will make the address during 
the Florida Citrus Breakfast 
sponsored by the Florida Citrus i 
Commission on Thursdav, Sept. 
22. ' ' 

Gelsthorpe has been with 
Ocean Spray since May, 1963 
when he left Colgate-Palmolixe 
Co. where he was corporate 
\ace president and general man- 
ager of the toilet articles di- 
vision. 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass. 02781 
Tel. 617 S24-757R 



Production Credit Loans 

Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office — 362, Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager |' 



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A complete line of 

WATER DISTRIBUTING 

EQUIPMENT 

AETNA 

ENGINEERING CO. 

Hanover, Mass. 
TAylor 6-2341 



h 



SIXTEEN 



UDENTS VISIT 
ORRIS BOG 

A group of high school stu- 
nts from Gig Harbor last 
inth visited, among other sites, 
e cranberry bog of veteran 
ower Leonard Morris at 
)ng Beach, Wash. The tour 
"the students was a new 
iproach to the learning of 
story. 

About 25 students were in 
e group and a photo of the 
cup at the MoiTis property 
peared on page one of the 
,vaco (Washington) Tribune. 



3NGRATULATIONS 
WASHINGTON 

Azmi Shawa, head of the 
estem Washington Coastal 
cperiment Station at Long 
ach and Mrs. Shawa are be- 
g congratulated on the birth 
their third cliild on July 11. 
16 child has been named 
'cma. 



Dng Range Project 
lay Add 2,000 Acres 
f Cranberry Land at 
Dng Beach, Wash. 

A long range project which 
uld, among other benefits, 
ovide 2,000 new acres of cran- 
rry land, is under consider- 
ion. This would be accom- 
ished by the building of a 
im at Bear River and a 16,000 
re-foot reservoir. The pro- 
"t would require the appro - 
iation of Federal grants and 
ans, the county and local ex- 
■nditures. The project, if ap- 
oved, could not be completed 
at least an estimated 10 
ars, and the cost might be in 
e neighborhood of 11 million 
illars. The project which 
Duld aid the whole Long 
^ach peninsula was broached 
it month in a meeting at Sea- 
3w. The group voted to del- 
ate authority to County Com- 
ssioner Eldred Pentilla, Com- 
ssioner Marion Vanderpool 
d the mayors of Long Beach 
d Ilwaco to get the project 
derway. 




follow 

the 
leader 



Once again Buckner Sprinklers rate as the number one agricul- 
tural irrigators. When tested for uniform water disbursement, 
Buckner Sprinklers led the field with the highest Coefficient of 
Uniformity (CU). Buckner high CU means more uniform crop 
growth, greater profit per acre. And Buckner design and 
exacting production standards assure sprinklers with a long, 
trouble-free life. For only Buckner has the patented, sand-proof 
GDG Bearing for thousands of extra maintenance-free hours. 
Only Buckner gives you over fifty years of Buckner sprinkler 
manufacturing experience. Follow the leader. Irrigate with 
Buckner— world's leading sprinkler manufacturer. See your 
Buckner Dealer or write: 

JoUCkXlGir® INDUSTRIES, INC. 

P.O. BOX 232, FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 93708 



SEVENTEEN 




ELECTRONIC DIET -Dave Quail, left, Tempe, Arizona, cowboy for 
Spur Feeding Company, and Benny Riggs, who helps run family 
feeding operation near Chandler, Arizona, wait at computer console 
for print out of answer to beef feeding problem they submitted. 



A ReDort On Use Of 
ComDuters in Anriculhre 



Modern argriculture's latest 
tool — for the mind instead of 
the hand — is the electronic 
computer. 

Students of agriculture at 
Arizona State University are 
learning to apply computers 
and develop bigger and better 
crops and cattle, in a course 
given for tlie first time tliis year. 

The instructor is an agricul- 
tural economist who once "fed" 
the entire state of Pennsylvania 
into a computer to analyze 
usable land area. He is ASU's 
Professor of Fann Management 
Dr. Jim Becker. 

Dr. Becker uses a GE-225 
general puq^ose computer at 
the University to digest and 
calculate farm and ranch in- 
formation in the time it takes to 
flick a light switch. 

EIGHTEEN 



At ASU, students in Dr. 
Becker's farm and ranch organ- 
ization course are programming 
existing faniis and stock feed- 
ing operations, hypothetical 
farms of the future, range allot- 
ment, farm expansion, nutrient 
and crop comparisions, even 
feasibihty of Kiising wild bron- 
cos for rodeo stock contractors. 

Everything today is influ- 
enced by computers— from main- 
taining bank records to design- 
ing farm machinery. It all can 
be symbolized by matliematics, 
the language of computers. 
Fanners directly use advantages 
of data processing for account- 
ing and problem solving. 

Farming is big business and 
accurate records must be kept 
for the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice and for banks which fi- 
nance most large operations. 



Computers handle these chores 
'luickly and cheaply. 

Problem solving represents 
a gigantic challenge with re- 
sults contingent only on tlie 
energy and ingenuity of the 
inquirer. Intelligent use of 
computers can provide valuable 
information on feeds, livestock, 
liousing, crops, cattle, machin- 
ery budgeting — all aimed at 
maximum profit and minimum 
cost. 

Experiment stations and 
feeders have compiled vast 
quantities of information on 
biology and nutrition over the 
years. Total digestible nutrients, 
digestible protein, dry matter 
and other factors have been 
figured for just about any feed. 

Many questions arise in areiis 
where less information exists. 
If cotton is in a bind, to what 
crop should a farmer switch? 
Can he make money on hogs 
even if he has never raised 
them? 

Much of the burden of pro- 
viding information is placed 
squarely on the farnier. Gener- 
ally, if he has succeeded in one 
area he will succeed in anotlier. 
But, computer analysis of his 
resources, peildnent actixaties, 
teclmical and economic factors 
can provide a reasonable pic- 
ture of anticipated profits or 
losses. 

ASU agriculture students iire 
challenged to obtain pertinent 
data by conducting thorough 
interviews and literature search- 
es for existing and projected 
conditions. They gather needed 
information on crop yields, 
acreage, labor, allotments, costs, 
equipment, size and quality of 
stock, etc. 

A student may spend days 
preparing a linear programming 
problem which the computer 
may solve in a minute. 

For instance: Gi\en the labor, 
cost, and net profit for one acre 
of corn, oats, wheat, and barley 
(as shown in the accompanying 
chart) the computer simulta- 



neously analyzes and projects 
the figures for a 120- acre farm 
with 1200 hours of available 
labor and $2,500 capital. 

Although com is the high 
value crop ($63 net per acre), 
compared Avith barley ($41 
net), the c-omputer takes into 
account given factors of yield, 
labor, cost, etc. It suggests all 
but 20 of the 120 acres be plant- 
ed to barley, the remainder to 
corn for a net profit of $5,360. 

It would take extensive fig- 
uring by hand to arrive at the 
correct allotment even though 
this is a relatively simple prob- 
lem for the computer. The more 
information available, the better 
the solution whether it is a low 
cost feed ration, machiner}' 
package, or plan for a model 
farm. 

ASU Junior Benny Riggs, 
who helps run a family stock 
feeding operation near Chand- 
ler, used figures from published 
tables of nutrients to program 
a "least-cost" feed ration. 

From experience, he knew 
cattle would not eat what the 
computer suggested from the 
way he initially set up the 
problem. Benny restricted 
poundage of some ingredients, 
added others such as barley 
and molasses, and re-ran the 
whole problem through the 
GE-225 computer in ASU's 
Computer Center, i 

He is now applying the re- 
sults in the family business. 
Cattle are consuming the com- 
puterized diet, and costs are be- 
ing reduced. 

Vitamin A was thought to 
increase even previously good 
results in cattle feeding, says 
Benny. But, benefits of the vi- 
tamin were considered out of 
proportion to the high cost for 
the small amounts consumed. 
So, Vitamin A was not being 
used extensively. 

However, the computer, com- 
paring diet nutrients, deduced 
Vitamin A results would justify 
its expense. The computer was 
correct. 

Dr. Becker teaches his stu- 
dents — who include rodeo per- 
formers, cowboys for stock feed- 



ers and full-time farmers — the 
basics of computer use, empha- 
sizing they need not be electron- 
ics engineers or mathematicians 
to operate them. Fundamen- 
tally, a computer is a calculat- 
ing tool only as effective as 
its operator. 

Some students may not be in 
a position to actively use com- 
puters when they graduate. 
Even so, they have learned a 
valuable lesson appHcable to 
any situation: how to recognize, 
obtain and organize information 
needed to solve a problem. 



state entomologist from 1922 
to 1927. He was manager of 
the state fair flower show from 
1927 to 1951 and treasurer of 
the Wisconsin Horticultural so- 
ciety from 1927 to 1958. 

He was editor of the Wiscon- 
sin Horticultm-e magazine in 
1927 and was a member of the 
editorial staff of the Journal of 
Economic Entomology from 
1952 to 1958. 



Ernest L Chambers 

Ernest L. Chambers, 69, re- 
tired state entomologist and for- 
mer chief of the plant industry 
division of the Wisconsin agri- 
culture department died at hiS' 
summer home near Sturgeon 
Bay, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Chambers headed the 
Wisconsin plant division from 
1927 to 1961 when he retired. 
Before that, he was assistant 



PERSONAL 

Oiva Hannulla, South Carver, 
Mass. cranberry grower spent 
part of July touring Wisconsin 
cranberry marshes and talking 
with their owners. He was very 
impressed by the mode of op- 
eration, versatility and general 
agressiveness of Wisconsin grow- 
ers. Mr. Hannulla found many 
young second and third gen- 
eration people all able to op- 
erate varying types of farm 
machinery. Before returning 
home he also toured Hudson 
Bay, Canada. 



^sso) 



Kerosene 

Solvent 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 



Acnadton^^ 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



NINETEEN 



WE THANK OUR 
CRANBERRY GROWING 
CUSTOMERS FOR THEIR 
BUSINESS THIS SEASON 



Y 



See Us For Your 



FALL PESTICIDE 
REQUIREMENTS 



R. F. MORSE & SON, INC. 

CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, AAASSACHUSETTS CY 5-1553 



TWENTY 




aK 




CRANBERRY-CELERY RELISH 

(Makes 3 cups) 
1 pound (4 cups) fresh cran- 
berries, chopped or coarsely 
ground 
% cup tliinly shced celery 
Vs cup finely chopped onion 
1 cup sugar 
1 teaspoon tarragon vinegar 

( optional ) 
Combine all ingredients; mix 
well. Cover and chill until 
serving time. 



CRANBERRY 
BAKED CORNISH HENS 

(Makes 6 servings) 
3 cups fresh cranberries 

1 cup water 

Vi cup frozen concentrated 

orange juice 
IVz cups sugar 
V'i cup butter or margarine 

2 teaspoons grated orange rind 
Pinch of poultry seasoning 

6 Cornish game hens 
Salt and pepper 
Combine cranberries, water and 
orange juice concentrate in 
saucepan; cook over medium 
heat until cranberries begin to 
pop. Remove from heat and 
stir in sugar, butter, orange rind 
and poultry seasoning. 
Sprinkle hens inside and out 
with salt and pepper. Truss 
and place on rack in shallow 
roasting pan. Roast according 
to package directions. About 
30 minutes before hens are 
done, brush liberally with cran- 
berry mixture. Continue to 
baste with cranberry mixture 
every 5 minutes until hens are 
done. 



The teen-age boys on the 
comer enjoyed offering little 
Tommy a choice of a nickel or 
dime, and he inevitably chose 
the larger coin — the nickel. 
He usually went to tlie corner 
store and spent it on candy. 

"You're not that dumb." the 
storekeeper said one day. "You 
know the smaller coin is worth 
more than the bigger one." 

"Course I do," Tomy replied, 
"But the first time I take the 
smaller one I'd be killing a 
good thing." 



jest 

for 
fun! 



A little old lady was going 
through customs at San Fran- 
cisco. An inspector asked her 
what was inside a bottle in her 
valise. 

"Holy water," she replied in 
a thick Irish brogue. 

The inspector uncorked the 
the bottle and took a swig. 
"For Pete's sake," he exclaimed, 
"This is Irish Whiskey." 

"Saints be praised!" exclaimed 
the old lady. "It's a miracle." 



A man went to the doctor to 
see if there was a cure for 
snoring. The doctor asked, 
"Does it bother your wife?" 
To which the man replied, 
"No, it just embarrasses her. It's 
the rest of the congregation it 
disturbs." 



CRANBERRY COLA 

( Makes about 4 servings ) 

2 cups cranberry juice, cliilled 
1 bottle (16 oz.) carbonated 

cola-flavored beverage, chilled 
Lime wedges and orange slices 

Combine equal parts of cran- 
berry juice and cola-flavored 
beverage in tall glasses. Add 
ice and garnish with lime 
wedges and orange slices. 



CRANBERRY QUEEN BEE SODA 

(Makes about 4 servings) 

1 pint vanilla ice cream 
Vs cup honey 

2 cups cranberry juice, chilled 
Place a small scoop of ice 

cream in each glass and top 
each scoop with about 1 tea- 
spoon honey. Add another small 
scoop of ice cream to each glass 
and top with remaining honey. 
Fill glasses with cranberry juice 
and serve with straws and long 
spoons. 



CRANBERRY SPRITZ 

(Makes 4 servings) 

2 cups cranberry juice cocktail, 

chilled 
2 cups drink mixer, chilled 

(quinine water, bitter lemon, 
ginger ale, Tom Collins 
mixer, or club soda) 

Combine equal parts of cran- 
berry juice and drink mixer in 
taU glasses. Add ice and gar- 
nish with fresh fruit slices or 
wedges, if desired. 

TWENTY-ONE 



m% of the total in 1948-1950 
to about 25% in 1965. Tlie ap- 
peal of ready-to-serve proc- 
essed foods, and the more recent 
enthusiasm for cranberry juice 
are responsible for the increas- 
ing demand for processed cran- 
berries, and tlie reduced inter- 
est in fresh fruit. 

Many of the arguments in 
fa\'or of diy harvesting lose 
their cogency if the berries do 
not need to be stored for long 
periods for eventual shipment 
as fresh fniit. It is estimated 
tliat by 1967, over half the total 
national crop \\n\l be sold as 
juice, and the berries used in 
juice manufacture are best 
frozen and thawed before ex- 
traction; and most commercial 
sauce can be as well made 
from frozen fruit as from fresh. 
Since tliis is the prevaiHng sit- 
uation, and since the berries 
for processing and those for 
fresh sliipment command es- 
sentially the same price, grow- 
ers increasingly seek to avoid 
the shrinkage losses of stored 
dry fresh fruit, and the very 
sizeable losses of the diy har- 
vest operation. 

Massachusetts, with its tra- 
ditional concern for the fresh 
cranberry market, is the last of 
the five cranberry-producing 
states to take up water harves- 
ting. In 1965 Massachusetts 
sent car lots of fresh cranberries 
to 23 terminal markets in USA, 
Wisconsin shipped to 9, Wash- 
ington to 4 (all West Coast), 
and New Jersey to 1. Tliere 
is no record of a "car lot un- 
load" from Oregon. All the 
states but Massachusetts now 
harvest most of their cranbeny 
crop in water. It is noteworthy 
tliat in New Jersey where the 
conversion to water harvesting 
took place in the last few- 
years, the crops of 1964 and 
1965 have shown a sharp 50% 
rise over the previous year. 

Experimental work condvicted 
at the Cranberry Station over 
the past five yen's has shown 
that on State Bog plots the 
crops harvested in water av- 
eraged 40% greater than tliose 
from equal areas harvested dry. 



Part of tliis increase (and pos- 
sibly the larger part) is at- 
tributable to the hardest of 
nearly all the berries raised. 
Tlie balance of the increase is 
surely accoimted for by the 
reduced mechanical damage of 
the water harvest both to the 
vine tops (which appear to be 
so little disturbed by the op- 
eration that it is hard to dis- 
tinguish the harvested and un- 
harvested vines viewed from 
the shore of the bog) and to 
the cranberry roots which are 
pulled less when machine heads 
are set high to skim off the 
floating fruit near the water 
surface. 

Because of the great vari- 
ability in vine density from 
bog to bog, and from spot to 
spot within a bog, it is very 
difficult to measure the actual 
loss of cranberries in dry har- 
vesting on Massachusetts cran- 
berry bogs. Scoop harvesting 
was notoriously inefficient and 
especially so when scoopers 
were paid "by the box." Care- 
ful measurements have shown 
that sometimes one-third of the 
total crop failed to get into 
harvest boxes. Macliine picking 
has tended to improve the ef- 
ficiency of the harvest, and this 
is more evident on bogs that 
have been regularly har\^ested 
with the same type of machine 
for several years in succession — 
for in this way the vines be- 
come "trained" and lie combed 
and less snarled. But vines 
thicken with successive ma- 
chine harvests, and the increas- 
ing use of fertilizers to produce 
heavier crops combine to make 
a "clean" harvest difficult if not 
impossible. With careful, de- 
liberate operation, either Wes- 
tern or Darlington machines 
can usually be used to pick 
the crop dry with -a loss of 
only 10% or 15% of the crop. 
But it is uncommon to be able 
to hire this carefully-conducted 
hai-vest with the result that few 
f^rowers argue when a loss of 
20-25% is averred as the state 
average diy-harvest loss. The 
Darlington machine especially 
appears to lose efficiency on our 



heaviest crops, even when the 
effective width of the harvest 
swath is cut to one-half the 
machine width. 

Until a new dry picker is 
designed, built and tested, the 
cnly assured means of redu- 
cing or eliminating these heavy 
losses lies in flood picking. Sev- 
eral trials have been made of 
flood picking in Massachusetts 
in the past and always with at 
least two strikes against it: 1. 
the bogs selected for the test 
were not built for such a har- 
vest, 2. the test was made in 
the context that half of all 
fruit harvested must be sold as 
fresh cranberries, and 3. the 
relatively slow utihzation of the 
fruit required that it be dry 
on delivery to the shipper. 

Several factors combine to 
discourage the Massachusetts 
grower from giving serious 
consideration to water harves- 
ting. In average or drier than 
average years, water suppUes 
are too low in September and 
October to flood the bogs at 
will. Tliis is surely the case 
with half the present acreage 
in the state. Another and re- 
lated problem is the large 
size of many individual cran- 
berry bogs. Individual flood- 
ing areas vary often from 20 
to 90 acres between dikes. 
Many of these large flooding 
areas are from one to four or 
five feet out of grade, and 
no machinery has yet been 
devised for picking cranberries 
in water much over 18 inches 
deep. Even where the grade 
is near level on a large bog, the 
investment in macliinery and 
the recruitment of a labor force 
large enough to harvest and 
handle the crop in a one or 
tsvo-day period would be im- 
practical if not impossible. 

Plagued as we are by con- 
tinuing drought, I would sug- 
gest that Massachusetts grow- 
ers think seriously about pick- 
ing a few small bogs in water 
where water supplies are 
ample. Tliis \\'Ould ha\e great 
advantages: 1. It would give 
the growers and their neigh- 
bors some valuable experience 



TWENTY-TWO 



in the diflBculties of the op- 
eration, 2. it would demon- 
strate on a commercial scale 
whether or not the increased 
crop harvested could reason- 
ably cx)ver the increased costs 
of equipment and labor and 3. 
it would demonstrate (as no 
amount of written or spoken 
words could) the advantage to 
the cranberry vines of being 
spared the mauling and mechan- 
ical breakage of the dry harvest 
operation. 

Some Massachusetts growers 
are preparing for new plantingsi 
next spring. Because of present 
bog values, and projected 
values as far as we can see, 
it is important and worthwhile 
to grade these new pieces as 
nearly level as skill, time 
and effort can make them. Be- 
cause the productivity of smal- 
ler bogs is in general greater 
than that of larger bogs, I would 
suggest that growers construct 
dikes to make the flooding 
areas no larger than five acres. 
This should facilitate flooding 
and irrigation operations and 
would provide a convenient 
size for flood harvesting as 
this develops in the future. 



1. Depreciation of Cranberry 



Bogs 



ful chemicals to speed their 
clearance through the Food and 

Drug Administration. A change in the Internal 
BE IT RESOLVED that a Revenue Code to allow a land- 
Research Advisory Committee owner the option of deprecia- 
composed of growers be es- ting cranberry bogs in the same 



FARM BUREAU 

Continued from Page 2 
2. Ways of Strengthening the 
Cranberry Experiment Station 

The Cranberry Experiment 
Station is more vital than ever 
today, for growers cannot le- 
gally experiment with new 
chemicals until they have been 
cleared for use. 

Also, with the shortage of 
available manpower and in- 
creased costs of production, it 
is vital that new cultural meth- 
ods of producing and harvest- 
ing cranberries be developed. 
Therefore, BE IT RESOLVED 
that applied research at the 
Cranberry Experiment Station 
receive greater emphasis. 

Futher, BE IT RESOLVED 
that a new position of assistant 
to the Director of the Experi- 
ment Station be created. His 
responsibiHties might well be 
to closely supervise the applied 
research and follow up on use- 



tablished to act as a liaison be- 
tween the Experiment Station 
and growers. This Committee 
will keep the Station informed 
of problems facing growers 
and will be kept informed at 
regularly scheduled meetings 
as to progress on specific pro- 
jects. 

In addition to the above 
resolutions presented to the 
committee for their recommen- 



manner as cattle, apple trees 
and factories. 

2. Migrant Workers 

All agricidture gets a black 
eye from the annual sensational 
stories about exploited labor. 
Most of these newspaper ar- 
ticles center around photographs 
of housing. Recently, such an 
article appeared, which centered 
around housing that had not 
been used for over 20 years, 
dation to the membership for We might consider tearing down 
consideration, the following our abandoned shacks which 
were presented for discussion make such photographs pos- 
and possible future action. sible. 

De J. FISH 

CRANE, DRAGLINE and 
BULLDOZER SERVICE 

EXCAVATIONS 

LAND CLEARING 

DITCH CLEANING 

SUMP HOLES 

CANALS 
WAREHAM BROCKTON 587-0824 

295-0506 BROCKTON 586-0550 



SHAWMUT GLASS 



Representing 

KNOX GLASS, INC. 



25 EAST STREET 
CAMBRIDGE 41, MASS. 



TWENTY-THREn: 




Pictured here is Cranberr/ Producfs, Inc. entry in the Eagle River, 
Wisconsin Fourth of July parade. Directly behind the float is a 
partial view of the new cranberry picking machine currently being 
manufactured in Warrens, Wisconsin. 



Regional News Notes — Continued 

W I "^ C O N S I N 

Hot, liTimid weather started 
the month \\ath temperatures 
averaging well above normal. 
Hi eh temperatures in the 90's 
;md lows in the 60's were the 
rule on most days. Shower ac- 
tivity was light and scattered as 
skies remained sunny and hazy. 
Most rain fell in western counties 
where weekly amounts of V2 to 
1 inch were common. 

Hot and muggv weather pre- 
vailed over the Holiday week- 
end. Shower activity became a 
little more widespread on the 
3rd and 4th. More generous 
rain fell on the 5th as squall 
lines in advance of a cold f ont 
moved across the state. 

Continued hot and humid 
early in the week of the 10th 
followed by cooling rain on the 
13th. There were a few 100- 
102 temperature readings in tlie 
central part. The southwest re- 
ceived cpiite heavy precipitation 

TWENTY-FOUR 



together with some hail and 
damaging winds. 

July 16 and 17 was generally 
cool and pleasant but the 18th 
turned hot and humid with a 
few more showers. Tempera- 
tures averaged slightlv below 
normal in all parts of the state. 
Nighttime temperatures, in par- 
ticular, were cool on several 
days with the mercury dropping 
into the 30's in the north and 
low 40's in the south on the 
20th and 21st. A low reading 
of 26 degrees was recorded in 
the Mather c-ranberry bogs on 
the morning of the 20th. No 
measurable precipitation fell at 
most stations outside of the 
northwest sections where some 
good 1 to 2 inch amounts fell 
in showers on the 18th. 

A slow warming trend with 
temperatiu-es into the 90's began 
tJie 25th. No precipitation oc- 
curred over the weekend of the 
23d and 24th. Sprinkling and 
flooding has been necessary in 
some locations for frost pro- 
tection 



Personal 

Vernon Goldsworthy, presi- 
dent of Cranberry Products, Inc., 
Eagle River, Wisconsin, and 
Mrs. Goldsworthy were July 
\isitors to Massachusetts. On 
tiie way East they stopped at 
NcAvbury, Michigan, where the 
University of Michigan has an 
experimental cranberry plot. 
In Drummonsville, Province of 
Quebec, the Goldsworthys vis- 
Hed the bogs of Charles La- 
Uocque, who is continuing to 
make further additions to his 
cranberr)^ properties. \\^hile in 
Massachusetts they visited with 
acquaintances in the Cranberry 
area, the Mass. Cranberry Ex- 
periment Station and the pub- 
lishers of Cranberries magazine. 



CORRUGATED 
CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 




serving the WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 

Vines 
for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 

INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 



*4t4t*4t4i*4i4i** 



Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 




OUR PRODUCTS 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange Relish 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cran-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



/JWU"A^A^tfW^VWU^^^^^ 



DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsingrer 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 






WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

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Phone : 



MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 
Area Code 608 257-1019 








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SHICH 
AY IS 







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ductivity of their properties. 

The reason? Ocean Spray's leadership m the marketing o 
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For instance, in just three short years Ocean Spray has Intro 
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FRENCH 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



SEP 1 9 W66 



UMIVERSITYOF 
WIkSc^AUHJSETTS 




Dr. David Robinson (center) Guest Speaker at CCCGA Meeting Explains some of His Color Slides to Mr. Alfred Pappi 
(left), President, and Dr. Chester Cross (right), Director of Cranberry Experiment Station, East Wareham, Mass. 

(Stories on Pages 7 and 14) 



IIM 

THIS 

ISSUE 



1 966 CROP PROSPECTS 1 

DR. ROBINSON DISCUSSES IRISH AGRICULTURE . . 7 
C.C.C.G.A. ANNUAL MEETING. T4- 



Ml 
1! 



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PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

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The National Bank of Wareham 



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1866 CROP 

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A record National cranberry 
crop of 1,557,800 barrels is 
forecast for 1966, 8 percent 
more than last year's crop and 
20 percent above the 1960-64 
a\erage. This forecast is based 
on conditions as of August 15. 
Larger crops than last year 
are forecast for all the cran- 
berry producing States except 
New Jersey. 

In New Jersey, a crop of 
141,000 barrels is in prospect, 
down 8 percent from the 1965 
crop, but 34 percent larger 
than average. Water was 
drawn from the bogs later 
than usual because of cold 
iweather in May. This reduced 



the bloom in some bogs but 
set was generally good. Hot, 
dry weather has limited sizing 
of berries. 

The Massachusetts crop is 
placed at 800,000 barrels, 9 
percent more than last year, 
19 percent above average and 
only 5,000 barrels less than the 
record crop of 1960. Growing 
conditions were nearly ideal in 
all respects until about mid- 
July. The cranberry belt has 
been exceptionally dry since 
early July and earlier prospects 
have deteriorated. 

Washington bogs got ofiF to a 
good start in the spring. The 
crop is expected to total 95,000 
barrels, up 44 percent from 
last year and 15 percent larger 
than average. Generally the 
set was good even though cold, 
wet weather occurred during 
the early bloom period. 

The Oregon crop is forecast 
at 44.800 barrels, up 7 percent 
from last year and 26 percent 
above average. Although un- 
protected bogs were damaged 
bv late spring frosts, growth 
in protected bogs has been fav- 
orable with a heaw set and 
good berry size indicated. 



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ONE 



CRANBERRY MARKETING COMMITTEE 
VOTES FOR NO 'SET-ASIDE' 



As was anticipated from the 
optimistic remarks of distribu- 
tors at the annual meeting of 
the Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association August 23, 
tlie cranberry marketing com- 
mittee at its annual meeting 
the following day voted there 
be no "set-aside" of the 1966 
crop, the largest on record as 
forecast by the USDA annual 
report. This figure predicted 
was 1,557,800 barrels. 

The meeting held at the Lo- 
gan Airport Motel was one of 
the shortest and most har- 
monious since the adoption of 
the marketing order in 1962, 



all handlers feeling certain 
that this large crop could be 
disposed of at satisfactory re- 
turns to the growers and that 
there would be an "orderly 
market." 

It was further voted that 
the carry-over for the coming 
year be increased 50,000 bar- 
rels to 250,000 barrels. An- 
other indication of the "good 
times" the cranberry industry 
is now enjoying. This carry- 
over is to fill the "pipelines" 
of the industry until the cur- 
rent year's crop is harvested 
and marketed. 



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SHARON. MASSACHUSETTS 

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Most of those present agreed' 
that the estimated crop was a 
realistic one and would be 
achieved when harvest is 
started shortly after Labor 
Day, as usual. 

Based on a IVz percent 
shrinkage as is customary the 
entire crop to be marketed 
was expected to be 1,400,745 
barrels, which is 150 barrels 
higher than was set for the 
1965 crop. 

The current carry-over or in- 
ventory was placed at 259,077 
barrels and that this would be 
reduced to 213,780 by Sept. 1, 
attesting to the continuing good 
demand for cranberries. This 
carry-over consists of 102,758 
of processed and 156,319 in 
freezers. They voted erower 
assessments for operating the 
order be continued at ^/^ 
cent per barrel. 

Committee member? attend- 
ing included: Mass., George C. 
P. Olsson, president of Ocean 
Spray and committee chair- 
man; John C. Decas. Wareham, 
Dec'is Bros. Distributing Co.; , 
New jersey, Tosenh Palmer, i 
Hammonton; Walter Z. Fort, 
Pemberton; Wisconsin. Clar- 
ence A. Searles. Wisconsin 
Kapids; from the West Coast. 
Frank O. Glenn, Jr., Long 
Be-^ch, Washington. 

Alternates: Maurice Make- 
neace, Wareham .^nd John N. 
Decas, Wareham, Mass.; J. Gar- 
field DeMarco, Hammonton, New 
Tersev. Absent were alternates, 
T. Roizers Brick, New Jersey, 
Frederick W. Barber. Wiscon- 
sin and Robert 0"imW, Gray- 
land, Wa.shington. 

The session re-elected of- 
ficers, chairman, Mr. Olsson; ^ 
Ben G. Pannkuk. former pres- 
ident of Indian Trail, Wiscon- 
sin, vice president: John C. 
Decas, secretary. They ^^^ll 
;ilso again comprise the execu- 
tive committee. 

Anthonv R. Briggs was re- 
elected Committee Manager. 
All elections were for a term 
of two years. 

Representing the USDA were 
George B. Dever and Robert 
Forni. 

Continued on ?age 22 



TWO 






31 



Mass. 

Cranberry 

Station 

S Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORAIMVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist 



Personals 



Drs. Robert Devlin, Bert 
Zuckerman and Surindar Para- 
cer attended the American Insti- 
tute of Biological Sciences (A. 
I.B.S.) metings at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland from August 
15 through August 19. 

Dr. Fred Chandler, Professor 
Emeritus, returned from a trip 
to Nova Sotia. Fred v^as away 
during June, July and early 
August serving as consultant for 
the Canadian Government. His 
main objective was to make a 
survey of the Nova Scotia area 
relative to finding suitable sites 
for cranberry plantings. 

Dr. Robert Devlin has writ- 
ten a college text book on plant 
physiology, which has been 
published by The Reinhold 
Publishing Company. Dr. Dev- 
lin tells me that this is the first 
new book in this field to be 
published in the United States 
in the. last 14 years. My con- 
gratulations to Bob on his 
splendid accomplishment. 

Dr. Wes Miller has an article 
pubHshed in the August issue of 
the Journal of Economic En- 
tomology entitled "Dieldrin 
Persistence in Cranberry Bogs." 
This article will appear in Cran- 
berries magazine very soon. 

Crop Estimate 

The official crop estimate re- 
leased by the New England 
Crop Reporting Service, shows 
Massachusetts with a prospec- 
tive 1966 crop of 800,000 bar- 
trels. This is 9 percent larger 
[than last year's crop of 735,000 
I barrels and 19 percent above 
jthe 5 year average. This is only 
[5,000 barrejs less than the re- 
cord crop in 1960, so that with 
a little luck we may estabHsh 
a new record. For the rest of 
the country, the New Jersey es- 



timate is 141,000 barrels down 
8 percent from last year, but 
34 percent above average; Wis- 
consin 477,000 barrels, up 8 
percent from last year and 17 
percent above average. This 
will be a new record for Wis- 
consin. The Washington crop is 
estimated at 95,000 barrels, up 
44 percent from last year's small 
crop and 15 percent above aver- 
age; Oregon 44,800 barrels, up 
7 percent from last year and 26 
percent above average. The na- 
tional crop is estimated at 
1,557,800 barrels, wliich wiU be 
a record if realized, this is 20 
percent above the average. 

Frost Warning Service 

The frost warning service, 
sponsored by the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association, 
is in operation tliis fall. The 
telephone answering service is 
also very popular and very 



helpful. Frost information is 
recorded daily and growers that 
are interested may telephone 
Wareham 295-2696 in the after- 
noon and evening for the latest 
reports. If you have not con- 
tributed to this service, it is 
still not too late to do so. Any 
contributions will be gratefully 
accepted. Send your money to 
Mrs. Ruth Beaton, Treasurer, 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers 
Asociation, Jefferson Shores, 
Buzzards Bay, Mass. There are 
218 subscribers to the frost 
warning service and consider- 
ably fewer to the answering 
service, surely there are more 
making use of this service: send 
your contributions now! 

The following radio schedule 
also supplements the answering 
and relay services. 

Continued on Page 12 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now Unloading - 1 Carload Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



THREE 




Come on 
up the 
ladder 

with us 



Things look pretty good for the climb. 

We've got products that are tops. A fine 

name in Dean's Indian Trail. A lot of 

ambition. And a willingness to try new 

ideas. 

To a grower this is important. With 
Dean's Indian Trail you get an ad- 
vance on your estimated crop at the 
beginning of harvest. You get a 
second payment when you ship 
during the season, and a final pay- 
ment at a later date. 

And there's this most impor- 
tant factor in our program for 
growers. It links you with a 
well-known, highly respected 
company with strong adver- 
tising and merchandising 
programs that sell cranberry 
products. And more each 
year. 

Dean's Indian Trail . . . 
the big new name in the 
cranberry business. 



Deanli 



\\ruilomXrwuli 

p. O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids • Wisconsin 54494 



FOUR 




ISSUE OF SEPTEMBER, 1966 / VOL. 31_NO. 5 



In the course of a recent mail communi- 
cation with a West Coast publisher and 
friend of CRANBERRIES, I was surprised 
to find that he too is having the same basic 
problem in publishing his weekly newspaper 
as we have been having here at CRANBER- 
RIES. 

I had mentioned to him that we were hav- 
ing some difRculty in getting our readers to 
submit news items which would be of inter- 
est to our readers. Short, informal items 
which would be written in plain English 
without frills and about anything that would 
pertain to their interest in cranberries and 
the cranberry industry. He said that he was 
also trying to fret more people to submit 
news to him but that, since his newspaper 
covers a much more limited area than does 
our magazine he does the best he can by 
using the phone to make his contacts. 

Can you imagine what kind of phone bill 
we'd have if we had to resort to this method 
of getting the news. 

But — there has to be a solution. What is 
the solution to this problem? Very simply, 
here it is. We ask our good friends across 
the country who are interested in the cran- 
berry industry to submit items of news for 
publication. 

Don't let this scare you! You don't have 
to be a writer to do this. We'll be more than 
haopy to re-write the copy you send and 
edit it for you. All we would ask is that the 
information be checked for accuracy. 

CRANBERRIES is your magazine! You 
can help make it more interesting! We in- 
vite your personal correspondence. We know 
from experience that other growers enjoy 
hearing about their fellow growers in other 
areas. They like to read what other people 
in the industry are doing. They even like 
to talk a bit about what they're doing them- 
selves. This seems to me to be a good way 
to establish an exchange of ideas — through 
the pages of your magazine. Remember — 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 
Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



CRANBERRIES is read in every cranberry 
growing area in the country and in Canada. 
We hope you won't mind us blowing our 
own horn, but we don't know of a better 
way to get together than through the pages 
of this magazine. 

Much can be learned from the pages of 
CRANBERRIES. Much is obtained from our 
rorresrondents and advisors. More can be 
learned if we who are at all concerned with, 
cranberries will take a real interest in the 
industry and share it with our neighbors. We 
promise to do all we can in this regard. 

Will you help us to help you? 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston. Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



FIVE 




ONE CRANBERRY HERBICIDE 
DOES THE WORK OF SEVERAL 

DE-PESTER 

CASOROIN G-4 

CONTROLS ALL THESE WEEDS 



Broadieaf Weeds 
Controlled: 

Arrowleaved Tear Thumb 
Beggarticks 
Knotweed 
Loosestrife 
. Marsh St. Johnswort 
f Tideland clover 

Ragweed 
Sorrel 
Wild Strawberry 
Asters 
Buckbean 
Hawkweed 
Western Lilaeopsis 
Marsh Pea 
Plantain 
Smartweed (Marshpepper, 
Pennsylvania, Spotted, 
Swamp and Water) 



Important Miscelia^eous 
Weeds Controlled: 

Bracken Fern 

Royal Fern 

Sensitive Fern 

Hair cap Moss 

Common Horsetail 

Water Horsetail (pipes) 

Rushes (Juncus spp.) 

Dodder 



Grass Weeds Controlled: 

Bluejoint Grass 

Rattlesnake grass 

(Manna grass) 

Summer grass 

Velvetgrass 

Bent Grass 

Little Hairgrass 

Crabgrass 
Rice cutgrass 



Sedges Controlled: 

Bunch grass 

Muskrat grass 

Nutsedge (Nutgrass) 

Short Wiregrass 

Wideleaf grass 

Stargrass 

Woolgrass 

Cotton grass 

Needlegrass 

Oniongrass 



, 



*CASORON is a registered trademark of 
N. V. Philips-Duphar, The Netherlands 

See Us Now 
For Fall Helicopter Application 

IN NEW JERSEY 



PARKHURST 

FARM & GARDEN SUPPLY 

301 N. WHITE HORSE PIKE 

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PHONE 609-561-0960 



SIX 



Dr. David Robinson. 

Irish HorlicullurisL Soeal(s to 

Cane Cod Cranberry Gromiers 



Several hundred persons, 
members of the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association 
and their families, enjoyed a 
rare treat at their Annual Meet- 
ing on August 23 at the Massa- 
chusetts Cranberry Experiment 
Station in East Wareham. They 
heard a fascinating talk, illus- 
bated by slides, by Dr. David 
Robinson, Director of the Agri- 
culture Institute, Dubhn, Ire- 
land. 

Dr. Robinson told the as- 
sembled group that he was 
happy to be returning a visit 
made by Dr. Chester Cross, 
director of the Mass. Cranberry 
Experimental Station and his 
family who visited the Robin- 
sons in Ireland last year. 

A very interesting speaker. 
Dr. Robinson explained that it 
was quite difficult to get exten- 
sion across to the people of Ire- 
land. He went on to explain 
that horticultural research in 
Ireland really got under way 
in 1958 with assistance from the 
United States. In the past the 
Irish people had always associ- 
ated horticulture with luxury, 
hence there was no great de- 
mand for it until recently. There 
seemed to be an antagonism 
toward those who desired to 
grow fruit, vegetables and 
flowers. Now there are three 
research stations in Southern 
Ireland doing much to intro- 
duce horticulure into the 
country. 



Dr. Robinson went on to 
explain that, contrary to general 
knowledge, Ireland lies north- 
east of the United States and 
the chmate there is always fairly 
cool. The summers are quite 
cool and the winters quite mild 
— in the forties — because of 
the Gulf Stream. There is only 
about a twenty degree differ- 
ence in the summer and winter 
temperatures. This makes for a 
twelve month growing season. 
Unfortunately tliis growing sea- 
son also applies to weeds which 
are quite a problem in Ireland. 
Also, the wetness of the land 
does not allow for cultivating 
macliines. The weed situation 
has been drastically changed by 
weed killers. It is estimated 
that 90% of the growers are 
using herbicides in Great Brit- 
ain and Ireland. They have had 
good results with herbicides 
and have come to the point 
where they do not cultivate 
when there are no weeds. This 
allows for better soil structure 
since the soil is not disturbed 
by machines. 

Since there is a lack of fuel 
in Ireland, Dr. Robinson con- 
tinued, the vast amounts of peat 
in Ireland, which covers one 
fifth of all the land, is used for 
fuel. This peat is sometimes 
twenty to thirty feet deep in 
some places. Only now is peat 
being used to any great extent 
in horticulture. It is being 
planned to use peat on blue- 
berry and cranberry crops. 



A somewhat humorus side- 
hght to the cranberry story in 
Ireland was told by Dr. Robin- 
son when he stated that the 
growth of cranberries in Ire- 
land was better than in Massa- 
chusetts. The problem, how- 
ever, is that tliey do not bear 
fruit. They are now working 
on this problem but are still 
not sure of the answer. 

Speaking on the production 
of nursery stock, he mentioned 
that Ireland can grow shrubs 
and trees too tender for our 
chmate. What with increasing 
affluence there will be a 
greater need for this type of 
crop. 

Ireland is too far north to 
produce good crops of peaches, 
cherries and plums but apple 
production is of great interest. 
Dwarf apple trees are favored 
in Ireland since they are easier 
to manage than the full size 
trees. This necessitates plant- 
ing more trees but there is a 
saving in labor. Dr. Robinson 
said he felt that the dwarf 
trees would perhaps catch on 
in North America one day. 
Small fruit size has to be con- 
tended with as temperatures 
are lower than optimum. When 
grown in hothouses or when 
the temperatures are increased 
the apples grow much larger. 

Disease is also a handicap. 
Leaf fungi are rampant because 
of the dampness of tlie weather. 
With the use of efficient con- 
trols good results have been 
obtained against grey mold in 
strawberries. 

In conclusion, Dr. Robinson 
stated that much progress has 
been made in the eight years 
since the country has become 
aware of the need for horticul- 
tural research. He also ex- 
tended an invitation to those 
listening who might visit Ire- 
land to also plan to visit one of 
the research stations. 

Dr. Robinson's presentation 
was well received and his 
pleasant wit and manner was 
refreshing. 

SEVEN 



American Farm Bureau 
President Speaks 



Mr. Charles B. Shuman, Pres- 
ident of the American Farm 
Bureau Federation was the 
featured speaker at tlie Annual 
Meeting of the Plymouth 
County Farm Bureau on Thurs- 
day, August 26, 1966. The meet- 
ing was held at the Leach's 
Grove, Route 18 & 28, Bridge- 
water, Massachusetts with a 
Chicken Bar-B-Que dinner 
starting at 6:30 P.M. Mr. Shu- 
man discussed current rises 
in food prices at the retail level 
and their effect on the farmer. 

A grass-roots farmer, Presi- 
dent Shuman farms a 1013 acre 
stock and grain farm in part- 
nership with his three sons in 
Moultrie County, Illinois. He 
graduated from the University 
of Illinois with honors in 1928 
and earned his Masters Degree 
in Agronomy with a minor in 
Agriculural Economics the fol- 
lowiiig year. 



The leader of 1,682,000 farm 
and ranch families throughout 
the United States, President 
Shuman has been active in 
Farm Bureau for over thirty 
years. He has served as Presi- 
dent and a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Moul- 
trie County Farm Bureau, the 
Illinois Agricultural Association 
and was elected to the Board 
of Directors of the American 
Farm Bureau Federation in 
1945 and assumed the Farm 
Biu^eau Presidency in 1954. 

Mr. Shuman recently noted 
that farmers are generating a 
far greater measure of poHtical 
and economic power through 
increased participation in their 
own organizations — with rap- 
idly growing marketing associa- 
tions a principal case in point. 

President Shuman was re- 
cently featured with a cover 
picture and story in a weekly 
news magazine. 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

for frost control 
and irrigation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manville Plastic 
Pipe and Fittings 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 



New Ocean Spray 
Washington Plant 
Now Open 

EorroR's Note: The following is 
reprinted from the 'North-West. 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, 
Inc., now benefits from more 
orderly processing and market- 
ing made possible by the con- 
struction last fall of an addition 
to its plant at Markham, in 
western Washington. 

The company sells cranber- 
ries both fresh and canned. 

The new building, a steel 
structure 80 x 170 feet, with 
controlled temperature, was put 
up at a cost estimated at 
$150,000, including refrigera- 
tion equipment. 

It not only helps in cooling 
fruit intended for the fresh 
market but, also, berries in cold 
storage make it possible to ex- 
tend the canning season instead 
of having to do all the pro- 
cessing immediately at harvest. 
It provides ordinary storage, 
too, during the oflF season when 
no fresh fruit is being held. 
Thirty thousand barrels of fresh 
cranberries or 200,000 cases of 
canned fruit can be accommo- 
dated in this modern structure. 

Tlie company, which has 
plants also at Onset and Han- 
son, Mass., Bordentown, N. J., 
and Cliicago, does from 18 to , 
20 per cent of all of its pro- 
cessing at Markham and sup- 
plies from that point all of its 
canned cranberries that are 
used in 13 western states. 

The plant at Markham, now 
640 feet long, adjacent to an 
N.P. industrial tract, handled 
100,000 cases of fresh fruit and ' 
1,000,000 cases of canned fruit 
in 1962. Back in 1941, the first 
year of operations, only 23,000 
cases were packed. 

At first known as tlie Gray- 
land Cranberry Growers' as- 
sociation, producers on the 
west coast in 1942 consolidated 
with Cranbery Canners, wliich 
later beame the National Cran- 
berry Association. The name 
was changed to Ocean Spray 1 
Cranberries, Inc., in 1960. 



EIGHT 



I 



i 





MASSACHUSETTS 

August Starts Dry 

x\ugust began with the same 
beautiful summer weather, but 
A ith less high temperatures and 
far less humidity. But the 
\\eather continued extremely 
dry. There was a Hght rain on 
the night of he 2nd, but only 
.002 inches was recorded at the 
Cranberry Station with a little 
inore on the outer Cape from 
Hyannis and Falmouth. The 
Mass. crop potential continued 
to fade away as the long 
drought kept on. 

A great change came to the 
summer pattern on the week 
of August 8. The beautiful, 
sunny weather gave way to 
five days of cloudy skies. The 
Sth brought light, but persist- 
ent rain, falling mostly in the 
cranberry area, where rain was 
most needed. The 9th and 10th 
vere sBghtlv showery, but wide 
scattered. The 11th brought fog 
and drizzle as did the 12th. 
Total rainfall for the period 
\\as, however only .26 of an 
inch as put down at the State 
Bog. 

II Helpful Rainy Weather 

I This was, of course, helpful 
o some extent, but more rain 
was desperately needed and the 



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five days of miserable weather 
did little to fill up reservoirs, 
which were way, way down. 
The rainy weather did however, 
help the sizing of fruit a little 
and the weekly loss due to the 
terrible drought was eliminated 
for that period. 

August Cooler 

On the 12th in the afternoon 
cool summer polar air moved 
in and the sun came out again. 
The period brought some of 
the most uncomfortable humid 
weather of the year, with hu- 
midity exceeding the tempera- 
ture at various times. The 
month that far was slightly 
cooler than normal, instead of 
being hotter than normal as 
was the preceeding part of 
the summer. 

It was beginning to shape up 
as a harvest slightly later than 
normal to be expected, perhaps 
about Sept. 10 as a starting 
point. More rain and colder 
nights were needed for color 
and additional size of the fruit. 



This spell of the usual Aug- 
ust "Dog Days," opened with 
a small tornado in the western 
part of Massachusetts and re- 
ports of possible hail, which, 
fortunately did not materiahze. 

Season Turning 

But the season was turning, 
summer was about to go into 
fall. There were cool days and 
cooler nights, which were help- 
ing to add color to fruit. By 
the 15th the month was also 
38 degrees cooler than normal. 

The week of the 15th started 
out as a repeat of the previous 
week. That is, with drizzle and 
fog, but no real heavy rain. 
Miserable weather. The dismal 
weather, however, began to 
clear on the night of August 
16th with a sharp thunder- 
storm, and heavy rain. This 
brought .59 of an inch of pre- 
cipitation as recorded at Cran- 
berry Station, with more or 
less at other points in the cran- 
berry area. This was one of the 
better rains of the entire sum- 
mer season. 



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NINE 



f 



Mid August had some warm 
and humid spells. For instance, 
on the 19th the temperatures 
were in the high 80's and low 
PO's with humidity in the high 
fiO's and low 70's. Very uncom- 
fortable weather. But the 
month continued to be as per- 
sistent in continuing dry in the 
Southeastern area as the stock 
market seemed persistent in 
becoming lower. Growers who 
had sprinklers, and had water 
were using their systems. 
Others were attempting to find 
additional sources. What was 
so badly needed, as for so long, 
was good soaking rain, possibly 
of two or three days duration. 

There followed cooler wea- 
ther with cool nights which 
were adding color to the fruit. 

The Big Rain 

But, finally, as always in the 
case of dry spells in the past, 
there came the day of the Big 
Rain. This was on August 23 
during the meeting of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' 
Association, a day when there 
is almost always traditionally 
fine weather. 

The rain came during a live- 
ly thunderstorm, pouring, de- 
luging precipitation, which 
continued from afternoon well 
into the night in deluging 
showers. The Cranberry Station 
recorded 1.55 inches for the 
storm, Norton IV2 inches. Car- 
ver 2, Plymouth 3, as well as 
Orleans 3 on the Cape, so it 
was a general rain over most 
of the cranberry area. This 
storm fTive not only temporary 
relief to the bogs, but helped 
to restore somewhat the ponds 
and re<:e^voirs. It was a most 
beneficial storm. 

Following the storm the wea- 
ther resumed its same dry pat- 
tern, but days and particularly 
nights were definitely cooler, as 
actual Autumn was approach- 
ing. 

The month ended on a warm 
and humid note. Hurricane 
"Faith." tlie 6th of the season 
was churning along up the 
coast, possibly headed for the 
Carolinas, but its destination 
known to no one. It bore with 



it the potential of heavy rains 
if it reached New England and 
also of damage. 

August Drier and Slightly Cooler 

As for rain in August, it was 
again on the short side. Total 
precipitation as recorded at the 
State bog was only 2.58 inches, 
at Boston IV2 inches. The nor- 
mal for the bog for August is 
3.60 inches. Some areas re- 
ceived more and some less. 
This left the water supplies at 
a very dangerovis low for fall 
frost protection. The month was 
also slightly cooler than nor- 
mal by a little less than half 
a degree a day. The hurricane 
had gone out to sea bringing 
none of the much needed rain 
and none of the probable and 
not-needed property damage. 

Berries Slow to Color 

As September came in it was 
reported generally that the 
fruit was very late in taking 
color. It was not exp-ected that 
nicking would generally begin 
before Sept. 10 or the week 
of Sept. 14th. As to the size 
of berries there was some dis- 
agreement. Some reported ber- 
ries as of good size. There were 
scattered instances of "pin 
heads" due to the lack of sum- 
mer rain. In general it might 
be said that late-drawn bogs 
and late varieties were of good 
size. 



NEW J ERSEY 

August was about normal in 
regard to temperature but was 
much drier than normal as the 
drought pattern of the last four 
vears continued. Rainfall to- 
taled only 1.08 inches or about 
3.60 less than normal. The total 
from Tanuary through August 
of 1966 now stands at 24.57 in- 
ches which is 5.23 less than nor- 
mal for the period. In the 
extremely bad droughts of the 
past two years rainfall for the 
same eight-month period was 
onlv 1.23 inches less in 1964 and 
1.48 less in 1965. In the import- 
ant growing season of June 
through August, 1966 had .58 
less rainfall than 1964 and 3 
inches less than 1965. 



The accumulated deficiency i 
of precipitation from January 1, 
1963 through August 31, 1965 
is 28.78 or roughly about eight 
months of normal rainfall. This 
has brouht cranberry reservoirs 
on most New Jersey bogs to a 
critical low level. Lack of water 
is now the main concern of 
most cranberry growers in this 
state. 

Blistering heat this summer 
has accentuated the problem. 
At the Cranberry & Blueberry 
Lab Weather Station at New 
Lisbon the evaporation from the 
standard evaporation pan from 
June 1st through August 31st, 
was 19.03 inches or about 12 
inches in excess of the rainfall. 

There were ten days of tem- 
perature in the 90's during Aug- 
ust, which is about three more 
than normal for this month. To 
balance this out there were fif- 
teen days when the minimum 
temperature went below 60°. 
The average temperature was 
73.9 which is onlv -3 of a degree 
above normal. Extremes were 
95° on the 31st, and 49° on the 
fourth. 

The 97th Summer Meeting of 
the American Cranberry Associ- 
ation was held on August 25th. 

Jack St. Pierre of the New 
Tersey Crop Reporting Service j 
estimated that the New Jersey i 
cranberrv crop would be J 
141,000 'barrels, 8% less than 
last year but 34% larger than 
average. Unusually late dra\\dng 
of the winter flood because of 
the very cold spring delayed 
extended blossoming. The ex- 
tended drought undoubtedly 
was also adverse on cranberries. 

C. W. Mainland of the Rut- j 
Jiers University Horticultural ' 
Dept. reported on his work 
with gibberellin on cranberries. 
Experimental apphcation in 
1965 caused a very sharp in- 
crease in the percentage set of 
berries. Almost all of the blos- 
soms set fruit and although ber- 
ries were smaller than normal 
the production by weight in the 
gibberellin plots was signifi- 
cantly higher than in the un- 
treated plots. r 
(Continued on Page 18) ' 



TEN 




McCulloch's New 
Electric Start Chain Saws 
Announced 



The world's first electric- 
starting chain saw has been in- 
troduced by McCulloch Corp., 
it was announced here today 
by W. B. Burkett, vice presi- 
dent — engineering of the Los 
j Angeles power tool and out- 
1 board motor manufacturing 
firm. 

The revolutionary new saw 
I marks the first time in history 
'that a small, hand-held gaso- 
iline engine can be started elec- 
itrically by a totally self-con- 
itained starter, generator and 
battery. 



"This development is sure to 
revolutionize the entire small 
engine field, including lawn- 
mowers, edgers, tillers, snow- 
mobiles, generators and the 
like," Mr. Burkett said. 

It will eventually put tlie 
starter pull rope on the shelf 
along with the automobile hand 
crank," he continued. 

The saw, designated the 
MAC 3-lOE, weighs under 15 
pounds and is designed for cut- 
ting firewood, triinming trees, 
clearing land, felling and buck- 
ing timber and pulpwood. 

"Push button starting is a 
very real benefit to inexperi- 
enced power chain saw users 
as well as veteran profession- 
als," Mr. Burkett added. 



He pointed out that the elec- 
tric-starting chain saws can be 
started safely and easily up in 
a tree or in some other pre- 
carious location for an import- 
ant safety factor. 

The new McCulloch system 
is an engineering breakthrough 
in miniaturization and elec- 
tronics. It was developed by 
McCulloch working closely with 
General Electric Co., Motorola 
and Denso Corp. 

A small starter-generator has 
been perfected which is inte- 
grated into the flywheel of the 
engine. When starting the en- 
gine, a nickel-cadmium battery 
pack supplies the necessary 
current and when the engine 
is driving the starter/generator, 
it then recharges the batteries. 

The battery pack is rated at 
13 volts and is contained in the 
handle of the saw. The packs 
were specially developed by 
McCulloch and GE and are 
similar to the type of batteries 
in cordless electric knives and 
toothbrushes, except they are 
designed for heavier duty. The 
batteries, it is claimed, will last 
the life of the saw. 

One of the most advanced 
components in the MAC 3-lOE 
is the voltage regulator system 
concealed in the pistol grip of 
the saw. It uses solid-state, 
semi-conductor devices and 
was designed by McCulloch. 

The engine, itself, features a 
de-stroking port (DSP) whicti 
can be started with half the 
effort required for an ordinary 
engine. 

Technically, the de-stroking 
port is a valve located near 
the top of the combustion 
chamber inside the cylinder. 
When the MAC 3-lOE user 
pushes the starter button, the 
valve opens automatically, re- 
leasing heavy compression in 
the engine. When the engine 
fires, the valve automatically 
closes, enabUng full compres- 
sion to take place. 

The battery pack is said to 
have a crankdown time of ap- 
proximately tliree minutes, again 
determined by extensive testing. 
This compares favorably witli 
that of an automobile. 



ELEVEN 



Large Cranberry 
Crop Looked For 

The agriculture department 
forecast a record cranberry 
crop of 1,557,800 barrels this 
year, including 477,000 barrels 
in Wisconsin. 

Such a crop would be 8% 
more than last year and 20% 
above the 1960-'64 average. 

The department said larger 
crops than last year are fore- 
cast for all the producing states 
except New Jersey. 

Indicated production for tlie 
other states included: Massa- 
chusetts, 800,000 barrels; New- 
Jersey, 141,000; Washington, 
95,000; and Oregon, 44,800. 

Dr. Ray H. Roberts 
Honored 

College Park, Md., Ray H. 
Roberts, emeritus professor in 
the University of Wisconsin 
department of horticulture, was 
named a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can Society for Horticultural 
Science at the group's annual 
banquet here August 16. 

The award recognizes Rob- 
erts for "outstanding contribu- 
tions to horticulture and ser- 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued jrom Page 3 



Station 


Place A.M. 


F.M. 


Afternoon 


Evening 


WEEI 


Boston 590k. 


103.3 


mg. 2:00 


9:00 


WBZ 


Boston 1030k. 


92.9 


mg. 2:30 


9:00 


WPLM 


Plymouth 1390k. 


99.1 


mg. 2:30 


9:30 


WOCB 


W. Yarmouth 1240k 


94.3 


mg. 3:00 


9:30 


WBSM 


New Bedford 1420k. 


97.3 


mg. 3:30 

Annual Meeting 


9:00 


m^^^ L-^ 1 


U„ '-J-- • - r .1 • - 





its objectives of promoting 
scientific research and educa- 
tion in horticulture." The 
award was made in conjunction 
with the 63rd annual meeting 
of the American Society for 
Horticultural Science at the 
University of Maryland, August 
14-20. 

Roberts joined the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin department of 
horticulture in 1915 as an ex- 
tension specialist, and retired 
as a professor of horticulture 
in 1960. 

Roberts lives at 2215 Hollis- 
ter Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Dr. Roberts has been much 
interested in cranberry re- 
search in Wisconsin and has 
made valuable contributions to 
the industry. 



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The annual meeting of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers 
Association was held at the 
Cranberry Station on August 23. 
The crowd was estimated at be- 
tween 275 and 300 which is as 
large as any in recent years. 
The guest speaker was Dr. 
David Robinson, Director of the 
Agricultural Institute in Kin- 
sealy. County Dubhn, Ireland, 
his subject was "Weed Control 
in Soft Fruits." Dr. Robinson 
gave an exceUent presentation 
and certainly enhanced the rep- 
utation of Irishmen as know- 
ledgeable and witty speakers. I 
enjoyed him immensely. OflBcers 
of the association elected for the 
coming year were: "Al" Pappi, 
President; "Bob" Hiller, 1st 
Vice President; "Bill" Atwood, 
2nd Vice President; "Bob" St. 
Jacques, Secretary; and Mrs. 
Ruth Beaton, Treasurer. 

Weather 

The month of August ^^•as 
slightly on the cool side aveag- 
ing 1/2 degree a day belo\\- 
normal. Total rainfall for Aw^- 
ust was 2.58 inches wliich is 
more than IVa inches below 
average at tlie Cranberry Sta- 
tion for August. We are now 
more than 8 1/2 inches below 
average for 1966 but 3 inches 
ahead of the same date in 1965. 
Over 50 percent of the month's i 
total occurred on August 23rd 
when 1.56 inches was recorded 
at the Station, tills coincided 
with tlie Annual Growers Meet- 
ing, but I doubt that anyonel 
was unhappy about having tc' 
compete with die rain. Actually, 
this storm was \'ery spotty, as 
this type is apt to be in this 
area, many places, fortunately, 
received more than we did witl: 
East Sandwich recording ovei 
2 inches, FreetowTi, Plymoutl 
and some areas in Carver ov« 



TWELVE 



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3 inches. Boston, New Bedford 
and almouth received less than 
% inch. 

Fall Management 

The following suggestions on 
fall management are offered for 
consideration: (1) It is an ex- 
cellent practice, where water is 
available, to flood bogs immedi- 
ately after harvest. This gives 
the vines a good drink of water, 
which helps revive them after 
the rough harvesting operation 
and allows broken vines and 
other harmful trash to be col- 
lected and disposed of. (2) 
Thin or weak areas of vines 
on the bog which are easily 
seen during the picking opera- 
tions should receive an appli- 
cation of fertiHzer. This will 
strengthen the vines without 
promoting weed growth. The 
old bucket technique of walk- 
ing the bogs and spreading the 
fertiHzer by hand on areas that 
need it, is still a good practice. 
(3) Casoron, or any of our 
other approved herbicides, 
should be used to clean up 
weedy areas. Allow the bog a 



week or ten days to recover 
from picking before applying 
any herbicide. Casoron should 
not be used until temperatures 
are cool, it is broken down and 
passes off into the air very 
quickly when temperatures are 
60 degrees or above and smaller 
amounts are lost at tempera- 
tures as low as 40 degrees. (4) 
Girdler, which is becoming a 
more common pest, can be con- 
trolled by flooding for a 5-day 
period in late September, ap- 
plying a coat of sand sometime 
before the start of the next 
growing season, or by the use 
of aldrin or dieldrin. Root grub 
can also be controlled by using 
aldrin or dieldrin. For more 
specific recommendations on 
using these insecticides, consult 
your cranberry insect control 
chart. 



cent above 1965 and 7 per 
cent abov0 the record year of 
1961. This should be looked 
upon as good by the cranberry 
industry as a large crop usually 
indicates no increase to the 
consumers and turkeys and 
cranberry sauce traditionally 
go together, particularly at 
Thanksgiving. 



1966 U. S. TURKEY 
CROP IS UP 

Turkeys raised in the U.S. 
in 1966 are expected by the 
USDA to increase to a total of 
114.8 bilhon birds or 11 per 



NEW JERSEY PERSONALS 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaiah Haines 
of New Lisbon were recently 
surprised by about 50 of their 
friends on the occasion of their 
35th wedding anniversary. Mr. 
Haines has long been promon- 
ent in the New Jersey cranberry 
industry. He is general manager 
of the huge J. J. White Com- 
pany, 

Walter Z. Fort, manager of 
the Growers Cranberry Com- 
pany of New Jersey and current 
president of the American Cran- 
berry Growers Association, 
newly elected county comman- 
der of the American Legion was 
installing officers at a legion 
ceremony at Pemberton. 

THIRTEEN 



Association Annoai Meeting 
Very Successfull - Wen Attended 



The Annual Meeting of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers 
Association was held at the 
Mass. Cranberry Experiment 
Station at East Wareham on 
Tuesday, August 23, 1966. 

Though the threat of rain 
hung over the gathering, the 
members and their families 
turned out several hundred 
strong and spent tbe morning 
hours looking over the equip- 
ment displays imd enjoying 
conversations with old and new 
friends alike. 

Since the possibility of rain 
was anything but remote, the 
chicken barbecue scheduled for 
noon was served earUer and, 
luckily, tlie heavy rain held off 
until everyone had enjoyed the 
delicious meal. 

When the rain showers be- 
gan, before the scheduled hour 
of the business meeting, it was 
decided that, rather than try 
to move the hundreds of people 
who had gathered for the 
meeting to the Wareham Town 
Hall as was planned in the 
event of rain, the business 
meeting would be moved into 
the large building in which the 
dinner had been eaten. When 
the last of the members had 
finished eating the staff of the 
Experiment Station cleared the 
building of the tables and re- 
arranged the chairs with great 
dispatch. At 1:30— the scheduled 
time — the President of the As- 
sociation, Mr. Alfred L. Pappi, 
called the meeting to order. He 
introduced the Association Sec- 
retary, William M. Atwood, 
who read the report of the last 
meeting. President Pappi then 



Mr. Pappi then asked Mr. 
Orrin Colley for his report on 
cranberry marketing. Mr. Col- 
ley stated that the interest in 
cranapple relish was growing 
steadily. The British dock strike 
affected cranberry export con- 
siderably and the cranberry 
market was slow in the United 
Kingdom. He stated that cran- 
berries are at a point where 
they are being accepted by 
the middle class housewife in 
the U. K. and now the emphasis 
is being placed on achieving the 
acceptance of cranberries by 
the upper income groups. Mr. 
Colley mentioned a few prob- 
lems in marketing in the Lnited 
Kingdom. These are tlie prob- 
lems involved in pioneering an 
unknown product. The con- 
sumer must be educated to the 
product image. An awareness 
of the value of the product 
must be raised in the consumer. 
Expanded usage and marketing 
methods must be developed. 
The belief in long-term oppor- 
tunities has led to the sale of 
from five to ten million pounds 
of berries. Ocean Spray has 
expressed a wilHngness to ex- 
port more cranberries to tlie 
U. K. during the next five 
years. Increased awareness has 
resulted in the sale of eighty to 
one hundred thousand cases of 
processed fruit. Mr. Colley 
stated in conclusion that the 
growers must be determined to 
keep after this market. 

At this point in tlie meeting 
two distinguished visitors were 
introduced to the audience. 
They were Mr. Clarence A. 
Searles, one of Wisconsin's lar- 
gest growers, and Mr. Ben G. 



mil I 

called on Mrs. Ruth E. Beaton||||Pannkuk, head of Indian Trail 
for the Treasrurer's report. cooperative of Wisconsin. 



Bill Atwood then made a 
brief statement regarding frost 
warning in which he stated 
that, naturally, it was impossi- 
ble to predict temperatures for 
each bog since the physical lo- 
cation of the individual bog has 
much to do with the tempera- 
ture of the bog. He suggested 
that the bog owners should 
have an idea of the average 
low temperature of their own 
bogs and make their own de- 
termination of the need for 
protection from this average. 
He suggested the frequent use 
of the answering service and 
that owners pay particular at- 
tention to the whole frost fore- 
casting service this fall. 

Next to be introduced was 
Dr. Chester Cross, director of 
the Mass. Cranberry Experi- 
ment Station. Dr. Cross ex- 
pressed his gratification at 
seeing such a large crowd. He 
spoke briefly of the purchase of 
the Cardozza property adjacent 
to the Experiment Station by 
the association and the fact 
that this property would even- 
tually be given to the station. 
He also stated that the bill to 
erect a new building at the 
station was at that moment 
being reported out of com- 
mittee. The proposal for the 
$100,000 building has been ap- 
proved by the W^ays and Means 
committee and enactment was 
expected soon. 

Dr. Cross expressed his 
pleasure at the growing sup- 
port of the frost warning ser- 
vice. He said that it was a good 
thing that so much water had 
been conserved during the 
spring as a result of this ser- 
vice since it will surely be 
needed now. He mentioned that 
a few growers had expressed 
concern over a change at the 
Cranberry Experiment Station 
— that they no longer hire 
people who come up with new 
chemicals and follow the results 
each week and then \\'rite re- 
ports on these results. Now, 
Dr. Cross explained, the FDA, 
Audubon, Fish and Wildlife 
and USDA people want more 
information than ever before. 



FOURTEEN 



chemicals must be registered 
before they can be used even 
on your own bogs and rules 
must be carefully followed. He 
also made mention of the fact 
that the labs which enforce 
these rules are now using very 
sophisticated methods of check- 
ing. They are also using new 
methods of clearing chemicals 
for use on bogs. The Experi- 
ment Station has a program of 
basic and applied research and 
tbey want to know, and the 
USDA insists on knowing what 
happens to chemicals after they 
are used. The station teams 
are working to find the answers 
to these and other problems. 

Dr. Cross began mentioning 
the work being conducted by 
members of his staff. He started 
by mentioning the work Bill 
Tomlinson was doing with the 
fruitworm. Bill has had black 
light traps on the bogs day and 
night and has been analyzing 
the insects caught in these traps. 
One question he has been try- 
ing to answer is the life cycle 
of the fruitworm. Bill has suc- 
ceeded in getting fruitworm 
miller to mate in captivity and 
the female to lay eggs in cap- 
tivity in season. If something 
could be found to develop out 
of season, a control could prob- 
ably be developed and there 
would no longer be a need for 
poisonous insecticides. It would 
be nice to be able to eliminate 
some of the insecticides since 
they are more dangerous than 
seems necessary and are hard 
to handle. 

The work being done by Stan 
Norton in trying to develop a 
better method of dry harvesting 
was the next topic touched 
upon by Dr. Cross. A long- 
time problem of Massachusetts 
cranberry growers has been tbe 
number of berries lost in dry 
harvesting. In other states water 
harvesting has eliminated this 
problem. Water harvesting is 
sure to come to Massachusetts 
and, in the meantime Stan is 
working on a dry picking ma- 
chine which will do the job 
efficiently and with as little 
loss to the crop as possible. He 



is also working on another 
problem — labor. The use of 
laborers to lift 35-40 pound 
boxes onto trucks is a waste 
and better methods will have 
to be developed. Also, it is well 
known that berries will not 
keep well in bulk storage boxes 
now used. 

Bert Zuckerman who has be- 
come an international figure in 
nematology has been doing a 
fine job in developing methods 
of efi^ectively applying fungi- 
cides through sprinkler nozzles. 
Now, ^vith Dr. Devlin and 




Just a few of the many CCCGA 



George Rounsville he is work- 
ing on the ring fungus. He is 
also working with Ocean Spray 
on the problem of color in 
berries. Pigments are very im- 
portant to cranberry products. 
Bert advises growers to leave 
berries on vines until ripe to 
insure a better crop and to 
improve the color. Bert is 
using radioactive material to 
find out what happens to para- 
thion when it is on the bog. 
These questions must be an- 
swered for FDA people in or- 
der to show that parathion is 
OK for use to their satisfaction. 

Dr. Cross continued to fill 
the audience in on the work 
being done by his staff. He 
spoke of the station biochemist 
Wes Miller. One of the ques- 
tions Wes is trying to answer 
is, what happens to Dieldrin 
after its use on the bogs. Audu- 
bon and Fish and Wildlife are 
interested in the answer to 
this question. They want to 
know whether this chemical 
will cause damage to birds and 
fish when taken in by them. It 
has been found that Dieldrin 
does not break down. The an- 
swer to why it does not is also 



at their annual meeting. 



members enjoying the chicken barbecue being researched. WeS is alsO 

trying to ascertain how long 
Parathion takes to lose its tox- 
icity on the bog and how long 
it takes to disappear from the 
water in bog ditches. Speaking 
of another staff member. Dr. 
Cross said that there -^vas really 
no need to go into detail on 
the work being done by Irving 
DeMoranville. He is not only 
the station cranberrv expert, he 
is also information expert and 
service expert and is nearly al- 
ways in contact with one or 
more of the area growers. It 
would take too long to elabor- 
ate on the work "Dee" is doing 
for the cranberry growers. 

It was as Dr. Cross was men- 
tioning Dr. Robert Devlin's new 
book that the tin roof of the 
building resounded with the 
roar of downpouring rain. As 
if on cue, the audience began 
to applaud as the much needed 
rain came down. The heavy 




Never too young to start attending 

CCCGA meetings. Happy young fellow 

is Christopher Alberghini, son of Mr. 

and Mrs. Robert A. Alberghini of 

Wareham, Mass. 



FIFTEEN 



downpour lasted for fifteen or 
twenty minutes, during which 
time the meeting was inter- 
rupted. 

When the meeting was re- 
sumed, President Pappi asked 
Mr. John Decas to give his 
portion of the 1966 sales pre- 
view. Mr. Decas stated that 
the market this year was com- 
mitted, that there was no rea- 
son to believe that the crop 
would be anything but good 
and that he felt there would be 
no set aside. 

Bob Hiller was then asked 
for his report and said that he 
was very optimistic. The de- 
mand for one pound fresh fruit, 
he said, was excellent. The 
sauce lines were good and 
cocktail excellent. Based on 
analysis of the market situa- 
tion, he said he felt that there 
were no unsurmountable obsta- 
cles in view and, altliough no 
one knows definitely, all seems 
to be well. Proper promotion 
and cooperation will mean a 
stable market and supply and 
demand ratio. 

Mr. Edward Gelsthorpe, Ex- 
ecutive Vice President of Ocean 
Spray spoke confirming what 
the two previous speakers had 
said - that it was going to be a 
good year. He estimated that 
the crop would be 1,500,000 
barrels - 100,000 up from last 
year. Mr. Gelsthorpe empha- 
sized that growers must be 
aware of a few problems — one 
of which is the increased de- 
mand for processed fruit. This 
will mean that more of the crop 
will go to process than to fresh 
fruit. Another problem is color. 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass. 02781 
Tel. 617 824-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office — 362, Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



Good color is necessary to the 
industry. Tlie rich, red color 
from nature itself is vitally nec- 
essary. Color must not need to 
be added. It is the responsi- 
bility of the grower to produce 
fruit of suitable color. Some 
imitating is being done with 
artificial color but this is not 
good for the industry. Another 
pitfall which many growers fall 
into is increasing acreage when 
times are good. This is not good 
practice — the law of supply 
nnd demand must be kept in 
balance, Mr. Gelsthome stated. 

On the plus side is the rapid 
development of clinical work. 
The acceptance of cranberry 
iuice is good for the grower. 
The fact that there will be four 
papers published before the 
end of this vear reinforcing the 
statement that cranberry juice 
is good for your health. 

Mrj Gelsthorpe concluded by 
noting that the nation's econ- 
omy is in rough shape. Wages 
are too high. Growers should 
reahze that prosperity does not 
come easy but must be worked 
for. 



Following Mr. Gelsthorpe's 
talk the nomination of officers 
was held and the following 
were elected to serve for the 
coming year: 

President, Alfred Pappi, 
Wareham; First Vice-President, 
Robert Hiller, Rochester; Sec- 
ond Vice-President, William M. 
Atwood, Wareham; Secretary, 
Robert St. Jacques, Wareham; 
Treasurer, Ruth E. Beaton, 
W^areham. 

DIRECTORS - Alfred L. 
Pappi, Robert Hiller, William 
B. Steams, WilHam M. Atwood, 
Ruth E. Beaton, Philip H. 
Gibbs, Louis Sherman, Dr. 
Chester Cross, Paul Morse, An- 
thony R. Briggs, Oscar L. Nor- 
ton, Gilbert T. Beaton, Robert 
St.. Jacques. 

HONORARY DIRECTORS 
— Dr. Herbert F. Bergman, 
Joseph L. Kelley. 

Following the principal 
speaker the event everyone was 
waiting f or - the 1966 Crop 
Forecast — was presented to the 
growers. Since Mr. Byron Pe- 
terson of the N.E. Crop Re- 
porting Service was unable to 
be present, the Association 



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SIXTEEN 



President introduced Mr. Mario 
P. Alfieri to speak for him, 
and give the report. Mr. Al- 
fieri in turn asked C. D. Stevens 
who had been instrumental in 
estabUshing the forecasts and 
has since retired from active 
participation, to read the 1966 
Forecast which is as follows: 
U.S. Total: 1,557,800 barrels 

1966 1965 

Massachusetts 800,000 735,000 

New Jersey 141,000 153,000 

Wisconsin 477,000 441,000 

Washington 95,000 66,000 

Oregon 44,800 41,800 

Former Record Crop: 1,436,800 

Average: 1,300,120 

Following the reading of the 
crop forecast the meeting was 
adjourned. 



Cranberry Marketing 
Committee Members 
Named by USDA 

Members and alternates of 
the Cranberry Marketing Com- 
mittee were named July 29 by 
the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, to serve through July 
31, 1968. 

USDA'S Consumer and Mar- 
keting Service said the com- 
inittee is comprised of seven 
grower members and alterni^tes. 

The committee administers 
the Federal marketing agree- 
ment and order for cranberries 
grown in Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, Connecticut, New Jer- 
sey, Wisconsin, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, 
and on Long Island in New 
York. One of its main functions 
is to investigate supply and de- 
mand conditions, then recom- 
mend to the Secretary of 
Agriculture the total quantity 



of cranberries which may be 
handled in normal marketing 
channels. 

Members and alternates, re- 
spectively, are: 

District 1 (all from Massa- 
chusetts ) — George C. P. Olsson, 
Plymouth, and Maurice B. 
Makepeace, Wareham. John C. 
Decas and John N. Decas, both 
cf Wareham. 

District 2 ( all from New Jer- 
sey) — Joseph H. Palmer, Tuck- 
erton, and J. Garfield DeMarco, 
Hammonton. Walter Z. Fort, 
Pemberton, and J. Rogers Brick, 
Medford. 

District 3 (all from Wiscon- 
sin ) — Clarence A. Searles, 
Wisconsin Rapids, and Ray- 
mond Habelman, Tomah. Beh- 
rend G. Pannkuk, Wisconsin 
Rapids, and Frederick W. Bar- 
ber, Warrens. 

District 4 (all from Wash- 
ington )— Frank O. Glenn, Jr., 
Long Beach, and Robert H. 
Quinby, Grayland. 



Use of Farm Plates 
Explained to Growers 

At the recent annual meet- 
ing of the Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association in East 
Wareham, Mr. Phil Good, Ex- 
ecutive Director of the Massa- 
chusetts Farm Bureau, clarified 
the use of farm f)lates by cran- 
berry growers. 

He stated that, in a conver- 
sation with the Administrative 
Assistant to the Registrar of 
Motor Vehicles, he was told 
that the use of farm plates by 
growers to transport their own 
crops from bogs to receiving 
station is perfectly permissible. 

He further stated that he was 
told that agricultural plates 
must be used if using your 
truck to transport any crop 
other than your own from point 
to point. 

Mr. Good said that he hoped 
this information would clear up 
any misunderstanding which 
may have arisen in regard to 
this matter. 




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SEVENTEEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 10 

However data taken in 1966 
showed that the cranberry up- 
rights in the gibberelHn plots 
produced considerably fewer 
blossoms than those in the un- 
treated areas. 

Joseph Palmer and Walter 
Fort, New Jersey Representa- 
tives on the Marketing Order 
Committee reported that the 
condition of the market did not 
justify a set aside for 1966. 
Despite the record national crop 
of cranberries anticipated this 
year there was optimism in the 
marketing pictiue and the opin- 
ion prevails that the huge crop 
can be marketed at good prices. 

Edward Lipman reported on 
the difficulty of the labor situa- 
tion and urged growers to sup- 
port the New Jersey Farm 
Bureau which was ably repre- 
senting the farmers in various 
labor hearings. 

WASHINGTON 

The summer has been a fine 
one, with lots of nice days, and 



an offering of cool ocean 
breezes to the tourist from the 
hot inland. Salmon fishing has 
been fairly good. 

Summer brings many visitors 
to the Coastal Washington Sta- 
tion and for many it is their 
first introduction to cranberry 
growth, many believe they grow 
on bushes. There have been 
visitors from as far away as 
Napal, Philadelphia, Finland, 

and from many close areas also. 
The cranberry crop looks bet- 
ter each day, and there is good 
water supply, with a promise of 
some before harvest begins here 
in October. The rainfall for 
August was 1.54 inches, with 
the greatest amount coming on 
the 26th measuring .96 inches. 

The temperature has been 
warmer overall this month than 
July with the mean high of 
69.19°. It has also been a bit 
cooler evenings, also with the 
mean low of 49.19°, and Fall is 
in the air already. The high day 
was 88° on the 20th and a low 
of 36° on the 10th in the bog. 



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WISCONSIN 

Record Cranberry Crop 

The Wisconsin cranberry crop 
for 1966 is forecast at 477,000 
barrels, based on conditions of 
early August, as reported by 
over two-thirds of the growers 
in the industry, with three- 
fourths of the producing bog 
acreage. Tliis would be about 3 
percent above the previous re- 
cord crop in 1961 and over 8 
percent more than last year. The 
production estimate includes the 
crop for market and also such 
after-harvest losses as cullage for 
low quality, spoilage, etc. 

Temperatures for the period 
through August 16 averaged 5° 
below normal in all sections. 
Readings in the 30's were ob- 
served for 5 straight mornings 
in the Mather cranberry bogs. 
Evening readings in the 40's 
were common in all districts. 
Rain was adequate in northern 
% of the state with only a trace 
falling in the dry southwest and 
south central districts. Cloudy 
cool weather conserved the 
plant moisture, but more pre- 
cipitation is needed in the 
southern third of the state. More 
showers in the north on the 
14th and 15th with only scat- 
tered light showers in the south. 
Outlook to mid-September — 
Temperatures and precipitation 
to average near normal. 

Average temperatures for the 
week of Aug. 21-27 from 4 to 6 
degrees below normal through- 
out the state. Mostly cloudy, 
cool and rainy weather with 
daytime temperatures in the 50's 
and 60's prevailed up to the 
24th. Good soaking rains fell 
throughout the state early in the 
period with western and south- 
ern counties recei\'ing well over 
an inch of moisture. After the 
24th the skies cleared and the 
mercury rose into the 80's. 

The 27th and 28th was sunny, 
warm and humid. A few widely^ 
scattered showers fell late onu 
the 29th. I 

The crop developed quite 
rapidly and the berries are good 
sized because of the hot weath- 
er in July. The first part of 
Continued on Page 2A 



EIGHTEEN 






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NINETEEN 




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CRANBERRY HIDEAWAYS 

(Makes 12 Muffins) 
y^ cup shortening 
¥4 cup sugar 
2 eggs, well beaten 
2 cups sifted all-purpose flour 
5 teaspoons baking powder 
1 teaspoon salt 
% cup milk 
1 cup whole cranberry sauce 

( drained ) 

Cream together shortening 
and sugar. Stir in well beaten 
eggs. Sift flour, baking powder, 
and salt together. Add sifted 
dry ingredients to shortening- 
sugar mixture alternately with 
milk. Blend thoroughly. 

Fill greased muffin tins Vs 
full making a hole in center of 
the batter. Put in one teaspoon 
of cranberry sauce, then fill 
tins about % full. Bake in hot 
oven (400) for about 30 min- 
utes. Serve hot. 



PEANUT and CRANBERRY RELISH 

(Makes IV2 cups) 
1 cup cranberries 
Vs cup sugar 
% cup chopped peanuts 
V4 tsp. salt 
1 small orange 
1 small apple 

Put cranberries through food 
chopper and mix with sugar. 
Cut the orange and apple into 
quarters, remove seeds and 
put through chopper. Combine 
nuts with all ingredients. 



Mountaineers are noted for 
their longevity. 

A newspaperman from an 
eastern city was travehng 
tlirough a backwoods area when 
he saw a wrinkled, bent, old 
man rocking on his porch. 
Thinking that perhaps there 
might be a good story here, he 
stopped to talk with the old 
man. 

"Sir, I'd like to know your 
secret for long life?" he said. 

"Well," replied the old man, 
"I drink a gallon of whiskey 
and smoke 25 cigars each day, 
and go dancing every night," 
replied the old man. 

"Remarkable," said the re- 
porter, "and exactly how old 
are you?" 

The reply was: 'Twenty- 
seven years old." 



jesl 

lor 

fun! 



A shoe salesman was stimned 
when the shapely gal he had 
been waiting on slapped his 
face and tore out of tlie store. 

"What the blazes happened," 
roared the boss. 

"I don't know," replied tiie 
puzzled clerk. "All I said to 
her was 'these shoes will make 
street-walking a pleasure'." 



HONEY ALMOND CRANBERRY 
COOLER 

(Makes 4 servings) 

2 cups cranberry juice, chilled 

% cup honey 

y2 teaspoon almond extract 

Crushed ice 

Mint sprigs 

Combine cranberry juice, 
honey, and almond extract; mix 
well. Fill four glasses partially 
full of crushed ice and add 
cranberry juice mixture. Garnish 
with mint sprigs. 



CRANBERRY BANANA BOUNCE 

( Makes 4 servings ) 

2 small ban:mas, mashed (about 
1 cup) 

1 pint lemon sherbet 

2 cups cranberry juice, chilled 

Combine Ijananas and sher- 
bet; beat with rotary beaterj 
or blend in blender until mix^ 
ture is smooth. Place mixture 
in 4 tall glasses and fill each 
with cranberry juice. Stir lightly. 
Serve garnished wath banana 
slices and fresh or frozen cran- 
berries arranged on toothpicks, 
if desired. 



TWENTY 



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lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
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MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviiand, Inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



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AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

JOHN BEAN DIVISION 

> Lansing, Michigan 



TWENTY-ONE 



MARKETING-Cont. from Pg. 2 
Attending as guests were: 
Leon April, New jersey, John 
Morellis, also of New Jersey, 
Orrin CoUey, president of 
Cranberry Institute, Duxbury, 
Mr. Ben Pannkuk, Wisconsin, 
Robert Hiller of Marion, Mass. 
(Pals Brand), Gilbert T. Bea- 
ton cf Ocean Spray and James 
A. Rowse of Littleton, New 
Hampshire, a processor. The 
meeting is open to the pub- 
lic by law. 

The next meeting unless|| 
otherwise called will be in Sep- 
tember of 1967. 

There was some discussion 
as to delinquent reporting of 
cranberry inventories. These 
reports are due November 1, 
February 1, May 1, and Aug- 
ust 1. 




NEW JERSEY GROWERS HOLD 
97th SUMMER MEETING 

Bright marketing prospects 
and bumper crops are in store 
for New Jersey Cranberry 
Growers, according to reports 
made at the 97th summer meet- 
ing of the American Cranberry 
Growers Association. 

Edward V. Lipman, Chair- 
man of the Association's Legis- 
lative Committee, said the acute 
problem was caused directly by 
the unwise ruling of Secretary 
of Labor Willard Wirtz which 
prohibits importation of foreign 
nationals for migrant labor. 

Other speakers on the pro- 
gram included John C. St. 
Pierre, N. J. Crop Reporting 
Service; C. W. Mainland, Rut- 
gers Horticulturist; Dr. John 
Meade, Rutgers Extension Spe- 
cialist in Weed Control; and 
Walter Fort and Joseph Palmer, 
N. J. members of the Cranberry 
Marketing Order Committee. 

Following luncheon at the 
Sweetwater Casino, where the 
morning program was held, the 
group formed a caravan and 
toured a number of bogs in the 
area. Tour included the Cavi- 
leer-Fox Bog, Weekstown; Earl 
Hill Bog, Bulltown; Rutgers 
Experimental Bogs at Oswego; 
and Sim Place Bogs, now being 
renovated by the new owners. 

TWENTY-TWO 



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lOcean Spray Announces 
Key Executive 
Promotions 



Key Ocean Spray executive 
promotions have been an- 
lounced by Edward Gelsthorpe, 
Executive Vice President and 
General Manager of Ocean 
Spray Cranberries, Inc., the na- 
tional cranberry marketing co- 
operative. 

Each of these promotions is 
to a position newly formed in 
keeping with sales and grower 
returns which have doubled 
over the past five years. Esti- 
mated 1966 fiscal sales will 



be "slightly in excess of 
$50,000,000," according to Mr. 
Gelsthorpe. 

Edwin F. Lewis, former Vice 
President — Marketing, was ap- 
pointed to the new position of 
Senior Vice President. In this 
capacity, he is responsible for 
vities, new product develop- 
all world-wide marketing acti- 
ment, and Research and De- 
velopment. His advancement 
marks Ocean Spray's continued 
expansion in distribution and 



Edwin F. Lewis 

Senior Vice President 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. 



product diversification. Mr. 
Lewis came to Ocean Spray in 
1964 from Young & Rubicam, 
Inc., where he was Vice Presi- 
dent and Account Supervisor. 

Richard Lagreze was ad- 
vanced from Director of Oper- 
ations to Vice President — Op- 
erations. The increase in his 
responsibilities is concurrent 
with the rapid growth of Ocean 
Spray's manufacturing needs. 
He directs the Purchasing and 
Engineering Departments as 
well as the operations of five 
processing plants and freezer 
facilities and receiving stations 
in the United States and Can- 
ada. Mr. Lagreze joined Ocean 
Spray in 1965. He had been 
associated with General Foods 
Corporation as Manager of 
Corporate Engineering Econ- 
omics and with Procter and 
Gamble as Group Production 
Manager. 

Lester F. Haines, former 
General Sales Manager, was 
named Vice President — Sales 
and is responsible for all 
phases of domestic sales. Mr. 
Haines has been associated with 
Agricultirre since the start of 
his business career. Prior to 
joining Ocean Spray in 1957, 
he was with the American 
Cranberry Exchange. 

Edward J. Gaughan has been 
assigned the new position of 
Vice President — Finance and, 
in addition, continues as Assis- 
tant Secretary - Treasurer. He 
has been a member of Ocean 
Spray's financial department 
since 1956. 

TWENTY-THREE 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 18 

August, however, was quite 
cool with quite a lot of rain in 
the northern part of the state. 

Shortages and Labor Problems 

Additional sprinkhng equip- 
ment in Wisconsin will be put 
in again this year and growers 
are already ordering the equip- 
ment for next spring because 
of the shortages which are re- 
sulting from the war in Viet 
Nam. Certain sizes of pipe are 
already becoming scarce. 

The biggest Fall problem will 
be the lack of help for harvest- 
ing and this will be a problem 
for all Wisconsin's cranberry' 
growers. Most of them are 
going to machine-type harvest- 
ing which is about twice as fast 
in order to reduce the labor 
needed in the marshes for the 
harvest. 

More Hail Damage 

There was some more hail 
damage in August in the cen- 
tral part of Wisconsin which 
will reduce the Wisconsin crop 
to some extent. Some growers 
had severe damage but when it 
is averaged with the rest of the 
state crop it is only about 3%. 

Wisconsin had the best bloom 
it has had in years but the set 
was not as good as the bloom 
indicated. Berries are nice sized 
and some of the early varieties 
such as Ben Lears and Black 
Veils are beginning to color and 
should be ready to harvest right 
after Labor Day. Most harvest- 
ing will stiirt about Sept. 18th 
on Searles Jumbos and McFar- 
lins. 

Vine Injury 

Th state had quite a bit of 
injury from extreme hot wea- 
ther in July and there is injury 
scattered quite generally 
throughout the state. Because of 
the extreme heat at the time, 
the vines were not able to take 
the moisture as fast as the 
plants gave it off. As a result, 
some of the vines were killed 
but this did not show up until 
later as the cranberry and ever- 
green plants do not turn brown 
for two or three weeks after 
the injury. 



Mrs. Howard Folsom 

Mrs. Howard Folsom, 50, 
Green Lake, Wis. died August 
20 at a Madison Hospital fol- 
lowing a lengthy illness. 

Funeral services were held 
at 10 a.m. August 24 at Our 
Lady of the Lake Catholic 
Church, with burial in the 
Green Lake Cemetery. 

The former Mary Klingkam 
was bom in Houghton, Mich. 
She and her husband operated 
a cranberry marsh at Manito- 
wish Waters. 

Surviving are her husband 
and two sons, Robert, a senior 
at Harvard University, and 
Thomas, a senior at Wayland 
Academy Beaver Dam. 



Mrs. Mark B. Moore 

Mrs. Mark B. Moore, o£ 
Moore's Meadows, Tabernacle, 
N. J., died recentlv at her 
home. She was 101. Mrs. Moore, 
the former Ida C. Smith, of 
Indian Mills, N. J., operated 
together with her husband, a 
cranberrv and blueberry busi- 
ness at Moore's Meadows dur- 
ing the late 1800s and early 
1900s. 

Mr. Moore died in 1934, but 
one of his grandchildren, George 
D. Simmons, still operates the 
family business at the original 
site. 

Services were held at Mount 
Holly, New Jersey. Interment 
was at the Junior O.U.A.M. 
Cemetery. 



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Area 715 384-3121 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



BARK RIVER 
CULVERT and EQUIPMENT Co. 

ESCANABA, MICH.— EAU CLAIRE, WIS. — MADISON, WIS. 
[RONWOOD, MICH. — GREEN BAY, WIS. — MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS & POWER UNITS 

CORRUGATED METAL CULVERT PIPE 

DROP INLETS AND GATES 

Galvanized - Bituminous Coafed - Aluminum 



TV.' 



■ FOUR 




serving the WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 
for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 
Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworlhy 

B.S. & M.S. -. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



^ 



OUR PRODUCTS 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange Relish 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cran-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



Please Mention 

CRANBERRIES 

When You Answer Adverfisemenfs 



1 



DANA § 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. ^ 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 
VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 
SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 
ROLLER CHAINS 
;' CONVEYOR BELTING 
J STEEL 



M^#«* 






WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



' 



^t0m 






V\ 



ll 

I 

I 
I 
I 

''I 



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I 
I 



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I 




INDUSTRY MAIN SPRING 



The Cranberry Industry and Ocean Spray are pretty near 
the same thing. 

In just three years Ocean Spray has raised the average 
return to its growers by 72%; the industry has followed 
suit. 

Just as important, Ocean Spray has created whole new 
markets for Cranberry Products — and others are just 
around the corner. 

This leadership in unprecedented growth has meant finan- 
cial stability and steady profits to Cranberry Growers the 
country over. 



For information about Cooperative Membership m Ocean 
Spray, contact any Director or Staff member in your grow- 
ing area. 



Ocean spray; 



IVIassachuset:ts 

■Mew Jersey 

\y\/iscorv5in 

Oregon 

\A/ashingtan 

Canada 




J k i 



LAN! & SOIL SCiE-XES LIL 

FRENCH 

CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 








»«i/, -'•4' *> *--»&>^ 5* 



HARVESTING WITH HAND SCOOPS (See Story on Page 7 



^^ A GLIMPSE OF THE PAST 7 

THIS WEED CONTROL 11 

ISSUE NEW PRODUCTS 22 

OCTOBER 
1966 



-^ BIBECTflBY (or cpanlierpy growers -^ 



The 

CHARLES W. HARRIS! 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST Ql ALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



MIDDLEBOROUCH 
TRUST COMPANY 



AAIDDLEBORO 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Member of 

The Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



Electricity — Icey to progress 



In indus+t7 as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 




NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



i: 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLI AMSTOWN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



^f^ 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogi and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WARBHAM. MASS Tel. CY 3-2000 



Canada Agriculturists 
Visit Cape Cod 
Cranberry Area 

Through the co-operation of 
Dr. F. B. Chandler, a tour of 
Cape Cod cranberry operations 
\\'as arranged for 6 agricultu- 
nrists from Nova Scotia. The 
tour included a visit to the 
cranberry station at East Ware- 
ham, the consumer outlet of 
Ocean Sprav at East Wareham, 
several cranberry bogs and the 
private packing plant of Peter 
Lesage at Plymouth, Massa- 
chusetts. 

The purpose of the trip was 
to observe the latest trends 

land methods in cranberry pro- 
duction with a view to revital- 

'izing the industry in Eastern 
Canada. Those making the trip 
were: 

Mr. Robert Murray, Horticul- 
turist, Nova Scotia Dept. 
of Agriculture and Mar- 
keting. 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-458r 



Mr. Donald Palfrey, Weed 
Specialist, Nova Scotia Dept. 
of Agriculture and Mar- 
keting. 

Mr. Derill Armstrong, Agri- 
cultural Engineer, Nova 
Scotia Dept. of Agriculture 
and Marketing. 

Mr. Chesley Lockhart, Plant 
Pathologist, Canada Dept. 
of Agriculture, Research 
Branch. 

Dr. Ivan Hall, Botanist, Can- 
ada Dept. of Agriculture, 
Research Branch. 

Mr. Murray Porter, Crower 
and Processor of Fruits, 
Chipman's Apple Products, 
Kentville, N. S. 



Wareham Savings 
Bank 

WAREHAM and FALMOUTH 

Savings Accounts 

Loans on Real Estate 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent 

Phone CYpress 5-3800 
Kimball 8-3000 



'What is your age?" asked 
the lawyer. "Remember," he cau- 
tioned, "you are under oath." 

"Twenty-one and some 
months," the woman said. 

"How many months?" 

"One hundred and eight." 



To drive a nail without 
smashing your thumb, hold the 
hammer with both hands. 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



I 



Ocean Spray Sells 
Out Early Blacks 

With the completion of the 
harvest of Early Blacks, receipts 
of this variety total 25% less 
than last year. Consequently, 
because of the brisk demand 
right from the start of the sea- 
son Blacks have been com- 
pletely sold out. Prices from 
September 30 is $5.00 a quarter 
or $20.00 per barrel. This is 
$1.00 above last year's price. 



Michigan Cranberry 
Area Shows Promise 

Cranberry bogs in the New- 
berry, Michigan area could av- 
erage a harvest of about 14,600 
pounds per acre, judging by the 
yield in an experimental plot 
near here. 

The plot, under supervision 
of the Michigan State university 
extension office here, was de- 
veloped in what is known as 
the Dollarville marsh, southwest 
of Newberry. 



C. fir L. EQUIPMENT CO. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET. MASS 



Graiiberry Bog Service 

PRUNING FERTILIZING 

RAKING 



WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further informafion Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



SHARQN BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHnD 18 56 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

S.iwmill located .it Norili Carver, Mast. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-22 J4 



A previous yield in the same 
plot was about 11,000 pounds 



an acre. 

The berries would bring about 
ISC' a pound in the Newberry 
area. 

It has been realized for some 
time that the area is suitable 
for growing cranberries. In the 
Whitefish point area 30 miles 
northeast of here the first set- 
tlers there in the 1870's grew 
cranberries in the numerous 
bogs on the point. 






Robert E. Reyda 

To Serve Ocean Spray 

In Babcock, Wisconsin 

Robert E. Reyda has been 
appointed manager of the new 
receiving station built at Bab- 
cock, Wisconsin by Ocean 
Spray Cranberies, Inc., it was 
announced recently by Lloyd 
Wolfe, field manager for the 
company. 

In addition to his duties at 
the new $500,000 plant, Reyda 
will be an assistant fieldman. 

His most recent position has 
been as research assistant with 
the DeKalb Agricultural Asso- 
ciation, Inc., at Waterman, 111. 
He was involved in hybrid 
wheat research for two years 
with that firm and had been 
in the production department 
since May of this year. 

A native of Akron, Ohio, the 
27-year-old Reyda majored in 
horticulture at Ohio State Uni- T 
versify and completed work on ll 
his master's degree in Decem- 
ber of 1963. He served in the 
Army for two years as an ar- 
tillery oflBcer. 



Inflation : Something that cost 
$5 to buy a few years ago, but 
now costs $10 to repair. 



TWO 



Mass. 

Cranberry 

Station 

i Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

extension cranberry specialist 



Personals 

Robert Norgren who has been 
vidth us for nearly two years 
is leaving in mid-October to 
accept a position at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in Am- 
herst. Bob has been working 
under Bert Zuckerman and 
gathering information for his 
doctoral thesis. He will be Ex- 
tension Plant Pathologist with 
some teaching responsibilities in 
his new job. Bob is a great 
sports fan and we had some 
lively discussions on baseball 
and football. We wish Bob and 
his familv nothing but good 
luck in their new surroundings. 

Drs. Zuckerman and Paracer 
have published an article in 
the August issue of the Plant 
Disease Reporter. The title is 
Nematophas,oiis Fungi and Pre- 
daceoiis Nematodes Associated 
with Cranberry Soils in Mas- 
sachusetts. This article is a 
progress report on studies that 
provided fundamental informa- 
tion for further investigation 
of possible agents for biological 
control of certain nematodes in 
CTanberrv soils. 

Prof. Bill Tomlinson has an 
article loublished in the August 
i'jsne of the Journal of Economic 
Entomology. The title is Mating 
and Revrodiictive Historif of 
Blacklight- Travved Cranberry 
Fruittvorm Moths. This article 
contains information on mating 
habits and sex ratio of fruit- 
worm moths captured in black- 
light traps. Much of this in- 
formation has been presented 
by Bill at the Cranberry Club 
meetings the past two winters. 

A delegation of six people 
from Nova Scotia visited the 
Cranberry Station from Sep- 
tember 14 to 16. These were 
Dr. Ivan Hall, Botanist, and Mr. 



Chesley Lockhart, Plant Path- 
ologist, Canada Dept. of Agri- 
culture; Mr. Robert Murray, 
Extension Horticulturist, Mr. 
Darrell Armstrong, Agricultural 
Engineer, Mr. Donald Palfrey, 
Weed Specialist, all of the Nova 
Scotia Dept. of Agriculture, and 
Mr. Murray Porter, a cranberry 
grower. These gentlemen were 
interested in the culture and 
marketing of cranberries and 
we thoroughly enjoved talking 
and traveling with them. 

Weather 

The month of September was 
cool, averaging nearly 2 degrees 
a day below normal, with w^arm 
temperatures the early part of 
the month and the last 10 days 
quite cool. Rainfall totalled 4.80 
inches which is an inch above 
the 30 year average. Generally 
the rain was distributed 



throughout the month with 
heavy amounts occuring on the 
4th, 15th, 22nd and 29th. We 
are still 7% inches below av- 
erage for 1966, but are nearly 
5% inches ahead of 1965 at 
this same date. 

Harvest 

Some harvesting started on 
September 12, but general har- 
vest did not begin until the 
16th or 17th in Massachusetts, 
This is the latest start that I 
can remember. Even at this late 
starting date color was not very 
good for the first week of har- 
vest and size was variable, gen- 
erally from average to small. 
Top berries had fairly good 
size but under berries were 
small. About 50 percent of the 
crop had been harvested up to 
October 5. There have been 4 
(Continued on Page 6) 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now Unloading - 1 Carload Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



^assBs^^ma 



THREE 



We d like 

to put you 

on the map! 




I 



We mean it. We want a map full of growers. Good growers for Dean's Indian 
Trail. Men who like the way we do business. 

Suppose you make the map at Dean's Indian Trail, then what? For one, you 
get an advance at the beginning of harvest on your estimated crop. You get a 
second payment when you ship during the season, and a final payment at a later 
date. For another, your crop will go into the finest 
cranberry products made. For a third, you'll be tied in 
with a well-known, highly respected company. 
A company with strong advertising and 
merchandising programs to sell cranberry 
products. 

Dean's Indian Trail... the big new name 
in the cranberry business. 



:| 




Deanls 



\\rvdJUmJhaili 

p. O. Box 710 • Wiscontio Rtpldt • Wllcontin 54494 



FOUR 




ISSUE OF OCTOBER, 1966 / VOL 31 -NO. 6 



WATER . . WATER . . WATER 

The only time, it seems, when people really 
think about water is when there is too much 
or when there is too little. 

The nation's cranberry growers right now 
are very much concerned about water — or 
rather the lack of it. 

We. in Massachusetts, have been plagued by 
several years of drought, during which time 
the levels of our reservoirs and ponds have 
gone down so sharply that one could almost 
sit and watch it drop What is really alarming 
is the fact that this is not a "local" problem 
but is shared by nearly all the cranberry 
growing areas. 

On a recent trip to New Jersey we found 
the same situation there. It has become so 
critical in that state that it is overshadowing all 
of the other problems the growers must con- 
tend with, and these are many. 

In New Jersey, where some of the larger 
growers either have or are in the process of 
cutting up their large bogs to facilitate water 
harvesting, there is the threatening fact that 
there just may not be enough water for that 
purpose. One larger grower there has begun 
construction of new bogs in one of the few 
locations which will give him an adequate 
supply of water, at least for the near future. 

Consideration is being given to the use of 
deep wells for source of water. This, although 
it seem to be practical for those growers who 
are able to aflFord it, entails problems of mu- 
nicipal and state regulations. An ironic fact is 
that the West Coast and Wisconsin areas, where 
there was abundant rainfall during the Spring 
and early Summer, the cranberry areas of these 
states got only a minimal amount of this 
valuable water. 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, MaM. 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 
Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



If one puts any credence in what weather 
prognosticators have to say, the conditions 
which have been causing this extended period 
of drought are due to change, and prospects 
are that the country will soon return to a more 
stable balance of wet and dry weather. Let's 
hope, for the sake of the American pubHc in 
q;eneral and the cranberry growers in particu- 
lar, that this is one of the few times they 
are right ! 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



FIVE 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 

general frost warnings released 
from the Cranberry Station as 
of October 5. These include 
afternoon and evening warn- 
ings. 

Market Report 

The first cranberry market re- 
port for fresh fruit was released 
October 3 from the Agricultural 
Marketing News Service tmder 
the direction of John O'Neil 
in Boston. This will be the 
13th season that these weekly 
reports have been prepared for 
growers and shippers. The re- 
ports include current informa- 
tion on the movement of fresh 
cranberries bv rail and truck, 
price and terminal market con- 
ditions in the leading cities in 
the United States. Those who 
wish to continue receiving this 
report should return the neces- 
sary form to Mr. O'Neil. Any- 
one else interested in this re- 
port mav receive it bv writing 
to the Af^ricnlhiral Marketing 
News Service. 408 Atlantic Ave., 
Room 70?i Boston, Mass., re- 
fiuesting that his name be ad- 
ded to the cranberry mailing 
list. 

Late Fall Management 

The following suggestions on 
late fall management are oflFered 
to the growers for their con- 
sideration. 1) Woody plants 
such as hardback, meadow 
sweet and bavberrv should be 
pulled out after harvest, this 
will greatlv improve the pick- 
ing operation next season. 2) 
A potato dipfeer can be used 
in the shore ditches to pull 
ont nmners of small bramble, 
\'irginia creeper or morning 
p:lory which may be crossing 
the ditch from shore. 3) 
Casoron® can be applied at the 
rate of 100 poimds per acre for 
control of loosestrife, aster, mud 
rush, needle grass, summer 
'''-;iss. rut paras';, nut frrass, cot- 
ton grass, marsh St. Johns-wort, 
^ i^weed, blue joint, sphagnum 
moss and wool grass. Casoron 
'^ ould be used in cold weather 

SIX 



Year Round Favorite 
Cranberries Becoming 

New Products Have Helped 
Cranberries Lose Seasonal 
Image 

The general pubhc has now 
accepted the cranberry as a 
year round berry. 

This is the opinion of cran- 
berry people and can quite 
easily be proven. 

Ocean Spray, the leading 
grower cooperative in the 
country, has been responsible 
for much of the groundwork 
which was done to bring about 
this situation. 



(after November 1) preferably 
iust before a rain. It is less 
likelv to harm vines that are 
healthy and vigorous. 4) Cas- 
oron and sand should not 
be applied in the fall to bogs 
that do not have winter pro- 
tection because of the increased 
«;usceptibilitv to winter injury. 
This combination is also likely 
to cause injury where vines 
have been weakened bv drought 
or other causes. 5) This is an 
excellent time to rake and/or 
prime the bog. also do not 
forget the trash flood where 
water supplies are available. 
These are verv valuable prac- 
^ces that will keep the bog in 
shape for peak production next 
vear. 6) Anv bog that has not 
received sand for the past five 
vears or more, should be sanded 
as soon as possible, preferably 
this fall or winter. Sanding, 
pnming and raking should be 
postponed until next spring 
on those bogs that do not have 
water for winter protection be- 
cause the vines are tnore sus- 
ceptible to winter injurv fol- 
lo^\^■ne these operations. 7) It 
mi>ht be a ffood idea after the 
fnll work is done, to put in the 
flume planks on those bogs that 
have drv reservoirs. Any water 
that can be saved would be 
helpful later on for winter pro- 
tection. 



As part of a three-year pro- 
gram aimed at taking the sea- 
sonal factor out of the cran- 
berry. Ocean Spray has intro- 
duced new cranberry products; 
such as cranberry catsup, cran- 
berry bread, cranapple cocktail 
at their Cranberry houses ire 
Massachusetts. 

All this has brought about a 
possible shortage of the berry 
where a few years ago the in- 
dustry had to dump more than 
ten percent of the crop in an 
efi^ort to keep prices up. 

The reason for this upswing 
is really quite simple — promo- 
tion and product development. 
Before Mr. Edward Gelsthorpe, 
Ocean Sprav's energetic and 
progressive Executive Director, 
took over his position there had 
not been a new cranberry prod 
uct in decades. After taking 
over his position, Mr. Gelsthorpe 
greatly expanded the product 
development section of the co- 
operative and called in con- 
sultants to develop new mar- 
keting procedures. This, of 
course, necessitated an increased 
advertising and promotional 
budget which is now estimated 
at approximately five milHon 
dollars a year. 

The introduction of cranberry 
juice cocktail was the first of 
the new products to be made 
available to the consumer. The 
results of this new approach 
w a s immediately noticeable. 
This step took cranberries out 
of the seasonal Thanksgiving 
and Christmas market and put 
it on a year roimd category. 

Ocean Spray members seem 
to be in favor of the ex- 
penditures for promotion since 
the results are self-evident and 
quite positive. 

It has come to appear that 
the 1959 cranberry scare has 
turned out to be the best thing 
that has happened in years to 
the cranberry industry. It got 
the growers to thinking about 
the necessit}' of changing their 
whole marketing approach. 

■I 
Continued on page 23 



\ Glimpse of the Pest: 
Wassacliusens Cranberry Growing 



Part I 



AN EARLY HISTORY OF MASS. STATE CRANBERRY BOG 



Dr. H. J. EYanklin, Cranberry 
Expeiriment Station, East Ware- 
ham, Mass., unpublished tran- 
script of talk given at the Walt 
ham Field Station, December, 
1940. 



Prepared By Mr. Silas A. Basse 



Among the papers Mrs. Franklin 
urned over to the Cranberry Station 
^hen she sold her house was an 
arly history of the State Bog from 
16 time the swamp was cleared in 
891 to the time it was purchased by 
le state in 1910. The account was in 
le form of a resume of the years 
Titten by Silas Besse, the developer 
f the property. To show how far 
/e have come in pest, frost control 
nd cultural practices in general 
ou will find this history of the State 
log interesting. It is edited slightly 
ar better continuity, but otherwise 
nchanged. 

The late Mr. Besse was a resident 
f East Wareham, and after selUng 
lis bog to the state built another 
1 the Eagle Hill section. 



1891-1893 

Commenced work at bog June 6, 
891. Entire bog ready for sanding 
Lpril 1, 1892. Vines set between 
ipril 25 and June 11, 1892 - about 

barrels to acre "Single setting". 15 



H. P. engine and 18 H. P. steam 
boiler installed and BCE(?) Pump 
for spring flowing of 1893. Cost of 
weeding for 1892— $6.55. Re-setting 
vines pushed out by frost and where 
first setting failed to start— 15 bar- 
rels vines spring of 1893. 400 lbs. 
fertilizer put around hills spring 
1893. Cost— weeding 1893— $6.00. 



1894 



Pump inadequate to protect from 
late frosts 1894. Fruitworms in ev- 
idence 1894. Practically no weeding 
expenses for 1894. 

1895 

Bog not under water winter 1894- 
1895. Bog not entirely covered with 
vines summer 1895-growth in places 
has been slow. Blossom indicate 500 
to 600 barrels of fruit. Blossoms 
failed to "set" well-perhaps 400 bar- 
rels "set". No fu-e worms, fruit- 
worms very disastrous— fully 30% 
damage. Had 100 torches all night 
for week during blossoming season 
— 10 inch plate smeared with tar 
and molasses under each torch — 
many millers caught but few of 
these fruitworm miller. (3 very hot 
days in September 1895 — caused 
scald and rot — lost fully 70 bar- 
rels from these causes.) Weeding 
1895— $3.00. 



1896 



Weeding about $18.00. Bog kept 
pretty wet all season. Pumping & 
prime, fuel and labor— $129.00. Water 
from winter flowage seeped from bog 
late in winter, put on again in mid- 
dle of April and held by repeated 
Dumpings till May 22nd. Ditches 
mied 3rd and 4th of July. Pumped 



4 days in October for frost. Picked 
309 barrels— Shipped 501 barrels. No 
rot 



1897 



Bog not flowed during winter of 
1896-1897. Water put on (pumping 
4 days) April 17th— allowed to seep 
away — covered again May 14 and 
agam June 10th. Heavy blossom- 
good "set". Fruitworms perhaps 
10% damage— vines have become 
deep and thick. Scald, blight or 
fungus cut crop to 505 barrels picked 
and 59 barrels out of 505 taken out 
by separator and screens rotten- 
shipped but 446 barrels. Weeding 
this year $55.00. Note how weeding 
expenses increased with keeping bog 
very wet. 



1898 



Bog uncovered during winter 1897 
and 1898. Black-head fire worms do 
some harm this season— promising 
bud and fair blossom but many 
"sets" dropped off shortly after set- 
ting. Shipped but about 325 Bbls. 
So many wormy rotten berries cost 
81c per bbls. to screen (and sepa- 
rate). Vines have become very deep 
and luxuriant. 



1899 



Bog uncovered all winter. Pumped 
little this season— once only for 
spring flowing. Weeding cost for 
season $16.20. Bloom promised fully 
1200 Bbls. Picked 300. Loss by fruit- 
worm estimate 150. Loss by other 
worms— (called them "bud" worms) 
—750. Fruit decayed badly in house 
this season. Vines deep and heavy. 



1900 



Bog flowed about Xmas— water 
froze solid and kept vines frozen in 
ice all winter. Pumping in ditches 
during spring and blossoming sea- 
son. No injury from most. Tremen- 
dous blossom and good "set". Put 
all vines under last of June during 
cloudy and cool times. Bushels of 
dead moths came ashore. Weeding 
expense light. Crop about 1040 Bbls., 
but seems to low. Praticully no 
fruitworms. Shipped 806 Bbls. Aver- 
age. Loss by decay in house 140 
Bbls. Loss by decay m bog and ber- 
ries rotten and left on bog, to poor 
to pick — 90 Bbls. Vines very deep 
and "thick." 

SEVEN 



1901 

Bog uncovered all winter. Winter- 
killed so very badly mowed greater 
part of bog with horse-machine. 
Weeding about $25.00 this season as 
vines cut left room and opportunity 
for weeds. Light sanding for first 
time since bog built. 2 tons of Stock- 
bridge fertilizer— first time fer- 
tilizer used on bog. Practically no 
crop, (about 100 Bbls. ) as no vines. 



1902 



Bog covered during winter. Kept 
on till middle March. Pumping to 
keep ditches supplied, no damage 
from late frosts. No fertilizer this 
season. Vines in May indicated big 
blossom, and was tremendous bloom 
and good set— but many of top sets 
failed to mature. 1195 barrels ship 
ped. Vines short and healthy. Nc 
rot. Fruitworm destroyed about 5%. 
Light sanding in winter 1902-1903. 




1903 



Bog fowled during winter. Water 
allowed to seep away last March 
and no reflowing till June. Pumping 
—ditches kept well filled during June 
and earyl July— all blossoms on 
ditch shores destroyed by water. 
Weeding for season $6.15. No fer- 
tilizer used. Big blossom— set not 
good as usually and top set all over 



bog failed to mature. Fruitworm set well as usual. Shipped 801 Bbls. 
damage fully 20%. 580 Bbls. Shipped. No rot. Very few fruit worms. Light 
No rot. Fall sanding quite heavy. sand Fall of 1904. 



1904 

Bog kept about Vs submerged 
all winter. Pumping— to keep water 
in ditches during blossoming sea- 
son. Weeding expenses very light. 
2 tons of fertilizer used. Blossom in- 
dicated about 1100 Bbls. Failed to 



1905 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

for frost control 
and irrigation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
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Bog about 1/2 submerged during 
entire winter— water seeped off by 
last March. Pumping tor late frosts 
not effectual — top slow — 40 hours re- 
quired to submerge all vines vdth 
old plant. Vines in May promised 
heavy blossom. Late frosts destroy- 
ed greater part of crop. 206 Bbls. 
shipped. Light sanding— Fall 1905. 



EIGHT 



Part II 
CRANBERRY HARVEST- 1900 

by EUGENE A. WRIGHT 
The following portion of this 
feature appeared in the SIL- 
VER LAKE NEWS (Ma^s.) and 
is used by permission. 

Times change and so do I., 
Put the two together and wei 
have quite a change. 

The cranberry harvest then 
as now was a lot of hard work, 
but more went witli those days. 
The picking was done mostly by 
hand and tlie pay was small, 
but quite a bit of social life was 
attached to it. The picking day 
was short and there was con- 
siderable time in the morning | 
to visit with town folks. . 

Pickers from neighboring 

towns were there and gossip] 

Continued on Page IQ 

I 



^ 



ffD 
i 




NEW J E RS EY 

September Brings Rain 

The good old fashioned north- 
easters which cranberry growers 
had hoped for returned to New 
Jersey in September, The much 
needed rains came with them 
and measured in terms of 
water in cranberry reservoirs, 
the drought was over. A total 
of 9.81 inches of rain was re- 
corded at the weather station at 
the Cranberry and Blueberry 
Research Laboratory in New 
Lisbon. It rained on twelve 
days of the month; on 10 of 
the last 16 days and 8 of the 
last 11 days. Two very heavy 
rains accounted for most of the 
precipitation, 3.18 inches on 
September 14th and 15th and 
4.89 inches on September 21st 
and 22nd. 



Precipitation Now Above Average 

The rainfall in September ex- 
ceeded that which occurred in 
the entire three previous sum- 
mer months — 7.06 inches. Sep- 
tember started out with an ac- 
cumulated deficiency for 1966 
of 5.23 inches. Since normal 



rainfall in September is 3.62 
the excess of 6.19 brings the 
total for 1966 to almost an inch 
above normal, (0.96). More- 
over, the rainy trend appears to 
have continued into October. 
During the first two days of 
the month, 1.43 inches of rain 
fell. This is about 40% of the 
total normal rainfall for Oc- 
tober. 

In the forty-year history of 
weather recording at the Lab- 
oratory this was the second 
rainiest September. In 1938 the 
total was 10.39 and it was a 
year in wliich the excess of rain 
definitely was not needed. 

Month was Cool 

In regard to temperature the 
month was considerably cooler 
than normal. The average tem- 
perature was 64.5 °F., or about 
three degrees below normal. 



Harvest Behind Schedule 

Cranberry harvesting was 
slow to get started this season. 
Unsatisfactory color and size 
of berries and, in some instan- 
ces, the lack of sufficient water 
for water harvesting, were the 
main deterrents. The rain and 
cool nights in late September 
have improved conditions and 
much progress has been made 
during the past few weeks. 
Dry harvesting was still con- 
siderably behind schedule as 
of October 1st. The cranberry 
crop in New Jersey does not 
appear to be as good in quan- 
tity as it was in 1965. At this 
time the 140,000 barrel es- 
timate for this State looks like 
it might be a little high. 



Continued on Paae 18 



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NINE 



CRANBERRY HISTORY 

Continued from Page 8 

and local news got a going 
over. The youth of the group 
got together for a swim in the 
reservoir. There was precau- 
tions about water snakes and 
turtles, but somehow they were 
more than glad to keep out of 
our way. 

We were socially hungry and 
more than glad to get together. 

My first experience at picking 
come when I was real young. I 
recall going to tlie bog one Sep- 
tember afternoon with father. 1 
couldn't have been more than 
six. I can't say I picked too 
many berries, but being with 
father I must have picked a 
few. 

Father wasn't the kind to have 
loafers around. There was a 
fight that afternoon. The owner 
and a picker got into an argu- 
ment. 

I cannot recall any of the 
heated words. Most likely it 
was over underberries or vines. 
These were the cause of many 
a squabble in the early cran- 
berry day. Somebody pushed 
somebody and I recall the 
wrestling with two rolling into 
a ditch. 

In the light of present day 
vine pulling and underberries, 
it was all over nothing. No one 
was hurt much outside of a few 
wet clothes and a little higher 
blood pressure. 

Distant pickers came to the 
bogs by various means of con- 



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Tel. 617 824-7578 



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'I 



veyances. A few rode on bicy- 
cles, but most came by horse 
and carriage. The horses were 
tied to trees in the woods near- 
by. A few living at not too great 
a distance walked. Picking was 
done into a six quart pail, 
which the picker dumped into 
the box when filled and received 
a cardboard check. When five 
pails had been filled he could 
exchange the single checks for 
a five-measure one. Then fol- 
lowed 16s, 20s and the 50. 

The value of the check va- 
ried on different bogs, from 
eight to 10 cents. Many of 
them could be used at the local 
stores for cash purchases. 

On the Plympton bog I 
have in mind, at times there 
were often 150 pickers. Some 
were transients and only re- 
mained a few days, and by far 
most of those who started fin- 
ished the season, which often 
was not completed until late 
October. 

At the end of the picking 
season a day was set for the 
cashing of the checks, and 1 



never heard of anyone losing 
out. 

The work was rather hard on 
the fingers and knees. We 
youngsters picked until school 
started. The opening session 
was delayed to give the older 
children a chance to earn a 
little money. Few of the young- 
sters ever picked more than 10 
pails a day and not too many 
that number. 

Once in a while an exception- 
al boy in exceptional picking 
might pick 25 or more pails. 1 
was not a fast picker and did 
well to get as many as nine. 
1 seldom ever saw any of the 
money we earned. It sort of 
came back to us in clothes, 
shoes and food. In our family 
there were many mouths to fill 
and not too much extra money. 

I must add this did take 
away some of the incentive to 
hustle, and I suspect many of 
us were more interested in what 
went on around the bog than 
how many berries went into the 
pail. 



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YOUR BOG NEEDS 



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TEN 



Most Areas Consider 
Weed Control to be One 
Of Their Maior Proiilems 



Weed control is one of the 
most troublesome problems 
confronting the cranberry 
grower. Originally most control 
was by hand weeding. Prior to 
about 1956 (Crowley, 1) pet- 
roleum products such as paint 
thinner, kerosene, and distillate 
were used as a general applica- 
tion during the late dormant 
period and as spot treatments 
during the growing season. As 
a result of more recent research 
(Doughty, 3), specific herbi- 
cides are recommended at 
specific rates, at specific dates 
cf application, and for specific 
weed species or weed groups. 
These herbicides are fisted in 
the cranberry weed control 
chart, EM 2185, which is re- 
vised annually. 

Annual weeds such as smart- 
weed (Polygonum sp.), toad 
rush or louse grass (Juncus bu- 
fonis L.), or sand spurry 
(Spergularia sp.) generally are 
a distinct problem only on 
young bogs not completely 
vined over and older bogs 
which have vines killed or 
thinned out so that an incom- 
plete ground cover is present. 
Generally treatment with one 
or more of the herbicides re- 
commended for use against 
perennial weeds will also con- 
trol annuals. Where annual 
weeds are a problem, herbicide 
applications must be made in 
the spring prior to the time 
their seeds germinate. 

Weeds in new bogs or newly 
cleared areas may Be reduced 
considerably by the use of her- 
bicides and cultural practices 
before planting. Combinations 
of contact (dinitro ompounds, 
endothal, etc.) and systemic 



ants (sodium chlorate or poly- 
bor chlorate) used for one 
season before the cranberries 
herbicides (2,4-D,2,4,5-T dala- 
pon) or temporary soil steril- 
are planted will reduce the 
weed problem materially. If 
the weed pests can be kept out 
of a bog from the start, the 
problem of control is made 
much easier and more economi- 
cal. 

Some of the more trouble- 
some weeds found in Washing- 
ton bogs are fall aster (Aster 
svhspecatus Nees ) , common 
horsetail (Equisetum arvense 
L. ), large horsetail (Equise- 
tum telmateia Ehrl. ), scouring 
rush (Equisetum hyemale L. ), 
yellow weed or loosestrife (Ly- 
simachia terrestris, B. S. P.), 
sedges (Carex sp.),Tushes(Jun- 
ciis sp.), tideland clover (Tri- 
folitim wormskj oldie, Lehm. ) , 
grasses (Gramineae), willows 
(Salix sp.) and alder (Alnus 
sp.). 

Other weeds may develop 
from roots remaining in the soil 
when the cranberry vines are 
planted, or from seeds carried 
onto the bog. The most trouble- 
some of these weeds (Crowley, 
1 ) are dogwood ( Comus cana- 
densis L. ), muckbrush, (Spirea 
douglasii Hook), false solomon's 
seal (Smikicina amplexicaulis 
Desf. ) , and hly-of-the-valley 
or two-leaved solomon's seal 
(Maianthemum unifolium dila- 
tatum, Desf). 

Bogs less than two years old 
are very susceptible to herbi- 
cide injury until the vines be- 
come set and the roots become 
established deeper in the soil. 



Herbicides should not be 
used or should be held to a 
minimum during this period 
and then used only at about 
one-half the recommended 
rates for bearing bogs. Field 
trials have shown that some 
herbicides that are less injur- 
ious to the vines may be ap- 
plied during the second dor- 
mant period. Treatment during 
the dormant period produces 
much less injury than at any 
other time of the year. Appli- 
cation of herbicides should be 
made before the weeds emerge 
from the soil. This is also true 
of bearing bogs. 

Bearing bogs may be treated 
with herbicides that are recom- 
mended for use (see EM- 
2185). Very few of the herbi- 
cides used at the present time 
are a cure-all for all weed 
pests. Herbicides, like present- 
day fungicides, are generally 
specific for certain weed groups 
or types. For this reason the 
selection of a particular herbi- 
cide or combination of herbi- 
cides will depend on the weed 
species present, whether they 
are annuals or perennials, gras- 
ses or broadleaf weeds, or 
members of the Rush or Sedge 
families. A combination of two 
different types of herbicides 
will probablv need to be used. 
Herbicides that are formulated 
specifically for these groups of 
weeds shouM be used in com- 
bination with a general herbi- 
cide. If the majority of the 
weeds are grasses that are hard 
to control, use a general herbi- 
cide, such as dichlobenil (Cas- 
oron" ) , in combination with one 
formulated specifically for 
grasses, or one formulated for 
broad-leaved weeds if they are 
the problem. Very little injury 
will occur if the herbicides are 
used as directed. Cranberry 
vines can be injured by herbi- 
cide treatment if excessive a- 
:";ounts are used. 

Consult current weed control 
charts for herbicides, rates, and 
application dates. 

ELEVEN 



Washington 
History Stodents 

Uistt 
Morris Boo 




Young People Inspect Morris Bog 



Photo Courtesy Chinock Observer 



A group of high school stu- 
dents from Gig Harbor, Wash, 
this year adopted a new ap- 
proach to learning history; that 
of touring the state by school 
bus under direction of their 
science teacher, Wm. J. Stocklin. 

TWELVE 



There were 28 students in 
the group who were met at the 
ferry by Tom Pierson, engineer 
with Telephone Utilities, Inc., 
who immediately started them 
on the tour, under sponsorship 
of the telephone company. 



First stop for the group was 
at Fort Columbia State Parks 
Museum where they had a 
three hour visit with Frans 
Johnson, curator, who conduc- 
ted a tour of the premises and 
made explanations. Next was 
a trip to Sea view Motor Hotel 
where they had dinner and 
remained overnight. During the 
evening at the hotel, telephone 
arrangements were made for 
the group of students to per- 
form in various ways and have 
the program picked up by KT- 
NT radio, Tacoma, Wash., for 
broadcast. 

After breakfast at the hotel 
the next morning, Pierson 
guided the visitors to the Leon- 
ard Morris cranberry bog, and 
to the Cranberry Association 
processing warehouse. Morris 
explained growing and handling 
of cranberries and Wilson Blair 
gave information regarding the 
cleaning, sorting and other pro- 
cessing of the fruit. 

Another leg of the tour took 
the young people to Bendik- 
sen's cannery at Nahcotta where 
Chet Strong spent two hours 
explaining the o>'ster industry. 
Next to the engineering depart- 
ment of Telephone Utilities, 
Inc. in Long Beach where 
Frank Seeker, Jim Ayedlott imd 
Jim Howerton, gave a full run- 
down on the automatic com- 
munications systems. 

Cape Disappointment was 
the next stop where the stu- 
dents were given first hand in- 
formation on the Coast Guard 
operation, channel lights, buoys 
and the like, all of which sent 
the knowledge seekers back to 
Gig Harbor mentally loaded. 

-Chinock (Wash.) Observer 



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'Empty' Pesticide 
Containers 

"Empty" pesticide containers 
are dangerous to have around — 
even for a short time. Most of 
then contained concentrated — 
not dilute — pesticides. Some 
contained higlily poisonous and 
/or volatile chemicals. 

It's too easy for someone to 
put food, feed or drink into that 
"clean" pail or bottle that's 
handy! 

You could be legally liable 
if someone is injured or made 
ill because you have let 
"empty" pesticide containers 
stay around. 

An "empty" pesticide con- 
tainer is NEVER empty! 

Did you ever get all the pow- 
dered pesticide out of a paper 
bag or a drum? Of course not; 
nobody does! 

Did you ever get those last 
few drops of liquid pesticide 
out of a can, drum, pail or 
bottle? Not \vithout rinsing and 



even then you didn't get out all 
the rinse water; and just rinsing 
does not remove some pesti- 
cides! 

Common sense should teU 
you to get rid of those "empty" 
pesticide containers soon and so 
as to not create a further haz- 
ard. 

Here are some guide Hnes: 

1. Follow any directions for 
disposal that you find on labels. 

2. Burn combustible contain- 
ers (except containers of hor- 
mone-type weed-kiUers, 2, 4-D, 
etc.) in a public or commercial 
incinerator or place approved 
by the local Boad of Health 
(even if on your own land). 
Keep everyone out of the 
smoke. 

3. Bury ashes from burning 
and all non-returnable contain- 
ers (after carefully breaking, 
puncturing and/or crushing) at 
least 18 inches or more deep in 
a public dump (notify the su- 
pervisor) or on private land 
at a site approved by the local 
Board of Health (ever if on 



your own land). Such a site 
must not be on a public water 
supply watershed, where any 
streams may become contami- 
nated or where the buried ma- 
terial is Hkely to be disturbed. 

CRANBERRY HISTORY 

Continued from Page 10 
Life of the period was quite 
simple in terms of modern life. 
We worked hard, saw Httle 
money, but we did have a good 
time. The group always had 
some new stories. Nearly al- 
ways someone could play a 
harmonica fairly well. Then 
there were penny pitching 
games. Gambhng, I suppose, 
but the stakes were not high. 
Outside of the occasional 
fight the group was a peaceful 
one. There was Httle drinking 
and no vulgarity. Altogether 
the pickers were a weU meaning 
group, trying to earn a few 
extra dollars for the long, cold 
winter ahead. We were young 
and hungry for adventure, and 
we did get a little. 

THIRTEEN 



Report to Farmers on 
U. S. Food and Fiber 
Commission Meeting 

The National Advisory Com- 
mission on Food and Fiber, 
meeting in New York City July 
14 and 15, heard the farm pol- 
icy recommendations of the 
National Farmers Union from 
President Tony T. Dechant. 
The Commission also heard 
briefinejs on a^rricnltiiral devel- 
f^nment tlironghout the world 
from Dr. T- G. Harrar. President 
at the BocTcefeller Foundation 
on the balance of payments 
problems from Undersecretary 
of the Treasury Frederick Dom- 
ing; and on world population 
trends from Dr. Frank Note- 
stein, President of the Popula- 
tion Council. 

Mr. Dechant of the Farmers 
Union told the Commission that 
his orcranization welcomed their 
<;tudy because the U. S. has not 
had any overall agrictdtural 
policv — only a "series of im- 
Dro\nsations to meet emergen- 
cies as thev come up." He said 
the Commission's primary task 
should be to look at the sort of 
igriculture America should have 
20 vears from now. 

Mr. Dechant urged support 
for the family farm, saying, 
"We must decide, and soon, 
vhcther we are to have an agri- 
?ulture made up largely of com- 
mercial family farms, or one of 
huge vertically-integrated agri- 
lailtural factories." He said the 
amily farm would have to be 
encouraged ''specifically and 
lynamicallv" through better 
•redit facilities, appropriate tax 
tnicturc. and encouragement of 
cooperatives. 

He recommended that the U. 
5. continue its food aid abroad. 
Hit said such aid should not be 
ubsidized by the American 
armer, as in the recent case of 
vheat. 

Mr. Dechant supported in 
eneral the recommendations of 
he National Commission on 
^ood Marketing. He also call- 
d attention to farmer's need 
or more bargaining power, and 

OURTEEN 



said achieving this would usu- 
ally call for government help 
in the form of marketing orders 
and encoiu-agement of cooper- 
atives. He advocated low cost 
loans for farmer-consumer pro- 
cessing plans and retail stores 
that would sen'e as yardsticks. 

Dr. Harrar, now President of 
the Rockefeller Foundation, 
previously ran the Foundation's 
cooperative agricultural pro- 
gram in Mexico. He said he 
is "cautiously optimistic" about 
the chances of the developing 
countries expanding their own 
food and fiber production to 
meet the needs of their mush- 
rooming populations — but he 
stressed tliat it will take tre- 
mendous effort on the part of 
both the developing and devel- 
oped nations,. Dr. Harrar said 
the best help the U.S. can offer 
developing countries is that 
which will enable them to do 
more for themselves. 

The Foundation agricultural 
projects are all carried out co- 
operatively with the govern- 
ment of the country, he said. 
They have three stages: mobi- 
lizing the technology to improve 
farming in a region; making 
sure that farmers have the in- 
puts they need, such as fertili- 
zer and credit; and making sm"e 
there are incentives for famiers 
to produce more. 

Dr. Harrar also stressed that 
agricultural development pro- 
jects must be long-term; they 
must continually train nations 
to carry on and expand the 
work; and they must look for 
"multipliers" — factors that can 
be adapted from one region or 
situation to fit another and 
speed the work. He sited a 
Mexican wheat variety which 
tiuTied out well in Pakistan and 
India as a multiplier example. 

Continuing development of 
a nation's agriculture depends 
on national investment in ''ac- 
celerators" — such as more ed- 
ucation, more research, exten- 
sion, improvements in transpor- 
tation and marketing, and ade- 
quate credit facilities, according 
to Dr. Harrar. 



Dr. Frank Notestein, Presi- 
dent of the Population Council, 
New York, said that even the 
most conservative estimates of 
world population growth in the 
next 35 years show the need 
for increasing the world's food 
and fiber production. Dr. 
Notestein said the lowest rea- 
sonable forecast he could make 
on the world's population in 
the year 2000 would be 5.1 
bilhon people — 56 percent 
more than the present world 
population 3.3 billion. The up- 
per limit, he suggested, would 
be nearly 7 billion!! 

Two-thirds of the world's 
people today are ill -clothed 
and malnourished. Dr. Notestein 
said, and heroic efforts will be 
needed just to maintain today's 
minimal standards in the years 
just ahead. 

Reason for the leap in pop- 
ulation is a dramatic reduction 
in death rates throughout the 
world, he said. As an example, 
a new-born baby girl in Ceylon 
today has as good a chance of 
reaching age 60 as her counter- 
part in 1920 had of reaching 
five. 

Dr. Notestein said, however, 
that we had new reason for opti- 
mism because of the rapid pro- 
gress now being made in popu- 
lation planning — brought 
about by new technology and 
greater awareness of the prob- 
lem in many developing regions. 

Undersecretary of the Treas- 
ury Doming said the U.S. should 
ex-pand its exports "rather sub- 
stantially" to help maintain our 
balance of payments in the 
face of heavy overseas commit- 
ments, the need for U.S. capital 
in developing countries, and 
die increase in imports brought 
on by tlie boom in our domes- 
tic economy. 

He pointed out the continu- 
ing gowth in world trade, and 
the growth of potential markets 
all over the world. These fac- 
tors mean, he said, that the U.S. 
ought to be able to increase ex- 
ports witliout displacing current 
production from other countries. 



25 Bears; 




25 YEARS AGO: Items taken 
from the October 1941 issue of 
CRANBERRIES. 

Massachusetts is now quite 
certain that it now has run 
about ten percent over the es- 
timate for Early Blacks. The 
Federal estimate was for about 
430,00 barrels, of which about 
sixty percent were expected to 
be Blacks. Accepting those fig- 
ures this increase would bring 
the Massachusetts total up to at 
least 455,000. 

Picking started in Masachu- 
setts about a week earher and 
there was no let-up. Labor 
shortage did not develop to any 
extent. Market has been Hvely. 
Weather has been unusually 
good. Canners are offering 
$9.90, or a dollar and a half 



under the fresh fruit market for 
berries run through the separa- 
tor once. One canner alone ask- 
ing for 20,000 barrels. Others 
buying all they can get. 

As picking draws to a close 
in New Jersey it is feared that 
the state may not harvest the 
forecast crop of 92,000 barrels. 
Same predict it will not exceed 
80,000 while others maintain a 
crop closer to 90,000. Extreme 
drought has been blamed for 
the shrinkage of size of the ber- 
ries resulting in a crop re- 
duction. 

Though the quality of Oregon 
berries is expected to be good, 
the crop is expected to fall short 
of the big crop of last year. 
Picking began a little earlier 
than usual. 



GET 15% MORE CROP . . . EASIER 

IF YOU HAVE SPRINKLERS, YOUR CROSS- 
DITCHES ARE LITTLE MORE THAN A 
NUISANCE . . . 

PUT UNDERDRAINS IN THEM. FILL THEM UP, 
AND SET THEM WITH THE DITCHBANK 
VINES . . . 

NO ADDED SPRINKLING, SPRAYING OR 
DUSTING. NO UNPICKED BANKS. NO 
DITCH WEEDS . . . A/O NUISANCE. 

p. S. If you fill in with Caterpillars or rubber-tired equip- 
ment, you will damage more bog than you add. Do it 
with a railroad — you wouldn't know it had been there. 

For a railroad see Russell Trufant, 15 Frank Street, Middleboro 



Washington will harvest about 
40,000 barrels this year. This 
will continue that state's great- 
ly increased yield of the past 
few years. Quite a few thou- 
sand barrels are expected to go 
into cans. The new Grayland 
cannery was expected to be 
ready by the latter part of Sep- 
tember. Some of the growers 
from around Ilwaco will ship 
berries to Vancouver to the 
Washington Co-operative can- 
ner in that city as they did last 
year (1940). 

By October first many of the 
Wisconsin growers had com- 
pleted harvesting and growers 
tliere are still sticking to their 
estimate of 100,000 barrels. 
Some feel that this figure may 
not even be quite reached but 
if there is any falling off it will 
be sHght. 

The harvest of Early Blacks 
in Jersey is now completed and 
the picking of Howes has be- 
gun. Jersey berries this season 
in general are said to have 
pretty good color and to be of 
good quality. Picking has pro- 
gressed under some difficulty as 
labor has been hard to obtain. 

Jersey has had no rain since 
the first of August, that is rain 
of any consequence. Reservoirs 
are at bottom and the entire 
Southern section of the state is 
arrid. Water supphes are the 
lowest in a long time. There 
have been some frost warnings 
and growers have used up wa- 
ter. Some water suppHes are 
entirely exhausted. 



READ 
YOUR MAGAZINE 



FIFTEEN 



Things to Come 
WEED KILLER IN 
A ROLL 

It just had to cornel 

Scientists have now devel- 
(>ped a weed killer in the form 
of strips of loosely woven cloth 
or water-soluble plastic. 

The carriermaterial is suppo- 
sedly dissolved by rain, re- 
leasing the weed killer after 
which the material decomposes. 

It is still not known how well 
the plastic material will work 
but weed scientists are certain 
the manufacturer can correct 
any problem. 

Although the treated cloth 
is still experimental, USDA sci- 
ents have put it through more 
than a dozen tests with differ- 
ent chemicals and tliink it may 
be a safe, easy to handle way 
to apply weed killers, particu- 
larly in areas where spray drift 
could be a problem. 



Other advantages of this type 
of weed killer are that the 
weed killer is already built in 
and thus calibration errors can 
be eliminated — the treated 
strips could hold the chemical 
intact until there is enough 
moisture to activate it and the 
strips could act as a mulch to 
hold soil and seed in place. 

Scientists also beheve that 
the plastic material may pro- 
mote thicker, earlier stands by 
holding in soil moisture and 
absorbing heat. 



^(>-^^<)^^(i^^()^^(K4 



Personal 

Clarence J, Hall, former editor 
and pubhsner and founder of 
Cranberries magazine, is recu- 
perating at his home in Ware- 
ham, Massachusetts, after a 
serious operation. 



Distributor For 

Hale Irrigation Pumps 

ROBY'S PROPANE GAS, 



INC. 



Carver, Mass. 
866-4545 



West Wareham, Mass. 
295-3737 



CONVERT YOUR IRRIGATION PUMPS 
TO L. P. GAS 

1, Saves on Oil 

2, No Pilferage 

3, Saves on Spark Plugs 

4, Up to Three Times the Engine Life 

5, Saves on Fuel Pumps and Carburetors 

FOR A DEMONSTRATION CALL US 
TODAY 



I I 

[Wisconsin Cranberry ( 
I Consultant Service j 

i P,o, Box 429 ! 

I Wisconsin Rapids, Wis, 1 

! Phone 423-4871 ( 

1 1 

) • i 

i ! 

i\Niscons\n Disfribufor j 



I 



for 



I 



I Casoron® G-4 granules j 

i i 



IN THE 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST 
SEE YOUR 

MILLER DEALER 

or 

MILLER FIELDMAN 

for 

CASORON® 

MILLER PRODUCTS CO. 

7737 N. E. Killingsworth 
Portland 18, Oregon 



BB» 



CASORON® 

IS AVAILABLE IN 
MASSACHUSETTS 

from 

R. F. MORSE & SON 

West Wareham 

Tel. 295-1553 



1 



IXTEEN 



CASORON 

DICHLOBENIL WEED & GRASS KILLER 

A Research Discovery of N.V. PHILIPS-DUPHAR U.S. Pat. No. 3,027,248 




It kills only weeds 



SORON- approved for bearing and non-bearing fruit, nursery 
lamentals, citrus nurseries, cranberries and alfalfa. 



It takes a merciless weed killer to wipe out ruthless perennial weeds. CASORON G-4 
granules is the way to wipe out cranberry-choking weeds. 

Apply CASORON anytime after mid-November. It polishes off perennial 

and certain annual weeds and grasses before they spring up to rob your cranberries 

of available soil moisture and valuable nutrients. 

Yet as devastating as CASORON is to weeds, it won't hurt your cranberries. 

The best time to use CASORON is right now while weeds are dormant. 
Come Spring, no weeds. And no labor problems. 

Just use CASORON and that's all. 

CASORON controls heavy, crop choking strands of weeds but it is also economical 
for use when only a few weeds are present. 

Get CASORON G-4 at your supplier. If you don't know who he is, write us. 
We'll tell you and send complete, illustrated information on CASORON. 
Use CASORON. The merciless weed killer that's murder to weeds. 



(£>. 



THOMPSON-HAYWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Subsidiary of Philips Electronics and Pharmaceutical Industries Corp. 
P.O. Box 2383 Kansas City, Kansas 66110 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 9 

MASSACHUSETTS 

September Alternates Warm and Cool 

Generally speaking, Septem- 
ber was a cool month in Mas- 
sachusetts, with the daily av- 
erage about two degrees below 
normal. 

The rainfall, altliough nothing 
to write home about, was 
slightly above normal with the 
Cranberry Station in East Ware- 
ham registering 4.8 inches dur- 
ing the month. 

The "big" storms occurred on 
September 4, 15, 22 and 29. 

The montli started off warm 
and alternated between cool 
and warm with the last ten 
days a bit on the cool side. 

Picking Starts Late 

Harvesting in Massachusetts 
got a later start than usual 
with the first picking beginning 
on September 12. It was in full 
swing by September 17. 

Color Not Good 

First picking showed color 
was not good and size of fruit 



smaller than expected. Cooler 
weatlier toward the end of the 
montli was expected to improve 
conditions and allow for bet- 
ter color and size. 

Frost Warning 

Fortunately, there has been 
little problem of frost damage 
during the month of September. 
Only two warnings were issued 
by the Cranberry Station — the 
first on September 16 and the 
second on September 24. Frost 
damage was practically nil. 

Harvest Going Well 

Considering the late start, 
picking was moving along very 
well and by October 1 nearly 
half the crop had been picked 
and by October 10 at least sev- 
enty percent had been har- 
vested. 



WASHINGTON 

Crop Looks Good 

According to respiration tests 
being done here at the station 
the local berries were mature 
by September 15th but the 
color was not up to market de- 



(Sso) 



Kerosene 

Solvent 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 






INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 



Telephones 
S85-4341 — 585-2604 



EIGHTEEN 



62 /WAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



sire, so though the experimental 
plots have been harvested, be- 
girming about four weeks ago, 
the local growers did not really 
start until the lOtli. A few 
began about the 6th and Cran- 
guyma started about the 1st. 
Harvest will coontinue until 
about November 5 with the 
main crop completed by the 
last week in October. 

All indications so far are for 
a very good return for the 
growers' work this year, the 
berries are quite plentiful. The 
Ocean Spray plant here, doing 
the sorting work, began last 
week, with several truck loads 
of berries sent from the east 
to supply the Markham plant 
with berries for the September 
orders. 

Rainfall Needed 

The mean high for the month 
of September was 67.47 degrees 
with a high for the month of 
86 on the 21st and another 
warm spell the last tliree days 
of the month with 70, 75 and 
80 degrees. The mean low was 
49.13 degrees and a bog low 
ot 37 on the 12th. We had 
2.96 inches of rain during the 
period with .77 on the 17th. 
Rain was recorded on only ten 
days, and a period of six days, 
21st through the 26th brought 
only 1.25 inches. Since tlie lo- 
cal Long Beach growers har- 
vest by flooding they are hoping 
for some good rain in the next 
few days. 

WIS CO N S I N 

About 200 acres is being pre- 
pared for next year but there 
is a shortage of planting stock 
of Stevens, Ben Lears, and 
Searles Jumbos. Growers pre- 
fer to plant Stevens if they can 
as in the long rim they out- 
produce other varieties by 15 
to 20%. 

The harvest is now under 
way and it looks like tlie es- 
timate will hold up prety much 
to the government estimate. 
Berries seem to be of good 
quahty with excellent coloring. 

Continued on Page 2A 



Push-Butlon Age ol Spraying 
Arrives Willi Tliree-Pliase Pnwer 



by WALT SEABORG 

Electric motors have replaced 
dies el engines for pumping 
water on cranberry bogs owned 
by the Olson brothers of War- 
rens, Wisconsin. 

By switching to electric 
power, Debs and James Olson 
now enjoy the convenience of 
push-button operation for their 
water spraying system. There is 
no need for them to haul fuel 
to their pumps. Their engine 
maintenance problems have 
been solved. And electric power 
does the job for less cost. 

The Olson brothers aren't 
alone in switching to electric 
power for pumping, thanks to 
the efforts of Oakdale Electric 
Cooperative which last Novem- 
ber began building three-phase 
power into the cranberry 
marshes of central Wisconsin. 
So far, 26 cranberry growers 
have been connected to the 
cooperative's new three-phase 
lines. The cooperative has in- 
vested more than $175,000 in 
new construction to serve the 
cranberry growers with three- 
phase pumping power. 

Spraying is Faster 

Cranberry growers spray 
water onto their bogs for two 
reasons, first to prevent frost 
damage, and second, to prevent 
drought. Spraying is replacing 
flooding as a means of protec- 
ting from frost and drought. As 
Debs Olson explains it, "Spray- 
ing is much faster than flooding. 
With these sprinklers, we can 



be protected from frost within 
ten minutes after the motors are 
started. With flooding, it takes 
much longer to get water on 
the cranberries. Speed is impor- 
tant. The temperature can drop 
ten degrees in an hour. 

"With flooding, there is al- 
ways the danger of giving the 
plants too much water. The 
sprinklers use a lot less water 
to get the same results." 

Each year, the Olson brothers 
begin spraying their cranberry 
bogs during the first week in 
May. Frost hits almost every 
night until about the end of 
June. 

No Use Trying to Sleep 

"Spraying is done at night," 
Debs Olson says. "When frost 
is predicted we have to check 
the temperatures in the bogs 
every half hour. This means 
driving around the levees at 
night, sometimes in thick fog. 
There's no use even trying to 
get any sleep. 

"When the bog temperature 
hits 33 degrees, then we turn 
on the sprayers. We get them 
going good before the tempera- 
ture hits 32 degrees; that's when 
the damage occurs. Tempera- 
tures in the 20's are common 
during May. It has gone as low 
as 26 in July." 

During midsummer, the frost 
danger persists, but most of the 
spraying is done for drought 
protection. During late sum- 
mer and early fall, the frost 
danger becomes continuous 



a gam. 



"We spray until October 15," 
Debs Olson says. "By that time 
all of the cranberries have been 
harvested." 

The Olson brothers raise 60 
acres of cranberries. A total of 
3P/^ acres is being sprayed by 
means of two pumps, each 
powered by a 75-horsepower 
electric motor. The other 28V2 
acres haven't been converted to 
electrically powered spraying 
as yet. The pumps push water 
into 8-inch aluminum pipes 
which are connected to pro- 
gressively smaller pipes as the 
network of pipes fans out to the 
sprayers. Water comes from a 
pond which was formed by 
damming a stream. 

Could be Made Automatic 

Debs Olson says he has been 
thinking about converting the 
spraying system to automatic 
control. "There is no reason 
why these sprayers couldn't be 
completely automatic," he says. 
"A system of thermostats might 
do the job." But then he adds, 
"Even if the sprayers were 
completely automatic, I would 
probably watch them every 
night anyway." 

Flooding is still used for har- 
vesting the cranberries. A sys- 
tem of ditches, levees and gates 
controls the water which flows 
by gravity from the pond. When 
the bogs are flooded, the cran- 
berries float to the surface and 
are harvested by special rake 
type macliines. 

NINETEEN 




aK 




SNAPPY HAM LOAF 

2 lbs. lean, smoked ham, ground 

1 lb. lean fresh pork, ground 

2 cups soft bread crumbs 

1 medium onion, finely chopped 

2 teaspoons Worcestershire 
sauce 

Few drops Tabasco 
y^ cup prepared horseradish 
1 tablespoon prepared mustard 
y-2. teaspoon rosemary 
Vz cup coffee beverage 

Combine all ingredients. Mix 
thoroughly. Pack into loaf pan 
8x5x3 inches. Bake at 375° 
for 1% hours. Serve hot or 
cold. 



CRANBERRY 
ORIENTALE SAUCE 

1 can (11 ounces) Mandarin 

oranges 
1 cup fresh cranberries 
1 cup sugar 
Vs cup silvered blanched 

almonds 
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind 

Drain oranges and reserve 
syrup. Combine reserved syrup, 
cranberries and sugar in sauce- 
pan. Bring to a boil and cook 
just until cranberries begin to 
pop. Remove from heat and 
add drained oranges, almonds 
and lemon rind. Chill. 

TWENTY 



A frightened householder ex- 
citedly reported to poHce head- 
quarters that he had been 
struck down in the dark by an 
unknown assailant. A rookie 
cop was dispatched to the scene 
of the crime to investigate, and 
soon returned to headquarters 
with a lump on his forehead 
and a glum look on his face. 

"I've solved the case," he 
muttered. 

"Amazingly fast work," his 
superior complimented. "How 
did you do it so quickly?" 

"I stepped on the rake, too," 
explained the sad cop. 



iest 

tor 

fun! 



A sailor received a letter from 
home and a comrade was sur- 
prised to see him pull out a 
blank sheet of paper and gaze 
intensely at it. Being curious, 
he asked the reason. The reply 
was: "Me and the wife ain't 
speaking." 



CRANBERRY 
SPICY SHORTCAKE 

(Makes 6 servings) 

2 cups biscuit mix 

2 tablespoons sugar 

Va. teaspoon nutmeg 

Vz teaspoon cinnamon 

% cup light cream 

1 teaspoon grated orange rind 
Cranberry Orientale Sauce or 
Cranberry Hawaiian Sauce 

Preheat oven to 400° F. Com- 
bine biscuit mix, sugar, nutmeg 
and cinnamon. Add cream and 
orange rind and stir until well 
blended. Knead on a Hghtly 
floured surface. Roll out to %- 
inch thickness. Cut into 3-inch 
rounds. Place on an ungreased 
baking sheet. Bake in hot oven 
(400°F.) for 10-12 minutes, or 
until golden browoi. Cool 
slightly, then split biscuits and 
fill with Cranberry Orientale 
Sauce or Cranberry Hawaiian 
Sauce. Top with sweetened 
whipped cream and garnish as 
desired. 



CRANBERRY 
HAWAIIAN SAUCE 

Makes about ^k cups sauce) 
1 cup fresh cranberries, ground 
1 cup drained canned pineapple 

tidbits 
^/^ cup flaked coconut 
1 cup sugar 

V% teaspoon ground cloves 
Combine all ingredients. Chill 
for several hours. 




ONE CRANBERRY HERBICIDE 
DOES THE WORK OF SEVERAL 

DE-PESTER 

CASOROIN G-4 



CONTROLS ALL THESE WEEDS 



Broadleaf Weeds 
Controlled: 

Arrow leaved Tear Thumb 

Beggarticks 

Knotweed 

Loosestrife 

Marsh St. Johnswort 

Tideland clover 

Ragweed 

Sorrel 

Wild Strawberry 

Asters 

Buckbean 

Hawkweed 

Western Lilaeopsis 

Marsh Pea 

Plantain 

Smartweed (Marshpepper, 

Pennsylvania, Spotted, 

Swamp and Water) 



Important Miscellaneous 

Weeds Controlled: 

Bracken Fern 

Royal Fern 

Sensitive Fern 

Hair cap Moss 

Common Horsetail 

Water Horsetail (pipes) 

Rushes (Juncus spp.) 

Dodder 



Giass Weeds Controlled: 

Bluejoint Grass 

Rattlesnake grass 

(Manna grass) 

Summer grass 

Velvetgrass 

Bent Grass 
Little Hairgrass 

Crabgrass 
Rice cutgrass 



Sedges Controlled: 

Bunch grass 

Muskrat grass 

Nutsedge (Nutgrass) 

Short Wiregrass 

Wideleaf grass 

Stargrass 

Woolgrass 

Cotton grass 

Needlegrass 

Oniongrass 



*CASORON is a registered trademark of 
N. V. Philips-Duphar, The Netherlands 

See Us Now 
For Fall Helicopter Application 

IN NEW JERSEY 

PARKHURST 



FARM & GARDEN SUPPLY 

301 N. WHITE HORSE PIKE 

HAMMONTON, NEW JERSEY 08037 

PHONE 609-561-0960 



TWENTY-ONE 



i 




i 



I 

uo 



7^^ 




' AIRCROP Aa-i. :: 

MODti 2a*c tixior tntCHMiiiT 



SiLiCtlON Of SPtAYCR BOOMS 

COVERAGE 




John Bean Division recently 
published a 20-page 2-color il- 
lustrated Row Crop Sprayers 
catalog covering its complete 
line of Air crop, high-pressure 
and farm sprayers. 

Optional tanks, booms and 
pumps are also shown. 

The Aircrop section outlines 
the 10, 20 and 40RC, air-type 
sprayers with 210 degree rotat- 
ing discharge for coverage from 
40 to 90 feet. 

The high - pressure Royal, 
Royalier and Royalette series 
capacity show tank options 




The world's first electric start- 
ing chain saw, marking the first 
time in history that a small, 
hand-held gasoline engine can 
be started by a totally self-con- 
tained starter - generator and 
battery combination. Starter- 



with from 10 to 60 g.p.m. pump 
from 150 to 1,000 gallons. 

Farm sprayers oflFered include 
a 125 gallon model with an op- 
tional meter-flow pump and a 
300 gallon fiber glass model. 

Booms include the HYD 60 
foot and 48 foot models plus 
veeetable and all purpose units. 

Five pump options including 
the new John Bean 2-stage, 
self-priming centrifugal model 
are shown. 

Write for free catalog L-1451, 
John Bean Div., Box 9490, 
Lansing, Mich. 48909. 

generator integral with fly- 
wheel, push button operated. 
Ten specially developed nickel 
cadmium batteries, infinitely re- 
chargeable, encased in handle. 
Solidstate semi-conductor volt- 
age regulator concealed in pis- 
tol grip. Ideal for woodcutting 
at home, on the farm, camp- 
site, in the woods, on construc- 
tion, pulpwood cutting, hne 
clearing, timber topping and so 
on. The electric starter is an ex- 
ceptional convenience and safe- 
ty feature. Weighs 14.9 pounds. 
Bore and stroke is 1.75 inches 
by 1.375 inches. Displacement 
3.3. cubic inches. Takes cutter 
bars up to 24 inches in length. 




A new electric powered trac- 
tor mounted spreader for ap- 
plying CASORON® dichlobenil 
weed and grass killer is avail- 
able from Thompson-Hayward 
Chemical Company, Kansas 
City, Kansas. Developed in co- 
operation with Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute the spreader 
is desiged to spread CASORON 
granules for nursery or fruit 
tree orchards. 

The electric powered spread- 
er, cafled the M-1, can be 
mounted on either side of the 
tractor for band applications or 
individual tree treatment or it 
can be mounted on the front 
or back of the vehicle for 
broadcast applications. The 
spreader operates off the trac- 
tor's electrical system and is 
available with either a 6 or 
12 volt electric motor. For ap- 
plications where vehicles do 
not have electrical svstems, the 
M-I spreader will operate off 
its own battery for more than 
a day without recharging. 

The M-1 spreader features a 
natented free-flow mechanism 
that is extremely accurate and 
tjives a uniform distribution of 
the CASORON granules. The 
spreader has a positive on off 
control and applies CASORON 
in a 15 foot wide swath. A rheo- 
stat on the imit can reduce this 
width if desirable. 

Additional information about 
the CASORON granular M-1 
spreader is a\'ailable from the 
-Agricultural Division, Thomp- 
son-Havwood Chemical Com- 
pany, P.O. Box 2383, Kansas 
Citv, Kansas 66110. 



TWENTY-TWO 



*> '« .. ■.\J* 




TAKING A TIP from the astronaut's space program, officials at 
Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. in Middleboro devis'ed a count- 
down clock to keep all involved aware of their groundbreaking 
date last July. It worked so well that they "reset" it for their 
completion or ribbon-cutting day next Summer. The new plant, 
designed by the Boston engineering firm of Gantaeume & Mc- 
Mullen, will be fully automated. 



YEAR ROUND' CRANBERRIES 



Continued from Page 6 



They succeeded in getting 
a man they felt had the ability 
to do the job they w^anted done. 
They sent for Mr. Edward Gels- 
thorpe who, at the time, was 
a vice president of Colgate- 
Palmolive Company. Although 
he knew little about farming or 
farm cooperatives, he did know 
a great deal about sales. Time 
has proven that they sent for 
the right man. Sales started 
rising and have been doing so 
steadily since 1963. 

The Massachusetts coopera- 
tive sees no immediate prob- 
lems in marketing although they 
are keeping an eye open at the 
higher rate of production in 
\\isconsin and other areas. 
Ocean Spray is busy developing 
more new products aimed at 
keeping the once seasonal 
cranberry on the year round 
market. 




I 






.-3 -SB 



PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
For Sand and Service that Satisfy . . . Call Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 

The newest and most modern plant Telephones 

serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 585-3355 - 585-3366 - 585-3377 

PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



TWENTY-THREE 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from, Page 18 

The central part of the state 
is becoming extremely short of 
water and some growers do not 
have enough water for the win- 
ter flooding and a few have 
raked early because they were 
so short of water. 

Buds sem to be well along 
and new plantings came along 
well this year because of fav- 
orable growing conditions. 

The main problem Wiscon- 
sin faces is the shortage of help 
for harvest. Growers like the 
Fenton Harvester because of 
the increased capacity of it and 
it can harvest about three times 
the acreage in a day as some 
of the other harvesters can do. 

The Ocean Spray plant at 
Babcock is now operating and 
should be a boom to the grow- 
ers in that area. 

Weather 

Warm summer weather re- 
turned to Wisconsin after a 
month of below normal tem- 
peratures. Average tempera- 
tures for the first week in Sept. 
ranged from 6 to 9 de^ees 
above normal. Skies remained 
mostly sunny with davtime tem- 
iieratures soaring well into the 
80's or low 90's. Verv humid 
conditions prevented tempera- 
tures from dropping much be- 
low the 60-degree mark on most 
nights. Scattered showers and 
thunderstorms occurred almost 
dailv somewhere in the state. 
Rainfall, though, was spotty 
with a few stations reporting no 
precipitation while neighbor- 
ing areas got drenched. 

Tt was warm and humid with 
scattered showers on the 3rd, 
turning much cooler and drier 
on the 4th and 5th wnth a 
slow warming trend since then. 
Bright, sunny weather prevailed 
during the week with daytime 
temperatures warming to near 
the 80-degree mark at the end 
of the period. Nights remained 
cool \vith lows mostly in the 
40's. Rainfall, falling earlv in 
the period, generally was light 
except for a few amounts of 

TWENTY-FOUR 



near an inch in southeastern 
and northeastern counties. 

Thermometer readings ranged 
from 26 to 86 degrees during 
the week of the 12th. Sunny 
and warm weather prevailed 
up to the 14th when a cold 
Canadian air mass pushed 
southward across the state. 
Scattered Hght frost with the 
coldest areas in the south-cen- 
tral part. Showers occurred 
ahead of the cold air mass on 
the 13th and 14th. Rainfall 
amounts ranged from about an 
inch in the north to a tenth 
or less in the south. 

Temperatures averaged slight- 
ly below normal for the week 
of the 19th. Days were mostly 
sunny and mild with highs 
in the low 70's while nights 
were clear and cool with lows 
in the 30's or 40's. No pre- 
cipitation was reported except 
for a few sprinkles mostly 
near the Lake Michigan shore 
line as an extensive rain area 
passed south and east of Wis- 
consin. 

Mostly cloudy and cool on 
the 24th with light rain. Sunny 
and cool on the 25th. Scattered 
frost throughout the state on 
the morning of the 26th with a 
low of 27 degrees at Madison. 
Increasing cloudiness and Hght 
rain late in the day. 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



CORRUGATED 
CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



BARK RIVER 
CULVERT and EQUIPMENT Co. 

ESCANABA, MICH.— EAU CLAIRE, WIS. — MADISON, WIS. 
[RONWOOD, MICH. — GREEN BAY, WIS. — MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS & POWER UNITS 
CORRUGATED METAL CULVERT FIFE 

DROP INLETS AND GATES 

Galvanized — Bifummous Coated — Aluminum 




serving the WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 

for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 
IN 
PURCHASING 
WISCONSIN 
CRANBERRY 
PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworlhy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



I 



OUR PRODUCTS 



1 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransvir^ets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 
iCranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 
Cranberry Chilli Sauce 
Cranberry Orange Relish 
Cranberry Vinegar 
Cranberry Juice 
Cran-Beri 
Cran-Vari 
Cran-Puri 
Cranberry Puree 
Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



Please Menf'ion 

CRANBERRIES 

When You Answer Advertisements 



DANA § 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: < I 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS S 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 



WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 



WEED RHAP 20 



SEVIN 



Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 









fRENCH 



TCCKBRIDGi: / 



EOWDITCH 



cO 

o 




o 



Univ. )f Mass. (order D-8876) 
Amherst, Mass, 01003 




e^i 



H I CHo. 



Ocean spray 



Ocean Spray Growers have enjoyed unprecedented growth in 
profits, financial stability and opportunity to invest in the pro- 
ductivity of their properties. 

The reason? Ocean Spray's leadership in the marketing of 
Cranberry products — old and new. 

For instance, in just three short years Ocean Spray has intro- 
duced into national distribution Cranberry-Orange Relish, Low 
Calorie Cranberry Juice Cocktail, Low Calorie Jellied Cranberry 
Sauce and now — delightful new Cranapple drink. 



For information about Cooperative Membership in Ocean Spray, contact any Director or Staff member in your growing area. 




r 



Massachusetts 

IMew Jersey 

\A/isconsin 

Oregon 

XA/ashington 

Canada 




Library - Serials Section 
Univ. of Mass. (order D-8876) 
Amherst, Mass. 01003 

CRANBERRIES 

THE IMATIOIMAL CRAIMBERRY MAGAZINE 



PLANT &rJi Sit. c^^iLiaRV 

fRtNCH 



P£M&£RTOM 



BLUE3£tey 

ueonATDijy ■^- 



WHITeS?)OC 



4 MILE. ae.CL£ 





WC£ OSW£^0 



RESEARCH CtMTtR^ 
WEW JER.SEY 

Upper Right: View of Cranberry Research 
bogs, Oswego, N. J. 

Lower Right: Entrance to Blueberry Research 
area showing Research 
Center garage. 

(Story on Page 7) 




A.'^ . 



^ XlB 




NOV 2 2 1966 

^jIVERSJTY OF 
SSACHUSETTS 



—rx^m 





IIM 


THIS 


ISSUE 


NOVEMBER 


1366 



1966 CROP REPORT 1 

NEW JERSEY RESEARCH CENTER 7 

25 YEARS AGO, NOVEMBER 1941 15 



^ BIBECTBBY (OP cranlierPM gpowiei'S -^ 



The 1 
CHARLES W.HARRIS| 

Company | 


MIDDLEBOROUGH 
TRUST COMPANY 


451 Old Somerset Avenue ^ 




North Dighton, Mass. M 
Phone 824-5607 S 


MIDDLEBORO 


AMES 1 


MASSACHUSETTS 


Irrigation Systems g 




RAIN BIRD 1 




Sprinklers U 
mCHEST QUALITY S 


Member of 


PRODUCTS ^ 


The Federal Deposit 


WITH SATISFACTION 'h 
GUARANTEED g 


Insurance Corporation 



Electricity - Icey to progress 



In Industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 




NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLIAMSTOWN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 
ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogt and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WARBHAM. MASS Tel. CY 5-2000 



CROP REPORT 
RY AREAS 



The United States cranberry 
crop on October was estimated 
at 1,552,800 barrels, up 8 per- 
cent from last year's crop and 
19 percent above average, ac- 
cording to the Crop; Reporting 
Board. Improved prospects from 
a month earlier in Wisconsin, 
Washington, and New Jersey 
were more than offset by re- 
duced prospects in Massachu- 
setts. New Jersey's crop is ex- 
pected to total 147,000 barrels, 
down 4 percent from last year 
but 40 percent above average. 
Expected production in Massa- 
chusetts is 765,000 barrels. 4 
percent above last year and 14 
percent above average. The 
Wisconsin estimate of 491,000 
barrels is up 11 percent from 
last year and 21 percent above 
average. The crops in both 
Washington and Oregon are 
above last year and average. 



Start of harvest was delayed 
in New Jersey because of poor 
size and color development. 
Activity was further delayed 
by rainy weather. The late 
September rains and cooler 
weather improved coloring and 
could improve size of later har- 
vested berries. No loss from 
fall frosts had occurred as of 
the first of October. Harvest 
of the crop in Massachusetts 
was about half complete on Oc- 
tober 1, about usual for the 
date. The bulk of the crop 
was harvested by October 15. 
Early harvested bogs had many 
small sized berries. September 
rains and cool nights helped 
sizing and improved color in 
late bogs. Water reserves are 
now adequate and the danger 
of freeze loss is minimal. Wis- 
consin's harvest began Septem- 
ber 15-20, about the usual time, 
but considerably earlier than 
last year. Berries sized well in 
most bogs, but have been slow 
in coloring. Harvest got under 
way on October 1 in Washing- 
ton and was expected to reach 
peak activity by mid-month. 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



There are only two ways to 
handle women — and nobody 
knows either of them! 



Wareham Savings 
Banic 

WAREHAM and FALMOUTH 

Savings Accounts 

Loans on Real Estate 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent 

Phone CYpress 5-3800 
Kimball 8-3000 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



Ocean Spray Prices 
Very Encouraging 

Ocean Spray prices on late 
fruit continue to advance com- 
fortably as the season moves 
along. The quotation on Novem- 
ber 1 to the trade was $5.65 
for Late Massachusetts Howes 
for 24 1 lb. Poly Bags or Win- 
dow Boxes, on all orders no 
later than Nov. 11 for shipment 
prior to Thanksgiving. This 
is about $22.60 per barrel. Wis- 
consin Sciirles were quoted at 
$5.15. Washington McFarlins 
were sold out by that date. 



Labor Question! 

A prominent Virginia apple 
grower wants to know why 
Secretary of Labor Willard 
Wirtz permits industry to im- 
port workers from such locales 
as England, Ireland, Belgium, 
Norway, Sweden, and Holland, 
when farmers can't have the 
same privileges for one of the 
nation's most important com- 
modities — food, and get the 
workers from less distant areas. 
— Fruit-O-Scope 



Flaming youth sometimes 
cooks its own goose. 



SHARON BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



C. & L. EQUIPMENT CO. 



1209 MATS STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 

PRUNING FERTILIZING 

RAKING WEED TRIMMING 

Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS POWER WHEELBARROWS 

RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



Fire Destroys 
Cranberry Properties 

A three - story screenhouse 
owned by Decas Bros. Cran- 
berry Company off Federal 
Furnace Road in South Carver, 
Mass. was totally destroyed by 
fire the night of Oct. 3. Loss 
was set at $100,000 and the 
blaze was believed to be of 
incendiary origin by Carver 
Fire Chief Homer F. Weston. 

The screen house at the prop- 
erty known as the Benjamin 
Bog contained screening equip- 
ment, other cranberry equip- 
ment and about 5,000 harvest 
boxes of Late Howes being 
held for the Christmas trade. 

The following night a cran- 
berry pump house on the 
Tweedy and Barnes bog, Paper 
Mill Road, West Wareham was 
burned. This was thought to 
be an ill-conceived Hallowe'en 
prank. 



17 Brokers Named to 
Handle Dean Foods 

A group of seventeen food 
brokers has been named to rep- 
resent various food products of 
Dean Foods Company, Frank- 
lin Park, Illinois. The appoint- 
ments were announced by C. C. 
(Dan) Daniel, National Sales 
Manager for the Food Products 
Division. 

Mr. Daniels said the appoint- 
ments were part of an overall 
plan to consolidate the sales 
efforts of the various product 
lines represented under the 
Dean label. 

"These experienced brokers 
will enable us to provide better 
service to our established and 
new accounts, we are happy to 
welcome them to our expanding 
organization," he said. 

Last year Dean Foods Com- 
pany reported sales of $87 mil- 
lion. The company produces 
and markets a diversified line 
of food products in cities and 
states across the nation. It 
also produces dairy products 
for sale in tlie Midwest and 
Upper South. 



TWO 



Mass. 

Cranterrv 

Station 

S Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist 



Personals 

Muhammed Waseem is the 
newest member of our Station 
group arriving in mid-October. 
He will work with Dr. Zucker- 
man on nematological prob- 
lems. Mr. Waseem was born 
in India but is now a Canadian 
citizen and came here from 
British Columbia. 

Dr. DevHn and the author of 
this column attended the New 
England Agricultural Chemicals 
Conference in Concord, New 
Hampshire, on October 26. 

Dr. DevHn has published a 
paper in Volume 19 of Physio- 
logia Plantarum, the official 
pubHcation of the Scandinavian 
Society for Plant Physiology. 
The title is "Stimulation of Ab- 
scission of Petioles of Phaseolus 
vulgaris by Sucrose and Gib- 
berellic Acid." This paper re- 
ports the effects on leaf drop 
of the addition of gibberellic 
acid or sugar solutions to the 
leaf stems of bean plants. 

Drs. Zuckerman, Miller and 
Deubert have published an ar- 
ticle in Volume 12 of Nema- 
tologica. The title is "Phenyla- 
lanine Deaminase in plant Para- 
sitic Nematodes." This deals with 
enzymatic breakdown of cer- 
tain products by some plant 
parasitic nematodes. 

Dr. Zuckerman, Miller, Dev- 
lin and Profs. Tomlinson and 
Norgren have published a paper 
in the October issue of the 
Journal of Economic Entomol- 
ogy. The title is "Parathion 
Studies on Bean Growth in 
Sterile Boot Culture." This 
paper deals with accumulation, 
uptake, concentration and mode 
of transport in the plant when 
parathion was added to the 
soil. Bean plants grown under 



sterile conditions were used for 
the tests. 

Harvest and Frost 

The Massachusetts cranberry 
harvest was virtually completed 
by the end of October. This is 
about the same as the past 
two years, even though we were 
at least a week later in starting 
this year. 

The frost warning service was 
terminated for the season on 
November 4. We sent out 20 
general warnings during the 
fall, with most occurring in 
October. This includes both 
afternoon and evening warn- 
ings and compares with 26 
sent out last fall. Frost losses 
were practically nil this year 
with the only cold night on 
October 2 with temperatures 
as low as 21 degrees, October 
12 with temperatures as low as 



17 degrees and October 31 with 
temperatures down to 9 degrees. 

The present author, as well 
as all preceding authors of tills 
column, have expressed their 
thanks to the frost warning 
service and to the people "who 
make it go." Although it may 
becoming boring to some of 
our readers, it is a gesture of 
our appreciation and small 
compensation to these dedi- 
cated people. So once again 
we would like to express our 
thanks to George Bounsville 
and Kenneth Bochefort who 
calculate and formulate the 
warnings for their very fine 
work on this most important 
phase of the operation. We are 
also indebted to the U. S. Wea- 
ther Bureau, our cooperative 
weather observers, the tele- 
phone distributors, the five 

Continued on Pas,e 14 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now in Stock - 50,000 ft. Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



THREE 



How long before 

the mailman brings your 

cranberry check? 




Growers who sell to Dean's Indian Trail get an advance on their estimated 
crop at the beginning of harvest. They get a second payment when they 
ship during the season, and a final payment at a later date. 

There's this, too. Dean's Indian Trail is a well-known, highly respected 
company. We have strong advertising and merchandising programs designed 
to sell cranberrry products. And we have a dedica- 
tion to making them the best. 

If you'd like to do business 
with a company like this, write us 
a note. You'll probably get an ans- 
wer before your cranberry check! 




Dean's 



llndio/ytT/uufi. 

p. O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 



FOUR 




It's November and time for Thanksgiving. 

The cranberries are in the crates. 

Thanksgiving has always been a day of 
special meaning for cranberry growers. 

Since the days of the Pilgrims, cranberries 
have been a part of the Thanksgiving din- 
ner. Ever since the early days of coloniza- 
tion, cranberries have been a part of our 
diet. It is hard to think of the traditional 
holiday feast without them. 

The demand for cranberries is ever in- 
creasing and production has exceeded IV2 
million barrels this year. There has been 
no lack of market for the entire crop. This 
alone, for the grower, is reason enough for 
Thanksgiving. Since the earliest days of the 
cranberry industry, it has grown steadily. 
It has also spread from one coast of our 
wonderul country to the other. It has 
weathered many storms — war, flood, drought, 
hurricanes, economic and has always gone 
forward to greater heights. 

No one need be reminded of the disastrous 
"scare" of 1959. 

In all this time, cranberry culture has 
become a highly-developed science. Ad- 
vances in insect and weed control, among 
other things, have been responsible for im- 
proved crops. New and more progressive 
methods of harvesting have resulted in 
greater economy and more profitable opera- 
tion. The cooperation between the growers 



ISSUE OF NOVEMBER, 1966 / VOL. 31 -NO. 7 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 



Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 
Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



and the people of science has greatly im- 
proved and shows signs of continuing to 
do so. 

It has not always been an easy road to 
travel, but America's native food . . cran- 
berries, has come a long way. All seems to 
indicate that the road ahead will be brighter, 

This is reason for Thanksgiving ! 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



FIVE 



ONE CRANBERRY HERBICIDE 
DOES THE WORK OF SEVERAL 

DE-PESTER 

CASORON G-4 



CONTROLS ALL THESE WEEDS 



';' 



Broadleaf Weeds 
Controlled: 

Arrowleaved Tear Thumb 
Beggarticks 
Knotweed 
Loosestrife 
Marsh St. Johnswort 
Tideland clover 
Ragweed 
Sorrel 
Wild Strawberry 
Asters 
Buckbean 
Hawkweed 
Western Lilaeopsis 
Marsh Pea 
Plantain 
Smartweed (Marshpepper, 
Pennsylvania, Spotted, 
Swamp and Water) 



Important Miscellaneous 
Weeds Controlled: 

Bracken Fern 

Royal Fern 

Sensitive Fern 

Hair cap Moss 

Common Horsetail 

Water Horsetail (pipes) 

Rushes (Juncus spp.) 

Dodder 



Grass Weeds Controlled: 

Bluejoint Grass 

Rattlesnake grass 

(Manna grass) 

Summer grass 
Velvetgrass 
Bent Grass 

Little Hairgrass 
Crabgrass 

Rice cutgrass 



Sedges Controlled: 

Bunch grass 

Muskrat grass 

Nutsedge (Nutgrass) 

Short Wiregrass 

Wideleaf grass 

Stargrass 

Woolgrass 

Cotton grass 

Needlegrass 

Oniongrass 



*CASORON is a registered trademark of 
N. V. Philips-Duphar, The Netherlands 



See Us Now 
For Fall Hellcopfer Application 

IN NEW JERSEY 

PARKHURST 



FARM & GARDEN SUPPLY 

301 N. WHITE HORSE PIKE 

HAMMONTON, NEW JERSEY 08037 

PHONE 609-561-0960 




SIX 



Cranberries Visits New Jersey's 
Researcli Center at Osweoo 



by DONALD CHARTIER 



One of the highlights of our 
recent visit to the New Jersey 
cranberry growing areas was a 
visit to the Blueberry-Cranberry 
Research Center at Oswego. 

This new facility, having been 
dedicated in August of 1965, 
is dedicated to the improvement 
of blueberry and cranberry cul- 
ture through research and to 
the dissemination of new re- 
search information. 

After a very short but very 
interesting visit with Mr. Phil 
Marucci, head of the Cranberry 
and Blueberry Research Lab in 
New Lisbon, we began, tape 
recorder in hand, our journey 
of about ten miles to the Os- 
wego site of the new research 
center. Phil carefully saw to it 
that we didn't miss a thing on 
our way to Oswego. He pointed 
out the Haynes and DeMarco 
bogs and filled us in on many 
interesting facts about the vast 



blueberry fields we passed along 
the way. 

As mentioned earlier, we had 
a portable tape recorder alcng 
with us, which proved to be in- 
valuable since we were often 
on the road between locations 
and could have been unable to 
make hand written notes. Phil 
and his assistant at the New 
Lisbon Lab, Harry Moulter 
kept us constantly on the move 
during our two-day visit, meet- 
ing bog owners and looking 
over cranberry and blueberry 
properties. 

As we turned off the main 
road onto a well-paved side 
road which was to lead to the 
research center we were im- 
pressed with the layout and 
location of the bogs adjacent 
to Lake Oswego. 

The bogs are located on the 
state-owned Wharton tract in 
Burlington County which rep- 



resents the approximate geo- 
graphical center of the blue- 
berry-cranberry industries in the 
state of New Jersey. Soils, 
chmate and water reserves in 
this area are considered among 
the best available in the state 
for the production of these 
crops. 

The facility was made pos- 
sible through a generous grant 
from the people of New Jersey 
and is a tribute to the leaders 
of these industries in recog- 
nition of their contribution of 
time, eft'ort and monies. 

The following is a trans- 
cript of the contents of the 
tapes which we made on our 
visit to Oswego. 

There are twenty bogs, each 
consisiting of a half acre with 
a dike road n.mning around 
them and also dividing each 
bog. Each bog has its own inlet 
and water can be regulated at 



bLUE.fctR.R.Y-^RANBtliaY R.ESUILCH aWTtR. • OSWt^O 



3c A.i_e 



ZOO'-O 




SEVEN 



any depth wanted for experi- 
mental purposes. All bogs are 
of the same dimension. Most 
are planted to Early Blacks. 
They have been parcelled out 
to various research people — en- 
tomology, horticulture, weed 
control, insect control, and so 
forth. 

All work done on these bogs 
is done on an experimental 
basis where everything can be 
regulated exactly. When look- 
ing at the bogs from the dams 
they don't look like much. We 
were told that this is the story 
of the cranberry bogs in New- 
Jersey. When first planted they 
look like hayfields but, after a 
while, the cranberries start to 
take advantage and do quite 
well. 

It was very noticeable that 
these were fairly well estab- 



lished bogs already although 
they had only had two grow- 
ing seasons. Though it usually 
takes longer than that, there 
were actually a few berries in 
these bogs. 

On bog *1 they have not used 
any controls. Phil explained that 
it was felt that one bog should 
have no controls since many 
growers feel that chemicals 
should not be used and he and 
his people would not be jus- 
tified in saying tJiat it wouldn't 
work unless they tried it. "Pres- 
sure also comes from the USDA 
who try to get us to reduce 
our schedules of using chem- 
icals," Phil said. "On one of 
our bogs we won't ever use an 
insecticide until we've decided 
that it won't work. We're going 
to give it an honest try. We're 
trying, by experimentation, to 



Ocean Spray Cranberries, 

Preferred and Common Stock 

BOUGHT - SOLD - QUOTED 

Inquiries Invited 


Inc. 


52 Wall 


DAVID MORRIS & CO. 

Street, N. Y. 10005 • (212) 


422-3537 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

for irosf control 
and irriqation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manv/7/e Piosfic 
Pipe and Fittings 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 



get bogs on which, by proper 
timing, we can use less chem- 
icals." 

One of the bogs showed, viv- 
idly, what one application of 
Casoron® did for weed control. 
Looking down the length of 
this bog there was a very no- 
ticeable lack of weeds, while 
on the other half it had be- 
come completely overrun with 
them. It was explained that ex- 
treme care was used to make a 
fair evaluation of this chem- 
ical. 

On a third bog, Phil explained 
that he was going to try to 
control insects by flooding at 
the proper time. "Of course," 
he went on to say, "this is an 
old method of insect control 
but, since they are after us 
for non - chemical methods, 
we're going to try it." 

Phil Marucci, along with 
others on the staff of the Re- 
search Center, have shown 
growers that it doesn't have 
to take five or six years to get 
a cranberry crop. The experi- 
mental bog isn't just a bog — 
it's a good bog and should be 
able to produce a hundred bar- 
rels per acre next year. It had 
about thirty or forty barrels 
per acre at the time of our 
visit but the fruitworm had 
taken a lot of it — about thirty- 
five percent of the crop. Some 
was also taken by tip worm. 

Bogs No. 2, 3, 4, and 5 h'^.AC 
been treated with Casoron. Dif- 
ferent sections of each bog were 
treated. It was easy to see the 
point at which the spraying was 
stopped. Only one application 
was made and yet the results 
were certainly obvious. Before 
the application the herbicide 
people warned that Cisoron 
should not be put on new bogs. 
They were only one year old 
when sprayed but, since Phil 
and Harry were anxious to get 
rid of the weeds they did about 
one-third of each of three bogs. 
The surprising thing was that 
there was no damage to the 
^ines which is what they were 
afraid of because general 
opinion was that they would 
be damaged. "What we hope 
Continued on Poa.e 10 



EIGHT 



i 




MASSACHUSETTS 

Harvest Very Late 

With a late start this fall 
harvest lingers on longer than 
usual in the Bay State. While 
the bulk of growers were fin- 
ished by the last weekend in 
October, about the 28th, there 
were still a few harvesting, per- 
haps a dozen, into November. 

October Lacking in Rain 

In spite of several heavy rains 
the month was deficient in rain- 
fall, not a good omen for win- 
ter flowing. Total, as recorded 
at the State Bog was only 2.86 
inches. Average is 3.74. 

Slightly Colder 

The month was also slightly 
colder than normal by about 
half a degree a day. 

Fall Frosts 

Fall frosts totalled 13. Two 
of these were in September. 
There was only slight and scat- 
tered damage. 

November Begins Warm 

November began on a warmer 
note, with warm air pushing 
up from the South. The 2nd 
and 3rd brought a heavy driv- 
ing rain, almost hurricane in in- 
tensity at times. The storm 
dropped from 3 to 4 inches of 
precipitation over parts of the 
cranberry area, building up 
supplies for the coming winter 
flooding of the bogs. Total rain 
for the storm at Cranberry Sta- 
tion was 2.66 inches. 

NEW J ERSEY 

Drought Broken 

The rainy trend of weather 
which started in September 
continued through October. 
Rainfall in this month was 
again excessive with 5.80 inches 
occurring, which is 2.55 inches 
more than normal. During the 
past two months there have 
been 20 rainy days and a to- 



tal of 15.61 inches of rain has 
fallen. The rain has hampered 
cranberry harvesting but was 
of coiu-se quite welcome. The 
drought is now definitely 
broken. Rainfall through Octo- 
ber in 1966 now amounts to 
40.18, only 3 inches shy of the 
annual total and 3.51 inches 
above to normal for the 10 
months' period of January 
through October. 

In regard to temperature the 
October was colder than nor- 
mal. The average temperature 
for the month was 53.9, about 
3 degrees below the norm. 
Frost calls to cranberry grow- 
ers were frequent throughout 
the month. However, the 
abundant rainfall has restored 
reservoirs to capacity and there 
was water to use in frost flood- 
ing and consequently very little 
frost damage was sustained. 
The lowest temperature re- 
corded on cranberry bogs was 
13 degrees on the 30th. 



Crop Good 

As of October 31st an esti- 
mated 85% of the crop has been 
harvested. Sever;il properties 
were later in 1: vesting than 
they had ever L en. The crop 
is good but cok : of the ber- 
ries has been les ? than desir- 
able in many caeses. 



WASHINGTON 

Water Situation Eased 

The Washington cranberry har- 
vest received a much needed 
boost with 5.2 inches of rain 
October 19-22. The Long Beach 
growers were able to get their 
berries harvested with the peak 
at the Ocean Spray plant com- 
ing the week of the 28th. The 
crop has been very good, better 
than expected or estimated, and 
various individuals have been 
getting some fine crop averages. 
Low temperatures were ex- 
perienced the middle of the 
Continued on Page 14 



AGENT FOR 
WIGGINS AIRWAYS 



BOG 
SERVICE 



AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICALS 

HAND SPRAYERS - TOOLS - POWER EQUIPMENT 
AUTHORIZED BRIGGS AND STRATTON SERVICE CENTER 

R. F. MORSE 6- SON, Inc. 

Cranberry Highway West Wareham, Mass. CY 5-1553 



NINE 



Ttanks! . . . 

CRANBERRIES THANKS 

NEW JERSEY RESEARCH LAB 

STAFF FOR ASSISTANCE 

In mid-September, the pub- 
lisher and editor of Cranberries 
spent a hectic but extremely in- 
teresting two days visiting 
growers in New Jersey. 

While on this abbreviated 
visit we were privileged to 
have been escorted on our 
rounds by Mr. Philip Marucci, 
director of the Blueberry-Cran- 
berry Research Lab in New 
Lisbon, and his assistant, Mr. 
Harry Moulter. 

We know that without their 
help we could not have ac- 
comphshed half as much as 
we were able to. We could 
not have had more thoughtful 
and courteous treatment that 
we were extended by these 
gentlemen. We appreciate their 
taking time from their busy 
schedule to show us around 
and introduce us to the area 
growers. 

We would also like to express 
our thanks to Messrs William 
Haines, Garfield DeMarco, 
Isaiah Haines and Walter Z. 
Fort for having been so cour 
teous to us in spite of the fact 
that our visit coincided^ with 
hai-vest time, the growers' busi- 
est time of the year. 

Incidentally you'll be reading 
stories of our visits to these 
New Jersey growers and in- 
dustry people in future issues 
of Cranberries. 

Once again, many thanks! 

OSWEGO STORY 

Continued from Page 8 

to try now," Harry explained, 

"is a pre-planting treatment of 

llie bogs. Treat the soil before 

we even plant the vines, to 

see if it will do any damage. 

These bogs won't be two years 

old until November (1966) and 

they already have a small crop 

of beiTies. On a commercial 

bog you don't think of starting 

to pick for at least four years." 

"We've had such good growth 

and we think it's because we 



planted the vines thick and they 
were established very quickly." 

This is a point they are try- 
ing to get across to the growers. 
They are trying to convince 
them that they should plant the 
vines thick. He also mentioned 
that they had a little difficulty 
getting the vines in the ground 
since the discs didn't have 
enough pressure to put that 
many plants into the soil — but 
they made it and it paid off. 

The four bogs mentioned 
above were sprayed for fruit- 
worm and have had three ap- 
plications for rot control and it 
has been very effective. It was 
noted that they could have 
had better set but right at 
blossom time, when the bees 
were active, they noted that 
fireworm was getting into the 
bogs and so a decision had to 
be made whether to spray for 
fireworm and lose the fruit or 
not to spray. It was decided to 
try to eliminate the fireworm 
since development of the bog 
was the main objective. If it 
had been decided not to spray 
for fireworm they would have 
had iDetter pollination and a 
better fruit set. They received 
control of the fruitworm but, 
of course, lost considerable 
amount of set. In this respect, 
Harry pointed out that there 
were no hives of bees near the 
bogs so they had to depend 
only on wild bees to do the 
pollinating. There had been 
sufficient number of bees before 
they had started to spray. 

Both Phil and Harry went 
on to mention that there would 
be much more to report when 
the other researchers who have 
had bogs assigned to them be- 
gin compiling their data. We've 
assured them that Cranberries 
v/ould be only too happy to in- 
clude their findings in its pages. 
We had spent a very busy 
few hours by the time we left 
the Research Center and we 
were convinced that many 
worthwhile results \\'Ould come 
out of the work of Phil Marucci 
and Harry Moulter and the 
other research people at Os- 
wego, New Jersey. 



i ! 

i Wisconsin Cranberry 



Consultant Service 

P.O. Box 429 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 
Phone 423-4871 



Wisconsin Disfribufor 

for 
ICasoron® G-4 granules 



I 



IN THE 
PACIFIC NORTHWEST 
SEE YOUR 

MILLER DEALER 

or 

MILLER FIELDMAN 

for 

CASORON^ 

MILLER PRODUCTS CO. 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
W. R. GRACE & CO. 

7737 N. E. Killingsworth 
Portland, Oregon 97218 



CASORON® 

IS AVAILABLE IN 
MASSACHUSETTS 

from 

R. F. MORSE & SON 

West Wareham 

Tel. 295-1553 



:! 



TEN 



GASORON 

DICHLOBENIL WEED & GRASS KILLER 

.A Research Discovery of N.V. PHILIPS-DUPHAR U.S. Pat. No. 3,027,248 




It kills only weeds 



It takes a merciless weed killer to wipe out ruthless perennial weeds. CASORON G-4 
granules is the way to wipe out cranberry-choking weeds. 

Apply CASORON anytime after mid-November. It polishes off perennial 

and certain annual weeds and grasses before they spring up to rob your cranberries 

of available soil moisture and valuable nutrients. 

Yet as devastating as CASORON is to weeds, it won't hurt your cranberries. 

The best time to use CASORON is right now while weeds are dormant. 
Come Spring, no weeds. And no labor problems. 

Just use CASORON and that's all. 

CASORON controls heavy, crop choking strands of weeds but it is also economical 

for use when only a few weeds are present. 

Get CASORON G-4 at your supplier. If you don't know who he is, write us. 

We'll tell you and send complete, illustrated information on CASORON. 

Use CASORON. The merciless weed killer that's murder to weeds. 



'\S0RON- approved for bearing and non-bearing fruit, nursery 
namentals, citrus nurseries, cranberries and alfalfa. 



m 



THOMPSONHAYWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Subsidiary of Philips Electronics and Pharmaceutical Industries Corp. 
P.O. Box 2383 Kansas City, Kansas 66110 



I 







Ji>^'»VXn■Aew^^^f 



JftvvM««M**»MSl4te»KWw««4^■«**s«v««WO(^^ 



:» AHWLOKfKWKMM 



John Bean Offers 
Mechanical Agitation 
125 Gallon Sprayers 

Two basic models of a 125 
gallon farm sprayer with me- 
chanical agitation and 3-point 
hitch are now available from 
John Bean Division, Lansing, 
Michigan. 

Model MF-125 features a me- 
ter-flow pump mounted under 
the sprayer tank. Capacity is 

12 g.p.m. at 40 psi. 

Model RlO-125, with a Royal- 
ette 10 pump, dehvers up to 
10 g.p.m. at up to 500 psi. 

Steel tank is Bean Bonded 
for rust resistance. It has 
snap lock lid, plastic strainer 
basket and mechanical agitator. 

Standard boom is a six-row, 
21 foot 8 inch Versafles with 

13 nozzles on 20 inch centers. 
For more information write 

for catalog L-1451, John Bean 
Division, Box 9490, Lansing, 
Mich. 48909. 



NEW CONCEPT IN CORRUGATED BOX PACKAGING 
OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



Until the present time, when 
certain fruit was packed in 
corrugated boxes for shipment 
to food stores, each layer was 
normally set apart by a corru- 
gated pad. The individual 
layers would then be divided 
into cells by separate corru- 
gated partitions. 

Now, a completely new con- 
cept — a one piece, flat corru- 
gated board that combines the 
functions of protective pad 
and four-cell divider — has been 
developed and is now available 
comercially from the Corru- 
gated Container Division of 
Continental Can Company. 

The exclusive construction, 
called "Cell-Pad," consists of a 
die-cut blank of corrugated 
board. For each layer of prod- 



uct, the packer simply snaps 
the specially-slotted blank into 
position, inserts it into the 
corrugated box and turns the 
cell dividers to their proper 
compartmenting places. Thus, 
with a single unit of corrugated 
board, each layer of produce 
gets a protective bottom pad 
and four-cell compartment. The 
blank also provides double-wall 
thickness of board at either 
end of the main partition, to 
add greater stacking strength 
to the box. 

If further product protection 
is desired, to furnish support 
to the comers of the four 
cells, the "Cell-Pad" can be 
manufactured with side walls 
which will provide additional 
rigidity to the unit above. 



Continental believes that its 
unique one-piece board con- 
cept has excellent potential in 
corrugated container packs for 
major fruits and vegetables, 
especially apples, peaches, or- 
anges, nectarines, tomatoes and 
sweet potatoes. It can be readily 
utilized by grower-shippers and 
repackers of produce that has 
been pre-packed in plastic bags 
and in molded pulp trays with 
shrink film overwraps. 

Complete information on and 
samples of "Cell-Pad" units 
can be obtained from the Cor- 
rugated Container Division, 
Continental Can Company, Hol- 
lister Road, Teterboro, New 
Jersey 07608. 



TWELVE 



MAKE ROBY S YOUR ONE-STOP 

SHOPPING CENTER for all your irrigation 
equipment and LP gas needs. We always 
have a large supply of parts on hand 
and the trained personnel to assist you 
with professional advice and service. 
We also carry: 

ALUMINUM PIPE, SPRINKLER HEADS, PLASTIC 
PIPE and FITTINGS, MURPHY SAFETY GAUGES, 
PRO-TEK PRIMERS and PARTS. 



CONVERT YOUR IRRIGATION PUMPS 
TO LP GAS. Here are some of the benefits: 

1. You'll save on oil and spark plugs 

2. Eliminates pilferage; fuel supplied in 
continuous flow from bulk tanks 

3. You'll get 3 times more engine life 

4. Fuel pumps eliminated; carburetors 
last a lifetime 

We'll be glad to explain about how 
easily you can convert to LP gas. Call 
us now. No obligation of course ! 



Roby's Propane Gas, Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



295-3737 



SOFA irrigation pumping unit. De 
signed for most economical oper- y — ^ 
ation with large volume guns at ^ — 
high pressures. Pumps up to 1000 
GPM; pressures up to 200 PSI. 
Skid or trailer mounted. 




40FW.A medium-size centrifugal 
pumping unit with a wide range 
of volumes and pressures. Pumps 
' up to 600- GPM; pressures up to 
140 PSI. Skid ortraller mounted. 




HALE PUMPS SERVE YOUR 
IRRIGATION PURPOSES BEST! There's a 
Hale pump to do any irrigation job — 
and do it better! Hale pumps have 
MATCHED POWER, designed to correctly 
match the power of the driving engines 
and give you top performance. Hale 
also has PREMIUM MATERIALS and 
DESIGN SIMPLICITY which assure long 
life, high operating efficiency, less down 
time and quick, easy servicing. 



80FR irrigation pumping unit. Ex- 
tra heavy duty. Can be used for 
overhead, underground, or port- 
able irrigation systems. Pumps 
up to 2700 GPM; pressures up to 
150 PSI. Skid or trailer mounted. 




THIRTEEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 9 

month which made it necessary 
to sprinkle. This hampered the 
Gray land and North Beach 
growers because they dry pick 
and had to wait for the vines 
to dry. 

Several growers used mala- 
ihion 2-4 weeks before harvest 
as recommended and they had 
a good increase in color. The 
overall color was not satisfac- 
tory due to late set. The har- 
vest was late due to a water 
shortage. 

Ideal Fall Weather 

Fall in Washington has been 
most pleasant with warm days 
and no wind with a high for 
the month on the 4th of 83 
degrees and the 3rd was 76. 
The 31st was a beautiful 70 
degree day. The mean high 
for the month of October was 
60.45 and the mean low was 
42.39 degrees with the lowest 
of 32 recorded on the 17th and 
a bog low that day of 28. This 
ended a week of cold nights 
and the need of sprinkling. 

The total rain fall was 7.65 
inches with the greatest of 2.5 
inches on the 21st. We had 
thirteen days of some precipi- 
tation. The 1965 total for Oc- 
tober was 7.69 inches but the 
overall total to date this year 
is about 5 inches short of last 
year's total to date ( 196.5 — 
56.9; 1966-51.73). 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 
Continued from Page 3 

radio stations and the Cape 
Cod Cranberry Growers Asso- 
ciation. 

Weather 

The month of October was 
only about Vz a degree a day 
below normal with a few 
cold days and most of the 
month about average. Precipi- 
tation totalled 2.86 inches but 
nearly all of it occurred in two 
storms on the 1st and the 19th 
and 20th so that the month was 
basically dry and sunny. The 
rainfall was slightly more than 
V2 inch below average for the 
month. We are now 8V4 inches 
below average for 1966 but 
have now exceeded the entire 
1965 total by 2 inches. 



Blueberry Funds 

Blueberry research funds have 
been approved imder a joint 
agreement with Pennsylvania 
Department of Agriculture and 
USDA to enable the former's 
marketing division to analyze 
blueberry consumption trends 
and to explore the potentials of 
producing and processing more 
lowbush blueberries in Pennsyl- 



vania. 



Fruit-O-Scope 



Utterly Shocking 

Engineering and horticul- 
tural experts of USDA's Agri- 
cultural Research Service are 
studying the feasibility of sub- 
jecting fresh fruits to electric 
currents to determine ripeness, 
moisture content, and other 
market qualities through a three 
year, $44,408 grant awarded by 
USDA to Purdue University. 

— Fruit-O-Scope 

FOURTEEN 



1965 NEW JERSEY CRANBERRY 
CROP LARGER THAN EXPECTED 

Although the lack of water 
for protective uses resulted in 
some frost damage, the 1965 
cranberry crop turned out lar- 
ger than had been expected 
early in the season. 

The final estimate of New 
Jersey's 1965 crop was 159,000 
barrels, the largest since 1937 
when 175,000 barrels were 
produced. 

An increasing number of 
growers have converted to the 
wet-pick method of harvesting. 
This, coupled with relatively 
frost-free springs and harvest 
periods the past two years, has 
contributed to much better 
yields. 



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Growing Friend or^ 
Employee an Xmas 
Gift Subscription to 

^CRANBERRIES' 

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NEW JERSEY BLUEBERRY CROP 
TWO MILLION TRAYS IN 1965 

The 1965 New Jersey blue- 
berry crop reached a total of 
1,976,000 trays of 12 pints (U 
pounds) and was 11 percent 
larger than the previous year's 
yield. Following only moderate 
winter damage to fruit buds, 
a better set was obtained than 
a year earlier. Persistent dry 
weather threatened the crop 
but timelv earlv season show- 
ers and the extended use or 
irrigation on selected acreage 
benefitted yields. Less acreage 
was harvested in 1965 than the 
previous year marking the first 
time harvested acreage has de- 
clined since 1958. Prices re- 
ceived for the 1965 crop aver- 
aged $2.95 per tray, the same 
as in 1961. The total value of 
the crop was $5,829,000, up 11 
percent from 1964 and 23 
percent above the 1959-63 av- 
erage and the highest in 14 
years. 



25 |9ears( ^go 



(The following items were 
taken from the November 1941 
issue of Cranberries.) 



The USDA crop estimating 
service now figures the total 
cranberry crop of the country 
at 725,100 barrels, as against 
the September first forecast 
of 678,600 and last year's (1940) 
total of 580,100 carrels. The 
biggest increase this year is in 
Massachusetts which last year 
had a light crop of 332,000. 

• • 

The New Jersey weather 
during the harvesting season 
continued "frightfully dry," and 
in fact the total rainfall dur- 
ing the whole growing season, 
August, September and Octo- 
ber, was but 4.8 inches. The 
berries, therefore, failed to 
achieve the size hoped for. 
There was very little water 
available for picking up floaters. 
Fortunately for the New Jersey 
growers was the fact that dur- 
ing the fall season there were 
no severe frosts since, with the 
water as lo'w as it was, a severe 
frost would have added further 
to their problem. 

1^ ^ 

Wisconsin last year had 121,- 
000 barrels but this year the 
government estimates a falling 
oflF to 113,000. This might well 
be expected as that state has 
been bearing good crops for 
several years and the vines have 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass. 02781 
Tel. 617 824-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office — :?fi 2. Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



earned the right to a little 
rest. The latest figure from 
that state now indicates a crop 
of 99,000 barrels, or very close 
to the original estimate of 
Vernon Golds worthy. 



• • 



Washington harvested this 
year in the worst weather it 
has experienced since 1920 — 
it rained a good deal and vines 
and berries were wet a large 
part of the time. It is expected, 
of course, that these conditions 
did not make for a crop of 
extra good keeping quality. 
Labor was scarce and few sol- 
diers from Forts Canby and 



Columbia helped out and 
earned a few extra dollars 
for themselves. 



ik ik 



Oregon is expected to have 
a slightly smaller crop than last 
year. The estimate is for 11,- 
100 barrels, although its out- 
look is improving over what it 
was when picking was started. 
This western state the last two 
years has also shown a much 
bigger crop than the ten year 
average which is 4,640 bar- 
rels. The west is beginning to 
come into real importance as a 
cranberry growing area. 



(^sso) 



Kerosene 

So/venf 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 



Kinadj&n^^ 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI H SONS 



Telephones 
585-4341 — 585-2604 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



FIFTEEN 




"SOMETHING FOR LESS THAN FIFTY DOLLARS?. . .HOW ABOUT 
TWO WEEKS AT A CRANBERRY BOG?" 



SIXTEEN 




Hugh L. Williams 
New President of 
Sprinkler Association 

A Portland, Oregon executive 
was elected president of the 
national Springier Irrigation As- 
sociation, an organization de- 



voted to the development of 
improved methods and the at- 
tendant conservation of water 
and soil. Hugh L. Williams, 
Irrigation Division sales man- 
ager for R. M. Wade & Co., 
Portland, Oregon manufacturer 
and distributor of irrigation 
equipment, was elected to head 
S.I.A. at the annual national 
conference in Corpus Christi, 
Texas, on October 23, 24, and 
25. He succeeds John McCavitt 
of Rainy Sprinkler Sales, Peoria, 
111., who now becomes a mem- 
ber of the new board of direc- 
tors. Discussions of the meeting 
centered on the theme, "Water 
Conservation through Sprinkler 
Irrigation." 

Others elected as officers and 
directors include: John J. Old- 
field, Oldfield Equipment Co., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, M. L. Raw- 
son, E. C. Olsen Company, Inc., 
Ogden, Utah, James Rauman, 
W. R. Ames Co., Milpitas, Cal, 
S. W. Heinzman, Heinzman 
Equipment Co., Hastings, Neb., 
Paul Hohnstein, Hastings Irriga- 
tion Supply Co., Hasting, Neb., 
H. Gordon Johnson, Irrigation 



& Power Equipment, Inc., 
Greeley, Colo., A. W. LaFetra, 
Rain-Rird Sprinkler Mfg. Corp., 
Glendora, Calif., Austin Miller, 
Sprinkler Irrigation Supply Co., 
Royal Oak, Mich., Donald L. 
Sanders, Gorman-Rupp Pump 
Co., Mansfield, Ohio, J. R. 
Skidgel, Moist O'Matic, Inc., 
Riverside, Calif. 

Williams has been with R. 
M. Wade & Co. for the past 10 
years. 

Commenting on the future 
of agriculture and the world 
wide shortage of water, Wil- 
hams stated: "100 years ago, 
each farmer's production took 
care of 4 people; 10 years ago, 
17 people; and today, 33 peo- 
ple — five of which are in for- 
eign lands . . . I'm confident 
that the necessary technology 
will develop in agriculture to 
balance soil and water manage- 
micnt to meet the needs of 
tomorrow. Retter utilization of 
our present water resources is 
possible; in fact, we can save 
up to 50% of the water used 
in agriculture through the use 
of sprinkler irrigation." 




PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
For Sand and Service that Satisfy . . . Call Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 



The newest and most modern plant 
serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 



Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 - 585-3377 



PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



SEVENTEEN 




THANKSGIVING COBBLER 

1 Vi cups cranberries 

6 cups sliced, pared apples 

1 teaspoon grated orange peel 

2 tablespoons orange juice 
1^/4 cups sugar 

2V2 tablespoons quick-cooking 

tapioca 
y^ teaspoon salt 
2 tablespoons margarine or 
butter 

Topping: 

1 cup flour 
V2 cup sugar 

IV2 teaspoons baking powder 

¥2 cup milk 

1/4 cup shortening 

2 tablespoons sugar 
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 

Combine washed and drained 
cranberries, apples, orange peel 
and orange juice in large 
bowl. In small bowl mix sugar, 
tapioca and salt, then pour 
over fruit, mix lightly and let 
stand 15 minutes. Turn into 
oblong dish, dot with butter. 

Mix topping, except for last 
two ingredients, drop by spoon- 
fuls over fruit, spread batter 
to cover fruit. Sprinkle with 
sugar-nutmeg mixture. Bake at 
350 for 30 minutes. Serve 
warm or cool, top with ice 
cream or whipped cream. 

EIGHTEEN 



aN' 




A society ior Absent Minded 
Professors was actually organ- 
ized in 1942 — they forgot to 
meet in 1944. And disbanded. 



A Hobby is a lot of hard 
work you wouldn't do for a 
living. 



iesi 

for 

iun! 



When it came to the naming 
of the new mine, the prospec- 
tor's wife said: "Will you name 
it after me dear?" 

"Yes darling, I will," said the 
prospector. "Yes, I'll name it in 
your honor." 

And from that day to this, 
one of the richest gold mines 
in the Black Hills of South Da- 
kota has been known as the 
Holy Terror. 



For that leftover turkey . . . 

BAKED TURKEY HASH 

2 cups chopped cooked turkey 
1 medium onion, chopped 

1 raw potato, chopped 

2 pimientos, diced 
2 carrots, shredded 
1/2 teaspoon salt 

2 tablespoons chopped parsley 
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning 
1 can turkey gravy and one 

cup leftover turkey gravy, 

heated 

Combine all ingredients and 
mix well. Put in IV2 quart cas- 
serole. Cover and bake in mod- 
erate oven (.350) for 45 min- 
utes. Uncover and bake about 
15 minutes longer. Serve with 
additional gravy. Serves 4. 

A TIMELY TIP . . . 

To store uncooked turkey, 
remove store wrappings from 
turkey, put bird on plate or tray 
and cover loosely wdth waxed 
paper. Store in coldest non- 
freezing part of refrigerator 
for from 1 to 3 days. Or wrap 
turkey in moisture-proof paper 
and freeze. Giblets and Hvers 
from each bird can be frozen 
until enough accumulates for a 
meal. Cook promptly after 
thawing. Do not refreeze. 



las 

Pp 
oitt 

It 
Ishe 

fitle( 

IriDl 
most 
iotl 
Iliei 



into 

m 
% 
lop; 

1! 



kf 



. 



Dr. Devlin 
^Has Book Published 

Professor Robert M. Devlin 
'of the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Experiment Station has pub- 
lished a brilHant new text en- 
titled Plmit Physiology which 
brings into focus many of the 
most important recent findings 
in the field of plant physiology. 
These findings have been simply 
and clearly stated and the ar- 
guments for and against them 
analyzed with thorougliness and 
precision. The book is divided 
into eight areas of plant physi- 
ology, each area being covered 
completely as a single unit. 
The sequence chosen for the 
topic takes into account what 
a student needs to know to 
grasp a specific point. 

Highly significant research has 
been done on the synthesis of 



starch and cellulose, phloem 
translocation, photosynthesis, 
mineral nutrition, plant hor- 
mones, photoperiodism, vernali- 
zation and dormancy. The new 
discoveries in all of these areas 
are fully discussed. The Cal- 
vin cycle, the path of the 
electron in photosynthesis, the 
recent work on gibberellins and 
kinetin, current thinking on the 
macro- and micromolecular 
structure of the chloroplast and 
how the chloroplast functions 
in the synthesis of ATP and 
reduced TPN are covered 
thoroughly, as is a relatively 
new concept in phloem trans- 
location — bidirectional move- 
ment in the same phloem duct. 

Also covered in detail are 
findings — many of them made 
with the use of radioactive 
tracing techniques — on the ab- 
sorption and translocation of 
mineral salts. Of particular in- 
terest to students of plant 
growth and development are 
discussions on the involvement 
of gibberellin and kinetin in 



flowering, vernalization and dor- 
mancy, and the function of the 
photoclirome pigment in photo- 
pericdism and dormancy. Fin- 
ally, protein synthesis and de- 
gradation, an area of almost 
universal interest, has been 
given careful attention. 

For the student there are 
numerous references at the ends 
of the chapters, suggesting 
sources of additional informa- 
tion. Most of the listed refer- 
ences are from original papers, 
and should help him become 
acquainted with the literature 
in the field and bring him into 
contact with those who con- 
tribute most to plant physiology. 

The author has organized 
the text in such a maimer that 
it can be used sucessfully in 
either the one-semester or the 
two-semester course. His book 
has been planed to serve as a 
basic text for courses in plant 
physiology, and also for selec- 
ted advanced courses at the 
undergraduate and graduate 
levels. 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous Moulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 

equipment for over one quarter century. 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS — pumping units, pumps, power units, 

sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for Uterature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 
Box 38 
Warrens, Wisconsin 
Phone: 112-715-247-5321 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 



NINETEEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 14 

WISCONSIN 



Harvest Report 

As of November 1st, the Wis- 
consin cranberry harvest is 
pretty much completed. A small 
amount of berries are left un- 
harvested by various growers 
in the state because of the 
shortage of help. These were 
primarily left in the cleaning 
up and in the ditch edges. 
There is some acreage of good 
berries that was not harvested 
because of the shortage of help. 
Weather was good for harvest 
in October until the end of 
the month when it turned quite 
cold. The beds were Hooded 
to protect them from freezing 
and growers had to wait until 
about noon for the ice to melt 
to allow the picker to operate. 

New Acreage 

Considerable new acreage will 
be going in next spring — 
probably about 300 acres. The 
availability of vines and the 
shortage of help to do the 
actual planting and final level- 
ing of beds may be quite an 
important factor in how much 
is planted next year. The Wis- 
consin crop may not be as 
good as many of the growers 
anticipated as the production 
per acre fell off 10 to 15% of 
the anticipated production. 

Sales of cranberries and cran- 
bery products seem to be ex- 
cellent and the final disposition 
of tlie 1966 crop should be no 
problem and there should be 
very little carry-over before the 
1967 crop is ready for harves- 
ting. 

First Good Rain in Six Weeks 

Fine Indian Summer weather 
prevailed through the early part 
of October. After the 8th it 
turned cooler and windy. Clouds 
and rain with milder tempera- 
tures moved into the southern 
portion on the 12th and across 
the entire state by the 14th. 
The first good soaking rains in 



about six weeks fell in many 
areas from the 12 through the 
evening of the 14th. Amounts 
of nearly 3 inches were re- 
corded in the west ranging 
down to one inch or less in the 
east. 

Windy and cold with snow 
was the order during the week- 
end of the 14th- 16th. The 17th 
turned sunny and pleasant. 

Outlook to Mid-November — 
temperatures above normal with 
precipitation near normal. 

Resume of the Season's Weather 

The Growing season began 
with ample soil moisture, both 
surface and deep; first time in 
several years and largely due 
to heavy autumn rains of 1965. 
Weather stayed cool to mid- 
June; not much rain except for 
a week or so in early June. 
After mid-June high tempera- 
tures in the 80's and 90's char- 
acterized the next four weeks 
with only spotty shower ac- 
tivity. Tornadoes and funnels 
were reported throughout the 
state on July 10. Relatively 
cool weather prevailed after 
mid- July, 2 to 4 degrees below 
normal in August. Except in 
the north rain was scanty but 
timely through August; Sep- 
tember was exceptionally dry, 
many central and southern are.^s 
getting less than an inch in- 
stead of the normal 3 or 4. 

/ 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



. 



CORRUGATED 
CULVERT PIPE 

and 
FLOW GATES 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



BARK RIVER 
CULVERT and EQUIPMENT Co. 

ESCANABA, MICH.— EAU CLAIRE, WIS. — MADISON, WIS. 
IRONWOOD, MICH. — GREEN BAY, WIS. — MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS & POWER UNITS 
CORRUGATED METAL CULVERT PIPE 

DROP INLETS AND GATES 

Ga/van/zed - 6/fum/nous Coafed - ^lumxnyim 



TWENTY 




servino Ihe WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 

for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 

IN 
PURCHASING 
WISCONSIN 
CRANBERRY 
PROPERTIES 
*********** 

Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of "Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 




OUR PRODUCTS 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 
Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 
Cranberry Chilli Sauce 
Cranberry Orange Relish 
Cranberry Vinegar 
Cranberry Juice 
Cran-Beri 
Cran-Vari 
Cran-Puri 
Cranberry Puree 
Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



Please Mention 

CRANBERRIES 

When You Answer Advertisements 



:; 



DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTELIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 



WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



««^ 



tt0^* 



i^k««^ 



**0^0 







A lot of people wouldn^t know 
what these were if we didn^t put 
an Ocean Spray label on them. 



You know how mo st people buy cranberries these days? 

In cans and bottles aijd jars. Jellied and frozen and squeezed. 

So hpw^do they k >ow what to buy? They look for the 
Oban Ep^ labeiy 

To millions of peo 3le, Ocean Spray means cranberries. 
4re buying mc re cranberry products than ever. Many 



OT 



i 



ny of thejp^wc uldn^t recognize a whole, fresh cran- 
if theyfebw-ond. 



I 



they never heard of j couple of years ago. 

— But the> kiiu v\ the name. And they know what it stands 

for. 

You don't get a reputation like that overnight. 



I 



Ocean spraV; 



FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHIP IN OCEAN SPRAY, CONTACT ANY DIRECTOR OR STAFF MEMBER IN YOUR GROWING A 



Massachusetts 

l\le\A/ Jersey 

XA/isconsin 

Oregon 

XA/ashington 

Canada 




ry - ijeriais ;:>ecxion 

of Mass. (order D-8876) 
St, Mass. OIGO3 



CRANBERRIES 



THE 



MTlOT^CKTO'roj'j 




UBRARY 

OEC 2 7 1?66 

UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



DECE 



IN 

THIS 

ISSUE 

ME 



WHITESBOG, NEW JERSEY 7 

WISCONSIN WATER LAW, PARTS I AND II 1 1 
MASSACHUSETTS FARM BUREAU REPORTS 14 



1366 



^ DIRECTORY tor GPanlierpy growers 




1 The 1 
CHARLES W.HARRIS| 

1 Company | 


MIDDLEBOROUCH 
TRUST COMPANY 


[ 451 Old Somerset Avenue ffi 




[ North Dighton, Mass. H 
[ Phone 824-5607 3 


AAIDDLEBORO 


f AMES 1 


MASSACHUSETTS 


t Irrigation Systems J 




1 RAIN BIRD 1 




r Sprinklers 9 
H HIGHEST QUALITY 3 


Memiber of 


B PRODUCTS « 


The Federal Deposit 


g WITH SATISFACTION g 
g GUARANTEED g 


Insurance Corporation 



Electricity - key to progress 



In industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be In the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it Is needed. 




NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED. TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cwmberry M«« 



Funds always available for soiind loans 



Complete Banking Service 



YOUR 

DISTRIBUTOR 




>#S#K#«#V»«V#<#V^«V#^#^>#^#^^^^^#'^^>''«^' 



WILIilAMSTOWN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Member Federal D«peait Ibcutabm €«rp. 



Extensive Experience in 
ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Scraenhouici, Boc* and 

Putnpi Maaat SatUtaetiMi 

WARBHAM. MASS Tal. CY 3-2000 



Dean Foods Company 
To Appeal F.T.C. Ruling 

Dean Foods Company will 
appeal the Federal Trade Com- 
mission ruling diat Dean must 
divest itself of the operating 
assets cf the Bowman Dairy 
Company. The appeal will be 
filed in the U. S. Seventh Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals. 

In commenting on the dives- 
ture order, Sam E. Dean chair- 
man of the boar:! of Dean 
Foods Company, stated: 

"We just don't understand 
what the FTC is trving to do. 
For many years the Dean Foods 
Company has devotsd its ef- 
forts to pro:!ucing the highest 
quality dairy producLS at. the 
lowest possible prices. To this 
end. Dean has been a leader in 
developing new products, in 
advancing production techniques 
and in operating the most ef- 
ficient dairy plants. 

"Per capita milk consumption 
has declined in the United 
States. In order to provide 
American consumers with ade- 
quate nutritional dairy products 



extensive research, development 
and quality control programs 
of the type which Dean has 
pioneered are required. Our 
acquisition of Bowman was an 
effort to maintain the volume 
necessary to sustain our stand- 
ards of quality control, re- 
search and development. 

"Every industry witness who 
appeared at the FTC's hearings, 
including representatives of 
dairy processors, dairy farmers 
and retail grocers, testified that 
our acquisition of Bowman is 
in no way harmful to compe- 
tition. In fact, the FTC's own 
hearing examiner, after evalu- 
ating all of the evidence, ruled 
that the Dean/Bowman merger 
not only would have no ad- 
verse efi^ect on dairy compe- 
tition in the Chicago area, but 
would actually strengthen it. 

"We are confident that the 
United States Court of Appeals, 
upon a review of these facts, 
will uphold our position and 
reverse the FTC's order." 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 
MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ 

Wareham Savings 
Banic 

WAREHAM and FALMOUTH 

Savings Accounts 

Loans on Real Estate 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent 

Phone CYpress 5-3800 
Kimball 8-3000 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 

CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now in Stock - 50,000 ft. Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



SHARON BOX COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 185 6 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



C. & L. EQUIPMENT CO. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 

PRUNING FERTILIZING 



RAKING 



WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



THE FARM POPULATION 

In 1963-1964, as in most years 
since World War II, several 
hundred thousand farm people 
either stopped farming their 
land or moved off their farms. 
The farm population dropped 
from 13,367 000 in 1963 to 12,- 
9.54,000 in 1964. 

The population on farms in 
1964 was 6.8 per cent of the 
national population. In 1960 
there were 15,635,000 people 
on farms, 8.7 per cent of the 
total population. 

While the U.S. population in- 
creased by more than 6 per 
cent between 1960 and 1964, 
farm population declined by 17 
per cent. All age groups in the 
farm population were involved 
in the exodus. 

Some 9.9 per cent of farm 
residents were at least 65 years 
old in 1964, up from 8.4 per 
cent in 1960. The national 
percentage in 196 i was 9.6 per 
cent. 

Not so very many years ago, 
the farm percentage was always 
lower than that for the total 
population because older farm 
people often moved to town 
when they retired. They hav- 
en't stopped doing this, but 
young adults are moving to 
town so much faster that the 
proportion of older people in 
the remaining farm population 
has risen. 

— N. E. Homestead 




ABC 



CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 



^^s^d 



UTILITY CT 



^ 



> 

"^3 



W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-l 

4511 E. Osborne Ave., Tampa, Florida 

1001 Dempsey Rd., Milpitas, Calif. 



TWO 



Mass. 

Cranberry 

Station 

S Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORAIMVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist 



Personals 



Drs. Bert Zuckerman and 
Kal Deubert attended the Amer- 
ican Phytopathological Society 



Wareham of 4.60 inches. The 
month started off as tliough we 
were going to make up the 
rainfall deficiency for the year. 
We recorded sHghtly more than 



Cash Receipts 



Meeting at the Pennsylvania 4 inches the first 10 days and 



then only Vz inch for the rest 
of the month. We are now 
running about 6V^" ahead of 
last year but about 8^A inches 
below average for the year. 



The following is taken from 
data supplied by Prof. Lau- 
rence D. Rhoades of the Dept. 
of Agricultural and Food Econ- 
omics, University of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Total cash receipts from 
farm marketings in Massachu- 
setts for 1965 was nearly 167 
million dollars. Included in this 
figure is more dian IOV2 mil- 
lion dollars from cranberries 
or 6 percent of the total. This 
puts cranberries ahead of such 
crops as apples, tobacco and 
potatoes in total cash receipts 
to farmers. In fact, cranberries 
account for 56 percent of the 
cash receipts for all fruit crops 
in Massachusetts for 1965. 

(Continued on Page 8) 



State University from Novem- 
ber 2nd to 4th. 

Weather 

The month of November was 
definitely on the warm side, 
ending up 2 degrees a day 
above normal. There were no 
prolonged cold spells and the 
lowest temperature for the 
month was only 19 degrees. 
There was no snow recorded 
for the month, but this is not 



Fruit Productions 



The November estimate of 
the United States cranberry 
production for 1966 indicates a 
record crop of over IVa million 
unusual as the 30 year average barrels, which is 9 percent 
is only V2 inch. Rainfall to- above last year, sour cherry 
tailed 4.63 inches which is crop 50 percent below and 
about as close as you can come citrus production 14 percent 
to the 30 year average at East above last year. 



* 

* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 



SPRINKLER SYSTEMS ARE OUR BUSINESS 

More than 20 years experience in design and layout of AMES 
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. We are available to plan your sprinkler system 
for both frost control and irrigation. We guarantee the correct pressure 
so necessary for the best sprinkler operation. Our quotations are for 
complete systems including suction line, pump (Hale, Marlow, Gould), 
AMES UTILITY main, AMES quick connecting adapters, plastic pipe, 
bronze fittings and Rainbird sprinklers. 

Now — new — AMES quick connecting adapters from main line to 
plastic lateral pipe. No more lost time with screwdriver or wrench to 
connect or break the lines. Adaptable to systems already installed. Ask 
for a showing. 

CHARLES W. HARRIS CO., INC. 

451 OLD SOMERSET AVENUE 
NORTH DIGHTON, MASS. 02764 

Telephone 824-5607 



* 
* 

* 
* 



* 



* 
* 



* 

* 

* 
* 



THREE 




Come on 

up the 

ladder 

with us 



Things look pretty good for the climb. 
We've got products that are tops. A fine 
name in Dean's Indian Trail. A lot of 
ambition. And a willingness to try new 
ideas. 
^ To a grower this is important. With 
Dean's Indian Trail you get an ad- 
vance on your estimated crop at the 
beginning of harvest. You get a 
second payment when you ship 
during the season, and a final pay- 
ment at a later date. 

And there's this most impor- 
tant factor in our program for 
growers. It links you with a 
well-known, highly respected 
company with strong adver- 
tising and merchandising 
programs that sell cranberry 
products. And more each 
year. 

Dean's Indian Trail . . . 
the big new name in the 
cranberry business. 



Deanls 



\\rviumX!wxll 

p. O. Box 710 • Wisconsin Rapids • Wisconsin 54494 



FOUR 




ISSUE OF DECEMBER, 1966 / VOL. 31 -NO. 8 



When December comes you can never tell 
what weather it will bring with it. The 
greens of the pine may be covered with a 
mantle of white — the summer furniture 
which you just forgot to bring in may be 
heaped with it. It may be that Decem.ber 
will be breathing its icy breath while de- 
ciding whether or not we will have a white 
Christmas. Whatever December holds for us 
we bid her welcome ! 

With December comes a warm feeling — a 
feeling, unfortunately, that too many of us 
have only at this time of year. There is a 
new glow to the candle, a new feeling 
toward people, we don't even seem to mind 
being pushed and shoved while doing our 
Christmas shopping. There is an added 
sparkle to the tree. 

This is a time for pausing to reflect on 
the true meaning of this wonderful day. A 
time of thanksgiving for what we have and 
of thought of those who do not have. It is 
a time for reunion, when those of v/hom 
you have thought many times since last 
Christmas get together again and share the 
joys of the season. 

What human being does not derive as 
much enjoyment out of Christmas morning 
as does the child seeing the gifts piled high 
under the fragrant tree. Why can't it always 
be like this? Why must it be only for a few 
days or weeks during the year? 

Some people might think it strange but 
I know of a highly successful gentlemen 
who does his best to remember Christmas 
all year round and to practice the spirit of 
the day by keeping, in his bedroom, all year 
long, a nativity scene. This man is no re- 
ligious fanatic. lie simply feels as most of 
us do, that the spirit of Christmas should be 
the spirit of every day of the year. 

Christmas is not a tree, an ornament, a 
carol. It is a feeling, a lifting up of our 
thoughts. It is a feeling of happiness — even 
though there may be many things that 
trouble you. 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 

Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



At the risk of sounding like a preacher, 
let me suggest that you light a candle every 
day of your life. Not a real candle on a 
tree but a candle in the heart of someone 
you know who could use a little encourage- 
ment — a word of cheer. 

May this be the very best Christmas you 
have ever had. May it last for three hun- 
dred and sixty-five days each year! 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Pljonouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



FIVE 



ONE CRANBERRY HERBICIDE 
DOES THE WORK OF SEVERAL 



1 



DE-PESTER 

CASORON G-4 



CONTROLS ALL THESE WEEDS 



Broadleaf Weeds 


Important Miscellaneous 


Controlled: 


Weeds Controlled: 


Arrowleaved Tear Thumb 


Bracken Fern 


Beggarticks 


Royal Fern 


Knotweed 


Sensitive Fern 


Loosestrife 


Hair cap Moss 


Marsh St. Johnswort 


Common Horsetail 


Tideland clover 


Water Horsetail (pipes) 


Ragweed 


Rushes (Juncus spp.) 


Sorrel 


Dodder 


Wild Strawberry 




Asters 




Buckbean 




Hawkweed 


*C 


Western Lilaeopsis 




Marsh Pea 




Plantain 


N 


Smartweed (Marshpepper, 




Pennsylvania, Spotted, 


Se 


Swamp and Water) 



Grass Weeds Controlled: 

Bluejoint Grass 

Rattlesnake grass 

(Manna grass) 

Summer grass 

Velvetgrass 

Bent Grass 

Little Hairgrass 

Crabgrass 
Rice cutgrass 



Sedges Controlled: 

Bunch grass 

Muskrat grass 

Nutsedge (Nutgrass) 

Short Wiregrass 

Wideleaf grass 

Stargrass 

Woolgrass 

Cotton grass 

Needlegrass 

Oniongrass 



*CASORON is a registered tradennark of 
N. V. Philips-Duphar, The Netherlands 



See Us Now 
For Fall Helicopter Application 

IN NEW JERSEY 

PARKHURST 



FARM & GARDEN SUPPLY 

301 N. WHITE HORSE PIKE 

HAMMONTON, NEW JERSEY 08037 

PHONE 609-561-0960 



SIX 



A STUDY IN CHANGE: 
WHITESBOG. NEW JERSEY 



by DONALD CHARTIER 



In Februaiy of 1939, Clarence 
]. Hall, tlien Editor and Pub- 
lisher of Cranberries, wrote i n 
article which he titled "Wliites- 
bog, New Jersey" and in which 
he went on to highlight many 
of its unique characteristics. 

In this issue we would like 
to take a rather different ap- 
proach to telling the story — we 
will make a comparison — to 
show you the then and now 
of a typical, though rather large 
cranberry - blueberry operation. 
As has just been menticned, 
Whitesbog is a large operation 
and, in this sense, cannot be 
considered typical of what is 
happening throughout the State 
of New Jersey. On a smaller 
scale what you will learn that 
what has happened at Whites- 
bog is being repeated many 
times by smaller growers in the 
Garden State, and the current 
trend seems to indicate that it 
will continue to do so fcr some 
time to come. 

In "Whitesbog, New Jersey," 
Mr. Hall described it as "about 
2000 acres, of which about 500 
acres are planted to cranber- 
ries and about 80 acres to blue- 
berries. This would make it 
the largest bog within a single 
area in the world." Since he 
was speaking of a property 
within a single district, it seems 
that tliis statement would still 
be true. "Whitebog is the only 
cranberry and blueberry plan- 
tation which has its own U.S. 
Post Office. Mail is addressed 
to no town in New Jersey, 
merely to Whitesbog." This is 
no longer true. The Post Office 
has been closed for some years, 
as has the general store which 
had for years served the "50 
year round workers and nearly 
600 employed at harvest time." 



"Whitesbog has always been 
nctsd for its active interest in 
experimentation, both in cran- 
berries and blueberries." This 
program is continuing and 
much progress is being made, 
particularly in blueberry re- 
search and development. It was 
at Whitesbog, incidentally, that 
tae Darlington picker was de- 
veloped. Tom Darhngton, its 
inventor, is one of the owners 
cf Whitesbog. 

'Isaiah Haines is Whitesbog's 
active resident foreman," wrote 
N^r. Hall. It was a pleasure, 
en OLU- recent trip to New Jer- 
sey and Whitesbog, to have 
met and talked with Mr. 
Haines. He graciously took time 
off from his very busy schedule 
to show us around and explain 
the transition which has had 
to take place in the State of 
New Jersey in recent years. 
Why do we say had to take 
place? Because many of the 
New Jersey growers have been 
forced to give up much of their 
acreage to the State for pro- 
grams such as the "Green 
Acres" conservation and beau- 
tification program. Such "im- 
provements" have cost the New 
Jersey growers a great deal 
of apprehension and has even 
forced some of them completely 
cut cf business. 

Whitesbog, for example, has 
had to sell its acreage to the 
State. It has, however, been 
able to lease it back from the 
State for a five-year period after 
which it will revert back to the 
State and quite probably be- 
come a hunting and fishing 
area. 

There are now three or four 
hundred acres where, in 1939, 
there were 500 or more. 



Mr. Hall spoke of having 
been "impressed" by the vast- 
ness and attractiveness of 
Whitesbog. Twenty-seven years 
later a visitor would be greatly 
disillusioned at the disrepair 
cf the bogs. Mr. Haines stated 
that all that was being done 
now was "just getting the crop." 

Again quoting Mr. Hall's ar- 
ticle, "Here, too, is what is 
known at Whitesbog as the 
'Cranberry House.' That is, it 
is the storehouse, screenhouse 
and shipping department. It 
stretches for no less than 600 
feet and is about forty feet 
wide and has two stories in 
actual use." This screenhouse 
was partially destroyed by fire 
some years ago and, due to the 
foresight of the individual who 
designed it, two sections still 
remain, the center third was 
lost in the fire but the firewalls 
which were built to divide the 
building into tliirds contained 
the fire and saved both ends 
of this huge building from de- 
struction. 

We could go on with com- 
parisons — the then and now of 
Whitesbog — but instead, let's 
take the remaining space to 
tell you about what decisions 
have been made there. 

As Mr. Haines explained, 
there was a great deal of con- 
cern as to what was going to 
happen to Whitesbog. As men- 
tioned before, the State had 
acquired it as part of the "Green 
Acres" program. At first there 
had been no indication that 
anything could be done to save 
the area for cranberry produc- 
ticn. Appeals were made to 
the State to reconsider their 
decision. Finally it was decided 

Continued on Page 17 



SEVEN 



Personal 

Clarence J. Hall, former ed- 
itor and publisher of Cran- 
berries, recently underwent his 
second operation in as many 
months at Tobey Hospital, 
Wareham. "J^^^" ^^^ returned 
to his home and is recupera- 
ting satisfactorily. We expect 
him to be back on his feet soon 
and lending his valuable as- 
sistance as consultant to the 
magazine. 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦, 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 
Continued jrom Page 3 

Odds and Ends 

Farm land prices incre-ased 
an average of 8 percent in 1965 
and early 1966. Gains in some 
areas were as much as 12 to 
15 percent. It would seem tliat 
cranberry bog isn't the only 
agricultural land with a high 
price tag. 

The fann population is no\\' 
about 6.5 percent of the U. S. 
population. 



YOUR CRANBERRY MAGAZINE EXTENDS THE 
GREETINGS OF THE SEASON AND THE VERY 
BEST OF WISHES FOR A PROSPEROUS 1967 TO 
ITS MANY READERS, ADVERTISERS AND FRIENDS 
WITHIN THE CRANBERRY INDUSTRY. CRAN- 
BERRIES LOOKS FORWARD TO THE COMING 
YEAR WITH CONFIDENCE AND FAITH IN THE 
FACT THAT CRANBERRY CULTURE WILL CON- 
TINUE TO STRIDE AHEAD IN THE FUTURE. 



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Box 38 
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Phone: 112-715-247-5321 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 



EIGHT 



no 

is 




MASSACHUSETT S 

November Very Warm 

November 1966 will go down 
as one of the wannest Novem- 
bers in history. With the ex- 
ception of a few verv cold days 
during the month, tlie weather 
was above normal. The rain- 
fall was just about normal for 
November. 

First Snow 

The first snow of the year 
fell on Saturday, December 3, 
with an accumulation of only 
one-half inch in Wareham, al- 
though the lower Cape area re- 
ported an accumulation of 
about two inches as a result 
of this same weather system. 

December 9 . . . . 70° 

As this report is written on 
December 9, records are being 
broken in Massachusetts. The 
record temperature for the day 
was 64 degrees in 1924 and 
this was broken with a reading 
of 70 degrees today. The 70 
degree temperature today also 
broke the official record of the 
Massachusetts Weather Bureau 
for the month of December 
which, up to today, was 69 
degrees. 



NEW J ERSEY 



Weather 

The weather in November 
varied considerably from wintry 
to balmy conditions with the 
Indian summer days prevailing 
over the more severe type. 
There were 10 days during 
which the maximum tempera- 
ture rose to above 60 and 3 
days were in the 70 degree 
range. 

Continuing the trend of the 
last few months, it rained 
much of the time. However 11 
rainy days accumulated only 



2.31 inches of rain, which is 
about 1.15 inches less than 
normal. The total rainfall for 
the first 11 months of the year 
now stands at 42.49 inches, 
only % of an inch less than the 
average annual rainfall in this 
region. The year 1966 will un- 
doubtedly have to be re- 
corded as being above average 
in rainfall. 

The average daily tempera- 
ture in November was 47.1 or 
about one degree above normal. 
The past month, probably 
would have been a record for 
warm weather in November had 
it not been for a frigid spell 
from the 20th thru the 23rd, 
when the temperature plunged 
below 20 degrees on four suc- 
cessive nights. 

Helicopter Spraying 

Toward the end of the month 
a spell of windy days interfered 
with the helicopter application 
of Casoron® granular herbicide 
for weed control. As of Dec. 2 



more than 100 acres had yet to 
be done. About 500 acres are 
being ti'eated in New Jersey 
this year. Although the per- 
centage of the cranberry acre- 
age treated in this state is much 
smaller than in other areas, 
there is a rapidly growing in- 
terest in Casoron. Only 200 
acres were treated in 1965. 



WASHINGTON 

Weather 

Winter has arrived in the 
Washington cranberry area with 
the advent of rain and wind. 
The mean liigh for the month 
of November was 51.93 degrees 
F. and the mean low 41.13 
with a bog low of 25 on tlie 
7th. There was light frost on 
November 3 through the 7th, 
and again on the 10th and the 
21st. 

Continued on Page 20 



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NINE 



"'WrvACATION CENTER 




Vernon Gohlsworthy . President, Cranberry Products, Inc., Eagle River, Wis., 
sent along these pictures to show what is being done in Wisconsin to promote 
an interest in Cranberries. The window pictured above was displayed at the 
Wisconsin Vacation Center in Chicago, while the one shown below was seen in 
Mihcaukee. According to information available the promotions were successful. 




TEN 



Wisconsin's New Water 
Resources Management 
law Explained in Brief 



The foUoiL'ing is the first instalment of the boiled-down version of 
the original bill to control water pollution and management of Wis- 
consin's water resources. Much of the information in the report is 
very general and probably oversimplified but, hopefully, it will pro- 
vide some background information that will help to clarify the bill 
which went into effect on August 1, 1966. 

The series is in three instalments, the next two instalments to be 
published in the January and Feburary 1967 issues of Cranberries. 



PART I 

Wisconsin's new water re- 
source management legislation, 
which became effective August 
1, 1966, promises to protect and 
preserve w at e r resources 
through an integrated, long- 
range, comprehensive program. 

"This is a tremendous bill 
that no other state in the coun- 
try can come close to in terms 
of a regulatory base for man- 
aging water resources," says 
Jacob Beuscher, water legisla- 
tion authority and professor of 
law at the University of Wis- 
consin. 

Too often in the past, water 
legislation has grown up on a 
patch- work basis. Laws were 
enacted and administered to 
meet certain pressing water 
resource problems. These laws 
were adequate, but frequently 
lacked coordination and a 
meaningful approach to solve 
long-range water resource prob- 
lems. 

The new water resource 
management law is broad in 
its approach, covering nearly 
all aspects of water use and 
misuse. Provisions in the la^v 
could affect homeowners, farm- 
ers, recreational developers, mu- 
nicipalities and industries. 

It is designed to protect the 
scenic and ecological values 
of Wisconsin's waterways and 



make them safe for human, 
fish and aquatic life. 

Integration of water man- 
agement control agencies into 
a single department is perhaps 
one of the strongest features of 
the new law, Beuscher points 
out. Before the law "was en- 
acted, Wisconsin residents had 
to find the right agency door 
to knock on before they could 
get help with their water prob- 
lems. Finding the right agency 
could often be a baffling exper- 
ience for state residents. 

Under the new law, how- 
ever, a single agency — the State 
Department of Resource De- 
velopment — will serve as the 
clearing house for all water re- 
source information and as a 
referral center for persons need- 
ing help with water matters. 

In addition to reorganizing 
water regulatory agencies, the 
law has made some bold ad- 
vances in controlling quaHty of 
Wisconsin's water resources. 

Previously Wisconsin's pol- 
lution control legislation was 
primarily concerned with pro- 
tecting streams from municipal 
and industrial pollutants. The 
new legislation shows a broad- 
ened concern and focuses on 
individual household pollution 
of lakes. Ground water pollu- 
tion also comes in for increased 
attention, Beuscher explains. 



The new water regulations, 
thus, take a much broader view 
of water quality. The regula- 
tions are still concerned with 
keeping waters healthful and 
safe, but they are also con- 
cerned with the problems of 
over enrichment of lakes and 
streams. 

Anyone who has ever fished, 
swum, water skied or just been 
near a lake that is in full algae 
bloom will appreciate the merit 
of this section of the new 
law. Water run-off from the 
land and waste discharges may 
be perfectly free from disease 
producing organisms, but nu- 
trients in run-off and waste 
discharges can still destroy the 
esthetic and recreational value 
of a lake. 

Enrichment control means 
a large number of persons now 
living along lakes and streams 
will be affected by the law. 
Individuals, for example, must 
meet certain installation and 
operating regulations for septic 
tanks to prevent over enrich- 
ment of bodies of water. In 
fact the department can declare 
"critical areas" and prohibit the 
installation of septic tanks in 
them. 



Continued on Next Page 



ELEVEN 



"This may seem like unneces- 
sary control for some people 
living next to lakes and streams, 
but in the long run, it is the 
only way to protect those water 
resources which first attracted 
people to them," Beuscher says. 

The law also provides for an 
increase in water resource per- 
sonnel and gives these per- 
sons more enforcement powers. 
The law gives financial assist- 
ance to municipahties and tax 
incentives to industries to help 
them clean up pollution prob- 
lems. 

Long-range planning for wa- 
ter resources use also gets more 
emphasis in the new law. This 
planning will be concerned not 
only \vith the quality aspects 
of water, but also with manag- 
ing water resources and related 
land areas for maximum public 
benefit. An example of this 
type provision is one that re- 
quires shorelines and flood 
plains to be zoned in order to 
protect bodies of water from 
erosion and unwise develop- 
ment. 

"But even with this strong 
water resources management 
law, the people of Wisconsin 
cannot expect that the waters 
of the state will be magically 
cleaned up," Beuscher warns. 
"The eventual success of the 
law still depends on how much 
the public is willing to support 
it with tax dollars, and on the 
ability of the state agencies 
to carry out the directives given 
m it. 



PART II 

Rapidly increasing pressure 
on the state's water resources 
plus greater awareness of the 
inter-relationship between water 
and land use have resulted in 
a more integrated approach to 
water resource management. 



As a result of this approach, 
the new water resource man- 
agement law reconstitutes the 
existing Department of Re- 
source Development. The de- 
partment now contains a new 
division of water resources in 
addition to the divisions of 
planning and recreation, ac- 
cording to Ed Brick, water re- 
sources specialist with the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin water re- 
sources center. 

Before passage of the new 
law, Wisconsin managed its 
water resources through sev- 
eral separate agencies. On Aug. 
1, 1966, the new land trans- 
fers the water quality functions 
of the State Board of Health 
and the Committee on Water 
Pollution to the new water re- 
sources division of the Depart- 
ment of Resource Development. 
Then on July 1, 1967, the water 
regulating function of the Pub- 
lic Service Commission will 
also be transferred to the 
water resources division. The 
law not only transfers water 
regulatory functions to a single 
division, but also creates func- 
tions not previously carried 
out at the state level. 

A seven - man resource de- 
velopment board will provide 
policy direction for the de- 
partment. 

The board members recently 
appointed by Governor Knowles 
represent a wide range of wa- 
ter interests. They are: Gerard 
Rohlich, director of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin water re- 
sources center O. J. Muegge, 
retired member of the State 
Board of Health; William Cart- 
wright, retired member of the 
Public Service Commission; 
John Potter, Wisconsin Rapids 
attorney and chairman of the 
Governor's former committee on 
water resources; John Strange, 
Institute of Paper Chemistry; 
Douglas Weiford, Eau Claire 
city manager; and Russell 
Lynch, retired conservation jour- 
nalist. 



This board selects the di- 
rector of the Department of 
Resources Development. 

In addition to the pohcy 
board, the law establishes a 
state advisory board and up 
to 12 regional advisory boards. 
The regional advisory boards 
are designed to increase aware- 
ness of the state's water man- 
agement problems, and to re- 
flect more accurately the spe- 
cific needs and desires of all 
regions of the state in devel- 
oping a comprehensive state 
water resources plan. 

Regions will be estabhshed 
by the Department of Resource 
Development on the basis of 
such factors as river basins, 
watersheds, population den- 
sity, economic factors, regional 
planning commissions, and geo- 
graphic, geologic and topo- 
graphic features. Considerable 
variation in water quality and 
use can be expected in the 
different regions of the state. 

Each regional board will be 
made up of the Department of 
Resources Development regional 
director, who \\'ill serve as ex- 
ecutive secretary; five citizen 
members appointed by the 
Governor; and tvvo state agency 
regional representatives. The 
state advisory board will be 
made up of one representati\'e 
from eacli of the regional 
boards. 

In addition, a technical ad- 
visory committee will be ap- 
pointed to assist the state ad- 
visory board. The committee 
will be made up of represen- 
tatives from four state agencies. 

The widespread program 
provided in the law requires 
more personnel and more 
money. This money supports a 
larger technical staff working 
to enforce the provisions of 
the bill and preserve Wiscon- 
sin's valuable water resources. 



{To be continued next ynonth) 



TWELVE 



Third Quarter Sales and 

Earning Up At 

Dean Foods Company 

Increased sales and earnings 
for the third quarter of 1963 
were reported by Dean Foods 
Company, but nine months 
earnings lagged behind the 
similar period in 1965. 

Earnings per share for the 
quarter ended September 30 
were 64^, up from 530 in 1965. 
Net sales increased from $20,- 
490,000 in 1965 to $40942,000 
in 1966. Net income was re- 



ported at 
$395,000. 



$487,000, up from WINTER CLOSES IN ON 



For the nine months ended 
September 30 company earnings 
were $1.60, down from $1.77. 
Sales however, were $118,380,- 
C03, largest for any nine months' 
period in company history. The 
large increase in sales reflects 
the volume of Bowman Dairy 
Co., which is included. Last 
week the Federal Trade Com- 
mission ordered Dean Foods 
Company to divest itself of 
the operating assets of Bowman. 
Dean will contest the ruling in 
the U. S. Seventh Court of 
Appeals. 



WISCONSIN CRANBERRY AREA 

The first zero weather of the 
season on December 1 and 2 
closed many of the smaller 
lakes and streams across the 
state. On the 4th a glaze and 
sleet storm, ahead of a warmer 
airmass, gave the first light 
snow cover to many southern 
areas. 



The United States is the 
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the world and has been since 
1946. 



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THIRTEEN 



Farm Bureau 
In Acfion 

By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 
David Mann of Buzzards 
Bay was elected 2nd Vice Pres- 
ident of the Massachusetts 
Farm Bureau Federation at the 
46th Annual Meeting of that 
organization on November 16, 
1966 at Shrewsbury, Massachu- 
setts. Mr. Mann serves on the 
Board of Directors of tlie Mas- 
sachusetts Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration and is President of the 
Plymouth County Farm Bur- 
eau. 

A successful cranberry grower 
Dave is a member of the Ocean 
Spray Cooperative and is a 
member of the Advisory Com- 
mittee. He is a member of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Associa- 
tion and is a supervisor of 
the Plymouth County Soil Con- 
servation District. 

Dave graduated from the 
University of Massachusetts in 
1951 with a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree and is a member 
of the Alpha Gamma Rho fra- 
ternity. 

The voting delegates of the 
Massachusetts Farm Bureau 
Federation is the policy-making 
arm of Farm Bureau. At the 
Annual Meeting many resolu- 
tions were considered which af- 
fect cranberry growers. Some 
of these resolutions are : ( 1 ) 
Migrant and Puerto Rican 
workers (2) Lack of Trespass 
laws and Vandalism on farms 
and (3) more emphasis on ap- 
plied research at the Cranberry 
Experiment Station in Ware- 
ham. 

A policy that all groups are 
concerned about deals with the 
Commonwealth Service Corps. 
The voting delegates adopted 
the followdng policy: RE- 
SOLVED that the Massachu- 
setts Farm Bureau Federation 
protest the interference of the 
Commonwealth Service Corps 
in areas other than basic edu- 
cation, hygiene and citizenship 
of migrant workers. Mr. Philip 
Good, Legislative Counsel for 



Farm Bureau and the Farm 
Bureau Labor Committee have 
been studying this problem 
since mid-summer. 

A resolution presented to 
Farm Bureau from Plymouth 
County on vandalism request- 
ing that steps be taken to in- 
crease penalties for violators 
and that the liability of Lirm- 
ers be limited due to trespass- 
ers. Several bills will be filed 
in the General Court to obtain 
relief for farmers in this mat- 
ter. 

Mr. Orrin Colley of the Cran- 
berry Institute, Duxbury was a 
featured panelist at the Annual 
Meeting of the Massachusetts 
Farm Bureau. The panel "For- 
eign Trade as it Relates to Mas- 
sachusetts Agriculture" was 
well attended. Mr. Colley spoke 
of the activities of the Cran- 
berry industry to solve their 
marketing problems and how 
Foreign Trade assisted in the 
solution. Others on the panel 
included Mr. Herbert Harris, 
Legislative Counsel of the 
American Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration, Washington, D.C., Mr. 
Ed O'Neill of the J. P. SulH- 
van Company, Ayer, Massachu- 



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setts and S. S. Garjian, Presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts Farm 
Bureau Federation of Stoughton 
who acted as moderator. 



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FOURTEEN 



25 Wtav^ Sgo 



(The following items were 
taken from the December, 1941 
issue of Cranberries.) 



The 1941 crop of cranberries, 
which tlie New England Crop 
Reporting Service now esti- 
mates as 749,200 barrels, or 
about 150,000 barrels more 
than the ten-year average, and 
probably the second largest 
crop ever, has now largely gone 
into the markets in perhaps the 
best season on record. The price 
at which the American Cran- 
beiTy Exchange opened its 
Lates' $3.40 a quarter barrel, 
held strong over the Thanks- 
giving market and the berries 
have sold at that figure or a 
little stronger. 

• * 

The New Jersey crop, accord- 
ing to the government figures 
is 88,000 barrels which is no 
change from the estimate of 
October 1. The berries in that 
state were harvested somewhat 
earlier than usual due to the 
extraordinary dry weather with 
lack of water for adequate frost 
control. 

There was no real labor prob- 
lem in the state of Oregon dur- 
ing the picking season this year 
(1941), but labor was scarce 
enough to slow down opera- 
tions to some extent. The State 
Employment oflBce made its 
initial effort to be of service 
in placing pickers to the best 
advantage, which aided the 
growers somewhat in getting 
the crop off. 

Farm Credit Service 

Box 7, Taunton, Mass. 02781 
Tel. 617 824-7578 

• 

Production Credit Loans 

Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office — nf;2. Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



The Wisconsin crop is esti- 
mated as 105,000 barrels. This 
is a decrease from last years 
figure of 121,000 barrels but 
it is well over the last ten-year 
average of 68,600 and shows 
that Wisconsin is apparently 
steadily clinching its position 
as the second-largest producing 
state. 

• • 

The cranberry industry is 
deeply shocked to learn of the 
death of Arthur U. Chaney, 
president and general manager 
of the American Cranberry Ex- 
change. He was stricken ill 
on Sunday, November 30( 1941 ) 
at his residence, London Ter- 
race, New York. He was re- 
moved to the Lenox Hill Hos- 
pital where he died on Thurs- 
day evening, December 22, 
( 1941 ) . Mr. Chaney was born 



April 16, 1874, on a farm in 
Clay County, Illinois, and 
spent his early life in that 
locality. Mr. Chaney devoted 
his life work to the cranberry 
industry, chiefly in the market- 
ing aspect. His name, when 
the final story of cranberry 
growing is told, will have a 
most honored place. 

Massachusetts is not well 
fixed in regard to its water 
prospects for winter flooding 
as yet, due to the long drought 
in the East. If some long and 
steady rains not do come along 
before too long, some of the 
bogs may get hurt. Bud for 
next year's crop seems about 
normal and the usual fall 
sanding program is going 
ahead. 



(Sso) 



Kerosene 

Solvent 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 

Telephones 62 MAI.M STREET 

585-4341 — 585-2604 KINGSTON, MASS. 



FIFTEEN 





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SIXTEEN 



WHITESBOG, 



NEW JERSEY 



Continued from Page 7 



that, under the condition that 
it would continue in cranberry 
production the State would 
lease it back for a five-year 
period. 

When it was learned that this 
would happen, it at least meant 
that there would be time to 
plan for the future. It was 
quite obvious that these plans 
had to be made as soon as 
possible. 

The owners of Whitesbog be- 
gan a search for new acreage 
which would have the necessary 
qualities for the establishment 
of new bogs. The obvious things 
were looked for — availability 
of water in sufficient quantity, 
the right type of soil, location 
of bogs to good transportation 
facihties, etc. 

Sursprisingly enough, they 
found the spot they were look- 
ing for only a few miles from 
Whitesbog. After the necessary 
tiansactions were completed no 



time was wasted in beginning 
the construction of the bogs. 
The new bogs will be small 
by comparison to the old bogs, 
some of which were several 
acres in size. The bogs now 
under construction will be ap- 
proximately one acre in size 
and will be set up for water 
harvesting. 

Work is progressing rapidly 
and it is expected that some 
of the bogs will be planted 
this year. The location of the 
bogs, adjacent to a large reser- 
voir, makes for an ideal situa- 
tion insofar as water harvesting 
is concerned. The new bogs 
are being laid out somewhat 
similar to those at the Oswego 
Cranberry Research Center 
which we described in the last 
issue. They will be approxi- 
mately twice as large, however. 

The State has agree "1 to per- 
mit the owners to transplant 
vines from the old Whitesbog 



property for use in the new 
area. 

Plans for the new Whitesbog 
include housing for some of 
the workers and, while on our 
visit, we noticed that a well 
was in the process of being 
drilled to supply water to the 
homes. 

If spirit and enthusiasm are 
any indication of success, there 
is no doubt, after speaking with 
Mr. Haines, that, although the 
new Whitesbog may never at- 
tain the enormity and expanse 
of the old, it will be heard 
from in the industry for many 
years to come. 

The way the operators of 
Whitesbog have come tlirough 
the serious problems attending 
a relocation and re-establish- 
ment of the bogs should be an 
inspiration to others who have 
to face the same situation. 




PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
For Sand and Service thai Satisfy . . . Call Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 



The newest and most modern plant 
serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 



Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 - 585-3377 



PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



SEVENTEEN 




CRANBERRY PIE 

Pastry for double-crust 9-inch 

pie 
4 cups fresh cranberries 
IV2 cups Ught brown sugar, 

firmly packed 
4 tablespoons light molasses 
Vz teaspoon cinnamon 
2 tablespoons butter 
V\ teaspoon salt 

Wash cranberries and cut in 
halves (or chop coarsely). Line 
9-inch pie pan with half of pas- 
try. Fill shell with cranberries 
and brown sugar. Dust with 
cinnamon and salt. Spoon mo- 
lasses over all. Dot with butter. 
Cover with remaining pastry. 
Cut vents for steam. Bake pie 
ten minutes in preheated 425 
degree oven. Reduce heat to 
325 degrees and continue bak- 
ing for about 1 hour. Serve 
with vanilla ice cream. 

CRANBERRY ICE 

1 1-pound can jellied cranberry 

sauce 
1 7-ounce bottle lemon-hme 
carbonated beverage 
Beat the cranberry sauce till 
smooth. Resting bottle on rim 
of bowl, slowly pour in lemon- 
lime carbonated beverage. Mix 
gently with up and down mo- 
tion. Pour mixture into 1-quart 
freezer tray. Freeze till firm. 
Break into chunks \vith wooden 
spoon and place in a chilled 
bowl. Beat till fluffy. Return 
to freezer tray and freeze till 
firm. Makes 1 quart. 

EIGHTEEN 



aw 




Just at twilight the vacation- 
ing husband and wife parked 
their trailer after a 400 mile 
drive. Then the ^vife said, with 
some hesitation: "Honey, re- 
member that flat rock we used 
for a doorstep at last night's 
stop?" 

" I remember . . . Wliy?" 
"Well . . I hid the door key 
under it." 



iest 

tor 
fun! 



If the moon isn't made of 
green cheese, how come there's 
such a rat race to see who gets 
to it first? 



A child is something halfway 
between an adult and a tele- 
vision set. 

There's one thing you can 
say for the men in charge of 
our government — they're run- 
ning it like nobody's business. 



PEANUT & CRANBERRY RELISH 

1 cup cranberries 

Vs cup sugar 

1/4 cup chopped peanuts 

V4 tsp. salt 

1 small orange 

1 small apple 

Put cranberries through food 
chopper and mix with sugar. 
Cut the orange and apple into 
quarters, remove seeds and put 
through chopper. Combine nuts 
with all ingredients. Makes 
IV2 cups. 

HAM LEFTOVER 

7/ ijou decide to have ham 
for the Holidays instead of the 
usual turkey, this is a good way 
to use the leftovers. 
4 cups cubed cooked ham 
3 tablespoons butter 
V2 cup water 
V2 cup sugar 
% cup fresh cranberries 

2 tablespoons grated orange 

rind 
Salt and pepper to taste 

Lightly brown ham in butter. 
Bring sugar and water to boil, 
covered 15 minutes. Add grated 
orange rind and seasoning. 
Combine ham and cranberry 
sauce in baking dish and bake 
uncovered at 350 degrees for 
20 minutes. 

Add V2 cup fresh cranberries 
and bake 10 to 15 minutes 
longer. Good with candied 
yams, green bean salad (beans 
and onions mixed with French 
salad dressing) and hot corn- 
bread sticks. Serves 6, made 
in oblong casserole. 



Wisconsin 'Mossers' 
Lose Labor Force To 
Job Corps 



-:) 



' - C r»- - 



Editor's Note: The follow- 
ing article is included in CRAN- 
BERRIES since it was felt that 
it would be of interest to many 
growers who got their start by 
harvesting sphagnum moss dur- 
ing the summer and selling it 
to florists and others. Some of 
these are still engaged in this 
work. 



Wisconsin's half million dollar 
a year sphagnum moss industry- 
is suffering from a serious lack 
of labor brought about by the 
attraction to the Job Corps of 
workers usually engaged in 
this harvest operation. It is es- 
timated that Wisconsin supplies 
nearly ninety percent of the 
world's supply of this strange 



crop. Less than a half dozen 
firms, located in Jackson, Mon- 
roe, Wood, Juneau and Clark 
counties, do the bulk of the 
business. 

Much of the supply comes 
from the Black River State 
Forest. The contractors who 
handle the harvest pay a fee 
to swamp owners. A tag is 
then affixed to the bales to show 
it is paid for. The sphagnum 
is a simple plant which looks 
like fern rather than moss. It 
renews itself from pieces of 
stem which break off in har- 
vesting. 

The plants are pulled out of 
the marshes by the use of 
forks. In the spring, as soon 
as the frost and ice leaves the 



swamps, the harvest begins, 
and continues until November. 
The soggy plants are taken off 
the swamp by boats pulled by 
a tractor. They are then spread 
out to dry and must be 
turned frequently for thorough 
drying. Some of the moss is 
baled on the site. 

Although the development of 
styrofoam and other synthetic 
materials have provided com- 
petition, florists still prefer 
sphagnum. Sphagnum moss 
takes up moisture by capillary 
action, usually up to twenty 
times its own weight. This fact 
makes it an ideal shipping me- 
dium for roses and other plants. 
This moss also is an ideal mulch 
over the surface of plant pots. 



Roby's Propane Gas, Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



295-3737 



MAKE ROBY S YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING CENTER for all 

your irrigation equipment and LP gas needs. We always have a 
large supply of parts on hand and the trained personnel to assist 
you with professional advice and service. We also carry: 



•ALUMINUM PIPE 

Alcoa - Hunter - Reynolds 
•SPRINKLER HEADS 

Rain Bird - Buckner 



•PLASTIC PIPE and FITTINGS 
•MURPHY SAFETY GAUGES 
•PROT-TEK PRIMERS and PARTS 



CONVERT YOUR IRRIGATION PUMPS TO LP GAS 

Here are some of the benefits: 

1. You'll save on oil and spark plugs 

2. Eliminates pilferage; fuel supplied in continuous flow from 

from bulk tanks 

3. You'll get 3 times more engine life 

4. Fuel pumps eliminated 

We'll be glad to explain about how easily you can convert to 
LP gas. Call us now. No obligation of course ! 



NINETEEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 9 

Precipitation 

The total precipitation for the 
month was 15.10 inches with 
only six days without rain and 
the greatest fell on the 30th 
with 2.96 inches. In the six 
days from November 29 to 
December 4th 12.52 inches fell. 
Several places were flooded and 
the water stood for quite some 
time. 

'Cranberry Vine' Issued 

Washington growers should 
carefully read the recently pub- 
lished Cranberry Vine for ac- 
tivities and coming projects of 
the area. 



WISCONSIN 



Freezing Temperatures Bring Frost 

Wisconsin had an unusually 
early freeze-in which cut short 
the time to get all the berries 
in and did not give time to 
finish all the fall marsh work. 
It was one of the earliest 
set-ins of wdnter that many of 
the growers can remember. 

There is more frost in the 
ground this year than there 
was a year ago but nothing 
like that in early December of 
1964. Frost depths so far this 
year are the deepest in the 
central and north western areas 
of the state and range generally 
from 2 to 6 inches. 

Snow cover has been limited 
to the northern part of the 
state. A year ago snow covered 
the northern third of the state 
with as much as 13 to 24 inches 
in some places. 

Sprinkler Systems Used to Melt Ice 

The thing that is of interest 
this year is that the growers 
have used the sprinkler systems 
to melt the flooded sections of 
the marshes which were under 
one or two inches of ice.,' 
When the marshes were fro- 
zen too much for harvesting 
the sprinkler systems were' 



turned on when the tempera- 
ture got above freezing and 
melted the ice so the harvesting 
could get under way. If it 
had not been for the sprinkling 
systems it is believed that quite 
a considerable amount of the 
crop would have been left un- 
harvested and frozen in. This 
is something that no one had 
planned on but is an addi- 
tional benefit of the sprinkler 
systems. 

Growers in the central part 
of the state are short of water 
as no snow reached that por- 
tion. Northern Wisconsin has 
plentv of water and all marshes 
are flooded. Central growers 
are anxiously looking for a little 
rain or snow in order to avoid 
vine injury. 

Weather Summary 

November weather was 
cloudy and windy. Tempera- 
tures averaged slightly above 
normal over the south and 
slightly subnormal in the north. 
Precipitation ranged from very 
light in the west to above 



Statement of ownership, management 
ami circulation (Act of October 23, 
1962; Section 4369, Title 39, United 
States Code). 

CRANBERRIES, The National 
Cranberry Magazine. Published mon- 
thly at 236 Main St., Kingston, Mass. 

The names and addresses of the 
publisher, editor, managing editor, 
and business manager are: 
Publisher— Comor Publishers, Kings- 
ston, Mass. Editor— Donald Chattier, 
Broekton, Mass. Business Manager, 
I. S. Cobb, Kingston, Mass. 

The known bondholders, mortga- 
gees, and other security holders 
owning 1 percent of bonds, mort- 
gages, or other securities are: None. 

Total No. Copies Printed (Net 
Press Run), 800; average no. copies 
each issue during preceding 12 
months, 800; Single issue nearest to 
filing date, 80,5; paid circulation, av- 
erage by mail, carrier delivery or by 
other means, 725; nearest issue, 725; 
Sales through agents, news dealers 
or otherwise, average, none; nearest 
issue, none; Free distribution, by 
carrier, delivery or other means, 60; 
nearest issue 60; Office use, 20; 
Total, 800. 

I. Stanley, Cobb, publisher 



normal in the extreme east. 
Some snow fell across the north 
during the period from Novem- 
ber 9 through the 11th and 
again on the 20th. Very mild 
weather following this latter 
snowfall melted the snow cover. 
A very intense Great Lakes 
storm on the 27th and 28th 
dropped several inches of new 
snow along the immediate Lake 
Michigan shoreline and in the 
extreme northern counties bor- 
dering Upper iMichigan. Snow 
depths of 1 to 6 inches from 
this fall were reported on the 
Door Peninsula and in the 
extreme north central counties 
on December 2. 



CORRUGATED 

CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Aluminum — Galvenized 
Asphalt Coated 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Go. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVIGE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



TWENTY 




servino tlie WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 

for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 

INTERESTED 
IN 
PURCHASING 
WISCONSIN 
CRANBERRY 
PROPERTIES 



•***•*•••** 



Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



OUR PRODUCTS 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Crans-weets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 
£^ranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 
Cranberry Chilli Sauce 
Cranberry Orange Relish 
Cranberry Vinegar 
Cranberry Juice 
Cran-Beri 
Cran-Vari 
Cran-Puri 
Cranberry Puree 
Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



Please Mention 

CRANBERRIES 

When You Answer Advertisements 



DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 









L 



WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



' 
< 









--•% 'smr 









/ % ■ ^ 



^ 




What w^ill you get for your 
cranberries five or ten years 
from now^? 

For a look at the future, take a look at the past. 

Over the years, Ocean Spray growers have done better 
than others. 

It's got nothing to do with boom or zoom. It's a matter of 
steady growth. 

Steady growth means financial stability. Financial stabil- 
ity means security. 

Security is knowing you'll be doing alright five or ten 
years from now. 
Ocean Spray has a h istory of steady growth. 

And history has a l^abit of repeating itself. 

FRENCH 
SrCGKBRIDGE 




FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHI 



Ocean spray. 



IN OCEAN SPRAY, CONTACT ANY DIRECTOR OR STAFF MEMBER IN YOUR GROWING AREA. 



Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

\A/isconsin 

Oregon 

\A/ashingt:on 

Canada 




1/ 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

PIANT & SOIL SCIENCES LIBRARY 

FKENCU 




st:ory page 7 



JAN 2 3 1967 



UNIVERSITY OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 



IIM 
THIS 
ISSUE 
JANUARY 



NEW FROST ALARM DEVICE ] 

CRANBERRY RING SPOT DISEASE ......... 4 

WISCONSIN WATER LAW, PARTS III AND IV 17 



1S67 






^^ BIBECTBRY lor cpanlieppy gpowers -^ 



The 

ieNARLESW.HARRISi 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 
RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



Attention 
Bog Owners 

Why Not Subscribe 
to 

CRANBERRIES 
Magazine 

for your Foreman? 

It would be a Good 
Business Investment 



Electricity - key to progress 



In industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 



NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 




The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

VVILLIAMSTOWN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

68i2 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING IHACHINES 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screcnhouses, Bogg and 

Pumps Maans Satisfaction 

WARBHAM. MASS Tel. CY 3-2000 



1866 
CROP 
REPORT 



Production of cranberries in 
1966 was a record high of 1,- 
582,300 barrels, up 10 percent 
from last year and 22 percent 
more than average. All cran- 
berry States except New Jersey 
had larger crops than last year. 
Massachusetts led with 765,000 
barrels, nearly one-half the U.S. 
total. 

Massachusetts 

The Massachusetts crop was 
the third largest of record, 4 
percent more than last year and 
14 percent above average. The 
crop got off to a good start 
under nearly ideal conditions 
until about mid-July, when the 
cranberry belt became excep- 
tionally dry. However, late 
August rains helped the crop. 
Early harvested bogs had many 
small sized berries, but Sep- 
tember rains and cool nights 
helped sizing and improved 



color in late bogs. Acreage har- 
vested, at 11,600 acres was un- 
changed from last year, but the 
yield per acre was up 2.5 bar- 
rels to 65.9. 

New Jersey 

New Jersey's crop of 144,000 
barrels was 6 percent smaller 
than last year's production but 
37 percent above average. Be- 
cause of cold weather in May 
water was left on bogs longer 
than usual, reducing the bloom 
in some bogs, but the set was 
still generally good. Hot. dry 
summer weather limited berry 
size but a good quality crop 
was produced. There were 
3,000 acres harvested, the same 
as last year, but the yield per 
acre dropped from 51.0 bar- 
rels last year to 48.0 ban-els this 
year. 

Wisconsin 

Wisconsin produced a record 
breaking 491,000 barrels of 
cranberries in 1966, 11 percent 
more than last year and 21 
percent above average. The 
season started late but favor- 
able July weather advanced the 
crop to about normal in the 
southern area by August 15. 
Harvest started about the usual 
time, but considerably earlier 



than last year. Berries sized 
well in most bogs but were 
slow to color. There were 4 800 
acres harvested this year, 100 
acres more than last season. The 
yield per acre at 102.3 barrels 
is 8.5 bbls. more than last year. 

Washington — Oregon 

Production of cranberries in 
Washington was 135,000 bar- 
rels, the second largest crop 
of record, more than double 
last year's short crop and 63 
percent above average. There 
was a generally good set despite 
cold, wet weather at early 
bloom. Harvest got underway 
on October 1, later than nor- 
mal. The acreage harvested at 
1,000 acres remains unchanged 
from last year, but the yield 
more than doubled to 135.0 
barrels per acre. Oregon's pro- 
duction totaled 47,300 barrels, 
also the second largest of rec- 
ord, 13 percent above last year 
and one-third more than av- 
erage. Unprotected bogs were 
damaged by spring frosts, but 
growth in protected bogs was 
favorable with a heavy set and 
good berry size. Some fall 
frost damage occurred. There 
were 560 acres harvested in 
Oregon, the same as last year. 
The yield per acre went up 
9.4 to 84.0 barrels per acre. 



Brewer & Lord 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 



CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARN ARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have seen the 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



ONE 



C.&L. EQUIPMENT CO. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



SHARON BOX and LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON. MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 18 56 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

Now in Stock - 50,000 ft. Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 

Square Edge or can be matched on order - Also 

4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our Middleboro yard has been closed as a retail yard. 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



Deon Announces Sale of 
Michigan Plant 

Sam E. Dean, Chairman of 
the Board of Dean Foods Com- 
pany, announced the sale of 
Dean Foods' Alpena, Michigan 
distribution branch to McDon- 
ald Dairy, of Flint, Michigan 
for cash. 

Dean had purchased opera- 
ting assets of the Alpena op- 
eration, know as Shady Lane 
Dairy, in late 1964. 

Annual sales volume of the 
location is approximately $750,- 
000.00. Under the terms of the 
sale. Dean retains the right to 
solicit and serve corporate 
buying groups in the area. 

Dean Foods' Michigan opera- 
tion include dairy processing 
plants at Fhnt, Evart, and 
Saginaw, and a distribution 
branch at Kalamazoo. Dean 
is the owner of Indian Trail 
Cranberries in Wisconsin Rap- 
ids, Wisconsin. 



CRANBERRY INDUSTRY 
BRIEFLY DESCRIBED IN 
"NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC" 

Massachusetts residents will 
be interested in reading all 
about their home state in the 
carefully prepared and illustra- 
ted article in the December 
1966 issue of Notional Geo- 
iiraphic magazine. On page 839 
the Massachusetts cranberry in- 
dustry is reported on and the 
A. D. Makepeace Co., exten- 
sive cranberry growing firm of 
Wareham, Mass. is spoken of. 



CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 




W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-l 

4511 E. Osborne Ave., Tampa, Florida 

1001 Dempsey Rd., Milpitas, Calif. 



TWO 



Mass. 

Cranberry 

Station 

S Held Notes 



by IRVIIMG E. DEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist 



Personals 

The Cranberry Station lost 
a colleague and valued friend 
in the passing of Dr. Frederick 
Chandler, Professor Emeritus, 
on December 21st. Dr. Chand- 
ler was associated with the 
Cranberry Station from 1946 
until his retirement in 1964, 
and was here frequently after 
his retiring. He worked on 
drainage and water relations, 
fertilizer, minor elements and 
breeding of new varieties but 
was interested in all phases of 
culture and marketing. Fred 
was a close personal friend of 
the author and he never ceased 
to amaze me with his cheerful 
disposition and ability to see 
the bright side of any situa- 
tion. 

Prof. Stan Norton attended 
the Annual Meeting of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of NE-44 in 



New York City on December 
14 and 15. This is a regional 
project on mechanical harvest- 
ing of fruits and vegetables and 
Stan is Secretary of the Com- 
mittee. 

Dr. Cross, Devlin, Miller and 
the author attended an Agricul- 
tural Leaders Pesticide Seminar 
sponsored by Geigy Chemical 
Co. in Braintree on December 
15. 

Dr. Bert Zuckerman attended 
a meeting of NE-34 in Ithaca, 
N.Y. on December 15 and 16. 
This is the northeastern regional 
meeting of nematologists. 

Dr. Wes Miller attended the 
A A AS meetings in Washington, 
D.C. from December 26 through 
30. Wes was especially inter- 
ested in the water pollution 
symposium. 

Drs. Zuckerman, Miller and 
Deubert of the Cranberry Sta- 



tion are co-authors with Dr. 
Gunner and Profs. Walker and 
Langley of the University of a 
paper published in the Octo- 
ber issue of Plant and Soil. 
The title is "The Distribution 
and Persistence of Diazinon Ap- 
plied to Plant and Soil and its 
Influence on Rliizosphere and 
Soil Microflora." This paper 
deals with the translocation of 
Diazinon in plants, its per- 
sistence and method of break- 
down in soil and its effect on 
soil fungi and other micro-or- 
ganisms. 

Weather 

December was warm and 
dry, the month was about iy2 
degrees a day above normal. 
The first half of the month 
was definitely warm, with the 
exception of the 3rd and 4th, 
Cunfimied on Page 20 



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THREE 



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NORTH DIGHTON, MASS. 02764 

Telephone 824-5607 



really the berries for. . . 




solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special IM" or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
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see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm &. Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, Inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



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WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 



JOHN BEAN DIVISION 



j^m, 



Lansing^ Michigan. 



OUR 




ISSUE OF JANUARY, 1967 / VOL. 31 -NO. 9 



THE YEAR AHEAD 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 



With the final chapter of 1966 completed, 
it is time to begin making entries into the 
ledger of 1967. 

What lies ahead for the cranberry grower 
in the coming year is strictly a matter of 
conjecture at this point. It is safe to say, 
however, that it will be a year of progress 
as have been so many before it. Those en- 
gaged in scientific research have indicated 
that they see a very fruitful year ahead (no 
pun intended). The growers themselves 
show apparent enthusiasm. Many are plan- 
ning to enlarge their operations. Some who 
have devoted only part of their time to 
their bogs have suggested that they will 
devote even more time to their properties. 
In spite of some hardships such as drought 
in some of the growing areas, there seems 
to be an enthusiasm which this reporter 
has failed to see in any other industry — an 
unshaken and vibrant feeling that 1967 is 
going to be the best year yet. 

Cranberry growers, large and small, seem 
to be a special kind of people. In the short 
period of time since assuming the position 
of editor of this magazine, it has been my 
pleasure to attend several growers' meet- 
ings, technical seminars and also to talk 
to individuals in various parts of the country. 
This has been a very rewarding experience 
for me and I have never failed to be im- 
pressed by the awareness and confidence 
and enthusiasm of these people. 

It goes without saying that, if my past 
experience is any criteria, the year 1967 will 
be a most productive one for the cranberry 
industry. 

This is our wish to all of you, along with 
abundant good health. Happy New Year ! 



Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 



Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 
30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 



Consultant 
CLARENCE J. HALL 

CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, "Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



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WISCONSIN GROWERS 
HOLD ANNUAL MEETING 

The Wisconsin State Cran- 
berry Growers' Association An- 
nual Winter Meeting will be 
held Thursday, January 19, 1967 
at 10:00 A.M. The meeting 
place will be the Labor Temple, 
in Wisconsin Rapids. Order 
of business is as follows: 

10:00 Business meeting, inclu- 
ding reports of officers and 
election of officers and direc- 
tors for 1967. 

10:30 Report by Dr. George 
Peltier. 

11:00 Report by Mr. Harvey 
H. Ostrander, Credit Repre- 
sentative, Federal Intermediate 
Credit Bank of St. Paul, Minn. 



11:45 Report of the State Mar- 
keting Committee Chairman, 
Bruce Potter. 

12:00 Lunch will be available 
at the Labor Temple. 

1:15 Report on Sprinkler Sys- 
tems by John S. Norton, Ag- 
ricultural Engineer, of the 
Agicultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, University of Mass. 

2:00 Mr. Koval, State Ento- 
mologist, Dr. Boone, Dr. 
Dana, and an authority on 
liquid fertilizers from Allied 
Chemical Company, will hold 
a panel discussion on the ap- 
plication of herbicides, fungi- 
cides, insecticides, and fer- 
tilizers through a sprinkler 
system. 



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O 



SIX 



A TELEPHONE 

EROST WARNING DEVICE 

by JOHN S. NORTON 

Massachusetts Cranberry Experiment Station 



A special telephone company 
service known as "Private-Line- 
signal Service" may be used to 
transmit signals from a remote 
location, such as a cranberry bog, 
to the owner's house, office or 
other suitable location. The 
signal may indicate any of a 
number of conditions existing at 
the location being monitored. 
For the cranberry grower, the 
most likely condition to monitor 
would be bog temperatures 
during the frost season. 

Other uses to which the sig- 
nal-service and associated cir- 
cuitry may logically be put 
are: (1) fire alarm, (2) burglar 
alarm, (3) operating condition 
of pumps or other equipment, 
and (4) the detection of vari- 
ous weather conditions in ad- 
dition to temperature. 

The system, starting at the 
location being monitored and 
terminating at the receiving 
station, consists of the follow- 
ing components: (1) a sensing 
device, (2) a switch actuated 
by the sensing device, (3) con- 
nections to an energized tele- 
phone line, (4) a sensitive re- 
lay at the receiving end of the 
telephone line, and (5) an 
alarm or other type signal ac- 
tuated by the sensitive relay. 



A Telephone Frost-Warning Device 

During the period when 90% 
of the cranberry acreage that 
could be protected from frost 
was protected by flooding, there 
was not much need for or in- 
terest in remote frost warning 
devices. This was due to the 
necessity of starting to flood far 
in advance of the occurrence 
of harmful temperatures. How- 



ever, now that 40% of the Mas- 
sachusetts crop is protected by 
sprinkler it would seem that 
interest in such equipment 
should be increasing. Since the 
sprinklers need not be started 
more than a few minutes in 
advance of the harmful temp- 
erature many man hours are 
wasted by the grower or his 
workers waiting beside the 
pump for the temperature to 
approach the danger level. 
Furthermore, it is not infre- 
quent that the person respon- 
sible for starting the sprinklers 
waits too long and frost damage 
occurs wliile the operator and 
the pump stands idle. This 
negligence is often caused by 
the person having spent several 
consecutive nights standing 
guard for frost and finally be- 
coming too tired to stay alert 
to the conditions existing 
around him. If a reliable system 
were available for warning a 
grower, in his home, of the 
occurrence of a predetermined 
temperature on the bog, there 
would be no need for him to 
lose many hours of sleep wait- 
ing for that temperature to oc- 
cur. Instead of staying by the 
bog he could go to bed at a 
normal time and the alarm 
would wake him in time to 
start the sprinklers. 

Such a system is available for 
many growers. It consists of a 
thermostat, a private line pro- 
vided by the telephone com- 
pany, and a bell or other alarm 
device. The telephone company 
line is known as their Private- 
Line-Signal-Service. A remote- 
bulb type thermostat would be 



located on the bog with the 
bulb situated as a minimum 
thermometer would be. (A 
minimum thermometer should 
also be located at the same spot 
for the purpose of checking the 
accuracy of the thermostat). A 
pair of wires would be run 
to the nearest point at which 
it could be connected to a 
telephone line. This telephone 
line would lead to the grower's 
house where it would be con- 
nected to a sensitive relay. The 
thermostat, line from thermostat 
to telephone line and the sen- 
sitive relay would form a com- 
plete circuit. This circuit would 
have either a D.C. or A.C. 
voltage of 12 volts to 48 volts 
applied to it to activate the 
sensitive relay when the ther- 
mostat switch was closed. The 
telephone company has a maxi- 
mum value for voltage that thsy 
allow on their lines. 

A second circuit would be 
located in the grower's home. 
This might consist of a simple 
doorbell circuit in which the 
sensitive relay in the first cir- 
cuit would act as a switch to 
ring the doorbell when the bog 
temperature reached the level 
for which the thermostat was 
set. 

There are at least two ar- 
rangements that may be used 
in the circuitry for the warn- 
ing system. The first that 
would probably come to the 
mind of the layman would be 
to have the thermostat switch 
close when the temperature 
fell to the setting. This would 
permit current to flow through 
the circuit leading from the 
bog to the house, the sensitive 

SEVEN 



relay would be activated, clos- 
ing the alarm circuit switch, 
thus sounding the alarm. A 
disadvantage of this arrange- 
ment is that an accidental 
break anywhere in the long 
circuit would prevent the re- 
ceipt of a signal when the 
thermostat closed. This could 
easily happen if either the tele- 
phone company line or the 
grower's own lines were broken 
bv a storm or other cause. In 
the second arrangement, which 
would protect against the haz- 
ards of accidental breaks in the 
telephone company line circuit, 
the circuit would be closed 
when the temperature was 
above the thermostat setting 
and the thermostat switch 
would open when the tempera- 
ture fell to the setting. In this 
arrangement the sensitive relay 
would be activated, holding 
the alarm circuit switch open, 
while the temperature remained 
above the setting but when the 
thermostat switch opened, the 
relay would be de-energized al- 
lowing the alarm circuit s.witch 
to close by gravity or bv spring 
action. With this circuitry, any 
break in the line leading from 
the bog to the house would 
set off the alarm. Therefore, if 
the circuit were accidentaly 
opened at a time when there 
obviously was no danger of 
frost the grower would then 
be alert to take normal precau- 
tions against frost until the 
trouble had been corrected. 

Experimental System 

A warning system like that 
described above is being tested 
at the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Experiment Station (Figure 1). 
A remote-bulb thermostat, ( Fig- 
ure 2, see photograph on front 
cover) with single pole, double 
throw switch was installed on 
the cranberry bog. A pair of 
lead wires were run from the 
thermostat to the telephone 
junction box in the headquar- 
ters building, a distance of 1000 
feet. At the junction box the 
wires from the thermostat are 
connected to a pair of telephone 
company wires which run to 



the residence of one of the 
Cranberry Station staff via the 
telephone exchange office (a 
distance of about four miles). 
This line is leased from the 
telephone company for $5.00 a 
month. It is protected from ac- 
cidental crossing with other 
telephone circuits by special 
labels at all junction points indi- 
cating tliat it is a private line. 
At the residence the telephone 
company wires connect to a 
sensitive relay (Figure 3) that 
operates a single pole, double 
throw switch. This switch con- 
trols a separate 16-volt alarm 
bell circuit. The alarm bell 
circuit consists of a door chime, 
a low voltage lamp, a toggle 
switch (Figure 4), and a small 
16-volt 10- watt transformer (Fig- 
ure 5). The transformer reduces 
the 120-volt house current to 
16 volts for the alarm circuit. 
The chime and lamp are in- 
stalled in the circuit in parallel 
to each other. The toggle 
switch is in series with the 
cliime permitting the chime to 
be de-energized after the alarm 
sounds. The lamp remains in 
the circuit and acts as a pilot 
light while the bell circuit is 
energized. The alarm bell cir- 
cuit is connected to the nor- 
mally closed contacts of the 
relay. This means that these 
contacts are normally closed 
when the relay is not energized. 
Therefore, the relay must be 
energized to hold the contacts 
open. Wlien the relay is de- 
energized for any reason the 
contacts will close causing the 
bell to ring and the lamp to 
Hght. The lamp also acts as an 
inexpensive standby for the 
bell, thereby providing greater 
reliability in the system. 

The line at the bog thermo- 
stat is connected to the swich 
terminals that are normally 
closed when the temperature is 
above the thermostat setting 
thus providing a closed circuit 
to the sensitive relay when- 
ever the temperature is up. This 
circuit is energized by a 24 
volt D.C. source thereby keep- 
ing the sensitive relay activated 
and holding the alarm bell 



switch open. Wlien the temp- 
erature falls below the ther- 
mostat setting, the thermostat 
switch opens, breaking the cir- 
cuit to the relay, which releases 
the alarm bell switch allowing 
it to close and sound the alarm. 
The system was installed on 
May 18th, 1965, and has been 
used for two spring and two 
fall frost seasons. It has not 
failed to signal each time tem- 
perature fell to the thermostat 
setting. 

Cost of the Experimental Alarm System 

The cost of the components 
of the experimental system was 
approximately $50 as follows: 
Thermostat, remote bulb, 

single-pole, double-throw 

$20.00 
Sensitive relay, 24 V. D.C, 

125 miliwatt power 5.00 

Door Chime 5.00 

Transformer, 16 volt, 10 

watt 3.00 

Wire, if 22 gauge had been 

used the value would 

be. 17.00 

Total S50.00 

In addition to the cost of the 
components there was a tele- 
phone company installation 
charge of $10.00 and there is 
a monthlv service charge of 
$5.00. The installation of 
equipment and wiring at either 
end of the telephone company 
lines was done by Station per- 
sonnel and labor costs were not 
calculated. 

Versatility of the System 

Although the system has 
been described as a frost warn- 
ing device for cranberry grow- 
ers it may have considerably 
Mdder application than that. 
First of all, there is no reason 
that it could not be used by 
ether fruit and vegetable grow- 
ers and it would seem that 
the increased use of sprinkler 
irrigation for frost protection 
should generate an increased 
interest in such a system where 
the operator does not live 
adjacent to the crop that needs 
protection. In the Massachu- 
setts cranberry belt many 
owners have property widely 
scattered and quite distant from 



EIGHT 




of-rx W^X" X^*-^*' 



^SS/.0£-JVC£ 



^-Qy---^ 












Figure I. Schematic of Telephone-Frost-Warning 
ci rcui t showi ng thermostat location, 
telephone lines and alarm bell circuit 





Figure 5, 



Figure 3. Sensitive relay 
at end of tele- 
phone I i ne. 



Electrical panel 
showing door bell 
transformer (up- 
per rfght) con- 
nected to house 
ci rcui t 




Figure 4. Door chime with toggle switch and pilot 
light mounted in separate box at right 



their residence. Tliis is the 
leason for taking advantage of 
the telephone cojnpany Private- 
Line-Signal-Service. 

The alternative to the use of 
the Private-Line-Signal-Service 
where there is no telephone line 
lietvveen the crop to be protec- 
ted and the sleeping ([uarters 
of the operator is almost too ob- 
ioiis to merit mentioning here. 
That is, the use of the previ- 
ously mentioned type thermo- 
stat, at the proper location in 
the crop area, connected to a 
low \()ltage bell in the sleep- 
ing quarters. The sensitive re- 
lay may not be necessary if the 
resistance in the lines from tlie 
thermostat were not too great 
to prevent operation of the 
bell. If available wattage were 
too low to allow operation of 
the bell the same arrangement 
of two separate circuits de- 
scribed earlier would be neces- 
sary. In this case, however, the 
telephone company Private-Line 
Signal-Service would not be 
used. 

In addition to its use as a 
frost warning system the equip- 
tnent and lines may be used 
for numerous signalling pur- 
poses. With \andalism seem- 
ingly on the increase in rural 
areas it might prove valuable 
as a burglar alarm. It could 
also be used as a fire alarm. 
And, if a frost protection 
sprinkler system were set up to 
start automatically it could be 
used to signal the start or fail- 
Tu-e to start of a pump. A littk> 
thought and imagination would 
doubtless result in the concep- 
tion of numerous other possi- 
bilities for using the Private- 
Line-Signal Service in agricul- 
ture. 

Those uses listed above could 
all \er\' easily be provided si- 
multaneously on a single line. 
If the normally closed circuit 
were used the various sensing 
devices would be connected in 
series in the line so that a 
break in the circuit at any one 
of the locations would set off 
the alarm. If a normally open 
circuit were used the sensing 
Continued on Page 20 

NINE 




"You've got to help him, Doctor - he says when he grows 
up he wants to be a cranberry grower i " 



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A Cranterrv Ringsool 
Disease Muring 
Searles Variehi 



by DONALD M. BOONE 

(Associate Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.) 



A cranberry disease with 
characteristic ringspot symptoms 
has been found in a few 
marshes in Wisconsin. It is ap- 
parently the same as that found 
by Stretch (1964) in New Jer- 
sey. Its effects on the fruit of 
Searles variety are severe 
enough that it should be con- 
sidered potentially threatening 
to profitable growing of this 
variety. 

Many of the fruits, of diseased 
Searles become misshapen (Fig. 
lA) and some show brown ne- 
crosis at the blossom end (Fig. 
IB). Some small berries be- 
come entirely brown from it. 
Whitish rings or pale, round 
patches form on the fruits as 
they begin to ripen. Berries 
from diseased vines showed 
four to five times more spoil- 
age after four months storage 
at 47 °F than berries from 
healthy vines. 

This disease has also been 
found on the Howes variety, 
and usually produces larger and 
more distinctive rings (Fig IC) 
on this than on Searles. It does 
not cause much malformation 
of Howes fruit, though. 

Ring symptoms also develop 
on the leaves of Searles and 
Howes (Fig. ID). The rings 
become most apparent as the 
leaves assume their reddish fall 
color. 

FOURTEEN 



Diseased vines of both vari- 
eties appear to be as vigorous 
and fruitful as healthy ones, 
but there has been some indi- 
cation that terminal buds, on 
diseased Searles vines may 
sometimes develop prematurely, 
in the fall, and then are too 
susceptible to winter injury. 

Ringspot appears to spread 
rather slowly, yet nearly all the 
vines in one Searles bed were 
aflFected and the disease was 
spreading to surrounding beds. 
It was also abundant in a new 



bed planted with cuttings from 
the bed that first showed the 
disease. 

The characteristics of the 
ringspot disease indicate that it 
is caused by a virus. However, 
the means of natural spread of 
the disease from vine to vine 
has not been determined and it 
has not been transmitted ex- 
perimentally yet. The false 
blossom virus disease was found 
occasionally in some of the 
marshes where ringspot was 
observed, but the great differ- 



SHAWMUT GLASS 
CONTAINERS, INC. 

Representing 

KNOX GLASS, INC. 



25 EAST STREET 
CAMBRIDGE 41, AAASS. 



ence in symptoms indicates that 
the two diseases are not re- 
lated. 

Since Searles shows the most 
injury from ringspot and is the 
most widely grown variety in 
Wisconsin, spread of the di- 



sease in the state should be 
prevented. Perhaps some other 
varieties might be injured 
also. To prevent spread of 
ringspot, vines suspected of 
being contaminated with it 
should not be used to plant 
new cranberry beds. 



Literature Cited 

1. Stretch, A. W. 1964. Cran- 
berry disease investigations — 
1962. Proceedings of the 
American Cranberry Grow- 
ers' Association 1961-1964, 
32-34. 




A 




B 







D 

FIGURE I. Ringspot symptoms on cranberry 
leaves. AB-Searles berries show 
and malformation. C-Howes berr 
i ng rings. D-Cranberry leaves 
rings. 



f ru 

Ing 

ies 

s 



it and 
ri ngs 
show- 
how i ng 




NEW TRIANGLE EMBLEM 
AIDS HIGHWAY SAFETY 

A unique new safety device, 
so effective that it has been 
adopted by at least 14 Eur- 
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now gaining recognition in the 
United States. Known as the 
Deltalert, it is designed to be 
carried on cars and other ve- 
hicles for use as a warning de- 
vice when stopped alongside 
a highway. 

The Deltalert consists of an 
open equilat-eral triangle with 
legs 18 inches long and 2 inches 
wide. A mounting stand holds 
the triangle secure in winds 
up to 40 mph. The triangle has 
collapsible supporting legs and 
is easily stored, with the stand, 
in a heavy plastic bag. When 
placed in the mounting stand 
and set on the shoulder of a 
highway about 100 feet back 
of a vehicle, it is visible for Va 
mile, both day and night, as 
an internationally recognized 
warning or danger symbol. 

The new Deltalert is a dur- 
able product that will outlast 
other highway warning devices. 
It is constructed of red reflec- 
tive sheeting bonded to gal- 
vanized steel. It has no bulbs 
to bum out or batteries to run 
down; it requires no matches 
and uses no open fire, and 
there is no glass to break. 

Recommended by internat- 
ional safety organizations, the 
Deltalert is manufactured in 
this country by Ag-Tronic, Inc., 
Box 36, Hastings, Neb. 68901. 



FIFTEEN 




Massachusetts 
Club Meetings 

Tlu' tentati\e dates for the 
1967 Craiibern Club Meetings 
are as follows: 

B(iiiisl(i])le Counhj 

l^anistal)le — Febriiarv 16, 
7:30 P. M. 

Hanistable - Marcli 16. 
7:30 P. M. 



trijcying her first Christmas turi^ey and cranberries, popular 
ne;w baby-food items, is three-months-old Lisa Ann Williams, grand- 
daughter of Harold AA. Williams, president of the Institute of Ameri- 
can Poultry Industries and great-granddaughter of the late Michael 
E. Fox, one of "those nine Fox Brothers," who was president of 
Fox Deluxe Foods. Known as the turkey men of America, the Fox 
Brothers were the first distributors of brand turkeys. When they 
started branding m 1926, the consum.ption of turkeys was only a 
fraction over one pound per capita. It is estimated that this year 
it will be 7.9 pounds per capita. Lisa Ann is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Daniel J. Williams and is shown with her mother. 



Fltjinontli Counhj 



14. 



Kingston — Februar\' 
7:30 P. M. 

Kocliester — Febniaiv 15, 
2:00 P.M. 

Kingston — March 14, 
7:30 P. M. 

l^ocliester — March 15, 
2:00 P. M. 



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sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

Phone: 112-715-247-5321 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 



SIXTEEN 



D]frfP 




WASHINGTON 



In Washington "spring" - like 
weather continues, and the 
primroses, snow drops, azalias 
and rhododendrons in some 
yards are blooming already. 

Light snow fell on January 
4th but so far there are no 
visible signs that winter is 
here, or has come. Christmas 
Day was beautiful and warm 
and all enjoyed the holidays 
with little rain. 

The mean high for the month 
was only 48.42 degrees with a 
high of 55 on the 15th, but the 
sun has come out often between 
showers. The mean low of 41.19 
degrees F gave little variance 
for the month, and the actual 
low in the bog area was 28 
degrees on the 21st and the 
26th. The cranberry buds are 
progressing rapidly and a hard 
freeze now could cause a great 
deal of injury. 

The growers are doing their 
pruning and general chores 
for this time of year. There 
have been a few soil samples 
sent to the experiment station 
so far this year, but now is the 
time to get the analysis done 
and have the recommendations 
back for proper bog fertility 
for the year ahead. The soil 
sample cartons and sampling 
instructions are available at the 
Coastal Washington Research 
and Extension Unit, Long 
Beach, Washington. 

Precipitation for the month 
of December was heavy, 20.37 
inches with 2.98 inches on the 
3rd. We had onlv two days 
with no measurable precipita- 
tion. The total for the year 
was. 87.20, compared with 1965 
total of 86.87, 1964 - 85.25. 



NEW J ERSEY 



December Varied 

December in the cranberry 
belt of New Jersey had a little 
bit of all of the seasons but 
the prevailing mood of course 
was wintry. From the 6th to 
the 9th it was almost balmy 
with temperatures reaching 47, 
54 and 69. Then for a couple 
of days it was almost like sum- 
mer time with maximums of 73 
and minimums of 50. There 
were a few days in the six- 
ties and fifties and then the 
weather reverted to type. It 
was cold enough in the latter 
part of the month to bring the 
average temperature down to 
35.0, about 1 degrees colder 
than normal. A snow storm on 
December 24th deposited 7 to 
10 inches of ornament and gave 
the first white Christmas in 
several years. 

The ice on flooded cranberry 
bogs never got thick enough to 

5 



AGENT FOR 
WIGGINS AIRWAYS 



support skating. Although the 
snow accumulated over the ice 
there was no chance for serious 
oxygen deficiency conditions to 
develop. The snow was quickly 
dissipated by fifty degree 
weather and a warm rain of 
1.05 inches on December 29th. 
Statistically the year of 1966 
will go into the records as one 
of above average rainfall. A 
total of 46.43 inches of rain 
occurred during the year, which 
is more than 3 inches above 
normal. From the grower's 
viewpoint, however, it was an- 
other of a series of bad drought 
years. In the important grow- 
and August there was a lack 
of normal rainfall while May 
and September had more than 
normal. The accumulated de- 
ficiency of rainfall from April 
to September, when the drought 
was finallv relieved, was 4.43 
inches. This added to the ac- 
cumulated deficiency of about 



BOG 
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HAND SPRAYERS - TOOLS - POWER EQUIPMENT 
AUTHORIZED BRIGGS AND STRATTON SERVICE CENTER 

R. F. MORSE & SON, inc. 

Cranberry Highway West Wareham, Mass. CY 5-1553 



SEVENTEEN 



20 inches from tlie previous 
two drought years left cran- 
berry water resources in a very 
critical condition. The copious 
rainfall which occurred in Sep- 
tember and Otober ( 15.66 in- 
ches) was a godsend to the 
cranberry area in New Jersey. 
Reservoirs and ground water 
resources on almost all cran- 
berry bogs in the state are 
now at near capacity. 

1966 In Review 

Summarizing 1966 tempera- 
ture records we find that the 
year was slightly cooler than 
normal. The average tempera- 
ture was 52.7 degrees F, about 
1.7 degree below normal. Only 
4 months, March, July, August 
and November were warmer 
than normal. January, April, 
May and September wer very 
much colder than normal. It 
was by far the coldest April on 
record at the weather station 
and the third coldest May. The 
two months together made it 
the coldest spring ever recorded 
here. 

Some of the extreme weather 
conditions which occurred in 
1966 are notewothy. A very 
destructive frost on May 11th, 
when temperatues in low lying 
blueberry fields plunged to 18 
to 20 degrees, caused serious 
damage to the early varieties of 
blues. Three successive days 
of 100 degrees weather in July 
on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th in the 
midst of the severe drought 
caused agricultural losses. An 
old fashioned "northeaster" in 
September dumped 5.25 inches 
of rain and brought relief from 
the drought. A storm on Janu- 
ary 30th left IIV2 inches of 
snow and generally paralyzed 
traffic for a while. The mini- 
mum temperatures on the of- 
ficial weather bureau shelter 
in 1966 was 3 above zero on 
February 20th. 



Teacher: "Do you know Lin- 
coln's Gettysburg Address?" 

Johnny. "No completely, but 
the ZIP Code is 17325." 

EIGHTEEN 



MASSACHUSETTS 



The month of December 
was dry in the Massachusetts 
cranberry area. The precipi- 
tation stood at 2.47 inches 
which was approximately 1% 
inches below the normal for 
this month. It was warm with 
average daily temperatures iy2 
degrees above the seasonal 
normal for this period. 

The first two-thirds of the 
month was warm and the 
final one-third of December 
turned nuch colder. 

There were no heavy snow 
storms during this period of 
time. Total snow accumulation 
was 6.1 inch, this being slightly 
above the December average. 
The snowfall occurred on the 
4th, 22nd, 25th and 29th. 

Continued on Page 2A 



FASM BUREAU 




By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 

Legislative activities of Farm 
Bureau are vital to farmers. 
Mr. Philip N. Good, Executive 
Secretary and Legislative Coun- 
sel for the Massachusetts Farm 
Bureau Federation reports. 



WISCONSIN FOOD EXPOSITION 
TO BE HELD SEPTEMBER 15-24 

A living "Cinderella," com- 
plete with glass slippers and a 
story-book pumpkin coach, will 
be the theme personality of 
the new World Food Exposition 
in Madison, Wisconsin, Sep- 
tember 15-24, 1967. 

The ten-day annual event 
will unveil the 100-foot high, 6 
million - dollar, air - conditioned 
Coliseum on a 150-acre site 
on Lake Monona. 

Bruce C. Walter, Executive 
Director of the World Food 
Exposition, described the Ex- 
position as "a fantasia of food, 
but with a far-visioned purpose 
of seeking new answers to 
world hunger." 

Along with the Exposition, 
the World Dairy Show will 
also be held. Located in new 
facilities on the same 150-acre 
Exposition site, the Dairy Show 
will house over 1500 head of 
the world's finest cattle for open 
competition. 



THE CHALLENGING YEAR 

IN THE 

GENERAL COURT 

The year 1967 is to be one 
of the most challenging years 
for Farm Bureau in the Mas- 
sachusetts General Court. The 
farmers of Massachusetts have 
more vital issues facing them 
than ever before. The problems 
caused by legislation filed this 
year are equal to, if not ex- 
ceeding the obstacles that were 
overcome in obtaining the pas- 
sage of such excellent pieces of 
legislation as the Farm Animal 
Excise Tax. 

Farm labor and minimum 
wage for farm workers is to 
be a key issue. There have 
been several pieces of legisla- 
tion filed to remove farming 
from the exempt list under the 
minimum wage and hours law. 
This legislation has been filed 
by several sources including 
the Massachusetts State Labor 
Council, A.F.L.-C.I.O. and Sen- 
ator Beryl Cohen of Brookline 
and Marie Umana of East 
Boston. A t>'pical reaction by 
Farmers to the announcement 
that this legislation has been 
filed is that because \\'e are 
pa\ing more than the minimiun 
wage, this really won't hurt us. 
However, this is not so. The 



removal of the farming exemp- 
tion from the minimum wage 
law would mean that farm 
workers would be subject to 
overtime pay after a 40 hour 
week in Massachusetts. This 
would undoubtedly mean an 
increase in the farm labor force 
as farmers could not afford to 
pay their employees at an ov- 
ertime rate. It would also 
bring into consideration the 
cost of room, board and other 
contiibutions made by the em- 
ployer to the employee's wel- 
fare when computing the wage. 
It Avould also place farmers 
under the control of the De- 
partment of Labor and indus- 
tiy, making them subject to 
rules and regulations of the 
Commissioner and the Wage 
Board. 

There is a strong move to 
see that the minimum wage 
exemption is removed. Labor is 
making it a major issue, we 
understand, as are social think- 
ing Senators and Representa- 
tives who are for the "little 
man." They are going to push 
for this legislation. This will 
be a number one fight and is 
going to require a strong, well- 
financed Farm Bureau to win 
on this issue. 

Housing of Farm Workers 

There are three bills that 
have been filed dealing with the 
housing of farm workers. They 
have been filed by A.F.L.-C.I.O. 
Senator Beryl Cohen of Brook- 
line and of all the organizations, 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's 



Association. These various pieces 
of legislation would require 
farmers to obtain ficenses be- 
fore they could house mi- 
grant workers. 

The ironical thing in the 
whole matter of farm housing 
is that farmers through Farm 
Bureau in cooperation with the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health, the Boston Uni- 
versity of Public Health de- 
veloped Article three of the 
Sanitary Code entitled: "Hous- 
ing and Sanitary Standards for 
Farm Labor Camps." These 
standards which have the force 
of law have been considered 
to be the model for all mi- 
grant labor housing in the 
country. 

We now find that there are 
those who do not feel that the 
Sanitary Code goes far enough 
or the enforcement of the Sjin- 
itary Code is sufficient. These 
people fail to recognize that no 
legislative action can cause men 



to keep their barracks clean, 
especially when we have a 
rainy week. The movement of 
a Massachusetts Selectmen's As- 
sociation into this particular 
area is one that causes consid- 
erable concern on my part as 
to why they should get involved 
in this particular matter when 
the legislation asks for the li- 
censing by the Board of Health 
rather than the Board of Select- 
men. 



It causes me to wonder as 
to why organizations like the 
Selectmen's Association, Con- 
servation Council, etc. which 
are totally financed by the tax- 
payers' money should enter into 
the legislative arena, using your 
money and my money to pay 
for the legislative agents to 
carry out programs designed to 
hurt you and me. 



To be concluded next month 




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Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



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INC. 



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Telephones 62 MAIN STREET 

585-4541 — 585-2604 KINGSTON, MASS. 



NINETEEN 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 



and the only prolonged cold 
spell came from the 19th thru 
the 28th. Total precipitation for 
the month was 2.47 inches 
which is about 1% inches less 
than the average. Snowfall was 
6.1 inches which is slightly 
above average, snow occurred 
on the 4th, 22nd, 25th and 
29th. 



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78 Gibbs Avenue 

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HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
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For the year 1966 the tem- 
perature was slightly above 
normal with 69 degrees or 
about 0.2 of a degree a day 
on the plus side. Total precipi- 
tation was 36.87 inches, which 
was 10 inches below the thirty 
year average at the Cranberry 
Station, but 9 inches more than 
in 1965. Snowfall totalled ,34.2 
inches or about 25 percent 
above the mean. Highest tem- 
perature was 92 degrees on 
July 12 and the lowest — 2 de- 
grees on February 8 as recorded 
in the weather shelter at the 
Station. Largest single snow- 
fall for the year was 6.5 inches 
on February 25th and heaviest 
rainfall was 2.66 inches on 
November 2 and 3. 



Professor to his students: 
"This exam will be on the 
honor system. Please take seats 
three seats apart in alternate 
rows." 



TELEPHONE WARNNG 
DEVICE FOR CRANBERRIES 
Continued from Page 7 

devices would be connected 
across the line in parallel and 
closing of the circuit at any 
one location would set off the 
alarm. 

This signalling system is de- 
scribed primarily for the benefit 
of the Massachusetts cranberry 
growers who could benefit 
by its use. (The return from 
ten extra barrels of cranberries 
could easily pay the initial in- 
vestment and an annual reduc- 
tion in loss to frost of six bar- 
rels would pay the telephone 
service charges) . However, the 
availability of the telephone 
company Private-Line- Signal- 
Service apparently is not some- 
thing that is common know- 
ledge so this information alone 
may be more useful to other 
segments of agriculture than 
the design details outlined 
above. 




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Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 



- 585-3377 



TWENTY 



Wisconsin's New Water 
Resources Manaoement 
Law Expiained in Brief 



The following is the second instalment of the boiled-down version of 
the original bill to control water pollution and management of Wis- 
consin's water resources. Much of the information in the report is 
very general and probably oversimplified but, hopeftdly, it will pro- 
vide some background information that will help to clarify the bill 
which went into effect on August 1, 1966. 

The series is in three instalments, and will be concluded in the February 
issue of Cranberries. 



The Department of Resource 
Development must select water 
quality criteria as standards 
which adequately reflect sev- 
eral water quality factors. These 
factors include variabilitv of 



PART III 

The new water resource man- 
agement law authorizes the re- 
organized Department of Re- 
source Development to estab- 
lish water quality standards for natural water quality, present 
all waters of the state. conditions of streams, current 

and potential uses, regional in- 

These standards are applied terests, and the general public 
to a stream for the preservation interest, Brick points out. 
and protection of the present 

and future use of the water. Recognition of these variables 

These standards are based on resulted in the regional and 
the water quality criteria re- state advisory board provisions 
quired to maintain a particular of the water bill. These regi- 
use, says Ed Brick, water re- onal boards advise the Depart- 
sources speciaHst with the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin water re- 
sources center. 



In a trout stream, for ex- 



ment of Resource Development 
on regional water quality stand- 
ards and on state-wide water 
quaity standards. This is done 
through regional representatives 
ample, water temperature and on the state advisory board, 
dissolved oxygen content are 

important water quality criteria. The federal Water Quality 

Water for domestic use also Act of 1965 requires states to 
has many criteria, including select water quality criteria for 
bacterial quality, color, and to- interstate and boundary waters 
tal dissolved solids. before July 1, 1967. If these 

criteria are acceptable to the 
These requirements can be federal givemment, they will 
developed for a wide range of become the water quality stand- 
water uses through research ards for these waters. If the 



and a review of practical ex- 
perien'^e. Although final agree- 
ment on all of these require- 
ments has not been achieved, 
they are accepted as identifi- 
able b" most speciaHsts. 



states do not act, the federal 
government will set standards 
for them. 

Adequate enforcement pro- 
vision must accompany the es- 



tabhshment of sound water 
quahty standards to assure the 
success of this program, Brick 
stresess. Enforcement reHes 
on accurate knowledge of pol- 
lution and its sources. 

Officials need a system that 
can measure the quality of a 
stream and also detect the sour- 
ces and amounts of materials 
harmful to the quality of the 
stream. 

Wisconsin has a good start 
in the area of water quality 
control. Brick says. Stringent 
enforcement powers and pen- 
alties provided for by the new 
law augment the actions of the 
state committee on water pol- 
lution. 

These new powers, coupled 
with an increased teclmical 
staff and adequate legal sup- 
port, will allow Wisconsin to 
move steadily toward the goal 
of clean water through reason- 
able use of the state's water 
resources. 



PART IV 

Wisconsin's new water re- 
sources management law rec- 
ognizes the financial difficulties 

TWENTY-ONE 



that some communities and in- 
dustries might have in hand- 
hng and treating wastes, and 
proposes to do something about 
it. 

A state loan program for con- 
struction of "polhition preven- 
tion and abatement facihties" 
is provided in the law to help 
local government and sanitary 
districts. An annual appropria- 
tion of $6 million is provided 
to pay the bond interest costs 
assumed by the state as part 
of its program to stop pollution 
from municipalities. 

The precise meaning of the 
phrase "pollution prevention and 
abatement facilities" is still in 
question, and the resource de- 
velopment board has requested 
a legal clarification of the word- 
ing. It is probably that the 
legal interpretation will permit 
financial assistance to munici- 
palities for construction of 
sewerage treatment facilities, 
sewerage systems, interceptor 
sewers, and sewers around 



lakes. Common sewers around 
some lakes could replace in- 
adequate, private septic tanks, 
and lead to greater control ot 
lake pollution and enrichment. 

In a similar manner, the 
water law recognizes the sav- 
ing which can be realized by 
large scale treatment of wastes 
from several small communities. 
The law provides for joint ac- 
tion by two or more municipal- 
ities in solving their mutual 
problems of waste treatment. 

Private industries could also 
benefit from this program by 
contracting with municipalities 
for waste treatment services. 
The municipality could receive 
financial help from the state to 
construct necessary treatment 
facilities. 

Direct incentives to industry 
to construct pollution abatement 
facilities are also provided in 
the law. The first provision al- 
lows state income tax relief to 
industries which construct ap- 



proved pollution abatement fa- 
cilities. The second provision 
authorizes a permanent exemp- 
fion from real estate taxes on 
]:>; llution abatement equipment 
installed by industries. 

The law recognizes that it 
is of little value to install pol- 
lution abatement facilities if 
such equipment is not operated 
properly. To insure proper op- 
eration, the Department of Re- 
source Development will es- 
tablish a mandatory certification 
program for all sewerage plant 
and waterworks operators. 

To he Concluded Next Month 



A downtown retailer sent an 
order to a distributor for a 
sizeable amount of merchan- 
dise. The distributor wired: 
"Can't ship until \ou pay for 
your last consignment." 

The retailer wired back (col- 
lect ) : "Can't wait that long. 
Please cancel order." 



Roby's Propane Gas, Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



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TWENTY-TWO 




Dr. Frederick Chandler 

Dr. Frederick B. Chandler, 
a scientist widely known for 
his cranberry research work, 
died December 21 at Tobey 
Hospital in Wareham, Massa- 
chusetts after a long illness. 
He was 63 and had been a 
resident of Marion the last 10 
years, making his home at 65 
Front Street. 

Dr. Chandler retired two 
years ago from his work at the 
University of Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experimental Station 
in East Wareham. 

Dr. Chandler was born in 
Machias, Me. son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Rnlph Chandler, and had 
workeH in Wareham for more 
than 27 years. 

He was a graduate of the 
Universitv of Maine, where he 
received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in 1928. He received his 
Ph.D. from the University of 
Marvland in 1938. He said re- 
cently "T worked seven months 
out of t^he year and for three 
month? T went to school. That's 
how I earned my doctorate." 



Affectionately called "Doc" 
by his contemporaries, he was 
soft-spoken, thoughtful and me- 
ticulous in his work. One of his 
research programs involved 
growing species of cranberries 
several times larger than the 
present varieties. 

Although retired, the pro- 
fessor had been very active in 
research work and recently 
wcrked in Nova Scotia for the 
Canadian Government trying to 
find reasons for a production 
drop in cranberry crops in that 
country. 

He was a member of the 
ATO Fraternity, Wareham Ki- 
wanis Club, Harwood Chapter, 
A.F.&A.M. of Machias, Me., for 
40 year; the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors, 
and was an hororary member 
of several horticultural societies. 
He was a member of the First 
Congregational Church of Mar- 
ion. 

Funeral services were held 
Dec. 23 at the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Marion with 
the Rev. George A. Robinson 
officiating. Interment was at 
Evergreen Cemetery, Marion. 



Dennis Rudolph 

Dennis Rudolph, 46, cran- 
berry grower of the Knapp re- 
gion of Wisconsin, died of a 
heart attack Monday, Dec. 5, 
in a Tomah, Wis. hospital 
shortly after he was admitted. 

He was born in Monroe 
County Dec. 6, 1920, and had 
lived in Monroe and Jackson 
Counties all his life. He was 
in business with his brother 
Leonard. 

He married the former La- 
Von Doers 12 years ago, and 
they moved to Millston. Fol- 
lowing the death of his wife 
in 1957, he made his home with 
his mother-in-law. Mrs. Myrtle 
Bunde. 

Survivors include a son, Kim, 
at home; his father, George Ru- 
dolph, Warrens; three brothers, 
Neil and Leonard of Warrens 
and Vern of Necedah; a sister, 
Mrs. Robert Schroeder of Mid- 
dleton; three stepdaughters, 
Mrs. Tom Waarvik of Madison, 
Tayna and Devra Doers, Mills- 
ton; two stepsons, Lloyd Doers, 
at home and Terry, with the 
Air Force in Texas. 



R. Bruce Arthur 

R. Bruce Arthur, 61, husband 
cf Helen M. (Sawyer) Arthur 
of Curlew Pond, Plymouth, 
Mass. died Dec. 23. A native of 
Plymouth, he was the son of 
the late Richard W. Arthur and 
Ida L. (Taylor) Arthur. For 
many years he was engaged 
in cranberry culture. He was 
the president of the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Co. 

In addition to his widow, Mr. 
Arthur leaves two sisters, Mrs. 
Secundo (Doris) Zucchelli of 
Plymouth and Mrs. Franklin P. 
(Lillian) Wilbur of North Car- 
ver, Mass.; and several nieces 
and nephews. 

Private funeral services were 
held at Beaman's Funeral Home 
in Plymouth on Dec. 27, at 11 
a.m. The Rev. Edwin T. An- 
thony of the Church of the 
Pilgrimage, Congregational, of- 
ficiated. 

TWENTY-THREE 



Henry Kissinger 

Funeral services were held 
Wednesday at St. Paul's Lu- 
theran Church, Tomah, Wis- 
consin, for Henry Kissinger, 83, 
retired cranberry grower, who 
died at Tomah Jan. 1 after a 
long illness. 

Mr. Kissinger was born April 
17, 188.3, in the town of Siegel, 
W^ood County, Wis., the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Kissin- 
ger. He was engaged in the 
cranberry business for 40 years, 
retiring in 1956. 

Surviving are his wife, the 
former Celia Zabel of Siegel; 
a daughter, Mrs. Ted Olsen, 
Warrens; a son. Glen, Madison; 
two sisters, Mrs. Emil Staven, 
Rt. 4. and Mrs. Orren Marks, 
W'isconsin Rapids, and one 
granddaughter. 

REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 18 

WISCONSIN 



Weather 

Winter Aveather has been 
slow in making its appearance 
in Wisconsin. Temperatlires 
have averaged well above nor- 
mal in all areas so far in De- 
cember with the mercury on 
many days rising into the 30's 
or low 40's in the north and 
the 40's and 50's over the south. 
A few scattered nighttime read- 
ings near zero or below were 
recorded mainly in the north- 
west on the 1st and 2nd and 
again on the 11th - 12th. 

The first 10-day period of 
the month was mostly cloudy 
and damp. Some glaze and 
sleet was reported in most 
areas on the 4th. Frequent fog 
with rain showers in the south 
and east and rain and light 
snow ov^er the northwest dom- 
inated the weather during the 
following six days. The snow 
cover of 1 to 5 inches meas- 
ured on the survey date in the 
extreme northwest fell during 
this period. Some thunder with 
hail accompanied some of these 
showers across the south. 

TWENTY-FOUR 



Heaviest rainfall amounts of 1 
to 2 inches were reported in 
extreme southern and eastern 
counties. 

The period from December 
10th to 20th was mostly mild 
and pleasant with a fair amount 
of sunshine. Light snow of 2 
to 4 iches dusted the entire 
state on the 19th. 

The very mild temperatures 
around mid-month returned to 
more seasonal levels after De- 
cember 19-20 when a light snow 
of 2 to 4 inches fell throughout 
the state. Heavier amounts of 
5 and 6 inches were reported 
in the Lake Winnebago area. 
This snow cover, together with 
additional dustings, resulted in 
a white Christmas tlirough- 
out Wisconsin. 

Temperatures averaged well 
below normal during the last 
week of the month as night- 
time reading near zero or be- 
low occurred on most days. 
The first heavy snowstorm of 
the season moved across the 
state on the 28th depositing 
snowfall amounts of 6 to 12 
inches in most areas. Lesser 
amounts of 2 to 5 inches from 
this storm were reported in 
some extreme northwestern coun- 
ties and in Kenosha County in 
the southeast. The snow is of 
the light, powdery variety with 
good insulating properties. 

Frost Report 

The frost penetration this 
year has been more rapid than 
it was a year ago. Last year 
there was little or no frost in 
the south central and south- 
eastern counties of the state 
while this year the average 
depths range from 2 to 11 in- 
ches. In the rest of the state 
a year ago frost depths were 
reported between 3 and 10 
inches whereas current indica- 
tions are from 4 to 24 inches. 

Winter Chores Underway 

Growers are now busy sand- 
ing and quite a lot of sanding 
will be done thru the winter. 
Roads \vill also be built during 



the winter months as this is 
about the only time this can be 
done. 

Due to the heavy snow cover 
it looks like growers are going 
to ha\'e plenty of water for 
the spring flood although last 
fall the growers in the central 
part of the state did not have 
enough water to get complete 
winter flooding. 

1966 Production 

There were 102.3 barrels of 
cranberries produced per acre 
in 1966 compared with 93.8 
barrels per acre last year and 
95.0 barrels per acre for the 
5-year average. 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 

ROBERTS 

IRRIGATION 

SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



CORRUGATED 

CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Aluminum — Galvenized 
Asphalt Coated 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 

Area 715 384-3121 




serving llie WISCONSIN groweps % 



FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 

for delivery in 1966 

$150 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 

INTERESTED 
IN 
PURCHASING 
WISCONSIN 
CRANBERRY 
PROPERTIES 



*4>***>k***** 



Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



OUR PRODUCTS 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Whole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange ReUsh 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cran-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc 




EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 



Please Mention 

CRANBERRIES 

When You Answer Advertisements 



VWWVAWW^WWAMJ'^A^^R. 



DANA 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 









WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATf ION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANt M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RH/ ^ 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



f(^M 




Some cranberries have a 
better future than others* 

Some cranberries get picked and packed and sent to mar* 
ket and no one ever hears of them. 

Some years they fetch a pretty good price. And other years 
...well, that^s agricuUure for you. 

But, some cranberries get picked and packed and sent to 
market with Ocean Spray labels on them. 

They get their pictures taken. They get talked about in 
magazines and newspapers. And on TV and radio from 
coast to coast. 

Over the years, theyVe fetched a better price for their 
growers than any other cranberry. 

Every year, people buy more of them than all other 
cranberries combined. 

Because, every year, Ocean Spray does more things with 
more cranberries than anybody else. 



Ocean spray. 



FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHIP IN OCEAN SPRAY, CONTACT /fNY'^l|E(:T 



FRENCH 



BOWDITCH 




^^^Wr 



& SOIL sciBXE3 l;::^ary 



■^ r^^ '7 




• <d* 



RENCH 



fRSI 



CRANBERRIES^ 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 




IN 

THIS 

ISSUE 

FEIIUMV 
19(7 



-^ BIBECTOBY lor cpanlierpy gpoweps -^ 



The 

CHARLES W. HARRIS! 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



Attention 
Bog Owners 

Why Not Subscribe 
to 

CRANBERRIES 
Magazine 



It would be 
a Good 
Business 
Investment 




Electricity — key to progress 



in Industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 



NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 




The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLIAMSTOVVN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HO.MELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

632 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogt and 
Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WARBHAM, MASS Tel. CY 5-2000 



Massachusetts Oxygen N. J. Buys Whitesbog 
Deficiency Warning For ^Green Acres' 



The present cold weather 
and recent snow has resulted 
in conditions that could cause 
oxygen deficiency on flooded 
bogs. Cold weather is ex- 
pected to continue. The only 
practical method of elimina- 
ting the oxygen deficiency 
hazard is to remove com- 
pletely the winter flood at 
this time- 

Shallow-flooded, level bogs 
probably have most of the 
vines embedded in ice. These 
should not be touched. Deep- 
flooded, unlevel bogs should 
be fully drained if the grower 
can replace the flood later to 
prevent winter-killing. 

Growers without reflooding 
capacity must make the diffi- 
cult decision of 1) pulling off 
the flood to avoid oxygen-de- 
ficiency injury in hopes that 
present snow and ice will last 
into March, or 2) leave the 
flood on, protecting from win- 
terkill but taking the chance 
of leaf-drop. Chances seem 
better than 50-50 that the 
snow and ice cover will last. 



Whitesbog, one of the larg- 
est remaining cranberry and 
blueberry tracts in New Jer- 
sey was purchased for the 
state's Green Acres program 
the State Department of Con- 
servation and Development 
officially announced this 
month- 

The 3,000 acre tract is 
spread over Pemberton town- 
ship in Burlington County. 
The land adjoins Lebanon 
State Forest. 

It was reported the state 
paid $431,803 to purchase the 
property from the J. J. White 
Company. 

The transfer of the prop- 
erty to the state means a loss 
in $255,000 in ratables to Pem- 
berton township and that ap- 
proximately 350 acres were 
retained along Rte. 70 where 
the White Co. is developing 
new cranberry bogs and blue- 
berry fields and plans to erect 
new quarters for field work- 
ers. 




MAY 

WE APOLOGIZE? 



. . . for being late with this 
issue of Cranberries. We can 
assure you that it was reasons 
beyond our control, and that 
we will be back on schedule 
with our next issue. We 
thank you for your patience 
in this matter. 



DONT BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 

Until you have 
seen the ..•** 

BILGRAM 

MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 




Carver, Mass. 



Tel. 866-4582 



40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 



CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



I 



ONE 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

I^JOW IN STOCK! 50,000 ft. Redwood Flume Lumber 

m 2x6 2x8 2x10 
Square Edge or can be matched on order - ALSO- 
^x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. COODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



Massachusetts 
dull Meetings 



The remaining Cranberry 
Club meetings are as follows: 

Barnstable County 

Barnstable — March 16 
7:30 P.M. 

Plymouth County 

Kingston — March 14 
7:30 P.M. 

Rochester — March 1& 
2:00 P.M. 



SHARON BOX and LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 79. 1 5 inches Rain 



SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



C&L Equipntent Co, 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS POWER WHEELBARROWS 

RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



Recorded for 1966 
In Washington 

Cranguyma Farms reported 
a tremendous letdown of 
moisture for December end- 
ing 1966 with 20.13 inches, 
the greatest amount of rain 
for 24 hours during the 
month being 2.77 inches on 
December 4th. ^ 

Total inches of precipitation 
reported for that area in 1966 
amounted to 79.1 inches. 




CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 



ABC 



UTILITY 



^^Sp£^ 




W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CRl 

4511 E. Osborne Ave., Tampa, Florida 

1001 9empsey Rd.. Milpitas, Calif. 



TWO 



Mess. 

Cranberry 

Station 

S Field Notes 



by IRVIIMG E. DEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist 



Personals 

Dr. Robert Devlin attended 
the Northeastern Weed Con- 
trol conference in New York 
City from January 4-6. Bob 
presented a paper on "Pre- 
liminary Studies in the influ- 
ence of Indole-3-Acetic Acid 
and Gibberellic Acid on the 
Uptake of Simazine by Ag- 
rostis Alba." This describes 
the effect of spraying summer 
grass or red top grass with 
growth hormones before ap- 
plying simazine- Bob found 
that smaller amounts of sima- 
zine would kill the grass that 
was treated with growth hor- 
mones. 

Prof. Stan Norton attended 
the Wisconsin Cranberry 
Growers Association meeting 



held in Wisconsin Rapids on 
January 19. Stan presented 
a paper on "Sprinkler Frost 
Protection." 

Dr. Devlin and the author 
attended the Northeastern 
Regional Meeting of the 
American Society for Horti- 
cultural Science in Cam- 
bridge on January 27-28. A 
paper was presented on "'Pre- 
liminary Studies on the Effect 
of Gibberellic Acid and Gib- 
rel on the Parthenocarpic 
Development in Vaccinum 
macrocarpon." This describes 
the effects of using gibber- 
ellic acid to increase the set 
of cranberries. 

Dr. Wes Miller, Andrew 
Charig and the author have 
published a paper in the 



October issue of Weeds, the 
official publication of the 
Weed Society of America. 
The title is "Persistence of 
Dichlobenil in Cranberry 
Bogs" This paper deals with 
residue analyses of cranberry 
bog soils treated at various 
times over a period of two 
years with dichlobenil (cas- 
oron ). Reprints of this ar- 
ticle are available. 

We at the Cranberry Sta- 
tion were saddened by the 
passing of Mr. Clarence Hall 
on January 29. We all knew 
him as "Josh" and he was a 
fine friend to all of us at the 
Station as well as the whole 
cranberry industry. 



Continued on Page ]6 



* 
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* 

* 

* 
* 
4* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
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* 
* 



* 
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* 



SPRINKLER SYSTEMS ARE OUR BUSINESS 

More than 20 years experience in design and layout of AMES 
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. We are available to plan your sprinkler system 
for both frost control and irrigation. We guarantee the correct pressure 
so necessary for the best sprinkler operation. Our quotations are for 
complete systems including suction line, pump (Hale, Marlow, Gould), 
AMES UTILITY main, AMES quick connecting adapters, plastic pipe, 
bronze fittings and Rainbird sprinklers. 

Cranberry Growers — Increase the pressure at the lateral sprinkler 
by using on the main AMES SADDLE TEES with 2" outlets in place of 
the usual 1" outlets. Pressure increases begin with 10 pounds. Only 
AMES mains can give you the right size lateral outlet that will eliminate 
pressure loss at the lateral take-off of the plastic pipe. 

CHARLES W. HARRIS CO., INC. 

451 OLD SOMERSET AVENUE 
NORTH DIGHTON, MASS. 02764 

Telephone 824-5607 



t 

* 
4> 



4> 



t 
t 

4 
4 
•» 

I 
t 



THREE 




solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems Eire ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special IH" or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
flat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 

see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information ' 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm 4 Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, Inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw S, Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



i 



m. 



AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

JOHN BEAN DIVISION 

> Lansing,, Michigan 



FOUR 




Fees 6^ lO 

ISSUE OF ©eCEMBS?, 1966 / VOL. 31 - NO.-Sr 



WHY THE APATHY? 

Some months ago, while preparing for 
a change in the format of Cranberries Mag- 
azine, we thought it might be a good idea if 
we could include a short article about some 
of our advertisers. With this in mind, we 
developed a column which we called "Spot- 
light on Suppliers." In order to get the idea 
started and to show other advertisers what 
we had in mind, we wrote about two local 
area suppliers. 

We then wrote to a dozen or so of our 
regular advertisers in all parts of the coun- 
try and offered them this space, without 
charge, if they would send us the informa- 
tion they wanted included in the story and 
a photograph which would be representative 
of their business. 

The results — or should I say, lack of 
results — were amazing. Of all the letters 
sent out we did not receive a single reply. 

Having been in the field of public re- 
tions before becoming editor of this maga- 
zine, and knowing how difficult free space 
is to obtain in any publication and how 
valuable it can be, I was awed at this 
apathy. 

I could not, and still cannot, understand 
why there was not an overwhelming re- 
sponse to this offer. 

Later, in these pages, the same offer 
was made. The response — the same as the 
first — none! 

Now — for the third time we are mak- 
ing the same offer. This will be our last 
attempt to "give" something to our adver- 
tisers as a sort of "thank you" for their con- 
fidence in us. Let me again point out that 
we are offering this space without charge. 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Ware'ham. Mas- 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 



CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Oregon 

FRED HAGELSTEIN 
Coquille, Oregon 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 



If you would like to take advantage of 
this offer, here is all you have to do. 

Write about 300 words about your firm, 
things you feel would be of interest to our 
readers — when your business was estab- 
lished, what you supply, how many employ- 
ees you have, a history of your firm — things 
of this type. 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston. Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



FIVE 




Joe Hoelting Promoted 
By Dean Foods Co. 

Joseph Hoeltinj^ has been 
promoted to manager of pro- 
duce procurement for Dean 
Foods Company. The an- 
nouncement was made by 
Raymond K. Esmond, vice 
president for production. 

In his new capacity Mr. 
Hoelting will be responsible 
for procurement of pickles, 
cranberries, and other pro- 
duce items used by Dean 
P^'oods Company. 

He has an extensive back- 
ground in sales and general 
management and was an ex- 
ecutive with the Indian Trail 
Cranberry Company when it 



was acquired by Dean Foods 
Company two years ago. 

A resident of Wisconsin 
Rapids, Wisconsin, he will 
continue to operate from that 
citv. 



r 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

Authorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 

MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



Robv's Propane Gas, Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



295-3737 



HALE PUMPS SERVE YOUR 

IRRIGATION PURPOSES BEST! There's a 
Hale pump to do any irrigation job — 
and do it better! Hale pumps have 
MATCHED POWER, designed to correctly 
match the power of the driving engines 
and give you top perfornnance. Hale 
also has PREMIUM MATERIALS and 
DESIGN SIMPLICITY which assure long 
life, high operating efficiency, Ics"^ down 
time and quick, easy servicing. 

Shown here are ONLY 3 OF A LARGE 

LINE of Hale units. See us for details. 



40FW.A medium-size centrifuga 
pumping unit with a wide range 
of volumes and pressures. Pumps 
up to 600 GPM; pressures up to 
140 PSI. Skid ortrailer mounted 




SOFA irrigation pumping 
signed for most economical oper- 
ation with large volume guns at 
high pressures. Pumps up to 1000 
GPM; pressures up to 200 PSI. 
Skid or trailer mounted. 




• WHAT ABOUT HALE RELIABILITY? 

Many Hale Pumps are presently working on cran- 
berry bogs after 20 years of continuous sevice ! 

* SERVICE 

We are stocking pump parts and will be able to 
service all equipment sold by us for many years 
to come. 

All makes of Irrigation Pumps can continue to be 
used regardless of their age. 



"25 Years Working With Cranberry People on a Local Basis" 



SIX 



ClAltENCEJ.F.IIAU, 
FORMER PURin OF 
CRANOHIRIES. SOCCOMRS 



The cranberry industry has 
lost a friend ! 

Few in the industry are aware 
of it but Clarence ]. F. Hall, 
was, perhaps, one of their 
greatest champions. 

Now, "Josh" is no longer with 
us for he succumbed to a long 
illness after having been rushed 
from his Great Neck Road home 
to Tobey Hospital in Ware- 
ham, Massachusetts. He was 
68. 

We like to think of Mr. Hall 
as the founder and former pub- 
lisher of this magazine. How- 
ever, he was much more than 
this. He was a writer, and an 
artist as well. But, most of 
all, to the cranberry growers 
throughout this country and in 
Canada he was a friend. 

During his 30 years at the 
helm of Cranberries, he learned 
to love the industry and all 
the people in it. 

Mr. Hall is survived by his 
widow, Edith (Savary) Halk 

In addition to Mrs. Hall he 
is survived by a son, David, of 
Forest Hills, New York; and a 
sister, Mrs. Herbert E. Dustin 
of West Wareham. 

Funeral services were held 
in the Cornwell Memorial 
Chapel in Wareham- 



He was born on October 25, 
1898 in Brewster, Massachu- 
setts, son of Lemuel C. and 
Lettie M. G. (Foster) Hall. 
Mr. Hall was graduated from 
Wareham (Mass.) High School 
and attended Boston Normal 
Art School. 

Prior to retiring from the 
publishing field three years 
ago, Mr. Hall had been assistant 
editor of the Wareham Courier, 
a position he took over after 
the death of his father and 
which he held for 21 years. 

He was known by cranberry 
people from coast to coast and 
had made many trips to various 
cranberry growing areas in the 
United States including Wash- 
ington, Oregon, Wisconsin and 
New Jersey. He and Mrs. Hall 
also travelled to Europe and 
only last year spent a vaca- 
tion in Trinidad, So. America 
where he requested and was 
served cranberry sauce with his 
meal. 

For some time before joining 
his father in the publishing 
business, he was employed as 
a reporter on the New Bed- 
ford (Mass.) Evenijig Stand- 
ard, during which time he de- 
veloped a well-known weekly 
column "Just by Josh" and was 
writer of many feature articles, 
many of which related to the 
cranberry industry. Mr. Hall 



was a direct descendant of Cy- 
rus Cahoon of Harwich (Mass.) 
who is credited with the de- 
velopment of the famous "early 
black" cranberry strain. 

For a time Mr. and Mrs. Hall 
operated a seven-acre cranberry 
bog in East Taunton (Mass.). 

Mr. Hall had a keen interest 
in local history and was an au- 
thority on the background of 
the Wareham area. He also 
pursued his career in art both 
as a painter and as a photog- 
rapher. He was a charter 
member of Marion, Mass. Art 
Center as well as the Wareham 
Historical Society. He was an 
active member of the Cape 
Cod Cranberry Growers Asso- 
ciation and the Farm Bureau 
of Brockton. 

"Josh" Hall was somewhat of 
a legend in the cranberry indus- 
try. He loved the industry and 
the people in it. He was born 
and brought up in cranberry 
country, and he never left it 
for any great length of time. 

His writings reflected his 
enthusiasm for everything 
connected with cranberries. 

His pen has been stilled. 
The cranberry industry has 
lost a friend ' 



30 



SEVEN 



ol3iruai^y 



E. L. Bartholomew 

One of the leading Ware- 
ham, Massachusetts cranberry 
growers and a retired metal- 
lurgist, Edward L. Bartholo- 
mew, 82, of 504 Main Street, 
died January 8th at home 
following a long illness. 

Mr. Bartholomew was born 
in Vermont, the son of the 
late L. and Ellen (Prudence) 
Bartholomew. He was grad- 
uated from Mount Herman 
School for Boys in 1904, and 
from the University of Ver- 
mont in 1908- His first po- 
sition following graduation 
was in Wareham as a chem- 
ist with the Tremont Nail Co. 
and later he became superin- 
tendent of the steel mill of 
that company. 

He left that position to 
work at the United Shoe Co., 
in Beverley as a metallurgist, 
and retired from that firm 
after 35 years as chief engin- 
eer. 

Mr. Bartholomew has main- 
tained his home in Wareham 
which was the former Leon- 
ard Estate on Main Street, 
Following his retirement, he 
becarne a cranberry grower 
and was president of the 
Cranberry Growers Associa- 
tion and a member of the 
Cranberry Growers Ex- 
change. 

As a life member and a 
past chairman of the Boston 
Chapter of the American So- 
ciety for Metals, Mr. Bar- 
tholomew was a national 
rustee of the American Met- 
als Society, a member of the 
National Metals Band Bank 
Committee, and a life member 
of the board of directors of 
the First Saugus Iron Works 
Association at Saugus. 



He was one of the oldest 
life members and past master 
of Society Harmony Lodge 
A.F- and A.M. in Wareham. 
He was also a member of the 
Draft Board Local 130 of Mid- 
dleboro and a trustee of the 
Wareham Free Library. One 
of his hobbies was the resto- 
ration of antique furniture 
for his friends. 

Besides his widow, Mrs. 
Alice (Hurley) Bartholomew, 
he is survived by a son. Dr. 
Edward L. Bartholomew, a 
member of the faculty at 
Stores University, Conn., and 
four grandchildren. 

Funeral services were pri- 
vate, conducted by the Rev. 
Roland V. E- Johnson, pastor 
of the First Congregational 
Church. Interment is at 
Center Cemetery in Ware- 
ham. 



Henry F. Bain 

Henry F. Bain, 72, a plant 
pathologist associated with 
the Wisconsin cranberry in- 
dustry from 1942 until his 
retirement in 1959, died 
this month at his home in 
Maggie Valley, N. C. 

While a resident of Wis- 
consin, Mr. Bain was em- 
ployed by the Biron Cran- 
l3 e r r y Company, Midwest 
Cranberry Company and Bad- 
ger Cranberry Company at 
Shell Lake and the Cranberry 
Lake Development Company 
at Phillips. 

Mr. Bain is survived by 
his wife, Laura and two sons, 
Richard and Robert, the lat- 
ter of Washington, D. C. 



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Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 

Phone 423-4871 



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NINE 



Cranterry Chk 
Meeting Hell 
In Kingstnn 



The Feb. meeting of the 
Mass. Cranberry club was held 
on Tuesday, February 14, at 
the Red Community Building 
in Kingston with a good at- 
tendance on hand. 

The meeting was called 
to order by Lawrence Cole, 
Club president, who asked 
Secretary-Treasurer, Robert 
Alberghini to read the min- 
utes of the previous meeting. 
The minutes having been ap- 
proved Mr. Cole introduced 
some of the guest speakers 
of the evening. 

First to be introduced were 
Mr. Warren Arnold of Pro- 
duction Credit Association; 
Mr. Allison Cook of the 
National Bank of Wareham 
and Mr. Charles Starr of the 
Farmers Home Administra- 
tion. Each of these gentle- 
men, in the above order, 
spoke of their organizations 
as "Sources of Credit." Each 
described the types of loans 
it could or could not grant 
and the reasons why. Several 
questions were asked of these 
gentlemen and satisfactory 
answers were given in re- 
sponse. 

After their presentation, it 
was explained by Mr. Cole 
that Mr. Philip Good of 
Mass. Farm Bureau Federa- 
tion, who was to have given 
a talk on "The Sales Tax," 
was unable to be present 
since he was still at the State 
House where he had taken 
part in hearings which were 
held that day. It was hoped 
that Mr. Good would be able 
to report the results of those 
hearings at a later date. 

After a short break in the 
proceedings, Mr. Cole intro- 

TEN 



duced the panel for a discus- 
sion of water harvesting. The 
members of this panel were 
Mr. David Eldridge of Ware- 
also of Wareham; and Pro- 
fessor J. S. Norton of the 
Cranberry Station in East 
Wareham. 

Mr. David Eldridge was the 
first speaker on the subject 
of water harvesting and be- 
gan by stating that there has 
been definite proof of in- 
creased yield with growers 
who have gone to water 
harvesting. In his first year 
of water picking it still has 
to be seen that this is so. 
He stated that he thought it 
would produce more tonage, 
but the increased production 
figures thus far have come 
from Wisconsin, the West 
Coast and New Jersey where 
they have been water picking 
for some time. "Another 
year will tell the tale." 
Dave also mentioned that, 
between him and Ken Beaton, 
they had picked 75 or 80 
acres. "We picked, I think, 
most every day that we 
could, barring a very severe 
rain storm. We could start 
early in the morning and end 
up at four or five o'clock in 
the evening." Most import- 
ant conditions for water pick- 
ing would be the ability to 
flow the bog up heavily and 
the ability also to have one 
more flooding. The water 
should be above the vines so 
that the berries could be 
boomed into a corner of the 
bog and elevated out of the 
water. He explained that, on 
the west coast, they use alu- 
minum and plywood dykes. 
These are put into the soil by 
cutting into it to divide large 



bogs into smaller ones. They 
are then flooded and picked, 
after which they use the 
same water for picking the 
next section. In New Jersey 
they are cutting their bogs 
into about six acre plots. 
Their bogs are quite similar 
to Massachusetts. They are 
old and quite large which 
necessitates their being cut 
up into smaller areas for wa- 
ter picking. "I think that, 
here in Massachusetts, par- 
ticularly, it's very difficult, 
on some of the old bogs, to 
easily water pick," Dave 
stated. This was because they 
may be out of grade, may 
have stumps which have come 
to the surface of the bog, and 
may have areas in the center 
where they have settled. In 
the case where this has hap- 
pened and the center is lower, 
it would be necessary to 
start at the center of the bog, 
pick that and then flood the 
remainder until the highest 
part of the bog has been 
reached. 

Berries have been held in 
the water for periods of four 
or five days with no notice- 
able deterioration. Dave went 
on to say that he would not 
advise picking more than six 
acres. He would hesitate to 
pick more than this under 
less than ideal conditions. 
One of the advantages of wa- 
ter harvesting which was 
mentioned was the fact that 
it can be done almost any 
day, regardless of the wea- 
ther, exceptions being only 
severe rain or winds. In case 
of frost warnings bogs may 
be flooded and be ready for 
water harvesting the next 

Continued on Pa<i^e 19 





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2 sligrhtly beaten eggs 
1 cup milk 

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Vi cup chopped green pepper 



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1 teaspoon dry mustard 
ll-i pounds ground lean beef 
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TWELVE. 



New Irrigation Coupling 
Designed for Growers 



With over 15 years of work- 
ing with Cranberry Growers, 
and living with their prob- 
lems, Phil Tropeano, chief en- 
gineer of Larchmont Engine- 
ering, decided it was time to 
do something to eliminate all 
the small nipples, tees, bush- 
ings, reducers, " and in many 
cases increasers, when ma- 
king up a lateral line coup- 
ling. 

To do this — Phil says — 
"why not just send the water 
where it should go — directly 
out the sides." 

As cranberry bogs have the 
world's most unusual shapes, 
it has always been a problem 
in designing the system as to 
where to start with the first 
sprinkler- So it was decided 
to start right on the pipe it- 
self. This eliminates many 
saddles, inserts, etc. 

It might be of interest to 
the Cranberry grower to 
know who Phil is. Phil is 
the inventor of man-made 
snow. Member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Agricultural 
Engineers, and through his 
efforts his company was 
awarded a citation from the 
United States government for 
its contributions in agricul- 
tural irrigation in foreign 
countries. Incidentally, golf 
course owners know him as 
the inventor of the world's 
largest pop-up fairway irriga- 
tion sprinkler. 

If a cranberry grower wants 
any answers to his pumping, 
or irrigation problems . . . 
just call Phil. 



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ENGINEERING & IRRIGATION CO. 
Lexington, Massachusetts 02173 



THIRTEEN 



FARM BUREAU 



fllll 



By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 



Legislative activities of Farm 
Bureau are vital to farmers. 
Mr. Philip N. Good, Executive 
Secretary and Legislative Coun- 
sel for the Massachusetts Farm 
Bureau Federation reports. 



THE CHALLENGING YEAR 

IN THE 

GENERAL COURT 

( Continued from last month ) 

The second area of concern 
is that of farm land assessment. 
Last year Farm Bureau filed a 
bill for the assessment of open 
spaces at a value related to 
its use. .This year we will file 
legislation which is more like 
the New Jersey program which 
was written up in previous is- 
sue of the New England Farmer 
magazine. The hill calls for a 
constitutional amendment which 
would permit the assessing of 
farm land at a value related 
to its agricultural use. It would 
require that there be a mini- 
mum of five acres and that the 
land would be farmed two 
years prior to coming \mder the 
program. This program has 
worked well in New Jersey and 
would work well in Massachu- 
setts. However, the job to get 
the program across may not ho 
accomplished in one vcar. 



There are several other bills 
filed dealing with the mainte- 
nance of open spaces and the 
setting up of conservation re- 
serves. These bills basically 
would permit towns by action 
of the town meeting to decide 
that they woidd adopt a policy 
of open spaces, whereby a 
farmer or land owner in a 
given section of the town 
could have his property as- 
sessed at a value related to 
its use provided he was willing 
to sign off to the town a de- 
velopment easement for a 
period of ten to twenty years. 
The sponsors of these pieces of 
legislation i n cl u d e Professor 
Charles Elliot of Harvard 
School of Planning, the Massa- 
chusetts Forests and Parks As- 
sociation, and the Massachusetts 
Department of Commerce. 

There also is another land 
tax bill which has been filed 
by Senator John Barrus which 
is a rewrite of Chapter 61, the 
Poorest Land Tax Law. Here 
again, action on the. part of a 
well-financed Farm Bureau can 
produce results for the farm- 
ers of Massachusetts. 

A third important issue to 
farmers in Massachusetts will 
be the sales tax. Although we 
have a sales tax, there have 
been a number of bills filed 
for amending the tax. These 
include bills filed by Farm 
Bureau relative to a definition 
cf agricult\iral production, the 
inclusion of mink under the 
exempt list as well as veterin- 
ary medicines. Every bill 
dealing with the sales tax must 
be closely watched by Farm 
Bureau to see that nothing is 
done which will cause farmers 
to sufl^er a loss of an exemption 
now granted imder the Sak\s 
Tax Law. 

A good example of what can 
happen occurred in the Special 
Session of the General Court 
dealing with mental health. At- 
tempts were made to take away 
from industry certain exemp- 
ticns they have under the sales 



t i\ in order to raise one-hun- 
dred million dollars to pay for 
the Mental Health Program. 
This is a sine sign that from 
time to time there will be at- 
tempts made to reduce the 
sales tax exemption list in or- 
der to secure additional income 
for the Coinmonwealth. 

The Departjnent of Agricul- 
ture has again filed a number 
of bills correcting and updat- 
ing the laws which they ad- 
minister. These bills will merit 
the support of Farm Bureau. 

Other areas in whicji Farm 
Bureau must become interested 
and watch pending legislation 
are in the fields of natural re- 
sources; University of Massa- 
chusetts; labor legislation in- 
cluding the payment of im- 
employment compensation ben- 
efits to those who are on strike; 
Sunday hunting; the abolition 
of county government; legisla- 
tion governing trucks; farm 
plates; packaging of farm prod- 
ucts — just to mention a few. 

It appears that this years 
legislative program will consist 
of action on better than foiu- 
hundred bills. At this writing 
we have not had the oppor- 
tunity to examine the titles of 
all pieces of legislation filed 
and until we do, we will not be 
able to give an accurate ap- 
praisal of the total legislatixc 
program. The legislative pro- 
gram will be a strenuous un- 
dertaking. We will be able to 
make it work and come up 
with another winning year in 
the Farm Bureau Legislative 
Program. 

Farm Bureau members must 
support the program actively 
by seeking legislative support 
for the Farm Bureau's position 
on key legislation. Farm Bur- 
eau members must get to 
know their Senators and Rep- 
resentati\es on more than a 
casual basis. In this way we 
will be able to ha\'e broad 
bv-p:irtisan support for oiu" 
semi-annual program. 



FOURTEEN 



spring tonic for cranbeny yields: 
Chloro IPC Herbicide before bud-break. 




Right now, while established 
plants are dormant, you can 
protect your cranberries against 
early weed competition. A treat- 
ment before bud-break with 
Chloro IPC selective herbicide 
stops germinating weeds and 
grasses such as annual bluegrass, 
bentgrass, bluejoint grass, 
dodder, horsetail, loosestrife, 
rushes (Juncus), sickle grass, 



turkeyfoot grass and velvet- 
grass. In Massachusetts, con- 
sult your Extension Service 
Cranberry Weed Control Chart. 
Once its work is done, PPG 
Chloro IPC breaks down with 
rising temperatures. This elimi- 
nates problems of build-up in 
soil or carryover. Chloro IPC 
also shows a broad margin of 
tolerance to cranberry plants. 



Uniform, hard granules of 20% 
Granular Chloro IPC are easy 
to measure and apply with air 
or ground equipment. 

Check your local extension 
service or supplier for more 
complete information or write 
Department 7713, Pittsburgh 
Plate Glass Company, Chem- 
ical Division, One Gateway 
Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222. 



Chemicals 




INDUSTRIES 



FIFTEEN 



MASS. STATrON FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 

Weather inches less than our 30 year discard their copy. There is 
Tanuarv wa^ cprtainlv a average- We recorded only a supply of these charts still 
January was ceriamiy a Q^^g.^^jf i^^h of snow for the available at the Station. Any- 
warm month for us averaging ^^^^^ ^^.^^ .^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ J^ 

over 5 degrees a day above a • i i i. t^ ^i j 

normal in temoerature We average. Agam, however, we send us a request. Dr. Chand- 

normal in temperature we ^^^ .^ January 1934 and ler's fertilizer bulletin is also 

recorded a maximum at the , y, . 

t, , o+ +• ^^ CO ^«. January 1951 we had no snow available. 

Cranberry Station of 63 de- . /, j^ 

grees on January 24th. This recoraea nere. ^^^^ 

was the warmest January ■ . 

24th here, breaking the old Growers are reminded that 

record of 62 degrees set in Chans February and March is a good 

1933, however, the warmest ^he cranberry Desticide ^'""^ *^ ""^^f ^°^' ^°'' ^^^ 

January temoerature we have -^^e cranoerry pesticiqe presence of green scum 

January temperaiure we iidve ^^^arts have been revised and around shore ditches If 

ever recorded came on Janu- are heinp nrinted Thp Cran- ^^^"^^ .f^°[^ n ? L x .i 

arv 1^ iq?9 and it was 67 f being printea.ine uran- present, it should be treated 

ary 15, 1932, ^na it was 0/ ^^ Station will mail the ^^u ^ '^^pr sulfate usinf^ the 

degrees. As mild as it was ^p^ charts to Prowers in ^itn copper sullate using tne 

iht^ vpar thpre are at least ^5 i ,^, growers in recommendations on the 1966 

this year tnere are at leasi ^^rch. The assistance and ^^.^^^ ^u^^f 

9 other years when the av- observations of the growers ^^^^ ^^' 

erage January temperature ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^.^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

at the Cranberry Station was ^.g^isi^ns are always greatly 

warmer. appreciated. Plans do not call Newly-hired secretary to boss. 

Precipitation was only 2.34 for a revision of the fertilizer "Do you want double-spacing 

inches which is nearly 2 chart, so growers should not on the carbons, too, sir?" 

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SIXTEEN 




WASHINGTON 

The area was greatly sad- 
dened by the sudden death 
of long time cranberry grower 
Leonard Morris- Many have 
known him in his various 
community activities and 
shall miss his wonderful 
smile and warm friendship. 

The mean high for the 
month of January was 49.13 
degrees with the 27th having 
a warm 53 degrees. And the 
Mean Low for the month was 
39.806 degrees actual low of 
25 degrees on the 30th. There 
have been a few frosty nights 
but basically quite warm for 
this time of year. 

The precipitation for the 
month outdid itself with 
24.52 inches the greatest 
amount falling on the 18th, 
2.84 inches- The area doubled 
the last January recording of 



TO BUILD 

Sectionalizing 

DIKES 
GET A 

For Water Picking 

RAILROAD 

SeeTrufant 15 Frank St. 
Middleboro Mar. 18th 



12.07, and from the many new 
streams and lakes from the 
tide line to the bay, a great 
deal of water has come this 
way. 

There will be a Cranberry 
Vine coming out about the 
middle of this month with 
news of the local area. The 
Field Day date has been set 
for June 24, and the feature 
will be baked salmon lunch- 
eon for those participating. 
Try to get out to the west 
coast for a visit about that 
time. 



NEW JERSEY 

The weather in January in 
the cranberry region of New 
Jersey was unusually mild. 
A prolonged "January thaw" 
occurred from the 22nd 
through the 27th during 



which the maximum daily 
temperatures were 57, 69, 72, 
70 and 56. Such warm spells 
in January are not unusual 
in this area but they seldom 
are so extended. 

Weather buffs interested in 
"records" frequently call 
this station to inquire about 
them; often they are disap- 
pointed that the weather just 
experienced did not set a rec- 
ord. There is also a species 
of "old timers" with supposed 
long memory, who opine that 
back in the old days it was 
warmer, colder, snowier, 
rainier, dryer (This kind, 
however, is distinctly in the 
minority). For these weather 
fans here are the facts 
gleaned from our thirty-years 
of weather recording history 
at the New Lisbon Station. 
Our recent January thaw does 
not even come close to that 



Continued on Next Fage 



R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 



Serving Agriculture 



Helicopter Application 
Division 

CHEMAPCO, INC. 



Cranberry Highway 

West Wareham, Mass. 

295-1553 



SEVENTEEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Contintwd from Fa^,e 17 

of January 1932 when the 
maximum daily temperature 
was above 50 degrees for 
thirteen days in a row. It 
came close to a record in the 
number of seventy degree 
days. The three such days 
this past January are second 
only to January 1950, when 
there were four. The warm- 
est January day recorded at 
New Lisbon was 75 degrees 
on January 26, 1950. 

The average temperature 
for the month was 36-8 de- 
grees, or about 3.5 degrees 
above normal. It was the 
warmest January since 1950 
but it was only the eighth 
warmest in the past 38 years 
in New Lisbon. 

Rainfall was deficient 
during the month, totaling 
only 1.38, or about 1.86 inches 
below normal. There was 
only 7/10 of an inch total 
snowfall during January, 



Flood water on cranberry 
bogs remained largely open 
most of^ the month. Under 
these conditions there could 
be no danger of oxygen defi- 
ciency developing in the 
water. 

The cranberry growers of 
New Jersey were saddened 
to hear of the recent deaths 
of Fred Chandler and Clar- 
ence Hall. Their contribu- 
tions to the cranberry indus- 
try of this nation are signifi- 
cant and are appreciated by 
all growers. 

Fertile Furrow — 50 Years 
Long is an interesting pub- 
lication authored by Gerald 
E. Zich, commemorating the 
50th anniversary of the New 
Jersey Department of Agri- 
culture. 

The American Cranberry 
Growers Association is twice 
prominently mentioned in 
this publication. On page 28 
is this interesting fact: 



(€sso) 

Kerosene 
So/venf 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 

Spraying Equipment ||||| installed - serviced 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 



funad&t^^ 




INC. 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 

62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



"The first recorded example 
of a farm product promotion 
by a group of farmers, in 
America is that of the New 
Jersey Cranberry Growers 
Association. Starting in 1862, 
that organization not only 
sold members' ' crops, but 
standardized packages and 
pioneered in market news 
service, and even introduced 
cranberries to England where 
-his New World fruit was un- 
cnown. Each container ear- 
ned cooking instructions, the 
orerunner of the recipe book- 
lets which are still among the 
effective tools of food pub- 
licity. Even today, New Jer- 
sey cranberries, along with 
those of four other states, 
are among our most widely 
advertised farm products." 

On page 8 is the following: 
"The all-embracing New 
Jersey Agricultural Society 
was seated from the begin- 
ning (establishment of the 
State Department of Agri- 
culture)- The only commod- 
ity groups taking part were 
the State Horticultural So- 
ciety and New Jersey Cran- 
berry Growers Association. 
The Board helped the poultry 
interests to organize as New 
Jersey State Poultry Associ- 
ation, and in 1890 welcomed 
that industry's delegate to 
participate. The 63 subordi- 
nate Granges then existing 
had their official spokesman 
in their State Master." 



Continued on Page 



1 



Farin Credit Service 1; 

>'< 



Box 7, Taunlon, Mass. 02781 
Tel. CI 7 S24-7578 



i 



Production Credit Loans 

Land Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office— 362. Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



EIGHTEEN 



CRANBERRY CLUB 

Continued from Page 10 
day. Another thing — -it is a 
very gentle way to handle 
the berries. There doesn't 
seem to be the mechanical 
injury that might be received 
in dry harvesting. Harvesting 
can, hopefully, be completed 
earlier in the fall because it 
is possible to take advantage 
of rainy weather. 

Ken Beaton then took the 
floor to mention that he had 
been thinking of getting into 
water harvesting for six or 
seven years but always found 
some excuse for not doing it. 
A year ago last fall he vis- 
isted Bill Haines in New Jer- 
sey. "Bill was happy to have 
us and, even though it was 
harvest time, he showed us 
around and took us to bogs 
where he was water harvest- 
ing with seven or eight water 
reels. He, too, was having 
his troubles since the bog he 
was harvesting at that time 
was relatively swampy and 
the wind was blowing the 
berries right into the bush. 
Nevertheless, he got the crew 
to round up the berries and 
rack them into a corner and 
an elevator placed them into 
a truck with bulk bins. From 
there the berries went to the 
screenhouse for drying and 
then to the processing plant." 
"Bill is very enthused 
about water picking and his 
enthusiasm sure overflowed 
onto the rest of us because 
I came back with the idea 
that I should be getting into 
it too." Ken then went on to 
explain that, when he got 
back from N.J. he spoke to 
Dave Eldridge and found that 
he had the same idea so they 
joined forces, bought some 
equipment and went to water 
picking. . "We picked ex- 
actly the same way Bill 
Haines did except that, in- 
stead of putting the berries 
into bulk bins, we put them 
in the truck itself." He felt 
that the most ideal bog to 
water harvest would be per- 
factly level, probably four 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST 
PROTECTION REMEMBER 
THESE 4 IMPORTANT POINTS 
ABOUT FMC WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole crew 
reciuired for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 

within 3 to 5 minutes, the 

marsh is receiving effective 

frost protection. FMC machines 

have an enviable rev^ord for 

operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 




FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA division 

FAIRWAY AVENUK, LAKELAND. FLORIDA 

n Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 
□ Please have sales engineer contact me 




CORPORATION 



® 



NAMEL 



_T1TLE_ 



ADDRESS (RFD). 
CITY 



^ONE- 



-STATE. 



NINETEEN 



CRANBERRY CLUB 

Continued from Page 10 

acres in size with sloping 
banks, one that when you 
flow it up doesn't back into 
a bog upstream a bit — one 
on which you can possibly 
maintain a flow for three or 
four days without much 
trouble." At this point Ken 
went on to explain the initial 
costs involved in getting 
ready to water pick. He has 
estimated that it would av- 
erage out to about $3,000 to 
get started. This figure de- 
pends, of course, on the 
amount of equipment you 
would want to start with. 
There are many variables to 
consider so that this figure 
is subject to changes in 
either direction. He went on 
to show that there is a defi- 
nite increase in yield from 
water harvesting. There is 
much less damage to berries 
and the advantage of being 
able to pick in almost all 
kinds of weather are just a 



few points in its favor. Ken 
and Dave then answered 
questions from the audience. 

It was then time for the 
presentation of Professor J. 
S. Norton, agricultural engi- 
neer at the Cranberry Station 
who showed slides taken of 
some of the equipment used 
in Wisconsin and other states 
for water picking and also 
some that he has been work- 
ing on at the Station. 

He explained a unit he has 
been developing which would 
detrash the berries as they 
are elevated to the truck and 
just before dropping into it. 
This blower throws a stream 
of air through the berries and 
up into a funnel-like device. 
This stream blows out the 
trash, which is lighter than 
the berries, and allows the 
berries to be cleaned as they 
pass through this stream of 
air. He also showed slides of 
and explained some of the 
types of dykes he has been 
experimenting with at the 
Station. 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

WISCONSIN 

Continued from Page 18 

Weather 

A snow cover continues to 
blanket- the state although 
some warmer temperatures 
during the period reduced 
the depth. Snow depths this 
year are almost twice what 
they were a year ago in the 
northern two-thirds of the 
state and are about the same 
in the southern part. 

Temperatures averaged 

near normal during the first 
w6ek of January. A deep low 
pressure system approached 
the state from the southwest 
on the 6th-7th, bringing rain 
to southern and eastern por- 
tions and heavy snow over 
the northwest- Strong north- 
erly winds drifted the snow 
badly in the extreme north- 
west with the storm reaching 
near blizzard proportions. 
Continued on Page 24 




PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
For Sand and Service fhaf Satisfy . . . Call Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 



The newest and most modern plant 
serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 



Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 - 585-3377 



PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



TWENTY 



Isconsin's New Water 
Resources Management 
Law Explained In Briei 



The following is the third and final instalment of the boiled-down 
ryersion of the original hill to control water pollution arid maiiage- 
ment of Wisconsin's water resources. Much of the information in the 
report is very general ar^d probably oversimplified hut, hopefully, it 
luill provide some background information that will help to clarify 
the bill which went into effect on August 1, 1966. 



PART V 

Wastes from improperly op- 
erating septic tank systems can 
carry disease bearing organ- 
isms that pollute ground and 
surface water. Also, septic 



tank effluent can over-enrich 
lakes and streams causing ex- 
cessive algae and weed 
growth. 

Wisconsin's new water re- 
source management law con- 
tains provisions aimed at regu- 



lating new septic tank installa- 
tion, according to Doug Yang- 
gen, University of Wisconsin 
resource development specialist. 
Wisconsin has over 300,000 
septic tanks with over 20,000 
being added each year. In re- 
cent years, it is estimated that 
less than a quarter of the 
septic tank installations have 
been recorded. Undoubtedly a 
number of the tanks were in- 
stalled in areas where they 
fail to function properly, ex- 
plains Yanggen. 

The new law sets up a sep- 
tic tank permit system requiring 
property owners to obtain a 
permit before buying or instal- 
ling a septic tank. This will 
provide the State Board of 
Health with a record of all new 
septic tank locations. 

After septic tanks digest 
Wastes, a soil absorption system 
disposes of the liquid effluent. 
Properly operating field aeration 
systems reduce minute solids to 

Continued on Page 23 



NOW IS THE TIME TO FIRM UP 
YOUR RCA LINE OF CREDIT 

A visit to your 

PCA OFFICE 

may well be the 
most profitable 
move you make 
all year ! 




Production Credit Associations 



MAUSTON 



MEDFORD 



WAUSAU 



TOMAH 



ANTIGO 



MARSHFIELD 



STEVENS POINT 



BLACK RIVER FALLS 



Intermediate Term Loans for Productive 
Purposes Made To Responsible Farmers 



TWENTY-ONE 




|l (The following items were 
taken from the February, 1942 
issue of Cranberries.) 



Little ice for sanding in Mass, War Slowing Up Oregon 



Most years in Massachu- 
setts, a good deal of ice sand- 
ing is done except for the 
short and sharp cold spell of 
a few days around January 
10, the winter has been far 
too mild to make ice which 
•will bear a truck. A few days 
of sanding were gotten in by 
a few growers however, who 
were able to get trucks on 
their bogs. The month of 
February and early March 
may bring enough ice to do 
a little more sanding. 



Bog Building 

Last season (1941) on the 
West coast in Oregon there 
was quite a flurry of bog 
building, but this winter since 
the declaration of war this 
has been slowed up. In some 
portions of Coos county, 
where the climate is much 
more mild than in the East 
or Wisconsin, the growers are 
facing a considerable prob- 
lem developing because of 
dandelions- 



Washington Growers feel 
War Tension 

The Washington cranberry 
growers are very much war 
conscious as many of the 
bogs are located almost with- 
in a stone's throw of the Pa- 
cific Ocean- They are in a 
very vulnerable position for 
attack. In the meantime, the 
West Coast cranberry grow- 
ers are going about their 
daily business. The growers 
cf Washington are pruning 
whenever weather permits. 
Some cold weather for that 
cranberry area was reported 
over the year end, with tem- 
peratures dropping low once 
or twice. 

14 Below in Jersey on 
January 10 (1942) 

In the cold spell of Janu- 
ary 10th, temperatures of 
about 14 degrees below zero 
were recorded. Here again 
for the present, as in Massa- 
chusetts, the amount of dam- 
age done is hard to estimate. 



Roky's Propane Gas, Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



295-3737 



• ALUMINUM PIPE 

Alcoa — Hunter — Reynolds 

• DELUXE EXTRA HEAVY PLASTIC PIPE 
• NYLON FITTINGS 

• MURPHY SAFETY GAUGES 

• PRO-TEK PRIMERS and PARTS 

• SERVICE 

Two qualified mechanics are ready to serve you during normal 

working hours. 

24 hour Emergency Service available for frost nights and similar 

situations. 

"25 Years Working With Cranberry People on a Local Basis" 



TWENTY-TWO 



WISCONSIN WATER LAW 
Continued from lage 21 

liquid and gas by-products, 
says James Kerrigan of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin water re- 
sources center. These septic 
tank sytems often fail to func- 
tion properly on soils with high 
ground water tables, poor per- 
colation characteristics, and 
shallowness over bedrock. 

Under the new law, the re- 
organized Department of Re- 
source Development must ap- 
prove all provisions of the state 
plumbing code which set speci- 
fications on septic tanks and 
their installation. 

The department can also pro- 
hibit septic tank systems where 
water quality would be im- 
paired. It is authorized to des- 
ignate alternate methods for 
water treatment and disposal 
in prohibited areas. Sewage 
holding tanks with sewage col- 
lection systems may be re- 
quired in these areas. 

If any waste disposal system 
creates a nuisance or menace 
to health or comfort, the de- 
partment can order the owner 
to correct the situation. If the 
owner refuses, the department 
can do the work and bill the 
owner. 

Town sanitary districts are 
authorized to provide for sew- 
erage collection systems under 
the new law, and can also 
require the installation of pri- 
vate sewerage systems. 



PART VI 

Regulation of shorelands and 
flood plains form an important 
part of Wisconsin's new wa- 
ter resources management law. 

Water and land use are di- 
rectly related, explains Doug 



Yanggen, University of Wis- 
consin resource development 
specialist. Sediment from ero- 
sion and septic tank pollution 
are ways improper land use 
can harm water quality. The 
shoreland provisions also aim at 
protecting fish and game habi- 
tat, shore cover, and natural 
beauty. 

Zoning restrictions concerning 
setbacks of structures from wa- 
ter, location of septic tanks, 
and protection of areas unsui- 
table for development will 
probably be covered by the 
regulations, according to 
Yanggen. 

Cottages crowding the wa- 
ter's edge, lake homes set win- 
dow to window all around the 
lake, and clear-cutting lake 
shore lots can quickly destroy 
the esthetic appeal of a lake or 
stream, and lead to severe sil- 
tation problems. Homes set on 
lake shore lots that are not 
large enough, or that have a 
soil type incapable of support- 
ing proper septic tank opera- 
tions can also lead to pollution 
problems and over enrichment 
of waters. 

Zoning restrictions are aimed 
at stopping such unwise de- 
velopment of shorelands. 

Before the passage of the 
new law, a county zoning ordi- 
nance was not effective in a 
town until approved by the 
town board. Now counties may 
enact separate ordinances zon- 
ing the areas within 1000 feet 
of a lake and within 300 feet 
of a stream, or a greater dis- 
tance if necessary to include 
the flood plain. These shore 
land ordinances do not require 
town board approval. 

The new law provides more 
state assistance for county gov- 
ernments. Basic responsibility 
for zoning shoreland still lies 
with the county. However, if 
a county does not enact effec- 
tive -shoreland zoning regula- 
tions by January 1, 1968, the 



state may adopt regulations and 
turn them over to the county 
to administer and enforce. Var- 
iances and appeals regarding 
shorelands will still be handled 
by the county board of adjust- 
ment. 

The reorganized Department 
of Resource Development is re- 
sponsible for providing recom- 
mendations on shoreland plans 
and regulations. A grant-in-aid 
of up to $1000 is available to 
each county enforcing suita])le 
regulations. 

Shoreland zoning ordinances 
aftect only unincorporated area' 
— not villages and cities. 

Another provision of the new 
law requires that cities, vil- 
lages and counties adopt suf- 
ficient flood plain zoning in 
areas where appreciable flood 
damage is likely to occur. The 
wisdom of such a provision is 
easily undestood when one con- 
siders the thousands of dollars 
of damage inflicted on homes 
and other buildings each year 
as rivers brim over their banks 
and flow through their flood 
plains. 

If a county does not enact 
flood plain zoning regulations 
by January 1 1968, the states 
may adopt regulations and turn 
them over to the county to ad- 
minister. 



FOR SALE 

3 Acres Bog, 1% Acres of 
Land. 1,000' Frontage 
Pond. New Electric 

Sprinkler System. New 
Lift Pump. 

Tel. 295-0543 after 6 



TWENTY-THREE 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 20 

Mild and dry weather pre- 
vailed during most of the 
second week. Sunshine and 
temperatures above the 
freezing mark on the 12th 
and 13th caused some thawing 
and a settling of 2 to 4 inches 
in the snow cover through- 
out the state. Only the snowy 
region around Gurney ^nd 
Ironwood received some snow 
during the week. Colder 
weather returned on the 15th. 
An area of wind-whipped 
snow crossed the state on the 
16th. 

The week of January 14-20 
was characterized by wide 
swings in temperature. The 
beginning and end of the per- 
iod were rather mild with 
temperatures near the freez- 
ing mark or slightly above. 
After the blizzard of the 
16th, which deposited 4 to 8 
inches of snow over central 
and northern areas, the tem- 
peratures started skidding. 
Early morning temperatures 
on the 18th ranged between 
-20 degrees and -45 degrees 
throughout the state. A drop 
of 60 to 70 degrees occurred 
in some areas over less than 
48 hours. 

The second week of the 
period, January 21-27, again 
offered a variety of weather. 
A typical January thaw set 
in with temperatures rising 
into the 50's over the south on 
the 23rd and 24th- Thunder- 
storms, some locally severe, 
brought heavy rain and high 
winds in some areas of the 
south, freezing rain and sleet 
over much of the central and 
northeastern part of the state, 
and snow to the extreme 
northwest. Some light stream 
flooding occurred along the 
Pecatonica River and other 
streams where the snow 
cover was too shallow to hold 
the rain water. Heavier rain- 
fall amounts in excess of an 
inch was soaked up by the 

TWENTY-FOUR 



deeper snow cover farther 
north. A heavy snowstorm 
out of the Southern Plains 
states on the 26th and 27th, 
which buried Chicago under 
more than 2 feet of snow, 
dealt a glancing blow to the 
extreme southeastern coun- 
ties. Much of Kenosha 
County received a foot of 
snow with snowfall amounts 
quickly tapering off north- 
ward. No snow fell north of 
a line from Dubuque to Port 
Washington. A light dusting 
of 2 to 6 inches of snow oc- 
curred after the survey date 
in southern areas on the 30th. 

Lime Sulfur 

Liquid lime sulfur or Poly- 
sul applications at the 18 
gal/300 gal water/Acre rate 
should have been completed 
before the end of January. 
This spray cannot be applied 
much longer as there is dan- 
ger of chemical burn on the 
tender buds when the 18 gal/ 
Acre rate is used past Janu- 
ary. Remember, though, that 
this spray is highly recom- 
mended as a part of the 
yearly fungus control pro- 
gram and you should plan 
now to apply it next Novem- 
ber-December at the 18 gal/ 
Acre rate. 

If you were not able to 
apply the liquid-lime sulfur 
or Polysul spray during the 
dormant season it could still 
be applied in March-early 
April but at the greatly re- 
duced rate of 6 gal/300 gal 
water/Acre. Of course, other 
fungicides could be used at 
this later time. However, 
with fungus problems being 
so widespread in the bogs 
the past year, the general 
clean up obtained from the 
March-early April 6 gal/Acre 
lime sulfur spray could be 
most beneficial if you were 
unable to spray earlier. 

January Thaw Melts 

The rain and high temper- 
atures on January 24 melted 



the snow in the southern part 
of the state- In the central 
and northern portions it was 
reduced and left with a layer 
of ice that measured one or 
more inches. This crust was 
hard enough to walk on and 
the children could ice skate 
most anywhere according to 
funeral directors and ceme- 
tery caretakers reporting to 
the Wisconsin Statistical Re- 
porting Service. 

The deepest average frost 
depths were located in Mara- 
thon, Langlade, and Lincoln 
Counties, but there were re- 
ports of 48 inches at La 
Crosse and Chippewa Falls. 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 




IRRIGATION SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



CORRUGATED 

CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Aluminum — Galvenizcd 
Asphalt Coated 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 




serving Ihe WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 

Vines 

for delivery in 1967 

$200 Ton F.O.B. 
Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 




I 



DANA ^ 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 

DISTR. of: 
VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 
? SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 
S ROLLER CHAINS 

S CONVEYOR BELTING 
J STEEL 



OUR PRODUCTS 



Slrained Cranberry Sauce 
Vv'hole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange Relish 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cran-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 



EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 





VVhen Tou 



■ u i^ J^ 



WISOONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 






J 



Cramood 




pie would n^t kno^v 
what these were if we didn't put 
an Ocean Spray label on them. 

You know how most people buy cranberries these days? 
In cans and botdes and jars. Jellied and frozen and squeezed. 

Many of them wouldn't recognize a whole, fresh cran- 
berry if they saw one. 

So how do they know what to buy? They look for the 
Ocean Spray label. 

To millions of people, Ocean Spray means cranberries. 

They're buying more cranberry products than ever. Many 
they never heard of a couple of years ago. 

But they know the name. And they know what it stands 
for. 

You don't get a reputation like that overnight. 



Ocean spray^ 



FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHIP IN OCEAN SPRAY. CONTACT ANY DIRECTOR OR STAFF MEMBER IN YOUR GROWING ARE/> 



r 



Massachusetts 

New/ Jersey 

\A/isconsin 

Oregon 

XA/ashington 

Canada 




PLANT & SQIL SCit;;CE3 UBM) 

CRANBERRIES ""'"'" 

THE iMATIOIMAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



^i^Rah 



Y 



^PRl 



f967 




SITY OF 
USETTS 



IIM 

THIS 

ISSUE 

MARCH 
1967 



THE MAKEPEACE STORY 7 

CRANBERRY LABELS 12 

WISCONSIN CRANBERRY VINE INJURY 16 

COOIO •SSBM ^c^sjaquiv 



^ BIBECTBBY Jor cpanlieppy groweps -^ 



The 

iCHARLESW. HARRIS! 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

mOHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



Attention 
Bog Owners 

Why Not Subscribe 
to 

CRANBERRIES 
Magazine 



It would be 
a Good 
Business 
Investment 




Electricity — icey to progress 



In Industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It Is now and will continue 
to be In the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 



NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 




The National Bank of Wareham 



Convententlv located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLI AMSTOVVN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

6;J2 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogi and 

Putnps Maans Satisfaction 

WAREHAM. MASS Tel. CY 9-2000 



Frost Protection and 
Frost Warnings 

Prepared by 

C. E. Cross, I. E. Demoranville 

and G. B. RoimsviUe 

There is probably no single 
cause of damage to the Massa- 
chusetts cranberry crop as de- 
structive year after year as 
spring frost injury. The Cran- 
berry Station is eager to reduce 
this injury as much as possible. 
In one area, we feel that our 
frost warnings may be mis- 
leading sonijc- growers. A brief 
accoimt of this should, we 
think, lead to better understand- 
ing and more efficient frost pro- 
tection. 

The tolerance t)f cranberry 
buds on the State Bog is used 
as a basis for determining 
whether or not a frost warning 
is needed. In recent years the 
winter flood has regularly been 
pulled from under the ice to 
avoid oxygen deficiency. Some- 
times the flood is put on again, 
and sometimics this has not ap- 
peared necessary. In any case, 
the flood is regularly removed 
and the bog drained every year 



in mid-March. This is the win- 
ter management of the cran- 
berry vines that is used as a 
standard in determining the 
need of a frost warning — the 
degree of tolerance — the tem- 
perature below which damage 
is likely to occur. 

In the past several years it 
has become evident that by 
shortening the winter flood a$, 
described above, the buds grow 
more slowly in the spring and 
remain resistant to frost dam- 
age throughout April. Veteran 
growers will recall that several 
years ago it was frequently 
considered necessary to issue 
frost warning during the last 
half of April. In Dr. Franklin's 
bulletin "Weather in Cranberry 
Culture," on page 35 he says 
"... when bog temperatures 
promise to fall below 20 de- 
grees F. during the last week 
of April, it is best to flood . . " 
More recently, we have ob- 
served the effects of several 
frosts with minimum tempera- 
tures in the teens during the 
last ten days of April, and one 
instance of 9 degrees and of 
11 degre-es F. on April 19th. 
In none of these cases has any 
injury been detected. So unless 



the weather of April is es- 
pecially mild, it is unlikely that 
frost warning will be issued in 
April. 

Growers who regularly hold 
a long and continuous winter 
flood, who do not draw the 
water from under the ice to 
avoid oxygen deficiency con- 
ditions, or who hold the winter 
flood into the first week of 
April, are likely to have buds 
that are more sensitive to frost 
in late April. These growers, 
it seems to us, might sustain 
damaging frost injury on nights 
with no frost warning. This 
situation is further complicated 
by the fact that a frost flood 
applied in April tends to force 
bud development ahead so that 
such a bog will be even more 
sensitive to frost during the 
next cold spell. 

Cross, Demioranville and 
Rounsville are in complete 
agreement that the holding of 
the winter flood later than 
March 20th serves only to in- 
crease the difficulty of frost 
protection. Usually it should 
be possible to take note of 
weather forecasts on March 15, 

Continued on Next Page 



DON'T BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 



Until you have , 
seen the ..•" 

BILGRAM 







MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 



40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 



CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 
EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 
HORACE K. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 






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Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. eOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



SHARON BOX and LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 18 56 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



C&L Equipment Co. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET, MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 

PRUNING FERTILIZING 

RAKING WEED TRIMMING 

Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS POWER WHEELBARROWS 

RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Call . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



John Guckien Elected 
V.P. of Dean Foods Co. 

fohn Guckien has been elec- 
ted a vice president of Dean " 
Foods Conn{[:>any. The announce- 
ment was made by Sam E. 
Dean, Board Chairman of the 
Frankhn Park, III. -based com- 
pany. 

Mr. Guckien succeeds Ber- 
tram J. Hoddinott as vice presi- 
dent in charge of dairy sales. 
Mr. Hoddinott retired on De- 
cem,ber 31, 1966, after 26 years 
with Dean. 

John Guckien joined Dean in 
1952. His entire service with the 
company has been in sales. In 
February 1965 he was named 
Director of Milk and Ice Cream 
Sales, the position he held until 
his recent election as an of- 
ficer of the company. 

A native of the Logansport, 
Indiana area, he is a graduate 
of St. Joseph College, Rennseae- 
laer, Indiana. He resides at 
4828 Grand Avenue, Western 
Springs, Illinois, with his \\ife 
and three sons. 



FROST PROTECTION 

Continued from Page 1 

when if no ^\'interkilling is in 
sight it is possible safely to 
draw the flood. If this is done 
the tolerance of the growers' 
vines should be similar to that 
of the State Bog's vines, and 
the frost warnings w^ould have 
a maximum usefulness. 




TWO 



CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 



ABC ^JP^^ 
UTILITY *0I§K^ ^ 



W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CR-1 

4511 E. Osborne Ave., Tampa, Florida 

1001 Dempsey Rd., Milpitas, Calif. 



Mass. 

Cranberry 

Station 

i Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry specialist 



Personals grees a day below normal. The are in the process of being 

Dr Wes Miller Dr Bert ^"^X ^^^m periods occurred on printed and we hope to be able 

Zuckerman and Andrew Charig ^^e 1st and 2nd, 11th and 14th to mail them shortly Growers 

have published a paper in the *«, 16th Precipitation totalled are reminded to carefully read 

October issue of Transactions fnly 2 66 inches at the Gran- the notes at the top of each 

of the American Fisheries So- ^erry Station, or about 0.9 of chart, there is considerable use- 

ciety. The title is "Water Trans- »" inch below average Actu- ful information included in 

location of Diazinon-C14 and ^^X there was measurable pre^ these sections. 

Parathion-S35 off a Model cipitation on 15 days during 

rranh^^rrv Rnfr and Siib^jPnuenf ^^e month, but It was mostly , ^'f cnanges on me weea 

L>ranDerry uog ana ^suDsequenr. j^lui ' „,:i.u ^„i„ i.„,V» chart are minor; however, we 

Occurrence in Fish and Mus- " ,^"¥l^^„,^ ^,,,^"^^^^^ have included a warning on 

sels." This paper reports on the l^.^.^'^^iJ^I^^Z^li "^^"^ ^^^"^"" "^^^^ ^^"^ 

persistence and leaching of ^"<^,^ ^^c,^- J^nowtall was Zi.^ 

radioactive labeled diazinon inches which is tar above aver- Ghanges on the insect chart 
and parathion after application fg^ but is. only the second include the substitution of Gu- 
to a model cranberry bog and largest recorded. The record of thion E.G. 3 pints per acre or 
also the accumulation of these nearly 24 inches occurred in the 2% dust for Diazinon in con- 
pesticides in fish and mjussel February, 1964. A series of trol of fireworm, cutworm. Spar- 
tissue. Reprints of this paper ^mor storms kept the ground ganothis fruitworm, gypsy moth 
are available. ^"°^ covered for tlie entire and tipworm in the new growth 

month. to Vz inch stage and for fruit- 

^***''*'" Charts worm, fireworm, leafhopper and 

February was a very cold The 1967 cranberry insect and 

month averaging nearly 4 de- disease and weed control charts Continued on Page JS 



I SPRINKLER SYSTEMS ARE OUR BUSINESS 

* More than 20 years experience in design and layout of AMES 
% SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. We are available to plan your sprinkler system 
% for both frost control and irrigation. We guarantee the correct pressure 

* so necessary for the best sprinkler operation. Our quotations are for 

* complete systems including suction line, pump (Hale, Marlow, Gould), 
% AMES UTILITY main, AMES quick connecting adapters, plastic pipe, 

* 



bronze fittings and Rainbird sprinklers. 

J A note from Rainbird sprinklers issued March 18, 1966 . . . 

* 1. Uniformity of application improves with length of application. 

% 2. Two nozzle sprinklers improve uniformity of application when lateral 

* spacing exceeds, the radius of coverage of the sprinkler. 
% 3. Pressure ranges for best operation of sprinklers: 

* 1/8" nozzle and smaller — 50 psl. 

% 9/64" to 11/64" nozzle — 55 to 60 psi. 

+ 3/16" to 7/32" nozzle — 60 to 65 psi. 

* 1/4" to 9/32" nozzle — 65 to 70 psi. 

4i 4. For frost protection increase all nozzle pressure by 10 psi. 

* Rainbird sprinkler charts are available for asking. 

I CHARLES W. HARRIS CO., INC, north dighton, mass. 824-5607 
* 






THREE 




solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special IH" or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
flat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 



see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, inc. 
Highland, New Yorit 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New Yorl< 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



factory for information 

WISCONSIN 



David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw i Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 




AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

JOHN BEAN DIVISION 

Lansing, Michigan 



FOUR 



CRANBERRY 
INSTITUTE 
HOLDS MEETING 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL 
CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



The Cranberry Institute at its 
annual meeting held in Dux- 
bury, Mass., March 14, 1967 
elected as directors: Leon April, 
Treasurer of Morris April Bros., 
Eatmor Division Bridgeton, 
N.J.; Orrin G. Colley, Treasurer 
of Cape Cod Cranberry Co- 
operative, Inc., EHixbury, Mass.; 
C. C. Daniels, National Sales 
Manager Food Products Divi- 
sion, Dean Foods Company, 
Franklin Park, Illinois; Edwin 
F. Lewis, Senior Vice-President 
of Ocean Spray Cranberries, 
Inc., Hanson, Mass.; George C. 
P. Olsson, president of Ocean 
Spray Cranberries, Inc., Han- 
son, Mass. and Clarence A. 
Searles, Cranberry grower of 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. 

Re-elected officers were: Or- 
rin G. Colley, President, Leon 
April, Vice-President and Edwin 
F. Lewis, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Major responsibility for the 
cranberry foreign market devel- 
opnr^nt project is shared by the 
Institute (representing the in- 
dustry) and the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture through its 
Foreign Agricultural Service. 
The program is sponsored, 
guided and partially funded by 
FAS but the industry provides 
initiative and direction and con- 
tributes a large share of the 
funds, goods and services. 

Mr. Colley, stated, "Overseas 
program results indicate pro- 
gress is being made in this effort 
to expand the market base for 
U.S. cranberries and in the long 
run will provide U.S. cranberry 
producers with a reliable and 
constant market." 



ISSUE OF MARCH, 1967 / VOL. 31 -NO. 11 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall 31 Wareham. Mass 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—583-4595 



CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

AAassachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jersey 




IS THERE ANYONE in Oregon interested 
enough in publicizing the activities 
of the Oregon cranberry people to act 
as a correspondent for CRANBERRIES ?? 
We feel strongly that there is much 
more happening in that state which is 
not being reported and would like to 
do something about it. We appeal to 
anyone interested in this project to 
get in touch with us as soon as pos- 
sible. Let's go Oregon 



I ? t 

• • • 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 



FIVE 




N A T I O N A L 

POISON 
PREVENTION 

WEEK 

MARCH 19-25 



Western Pickers 

Sales, Parts and Repairs 

AiLlhorized Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 

MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenue 

Wareham, M»ss. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



ofeiru3ii^y 



Stanley Coville 

Stanley Coville, 73, who 
helped develop New Jersey's 
blueberry crop into a $6 million 
industry, died February 5 at 
his home, of heart failure. 

Mr. Coville was one of the 
first commercial producers of 
cultivated blueberries in the 
state, beginning in 1920. 

A graduate of Cornell Uni- 
versity, he organized the True 
Blue Cooperative Association 



in 1927, developing standards 
of quality for blueberries and 
helping design unique packag- 
ing for the crop. He was co- 
operative manager from then 
until the time of his death. 

In 1965, the state board of ag- 
riculture awarded him its Dis- 
tinguished service citation for 
40 years' service to the blue- 
berry industry. 

Surviving are a son, Stanley 
B., a daughter, Mrs. Vinton 
Thompson, two brothers and a 
sister. 

Services were held Feb. 10 at 
the Grace Episcopal Church, 
Pemberton, N. J. 



Roby's Propane Gas. Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



295-3737 



HALE PUMPS SERVE YOUR 

IRRIGATION PURPOSES BEST! There's a 
Hale pump to do any irrigation job — 
and do it better! Hale pumps have 
MATCHED POWER, designed to correctly 

match the power of the driving engines 
and give you top performance. Hale 
also has PREMIUM MATERIALS and 
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life, high operating efficiency, Icsri down 
time and quick, easy servicing. 

Shown here are ONLY 2 OF A LARGE 

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• WHAT ABOUT HALE RELIABILITY? 

Many Hale Pumps are presently working on cran- 
berry bogs after 20 years of continuous sevice ! 

* SERVICE 

We are stocking pump parts and will be able to 
service all equipment sold by us for many years 
to come. 

All makes of Irrigation Pumps can continue to be 
used regardless of their age. 



SIX 



"25 Years Working With Cranberry People on a Local Basis" 



Ht. 




SWuJ^ 



Massachusetts, A. J). Makt- 
peace owned and operated b(),u;s 
in New Jersey. The ii.iiik- 
"Makepeace" is essentially Eng- 
lish, according to Maurice. 

Maurice attended grade 
school at several locations in 
Wareham. He then went to 
Tabor Academy in Marion. This 
is a noted prep school, with ; 
nautical bent, and when Maur- 
ice was there the students wore 
naval uniforms at all times, al- 
though today the uniforms are 
mostly for dress occasions. He 
traveled in those days by street 
car from Wareham to Marion 
and returned on the now de- 
funct New Bedford and Onset 
Street Railway. 

He then entered Dartmouth 
College in New Hampshire, 
where he took a general course, 
and received his B.S. degree in 



JVJ2(S. lie majored in luonomics. 
lie tlu'ii spent two \tars in the 
Ilarxarcl Busiiu-ss School at 
Caiiibridgi', Mass. 

He married the former Anne 
P. Franchot of Washington, 
D.C. while he was living in 
New York City. He was em- 
ployed at the Chase National 
Bank, one of the great banks of 
the country from 1930 to 1941. 

He found he did not like city 
life as did Mrs. Makepeace also. 
"I wanted to get back into the 
country again," he says, "and 
get some out-door life." He 
joined the ADM Company im- 
mediately thereafter in 1941. 
His father was then president 
of the company, a position held 
today by Russell Makepeace, 
his cousin. 

Continued on FaEe 10 



By CLARENCE J. HALL 

"Due to expansion in sales," 
says conservative, quiet-spoken 
Maurice B. Makepeace, treas- 
urer of the huge A. D. Make- 
peace Company of Wareham, 
Massachusetts, "the next several 
years look pretty good for the 
cranberry industry," In addition 
to his work at the ADM Com- 
pany, Maurice has been and is 
engaged in the banking busi- 
ness, which is a reason why he 
does not speak at random, so 
such a statement from him 
carries considerable weight. 

The ADM Company ovms 
and operates about 1,500 acres 
of bog in two counties and 
Maurice says production has 
consistently been a little above 
the Massachusetts average. 

The Makepeaces have been 
growing cranberries since the 
1870's, and Maurice has always 
been familiar with cranberries, 
of course, and when he was a 
youngster weeded and sprayed 
on some of the Makepeace bogs, 
and in the fall he picked cran- 
berries. 

Maurice 

Maurice was born December 
29, 1906, in a hospital in Boston 
with his parents living in Ware- 
ham at the time. His father was 
the late John C. Makepeace for 
m,any years a leader in the cran- 
berry industry, his mother being 
the former Grace Parker of 
West Barnstable on the Cape. 
His grandfather was Abel Den- 
nison Makepeace, who around 
the turn of the century was 
known widely as the "Cranberry 
King," and articles about him 
were written in the New York 

newspapers and other periodi- ^"® Handsome A. D. Makepeace Office Building, Wareham 
cals. As well as owning bogs in seven 




IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

For frost control 
and irrigation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manville Plastic 
Pipe and Fittings 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 



\ 


H. R 


FOR SALE 


. BAILEY COMPANY, Manufacturer 


of Cranberry Machinery and Equipment 


Since 


1900. Stock, machinery, equip- 


ment. 


land and buildings (no cranberry 


bogs) 


• 




Address all inquiries to: 




ATTY. ALBERT T. MADDIGAN 

111 Center Street 
MiddleboTO, Mass. 02346 


■ 1 



Wisconsin Cranberry 
Consultant Service 

P.O. Box 429 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 
Phone 423-4871 



Wisconsin Distributor 

for 
Casoron®G-4 granules 



IN THE 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST 
SEE YOUR 

MILLER DEALER 

or 

MILLER FIELDMAN 

for 

CASORON 



(Ti) 



MILLER PRODUCTS CO 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
W. R. GRACE & CO. 

7737 N. E. Killingsworth 
Portland, Oregon 97218 



•► 



CASORON 



OD 



IS AVAILABLE IN 
MASSACHUSETTS 

from 

R. F. MORSE & SON 

West Wareham 

Tel. 295-1553 



EIGHT 



CASOBON 

DICHLOBENIL WEED & GRASS KILLER 

A Research Discovery ol N V PHILIPS OUPHAR U S Pdt No 3.0?7.^18 




It takes a merciless weed killer to wipe out ruthless perennial weeds. CASORON G-4 
granules is the way to wipe out cranberry-choking weeds. 

It polishes oft perennial and certain annual weeds and grasses before they spring up to 
your cranberries of available soil moisture and valuable nutrients. 

Yet as devastating as CASORON is to weeds, it won't hurt your cranberries. 

Just use CASORON right now. You'll have no weeds, no labor problems. 

CASORON controls heavy, crop-choking strands of weeds but it is also economical 
for use when only a few weeds are present. 

Get CASORON G-4 at your supplier. If you don't know who he is. write us. 
We'll tell you and send complete, illustrated information on CASORON. 

Use CASORON. The merciless weed killer that's murder to weeds. 



CASORON -approved for bearing and nonbearini; fruit, nursery 
ornamentals, citrus nurseries, cranberries and alfalfa. 



iSD! 



THOMPSON-HAYWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Subsidiary of Philips Electronics and Pharmaceutical Industries Corp. 
P.O. Box 2383 Kansas City, Kansas 66110 



NfNE 



MAKEPEACE STORY 

Continued from Page 7 

Maurice and his wife now 
live at Piney Point in Marion. 

The couple haVe a daughter, 
now Mrs. Marshall Severance of 
Worcester, Mass., and a son 
Christopher 18, recently grad- 
uated from Tabor. Maurice be- 
longs to few social clubs, but is 
a member of the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers' Association 
and the Southeastern Cranberry 
Club which meets at Rochester. 
For recreation he pays golf at 
the Kittansett Club in Marion 
^^ here he is a member. 

He attends the Congregation- 
al Church of Marion, of which 
Mrs. Makepeace is a member. 

When he went to work for 
ADM his first job was to learn 
where the Makepeace proper- 
ties are, and to get oriented to 
the whole cranberry picture. 
The bogs are located in Plym- 
outh and Barnstable Counties. 
Barnstable County (which is 
Cape Cod) was where A. D. 
Makepeace first started in tlie 
cranberry business. He was a 
farmer at Hyannis, for one thing 
growing turnips and onions. He 
later came up to develop bogs 
in Plymouth County. 



Today Maurice's "particular 
baliwick is Barnstable County." 
Responsibility has tobe divided, 
and while the Cape is his 
special responsibility he has to 
keep informied and take part in 
all the general cranberry opera- 
tions. For the ADM Company 
it is "Russ" who is secretary' of 
Ocean Spray, who is closer to 
the "big co-op" and attends to 
the ADM Company's interests 
there. The ADM Company sells 
its crop through Ocean Spray. 

The Company bogs are in 
Wareham, Rochester, Middle- 
boro, Carver and Plymouth in 
Plymouth County and in Barn- 
stable County, Barnstable, Yar- 
mouth, Harwich, Brewster, 
Mashpee and Falmouth, 



ADM as Employer 

The company employs six 
people at the company office on 
Main Street, Warehara, a hand- 
some and well designed brick 
structure. There is additional 
help in the harvest period. 

There are 12 foremen alto- 
gether, with two of these on the 
Cape and they have their help- 
ers. Year-round bog help num- 
bers about 50, of course this 
increases greatly in the fall. The 
ADM now uses Darlington's 
exclusively. 



"The peak of our employment 
was reached about eight years 
ago when we had about 700 
people in one capacity or an- 
otlicr," Maurice recalls. That 
was in the days of hand scoop- 
ing. 

The company has about 40 
pieces of automotive equip- 
ment; about 23 pumps, 5 front 
end loaders, 75 picking ma- 
chines. The ADM does not go 
in for water raking. 

About 60 additional acres of 
sprinklers were put in, in the 
spring of 1966. "Frankly," says 
Maurice, "I don't think we have 
enough water at all locations 
to use sprinklers." 

At the rear of the office on 
Main Street there is a wooden 
structure which is a machine 
shop. This is under the direc- 
tion of William) ( Bill ) Ross who 
has one or two helpers at times. 
With all this equipment a good 
repair shop is a necessity. 

Blacks and Howes 

The Makepeace bogs are set 
to roughly 55 percent Early 
Blacks, and the rest mostly Late 
Howes. "We ha\'e gotten rid of 
our fancy varieties," Maurice 
claims, and we ha\'e a few of 
the hybrids for experimental 
purposes." 




View of Makepeace Bogs on Tihonet Road in Wareham 



TEN 



Company Screens Some of its Crop 

The company still screens 
some of the berries itself at the 
Century bog near White Island 
Pond, Wareham, Wankinquoah 
bog in Carver and at the screen 
house in the center of Ware- 
ham. Berries are delivered in 
the chaff to the Ocean Spray 
screenhouse at North Harwich 
on the Cape. The others go to 
the cooperative plants at Han- 
son and Onset, mostly Onset. 



On Marketing Committee 

Maurice was elected as alter- 
nate to George C. P. Olsson on 
the Cranberry Marketing Com- 
mittee when it was being con- 
sidered and then voted into 
effect. Maurice played a con- 
siderable part in the drawing 
up of the by-laws. One of his 
jobs was the definition of the 
rules. Maurice was a strong 
supporter of the plan to have 
such an order, and although 
the Order has not been in use 
every year when tne total U.S. 
Crop was small, he considers 
having it of value to put into 
effect when considered neces- 
sary, because of a large crop. 



Maurice has served on the 
Board of Trustees, Plymouth 
County Aid to Agriculture. 



Own Crop Duster and Research Men 

On the ADM payroll is Leslie 
"Les" Holmes of Wareham who 
in season pilots a straight- wing 
craft for crop spraying and dust- 
ing. Holmes is employed the 
entire year around. \^^ien the 
air control of insects is not in 
operation Holmes is employed 
by the company either with 
equipment operation and main- 
tenance or in a machine shop 
at Tihonet, a section of Ware- 
ham. 

The company also employs a 
full time mian who came as. a 
research man, and while he still 
does research is now working 
as a field man supervisor, but 
mostly in production. He is 
William M. Atwood, who has 
contributed papers to this mag- 
azine and about whom there 
was a feature article some time 
ago. "Bill" At wood has also 
been a cranberry grower in his 
own right. 

With all the foregoing facts 
it becomes very evident that the 
ADM Company is a consider- 
able factor in the economics of 
the Massachusetts cranberry 
area. 



As a Banker 

Maurice is President of the 
National Bank of Wareham, a 
position his father had held for 
45 years, succeeding him in 
1957. He is a Corporator and 
Trustee of the Wareham Sav- 
ings Bank. He is Director and 
Vice-President of the Buzzards 
Bay National Bank. Russell is 
Director and Chairman of the 
Board of the Cape Cod Bank 
and Trust Company. 

Maurice has never found tirrve 
to go "into politics," although 
Russell has been Town Meeting 
Moderator in Marion and was 
a Selectman. Maurice is Treas- 
urer and Trustee of the Tobey 
Hospital, Wareham. 

His father, who died in 1958, 
quietly and with no fanfare did 
a considerable amount of charit_ 
able, or philanthropic work. 
This was to private individuals 
or to organizations. Maurice, 
who has followed in his father's 
footsteps in so many ways, is 
following him in this respect 
also. 

Fourth Generation in Cranberries? 

Maurice's son, Christopher, 
while not having decided yet 
what will be his business career 
is definitely interested in cran- 
berries. "He may go into the 
business. Who knows?" Maurice 
concludes. 





*. . .< .A. >.• 




i^_iJ_*___:t___ 



Another View of Makepeace Bogs 



ELEVEN 



WISCONSIN PROFESSOR 
HAS UNIQUE HOBBY 




Do you remember when 
cranberries were shipped in 
cranberry barrels and boxes? 
And do you remember the 
colorfid labels which designated 
the area or the marsh in which 
they were grown, and the 
variety of berry? The labels 
have almost disappeared, but a 
few haxe been diligently col- 
lected and assembled for others 
to see. 

Dr. K. G. Weckel, Professor 
of Food Science and Industries, 
University of Wisconsin, Madi- 
son, who is also a grower of 20 
acres of cranberries at Dock 
Lake near Spooner, \\'isconsin, 
has assembled what is believed 
to be the most complete collec- 
tion of cranberry labels 
mounted on ends of V4 barrel 

TWELVE 



cranberry boxes. These are hung 
on a display panel in his office 
at Madison. 

The display consists of the 
labels from, the four major cran- 
berry producing areas of the 
countr)' — New England, New 
jersey, Wisconsin, and the Paci- 
fic Northwest. He originally had 
his coaching in the lore of the 
labels from the venerable Dr. 
George Peltier, Wisconsin 
Rapids, Wisconsin, and has had 
much help from Vernon Golds- 
worthy, Eagle River, Wisconsin, 
Walter Fort, Pemberton, New 
jersey, Mrs. Elizabeth Palmer, 
Tuckerton, New jersey, judge 
Paulding, South Carxer, Massa- 
chusetts, and Charles Nelson, 
Mahcotta, W'ashington, and 
Frank Glenn, Long Beach, 



Washington. He admits to 
crawling through many dustty 
warehouses and sheds, peeking 
into shelves and closets in cran- 
licrry marshes throughout the 
United States. Most growers 
liave been very helpful in 
searching through their ware- 
houses with him when they 
learn of the collection. The col- 
lection is quite complete, but 
Dr. \\'eckel states, "A few la- 
bels are missing, and I am on 
the Imnt for them. There were 
three foimders of Ocean Spray 
Cooperative, but I have only 
the label of the Makepeace 
Marsh. Walter Fort told me the 
Plum label used in New jersey 
may have disappeared, as the 
warehouse was consumed by 
fire; but, perhaps, a V4 barrel 
box with this label is in other 
warehouses." 

Among the labels shown in 
the collection in the photo are: 

Massachusetts— Beacon, Blue- 
bird, Bunker Hill, Capitol, 
Chanticleer, Harvard ( Vs box ) , 
Holiday, Honker, Iris, In- 
spected, John Alden, Lion, Long 
Distance, Magnolia, Mayflower, 
Minots Light, Makepeace, 
Mistletoe, Myles Standish, Pea- 
cock, Pilgrim, Pocahontas, Plym- 
outh Rock, Pointer, Skipper, 
Turkey, Whitehouse, \Mndmill, 
Yale, Cape Cod Early Black, 
Cape Cod Howe, Ocean Spray, 
Ocean Spray Bell Cherry. 

New Jersey — Alpine, Ameri- 
can Beauty, Arbutus, Arrow, 
Atlantic, Cottage, Dixie, Excel- 
sior, Fenwick, Gem, Globe, 
Goldenrod, Hanover, Heather, 
Homestead, Jersey Belle, Laur- 
el, Liberty Bell, Mallard, Mon- 
mouth, Oak, Olive, Plantation, 
Princeton, Quail, Rancocas, Red 
Bell, Red Clover, Ruby, Silver 
Medal, Shamrock, Sunrise, Swan. 

Wisconsin — Antler, Badger, 
Banner, Bessie, Bison, Bouquet, 
Cultivated, Daisy, Deer, Elk, 
Favorite, Fox, Gaynor, Holly, 
jumbo. Moose, Penant, Poppy, 
Royal, Star, Wisconsin, Wiscon- 
sin Bell-Clierrv, Indian Trail. 

Continued on Pap,e 18 



taiikerry 




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THIRTEEN 



NEW PRODUCTS: 



Bean Expands 
Capacity of 
Solid Set Valve 

John Bean Division has added 
a larger valve to its line of 
Sequa-Matic, grid type, solid 
set irrigation systems. 

The V-2 Sequa-Matic valve 
with aluminum couplers was 
expanded to 2 inches with a 
new capacity of 10 to 30 g.p.m. 

The automatic sequencing 
valve controls the sprinkling 
operation of individual sprink- 
lers through the action of water 
line pressure on lateral lines 
up to 1/4 miles long. 

Each row of sprinklers oper- 
ates automatically in pre-deter- 
miined steps from the mainline 
to the end of the field. 

A timer pre-selects time in- 
tervals from 10 minutes to 10 
hours. 

For more information write 
John Bean Division, 1305 S. 
Cedar St., Lansing, Mich. 48910, 




Jetster-AAatic Introduced 

The development of a pres- 
surized system for dispensing a 
wide variety of consumer and 
institutional products was an- 
nounced today by National Can 
Corporation. The new system 
called JETSTER-MATIC, oflFers 
the user an economical method 
of conveniently applying paint 
of conveniently applying paint, 
weed killer, insecticides, floor 
wax, hair spray, liquid fertilizer 
and many other products. 

The JETSTER-MATIC sys- 
tem is the first packaging de- 

FOURTEEN 




velopment that combines the 
convenience of aerosols with the 
economics inherent in bulk 
packaging. 

The container is not pres- 
surized until the consumer is 
_ ready to use the product, there- 
fore, the need for complicated 
aerosol filling equipm,ent is eli- 
^minated. Since the container is 
^ not pressurized until used, it is 

tnot subject to the same stringent 
l.C.C. restrictions that apply to 
the aerosol can. 
Continued on Page 20 



spring tonic for cranberry yields: 
Chloro IPC Herbicide before bud-break. 




Right now, while established 
plants are dormant, you can 
protect your cranberries against 
early weed competition. A treat- 
ment before bud-break with 
Chloro IPC selective herbicide 
stops germinating weeds and 
grasses such as annual bluegrass, 
bentgrass, bluejoint grass, 
dodder, horsetail, loosestrife, 
rushes (Juncus), sickle grass, 



turkeyfoot grass and velvet- 
grass. In Massachusetts, con- 
sult your Extension Service 
Cranberry Weed Control Chart. 
Once its work is done, PPG 
Chloro IPC breaks down with 
rising temperatures. This elimi- 
nates pfoblems of build-up in 
soil or carryover. Chloro IPC 
also shows a broad margin of 
tolerance to cranberry plants. 



Uniform, hard granules of 20% 
Granular Chloro IPC are easy 
to measure and apply with air 
or ground equipment. 

Check your local extension 
service or supplier for more 
complete information or write 
Department 7713, Pittsburgh 
Plate Glass Company, Chem- 
ical Division, One Gateway 
Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222. 



Chemicals 




INDUSTRIES 



FIFTEEN 



The Controversial Case 
of Crar)berry Vine Injury 

Prepared by 

Malcolm N. Dana, 
Department of Horticulture 
D. M. Boone and R. J. Friend 
Department of Plant Pathology 

C. M. Koval 

Department of Entomology 

The summer of 1966 saw in- 
jury to cranberry vines in many 
areas of Wisconsin. The first 
report of this injury came to 
our attention from a grower in 
the northwest comer of the 
state, but a later survey showed 
it to be present in all northern 
areas and to a less extent in the 
southern producing areas. Char- 
acteristically, the vines turned 
brown in a pepper and salt dis. 
tribution over considerable areas 
of some beds. Close examina- 
tion showed that both good and 
bad uprights occurred on the 
same runners. There seemed 
to be no relation of the injury 



to position on the vine. Death 
of uprights occurred from the 
tip downward. Injured up- 
rights first took on a dull green 
appearance which turned to a 
light brown and finally a deep 
brown. It was assumed that 
these color differences were 
successive tissue breakdo"wns 
and enzymatic changes after 
the actual death of the vine. 
Dead uprights showed dark- 
ening of internal tissues sugges. 
tive of vascular plugging. Care- 
ful examination of roots from 
injured vines showed no mac- 
roscopic evidence of breakdown 
or injury. 

A careful search of the soil 
in the areas showing vine in- 
jury revealed two types of small 
worms in close proximity to the 
vines. One of these proved to 
be a round worm that lives on 
the decaying organic material 
at the bog surface and could 
not be damaging the vines. 
The second worm was identi- 
fied as the larval stage of a fly 
that also lives as a saprophyte 



on decaying organic material 
and likewise was not damag- 
ing living vines. 

Sample of vines collected by 
Dr. Boone and Mr. Friend were 
brought to the laboratory for 
the early stages of breakdown 
study. From vines that were in 
and also from healthy vines, 
these men were able to isolate 
several fungi. Several of these 
fungi are often found in asso- 
ciation with cranberry vines 
and seem not to be involved 
with the observed injury. How- 
ever, one organism occurred fre. 
quently in affected uprights 
and infrequently in healthy up- 
right. Although the evidence 
is certainly not conclusive, we 
believe it likely that the injury 
found is due, in part, to the 
development of this disease. 

The organism is called Phom- 
ppsis or Dioporthe. This fungus 
is known to be a weak parasite 
i.e. it can, under certain con- 
ditions, invade and kill living 

Continued on Fage 22 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous AAoulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 

equipment for over one quarter century. 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS - pumping units, pumps, power units, 

sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

Phone: 112-715-247-5321 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 



^ 



■ 



m 



I 



^ 



SIXTEEN 



^ 







NEW JERSEY 

Nature's law of normalization 
was at work in February in the 
cranberry belt of New jersey. 
To balance out the balmy 
weather in January, extremely 
severe weather occurred. Three 
below zero days were recorded 
in February — 3 below on the 
8th, 5 below on the 9th and 
7 below on the 13th. Tempera- 
tures of this extreme are un- 
usual but not rare in this state; 
they have occurred in 19 of the 
39 years of weather recording 
at the Cranberry & Blueberry 
Laboratory at New Lisbon. A 
total of .54 below zero days have 
been recorded here, an average 
of less than 1.5 such days per 
year. The three such days this 
past month marks only the fifth 
time that 3 or more days of 
below zero temperatures hap- 
pened in a single month. The 
record is 7 days in February 
of 1934. 



Illilllllllllllllllllll!lllllllll!llllllllllli;illlllllllllll!lllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^^ 

TO BUILD 

Sectionalizing 

DIKES 

for Wafer Pkk'mg 

GET A 
RAILROAD 

Seelrufant 15 Frank St. 
Middleboro Mar. 1 



The temperature for the 
month averaged 29.9°F or about 
4.2° below normfil. It was the 
sixth coldest February recorded 
at the laboratory. 

Rain or snow occurred on 12 
days during the month. Snow- 
fall was exceptionally heavy. A 
total of 20.3 inches was re- 
corded, making it the 2nd heavi. 
est to occur here in February. 
The largest snowfall of the 
month was 9.5 on Feb, 7th. The 
total snowfall this year is now 
31 inches or just about twice 
the normal amount and about 
the sixth heaviest on record 
here. Precipitation converted to 
rainfall totalled 3.00 inches in 
February, just .06 inches above 
normal. 

Ice thickness of more than 
six inches with a heavy cover 
of snow over it caused rapid 
depletion of the oxygen supply 
in the flood water on cranberry 
boj^s. The following oxygen de- 



ficiency warning was issued by 
the Cranberry & Blueberry Lab- 
oratory on Feb. 21st: "Damage 
to next year's cranberry crop 
from oxygen deficiency is a 
definite threat if the ice on bogs 
does not break up soon. Analy- 
sis of samples of flood water 
cranberry bogs taken on Mon- 
day showed that the oxygen 
content was approaching critical 
levels. If the bogs do not open 
up on Wednesday night cran- 
berry growers are advised to 
draw the water oflF their bogs 
to give the vines a breather. 
Vines are well protected with 
ice lying on them but water 
should be put back on before 
the ice is completely melted." 

Temtperatures ranging from 
10 below zero to 15 below zero 
were recorded in blueberry 
fields on Feb. 13th. This is very 
close to the point at which 
serious winter injury may occur 

Continued on Next Page 



R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 



Serving Agriculture 



Helicopter Application 
Division 

CHEMAPCO, INC. 



Cranberry Highway 

West Wareham, Mass. 

295-1553 



SEVENTEEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 17 

to fruit buds and/or wood of 
blueberries. A cursory survey 
indicated about 31% of the em- 
bryo flowers within the large 
fruit buds of the Weymouth 
variety were destroyed in a 
Burlington County field in 
which the minimum recorded 
was 15 below. In an Atlantic 
County field where the temper- 
ature plunged to 10 below zero 
only about G% of the Weymouth 
flowers appeared to be killed. 
Damage to wood can not be 
ascertained. 

WASHINGTON 

Weather 

The area had two periods 
this month when the growers 
needed to sprinkle for frost 
damage. The 4th tlirough the 
7th with a low of 27 degrees, 
and the 18th through the 25th 
with a low of 25. The mean 
low for the month of February 
was 37.32 degrees F. bog low 



of 25 degrees on the 18tli. 

The mean high for the month 
was 50.46 degrees, and we feel 
that spring is on its way, the 
days have been warm and 
sunny. The precipitation for 
the month 7.25 inches with 
1.20 inches falling on the 12th. 
February saw ten days witliout 
rain so that is a great improve- 
ment over the last two months. 

Excerpts taken from "Cranberry Vine" 

The weather during Novem- 
ber and December 1966 was rel- 
atively mild. It is believed that 
the buds did not build the re- 
quired hardiness and resistance 
to cold injury compared to the 
same previous year. 

The month of November had 
36 hours at 32 degrees F. and 
below. December had 18 hours 
and January 23 horn's. Tliis is 
considered a very mild winter 
with a normal relative humidity 
which did not drop, fortunately, 
to the critical point of desi- 
cation. 

Continued on Page 24 



(^SSO) ESSOTANE 

V ^ ^y PROPANE 

GAS 

Kerosene 
Solvent 

PROPANE CARBURETION 

Spraying Equipment ||||| installed - serviced 

iliii BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 1111 



/dnadGn^ 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 

Telephones 62 MAIN STREET 

585-4541 — 585-2604 KINGSTON, MASS. 



LABEL COLLECTOR 

Continued from Page 12 

Washington, Oregon — Kno- 
Better. 

Michigan — Michigan Sweets 
(Peterson Brothers.) 

In addition to the paper 
labels used on the cranberry 
box ends, ink imprinted box 
ends were used also. Among 
those that Dr. Weckel has are: 
C W Company ( Boxton, Massa- 
chusetts), Big Injun (Manomet, 
Massachusetts). Habelman Bro- 
thers (Wisconsin). Gebhardt 
(Wisconsin), Blue Diamond 
(George Davis, Manorville, 
New York). 

"I am always looking or in- 
quiring for those variety labels 
1 know about but haxe not yet 
found, and hope someone has." 
Among the labels still missing 
are: Battleship, Beaver, Chief, 
Chipmunk, Dragon, Eagle, 
Faneuil Hall, Fisherman, Lone 
Pine, Monogram, Pheasant, 
Priscilla, Puritan, Red Cedar, 
Samoset, and Santa Claus. 

"If any grower has these la- 
bels, particular!) in the ^A 
barrel si/c ritlu r separate or 
on a box nul. I sliall hv pleased 
to know aliont it. There are 
manv of the ink imi)rinted box 
ends, either with iiini. marsii, 
.or grower's names, 1 would wel- 
come very much. 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7. Taunton, Mass. 02781 
Tel. fil7 S24-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
Land Bank Mortgages 



Office— 362. Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



.^^#^#s*^^^*s#^#^*^*^#^*^*^#^#^#^»^*^*^ 



EIGHTEEN 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 

girdler moths in the late bloom 
stage. Guthion has also been 
added to the control for green 
spanworm and tipworm in the 
V2 inch growth to hook stage. 
Aldrin has been deleted for 
control of weevil. 

Frost Warning 

The Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association is again 
sponsoring the telephone frost 
warning service. Applications 
were mailed to all growers by 
mid March. If a grower has not 
received an application, he 
should notify Mrs. Ruth Beaton, 
treasurer of the association, Jef- 
ferson Shores Road, Buzzards 
Bay, Mass. There is a spot on 
the application for a donation 
to the telephone answering ser- 
vice which is also sponsored 
by the Association and is in 
operation during the frost sea- 
son at the Cranberry Station. 
This is a very valuable part of 
the frost warning service and is 
particularly helpful when a 
grower may have {missed the 
warning for various reasons. 
There is a message on the re- 
corder every day during the 
frost season, whether a frost 
warning is sent or not. George 
Rounsville wishes to remind 
growers using the answering 
service that the recorded mes- 
sage will not be available be- 
fore 1:30 in the afternoon or 
8:30 in the evening. The frost 
pad for writing down the mes- 
sage has proved very popular 
and will be mailed to growers 
subscribing to the service. All 
applications and payments 
should be returned by April 2 
in order that the necessary ar- 
rangements can be completed 
prior to the frost season. Appli- 
cations returned after this date 
will result in the subscribers 
name being placed at the bot- 
tom of the telephone list. There 
were approximately 219 sub- 
scribers last season, lets hope 
there will be an increase this 
season. 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST PROTECTION 
REMEMBER THESE 4 IMPORTANT 
POINTS ABOUT FMC TROPIC BREEZE 
WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole crew 
required for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 

within 3 to 5 minutes, the 

marsh is receiving effective 

frost protection. FMC machines 

have an enviable record for 

operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 



i 




'<**-"; y^-f'W 



FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA division 

FAIRWAY AVENUE, LAKELAND, FLORIDA 

n Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 
□ Please have sales engineer contact me 




CORPORATION 



© 



NAME- 



_T1TLE_ 



ADDRESS (RFD). 
CITY 



..iONE- 



-STATE. 



NINETEEN 



FOR SALE 

1 Farrah Pump with Ford V-8 engine, 
completely reconditioned and mounted 
on trailer, complete with suction lines. 
Rated at 500 gallons per minute. 
PRICE $550.00. 

Call C. E. Morse at 
North Attleboro, Mass. 695-9612. 



NEW PRODUCTS 

Continued from "page 14 

The total package consists of 
a gallon can specifically de- 
signed to be used with a CO/2 
regulating unit which, when at- 
tached to the gallon can, main- 
tains a constant pressure on the 
liquid within the can. The pres- 
sure forces the liquid from the 
can into one of many different 
types of applicators for ultimate 
consum^er and institutional uses. 
The product flow may be con- 
trolled by adjusting a simple 
on-off valve built into the sys- 
tem at the point of dispensing. 

F. W. Considine, Executive 
Vice President of the Chicago 
based corporation, in making 
the announcement, said, "This 
system is a product of National 
Can's total miarketing program 
which emphasizes the develop- 
ment of 'consumerized' products 
for the sophisticated consumer. 
The market potential for the 
JETSTER-MATIC system is 
limited only by the imagination 
of the industries to whom it will 
be made available. 




PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
for Sand and Service that Satisfy . . . Call Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 



The newest and most modern plant 
serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 



Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 



585-3377 



PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



TWENTY 



NEW JERSEY 
AMERICAN CRANBERRY 
GROWERS' ASSOC. 
HOLD MEETING 



The 97tli Annual Winter 
Meeting of the Anieriean Cran- 
lierry Growers Association \\'as 
held at the Concord Motel at 
Monnt Holly on February 16th. 
A full day's program was con- 
ducted with President Walter 
Z. Fort presiding before an at- 
tendance of about fifty. 

Mike Mainland of the Rutgers 
University Department of Hor- 
ticulture and Forestry presented 
a paper on the use of gibberel- 
lin on cranberries. Applications 
made in 1965 induced a very 
high set of berries, much smaller 
in size, but larger in volume 
than the checks. Production in 
1966 of the 1965 gibberellin 
treated plots was considerably 
reduced but the yield for the 
two years was slightly greater 
in the gibberellin plots. How- 
ever, as the plots go into the 
third year the gibberellin plots 
appear to be weaker than the 
checks. An odd elongated 
growth of uprights with larger 
than normal spaces between 
leaves has resulted from the use 
of the gibberellin. 

Jack St. Pierre presented 
cranberry statistics for New 
Jersey. The 1966 crop was esti- 
mated at 144,000 barrels, 6% 
short of the big crop of 1965 
but 37% above normal. The effi- 
ciency of the water harvesting 
method was noted. On bogs 
which were water harvested the 
average loss of berries was 2% 
as compared to 29% in dry 
mechanical harvesting and 41% 
in hand scooping. Losses to 
diseases and insects averaged 
about 5.7%. 

Phil Marucci discussed broad, 
ly the experiments and demon- 
stration work which will be 
conducted at the Oswego Blue- 
berry-Cranberry Research Site 



of the Experiment Station. Re- 
search work is of a long term 
nature and results will not be 
apparent for a few years. Bogs 
have been assigned for the Con- 
duct of research in fertilizers 
and nutrition, insect and disease 
control, pollination, growth reg- 
ulators, pruning, weed control 
and the development of new 
varieties. Demonstration work 
has already demonstrated the 
value of casoron in weed con- 
trol and the effectiveness of 
dense planting of vines and 
early fertilization to quickly es- 
tablish cranberry bogs. Variety 
trials with seventeen named 
varieties and sixteen U.S.D.A. 
numbered seedlings were 
started in the fall'of 1966. These 
trial plots are planted in such 
a manner that water harvesting 
of each variety separately will 
be possible. 

Dr. Paul Eck presentetd data 
to show that the color of cran- 
berries can be markedly im- 
proved by he use of a m,alathion 
spray before harvest. 

Dr. Clarence Sakamoto pre- 
sented an analysis of clima- 
tological data to show the risks 
of frost damage inherent in the 
removal of the winter flood 
from bogs at various times in 
the spring. 

Ed Lipman, the organization's 
delegate, reported on the 1967 
New Jersey Agricultural Con- 
vention. Agricultural interests 
in the state are in danger of 
being overwhelmed by the ur- 
ban power. The new reappor- 
tionment of the state legislature 
has eliminated much of the 
representation of the rural 
areas. Cranberry growers who 
have traditionally had a miem- 
ber on the State Water Policy 
Commission are now left with- 
out a representative on this im- 
portant body. 

The highlight of the program 
was Walter Fort's showing of 
his wonderful colored slides of 
New Jersey cranberry bogs ^ and 
cranberry problems. 



Election of officers produced 
the following slate: Earl Kersh- 
ner, President, Chatworth; Ern- 
est Cutts, Jr.^ 1st Vice President, 
Tabernacle", Garfield DeMarco, 
2nd Vice President, Hamtmon- 
ton; Philip E. Marucci, Secre- 
tary, Pemberton; Paul Eck, 
Treasurer, New Brunswick, 



UFO Observed Near 
Oregon Cranberry Area 

A rectangular-shaped object, 
the base of which cast a red- 
orangey glow, was reported seen 
in the sky in the vicinity of the 
Millard School at 10:20 p.m. 
recently in Bandon, Oregon. 

In reporting the Unidentified 
Flying Object Mrs. Esther Mil- 
lard stated that she was out 
for an evening walk with her 
German Shepherd when she 
first noticed the strange object 
hovering over the school's gym- 
nasium some 50 to 60 feet above 
the ground and an estimated 
150 feet away from her. 

In describing the event, she 
told Police Chief D. S. Mac- 
Donald that the object was 
about seven feet wide and 
about twice as tall. It was rec- 
tangular in shape and rrsoved 
in a slightly-tilted upright po- 
sition, making absolutely no 
sound. The orange-red glow 
came from the base, and it cast 
a bright beam of light. 

Mrs. Millard told the Chief 
that it looked as if it might 
land on the gymnasium build- 
ing as it was quite low to the 
ground — below the level of the 
trees. But, after remaining for 
several minutes, the object flew 
across Bradley Lake and over 
the sand dunes, and was last 
seen flying high over the ocean. 

After talking to a number of 
the boys at Millard School 
the Chief learned that several 
of them had seen a strange light 
in the sky the previous night, 
but had not reported it. 

Chief MacDonald notified the 
North Bend Radar Station up- 
on receiving the call from Mrs. 
Millard. 

TWENTY-ONE 



CRANBERRY VINE INJURY 

Continued from Page 16 

tissue of the host phint. This 
weakly parasitic habit suggests 
that it would develop slowly 
in the host organism and its 
full effects would not be mani- 
fested until some weeks after 
the initial invasion. Finally, we 
know this fungus is a warm 
temperature funguis, that, it 
grows most succesfully under 
warm summer temperatures. 

The summer weather of 1966 
was interesting though often- 
times frustrating to growers. 
The one features that stands 
out in the weather records is 
the period from June 25 to 
July 3 when maximum temper- 
atures were above 90 degrees 
F daily at southern Wisconsin 
reporting stations and 88 de- 
grees F or above at northern 
stations. During this 8-day 
period, the minimum tempera- 
tures were above 60 degrees F 
at 6 dates in Minong and on 
8 dates at Mather. The mean 
temperature for these 9 days 
was something over 75 degree 
F and on several dates was 



80 degrees F. This period of 
uncomfortably warm weather 
was during the period of longest 
summer days and thus the high 
temperatiues extended late in 
the afternoon and into the eve- 
ning so . that probably actual 
number of hours above 80 de- 
grees F was more than the 
number of hours below 80. 

At the beginning of this per- 
iod the northwestern comer of 
the state had showers while the 
southern growing areas had 
none. On July 24, 25 and 26, 
Minong had .15 .77 and .08 in. 
of rain, respectively. Hayward 
accumulated .54 inch and Cou- 
deray had .19 inch in the same 
period. In Vilas County the 
rainfall during the period was 
generally less than ,10 inch and 
in Mather, Pittsville, and Wis- 
consin Rapids there was none 
or only a trace. The hot spell 
was broken by widespread 
shower activity on July 3, 4, 
5 and 6. 

This hot spell following good 
rainfall would have provided 
ideal conditions for fungal de- 



velopment particularly a fungus 
known to be favored by high 
temperatures. We believe that 
circumstances point strongly to 
the association of Phomopis 
fungus to the deterioration of 
cranberry vines under the stress 
conditions of high temperature, 
rapid growth, initially high hu- 
midity and later water stress. 

What is the answer to the 
problem? We don't konw. If 
our analysis- is correct we would 
expect some more dead vines 
next spring as development of 
the fungus in affected vines 
continues. Because of the 
build-up of fungus inoculum in 
the beds, we wc»ild expect a 
serious outbreak of disease 
should we have a repeat per- 
formance of 1966 weather in 
1967. It is our considered opin- 
ion that "air-conditioning" the 
vines with sprinkler irrigation 
on exceedingly hot days could 
be highly beneficial in reducing 
development of this malady. 
We have no suggestions for 
spraying with fungicides for 
control of this problem. 



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CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



285-3737 



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rWENTY-TWO 




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FROST control! 



We supply complete systems immediately from stock, as 
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Easy financing available through Alcoa. Reconditioned, 
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IRRIGATION CO. 

WILLIAMSTOWN, NEW YORK 



TWENTY-THREE 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

Continued from Page 18 

Several growers have been 
sprinkling in the Long Beach 
area for protection against frost 
injury. To be on the safe side, 
maybe it is worth the expense 
of sprinkling to avoid any 
chance of injury. 

Several soil tests have been 
received and fertilizer recom- 
mendations sent promptly to 
the growers. This makes it easy 
to order your required fertili- 
zer without any guess work. 
Fertilizing time will be upon 
you very soon, why don't you 
test your soil while you have 
the chance. It pays to be sure. 
Sample boxes are available at 
the Long Beach Unit. 

Maybe it is too early for such 
activity, but Director Miller 
wrote and said, "There is noth. 
ing hke being the early bird." 
So I arrv rushing to tell you 
we have set a date, Saturday, 
June 24, 1967 for the Annual 
Field Day. Please circle this 
date on your calendar and do 
your best to attend. Plan to 
treat your family to a smoked- 
baked salmon lunch. The pro- 
gram for the day will be pub- 
hshed later. 



WISCONSIN 

State Marketing Order 

The director of the Wiscon- 
sin State Department of Agri- 
culture which administers the 
Wisconsin cranberry marketing 
order reported that, out of 
funds collected, $5000 was be- 
ing allocated to the University 
of Wisconsin horticulture de- 
partment for cranberry research 
and 2500 to the U.S. Weather 
Bureau for frost warning ser- 
vice. The marketing order which 
has been in effect since July 
1965 provides an assessment of 
24 per barrel of cranberries, 
amounting to eight or nine thou- 
sand dollars per year. 

Frost 

Some below zero tempera- 

TWENTY-FOUR 



tures during the two-week per- 
iod after February 10th dr()\'C 
the frost deeper in Wisconsin 
after only a moderate increase 
in the two-week period prior 
to that date. The unusual ar- 
rangement of the groiuid cover 
has made it hard to arrive at 
an average frost depth. 

The snow cover is very un- 
even in some areas this year 
because of the drifting caused 
by strong winds that accom- 
panied the snow storms. There 
is the ice cover or crusts that 
exist over most of the State. 
SoniiC of this ice or crusted snow 
lies on the ground covered 
snow, other areas have snow, 
then ice and more snow and 
some portions have several ice 
and snow layers. 

Weather 

More settled winter weather 
conditions arrived at the end 
of January after the unusually 
changeable period of the pre- 
vious two weeks. Temperatures 
averaged slightly above normal 
during the week Jan. 28 to Feb. 
3 with percipitation also a litle 
above normal. Several areas of 
light, fluffy snow crossed the 
state from the northwest depos- 
iting amounts of 3 to 6 inches 
in most sections. 

The week of Feb. 4 to 10 
continued near normal both 
with respect to temperatures 
and precipitation. Cold, clear 
weather with temperatures to 
—30 on the 6th and 7th was 
offset by milder conditions 
earlier and later in the week. 
Low water content snow in 
amounts of up to a foot fell 
along the Lake Michigan shore- 
line on the 5th and 6th with 
lesser amount elsewhere. 

Temperatures turned very 
cold again with readings down 
in the —35 to —40 degree range 
in the northwest on the 11th 
and 12th. Additional light, fluf- 
fy snow fell in most areas on 
the 12th. Warmer weather re- 
turned on the 13th and 14th. 

Cold winter weather contin- 
ued during the last two weeks 



of the month with temperatures 
below normal in all areas of the 
state. Minimum temperatures 
down to 40 below zero were 
recorded in the northwest on 
the 12 and unusually cold and 
windy weather returned on the 
24th and 25th. A few mild 
days with above freezing tem- 
peratures occurred from the 
13th througli the 15th. 

The snow cover in many 
northwestern areas was unusu- 
ally deep and of high water 
content as the month ended. 
Wildlife has been experiencing 
some difficulties and there is 
concern over pastures where 
ice and glaze cover is lieavy. 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 




IRRIGATION SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



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MARSHHELL' WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 




serving the WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 

Vines 

for delivery in 1967 

$200 Ton F.O.B. 
Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworlhy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



^ DANA 

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Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

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Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

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Cranberry Vinegar 

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WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 






J 




Some cranberries have a 
better future than others* 

Some cranberries get picked and packed and sent to mar- 
ket and no one ever hears of them. 

Some years they fetch a pretty good price. And other years 
...well, that^s agriculture for you. 

But, some cranberries get picked and packed and sent to 
market with Ocean Spray labels on them. 

They get their pictures taken. They get talked about in 
magazines and newspapers. And on TV and radio from 
coast to coast. 

Over the years, theyVe fetched a better price for their 
growers than any other cranberry. 

Every year, people buy more of them than all other 
cranberries combined. 

Because, every year. Ocean Spray does more things with 
more cranberries than anybody else. 



Ocean spray> 



FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHIP IN OCEAN SPRAY, CONTACT ANY DIRECTOR OR STAFF MEMBER IN YOUR GROWING AREA 



Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

\A/isconsin 

Oregon 

\A/ashingt:on 

Canada 




■ «■ IB U U 



FRENCH 

CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 




$ 




« 



IIM 


THIS 


ISSUE 


APRIL 


19B-7 



MR. LEWIS TALKS ABOUT OCEAN SPRAY 7 

CRANBERRY RED GALL DISEASE 14 

WISCONSIN WEED^CHART 22- 

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Attention 
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NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

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Funds flways available for sound loans 



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YOUR 
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IRRIGATION 

• 

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632 Main St. Acuslinet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



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At Screenhouses, Bog» and 

Pumps M«ans Satisfaction 

WAREHAM. MASS Tcl. CY 3-2000 



Marcus L. Uronn 
Scholarship Fund 

Probably everyone who has 
raised commercial quantities of 
cranberries in Massachusetts 
has heard of Mr. Marcus L. 
Urann, the founder of Ocean 
Spray. A very large number of 
growers knew Mr. Urann per- 
sonally, knew him as a leader 
in the cranberry industry, a 
very able businessman, and an 
enthusiast for everything that 
would promote cranberries. 
Many had the rare good for- 
tune to know Mr. Urann as a 
personal friend. It was he who 
directed the writer's path tow- 
ard college, and I hereby ack- 
nowledge my undying gratitude 
to him for it. 

Under the terms of Marcus 
L. Urann's will, a large per- 
centage of his holdings were 
set up as a Trust under which 
certain funds are made avail- 
able annually to assist the chil- 
dren of cranberry growers and 
cranberry workers to- get an 
education beyond the high 
school level. The parents of 
children must live in Plymouth 
or Barnstable Counties, Massa- 



chusetts, to be eligible. Schol- 
arship assistance is available 
for many types of higher edu- 
cation, including 2- or 4-year 
college programs, technical and 
vocational training, nursing, etc. 

The Urann Scholarship Com- 
mittee will review applications 
from interested students and 
their parents. The intent of 
Mr. Urann's trust is that quah- 
fied children of cranberry grow- 
ers and cranberry employees 
should be assisted toward 
higher education, especially if 
the high costs of education pre- 
sent a real barrier to the chil- 
dren or their parents. Thus the 
student and his parents must 
shew a need for help, and the 
students must show scholastic 
merit and the desire to go 
ahead. Mr. Urann loved the "so- 
getter. 

I knew Marcus L. Urann as 
"a grand old man." It is typical, 
I think, that his last wish 
should be that of helping his 
colleagues in the cranberry 
business with their educational 
problems. The establishment of 
this trust was the act of a very 
generous man. Those inter- 
ested in further details or in 



applying for a Urann Scholar- 
ship may get the necessary ap- 
plication forms from the guid- 
ance director of the local high 
school or from the Urann Schol- 
arship Fund, P.O. Box 8, Han- 
son, Mass. 02341. 

Chester E. Cross 
Cranberry Experiment 
Station 



Lulu Island Grower 
Reports Wettest Winter 

\ji a recent communication to 
this magazine from Mr. Nor- 
man Holmes in New Westtnin- 
ster, British Columbia, Canada, 
he states that the area is ex- 
panding very rapidly and may 
be a httle ahead of the Can- 
adian market. It is expected 
that there will be about 600 
acres planted on Lulu Island. 

The weather in the area has 
been very warm and wet this 
past winter and he said that 
it was too bad that we could 
not have been in a position to 
get some of their surplus rain. 
It rained almost every day 
since the first of November and 
this has been, in fact, the wet- 
test winter he has seen in that 
region. 



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Mass. 

Cranberry 

Station 

I Field Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

extension crianberry specialist: 



Personals the sEuce and juice of a number data 

"Prof. Bill Tomlinsoii lias an of cranberry varieties and how tion. 
article published in tjie March these characteristics vary from 



tence 



issue of the Annals of the En- 
tomological Society of America. 
The title is "A Color Varient 
of Cranberry Fruitworm, Acro- 
hmis vaccina, and Host Records 
of Acrobasis amplexcUu." This 
paper reports on cranberr\' 
fruitworm mcths that have 
darker colored wing^ tlian the 
typical fruitworm motlis. Re- 
prints of this paper are a\'aila- 
ble. 

Dr. Bert Zuckcrman, (he au- 
thor and several others ha\e 
published a paper in the Pro. 
ceedings of the American 
Society for Horticultiu'al 
Science, Volume 89, 1966. The 
title is "Pigment and Viscositx' 



bog to bog. Reprints of this 
paper are available. 

Club Meetings 

The March series of cranberr\ 
club meetings were held at 
Kingston on March 14, Roches- 
ter, March 15 and Barnstable 
March 16. Dr. Chester Cross 
discussed "Prospect^ for 1967," 
in which he outlined weather 
factors influencing the potential 
crop. Dr. Robert Devlin's topic 
was "Growtli Hormone^ and 
Herbicide Tests." Bob gave the 
preliminary results of his tests 
of \'arious weed killers and the 
effects of gibberellic acid on 
cranberry fruit set. Prof. Wil- 
liam Tomlinson discussed "In- 



on "Pesticide Inxestiga- 
^^V.^ talked on the persis- 
of casoron in bog soils 
and parathi(m residues in drain, 
age water. The author gave 
"The effects of \\'eed Killers on 
Cranberries," in which data was 
presented on the rooting of 
cranberry cuttings from vines 
treated with casoron and 
chloro-IPC and the effect of 
chloro-lP(> on \ields related to 
flood and sprinkler fiost pro- 
tection. 

The clubs elected officers for 
the new^ season. The South 
Shore Club in Kingston re- 
elected Larr\^ Cole, president, 
Alden Alberghini, \'ice president 
and Bob Alberghini, secretary- 
treasurer. The Southeastern 
Massachusetts Club elected 
Dave Mann, president, John 



of Juice and Sauce of Se\eral sect Control." Bill's talk 

Cranberry Varieties." This is a be printed in next month "s issue Decas, vice president and Rus- 

report on differences in red of Cranberries. Dr. Charles sell Hiller, secretar\ -treasurer 

color and pectin contents of Miller presented some of his 



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SPRINKLER SYSTEMS ARE OUR BUSINESS 

More than 20 years experience in design and layout of AMES 
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. We are available to plan your sprinkler system 
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AMES UTILITY main, AMES quick connecting adapters, plastic pipe, 
bronze fittings and Rainbird sprinklers. 
A note from Rainbird sprinklers issued March 18, 1966 . . . 

1. Uniformity of application improves with length of application. 

2. Two nozzle sprinklers improve uniformity of application when lateral 
spacing exceeds the radius of coverage of the sprinkler. 

3. Pressure ranges for best operation of sprinklers: 

1/8" nozzle and smaller — 50 psi. 
9/64" to 11/64" nozzle — 55 to 60 psi. 
3/16" to 7/32" nozzle — 60 to 65 psi. 
1/4" to 9/32" nozzle — 65 to 70 psi. 

4. For frost protection increase all nozzle pressure by 10 psi. 

Rainbird sprinkler charts are available for asking. 

CHARLES W. HARRIS CO., INC. north dighton, mass. 824-5607 



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Three 




^1> 



»^ 




We Irrigate Fruits & Vegetables 
Any wliere In The Free World 







T 




J 




r. 



Now! New! All 1967 equipment is furnished with 
new TICO pipe, first coupler and pipe formed as 
o single unit. Simpler, more trouble free. Directly 
interchangeable with existing TICO and many 
other mokes. Here, Dove deGraff, president of 
Williamstown, shows port of half million feet of 



Qvoiloble pipe. 



FROST CONTROLl 



We supply complete systems immediately from stock, as 
well as technical knowledge and engineering. There is no 
waiting. Most of our systems are engineered, financed and 
installed within 36 hours of the time you phone. 

Distributors of 28 Nationally Known Lines of Irrigation 
Equipment and Supplies: Hale, Jaeger, Marlow, Rain Bird, 
Buckner, Skinner, Ames, Gorman-Rupp, Speedloc, Alcoa 
Tubing, Tico, Champion, Rain Control, Ireco, Shur-Rain, 
CMC, Ravit, Mathieson, Pierce, Valley, Perfection, Flexo- 
Seal, Gould, Myers, Geehn, Carlon Plastics, Thunderbird 
Irrigation, and B. F. Goodrich Mobile Pipe. 

Easy financing available through Alcoa. Reconditioned, 
guaranteed equipment is also available. 



This equipment can double as a frost control unit effective 
at temperatures as low as 18°. 



WHOLESALE & RETAIL 



DESIGN & INSTALLATION 




AREA CODE 315 964-2214 



IRRIGATION CO. 

WILLIAMSTOWN, NEW YORK 



Four 




ISSUE OF APRIL 1967 / VOL. 31— NO. 12 



MAN AND HIS WORLD — EXPO '67 

Perhaps the most publicized event of 1967, 
at least until now, has been the International 
Exhibition of 1967 — better known as Expo 
67 — to be held in Montreal, Canada from 
April 28 through October 27, 1967. 

If all indications are correct, this promises 
to be one of the most spectacular happenings 
of the century. 

The theme "Man and his World" is taken 
from the title of a book by the French 
author and aviator Antoine de Saint-Ex- 
purgy. Expo 67 will have five subthemes: 
Man the Explorer, Man the Creator, Man 
the Producer, Man and the Community 
and Man the Provider. In each of the theme 
pavilions you'll see dramatic visual presen- 
tations of the effects of environment on 
man, and his efforts to change that environ- 
ment to realize his aspirations. 

Two exhibits should be of particular in- 
terest to cranberry growers. The internat- 
ional food exhibit in which will be shown 
the foods of the world. Each country rep- 
resented, and there are 70 of them, will 
feature the preparation of its native dishes. 
Menus will be shown of the typical meals 
of the countries. One will be able to see 
and learn of exotic foods as well as substi- 
tute dishes prepared in the more depressed 
countries of our world. 

The other exhibit of notable interest to 
our readers would be the great agricultural 
exhibit, part of the Man the Provider theme, 
will include the Sun Acre of growing crops, 
an automated egg factory, a dairy herd 
and displays showing soil management, ir- 
rigation and fertility. Obviously there is 
much more to be seen by the visitor to Expo 
67 — more, it is said, than one will be able 
to see during the average visit. 

Certainly we in the United States are 
familiar with fairs for we are the area 
where state and county fairs were origi- 
nated. We are not trying to compare our 
county and state fairs with Expo 67, but 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall nt Ware-h.im. Ma>- 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 



CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jefsey 



there is an analogy between the two. When 
we go to the "county Fair" we do so first 
to enjoy ourselves, secondly, and perhaps 
the most important reason to some of us, 
is to learn something. Much can be learned 
from our county and state fairs — much can 
be learned from Expo 67. 

It has long been said that we should "see 
America first." This year we are invited 
to see America first while travelling to Can- 
ada to Expo 67. 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston, Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 

Five 



spring tonic for cranberry yields: 
Chloro IPC Herbicide before bud-break. 




Right now, while established 
plants are dormant, you can 
protect your cranberries against 
early weed competition. A treat- 
ment before bud-break with 
Chloro IPC selective herbicide 
stops germinating weeds and 
grasses such as annual bluegrass, 
bentgrass, bluejoint grass, 
dodder, horsetail, loosestrife, 
rushes (Juncus), sickle grass, 



turkeyfoot grass and velvet- 
grass. In Massachusetts, con- 
sult your Extension Service 
Cranberry Weed Control Chart. 
Once its work is done, PPG 
Chloro IPC breaks down with 
rising temperatures. This elimi- 
nates problems of build-up in 
soil or carryover. Chloro IPC 
also shows a broad margin of 
tolerance to cranberry plants. 



Uniform, hard granules of 20% 
Granular Chloro IPC are easy 
to measure- and apply with air 
or ground equipment. 

Check your local extension 
service or supplier for more 
complete information or write 
Department 7713, Pittsburgh 
Plate Glass Company, Chem- 
ical Division, One Gateway 
Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222. 



S ix 



Chemicals 

INDUSTRIES 




Edwin F. Lewis 



Edwin F. Lewis is Senior Vice- 
President in charge of neto 
production development, mar- 
keting arul research and de- 
velopment for Ocean Spray 
Cranberries, Inc. Prior to join- 
ing Ocean Spray, Mr. Lewis 
was associated with Young i~ 
Ruhi-cam, Inc., during tchich 
time he served as Vice-Presi- 
derrt and Account Supervisor. 
Following is part one of a 
two part speech delivered by 
Mr. Lewis on aspects of To- 
tal Marketing. Conclusion will 
be printed in the May issue. 



EDWIN F. LEWIS SPEAKS ON 

TOTAL MARKETING 



This presentation is about 
new product marketing at 
Ocean Spray. New product acti- 
vity can't and doesn't exist in 
limbo. It is part of the total in- 
tegrated marketing operation for 
our company. Therefore, to un- 
derstand our new product acti- 
\ity, it is necessary to under- 
stand our total structure and 
complete marketing program. 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, 
Inc., is a growers' marketing co- 
operative. The common shares, 
of the corporation are owned 
by approximately 1,000 cran- 
berry growers. Ocean Spray re- 
quires its members to own one 
share of common stock for every 
four barrels of cranberries de- 
livered to the cooperati\'e based 
on the growers' three-year aver, 
age plus or minus iO%. A barrel 
of cranberries weighs 100 lbs. 
The grower-member is required 
to deliver all of his crop to 
Ocean Spray and his growing 
practices insofar as fertilizers, 
insecticides and pesticides, etc., 



are losely supervised by the co. 
operative. 

With that brief background, 
I would like to tell you what 
we have done at Ocean Spray 
in the past four years. Particu- 
larly, how we have expanded 
some old established markets 
and penetrated some new ones. 

The cranberry industry has 
been plaqued for years with an 
over-supply situation and a 
widely fluctuating return to 
growers for their raw products. 
There had been no stability in 
this business.. Returns to grow- 
ers had fluctuated prior to> the 
present management from a 
high of $35 per barrel in 1946 
to a low of $8 per barrel in 
1962. 

When the present manage- 
ment team took over at Ocean 
Spray approximately four vears 
ago, we did not need a high- 
priced, marketing consultant to 
tell us that we had a sick com- 
pan)' on cur hands. We care- 
fully reviewed, analyzed and 



observed all of the symptoms 
of this cooperative before chart- 
ing a course of action. In our 
study and observations, we 
found two assets of tremendous 
value. 

1. A national brand trade- 
mark with high consumer 
awareness. This is something 
that very few marketing coop- 
eratives own. I need not point 
out to you the value of a con- 
sumer accepted national brand 
trademark. We are all aware of 
how even the major chain stores 
strive vahantly to establish 
brand names for their private 
label merchandise. Your most 
successful California coopera- 
tives are those with a well re- 
spected trademark. These people 
well understand the value of a 
brand name. 

2. The second item of sub- 
stantial value we found was that 
Ocean Spray growers controlled 
an 80% share of the marketable 
crop. This provided us with real 
Continued on Page 10 

Seven 



IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 

For frost control 
and irrigation 

SOLID SET BOG 

ALL ALUMINUM 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Johns Manv///e Plastic 

Pipe and Fittings 

WE ALSO HAVE SOME ^V/' and 2" ALUMINUM PIPE 
FOR SALE AT THE PLYMOUTH WAREHOUSE. 

LARCHMONT ENGINEERING 

LEXINGTON, MASS. VO 2-2550 

BILL STEARNS 

99 Warren Ave. Plymouth, Mass. (716-6048) 

Larchmont Eng. Rep. 



FOR SALE 

H. R. BAILEY COMPANY, Manufacturer 
of Cranberry Machinery and Equipment 
Since 1900. Stock, machinery, equip- 
ment, land and buildings (no cranberry 
bogs). 

Address all inquiries to: 

ATTY. ALBERT T. MADDIGAN 

111 Center Street 
Mlddleboro, Mass. 02346 



Wisconsin Cranberry 
Consultant Service 

P.O. Box 429 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 

Phone 423-4871 



Wisconsin Distributor 

for 
Casoron®G-4 granules 



IN THE 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST 
SEE YOUR 

MILLER DEALER 

or 

MILLER FIELDMAN 

for 

CASORON* 

MILLER PRODUCTS CO 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
W. R. GRACE & CO. 

7737 N. E. Killingsworth 
Portland, Oregon 97218 



► 



CASORON 



® 



IS AVAILABLE IN 
MASSACHUSETTS 

from 

R. F. MORSE & SON 

West Wareham 

Tel. 295-1553 



Eight 



CASORON 

DICHLOBENIL WEED & GRASS KILLER 

A Research Discovery ol N V PHILIPS DUPHAR US Pdt No. 3,0?/.Z18 




It takes a merciless weed killer to wipe out ruthless perennial weeds. CASORON G-4 
granules is the way to wipe out cranberry-choking weeds. 

It polishes oft perennial and certain annual weeds and grasses before they spring up to rob 
your cranberries of available soil moisture and valuable nutrients. 

Yet as devastating as CASORON is to weeds, it won't hurt your cranberries. 

Just use CASORON right now. You'll have no weeds, no labor problems. 

CASORON controls heavy, crop-choking strands of weeds but it is also economical 
for use when only a few weeds are present. 

Get CASORON G-4 at your supplier. If you don't know who he is, write us. 
We'll tell you and send complete, illustrated information on CASORON. 

Use CASORON. The merciless weed killer that's murder to weeds. 



CASORON -approved for bearing and non bearing fruit, nursery 
ornamentals, citrus nurseries, cranberries and alfalfa. 



<aD! 



THOMPSON-HAYWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Subsidiary of Philips Electronics and Pharmaceutical Industries Corp. 
P.O. Box 2383 Kansas City, Kansas 66110 



Nine 



some of these are liarder to re- 
solve than others. Relations \\'it]i 
our Board of Direetors are now 
excellent because we have mu- 
tually agreed on their responsi- 
bilities. Their functions are . . . 



1. To lay out broad company 
policies. 

2. ^^^ork with Management 
in establishing the goals for the. 
cooperative. 

3. To review with Manage- 
ment whether or not those goals e\i:)and the 
are being achieved within tlu; j^j,.jj. Ot^.^.^j^ 



TOTAL MARKETING 

Continued from Page 7 

market power — not that size 
alone gives a commodity mar- 
keting power, but it is a factor 
— if bigness produces operation- 
al efficiencies which in turn per- 
mit gaining market share at a 

profit, then bigness is market 

power. If size provides the 

trade with services desired by 

the trade, then we have market 

power. 

More importantly, Ocean 
Spray's size permits flexibility 
for new product development 
and market testing, which, as 
you well see, is the future lifc> 
blood for our cooperative. 

In our analysis and market 
research, we found these items 
of major concern: 

1. The consumer's ideas and 
usage of cranberries were old 
fashioned and holiday-oriented. 

2. The consumption of cran- 
berries on a per capita basis 
was static. 

3. There was keen price com. markeeting cooperative is to 
petition with the independent market its members' crops at a 
producers. Cranberries were fair market price. 



households was to offer a whole 
new famil\ of crauberrx -l)ased 
or craiiberrv -ingredient produc-ts 

\\ith a more inodcin image. 
I'sing our national brand trade- 
mark w^itli its high consumer 
a\\areness, this is the direction 
we took. 



we 



in minute 
aspects of 



specified time 

4. To understand 
detail the financial 
the company. 

5. Not to direct or interfere 
with Nhinagement as to how it 
achieves the company's goals. 



Mone\' management has been 
tightened so we properly handli' 
our cash flow and borrow onl\' 
when necessary. 

The primary objectixe of a 



being marketed as a commodity 
on price. 

4. The Ocean Spray consumer 
franchise was weakening be- 
cause advertising and promotion 
dollars were being used pri- 
marily to combat the price com. 
petition. 

5. The national cranberr\' 
crop was shrinking due to <\v- 
clining growers' returns and 
rising cost of production. 

6. A weak and practicalK- 
non-existent research and de- 
velopment department. 

7. Some weak staff members 
in critical areas of responsibil- 
ity. 

8. Lack of harmony on the 
Board of Directors and friction 
with Management. 

9. Inadequate money man- 
agement. 

The new management souglit 
to correct (\ich of these items 
of major concern. Ob\iousl\, 

Ten 



Thijj objectix'c can be accom- 
plished in a number of ways — 
one is to restrict crop produc- 
tion to the market demand — 
thereby holding prices up; this 
we didn't even consider for it 
is unnatural and contrary to the 
best interest of the growers and 
th(» economy. The second way 
is to increase consumer con- 
t;umption and usage of our pro- 
duct so as to broaden the mar- 
ket. This is the direction wf 
chose at Ocean Sjira) . From our 
consumer research we learned 
that cranberr\" usage among 
younger households was at a 
much lower l(>\el than in the 
older households. A part of this 
was due to changing diets and 
food habit.s, and the tendenc) 
on the part of the voimg people 
to be less tied to tradition. One 
of the ()b\i()us ways to aj^peal 
to a broader market is to in- 
crease consumption in \<)nng(M- 



IIa\ing si't onr cours( 
looked fil•^t at the existing ])r()- 
duct line for possible growth. 
It was \'er\- obxious that we 
had to maintain and, if possible, 
current products 
Sprav had in the 
market place. Only by maintain, 
ing our current market position 
could we take our second step. 
VoY the second step, we set in 
motion a program with the ob- 
jectix'c of developing new prod- 
ucts; which had the following 
characteristics. 



)e specialt)' 

be products 
high (juality 



1. They were to 1 
grocery products. 

2. They were to 
in keeping w ith the 
standards of Ocean Spray. 

3. They were to be products 
built on a consumer franchise 
giving us a uni(|ue and com- 
petitive consumer image. 

4. They were to reduce the 
seasonal fluctuation of our sales 
insofar as possible. 

5. They were to use produc- 
tion facilities on a xear-round 
basis to gain maximum use of 
all capital equipment. 

6. They were to gi\e longer 
profit margins which are sO nee. 
(>ssary in the establishment of 
a consumer franchise. 

Looking at the established 
line of products — whole berry 
cranberr\' sauce, jellied sauce 
and fresh cranberries, it was 
obxious that to increase margins 
on these long-established pro- 
ducts, major changes in their 
marketing was indicated. To 
expeilite the program, we insti- 
tuted clianges in both the Re- 
search and Sales Departments. 

If there is one attribute more 
inii)ortant in marketing than a 
(inestioniug mind. 1 don t know- 
it. In fact, to (juestion the ac- 



cepted may be more important 
than questioning the less obvi- 
ous. Cranberry sauce had been 
made to a standard practically 
since the Pilgrim Fathers 
learned about this native Ameri- 
can fruit from the Indians; how- 
ever, our newl)' staffed research! 
and development department 
reformulated Cranberry sauce 
and came up with an improved 
product. This new formula in- 
cludes use of a by-product of 
our processed cranberries. This 
change increased our case yield 
per barrel of fruit by 25%. 

With increased returns as- 
sured in processing, we made 
changes in the marketing setup. 
In analyzing advertising and 
promotion expenditures for 
cranberry sauce, we found 
$15,500,000 spent for advertis- 
ing and promotion for the five 
year period 1958 to 1963 while 
case sales decreased 280,000 
cases. 

Heavy promotion expendi- 
tures had been made in the fall 
to load the trade. In our judg- 
ment the retailer will buy and 
promote a seasonal demand 
item like cranberries at Thanks, 
giving and Christmas whether 
the manufacturer supports him 
or not. Substantial advertising 
expenditures for cranberry 
sauce in the previous five years 
had been on a year-round basis 
in an effort to break the tradi- 
tion-bound product usage at 
holidav times. The advertising, 
which wa^ primarily print, was 
directed to serving suggestions 
of cranberry sauces in salads, 
desserts, ice cream toppings and 
with all kinds of meats — all of 
this effort was to no avail. 

We drastically reduced the 
promotion funds in support of 
the product particularly in the 
early fall. Advertising was re- 
duced to reminder advertising 
at only the traditional holiday 
seasons. These changes pro- 
vided substantial funds to dix^ert 
to new product work. They 
paid for the cost of an expanded 



Research and Development De- 
partment. They permit the im- 
portant new product work to 
start without taking dollars from 
growers' returns. 

We have done some other 
things with the old established 
products. 

1. We redesigned the labels 
in order to strengthen the pro- 
duct identification and impact 
at retail. 

2. The package for fresh fruit 
was redesigned and the sales 
organization wa^ strengthened. 
Along with reorganizing our 
fresh fruit selling operation, we 
completely reorganized our pro- 
cess product sales department. 

Ocean Spray sales territories 
were realigned to correspond to 
the Nielseen marketing areas. 
Ocean Spray had been a Nielsen 
subscriber for years, but t|ie 
reports were not adequately 
used, since the broker areas and 
sales regions did not correspond 
to Nielsen reporting areas. 

We can now correct distribu- 
tion, out-of-stock and poor shelf 
position very promptly. Sales 
statistics are now compiled im- 
mediately by computer and all 
sales analysis can be quickly 
prepared for management de- 
cision and action. We have 
turned around the sales decline 
on these old established pro- 
ducts. The full sales story is 
part ol another phase on which 
I'll report later. 

When the new management 
took over, there was one new 
product in test market — Ocean 
Spray Cranberry Juice Cocktail. 
This product wais being adver- 
tised regiOiially on radio only 
and was thought to have limited 
consumer appeal. In order to 
determine more definitely the 
products potent al, consumer 
product placeme.it- tests and 
other market research studies 
were conducted. As a result of 
these tests we . . . 

1. Reformulated ' product to 
increase consumer acceptance. 



2. Redesigned the package 
and label to: 

(a) Make the product more 
convenient for the con- 
sumer to physically 
handle. 
(b) Increase the product 
identification and impact 
at retail. 

3. Prompted by our market 
research, we developed new 
advertising and conducted re- 
search to evaluate it. 

4. Finally, we took the pro- 
duct into national distribution 
in September, 1963, and we 
have enjoyed substantial suc- 
cess. 

Sales increased approximately 
200% the first year of national 
distribution. At the close of the 
1966 fiscal year, Cranberry Juice 
Cocktail sales represented $16 
million or 32% of our total sales 
volurrie. Distribution is now at 
the 95% level of all commodity 
distribution nationally. 

Since that time, we have in- 
troduced nationally a 48-ounce 
size of Cranberry Juice Cocktail, 
and have also sold in nationally 
( sic ) the pint and quart cocktail 
in a low calorie form. All three 
of these have gained substantial 
national distribution and are 
contributing to the growth in 
total cocktail volume, and to 
Ocean Spray's share of the fruit 
and vegetable juice market. 
Advertising and promotion ex- 
penditures have been substan- 
tial since the fall of 1963 when 
cranberry juice cocktail was 
taken national. We now spend 
in excess of $3 milhon a year 
to advertise this product on a 
national basis. 

Initially, our advertising dol- 
lars were spent in daytime tele- 
vision and periodic spot tele- 
vision flights. The majority of 
the spots were in day and 
fringe- time periods. This was 
done in order to reach a maxi- 
mum number of housewives 
best fitting the product profile 
as determined by our research. 

Continued on Fage 13 



El-even 



Coville Memorial 
Planned by Friends 



Former associates and friends 
have joined informally to com- 
memorate the 100th anniversary 
of the birth, March 23, 1867, 
of a distinguished botanist who 
"tamed" the wild blueberry and 
worked for over 30 years to 
have the National Arboretum 
established. 

The Frederick V. Coville 
Centennial Group is conduct- 
ing no fund drive and holding 
no formal meetings, but is 
gently encouraging recognition 
of the accomplishments of the 
late Dr. Coville. 

Dr. Coville served for 49 
years in the Department of Ag- 
riculture, and was its chief bot- 
anist from 1893 until his death 
in 1937. He was also curator 
of the National Herbarium and 
acting director of the then 
fledgling arboretum. 

One phase of the centennial 
group's efforts will come up 
for consideration at the April 
24 meeting of the Advisory 
Council on the Arboretum, 
when the council takes up a 
proposal for designating a per- 
manent memorial there. 

Organizations Notified 

Frederic P. Lee, chairman of 
the council, said a Coville me- 
morial will be considered, pos- 
sibly along with policies to gov- 
ern memorials generally at the 
arboretum, for recommendation 
to the Secretary of Agriculture. 

The centennial group also is 
sending information on the 
centenary to the various or- 
ganizations in which Dr. Co- 
ville was acti\'e. 

Possibly his best publicly 
known achievement was the 
"taming," as he put it, of the 
wild blueberry. 



A vignette in January's Cos- 
mos Club Bulletin by F. C. 
Brown and Arthur W. Palmer 
said Dr. Coville's domestica- 
tion and improvement of the 
native blueberry gave the 
Northeast and the Pacific North- 
west a new horticultural crop 
now worth $15 to $20 million 
annually to the growers. 

Campaigned for Arboretum 

Less well known, his admir- 
ers note, is his work for the ar- 
boretum, established in 1929. 
The United States was one of 
the last progressive countries to 
establish a government-owned 
arboretum, and even then it re- 
quired the concentrated efforts 
of a small but determined group 
to get Congress to act. 

Among those pressing the 
need along with Dr. Coville 
were the late Mrs. Frank B. 
Noyes, whose husband was for 
many years president of the 
Evening Star Newspaper Co., 
and Frederic A. Delano. 

As a botanist. Dr. Coville 
contributed nearly 175 profes- 
sional papers and publications. 
He became a recognized au- 
thority On the North American 
rushes, wild currants and blue- 
berries. Among many ether con- 
tributions, he helped reduce 
confusion in botanical definit- 
ions and plant names. 

He had a lifelong interest in 
desert botany, and his "Bot- 
any of the Death Valley Ex- 
pedition" was acclaimed a clas- 
sic study. He described and 
named many plants found in 
Alaska. 

First Herbarium Curator 

He helped establish the Nat- 
ional Herbarium in 1894, a 
vmion of the herbaria of the 
Agricultural Department and 



Smithsonian Institution, and 
was its first curator. He strongly 
assisted setting up Agriculture's 
Seed Laboratory. 

Dr. Coville served from 1920 
until 1937 as chairman of the 
National Geographic Society's 
research committee. 

He was president of the Bio- 
logical Society of Washington 
in 1899-1900, of the Botanical 
Society of America in 1903-04, 
of the Washington Academy of 
Sciences in 1912, of the Cosmos 
Club in 1915, of the Washington 
Biologists' Field Club in 1919- 
21, and of the Arts Club of 
Washington in 1927-29. 

In 1902 he was vice president 
of tbe American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, 
and in 1"931 received the Geo. 
Robert White Medal of Honor 
from the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society for his work 
on blueberries. George Wash- 
ington University made him an 
honorary doctor of science in 
1921. 



VOLTA OIL CO. 

Distributor of the Famous 

TEXACO 

WATER WHITE 

KEROSENE 

For your Bog 
STODDARD SOLVENT 

Tel. 746-1340 

Route 44, Samoset St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 



Twel 



ve 



TOTAL MARKETING 

Continued from Page 11 



Advertising weight ha<^ in- 
creased during the last three 
years with increasingly more 
emphasis on nighttime televi- 
sion to reach the full family 
unit; this action was taken 
based on the findings of succes- 



sive research flights conducted 
yearly since 1963 for cranberry 
juice cocktail. 

Each of these research flights, 
incidentally, was conducted 
with a national probability sam. 
pie. Thus, the data obtained 
each successive year, from 1962 
through 1965, are comparable. 

To he concluded next month 



i GASOLINE 
I MOTOR OILS 



STODDARD SOLVENT 

(Available Year Round) 
WATER WHITE KEROSENE 



DIESEL FUELS 



FUEL OIL 



866-4545 




Central 
Heating 

CARVER, MASS. 



Thunder Lake Reports... 

rTomahawk (Wis.) Cranberry 
Company expects to tile about 
six acres this spring. The beds 
are 100 ft. wide and about 1,4(M) 
ft. long and will have tile down 
the center and along botli sides. 
The method may eliminate the 
ditches, as all the marsli there 
is under sprinkler and tile will 
do the job. As far as the drain- 
age is concerned, there is little 
use for the ditches to carry 
flooding water. 

Thunder Lake will increase 
the number of varieties it has 
commercially to about 45 this 
spring and we will try to .see 
how some of these new var- 
ieties work out, as well as .some 
of the older ones. Right now, 
it appears that Pilgrims and 
Stevens are the best possibilities 
in Wisconsin. 

Another reason for interest 
in having so many varieties is 
that some of the Wisconsin 
growers may want to try some 

Continued on Page 15 



NOW IS THE TIME TO FIRM UP 
YOUR RCA LINE OF CREDIT 

A visit to your 

PCA OFFICE 

may well be the 
most profitable 
move you make 
all year ! 




Production Credit Associations 



MAUSTON 



MEDFORD 



WAUSAU 



TOMAH 



ANTIGO 



MARSHFIELD 



STEVENS POINT 



BLACK RIVER FALLS 



NEILLSVILLE 



Intermediate Term Loans for Productive 
Purposes Made To Responsible Farmers 

Thi rteen 



CONTROL OF HEjD'GALlL OF CRANBERRY 



bij KENNETH ROCHEFORT 
and B. M. ZUCKERMAN 

University of Massachusetts, Cranberry Experiment Station, 

East Wareham 



Red-gall disease occasionally 
causes severe economic losses. 
The disease stems from spores 
of the fungus Synchyirium vac- 
cina, which are spread by water 
to attack the stem leaves and 
fruit of the cranberry. Small, 
red galls are formed as a result 
of infection, frequently killing 
the flowers before the fruit is 
set (Figure 1). There i& an 
indication that these galls may 
also inhibit berry growth, since 
where several galls occur close 
together, an indentation occurs 
in the berry surface. Infected 
berries do not make satisfactory 
fresh fruit. 

The total effect of red-gall 
on a bog is quite deceiving, as 
infection is usually spotty. Low, 
wet areas are more prone to 
infection than higher, dry areas. 
Generally small, heavily infec- 
ted areas are scattered through- 
out the bog. Since free water 
is necessary for transfer of the 
disease, red-gall can be readily 
controlled through the installa- 
tion of sprinklers or a reduction 
in the number of floods. 

In 1965, fungicides were used 
on test plots in infected areas 
to determine their effectiveness 
in controlling the disease. Un- 
fortunatelv, the area chosen 
s;uffered little infection and a 
valid evaluation could not be 
made. The dry weather and 
infrequent use oi water for 
frost protection that year ham- 
pered development of the di- 
sease. However, a good indica- 
tion of control by fungicides 
was evident in a 20-foot wide 
swath along an irrigation ditch 
running through the control 
plots and plots on wdiich two 



applications of maneb or Bor- 
deaux mixture had been ap- 
plied. Berry infection was* re- 
duced by both maneb and Bor- 
deaux mixture. Plots which re- 
ceived one application of the 
fungicides and controls had no 
infection, therefore no evalua- 
tion of these was possible. 

In 1966, the same fungicide 
combinations were retest'cd. A 
low area, generally wetter than 
the rest of the bog was chosen, 
and two plots ten thousand 
square feet each laid out. Equal 
areas at the end of each plot 
were used as controls. Each plot 
received a fungicide application 
in mid-April, and four weeks 
later a second spray was ap- 
plied to one-half of each plot. 
Bordeaux mixture was applied 
at a rate of 20 pounds copper 
sulphate, 8 pounds lime/acre 
and maneb at a 12-lb/acre rate. 



The plots were examined in 
late August. Six one - foot 
square random samples were 
taken within each plot. Infec- 
tion, though light, was well dis. 
tributed throughout tji^e plots. 
Table 1 gives the results of 
these experiments. With both 
chemicals, better control was 
obtained in the plots that re- 
ceived two applications. 

Under conditions where water 
management needs cannot be 
met either through reduction 
of floods or installation of 
sprinklers, the use of fungicides 
is recommended. From the re- 
sults of 1965 and 1966 experi- 
ments, two applications of Bor- 
deaux mixture or maneb about 
one month apart at the afore- 
mentioned dosages will reduce 
the incidence of red gall. 

RESULTS OF FIELD TRIALS 
ON PAGE 18 




Fi<!,. 1 — Cranhcrry sliools dii:! 
of rc(l-<J,(iU disease. 



fioicers sJioicinii. the symptoms 



Fourteen 



Goldsworthys Visit West 
Coast Cranberry Areas 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Golds- 
worthy, son Charles and Mrs. 
GoldswortJiy and Mr. Ralph 
Sampson, all of Eagle River, 
Wisconsin recently enjoyed an 
extended tour of the U.S. and 
Canadian West Coast cran- 
berry country. Their trip in- 
cluded visits to growers in 
Washington, Oregon and Brit- 
ish Columbia. They report 
much enthusiasm throughout 
the entire region with new 
acreage being prepared and 
planted at nearly every point. 



Ray 

who 
var- 



The group visited Mr. 
Bates in Bandon, Oregon 
demonstrated his Pilgrim 
iety which he reported pro- 
duced 800 barrels per acre. Di- 
rector Azmi Y. Shawa of the 
Long Beach, ^^''ashington ex- 
periment station enlightened the 
entourage with interesting ex- 



periments and presentation of 
some of the problems confront- 
ing cranberry men in his sec- 
tion. At Cranguyma Farms 
Mr. Frank Glen showed his 
new sprinkler system operated 
by Peerless pumps and which 
he stated is unusually accurate 
and provides "instant" protec- 
tion. 

The Goldsworthys observed 
that the most noticeable in- 
crease in cranberry acreage 
was evident in British Colum- 
bia. Mr. Norman Holmes has 
a particularly impressive pro- 
ject of over 100 acres in prep- 
aration for water raking Wis- 
consin style. Big Red appears 
to be the outstanding cranberry 
producer in British Columbia 
and the various properties pre- 
sent a pleasing appearance this 
season. Fruit bud set appeared 
to be good with exceptional 
growth and comparative free- 
dom from weeds. 



After an interesting and 
worthwhile tour the Golds- 
worthys and Mr. Sampson re- 
turned to Wisconsin. On April 
12 "Goldy" was presented with 
a Certificate of Recognition by 
the Federal Land Bank Associ- 
ation of Wausau for his distin- 
guished service to agricultiu'c 
and its related interests. 



THVNDKR LAKE 

Continued jrom Page 13 

experiments and all the varieties 
may not be available. Right 
now some of the varieties are 
being eliminated as no one has 
much interest in propagating 
them. 

Thunder Lake recently pur- 
chased the Weber Cranberry 
Acres, Manitowish Waters, and 
consists of 40 acres which is 
considered to be one of the 
finest properties in the state. 



^«* ^^^<'-^^(>'^^(i'«i»'(>-^i»n-^^()^^<H 



»l>'1^»-(l-^^()-^H»-<i-^H»'t<i 



^tt^l^U-^^O'^l^iu 



»t >«^(>«i^c> ^^( ) ^^(>-^^(>-« 




Orders Must Be Placed by August 20 

^399°° $100 Down- Balance Due October 31 carlson mfg. 

KINGSTON, MASS. 
• 2500 lb. Capacity i 



I 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

35 Picking Bags | 



L 



# 35 Picking Boxes i 

• Platform Area: 48 x 78 inches. 

Engine — /]_ h.p. Briggs & Stratton with Reduction Unit. Tires — 800:6 - 10 inches wide - 18 inches 
diameter - 1000 lbs. capacuy per tire with only 20 lbs. of air pressure. Frame — 21/4" square tubing 
Vs" wall thickness. Axles — 1" round cold roll. Tiller — operated tricycle arrangement for ease 
of reversing and to minimize scuffing. 

Unit is shown backing up a 5' incline on one of our 16' ramps that can be erected by one man. 
Average load by bog operators is 25 boxes. 



I 



Fi fteen 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued jrom Page 3 



The Cape Cod Club elected 
Raymond Thatcher, president, 
Mr. Ryder, vice president, Mrs. 
Hollidge, secretary and Victor 
Adams, treasurer. 



Frost Service 

The Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association is again 
sponsoring the telephone frost 
warning service. The telephone 
answering systems at the Cran- 
berry Station will also be in 
operation again this season. The 
number for the answering sys- 
tem is 295-2696 and is not listed 
in the telephone directory, being 
intended only for use of the 
cranberry growers. The radio 
stations will supplement the 
above services and are listed 
below. 



Dial 



Station 



Place 



A.M. 



F.M. Afternoon Eveninfi 



WEEI 


Boston 


590 k. 


103.3 mg. 


2:00 


9:00 


WBZ 


Boston 


1030 k. 


92.9 mg. 


2:30 


9:00 


WPLM 


Plymouth 


1390 k. 


99.1 mg. 


2:30 


9:30 


WOCB 


W. Yarmouth 


1240 k. 


94.3 mg. 


3:00 


9:30 


WBSM 


New Bedford 


1420 k. 


97.3 mg. 


3:30 


9:00 



The keeping quality prospect 
at this time is only fair. There 
are only 3 points of a possible 
10 which favor good-keeping 
next fall. Cooler and/or drier 
weather in April and May could 
brighten the prospect by June. 
The holding of late-water would 
improve the keeping quahty 
where it is used. 

Weather 

March was a very cold month 
averaging about 4 degrees a 
day below normal. The average 
temperature at East Wareham 
was 30.5 degrees and from our 



records only March 1960, with 
30.1 degrees, waj^ colder. We 
had a minimum of an even 
degrees on March 19, this is the 
coldest for the date on record 
at the Cranberry Station but 
we have recorded a -5 degrees 
on March 6, 1948 and a -1 de- 
gree on March 4, 19.50. 

Precipitation totalled 5.60 
inches which is -8 of an inch 
above average. We are only 2 
inches below the average for 
1967 so far. Snowfall was 18.7 
inches for the month, far above 
average but not a record. 



Rolw's Propane Gas. Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, AAASS. 



285-3737 



ALUMINUM PIPE 

• DELUXE EXTRA HEAVY PLASTIC PIPE 
• NYLON FITTINGS 

• MURPHY SAFETY GAUGES 

• PRO-TEK PRIMERS and PARTS 



SERVE YOUR 



HALE PUMPS 

IRRIGATION PURPOSES BEST! There's a 
Hale pump to do any irrigation job — 
and do it better! Hale pumps have 
MATCHED POWER, designed to correctly 
match the power of the driving engines 
and give you top performance. Hale 
also has PREMIUM MATERIALS and 
DESIGN SIMPLICITY which assure long 
life, high operating efficiency, less down 
time and quick, easy servicing. 

"25 Years Working With Cranberry People on a Local Basis" 



40FW.A medium-size centrifugal 
pumping unit with a wide range 
of volumes and pressures. Pumps 
up to 600- GPM; pressures up to 
140 PSI. Skid ortrailer mounted. 




S ixteen 



fjD 

m 




ft^I^p 




WASHINGTON 

The cranberry growers of 
Washington were saddened to 
hear of the recent death of 
Chirence Hall. He visited our 
station and area a few years 
ago and Mr. Shawa recalls what 
a fine man he was, and has con- 
tribution to the industry as a 
whole. 

Cranberry Club Meets 

Dr. Doughty spoke at the 
February meeting of the Long 
Beach Cranberry Club and the 
Grayland-North Beach growers 
meeting giving the extended re- 
search on Cold Injury to Cran- 
berries. Dr. Folke Johnson was 
the speaker for the Si arch meet- 
ing of these two groups with 
his topic Fungus diseases. There 
is a new bulletin No. 675 en- 
titled 'Tungi Found on Erica- 
ceae in the Pacific Coastal Area" 
by Dr.'s Maksis Eglitis, Charles 
J. Gould and Folke Johnson, 
available through the Washing- 
ton Agricultural Experiment 
Station Bulletin Department. 
This publication includes iden- 
tification of specimens obtained 
from economially important 
wild or cultivated rhododendrons 



Attention Growers ! ! 

for 
your Spring 
weed control 

we offer 
water white 

kerosene 
"GRADE A" 

metered trucks 
STODDARD SOLVENT 

SUPERIOR 
FUEL COMPANY 

Wareham, Mass. 
Tel. 295-0093 



blueberries, cranberries and the 
two main "native" crops picked 
for florists' use: salal and huck- 
leberry. 

Weather 

March temperature was about 
normal for our area with a high 
of 54 degrees for the period. 
The growers had seven days of 
below freezing recordings dur- 
ing the first thirteen days of 
the month and most sprinkled 
for protection from frost injiu\ . 

Precipitation was 11.47 inches 
bringing the total to date to 43- 
24 inches which is 11.84 inches 
more than the 1966 total to 
date of 31.40 inches. 

Charts 

1967 Cranberry Insect and 
Disease control Program Charts 
were sent out with the Febru- 
ary issue of the Cranberry Vine. 
The Chemical Weed Control in 
Cranberries Chart will be 
mailed with the April issue of 
tiie Cranberry Vine. There is 
a supply of both ("f these charts 
still available at the Station. 
Anx'one \\'ho needs one should 
send a rc(juest. 



Dr. Robins New Director 

Dr. |()hii S. i^obius has been 
named director of research for 
the Washington State Univer- 
sit\ Clollege of Agriculture. He 
succeeds Dr. Mark T. Buchan- 
an who has resigned to accept 
a new 1\ -created post as coor- 
dinator of agricultural experi- 
ment stations in the western 
states. Dr. Robins has been 
serving as superintendent of 
the hrigated Agriculture Re- 
search and Extension Center, 
Prosser, Washington. 

Dr. l-lobbins promotion as 
head of agricultiual work 
throughout the state becomes 
effecti\e immediately. His head- 
quarters will be on the Pull- 
man campus. 



NEW JERSEY 

March was cold and wet. 
Extremes of cold and warm 
temperatures were destructive 
to peaches, apples and straw- 
berries but little damage has 
been found in blueberries. Max- 
imum temperatures of 72 and 

R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 



Serving Agriculture 



Helicopter Application 
Division 

CHEAAAPCO, INC. 



Cranberry Highway 

West Wareham, Mass. 

295-1553 



Seventeen 



CONTROL OF RED GALL OF CRANBERRY 

Continued from Page 14 

Table 1. Results of field trials of fungicides for control of ihc 
red '^all disease 



Treatment 



No. of applications Total No. of infections' 



Bordeaux mixture 



1 

2 



Adjacent control areas 



230 

52 

256 



Maneb 



Adjacent control areas 



1 

2 



311 

56 

116 



-Each fi gure represents the total number of shoots or ber- 
ries within a six square foot area that had one or more galls 



^so) 



Kerosene 

So/venf 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 



Aina^fmt^^ 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONI & SONS 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



74 degrees on March 10th and 
11th, followed by minimums 
of 8 and 3 below zero in se\- 
eral blueberry fields a few da}s 
later, on March 8th and March 
9th were destructive to buds 
as well as wood of peaches 
and to the crowns of straw- 
berries. Since all of the cran- 
berry bogs in New Jersey were 
Hooded at the time ther(> was 
no damage on cranberries. 

The temperature for the 
month averaged out 38.6 de- 
grees colder than normal. 

There were thirteen days of 
rain with a total of 5.61 inches, 
or 1.86 inches above normal. 
Five of these rains were mixed 
with snow and the total snow 
accumulation for the month 
was 6.3. For the first tliree 
months of 1967 the rainfall to- 
taled 9.99 inches, just .06 above 
normal. 

Continued on Taae 24 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



Elmer A. Haines 

Elmer A. Haines, a Pember- 
ton, N.J. borough councilman 
for 20 years passed awa\' at his 
home recently following a 
lengthy illness. He was 49. 

A veteran of World \\'ar II, 
he was a member of Pemberton 
Lodge 199, AF&AM, an exempt 
member of Pemberton Good- 
will Fire Company, past presi- 
dent of the Pemberton Rotary 
Club and huntmaster of the 
Red Stag Sportsman Club for 
20 years. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Pemberton Borough 
Board of Education and was 
on the board of the Pemberton 
Methodist Church. Mr. Haines 
was the brother of 
Haines, prominent New 
cranberry grower. 



Isaiah 
Jersey 



«=cti&itij=srss33ra=i£=it=a:=a=^^ 



READ CRANBERRIES 



a=sj=sca»t=arit=s&:st=ari!=iMcacas=ic 



E ighteen 



$50 AlC Scholarships 
Offered to 4~H Members 

Fifty outstanding 4-H b()\\s 
and girls, one from each state, 
may be selected by June 15 In 
educational and cooperatixc 
leaders as $50 4-H scholarship 
winners who will participate 
next August 6-9 when the 39tli 
vSummer Session on farm bus- 
iness of the American Institute 
of Cooperation is held at Pur- 
due Universit)', Lafayette, Ind. 

One of the scholarship win- 
ners will become co-chairman 
of the 1968 Youth AIC summer 
session at Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute, Blacksburg, Va., it wa^ 
announced by J. K. Stern, Pres- 
ident of the farm educational 
and research organization. 

"Mary Lou Brooks of Owens- 
boro, Ky., one of the 1966 4-II 
scholarship winners has been 
named co-chairman cf the 1967 
Youth Session, which more thai 
1,000 rural youth and younj. 
farmers from all over the 
country will attend," Mr. Stern 
said. "Mary Lou, the first Ken- 
tuckian to be co-chairman of 
the youth sessions, is an honor 
student at Owensboro High 
School. She was 4-H area dem- 
onstration champion in 1965 and 
4-H area speech champion in 
1965. She was Daviess County 
Farm Bureau Queen and talent 
winner in 1965 and 1966." 

"Objective of the special 
award in each state for 4-fI 
members and groups is to rec- 
ognize their efforts in learning 
about the ways we do busin(\ss 
in America and particularh' co- 
operative business organizations. 

"Bob Pinches, Program Lead, 
er, 4-H and Youth DexelopmcMit, 
Federal Extension Serxice, U.S. 
D.A., is working with Walter 
Jacoby, AIC Youth Education 
Director, on the program for 
4-H participation." 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST PROTECTION 
REMEMBER THESE 4 IMPORTANT 
POINTS ABOUT FMC TROPIC BREEZE 
WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole crew 
required for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 

within 3 to 5 minutes, the 

marsh is receiving effective 

frost protection. FMC machines 

have an enviable rev^ord foi' 

operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 




FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA division 

FAIRWAY AVENUE, LAKELAND. FLORIDA 

n Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 
□ Please have sales engineer contact me 




CORPORtTION 



© 



NAME_ 



-TITLE. 



ADDRESS (RFD). 
CITY 



-ZONE- 



-STATE. 



Ni neteen 



FOR SALE 

(available immediately) Worthington 
Pump - 1,000 G.P.M. with four cylin- 
der climax engine (97 H.P. at 1600 
R.P.M.) in very good condition. 
Please coll or write: 
W. V. Knapton 
Plymouth Rubber Co., Inc. 

Revere Street 

Canton, Mass. 02021 

828-0220 



Insecticides and fungicides are 
very much needed in the food pro- 
duction program of this country. 
Without these chemicals being used 
it would be impossible lor enough 
food to be produced in this country 
to feed all of its citizens. Chem - 
cals used on food crops are closely 
screened by the Pure Food and 
Drug Administration and their use 
is carefully supervised by the same 
organization. 



BOGS FOR SALE 

Duxbury, Mass., 81 acres, 13 
bogs in all, ranging from poor 
to fair. Unlimited water sup- 
ply, good sand, 2 pumps, new 
sander, new Furford picker, 
Some sections picked last 
year. Financing available. 
Priced to sell fast. 

Call 617—826-2700 

Graham Realty 

711 Washington St. 

Hanover, Mass. 





PILGRIM SAND & GRAVEL 

Producers of 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED STONE 
For Sond ond Service fhof Sotisfy . . . Coll Pilgrim 

BOG SAND A SPECIALTY 



The newest and most modern plant 
serving South Shore and Cape Cod. 



Telephones 
585-3355 - 585-3366 



585-3377 



PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Twenty 



olBiruai^y 



Mrs. Lawrence Dana 

Mrs. Lawrence Dana, 65, 1310 
13th Avenue S., Wisconsin Rap- 
ids, Wisconsin, died at 2:10 a.m. 
Tuesday, March 28, following 
a five weeks' illness. She was 
admitted to the hospital on Feb. 
26 and had undergone surgery. 

Funeral services were held 
at 2 p.m. Thursday at Taylor 
Funeral Home, the Rev. Robert 
Kingdon officiating, with burial 
following at Restlawn Memorial 
Park. 

She was treasurer of Dana 
Machine & Supply, Inc., a com- 
pany headed by her husband. 

The former Katheryn Juckett 
was born at Janesville, Wisjc. 
July 17, 1901, the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Juck- 
ett, and married Lawrence 
Dana at Woodstall, 111., July 19. 
1927. They came to Wiscon- 
sin Rapids in 1929. 

Surviving, in addition to her 
hu.'-lband, are a son, George, 
Stevens Point; two brothers, 
Leonard and Leland Juckett, 
both of Janesville, and three 
sisters, Mrs. Clarence Yanke, 
Newberry, Ore.; Mrs. Jos,eph 
Smith, Janeville and Mrs. Rich- 
ard Johnson, St. Louis, Mo. 

Lewis E. Billings 

Funeral services for Lewis E. 
BilHngs, a resident of Plympton 
Massachusetts for 60 years, and 
a selectman for the last seven 
and a member of the planning 
board for 12, were held at the 
First Congregational Church. 

Mr. Billings died April 10 
at Jordan Hospital at the age 
of 73. 

He also had served the town 
as police chief from 1924 to 
1939, highway surveyor from 



1925 to 1948, and as fire chief 
and forest fire warden from 
1935 to 1947. 

His other civic activities in- 
cluded terms on the school com- 
mittee, town forest committee, 
water exploration study com- 
mittee and as chairman of the 
town house renovation commit- 
tee. 





By occupation, he was a 
dairy farmer in Plympton since 
1912 and for many yearsj was ;• 
well known cranberry grower. 

At the time of his death, Mr. 
Billings was president of the 
Producersi' Dairy Cooperative 
of Brockton, a director of the 



American Dairy Association in 
Massachusetts and a director 
of the Plymouth County Farm 
Bureau and the National Milk 
Producers Federation. 

Mr. Billings also was a su- 
pervisor of the Plymouth County 
Soil Conservation, a member of 
the Agricultural Stabilization 
Conservation and a former 
president of the South Shore 
Cranberry Club and the Plym- 
outh County Selective Breed- 
ing Association, and a trustee 
of Plymouth County Aid to 
Agriculture. 

Born in Weymouth he at- 
tended Plympton schools and 
the Plymouth Business School. 

Mr. Billings is survived by 
his wife, the former Eleanor 
Bussiwell; two daughters, Mrs. 
Richard Phelps of Frederick, 
Md., and Mrs. Robert Bousquet 
of Pembroke, and two sisters, 
Mrs. James Riley of Woods 
Hole and Mrs. Ruth Nilges of 
Hudson. 



OC3 Crawler w/Bucket 

Engine completely rebuilt. 
Could use Hopto, etc. or wide 
track OC3 with or without 
blade. 

CARLSON MFG. 

Kingston, Mass. 585-2409 



BARK RIVER 
CULVERT and EQUIPMENT Co. 

ESCANABA, MICH.— EAU CLAIRE, WIS. — MADISON, WIS. 
IRONWOOD, MICH. — GREEN BAY, WIS. —MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS & POWER UNITS 
CORRUGATED METAL CULVERT PIPE 

DROP INLETS AND GATES 

Galvanized — Bituminous Coated — Aluminum 



Twenty-one 



1967 WISCONSIN CHmiCAL WEED CONTROL SUGGESTIONS FOR CRANBERRIES 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 
DEP'T OF HORTICULTURE 



HERBICIDE 



POUNDS/A 

ACTUAL 

HERBICIDE 



TIME OF 
APPUCATION 



WEEDS 
CONTROLLED 



REMARKS 



Dalapon 



After October 1 



Wide leaf grass, soft 
rush, bunch grass 



Apply as a spray on non-bearing beds. 
Do not har\est the following year. 



Dichlobenil 
(Casaron) 



Ferrous (iron) 
sulfate 



After harvest and 
before May 1 



Wide range of per- 
ennial and annual 
grasses, sedges and 
broadleaf weeds. 



Some injury may develop on vines. Do not 
use on new planting. Use granular formula- 
tion only. Irrigate after application. 



800 



April to June 



Ferns 



Pack herbicide around fern plants or 
broadcast on patches. 



Petroleum 

solvent 

(Spirits) 



350-500 gal. 



May 



Grasses, sedges 



Broadcast at rates to wet crowns of weed plantf 
Do not use after buds swell on vines. Do not 
use when temperatures are high. 



Same 



Same 



Up to June 15 



Rice cutgrass, 
sedges, rushes 



Apply with undei^rine boom. Do not spray 
vine tips. Do not let boom drain on beds 
or spray when temperatures are high. 



Sodium 
arsenite 



Summer 



Ditch weeds 



Do not allow material to contact desirable 
plants. 



2,4-D 



Spring 



Rice cutgrass, 
ragweed, beggar ticks 



Apply as a granular before weed seeds 
germinate. Weed Rhap 20 is available at 
present. 



2,4-D 
formula 40 
(Dow) 



1/3 cup in 4 
gal. water 



Up to blossom time 



Willows, loosetrife, 
smartweed, hardhack 
and other broadleaf 
species. 



Use to suppress broadleaf weeds. Wipe on 
individual weeds. Keep off of vines. 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous Moulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 
equipment for over one quarte;- centuiy. 

COMPLl^]TE SYS'FEMS — pumping units, pumps, power units, 
sprinklers. Aluminum or steel fittmgs made to order. 
Write or call for literature and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PKDRRSEN 
Bo.x 38 
Warrens, Wisconsin 
Phone: 112-715-247-5321 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow, Minnesota) 



Twenty-two 



really the berries for 






migation 




BEAD/. 



solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special IW or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
flat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 

see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, Inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck 4 Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply Co. 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



t, 



im 



AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

JOHN BEAN DIVISION 

) Lansing, Michigan 

Twen+y-three 



Cranberry Products Gift 
House to Reopen 

Cranberry Products, Eagle 
River, W'isconsin will open its 
gift house May 15, in time for 
the first tourist arrival for the 
fishing season. 

The gift house has added a 
number of new items to those 
that will be offered and plans 
are for opening a second gift 
house soon. Tourists are al- 
ways looking for something to 
do and when they get into the 
cranberry country they look 
for something to take home to 
remind them of their visit. 

For the first time, Cranberrv- 
Products will be carrying lin- 
gonberry sauce, for which 
there is a considerable demand 
among the Scandanavian people 
in this area. 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

WISCONSIN 

Continued from Page 18 



This is about the time of the 
year the frost is the deepest 
but frost penetration this year 
is not quite as deep as it \\'as 
a year ago at this tinie. TIumc 
is a wide variation in frost 
depths now because of the 
length of time there has been a 
snow cover this winter. Frost 
penetration has bcx'n deep \\n- 
der roadways and some locali- 
ties in the north were plagued 
with frozen water mains. The 
frost has also been hard on 
road because of the thawing 
and hea\ing catised by tlie 
wide \ariance in temperatures. 

The snow cover in the stat(> 
lias gradually been receding 
nortln\ard with the warm tem- 
peratines. We ha\(^ much 
more snow that we did a year 
ago when the state was prac- 
tically bare. 

Twenty-four 



A minimum temperatinv of 
—25 degrees occurred on Mar. 
Sth. Daytime temperatures, as 
a rule, were pleasantly mild 
with the increasing powerful 
sunshine eating into the snow 
cover. One such day was May. 
10 when temperatures rose into 
the low 60's in the extn^ne 
south and into the 50's even in 
some northern areas of the 
state. The following day a slow- 
moving cold front sagged 
southward across the state ac- 
companied by cloudiness and 
colder temperatures. 

The weather was unusually 
dry during the period with no 
measurable precipitation fal- 
ling at most stations. The snow 
cover in open countiy disap- 
peared in many southern coun- 
ties and settled considerably 
in the north. The run-off oc- 
curred in an orderly fashion 
and was slowed by cool night- 
time temperatures and the ad- 
vent of colder weather after 
March 10. 



Additional snow^ fell during 
the two week period from Mar. 
10 to 24. The snow depths in 
the state were 1 to 12 inches 
more than a year ago. 

The period March 11-16 was 
cloudy and dry throughout the 
state. Temperatures remained 
in a very narrow range, around 
the freezing point. Some snow 
sc^ualls occurred on th(^ 16th 
accompanying a cold front 
which introduced clear and 
colder air into the area. Night- 
time temperatures dropped wc]] 
below zero over northern and 
central portions on the 17th 
and 18th. 

'I'he first general precipitation 
in nearly a month arri\'(Hl on 
the 20th in the form of wet 
snow. Heaviest amount of 8 
to 12 inches fell in southwes- 
tern comities. This snow meltcnl 
rapidly over the next few days 
as warmer springlike weatluT 
made its appearance. Tem- 



peratures o!i the 2.5th rose into 
the upper 60's or low 70's in 
the extreme south and into the 
5()'s in the north. Scattered 
light thundershow(TS on the 
24th and a steady rain on the 
26th assisted in the snow melt. 
Light Hooding occurred along 
southwestern streams, but much 
of the moisture managed to 
penetrate into the relatively 
dry subsoil layers as the frost 
commenced leaving the ground 
in the south. Over the north- 
ern half of the state the main 
runoff is still to come during 
the coming weeks. The snow 
cover contains 3 to 7 inches of 
water in most areas. 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 




IRRIGATION SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



CORRUGATED 

CULVERT PIPE 

and 

FLOW GATES 

Aluminum — Galvenizcd 
Asphalt Coated 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



I 




sepving the WISCONSIN grovuers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES J MBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 

Vines 
for delivery :ii : }67 

$200 Im FJ.a. 

Ben Laars $750 Ton 

m 



INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERkY 

PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

' Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



" "J*-"^"-" " H "_■ ■_■ ■ H ■ am a b_h_h_h_b_q_ 
B mrnmrn ■ ■ a bob ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ h m n a ■ ■ ■ 



DANA 



:■ MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. »" 



5 



Wis. Rapids, Wis. 

MFG. of: 

SPRAY BOOMS r, 

GRASS CLIPPERS > 

J FERTILIZER SPREADERS "" 

Getsinger 4 

Retracto Tooth Pickers S" 

Dryers J 

DISTR. of: 5 

J VEE BELTS and PULLEYS "! 

■■ SPROCKETS and BEARINGS J 

■^ ROLLER CHAINS f 

CONVEYOR BELTING ^ 

STEEL Ji 






OUR PRODUCTS 



Strained Cranberry Sauce 
Vvhole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preser\ es 
-':;.■ berry-Pireappk Prr "arves 
i^i'uaberry-itaspberrv pi, serves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange Relish 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cian-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Corsu^ner Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 



Cranberry Products, Inc 




EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 




Please M^"!?^!? R1^^ k 



Whe" 



WISGONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

P O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 



















-« * H 



« 






What mil you get for your 
cranberries five or ten years 
from no^v? 

For a look at the future, take a look at the past. 

Over the years, Ocean Spray growers have done better 
than others. 

It's got nothing to do with boom or zoom. It's a matter of 
steady growth. 

Steady growth means financial stability. Financial stabil- 
ity means security. 

Security is knowing you'll be doing alright five or ten 
years from now. 

Ocean Spray has a history of steady growth. 

And history has a habit of repeating itself. 



Ocean spray. 



FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHIP IN OCEAN SPRAY. CONTACT ANY DIRECTOR OR STAFF MEMBER IN YOL'R GROWING AREA, 



IVIassachuset:t:s 

Ne\A/ Jersev 

XA/isconsin 

Oregon 

\A/a5hingt:an 

Canada 




PtANT & SOIL SCIENCES LIBIMW 

CRANBERRIES "^ 

THE IMATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZIIME 



LIBRARY 

mY29m7 

UNIVI 





Watae^ 



'900 




LIFE ON A CRANBERRY BOG 

AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY 7 

MISC. THOUGHTS ON CRANBERRY INSECTS 13 
TOTAL MARKETING - Concluded 21 



£0010 •seeM '%sde^m 
(9Z89-G aep^o) ssm J^ '^J^ 



^ ^ BIRECTOBY (DP cranlierpy growers -^ 



The 

CHARLES W. HARRIS 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 




Complete Line of 

Proven Pesficides 

and Ferfilizers for your 

Bog Needs 

HARRY T. FISHER, JR. 

Agric. Chemical Representative 

Purchase St. Middleboro, Mass. 
Telephone 947-2133 



Electricity - key to progress 



In industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 




NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLIAMSTOVVN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. Tripp & Sons, Inc 

63a Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouses, Bogf and 

Pumps Means Satisfaction 

WAREHAM, MASS Tel. CY 3-2000 



F F A Offers $2,000 
Awards in Annual 
AlC Contest 



For outstanding cooperative 
farm business activities, four 
Future Farmers of America 
Chapters will be selected as na- 
tional winners to share $2,000 
in awards in the annual contest 
of the AIC, it was announced 
today by J. K. Stem, President 
of the Ainerican Institute of 
and research organization for 
Cooperation, the educational 
farmer cooperatives. The awards 
will be presented at Purdue 
University, Lafayette, Ind., Aug. 
7, when the Institute holds its 
Annual Summer Conference. 

"Supported by State Councils 
of Farmer Cooperatives, local 
and regional cooperatives, the 
National Vocational Agricultural 
Teachers Association, and Agri- 
cultural Education, Division of 
Vocational and Technical Edu- 
cation, OflBce of Education, the 
program has four objectives as 
follows," Mr. Stem said. 



1. To create desire among 
FFA members to better under- 
stand the cooperative form of 
business organization and its 
relationship to other forms of 
business. 

2. To encourage youtji to de- 
velop personal, business, and 
leadership qualities so that they 
may participate more effectively 
in cooperative organizations. 

3. To develop among FFA 
members the ability to work to- 
gether to develop community 
service activities through co- 
operative effort. 

4. To encourage leaders of 
farmer cooperatives to better 
understand the objectives and 
activities of the Future Farmers 
of America and high school 
programs of vocational agricul- 
ture. 

''The national winners will be 
selected from state winners, 
representatives of each being 
awarded an attractive 'State 
Champion' plaque during the 
Tribute to Youth Session at the 
Purdue Summer Conference, 
Aug. 7. Reports will be ^iven 



on the highlights and programs 
of the four national winners." 

"In the contest last year, the 
following states selected State 
Champions who competed for 
national honors: Colo., Fla., Ga., 
111., Ind., Iowa, Kansas, La. 
Md., Mich., Minn., Mont., N.J. 
N.C., Ohio, Okla., S.C, Tenn. 
Va., Wash., W. Va., Wis. 

'Wide distribution has been 
given entry forms, and reports 
from the winners of contests in 
each state and Puerto Rico with 
photographs are due in the 
office of W^alter facoby, Director 
of Youth Education, who is 
supervising this program, at tlie 
Institute in Washington, D.C., 
June 30." 



BOGS FOR SALE 

24 acres in Duxbury, Mass. 
Reliable reservoirs. Portions 
in need of work. Lots of good 
vine, I>ecent crop last year. 
Will sell below market value. 
Financing available. 
Call evenings 617—659-2288 



DONT BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 



Until you have 
seen the ,.•** 

BILGRAM 



MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 




Bieivei' S load 

40 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 



CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARNARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People of New England 
Since 1859 



ONE 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

m IN STOCK! 50,000 ft. Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x5 2x8 2x10 
Square Edge or can be matched on order - ALSO- 
4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freetown yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN, MASS. 02717 



SHARON BOX and LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON. MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 18 56 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mass. 
Office Phones: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



C&L Equipment Co. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET. MASS 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Gall . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C. J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



Western Pickers 

Sales. Pdrls atid Repairs 

AnUion^cd .■\geTit 

ORDER NOW 

J K. HKALEY & SON 

MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Ayenae 

Wareham, Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 



NATIONAL GIRLS CLUB 
WEEK - MAY 10-17 



I J. W. Hurley Co. 

i • FUEL OIL 



Water White 

- KEROSENE - 

For BOGS 

(METERED TRUCKS) 

24-hour Fuel Oil Service 
Telephone 295-0024 

341 Main St. WAREHAM 




CHOICE OF 
IRRIGATION 



ABC 




UTILITY */'i^l<^ 






W. R. AMES CO. 

Dept. CRl 

4511 E. Osborne Ave., Tampa, Florida 

1001 Dempsey Rd., Milpitas, Calif. 



TWO 



Mass. 
Crankerry 




S Field Notes 



by IRVING E. OEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry speclallat 



Personals 

Drs. Bert Zuckerman and 

Bob Devlin attended the First 
Research Conference on the 
Ecology of Root-infecting Mic- 
roorganisms at the University 
of Maryland from April 2 to 5. 
Dr. Zuckerman was one of the 
guest speakers at the sympo- 
sium. 

Prof, and Mrs. William Tom. 
linson departed on April 13 for 
a vacation in Europe. They will 
visit France, Switzerland, Ger- 
many, England and Wales and 
vidll return on May 15th. 

Drs. Deubert, Norgren, Pa- 
racer and Zuckerman have a 
paper published in volume 13 
of Nematologica. The title is 
*The Influence of Tylenchus 
agricola and Tylenchorhynchus 
claytoni on Com Roots Under 
Gnotobiotic Conditions." This 



describes changes in size and 
shape of the nuclei in corn root 
cells grown under sterile con- 
ditions when two types of root 
feeding nematodes were pres- 
ent in the soil. 

Weather 

April was the third in a ser- 
ies of cold months averaging 
3 degrees a day below normal. 
After two warm days on the 
2nd and 3rd, when tempera- 
tures reached the low 70's, we 
did not a temperature above 
60 degrees until the 14tli and 
this was the only one for the 
month. Precipitation totalled 
4.84 inches or about .6 of an 
inch above average. We are 
now only about IVz inches be- 
low average for the year. Snow 
fall was 2.7 inches which is 
more than we have ever re- 
corded before for April. We also 



had measurable amounts on the 
25th and this is the latest date 
that we have recorded snow at 
the Cranberry Station. 

Early Blacks were just start- 
ing to "green up" on May 4th 
and we estimate that bogs are 
about two weeks behind nor- 
mal development. There ap- 
pears to have been very little 
winterkill or oxygen deficiency 
injury last vdnter. 

Frost Warning Service 

The frost warning service 
sponsored by the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association 
has 215 subscribers to date as 
compared vdth 214 a year ago. 
The donations to the telephone 
answering service are also up 
over last year, which is very 
gratifying. There are two an- 

Continued on page 20 



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* 



SPRINKLER SYSTEMS ARE OUR BUSINESS 

More than 20 years experience in design and layout of AMES 
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. We are available to plan your sprinkler system 
for both frost control and irrigation. We guarantee the correct pressure 
so necessary for the best sprinkler operation. Our quotations are for 
complete systems including suction line, pump (Hale, Marlow, Gould), 
AMES UTILITY main, AMES quick connecting adapters, plastic pipe, 
bronze fittings and Rainbird sprinklers. 
A note from Rainbird sprinklers issued March 18, 1966 . . . 

1. Uniformity of application improves with length of application. 

2. Two nozzle sprinklers improve uniformity of application when lateral 
spacing exceeds the radius of coverage of the sprinkler. 

3. Pressure ranges for best operation of sprinklers: 

1/8" nozzle and smaller — 50 psi. 
9/64" to 11/64" nozzle — 55 to 60 psi. 
3/16" to 7/32" nozzle — 60 to 65 psi. 
1/4" to 9/32" nozzle — 65 to 70 psi. 

4. For frost protection increase all nozzle pressure by 10 psi. 

Rainbird sprinkler charts are available for asking. 

CHARLES W. HARRIS CO., INC. north dighton, mass. 824-5607 



4> 

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THREE 



Vernon Goldsworthy 
Named to Wisconsin 
AADA Committee 

The Wisconsin State Board 
of Agriculture has named well- 
known Wiscon^sin cranberry 
grower and consultant Vernon 
Goldsworthy to their Market 
Advisory Committee for the 
year 1967. 

The purpose of this MDA 
Committee is to advise the De. 
partment of Agriculture in the 
total area of commodity pro- 
motion and marketing of all 
farm products. 

Mr. Goldsworthy was asked 
to serve on this important 
committee because of his "in- 
terest and experience in agricul- 
tural matters in the state. 

Vernon Goldsworthy has con. 
tributed much to the State of 
Wisconisin in the past and we 
wish him much success as a 
member of the MDAC. 

"Goldy" is President of Cran- 
berry Products, Inc. at Eagle 
River and is a frequent contri- 
butor to these pages. 

Ocean Spray 

To Build Office 
In Plymouth 

George C. P. Olsson, Presi- 
dent of Ocean Spray Cranber- 
ries, Inc., Hanson, Mass. has 
announced that the company 
has taken an option on twenty 
acres of land in the Plymouth 
Industrial Park. 

The company is planning to 
build a modern office building 
containing about .50,000 square 
feet on the site. 

Ocean Spray is a wholly 
owned farmer's cooperative with 
approximately 1,000 members 
and produces a variety of 
products and its sales are $60 
million. 

FOUR 




OUR FINISHED 
PRODUCT 



Buckner Sprinklers are engineered to give you the best possible water dii 
tribution for effective penetration in any soil condition. Whatever yo 
grow, wherever you grow it, there's a Buckner Sprinkler specially designe 
to give you optimum irrigation at minimum cost and water waste. Whc 
do you need? Slow or rapid rotation? Heavy or light precipitation? Clos 
wide or extra-wide spacing? High or low angle? Frost control? Bucknt 
has them all in the widest range of sizes — with or without the patente 
sandproof, low-friction GDG Bearing, dry-sealed for trouble-free operatic 
and extra years of service. Get full information on over 50 Models froi 

840 through 890 with coupon below. 

Buckner 




INDUSTRIES, INC 

WORLD'S LEADING SPRINKLER MANUFACTURE 



BUCKNER INDUSTRIES, INC. 

P.O. Box 232, Fresno, California 93708 

Please send catalog and name of nearest dealer. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 




ISSUE OF MAY 1967 / VOLUME 32 - NO. I 



2066 

Last year marked the one hundredth an- 
niversary of the United States Crop Report- 
ing Service, during which time there has been 
great change throughout the country and 
world. 

Mr. Emerson M. Brooks, at the time, 
felt that it would be interesting to look 
ahead another hundred years to see how 
things would be in 2066. 

Here are a few of the things we might 
look forward to: first, the need for more 
and better information. By 2066, the popu- 
lation will have grown to between 600 mil- 
lion and a billion in the United States. World 
population will be above 25 billion, eight 
times more than the present. 

Technology will have perfected many 
new methods of doing what seems an im- 
possibility today. More will be known of 
the earth's surface and, thus, more can be 
done to obtain the most from it. Laser beams 
will facilitate the sending of messages for 
undreamed of distances at speeds of light. 
Along with this, sophisticated satellites will 
be used to send and receive messages all 
over the world — even hand-carried devices. 

Planets will have been investigated. 
Much will be known about them. 

Newspapers will be reproduced by fac- 
simile directly through home receivers. 
Oceans will have been explored and food 
from the sea will be regular fare on the 
tables of 2066. Sea water will also have 
been easily converted to fresh water for the 
increased population. 

Automobiles and other forms of trans- 
portation will be vastly changed. Some types 
of vehicles will ride on a cushion of air. 
This is already on the drawing boards and 
in experimental stages of development. 

What does this mean to the growers 
of food? Most certainly no one now reading 
this column will be here to see these ad- 
vantages — but our children's children will 
be in a position to verify these facts. 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall nt Ware-hnm. Ma- 

Publish er 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—583-4595 



CORRESPONDENTS -ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jefsey 



All that has been written here is done 
solely to emphasize the great speed at which 
progress is being made in our time. 

It also serves to emphasize the need 
for better education for our children and 
their children after them. 

It stresses the need for an open mind, 
for confidence, common sense and faith — 
perhaps the latter above all! 

It leaves us with the realization that it 
is today's grower who relieves tomorrow's 
hunger. 



Cranberries is published monthly by Comor Publishers, P.O. Box 70, Kingston. Massachusetts 02360. 
Second Class Postage Paid at Plymouth, Massachusetts P.O. Subscriptions $4.00, Foreign $5.00 per year. 

FIVE 



Oregon Cranberry 
Industry Expands 



Reports received from the 
Bandon, Oregon area show a 
20% increase in cranberry acre- 
age in a period just over a year. 
This would indicate that there 
are approximately 600 acres 
now planted in that region. 

Since these newly-planted 
bogs will begin to produce 
within the next three years, it 
will certainly show an increase 
in the Oregon crops at that 
time. 

There has been considerable 
debate as to the amount of 
land that could possibly be 
available to the cranberry in- 
dustry at any time in the fu- 
ture. There is a considerable 
amount of controversy over this 
question. It is felt by some 
that only the "peat land" would 



be suitable while others believe 
that much other land might be 
successfully planted to cran- 
berries. Estimates range from 
the hundreds to the thous^ 
ands of acres available and suit, 
able. 

One very serious considera- 
tion is the availability of water 
to the proposed bog lands. Sev. 
eral methods of water usage 
and conservation are being dis- 
cussed, and it is felt that this 
problem could readily be 
worked out with a bit of plan- 
ning. 

However, it is true in Ore- 
gon, as it is in all other cran- 
berry growing areas, that acre- 
age alone will not insure an 
abundant harvest. Since most 
of the harvest in the state has 
come from bogs that had some 
form of frost control, the crop 
which is already planted could 
be greatly increased with the 
addition of frost control de- 
vices on those bogs which do 
not have them at the present 



time. The early frost of last 
year destroyed whole bogs. 
Some of the growers who 
missed flooding on only one 
or two nights lost much of 
their crops in a few hours. 
Automatic frost control devices 
are being recommended to all 
growers. The cost of installing 
these units could certainly 
prove to be a saving investment. 

Growers in the area have 
also become more aware of and 
interested in new developments 
and methods of keeping their 
bogs in good condition which 
will, undoubtedly, result in 
bigger crops. 

The growers in the Bandon 
area have also become increas- 
ingly promotion-minded and 
are publicizing the "Cranberry 
Capitol of Oregon" in many 
ways. 

All in all, the future of the 
cranberry industry looks ex- 
tremely promising in the state 
of Oregon. 



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Tel. 947-2133 



SIX 



Life on a Cranberry Bog at the 




by HOSE T. BRLGGS 

Curator of the Plymouth, Mass. 
Antiquarian Society 



Editor's Note: 
The following is a story 
of the early days of the 
cranberry industry as it 
was in the Cape Cod area 
of Massachusetts . 
Vie would like to hear of 
similiar times in other 
areas of the country. If 
any of our readers have 
this information^ please 
send it along. We will 
publish them as space 

will allow. 

No reader of Cranberries 
needs to be told the problems 
of cranberry growing, but some 
may^nd it entertaining to re- 
view the ways these problems 
used to be met, and the dif- 
ferences between hfe on a 
cranberry bog at the turn of 
the century, and hfe in Inc 
same place now. 



I believe these changes have 
been brought about chiefly by 
differences in transportation, 
and by the entirely different 
wage scale that now exists. In 
my childhood a 10 hour day 
was normal, and I think the 
current rate for day labor was 
I2V2 cents an hour. I know 
that in 1910 the foreman was 
getting 40^, semi-skilled labor 
20^ and day labor 16%^-. In 
1903, when scoops and "snap- 
machines" were beginning to 
come in, the rate for that work 
was 25^^ an hour. Picking was 
always paid for at a higher 
hourly rate than day-labor. 

There were no automobiles 
until sOTue time after 1900, and 
our berries had to be carted 
10 miles to Plymouth to the 
railroad, and everything we 
needed, from hay to yeast 
cakes, hauled 10 miles back. 
Tire result of lower wages and 




HANDPICKERS AND TALLY KEEPER - BEFORE 1900 



slower transportation was that 
we did on the place nearly 
everything that would now be 
done by hiring someone with 
specialized equipment to ^ome 
and do it. We lived in a 
completely unmechanized age. 
I don't think we even had gas- 
oline engines till after 1900. 
There was a pumping engine 
at one of our bogs, but it ran 
by steam. Like most of the 
older bogs, ours were built 
where they could be flowed by 
gravity. Frosts and pests were 
controlled by flowage. Spray- 
ing, and of course dusting for 
pest control, were still in the 
future. Weeds were rooted out 
by hand, perfectly , practical at 
the wage-scale then current. 
Sanding was done with wheel- 
barrows and shovels. The ear- 
liest bill I can find is for 20 
iron wheels for wheelbarrows. 

With transportation what it 
was, we expected few services 
from outside, and no mail un- 
less we went for it. We had a 
mail bag where letters accumu- 
lated until someone went to 
town. There was no telephone 
so far from Plymouth, and of 
course no electricity. The 
Town kept up the main roads 
. . . that is, they engaged some, 
one who had men and horses 
available to do it. We were 
the ones in our area. It took 
experience to build a good dirt 
road, that would not be too 
sandy in summer or too muddy 
in winter. The road material 
had to be a happy proportion 
of gravel and "loam." I remem- 

Continued on page 10 

SEVEN 



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lia.s aniioiinced that it is ready 
to l)egin its Markham. Wash- 
ington, phml <'\pansion iinmc- 
diatcK. it is expected that 
nearly $2 inilhon will ])C .spt^nt 
on th(^se I'xpansion plans. 

The site ol the expansion is 
adjacent lo the piescnl faeili 
tics. 

Halt of the proposed ])udget 
will be spent in the constrnc- 
tion of a 250 foot lont^, pre- 
stressed concrete building 
wliich will lia\e three stories 
at one end. The ])alance of 
the two-million dollar alloca- 
tion will be nsed to j'jrovide 
the most up-to-date and efficient 
types of processing ecinipment 
to l)e installed in the new 
l)nilding, as well as for repair 
and reno\ation of the existing 
facility and de\clopinent of the 
gronnds. 

Several thonsand additional 
scjuare feet of mannfactnring 
and warehouse space will be 
provided by this expansion 
program. The production of 
cranberry juice alone is expec- 
ted to be increased four times 
with the new plant. Similar 
output increases are seen in the 
other specialty items under 
the Ocean Spray la])el. 

Railroad and truck facilities 
will be greatly improved. 

Robert Lucas, West Coast 
area manager, stated that the 
existing plant will be primarily 
used for the cleaning and 
handling of fresh fruit, upon 
completion of the new building. 
Until that time it will continue 
to be used as in the past. 

Although the new building 
is not expected to be completed 
until early ne.xt year, it is 
planned to liave the warehouse 
facilities ready by September of 
this year. 

Continued on page 24 



EIGHT 




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NINE 



Life on a Cranberry Bog at the 
Turn of the Century 

Continued from page 7 



ber test holes being dug, and 
my father deciding that one 
lot would do, and another lot 
was worthless. 

The responsibility for fire 
fighting was distributed in the 
same way. The Town paid the 
bills, and someone in each 
area who had a horse and wag. 
on was issued a rack of ex- 
tinguishers and made a "fire 
ward." My father was "Fire 
\\'arden," or chief fire-ward, in 
our area, and a big red fire- 
wagon was kept at our place. 
It belonged to the Town, but 
it was moved by our horses 
and manned by our men, and 
my father had over-all charge 
of the fire, and whatever vol- 
unteers turned up to fight it. 
Those were the days when fires 
were fought with back-fires, 
while men with shovels and ex- 
tinguishers held the lines. 
Whenever smoke appeared on 
the horizon, my father had to 
go, and if my brother and I 
were with him we went too! 
Of course we liked it! 

The transportation problem 
made a lot of horses and wag- 
ons necessary. There were 
two heavy teams that hauled 
berries to Plymouth. We used 
either a four-horse hitch, or a 
"spike-team" of three honses, 
two abreast and a leader 
ahead. For lighter work we 
used a two-horse hitch. Then 
there was a pair of driving 
horses, trained both to double 
and single harness, and two or 
three single horses as well, any 
of which my father used in an 
open buggy or a meadowbrook 
cart to drive around the bogs. 
There was also a quiet horse 
for my mother to drive, and a 
couple of utility horses. At 
picking time we usually added 
some extra workhorses to take 
picking crates down to the 

TEN 



bog, and bring the berries 
back to the screen-house. 

All these horses had to be 
fed, which meant that we grew 
com, mowed what grass we 
could raise, and sometimes 
bought standing hay and went 
with our men and equipment 
to cut it. Even then we bought 
oats and baled hay by the car- 
load, and the horses that ate 
it hauled it home. 

The horses had to be shod, 
the wagons kept in order the 
flume irons made, windmill 
kept working etc. so a black- 
smith was necessary. He was 
wonderful to us children, and 
let us hang round the forge, 
and even hammer out things 
ouselves. But he onlv let us 
use cold iron, not the lovely 
cherry-red stuflF that came out 
of the forge, and bent so beau- 
tifully on the anvil, and gave 
out such fascinating showers of 
sparks. 

We made most of our own 
barrels, buying staves and hoops 
by the carload, so we had to 
have a cooper. His work was 
as absorbing to watch as the 
blacksmith's. After the Great 
Fire, we produced our own bar 



rel heads. We bought a lot of 
standing white pine which had 
been scorched but not actually 
burned, logged it off, dumped 
it in the Reservoir, bought a 
sawmill and milled out the 
lumber for the buildings we 
had to replace after the fire, 
and for barrel heads and crate 
stock. The saw mill was run 
by a stationary gasoline en- 
gine, I think the first we had 
on the place. We installed 
some at some of the bogs at 
about the same time. 

We raised sows, pigs, chick- 
ens, vegetables and fruit on 
the place and bought flour and 
sugar by the barrel, and most 
of our meat. A fish peddler 
brought fish from Ellisville, 
three or four miles away, but 
there was more choice in Plym- 
outh, if anyone was going to 
town. We had a farm board- 
ing house for the unmarried 
help who lived on the place, 
and there were shanties of var- 
ious sizes for married help and 
for the pickers. 

You may think I date every- 
thing from before or after 
1900. 1 do. This is the date 
of the forest fire when all our 
buildings were burned. It took 




SCREENING AT BOG 
CAPE COD - MID 19th CENTURY 



place in picking time — Septem- 
ber 12, 1900. We still picked 
by hand in those days, and 
most of the pickers were Cape 
Codders — not yet Cape Verde 
Islanders. The Cape Codders 
came with their whole fami- 
lies, and camped out in the 

' shanties which every bog pro- 
' vided for its help before the 
days of the automobile trans- 
portation. The fire swept down 
on us with a sudden change of 
near-hurricane wind. My fa- 
ther, with the fire wagon and 
all the men who had any 
fire-fighting experience \\'ere 
already out fighting it. The 
shift of wind put the main fire 
between them and home. Of 
the people on the place, some 
took refuge in a sand hole; the 
rest, including my mother and 
five-year old brother, in one 
of the flumes. The fire swept 
over the place, and finally into 
the sea at Ship Pond. No one 
was hurt, but when my father 
and the men got back, nothing 
was standing but the hen 
house and the cow barn. For- 
tunately the pickers' shanties 
were in a little hollow, and 
the-fire skipped aver them. The 
people left on the place that 



night ate half-baked apples 
off the scorched apple trees. 
There was nothing else. 

We had other excitements 
beside the fire. There was an 
elopement. The young people 
stole the girl's father's horse 
and buggy, and made off. down 
the road, vvdth the father pant- 
ing and swearing after them. 
Some wild young men stole 
green com at Ship Pond. The 
owner sat up for them with a 
shot gim. One of them got 
peppered with bird shot, and 
had to be driven to Plymouth 
to the doctor in the middle of 
the night. Fortunately he was 
more scared than hurt. Chil- 
dren fell into ditches, and were 
hauled out before they drowned 
in the mud. Babies were put 
to sleep in cranberry crates and 
got stung by hornets. Some- 
where about that time, the Sy- 
rians came, one of the most 
colorful groups we ever had. 
They used to put on a sort of 
fire-dance at night, dancing 
around, and finally over, a 
small fire, hand in hand, in a 
long line, behind a leader who 
swung a knotted handkerchief 
in his free hand and made a 
great play of stamping out sym. 







'<--Wu'<\.^ %-'J%,. .■:"<..»a{^ *"' * ^ 

HANDPICKING - CAPE COD - 1900 



bolic sparks as he leaped over 
the fire. There was a sort of 
wild chant that went with it, 
and the little boys marked 
time by thumping on the bot- 
tom of their tin picking pails. 

Those were the days of hand 
picking, by the 6-quart tin 
measure, that had a lovely re- 
verberation when the first ber- 
ries were dropped into it, but 
took, for a child, so long to 
fill. Then you proudly lugged 
your measure vip to the tally- 
keeper, called out your number, 
emptied your measure (an- 
other satisfying sound) and re- 
turned to begin another. The 
bog was laid off in rows with 
section-line, so each picker or 
family had their own row, and 
no one could hog the best 
picking. The man in charge of 
the gang had an eagle eye for 
dropped underberries, and for 
thin spots neglected, and the 
tally-keeper rejected measures 
that were not properly full, or 
had vines stuffed into the mid- 
dle ! 

In 1900, "snap - machines" 
were beginning to come in. 
They took some skill to operate, 
and of course were much faster 
than hand picking. The men 
that used them were paid by 
the hour, not the measure. In 
1903, it was 250 an hour. 
Scoops were also coming in in 
1903, and with them the Cape 
Verde Portuguese, who soon 
were the characteristic labor 
force on the bogs. The scoop 
was their distinctive harvest 

tool, as the shovel and ^\'hccl 
banow were the tools of those 
who stayed for tlie winter 
sanding. They often worked 
their way over from the Islands 
on some sailing vessel. They 
were amphibious, as the whal- 
ing captains knew, who had 
hired them as whale-men, and 
taught them the way to New 
Bedford. They would pick 
cranberries in the fall, blue- 
berries in the siunmer, and 
cranberries again when the 

Continued on page 12 



ELEVEN 



Life on a Cranberry Bog at the 
Turn of the Century 

Continued from page II 

liarvest season came around. 
Their labor built new bogs and 
sanded old ones. Sometimes 
they got winter jobs in Provi- 
dence — even in the steel mills 
of Pennsylvania — but they all 
came back for the picking. Even 
in war time, they would leave 
better jobs to join their cous- 
ins .. . they were all cousins 
.... on the bogs. 

They arrived and left in neat 
store suits, each carrying a 
suitcase and a furled umbrella. 
Every few years they would 
go back to the Islands for the 
winter — to get married, to lay 
the foundations of their future 
when they should have made 
their stake — perhaps just to 
visit. One of them told us 
about his wedding. 

"Well, where's your wife, 
Jock? Didn't you bring her with 
you?" 

"Oh no, Mr. Briggs! I left 
her home, take care of the 
cow! 



A few years later, he went 
home for good. He told us his 
wife would come down from 
their village to meet him, lead- 
ing a donkey. Jock would ride 
back on it in state, and his 
wife would follow, carrying the 
baggage on her head. Wliat 
he counted on to make the big- 
gest sensation with his friends 
was a dcckload of lumber with 
which he was going to make a 
wooden floor for liis house. I 
don't know how he planned to 
get the lumber home, but it was 
going to be the only wooden 
floor in the village! 

When immigration was put 
on a quota basis, all this com- 
muting to the Islands came to 
an end, and settled Portuguese 
communities grew up in this 
coimtry. They too came pick- 
ing. 

There was an era, I think 
about World War II, when 
energetic women, Portuguese 
and others, operated as scoop- 
crs, which had always been 
considered strictly a man's job. 
The type of motor picking ma- 
chine now in use is often op- 



crated by women. The big 
gangs of scoopers have gone. 
What strikes one now in look- 
ing at a picking crew, is the 
;>ma!l nninber of people in- 
volved. Sometimes tne tenders 
outnumber the pickers. 

Our screen houses have be- 
come meclianized, too. Our 
shipping containers are differ- 
ent. Barrels went out of use 
long ago; shipping boxes have 
followed them. The final pack- 
aging is done at a central 
plant, not at the home screen 
house. Much of the crop goes 
in bags to the cannery. WTiere 
the growers' teams once carted 
his berries to the railroad, huge 
trucks now come from outside 
to transport the crop. Sanding 
and other bog work is done, 
increasingly, by specialists \\ath 
specialized equipment. The 
work force comes in automo- 
biles in the morning, and goes 
home at night. Cranberry grow- 
ing is still a colorful business, 
but the days of isolated self- 
sufficiency are over. 



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"25 Years Working With Cranberry People on a Local Basis" 



TWELVE 



CRaNBGRRY INSGCTS 



by William E. Tomlinson, Jr. 



Spray Charts referred 
to in this article will 
be found on pages 26 
and 27. 

Even though the introductory 
rate of new pesticide chemicals 
has slowed appreciably we still 
seem to be able to dream up 
a change or two in the spray 
charts every year. This year 
is no exception. 

The changes in the text of 
the chart are mostly of a minor 
editorial nature. Under New 
Growth we have removed al- 
drin for the control of weevil, 
not because it doesn't do the 
job, but because it is not reg- 
istered with the U.S.D.A. for 
the control of this insect. Also 
under New Growth we have 
added Tipworm. It is impor- 
tant to control tipworm early 
because they get a head start 
in ditches and other areas that 
start early. 

New brood weevil control 
has been moved out of the Late 
Bloom and Fruitworm to After 
Fruit Set with girdler larva 
control. Also in the After Fruit 
Set section we inserted a sprink- 
ler recommendation using di- 
eldrin or DDT. For those with 
sprinklers this is the superior 
method for distribution and 
penetration of the insecticide to 
where the action is. 

The inclusion of Guthion for 
control of fruitworm, fire- 
worms, Sparganothis and tip- 
worm for the first time is the 
main change this year. This is 
a material that I have had un- 
der test since about 1960, It 
is an organic phosphate with 
somewhat less oral toxicity and 
much less contact toxicity than 
parathion. In the days when 



99% of the parathion was cus- 
tom applied from the air there 
seemed no pressing need for 
Glithion in the cranberry in- 
dustry. However, with the re- 
cent meteoric increase of sprink- 
ler systems and their use as 
peticide applicators by the 
growers themselves, the su- 
perior in use safety record of 
Guthion leads me to recom- 
mend it in spite of its greater 
cost. At the suggested rate of 
3 pts. per acre it will cost al- 
most $2.75 per acre compared 
to about $1.25 for a pint of 
parathion. Actually 2 pints has 
generally performed very sat- 
isfactorily against fireworms 
and tipworms and at that rate 
would bring the cost down un- 
der $2.00 per acre for materials. 
In spite of its being less toxic 
than parathion, proper respect 
in handling it is still in order. 
This is particularly true of the 
concentrate. Wear protective 
clothing and gloves and 
promptly remove spillage by 
thorough washing whether on 
yourself or clothing. 

The use of sprinklers for ap- 
plying insecticides has become 
an important factor in present 
day cranberrry production. 
Spacing of sprinkler heads has 
a bearing on eveness of distri- 
bution of a pesticide through 
the system. Some areas may be 
overtreated and others under, 
but there is usually enough po- 
tential toxicity in the insecticide 
to produce the desired results 
even in the areas where the 
rate may be below the desired 
pounds per acre. Superior pen- 
etration, coverage and timeli- 
ness of the applications appar- 
ently more than make up for 
any reduction in rate. 

The length of time to run 
the insecticide through the 



system varies with the size of 
the system, pipes, sprinklers and 
pump. The system should be 
run long enough to insure that 
the pesticide reaches the far- 
thest head and clears the line 
afterwards. This, of course, 
means, that only water is be- 
ing applied close to the in- 
jection system long before the 
insecticide clears the far end 
of the system. This fact 
troubles growers at times, with 
visions of washing all the in- 
secticide ofi^ and not getting 
the desired kill. That washing 
oflf and overdilution are not 
important with quick acting in- 
secticides such as parathion is 
bourne out by experience. The 
effectiveness depends on con- 
tact, and the superior penetra- 
tion and coverage obtained 
with a sprinkler system pays 
off in superior results. This 
was very apparent in fruitworm 
control last season when almost 
without exception control with 
sprinklers was excellent. The 
Insecticide may eventually wash 
off, but in so doing it pene- 
trates and wets everything so 
thoroughly that contact occurs 
knd control is obtained. It's 
better to run too long a time 
than to run too short a time 
for all foilage and fruit feeding 
insects. If you are after grubs 
or girdler the longer the system 
runs the better. 

What appeared to be an easy 
fruitworm year early in the 
summer of 1966 turned into a 
nightmare after berries were 
h rvested. Screenhouse floors 
were crawling with fruitworm 
larvae and many lots were so 
badly infested that they had 
to be put aside to await com- 
pletion of feeding of the fruit- 
worm present before they could 

Continued on page 16 

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FIFTEEN 



Miscellaneous Thoughts on 
Cranberry Insects 



Continued from page I 3 



be sorted. Some fresh ship- 
ments were found infested in 
the market, a condition not 
condusive to a favorable image 
by consumers. 

The reasons for the fruitworm 
trouble late in the season stem 
in part from our late cold spring 
which delayed both plant and 
insect development. The drought 
was also a factor because some 
bogs were not properly winter 
flooded or reflowed in tlie 
spring. Such bogs start later 
than bogs that are winter and 
frost flooded and moth emer- 
gence is correspondingly later 
Ltlso. 

The graph compares the moth 
fliglit pattern on the same bog 
in 1964, which was not an early 
year, with 1966. This is a bog 
that IS winter flooded by catch- 
ing rain and snow and was 
flooded in the winter of 1963- 
64, but did not go completely 
under in the winter of 1965-66. 
The first moth was trapped on 
the same date both years, but 
from then on the 1966 curve is 
10 days or more later for the 
various levels of emergence. 
The 1964 season ended up on 
September 12 with 628,5 moths 
trapped and 1966 ended be- 
tween October 1 and 5 with 
5915 moths trapped. The big 
difference being that only 
slightly over 10% emerged after 
August 1 in 1964 whereas nearly 
50% emerged after August 1 in 
1966. No wonder there were 
wormy berries at harv^est! If 
this happens too frequently we 
will have to recommend egg 
counts till after Labor Day! 

Tlie girdler flight pattern was 
about a week later than in 
1965 but spread over 73 days 
compared to 72 in 1965. At the 
State Bog females outnumbered 



males 417 to 193 or about 2 
to 1 whereas on the other sur- 
vey bog males outnumbered 
females 316 to 241 or about 
3 to 2. In 1965 the State Bog 
ratio was very near 1 to 1 while 
on the other bog males out- 
numbered females by an even 
more lopsided margin of 5 to 
2. 

I don't know the reason for 
the surplus of males on one bog 
and the reverse on the State 
Bog nor do I expect it's of any 
great significance. There were 
plenty of females to lay plenty 
of eggs in both location I'm 
sure. 

The "Warning" at the bottom 
of the chart is important. The 
cautionary statement to not ap- 
ply insecticides to streams or 
ponds is asking next to the 
impossible I'm well aware. 
However, with the present em- 
phasis on air and water pol- 
lution, we are going to be 
subjected to closer scrutiny in 
this respect than we have been 
in the past. Therefore any- 
thing we can do to avoid or 
minimize water pollution will 
pay dividends. Complete avoid- 
ance of direct and even indi- 
rect application of pesticides 
to streams may be an impossi- 
bility, but impounding of water 
for as long a period as possible 
after an application wall help 



the processes of evaporation, 
degredation, absorption and di- 
lution. In this way most of the 
pesticides we use will have 
disappeared, become bound up 
in the organic matter present 
in the soil and water or will 
have been diluted to a non- 
toxic leve- before entering 
streams or ponds. 

Last but not least, with more 
of you personally involved in 
applying your own pesticides 
through sprinklers and with 
more and more people around 
your bogs, it behooves all of 
you to be safety conscious. Ac- 
cidents with pesticides don't 
just happen. Somebody allows 
them to happen through 
thoughtlessness or carelessness. 

Young children are poisoned 
by pesticides more frequently 
than any other age group. Im- 
proper storage of pesticides 
and unsafe disposal of "empty" 
containers are major causes. 
Youngsters are curious and 
they get from 'liere to there" 
before anyone knows it. If your 
children, or anyone's children, 
can get to your pesticides or 
"empt)'" containers tiiere is 
something wrong — something 
that is YOUR responsihiUty to 
correct. These suggestions, if 
followed will help you keep out 
o£ trouble. 

Continued on page 24 



CRANBERRY FRUITWORM EMERGENCE 



J 



< 



SIXTEEN 



n 



ffD 
i 




NEW JERSEY 



^s 



severity of this cannot be 
gauged until warm weather 
occurs. 

Frost Warning Service 

As of May 2nd the winter 
flood has been withdrawn 



WISCOlliilll 







Weather 

The weather in the cranberry 
region in New jersey in April 
was quite variable with warm 
spells alternating with cold per- 
iods frequently. Maximum tem- 
peratures were in the 80's four 
times and 70's four times; this 
was balanced out by minimum 
temperatures in the 20's and 
30's fourteen times. The aver- 
age temperature for the month 
was 50.8 degrees F, about 1 
degree below normal. Extremes 
were 84 degrees on April 2nd 
and 23 degrees on April 12th. 

Rains were of above normal 
frequency although they were 
generally very light. There 
were twelve rainy days but the 
total precipitation amounted to 
only 3.08 inches, 0.34 is less 
than normal. On April 27th 
rain mixed with some snow 
totaled 1.37 inches to relieve 
dry conditions which had been 
conducive to several grass fires 
in the area. This is believed 
to be one of the latest dates 
for snow in this area. 

Much of the colder tempera- 
tures occurred during the latter 
half of the month when soil 
temperatures normally initiate 
growth in blueberries. Conse- 
quently the blossoming season 
is later than would be indicated 
by the average temperature. 
ks, of May 2nd blueberry blos- 
soming is estimated at being 
at least one week late. There 
was a Ught amount of frost 
damage to blueberry buds on 
April 28th when temperatures 
plunged to near 20 degrees in 
some fields. Some winter kill 
of wood and buds is also ap- 
parent in many fields but the 



from only a few. cranberry bogs Temperatures averaged well 

in New Jersey. Most growers above normal during the 2- 

are sticking to traditional May week period March 25-April 

10th date for the removal of 7. Record high temperatures 

water. Water reservoirs seem in the low 80's occurred in 

ample for the spring frost sea- southwestern and western 

son. The telephone answering areas on the 30th with 60's 

service to alert growers on frost elsewhere. Precipitation was 

conditions is now in operation heavy over west-central, cen- 

''^*^®^P''"^^'■'^ ^ Blueberry ^j-al and northeastern areas to- 

Lab. This service is operated ^^^ 3 to 4 inches. Lesser 

by a committee appomted by ^j^Q^nts were reported in 



southern districts and in the 
extreme northwest. Most of 
the precipitation fell in heavy 
thunderstorms. One small tor- 
nado was sighted around mid- 
night on the 30th in Wood 



the American Cranberry Grow 
ers' Association. The members 
are Isaiah Haines, joe Palmer, 
Eddie Budd and Phil Marucci. 

ORE GOA/ 

A late report from the Ban- 

don cranberry area states that County doing moderate dam- 

the second full week of May age in the Marshfield area. 

produced nearly two inches of Some 4 to 8 inches of new 

rainfall. The same week night- snow fell in the extreme north 

time temperatures went down April 6th and 7th. 

below freezing twice to 28 and r^ ^- j -n ir^ 

or, J „ ^ Continued on Paae 19 

27 degrees. ^ 

R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 




Serving Agriculture 



Helicopter Application 
Division 

CHEMAPCO !NC. 



Cranberry Highway 

West Wareham, Mass. 

295-1553 



SEVENTEEN 



NEW JERSEY CRAfCERRY GROWER 
IS HONORED BY BANK 




FOR SERVICE - Judge Alexander Denbo, presi- 
dent of Mechanics National Bank of Burlington 
County, presents plaque to Theodore H. Budd Jr. lor 
51 years of service. Looking on (right) is Nelson 
Moi'lon, executive vice president of the bank. 



HAIL INSURANCE 
on CRANBERRIES 

for WISCONSIN GROWERS 

FULL COVERAGE 

Ask obout our Deferred Premium Plan 
LOW COST and PROMPT SERVICE 

INSURE YOUR 1967 INCOME NOW 

Call our LOCAL AGENT or write 

RURAL MUTUAL 

_ INSURANCE COMPANY 

I 801 W. Badger Road, Madison, Wis. 





fe 



The chairman of the board at 
Mechanics National Bank of 
Burlington County was honored 
recently for completing 51 years 
of banking service. 

And accordng to Theodore H. 
Budd. Jr. he'll go 50 more if he's 
physically able. 

Budd was presented a plaque 
and well wishes by Judge Alex- 
ander Denbo, president of Me- 
chanics National Bank at a sur- 
prise ceremony at the bank's 
headquarters in Burlington. 

At 77, Budd says he's not at 
all ready for retirement. 



The banking executive has 
been as much a part of Burling- 
ton County's cranberry industry 
as anyone. He was an original 
member of the Cranberry Prod- 
ucts firm of Bordentown which 
has grown into the now famous 
Ocean Spray Corp. 

A past president of the Ameri- 
can Cranberry Exchange, the 
Budds still operate their large 
cranberry business. 

The well-known banker and 
his wife, Helen, have four chil- 
dren and 12 grandchildren which 
include two sets of boy twins. 



Attention Growers!! 



for 

your Spring 
weed control 

we offer 
water white 

kerosene 
"GRADE A" 

metered trucks 
STODDARD SOLVENT 

SUPERIOR 
FUEL COMPANY 

Wareham, Mass. 
Tel. 295-0093 



EIGHTEEN 




^ 







BULK SERVICE 



:^»lV^ 



SPRAYING EQUIPMENT 
WATER WHITE KEROSENE 

STODDARD SOLVENT 
LP. GAS - CARBURETION 

"Service that you can trust" 

VOLTA OIL CO. 

SAMOSET STREET, ROUTE 44 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 746-1340 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

WISCONSIN 

Continued 

Weather 

Tlic very mild temperatures 
and the heavy precipitation mel. 
ted tlie dwindling snow cover 
in record time and sent rivers 
and streams in the north and 
west over their banks with ex- 
tensive flood damage reported 
in many areas. Much of the 
moisture, though, was allowed 
to sink into the dry subsoils as 
the frost left the ground. 

April continued wet with 
good soaking rains across nor- 
thern and central areas. The 
extreme southeastern counties 
received heavy amounts Fri- 
day afternoon the 22nd in severe 
thunderstorms which brought 
destructive tornadoes to nor- 
thern Illinois. Temperatures 
averaged well above normal 
since April 1. 

Confinuecl on- ?na,e 2(S 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 



COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

Famous AAoulton Quick Coupler Solid Set Systems 

We have been designing and manufacturing irrigation 

equipment for over one quarter century. 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS - pumping xinits, pumps, power units, 

^rinklers. .\luminum or steel fittings made to order. 

Write or call for iiteratmre and details. 

Wisconsin representative: 

STUART PEDERSEN 

Box 38 

Warrens, Wisconsin 

Phone: 112-715-247-5321 

MOULTON IRRIGATION COMPANY 

SOMERSET, WISCONSIN 54025 
(formerly Withrow. Minnesota) 



NINETEEN 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 



Continued from page 3 

swering devices at the Station, 
both are hooked up on the 
same Hne, so that when one is 
in use the other takes over and 
gives the message. Up until 
May 4th no frost warnings had 
been issued. 

Tips for Late Spring and Early Summer 

1.) The early spring pests 
are, or soon will be, showing up 



on bogs. These include cut- 
worms, spanworms, leafhoppers, 
fireworms, sparganothis fniit- 
worm and weevil. The sparg- 
anothis fruitworm can be detec- 
ted by careful examination of 
loosestrife or the new cranberry 
tips for webbing. Weevils over, 
winter as adults and are active 
whenever temperatures reach 
70 degrees or above. If these 
pests are controlled in May or 
June, particularlv those that 
have a new or second brood, 
they very seldom create a prob- 
lem later in the season. 





FOR SALE 


H. R 


. BAILEY COMPANY, Manufacturer 


of Cranberry Machinery and Equipment 


Since 


1900. Stock, machinery, equip- 


ment. 


land and buildings (no cranberry 


bogs) 


• 




Address all inquiries to: 




ATTY. ALBERT T. MADDIGAN 

111 Center Street 
Middlehoro, Mass. 02346 



FOR $AL£ 

50 acre farm - 8 acres cultivated cranberry 
bog - cleaning and grading machine - two 
cranberry houses - canning plant all equip- 
ped - 8 rocm house with bath - bam - bath- 
ing beach - school bus - hard surface. 
Asking price: $12,000 



L 



GEORGE W, MASON 
P.O.BOX 86 MERIGOMISH , N.S. 




2.) This is a good time to 
treat brush, poison ivy and 
brambles on the uplands using 
one of tli(> brush killers, sil- 
vex or 2,4-5-T. These should 
be mixed with water rather 
than oil at this time of year 
because of the damage to turf, 

3. ) Stoddard solvent or stod- 
dard-kerosene treatments fol. 
lowing late water should be 
completed within 5 days after 
the floed has been witlidrawn 
or within 8 days if kerosene is 
used alone. Less damage will 
occur to the vines if tempera- 
tures are below 65 degrees 
when these oils are applied. 

4.) Casoron, alanap-3, Chloro 
IPC and simazine should not 
be applied after withdrawal of 
the late water flood as vine 
and crop injury will result. 

5.) Many bogs will benefit 
from an application of fertili- 
zer, especially where hea\y 
crops are harvested. Some bogs 
that have had casoron treat- 
ments either last fall or this 
spring may look "hungry" and 
should be fertihzed. Don't for- 
get to touch up tlie thin or 
weak spots by going around 
with a bucket of fertilizer and 
using it. 

6.) Get out and walk your 
bogs, you will be surprised at 
the number of litde things, both 
good and bad, that you will 
notice on your inspection trips. 



J 



CRANBERRY CHEMICAL USED 
ON PEACHES IN NEW JERSEY 

A chemical weed control dem- 
onstration was applied the week 
of April 12 at C. Wm. Haines' 
farm in Masonville N. J. for 
the control of weeds in peaches. 
The material used was Casoron, 
well known to ajl cranberry 
growers. 



TWENTY 



EDWIN R LEWIS SPEAKS ON 

TOTAL MARKETING 



Continued from last month 

We use research continually 
to help in marketing decisions. 
Market research to determine 
how we are doing against all 
the competitive products. Con- 
sumer research to knov/ who 
our customers are and how they 
use our products. Media re- 
search to find out where our 
best potential customers are 
and how to reach them at the 
least possible cost. Copy re- 
search to see if our sales story 
is the right one. Research is a 
tool to assist in making de- 
ciions. Too often it is used as 
a crutch to back up indecisive 
management 

During the past three years, 
our new product development 
program has been moving 
ahead at an accelerated rate. 
At this time, there are 46 new 
products in some stage of ex- 
perimentation and product de- 
velopment. For example: One 
piece of research we conducted 
indicated that many of our 
fresh fruit consumers used our 
fresh fruit during the holiday 
season to prepare a homemade 
cranberry-orange relish. Using 
this information, our technici- 
ans formulated Ocean Spray 
cranberry-orange relish as a hot 
pack product, and early in 1963 
we went into Nielsen test area 
No. 6 with it. 

The results of this test mar- 
ket were very gratifying, and 
in October of 1964, we took 
this product into national dis- 
tribution. By the end of our 
first full year, we had reached 
77% of all commodity volume 
in distribution and sales were 
in excess of 450,000 cases. Sales 
have continued to increase. It 



should be noted here that ad- 
vertising and promotion expen- 
ditures on some new products 
can exceed the actual income 
produced by the sales of that 
product. In this area, we work 
out pay-outs on our products, 
sometimes not realizing any re. 
tiun for the cooperative and 
growers for as long as three 
years. If we are to compete 
with the typical package goods 
manufacturer, we must use 
many of their concepts for new 
product introduction. 

A Httle earlier, I had indi- 
cated that I would give you the 
full sales story on what has 
happened to cranberry sauce 
in light of the actions taken 
by management. Since I have 
just mentioned the sizeable 
year-round advertising and pro- 
motional dollars being spent on 
new products, I feel this is a 
good time to report our sauce 
sales gains for the past four 
years. Last year sauce sales 
gained 5 to 7%. This indicates 
that the old established prod- 
ucts have started to show a 
new vitaHty even though the 
expenditures in advertising and 
promotion have been drastically 
reduced on this group of prod- 
ucts. In our opinion, this is a 
direct result of the increased 
year-round advertising weight 
on the new products. This in- 
creased year-round advertising 
has obviously caused synergis- 
tic action with the consumer 
for all cranberry products. It 
has created increased brand 
awareness and sales of all 
Ocean Spray branded merchan- 
dise. 



Spray Cranberries, Inc., was a 
marketing cooperative. We be. 
lieve the essence of marketing 
is to cause new things to hap- 
pen—new or improved prod- 
ucts — new or better advertis- 
ing — new or sharper selling ef- 
forts — new or more eflFective 
channels of distribution. Ob- 
viously, there is risk, but the 
reward is profit or, in our case, 
greater grower returns. When 
you cause new things to hap- 
pen, you make change and 
change is something that al- 
most all of us resist. We are 
proud of the fact that we have 
made changes that caused ac- 
celerated growth, and the pleas- 
ing thing about these changes 
is that we have not disrupted 
our Board or growers' relations. 
They are to be thanked in that 
they have given this new man- 
agement substantial backing 
in the eflForts to introduce new 
products and to build and en- 
hance Ocean Spray's consumer 
franchise. At the present time, 
We have a number of new 
products being evaluated in test 
markets. 

Three years ago, we did some 
preliminary work with a prod- 
uct that we call Cranapple. 
This product is a delightful 
mixture of cranberry juice and 
apple juice. Initially, this prod- 
uct, after consumer placement 
test, was sold into the Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania area in 
test market. This product was 
packaged in a 46-ounce tin can. 
Television advertising prepared 
to support this product was 
directly addressed to children, 
since our placement studies 
and taste test had indicated 
that this was the correct direc- 
tion. Quickly and briefly, I can 
say that we failed. In our 
opinion, we failed because we 
positioned the product incor- 
rectly in the market mth our 
advertising and with our pack- 
aging. In putting this product 
in a 46-ounce can, we posit- 
ioned ourseK'es on the retail 
shelves alongside all of the 



Earlier I stated that Ocean Continued on page22 



TWENTY-ONE 



TOTAL MARKETING 

Continued from page 2 I 

belly-wash drinks that retail 
three and four cans for a dol- 
lar, while our product had to 
be priced at 49^. We went to 
work to determine how we 
could sell this product success- 
fully. ^^ e worked on packaging, 
label, advertising and consumer 
acceptance. Based on our find- 
ings. April two years ago, we 
opened two new test markets 
for cranappie. This time in 
glass quart size with advertising 
addresseed to a family audi- 
ence. We have audited these 
test markets monthly since then 
and here briefly are the high- 
lights of the test market re- 
sults. 

Total Ocean Spray juice 
sales up 20^, total cranberry 
juice sales up 55% and the newly 
packaged cranappie selling at 
oO^f of cocktail volume. 

The second time around we 
did our homework a httle bet- 
ter Tm pleased to tell you 
tJiat we started national intro- 
duction of tliis product on 
April 15. 1966 By June 15, we 
estimated 50^ all commodity 
distribution and started our 
advertising at a national rate 
of a milhon dollars. At this 
time we are at 20% national dis- 
tribution and sales are running 
in excess of 25% of our total 
cocktail volume. 

Just recently, we took an- 
other new product out of test 
market and started it into nat- 
ional distribution. This new 
product uses sizeable amounts 
of one of California's fine prod- 
ucts — prune juice. Our product 
is called Cranprune and it is 
receiving good reception by 
the trade and consumers to 
'ite. 

^^"c ha\c three additional 
products in test market at tin's 
lime. It is ob\'ious tliat ifw 
products are the mainstay for 
:)ur future growth. 

TWENTY-TWO 



New product development 
procedures var>' among com- 
panies from one-man opera- 
tions to highly sophisticated 
?ommittee procedures. At Ocean 
Spray we would like to think 
that our procedure is sophisti- 
cated, but streamlined for ef- 
ficiency! Here are the steps 
we normally follow in new 
product development. 

We start with a new product 
idea — these we get from all 
areas of our business. 

At the idea stage we search 
all available information to de- 
tennine the market potential in 
terms of size, competition, con- 
sumer's wants or needs, and 
our capabilities to process, dis- 
tribute and sell. At this stage, 
many new product ideas are 
killed or shelved for future 
reference. 

If the idea is accepted for 
further development, it then 
goes through the following 
stages: 

Test kitchen 

Management and staff evalu- 
ation 

Preliminar>' market strategv 
formulation 

Research lab for product for- 
mulation 

Consumer panel test or con- 
sumer placement test 

Research laboratory and pos- 
sibly the test kitchen for 
product refinement and 
changes based on consu- 
mer test results. 

Pilot plant production for 
test market 

Creative work for package, 
label, master cartons, re- 
search plans 

Test m.arket selection 

Test market advertising pre- 
paration 

Test market sell-in 

Success in the test market is 
solely dependent on how well 
we are filling a consumer need 
— be it a real need or a created 
one. 

The Ocean Spray stor>' is one 
of a business that had grown 



relatively static — it happens to 
all business, and the cause of 
the static business state at 
Ocean Spray was an obvious 
marketing problem. Ocean 
Spray for years had been in- 
terested in selling cranberries 
the way the company wanted 
to sell them rather than find- 
ing the various forms consum- 
ers would be interested in buy- 
ing cranberry products. 

Our new product activity at 
Ocean Spray has not been lim- 
ited to the retail market. We 
have spent a considerable 
amount of time and money in 
the development of new insti- 
tutional and industrial usages 
of cranberry products and/or 
cranberry ingredient products. 
A good industrial product can 
be highly profitable. The best 
way to explain what is meant 
by industrial products is to give 
you some specific examples. 
Betty Crocker is currently mar- 
keting a cranberry muffin mix; 
Swanson Frozen Foods, which 
is a division of Campbell 
Soup, is including cranberry i 
sauce with its T\' dinners; H. 
J. Heinz is using Ocean Spray 
products for baby foods; Kraft 
is using Ocean Spray cranber- 
ries in a unit portion; Knox 
Gelatine is using a prepared 
cranberiy-orange product for 
gelatine. All of these use cran- 
berries in various and sundry 
ways in products that they are 
introducing to the consumer. 
Some of these companies carry 
the Oean Spray logo-type and 
brand name on their finished 
product package. This activity 
permits us to broaden the 
awareness of cranberries, which 
can only help Ocean Spray in 
the long run. 

In developing industrial bus- 
iness, we have one man who 
spends his entire time and ef- 
fort toward developing cran- 
berry ideas where cranberries 
can be used by other proces- 
sors and manufacturers as an 
ingredient Ouv researcli and 
development department works 



Continued on page 



9"^ 



TOTAL MARKETING 

Continued from page 22 

closely with him in this area. 
In addition to using original 
product, we have spent time, 
money and effort in trying to 
develop uses by other proces- 
sors for some of our waste 
products. 

In summary, let me remind 
you that the primary func- 
tion of a marketing coopera- 
tive is to deliver a fair return 
to the grower-members. Ocean 
Spray's grower returns have 
shown substantial increases for 
the past four years. From a 
low of $8 in 1962 per barrel, 
our returns for growers have 
gone to $15 in 1965. The 
gross consolidated fiscal sales 
for the year ending August 31, 
1966, reached an alltime high 
of $52 million. This is an in- 
crease of $19 million or 5 9% 
over the same period in 1963, 
This increase was realized with 
an increase of only 7% in total 
barrels received l^y the coop- 
erative. 

These are substantial in- 
creases and just as importantly, 
this marketing operation is over- 
coming the feast or famine 
problem that has plagued the 
cranberry business for years. 
These results have pleased 
those involved in the market- 
ing operation at Ocean Spray. 
They have pleased but not sat- 
isfied. The aggressive market- 
ing team at Ocean Spray is 
continuing to search for ways 
to expand and diversify. 

We, at this time, are ac- 
tively investigating several co- 
operative merger and/or ac- 
quisition possibilities. We be- 
lieve our strength lies in fi- 
nance, production, marketing 
and general management With 
a single commodity, we are re- 
stricted in our new products 
development and total growth. 
By broadening our base to in- 
clude more farm commodities, 
we can be of more service to 
the entire farming commimity. 



WHEN IT COMES TO FROST PROTECTION 
REMEMBER THESE 4 IMPORTANT 
POINTS ABOUT FMC TROPIC BREEZE 
WIND MACHINES 



1. THEY REDUCE LABOR COST 

One man can efficiently operate 
one or several wind machines. 
FMC wind machines save the 
labor cost of a whole crew 
required for flooding. 

2. THEY GIVE IMMEDIATE 
PROTECTION 

Switch on the motor and 

within 3 to 5 minutes, the 

marsh is receiving effective 

frost protection. FMC machines 

have an enviable record for 

operating reliability too. 

3. THEY ELIMINATE FLOODING 

Water shortages, water damage 
to fruit, drainage difficulty all 
dictate against flooding. The 
FMC wind machine protects 
by drawing warm air from 
above and mixing it with cold 
ground air. Not one drop of 
water is involved. 

4. THEY PROMOTE BETTER FRUIT 
YIELD AND QUALITY 

Flood water may damage fruit, 
wash away pollen, inhibit vig- 
orous growth. Also, flood water 
can carry in weed seeds. FMC 
wind machines eliminate these 
time and profit consuming 
drawbacks. 

Make your own investigation. 
FMC Wind Machines have a 
proven record of successful 
frost protection in cranberry 
marshes. The savings they 
can effect in one or two sea- 
sons will more than justify 
your investment. Fill in the 
coupon and mail it today. 
We'll see that you have com- 
plete information by return 
mail. 




FMC CORPORATION, FLORIDA division 

FAIRWAY AVENUE. LAKELAND. FLORIDA 

□ Please send me sales literature on Tropic Breeze Wind Machines 
n Please have sales engineer contact me 




CORPORATION 



© 



NAME_ 



_TITLE_ 



ADDRESS (RFD). 
CITY 



_ZONE_ 



-STATE. 



TWENTY-THREE 



Miscellaneous Thoughts on 
Cranberry Insects 



Continued from page I 6 



1. Store all pesticides (and 
other hazardous materials ) 
in original, plainly labeled 
containers. 



2. Have ojie place for pesti- 
cides — one which can he 
locked! (Another spot may 
be needed for products 
spoiled by freezing). A 
shed,. garage or other open 
area is not a safe place to 
keep pesticides. Opened 
packages increase the dan- 
ger. 



3. A separate, well-marked 
building is best. Second 
best would be an enclosed 
corner or end of a struc- 
ture in which no animals 
are housed — no people 
either. 



4. Never leave pesticides out- 
side the locked storage even 
though you may be planning 
to use them again tommor- 
row. 



5. Pesticides and "empties" Icit 
unattended in the open at 
the mixing-filling station arc 
an invitation to tragedy in 
this day when farms are 
not so isolated from non- 
farm families. 

6. A ditch, stream bank or an 
open dump is NOT a safe 
place to throw "empty" pes. 
ticides containers. Tliey arc 
never empty! 

7. Burn '"empties," that will 
burn (except hormone-type, 
2,4-D, etc, weed killers) in 
a spot where -ashes can be 
buried; this amount of heat 
does not destroy some pesti- 
cides. And remember, smoke 
from organo phosphate in- 
secticides is especially dan- 
gerous. 

8. Bury bottles and metal con- 

tainers 18 inches or deeper 
at a spot where, in so far as 
possible, you have deter- 
mined there is no chance 
of later exposure or that 
waters can be polluted. It 
is best to break bottles and 
to puncture and/or crush 
cans and drums, but, do it 
in the hole or so that surface 
soil is not contaminated. 
Avoid splashing with the 
concentrates! 



Ocean Spray Expands 



Continued from page 8 



The Markham plant is expec- 
ted to be handling nearly 20% 
of the company's total country- 
wide production. 

It is anticipated that the new 
plant will, eventually, employ 
between two and three hundred 
people, as compared to the 
approximately 90 now em- 
ployed in all capacities. 

Increased production, lower 
cost and greater speed will be 
provided as a result of new 
equipment and the company's 
own engineering staff. 

Mr. Lucas was high in praise 
of the people in the area who 
had cooperated with the firm 
in ironing out some of the 
problems involved in an ex- 
pansion of this magnitude. 

Production is expected to 
double within the next five 
years as a result of opening of 
the new plant. The groNser- 
owned cooperative has great 
faith in the future of the ^^'^ash. 
ington cranberry industry and 
this plant expansion is proof 
of their faith. 



icitst=arari!risr4lr=!ta!=st=ar^^ 



STODDARD SOLVENT 

(Available Year Round) 
WATER WHITE KEROSENE 
GASOLINE 



I MOTOR OILS 
! DIESEL FUELS 
I FUEL OIL 

j 866-4545 

TWENTY-FOUR 




Centra 
Heating 

CARVER, MASS. 



READ CRANBERRIES 






.^^'^N#S#S#S#S#S#S#^S#S#S#S#S#S#^#^#S#S#S^^ ' 



I 



:; 



Farm Credit Service 

Box 7. Taunton, Mass. 02781 
Tel. 617 S24-7578 



Production Credit Loans 
r>and Bank Mortgages 

• 

Office— :^fi2. Route 44 
RAYNHAM, MASS. 

Warren R. Arnold, Manager 



really the berries for 




solid set bog irrigation systems 

John Bean Shur-Rane solid set bog systems are ideally suited to meet the needs of any 
cranberry grower. Minimum gallonage. Special IM" or 2" solid set couplers for use with 
lightweight, low-cost aluminum tubing. Easy, twist-of-the-wrist coupling action. Wide, 
flat footpads keep sprinklers upright. Also available: conventional portable systems and 
Sequa-Matic automatic sequencing systems for crops and lawns. 

see your authorized shur-rane distributor or write factory for information 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Hayden Separator Company 
Wareham, Massachusetts 

Roman R. Skibiski 
Sunderland, Massachusetts 

NEW JERSEY 

C. H. Roberson, Inc. 
Freehold, New Jersey 
& Heightstown, N.J. 

Parkhurst Farm & Garden Supply 
Hammonton, New Jersey 



NEW YORK 

W. E. Haviland, Inc. 
Highland, New York 

Tryac Truck & Equipment 
Riverhead, Long Island, New York 

NOVA SCOTIA 

R. W. DeWolfe, Ltd. 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 

RHODE ISLAND (CAPE COD) 

Darbco, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



WISCONSIN 

David Slinger 
Randolph, Wisconsin 

Kinnamon Saw & Mower Supply Co, 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Reinders Brothers, Inc. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

John D. Roberts 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



;!> 



iiw 



AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

JOHN BEAN DIVISION 

) Lansing, Michigan 

TWENTY-FIVE 



1967 Cranberry Weed Control Chart 

This schedule is intended to furnish general recommendations. More detailed information may be obtained 
from the Cranberry Experiment Station, East Wareham, Massachusetts. 



NOTES 

1. PROVIDE ADEQUATE DRAINAGE or recommendaUoiu below are of qaesUonable valae. 

2. APPLY THE EXACT QUANTITIES of chemlcal.s reoommended to mra-sured areas and at the Indicated tlmoL One »q. rod eqnals 16S ft sq. One a«re «)aaU 160 sq. roda. 

3. WA.SB EQUIPMENT with soap and water Imniediatcly after using. Rinse with ammonia solution after unlng hormone type herbicides. 

4. HAND tVEEDING Is often practical with scattered ereen and woody weeds If roots are removed. 

5. MOWING of non-woody weeds helps to prevent shading and reduces seed formation. 

6. LATE WATER causes a general reducUon of annual era.<ises. If held until June 5. and tf temperatures are high, small brambles are tuuaUy killed. 

7. Rain must follow the application of Iron sulfate, slmarlne, Casoron and Chloro-IPC within 4 days, or the bog must be sprinkled with water to make them most effective. 

8. IRON SULFATE (ferrous! in excess of 20 lbs. per sq. rod may kill newly set vines or mature vines when they have been sanded within 18 months. If 9 parU of Iron sulfate 
arc mixed with 1 part of salt, rain or sprinkling Is unneceiuary. 

9. SPOT TREATMENTS are often necessary In subsequent years as a follow-up to these control measures. 
0. C'liLORO-IPC may be used at 75 lbs. per acre before late water from mld-Marcb to April 10. 



CAUTIONS 

CHEMICALS not registered for use on cranberries must not be used. 

SIMAZINE must be sprayed evenly with continuous agitation using the recommended amounts. An overdose may injure vines or crop. Thin or 
wealt vines and new plantings one week to three years old are very susceptible to Injury. In the spring use a pre-emergence spray. May be used 
safely in successive years. 

VINES SPRAYED WITH OIL are highly inflammable. All broadcast treatments are likely to reduce the crop and may increase sensitivity to low 
temperatures. 

CASORON applications by regulation must be at least 12 months apart. Applications under sand or on weak vines may cause injury. 
Herbicide use makes vines more liable to injury and crops may be reduced. 



TIMING 



WEEDS 



RECOMMENDATIONS 



February 

atid 

March 



SHORES and DIKES 



2,4-D — 2,4,5-T - 1 gal. ester brush killer (4 lbs. acid equivalent per gal.) in 
50 gals, kerosene or No. 2 fuel oil. Wet thoroughly. Will control scrub oak, 
buUbrler, poison ivy, pitch pine, etc. 



GREEN SCUM 



COPPER SULFATE - Distribute evenly on ice or in bog flowage 4 lbs. of 

crystals per acre-foot of water. May kill fish. 



Cut Grass, Manna Grass, Shore Grass, Aster, 
Plaintain, Needle Grass, Nut Grass, Dulicbium, 
Pitchfork, Mud Rush, Haircap Moss, Royal 
Fern, Bracken Fern, Sensitive Fern, Wild 
Strawberry, Marsh St. John's Wort, Summer 
Grass, Blue Joint, Loosestrife, Wild Bean, 
Hawkweed, Wool Grass, Cotton Grass, Rag- 
weed, Fireweed, Spike Ruth, Horsetail, Sor- 
rel, White Violets. 



DICHLOBENIL (CASORON) - i'i granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Apply in 
March or early April to avoid high temperatures. - May be used before 
late water from mid-March to April 10. (See Caution 4 and Note 7) 



DODDER, CORNGRASS, 

WARTY PANIC GRASS, CRAB GRASS 



DICHLOBENIL (CASORON) 

before bud break. 



4% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Use Just 



March 
to 

Mid - May 



SUMMER GRASS 

CUT GRASS 

SOME UPLAND GRASSES ON BOG 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre or SIMAZINE - 4^ lbs. 
80% W.P. In 300 gals, water per acre. Apply by May 1. (See Note 10 and 
Caution 2 and 5). 



RAGWEED, PITCHFORKS, WARTY PANIC 
GRASS, TEAR THUMB, FIREWEED 



SIMAZINE - 3% lbs. 80% W.P. in 300 gals, water per acre. Apply only from 
mld-April through first week of May. (See Caution 2). 



HAIRCAP MOSS, SORREL, 
HAIRY PANIC GRASS 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre, 
and Caution 5). 



By May 1. (See Note 10 



CORN GRASS, BARNYARD GRASS, 
CRAB GRASS, TEAR THUMB, FIREWEED 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 50 lbs. per acre on first year planting. 100 
lbs. per acre on mature vines. Late April to bud break, (See (Caution 5). 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Use just before bud break. 



POVERTY GRASS, CAREX SPP., 
WOOL GRASS, SPIKE RUSH 

RUSHES, ASTERS, GOLDEN ROD 



WATER WHITE KEROSENE - 600-800 gals, per acre. 



STODDARD SOLVENT 

a spot treatment. 



500 gals, per acre (3 gals, per sq. rod). Primarily 



SPHAGNUM MOSS 



IRON SULFATE - 50 lbs. per sq. rod. (See Note 8). 



NUT GRASS, CUT GRASS, MUD RUSH, 
NEEDLE GRASS, SPIKE JIUSH, CORN GRASS 



ALANAP 3-4 gals. In 300 gals, water per acre or 10% granular 80 lbs. 
per acre. Do not use after first week In May. Best results where bog sur- 
face Is wet before application. Blossoms may be Injured at temperatures 
under 32° F after application. 



After 

Late Water 
(When winter flood 
is not withdrawn) 



LOOSESTRIFE, CUT GRASS 



STODDARD SOLVENT - Mix 1 part Stoddard to 1 part water white kero- 
sene. 600 gals, per acre. Apply within 5 days of withdrawal of the flood. 



WOOL GRASS, SPIKE RUSH, CAREX SPP. 



WATER WHITE KEROSENE - 800 gals, per acre. Drain late water May 25. 
Treat within 8 days when temperature is below 65 degrees and bog is well 
drained. 



Mid - May 
and 
June 



June 
and 
July 



TRIPLE AWNED GRASS 



WATER WHITE KEROSENE - 400 gals, per acre. Apply when temperature 
is below 65 degrees. 



SMALL BRAMBLES ON SHORE 



SILVEX - 1 gal. ester formulation (4 lbs. acid per gal.) in 50 gals, water, 
300 gals, per acre. 



ROYAL FERN, CINNAMON FERN 



IRON SULFATE AND SALT - 9 to 1 and apply small amount to each plant. 
(See Note 8). 



SENSITIVE FERN, FEATHER FERN 



IRON SULFATE - 35 lbs. per sq. rod or small amount to each plant. (See 
Note 7 and 8). 



MARSH ST. JOHN'S WORT, 
CINQUEFOIL, ASTERS 



IRON SULFATE - 50 lbs. per sq. rod. (See Note 7 and 8). 



DITCH WEEDS 



DALAPON 85% - Vi lb. in 5 - 6 gals, water per 1000 sq. feet of ditch; will 
control cat-tails, bur-reed, grasses, sedges, and rushes, or No. 2 FUEL OIL, 

for grassy weeds, drain ditches and wet thoroughly. 



SHORES and DIKES 



2, 4, 5-T - IV2 teaspoons per gal. water or IVi pints per 100 gals. wat«r of 
low volatile ester (4 lbs. acid per gal.) will control poison ivy. wild cherry, 
maple sprouts, grapevine, and possibly other broadleaved weeds. Avoid 
drift onto bogs or DALAPON SS^i - 20 lbs. In 300 gals, water per acre, for 
poverty and switch grass. 



In the Fall 

after 

Harvest 



Cut Grass, Blue Joint, Aster, Wool Grass, Cot- 
ton Grass, Mud Rush, Marsh St. John's Wort, 
Summer Grass, Loosestrife, Needle Grass, Nat 
(irass. Ragweed, Sphagnum Moss, White 
Violets. 



DICHLOBENIL (CASORON) - 4^f granular 100 lbs. per acre. Do not ap- 
ply until after November 15. Avoid temperatures above 60° F. 
(See Caution 4) 



SUMMER GRASS 



SIIHAZINE - 5 lbs. 80% W.P. in 300 gals, water per acre; or CHLORO-IPC 
20% granular, 50-75 lbs. per acre. Do not apply after November 1. 



CHLORO-IPC - 20% granular, 100 lbs. per acre. Do not apply after Nov. 1. 



GOLDEN ROD, WILD ROSES 



STODDARD SOLVENT - 500 gals, per acre (3 gals per sq. rod), 
a spot treatment. 



Primarily 



POVERTY GRASS, SWITCH GRASS 



DALAPON 85% - 10 lbs. In 300 gals, water per acre. Will reduce following 
crop, especially on Early Black. Do not apply after November 1 



TWENTY-SIX 



WARNING 

"AU pesticides mentionpd in this publication are registered and cleared for the suRgested uses in accordance with state and federal laws 
and reflations. Where trade names are used for identification no product endorsement is implied nor is discrimination intended." 

MOST PESTICIDES ARE POISONOUS. READ AND FOLLOW Ai.L DIRECTIONS AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ON L.\BELS. HANDLE 
CAREFULLY AND STORE IN ORIGINAL CONTAINERS WITH COMPLETE LABELS. OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN, PETS AND 
LI\'ESTOCK. 



Issued by the Extension Service, A- A. Splclman. Dean and Dirwliir. in furtherance of Acts of May 8 and June 30, 
I9H. University of Massachusetts. United Slates Department of Agriculture, and County Extension Services cooperating! 



1967 Cranberry Insect and Disease Control Chart 

This chart is intended to furnish general recommendations. More detailed information may be obtained from the 
Cranberry Experiment Station. East Warcham, Massachusetts 



NOTES 



1. HOLDING WTNTER WATER till HUy 20-25 concentrates emergence of all 
insects and controls false 3rni>^vorm, yellow -headed fire worm and may 
control or reduce fraltworm. Favors cutworm infestation. 

3. REFLOODING 

a. About May 18 (or 10 hoars, controls false arni>-worm and blossom worm. 

b. About June 1 and 12 for 10 hours controls green spanwonn. small black- 
headed fireworm, spotted and black cutworms and armyworm, but Is 
likely to INCREASE FRIHT ROTS and REDUCE THE CROP. 

c. About May 12 and holding to July 15-20 kills all insects but with the loss 
of the crop. 

d. Sept 15-26. Flooding for 6 days every third year daring this period 
discourages girdler and blossom worm. 

3. Insecticide sprays may be applied by aircraft, ground rig, or sprinkler. 

I. CONCENTRATE SPRAYS may Injure new growth, bloom and small berries, 
particularly in hot humid weather. Flowable formulations or those with 
XYLENE type solvents are preferred because (hey cause less injury. 

5. FUNGICIDE CONCENTRATES. Mix fungicide witti water in pall or tank 
antU a smooth suspension is obtained, then transfer suspension to tank. 
Use immediately. 

i>. FUNGICIDES and COLOR. It may be necessary to delay harvest to obtain 
acceptable color when maneb is used. 

7. SANDING and FERTILIZING. Provided blnnt-nosed leafhopper is con- 
trolled, frequent resandlng and fertilizing helps reclaim bo^ infected with 
false blossom. Regular uniform sanding helps check ^rdler and tlpworm. 



INSECT NET. If JO -.uoeps gallicr !l cutworms. E.vpsv muth caterpillars or 
uecviK, Xb si).iiiui»rms. or 3 blunt-nosed leafhoppers. treatment is necessary. 
Make weevil counts ^vhcn lemperatures are at 10 . 

(;RI'B CONTROL. Kales of application. (May also control tipworm. girdler 
and cranberry weevil in year of application). 



Formulation 



Amount per 100 gala, 
uhcn applied at the 
rate of 1.000 gals, per 
acre to give; 
5 lbs. 10 lbs. 



Amount of Grannlar 
Aldrin or Dieldrin to 
give: 
Formulation 5 lbs. 10 lbs. 



Aldrtn E. C. containing 

2 lbs. per gal. 1 qt. 


2 qta. 


ST. 


100 lbs. 


200 lbs 


Dieldrin E. C. containing 

I'^ lbs. per gat. 1 1/3 qts. 


2 2/3 qts. 


105i 


50 lbs. 


100 lbs. 



10. Pesticides may deteriorate in storage. It is usually not advisable to nse 
held-over chemicals. Always follow regulations of the Pesticide Board when 
disposing of unused chemicals and empty containers. 



II. TOXICANT per acre and Minimum Time— Last Application to Harvest. 



Aldrin 0.25 lb. 

Carbsryl ISevlnl 3.0 lbs. 

DDT 6.0 lbs 

nieldrin 1 ?■; Ihs 



21 days 



Guthlon 1.0 ib. 
Malsthion 2J> lbs. 
Maneb 7.5 lbs. 
"""■■"■" "« "■ 



21 days 
3 " 



Timin 



g 



Pests 



Ferbam 6.8 lbs. 



1.0 lb. 

Recommendations 



Dormant 
To 

Delayed Dormant 



ROOT GRUB 
WHITE GRUB 



ROOT GRUB 
WHITE GRUB 



Apply 10 lbs. actual DIELDRIN or ALDRLN per acre. Dry 
form may be applied alone or combined with fertilizer up to 
10 days before bloom or after harvest. Apply spray as soon 
as bog is well drained and before the growth is V^" long or 
after harvest is completed. Apply before rain or water In 
thoroughly. (See Notes 4 and 9) 



Drain bog thoroughly from early April to May 12. Reflow 
May 12-July 20. Keep well flooded. If cutworm infestation 
develops spray CARBARYL (SEVIN) 2 lbs. actual or PARA- 
THION flowable 1 lb. actual per acre or dust S'l- CARBARYL 
or 10?S DDT + 2T> MALATHION 50 lbs. per acre. (See Notes 
2c, 3, 4, 8 and 10) 



New Growth 
Up to 1/2 Inch 



1/2 Inch Growth 

To 

Hook Stage 



Hook Stage 

To 

5r= Bloom 



570 Bloom 

To 
Mid ' Bloom 



Late Bloom 

Repeat in 10 days 

lor Fruitworms 



After Fruit Set 



Sept. 26 

To 

Oct. 1 



WEEVIL 



Spray DIELDRIN E. C. (1.5 lbs. per gal.) 1 pt. per acre; or 
dust IVzT. DIELDRIN 25-35 lbs. per acre. DIELDRIN may be 
combined with CARBARYL or PARATHION for weevil. (See 
Notes 1, 3, 4, 8 and 10) 



FIREWORMS 
CUTWORMS 
SPARGANOTHIS 
GYPSY MOTH 
TIPWORM 



FRUITWORM 



Spray CARBARYL (SEVIN) 2 lbs. actual or GUTHION E. C. 
3 pts or PARATHION flowable 1 lb. actual per acre; or dust 
f>"o CARBARYL or 2'~o GUTHION or 10^^ DDT + 2^. MALA- 
THION 50 lbs. per acre. (Notes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 10) 



New Growth Insects 
GREEN SPANWORM 
TIPWORM 



Spray PARATHION flowable 1 lb. actual or GUTHION E. C. 

3 pts. per acre or dust lO'-o DDT + 2<^c MALATHION or I'T' 
GUTHION 50 lbs. per acre. Apply every year as a blanket 
control for all insects before bloom. (Notes 1, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 10) 



All Insects through Hook Stage 



See appropriate control measures. 



BLUNT -NOSED LEAFHOPPER 



CARBARYL or PARATHION or DDT + MALATHION as for 

New Growth Insects. 



GIRDLER 



10« DDT + 2% MALATHION dust 50 lbs. per acre. Repeat 
if necessary. (See Note 7). 



FRUIT ROTS -One application ineHective. 



80% MANEB or 761 FERBAM 9 lbs. plus suitable sticker In 
_ ,,11 !_• ■ . 25-100 gals, water per acre by ground rig; or in 13 gals, water 

Repeat about 2 weeks later or combme with ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ aircraft. Avoid applying insecticides during 
first late bloom spray. bloom if possible. (See Notes 2b, 5. 6 and 10) 



CRANBERRY FRUITWORM 
SPARGANOTHIS FRUITWORM 
BLACK- HEADED FIREWORM 
BLUNT -NOSED LEAFHOPPER 
GIRDLER MOTHS 



Spray PARATHION flowable 1 Ib. actual or CARBARYL 2 lbs. 
actual or GUTHION E. C. 3 pts. per acre or dust 10'7 DDT 
+ 2^0 MALATHION or 2'S GUTHION 50 lbs. per acre. Make 
egg count every 3 or 4 days until August 10 on Early Blacks 
and until August 20 on Howes. 2 unhatched and unparasi- 
tized fruitworm eggs to 100 berries calls tor treatment. Do 
not wait for appearance of red berries. 
(See Notes 1, 3, 4, 8, 10 and 11) 



WEEVIL 
GIRDLER LARVAE 



ICT. DIELDRIN granules 10 lbs. per acre or dust ICT- DDT + 
2% MALATHION 50 lbs. per acre or sprinkle DIELDBDJ E. C. 

6 pts. or DDT E. C. 4 pts per acre. (Notes 7, 10 and 11) 



GIRDLER 



Flood 6 days (with late berries on vines If necessary). 
(Notes 2d and 7) 



"All pesticides mentioned in this publication are re^tered 
and cleared for the suggested uses in accordance with state 
and federal laws and regulations. Where trade names are 



used for idei.tification no product endorsement is implied 
nor is discrimination intended." 



■MOST PESTICIDES .ABE POISONOI'S READ AND FOLLOW ALL DIRECTIONS AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ON LABELS. HANDLE CAREFULLY 
AND STORF IN ORir.iv.M r <1NT A ivt ns_wi rii^nM^:^ A'i^'M'TT^f^' " ""[^ ""'"iF^' FFTil I '^Nn l i lVT i RTnrff" fSvnlll lilitt. 



"WARN'ING'ti 



^■^THmSfa^'^l^S^BoTior^ppTyToTrre^Sorpondsr 
PARATHION and Gl'THION are extremely dangerous. Repealed exposure to phosphate type insecticides may, without symptoms, increase susceptibility to 

phosphate poisoning. Stay off bogs at least 48 hours after application. Post Parathion treated bogs. 
IMPORTANT: Before using Parathion or Guthlon obtain a supply of atropine tablets for emergency use lobUinable only -vlth physicians urescription). 



luuuutl Ij iliL Biluuluu flu i ltt. k. y. flpltlunu. P uau »uJ uulllui. ui imLlii.imn Jl j ' llu '"-War 



a? 



1914; University of Massachusetts, tjnlted States Department of Agriculture, and County Extensiot Services cocperaiing. 



TWENTY-SEVEN 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

WISCONSIN 

Continued from Pof^c 19 

Temperatures were well be- 
low normal during the entire 
week of the 24th with night- 
time frost almost daily in all 
sections of the state. No pre- 
cipitation was reported in nor- 
thern and central areas. The 
rainfall amounts reported in 
the south mostly fell at the 
end of the previous period but 
were recorded in the gauge on 
the 22nd. A few light show- 
ers also fell- in the south on the 
26th. Very light snowshowers 
occurred on the 22nd. 

Warmer temperatures and 
thunder shower activity re- 
tm-ned over the weekend of 
the 26tli. The 28th was mostly 
sunny and windy with good 
drying conditions. 



\ 



Water Off Marshes 

All of the Wiscoonsin grow- 
ers have their marsh water off 
and the vines seem to have 
come through the winter in 
good shape. 

Hail 

On April 16th, some of the 
marshes in the northern part 
of the state had hail which 
damaged to some extent the 
marshes that had drawn their 
winter flood prior to the hail 
storm. 

Vine Shortage 

The a\ailability of vines for 
planting is extremely critical 
this year and there may not be 
enough vines available to plant 
all the acreage that the grow- 
ers had anticipated jilanting. 
Labor has been another scarce 
item. 



Soil Moisture 

Soil moisture is generally 
ade{}uate throughout the state 
but there is some dryness in 
scattered areas of the south- 
west, particularly in the subsoil. 
For the southern third of the 
state precipitation since last 
September is running 3V2 to 
4V^" le.ss than normal. 



^^CH-c^ 



BEES F. E. MCCLINTOCK CLAYTON wis. 54004 



WILL DELIVER UP TO 
300 MILES 




2000 COLONIES 
AVAILABLE 



Telephone Clear Lake 263-2077 



BARK RIVER 
CULVERT and EQUIPMENT Co. 

ESCANABA, MICH.— EAU CLAIRE. WIS. — MADISON, WIS. 
IRONWOOD, MICH. — GREEN BAY. WIS. — MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS & POWER UNITS 

CORRUGATED METAL CULVERT PIPE 

DROP INLETS AND GATES 

Galvanized — Bituminous Coated — Aluminum 




^^/se^^' 



SPRINKLER 
SYSTEMS 

PUMPS 

HIGH CAPACITY 

WELLS 




IRRIGATION SERVICE 

STEVENS POINT 
WISCONSIN 



CORRl GATED 

cui.\ i:rt ripi: 

and 
FLOW GATES 

Aluininuni — Galvenized 
Asphalt Coated 

Felker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

MARSHFIELD WISCONSIN 
Area 715 384-3121 



TWENTY-EIGHT 




serving the WISCONSIN growers 




FOR SALE 

SEARLES JUMBO 
HOWES, McFARLIN 
Vines 

for delivery in 1967 

$200 Ton F.O.B. 

Ben Lears $750 Ton 
Stevens $1000 Ton 



INTERESTED 

IN 

PURCHASING 

WISCONSIN 

CRANBERRY 

PROPERTIES 

Vernon Goldsworthy 

B.S. & M.S. 

University of Wisconsin 

Cranberry Consultant 

Fees Reasonable 

EAGLE RIVER WISCONSIN 



^ 



\ir^ 



OUR PRODUCTS 



Slrained Cranberry Sauce 
Vv'hole Cranberry Sauce 
Cransweets 
Diced Cransweets 
Cranberry Apple Sauce 
Cranberry-Strawberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Cherry Preserves 
Cranberry-Pineapple Preserves 
Cranberry-Raspberry Preserves 
Cranberry-Rhubarb Preserves 



Spiced Cranberries 

Cranberry Chilli Sauce 

Cranberry Bar-B-Q Sauce 

Cranberry Orange Relish 

Cranberry Vinegar 

Cranberry Juice 

Cran-Beri 

Cran-Vari 

Cran-Puri 

Cranberry Puree 

Cran-Bake 



Cranberry-Gooseberry Preserves 

Sliced and Whole Maraschino Cranberries 
Consumer Size and Bulk Fresh Cranberries 

Cranberry Products, Inc. 

EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 




Please Men^^^^^lES 
R^^^„.Jer Advert.^ 



When 



You Answer 



rtisem 



ents 



I 



VJV«V-V\iV-=ii","AVA"-V-"-Vi/^ 

^ DANA i: 

MACHINE & SUPPLY CO. '; 
Wis. Rapids, Wis. \ 

MFG. of: -; 

SPRAY BOOMS t 

GRASS CLIPPERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS 

Getsinger 

Retracto Tooth Pickers 

Dryers 



DJSTR. of: 

VEE BELTS and PULLEYS 

SPROCKETS and BEARINGS 

ROLLER CHAINS 

CONVEYOR BELTING 

STEEL 



V^«^AW-ViW-V-VJS"ASV-"»".' 



WISCONSIN HEADQUARTERS FOR 

INSECTICIDES — FUNGICIDES 

HERBICIDES 

DUSTS — WETTABLE POWDERS — EMULSIONS 

PARATHION — MALATHION 

FERBAM — SIMAZINE 

DITHANE M-22 (Maneb) 

WEED RHAP 20 SEVIN 

Hopkins Agricultural Chemical Co. 

p. O. BOX 584 MADISON, WISCONSIN, 53701 

Phone: Area Code 608 257-1019 






^«**B 




A lot of people wouldn't know 
what these were if we didn't put 
an Ocean Spray label on them. 

You know how most people buy cranberries these days? 
In cans and bottles and jars. Jellied and frozen and squeezed. 

Many of them wouldn't recognize a whole, fresh cran- 
berry if they saw one. 

So how do they know what to buy? They look for the 
Ocean Spray label. 

To millions of people, Ocean Spray means cranberries. 

They're buying more cranberry products than ever. Many 
they never heard of a couple of years ago. 

But they know the name. And they know what it stands 
for. 

You don't get a reputation like that overnight. 



Ocean spray^ 



FOR INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE MEMBERSHIP IN OCEAN SPRAY, CONTACT ANY DIRECTOR OR STAFF MEMBER IN YOUR GROWING AREA. 



IVIassachuset:ts 

New Jersey 

\A/isconsin 

Oregon 

W/ashington 

Canada 




JUNE 1367 



CRANBERRIES 

THE iMATiOIMAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



PLANT & CCIL HC1E:;CES LIBKARf 






W. MASON 



Nova Scotia Grower 







/ft»-_ '':-f i-' > '< 




GEORGE MASON— NOVA SCOTIA GROWER 8 

WOMAN ' S PAGE 12 

PALLETIZED HANDLING OF CRANBERRIES. . .16 



£0010 'SSEM ^c^saaqinV 

(9Z.98-CI Japvto) -ssbw JO -ATun 

uoT^oas SXBTJ8S - i^^JqTI 



^ DIRECTORY fop cpanlieppy growers -^ 



The 
CHARLES W. HARRIS! 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

PRODUCTS 

WITH SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 



Attention 
Bog Owners 

Why Not Subscribe 
to 

CRANBERRIES 

Magazine 



It would be 
a Good 
Business 
Investment 




Electricity - Icey to progress 



In industry as well as the home, 
electricity has been a vital key to 
progress. It is now and will continue 
to be in the future, readily available 
wherever and whenever it is needed. 




NEW BEDFORD GAS AND EDISON LIGHT COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH DIVISION 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



AN INVESTOR-OWNED, TAXPAYING UTILITY COMPANY 



The National Bank of Wareham 



Conveniently located for Cranberry Men 



Funds always available for sound loans 



Complete Banking Service 



YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR 

WILLIAMSTOVVN 

IRRIGATION 

• 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

TRACTORS 

• 

HOMELITE CHAIN 

SAWS 

• 

FARM SUPPLIES 

Walter E. 'fripp & Sons, Inc 

6:J2 Main St. Acushnet, Mass. 
WYman 5-0422 



>#v«^S> 



EQUIPMENT 

HAYDEN 

- SEPARATOR - 
WAREHAM, MASS. 

Irrigation Systems 
PUMPS 

SEPARATORS - BLOWERS 
SCREENHOUSE EQUIPMENT 

DARLINGTON 
PICKING MACHINES 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Extensive Experience in 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

ALFRED PAPPI 

At Screenhouscs, Bog» and 

Pumps M«an9 Satisfaction 

WAREHAM, MASS Tel. CY 5-2000 






SPRAYING EQUIPMENT 
WATER WHITE KEROSENE 

STODDARD SOLVENT 
LP. GAS - CARBURETION 

"Service that you can trust" 

VOLTA OIL CO. 

SAMOSET STREtT, ROUTE 44 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 746-1340 



IS IT REALLY 
WORTH IT? 

Recent USDA revised esti- 
mates praise a $10 million in- 
crease by 1970 in fruit exports 
to Western Europe. But the 
National Fruit Export Council, 
formed of fruit associations, be- 
lieves otherwise, as seen in a 
highly critical statement aimed 
at State Department tariff n©- \ 
gctiations with the European ' 
Economic Community. Fear 
is that attempts to widen trade '1 
in fruits will be sacrificed for 
industrial tariff concessions. 



/ 



HOW ABOUT FRUIT 
BATH SALTS ? 






Cranberries . 



It makes scents, believe it 

or not — the Cranberry Perfume 

Corporation of America, East 

the year-'round berries with the bounce! Wareham, Massachusetts. Yep, 

that's the new perfume Hne, 
CRANBERRY. Wait 'til 
Tom Turkey gets a whiff of this 
news! 



HAIL IS ON THE WAY 
WATCH OUT, MR. GROWER 

Protect Yourself Against Loss 

Our new policy protects the berries and vines against 
hail and fire from the time the water is off in the 
Spring until after harvest. 

Stop worrying — buy Hail Insurance 

CRANBERRY RATES ARE LOW 

For further information write or call: 

ALVIN R. REID 

INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Main Street, Hanson, Mass. 



293-6336 



293-6441 



DONT BUY 

A 

SPRINKLER 

PUMP 




Until you have . 
seen the ..•** 

BILGRAM 



MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

Carver, Mass. Tel. 866-4582 

ONE 



NEW 
PRODUCT: 

AAcCulloch Introduces 
World's Lightest 
Gear-Drive Saws 



The two lightest gear-driven 
chain saws ever developed have 
been introduced by McCulloch 
Corp., it was announced re- 
cently by Kenneth C. Mulkey, 
vice president-marketing. 

The MAC 2-lOG and MAC 
5-lOG are fourth and fifth new 
models to be marketed by the 
company this fall. Earlier, the 
company introduced the revo- 
lutionary push-button, electric 
starting MAC 3-lOE, the manu- 
ally starting MAC 3-10, and the 
MAC 510 — all direct drives. 

The new MAC 2-lOG has a 
gear ratio of 3 to 1 and weighs 
only 131/4 pounds. It has a 1.75 
inch bore and 1.375 inch stroke 
with a displacement of 3.3 
cubic inches. 

The mpre powerful MAC 
5-lOG has a gear ratio of 3 to 1 
and weighs 14 Vz pounds. It has 
a 1.375 inch stroke, a 2.0 inch 
bore, and a displacement of 4.3 
cubic inches. 

The weight reduction is best 
illustrated, Mulkey said, by 
comparing the new models with 
the 20y2 pounds of the next 
lightest McCulloch gear-drive 
chain saw. 

Gear-drives are used for all 
wood cutting tasks, including 
commercial logging, construc- 
tion, tree surgery, line clearing 
and a wide variety of jobs 
around the home, on the farm 
and at the campsite. However, 

Continued on Page fi 

TWO 



C&^Zj Equipment Co. 



1209 MAIN STREET 



ACUSHNET. MASS. 



Cranberry Bog Service 



PRUNING 
RAKING 



FERTILIZING 
WEED TRIMMING 



Machinery Sales 

PRUNERS 



POWER WHEELBARROWS 
RAKES WEED TRIMMERS 

FERTILIZER SPREADERS - Large and Small 



For Further Information Gall . . . 



F. P. CRANDON 
ROckwell 3-5526 



C J. TRIPP 
WYman 5-2013 



SHARON BOX and LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 

SHARON. MASSACHUSETTS 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

We Will Buy Your White Pine Logs 

Either Standing or Cut 

• Highest Prices Paid • 

Sawmill located at North Carver, Mas*. 
Office Phone*: Sharon. SU 4-2011 Carver UN 6-2234 



CRANBERRY GROWERS 

m IN STOCK! 50,000 ft. Redwood Flume Lumber 

2x4 2x6 2x8 2x10 
Square Edge or can be matched on order - ALSO- 
4x4 4x6 6x6 6x8 and 3x8 Timbers 

Our complete stock of Redwood is now at our East 
Freeto^vn yard. Complete milling facilities available. 

PHONE 
763-8811 — — 947-2300 

E. W. GOODHUE LUMBER Co., Inc. 

EAST FREETOWN. MASS. 02717 



Mass. 

Cranterry 

Slatian 

I FieH Notes 



by IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 
extension cranberry speoiallat 



Personals 

Dr. Robert Devlin attended 
the Northeastern Regional Meet- 
ing of Plant Physiologists at 
Harvard University on May 5-6. 

Prof, and Mrs. WilHam Tom- 
linson returned from their Eur- 
opean vacation trip on May 16. 
Bill reported seeing fresh cran- 
berries at a fruit stand in Paris. 

Dr. Surindar Paracer is leav- 
ing the Station in early June 
after working with Dr. Bert 
Zuckerman for nearly two 
years. He will work at the 
Marine Biological Laboratory 
in Woods Hole for the summer 
and in the fall will join the fac. 
ulty at Nichols College in Dud- 
ley, Mass. Dr. Paracer will 
teach biology, ecology and in- 
vertebrate zoology. 



Frost 

The spring frost season has 
not been too active so far with 
9 warnings released for May. 
The first warning came on May 
12. This compares with 10 
warnings for the same period 
in 1966 and 15 in 1965. These 
figures include both afternoon 
and evening warnings. There 
has not been any estimate of 
frost damage up to June 1st. 
The coldest bog temperatures 
occurred on the night of May 
16 with a range of 17 degrees 
to 25 degrees and en the nights 
of May 30 and 31 when tem- 
peratures were generally in the 
range of 25 to 28 degrees. Both 
April and May were consider- 
ably below normal in tempera- 
ture and bogs are nearly two 



S^eiver 6 load 

40 Broad , Street, Boston, Mass. 
INSURANCE 



CONVERSE HILL CHARLES M. CUTLER 

WILLIAM B. PLUMBER VINCENT M. WILSON 

EDWARD H. LEARN ARD JOHN B. CECIL, Jr. 

HORACE H. SOULE ROBERT C. BIELASKI 



Serving the People oT New England 
Since 1859 



weeks behind normal develop- 
ment with terminal buds just 
beginning to break on June 1st. 

Weather 

Temperatures for May were 
much below average, averaging 
7 degrees a day below normal. 
This was the coldest May ever 
recorded at the Station and the 
Boston Weather Bureau indi- 
cates the coldest in 50 years. 
The only day at East Wareham 
with a maximum above 70 de- 
grees was May 20 with 72 de- 
grees. 

Precipitation for the month 
totalled 8.6*^ inches or over 5 
inches above normal. This is not 
a record for us however, as 
May 1948 was sHghtly over 9 
inches. A .northeaster starting 
during the c^ve^ing of the 24t.h 
and ending the evening of the 
26th dumped 5.26 inches on us, 
3.79 inches of this occurred m 
the 24 hour period from 9 A.M. 
the 25th to 9 A.M. the 26th. 
We have to go back to Septem- 
ber 20, 1960 to find a larger 
amount of precipitation in any 
24 hour period, and way back 

(Continued oii Page 6) 



Western Pickers 

Sales. I^arts and Repairs 

AnlJiorizi'd Agent 

ORDER NOW 

J. E. BRALEY & SON 

MACHINE SHOP 

78 Gibbs Avenne 

Wareham. Mass. 

HAVE YOUR REPAIRS 
DONE NOW 

THREE 



ofeiruany 



Leslie E. Rezin 

Funeral services were lield 
recently for Leslie E. Rezin, 68, 
a cranberry grower at Warrens 
and Eiigle River, Wisconsin for 
many years, who died Friday, 
May 19 at 12:30 a.m., at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Marshfield. 
He had been hospitalized for 
six weeks after suffering a 
stroke. 

The Rev. B. L. Marceil of- 
ficiated at the services and bur- 
ial was in Forest Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. Rezin began liis cran- 
berry operations at Warrens in 
1930, and in 1949 started a 
marsh at Eagle River which 
was first operated by his son 
and by father and son since 
1958 when he took up residence 
there. He was born in the town 
of Rudolph July 10, 1898, the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Rezin. 

On Sept. 16, 1922, he mar- 
ried Beatrice Asbury at Winona, 
Minn. 

Surviving are his wife; two 
sons, Richard, Eagle River, and 
Thomas, Chippewa Falls; two 
brothers, Russell and Daniel, 
both of Warrens; two sisters, 
Isobel and Mrs. Beryl Lenoch, 
both of Orlando, Fla., and War. 
rens; and seven grandchildren. 

One son preceded him in 
death. 



.^^i^.^O 




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OUR FINISHED 
PRODUCT 



Buckner Sprinklers are engineered to give you the best possible water dis- 
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wide or extra-wide spacing? High or low angle? Frost control? Buckner 
has them all m the widest range of sizes — with or without the patented 
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INDUSTRIES, INC. 

WORLD'S LEADING SPRINKLER MANUFACTURER 




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P.O. Box 232, Fresno, California 93708 

Please send catalog and name of nearest dealer. 

NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



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ISSUE OF JUNE 1967 / VOLUME 32 - NO. 2 



LABOR AND THE PROUTY AMENDMENT 
Any grower who has attempted to under- 
stand the minimum wage law has probably 
broken out in a cold sweat. It takes a law de- 
gree to be able to interpret its language. 

On February 1, 1967, the minimum wage 
law went into effect. On that date, also, em- 
ployers of farm labor, for the first time in his- 
tory, must pay a minimum wage of $1 per 
hour. One year from the above date, the mini- 
mum wage increases automatically to $1.15 
per hour and the rinal step, which takes place 
on February 1, 1969 will make the minimum 
for farm workers $1.30 per hour. 

In order to be covered by the minimum wage 
law, an employer must "use" 500 man-days of 
labor on his farm during any quarter of the 
preceding calendar year. One farm worker 
employed one or more hours wdthin one day 
is considered a man-day. 

Members of the employers immediate family 
are not to be figured in when figuring the num- 
ber of man-days. Also not be figured in man- 
days are workers employed in hand-harvest on 
a piece basis if he commutes daily from his 
permanent residence and was employed less 
than 13 weeks in the preceding year. (And if 
piece rate methods are customary in that 
farm's area.) 

Growers do not have to pay minimum wages 
as mentioned above or to workers 16 years old 
or less, employed in hand harvest on a piece 
rate basis as above who works on the same 
farm as his parents and is paid the same piece 
rate as workers over 16 on the same farm. 

The new law does not require covered farm 
workers be paid time and one-half after 40 
hoifrs a week. 

What growers are concerned about is the 
fact that the writers of the minimum wage 
law refused to accept an amendment which 
would have included piece-rate wages in the 



Established 1936 by Clarence J. Hall at Wareham, Mass. 

Publisher 

COMOR PUBLISHERS 

Box 70, Kingston, Mass. 02360 

617—585-2310 

Editor 

DONALD CHARTIER 

30 Sewell St., Brockton, Mass. 02401 

617—588-4595 



CORRESPONDENTS - ADVISORS 

Wisconsin 

VERNON GOLDSWORTHY 
Eagle River, Wisconsin 

Washington 

AZMI Y. SHAWA 

Junior Horticulturalist and Extension Agent 

in Horticulture 

Long Beach, Washington 

Massachusetts 

DR. CHESTER E. CROSS 

Director Mass. Cranberry Experiment Station 

East Wareham, Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

P. E. MARUCCI 

New Jersey Cranberry and Blueberry Station 

New Lisbon, New Jefsey 



bill's context. 

The new law, unfortunately, allows the lag- 
ger to be paid as much as the go-getter, since 
most growers pay according to the fruit picked. 

There have been problems with this new 
law and there will continue to be unless amend- 
ments to the bill can be adopted in the future. 

The Department of Labor is prepared to as- 
sist any grower in better understanding the law. 

Editor's Note— Details of the Mass. Minimum Wage 
Law can he found in "Farm Bureau" column, page 10. 



/^^j^/^y*^/)f/^irtr> ^c iMt V>1 i c}^^/^ mrx 



r,TitViiv bv rnmnr Publishers. P.O. Box 70. Kingston. Massachusetts 02360. 



NEW PRODUCT 

Continued from Page 2 



they are most popular for pulp- 
wood cutting because of their 
handling characteristics and be- 
cause of the longer chain life 
resulting from slower chain 
speed. 

The chain on a gear-drive 
saw travels more slowly than on 
a direct-drive. The gear-drives 
have greater pulling, or "lug- 
ging," power and permit the 
use of longer cutter bars than 
on corr^arable direct-drive 
saws. 



MASS. STATION FIELD NOTES 

Continued from Page 3 

to June 1941 to find a storm 
that totalled more than this 
one. We are now about 3% 
inches above average for 1967 
and 7 inches ahead cf last year 
at this time. 

Keeping Quality 

The final keeping quality 
forecast was released on June 5. 

Almost continuous low tem- 
peratures in April and May have 
substantially improved the keep, 
ing quality prospects for the 
1967 Massachusetts cranberry 
crop. There are now 7 points 



of a possible 16 in favor, so we 
can forecast with considerable 
confidence that the quality of 
this crop will be "very good." 

(Even so, we would urge 
growers to be careful with fer- 
tilizer programs, avoid heavy 
applications on heavy vines for 
this will retard coloring and in- 
crease harvest losses. Try to 
apply fertilizers where they 
are most needed on thinly-vined 
areas and where insect damage 
needs to be repaired. In this 
way next year's prospects will 
be improved without harm to 
this year's crop. 



, 



Both of the new gear-drive 
models feature the 'company's 
instant start primer, automatic 
and manual chain oiling, rebor- 
able cylinder and streamlined 
"balanced" design. The MAC 
5-lOG, in addition, is equipped 
with McCulloch's de-stfoking 
port (DSP) which reduces by 
half the efFort needed to start 
the engine. 

Introduction of the two gear- 
drives brings the number of 
models in McCulloch's full 1967 
line to 15. Nine of these are 
direct-drives and six are gear- 
drives. / 

This is the ' broadest variety 
of lightweight chain saws 
offered by any manufacturer, 
Mulkey said, and provides a 
chain saw for practically every 
cutting need and every cutting 
situation. 



1 




FOR 9ALE 


H. R 


. BAILEY COMPANY, Manufacturer 


of Cranberry Machinery and Equipment 


Since 


1900. Stock, machinery, equip- 


ment. 


land and buildings (no cranberry 


bogs) 


• 




Address all inquiries to: 




ATTY. ALBERT T. MADDIGAN 

111 Center Street 
Middleboro^ Mass. 02346 


1 



PROVEN PESTICIDE APPLICATION BY HELICOPTER 

Call: HARRY T. FISHER, JR. 

an independent distributor 
oj Agway pesticides 




Helicopter operated by Plymouth Copters, Inc. Thomas "Whitey" Weitbrecht 



TiiAt V&mii/ hi&mm: 



GEOlUiE MASm 

mm, scmiA 

GROWER 



by DONALD CHARTIER 



On the morning of June 3, 
1967, after a good night's sleep 
following a twelve hour auto 
trip from Massachusetts to New 
Glasgow, Nova Scotia, I ar- 
rived at No. 86 Shore Road in 
Merigomish, some fifteen miles 
from New Glasgow and only 
yards from the water of the 
Northumberland Straits on the 
north shore of this quiet, color- 
ful Canadian community. 

As I drove up the circular 
driveway to a nicely kept bvm- 
galow, I caught my first glimpse 
of a gentleman 1 was scon to 
know and admire — Mr. George 
W. Mason — proprietor of the 
North Shore Cranberry Bogs. 

A genial reception was the 
culmination of several corres- 
pondences and telephone calls 
in preparation for this meet- 
ing. 

It may seem strange that I 
would take the few days of 
a beautiful weekend and spend 
it driving up to Nova Scotia — 
an area not greatly known for 
its cranberry production. This 
incidentallv. was mv. verv rea- 



I had heard, from others 
who had been visiting in the 
area, of a man who, despite 
his advanced age, had been, 
until recent years, keeping up 
an eight acre bog and produc- 
ing a good crop every year. 

My journey let me say right 
now, was a very pleasant one. 

Mr. Mason, after exchanging 
greetings, invited me into the 
old and comfortable home he 
and Mrs. Mason share with one 
of their sons, Harvey, and 
their daughter, Mrs. Evelyn 
Hubbell. Mrs. Mason was ill 
and confined to bed at the time 
of my visit. 

After the introductions were 
completed, we got right down 
to the subject we were both 
greatly interested in — cranber- 
ries. 

Mr. Mason, I learned to my 
surprise, was born in Merigomish 
in 1881. To save you time in 
trying to figure his age, that 
makes him 86 years old. In fact, 
he just reached that milestone 
last Mav 15. 



He explained that he started 
his bogs in 1935 with vines 
which he had taken from a 
bog which he had bought just 
for the vines themselves. It 
was several years, of course, be- 
fore he had a crop to harvest. 

The first four years he was 
in operation he harvested his 
crop by hand using no imple- 
ments of any kind. At that 
time he employed 30 to 40 
people to harvest and maintain 
the bogs. 

Following these four years 
he had hand scoops made for 
his use and the harvesting be- 
came a family affair vdth his 
children and his wife all pitch- 
ing in to get the job done. It 
took approximately three weeks 
to harvest the eight acres by 
this method. 

His bogs were, and still are, 
planted to Early Blacks and late 
Howes. He has never had a 
problem of water since he has 
a deep well water supply and 
the output is more than ade- 
quate. 



Continued from page 7 

For the last three years Mr. 
Mason has had to slow down 
his operation because ot his 
age and the fact tiiat his chil- 
dren (the Masons have six 
children, 4 boys and 2 girls ) 
have grown up and married 
and have families of their own, 
although they do help him as 
much as they can. 

After finishing our coffee in 
the Mason living room, we 
went out to look over the bogs. 
The begs are located only a 
few hundred yards to the rear 
of the house. They appeared 
to be very well kept and the 
many blossoms indicated the 
possibility of a good yield. 
The dikes and canals were 
clean and well kept. 

The outbuildings are in ex- 
cellent condition although they 
are nearly 40 years old. There 
is one building ^on each side 
of the road leading from the 
house to the bogs. On the 
right is the building which 
houses the cleaning and grad- 
ing equipment. On the left is 
the packing building which 
houses the equipment used in 
packing and processing ber- 
ries. 

Mr. Mason went on to tell 
rne an interesting story as to 
the reason for a small grower 
having processing equipment 
of his own. 

It seems that, early in the 
1950s, there . was a serious 
shortage of sugar which was 
causing some concern to the 
major processors in the area. 
Mr. Mason, however, had a 
soure of supply and was able 
to obtain all the sugar he 
needed. It was then that he 
decided to process and can 
his own berries. He installed 
two retorts. These are oven- 
like units into which the newly 
oannf^d and <:ea1ed ean<: of 



heated for sterilization. He al- 
so set up a capping machine 
for the cans. Ater an attempt 
at processing his own berries 
he discovered that he coidd 
make more profit with fresh 
fruit and so came the abrupt 
end to his processing venture. 

As we proceeded to inspect 
the bogs — there are three sep- 
arate bogs for a total of eight 
acres — Mr. Mason explained 
that, in Nova Scotia, the grow- 
ers pick their berries into 24 
pound wooden boxes and their 
yield is figured in this manner. 
He has had yields of as much 
as 2000 boxes from his eight 
acres, although more recent 
figures have been closer to 1400 
boxes since he is unable, be- 
cause of his age, to do as much 
work on the bogs as is re- 
quired. 

The berries are all sold as 
fresh fruit and are packaged 
in one pound boxes and sold 
locally to wholesalers and also 
to a few retailers. There is 
no problem with marketing 
since his crop is always com- 
mitted before the harvest is 
in. One of Mr. Mason's sons 
help by providing truck trans- 
portation for his father when 
it is necessary. 

When asked what his did 
about fertilizing and insect 
control, Mr. Mason replied that 
although he has used commer- 
cial fertilizer he had had bet- 
ter luck on his particular bogs 
with just sanding and with 
kerosene for weed control. He 
mentioned that he had been 
successful using Parathion for 
the control of fire worm on the 
only ocasion he had to need 
such control. The fire worm 
problem developed after Mr. 
Mason had agreed to clean and 
grade berries from the bogs of 
another small area grower. It 
was after this that fire worm 
was found on his bogs. J' 
quickly took precautions 
mentioned and has not had t 



Mr. Mason told me when I 
asked why his bogs were not 
in full production that he had 
had a visit a few years ago 
from some Cape Cod cran- 
berry people, one of whom 
was the late Dr. Fred Chandler 
of the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Eixperiment Station in East 
Wareham. After seeing how 
thick his vines had grown, 
they advised him to cut off 
his vines and let them start 
again. This he immediately 
proceeded to do. The vines 
have come in very well since 
the cutting and a good yield 
is expected this fall. 

He also mentioned, in pas- 
sing, of the year when the Nova 
Sotia government placed an 
embargo on the importing of 
berries. This was around 1955. 
He could not tell me why this 
had been done but remembered 
very well the event since he 
was able to reahze $8.00 per 
box for his crop that year. The 
average going price, he stated, 
is about $.5.00 per box. 

Mr. Mason remembers with 
fondness the visit he had a 
year or so ago with Dr. Chand- 
ler who had been invited to 
visit the bogs by the Nova 
Scotia government. "He looked 
at my bogs and said: 'You've 
got good bogs. All you need 
is sand, water and a picking 
machine.' " "I ve got the water 
and the sand but still no pick- 
ing machine." 

I asked Mr. Mason about 
frost protection and he said that 
it wasn't a particular problem 
in his area since they are so 
close to the ocean and that the 
salt water helps a great deal 
to kill the frost. They have no 
frost warning system but over 
the years they have beome 
adept at forecasting by the 
velocity and direction of the 



Photos Facing Page 




mm mm mMmm 



Mason Homestead 

2 

Mr. Mason looking over 
sand to be used on bogs 

3 

Cleaning & Grading shed 

4 

Mr. Mason on bog 



Packina & Process Ina 
shed 

e 

Mr. Mason looking 
over bogs 

V 

General view of 
Merigomish area 



Cleaning & Grading 
shed showing 
Hayden Separator 

9 

View from bog toward 
sheds 

10 

General view of bogs 



NINE 



FARM BUREAU 



!■! 



By VERNON A. BLACKSTONE 
Farm Bureau Staff Assistant 

Minimum Wage Law for Massachusetts 

The farm labor pot is still 
boiling with many of the "do 
gooders" frothing about the 
conditions under which migrant 
workers are housed in Massa- 
chusetts. Recently the general 
target areas have been the 
Plymouth County cranberry 
areas. It has been pointed out 
in several articles that sub-stan- 
dard housing exists in these 
areas with each one of the ar- 
ticles, seemingly citing the one 
location which gives the "do 
gooders' something to talk 
about. 

Those who are professionals 
in the field of administrating 
the Sanitary Code recognize 
that the cranberry industry as 
such has had a most difficult 
period and that bog owners 
are now becoming able to 
tackle, renovations of quarters, 
etc. This fact is cited in the 
report of the migrant health 
program carried on by the De- 
partment of Public Health. The 
recognition of this fact by health 
authorities should be encourag- 
ing to the cranberry industry. 

Those involved in social ac- 
tion groups fail to recognize any 
economic conditions that now 
or have recently plagued the 
industry. All they can do and 
all they want to do is look at 
what they see today and talk 
about it. 

The fact is that cranberry 
people have done a tremendous 
job in upgrading their quarters 
with many thousands of dol- 
lars, even hundreds of thous- 
ands of dollars having been 
poured into housing for work- 
TEN 



ers. However, these people are 
of such a type that they can- 
not rest until the last poor 
worker is taken care of. 

Farmers in general are not 
people who want to abuse their 
help. Farm help today is dif- 
ficult to obtain and we must 
do all that is humanly and finan- 
cially possible to entice help 
onto our farms. This is a mat- 
ter of business fact as farmers 
are taking and spending consid. 
erable amounts of money to 
make their farms or bogs bet- 
ter places to live in. 

Farm Labor Pot Still Boiling 

By mid-summer Massachusetts 
will have a minimum wage law. 
This wage law will differ from 
the national agricultural mini- 
mum wage law in several ways. 
First, every farmer will be af- 
fected, there will be no mini- 
mum number of hours that have 
to be worked before the farm 
becomes under a law and the 
second major difference is in the 
wage rate under the law. As 
currently written with many 
legislative steps before passage, 
the Massachusetts law H-4653 
calls for $1.20 an hour effective 
June 'Ist, $1.35 February 1st 



of next year, $1..50 February 1st 
of the next year. Those mem- 
bers of the farm family are ex- 
empt as are workers who have 
yet to reach their 18th birth- 
day. 

The Department of Public 
Health will be charged with the 
resporisibility of overseeing tlie 
housing of migrant workers. 
They currently have this re- 
sponsibility in the Sanitary 
Code. However, the proposal 
as contained in H-4653 directs 
the Department of Health to 
handle complaints that are pre- 
sented to it in writing in a 
specified manner. 

Commonweath Service Corps 

There appears to be little 
or no let up in the determina- 
tion of the Commonwealth Ser- 
vice Corps to educate the mi- 
grant workers. They have 
changed their staff considerably. 
They now have a new direc- 
tor of migrant education pro- 
ject, Wallace Blither who is a 
former school teacher in Ware- 
ham and other towns in the 
area. Cranberry growers them- 
selves must make up their 
minds as to how they are to deal 
with the Service Corps. 



Announcing our NEW LOCATION on 
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AS ALWAYS 

11 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 
ON NEW ENGLAND BOGS 

PLYMOUTH COPTERS, Inc. 

(Formerly Aerial Sprayers, Inc.) 

THOMAS S. WEITBRECHT (Whitey) 

Phone 746-6030 




cut^vorms 



fire^vorms 




CARBARYL INSECTICIDE 



CONTROLS 

CRANBERRY 

INSECTS 






i 




fruit^forms 



lapaitese 
beetles 




leafhoppers 



You get better, safer insect control by using 
SE VIN in your cranberry bogs. SE VIN insecticide 
destroys cutworms, fireworms, fruitworms, Japanese 
beetles and leafhoppers, including the leafhoppers 
that spread false blossom disease. And the relatively 
low toxicity of SE VIN provides fewer drift and 
residue problems to humans, livestock and fish. Order 
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Sevin is the re>,'isterefl trade mark of Union Carbide Corporation for carbaryl insecticide. 



ELEVEN 




aN' 




Cranberry Orange Refisl^ 



4 cups (l lb.) Ocean Spray 
Fresh or Fresh Frozen 
Cranberries 

2 oranges (quartered and 
seeded) 



4 tablespoons Sucaryl solution 



or 



1 to 2 tablespoons Sweet lO 
solution 



Put cranberries and oranges including rind through food grinder (coarse blade). 
Stir in sweetener. Chill at least 3 hours before serving. Makes about 2 cups. 



Cranberry Snow 

2 cups Ocean Spray Fresh or 
Fresh Frozen Cranberries 

1 orange (quartered and 
seeded) 



2 tablespoons' Sucaryl solution 

2 egg whites 

Dash salt 

1 teaspoon vanilla 



Put cranberries and orange including rind through food grinder (coarse blade). 
Stir in sweetener. Chill for flavors to blend. Beat egg whites and salt until stiff. 
Fold in vanilla and cranberry orange reUsh. 

Note: Very good on cake made with sweetener for a low calorie dessert. 



Cranberry Ice 

4 cups Ocean Spray Fresh or 
Fresh Frozen Cranberries 
1 cup water 
1 egg white 



1 tablespoon liquid Sweet 10 
14 cap non fat dry milk 
}4 cup cold water 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 




Simmer cranberries and water until berries pop open. Strain, pressing through 
sieve with spoon, into large mixing bowl. (Makes i^ cups puree). Add un- 
beaten egg white and liquid Sweet 10. Beat at highest speed until thick and 
creamy, 5 to 8 minutes. Beat non fat dry milk with cold water and lemon 
juice in chilled bowl until thick. Fold into cranberry mixture. Turn into two 
refrigerator trays. Freeze, 



TWELVE 



ONCE AGAIN LARCHFIONT ingenuity has triumphed ! 
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FEDERAL FURNACE ROAD / PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Phone: 746-6048 



Or contact: 




ENGINEERING S IRRIGATION CO. 



LEXINGTON. MASS. 



Phone: 617-862-2550 



D2iy3 



TH I RTEEN 



I MONTH REMAINS 
FOR Gl LOANS 

Less than one month remains 
for veterans of World War II to use 
their guarantee privileges for a 
loan to purchase a home, farm or 
for business purposes. This warn- 
ing came from P. M.Nugent, man- 
ager of the Vetei:ans Administra- 
tion Regional Office in Newark, 
N.J. 

Present laws provide that the ab- 
solute cutoff date for World War II 
veterans will be on July 25, 1967. 
This deadline is the result of Con- 
gressional action which has de- 
layed the final date of eligibility 
several times. 

The cutoff will not affect veter- 
ans of the Korean conflict or 
veterans who have served since 
Jan. 31, 1955, Nugent pointed out, 
as these veterans are covered by 
different legislation. 

Almost seven million loans have 
been guaranteed by the Veterans 
Administration to veterans since 
the beginning of the program fol- 
lowing World War IT. One out of 
every five homes constructed in the 
United States following World War 
n was with VA guarantee. 

The Veterans Administration 
will guarantee up to 60 per cent of 
the purchase price of a home» 



HELICOPTER PEST CONTROL 



J. W. Hurley Co. 

• FUEL OIL 

Water Whtte 

> KEROSENE - 

For BOGS 



I (METERED TRUCKS) 

I 24-hoar Fuel Oil Service 
I Telephone 295-0024 

I 341 Main St. WAREHAM 



FOURTEEN 




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DUSTING and SPRAYING 



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TEL. 295-1553 



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467 COMMERCIAL STREET / BOSTON, MASS. Q2109 



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Rep.: JAMES JACKMAN, Stoughton^ Mass. 
Phone 344-5366 




Thompson-Hay ward Chemical 
Company is best known in 
cranberry country for one of its 
products - CASORON®, a di- 
chlobenil weed and grass killer 
which controls weeds in cran- 
berries. 

Celebrating its 50th Anniver- 
sary this year, Thompson-Hay- 
,ward started as a chemical dis- 
tributor with offices and ware- 
house facilities in Kansas City 
and St. Louis. From this mod- 
est beginning the company, 
with headquarters in Kansas 



City, Kansas, now serves more 
, than 40,000 customers from 
sales offices and warehouses in 
35 cities. It produces, formu- 
lates and distributes industrial 
and agricultural chemicals. 

A 1961 merger with Philips 
Electronics and Pharmaceutical 
Industries provided the impetus 
for Thompson-Hayward to push 
out its midwest boundaries and 
reach national status. Through 
purchases and mergers the 
company's interest now reach 
from coast to coast. 

Industry and agriculture are 
served through four sales Di- 
visions: (1) the Feed Division 
started in 1938, (2) Agricultu- 
ral Chemical Division in 1946, 
(3) the Laundry and Dry 
Cleaning Division in 1954. The 
fourth division is known as the 
Industrial Chemical Division 
for its chemical distribution. 

During the past five years a 
vigorous research and develop- 
ment program has brought 



forth several specialty proprie- 
tary products. Special interest 
to cranberry growers is CASO- 
RON®, a herbicide with a wide 
variety of uses. It offers ef- 
fective weed control for orna- 
mental nurseries, fruit orchards, 
seed stock and is also an aqua- 
tic weed control product. 

With the cranberry grower in 
mind, Thompson - Hayward 
adapted CASORON® to the ) 
particular needs of the grower. 
In a granular form — CASORON I 
G4 (4% granules) —it can be I 
apphed from ground or air. j 
The broad spectrum weed con- , 
trol of this herbicide insures 
control of most of the weeds 
which plague the cranberry in- 
dustry. 

Other proprietary products, 
which have been recently de- 
veloped include: a fungicide 
used to protect pecan crops 
from scab and a surfactant 

Continued on Page 20 



loliirs Propane Gas, Inc. 



CRANBERRY HIGHWAY 
WEST WAREHAM, MASS. 



285-3737 



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40FW.A medium-size centrifugal 
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"25 Years Working With Cranberry People on a Local Basis" 



FIFTEEN 




Q{juA)WjwL Mphj -^^OMjoJIaM^ 



INTRODUCTION. 



As all cranberry growers know, labor is the 
most expensive item connected with the produc- 
tion of cranberries. Of the various operations 
involved in production, haresting the crop requires 
the greatest amount of labor. Increasingly, mech: 
arAzation is reducing the amount of labor used 
in cranberry production as it is in all other 
agricultural production. 

A phase of the harvestirig operation that would 
benefit from further mechanization is the hand- 
ling of the bushel boxes of cranberries after they 
are picked. In the pasi, the boxes of berries 
have been hauled from the bog to the shore on 
wheelbarrows or small motorized wagons. They 
were then stacked at the side of the bog road 
where they were later hand loaded into flat-bed 
or van-ype trucks for delivery to the packing 
plants. Upon arrival at the plant they were un- 
loaded by hand onto pallets which were then 
handled by fork lift truck. The loading and un- 
loading of 200 boxes would take IV2 to 2 man 
hours. The slow unloading operation also resulted 
in long loaiting lines of trucks at the plant. 




Roller-Conveyor and Pallet System 

A system that greatly reduces 
the loading and unloading time 
is being practiced by a few 
growers. This system consists 
of the use of standard 40" x 
48" pallets, upon which are 
stacked 25 or 30 bushel boxes 
of cranberries, a fork-lift truck 
to handle the pallets and roller 
conveyors on the floor of the 
truck upon which the pallets 
are moved in the truck. Most 
trucks, greater than pick-up 
size, Vvdll acconunodate six or 
more pallets loaded with ber- 
ries. They are arranged two 
abreast on the truck bed and 
three or more lengthwise of the 
truck bed. Three roller convey, 
ors are required to move the 
pallets forward in the truck, 
one is placed along each side 
and one down the center of the 
bed. The conveyors along the 

SIXTEEN 



sides of the ti'uck support the 
outer ends of the pallets and 
the single conveyor in the 
center provides a common sup- 
port for the two adjacent edges 
of pairs of pallets. 

The system is simple and ef- 
fective. If six loaded pallets 
are all at one location at the 
bog side, the truck can be 
loaded in about five minutes 
by the fork-lift operator and a 
man on the truck to push the 
pallets forward. The pallets 
might even by pushed forward 
by the fork Uft as it sets the 
next one in place. The unload- 
ing operation may be executed 
as rapidly as loading. Here the 
packing plant supplies the fork, 
lift and operator. The truck 
driver pushes the pallets to the 
rear of the truck where they are 
quickly removed by fork-lift. 



CRANBERRIES 

by JOHN S. NORTON 



Jf all the growers equipped 
their trucks wdth roller-convey- 
ors or some other means of 
moving loaded pallets about, 
the waiting time at the packing 
plants would be reduced to a 
few minutes and the unloading 
time could be .reduced from 
about one man hour to five or 
ten minutes. The loading time 
could be reduced a like 
amount if a mechanical loader 
were used. 



If use of a mechanical loader 
were not practical the system 
could still be used for unload- 
ing and reduce that cost by at 
least 3 cents a barrel. It would 
merely be necessary to place 
pallets on the truck and place 
the boxes of berries on them 
as they were passed up from 
the ground. The practical way 
would be to load each pallet 
near the rear of the truck and 
then roll it forwaird on the 
ronveyors. 



Track, Dolly and Pallet System 

An alternate system to that 
described above for handUng 
pallet loads of cranberries on 
board trucks was developed 
at the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Elxperiment Station. In place 




■PITAIL A 



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Zxr\3//6' BAH CHANNEL 
FOR FRAMEWORK 

3 i/io \2"lA riBER 
WHEELS WITH NEB OLE 
BEARIN&S -700 LBS CAP - 
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FLAN VIEW 



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W 



FRONT V/eW 

PALLET POLLY 



5C<^E /•= iZ 



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J 



3- 



£ 



.U-.^:-^ 



TOP View 



CENTER OF AXLE 
TO TOP OF FRAME 



Z"X l/h'xS"PLATE. 
a"X rX^l6" CHANNEL 
ALL JOINTS WELDED 

Rl&HT SIDE VIEW 



I/Z"X 1/4" XS" STRAP WELDED 
TO LOWER EDb-E OF FRAMEi, 
FLUSH WITH FLAT FACE 
OF CHANHFL, TO PRO'JIDE. 
SUPPORT FOR OUTER END OF 
AXLE 





FLAN6E OF FRAME NOTCHED 
TO PERniT INSTALLATION OF 
AXLE AI^D NUT 



fRONT VIEW LEFT ^IPE V/EW 

DETAIL "A OF DOLLY 



SCALE I "= 4- 



Figure 1. 

Design details of pallet doUy 

used in 

Cranberry Statiort experiment. 



of the three roller conveyors, 
four shallow steel channels are 
anchored to the floor of the 
truck and low, four-wheel dol- 
lies are used to convey the pal- 
lets forward. The tracks and 
dollies have the advantage of 
being more durable than roller, 
conveyors of a comparable cost. 

The tracks were conventional 
bar-channel, 2,V2 inches wide 
with % inch fl.anges. They were 
anchored, flanges up, to the 
truck floor by bolts. The bolts 
were put through small pieces 
of %" X %" angle which were 
welded to the flanges of the 
channel. The bolts were put 
through the angles rather than 
the channels to prevent the bolt 
heads from interfering with the 
movement of the dolly wheels. 

The dollies were 38" x 44" 
rectangles. They were welded 
construction of 2" x 1" x 3/16" 
steel channel. The channels 
were placed on edge for greater 
strength. The dollies were 
equipped with four rigid, rol- 
ler-bearing, SVa" diameter by 
2" width, fiber wheels with 700_ 
pound load capacity. Figure 1 
shows the details of construe- 



In using the tracks and dol- 
lies a hauler would use two less 
dollies than the number of pal- 
lets his truck could hold. The 
first four or six pallets would 
be rolled forward on the dol- 
lies and the two at the rear of 
the truck would be set right on 
the floor of the truck, thus 
preventing those farther front 
from accidentally rolling back. 



Current Limitations of the System 

Some years ago, when the 
receivers first became equipped 
to handle palletized bushel 
boxes of cranberries, adoption 
of this method could have saved 
growers substantial amounts on 
hauling charges over the years. 
However, approximately two- 
thirds of the major receivers' 
berries are processed, and will 
soon be handled in bulk by 
dump truck. This development 
will reduce the volnme that 
might be palletized. The one- 
third that will be sold as fresh 
fruit must still be handled in 
bushel-boxes and the trend 
will definitely be to mechanize 
the handling of this latter one- 



Many of the growers with 
small acreages will be reluctant 
to develop equipment for load- 
ing dump trucks and will still 
hire flat trucks of vans to haul 
their berries, regardless of wea- ' 
ther they will be sold as fresh ' 
fruit or processed. These grow- I 
ers could still benefit from pal- • 
letizing their bushel-boxes as ! 
outlined above. > 

Because of the large number 
of growers wiio contract their >i 
hauling, the Cranberry Experi- 
ment Station is attempting to 
develop a practical, truck- 
mounted loader that may be 
mounted on a van and load the 
pallets directly into the rear 
of the van. The roller-convey- 
ors or track-dolly systems would 
be used in conjunction with the 
truck-mounted loader just as 
they would with fork-lift or 
hand loading. 



Prof. John S. "Stan" Norton is a 
member of the staff at the Massa- 
chusetts Cranberry Experiment Sta- 
tion in East Wareham. He is well 
versed in all phases of cranberry 
irrigation and is working on solu- 
tion to certain labor problems in 
the industry as is shown here 

I WhNTY-ONE 



ffD 




:S¥':55S¥:4:$:¥:¥:K':«*M'K 



WfWMl^^ 



m 



®I*J 



NEW JEISEV 




■SiS 



It was the coldest May in the 
weather-recording history at the 
Cranberry-Blueberry Lab. The 
average temperature for the 
month was 54.3 — 8.2 degrees 
colder than normal. In nearby 
Philadelphia it was the coldest 
May in their ninety-six year 
Weather Bureau there. 

There were only eleven days 
during which the maximum 
temperature was in the normal 
70 degrees. The seventh of the 
month was the coldest on rec- 
ord. On .this day the maximum 
was 46 degrees and the mini- 
mum was 40 degrees with light 
rain. 



4.01, only about a half inch 
above normal for the Station at 
the Lab. 

The cold weather and fre- 
quent frost reflows have kept 
cranberries dormant much long- 
er than normal. On the first of 
June there was very little new 
upright growth on bogs drawn 
on the traditional May lOth 
date. Many old veteran cran- 
berry growers aver they have 
never seen such slow develop- 
ment of uprights. Even bogs 
down in April are still not in 
the dangle stage yet. Fortu- 
nately there has been very little 
frost damage to date. Water 
reservoirs are still adequate for 
frost reflows in June. 

WISIINBim 



It was also a very rainy 
month although the precipita- 
tion total does not reflect it. There has been little change 
There were eighteen days of in the weather and though 
rain, most of them light misty little rain the cold persists. The 
drizzles. The total rainfall was total precipitation for the month 

R. F. MORSE & SON, Inc. 




Serving Agriculture 



Helicopter Application 
Division 

CHEMAPCO, INC. 



Cranberry Highway 

West Wareham, Mass. 

295-1553 



O I /\ I UI_M 



of May was 1.43 with the lar- 
gest falling on the 28th and 
.97 of the total coming on the 
27th, 28th and 29th. 

The high temperature came 
on the 16th with 69 degrees F. 
and a mean high for the 
month of 59.16 degrees. The 
low 33 degrees F. came on 
the 9th with the bog low that 
night of 30 degrees F. The 
mean low for the month was 
43.9 degrees. 

The Coastal Washington Ex- 
periment Station is now the 
only weather station on the 
peninsula area for the weather 
bureau has removed the equip- 
ment at Cranguyma Farms. The 
month cf May has been very 
dry and the lawns and gardens 
have needed sprinkling. Many 
have not realized this and 
brown lawns are already ap- 
pearing. 

Notices have gone out to the 
Washington growers of the 
first fireworm broods and mimy 
are spraying at this time 4 pints 
Diazinon 48% E.C. per acre or 
r% pints per 1000 gallons of 
water. This treatment will con- 
trol the fireworm and preserves 
pedetors which will control the 
cyclamen mites. It is a busj- 
time now for the cranberry 
grower with fungicides and fer- 
tilizers to apply. 

Field Day will be held June 
24, Saturdav 10:00 here at the 
Station in Long Beach. Speak- 
ers for the morYiing program 
will be Dr. Max Patterson, Post 
Harvest Physiology, Pullman; 
Dr. Shirl Graham, keeping 
quality, Pullman; Dr. Dean 
Swan, Herbicides, Puyallup; 
and Dr. A. R. Halvorson, soil 
analysis. Mr. Klingbeil, Exten- 
sion Specialist, Fruit Production, 
University of Wisconsin will 
show slides and discuss sprink- 
linrr irrif^ation.. 



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Foreign Saies — Irrigation &• Industrial Development Corp. 260 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016 

IWtNTY-ONE 



GEORGE MASON 
NOVA SCOTIA GROWER 

Continued from Page 8 



Incidentally, the water on 
Mr. Mason's bogs had just been 
drawn off. This usually is done 
the 10th of May. 

After having looked over the 
bogs and talked a great deal 
about his experienes in the 
cranberry industry, we decided 
to continue the informal inter- 
view back at the house. 

Once back in the comfortable 
living room I asked Mr. Mason 
a bit about his personal life. 

Mr. Mason was bom in Meri. 
gomish, only a short distance 
from his present home. He 
went to school in New Glas- 
gow during the school year 
but always returned to Meri- 
gomish for the summer months. 
He met and married Mrs. 
Mason, also a native of Meri- 
gomish, around the turn of the 



century, and as we stated be- 
for, raised six children. 

Asked about his hobbies, Mr. 
Mason listed fishing as "still 
my main hobby, although all 
I do now is set out salmon 
traps." 

Mr. Mason is a member of the 
Merigomish Presbytarian Church 
and a long time member of the 
Masonic Lodge in that town. 

With this we concluded our 
interview and, at his sugges- 
tion, went over to visit with his 
granddaughter and her hus- 
band, Mr. and Mrs. Lyall Mur- 
ray. Mr. Murray also has a 
small bog which he works part- 
time and about which we will 
write in a future issue. 

As the time was getting late 
and I had to leave from there 
on my twelve-hour drive back 
to Massachusetts, I reluctantly 
said goodbye to a gentleman 
I won't soon forget, one who 
is a credit to his community 
and to the Nova Scotia cran- 
berry industry — Mr. George 
W. Mason. 



SPOTLIGHT ON SUPPLIERS 
Continued from Page 15 

with a variety of uses. In ad- 
dition the company markets a 
complete line of animal nutrit- 
ional products. 

This type of interest in cus- 
tomer needs and problems has 
been instrumental in Thomp- 
scn-Hayward Chemical Com- 
pany's half century of growth. 

Expanded facilities and a 
dynamic research program in- 
sure that Thompson-Hayward 
will continue to meet the chang- 
ing needs of its customers. 










)) 



HAIL INSURANCE 
on CRANBERRIES 

for WISCONSIN GROWERS 

FULL COVERAGE 

Ask about our Deferred Premium Plan 
LOW COST and PROMPT SERVICE 

INSURE YOUR 1967 INCOME NOW 

Call our LOCAL AGENT or write 



I 



RURAL MUTUAL 

INSURANCE COMPANY 
801 W. Badger Road, Madison, Wis. 



Bowers and Thompson of USDA 
report a hormone which when 
applied to pupae of some insects 
keeps them from growing up and 
maturing — causing them "to live 
out their days as youngsters, 
without reproducing themselves" 
— another step in insect control. 



Attention Growers ! ! 

for 
your Spring 
weed control 

we offer 
water white 

kerosene 
"GRADE A" 

metered trucks 
STODDARD SOLVENT 

SUPERIOR 
FUEL COMPANY 

Wareham, Mass. 
Tel. 295-0093 



^sso) 



Kerosene 

Solvent 

Spraying Equipment 



ESSOTANE 

PROPANE 

GAS. 



PROPANE CARBURETION 
INSTALLED - SERVICED 



BULK and CYLINDER GAS SERVICE 




INC. 



JOSEPH BALBONi & SONS 



Telephones 
585-4541 — 585-2604 



62 MAIN STREET 

KINGSTON, MASS. 



REGIONAL NEWS NOTES 

WASHINGTON 

Continued on Pa^e 18 

Recognition was given to 
Charles L. Lewis in the Wes- 
tern Edition, April 1967 issue 
American Fruit Grower, pg. 44. 

"Wisconsin, Cranberry Grow- 
er Honored — Because of 'out- 
standing contributions to ag- 
riculture,' Charles L. Lewis, 78- 
year-old grower residing hx 
Shell Lake, was recently hon- 
ored by University of Wiscon- 
sin's agricultural College. Lewis 
was hailed as a 'builder of the 
cranberry industry, supporter of 
local economy, servant of his 
community, and a academic 
scholar.' 

Thie veteran grower manages 
two cranberry farms. He served 
as vice-president and board 
member of National Cranberry 
Association, now known as 

Continued on Page 24 



<$:¥:-:•: 



FROST CONTROL AND IRRIGATION 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS TAILORED 
TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

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